SoundCheck Manual

SoundCheck
SoundCheck
User Manual
®
®
VERSION 16
Instruction Manual
Version 16.0
Feb 2017
© Copyright 2000 - 2017 Listen, Inc.
Loudspeakers &
Microspeakers
Microphones
Headphones &
Headsets
Wireless
Devices
Smartphones
& Tablets
Telephones
Sound Measurements Make Sound Products
6
Hearing
Aids
Audio
Electronics
Listen, Inc. 580 Harrison Ave, Suite 3W Boston, MA 02118
Tel: (617) 556-4104
Web: www.listeninc.com
Sales: sales@listeninc.com
Support: support@listeninc.com
580 Harrison Ave, Suite 3W • Boston, MA 02118 • 617-556-4104 • Fax 617-556-4145 • www.listeninc.com
PN: 8010
REV 120717
SOUNDCHECK
®
VERSION 16 USER MANUAL
© COPYRIGHT 1995-2017 LISTEN, INC.
REV 120717
Contents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i
Contents
Listen Software License Agreement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i
Installing SoundCheck for Windows. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Minimum Computer Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Computer Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Upgrading From an Earlier Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Rules - Installing SoundCheck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Software Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Hardware Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Demo Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Listen Hardware Drivers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Demo Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Optional Modules and Protected Sequences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
NI Visa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Windows Text Size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
European Decimal Notation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Setup Wizard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
First Run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Creating Sequences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Audio Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
A Note About Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Page intentionally left blank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
SoundCheck 16.0 New Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Listen Hardware Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Full Multichannel Acquisition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
SoundCheck ONE™ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Operating Principles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Sequences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Sequence Run Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Test Equipment Setup for Typical Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
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Microphone Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
SoundCheck Main Screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Quick Start Menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Control Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Offline Tab Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Drop down menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Mass Export . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
SoundCheck 16.0.ini Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
INI File Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Controls and Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Graphs and Cursors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Login . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Access Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
User Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Login Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Hardware Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Hardware - System.Har . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Hardware Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Hardware Editor Rules For Production Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Audio Page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Listen Hardware Page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
External Hardware Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Interface Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
NI DAQ Digital I/O Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
NI DAQmx. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Calibration Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
System.Cal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Calibration Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
SoundCheck Signal Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
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Instruction Manual
Naming - Best Practices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Defining the Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Calibrating SoundCheck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Calibration History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Digital signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Equalization and Correction Curve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Input Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Output Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Digital Channel Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Reference Codec & dBm0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Bluetooth Sequence Setup Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Units Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Analysis Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Display Editor – Memory List. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Post-Processing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Message Step Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Stimulus Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Frequency Stepped Sweep (Stweep™) Excitation Signal Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
New - Sweep Equalization for Minimized Transients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Stimulus Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Right Click Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Stimulus Step Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Analyze/Ignore Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Compound Stimulus - Stweep Optimized. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Compound Stimulus - WAV File With Pilot Tone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Signal Parameters for Amplitude Sweep Excitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
