Avid MediaLog User'

Avid® MediaLog
™
User’s Guide
m a k e m a n a g e m ove | m e d i a ™
Avid
®
Copyright and Disclaimer
Product specifications are subject to change without notice and do not represent a commitment on the part
of Avid Technology, Inc.
The software described in this document is furnished under a license agreement. You can obtain a copy of
that license by visiting Avid's Web site at www.avid.com. The terms of that license are also available in the
product in the same directory as the software. The software may not be reverse assembled and may be
used or copied only in accordance with the terms of the license agreement. It is against the law to copy the
software on any medium except as specifically allowed in the license agreement.
Avid products or portions thereof are protected by one or more of the following United States Patents:
4,746,994; 4,970,663; 5,045,940; 5,267,351; 5,309,528; 5,355,450; 5,396,594; 5,440,348; 5,452,378;
5,467,288; 5,513,375; 5,528,310; 5,557,423; 5,568,275; 5,577,190; 5,584,006; 5,640,601; 5,644,364;
5,654,737; 5,715,018; 5,724,605; 5,726,717; 5,729,673; 5,745,637; 5,752,029; 5,754,851; 5,799,150;
5,812,216; 5,852,435; 5,905,841; 5,929,836; 5,930,445; 5,946,445; 5,987,501; 6,016,152; 6,018,337;
6,023,531; 6,058,236; 6,061,758; 6,091,778; 6,105,083; 6,118,444; 6,128,001; 6,134,607; 6,137,919;
6,141,691; 6,198,477; 6,201,531; 6,223,211; 6,249,280; 6,269,195; 6,317,158; 6,317,515; 6,330,369;
6,351,557; 6,353,862; 6,357,047; 6,392,710; 6,404,435; 6,407,775; 6,417,891; 6,426,778; 6,477,271;
6,489,969; 6,512,522; 6,532,043; 6,546,190; 6,552,731; 6,553,142; 6,570,624; 6,571,255; 6,583,824;
6,618,547; 6,636,869; 6,665,450; 6,678,461; D392,269; D396,853; D398,912. Other patents are pending.
No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or
mechanical, including photocopying and recording, for any purpose without the express written permission
of Avid Technology, Inc.
Copyright © 2004 Avid Technology, Inc. and its licensors. All rights reserved.
The following disclaimer is required by Apple Computer, Inc.
APPLE COMPUTER, INC. MAKES NO WARRANTIES WHATSOEVER, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED,
REGARDING THIS PRODUCT, INCLUDING WARRANTIES WITH RESPECT TO ITS
MERCHANTABILITY OR ITS FITNESS FOR ANY PARTICULAR PURPOSE. THE EXCLUSION OF
IMPLIED WARRANTIES IS NOT PERMITTED BY SOME STATES. THE ABOVE EXCLUSION MAY NOT
APPLY TO YOU. THIS WARRANTY PROVIDES YOU WITH SPECIFIC LEGAL RIGHTS. THERE MAY BE
OTHER RIGHTS THAT YOU MAY HAVE WHICH VARY FROM STATE TO STATE.
The following disclaimer is required by Sam Leffler and Silicon Graphics, Inc. for the use of
their TIFF library:
Copyright © 1988–1997 Sam Leffler
Copyright © 1991–1997 Silicon Graphics, Inc.
Permission to use, copy, modify, distribute, and sell this software [i.e., the TIFF library] and its
documentation for any purpose is hereby granted without fee, provided that (i) the above copyright notices
and this permission notice appear in all copies of the software and related documentation, and (ii) the
names of Sam Leffler and Silicon Graphics may not be used in any advertising or publicity relating to the
software without the specific, prior written permission of Sam Leffler and Silicon Graphics.
THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED “AS-IS” AND WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS,
IMPLIED OR OTHERWISE, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION, ANY WARRANTY OF
MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
IN NO EVENT SHALL SAM LEFFLER OR SILICON GRAPHICS BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL,
INCIDENTAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OF ANY KIND, OR ANY DAMAGES
WHATSOEVER RESULTING FROM LOSS OF USE, DATA OR PROFITS, WHETHER OR NOT ADVISED
OF THE POSSIBILITY OF DAMAGE, AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, ARISING OUT OF OR IN
CONNECTION WITH THE USE OR PERFORMANCE OF THIS SOFTWARE.
The following disclaimer is required by the Independent JPEG Group:
Portions of this software are based on work of the Independent JPEG Group.
The following disclaimer is required by Paradigm Matrix:
Portions of this software licensed from Paradigm Matrix.
2
The following disclaimer is required by Ray Sauers Associates, Inc.:
“Install-It” is licensed from Ray Sauers Associates, Inc. End-User is prohibited from taking any action to
derive a source code equivalent of “Install-It,” including by reverse assembly or reverse compilation, Ray
Sauers Associates, Inc. shall in no event be liable for any damages resulting from reseller’s failure to
perform reseller’s obligation; or any damages arising from use or operation of reseller’s products or the
software; or any other damages, including but not limited to, incidental, direct, indirect, special or
consequential Damages including lost profits, or damages resulting from loss of use or inability to use
reseller’s products or the software for any reason including copyright or patent infringement, or lost data,
even if Ray Sauers Associates has been advised, knew or should have known of the possibility of such
damages.
The following disclaimer is required by Videomedia, Inc.:
“Videomedia, Inc. makes no warranties whatsoever, either express or implied, regarding this product,
including warranties with respect to its merchantability or its fitness for any particular purpose.”
“This software contains V-LAN ver. 3.0 Command Protocols which communicate with V-LAN ver. 3.0
products developed by Videomedia, Inc. and V-LAN ver. 3.0 compatible products developed by third
parties under license from Videomedia, Inc. Use of this software will allow “frame accurate” editing control
of applicable videotape recorder decks, videodisc recorders/players and the like.”
The following disclaimer is required by Altura Software, Inc. for the use of its Mac2Win
software and Sample Source Code:
©1993–1998 Altura Software, Inc.
The following disclaimer is required by Ultimatte Corporation:
Certain real-time compositing capabilities are provided under a license of such technology from Ultimatte
Corporation and are subject to copyright protection.
The following disclaimer is required by 3Prong.com Inc.:
Certain waveform and vector monitoring capabilities are provided under a license from 3Prong.com Inc.
Attn. Government User(s). Restricted Rights Legend
U.S. GOVERNMENT RESTRICTED RIGHTS. This Software and its documentation are “commercial
computer software” or “commercial computer software documentation.” In the event that such Software or
documentation is acquired by or on behalf of a unit or agency of the U.S. Government, all rights with
respect to this Software and documentation are subject to the terms of the License Agreement, pursuant to
FAR §12.212(a) and/or DFARS §227.7202-1(a), as applicable.
Trademarks
888 I/O, Adrenaline, AirPlay, AirSPACE, AirSPACE HD, AniMatte, AudioSuite, AudioVision, AutoSync,
Avid, Avid DNA, AVIDdrive, AVIDdrive Towers, Avid Mojo, AvidNet, AvidNetwork, AVIDstripe, Avid Unity,
Avid Xpress, AVoption, AVX, CamCutter, ChromaCurve, ChromaWheel, DAE, D-Fi, D-fx, Digidesign,
Digidesign Audio Engine, Digidesign Intelligent Noise Reduction, DigiDrive, Digital Nonlinear Accelerator,
DigiTranslator, DINR, D-Verb, Equinox, ExpertRender, FieldPak, Film Composer, FilmScribe, FluidMotion,
HIIP, HyperSPACE, HyperSPACE HDCAM, IllusionFX, Image Independence, Intraframe, iS9, iS18, iS23,
iS36, Lo-Fi, Magic Mask, make manage move | media, Marquee, Matador, Maxim, MCXpress,
Media Composer, MediaDock, MediaDock Shuttle, Media Fusion, Media Illusion, MediaLog,
Media Reader, Media Recorder, MEDIArray, MediaShare, Meridien, MetaSync, NaturalMatch, Nearchive,
NetReview, NewsCutter, Nitris, OMF, OMF Interchange, OMM, Open Media Framework,
Open Media Management, ProEncode, Pro Tools, QuietDrive, Recti-Fi, RetroLoop, rS9, rS18, Sci-Fi,
Softimage, Sound Designer II, SPACE, SPACEShift, Symphony, the Avid|DS logo, Trilligent, UnityRAID,
Vari-Fi, Video Slave Driver, VideoSPACE, and Xdeck are either registered trademarks or trademarks of
Avid Technology, Inc. in the United States and/or other countries.
iNEWS, iNEWS ControlAir, and Media Browse are trademarks of iNews, LLC.
Aaton is a registered trademark of Aaton S.A. Arri is a registered trademark of Arri Group. Claris is a
trademark of Claris Corporation, registered in the U.S. and other countries. FileMaker is a trademark of
FileMaker, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. FLEx is a trademark of Pioneer-Standard
Electronics, Inc. IBM is a registered trademark of International Business Machines Corporation. KeyKode is
a trademark of Eastman Kodak Company. Final Cut Pro, Macintosh and Mac OS are trademarks of Apple
Computer, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Microsoft, Windows, Windows NT, and Windows
XP are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or
3
other countries. Sony is a registered trademark of Sony. V-LAN and VLXi are registered trademarks of
Videomedia, Inc.
All other trademarks contained herein are the property of their respective owners.
Footage
Arri — Courtesy of Arri/Fauer — John Fauer, Inc.
Bell South “Anticipation” — Courtesy of Two Headed Monster — Tucker/Wayne Atlanta/GMS.
Canyonlands — Courtesy of the National Park Service/Department of the Interior.
Eco Challenge British Columbia — Courtesy of Eco Challenge Lifestyles, Inc., All Rights Reserved.
Eco Challenge Morocco — Courtesy of Discovery Communications, Inc.
It’s Shuttletime — Courtesy of BCP & Canadian Airlines.
Nestlé Coffee Crisp — Courtesy of MacLaren McCann Canada.
Saturn “Calvin Egg” — Courtesy of Cossette Communications.
“Tigers: Tracking a Legend” — Courtesy of www.wildlifeworlds.com, Carol Amore, Executive Producer.
Windhorse — Courtesy of Paul Wagner Productions.
GOT FOOTAGE?
Editors — Filmmakers — Special Effects Artists — Game Developers — Animators — Educators —
Broadcasters — Content creators of every genre — Just finished an incredible project and want to
share it with the world?
Send us your reels and we may use your footage in our show reel or demo!*
For a copy of our release and Avid’s mailing address, go to www.avid.com/footage.
*Note: Avid cannot guarantee the use of materials submitted.
Avid MediaLog User’s Guide • 0130-07990-01 • June 2008
4
Contents
Using This Guide. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Symbols and Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
If You Need Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
How to Order Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Avid Educational Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Chapter 1
Understanding MediaLog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
What Is MediaLog? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
How Does MediaLog Work? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
What Are the Basic Logging Steps? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Chapter 2
Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Setting Up the Hardware (Windows) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Setting Up the Hardware (Macintosh) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Supported Decks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Turning On the Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Installing MediaLog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Installing MediaLog on a Windows System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Installing MediaLog on a Mac OS X System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Starting MediaLog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Changing Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Selecting a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Creating a New Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Selecting a Private Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Selecting a Shared Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Selecting an External Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Browsing for a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
5
Using User Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Creating a User Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Importing a User Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Changing User Profiles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Exporting a User Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Closing a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Backing Up Your Project Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Saving Your Project Information on a Drive or Floppy Disk . . . . . . . . . 39
Restoring from a Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Ending a Work Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Quitting the MediaLog Application. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Turning Off Your Equipment (Windows) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Turning Off Your Equipment (Macintosh) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Using Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Chapter 3
Working with the Project Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Exploring the Project Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Opening and Closing the Project Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Changing Font and Point Size. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Working with Bins. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Viewing a List of Bins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Displaying Folders of Bins in the Bins List. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Creating a Folder in a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Creating a New Bin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Renaming a Bin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Opening and Closing a Bin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Opening Selected Bins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Opening Bins from Other Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Closing a Bin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Deleting a Bin or Folder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Viewing Contents in the Trash. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
6
Emptying the Trash in the Bins List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Managing Folders and Bins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Saving Bins Automatically . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Saving Bins Manually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Describing Project Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Understanding Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Defining Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Reviewing Basic Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Film Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Bin Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Logging Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Displaying Project Settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Working with Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Selecting Another User . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Modifying Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Restoring Default Settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Using Site Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Viewing Keyboard Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Customizing Your Workspace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Using the Format, Info and Usage Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Using Other Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
About the Avid Calculator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Using the Communications (Serial) Ports Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Using the Console Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Chapter 4
Logging Source Material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Understanding Logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Configuring Decks and Setting Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Configuring Decks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Automatic Deck Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Manual Deck Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
7
Deck Settings Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Deleting Deck Configuration Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Setting Deck Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Understanding Timecode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Preparing to Log Material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Accessing and Setting Up the Logging Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Accessing the Logging Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Setting Up the Logging Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Guidelines for Naming Tapes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Inserting Source Tapes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Selecting Active Tracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Selecting the Target Bin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Selecting the Source Deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Identifying the Source Tape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Setting the Audio Sample Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Logging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Logging from a Source Tape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Marking and Logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Adding a Memory Mark. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Logging On-the-Fly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Pausing a Deck While Logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Logging with the Deck Offline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Adding Clip Names and Comments On-the-Fly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Controlling Decks from the Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Logging Film Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Modifying Clip Information After Logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Creating Avid Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Importing Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Importing Standard Log Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Compatible Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
8
Importing Log Files into MediaLog Bins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Transferring Bins from Another MediaLog System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Chapter 5
Organizing with Bins. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Preparing to Work with Bins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Film Scene Workflow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Setting the Bin Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Understanding Bin Display Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Brief View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Text View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Bin View Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Customizing Bin Views in Text View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Saving a Custom Bin View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Bin Fast Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Basic Bin Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Selecting Clips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Duplicating Clips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Moving Clips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Copying Clips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Deleting Clips and Subclips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Assigning Colors to Bin Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Adding a Color Column to a Bin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Assigning a Source Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Assigning a Custom Source Color. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Limiting Color Choices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Sifting Clips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Sifting Timecodes or Keycode Ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Sifting Within a Range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Locking and Unlocking Items in a Bin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
9
Using Text View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Arranging Bin Columns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Moving and Rearranging Columns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Aligning Bin Columns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Showing and Hiding Columns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Deleting a Column . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Duplicating a Column . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Adding Customized Columns to a Bin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Changing a Custom Column Heading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Managing Clip Information in Text View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Moving Within Column Cells. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Copying Information Between Columns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Sorting Clips in Text View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Sorting Clips in Ascending Order . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Sorting Clips in Descending Order . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Multilevel Sorting with Columns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Sorting Clips by Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Displaying Timecodes in a 23.976p, 24p or 25p Project . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Frame Counting for Timecodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Adding Timecode Columns to a Bin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Adding Timecode Values to the Timecode Columns . . . . . . . . . . 129
Bin Column Headings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Chapter 6
Creating MediaLog Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Printing Bins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Exporting Bins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Transferring Bins to an Avid Editing System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Transferring Projects and Bins Using AFE Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Appendix A
Avid Log Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Understanding Avid Log Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
10
Avid Log Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Global Headings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Column Headings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Data Entries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Sample Avid Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
Appendix B
Working with a Film Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Film and 24P Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Setting the Film and Edge Type Ink Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Transfer Settings for Film Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Setting the Pulldown Phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Logging Film Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
Displaying Film Columns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
Entering Pulldown Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Determining the Pulldown Phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Modifying the Pulldown Phase Before Logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Entering Frames-per-Second Rates for PAL Transfers . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Entering Key Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Tracking 3-Perf Counts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Entering Additional Timecodes (Optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Entering the Ink Number (Optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
Entering Additional Film Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
11
12
Using This Guide
This guide provides information about the configuration and operation of
Avid® MediaLog™.
This guide is for video and film editors who wish to log clips before bringing
them to an Avid editing system for batch capture and editing.
Unless noted otherwise, the material in this document applies to the
Windows XP and Mac OS X operating systems.The majority of screen shots
in this document were captured on a Windows XP system, but the information
applies to both Windows XP and Mac OS X systems. Where differences exist,
both Windows XP and Mac OS X screen shots are shown.
n
The documentation describes the features and hardware of all models.
Therefore, your system might not contain certain features and hardware that
are covered in the documentation.
Symbols and Conventions
Avid documentation uses the following symbols and conventions:
Symbol or Convention
Meaning or Action
n
A note provides important related information,
reminders, recommendations, and strong suggestions.
c
A caution means that a specific action you take could
cause harm to your computer or cause you to lose data.
w
A warning describes an action that could cause you
physical harm. Follow the guidelines in this document
or on the unit itself when handling electrical
equipment.
Using This Guide
n
14
Symbol or Convention
Meaning or Action
>
This symbol indicates menu commands (and
subcommands) in the order you select them. For
example, File > Import means to open the File menu
and then select the Import command.
t
This symbol indicates a single-step procedure.
Multiple arrows in a list indicate that you perform one
of the actions listed.
k
This symbol represents the Apple or Command key.
Press and hold the Command key and another key to
perform a keyboard shortcut.
Margin tips
In the margin, you will find tips that help you perform
tasks more easily and efficiently.
(Windows), (Windows
only), (Macintosh), or
(Macintosh only)
This text indicates that the information applies only to
the specified operating system, either Windows XP or
Macintosh OS X.
Italic font
Italic font is used to emphasize certain words and to
indicate variables.
Courier Bold font
Courier Bold font identifies text that you type.
Ctrl+key or mouse action
k+key or mouse action
Press and hold the first key while you press the last
key or perform the mouse action. For example,
k+Option+C or Ctrl+drag.
In this guide, the term Avid system is a generic term that refers to any Avid
application, including MediaLog. The term Avid editing system refers to one of
the Avid video editing applications such as Avid Symphony, Avid
Media Composer, Avid Film Composer, Avid Xpress, or Avid NewsCutter.
If You Need Help
If You Need Help
If you are having trouble using Avid MediaLog:
1. Retry the action, carefully following the instructions given for that task in
this guide. It is especially important to check each step of your workflow.
2. Check for the latest information that might have become available after
the documentation was published in one of two locations:
n
-
If release notes are available, they ship with your application.
-
If ReadMe files are available, they are supplied in your Avid
application folder. ReadMe files are also available from Help.
The most up-to-date ReadMe files are available on the Avid Knowledge Base.
3. Check the documentation that came with your Avid application or your
hardware for maintenance or hardware-related issues.
4. Visit the online Knowledge Base at www.avid.com/onlinesupport. Online
services are available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. Search this
online Knowledge Base to find answers, to view error messages, to access
troubleshooting tips, to download updates, and to read/join online
message-board discussions.
5. For Technical Support, please call 800-800-AVID (800-800-2843).
For Broadcast On-Air Sites and Call Letter Stations, call
800-NEWSDNG (800-639-7364).
How to Order Documentation
To order additional copies of this documentation from within the
United States, call Avid Sales at 800-949-AVID (800-949-2843). If you are
placing an order from outside the United States, contact your local
Avid representative.
15
Using This Guide
Avid Educational Services
For information on courses/schedules, training centers, certifications,
courseware, and books, please visit www.avid.com/training or call Avid Sales
at 800-949-AVID (800-949-2843).
16
Chapter 1
Understanding Avid MediaLog
Avid MediaLog is a tool to select and log footage before your edit session.
Although you can log footage with Avid editing system products, using Avid
MediaLog frees up your Avid editing system for editing rather than for
logging footage. After logging shots (for example, on a laptop), use your Avid
editing system to capture and edit the footage. In addition, you can transfer
film to National Television Standards Committee (NTSC) or Phase
Alternating Line (PAL) video. Use Avid MediaLog to log the material and
then transfer the logged shots (also known as clips) to an Avid editing system
for capturing and editing.
This chapter answers the following questions:
•
How to Use Avid MediaLog?
•
How Does MediaLog Work?
•
What Are the Basic Logging Steps?
How to Use Avid MediaLog?
Avid MediaLog is portable; you can install it on a laptop or on desktop
computers running the Windows® 2000, Windows XP Professional, or Mac
OS® X operating system. To log shots from a source tape, connect your
computer to a deck that uses Sony® serial deck protocol. With Avid
MediaLog, you control the deck while viewing your source tapes and selecting
the shots for your log. You can also log without a deck and manually enter
logging information.
For each shot that you log, Avid MediaLog saves the start and end timecodes,
duration, tracks selected, and tape name.
Chapter 1 Understanding Avid MediaLog
Avid MediaLog also lets you add new categories of information to your log, so
you can record the scene, take, location, or any other comments that can help
you identify the footage.
Once you have created a log, the Avid MediaLog Sort command orders your
shots according to criteria you specify. The Sift command uses your criteria to
pick out specific footage, such as all the product shots or all shots from a
certain location.
You can also use Avid MediaLog to output an AFE file. AFE files are designed
to transfer project information between Avid editing systems.
How Does Avid MediaLog Work?
The Avid MediaLog system uses clips, bins, and projects to organize your
work.
Avid MediaLog clips and bins are a lot like their film counterparts. Just as film
editors pull clips from their raw footage and store the clips in bins for the
editing session, Avid MediaLog lets you select shots from your tapes and store
information about the shots in electronic bins.
A clip corresponds to a shot you select from a tape. Clips contain information
about your footage such as the start and end timecodes and the number of
video and audio tracks. Clips are stored in electronic bins that have built-in
database capabilities to help you easily find a specific shot.
18
How Does Avid MediaLog Work?
Each time you log clips, you open a bin and use Logging Tool controls to play
your tapes, mark the shots, and add the clips to the open bin.
A bin is open while you log clips to it.
Sample Bin
Deck and log controls are in the Logging tool.
Deck controls
Log controls
If you have a log sheet, you can log clips without using a deck. You type the
start and end timecodes for each clip, and then add them to the bin.
Avid MediaLog uses a project file to organize all the work you do on a single
job. You must always create a new project or open an existing project before
you can open a bin and log your shots.
19
Chapter 1 Understanding Avid MediaLog
As you work on a project, Avid MediaLog remembers the name of each bin
you open and displays a list of bin names in the Project window. The list is
useful for helping you to quickly access bins.
Sample Project
window
Bin names
What Are the Basic Logging Steps?
To perform a logging session:
1. Start your computer and the Avid MediaLog program.
2. Create a new or open an existing project.
3. Create a new or open an existing bin.
4. Prepare to log:
a.
Select a video format.
b.
Enter Logging mode.
c.
Select a source name.
5. Select the tracks you want to log from the tape.
6. Log the clips.
7. Save and organize the bin.
8. Quit the Avid MediaLog application, and (optionally) shut down the
computer.
20
Chapter 2
Getting Started
This chapter describes how to set up the hardware and run Avid MediaLog
sessions. It includes the following topics:
•
Setting Up the Hardware (Windows)
•
Setting Up the Hardware (Macintosh)
•
Supported Decks
•
Turning On the Hardware
•
Installing Avid MediaLog
•
Starting Avid MediaLog
•
Backing Up Your Project Information
•
Ending a Work Session
•
Using Help
Setting Up the Hardware (Windows)
Make sure your computer meets the following requirements:
•
The computer must be running the Windows 2000 or Windows XP
operating system.
•
The computer includes at least 32 megabytes (MB) of random-access
memory (RAM).
Avid MediaLog can control a deck that uses Sony serial deck protocol and a
timecode reader. Manually control a single deck by connecting an RS-232 to
RS-422 serial adapter kit to the serial port of your computer. Avid MediaLog
can also control a deck through V-LAN® VLXi® connections.
Chapter 2 Getting Started
n
If you need to connect and control more than one video deck, see the setup
guide for your Avid editing system.
A direct serial video deck connection requires a serial adapter kit that contains
these items (see the following figure):
c
•
An RS-232 to RS-422 serial adapter
•
Two serial cables; male 9-pin connectors at both ends
Turn off the computer and the deck when you are connecting the serial
cable.
To connect a single deck to your PC:
1. Shut down the computer and the deck.
2. Attach one end of the first 9-pin cable to the end of the serial adapter
labeled RS-232.
