Photoshop Elements Help / What's new in Photoshop Elements 15
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We all enjoy capturing our enthralling memories. Adobe Photoshop Elements
15 simplifies the process of organizing and editing these moments. You can
use one-click fixes and add effects to create impressive snapshots,
collages, slideshows, cards, and scrapbook pages. Share on social media and
get the world talking.
Touch-based editing
Perspective Crop tool
New Guided Edits
Enhanced filters for effects
Photo Text
New frames and backgrounds
Effects Collage
Layer grouping and color coding
Speed Pan
Retouch photos with enhanced
tools
Painterly
Frame Creator
Adjust facial features Disable automatic creation of
Smart Objects
eLive Search
Adobe Photoshop Elements includes Elements Organizer, which helps you
organize your assets. For information about new features in Elements
Organizer, see What's new in Elements Organizer.
Try the latest Photoshop Elements | Explore Elements product suite
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Touch-based editing
Organizer and Quick Edit mode are now touch-friendly! Edit and organize photos with your fingertips. Now, you can simply tap to find,
sort, and enhance your photos in the Organizer and Quick Edit mode in your
touch-screen devices.
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New Guided Edits
Photo Text
Create cool visual text!
Now create fun text with one of your photos as the background. The new
Photo Text Guided Edit makes it easy to create text outlines filled with a photo
and add effects like emboss and drop shadow to bring the text in the spotlight.
Creatively make use
of this photo text in collages, scrapbook pages, cards,
and more. Find this new Guided Edit using Guided > Fun Edits > Photo Text. Cool visual text created with Photo Text
For detailed steps, see Guided mode - fun edits.
Effects Collage
A new way to look artistic!
With Photoshop Elements 15, you can now apply different effects to different
sections of your photograph. In a few guided steps, transform a regular photo
into an artistic collage. Photoshop Elements gives you a choice of templates
and themes. Find this new Guided Edit using Guided > Fun Edits > Effects
Collage.
Transform your photo with Effects Collage
For detailed steps, see Guided mode - fun edits.
Speed Pan
Create a dramatic action shot!
Follow the steps in the Speed Pan Guided Edit to give your photo’s subject a
panning effect by blurring the background. Use the Quick Selection tool to
select the subject of your photo and click Add Motion Blur to make the
background blurred and your subject appear in action. Quick and smart way to add speed to your photo
For detailed steps, see Guided mode - fun edits.
Painterly
Portray your photos as paintings!
Use the new Painterly Guided Edit to create unique work of art by painting
your photo with Paint Brush, adding different colored and textured canvasses,
and applying effects to your painting. Share your work of art on social media
or keep a printed copy as a memento. Find this Guided Edit using Guided >
Fun Edits > Painterly. Your photo turns into a painting with Painterly
For detailed steps, see Guided mode - fun edits.
Frame Creator
Create your own frames!
Bored of the existing choices to frame your photo? Now create frames using
any photo from your library to complement your photos using the Frame
Creator Guided Edit. You can also import frames that other Elements users have created. You can
find this new guided workflow using Guided > Special Edits > Frame Creator. Create frames to match the mood in your photos
For detailed steps, see Guided mode - special edits.
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Adjust facial features
Keep smiling!
Have you ever missed that perfect shot with a smiling face by a second? Now,
you can change frowns into smiles, adjust squinting eyes, and make other
adjustments with Photoshop Elements 15 (Enhance > Facial Features). You
can easily retouch the height, width, and other characteristics of facial
features, including lips, eyes, nose, forehead, jawbone, and chin, to get the
desired looks. Enhance any face in photos by simply adjusting the sensitivity
slider to get back your smile. Turn frowns into smiles
For detailed steps, see Retouch and correct photos.
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Perspective Crop tool
Change the perspective of your photograph!
In Expert mode, use the Perspective Crop tool to transform the perspective in
an image while cropping. This tool enables you to remove any distortion
present in an image taken from an angle rather than a straight view. You can
simply drag the corners of the bounding box of this tool or specify the
dimensions to change the perspective and remove
any distortions.
Remove distortions using the Perspective Crop Tool
For more information, see Cropping.
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Enhanced filters for effects
Have more fun with filters!
Filters are a great way to try on new looks and show off your creativity, and
now it's even easier to choose the best filter
for your photo and fine-tune the
details. You can now apply the filters directly from the Filters panel in the
Expert mode. For some filters, Photoshop Elements 15 even lets you modify
the intensity of the applied filter by simply adjusting a slider. Try a combination
of filters and effects to spruce up your photographs before sharing it with
family and friends.
One photo and many new looks with filters
For more information, see Filters.
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New frames and backgrounds
Photoshop Elements 15 brings to you more than 100 new frames and
backgrounds that are ready for use. Select By Type in the Graphics panel in
Expert mode to use fresh graphical additions for enhancing your photographs.
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Layer grouping and color coding
Photoshop Elements 15 comes with enhancements to help you manage your
layers better. You can now group layers and color-code layers and layer
groups.
Grouping layers helps you organize the different components of your projects
and keeps your Layers panel uncluttered.
Color coding layers and groups helps you locate related layers in the
Layers
panel. Simply right-click the layer or group to select a color.
For more information, see Creating layers.
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Retouch photos with enhanced tools
The Healing Brush and Spot Healing Brush tools are now enhanced for better
performance.
The enhanced Content-aware Move Tool now allows you to adjust the
scale and rotation of the object that you are moving or the area that you
are extending. For more information, see Retouch and correct photos.
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Disable automatic creation of Smart Objects
Photoshop Elements preferences (Edit > Preferences > General) now
includes an option to disable automatic creation of Smart Objects when you
place or drag images from the photo bin.
For more information, see Edit preferences.
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eLive Search
Need help?
Find your answers directly in the eLive view. Photoshop
Elements 15 enables you to search for eLive content, Help pages, and
troubleshooting articles from within the eLive view. For more information, see eLive. Twitter™ and Facebook posts are not covered under the terms of Creative
Commons.
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Photoshop Elements Help / Guided mode - Fun edits
Adobe Community Help
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Applies to
Photoshop Elements
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The Guided
mode provides you with guided edits - a wizard-like interface to
accomplish certain predefined effects. Each guided edit has an associated
image. As you move the mouse horizontally over the image, the
portion to the
left of the slider displays the image before the effect is applied. The portion to
the right of the slider displays the image after the effect is applied.
Covered in this article
Effects Collage Guided Edit
Old Fashioned Photo Guided Edit
Out of Bounds Guided Edit
Painterly Guided Edit
Photo Text Guided Edit
Picture Stack Guided Edit
Pop Art Guided Edit
Puzzle Effect Guided Edit
Reflection Guided Edit
Speed Effect Guided Edit
Show All
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Effects Collage Guided Edit
Introduced in Photoshop Elements 15
The Effects Collage Guided Edit helps you apply effects to different sections
of your photograph. Take a regular image and apply multiple effects to it to
make an eye-popping piece of contemporary art.
1. Open a photograph in Photoshop Elements.
2. Click Guided > Fun Edits > Effects Collage.
3. Select how many sections you want on your photo. Options are 2, 3, and
4.
4. Select from the available options for a layout.
Photo with a layout applied.
5. Choose a collage style. Scroll through the thumbnails to pick and apply
the right combination of effects.
6. (Optional) Use the Opacity slider to vary the intensity of the effects
applied to the photo.
Photo with a layout, layout style, and effects collage applied.
7. After you get the desired result, click Next to choose how you would like
to proceed:
Save - Save / Save As: Preserve the newly created image in any of
the available formats.
Continue editing - In Quick / In Expert: Choose where you would like
to continue working on the image - in Quick mode or Expert mode.
Share - Facebook / Flickr / Twitter / SmugMug Gallery: Choose to
place your image online through one of the social or sharing services
available in Photoshop Elements.
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Old Fashioned Photo Guided Edit
For more information on the features used in this Guided Edit, see Using the
Effects panel, Specify the opacity of a layer, and About Levels adjustments.
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Out of Bounds Guided Edit
The Out Of Bounds option in Guided Edit helps you add a frame to an image
and display a selected part of the image outside the frame.
A. Original image B.
After adding a frame C.
After selecting the part to
extend D.
Final image
1. In the Guided Edits panel, select Out Of Bounds.
2. Click Add Frame to add a frame to the image.
3. Drag the corners of the frame to leave a part of the main
subject outside
the frame.
4. Add a perspective by pressing Control + Alt + Shift (Command + Option +
Shift in Mac OS) and dragging the handles of the frame. Click Commit.
5. Adjust the width of the frame border by dragging the boundaries. Click
Commit.
6. Using the Quick Selection tool, select the part of the image that should
extend outside the frame.
7. Click Out of Bounds Effect.
8. (Optional) Add a shadow.
9. (Optional) Click Add A Background Gradient.
10. Click Next to move to the Share panel or Cancel to close Out of
Bounds Guided Edit.
The Share panel is displayed to the right of your picture. In this panel, you
can save the picture at the same location or save it as another picture.
You
can take the picture to the Quick Edit or Expert Edit rooms. You can
also share the picture one Facebook, Flickr, or Twitter.
A (Save) & B (Save As) Save
your edited picture to a folder on your
computer. If you have not saved
the edits before, you will be asked to
pick a folder on your computer where you want to save your picture.
Use the Save As option to save the edited picture to another folder or by
another name.
The JPEG Options dialog allows you to select some advanced image
formatting options. If you don't want to make any special changes, click
OK to accept the settings that are applied by PhotoShop Elements.
C (In Quick) & D (In Expert) Take
your picture to the Quick Edit or
Expert Edit rooms. This means that you have make edits in the Guided
Edit room and then make some more adjustments in the Quick and
Expert rooms.
E (Facebook), F (Flickr), & G (Twitter( Share
your freshly edited picture
with your family and friends on Facebook or
Twitter. Or upload you
pictures to Flickr where you can create photo albums that you can share.