WAV File Excitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
DC Connect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Control Method: Analog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Two Tone Stimulus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Sweep Type - Difference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Active Speech Level Stimulus Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
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Acquisition Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Play & Record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Time (sec). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Record Padding (sec) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Record Delay (sec) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Curve Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Use Signal Path Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Virtual Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Show/Hide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Rules - Virtual Instrument Acquisition Step Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Analysis Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Algorithms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
View Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Waveforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Algorithm Details. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Analysis Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Rules - Normalized THD/Normalized Rub and Buzz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Measurement Confidence Rules: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Rules - Impedance Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Reference Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Autosave Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Save . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Rules - Relative File Path Rules in Autosave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Rules of use for Text Files: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Test Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Filename. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Apply Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
In a Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Memory List Value Example. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
Recall Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
File Path . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
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Rules - Relative File Path Rules in Recall Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
Automatic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Prompt Operator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
File Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
File Path Info . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
Curve Names to be Recalled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Order of Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Recall in a Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Post-Processing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Search Range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Desired Result. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
Arithmetic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
Constant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206
Rules - Axis choices for Operand A in Post Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206
Unary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
Scalar (Statistics) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210
Zwicker Loudness (Optional Module Required) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Zwicker Example. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Smoothing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
Intersection (search). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
User Equation (optional module) Equation Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
Windowing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Resolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
Directivity Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226
Nth Octave Synthesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
Rules - Resampling and Frequency Shift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228
Resampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228
Frequency Shift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229
Time Domain Waveform Filter (Optional Module Required) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230
Post Processing Use Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233
Message Step . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
Listen Hardware Control Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
AmpConnect Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
AudioConnect Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
SoundConnect 2 Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
DC Connect Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240
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BTC-4148 Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240
Operator Message - Dialog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242
Display Local Language Characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244
Numeric Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
Digital I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246
External Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246
Syntax for Sending RS232 (serial) or IEEE-488 (GPIB) Commands in SoundCheck . . . . . . . 249
Reading RS232 Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
AmpConnect USB Control Via SoundCheck. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
AmpConnect Message Step . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
AmpConnect Message Step . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254
Custom Step Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256