3. Attach the other end of the first 9-pin cable to the serial port of your
computer.
n
When you attach the cable to the serial port on the computer, note if it is
port 1 or port 2. You have to select the port in the Avid software.
Serial adapter
RS-422 connection
To your
deck
RS-232 connection
To your
computer
4. Attach one end of the second 9-pin cable to the end of the serial adapter
labeled RS-422.
5. Attach the other end of the second 9-pin cable to the remote serial port of
the deck.
n
Set the deck to Remote mode before you attempt to control the deck using the
software.
For more information about connecting decks, see the setup guide for your
Avid editing system.
22
Setting Up the Hardware (Macintosh)
Setting Up the Hardware (Macintosh)
Make sure your computer meets the following requirements:
•
The computer is running the Mac OS X operating system. See the release
notes for the supported version.
•
At least 12 MB of RAM is available to run Avid MediaLog (20 MB or
more is preferred when working with large bins).
Avid MediaLog can control a deck that uses Sony serial deck protocol and a
timecode reader.
c
Turn off the computer and the deck when you are connecting the serial
cable.
To connect a single deck to your system:
1. Locate a serial cable.
2. Attach the round 8-pin DIN connector to a USB-to-serial adapter.
3. Connect the USB-to-serial adapter to one of the following:
t
A USB connector on the rear of your Macintosh G4 system
t
A USB hub (See the following figure.)
USB hub
USB-to-serial adapter
4. Attach the 9-pin D connector to the remote serial connector on the back of
the deck.
23
Chapter 2 Getting Started
n
Adjust the switch on the video deck to Remote mode before using the software
to control the video deck.
For more information about connecting decks, see the setup guide for your
Avid editing system.
Supported Decks
For a list of supported decks, search for “Supported Decks” in the Avid
Customer Support Knowledge Center on www.avid.com. For instructions on
how to access the Knowledge Center, see the Avid editing application release
notes.
Turning On the Hardware
To assure that the computer detects all the attached hardware and to
avoid damage to any component, turn on the hardware in the following
order:
1. If your computer has media drives, turn on each drive.
Wait 15 to 30 seconds for the drives to spin up before you turn on the
computer system; otherwise, the computer will not communicate with the
storage devices successfully.
2. If you are logging clips using a deck, turn on the deck.
Set the REMOTE/LOCAL switch on the deck to REMOTE.
3. Start the computer.
c
Do not disconnect or turn off individual drives while the
computer is on.
You can now install the Avid MediaLog software.
24
Installing Avid MediaLog
Installing Avid MediaLog
This section describes how to install the Avid MediaLog software.
c
c
Do not install the Avid MediaLog application on disks where you store
media.
If you install Avid MediaLog on an Avid editing system, make sure the
Avid MediaLog application is in a folder separate from the Avid editing
application. Each application has its own preferences.
Installing Avid MediaLog on a Windows System
You can install Avid MediaLog on the following Windows operating systems:
•
Windows 2000
•
Windows XP Professional
Avid MediaLog software is shipped on the Avid MediaLog CD-ROM and the
Avid editing application CD-ROM.
n
For information on installing Avid MediaLog from the Avid editing application
CD-ROM, see the release notes for your Avid editing system.
To install Avid MediaLog software on a Windows system:
1. Quit all Windows applications.
2. Insert the Avid MediaLog CD-ROM into your computer’s CD-ROM
drive.
If the installer does not run automatically after you insert the application
CD-ROM, do the following:
a.
Double-click the My Computer icon.
b.
Double-click the CD-ROM icon.
c.
Double-click Launch.exe to run the installer.
The Avid MediaLog Installer CD-ROM window opens.
25
Chapter 2 Getting Started
3. Click Install Avid MediaLog.
Follow the online instructions to install the software.
When the installation is complete, a message asks if you want to restart
the system.
4. Restart the computer now or later (before you start the Avid MediaLog
application).
Installing Avid MediaLog on a Mac OS X System
For Macintosh systems, Avid MediaLog software is shipped only on the Avid
MediaLog CD-ROM.
n
The Macintosh version of Avid MediaLog v11.7 and later runs only on the
Mac OS X operating system. See the Avid MediaLog ReadMe file for more
information.
To install Avid MediaLog software on a Mac OS X system:
1. Restart your Macintosh system.
2. Quit any applications that run automatically at startup.
3. Insert the Avid MediaLog CD-ROM into your computer’s CD-ROM
drive.
4. Double-click the Avid MediaLog Installer icon.
Follow the online instructions to install the software.
Starting Avid MediaLog
After you install Avid MediaLog, you are ready to start the application.
To start Avid MediaLog:
1. Turn on the video deck.
2. If you are using a deck, set the REMOTE/LOCAL switch on the deck to
REMOTE.
3. Turn on the computer.
26
Starting Avid MediaLog
c
Do not run any other Avid editing application on the computer at the
same time as the Avid MediaLog application. The two applications
conflict with each other.
4. Do one of the following:
t
(Windows) Click the Start button and select Programs > Avid >
MediaLog.
t
(Macintosh) Double-click the Avid MediaLog folder to open it and
then double-click the Avid MediaLog application icon to start Avid
MediaLog.
The Select Project dialog box appears.
Your login name is selected as the user. You can change users by logging
in through a different name. You can also establish user profiles.
Changing Users
To change users:
1. Quit the Avid application.
2. Do one of the following:
t
(Windows) Select Start > Log Off, and then log in as a different user.
t
(Macintosh) Select Apple P menu > Log Out, click Log Out, and
then click a new user.
27
Chapter 2 Getting Started
n
(Macintosh only) You have to create a new user before you can change to that
user. See your Macintosh documentation or the Macintosh Help.
3. Start the Avid application.
Your current login name appears as the User in the Select Project dialog
box.
Selecting a Project
You can select a project from a private folder, a shared folder, or a folder
anywhere on your system. You can also create a project in any of these folders.
The path of the folder appears in the Folder text box in the Select Project
dialog box.
Folder path
Folder
options
28
Starting Avid MediaLog
The following table lists the default folder locations for each folder option:
Folder Option
Folder Path
Private
(Windows) C:\Program Files\Avid\Avid MediaLog\Avid
Projects\login name
(Macintosh) Macintosh HD/Users/Shared/MediaLog/Avid
Projects/login name
Shared
(Windows) C:\Program Files\Avid\Avid MediaLog\Avid Projects
(Macintosh) Macintosh HD/Users/Shared/MediaLog/Avid
Projects
External
Last folder opened through Browse button.
Creating a New Project
To create a new project:
1. In the Select Project dialog box, select the folder in which you want to
create the project: private, shared, or external.
2. Click New Project.
The New Project dialog box opens.
3. Type the name of your new project in the text box.
n
n
If you plan to move bins and projects from one platform to another, do not use
the characters / \ : * ? “ < > | or leading spaces, trailing spaces, or trailing
periods, when naming projects, bins, and users. Bin and project names are
limited to 27 characters, not including the period and 3-character extension
that the system automatically adds to a file name.
(Macintosh only) You can set the Use Windows compatible File Names option
in the Avid application’s General Settings dialog box to prevent the system
from accepting these restricted characters in a bin, project, or user name. If
you are using your Avid application as a standalone editor (and do not plan to
move your bins or projects to another platform), you have the option of
extending bin and project names to 31 characters using the Allow filenames to
exceed 27 characters option in the General Settings dialog box.
29
Chapter 2 Getting Started
4. Click the Format pop-up menu and select a project type based on your
source footage.
The following table lists the available format options.
n
30
References to 24p projects include 23.976p projects unless otherwise noted.
Project Type
Source Footage Transfer
23.976p NTSC
For film-originated or video-originated footage that
has been shot at 23.976 fps or film-originated footage
transferred on digital videotape (such as Digital
Betacam®)
24p NTSC
For film-originated or other 24-fps footage
transferred to NTSC videotape
30i NTSC
For NTSC video-originated or other 30-fps footage
transferred to NTSC videotape
24p PAL
For film-originated or other 24-fps footage
transferred to PAL videotape at 25 fps
25p PAL
For 25-fps film footage transferred to PAL videotape
25i PAL
For PAL video-originated footage (25 fps)
720p/59.94
HD broadcast. For video-originated footage
transferred to this format
1080p/23.976
HD online. For film-originated footage transferred to
this format
1080p/25
HD online. For film-originated footage transferred to
this format
1080i/50
HD broadcast. For video-originated footage
transferred to this format
1080i/59.94
HD broadcast. For video-originated footage
transferred to this format
Starting Avid MediaLog
5. Select the following additional options:
-
For 23.976p, 24p, 25p, and 1080p film projects, click the Film button
and select a film gauge tracking format from the Film Type pop-up
menu.
-
For 24p PAL projects, select an audio transfer rate. For information
on audio transfer rates, see “Transfer Settings for Film Projects” on
page 158.
-
For 25i PAL, 30i NTSC, and 1080i Matchback projects, select
Matchback, click the Film Type pop-up menu, and select a film
format.
For more information about matchback, see “Using the Matchback
Option” in the input and output guide or user’s guide for your Avid
editing system.
6. Click OK.
The system creates the new project files and folder, and then returns to the
Select Project dialog box. The project name is highlighted in the Projects
scroll list.
7. Select a user profile. (See “Using User Profiles” on page 36.)
8. Do one of the following:
t
Select a project and click OK.
t
Double-click a project name.
The Project window, the Composer monitor, and the Timeline open with
the selected User settings loaded.
Setting Film Preferences
If you are logging 24p or 25p footage for a film project, set film preferences in
the Film Settings dialog box immediately after you create a project. These
settings provide the system with important information about the type of film
and audio transfer you used for your job. For more information, see “Working
with a Film Project” on page 155.
31
Chapter 2 Getting Started
Selecting a Private Project
The default location for the private projects folder is
•
(Windows) C:\Program Files\Avid\Avid MediaLog\Avid Projects\login
name
•
(Macintosh) Macintosh HD/Users/Shared/MediaLog/Avid Projects/login
name
Creating or storing a project in a private folder does not prevent other users
from navigating to or opening the folder.
To select a private project:
1. Start the Avid application.
The Select Project dialog box opens.
Login name
Private folder
location
Private option
selected
2. Click Private in the Select a Project area.
Your private projects appear.
n
You cannot type into the User or Folder text boxes.
3. Do one of the following:
t
Select a project and click OK.
t
Double-click a project name.
The Project window, the Composer monitor, and the Timeline open with
the selected User settings loaded.
32
Starting Avid MediaLog
Selecting a Shared Project
The default path for the shared projects folder is
•
(Windows) C:\Program Files\Avid\Avid MediaLog\Avid Projects
•
(Macintosh) Macintosh HD/Users/Shared/MediaLog/Avid Projects
To select a shared project:
1. Start the Avid application.
The Select Project dialog box opens.
Shared folder
Location
Shared
option
selected
2. Click Shared in the Select a Project area.
n
You cannot type into the User or Folder text boxes.
33
Chapter 2 Getting Started
3. Do one of the following:
t
Select a project and click OK.
t
Double-click a project name.
The Project window, the Composer monitor, and the Timeline open with
the selected User settings loaded.
Selecting an External Project
You can select a project that is located outside of the Avid Projects folder.
To select an external project:
1. Start the Avid application.
The Select Project dialog box opens.
Browse
button
2. In the Select Project dialog box, click External.
The projects displayed are those you most recently navigated to by using
the browse button.
34
Starting Avid MediaLog
3. Do one of the following:
t
Select a project and click OK.
t
Double-click a project name.
The Project window, the Composer monitor, and the Timeline open with
the selected User settings loaded.
Browsing for a Project
To browse for a project in a location other than the default folders:
1. Start the Avid application.
The Select Project dialog box opens.
2. Click the Browse button.
Browse
button
3. The Browse for Folder (Windows) or Project Directory (Macintosh)
dialog box opens.
4. Navigate to the folder that contains the project you want.
5. Click OK (Windows) or Choose (Macintosh).
6. Do one of the following:
t
Select a project and click OK.
t
Double-click a project name.
The Project window, the Composer monitor, and the Timeline open with
the selected User settings loaded.
35
Chapter 2 Getting Started
Using User Profiles
You can establish different profiles for a single user without having to log out
of your system and log back in under a different name (see “Changing Users”
on page 27). Separate editing functions to have separate settings. User
“Editor,” for example, can have separate profiles for “Audio editor,” “Film
editor,” or for “Assistant 1,” “Assistant 2,” and so on. These profiles have
separate folders and settings that are kept in the following folders:
•
(Windows) C:\Program Files\Avid\Avid MediaLog\Avid Users\login
name
•
(Macintosh) Macintosh HD/Users/Shared/MediaLog/Avid Users/login
name
You can also import a user or user profile from another location.
Creating a User Profile
To create a user profile:
1. Click the Settings tab in the Project window.
2. Click the User Profile Selection pop-up menu, and select Create User
Profile.
User Profile Selection pop-up menu
36
Starting Avid MediaLog
The Create User Profile dialog box opens.
3. Type a name in the Profile Name text box and then click OK.
The new user profile appears selected in the pop-up menu and the user
profile name appears in the Project window title bar.
Importing a User Profile
To import user settings from another user or user profile:
1. Click the Settings tab in the Project window.
2. Click the User Profile Selection pop-up menu and select Import User or
User Profile.
3. Navigate to the user or user profile you want to import.
Changing User Profiles
To change user profiles:
1. Click the Settings tab in the Project window.
2. Click the User Profile Selection pop-up menu and select another user
profile.
To return to the original user profile:
1. Click the Settings tab in the Project window.
2. Click the User Profile Selection pop-up menu and select the original user
profile.
n
When you select the original user profile, your login name appears in the
Project window title bar. When you select another user profile, the user profile
name appears in the Project window title bar.
37
Chapter 2 Getting Started
n
If you are using a user profile other than the default and you change to
another project, the default user settings are loaded, even though the Project
window still displays your non-default user profile name. You must reselect the
user profile you want to have active.
Exporting a User Profile
You can create a user profile on one system, export it to a server and then
import the same user profile from another system to the new system. Export
the user profile as a Personal profile or a Group profile.
When you choose Personal, the user profile performs an autoload and auto
save every time you open a project. Every time you update the user profile, it
saves the new profile information. For example, you can create the user profile
Jennie on one system, export it to another location (server) and then import it
to a different system. Every time you make any changes to the Jennie user
profile, it updates to the server and when you open the Jennie user profile on
either system, it uses the most recent Jennie user profile.
When you choose Group, the user profile autoloads but does not auto save.
Changes made to the user profile only affects the system the changes were
made on, the changes do not update to the server.
To export user settings to another user or user profile:
1. Click the Settings tab in the Project window.
2. Click the User Profile Selection pop-up menu and select Export User or
User Profile.
3. Choose Personal or Group.
4. Navigate to the location where you want to place the user or user profile.
Closing a Project
When you close the current project, you return to the Select Project dialog
box.
To close the current project, do one of the following:
38
t
With the Project window active, select File > Close.
t
Click the Close button in the Project window.
Backing Up Your Project Information
Backing Up Your Project Information
Although Avid MediaLog automatically saves your bins, projects, and
settings, you should back up these items frequently to avoid losing any of your
work if your hard drive fails. Because the storage requirements are minimal,
you can back up these files to a variety of storage devices, such as:
n
•
Floppy disk or equivalent drive
•
Removable storage device
•
Network storage device (such as a file server)
To back up the larger media files created when you capture footage, use a
high-capacity storage device. For information on backing up media files, see
the editing guide or user’s guide for your Avid editing system.
Saving Your Project Information on a Drive or Floppy Disk
To save your work on a floppy disk or equivalent device:
1. Close Avid MediaLog.
2. Mount the drive or insert a floppy disk as appropriate.
3. (Windows only) From the Windows desktop, double-click the My
Computer icon.
4. Double-click the icon for the destination storage drive or floppy drive to
open it. Double-click any additional folders to target the appropriate
storage location.
5. Double-click the internal hard drive to open it.
6. Navigate to the project folder and drag the folder to the targeted storage
location. For the default locations of project folders, see “Selecting a
Project” on page 28.
7. When the system finishes copying the files, unmount the drive or eject the
floppy disk and store it where appropriate.
39
Chapter 2 Getting Started
Restoring from a Backup
To restore a project, user profile, or settings from a backup storage
device:
1. Make sure Avid MediaLog is closed.
2. Mount the drive or insert a floppy disk as appropriate that contains the
backup copies you want to restore.
3. From the desktop, double-click the drive or floppy disk and the internal
hard drive.
4. Drag the project folders from the storage device to the appropriate folder
on the internal hard drive. For the default locations of project folders, see
“Selecting a Project” on page 28.
When you start Avid MediaLog, the restored project is displayed in the Select
Project dialog box.
Ending a Work Session
To end the work session, first you must quit the application, and then turn off
your equipment in the order described in these sections:
•
Quitting the Avid MediaLog Application
•
Turning Off Your Equipment (Windows)
•
Turning Off Your Equipment (Macintosh)
Quitting the Avid MediaLog Application
There are two ways to quit the Avid MediaLog application, depending upon
whether you have a project open or you are between projects:
t
If you are working on an open project and want to quit Avid MediaLog
quickly, select File > Exit (Windows) or File > Quit MediaLog
(Macintosh).
The project closes and the application quits.
t
If you are between projects, from the Select Project dialog box:
a.
Click the Quit button.
A message box opens, asking if you want to leave the application.
40
Ending a Work Session
b.
Click Leave to quit the application. Click Cancel to return to the
Select Project dialog box, and select another project.
Turning Off Your Equipment (Windows)
When you finish using your system and want to turn it off completely, follow
these steps to avoid damaging your system or media storage drives. Quit the
Avid application before turning off your equipment.
To turn off your equipment:
1. Select Start > Shut Down.
The Shut Down Windows dialog box opens.
2. Select Shut down from the pop-up menu, and click OK.
3. When a message states that you can safely turn off your computer, press
the computer’s Power button.
4. Turn off your speakers and monitors.
5. Turn off each external drive in the chassis, and then turn off the chassis
itself.
6. Turn off all other hardware.
c
Never remove media drives from your Avid system when it is turned on.
Shut down the computer and then remove the drives.
Turning Off Your Equipment (Macintosh)
When you finish using your system and want to turn it off completely, follow
these steps to avoid damaging your system or media storage drives. Quit the
Avid application before turning off your equipment.
To turn off your equipment:
1. Select Apple P menu > Shut Down.
This turns off your Macintosh system. The screens on the Bin and Edit
monitors become dimmed.
2. Turn off your speakers and monitors.
41
Chapter 2 Getting Started
3. Turn off each external drive in the chassis and then turn off the
chassis itself.
4. Turn off all other hardware.
c
Never remove media drives from your Avid system when it is turned on.
Shut down the computer and then remove the drives.
Using Help
You can get help and background information for tasks, windows, dialog
boxes, and screen objects through your Avid Help system. The Help system is
HTML based and operates in the Microsoft® Internet Explorer Web browser.
Avid recommends using Internet Explorer Version 5 or later.
To open the Help system:
t
Select Help > Media Log Help.
The Help system appears in a browser window.
To close the Help system, do one of the following:
42
t
Click the Close button in the browser.
t
(Windows) Select File > Close.
t
(Macintosh) In Internet Explorer, select Explorer > Quit. In Netscape
Navigator, select Netscape > Quit.
t
Navigate to another Web site.
Chapter 3
Working with the Project
Window
The Project window provides controls for structuring and viewing important
information about your current project.
This chapter covers the following topics:
n
•
Exploring the Project Window
•
Working with Bins
•
Describing Project Settings
•
Using the Format, Info and Usage Displays
•
Using Other Tools
This chapter refers to the installation default directory path for the various
Avid folders. If you selected a different directory path during the installation,
you must substitute that path when using this chapter.
Exploring the Project Window
The Project window provides controls (Bins, Settings, Format, Info, and
Usage) for structuring and viewing information about your current project.
The Project window also provides access to the Settings scroll list for altering
various User, Project, and Site settings.
Chapter 3 Working with the Project Window
You can use the Project window to:
•
Create and open bins.
•
View and modify settings.
•
View information about the format of the project and system memory
usage.
•
View information about the work session usage.
•
Add folders to organize project components.
Opening and Closing the Project Window
The Project window opens automatically when you select a project in the
Select Project dialog box.
To close the Project window and return to the Select Project dialog box,
do one of the following:
t
Click the Close button in the Project window.
t
With the Project window active, select File > Close Project.
The Project window remains open the entire time you are working in a project;
however, it might be hidden from view by several open bins or tools.
44
Exploring the Project Window
To locate and redisplay the Project window, do one of the following:
t
Select Tools > Project.
t
Click in an unobstructed area of the Project window to bring it forward.
Changing Font and Point Size
You can change the default font and point sizes of the Project and Bin
windows. You can vary the fonts and point sizes across these windows. For
example, you can set the Project window to Helvetica, 13 pt; set one Bin
window to Times Roman, 11 pt; and set another Bin window to Arial, 12 pt.
The following table describes the windows you can change and where these
changes are saved.
Window
Location of Changes
Project
Changes the font and point size of the text in the Bins and Settings
tabs; saved as a Project setting.
Bin
Changes the font and point size of the text in the Bin window;
saved as a Bin setting (not the Bin View setting).
To change the font displayed in the Project or Bin window:
1. Click the Project or Bin window to make it active.
2. Select Edit > Set Font.
The Set Font dialog box opens.
3. Select a font from the Font pop-up menu.
n
Any font installed on the Avid system appears in the list. For information on
adding fonts to your system, see your Windows or Macintosh documentation.
4. Type another point size for the font in the Size text box.
5. Click OK.
The new font and point size appear in the active window.
When you close the window, the last font and point size applied is saved with
the window.
45
Chapter 3 Working with the Project Window
Working with Bins
Bins contain the master clips that are created when you log source material.
From the Project window, you can view a list of bins associated with the
project, and open, close, and create bins. You can also open bins created for
another project.
Viewing a List of Bins
To view a list of bins associated with the project:
t
Click the Bins tab in the Project window.
Bins tab
Fast Menu
button
Bin icon
Bins list
From the Bins list you can examine the number, names, sizes, and location of
the bins.
46
Working with Bins
Displaying Folders of Bins in the Bins List
You can add folders to the Bins list in the Project window to help organize
your project. You can click bins and drag them into folders, or click folders
and drag them into other folders. See “Managing Folders and Bins” on
page 52.
Fast Menu button
New folders
Trash icon
To display the folder’s contents in the Bins list of the Project window:
t
Click the triangular opener next to a folder icon.
To close the display:
t
Click the triangular opener again.
To view a list of only the folder contents and not the folders:
t
Select Fast > Flat View.
The Trash icon and its contents disappear until Flat View is deselected.
n
The Trash icon does not appear until you select and delete a bin.
47
Chapter 3 Working with the Project Window
Creating a Folder in a Project
To create a folder in a project:
1. Click the Bins tab in the Project window.
2. Select Fast > New Folder.
A new untitled folder opens.
3. Click the untitled folder name in the Bins list and rename it.
Creating a New Bin
To create a new bin from the Project window, do one of the following:
t
Select File > New Bin.
t
Click the New Bin button in the Project window.
A new (empty) bin opens and is given the name of the project as displayed in
the title bar of the Project window. The new bin opens in the Bins list of the
Project window with the default name highlighted. A corresponding file is
placed in the project folder in the Avid Projects folder and a backup copy is
placed in the Avid Attic folder.
You can keep the default name of the bin or rename the bin immediately. For
more information, see “Renaming a Bin” on page 48.
Renaming a Bin
Each new bin you create takes the name of the project that appears in the title
bar of the Project window, and is numbered incrementally.
48
Working with Bins
To change the name of a bin:
1. Click the bin name in the Bins list of the Project window.
2. Type a new name.
Project name
Default bin name
Opening and Closing a Bin
To open a bin:
1. Click the Bins tab in the Project window.
2. Double-click the Bin icon next to the bin name.
The bin opens in a separate window. The Bin icon in the Project window
becomes dimmed, indicating the bin is open.
