V1803-01
This manual describes in detail the possibilities of the LOGBOX SE as manufactured by Physicus, Bratislava, Slovakia
1
DECLARATION OF CONFORMITY
Kipp & Zonen B.V.
Delftechpark 36, 2628 XH Delft
P.O. Box 507, 2600 AM Delft
The Netherlands
declares under our sole responsibility that the product
LOGBOX SE ultra low power data logger
to which this declaration relates, is in conformity with European Harmonised Standards
as published in the Official Journal of the EC, based on the following standard
[EMC - Emissions] EN 61326-2-1:2013 and EN 61326-2-3:2013
[EMC - Immunity] EN 61326-2-1:2013 and EN 61326-2-3:2013
following the provisions
EMC-directive 2004/108/EC
also, this device complies
[EMC - FCC] Title 47CFR part 15
Delft, 1st September 2016
Handtekening
Edo van Houten - CFO
Kipp & Zonen B.V.
2
2
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1
2
3
4
5
6
DECLARATION OF CONFORMITY.............................................................................................................................. 2
TABLE OF CONTENTS............................................................................................................................................. 3
NOTES ................................................................................................................................................................. 4
INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................................................... 5
OVERVIEW ............................................................................................................................................................ 5
SPECIFICATIONS ................................................................................................................................................... 6
6.1
Power consumption estimates ......................................................................................................................................................... 7
7
QUICK START...................................................................................................................................................... 10
8
USING THE LOGBOX SE ........................................................................................................................................ 11
8.1
Connecting power........................................................................................................................................................................... 11
8.2
Inserting the SIM and attaching GSM antenna ............................................................................................................................... 12
8.3
Connecting to differential inputs.................................................................................................................................................... 13
8.4
Connecting to single ended inputs ................................................................................................................................................. 13
8.5
Connecting a sensor with a Pt-100 thermistor ............................................................................................................................... 14
8.6
Connecting a thermistor. ................................................................................................................................................................ 14
8.7
Connecting digital inputs ............................................................................................................................................................... 15
8.8
Connecting a SMART sensor via RS-485 ......................................................................................................................................... 16
9
PC CONFIGURATION SOFTWARE ........................................................................................................................... 17
9.1
Toolbar ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 18
9.2
Analog configuration. ..................................................................................................................................................................... 19
9.3
Digital configuration ....................................................................................................................................................................... 20
9.4
Serial configuration ........................................................................................................................................................................ 20
9.5
Internal values ................................................................................................................................................................................ 21
9.6
Output ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 22
9.6.1
Polynomials for CMP, CHP, CGR etc ..................................................................................................................................... 22
9.6.2
Polynomials for Thermistors ............................................................................................................................................... 23
9.6.3
Polynomials for Pt-100......................................................................................................................................................... 23
9.6.4
Polynomials for UVS: ............................................................................................................................................................ 24
9.7
System............................................................................................................................................................................................. 25
9.8
Modem ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 26
9.9
Setup flow ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 27
9.10
LIVEVIEW .................................................................................................................................................................................... 28
10
FIRMWARE UPDATE ............................................................................................................................................. 29
11
SERVICE MODE.................................................................................................................................................... 30
11.1
Setup and check commands ..................................................................................................................................................... 31
11.1.1
Help ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 31
11.1.2
Question mark command .................................................................................................................................................... 32
11.1.3
Config ................................................................................................................................................................................... 32
11.1.4
Modem.................................................................................................................................................................................. 33
11.1.5
System .................................................................................................................................................................................. 33
11.1.6
SaveConfig ........................................................................................................................................................................... 33
11.1.7
ReadConfig ........................................................................................................................................................................... 33
11.1.8
ReadData .............................................................................................................................................................................. 33
11.1.9
ActualData ............................................................................................................................................................................ 34
11.1.10
SD .................................................................................................................................................................................... 34
11.1.11
RS-485 ............................................................................................................................................................................. 34
11.1.12
ReadFile .......................................................................................................................................................................... 34
11.1.13
Miscellaneous ................................................................................................................................................................. 34
11.1.14
Settings via terminal session .......................................................................................................................................... 35
12
QUICK REFERENCE .............................................................................................................................................. 38
13
LOGBOX SE POSSIBILITIES AND EXAMPLES............................................................................................................ 39
14
MY LOGBOX SE DOESN’T WORK THE WAY I WANT IT ................................................................................................ 42
14.1
Common issues ......................................................................................................................................................................... 42
14.1.1
When the results in LiveView remain ---............................................................................................................................... 42
14.1.2
Several intervals, I’m confused ............................................................................................................................................ 42
14.1.3
My modem doesn’t work...................................................................................................................................................... 42
14.1.4
I get no reports on the second RS-232 port ......................................................................................................................... 43
14.1.5
Resetting the LOGBOX SE..................................................................................................................................................... 43
14.1.6
I can’t install the driver on Windows 8 or 10 ........................................................................................................................ 43
15
APPENDICES....................................................................................................................................................... 45
15.1
Polynomials ............................................................................................................................................................................... 45
15.2
Example output of TestGprs...................................................................................................................................................... 49
15.3
Example output of TestEmail .................................................................................................................................................... 49
15.4
Example output of TestSync ..................................................................................................................................................... 50
3
3
NOTES
Reading this entire manual is recommended for a full understanding of this product.
The exclamation mark within an equilateral triangle is intended to alert the user to the presence of important operating
and maintenance instructions in the literature accompanying the instrument.
Kipp & Zonen reserve the right to make changes in the specifications without prior notice.
WARRANTY AND LIABILITY
Kipp & Zonen guarantees that the product delivered has been thoroughly tested to ensure that it meets its published
specifications. The warranty included in the conditions of delivery is valid only if the product has been installed and used
according to the instructions supplied by Kipp & Zonen. This product is under warranty for 24 months from the date of
purchase.
Modifications made by the customer or on customer request can affect the validity of the CE declaration.
Kipp & Zonen shall in no event be liable for incidental or consequential damages, including without limitation, lost profits,
loss of income, loss of business opportunities, loss of use and other related exposures, however caused, arising from the
faulty and incorrect use of the product.
COPYRIGHT 2016 Kipp & Zonen
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form
or by any means, without permission in written form from the company.
In the case you have questions, comments or need technical support, please contact us at the following address:
Kipp & Zonen B.V.
Delftechpark 36
2628 XH Delft
the Netherland
+31 15 2755 234
support@kippzonen.com
www.kippzonen.com
Note: in case technical support is required please add the configuration file of the Software interface, the log files in
TXT or XLS format, add the serial number of the LOGBOX SE, and please describe your inquiry in as much detail as
possible.
4
4
INTRODUCTION
The LOGBOX SE is a data logger for slow varying low voltage 0-3V signals. It features low noise, high resolution and low
power consumption.
The LOGBOX SE is a universal data logger, configurable by software, suitable for mobile as well as permanent installation
and can be used in a laboratory and in the field. It can be used under all weather conditions. A mounting plate for
installation on a mast or pole is provided.
5
OVERVIEW
The LOGBOX SE is designed for measuring, processing and recording (data logging) measured data in real time for the
needs of relatively slow signals analyses. It is designed for ultra-low power consumption and will run many weeks
unattended on the internal AA batteries.
It offers four analog inputs, which can be configured by software as unipolar inputs or as bipolar differential inputs with
24 bit resolution as well as four single ended inputs with 12 bit resolution. With definition of polynomial coefficients (of the
3-rd order) measured values can be converted to engineering units on the fly.
Four digital inputs are configurable by software for measuring frequency, time or as counters. Again, with definition of
polynomial coefficients (of the 3-rd order) the measured values can be converted to engineering units.
Internal values that can be logged are: VRTC, VMAIN, VPOWER, VOUT, GSM signal and Atmospheric pressure.
All logged data will be stored on the internal SD card which comes with 512MB capacity and is enough for a few years of
data logging.
For optional communication to a PC the LOGBOX SE uses either its RS-232 communication port, the internal USB port or
the GSM modem. For longer physical data lines the RS-232 signals can be converted to RS-485 by using locally bought
RS-232 to RS-485 converters.
A Real Time Clock circuit keeps track of time and date and is powered from a standard C2032 lithium battery. Operational
life is more than 10.000 hours. The clock can be synchronised daily using the GSM modem with the right 2G GPRS SIM card.
For signalling and powering external devices the LOGBOX SE has a built-in output capable of handling a current up to
200mA.
Additionally, a precise reference voltage of 2.5Vdc is available of which the exact value is printed on the calibration sheet
supplied with each unit and stored in non-volatile memory.
The LOGBOX SE offers 6 waterproof cable glands for feeding cables to the internal connectors like sensors, solar panel or
external power supply or battery.
5
6
SPECIFICATIONS
Differential inputs
Number of analog inputs
Input ranges
Max. number of instruments without
temperature sensor
Max. number of instruments with Pt100
Max. number of instruments with 10k NTC
Max. voltage allowed on input
Resolution
4
8
A9 – A12
19, 38, 78,156, 312, 625, 1250, 2500mV
4
2-wire signal
1
4
5V
24bit
2-wire signal & 4 wire Pt100 thermistor
2-wire signal & 2 wire 10k NTC to single ended
Single ended inputs
Number of analog inputs
Input ranges
4
2
Max. number of 10k thermistors
Max. voltage allowed on input
Resolution
4
5V
12bit
AIN1 – AIN4
0 – 2.5V on AIN1 & AIN2
0 – 3V on AIN3 & AIN4
2-wire
Digital inputs
Number of inputs
Input selections
Max. voltage allowed
Max. input frequency
Logic level
Serial inputs
Number of RS-485 inputs
Supported models
4
3
15V
1500Hz
3V
DIN1 – DIN4
Time, Frequency, Counter
8
5
Use one common RS-485 connection
SMPxx, SGRxx, SHP1, SUVx, RT1
CMOS, DIN4 0.5V for CDS3
General specifications
Input offset differential max.
Inaccuracy differential
Inaccuracy single ended
Memory
0.5µV
0.05%
0.1%
SD card
Internal power supply
Power connection (PWR)
6x AA battery
4 – 24VDC
Solar power connection (SOLAR)
Battery power connection (BATT)
Charger connection (CHARGER)
Battery out (BATOUT)
Power out (PWROUT)
Power consumption
12 – 20VDC
12VDC
6 – 13VDC
12V -750mA
Follows PWR
From 6x AA battery
or PWR
Power via USB
Temperature range
Dimensions
Protection
Mounting
RTC accuracy (without synchronization)
Time synchronization
Possible
-40 to 60ºC
170x145x50mm
IP65
⌀ 45mm
10ppm
once a day over
internet
GSM modem specifications
Model
512MB included, 4GB max FAT formatted
And 16GB FAT32 formatted
Cinterion MC75i
6
General input when internal batteries are not
used
From optional solar panel
12V Pb battery, max. charge 750mA
Used to charge the 12V Pb battery
Constant power to drive instruments
Switched power max. 200mA
1mA standby, 7mA short burst when storing
data max. 100mA with GSM modem working
Doesn’t include powered instruments
Only with opened box, for logger setup
Pole / mast mounting
If ModemInterval is not zero
www.gemalto.com/m2m/solutions/downloads
6.1
Power consumption estimates
For safe scenario’s it is advised to calculate with 50-60% of the mAh capacity as indicated on the battery used. This takes
into account the self-discharge of most batteries and the possibly needed peak current for the GSM modem.