Note: For Facebook, Flickr, and Twitter,
PhotoShop Elements will ask
you to allow it to post your pictures to their websites. However, this is a
one-time activity for each of them.
11. Click Done.
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Painterly Guided Edit
Introduced in Photoshop Elements 15
Painterly is a
way to create artistic output by painting your photo with a brush
on different textured canvasses and applying different painting effects. Find
this Guided Edit in Guided > Fun Edits > Painterly.
1. Open a photograph in Photoshop Elements.
2. Click Guided > Fun Edits > Painterly.
3. Click Paint Brush. You are about to select the area of the photo that you
will work on for the rest of this task.
Show / Hide. Use Show to paint over areas you want to reveal. Use
Hide to paint over areas you want to hide.
Presets. Choose the kind of brush you want to use to create the right
effect for your painting.
Size. Use the Size slider to determine the size of brush strokes on
your photo. Opacity. Use the opacity slider to determine the intensity of the
original revealed upon painting with the brush.
Brush Angle. Use the Brush Angle control to rotate the brush.
Paint over the areas that you want to reveal in your painting.
4. Select a canvas color for the rest of the photo. You can choose from the
available colors - Black or White. However, you can also click Select
Custom Color and click anywhere on the revealed part of the photo to
pick a different color.
A custom canvas color has been applied.
5. (Optional) Select a texture for the canvas (the background).
6. To accentuate the texture, click Effect and apply an effect.
Your painting with a texture and effect applied.
7. After you get the desired result, click Next to choose how you would like
to proceed:
Save - Save / Save As: Preserve the newly-created image in any of
the available formats.
Continue editing - In Quick / In Expert: Choose where you would like
to continue working on the image - in Quick mode or Expert mode.
Share - Facebook / Flickr / Twitter / SmugMug Gallery: Choose to
place your image online through one of the social or sharing services
available in Photoshop Elements.
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Photo Text Guided Edit
Introduced in Photoshop Elements 15
The Photo Text Guided Edit allows you to use one of your photos to create
cool visual text. Use any photo as a background, and when you use the Photo
Text Guided Edit, you can get fun text that is stenciled on to your photo. 1. Open a photograph in Photoshop Elements.
2. Click Guided > Fun Edits > Photo Text.
3. Click Type Tool, click anywhere on the photo, and then type your text.
You can change the font, size, and style of the text from the Tool Options
bar in the Guided workspace. When you are done typing, click the green
check
mark to commit your changes.
4. Choose if you want to resize the text on your photo using the Fit or Fill
options.
Fit: Expands the text to fit across the width of the photo. The aspect
ratio of the font is maintained.
Fill: Expands the text to cover the height and width of the photo.
5. Select a background style for the photo text. Choose from Black, White,
or Clear.
Photo Text, with a clear background.
6. Click Crop Image to remove any extra space around the text.
Move your text to the position of your choice on the image, before
clicking Crop Image.
7. Apply effects
to your text using one of the three presets. Choose from
Small, Medium,
or Large. The buttons vary the Bevel, Drop Shadow, and
Strokes of your text.
To modify the Bevel, Drop Shadow, and Stroke to suit your
requirements, click Advanced and continue modifying the applied
effects.
8. After you get the desired result, click Next to choose how you would like
to proceed:
Save - Save / Save As: Preserve the newly-created image in any of
the available formats.
Continue editing - In Quick / In Expert: Choose where you would like
to continue working on the image - in Quick mode or Expert mode.
Share - Facebook / Flickr / Twitter / SmugMug Gallery: Choose to
place your image online through one of the social or sharing services
available in Photoshop Elements.
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Picture Stack Guided Edit
The Picture Stack Guided Edit helps you add frames to your photo, giving it an
outlook of a creative collage.
1. Open a photograph in Photoshop Elements.
2. Click Guided > Fun Edits > Picture Stack.
3. Select the number of pictures you want in your photo collage from the
available options.
4. Add a border to your pictures using one of the three presets. Choose from
Small, Medium, or Large.
5. Click one of the following buttons to change the background:
Gradient
Solid Color
In the dialog box, specify the color, blending mode, and opacity. Click
OK. 6. After you get the desired result, click Next to choose how you would like
to proceed:
Save - Save / Save As: Preserve the newly-created image in any of
the available formats.
Continue editing - In Quick / In Expert: Choose where you would like
to continue working on the image - in Quick mode or Expert mode.
Share - Facebook / Flickr / Twitter / SmugMug Gallery: Choose to
place your image online through one of the social or sharing services
available in Photoshop Elements.
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Pop Art Guided Edit
In Guided Edit, transform an image into pop art in three simple steps. What’s
more, you have a choice of two styles.
1. In Guided mode, select Pop Art.
2. Choose a style and follow the onscreen instructions:
Style A Convert the image mode, add color, and duplicate the image
with different pop colors.
Style B Posterize the image, add a neon glow, and duplicate the image
with different pop colors.
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Puzzle Effect Guided Edit
Introduced in Photoshop Elements 12
The new Puzzle Effect Guided Edit creates the visual effect of a photograph
being created by putting together pieces of a puzzle. With the Guided Edit,
you can extract a few pieces of the puzzle from their slots, and move them
around to simulate the feel of an unfinished puzzle
The Puzzle Effect Guided Edit enables you to leave a few tiles out of place, to
render a realistic view of a puzzle.
1. Click Small, Medium, or Large, to select the size of the tiles that your
photo will be sliced into.
2. To make the puzzle look real, you can select a few tiles to be out of their
intended place. Click Select Puzzle Piece Button, and then click on a tile
in the puzzle. The tile is selected.
3. Click Extract Piece to displace the selected tile. The Move Tool is
automatically selected.
4. Drag the selected tile around to any location on the canvas, or use the
handles to rotate or scale it.
Repeat steps 2, 3, and 4, to extract and move around multiple tiles.
5. (Optional) Click Eraser Tool to remove any unnecessary artifacts that
may have been introduced as a result of applying this Guided Edit.
6. Click Next to move to the Share panel or Cancel to close Pop Art Guided
Edit.
The Share panel is displayed to the right of your picture. In this panel, you
can save the picture at the same location or save it as another picture.
You
can take the picture to the Quick Edit or Expert Edit rooms. You can
also share the picture one Facebook, Flickr, or Twitter.
A (Save) & B (Save As) Save
your edited picture to a folder on your
computer. If you have not saved
the edits before, you will be asked to
pick a folder on your computer where you want to save your picture.
Use the Save As option to save the edited picture to another folder or by
another name.
The JPEG Options dialog allows you to select some advanced image
formatting options. If you don't want to make any special changes, click
OK to accept the settings that are applied by PhotoShop Elements.
C (In Quick) & D (In Expert) Take
your picture to the Quick Edit or
Expert Edit rooms. This means that you have make edits in the Guided
Edit room and then make some more adjustments in the Quick and
Expert rooms.
E (Facebook), F (Flickr), & G (Twitter( Share
your freshly edited picture
with your family and friends on Facebook or
Twitter. Or upload you
pictures to Flickr where you can create photo albums that you can share.
Note: For Facebook, Flickr, and Twitter,
PhotoShop Elements will ask
you to allow it to post your pictures to their websites. However, this is a
one-time activity for each of them.
7. Click Done.
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Reflection Guided Edit
In Guided Edit, choose a predefined reflection effect and apply it to an image
in a few steps.
For best results, avoid skipping a step or performing the steps in a random
order.
1. In Guided mode, select Reflection.
2. Click Add Reflection to create an inverted duplicate layer.
3. Click Eyedropper tool, to choose the background color for reflection.
4. Choose a color from the image and click Fill Background.
5. Click one of the following buttons to apply a reflection type:
Floor Reflection
Glass Reflection
Water Reflection
6. (Optional) Adjust the intensity of reflection.
7. (Optional) Click Add Distortion to distort the reflection in a realistic way.
8. (Optional) Click Crop Tool to remove unnecessary areas.
9. (Optional) Click Gradient Tool and drag a gradient line from the bottom of
the reflection to the bottom of the image.
10. After you get the desired result, click Next to choose how you would like
to proceed:
Save - Save / Save As: Preserve the newly-created image in any of
the available formats.
Continue editing - In Quick / In Expert: Choose where you would like
to continue working on the image - in Quick mode or Expert mode.
Share - Facebook / Flickr / Twitter / SmugMug Gallery: Choose to
place your image online through one of the social or sharing services
available in Photoshop Elements.
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Speed Effect Guided Edit
Introduced in Photoshop Elements 14
Infuse an object with the illusion of motion and speed using the Speed Effect
Guided Edit.
1. Select an image in the Photo Bin, and then choose Guided room > Fun
Edits > Speed Effect.
2. Use the Quick
Selection Tool to select the portion of the image or an
object in your picture that you want to provide a sense of motion to. Use
the Add or Subtract buttons to add to or refine your selection.
Use the Brush Size slider to select large objects quickly or select
smaller objects more carefully.
3. Click Add Speed Effect to introduce the illusion of a moving object. If the
object
is not exactly horizontal or vertical, use the Angle control to provide
a direction to the speed effect.
4. Click Add Focus Area to remove portions of the effect applied. For
example, if the
effect is applied to the image in the projection path of a
selected object, paint that path. The effect should noticeably reduce in
that area of the image. Repeat until the speed effect is only in the regions
you would like it to appear.
5. Click Refine Effect, and then add or remove the motion blur effect to the
selected objects.
The Size slider controls the thickness of swathes drawn.
The Opacity slider controls the density of swathes drawn. Choose to
make the motion starkly apparent or subtle.
6. After you get the desired result, click Next to choose how you would like
to proceed:
Save - Save / Save As: Preserve the newly-created image in any of
the available formats.
Continue editing - In Quick / In Expert: Choose where you would like
to continue working on the image - in Quick mode or Expert mode.
Share - Facebook / Flickr / Twitter / SmugMug Gallery: Choose to
place your image online through one of the social or sharing services
available in Photoshop Elements.
