EMC Celerra Virtual Storage Appliance (VSA

EMC Celerra
Virtual Storage Appliance (VSA)
&
VMware Site Recovery Manager
Building a low-cost, self-contained, learning, testing and
development environment using EMC Celerra Virtual Storage
Appliances (VSAs) with VMware Virtual Infrastructure and VMware
Site Recovery Manager (SRM)
Revision 2.0
July 15, 2009
Bernie Baker
Sr. VMware Specialist
EMC Corporation
VMware Affinity Team
(339) 293-2320
baker_bernard@emc.com
EMC Celerra Virtual Storage Appliance (VSA) & VMware Site Recovery Manager
Source Material:
http://virtualgeek.typepad.com/virtual_geek/2009/04/new-celerra-vsa.html
http://virtualgeek.typepad.com/virtual_geek/2008/11/celerra-virtual-appliance-howto-301---replicating-between-two-celerra-vsas.html
Administering VMware Site Recovery Manager 1.0, Mike Laverick
VMware Site Recovery Manager 1.0 Evaluator Guide
VMware Site Recovery Manager 1.0 Update 1 Administration Guide
EMC® Celerra® NS Series iSCSI, EMC Celerra Replicator™ Adapter for VMware Site Recovery Manager, Version 1.1
Release Notes
EMC P/N 300-007-023
Configuring iSCSI Targets on EMC Celerra
EMC P/N 300-004-153
Using EMC® Celera Replicator™ (V2)
P/N 300-004-188
On-Demand Web Replay: EMC Celerra Replicator Delivers Advanced IP Storage Protection
http://www.userlocal.com/helpvi.php
THE CONTENTS OF THIS WORK ARE NOT MEANT TO BE A COMPLETE INSTALLATION AND
CONFIGURATION GUIDE FOR THE EMC CELERRA OR VMWARE SRM. THIS DOCUMENT
STRIVES TO PROVIDE INFORMATION REGARDING THE INITIAL CONFIGURATION OF THE
AFOREMENTIONED PLATFORMS IN A MANNER TO SUPPORT LEARNING, TESTING AND
DEVELOPMENT IN A NON-PRODUCTION VMWARE VIRTUAL INFRASTRUCTURE
ENVIRONMENT WITH VMWARE SITE RECOVERY MANAGER (SRM).
NOTE: THIS CONFIGURATION, SPECIFICALLY RUNNING CELERRA VSAS ON VMWARE ESX,
IS NOT SUPPORTED IN PRODUCTION ENVIRONMENTS BY EMC CORPORATION OR
VMWARE, INCORPORATED.
BEST EFFORT SUPPORT IS AVAILABLE FROM THE
COMMUNITY OF USERS AND MAINTAINERS.
HTTP://FORUMS.EMC.COM
HTTP://VIRTUALGEEK.TYPEPAD.COM
ADDITIONAL SUPPORT IS PROVIDED BY THE VMWARE AFFINITY TEAM WITHIN EMC.
CONTACT YOUR LOCAL EMC OFFICE FOR CONTACT INFORMATION.
ALSO, NOTE THAT YOU CANNOT USE THE EMC CELERRA VSA FOR ANYTHING BEYOND
TESTING AND DEVELOPMENT WITHOUT VIOLATING THE LICENSE AGREEMENT WHICH
CAN BE FOUND HERE:
FTP://FTP.DOCUMENTUM.COM/VMWARECHAMPION/VIRTUAL_MACHINE_LIBRARY/CELERRA/CELERR
A_SIMULATOR_-_EVAL_EDITION_SOFTWARE_LICENSE_AGREEMENT__2_.PDF
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EMC Celerra Virtual Storage Appliance (VSA) & VMware Site Recovery Manager
Table of Contents
Overview.................................................................................................................................................5
Diagram ................................................................................................................................................5
Required Server and Network Hardware.........................................................................................5
Required Software ..............................................................................................................................6
Required Infrastructure......................................................................................................................6
Required Commitment .......................................................................................................................7
General Comment ...............................................................................................................................7
Small Request ......................................................................................................................................7
My Network ...........................................................................................................................................8
Section 1: The Basics .........................................................................................................................9
Assumptions.......................................................................................................................................10
Step 1: Download and Import Celerra Virtual Storage Appliance (VSA)..................................11
Step 2: Configuring the Celerra VSA VM.......................................................................................15
Step 3: Configuring the Celerra VSA TCP/IP addresses..............................................................18
Step 4: Configuring the Celerra VSA to be Unique......................................................................22
Step 5: Licensing...............................................................................................................................35
Step 6: Configuring cge IP addresses ...........................................................................................41
Section 2: Adding Physical Storage............................................................................................45
Step 1: Add new “Hard Disk(s)” to your Celerra VSA VM...........................................................45
Step 2: Configure the Celerra VSA to use the new storage .......................................................47
Step 3: Adding “Physical” Disk to the Celerra VSA ......................................................................52
Section 3: Review..............................................................................................................................55
Section 4: Configuring Celerra Replication .............................................................................56
Step 1: Configuring NTP (Network Time Protocol)......................................................................57
Step 2: Correcting the Celerra VSA Replication Database ..........................................................60
Step 3: Configuring Replication Using the Celerra Manager GUI..............................................65
Step 4: Preparing ESX Servers for iSCSI Targets and LUNs.......................................................89
Section 5: Site Recovery Manager Installation......................................................................99
Step 1: Site Recovery Manager Database Connectivity ............................................................100
Step 2: Copying Site Recovery Manager, the SRM patch and SRA .........................................108
Step 3: Installing Site Recovery Manager ...................................................................................108
Step 3: Patching Site Recovery Manager .................................................................................... 111
Step 4: Installing the Storage Replication Adapter.................................................................... 111
Step 5: Installing the SRM Plug-in for Virtual Center................................................................112
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Section 6: Site Recovery Manager Configuration ...............................................................117
Step 1: Configuring the Connection.............................................................................................118
Step 2: Configuring the Array Managers.....................................................................................121
Step 3: Configuring Inventory Mappings (Optional) .................................................................126
Step 4: Configuring Protection Groups........................................................................................128
Step 5: Configuring Recovery Groups .........................................................................................131
Step 6: Testing ................................................................................................................................135
Section 7: Automated SRM Failback ........................................................................................139
Step 1: Installing the Celerra Failback Wizard............................................................................139
Step 2: Configuring the plugin......................................................................................................141
Step 3: Preparing for SRM Failover ..............................................................................................144
Step 4: SRM Failover ......................................................................................................................145
Step 5: Using the Celerra Failback Wizard ..................................................................................150
Section 8: Wrap-up.........................................................................................................................156
Appendix A: Configuring the Replication Target (Command Line Interface) ..........157
Configuring Replication ..................................................................................................................160
Appendix B: iSCSI and NFS Discrete LUN Creation & Assignment ...............................162
Step 1: Creating iSCSI Targets......................................................................................................162
Step 2: Configuring iSCSI LUNs and presenting them to ESX as VMFS Datastores ...........164
Step 3: Configuring NFS LUNs and presenting them to ESX as NFS Datastores..................175
Appendix C: Basic VI Commands...............................................................................................182
Appendix D: Troubleshooting Tips............................................................................................184
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Overview
There are two goals associated with this initiative. The first is the installation and configuration of
“geographically separate” Celerra Virtual Storage Appliances (VSA) instances complete with bidirection replication. The second goal leverages these Celerra VSAs for the purpose of testing and
developing a working knowledge of VMware’s Site Recovery Manager (SRM).
The ultimate goal is to build and environment similar to the one depicted in the diagram below.
Diagram
VMware Demo Environment
Site Recovery Manager (SRM)
Protected
Site
Recovery
Site
VCPROD1
VCDR1
VirtualCenter
Virtual Center 2.5
Update 3
Build 119598
Dell
PowerEdg 1850
Two Intel 2.8GHz
4 GB RAM
Two GbE (Broadcom) Adapters
PERC4 (RAID Controller)
Two 73GB SCSI RAID1
Site Recovery
Manager
Site-Site SRM Communications via TCP/IP
SRM 1.0 Update 1
VMW Virtual Center 1 – Non Replicated
Celerra VSA (csprod)
MS Active Directory (1)
MS Windows XP (2)
MS SQL Server 2005
VMware: ESX6
ESX 3.5 U4
SRM 1.0 Update 1
These Disks are
provisioned from within the
Celerra VSA VMs. The disk
used to setup the Celerra
VSA VMs is provisioned
from the storage internal to
the physical server ESX is
running on
VirtualCenter
Virtual Center 2.5
Update 3
Build 119598
VMW Virtual Center 2 – Non Replicated
Protected Site VM Staging Area
Celerra VSA (csdr1)
VMware: ESX7
ESX 3.5 U4
Dell
PowerEdg 1850
Two Intel 2.8GHz
4 GB RAM
Two GbE (Broadcom) Adapters
PERC4 (RAID Controller)
Two 73GB SCSI RAID1
Evaluation License
Evaluation LIcense
Dell Remote Access Card (DRAC)
Dell Remote Access Card (DRAC)
DRAC IP:
xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
Site Recovery
Manager
TCP/IP Network
DRAC IP:
xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
Array Replication
CelerraReplication
Replicator
Array
Asynchronous
Required Server and Network Hardware
In order to accomplish this task, the following physical equipment is required:
•
Two physical servers: (in my lab environment I used x86_64 Intel-based boxes)
o Intel or AMD class, single processor or better, 4GB RAM (Minimum) 6 - 8GB
preferred (the more you have the more testing you are able to accomplish e.g.,
more virtual machines), internal disk with at least 100GB of free capacity or
access to an external shared storage device, two physical GbE NICs per server
•
GbE network (a simple GbE switch will suffice, flow control and trunking support will
improve overall iSCSI performance)
Need to build servers on a budget? Check out the following link:
http://virtualgeek.typepad.com/virtual_geek/2008/06/building-a-home.html
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Required Software
•
VMware ESX 3.5 Update 4 (Evaluation License: 60 days by default from VMware download site)
•
VMware Virtual Center 2.5 Update 4 (Evaluation License as per above)
•
VMware Site Recovery Manager 1.0 Update 1 (Evaluation License as per above)
•
EMC Celerra Failback Wizard (v1.0.1) for VMware Site Recovery Manager (PowerLink)
•
The EMC Celerra Virtual Storage Appliance (VSA)
•
Microsoft Windows XP or Windows 2003 Server R2 Enterprise Edition for use with the VMware
Virtual Center Server
•
Microsoft Windows XP for use as a utility device as required. It makes sense to use several of
these for SRM testing
•
VMware SCSI Floppy image for installing XP in a VM on ESX
•
Windows 2003 Server R2 Standard Edition or Enterprise for various servers you may want to
create and test against. e.g., Active Directory, DNS, SQL, Exchange, etc.
•
Other Operating Systems such as Solaris x86, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, CentOS or Ubuntu
•
EMC Celerra Replicator Adapter for VMware Site Recovery Manager
•
Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Management Studio Express (SSMSEE)
•
Microsoft SYSPREP (optional) – provides for customization of VMs deployed from a template
Required Infrastructure
There are several components in this lab that work better if you have Active Directory, Domain
Name Server (DNS), Windows Internet Name Service (WINS) and DHCP enabled. These don’t
have to be large, elaborate implementations. In fact, all of these services could be setup in a
single VM on one of your ESX hosts. This about simple domain names like lab.com or vsasrmlab.com. Create a DHCP scope to hand out TCP/IP addresses, a default gateway, DNS and
WINS information. Have the client devices register host information automatically with DNS.
There is a checkbox in the TCP/IP properties of the Ethernet adapter for the defined virtual
machines. For those devices with static IP address add them to the DNS tables as “A” record,
host entries. Don’t forget to click the PTR (reverse lookup) check box.
A quick note about disk space; you should plan on allocating disk capacity for the primary and
secondary site Celerra VSAs as follows:
Primary site: as required/desired to support your environment. Default, required
minimum, is 40GB. Add space as required.
Secondary site: plan to allocate a file system that is 2.5-3 times larger than the
replication target LUN. With out this space you will have issues creating
snapshots required for Site Recovery Manager. A full failover will work but the
test function within SRM will likely fail without the ability to create array-based
snapshots.
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Required Commitment
The task you are about to embark on will take some time to setup and configure. In my
estimation, you should be able to accomplish the complete implementation in a day or two.
Truthfully it depends on your experience and comfort with the tools.
The first time I went through the task this document didn’t exist. It took me and a colleague
two days to complete all of the required tasks leveraging a multitude of different documents
and subject matter experts. Now that we have done it several times we can have a full
environment up and running within 8 hours. That assumes, two people working from scratch,
installing ESX, setting up active directory, test machines, Celerra VSA installs and the SRM
configuration. There is a lot of work to accomplish but if you stick with it, the benefits will be
instantly recognizable.
General Comment
If you need any assistance setting up your VMware ESX infrastructure I suggest reviewing
these documents:
Release Notes: ESX Server 3.5 Update 4 and VirtualCenter 2.5 Update 4
Quick Start Guide
Basic System Administration
Small Request
This document represents a great deal of effort on my behalf and that of several of my peers
on EMC’s VMware Affinity Team. We appreciate your desire and willingness to test VMware
and EMC in your environment. If you have any questions or comments please forward them to
my email address at: baker_bernard@emc.com or berniebaker@gmail.com. Please let me
know if you find any problems or glaring omissions. I have tried to ensure completeness and
accuracy.
