Wi-Q 3.1 User Guide - knowledge base

Copyright ©2012 Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
All rights reserved.
Information in this document is subject to change without notice and does not represent
a commitment on the part of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc. The software described in
this document are furnished under a license agreement or nondisclosure agreement.
This publication is intended to be an accurate description and set of instructions
pertaining to its subject matter. However, as with any publication of this complexity,
errors or omissions are possible. Please call Stanley Security Solutions, Inc. at (317)
849-2250 if you see any errors or have any questions. No part of this manual and/or
databases may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic
or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or information storage and retrieval
systems, for any purpose, without the express written permission of Stanley Security
Solutions, Inc.
This document is distributed as is, without warranty of any kind, either express or
implied, respecting the contents of this book, including but not limited to implied
warranties for the publication’s quality, performance, merchantability, or fitness for any
particular purpose. Neither Stanley Security Solutions, Inc, nor its dealers or distributors
shall be liable to the user or any other person or entity with respect to any liability, loss,
or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly by this publication.
The Stanley Wi-Q AMS and Wi-Q Technology are registered trademarks of Stanley
Security Solutions, Inc.
Bonjour is a registered trademark of Apple Inc.
Wi-Spy and MetaGeek are registered trademarks of MetaGeek, LLC.
Microsoft, Windows, CE, and ActiveSync are registered trademarks of Microsoft
Corporation.
T85202/Rev E August 2015
FCC/IC Certification
CAUTION: Please keep the PG antenna 20cm away from people to ensure that FCC RF
exposure compliance requirements are not exceeded.
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for Class B Digital
Device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide
reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential installation. This
equipment generates and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and
used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio
communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a
particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or
television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, you
can try to correct the interference by taking one or more of the following measures.
„„ Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna
„„ Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver
„„ Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the
receiver is connected
„„ Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
This device complies with Industry Canada licence-exempt RSS standard(s). Operation is
subject to the following two conditions: (1) This device may not cause interference, and
(2) this device must accept any interference, including any interference that may cause
undesired operation of the device.
Cet appareil est conforme à la norme RSS Industrie Canada exempt de licence. Son
fonctionnement est soumis aux deux conditions suivantes: (1) cet appareil ne doit pas
provoquer d’interférences et (2) cet appareil doit accepter toute interférence, y compris
les interferences pouvant causer un mauvais fonctionnement du dispositif.
This Class [B] digital apparatus meets all requirements of­the Canadian InterferenceCausing Equipment Regulations.
Cet appareil numérique de la classe [B] respecte toutes les exigences du Réglement sur
le matériel brouilleur du Canada.
Warning! Changes or modifications not expressly approved by {Applicant name} could
void the user’s authority to operate the equipment. Approved antennas are listed below
and antennas not included in this list are strictly prohibited for use with these devices.
The required antenna impedance is 50 ohms.
Approved Antennas
Portal Gateway
„„ HG2402RD-RSF - 2.4GHz Rubber Duck Antenna
„„ MP24008XFPTNF - 2.4GHz ISM-XF Panel Antenna
„„ MC2400PTMSMA - 2.4GHz Omni-Directional Antenna
„„ BS2400XL3 - 2.4GHz Outdoor Omni-Directional Antenna
Controller
„„ Integrated Antenna
IMPORTANT! Any changes or modifications not expressly approved by the party
responsible for compliance could void the user’s authority to operate the equipment.
Contents
1
Overview
System Overview.............................................................. 7
Setup Checklist............................................................... 12
2
Hardware Installation
Hardware Overview....................................................... 13
Installing System Hardware......................................... 16
Install Portal Gateways (Task 8)................................. 24
Install Door Hardware (Task 9).................................... 28
3
Software Installation
Prepare Your Computer (Task 3)..................................33
Gather and Organize Segment Data
(Task 4)..............................................................................43
Install Software (Task 5)............................................... 45
4
Configuring Segments, Portal Gateways
and Controllers
Create Your Segment (Task 6)......................................63
Add and Configure Portal Gateways
(Task 7).............................................................................. 67
Sign on and Configure Controllers
(Task 10)............................................................................ 84
5
Configure AMS Software
(Task 11)
Associations....................................................................96
Credential Settings....................................................... 108
Daylight Saving Settings............................................. 116
I/O.................................................................................... 116
Misc................................................................................. 120
PIN Settings................................................................... 120
Adding Users to the Segment..................................... 121
Portal and Reader Control and
Messaging...................................................................... 134
Configuring Timezones................................................ 137
6
Using and Managing the System
Wi-Q AMS
Configurator................................................................... 145
System Administrator.................................................. 166
Backing Up and Restoring Your
AMS Database.............................................................. 174
Firmware Updates........................................................ 178
Transactions Monitor................................................... 181
Statistics Monitor......................................................... 191
Reports............................................................................ 199
7
Advanced Troubleshooting
Status Flags in the FLAGS Column............................ 211
Update Flags in the PEND Column............................ 212
A
B
Glossary.................................................. 214
Lock installation....................................220
1 Overview
This manual is your complete guide to the Stanley Wi-Q Access Management
System. It provides detailed steps to install hardware and software, configure and
customize your system, and use and manage the system.
The information is presented in a linear manner, describing each tab, feature and
application in the system. However, tasks to install hardware and software and
configure the system for the first time do not necessarily progress in a linear manner. You will find a Set Up Checklist at the end of this section and in the Getting
Started Guide to take you through the initial setup and configuration tasks in a
logical sequence.
If you have not yet read through the Wi-Q AMS Getting Started Guide, it is a good
idea to do so before beginning any installation and setup. The Getting Started
Guide presents the big picture in just a few pages and will help you identify problems and create solutions as you work your way through hardware installation
and setup, software configuration, and system operation. If you are unfamiliar
with the terms used in wireless technology, you may want to refer to the Glossary
included in this manual as Appendix A.
System Overview
The Stanley Wi-Q Access Management System (Wi-Q AMS) integrates powerful access management software with Portal Gateways, Wireless Access
7
Controllers, and multiple controller formats that work together to enable all decision-making at the door. The system runs remotely with no need for hard-wiring,
providing innovative access control in any environment. Wi-Q AMS is versatile so
you can create a whole new system, retrofit existing hardware, and include various CCTV alarms, general alarms, and inputs/outputs.
Basic Hardware Components
A basic Wi-Q AMS system has three components: a host computer with Wi-Q
AMS, a Portal Gateway, and a controller lock at the door. Figure 1 is a simple diagram showing these three components.
Figure 1 Four Basic Components
PORTAL
GATEWAY
HOST
LAN/WAN
WIRELESS
DOOR
CONTROLLER
The Host Computer
The software is installed at the Host computer and set up to tell the Portal Gateways on the network which controllers to control and how to control them. It
contains all User ID and access management commands. The Host transfers
information to and from the Portal Gateway through a standard Ethernet (LAN/
WAN) connection.
The Portal Gateway
The Portal Gateway is a device connected to the Host computer through a secure
IP address, similar to the way your computer is connected to the internet. It transfers data signals from Wireless Controllers to and from the Host computer. The
Portal Gateway recognizes all Wireless Controllers within its antenna range. One
Portal Gateway can control as many as 64 controllers in a system.
Wireless Controllers
There are two types of Wi-Q and Omnilock Wireless Controllers:
8
Wi-Q
„„ Wireless Access Controller
„„ Wireless Door Controller
Omnilock
„„ Single Door Controller
„„ Omnilock Reader
Both controllers are equipped with Wi-Q or Omnilock Technology that controls
user access at the door. The basic configuration is battery operated, with either
keypad or card reading capability and an internal antenna that communicates with
the Portal Gateway. The Wireless Controller grants user requests according to
how they are configured in the AMS software.
Basic Operation
The system works very simply. A user enters a pass code at a controller, either
using an access card or by entering a code on a keypad. If the controller recognizes the credential from the configured settings downloaded from the Host via
the Portal Gateway to the controller, the door opens. The controller also sends
regular signals (beacons) to the Portal to let it know that it’s working properly. If a
controller goes offline, the Host receives a message from the Portal Gateway.
9
Additional System Configurations
Wi-Q AMS supports various system configurations. For example, some locations
at your segment may already be hard-wired with legacy equipment or additional
input or output devices. You can also use a Wireless Access Controller, hardwired to a controller and strike, and wirelessly communicate back to a Portal
Gateway.
For more information about various applications you can adapt for use with Wi-Q
AMS, see “Hardware Overview” on page 13.
Software Overview
Wi-Q AMS provides powerful tools to manage your system: Wi-Q AMS Configurator, Transactions, and Statistics Monitor help you configure your settings, monitor
transactions in the system, and verify system hardware performance. You can view
and create reports from all applications and perform archivals and imports using Wi-Q
AMS Administrator.
If you are the Program Administrator responsible for setting up communications
between AMS software and system Portals and controllers; you will spend most
of your time using the Configurator module. If you are in personnel or security, you
may be the person who adds users to the system and gives them access privileges and IDs. You will spend most of your time on the Users tab of the Configurator.
If you are responsible to oversee security for your organization, you will monitor
all access and alarm activity using the Transactions module. If you are a Systems
Administrator responsible to ensure the wireless network is operating at maximum performance, you will use the Statistics Monitor and Administrator modules.
If your organization is small, you may use all applications. Regardless of the tasks
you are responsible to perform, you can view and print reports from all applications using the Reports module.
10
Figure 2 Five Applications
Once the software is installed, you will find the Configurator module shortcut on
your desktop. You can access all applications from the Configurator main menu.
You can also access these applications from the Windows Start Menu under
Stanley Security Solutions.
11
Setup Checklist
Wi-Q AMS is set up in eleven basic tasks. Completing these tasks will ensure you
get your system up and running as quickly and efficiently as possible.
Some tasks are performed at the Host computer and some at the segment site.
It is appropriate to perform some tasks concurrently, for example, you may have
someone prepare your computer and install the software concurrently with site
plan development and hardware installation. However, you must have the software installed and Portal Gateways ‘online’ before you can sign on controllers.
Note System setup does not proceed in a linear manner. The following references
prompt you to skip around within this User Guide.
‰‰ Task 1: Develop a Site Plan, page 17.
‰‰ Task 2: Position Portal Gateways, page 21.
‰‰ Task 3: Prepare your Computer, page 33.
‰‰ Task 4: Gather and Organize Segment Data, page 43.
‰‰ Task 5: Install Software, page 45.
‰‰ Task 6: Create your Segment, page 63.
‰‰ Task 7: Add and Configure Portal Gateways, page 67.
‰‰ Task 8: Install Portal Gateways, page 24.
‰‰ Task 9: Install Door Hardware, page 28.
‰‰ Task 10: Sign On and Configure Controllers, page 84.
‰‰ Task 11: Configure AMS Software, page 96.
12
2 Hardware Installation
Hardware Overview
Wi-Q AMS runs remotely with no need for hard-wiring, creating a simple, innovative approach to access control in any environment.
Note Once Wireless Controllers are installed, you will need to sign them on to AMS
software. Therefore, it is appropriate to install the software before or concurrent
with hardware installation. For more information, see “Sign on and Configure
Controllers (Task 10)” on page 84.
Figure 3 is a block diagram showing various configurations. Wi-Q AMS supports
all Wireless Controllers via Portal Gateways (A); and existing Prox/Wiegand,
RQE, door strike, and door monitor switch configurations (B). Configuration types
are briefly described in the following paragraphs. Full installation instructions are
provided in the following sections.
13
Figure 3 Example System Configurations
PORTAL
GATEWAY
ETHERNET
10/100 BASE T
A
2.4 Ghz, Spread Spectrum/
AES 128 Bit Encryption
SECURE
SOCKET
WIRELESS
DOOR
CONTROLLER
LAN/WAN
HOST
Up to 64 wireless devices
per portal gateway
(configured in
increments of 16)
B
DOOR MONITOR
SWITCH
WIRELESS ACCESS
CONTROLLER
802.11g or other
comm. Carrier
RQE
STRIKE
PORTAL
GATEWAY
12V DC
Optional 12/24 V
DC Power Supply
Sealed Led Acid
Battery Pack
Existing
Prox/Weigand
card reader
Portal Gateways
The Stanley Portal Gateway is a wireless device connected to the Host computer
through a secure IP address, similar to the way your computer is connected to the
internet. It transfers data signals from Wireless Controllers to and from the Host
computer. The Portal Gateway recognizes all Wireless Controllers within its antenna
range. One Portal Gateway can be upgraded to control up to 64 Wireless Controllers.
Portal Gateways provide bi-directional radio frequency communication between
Wireless Controllers and the associated host computer(s). All communications are via
secure AES 128-Bit encrypted 2.4 HGz using spread spectrum RF Radio technology.
The Portal Gateway communicates to the host computer through web services via
either Ethernet 10/100 BaseT, approved 802.11 G wireless, or an approved commercial RF carrier-enabling a wireless solution end-to-end. All communications between
Wireless Controllers and Portal Gateways can be further backed up by “redundant”
Portal Gateways each with capacity for up to 64 Wireless Controllers.
Transmit range from Portal Gateway to controller varies based on building construction. Various factors can affect the range you will see in your facility.
14
Wireless Controllers
Wi-Q AMS software is designed to operate with Wi-Q Technology Best 45HQ
mortise and Best 9KQ Cylindrical locksets equipped with either keypad, card, or a
combination of controller input devices. Wi-Q AMS software is also designed to
work with Omnilock 9KOM cylindrical and 45KOM mortise locksets. Door switch
monitor, request to exit, and door lock position sensors are included in the locks.
Wi-Q and Omnilock Controllers support a broad range of Controller technologies:
„„ Card or Keypad ID with PINs
„„ Magnetic Stripe, Prox, MIFARE (card number only)
„„ 512 Timezones (per Segment)
„„ 18000 User Credentials per door (based on licensing)
„„ Cardholder access level definition
„„ Dynamic memory for IDs vs Transactions
„„ Locally stored and transmitted transactions
„„ ADA Compliant
„„ No AC required at door
Wireless Access Controllers
You can retrofit any existing controller configuration to communicate with Portal
Gateways using Wireless Access Controllers. You can also use this device to
connect other I/O devices to the system. About the size of a standard doublegang box electrical box, these controllers operate on standard 12V DC or an
optional 12/24 V DC power supply, sealed, lead acid battery pack. They seamlessly integrate existing door hardware into the Wi-Q AMS system, supporting
Wiegand-compatible keypad Controller inputs. Check with your Stanley Representative for a list of compatible controllers.
15
Antenna Types and Applications
To optimize system performance, it is important to position Portal Gateways to
receive maximum signal strength from the controllers. Once all door hardware
has been installed, you will be ready to position Portal Gateways using the Wi-Q
Technology Site Survey Tool. Wi-Q and Omnilock Technology support two antenna
types: Omni-directional, designed to provide coverage in all directions; and Directional antennas that focus the signal from point-to-point over longer distances and
through obstacles. For more information, see Position Portal Gateways (Task 2).
Installing System Hardware
Wi-Q AMS is designed to operate with Stanley Wi-Q and Omnilock Controllers
and Portal Gateways. Detailed installation instructions are provided in the following sections and in the lock instructions provided with the hardware which are
included as Appendices to this manual.
What you will need
‰‰ Engineering drawings or segment map
‰‰ Wi-Q Technology Site Survey Kit
‰‰ Wi-Spy Spectrum Analysis Tool by MetaGeek (or equivalent) to identify the
best open channels for your network
‰‰ For Keypad Controllers, you will need the sign-on credential from the Wi-Q
AMS software
‰‰ For magnetic stripe or proximity card controllers, you will need the Programmer ID cards supplied in the software package. You will also need the
appropriate magnetic stripe or proximity USB enrollment controller to create a
proximity sign-on credential.
‰‰ Locksets to be installed on doors, including cores and keys supplied with
specific model.
‰‰ Installation instructions for specific lockset brand and model.
‰‰ Portal Gateways
‰‰ Access to standby power for 120 VAC non-switch circuit for 12 VDC plug-in
transformer.
‰‰ 10/100/1 GigE Base-T network connection
16
‰‰ Crossover Ethernet cable if direct connection between Portal Gateway and
Host will be used
‰‰ Wireless Access Controllers, if used, and knowledge of existing hardware and
switches for any retrofit installations
‰‰ Installation tools
‰‰ Drill Motor/hole saw with bits appropriate for the specific lock (see the template included in your lock)
‰‰ Phillips-head and flat-head screw drivers
‰‰ Access to the Host, a networked workstation, or wireless laptop computer.
Develop a Site Plan (Task 1)
Before installing Portal Gateways, it is a good idea to develop a general plan for
the segment. This plan will guide you in deciding where to install the Portal Gateways. You must consider the following:
Transmit range from Portal Gateway to controller varies based on building construction. Site characteristics such as reinforced concrete walls could interfere
or weaken the signal; open spaces and low interference can increase signal
strength.
Controllers will transmit to the nearest Portal Gateway; however, if for some unforeseen event, the nearest Portal Gateway goes down; the controllers are able
to report to another Portal Gateway in the nearby area, providing redundancy in
the system.
Figure 4 shows a typical site configuration. The Host (A) is located in Building 1.
The Building 1 Portal Gateway (B) is located near the electrical panel in the communications/electronics room. This Portal Gateway will collect transactions from
the 12 controllers in Building 1. As you can see by the gray circle representing the
Portal’s range, it also extends to the entrance of Building 2 and the Parking Garage. This provides redundant coverage of those areas should either of the other
Portals go off line.
17
The Building 2 Portal Gateway (C) is positioned next to the electrical panel. With
48 rooms in this three-story dorm, front and rear access doors and access to the
elevator on three floors, this gateway provides coverage to 53 controllers. Its
range extends to all three floors of the building, and will also cover the pedestrian
access, and elevator of the Parking Garage. The Parking Garage Portal (D) is positioned to cover the pedestrian door near the dorm and the stairway and elevator
doors. Its range also extends to the entrance of Buildings 1 and 2.
18
Figure 4 Sample site installation plan
Parking Garage
108
Building 2
116
107
115
106
114
C
105
Comm./
Elect.
113
200 ft
Stair/
Elevators
104
112
103
111
102
D
Portal
Gateway
101
Stair/
Elevators
3 Story Dorm Rooms
101-148
Double Occupancy
96 Students
110
109
50 ft
Admin.
6 Staff
Portal
Gateway
Host
B
A
Electrical
Panel Box
Housekeeping
10 Staff
150 ft
Building 1
Lecture 1
Lecture 2
250 ft
19
Plotting the Plan
If you don’t already have a site plan indicating building dimensions, distances between buildings, possible obstructions, parking segment, and other gated access
points, contact your facilities maintenance or project engineer. If none are available, you will need to visit the site, take measurements and draw up a plan of your
own.
Device Identification
Each device in the system will have its own unique identity. It will be important
for you to document that identity, along with capacities and locations, and to give
each device a common name such as “Parking Garage” or “Admin 1”. At a minimum, you must record the Media Access Control number (MAC address) for each
device. This 12-digit number is assigned by the manufacturer of a network device
so that it can be recognized as a unique member of a network.
Note The MAC address is most commonly shown on the back of or inside the device, so
it’s important to record this number before you install the device.
When you move on to configure the Host computer, it is essential to have a list
identifying each controller lock and Portal Gateway recognized by the system.
We recommend creating a temporary label for each device that includes the MAC
address, device name, location, capacity, and type of antenna so that installers on
the site will have a reference for installing the correct device in a location.
Redundancy
In our sample plan, approximate Portal Gateway ranges are indicated by shaded
circles. As you can see, these circles overlap, creating a degree of redundancy
in the system. It is perfectly acceptable, in fact, desirable to create range redundancy in your plan. This will provide additional coverage should a Portal Gateway
go off line, intentionally or otherwise. If the controllers find that the nearest Portal
Gateway is down, they will “search” for the nearest Portal Gateway.
Interference
Wi-Q and Omnilock Technology transfers information between devices in the form
of data packets over the 2.4 GHz ISM band. This band frequency is very heavily
used in many devices such as wireless computer networks (802.11 b and g) and
cordless phones, which increases the risk of lost packets, that is, packets that
do not make it from a controller to a Portal Gateway because of interference.
Interference can also reduce controller battery life due to the constant re-broadcasting of packets and lost connections to the Portals.
20
To achieve maximum efficiency in AMS, this frequency range must be managed
effectively. Therefore, the installer must know the positions and channels of all
the 2.4 GHz wireless devices in the segment and ensure channels are assigned to
each device so that there is minimum frequency overlap with adjacent or nearby
devices.
Extended Range
It is likely that you will have locations in your segment separated by distances
greater than 300 feet. You may want to consider adding a Portal Gateway with a
directional antenna to increase the transmit range.
Note Actual distances will vary based on building construction.
Position Portal Gateways (Task 2)
Once all door hardware and controllers have been installed, you are ready to determine the final placement of Portal Gateways using the results from the Wi-Q
Technology Site Survey Kit. The Site Survey Kit helps you determine the number and
optimum location of Portal Gateways and verify signal strength before permanently
installing the hardware. It is important to perform the Site Survey process as many
times as needed to determine the optimal position.
Note You will need to test signal strength at all door locations near the perimeter of the
coverage area as well as any location where a physical obstruction may cause
interference.
Antenna types
Wi-Q and Omnilock Technology provide two antenna types: Omni-directional,
designed to provide coverage in all directions; and Directional antennas that focus
the signal from point-to-point over longer distances and through obstacles. If you
have trouble verifying signals, you may need to consider some antenna type options. Figure 5 shows two available antenna types.
21
Figure 5 Selecting the antenna type that best suits your needs.
Power Supply
Portal Gateways must be located where they can receive 12 VDC power from a
transformer plugged into a dedicated power source. If this is not possible, ensure
they are plugged in to a 24/7 power circuit that cannot be turned off at a switch,
such as a light switch that might be turned off by a cleaning crew.
To make your final determination, you must also consider the following:
„„ Access to Ethernet 10/100 Base T network connection.
„„ Proximity to other I/O device(s) if used.
„„ Placement within range of controllers.
Note Actual distances will vary based on building construction.
22
Troubleshooting
If you have problems establishing communication using the Wi-Q Technology Site
Survey Tool, refer to the following troubleshooting guide:
If...
Then
The green light on the power supply does
not turn on...
Firmly press the power cord into the outlet on the outside
of the case. Confirm that the other end of the power cord is
plugged into a working electrical outlet.
The power supply is on, but the green
light on the Portal Gateway does not turn
on.
Ensure the power cord is firmly connected to the bottom of
the Portal Gateway.
The Stanley Site Survey application
freezes after clicking Connect.
Close the application and reconnect the Host PC to the Stanley survey wireless network.
The Stanley Survey network is not listed
in the Wireless Network Connection
window.
Confirm that the green light on the power supply is on. Ensure the power cord is firmly connected to the bottom of the
wireless router (under the foam).
The Stanley Site Survey application is not Ensure the beacon is powered up. Move the beacon closer
receiving a signal from a beacon.
to the Stanley Site Survey kit.
When connecting the battery wires, the
beacon does not power up (the blue LED
on the circuit board remains off and no
confirmation tone sounds).
Disconnect the battery pack wires, wait 10 seconds, and
reconnect. If this does not work, replace the battery pack.
The Stanley Site Survey application is not Ensure the Ethernet cord is connected to the wireless router
receiving signals from any beacons.
(under the foam). If this does not work, you might need to
change the advanced setup options for the application with
the assistance of your Stanley Security Solutions representative.
Next steps
When you are satisfied with signal performance, you can proceed to configure
Portal Gateways using Wi-Q AMS.
23
Install Portal Gateways (Task 8)
The most common installation site is inside an existing protected area such as a
locked room or other secure enclosure, or above ceiling level. If you are installing
inside a dealer-supplied locked enclosure, refer to the instructions provided with
that equipment. Figure 6 shows a Portal Gateway positioned in a protected area.
Figure 6 Installing a Portal Gateway in a protected area.
Approx.
5 ft. 6-in. high
(eye level)
Portal
Gateway
Connecting the Portal Gateway and Verifying Operation
Once the Portal Gateway is installed, connect and verify operation:
1 Connect the power supply to the Portal Gateway and plug the transformer into
a dedicated AC power supply (wall outlet). The Power Indicator light should
come on. See Figure 7.
24
2 Insert the Ethernet cable into the Ethernet connection on the bottom of the
Portal Gateway. The Link Indicator light should come on. After about 30 seconds, the yellow activity indicator light will flash under normal operation.
Figure 7 Connecting the Portal Gateway to Power and Ethernet Connections.
Activity Indicator
Link Indicator
Ethernet
Connection
Power Indicator
Power
Port
Note If no protected area is available, consider positioning the Portal Gateway inside
a locked enclosure designed for that purpose. Contact your dealer for more
information.
Installing a Wireless Access Controller
The Wi-Q Technology Wireless Access Controller (WAC) provides an optional,
cost effective way to retrofit an existing hard-wired application, or where the installed controller my be obsolete or unable to handle additional controller inputs.
It supports Wiegand-compatible keypad Controllers and is configured and monitored in Wi-Q AMS the same as a standard controller.
Note Please check with your Stanley representative for a list of compatible controllers.
Using the Wireless Access Controller (Figure 8), you can add controllers or other
I/O devices to an overall wireless solution without the high cost of installing hardwire such as RS485 or CAT5 to the controller. You can position the controller at
the door or where suitable above the ceiling tile.
25
Figure 8 Wireless Access Controller.
Installation
Specific installation methods are dependent on the device type and configuration
of the system; therefore, the WAC should be installed by a trained technician using the instructions provided with the controller.
WARNING: Wireless Access Controllers are intended for use in indoor or protected area. For other applications, such as outdoor use, contact the factory for
the appropriate NEMA enclosure. Changes or modifications not expressly approved by Stanley Security Solutions could void the user’s authority to operate
the equipment.
Wireless Access Control Wiring
The Wireless Access Controller (WAC) can be installed with its own 12 VDC
power supply or slaved to the existing installation. Figure 9 is a wiring diagram
illustrating both configurations.
26
Figure 9 Connecting devices to a WAC
(+ Power)
(+)
(–)
STRIKE NC (Relay 1)
Electric
lock
STRIKE COM (Relay 1)
STRIKE NO (Relay 1)
ANT
SHUNT NC (Relay 2)
SHUNT COM (Relay 2)
SHUNT NC (Relay 2)
KEY (I/O)
GND
Connect
as required
DO NOT USE
GND
3.3V (10mA MAX)
DO NOT USE
RQE (I/O)
– DC 9-24V
DSM (I/O)
+ DC 9-24V
GND
– DC 9-24V
DLS (I/O)
+ DC 9-24V
WIEGAND 0 (I/O)
GND
GND
GRN
Weigand
output
reader
(+ Power)
GND
RED
+12 VDC
WIEGAND 1 (I/O)
12 VDC
Strike Power
Supply
by others
Once the WAC is installed and all points connected, it will be recognized by Wi-Q
AMS as a ‘Controller’ in the system. For more information about configuring the
WAC in the software, see “I/O” on page 116.
27
Install Door Hardware (Task 9)
This section provides general instructions for installing your controllers. Complete
instructions for installing locks are packaged with the hardware. You will also
find instructions for Stanley Wi-Q Technology Best 45HQ mortise locks, Best 9KQ
Cylindrical Locks, Best EXQ Trim, Omnilock 45KOM mortise locks, and Omnilock
9KOM cylindrical locks as Appendices to this manual.
Before You Begin
Before you begin, take a few moments to review the following considerations:
„„ Record device MAC address before installing device. You will need this when
configuring the controller in the software.
„„ Wi-Q and Omnilock Technology locks will work from -31°F to 151°F.
Note Extreme heat will cause a reduction in wireless signal strength and can cause a
loss of connectivity while the heat remains.
Note Alkaline batteries cease to operate if they reach a temperature of -20°F.
„„ Wi-Q and Omnilock Controllers are designed for use on 1-3/4-inch doors. If you
need to install on non-standard doors, contact Stanley Customer Service for
more information.
„„ Lockset instructions are given for right-hand doors (as determined from outside
the door). If you are installing a left-hand door, see the instructions provided
with your lockset for hand change instructions.
„„ If you are installing locksets on unprepared (un-drilled) doors, use the template
provided with your specific lockset.
Please refer to the Appendices or the instructions provided with your particular
lock to complete these steps. Once this is done, check controller operation as
described in the following paragraphs.
28
Check Controller Operation
Verify controller operation using the steps appropriate for your controller type
(Magnetic Card or keypad). If the system does not operate properly, see Troubleshooting, at the end of the section.
Magnetic Card Check
If your system has a magnetic card controller (mag card), default Programmer
ID cards are supplied with the software. You will need these cards when you are
ready to sign on the controllers.
To perform a magnetic stripe card verification:
1 Determine if the magnetic card type is Track 2 or Track 3.
2 Select the default Programmer ID card that matches the type for your magnetic
card controller.
3 Insert and remove the magnetic card. The magnetic stripe on the card should
be aligned with the ‘V’ mark by the card slot. The lights on the top of the Controller will flash green once and unlock, then during the open delay time, it will
flash green five times. Once this occurs, the card controller light will flash red
and lock.
4 While unlocked, check for proper lock operation.
Keypad Check
If your Controller is a keypad type, perform the following steps:
1 At the keypad, enter the default Programmer ID, 1234#. The green light on top
of the card controller will flash once and the lock will unlock, then during the
open delay time, it will flash green five times. Once this occurs, the controller
red light will flash and the lock will relock.
2 While unlocked, check for proper lock operation.
29
Troubleshooting mortise and cylindrical locks
If the mechanism doesn’t unlock, refer to the following table:
LEDs
Sounder
You should...
Single red flash
—
Use the card at a moderate speed.
Red flashes
3 short tones
Use the temporary operator card provided
with the lock.
Green flashes
—
Check the motor connection.
—
—
Check the battery connection.
Troubleshooting EXQ Exit Hardware trim
If the mechanism doesn’t unlock, refer to the following table:
LEDs
Sounder
You should...
Single red flash
—
Use the card at a moderate speed.
Red flashes
3 short tones
Use the temporary operator card provided
with the lock
or
Perform a door reset to restore to the factory default settings (the lock may already
be associated (programmed).
Green flashes
—
Check the motor connection.
Alternating red and green
flashes
—
Check the motor connection.
—
—
Check the battery connection.
For additional troubleshooting instructions, see the Service Manual for the hardware.
Once you have installed and tested your Controllers, you are ready to sign them
on in your system. To do this, Wi-Q AMS software must be installed on your Host
computer. At a minimum, you will need to create your Segment and add your
Portal Gateways to the Segment Tree before you can sign on the Controllers. See
“Add and Configure Portal Gateways (Task 7)” on page 67. Once that is done
you can return to the site and sign on the controllers. See “Sign on and Configure
Controllers (Task 10)” on page 84.
Verify Signal Strength, Voltage and Packet Radio
30
If you used the Wi-Q Technology Site Survey Kit, you have already verified basic controller signal strength. Once the controllers are signed on, you can use the Statistics
Monitor application to further measure controller performance, including controller
voltage (battery level), and the packet ratio (the number of packets received vs the
number of packets sent) of the controller. For more information about the Statistics
Monitor application, see “Statistics Monitor” on page 191.
31
3 Software Installation
Stanley Wi-Q AMS provides powerful suites of tools to manage your system: Configurator, Transactions and Statistics Monitor. View reports from all applications
using Reports, and perform archivals and imports using Administrator.
Once the software is installed, you will find the Configurator shortcut on your
desktop. You can access all applications from the Configurator main menu. You
can also access these applications from the Windows Start Menu.
The following setup tasks are covered in this section:
Task 3 — Prepare your Computer
Task 4 — Gather and Organize Segment Data
Task 5 — Install Wi-Q AMS Software
32
Prepare Your Computer (Task 3)
To prepare your computer for the installation of the Wi-Q AMS software, you must
ensure that your system is equipped with an appropriate operating system, database and server and configure your Windows Firewall Ports.
Recommended System Limits
It is important to ensure your Host computer or computers are adequate to handle
the system. The following table lists the recommended system limits for running
Wi-Q AMS.
Parameter
Hardware
Configuration
Config 1
Config 2*
Config 3*
Config 4*
CPU Speed
1 cores @ 3GHz
2 cores @ 3GHz
4 cores @ 3GHz
8 cores @ 3GHz x 2
machines (SQL server
& communication
server)
RAM
1 GB
4 GB
4 GB
8 GB
Hard Disk
40 GB
40 GB
40 GB
100 GB
OS
Windows 7 Pro,
Ultimate & Enterprise
SP1 (x32 & x64)
Windows 8.1 Pro &
Enterprise (x32 & x64)
Windows 7 Pro,
Ultimate & Enterprise
SP1 x64
Windows 8.1 Pro &
Enterprise x64
Windows Server
2008 R2 Standard &
Enterprise SP1 x64
Windows Server 2012
Standard & R2
Standard x64
Windows Server
2008 R2 Standard &
Enterprise SP1 x64
Windows Server 2012
Standard & R2
Standard x64
SQL Version
SQL 2008 Express
(x32 & x64)
SQL 2012 Express
(x32 & x64)
SQL 2008 R1 SP3 x64
SQL 2008 R2 SP2 x64
SQL 2012 R1 SP1 x64
SQL 2008 R1 SP3 x64
SQL 2008 R2 SP2 x64
SQL 2012 R1 SP1 x64
SQL 2008 R1 SP3 x64
SQL 2008 R2 SP2 x64
SQL 2012 R1 SP1 x64
Portal
Gateways
50
100
250
1000
Devices
300
1000
3000
10000
Users
1000
5000
10000
50000
Segments
1
1
1
1
Ethernet
1000 Base T
1000 Base T
1000 Base T
1000 Base T
* — requires tuning of system parameters during installation by Stanley Security Solutions Technical Support
33
Configure Windows Firewall Ports
Several ports must be enabled in your Windows firewall settings to allow proper
communication with AMS. The following ports must be enabled:
„„ Port 23
„„ Port 80
„„ Port 1433
„„ Port 1434
„„ Port 8000
„„ Port 11000
„„ Port 5353
If your firewall is disabled, then all ports are open by default. If the firewall is on,
perform the following steps in order to add the required ports listed above:
34
Note The screenshots below reflect a Windows 2007 operating system. Navigating
through the firewall settings in other editions of Windows will be slightly different.
