MDS TransNET 900™ Spread Spectrum Data Transceiver

MDS TransNET 900™
FCC ID: Model EL805
Spread Spectrum
Data Transceiver
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
FEBRUARY 2004
Installation & Operation Guide
Microwave Data Systems Inc.
QUICK START GUIDE
1. Install and connect the antenna system to the transceiver
• Use a high-quality gain antenna, mounted in the clear.
• Use a low-loss feedline such as LMR 400.
• Preset directional antennas in the direction of desired transmission/reception.
2. Connect the data equipment to the radio’s DB-9F DATA connector
• Connect only the required pins. EIA-232, shown below, typically uses only
TXD, RXD and GND. (See Page 76 for EIA-485 interface connections.)
TXD
RXD 3
2
RXD
GND 7
5
GND
RTS 4
CTS 5
DTR 20
DSR 6
JUMPERS:
Only if required by RTU.
See manual for additional details.
DB-9
DB-9
TXD 3
3
TXD
RXD 2
2
RXD
GND 5
5
GND
DTR 4
DSR 6
RTS 7
TRANSCEIVER
(DCE)
DB-9
3
DATA EQUIPMENT
(DTE)
DATA EQUIPMENT
(DTE)
DB-25
TXD 2
TRANSCEIVER
(DCE)
• Verify the connected data equipment is configured as DTE. (Radio is DCE.)
JUMPERS:
Only if required by RTU.
See manual for additional details.
CTS 8
3. Apply DC power to the radio. Use the supplied 2-pin connector
• Input voltage is 6–30 Vdc. Observe proper polarity. The left pin is positive (+)
and the right pin is negative (–). (See Page 28 for details.)
4. Configure with a PC terminal or TransNET Configuration Software
• Connect computer to radio’s DIAG connector. See Page 74 for cable wiring.
• Set the Mode using the MODE M (Master), MODE R (Remote), or MODE X
(Extension) command. (Note: Only one Master is permitted in a system.)
• Set a unique Network Address (1–65000) using ADDR command. Each radio
in the system must have the same network address. Tip: Use the last four
digits of the Master’s serial number to help avoid conflicts with other
MDS TransNET 900 networks.
• Set the baud rate/data interface parameters. Default setting is 9600 bps, 8
data bits, no parity, 1 stop bit. If changes are required, use the BAUD xxxxx
abc command where xxxxx equals the data rate (1200–115200 bps) and abc
equals the communication parameters as follows:
a = Data Bits (7 or 8)
b = Parity (N for None, O for Odd, E for Even
c = Stop Bits (1 or 2)
NOTE: 7N1, 8E2 and 8O2 are not supported.
5. Verify proper operation by observing the LED display
• Refer to Table 4 on Page 31 for a description of the status LEDs.
• Refine directional antenna headings for maximum received signal strength
using the RSSI command. (Remotes must be synchronized with the master.)
CONTENTS
1.0 ABOUT THIS MANUAL..........................................................1
2.0 PRODUCT DESCRIPTION....................................................1
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
Transceiver Features .......................................................1
Model Configuration Codes ............................................2
Spread Spectrum Radios—How Are They Different? .....3
Typical Applications .........................................................3
Multiple Address Systems (MAS) ....................................3
Point-to-Point System ......................................................4
Adding a Tail-End Link to an Existing Network ................4
Extending a TransNET Network with a Repeater.............5
2.5 Accessories ....................................................................5
3.0 INSTALLATION PLANNING ...................................................6
3.1 General Requirements ....................................................6
3.2 Site Selection ..................................................................7
Terrain and Signal Strength .............................................7
Conducting a Site Survey ................................................8
3.3 A Word About Radio Interference ...................................9
3.4 Antenna & Feedline Selection .........................................10
Antennas..........................................................................10
Feedlines .........................................................................11
3.5 How Much Output Power Can be Used? ........................12
4.0 INSTALLATION ......................................................................13
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
Transceiver Installation ....................................................13
Configuring Multiple Remote Units .................................17
Tail-End Links ..................................................................18
Configuring a Network for Extensions .............................18
5.0 OPERATION ..........................................................................18
5.1 Initial Start-up ..................................................................18
5.2 Performance Optimization ...............................................19
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MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
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Antenna Aiming............................................................... 19
Antenna SWR Check ...................................................... 20
Data Buffer Setting—Modbus Protocol ........................... 20
Hoptime Setting............................................................... 20
TotalFlow™ Protocol at 9600 with Sleep Mode............... 20
Operation at 115200 bps................................................. 20
Baud Rate Setting ........................................................... 21
Radio Interference Checks.............................................. 21
6.0 RADIO PROGRAMMING ...................................................... 21
6.1 Radio Programming Methods ......................................... 21
Terminal Interface............................................................ 21
PC-Based Configuration Tool .......................................... 21
6.2 User Commands ............................................................ 22
Entering Commands ....................................................... 22
6.3 Detailed Command Descriptions .................................... 27
ADDR [1–65000] ............................................................. 28
Network Address
AMASK [0000 0000–FFFF FFFF] ................................... 28
Alarm Mask
AT [ON, OFF] .................................................................. 28
Hayes-Compatible AT Command Support
ASENSE [HI/LO] ............................................................. 28
Alarm Output Sense
BAUD [xxxxx abc]............................................................ 28
Data Interface Port Baud Rate
BUFF [ON, OFF] ............................................................. 29
Data Buffer Mode
CODE [NONE, 1…255]................................................... 30
Security Code
CSADDR [1–65000, NONE]............................................ 30
Clock-Synchronizing Master Address
CTS [0–255] .................................................................... 30
Clear-to-Send Delay
CTSHOLD [0–60000] ...................................................... 30
Clear-to-Send Hold Time
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MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
DEVICE [DCE, CTS KEY] ..............................................31
Radio-MODEM Behavior
DLINK [xxxxx/ON/OFF]....................................................31
InSite Diagnostics Link Support
DKEY ...............................................................................32
Turn Off Radio Transmitter Test Signal
DTYPE [NODE/ROOT] ....................................................32
Network Diagnostics Mode
FEC [ON, OFF] ................................................................32
Forward Error Correction
HOPTIME [7, 28] .............................................................32
Radio Transmitter Hop Timing
INIT ..................................................................................33
Initialize; Restore to Factory Defaults
HREV...............................................................................33
Hardware Revision
KEY..................................................................................33
Turn On Radio Transmitter Test Signal
LED [ON, OFF] ................................................................33
Enable/Disable LEDs
LPM [1, 0] ........................................................................33
Low-Power Mode
LPMHOLD [0–1000] ........................................................34
Low-Power Mode Sleep Time
MODE [M, R, X] ...............................................................34
Radio Operating Mode
OWM [xxxxx]....................................................................34
“Owner’s Message”
OWN [xxxxx] ....................................................................34
“Owner’s Name”
PORT [RS232, RS485] ....................................................34
Data Interface Port Signalling Standard
PWR [20–30] ...................................................................36
Radio Transmitter Power Level
REPEAT [0–10]................................................................36
Downstream Repeat Transmission Count
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MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
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RETRY [0–10] ................................................................. 36
Upstream Repeat Transmission Count
RSSI................................................................................ 37
Received Signal Strength Indicator
RTU [ON, OFF, 0-80]....................................................... 37
Remote Terminal Unit Simulator
RX [xxxx] ......................................................................... 37
Radio Receive Test Frequency
RXD [0–235] / [ON/OFF] ................................................. 38
RXD Delay
RXTOT [NONE, 0–1440] ................................................. 38
Receive Data Timeout-Timer
SAF [ON, OFF]................................................................ 38
Store-and-Forward Services Support
SETUP ............................................................................ 38
Setup Radio Test
SER................................................................................. 38
Radio Serial Number
SHOW CON .................................................................... 39
Show Virtual Connection Status
SHOW PWR.................................................................... 39
Show Measured RF Transmit Power
SHOW SYNC .................................................................. 39
Show Clock-Synchronization Master Network Address
SKIP [NONE, 1...8].......................................................... 39
Skip Radio Operating Zones
SLEEP [ON, OFF] ........................................................... 40
Transceiver Sleep
SREV .............................................................................. 40
Firmware Revision Level
STAT ................................................................................ 40
Alarm Status
TEMP .............................................................................. 40
Radio’s Internal Temperature
TX [xxxx] ......................................................................... 41
Radio Transmit Test Frequency
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MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
UNIT [10000–65000] .......................................................41
Unit Address
XADDR [0–31] .................................................................41
Extended Address
XMAP [00000000-FFFFFFFF].........................................41
Map of Extension Addresses
XPRI [0–31] .....................................................................41
Primary Extended Address
XRSSI [NONE, –40...–120]..............................................41
Extension RSSI Level
ZONE CLEAR..................................................................42
Clear Zone Statistics Log
ZONE DATA .....................................................................42
Read Zone Statistics Log
7.0 TROUBLESHOOTING ...........................................................42
7.1 LED Indicators ................................................................43
7.2 Alarm Codes ...................................................................44
Checking for Alarms—STAT command............................44
Major Alarms vs. Minor Alarms ........................................44
Alarm Code Definitions ....................................................44
7.3 Troubleshooting Chart .....................................................46
7.4 Performing Network-Wide Remote Diagnostics ..............47
7.5 Internal Fuse Replacement .............................................48
8.0 RADIO FIRMWARE UPGRADES ..........................................49
8.1 Obtaining New Firmware ................................................49
Saving a Web-Site Firmware File Onto Your PC ..............49
8.2 Installing Firmware Into Your Radio .................................49
9.0 OPERATING PRINCIPLES AND CONFIGURATION.............50
9.1 SAF Operation with Extension Radios ............................50
Simple Extended SAF Network .......................................50
Extended SAF Network ...................................................51
Retransmission and ARQ Operation ...............................51
9.2 Synchronizing Network Units ..........................................52
Synchronization Messages..............................................52
9.3 Using AT Commands with TransNET ..............................53
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
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9.4 Configuration Parameters
for Store-and-Forward Services .................................. 54
9.5 Using the Radio’s Sleep Mode (Remotes Only) ............. 56
Sleep Mode Example ...................................................... 57
9.6 Low-Power Mode ............................................................ 57
9.7 Low-Power Mode versus Remote’s Sleep Mode ............ 58
9.8 MIRRORED BITS™ Protocol Support ........................... 58
9.9 Seamless Mode Emulation ............................................. 58
9.10 Full-Duplex Emulation .................................................. 58
9.11 Co-Located and Close-Proximity Masters .................... 59
Master Station Configuration........................................... 59
Antenna System for Co-Located Master Stations ........... 59
9.12 Security ........................................................................ 60
10.0
TECHNICAL REFERENCE ................................................ 61
10.1 Product Specifications .................................................. 61
10.2 Diagnostic Interface Connections (RJ-11) .................... 62
10.3 Data Interface Connections (DB-9F) ............................ 63
Pin Descriptions—RS/EIA-232 Mode.............................. 63
Pin Descriptions—RS/EIA-422/485 Mode....................... 64
10.4 User Confirgurable I/O Connections ............................. 65
Application Example........................................................ 66
10.5 Power Supply Connections at 28 Vdc .......................... 67
10.6 dBm-Watts-Volts Conversion Chart ................................ 68
Copyright Notice
This Installation and Operation Guide and all software described herein are Copyright 2004 by
Microwave Data Systems Inc. All rights reserved. Microwave Data Systems Inc. reserves its
right to correct any errors and omissions in this manual.
MDS Quality Policy Statement
We, the employees of Microwave Data Systems, are committed to understanding and exceeding
our customer’s needs and expectations.
• We appreciate our customers’ patronage. They are our business.
• We promise to serve them and anticipate their needs.
• We are committed to providing solutions that are cost effective, innovative and
reliable, with consistently high levels of quality.
We are committed to the continuous improvement of all of our systems and processes, to improve
product quality and increase customer satisfaction.
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MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
RF Exposure Notice
RF EXPOSURE
Professional installation required. The radio equipment described in this
guide emits radio frequency energy. Although the power level is low, the
concentrated energy from a directional antenna may pose a health
hazard. Do not allow people to come closer than 23 cm (9 inches) to the
antenna when the transmitter is operating in indoor or outdoor environments. More information on RF exposure is available on the Internet at
www.fcc.gov/oet/info/documents/bulletins.
ISO 9001 Registration
Microwave Data Systems adheres to the internationally-accepted ISO 9001 quality system standard.
UL/CSA Notice
This product is available for use in Class I, Division 2, Groups A, B, C & D Hazardous Locations. Such locations are defined in Article 500 of the National Fire Protection Association
(NFPA) publication NFPA 70, otherwise known as the National Electrical Code.
The transceiver has been recognized for use in these hazardous locations by two independent
agencies —Underwriters Laboratories (UL) and the Canadian Standards Association (CSA). The
UL certification for the transceiver is as a Recognized Component for use in these hazardous
locations, in accordance with UL Standard 1604, UL508. The CSA Certification is in accordance
with CSA STD C22.2 No. 213-M1987.
UL/CSA Conditions of Approval: The transceiver is not acceptable as a stand-alone unit for use
in the hazardous locations described above. It must either be mounted within another piece of
equipment which is certified for hazardous locations, or installed within guidelines, or conditions
of approval, as set forth by the approving agencies. These conditions of approval are as follows:
1. The transceiver must be mounted within a separate enclosure which is suitable for the
intended application.
2. The coaxial antenna cable, power input cable and interface cables must be routed through
conduit in accordance with Division 2 wiring methods as specified in the National Electrical
Code, Article 501.4(B).
3. The transceiver must be used within its Recognized “Ratings”.
4. Installation, operation and maintenance of the transceiver should be in accordance with the
transceiver's installation manual, and the National Electrical Code.
5. Tampering or replacement with non-factory components may adversely affect the safe use of
the transceiver in hazardous locations, and may void the approval.
6. A power connector with screw-type retaining screws as supplied by MDS must be used.
When installed in a Class I, Div. 2, Groups A, B, C or D hazardous location, observe the following: WARNING EXPLOSION HAZARD
Do not disconnect equipment unless power
has been switched off or the area is know to be non-hazardous.
Refer to Articles 500 through 502 of the National Electrical Code (NFPA 70) for further information on hazardous locations and approved Division 2 wiring methods.
FCC Part 15 Notice
The MDS TransNET 900™ transceivers (FCC ID: EL 805) comply with Part 15 of the FCC
Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1) this device may not cause
harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation. This device is specifically designed to be used under
Section 15.247 of the FCC Rules and Regulations. Any unauthorized modification or changes to
this device without the express approval of Microwave Data Systems may void the user’s
authority to operate this device. Furthermore, this device is intended to be used only when
installed in accordance with the instructions outlined in this manual. Failure to comply with these
instructions may also void the user’s authority to operate this device.
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
vii
Manual Revision and Accuracy
While every reasonable effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this manual, product
improvements may result in minor differences between the manual and the product shipped to
you. If you have additional questions or need an exact specification for a product, please contact
our Customer Service Team using the information at the back of this guide. In addition, manual
updates can often be found on the MDS Web site at www.microwavedata.com.
RXD
TXD
C
SYN
PWR
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MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
1.0 ABOUT THIS MANUAL
This manual presents installation and operating instructions of the
MDS TransNET 900™ transceiver for use by a professional installer. This
person is expected to install, operate, and perform basic system maintenance
on the described radio. Following installation, we suggest keeping this
manual near the equipment for future reference.
2.0 PRODUCT DESCRIPTION
The transceiver, shown in Figure 1, is a spread spectrum radio designed for
license-free operation in the 900 MHz frequency band. Employing Digital
Signal Processing (DSP) technology, it is highly reliable for long-distance
communications, even in the presence of weak signals or interference.
DSP technology also makes it possible to obtain information about radio
operation and troubleshoot problems, without going to the remote radio site.
Using appropriate software at the master station, diagnostic data can be
obtained on any DSP radio in the system, even while payload data is being
transmitted. (See “Performing Network-Wide Remote Diagnostics” on
Page 47.)
The MDS TransNET 900 is housed in a compact and rugged die-cast enclosure that need only be protected from direct exposure to the weather. It
contains a single printed circuit board with all necessary components for
radio operation. No jumper settings or manual adjustments are required to
configure the radio for operation.
Figure 1.
MDS TransNET 900™
Transceiver
2.1 Transceiver Features
Listed below are several key features of the MDS TransNET 900 transceiver.
These are designed to ease the installation and configuration of the radio,
while retaining the ability to make changes in the future.
• 128 frequencies over 902–928 MHz, subdivided into eight frequency
zones
• Configurable operating zones to omit frequencies with constant
interference
• 65,000 available network addresses
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MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
1
• Network-wide configuration from the master station; eliminates most
trips to remote sites
• Data transparency–ensures compatibility with virtually all
asynchronous SCADA system RTUs
• Peak-hold RSSI, averaged over eight hop cycles
• Operation at up to 115,200 bps continuous data flow
• Store-and-Forward repeater operation
• Data latency typically less than 10 ms
• Same hardware for master or remote configuration
• Supports RS/EIA-232 and RS/EIA-485 user interface
• Low current consumption—Less than 8 mA in “sleep” mode.
NOTE:
Some MDS TransNET 900 radio features may not be available on all radios,
based on the options purchased and the applicable regulatory constraints for
the region in which the radio will operate.
2.2 Model Configuration Codes
The model number code is printed on the radio enclosure, and provides key
information about how the radio was configured when it left the factory. See
Figure 2 for an explanation of the model number characters. (Note: This
information is subject to change and should not be used for product ordering.)
OPERATION
(X) Remote/Master
(M) Mirrored Bits
AGENCY
BAND
(N) None
(9) 900 MHz
(F) FCC/IC
EL805 9
ENCLOSURE
(0) PCB Only
(1) w/Enclosure
MTG. BRACKETS
(N) None
(S) Standard
(D) DIN Rail
N
1 A
INTERFACE
(Ø) EIA/RS-232
(1) EIA/RS-485
N
SPARE
(N) None
DIAGNOSTICS
(N) None
(W) Network-Wide
OPTIONS
(A) None
SAFETY CERT.
(N) N/A
(C) UL/US/CSA
OPTION
(N) None
Figure 2. MDS TransNET 900 Transceiver Model Configuration Codes
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MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
2.3 Spread Spectrum Radios—
How Are They Different?
The main difference between a traditional (licensed) radio and the
MDS TransNET 900 transceiver is that this unit “hops” from channel to
channel many times per second using a specific hop pattern applied to all
radios in the network. A distinct hopping pattern is provided for each of the
65,000 available network addresses, thereby minimizing the chance of interference with other spread spectrum systems. In the USA, and certain other
countries, no license is required to install and operate this type of radio
system, provided that RF power and antenna gain restrictions are observed.
2.4 Typical Applications
Multiple Address Systems (MAS)
This is the most common application of the MDS TransNET 900 transceiver.
It consists of a central control station (master) and two or more associated
remote units, as shown in Figure 3. An MAS network provides communications between a central host computer and remote terminal units (RTUs) or
other data collection devices. The operation of the radio system is transparent
to the computer equipment. When used in this application, the transceiver
provides an excellent alternative to traditional (licensed) MAS radio systems.
Invisible place holder
MDS TransNET
Remote
RTU
RXD
RTU
MDS TransNET
Remote
TXD
C
SYN
PWR
RXD
TXD
C
SYN
PWR
MDS TransNET
Remote
RXD
TXD
C
SYN
RTU
PWR
MDS TransNET
Master
RXD
RXD
TXD
TXD
C
SYN
C
SYN
PWR
RTU
PWR
MDS TransNET
Remote
Host System
Figure 3. Typical MAS Network
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MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
3
Point-to-Point System
A point-to-point configuration (Figure 4) is a simple arrangement consisting
of just two radios—a master and a remote. This provides a half-duplex
communications link for the transfer of data between two locations.