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My Network
EMC Celerra VSA and
VMware Site Recovery Manager
(SRM) Lab Environment
Protected
Site
NOTE THE RED TEXT IN THIS DIAGRAM
INDICATES THOSE INTERFACES CONNECTED
VCPROD1
IP Address: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
Recovery
Site
VCDR1
IP Address: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
TO AND SUPPORTING iSCSI TRAFFIC
VirtualCenter
Qty 2
Dell
PowerEdge 1850
Two Intel 2.8GHz
8 GB RAM
Two GbE Adapters
PERC4 (RAID) Controller
Two 73GB 15K SCSI RAID 1
Virtual Center 2.5
Update 3
Build 119598
Site Recovery
Manager
SRM 1.0 Update 1
Celerra VSA (csprod1)
MS Active Directory (2)
MS DNS (2)
MS DHCP (1)
MS Windows XP (Clients) (4)
Dell Remote Access Card (DRAC4)
DRAC IP: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (192.168.1.0 Net)
VMware ESX3 IP:
eth0: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (192.168.1.0 Net)
eth1: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (10.100.1.0 Net)
EMC Celerra VSA VM IP:
eth0: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (General/NFS/CIFS)
– 192 Net
eth1: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (iSCSI)
– 10 Net
eth2: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (Control Station)
– 192 Net
cge0: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (Data Mover NFS/CIFS target)
– 192 Net
cge1: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (Data Mover iSCSI target)
– 10 Net
VMware: ESX1
ESX 3.5 U2
Build 82663
Evaluation LIcense
Site Recovery
Manager
SRM 1.0 Update 1
VMW Virtual Center 1 w/ License Server and SRM
Server – Non Replicated
VMware DRS/HA Cluster
(vMotion Enabled)
VMware ESX2 IP:
eth0: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (192.168.1.0 Net)
eth1: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (10.100.1.0 Net)
Site-to-Site SRM Communications via TCP/IP
VMW Virtual Center 2 w/ License Server and SRM
Server – Non Replicated
These Disks are provisioned
from within the Celerra VSA
VMs. The disk used to setup
the Celerra VSA VMs is
provisioned from the storage
internal a physical server on
which ESX is running: Server
Name is ESX1 (not pictured)
Celerra VSA (csdr1)
Protected Site VM Staging Area
Virtual Center 2.5
Update 3
Build 119598
Qty 2:
Dell
PowerEdge 1850
Two Intel 2.8GHz
8 GB RAM
Two GbE Adapters
PERC4 (RAID) Controller
Two 73GB 15K SCSI RAID 1
VMware DRS/HA Cluster
(vMotion Enabled)
Dell Remote Access Card (DRAC4)
DRAC IP: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (192.168.1.0 Net)
VMware: ESX2
ESX 3.5 U2
Build 82663
Evaluation License
iSCSI/TCP/IP Network
EMC Celerra VSA
Asynchronous
Array
Replication
Replication
(v2)
All server and Celerra VSA TCP/IP addresses are static.
The client TCP/IP assignments accomplished via MS DHCP server running as a VM on ESX 1
DNS Domain: baker-iss.com
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VirtualCenter
VMware ESX3 IP:
eth0: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (192.168.1.0 Net)
eth1: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (10.100.10.0 Net)
VMware ESX4 IP:
eth0: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (192.168.1.0 Net)
eth1: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (10.100.10.0 Net)
EMC Celerra VSA IP:
eth0: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (General/NFS/CIFS)
-192 Net
eth1: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (iSCSI)
-10 Net
eth2: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (Control Station)
-192 Net
cge0: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (Data Mover NFS/CIFS target)
-192 Net
cge1: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (Data Mover iSCSI target)
-10 Net
EMC Celerra Virtual Storage Appliance (VSA) & VMware Site Recovery Manager
Section 1: The Basics
Important Note:
This document makes mention of a second (disaster recovery target) Celerra
VSA for use with VMware’s Site Recovery Manager. All of Section 1 and
Section 2 will need to be completed for two Celerra VSA instances on separate
VMware ESX hosts. This document assumes the following names for these
instances: csprod and csdr. Where csprod represents a mock production
environment (A.K.A. the protected site) and csdr is the disaster recovery
partner (A.K.A. the recovery site).
I assume you, as the reader and implementer, will create the recovery
Celerra (csdr) using the same steps required to configure the protected
(csprod). This will be accomplished without specific instructions for
recovery site since they are identical to the protected site with name
network changes applied.
site
site
the
and
This text will cover the specific steps necessary to configure replication
components required for the Celerra VSAs. Additionally, we will discuss, in
detail, the steps required to setup and configure VMware Site Recovery
Manager on both the protected and recovery sites. I will also cover the EMC
Celerra Failback Wizard for VMware Site Recovery Manager. If you haven’t
already seen it, the Celerra Failback Wizard is an automated tool, developed
by the Celerra Solutions Engineering Team, that provides a mechanism for
SRM recovery that is truly unique in the industry. At the time of this writing,
there is not another storage company that has developed this type of solution
or demonstrated this level of integration with SRM.
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With the intention of streamlining the installation and configuration process, this document
focuses on the core steps required to build out two EMC Celerra VSAs to support replication
and disaster recovery using Site Recovery Manger (SRM) from VMware. As mentioned on page
2, some of the source material contained within was provided via the VirtualGeek web blog.
I’ll reference the blog on a few occasions throughout this document.
Please note the main URL for this site is: http://virtualgeek.typepad.com
Assumptions
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
I have assumed some core competency with respect to Linux, VMware ESX and VMware
vCenter. I have added tips on specific Linux commands and tried to remain consistent
with those tips throughout the text
Active Directory implementation to support the environment (I setup two AD virtual
machines. One on each ESX host)
Two preconfigured VMware ESX 3.5 Update 4 servers under the management of
VMware vCenter 2.5 Update 4. (My vCenters were implemented as virtual machines on
the ESX servers that each vCenter managed) – Not a best practice for production but
this is a lab.
You will need full, administrative access to all of the platforms discussed
Need a little help with vi? See Appendix C – Basic vi Commands
One last thing… The Celerra VSA is implemented in a service know as “blackbird” and is
sometimes referred to as a Celerra Simulator.
So enough of the overview… Let’s get started with the Celerra VSAs!!
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EMC Celerra Virtual Storage Appliance (VSA) & VMware Site Recovery Manager
Step 1: Download and Import Celerra Virtual Storage Appliance (VSA)
Ensure you have the latest version of the Celerra Virtual Storage Appliance (VSA). It is
available at the following location:
•
VirtualGeek, a blog maintained by Chad Sakac, Vice President, VMware Technology
Alliance
THIS IS AN EXTREMELY LARGE FILE (approximately 1.5GB).
ALLOW ADEQUATE TIME FOR THE DOWNLOAD TO COMPLETE
Once downloaded:
unzip the file
make note of the location of the .OVF file
start the Virtual Infrastructure Client and attach to your “production”
vCenter instance (in my case it was named vcprod1)
Don’t forget to come back and perform these steps again for the
“recovery” site. You will attach to the “recovery” site vCenter instance
(mine was named vcdr1) and configure the Celerra VSA in the same
manner as the “production” site
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From vCenter, Click “File”, “Virtual Appliance”, “Import”
Click on the Import from File radio button, Click “Browse”, Browse to the .OVF file and Click “Open”
Click “Next” when returned to the Import Location panel.
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Identify the Name of the VM (csprod or csdr) and the target datastore. In most cases, I put
the Celerra VSA on the local datastore of the ESX hosting the virtual machine. I do this for
convenience and the fact that it does not consume any of the limited network storage
resources in my lab. If and when you add additional storage to the Celerra VSA the source is
inconsequential. It can come from a local source (internal server disk) or a network based
source such as a physical EMC Celerra or other storage source. If you are using internal, nonshared storage you will want to disable the Celerra VSA from a DRS perspective. This is not a
requirement but DRS requires access to shared storage to do its job.
Setup network mappings (leave as default for now)
•
Summary, Finish, Import process started. Typically the import process takes about 1520 minutes to complete.
Note: OVF is approximately 1.5GB. When finished importing the file will be in
eagerthick VMDK format and approximately 40GB.
•
Once imported Click Close
The Celerra VSA VM will be displayed in the Virtual Center Inventory.
Prior to configuring anything else; clone the Celerra VSA VM to Template from vCenter for
future use.
Right Click on the Celerra VSA VM and Select Clone to Template.
Note: The Celerra VSA VM needs to be powered off in order to complete this step
Give it a name and datastore location; identify the ESX cluster on which to store the template
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Store it in Compact format.
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Step 2: Configuring the Celerra VSA VM
Edit the Virtual Machine (VM) settings
Right Click on the Celerra VSA VM and Select “Edit Settings”
Change the Memory allocated from the default to 2048 (min for initial testing) or 3072
(replication or SRM). If you have the extra memory set this to 4096 as I did for my
configuration.
Configure Networks to map appropriately to your ESX configuration – This configuration
requires two physical NICs in your ESX host. If you have more than two that is ok but this
document assumes only two.
eth0 – vSwitch0 (Connected to an IP LAN Segment for NFS access)
eth1 – vSwitch1 (Dedicated to iSCSI traffic)
eth2 – vSwitch0 (Maps to the Celerra Control Station Interface)
Click “OK” when you have finished making these changes.
A quick note about performance:
If your ESX server hardware supports Virtualization (Intel-VT or AMD-V) I would recommend
enabling it in system BIOS.
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Historically, the Celerra VSA’s graphical user interface (GUI) has been a slow performer.
Enabling VT and setting the Celerra VSA VM to take advantage of this feature will increase GUI
performance dramatically.
See the following link for additional information;
http://virtualgeek.typepad.com/virtual_geek/2009/05/using-vsphere-and-hw-offload-forimproved-celerra-vsa-performance.html
Configure the VM via vCenter by right clicking on the VM and selecting “Edit Settings”
Select the Options tab
Select the Virtualized MMU Setting and Click on the “Force use of these features where
available” radio button.
Click “OK”
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If you installed the Celerra VSA on a vSphere (ESX 4.0) server the Edit Settings screen would
look like this:
Right Click on the Celerra VM and Select “Power On”
Note: During the initial boot of the Celerra VSA VM the “blackbird” service may
hang. This only affects the initial boot and will not occur during subsequent
restarts. Reset the Celerra VSA VM by powering it off and back on.
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Step 3: Configuring the Celerra VSA TCP/IP addresses
The following steps are specific to the Celerra VSA only. A physical Celerra offers a
configuration wizard for these steps
Right Click on the Celerra VSA VM. Select “Open Console”
Please note: You will need to click inside the VM console window in order to
interact with the command line. If the screen is blank, click inside the window and
hit the Enter key. If you need to interact with some other window, type CTL-ATL
together to release the cursor from the VM window. This is required as the
VMware Tools are not installed on the VM.
Login to the Control Station; User: root, Password: nasadmin
Type the following command: (do not type [root@localhost ~]# as this is the system prompt)
[root@localhost ~]# ifconfig | less
The less command will allow for scrolling up and down within the command output for the
purpose of viewing all of the interfaces.
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The virtual NICs (vNICs) are as follows:
dart-eth0: (Internal Interface for DART OS Data Mover – Celerra VSA service)
dart-eth1: (Internal Interface for DART OS Data Mover – Celerra VSA service)
eth0: connected to first vNIC
Note: By default this adapter maps to cge0 and cge1 on the Celerra VSA
Manager but this needs to be changed – we’ll do that later and explain
what cge0 and cge1 are used for.
eth1: connected to the second vNIC
eth2: management interface for the Celerra VSA Control Station
eth2 may not be listed as this point. If not, don’t worry, we’ll add it
momentarily.
lo: loopback
To exit the scrolled page view of the less command type “ctl-z” or “q” without the
quotes
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Configure the NICs
The following set of commands will configure the TCP/IP address information and reset the
Virtual NICs accordingly.
Type the following command:
[root@localhost ~]# netconfig -d eth0
netconfig will launch a pseudo GUI to accomplish this task: Enter the appropriate values for
each interface. eth0 will act as the NFS interface, eth1 will handle the iSCSI traffic and eth2
will be the Celerra VSA Control Station interface. The Control Station interface (eth2) will also
act as the target interface for SecureShell (SSH) sessions and the Celerra Manager GUI.
Use the <Tab>” key to move between the fields on the form.
Repeat the process for eth1 and eth2
[root@localhost ~]# netconfig -d eth1
[root@localhost ~]# netconfig -d eth2
Once completed enter the following commands in ordered succession.
[root@localhost
[root@localhost
[root@localhost
[root@localhost
[root@localhost
[root@localhost
~]#
~]#
~]#
~]#
~]#
~]#
ifdown eth0
ifdown eth1
ifdown eth2
ifup eth0
ifup eth1
ifup eth2
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Alternatively you could reboot the Celerra VSA (but that takes more time) using the command:
reboot –n from the system prompt: [root@localhost ~]#
Validate the TCP/IP address information has been assigned correctly:
[root@localhost ~]# ifconfig | less (check the IP addresses for proper configuration)
Ping each of the interface addresses including the DART interfaces and ensure a positive
response:
[root@localhost
[root@localhost
[root@localhost
[root@localhost
[root@localhost
~]#
~]#
~]#
~]#
~]#
ping
ping
ping
ping
ping
<eth0 ipaddress>
<eth1 ipaddress>
<eth2 ipaddress>
128.221.252.2 Note this is the simulated data mover
128.221.253.2 Note this is the simulated data mover
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Step 4: Configuring the Celerra VSA to be Unique
These steps are required for Celerra VSA Replication and VMware Site Recovery Manager to
function properly.