Smart digital instrument need to remain powered all the time as the power-on sequence takes time and most instruments
need to reach a temperature equilibrium. The switched on instruments will have a significant impact on the power
consumption.
A Kipp & Zonen Smart instrument on average uses 8mA on low voltages (5-9V) and 4mA on higher voltages.
Tabel updated 20-03-2018 Valid for 12V power
Scenario
Instruments
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Analog
Analog
Analog
Analog
Smart digital 1x
Smart digital 2x
Smart digital 4x
Smart digital 4x
Smart digital 4x
Measurement
interval seconds
60
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
GSM data
transfer
LogboxSE and instrument
current in mA
mAh per day LogboxSE
and instruments
None
None
Every 24 hr
Every hr
None
None
None
Every 24 hr
Every hr
0.15
1.5
1.51
3.2
7
11
19
19.07
20.7
3.6
36
37.7
76
168
264
456
457
496
GSM data
transfer
LogboxSE and instrument
current in mA
mAh per day LogboxSE
and instruments
None
None
Every 24 hr
Every hr
None
None
None
Every 24 hr
Every hr
0.15
1.5
1.51
3.2
11
16
35
35.07
36.7
3.6
36
37.7
76
264
456
840
841
880
Tabel updated 20-03-2018 Valid for power from 6x AA battery
Scenario
Instruments
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Analog
Analog
Analog
Analog
Smart digital 1x
Smart digital 2x
Smart digital 4x
Smart digital 4x
Smart digital 4x
Measurement
interval seconds
60
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Running Smart instruments on 6x AA battery is not practical.
Estimated days of working time = mAh of batteries *50% ÷ (mAh per day LogboxSE and instruments)
7
Hardware
Mechanical solution of LOGBOX SE is based on single board design with minimal dimensions, weight and power
consumption.
Thanks to clear layout the user can easily connect relatively large number of sensors. For better access to input
connections, connectors are divided by two or three and removable.
The mounting plate can be used to connect the LOGBOX SE to a mast of 45 mm or smaller.
Unused cable glands are closed with an inside plug.
For permanent installation it is possible to use four screws ⌀4mm for fixing, while retaining IP65 class protection.
The LOGBOX SE board has the following components and connectors:
Lithium battery, CR2032 - reserved for real time clock.
During normal operation the RTC is powered by the available power
supply.
Off - On switch – small switch for turning the LOGBOX SE off (sleep except
real time clock). It is used when exchanging the SD card or when the data
logger is not used.
EXC jumper – this jumper offers excitation for Pt-100 sensors. It connects
a 3.9kΩ resistor from the 2.5V reference voltage to AIN9+. If no Pt-100 is
used, do not connect it.
BATT MNG jumper - this jumper is used when your power supply is a 12Vdc
solar panel or charger input (5Vdc to 12Vdc). If this jumper is removed, the
only
power source input is POWER and the control circuitry of the
charger is disconnected. This leads to minimum power consumption
during operation.
Fig.3 Description of major parts
SD memory card – any SD memory card larger than 128MB can be used. The card is used only for data storage and is not
intended for more manipulation (deleting or other operations). The unit comes with an industrial grade 512MB FAT
formatted SD card.
GSM SIM card holder – this will take your full-size SIM card which must have appropriate internet data services.
STATUS LED – this RED LED flashes every 5 seconds to indicate data logger operation (switched on and powered). This
feature is useful when long time between measurements is selected and the user needs indication that logger is operating.
8
BUSY LED - this GREEN LED is on when data is written to the SD card. Do not remove the card when this LED is on, as it will
result in unwanted open files and data loss.
SOLAR LED – this BLUE LED indicates charging of your 12V Pb battery from the CHARGER input. When the battery voltage
reaches its maximum value this indicator will flash, otherwise it will be on permanently. If there is no power on CHARGER
or SOLAR this indicator will be off.
POWER – the user can connect any type of power source (ZnMn, alkaline, NiCd, NiMH, lithium, lead acid battery, solar
panel, mains adapter) with output voltage in the range of 4Vdc – 24Vdc. The top lid can hold 6x AA battery.
PWROUT – switched power output for powering local sensors or instruments.
VREF – switched reference voltage of 2.5V for bridge or similar instruments. The exact voltage can be found on the
calibration sheet that came with the unit.
AIN1 to AIN4 – analog single ended inputs with 12 bit resolution. Input range is 0V to 2.5V for AIN1, AIN2 and 0V to 3.0V for
AIN3 and AIN4.
A9 + and - to A12 + and - – differential input pairs with 24 bit resolution. The inputs can set as unipolar or bipolar inputs
with range from 0…19mV (-19mV … +19mV bipolar) to 0…2.5V (-2.5V … +2.5V bipolar) by software.
GND – ground pins. All GND pins are electrically connected on the board. For analog inputs GND pins are separately routed
for best low noise performance.
DIN1 to DIN4 – digital inputs. Can be selected as frequency input, counter input or time of logical one input by software.
RX232_1 and TX232_1 – Serial line COM1 signals. Software configurable serial port for communication with serial sensors.
This COM1 is shared with the RS-485 port for SMART serial devices.
RS-485A and RS-485B – Serial line COM1 signals used for RS-485. Software configurable serial port for communication with
SMART serial devices (e.g. SMP-series).
RX232_2 and RX232_2 – Serial line COM2 signals. Software configurable serial port for sending reports with logged or
measured data and for communicating with the LOGBOX SE to check and change settings or read data.
BATOUT – output of power supply backed up by connected battery. This output is used for powering devices or sensors
which needs continuous power (e.g. wind speed sensor). It has deep discharge protection feature.
BATT – input for connecting 12Vdc lead acid battery. The battery is conditioned (charged by aprox. 350mA and protected
from deep discharge condition at about 10.5V). BATT MNG jumper must be inserted for this to function.
SOLAR – input for solar panel with nominal 12Vdc output. BATT MNG jumper must be inserted.
CHARGER – input for charger source with 5Vdc to 12Vdc output. BATT MNG jumper must be inserted.
ANTENNA – GSM/GPRS antenna for remote data transfer.
The instrument is mounted in a plastic enclosure (IP65 protection class) allowing outdoor installations. For smaller
measuring systems it is possible to use 6 pieces of AA battery (mignon) inside the battery compartment which is attached
to the lid of the enclosure. This results in a compact and portable solution using the LOGBOX SE.
9
7
QUICK START
The LOGBOX SE is supplied ready for use. After unpacking it is necessary to open the case by unscrewing the four screws.
With the switch in Off position now connect a power supply in the range of 4...20Vdc to POWER or CHARGER or the lead
acid battery to BATT. For mobile power supply there is the holder for six AA type batteries that needs to be connected to
POWER with the BATT jumper removed for the lowest power consumption possible.
Last step is to connect the supplied USB cable with the computer. The LOGBOX SE Setup software can be used to setup
the logger and related sensors. Do not switch the LOGBOX SE on yet. The USB connection or 6 AA batteries can both supply
the board enough electrical power to perform the setup.
The screw terminals for wire connections can easily be removed from the printed circuit board. Thus making
cable screw down easier and preventing the printed circuit board from being damaged.
10
8
8.1
USING THE LOGBOX SE
Connecting power
There are various power supply options. Simple battery management (controlled charging and protection from deep
discharge) is provided.
For minimum power consumption there is the POWER input. It is connected directly before power stabilizer, without any
charging or battery management option. Only PWROUT output is enabled.
POWER input is used in systems where very small power consumption is expected and there is no charging source available
(neither wall adapter, nor solar panel). Jumper BATT MNG must be removed. In this scenario it is possible to use 6xAA
batteries with GPRS data transfer.
Alkaline AA batteries can be used but if the GSM modem is used it is advised to use properly charged NiMh rechargeable
batteries ≥2500mA. The LOGBOX SE does not charge the 6 batteries in the holder.
If there is mains power supply available, it is recommended to use the CHARGER input. The input voltage range is from
7Vdc to 13Vdc. In this configuration a 12V lead acid battery can be connected with power management. Jumper BAT MNG
must be inserted. If correct CHARGER input is connected the SOLAR blue LED will light, indicating battery charging.
Very similar input is for solar panels on input SOLAR. It has the same features as CHARGER input. Maximum current from
solar panel is approximately 1A. Jumper BAT MNG must be inserted. If a solar panel is connected SOLAR a constant blue
LED will indicate charging. Once the battery is full, it will only flash.
Battery management cares for deep discharge condition of the attached 12V lead acid battery. If the voltage drops below
approximately 10.5V the battery is disconnected.
BATOUT output is available for powering sensors that must be powered all of the time, like wind speed sensors, Kipp &
Zonen SMART sensors or rain gauges.
Overall system operation is as follows: if main switch is in OFF position, only the real time clock is running. Most of other
the tasks are disabled. The user can enter service mode and communicate with data logger using a USB service cable.
If main switch is in ON position, full functionality follows and measuring and logging is started, indicated by the flashing
red and green LEDs.
11
8.2
Inserting the SIM and attaching GSM antenna
Before starting to send data over the internet you will need a SIM card with internet connection enabled. The SIM card
holder is located on upper right corner.
Sending data via the GSM modem is optional and not needed when local data logging on the SD memory card is sufficient.
Location of the SIM card holder
Open the SIM card holder
Place the SIM card
Close the SIM card holder
Now your data logger is ready for operation. For correct modem operation, you need to setup following parameters:
ModemPIN, APN and EmailTo address as described in section 10.8
12
8.3
Connecting to differential inputs
The LOGBOX SE allows you to connect up to 4 sensors on the differential
analog inputs AIN9 to AIN12 which have a selectable input from 19mV up to
2500mV.
8.4
-AIN9+ and AIN9-
(first sensor)
-AIN10+ and AIN10-
(second sensor)
-AIN11+ and AIN11-
(third sensor)
-AIN12+ and AIN12-
(fourth sensor)
Connecting to single ended inputs
It’s possible to connect up to four sensors on the analog single ended inputs AIN1 to AIN4.
Please note that AIN3 and AIN4 can be used to connect sensors which have a slightly higher voltage output up to 3Vdc (like
Kipp & Zonen UVS or CSD3 sensors).