Invisible place holder
MDS TransNET
Master
MDS TransNET
Remote
Host System
Figure 4. Typical Point-to-Point Link
Adding a Tail-End Link to an Existing Network
A tail-end link can be used to extend the range of a traditional (licensed) MAS
system. This might be required if an outlying site is blocked from the MAS
master station by a natural or man-made obstruction. In this arrangement, an
MDS TransNET 900 radio links the outlying remote site into the rest of a
licensed MAS system by sending data from that site to an associated
MDS TransNET 900 installed at one of the licensed remote sites. (See
Figure 5).
As the data from the outlying site is received at the licensed remote site, it is
transferred to the licensed radio (via a local cable connection) and is then
transmitted to the MAS master station in the usual manner. Additional details
for tail-end links are given in Section 4.3 (Page 18).
Invisible place holder
REPEATER STATION
MDS x710B
Series Radio
Master Station
MDS TransNET
Master
PWR
SYN
C
TXD
RXD
ACTIVE
STBY
ALARM
RX ALR
TX ALR
ACTIVE
LINE
STBY
ALARM
RX ALR
TX ALR
LINE
ENTER
ESCAPE
SP
RE
TO AD
OU SPE
TL CT
YI RU
NG M
SI LIN
TE K
Null-Modem Cable
MDS TransNET
Remote
Remote
Radio
PWR
Remote
Radio
SYN
C
TXD
RXD
RTU
RTU
RTU
MAS SYSTEM (LICENSED OR UNLICENSED)
OUTLYING
REMOTE SITE
LICENSE-FREE SPREAD SPECTRUM SYSTEM
Figure 5. Typical Tail-End Link Arrangement
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MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
Extending a TransNET Network with a Repeater
Similar to a Tail-End Link, Store-and-Forward (SAF) offers a way to physically extend the range of a TransNET network, but in a simplified economical
manner. SAF operates by dividing a network into a vertical hierarchy of two
or more sub-networks. Extension radios (designated as MODE X) serve as
single-radio repeaters that link adjacent sub-networks, and move data from
one sub-network to the next one.
Invisible place holder
REPEATER STATION
MDS TransNET
Master
MODE M
SP
RE
TO AD
OU SPE
TL CT
YI RU
NG M
SI LIN
TE K
RTU
MDS TransNET
Extension
MODE X
MDS TransNET
Remote
MODE R
MDS TransNET
Remote
MODE R
MDS TransNET
Remote
MODE R
RTU
RTU
OUTLYING
REMOTE SITE
RTU
Figure 6. TransNET Repeater Network
2.5 Accessories
MDS TransNET 900 transceivers can be used with one or more of the accessories listed in Table 1. Contact the factory for ordering details.
Table 1. Accessories
Accessory
Description
AC Power
Adapter
Small power supply module designed for continuous service. UL approved.
Input: 120/220 Vac
Output: 12 Vdc @ 500 mA (20 Watts)
01-3682A02
Omnidirectional
Antennas
Rugged antennas suited for use at Master
stations. Consult MDS for details.
Various
Yagi Antenna
Rugged directional antennas suited for use at
Remote stations. Consult MDS for details.
6.4 dB gain:
97-3194A13
10 dB gain:
97-3194A14
Bandpass Filter
Antenna system filter to aid in eliminating interference from paging system transmissions.
20-2822A02
TNC-to-N
Adapter Cable
(3 foot/1 meter)
Coaxial cable used to connect the radio’s TNC
antenna connector to a Type-N style commonly used on large diameter coaxial cables.
97-1677A159
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MDS Part No.
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
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Table 1. Accessories (Continued)
TNC-to-N
Adapter Cable
(6 foot/1.8
meter)
Coaxial cable used to connect the radio’s TNC
antenna connector to a Type-N style commonly used on large diameter coaxial cables.
97-1677A160
TNC-to-N RF
Adaptor Plug
Adapts radio’s antenna connector to Type-N
style commonly used on large diameter coaxial cables.
97-1677A161
RS/EIA-232
Cable
Shielded data cable fitted with DB-9 male and
DB-9 female, 6 ft./1.8 meter.
97-1971A03
RJ-11 to DB-9
Adapter Cable
For connecting a PC terminal to the transceiver via the radio’s DIAG(notics) connector.
Used for programming and diagnostics.
03-3246A01
Fuse (Internal)
Fuse, 2A SMF Slo-Blo
29-1784A03
Flat-Surface
Mtg. Brackets
Brackets: 2” x 3” plates designed to be
screwed onto the bottom of the transceiver for
surface-mounting the radio.
82-1753-A01
Mtg. Bracket
Screws
Screws: 6-32/1/4˝ with locking adhesive.
(Industry Standard MS 51957-26)
70-2620-A01
19” Rail Mtg.
Brackets
Adaptor for mounting the radio in a standard
19-inch equipment rack.
Consult Factory
DIN Rail Mtg.
Brackets
Adaptor for mounting the radio in a standard
19-inch equipment rack.
03-4022A01
3.0 INSTALLATION PLANNING
The installation of the radio is not difficult, but it does require some planning
to ensure station reliability and efficiency. This section provides tips for
selecting an appropriate site, choosing an antenna system, and reducing the
chance of harmful interference.
3.1 General Requirements
There are three main requirements for installing the radio—adequate and
stable primary power, a good antenna system, and the correct interface
between the transceiver and the data device.
Figure 7 shows a typical remote station arrangement. Master stations are
similar, but an omni-directional antenna is normally used instead of a directional type, and a host computer replaces the data terminal equipment.
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MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
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Invisible place holder
DATA TERMINAL
EQUIPMENT
ANTENNA
SYSTEM
LO
POWER SUPPLY
13.8 VDC @ 500 mA
(6–30 Vdc)
W
-L
O
SS
FE
ED
LI
N
E
MDS Transceiver
Figure 7. Typical Remote Station Arrangement
3.2 Site Selection
For a successful installation, careful thought must be given to selecting proper
sites for the master and remote stations. Suitable sites should provide the
following:
• Protection from direct weather exposure
• A source of adequate and stable primary power
• Suitable entrances for antenna, interface or other required cabling
• Antenna location that provides an unobstructed transmission path in the
direction of the associated station(s)
These requirements can be quickly determined in most cases. A possible
exception is the last item—verifying that an unobstructed transmission path
exists. Radio signals travel primarily by line-of-sight, and obstructions
between the sending and receiving stations will affect system performance. If
you are not familiar with the effects of terrain and other obstructions on radio
transmission, the discussion below will provide helpful background.
Terrain and Signal Strength
While the 900 MHz band offers many advantages over VHF and lower UHF
frequencies for data transmission, it is also more prone to signal attenuation
from obstructions such as terrain, foliage or buildings in the transmission
path.
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A line-of-sight transmission path between the master station and its associated remote site(s) is highly desirable and provides the most reliable communications link. A line-of-sight path can often be achieved by mounting the
station antenna on a tower or other elevated structure that raises it to a level
sufficient to clear surrounding terrain and other obstructions.
The importance of a clear transmission path relates closely to the distance to
be covered by the system. If the system is to cover only a limited geographic
area, say up to 3 miles (4.8 km), then some obstructions in the communications path can usually be tolerated with minimal impact. For longer range
systems, any substantial obstruction in the communications path could
compromise the performance of the system, or block communications
entirely.
Much depends on the minimum signal strength that can be tolerated in a given
system. Although the exact figure will differ from one system to another, a
Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI) of –85 dBm or stronger will
provide acceptable performance in many cases. While the equipment will
work at lower signal strengths, this provides a “fade margin” to account for
variations in signal strength which may occur from time-to-time.
Conducting a Site Survey
If you are in doubt about the suitability of the radio sites in your system, it is
best to evaluate them before a permanent installation is begun. This can be
done with an on-the-air test (preferred method), or indirectly, using
path-study software.
An on-the-air test is preferred because it allows you to see firsthand the
factors involved at an installation site and to directly observe the quality of
system operation. Even if a computer path study was conducted earlier, this
test should be done to verify the predicted results.
The test can be performed by first installing a radio and antenna at the
proposed master station site and then visiting each remote site with a transceiver and a hand-held antenna.
With the hand-held antenna positioned near the proposed mounting spot, a
technician can check for synchronization with the master station (shown by a
lit SYNC lamp on the front panel) and measure the reported RSSI value. If
adequate signal strength cannot be obtained, it may be necessary to mount the
station antennas higher, use higher gain antennas, or select a different site. To
prepare the equipment for an on-the-air test, follow the general installation
procedures given in this guide and become familiar with the operating
instructions given in Section 5.0, beginning on Page 18.
If time is short, and a site survey is impractical, a computer path study is a
good alternative. Factors such as terrain, distance, transmitter power, receiver
sensitivity, and other conditions are taken into account to predict the performance of a proposed system. Contact MDS for more information on path
study services.
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3.3 A Word About Radio Interference
The radio shares the frequency spectrum with other services and other Part 15
(unlicensed) devices in the USA. As such, near 100% error free communications may not be achieved in a given location, and some level of interference
should be expected. However, the radio’s flexible design and hopping techniques should allow adequate performance as long as care is taken in
choosing station location, configuration of radio parameters and software/protocol techniques.
In general, keep the following points in mind when setting up your communications network:
1. Systems installed in rural areas are least likely to encounter interference;
those in suburban and urban environments are more likely to be affected
by other devices operating in the license-free frequency band and by
adjacent licensed services.
2. If possible, use a directional antenna at remote sites. Although these
antennas may be more costly than omnidirectional types, they confine the
transmission and reception pattern to a comparatively narrow lobe, which
minimizes interference to (and from) stations located outside the pattern.
3. If interference is suspected from a nearby licensed system (such as a
paging transmitter), it may be helpful to use horizontal polarization of all
antennas in the network. Because most other services use vertical
polarization in this band, an additional 20 dB of attenuation to
interference can be achieved by using horizontal polarization.
4. Multiple transceiver systems can co-exist in proximity to each other with
only very minor interference as long as they are each assigned a unique
network address. Each network address has a different hop pattern.
5. If constant interference is present in a particular frequency zone, it may
be necessary to “lock out” that zone from the radio’s hopping pattern.
The radio includes built-in tools to help users remove blocked frequency
zones. Refer to the discussion of the SKIP command (Page 39) for more
information. In the USA, a maximum of four zones may be skipped, per
FCC rules. Check the regulatory requirements for your region.
6. Interference can also come from out-of-band RF sources such as paging
systems. Installation of a bandpass filter in the antenna system may bring
relief. (Recommended: MDS P/N 20-2822A02)
7. Proper use of the RETRY and REPEAT commands may be helpful in areas
with heavy interference.
The RETRY command sets the maximum number of times (1 to 10) that a
radio will re-transmit upstream data over the air. Values greater than 1
successively improve the chances of a message getting through when
interference is a problem.
The REPEAT command sets a fixed number of unconditional
retransmissions for downstream data.
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8. The RF power output of all radios in a system should be set for the lowest
level necessary for reliable communications. This lessens the chance of
causing unnecessary interference to nearby systems.
3.4 Antenna & Feedline Selection
Antennas
The equipment can be used with a number of antennas. The exact style used
depends on the physical size and layout of a system. Contact your MDS representative for specific recommendations on antenna types and hardware
sources.
In general, an omnidirectional antenna (Figure 8 and Figure 9) is used at the
master station site in an MAS system. This provides equal coverage to all of
the remote sites.
NOTE:
Antenna polarization is important. If the wrong polarization is used, a signal
reduction of 20 dB or more will result. Most systems using a gain-type omnidirectional antenna at the master station employ vertical polarization of the signal; therefore, the remote antenna(s) must also be vertically polarized
(elements oriented perpendicular to the horizon).
When required, horizontally polarized omnidirectional antennas are also available. Contact your MDS representative for details.
Figure 8.
Omnidirectional Antenna
(mounted to mast)
At remote sites and point-to-point systems, a directional Yagi antenna
(Figure 9), is generally recommended to minimize interference to and from
other users. Antennas are available from a number of manufacturers.
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Invisible place holder
Figure 9. Typical Yagi Antenna
mounted to mast
Feedlines
The choice of feedline used with the antenna should be carefully considered.
Poor-quality coaxial cables should be avoided, as they will degrade system
performance for both transmission and reception. The cable should be kept as
short as possible to minimize signal loss.
For cable runs of less than 20 feet (6 meters), or for short range transmission,
an inexpensive type such as Type RG-8A/U may be acceptable. Otherwise,
we recommend using a low-loss cable type suited for 900 MHz, such as
Times Microwave LMR 400® or Andrew Heliax®.
Table 2 lists several types of feedlines and indicates the signal losses (in dB)
that result when using various lengths of each cable at 900 MHz. The choice
of cable will depend on the required length, cost considerations, and the
amount of signal loss that can be tolerated.
Table 2. Length vs. loss in coaxial cables at 900 MHz
Cable Type
LMR 400
10 Feet
(3.05 Meters)
50 Feet
(15.24 Meters)
100 Feet
(30.48 Meters)
0.39 dB
1.95 dB
3.9 dB
300 Feet
(91.44 Meters)
11.7 dB
(not recommended)
1/2 inch
HELIAX
0.23 dB
1.15 dB
2.29 dB
6.87 dB
7/8 inch
HELIAX
0.13 dB
0.64 dB
1.28 dB
3.84 dB
1 1/4 inch
HELIAX
0.10 dB
0.48 dB
0.95 dB
2.85 dB
1 5/8 inch
HELIAX
0.08 dB
0.40 dB
0.80 dB
2.4 dB
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3.5 How Much Output Power Can be Used?
The transceiver is normally supplied from the factory set for a nominal
+30 dBm (1 Watt) RF power output setting; this is the maximum transmitter
output power allowed under FCC rules. The power must be decreased from
this level if the antenna system gain exceeds 6 dBi. The allowable level is
dependent on the antenna gain, feedline loss, and the transmitter output power
setting. Power considerations for the transceiver are discussed below.
NOTE: In some countries, the maximum allowable RF output may be limited to
less than 1 watt (e.g., 100 mW / +20 dBm). Be sure to check for and
comply with the requirements for your area.
To determine the maximum allowable power setting of the radio, perform the
following steps:
1. Determine the antenna system gain by subtracting the feedline loss (in
dB) from the antenna gain (in dBi). For example, if the antenna gain is
9.5 dBi, and the feedline loss is 1.5 dB, the antenna system gain would be
8 dB. (If the antenna system gain is 6 dB or less, no power adjustment is
required.)
2. Subtract the antenna system gain from 36 dBm (the maximum allowable
EIRP). The result indicates the maximum transmitter power (in dBm)
allowed under the rules. In the example above, this is 28 dBm.
3. If the maximum transmitter power allowed in your region is less than 30
dBm, use the PWR command (described on Page 36) to set the power
accordingly.
For convenience, Table 3 lists several antenna system gains and shows the
maximum allowable power setting of the radio. Note that a gain of 6 dB or
less entitles you to operate the radio at full power output—30 dBm (1 watt).
Table 3. Antenna system gain vs. power output setting (USA)
Antenna System Gain
(Antenna Gain in dBi*
minus Feedline Loss in dB†)
6 (or less)
Maximum Power
Setting
EIRP
(in dBm)
(in dBm)
30
36
8
28
36
10
26
36
12
24
36
14
22
36
16
20
36
* Most antenna manufacturers rate antenna gain in dBd in their literature. To
convert to dBi, add 2.15 dB.
† Feedline loss varies by cable type and length. To determine the loss for
common lengths of feedline, see Table 2 on Page 11.
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4.0 INSTALLATION
Figure 10 shows a typical transceiver shipment. Check the contents against
the packing list secured to the outside of the shipping box. Accessories and
spare parts kits, if any, are wrapped separately. Inspect all items for signs of
damage and save all packing materials for possible re-shipment.
Invisible place holder
MDS
Xxxx
MOUNTING
BRACKETS
INSTALLATION &
OPERATION GUIDE,
AND SOFTWARE
(CD AND/OR MANUAL)
2-PIN
POWER PLUG
SPARE FUSE
Figure 10. Typical Transceiver Shipment
Items are not shown at the same scale.
User documentation will be provided as a paper manual and/or as a PDF on
the “MDS TransNET 900™ Support Package CD” (P/N 03-2708A01). The
CD includes:
• Installation & Operation Guide in PDF (a.k.a. Adobe Acrobat™)
• TransNET Configuration Software
If a paper copy is required but not provided with your shipment, please
contact MDS.
4.1 Transceiver Installation
The following is an overview of a typical procedure for installing the transceiver. In most cases, these steps alone will be sufficient to complete the
installation. Should further information be required, contact the factory using
the information given on the inside back cover of this manual.
If you are installing a tail-end link system, you should also review Section 4.3
(Page 18) for important details on configuration.
NOTE:
It is recommended that the master station be installed first. In this way, it will
be possible to quickly check the operation of each associated remote station
as it is placed on the air.
1. Mount the transceiver to a stable surface using the brackets supplied with
the radio. (Fasteners/anchors are not supplied.) Figure 11 shows the
dimensions of the transceiver case and its mounting brackets. If possible,
choose a mounting location that provides easy access to the connectors
on the end of the radio and an unobstructed view of the LED status
indicators.
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MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
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Invisible place holder
2.75
(7.0 cm)
6.63
(16.64 cm)
1.62
(4.15 cm)
Figure 11. Transceiver Mounting Dimensions
Figure 12 shows the four connectors on the MDS TransNET 900 and their
functions.
Invisible place holder
Antenna
Data
(Payload)
Diagnostic
(Communications)
Primary Power
(6–30 Vdc)
Figure 12. Interface Connector Functions
2. Install the antenna and antenna feedline for the station. Antennas should
be mounted in the clear and in accordance with the manufacturer’s
instructions. Additional information on antennas and feedlines is
contained in Section 3.4 on Page 10.
NOTE:
It is recommended to mount the antenna be at least 10 feet (>3 meters) from
the radio, RTU, sensors and other components of the system to prevent RFI.
3. Connect the data equipment to the transceiver’s DATA connector. Use
only the required pins for the application.
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Typical RS/EIA-232 applications require the use of Pin 2 (receive
data—RXD and Pin 3 (transmit data—TXD). Some systems may require the
use of Pin 7 (Request-to-send—RTS). Figure 13 and Figure 14 show a
detailed views of the DATA connector for EIA/RS-232 and EIA/RS-485,
respectively.
If hardware flow control is desired, Pin 7 (RTS) and Pin 8 (CTS) may also be
connected. A more detailed discussion of pin functions is provided in see
“Data Interface Connections (DB-9F)” on page 63.
Invisible place holder
Pin Function
1
5
9
1.....Data Carrier Detect (DCD)
2.....Receive Data (RXD)
3.....Transmit Data (TXD)
4.....Sleep (GND = Sleep)
5.....Signal Ground (GND)
6.....Alarm Output (+5/-5 Vdc)
7.....Ready-to-Send (RTS)
8.....Clear-to-Send (CTS)
9.....Reserved for Special Uses (Do not connect)
6
Figure 13. DATA Connector Pin Functions, EIA/RS-232 Mode
As viewed from outside the radio
NOTE:
The data cabling between the transceiver and the connected device should be
kept as short as possible. For EIA/RS-232 operation, the maximum recommended cable length is 50 feet/15 meters.
Invisible place holder
Pin Function
1
5
9
6
1.....Not Used (Open)
2.....TXD+/TXA, Non-inverted driver output.
Supplies data to connected device.
3.....RXD+/RXA, Non-inverted receiver input.
Accepts data from the connected device.