In these steps we will change the host name and correct the fact that the MAC addresses have
changed as a result of the .OVF import process.
You should still be logged in as root. If not, login to the Control Station (eth2 IP Address);
via SSH or use the Open Console selection from the right click menu on the Celerra VSA virtual
machine. If you prefer an SSH client one is freely available from http://www.putty.org
user: root
password: nasadmin
[root@localhost ~]# cd /opt/blackbird/tools
[root@localhost ~]# ls –l (this displays the contents of the /opt/blackbird/tools directory)
Enter the following command:
[root@localhost tools]# ./init_storageID
This regenerates the Celerra VSA Serial number to match the VM UUID – The
Celerra VSA was created from a clone. This replaces the clone Serial Number and
replaces it with a unique identifier. This is a critical step as we will setup
replication in a later step and each Celerra VSA instance in a replication partnership
needs a unique ID. Note you may get a message that states “No change needed…"
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Once completed we need to update the host file using the following command:
[root@localhost tools]# vi /etc/hosts
(see Appendix C for assistance with vi commands
Insert an entry below the localhost entry as follows:
192.168.1.52
csprod
csprod.mydomain.com
csprod
Use the IP address you specified for the Celerra VSA Control Station interface
(eth2)
Save the file by hitting <Esc> then typing :wq!
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Now for the network file in /etc/sysconfig. This will ensure the host boots with the proper
name.
[root@localhost tools]# vi /etc/sysconfig/network
Add the following lines to the bottom of the existing file:
DOMAINNAME=mydomain.com (in my case: baker-iss.com)
HOSTNAME=csprod
Save the file by hitting <Esc> then typing :wq!
In order to save a reboot, issue this command: [root@localhost tools]# hostname csprod
This changes the host name immediately. The previous two file edits (/etc/hosts and
/etc/sysconfig/network) will ensure host name retention over a reboot.
[root@localhost tools]# exit (may need to repeat this a couple of times to get back to the
login prompt)
csprod login:
Notice the host name has changed, it used to look like this; localhost login:
(See the screen shot below)
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We will now login with the nasadmin user account. This account is used for all activities not
related to the configuration of the Linux operating environment but to the actual Celerra VSA |
DART environment.
Login to the Control Station (eth2 IP Address); user: nasadmin
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password: nasadmin
EMC Celerra Virtual Storage Appliance (VSA) & VMware Site Recovery Manager
Adjustments required for the new NIC MAC address:
The Celerra VSA service (blackbird) stores its interface MAC address so we need to change
them. This is due the fact we created this Celerra VSA instance from an .OVF file which was
created from a physical EMC Celerra platform. The blackbird service is aware of the previous
physical network interface MAC addresses and we need to change them to match the MAC
address of the Celerra VSA Virtual Machine’s virtual NICs (vNICs). We’ll accomplish this with
the following set of commands:
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ cd /opt/blackbird/tools
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ ls –l (this displays the contents of the /opt/blackbird/tools directory)
[nasadmin@csprod tools]$ ./configure_nic server_2 –l
This lists the NICs in their current configuration
Notice that both cge0 and cge1 map to eth0; we will delete and re-add them to resolve this
problem
[nasadmin@csprod tools]$ ./configure_nic server_2 -d cge0 (Delete cge0)
[nasadmin@csprod tools]$ ./configure_nic server_2 -d cge1 (Delete cge1)
As of these commands execute the output shows the remaining configured cge interfaces.
Since we have run this command twice the output from the second execution shows an empty
list.
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For additional confirmation, execute the same command with the “list” option:
[nasadmin@csprod tools]$ ./configure_nic server_2 –l
The output should confirm the deletion and non-existence of the previously defined cge
interfaces.
[nasadmin@csprod tools]$ export NAS_DB=/nas
Now that the cge interfaces have been deleted and the NAS_DB has been exported, we need
to reboot the Celerra VSA. When the system comes back up we will re-add these interfaces
and map them to the appropriate eth interfaces.
The following is the Linux Switch User command. By default su assumes the current user is
switching to the root user account. The “-“, as in su –, forces the system to reload the new
user’s profile information. By default su – is short hand for “switch user to root and load root’s
profile”
[nasadmin@csprod tools]$ su –
Password: nasadmin
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This command will shutdown the Linux operating system, warm reset the virtual machine and
restart the Celerra VSA
[root@csprod tools]# reboot –n
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Post Reboot #1:
Login to the Control Station (eth2 IP Address); user: nasadmin
password: nasadmin
The overall boot process take approximately 20 minutes to complete. The system
will appear to be up but the Celerra VSA (blackbird) service may not be fully
operational.
Note: If you enabled BIOS VT support the getreason command below will typically
return a “contacted” status for slot_2 within 3 minutes and the Web GUI should be
available within 7-8 minutes.
To check the status of the service issue the following command:
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ /nas/sbin/getreason
When the status matches the above the Celerra VSA is up and fully operational. You may
notice other items in the list that refer to slot_x where “x” will be a number from 4 to 9.
Ignore these.
NOTE: If you don’t want to repeatedly type the “getreason” command,
type the following:
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ watch –n 5 /nas/sbin/getreason
This will issue the command and refresh the interface every 5 seconds.
<Ctrl><c> or <Ctrl><z> will exit the watch command
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We now need to add the cge interfaces back to the configuration and map them to their
appropriate eth interface.
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ cd /opt/blackbird/tools
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ ls –l (this displays the contents of the /opt/blackbird/tools directory)
[nasadmin@csprod tools]$ ./configure_nic server_2 -l
Notice the list is empty. It should look just as it did prior to the reboot.
[nasadmin@csprod tools]$ ./configure_nic server_2 -a eth0 (maps eth0 to cge0)
[nasadmin@csprod tools]$ ./configure_nic server_2 -a eth1 (maps eth1 to cge1)
[nasadmin@csprod tools]$ ./configure_nic server_2 -l
Notice the list now reflects appropriate mapping between cge0/eth0
and cge1/eth1
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[nasadmin@csprod tools]$ export NAS_DB=/nas
We need to reboot:
[nasadmin@csprod tools]$ su Password: nasadmin
[root@csprod tools]# reboot -n
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Post Reboot #2:
Login to the Control Station (eth2 IP Address);
user: nasadmin
password: nasadmin
Remember to wait for the blackbird service to finish loading. To check use the following
command:
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ /nas/sbin/getreason
Once the service has completed loading, issue the following command:
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ nas_cel -list
Output refers to the hostname (name) as “localhost” and not “csprod” the net_path may be
pointing to the lo (loopback) interface as 127.0.0.1. We’ll correct this using the next series of
commands.
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First thing we need to do is su to the root user as we discussed a moment ago. What is
different now is that we will not pass the “-“ argument to the su command as we want to
maintain the nasadmin profile, specifically for file system pathing.
We modified the cge interfaces and as such they are properly configured. We also have the
proper host name is place. With these items completed we must now update the Celerra VSA
internal database. To do so execute the next commands;
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ su (This is not a typo. The command here is “su” not “su –“)
Password: nasadmin
[root@csprod ~]# nas_cel -update id=0
operation in progress (not interruptible)…
Ignore the warning about the loopback interconnect and note that this step may
take a minute or two to complete
[root@csprod ~]# nas_cel –list
This verifies the change was completed
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As we continue these housekeeping tasks, we need to update the SSL certificates associated
with the Celerra VSA to avoid certificate errors on the Celerra VSA's web management
interface. To do this, enter the following commands:
[root@csprod ~]# /nas/sbin/nas_config -ssl
Do you want to proceed? [y/n]: y
[root@csprod ~]# /nas/sbin/js_fresh_restart
Reboot the VM. Since we executed the su command earlier we don’t need to do it again here.
Simply type the reboot command and hit Enter; [root@csprod ~]# reboot –n
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Step 5: Licensing
Login to the Control Station (eth2 IP Address); user: nasadmin
password: nasadmin
Remember to wait for the Celerra VSA service to finish loading. To check use the following
command:
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ /nas/sbin/getreason
First we need to initialize the Celerra Licensing Database
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ nas_license -init
done
Now we can enable the specific licenses available within the Celerra Manager. It is important
to note that EMC does not require the purchase or installation of a license. The Celerra VSA is
enabled for all protocols and advanced features. Please recall that using this platform for
anything other than learning, testing or development is in violation of the license agreement.
Launch each of these commands in succession. Each command will signify a successful
application of the feature with the message: done
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ nas_license –l
The nas_license –l command will output the site_key number only. Next time we run this
command it will list the site_key and all of the applied licenses.
[nasadmin@csprod
[nasadmin@csprod
[nasadmin@csprod
[nasadmin@csprod
[nasadmin@csprod
[nasadmin@csprod
[nasadmin@csprod
~]$
~]$
~]$
~]$
~]$
~]$
~]$
nas_license
nas_license
nas_license
nas_license
nas_license
nas_license
nas_license
–c
–c
–c
–c
–c
–c
–c
advancedmanager
nfs
cifs
iscsi
snapsure
replicatorV2
filelevelretention
See the graphic on the next page
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[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ nas_license –l
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EMC Celerra Virtual Storage Appliance (VSA) & VMware Site Recovery Manager
As an option, you could have performed the licensing task from the Celerra Manager GUI.
If you are so inclined, the steps are as follows:
Best Practice:
Add your Celerra VSA names to a DNS server in your environment. If DNS
is not an option, define your machine name using both short and FQDN
formats in your host file. Do the same for the Celerra VSA used as the
disaster recovery target in the recovery site.
Open a web browser to the running Celerra VSA VM Management interface: https://csprod
The Celerra Manager requires Java. Java will be installed for you if it is not present on your
machine. Of course this requires a connection to http://www.sun.com for the installation bits.
From my personal experience Internet Explorer 7 and 8 will always indicate an issue with the
SSL certificates issued during connection even after the SSL configuration has been modified.
Internet Explorer 6 works without issue as does Firefox as long as Java is installed properly
and is operational. I used Firefox 3.0. A colleague tested Firefox 3.5 for PC and Safari on an
Apple Mac. Thanks Michael!
Login with the following credentials; Username: nasadmin Password: nasadmin
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If you get an HTTP 503 Error: logout, wait a few moments and log back in. This
error is caused as a result of incomplete initialization of web services within the
Celerra VSA. Give it a couple of minutes to complete.
If you get a cookie error there may be a DNS issue. Resolve the DNS issues or use
a Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN) or TCP/IP address.
Example:
FQDN:
TCP/IP:
http://csprod.baker-iss.com
http://192.168.1.50 - this was the TCP/IP address of Celerra (csprod)
If you receive a “secure connection failed” error while using the Firefox Web
Browser you may need to delete a cached certificate. This may happen if you run
thru this document more than once or connect to a Celerra VSA with the same
serial number. (It happened in my lab and to at least one of the document testers.)
If this is the case you may choose to run the Celerra GUI from Internet Explorer. IE
seems to be a bit more forgiving of the serial number/SSL conflicts.
Navigate to Tools, Options, Advanced, Encryption. Click View Certificates,
Authorities. Scroll to the certificate in question, Select said certificate and Click
“Delete”. Click “OK”
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If prompted, acknowledge the web site certificate warning…
When presented with the Celerra Message of the Day (MOTD) Click “OK”. You have the option
to dismiss additional MOTD pop-ups until the message changes. There is a check box on the
panel.
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From the Celerra Manger Main Page: Select the Licenses tab
Select the licenses one at a time. Click “Apply”, Click “OK”
Celerra Manager – Advanced Edition Licensed
NFS Licensed
CIFS Licensed
iSCSI Licensed
SnapSure Licensed (CIFS, NFS, iSCSI Snapshots)
ReplicatorV2 Licensed (iSCSI and Fibre Channel Only – NFS not supported)
File-level Retention Licensed (WORM Functionality – Formally delivered in this release of the
Celerra)
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Step 6: Configuring cge IP addresses
This step configures the “real” data mover IP addresses (cge0/1) and configures the initial
iSCSI target
FYI: cge breaks down as “c” (Copper) “ge” (Gigabit Ethernet). On a physical Celerra these are
the actual interfaces into the data movers.
Using the Web Management interface: https://csprod
Login with the following credentials; Username: nasadmin Password: nasadmin
Navigate to and Click on the “Network” Folder (left side panel, middle of the list); you'll notice
two el3x (where x = 0 or 1) interfaces. These interfaces facilitate Control Station to Data
Mover communications.
We will configure cge0 and cge1 with valid TCP/IP addresses
Click “New”
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In the presented panel, configure cge0: Select Data Mover (server_2), Device Name (cge0)
and add the TCP/IP address information you want to assign. This will be the NFS export
address on your test network should you choose to configure and enable NFS.
Note: If you do not provide a name, the system will default the name to a “dash divided” IP
address. In the panel below, the Celerra would have named this interface 192-168-1-51.
There is no difference in functionality if the name is system or user assigned. I use specific
names for quick, easy recognition.