1 Navigate to your Windows Firewall settings from your PC’s control panel. See
Figure 10. Then, click on Advanced settings.
Figure 10 Windows Firewall
Navigate to Windows Firewall
Click on Advanced settings
35
2 Select Inbound Rules.
Figure 11 Inbound Rules
Select Inbound Rules
36
3 Right click on Inbound Rules to open an option menu. Select New Rule from the
menu.
Figure 12 New Rule
Select New Rule
37
4 In the New Inbound Rule Wizard window, select Port. Click Next to continue.
Figure 13 Create Port Rule
Select Port
Click Next
38
5 Enter the following ports into the “Specific local posts” field: 23, 80, 1443, 1434,
8000, 11000, 5353. Then, click Next to continue.
Figure 14 Enter Ports
Enter ports: 23, 80, 1443, 1434, 8000, 11000, 5353
Click Next
39
6 Select Allow the connection. Click Next to continue. See Figure 15.
Figure 15 Allow the Connection
Select Allow the connection
Click Next
40
7 De-select the Public option. Click Next.
Figure 16 De-select Public
De-Select Public
Click Next
41
8 Give the new rule a name that can be easily identified by an administrator.
Once finished, click Finish. See Figure 17.
Figure 17 Name the Rule
Name the Rule
Click Finish
42
9 The new rule now appears in the list. The Firewall Settings module may now be
closed. See Figure 18.
Figure 18 Inbound Rules List
New Rule shows in list
Click to close
Gather and Organize Segment Data (Task 4)
As the technical team works on planning and installing hardware using the Site
Plan, a program administrator or other person responsible for the software side of
program setup should be making plans to populate and configure Wi-Q AMS.
Device Information
You will need the MAC numbers, device names, capacities, and physical locations
of all Portal Gateways so that you can easily identify them and assign them to the
correct location within the AMS Segment Tree. Ensure your site technical team
will provide you this information as they work their way through the site.
43
User Information
You will also need to gather the names of users, define their access requirements,
organize user and timezone groups, and decide how you will use other features
configurable within AMS.
It will be helpful to create a table listing what you know about each user. Starting with a list of names, think about building a table that defines basic information
about each user; such as, User Type, User Group, Shift, and so on. Following is a
very simple example:
Last
First
User Type Bldg. User Group Timezone Shunt
Alverez Alicia
Manager
A
Admin
Default
Default
Bennet
Fred
General
A
Lecture
Default
30 sec.
Ford
Aldo
General
B
Service
Service 1 30 sec.
What User Groups will help you manage security? Do you have shift workers who
are allowed on site only during certain days or hours? Will there be areas off limits to certain groups? Do some users need extra time to pass through a door, such
as to accommodate a food cart or wheel chair? Start thinking about these elements and begin organizing the data as soon as possible so you’ll be ready when
your equipment and software are ready. It is a good idea to use a spreadsheet
software such as Microsoft ® Excel® for this purpose. That way you can sort the
data to help you plan your segment.
Importing Data
Do you have an existing database that already contains much of the information you need?
It is likely you can modify a version and import it into AMS using the program’s System
Administrator feature. If you have a large organization, this will save you time and reduce
data entry error. See “Importing Data from a Legacy OFM Database” on page 170.
44
Install Software (Task 5)
The AMS software is installed in three steps: Install the Database Server component, Install Wi-Q AMS Web Services, Install Applications.
Note The installation may detect missing prerequisites during the installation process.
Have your original Microsoft Windows installation disks ready for use if prompted
(Configuration #5 – Server PC (Pro and Enterprise Region Systems). In addition, be
prepared to address the following conditions during the setup:
If...
Then
A valid certificate must be obtained
If you plan to use a secure socket
layer (SSL) connection (connecting from a certificate authority for IIS.
See your Network Administrator.
via the internet)
You plan to use a basic
authentication
A local administrator user account, login, and
password must be generated for the system to
log into. (Instructions are presented in Portal
Gateway Setup, Setup tab, Host Access Settings.)
You plan to use certificate
mapping
A client certificate file must be generated. See
your Network Administrator.
Beginning Installation
1 If you have not already done so, download the Wi-Q AMS Software from the
Stanley Technical Support website
or
Insert the software disc into your machine’s disc reader.
Note If you have downloaded the installation files to your machine, it is recommended
that you save the folder directly on your local hard drive to keep the path to the
files as short as possible.
2 Click on the .exe file that contains “Bootstrap”
(Example: WiQBootstrap.exe).
3 Wi-Q AMS Setup checks your workstation for any missing prerequisites, such
as Microsoft.NET Framework. If the following dialog box opens, click Next. If
not, proceed to Step 4.
45
Figure 19 Installation Bootstrap
a
The Microsoft .NET Framework Setup wizard welcome screen opens. Click
Next to continue.
b
Read the End-User License Agreement. To continue with the installation,
click the checkbox at the bottom. Then click Install. The installation may
take a few minutes.
c
When the installation is complete, click Finish.
Note It is recommended that you reboot your machine after any missing prerequisites
are installed before continuing on with the installation.
d
After rebooting your machine, click the “Bootstrap” .exe file again.
4 The AMS Setup Main page opens, Figure 20. It is important to perform the
steps in the sequence presented.
Note You may wish to install the services and database on one machine (such as the
Host) and the AMS Applications only at other machines. This can be done by
selecting the appropriate application from the System Setup windows.
Note The screen shots in this User Guide are from a Stanley Wi-Q AMS system.
46
Figure 20 AMS Setup
47
Step 1
1 Click the AMS Database Server link. If a similar dialog box opens with a link to
install Prerequisites, click the link.
Figure 21 Database Server Prerequisites
2 You may be prompted to install a number of prerequisites, including Microsoft
Windows Installer and Windows PowerShell. To install the latest versions of
these prerequisites, it is recommended that you click the website links provided
and download directly from the Microsoft website. Once you’ve downloaded
the setup files, follow the installation prompts provided.
Note It is recommended that you reboot your machine after any missing prerequisites
are installed before continuing on with the installation.
48
3 Once all the prerequisites have been installed, click the link on the main setup
screen to install the AMS Database Server.
4 The Database Server System Definition dialog box opens. Choose whether to
install the server on a local machine or within an existing SQL Server instance.
If you choose to install on a local machine, decide whether to use the default
password or define a new password. If you choose to install within an existing
server, enter the instance name and associated user name and password. Then
click Finish.
Figure 22 Database Server System Definition
5 The SQL Database Server will install now. This may take several minutes.
49
6 When the server is successfully installed, you will see “Installed” next to Step
1. As you work through the process, steps that have been completed or don’t
need attention will no longer have clickable links.
Figure 23 AMS Database Server Successfully Installed
50
Step 2
1 On the Setup main page, click the AMS Services link.
2 If a similar dialog box opens with a link to install Prerequisites, click the link.
See Figure 24.
Figure 24 Install Prerequisites
a
You may be prompted to install Apple® Bonjour®. Bonjour networking technology is used by the Portal Configuration Tool to locate and list all Portal
Gateways on the network. Click the link to begin installing Bonjour.
b
The Bonjour Print Services window opens. Click Next to continue.
51
Figure 25 Bonjour Print Services Installer
c
Read the License Agreement. To continue with the installation, click on “I
accept the terms in the license agreement,” then press Next.
Figure 26 Bonjour Print Services License Agreement
52
d
Read the information about Bonjour Print Services. Then press Next.
Figure 27 Bonjour Print Services Information
53
e
In the Installation Options section, decide whether or not to create a desktop shortcut and/or schedule automatic updates for Bonjour. Choose your
destination folder and then select Install.
Figure 28 Bonjour Installation Options
54
f
Once the Bonjour Print Services Installation is complete, press Finish.
Figure 29 Bonjour Print Services Installation Complete
3 Click on AMS Services to install the Wi-Q/Omnilock Windows Service and create a database.
4 Click Next to continue past the Welcome page.
5 On the Database Server dialog box, browse to your database server and select
your connection method. In the Connect Using section, choose your connection
method. If you choose Server authentication, provide the Login ID and Password for the server. See Figure 30
55
Figure 30 InstallShield Wizard Database Server
6 In the Setup Type dialog box (Figure 31), select a Complete or Custom install.
Selecting Complete will run installations for the Database, Communication
Service, Portal Config App and Wi-Q/Omnilock Service. Selecting Custom
will allow you to choose which components to install. Once you’ve made your
selection, press Next to continue.
56
Figure 31 Setup Type
Figure 32 shows the installation components available in a Custom Setup.
Figure 32 Custom Setup
57
Clicking on the icons to the left of each component will bring up installation
options. If you decide on a Custom Setup, you must select an installation option
for each component. Then click Next to continue.
7 The wizard is now ready to begin installation. Click Install.
8 Once the installation is complete, click Finish.
Step 3
1 On the Setup main page, click the AMS Applications link.
Figure 33 Install AMS Applications
2 On the InstallShield Wizard Welcome screen, click Next to continue.
58
3 On the Destination Folder screen, click Change if you would like to change the
install folder location and browse to the desired location. Then, click Next.
Figure 34 Destination Folder
4 In the Setup Type dialog box, select a Complete or Custom install. Selecting
Complete will run installations for the Configurator, Transactions, Administrator, Status Monitor and Reports applications. Selecting Custom will allow you
to choose which components to install. Once you’ve made your selection, press
Next to continue.
59
Figure 35 shows the installation components available in a Custom Setup.
Figure 35 Custom Setup
Clicking on the icons to the left of each component will bring up installation
options. If you decide on a Custom Setup, you must select an installation option
for each component. Then click Next to continue.
5 The wizard is now ready to begin installation. Click Install.
6 Once the installation is complete, click Finish.
60
The installation of all three components is now complete.
Figure 36 Successful System Setup
Click Exit on the Setup window. Wi-Q AMS will be accessible through your Start
Menu.
Note It is recommended that you reboot your machine after installation is complete.
If you chose a non-standard database server location in Step 1, you must reboot
your machine now.
61
4 Configuring Segments, Portal Gateways
and Controllers
This chapter contains detailed steps to perform the following tasks:
„„ Task 6: Create your Segment
„„ Task 7: Add and Configure Portal Gateways
„„ Task 10: Sign on and Configure Controllers
After segment creation, this chapter discusses Portal Gateway and Controller
configuration. However, it is perfectly acceptable to add Users, User Groups and
any special Timezones you will need before configuring Portals and Controllers. An advantage to adding Users and User Groups before you add Portals and
Controllers is that they will be available as you configure each new Portal and
Controller in the system. You can also add Portals, Controllers, users and user
groups as you go, building the system in any way that makes it efficient with the
data that you have available.
Note The terms “Controller” and “Reader” are used synonymously throughout this
chapter.
62
Create Your Segment (Task 6)
It is important to give some thought to how you will go about configuring a segment in AMS. If you have not already done so, it may be helpful to review the
Getting Started Guide.
Logging in to Configurator
To get started, open your Configurator module. You can access it via the icon on
your desktop or from the Windows Start Menu (Programs>Stanley Security Solutions).
The Wi-Q AMS splash screen appears briefly, then the Login dialog box opens.
Selecting the Database Connection
When you start up AMS, the system defaults to the database installed on the Host
computer. If for some reason your database resides on a computer other than the
one running AMS, you must select the database before you login.
To select a database on a different computer
1 From the File menu, select Select database connection from the drop-down list.
Figure 37 Select Database Connection
Click on Select
Database
Connection
The Database Connection dialog box opens. See Figure 38.
Figure 38 Database Connection Window
63
2 In the Server field, select the server location from the drop-down list.
3 Under Connect Using, select either Windows authentication or SQL Server
authentication. If you select SQL Server, enter the login name and password for
that server.
4 Click Test Connection.
5 Click Finish. You are ready to login to AMS using your desired database.
Login Information
When you enter the system for the first time, the default, case-sensitive, User
Name and Password are:
Login: Admin
Password: Admin
1 Enter the Login Name and Password.
2 Select Login. You are ready to start setting up your new segment.
64
When you select Login, the Define a New Segment dialog box opens.
Define a New Segment
1 In the Segment Name box, enter a unique name for your segment.
Figure 39 Define a New Segment
2 Select Finish. The Configurator dialog box opens on the Segment Tab. The new
segment name appears in the Selected Segment box and AMS assigns it a
unique Segment ID.
Figure 40 Identifying the Segment name and ID
Segment name
Segment ID
Note Once you have successfully logged in, it is recommended that you change the default
User Name and Password to ensure system security.
65
To change the Password
1 At the top left corner of the Configurator dialog box, select File>Change Password. The Set Password of User dialog box opens.
Figure 41 Set Password of User
2 Enter the new password
3 Retype the new password.
4 Select Finish.
WARNING: Be sure to keep a record of your new password in a locked safe that
is available to your senior management team!
66
Add and Configure Portal Gateways (Task 7)
Portal Gateways can now be added and configured within the software. Portals
are configured from the factory with an IP address of 192.168.1.200. When configuring a Portal Gateway, it is best to connect directly to the Portal before placing
it on the network. This removes the possibility of duplicate IP addresses on the
network.
You can change the IP address of your Portals with the Portal Configuration Module.
Note All Portal Gateway IP address must be unique across the entire system.
Configuring a Portal Gateway with the Portal Configuration Module
Perform the following steps to change your Portal Gateway’s IP address.
1 Connect the Portal Gateway to the Host either over the network or directly via
crossover Ethernet cable (recommended). For more information on connecting
a Portal Gateway, see “Connecting the Portal Gateway and Verifying Operation” on page 24.
2 Open the Portal Configuration module (Start Menu>Stanley Security Solutions>Stanley
Wi-Q AMS Tools).
3 Portals available on the network will automatically be listed in the Portal Configuration module.
Figure 42 Portal Gateways Available on the Network
67
4 Select a portal from the list.
5 At this point, you may change the IP address from the factory setting to one
from the range you’ve created. Click on Update IP Configuration to update the
selected portal.
6 Select IPv4 and/or IPv6 and enter the IP address.
7 You may need to adjust the SubNet Mask/Network Destination and Gateway to
match your network. Consult your network administrator for details.
8 If you wish to generate a SSL certificate for a more secure connection, click
on the SSL Enabled checkbox, then click OK.
Note If you enable SSL, you must create a certificate and load the certificate into your
system.
Figure 43 Update IP Configuration
68
Portal Configuration Features and Functions
Review this section for additional information regarding the Portal Configuration
window. See Figure 44.
Figure 44 Portal Configuration Window
1 Portals on the Network grid
Provides a list of Portal Gateways on the network. It shows the status of the
last operation performed, the portal network name, a hyperlink that opens the
corresponding status page, portal MAC address and portal IP configuration
data.
2 Retrieve IP Configuration Scan
When checked, attempts to retrieve the current IP Configuration for the
corresponding portal. This requires direct communication with the portal configuration service, which only runs for one hour after a reboot. If the service is
not running, the IP Configuration data will return unknown data.
3 Update IP Configuration
Updates the IP Configuration of the selected portal. This requires direct
communication with the portal configuration service. The “New Portal IP Configuration” fields are used for the new IP Configuration data.
4 Manual Connection
When checked, allows a portal to be configured by IP address. Some net69
works do not allow port 5353 to be open, which is required by the application
when scanning for portals. This allows manual connection to the portal so
the portal can be configured. You must click on Update IP Configuration after
selecting this box.
5 Keep Connection Alive Checkbox
Allows the connection with the portal to continue, otherwise a reboot will occur after the action selected.
6 Generate Portal Certificates
Generates a portal certificate that is sent to the portal and stored to the file
system. Enable this box when data encryption is required. Multiple portals
can be selected when generating certificates.
7 Export Portal IP Configuration
Exports the portal IP configuration for the selected portals.
Set Default Configuration
Clear Transactions
When checked, allows you to clear all transactions from portals you select in
the list above. This may be selected in combination with the Set Back to Factory
Default checkbox. .
Set Back to Factory Default
When checked, allows you to set change the IP address(es) of the portal(s) you
select in the list above back to factory default (192.168.1.200). This may be selected in combination with the Clear Transactions checkbox.
70
Once you’ve configured your Portal Gateways with the Portal Configuration module, you can add them into your Wi-Q AMS Software.
Adding Portal Gateways to AMS
Portals can be added to your system in two ways:
„„ Adding — normally use this method if the number of Portal Gateways is manageable. This is a manual method that requires manual entry of the IP address
of each Portal Gateway.
„„ Bulk Importing — normally use this method for large systems. This is done
through the System Administrator application through the ‘Import Portals’
selection.
71
Adding Portal Gateways One at a Time
Refer to Figure 45.
1 In the Configurator application, click the Portals Tab.
2 Click Add and the Configure New Portal Gateway screen opens.
3 In the Workstation field, select the location of your server.
4 Enter the name and description of the Portal Gateway.
Note Normally name Portal Gateways by their location. For large systems, work out a
naming scheme that makes it easy to locate the Portal Gateway in your segment.
5 Enter the IP address of the Portal Gateway. You will need to get IP addresses
from your network administrator.
6 Enter the port.
Figure 45 Configure New Portal Gateway screen
7 Click the ellipsis button next to the Channels field and select at least two channels that the Portal Gateway will use to communicate. Check with your network
administrator to make sure the channels are available.
72
8 Click the ellipsis button next to the Update Interval field. Here you can set how
often the system will update the Portal Gateway with changes you’ve made to
users, readers, timezones, and other functional changes to the database.
9 Click the ellipsis button next to the Transactions field to select which, if any, Portal
Gateway transactions you want to enable and which you want to make a ‘priority.’
Priority transactions will be uploaded immediately rather than waiting for the next
‘update interval’ that was set in the field above. Two transactions are available:
„„ Portal Firmware Update
„„ Portal Radio Start Failed
If you click on Select All, a dialog box window will ask you to confirm your
choice and it will also ask if you would like to enable priorities as well.
10 If you generated SSL certificates within the Portal Configuration module, you
may browse to your Portal Gateway’s certificate by clicking on the ellipsis
button next to the SSL Certificate field. The Certificate can be found in your
Program Files at the path shown below (Figure 46). The file is located within a
folder named for the Portal Gateway’s IP address. Select the file with the .pfx
extension, and click Open.
Figure 46 Path to Certificate File
11 Click Finish.
The Portal(s) you have added will now be visible in the Segment Tree. See “Viewing the Segment Tree” on page 79. You can check the operational status of your
Portal(s) by clicking on the top folder within your Segment Tree.
73
Portal Gateway Operational Status
When you are on the Portals tab within the Configurator module, you can click on the
top folder within your Segment Tree, and the right side of the screen will change to a
list of Portals in your system. The icon next to each Portal will give you the Portal’s
operational status. Five different status icons are present in the system for Portal
Gateways:
Icon
Name
Description
Question Mark
Device is loading.
Green Circle
Device is online.
Red X
Device is offline.
Blue Down Arrow
Portal Gateway or Controller is not assigned
to a workstation or the workstation is not
running.
Out-of-Date Firmware
Incompatible or Out-of-Date Firmware, all
features may not be supported
If your Portal Gateways have blue down arrow icons, restart your Communication Server. See “Restarting your Communication Server”. After you restart your
Communication Server, your Portal Gateway status icons should change to green
circles, indicating that the devices are online. See Figure 47.
Figure 47 Portal Gateway with Green Circle Icon
74
Restarting your Communication Server
If you need to restart your Communication Server, navigate to your system’s Services via Administration Tools. See Figure 48.
Figure 48 Navigate to Services
Navigate to Administrative Tools
Click to Open Services
Next, locate “Stanley Wi-Q Communication Service” in the list of services. Rightclick on the line and select Restart.
75
Importing Portal Gateways in Bulk
Before you can import Portal Gateways in bulk, you must generate an XML bulk
import file using the Portal Configuration module.
Generating an XML Bulk Import File
The XML file you will generate documents and cross-references Portal Gateways’
Mac addresses and IP addresses. Perform the following steps inside the Portal
Configuration module.
1 Click on Scan to generate a list of Portals in your system.
2 Select all the Portals you wish to add to your AMS software.
3 Click on Export Portal IP Configurations (see Figure 44).
4 Choose a location to save your XML file, and click Save. Figure 49 shows a
sample XML file.
Figure 49 Sample XML file
Once you have generated your XML bulk import file, perform the following steps.
1 Start the System Administrator module (Applications dropdown menu inside
Configurator).
2 Click the Import Portals link from the Import pane. See Figure 50.
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Figure 50 System Administrator Portal Gateway Import
Click the Import
Portals Link
3 The Import Portal Gateways dialog displays.
4 Click the ellipsis button and locate the bulk import XML file.
5 Click Open.
Figure 51 Import Portal Gateways
6 Click Import.
Note The Portals are imported (or updated) and a results box details the import. The
MAC addresses should automatically show up in Portal Gateways’ properties.
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Importing Portal SSL Certificates
If you previously generated SSL certificates for your Portal Gateways, you may
import them now. Perform the following steps.
1 From the System Administrator application, click the ‘Portal Certificates’ link
under the Import pane. See Figure 52.
Figure 52 System Administrator Portal Certificates link
Click the Portal
Certificates Link
2 Choose the Portal Gateway that you want to import an SSL certificate to and
click the ellipsis button next to it. Then find the certificate file (see Figure 46)
and click Open.
3 When finished with importing all the Portal Gateway SSL certificates, click Finish.
The Portals you have added will now be visible in the Segment Tree. See “Viewing the Segment Tree”. You may now check the operational status of your Portal
Gateways. See “Portal Gateway Operational Status” on page 74.
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Viewing the Segment Tree
The Segment Tree is a visual representation of the locations and associations of
the Portal Gateways, associated Controllers and I/O devices in your segment. As
you configure your Portal Gateways, sign on Controllers and configure additional
hardware in your system, you can drag them to the folders and subfolders you
create in the Segment Tree.
Figure 53 shows an example Portal Gateway in the Segment Tree.
Figure 53 Portal Gateway visible in Segment Tree
Portal
Gateway in
Segment Tree
To view the Segment Tree
1 In the Segment tab, select the segment you wish to work with.
2 Click on the Portals tab. The Segment Tree pane displays on the left, and a list
of all prepared devices displays on the right. The first item in the Segment Tree
is the folder for the selected segment, in this case, Acme University.
The Segment Tree is also viewable from within the Readers tab. See “Adding Controllers to the Segment Tree” on page 89.
Organizing your Segment Tree
You can organize your Segment Tree by Portals and Controllers, or by building
locations, or by any other method you prefer. Remember, the Segment Tree is provided as a visual aid and does not affect the actual hardware or communication to
the devices.
The first level below the Segment level in the tree might contain, for example,
folders for Portals and Controllers, or folders for building locations. You can create
sub-items in each folder as needed, for example: First Floor, Second Floor, offices,
laboratories, and so on. There is no specific protocol for creating the hierarchy;
only that it makes sense to your operation so that when you add other elements to
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the system, you can easily locate the Controllers to be assigned. Once you create
Segment folders of your own, you can move your Portals to the appropriate folders.
Note To delete a folder, you must already have moved any devices in that folder to a
different location.
To create a new segment item folder
1 Right click on the parent folder and select New Path from the drop down list.
The New Reader Path dialog box opens.
Figure 54 Defining a New Reader Path
Select New
Path Name and
enter a name
2 Select New Path Name and enter the name.
3 Select Finish. The new path folder is added to the Segment Tree. Repeat the
process to create the folders needed to define your Segment Tree. Figure 55
shows a Segment Tree with several added folders and sub-folders.
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Figure 55 Folders and Sub-Folders in the Segment Tree
Moving Portal Gateways within the Segment Tree
Once you have created the Segment Tree with folders and sub-folders, you can
move Portal Gateways into the appropriate folders.
Click on the Portals tab. Select the desired Portal Gateway from within the Segment Tree and drag it to the desired folder.
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Assign Portal Channels
Portal Gateways default to All Channels; however, you can assign specific channels if needed. For example, if you have configured a new wireless component to
operate on channel 17, you will want to disable channel 17 in the Portal channel
configuration.
To assign Portal channels
1 Click on the Portal tab, and select the desired Portal from the Segment Tree. Clicking on a Portal will display Portal properties on the left.
Figure 56 Portal Properties
2 Under the Configuration category, click in the Assigned to Channels field. The
ellipsis button appears at the far right of the field. Click the ellipsis button to
open the Channel Selection window.
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Figure 57 Portal Channel Selection
3 Enable or disable channels as needed (at least one channel must be selected).
4 Click Finish to save your settings.
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Sign on and Configure Controllers (Task 10)
Each segment created in AMS is assigned a discrete Sign On Key number. Select
a segment and you will find this number in the ID Category of the Configurator
module’s Segment Tab.
Figure 58 Signing on readers from the Segment tab
If your segment uses Controllers with keypads, you must enter this number at
each Controller to establish connection between the Controllers and the Portals,
and ultimately to a segment in the software. If you use card readers, you can
create a sign-on card to use at each reader. Either way, you must sign on each
Controller in the system to register them in the database and ultimately establish
communication with the software.
Note Readers associated with Single Door Controllers are configured, signed on, and
monitored in AMS exactly like any other networked keypad Controller in the
system.
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Signing on Keypad Controllers
If your segment uses keypad Controllers, use the following steps, in sequence, to
register each Controller in the system. Once this is done, the readers will appear
in the <New Segment Items> folder, viewable in the Readers tab Segment Tree.
Note The following sequence is timed. Be sure to have your segment sign on key ready
to enter at the appropriate time.
1 At a keypad Controller, press the following number sequence on the keypad:
5678# (Wi-Q) or 5678 (Omnilock and WAC). The green light will flash three
times.
2 Within five or six seconds, begin to enter the six-digit segment sign on key
number, followed by #. You will have about five seconds to enter each number.
The sequence will time out if more than five seconds elapses between numbers.
3 Once the key number is completed, the reader begins to alternately flash green
and red to signify that it is searching for Portal Gateways in range. If the sequence was completed successfully, three green flashes indicate the Controller
has accepted the sign on key.
4 If you see three red flashes, the Controller has not accepted the number or you
have exceeded the time limit. Begin again at step two, and continue until you
receive three green flashes.
Note Once a Controller has been signed on, all sign-on functionality is disabled unless it
is deep-reset.
Signing on Card Readers
If your segment uses card readers, you may want to register one of your cards
with a segment credential number. This card will be used to sign on card readers
to the system. You can register a separate card and hold it specifically for this
purpose, or register one that belongs to a user such as the Administrator’s card.
Once this is done, you will use the card to sign on each reader in the system.
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To register a card with a segment credential
1 In the Configurator’s Segment tab, select the segment to which the readers
belong.
2 In the ID Category, click in the Sign On Credentials field and select the ellipsis
button at the far right of the field. The Segment Credentials Setup property
sheet opens.
Figure 59 Segment Credentials Setup
3 Select the type of card you will use. If your card type is not listed, select Add.
The Add Credential to Segment dialog box opens.
Figure 60 Add Credential to Segment
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4 Select the card type from the drop-down list, in this case, Magnetic Card. The
Segment (Magnetic) Card Credential Number Setting dialog box opens.
Figure 61 MAG Card Settings
5 You can enter the card’s 16-digit credential number manually; or, you can scan
the card at a local scanning wedge, or select a reader where the card will be
scanned.
To Scan a card locally, select Card Reader and Select Scan. You will have about
30 seconds from the time you select Scan to actually scan the card through a
reader.
To Scan at a reader, select Reader and select the reader from the drop-down
list to scan at from the drop-down list, then select Scan. You will have about
30 seconds from the time you select Scan to actually scan the card through a
reader (this option is available only if the reader has been signed on).
6 Select Finish to save your settings and return to the Segment Credentials Setup
dialog box, or Cancel if you decide not to create the number. The number appears in the Credential Number category and the card is now registered. If you
will use a Prox card, see the following additional steps to complete registration.
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Completing the Credential for a Prox card
1 Under the Proximity Card category, Enforce Expiration Date, select True or
False, depending on your preference. If you select true, you will need to register a new card when the expiration date occurs. If False, the card will not
expire.
2 Under Proximity Card Type, select the type of encryption the card uses from
the dropdown menu.
3 Select Finish. Once this is done, you can use this card to sign on card readers.
To sign on card readers
1 At each card reader, scan the card you registered with the segment credential.
2 Once this is done, the readers will appear in the <New Segment Items> folder,
viewable in the Readers tab Segment Tree.
Note Once a reader has been signed on, all sign-on functionality is disabled, that is,
removed from the database. If you wish to use the reader in a different capacity,
that will require a new sign on. You will need to perform a reset to restore its sign
on capability.
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Adding Controllers to the Segment Tree
Within 10 to 15 seconds after you sign on a controller, it will appear in the Configurator <New Segment Items> folder, viewable in the Readers tab. The folder will
appear in red to indicate that it has received new Controllers. See Figure 62.
Figure 62 <New Segment Items>
You can move new Controllers into sub-folders within the Segment Tree by dragging them to the desired location. When all new Controllers have been assigned to
segment folders, the <New Segment Items> folder will be empty and the display
color will change from red to black. You can move segment sub-folders to different locations in the tree and the Controllers within will move with them.
If you expand your segment by adding new Controllers, the new Controllers will
appear again in the red <New Segment Items> folder so that they can be assigned
a location in the Segment Tree.
When you first configure a Controller, you will have the option to configure a new
Controller or copy parameters from one that has already been configured.
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Copying Reader Parameters
The Copy Reader Parameters feature is useful when you have more than one
reader that serves the same users and user groups or will be assigned a special
Timezone Group. This feature is available when you first bring a Controller from
the <New Segment Items> folder to the Segment Tree, and as a right-mouse-click
copy function. It makes sense then that if you are going to use this feature you will
want to configure the Users and User Groups before configuring the readers. See
“User Groups” on page 103 and “Adding Users to the Segment” on page 121 for
steps to create these parameters.
Configuring New Controllers
When you create a new Controller, its name is displayed in the Reader Properties section on the right, and it is automatically assigned to the Master Timezone.
Users, User Groups, and Timezone Groups will be available to the Controllers only
if they have already been configured. If not, you can configure the Controllers first
with default parameters and return to assign Users, User Groups and any Timezone Groups after they are created.
To configure a new Controller
1 Drag your Controller out of the <New Segment Items> folder and into your
desired sub-folder in the Segment Tree.
2 If you are configuring your first controller, select the Controller within the tree, and
the Reader Properties sheet will show on the right.
If you have signed on more than one Controller into your segment, a window
will open to ask if you would like to copy a configuration from another reader or
create a new configuration. See Figure 63.
If you select Copy Configuration from, you can choose a reader in the dropdown list from which to copy configuration settings.
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Figure 63 New Reader Configuration
When you have made your selection, click OK. If you are copying reader properties, a window will open asking if you would like to proceed. Click Yes to
proceed.
Field Category Definitions
The following is a list of Reader property field categories and their functions.
Reader Name
The Reader name displays automatically. You may change it by typing over the
default name.
Associations
If you have already configured User Groups and Users, you can assign them to the
readers now. If you have not yet configured these parameters, or don’t wish to do
it now, you can come back later to add these settings.
Configuration
Under the Configuration category, you can configure various reader settings, such
as default settings for Channels, Beacon Time, Operate and Shunt times, and add
delays depending on how the reader will be used.
Assigned to Channels — New readers default to All Channels; however, you can
assign specific channels if needed. For example, if an existing wireless component operates on Channel 17, you will want to disable Channel 17 in the reader
channel configuration. See “Assigning Reader Channels”.
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Beacon Time — The default Beacon Time for a reader is one minute; however,
you can manually input a different value anywhere from 10 seconds to 1 day. Keep
in mind, the more frequent the beacon time, the more battery power used.
Note For best results, it is recommended that beacon time be set to no lower than 1
minute.
Default Operate Time — The Default Operate time is three seconds. You can
manually enter a different value as needed.
Default Shunt Time — The Default Shunt Time is three seconds. You can manually
enter a different value as needed. This feature is useful for readers that will be
used to accommodate wheelchairs or other equipment that may need additional
time to get through the door before the alarm is triggered.
Operate Delay — This feature is useful during situations where, for example, a
guard may want a chance to visually confirm the identity of the user before access is granted.
Shunt Delay — This feature is useful when the users accessing this reader typically need more time to pass through the door after it unlocks; such as, someone
in a wheelchair or someone who will move equipment through the doorway.
Statistics Update Interval — Manually enter the desired reader polling time.
Wiegand Device — Define if applicable.