4.....Sleep Mode Input (GND = Sleep)
5.....Signal Ground (GND)
6.....Not Used (Open)
7.....RXD–/RXB, Inverting receiver input
8.....TXD–/TXB, Inverting driver output
9.....Not Connected (User configureable via internal jumper)
Figure 14. DATA Connector Pin Functions, EIA/RS-485 Mode
As viewed from outside the radio
4. Measure and install the primary power for the transceiver. It must be
within 6–30 Vdc (including transients) and be capable of providing 7.5
watts over this voltage range. (Typical current draw is 510 mA
@13.8 Vdc; 1.25A @6 Vdc.) A power connector with screw-terminals is
provided with each unit. Strip the wire leads to 0.25"/6 mm. Be sure to
observe proper polarity. The left pin is the positive input; the right is
negative. (See Figure 15.)
NOTE:
If you are planning on operating the transceiver from a power source above 15
Vdc, please read “Power Supply Connections at 28 Vdc” on Page 67 for guidance on wiring that will minimize the chances of damaging transients.
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CAUTION
POSSIBLE
EQUIPMENT
DAMAGE
The radio must be used only with negative-ground systems. Make sure the polarity of the power source is correct. The unit is protected from reverse polarity by an
internal diode and fuse.
Invisible place holder
Lead
Binding
Screws (2)
Wire Ports (2)
Figure 15. Power Connector
(Polarity: Left +, Right –)
CAUTION
POSSIBLE
EQUIPMENT
DAMAGE
The power connector used with the TransNET series is
similar to that used by other MDS products, such as the
MDS 9810 and MDS x710 family. The connectors are
not equal and the use of the other style connector may
provide unreliable connections and a spark may be created.
Only the power connector, shown in Figure 15 with
screw terminals and two retainer screws should be used
with this unit.
5. Set the radio’s basic configuration with a PC terminal connected to the
DIAG(nostics) connector via an RJ-11 to DB-9 adapter cable, MDS
P/N 03-3246A01. (A cable of this type may be constructed using the
information shown in Figure 21 on Page 62.) For more information on
connecting a PC terminal and preparing it for use, refer to Section 6.1 on
Page 21.
The three essential settings for the Transceiver are as follows:
Mode—Master, Remote, or Extension
Network Address—a unique number from 1 to 65000
Data Interface Parameters—bps, data bits, parity, stop bits
a.
Set the Mode using the MODE M (Master), MODE R (Remote), or
MODE X (Extension) command. (Note: There can be only one master
radio in a system.)
If any MODE X radios are used in the network, SAF must be turned
on at the Master station. The MODE X radio must be programmed
with an Extended Address (XADDR). Units that need to hear the
MODE X radio must be programmed with an appropriate XPRI and/or
XMAP value. (See “SAF Operation with Extension Radios” on
Page 50 for more information.)
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b.
Set a unique Network Address (1–65000) using ADDR command.
Each radio in the system must have the same network address. Tip:
Use the last four digits of the master’s serial number to help avoid
conflicts with other users.
c.
Set the baud rate/data interface parameters. Default setting is 9600
bps, 8 data bits, no parity, 1 stop bit. If changes are required, use the
BAUD xxxxx abc command where xxxxx equals the data speed
(1200–115200 bps) and abc equals the communication parameters
as follows:
a = Data bits (7 or 8)
b = Parity (N for None, O for Odd, E for Even
c = Stop bits (1 or 2)
NOTE:
7N1, 8E2 and 8O2 are invalid interface parameters.
4.2 Configuring Multiple Remote Units
In most installations, the Remote radios will be programmed with virtually
the same set of parameters. This process can be streamlined by testing key
pieces of equipment—such as the Master, any Extensions, and a typical
Remote—on a benchtop setup prior to installation. This allows you to test
various configurations in a controlled environment. Once the evaluation
network is working satisfactorily, you can save the configuration of each unit
in a data file on your PC’s hard drive through the use of the MDS TransNET
Configuration Software.
Most often, there are many Remote units that will need configuring. Using the
MDS TransNET Configuration Software, you can save the sample unit’s
configuration, then open the configuration file with the program and install it
in the next Remote. The software will prevent you from overwriting unit or
mode-unique parameters.
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4.3 Tail-End Links
DCE
DB-9
DCE
DB-25
RXD 3
3
TXD
TXD
2
RXD
2
5 GND
GND 7
RTS
4
If required.
8 CTS
MDS TransNET 900
Remote Transceiver
(DEVICE CTS KEY)
MDS x710B Series
Remote Transceiver
(or device requiring keyline)
A tail-end link is established by connecting an MDS TransNET 900 radio
“back-to-back” with another radio such as a licensed MDS x710B Series
transceiver. This can be used to link an outlying remote site into the rest of an
MAS network. (Figure 5 on Page 4 shows a diagram of a typical tail-end link
system.) The wiring connections between the two radios in a tail-end link
system should be made as shown in Figure 16.
Figure 16. Data Interface Cable Wiring for Tail-End Links
4.4 Configuring a Network for Extensions
The installation and configuration of an Extension transceiver is
straight-forward with only a few unique parameters that need to be considered and set at each unit.
In every network there can be only one Master station. It will serve as the sole
gateway to the outside world. The tables in “Configuration Parameters for
Store-and-Forward Services” on Page 54 detail the parameters that will need
to be set on each type of radio in the network. For a detailed description of
this network design, please see “SAF Operation with Extension Radios” on
page 50.
5.0 OPERATION
5.1 Initial Start-up
In-service operation of the transceiver is completely automatic. Once the unit
has been properly installed and configured, operator actions are limited to
observing the LED status indicators for proper operation.
If all parameters are correctly set, operation of the radio can be started by
following these steps:
1. Apply primary power to the radio.
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2. Observe the transceiver LED status panel for proper indications. Table 4
provides an explanation of the LED functions.
In a normally operating system, the following indications will be seen
within 16 seconds of start-up:
• PWR lamp lit continuously
• SYNC lamp lit continuously
• Remote radio(s) transmitting data (TXD) and receiving data (RXD) with
master station.
Table 4. LED indicator descriptions
PWR
SYNC
TXD
RXD
Name
Description
PWR
• Continuous—Power is applied to the radio; no problems detected
• Flashing (5 times-per-second)—Fault indication.
See “TROUBLESHOOTING” on Page 42
• Off—Radio is unpowered or in Sleep mode
See also, “LED [ON, OFF]” on Page 33.
SYNC
Continuous—Radio is receiving/sending synchronization frames
On within 10 seconds of power-up under normal conditions
TXD
Transmit data activity on the DB-9 DATA interface connector.
Payload data to connected device.
RXD
Receive data activity on the DB-9 DATA interface connector.
Payload data from the connected device.
5.2 Performance Optimization
After the basic operation of the radio has been checked, you may wish to optimize its performance using some of the suggestions given here. The effectiveness of these techniques will vary with the design of your system and the
format of the data being sent.
Complete instructions for using the commands referenced in this manual are
provided in “RADIO PROGRAMMING” on Page 21.
Antenna Aiming
For optimum performance of directional antennas, they must be accurately
aimed in the direction of desired transmission. The easiest way to do this is to
point the antenna in the approximate direction, then use the remote radio’s
RSSI command (Received Signal Strength Indicator) to further refine the
heading for maximum received signal strength.
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In an MAS system, RSSI readings are only meaningful when initiated from a
remote station. This is because the master station typically receives signals
from several remote sites, and the RSSI would be continually changing as the
master receives from each remote in turn.
Antenna SWR Check
It is necessary to briefly key the transmitter for this check by placing the radio
in the SETUP mode (Page 38) and using the KEY command. (To unkey the
radio, enter DKEY; to disable the SETUP mode and return the radio to normal
operation, enter Q or QUIT.)
The SWR of the antenna system should be checked before the radio is put into
regular service. For accurate readings, a wattmeter suited for 1000 MHz is
required. One unit meeting this criteria is the Bird Model 43 directional wattmeter with a 5J element installed.
The reflected power should be less than 10% of the forward power
(≈2:1 SWR). Higher readings usually indicate problems with the antenna,
feedline or coaxial connectors.
Data Buffer Setting—Modbus Protocol
The default setting for the data buffer is OFF. This allows the radio to operate
with the lowest possible latency and improves channel efficiency. MODBUS
and its derivatives are the only protocols that should require the buffer to be
turned on. See “BUFF [ON, OFF]” on Page 29 for details.
Hoptime Setting
The default hop-time setting is 7 (7 ms). An alternate setting of 28 is used to
increase throughput, but at the cost of increased latency. A detailed explanation of the HOPTIME command can be found on Page 32.
TotalFlow™ Protocol at 9600 with Sleep Mode
For reliable operation with TotalFlow meters, use the default settings for
9600 with the following alterations:
HOPTIME 28—Allows large data packets
FEC OFF—Improves store-and-forward performance for a large continuous data stream
BUFF ON—Ensures “ungapped” 4-second polls if unit in sleep mode
Operation at 115200 bps
Burst throughput at 115200 bps is supported at all settings. The radio will
always buffer at least 500 characters. Sustained throughput at 115200 bps is
only possible when the data path is nearly error free and the operating settings
have been properly selected. For sustained operation at 115200 bps, use the
following settings: SAF OFF, FEC OFF, REPEAT 0, RETRY 0, HOPTIME 28.
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Baud Rate Setting
The default baud rate setting is 19200 bps to accommodate most systems. If
your system will use a different data rate, you should change the radio’s data
interface speed using the BAUD xxxxx abc command (Page 28). It should be
set to the highest speed that can be sent by the data equipment in the system.
(The transceiver supports 1200 to 115200 bps.)
Radio Interference Checks
The radio operates in eight frequency zones. If interference is found in one or
more of these zones, the SKIP command (Page 39) can be used to omit them
from the hop pattern. You should also review Section 3.3, A Word About
Radio Interference, when dealing with interference problems.
6.0 RADIO PROGRAMMING
There are no manual adjustments on the radios. Programming and control is
performed through a PC connected to the radio’s DIAG connector.
6.1 Radio Programming Methods
Terminal Interface
A PC may be used by operating it in a basic terminal mode (for example, a
HyperTerminal session) and entering the radio commands listed in tables
found in “User Commands” on Page 22. The PC must be connected to the
radio’s DIAG connector using an RJ-11 to DB-9 Adapter Cable (MDS Part
No. 03-3246A01). If desired, a cable of this type may be constructed using
the information shown in Figure 21 on Page 62.
Once connected, communication (baud rate) is established through the
command interface. To access the command interface, press the ESCAPE
key, followed by one or more ENTER keystrokes (delivered at about
half-second intervals), until the “>” prompt is displayed.
NOTE:
The DIAG port (RJ-11 connector) uses 8 data bits, 1 stop bit, and no parity. It
can automatically configure itself to function at 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600,
19200, 38400, 57600, and 115200 bps.
If the DLINK setting is ON, the DIAG port will start out in Diagnostic Link mode.
This is a special protocol used to support Network-Wide Diagnostics. The process described in the paragraph above causes the radio to exit diagnostic link
mode and enter command mode. If there is no input in command mode for 5
minutes, the DIAG port will revert back to diagnostic link mode.
PC-Based Configuration Tool
The Windows™-based MDS TransNET Configuration Software
(P/N 06-4059A01) is designed for use with a PC connected to the radio’s
DIAG connector through an RJ-11 to DB-9 cable assembly (MDS Part No.
03-3246A01). A cable of this type may be constructed using the information
shown in Figure 21 on Page 62.
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The TransNET Configuration Software provides access all of the radio’s
capabilities with the benefit of context-sensitive help. The program is shipped
as part of the TransNET support CD included with every order (CD part
number 03-2708A02)
6.2 User Commands
A series of tables begin on the next page that provide reference charts of
various user commands for the transceiver. See “Detailed Command Descriptions” on Page 27 for more details.
Entering Commands
The proper procedure for entering commands is to type the command,
followed by an ENTER keystroke. For programming commands, the
command is followed by SPACE , the appropriate information or values, and
then ENTER .
Table 5. Network Configuration—Master Station
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
AT [ON, OFF]
Details Page 28
Enables Master station to spoof a modem and
respond to AT commands
BUFF [ON, OFF]
Details Page 29
ON = Seamless data
OFF = Fast byte throughput.
FEC [ON, OFF]
Details Page 32
Sets/disables FEC
(Forward Error Correction) setting.
HOPTIME [7, 28]
Details Page 32
Displays hop-time or sets it to 7 or 28 ms.
LPM [1, 0]
Details Page 33
Used at Master to set all associated stations
in an energy-conservation mode.
1 = Low-power mode enabled network-wide
0 = Disable low-power mode (Default)
REPEAT
Details Page 36
Sets/displays the fixed downstream re-send
count.
RETRY [0–10]
Details Page 36
Sets/displays the maximum upstream re-send
count for ARQ (Automatic Repeat Request)
operation
SAF [ON, OFF]
Details, page 38
Enables/disables the store-and-forward function for the network controlled by this Master
unit.
SKIP [NONE, 1...8]
Details, page 39
Skip one or more frequency zones
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MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
Table 6. Network-Wide Diagnostics
Command
Description
DLINK [xxxxx/ON/OFF]
Details, page 31
Controls operation of diagnostic link function.
DTYPE [NODE/ROOT]
Details, page 32
Set radio’s operational characteristics for
network-wide diagnostics
Table 7. Operational Configuration—Set/Program
Command
Description
ADDR [1–65000]
Details, page 28
Program network address
AMASK [0000 0000–FFFF FFFF]
Details, page 28
Alarm response
ASENSE [HI/LO]
Details, page 28
Sense of the alarm output on Pin 6 of the
DATA interface connector in the EIA-232
mode.
Default: Alarm present = HI
BAUD [xxxxx abc]
Details, page 28
Data communication parameters
CODE [NONE, 1…255]
Details, page 30
Select the security/encryption setting in the
radio.
CSADDR [1–65000, NONE]
Details, page 30
Used on a single Master/Remote network to
support TDD-style simulated full-duplex.
CTS [0–255]
Details, page 30
CTS delay in milliseconds
(A value of 0 returns CTS immediately)
CTSHOLD [0–60000]
Details, page 30
“Hold time” that CTS is present following last
character from DATA port.
DEVICE [DCE, CTS KEY]
Details, page 31
Device behavior:
DCE (normal) or CTS Key
MODE [M, R, X]
Details, page 34
Operating mode:
M = Master, R = Remote, X = Extension
OWM [xxxxx]
Details, page 34
Owner’s message, or alternate message
(30 characters maximum)
OWN [xxxxx]
Details, page 34
Owner’s name, or alternate message
(30 characters maximum)
PORT [RS232, RS485]
Details, page 34
Data port (DATA connector) interface
signaling mode: RS232 or RS485
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
Default: FFFF FFFF
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
23
Table 7. Operational Configuration—Set/Program (Continued)
Command
Description
PWR [20–30]
Details, page 36
Power output in dBm
(Figure 23 on Page 68)
RXD [0–235] / [ON/OFF]
Details, page 38
Set RXD delay time for virtual seamless mode
with low latency.
RXTOT [NONE, 0–1440]
Details, page 38
Maximum duration (in minutes) before
time-out alarm. Default is OFF.
RTU [ON, OFF, 0-80]
Details, page 37
Enable or Disable unit’s built-in RTU
simulator. Default is OFF. Set RTU address
between zero and 80.
SLEEP [ON, OFF]
Details, page 40
Enable or Disable the radio’s Sleep mode
function.
UNIT [10000–65000]
Details, page 41
Unit address used for network-wide
diagnostics. (Unique within associated network.)
XADDR [0–31]
Details, page 41
This unit’s Extended address
XPRI [0–31]
Details, page 41
Address of the primary Extended radio unit
(Extension).
XMAP [00000000-FFFFFFFF]
Details, page 41
Included Extended units in MODE X.
(Extensions and Remotes only).
XRSSI [NONE, –40...–120]
Details, page 41
Minimum RSSI level required to preserve synchronization with a non-primary radio.
(Only meaningful when XPRI is not NONE)
ZONE CLEAR
Details, page 42
Reset zone data statistics
Typically, the Master is set to zero (0).
Table 8. Operating Status—Display Only
Command
Description
ADDR
Details Page 28
Network address
AMASK
Details Page 28
Alarm mask (response)
ASENSE
Details Page 28
Current sense of the alarm output.
BAUD
Details Page 28
Data communication parameters. Example:
BAUD 9600 8N1
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MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
Table 8. Operating Status—Display Only (Continued)
Command
Description
BUFF
Details Page 29
Data buffering mode: ON = seamless data,
OFF = fast byte throughput
CODE
Details Page 29
Security/encryption operational status.
CTS
Details Page 30
CTS delay in milliseconds (0–255 ms)
CTSHOLD
Details Page 30
“Hold time” that CTS is present following last
character from DATA port.
DEVICE
Details Page 31
Device behavior
HOPTIME
Details Page 32
Hop-time value in milliseconds (ms).
LPMHOLD
Details Page 34
Time (0-1000 ms) provided to give an RTU
time to respond before the radio goes to sleep.
MODE
Details Page 34
Current operating mode:
OWM
Details Page 34
Owner’s message or site name
OWN
Details Page 34
Owner’s name or system name
PORT
Details Page 34
Current data port (DATA connector) interface
signaling mode: RS232 or RS485
PWR
Details Page 36
Forward power-output setting in dBm
REPEAT
Details Page 36
The fixed downstream re-send count.
RETRY
Details Page 36
The maximum upstream re-send count for
ARQ (Automatic Repeat Request) operation.
SAF
Details Page 38
The store-and-forward function status.
SKIP
Details Page 39
Table of frequency zones programmed to be
skipped
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
“NONE” (Inactive), or “ACTIVE”
Alternatives: DCE and CTS KEY
M = Master
R = Remote
X = Extension (Repeater)
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
25
Table 8. Operating Status—Display Only (Continued)
Command
Description
RSSI
Details Page 37
Received signal strength indicator (dBm).
Unavailable at Master unless SETUP is
enabled.
RXTOT
Details Page 38
The amount of time (in seconds) to wait before
issuing a time-out alarm.
RTU
Details Page 37
RTU simulator’s operational status (ON/OFF)
SAF
Details Page 38
Store-and-forward mode status in this unit.
(ON/OFF)
SER
Details Page 38
Serial number of radio
SHOW CON
Details Page 39
Display virtual modem connection status
SHOW PWR
Details Page 39
RF output power. Measured RF power in dBm
SHOW SYNC
Details Page 39
Information on synchronization source
SKIP
Details Page 39
Frequency zones that are skipped
SLEEP
Details Page 40
Radio’s Sleep Mode setting.
(At Remotes Only)
SREV
Details Page 40
Transceiver firmware revision level
STAT
Details Page 40
Current alarm status
TEMP
Details Page 40
Transceiver’s internal temperature (°C)
UNIT
Details Page 41
Programmed unit address for
network-wide diagnostics
XADDR
Details Page 41
This unit’s Extended address
XPRI
Address of the primary Extended radio unit
(Extension).
Details Page 41
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MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
Table 8. Operating Status—Display Only (Continued)
Command
Description
XMAP
Included Extended units in MODE X. (Extensions and Remotes only).
Details Page 41
XRSSI
Details Page 41
Minimum RSSI level required to preserve
synchronization with a non-primary radio.
(Only meaningful when XPRI is not NONE)
Table 9. Diagnostic and Test Functions
Command
Description
KEY
Details Page 33
Enables the transmitter test.
(Radio must be in Setup mode.)
DKEY
Details Page 32
Turns off the transmitter test.
(Radio must be in Setup mode.)
TX [xxxx]
Details Page 41
Set/display transmit test frequency.
(Radio must be in Setup mode.)
RX [xxxx]
Details Page 37
Set/display receive test frequency.
(Radio must be in Setup mode.)
SETUP
Details Page 38
Enables Setup mode. Times out after 10 minutes. Press “Q” to quit.