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Speed Pan Guided Edit
Introduced in Photoshop Elements 15
The Speed Pan
Guided Edit is a great way to add a sense of motion to your
photo’s subject by blurring the background. Here's how:
1. Open a photograph in Photoshop Elements.
2. Click Guided > Fun Edits > Speed Pan.
3. Click Quick Selection Tool, and then select the object in the photograph
that must appear to be moving.
Add. Add areas to the object selection.
Subtract. Remove areas that must be part of the background that
must appear with motion blur.
Brush Size. Use the slider to set the size of the brush.
Mark your selection with the Quick Selection Tool
4. Click Add Motion Blur, to introduce the sense of movement in the photo.
Intensity. Use the Intensity slider to vary the amount of blur
introduced in the image. Angle. Use the Angle control to vary the direction of the perceived
motion.
The Speed Pan effect applied at an approximate angle of 115 degrees.
5. (Optional) Use the Refine Effect Brush to fine-tune the amount of motion
blur applied to the photo.
6. After you get the desired result, click Next to choose how you would like
to proceed:
Save - Save / Save As: Preserve the newly-created image in any of
the available formats.
Continue editing - In Quick / In Expert: Choose where you would like
to continue working on the image - in Quick mode or Expert mode.
Share - Facebook / Flickr / Twitter / SmugMug Gallery: Choose to
place your image online through one of the social or sharing services
available in Photoshop Elements.
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Zoom Burst Effect Guided Edit
Introduced in Photoshop Elements 12
The Zoom Burst
effect creates the illusion of motion, with attention drawn to
the central object in your photograph. This effect can, generally, be produced
manually by zooming in on an object, while the shutter is open.
1. Use the Crop tool, to crop your image in a way that enables your primary
object to be in focus .
2. Use the Zoom Burst button, to apply a selective radial blur effect to your
image. This effect provides the illusion of motion.
3. Use the Add Focus Area
button, to add an area of focus on the image.
This button provides a gradient tool. Drag the gradient tool on the part of
image you want to bring in focus.
Add more focus areas if you would like more than one portion of the
photo to appear in focus.
4. Use the Apply Vignette button to automatically apply a vignetted effect.
This helps to intensify the appearance of the Guided Edit.
5. After you get the desired result, click Next to choose how you would like
to proceed:
Save - Save / Save As: Preserve the newly-created image in any of
the available formats.
Continue editing - In Quick / In Expert: Choose where you would like
to continue working on the image - in Quick mode or Expert mode.
Share - Facebook / Flickr / Twitter / SmugMug Gallery: Choose to
place your image online through one of the social or sharing services
available in Photoshop Elements.
Twitter™ and Facebook posts are not covered under the terms of Creative
Commons.
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Photoshop Elements Help / Guided mode - Special edits
Adobe Community Help
Search
Applies to
Photoshop Elements
Contact support
The Guided
mode provides you with guided edits - a wizard-like interface to
accomplish certain predefined effects. Each guided edit has an associated
image. As you move the mouse horizontally over the image, the
portion to the
left of the slider displays the image before the effect is applied. The portion to
the right of the slider displays the image after the effect is applied.
Depth of Field effect
Frame Creator
Import a shared frame
Orton Effect Guided Effect
Recompose Guided Edit
Perfect Portrait Guided Edit
Restore Old Photo Guided Edit
Show All
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Depth of Field effect
The Depth of Field effect allows you to focus on selected areas of the image
by blurring out the rest of the image.
Simple method
In this method, a copy of the background layer is created
and a uniform blur
applied to it. Choose selected areas that you
want to focus on. You can
customize the degree of blur applied to
the rest of the image.
1. In Guided mode, from the Special Edits section, click Depth of Field.
2. Click Simple.
3. Click Add Blur. A uniform blur appears across the image.
4. To define areas of focus, click Add Focus Area and drag the cursor
across areas of the image you want to focus on.
5. To customize the blur for the rest of the image, drag the Blur slider until
you achieve the desired blur effect.
6. After you get the desired result, click Next to choose how you would like
to proceed:
Save - Save / Save As: Preserve the newly-created image in any of
the available formats.
Continue editing - In Quick / In Expert: Choose where you would like
to continue working on the image - in Quick mode or Expert mode.
Share - Facebook / Flickr / Twitter / SmugMug Gallery: Choose to
place your image online through one of the social or sharing services
available in Photoshop Elements.
Custom method
In this method, you choose the objects you want to focus
on using the quick
selection tool. The blur is applied to unselected
areas of the image. You can
customize the degree of blur applied
to the rest of the image.
1. In Guided mode, from the Special Edits section, click Depth of Field.
2. Click Custom.
3. Click the Quick Selection tool and move over areas of the image you want
to focus on.
4. Click Add Blur. A uniform blur is applied to the rest of the image.
5. To customize the blur for the rest of the image, drag the Blur slider until
you achieve the desired blur effect.
6. After you get the desired result, click Next to choose how you would like
to proceed:
Save - Save / Save As: Preserve the newly-created image in any of
the available formats.
Continue editing - In Quick / In Expert: Choose where you would like
to continue working on the image - in Quick mode or Expert mode.
Share - Facebook / Flickr / Twitter / SmugMug Gallery: Choose to
place your image online through one of the social or sharing services
available in Photoshop Elements.
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Frame Creator
Introduced in Photoshop Elements 15
You can now create a photo frame using any photo that you have in your
library. Use the Frame Creator guided edit to quickly create a custom frame to
outline your photos. 1. Open a photograph in Photoshop Elements.
2. Click Guided > Special > Frame Creator.
3. Select an area on the photo where other photos can be placed by using
one of the following selection tools:
Quick. Easily select large areas by dragging the tool across the
photo.
Brush. Paint over areas of the photo where photos can be inserted.
Magic Wand. Click areas of the photo where photos can be inserted.
Polygon Lasso. Click the corners of the areas where a photo can be
inserted.
Use a tool to make a selection.
4. Click Create Frame to create the frame. The part of the photo selected in
the previous step is subtracted from the original photo to create the
frame.
5. Click Save Frame. Provide a meaningful name for your new frame.
6. Click Continue in Expert to make further modifications to the frame, or to
start using it.
Use the frame right away!
All frames you created are available in Expert mode > Graphics panel.
Use the Filters By Type > Frames > My Frames to filter the frames you
created.
7. Click or drag a photo to place it in the frame.
Add a photo to the frame.
You can share your custom frames with others from the Graphics
panel in the Expert mode. Use the filters By Type > Frames > My
Frames. Right click on the frame that you want to share and select
Reveal in Explorer.
Import a shared frame
Not only can you now create fun, customized frames that speak your story,
you can also import frames that other Elements users have created.
Import a frame in a few simple steps:
1. In Photoshop Elements, switch to Expert mode.
2. Click Graphics, and then from the fly-out menu, click Add Frame.
3. Select the PSD file that represents the frame you are importing, and then
click Load.
View an imported frame:
1. In Expert mode, click Graphics.
2. From the drop-downs available in the right panel, choose By Type >
Frames > My Frames.
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Orton Effect Guided Effect
The Orton effect provides a dreamy effect to your photographs.
1. In Guided mode, from the Special Edits section, click Orton Effect.
2. In the Create Orton Effect panel, click Add Orton Effect.
3. Edit the following parameters according to your requirements:
Increase Blur
Specifies the amount of blur in the out-of-focus layer.
Increase Noise
Adds noise to the blurred layer.
Apply Brightness
Increases brightness of the blurred layer.
4. After you get the desired result, click Next to choose how you would like
to proceed:
Save - Save / Save As: Preserve the newly-created image in any of
the available formats.
Continue editing - In Quick / In Expert: Choose where you would like
to continue working on the image - in Quick mode or Expert mode.
Share - Facebook / Flickr / Twitter / SmugMug Gallery: Choose to
place your image online through one of the social or sharing services
available in Photoshop Elements.
Use the zoom option in the editor to identify
how the effect is applied to
different areas of the photograph.
To the top
Recompose Guided Edit
For more information on the features used in the Recompose Photo Guided
Edit, see Recomposing.
To the top
Perfect Portrait Guided Edit
In Guided Edit, create a perfect portrait by removing blemishes and enhancing
various parts of the image with easy-to-use tools.
1. In Guided mode, from the Special Edits section, click Perfect Portrait.
2. Enhance the texture of the skin.
a. Click Apply Smart Blur to smoothen the skin and remove wrinkles.
For information about Smart Blur controls, see Smart Blur.
b. Click Reveal Original. When the original skin is revealed from
beneath the blurred skin, use the Blur brush to brush in the smooth
skin where it is required.
c. Click Increase Contrast to add clarity.
3. Enhance facial features.
a. Click Spot Healing Tool to fix small flaws. For help with using the
Spot Healing brush, see Remove spots and small imperfections.
b. Click Red Eye Removal Tool to precisely remove red eye. See
Precisely remove red eye.
c. Click Brighten Eyes to brighten the eyes.
d. Click Darken Eyebrows to darken the eye lashes and eye brows. See
Quickly lighten or darken isolated areas.
e. Click White Teeth Tool to brighten the smile.
4. Add special touch-ups.
a. Click Add Glow. Adjust the sliders until you achieve the desired
results.
b. Click Slim.
Note: Each click intensifies the effect.
5. After you get the desired result, click Next to choose how you would like
to proceed:
Save - Save / Save As: Preserve the newly-created image in any of
the available formats.
Continue editing - In Quick / In Expert: Choose where you would like
to continue working on the image - in Quick mode or Expert mode.
Share - Facebook / Flickr / Twitter / SmugMug Gallery: Choose to
place your image online through one of the social or sharing services
available in Photoshop Elements.
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Restore Old Photo Guided Edit
Photographs, over time, may get damaged due to the effects of the weather,
quality of
paper, or neglect. After digitization of a damaged photograph,
various tools can be used to restore the image to remove cracks,
discoloration, smudges, or other imperfections. The Restore Old Photo
guided
edit takes you through a step-by-step process, and presents you with all the
tools you need to restore an image in one workflow.