First Card Unlock Authority — The reader requires authority to leave the door
unlocked when in an ‘unlock with ID’ access mode.
Card Formats Assignments — Assign card formats to the reader.
Assigning Reader Channels
Perform the following steps to assign reader channels.
1 In the Reader tab, select the desired reader within the Segment Tree.
2 In the Reader Properties sheet, under the Configuration category, click in the
Assigned to Channels field. The ellipsis button appears at the far right of the
field.
3 Click the ellipsis button to display the Channel Selection for the Reader.
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Figure 64 Reader Channel Selection
4 Select your desired channels.
5 Click Finish to save your settings.
Note When changing a reader’s channels, ensure that it can connect to a Portal
Gateway on the same channel. For example: if a reader is changed to use only
Channel 17, the Portal’s channels must include Channel 17.
Reader Control
The Reader Control dropdown list corresponds to settings configured under the
Reader Control sub tab in the Timezones tab. See “Configuring Timezones” on
page 137 for more information.
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Uploaded Transactions
Click on the Transaction Masks ellipsis button, the Configure Controller Transactions dialog box will open.
Figure 65 Configure Controller Transactions
Here, you can determine what transaction types will show up in the Transactions
application. If you make a transaction a priority by checking the Priority checkbox,
it will come through immediately instead of waiting until the next beacon. If you
click on the Select All or Clear All buttons, a dialog box will open to ask if you want
to include Priorities as well. Select Yes or No.
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5 Configure AMS Software (Task 11)
This chapter will provide detailed information on configuring the AMS Software.
Now that Portal Gateways and Controllers have been added to and configured within
the software, you are ready to configure your segment even further. The first part of
this chapter will discuss the configurable items within the different categories of the
Segment tab.
Associations
In the Associations category of the Segment tab, you can select from a set of supplied User Fields or add your own and create User Groups for your segment.
User Fields
Wi-Q AMS supplies you with a set of common User Fields which are available
in the User Tab when you start adding users. You are also supplied with a set of
additional User Fields and Categories that you can add to the system if needed. If
you do not find the fields and categories you need to fully define your user parameters, you can create your own and they will be available from the User Tab. When
you add and remove User Fields, the changes affect all segments in the system.
Adding Additional User Fields
1 In the Segment tab, click on User Fields and select the ellipsis button at the far
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right of the field. The User Field Management dialog box opens.
Figure 66 User Field Management
2 Click the Select Fields button at the bottom of the dialog box. The Select Segment User Fields dialog box opens. Additional pre-defined User Fields are listed
on the right.
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Figure 67 Select Segment User Fields
3 To add one of these fields, select the checkbox next to the field and select
<<Add. The field is transferred to the User Fields in Facility box on the left.
Figure 68 User Fields in Facility
4 Select Finish. Once you add the field to a Segment, it will appear on the Users
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Tab in the Configurator module. See the next few sections for steps to complete this process.
Creating New User Fields
If the field you wish to add does not appear in the User Fields list on the right, you
can add one of your own. Once this is done, you can add it to an existing Category,
or create a new Category for the field. You can add any number of new fields and
new categories.
Perform the following steps to To create a New User Field.
1 In the Select Segment User Fields dialog box, select Add Field at the bottom of
the box. The Add, Remove, and Configure System User Fields dialog box opens.
Figure 69 Add, Remove and Configure System User Fields
2 Under Specifications, Category, select the category under which you wish the
new field to appear from the drop down list, for example, Statistics.
Note If the category you want is not available, you can also create your own category.
See “Adding a New User Fields Category” on page 101.
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3 In the Field Name category on the right, type in a new name for the new field.
In the example, we used Alternate Phone Contact.
4 Select Update. When you click Finish, the Select Segment User Fields dialog
box shows that your new field is now available for selection.
Figure 70 User Field added to list
5 Select the Checkbox next to the field and click <<Add. The field is transferred
to the User Fields in Segment box on the left.
6 Select Finish. The new field is now added to the User Field Management dialog
box.
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Adding a New User Fields Category
1 In the User Field Management of Segment dialog box, click the Add Category
Link at the bottom of the dialog box.
Figure 71 Add Category
Add Category
2 The Add and Remove System User Categories window opens.
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Figure 72 Adding and Remove System User Categories
3 Click the Add button. “Category 1” appears in the text box.
4 Double-click on “Category 1” to rename it.
5 Click Finish. In the Configure Segment Users Fields dialog box, the new category is now available for selection from the Category drop-down list. Now you
can select this category when defining a new User Field.
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Removing User Fields and Categories
You can also remove added User Fields and Categories from the system. The system will not allow you to do this, however, if the field or category is in use. Before
you remove the field or category, ensure there are no records assigned to them,
then perform the following steps.
To remove User Fields from the system
1 In the User Fields Management dialog box, click the Select Fields button at the
bottom of the dialog box.
2 From the User Fields in Facility list on the left, select the fields you wish to remove and click Remove>>. The field is moved to the User Fields list on the right,
and remains inactive unless you add it back to the list.
3 Click Finish. The field is no longer available in the User Fields list.
To remove added Categories from the system
1 In the User Field Management window, select Add Category.
2 The Add and Remove System User Category window opens.
3 Select the category you wish to remove, and click Remove. Click Finish when
you are done.
User Groups
User Groups are a convenient way to define properties that will affect certain
groups of individuals in your system. For example, if your Administrative personnel
have different hours or entry parameters, you can create an Administrative group,
make that group a Timezone Group and assign administrative personnel to that
group.
You can define any number of User Groups, such as Administrative, General, Laboratories, Dormitories, Night Shift, Contractors, and so on.
Adding User Groups
1 In the Users Tab, Associations category, click the User Groups field. Select
the ellipsis button at the far right of the field. The User Group Setup dialog box
opens.
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Figure 73 User Groups Setup
2 The groups you create display on the left. The group’s ID, Name, Associations
and Timezone appear on the right.
3 Select Add. A new Group (Group1) is created and displays on the left.
4 In the Group Name box, replace the name Group1 with a name for the new
group (for example, Administrative).
5 Select OK.
Note Once you have added users to the system via the Users Tab, you can assign them
to these User Groups.
Removing User Groups
In the User Group Setup dialog box, select the group you wish to remove and select the Delete button. The group is immediately removed from the list, along with
its associations.
Associating Users with User Groups
1 In the Segment Tab, Associations category, click the User Groups field.
2 Select the ellipsis button at the far right of the field.
3 In the User Groups Setup dialog box, select the group you wish to associate
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with users.
4 In the Associations category, click in the Users field and select the ellipsis button. The Users of Group dialog box opens.
5 All users in the segment not already assigned to the group are displayed under
Segment Users list on the right.
Figure 74 Users of Group
Note Users will not appear in the Segment Users list until they have been added to the
system. If you have a large number of users, you can use the Alphabetic sorter
buttons on the left of the list to more quickly find a specific user.
6 Select the checkbox next to the users you wish to associate with the User
Group.
7 Select <<Add. The User names will be removed from the Segment Users list on
the right and display under Users in Group list on the left.
8 Select OK to close the Users of Group dialog box.
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Removing Users from User Group
1 In the User Groups Setup dialog box, select the group in which the user currently resides.
2 In the Associations category, click on the Users field, and select the ellipsis
button. The Users of Group dialog box opens.
3 From the Users in Group list on the left, select the checkbox next to the user
you wish to remove from the group.
4 Select Remove. The user name will be removed from Users in Group list on the
left and moved back to the Segment Users list on the right. Select OK to close
the Users of Group dialog box.
Timezone User Groups
You can create up to 512 Timezone User Groups to further define access levels for
the Master Timezone. These can restrict access of a certain group of employees
to a specific time period. Perform the following steps to create a timezone user
group.
1 In the Segment Tab, select the Segment to which you wish to add a new Timezone User Group.
2 In the Associations Category, select User Groups and click the ellipsis button at
the far right of the field. The User Groups Setup dialog box opens.
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Figure 75 Creating a Timezone User Group
3 Select Add. Group1 is created.
4 In the Name Category, Description, enter a description for the group, for example: Housekeeping Timezone.
5 In the Group Name, replace Group1 with the name of your new user group, for
example, Residential.
6 Under Timezone, change the Is Timezone Group default setting from False to
True. Select Update to continue creating groups.
7 Select OK to save the new Timezone group.
Once you have created a Timezone group, you will need to set up access times
to apply to that group. For more information about Timezones and Timezone User
Groups, see “Configuring Timezones” on page 137.
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Credential Settings
Keypad credentials, magnetic card settings, and proximity card settings are all set in
this category. Detailed steps are presented in the following sections.
Keypad Credential Length
If your access system will have or currently has cards encoded with keypad credentials, you may set the number of digits required here.
Note Keypad credential length must be set before you add users to the system.
Perform the following steps to set the Keypad Credential Length.
1 In the Segment Tab, under the Credential Settings category, click in the Keypad
Credential Length field.
2 Click the ellipsis button at the far right of the field. The Set value of Keypad
Credential Length dialog box opens.
Figure 76 Setting the Credential Length
3 Enter the length or slide the bar to select the position of the Keypad Credential
length you will use on segment cards.
4 Select OK to save your settings and exit the box.
Magnetic Stripe Credential Configurations
Before Magnetic cards can be used in the system, you must configure AMS to
accept the card types and settings. Figure 77 shows the Magnetic Stripe Credential
Configurations Window. Default settings will be sufficient for most systems.
Most users will use Track 2 cards and will not need to set up any type of advanced
card parameters. Wi-Q AMS default Expiration Date, Segment Code, and Issue
Number settings to Not Used, and no other changes need to be made.
Stanley Security Solutions currently stocks and provides Track 2 or Track 3
magnetic cards. These cards conform to ISO standards and can be ordered preencoded or blank. The system can be used with either Track 1, Track 2, or 3 cards,
however you can only encode 1 type within the same segment.
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Figure 77 Magnetic Stripe Credential Configurations
If you must make changes to the default settings, click Add to create a new
Magnetic Stripe card configuration, and give a name to your configuration in the
Configuration name field.
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Credential Settings
Wi-Q AMS can be configured to accept coding from existing Track 1(210 BPI),
Track 2 (75 BPI) or Track 3 (210 BPI) cards as long as the code does not exceed the
maximum number of characters for that track and/or controller. Magnetic cards
are configured as Track 2 by default. Perform the following steps to change to
change the segment track setting for encoding cards:
1 In the Magnetic Stripe Credential Configurations window, click the Card Track
Information link at the bottom of the window.
2 The Define Magnetic Stripe Card Track Information window opens. Specify the
desired track from the dropdown menu. Then click Finish.
3 Click OK to exit the Magnetic Stripe Credential Configurations window.
4 In the Segment tab, click Update at the bottom right to update your segment.
Card Track Limits
Wi-Q AMS is flexible and may accept coding from existing Track 2 or Track 3
cards as long as they do not exceed the maximum number of characters for that
track and/or controller. These characters include any digits and field separators,
however they exclude the starting and ending sentinels. Refer to the Stanley
Security Knowledge Base or contact Technical Support for controller hardware
track limits.
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Character codes and counts
The software recognizes data on a magnetic card stripe using ANSI standard
codes formatted to either a field separator or character count. Following is a brief
description of each type.
Field Separator — Field Separator (FS) character, generally represented as an
equal sign (=) to separate two independent data fields. A card using this method
might have the owner’s individual ID encoded at the beginning of the stripe followed by the FS character then the global segment ID. The fields can be in either
order, or there can be more than two fields, which could be required for compatibility with pre-existing systems, and any one of them can be set up as User ID,
Segment ID, Card Issue ID, or Expiration Date.
Following is an example of encoded data using field separators on Track 2.
Figure 78 Data Fields
; 1 5 7 6 = 3 4 9 2 6 5 7 1 8 2 = 0 = 0 6 0 11 3
FIELD 4: Card Expiration Date
060113 = MMDDYY = June 1, 2013
FIELD 3: Card Issue ID
0 = First Issue
FIELD 2: User ID Number (Max 19 digits)
ID Number = 3492657182
FIELD 1: Facility Code = 1576
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Character Count — You can set up a character count from the beginning of each
ID. For example, the Segment ID could start at the beginning of the data stripe,
digit count of 1. If the Segment ID has eight digits, the User ID would be set to
start at digit count of 9. This method requires all data groups with exception of the
last one, to have a fixed number of digits. Following is an example of encoded data
using character counts on Track 2.
Figure 79 Character count fields
; 1 5 7 6 3 4 9 2 6 5 7 1 8 2 0 0 6 0 11 3
Card Expiration Date Starts at Character 16
060113 = MMDDYY = June 1, 2013
Card Issue ID Starts at Character 15
0 = First Issue
User ID Number Starts at Character 5
ID Number = 3492657182
Facility Code Starts at Character 1
Facility Code = 1576
Note If you are not using the default settings for Magnetic Stripe Credential
Configurations, make sure that Expiration Date Position Type, Facility Code
Position Type, Issue Number Position Type and User ID Position Type are all set to
either must be set to “Field” (Field Separator) or “Character” (Character Count);
you cannot mix types.
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Expiration Date Settings
Perform the following steps to define a card expiration date.
1 In the Magnetic Stripe Credential Configurations window, under the Expiration
Date Settings category, click in the Expiration Date Position Type field.
2 Select either Character or Field from the drop-down list. The Expiration Date
Format, Position and Valid list boxes activate.
3 In the field next to Expiration Date Format, select the date format you need
from the drop down list (MMDDYY, etc.).
4 In the field next to Expiration Date Position, enter the value to represent either
the field position or the character number where the expiration date appears
on the card stripe.
5 In the field next to Expiration Date Valid, select either To or Thru Expiration
date.
6 Select OK to save your settings and exit the box.
Note If you use the character code format and select the six-digit expiration date
format, the value of your next setting (Facility Code Settings) must start with
character position 7. If you enter an incorrect value, the system will report an error
message. Review the “Character codes and counts” on page 111 if you need
clarification.
Facility Code Settings
Perform the following steps to define a facility code type, position and length.
1 Under the Facility Code Settings category, click in the Facility Code Position
Type field.
2 Select either Character or Field from the drop-down list. The Facility Code
fields below activate.
3 In the field next to Facility Code, enter your Facility Code number.
4 In the field next to the Facility Code Length, enter the length.
5 In the field next to Facility Code Position, enter the facility code position.
6 Select OK to save your settings and exit the box.
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Issue Number Settings
You can issue a replacement card to a user in lieu of issuing a new User ID. The
Card Issue ID consists of one or two digits from 0 through 99. After using the card
with an incremented (higher number) Card Issue ID in a reader, that lock will no
longer accept cards with the same User ID that have a lower Card Issue ID.
Perform the following steps to define an issue number position.
1 In the Issue Number Settings category, click in the Issue Number Position Type
field.
2 Select either Character or Field from the drop-down list. The Issue Number
fields below activate.
3 Enter the Issue Number length.
4 Click the Issue Number Look Ahead Enable field, and select true or false from
the dropdown menu.
5 Enter the Issue Number position.
6 Select OK to save your settings and exit the box.
User ID Settings
You can specify the position of the User ID code in the credential number either
by character or field position. Perform the following steps to modify the User ID
Settings.
1 Enter the User ID Length.
2 In the User ID Position field, enter the position number.
3 In the User ID Position Type field, specify Character or Field.
4 Select OK to save your settings and exit the box.
5 Select Finish to save all your settings.
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Proximity Credential Configurations
If you are using proximity cards in your system, you can add card configurations
by clicking on the Proximity Credential Configurations field and selecting the ellipsis button at the far right. Figure 80 shows the Proximity Credential Configurations
window.
Figure 80 Proximity Credential Configurations
To add a card configuration, perform the following steps.
1 Click Add. Give your new configuration a name in the Configuration Name field.
2 Under Credential Settings, select Number of Bits in the Credential. Change the
number to the right (default 60) to match the number of bits on your card.
3 If your card is configured to include the facility code, change Facility Code
Position type to Active. The facility code fields below will activate.
a
Enter your facility code in the Facility Code field.
b
Change the Facility Code Length to match the number of bits in your facility
code.
c
Change the Facility Code Position to match your card.
Note Issue Number Settings are not configurable for proximity cards. Proceed to User
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ID Settings.
4 Under the User ID Settings category, change the User ID Length to the number
of bits used for User IDs on your card. Set the User ID Position.
5 When finished, click OK.
Daylight Saving Settings
You can set Wi-Q AMS to automatically respond to Daylight Saving Time settings.
When you select North American as the Daylight Saving Type, the system defaults to standard Daylight Saving Time settings. When you select Europe as the
Daylight Saving Type, the system defaults to the settings for Europe. When you
select Southern Hemisphere, the system defaults to the settings for the Southern
Hemisphere. Once the settings are selected, the system will adjust to Daylight
Saving Time automatically.
To change Daylight Savings Settings, place the cursor in the field next to Daylight
Saving Type and select the type you wish to use. The settings below change to the
defaults for that setting.
I/O
If you are using input/output devices in your system, they are recognized and
defined similar to a Controller.
For example, if you are using a WAC to collect transactions from an alarm, you will
see it in your Segment Tree as a “Reader” when its associated Portal Gateway is
brought online. You can define and modify I/O events for the controller under I/O
References.
Adding and Modifying I/O References
1 In the Segment tab, click the I/O References field, and click the ellipsis button
at the far right. The I/O References Setup dialog box opens.
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Figure 81 I/O References Setup
Here, you define an event and type for the reference. The system creates an I/O
reference point in the left column of the dialog box and assigns it a reference ID
number.
2 Click Add.
3 Under Description, replace the default description “Reference1’ with a description that will have meaning for your segment, such as Alarm Annunciator.
4 Under Name, replace the default name “Reference1” with a name that will have
meaning for your segment, such as Parking Garage A Alarm.
5 Under the I/O category, click the Segment I/O Events field and select the ellipsis button at the far right. This will open the I/O Events Setup window.
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Figure 82 I/O Events Setup
From here you can create an event, check the device’s current state of operation,
define an access level, associate it with a reader in the system, define a trigger
state (high or low), and define the type of event to be triggered.
Note: The system recognizes the WAC as any other “reader” in the system. It will appear
in the referenced dialog boxes as a reader; however, you will recognize it by its
MAC address.
6 Click the Add button. The system creates an Event ID and adds it to the list in
the left hand column.
7 Enter a name for the event, such as Fire Alarm A.
8 Under the Settings Category, click the Readers field and click the ellipsis button.
9 This will open up a new window. See Figure 83. Select a device from the Readers in Segment section that will be associated with the event.
10 Click Add << to add it to the list of Readers Associated with I/O Event list.
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Figure 83 Associating an I/O event with a Reader
11 Click OK to save the association and return to the Setup dialog.
12 In the Reader Access level field, select either Unlock or Lockout from the dropdown list.
13 In the Reference Trigger State field, select either Active High or Active Low
from the drop-down list (this reference will act as a toggle from one state to
the other).
14 Under Type, select the event type from the drop-down list.
„„ Restore Readers To Normal
„„ Change Output Reference
„„ Override Reader Access Level
„„ Override Timezone User Group Access
„„ Restore Output Reference To Normal.
15 Click Update and continue defining devices then click Finish to save your settings and exit the dialog box.
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Misc
This category contains three fields (Contact 1, Contact 2, and Reference) that you
can use to store any miscellaneous information you that will be helpful to you and
your system. For example, you may decide to enter the phone number or email address for Stanley Technical Support in case you experience technical difficulties.
PIN Settings
If your system will require user PINs, you may set the PIN length here. Perform
the following steps.
1 Click in the PIN Length field, and select the ellipsis button at the far right. The
PIN Length window opens.
Figure 84 Set the Value of PIN Length
2 Set the value to a number between 3 and 6 by typing it in or sliding the bar to
select the position of the PIN length you will use on segment cards. Then, press
OK.
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Adding Users to the Segment
The system is now ready for you to add users. Follow the steps in this section the
first time you enter users, and each time you add a new user to the system. To get
started, navigate to the Users tab within the Configurator module.
Before You Begin
Before you begin adding users to the system for the first time, be prepared to address the following items:
If...
Then...
You plan to use only keypad Controllers
AMS assigns a unique keypad credential to each new
user and automatically registers it with the system.
You plan to use card readers
You must know the card type and settings required for
that type.
You plan to use a serial scanning device at your
computer to register user credentials
The scanning device must be attached to the computer com port and you must be able to identify that
port (Com1, Com 2) when you register the credential.
You plan to use local readers to register credentials
Know the reader name and locations to be used.
You plan to manually enter the credential
numbers
Have a credential number list or creating conventions
ready to enter.
Note If you do not have this information, contact your System Administrator before you
begin.
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Users Tab Overview
Figure 85 Users Tab
In the Users Tab, all users currently in the system display in the list on the left. If
you have a large number of users, you can use the alphabet buttons on the far left
to quickly sort through the list. Users Categories display on the right. By default,
these categories display as shown; however you can click the A-Z sort button to
display categories alphabetically. Here you can add or remove users from the system, set their credentials, and include any personal information needed to identify
that person in the system.
If an ellipsis button displays when you select a field, additional parameters are
available for selection. From here you will define user name and address information and access parameters such as readers, user groups, credentials, PIN, and so
on.
Note If you see a need for additional fields to define for your Users, contact your System
Administrator. They can add more fields to the Users Tab, or create additional User
Fields unique to your organization.
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The following sections describe each category in the Users Tab, and present steps
for adding and configuring users in the system.
ID — When you add a user, the system automatically assigns them a unique ID
and displays the number in the User ID field.
Name — Provides entry fields for Users’ first and last name and middle initial.
Adding a User Name
1 In the Users Tab, select the Add User button. In the ID category, the system will
display a new unique User ID.
2 In the First Name line, highlight and replace the default text (example: User1)
with a first name.
3 In the Last Name field, highlight and replace the default text
(“_New”) with a last name. Add a Middle Initial if needed.
Note The Update button will flash to remind you to update your settings. You can update
each time you add a user, or wait until all user information is added. The software
will automatically update your settings when you exit the Users tab.
User Defined Categories and Fields— If your segment has been configured with
user defined categories and fields, such as Address, City, Zip Code, enter the
information as configured.
Associations — In this category, you associate Users with Readers and User
Groups. This task defines which readers will recognize the User’s requests for
entry and exit. If User Groups have been created for your organization, these will
also be available for selection from the Associations category.
To associate a user with readers
1 In the Associations category, click inside the Readers field, and select the ellipsis button at the far right.
2 The Readers of User dialog box opens and displays a list of readers available to
the User.
Figure 86 Readers of User
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3 Select the reader(s) from Readers in Segment.
4 Select Add <<. The selected readers are moved from the Readers in Segment
list to the Readers Associated with User list on the left. You can associate a
user with any number of readers.
Figure 87 Selecting a reader to associate with a user
5 Select OK to save your settings and return to the Users Tab.
User Groups
If User Groups have been created for your segment, these will already be associated with readers. For example, a User Group may have been defined for
Laboratory Building 1. Laboratory Building1 might have six readers. By assigning
the User to the Laboratory Building 1 Users Group, they will automatically be associated with all the readers in that group.
A User Group may also be defined as a Timezone Group. Timezone User Groups
further define access levels for the Master Timezone. You can restrict access of
certain groups of employees to a specific time period. For example, you may have
a housekeeping group designated as a Timezone Group with restricted access
to dormitories from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., weekdays only. You would then assign
Users from the housekeeping department to this group. Steps to add users to User
Groups are presented in the following section. For more information about creating Timezone Groups, see “Timezone User Group Collections” on page 142.
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Perform the following steps to add a user to a User Group.
To add a user to a User Group
1 When adding or editing a User, in the Associations Category, click in the User
Groups field and click the ellipsis button. The User Groups of User dialog box
opens.
Figure 88 User Groups of User
2 Select the group(s) to associate with this user and click the Add << button. The
groups are added to the User of Groups list.
3 Select OK to save your selections and return to the Users Tab. You can add or
change User Groups for a user any time by returning to this list.
Credential Settings
Wi-Q AMS tracks individual requests for access or exit from the segment by their
unique credentials, and each request is recorded as a transaction in the database
for reference. Whether your organization uses keypad Controllers or card readers,
each user will be assigned a unique credential number. Under Credential Settings, you will enter the credential ID and number, select a credential type, and set
additional parameters related to the credential type. You can add another level of
security by combining an individual’s credential with a personal ID number (PIN).
If your organization requires a PIN, you will enter them here. Credential setup is
a two-step process: First you will select the credential type to be used, then you
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will register the credential.
Keypad Type — The default credential type in AMS is Keypad. When you add a
user to the system, the software assigns them a unique keypad credential number, then automatically registers it with the system. If your segment uses only
keypads, once you add the new user name, you can skip to Adding PINs and
Expirations Dates.
Card Type — If your segment uses card type credentials, you must select the card
type, enter the appropriate settings, and then register the credential number with
the system.
To select the card type
1 In the Users Tab, Credentials line, select the ellipsis button. The User Credentials Setup dialog box opens. The credential types are listed on the left and the
categories available for each type are listed on the right.
Figure 89 Selecting a User Credential type
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2 Select the type of credential the reader will use, for example, Keypad. The
credential options in the categories on the right will change, depending on the
type selected.
Passage Mode Authority — User credential has the authority to activate passage
mode with 2 entries.
1st Card Unlock Authority — User credential has the authority to leave the door unlocked when in an ‘unlock with ID’ access mode.
3 Under the credential category, click the Number field and click the ellipsis button. The Specify the Credential Number dialog box opens.
Figure 90 Enter a user credential number
4 If you wish to have the software generate a new number, select Recode. Or,
you may type in the user’s credential number. Click Finish. You can change the
credential number at a later date if needed.
5 Now you are ready to register the credential.
Note If the credential type you need is not in the list of card types on the left, you can
add one. See “Adding a Credential Type” on page 131.
Credentials Deactivation Date — You can define whether a user’s credentials
can be automatically de-activated based on an expiration date. This is useful, for
example, when entering credentials for a temporary employee or contractor. If the
credential can expire, select True from the drop-down list next to the Credentials
have Deactivation Date field, and then enter the de-activation date in the Creden127
tials Deactivation Date field. If the credential cannot be de-activated, select False
from the drop-down list. The default deactivation date is 26 years to ensure a
user’s credential is not inadvertently deactivated.
Registering the Credential
When you click on the Number field below the Credential category and select the
ellipsis button, the Specify the Credential Number dialog box opens. From here,
you can enter the credential number manually, scan the user’s card with a scanning device connected to your computer, or specify a reader where the user will
scan their card. Steps to register each type of card are presented in the next few
sections.
Note If you use the reader scan method, the card used must be unassigned.
To register a Keypad credential
1 Keypad credentials are automatically registered by the system, and no further
steps are required.
To register a Magnetic Stripe Card credential
1 From the User Credential Setup dialog box, select Mag Card from the list.
2 Click in the Number field and select the ellipsis button. The Users Magnetic
Stripe Card Credential Number Setting dialog box opens.
Figure 91 Entering a Magnetic Card credential number
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3 Enter a Credential Number manually (must be less than 16 characters, zeros
will be appended) or select a scan device.
Using a scanning device to register a credential
You can use a scanning device connected to your computer to register a credential.
1 Select Card Reader. When you are ready to scan the card, select the Scan button. You will have 30 seconds to scan the card.
Figure 92 Scan Credentials
2 When recognized, the number will display in the Credential Number text box.
3 Select Finish and return to the Credential Setup dialog box.
Using a local reader
You can use a local reader to scan the card credentials.
1 Select Reader, and then use the drop-down list to navigate to the reader where
the card will be scanned. When you are ready to scan the card, select the Scan
button. You will have 30 seconds to scan the card. When recognized, the number will display in the Credential Number text box.
2 Select Finish and return to the Credential Setup dialog box.
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Note You may need to expand the drop-down list to view all available readers. Use the
highlighted area in the lower right corner.
Registering a Prox card credential
In the Proximity Card category, review the Prox Card Type. If the default entry
is not the one you will use, select the field and use the down-arrow to select the
correct type from the list.
To register a Prox Card Credential
1 Select Prox Card from the list on the left. Click the ellipsis in the Number field,
under the Credential category. The User Proximity Card Credential Number
Setting dialog box opens
Figure 93 Entering a Proximity Card credential number
2 Enter a Credential Number manually (must be less than 16 characters, zeros
will be appended) or select a scan device:
USB Card Reader
If you have a MSR 206 USB Card reader connected to your computer, select MSR
206.
1 When you are ready to scan the card, select the Scan button. You will have
30 seconds to scan the card. When recognized, the number will display in the
Credential Number text box.
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2 Select Finish and return to the Credential Setup dialog box.
Serial Card Reader
If you have a Serial Card Reader connected to your computer, select Serial Card
Reader and then select the appropriate com port from the drop-down list.
1 When you are ready to scan the card, select the Scan button. You will have
30 seconds to scan the card. When recognized, the number will display in the
Credential Number text box.
2 Select Finish and return to the Credential Setup dialog box.
Adding a Credential Type
At least one credential type must be defined for the system. The default credential
type in Wi-Q AMS is Keypad. If you use other than keypad credential types, you
can add them to the User Credentials Setup dialog box.
To add a card type to the list
1 In the Users Credentials Setup dialog box, select the Add button. The Add Credential to User dialog box opens
Figure 94 Add Credential to User
2 Select the Credential Type from the drop-down list, in this case, Proximity Card.
3 Select Finish. The User <Proximity Card> Credential Number Setting dialog box
opens.
4 Now, you may manually enter a credential number or scan the credential with a
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scanning device.
PIN
You can add a level of security by requiring PIN numbers in addition to credentials for all users, or for specific Timezone Intervals. The default displays the PIN
number as asterisks in the fields; however you can choose to show the actual PIN
numbers.
To add a PIN Number for a User
1 Under Credential Settings, click the ellipsis button in the field next to PIN. The
Set Personal Identification Number dialog box opens.
Figure 95 Set PIN of User
2 Select the Show PINs check box if you wish to view the numbers instead of
asterisks as you type them in.
3 Enter a PIN number for the user. Retype the PIN below.
4 Click Finish to save the PIN and exit the dialog box.
Reader Control
The system defaults the amount of time from the moment a reader unlocks until
it relocks, and the amount of time a door can stay open before an alarm will be
triggered. You can modify reader operate and shunt times for individual users. For
example, to be ADA compliant, a user who is in a wheelchair or uses a walker may
need more time to pass through a door. You can increase the shunt time for this
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user.
To modify User Operate Time
In the Reader Control category, click the ellipsis button next to the User Operate
Time and select the amount of time you wish to leave the reader in the unlocked
position.
To modify User Shunt Time
In the Reader Control category, click the ellipsis button next to User Shunt Time
and select the amount of time you wish to allow for passage before an alarm will
be triggered.
Settings
Each segment user will be assigned a User and Access type, depending on the
tasks they perform and the access mode needed to perform those tasks. The
system supports three different types of users: General Users, Managers, and
Programmers. You can have up to 65,000 individual users in the system and they
can be of any User Type. User types are briefly described in the following paragraphs.
General Users — The majority of users will be assigned as General Users. They
are allowed entry only when the access level is set to ID Required. General Users
never have access when the reader is in Lockout.
Manager — Managers are one of the most useful types of IDs. This User Type
provides the capability to change the access level of a reader with a few simple
key presses. These changes can and will be overridden by the time schedule or
another manager or programmer. A user with Manager privileges is always allowed access to a reader. For example, when a segment requires an individual to
have access at all hours of the day without giving any extra privileges, that individual will be assigned Manager Privileges
Programmer — Programmers can scan all channels at the keypad reader as well
as reset the reader to respond to keypad commands as in manager mode.
Note Managers and programmers are indistinguishable from a general user when no
keypad is present.
For a list of Manager and Programmer system override codes, see “System Overrides” on page 160.
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To assign User Type
1 Under the User Tab, in the Settings category, select the field next to User Type.
2 Select a User Type from the drop-down list.
Portal and Reader Control and Messaging
Wi-Q AMS provides a number of features to reset and restore normal operations,
override locks and access levels, and temporarily remove reader association with
a Portal. These right-click functions send real-time instant messages to the hardware from within the software.
Portal Controls
You can delete, reset and restore a Portal to normal operation without going to
the physical location of the Portal. These functions are accessible via a right-click
in the Readers tab of the Configurator module. You can also delete a Portal from
the system with the right-click function.
To access right-click Portal messaging
1 In the Portals Tab, right-click on the Portal and select the option from the dropdown list. The software will ask you if you wish to proceed with the operation.
2 Click Yes. If the Portal is online, the operation is performed. If for any reason
the Portal is offline and unable to execute the command, the message will
become obsolete after five minutes.
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Figure 96 Right-click Portal messaging options
Note Momentary unlocks and overrides must be recognized and executed by the Portal
within five minutes of the command or they become obsolete. This feature ensures
that commands executed during period when the hardware cannot respond are
not executed when the hardware is back online.
Reader Controls
You can delete, reset and restore a reader to normal operation without going to
the physical location of the reader. In addition to these commands, you can momentarily unlock, override the access level, perform a deep reset and remove the
reader’s association to a Portal all from within the software. These functions are
accessible via a right-click in the Readers tab of the Configurator module. You can
also delete a reader from the system with the right-click function.
Note To delete more than one reader at a time, hold down the control key (CTRL) and
select using the left mouse key.