Click “OK”
Note: The cge0/1 IP address can not be the same as eth0/1 even though they bind
to the same physical interface
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Perform these steps again for cge1. (This will map to eth1; your iSCSI interface)
Note:
Once these interfaces are configured you can test them using the following command:
From the Celerra VSA Command Prompt:
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ server_ping server_2 <TCP/IP Address of the cge0/1 interface>
These interfaces, cge0 and cge1, can not be pinged with the standard “ping” command.
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Once completed the Network Interfaces panel should look something like this:
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Section 2: Adding Physical Storage
This section discusses the steps required to add physical storage to the Celerra VSA. This
includes modifications to the VM with the addition of a new VMDK, configuring the storage
within the Celerra VSA host OS i.e., partitioning, formatting, and mounting the new storage
and then reviews the steps required to “plug in” the “new” enclosures.
Note: This is not explicitly required but most folks want to play with more storage
the 25GB available in the Celerra VSA by default. I’ve added these steps so you
have the option if you choose to add capacity.
Of course you must have available physical storage capacity to support the
additional virtual storage capacity in the Celerra VSA. This storage can be in the
form of Direct Attached/Internal Server Storage (DAS), Network Attached Storage
(NFS) or iSCSI/FibreChannel (SAN) based storage.
Step 1: Add new “Hard Disk(s)” to your Celerra VSA VM
•
Power Down the Celerra VSA VM
•
Snapshot the Celerra VSA VM from Virtual Center – Right Click, Snapshot, Take Snapshot
•
Right Click on the Celerra VSA VM and Select “Edit Settings”
•
Add a new hard disk to the Celerra VSA VM, make it an appropriate size
•
Repeat the previous step for each disk you want to add. I added a total of 4 additional
disks. Each disk was 256GB in size.
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Best practice: Add more, smaller VMDKs vs. one large one. Each VMDK file will be
associated with a physical disk partition. If you need to run a file system check
(fsck) on one of these physical partitions the process will be less intrusive and will
require less time.
In my environment I added 4 disks of identical size; each was 200GB. These drive
sizes do not have to be identical but it seems to make more sense to do so.
Note: Maximum size of a physical partition/virtual disk file is 2,048 GB (2 TB)
•
Power On Celerra VSA VM
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Step 2: Configure the Celerra VSA to use the new storage
From the Celerra Console
Login to the Control Station (eth2 IP Address); user: nasadmin
password: nasadmin
Remember to wait for the Celerra VSA service to finish loading. To check use the following
command:
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ /nas/sbin/getreason
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ su When prompted enter the root user’s password: nasadmin
[root@csprod ~]# dmesg | grep sd
This command will search device message and provide an indication of the added storage
device(s) and the associated address(es). I added 4 additional devices.
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We need to create partitions on the newly added disk(s). To do this, enter the following
command:
[root@csprod ~]# fdisk /dev/sdx (where x completes the device name e.g., /dev/sdb)
The device number/letter (/dev/sd#) will change based on the number of attached “disks”
In my case I added 4 disks therefore my devices names were:
/dev/sdb
/dev/sdc
/dev/sdd
/dev/sde
At the prompt; Command (m for help): Type “n” for new partition
Enter “p” for primary partition (without the quotes)
Enter “1” for partition number
Take the defaults for First Cylinder and Last Cylinder
Command (m for help): w (write partition table to disk)
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The next command assumes the existence of the directory /mount; if /mount doesn’t exist
issue the following command first; mkdir /mount
[root@csprod ~]# mkdir /mount/<insert your desired name here>
i.e., mkdir /mount/csprod-diskX
“X” represents a user assigned disk number - See the graphic below. WE will use these
directories in a few moments as mount points for the partitions that we are about to create.
[root@csprod ~]# mkfs.ext3 /dev/sdb1
Remember this will change based on your device name. In this case it is /dev/sdb1
For those not familiar with Linux/UNIX disk and partitions you might ask yourself how we
moved from /dev/sdb to /dev/sdb1.
/dev/sdb represents the actual disk device. (i.e., the physical drive)
/dev/sdb1 represents the partition created on the physical drive. Think of this as a d: or e:
drive in a Windows environment.
The operating system is formatting the disk. This process will take a few minutes to complete.
Repeat the previous three steps for each new disk added to the virtual machine. Subsequent
device addresses would be /dev/sdc, /dev/sdd, etc.
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Edit the fstab file:
[root@csprod ~]# vi /etc/fstab
Add the following line to the bottom of the existing file and save the file (<esc> :wq!)
/dev/sdb1
/mount/csprod-disk2
auto
defaults
0 0 (these are zeros)
These may also be added for other drives added to the virtual machine. The following are not
needed if you only added one additional disk. Furthermore, only add one entry per added disk
/dev/sdc1
/dev/sdd1
/dev/sde1
/mount/csprod-disk3
/mount/csprod-disk4
/mount/csprod-disk5
auto
auto
auto
defaults
defaults
defaults
00
00
00
Note: The fstab defines which disk partitions will be mounted to the file system and defines
the parameters and characteristics of the mount point. For additional information on fstab
please consult the Linux man (manual) pages on your Celerra VSA.
To accomplish this, type “man fstab” from the command prompt.
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root@csprod ~]# mount –a
[root@csprod ~]# df –h (verify the newly mounted file system(s) is/are listed)
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Step 3: Adding “Physical” Disk to the Celerra VSA
From the Celerra Console
[root@csprod ~]# export NAS_DB=/nas
[root@csprod ~]# /nas/sbin/setup_clariion –init
The initial output from this command presents the serial number of the virtual CLARiiON
backend storage array. Please note this number: the format starts with BB
Note your specific serial number here: _____________________________
Select “q” to quit the setup_clariion command
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Because the Celerra VSA was created from another virtual device we need to
ensure the serial number and the associated log .xml files match this number.
To accomplish this execute the following commands:
Note:
In the commands below you will replace the BBxxxxxxxxxxxx.xml with the
actual Celerra VSA serial number currently in place. You may want to
manually chage to the /nas/log directory to see this value.
Alternatively, you could use the shell command completion functionality to
auto-complete this for you. As you are typing the command, hit the <Tab>
key once you have entered the following portion of the command:
/nas/log/backend_status.BB
Hitting <Tab> at this point will add the
remaining numbers represented in this text with xxxxxxxxxxxx.
The <INSERT_YOUR_SERIAL_HERE>.xml file name used in the example
below should match that of the serial number just noted above.
[root@csprod ~]# cp /nas/log/backend_status.BBxxxxxxxxxxxx.xml
/nas/log/backend_status.<INSERT_YOUR_SERIAL_HERE>.xml
[root@csprod ~]# cp /nas/log/backend_resume.BBxxxxxxxxxxxx.xml
/nas/log/backend_resume.<INSERT_YOUR_SERIAL_HERE>.xml
If the previous two copy commands are not executed the following steps will fail.
Tip: Use the up arrow to load the second command from the CLI history and just change the
words “status” to “resume”. Of course leave the quotes off.
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[root@csprod ~]# /nas/sbin/setup_clariion –init
Notice the initial configuration defaults include two virtualized disk storage
shelves.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Select Option “1”. Add New Enclosure
Accept defaults for Enclosure [2_0], Physical Disk Size [146] and Physical Disk Type [FC]
Select Option “3”, Continue to Diskgroup Template Menu
Select Option “1”, CX_Standard_Raid_5
Type “yes” to continue when asked: Do you want to continue and configure as shown?
When prompted to enter pathname for disk storage location enter the mount point you
defined earlier: i.e., /mount/csprod-disk2
Next prompt, Select “1. Create LUNs using available storage size in this path (xx MB in
total)”
Type “no” when asked about zeroing all LUNS
Note: There is a slight performance benefit when zeroing the LUNs up front but
it takes a really long time to complete.
The Celerra VSA will now create the enclosures, hot spares, LUNs and disk groups
•
•
Repeat this step for for each of the physical disks you added to the Celerra VSA
Reboot the Celerra VSA (reboot –n)
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Section 3: Review
At this point you should have two fully configured Celerra VSAs installed and configured with
additional disk, iSCSI and NFS LUNs. You may recall from the opening statements that we
would not walk thru DR site Celerra VSA implementation. The DR Celerra VSA is a mirror
image of the primary site Celerra. The only differences relate to the networking configuration.
Using the previous steps in Section1 and Section 2 and replacing all references to csprod with
csdr you will successfully configure the DR Celerra VSA. Remember the DR Celerra VSA is
installed on the ESX host designated for DR in your test environment.
In the next section, Configuring Celerra Replication, we will connect the two Celerra VSAs and
replicate LUNs between them. Once we complete the replication configuration we will install
and configure Site Recovery Manager, setup Protection and Recovery Groups and exercise the
tool in test and failover scenarios in Section 5. We’ll wrap Section 5 with a review of the EMC
Celerra Failback Wizard for VMware Site Recovery Manager.
If you have not already done so, please setup,
install and configure the Celerra VSA for the
recovery site.
Proceed to Section 4: Configuring Celerra Replication when complete
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EMC Celerra Virtual Storage Appliance (VSA) & VMware Site Recovery Manager
Section 4: Configuring Celerra Replication
Celerra Replicator is a very sophisticated remote replication facility. It supports the following
features: (this is not an all inclusive list)
•
•
•
•
•
•
1:n and n:1 replication fan-in/fan-out replication relationships
Support cascading topologies (i.e. site one replicates to site two with a given frequency,
and then site 2 replicates the data from site 1 to site 3 at a different frequency)
It has sophisticated QoS mechanisms (i.e. you can setup different bandwidth use for
different parts of the day)
You can replicate all sorts of configurations - CIFS/NFS/iSCSI.
Full support for thin provisioning at the source or the target
And of course - most interestingly of all - it's fully integrated with VMware Site Recovery
Manager so you can use this functionality to build your own SRM test bed.
Site Recovery Manager (SRM) doesn't support NFS yet, so this section is focused on iSCSI - but
it's very easy to see how you would support NFS by selecting the appropriate radio button
during configuration. At the time of this writing VMware has the next version of SRM
underdevelopment and in beta testing with select customers and partners. The next version of
SRM will support NFS.
Contained within this section are the following items:
•
•
Configuring NTP
Correcting the Celerra VSA Replication Database
The ID associated with the Replication Database needs to be unique. As a result of the
import process the database still maintains the original ID it had prior to cloning.
Therefore, two Celerra VSAs replicating between each other would potentially have the
same ID which will prohibit replication setup. The process of correcting/changing the
ID will avoid this problem
•
•
Configuring an iSCSI LUN that will be used as a replication target
Configuring Celerra Replicator
My configuration was completed in a local datacenter. All connections and communications where
limited to that location. If you want to perform these steps over your WAN or to a network protected
by a firewall you should be aware of the following:
Port 8888 is used by Celerra Replicator for transferring data between Celerra VSAs
The HTTPS connection between the source and destination Data Movers utilizes port
5085
The HTTPS connection between the Control Stations requires access across port 443
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Step 1: Configuring NTP (Network Time Protocol)
Celerra Replication requires the system time on the source and target devices to be within 10
minutes of each other. If not replication may fail in addition to issues with authentication and
security.
From the Celerra Manager GUI
(Using the Web Management interface: https://csprod)
Login as root PW: nasadmin
Click “Control Station Properties” tab
Modify the Current Date and Time, Current Time zone and NTP Servers: fields accordingly
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Note: Changing the time zone may require a reboot of the Celerra VSA
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Open the Data Movers Folder and Right Click, Properties on server_2
Verify the current date and time settings are in sync with the control station
If the time skew is too great you may have issues syncing with the NTP server you
specified in the GUI. If this is the case, follow this sequence:
o
o
o
o
o
o
Login to the Celerra VSA Console as root
[root@csprod ~]# date (verify current date and time)
[root@csprod ~]# pgrep ntpd (ensure the NTP daemon is running)
[root@csprod ~]# chkconfig ntpd on (ensures the NTP starts with the VSA)
[root@csprod ~]# service ntpd stop
[root@csprod ~]# ntpdate –u <NTP server IP address>
o
Here are several Internet based NTP server addresses for reference:
o
o
o
•
129.6.15.28
129.6.15.29
128.138.140.44
132.246.168.148
(time-a.nist.gov)
(time-b.nist.gov)
(utcnist.colorado.edu)
(time.nrc.ca)
[root@csprod ~]# service ntpd start
[root@csprod ~]# date (verify current date and time are correct)
[root@csprod ~]# logout
Now perform the same process for the data mover
o
o
o
o
o
Login to the Celerra VSA Console as nasadmin PW: nasadmin
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ server_date server_2 timesvc delete ntp
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ server_date server_2 timesvc start <NTP server IP
address>
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ server_date server_2
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ logout
If the times are still out of sync after following these steps reboot the entire Celerra VSA
Repeat these steps for the recovery site Celerra VSA (csdr)
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Step 2: Correcting the Celerra VSA Replication Database
The Celerra VSA has several small databases for the maintenance of critical information. As a
result of the cloning process the replication database has the wrong serial number. The
following process will correct this issue.
From the Celerra VSA Console
Login as nasadmin: PW: nasadmin
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ nas_cel –list (note the CMU maybe incorrect)
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ su (This is not a typo. The command here is su not su -)
Password: nasadmin
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[root@csprod ~]# cd /nas/dos/slot_2
[root@csprod slot_2]# vi boot.cfg
Scroll to bottom of the file and comment the dpinit line (comment character = #)
Use the Insert Command (i) from the beginning of the dpinit line and type the hash (#) key.