1. Use the Crop (C) tool and the rotate cropping frame to decide on the
section of the photograph that you would like to restore.
2. Use the Spot Healing tool to repair smaller spots, lines, and tears.
3. Use the Healing Brush
tool to heal a damaged part of an image with an
undamaged section of the same photograph. Press Alt + Click a suitable
part of the image, and
then drag the portion to the damaged part of the
image.
4. Use the Clone Stamp
tool to copy one part of an image to another. To
repair portions, press
Alt + click the source area, and then drag on the
damaged area.
5. Use the Blur tool to smooth the areas where there is undesirable
granulation of the photo.
6. Use the Dust Remover tool to heal smaller lines, dust impressions, and
other imperfections.
7. Use the available buttons to apply corrections related to levels, contrast,
and color. You can also convert the photo into a black and white image in
a single click.
8. Use the Sharpen tool to enhance the clarity of the final output.
9. After you get the desired result, click Next to choose how you would like
to proceed:
Save - Save / Save As: Preserve the newly-created image in any of
the available formats.
Continue editing - In Quick / In Expert: Choose where you would like
to continue working on the image - in Quick mode or Expert mode.
Share - Facebook / Flickr / Twitter / SmugMug Gallery: Choose to
place your image online through one of the social or sharing services
available in Photoshop Elements.
To the top
Scratches and blemishes
Use the Touch
Up Photo Guided Edit to fix (large or small) flaws in an image
(using the Healing Brush or the Spot Healing Brush).
You can view the after image only, or view both the before and after images
either vertically or horizontally.
For more on correcting color casts, see Fix large imperfections or Remove
spots and small imperfections.
To the top
Tilt-Shift Guided Edit
Apply the tilt-shift effect to focus attention on certain
aspect or object in your
photo, while selectively taking focus away
from other things in your photo. The
tilt-shift effect also causes
a pseudo-miniature effect to be formed on the
photo.
Picture before applying the tilt-shift effect (left), and
after
1. Open a photo, and in the Guided Edits panel click Photo Effects > TiltShift.
2. Click Add Tilt-Shift to apply the basic effect to the photo. The photo will
appear blurred out.
3. Click Modify Focus Area and then click and drag across the image to
specify the areas that you would like to appear in sharp focus.
4. To experiment with more effects, click Refine Effect and modify:
Blur: Increase the intensity of blur applied to the photo.
Contrast: Increases or decreases the contrast levels of the photo.
Saturation: Increases or decreases the color saturation levels of the
photo
5. After you get the desired result, click Next to choose how you would like
to proceed:
Save - Save / Save As: Preserve the newly-created image in any of
the available formats.
Continue editing - In Quick / In Expert: Choose where you would like
to continue working on the image - in Quick mode or Expert mode.
Share - Facebook / Flickr / Twitter / SmugMug Gallery: Choose to
place your image online through one of the social or sharing services
available in Photoshop Elements.
Twitter™ and Facebook posts are not covered under the terms of Creative
Commons.
Photoshop Elements Help / Retouch and correct photos
Adobe Community Help
Search
Adjust facial features
Precisely remove red eye
Applies to
Photoshop Elements
Contact support
Remove the Pet Eye effect
Move and reposition objects Remove spots and unwanted objects
Fix large imperfections
Correct camera distortion
Show All
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Adjust facial features
Introduced in Photoshop Elements 15
The Adjust Facial Features workflow uses face-aware technology to identify
and adjust facial characteristics of people in a photograph. You can take a
portrait picture and adjust facial features like the jaw, nose, lips, and eyes by
using simple sliders to increase or decrease an effect.
1. Open a photo in Photoshop Elements.
For Adjust Facial Features to work well, ensure that there are one or
more faces in the photograph that you are using.
2. Click Enhance > Adjust Facial Features.
3. In the Adjust
Facial Features dialog, you will notice that the face of the
person is marked with a circular highlighter to indicate that the face-aware
feature has found a face in the picture.
More than one face in the picture?
If there are more than one faces
in the picture, there will be multiple
circular highlighters indicating
where Photoshop Elements was able to detect faces. Click a ring or a
face to adjust the features of that face. Select a face and adjust the facial characteristics of a person
4. For a selected face, you can adjust the following features using the
available sliders:
Feature
Characteristics
Lips
Smile, Height, Width, Upper lip, Lower lip
Eyes
Height, Width, Size, Tilt, Distance
Nose
Height, Width
Face
Width, Forehead height, Jawbone shape, Chin
height
Click the Before/After toggle button to review the changes caused by
moving the sliders left or right.
Move the sliders to make effect changes on the face.
5. (Optional)
To reset edits to a particular characteristic, double-click the
slider.
Modifications for that characteristic are canceled.
6. Do one of the following:
To cancel the set of modifications you have made to facial features,
click Reset.
To apply the modifications made to the facial features, click OK.
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Precisely remove red eye
Red eye is a common issue that occurs when your photo subject's retina is
illuminated
by your camera's flash. You’ll see it more often when taking
pictures in a darkened room because the subject’s iris is wide open. To avoid
red eye, use the camera’s red-eye reduction feature, if available.
To automatically fix red eye when you import photos into the Elements
Organizer, select Automatically Fix Red Eyes in the Get Photos dialog box.
You can also remove red eye from selected photos in the Photo Browser.
Correct red eye by selecting an eye (top) or clicking an eye
(center).
1. To manually fix red eye, select the Red Eye Removal tool
Expert modes.
in Quick or
2. In the Tool Options bar, set the Pupil Radius and Darken Amount.
3. In the image, do one of the following:
Click a red area of an eye.
Draw a selection over the eye area.
When you release the mouse button, the red is removed from the eyes.
Note: You can also automatically fix red eye by clicking Auto Correct in
the Red Eye Removal tool options bar.
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Remove the Pet Eye effect
The red-eye removal tool enables you to remove the reddish glow in the eyes,
due to reflection of light (resulting from low ambient light or the use of a flash).
For animals, the eyes glow white, green, red, or yellow, and the
often-used
red-eye removal tools may not fix the effect correctly.
Golden retriever with the pet eye effect (left), and after applying the Pet Eye
tool (right)
To fix the Pet Eye effect:
1. In the Quick or Expert mode, select the Red Eye Removal Tool.
2. In the Tool Options bar, select the Pet Eye check box.
3. Do one of the following using a mouse:
Draw a rectangle around the eye region.
Click on the eye in the picture.
Note: When you select the Pet Eye check box, the Auto Correct button is
disabled.
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Move and reposition objects
The Content-Aware Move tool allows you to select an object in your
photograph and move the selection to a different location, or extend it.
The original photograph (left);
the kite has been positioned closer to the
ground (middle);
the kite has been moved higher into the sky (right).
Video: Moving objects with Content Aware Move
Easily move objects in a photo and let the background automatically fill
in.
by Adobe TV
1. Select the Content-Aware Move tool
.
2. Choose a mode to specify whether you want to move an object or create
a copy of the object.
Move Enables you to move objects to a different location in the image.
Extend Enables you to replicate the object multiple times.
3. Choose the type of selection you want to make:
New Drag your mouse around the object you want to move, or extend to
create a new selection.
Add Any selection you make adds to the previous selection.
Subtract When you make a new selection over an existing selection, the
overlapping portion is removed from the resulting selection.
Intersect When
you make a new selection over an existing selection,
only the common area overlapping the new and old selection continues to
be selected.
4. Drag the mouse pointer (
to move or extend.
) over the image, select the object you want
Drag the mouse around the object you want to select
5. When you have made a selection, move the object to a new location. To
do this, click and drag the object to a new location.
The area where the selection is moved from is automatically filled, based
on the image content surrounding the area.
6. Transform your selection at the new location. Click one of the following
options:
Rotate Enables you to rotate your selection to a different angle in the
image.
Scale Enables you to adjust the size of your selection.
Skew Enables you to change the perspective of your selection in the
image.
7. If the automatically-filled area does not appear correct, select the Sample
All Layers check box and adjust the Healing slider.
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Remove spots and unwanted objects
Photoshop Elements has several tools you can use to remove small flaws,
such as spots or unwanted objects, from your images.
Remove spots and small imperfections
The Spot Healing Brush
quickly removes blemishes and other imperfections
from your photos. You
can either click once on a blemish, or drag to smooth
away imperfections in an area.
Easily remove spots or imperfections using the Spot Healing
Brush tool.
1. Select the Spot Healing Brush tool
.
2. Choose a brush size. A brush that is slightly larger
than the area you want
to fix works best so that you can cover the
entire area with one click.
3. Choose one of the following Type options in the Tool Options bar.
Proximity Match Uses
the pixels around the edge of the selection to find
an image area to use as a patch for the selected area. If this option
doesn’t provide a satisfactory fix, choose Edit > Undo, and try the Create
Texture option.
Create Texture Uses
all the pixels in a selection to create a texture for
fixing the area. If the texture doesn’t work, try dragging through the area a
second time.
Note: Click Sample All Layers to apply your change to all layers of the
image.
4. Click the area you want to fix in the image, or click
and drag over a larger
area.
Remove unwanted objects with content-aware
healing
You can remove unwanted objects or figures from your photos without
destroying the photos. Using the Content-Aware option with the Spot Healing
Brush
tool, you can remove selected objects from a photo. Photoshop
Elements compares nearby image content to seamlessly fill the selection,
realistically maintaining key details such as shadows and object edges.
Image before and after an unwanted object (the brush) is removed
with
content-aware fill.
To remove an unwanted object:
1. Select the Spot Healing Brush tool
.
2. Select Content-Aware in the Tool Options bar.
3. Paint over the object that you want to remove from the image.
Spot healing works best on small objects. If the image you're working on is
large and
has a large unwanted object, make sure that you work with high-end
computer configuration. You can see the Photoshop Elements system
requirements for the recommended computer configuration.