To Access Right-Click Reader Messaging
1 In the Readers tab Segment Tree, right-click on the reader and select the option
from the drop-down list. The software will ask you if you wish to proceed with
the operation.
2 Click Yes. If the reader is online, the operation is performed. If for any reason
the reader is offline and unable to execute the command, the message will
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become obsolete after five minutes.
Figure 97 Right-click reader messaging options
Momentary Unlock — A user with appropriate permissions can override the standard Timezone conditions to temporarily unlock the door controlled by a reader.
The reader goes through a normal unlock-lock cycle where the default shunt and
operate times apply. As soon as the command is executed, the standard Timezone
conditions are restored.
Override Access Level — A user with appropriate permissions override the
reader’s access level. The override can be defined to last until the next timezone
interval occurrence or to remain until a restore to normal message is sent. As
soon as the command is executed, the standard Access Level conditions are
restored.
Restore to Normal — Immediately restores all standard normal operation.
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Reset and Deep Reset — These options allow you to perform a reset and a deep
reset on a reader from within the software. The function is the same as performing a manual reset or deep reset at the reader hardware.
Remove Association with Portal — This command is useful when the reader has
associated with a different Portal or is being removed from the segment. When
you remove the reader’s association with the assigned Portal, it will search for
another Portal and resume communication.
Lock/Unlock Association with Portal — Locking a reader’s association with a
Portal will disallow its communication with other Portals. Unlocking an association will re-allow communication with other Portals in range.
Synchronize All Data — This command will resend all reader information to the
Portal and update the reader hardware.
Note All overrides must be recognized and executed by the Portal within five minutes
of the command or they become obsolete. This feature ensures that commands
executed during period when the hardware cannot respond are not executed
when the hardware is back online.
Configuring Timezones
For the greatest majority of facilities, the default access level provided in the
Master Timezone gives you all the options you need to manage your segment.
The system works by defining different access levels at a controller rather than
different times of day the segment is locked or unlocked. However, it may become
necessary to define a new Timezone under certain circumstances. For example,
you may want to define a separate Timezone for a specific set of readers that
would operate on a totally different schedule from the main system. For this application, you would create a different Timezone and then assign the readers to
that Timezone.
Timezones are created and configured in the Timezones tab within the Configurator module. Three sub-tabs exist inside the Timezone tab:
„„ Interval Collections — this is a collection of recurring ranges of time and days
of the week, such as 6:00 am to 6:00 pm weekdays AND 8:00 am to 8:00 pm
weekends.
„„ Reader Control — this is where you assign access levels to readers and determine how the reader will operate during assigned timezone intervals.
„„ User Group Collections: this is where you can add user groups to a collection
and define timezone intervals to the collection.
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Note Readers can be assigned to only one Timezone.
To create a Timezone Interval Collection
1 Select the Interval Collections Tab under the Timezones Tab. The Interval Collection window opens.
2 Click the Add button to create a new Timezone Interval Collection.
3 Click the New button to create a new interval.
Figure 98 Interval Collection
Click New to
create a new
interval.
Click Add to
create an Interval
Collection.
4 The Interval Configuration window opens.
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5 Enter a brief name for the Interval.
6 Select the Start and End Time of the Interval.
7 Click the Recurrence checkbox.
Figure 99 Interval Configuration
Name the
Interval. Tip:
usually good
practice to
name Intervals
by time ranges.
Click Recurrence if
the interval repeats.
8 Select the Recurrence Pattern of the Interval.
9 Select the Range of Recurrence for the Interval.
10 Click Finish to save your new Interval. This Interval is now listed as one of the
intervals for the Interval Collection.
11 Repeat steps 3 to 9 to create other Intervals until the Interval Collection is
complete.
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Timezone Interval Template Feature
At the top of the Interval Configuration window, there is a “Template” checkbox.
Selecting this box will allow the timezone interval you configure to be used as a
template for other intervals. For example, if you create a “Lunchtime” interval collection between 12pm and 1pm, and you select the “Template” checkbox (Figure
100), you can add that interval to an existing collection.
Figure 100 Interval Configuration Template
Template
To add the “Lunchtime” interval to another collection , select the existing interval collection from the list at the left, right-click in the calendar area, and select
“Lunchtime” from the Add Interval from Templates options. In our example, we
add the Lunchtime interval to the Office Staff Interval Collection. See Figure 101.
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Figure 101 Add Interval from Templates
To create a Timezone Reader Control
1 Select the Reader Control Tab under the Timezones Tab. The Reader Control
Window opens.
2 Click Add to create a new Reader Control.
3 Enter a brief name for the Reader Control.
4 Select the default Access Level that will be operate for the Reader Control.
This access level can be overridden for specific Interval Collections.
5 Select the Interval Collections when the Reader Control will operate.
6 Use the red X to delete the interval collection if needed.
7 Click Update to complete the Reader Control.
8 Select the Readers that will operate under this Reader Control.
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Figure 102 Reader Control
Name the
Reader Control.
Select what access
level is required for
this Reader Control.
Select the Interval
Collections when
the Reader Control
will operate.
Click Add to
create a new
Reader Control.
Timezone User Group Collections
You can create up to 32 Timezone User Groups to further define access levels for
the Master Timezone. You can restrict access of a certain group of employees to a
specific time period. For example, you may want to create a housekeeping group,
designate it as a Timezone Group, and then restrict access to dormitories only from
8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., weekdays. This is a two step process. First, you will create a
Users Group and designate it as a Timezone Group; then you will define the Timezone
Interval for the new Timezone Group (you may want to review User Groups before
starting this task)
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To create the Timezone User Group Collection
1 Select the User Group Collection Tab under the Timezones Tab. The User Group
Collection window opens.
2 Click Add to create a new User Group Collection.
3 Enter a brief name for the User Group Collection.
4 Select the User Groups that will be a part of the User Group Collection. You
must have set up User Group for the selections to be available.
5 Select the Interval Collections when the User Group Collection will operate.
You must have set up Interval Collections for the selections to be available.
6 Use the red X to delete the association of User Groups or Interval Collections
as needed. This will not delete the User Group or Interval Collections, it will
only delete the association.
7 Click Update to complete the User Group Collection.
Figure 103 Creating the timezone user group collection
Name the User
Group Collection
Select what what
User Groups will
make up the User
Group Collection
Select the Interval
Collection when the
User Group Collection will operate.
Click Add to
create a new
Reader Control.
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6 Using and Managing the System
Wi-Q AMS and Omnilock provides powerful tools to manage your system: Configurator, Transactions, Statistics Monitor and Reports.
If you are the Program Administrator responsible for setting up communications
between the software and system Portals and Controllers; you will spend most
of your time using Configurator. If you are in personnel or security, you may be
the person who adds users to the system and gives them access privileges and
IDs. You will spend most of your time on the Users tab of Configurator. If you are
responsible to oversee security for your organization, you will monitor all access
and alarm activity using Transactions. If you are the person responsible to ensure
the system is operating at maximum performance, you will use the Statistics
Monitor. If your organization is small, you may use all three! You can access all
applications from the Configurator main menu. You can also access these applications from the Windows Start Menu under Stanley Security Solutions.
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Wi-Q AMS and Omnilock Configurator
The following sections describe the essential functions you can perform using
Configurator.
Launching Wi-Q AMS Configurator
When the software is loaded onto your computer, it places a shortcut to AMS on
your desktop.
1 Double-click the Configurator icon to start the application. The splash screen
appears briefly, then the Login dialog box opens.
Figure 104 Logging in to Configurator
If you are a AMS User, your System Administrator or IT representative must
provide you a Login Name and Password. You will need this to login to the Configurator. If you are a System Administrator, see “Logging in to Configurator” on
page 63 for more information about launching the software for the first time.
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To Login to the Wi-Q AMS Configurator:
1 Enter your case-sensitive Login Name and Password.
2 Select Login. Configurator opens at the Segment tab.
3 If the System Administrator has created only one segment, you are ready to
begin. If more than one segment has been created, select the segment from
the drop-down list. Any elements you access in Configurator will be directed to
that segment.
WARNING: Once the System login and password have been personalized for your
segment, it is important to record the information in hard copy form and safeguard it
in a location known to management.
Managing Application Users
Wi-Q AMS and Omnilock ‘Application Users,’(AMS Users) as opposed to
‘cardholders,’ are those individuals who will operate one or all of software applications. For example, an application user might be a person in the Security
department who will use only the Transactions software to monitor system
access activity. Another AMS User might be a person in Human Resources or Administration who is assigned to add users to the system or change their settings.
AMS Users must be added to the system as cardholders because they will require some type of physical access to the segment. However, they must also be
assigned as AMS Users and be given User names and Passwords if they are to
access and operate application software.
Access the Manage Application Users features via the Configurator File Menu.
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To Manage Applications Users:
1 From the Configurator main screen, select File>Manage Application Users. The
AMS Users dialog box opens.
Figure 105 AMS Users
From here you can add or remove an AMS User, associate them with applications and specific facilities, and configure their lock control privileges, password
change interval and assign a User Type. You can select whether require authentication for reader control or require dual authority for this user.
To add an AMS User:
1 In the AMS Users dialog box, click Add User. The system creates “User1” in
the left column.
2 In the Name category on the right, enter an e-mail address (optional), and the
user name.
3 Under Associations, click the Applications field, then click the ellipsis button at
the far right.
4 Select which application(s) the User will have access to. Then click Finish.
5 In the Directories field, click the ellipsis button. Select the directories linked to
the User. Then, click Finish.
6 In the Segments field, click the ellipsis button. Select which segments the User
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will have access to and supply contact information as needed.
7 Under the Configuration category, in the Allow Lock Control field, select either
True or False from the drop-down list.
8 In the Password Change Interval field, select a change interval from the dropdown list.
9 In the User Type field, select a User Type from the drop-down list. (User Types
are defined in the following paragraphs.)
10 If the user will require Authentication for Reader Control or Dual Authority,
select these options at the bottom of the sheet.
11 Click Finish to save your settings.
User Types
AMS Users can be one of four User Types: Administrator, Manager, Service, and
General. You will be assigned a User Type depending on which applications you
will log in to and operate.
Administrator — has access to all applications and all segments. This User Type
would be assigned to a System Administrator, that is, someone who is responsible
for set up and configuration.
Manager — has access to all applications. This type would, for example, be assigned to someone responsible for adding users to the system. As an additional
security measure, this type could be restricted to access specific segments only.
Service — has access to Transactions and Statistics Monitor. This User Type can
also be restricted to specific segments only, if needed.
General User — has access only to the Transactions and Reports applications for
specific facilities. This user type would be assigned to someone in Security for
example, who will monitor daily entry and exit activity and system alarms. They
can not access the Configurator application.
Once an Administrator has logged in to the system, they can add AMS Users to
the system. If you are designated as an AMS User, you will be assigned a login
User Name and Password to access the software application(s) you need.
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Linking AMS Users’ Windows Accounts to Configurator
You can change the Configurator login settings so that your Windows account is
linked to Configurator. This way, when you are logged into your Windows account,
you won’t need a login ID or password when signing in to Configurator.
To link your Windows account to Configurator, perform the following steps.
1 From the Configurator File menu, select Manage Directories.
Figure 106 Manage Directories
2 The Configure Directories dialog box opens. Click on Add Directory.
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Figure 107 Configure Directories
3 The Select a Directory Type window opens. From the Directory Types dropdown list, choose Microsoft Windows Workstation. Then, click Finish.
Figure 108 Select a Directory Type
4 In the Directory Name field, specify a name for the new directory or leave in
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the default name. In the Host Name field, under the General category, type in
the computer name of the host. Then, click Finish.
Figure 109 Directory and Host Names
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5 From the Configurator File menu, select Manage Application Users.
Figure 110 Manage Application Users
6 The AMS Users dialog box opens. Click in the Directories field, under the Associations column, and select the ellipsis button.
Figure 111 AMS Users
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7 The Select User Directories window opens. Select the directory you created
previously.
Figure 112 Select User Directories
8 This will open the Select User Directory Account dialog box. Select Search,
and a list of users will be generated below. Select the desired Windows user
and then click Finish.
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Figure 113 Select User Directory Account
9 Back in the Select User Directories window, the directory will now have a
checkmark. Click Finish.
As long as you are logged into Windows using the account you linked to in the
previous procedure, you will not be prompted to input a login ID and password the
next time you log into Configurator.
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Configurator Overview
The following sections provide a brief overview of the Configurator module’s Display and Tab options.
Display Options
All tasks in Wi-Q AMS and Omnilock start from the Configurator, which has six
tabs: Segment, Portals, Readers, Timezones, Users, and Firmware. AMS operates
in the Windows environment using its standard Windows conventions. You can
use Configurator full screen or resize the window using the min/max buttons in
the top right corner of the window.
Following is the Segment Tab in minimized view with the scroll bar visible. This is
a useful option if you must run a number of other applications on your desktop and
need more space on your desktop.
Figure 114 Segment Tab
File Menu
Tab Options
Categories
In the Segment and Users Tabs, you can display items by category or sort alpha155
betically. This is useful when displaying the Configurator in full-screen view. A
number of global operations are also available from the program File menu.
Segment Tab
Most Segment set up tasks are performed in the Segment Tab, Figure 114. Here,
the Program Administrator will create User Groups and configure the software to
work with the type of segment access cards or keypad credentials you will use.
If your Program Administrator has created more than one segment, you will first
select a segment to work with in the Segment Tab before moving on to work in the
other tabs.
Once you select a category within Configurator, you can use the ellipsis button to
configure additional settings.
Figure 115 Segment Tab Categories
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Portals and Readers Tabs
The Portals and Readers tabs displays the Segment Tree, which is a visual representation of all Portal Gateways, Controllers, and I/O devices connected to the
software. Once the devices are organized in the Segment Tree, the various paths
to associate Controllers and Portals are available when you add new users to the
system.
Information about creating the Segment Tree and assigning devices to the various folders in the tree is presented in Chapter 4, “Configuring Segments, Portal
Gateways and Controllers” on page 62. Typically, only the Program Administrator will perform tasks using the Readers Tab, Figure 116.
Figure 116 Readers Tab
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Timezones Tab
The software automatically assigns all Controllers to a Master Timezone. Your
Program Administrator can create any number of Timezone Intervals Collections
and Timezone User Group Collections to modify user access within the Master
Timezone. The Timezones tab displays the default Master Timezone, a calendar
that operates similar to Microsoft Outlook, and any Timezone User Groups that
have been created.
You can choose to display the calendar detail as one day, a work week, a full week
or by the month, or click on the calendar to display a specific date.
More information about creating Timezone Intervals and Timezone Groups is presented in later in Chapter 5, “Configure AMS Software (Task 11)” on page 96.
Figure 117 Setting up the Timezones
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Users Tab
If you have been assigned responsibility to add or maintain general cardholder
users of the system, your tasks will be performed in the Users Tab. All users
currently in the system are displayed in the column at the left. To display a User
profile, simply select their name from the list.
Figure 118 Users Tab
More information about adding users to the system is presented in Chapter 5,
“Configure AMS Software (Task 11)” on page 96.
Firmware Tab
Firmware updates will be sent to you periodically by Stanley Technical Support.
You can upload these firmware files to your database by using the System Administrator Application, and then you can send the updates to your hardware from the
Configurator’s Firmware Tab. See “” on page 177.
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System Overrides
Manager Override at Keypad Controller
When an AMS User is assigned the Manager Type, that user can change the current access level at a Controller with a keypad. Once their credential has been
presented to a Controller and it has cycled, the following keys can be used to
change the Controller’s access level:
Note MC refers to Manager Credential.
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Item
WDC
WAC
Omnilock
Function
Manager
Code
MC#
MC
MC
Momentary Unlock.
Restore to
Normal
MC# + 0#
MC + 0000
MC + 0 + CL
Return to normal operation from an
override.
Toggle with
ID
MC# + 1#
MC + 1111
MC + 1 + CL
Places the device in a mode
to toggle between locked and
unlocked with a credential.
Unlock
MC# + 2#
MC + 2222
MC + 2 + CL
Places the device in an unlocked
state.
Unlock with
ID
MC# + 3#
MC + 3333
MC + 3 + CL
Places the device in a mode to
unlock with credential.
Unlock with
ID and PIN
MC# + 4#
MC + 4444
MC + 4 + CL
Places the device in a mode to
unlock with credential and PIN.
ID
Required
MC# + 5#
MC + 5555
MC + 5 + CL
Places the device in a mode where
a credential is required to enter.
PIN
Required
MC# + 6#
MC + 6666
MC + 6 + CL
Places the device in a mode where
a PIN is required to enter.
Facility Card MC# + 7#
MC + 7777
MC + 7 + CL
Places the device in a mode where
all credentials with the correct
facility ID have access.
Lockout
MC# + 8#
MC + 8888
MC + 8 + CL
Places the device in a mode where
only manager credentials have
access.
Toggle with
ID and PIN
MC# + 9#
MC + 9999
MC + 9 + CL
Place the device in a mode to
toggle between locked and
unlocked with a credential and
PIN.
Programmer Override at Keypad Reader
When an AMS User is assigned a Programmer Type, that user can present their
credential and perform the following.
Note PC refers to Programmer Credential.
WAC
Omnilock
Function
Programmer PC#
Code
PC
PC
Momentary Unlock.
Soft Reset
PC# + 1#
PC + 1111
PC + 1
Soft resets device.
Motor Reset PC# + 2#
PC + 2222
PC + 2
Resets the motor drive.
Comm.
Processor
Reset
PC# + 7#
PC + 7777
PC + 7
Resets the communication
processor.
Motor Test
PC# + 8#
PC + 8888
PC + 8
Runs motor test.
Deep Reset
MC# + 9#
MC + 9999
MC + 9
Deep resets device.
Item
WDC
Deep Reset
At times it may be necessary to perform a Deep Reset on a Controller. For example, when you install a dial up gateway modem, you must temporarily clear reader
data. If the reset button inside the Controller housing is not accessible, you can
use the Programmer Override to perform a Deep Reset. You can also perform a
deep reset from within Configurator.
To Perform a Deep Reset from within Configurator
1 In the Configurator’s Readers Tab, navigate to the desired reader using the
Segment Tree.
2 In the list on the right, right-click on the reader and select Deep Reset from the
drop-down list. Reader data will be cleared.
3 To bring the reader back into the software, you must perform a standard sign
on procedure.
Note If the reader does not respond and perform the Deep Reset within five minutes, the
action will be aborted.
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Segment Item Upgrades
As you continue to add users and readers to your system it may become necessary to expand your Portal and reader capacities. This is performed via the File
menu in Configurator.
When you near maximum capacity in one or all of the system segment items, it’s
time to use one of the upgrade licenses you purchased with your system, or call
Stanley Security Solutions for additional Upgrades. You can purchase system
upgrades to expand the user and Controller capacity of each segment in your
organization.
Each Wireless Controller begins with support for 2000 user credentials and can be
upgraded to support up to 18000 Users. Upgrade licenses are available in maximum capacities of 2000, 10000, and 18000 users.
Each Portal Gateway begins with support for 16 readers and can be upgraded to
support 32 and 64 wireless readers. Upgrade licenses are available in maximum
capacities of up to 64 readers.
Determine Segment Reader and Portal Capacity
An AMS user with Administrator privileges can monitor system capacity by segment from within Configurator. From here it is easy to see how many licensed
upgrades are in use and how many are available.
To view Wi-Q AMS and Omnilock Upgrade use
1 In Wi-Q AMS Configurator, Segment Tab, select the Segment you wish to review for upgrade use.
2 From the Wi-Q AMS Configurator File menu, select System Upgrades from the
dropdown list. The System Upgrades window opens at the Upgrade Information Tab.
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Figure 119 Upgrading your system capacity
AMS Upgrades
With the Wi-Q AMS Upgrades radio button selected on the left, the property
sheet displays the current reader capacity for the segment and how many of those
readers are currently in use.
Wi-Q AMS now offers free upgrades. All capacities can be set to unlimited without a new interlock code.
Reader Licenses in Use — With the Reader Upgrades radio button selected on
the left, the property sheet displays the number of Licensed Upgrades in each
user capacity value, and how many of those Licensed Upgrades are currently in
use.
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Select the upgrade all link if additional user capacity is needed.
Select force all readers to max capacity and click finish.
Portal Licenses in Use — With the Portal Upgrades radio button selected on the
left, the property sheet displays the number of Licensed Upgrades in each reader
capacity value, and how many of those Licensed Upgrades are currently in use.
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Select the upgrade all link if additional reader capacity is needed.
Select force all portals to max capacity and click finish.
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System Administrator
System Administrator is an application accessed inside Configurator or from the
Windows Start menu. With System Administrator, you can archive and restore
Portal statistics, reader statistics, and reader transactions. From here you can
also import data from an existing database or comma-delimited file. You must be
an AMS User with Administrator privileges to use this feature. It is a good idea
to archive records on a regular basis. It will be helpful to establish a protocol and
ensure that it is carried out according to plan.
Note Archiving and restoring transactions and statistics is not the same as performing a
full AMS database back up. Full back up and restore is performed using Microsoft
SQL Server Management Studio Express (installed with AMS). Complete steps are
described later in this chapter.
Establish an Archive Protocol
An industry best practice for use of any archiving systems is to establish a protocol for who, when and how much data to archive, depending on the volume and
nature of the data being archived. For security purposes, it will be important to
ensure the protocol is being implemented by also establishing an audit practice.
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Using System Administrator
Figure 120 System Administrator
From here you can archive and restore statistics in the AMS database, import
data to AMS from the OFM Database, or import data from standard comma-delimited files such as .txt and .csv.
Archiving Statistics in the AMS Database
It is important to maintain your database in optimum condition. On the basis of the
statistics volume in your segment, you should establish a protocol to regularly archive data that are not likely to be used again. For example, each month, you may
want to archive data that are three months old. When you archive records from
the software using the System Administrator application, the data is removed
from the database. The statistics can be fully restored to AMS in the future, if
necessary.
The archive feature operates the same for Portal statistics, Reader statistics,
and Transactions. The following steps illustrate how to archive Portal statistics;
however, the steps are the same for each type. You can archive statistics in all
devices or select a specific Portal or reader for archive.
Once you’ve selected the Portal or reader to archive, you can also select what
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statistics to archive; for example, all statistics, only those statistics greater than a
specific ID, or specify a range of statistics older than a specific date.
To Archive Statistics
1 In the System Administrator application, select the segment for which you wish
to archive statistics.
2 In the main window, under Archive and Restore, select a Statistics type, such
as Portal Statistics.
Figure 121 Portal Statistics Archival for Segment
3 In the Portal Selection box, select one of the following:
„„ All Portals — All Portals’ data will be archived.
„„ Selected Portal — Choose a Portal ID from the drop-down list. Data from only
that Portal will be archived.
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4 In the Statistics Selection box, select one of the following:
„„ Archive All Statistics — All statistics in the database will be archived.
„„ Archive Statistics with IDs less than — Define an ID number. Only statistics
with IDs less than the defined number will be affected.
„„ Archive Statistics older than — Select a date. Only data older than the date
selected will be archived.
5 When you have selected the appropriate options, click the Archive button and
click Yes if you wish to continue with the archive.
6 In the Windows browser, navigate to a folder or create a new one in which to
archive the file. You should create a filename that will be meaningful to your
segment (for example, all_Portals, or siteA_Portals). These files will be accessible under this location should you wish to restore them at a later date.
7 Click OK. The system will display the status of the archive activity as it proceeds.
8 Click Finish to exit Portal Statistics Archive.
Restoring Data to the Database
You can restore data that have been archived by System Administrator back into
the database. Once this is done, you will be able to view them in Configurator and
its related applications.
To Restore Data to AMS
1 From the Configurator Segment Tab, select the segment for which you wish to
archive statistics.
2 From the Applications menu on the Configurator menu bar, select System Administrator. The Systems Administrator window opens.
3 Select the Segment you wish to work with. From the left window pane, select
Restore Data. The Windows browser window opens.
4 Select the file you wish to restore to AMS, then click Open.
5 The system reports that the records will be restored to the Segment. Click
Yes to continue. The system will display the status of the archive activity as it
proceeds.
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Importing Data from a Legacy OFM Database
You can import an entirely new segment into the software from a legacy OFM
database, or you can import all or some elements of data into an existing segment and overwrite any data with the latest data in the OFM. When you import an
entire segment from an OFM database, AMS creates a segment with the segment
name of the old database.
To Import Data to AMS
1 From the Applications menu on the Configurator menu bar, select System Administrator. The System Administrator window opens.
2 From the right window pane, select OFM Database. The Windows browser
window opens.
Figure 122 OFM Database Import
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3 In the Segment Selection box, select one of the two options:
„„ Import OFM Segment — This option imports a new segment in its entirety and
automatically gives it the name of the existing Segment in the OFM Database.
„„ Use Segment — This option activates the drop-down list. Select the Segment
into which you wish to import data. It will import any new data and update any
existing records with the same ID based on the import type.
4 Select the Import OFM Users option if you want to include OFM Database existing Users and User Groups.
5 From the Import Type dropdown menu, select the type of import you wish to
perform:
„„ Import New OFM Records into the Database — This will import only new records.
„„ Merge New and Changed OFM Data into the Database — This will import all
data and add or update any records that are new since the last import.
6 Select Browse to find the OFM Database File.
7 Select Import Now. The data will begin to transfer and you will see the records
scroll through the Status window. This should take only a few minutes, depending on the size of the data being imported.
Import Data from a Standard Comma-Delimited File
You can also create a comma-delimited .txt or .csv file containing Names, Credentials and other AMS information and import the data directly to the database,
including any of the following data:
„„ Last Name
„„ First Name
„„ Middle Initial
„„ Proximity Card Credential
„„ Proximity Card Type
„„ Magnetic Stripe Card Credential
„„ Keypad Credential
In addition, you can include data for any user fields created for the segment selected for import.
AMS Importer imports files in a few easy steps:
„„ Create the data file in the appropriate program, such as Microsoft Word, Excel,
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or other text-based program and save it as a .txt or .csv format.
„„ Prepare the Wi-Q AMS Import Utility to accept the file.
„„ Import the data.
„„ Send the Data to the database.
In the Import Utility, you can view the data as it imports into the window and
make any corrections to the file or column headers until you are satisfied with the
import before you actually send it to the database.
Detailed instructions are presented in the next few sections.
To prepare Wi-Q AMS Import Utility
1 From the Applications menu on the Configurator menu bar, select System Administrator. The System Administrator window opens.
2 From the right window pane, select Wi-Q (or Omnilock) Importer. The Import
Utility opens.
Figure 123 Import Utility
3 Use the cursor to drag the column headers into any order you wish.
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4 If you wish to import additional data into user fields associated with the segment, click Show Additional Fields to display the Field Chooser and double-click
or drag to add them to the header.
5 Enter the appropriate Field Delimiter for the import file, the default is a comma.
6 If you have field headings in the first line of your data file, click the Field Heading in First Line check box.
To import the data
1 Once all column headers are in the order you wish, click Import Data.
2 Navigate to the location of the data file you created and click Open.
3 The Data appears under the appropriate column headers in the upper window.
If the file is large, you can watch the progress in the Status box on the bottom
of the window.
Figure 124 Using the Import Utility
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4 Review the data import. Scroll the window to ensure the data has imported in
the appropriate column headers. If not, you can rearrange the column headers
and import the file again. You can do this as many times as you need to ensure
you will get a good import.
5 Once you are satisfied that the data has imported as intended, click Send to
Database. The data will now appear in the appropriate fields throughout AMS.
Backing Up and Restoring Your AMS Database
Full backup and restore functions are performed outside of AMS using Microsoft
SQL Server Management Studio Express (installed with the software). You should
plan to perform this function on a regular basis. You can also use this program to
move the database to a different computer.
WARNING: This operation should be performed only by an IT professional who is
designated as an AMS User with Admin or Programmer privileges.
Backing Up the Database
Perform the following steps to back up the database.
1 Exit AMS.
2 From the Windows Start menu, select Programs>Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio Express. The connect to Server dialog box opens.
3 Enter the Server type, Server name, and choose your Authentication type.
Then, click Connect.
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4 The program opens at the default database location.
Figure 125 Default database display in SQL Server
5 Double-click on databases, then right-click on the folder and select
tasks>Backup. The backup database dialog box opens.
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Figure 126 Backup Database
6 Define a Backup Type (full or differential) and add a description of the backup
(optional).
7 The default destination displays. You can change the destination, if needed,
for example if you wish to move the database to a new location on a different
computer.
8 Click OK. The backup progresses and the system reports when the backup is
complete.
To Restore the database
1 Exit AMS.
2 From the Windows Start menu, select Programs>Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio Express. The connect to Server dialog box opens.
3 Enter the Server type, Server name, and choose your Authentication type.
Then, click Connect.
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4 The program opens at the database location.
5 Double-click on databases, then right-click on the folder and select
tasks>Restore>database. The restore database dialog box opens.
Figure 127 Restore Database
6 The location defaults to the original location. You can specify a different location, for example, if you wish to more the database to a different computer.
7 Specify the source from which to restore and select a backup set to restore.
8 Select the backup set you wish to restore from the available list.
9 Click OK. The restore progresses and the system reports when the restore is
complete.
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Firmware Updates
Firmware updates will be sent to you periodically by Stanley Technical Support.
You can upload these firmware files to your database by using the System Administrator Application, and then you can send the updates to your hardware from
the Configurator’s Firmware Tab. This section will guide you through the firmware
update process.
Firmware File Types
Every Controller has two firmware files:
„„ Application File: Software that provides the access control decision-making
functionality on a Controller
„„ Bootloader File: Software that executes the reprogramming session on the
Controller
The application file is what is typically reprogrammed by the Stanley Team, but it
is possible that the bootloader file will require reprogramming as well. Controller
firmware files will always have a “binhe” file extension.
For Portal Gateways, only one file is required for reprogramming, and the file
name begins with the version number and ends with “image.bin.gzhe.”
Uploading Firmware Files
1 In the System Administrator application, choose Firmware Manager from the
Import list on the right. The Manage Firmware Files dialog box opens.
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Figure 128 Manage Firmware Files
2 Click on the ellipsis button next to the File to upload field. Browse to your Portal
gateway or Controller file(s). Once you’ve located your file, click Open.
3 Provide a unique name and description of the firmware file. If you are uploading a Controller firmware file, it is recommended that you build either “Boot” or
“Application” into your description name, depending on the file type.
4 Click Upload. The firmware file will be added to the list at the bottom of the
screen and added to your database.
To avoid confusion between updates, it is recommended that you only keep the
latest firmware files in your list. To remove older files, select the file(s) you wish to
delete and click on Delete.
5 Click Finish once all of your files are uploaded.
You are now ready to send the updates to your hardware.
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Firmware Reprogram
Perform the following steps to send firmware updates to your hardware.
1 If not already open, launch the Configurator application and click on the Firmware tab.
Figure 129 Configurator Firmware Tab
2 Choose your device type from the dropdown menu, and choose the appropriate
firmware file.
Note If you are reprogramming both the Bootloader and Application files on a Controller,
you must update the Bootloader file first.
3 Check the boxes next to the devices that need updating. You can click Select
All or Clear All as needed.
4 Once you’ve made your selections, press Update.
5 The devices will be added to the Manage Firmware Updates queue below,
where you can view the download progress and status.
180
Transactions Monitor
Each time a user accesses the system, the software collects a transaction from
the Controller/Portal Gateway network. Once the system is signed on and users
begin accessing the system, transactions begin including any alarm activity. You
can monitor all this activity in Transactions. Access Transactions via the Windows
Start menu.
To Launch Transactions
1 Select Start>All Programs> Stanley Security Solutions >Stanley Wi-Q AMS>
Transactions.
2 Enter your Login and Password. Transactions opens at the Transactions Tab.
3 From here you can view all transaction and alarm activity for the segment you
select.
Note: If you have been assigned the Manager or Administrator User Type, you can
launch Transactions from the Applications menu in Configurator.
Transactions Overview
As activity takes place throughout the segment, AMS tracks each event as a
transaction. The most obvious use of Transactions is to recognize and investigate
when security has been compromised. You can immediately locate the source of
an alarm and take the action necessary to respond according to your segment
policy and procedure.
AMS gives each transaction in the database a unique ID, records the time and
type of transaction, the Controller where the transaction occurred and the User ID
and Group name associated with the transaction. You can monitor all this activity,
real time, from the Transactions application. The transactions can be organized
and sorted according to how you want to use the data. In addition, you can temporarily pause data updating if you need to review a transaction in more detail.
181
Transactions Tab
You can view all transactions as they occur in the Transactions Tab. Alarm transactions such as Forced Entry or Anti Tamper display in red. Access requests
“attempted but not allowed” displays in yellow. Successful access requests
display in black on a white background.
Figure 130 Transactions
System transactions such as changing an access level or clearing an alarm display in blue on a white background. To review and respond to alarms, select the
Alarms Tab.
182
Reader and Portal Controls
You can access reader and Portal controls from inside the Transactions tab. From
here you can override access levels of readers to unlock or lockout one or a whole
related group of readers. To use this feature, simply right click on the Portal or
reader and select an option.
Figure 131 Accessing Portals and Readers in the Transactions tab
183
Alarms Tab
When an alarm is triggered, such as a door is blocked open or forced entry, the
system creates an alarm record. When you select the Alarms tab, unanswered
alarms display in red and activate an alarm sound .wav file on your computers
sound system.