Save the file: (<esc> :wq!)
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•
[root@csprod slot_2]# cd /nas/server/slot_2/
(notice this is a different directory off of /nas)
•
[root@csprod slot_2]# vi eof
Scroll to middle of the file and comment the dpinit line (comment character = #)
Use the Insert Command (I) from the beginning of the dpinit line and type the hash (#) key.
Save the file: (<esc> :wq!)
•
[root@csprod slot_2]# server_cpu server_2 –reboot now
•
[root@csprod slot_2]# watch –n 5 /nas/sbin/getreason (will delver status on the data
mover reboot)
Wait for slot_2 to be in a “contacted” state
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[root@csprod slot_2]# server_dbms server_2 –db –delete icon_db (deletes the existing
replication database)
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[root@csprod slot_2]# .server_config server_2 –v “dpinit” (creates a fresh replication
database – Don’t forget the “.” at the beginning of this command. It is not a typo)
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[root@csprod slot_2]# nas_cel –list
•
[root@csprod slot_2]# nas_cel –update id=0 (This is a zero)
(The CMU now correctly correlates to the Celerra VSA serial number)
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•
•
[root@csprod ~]# cd /nas/dos/slot_2
[root@csprod slot_2]# vi boot.cfg
Scroll to bottom of the file and uncomment the dpinit line (remove the #)
Save the file: (<esc> :wq!)
•
•
[root@csprod slot_2]# cd /nas/server/slot_2/
[root@csprod slot_2]# vi eof
Scroll to middle of the file and comment the dpinit line (remove the #)
Save the file: (<esc> :wq!)
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Step 3: Configuring Replication Using the Celerra Manager GUI
Replication involves a source and a target - if you're replicating file systems, then they are file
systems. If you are replicating LUNs then they are LUNs. This step shows how to configure
an iSCSI LUN that will be a replication target. To be a replication target, it needs to be the
same size as the source, it needs to be configured as “read only”, and the file system has to
be bigger than the LUN itself. Therefore, you need a bit of "space reservation". This "space
reservation" is common to many storage use cases involving snapshots. One nice thing is
that EMC has always philosophically chosen that an "out of space condition" should cause
snap/replica LUNs to fail, not production LUNs.
This step assumes the existence of a second Celerra VSA configured as per the contents of
this document. That said, on the target Celerra VSA, there needs to be a LUN designated as a
read-only LUN that the primary Celerra VSA will use as a replication target. This will be
created as part of the configuration process. I was just pointing out the fact that it needs to
be there as some point.
These next several pages will walk thru the GUI version of all these steps. The process is a
little slower than the CLI but it combines several sub-steps in a single Wizard interface. If you
want to see the CLI version of these steps please refer to Appendix A: Configuring the
Replication Target (Command Line Interface).
From the Celerra Manager GUI
These steps will configure the Celerra VSAs with the following components:
iSCSI Target
iSCSI LUN
Replication Interconnects
Replication
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Create file system for use with the iSCSI LUN
Starting with CSPROD, Click on “Wizards”, “New File System”
Best Practice: The size of the remote file system should be at least two times the
size of the source LUN you will be replicating. This will accommodate the creation
of Snap LUNs during SRM testing and failover. If not you will run into issues
including SRM test failure.
Click “Next” to Select server_2 (default), Click “Next” to Select Storage Pool (default)
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Select the Storage Pool capable of providing capacity for the iSCSI LUN. In my case, I am
using clar_r5_performance. Click “Next”
Enter a name for the file system. I used csprod_iscsi_fs1_replicated as I plan to replicate this
LUNs on this file system to csdr. Enter the size of the filesystem in MB (1024MB = 1GB).
Ensure the Slice Volumes check box is selected. Check the Deduplication Enabled box should
you choose to enable this technology. Click “Next”
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For the purposes of this exercise, take the defaults on the Enable Auto Extension Panel and the
Default Quota Settings Panel by clicking “Next”
Click “Finish” to create the file system:
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When completed. The Panel will look similar to this one.
Click “Close”
Repeat this process for csdr keeping in mind that the target file systems should be
at least 2.5-3 times larger than the replicated LUN is houses.
One you have completed the file system creation on csdr we’ll add an iSCSI LUN and iSCSI
target on csprod. We’ll repeat the process on csdr as well.
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Create the iSCSI target and LUN(s)
Click “Wizards”, Click “New iSCSI Lun”
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During this step the Create iSCSI LUN wizard will create the iSCSI target and the iSCSI LUN
associated to said target.
Click “Next” to select server_2 (default), on the Select/Create Target panel,
Click “Create Target”
Enter a Target Alias Name (I am using csprod_target1), Ensure the Auto Generate Target
Qualifier Name check box is checked. Click “Next”
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Select the iSCSI interface created earlier (cge1), Click “Add”, Click “Next”
Click “Submit”, Click “Next”
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Select the iSCSI target just created, Click “Next”
On the Select/Create File System panel; select the file system created for replication earlier.
Click “Next”
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Enter the LUN information. Click “Next”
Note: When configuring this step on csdr the LUN must be defined as read-only
Also note that when defining LUN sizes you must leave a little room for the
overhead associate with LUN formatting. If you need to use the maximum size,
use 99% as a guide.
Here is the same screen
for csdr. Notice the LUN sizes are identical.
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Add the iSCSI initiators for the ESX servers that will access the replicated LUN
Enable Multiple Access if more than one ESX will access this LUN
Click “Add New”, Add the IQN number from your “production” ESX server, Click “OK”
Repeat this for each ESX server accessing this LUN
When completed, Click “Next” on the main Main LUN Masking panel
Click “Next” on the CHAP Access (Optional) Panel
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Assuming you have not added any iSCSI LUNs to this Celerra VSA you will be prompted with
the following panel:
Ensure the iSCSI service check box is selected, Click “Next”
Review the Summary in the Overview / Results panel, Click “Finish”
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Click “Close” once the task completes
Of course this needs to be completed on csdr, once completed move on to
Configuring Replication
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Configuring Replication
From CSPROD, Select “New Replication” from the “Wizards” folder
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All of our conversation thus far has centered on iSCSI. To that, we will select the iSCSI LUN
radio button and Click “Next”
Click “New Destination”
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Enter the name, IP address and a passphrase (your choice) of the destination Celerra
Enter the user credentials of csdr; the username is nasadmin; password is nasadmin
Click “Next”
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Enter the name of the production Celerra VSA (csprod).
The IP address maps to the eth0 interface and should be pre-populated. Only change this
address if it is not the IP address of your eth0.
50
Click “Next”, Click “Submit” and view the following screen…
Acknowledge the successful completion of Control Station configuration, Click “Next”
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Select the Celerra VSA Destination just created. In my case it network name was csdr.
Click “Next”, “New Interconnect”
Click “Next”
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Name the data mover interconnect. I used csprod-to-csdr, Click “Next”
The next panel is asking you to define an interconnect for the peer data mover. This is the
interconnect the allows for reverse communication between the Celerra VSAs
I used csdr-to-csprod. Your peer Celerra, in this case, is the production side Celerra VSA;
csprod
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Take the defaults on the next screen, Click “Next”
Ensure the time on the Celerra VSA control stations is within 10 minutes of each
other.
Double-check prior to clicking submit.
Are you sure the time is less than 10 minutes out of skew? Click “Submit”
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Review the results of the changes and Click “Next”
Select the newly created Data Mover Interconnect, Click “Next”
Select the iSCSI interfaces for each of you Celerra VSAs, Click “Next”
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The next couple of items will name the replication session and select the specific LUNs
involved in this session. Since this session will facilitate replication for VMware Site Recovery
Manager, I named the session “srm_replication”. Notice the iSCSI target and iSCSI LUN
selections. These were there by default. Double-check the entries for accuracy prior to
clicking “Next”
If the Target Destination information is correct Click “Next”. Otherwise select the correct
parameters and then Click “Next”
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Take the defaults on the Update Policy Panel. Click “Next”
Click “Finish”
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Review the results, Click “Close”
Once completed. Navigate back to the Celerra Manager Main Panel. Click on the
“Replications” folder. Check the status of the srm_replication session you just created.
Do this from both sides of the replication relationship.
csprod:
csdr:
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Step 4: Preparing ESX Servers for iSCSI Targets and LUNs
From Virtual Center:
Click on the “Configuration” tab of the ESX hosts you want to configure.
Click on “Networking”
Click on “Properties” for the vSwitch configured for iSCSI
Select vSwith, Click “Edit”
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Click on the “Security” tab
Change Promiscuous Mode to Accept
Note: This is NOT required for the Celerra Simulator as it will run either way. This
is a best practice as it relates to most simulators
Click “OK”, Click “Close”
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The following step is not required for ESXi implementations…
If you are running ESXi please skip to the next page
From the main panel: Click on the Security Profile. Ensure that the Software iSCSI Client is
enabled
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Move to the Storage Adapters Tab and scroll to the iSCSI Software Adapter.
Note: Two items: 1.) the iSCSI Initiator IQN, 2.) Targets: currently 0 (zero)
Click “Properties”, Click “Configure”, Select Enabled
Click “OK”
Click on the “Dynamic Discovery” tab, Click “Add”
Enter the TCP/IP address of the iSCSI target you created earlier. This is your cge1 interface
address. Ensure the port number is 3260 (default)
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Click “OK” (This may take a moment or two...)
Click “Close”
When prompted to Rescan the host Click “Yes”
Accept the defaults and Click “OK”
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Notice the new Target.
Repeat this step for each ESX server masked to the replicated iSCSI Target
To this point all we have done is allow the ESX servers to see the iSCSI LUNs. We must
establish a VMFS file system so they are usable within the Virtual Infrastructure.
The steps on the proceeding two pages are for
the “Production” side ESX servers only!
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Click on the “Configuration” tab, Select Storage, Click “Add Storage”
Select the “Disk/LUN” radio button, Click “Next”
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Select the LUN just added
Click “Next”
Review the current disk layout and notice the message: “The hard disk is blank.”
Click “Next”
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Enter a Name in the “Datastore Name” field:
Use something obvious like “iscsi_datastore1_replicated”
Click “Next”
Review VMFS Parameters
Click “Next”
Click “Finish”
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Verify the LUN was added to the ESX host
Important Note:
Add or migrate at least one virtual machine you want to protect with SRM to
the replicated datastore. If not the SRM configuration will not display any
summary information in the Display Replicated Datastores later in this
configuration. Please add at least one VM to this new datastore.
Also only one LUN is replicating between the Celerra VSAs. You can create
additional LUNS following the process above.
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Section 5: Site Recovery Manager Installation
In order to complete the implementation and configuration of SRM we need to ensure the
following components are in place.
•
ESX Server managed by Virtual Center for each location
Of course these locations can be in the same data center or home office or where ever
you want them. The key is a working TCP/IP connection between the two for the
purposes of TCP/IP based Celerra Replication and SRM failover.
ESX version must be 3.5 Update 2 or later because we are using SRM 1.0 Update 1
Virtual Center must be version 2.5 Update 3 or later
•
You will need to following software components:
VMware SRM 1.0 Update 1
VMware SRM 1.0 Update 1 Patch 3
Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio Express (SQLServer2005_SSMSEE)
If you haven’t already done so, download the SSMSEE and install it on the Virtual Center
Server. It is a straight-forward Next, Next, Next, Finish type of installation
EMC Celerra Storage Resource Adapter (SRA)
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Step 1: Site Recovery Manager Database Connectivity
In this step we will perform a number of steps required prior to the actual installation of
the SRM server instance on the Virtual Center Server. Specifically we will
o
o
o
o
Create a new Active Directory user for use with the SRM database
Create the SRM data base using the SSMSEE application
Assign the new user to the database as the db_owner
Setup and test an ODBC connection to the new database
Within your Active Directory create a new user: I used srmprotected-db. Notice I selected
the “User cannot change password” and “Password never expires” options.
Click “Create”
Once created launch the SSMSEE application:
Start> all Programs> Microsoft SQL Server 2005 > SQL Server Management Studio Express
The application may or may not display the following panel:
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From the SQL Server 2005 Connect to Server Panel, Click “Connect”
Make note of the Server Name: in my case VMWARE-VC\SQLEXP_VIM.
You will need this information when you create an ODBC connection to the SRM database.
For some reason it will not be on the drop down list so I copied it to my clipboard.
In the main panel Right Click Databases and Select New Database. Name the Database as
you wish. I used srmprotected-db. Click “OK”
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Create a new login: Right Click on the “Logins” Folder under “Security”
Enter the login ID you created for this purpose. Enter the name in domain\user format:
i.e., BAKER-ISS\srmprotected-db
Select the database you created from the Default Database Drop Down
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Next select “User Mappings” from the “Select a Page” panel. Select the database you user will be
mapped to (i.e., srmprotected-db), Select db_owner and leave public checked.
Click “OK”
Now that the database has been created and the user mapped to it, we need to create an ODBC
connection to the new database.
Navigate to the Control Panel on the Virtual Center Server. Double Click on the Data Sources (ODBC)
shortcut. Click “Add”
(If the ODBC setup icon is not in the Control Panel it will be in the Administrative Tools
folder. You may need to enable this via the start menu properties.)