If you experience problems with large images, try the following approaches:
Draw smaller brush strokes at a time.
Downsample the image.
Increase the RAM allocated and relaunch the application.
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Fix large imperfections
The Healing Brush
fixes large areas of imperfection when you drag over them.
You can remove objects from a uniform background, such as an object in a
field of grass.
Before and after using Healing Brush.
1. Select the Healing Brush tool
.
2. Choose a brush size from the Tool Options bar and set healing brush
options:
Mode Determines
how the source or pattern blends with existing pixels.
Normal mode lays
new pixels over the original pixels. Replace mode
preserves film grain and texture at the edges of the brush stroke. Source Sets
the source to use for repairing pixels. Sampled uses pixels
from the current image. Pattern uses pixels from the pattern you specify
in the Pattern panel.
Aligned Samples pixels continuously without losing the current sampling
point, even if you release the mouse button. Deselect Aligned to continue
using the sampled pixels from the initial sampling point each time you
stop and resume painting.
Sample All Layers Choose Sample All Layers to sample data from the
current layer,
the current layer and below, or all visible layers.
3. Position the pointer in any open image and press Alt
(Option in Mac OS)
click to sample data.
Note: If you are sampling from one image and applying to another,
both
images must be in the same color mode unless one of the images
is in
Grayscale mode.
4. Drag the image over the flaw to meld existing data with
sampled data.
The sampled pixels meld with the existing pixels each
time you release
the mouse button.
If there is a strong contrast at the edges of the area you want to heal,
make a selection before you use the Healing Brush
tool. Make the
selection bigger than the area you want to heal but precisely follow the
boundary of contrasting pixels. When you paint with
the Healing Brush
tool, the selection prevents colors from bleeding from the outside.
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Correct camera distortion
The Correct Camera Distortion
dialog box enables you to fix common lens
distortion problems, like darkened edges due to lens faults or improper lens
shading. For example,
in a picture of the sky taken in low light, the corners of
the image are darker than the center. Changing the vignette amount and
midtone settings fixes the distortion.
Adjust distortions due to vertical or horizontal camera tilt by using
the
perspective controls. Rotate an image or fix image perspective to adjust
distortions. The filter image grid for Correct Camera Distortion helps you make
easy and accurate adjustments.
Correct camera distortion
1. Choose Filter > Correct Camera Distortion.
2. Select Preview check box.
3. Set any of the following options to correct your image,
and then click OK:
Remove Distortion Corrects lens barrel or pincushion distortion. Type a
number
in the box, or move the slider to straighten horizontal and vertical
lines that bend either away from or toward the center of the image.
Vignette Amount Sets the amount of lightening or darkening along the
edges of an image. Type a number in the box, or move the slider
to
gradually shade the image.
Vignette Midpoint Specifies the width of area affected by the Amount
slider. Move the slider, or type a lower number to affect more of the
image. Type a higher number to restrict the effect to the edges of the
image.
Vertical Perspective Corrects image perspective caused by tilting the
camera up
or down. Type a number in the box or use the slider to make
vertical
lines in an image parallel.
Horizontal Perspective Type a number in the box or use the slider to
correct perspective by making horizontal lines in an image parallel.
Angle Rotates the image to correct for camera tilt or to make
adjustments after correcting perspective. Type a number in the box
or
drag the angle dial to rotate the image to the left (counterclockwise)
or
right (clockwise).
Scale Adjusts the image scale up or down. The image pixel dimensions
aren’t changed. Type a number in the box or use the slider to remove
blank areas of the image caused by pincushion, rotation, or perspective
corrections. Scaling up effectively results in cropping the image
and
interpolating up to the original pixel dimensions.
Show Grid Shows the grid when selected. Hides the grid when
deselected.
Zoom Shows a closer view when you zoom in, and shows a more
distant
view when you zoom out.
Color Specifies the grid color.
To the top
Automatically remove haze
Remove haze, fog, or smog from a photo
You can now remove the dampening effect that environmental or atmospheric
conditions
have on your pictures, particularly photos of landscapes. Using the
Auto Haze Removal feature, you can reduce the masking effect that haze, fog,
or smog creates.
To use the Auto Haze Removal feature:
1. Open an picture in Photoshop Elements, in the Quick or Expert modes.
2. With the image open, choose Enhance > Auto Haze Removal.
The image is processed and the effects of haze or fog are reduced. Repeat
Step 2, to further process the photograph.
Auto Haze Removal works better on uncompressed/raw images.
To the top
Manually remove haze
An alternative to automatic haze removal
A photograph taken under foggy
conditions
Photograph treated with Haze
Removal and additional exposure and
contrast modifications
1. Open an image in Photoshop Elements, in the Quick or Enhanced room.
2. Choose Enhance > Haze Removal.
3. Use the Haze Reduction and Sensitivity sliders to achieve the desired
level of haze reduction.
Low levels of haze removal applied
Haze removal applied until the picture is clearer
Remember that using too much of either of the sliders may result in an
image with high levels of contrast or minor imperfections in the
photograph getting magnified. Play with both sliders till you get the
right result.
4. Use the Before / After toggle button to see the effectiveness of the Haze
Reduction feature on the photo.
5. When done, click OK. To cancel Haze Removal edits to the image, click
Cancel.
See also
Automatically correct lighting and color
Adjust the color of skin tone
Fix photos with Touch Up buttons
Adjust the color of skin tone
About blending modes
About patterns
Adjust color curves
Improve shadow and highlight detail
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Photoshop Elements Help / Cropping
Adobe Community Help
Search
Crop an image
Crop to a selection boundary
Applies to
Photoshop Elements
Automatic cropping suggestions
Use guides for better cropping results
Perspective Crop tool
Key concepts in this article:
Use the Cookie Cutter tool
Change the size of the canvas
Show All
Video | Resize and crop photos
Crop
Bounding box
Canvas
by Infinite Skills
To the top
Crop an image
All key concepts
The Crop
tool removes the part of an image surrounding the crop marquee, or
selection. Cropping is useful for removing distracting background elements
and creating a focus for your photo. By default, when you crop a
photo, the
Contact support
resolution remains the same as the original photo. Using the
Photo Ratio
option allows you to view and modify the size and resolution when cropping a
photo. If you use a preset size, the resolution changes to fit the preset.
Crop a photo to remove some of the distracting background.
1. Select the Crop tool .
2. From the Tool Options bar, select a cropping guide that meets your
requirement. You can choose one of Rule of Thirds, Grid, Golden Ratio,
or None. For more information on cropping guides, see the section on
Use guides for better cropping results in this article.
3. If you want to use a resolution other than that of the original photo, select
one of the following options from the Aspect Ratio menu or specify new
custom values in the Width and Height boxes in the options bar:
No Restriction Lets you resize the image to any dimension.
Use Photo Ratio Displays the original aspect ratio of the photo when
you crop. The Width and Height boxes show the values that are used for
the cropped image. The Resolution box allows you to change the image
resolution.
Preset Size Specifies
a preset size for the cropped photo. If you want
your final output to be a specific size, such as 4 x 6 inches to fit a picture
frame, choose that preset size.
Note: When you specify values for the Width and Height boxes, the
Aspect Ratio menu changes to Custom.
4. Drag over the
part of the image you want to keep. When you release the
mouse button, the crop marquee appears as a bounding box with handles
at the corners and sides.
5. (Optional) Adjust the crop marquee by doing any of the
following:
To change the preset size or aspect ratio, choose new values from
the Aspect Ratio menu in the options bar.
To move the marquee to another position, place the pointer inside the
bounding box and click-drag, or use the arrow keys to move the
marquee.
To resize the marquee, drag a handle. (If you choose No Restriction
from the Aspect Ratio menu, you can constrain the proportions while
scaling by holding down Shift as you drag a corner handle.)
To swap Width and Height values, click the Swap icon options bar.
in the
To rotate the marquee, position the pointer outside the bounding box
(the pointer turns into a curved arrow ), and drag. (You can’t rotate
the crop marquee for an image in Bitmap mode.)
Note: You can change the color and opacity of the crop shield (the
cropped area surrounding the image) by changing the Crop tool
preferences. Choose Edit > Preferences > Display & Cursors and
specify a new Color and Opacity value in the Crop Tool area of the
Preferences dialog box. If you don’t want to see a colored shield while
cropping, deselect Use Shield.
6. Click the green Commit button located in the lower-right corner of the
marquee, or double-click the bounding box to finish the cropping. If you
want to cancel the cropping operation, click the red Cancel button press Esc.
or
Click the Commit button to accept a crop.
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Crop to a selection boundary
Using the Crop
command, you can remove the areas that fall outside the
current selection. When you crop to a selection boundary,
Photoshop Elements trims the image to the bounding box that contains the
selection. (Irregularly shaped selections, such as those made by using the
Lasso tool, are cropped to a rectangular bounding box that contains the
selection.) If you use the Crop command without first making a selection,
Photoshop Elements trims the image by 50 pixels from each visible edge.
1. Use any selection tool, such as the Rectangular Marquee tool
select the part of the image you want to keep.
, to
2. Choose Image > Crop.
To the top
Automatic cropping suggestions
Introduced in Photoshop Elements 13
The Crop tool and technique is an essential part of the photo editing workflow.
From Photoshop Elements 13, the Crop
tool automatically displays four readyto-use suggestions. You can choose the best crop for your needs from one of
them. You can also continue to crop as much as you want to, after taking one
of the four suggestions or rejecting all four suggestions.
Original image
Four suggestions, as recommended by Photoshop Elements
To use the automatic cropping suggestions:
1. Open a photograph in Photoshop Elements.
2. Choose the Crop tool. Four thumbnails displaying the automatic
suggestions are visible in the Tool Options box.
3. Click a thumbnail that you think is the best fit. However, you can look at
more suggestions when you select a different aspect ratio from the drop-
down in the tool options.
Hovering your mouse pointer on the suggestions in the Tool Options box
will present a preview of how the particular crop suggestion.