When you “silence” an alarm in Transactions, you are simply telling the system
that you have recognized the alarm condition. The alarm sound .wav file will stop
on your computer system for that alarm and the display color changes from red to
yellow. A log will be generated recording the time and date the alarm was silenced. You can add a comment to this log to further define the incident
Figure 132 Silencing an alarm in the Alarms tab
184
Create an Alarm Response Protocol
Remember, when you “Silence” an alarm in Wi-Q AMS Transactions, you are only silencing a .wav file; you are not resolving the problem. It is important to establish Alarm
Response protocols within your segment and follow up with action. See “Responding
to Alarms” on page 188.
Figure 133 Alarms Tab
Transaction Types
The database records transactions by category. Under normal operating conditions, the most common transaction types will be Entry and Request to Exit. The
system recognizes various alarm and status categories, such as:
„„ Alarm Cleared (All)
„„ Alarm Cleared (Forced Entry)
„„ Anti-Tamper
Organizing and Sorting Transactions
AMS makes it easy to manage high transaction traffic. You could view every
transaction in the system, real time. However, in large systems where hundreds
of transactions can occur in a very short time, you may want to limit the number of
transactions displayed, or group them in a way that makes sense for system activity. For example, you can limit the transactions list to only those that occurred in
the last ten minute timespan; you can sort ascending or descending by column
header; and you can arrange the columns in any order you wish. In addition, you
can create a hierarchy, rather than a columnar view.
Display by Timespan
185
By default, Transactions displays all transactions in the order they occur. If you
are monitoring all transactions, you may want to simply watch them as they occur.
However, in large systems, your effort may best be served by limiting transactions
to only those that have occurred in the previous ten minutes, or previous hour. The
software gives you a number of options from All to year to date.
To set the display timespan
In the Transactions Tab, select the Segment you wish to monitor.
Under Timespan, select the timespan you wish to display from the drop-down list.
The display list on the right changes to reflect your selection.
Figure 134 Transactions Timespan
186
Sort by Column Header
You can sort Transactions by column header in ascending or descending order.
This is helpful, depending on what you are looking for. If you simply want to watch
transactions in the order they occur, the default setting—sorted by ID, descending—will display the most recent transaction on the top line of the list. However,
if you have an interest in viewing all the activity of a particular user, you can sort
alphabetically by User credential. As with common database programs, you can
move the columns in the column header to any order you wish. Transactions will
remember your changes and display in the new order when you next open the
program.
View Transactions in Tree Levels
You can display transactions similar to the way you view the Segment Tree in
Configurator. This is useful to minimize and organize the amount of data you view
at one time.
Figure 135 Transactions in Tree Levels
Drag column
headers to
gray area.
In this example, we placed Readers at the top of the tree; however, you can place
them in any hierarchy you wish. When you select the plus sign next to the top
level, the second and third level items expand to display. It’s easy to create a
Transactions Tree: simply drag and drop the column headers into position.
Transaction Filters
If you want to search for a specific transaction by certain criteria (user name,
187
reader name, etc.), click on Define Additional Filter at the top of the Transactions
module. The Transaction Filter dialog box will open.
Figure 136 Transaction Filters
A list of fields is located on the left side of the dialog box. Clicking on a field will
bring up checkbox or dropdown options specific to the selected field. In Figure
141, the Access Level field is selected. Here, you can check multiple options. Once
you’ve selected your options, click Apply. The Filter section at the bottom of the
dialog box will reflect what filter you’ve applied.
You can turn on multiple filters with the use of the AND/OR selection options in
the Filter section. If you’d like to search your transactions by a specific access
level and reader name, apply both filters and select AND.
If you want to omit certain transactions from your list, you can click the Invert
checkbox once you’ve applied your filters. Inverting will adjust your list so that the
applied filters are not shown.
When finished creating filters, click Finish. If you would like to clear your filters,
click on Reset Filter.
Responding to Alarms
188
When an alarm occurs, the system immediately displays it in red in the Transactions Tab. The alarm will be categorized as either an Anti-Tamper or a Forced
Entry type. At this point, you will take action according to your segment’s security
plan. In a small segment, you may simply dispatch a person to physically investigate the source of the alarm. In larger facilities with I/O devices in the system, the
alarm may trigger a video recorder, a lighting plan, or other I/O device. In either
case, you will respond to the alarm in Transactions using the Alarms Tab.
As with the Transactions Tab, you can sort the alarms in ascending and descending order with a column, and change the order in which the columns display, and
create an Alarms Tree.
To respond to and silence an alarm
1 Select the Alarms Tab.
2 Double-click on an active alarm (displaying in red). The Silence Alarm text box
opens. Alarm details display in red text in the message area.
3 Click on Silence Alarm.
4 To add a log entry, click Add Log Entry.
5 Enter a comment in the text box.
6 When finished, click Add to Log.
7 The message entered will become the record for the alarm event.
189
Figure 137 Log Entry Recorded
8 Select Close. In the Alarms Tab, the alarm line changes from red to yellow and
the alarm sound stops.
9 You can continue to add comments in the alarm’s log until the condition is
resolved.
190
Statistics Monitor
The Statistics Monitor is a powerful tool that displays a real-time, color coded
overview of system performance. When you set up your new system, and want
to monitor ongoing system performance, you will use the Statistics Monitor.
This tool appears similar to the Configurator, displaying the Segment Tree for the
segment you select on the left of the screen, and the hardware categories on the
right. To check the performance of the entire system, select the segment at the
top of the tree. Reader statistics display at the top of the screen and Portal statistics display at the bottom.
You can access the Statistics Monitor from the Applications menu at the top of
the Configurator Main Screen or launch it from the Windows Start menu as a
separate application
Reader Statistics
Figure 138 Viewing Reader Statistics
In this example, the system is performing well, delivering transactions at an acceptable level. To display the actual measurement, hover the cursor over a bar.
To get more detail; for example, to diagnose the problem of low signal for a particular reader, you can navigate to that reader in the Segment Tree and see data for
only that reader. You can also double-click the reader on the right panel. Specific
information for the selected reader displays in the list on the right.
191
Figure 139 Display reader detail
Here, you can see the reader’s MAC Address, ID, Reader Name, and the Portal associated with it. You can also view the reader’s power performance.
Automatic Updates
The Updating button can be used to pause automatic updating to view a snap shot
of data. This is especially useful when viewing the top level, where the values may
be changing rapidly.
Configuration/Test
Under the Configuration/Test category inside a reader’s property list, you can see
the Statistics Update Interval. This value can be changed in the Readers tab of the
Configurator application. For more information on configuring readers, see Chapter 4, “Configuring Segments, Portal Gateways and Controllers”.
192
Power
To view individual reader performance:
1 Under the Power Category, place the cursor in the field next to Supply Voltage,
and select the ellipsis button.
2 The Reader Statistics chart opens at the Voltage Tab. From here you can also
check the Signal, Packet Ratio, and User Capacity.
Voltage Tab
The Voltage Tab displays battery and external power supply to ensure battery
integrity and longevity. If you see a downward trend, you should consider replacing the battery for preventive maintenance.
Figure 140 Reader Statistics Voltage Tab
Every minute, the reader sends a beacon to the Portal Gateway with signal
strength, battery voltage, external supply voltage and packet transfer ratio information. These statistics are stored at the rate defined by the Statistics Update
Interval.
Select Refresh to get the latest readings, or you can reset the timespan to various
intervals relevant to your diagnostic evaluation. You can move through the tabs as
you check the system performance.
193
Signal Tab
The Signal Tab displays the signal strength at the reader and at the reader’s Portal.
Figure 141 Reader Statistics Signal Tab
194
Packet Ratio Tab
The Packet Transfer Ratio at Reader is the number of valid packets received versus the total number of packets sent to the reader. The Packet Transfer Ratio at
Portal is the number of valid packets sent from the reader versus the total number
of packets received at the Portal. If the Packet Ratio is high (near 1, or 100%) your
readers are performing well, even though signal strength might be low. If signal
strength is high and Packet Ratio is low, you may have a problem at the reader, or
there may be interference on the channel that the Portal is using.
Figure 142 Reader Statistics Packet Radio Tab
User Capacity
This chart shows the Max allowable users for this reader and the current use. If
you find that the use is nearing capacity, you may want to consider upgrading the
reader capacity. See “Segment Item Upgrades” on page 162.
195
Figure 143 Reader Statistics User Capacity Tab
196
Portal Statistics
Portal Statistics display at the bottom of the Statistics Monitor. Select the top
level in the Segment Tree to display all Portals in the system. See Figure 143.
Clicking on a Portal within the Segment Tree in the Statistics Monitor will display
the Portal’s properties on the right.
Figure 144 Statistics Monitor Portal Properties
The Portal ID, Name, Specifications such as Firmware Version, Model Number,
PAN ID, and Serial Number display on the right. In the Statistics category, you can
see how many readers are associated with the Portal and its current maximum
reader capacity.
197
Portal Diagnostics
You can check the reader counts associated with a Portal over time for a detailed
look at Portal capacity. This is useful to determine if some readers are operating
intermittently or dropping out of range at intervals.
To review associated readers at Portals
1 In the Portal detail display, Statistics Category, place the cursor in the
Maximum number of Readers field and select the ellipsis button. The Portal
statistics chart opens for the Portal selected.
Figure 145 Portal Statistics
If the Associated Readers line appears steady and reflects the number of readers you know are associated with the Portal, your readers are consistently being
recognized by the Portal. If this line is erratic; for example, showing a drop or
fluctuation on associated readers over time, you may want to review the readers
to see if there is a problem with power supply or signal that is making one or more
of them drop out of range.
Configuration/Test
198
In the Configuration/Test category, the Statistic Update Interval is visible. You can
modify this value in the Configurator application’s Portals Tab.
Reports
You can view a wide variety of reports based on data collected in Configurator
and Transactions. You can access Reports from the Applications menu at the top
of the Configurator Main Screen or launch it as a separate application.
To Launch Wi-Q AMS Reports
1 Select Start>All Programs> Stanley Security Solutions >Stanley Wi-Q AMS>
Wi-Q Reports.
2 Enter your Login and Password. Reports opens.
Reports Overview
The software provides seven reports that you can modify:
Users of Readers — Generate a report that lists all readers and the users currently assigned to them, or you can specify a particular reader and view only the
users for that reader.
Users of Groups — Generate a report that lists all user groups and the users currently assigned to them, or you can specify a particular user group and view only
the users for that group.
Users Entry Log — Generate a report that lists user entry data for all users and all
readers, or you can specify which readers and users to list. You can also specify a
timespan or Begin and End dates on which to report.
Users Entry/Exit Log — Generate a report that lists user entry/exit data for all
users and all readers, or you can specify which readers and users to list. You can
also specify a timespan or Begin and End dates on which to report.
Alarms Log — Generate a report by alarm for all readers in all timespans, or
specify which alarms, timespans, or Begin and End dates.
199
Reader Alarms — Generates a report by reader for all alarms in all timespans, or
specify which readers, timespans, or Begin and End dates.
Transactions — Generate a report for all transactions at all readers for all users
during all timespans, or specify which transactions you wish to list.
Creating Reports
The first step in creating reports in the software is to configure report settings.
Here you can enter your company name and include a picture or logo that will be
included in any files exported or printed from the application. Once you have configured your report settings you are ready to choose a report type and generate
the report. From there you can print the report, or export the report to any number
of file formats such as .doc, .rtf, .rpt, etc.
To get started, launch Reports from the Configurator main menu.
Once you enter your login and password, the Reports main screen opens.
Figure 146 Reports
200
Configure Report Settings
You can include your company or organization name and logo with any report.
AMS supports both .bmp and .jpg image formats. Perform the following steps:
1 In the Segment box, select the Segment for which you wish to create the setting.
2 Select Options>Report Settings. The Set Company Name and Logo for Reports
dialog box opens.
Figure 147 Setting up a company name for a report
3 In the Company Name field, type in the company name you wish to appear on
your reports.
4 Under Company logo, click the Change link. Use the Select Logo browser to
navigate to the file you wish to include.
5 Click Open. The file is now uploaded to the Reports settings.
6 Click Finish to save your settings and begin working with Reports.
201
Generating a Report
This section presents steps to create some example reports. Once you are familiar with the basic operations, you will be able to create your own reports using the
selections available in Reports. First we’ll look at a Users of Readers report with
All Users selected. Then we’ll look at a filtered report using the options under the
Report Settings categories.
Note The Reports application won’t show much data until you have configured your
system added Users and User Groups, and begun collecting transactions. Once
this occurs, you can experiment with the options to get the reports that will be
most significant for your operation.
To Generate a Report
1 In the Reports main screen, under the User Reports box, click on Users of
Readers. Reports opens at the basic users of Readers Reports generator.
2 In the Segment box, select the Segment you wish to report on.
3 Available report settings are listed on the left, and the results are shown on the
right. For this particular report, the default will be <All Readers>.
Figure 148 Viewing System Reports
4 Use the scroll bars to view the data, use menu icons to export, print, scroll
through multi-paged reports, or use the Zoom tools to get a closer look.
5 If you have a large number of readers, Click the Toggle Group Tree icon and
202
highlight a specific reader to jump to its section in the report.
Figure 149 Toggle Group
Toggle group
button
6 Click Run Report (bottom left of screen) to return to the Report Generator
screen.
Generating Filtered Reports
The report generator defaults to print all records. For example, when you select
the Users of Readers report, report content displays users of all readers in the
system. You can filter the report to display the users of only one specific reader,
as in the following example.
203
To create filtered report
1 In the Reports main screen, select the Segment you wish to report on.
2 Under the User Reports box, click on Users Entry Log. The report opens (Figure
155). In this report set up, more selections are available for this report than for
the Users of Readers report, including Reader, User, and Report Timespans.
You can use any or all of these selections to filter your report. Each report type
will have different selections available depending on the data available for the
report. The defaults are always All.
Figure 150 Users of Readers Report
3 To select a specific reader for this report, click on the Reader field’s ellipsis
button. The Select Reader dialog box opens.
4 Clear the All Readers box just below the drop-down list box.
5 Select the reader to filter from the drop-down list.
6 Click Finish. The report results will display data for only the reader you selected.
204
Generating Larger Reports
The more records you include in your report, the longer the report will take to generate. During report generation, you can use other AMS applications; however,
you can generate only one report at a time in the Reports application. If you define
a report that will take more than 30 minutes to generate based on the records
included, the software will present the following message:
In the example, AMS detected that the defined report contains over 30,000 records and will take more than 30 minutes to generate. If this is acceptable, simply
select Yes and the report will be generated. Select No if this is an inconvenient
time to generate the report, or review your report definitions to see if you can further filter the report and still get the information you need. When you select Yes,
the report begins to generate and AMS displays the Elapsed Time as the report
runs.
Printing and Exporting Reports
Once you are satisfied with your report, you can print to a local or networked
printer, or export the report in several formats. Your results will be determined
by the options you select and how you wish to use the data. For example if you
export to a Microsoft Excel file, you may get a different formatting result than if
you export to an Adobe Acrobat file or print directly from AMS. However, you may
wish to export to an Excel file and use the data in another format. The following
example was printed from an Adobe Acrobat .pdf file exported from Reports. It
retains all the formatting as displayed in Reports.
205
Figure 151 Sample report file
To print a report
1 Create the report using the features described in the previous sections.
2 Click the Printer icon in the menu bar.
3 Navigate to the printer you wish to use.
4 Print using the appropriate actions for the chosen printer.
206
To export a report
1 Create the report using the features described in the previous sections.
2 In the menu bar, click the Export Report option.
3 In the Export Report dialog box, select a format type from the drop-down list.
The available types are:
„„ Crystal Reports (*.rpt)
„„ Adobe Acrobat (*.pdf)
„„ Microsoft Excel (*.xls)
„„ Microsoft Excel Data Only (*.xls)
„„ Microsoft Word (*.doc)
„„ Rich Test Format (*.rtf)
4 Navigate to the location you wish to export to.
5 Enter a filename for the file.
6 Click Save.
Now you can use the report in any manner you wish, depending on the format
exported.
207
7 Advanced Troubleshooting
This section provides an overview on the Portal Gateway status webpage. You
can access the status webpage for a specific Portal Gateway in one of two ways:
„„ Inside the Portal Configuration Module, select Scan. Locate the desired Portal
in the list and click on its hyperlink. See Figure 43 on page 68.
„„ Type your desired Portal’s IP address directly into your internet browser.
Your browser will display the status of your Portal Gateway and associated devices. See Figure 157.
208
Figure 157 Portal Gateway Status Webpage
1
2
3
Status Page Generated
03/06/2012-16:18:39
Last System Boot
03/05/2012-17:02:45
Portal MAC 0014f5201731
Radio 1 at channel 20 PAN_id 6401
Radio 4 at channel 15 PAN_id 6402
Associated Devices 15 Maximum allowed 64
MAC ADDRESS Stat Associate Time
Beacon
01 0014f5404e9e 0000 03/05/12-17:04:10 16:18:26
02 0014f5403854 0000 03/05/12-11:41:38 16:18:30
03 0014f54010d9 0000 03/05/12-17:04:19 16:17:07
04 0014f5401241 0000 03/05/12-17:04:19 16:18:10
05 0014f5201abc 0000 03/06/12-11:26:31 16:17:56
06 0014f540127e 0000 03/05/12-17:04:24 16:18:08
07 0014f5404ee1 0000 03/05/12-17:04:27 16:17:39
08 0014f52001d0 0000 03/05/12-17:04:38 16:18:15
09 0014f54012c1 0000 03/05/12-17:04:44 16:18:27
10 0014f5400003 0000 03/05/12-17:04:48 16:17:40
11 0014f5400002 0000 03/05/12-17:04:53 16:18:32
12 0014f54010ca 0002 03/06/12-11:28:04 16:16:46
13 0014f520173d 0000 03/05/12-18:11:32 16:18:29
14 0014f5401301 0000 03/05/12-17:05:09 16:17:31
15 0014f540126d 0000 03/05/12-17:05:26 16:18:31
4
5
6
%
none
none
none
none
none
none
none
none
none
none
none
45
none
none
none
F/W
Rev
003.000.038
003.000.038
003.000.038
003.000.038
003.000.038
003.000.038
003.000.038
003.000.038
003.000.038
003.000.038
003.000.038
003.000.038
003.000.038
003.000.038
003.000.038
7
8
R PG_RSS RDR_RSS - FLAGS
PEND
1
-28
-19 - 000300043 -|--------|1
-28
-19 - 000300043 -|--------|4
-19
-19 - 000300043 -|--------|4
-19
-27 - 000300043 -|--------|1
-28
-28 - 000300043 -|--------|1
-23
-28 - 000300043 -|--------|1
-28
-19 - 000300043 -|--------|1
-22
-26 - 000300043 -|--------|4
-49
-26 - 000300043 -|--------|1
-27
-38 - 000300043 -|--------|1
-28
-28 - 000300043 -|--------|S
1
-28
-19 - 000300043 U|S-------|1
-19
-36 - 000300043 -|--------|1
-28
-19 - 000300043 -|--------|1
-29
-25 - 000300043 -|--------|-
9
10
11
12
13
The Portal Gateway Status webpage provides the following information:
1 Last System Boot
Last time Portal Gateway was reset or rebooted.
2 Radio and Channel
Shows the channel associated with each radio in the Portal.
3 Associated Devices List
Shows which devices are associated with the Portal.
4 MAC Address
Column shows the MAC Address of each associated device.
5 Associate Time
Column shows the time that the Controller last associated with the Portal.
6 Beacon
Column shows the time of the last Controller beacon.
7 %
Column shows progress percentage of pending operations.
209
8 F/W Rev
Column shows the firmware version number of associated Controller.
9 R
Column shows which radio the Controller is connecting to in the Portal Gateway. Radio 1 is on the right side of the Portal. Radio 4 is on the left side of the
Portal.
10 PG_RSS
Column shows the signal strength of the Controller as received at the Portal.
This signal strength ranges from -18 (highest) to -91 (lowest).
11 RDR_RSS
Column shows the signal strength of the Portal as received at the Controller.
This signal strength ranges from -18 (highest) to -91 (lowest).
12 FLAGS
Column shows the current operational status of the associated device.
13 PEND
Column shows the abbreviation of the message currently in
operation.
210
Status Flags in the FLAGS Column
The following is a list of the bits in the FLAGS column and their corresponding
Portal Gateway status flags and definitions (Figure 157, item 12).
Note The typical Wi-Q and Omnilock device status code is 00030043. This is the example
used in the chart below.
Bit
Right
END
3
4
0
0
3
Left
END
Portal Gateway Status Flag
Definition
Bit 0
CONTROLLER_IS_ASSOCIATED
Set when the Controller is first associated with
the Portal.
Bit 1
CONTROLLER_IS_VALID
Set during association, after the Portal
receives a beacon from the Controller.
Bit 2
CONTROLLER_CONFIG_REQUIRED
Set during association, cleared by Portal
Communication Service after Controller
configuration.
Bit 3
CONTROLLER_ASSOC_PENDING_LIF
Set during association to indicate that Portal
requires LIF (Lock Information Frame) data.
Bit 4
CONTROLLER_BEGIN_TRANSMISSION
Set when Portal first transmits data to the
Controller.
Bit 5
CONTROLLER_DEEP_RESET_PENDING
Portal must disassociate Controller when it
receives the next beacon.
Bit 6
CONTROLLER_VALID_INTERVALS
Set when Controller interval assignment has
been received from the PC Communication
Service.
Bit 7
NOT USED
Bit 8
CONTROLLER_RETRY_LIMIT_
EXCEEDED
Bit 9
NOT USED
Bit 10
NOT USED
Bit 11
NOT USED
Bit 12
NOT USED
Bit 13
CONTROLLER_PREFERRED_PG_
ENABLED
Set when Controller is locked to the Portal.
Bit 14
CONTROLLER_FIRMWARE_PENDING_
DN
Set when the firmware commit has been sent
to indicate that the disassociation is pending.
Bit 15
CONTROLLER_FIRMWARE_PENDING
Set when firmware update is scheduled for
the Controller, cleared when firmware commit
is sent.
Bit 16
CONTROLLER_REPORT_TIME
_UPDATED
Set during association and when report time
is updated
Bit 17
CONTROLLER_LIF_IS_VALID
Set when a LIF beacon is received
Bit 18-31
NOT USED
Set when the retry limit on any command has
been hit; used to limit downloads to firmware
only.
211
Update Flags in the PEND Column
Figure 158 is a section of the Associated Devices listed in Figure 157. Notice that items
11 and 12 have letters U and S in the PEND column. These letters are update flags,
and they stand for controller information that is being updated. The placement of the
update flags within the column denotes update status.
Figure 158 PEND Column Codes
Associated Devices 15 Maximum allowed 64
MAC ADDRESS Stat Associate Time
Beacon
01 0014f5404e9e 0000 03/05/12-17:04:10 16:18:26
11
12
13
14
15
0014f5400002
0014f54010ca
0014f520173d
0014f5401301
0014f540126d
0000
0002
0000
0000
0000
03/05/12-17:04:53
03/06/12-11:28:04
03/05/12-18:11:32
03/05/12-17:05:09
03/05/12-17:05:26
16:18:32
16:16:46
16:18:29
16:17:31
16:18:31
%
F/W
Rev R PG_RSS RDR_RSS - FLAGS
PEND
none 003.000.038 1
-28
-19 - 000300043 -|--------|none
45
none
none
none
003.000.038
003.000.038
003.000.038
003.000.038
003.000.038
1
1
1
1
1
-28
-28
-19
-28
-29
-28
-19
-36
-19
-25
-
000300043
000300043
000300043
000300043
000300043
-|--------|S
U|S-------|-|--------|-|--------|-|--------|-
The following is a list of the Update Flags that may be visible in PEND column.
S
C
L
U
T
I
F
P
212
Segment (PIN length, DST times)
Card Formats
Controller configuration (beacon time, channels, transaction masks, etc.)
Users
TImezone Intervals
WAC I/O
Firmware
Ping (missing LIF data after association or update)
Figure 159 shows the significance of update flag placement between the dividing
lines in each entry of the PEND column.
Figure 159 Update Flag Placement in PEND Column
Left
Center
Right
Currently
downloading
Pending
updates
Download complete
pending LIF verification
–|– – – – – – – –|–
Item 11 in Figure 158 shows that the Controller’s Segment download is complete
pending LIF verification.
Item 12 in Figure 158 shows that the Controller’s Users are currently downloading,
with 45% complete, and the Controller’s segment update is pending.
Note Only one update flag will be positioned at the left or right, but it is possible for
more than one flag at a time to be in the center of an entry in the PEND column.
213
A Glossary
10Base-T
The most common Ethernet wiring standard.
access level
An access control relationship made between a
controller or controllers and a time zone or time
zones. An access level is assigned to a badge
ID for the purpose of granting access through a
controller or controllers during a specified time.
access panel A circuit board with on-board memory that is
responsible for making most of the decisions in an
access control system.
activation/deactivation date
The date that a credential becomes active or
expires.
antipassback
A configuration limiting the ability of consecutive
uses for a credential at a reader. Usually,
configured with readers installed on both the
secure and non-secure side of an opening. Once
a credential has been used in a reader to gain
access on one side of the opening, the credential
cannot be used in the same reader until the
credential is used to gain access to a reader from
214
the opposite side of the opening.
APB exempt
Antipassback exempt. The cardholder with this
privilege is exempt from antipassback rules.
badge
The credential or token that carries a cardholder’s
data.
badge ID
card format
Part of the access control information that is
encoded to a token. This information, usually
numerical, is unique to a particular credential
holder.
The way that data is arranged and ordered on the
card.
cardholder
An individual who is issued a particular credential.
chassis type
The designation that defines the physical lock
type. Three types exist: cylindrical, mortise, or exit
hardware. See those terms for more information.
common door A configuration setting that allows for the
allocation of duplicate badge ID ranges in separate
offline locks.
communication port The connector on the bottom of a Lock that allows
the lock to be connected to a reader.
communication server
The server application designed to provide
network services to access panels, controllers,
PCs and PDAs.
credential
A physical token, usually a card or fob, encoded
with access control information.
cylindrical
Lock chassis that installs into a circular bore in the
door.
deadbolt override The ability for an authorized credential to retract
both the spring latch and the deadbolt when the
deadbolt is engaged
directional antenna
An antenna type optimized to focus signal from
point-to-point over longer distances and through
obstacles.
215
dual access
The requirement for the presentation of two
separate, authorized credentials in order to gain
entry through an access controlled opening.
ethernet
The most common networking standard in the
world, formally known as IEEE 802.3.
exit hardware
extended unlock
Lock chassis type that supports exit hardware trim
lock.
The extra period of time the lock will unlock when
an authorized credential with extended unlock
privileges is presented.
guest
A feature that enables you to add and delete
cardholders to and from a lock without having to
go out to a lock to reprogram it.
Host
The computer on which Wi-Q AMS software is
installed and set up to manage Portal Gateways
and readers on the network.
IP address
The numeric address (like 192.168.1.1) that
identifies each device in a TCP/IP network.
input
A hardware connection point used for status
reporting of a particular sensor.
intelligent system controller (ISC)
See access panel.
I/O device
A device, such as an alarm or parking gate that can
be configured to operate on the network using a
Wireless Access Controller.
issue code
Part of the access control information contained
on a credential that allows reuse of the badge
ID when a credential is lost, damaged, or stolen.
Usually one or two digits in length, this code
increments forward when creating a new
credential. Access is granted only when the badge
ID and the issue code match the current database
information.
MAC address
216
The Media Access Control number (MAC).
A unique, 12-digit number assigned by the
manufacturer of a network device.
mortise
A lock chassis that installs into a mortised cavity
in the edge of a door.
omni-directional antenna
An antenna type optimized to provide signal
coverage in all directions.
packet
A discrete chunk of data, being transferred on a
TCP/IP or other addressable network.
passage mode
The ability to double present an authorized
credential within the strike time to unlock an
opening. The lock is returned to its original status
by a second, double presentation of an authorized
credential.
portal gateway
The Portal Gateway is a wireless device
connected to the Host computer through a secure
connection to transfer data signals from Wireless
Controller locks to and from the Host computer.
request to exit
A sensor usually installed on the non-secure side
of the door that will mask the door position switch
upon activation.
segment code
Part of the access control information that can be
encoded to a credential. This information, usually
numerical, is unique to a group of credentials.
Usually this feature is used to authenticate a
credential to a particular organization.
sign-on key
Number generated within AMS to establish the
connection between the readers and the Portals,
and ultimately to a segment in the software.
site survey kit
The Wi-Q Technology Site Survey Kit tool used
to determine optimum Portal Gateway location to
verify signal strength before permanently installing
the hardware.
time interval
A specific range of time, which corresponds to a
particular day or days of the week. A time zone can
be comprised of several, individual intervals.
217
A defined range of time for assignment to various
access control activities. A time zone may be
applied to a reader or readers when creating an
access level, to a reader to change the mode of
operation, to a relay to activate and deactivate, to
an input to mask and unmask, and a host of other
operations.
time zone
unlock duration
use limit
A configuration limiting a credential to a defined
number of uses.
Web Interface
The software program that allows setup and
communication between the Portal Gateway and
the Host Computer.
Wi-Q Technology
Wireless Access Controller
218
The time that the lock momentarily unlocks.
Provides efficient, online access control decisions
at the door.
Wireless Access Controller provides additional
capability to connect stand-alone controllers and
locks.
wireless reader lock
The wireless reader lock controls user access at
the door and grants user requests according to
how they are configured in the software.
219
B Lock installation
220
Installation Instructions for
Wi-Q™ Technology 9KQ Cylindrical Locks
Planning the installation
Contents
Components checklist
These installation instructions describe how to install your
93KQ Cylindrical Lock. Topics covered include:
Use the following checklist to make sure that you have the
items necessary to install your Electronic Wireless Cylindrical Lock.
Planning the installation ............................................... 1
Preparing the door and door jamb .............................. 2
Installing the lock ........................................................... 7
Completing the installation ........................................13
Patents
Products covered by one or more of the following patents:
5,590,555 5,794,472 5,083,122 6,720,861
Site survey
Use the following survey to record information about the
installation site. You need this information to determine
how to prepare the door for the lock.
Door information
Door handing and bevel:
❑ Left hand (LH)
❑ Left hand, reverse bevel (LHRB)
❑ Right hand (RH)
❑ Right hand, reverse bevel (RHRB)
inches (1 3/4″ to 2 1/4″ )
Door thickness:
Environment information
Ambient temperature:
❑ Is within specifications. See the tables below.
This product meets the following Locked Door Outdoor
test requirements for ANSI/BHMA 156.25:
Side of door
Range
Outside
–31°F to +151°F (–35°C
to +66°C)
This product meets the following Full Indoor test requirements for ANSI/BHMA 156.25:
Side of door
Range
Inside and out+32°F to +120°F (0°C to +49°C)
side
Components provided in the box:
❑ Chassis with outside lever and outside rose liner
assembly
❑ Top and bottom inside covers
❑ Fire plate
❑ Battery holder with batteries
❑ Inside rose liner
❑ Outside escutcheon assembly
❑ Inside lever
❑ Throw member package
❑ Latch
❑ Hub washers
❑ Trim hole insert package
❑ Plastic bushing package
❑ Escutcheon screw package
❑ Door status switch assembly
❑ Strike package
❑ Bar code ID sticker (for your records)
❑ Installation template and instructions
Other components:
❑ Core and control key
❑ Temporary operator card
Special tools checklist
Use the following checklist to make sure that you have the
special tools necessary to install your Electronic Wireless
Cylindrical Lock.
❑ KD303 Drill jig
❑ T20 TORX® bit driver
❑ KD325 Strike plate locating pin
❑ KD315 Faceplate marking chisel
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
1
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q™ Technology 9KQ Cylindrical Locks
Preparing the door and door jamb
1
Installation template
Position template and mark drill points
Note: If the door is a fabricated hollow metal door,
determine whether it is properly reinforced to support
the lock. If door reinforcement is not adequate, consult
the door manufacturer for information on proper reinforcement. For dimensions for preparing metal doors,
see the Q01 and G02 Templates—Installation Specifications for 93KQ Cylindrical Locks.
Note: If the door is a LH or RH door, mark the inside of
the door. If the door is a LHRB or RHRB door, mark the
outside of the door.
For uncut doors and frames
Centerline of lock
1 Measure and mark the horizontal centerline of the
lever (the centerline for the chassis hole) on the door
and door jamb. Mark the vertical centerline of the door
edge.
Note: The recommended height from the floor to the
centerline of the crossbore or chassis hole is 38”.
2 Fold the Q05 Template—Installation Template for
93KQ Cylindrical Locks on the dashed line and carefully
place it in position on the high side of the door bevel.
Figure 1
Positioning the template
Note: For steel frame applications, align the template’s
horizontal centerline for the latch with the horizontal
centerline of the frame’s strike preparation.
3 Tape the template to the door.
4 Center punch the necessary drill points. Refer to the
instructions on the template.
For doors with standard cylindrical preparation
1 Fold the Q05 Template—Installation Template for
93KQ Cylindrical Locks on the dashed line. Looking
through the hole from the opposite side of the door,
align the template so that you see the template
outline of the 2 1/8″ diameter chassis hole.
2 Tape the template to the door.
3 Center punch the necessary drill points. Refer to the
instructions on the template.