ZONE DATA
Details Page 42
Zone data statistics
ZONE CLEAR
Details Page 42
Clears the Zone Data log
6.3 Detailed Command Descriptions
The essential commands for most applications are Network Address (ADDR),
Mode (MODE), and Baud Rate (BAUD). However, proper use of the additional
commands allows you to tailor the transceiver for a specific use, or to conduct
basic diagnostics on the radio. This section gives more detailed information
for the commands listed above in section 6.2.
Most of the commands below can be used in two ways. First, you can type
only the command name (for example, ADDR) to view the currently
programmed data. Second, you can set or change the existing data by typing
the command, followed by a space, and then the desired entry (for example,
ADDR 1234). In the descriptions which follow, allowable programming variables, if any, are shown in brackets [ ] following the command name.
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
27
ADDR [1–65000]
Network Address
This command sets or displays the radio’s network address. The network
address can range from 1 to 65000.
A network address must be programmed at the time of installation and must
be common across each radio in a given network. Radios are typically
shipped with the network address unprogrammed, causing the address to
display as NONE. If the address is not set (or is set to a wrong value) it leaves
the system in an invalid state, preventing operation and generating an alarm.
NOTE:
It is recommended that the last four digits of the master radio’s serial number
be used for the network address. This helps avoid conflicts with other TransNET 900 users.
AMASK [0000 0000–FFFF FFFF]
Alarm Mask
This command sets the alarm bits that cause the alarm output signal to be triggered. The PWR LED will still flash for all alarms, but the alarm output signal
will only be activated for those alarms that have the corresponding mask bit
set. The hex value for the mask aligns directly with the hex value for the
ALARM command. The default is FFFF FFFF. Through proper use of the
AMASK command, it is possible to tailor the alarm response of the radio.
Contact the factory for more information on configuring the alarm mask.
AT [ON, OFF]
Hayes-Compatible AT Command Support
AT-style modem commands, also know as “Hayes-Compatible Commands”,
can be processed through the payload port. By setting AT ON at the Master
(MODE M), individual Remotes can be accessed by using ATDT
[Unit Address]. In this mode, RTUs designed only for dial-up access can be
accessed through the Master station. For more details, see See “Using AT
Commands with TransNET” on Page 53.
ASENSE [HI/LO]
Alarm Output Sense
This command is used to set the sense of the alarm output at Pin 6 of the DATA
connector. The default is HI which means an alarm is present when an RS-232
high is on Pin 6.
BAUD [xxxxx abc]
Data Interface Port Baud Rate
This command sets or displays the communication attributes for the normal
payload communications through the DATA port. The command has no effect
on the RJ-11 DIAG(NOSTICS) port.
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MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
The first parameter (xxxxx) is baud rate. Baud rate is specified in
bits-per-second and must be one of the following speeds: 1200, 2400, 4800,
9600, 19200, 38400, 57600, or 115200. At baud rates of 19200 bps or less,
the radio can support unlimited continuous data transmission at any hop rate.
The second parameter of the BAUD command (abc) is a 3-character block
indicating how the data is encoded. The following is a breakdown of each
character’s meaning:
a = Data bits (7 or 8)
b = Parity (N for None, O for Odd, E for Even)
c = Stop bits (1 or 2)
The factory default setting is 9600 baud, 8 data bits, no parity, 1 stop bit
(Example: 19200 8N1).
NOTE:
7N1, 8O2, and 8E2 are invalid communication settings and are not supported
by the transceiver.
BUFF [ON, OFF]
Data Buffer Mode
This command sets or displays the received data handling mode of the radio.
The command parameter is either ON or OFF. (The default is OFF.) The
setting of this parameter affects the timing of received data sent out the DATA
connector. Data transmitted over the air by the radio is unaffected by the
BUFF setting.
If data buffering is set to OFF, the radio will operate with the lowest possible
average latency. Data bytes are sent out the DATA port as soon as an incoming
RF data frame is processed. Average and typical latency will both be below
10 ms, but idle character gaps may be introduced into the outgoing data flow.
If data buffering is ON, the radio will operate in a seamless mode. That is, data
bytes will be sent over the air as quickly as possible, but the receiver will
buffer the data until the entire packet has been collected. The delay introduced
by data buffering is variable and depends on message size and the number of
retransmissions required, but the radio will not create any gaps in the output
data stream. This mode of operation is required for protocols such as
MODBUS™ that do not allow gaps in their data transmission.
Seamless mode (BUFF ON) is intended only for applications where the
message size is 256 characters or less. Enforcement of this rule is left up to
the user. If more than 256 characters are transmitted data delivery will not be
seamless and data may be lost.
Changes to the BUFF setting may only be made at the master radio. This is
because the master radio broadcasts the buffer setting for the entire network.
At remote radios, the buffer setting may be read when the radio is in synchronization with the master, but it can not be changed.
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
29
CODE [NONE, 1…255]
Security Code
The CODE command is used to select or display the security/encryption
setting in the radio.
The default is CODE NONE. Setting CODE to a value other than NONE
provides an extra level security beyond that provided by the Network Address
(ADDR). The disadvantage is increased complexity in managing the network.
The CODE command takes an argument 1…255, or “NONE”. Entering CODE
without an argument will display either “NONE” or “ACTIVE”. ACTIVE
means that security/encryption has been enabled, but the radio will not
display the security argument.
When a CODE value is active, all radios in the system must use the same code
value. If the code value is not properly programmed, a remote radio will not
synchronize with the master.
CAUTION: Record the CODE value and store it in a safe place. If the code is
later forgotten, and a unit is to be added to the system, all radios in the
network must be set to NONE and then reprogrammed to a new value.
CSADDR [1–65000, NONE]
Clock-Synchronizing Master Address
Used to specify the network address of a “Clock-Sync” master station to
which this station will be synchronized. Also see “ADDR [1–65000]” on
Page 28 and “Co-Located and Close-Proximity Masters” on Page 59 for
further details.
CTS [0–255]
Clear-to-Send Delay
The CTS (clear-to-send) command sets or displays the timer value associated
with the CTS line response. The command parameter ranges from 0 to 255
milliseconds.
For DCE operation, the timer specifies how long to wait after the RTS line
goes high before asserting the CTS line. A timer value of zero means that the
CTS line will be asserted immediately following the assertion of RTS.
For CTS Key operation (see the DEVICE command), the timer specifies how
long to wait after asserting the CTS line before sending data out the DATA
port. A timer value of zero means that data will be sent out the data port
without imposing a key-up delay. (Other delays may be in effect from other
radio operating parameters.)
CTSHOLD [0–60000]
Clear-to-Send Hold Time
Used in DEVICE CTS KEY mode, this command sets the amount of time in
milliseconds that CTS remains present following transmission of the last
character out the RXD pin of the DATA port. This “hold time” can be used to
prevent squelch tail data corruption when communicating with other radios.
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MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
The CTSHOLD setting can range from 0 to 60000 (i.e., 60 seconds). The
default value is 0, which means that CTS will drop immediately after the last
character is transmitted. If the command is entered when the radio is in
DEVICE DCE mode, the response CTSHOLD N/A will be displayed.
DEVICE [DCE, CTS KEY]
Radio-MODEM Behavior
The DEVICE command sets or displays the device behavior of the radio. The
command parameter is either DCE or CTS KEY.
The default selection is DCE. In this mode, CTS will go high following RTS,
subject to the CTS programmable delay time. Keying is stimulated by the
input of characters at the data port. Hardware flow control is implemented by
dropping the CTS line if data arrives faster than it can be transmitted.
If CTS KEY is selected, the radio is assumed to be controlling another radio,
such as in a repeater or tail-end link system. The RTS line is ignored and the
CTS line is used as a keyline control for the other radio. CTS is asserted
immediately after the receipt of RF data, but data will not be sent out the DATA
port until after the CTS programmable delay time has expired. (This gives the
other radio time to key.)
Following transmission of the last byte of data, CTS will remain asserted for
the duration specified by the CTSHOLD command. CTSHOLD should be set
sufficiently high.
DLINK [xxxxx/ON/OFF]
InSite Diagnostics Link Support
DLINK ON enables use of Diagnostic Link mode and establishes it as the
default protocol on the RJ-11 DIAG port. Diagnostic Link mode is a special
protocol used to support Network-Wide Diagnostics. DLINK must be set to
ON to support connection to InSite or to support chained diagnostics between
radio networks even while the radio is in the sleep mode. DLINK OFF disables
this feature. The default setting is ON.
The following DLINK baud rates selections are allowed:
• 1200• 4800• 9600• 19200 (default)
• 38400• 57600• 115200
Example: DLINK 4800 sets the RJ-11 DIAG port to operate at 4800 bps when
diagnostics is “closed”. This setting will not affect the port’s autobaud operation. Use only of DLINK ON, will enable the use 19200 or the most recently
programmed value. The default is DLINK 19200 and DLINK ON.
NOTE:
The same baud rate must be entered into the InSite Equipment List’s BAUD
field.
NOTE:
The DLINK rate must match the rate of any connected device to the diagnostic
port. This may be either another MDS radio’s diagnostic port, InSite computer,
or another data link device that eventually connects to the InSite computer.
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
31
DKEY
Turn Off Radio Transmitter Test Signal
Disables the transmitter when it is keyed. See also KEY command.
DTYPE [NODE/ROOT]
Network Diagnostics Mode
The DTYPE command specifies the radio’s operational characteristics for
network-wide diagnostics. The transceiver uses the following types:
• NODE–The most common setting, and the default. This is the basic
system radio device-type. Typically, the radio network is comprised of
nodes and one root. Intrusive diagnostics can originate from any node.
However, non-intrusive diagnostics can only be conducted from the
root node.
• ROOT–Always one, and only one, per network (including units
associated through Extension units.) The root is the focal point of
network-wide diagnostics information. Intrusive diagnostics can
originate from any radio, including the root. However, the root is the
only radio through which non-intrusive diagnostics can be conducted.
FEC [ON, OFF]
Forward Error Correction
This command is used to view the FEC setting, or turn it on or off. The default
setting is FEC ON. (It needs to be turned off when throughputs exceed
57,600 bps.) FEC is set at the master and is automatically passed on to all of
the remotes in a network.
Setting FEC to ON improves sensitivity at the cost of reduced throughput.
Typical SCADA/telemetry applications use low data rates and, as such, the
FEC setting is normally transparent to them.
HOPTIME [7, 28]
Radio Transmitter Hop Timing
The HOPTIME command is used to set or display the hop-time setting. The
command is a digit corresponding to the hop-time setting in milliseconds. The
default HOPTIME setting is 7. A setting of 28 must be used when throughputs
exceed 57,600 bps and is recommended when data transmission sizes exceed
256 bytes.
Changes to the HOPTIME setting may only be made at the master radio. (This
is because the Master radio establishes the hop-time setting for the entire
network.) At remote radios, the hop-time setting may be read when the radio
is in synchronization with the master, but it cannot be changed.
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INIT
Initialize; Restore to Factory Defaults
The INIT command is used to reset the radio’s operating parameters to the
factory defaults listed in Table 10 on Page 35. This may be helpful when
trying to resolve configuration problems that resulted from the entry of one
or more improper command settings. If you are unsure of which command
setting caused the problem, this command allows you to get back to a known
working state.
NOTE:
Caution should be exercised when using the INIT command on radios in a system employing the Store-and-Forward feature. Settings relating to the use of
Extension services will be lost and will need to be re-entered. Inventory and
record the settings for XADDR, XPRI and XMAP before using the INIT command.
SPECIAL
NOTE: Installing firmware of Revision 3.0 or later into a radio with Revisions 1.x firmware will preserve the radio’s compatibility with other radios running Revision
1.x firmware. If updating the radio’s firmware is part of a system-wide upgrade,
the last step should be to use the INIT command at the Master station. Use of
the INIT command causes the changes shown in Table 10 on Page 35 to be
applied
HREV
Hardware Revision
Shows the hardware revision of the radio.
KEY
Turn On Radio Transmitter Test Signal
Enables the transmitter. (Radio must be in Setup mode.) See also DKEY
command.
LED [ON, OFF]
Enable/Disable LEDs
LED ON enables/disables the PCB board mounted LEDs seen only with the
transceiver’s covers removed. LED is normally OFF, it may be useful to have
them on for testing the radio with the covers removed. On a chassis model,
LED OFF makes the external LEDs brighter.
The LED command also determines “Low-Power Mode” (LPM) behavior.
When LED is OFF, the radio keeps the PWR and SYNC LEDs extinguished.
LPM [1, 0]
Low-Power Mode
This feature trades increased latency to gain power savings. Low-power
mode (LPM) automatically saves power at a remote by instructing the remote
to shutdown for large periods of time in between SYNC messages. Master
transmissions are automatically blocked while the remotes are asleep. Note,
both Masters and Remotes are adaptive and will suppress a normal sleep
interval if data transmission or reception is in progress.
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
33
• LPM 1 at the Master enables low-power mode network-wide; all
remotes pick it up and start saving power by automatically sleeping.
LPM 1 can work in conjunction with the AT dialing feature. The dialed
unit will be forced awake; all others will sleep.
• LPM 0 at the master to disable low-power mode (Default setting)
For further information, see “Low-Power Mode versus Remote’s Sleep
Mode” on Page 58.
LPMHOLD [0–1000]
Low-Power Mode Sleep Time
Used to give an RTU time (0-1000 ms) to respond before the radio goes to
sleep. Value determines how long to suppress auto-sleep following reception
of the last character sent out of the RXD serial data port.
NOTE:
Any values entered will be rounded to the nearest multiple of 4 ms.
To verify the exact hold time, enter LPMHOLD, the response will give you the
value currently being used.
MODE [M, R, X]
Radio Operating Mode
The MODE command sets or displays the operating mode of the radio. A
master radio is set by MODE M; a remote set by MODE R, and an Extension is
set by MODE X.
All units default to remotes; other modes must be specifically programmed
with the MODE command.
If MODE X is used, the MODE X radio should be programmed with an
Extended Address (XADDR). Units that need to hear this MODE X radio must
be programmed with an appropriate XPRI and/or XMAP value.
OWM [xxxxx]
“Owner’s Message”
The OWM command sets or displays an optional owner’s message, such as the
system name. The entry can contain up to 30 characters.
OWN [xxxxx]
“Owner’s Name”
The OWN command sets or displays an optional owner’s name, such as the
site name. The entry can contain up to 30 characters.
PORT [RS232, RS485]
Data Interface Port Signalling Standard
Select or identify the current data port (DATA connector) interface signaling
mode: RS232 or RS485. This is the port though which the payload data will
pass. Pin descriptions for EIA-232 are on Page 63 and EIA-485 can be found
on Page 64.
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Table 10. INIT Command Generated Defaults
Parameter
Corresponding
Command
Default Setting
For all radios
Alarm Mask
FFFF FFFF
AMASK
Alarm Output Sense
RS-232 High (+5.0 Vdc)
ASENSE
Device operation
DCE
DEVICE DCE
DATA Interface port
• 9600 baud
• 8 data bits
• none (no parity)
• 1 stop bit
BAUD 9600 8N1
Data Port Setting
RS/EIA-232
PORT RS232
CTS delay
0 (CTS is continuously asserted)
CTS 0
CTS hold-time
0
CTSHOLD 0
LED operation
OFF
LED
Low-Power Mode
Hold
0
LPMHOLD
RX Time-out-Timer
None/Disable
RXTOT
RF output power
30 dBm (1 watt)
PWR 30
Transmitter
test frequency
915.000 MHz
TX xxx
Receiver
test frequency
915.000 MHz
RX xxx
Sleep Enable
OFF
SLEEP OFF
Primary Extension
Radio Address
0 (Master)
XPRI 0
Synchronization
Source Map
None
XMAP 0
Extended Address
0
XADDR 0
AT Command Support
OFF
AT
Buffer mode
OFF
BUFF OFF
Forward Error
Correction
ON
FEC ON
Hop-time
7 ms
HOPTIME 7
Low-Power Mode
0 (Off)
LPM
Skipped frequencies
None (radio will hop across all
frequencies)
SKIP NONE
For MASTER radios
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Table 10. INIT Command Generated Defaults (Continued)
Parameter
Corresponding
Command
Default Setting
Retry Count
10 (max. 10 repeats for ARQ)
RETRY 10
Repeat Count
3 (downstream repeats)
REPEAT 3
PWR [20–30]
Radio Transmitter Power Level
This command displays or sets the desired RF forward output power setting
of the radio. The PWR command parameter is specified in dBm and can range
from 20 dBm through 30 in 1 dBm steps. The default setting is 30 dBm (1
watt). To read the actual (measured) power output of the radio, use the SHOW
PWR command.
In the USA, maximum allowable power is governed by FCC limits on Effective Isotropic Radiated Power output (EIRP). The EIRP limit of +36 dBm
means that any user with a net antenna gain greater than 6 dBi must decrease
the PWR setting accordingly. “How Much Output Power Can be Used?” on
Page 12 contains a detailed discussion of this topic.
REPEAT [0–10]
Downstream Repeat Transmission Count
The REPEAT command affects “downstream” data. The command causes a
Master or Extension to always repeat transmissions for the specified number
of times (range is 0 to 10; default selection is 3). Unlike the RETRY command,
there is no acknowledgment that a message has been received.
Use the REPEAT command without a value to display the current setting.
RETRY [0–10]
Upstream Repeat Transmission Count
The RETRY command affects upstream data. The command selects, or
displays, the maximum number of times (0 to 10) that a remote radio will
re-transmit data. The default setting is 10.
This command is associated with ARQ (Automatic Repeat Request) operation of the radio and is intended for use in areas with heavy radio interference.
When the RETRY command is issued without parameters, the maximum
retransmission count is shown. A value of 0 represents no retries, while
values of 1 or greater successively improve the chance of data delivery in
spectrally harsh environments (at the expense of possibly increased latency).
The RETRY value is only setable at the Master. It is readable by a synchronized Remote.
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RSSI
Received Signal Strength Indicator
This command displays the radio’s Received Signal Strength Indication in
dBm (decibels relative to 1 mW). The output can range from –40 dBm to
–120 dBm. Command availability and results depend on the mode of operation (master or remote). The closer to 0 dBm, the stronger the signal, thus a
reading of –70 dBm is stronger than –80 dBm.
For a remote radio, under normal operation, RSSI is based on the average
signal strength of the SYNC message received in each of the eight frequency
zones. (RSSI is sampled each time a SYNC message is received.) When using
the RSSI reading to align a directional antenna, it is important to make
changes slowly so that the RSSI reading will provide meaningful results. It
will take several seconds to indicate a change in signal level. The radio stays
in RSSI mode until ENTER is pressed.
For a master radio, under normal operation, entering the RSSI command
causes the response NOT AVAILABLE to be returned. This is because a master
is normally receiving signals from several remote stations and an RSSI
reading would be continually changing. The only exception is when the
SETUP command has been asserted. This disables hopping and allows
reading a “raw” RSSI signal level in real time from a master or remote radio.
NOTE 1: RSSI readings will not indicate signals stronger than –40 dBm.
NOTE 2: RSSI works for Dependent Masters. Command displays “NOT AVAILABLE” if
the Dependent Master is not synchronized.
RTU [ON, OFF, 0-80]
Remote Terminal Unit Simulator
This command re-enables or disables the radio’s internal RTU simulator,
which runs with MDS’ proprietary polling programs (poll.exe and rsim.exe).
The internal RTU simulator is available whenever a radio has diagnostics
enabled. This command also sets the RTU address to which the radio will
respond.
The internal RTU can be used for testing system payload data or pseudo bit
error rate (BER) testing. It can be helpful in isolating a problem to either the
external RTU or the radio. The default RTU setting is OFF.