Limits Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257
Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258
Precision of Limits Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
Critical Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
Limits Editor Summary Table. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
Data Tab Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264
Rules - Waveform in Limit Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266
Multimeter Limit Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
Parameters Tab - Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268
Alignment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268
Absolute Comparison Precision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273
X Axis - Log vs. Linear Interpolation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275
Failed Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276
Comparison of Absolute Limits, Floating Limits and Floating Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277
Display Editor and Memory List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279
Memory List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279
Memory List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280
Tabs (Curves, Values, Results and WFM). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280
Memory List Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281
Memory List Drop Down Menus. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282
Display Lock Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282
Data Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284
Autoprotect/Undo Autoprotect Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 286
Auto Grouping General Rules - Memory List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 290
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Report Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291
Right Click . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291
Window Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292
Help Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292
WAV File Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293
WAV File General Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293
WAV File Scaling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294
Rules for scaling Waveforms when they are saved as WAV files: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294
Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295
Offline Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295
Display Tabs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295
Display Editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296
Right Click on Graph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297
Graph Header . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302
Graph Footer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305
Creating a Display Step . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306
Display Step Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306
Display Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 308
Adding Polar Curves to Display Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309
Report Generator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317
Report Template Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317
Print Step . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319
Print Type Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319
Report Generator Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320
Report Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325
Report Template Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325
Manually Creating Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 326
Creating a Word Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 327
Manual Report With Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 328
Print Step Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329
Creating an Excel Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330
Serial Number Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333
Auto Increment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333
Prompt Operator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333
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Statistics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 335
Online Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 335
Offline Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 336
Statistical Process Control. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 337
Choosing What Statistics to Create . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338
SPC - Statistical Process Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 341
Best Fit to Average . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 343
Adding Statistics Steps to the Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 344
Verdict of the Step. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 344
Rules - Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 344
Statistics Example Sequence. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 345
Custom Steps Included With SoundCheck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 347
Outline Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 347
Instrument Open Close. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348
System Custom Step . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 349
Mixer Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350
RS232 Read Integer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351
Serial Number Write Read . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351
Open Before Converting Old Custom VIs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352
Creating a Custom VI and Custom Step . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353
Creating a Custom VI for SoundCheck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353
Creating a Custom Step . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 356
SoundMap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 357
Time Frequency Analysis Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 357
SoundMap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 357
Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358
Time-Frequency Analysis Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 362