Since the ADC always uses 12 bit on the single ended input; the lowest bit on AIN1 & 2 equals 0,61035 mV and on AIN3 & 4
the lowest bit equal 0,73242 mV
13
8.5
Connecting a sensor with a Pt-100 thermistor
The LOGBOX SE allows you to connect one Pt-100 temperature sensor:
-AIN9+ & AIN9reference resistor
voltage over 100Ω 0.05% 5ppm/ºC
Imeasure = VAIN9 / 100
-AIN10+ & AIN10-
voltage over Pt-100 thermistor
RPt-100 = VAIN10 / Imeasure RPt-100 = 100 x AIN10/AIN9
The ratio selection in the setup software can take care of the calculations
needed.
After connecting the Pt-100 it’s still possible to connect up to two sensors on
the differential analog inputs AIN 11 and AIN12.
8.6
Connecting a thermistor.
It’s possible to connect up to four thermistors on the analog single ended inputs AIN1 to AIN4.
In the illustration the 10K thermistor is connected to AIN 1 but in practice it
can be connected to any of the four analog single ended inputs AIN1 – AIN4.
The polynomials for AIN1&2 are different from the ones for AIN3&4 as these
have a voltage divider and low 13.2kΩ input impedance.
The thermistor can be connected to GND or VREF and polynomials change
accordingly.
It`s common for a pyrgeometer, pyrheliometer and high-end pyranometer
to have a 10K thermistor and four of these instruments in total can be
connected.
14
8.7
Connecting digital inputs
It’s possible to connect up to four digital sensors or signals to DIN1 to DIN4.
The digital inputs can measure frequency, time logical high, or count Hi-Lo changes.
15
8.8
Connecting a SMART sensor via RS-485
Up to 8 Modbus® SMART sensors can be addressed by the LOGBOX SE. Each one needs a unique address. Instructions for
setting the address are in section 10.9
All Kipp & Zonen SMP sensors have the following connections:
The sensors need constant power to stabilise and to be able to provide fast response to irradiation level changes.
blue and black wire(s)  GND
white wire(s)
 BATTOUT or parallel to POWER input
yellow Modbus® B/B’/+ wire(s)
grey Modbus® A/A’/- wire(s)
 RS-485B+ on LOGBOX SE board
 RS-485A“”
The Kipp & Zonen RT1 rooftop sensor uses:
The black and green wire(s)  GND
The white wire(s)  BATTOUT or parallel to POWER input
The grey Modbus® Data + wire(s)
The yellow Modbus® Data - wire(s)
 RS-485B+ on LOGBOX SE board
 RS-485A“”
All remaining wires need to be isolated properly.
Typical power consumption SMP-V for maximum output (1 V)
5 VDC
50 mW
approx. 10.0 mA
12 VDC
55 mW
approx. 4.5 mA
24 VDC
60 mW
approx. 2.5 mA
Typical power consumption SMP-A for maximum output (20mA)
5 VDC
77 mW
approx. 28 mA with 100Ω load resistor
12 VDC
83 mW
approx. 24 mA with 100Ω load resistor
24 VDC
100 mW
approx. 6 mA with 100 Ω load resistor
16
9
PC CONFIGURATION SOFTWARE
The LOGBOX SE Setup software is designed for easy set up of the LOGBOX SE. It is intuitive in use and a full configuration
can be made in just a few minutes. The LOGBOX SE Setup software is a simple executable file, without the need for
further installation. It is compatible with Windows™ 7, 8 and 10 operating systems 32 and 64 bit.
First of all it is necessary to download the files to your computer. Please visit the www.kippzonen.com website,
navigate to Data Loggers and the LOGBOX SE, click on Downloads and select LOGBOX SE - Software. Download the ZIP
file and unzip the files to the directory on your local computer where you want to store LOGBOX SE Setup files. There
is no need for further program installation. For maximum comfort it is advisable to create a shortcut on your desktop.
When the LOGBOX SE is attached via USB the driver will need installation. It is advised to stop the Windows installation
of the driver and perform the installation manually.
Right click on the file “msp430_ti_signed” and select Install.
In only a few seconds the driver should be installed.
Now when the LOGBOX SE is attached via the USB cable a COM port will be created. For the software to operate you
will need to know the COM port.
Open Device Manager by clicking on the Windows logo and typing Device Manager and Enter. Or Open the "Run" dialog
box by pressing and holding the Windows key, then press the R key ("Run"). Type devmgmt.msc and Enter
Note the new COM port with TI MSP430 in its name. Any extra LOGBOX SE attached later can get a new and higher COM
port. TI MSP430 is only shown when the driver was manually installed. Otherwise a generic driver will be used.
The files starting with BSL are for future use when a new firmware may be made available.
When the USB is connected also a new removable disk will appear. This allows for easy file management like copy and
removal. The SD contents visible in the Windows Explorer will be updated when files are removed but will not be
updated when the logger produces new log files. Then the USB cable must be unplugged and plugged in again.
17
After starting the software, the following window will appear.
If the software hasn’t been able to detect the right COM port please select it in the first dropdown menu under PC COM. No
other settings are needed right now.
Now click Retrieve to get the current settings from the LOGBOX SE.
After program start always click Retrieve to load the program with your current settings and the possibilities of
your Logbox SE.
Do not click Send unless you are very certain that the settings in the software are correct. After program start all
settings are off or zero and Send would reset your LOGBOX SE completely.
If by accident the LOGBOX SE is reset it is possible to go back to the original settings by selecting File, Open….. and selecting
the file Empty-std-setup or your own saved config file and Open. Once this is done a click on Send will transfer the settings
to your LOGBOX SE.
9.1
Toolbar
The File menu offers the following:
In this menu you can create new configurations (New) and save them (Save / Save
As…), or you can open existing configuration (Open…). Print, Print Preview and Printer
Setup are also possible to allow you to have a hardcopy of the settings at hand when
changing some settings.
Last four configurations are directly accessible. With Exit you can close the application.
18
The View menu turns on or off the toolbar and status bars. It’s best to leave these on.
9.2
Analog configuration.
After clicking Analog you can select all parameters of the analog inputs. Analog inputs, which should be logged, must be
checked in the Measure column.
Any UVS or CDS3 sensor needs to be attached to AIN3 or AIN4 because of their higher output voltage.
For the differential input AIN9 to AIN11 one needs to select Bipolar (BIP) and the input voltage range (19 – 2500mV). E.g. a
CMP pyranometer will produce max. around 20mV so the 38mV range would be the right selection. A SP Lite2 or equivalent
needs the 156mV setting for normal outdoor use.
Inputs AIN9 - AIN12 offer ratio measurements by checking RATIO box. It is designed for Pt-100
measurements, where AIN9 is connected to a high precision 100Ω reference resistor and AIN10 is
connected to the Pt-100 sensor. This way the user can measure temperature with the 4 wire method (for
highest precision). See section 9.5
When you select RATIO AIN10, the logger will make the following calculation:
Value = 100Ω * Uin10/Uin9 = resistance of the Pt-100
78mV would be the right voltage range for Pt-100 measurements.
19
9.3
Digital configuration
After clicking Digital you can select the parameters of the digital inputs.
Digital inputs, which should be logged, must be checked in the Measure column.
The digital inputs can measure Frequency, Time or Count.
The logic level is CMOS at 3V and max. voltage is 15V, max. frequency is 1500Hz.
DIN4 is for CDS3 sunshine duration sensor and has a 0.5V logic level.
Time (when digital input is in high logical state) is measured in seconds.
Count will count the amount of Hi-Low transitions in the programmed measurement period.
Using polynomial coefficients of the 3-rd order the logged values can be converted to engineering units
9.4
Serial configuration
After clicking Serial you can select the parameters of the RS-485 serial inputs.
Serial inputs, which should be logged, must be checked in the Measure column.
The COM port used is COM1 as that is shared with the RS-485 port that is used for communication with Kipp & Zonen SMART
sensors.
Kipp & Zonen SMART device standard settings are baudrate 19200, 8 bits, even parity and 1 stopbit.
The appropriate driver for the sensor model is selected under Driver. This only works after Retrieving the setup from the
Logbox SE.
Currently supported are: SMPxx, SGRx, SPHx, RT1 and SUVx
More devices might be added in the future.
Each SMART sensor needs to have a unique Modbus® address programmed in advance when there is more than one sensor.
Otherwise, the standard address 1 is fine.
20
Modbus® address programming can be done with Kipp & Zonen SmartExplorer software that is available for download for
free and a separately bought widely available USB – RS-485 converter.
9.5
Internal values
After clicking Internal you can see the internal values that are linked to internal sensors that can be logged.
V3V – system voltage 3.3V
VRTC – voltage of the CR2032 lithium battery
VMAIN
– voltage on CHARGER or SOLAR input
VPOWER
– voltage on POWER input
VOUT– voltage on PWROUT output (power supply for sensors)
All voltages are reported in mV.
PA – atmospheric pressure. On the board there is a simple barometer. If the box is closed and pressure needs to be
measured, it is necessary to place a pressure port in one position of the cable glands.
PA is reported in Pascal and for millibar needs to be divided by 100.
GSM – signal strength of GSM network. It is directly proportional to dBm value.
The polynomial to get dB is given in the next section.
21
9.6
Output
After clicking Output you can connect a measured input or internal value to an output, decide to log the average value,
the min and max and standard deviation for your output and optionally vector if it is related to wind direction.
For easier reading of the logged values the outputs can be given an alias that will be reported in the logs and in the LiveView
window.
The Kipp & Zonen SMART instruments (SMP, SHP, RT1 etc.) offer the choice of logging the radiation W/m2 (Sx_RAD) , the
instruments temperature (Sx_TEMP) and the raw not linearised, not temperature compensated radiation from the sensor
(Sx_RAW). For the pyrgeometers there’s also the calculated downward atmospheric long-wave radiation Sx_DOWNRAD
and the raw sensor data (Sx_RAW1) and the raw log wave down (Sx-RAW2) data both not linearised, not temperature
compensated
Each logged measured output must be converted using a 3rd power polynomial. Sixteen polynomials can be setup and
assigned. At least A1 needs to be set at the value 1.
Pn = A0 + A1 * x + A2 * x2 + A3 * x3
In the above example, P1 gives just the original millivolt value and must be used if no conversion is needed. P2 will convert
millivolts to volts for easier reading or when needed when processing the logged data. P3 is for converting the analog
voltage output of a SMART-V pyranometer to W/m2 and is hardly ever used.
The logged digital SMART sensor reading needs no further action as the readings are in W/m2, thus A1 = 1.
The temperature is in 0.1°C (see SMP manual) and needs to be divided by 10 thus giving a A1 value of 0.1.