RX [xxxx]
Radio Receive Test Frequency
This command sets or displays the test receive frequency used in place of
hopping when the radio is in SETUP mode. The test receive frequency can be
reprogrammed to any value between 902.200 MHz and 927.800 MHz, inclusive. The factory default setting is 915.000 MHz.
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RXD [0–235] / [ON/OFF]
RXD Delay
Used to set a delay, in milliseconds, of RXD data to emulate a seamless mode
with much lower latency in applications where retries are not required.
(Specify a delay of 2 x HOPTIME.)
Entering a RXD ON (0 ms default) or RXD xx will enable the function.
Entering RXD OFF will disable the function and erase any stored value.
RXTOT [NONE, 0–1440]
Receive Data Timeout-Timer
This command sets or displays the amount of time (in minutes) to wait for the
next received data packet before issuing a receiver time-out alarm. The
default setting is NONE.
SAF [ON, OFF]
Store-and-Forward Services Support
This command enables/disables the operation of the Store-and-Forward
services. It can be set only at the network’s Master station, but will effect all
radios in the associated network. The default setting is OFF. See related
commands: “XADDR [0–31]” on Page 41, “XPRI [0–31]” on Page 41, and
“XMAP [00000000-FFFFFFFF]” on Page 41.
SETUP
Setup Radio Test
This command sets up the transceiver for checking antenna SWR or transmitter power with external measuring equipment. Do not use this mode
during normal operation.
When the SETUP command is entered, the prompt changes to SETUP>, and:
• Hopping is disabled.
• Synthesizer frequencies are reset to the test frequencies specified by the
TX and RX commands described earlier.
• The radio can be keyed using the KEY command. DKEY is used to unkey
the radio. (If the radio is left in a keyed state it is automatically unkeyed
after several minutes.)
• The RSSI is sampled in a raw, continuous fashion regardless of whether
the unit is a master or a remote.
Entering Q or QUIT returns the system to normal operation.
A timer keeps the Setup mode from accidentally leaving the system disabled.
After 10 minutes the system behaves as if Q or QUIT had been entered,
returning to normal operation.
SER
Radio Serial Number
Displays the Serial Number of the radio.
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SHOW CON
Show Virtual Connection Status
Shows virtual connection status.
(Works only with AT ON. See“AT [ON, OFF]” on Page 28)
If no connection is established, it displays “NONE”
If a connection is active,
“<Master unit address> TO <Remote (“dialed”) unit address>”
SHOW PWR
Show Measured RF Transmit Power
The SHOW PWR command displays the actual (measured) RF power output
in dBm. Unlike the PWR command, this command shows the actual level
being measured, not the programmed RF power setting.
SHOW SYNC
Show Clock-Synchronization Master Network Address
When used at a Remote station, this command will display Extended Address
and Unit Address of the Master or Extension radio to which the Remote is
synchronized. The network depth at the remote, defined as the number of
downstream links from the Master, is displayed in parentheses.
SHOW SYNC works for Dependent Masters. A value of zero (0) means the
station is a master synchronized to a Clock-Sync Master. The SHOW SYNC
command will display a asterisk (*) after depth value if the radio is operating
with co-located masters.
SKIP [NONE, 1...8]
Skip Radio Operating Zones
This command sets or displays which, if any, of the eight 3.2 MHz-wide
zones will be skipped from the radio’s hopping sequence. Skipping zones is
one way of dealing with constant interference on one or more frequencies.
See “A Word About Radio Interference” on Page 9 for more information on
dealing with interference.
Table 11 shows the frequency range covered by each zone. The command
parameter is either the keyword NONE or an undelimited string of up to four
digits where each digit 1...8 represents a corresponding zone to skip. (For
zone parameter input, the digits can appear in any order and can be optionally
separated by a blank space.) The SKIP command is display-only at remote
radios. (Remotes must be synchronized with the master radio to display the
skip status.)
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In the USA, a maximum of four zones may be skipped, as stipulated by FCC
rules. Check the regulatory requirements for your region. The SKIP function
may not be permitted in your country and the radio will not respond to the
SKIP command.
Table 11. Frequency Zones
ZONE 1
ZONE 2
ZONE 3
ZONE 4
ZONE 5
ZONE 6
ZONE 7
ZONE 8
902.200
to
905.200
905.400
to
908.400
908.600
to
911.600
911.800
to
914.800
915.000
to
918.000
918.200
to
921.200
921.400
to
924.400
924.600
to
927.600
SLEEP [ON, OFF]
Transceiver Sleep
This command is used to set or display the radio’s Sleep Mode setting. The
default setting is SLEEP OFF. When this setting is ON (enabled) the
Low-Power, or RTU-forced Sleep Mode, can be used. This function cannot
be turned on for a Master or Extension radio. See “Using the Radio’s Sleep
Mode (Remotes Only)” on Page 56 and “Low-Power Mode versus Remote’s
Sleep Mode” on Page 58 for more information.
SREV
Firmware Revision Level
This command displays the version of the firmware currently loaded into the
transceiver.
A display of 06-4040A01, 2.0.0 is an example of the firmware version identifier—part number followed by release/version number.
STAT
Alarm Status
This command is used to check the alarm status of the radio. If no alarms
exist, the message NO ALARMS PRESENT is returned.
If an alarm does exist, a two-digit alarm code (00–31) is displayed and the
event is identified as a “Major” or “Minor” alarm. A brief description of the
event is also given.
If more than one alarm exists, the word MORE appears, and additional alarms
may be viewed by pressing the ENTER key. Detailed descriptions of the
alarm codes are provided in Table 13 on Page 44.
TEMP
Radio’s Internal Temperature
This command displays the internal temperature of the transceiver in degrees
Celsius. (Note that the radio is specified to operate in an environment between
–30 C° and +60 C°). This internal reading may be higher than the outside
temperature by several degrees.
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TX [xxxx]
Radio Transmit Test Frequency
This command sets or displays the test transmit frequency used in place of
hopping whenever the radio is in Setup mode. The test transmit frequency can
be reprogrammed to any value between 902.200 MHz and 927.800 MHz,
inclusive. The factory default setting is 915.000 MHz.
UNIT [10000–65000]
Unit Address
This command sets the unit addressing for network-wide diagnostics and
AT-Command address. The unit address is factory programmed to the last
four digits of the serial number. If re-programmed in the field, the entry must
consist of five digits between 10000 and 65000.
XADDR [0–31]
Extended Address
Display or program the Extended Address of this radio that will serve as a
common address for the sub-network synchronized to this Master or Extension. This value can be listed in the XPRI parameter of associated Extension
or Remote radios to allow them to synchronize to this radio. We recommend
setting the Master to zero (0). It is easy to remember, and is the default
address when the INIT command is used. (Programmed only in Master and
Extension radios.)
XMAP [00000000-FFFFFFFF]
Map of Extension Addresses
XMAP is a 32-bit hex entry where the least significant bit represents XADDR
0 and the most significant bit represents XADDR 31. The full 32-bit hex
value represents the entire list of extensions with which the radio will be
allowed to communicate. (Remotes and Extensions only.)
This parameter is easily programmed through the MDS TransNET Configuration Software’s Store and Forward Settings panel.
XPRI [0–31]
Primary Extended Address
Display or program the extended address of the primary radio with which this
radio will attempt to synchronize and communicate. A setting of NONE will
allow the unit to synchronize with any Master or Extension in the XMAP list.
(Parameter only meaningful for Remote or Extension units.)
XRSSI [NONE, –40...–120]
Extension RSSI Level
The XRSSI command is used to set the RSSI minimum signal level required
to preserve synchronization with a non-primary Extension radio. This parameter will be ignored if XPRI is set to NONE.
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ZONE CLEAR
Clear Zone Statistics Log
The ZONE CLEAR command clears the zone data for all zones in the Zone
Data Log, resetting the count to 0. (Zone data is also cleared automatically
upon reboot.)
ZONE DATA
Read Zone Statistics Log
The transceiver divides its frequency operating spectrum into eight
3.2 MHz-wide zones. (These are the same zones referenced by the SKIP
command described earlier.) Data frame statistics are maintained for each
zone to indicate the transmission quality of data through the network. This
information is useful for identifying zones where significant interference
exists.
Zone quality information can be accessed using the ZONE DATA command.
For each zone (1–8), it shows you the number of data frames sent, the number
received, and the number received with errors. If an excessive number of
errors are seen in one or more frequency zones, it may indicate interference,
and you should consider “skipping” those zones using the SKIP command.
Note: If a frequency zone has been skipped, all counts for that zone will be
zeros.
The ZONE DATA format is displayed as follows:
1:TX
1:RX
1:RX
x:
x:
x:
8:TX
8:RX
8:RX
TOTAL 00000000
TOTAL 00000000
ERROR 00000000
TOTAL 00000000
TOTAL 00000000
ERROR 00000000
All data is based on payload packets. Incoming network data may be divided
up into multiple packets for over-the-air transfers. The number before the
colon represents the zone. TX TOTAL is the transmit packet total. RX TOTAL is
the receive packet total. RX ERROR is the total number of received packets
with CRC errors. All zone data is reset with the ZONE CLEAR command.
7.0 TROUBLESHOOTING
Successful troubleshooting of an MDS transceiver system is not difficult, but
requires a logical approach. It is best to begin troubleshooting at the master
station, as the rest of the system depends on the master for polling instructions
and synchronization data. If the master station has problems, the operation of
the entire network will be affected.
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When communication problems are found, it is good practice to begin by
checking the simple things. All radios in the network must meet these basic
requirements:
• Adequate and stable primary power
• An efficient and properly aligned antenna system
• Secure connections (RF, data & power)
• Proper programming of the radio’s operating parameters, especially
Mode selection (MODE), Network Address (ADDR), and interface Baud
Rate (BAUD)
• The correct interface between the radio and the connected data
equipment (proper cable wiring, data format and timing).
• In store-and-forward systems there are several areas that must be
carefully evaluated:
• Duplicate XADDR values on MODE M and MODE X radios will cause
failures unless the radios are far enough apart to not hear each other.
• Errors in the synchronization qualifiers, XPRI and XMAP, on
corresponding Remote radios.
• SAF must be enabled at the Master
7.1 LED Indicators
The LED status indicators are an important troubleshooting tool and should
be checked whenever a problem is suspected. Table 12 describes the function
of each status LED.
Table 12. LED indicator descriptions
PWR
SYNC
TXD
RXD
Name
Description
PWR
• Continuous—Power is applied to the radio; no problems detected
• Flashing (5 times-per-second)—Fault indication. See Section 7.0,
TROUBLESHOOTING
• Off—Radio is unpowered or in Sleep mode
SYNC
Continuous—Radio is receiving/sending synchronization frames
On within 10 seconds of power-up under normal conditions
TXD
Transmit data activity on the DB-9 DATA interface connector
RXD
Receive data activity on the DB-9 DATA interface connector
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7.2 Alarm Codes
When an alarm condition exists, the transceiver creates an alarm code. These
codes can be very helpful in resolving many system difficulties.
Checking for Alarms—STAT command
To check for the presence of alarms, enter STAT. If no alarms exist, the
message NO ALARMS PRESENT appears at the top of the display.
If an alarm does exist, a two-digit alarm code (00–31) is displayed, and it is
identified as a major or minor alarm. A brief description of the alarm is also
given. Alarm codes and their meanings are listed in Table 13.
If more than one alarm exists, the word MORE appears at the bottom of the
screen; additional alarms can be viewed by pressing ENTER .
Major Alarms vs. Minor Alarms
Major alarms report serious conditions that generally indicate a hardware
failure, or other abnormal condition that will prevent (or seriously hamper)
further operation of the transceiver.
With the exception of alarm code 00 (network address not programmed),
major alarms generally indicate the need for factory repair. Contact MDS for
further assistance.
Minor alarms report conditions which, under most circumstances, will not
prevent transceiver operation. This includes out-of-tolerance conditions,
baud rate mismatches, etc. The cause of these alarms should be investigated
and corrected to prevent system failure.
Alarm Code Definitions
Table 13 contains a listing of all event codes that may be reported by the
transceiver. Additional alarm codes may be used in future firmware releases
or are used by the factory. Troubleshooting Chart
Table 13. Alarm Codes
Alarm
Code
Alarm
Type
Description
00
Major
The network address is not programmed.
01
Major
Improper firmware detected for this radio model.
04
Major
One or more of the programmable synthesizer loops is reporting
an out-of-lock condition.
08
Major
The system is reporting that it has not been calibrated. Factory
calibration is required for proper radio operation.
10
Major
The DSP was unable to properly program the system to the appropriate defaults. A hardware problem may exist.
12
Major
Receiver time-out alarm.
16
Minor
The unit address is not programmed.
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Table 13. Alarm Codes (Continued)
Alarm
Code
Alarm
Type
17
Minor
A data parity fault has been detected on the DATA connector.
This usually indicates a parity setting mismatch between the radio and the RTU.
18
Minor
A data framing error has been detected on the DATA connector.
This may indicate a baud rate mismatch between the radio and
the RTU.
29
Minor
RF output power fault detected. (Power differs by more than 2
dB from set level.) Often caused by high antenna system SWR.
Check antenna, feedline and connectors.
30
Minor
The system is reporting an RSSI reading below –105 dBm.
31
Minor
The transceiver’s internal temperature is approaching an
out-of-tolerance condition. If the temperature drifts outside of
the recommended operating range, system operation may fail.
Description
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7.3 Troubleshooting Chart
Table 14 provides suggestions for resolving system difficulties that may be
experienced in the radio system. If problems persist, contact the factory for
further assistance. Refer to the inside back cover of this guide for contact
information.
Table 14. Troubleshooting chart
Difficulty
Recommended System Checks
Unit is
inoperative.
a.Check for the proper supply voltage at the power connector.
Interference is
suspected.
a.Verify that the system has a unique network address. Nearby
systems with the same address will cause interference.
b.The transceiver’s internal fuse may have opened. Refer to Section 7.5 below for replacement instructions.
b.Check for interference by locking out affected zone(s) using the
SKIP command (Page 39).
c. If omnidirectional antennas are used on remote stations, consider changing to directional antennas. This will often limit interference to and from other stations.
No synchronization with master,
or poor overall
performance.
a.Check for secure interface connections at the radio and the
connected device.
b.Check the antenna, feedline and connectors. Reflected power
should be less than 10% of the forward power reading
(SWR ≈ 2:1 or lower).
c. If the remote radio is in synchronization, but performance is
poor, check the received signal strength using the RSSI command (Page 37). If RSSI is low, it may indicate antenna problems, or misalignment of directional antenna headings.
d.Verify proper programming of system parameters: mode, network address, data interface baud rate, transmitter power, CTS
delay, etc. For store-and-forward applications, also verify the
following: SAF is ON; extended address is properly programmed at each extension; remotes are using the proper values for XPRI and XMAP.
e.Check for alarms using the STAT command (Page 40)
BER is too high.
Data throughput
is spotty.
a.The RETRY and REPEAT commands may be increased to
deal with interference, or decreased to increase throughput
and reduce latency.
b.Try turning on FEC. FEC on gives some coding gain, but
comes at the cost of reduced throughput.
Latency is too
high.
a.Reduce the REPEAT count.
b.Turn BUFF OFF. BUFF ON insures that no gaps occur in the
data, but this comes at the cost of increased latency.
c. Make sure HOPTIME is set to 7.
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7.4 Performing Network-Wide Remote Diagnostics
Diagnostics data from a remote radio can be obtained by connecting a laptop
or personal computer running MDS InSite diagnostics software (V6.6 or later)
to any radio in the network.
NOTE:
The diagnostics feature may not be available in all radios. The ability to query
and configure a radio via Network-wide Diagnostics is based on the feature
options purchased in the radio being polled.
If a PC is connected to any radio in the network, intrusive polling (polling
which briefly interrupts payload data transmission) can be performed. To
perform diagnostics without interrupting payload data transmission, connect
the PC to a radio defined as the “root” radio. A radio is defined as a root radio
using the DTYPE ROOT command locally, at the radio.
A complete explanation of remote diagnostics can be found in MDS’
Network-Wide Diagnostics System Handbook (MDS P/N 05-3467A01).
Table 15. Network-Wide Diagnostics Commands
Command
Description
DLINK [xxxxx/ON/OFF]
Details, page 31
Set baud rate of diagnostics link
DTYPE [NODE/ROOT]
Details, page 32
Set radio’s operational characteristics for network-wide diagnostics
1. Program one radio in the network as the root radio by entering the
DTYPE ROOT command at the radio.
2. At the root radio, use the DLINK ON and DLINK [baud rate] commands to
configure the diagnostic link protocol on the RJ-11 port.
3. Program all other radios in the network as nodes by entering the
DTYPE NODE command at each radio.
4. Use the DLINK ON and DLINK [baud rate] commands to configure the
diagnostic link protocol on the RJ-11 port of each node radio.
5. Connect a PC on which MDS InSite software is installed to the root radio,
or to one of the nodes, at the radio’s diagnostics port.
To connect a PC to the radio’s DIAG port, an RJ-11 to DB-9 adapter
(MDS P/N 03-3246A01) is required. If desired, an adapter cable may be
constructed from scratch, using the information shown in Figure 21 on
Page 62.
6. Launch the MDS InSite application at the PC. (Refer to the InSite user’s
manual for details.)
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7.5 Internal Fuse Replacement
The radio is protected by an internal fuse. Most likely the fuse will be blown
by an over-voltage transient or an internal failure. Follow the procedure
below to remove and replace the fuse:
1. Disconnect the primary power cable and all other connections to the unit.
2. Place the radio on its back and remove the four Phillips screws at the
corners of the bottom cover.
3. Carefully separate the top and bottom covers. There is a flat ribbon cable
between the top cover’s LED panel and the motherboard. You do not need
to disconnect the ribbon cable.
4. Locate the fuse holder assembly behind the power connector.
(See Figure 17).
5. Loosen the fuse from the holder using a very small screwdriver, then use
a small pair of needle-nose pliers to pull the fuse straight up and out of
the holder.
6. Use an ohmmeter or other continuity tester to verify that the fuse is
blown.
7. Install a new fuse by reversing the process. Replacement fuse
information: Littelfuse #0454002; 452 Series, 2 Amp SMF Slo-Blo fuse
(MDS Part No. 29-1784A03).
8. Re-install the covers, interface cables and check the radio for proper
operation.
Invisible place holder
Figure 17.
Internal Fuse and Holder
Assembly Location
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8.0 RADIO FIRMWARE UPGRADES
From time to time, Microwave Data Systems releases new firmware for its
radio products. This file can be installed in existing radios to take advantage
of engineering improvements or additional features.
8.1 Obtaining New Firmware
The latest firmware for each radio type may be obtained free from our Web
site at:
www.MicrowaveData.com/service/technical/support/downloads/
Firmware is also available on disks from MDS that are bundled with a installation utility (MDS Radio Software Upgrade (upgrade.exe)) for transferring
the firmware file on the disk to the radio.
Saving a Web-Site Firmware File Onto Your PC
MDS firmware upgrades are distributed as a plain-text (ASCII) file with a
“.S28” extension. Browse to find the desired “.S28” file for your radio on the
MDS Web site. After finding your selection, use the right mouse button to
select a path on your computer on which to save the file. (If this isn’t done,
your browser may display the firmware file contents as text on the screen
instead of downloading it to your local hard drive.)
After the “.S28” file has been saved to your computer, you may use either
MDS TransNET Configuration Software or MDS Radio Software Upgrade
programs to install this firmware in your radios.
8.2 Installing Firmware Into Your Radio
1. Connect the PC to the radio’s DIAG port using an RJ-11 to DB-9 Adapter
Cable (MDS Part No. 03-3246A01). If desired, a cable can be fabricated
from the information shown in Figure 21 on Page 62.
2. Start the MDS TransNET Configuration Software. Open diagnostics port
to the radio. The program will automatically read the radio’s profile.