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Select “SQL Native Client”, Click “Finish”
Name the ODBC Connection to the SRM database a name and enter the server name on the Server:
field as noted above i.e., in my case VMWARE-VC\SQLEXP_VIM, Click “Next”
Select the “With Integrated Windows authentication” radio button, Click “Next”
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Ensure “Change the default database to:” selection is checked
Select the SRM database you created earlier from the dropdown box. Keep the rest of the selections
at their defaults. Click “Next”
On the next panel take the defaults and Click “Finish”
Once completed you will be presented with the following panel:
Click “Test Data Source”
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If everything was configured properly you should see the following panel (a small reward for the
work so far!). Click”OK”
When returned to the original panel Click “OK”
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Click “OK” again when presented with the ODBC Data Source Administrator Panel
Notice the addition of the VMware SRM Data Source
At this point you should configure SQL on the recovery site Virtual Center Server.
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Step 2: Copying Site Recovery Manager, the SRM patch and SRA
Copy the SRM and SRA installation media to your Virtual Center Desktop. The best was to
accomplish this (if you are remote to the console) is to map a drive to the administrative share, C$,
on the Virtual Center server. Start> Run> \\192.168.1.14\c$
Enter user credentials as required
Step 3: Installing Site Recovery Manager
Double Click on the VMware-srm-1.0.1-128004 installation icon
Accept the ELUA and Select a Destination Folder, Fill in the appropriate information in the SRM
registration panel.
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Acknowledge the Security Warning and accept the certificate’s thumbprint by Clicking “Yes”
Select the “Automatically generate a certificate” radio button and Click “Next”
Enter the appropriate (anything you like) information in the Organization and Organizational Unit
fields and Click “Next”
Fill in the requested information and Click Next. Do not modify the SOAP or HTTP ports
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Enter the database specifics in the next panel and Click “Next”
Click “Install”
The installation will proceed without any additional input. Once completed Click “Finish” and proceed
to the next step
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Step 3: Patching Site Recovery Manager
After pushing the SRM 1.0 Update 1 Patch 3 package to the SRM server, double click the icon to
launch the installation.
Click “Run”, “Next”
Accept the terms of the End User License Agreement and Click “Next”
Click “Install”
Click “Finish”
Step 4: Installing the Storage Replication Adapter
Please note if you are running an earlier version of the storage replication adapter please remove it
prior to proceeding.
Double Click on the EMC_Celerra_Replicator_Adapter_for_VMware_Site_Recovery_Manager
installation icon.
Click “Next”, Accept the License, Click “Install”, Click “Finish”
From the services MMC restart the VMware Site Recovery Manager Service
No need for screen shots!
Restart the VMware SRM service.
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Step 5: Installing the SRM Plug-in for Virtual Center
If not already running, launch the VI Client and attach to your Virtual Center Server.
Click “Plugins” from the Menu Bar
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Click the “Download and Install” button for Site Recovery Manager
At this point a separate installer will launch to install the plug-in. This is a standard windows install
similar to the installs completed in Steps 2 and 3 of this section.
Click “Next”, accept the license, “Install”, “Finish”
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Shortly after the completion of the add-in install, you will be taken back to the plug-in manager for
Virtual Center. Notice the plug-in has been installed but still needs to be enabled.
Note: Do not select the “Installed” tab until the VMware Site Recovery Manager status changes in
the “Available” tab to read: The plugin has been installed. Please go to the installed tab to enable
the plugin. Doing so prior to completion may require a restart of the VI client to see the plugin as
installed.
Click on the “Installed” tab and Click “Enabled” in the Site Recovery Manager panel, Click “OK”
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Click on the new “Site Recovery” Manager Icon
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This panel offers us the ability to start configuring the actual linkages between SRM servers and their
associated storage devices. Prior to that however, the SRM installation needs to be completed on the
recovery, disaster recovery site. Please complete Section 5 on the recovery site Virtual Center server
before proceeding to Section 6.
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Section 6: Site Recovery Manager Configuration
Welcome Back! Hopefully the SRM implementation on the recovery site went well. At this point we
have completed several tasks each a critical component in the grand scheme of SRM. Here however,
is where the preverbal rubber hits the road.
In this section we will configure each of the SRM servers to interact. We will also create protection
and recovery groups and test the failover capability of the SRM servers.
When we finished Section 5 we were left with the following screen shot. Notice the information in
the Local Site panel. This information matches the information in the paired site providing you are
looking at this screen from the perspective of the protected site. Of course this will change when you
open this panel this from the recovery site SRM server. The Paired site will always reflect the
“replication partner.” That said, if logged into the protected site you will see the recovery site
information in the Paired Ssite panel. If you are looking at this from the Recovery site, the paired site
will be that of the Protected site. Crystal clear? It will all make sense as we work through the next
several steps.
Click “Configure” in the “Protection Setup” panel
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Step 1: Configuring the Connection
All of these tasks are completed from the protection site unless otherwise indicated.
Enter the TCP/IP Address of the remote (recovery) site Virtual Center Server, the Port number
defaults to 80.
Acknowledge the Certificate Panel, Click “OK”
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Enter the Administrative Credentials for the Virtual Center Server. You may be asked to authenticate
to both the remote and the local servers.
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Once Authenticated the system will establish a reciprocal connection between the Virtual Center
Servers.
Acknowledge any Security Certificate warnings (you may not see any)
Click “Finish”
Check the status of the connection. It should be “Connected”
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Step 2: Configuring the Array Managers
Now that the connection between the two sties has been established the arrays can be configured.
You recall that we installed the EMC Celerra SRA and the Solution Enabler earlier. This step will not
work if those components did not install properly.
Click “Configure” next to Array Managers: SRM main panel
Add the Protection Site Celerra VSAs, Click “Add”
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Enter the requested information in the “Add Array Manger” Panel. The display name should be the
same as your protection site Celerra VSA. Manager Type is Celerra iSCSI Native, Control Station IP is
the csprod eth2 IP address, User Name and Password are nasadmin. Click “Connect”
Once added, the replicated LUNs on csprod should be displayed in the Protection Arrays Panel below
Click “OK”
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The Add Array Manager process will return to the Configure Array Manager main panel. Notice the
Protection Arrays: panel. It lists the Celerra VSA as “NS-Simulator”, shows the Peer array at the
remote site and the number of LUN(s) configured for replication
Click “Next”, to configure the recovery side array, Click “Add”
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Enter the requested information in the “Add Array Manger” Panel. The display name should be the
same as your protection site Celerra VSA. Manager Type is Celerra iSCSI Native, Control Station IP is
the csdr eth2 IP address, User Name and Password are nasadmin. Click “Connect”, Click “OK”
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Click”Next”
Review the Replicated Datastores, Click “Finish”
Remember: If you did not add at least one virtual machine to the replicated
datastore this panel will be blank. That is OK! Don’t think something is wrong if
the datastore summary is blank.
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Step 3: Configuring Inventory Mappings (Optional)
Moving forward… the Inventory Mappings need to be completed. This puts us one step away from
configuring the Protection and Recovery Groups. Note that these mappings set the general defaults
for virtual machine networks on the recovery site. These can be overridden during the process of
creating protection groups.
Click “Configure” next to the “Inventory Mappings:” entry in the “Protection Setup” Panel
Use this panel to map source site resources to recovery site resources. These are the recovery site
resources used during testing and failover. Specifically, you are mapping network, resource pools and
data center locations.
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Example:
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Step 4: Configuring Protection Groups
There are only a few steps left prior to testing our SRM configuration. Specifically, we need to create
protection and recovery Groups. Protections Groups as their name infers are created at the
protection/”production” site and will define which virtual machines are protected via the SRM facility.
Recovery Groups wrap policy and procedure around the protection groups and become the basis of
the recovery plan. The recovery Groups are created on the recovery/DR site.
Click on Site Recovery in the left hand navigation pane.
Click “Create” next to “Protection Groups” in the “Protection Setup” Panel
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Give the Protection Groups a Name and Click “Next”
The name should give some insight to the VMs that will be contained within.
Select a Datastore Group and Click “Next” (as discovered by the Array Manager)
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Select a recovery site datastore for the shadow/“placeholder” Virtual Machines, Click “Finish”
We now see the created Protection Group
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Step 5: Configuring Recovery Groups
The final step in the configuration process centers on the Recovery Site and the configuration of
Recovery Groups. The following steps will be executed from the recovery site Virtual Center server.
Click “Create” in the “Recovery Setup” Panel
Name the Recovery Plan – use something indicative of the Plan’s scope (entire site, windows
machines, Linux machines, web servers, etc.), Click “Next”
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In the “Create Recovery Plan - Protection Groups” dialog select the Protection Group(s) created in the
previous step.
Click “Next”
In the next panel, “Response Times”, leave the defaults and Click “Next”
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The “Configure Test Networks” dialog provides the ability to select a test network for use when
testing your recovery plan. By default this is set to Auto. Auto will dynamically create a “bubble”
network during a running test and tear it down when the test completes. Note: Any virtual
machines dependant on non-protected machines running DNS, AD and DHCP may not be able to
communicate with each other once on the bubble network. Make provisions for these services in the
bubble or configure an isolated network with these services for testing purposes.
Make the appropriate selections.
Click “Next”
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It is likely, during a test, that you may need to free-up some of the available DR site resources (CPU
and Memory) until the test cycle is completed. SRM provide this capability via the recovery plan. If
you choose to, SRM will suspend selected virtual machines. Click the check box next to the VMs you
wish to suspend. I chose not to suspend any of my VMs as each is providing a critical service to m
lab environment.
Click “Finish”
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Step 6: Testing
Providing everything to this point has been configured properly, we are ready to push the test button.
Let’s get right to it.
From the Recovery Site Virtual Center Server, Click the “Site Recovery” button on the ribbon menu.
Expand the Recovery Plans, and Click on the Recovery Plan created earlier.
Click the “Recovery Steps” tab.
The steps listed here have been automatically created via the Create Recovery Plan.
Take a few moments to review the steps in the recovery plan. You have many options to tweak the
plan but that is slightly outside the scope of this document.
When you are ready to proceed… move to the next page!
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Click on the Green “Test”’ Button (The Red “Run” Button is reserved for the actual failover event!)
Acknowledge the following dialog
SRM will start by configuring the storage components. Without a long dissertation, SRM will ready
the remote storage and present a writeable snapshot to the ESX server in the DR site.
Notice the status in the recent task panel at the bottom of the main Virtual Center
window.
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The next step in the process will suspend any Virtual Machines (if they where selected to do so
during the creation of the Recover Plan). If not the recovery plan will skip to recovering virtual
machines in order of priority.
(These are the place holder VMs created during the Protection Groups configuration)
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Once the VM have been recovered and all of the recovery plan steps have been completed, the plan
will pause for user input. During this pause the virtual machines are running and “connected” to the
network previously defined in the recovery plan. Remember, by default this network is referred to as
the “bubble” network and maintains no connectivity to other physical networks and does not provide
for network-based services such as AD, DNS or DHCP. This is unless you have made provisions ahead
of time.
Testing complete? Great! Click “Continue”
Site Recovery Manager will clean up the underlying storage, place the VMs back into a powered off
state in the placeholder datastore and return to the Recovery Plan main panel.
You have just executed a successful Site Recovery Manager test using Celerra VSAs. How did it go?
Do you want to run an actual failover? If so, I’ll show you how to accomplish this task in conjunction
with a successful failback using the EMC Celerra Failback Wizard. Interested? Proceed to Section 7.
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Section 7: Automated SRM Failback
Welcome to the part of the document that only EMC could write. As of this writing, EMC is the only
storage vendor to provide an automated failback tool for Site Recovery Manager. Officially know as
the Celerra Failback Wizard, the EMC failback tool automates the process of recovering from a failover
using SRM and the underlying replication technologies provided by Celerra Replicator.
The purpose of the plug-in is to reestablish a VMware vCenter environment that has been previously
failed using VMware Site Recovery Manager. The tool uses the VMware Virtual Infrastructure (VI)
software development kit (SDK) to manipulate the vCenter at both the protected and recovery sites.
In addition, the tool will connect to two EMC Celerra VSAs, one for each vCeneter, in order to crossreference storage information with vCenter data.
Step 1: Installing the Celerra Failback Wizard
To start the process we must first install the Celerra Failback Wizard. I assume you have pushed the
installation files to the recovery side vCenter server.
The installation is a straight forward, standard installation.
Double Click on the EMC Celerra SRM Failback Wizard v1.1 icon
Click “Next”
Accept the End User License Agreement, Click “Next”
Click “Install”
When prompted, Fill in the EMC Celerra SRM Failback Wizard – Virtual Center Plugin
Registration Panel
Click “Register”
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Acknowledge the Registration Success Panel, Click “OK”
Click “Exit” when returned to the EMC Celerra SRM Failback Wizard – Virtual Center Plugin
Registration Panel
Click “Finish” when returned to the installation panel
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Step 2: Configuring the plugin
Unlike most plug-ins, the Celerra Failback Wizard automatically registers itself with vCenter during the
installation process. Note, as of this writing the failback wizard does not support the vSphere (ESX4)
client. You must use the VI client available for ESX 3.5. If for some reason you need to re-register
the failback wizard you may do so by following these steps;
Fist of all you will need to ensure the EMC Celerra Failback Service is running: Launch the Services
MMC to check (Click “Start”, “Run”, services.msc, Click “OK”). Since the Failback Wizard is installed
on the remote site, vCenter server we must confirm from that perspective:
If the service is running; re-run the registration process. This is accomplished by double clicking on
the executable .jar file in this directory on the vCenter server (vcdr):
C:\Program Files\EMC\Celerra SRM Failback Wizard\RegisterVcPlugin\RegisterVcPlugin
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After the installation and registration, the VI client will display a new button on the interface. This is
the button we will use to access the EMC Celerra Failback Wizard.