Opening Selected Bins
To open several bins at once from the Project window:
1. Click a Bin icon in the Bins list.
2. Ctrl+click (Windows) or Shift+click (Macintosh) each additional bin you
want to open.
3. Select File > Open Selected Bins.
Opening Bins from Other Projects
To open a bin from another project:
1. Select File > Open Bin.
(Make sure that no bins are selected in your current project view.)
The Open dialog box opens.
49
Chapter 3 Working with the Project Window
2. Find and select the bin you want.
(Windows only) Bins have the file name extension .avb.
c
Never open a bin that is stored on a floppy disk or equivalent device, since
the system cannot save your work. Always copy the bin to a project folder
on the system drive before you open it. For more information, see the
input and output guide or user’s guide for your Avid editing system.
3. Click Open.
The bin appears in the Bins list of the Project window in a folder called Other
Bins. The name Other Bins appears in italics. You can rename this folder. This
option is useful when you want to open a bin not currently displayed in the
Project window.
n
The Other Bins folder disappears from the Bins list when you delete all the
bins in the Other Bins folder. Deleting bins from the Other Bins folder does not
remove the bins from the drive; only the pointers to the bins are removed.
Closing a Bin
To close a bin, do one of the following:
t
Click the Close button.
t
Select File > Close Bin.
Deleting a Bin or Folder
You can delete bins and folders along with their contents from the Bins list in
the Project window. Deleted bins and folders are moved to a Trash folder in
the Bins list until you empty the Trash. If you need a deleted bin or folder, you
can retrieve it from the Trash. For more information, see “Viewing Contents in
the Trash” on page 51.
c
Only bins and folders appear in the Trash. If you select any other item
within a bin and press Delete, the item is permanently deleted and does
not appear in the Trash.
To delete a bin or folder from the Project window:
1. Select the bin or folder you want to delete in the Bins list.
2. Press the Delete key.
50
Working with Bins
A Trash icon appears in the Bins list in the Project window. The Trash
contains the deleted item (bin or folder). The deleted item is stored in the
Trash until you empty it.
Viewing Contents in the Trash
If you need to view the contents in the Trash or decide you do not want to
delete those items in the Trash, you must first move the bins or folders from
the Trash.
To view items in the Trash:
1. Click the triangular opener next to the Trash icon in the Bins list to list the
contents of the Trash.
2. Click the bins or folders you want to keep (or view) and drag them from
the Trash to the Bins list in the Project window.
3. Double-click the bin or folder to view it.
Emptying the Trash in the Bins List
You can empty the contents of the Trash that is located in the Bins list.
c
n
Emptying the Trash permanently removes the bins or folders from the
drive.
If you change the name of the Trash icon, you cannot empty the Trash.
To empty the Trash in the Bins list:
1. Select Fast > Empty Trash.
A message box is displayed.
51
Chapter 3 Working with the Project Window
2. Click Empty Trash to delete the bins or folders from the Trash and from
your system drive.
Managing Folders and Bins
You can use the Project window to create hierarchies of folders and bins that
reflect the specific workflow of the current project. This structure provides
both simplicity and backup security.
Creating a hierarchy allows you to have one set of bins available in the Project
window during the digitizing and organizing phase, and another set of bins
available during editing to reduce clutter. For more information, see the
editing guide or user’s guide for your Avid editing system.
Saving Bins Automatically
Avid MediaLog automatically saves changes to your work on a regular basis
during each session. You can modify the frequency of the automatic backups
using the Bin settings in the Settings scroll list in the Project window.
When you are working with bins, an asterisk (Windows) or a diamond
(Macintosh) appears before the bin name in the bin’s title bar. The asterisk
(Windows) or diamond (Macintosh) indicates that the changes to the bin have
not been saved. Once you save the bin, the asterisk (Windows) or diamond
(Macintosh) is removed.
When auto-save occurs:
•
Any open bins are updated with changes made since the last auto-save.
•
Copies of these bins are placed in the following folders as backup:
(Windows) drive:\Program Files\Avid\Avid MediaLog\Avid Attic folder
(Macintosh) Macintosh HD:/Users/Shared/MediaLog/Avid Attic folder
The system automatically places copies of all bins into the Avid Attic folder at
regular intervals for backup. The procedure for recovering bin files from the
Avid Attic folder is described in the editing guide or user’s guide for your Avid
editing system.
52
Working with Bins
You can manually save bins for added security — for example, immediately
after an important edit. When your work is lost, or when you want to recover
an earlier version of a bin, you can retrieve files from the Avid Attic folder.
To adjust the frequency of automatic saves:
1. Click the Settings tab in the Project window.
The Settings scroll list appears.
2. Double-click Bin in the Settings scroll list.
The Bin Settings dialog box opens.
3. Type a number in the minutes text box for the Auto-save interval option.
4. Click OK.
Saving Bins Manually
You can manually save a specific bin, selected bins, or all bins.
To save a specific bin:
1. Click the bin window to activate it.
2. Select File > Save Bin.
n
The Save Bin command appears dimmed if there have been no changes since
the last time the active bin was saved.
To save all the bins:
1. Click the Project window to activate it but do not select any bins in the
Bins list.
2. Select File > Save All.
The system saves all the bins for the project.
53
Chapter 3 Working with the Project Window
Describing Project Settings
From the Settings scroll list in the Project window, you can view, select, open,
and alter various User, Project, and Site settings.
To view the Settings scroll list:
t
Click the Settings tab in the Project window.
Settings tab
Settings type
Settings scroll list
Understanding Settings
The three types of settings appear in the Settings scroll list as User, Project,
and Site.
The function of these settings is as follows:
54
•
User settings are specific to a particular editor. User settings reflect
individual preferences for adjusting the user interface in the Avid
MediaLog application. Individual User settings are stored in each user
folder.
•
Project settings are directly related to individual projects. When you
change a Project setting, it affects all editors working on the project.
Specific Project settings are stored in each project folder.
Describing Project Settings
•
n
Site settings establish default parameters for all new users and projects on
a particular system. They can apply to particular configurations of
equipment installed at the site (for example, specification and node
settings for an external switcher). They can also include other User or
Project settings that you copy into the Site Settings window. Site settings
are stored in a separate Settings folder.
For information about the location of the settings files, see the editing guide or
user’s guide for your Avid editing system.
The following table briefly describes each item in the Settings scroll list. The
table also lists where you can find additional information on a particular item,
and indicates whether the item has an associated dialog box (or window) that
you can access from the Settings scroll list.
Settings Scroll List
For More
Information
Setting Name
Description
Audio Project
Sets the rate for audio input.
Bin
Sets the auto-save interval; double-click See “Bin Settings” on
preferences for bins and other binpage 57.
related parameters.
Bin View
Selects and formats the information
displayed in bins.
See “Bin View Menu”
on page 104.
Communication
(Serial) Ports
Configures the serial ports on your
system for deck control.
See “Using the
Communications
(Serial) Ports Tool” on
page 65.
Deck
Configuration
Configures channels and decks into the See “Configuring
system.
Decks and Setting
Preferences” on
page 68.
Deck Preferences
Sets preferences that affect all decks
configured into the system.
See the input and
output guide or user’s
guide for your Avid
editing system.
See “Setting Deck
Preferences” on
page 75.
55
Chapter 3 Working with the Project Window
Settings Scroll List (Continued)
Setting Name
Description
For More
Information
Film
Sets parameters for edit play rate, ink
number format, and transfer rate.
See “Film and 24P
Settings” on page 156.
Import
Sets parameters for file import.
See “Importing Logs”
on page 93.
Keyboard
Maps commands from the Command
palette to the keyboard.
See “Viewing
Keyboard Settings” on
page 62.
Logging
Allows you to enable the Pause Deck
While Logging feature, map function
keys, and specify a preset duration for
subclips.
See “Pausing a Deck
While Logging” on
page 88.
Workspace
Enables you to associate settings and
windows with a workspace.
See “Working with
Bins” on page 46.
Defining Settings
You can use the Settings scroll list to establish a hierarchy of settings that
address the specific needs of each production phase.
For example, you can establish:
c
•
User settings for the assistant editor — Facilitate logging, digitizing,
and organizing projects
•
Project settings — Reflect the specific needs of the project
•
Bin View settings — Display useful columns of information for each bin
Never use a User settings file that was opened in an Avid editing
application such as Avid Symphony, Media Composer, Film Composer,
Avid Xpress, or Avid NewsCutter.
By establishing these settings once, and selecting the appropriate setting or bin
view in context, you can save time and effort that would be spent searching for
information or adjusting bin headings on-the-fly. You can also save these
settings along with your template for use on similar projects.
56
Describing Project Settings
Reviewing Basic Settings
The following are basic system settings to review at the start of your project:
•
Film SettingsBin Settings
•
Logging Settings
To view the settings:
t
Double-click each setting in the Settings scroll list of the Project window.
Film Settings
Film settings determine essential parameters for accurately capturing,
tracking, and editing source material for 23.976p, 24p, 25p, and 1080p
projects. For a description of film settings, see “Film and 24P Settings” on
page 156.
Bin Settings
The Bin Settings dialog box controls the Avid MediaLog’s automatic save
features, including the number of backups saved in the Avid Attic folder. The
following table describes the Automatic Save and Backup options, and the
results of double-clicking an object in a bin.
Bin Settings Dialog Box Options
Option
Description
Auto-Save interval
Specifies the length of time between attempts to auto-save project
files. The default is 15 minutes.
To avoid interrupting a logging operation, the Avid system waits
until the system is inactive before auto-saving. Use the “Force autosave at” option to specify an interval at which the system will
interrupt an operation to auto-save.
Inactivity period
Specifies the length of time the Avid system waits while the system
is inactive before automatically saving the project files. The default
is 0 seconds.
Force Auto-Save at
Specifies the maximum length of time between auto-saves. When
the system reaches this time, it will auto-save the project files even
if it must interrupt an operation to do so. The default is 15 minutes.
57
Chapter 3 Working with the Project Window
Bin Settings Dialog Box Options (Continued)
Option
Description
Maximum files in a project’s attic
Specifies the total number of files stored in the Avid Attic folder.
When a bin is saved, the Avid system copies the previous version of
the bin to a special folder called the Avid Attic. The default is 30
files.
Keep more files if there are many users working on the system. This
ensures that all the bins are backed up.
When there are multiple users working on one system, store Bin
settings as Site or Project settings. This will ensure that another user
does not override your settings and delete your backups.
Max versions of a file in the attic
Specifies the total number of single-bin copies stored in the Avid
Attic folder. This setting prevents filling the Avid Attic with too
many copies of one bin, at the risk of losing the others. The default
is 5 copies.
Logging Settings
The logging settings let you define whether the deck will pause during a
logging operation. See “Pausing a Deck While Logging” on page 88.
Displaying Project Settings
You can display the Settings scroll list of the Project window in different
groups, depending on what you need to view.
To change the Settings scroll list display of the Project window:
1. Click the Settings tab in the Project window.
The Settings scroll list appears.
2. Click the Fast Menu button and select a settings display group from the
Settings menu.
The Settings menu displays the selected settings group and the Settings
scroll list displays only the settings in that group.
58
Describing Project Settings
The following table describes the different settings display groups.
Settings Display Groups
Option
Description
Active Settings
Displays currently active settings in your Avid system.
All Settings
Displays all settings available in the Avid system.
Base Settings
Displays Project, User, and Site settings only; no views are displayed.
Bin Views
Displays all the Bin View settings you created.
Import Settings
Displays all the Import settings.
Workspaces
Displays all the Workspace settings you created.
Workspace Linked
Displays only the linked workspaces.
Working with Settings
You can view and modify most of your current settings by double-clicking
them in the Settings scroll list of the Project window and by selecting new
options. You can duplicate, rename, copy, and move settings among files or
systems.
Selecting Another User
Because User settings are not project or site specific, you can display another
set of User settings in the Project window.
To select another user:
1. Click the Settings tab in the Project window.
The Settings scroll list appears.
59
Chapter 3 Working with the Project Window
2. Select another name from the User pop-up menu.
User pop-up menu
The previous user’s settings are saved, and the new user’s settings are loaded
into the Avid system and the Project window.
Modifying Settings
You can alter the default options for various settings to reflect the specific
needs of a project or to customize the system based on personal preferences.
For details, open a settings window and press F1 (Windows) or the Help key
(Macintosh).
Restoring Default Settings
To restore settings to their default values:
1. Click the Settings tab in the Project window.
The Settings scroll list appears.
2. Click a setting to select it. Ctrl+click (Windows) or Shift+click
(Macintosh) each additional setting you want to select.
3. Select Special > Restore to Default.
A message box opens and asks whether you want to save the settings.
4. Click the Copy & Restore button to copy the current settings before
restoring the default settings, or click the Restore button to discard the
current settings.
The system restores the default values for the selected settings.
60
Describing Project Settings
Using Site Settings
When the system opens a new project, it searches for the Site_Settings file in
the following path:
•
(Windows) drive:\Program Files\Avid\Avid MediaLog\ML Settings
•
(Macintosh) Macintosh HD:/Applications/MediaLog/ML Settings
The system loads Site settings and any settings placed in the file and then
loads any Project and User settings not included in the Site_Settings file.
Adding settings to the Site_Settings files is useful if you need to establish
global settings for all new users and projects, such as deck settings, a specific
start timecode for all clips, or various customized features of the interface.
To load settings into the Site_Settings file:
1. Open a project with the settings you want to establish as Site settings. If a
project does not already exist with the settings you want, create a project
and make adjustments to the default settings as needed.
2. Select Special > Site Settings.
The Site_Settings window opens.
3. Click a Project or User setting in the Settings scroll list of the Project
window, or Ctrl+click (Windows) or Shift+click (Macintosh) multiple
settings and drag them into the Site_Settings window.
Copies appear in the Site_Settings window.
4. Close the Site_Settings window.
All new users and projects opened from the Select Project dialog box use these
settings as the default settings.
61
Chapter 3 Working with the Project Window
Viewing Keyboard Settings
Common editing commands are mapped to the MediaLog keyboard. Use the
Keyboard settings to view the commands mapped to your keyboard. You
cannot change the mappings in Avid MediaLog.
To view keyboard settings:
t
n
Double-click Keyboard in the Settings scroll list of the Project window.
The Keyboard palette varies, depending on the type of keyboard attached to
your Avid system. If an Avid-supported European keyboard is attached to your
Avid system, then the Keyboard palette matches that keyboard.
Customizing Your Workspace
Your workspace defines how you arrange and size the windows on the desktop
of the Avid editing application. If you like to work with a particular group of
windows arranged and sized in a particular setup, you can assign them to a
workspace setting that you can then recall with a Workspace button. For
example, during logging you might want to display the Logging tool and bins
in specific locations.
While in a workspace, you can move tool windows or open and close tool
windows. The next time you select that workspace, the tool windows appear
with either:
•
The arrangement from the last time you left the workspace
•
The arrangement you set for the workspace, regardless of any changes you
made
For information on setting up workspaces, see the editing guide or user’s guide
for your Avid editing system.
62
Using the Format, Info and Usage Displays
The Keyboard settings window opens and displays command buttons that are
mapped to the keyboard. To view the name of a command button, let the
mouse pointer rest on the button for 1 or 2 seconds.
Using the Format, Info and Usage Displays
The following types of information are also available on the Project window:
•
The Format display allows you to view the video format selected in the
New Project dialog box.
•
The Info display allows you to view basic project information. The
displayed information lists the options you selected in the New Project
dialog box when you created the project. You can also view system
memory information from the Info display.
•
The Usage display shows information on system usage. You can use this
information to support business functions such as resource management.
For more information, see the editing guide or user’s guide for your Avid
editing system.
To open the Format, Info, or Usage display:
t
Click the Format, Info, or Usage tab in the Project window.
The items listed in this view are for information only and cannot be changed.
63
Chapter 3 Working with the Project Window
Using Other Tools
The Avid MediaLog application provides access to the following tools for use
while logging clips:
•
Avid Calculator
•
Communications (Serial) Ports tool
•
Console window
About the Avid Calculator
The Avid Calculator helps you calculate video and film durations, and convert
timecode and film key numbers to different formats.
For example, you can:
•
Convert drop-frame to non-drop-frame timecode values.
•
Convert timecode durations between 30-fps and 25-fps projects.
•
Convert a duration in video to the corresponding length in footage and
frames for measuring 35mm film.
To use the Avid Calculator:
1. Select Tools > Calculator.
The Avid Calculator opens.
Format pop-up menu
64
Using Other Tools
2. Select a format from the Format pop-up menu.
3. Make calculations in one of the following ways:
t
Click numbers and functions in the Avid Calculator.
t
Enter numbers and functions using the numeric keypad.
t
Enter numbers and functions using the top row of numbers on the
keyboard.
You do not need to enter leading zeros, colons, or semicolons for
timecode.
4. To convert your totals at any time to another format, select a different
frame code or key number format from the Format pop-up menu.
Using the Communications (Serial) Ports Tool
The Communications (Serial) Ports tool allows you to view the current
configuration of the serial interface at any time during editing. You can also
use it to reconfigure the ports without quitting Avid MediaLog or shutting
down the computer.
To access the Communications (Serial) Ports tool:
1. Double-click Communications (Serial) Ports in the Settings scroll list of
the Project window.
The Communications (Serial) Ports tool opens.
n
If you have not yet configured a deck, the window is empty.
2. View or change the port for one or more decks.
You configure the deck and port in the Deck Configuration dialog box
(see “Configuring Decks and Setting Preferences” on page 68). You can
change the port in the Communications (Serial) Ports tool, but whenever
Avid MediaLog starts it uses the port selected in the Deck Configuration
dialog box.
Using the Console Window
The Console window provides a number of features, including:
•
Current system information, including your system ID number
•
A log of error messages
65
Chapter 3 Working with the Project Window
c
Do not use the programming features of the Console window without
guidance from Avid professionals. Contact your local Avid Reseller (in
North America, you can contact Avid Customer Support).
To display current system information:
1. Select Tools > Console to open the Console window.
2. Scroll to the top of the Console window to view your system information
and ID. This feature is especially useful for finding the system ID before
you contact your Avid Reseller or Avid Customer Support.
66
Chapter 4
Logging Source Material
You use Avid MediaLog to log your clips in preparation for capturing later
when using Avid editing applications.
This chapter covers the following topics:
•
Understanding Logging
•
Configuring Decks and Setting Preferences
•
Understanding Timecode
•
Preparing to Log Material
•
Logging
•
Logging Film Information
•
Modifying Clip Information After Logging
•
Creating Avid Logs
•
Importing Logs
Chapter 4 Logging Source Material
Understanding Logging
Avid MediaLog requires that you name the clips that you log, the tapes they
came from, and their start and end timecodes. Many editors prefer to log all
their clips (shots) first and then batch capture their material later in the Avid
editing application.
There are three basic methods for producing a bin or log that you can use later
for batch capturing:
•
Logging directly to a bin
•
Importing standard log files to a bin
•
Creating Avid logs
The Avid MediaLog tools automate the process of recording each clip’s start
and end timecodes, track selection, and other important data. You do not need
to enter information manually. However, if a source deck is unavailable, or if
you already logged the data on paper, you can manually record clip data in a
bin.
The logging tools provided in Avid MediaLog are also available in the Avid
editing system products. Bins that you create with Avid MediaLog are
completely compatible with your Avid editing system product — you can
copy Avid MediaLog bins to the Avid editing system to begin working with
the logged footage.
Configuring Decks and Setting Preferences
Attach and configure your deck, and then set deck preferences within the Avid
MediaLog application.
See the next section to configure a deck and then go to “Setting Deck
Preferences” on page 75.
68
Configuring Decks and Setting Preferences
Configuring Decks
The Avid MediaLog application provides a feature that automatically
configures your attached deck. Each time you quit the Avid MediaLog
application, the deck configuration settings are saved. If you reconnect the
deck to a different port, or attach a new deck, run the automatic deck
configuration feature again.
If Avid MediaLog does not automatically sense your attached deck, you must
manually configure the deck.
n
Avid MediaLog does not override the manually specified configurations.
Automatic Deck Configuration
Use the automatic configuration feature before manually trying to configure
any attached deck. If the automatic feature does not sense your attached deck,
see “Manual Deck Configuration” on page 69.
To automatically sense the attached deck:
t
Select Special > Autoconfigure All Ports.
Avid MediaLog searches the system ports and configures the attached decks.
Manual Deck Configuration
Avid MediaLog offers an alternative method of configuring your deck if it
cannot be automatically configured. You can manually configure single or
multiple decks even if the decks are not currently attached to the system. You
can also delete stored deck configurations.
69
Chapter 4 Logging Source Material
The Deck Configuration and Deck Preferences settings appear as separate
items in the Settings scroll list of the Project window.
Deck settings
Deck Configuration settings allow you to establish deck control parameters for
a single deck or for multiple decks. As with all settings, you can create
multiple versions, allowing you to select among them for frequent changes in
hardware configurations.
Deck Configuration settings and global deck control preferences appear as
separate items in the Settings scroll list of the Project window.
For information on setting Deck Preferences, see “Setting Deck Preferences”
on page 75.
c
70
You must manually configure the appropriate hardware connections
before Deck Configuration settings can take effect. For more information,
see the setup guide for your Avid editing system.
Configuring Decks and Setting Preferences
To configure a deck or multiple decks:
1. Double-click Deck Configuration in the Settings scroll list of the Project
window.
The Deck Configuration dialog box opens.
2. If you are configuring your system for the first time, click the Add
Channel button to add a new channel box on the left side of the Deck
Configuration dialog box and to automatically open a Channel dialog box.
n
Channel refers to the signal path for deck control, whether directly through a
serial port or through a V-LAN VLXi system connected to a serial port. Direct
serial port connection allows one deck for each channel, while a
V-LAN VLXi system provides multiple decks.
3. Select one of the following from the Channel Type pop-up menu,
depending upon your system configuration.
For more information
on V-LAN equipment,
contact your Avid sales
representative.
t
Direct if you are controlling a deck through an RS-422 connection to
the serial port.
t
VLAN VLX if you are controlling a deck through a V-LAN/VLXi
connection.
4. Select the port to which you are connecting the deck from the Port pop-up
menu.
71
Chapter 4 Logging Source Material
n
If you are not sure which port to choose, check the 9-pin serial port connectors
on the back of the system. If the ports are not labeled, see the hardware
documentation supplied with your system.
5. Click OK to close the Channel dialog box.
A message box opens and asks if you want to automatically configure the
channel now.
6. Click Yes if you want to automatically configure the channel.
A new channel appears in the display area of the Deck Configuration
dialog box, along with the autoconfigured deck.
Decks appear on the right side
Channel
boxes appear
on the left
side.
n
You can reopen the Channel dialog box to change the options at any time by
double-clicking the channel box in the Deck Configuration dialog box.
7. If you did not autoconfigure the deck, click the channel box to select it.
8. Click the Add Deck button to open the Deck Settings dialog box.
72
Configuring Decks and Setting Preferences
n
With a deck already connected to the system, you can click the Auto-configure
button to bypass the Deck Settings dialog box and automatically configure a
deck with the default settings.
9. Select settings based on your deck. For information on Deck settings, see
“Deck Settings Options” on page 73.
10. Click OK to close the Deck Settings dialog box and return to the Deck
Configuration dialog box.
n
You can reopen the Deck Settings dialog box to change the options at any time
by double-clicking the deck box in the Deck Configuration dialog box.
11. Repeat steps 2 to 10 for each additional channel or deck you want to
configure.
12. (Option) Select the “Verify configuration against actual decks” option (at
the bottom of the Deck Configuration dialog box) if you want the system
to check the deck configuration against the decks physically connected to
the system.
The system checks the deck configuration after you click Apply in the
Deck Configuration dialog box and when you start Avid MediaLog. A
message box warns you if the configuration does not match the deck.
13. Type a name in the Configuration name text box to name the deck
configuration. The new deck configuration appears in the Settings scroll
list of the Project window.
73
Chapter 4 Logging Source Material
14. Click Apply to complete the configurations and close the Deck
Configuration dialog box.