3. From the File menu select Radio Firmware Upgrade and follow the prompts
to install the new firmware into the radio. Do not press the Cancel button
once the installation has started or it will leave the radio without any
code. When the installation is complete, another radio may be connected
to your PC and programmed.
NOTE:
If a firmware installation fails, the radio is left unprogrammed and inoperative.
This is indicated by the PWR LED flashing slowly (1 second on/1 second off).
This condition is only likely to occur if there is a power failure to the computer
or radio during the installation process. The installation should be attempted
again.
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9.0 OPERATING PRINCIPLES AND CONFIGURATION
9.1 SAF Operation with Extension Radios
The Store-and-Forward (SAF) capability operates by dividing a network into
a vertical hierarchy of two or more sub-networks. (See Figure 6 on Page 5.)
Adjacent sub-networks are connected via Extension radios operating in
“MODE X” which move data from one sub-network to the next one.
The Store-and-Forward implementation adheres to the general polling principles used in most multiple-address systems (MAS). Polls originate from the
Master station, broadcast to all radios within the network, and travel hierarchically downward. All Remotes will hear the same message, but only one
Remote will respond. Messages within a hierarchy only travel in one direction at a time.
Using SAF will cut the overall data throughput in half, however, multiple
networks can be inter-connected with no additional loss in network
throughput.
Simple Extended SAF Network
The following example depicts a two-level network utilizing a single Master
(M) and an Extension (X) radio. See Figure 18.
Invisible place holder
MJ
Sub-Network J
RJ
RJ
X J,K
RJ
RK
RK
RK
Sub-Network K
Figure 18. Simple Extended SAF Network
Networks: J and K
In this network, messages directed to Remotes in the “K” sub-network, will
be relayed through Extension radio Xj,k to the K-Remotes. Any response
from a Remote in sub-network “K” will pass back through Extension radio
Xj,k to the Master Mj. Radios in sub-network “J” operate on the same set of
frequencies and sub-network “K” but with a different radio-frequency
hopping pattern.
In the SAF operation, the Extension radios are set to MODE X
(Details Page 34) and operate with a “dual personality”—50% of the time it
serves as a Remote station and 50% of the time as a Master for sub-network
Remotes.
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Extended SAF Network
Below is an example of a multilevel network utilizing two repeaters—XJ,K
and XK,L. The example demonstrates the extensibility of the network. In this
case, messages directed to Remotes in the sub-network L will be relayed
through Extension radios XJ,K and XK,L. Like the previous example, the
Extension radios will split their operating time equally between their Master
and Remote personalities. This multi-layered network can be extended indefinitely without additional degradation in system throughput beyond that
initially incurred by placing the network in the SAF mode.
Invisible place holder
MJ
Sub-Network J
RJ
RJ
X J,K
RJ
Sub-Network K
X K,L
RL
RL
RK
RK
RL
Sub-Network L
Figure 19. Extended SAF Network
Networks: J, K, L
Retransmission and ARQ Operation
Functionally, the sub-network side of an Extension behaves like a corresponding connection between a master and a remote.
When an Extension is using its “master personality” it sends acknowledgments and performs unconditional retransmissions based on its REPEAT
count.
When an Extension is using its “Remote personality”, acknowledgments are
processed and retransmissions occur as needed, up to the number of times
specified by the RETRY count value.
If new data arrives—from a new source—prior to completion of retransmissions, then this is considered a violation of the polling model protocol. The
new data takes precedence over the old data and the old data is lost. In such a
situation, new data is bound to be corrupt as it will have some old data mixed
in with it.
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9.2 Synchronizing Network Units
The Master controls the synchronization for a given network for all modes.
Setting the Master to “SAF ON” broadcasts a command from the Master to all
radio units in the associated network either directly or through an Extension
radio. This command puts all radios in the entire system in a special
time-division duplexing mode that alternates between two timeslots. One
time slot for data communications upstream and the second for downstream
communications.
The Extensions are single radios which serve as bridges between adjacent
sub-network levels. Extensions will undertake a “remote” personality in one
timeslot, and a “master” personality in the alternate timeslot and provide
communications with associated Remotes downstream. Extensions behave
like two radios with their data ports tied together, first synchronizing with
their upstream Master during their Remote personality period, and then
providing synchronization signals to dependent Remotes downstream during
its Master personality period.
All Remotes synchronize to a corresponding Master. This can be the “real
master” (the MODE M unit), or it can be a repeater “Extension” that derives
synchronization from the “real master”.
Payload polls/packets broadcast from the network Master will be repeated to
all levels of the network, either directly to Remotes, or through network
repeaters—the Extensions station. The targeted Remote will respond to the
poll following the same path back to the Master.
Synchronization Messages
Remotes acquire synchronization and configuration information via SYNC
messages. They can synchronize to the Master (the MODE M unit) or to any
valid Extension (a MODE X unit).
The Master will always transmit SYNC messages. An Extension will only
start sending SYNC messages after synchronization is achieved with its
Master.
The ability to synchronize to a given radio is further qualified by the sender’s
Extended Address (XADDR) and by the receiver’s Synchronization Qualifiers
(XMAP, XPRI, and XRSSI).
When a primary is specified (XPRI is 0...31), a radio will always attempt to
find the primary first. If 30 seconds elapses and the primary is not found, then
the radio will attempt to synchronize with any non-primary radio in the XMAP
list.
Once every 30 minutes, if a primary is defined, the radio will check its
synchronization source. If the radio is synchronized to a unit other than the
primary, then the current RSSI value is compared to the XRSSI value. If RSSI
is less than XRSSI (or if XRSSI is NONE) the radio will force a
loss-of-synchronization, and hunt for the primary again (as described in the
previous paragraph).
52
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
By default, Extensions (and the Master) begin with XADDR 0. Synchronization qualifiers are set to XMAP 0, XPRI 0, and XRSSI NONE, respectively. This
default configuration allows any radio to hear the Master. When an Extension is added, the extended address of the Extension radio must be set to a
unique value. All remotes that need to hear that extension can specify this
either by designating the extension as the primary (XPRI), or by including it
in their list of valid synchronization sources (XMAP).
9.3 Using AT Commands with TransNET
A TransNET network may be configured to support protocols employing
Hayes-Compatible RTUs through the AT Mode. In this mode, TransNET
units can provide a communications replacement for dial-up modems where
the RTUs and the protocol do not contain addressability, and the establishment a direct-communications link is effectively the only way to determine if
the RTU has data ready to be sent. This requirement is common in many older
SCADA systems which were developed for direct connections where wire
lines were the only communications link available at the time. Most of these
older system implemented support the AT commands needed in the host software, so TransNET units s can be used without software modifications.
In this mode, the Master’s data port is parsed for a subset of AT commands.
(See Supported Commands below). When an ATDT xxxxx data sequence is
detected, and xxxxx is a unit address of a radio in the network, the TransNET
Master will establish a virtual link to that unit. It will remain in that state until
either another ATDT xxxx or ATH (hang-up/disconnect) is detected. (Note:
Unaddressed TransNET Remotes units in the network will not respond to
user data. Data will only be exchanged between the equipment connected to
the addressed Remote unit and the network or device connected to the
Master’s data port.
In order to use this mode, the command AT ON must be selected at the Master
Radio. The acknowledgment to an ATDT command is spoofed by the Master;
there is no true verification that the far-end connection is valid.
NOTE: No other radios can send or receive payload data until the AT Mode connection is closed. The Master station will continue in this mode until a new unit address or a disconnect command (ATH) is received.
Supported Commands
Supported modem commands on the payload port:
AT <attention>
Returns (code 0, “OK”)
ATDT[xxxxx] <dial>
“xxxxx” represents 5-digit unit address with a leading zero (0) if
applicable. Returns (code 1, “CONNECT”) once connected, all characters
are passed through until a “+++” is seen. (+ = (ASCII character 43/Hex 2B)
ATH <hang up> or +++
Returns (code 0, “OK”) and deletes any virtual connection to the currently
addressed Remote station.
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
53
ATV[x] <change verbosity>
x = 0, means use numeric messages
x = 1, means use text messages (Default)
Returns (code 0, “OK”)
AT <command errors>
Returns (code 4, “ERROR”)
Characters with <no AT command>
Modem will echo characters in data stream but will be ignored until a
second “AT” is seen at which time the modem will close the virtual
connection.
Application Notes with AT Commands ON
• Radios will not poll with the embedded RTU simulator unless a
connection is established.
• Network-wide Diagnostics are unaffected by the dialed unit connection
status.
9.4 Configuration Parameters for Store-and-Forward
Services
The installation and configuration of an MDS TransNET 900 network with
an Extension using SAF is straight-forward with only a few unique parameters that need to be considered and set at each unit.
In every network there can be only one Master station. It will serve as the sole
gateway to the outside world. The following three tables detail the parameters
that will need to be set on each type of radio in the network.
• Network Master Radio—Table 16 on Page 54
• Extension Radio(s)—Table 17 on Page 55
• Remote Radio(s)—Table 18 on Page 56
Table 16. Configuration Parameters for SAF Services
Network Master Radio
Parameter
Command
Description
Operating Mode
MODE M
Sets the radio to serve as
a Master
Details Page 34
Network Address
ADDR
Details Page 28
54
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
A number between 1 and
65,000 that will serve as a
common network address.
All radios in the network
use the same number.
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
Table 16. Configuration Parameters for SAF Services
Network Master Radio (Continued)
Parameter
Command
Description
Extended Address
XADDR
A number between 0 and
31 that will serve as a
common address for radios that synchronize directly to this master.
Typically, the Master is
set to zero (0).
Details Page 41
SAF ON
Store and Forward
Mode
Details Page 38
Enables store and forward capability in the network.
Table 17. Configuration Parameters for SAF Services
Extension Radio(s)
Parameter
Command
Description
Operating Mode
MODE X
Set the radio to serve as an
Extension
Details Page 34
Network Address
ADDR
Details Page 28
Extended Address
XADDR
Details Page 41
XPRI
Primary Extended
Address
Details Page 41
Extension Map
XMAP
Details Page 41
Extension
Received Signal
Strength Indicator
XRSSI
Details Page 41
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
A number between 1 and
65,000 that will serve as a
common network address.
All radios in the network use
the same number.
A number between 0 and 31
that will serve as a common
address for radios that synchronize directly to this Extension radio serving as
master for associated
sub-network units.
We recommend using zero
(0) for the Master station.
XADDR number of the primary or preferred radio with
which this radio will synchronize.
Functional list of all XADDR
values with which this radio
can synchronize, excluding
the XPRI address
The minimum RSSI level required to preserve synchronization with a non-primary
radio. (Ineffective when
XPRI is NONE)
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
55
Table 18. Configuration Parameters for SAF Services
Remote Radio(s)
Parameter
Command
Description
Operating Mode
MODE R
Set the radio to serve
as a Remote station
Details Page 34
Network Address
ADDR
Details Page 28
XPRI
Primary Extended
Address
Details Page 41
Extension Map
XMAP
Details Page 41
Extension
Received Signal
Strength Indicator
XRSSI
Details Page 41
A number between 1
and 65,000 that will
serve as a common
network address or
name.
Same number for all
units in the same network.
XADDR number of the
primary or preferred
radio with which this
radio will synchronize.
Functional list of all
XADDR values with
which this radio can
synchronize, excluding the XPRI address
The minimum RSSI
level required to preserve synchronization
with a non-primary radio. (Ineffective when
XPRI is NONE)
9.5 Using the Radio’s Sleep Mode (Remotes Only)
In some installations, such as at solar-powered sites, it may be necessary to
keep the transceiver’s power consumption to an absolute minimum. This can
be accomplished using the radio’s Sleep Mode feature. In this mode, power
consumption is reduced to about 8 mA.
Sleep Mode can be enabled under RTU control by asserting a ground (or
EIA/RS-232 low) on Pin 4 of the radio’s DATA connector. All normal functions are suspended until it is awakened. The radio stays in Sleep Mode until
a built-in five-minute timer “awakens” it for resynchronization, or the low is
removed from Pin 4.
When Pin 4 is opened (or an EIA/RS-232 high is asserted), the radio will be
ready to receive data within 75 milliseconds or less. The radio can be awakened more often if desired, by your RTU.
NOTE:
56
The SLEEP function must be set to ON; without this, a ground on Pin 4 will
be ignored.
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
It is important to note that power consumption will increase somewhat as
communication from the master station degrades. This is because the radio
will spend a greater period of time “awake” looking for synchronization
messages from the master radio.
In order for the radio to be controlled by Pin 4, the unit’s sleep mode must be
enabled through the SLEEP [ON, OFF] command. See “SLEEP [ON, OFF]”
on Page 40 for more information.
NOTE:
When using MDS’ InSite NMS software, if INTRUSIVE polling is used, it is
necessary to select SLEEP MODE INHIBIT ON from the Polling Options
menu, on the Network Wide Diagnostic Polling screen.
Sleep Mode Example
The following example describes Sleep Mode implementation in a typical
system. Using this information, you should be able to configure a system that
meets your own particular needs.
Suppose you need communications to each remote site only once per hour.
Program the RTU to raise an EIA/RS-232 line once each hour (DTR for
example) and wait for a poll and response before lowering it again. Connect
this line to Pin 4 of the radio’s DATA connector. This will allow each RTU to
be polled once per hour, with a dramatic power consumption savings.
9.6 Low-Power Mode
The Low-Power Mode (LPM) puts Remote radios into an operational configuration similar to Sleep, but with some important distinctions. The most
important difference is the radio will automatically go to sleep in this mode,
regardless of the condition of Pin 4 of the Data Interface connector.
This feature trades increased latency to gain power savings. The low-power
mode (LPM) automatically saves power at a Remote by instructing the
Remote to shutdown for large periods of time in between SYNC messages.
Master transmissions are automatically blocked while the remotes are asleep.
Note, both Masters and Remotes are adaptive and will suppress a normal
sleep interval until after the end of a normal data transmission or reception.
• LPM 1 at the Master enables low-power mode network-wide; all
remotes pick it up and start saving power by automatically sleeping.
LPM 1 can work in conjunction with the AT dialling feature. The dialled
unit will be forced awake; all others will sleep.
• LPM 0 at the master to disable low-power mode
(Default setting following an INIT or firmware upgrade.)
For LPMHOLD 0 with REPEAT 0 setting, a remote with no data to send
will consume about 1/4 of its normal power consumption.
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
57
9.7 Low-Power Mode versus Remote’s Sleep Mode
The Low-Power Mode (LPM) puts Remote radios into an operational configuration similar to Sleep, but with some important distinctions. Below is a
comparison of the two modes.
Table 19. Power-Conservation Modes Comparison
Sleep Mode
Low-Power Mode
Features
• Manual control by connected equipment
• Selective application of
Sleep control
• User determines length and
frequency of sleep periods
• Automatic radio-controlled timing
• Automatic sleep during absence of
directed traffic
• Network-wide implementation
through Master station
Benefits
• Low latency
• Low standby power, ≈ 8 ma
• Greatest potential for power
savings
• Less complicated implementation
• Simple configuration
9.8 MIRRORED BITS™ Protocol Support
TransNET radios are compatible with Schweitzer’s Mirrored Bits MB8
protocol providing complementary firmware (06-4045A01)is installed in all
network radios. A detailed application guide (AG2003-07) is available from
Schweitzer Engineering Labs Web site, www.SELinc.com/aglist.htm, or
from Microwave Data Systems’ Web site at www.microwavedata.com.
9.9 Seamless Mode Emulation
The RXD command assumes the payload message will be ready for transmission after the delay period has expired. If there is a chance the payload data
may be delayed, it is recommended to use the BUFF(er) command to make
sure the entire message is received before delivery is started. The BUFF
command provides a highly reliable seamless mode of operation, but can be
very slow to start, especially if it waits for the reception of long messages
before passing on the message.
9.10 Full-Duplex Emulation
If your system design needs to support PTP or Point-to-Multipoint applications and your communications must appear to be full-duplex to the
connected devices, set the Master to CSADDR xxxxx (where xxxxx is the
Network Address (ADDR)). This will place the system in a time-division
duplex mode (TDD). The radio system will appear to be full-duplex to the
connected devices, but actually operates half-duplex over the radio link. Data
is buffered by the transmitting side until it is its turn to transmit. Throughput
will be approximately 1/2 of the DATA INTERFACE rate.
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MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
9.11 Co-Located and Close-Proximity Masters
If your requirements call for multiple TransNET networks at the same location, you need to ensure that interference between the systems in minimized
to prevent overload that will diminish the performance of the TransNET
radios. Traditionally, about 10' of vertical separation of the antennas of
co-located radios was required in order to reduce the interference to the point
where overload of one network by the other will not occur. The CSADDR
command will provide relief from this antenna separation requirement by
operating the networks in a TDD mode and ensuring that one Master cannot
transmit while the other (or multiple others) are trying to receive a signal from
a distant radio.
Master Station Configuration
On all Masters for which you wish to synchronize transmissions, establish
one Master as the “Clock-Sync Master by setting its CSADDR value to it own
Network Address (ADDR xxxxx). Then, set all other dependent Masters
CSADDR values to the Network Address (ADDR) of the Clock-Sync Master.
Note that all Masters must be set to the same CSADDR setting, but only one
where the CSADDR matches its own ADDR; this is the Clock-Sync Master.
Please ensure that you use a different Network Address (ADDR) for each
Master. This value will be used to identify all units associated with this
Master’s network.
CSADDR = ADDR—Unit serving as a Clock-Sync Master
CSADDR ≠ ADDR—Unit serves as a Dependent Master (Clock Slave)
CSADDR = NONE—Co-located Master feature disabled (default)
HOPTIME, FEC and SAF values are provided by the Clock-Sync Master to all
dependent units.
NOTE:
If a Dependent Master station is unable to find the Clock-Sync Master station,
it will not be able to operate properly and the associated network will be
out-of-service.
Antenna System for Co-Located Master Stations
Using this TDD (Clock-Sync) mode will prevent any two masters from transmitting at the same time and greatly reduce the antenna separation requirements to near zero. Under this arrangement, the antennas of co-located
Masters may be placed a few feet (less than a meter) apart horizontally, or just
above or below vertically with no ill effects. There are two common antenna
system arrangements:
Sharing a Common Antenna System
It is possible to share an antenna between multiple Masters using standard power dividers, as long as the extra loss associated with these
devices is taken into account in your RF budgeting process. These Masters must be operating with Clock-Sync (CSADDR) enabled.
For example, the two Master stations shown in Figure 20 are connected
to a common antenna system. They use a power-divider that will result
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
59
in a signal loss of 3 dB, or one-half power level, on both transmit and
receive signals.
The power divider, such as a Mini-Circuits ZAPD-1 or similar product,
must be capable of handling 1 Watt and have >25 dB isolation between
TX ports.
Invisible place holder
Omnidirectional
Antenna
Network “A”
Power
Divider
MDS TransNET
Master—Network “A”
CS Master
Network “B”
(– 3 dB)
MDS TransNET
Master—Network “B”
CS Slave
Figure 20. Co-Located Masters Sharing an Antenna
9.12 Security
Today, the operation and management of an enterprise is becoming
increasing dependent on electronic information flow. An accompanying
concern becomes the security of the communication infrastructure and the
security of the data itself. MDS takes this matter seriously, and provides
several means for protecting the data carried over its wireless products.
The radio addressed this issue primarily through the use of the following
items:
1. A proprietary modem/data link layer—Data signals are processed using
code and hardware specifically designed by MDS.
2. A unique Network Address—This provides a unique identifier for each
radio in a network. A radio is not addressable unless this unique code is
included in the data string.