Time-Frequency Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365
3D View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 368
Analysis Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 371
Algorithm Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 382
Sequence Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387
What is a sequence?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387
What is a step? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387
Default Sequences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387
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Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 388
Sequence Editor Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389
Relative File Paths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389
Sequence Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 390
Editing Sequences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 391
Editing Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 393
Step Template Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 393
Rules - Sub-sequences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 394
Right Click Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 396
Configure Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 397
Configure Step . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 398
Conditional Branching Rules - Sequence Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400
Creating a New Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 401
Exporting Sequences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 403
Document Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 404
Virtual Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407
Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407
Instrument List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408
Overload Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408
Common Instrument Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 409
Virtual Instrument Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 409
Opening Multiple Instances of Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 410
Instrument Operation Time Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 410
Signal Generator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 411
WAV file playback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 413
Why use an equalized WAV file? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 413
Equalize a WAV file. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414
Multimeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 417
Strip Chart Recorder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 420
Spectrum Analyzer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 423
Oscilloscope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 431
Real Time Analyzer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 432
Distortion Analyzer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 434
Frequency Counter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 435
SoundCheck ONE™ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 437
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 437
Setup Wizard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 437
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Template Sequences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 438
Setup & Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 439
Generating SoundCheck ONE Sequences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 440
Sequence Editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 441
Controlling SoundCheck with TCP/IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 443
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 443
Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 443
Controlling SoundCheck with TELNET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 444
C# Example App . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 446
LabVIEW Example App . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 447
Python Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 449
Command Set Definition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 450
Controlling SoundCheck From ActiveX - DEPRECATED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 457
ActiveX Control - Legacy Examples (Windows Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 457
API Specification (Windows) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 460
Database Setup for use with SoundCheck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 467
Creating an ODBC Connection for MS Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 467
ODBC Connection Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .467
Example Database. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 468
Relationship of Access Tables for SoundCheck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 469
Supported Databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 470
Database Setup Steps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 470
Determining the Data Store . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 470
Creating the Connection Descriptor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 471
Data File Format. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 477
SoundCheck *.DAT and *.WFM file binary formats for most commonly used versions . . . . 477
1 DAT Binary Data File Format – SoundCheck 4.13 (DAT v2). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 477
2 DAT Binary Data File Format – SoundCheck 5.54 (DAT v3). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 478
3 DAT Binary Data File Format SoundCheck 6.01-7.01 (DAT v6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 480
4 WFM Binary File Format – SoundCheck 6.01-7.01 (WFM v3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 481
Appendix A: Hardware Compatibility List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 483
Appendix B: Windows Setup Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 493
Audio Device System Settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 493
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European Decimal Notation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 494
Windows Display - Text Size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 495
Appendix C: PXI/PCI 4461 Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 497