15. If necessary, double-click Deck Preferences in the Settings scroll list of
the Project window to adjust global deck control options. For more
information, see “Setting Deck Preferences” on page 75.
Deck Settings Options
To access the Deck Settings dialog box, do one of the following:
74
t
Click the Add Deck button in the Deck Configuration dialog box.
t
Select Deck Selection > Adjust Deck in the deck controller section of the
capture tool.
t
Double-click the deck name in the Deck Settings dialog box.
Configuring Decks and Setting Preferences
The following table describes the Deck Settings options.
Deck Settings Options
Option
Suboption
Description
Name
Type your custom name for the tape deck. The default name
matches the deck type.
Description
Enter notes about the deck.
Notes
Displays configuration information, supplied by Avid, about the
deck you have selected. Not all decks include this information.
Device
Select your manufacturer and model from the menus. These decks
have been qualified to work with your Avid system.
Address
For V-LAN VLXi use only (see your V-LAN VLXi
documentation). If you are using direct serial port deck control,
this option is unavailable.
Preroll
Specifies how many seconds the tape rolls before a capture or
digital cut starts. The default is based on the type of deck.
n
FAST CUE
The Preroll option has no effect in Avid MediaLog.
Speeds up long searches; if your decks can read timecode in Fast
Forward or Rewind mode. Otherwise, this option is not useful.
Switch to ff/rew
(seconds)
When this option is selected, the system switches to fast forward
or rewind if the target timecode is beyond the specified number of
seconds from your current location on the tape.
By default, the deck switches to fast forward or rewind to reach a
target timecode that is more than 60 seconds away.
If your deck shuttles very quickly, you can increase this number
so the system uses fast cue only for long searches.
Switch to Search
(seconds)
When this option is selected, the system switches out of fast
forward or rewind when it is within the specified number of
seconds of the target timecode. By default, the system switches to
Search mode when it is 25 seconds from the target timecode.
75
Chapter 4 Logging Source Material
Deleting Deck Configuration Elements
You can delete deck configuration elements to remove or replace them.
To delete deck configuration elements in the Avid system:
1. Double-click Deck Configuration in the Settings scroll list of the Project
window.
The Deck Configuration dialog box opens.
2. Click a channel box, a deck box, or the entire configuration to select it.
3. Click the Delete button.
4. Click Apply to complete the changes and close the dialog box.
Setting Deck Preferences
Deck preferences are global settings for basic deck control. These settings
apply to all decks connected to your system, regardless of your deck
configuration. You can open the Deck Preferences dialog box from the
Settings scroll list of the Project window.
76
Configuring Decks and Setting Preferences
The following table describes the Deck Preferences options.
Deck Preferences Options
Option
Description
When the deck contains
no tape, Log As
You select the timecode format (Drop Frame or Non-drop Frame) for logging
clips when no tape is in the deck. When a tape is in the deck, the system
automatically uses the existing timecode format on the tape (See
“Understanding Timecode” on page 77).
Allow assemble edit for
digital cut
Not Applicable.
Stop key pauses deck
This option defines the function of the Stop key (space bar) on the keyboard.
Select this option to map the space bar to the Pause button on the deck.
Deselect this option to map the space bar to the Stop button.
If the videotape heads are down in “Stop key pauses deck” mode, pressing the
space bar brings up the heads and pauses the deck.
The Stop button in the capture tool and Deck Controller tool always stops the
decks. (Select Tools > New Deck Controller to access the Deck Controller
tool.)
Shuttle holds speed
The Shuttle button continues shuttling at a constant speed instead of stopping
when you release it.
Stop any paused decks
when quitting
Any paused decks are stopped when you quit the Avid application. Selecting
this option saves wear on the deck heads.
Poll deck during digital
cut
Not Applicable.
77
Chapter 4 Logging Source Material
Understanding Timecode
Timecode is an electronic indexing method that denotes hours, minutes,
seconds, and frames that have elapsed on a videotape. For example, a
timecode of 01:03:30:10 denotes a frame that is marked at 1 hour,
3 minutes, 30 seconds, and 10 frames.
NTSC video (the video format used mainly in the United States) uses one of
two formats: drop-frame timecode and non-drop-frame timecode. Drop-frame
(DF) timecode is designed to match the NTSC scan rate of 29.97 frames per
second (fps). Two frames of timecode are dropped every minute except for the
tenth minute. No video frames are dropped. Drop-frame timecode is indicated
by semicolons between the digits; for example, 01;00;00;00.
Non-drop-frame (NDF) timecode tracks NTSC video at a rate of 30 fps and is
indicated by colons between the digits; for example, 01:00:00:00. Non-dropframe timecode can be easier to work with, but does not provide accurate
timing for NTSC broadcast.
For example, a typical 1-hour show uses 52 minutes of video. If your program
ends at 01:52:00:00 (non-drop-frame), and it is broadcast at 29.97 fps, it will
last 94 frames too long (approximately 3 seconds). The final credits could be
cut off.
The following illustration compares the two types of timecode at the
1-minute mark. No frames are actually dropped.
Non-dropframe
timecode
01:00:59:28
01:00:59:29
01:01:00:00
01:01:00:01
01:00:59:28
01:00:59:29
01:01:00:02
01:01:00:03
01:01:00:02
Drop-frame
timecode
78
01;01;00;04
Preparing to Log Material
PAL video (the video format used in many countries other than the United
States) uses a scan rate of 25 fps. Timecode is indicated by colons. There is no
need for drop-frame timecode in PAL video.
You set the default timecode format for logging clips in the Deck Preferences
dialog box (see “Setting Deck Preferences” on page 75). You can select Drop
Frame or Non-drop Frame.
You can change the starting timecode of a clip or, for NTSC projects, the type
of timecode. See the editing guide or user’s guide for your Avid editing
system.
Preparing to Log Material
Avid MediaLog provides two special tools for logging source material:
•
•
The Logging tool, which contains:
-
Source deck controls
-
Marking and logging controls
-
Active track controls
-
Timecode information
-
Deck, bin, and tape name information
-
Comment section
-
Message area
The Audio Project settings, which enables you to set the audio rate
Accessing and Setting Up the Logging Tool
Once you have opened or created a bin, use the Logging tool to enter the name
of the tape you are logging and to access deck and logging controls.
Use the Logging tool to plan a naming scheme; to work with source tapes; and
to select tracks, bins, and sources.
79
Chapter 4 Logging Source Material
Accessing the Logging Tool
To access the Logging tool, do one of the following:
t
Click in a Bin window to activate it, and then select Bin > Go To Logging
Mode.
t
Select Tools > Logging.
Setting Up the Logging Tool
To select the appropriate source deck, source tape, and active track
settings for your logged material:
1. Open or create your project and the bin in which you want to store your
master clips. For information about opening projects and bins, see
“Getting Started” on page 21.
2. Select Bin > Go To Logging Mode.
The Logging tool opens.
Mark IN button
Enable timecode
button
Channel Selection
area
Triangular opener
Deck controller
Guidelines for Naming Tapes
Consider the following naming guidelines when you provide a name for your
tape:
•
80
Devise a naming scheme. You may prefer tapes of similar names because
they are easy to sort and view together in a bin but distinguishing among
them is difficult when you try to quickly locate a specific tape. Name the
tapes based on the amount and complexity of your source material.
Preparing to Log Material
n
•
Use unique names. The system cannot distinguish between two tapes with
the same name and between two bins or clips with the same name. For
example, if two tapes are named 001, you might encounter problems
correctly associating their clips with the correct physical tapes.
•
Use alphanumeric characters (A–Z, 0–9), with no spaces before the name.
Characters can be uppercase and lowercase. The maximum length of a
name is 31 characters.
Although the maximum length of a name is 31 characters, most online houses
accept tape names of no more than 6 characters.
•
Select a case convention and maintain it throughout a project. A single
tape is listed as several different tapes if you alter the case of the letters.
For example, if you type a single name as SUNSET, Sunset, and sunset on
three different occasions, all three names appear. This can cause problems
when keeping track of clips during the logging process.
•
Be cautious when changing the tape name. After you provide a name for a
tape source, any change to the name automatically changes that tape name
everywhere it occurs. If you decide later to change the name of one of the
tapes from 001 to 999, every reference to tape 001 changes to a reference
to tape 999.
Inserting Source Tapes
To insert a source tape in a deck to prepare for logging source material
with Avid MediaLog:
1. Set the REMOTE/LOCAL switch on the deck to REMOTE.
2. Insert a tape into the deck.
3. Select Bin > Go To Logging Mode.
The Deck Controller tool opens as part of the Logging tool.
Source tape timecode
Shuttle button
Valid timecode indicator
Fast Forward button
Rewind button
Single-Frame Backward button
Stop button
Single-Frame Forward button
Pause button
Eject button
Deck Name
pop-up menu
Play button
Source Tape Display button
81
Chapter 4 Logging Source Material
Selecting Active Tracks
The Logging tool captures information about the active tracks. Avid
MediaLog automatically activates the tracks that were active in the previous
session.
To change these settings:
t
Click tracks in the Channel Selection area of the Logging tool to activate
or deactivate them.
Selecting the Target Bin
You select a target bin in which you want to organize your logged material.
To select a target bin:
t
n
Click the Bin pop-up menu in the Logging tool and make a selection.
Only opened bins appear in the Bin pop-up menu.
To open a bin, do one of the following:
For more information
on working with bins,
see “Organizing with
Bins” on page 99.
t
For a bin created in the current project, double-click the bin in the Project
window.
t
For a bin created in a different project, select File > Open Bin, and then
locate and open the bin in the Open dialog box (Windows) or Open a Bin
dialog box (Macintosh).
t
Create a new bin by clicking the New Bin button in the Project window.
Selecting the Source Deck
In some cases, your source material might not reside on a video deck. You can
also select other source devices, such as a digital audiotape (DAT). Be sure the
source material has readable timecode.
To select the deck where the source material is found:
1. Click the Deck Name pop-up menu to display the available online decks.
2. Select the name of your source deck from the pop-up menu.
82
Preparing to Log Material
Identifying the Source Tape
To select a source tape:
1. Insert a tape into the deck.
The Select Tape dialog box opens.
n
For information about
deck preferences, see
“Setting Deck
Preferences” on
page 75.
n
For information on tape
naming conventions,
see “Guidelines for
Naming Tapes” on
page 79.
If a tape is already inserted into the deck, click the Source Tape Display button
in the capture tool.
2. In an NTSC project, play the tape for a few seconds so the system can
detect the timecode format of the tape (drop-frame or non-drop-frame).
Otherwise, the system maintains the timecode format set in the Deck
Preferences dialog box, regardless of the format on the tape and you might
receive a message indicating a wrong tape.
Drop-frame timecode appears in the Timecode indicator with semicolons
between hours, minutes, seconds, and frames. Non-drop-frame timecode
appears with colons. For more information, see “Understanding Timecode”
on page 77.
3. Provide the system with a tape name in one of the following ways:
t
Select the name of the tape from the list in the Select Tape dialog box
and click OK.
t
Click the New button in the Select Tape dialog box if the tape is not in
the list. A new tape name line appears in the dialog box. Type the new
name and click OK.
83
Chapter 4 Logging Source Material
Setting the Audio Sample Rate
Before you begin logging, you must select an audio sample rate.
To set the audio sample rate:
1. Double-click Audio Project in the Settings scroll list of the Project
window.
The Audio Project Settings dialog box opens.
2. Click the Sample Rate pop-up menu and select either 44.1 kHz or 48 kHz.
3. Close the dialog box.
If you select Batch Capture in your Avid editing system and then select the
“Use the audio compression rate logged for each clip” option, you must
capture at the same rate as the audio rate at which you logged the clips.
Logging
The following methods are available for logging:
84
•
Logging from a Source Tape
•
Logging On-the-Fly
•
Pausing a Deck While Logging
•
Logging with the Deck Offline
•
Adding Clip Names and Comments On-the-Fly
•
Controlling Decks from the Keyboard
Logging
Logging from a Source Tape
One method of logging is to use Avid MediaLog tools to control a source
deck, to select shots from your source tapes, and to record clip data directly to
a bin.
Make sure you have set up all the required information for logging, as
described in “Configuring Decks and Setting Preferences” on page 68 and
“Preparing to Log Material” on page 78. After you establish your settings and
specify your bin, deck, and tape, the Logging tool is the only tool you need to
log from a tape to a bin.
The Logging tool provides flexibility in the way you mark your clips for
logging as the following illustration shows.
Channel Selection
area
Mark IN
button
Logging Messages
bar
Clip name and
Comment heading
Go To IN button
Clear IN button
Bin name
Mark IN button
Mark OUT button
Go To OUT button
Source tape
display button
Timecode entry
text boxes
Clear OUT button
Duration Mark button
Mark Memory button
Clear Memory button
Go To Memory button
Marking and Logging
The basic logging procedure involves marking IN and OUT points. You mark
IN and OUT points using the Mark buttons or by typing IN and OUT
timecodes.
The button in the top left corner of the Logging tool changes according to the
stage of logging you are in. When the button appears as a pencil, Avid
MediaLog is ready to log the clip.
85
Chapter 4 Logging Source Material
To log clips directly from a source tape to a bin:
1. Insert your tape into the deck.
The Logging Messages bar displays the message “Mark IN,” indicating
the system is waiting for you to mark an IN point. The Mark IN button
appears in the top left corner of the Logging tool.
2. Set an IN point or an OUT point for the clip you want to log, using one of
the following methods:
t Use the deck controls in the Logging tool to cue your source tape to
the start or end point, and click the Mark IN or the Mark OUT button.
Mark IN
Mark OUT
Go To IN
Go To OUT
Mark OUT
and Log
t
Click the Mark IN button in the upper left corner of the Logging tool
or press the F4 key.
t If the footage starts at a known IN point or ends at a known OUT
point, type the timecode in the text box next to the Mark IN or the
Mark OUT button, press the Go To IN or the Go To OUT button to
scan the tape forward to the mark, or press Enter (Windows) or
Return (Macintosh) to enter the mark.
After you set the mark, the Mark IN button changes to the Mark OUT and
Log button or the Mark IN and Log button.
Mark IN
and Log
n
c
The Mark OUT and Log and Mark IN and Log buttons only appear when the
Pause Deck While Logging feature is not in effect. If you want to pause the
deck while you enter a clip name and comments, see “Pausing a Deck While
Logging” on page 88.
For an NTSC film-to-tape transfer or footage downconverted from
1080p/24, you must log the correct pulldown phase. See “Setting the
Pulldown Phase” on page 159 and “Entering Pulldown Information” on
page 163.
3. To finish logging the clip, do one of the following:
86
t
Set the remaining IN or OUT points on-the-fly using the Mark IN or
Mark OUT buttons or by pressing the F4 key.
t
t
Click the Mark OUT and Log or Mark IN and Log button.
Type a timecode for the clip IN point, OUT point, or duration in the
timecode text boxes next to the corresponding icon and press Enter
(Windows) or Return (Macintosh).
Logging
The system automatically calculates the appropriate timecode for the
remaining IN point, OUT point, or duration, and enters the clip into the
bin. The clip name, which is automatically numbered by the system, is
highlighted and ready to change.
c
You must enter two of the three timecode marks (IN point, OUT point, or
duration) to complete the log entry.
4. Name the clip by typing a new name before clicking any of the buttons in
the Capture tool.
n
Consider changing the clip name immediately, because it is easy to forget the
contents of each clip if you are logging many clips. You can accept the clip
name and proceed with the logging process and change the clip names in the
bin at a later time.
5. Repeat these steps until all your clips are logged.
n
While viewing the footage, you can continuously update your marks on-the-fly
by clicking the Mark IN or the Mark OUT button repeatedly before entering
the second mark. See “Logging On-the-Fly” on page 87.
Adding a Memory Mark
You can add a memory mark to a particular location on a tape.
You can add one mark per tape. The memory mark is not stored on the tape.
When you remove the tape from the deck and insert another tape into the
decks, the mark is cleared.
Clear Memory button
Mark Memory button
Go To Memory button
To mark the location:
t
Click the Mark Memory button.
87
Chapter 4 Logging Source Material
To move through the tape to the marked location:
t
Click the Go To Memory button.
To clear the memory mark:
t
Click the Clear Memory button.
Logging On-the-Fly
You can log clips while the tape is playing. This is called logging on-the-fly.
Logging on-the-fly requires the preparation described in the following
sections:
•
“Selecting the Source Deck” on page 81
•
“Identifying the Source Tape” on page 82
•
“Setting the Audio Sample Rate” on page 83
You can log on-the-fly whether or not you already know where you want to
mark the IN and OUT points in your clips.
To log on-the-fly:
1. Insert your tape into the deck.
2. Open the bin where you want to store the clips, or create a new bin.
3. Select Bin > Go To Capture Mode.
4. Select the audio and video tracks you want to log and their tape name.
5. Play the tape.
6. Mark an IN point by pressing the E key or I key.
The timecode appears and the Logging Messages bar displays the
following message: “Mark OUT and Log.”
7. Mark the OUT point by pressing the R key or O key.
8. Log the clip by pressing the F4 key.
The clip is logged into the bin.
The clip name, which the system selects and numbers, is highlighted in
the bin and ready to change. The default clip name is the bin name plus a
number.
88
Logging
9. (Option) Type a new name for the logged clip in the bin, and press Enter
(Windows) or Return (Macintosh).
10. Repeat these steps until you have logged all your clips.
Pausing a Deck While Logging
If the deck is playing while you log clips, you can direct Avid MediaLog to
automatically pause the deck after you select an IN point and an OUT point.
While the deck is paused, you can enter the name and comment for the clip
you want to log.
To pause the deck while logging:
1. Click the Settings tab in the Project window.
The Settings scroll list appears.
2. Double-click the Logging setting and select the Pause Deck While
Logging option in the Logging Settings dialog box.
3. Start the deck playing.
4. When you reach the point where you want to start the clip, click the Mark
IN button (or press the F4 key). The Mark IN button changes to the Mark
OUT button, and the deck continues to play.
5. When you reach the point where you want to end the clip, click the Mark
OUT button (or press the F4 key again). The Mark OUT button changes to
the Log Clip button, and the deck pauses.
6. (Option) Enter a clip name and comment.
7. Click the Log Clip button (or press the F4 key again).
The system logs the clip in a bin, and the deck starts playing again.
Logging with the Deck Offline
You can also log material without controlling a source tape deck. If the deck is
not connected or not working, or if the tape is not available, you can still log
material as long as you know the timecodes.
To log without a deck or tape:
1. Click the Settings tab in the Project window.
The Settings scroll list appears.
2. Double-click Deck Preferences.
89
Chapter 4 Logging Source Material
The Deck Preferences dialog box opens.
3. For NTSC projects, select either Non-drop Frame or Drop Frame from the
pop-up menu. This selects the timecode format for logging.
4. Click OK to close the Deck Preferences dialog box.
5. Make sure a bin is selected.
6. Select Bin > Go To Logging Mode.
The Logging tool opens.
7. Click the Source Tape Display button.
A message box opens and asks if you want to associate a tape with the
deck.
90
Logging
8. Click Yes to open the Select Tape dialog box.
List of tapes
9. Do one of the following:
t
Double-click the name of the tape.
t
Click the New button, type the name of the tape you want to log, and
then click OK.
t
Select the name from the list, and then click OK.
10. In the Channel Selection area in the Logging tool, click the tracks you
want to log. For example, click V, A1, and A2.
11. Select the destination bin from the Bin pop-up menu.
12. Type the start timecode in the timecode entry text box for mark IN, and
press Enter (Windows) or Return (Macintosh).
13. Type the end timecode in the timecode entry text box for mark OUT, and
press Enter (Windows) or Return (Macintosh).
14. Click the Log Clip button.
15. (Option) Rename the clip that appears in the destination bin.
Adding Clip Names and Comments On-the-Fly
The Avid system’s Annotate feature allows you to type clip names and
comments during logging. This information is saved in the clip Name and
Comments columns in the bin. You can add comments about such things as
color correction or directions for editing.
91
Chapter 4 Logging Source Material
n
To carry your comments over to the sequence so that they will appear in the
Timeline, in cut lists, or in EDLs, you must add the comments again when
creating the sequence by using the Add Comments command in the Clip Name
menu.
To add clip names and comments on-the-fly:
1. Start typing the clip name at any time during logging of a clip.
The Annotate window opens on screen, allowing you to see the text as you
type.
2. After typing the clip name, press the Tab key and begin typing comments.
You cannot edit the text until after the capture is complete, but you can
backspace to retype the comments.
Controlling Decks from the Keyboard
You can use the J-K-L keys to control a deck while logging.
J-K-L Functions for Deck Control
Press
To
K
Stop the deck.
L
Shuttle the deck at 1x, 2x, 3x, 5x, 8x, 16x, or 24x normal speed.
J
Shuttle the deck at –1x, –2x, –3x, –5x, –8x, –16x, or –24x normal
speed.
K+L
Shuttle the deck at 0.25x normal speed.
J+K
Shuttle the deck at –0.25x normal speed.
The following restrictions apply:
92
•
The Logging tool window must be selected for keys to be active.
•
Single-field stepping is not supported.
Logging Film Information
Logging Film Information
After entering or importing the basic log information into a bin, you can then
add film-related log information before capturing. For information, see
“Working with a Film Project” on page 155.
Modifying Clip Information After Logging
You can change or modify the information logged into the bin. This is
especially useful if you find that some of the data is incorrect, or if you need to
update the information based on technical needs such as varying timecode
formats or film specifications.
There are two ways to modify clip information prior to capturing:
•
You can modify the information directly by clicking in a column and by
entering the new information one field at a time.
•
You can use the Modify command to change selected groups of clips all at
once.
For information on modifying the pulldown phase, see “Setting the Pulldown
Phase” on page 159.
c
Modifying tape names and timecodes will affect any key numbers entered
for the selected clips.
Creating Avid Logs
You can use a text editor to log your source footage manually. An Avid log
lists video clips you want to capture for editing. You can create the logs in
Avid format, entering data about your source tapes and clips according to Avid
specifications.
You can also modify an incompatible log to make it conform to Avid
specifications. To prepare an Avid log on any type of computer, use any text
editor. After you create logs, you can import them directly into Avid
MediaLog bins.
93
Chapter 4 Logging Source Material
“Avid Log Specifications” on page 143 describes the format specifications for
an Avid log and includes a sample Avid log.
Make a separate log for each videotape, or log clips from several different
videotapes into one log. After you manually create an Avid log, you can
import it into Avid MediaLog as described in “Importing Log Files into
MediaLog Bins” on page 94.
Importing Logs
Many logging programs and film-to-tape transfer systems create logs you can
import into your Avid MediaLog project. You can open some logs directly in
Avid MediaLog bins; others require converting to Avid format first.
Importing Standard Log Files
If you are transferring film to video for logging in Avid MediaLog, ask the
transfer house to log the source footage during the film-to-tape transfer. You
can import some standard film-to-tape logs directly into Avid MediaLog bins
or use Avid Log Exchange to convert other film-to-tape logs to Avid format
and then import them into Avid MediaLog. A number of video logging
systems also produce files you can import into a Avid MediaLog bin.
Compatible Logs
Use the File > Import command to import these files to a Avid MediaLog bin:
94
•
Avid Log Exchange (ALE)
•
Log Right (file names that have the .ale file name extension)
•
Excalibur (file names that have the .ale file name extension)
•
Shotlister
•
Avid logs you create yourself, using a text editor (see “Creating Avid
Logs” on page 92)
•
Logs converted into Avid format using Avid Log Exchange (file names
that have the .ale file name extension)
Importing Logs
n
Avid recommends that you convert any files not created on an Avid system into
Avid format using Avid Log Exchange. Avid Log Exchange is included with
most Avid video editing applications.
The following table lists the log formats that can be imported directly or
converted for import using Avid Log Exchange (ALE).