3. An optional encryption value (code)—Setting an encryption code
requires the use of the CODE command. This command scrambles the
radio’s hop pattern and encrypts payload data content. A radio requires
the correct Network Address (ADDR) and CODE value in order to
synchronize. When the CODE command is used, the same value must be
programmed into all radios in the network. See “CODE [NONE,
1…255]” on Page 30 for more details.
The effective combination of CODE and ADDR discourage the use of an
exhaustive search to gain access to a system.
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MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
The items described above provide sufficient security for a typical MAS
system. For more highly-sensitive applications, system designers should
consider employing application level encryption into their polling protocols
to further protect their systems. Third party software tools are available for
adding encryption, and these should be considered as part of any advanced
encryption scheme.
10.0 TECHNICAL REFERENCE
10.1 Product Specifications
GENERAL
Frequency Hopping Range:
Hop Pattern:
Frequency Stability:
Half-Duplex Operation:
Network Addresses:
Temperature Range:
Humidity:
Primary Power:
Current Draw (typical):
Transmit:
Receive:
Sleep Mode:
Size (excluding mtg. hardware):
Enclosed Version:
Board Version:
Weight:
Case:
Agency Approvals:
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
Up to 128 frequencies within
902–928 MHz,
configurable in 3.2 MHz zones
Based on network address
±1.5 ppm
±1.6 MHz TX/RX split
65,000
–40° C to +70° C
<95% at +40° C; non-condensing
13.8 Vdc (6–30 Vdc range)
510 mA @ 13.8 Vdc
115 mA @ 13.8 Vdc
8 mA @ 13.8 Vdc
5.30" W x 3.50” D x 1.40"H
(135 W x 89 D x 36 H mm)
4.00"W x 3.25 ” D x 0.50" H
(102 W x 83 H x 13 D mm)
1 Lb/0.5 k w/o brackets;
1.15 Lb/0.52 k w/brackets
Die-cast aluminum
• FCC Part 15.247
(E5MDS-EL805)
• Industry Canada RSS-210 and RSS-139
(CAN 3738A 12122)
• UL/CSA Class 1, Div. 2; Groups A, B, C
and D hazardous locations
• Contact MDS for information on availability and governmental approvals in other
countries
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
61
DATA CHARACTERISTICS (DB-9 Data Port)
Data Interface:
Interface Connector:
Data Rate:
Data Latency:
Byte Length:
Maximum Data Transmission:
RS-232/422/485
DB-9 female
1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200, 38400,
57600, 115200 bps asynchronous
7 ms typical
10 or 11 bits
Continuous up to 115200 bps
RF CHARACTERISTICS (TNC RF Connector)
TRANSMITTER:
Power Output
(at antenna connector):
0.1 to 1.0 watt (+20 dBm to +30 dBm),
set by user
Continuous
Binary CPFSK
50 Ohms
–60 dBc
–55 dBc
Duty Cycle:
Modulation Type:
Output Impedance:
Spurious:
Harmonics:
RECEIVER:
Type:
Sensitivity:
Intermodulation:
Desensitization:
Spurious:
Bandwidth:
Interference Ratio
(SINAD degraded by 3dB):
Time Required to Synchronize
with Master Radio:
Double conversion superheterodyne
–108 dBm @ 10-6 BER
54 dB minimum (EIA)
75 dB
70 dB minimum
200 kHz
Co-channel:–10 dB
Adjacent channel:+30 dB
Two channels away:+40 dB
Three channels away:+48 dB
0.5 seconds (typical)
10.2 Diagnostic Interface Connections (RJ-11)
Invisible place holder
RJ-11 PLUG
(TO RADIO)
1
6
RJ-11 PIN LAYOUT
DB-9 FEMALE
(TO COMPUTER)
4 TXD
RXD 2
5 RXD
TXD 3
6 GND
GND 5
Figure 21. RJ-11 to DB-9 Adapter Cable—Wiring Details
62
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
NOTE:
Only wire pins 4, 5, and 6. Pins 1,2, and 3 are reserved for special functions
and are not normally connected.
10.3 Data Interface Connections (DB-9F)
The DATA connector (Figure 22) is used to connect the radio to an external
DTE data terminal that supports the EIA/RS-232 or EIA/RS-485 (balanced)
format, depending on how the radio was configured at the factory. The radio
supports data rates of 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200, 38400, 57600, and
115200 bps (asynchronous data only).
The DATA connector mates with a standard DB-9 plug that is available from
many electronics parts distributors. Table 20 and Table 21 provide detailed
pin descriptions for the DATA connector in RS/EIA-232 mode and
RS/EIA-485 mode, respectively.Pin Descriptions—RS/EIA-232 Mode
5
1
Figure 22. DATA Connector (DB-9F)
As viewed from outside the radio
9
6
Pin Descriptions—RS/EIA-232 Mode
Table 20 lists the DATA connector pin functions for radios configured to
operate in RS/EIA-232 mode.
NOTE:
The radio is hard-wired as a DCE in the EIA-232 mode.
Table 20. DATA connector pin descriptions—RS/EIA-232
Pin
Number
Input/
Output
1
OUT
DCD (Data Carrier Detect)
A “high” indicates hopping synchronization.
2
OUT
RXD (Received Data)
Supplies received data to the connected device.
3
IN
TXD (Transmitted Data)
Accepts TX data from the connected device.
4
IN
Sleep—A ground on this pin turns off most circuits in a remote radio, including transmit, receive, modem, and diagnostic functions. This allows for greatly reduced power
consumption, yet preserves the radio’s ability to be quickly
brought on line. See Section 5.6, Using the Radio’s Sleep
Mode (beginning on Page 56) for details.
5
IN
Signal Ground—
Connects to ground (negative supply potential) on the radio’s PC board and chassis.
Pin Description
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
63
Table 20. DATA connector pin descriptions—RS/EIA-232
Pin
Number
Input/
Output
6
OUT
Alarm Output—An RS-232 high/space (+5.0 Vdc) on this pin
indicates an alarm condition. An RS-232 low/mark (-5.0
Vdc) indicates normal operation. This pin may be used as an
alarm output. (See ASENSE [HI/LO]Details, page 28 for
further information.
7
IN
RTS (Request-to-Send)
8
OUT
CTS (Clear-to-Send)—Goes “high” after the programmed
CTS delay time has elapsed (DCE), or keys an attached radio when RF data arrives (CTS KEY).
9
--
Reserved for Special Uses (Do not connect)
Pin Description
Pin Descriptions—RS/EIA-422/485 Mode
Table 21 lists the DATA connector pin functions for radios configured to
operate in RS/EIA-422/485 mode. See Figure 23 for wiring schemes.
Table 21. DATA connector pin descriptions—RS/EIA-485 Mode
Pin
Number
Input/
Output
Pin Description
1
—
Not Used—Do not connect
2
OUT
TXD+/TXA—Non-inverting driver output. Supplies data to
the connected device.
3
IN
RXD+/RXA—Non-inverting receiver input. Accepts data
from the connected device.
4
IN
Sleep Mode Input—A ground on this pin turns off most circuits in the radio, including transmit, receive, modem, and diagnostic functions. This allows for greatly reduced power
consumption, yet preserves the radio’s ability to be quickly
brought on line. See Section 5.6, Using the Radio’s Sleep
Mode (beginning on Page 56) for details.
5
--
Signal Ground (GND)—Connects to ground (negative supply potential) on the radio’s PC board and chassis.
6
--
Not Used—Do not connect
7
IN
RXD– /RXB—Inverting receiving input
8
OUT
TXD– /TXB—Inverting driver output.
9
--
Open (User configurable via internal jumper. See
“User Confirgurable I/O Connections” on Page 65)
NOTES:
• RXD+ / RXA and RXD– / RXB are data sent into the radio to be transmitted out
• RXD+ / RXA is positive with respect to RXD– / RXB when the line input is a “0”
• TXD+ / TXA and TXD– / TXB are data received by the radio and sent to the connected
device
• TXD+ / TXA is positive with respect to the TXD– / TXB when the line output is a “0”
64
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
Invisible place holder
RXD –
RXD – 7
TXD +
TXD – 8
TXD –
TXD + 2
RXD + 3
RXD – 7
TXD – 8
RXD+/TXD+
RXD–/TXD–
EXTERNAL DEVICE
RXD +
RXD + 3
RADIO
DATA CONNECTOR
TXD + 2
2-WIRE CONNECTIONS
EXTERNAL DEVICE
RADIO
DATA CONNECTOR
4-WIRE CONNECTIONS
Figure 23. EIA-422/485 Wiring Schemes
(Left: EIA-422, Right: EIA-485)
10.4 User Confirgurable I/O Connections
Several connection points (eyelets) are provided within the TransNET near
the Data Interface connector that allow the user to facilitate unique integration requirements. By jumpering eyelets, external functions can be transparently passed through the TransNET to user’s equipment connected to the
same pins on the associated TransNET unit. One pin of the DB-9 Data Interface connector is available, and three pins of the RJ-11 Diagnostics
connector.
Care should be taken when soldering to the PCB eyelets due to
their small size. For this reason, only qualified personnel should
install the jumpers and external connections.
Installation of internal jumpers and connection to non-standard
interface pins may void the product’s warranty.
If you are uncertain of your interface design, please consult with
the MDS Customer Service Department for a review of your
design to assure maintenance of your warranty.
CAUTION
POTENTIAL
EQUIPMENT
DAMAGE
Invisible place holder
Figure 24. User Interface I/O Jumper Eyelets
PCBs 03-4040A03/A04 and later.
NOTE:
If your PCB does not look like the one in the Figure 24, consult with the MDS
Technical Services for assistance.
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
65
Table 22. TransNET User I/O Connection Resources
Function or Service
Range
Available
at eyelet:
Filtered Receive Audio
(For test purposes)
0 – 5 Vac, 30–5 kHz
H2
General Purpose I/O 1 (GPIO 1)a
TTL; External 10K to 3.3 V
Vcc Recommended
H3
General Purpose I/O 2 (GPIO 2)b
TTL; External 10K to 3.3 V
Vcc Recommended
H4
Analog 1c
0 – 5 Vac, ≤ 60 HZ
H6
Do not connect. Factory use only.
H5
Data Interface Pin
Available
at eyelet:
DB-9, Pin 9
H1
RJ-11, Pin 1
H7
RJ-11, Pin 2
H8
RJ-11, Pin 3
H9
a. Configuration and data retrievable via MDS InSite™ software.
b. Configuration and data retrievable via MDS InSite™ software.
c. Parameter retrievable via MDS InSite™ software.
Application Example
A typical application of the user I/O connections may require one digital input
and one digital output to be controlled by network diagnostics. In this
example, H3 could be jumpered to H7 (I/O 1 to RJ-11,Pin 2) and H4 jumpered
to H8 (I/O 2 to RJ-11, Pin 2). Using InSite, I/O 1 could be configured as an
output and I/O 2 as an input.
Intrusion Alarm—An intrusion alarm sensor may pass its signal to the
TransNET radio for monitoring by InSite. When the user-defined threshold is
exceeded, a signal would then be passed back to the remote site via the
TransNET network to control a relay that in turn, turns on building’s flood
lights, a video camera and a siren.
Each pin connected to user-designed equipment must be connected through a
special cable constructed to breakout the User I/O pins.
Your interface can complement your unique requirements. The input signals
and output interface must be within the radio’s interface parameters as
summarized in Table 22.
66
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
10.5 Power Supply Connections at 28 Vdc
Common 28 Vdc supplies are often high-current power supplies designed
primarily to charge battery banks. The radio can be operated from these
supplies providing there are no transients on the leads as power is applied to
the radio. Transients can be created that rise above 30 Vdc to a voltage that
exceeds the radio’s primary voltage rating and can destroy its voltage regulators and other components. It is important to keep this potential hazard in
mind when designing 28 Vdc power supply connections for the radio.
• Use a 2-conductor cable to power to the radio. Then the currents in the
positive and negative wires are equal and opposite, causing their
magnetic fields to cancel. The result is no net inductance in the
connection to cause voltage overshoot.
• Do not connect a radio to a power supply that is already powered up,
unless necessary (i.e., when connecting a radio to a battery bank and
charger). When power is applied by switching on a power supply, the
rise time of the supply is too slow to cause overshoot.
• Typically there are multiple return paths for the negative side of the
power supply, through the coaxial cable shield and the chassis, for
example. Any imbalance in the currents in the power cable results in
voltage overshoot, so this should be minimized during initial power-up
if the supply cannot be turned off.
• Add a 1 to 2-Ohm, 2-Watt resistor in series with the positive lead. This
greatly limits voltage overshoot. Since these radios draw very little
current in receive mode, and transmit only briefly, there is little loss in
power efficiency. In transmit, the voltage drop is minimal and has no
effect.
• Minimize the length of the power cabling, within reason.
• When power is applied from a power source having a relatively high
(1 or 2 Ohms) source impedance, or from a power source without a
large amount of output capacitance, no overshoot occurs. Therefore, use
a power supply that is rated appropriately for the radio if possible—
avoid using power supplies that far exceed the radio's current
requirements.
Please direct any questions you may have about interfacing to MDS radios to
MDS Technical Services at TechSupport@MicrowaveData.com, or telephone
+1-585-241-5510.
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
67
10.6 dBm-Watts-Volts Conversion Chart
Table 23 is provided as a convenience for determining the equivalent voltage
or wattage of an RF power expressed in dBm with 50 Ohms load.
Table 23. dBm-Watts-Volts Conversion Chart
dBm V
Po
dBm V
Po
dBm mV
+53
+50
+49
+48
+47
+46
+45
+44
+43
+42
+41
+40
+39
+38
+37
+36
+35
+34
+33
+32
+31
+30
+29
+28
+27
+26
+25
+24
+23
+22
+21
+20
+19
+18
+17
+16
+15
+14
+13
+12
+11
+10
+9
+8
+7
+6
+5
+4
+3
+2
+1
200W
100W
80W
64W
50W
40W
32W
25W
20W
16W
12.5W
10W
8W
6.4W
5W
4W
3.2W
2.5W
2W
1.6W
1.25W
1.0W
800mW
640mW
500mW
400mW
320mW
250mW
200mW
160mW
125mW
100mW
80mW
64mW
50mW
40mW
32mW
25mW
20mW
16mW
12.5mW
10mW
8mW
6.4mW
5mW
4mW
3.2mW
2.5mW
2.0mW
1.6mW
1.25mW
0
-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
-8
-9
-10
-11
-12
-13
-14
-15
-16
1.0mW
.80mW
.64mW
.50mW
.40mW
.32mW
.25mW
.20mW
.16mW
.125mW
.10mW
-49
-50
-51
-52
-53
-54
-55
-56
-57
-58
-59
-60
-61
-62
-63
-64
68
100.0
70.7
64.0
58.0
50.0
44.5
40.0
32.5
32.0
28.0
26.2
22.5
20.0
18.0
16.0
14.1
12.5
11.5
10.0
9.0
8.0
7.10
6.40
5.80
5.00
4.45
4.00
3.55
3.20
2.80
2.52
2.25
2.00
1.80
1.60
1.41
1.25
1.15
1.00
.90
.80
.71
.64
.58
.500
.445
.400
.355
.320
.280
.252
.225
.200
.180
.160
.141
.125
.115
.100
.090
.080
.071
.064
.058
.050
.045
.040
.0355
dBm µV
dBm mV
-17
-18
-19
-20
-21
-22
-23
-24
-25
-26
-27
-28
-29
-30
-31
-32
-33
-34
-35
-36
-37
-38
-39
-40
-41
-42
-43
-44
-45
-46
-47
-48
31.5
28.5
25.1
22.5
20.0
17.9
15.9
14.1
12.8
11.5
10.0
8.9
8.0
7.1
6.25
5.8
5.0
4.5
4.0
3.5
3.2
2.85
2.5
2.25
2.0
1.8
1.6
1.4
1.25
1.18
1.00
0.90
Po
-65
-66
-67
-68
.01mW -69
-70
-71
-72
-73
-74
-75
-76
-77
-78
.001mW -79
-80
-81
-82
-83
-84
-85
-86
-87
-88
.1µW
-89
-90
-91
-92
-93
-94
-95
-96
-97
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
Po
0.80
0.71 .01µW
0.64
0.57
0.50
0.45
0.40
0.351
0.32
0.286
0.251
0.225 .001µW
0.200
0.180
0.160
0.141
128
115
100
90
80
71
65
58
50
45
40
35
32
29
25
22.5
20.0
18.0
16.0
11.1
12.9
11.5
10.0
9.0
8.0
7.1
6.1
5.75
5.0
4.5
4.0
3.51
3.2
dBm µV
-98
-99
-100
-101
-102
-103
-104
-105
-106
2.9
2.51
2.25
2.0
1.8
1.6
1.41
1.27
1.18
dBm nV
-107 1000
-108 900
-109 800
-110 710
-111 640
-112 580
Po
-113 500
-114 450
-115 400
-116 355
-117 325
-118 285
.1nW
-119 251
-120 225
.001pW
-121 200
-122 180
-123 160
-124 141
-125 128
-126 117
-127 100
.01nW -128 90
-129 80
-130 71
-131 61
-132 58
-133 50
-134 45
-135 40
-136 35
-137 33
.001nW -138 29
-139 25
-140 23
Po
.1pW
Po
.01pW
.1ƒW
.01ƒW
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
GLOSSARY
Antenna System Gain—A figure, normally expressed in dB, representing
the power increase resulting from the use of a gain-type antenna. System
losses (from the feedline and coaxial connectors, for example) are subtracted
from this figure to calculate the total antenna system gain.
Bit—The smallest unit of digital data, often represented by a one or a zero.
Eight bits (plus start, stop, and parity bits) usually comprise a byte.
Bits-per-second—See BPS.
BPS—Bits-per-second. A measure of the information transfer rate of digital
data across a communication channel.
Byte—A string of digital data usually made up of eight data bits and start,
stop, and parity bits.
Decibel (dB)—A measure of the ratio between two signal levels. Frequently
used to express the gain (or loss) of a system.
Data Circuit-terminating Equipment—See DCE.
Data Communications Equipment—See DCE.
Data Terminal Equipment—See DTE.
dBi—Decibels referenced to an “ideal” isotropic radiator in free space.
Frequently used to express antenna gain.
dBm—Decibels referenced to one milliwatt. An absolute unit used to
measure signal power, as in transmitter power output, or received signal
strength.
DCE—Data Circuit-terminating Equipment (or Data Communications
Equipment). In data communications terminology, this is the “modem” side
of a computer-to-modem connection. By default, MDS TransNET 900™
transceivers are set as DCE devices.
Dependent Master Station—Master station configured to be dependent on
another Master station (“Clock-Sync Master”) for timing sinformation to set
its CPU data clock.
Digital Signal Processing—See DSP.
DSP—Digital Signal Processing. In the MDS TransNET 900™ transceivers,
the DSP circuitry is responsible for the most critical real-time tasks; primarily
modulation, demodulation, and servicing of the data port.
DTE—Data Terminal Equipment. A device that provides data in the form of
digital signals at its output. Connects to the DCE device.
Equalization—The process of reducing the effects of amplitude, frequency
or phase distortion with compensating networks.
EIRP/EiRP—Effective Isotropic Radiated Power. Signal gain from an
antenna on its primary axsis as compared to a theoretical spherical
point-source. A dipole antenna has 2.14 dB gain over an isotraopic source .
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. B
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
G-1
Extended Address—A user-selectable number between 0 and 31 that
identifies a group of transceivers that are part of a common sub-network. It is
recommended the Master be assigned XADDR 0 and the values of 1–31
assigned to Extension radios.
Extension Radio—A radio in a TransNET spread-spectrum network that
serves as a gateway between vertically adjacent sub-networks. See
Store-and-Forward.
Fade Margin—The greatest tolerable reduction in average received signal
strength that will be anticipated under most conditions. Provides an
allowance for reduced signal strength due to multipath, slight antenna
movement or changing atmospheric losses. A fade margin of 20 to 30 dB is
usually sufficient in most systems.