2
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q™ Technology 9KQ Cylindrical Locks
Preparing the door and door jamb
2
Drill holes and mortise for latch face
1 Drill the holes listed below:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
upper and lower trim holes
◆ 5/8″ diameter
◆ through door
harness hole
◆ 3/4″ diameter
◆ through door
motor wire hole
◆ 7/16″ diameter
◆ through door
◆ before drilling chassis hole
chassis hole
◆ 2 1/8″ diameter
◆ through door
◆ after drilling motor wire hole
latch hole
◆ 1″ diameter
◆ meets chassis hole
door status switch hole
◆ 1″ diameter
◆ meets harness hole
anti-rotational hole, see “Use drill jig to drill
through-bolt holes” on page 5.
◆ 5/16” diameter
◆ through door
Harness
hole
Door
status
switch hole
Upper trim hole
Anti-rotational
hole
Latch hole
Chassis hole
Motor wire hole
Anti-rotational
hole
Lower trim hole
Latch face
mortise
Inside of door
Figure 2
Drilling holes and mortising for the latch face
Note 1: To locate the center of a hole on the opposite
side of the door, drill a pilot hole completely through
the door.
Note 2: For holes through the door, it is best to drill
halfway from each side of the door to prevent the door
from splintering.
2 Mortise the edge of the door to fit the latch face.
3 Drill the holes for the screws used to install the latch.
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
3
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q™ Technology 9KQ Cylindrical Locks
Preparing the door and door jamb
3
Install latch
1 Install the latch in the door.
Note: The latch tube prongs should be centered and
should project into the chassis hole.
2 Check that the door swings freely.
4
Chassis hole
Install door status switch and magnet
1 On the door jamb, mark the drill point for the
1″ diameter magnet hole. This hole should be directly
opposite the door status switch reader harness hole
when the door is closed.
Location of latch
tube prongs
Latch
2 Drill a 1″ diameter hole for the magnet, at least 1 3/4″
deep.
3 Insert the magnet in the hole.
Inside of door
Figure 3
Installing the latch in the door
4 Insert the door status switch assembly into the door
status switch hole in the edge of the door, feeding the
connectors out the harness hole to the inside of the
door, as shown in Figure 4.
Harness hole
Magnet
Door
status
switch
Door jamb
Figure 4
4
Inside of door
Installing the door status switch and magnet
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q™ Technology 9KQ Cylindrical Locks
Preparing the door and door jamb
5
Use drill jig to drill through-bolt holes
1 Press the drill jig (KD303) onto the door, engaging it
with the latch tube prongs (see the close-up in
Figure 5). Make sure the front edge of the jig is parallel
with the door edge.
2 Drill the through-bolt holes (5/16″ diameter) halfway
into the door.
Drill upper through-bolt
hole.
3 Turn over the drill jig and repeat steps 1 and 2 from the
opposite side of the door.
Note: Replace the drill jig after 10 door preparations.
Latch
tube
prongs
Drill lower through-bolt hole.
Inside of door
Figure 5
Installing the drill jig and drilling the
through-bolt holes
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
5
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q™ Technology 9KQ Cylindrical Locks
Preparing the door and door jamb
6
Install strike box and strike plate
1 In alignment with the center of the latchbolt, mortise
the door jamb to fit the strike box and strike plate.
2 Drill the holes for the screws used to install the strike
box and strike plate.
Strike box
Strike plate
3 Insert the strike box and secure the strike with the two
screws provided.
4 Check the position of the deadlocking plunger against
the strike plate.
Caution: The deadlocking plunger of the latchbolt
must make contact with the strike plate, as shown
in Figure 6b. The plunger deadlocks the latchbolt
and helps prevents someone from forcing the
latch open when the door is closed.
Door jamb
Figure 6a Installing the strike box and strike plate
Deadlocking
plunger
Strike plate
Door jamb
Figure 6b Aligning the deadlocking plunger with the
strike plate
6
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q™ Technology 9KQ Cylindrical Locks
Installing the lock
7
Remove outside lever or knob
1 Insert the control key into the core and rotate the key
15 degrees to the right.
2 Insert a flat blade screwdriver into the figure-8 core
hole and into the lever.
3 Press the screwdriver blade in the direction of the
arrow in Figure 7.
Note: You cannot remove the lever if the screwdriver
blade is inserted too far past the keeper.
4 Slide the lever or knob off of the sleeve.
Lever keeper
Insert screwdriver
blade here.
Figure-8
core hole
Figure 7
Removing the outside lever
Caution: Be careful that you do not disconnect the
lever keeper spring.
8
Adjust for door thickness
1 Determine the door’s thickness.
2 Pull the rose locking pin and rotate the outside rose
liner until the proper groove on the through-bolt stud
lines up with the hub face.
2 1/4″ groove
2″
1 3/4″
Hub face
Motor wire
Outside
rose liner
Figure 8
Throughbolt stud
Rose locking pin
Adjusting the rose liner for the door
thickness
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
7
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q™ Technology 9KQ Cylindrical Locks
Installing the lock
9
Retractor
Latch tube
prong
Latch
tailpiece
From the outside of the door, insert the lock chassis
into the 2 1/8″ chassis hole, routing the motor wire
through the notch.
Caution: Make sure that the latch tube prongs
engage the chassis frame and that the latch
tailpiece engages the retractor.
Latch tube
prong
Chassis frame
Notch
Install lock chassis and engage
retractor in latch
Chassis
Inside of door
Figure 9
Installing the lock chassis and engaging the
retractor in the latch
10
Install the trim hole insert, bushing,
and hub washer on outside of door
1 On the outside of the door, insert the trim hole insert
into the upper trim hole, as shown in Figure 10.
Trim hole insert
Bushing
2 Insert the bushing into the harness hole.
3 Slide a hub washer over the chassis sleeve so it rests on
the hub.
Hub
Hub washer
Outside of door
Figure 10 Installing the outside trim hole insert,
bushing, and hub washer
8
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q™ Technology 9KQ Cylindrical Locks
Installing the lock
11
Install fire plate
Position the fire plate on the inside of the door so that the
chassis fits through the square opening in the fire plate, as
shown in Figure 11.
Fire plate
Inside of door
Figure 11 Installing the fire plate
12
Install through-bolts and
inside rose liner
1 Place the inside rose liner on the chassis, aligning the
holes in the rose liner with the holes prepared in the
door, as shown in Figure 12.
Caution: Make sure that the motor wire is pulled
toward the top of the fire plate and avoid routing
it over any surface that could damage the
sleeving or wire insulation.
Motor wire
RQE
connector
Rose liner
with RQE
2 Install the through-bolts through the rose liner and
door in the top and bottom holes.
Through-bolt
Caution: Make sure that there is clearance for the
motor wire between the rose liner and the door.
3 Tighten the rose liner to the door and fire plate with
the through-bolts.
Inside of door
4 Install the hub washer over the rose liner.
Hub
washer
Figure 12 Installing the through-bolts and rose liner
(9K shown)
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
9
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q™ Technology 9KQ Cylindrical Locks
Installing the lock
13
RQE connector
Harness hole
Battery connector
Motor connector
Door status
connector
Antenna wire
RQE connector
Outside escutcheon
Route wire harness and position
outside escutcheon
1 From the outside of the door, feed the motor
connector, battery connector, door status switch, and
antenna wire, through the harness hole.
Caution: When routing the connectors, make sure
the wire harness is not routed across any sharp
edges or over any surface that could damage its
sleeving or wire insulation.
2 On the inside of the door, insert the two countersunk
mounting screws into the holes at the top and bottom
of the fire plate.
3 Tighten the mounting screws until the fire plate is
securely mounted to the door.
Outside of door
Figure 13 Feeding the wire harness connectors through
the harness hole
14
Route wires on fire plate
1 Route the motor connector wire, RQE connector, and
door status connector underneath the side tabs as
shown in Figure 14.
Antenna wire
2 Route the battery connector and antenna wire above
the side tabs. See Figure 15 for additional detail.
Battery connector
Door
status
connector
Side tabs
Door status
connector
RQE connector
Motor connector
Inside of door
Figure 14 Routing the wires on the fire plate
10
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q™ Technology 9KQ Cylindrical Locks
Installing the lock
15
Connect motor wires, RQE, and
door status switch
1 From the inside of the door, make the following
connections:
◆
◆
◆
Battery
connector
Antenna wire
Motor
RQE
Door status switch
Wire connection Color
Motor
RQE
Door status
Yellow-Gray
Orange-Brown
White
No. of
wires
2
2
2
No. of
pins
2
3
2
2 Insert the plastic wire tie through the mounting clip
and secure the wires as shown in Figure 15. See Figure
15 for additional detail.
Caution: When making the motor connection,
make sure:
◆ there are no loose wire connections where the
wires are inserted into the connectors
◆ the connectors are firmly mated.
Route wire
harness on
the left side
of the fire
plate.
Mounting
clip and
wire tie
Dress wires so
that wire connectors are mated
here. Use electric
tape to affix them
as needed.
Figure 15 Routing the wires (view of the inside
escutcheon)
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
11
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q™ Technology 9KQ Cylindrical Locks
Installing the lock
16
Install bottom cover
(inside escutcheon)
1 Making sure that the cover does not pinch the
wires, guide the bottom cover over the chassis onto
the fire plate.
2 Use two cover screws to secure the cover to the side of
the fire plate, as shown in Figure 16.
Bottom
cover
Cover
screws
Note: Phillips Type 2 and T20 Torx options are available
for the cover mounting screws.
Caution: Dress all wires away from possible pinch
points before putting the bottom cover in place.
Inside of door
Figure 16 Installing the bottom cover
Battery holder
17
Antenna
1 Position the battery wires against the fire plate
side wall, as shown in Figure 17.
Battery wires
Fire plate side
tabs
Battery holding
tabs
Install battery holder
2 Slide the battery holder behind the fire plate side tabs
until it rests on the bent battery holding tabs.
Caution: When routing the battery wires, make
sure the wires are not routed across any sharp
edges or over any surface that could damage their
sleeving or wire insulation.
3 Connect the battery holder to the battery connector
on the wire harness.
Inside of door
Caution: When connecting the battery holder,
make sure:
◆ there are no loose wire connections where the
wires are inserted into the connectors.
◆ the connectors are firmly mated.
Figure 17 Installing the battery holder, eight-cell
12
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q™ Technology 9KQ Cylindrical Locks
Completing the installation
18
Install inside and outside levers
Note: To use a core and throw member from a manufacturer other than BEST with a Electronic Stand-alone
Lock, see the Installation Instructions for 9K Non-interchangeable Cores & Throw Members (T56093) and
skip task 19.
■
With the handle pointing toward the door hinges,
position a lever on the outside sleeve and push firmly
on the lever until it is seated. Repeat, placing the other
lever on the inside sleeve.
19
Install core and throw member
Outside of door
1 Install the blocking plate onto the throw member.
Figure 18 Installing the levers
Caution: You must use the blocking plate to
prevent unauthorized access.
For 6-pin core users only: Install the plastic spacer
(not shown, supplied with permanent cores) instead of
the blocking plate, on the throw member.
Core
2 Insert the control key into the core and rotate the key
15 degrees to the right.
Blocking
plate
3 Insert the throw member into the core.
Throw
member
4 Insert the core and throw member into the lever with
the control key.
5 Rotate the control key 15 degrees to the left and
withdraw the key.
Caution: The control key can be used to remove
cores and to access doors. Provide adequate
security for the control key.
Figure 19a Installing the blocking plate and throw
member
Throw
member
Core
Control
key
Figure 19b Installing the core
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
13
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q™ Technology 9KQ Cylindrical Locks
Completing the installation
20
Antenna wire
Top cover
Install top cover
(inside escutcheon)
1 Connect the antenna to its mating connector.
2 Place the top cover against the door and above the fire
plate. Slide the top cover down toward the bottom
cover as shown in Figure 20b.
Caution: As you slide the top cover onto the fire
plate, feed the antenna wire down into the
bottom cover. Be sure not to pinch the antenna
wire on the bottom cover as you slide the top
cover into place.
3 Use two cover screws to secure the cover to the side of
the fire plate, as shown in Figure 20b.
Figure 20a Inside view of top cover
Note: Phillips Type 2 and T20 Torx options are available
for the cover mounting screws.
Cover screws
Top cover
Antenna wire
Inside of door
Figure 20b Installing the top cover
14
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q™ Technology 9KQ Cylindrical Locks
Completing the installation
21
Test lock
For 9KQ Locks with keypad:
To test the lock for proper operation before the lock is programmed, follow these instructions:
1 Press 1234.
2 Press #.
The green light flashes and the locking mechanism
unlocks.
3 Turn the lever and open the door.
For all other locks:
To test the lock for proper operation before the lock is programmed, use the temporary operator card that came
with the lock. This card is for temporary use only. After
permanent cards have been programmed for the lock, the
temporary card should be deleted.
If the mechanism doesn’t unlock, refer to the following table. For additional troubleshooting instructions,
see the Service Manual.
LEDs
Sounder
You should
Single
red flash
—
Use the card at a moderate
speed.
Red
flashes
3 short
tones
Use the temporary operator
card provided with the lock.
Green
flashes
—
Check the motor connection.
—
—
Check the battery connection.
1 Use the temporary operator card to activate the lock.
Note: If the lock has a proximity card reader, it may
have already been activated by the presence of an
object near the card reader.
2 Use the temporary operator card to access the lock.
3 The green light flashes and the locking mechanism
unlocks.
4 Turn the lever or knob and open the door.
5 With the door closed, insert and turn the key to
unlatch the door.
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
15
© 2008–09 Stanley Security Solutions, Inc
T82619/Rev B 3109013 ER-7991-12 Oct 2009
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for
Wi-Q™ Technology 45HQ Mortise Locks
Contents
These installation instructions describe how to install your
45HQ Mortise Lock. Topics covered include:
J
Preparing the door ........................................................ 1
Configuring and installing the mortise case .............. 3
Installing the trim .......................................................... 4
Completing the installation.......................................... 9
J
Patents
Products covered by one or more of the following patents:
6,720,861
1
Identify holes to drill
1 Determine the lock function to be installed.
Caution: Determine the inside and outside, hand, and
bevel of the door.
2 See the Holes by Function table and Figure 1 to
determine the holes to be drilled for the lock function.
A
B
B
C
For hole sizes, see the
Q06 Template
(T82606).
F
Functions
Holes by Function
Holes to drill
A Forged trim
(2 holes)†
B Harness†
DV
TV
I/S O/S
Through
door
Through
door
I/S O/S
Through
door
Through
door
C Standard cylinder
D Sensor & motor wire
(2 holes)
F Thumb turn
G Trim mounting
(2 holes)‡
H Lever††
J Door sensing channel
(2 holes)
†
‡
G
D
■
Figure 1
■
Through
door
Through
door
DO NOT
DRILL
H
■
■
■
G
A
D
Identifying holes to drill
Through
door
Through
door
See Figure
1
Determine trim holes based on trim type.
Because these holes pass through the mortise pocket,
it is recommended that each hole be drilled separately
rather than straight through.
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc
1
J
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q™ Technology 45HQ Mortise Locks
Preparing the door
2
Door edge
template
Installation
template
Centerline
Centerline
Align templates
Note: If the door is a fabricated hollow metal door,
determine whether it is properly reinforced to support
the lock. If door reinforcement is not adequate, consult
the door manufacturer for information on proper
reinforcement. For dimensions for preparing metal
doors, see the Q03 Template—Installation
Specifications for 45HQ Mortise Locks (T82603).
1 Separate the four templates provided on the Q06
Template—Installation Template for 45HQ Mortise
Locks (T82606).
Figure 2
Aligning the templates
2 Position one of the door edge templates on the door,
making sure that the lock case mortise shown on the
template aligns with the mortise pocket prepared in
the door.
3 Using the centerlines on the door edge template as a
guide, position the appropriate door template on each
side of the door. You need to take the bevel into
account. Tape the templates to the door.
3
Door
status
switch
Shield
1 Center punch the necessary drill points. See the
instructions on the template.
2 Drill the holes.
Note 1: To locate the center of a hole on the opposite
side of the door, drill a pilot hole completely through
the door.
Note 2: For holes through the door, it is best to drill
halfway from each side of the door to prevent the door
from splintering.
4
Figure 3
2
Installing the door status switch
Center punch and drill holes
Install door status switch
(optional for deadbolt TV function locks
only)
1 Position the shield on the door status switch with the
notch facing downwards (towards the mortise
pocket).
Caution: Make sure the wires are not routed across any
sharp edges or over any surface that could damage its
sleeving.
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q™ Technology 45HQ Mortise Locks
Configuring & installing the mortise case
2 Feed the wires for the door status switch into the door
status switch hole and through the channel into the
mortise cavity and out through one of the sensor and
motor wire holes.
3 Press fit the door status switch assembly into the door
status switch hole.
5
Rotate latchbolt (if necessary)
Latch access point
Note: If a function specific mortise case was ordered,
some steps for configuring the case have already been
performed at the factory.
1 Determine whether you need to rotate the latchbolt to
match the handing of the door.
Note: The angled surface of the latchbolt must contact
the strike when the door closes.
2 If you need to rotate the latchbolt, insert a flat blade
screwdriver into the latch access point approximately
1/2″ into the case and press to extend the latch out of
the case. See Figure 4.
3 Rotate the latchbolt 190 degrees (slightly past 180
degrees) and allow it to retract into the case.
6
Figure 4
Rotating the latchbolt
Position hub toggles (if necessary)
1 Check whether the hub toggles are in the proper
position for the lock. See the table below and Figure 5.
Hub toggle positions
Function
Hub toggle positions
DV, TV
Inside down (always unlocked) &
outside up (lockable)
Note: For LH & LHRB doors, the inside is the back side
of the case and the outside is the cover side of the
case.
For RH & RHRB doors, the inside is the cover side of the
case and the outside is the back side of the case. The
cover is mounted to the case with four screws.
2 To change the position of a hub toggle, remove the
toggle screw, move the toggle into the desired
position, and re-tighten the screw.
Hub toggle
Figure 5
Hub toggle
Positioning hub toggles
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc
3
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q™ Technology 45HQ Mortise Locks
Installing the trim
7
Mortise cavity
1 Drill the holes for the case mounting screws.
2 Insert the mortise case into the mortise cavity, while
feeding the sensor and motor wires into the mortise
cavity and out the two sensor & motor wire holes to
the inside of the door as shown in Figure 6.
Note: The armored front of the mortise case selfadjusts to the door bevel.
3 Secure the mortise case with the case mounting
screws.
Mortise case
Case
mounting
screws
8
Sensor & motor
wire holes
Figure 6
Install mortise case
Sensor wires
and motor
wires
Installing the mortise case (inside of door)
Install trim mounting plates
1 Insert the outside trim mounting plate through the
door and mortise case.
2 Position the inside trim mounting plate opposite the
outside trim mounting plate and screw them securely
in place.
Caution: Do not overtighten the trim mounting plate
screws. Overtightening may damage the locking
mechanism.
3 By temporarily installing a lever, test the lock to make
sure that it doesn’t bind.
Outside
mounting
plate
Inside
mounting
plate
Figure 7
4
Installing the trim mounting plates
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q™ Technology 45HQ Mortise Locks
Installing the trim
9
Install concealed cylinder & core
1 Use a cylinder wrench to thread the cylinder into the
mortise case so that the groove around the cylinder is
even with the door surface as shown in Figure 8.
Caution: A malfunction can occur if the cylinder is
threaded in too far.
2 Secure the cylinder in the mortise case with the
cylinder retainer screw.
3 Insert the control key into the core and rotate the key
15 degrees to the right.
4 With the control key in the core, insert the core into
the cylinder.
5 Rotate the control key 15 degrees to the left and
withdraw the key.
Caution: The control key can be used to remove cores
and to access doors. Provide adequate security for the
control key.
10
Install trim hole insert and bushing
Cylinder
retainer
screw
Figure 8
Installing the concealed cylinder
1 Insert the trim hole insert into the upper trim hole on
the outside of the door, as shown in Figure 9.
2 Insert the bushing into the harness hole on the outside
of the door, as shown in Figure 9.
Trim hole insert
Bushing
Outside of door
Figure 9
Installing the trim hole insert and bushing
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc
5
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q™ Technology 45HQ Mortise Locks
Installing the trim
11
Harness
hole
Sensor
connectors
Battery
connector
Motor
connector
Antenna
Outside
escutcheon
Outside of door
Figure 10 Feeding the wire harness connectors through
the harness hole
Antenna
wire
Mounting
screws
Route wire harnesses and position
outside escutcheon
1 From the outside of the door, feed the motor
connector, battery connector, and sensor connectors
through the harness hole.
Caution: When routing the connectors, make sure the
harnesses are not routed across any sharp edges or over
any surface that could damage their sleeving or wire
insulation.
2 Perform these steps:
a Firmly press the outside escutcheon in position on
the door. The core should be flush with the outer
surface of the escutcheon.
b If necessary, adjust the cylinder depth plus or
minus one turn so that the core is flush with the
outer surface of the escutcheon.
c Secure the cylinder in the mortise case with the
cylinder clamp screw.
3 Rest the outside escutcheon on the door by inserting
the trim studs into the trim holes.
12
Install fire plate
1 From the inside of the door, feed the wiring through
the fire plate harness hole.
2 Position the fire plate on the door so that the inside
mounting plate fits through the square opening in the
fire plate.
3 Insert the two counter sunk mounting screws into the
holes at the top and bottom of the fire plate.
4 Tighten the mounting screws until the fire plate is
securely mounted to the door.
Inside of door
Figure 11 Installing the fire plate
6
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q™ Technology 45HQ Mortise Locks
Installing the trim
13
Connect wire harnesses
1 From the inside of the door, make the following
connections:
Antenna wire
No. of No. of
wires pins
Wire connection
Colors
Motor
Yellow-gray
2
2
Key override sensor
Gray
2
3
Deadbolt sensor
Blue
2
3
RQE
Orange-brown
2
3
Door sensing
White
2
2
Latchbolt sensing
Purple
2
2
2 Insert the plastic wire tie through the mounting clip
and secure the wires as shown in Figure 12.
Note: It is physically possible to connect the key
override sensor connector from the mortise case to the
battery connector from the wire harness. To avoid this
mistake, connect only the connectors with matching
wire colors.
Caution: When making the motor connection and
sensor connections, make sure:
◆ there are no loose wire connections where the
wires are inserted into the connectors
◆ the connectors are firmly mated
Route wire
harness on
the left side
of the fire
plate.
Mounting
clip and
wire tie
Dress wires so
that wire
connectors are
mated here.
Use electric
tape to affix
them as
needed.
Figure 12 Routing the wires
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc
7
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q™ Technology 45HQ Mortise Locks
Installing the trim
14
Antenna wire
Battery wires
Thumb turn
(optional)
Cover
screws
Install bottom cover
(inside escutcheon)
1 Position the battery wires above the side tabs and
against the side of the fire plate, as shown in
Figure 13.
2 Optional for Thumb Turn option only: Make sure
that the Thumb Turn is in the upright position, as
shown in Figure 13.
3 Making sure that the cover does not pinch the
wires, guide the bottom cover over the chassis onto
the fire plate.
Note: Phillips Type 2 and T20 Torx options are available
for the cover mounting screws.
Bottom
cover
Inside of door
Figure 13 Installing the bottom cover
8
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q™ Technology 45HQ Mortise Locks
Completing the installation
15
Battery wires
Install battery holder
1 Position the battery wires against the fire plate
side wall, as shown in Figure 14.
2 Slide the battery holder behind the fire plate side tabs
until it rests on the bent battery holding tabs.
Caution: When routing the battery wires, make sure the
wires are not routed across any sharp edges or over any
surface that could damage their sleeving or wire
insulation.
3 Connect the battery pack to the battery connector on
the wire harness.
Caution: When connecting the battery pack, make sure:
◆ there are no loose wire connections where the
wires are inserted into the connectors.
◆ the connectors are firmly mated.
16
Battery wires
Battery holder
Antenna
wire
Battery holding
tabs
Install inside and outside levers
1 Unscrew the inside spindle one full turn to allow the
spindles to turn freely.
2 With the handle pointing toward the door hinges,
insert the outside lever and spindles assembly into the
lock from the outside of the door.
3 Slide the inside lever onto the inside spindle and
secure it with the set screw.
4 Making sure that the core is positioned properly in the
outside escutcheon (DV and TV function Locks only)
and the escutcheons are aligned properly on the door,
tighten the escutcheon mounting screws.
Note: If a core is not available, you can use the cylinder
wrench to help you align the core opening in the
escutcheon.
5 Turn the levers to check that they operate smoothly.
Inside of door
Figure 14 Installing the battery holder
Location
of set
screw
Outside of door
Inside of door
Spindles
Figure 15 Installing the levers
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc
9
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q™ Technology 45HQ Mortise Locks
Completing the installation
17
Antenna wire
Top cover
Figure 16 Inside view of top cover
1 Connect the antenna to its mating connector.
2 Place the top cover against the door and above the fire
plate. Slide the top cover down toward the bottom
cover as shown in Figure 17.
Caution: As you slide the top cover onto the fire plate,
feed the antenna wire down into the bottom cover. Be
sure not to pinch the antenna wire on the bottom cover
as you slide the top cover into place.
3 Use two cover screws to secure the cover to the side of
the fire plate, as shown in Figure 17.
Note: Phillips Type 2 and T20 Torx options are available
for the cover mounting screws.
18
Cover screws
Wireless cover
Install top cover
(inside escutcheon)
Install mortise case faceplate
1 Secure the mortise case faceplate to the mortise case
with the faceplate mounting screws.
2 Check the lock for proper operation.
Antenna wire
Mortise
case
faceplate
Faceplate
mounting
screws
Inside of door
Figure 17 Installing the top cover
10
Outside of door
Figure 18 Installing the mortise case faceplate
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q™ Technology 45HQ Mortise Locks
Completing the installation
19
Install strike box and strike plate
1 Insert the strike box into the mortise in the door jamb.
Place the strike plate over the strike box and secure the
strike with the screws provided.
2 Check the position of the auxiliary bolt against the
strike plate.
Caution: The auxiliary bolt must make contact with the
strike plate. The auxiliary bolt deadlocks the latchbolt
and prevents someone from forcing the latch open
when the door is closed. If the incorrect strike is
installed, a lock-in can occur.
Note: The recommended gap between the door and
jamb is 1/8″ .
Make sure to
position the
magnet at
the top.
Strike
box with
magnet
Strike
plate
Door jamb
Figure 19a Installing the strike box and strike plate
Strike plate
Auxiliary bolt
Figure 19b Positioning the strike
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc
11
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q™ Technology 45HQ Mortise Locks
Testing the lock
20
Test lock
For 45HQ Locks with keypad
To test the lock for proper operation before the lock is
programmed, follow these instructions:
1 Press 1234.
2 Press #.
The green light flashes and the locking mechanism
unlocks.
3 Turn the lever and open the door.
For all other locks:
To test the lock for proper operation before the lock is
programmed, use the temporary operator card that came
with the lock. This card is for temporary use only. After
permanent cards have been programmed for the lock, the
temporary card should be deleted.
1 Use the temporary operator card to activate the lock.
Note: If the lock has a proximity card reader, it may
have already been activated by the presence of an
object near the card reader.
2 Use the temporary operator card to access the lock.
The green light flashes and the locking mechanism
unlocks.
3 Turn the lever and open the door.
If the mechanism doesn’t unlock, refer to the following
table. For additional troubleshooting instructions, see the
Service Manual.
LEDs
Sounder
You should
Single
red flash
—
Use the card at a moderate speed.
Red
flashes
3 short
tones
Use the temporary operator card
provided with the lock.
Green
flashes
—
Check the motor connection.
—
—
Check the battery connection.
For all locks
1 Insert and turn the key to unlatch the door.
For all TV function locks
2 From the inside of the door, turn the turn knob and
make sure that the deadbolt operates properly.
©2008–2009 Stanley Security Solutions, Inc
T82623/Rev C 3108931 ER-7991-12 Oct 2009
12
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc
Installation Instructions for
Wi-Q Technology™ EXQ
Exit Hardware Trim
Introduction
Contents
These installation instructions describe how to install your
BEST® Wi-Q Technology™ EXQ Series Exit Hardware Trim.
Electronic Stand-Alone Exit Hardware Trim is available for
use with the following types of wide stile exit devices:
Precision® brand manufactured by Stanley (2000 Series),
Von Duprin® (98/99 Series), and Sargent® (8800 Series).
Not all features are available for all exit device configurations. The table below details what sensors are available
for which exit device configurations:
These instructions cover the following topics:
n
Device
Precision
Rim (2100)
Surface Vertical (2200)
Mortise (2300)
Wood Door Concealed (2700)
Concealed Vertical (2800)
Von Duprind
Rim
Surface Vertical
Concealed Vertical
Sargente
Rimf
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
DSa TSb
LSc
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Planning the installation................................................ 1
Preparing the door.......................................................... 3
Installing the exit hardware and trim ........................... 7
Completing the installation ......................................... 16
Site survey
Use the following survey to record information about the
installation site and hardware application.
Exit hardware type:
❑ rim
❑ surface vertical rod
❑ mortise
❑ concealed vertical rod
Door handing and bevel:
❑ Left-hand reverse bevel (LHRB)
❑ Right-hand reverse bevel (RHRB)
Door type:
❑ Wood
❑ Metal
Door thickness:
inches (1-3/4″ to 2-1/4″ )
Components checklist
Use the following checklist to make sure that you have the
items necessary to install your EXQ Exit Hardware Trim.
■
■
❑ Escutcheon and
lever assembly
■
Door position sensing
Request-to-exit (PHI touchbar monitoring)
Latch sensing
Von Duprin is a registered trademark of Von Duprin, Inc.
Sargent is a registered trademark of Sargent Mfg. Co.
Latch must have lift-type trim input (8863)
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
1
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q Technology™ EXQ Exit Hardware Trim
❑ Battery bracket
❑ 7-pin core (only
included if ordered
with trim)
ST
BE
❑ Cylinder mounting
sleeve (for Von
Duprin functions
only)
❑ Door position
switch with
magnet
❑ Temporary
operator card
Tempora
ry
Operator
❑ Battery cover with
antenna
❑ Key cylinder and
keys (only included
if ordered with
trim).
OR
Rim cylinder
Tools required
❑ Battery pack
Use the following checklist to make sure that you have the
tools necessary to install your EXQ Exit Hardware Trim.
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑ Battery cover screw
package
❑ Bar code ID sticker
(for your records)
❑ Cable ties, buttsplices, and tape
❑ Installation
templates and
instructions
Installation Instructions
Wi-Q Technology™
Exit Hardware Trim EXQ
Introduction
for
These installation instructions
Site survey
describe
BEST® Wi-Q Technology™
to install your
Use the following survey
EXQ Series Exit how
Electronic Stand-Alone
Hardware Trim.
to record information about
installation site and hardware
Exit Hardware Trim
use with the following types
the
available for
application.
of wide stile exitisdevices
Exit hardware type:
manufactured by
Stanley-Precision
Series) and Von Duprin®
Hardware (2000
rim
surface vertical
Not all features are available(98/99 Series):
mortise
concealed verticalrod
for all
tions. The table below
Door handing and bevel:
rod
details what exit device configurafor which exit device
Left-hand reverse bevel (LHRB)
configurations: sensors are available
Right-hand reverse bevel
(RHRB)
Device
Door type:
DS a TS b LS c
Precision
Wood
Metal
Door thickness:
Rim (2100)
inches (1-3/4″ to 2-1/4″ )
Surface Vertical (2200)
Components checklist
Mortise (2300)
Use the following checklist
to make sure that you have
items necessary to install
Wood Door Concealed (2700)
your EXQ Exit Hardware Trim. the
Concealed Vertical (2800)
Escutcheon
Von Duprin
lever assemblyand
Rim
Surface Vertical
Concealed Vertical
n
a. Door position sensing
b. Request-to-exit (PHI
touchbar monitoring)
c. Latch sensing
Contents
These instructions cover the
following topics:
Planning the
................................................
Preparing the installation
1
..........................................................
Installing the exitdoor
4
hardware and trim............................
Completing the installation..................
........................15 8
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley
Security Solutions, Inc.
Battery bracket
1
Electric drill (preferably corded)
Jigsaw
Wire snips
Wire strippers
Phillips screwdriver
Measuring tape
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
Straight edge
Square
Pencil/marker
7/16” dia drill bit
7/8” dia drill bit
1” dia hole saw
For Precision® Hardware and Sargent installations
❑ 1-3/8” dia hole saw (EV function only)
❑ 1-1/8” dia hole saw
For Von Duprin® installations
❑ 2” dia hole saw
❑ 3/4” dia hole saw
For BEST® cylinders
❑ BEST ED211 cylinder wrench
For surface vertical exit devices
❑ Razor blade
2
Mortise cylinder
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q Technology™ EXQ Exit Hardware Trim
Preparing the door
1
Mark centerlines
Note 1: If retrofitting to an existing exit hardware installation, skip this task. Instead, remove the exit hardware
from the door.
Vertical
centerline
Note 2: If the door is a fabricated hollow metal door,
determine whether it is properly reinforced to support the
lock. If door reinforcement is not adequate, consult the
door manufacturer for information on proper reinforcement.
1 Prepare the push side of the door according to the exit
device manufacturer’s installation instructions.
Note: The tape-on template supplied with the EXQ trim
will supersede the exit device template in the trim area.