Compatible Log Formats
Log Format
Requirements
File Name Extension
AatonBase
Conversion required
.atn or .atl
Avid Log
Import directly
.ale
Cinema Tools
Conversion required
.txt
CMX EDL
Conversion required
.cmx
Evertz
Conversion required
.ftl
Excalibur
Conversion required
.ale or .flx
Final Cut Pro™
Conversion required
.txt
FLEx
Conversion required
.flx
Keyscope
Conversion required
.ksl
Log Producer
Conversion required
.llp
Log right
Import directly
.ale
OSC/R (Macintosh only)
Conversion required
.asc
OLE (Windows only)
Conversion required
.odb
For information about using Avid Log Exchange, see the input and output
guide or user’s guide for your Avid editing system.
Importing Log Files into Avid MediaLog Bins
To import log files into a Avid MediaLog bin:
1. Open a bin and click its window to select it.
2. Select File > Import.
95
Chapter 4 Logging Source Material
The Select files to Import dialog box opens. For Windows, select Files of
type > Shot Log Files (*.ale). For Macintosh, Shot Log Documents is
already selected as the file type.
3. Navigate to the drive and then to the folder that contains the log file you
want to import.
If the log is on a floppy disk, insert the floppy disk into the floppy drive.
4. (Option) If you want to adjust import parameters for the shot log, click the
Options button.
The Import Settings dialog box opens.
5. Select one of the options from the following table and click OK.
Import Settings Options
96
Option
Description
Maintain events as logged.
Select this option to maintain events as originally logged.
Combine events based on scene and
automatically create subclips.
Select this option to combine all the events for a scene into
a single master clip. Then, link the master clip to subclips
that represent the original events for that scene. To use this
option, you must have scene numbers logged into a scene
column in the bin.
Combine events based on camera roll and
automatically create subclips.
Select this option to combine all the events from a camera
roll into a single master clip. Then, link the master clip to
subclips that represent the original events for that camera
roll. To use this option, you must have camera roll
numbers logged into a camera roll column in the bin for a
film project.
Importing Logs
Import Settings Options (Continued)
Option
Description
Merge events with known sources and
automatically create subclips.
Select this option to create subclips for events that are
merged or relinked to their source clips upon import. Use
this option if you have already entered master clips in a bin
for each camera roll or master scene and have
subsequently logged all the events related to those clips for
import.
n
Merge events with known master clips.
You must select the clips that you want to merge
before selecting this option.
Select this option to merge information in the shot log onto
selected master clips based on the matching tape name.
Use this option if you have already logged (or captured)
master clips in a bin for each take.
n
You must select the clips that you want to merge
before selecting this option.
6. Select files or deselect files from the source file list by doing one of the
following:
t
(Windows only) To add a group of files, click the first file in a group,
and then Shift+click the last file in a group.
t
To deselect a single file from the file browser section (Windows) or
import section, Ctrl+click a highlighted file name (Windows) or select
a file name and click Remove (Macintosh).
7. Click Open (Windows) or Done (Macintosh) to import the selected logs to
the bin, or click Cancel to cancel the operation.
The bin fills with master clips derived from the information in the
imported shot log. Any additional information logged with each clip is
also imported.
8. To save the new master clips that came from importing the log, save the
bin.
97
Chapter 4 Logging Source Material
Transferring Bins from Another Avid MediaLog System
Avid MediaLog bins are interchangeable with those of other releases. In
general, later releases of the Avid MediaLog application accept bins from
earlier releases.
To transfer a bin from one Avid MediaLog system to another Avid
MediaLog system:
1. Save Avid MediaLog project bins from the first Avid MediaLog system on
a floppy disk.
2. Go to your second Avid MediaLog system and quit the Avid MediaLog
application.
3. Locate the project folder where you want to store the Avid MediaLog bins
and double-click it to open it.
For information about the default paths for project folders, see “Selecting
a Project” on page 28.
4. Insert the transfer floppy disk into the floppy drive on the second Avid
MediaLog system.
5. Navigate to the floppy drive.
6. Position the floppy drive window and your Avid MediaLog project folder
window so you can see both.
7. Select (click) the Avid MediaLog bins in the floppy drive window and
drag them to your Avid MediaLog project folder.
When you start your Avid MediaLog program, open the imported bins in the
same way you open standard Avid MediaLog bins.
98
Chapter 5
Organizing with Bins
The Avid system provides powerful database tools for organizing and
managing your captured material. You can view bins in two different display
views. You can rename, print, sort, sift, duplicate, and delete clips.
This chapter covers the following topics:
•
Preparing to Work with Bins
•
Understanding Bin Display Views
•
Basic Bin Procedures
•
Using Text View
Preparing to Work with Bins
Before organizing a project, you may want to follow these procedures since it
affects the display of information in bins or the way the clips play back during
screening:
•
When working with film projects, organize captured clips according to the
scene. This practice keeps crowded bins to a minimum. See “Film Scene
Workflow” on page 100.
•
If you want to customize the types of objects displayed in a bin, see
“Setting the Bin Display” on page 100.
•
If you need to group or multigroup material, see the editing guide or user’s
guide for your Avid editing system.
Chapter 5 Organizing with Bins
Film Scene Workflow
During the organizing phase, common practice on film productions is to
organize the captured clips according to a scene. This helps to simplify the
work environment for the editor and keeps crowded bins to a minimum.
Organize scene bins according to the following basic workflow:
1. Create one bin for each scene using the procedures described in “Creating
a New Bin” on page 48.
2. Gather clips according to scene using one of the following optional
procedures:
t
Copy clips for each scene from the dailies bins into the appropriate
scene bin, using procedures described in “Copying Clips” on
page 107.
t
Duplicate the clips and then move the duplicates into the appropriate
scene bin, using procedures described in “Duplicating Clips” on
page 107.
3. Proceed to sort, sift, and organize the clips within each scene bin,
according to the editor’s preferences.
It is good practice to copy or duplicate clips as you reorganize them in bins. As
a result, the original source clips remain in the appropriate dailies bin if you
ever need to recapture according to source tape.
Setting the Bin Display
By default, your bins display all existing media objects except source clips and
rendered effects. To reduce crowding in the bin and to display only those
objects required to organize your project, you can display selected media
objects.
You can use the Set Bin Display option to display clips referenced by a
sequence, even if the clips were not previously in the bin. Place a sequence in
a new bin and follow this procedure.
To set the bin display:
1. Click the window of the bin that you want to display.
2. Select Bin > Set Bin Display.
100
Preparing to Work with Bins
The Set Bin Display dialog box opens.
The following table describes the object icons listed in the Set Bin Display
dialog box.
Object Icon Descriptions
Object Icon
Object Description
Master Clips
Clips that reference audio and video media files formed from captured
footage or imported files
Subclips
Clips that reference selected portions of master clips
Sequences
Clips that represent edited programs, partial or complete, that you created
from other clips
Sources
Clips that reference the original videotape source footage for master clips
Effects
Clips that reference unrendered effects that you created
Motion Effects
Files in the bin that reference effect media files generated when you create
motion effects
101
Chapter 5 Organizing with Bins
Object Icon Descriptions (Continued)
Object Icon
Object Description
Rendered Effects
Groups
Clips that reference effect media files generated when you render an effect
(For MultiCamera editing) Clips containing two or more grouped clips,
strung together sequentially according to common timecodes
3. Select the object types that you want to see: usually master clips and
subclips.
4. Select the option “Show clips created by user” by default. Deselect this
option only if you want to hide all objects except those created by the
system.
5. Select the option “Show reference clips” to automatically display objects
that are referenced by sequences in the bin, whether those clips were
previously in the bin or not.
6. Click OK.
The bin displays objects according to your specifications.
Understanding Bin Display Views
There are two display views for viewing and working with clips in a bin: Brief
view and Text view. You can also customize bin views.
n
You can resize each display view by clicking the lower right corner of the Bin
window and dragging it. Save the size of the display view as a user setting for
the bin. The bin view retains its set size every time you open that view of the
bin, even in separate editing sessions. Each bin view can have a different size.
Brief View
In Brief view, the system displays a select number of standard columns based
on project type. You cannot customize the column headings in Brief view. This
view helps you manage your screen real estate.
102
Understanding Bin Display Views
To enter Brief view:
t
n
Click the Brief tab in the bin.
A different set of column headings appears for film projects.
Column
headings
Object icon
Bin Fast Menu
button
Text View
For information on
Text view features, see
“Using Text View” on
page 117.
In Text view, clips are displayed in a database text format, using columns and
rows, with icons representing the various objects. You can save various
arrangements of columns, text, and objects as customized views. See
“Customizing Bin Views in Text View” on page 104.
To enter Text view:
t
Click the Text tab in the bin.
Column
headings
Object icon
Bin Fast Menu
button
Bin View pop-up menu
103
Chapter 5 Organizing with Bins
Bin View Menu
To the right of the Fast Menu button is the Bin View pop-up menu (Text view
only) for selecting different bin views. Three bin default views are installed
automatically. They are:
For more information
on film and statistical
column headings, see
“Bin Column
Headings” on
page 130.
•
Custom view: Allows you to create and save customized views. The only
required column heading is the Name heading, that appears by default.
You can customize the view by adding, hiding, or rearranging column
headings.
•
Film view: Has film-related column headings, including key number, ink
number, pullin, and so on.
•
Statistics view: Uses the standard statistical column headings derived
from information established during logging, such as start and end
timecodes, duration, resolution, and so on.
If you import a log file from your telecine transfer, most of this information is
placed in the bin when you import the log. If you do not have a film log, then
you can enter this information manually by highlighting the field in the bin
and typing the information.
Customizing Bin Views in Text View
You can create and save customized bin views that you can easily access from
the Bin View pop-up menu. You can customize the bin view by resizing the
Bin window and adding, hiding, or rearranging bin columns. The only
required column heading is Name, which appears by default.
There are several ways to customize views of the bin:
104
•
Alter the arrangement of existing columns in the standard Statistics view
or Film view to suit your needs, without adding or hiding columns. These
arrangements are recalled each time you reopen a bin in that view.
•
Add or hide columns of information to create customized Statistics or
Film views. They are saved as additional view settings in numerical order:
for example, Statistics.1, Statistics.2, and so on, unless you select another
name.
•
Add, hide, copy, or rearrange standard or customized columns in any
combination to create your own custom views. You can name and save
these views to suit your needs.
Understanding Bin Display Views
When you create a new bin view, the system saves the settings for this view so
that you can later access and alter, copy, or delete these settings. New bin view
settings appear in the Settings scroll list of the Project window.
Saving a Custom Bin View
Any time you add, hide, or delete a column, the bin view name changes to an
italicized name with the file name extension .n to indicate that it no longer
matches the original view. If you select a new bin view setting while the
current setting is untitled or italicized, the system discards the current setting.
n
If you do not save the view after adding or deleting headings, it is discarded
when you close the bin or select another view.
To save a bin view:
1. Open a bin and click the Text tab.
For procedures on
adding, hiding, and
deleting bin columns,
see “Arranging Bin
Columns” on page 117.
2. Add or hide columns according to preference. The bin view name
becomes italicized.
3. Click the Bin View menu and select Save As.
The View Name dialog box opens.
4. Type a name for the custom view, and click OK.
Bin Fast Menu
All Bin menu commands are also available in the Bin Fast menu located in the
lower left corner of every bin. The Bin Fast menu is especially convenient
when you are working with several open bins and need to access Bin menu
commands quickly.
105
Chapter 5 Organizing with Bins
To open the Bin Fast menu:
t
Click the Fast Menu button in the appropriate bin display view.
Basic Bin Procedures
There are some basic procedures that you can use in either bin display view for
manipulating clips in the bin. They include selecting, deleting, duplicating,
moving, copying, and sifting clips.
You can also change the font and point size of the text in a bin. See “Changing
Font and Point Size” on page 45.
When you are working with bins, an asterisk (Windows) or a diamond
(Macintosh) appears before the bin name in the bin’s title bar. The asterisk or
diamond indicates that the changes to the bin were not saved. Once you save
the bin, the asterisk or diamond is removed.
n
To view a complete list of the bins in your project, see “Changing Font and
Point Size” on page 45.
Selecting Clips
To select a clip in a bin:
t
Click the clip icon.
To select multiple clips in a bin, do one of the following:
t
(Windows) Ctrl+click additional items.
t
(Windows) Shift+click the first and last items.
t
(Macintosh) Shift+click additional items.
t
Lasso several clips.
To reverse your selection:
t
Select Bin > Reverse Selection.
The items that you previously selected are deselected and those items that
were previously deselected are selected.
106
Basic Bin Procedures
Duplicating Clips
When you duplicate a clip, the system creates a separate clip linked to the
same media files. You can move, rename, and manipulate this clip without
affecting the original clip.
To duplicate clips:
1. Select the clip that you want to duplicate or select multiple clips.
2. Select Edit > Duplicate or press Ctrl+d (Windows).
A copy of the clip appears in the bin, with the original clip name followed
by the file name extension .Copy.n, where n is the number of duplicates
created from the original clip.
Moving Clips
You can move clips to other bins in order to group and organize various types
of material based on project needs.
To move clips from one bin into another:
1. Create or open another bin. Give the bin a name that represents its purpose
or contents.
2. Position or resize the bins so you can see both of them at the same time.
3. Select the clip that you want to move or select multiple clips.
4. Click the clips and drag them to the new bin.
n
If the destination bin’s display has been set to show reference clips, the
referenced object types do not appear until you save the bin. For more
information on setting the bin display, see “Setting the Bin Display” on
page 100.
Copying Clips
When you copy clips, you are essentially cloning the same clip in another bin.
Any change you make to the copy affects the original as well. The system does
not add the .Copy.n file name extension to the clip as it does when duplicating.
You cannot copy clips to the same bin and you cannot return a clip copy to the
same bin where the original resides.
107
Chapter 5 Organizing with Bins
When you copy clips from one bin to another, the custom columns that you
created in the first bin are also copied to the second bin. The custom columns
appear in the order in which you created them.
The copies appear in the destination bin and the originals remain in the source
bin. If the destination bin’s display was set to show reference clips, the
referenced object types do not appear until you save the bin.
To copy clips from one bin to another bin:
1. Position or resize the bins so that you can see both of them at the same
time.
2. In the original bin, click the clip that you want to copy or select multiple
clips.
3. While pressing the Alt key (Windows) or Option key (Macintosh), drag
the clips to the destination bin and release the mouse button.
Deleting Clips and Subclips
To delete clips and subclips from a bin:
1. Select the clips and subclips you want to delete.
2. Select Edit > Delete, or press the Delete key.
The Delete dialog box opens and shows information about the selected
items (for example, one master clip).
To protect you from accidentally deleting important information, the
master clips, by default, are not marked for deletion.
3. To mark a master clip for deletion, select the check box next to the item.
To exempt the master clip from deletion, select the check box again.
4. Click OK.
108
Basic Bin Procedures
Assigning Colors to Bin Objects
You can assign colors to clips and subclips to help you manage and organize
the bin objects. Colors assigned to bin objects are referred to as source colors.
Adding a Color Column to a Bin
To add a Color column to a bin:
1. With a bin in Text view, select Bin > Headings.
The Bin Column Selection dialog box opens.
2. Ctrl+click (Windows) or click (Macintosh) Color from the scroll list to
select it.
3. Click OK.
The Color column appears in the bin.
n
By default, a new column appears as the last column in the bin. To move the
Color column, click the Color column heading and drag it to the left.
Assigning a Source Color
To assign a color to a clip or subclip in a bin:
1. With a bin in Text view, select the bin objects to which you want to assign
a color.
2. Select Edit > Set Clip Color and select a color from the submenu.
The color appears in the Color column and on the clip icon.
n
You can also assign a color by clicking in the Color column and choosing a
color from the pop-up menu.
Assigning a Custom Source Color
To assign a custom color to a clip or subclip in a bin:
1. With a bin in Text view, select the bin objects to which you want to assign
a color.
2. Select Edit > Set Clip Color and select Pick from the submenu.
The Windows Color dialog box or the Macintosh Color Picker opens.
109
Chapter 5 Organizing with Bins
3. Select a color from the Windows Color dialog box or the Macintosh Color
Picker, and click OK.
The custom color appears in the Color column and on the clip icon.
n
After you assign a custom color, the color appears as Other in the Set Clip
Color submenu.
Limiting Color Choices
When assigning colors to bin objects, you can limit the color choices to only
the colors currently used in the bin.
To limit the colors available when assigning colors to bin objects:
1. With a bin in Text view, select the bin objects to which you want to assign
a color.
2. Alt+click (Windows) or Option+click (Macintosh) in the Color column in
the bin.
A menu of all the colors you are using in the bin appears. Any custom
colors you assigned are labeled Other.
3. Select one of the colors.
The color appears in the Color column and on the clip icon.
110
Basic Bin Procedures
Sifting Clips
When you sift clips, the bin displays only those clips that meet a specific set of
criteria. For example, you can do a custom sift to display only those clips
containing the word “close-up” in the heading column. The Custom Sift dialog
box provides six levels of criteria.
To sift clips:
1. Select Bin > Custom Sift.
The Custom Sift dialog box opens.
Criterion pop-up menu
Text to Find text box
Column or Range to
Search pop-up menu
2. Click the Criterion pop-up menu and select one of the sifting options.
3. Click the first Text to Find text box and type the text that you want to use
as a sift criterion. When sifting by color, type the exact name of the color
(using uppercase and lowercase letters) in the text box.
4. Click the Column or Range to Search pop-up menu and select a column
heading to which you want to apply the criterion.
5. Type additional sift criteria and make additional column selections as
necessary.
6. Click OK.
Only the clips that meet your criteria remain in the bin, with the word
“sifted” added to the bin name.
111
Chapter 5 Organizing with Bins
After you have sifted the clips in a bin, you can display the bin in a sifted or an
unsifted state.
To view the entire bin:
t
Select Bin > Show Unsifted.
To view the sifted bin:
t
Select Bin > Show Sifted.
The word “sifted” appears in parentheses after the bin name when you view
the bin in its sifted state.
Sifting Timecodes or Keycode Ranges
You can sift on a timecode (or keycode) number within a specific range. For
example, you can sift for all the clips that start before and end after a particular
timecode.
Before custom sift
112
Basic Bin Procedures
Type 01:08:32:00 in the Text to Find text box in the Custom Sift dialog
box, and select Start to End Range from the Column or Range to Search popup menu.
After custom sift
The clips that
encompass the
timecode number
01:08:32:00
Some column pairs explicitly define a range; for example, Start and End or
Mark IN and Mark OUT. Other columns define the beginning of a range and
the Duration column determines the end of the range. For example, Auxiliary
TC1 implies a range that begins at the value in the Auxiliary TC1 column and
ends at that value plus the value in the Duration column.
If you display any column in the bin that is associated with ranges, the
corresponding range menu item appears in the Column or Range to Search
pop-up menu of the Custom Sift dialog box. For example, if you select to
display the Start column and the Auxiliary TC1 column in the bin, the Start to
End Range and Auxiliary TC1 Range menu choices appear in the Column or
Range to Search pop-up menu.
When specifying a timecode or keycode number, it is not necessary to enter
colons or semicolons and you can omit the leading zero. For example, you can
enter 3172000 as a timecode number.
Keycodes contain letters, numbers, and a dash before the feet and frames; for
example, KJ236892 -0345+13. When sifting on a keycode number, you only
need to enter the numbers after the dash (the actual counter portion). Any
information before the dash is ignored. If you do enter characters before the
dash, they must match the corresponding characters in the bin column exactly.
113
Chapter 5 Organizing with Bins
The following table lists all columns associated with explicit ranges and their
corresponding menu choices:
Range Menu Items for Explicit Ranges
Bin Column (Explicit Ranges)
Column or Range to Search
Pop-up Menu Item
Start, End
Start to End Range
Mark In, Mark Out
Mark In to Out Range
KN Start, KN End
KN Start to End Range
KN Mark In, KN Mark Out
KN Mark In to Out Range
The following table lists all columns associated with implicit ranges and their
corresponding menu choices.
Range Menu Items for Implicit Ranges
Bin Column (Implicit Ranges)
114
Column or Range to Search
Pop-up Menu Item
Duration
Determines the end of an implicit
range
Film TC
Film TC Range
Sound TC
Sound TC Range
Auxiliary TC1
Auxiliary TC1 Range
Auxiliary TC2
Auxiliary TC2 Range
Auxiliary TC3
Auxiliary TC3 Range
Auxiliary TC4
Auxiliary TC4 Range
Auxiliary TC5
Auxiliary TC5 Range
Ink Number
Ink Number Range
Auxiliary Ink
Auxiliary Ink Range
Basic Bin Procedures
Sifting Within a Range
To sift for a timecode or keycode number within a specific range:
1. Select Bin > Custom Sift.
The Custom Sift dialog box opens.
Criterion pop-up menu
Column or Range to Search pop-up menu
2. Type the timecode (or keycode) number for which you want to sift in a
range.
3. Select a range from the Column or Range to Search pop-up menu; for
example, Start to End Range or Mark In to Out Range.
The criterion “contain” is displayed in the Criterion pop-up menu. If you
try to change this criterion, a blank is displayed in the Column or Range to
Search pop-up menu.
4. Click OK.
The bin will display those clips that encompass the timecode (or keycode)
number that you entered.
115
Chapter 5 Organizing with Bins
Locking and Unlocking Items in a Bin
You can lock items in a bin to prevent deletion. When you lock clips in a bin,
you lock their associated media files on your desktop as well.
To lock items:
1. Click a clip or subclip to select it. Ctrl+click (Windows) or Shift+click
(Macintosh) additional clips, if necessary.
2. Right-click (Windows) or Ctrl+Shift+click (Macintosh) and select Lock
Bin Selection.
For more information
on displaying columns,
see “Showing and
Hiding Columns” on
page 118.
A Lock icon appears for each locked clip in the Lock column of the bin in
Text view.
Lock icon
To unlock previously locked items:
1. Select the items in the bin.
2. Right-click (Windows) or Ctrl+Shift+click (Macintosh) and select Unlock
Bin Selection.
116
Using Text View
Using Text View
Text view provides the most complete view of clip information. It uses
database columns you can rearrange and customize to suit your needs. For
information about saving a custom bin view, see “Saving a Custom Bin View”
on page 105.
To enter Text view:
t
Click the Text tab in the Bin window.
Arranging Bin Columns
This section provides procedures for moving, aligning, showing and hiding,
deleting, duplicating, adding, and changing columns in a bin.
Moving and Rearranging Columns
To move a text column in a bin:
1. Click the heading of the column you want to move.
The entire column is selected.
2. Click the column and drag it to the position you want and release the
mouse button.
The column appears in the new position and columns to the right are
moved to make room.
Aligning Bin Columns
When you align bin columns, the system maintains the same order of columns
from left to right, but spaces them according to the length of contents. This is
especially useful for removing spaces left after moving or rearranging
columns.
To align bin columns:
t
Select Bin > Align Columns.
117
Chapter 5 Organizing with Bins
Showing and Hiding Columns
You can select individual or multiple columns to be displayed or hidden in the
bin. For a complete description of each column heading, see “Bin Column
Headings” on page 130.
To select column headings:
1. With a bin in Text view, select Bin > Headings.
The Bin Column Selection dialog box opens.
2. Select the headings you want to add to the bin:
t
Click the name of a heading to select it.
t
Click a selected heading to deselect it.
t
Click All/None to select or deselect all the headings.
3. Click OK.
Only the headings selected in the Bin Column Selection dialog box appear
in the bin or bin view.
118
Using Text View
Deleting a Column
Deleting a statistical column is the same as hiding the column; you can restore
the column at any time using the Bin Column Selection dialog box, as
described in “Showing and Hiding Columns” on page 118. When you
delete a custom column, however, you must re-create the column.
To delete a column:
1. Click the column heading in a bin.
2. Select Edit > Delete or press the Delete key.
The column disappears from the view and surrounding columns fill the
empty space.
Duplicating a Column
You can duplicate existing columns containing timecode information into
other compatible columns that you target in a dialog box.
To duplicate a timecode column:
1. Select the column you want to duplicate by clicking its heading.
2. Select Edit > Duplicate or press Ctrl+d (Windows).
The Select dialog box opens.