Click on the button for a quick view of the interface.
Acknowledge the security alert by clicking “Yes” to the “Do you want to proceed?” prompt
The failback wizard will present the following panel:
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Notice that the failback wizard interface is very straight forward. Each time you run a failback session
you will be required to provide the TCP/IP address information along with administrative credentials
for the vCenter servers and the Celerra storage devices (the VSAs in this case). By default, the
vCenter username is “administrator”. The password is user definable and is the same password you
have been using throughout this document. The default administrative credentials for the Celerra
VSAs are nasadmin/nasadmin.
Please note: When running these tools in your lab you need to know the following information.
Most plugins for vCenter and for the most part vCenter itself runs in the context of an
Internet browser. As such if you try to run the Celerra Failback Wizard more than once
without first closing the VI Client and re-launching the failback wizard you will likely run
into minor issues due to the cached information from the last session.
Consider it a best practice to restart your VI client betweens tests.
According to the development team at EMC responsible for this tool, future releases will
incorporate changes to remedy this situation.
For the moment we’ll leave the failback wizard and return to SRM to facilitate an actual failover
event.
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Step 3: Preparing for SRM Failover
You should notice that the following steps will be a lot like the SRM “Test” run earlier. The primary
difference here is that once we execute an SRM “Run” the changes made to the environment are
more ”permanent” in nature. I use d quotes around permanent because this would be the case if we
didn’t have a failback tool. Of course the tool is automating the task required to “failback” and a solid
administrator with good storage and VMware skill could manually reset the environment with a good
deal of time and effort. To that, some of the changes I eluded to a moment ago include but are not
limited to:
Fracturing the storage replication relationship
Promoting the secondary (target) LUN (vs. a snapshot) to the target ESX host(s)
Stopping and Removing (if available) the VMs on the primary site
Remapping of the storage LUNs to and from their assigned ESX hosts
The following steps will make these changes to your environment. Please proceed with caution and
take a few steps to prepare your environment should something go wrong.
Limit your initial testing to a single LUN
Choose a small number of VMs to test
Use simple VMs (WindowsXP, No RDMs etc.)
Create Clones of your test VMs and store them on non-replicated, non-SRM LUNs
You can add complexities to the mix once you are more comfortable with the tool
and how it works.
A few additional items to take note of:
Based on your configuration, there may be a handful of VM that you are testing. Notice
their state on the production vCenter, vcprod1, 192.168.1.14, in my case. These VMs are
likely running on a particular ESX host supported by a replicated LUN provided by the
Celerra VSA known as csprod.
On the recovery site vCenter, vcdr1, 192.168.1.24 in my lab, there are shadow VMs created
by the configuration of the protection group, PG1 – Windows Desktops. These VMs should
be powered off, connected to an ESX host but not attached to any storage provided by the
Celerra VSA known as csdr. If you were to try and power one of these VMs on you would
notice the power on option is dimmed and not available. For that matter, all of the power
related functions are disabled. This is the normal state for a shadow VM.
Once the SRM failover process is complete the VMs on the production vCenter server will
be deleted and unregistered, these shadow VMs will have been restarted after the SRM
server maps the replicated LUN, which has been fractured from the original source LUN,
and all of the networking changes have been implemented.
If you are demonstrating this functionality to others, point out some of these
items.
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Step 4: SRM Failover
Navigate to the SRM plugin on your destination vcenter server. This is the same interface we used
for the SRM test earlier.
Authenticate to the SRM servers as prompted.
Expand the Recovery Plans, and Click on the Recovery Plan, RP1 – Windows Desktops.
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Click the “Recovery Steps” tab.
The steps listed here have been automatically created via the Create Recovery Plan steps performed
earlier.
Again, take a few moments to review the steps in the recovery plan. This time note that some steps
are executed during recovery or test only. If there is not a designation, the step runs regardless.
When you are ready to proceed, Click on the Red “Run”’ Button (The Green “Test” Button, as we
learned earlier, is used for testing the failover without impacting the production environment)
Acknowledge the following dialog.
This is the last warning
provided by the SRM GUI prior to
starting the actual failover process.
The changes about to be made will
require the use of the Celerra Failback
Wizard to restore the environment
to its original, pre-failover, state. That is,
unless you perform these steps manually!
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The steps of the failover will execute in a similar manner as the test failover we performed earlier.
When completed the VMs on the production side vCenter server will be powered down. In my case I
shut these devices down ahead of time and powered down the vCenter (vcprod1) to simulate a real
disaster recovery test. Since the SRM process executes from the recovery site access to the
production site is not required. Killing my production vCenter proves this point. If the production site
we up and available, albeit in some state of compromise in the event of a real disaster, SRM would
attempt to shut down any of the surviving production VMs to avoid conflicts between the original
production VMs and their restarted DR counterparts.
The actual difference in between a DR test and the actual running of the SRM failover were discussed
earlier in the document. With regard to the GUI, the primary difference relates to how the process
completes. Once the failover is started it will execute to completion without any user intervention.
Recall that you were required to hit the “Continue” button when testing. This “paused” the process
until testing was completed. Once clicked, the test processes would cleanup the environment and
restore the DR site to its previous state. A state exactly as it was prior to invoking the test.
This is what the SRM screen looks like after a successful failover: Notice that it is not much different
compared to the screen prior to execution.
One clue here is the Test button. It is dim and no longer accessible. This is because the Recovery
Plan is no longer valid. During the execution, SRM provided status for each of the steps in the
Recovery Plan. For a complete view of the status of each individual step. Click on the “History” tab
and view or export the Recovery Report.
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Here is a snippet of what that report looks like:
In addition to the History Report, all of the VMs you protected in the first place are now up and
running or at least available as per you Recovery Plan. These VMs will be attached to one or more
ESX servers in your cluster and will be supported by the Celerra VSA and a LUN now referred to in a
snap-name format. You may choose to rename this name, removing the snap-xxxxxxxx- prefix
assigned to this LUN by ESX when it was presented as part of the SRM process. For the purpose of
our testing we’ll leave the snap-xxxxxxxx- prefix in place. See the graphic on the next page for
reference to the snap-xxxxxxxx- LUN name. One point of note, the remainder of the LUN name is
the original LUN name. (i.e., snap-3f6ff555-csprod-iscsi-datastore0) csprod-iscsi-datastore is the
original LUN name.
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Take a few moments to explore the difference aspect of the DR vCenter server. Look at the
networking and storage configuration pages, explore the datastore. You will notice that you are now
running your “production” site workloads on the DR site. You have successfully failed over using the
VMware Site Recovery Manager.
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Step 5: Using the Celerra Failback Wizard
Several of the following screen shots were taken from a standard VI3 Virtual Infrastructure Client. As
mentioned earlier, the Celerra Failback Wizard does not support the vSphere client. I have used the
vSphere client for a majority of this document. The VI3 VI Client screen shots are purposely
different. (Different theme with darker colors and different fonts)
Click on the EMC Celerra Failback Icon and acknowledge the Security Alert
On the next panel enter the following information:
Protected Site:
o Celerra Control Station IP address
o vCenter User Credentials
Recovery Site:
o Celerra Control Station IP address
o vCenter User Credentials
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To accomplish this task click “Configure” next to each of the required items.
Start with the Protected Site Celerra VSA and proceed to the three remaining items.
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When completed the screen should look like the panel below: Notice that both the protected site and
the recovery site Celerra and vCenter fields have have been configured with their corresponding IP
addresses.
Click on the “Configure & Run Failback” link
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The first task discovers available failback sessions, the LUNS associated with those sessions and the
VMs residents on said LUNs. Notice the Status window on the bottom left of the panel.
Once the failback session(s) have been identified the process stops and waits on user input. You
must select a Failback Session to continue. If there are multiple sessions available you have the
option to select individual session of selecting all of them with the “Select All” check box under the
Failback Sessions portion of the panel. The tool also provide the ability to Power On VMs after
failback. Unlike SRM, this tool, as of this writing, does not support power on priorities. The best
practice associate with this option dictates manual power on after failback.
Select the Failback Session listed in the Panel. (it starts with fs23_T1_LUN0_BB0050…) and happens
to be the only one listed.
Click “Failback”
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Watch the Recent Tasks window at the bottom of the VI Client in addition to the Status window as
the process runs. It provides a good deal of information as to the steps in the process and the
relative success of each.
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Once completed the tool will provide “Failback Complete” in the Failback section of the Panel
Check on the success of the failback by checking you production and DR vCenter servers. They
should look like they did prior to the SRM failover. Your test VMs should be back up and running (if
you told the tool to power them up) and the shadow VMs on the DR vCenter should be gone.
Of course, when the SRM failover ran it in validated the Protection Groups and the associated
Recovery Plans. VMware is working to provide consistency of these plans in a future release of SRM.
Until then the Protection Groups and Recovery Plans will need to be manually recreated.
In my humble opinion, this is considerably less work, and more accurate than failing back using
manual techniques or scripts. And compared to physical failover and failback, I can’t imagine using
those methods unless I absolutely had to (i.e., workloads that can not leverage VMware or SRM).
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Section 8: Wrap-up
As I wrap this up, would like to thank the great community of virtualization geeks, gurus and testers
that have used this document to perform their jobs and extend their knowledge. Thanks to all of
you!
This document is the first major update since the initial release in December 2008. Since that time,
this document has been downloaded by individuals, from around the globe, representing EMC, EMC
partners, resellers, competitors, customers, prospects and enthusiasts. The responses and feedback
have been fantastic and invaluable. I have tried to ensure accuracy throughout the process. If you
find anything that needs clarification or correction please be sure to let me know. My email
addresses are; baker_bernard@emc.com and berniebaker@gmail.com.
It took a great deal of time, energy and effort to put this document together. I hope the community
or users and testers continue to find value in the content. Please let me know if you found this
document useful.
I strongly believe that VMware SRM in conjunction with the Celerra VSAs allow for the creation of an
environment fully capable of testing SRM and failback in a manner that mimics a real world
implementation.
I will provide updates to this document as the technology changes and new release become
available.
Thanks for taking time to look at the Celerra VSA and testing VMware Site Recovery Manager using
this document.
For those of you sitting on the edge of your seat waiting for what’s next:
I will be developing a new document (in conjunction with one of my compatriots at VMware) focused
on VMware Site Recovery Manager at scale. Look for something in the Fall ’09 timeframe. (maybe in
time for VMworld)
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Appendix A: Configuring the Replication Target
(Command Line Interface)
Replication involves a source and a target - if you're replicating file systems, then they are file
systems. If you are replicating LUNs then they are LUNs. This step shows how to configure
an iSCSI LUN that will be the replication target. To be a replication target, it needs to have the
same size as the source, it needs to be configured to be read only, and the file system has to
be bigger than the LUN itself. Therefore, you need a bit of "space reservation". This "space
reservation" is common to many storage use cases involving snapshots. One nice thing is
that EMC has always philosophically chosen that an "out of space condition" should cause
snaps/replicas to fail, not production.
This step assumes the existence of a second Celerra VSA configured as per the contents of
this document. That said, on the target VSA, there needs to be a LUN designated as a readonly LUN that the primary Celerra VSA will use as a replication target.
These next several pages will walk thru the CLI version of all these steps. The process is
streamlined and much faster that using the Celerra Manager GUI. If you want to see the GUI
version of these steps please refer to Section 4, Step 3 Configuring the Replication Target via
the Celerra Manager GUI.
From the Celerra Console
These commands will configure the Celerra VSAs with the following components:
iSCSI Target
iSCSI LUN
Replication Interconnects
Replication
Create and Mount a file system for use with the iSCSI LUN
csprod:
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ nas_fs -name csprod-fs1 -type uxfs -create size=45G
pool=clar_r5_performance -option slice=y
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ server_mount server_2 csprod-fs1 /nas/fs1
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csdr:
[nasadmin@csdr ~]$ nas_fs -name csdr-fs1 -type uxfs -create size=45G
pool=clar_r5_performance -option slice=y
[nasadmin@csdr ~]$ server_mount server_2 csdr-fs1 /nas/fs1
Start the iSCSI service
csprod:
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ server_iscsi server_2 -service -start
csdr:
[nasadmin@csdr ~]$ server_iscsi server_2 -service -start
Create an iSCSI target that will be used to serve LUNs to each Celerra VSA
csprod:
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ server_iscsi server_2 -target -alias csprod-target1 -create
1:np=10.100.10.51 (This is the iSCSI interface on you created in Section 1-eth2)
csdr:
[nasadmin@csdr ~]$ server_iscsi server_2 -target -alias csdr-target1 -create
1:np=10.100.10.56 (This is the iSCSI interface on you created in Section 1-eth2)
Create an iSCSI LUN
Note that the LUN on the secondary needs to be set as “read-only”
csprod: (Primary)
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ server_iscsi server_2 -lun -number 1 -create csprod-target1 size 10G -fs csprod-fs1
csdr: (Secondary)
[nasadmin@csdr ~]$ server_iscsi server_2 -lun -number 1 -create csdr-target1 -size
10G -fs csdr-fs1 -readonly yes
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Note: In order to setup reverse replication, from secondary to primary, a second
set of LUNs needs to be created. This time the target replication LUN on the
Primary must be set to read-only. The source LUN on the secondary is configured
normally as a read/write LUN.