PXI 1031 Chassis Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 497
NI 4461 Install and Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 498
SoundCheck Hardware Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 499
Appendix D: Connection Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 501
Amp Calibration - Single Ended Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 501
Amp Calibration - XLR Balanced Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 502
Amp Calibration - Bridged Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503
Mic Calibration - SoundConnect™ Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 504
Loudspeaker Test Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 505
Loudspeaker Test Connections with Impedance Box. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 506
Detailed Drawing of Impedance Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 507
Balanced Audio Interface Calibration Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508
Balanced vs Single Ended Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 509
Appendix E: Serial Port Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 511
Footswitch and Buzzer Control Via Serial Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 511
Serial Port Pin Out Definition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 511
Buzzer On/Off Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 511
Remote Control Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 514
Appendix F: System Verification Using SoundCheck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 515
Hardware Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 516
Sequence Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 516
Appendix G: Verifying SoundConnect™ Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 517
Noise Floor and Ground Loop Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 518
Windows Keyboard Shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 521
Keyboard Shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 521
Appendix H: Keyboard Shortcuts & Stweep Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 521
Stweep Table - ISO Stepped-sine Frequencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 522
Appendix I: Equation Editor Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 523
User Equation Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 523
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Appendix J: Weighting and Window Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 525
TSR Window Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 525
Appendix K: Time Selective Measurements With Log Sweep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 527
Appendix L: Excel Template Tutorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 529
Step 1 – Write Sequence. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 529
Step 2 – Create Autosave Step(s) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 529
Step 3 – Create Initial Excel File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 531
Step 4 – Create Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 531
Step 5 – Use the Template in the Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 533
Appendix M: Barcode Reader Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 535
Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 535
Bar Code Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 535
Appendix N: Running Sequences from a Network Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 537
Master PC Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 537
Workstation PC Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 538
Appendix O: Data Import Wizard Tutorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 539
Importing text from a saved file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 539
Appendix P: Default Sequence List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 543
SoundCheck 16.0 Available Functionality. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 545
Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 549
INDEX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 557
xii
Contents
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Listen Software License Agreement
READ THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF THIS LICENSE AGREEMENT CAREFULLY BEFORE
INSTALLING THIS SOFTWARE. THE SOFTWARE IS COPYRIGHTED AND LICENSED (NOT SOLD). BY
INSTALLING THIS SOFTWARE, YOU ARE ACCEPTING AND AGREEING TO THE TERMS OF THIS
LICENSE AGREEMENT. IF YOU ARE NOT WILLING TO BE BOUND BY THE TERMS OF THIS LICENSE
AGREEMENT, YOU SHOULD RETURN THE SOFTWARE, HARDWARE KEY, AND DOCUMENTATION
WITHIN THIRTY (30) DAYS OF YOUR INVOICE DATE, AND YOU WILL RECEIVE A CREDIT OR A
REFUND.
The enclosed Software is provided to the purchaser of the Software ("End-User") by LISTEN, Inc., ("Licensor") for use only under the terms set forth in this Agreement. Licensor reserves any right not expressly
granted to the End-User. The End-User owns the disk on which the Software is recorded, but Licensor
retains ownership of all copies of the Software itself. The End-User assumes sole responsibility for the
installation, use and results obtained from use of the Software.
1. License. Licensor grants to End-User a limited, non-exclusive and nontransferable license to install,
maintain and use the Software in object code form on a single computer owned or leased by End-User
solely in connection with the End-User's own business. End-User may make one copy of the Software, in
machine-readable form, solely for backup or archival purposes for the computer on which the Software is
installed. The Software is protected by copyright law. As an express condition of this License, the End-User
must reproduce on the copy Licensor's copyright notice and any other proprietary legends on the original
copy supplied by Licensor.
2. Restrictions. End-User agrees that the Software is a proprietary product and that all right, title and interest in and to the Software, including all associated intellectual property rights, are and shall at all times
remain with Licensor. End-User may NOT sublicense, assign, or distribute copies of the Software to others.
THE END-USER MAY NOT DECOMPILE, REVERSE ENGINEER, DISASSEMBLE, OR OTHERWISE
REDUCE THE SOFTWARE TO A HUMAN READABLE FORM. THE END-USER MAY NOT MODIFY,
ADAPT, TRANSLATE, RENT, LEASE, LOAN, RESELL FOR PROFIT, DISTRIBUTE, OR OTHERWISE