For converting the internal GSM signal IIN7 to dBm A0 = -113, A1 = 2, A2 = 0, A3 = 0 must be used.
9.6.1
Polynomials for CMP, CHP, CGR etc
The sensitivity of the instrument (e.g. 10.60 µV/W/m2) can be transformed to a simple polynomial: 1 =
µV/W/m as indicated on the calibration certificate of the instrument.
2
For this example:where the sensitivity is 10.60 µV/W/m2:
A0 = 0
A1 = 94.33962
A2 = 0
A3 = 0
22
in
9.6.2
Polynomials for Thermistors
This section will explain how to use standard or create your own polynomials to be applied when you are using Pt-100 or
TH10K components with given specifications.
Standard polynomials for 10k thermistor to GND, 10k resistor to VREF
For AIN1 and 2:
y = -1.52813E-08x3 + 6.29616E-05x2 –1.23747E-01x + 1.11104E+02
For AIN3 and 4:
y = -1.39006E-07x3 + 3.42417E-04x2 – 3.47914E-01x + 1.63139E+02
Standard polynomials for 10k thermistor to VREF, 10k resistor to GND
For AIN1 and 2:
y = 1.52813E-08x3 – 5.16481E-05x2 + 9.54629E-02x – 4.35227E+01
For AIN3 and 4:
y = 1.39006E-07x3 – 7.00125E-04x2 + 1.24218E+00x – 7.38502E+02
y= A3 x3 + A2 x2 + A1 x + A0 as used in the LOGBOX SE
9.6.3
Polynomials for Pt-100
With the excitation jumper placed there will be a current of approximately 600µA available to flow through the 100Ω series
precision resistor and Pt100 thermistor. (see section 9.5 for connections)
AIN9 is used to measure URESISTOR .
Expected voltage is in the range of 60mV and always positive and unipolar.
IMEASURE = URESISTOR / 100
AIN10 is used for measuring the Pt-100 voltage UPt-100 and again the expected voltage is in the range of 60mV and unipolar.
RPt-100 = UPt-100 / IMEASURE = 100 * UPt-100 / URESISTOR
Calculation of the temperature can be done on the computer after receiving the logged data.
or the RATIO function in the Analog setup can be used.
Inputs AIN9 - AIN12 offer ratio measurements by checking the RATIO box in the Analog window
It’s designed for Pt-100 measurements, where AIN9 is connected to a high precision 100ohm reference resistor and
AIN10 is connected to Pt-100 sensor. This way the user can measure temperature with 4 wire method (for highest
precision). See section 9.5
When you select RATIO for AIN10 the, logger will make the following calculation:
Logged value OUTx = RPt-100 = 100 * UPt-100 / URESISTOR = 100*Uin10/Uin9
23
A usable polynomial is calculated for °C and Fahrenheit in the Excel file that came with the downloaded software package.
TCelcius = -3.89779E-06x3 + 2.20939E-03x2 + 2.23389E+00x -241.600
TKelvin = -3.89779E-06x3 + 2.20939E-03x2 + 2.23389E+00x + 31.55
TFahrenheit = -7.01601E-06x3 + 3.97691E-03x2 + 4.02100E+00x – 4.02880E+02
You can apply the above polynomials to OUTx to convert resistance to temperature in degrees Celcius, Kelvin or
Fahrenheit.
9.6.4
Polynomials for UVS:
Polynomial in mV:
To have the output values recorded in mV (millivolt) we will have to enter the following polynomial A1=1
If you are only interested in the UV values recorded by the instrument you would probably like to have these readings in
W/m².
Polynomial for W/m²:
To have the output values recorded in W/m² we will need to make some calculations using the mean sensitivity values of
the UVS instruments. The mean sensitivity values can be found on the supplied calibration certificates.
Example:
The calibration certificates state that the mean sensitivity of the UVS-A = 30.083 W/m²/V and the mean sensitivity of the
UVS-B =1.879 W/m²/V.
In order to have the correct engineering units, W/m², we need to apply the following equation: A1=Mean sensitivity/1000
For this example UVS-A
For this example UVS-B
A1 =30.083/1000=0.030083
A1 =1.879/1000=0.001879
A0 = A2 = A3 = 0
Please note that this cannot be used in combination with the Kipp & Zonen
Uviator software.
Uviator requires all logged outputs to be in Volt!
Polynomial for converting mV to Celsius:
In your UVS manual you will find a table to convert the voltage output of the UVS
into the temperature (°C). Using the described way to create polynomials this
leads to:
°C = 1.97893E-09x3 – 1.25261E-05x2 + 4.60569E-02x – 4.28345E+01
These values can be entered in the polynomials section:
24
9.7
System
After clicking System the LOGBOX SE displays the settings related to measuring and logging.
The LOGBOX SE can be given a unique name in the Name box.
MeasInterval [1-3600s] is the time in seconds between each measurement period start.
The POWEROUT output is activated at the start of the measurement period and if needed a
MeasDelay different from 0 can be entered to delay the actual measurement to let the
instruments stabilise after POWEROUT has been applied.
MeasInterval needs to be bigger than MeasDelay.
LogInterval [1-3600s] is the time between individual loggings of the gathered data. When this
interval is finished the LOGBOX SE calculates average, min, max, std Dev and stores it on the SD
card. On the SD card a new file is created for every day.
One second MeasInterval with 60 second LogInterval is often used
25
RepInterval [0…3600] – interval between reports in seconds on COM2 serial port. If RepInterval is zero, there is no report
on COM2. If RepInterval is non zero and equal to LogInterval, reports on COM2 will be the same as logged data. If
RepInterval is non zero and different from LogInterval, reports on COM2 are generated from last measured data (without
min, max, stdev).
The amount of measurements taken for each log is LogInterval / MeasInterval.
Serial 1 setting is for potential future use.
Serial 2 is the baudrate for communication via the RX/TX232_2 port. Other setting are fixed and 8 bit, no parity and 1
stopbit.
DataFormat sets the way that data is continuously sent via the emulated COM port on the USB connection and TX232_2
output when the LOGBOX SE is switched on and logging.
Default sends values separated by spaces: 03.08.2016 13:28:00 13.804 6.222 6.000 7.000 0.416 24.200 55.083 3.083 0.000 2.494
Making them easy to read. When the data needs to be logged and processed a comma separated format CSV can be easier
to process. CSV (format 1) will send: 03.08.2016,13:26:00,13.803,10.061,9.000,11.000,0.851,24.200,91.952,3.083,0.000,2.494.
CSV also places the headers above the values.
Date and Time will be shown when retrieved from the LOGBOX SE and can be updated when needed.
When the Set System Time box is checked the date and time and all other setting are sent to the LOGBOX
SE when Send is clicked.
9.8
Modem
After clicking Modem the LOGBOX SE displays the settings related to the GSM modem, email and or FTP settings and time for
communication.
ModemInterval [0 … 24] is the interval between sending data over
modem in hours. A setting of 0 means no sending via modem.
ModemOnTime] is the time at which modem will connect to GSM network
and wait for an incoming call. For future use.
ModemOnDuration [0…30min] – divines how long modem will be
connected to GSM network for a call.
ModemPIN [number] –PIN belonging to the installed SIM card (max 10
digits)
APN [string]– access point of your GSM/GPRS provider.
IP [string]– IP address for sending emails or IP address of FTP server.
EmailFrom [string]– your sender address for the email
EmailTo [string]– recepient address for the email. Here data will be sent
to.
UserName [string]– user name for authorization on smtp server or FTP
server. Minimum 5 characters. If less than 5 characters are used, access without authorization is activated (UserName and
Password are then not used)
Password [string]– password for authorization on smtp server or FTP server. Minimum 4 characters. If less than 4
characters are used, access without authorization is activated
TimeServer [string]– time server for time synchronization. Synchronisation will take place at 00:00 hr using port 123 and is
UTC/GMT time. Standard server to use is sk.pool.ntp.org .
TimeZone [-12…12]– your local time zone with regards to GMT/UTC. Best not to use daylight saving time.
ModemMode selects between sending the log files as email attachments or to an FTP server.
26
All other settings are for future use.
The following settings are standard settings when you don’t have your own SMTP email gateway.
APN internet is unique for your GSM provider
IP smtp.webglobe.sk
EmailFrom sender@physicus.eu
EmailTo your.email@your-company.com
UserName sender@physicus.eu
Password Sender39
TimeServer sk.pool.ntp.org
If you do have your own email provider you have to change IP, UserName and Password to your login.
The LOGBOX SE does not allow for secure connection or secure authentication.
If your email provider doesn’t even need user authentication for SMTP then leave UserName and Password empty.
If you want to send the log files to an FTP server than the IP, UserName and Password need to reflect your FTP server login.
User settings on your FTP server need to be set correct and allow for writes for by the LOGBOX SE.
9.9
Setup flow
When starting with a LOGBOX SE it is best to use the following sequence:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Write your equipment and attachments to the LOGBOX SE using e.g. Planned Setup on page 39.
Make the analog instruments know using the first tab called Analog.
Make the digital signals known if you have using the Digital tab
Make the RS-485 Modbus instruments known using the Serial tab
Select which input to log and in which order using the Output tab
Select when needed the Min, Max and StdDev to be logged as well
Select the right polynomials
Select the measurement and logging interval using the System tab
DataFormat (Space delimited or Comma delimited) can be selected
If you do have a SIM card and data capabilities the systems can be personalised using the Modem tab
To check if the logging is working the LiveView tab can be used.
For just checking it is advised to use short measurement and logging intervals and finally change them to the desired
values when ready.
27
9.10
LIVEVIEW
Clicking LiveView opens the window where live logged data can be viewed.
The switch in the LOGBOX SE must in the On position for logging and Start will start the actual live view and as expected
Stop will stop it.
Measure is for future use.
--- means: No data received or this input was not selected in the Measure box in the Analog, Digital or Serial tab
Leaving the LiveView window doesn’t stop the logging and the LiveView will be resumed when the LiveView window is
selected again.
Do not forget to click Stop as functions like Send are disabled when LiveView is active.
28
10
FIRMWARE UPDATE
If needed to solve potential issues or enhance the functionality of the logger new firmware might be released on the Kipp
& Zonen website under Downloads.
Download the software for performing the update and the actual firmware in TXT format.
BSL_USB_GUI.EXE
BSL430.DLL
LOGBOX SExxx.TXT
In order to check the current firmware start the LOGBOX SE Setup
software and navigate to the system tab where there is a Firmware
box.
If there is a newer version available that you want to install, stop
LOGBOX SE Setup.







Disconnect all power supplies from the data logger and the USB service cable
Place UPGRADE jumper on the circuit board (optionally borrow jumper from Batt or Exc)
Connect power supply
Reconnect USB service cable. You can check in DeviceManager that the COM port is gone
Remove UPGRADE jumper. Do not forget this step otherwise upgrade will fail.