Set the iSCSI LUN masking for each ESX host
csprod:
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ server_iscsi server_2 -mask -set csprod-target1 -initiator
iqn.1998-01.com.vmware:esx2-29d419e2 -grant 1
csdr:
[nasadmin@csdr ~]$ server_iscsi server_2 -mask -set csdr-target1 -initiator iqn.199801.com.vmware:esx3-017f4fc5 -grant 1
Note: The IQN number is associated with the software iSCSI interface on the ESX host. You
will need to retrieve this from the ESX server via Virtual Center as noted earlier.
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Configuring Replication
Set up mutual trusts between Celerra VSAs
This trust needs to be setup in both directions; primary to secondary and secondary to
primary. The passphrase must be the same in both cases:
csprod:
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ nas_cel -create csprod -ip 192.168.1.52 –passphrase nasadmin
csdr:
[nasadmin@csdr ~]$ nas_cel -create csdr -ip 192.168.1.57 –passphrase nasadmin
Configure the Data Movers to converse and share replicated data
csprod:
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ nas_cel -interconnect -create csprod-to-csdr -source_server
server_2 -destination_system csdr -destination_server server_2 -source_interfaces
ip=10.100.10.51 -destination_interfaces ip=10.100.10.56
csdr:
[nasadmin@csdr ~]$ nas_cel -interconnect -create csdr-to-csprod -source_server
server_2 -destination_system csprod -destination_server server_2 -source_interfaces
ip=10.100.10.56 –destination_interfaces ip=10.100.10.51
Note: Perform this interconnect from both directions; primary to secondary and
secondary to primary. If you only set it from one side replication will only work in
one direction.
The interconnect must be the same in both cases.
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Establish Replication from the primary Celerra VSA to the secondary Celerra VSA
csprod:
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ server_iscsi server_2 –target –l
This will provide the Celerra VSA IQN number for the next command
csdr:
[nasadmin@csdr ~]$ server_iscsi server_2 –target –l
This will provide the Celerra VSA IQN number for the next command
csprod (only):
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ nas_replicate -create srm-replicaiton -source -lun 1 -target
iqn.1992-05.com.emc:bb0050568a59e40000-3 -destination -lun 1 -target
iqn.1992002D05.com.emc:bb0050569a3d070000-3 -interconnect csprod-to-csdr source_interface ip=10.100.10.51 -destination_interface ip=10.100.10.56 overwrite_destination
csprod:
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ nas_replicate -l
csdr:
[nasadmin@csdr ~]$ nas_replicate –l
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Appendix B: iSCSI and NFS
Discrete LUN Creation & Assignment
Some people may have downloaded this document hoping for a “I just need to add an iSCSI
LUN or NFS export to my ESX server from my existing Celerra VSA or physical Celerra” type of
document. This appendix discussed just that. It falls outside the scope of the SRM discussion
earlier but nevertheless provides insight to some of the basic functions of the Celerra VSA.
This appendix assumes that all LUNs and file systems are created for non-replicated uses.
This appendix also assumes that you have completed all of the steps in Section 1 of this
document. If you need to create LUNs greater than 20GB in capacity you may also want to
complete Section 2.
Step 1: Creating iSCSI Targets
Login to your Celerra VSA as nasadmin, Password: nasadmin
Navigate to the Wizards Folder
Click “New iSCSI Target”, Click “Next” to configure an iSCSI target on server_2
Enter the Target Alias Name: csprod_target1 and select Auto Generate Target Qualified Name
Note: This will generate a Unique IQN number for this target.
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Assign the target to cge1 (your iSCSI Interface), Click “Next”
Click “Finish”
This graphic represents the complete target configuration as viewed from the iSCSI folder,
Targets tab.
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Step 2: Configuring iSCSI LUNs and presenting them to ESX as VMFS
Datastores
You may not need to complete this step (outlined on pages 118-121) if you already configured your
environment for iSCSI replication. These steps have already been completed. If you did not set up
replication please continue.
From Virtual Center:
Click on the “Configuration” tab of the ESX hosts you want to configure.
Click on “Networking”
Click on “Properties” for the vSwitch configured for iSCSI
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Select vSwith, Click “Edit”
Click on the “Security” tab
Change Promiscuous Mode to Accept
Note: This is NOT required for the Celerra Simulator as it will run either way. This is a best
practice as it related to most simulators
Click “OK”, Click “Close”
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From the main panel: Click on the Security Profile. Ensure that the Software iSCSI Client is
enabled
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Move to the Storage Adapters Tab and scroll to the iSCSI Software Adapter.
Note: Two items: 1) the iSCSI Initiator IQN, 2.) Targets: currently 0 (zero)
Click “Properties”, Click “Configure”, Select Enabled
Copy the iSCSI Name field to the clipboard. You may want to write it down as well. Just in
case you copy something else to the clipboard.
Click “OK”
Click on the “Dynamic Discovery” tab, Click “Add”
Enter the TCP/IP address of the iSCSI target you created earlier. Ensure the port number is
3260
Click “OK” (This may take a moment or two...)
Click “Close”
When prompted to Rescan the host Click “No”
Repeat this step for each ESX host that will attach to this target.
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From the Celerra Manager GUI
(Using the Web Management interface: https://csprod)
Navigate to the Wizards Folder
Click “New iSCSI LUN”, Click “Next” to configure an iSCSI target on server_2
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Pick the iSCSI target created earlier (csprod_target1), Click “Next”
Click “Create File System” (remember, like all filers, iSCSI LUNs are files in file systems)
Select the Storage Pool radio button. On the next screen select the specific Storage Pool you
want to use. Two pools are defined by default; one for Performance and one for Economy.
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Click “Next”, Enter the name for the new file system: iscsifs1
Enter the size of the new file system: enter an appropriate value in MB
Click “Next”, Click “Submit” wait for the job to complete, review the summary results
Click “Next”
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Pick the file system just created from the pick list windows (it may be highlighted)
Click “Next”
There are several options presented on this page: execute the options required for your
specific use case. For the purpose of this document we'll focus on creating a single LUN
Enter the Number: (This is the LUN number assigned to the newly created LUN) i.e., 10
Enter the size of the new LUN
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Click “Next”
Click “Enable Multiple Access” check box so it is selected
Click “Add New”
Paste the ESX Host IQN number you copied earlier.
Repeat for all ESX Hosts, Click “Next”,
Click “Next” on the CHAP Access Panel
Click “iSCSI Service” check box so it is selected.
Click “Next”
Click “Finish” Wait for the job to process, review the summary for errors
Click “Close”
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From Virtual Center:
Select one of the ESX host(s) just masked to the iSCSI target.
Click on the “Configuration” tab, Select Storage Adapters. Select the iSCSI software adapter
Click “Rescan”, Accept the defaults and Click “OK”
Notice the “Targets” count has incremented by the number of LUNs associated with the target
and masked to this server. In this case, maybe one or two LUNs..
Perform these steps for all ESX hosts in the cluster.
To this point all we have done is allow the ESX servers to see the iSCSI LUNs. We must
establish a VMFS file system so they are usable within the Virtual Infrastructure.
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Click on the “Configuration” tab, Select Storage, Click Add Storage
Select the “Disk/LUN” radio button, Click “Next”
Select the LUN just added (i.e., LUN10 which may be display as vmhba32:0:10)
Click “Next”
Review the current disk layout and notice the message: “The hard disk is blank.”
Click “Next”
Enter a Name in the “Datastore Name” field: Use something obvious like
“csprod_iscsi_lun10”
Click “Next”
Review VMFS Parameters
Click “Next”
Click “Finish”
Verify the LUN was added to the ESX host.
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Step 3: Configuring NFS LUNs and presenting them to ESX as NFS
Datastores
Note: This step is not required for SRM but is included here for completeness of
configuration and protocol options.
From Virtual Center:
Click Security Profile for the ESX host(s). Enable the NFS Client
From the Celerra Manager GUI
(Using the Web Management interface: https://csprod)
Click “Wizards”. Click “New File System”
Select Data Mover: server_2, Click “Next”
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Select the Storage Pool radio button. On the next screen select the specific Storage Pool you
want to use. Two pools are defined by default; one for Performance and one for Economy.
Click “Next”
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Enter the name for the new file system: nfsfs1
Enter the size of the new file system: enter an appropriate value in MB
Click “Next”, “Next”, “Next”
Click “Close”
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Back on the main panel:
Click “NFS Exports”, Click “New”
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Select the appropriate file system; i.e., nfsfs1 (/nfsfs1)
Enter TCP/IP Addresses for each ESX host that will access this export in the “Root Hosts:” field
Note: this field accepts wild cards and CIDR formatted entries
Click “OK”
Celerra Manager will finish the task and present a list of the NFS exports as confirmation.
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From Virtual Center:
Click on the “Configuration” tab, Select Storage, Click “Add Storage”
Select the “Network File System” radio button, Click “Next”
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In the Properties panel enter the Server: name or IP and the Folder: that server is exporting:
Example: Server: 192.168.1.247
(NOTE: this is a datamover (cge0) interface NOT the control station)
Folder: /nfsfs1
Enter a Name in the Datastore Name field: Use something obvious like
csprod_nfs1, Click “Next”
Review the properties, Click “Finish”
Verify the LUN was added to the ESX host.
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Appendix C: Basic VI Commands
Credits to: Douglas (Doug) Palovick
Homepage: Palovick.com
email: doug@palovick.com
What is VI and is it for you?
VI is an extremely powerful text editor (not to be confused with a word processor). Here you will find
basic VI commands for use within the VI, or vim, editor.
Ok, now onto some VI basics…
Opening a file/starting vi
•
To start vi, all you need to do is type "vi" (minus the quotes, always minus the quotes from
here on through)
•
Let’s say I wanted to open a file named foo.txt that resides in the same directory I am
currently in. I would type "vi foo.txt"
•
Now lets say I
•
i wanted to open inetd.conf which lives in the /etc directory. I would type "vi /etc/inetd.conf".
The directory path to inetd.conf is always the same, no matter what directory you are in.
Quitting VI
•
First let’s make sure you are in what is called "command mode". We do this by pressing the
Esc key.
•
Now we press " : ". You should see a little prompt at the bottom of your page. Now press "q"
and hit enter.
•
If it will not let you quit, it is because you have made some changes to the file and you must
press ":", then "q!", then enter to force vi to quit (warning, this will disregard any changes you
have currently made).
•
If you would like to save the changes you have made within you vi session press ":", then
"wq", now press enter. If vi ever complains that you're trying to make changes to a read-only
file, try "w!" or "wq!".
•
If you ever have any problems with doing this or other "command mode" commands hit the
Esc key once or twice to make sure you are in command mode and try again.
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Basic command mode commands for inserting text
•
First make sure you are in command mode by pressing the Esc key and then make sure you
press ":" before you try any of the commands bellow. Please note that after you enter one of
these commands in command mode you will be put into insert mode, which will enable you to
enter new text into the file. In order to get back to command mode you will have to press the
Esc key again.
c - Add changes to file. This is a commonly used command for editing a file with vi. When this
option is invoked, you rewrite over the text you want to change by backing up over it using
the del key. Simply re-type over the text you have backed up over. When you use the left
arrow key to back up over text you can not rewrite over the text you backed up over, but just
insert new text at the point where you stopped backing up. Make sense? If not, no worries,
you'll catch on.
a - Append text after the cursor.
A - Append text at the end of the line.
d - delete text
i - Insert text before the cursor.
I - Insert text at the beginning of the line.
R - Allows you to overwrite over text.
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Appendix D: Troubleshooting Tips
HTTPS Issues
To view whether the HTTPD daemons are enabled at the Control Station and to reenable them if
necessary, type:
$ ps -e|grep httpd
If the HTTPD daemons are not running, restart the Celerra Manager by switching to root and typing:
/nas/http/nas_ezadm/etc/script restart
Are all of the Celerra VSA processes running?
To view whether the Celerra VSA daemons are enabled at the Control Station and to re-enable them,
type:
[nasadmin@csprod ~]$ ps -e|grep nas | awk ' { print $4 } ' | sort | uniq
nas_boxmonitor
nas_eventcollec
nas_eventlog
nas_mcd
nas_replicate
nas_watchdog
The complete list of daemons is shown in the Output. The output list for the server might be
different. If the daemons are not running, restart them by typing:
/etc/rc.d/init.d/nas stop
/etc/rc.d/init.d/nas start
Restart a data mover
server_cpu server_2 -reboot -monitor now
You can verify when the system is back online by using /nas/sbin/getreason
Code 5 indicates the Data Mover or blade is available.
You might also see the following codes as the Data Mover or blade restarts:
0 (reset) — Data Mover or blade performing a power on self-test (POST)
1 (DOS booted) — Data Mover or blade booting to DOS
3 (loaded) — operating system loaded and initializing
4 (ready) — operating system initialized
5 (contacted) — Data Mover or blade available
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