Columns that
may appear
119
Chapter 5 Organizing with Bins
In the example, “Copy ‘Start’ column to:” appears at the top of the dialog
box because the user selected the Start column for duplication.
3. Select a column name from the list.
The column must contain the same type of data for the copy to occur. For
example, you can copy start timecodes to the Auxiliary TC column, but
you cannot copy timecodes to the Pullin column.
4. Click OK.
The column of information appears in the column you designated.
When you duplicate a timecode column (Start, TC 24, TC 25, TC 25P, TC 30,
TC 30N, or TC 60), the values for master clips and subclips are converted to
the appropriate timecode. For more information, see “Displaying Timecodes
in a 23.976p, 24p or 25p Project” on page 127.
Adding Customized Columns to a Bin
In addition to the standard statistical or film column headings, you can add
your own column headings to describe information about clips. For example,
you might want to add a column heading to describe what kind of shot (closeup, wide shot, master shot, extreme close-up, and so on) is used in a clip.
To add a new custom column:
1. Click an empty area to the right of the current headings in the headings
box.
2. Move any existing column to the right or left in order to create an empty
area.
3. Type the column heading you want, and press Enter (Windows) or Return
(Macintosh). Column headings must contain fewer than 14 characters,
including spaces.
This places the pointer in the data box, beside the first clip in the bin.
4. Select Bin > Align Columns after you have entered the new column
heading.
5. Type the information, and press Enter (Windows) or Return (Macintosh)
to move to the next line.
120
Using Text View
Changing a Custom Column Heading
You can change the heading name of custom columns only. You cannot change
any of the standard column headings.
To change the name of a custom column:
1. Press and hold the Alt key (Windows) or Option key (Macintosh) and
click the heading to highlight it.
2. Type the new text for the heading and press Enter (Windows) or Return
(Macintosh).
Managing Clip Information in Text View
For additional bin
shortcuts, select Help >
Shortcuts.
There are several ways to manage clip information in bin columns. These
methods include copying information between cells, moving information
between whole columns, sorting clip information, and modifying clip data, as
described in this section.
Moving Within Column Cells
Use the keyboard shortcuts to move from cell to cell in bin columns:
•
Tab: Moves the pointer to the parallel cell in the next column. You can
continue to press the Tab key to scroll through the cells to the right until
the cell in the last column is highlighted. The next time you press the Tab
key, the cell in the first column is highlighted.
•
Shift+Tab: Moves the pointer left to the cell in the previous column. You
can continue to press the Shift+Tab keys to scroll through cells to the left
until the cell in the first column is highlighted. The next time you press
Shift+Tab, the cell in the last column is highlighted.
•
(Windows) Enter key on the main keyboard: Enters any new
information typed into the cell and moves the pointer down to the cell in
the next row. You can continue to press Enter to scroll down the column
until the last cell in the column is highlighted. The next time you press the
Enter key, the first cell in the column is highlighted.
•
(Windows) Shift+Enter keys on the main keyboard: Move the pointer
up to the cell in the previous row. You can continue to press the
Shift+Enter keys until the cell in the top row is highlighted. The next time
you press the Shift+Enter keys, the cell in the last row is highlighted.
121
Chapter 5 Organizing with Bins
•
(Macintosh) Return: Enters any new information typed into the cell and
moves the pointer down to the cell in the next row. You can continue to
press Return to scroll down the column until the last cell in the column is
highlighted. The next time you press the Return key, the first cell in the
column is highlighted.
•
(Macintosh) Shift+Return: Move the pointer up to the cell in the
previous row. You can continue to press the Shift+Return keys until the
cell in the top row is highlighted. The next time you press the
Shift+Return keys, the cell in the last row is highlighted.
Using the Modify Command to Modify Data
The Modify command gives you specialized control over groups of clip
information. For example, you can use the Modify command to change the
name of source tapes, or to increment or decrement the start and end
timecodes by a specified length of time for one or several clips at once.
For a complete
description of the
Modify dialog box
options, see the input
and output guide or
user’s guide for your
Avid editing system.
You can apply changes with the Modify command to master clips only;
subclips cannot be altered in this way. In addition, you can only perform
modifications that alter the end timecodes or the tracks before capturing as
described in the following table.
Modify Command Options
122
Type of Modification
Options
Description
Set Timecode Drop/
Nondrop
Drop, Nondrop
Changes the timecode format between dropframe and non-drop-frame. Setting must match
the timecode format of the tape.
Set Timecode By Field
Start or End
Changes either the start or end timecode. Only
start timecode can be altered after capturing.
Hour, Minutes, Seconds,
Frames
Allows you to enter custom timecode.
Using Text View
Modify Command Options (Continued)
Type of Modification
Options
Description
Increment Timecode
Start or End
Changes either the start or end timecode.
Incrementing the start timecode automatically
modifies the end timecode by the same amount.
Only start timecode can be incremented after
capturing.
Timecode text box
Allows you to enter custom incremental
timecode.
Start or End
Changes either the start or end timecode.
Decrementing the start timecode automatically
modifies the end timecode by the same amount.
Only start timecode can be decremented after
capturing.
Timecode text box
Allows you to enter new decremental timecode.
Set Key Number
Generic (Prefix)
Key Number text box
Allows you to enter a custom generic key
number. Only for 23.976p, and matchback
projects. See “Entering Key Numbers” on
page 168.
Set Pullin
A, B, C, or D
Selects the pulldown phase to match to the
timecode entry (23.976p and matchback projects
only). For more information, see “Entering
Pulldown Information” on page 163.
Set Tracks
V, A1, A2, A3, A4, A5,
A6, A7, and A8 track
selector buttons
Changes the clip’s configuration of tracks. The
clip must be unlinked. For information on
unlinking clips, see the editing guide or user’s
guide for your Avid editing system.
Set Source
None
Opens the Select Tape dialog box. Selects another
source tape name for the clips that should match
the original source tape name.
Set Format
23.976p NTSC, 24p
NTSC, 30i NTSC, 24p
PAL, 25p PAL, 25i PAL,
720p/29.97 HDV,
720p/59.94,
1080p/23.976, 1080p/25,
1080i/50, 1080i/59.94
Changes the project type for a clip, sequence, or
an effect.
Decrement Timecode
123
Chapter 5 Organizing with Bins
To modify selected data, using the Modify command:
1. Open the bin and click the Text tab.
2. Click the icon to the left of the clip or other object you want to modify.
Ctrl+click (Windows) or Shift+click (Macintosh) each additional object
you want to modify.
3. Select Special > Modify.
The Modify dialog box opens.
Modify Options
pop-up menu
4. Select an option, such as Modify Options > Set Timecode By Field.
5. Select an option or type information into the text boxes (timecode values,
for example) when they appear.
6. Click OK.
The modification takes effect.
124
Using Text View
Copying Information Between Columns
The following procedure describes how to copy all the information in one
column to another column, or just to copy information from a cell to a column.
The procedure uses an example of copying timecode information in one
column to a new column.
To copy column information to another column:
1. Select the timecode column you want to copy.
2. Select Edit > Duplicate.
The Select dialog box opens, prompting you to target a timecode column
for the data.
3. Select the target column for the data, and click OK.
To copy information from another cell in a custom column:
1. Press and hold the Alt key (Windows) or Option key (Macintosh) while
you click in the destination cell to reveal a pop-up menu of all items
entered in that column.
2. Select the text from the menu.
The text appears in the cell.
Sorting Clips in Text View
Sorting clips arranges them in either numerical order, alphabetical order, or by
color, based on the data in the column you select as the sorting criteria. You
can sort clips in several different ways, including an ascending sort, a
descending sort, or a multilevel sort.
Sorting Clips in Ascending Order
To sort clips in ascending order:
1. With a bin in Text view, click the heading of the column you want to use
as the criterion.
The column is highlighted.
2. Select Bin > Sort or right-click and select Sort from the menu (Windows).
The objects in the bin are sorted in ascending order.
125
Chapter 5 Organizing with Bins
n
If the Sort command appears dimmed in the menu, you have not selected a
column.
To reapply the last sort:
t
Select Bin > Sort Again with no column selected.
This step is especially useful after you have added new clips to a sorted bin.
Sorting Clips in Descending Order
To sort clips in descending order:
1. With a bin in Text view, click the heading of the column you want to use
as the criterion.
The column is highlighted.
2. Press and hold the Alt key (Windows) or Option key (Macintosh) while
you select Bin > Sort Reversed.
The objects in the bin are sorted in descending order.
Multilevel Sorting with Columns
You can select multiple columns in a bin and perform a multilevel sort using
the information in the columns.
To perform a multilevel sort using the information in the bins:
1. With a bin in Text view, arrange the columns in the bin to establish the
primary column.
The column that appears farthest to the left in Text view becomes the
primary criterion for the sorting operation.
2. Select the columns you want to sort.
The columns are highlighted.
3. Select Bin > Sort.
The objects in the bin are sorted.
126
Using Text View
Sorting Clips by Color
You can sort the clips by color if you assigned colors to the clips. See
“Assigning Colors to Bin Objects” on page 109.
To sort clips by color:
1. Click the Color column heading in the bin.
2. Select Bin > Sort.
The objects in the bin are sorted by color.
n
Colors are sorted by hue, saturation, and value.
Displaying Timecodes in a 23.976p, 24p or 25p Project
When you are working with 23.976p, 24p and 25p projects, you can add
timecode columns to bins to enter and display starting timecodes in several
timecode formats for master clips and subclips.
After you add a timecode column (TC 24, TC 25, TC 25P, TC 30, TC 30N, or
TC 60) to a bin, you can use the Duplicate command to convert the values for
master clips and subclips to the appropriate timecode for that column.
For example, when working with a 24p NTSC project, if you duplicate the
Start column values to one of the timecode columns and the Start column
contains a master clip with the timecode 01:00:00:15, the timecode is
converted to the timecode of that column.
127
Chapter 5 Organizing with Bins
The following table shows the converted timecode for each timecode column.
All of the values are equivalent.
Timecode Columns
n
Bin Column
Timecode
TC 24
01:00:00:12
TC 25
00:57:36:12
TC 25P
00:57:36:12
TC 30
01:00:00:15
TC 30N
01:00:01:00
TC 60
01:00:00:30
The TC1 track in the Timeline represents the timecode of the project in which
you are working. For example, when you are working in a 24p NTSC project,
the TC1 track displays the same timecode as the TC 30 track.
Frame Counting for Timecodes
The following table shows the frame count for each of the timecodes. The
timecodes are listed as 24 for 24 fps, 25 for 25 fps, 25P for 25 (PAL with
pulldown), 30 for 30 fps (the count skips 6 frames to fit 30 frames into 24 fps),
30N without pulldown, or 60 for 60 fps (for HD).
Timecode Frame Counts for Record
Timecode Frames
24
00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 00
25
00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25P
00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 00
30
00 01 03 04 05 06 08 09 10 11 13 14 15 16 18 19 20 21 23 24 25 26 28 29 00
30NP
00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
60
00 02 06 08 10 12 16 18 20 22 26 28 30 32 36 38 40 42 46 48 50 52 56 58 00
128
Using Text View
Adding Timecode Columns to a Bin
To add timecode columns to a bin:
1. Select Bin > Headings.
The Bin Column Selection dialog box opens.
2. Ctrl+click (Windows) or click (Macintosh) the timecode columns you
want to display.
3. Click OK.
The timecode columns appear in the bin.
Adding Timecode Values to the Timecode Columns
To add timecode values to the timecode columns:
1. Open a bin.
2. Add the Start column and the timecode column with the format you want
to use.
3. Select the Start column.
4. Select Edit > Duplicate.
The Select dialog box opens.
5. Select the timecode heading from the list.
129
Chapter 5 Organizing with Bins
6. Click OK.
The values for master clips and subclips in the Start column are converted
to the appropriate timecode format and are entered into the column you
selected.
Bin Column Headings
You can select individual or multiple columns to be displayed or hidden in a
bin. The following table describes the Bin Column headings. For a procedure
on how to select column headings, see “Showing and Hiding Columns” on
page 118.
Bin Column Headings
Heading
Description
Name
Heading does not appear as a column selection, but it always appears in the bin.
The column contains the name of the clip or sequence (you can rename a clip or
sequence after it has been captured).
Audio
Audio resolution (sample rate).
Audio Bit Depth
Audio bit depth used when you work with audio files: 16 bit or 24 bit.
Audio Format
Audio format of master clips (AIFF-C, SDII, or WAVE).
AuxInk Dur
Length of the clip, expressed in the auxiliary ink number. You cannot modify this
number.
AuxInk Edge
Type of edgecode used in the auxiliary ink number. Ctrl-click the cell and select
the type of edgecode.
AuxInk End
Ending auxiliary ink number for the clip. You cannot modify this number.
AuxInk Film
Film gauge for the auxiliary ink number. Ctrl-click the cell and select the gauge.
Auxiliary Ink
Auxiliary ink format settings allow you to display an additional type of ink
number. This lets you track additional types of film information for different film
gauges. Used for 24p projects, 25p projects, and matchback projects only.
Auxiliary Ink is the starting frame for the clip.
Auxiliary TC1 through You can enter an auxiliary timecode, such as Aaton® or Arri®, or another timecode
TC5
for editing film or audio timecode for film.
Aux TC 24
130
Original HDTV sources (1080p/24) or audio DATs created for PAL feature film
productions that use in-camera timecode.
Using Text View
Bin Column Headings (Continued)
Heading
Description
CFPS
Captured frames per second.
Cadence
Type of pulldown present on the source NTSC tapes when in a 23.976 or 24p
project.
Camera
Camera used to film this clip. This feature is used in multicamera shoots.
Camroll
Camera roll containing this clip. Used for 24p projects, 25p projects, and
matchback projects only.
Color
Color of the bin objects for organizing the objects.
Creation Date
Date and time the clip was logged or captured.
DPX
Frame-counting field for Digital Picture Exchange, a SMPTE standard describing
frames scanned from film. The format is the following: a descriptor of up to 32
alphanumeric characters, followed by a hyphen (-), followed by a six-digit frame
count, for example, DPXChildDocu-023657.
Drive
Last known drive on which the media for that master clip existed.
Duration
Length of the clip.
End
Timecode of the clip’s tail frame.
FPS
Play rate: the number of frames to be displayed each second. The default is 29.97
for NTSC and 25 for PAL for video. The play rate can also be 24 or 23.98.
Film TC
Ttimecode used on film. Used for 24p and 25p projects only.
Format
Project type.
IN-OUT
Length of the marked segment, if any.
Ink Dur
Length of the clip, expressed in ink number. Used for 24p projects, 25p projects,
and matchback projects only. You cannot modify this number.
Ink Edge
Type of edgecode used in the ink number. Ctrl-click the cell and then select the
type of edgecode.
Ink End
Ending ink number for the clip. You cannot modify this number.
Ink Film
Film gauge for the ink number. Ctrl-click the cell and then select the gauge.
Ink Number
Ink number for the clip. Used for 24p projects, 25p projects, and matchback
projects only.
131
Chapter 5 Organizing with Bins
Bin Column Headings (Continued)
132
Heading
Description
KN Dur
Length of the clip, expressed in feet and frames.
KN End
Ending key number for the clip.
KN Film
Key number film gauge. Ctrl-click the cell and then select the gauge.
KN IN-OUT
Mark IN and Mark OUT key number for the clip.
KN Mark IN
Key number for the IN point, if you set one for the clip.
KN Mark OUT
Key number for the OUT point, if you set one for the clip.
KN Start
Starting key number for the clip. Used for 24p projects, 25p projects, and
matchback projects only.
LUT
File name of the color look-up table used for the series of clips or frames.
Labroll
Labroll containing the clip.
Lock
Specifies whether the clip is locked against deletion.
Mark IN
Timecode for the IN point, if you set one for the clip.
Mark OUT
Timecode for the OUT point, if you set one for the clip.
Master Dur
Length of the final master sequence, expressed in feet and frames. You cannot
modify this number.
Master Edge
Type of edgecode used in the final master sequence. Ctrl-click the cell and then
select the type of edgecode.
Master End
Ending key number for the final master sequence. You cannot modify this number.
Master Film
Gauge of the final master sequence. Ctrl-click the cell and then select the gauge.
Master Start
Starting key number of the final master sequence. Used for 24p projects, 25p
projects, and matchback projects only.
Media File Format
Clip media format.
Modified Date
Date and time a sequence was last edited or changed.
Offline
Track names for any media files that are offline.
Perf
Film edge perforations format used for 3-perf projects. Used for projects brought
forward from earlier releases only; now superseded by the film size and perf
options available in Ink Film, AuxInk Film, KN Film, and Master Film.
Using Text View
Bin Column Headings (Continued)
Heading
Description
Project
Project under which the media was originally captured.
Pullin
Telecine pulldown of the first frame of the clip (pulldown phase). Pullin can have
the values A, B, X (matchback only), C, or D. Used for 24p projects and
matchback projects only. (NTSC only)
Pullout
Telecine pulldown of the last frame of the clip. Pullout can have the values A, B, X
(matchback only), C, or D. Used for 24p projects and matchback projects only.
(NTSC only)
Reel #
Source reel number. Used for 24p and 25p projects only.
Scene
Scene number of the clip.
Shoot date
Date the footage was shot.
Slip
Number and direction of perfs for subclips (audio clips only). Used for 24p and
25p projects only.
Sound TC
Timecode for audio.
Soundroll
Sound roll this clip came from. Used for 24p projects, 25p projects, and
matchback projects only.
Start
Timecode of the clip’s head frame.
TC 24
24-fps timecode.
TC 25
25-fps timecode, no pulldown. Used for 24p and 25p projects only.
TC 25P
25-fps timecode with PAL pulldown. Used for 24p and 25p projects only.
TC 30
30-fps timecode with 2:3 pulldown. Used for 24p and 25p projects only.
TC 30NP
30-fps timecode with no pulldown (frames 00 through 29).
TC 60
60-fps timecode. Used for HD projects.
Take
Take number of the scene.
Tape
Source tape name.
TapeID
Tape ID number.
Tracks
All tracks used by this media object.
133
Chapter 5 Organizing with Bins
Bin Column Headings (Continued)
134
Heading
Description
Transfer
Frame-counting field for sources that have been prepped for transfer. The format is
the following: a descriptor of up to 32 alphanumeric characters, followed by a
hyphen (-), followed by a six-digit frame count, for example, TransferChildDocu023657.
UNC Path
Universal Naming Convention that specifies the location of resources on a server.
The location you enter becomes a hyperlink to that location. Ctrl-click the cell, and
then type the location.
VFX
Frame-counting field for visual effects. The format is the following: a descriptor of
up to 32 alphanumeric characters, followed by a hyphen (-), followed by a six-digit
frame count, for example, FXChildDocu-023657.
VFX Reel
Source reel identification for the FX shot.
VITC
Vertical interval timecode.
Video
Resolution under which the media for that clip was captured.
Chapter 6
Creating MediaLog Output
After logging your tapes, you can print the bins to create a paper record of
your log, export the bin files for use in a different application, or transfer the
bins to an Avid editing system for capturing and editing the footage.
This chapter covers the following topics:
•
Printing Bins
•
Exporting Bins
•
Transferring Bins to an Avid Editing System
•
Transferring Projects and Bins Using AFE Files
Printing Bins
Before you print MediaLog bins, make sure a printer driver is installed and
your computer recognizes the driver. If the driver is installed properly,
restarting your computer causes the system to recognize the driver.
n
Directions for installing the printer driver and selecting the printer should be
included in the documentation for your printer and for your computer system.
The Avid application allows you to print entire bins or individual frames in
hardcopy form.
To print entire bins in Brief or Text view:
1. Make sure your printer is correctly set up. See the Help or your system
administrator.
2. Click the Brief tab (Brief view) or Text tab (Text view) of the bin to select
the view you want to print.
Chapter 6 Creating MediaLog Output
3. Select File > Page Setup.
The Page Setup dialog box opens, reflecting the specific options for your
printer.
4. Select the Page Setup options.
5. Click OK.
6. Select File > Print Bin.
The Print dialog box opens, reflecting the specific options for your
printer.
7. Select the Print options.
8. Click OK (Windows) or click Print (Macintosh).
The system prints the active bin.
Exporting Bins
You can export a shot log file from the Avid system in one of two formats for
making adjustments in a text processor or for importing into another system:
•
ALE (Avid Log Exchange)
•
TAB Delimited
An ALE file is a shot log in Avid format that you can import into an Avid
editing system bin. Exporting an ALE file is an alternative to transferring bins.
One possible use is recovery from errors, such as logging with the wrong
frame rate. For more information about Avid Log Exchange, see the input and
output guide or user’s guide for your Avid editing system.
A TAB Delimited file is an ASCII file that is organized in the following way:
•
Line 1 is a list of the headings in the current Bin view. This line is
optional.
•
Each remaining line is data for an individual clip, with tabs delimiting
each category of information. These lines are separated by carriage
returns.
You can open the file in any word processing or text editing package or import
it into a database file created by applications such as Microsoft Excel or
Claris® FileMaker®.
136
Transferring Bins to an Avid Editing System
n
ALE and tab-delimited files include information for master clips and subclips
only. Information for other objects, such as group clips, sequences, and
precomputes, is not included.
You can also export a bin as an AFE file. For more information, see
“Transferring Projects and Bins Using AFE Files” on page 139.
To export a shot log based on clip information in a bin:
1. Open the bin containing the clips you want to export. If necessary, click
the Text tab to display all clip information.
2. Click a Clip icon to select it. Ctrl+click (Windows) or Shift+click
(Macintosh) each additional clip you want to export.
3. Select File > Export.
A MediaLog dialog box is displayed.
4. Select the type of export: ALE or Tab Delimited.
The Export As dialog box (Windows) or Destination dialog box
(Macintosh) opens with a default file name and extension, based on the
file type.
5. Select the destination folder for the file and click Save.
Transferring Bins to an Avid Editing System
Bins you have created on a MediaLog system can be transferred to an Avid
editing system and then opened directly from within an Avid editing project.
The clips logged in the transferred bins are ready for batch capturing; no
additional preparation is required.
It is best to transfer only bins, without projects, to the Avid editing system.
Then if you want, you can capture the bins using a different video resolution.
137
Chapter 6 Creating MediaLog Output
You can transfer bins in the same way you transfer any files: on a floppy disk,
removable disk, or over a network.
To transfer MediaLog bins to an Avid editing system:
1. On your computer desktop, locate and double-click the folder that holds
the project you want to transfer. For default project folder locations, see
“Selecting a Project” on page 28.
2. Double-click the project from which you want to transfer bins.
Bin
3. Select the bins you want to transfer. Bins use the extension .avb.
4. Copy the MediaLog bins to a formatted floppy disk, removable disk, or
network drive.
5. At the Avid editing system, create a project for the transferred bins. Then
quit the Avid editing application.
6. If using a floppy disk for transfer, insert the floppy disk into the Avid
editing system floppy drive.
7. Double-click the drive icon or network server and navigate to the folder
that holds the MediaLog bins.
138
Transferring Projects and Bins Using AFE Files
8. Select the MediaLog bins and copy them into the appropriate Avid project
folder.
The location of this folder depends on your product and platform. For
more information, see the editing guide for your Avid editing system.
9. Start the Avid editing application and open the project.
The MediaLog bins appear in the list of bins.
Transferring Projects and Bins Using AFE Files
AFE (Avid File Exchange) files are an efficient way to transfer project
information between Avid applications. For example, you can use AFE files to
transfer projects and bins from an offline Media Composer to an Avid DS
finishing system.
n
You can import an AFE file into Avid DS v6.0 or later only.
AFE files are based on AAF (Advanced Authoring Format) technology. AFE
files, however, are especially designed for sharing project information among
Avid applications. AFE files let you transfer one or more bins, their contents,
and information about the contents, including master clips, subclips, titles, and
sequences.
139
Chapter 6 Creating MediaLog Output
n
Specific information for transferring projects to Avid DS is contained in the
Avid DS Conform Guide, which is available from the Avid Customer Support
Knowledgebase or the Avid DS Web site. For information on accessing the
Knowledgebase, see the release notes for your Avid system.