Start the BSL-USB_GUI program and click Next
Accept the license agreement and click Next
Check Select Firmware, click Browse, navigate to the directory where you downloaded and unzipped the update and
select the TXT file. Click Upgrade Firmware.
The logger will be restarted when the update has finished. Click Close.
When there is a No device connected, please check if your USB connection is directly to your PC and that
you followed above procedure and removed the jumper before starting the software.
Depending on the newer firmware and the advice in the readme file it might be needed to a) install newer LOGBOXSESetup
software.
29
11
SERVICE MODE
To access service mode, you need to have a terminal program installed on your PC like e.g. Termite or the old
Hyperterminal. Connect the LOGBOX SE via USB to the PC and connect your terminal program to the right COM port. The
serial settings aren’t really important.
Or attach the Serial2 port of the LOGBOX SE using RS-232 and when applicable an RS-232 – RS-485 converter. Then serial
settings do matter of course.
Type Service at the bottom of the Termite window.
Now a wide range of commands is possible. Normally one would not need them as they offer no advantages over the
LOGBOX SE program apart from a forced Reset, SetFactoryDefaults and switching on the GSM modem for testing and
sending test emails.
Commands are Case sensitive.
After a few minutes Service Mode will be exited automatically
30
11.1
Setup and check commands
11.1.1
Help
Help displays all available commands.
a 1..8, Measure
AIN1-4 are available
a 9..20, Measure, Gain, Unipolar, Ratio AIN9-12 are available
d 1..8, Measure, Frequency, Counter, Time
s 1..8, Measure, Comport, bpS, Bits, Parity, sTop, Driver, Address
o 1..32, Input, miN, maX, Stdev, Vector, Polynome, Alias
e 1..16, Input, Type, Logint, Modemint, Alarm, Bitmask, Units
not used
p 1..16, 0..3=
Name StationName
Vref [mV]
Date 1.2.2016
to manually set the date
| can be overwritten automatically
Time 11:45:20
to manually set the time,
| when synchronisation via GSM is enabled
MeasInterval [sec]
MeasDelay [sec]
LogInterval [sec]
RepInterval [sec]
DataFormat 0...3
ModemInterval [hr]
ModemOnTime [09:00:00]
ModemOnDuration [min]
ModemPIN
APN
IP
EmailFrom
EmailTo
UserName
Password
TimeServer Server/GSMNetwork
TimeZone
Ftp 0/1
IPConnect
IPConfig
UserNameConfig
PasswordConfig
ModemDetail 0/1
SaveConfig - save configuration to Flash
ReadConfig - read configuration from Flash
? - show actual settings
Modem? - show actual modem settings
ModemDetail 1/0
Config? - show all acutal configuration
Config1?..5? - show parital actual configuration
SD? /prolog - show actual files on SD card
System? - show sw version
SerialDriver?
Serial1 300, 1200, 2400, 9600, 19200, 38400, 57600, 115200bps
Serial2 300, 1200, 2400, 9600, 19200, 38400, 57600, 115200bps
EWS 0/1 not used
SmsCenter +421905303303
SmsNumber 1..16 +421905123456
EarlyWarning?
LogVariables - show all logged variables with names
ReadData 10 - read last 10 records
ActualData - show actual measured data
Measure - execute one measurement
ReadFile /LOGBOX/KLOG0001.txt - read file from SD card
TestGprs
TestEmail
TestSync
TestSocket not used
TestSms not used
SetDefaultConfig
Service - enter service mode
Exit - exit from service mode
Help
Reset - reboot datalogger
31
11.1.2
Question mark command
Example: ?
SN 002/0115
Name PROlog
MeasInterval 5 sec
MeasDelay 0 sec
RepInterval 0 sec
Page 26 of 54
LogInterval 10 sec
Vref 2498.650 mV
Serial1 115200 bps
Serial2 115200 bps
RS-485 0
EWS 0
Date 01.02.2015
Time 08:12:26
11.1.3
Config
Config? displays all settings
a 1, M=1, V=0, P=3, O=1
a 2, M=0, V=0, P=1, O=0
a 3, M=1, V=0, P=4, O=2
a 4, M=0, V=0, P=1, O=0
a 5, M=0, V=0, P=1, O=0
a 6, M=0, V=0, P=1, O=0
a 7, M=0, V=0, P=1, O=0
a 8, M=0, V=0, P=1, O=0
a 9, M=0, U=0, G=1, R=0, P=1, O=0
a 10, M=0, U=0, G=1, R=0, P=1, O=0
a 11, M=0, U=0, G=1, R=0, P=1, O=0
a 12, M=0, U=0, G=1, R=0, P=1, O=0
a 13, M=0, U=0, G=1, R=0, P=1, O=0
a 14, M=0, U=0, G=1, R=0, P=1, O=0
a 15, M=0, U=0, G=1, R=0, P=1, O=0
a 16, M=0, U=0, G=1, R=0, P=1, O=0
a 17, M=0, U=0, G=1, R=0, P=1, O=0
a 18, M=0, U=0, G=1, R=0, P=1, O=0
a 19, M=0, U=0, G=1, R=0, P=1, O=0
a 20, M=0, U=0, G=1, R=0, P=1, O=0
d 1, M=0, F=1, C=0, T=0, P=1, O=0
d 2, M=0, F=1, C=0, T=0, P=1, O=0
d 3, M=0, F=1, C=0, T=0, P=1, O=0
d 4, M=0, F=1, C=0, T=0, P=1, O=0
d 5, M=0, F=1, C=0, T=0, P=1, O=0
d 6, M=0, F=1, C=0, T=0, P=1, O=0
d 7, M=0, F=1, C=0, T=0, P=1, O=0
d 8, M=0, F=1, C=0, T=0, P=1, O=0
i 1, P=2, O=0, A=V3V
i 2, P=1, O=0, A=VRTC
i 3, P=1, O=0, A=VMAIN
i 4, P=2, O=3, A=VPOWER
i 5, P=1, O=0, A=VOUT
i 6, P=1, O=0, A=PA
i 7, P=1, O=4, A=GSM
i 8, P=1, O=0, A=RG10M
i 9, P=1, O=0, A=RG1H
i 10, P=1, O=0, A=RG6H
i 11, P=1, O=0, A=RG24H
s 1, M=0, C=1, S=115200, B=8, P=N, T=1, D=NONE, A=
s 2, M=0, C=1, S=115200, B=8, P=N, T=1, D=NONE, A=
s 3, M=0, C=1, S=115200, B=8, P=N, T=1, D=NONE, A=
s 4, M=0, C=1, S=115200, B=8, P=N, T=1, D=NONE, A=
s 5, M=0, C=1, S=115200, B=8, P=N, T=1, D=NONE, A=
s 6, M=0, C=1, S=115200, B=8, P=N, T=1, D=NONE, A=
s 7, M=0, C=1, S=115200, B=8, P=N, T=1, D=NONE, A=
s 8, M=0, C=1, S=115200, B=8, P=N, T=1, D=NONE, A=
o 1, I=A1, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=3, A=10kT
o 2, I=A3, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=4, A=10kT-par
o 3, I=I4, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=2, A=VPOWER
o 4, I=I7, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=GSM
o 5, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 6, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 7, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 8, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 9, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 10, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 11, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 12, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 13, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 14, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 15, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 16, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 17, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 18, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 19, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 20, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 21, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 22, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 23, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 24, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 25, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 26, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 27, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 28, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 29, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 30, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 31, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
o 32, I=0, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=1, A=
p 1, 0=0, 1=1, 2=0, 3=0
p 2, 0=0, 1=0.001, 2=0, 3=0
p 3, 0=-200, 1=2.2, 2=0, 3=0
p 4, 0=111.104, 1=-0.123747, 2=6.29616e-05, 3=-1.52813e-08
p 5, 0=0, 1=0, 2=0, 3=0
p 6, 0=0, 1=0, 2=0, 3=0
p 7, 0=0, 1=0, 2=0, 3=0
p 8, 0=0, 1=0, 2=0, 3=0
p 9, 0=0, 1=0, 2=0, 3=0
p 10, 0=0, 1=0, 2=0, 3=0
p 11, 0=0, 1=0, 2=0, 3=0
p 12, 0=0, 1=0, 2=0, 3=0
p 13, 0=0, 1=0, 2=0, 3=0
p 14, 0=0, 1=0, 2=0, 3=0
p 15, 0=0, 1=0, 2=0, 3=0
p 16, 0=0, 1=0, 2=0, 3=0
32
11.1.4
Modem
Modem? displays all modem settings
Modem?
ModemInterval 1 hr
ModemDelay 0 min
ModemOnTime 00:00:00
ModemOnDuration 0 min
ModemPIN
0000
ModemNumber
APN
internet
IP
smtp.webglobe.sk
EmailFrom
sender@physicus.eu
EmailTo
your_name@email.com
UserName
sender@physicus.eu
Password
Sender39
TimeServer sk.pool.ntp.org
TimeZone
1
Ftp
0
IPConnect
IPConfig
UserNameConfig
PasswordConfig
11.1.5
System
System? – displays actual firmware version
System?
LOGBOX SE Version 9.4 Jun 3 2016
SystemOnTime (126660) 0.1 Days
11.1.6
SaveConfig
SaveConfig saves current settings to non-volatile memory. Necessary after changing settings via the terminal session.
11.1.7
ReadConfig
ReadConfig – reads current settings from nonvolatile memory
11.1.8
ReadData
ReadData [1…200] – reads last 1…200 records from memory.
Example: ReadData 2
Searching data...
Current Write Flash page 10
16.07.2009 12:09:00 264.887 239.766 267.539 7.702 55.770 0.000 600.366 0
.061 13.743 0.320 0.000 161.728 0.029 258.572 0.078 258.574 0.079
16.07.2009 13:00:00 267.189 267.188 267.539 0.018 54.427 1.252 600.366 0
.051 13.753 0.320 0.000 161.728 0.028 258.573 0.078 258.573 0.078
33
11.1.9
ActualData
ActualData – displays actual data from measured inputs
(O8) Vbatt 20.053
(O9) Ref100 100.000
(O10) Pt-100 22.344
((O4) SD 0.000
11.1.10
SD
SD? – displays all data files in the root directory of the SD memory card.
Example: SD?
Directory listing...
<dir> .
<dir> ..