2 Transfer horizontal and vertical centerlines to the outside of the door face.
Note: When measuring from the edge of the door, take
into account the door bevel (if any).
2
n
Precision
Straight
edge
Figure 1
Marking centerlines on outside door face
Determine required door prep
1 Determine which template is applicable (Q08 for Precision and Sargent, Q07 for Von Duprin) and discard the
other one.
2 Based on the kind of exit device you have, use the table
below to locate the appropriate door preparation.
3 On the template, circle the holes needed for your installation and cross out those that are not applicable.
Von Duprin
Horizontal
centerline
Device
Rim (2100)
Surface Vertical (2200)
Mortise (2300)
Wood Door Concealed (2700)
Concealed Vertical (2800)
Rim (with RQE)
Rim (without RQE)
Surface Vertical
Concealed Vertical
Sargent Rim
Note: Follow the Precision 2300
door preparation for Sargent,
ignoring any steps directly pertaining to the mortise lock or
key cylinder.
Figure
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 4
Figure 3
Figure 3
Figure 5
Figure 7
Figure 7
Figure 7
Figure 6
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
3
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q Technology™ EXQ Exit Hardware Trim
Preparing the door
Hole Description
A
B
C
D
E
G
A
Battery bracket hole
7/16″ diameter, thru
door
B
Battery bracket/harness hole
7/8″ diameter, thru door
C
Sensor harness rout- 7/16″ diameter, thru
ing hole
door
D
Door sensing switch
mounting hole and
channel
1” diameter hole,
drilled 1-3/4” deep, then
7/16” channel to intersect
door sensing wire routing
hole.
E
Escutcheon mounting holes
7/16″ diameter, thru
door
F
Door sensing switch 1” diameter hole,
magnet hole (in door drilled 1-3/4” deep
frame or opposing
(NOT SHOWN).
door leaf)
G
Cylinder hole
Precision: 1-3/8″ diameter, thru door (for
2300, only into mortise
cavity)
Von Duprin: 2″ diameter
thru door
H
Lift finger slot
Precision/Sargent:
1-1/8″ diameter slot, thru
door
Von Duprin: 3/4″ diameter slot, thru door
H
E
Outside of LHRB door
Figure 2
Outside of RHRB door
Outside door prep for use with
Precision exit hardware, 2100 Series
A
B
E
G
D
C
H
E
Outside of LHRB door
Figure 3
4
Instructions
Outside of RHRB door
Outside door prep for use with
Precision exit hardware, 2200, 2700,
and 2800 Series
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q Technology™ EXQ Exit Hardware Trim
Preparing the door
A
B
D
A
B
D
E
G
E
mortise
cavity
H
H
E
E
Outside of LHRB door
Figure 4
Outside of RHRB door
Outside door prep for use with
Precision exit hardware, 2300 Series
Outside of LHRB door
Figure 6
Outside door prep for use with
Sargent 8863 exit hardware
A
B
D
A
B
E
E
G
G
C
D
H
E
Outside of LHRB door
Figure 5
Outside of RHRB door
H
E
Outside of RHRB door
Outside door prep for use with
Von Duprin exit hardware, Rim with RQE only
Outside of LHRB door
Figure 7
Outside of RHRB door
Outside door prep for use with
Von Duprin exit hardware. Use for all Von
Duprin vertical rods and rim without RQE
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
5
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q Technology™ EXQ Exit Hardware Trim
Preparing the door
3
Vertical centerline
of lock
Trim template
1 For new installations
a Cut the applicable template along the dashed lines.
b Align the horizontal and vertical centerlines
marked on the template with the centerlines
marked on the OUTSIDE of the door (from step 1).
See Figure 8.
For retrofit installations
Align the mounting holes for the escutcheon and
lock stile case shown on the template with the
mounting holes already present in the door.
Note: The outside escutcheon is mounted using the
four lock stile case mounting holes (‘A’ holes); these
holes must be 7/16″ in diameter and drilled completely through the door.
Horizontal centerline
of lock
Outside of door
Figure 8
Positioning the trim template,
Q08 LHRB shown
Position trim template and mark drill
points
2 Tape the template to the OUTSIDE of the door in the
properly aligned position.
3 Center punch the necessary drill points. Refer to the
instructions on the template and the figures of the
previous step.
4
Mortise for mortise case and faceplate
(mortise exit devices only)
Note: If retrofitting the EXQ Exit Hardware Trim to an
existing exit hardware installation, skip this task.
Mortise the edge of the door for the mortise case and
faceplate; follow the instructions provided by the exit
hardware manufacturer.
6
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q Technology™ EXQ Exit Hardware Trim
Installing the exit hardware and trim
5
Drill holes
Door sensing
switch
Caution: Double-check for the correct lock function, hand, and bevel before drilling.
1 Drill the trim holes that are required for your application; follow the instructions on the trim template and
refer to the figures in step 2.
Note 1: To locate the center of a hole on the opposite
side of the door, drill a small pilot hole through the door.
Note 2: For holes through a wood door, drill halfway
from each side of the door to keep the door from splintering.
6
Install mortise case
(mortise exit devices only)
Install the mortise case in the door; follow the instructions provided by the exit hardware manufacturer.
7
Install door sensing switch
Wire routing
hole
Door sensing
magnet
Door sensing
harness
Route
the door
sensing
harness
to the
inside.
See Q07 and
Q08 templates
for other door
sensing wire
routing.
Inside Door
1 Clip off the purple wires and connector and remove.
2 Clip off the connector from the white door sensing
harness (with black sleeving) and leave as much wire
as possible. See Figure 9. These wires will be buttspliced to the sensing harness from the trim. See
“Route sensor wires” on page 14.
3 Route the door sensing switch wires through the channel and out through the wire routing hole to the exit
device side. See Figure 9.
4 Press-fit the door sensing switch into the 1” diameter
hole in the door.
5 Mark and drill 1” diameter hole in the frame, aligned
with the door position switch (for the magnet).
Note: For double-door applications, this hole will be into
the edge of the opposing door leaf (not the frame).
Clip both
connectors
off here
Figure 9
Frame
Installing the door sensing switch and magnet,
Precision 2100 shown
6 Press-fit the door sensing magnet into the 1” diameter
hole in the frame.
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
7
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q Technology™ EXQ Exit Hardware Trim
Installing the exit hardware and trim
Antenna
cable
Antenna
cable
Primary
harness
Primary
harness
8
Re-route sensor harness (if applicable)
Looking at the back of the trim, compare it to the pictures
in Figure 10. If your trim does not match the proper picture, then follow the applicable steps below to re-route
the sensor harness.
Sensor
harness
Sensor
harness
Antenna
cable
PHI Rim
(2100)
PHI Vertical
(2200/2700/2800)
Antenna
cable
Primary
harness
Primary
harness
Sensor
harness
Sensor
harness
PHI Mortise (2300)
& Sargent (8800)
Von Duprin
Rim (LHRB)
Antenna
cable
Antenna
cable
Primary
harness
Primary
harness
Sensor
harness
Sensor
harness
Von Duprin
Rim (RHRB)
Von Duprin
Verticals
Figure 10 Variations of EXQ Trim rear view
8
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q Technology™ EXQ Exit Hardware Trim
Installing the exit hardware and trim
1 Carefully peel the black gasket off of the back of the
trim. Set it aside to be re-applied later.
2 Remove the backplate from the trim by removing the
four screws that attach it.
3 While the gasket and backplate are removed, change
the handing of the trim if necessary.
Do so by removing the four threaded guide pins and
retaining ring as shown in Figure 11, pulling out and
flipping the lever 180 degrees, and then reassembling.
Guide pins
Lever
Retaining
ring
For Precision 2100 devices
4 Re-route the sensor harness out through the alternate
wire-routing hole as shown in Figure 12.
5 Reattach the backplate ensuring that the springs are
properly seated and wires are not pinched.
6 Reapply the gasket.
Yoke finger
Figure 11 Changing the hand of the trim (if needed)
Backplate
Route
sensor
harness
here
Sensor
harness
Figure 12 Re-routing the sensor harness for Precision
2100 exit devices
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
9
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q Technology™ EXQ Exit Hardware Trim
Installing the exit hardware and trim
For Precision 2200, 2700 and 2800 devices
4 Re-route the sensor harness around the cylinder hole
and around the escutcheon boss, then out through the
alternate wire-routing hole as shown in Figure 13.
5 Reattach the backplate ensuring that the springs are
properly seated and wires are not pinched.
6 Reapply the gasket.
Backplate
Sensor
harness
For Precision 2300 and Sargent 8800 devices
4 Re-route the sensor harness toward the top of the
escutcheon to the same area as the battery cable,
antenna cable and relay shunts. See Figure 14.
5 Reattach the backplate ensuring that the springs are
properly seated and wires are not pinched.
6 Reapply the gasket.
Route
sensor
harness
here
Figure 13 Re-routing the sensor harness for Precision
2200, 2700 and 2800 exit devices
Route
sensor
harness
here
For Von Duprin Rim devices with RQE
4 Re-route the sensor harness around the cylinder hole
and around the escutcheon boss, then out through
one of the alternate wire-routing holes (based on
handing) as shown in Figure 15.
5 Reattach the backplate ensuring that the springs are
properly seated and wires are not pinched.
6 Reapply the gasket.
Backplate
Backplate
Sensor
harness
Sensor
harness
Route
sensor
harness
here for
LHRB
Figure 14 Re-routing the sensor harness for Precision 2300
and Sargent 8800 exit devices
10
Route
sensor
harness
here for
RHRB
Figure 15 Re-routing the sensor harness for Von Duprin
with RQE
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q Technology™ EXQ Exit Hardware Trim
Installing the exit hardware and trim
For Von Duprin vertical rod devices and rim without
RQE
4 Re-route the sensor harness as shown in Figure 16.
5 Reattach the backplate ensuring that the springs are
properly seated and wires are not pinched.
6 Reapply the gasket.
9
Route
sensor
harness
here
Backplate
Install cylinder (Von Duprin only)
Sensor
harness
1 To determine the correct spindle length, try the cylinder in the door while holding the escutcheon and lock
stile case in place.
Then break off the spindle at the groove where it will
engage correctly with the latching mechanism.
If necessary break off the mounting screws as shown in
Figure 17.
2 From the front of the escutcheon, insert the cylinder
into the cylinder opening.
3 Holding the cylinder in position in the escutcheon,
insert the cylinder mounting sleeve through the back
of the escutcheon, over the cylinder.
4 Orient the cylinder and clamp plate as shown in
Figure 17. From the back of the escutcheon, secure the
cylinder and mounting sleeve using the clamp plate
and mounting screws.
Figure 16 Re-routing the sensor harness for Von Duprin
vertical rod and rim without RQE exit devices
Spindle
Clamp
plate
Screws
Rim
cylinder
Break off the
screws here.
Mounting
sleeve
Orient the
curve toward
the cylinder.
Escutcheon
Figure 17 Installing the cylinder for Von Duprin
rim and rod exit devices
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
11
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q Technology™ EXQ Exit Hardware Trim
Installing the exit hardware and trim
Relay shunt
(Future use)
Battery
connector
Antenna
wire
Sensor harness
Battery
bracket/
harness hole
Door sensing
switch and
wires
Escutcheon
10
1 From the outside of the door, feed the antenna wire
and battery connector (with relay shunt) through the
battery bracket/harness hole as shown in Figure 18.
Caution 1: When routing the connectors, make
sure the harnesses are not routed across any
sharp edges or over any surface that could
damage their sleeving or wire insulation.
Caution 2: Do not strain the wire harness either by
pulling too hard on it or by dangling the
escutcheon from it.
2 Route the sensor harness through the door (same hole
as the door sensing wires).
3 Rest the escutcheon on the door by inserting the trim
studs into the mounting holes.
11
Outside of door
Figure 18 Feeding the wires through the door
Route wire harnesses and position
escutcheon
Install cylinder (Precision devices)
For rim and vertical rod exit device installations (rim
cylinder)
1 To determine the correct spindle length, try the cylinder in the door while holding the escutcheon and lock
stile case in place.
Then break off the spindle at the groove where it will
engage correctly with the latching mechanism.
Break off the mounting screws at the groove where
they will secure the clamp plate to the cylinder.
2 Insert the cylinder through the cylinder opening in the
escutcheon and into the door as shown in Figure 19.
3 Orient the cylinder and clamp plate as shown in
Figure 20. From the inside of the door, secure the cylinder using the clamp plate and mounting screws.
Rim
cylinder
Escutcheon
Outside of door
Figure 19 Installing the cylinder
12
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q Technology™ EXQ Exit Hardware Trim
Installing the exit hardware and trim
For mortise exit device installations
(mortise cylinder)
1 For doors less than 2″ in thickness, place the cylinder ring provided on the cylinder.
2 Rotate the cylinder cam to the 12 o’clock position, as
shown in Figure 21.
3 Using a cylinder wrench (ED211), insert the cylinder
through the cylinder opening in the escutcheon and
screw the cylinder into the mortise case. Make sure
that the figure-8 hole is in the 12 o’clock position.
Caution: Do not screw the cylinder in too tightly.
Doing so may cause users to be locked out.
12
Screws
Clamp plate
Spindle
Orient the curve
toward the cylinder.
Rim
cylinder
Figure 20 Rim cylinder components
View of the back
of the cylinder
Install exit hardware and
secure escutcheon
Cam in 12 o’clock
position
For Precision 2200, 2700 and 2800 exit devices only
■
Drill a 5/16” hole through the front part of the chassis
as shown in Figure 22. (This hole is used to pass the
sensor harness and door position switch wires into the
chassis area.)
Mortise cylinder
Figure 21 Mortise cylinder components
For all exit devices
1 Make any adjustments to the exit hardware necessary
for compatibility with lever function outside trim.
2 Install the exit hardware (lock stile case, touch bar
assembly, latches and rods [if applicable], and related
hardware); follow the instructions provided by the exit
hardware manufacturer.
Note: The escutcheon is secured on the outside of the
door by the screws used to mount the lock stile case on
the inside of the door.
Drill 5/16”
hole thru the
face of the
chassis here.
Caution: When securing the escutcheon, make
sure that it does not pinch any wires.
Drill ONLY
for 2200,
2700 and
2800 devices
Figure 22 Drilling 5/16” hole for Precision 2200, 2700,
and 2800 exit devices only
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
13
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q Technology™ EXQ Exit Hardware Trim
Installing the exit hardware and trim
13
Wire entry from
trim for rim
(2100) device
Use the following table to determine sensing wire
functions:
Wire entry from
trim for vertical
rod (2200, 2700,
2800) device
Pull sensor
wires to top of
device head
(shaded area)
EXQ Trim
NO
Violet
Blue
COM
Blue
Latchbolt
switch
NC
Red
Sensor
harness
NO = Normally Open
NC = Normally Closed
COM = Common
Wht
Wht
Wht
Wht
Org
NC
Org
Tan
COM
Tan
Butt
splices
Not used
Door
position
switch
Touchbar
switch
NO
Yellow
Colors
Touchbar monitoring (RQE)
Orange and tan
2
Door sensing
White
2
Latchbolt sensing
Red and blue
2
Note: For Von Duprin applications with RQE, touchbar
switch wires must be re-routed into the device head in
such a way as to avoid any pinching or contact with
moving parts. The sensor harness can be routed into the
head area through any suitable hole in the chassis.
2 Cut the wires to the appropriate length (that is,
remove the excess to leave minimal slack after the
spliced connections).
3 Strip the wire ends for connection using the buttsplices.
4 Make wire connections as detailed in Figure 24 or Figure 25 using the butt-splices (provided).
Note: For Sargent devices, connect the door position
switch to the two white sensor harness wires.
Note: In the case of unused wires, be sure to cover the
ends with electrical tape.
Not used
Figure 24 Schematic diagram for connecting Precision
sensor harness wires
14
No. of
wires
Wire function
1 Pull wires from the sensor harness, door position
switch, latchbolt switch, and touchbar switch to the
top of the device head as shown in Figure 23.
Note: For Precision 2300, Sargent 8800, or any Von
Duprin application without RQE, pull the door position
switch and sensor harness wires into the battery bracket
area rather than the device head.
Figure 23 Pulling sensor harnesses to the top of the
device head
Red
Route sensor wires
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q Technology™ EXQ Exit Hardware Trim
Installing the exit hardware and trim
5 Make sure to route and dress the wires so that they do
not interfere with any moving parts.
6 Tape the wires to the device head (some tape is provided).
Note: For Precision 2200, 2700, and 2800 exit devices,
use cable ties in addition to the tape, to hold wires as
shown in Figure 26.
NO = Normally Open
NC = Normally Closed
COM = Common
EXQ Trim
Butt
splices
Org
NC
Blue
Tan
COM
Red
Touchbar
switch
NO
Yellow
7 Install the case cover.
Sensor
harness
Wht
Wht
Wht
Wht
Red
Blue
Not used
Door
position
switch
}
Not used
Figure 25 Schematic diagram for connecting Von Duprin
sensor harness wires
TOP
Sensor harness coming
thru the 5/16”
hole
described in
Figure 17
Use cable tie
here to secure
the sensor
harness
Cable tie
Figure 26 Using cable ties to hold wires for Precision
2200, 2700, and 2800 exit devices
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
15
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q Technology™ EXQ Exit Hardware Trim
Installing the exit hardware and trim
14
Install core
1 Insert the control key into the core and rotate the key
15 degrees to the right.
2 With the control key in the core, insert the core into
the cylinder as shown in Figure 27.
3 Rotate the control key 15 degrees to the left and withdraw the key.
Caution: The control key can be used to remove
cores and to access doors. Provide adequate security for the control key.
Cylinder
Core
Control key
15
Outside of door
Install mortise case faceplate
(mortise exit devices only)
1 Secure the mortise case faceplate to the mortise case;
follow the instructions provided by the exit hardware
manufacturer.
2 Check the lock for proper operation.
Figure 27 Installing the core
16
Install strike(s)
Note: If retrofitting the trim to an existing exit hardware
installation, skip this task.
1 Install the strike(s) in the door frame or door stop; follow the instructions provided by the exit hardware
manufacturer.
2 Check the lock for proper alignment between the
strike(s) and latch(es).
16
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q Technology™ EXQ Exit Hardware Trim
Completing the installation
17
Install battery bracket on door
Battery
connector
1 Position the battery bracket on the inside of the door
as shown in Figure 28.
Note: If installing with a surface rod exit device, the battery bracket is mounted over the upper rod.
Battery
bracket
Mounting
screws
2 Secure the battery bracket to the door using two of the
mounting screws provided.
Note: For doors less than 2″ in thickness, use the
1 1/4″ screws. For doors 2″ or greater, use the
1 3/4″ screws.
Caution: When routing the wire harness, make
sure the wires are not routed across any sharp
edges or over any surface that could damage their
sleeving or wire insulation. Keep away from any
moving parts.
3 Tape all wires to the bracket using the tape provided.
Note: For Precision 2300, Sargent 8800, or any Von
Duprin exit device without RQE, sensor harness and door
position switch wires will also be run into this area of the
battery bracket.
Antenna
wire
Relay shunt
wires
Inside of door
Figure 28 Installing the battery bracket on the door
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
17
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q Technology™ EXQ Exit Hardware Trim
Completing the installation
18
Battery pack
Battery bracket
Antenna wire
Relay shunt
wires
Inside of door
Figure 29 Connecting the battery pack
Install battery pack in bracket
1 Connect the battery pack to the battery connector on
the wire harness as shown in Figure 29.
Caution: When connecting the battery pack,
make sure:
— there are no loose wire connections where the
wires are inserted into the connectors
— the connectors are firmly mated.
2 Place the battery pack in the holder inside the battery
bracket and dress the wire harness inside the bracket.
Caution: The battery pack fit will be snug. Make
sure you do not damage the sleeving on the battery pack. Doing so may cause the batteries to
drain.
3 If installing with a surface vertical rod device,
dress the wire harness inside the bracket to the left of
the rod so that the harness will not interfere with the
movement of the rods.
We recommend that you loosely coil the harness and
use a cable tie to secure the coil. To avoid damaging
the harness, do not put any sharp bends in it or flex it
close to the connectors.
Caution: Failure to dress the wire harness away
from the rod could damage the wire harness,
causing the lock’s electronics to not work properly.
18
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q Technology™ EXQ Exit Hardware Trim
Completing the installation
19
Battery bracket
Install battery/antenna cover
1 If installing with a surface vertical rod exit device,
carefully use a razor blade to remove the knockouts for
the rod from the battery cover. See Figure 30.
2 Connect the antenna to its mating connector.
3 Coil the antenna wire carefully inside the battery
cover.
Caution: Carefully bend, but do not twist or kink
the antenna wire. Doing so may significantly
reduce or completely interrupt signal transmission.
4 Making sure that the battery/antenna cover does
not pinch any wires, place the battery/antenna cover
over the bracket and battery.
5 Secure the battery cover with the provided self-tapping screws.
Caution: Tighten screws firmly but do not overtighten. Over-tightening may strip screw holes or
crack the cover.
Knockout
Battery/
antenna cover
Antenna wire
Carefully bend,
but DO NOT
TWIST OR KINK
the antenna
wire!
Figure 30 Installing the battery cover over the battery
bracket and connecting the antenna
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
19
Installation Instructions for Wi-Q Technology™ EXQ Exit Hardware Trim
Completing the installation
20
If the mechanism doesn’t unlock, refer to the following table.
Test lock
For EXQ Locks with keypad only:
To test the lock for proper operation before the lock is programmed, follow these instructions:
1 Press 1234.
2 Press #.
The green light flashes and the locking mechanism
unlocks.
3 Turn the lever and open the door.
For all other locks:
To test the lock for proper operation before the lock is programmed, use the temporary operator card that came
with the lock. This card is for temporary use only. After
permanent cards have been programmed for the lock, the
temporary card should be deleted.
1 Use the temporary operator card to activate the lock.
2 Use the temporary operator card to access the lock.
The green light flashes and the locking mechanism
unlocks.
3 Turn the lever or knob and open the door.
4 With the door closed, insert and turn the key to
unlatch the door.
LEDs
Sounder
You should
Single red
flash
1 short
tone
Use the card at a
moderate speed.
Single red
flash
3 short
tones
Use the temporary operator card provided with
the lock.
or
Perform a door reset to
restore to the factory
default settings (the lock
may already be associated/programmed)
Alternating
red and
green
flashes
none
Check the motor
connection.
none
none
Check the battery
connection.
Important: When the trim and exit hardware
installation is complete, perform all testing specified
by the exit hardware manufacturer.
©2008–2009 Stanley Security Solutions, Inc. and Stanley Logistics, Inc.
T82621/Rev D 3108554 ER-7991-12 April 2009
20
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for
Stanley Wi-Q™ Technology
WQX-WAC Wireless Access Controllers
Introduction
The WQX Wireless Access Controller (WAC) controls
access to one door or access point. It runs on four AA
batteries, or can be externally powered with a DC
power supply. The WAC can be purchased integrated
in a box with power supply or can be purchased standalone. If purchased as a stand-alone unit the power
supply powering the WAC (WQX alone with no other
devices connected) must be able to deliver at least
500mA.a
Antenna
Components provided in the box
❑ Wireless Access Controller with antenna
❑ Batteries
❑ Documentation
Optional components
❑ Indoor ceiling mount omni-directional antenna
❑ Indoor wall mount directional antenna
❑ Outdoor mount directional antenna
❑ Outdoor mount omni-directional antenna
❑ Enclosure
1
Power terminal
Mounting hole
Four AA
Batteries
Mounting hole
Terminals
Figure 1
Wireless Access Controller, shown without
cover
Site survey
If a site survey has not been completed, contact your
Stanley Representative.
Components checklist
Use the following checklist to make sure that you have
the items necessary to install your Wireless Access Controller.
Mount Wireless Access Controller
The standard WAC comes with a small antenna, but
you may need a supplemental antenna for your application. See the Site Survey Tool Quick Reference Guide
for more antenna information.
1 Determine the appropriate location for the wireless
single door controller, making sure that the
antenna will have maximum exposure for signal
transmission.
2 Mount the Wireless Access Controller box.
3 Screw on antenna as shown in Figure 1 so that it’s
vertical and upright.
4 Install batteries if needed.
2
Install other hardware as necessary
Make sure all other system components are mounted
and installed. System components may include:
■ Electronic or electric lock or strike
■ Request-to-exit switch
■ Power supply for lock or strike
■ Reader: either magstripe, proximity, keypad or combination readers. The default reader is a Weigand,
26-bit, 8-bit word type.
a. Power for WAC device only. Calculate power
requirements for attached readers separately.
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
1
Installation Instructions for Stanley Wi-Q™ Technology WQX-WAC Wireless Access Controllers
Planning the installation
Manufacturer
Stanley
■
Table 1
Part number
909028065
Terminal
Indala
FP2511A
XceedID
XF-1050-B
HID
5355AGK00
Essex
KTP-163-SN
Sensors: door, latch, deadbolt, key, and/or other.
Note: Some sensors may be included inside the lock.
The BEST 45HW may include door, latch, deadbolt,
and key sensors.
3
Pull wire and make connections to
wireless access controller
1 Determine what connections you need to make
based on your application.
2 Using Figure 2 and Table 1 make the connections.
Table 1
WAC Connections and descriptions
Terminal
Strike NC
Strike COM
Strike NO
SHUNT NC
SHUNT COM
SHUNT NO
KEY
2
WAC Connections and descriptions
Description
Normally-closed terminal
where the locking mechanism
connects
Common return path for current through the locking mechanism
Normally-open terminal where
the locking mechanism connects
Normally-closed relay terminal
that shunts door force alarm if
access is granted or RQE is activated
Return path for the shunt relay
Normally-open terminal for the
shunt relay
Detects and reports a key-override event
RQE
Description
Return path for the key-override switch and RQE
Request-to-exit input
DS
Door status input
GND
LS
Return path for door status and
latch status
Latch status input
WIEGAND 0
Wiegand D0 terminal
GND
WIEGAND1
Ground (the wiegand reader
must be grounded at this
point)
Wiegand D1 terminal
RED
Red LED control input
GND
LED ground point
GRN
Green LED control input
ANT
Antenna connection
Negative DC
terminal
Power connection
GND
Power connection. Use the
extra negative DC terminal to
Negative DC
‘daisy-chain’ power to another
terminal
wireless access controller or
reader.a
Positive DC 9–24V Power connection
terminal
Power connection. Use the
extra positive DC terminal to
Positive DC 9–24V ‘daisy-chain’ power to another
terminal
wireless access controller or
reader.a
a. Make sure the power supply is of appropriate
wattage to supply enough power.
Important note: When using the WAC to daisy-chain
other devices, be sure that the other devices will
accept the voltage supplied to the WAC.
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Stanley Wi-Q™ Technology WQX-WAC Wireless Access Controllers
Planning the installation
(+ Power)
Electric
lock, strike
or maglock
(+)
(–)
STRIKE NC (Relay 1)
STRIKE COM (Relay 1)
Output
device (example
shown: horn)
Input switch
Connect
as required
STRIKE NO (Relay 1)
ANT
SHUNT NC (Relay 2)
DO NOT USE
SHUNT COM (Relay 2)
GND
SHUNT NC (Relay 2)
KEY (I/O)
3.3V (10mA MAX)
GND
DO NOT USE
RQE (I/O)
– DC 9-24V
DSM (I/O)
+ DC 9-24V
GND
– DC 9-24V
DLS (I/O)
+ DC 9-24V
WIEGAND 0 (I/O)
GND
+12 VDC
RED
GND
GRN
Weigand
output
reader
Figure 2
GND
WIEGAND 1 (I/O)
12 VDC
Strike Power
Supply
by others
(+ Power)
Wireless Access Controller, typical installation.
See Table 1 for a description of connections.
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
3
Installation Instructions for Stanley Wi-Q™ Technology WQX-WAC Wireless Access Controllers
Planning the installation
4
5
Sign on WAC
The process of bringing a WAC into the Stanley Wi-Q™
Access Management System (AMS) is known as signing
on.
If the connected reader doesn’t have a keypad, a signon keypad is required. If no wired keypad is installed, a
sign-on keypad is available as accessory WQD-WACPAD.
Connect the sign-on keypad to the WAC Wireless
Access Controller
1 Once the WAC is wired, connect the sign-on keypad
to the WAC reader terminal.
Signing on a WAC Wireless Access Controller
2 Enter 5678 on the keypad.
This will cause the green LED to blink the on the WAC
three times.
3 Enter the sign-on key for the facility in the AMS
database.
Note: The sign-on key can be found under the facility
sign-on credential field in the Wi-Q Technology™
Access Management System (AMS). Refer to the Stanley Wi-Q AMS User Guide.
You should see the red and green LEDs blinking and
the blue light turns ON to indicate that the radio on
the board is active. Once the reader signs on to one of
the portal gateways in your facility, the green LED on
the WAC blinks three times. At this point the WAC
should appear under the New Facility Item folder in
AMS (it may take up to 2 minutes for this to occur).
4
Test WAC
For Wireless Access Controller with keypad only:
To test the WAC for proper operation before It’s programmed, follow these instructions:
1 Press 1234.
2 Press #.
The green light flashes and the locking mechanism
unlocks or you should hear a relay click.
3 Operate the lock and open the door.
For Wireless Access Controllers wired to card
readers:
To test the lock for proper operation before the lock is
programmed, use the temporary operator card that
came with the device. This card is for temporary use
only. After permanent cards have been programmed
into the device, the temporary card will no longer
unlock the lock (once users are programmed into the
WAC).
1 Using the installed reader to access the lock, present the temporary operator card to gain access.
The green light flashes and the locking mechanism
unlocks.
If the mechanism doesn’t unlock, use the on-board
LEDs and refer to the following table.
WAC
on-board
LEDs
You should
Single red
flash
Use the card at a moderate speed.
Three red
flashes
Use the temporary operator card
provided with the lock.
or
Perform a deep reset to restore to
the factory default settings (the lock
may already be associated/programmed)
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Stanley Wi-Q™ Technology WQX-WAC Wireless Access Controllers
Planning the installation
WAC
on-board
LEDs
You should
none
Check the battery connection.
no blue
light
Reset. Sign-on the WAC using the
sign-on procedure.
LEDs
You should
Single red
flash
Use the card at a moderate
speed.
Three red
flashes
Use the temporary operator
card provided with the lock.
Using the soft reset function
■ Hold the reset button until the green LED flashes
five times and then release. See Figure 3.
Lights will alternate red/green rapidly.
The WAC is restored to its previous functionality
Using the hard reset function
Caution: Use this procedure only to restore the
factory default settings. Performing these steps
will erase all user data that may have been
programmed into the WAC.
■ Hold the reset button for up to 30 seconds — until
the green LED flashes and then the red LED flashes
three times. Then release. See Figure 3.
All users are erased and the WAC is restored to its
factory default settings.
Resetting the WAC
The WAC has two reset functions:
■ Soft reset – restores previous functionality. Use this
under normal operation. It will reset the WAC, but
DOES NOT ERASE USERS.
■ Hard reset – restores factory settings. Use this reset
only when moving the WAC or after exhausting all
other troubleshooting options.
Reset
button
Figure 3
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Using the reset button
5
Installation Instructions for Stanley Wi-Q™ Technology WQX-WAC Wireless Access Controllers
6
BEST ACCESS SYSTEMS
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for
Stanley Omnilock 9KOM
Cylindrical Locks
Planning the installation
Contents
Components checklist
These installation instructions describe how to install
your 9KOM Cylindrical Lock. Topics covered include:
Use the following checklist to make sure that you have
the items necessary to install your Electronic Standalone Cylindrical Lock.
Planning the installation.............................................. 1
Preparing the door and door jamb............................. 2
Installing the lock .......................................................... 7
Completing the installation......................................... 9
Site survey
Use the following survey to record information about
the installation site. You need this information to determine how to prepare the door for the lock.
Door information
Door handing and bevel:
❐ Left hand (LH)
❐ Left hand, reverse bevel (LHRB)
❐ Right hand (RH)
❐ Right hand, reverse bevel (RHRB)
Door thickness: 1-3/4 to 2 inches (44 to 50 mm). If other
than 1 3/4” (44 mm), see “Optional: Adjust for door
thickness” on page 6.
Environment information
Model
Side of
door
Temperature
Range
Standard
Outside
+32°F to +129°F
0°C to +54°C
Weatherized
Outside
-4°F to +129°F
-20°C to +54°C
-40°F to +129°F
-40°C to + 54°C
+32°F to +129°F
0°C to +54°C
Extreme
Weatherized a
a.
Outside
Inside
Exposure
Components provided in the box:
❐ Outside lever
❐ Inside lever
❐ Throw member package
❐ Latch
❐ Strike package
❐ Through-bolt screws
❐ Installation template and instructions
❐ Four AA size batteries (or 2 weatherized packs)
Other components:
❐ Programming Default ID Card (provided with
software)
Special tools checklist
Use the following checklist to make sure that you have
the special tools necessary to install your Electronic
Stand-alone Cylindrical Lock.
❐ KD303 Drill jig
❐ KD325 Strike plate locating pin
❐ KD315 Faceplate marking chisel
Drip proof. Inadvertent water
splash accepted.
Direct exposure to
rain and snow
Direct exposure to
rain and snow
N/A
See Stanley installation instruction Addendum (T83317) Extreme
Weatherized Installation for the extreme weatherized model.