Frame—A segment of data that adheres to a specific data protocol and
contains definite start and end points. It provides a method of synchronizing
transmissions.
Frequency Hopping—The spread spectrum technique used by the MDS
TransNET 900™ transceivers, where two or more associated radios change
their operating frequencies several times per second using a set pattern. Since
the pattern appears to jump around, it is said to “hop” from one frequency to
another.
Frequency Zone—The transceivers use up to 128 discrete channels in the
902 to 928 MHz spectrums. A group of 16 channels is referred to as a zone.
The transceivers use five to eight frequency zones.
Hardware Flow Control—A transceiver feature used to prevent data buffer
overruns when handling high-speed data from the RTU or PLC. When the
buffer approaches overflow, the radio drops the clear-to-send (CTS) line,
which instructs the RTU or PLC to delay further transmission until CTS again
returns to the high state.
Host Computer—The computer installed at the master station site, which
controls the collection of data from one or more remote sites.
Latency—The delay (usually expressed in milliseconds) between when data
is applied to TXD (Pin 2) at one radio, until it appears at RXD (Pin 3) at the
other radio.
MAS—Multiple Address System. A radio system where a central master
station communicates with several remote stations for the purpose of
gathering telemetry data.
Master (Station)—The one radio transceiver in a spread spectrum network
that automatically provides synchronization information to one or more
associated remote transceivers. A radio may be programmed for either master
or remote mode using software commands.
Multiple Address System (MAS)—See Point-Multipoint System.
G-2
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. B
Network Address—User-selectable number between 1 and 65000 that is
used to identify a group of transceivers that form a communications network.
The master and all remotes within a given system must have the same
network address.
Power Divider—Passive device used to couple two transmitters or receivers
to a common device, usually an antenna system.
Point-Multipoint System—A radio communications network or system
designed with a central control station that exchanges data with a number of
remote locations equipped with terminal equipment.
Poll—A request for data issued from the host computer (or master PLC) to a
remote radio.
PLC—Programmable Logic Controller. A dedicated microprocessor
configured for a specific application with discrete inputs and outputs. It can
serve as a host or as an RTU.
Remote Radio—A radio in a spread spectrum network that communicates
with an associated master station. A radio may be programmed for either
master or remote mode using software commands.
Remote Terminal Unit—See RTU.
Repeater—A radio that receives RF data and retransmits it. See
Store-and-Forward.
RTU—Remote Terminal Unit. A data collection device installed at a remote
radio site.
SCADA—Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition. An overall term for
the functions commonly provided through an MAS radio system.
Standing Wave Ratio—See SWR.
Sub-Network—A group of TransNET transceivers and the corresponding
radio that they are directly synchronized to. A sub-network can be identified
by Extended Address. See Store-and-Forward.
Store-and-Forward—A radio that receives RF data and retransmits it. In the
TransNET product line, store and forward is defined as a network that
consists of vertically adjacent sub-networks that alternate communicating
upstream and downstream. TransNET performs store and forward at the
internal data frame level (not the the user data level) which allows TransNET
equipment to stream data with minmal latency through each
Extension/Repeater radio station.
SWR—Standing Wave Ratio. A parameter related to the ratio between
forward transmitter power and the reflected power from the antenna system.
As a general guideline, reflected power should not exceed 10% of the forward
power (≈ 2:1 SWR).
Zone—See Frequency Zone.
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. B
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
G-3
RXD
TXD
C
SYN
PWR
G-4
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. B
A
Accessories (table) 5
ADDR command (set/display radio network address) 28
Alarm
checking for 44
code definitions 44
codes 44
codes, table 44
major vs. minor 44
receiver timeout (RXTOT command) 38
reset output signal 28
set/display output sense (ASENSE command) 28
status (STAT command) 40
ALARM command (superseded; see STAT command) 40
Alarm Mask (AMASK) Command 28
Alarm Sense (ASENSE) Command 28
Alarm Status Command (STAT) 40
AMASK command (configure alarm output signal) 28
Antenna
installation 14
performance optimization 19
selection 10
SWR check 20
system gain vs. power output setting, table 12
Yagi, illustrated 11
ASENSE command (set/display alarm output sense) 28
B
BAUD command (set/display data interface port attributes) 28
Baud rate
setting 21
setting for RJ-11 DIAG port (DLINK command) 47
BUFF command (set/display received data handling mode) 29
C
Cable
data equipment to DATA INTERFACE connector 14, 21
data interface wiring for tail-end links 18
feedlines 11
maximum length, recommended 15, 64, 65
Clear Zone Statisics Log, ZONE CLEAR 42
Clear-to-Send Delay (CTS) Command 30
Clear-to-Send Hold Time (CTSHOLD) Command 30
Clock-Synchronizing Master Address (CSADDR) Command 30
CODE command (display/set encryption value) 30
Command 33
TEMP (radio’s internal temperature reading) 40
Commands
ADDR (set/display radio network address) 28
AMASK (configure alarm output signal) 28
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
I-1
ASENSE (set/display alarm output sense) 28
BAUD (set/display data interface port attributes) 28
BUFF (set/display received data handling mode) 29
CODE (set/display encryption value), See also Encryption 30
CTS (set/display CTS line response timer) 30
CTSHOLD (set/display CTS hold timer) 30
detailed descriptions 27–42
DEVICE (set/display DCE or CTS Key behavior) 31
display operating status 23
DKEY Command, Turn off radio transmitter test signal 32
DTYPE (set radio’s diagnostics type) 32
FEC (Forward Error Correction) 32
FEC (Forward Error Correction) Command 32
HOPTIME (set/display hoptime setting) 32
how used 27
INIT (restore factory default settings) 33
LPM (low-power mode) 33
LPMHOLD (low-power mode sleep time) 34
MODE (display/set radio mode as master, remote, or extension) 34
MODE (radio operating mode) 34
most often used commands 27
network configuration 22
OWM (set/display optional owner’s message) 34
OWN (set/display optional owner’s name) 34
PORT (display/set current data port) 34
PWR (set/display RF forward output power) 36
Radio transmitter test frequency (TX) 41
RSSI (display received signal strength) 37
RTU (enable/disable internal RTU) 37
RX (set/display receiver test frequency) 37
RXD 38
RXTOT (set/display received data timeout value) 38
SAF (store-and-forward) 38
SER (radio serial number) 38
SETUP (enter testing and setup mode) 38
SHOW (display measured power output) 39
SHOW PWR (show power) 39
SHOW SYNC 39
SHOW SYNC (show Clock-Synchronization Master) 39
SKIP (set/display frequency zone to skip) 39
SLEEP (display/set radio’s sleep mode setting) 40
SLEEP (transceiver sleep mode) 40
SREV (firmware/software revision level) 40
STAT (list alarms) 40
TEMP (display internal temperature) 40
UNIT (unit address) 41
XADDR (extended address) 41
XMAP (Map of Extension Addresses) 41
XPRI (display/program primary radio’s extended address) 41
XRSSI (sets minimum signal level for sync. with non-primary extension unit) 41
I-2
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
Connections
User Confirgurable I/O 65
Connectors
Diagnostic Interface, Connections 62
D
Data Baud Rate (BAUD) Command 28
Data Baud Rate (BUFF) Command 29
Data buffer setting 20, 29
DATA INTERFACE
cable wiring for tail-end links, illustrated 18
connections 63
connector pin descriptions, table 63
Data Port Signalling Standard (PORT) Command 34
Default settings
data interface baud rate 21
factory settings reset by INIT command (table) 35
restoring (INIT command) 33
See also individual command descriptions
DEVICE Command 30
DEVICE command (set/display DCE or CTS Key behavior) 31
Diagnostics
network-wide, performing 47
setup mode (SETUP command) 38
using InSite software for network-wide 47
Diagnostics Link (DLINK) 31
Display
alarm output sense (ASENSE command) 28
alarms (STAT command) 40
CTS hold timer value (CTSHOLD command) 30
CTS line response timer value (CTS command) 30
data interface baud rate (BAUD command) 28
device behavior (DEVICE command) 31
hoptime setting (HOPTIME command) 32
network address (ADDR command) 28
operating status commands 23
owner’s message (OWM command) 34
owner’s name (OWN command) 34
receive test frequency (RX command) 37
received data handling mode (BUFF command) 29
received data timeout value (RXTOT command) 38
received signal strength (RSSI command) 37
RF forward output power (PWR command) 36
RF power output, actual measured (SHOW command) 39
skipped frequency zones (SKIP command) 39
temperature, internal (TEMP command) 40
display/set radio mode as master, remote, or extension (see MODE command) 34
DKEY command (disable transmitter) 20, 38
DKEY, Disable Transmitter, Command 32
DLINK command (set/display baud rate of diagnostics link) 47
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
I-3
Downstream Repeat Transmission Count (REPEAT) Command 36
DSP (digital signal processing) 1, 44
DTYPE command (set radio’s diagnostics type) 32, 47, 48
E
Employing Digital Signal Processing (DSP) 1
Enable
internal RTU (RTU command) 37
network-wide diagnostics, procedures 47
Setup mode (SETUP command) 38
skipped zone (SKIP command) 39
Sleep Mode
Enable/Disable LEDs (LED) Command 33
Encryption. See CODE command
Equipment List 31
Extended Address Command (XADDR) 41
Extension radio. See Store-and-Forward (SAF)
F
Feedline
selection 10, 11
Firmware Revision Level Command (SREV) 40
Forward-Error Correction (FEC) Command 32
Fuse Replacement 48
G
Gate (radio diagnostics type) 32, 48
H
Hardware Revision (HREV) Command 33
Hayes-Compatible AT Command (AT) 28
Hoptime
setting 20
HOPTIME Command (radio transmitter hop timing) 32
HOPTIME command (set/display hoptime setting) 32
I
Illustrations
antenna, Yagi 11
data interface cable wiring for tail-end links 18
model configuration code 2, 65
point-to-point link 4
remote station arrangement 7
tail-end link 4
typical MAS network 3
INIT command (restore factory default settings) 33
Initialize 33
InSite software 47
Installation
antenna 14
I-4
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
connecting transceiver to data equipment 14, 21
feedline selection 11
performance optimization 19
requirements 6
site selection 7
site survey 8
tail-end links 18
transmission path 7
Interference
about 9
checks 21
troubleshooting 46
interference 9
K
Key
set to CTS keying (DEVICE command) 31
transmitter, for antenna SWR check 20
KEY command (key transmitter) 20, 38
L
LED status indicators
table 19, 43
Low-Power Mode (LPM) Command 33
Low-Power Mode Sleep Time (LPMHOLD) Command 34
LPM Command (low-power mode) 33
LPMHOLD Command 34
M
Map 41
Map of Extension Addressses (XMAP) 41
Master Station
default settings 35
MIRRORED BITS™ Protocol Support 58
MODE Command 34
MODE command (display/set radio mode as master, remote, or extension) 34
MODE command (display/set radio’s operating mode as master, remote, or
extension) 34
Model configuration code, illustrated 2, 65
Modes
Low-Power Mode versus Remote’s Sleep 58
Mounting instructions/dimensions 13–14
Multiple Address System (MAS)
network, illustrated 3
Multiple Address Systems (MAS) 3
N
Network Address (ADDR) Command 28
Network configuration commands 22
Network Diangnsotics Mode (DTYPE) Command 32
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
I-5
Network-wide diagnostics
procedures 47
Node (radio diagnostics type) 32, 48
O
LED 33
Modbus, BUFF 29
Operation 18–21
OWM command (set/display optional owner’s message) 34
OWN command (set/display optional owner’s name) 34
Owner’s Message (OWM) Command 34
Owner’s Name Command (OWN) 34
P
PC
connecting to radio’s diagnostic port 47
launching InSite application at 47
performing diagnostics using connected 47
Peer (radio diagnostics type) 32, 48
Performance optimization 19
Pins, DATA INTERFACE connector descriptions (table) 63
Point-to-point system
link, illustrated 4
Point-to-Point System (P-P) 4
PORT command (set/display current data port) 34
Power
Low-Power Mode versus Remote’s Sleep 58
Power (RF)
how much can be used 12
Measurement 39
set/display RF forward output (PWR command) 36
Power saving mode (see Sleep Mode)
Powering radios from 28 Volt systems 67
Primary Extension Address (XPRI) 41
Procedures
antenna aiming 19
antenna and feedline selection 10
antenna SWR check 20
connecting data equipment to DATA INTERFACE connector 14, 21
connecting PC and radios for network-wide diagnostics 47
enabling sleep mode
installation planning 6
installing the antenna and feedline 14
interference check 21
mounting the transceiver 13–14
network-wide diagnostics 47
performance optimization 19
performing network-wide diagnostics 47
programming radio for network-wide diagnostics 47
reading LED status indicators 19
I-6
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
site selection 7
troubleshooting 42–46
Programming radio 27–42
as root or node 47
PWR command (set/display RF forward output power) 36
R
Radio
inoperative (troubleshooting chart) 46
no synchronization with master (troubleshooting chart) 46
poor performance (troubleshooting chart) 46
Radio Operating Mode (MODE) Command 34
Radio Receive Test Frequency Command (RX) 37
Radio Serial Number Command (SER) 38
Radio Transmit Test Frequency (TX) 41
Radio Transmitter Hop Timing (HOPTIME) 32
Radio Transmitter Power Level (PWR) Command 36
Radio’s Internal Temperature Command (TEMP) 40
Radio-MODEM Behavior (DEVICE) Command 31
Receive Data Timeout-Timer Command (RXTOT) 38
Received Signal Strength Indicator Command (RSSI) 37
Remote radio
default settings 35
Remote station
typical arrangement, illustrated 7
Remote Terminal Unit Simulator Command (RTU) 37
Repeater Operation. See Store-and-Forward (SAF)
Restore to Factory Defaults (INIT) 33
RJ-11
Diagnostic Interface, Connection 62
Root (radio diagnostics type) 32, 48
RSSI command (display received signal strength) 37
RTU command (enable/disable internal RTU) 37
RX command (set/display test receive frequency) 37
RXD Command 38
RXD Delay Command (RXD) 38
RXTOT command (set/display received data timeout value) 38
S
SAF command (store-and-forward) 38
Security
Network Address 60
optional encryption value 60
Security Code (CODE) Command 30
Security, Data 60
SER Command 38
Set
alarm output sense (ASENSE command) 28
alarm output signal (AMASK command) 28
CTS hold timer (CTSHOLD command) 30
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
I-7
CTS line response timer (CTS command) 30
data interface baud rate (BAUD command) 28
DCE or CTS Key device behavior (DEVICE command) 31
frequency zone to skip (SKIP command) 39
hoptime (HOPTIME command) 32
network address (ADDR command) 28
owner’s message (OWM command) 34
owner’s name (OWN command) 34
radio mode (see MODE command) 34
received data handling mode (BUFF command) 29
received data timeout value (RXTOT command) 38
receiver test frequency (RX command) 37
testing mode (SETUP command) 38
SETUP command (enter testing and setup mode) 38
Setup Radio Test (SETUP) 38
Show Clock-Synchronization Master Network Address (SHOW SYNC) 39
SHOW command (display power output) 39
SHOW CON Command (show virtual connection status) 39
Show Measured RF Transmit Power (SHOW PWR) 39
SHOW SYNC Command 39
Show Virtual Connection Status Command (SHOW CON) 39
signal strength, minimum 8
Site selection 7
SKIP command (set/display frequency zone to skip) 39
Skip Radio Operating Zones (SKIP) 39
SLEEP command (display/set radio’s sleep setting) 40
SLEEP command (transceiver sleep ON/OFF) 40
Sleep Mode 56
Spread spectrum, basic principles of 3
SREV Command 40
STAT command (list alarms) 40
Store-and-Forward (SAF) 5, 22, 25, 26, 33, 38, 43, 50, 54
Store-and-Forward Services (SAF) Support Command 38
SWR (Standing Wave Ratio)
performance optimization 20
Synchronization qualifiers 43, 52
synchronization, check 8
T
Tables
accessories 5
alarm codes 44
antenna system gain vs. power output setting 12
DATA INTERFACE connector pin descriptions 63
LED status indicators 19, 43
troubleshooting 46
Tail-end link
Adding to Existing Network 4
cable wiring for, illustrated 18
illustrated 4
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MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
installation 18
Technical specifications 61–62
TEMP command (display internal temperature) 40
Temperature, display internal (TEMP command) 40
Terrain 7
Terrain and Signal Strength 7
Test, on-the-air 8
Transceiver
connecting to data equipment 14, 21
default settings 35
mounting instructions/dimensions 13–14
performance optimization 19
sleep mode 56
Transceiver Sleep (SLEEP) 40
Troubleshooting 42–46
performing network-wide diagnostics 47
table 46
Turn Off Radio Transmitter Test Signal (DKEY) Command 32
Turn On Radio Transmitter Test Signal (KEY) Command 33
U
UNIT Command (unit address) 41
Upstream Repeat Transmission Count Command (RETRY) 36
User Confirgurable I/O Connections 65
X
XADDR (extended address command) 16, 26, 33, 35, 43, 52, 53, 55
XADDR (extended address) Command 34
XPRI command (display/set extended address) 41
XRSSI command (sets minimum RSSI level to maintain sync. w/non-primary
extension radio) 41
Z
ZONE CLEAR (clear zone statistics log) 42
ZONE DATA Command (read zone statistics log) 42
Zone, Clear Statistics Log (ZONE CLEAR) 42
Zone, Read Statistics Log (ZONE DATA) 42
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
I-9
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MDS TransNET 900 I&O Guide
MDS 05-2708A01, Rev. C
IN CASE OF DIFFICULTY...
MDS products are designed for long life and trouble-free operation. However,
this equipment, as with all electronic equipment, may have an occasional
component failure. The following information will assist you in the event that
servicing becomes necessary.
TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE
Technical assistance for MDS products is available from our Customer Support
Team during business hours (8:00 A.M.–5:30 P.M. Eastern Time). When
calling, please give the complete model number of the radio, along with a
description of the trouble/symptom(s) that you are experiencing. In many cases,
problems can be resolved over the telephone, without the need for returning the
unit to the factory. Please use one of the following means for product assistance:
Phone: 585 241-5510
FAX: 585 242-8369
E-Mail: TechSupport@microwavedata.com
Web: www.microwavedata.com
FACTORY SERVICE
Component level repair of radio equipment is not recommended in the field.
Many components are installed using surface mount technology, which requires
specialized training and equipment for proper servicing. For this reason, the
equipment should be returned to the factory for any PC board repairs. The
factory is best equipped to diagnose, repair and align your radio to its proper
operating specifications.
If return of the equipment is necessary, you will be issued a Service Request
Order (SRO) number. The SRO number will help expedite the repair so that the
equipment can be repaired and returned to you as quickly as possible. Please be
sure to include the SRO number on the outside of the shipping box, and on any
correspondence relating to the repair. No equipment will be accepted for repair
without an SRO number.
A statement should accompany the radio describing, in detail, the trouble
symptom(s), and a description of any associated equipment normally connected
to the radio. It is also important to include the name and telephone number of a
person in your organization who can be contacted if additional information is
required.
The radio must be properly packed for return to the factory. The original shipping container and packaging materials should be used whenever possible. All
factory returns should be addressed to:
Microwave Data Systems
Product Service Department
(SRO No. XXXX)
175 Science Parkway
Rochester, NY 14620 USA
When repairs have been completed, the equipment will be returned to you by
the same shipping method used to send it to the factory. Please specify if you
wish to make different shipping arrangements.
Microwave Data Systems Inc.
175 Science Parkway
Rochester, NY 14620
General Business: +1 585 242-9600
FAX: +1 585 242-9620
Web: www.microwavedata.com
A product of Microwave Data Systems Inc.