KLOG0001.TXT 51559 2016/08/11 00:00
KLOG0002.TXT 49890 2016/08/11 09:31
Total Space 481920 kB
Free Space 481784 kB
Actual File /LOGBOX/KLOG0002.txt
OK
11.1.11
RS-485
RS-485 [0…1] – configures if using RS-485 port. For future extension
Example RS-485 1
11.1.12
ReadFile
ReadFile KLOG0001.TXT – displays requested file saved on SD memory card
Example: ReadFile /LOGBOX/KLOG0020.TXT
#Name LOGBOX SE
#SN 004/0716
#(O1) 10kT Avg;
#(O2) 10kT-par Avg;
#(O3) VPOWER Avg;
#(O4) GSM Avg;
04.07.2016 10:54:32 5244.709 111.104 3.006 --04.07.2016 10:54:34 5270.221 111.104 3.006 --04.07.2016 10:54:36 5270.892 111.104 3.008 --11.1.13
Miscellaneous
TestEmail – start to send testing email or FTP file via GSM modem
TestGprs – start to test GPRS connection
TestSocket – start to test socket connection
Exit – exit from Service mode
Service – enter Service mode
Reset – software reset of EasyLogGSM
34
SetDefaultConfig clears all settings and then sets logging on AIN1, V3V and VPOWER. To save use SaveConfig command
11.1.14
Settings via terminal session
Analog and digital inputs
a x, M=y, G=y, U=y, R=y
where:
a x [1-4 , 9-12] – analog input number (AIN1-4 …AIN9-12)
M=y [0,1] – if M=1, activate measurements on this input
G=y [1…8] – ranGe for differential inputs (a 9 … a 12) 19, 38, 78,156, 312, 625, 1250, 2500mV
U=y [0,1] – unipolar setting (U=1) or bipolar setting (U=0) for differential inputs (a 9 … a 12)
R=y [0,1] – calculating ratio to a9 for inputs a10 … a12. a x becomes100* AINx / AIN9 for Pt-100
Example a 1,M=1 (analog input 1 is configured for measuring)
a 9,M=1, G=8, U=1, R=0 (analog input 9 is configured for measuring, input range 8, unipolar and no ratio calculation)
Command format for configuring digital inputs:
d x, M=y, F=y, T=y, C=y
where:
d x [1…4] – digital input number (d 1 … d 4)
M=y [0,1] – if M=1, activate measurements on this input
F=1 – frequency measurement
T=1 – time measurement
C=1 – counter
Example d 5, M=1, F=1 (digital input 5 is configured for measuring, input is frequency measuring)
Command format for configuring serial inputs:
s x, M=y, C=y, S=y, B=y, P=y, T=y, D=z, A=z
where:
s x [1…8] – serial input number (s 1 … s 8)
M=y [0,1] – if M=1, activate measurements on this input
C=y [1, 2] – COM port selection
S=y [300, 1200, 2400, 9600, 19200, 38400, 57600, 115200] – communication speed bps
B=y [7, 8] – number of bits
P=y [N, E, O] – parity None, Even, Odd
T=y [1, 2] – number of stop bits
D=z [KIPPZONEN_SMPX…] – serial driver name. This name identifies type of serial sensor connected
A=z [1, …]] – address of serial sensor (mostly used for sensors communicating on the RS-485 bus)
example
s 5, M=1, C=1, S=19200, B=8, P=E, T=1, D=KIPPZONEN_SMPX, A=1
(serial sensor 5, connected on COM1 with 19200bps 8E1 settings; type of sensor is SMPx
series and bus address is 1)
Command format for configuring outputs:
o x, I=y, L=y, N=y, X=y, S=y, V=y, P=y, A=z
where:
o x [1…32] – output number (o 1 … o 32)
I=z [A1…A20, D1…D8, S1…S8, I1…I14] – map to measured input
L=y [0, 1] – logging
N=y [0, 1] – logging minimum value
X=y [0, 1] – logging maximum value
S=y [0, 1] – logging standard deviation value
V=y [0, 1] – vector calculation
P=z [1 … 16] – polynomial number for calculation
A=z – alias – name of logged variable
35
Example o 1, I=A1, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=0, V=1, P=5, A=WD
(output 1 maps to AIN1 input channel with logging mean value, vector calculation is used
with polynome nr. 5. Variable alias is WD)
o 5, I=I1, L=1, N=1, X=0, S=0, V=0, P=16, A=VPOWER
(output 5 maps to internal input 1 – voltage on POWER terminal with logging mean and
minimum value with polynome 16. Variable alias is VPOWER.)
o 9, I=S1_RAD, L=1, N=0, X=0, S=1, V=0, P=1, A=GlobalRadiation
(output 9 maps to serial input 1 with logging mean and standard deviation value with
polynome 1. Variable alias is GlobalRadiation.)
Command format for configuring polynomials:
p x, 0=a, 1=a, 2=a, 3=a
where:
p x [1…16] polynomial number
0=a, coefficient a0
1=a, coefficient a1
2=a, coefficient a2
3=a, coefficient a3
Example p 2, 0=-0.035, 1=0.1, 2=0, 3=0 (coefficients to polynomials are: a = -0.035, b = 0.1, c = 0, d = 0)
Command format for system settings:
MeasInterval [1…3600] – interval between measurements in seconds
Example MeasInterval 60 (configuring measuring interval to 60 seconds)
MeasDelay [0…60] – delay after MeasInterval to start measurements in seconds
Example MeasDelay 5 (configuring delay between beginning of measuring interval and actual measurement to 5
seconds)
LogInterval [0…3600] – interval between logging in seconds
Example LogInterval 600 (configuring logging interval to 600 seconds)
RepInterval [0…3600] – interval between reports in seconds on COM2 serial port. If RepInterval is zero, there is no report on
Serial2 and it can be used for communication with serial sensors. If RepInterval is non zero and equal to
LogInterval, reports on COM2 will be the same as logged data (averaged, min, max… according to configuration). If RepInterval
is non zero and different from LogInterval, reports on COM2 are generated from last measured data
(without min, max, stdev).
Example RepInterval 600 (configuring report interval to 600 seconds)
Vref [2450…2550] – set reference voltage
Example Vref 2500.3 (setting reference voltage to 2500.3mV)
Serial2 [300,1200,2400,9600,19200,38400,57600,115200] – set communication speed on COM2 (report port)
Example Serial2 9600 (setting Serial2 baud rate to 9600 bps)
Date dd.mm.yyyy – set current date – day.month.year
Example Date 10.1.2011 (setting date to 10.1.2011)
Time hh:mm:ss – set current time - hours: minutes: seconds
Example Time 10:30:45 (setting time to 10:30:45)
Command format for modem settings:

ModemInterval [0 … 24] – interval between sending data over modem in hours. Parameter 0 means no modem
sending.
Example ModemInterval 24 (configuring modem data transfer to every 24 hours)

ModemDelay [0 … 1439] – delay after ModemInterval to start sending data.
Example ModemDelay 5 (configuring modem delay to 5 minutes)

ModemOnTime [hh:mm:ss] – time at which modem should connect to GSM network and waits for a call
example ModemOnTime 09:00:00
36














ModemOnDuration [0…30] – interval how long modem will wait connected to GSM network for a call; in minutes.
Example ModemOnDuration 30
ModemPIN [number] – modem PIN number (max 10 digits)
Example ModemPIN 485351 (configuring PIN number of inserted SIM card into the GSM modem to 485351)
ModemNumber [number] – number of remote modem where GSM data will be transferred (if ModemGPRS 0 was set)
Example ModemNumber 0265428834
APN [string]– access point of GSM/GPRS provider
Example APN internet (configuring APN to string internet)
IP [string]– IP address for sending emails or IP address of FTP server
Example IP 213.151.208.170 (configuring IP to 213.151.208.170)
EmailFrom [string]– sender address for the email
Example EmailFrom Testing@physicus.eu (configuring sender address to Testing@physicus.eu)
EmailTo [string]– recepient address for the email. Here data will be received.
Example EmailTo physicus@physicus.eu (configuring recipient address to physicus@physicus.eu)
UserName [string]– user name for authorization on smtp server or FTP server. Minimum 5 characters. If less than 5
characters are used, access without authorization is activated (UserName and Password are not used)
Example UserName data@physicus.eu (configuring user name to data@physicus.eu)
Password [string]– password for authorization on smtp server or FTP server. Minimum 4charactres.
If less than 4 characters are used, access without authorization is activated
Example Password data (configuring password to data)
TimeServer [string]– time server for time synchronization.
Example TimeServer time.nist.gov (configuring time server to time.nist.gov)
TimeZone [-12…12]– local time zone.
Example TimeZone -5 (configuring time zone to -5 hours from TimeServer)
Ftp [0,1]- enable/disable FTP data transfer.
Example Ftp 0 (configuring data transfer to email)
ModemDetail [0,1] – enables detailed messages from modem. Used only for problem solving with remote data transfer.
37
12
QUICK REFERENCE
Commands summary
Command
A
D
S
O
MeasInterval
MeasDealy
LogInterval
RepInterval
DataFormat
Vref
Serial1
Serial2
Date
Time
ModemInterval
ModemDelay
ModemOnTime
ModemOnDuration
ModemPIN
APN
IP
EmailFrom
EmailTo
UserName
Password
TimeServer
TimeZone
Ftp
RS-485
TestGprs
TestSync
TestEmail
TestSocket
?
Config?
Modem?
SD?
System?
SerialDriver?