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Use guides for better cropping results
The following overlay options are available in the crop tool:
Example of Golden Ratio cropping
Rule of Thirds Breaks
the image in thirds, horizontally and vertically
(equidistant lines) into nine parts thus providing a better visual aid to decide a
crop. You
can commit or cancel a crop suggestion. The crop overlay is
decided based on the W and H options in the options bar. For example, your
main subject (A tree, person, or animal) can be at 2/3rd of the horizon
coinciding with one of the lines.
Grid Creates a grid guide on the image. Use the grid to position objects
before you crop the image.
Golden Ratio The Golden Ratio
provides a guideline for placement of
objects in a photograph. Positioning objects in the picture along the lines and
intersections of this grid makes an image visually appealing. With Golden
Ratio
grid, you can position an important part of the image. For example, an
eye or ornament or a leaf at the point of focus which is highlighted with a
concentric circle in the grid.
Use the Swap height and width icon to rotate the grid. Depending on the
aspect ratio of the crop box (tall or wide), the vertical or horizontal flip option is
displayed.
In the Tool Options bar, click Flip to flip the golden ratio grid horizontally or
vertically. The Golden Ratio crop can be rotated clockwise or counterclockwise. The behavior of the flip button is:
If crop dimensions are such that width is greater than height in crop
options bar then a horizontal flip appears (which is shown graphically) as
the button.
If crop dimensions are such that width is less than height in crop options
bar then a vertical flip button appears (which is shown graphically) as the
button.
None No crop guide overlay is displayed inside the bounding box.
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Perspective Crop tool
Introduced in Photoshop Elements 15
The Perspective Crop tool lets you transform the perspective of a picture while
cropping it. This is especially useful when you have an image with
keystone or
barrel distortion. Distortion occurs when an object is photographed from an
angle rather than from a straight on view, or when wide-angle lenses are used
to photograph a large expanse of an object. For example, if you take a picture
of a tall building from the ground level, the edges of the building appear closer
to each other at the top than they do at the bottom.
1. Open a photo in Photoshop Elements.
2. In Expert mode, from the Modify section of the toolbox, select the
Perspective Crop tool.
3. Draw a marquee around the object that you want to correct the
perspective of while cropping the image to the area of the marquee.
Marquee drawn using the Perspective Crop tool.
4. Use the corners of the selection to modify the shape of the marquee.
Hover your mouse pointer on any corner, and when the pointer turns
white, click and
move the corner.
For best results, move the corners to align the vertical edge of the
marquee with a pattern or object in the photo that should appear
vertical.
Modify the shape of the marquee to align the vertical lines in the image.
5. (Optional)
In the tool options area, provide values for the width (W),
height (H),
and the Resolution boxes. The final image is transformed to
this height, width, and resolution.
Perspective Crop tool options
to transform the perspective and crop the image to the region of
6. Click
the marquee.
Final, perspective-corrected image.
To the top
Use the Cookie Cutter tool
The Cookie Cutter
tool crops a photo into a shape that you choose. After you
drag the shape in your photo, you can move and resize the bounding box until
you have just the area you want.
Use the Cookie Cutter tool to clip a photo into a fun shape.
1. Select the Cookie Cutter tool.
2. Click the Cookie Cutter pop-up menu in the Tool Options bar, and select
a shape. To view other libraries, select a different library from the Shapes
drop-down.
3. Double-click a shape to select it.
4. Set Shape Options:
Unconstrained Draws the shape to any size or dimension.
Defined Proportions Keeps the height and width of the cropped shape
in proportion.
Defined Size Crops the photo to the exact size of the shape you chose.
Fixed Size Specifies
the exact measurements of the finished shape. The
measurements are picked up from the height and width settings that you
provide.
From Center Draws the shape from the center.
Feather Decides
how soft the edges of the finished shape must be.
Feathering softens the edges of the cropped image so that the edges
fade out and blend into
the background.
Crop Select to trim the image to the bounding box that contains the
shape created
5. Drag within the image to create the shape boundary and
move it to the
desired location in the image.
6. Click the Commit button , or press Enter to finish the cropping. If you
want to cancel the cropping operation, click the Cancel button Esc.
or press
To the top
Change the size of the canvas
The canvas is
the workspace around an existing image, within the image
window. It is the full editable area of an image. You can increase or decrease
the size of the canvas, on any side of an image. Added canvas appears in the
currently selected background color on the Background layer (by default), or
selected canvas extension color from the Canvas size window. In other layers,
the added canvas is transparent.
Increasing the size of the canvas makes room for a colored
border.
1. Choose Image > Resize > Canvas Size.
2. Do one of the following:
In the Width and Height boxes, enter the full dimensions of the new
canvas. Choose the units of measurement you want from the
adjacent drop-downs.
Select Relative, and enter the amount
by which you want to increase
or decrease the size of the canvas. Enter
a negative number to
decrease the size of the canvas. Use this option if you want to
increase the canvas by a specified amount, such as 2 inches on each
side.
3. Click an arrow on the Anchor icon to indicate the position at which the
existing image should be, on the new canvas.
4. To change the color of the added canvas, choose an option from the
Canvas Extension Color menu and click OK.
To the top
Straighten an image
Camera shake may cause an image to be improperly aligned. For example,
the horizon in
the picture of a sunset may not be perfectly horizontal. In
Photoshop Elements, you can realign the photo to cause the horizon to be
perfectly horizontal. You can use the Straighten
tool (P) to realign an image
vertically or horizontally. If necessary, choose to also automatically resize or
crops the canvas to accommodate straightening of the image.
In Quick mode, with the Straighten tool (P) active, simply draw a line along
the horizon (if visible). If not visible, draw a line that you consider must
represent the horizontal axis of the photo.
The photo is straightened, and depending on the option you chose, any
empty edges created are automatically filled.
Manually straighten an image in Expert mode
1. Select the Straighten tool.
2. Choose from the available option buttons:
Grow Or Shrink Canvas To Fit Resizes
the canvas to fit the rotated
image. Straightening causes corners of the image to fall outside the
current canvas. The straightened image will contain areas of blank
background, but no pixels are clipped.
Crop To Remove Background Crops the image to remove any blank
background area that becomes visible after straightening. Some pixels
will be clipped.
Crop To Original Size Keeps
the canvas the same size as the original
image. The straightened image will include areas of blank background
and some pixels will be clipped.
Straightening and cropping to remove the background
Note: The three straighten options are enabled when the Rotate All
Layers options is enabled.
3. To straighten the image, do one of the following:
To align horizontally, draw a line along an edge that should be
horizontal. For example, you may have the image of a train with an
improperly aligned horizon. Draw a horizontal line parallel to the train.
To align vertically, draw a line along an edge that should be vertical.
For example, you may have the image of a tower that is improperly
aligned. Draw a vertical line parallel to the tower.
Automatically fill empty edges
The Straighten
tool has an enhanced option to automatically fill the edges with
relevant image data intelligently, instead of filling in background color or
transparent pixels.
The Autofill edges option is available only in the Grow or Shrink and Original
Size modes. Before you draw a line to enable image straightening, select the
Autofill edges checkbox. When you draw the line, any gaps created along the
edges of the photo are automatically and intelligently filled.
Manually straighten an image in Quick mode
1. Select the Straighten tool.
2. Choose from the available option buttons:
Maintain Canvas Size Resizes
the canvas to fit the rotated image.
Straightening causes corners of the image to fall outside the current
canvas. The straightened image will contain areas of blank background,
but no pixels are clipped.
Maintain Image Size Resizes the image to remove any blank
background area that becomes visible after straightening. Some pixels
will be clipped.
3. To straighten the image, do one of the following:
To align horizontally, draw a line along an edge that should be
horizontal. For example, you may have the image of a train with an
improperly aligned horizon. Draw a horizontal line parallel to the train.
To align vertically, draw a line along an edge that should be vertical.
For example, you may have the image of a tower that is improperly
aligned. Draw a vertical line parallel to the tower.
Automatically fill empty edges
The Straighten
tool has an enhanced option to automatically fill the edges with
relevant image data intelligently, instead of filling in background color or
transparent pixels.
Before you draw a line to enable image straightening, select the Autofill edges
checkbox. When you draw the line, any gaps created along the edges of the
photo are automatically and intelligently filled.
Automatically straighten an image
To automatically straighten the image and leave the canvas around the
image, choose Image > Rotate > Straighten Image. The straightened
image contains areas of blank background, but no pixels are clipped.
To automatically straighten and crop the image, choose Image > Rotate >
Straighten And Crop Image. The straightened image does not contain
areas of blank background, but some pixels are clipped.
To the top
Divide a scanned image containing multiple
photos
If you scanned several pictures at once on a flatbed scanner, you can
automatically divide and straighten the scanned image into its component
photos. The photos must have a clear separation between them.
Separating images scanned from one page into three separate
images
Choose Image > Divide Scanned Photos. Photoshop Elements
automatically divides the image and places each photo in a separate file.
For images with white around the border (images of light skies, snow,
and so on), this command works best
if you cover the image on the
scanner with a piece of dark paper.
See also
Resample an image
Keywords: cropping, image size, image resolution, retouching, sharpening,
transforming, 3D transform, rotate, skew, scale,
Unsharp Mask, Photomerge
Group Shot, Photomerge Scene Cleaner, Photomerge Faces, clone
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Photoshop Elements Help / Filters
Adobe Community Help
Search
About filters
Apply a filter
Applies to
Filter categories
Photoshop Elements
Filter Gallery
Texture and glass surface options
Contact support
Improve performance with filters
and effects
To the top
About filters
You
can use filters to clean up or retouch photos. You can also use
filters to apply
special art effects or create unique transformations
using distortion effects. In addition
to the filters provided by
Adobe, some filters provided by third-party developers are
available
as plug-ins. Once installed, these plug-in filters appear at the
bottom of the
Filter lists.
Filters can radically change the mood of a photo or image.
You can apply filters in any of three ways:
Filter menu Contains all of the available filters and lets you apply
filters
individually.