To create an AFE file that includes all bins in a project:
1. Click the Project window and select File > Export.
The Export Project As dialog box opens. The file name uses the name of
the project.
2. Select a location and click Save.
3. Transfer the AFE file to a location you can access from the other Avid
application.
You can use removable media, a network connection, or an Avid UnityTM
shared storage system.
To create an AFE file that includes the contents of a single bin:
1. Open the bin.
2. Do one of the following:
140
t
To export the entire contents of a bin, select the bin. (Make sure no
objects are selected.)
t
To export individual clips, select one or more clips.
Transferring Projects and Bins Using AFE Files
3. Select File > Export.
A MediaLog dialog box is displayed.
4. Select AFE.
The Export Bin As dialog box (for the entire bin) or Export As dialog box
(for individual clips) is displayed.
5. Select a location, name the file, and click Save.
MediaLog creates the AFE file.
6. Transfer the AFE file to a location you can access from the other Avid
application.
You can use removable media, a network connection, or an Avid Unity
shared storage system.
141
Chapter 6 Creating MediaLog Output
142
Appendix A
Avid Log Specifications
This appendix explains the Avid log file format.The Avid editing system can
import logs that meet Avid log specifications. These logs must follow the
formatting requirements described in the following topics:
•
Understanding Avid Log Specifications
•
Avid Log Specifications
•
Sample Avid Log
Understanding Avid Log Specifications
You can prepare an Avid log on any type of IBM®-compatible or Macintosh
computer by using a word processing application or a text editor. You can use
the file name extension .txt, but it is not required.
To ensure accuracy, you must follow the Avid log specifications described in
this appendix.
An Avid log is composed of three sections, in this order:
•
Global headings
•
Standard and custom column headings
•
Data headings
When you create an Avid log, you must follow the order precisely. The tables
in this section follow this order.
For an example of a simple log file, see “Sample Avid Log” on page 152.
Appendix A Avid Log Specifications
Avid Log Specifications
This section contains tables that show how to enter headings and data to create
an Avid log. The tables use the following conventions:
•
A heading appears in the first column, without angle brackets or standard
brackets. For example, FIELD_DELIM is the first global heading.
•
A <supported value> is surrounded by angle brackets. <Alternative
supported values> appear underneath, also in angle brackets. You must
enter exactly one of these values. For example, <29.97> is one of the
supported values for the FPS heading; to specify that value, type 29.97.
•
<A variable data value> is also surrounded by angle brackets, but it is
italicized. For example, <timecode> is the data entry for the Start heading;
type the correct timecode, in the format 08:19:10:00 (or 08;19;10;00,
for drop-frame timecode).
•
[Tab] and [Enter] (Windows) or [Return] (Macintosh) keys are
surrounded by standard brackets.
•
A column contains the word “Required” if the heading must be included
in the log.
•
The final column contains notes about the heading or values.
You can decide not to display a defined heading (including a required
heading), except for Name. Name must always be displayed.
The maximum number of combined global, standard, and custom headings in
a log file is 64.
Global Headings
The global headings must come first in an Avid log file, and you must enter
one value for each heading.
The following table shows the format for the global headings and the
supported values for each heading.
144
Avid Log Specifications
Avid Log Global Headings
GLOBAL HEADINGS: Global headings are case sensitive and must be spelled exactly as shown. Include all
required headings. Other headings are optional but might be necessary for your project. The maximum number of
combined global, standard, and custom headings in a log file is 64.
Heading
[Enter] or
[Return]
Required
This marks the start of the global
headings.
Enter TABS to show that the file
is Tab delimited.
FIELD_DELIM
[Tab]
<TABS>
[Enter] or
[Return]
Required
VIDEO_FORMAT
[Tab]
<NTSC>
<PAL>
[Enter] or
[Return]
Required
FILM_FORMAT
[Tab]
<16mm>
<35mm,3perf>
<35mm,4perf>
[Enter] or
[Return]
AUDIO_FORMAT
[Tab]
<22kHz>
<24kHz>
<44kHz>
<48kHz>
[Enter] or
[Return]
TAPE
[Tab]
<tape name>
[Enter] or
[Return]
Required
Name of the videotape reel you
are logging. If you omit this
heading, the file name becomes
the global tape name. You can
override this for individual clips.
FPS
[Tab]
<23.98>
<24>
<25>
<29.97>
[Enter] or
[Return]
Required
Capture rate is 23.98 fps
(23.978 fps) for NTSC, 24 fps
for NTSC or PAL, 25 fps for
PAL, or 29.97 fps for NTSC.
[Enter]
or [Return]
Audio sampling rate for
digitizing. You can override this
for individual clips.
Press Enter (Windows) or
Return (Macintosh) a second
time after entering the FPS
value. This marks the end of the
global headings.
145
Appendix A Avid Log Specifications
Column Headings
The standard column headings appear after the global headings in the Avid log
file.
You do not enter the data for a column heading along with the heading. You
enter the data later, in a separate data section.
You must include the five required standard column headings; they are listed
first in the following table.
You can create your own custom column headings. Enter them after the
standard headings (see the last heading in the following table). To create a
custom heading, substitute the custom heading name for <Your_heading>.
You can create several custom headings, as long as the total of global,
standard, and custom headings does not exceed 64.
Avid Log Column Headings
COLUMN HEADINGS: Column headings are case sensitive and must be spelled exactly as
shown. Note that the first five headings are required. Other headings are optional but might
be necessary for your project. This table lists only the column headings that are relevant to
shot log files. Some data, such as Creation Date, is gathered by the system. The following
table does not include headings for such data. The maximum number of combined global,
standard, and custom headings in a log file is 64.
146
Column
[Enter] or
[Return]
Required
Indicates the start of the column headings.
Name
[Tab]
Required
Heading for clip name.
Tracks
[Tab]
Required
Heading for tracks you select for digitizing.
Start
[Tab]
Required
Heading for video timecode of sync point — the timecode
IN for clip. From address track of video.
End
[Tab]
Required
Heading for timecode OUT for clip. From address track of
video.
Audio
[Tab]
Heading for the audio resolution (sample rate). If omitted,
the global entry for AUDIO_FORMAT applies.
Auxiliary Ink
[Tab]
Heading for a second ink number used for the clip.
Auxiliary TC1
[Tab]
Heading for auxiliary timecode.
Avid Log Specifications
Avid Log Column Headings (Continued)
COLUMN HEADINGS: Column headings are case sensitive and must be spelled exactly as
shown. Note that the first five headings are required. Other headings are optional but might
be necessary for your project. This table lists only the column headings that are relevant to
shot log files. Some data, such as Creation Date, is gathered by the system. The following
table does not include headings for such data. The maximum number of combined global,
standard, and custom headings in a log file is 64.
Auxiliary TC2
[Tab]
Heading for auxiliary timecode.
Auxiliary TC3
[Tab]
Heading for auxiliary timecode.
Auxiliary TC4
[Tab]
Heading for auxiliary timecode.
Auxiliary TC5
[Tab]
Heading for auxiliary timecode.
Camera
[Tab]
Heading for the camera used to film this clip. This feature
is used in multicamera shoots.
Camroll
[Tab]
Heading for the camera roll ID containing this clip.
Duration
[Tab]
Heading for timecode Start to timecode End, the length of
the video clip.
FPS
[Tab]
Heading for video frames per second rate for digitizing the
individual clip. If omitted, the global entry applies.
Film TC
[Tab]
Heading for the timecode used on the film.
Ink Number
[Tab]
Heading for the ink number used for the clip.
KN Duration
[Tab]
Heading for the length of the clip, expressed in feet and
frames.
KN End
[Tab]
Heading for the ending key number for the clip.
KN Start
[Tab]
Heading for the starting key number for the clip.
Labroll
[Tab]
Heading for the lab roll ID for the clip. Lab rolls are a
combination of several camera rolls.
Perf
[Tab]
Heading for the film-edge perforations format used for 3perf projects.
Pullin
[Tab]
Heading for the telecine pulldown of the first frame of the
clip (pulldown phase). Pullin can have the values A, B, C,
or D.
147
Appendix A Avid Log Specifications
Avid Log Column Headings (Continued)
COLUMN HEADINGS: Column headings are case sensitive and must be spelled exactly as
shown. Note that the first five headings are required. Other headings are optional but might
be necessary for your project. This table lists only the column headings that are relevant to
shot log files. Some data, such as Creation Date, is gathered by the system. The following
table does not include headings for such data. The maximum number of combined global,
standard, and custom headings in a log file is 64.
148
Pullout
[Tab]
Heading for the telecine pulldown of the last frame of the
clip (pulldown phase). Pullout can have the values A, B,
C, or D.
Reel #
[Tab]
Heading for the source reel number.
Scene
[Tab]
Heading for the scene number of the clip.
Shoot date
[Tab]
Heading for the date the footage was shot.
Sound TC
[Tab]
Heading for Nagra timecode, Aaton code, Arri code, and
so on, at the sync point. Syncs with the Start timecode.
Required if tracking the sync sound. Capture rate can be
25 or 30 fps.
Soundroll
[Tab]
Heading for sound roll ID for clip.
TC 24
[Tab]
Heading for 24-fps timecode.
TC 25P
[Tab]
Heading for 25-fps timecode with pulldown.
TC 25
[Tab]
Heading for 25-fps timecode.
TC 30
[Tab]
Heading for 30-fps timecode.
Take
[Tab]
Heading for take ID for clip.
Tape
[Tab]
Heading for source tape ID for the individual clip. If
omitted, the global entry applies.
DESCRIPT
[Tab]
Heading for description of clip.
COMMENTS
[Tab]
Heading for comments about clip.
Avid Log Specifications
Avid Log Column Headings (Continued)
COLUMN HEADINGS: Column headings are case sensitive and must be spelled exactly as
shown. Note that the first five headings are required. Other headings are optional but might
be necessary for your project. This table lists only the column headings that are relevant to
shot log files. Some data, such as Creation Date, is gathered by the system. The following
table does not include headings for such data. The maximum number of combined global,
standard, and custom headings in a log file is 64.
<Your_heading>
[Tab]
[Enter] or
[Return]
Add any category of information you want. Add as many
headings as you want, but do not use more than a total of
64 global and column headings in the file. Press the Tab
key between each heading. Do not press the Tab key after
the last heading.
[Enter] or
[Return]
Press [Enter] (Windows) or [Return] (Macintosh) twice
(do not press Tab) after the last heading.
Data Entries
The data entries come after the Custom column headings. The following table
shows the format for entering data. Enter a line of data in this format for every
clip. Be sure to start the data section for each clip with the word Data [Enter]
(Windows) or Data [Return] (Macintosh).
Avid Log Data Headings
DATA HEADINGS: The word Data marks the start of the data for each clip.
Data
n
[Enter] Required
or
[Return]
Enter the word Data to mark the start of the logged clip
entries.
DATA FOR EACH CLIP: Enter a line of data for each clip. Enter the data so it aligns with its column
heading. (The data that goes with the ninth column heading must be the ninth data entry.) Be sure to
enter data for all the required values. To leave a data position unfilled, press the Tab key instead of
typing data. Press Enter (Windows) or Return (Macintosh) at the end of each line. Your Avid system
supports up to four audio tracks in imported and exported logs.
<clip name>
[Tab]
Required
Under Name heading. Enter a clip identifier (32 characters
maximum).
149
Appendix A Avid Log Specifications
Avid Log Data Headings (Continued)
DATA HEADINGS: The word Data marks the start of the data for each clip.
150
<V>
<VA1>
<VA2>
<VA1A2>
<A1A2>
<A1>
<A2>
[Tab]
Required
Under Tracks heading. Enter the tracks you want captured
for the clip. Enter V for MOS takes. Enter A1, A2, or
A1A2 for wild sound.
<timecode>
[Tab]
Required
Under Start heading. Enter the video timecode for the sync
point, the first frame of the clip. Use colons for non-dropframe (for example, 01:00:12:20). Use one or more
semicolons for drop-frame (for example, 01;18;00;02).
<timecode>
[Tab]
Required
Under End heading. Enter the video timecode for the last
frame of the clip.
<22kHz>
<24kHz>
<44kHz>
<48kHz>
[Tab]
Under Audio heading. Enter the audio sampling rate for
this clip only. If omitted, global entry applies.
<inknumber>
[Tab]
Under Auxiliary Ink Number heading. Identify a second
ink number for the start of the clip.
<timecode>
[Tab]
Under Auxiliary TC heading. Enter a Nagra timecode,
Aaton code, Arri code, and so on, for the sync point. Syncs
with the Start timecode.
<camera ID>
[Tab]
Under Camera heading. Identify the camera, using letters
or numbers. For multicamera shoots.
<camera roll ID>
[Tab]
Under Camroll heading. Identify the camera roll, using
letters and numbers.
<timecode>
[Tab]
Under Duration heading. Enter the length of the video
clip, Start to End.
<23.98>
<24>
<25>
<29.97>
[Tab]
Under FPS heading. Enter the video capture rate for this
clip only. If omitted, the global entry applies. Use 23.98 fps
(23.978 fps) for NTSC, 24 fps for NTSC or PAL, 25 fps for
PAL, or 29.97 fps for NTSC.
<timecode>
[Tab]
Under Film TC heading. Identify the timecode used for the
film, usually at 24 fps.
Avid Log Specifications
Avid Log Data Headings (Continued)
DATA HEADINGS: The word Data marks the start of the data for each clip.
<inknumber>
[Tab]
Under Ink Number heading. Identify the ink number for
the start of the clip.
<keynumber>
[Tab]
Under KN Start heading. Identify the complete key
number for the start of the clip, for example, KU 31 26368903&12.
<keynumber>
[Tab]
Under KN End heading. Identify the key number for the
end of the clip. You need to identify only feet and frames,
for example, 0342&07.
<keynumber>
[Tab]
Under KN Duration heading. Identify the length of the
clip, in feet and frames.
<lab roll ID>
[Tab]
Under Labroll heading. Identify the lab roll, using letters
and numbers.
<1>
<2>
<3>
[Tab]
Under Perf heading. Edit the perf for this clip only.
<A>
[Tab]
<B>
<X> (matchback only)
<C>
<D>
Under Pullin heading. Identify the telecine pulldown of the
first frame of the clip (pulldown phase). NTSC only.
<A>
[Tab]
<B>
<X> (matchback only)
<C>
<D>
Under Pullout heading. Identify the telecine pulldown of
the last frame of the clip. NTSC only.
<reel ID>
[Tab]
Under Reel # heading. Identify the reel, using numbers.
<scene ID>
[Tab]
Under Scene heading. Identify the scene, using letters and
numbers.
<shoot date>
[Tab]
Under Shoot Date heading. Identify the date the footage
was shot, in numbers or in letters and numbers.
<timecode>
[Tab]
Under Sound TC heading. Identify the sound timecode at
the sync point. Syncs with the Start timecode.
151
Appendix A Avid Log Specifications
Avid Log Data Headings (Continued)
DATA HEADINGS: The word Data marks the start of the data for each clip.
<sound roll ID>
[Tab]
Under Soundroll heading. Identify the sound roll, using
letters and numbers.
<timecode>
[Tab]
Under TC 24 heading. Identify the start of the clip for 24p
timecode.
<timecode>
[Tab]
Under TC 25p heading. Identify the start of the clip for 25p
timecode (PAL pulldown).
<timecode>
[Tab]
Under TC 25 heading. Identify the start of the clip for
25-fps timecode (PAL).
<timecode>
[Tab]
Under TC 30 heading. Identify the start of the clip for
30-fps timecode.
<take ID>
[Tab]
Under Take heading. Identify the take, using letters and
numbers.
<source tape ID>
[Tab]
Under Tape heading. Enter the source videotape ID for this
clip only.
<clip description>
[Tab]
Under DESCRIPT heading. Describe the clip.
<clip comments>
[Tab]
Under COMMENTS heading. Comment on the clip.
<information>
[Tab]
Under the headings you created yourself, type the
appropriate information.
[Enter] or [Return]
Press Enter (Windows) or Return (Macintosh) after the last
entry for the clip.
Do not press Tab after the last entry for the clip.
Enter an additional line of data for each remaining clip.
Sample Avid Log
This section contains a sample Avid log for an NTSC video project, in
Windows and Macintosh formats.
Formatting keys (such as [Tab] and [Enter] (Windows) or [Return]
(Macintosh)) are shown in brackets.
152
Sample Avid Log
Windows
Heading [Enter]
FIELD_DELIM [Tab] TABS [Enter]
VIDEO_FORMAT [Tab] NTSC [Enter]
AUDIO_FORMAT [Tab] 44kHz [Enter]
TAPE [Tab] 001 [Enter]
FPS [Tab] 29.97 [Enter]
[Enter]
Column [Enter]
Name [Tab] Tracks [Tab] Start [Tab] End [Enter]
[Enter]
Data [Enter]
CU Josh & Mary [Tab] V [Tab] 01:00:00:00 [Tab] 01:15:05:00 [Enter]
CU Josh [Tab] VA1 [Tab] 01:15:06:00 [Tab] 01:20:00:00 [Enter]
Macintosh
Heading [Return]
FIELD_DELIM [Tab] TABS [Return]
VIDEO_FORMAT [Tab] NTSC [Return]
AUDIO_FORMAT [Tab] 44kHz [Return]
TAPE [Tab] 001 [Return]
FPS [Tab] 29.97 [Return]
[Return]
Column [Return]
Name [Tab] Tracks [Tab] Start [Tab] End [Return]
[Return]
Data [Return]
CU Josh & Mary [Tab] V [Tab] 01:00:00:00 [Tab] 01:15:05:00 [Return]
CU Josh [Tab] VA1 [Tab] 01:15:06:00 [Tab] 01:20:00:00 [Return]
153
Appendix A Avid Log Specifications
154
Appendix B
Working with a Film Project
This appendix covers the following topics:
•
Film and 24P Settings
•
Logging Film Information
For information about starting a film project, see “Creating a New Project” on
page 29.
n
n
The information in this appendix also applies to matchback projects.
Matchback is available in Symphony, Media Composer, Film Composer,
Avid Xpress, and Avid Xpress DV systems.
Film projects that use 24p and 25p media are not available on all Avid
systems. For information on film projects, see the appropriate editing guide
and input and output guide.
Appendix B Working with a Film Project
Film and 24P Settings
Set film preferences in the Film and 24P Setting dialog box immediately after
you create a project to provide the system with important information about
the type of film and audio transfer you used for your job. You can access the
Film and 24P Setting from the Settings scroll list in the Project window. The
following illustration shows the dialog box for an NTSC film project. A PAL
project replaces the Audio Source Tape TC Rate menu with an Audio Transfer
Rate menu.
Film settings determine essential parameters for accurately capturing,
tracking, and editing source material for 24p, 25p, and 1080p projects
including:
156
•
Play rate
•
Film and Edge Type ink numbers
•
Audio transfer rate (PAL only) and pulldown parameters for film-to-tape
transfers
•
Pulldown phase
Film and 24P Settings
Adjusting the Film and 24P Settings Options
The following table describes the Film and 24P Setting dialog box options that
Avid MediaLog uses with film projects to set the essential parameters
necessary to capture, track, and edit source material.
Film and 24P Setting Dialog Box Options
Option
Description
Edit Play Rate
Selects the play rate for your project.
Ink Number Default Film
Type
Selects one of these industry-standard ink number film types to meet your
production lab standards and your film type.
Ink Number Default Edge
Type
Selects the edge type for the ink number display in bins and cut lists.
Auxiliary Ink Default Film
Type
Selects the film type for a second ink number (this is useful for tracking
additional information for different film gauges). The choices are the same
as for Ink Number Default Film Type.
Auxiliary Ink Default Edge
Type
Selects the format for the auxiliary ink number edge type. The choices are
the same as for Ink Number Default Edge Type.
Video Pulldown Cadence
Specifies the type of film-to-tape transfer (NTSC only). The choices are:
Video Rate, no pulldown. For 24-fps footage transferred MOS (without
sound) to 30 fps by speeding up the film and using audio brought into the
Avid system separately at 100% of the actual speed.
Standard 2:3:2:3 pulldown. For 24-fps footage transferred to 30 fps
using Standard Pulldown with the audio synchronized to the picture.
Advanced 2:3:2:3 pulldown. For 24-fps footage transferred to 30 fps
using Advanced Pulldown with the audio synchronized to the picture.
Audio Source Tape TC Rate
Selects the source audio timecode rate. The choices are:
30 fps
29.97 fps
157
Appendix B Working with a Film Project
Film and 24P Setting Dialog Box Options (Continued)
Option
Description
Audio Transfer Rate (PAL)
For 24P PAL film projects. The choices are:
Film Rate (100%). For 24-fps film footage transferred MOS to 25 fps by
speeding up film with the audio coming in separately at 100% of the
actual speed.
Video Rate (100%+). For 24-fps film footage transferred to 25 fps by
speeding up the film with the audio synchronized to the video picture.
Set Pulldown Phase of
Timecode
Sets a default pulldown phase for a 23.976p or 24p NTSC project.
For more information, see “Entering the Ink Number (Optional)” on page 170.
Setting the Pulldown Phase
If you are logging or capturing 24-fps sources (film-to-tape transfers, media
downconverted from 1080p/24 footage, or both), set the pulldown-to-timecode
relationship for a transferred tape in the Film and 24P Setting dialog box.
Set Pulldown
Phase option
n
The information in this section only applies to NTSC projects.
You set this relationship by selecting the pulldown phase (sometimes called
the pulldown frame or pullin frame), which is the video frame at which the
master clip starts. The pulldown phase is designated A, B, C, or D. Film labs
and transfer houses typically use the A frame to start the transfer. Ideally, the
A-frame pulldown coincides with timecode ending in 0 and 5 (:00, :05, :10,
and so on). See “Determining the Pulldown Phase” on page 165 for more
information.
158
Film and 24P Settings
The following illustration shows the relationship between film frames and
video frames.
Four film frames
A
B
C
D
n
Five NTSC video frames (10 fields)
A1
odd
A2
even
B1
odd
B2
even
B3
odd
C1
even
C2
odd
D1
even
D2
odd
D3
even
A
B
X
C
D
This setting is not available in matchback projects. However, you can modify
the pulldown phase after you log it. See “Entering Pulldown Information” on
page 163.
The Set Pulldown Phase option lets you log more easily because the correct
pulldown phase of any IN point for a particular tape is automatically
determined. Setting the correct pulldown phase prevents inaccuracies in cut
lists and matchback EDLs. It also prevents incorrectly captured clips that
appear to stutter when played in 23.976p or 24p NTSC projects.
For example, if you set the pulldown phase of 00:00:00:00 as A (indicating
that the A frame is located at timecodes ending in 0 or 5), any timecode you
log will calculate its pulldown phase based on the same sync point, regardless
of where you set the IN point. If you use the logging tool to log a clip that
starts at 01:00:10:01, the Avid system automatically enters B in the Pullin
column of the bin.
The pulldown-to-timecode relationship might vary from tape to tape, or within
the same tape, depending on how the footage was transferred. If you find a
tape requires a different pulldown phase, you can change the setting in the
159
Appendix B Working with a Film Project
Film and 24P Setting dialog box or use the Modify Pulldown Phase dialog box
before logging (see “Modifying the Pulldown Phase Before Logging” on
page 166.
To set the pulldown phase:
1. Determine the correct pulldown phase for 00:00:00:00 in one of the
following ways:
t
If you are logging film-to-tape transfers, check the transfer log.
t
If you are logging tapes that were downconverted from 1080p/24,
check what pulldown frame was set for 00:00:00:00 on the deck that
performed the conversion.
If you still cannot determine the pulldown phase, see “Determining the
Pulldown Phase” on page 165.
2. Double-click Film and 24P in the Settings scroll list of the Project
window.
3. Select the option Set Pulldown Phase of Timecode 00:00:00:00 and then
select the correct pulldown phase (A, B, C, D) from the pop-up menu.