ASSIGN OR TRANSFER THE SOFTWARE, OR CREATE DERIVATIVE WORKS BASED UPON THE
SOFTWARE OR ANY PART THEREOF.
3. Protection and Security. End-User agrees that the Software contains trade secrets, proprietary information and copyrighted material of Licensor. End-User agrees to use its best efforts and to take all reasonable
steps to safeguard the Software to ensure that no unauthorized person shall have access thereto and that
no unauthorized copy, publication, disclosure or distribution, in whole or in part, in any form, shall be made.
End-User acknowledges that the Software contains valuable confidential information and that unauthorized
use and/or copying are harmful to Licensor. End-User agrees to assist and cooperate with Licensor in the
identification and removal of illegal copies of Listen software or software based on Listen’s source-code
located on the End-User’s computer, computer system, or at End-User’s place of business. End-User
agrees to only install and use authorized, genuine and licensed versions of the Software. Installation or use
of any unlicensed or illegal copies, or software based on Listen’s source code shall be deemed a material
breach of this Agreement.
4. Termination. This License is effective until terminated. This License will terminate immediately without
notice from Licensor if the End-User fails to comply with any of its provisions. Upon termination the EndUser must destroy the Software and all copies thereof. End-User may terminate this License at any time by
destroying the Software and all copies thereof.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Listen Software License Agreement
i
5. Limited Warranty. Licensor warrants that, for ninety (90) days from the date of shipment by Licensor (i)
the media on which the software is furnished will be free of defects in materials and workmanship under
normal use; and (ii) the Software conforms to its published functional specifications current at the time of
shipment. Except for the foregoing, the Software is provided AS IS. If, during the warranty period, a defect
appears, End-User shall return the Software to Licensor and Licensor's only obligation shall be, at Licensor's election, to replace the defective Software or refund the purchase price. The End-User agrees that the
foregoing constitutes the End-User's sole and exclusive remedy for breach by Licensor under any warranties made under this Agreement. This warranty does not apply if the Software (i) has been altered or
changed in any way by anyone other than Licensor; (ii) has not been installed, operated, repaired or maintained in accordance with instructions supplied by Licensor (including the use of other Software versions) or
(iii) has been subjected to abnormal physical or electrical stress, misuse, negligence or accident. Licensor
is not responsible for problems associated with or caused by incompatible operating systems or equipment,
or for problems in the interaction of the Software with software not furnished by Licensor.
No oral or written information or advice given by Licensor or its dealers, distributors, employees or agents
shall in any way extend, modify or add to the foregoing warranty.
THE WARRANTY AND REMEDY PROVIDED ABOVE ARE EXCLUSIVE AND IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER
WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. THE END-USER
ASSUMES ALL RISK AS TO THE SUITABILITY, QUALITY, AND PERFORMANCE OF THE SOFTWARE.
6. LIMITATION OF LIABILITY. IN NO EVENT WILL LICENSOR, OR ITS DIRECTORS, OFFICERS,
EMPLOYEES, CONSULTANTS, INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS, AGENTS OR AFFILIATES, BE LIABLE TO THE END-USER FOR ANY CONSEQUENTIAL, INCIDENTAL, INDIRECT, SPECIAL OR EXEMPLARY DAMAGES (INCLUDING DAMAGES FOR LOSS OF BUSINESS REVENUES OR PROFITS,
BUSINESS INTERRUPTION, LOSS OF DATA OR BUSINESS INFORMATION, AND THE LIKE), HOWEVER CAUSED AND REGARDLESS OF THE THEORY OF LIABILITY, INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE,
ARISING OUT OF THE USE OF OR INABILITY TO USE THE SOFTWARE OR ACCOMPANYING WRITTEN MATERIALS, EVEN IF LICENSOR HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.
LICENSOR'S LIABILITY TO THE END-USER (IF ANY) FOR ACTUAL DIRECT DAMAGES, HOWEVER
CAUSED AND REGARDLESS OF THE THEORY OF LIABILITY, INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE, WILL BE
LIMITED TO, AND IN NO EVENT SHALL EXCEED, THE AMOUNT ORIGINALLY PAID TO LICENSOR
FOR THE LICENSE OF THE SOFTWARE.
7. Enhancements. From time to time Licensor may, in its sole discretion, advise the End-User of updates,
upgrades, enhancements or improvements to the Software and/or new releases of the Software (collectively, "Enhancements"), and may license the End-User to use such Enhancements upon payment of prices
as may be established by Licensor from time to time. All such Enhancements to the Software provided to
the End-User shall also be governed by the terms of this License. IN ORDER FOR THE END-USER TO BE
ASSURED THAT IT WILL BE ADVISED OF AND LICENSED TO USE ANY ENHANCEMENTS TO THE
SOFTWARE, THE END-USER MUST REGISTER THEIR SOFTWARE AT www.listeninc.com/register.
8. Export Regulations. Software, including technical data, is subject to U.S. export control laws, including
the U.S. Export Administration Act and its associated regulations, and may be subject to export or import
regulations of other countries. End-User agrees to strictly comply with all such regulations and acknowledges that it has the responsibility to obtain licenses to export, re-export or import Software.
ii
Listen Software License Agreement
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
9. General. This License will be governed by and construed in accordance with the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the United States, and shall inure to the benefit of Licensor and End-User and
their successors, assigns and legal representatives. Any action, suit or proceeding arising out of under or in
connection with this Agreement whether, brought for equitable relief or money damages shall be brought
exclusively in either state or federal court in Suffolk County, Massachusetts. LicenSee irrevocably and
unconditionally submits to the exclusive jurisdiction and venue of such courts and agrees to take any and all
future action necessary to submit to the jurisdiction of such courts. Final judgment in any such suit shall be
conclusive and may be enforced in other jurisdictions by suit on the judgment, a certified or true copy of