T83303/Rev C 3132330 ER-7991-12 Mar 2011
Stanley Omnilock
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
1
Installation Instructions for Stanley Omnilock 9KOM Cylindrical Locks
Preparing the door and door jamb
1
High edge of
door bevel
Figure 1
Left hand
Left hand
reverse
bevel
reverse bevel
(LHRB)
E
with RQ
ckset
3/4" Ba drical Locks
e for 2
lin
Templat 8K and 9K Cy
6K, 7KC,
Outside
Outside
Outside
Outside
(LHRB)
Figure 2
2
Note: If the door is a fabricated hollow metal door,
determine whether it is properly reinforced to
support the lock. If door reinforcement is not
adequate, consult the door manufacturer for
information on proper reinforcement. For
dimensions for preparing metal doors for locks with
2 3/4” (70 mm) backset, see Template T56052 or
T56053 Door and Frame Preparation for 63K, 73KC,
83K, and 93K Cylindrical Locks.
Note 1: If the door is a LH or RH door, mark the
inside of the door. If the door is a LHRB or RHRB door,
mark the outside of the door. See Figure 2.
Note 2: For Extreme Weatherized model template,
see Installation Addendum for Stanley Omnilock
9KOM Extreme Weatherized Locks (T83319).
Positioning the template
Left
Lefthand
hand(LH)
(LH)
Door handing chart
Position template and mark drill
points
RightHand
hand(RH)
(RH)
Right
Right
Righthand
hand
reverse
reversebevel
bevel
(RHRB)
(RHRB)
For uncut doors and frames
1 Measure and mark the horizontal centerline of the
lever (the centerline for the chassis hole) on the
door and door jamb. Mark the vertical centerline
of the door edge.
Note: The recommended height from the floor to
the centerline of the lock (centerline of 2 1/8” (54
mm) hole) is 40 5/16” (1024 mm).
2 Fold the template on the dashed line and
carefully place it in position on the high side of
the door bevel as shown in Figure 1.
Note: For steel frame applications, align the
template’s horizontal centerline for the latch with
the horizontal centerline of the frame’s strike
preparation.
3 Tape the template to the door.
4 Center punch the necessary drill points. Refer to
the instructions on the template.
Stanley Omnilock
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Stanley Omnilock 9KOM Cylindrical Locks
Preparing the door and door jamb
For doors with standard cylindrical preparation
1 Fold the template on the dashed line. Looking
through the hole from the opposite side of the
door, align the template so that you see the
template outline of the 2 1/8” (54 mm) diameter
chassis hole.
2 Tape the template to the door and enter punch the
necessary drill points.
2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Optional door status
switch holes
Mounting hole
Chassis hole
Drill holes and mortise for latch face
Note: To locate the center of a hole on the opposite
side of the door, drill a pilot hole completely through
the door.
Drill the holes in order listed below:
■ motor wire hole
◆ 7/16” (11 mm) diameter through door
◆ always drill before drilling chassis hole
■ chassis hole
◆ 2 1/8” (54 mm) diameter through door
◆ drill after drilling motor wire hole
■ latch hole
◆ 1” (25 mm) diameter
◆ meets chassis hole
■(OPTIONAL) Door Status Switch
◆ 1” (25 mm) diameter on door
◆ 1” (25 mm) diameter on jamb
◆ 1-3/4” (44mm) deep on door
◆ 1” (25 mm) deep on jamb
Note: The latch tube prongs should be centered and
should project into the chassis hole.
Mortise the edge of the door to fit the latch face.
Drill the holes for the latch screws.
Install the latch in the door as shown in Figure 4.
For optional door status switch: Position the bit
inside the hole. Then drill a 3/8” (10mm) channel at
an angle that will connect the door status switch
hole to the chassis hole as shown in Figure 4.
Press fit both switch pieces as shown in Figure 4.
Check that the door swings freely.
Motor wire
notch
Latch hole
Mounting hole
Inside of door
Figure 3
Drilling holes and mortising for the latch face
Caution: Make sure the wires are not routed across any sharp
edges or over any surface that could damage the sleeving.
Optional door
status switch
Chassis hole
Latch
Latch mortise
Location of latch
tube prongs
Inside of door
Figure 4
Installing the latch in the door
Stanley Omnilock
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
3
Installation Instructions for Stanley Omnilock 9KOM Cylindrical Locks
Preparing the door and door jamb
Use drill jig to drill through-bolt holes
Drill upper through-bolt hole.
1 Press the drill jig (KD303) onto the door, engaging
it with the latch tube prongs (see the close-up in
Figure 5). Make sure the front edge of the jig is
parallel with the door edge.
2 Drill the through-bolt holes (5/16(8 mm)
diameter) halfway into the door.
3 Turn over the drill jig and repeat steps 1 and 2
from the opposite side of the door.
Note 2: Replace the drill jig after 10 door
preparations.
Latch
tube
prong
Inside of door
Figure 5
4
Drill lower through-bolt hole.
Installing the drill jig and drilling the
through-bolt holes
Stanley Omnilock
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Stanley Omnilock 9KOM Cylindrical Locks
Preparing the door and door jamb
3
Install strike box and strike plate
1 Align with the center of the latchbolt, then
mortise the door jamb to fit the strike box and
strike plate. See Figure 6.
2 Drill the holes for the screws used to install the
strike box and strike plate.
3 Insert the strike box and secure the strike with the
two screws provided.
4 Check the position of the deadlocking plunger
against the strike plate.
Caution: The deadlocking plunger of the
latchbolt must make contact with the strike
plate, as shown in Figure 7. The plunger
deadlocks the latchbolt and helps prevent
someone from forcing the latch open when
the door is closed.
Strike box
Strike plate
Door jamb
Figure 6
Installing the strike box and strike plate
Deadlocking
plunger
Strike plate
Door jamb
Figure 7
Aligning the deadlocking plunger with the
strike plate
Stanley Omnilock
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
5
Installation Instructions for Stanley Omnilock 9KOM Cylindrical Locks
Preparing the door and door jamb
2 1/4” (57 mm)groove
2” (51 mm)
1 3/4” (44 mm)
Figure 8
Optional: Adjust for door thickness
Note: The default door thickness is 1 3/4” (44 mm).
If your door is thicker than 1 3/4” (44 mm), use the
following instructions.
1 Determine the door’s thickness.
2 Pull the rose locking pin and rotate the outside
rose liner until the proper groove on the
through-bolt stud lines up with the hub face. See
Figure 8.
Hub face
Motor wire
Outside
rose liner
4
Through-bolt stud
Rose locking pin
5
Adjusting the rose liner for the door
1
2
3
Battery cover
Re-route wire
Rotate chassis
180 degrees
clockwise
4
5
Opening
Rose
6
7
Optional: Adjust handing
Note: This is required only if the lock hand does not
meet your application. The lockset is normally
preset for a right-hand door. Verify the handing of
the lock per Figure 2 and, if required, change the
handing of the lock.
In order: remove the gasket, battery cover, and
back plate. See Figure 9.
Remove the chassis.
Rotate the chassis 180 degrees clockwise (looking
at the back or opposite the latch).
Note: Do not pull the wire.
Pry off the rose that holds the wire in place.
Re-route the wire back through the opening in
the rose.
Press the rose back on.
Reinstall the chassis.
Back plate
Gasket
Figure 9
6
Adjusting the rose liner for the door
Stanley Omnilock
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Stanley Omnilock 9KOM Cylindrical Locks
Installing the lock
6
Install batteries
Housing assembly
Four alkaline AA batteries (or two weatherized packs,
if installing a weatherized unit) are furnished with
your Omnilock system and must be installed before
proceeding.
Note: For the Extreme Weatherized model, see
Installation Addendum for Stanley Omnilock 9KOM
Extreme Weatherized Locks (T83319) for battery
and escutcheon installation.
1 Remove the gasket from the rear of the housing
assembly as shown in Figure 10.
2 Remove the screw from the battery cover and
remove the cover.
3 Install batteries with proper polarity as shown in
Figure 11. (For weatherized battery packs, simply
connect the wires from the battery pack to the
circuit board as shown in Figure 12.)
Note: Be sure red and black motor wires are
connected before attempting step 4. Align the wires
together so that the wire colors match.
4 Press and hold the reset button on the PC board
(as shown in Figure 11) until the green light on
the keypad flashes (about three seconds), then
release the button. If the green light does not
flash see “Troubleshooting” on page 10.
5 Replace the battery cover. See Figure 10. Make
sure that the tabs on the lower edge of the
battery cover are hooked over the edge of the
back plate and secure the cover with the screw.
6 Replace the gasket. See Figure 10. Make sure that
it is inside the edge of the housing.
7 A label on the housing assembly battery cover
indicates the magnetic card track (track 2 or track
3) that the system is set to read. See Figure 10.
Track setting
label
Pan head
AA Batteries
Back plate
Battery cover
Gasket
Figure 10 Installing batteries
Terminal block
Reset button
Motor connector
Red wire
Black wire
Figure 11 Using the reset button
Figure 12 Weatherized battery packs
Stanley Omnilock
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
7
Installation Instructions for Stanley Omnilock 9KOM Cylindrical Locks
Installing the lock
7
Install outside escutcheon and lock
chassis and engage retractor in
latch
1 From the outside of the door, insert the lock
chassis and outside escutcheon into the 2 1/8” (54
mm) chassis hole. See Figure 13.
2 Make sure that the latch tube prongs engage the
chassis frame and that the latch tailpiece engages
the retractor. See Figure 14.
Outside escutcheon
and chassis
Inside of door
Figure 13 Installing the outside escutcheon and lock
chassis
Retractor
Latch tube
prong
Latch
tailpiece
Latch tube
prong
Chassis frame
Notch
Chassis
Figure 14 Installing the lock chassis and engaging the
retractor in the latch
8
Stanley Omnilock
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Stanley Omnilock 9KOM Cylindrical Locks
Installing the lock
8
Install through-bolts, inside rose
and lever
Rose liner
1 Place the inside rose liner on the chassis, aligning
the holes in the rose liner with the holes prepared
in the door as shown in Figure 15.
2 Install the through-bolts through the rose liner
and door in the top and bottom holes.
3 Tighten the rose liner on the door with the
through-bolts.
4 Press the inside rose onto the rose liner.
5 Push the inside lever onto the chassis shaft until it
clicks in place.
9
Through-bolt
Chassis shaft
Inside rose
Inside of door
Figure 15 Installing the through-bolts and rose liner
Install outside lever, core and throw
member
For a non-IC lever handle
1 Place the cylinder inside the outside lever. See
Figure 16.
2 Install the retainer into the outside lever.
3 Insert the key into the cylinder and rotate the key
90 degrees clockwise. Slide the lever assembly
onto the chassis shaft until the lever clicks as it
engages against the lever catch.
4 Pull on the lever to test that the lever catch is
engaged. Turn the key back to the original
position and remove it from the cylinder.
For interchangeable core handles
1 Push the outside lever onto the chassis shaft until
the lever clicks as it engages against the lever
catch.
2 Install the blocking plate onto the throw
member, then install the throw member in the
core. See Figure 17.
Caution: You must use the blocking plate to
prevent unauthorized access.
For 6-pin core only: Install the plastic spacer (not
shown, supplied with permanent cores), instead
of the blocking plate, on the throw member.
Key
Outside lever
Push pin
Cylinder
Retainer
Figure 16 Installing outside lever (applies to both IC
and non-IC levers)
Throw
member
Blocking plate
Core
Control
key
Figure 17 Installing the core
Stanley Omnilock
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
9
Installation Instructions for Stanley Omnilock 9KOM Cylindrical Locks
Installing the lock
3 Insert the control key into the core and rotate the
key 15 degrees to the right.
4 Insert the throw member into the core.
5 Insert the core and throw member into the lever
with the control key
6 Return the control key to the original position
and withdraw the key.
Caution: The control key can be used to
remove cores and to access doors. Provide
adequate security for the control key.
10
Test lock
To test the lock for proper operation before the lock
is programmed:
Troubleshooting
If the mechanism does not unlock, remove the battery cover and check for proper orientation and seating of the batteries and motor connector. Ensure that
wires are not pinched. Reset the electronics by pressing and holding the reset button on the circuit board
until the light flashes green (approx three seconds),
then release. See Figure 12.
The system will go through a self-test and the green
light will flash five times. You will hear the lock
unlock, then relock three times. A red flash indicates
a PC board or drive system problem. If a red flash or
no flash is observed, check for proper orientation
and seating of the batteries and motor connector,
ensure that wires are not pinched, then repeat the
reset process.
For keypad locks
1 Press 1234 for the 2000 series, or 5011234
for the 500 series.
The green light flashes and the latch unlocks.
2 Turn the lever and open the door.
During the unlock time, the green light flashes. Then
the red light flashes and the latch relocks.
For magnetic stripe or proximity card only locks
Note: If the lock has a proximity card reader, it may
have already been activated by the presence of an
object near the card reader.
1 Align the magnetic stripe card with the V mark by
the card slot.
2 Insert and then remove the card.
The green light flashes and the latch unlocks.
3 Turn the lever and open the door.
During the unlock time, if using the Programming
Default ID Card, the green light flashes. Then the red
light flashes and the latch relocks.
10
Stanley Omnilock
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Stanley Omnilock 9KOM Cylindrical Locks
Installing the lock
Removing the levers (when needed)
Removing the IC outside lever
1 Insert the control key into the core and rotate the
key 15 degrees to the right.
2 Remove the core and throw member from the
lever.
3 Insert a flat blade screwdriver into the figure-8
core hole and against the trapezoid-shaped lever
keeper.
4 Push the screwdriver blade in the direction of the
arrow in Figure 18.
Caution: Use the flat of the screwdriver to
push the lever keeper sideways. Using the
screwdriver tip to pry the keeper at an angle
may result in unseating the retaining spring.
For assistance, contact your local Stanley
Omnilock dealer.
Lever keeper
Figure 18 Push the lever keeper to remove the lever
M
Note: You will not be able to remove the lever if the
screwdriver blade is inserted past the keeper into
the center hole.
5 Slide the lever from the sleeve.
Removing the non-IC outside lever
1 Insert the key into the cylinder and turn it 45
degrees clockwise.
2 Depress the lever catch through the hole in the
outside lever by using the push pin or other
suitable tool. See Figure 19.
3 Slide the outside lever off.
Removing the inside lever
1 Depress the lever catch through the hole in the
inside lever by using the push pin or other
suitable tool as shown in Figure 20.
2 Slide the inside lever off.
Note: Reinstall lever(s) according to “Install
through-bolts, inside rose and lever” on page 9, or
“Install outside lever, core and throw member” on
page 9
Turn key 45
degrees
clockwise
Outside lever
Push pin
Figure 19 Removing the outside non-IC lever
Inside lever
Push pin
Figure 20 Removing the inside lever
Stanley Omnilock
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
11
12
Stanley Omnilock
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for
Stanley Omnilock 45HOM
Mortise Locks
Planning the installation
Components checklist
Contents
These installation instructions describe how to install
your 45HOM Mortise Lock. Topics covered include:
Planning the installation...........................................1
Preparing the door and door jamb..........................4
Installing the lock........................................................7
Completing the installation......................................9
Site survey
Use the following survey to record information
about the installation site. You need this information
to determine how to prepare the door for the lock.
Door information
Door handing and bevel:
If a handing change is required, see “Rotate latchbolt
(if necessary)” on page 4.
❐ Left hand (LH)
❐ Left hand, reverse bevel (LHRB)
❐ Right hand (RH)
❐ Right hand, reverse bevel (RHRB)
Door thickness: 1-3/4 to 2 inches (44 to 50 mm).
Environment information
Model
Side of
door
Temperature
Range
Exposure
Standard
Outside
+32°F to +129°F
0°C to +54°C
Drip proof.
Inadvertent
splashing of
water spray
acceptable.
Weatherized
Outside
-4°F to +129°F
-20°C to +54°C
-40°F to +129°F
-40°C to + 54°C
+32°F to +129°F
0°C to +54°C
Extreme
Weatherized a
a.
Outside
Inside
Use the following checklist to make sure that you
have the items necessary to install your Omnilock
Mortise Lock.
Components provided in the box:
❐ Inside and outside trim cassettes
❐ Inside and outside rose and rose ring
❐ Outside escutcheon assembly
❐ Mortise case assembly
❐ Mortise cylinder and collar
❐ Outside lever and spindle assembly
❐ Inside lever
❐ Strike package
❐ Installation template and instructions
❐ Screw package
❐ Mortise case faceplate
❐ Batteries
❐ Torx T15 driver
❐ 1/8” hex wrench
Other components:
❐ Programming Default ID Card (provided with
software)
Direct exposure
to rain and snow
Direct exposure
to rain and snow
N/A
See Stanley installation instruction Addendum (T83317)
Extreme Weatherized Installation for the extreme weatherized
model installation.
T83312/Rev B 3132456 ER-7991-12 Feb 2011
Stanley Omnilock
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
1
Installation Instructions for Stanley Omnilock 45HOM Mortise Locks
Planning the installation
1
For hole sizes, see
the OM1 Template
T83316
F
G
F
Identify holes to drill
1 Determine the lock function to be installed.
2 Determine the inside and outside, hand, and
bevel of the door.
3 See the Holes by Function table and Figure 3 to
determine the holes to be drilled for the lock
function.
G
A
E
B
H
Functions
H
Holes by Function
Door side
D
A Cylinder
C
Identifying holes to drill
Align
Low edg e )
(narrowside
e–
Flat edg
no beve l
e
High edg
)
(wide side
F
G
3/16 in
5 mm
5/16 in
8 mm
5/16 in
8 mm
F
G
Installation
template
3/8 in
10 mm
Centerline
Detach here
Strike lip
1 1/4 in
32 mm
criptions
5/16 in
Hole Des
er (1)
8 mm
A Cyind
turn (1)
B Thumb
(1)
C Lev er
nting(2)
mou
D Trim
1/8 in
ing(1)
E Ground
3 mm
bolt (2)
F Module
(2)
standoff
G Module
turn
H Thumb g screw (2)
mountin
3/8 in
10 mm
H B
1/2 in
13 mm
center line
Horizontal
of lock
D
7/8 in
23mm
center line
Horizontal
of lever
plate for the
this tem
Note: Use LH or LHRB door
a
of
inside of ide (keyed side)
or the outs B door.
RHR
a RH or
C
er line
Vertical centr
of leve
factoryuse only es.
aration,
imili
door prep copies or facs
use
re accurate
To ensutemplates. Do not
printed
Figure 2
2
Aligning the templates
D
Centerline
■
■
E Grounding hole
■
■
Through
door
Through
door
■
■
H Thumb turn mounting
screw (2 holes)
J Door Status Switch
(Optional)
a.
A
A
E
Out
D Trim mounting
(2 holes) a
G Standoff hole
3/16 in
5 mm
In
■
Through
door
Through
door
F Through bolt hole
Door edge
template
Out
Through
door
Through
door
C Lever a
r.door
to edge of
In
TV
B Thumb turn
D
Figure 1
DV
■
Door
Edge
Because these holes pass through the mortise pocket, it is
recommended that each hole be drilled separately rather
than straight through.
2
Position template and mark drill
points
Note: If the door is a fabricated hollow metal door,
determine whether it is properly reinforced to
support the lock. If door reinforcement is not
adequate, consult the door manufacturer for
information on proper reinforcement. For
dimensions for preparing metal doors, see the OM2
Template — Installation Specifications for
45HOM Mortise Locks (T83318).
Stanley Omnilock
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Stanley Omnilock 45HOM Mortise Locks
Planning the installation
1 Separate the templates provided on the OM1
Template — Installation Template for 45H Mortise
Locks (T83316).
Note: If installing an Extreme Weatherized model,
see Installation Addendum for Stanley Omnilock
45HOM Extreme Weatherized Locks (T83317). This
includes the template for locating the extreme
weatherized module mounting holes.
2 Position one of the door edge templates on the
door, making sure that the lock case mortise
shown on the template aligns with the mortise
pocket prepared in the door.
3 Using the centerlines on the door edge templates
as guides, position the appropriate door template
on each side of the door. You need to take the
bevel into account. Tape the templates to the
door.
3
Center punch and drill holes
1 Center punch the necessary drill points. See the
instructions on the template.
2 Drill the holes.
Note 1: To locate the center of a hole on the
opposite side of the door, drill a pilot hole
completely through the door.
Note 2: For holes through the door, it is best to drill
halfway from each side of the door to prevent the
door from splintering.
4
Left hand (LH)
Outside
Left hand
reverse bevel
(LHRB)
Figure 3
Right hand
reverse bevel
(RHRB)
Door Handing Chart
Optional for Wireless TV Models
Door status
Door status switch
switch sensor
Optional: Install door status switch
(Optional for TV function wireless
locks only)
1 Locate the centerpoint for the door status switch
2 1/2” (64mm) above the top of the faceplate
mortise on the edge of the door as shown in
Figure 4.
2 Drill a 1” (25 mm) diameter hole 1 3/4” (44 mm)
deep for the door status switch.
3 Position the drill so the tip of the bit is
approximately 1”(25 mm) into the hole and the
Outside
Right hand (RH)
Centerline
Door Jamb
Figure 4
Door
Installing the door status switch
Stanley Omnilock
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
3
Installation Instructions for Stanley Omnilock 45HOM Mortise Locks
Configuring & installing the mortise
bit is close to the top edge of the hole. Then drill a
3/8” (10mm) channel at approximately a 35°
angle from the door status switch hole into the
mortise cavity as shown in Figure 4.
Caution: Make sure the wires are not routed
across any sharp edges or over any surface
that could damage the sleeving.
4 Press fit the door status switch assembly into the
door status switch hole.
5 On the door jamb, drill a corresponding hole for
the door status switch sensor. Use the door switch
centerline as a guide. Press fit the sensor into the
jamb.
Latch access point
5
Figure 5
Rotating the latchbolt
Cover side
Case (back) side
Rotate latchbolt (if necessary)
Note: If a function specific mortise case was
ordered, some steps for configuring the case have
already been performed at the factory.
1 Determine whether you need to rotate the
latchbolt to match the handing of the door.
Note: The angled surface of the latchbolt must
contact the strike when the door closes.
2 If you need to rotate the latchbolt, insert a flat
blade screwdriver into the latch access point
approximately 1/2” (13 mm) into the case and
press to extend the latch out of the case. See
Figure 5.
3 Rotate the latchbolt past 180 degrees, keeping
constant pressure on the latch access point. Then
allow the latch to rotate back slightly and retract
into the case.
6
Position hub toggles (if necessary)
1 Check whether the hub toggles are in the proper
position for the lock. See the table below.
Hub toggle
Figure 6
4
Hub toggle
Positioning hub toggles
Hub toggle positions
Inside down (always unlocked)
Outside up (lockable)
Stanley Omnilock
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Stanley Omnilock 45HOM Mortise Locks
Installing the trim
2 For LH & LHRB doors, the inside is the case (back)
side of the case and the outside is the cover side
of the case. For RH and RHRB doors, the inside is
the cover side of the case and the outside is the
case (back) side of the case. The cover is mounted
to the case with four screws.
3 To change the position of a hub toggle, loosen
the toggle screw, move the toggle into the
desired position, and re-tighten the screw.
7
Door Status Switch
(TV location shown)
Mortise case
Case
mounting
screws
DS (white)
Motor wire
(red/black)
Install mortise case
RQE (org/brown)
KOS (gray)
LS/LSM (purple)
1 Drill the holes for the case mounting screws.
2 Insert the mortise case into the mortise cavity,
while feeding the motor wires and any optional
sensor wires into the mortise cavity and keyhole
to the inside of the door as shown in Figure 7.
Note: The armored front of the mortise case selfadjusts to the door bevel.
a.
Option
DV
TV
Stand
Alone
Wireless
Key Overide Sensor
(KOS)
■
■
■�
■
Request-to-Exit
(RQE)
■
■�
■
Door Status Switch
(DS) a
■
■�
■
Latch Status
Switch (LS)
■
Figure 7
Installing the mortise case
■
Door status switch is located differently for DV and TV
functions.
Inside trim
3 Secure the mortise case with the case mounting
screws.
8
Install trim mounting plates
Outside trim
1 Insert the outside trim mounting plate through
the door and mortise case.
Figure 8
Installing the trim mounting plates
Stanley Omnilock
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
5
Installation Instructions for Stanley Omnilock 45HOM Mortise Locks
Installing the lock
2 Position the inside trim mounting plate opposite
the outside trim mounting plate and screw them
securely in place.
Caution: Do not overtighten the trim
mounting plate screws. Overtightening may
damage the locking mechanism.
3 Temporarily install a lever and test the lock to
make sure that it doesn’t bind.
Thumb turn
9
1 Orient the thumb turn so it points up when the
deadbolt is retracted, and toward the hinge edge
of the door when the deadbolt is extended.
2 Install the thumb turn using the two screws
provided. See Figure 9.
Inside door
Figure 9
Install thumb turn (TV function only)
10
Installing the thumb turn
Install inside and outside levers
1 Unscrew the inside spindle one full turn to allow
the spindles to turn freely. See Figure 10.
2 Remove the label from the inside spindle.
3 With the handle pointing toward the door hinges,
insert the outside lever and spindle assembly into
the lock from the outside of the door.
4 Slide the inside lever onto the inside spindle and
secure it with the set screw.
5 Turn the levers to check that they operate
smoothly.
Location
of set screw
Inside spindle
Outside spindle
Spindle Assembly
on Outside door
Figure 10 Installing the levers
6
Stanley Omnilock
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Stanley Omnilock 45HOM Mortise Locks
Installing the lock
11
Install batteries
Housing assembly
Four alkaline AA batteries (or two weatherized packs
if installing a weatherized unit) are furnished with
your Omnilock system and must be installed before
proceeding with operation verification and system
installation.
Note: For the Extreme Weatherized model, see
Addendum (T83317) Extreme Weatherized
Installation for battery and escrutcheon
installation.
1 Remove the gasket from the rear of the housing
assembly as shown in Figure 11.
2 Remove the screw from the battery cover and
remove the cover.
3 Install batteries with proper polarity as shown in
Figure 12. (For weatherized battery packs, simply
connect the wires from the battery pack to the
circuit board as shown in Figure 13.)
Note: Be sure red and black motor wires are
connected before attempting step 4. Align the wires
together so that the wire colors match.
4 Press and hold the reset button on the PC board
(as shown in Figure 12) until the green light on
the keypad flashes (about three seconds) then
release the button. If green light does not flash,
see “Troubleshooting” on page 12.
5 Replace the battery cover. See Figure 11. Make
sure that the tabs on the lower edge of the
battery cover are hooked over the edge of the
back plate and secure the cover with the screw.
6 Replace the gasket. See Figure 11. Make sure that
it is inside the edge of the housing.
Track setting
label
AA Batteries
Screw
Back plate
Battery cover
Gasket
Figure 11 Installing batteries
Reset button
Figure 12 Using the reset button
Figure 13 Installing weatherized batteries
Stanley Omnilock
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
7
Installation Instructions for Stanley Omnilock 45HOM Mortise Locks
Installing the lock
12
Screws and
washers
1 Ensure that no wires are pinched when attaching
the escutcheon to the door.
2 Insert the standoffs and grounding spring into the
predrilled holes. Use screws and washers to attach
the escutcheon from the inside of the door.
13
Figure 14 Installing the outside escutcheon
Motor
Key Override
Sensor
Door Status
Switch
Latch Status
Switch
Request to
Exit
Red/black
Gray
White
Red/black
Gray or Yellow
White
Purple
Purple
Orange/Brown
Orange
Mortise
Figure 15 Simplified wiring diagram
8
Install outside escutcheon
Motor
Connecting escutcheon wires
1 Connect the red and black motor wire from the
mortise case to the red and black escutcheon
motor wire. Align the wires together so that the
wire colors match.
2 Connect the color-coded wires of the escutcheon
wiring harness to the corresponding wire options
on your mortise case. Some wires may not be
used.
Note: Two RQE status switches are installed in the
mortise case. However, only the switch for the inside
of the lock needs to be connected. You will need to
connect the ‘Case Side’ pair of RQE wires for LH and
LHRB doors or the ‘Cover Side’ pair of RQE wires for
RH and RHRB doors. See Figure 16. Wires are
labeled.
Key Override
Sensor
Door Status
Switch
Left hand (LH)
Outside
Right hand (RH)
Latch Status
Switch
Request to
Exit
Escutcheon
Left hand
reverse bevel
(LHRB)
Outside
Figure 16 Door Handing Chart
Stanley Omnilock
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Right hand
reverse bevel
(RHRB)
Installation Instructions for Stanley Omnilock 45HOM Mortise Locks
Finishing the installation
14
Install cylinder
1 Push any excess wires into the escutcheon
housing. Make sure no wires are pinched.
1 Make sure cylinder collar is positioned on the
cylinder.
2 Thread the cylinder into the mortise case. Rotate
the cylinder until the cylinder is flush against the
collar and the cylinder cam is in the 12 o’clock
position. See Figure 17.
Caution: A malfunction can occur if the
cylinder is threaded in too far.
3 Secure the cylinder in the mortise case with the
cylinder retainer screw.
15
Cylinder collar
Cylinder
Cylinder
retainer
screw
Install mortise case faceplate
1 Secure the mortise case faceplate to the mortise
case with the faceplate mounting screws. See
Figure 18.
2 Check the lock for proper operation.
Figure 17 Installing the standard cylinder
TV Faceplate
DV Faceplate
Figure 18 Installing the mortise case faceplate
Stanley Omnilock
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
9
Installation Instructions for Stanley Omnilock 45HOM Mortise Locks
Finishing the installation
16
Strike box with DSS magnet
Strike box
Strike plate
Figure 19 Installing the strike box and strike plate
1 If the door jamb has not been mortised for the strike
box and strike plate, perform these steps:
a On the door jamb, locate the horizontal
centerline of the strike (3/8” (10mm) above the
centerline of the lock), as well as the vertical
centerline of the strike.
b Mortise the door jamb to fit the strike box and
strike plate.
c Drill the holes for the screws used to install the
strike box and strike plate.
2 Insert the strike box into the mortise in the door
jamb. Place the strike plate over the strike box
and secure the strike with the screws provided.
Note: If installing a DV wireless model with a Door
Status Switch, ensure that the magnet is located at
thetop of the strike box. See Figure 19.
3 Check the position of the auxiliary bolt against the
strike plate (or the filled area of the strike box).
Note: The recommended gap between the door
and jamb is 1/8” (3 mm).
17
Cylinder
Core
Control key
Install strike box and strike plate
Install core
1 Insert the control key into the core and rotate the
key 15 degrees (midway between the 12 o'clock
and 1 o'clock positions) to the right.
2 With the control key in the core, insert the core
into the cylinder.
3 Return the control key to the 12 o’clock position
and withdraw the key.
Caution: The control key can be used to
remove cores and to access doors. Provide
adequate security for the control key.
Figure 20 Installing the core
10
Stanley Omnilock
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
Installation Instructions for Stanley Omnilock 45HOM Mortise Locks
Finishing the installation
18
Check operation
Check the operation of the lock. For example, check
that:
❐ door latches and opens properly
❐ deadbolt operates properly
❐ key access works
❐ door gap is 1/8” (3 mm)
❐ auxiliary bolt is held inside the case when the door
is closed.
For assistance, contact your local Stanley Omnilock
dealer.
19
Test lock
To test the lock for proper operation before the lock
is programmed, follow these instructions:
For keypad locks
1 Press 1234 for the 2000 series, or 5011234
for the 500 series.
The green light flashes and the latch unlock.
2 Turn the lever and open the door.
During the unlock time, the green light flashes. Then
the red light flashes and the latch relocks.
For magnetic stripe or proximity card locks only
Note: If the lock has a proximity card reader, it may
have already been activated by the presence of an
object near the card reader.
1 Align the magnetic stripe card with the V mark by
the card slot.
2 Insert and then remove the card.
The green light flashes and the latch unlocks.
3 Turn the lever and open the door.
During the unlock time, if using the Programming
Default ID Card, the green light flashes. Then the red
light flashes and the latch relocks.
Stanley Omnilock
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.
11
Installation Instructions for Stanley Omnilock 45HOM Mortise Locks
Finishing the installation
20
Terminal block
Reset button
Motor connector
Red wire
Black wire
Figure 21 Using the reset button
Troubleshooting
If the mechanism doesn’t unlock, remove the battery
cover and check for proper orientation and seating of
the batteries and motor connector. Ensure that wires
are not pinched. Reset the electronics by pressing
and holding the reset button on the circuit board
until the light flashes green (approximately three
seconds), then releasing the botton. See Figure 21.
Note: The system will go through a self-test and the
green light will flash five times. You will hear the
lock unlock, then relock three times. A red flash
indicates a PC board or drive system problem. If a
red flash or no flash is observed, check for proper
orientation and seating of the batteries and motor
connector, ensure that wires are not pinched, then
repeat the reset process.
Check operation
1 Press 1234 for the 2000 series, or 5011234
for the 500 series.
During the unlock time, the green light flashes; then
the red light flashes and the latch relocks.
2 Turn the lever and open the door.
3 If your system has a magnetic card reader, verify
proper operation of the system using the
magnetic card reader; otherwise, see “Test lock”
on page 11.
A label on the housing assembly battery cover indicates the magnetic card track (track 2 or track 3) that
the system is set to read. See Figure 11.
12
Stanley Omnilock
a Product Group of Stanley Security Solutions, Inc.