4. Click OK.
Logging Film Information
Once you have entered or imported the basic log information into a bin, you
can add film-related log information. This section describes procedures and
formats for adding various film headings.
The following are some important requirements for film-based projects:
160
•
The minimum information required for capturing is the data recorded in
the Start and End video timecode columns, and the pulldown phase for
NTSC transfers, that is noted in the Pullin column (23 or 24-fps capture
only).
•
Logs each reel of film as a separate clip and corresponds to a single master
clip, only if the video transfer of the film reel has continuous pulldown
(NTSC format) and continuous timecode (NTSC and PAL). If the film
reels for your project do not meet this condition, you must log each take
on a reel of film as a separate clip that corresponds to a single master clip.
Logging Film Information
•
If you want to produce a cut list or use film-tape-film-tape for recapturing,
you must log key numbers. You can add key numbers after logging or
capturing, before you create the cut list.
•
All film and video reference numbers are in ascending order. For example,
you cannot have key numbers in descending order.
Displaying Film Columns
To display film columns in the bin:
1. Select Bin View > Film, which is located at the bottom of the Bin window,
to display all the required film column headings.
161
Appendix B Working with a Film Project
2. To log data under optional headings (for example; Auxiliary TC1 through
Auxiliary TC5, or Film TC), select Bin > Headings and Ctrl+click
(Windows) or click (Macintosh) the specific headings you want to add
from the Bin Column Selection dialog box.
3. You can also track custom information for the job by creating a custom
heading. To create a new heading, type a name that describes the
information in the headings bar at the top of the bin. For more information
on customizing bin views, see “Customizing Bin Views in Text View” on
page 104.
Entering Pulldown Information
For information about
importing a log file, see
“Importing Logs” on
page 93.
162
To accurately capture NTSC transfer tapes in 23.976p or 24p projects, you
need to enter pulldown information into the bin. (This information is not
required for PAL transfer tapes.) Setting the correct pulldown phase prevents
inaccuracies in cut lists and matchback EDLs. If you are importing a log
generated during the telecine transfer, the pulldown information is
automatically entered in the bin.
Logging Film Information
You specify the pulldown phase in the Pullin column. The following
illustration shows a bin with a Pullin column.
Start timecode
Pullin column (information
required for NTSC)
If you do not have a transfer log, or if the transfer log is incorrect, you need to
add the information manually. If you log clips using the Logging tool, the Avid
system uses the A frame as the default pulldown phase. You might need to edit
this value.
You can set a default pulldown phase in the Film and 24P Setting dialog box.
See “Setting the Pulldown Phase” on page 159 (23/24p projects only).
n
For matchback projects, you need to log key number information before you
can log pulldown information.
By specifying the pulldown phase in the Pullin column, you accomplish the
following:
•
You ensure the clips will start with the correct frame for the pulldown.
Otherwise, you might experience inaccuracies in key-number tracking and
in the cut lists.
•
You indicate where the pulldown fields are located so the Avid system can
accurately eliminate the pulldown fields during the capturing process,
leaving you with a frame-to-frame correspondence between your digital
media and the original 23/24-fps footage (23.976p or 24p projects only).
To do this, you must indicate whether the sync point at the start of each film
clip transferred to tape is an A, B, C, or D frame, as described in the following
section. In most cases, the sync point is the A frame.
163
Appendix B Working with a Film Project
Determining the Pulldown Phase
It is easiest to determine the pulldown of a sync point (or pulldown phase) if
you ask your film lab to keypunch (cut a small hole in) the sync frame at the
zero frame in the original film footage before transferring the film to video.
Many film labs or transfer houses can also provide a pulldown frame indicator
displayed at the far right of the burn-in key numbers, depending on the
equipment available. Ideally, the A-frame pulldown coincides with timecode
ending in 0 and 5 (:00, :05, :10, and so on).
If the footage was not keypunched, you can determine pulldown according to
clapsticks or any other distinctive frame at the beginning of the clip.
Determining the pulldown is easier if the frames depict motion.
To determine the pulldown phase:
1. While viewing the video transfer on a monitor, go to the keypunched (or
clapsticks) sync point for the beginning frame of the clip you’re logging.
2. Use the Step wheel on the tape deck to Step (jog) past the sync point
frame field-by-field. You see two or three keypunched fields. If the
footage is not keypunched, look for two or three fields with little or no
motion.
3. If there are two keypunched fields, the pulldown is either A or C. Step
through the fields again and note where the timecode changes:
164
-
If the timecode does not change from the first to the second fields, the
fields came from an A frame.
-
If the timecode changes from the first to the second fields, the fields
came from a C frame.
Logging Film Information
The following illustration shows a keypunch on the A frame. Notice
where the timecode changes.
Four film frames
A
B
C
D
Five NTSC video frames (10 fields)
A1
odd
A2
even
B1
odd
B2
even
B3
odd
C1
even
C2
odd
D1
even
D2
odd
D3
even
A
Timecode change
B
Timecode change
X
Timecode change
C
Timecode change
D
4. If there are three keypunched fields, or fields without motion, the
pulldown is either B or D. Step through the fields again and note where
the timecode changes:
-
If the timecode changes from the second to the third fields, the fields
came from a B frame.
-
If the timecode changes from the first to the second fields, the fields
came from a D frame.
5. Enter or edit the information in the Pullin column in the appropriate bin,
as described in the next section.
Modifying the Pulldown Phase Before Logging
After you determine the correct pulldown phase (as described in the previous
section) you can modify the pulldown phase before capturing in one of the
following ways.
To modify the pulldown phase directly in the Pullin column:
1. Enter Text view.
2. Click the cell you want to modify.
165
Appendix B Working with a Film Project
3. Click the cell again. The pointer changes to an I-beam.
4. Type the pulldown phase and press Enter (Windows) or Return
(Macintosh).
To modify the pulldown phase for multiple clips:
1. Ctrl+click (Windows) or Shift+click (Macintosh) the clips you want to
modify.
2. Select Special > Modify.
3. Select Modify Options > Pull in.
4. Select A, B, C, or D.
5. Click OK.
The pullin for all selected clips is changed, based on the pulldown phase
you selected.
To modify the pulldown phase for multiple clips that have the same
pulldown-to-timecode relationship:
1. Ctrl+click (Windows) or Shift+click (Macintosh) the clips you want to
modify.
2. Select Special > Modify Pulldown Phase.
The Modify Pulldown Phase dialog box appears.
3. Select the correct pulldown phase for timecodes ending in 0 or 5 from the
pop-up menu.
4. Click OK.
The pulldown phase for each selected clip is changed, based on the
pulldown phase you selected for 00:00:00:00.
The Pulldown Phase setting also appears in the Film and 24P Setting
dialog box (23.976p or 24p projects only). You can override that setting
with the Modify Pulldown Phase dialog box. The selection in the Film and
24P Setting dialog box remains the same. For more information, see
“Setting the Pulldown Phase” on page 159.
166
Logging Film Information
n
After you capture an NTSC transfer, the timecode shows a loss of every fifth
frame of video. For example, do not worry if you find that your timecode jumps
at one point from 1:00:14:15 to 1:00:14:17. You have not lost a frame, just an
extra pulldown field.
Entering Frames-per-Second Rates for PAL Transfers
When you log in advance for PAL film-to-tape transfers, log the footage as
clips that have a 25-fps play rate, as listed in the FPS column of the bin. The
minimum information required to capture the footage is the data logged in the
Start and End video timecode columns.
Entering Key Numbers
To add key numbers:
t
Highlight the KN Start column, then type the key number for the sync
point at the start of the clip using one of the following formats:
-
Keykode™ Format: Type a 2-character manufacturer and film-type
code, a 6-digit prefix for identifying the film roll, a 4-digit footage
count, a 2-digit frame offset, and then press Enter (Windows) or
Return (Macintosh).
The Avid system adds a space, hyphen, and either a plus sign (for
35mm projects) or an ampersand (for 16mm projects) to format the
number. For example, in a 35mm project, to enter KJ 23 68921234+15, type KJ236892123415. In a 16mm project, typing the same
number results in the code KJ 23 6892-1234&15.
-
Other Formats: Enter other key-number formats in the Ink Number
column. Type up to eight characters for the prefix, up to five
characters for the footage count, two digits as the frame count, and
then press Enter (Windows) or Return (Macintosh).
The Avid system automatically calculates the ending key number (KN
End), based on the timecode duration.
c
Make sure the correct number appears when you press Enter (Windows)
or Return (Macintosh). For key-number formats other than Keykode, you
might need to type the space, hyphen (-), and plus sign (+) or ampersand
(&) to format the number correctly.
167
Appendix B Working with a Film Project
Tracking 3-Perf Counts
For film projects, you can track 3-perf key number counts in your Avid editing
system. 3-perf key number tracking appears in the KN Start, Ink Number, and
Aux Ink Number bin columns. A sample key number might be as follows:
KJ 12 1234-3456-10.3
The “.3” at the end of the key number represents the perf value. Enter the perf
value as an extension of the key number (.1, .2, or .3) in the appropriate bin
column cell.
Entering Additional Timecodes (Optional)
Consider the following when you enter additional timecodes:
•
•
n
168
In one of the Auxiliary TC columns (that is, Auxiliary TC1 through
Auxiliary TC5) type an auxiliary timecode that syncs with the video
timecode logged in the Start column. You can enter up to five auxiliary
timecodes. Supported timecodes depend on your project: 30-fps for NTSC
(drop-frame or non-drop-frame) and 25-fps for PAL. Use one of the
following formats:
t
Enter a 2-digit format for hours, minutes, seconds, and frames. You
need not enter a leading zero. (For example, to enter 01:23:02:00,
type 1230200.)
t
When working with drop-frame timecode in the NTSC format (not
applicable to PAL), enter a semicolon to indicate drop-frame
timecode. (For example, to enter 01;23;02;00, type 01;230200.)
In the Sound TC column, enter the Nagra or DAT timecode for the
original audio for the start of the clip. The timecode should sync with the
video timecode logged in the Start column in the bin. First, enter the
source sound-roll identifier in the Soundroll column. Supported timecodes
depend on your project: 30-fps for NTSC (drop-frame or non-drop-frame)
and 25-fps for PAL. The clip being captured must contain an audio track.
Enter the soundroll value before you enter the timecode.
Logging Film Information
n
•
In the Film TC column, enter timecode generated by a film camera (using
Aaton or Arri timecode) for tracking the picture at the start of the clip. The
film timecode should sync with the video timecode logged in the Start
column. Only 24-fps timecode is supported. The clip being captured must
contain a video track.
•
In the TC 24 column, enter timecode for original HDTV sources
(1080p/24) or audio DATs created for PAL feature-film productions that
use in-camera timecode.
You can use the Duplicate command to convert timecodes from one format to
another. For more information, see “Duplicating a Column” on page 119.
Entering the Ink Number (Optional)
To enter ink numbers:
1. Open the Film and 24P Setting dialog box by double-clicking Film and
24P in the Settings scroll list of the Project window.
2. Make sure the correct options are selected for ink number default film
type and ink number default edge type, and click OK.
n
You can log different ink number default film types in the same project as long
as you change the ink number setting to the appropriate default film type
before you log each type. Changing the ink number setting affects only the next
ink numbers you log, not numbers already logged.
3. Return to the bin and enter numbers under the Ink Number heading.
For example, use Keykode format or use a 2-digit prefix to identify the
roll, a hyphen, a 4- or 5-digit footage count, a plus sign, and a 2-digit
frame count (for example, AA-00924+00).
Entering Additional Film Data
You can continue to log additional film data into the Labroll, Camroll,
Soundroll, LUT, Scene, VFX, VFX Reel, Transfer, and Take columns, or into
your own custom columns, as necessary. You can include the information in
these columns on the cut lists you create for your edited sequence.
169
Appendix B Working with a Film Project
170
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
Index
Numerics
23.976 editing projects, creating 30
24p editing projects
creating 30
displaying timecodes in 127
24p PAL editing projects, creating 30
25i PAL editing projects, creating 30
25p editing projects
creating 30
displaying timecode in 127
30i NTSC editing projects, creating 30
3-perf key number counts 169
tracking 169
A
AatonBase log format 94
Add Channel button (Deck Configuration
dialog box) 70
Add Deck button (Deck Configuration
dialog box) 72
Adding
bin columns 120
memory mark 86
user profiles 36
Adding clip names, during capturing 90
Adding comments, during capturing 90
AFE files
described 139
exporting projects and bins 139
ALE (Avid Log Exchange)
converting logs with 93
logs compatible with 93
Align to Grid command (Bin menu) 117
Aligning columns in a bin 117
Annotate feature 90
Attic folder, described 52
Audio Project settings
access and brief description of 55
dialog box 83
Audio sample rate, setting 83
Audio Source Tape TC Rate 157
Audio Transfer Rate (Film Settings) 159
Audio Transfer Rate (PAL) 158
Autoconfigure All Ports (Special menu) 69
Automatic deck configuration 69
Auto-save function, described 52
Auto-Save options (Bin settings) 57
Auxiliary Ink Default Edge Type 157
Auxiliary Ink Default Film Type 157
Avid Attic folder
Bin settings for 58
described 52
Avid Calculator tool, using 64
Avid Log Exchange See ALE
Avid logs
clip data in 149
creating 143
custom headings in 146
data entries in 149
formatting guidelines 144
Index
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
global headings in 144
importing 93, 143
sample created with text editor 152
specifications 144
standard headings in 146
B
Backing up, media files 39
Backup options (Bin settings) 57
Bin Column Selection dialog box 118
Bin display, settings 100
Bin Fast menu, described 105
Bin settings
access and brief description of 55
Automatic-Save options 57
Backup options 57
defined 57
storing files in the Avid Attic folder 58
Bin View settings
column headings 130
described 55
Bin views
customizing 104
saving 105
types of 104
Bins
auto-save function, described 52
Bin View pop-up menu 104
changing fonts 45
closing 50
columns in
adding 120
aligning 117
deleting 119
duplicating 119
moving 117
showing and hiding 118
creating 48
deleting 50
displaying film columns in 162
displaying in Project window 46
displaying objects in 100
exporting 136
exporting as AFE files 139
172
Fast menu 105
Info display 63
listing timecodes in 127
locking items in 116
managing 52
managing clip information in 121
opening 49
opening from a different project 49
printing 135
renaming 48
saving, using the Save Bin command 53
targeting for digitizing 81
transferring 137
transferring from a MediaLog system 97
using system backup to save 39
Bins display (Project window) 46
Brief tab (bin) 102
Browsing for a project 35
C
Calculator tool, using 64
Camroll data 170
Capturing
adding clip names during 90
adding comments (annotating) during 90
Changing
clip information before digitizing 92
fonts for bins and Project window 45
user profiles 37
Channel dialog box 70
Channel Selection area 81
Cinema Tools log format 94
Clip colors
assigning source colors 109
viewing in bins 109
Clip data in Avid logs 149
Clip information
managing in bins 121
modifications table 122
Clips
assigning source colors in bins 109
copying 107
defined 18
deleting from bins 108
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
displaying source colors in bins 109
duplicating 107
locking in a bin 116
modifying information in 92
moving 107
removing from bins 108
selecting 106
sifting 111
Closing
bins 50
projects 38
the Project window 44
CMX EDL log format 94
Color, assigning source color in bins 109
Color column, adding to bins 109
Column headings
displaying or hiding in a bin 130
in Avid log file 146
Columns See Bins
Comments, adding during capturing 90
Communications (Serial) Ports tool 65
Configuring decks 70
automatically 69
manually 69
Connecting deck to computer
Macintosh 23
Windows 22
Copying clips 107
Creating
a folder in a project 48
Avid log files 143
bins 48
projects 29
criterion 126
Criterion pop-up menu (Custom Sift
dialog box) 111
Custom headings in Avid logs 146
Custom Sift command (Bin menu) 111
Custom Sift dialog box 111
Customizing bin views 104
Index
D
Data entries in Avid log file 149
Deck Configuration settings
access and brief description of 55
Add Channel options 70
adjusting 70
deleting elements in 75
Deck Preferences settings
access and brief description of 55
description 75
Deck settings
Fast Cue option 74
for configuring decks 72
Preroll option 74
Decks
automatic configuration 69
configuring 70
connecting 21, 23
manual configuration 69
not connected, logging with 88
offline 88
pausing while logging 88
using the keyboard to control decks 91
Default settings, restoring 60
Delete command (Edit menu) 108
Deleting
bin columns 119
bins 50
clips from bins 108
columns 119
deck configurations 75
Destination bins, choosing 81
Dialog boxes
Bin Column Selection 118
Custom Sift 111
Film Setting 156
Film Settings 31
Modify Pulldown Phase 167
New Project 29
173
Index
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
Open 49
Set Font 45
View Name (bin) 105
Digitizing
modifying clip information before 92
preparing for targeting bins 81
Disks See Drive space, Drives
Displaying
bin column headings 130
film columns 162
Drives, saving work on 39
Duplicate command (Edit menu) 119
duplicating clips using 107
Duplicating
bin columns 119
clips 107
E
Entering
additional film data 170
ink numbers 170
key numbers 168
optional timecodes 169
pulldown of the sync point 163
Entering frames-per-second rates for PAL
transfers 168
Evertz log format 94
Excalibur files, importing 93
Export (File menu) 140, 141
Exporting
bins 136
bins as AFE files 139
projects as AFE files 139
shot log files 136
Film
columns, displaying 162
data entering 170
information logging 162
options, matchback 31
preferences, setting 31, 156
scene workflow 100
timecodes, entering 169
tracking 3-perf counts 169
Film settings
described 56
for transfer 158
in the Project window 156
pulldown phase 159
Final Cut Pro log format 94
FLEx log format 94
Folders, managing 52
Fonts, changing in bins and Project window 45
Format display 63
Frames-per-second rates for PAL 168
G
Global headings in Avid log file 144
H
Hardware
setup (Macintosh) 23
setup (Windows) 21
turning on 24
Headings command (Bin menu) 109, 118
Help system, overview 42
Hiding
bin column headings 130
bin columns 118
F
Fast Cue option (Deck settings) 74
Fast menus
Bin 105
Bin display in the Project window 47
Settings display in the Project window 58
174
I
Import command (File menu) 94
Import settings, access and brief description
of 56
Importing logs 93
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
Info display in the Project window, defined 63
Ink Number Default Edge Type 157
Ink Number Default Film Type 157
Ink numbers, entering 170
Installing MediaLog
on a Macintosh system 26
on a Windows system 25
K
Key numbers
entering 168
formats for 168
Keyboard, controlling decks from 91
Keyboard settings 62
access and brief description of 56
Keykode format 168
Keyscope log format 94
Kits for connecting hardware 21
L
Labroll data 170
Launching (Starting) MediaLog 27
Locking and unlocking bin items 116
Log files, importing from film-to-tape transfer
systems 104
Log Right files, importing 93
Logging
basic steps 20
defined 68
directly to bin from source tape 84
film information 162
information from active tracks 81
on-the-fly 87
pausing deck while 88
preparing for 78
tape selection 82
without a tape 88
without deck connected 88
Logging tool 79
Logs, importing into MediaLog bins 94
Index
M
Managing
bins 52
folders 52
Marking tape location, using Mark Memory
button 86
Master clips
copying 107
duplicating 107
locking 116
moving 107
selecting 106
sifting 111
Matchback option 31
MediaLog, overview 17
Memory marks, adding 86
Menu commands
Align to Grid (Bin menu) 117
Custom Sift (Bin menu) 111
Delete (Edit menu), columns using 119
Duplicate (Edit menu) 107
Export (File menu) 140, 141
Headings (Bin menu) 118
New Bin (File menu) 48
Open Bin (File menu) 49
Page Setup (File menu) 136
Print Bin (File menu) 136
Set Bin Display (Bin menu) 100
Set Font (Edit menu) 45
Modify Pulldown Phase dialog box 167
Modifying clip information 92
Moving
bin columns 117
clips 107
Multilevel sorting of columns 126
N
Naming tapes 79
New Bin command (File menu) 48
NTSC (National Television Standards Committee)
video editing format 29
175
Index
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
O
Offline logging 88
OLE log format 94
Online Help See Help system
Open Bin command (File menu) 49
Open dialog box 49
Opening
bins 49
Help 42
the Project window 44
OSC/R log format 94
Output timecodes, displaying in bins 127
Projects
backing up 39
browsing for 35
closing 38
creating new 29
exporting as AFE files 139
saving 39
selecting a private 32
selecting a shared 33
Pulldown, finding at the sync point 163
Pulldown phase
modifying before digitizing 167
setting for Film 159
P
Q
Page Setup command (File menu) 136
PAL (Phase Alternating Line) video
format 29
frames-per-second rates 168
Phase Alternating Line (PAL) video
editing format 29
Picture Transfer Rate (Film Settings) 158
Preroll option (Deck Settings dialog box) 74
Print Bin command (File menu) 136
Printing bins 135
Private project, selecting 32
Profiles, user
adding 36
changing 37
described 36
Project settings
defined 54
displaying 59
Project window
changing fonts 45
closing 44
displaying
bins 46
settings 54
usage 63
Info display, using 63
opening 44
Quitting MediaLog 40
176
R
Removing
clips from bins 108
deck configuration elements 75
Renaming bins 48
Replacing deck configuration elements 75
Restoring
default settings 60
files from backup 40
Restricted characters in project names 29
S
Sample rate, setting 83
Save Bin command (File menu) 52
Saving
bins, automatically 52
bins, manually 39
custom bin views 105
projects 39
Scene data 170
Selecting
clips 106
settings for deck configuration 70
tapes for logging 82
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
Serial (COM) Ports settings, access and brief
description of 55
Set Bin Display command (Bin menu) 100
Set Font command (Edit menu) 45
Set Pulldown Phase of Timecode 158
Setting up hardware
Macintosh 23
Windows 21
Settings
basic 57
bin 57
deck configuration 70
default, restoring 60
defining 56
described 54
film 57, 156
for film preferences 31, 156
keyboard 62
overview of 54
project
defined 54
displaying 59
scroll list 55
site
defined 55
using 61
tab 54
user defined 54
Settings scroll list
Audio Project 55
Bin 55
Bin View 55
Deck Configuration 55
Deck Preferences 55
Film 56, 156
Import 56
Keyboard 56
Serial (COM) Ports 55
summary of contents 55
Workspace 56
Shared project, selecting 33
Shot log files
Avid log file specifications 143
exporting 136
Shotlister files
importing 93
Index
Showing bin columns 118
Shutting down the system
Macintosh 41
Windows 41
Sifting clips 111
Site settings
defined 55
using 61
Sorting
clips 126
columns, multilevel 126
Sound roll, entering data for 170
Source colors
assigning custom colors to 109
assigning in bins 109
limiting available colors of 110
Source tapes, selecting for logging 82
Specifications, Avid log 144
Standard headings in Avid log files 146
Starting MediaLog 26
Subclips
copying 107
duplicating 107
moving 107
selecting 106
sifting 111
Sync point, finding the pulldown at 163
T
Tape naming schemes 79
Target bin, choosing 81
Telecine, importing log file from 104
Text editors, creating Avid logs with 143
Text view (bin display)
defined 103
using 117
Timecode
display options, 24p and 25p projects 127
entering 169
Transferring
bins from another MediaLog system 97
bins to an Avid editing system 137
through AFE 139
177
Index
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
Trash
emptying 51
moving bins from 51
viewing contents of 51
Turning off equipment
Macintosh 41
Windows 41
Turning on the hardware 24
U
Unique tape names 79
Unlocking and locking bin items 116
Usage information, displaying 63
User, selecting another 27, 59
User profiles
adding 36
changing 37
described 36
User settings
defined 54
selecting a user from 59
178
V
Video decks See Decks
Video Pulldown Cadence 157
View
bin
customizing 104
saving 105
types of 104
View Name dialog box (bin) 105
VITC (Vertical Interval Timecode) in a bin 134
V-LAN/VLXi 71
VTRs See Decks
W
Word processor, creating Avid logs with 143
Workflow, film scene 100
Workspaces
assigning buttons to 62
assigning windows to 62
settings 56