which shall be conclusive evidence of the fact and the amount of any liability therein described, or by appropriate proceedings under any applicable treaty or otherwise. If any provision of this License is held by a
court of competent jurisdiction to be invalid or unenforceable to any extent under applicable law, that provision will be enforced to the maximum extent permissible and the remaining provisions of this License will
remain in full force and effect. Any notices or other communications to be sent to Licensor must be mailed
first class, postage prepaid, to the following address:
LISTEN, Inc.
580 Harrison Ave.,
Suite 3W,
Boston, MA 02118
This Agreement constitutes the entire agreement between the parties with respect to the subject matter
hereof, and all prior proposals, agreements, representations, statements and undertakings are hereby
expressly cancelled and superseded. This Agreement may not be changed or amended except by a written
instrument executed by a duly authorized officer of Licensor.
10. Acknowledgment. BY OPENING THIS PACKAGE AND/OR INSTALLING THIS SOFTWARE, THE
END-USER ACKNOWLEDGES THAT IT HAS READ THIS LICENSE, UNDERSTANDS IT, AND AGREES
TO BE BOUND BY ITS TERMS AND CONDITIONS. Should you have any questions concerning this
License, contact Licensor at the address set forth above.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Listen Software License Agreement
iii
LISTEN 䕃ӊ䆌ৃण䆂
䇋೼ᅝ㺙ᴀ䕃ӊѻકПࠡҨ㒚䯙䇏ᴀण䆂Ёⱘᴵℒ੠ᴵӊDŽᴀ䕃ӊѻકᏆপᕫ㨫԰ᴗᑊ䖯㸠䆌ৃ
˄㗠䴲ߎଂ˅DŽϔᮺᅝ㺙ᴀ䕃ӊѻકˈे㸼⼎ᙼᏆ᥹ফᑊৠᛣᴀ䆌ৃण䆂ⱘ৘乍ᴵℒDŽབᙼϡৠᛣ
ফᴀण䆂ᴵℒⱘ㑺ᴳˈᙼᑨ೼থ⼼᠔䕑᮹ᳳПৢϝक(30)໽‫ݙ‬Ѹ䖬ᴀ䕃ӊѻકǃ⹀ӊ䩹࣭੠᭛ӊˈ
ᑊᇚӮᬊࠄ䗔ℒDŽ
᠔䰘䕃ӊ⬅ LISTEN, Inc.( 䆌ৃᮍ ) ৥䕃ӊфᆊ˄᳔㒜⫼᠋˅ᦤկˈ᳔㒜⫼᠋乏ḍ᥂ᴀण䆂ᴵℒՓ
⫼䆹䕃ӊDŽ䆌ৃᮍֱ⬭᠔᳝᳾ᯢ⹂ᥜќ᳔㒜⫼᠋ⱘᴗ߽DŽ᳔㒜⫼᠋ᢹ᳝ࠏᔩ᳝䕃ӊⱘ‫ˈ⹳ܝ‬Ԛܼ䚼
䕃ӊࡃᴀⱘ᠔᳝ᴗ⬅䆌ৃᮍѿ᳝DŽ᳔㒜⫼᠋ᇍᅝ㺙ǃՓ⫼ঞ䕃ӊՓ⫼ⱘ៤ᵰᡓᢙ⣀ゟ䋷ӏDŽ
1.䆌ৃDŽ䆌ৃᮍ৥᳔㒜⫼᠋ᥜќϔӑ᳝䰤ⱘǃ䴲ᥦҪⱘǃϡৃ䕀䅽ⱘ䆌ৃˈ䆌ৃ೼᳔㒜⫼᠋ᢹ᳝៪
⾳⫼ⱘϔৄҙ⫼Ѣ᳔㒜⫼᠋㞾䑿Ϯࡵⱘ⬉㛥ϞˈҹⳂᷛҷⷕⱘᔶᓣᅝ㺙ǃ㓈ᡸঞՓ⫼ᴀ䕃ӊDŽ᳔㒜
⫼᠋ৃҹᴎ఼ৃ䇏Ḑᓣࠊ԰ϔӑᴀ䕃ӊⱘࡃᴀˈԚࠊ԰ࡃᴀⱘⳂⱘ䳔Ўᇍᅝ㺙᳝ᴀ䕃ӊⱘ⬉㛥䖯㸠
໛ӑ៪ᄬḷDŽᴀ䕃ӊѻકফ㨫԰ᴗ⊩ֱᡸDŽ԰Ўᴀ乍䆌ৃⱘϔ乍ᯢ⹂ᴵӊˈ᳔㒜⫼᠋ᖙ乏ᡞ೼䆌ৃ
ᮍᦤկⱘॳ䕃ӊϞⱘ䆌ৃᮍ㨫԰ᴗໄᯢҹঞӏԩ݊Ҫϧ᳝ᴗᷛ⼎ϔৠ໡ࠊࠄ䕃ӊ໛ӑϞDŽ
2.䰤ࠊDŽ᳔㒜⫼᠋ৠᛣᴀ䕃ӊᰃϔ乍ϧ᳝ѻકˈᴀ䕃ӊЁⱘҹঞϢᴀ䕃ӊⳌ݇ⱘϔߛᴗ߽ǃᴗⲞ੠
߽Ⲟˈࣙᣀ᠔᳝Ⳍ݇ⶹ䆚ѻᴗˈഛ⬅䆌ৃᮍѿ᳝Ϩ೼ӏԩᯊ‫׭‬ഛᑨ⬅䆌ৃᮍѿ᳝DŽ᳔㒜⫼᠋ϡᕫᇚ
䕃ӊⱘࡃᴀߚ䆌ৃǃ䕀䅽៪䫔ଂќҪҎDŽ᳔
᳔㒜⫼᠋ϡᕫᇍᴀ䕃ӊ䖯㸠㾷ⷕǃড৥Ꮉ⿟ǃߚ㾷៪ҹ݊
Ҫᮍᓣᇚᴀ䕃ӊ䰡ԢЎৃ䇏ḐᓣDŽ᳔㒜⫼᠋ϡᕫׂᬍǃᬍ㓪ǃ㗏䆥ǃߎ⾳ǃߎ‫׳‬ǃ⾳‫׳‬ǃҹ䌶߽Ў
Ⳃⱘߎଂǃ㒣䫔ˈ៪ҹ݊Ҫᮍᓣ䕀䅽៪䕀⿏ᴀ䕃ӊˈ៪෎Ѣᴀ䕃ӊ៪ᴀ䕃ӊⱘӏԩ䚼ߚ߯䗴㸡⫳԰
કDŽ
3.ֱᡸ੠ᅝܼDŽ᳔㒜⫼᠋ৠᛣ䕃ӊࣙ৿䆌ৃᮍⱘଚϮ⾬ᆚˈϧֵ᳝ᙃ੠৿᳝㨫԰ᴗⱘ䌘᭭DŽ᳔㒜⫼
᠋ৠᛣሑ᳔݊໻ࡾ࡯ᑊ䞛প᠔᳝ড়⧚᥾ᮑᇍᴀ䕃ӊࡴҹֱᡸˈ䙓‫ܡ‬᳾㒣ᥜᴗ㗙Փ⫼ᴀ䕃ӊˈ䙓‫ܡ‬ҹ
ӏԩᮍᓣᇚᴀ䕃ӊᭈԧ៪݊Ёӏԩ䚼ߚ䖯㸠᳾㒣ᥜᴗⱘ໡ࠊǃ݀ᓔǃ᡿䴆៪䫔ଂDŽ᳔㒜⫼᠋ᡓ䅸ᴀ
䕃ӊЁࣙ৿њᵕ‫݋‬Ӌؐⱘֱᆚֵᙃˈ᳾㒣ᥜᴗⱘՓ⫼੠/៪໡ࠊᇚӮᇍ䆌ৃᮍ䗴៤ᤳᆇDŽ᳔㒜⫼᠋
ৠᛣणࡽᑊ䜡ড়䆌ৃᮍ䆚߿ᑊߴ䰸ᅝ㺙Ѣ᳔㒜⫼᠋ⱘ⬉㛥ǃ⬉㛥㋏㒳៪ࡲ݀ഄ⚍ⱘ᳾㒣ᥜᴗⱘᴀ䕃
ӊ៪ⲫ⠜䕃ӊ˄ࣙᣀᴀ䕃ӊ݊Ҫ⠜ᴀ˅DŽ᳔㒜⫼᠋ৠᛣҙᅝ㺙ᑊՓ⫼Ꮖᥜᴗⱘǃℷ⠜ⱘᑊ㦋ᕫ䆌ৃ
ⱘᴀ䕃ӊⱘ䕃ӊ⠜ᴀDŽᅝ㺙៪Փ⫼ӏԩ᳾㒣䆌ৃⱘ៪ⲫ⠜ⱘ䕃ӊⱘ㸠Ўᇚ㹿㾚Ўᇍᴀण䆂ⱘḍᴀ䖱
㑺DŽ
4.㒜ℶDŽᴀ䆌ৃᣕ㓁᳝ᬜⳈ㟇㒜ℶDŽ᳔㒜⫼᠋䖱ডᴀ䆌ৃӏԩϔ乍㾘ᅮⱘˈᴀ䆌ৃᇚゟे㒜ℶ㗠᮴
䳔䆌ৃᮍ԰ߎк䴶䗮ⶹDŽ㒜ℶৢˈ᳔㒜⫼᠋ᖙ乏䫔↕ᴀ䕃ӊঞ᠔᳝Ⳍ݇ᣋ䋱DŽ᳔㒜⫼᠋ৃ䗮䖛䫔↕
ᴀ䕃ӊ੠᠔᳝Ⳍ݇ᣋ䋱ⱘᮍᓣ䱣ᯊ㒜ℶᴀ䆌ৃDŽ
5. ᳝䰤ⱘֱ䆕DŽ䆌ৃᮍֱ䆕ˈ㞾䆌ৃᮍথ䋻П᮹䍋бक˄90˅໽‫˄˖ݙ‬i˅೼ℷᐌՓ⫼⢊ᗕϟˈᅝ
㺙њᴀ䕃ӊⱘ䕑ԧ೼ᴤ᭭੠Ꮉ㡎Ϟ≵᳝⨩⮉˗ᑊϨ˄ii˅ᴀ䕃ӊ೼থ䋻ᯊヺড়݊᠔݀Ꮧⱘࡳ㛑㾘
ḐDŽℸ໪ˈᴀ䕃ӊᣝĀ⦄⢊āᦤկDŽབᵰᴀ䕃ӊ೼ֱׂᳳ‫⦄ߎݙ‬њ⨩⮉ˈ᳔㒜⫼᠋ᑨᇚП䗔ಲ䆌ৃ
ᮍˈᑊϨ䆌ৃᮍଃϔⱘНࡵेˈ⬅䆌ৃᮍ㞾㸠䗝ᢽˈ᳈ᤶ᳝⨩⮉ⱘ䕃ӊ៪䗔䖬ӋℒDŽ᳔㒜⫼᠋ৠᛣ
ࠡ䗄НࡵЎ᳔㒜⫼᠋಴䆌ৃᮍ䖱ডᴀण䆂乍ϟ᠔԰ⱘӏԩֱ䆕㗠ѿ᳝ⱘଃϔ੠ܼ䚼ᬥ⌢᥾ᮑDŽབᵰ
ᴀ䕃ӊߎ⦄ҹϟᚙ‫ࠡˈމ‬䗄ֱ䆕ϡќ䗖⫼˄i˅Ꮖ㒣㹿䰸䆌ৃᮍП໪ⱘӏԩҎҹӏԩᮍᓣ᳈ᬍ៪ׂ
ᬍ˗˄ii˅≵᳝ḍ᥂䆌ৃᮍᦤկⱘ᪡԰ᣛफᅝ㺙ǃ᪡԰ǃׂ⧚៪㓈ᡸ˄ࣙᣀᇍᴀ䕃ӊ݊Ҫ⠜ᴀⱘՓ
⫼˅៪˄iii˅⬅Ѣফࠄ䴲ℷᐌⱘ⠽⧚៪⬉ᄤⱘय़࡯ǃϡᔧՓ⫼ǃ⭣ᗑ៪ᛣ໪DŽᇍՓ⫼ϡऍ䜡ⱘ᪡԰
㋏㒳៪䆒໛ᇐ㟈ⱘ៪ϢПⳌ݇ⱘᬙ䱰ˈ៪ᇚᴀ䕃ӊϢ䴲䆌ৃᮍᦤկⱘ䕃ӊϔ䍋Փ⫼᠔ᓩথⱘᬙ䱰ˈ
䆌ৃᮍϡᡓᢙ䋷ӏDŽ
iv
Listen Software License Agreement
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
䆌ৃᮍ៪݊㒣䫔ଚǃߚ䫔ଚǃਬᎹ៪ҷ⧚ଚᦤկⱘӏԩষ༈ⱘ៪к䴶ⱘֵᙃ៪ᓎ䆂ϡᕫҹӏԩᮍᓣ
ᵘ៤ᇍϞ䗄ֱ䆕ⱘᓊԌǃׂᬍ៪๲㸹DŽ
Ϟ䗄ֱ䆕੠ᬥ⌢᥾ᮑЎᥦҪᗻⱘˈᑊϨপҷњ᠔᳝݊Ҫᯢ⼎៪ᱫ⼎ⱘֱ䆕ˈࣙᣀԚϡ䰤Ѣ䩜ᇍ䗖䫔
ᗻ੠ᇍᶤϔ⡍ᅮⳂⱘ䗖⫼ᗻⱘ咬䅸ֱ䆕DŽ᳔㒜⫼᠋ᡓᢙ᳝݇ᴀ䕃ӊ䗖⫼ᗻǃ䋼䞣੠ᗻ㛑ⱘ᠔᳝亢
䰽DŽ
6.䋷ӏ㣗ೈDŽ᳔㒜⫼᠋⬅ѢՓ⫼៪᮴⊩Փ⫼ᴀ䕃ӊ៪䜡༫ⱘк䴶ᴤ᭭ҹӏԩᔶᓣᇐ㟈ⱘӏԩৢ㓁
ⱘǃ‫ⱘ✊ي‬ǃ䯈᥹ⱘǃ⡍⅞ⱘ៪ᚽ㔮ᗻⱘᤳᆇ䌨ٓ˄ࣙᣀᇍ㧹Ϯᬊܹ៪߽⍺ᤳ༅ǃ㒣㧹Ёᮁǃ᭄᥂
៪ଚϮֵᙃ϶༅ㄝⱘᤳᆇ䌨ٓ˅ˈ᮴䆎䋷ӏᔶᓣབԩˈࣙᣀ⭣ᗑ໻ᛣˈ䆌ৃᮍ៪݊㨷џǃ催㑻ㅵ⧚
ҎਬǃਬᎹǃ乒䯂ǃ⣀ゟᡓࣙଚǃҷ⧚Ҏ៪݇㘨ᮍϡᡓᢙӏԩ䋷ӏˈेՓ䆌ৃᮍᏆ㹿ਞⶹ䆹ᤳᆇথ
⫳ⱘৃ㛑ᗻDŽ
䆌ৃᮍ৥᳔㒜⫼᠋ᡓᢙⱘҹԩ⾡ᔶᓣѻ⫳ⱘᅲ䰙ⱘⳈ᥹ᤳᆇ䌨ٓ䋷ӏ˄བᵰ᳝˅ˈϡ䆎䋷ӏᔶᓣབ
ԩˈࣙᣀ⭣ᗑ໻ᛣˈҙ䰤ѢϨ೼ӏԩᚙ‫މ‬ϟϡ催Ѣህ䕃ӊ䆌ৃ৥䆌ৃᮍᬃҬⱘॳྟӋℒDŽ
7. छ㑻DŽ䆌ৃᮍৃҹϡᯊ㞾㸠‫އ‬ᅮ䗮ⶹ᳔㒜⫼᠋ᇍᴀ䕃ӊ԰ߎⱘ᳈ᮄǃᦤछǃ๲ᔎ៪ᬍ䖯੠//៪ᴀ
䕃ӊⱘ᳔ᮄথᏗ˄ড়⿄“छ㑻”˅ˈᑊϨৃҹ೼᳔㒜⫼᠋ᬃҬ䆌ৃᮍϡᯊ䆒ᅮⱘӋḐৢ৥᳔㒜⫼᠋ᥜ
ќᇚℸ㉏छ㑻ⱘՓ⫼䆌ৃDŽᴀ䆌ৃᴵℒᇍ৥᳔㒜⫼᠋ᦤկⱘ᠔᳝ᇍᴀ䕃ӊⱘछ㑻ৠḋ‫݋‬᳝㑺ᴳ࡯DŽ
Ў⹂᳔ֱ㒜⫼᠋㛑໳ᬊࠄ݇Ѣࠡ䗄छ㑻ⱘ䗮ⶹᑊ㦋ᕫℸ㉏䕃ӊछ㑻ⱘՓ⫼䆌ৃˈ᳔㒜⫼᠋ᖙ乏೼ҹ
ϟ㔥ഔᇍ݊䕃ӊ䖯㸠⊼‫˖ݠ‬www.listeninc.com/register <http://www.listeninc.com/register>DŽ
8.ߎষᴵ՟DŽ䕃ӊˈࣙᣀᡔᴃ᭄᥂ˈᑨヺড়㕢೑ߎষㅵࠊ⊩ⱘ㽕∖ˈࣙᣀ㕢೑ߎষㅵ⧚⊩ḜঞϢП
Ⳍ݇ⱘᴵ՟ˈᑊৃ㛑䳔㽕ヺড়݊Ҫ೑ᆊⱘ䖯ߎষᴵ՟DŽ᳔㒜⫼᠋ৠᛣϹḐ䙉ᅜ᠔᳝ࠡ䗄ᴵ՟ᑊᡓ䅸
᳝݊䋷ӏህߎষǃ‫ߎݡ‬ষ៪䖯ষ䕃ӊ㦋ᕫ䆌ৃDŽ
9.ϔ㠀ᴵℒDŽ ᴀ䆌ৃফ㕢೑੠偀㧼䇌าᎲ㘨䙺⊩ᕟⱘㅵ䕪ᑊ᥂ℸ԰ߎ㾷䞞ˈᑊᑨヺড়䆌ৃᮍǃ᳔㒜
⫼᠋ঞ݊৘㞾㒻ফᮍǃফ䅽ᮍ੠⊩ᅮҷ㸼Ҏⱘ߽ⲞDŽᴀण䆂ᓩ䍋ⱘ៪Ϣᴀण䆂Ⳍ݇ⱘӏԩ㸠ࡼǃ䆝
䆐៪⊩ᕟ⿟ᑣˈ᮴䆎ᰃ৺ᇏ∖㸵ᑇᬥ⌢៪䞥䪅ᤳᆇ䌨ٓˈᑨܼ䚼Ѹ⬅偀㧼䇌าᎲ㧼⽣‫ܟ‬䚵ⱘᎲ៪㘨
䙺⊩䰶ϧሲㅵ䕪DŽ㹿䆌ৃᮍϡৃ᩸ಲᑊ᮴ᴵӊഄ᳡Ңࠡ䗄⊩䰶ⱘϧሲㅵ䕪ᴗ੠ഄ⚍ˈᑊৠᛣ䞛পӏ
ԩঞ᠔᳝䖯ϔℹⱘᖙ㽕㸠ࡼҹ᳡Ңࠡ䗄⊩䰶ⱘㅵ䕪ᴗDŽᇍ䆹䆝䆐ⱘ㒜ᅵ߸‫އ‬Ў᳔㒜㒧ᵰˈᑊϨৃҹ
ḍ᥂䆹߸‫އ‬ǃ䅸ᅮџᅲⱘ㒧䆎ᗻ䆕᥂ᴤ᭭ⱘ㒣䖛䅸䆕ⱘ៪‫⹂ޚ‬᮴䇃ⱘࡃᴀϔӑҹঞ݊Ё᠔䗄ⱘ䋷ӏ
䞥乱ˈ៪ḍ᥂᳝݇ᴵ㑺៪݊Ҫ㾘ᅮ䗮䖛䗖ᔧ⿟ᑣˈ೼݊Ҫㅵ䕪ऎඳ‫ݙ‬ᔎࠊᠻ㸠DŽ㢹ᴀ䆌ৃⱘӏԩᴵ
ℒ㹿‫݋‬᳝ㅵ䕪ᴗⱘ⊩䰶ḍ᥂Ⳍ݇⊩ᕟ䅸ᅮЎ᮴ᬜ៪ϡৃᠻ㸠ˈ䆹ᴵℒᇚ೼‫ܕ‬䆌ⱘ᳔໻㣗ೈ‫ݙ‬ќҹᠻ
㸠ˈϨᴀ䆌ৃⱘ݊Ҫᴵℒ㒻㓁ᅠܼ᳝ᬜDŽ৥䆌ৃᮍ԰ߎⱘӏԩ䗮ⶹ៪݊ᅗ≳䗮ᖙ乏䗮䖛䚂䌘乘Ҭᮍ
ᓣҹ༈ㄝ䚂ᬓ䚂ᆘ㟈ҹϟഄഔ˖
LISTEN, Inc.
LISTEN, Inc.
580 580
Harrison
Ave.,
Harrison
Ave.,
Suite
Suite
2A, 3W,
Boston, MA 02118
Boston, MA 02118
ᴀण䆂ᵘ៤ঠᮍህᴀण䆂Џ乬᠔䖒៤ⱘᅠᭈण䆂ˈৠᯊᯢ⹂㾷䰸ᑊপҷ᠔᳝Пࠡⱘϔߛᦤ䆂ǃण
䆂ǃ䰜䗄ǃໄᯢ੠ֱ䆕DŽ䰸䴲᳝䆌ৃᮍᥜᴗҷ㸼ㅒ㕆ⱘк䴶᭛кˈᴀण䆂ϡᕫব᳈៪ׂᬍDŽ
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Listen Software License Agreement
v
10. ᡓ䅸DŽᠧ
ᠧᓔᴀࣙ㺙੠/៪ᅝ㺙ᴀ䕃ӊৢˈ᳔㒜⫼᠋ेᡓ䅸݊Ꮖ䯙䇏ǃ⧚㾷ᴀ䆌ৃᑊৠᛣফࠄᴀ䆌
ৃⳌ݇ᴵℒ੠ᴵӊⱘ㑺ᴳDŽ㢹ᇍᴀ䆌ৃ᳝ӏԩ䯂乬ˈৃ䗮䖛Ϟ䗄ഄഔ㘨㋏䆌ৃᮍDŽ
vi
Listen Software License Agreement
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Installing SoundCheck® for Windows
System Requirements
SoundCheck uses your computer’s CPU to perform all calculations and signal processing. Because of this, the
speed of your computer directly affects the overall performance of the SoundCheck system. In addition, all
stimulus waveforms and measured waveforms are played and/or stored in memory for optimum performance.
This means that long test signals and measurements require more memory and longer processing time than
short test signals and measurements. Therefore, it is recommended that 4 GB of RAM be used for
measurements of 4 to 10 seconds and 8 GB of RAM (or more) for measurements longer than 10 seconds.
More system memory is also required for the following: Low frequency measurements, using more than 2
channels per measurement and high bandwidth measurements (more than 48 kHz sample rate).
Note:
Windows 32 bit operating systems are limited to 4 GB of RAM (3.25 GB of actual RAM).
SoundCheck 32 bit will only make use of 2 GB of ram. The extra ram in addition to the 2 GB is to
allow for headroom for the operating system and other system requirements. SoundCheck 64 bit
makes full use of additional memory installed on a 64 bit operating system. 8 GB of RAM or more is
common.
Minimum Computer Requirements
Before buying a series of new computers for use with SoundCheck, we recommend that you test one
with all the related hardware, including the audio interface. Test the audio interface with the
SoundCheck Self Test sequence to insure that it is compatible with the computer. We recommend that
you purchase a high quality computer according to the quidelines below.