Filter Gallery Displays thumbnail examples of what each filter does, like
the panel.
The Filter Gallery lets you apply filters cumulatively
and apply individual filters more
than once. You can also rearrange
filters and change the settings of each filter you’ve
applied to
achieve the effect you want. Because it is so flexible, the Filter
Gallery is
often the best choice for applying filters. However,
not all filters listed in the Filter
menu are available in the Filter
Gallery.
Filters panel Displays
thumbnail examples of what each filter listed in the Filter
menu does. The Filters panel allows you to apply filters individually to a photo in
the
Expert view.
Tips for applying filters
The following
information can help you understand the process of applying filters
to
your images.
Preview the filter’s result. Applying
filters to a large image can be timeconsuming. It’s quicker to
preview what the filter does in the Filter Gallery. Most
filters
also let you preview their result in the Filter Options dialog box
and the
document window. You can then choose to apply the filter
or cancel the operation
without losing time.
Filters apply only to the active part of an image. Filters
affect only the active,
visible layer or a selected area of the
layer.
Filters don’t work on all images. You can’t use some filters
on images in
grayscale mode, or any filters on images in bitmap
or indexed-color mode. Many
filters don’t work on 16 bit images.
You can reapply the previous filter. The last filter you
applied appears at the top
of the Filter menu. You can reapply it
with the same settings you last used to
further enhance the image.
Tips for creating visual effects with filters
Use
the following techniques to achieve special visual results with
filters:
Feature the filter edges. If you’re applying
a filter to a selected area, you can
soften the edges of the filter
effect by feathering the selection before you apply
the filter.
Apply filters in succession to build up effects. You can
apply filters to individual
layers or to several layers in succession
to build up an effect. Choosing different
blending modes in the
Layers panel blends the effect. For a filter to affect a layer,
the layer must be visible and must contain pixels.
Create textures and backgrounds. By applying filters to solid-color
or grayscale
images, you can generate a variety of backgrounds and
textures. You can then
blur these textures. Although some filters
(for example, the Glass filter) have little
or no visible effect
when applied to solid colors, others produce interesting
effects.
For such colors, you can use Add Noise, Chalk & Charcoal, Clouds,
Conté Crayon, Difference Clouds, Glass, Graphic Pen, Halftone Pattern,
Mezzotint,
Note Paper, Pointillize, Reticulation, Rough Pastels, Sponge, or
Underpainting.
You can also use any of the filters in the Texture submenu.
Improve image quality and consistency. You can disguise faults,
alter or enhance
images, or make a series of images look similar
by applying the same filter to
each.
To the top
Apply a filter
1. Choose
the area you want to apply the filter to:
To apply a filter to an entire layer, deselect
any selected areas, and then
select the layer in the Layers panel.
To apply a filter to a portion of a layer, use any
selection tool to select an
area.
2. Choose how to apply the filter:
To use the Filter gallery, choose Filter > Filter Gallery, select a category, and
click the filter you want to apply.
To use the Filters panel, choose Window > Filters, select a category, and
double-click the filter you want to apply.
To use the Filter menu, choose Filter, then choose a submenu followed by
the filter you want to apply. If a filter name is followed by ellipses (…), a
Filter Options dialog box appears.
3. If a dialog box appears, enter values or select options.
4. If available, select the Preview option to preview the
filter in the document
window. Depending on the filter and how you
are applying it, use one of the
following methods to preview the
filter:
Use the + button or - button under the
preview window to zoom in or zoom
out.
Click the zoom bar (where the zoom percentage appears)
to choose a zoom
percentage.
Click-drag within the preview window to center a
specific area of the image
in the window.
Click the Show/Hide button at
the top of the dialog box to hide the filter
thumbnails. Hiding
the thumbnails expands the preview area.
Click the eye icon next
to a filter to hide the effect in the preview image.
5. If the dialog box contains sliders, hold down Alt (Option
in Mac OS) while
dragging a slider to see a real-time preview (real-time
rendering).
6. Click in the image window to center a specific area of
the image in the preview
window. (This may not work with all preview
windows.)
Note: A blinking line beneath the preview size indicates
that the preview
is being rendered.
7. If you are using the Filter Gallery, or the filter opens
in the Filter Gallery, do any
of the following and click OK:
Click the New Effect Layer button at
the bottom of the dialog box and
choose an additional filter to
apply. You can add multiple effect layers to
apply multiple filters.
Rearrange applied filters by dragging a filter name
to another position in the
list of applied filters at the bottom
of the dialog box. Rearranging the order
of filters can dramatically
change the way your image looks.
Remove applied filters by selecting the filter and
clicking the Delete Effect
Layer button .
8. If you are using the Filters panel, do the following and click OK:
Click the filter you want to apply to your photo.
If available, you can do one of the following:
Adjust the sliders to modify the intensity of the filter applied.
Click Apply More button to add more effect, available for few one-click
filters (for example, Blur).
Some filters enable further adjustments. Click Advance Options button.
In the dialog box, adjust the sliders and select options to make
modifications in the filter applied to the photo. To the top
Filter categories
You
can apply the following categories of filters:
Correct Camera Distortion Fixes common lens flaws such as barrel and
pincushion distortion,
and vignetting. The filter also rotates an image and fixes image
perspective caused by vertical or horizontal camera tilt.
Adjustment filters Change the brightness values, color, grayscale range, and tonal
levels of pixels in an image. Convert color pixels into black and
white.
Artistic filters Simulate a painterly appearance on traditional media and
create a
unique look.
Blur filters Soften a selection or an image. Useful for retouching.
Brush Stroke filters Give a painterly or fine-arts look using different brush
and
ink stroke effects.
Distort filters Geometrically distort an image, creating three-dimensional
and other
reshaping effects.
Noise filters Blend a selection into the surrounding pixels and remove
problem
areas, such as dust and scratches.
Pixelate filters Sharply define an image or selection by clumping pixels
of similar
color values.
Render filters Create cloud patterns, lens flare, fibers, and lightning
effects in an
image.
Sketch filters Add texture for depth or to give a hand-drawn look.
Stylize filters Produce a painted or impressionistic effect by displacing
pixels and
heightening contrast.
Texture filters Give the appearance of depth or substance, or add an organic look.
Other filters Let you create your own filter effects, modify masks, offset
a selection
within an image, and make quick color adjustments.
Digimarc filter Lets you read a Digimarc watermark.
To the top
Filter Gallery
The
Filter Gallery (Filter > Filter Gallery) lets you apply
filters cumulatively, and
apply individual filters more than once.
You can also rearrange filters and change the
settings of each filter
you’ve applied to achieve the effect you want. Because you can
apply
more than one filter to an image when you use the Filter Gallery dialog
box, you
have a lot of control over the way your image is affected
by each filter. The Filter
Gallery is often the best choice for
applying filters because it’s flexible and easy to
use.
Applying filters through the Filter Gallery
A. Original photo B.
Photos
each with a single filter applied C.
Three
filters
applied cumulatively
Filter Gallery dialog box
A. Filter category B.
Thumbnail
of selected filter C.
Show/Hide
filter
thumbnails D.
Filter menu E.
Options
for selected filter F.
List of
filter effects to
apply or arrange G.
Hidden
filter H.
Filters applied cumulatively
but not
selected I.
Filter selected but
not applied
However, not all filters are available from the Filter Gallery.
Some are available only
as individual commands from the Filter menu.
Also, you cannot apply effects and
Styles from the Filter Gallery,
as you can from the Effects panel.
To the top
Texture and glass surface options
The
Conté Crayon, Glass, Rough Pastels, Texturizer, and Underpainting
filters have
texturizing options. These options make images appear
as if they were painted onto
textures, such as canvas or brick,
or viewed through glass blocks.
Texture Specifies the type of texture to apply. You can also click
Load Texture to
specify a Photoshop file.
Scaling Increases or decreases the effect on the image surface.
Relief (if available) Adjusts the depth of the texture’s surface.
Light (if available) Sets the direction of the light source on the image.
Invert Reverses the surface’s light and dark colors.
To the top
Improve performance with filters
and effects
Some
filters and effects are memory intensive, especially when applied
to highresolution images. You can use these techniques to improve
performance:
Try filters and settings on a small selected area of the image.
Try filters and settings on a smaller, resized copy of your image. When you’re
satisfied with the results, apply the filter with the same settings to your original
image.
Free up memory before running the filter or effect by clearing the clipboard, the
undo history, or both. Choose Edit > Clear > [command].
Exit from other applications to make more memory available.
Adjust filter settings to make memory-intensive filters less complex. Memoryintensive filters include Cutout, Stained Glass, Chrome,
Ripple, Spatter, Sprayed
Strokes, and Glass. (For example, to reduce the complexity of the Stained Glass
filter, increase cell size. To reduce the complexity of the Cutout filter, increase
Edge Simplicity, decrease Edge Fidelity, or both.)
See also
Using the Effects panel
About photo effects
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Commons.
Photoshop Elements Help / Create layers
Adobe Community Help
Search
Understanding layers
About the Layers panel
Applies to
Adding layers
Photoshop Elements
Create and name a new blank layer
Create a new layer from part of
another layer
Contact support
Convert the Background layer into
a regular layer
Make a layer the Background layer
Show All
To the top
Understanding layers
Layers
are useful because they let you add components to an image and work
on them one at a time, without permanently changing your original
image. For
each layer, you can adjust color and brightness, apply
special effects,
reposition layer content, specify opacity and blending
values, and so on. You
can also rearrange the stacking order, link
layers to work on them
simultaneously, and create web animations
with layers.
Layers
are like stacked, transparent sheets of glass on which you can paint
images.
You can see through the transparent areas of a layer to the layers
below. You can work on each layer independently, experimenting to
create the
effect you want. Each layer remains independent until
you combine (merge)
the layers. The bottommost layer in the Layers
panel, the Background layer, is
always locked (protected), meaning
you cannot change its stacking order,
blending mode, or opacity
(unless you convert it into a regular layer).