ReadFile
LogVariables
ReadData
ActualData
SaveConfig
ReadConfig
Help
Exit
Reset
SetDefaultConfig
parameter
see text
see text
see text
see text
1…3600
1…60
0…3600
0…3600
0, 1, 2, 3
2450…2550
300, 1200, ---,115200
idem
dd.mm.yyyy
hh:mm:ss
0…24
0…1434
hh:mm:ss
0…1440
number
string
string
string
string
string
string
string
-12…12
0..1
0..1
klog0001.txt
1…200
description
analog inputs setup
digital inputs setup
serial inputs setup
output setup
measuring interval in seconds
measuring delay in seconds
logging interval in seconds
report interval on COM2
0=default spaces, 1 is CSV, 2 and 3 equal to 0
reference voltage in mV
baud rate for Serial1 in bps, future use
baud rate for Serial2 in bps, 115200 not advisable
period for modem to send data in hours
delay from modem period in seconds
time, when modem will wake up and wait for a call every day
duration of modem on, waiting for a call in minutes
GPRS provider access point
smtp server IP address or FTP server IP address
user name for authorized access to smtp server or FTP server
password for authorized access to smtp server or FTP server
time shift from UTC in hours
modem mode email (0) or FTP (1)
using RS-485 line
start GPRS session for testing purposes
start time synchronization over modem
start sending test email
start socket session
show system parameters
show full inputs configuration
show modem parameter
show files on SD card
show actual firmware version
show supported serial sensors
type one file from SD card via serial port
show format of logged variables
read last nr. of records in memory
show last measured data
save current configuration to nonvolatile memory
read configuration from nonvolatile memory
print all commands
exit from Service mode
reboot datalogger
clears all settings and then sets logging on AIN1, V3V and VPOWER
38
13
LOGBOX SE POSSIBILITIES AND EXAMPLES
The LOGBOX SE can handle simultaneously:

4 sensors on the differential inputs AIN9 – AIN12

4 sensors on the single ended inputs AIN1-4

4 digital sensors (freq, count, time) on the digital inputs DIN1-4

8 SMART sensors on RS-485
Kipp & Zonen sensors need:
Sensor model
Always needed
CMP3, CMP6, CMP10, CMP11
1x differential
CMP21 , CMP22 with 10k thermistor
1x differential
1x single ended
temperature measurement
CMP21 , CMP22 with Pt-100
1x differential
2x differential
temperature measurement
CGR3 , CGR4 with 10k thermistor
1x differential
1x single ended
temperature measurement
CGR3 , CGR4 with Pt-100
1x differential
2x differential
temperature measurement
CHP1 with 10k thermistor used
1x differential
1x single ended
temperature measurement
CHP1 with Pt-100 used
1x differential
2x differential
temperature measurement
Only 1x differential left
CMA6 , CMA11
2x differential
Albedometers with 2x CMP
2x differential
CUV5
1x differential
Up to 2V output signal
UVS A, B and E
1x single ended
Input AIN3 or AIN4
1x single ended
temperature measurement
Radiation & temperature
use AIN3 & 4. One sensor
possible
NR2 Lite
1x differential
CNR4
4x differential
1x single ended
temperature measurement
Pt-100 not possible
PQS1
1x differential
CSD3
1x digital for
sunshine signal
1x single ended for DNI is
optional
Max 1x sunshine duration on
input DIN4
SMART SMP, SHP , SGR , SUV
Unique Modbus®
address
CVF4, CNF4 ventilation unit (fan)
Optional
Remark
Only 1x differential left
Only 1x differential left
Max. 8 sensors supported
Max. 3 supported, 4th digital
input is for CSD3
1x digital
Your requirements:
Differential
....+....+....+....
Max 4
Single ended
....+....+....+....
Max 4
Digital
....+....+....+....
Max 4
Continued on next page
39
Examples.
All inputs can be used at the same time.
Pt-100
10k NTC
LOGBOX SE
3V logic
3V logic
3V logic
0.5V logic
for CDS3
+ digital input
DIN1
+ digital input
DIN2
+ digital input
DIN3
+ digital input
DIN4
GND
Your planned setup:
Instrument model
Instrument
number
Nr.
Inputs needed
(diff, single ended, digital)
Input used
Nr.
Nr.
Nr.
Nr.
Nr.
Nr.
Nr.
Nr.
40
Serial number
Sensitivity
Examples:
Instrument model
Instrument
number
Inputs needed
(diff, single ended,
digital, RS-485)
Input used
Serial number
Sensitivity
CMP10
Nr 1
Differential
AIN12
16005231
9.56
CMP22 Pt100
Nr 2
3x Differential
AIN9/10 and 11
16006354
9.78
CMP10 GHI
Nr 1
Differential
AIN9
16005231
9.56
CMP10 DHI
Nr 2
Differential
AIN10
16005232
9.58
CHP1 DNI
Nr 3
Differential
AIN11
16009835
9.47
CGR4 10k
Nr 4
Differential + SE
AIN12 + AIN1
15006893
9.86
fan1 CMP10 tacho
Nr 1F
Digital
DIN1
15689542
n.a.
fan2 CMP10 tacho
Nr 2F
Digital
DIN2
15689544
n.a.
fan3 CGR4 tacho
Nr 3F
Digital
DIN3
15689546
n.a.
SMP10
Nr 1
RS-485
Address 2
16003569
n.a.
SMP10
Nr 2
RS-485
Address 3
16003540
n.a.
SHP1
Nr 3
RS-485
Address 5
15012398
n.a.
SGR4
Nr 4
RS-485
Address 4
16005874
n.a.
fan1 SMP10 tacho
Nr 1F
Digital
DIN1
15689542
n.a.
fan2 SMP10 tacho
Nr 2F
Digital
DIN1
15689542
n.a.
fan3 SGR4 tacho
Nr 4F
Digital
DIN3
15689546
n.a.
SMP10 reflected
Nr 8
RS-485
Address 6
16003549
n.a.
SGR4 up welling
Nr 9
RS-485
Address 7
16005878
n.a.
Small BSRN
Optional
SMART only setup
Optional
Optional
No tacho possible
41
14
MY LOGBOX SE DOESN’T WORK THE WAY I WANT IT
14.1
Common issues
14.1.1
When the results in LiveView remain ---
please check if Measure has been selected in the Analog, Digital or Serial window:and that in
the Output window the correct INPUT is chosen, with optionally Min, Max, SDev and that the
right Poly is selected.
When in doubt about the POLY we suggest to select one with A1=1 and recheck in LiveView.
When there is still not the expected result please check the wiring and if possible use a digital
multimeter to measure the input voltages on AIN1-4 and GND or across AINx + and –
The instruction sheets of our products will give you an indication of the normal amount of
irradiation to expect and by multiplying this by the given sensitivity one has an estimated voltage to be measured.
Indoor all readings will always be very low and sometimes even negative due to warming and cooling as a result of holding the
instrument.
14.1.2
Several intervals, I’m confused
The settings to the left are save settings for diagnosis.
Every 2 seconds (MeasInterval) a measurement is started.
VREF, Pt-100 excitation and POWER are switched on and after a 1 second
wait (MeasDelay) the actual measurement is performed.
Two measurement periods of 2 seconds each fit the selected 4 seconds
LogInterval. These measurements are averaged and used for Min, Max,
SDev.
In LiveView every 4 seconds there will be a line with the selected outputs
14.1.3
My modem doesn’t work
There are many possible reasons for a failure in this inherently difficult area.
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
Check if the SIM card has working internet capabilities by temporarily putting it in a smartphone and perform internet
serving or social media updates.
Make sure it has a PIN
The settings given in section 10.8 are a good starting point to have the LOGBOX SE sent e-mail log files using the
Physicus emailbox and server. Once this works you can change to your own server and try again.
Often the GSM signal in the office or building can be to weak or unstable to work properly. Try to put the small antenna
outside for a better signal.
The LOGBOX SE will wait with sending a log file until the internal clock reaches a whole hour like 14:00 hr.
When a TimeServer and TimeZonehave been selected, at midnight the internal clock will be synchronised. Logged
data afterwards could have a different time stamp but a big difference is only to be expected the first time there is a
synchronisation and only when the time and or date weren’t set properly.
42
14.1.4
I get no reports on the second RS-232 port
Please check your settings for COM2 on the System tab.
If RepInterval = 0, there is no activity on COM2
If RepInterval = LogInterval, then you will see logged data in real time sent via COM2.. All
statistical values will appear and the baudrate set voor Serial2 is used. Other settings are
fixed and 8 bit, no parity and 1 stopbit.
If RepInterval is different from LogInterval, on COM2 you will see actual last measured data
without statistical processing. Values for min, max, stdev values, they will be not on the
output
14.1.5
Resetting the LOGBOX SE
When in doubt or when the red or green LED stays on for more than 5 minutes it is possible to issue a Reset command via a
terminal session.
Or fully power down the unit by disconnecting any power supply or battery and the USB cable and reconnecting.
14.1.6
I can’t install the driver on Windows 8 or 10
How can I install drivers that are not digitally signed?
Windows 10 enforces driver signatures by default. This can be disabled to install drivers that are not digitally signed. Use the
following steps to disable driver signature enforcement.
Click the Start menu and select Settings.
Click Update and Security.
Click on Recovery.
Click Restart now under Advanced Startup.
Click Troubleshoot.
Click Advanced options.
Click Startup Settings.
Click on Restart.
On the Startup Settings screen press 7 or F7 to disable driver signature enforcement.
Your computer will restart and you will be able to install non-digitally signed drivers. If you restart your computer again the
driver signature enforcement will be re-enabled.
43
Now install the msp430_ti_signed driver. Probably nothing will have changed and you still see the standard Windows USB Serial
Device in Windows Device Manager.
We’ll force the driver to the msp430 version:
and click Next
Now in the Device Mnager you should see
44
15
15.1
APPENDICES
Polynomials
Nonstandard polynomials
Kipp & Zonen uses a particular Pt-100 or TH10K in specific classes, behaving well documented to temperature changes.
Therefore, it’s vital to create a perfect polynomial for temperature sensors.
The tables below, taken from the manuals, show the values for a Kipp & Zonen 10k thermistor YSI 44031 and Pt-100
Let’s begin to create your polynomials:
Step 1: Collect the information as shown in figure 1 and 2. The values for the Kipp & Zonen thermistors came with the software
package downloaded earlier in the file “Table with 10k and Pt-100 thermistors”
45
Step 2: Open the Excel file or insert all your NTC thermistor information in the excel sheet.
10k thermistor YSI 44031
Temp °C
Resistance kΩ
-30
135,2
-29
127,9
-28
121,1
-27
114,6
-26
108,6
-25
102,9
Input the VREF value (close to 2.5V) as indicated on the calibration sheet and the series resistor used. The column VIN will be
recalculated
Step 3: Translate this information into a graphical chart.
Select all of the Temp and VIN values of interest to you and Insert, Scatter with only Markers
Step 4: Add a trendline by right clicking on the line inside the graphical chart and select “add trendline”
46
-Select the polynomial option, put it on 3rd degree , and do not forget to put a checkmark in the box “display equation on chart”
at the options.
Step5 : The result will be as below with a text box with the polynomial as calculated by e.g. Excel. It has been moved and made
red here to be better visible.
Now right click on the box with the polynomial and select
Format Trendline Label
47
Scientific, 5 decimal places and Add.
Now with 5 decimal places
48
15.2
Example output of TestGprs
TestGprs
TestGprs
OK
Modem On
^SYSSTART
at
at
OK
ate0
ate0
OK
at+cpin?
+CPIN: SIM PIN
OK
at+cpin=
at+cpin=
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
15.3
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,1
OK
at+cgatt=1
at+cgatt=1
ERROR
at+cgatt=1
ERROR
at+cgatt=1
ERROR
at+cgatt=1
ERROR
Reinit Modem Off
Reinit Modem On
Modem On
^SYSSTART
at
at
OK
ate0
ate0
OK
at+cpin?
+CPIN: SIM PIN
OK
at+cpin=
at+cpin=
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,1
OK
at+cgatt=1
at+cgatt=1
OK
at^sics=0,contype,gprs0
OK
at^sics=0,apn,
OK
at^sics=0,alphabet,1
OK
at^sics=0,user,
OK
at^sics=0,passwd,
OK
at^siss=0,srvtype,smtp
OK
at^siss=1,srvtype,socket
OK
at^siss=2,srvtype,http
OK
at^siss=3,srvtype,socket
OK
at^sico=0
OK
at^sici?