Transparent areas on a layer let you see through to the layers
below.
Layers are organized in the Layers panel. Keep this panel visible whenever
you’re working in Adobe Photoshop Elements. With one glance, you can see
the active layer (the selected layer that you are editing). You can link layers,
so they move as a unit, helping you manage layers. Because multiple layers in
an image increase the file size, you can reduce the file size by merging layers
that you’re done editing. The Layers panel is an important source of
information as you edit photos. You can also use the Layer menu to work with
layers.
Ordinary layers are pixel-based (image) layers. There are several other layer
types you can use to create special effects:
Fill layers Contain a color gradient, solid color, or pattern.
Adjustment layers Enable you to fine-tune color, brightness, and saturation
without
making permanent changes to your image (until you flatten, or
collapse, the
adjustment layer).
Type layers and shape layers Let you create vector-based text and shapes.
You can’t
paint on an adjustment layer, although you can paint on its mask.
To
paint on fill or type layers, you must first convert them into
regular image
layers.
To the top
About the Layers panel
The Layers panel (Window > Layers) lists all layers in an image, from the top
layer to the Background layer at the bottom. In Expert mode, if you are
working in the Custom Workspace, you can drag the Layers panel out and tab
it with other panels.
The active layer, or the layer that you are working on, is highlighted for easy
identification. As you work in an image, check which layer is active to make
sure that the adjustments and edits you perform affect the correct layer. For
example, if you choose a command and nothing seems to happen, check to
make sure that you’re looking at the active layer.
Using the icons in the panel, you can accomplish many tasks—such as
creating, hiding, linking, locking, and deleting layers. With some exceptions,
your changes affect only the selected, or active, layer, which is highlighted.
Layers panel
A. Blending mode menu B.
Show/Hide
layer C.
Layer is linked to another
layer D.
Preview of a layer E.
Highlighted
layer is active layer F.
Locked
layer G.
Layer has style applied
In the list of layers, the panel shows a thumbnail, a title, and one or more
icons that give information about each layer:
The layer is visible. Click the eye to show or hide a layer. When the layer is
hidden, the icon is . Hidden layers are not printed.
The layer is linked to the active layer.
The layer is locked.
The image contains layer groups and was imported from Adobe Photoshop.
Photoshop Elements doesn’t support layer groups and displays them
in their
collapsed state. You must simplify them to create an editable image.
You use the buttons in the panel to perform actions:
Create a new layer.
Create a new group.
Create a new fill or adjustment layer.
Delete a layer.
Lock transparent pixels.
Also at the top are the panel Blending Mode menu (Normal, Dissolve, Darken,
and so on), an Opacity text box, and a More button displaying a menu of layer
commands and panel options.
To the top
Adding layers
Newly
added layers appear above the selected layer in the Layers panel.
You
can add layers to an image by using any of the following methods:
Create new, blank layers or turn selections into layers.
Convert a background into a regular layer or vice versa.
Paste selections into the image.
Use the Type tool or a shape tool.
Duplicate an existing layer.
You can create up to 8000
layers in an image, each with its own blending
mode and opacity.
However, memory constraints may lower this limit.
To the top
Create and name a new blank layer
Do one of the following in the Photoshop
Elements:
To create a layer with default name and
settings, click the New Layer
button in the Layers panel. The resulting
layer uses Normal mode with
100% opacity, and is named according
to its creation order. (To
rename the new layer, double-click it
and type a new name.)
To create a layer and specify a name and options,
choose Layer >
New > Layer, or choose New
Layer from the Layers panel menu.
Specify a name and other options,
and then click OK.
The new layer is automatically selected
and appears in the panel
above the layer that was last selected.
To the top
Create a new layer from part of
another layer
You can move part of an image from
one layer to a newly created one, leaving
the original intact.
1. Select an existing layer, and make a selection.
2. Choose one of the following:
Layer > New > Layer
Via Copy to copy the selection into a new layer.
Layer > New > Layer Via
Cut to cut the selection and paste it into a
new layer.
The selected area appears in a new layer in the same
position relative to
the image boundaries.
Creating a new layer by copying part of another layer and
pasting it into a new
layer
To the top
Convert the Background layer into
a regular
layer
The Background layer is the bottom
layer in an image. Other layers stack on
top of the Background layer,
which usually (but not always) contains the actual
image data of
a photo. To protect the image, the Background layer is always
locked.
If you want to change its stacking order, blending mode, or opacity,
you must first convert it into a regular layer.
1. Do
one of the following:
Double-click the Background layer in the Layers panel.
Choose Layer > New > Layer From Background.
Select the Background layer, and choose Duplicate Layer from the
Layers panel flyout menu, to leave the Background layer intact and
create a copy of it as a new layer.
You can create a duplicate layer of
the converted Background layer no
matter how you convert the layer; simply select the converted
Background layer and choose Duplicate Layer from the More menu.
2. Name the new layer.
If you drag the Background Eraser tool
onto the Background layer, it is
automatically converted into a
regular layer, and erased areas become
transparent.
To the top
Make a layer the Background layer
You can’t convert a layer into the Background
layer if the image already has a
Background layer. In this case,
you must first convert the existing Background
layer into a regular
layer.
1. Select a layer in the Layers panel.
2. Choose Layer > New > Background
From Layer.
Any transparent areas in the original layer are filled
with the background
color.
To the top
Manage layers
Create a new group
You can create a new group to prevent cluttering and organize the layers. Do
one of the following:
To create a new group with default settings, create Click A New Group
icon in the Layers panel in the Expert mode.
To create a new group with customized settings, follow these steps:
Select Layer > New > Group.
In the dialog box, specify a name and other options, and click OK.
Assign a color to a layer or a group
Color-coding layers and groups helps you to identify related layers in the
Layers panel. Simply right-click the layer or group and select a color.
See also
Video | Manage layers in Photoshop Elements
About adjustment and fill layers
About layer clipping masks
Lock or unlock a layer
About opacity and blending options in layers
Simplify a layer
About text
Delete a layer
About shapes
Copy a layer from one image to another
Duplicate a layer within an image
Specify a blending mode for a layer
Specify the opacity of a layer
About selections
Photoshop Elements Help / Tools
Adobe Community Help
Search
About the toolbox
Select a tool
Applies to
Set Edit preferences
Photoshop Elements
Set the appearance of a tool pointer
Resize or change the hardness of
painting cursors by dragging
Contact support
Set tool options
To the top
About the toolbox
You use tools
in the Photoshop Elements toolbox to select, edit, and view
images; some tools let you paint, draw, and type. The toolbox appears on the
left side in the Quick and Expert modes.
Tools in the toolbox are grouped logically, in the Quick and Expert modes. For
example, in the Expert view, the Move, Rectangular Marquee, Lasso, and
Quick Selection tools are placed together in the Select group. Select a tool in the toolbox to use it. Once selected, the tool is highlighted in
the toolbox. Optional settings for the tool appear in the
Tool Options bar,
towards the bottom of the Photoshop Elements window.
note: You cannot deselect a tool—once you select a tool, it remains selected
until you select a different tool. For example, if you’ve selected the Lasso tool,
and you want to click your image without selecting anything, select the Hand
tool.
Toolbox overview
To the top
Select a tool
Do
one of the following:
Click a tool in the toolbox. If there are additional tool options, they are
displayed in the Tool Options bar. Click the tool you want to select.
Press the tool’s keyboard shortcut. The keyboard shortcut is displayed
in its tool tip. For example, you can select the Brush tool by
pressing
the B key.
To the top
Set Edit preferences
1. In
Windows, choose Edit > Preferences > General. In Mac, choose
Photoshop Elements > Preferences > General.
2. Set one or more of the following options, and click OK.
Select Show Tool Tips to show or hide tool
tips.
Select Use Shift Key For Tool Switch to cycle through a set of hidden
tools by holding down the Shift key. When this option is deselected,
you can cycle through a set of tool options by pressing the shortcut
key (without holding down Shift). For example, pressing B on your
keyboard repeatedly, cycles through all the Brush tool options (Brush,
Impressionist Brush, and Color Replacement tools)
To the top
Set the appearance of a tool pointer
1. In Windows, choose Edit > Preferences
> Display & Cursors. In Mac,
choose Photoshop Elements >
Preferences > Display & Cursors.
2. Select a setting for the Painting Cursors:
Standard Displays pointers as tool icons.
Precise Displays pointers as cross-hairs.
Normal Brush Tip Displays pointers as circles at 50% of the size you
specify
for the brush.
Full Size Brush Tip Displays pointers as circles at the full size you
specify
for the brush.
Show Crosshair In Brush Tip Displays cross-hairs in the circles when
you choose either
Normal Brush Tip or Full Size Brush Tip.
3. Select a setting for Other Cursors:
Standard Displays pointers as tool icons.
Precise Displays pointers as cross-hairs.
To the top
Resize or change the hardness of
painting
cursors by dragging
You can resize or change the hardness of a
painting cursor by dragging in the
image. As you drag, you preview
both the size and hardness of the painting
tool.
To resize a cursor, right-click + press Alt (Windows only), and drag to the
left or right.
To change the hardness of a cursor, right-click + press Alt (Windows only),
and drag up or down.
To the top
Set tool options
The Tool Options bar appears above the taskbar at the bottom of the
Photoshop Elements window. The Tool Options bar displays different options
when you select different tools.
A. Tool icon B.
Active tool in the Tool Options bar C.
Hidden tools D.
Tool
options
1. Select a tool.
2. Look in the Tool Options bar to see the available options. For more
information on setting options for a specific tool, search for the tool’s
name in
Photoshop Elements Help.
Note: To return a tool or all tools to their default settings, click the tool
icon, select the flyout menu from the Tool Options bar, and then choose
Reset Tool or Reset All Tools.
3. To close the Tool Options bar, click Tool Options in the task bar. To
reopen the bar, click Tool Options from the task bar.
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troubleshooting articles within this window by simply clicking the search icon
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