^SICI: 0,2,0,"10.248.103.102"
OK
at+csq
+CSQ: 30,99
OK
at^sisi?
^SISI: 0,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 1,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 2,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 3,2,0,0,0,0
OK
at^siso?
^SISO: 0,
"Smtp","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0",
"0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 1,
"Socket","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0
","0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 2,
"Http","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0","
0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 3,
"Socket","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0
","0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 4, ""
^SISO: 5, ""
^SISO: 6, ""
^SISO: 7, ""
^SISO: 8, ""
^SISO: 9, ""
OK
at+csq
+CSQ: 30,99
OK
at^sisi?
^SISI: 0,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 1,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 2,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 3,2,0,0,0,0
OK
at^siso?
^SISO: 0,
"Smtp","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0",
"0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 1,
"Socket","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0
","0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 2,
"Http","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0","
0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 3,
"Socket","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0
","0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 4, ""
^SISO: 5, ""
^SISO: 6, ""
^SISO: 7, ""
^SISO: 8, ""
^SISO: 9, ""
OK
at^sicc=0
OK
at^smso
^SMSO: MS OFF
OK
Modem Off
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,1
OK
at+cgatt=1
at+cgatt=1
OK
at^sics=0,contype,gprs0
OK
at^sics=0,apn,
OK
at^sics=0,alphabet,1
OK
at^sics=0,user,
OK
at^sics=0,passwd,
OK
at^siss=0,srvtype,smtp
OK
at^siss=1,srvtype,socket
OK
at^siss=2,srvtype,http
OK
at^siss=3,srvtype,socket
OK
at^sico=0
Example output of TestEmail
TestEmail
TestEmail
OK
Modem On
^SYSSTART
at
at
OK
ate0
ate0
OK
at+cpin?
+CPIN: SIM PIN
OK
at+cpin=
at+cpin=
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
49
OK
at^sici?
^SICI: 0,2,0,"100.121.202.228"
OK
at+csq
+CSQ: 28,99
OK
at^sisi?
^SISI: 0,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 1,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 2,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 3,2,0,0,0,0
OK
at^siso?
^SISO: 0,
"Smtp","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0",
"0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 1,
"Socket","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0
","0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 2,
"Http","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0","
0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 3,
"Socket","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0
","0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 4, ""
^SISO: 5, ""
^SISO: 6, ""
^SISO: 7, ""
^SISO: 8, ""
^SISO: 9, ""
OK
at^siss=0,conid,0
OK
at^siss=0,alphabet,1
OK
at^siss=0,srvtype,
OK
at^siss=0,address,
OK
at^siss=0,smfrom,
OK
at^siss=0,smrcpt,
OK
at^siss=0,smsubj,
OK
at^siss=0,user,
OK
at^siss=0,passwd,
OK
15.4
^SISI: 1,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 2,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 3,2,0,0,0,0
OK
at^siso?
^SISO: 0,
"Smtp","6","1","0","261","100.121
.202.228:1024","212.57.32.39:25"
^SISO: 1,
"Socket","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0
","0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 2,
"Http","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0","
0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 3,
"Socket","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0
","0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 4, ""
^SISO: 5, ""
^SISO: 6, ""
^SISO: 7, ""
^SISO: 8, ""
^SISO: 9, ""
OK
OK
at^sisc=0
OK
^SISO: 3,
"Socket","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0
","0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 4, ""
^SISO: 5, ""
^SISO: 6, ""
^SISO: 7, ""
^SISO: 8, ""
^SISO: 9, ""
OK
at^sisc=0
OK
at^siss=0,srvtype,smtp
OK
at+csq
+CSQ: 28,99
OK
at^sisi?
^SISI: 0,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 1,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 2,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 3,2,0,0,0,0
OK
at^siso?
^SISO: 0,
"Smtp","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0",
"0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 1,
134 Bytes sent
"Socket","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0
Data Transfer Finished
","0.0.0.0:0"
at+csq
^SISO: 2,
+CSQ: 28,99
"Http","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0","
OK
0.0.0.0:0"
at^sisi?
^SISO: 3,
^SISI: 0,2,0,0,0,0
"Socket","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0
^SISI: 1,2,0,0,0,0
","0.0.0.0:0"
^SISI: 2,2,0,0,0,0
^SISO: 4, ""
^SISI: 3,2,0,0,0,0
^SISO: 5, ""
OK
^SISO: 6, ""
at^siso?
^SISO: 7, ""
^SISO: 0,
^SISO: 8, ""
"Smtp","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0", ^SISO: 9, ""
"0.0.0.0:0"
at^sicc=0
^SISO: 1,
OK
"Socket","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0 at^smso
","0.0.0.0:0"
^SMSO: MS OFF
^SISO: 2,
OK
"Http","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0"," Modem Off
0.0.0.0:0"
Example output of TestSync
TestSync
TestSync
OK
Modem On
^SYSSTART
at
at
OK
ate0
ate0
at^siss=0,smauth,
OK
at^siso=0
OK
^SISW: 0, 1
at+csq
+CSQ: 28,99
OK
at^sisi?
^SISI: 0,3,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 1,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 2,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 3,2,0,0,0,0
OK
at^siso?
^SISO: 0,
"Smtp","3","1","0","0","100.121.2
02.228:0","212.57.32.39:0"
^SISO: 1,
"Socket","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0
","0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 2,
"Http","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0","
0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 3,
"Socket","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0
","0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 4, ""
^SISO: 5, ""
^SISO: 6, ""
^SISO: 7, ""
^SISO: 8, ""
^SISO: 9, ""
OK
at^sisw=0,127
^SISW: 0, 127, 0
OK
^SISW: 0, 1
at^sisw=0,134
^SISW: 0, 134, 0
OK
^SISW: 0, 1
at^sisw=0,0,1
^SISW: 0, 0, 0
OK
^SISW: 0, 2
at+csq
+CSQ: 28,99
OK
at^sisi?
^SISI: 0,6,0,261,0,0
OK
at+cpin?
+CPIN: SIM PIN
OK
at+cpin=
at+cpin=
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
50
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,2
OK
at+creg?
+CREG: 0,1
OK
at+cgatt=1
at+cgatt=1
OK
at^sics=0,contype,gprs0
OK
at^sics=0,apn,
OK
at^sics=0,alphabet,1
OK
at^sics=0,user,
OK
at^sics=0,passwd,
OK
at^siss=0,srvtype,smtp
OK
at^siss=1,srvtype,socket
OK
at^siss=2,srvtype,http
OK
at^siss=3,srvtype,socket
OK
at^sico=0
OK
at^sici?
^SICI: 0,2,0,"10.103.176.85"
OK
at+csq
+CSQ: 29,99
OK
at^sisi?
^SISI: 0,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 1,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 2,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 3,2,0,0,0,0
OK
at^siso?
^SISO: 0,
"Smtp","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0",
"0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 1,
"Socket","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0
","0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 2,
"Http","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0","
0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 3,
"Socket","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0
","0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 4, ""
^SISO: 5, ""
^SISO: 6, ""
^SISO: 7, ""
^SISO: 8, ""
^SISO: 9, ""
OK
at^siss=1,conid,0
OK
at^siss=1,alphabet,1
OK
at^siss=1,srvtype,socket
OK
at^siss=1,address,sockudp://
OK
at^siso=1
OK
^SISW: 1, 1
at+csq
+CSQ: 29,99
OK
at^sisi?
^SISI: 0,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 1,4,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 2,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 3,2,0,0,0,0
OK
at^siso?
^SISO: 0,
"Smtp","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0",
"0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 1,
"Socket","4","2","0","0","10.103.1
76.85:1025","193.87.160.18:123"
^SISO: 2,
"Http","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0","
0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 3,
"Socket","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0
","0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 4, ""
^SISO: 5, ""
^SISO: 6, ""
^SISO: 7, ""
^SISO: 8, ""
^SISO: 9, ""
OK
at^sisw=1,48
^SISW: 1, 48, 0
OK
^SISW: 1, 1
^SISR: 1, 1
at^sisr=1,128
^SISR: 1, 48
$[02][06]é[00][00][02]
[00][00]
û“ç[02][06]ÛaÀsƒ„‚î[00][
00][00][00][00][00][00][00]ÛaĉU
#ûƒÛaĉU%ÁÞOK
Time Received 19.08.2016 17:46:49
at+csq
at+csq
+CSQ: 29,99
OK
at^sisi?
^SISI: 0,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 1,4,48,48,0,0
^SISI: 2,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 3,2,0,0,0,0
OK
at^siso?
^SISO: 0,
"Smtp","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0",
"0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 1,
"Socket","4","2","48","48","10.103
.176.85:1025","193.87.160.18:123"
^SISO: 2,
"Http","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0","
0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 3,
"Socket","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0
","0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 4, ""
^SISO: 5, ""
^SISO: 6, ""
^SISO: 7, ""
^SISO: 8, ""
^SISO: 9, ""
OK
at^sisw=1,48
^SISW: 1, 48, 0
OK
^SISW: 1, 1
^SISR: 1, 1
at^sisr=1,128
^SISR: 1, 48
$[02][06]é[00][00][02][0B][00][00][
04]ñ“ç[02][06]ÛaÄŠƒƒni[00][00][00
][00][00][00][00][00]ÛaÄ‹@ ?‘ÛaÄ‹
@Ž³WOK
Time Received 19.08.2016 17:46:51
at+csq
+CSQ: 29,99
OK
at^sisi?
^SISI: 0,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 1,4,96,96,0,0
^SISI: 2,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 3,2,0,0,0,0
OK
at^siso?
^SISO: 0,
"Smtp","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0",
"0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 1,
"Socket","4","2","96","96","10.103
.176.85:1025","193.87.160.18:123"
^SISO: 2,
"Http","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0","
0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 3,
"Socket","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0
","0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 4, ""
^SISO: 5, ""
^SISO: 6, ""
^SISO: 7, ""
^SISO: 8, ""
^SISO: 9, ""
OK
at^sisc=1
OK
at+csq
+CSQ: 29,99
OK
at^sisi?
^SISI: 0,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 1,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 2,2,0,0,0,0
^SISI: 3,2,0,0,0,0
OK
at^siso?
^SISO: 0,
"Smtp","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0",
"0.0.0.0:0"
51
^SISO: 1,
"Socket","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0
","0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 2,
"Http","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0","
0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 3,
"Socket","2","1","0","0","0.0.0.0:0
","0.0.0.0:0"
^SISO: 4, ""
^SISO: 5, ""
^SISO: 6, ""
^SISO: 7, ""
^SISO: 8, ""
^SISO: 9, ""
OK
at^sicc=0
OK
at^smso
^SMSO: MS OFF
OK
Modem Off
52