Refer to Appendix A:Hardware Compatibility List on page 483, for details regarding audio
interfaces and operating systems. The audio interfaces listed in the Hardware Compatibility List have
been tested with SoundCheck on computer systems supplied by Listen. Note that some computers
may not be compatible with all audio interfaces.

Supported operating systems are: Windows® 7, 32 bit and 64 bit, and Windows® 10 - 64 bit only

Windows® 8.0 and 8.1 are no longer supported. See Appendix A:Hardware Compatibility List on
page 483.

Windows® XP, 98, Millennium Edition, Windows® 2000 & NT® are not supported

Intel Core Duo processor minimum or better (Celeron processors are not recommended)
To take advantage of using multiple virtual instruments, a multi-threaded processor is recommended,
e.g.; Intel-I3/I5/I7 processor / AMD Phenom II processor or better.

Intel processor motherboards require changes to Bios. See Appendix A:Hardware Compatibility
List on page 483.

4 GB of RAM minimum (8 GB or more recommended for large WAV files or high resolution
measurements below 50 Hz). Windows 7 systems will require a minimum of 4 GB of RAM

500MB of free hard-disk space required for complete software installation

Do not connect audio interfaces through USB hubs. Connect directly to the USB port on the computer.
We offer an evaluation service to customers who would like to have their computer and hardware compatibility
evaluated by Listen. Please contact sales@listeninc.com for pricing on this service.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Installing SoundCheck for Windows
1
Computer Setup
Important! SoundCheck requires that you have Administrative Rights Enabled in
Windows, for any account that it is installed on.
Please follow the procedures outlined in Appendix B:Windows Setup Recommendations on page 493. This
shows our recommended setup for Windows 7 and optimization tips.
Refer to the Appendix A:Hardware Compatibility List on page 483 for information on approved audio
interfaces.
Backup
It is highly recommended that you make a backup of your SoundCheck critical folders on a regular basis. A
backup should always be made prior to installing a new version or update to SoundCheck. We recommend that
the following folders be included in any backup:

Sequence files (.SQC)

Data (If the default Data folder in SoundCheck is the location for your data files)

Results (If the default Results folder in SoundCheck is the location for your result files)

WAV files

SoundCheck 16.0 (x64).ini and SoundCheck 16.0.ini (Stores the preferences that were last used in
SoundCheck and settings specifically for the 64 bit version) See SoundCheck 16.0.ini Files.
Upgrading From an Earlier Version
If you are upgrading from an earlier version of SoundCheck 16.0 (or Beta version) you should copy the old
installation folder and name it "SoundCheck 16.0 OLD" before installing the new version. This is a
precautionary measure to keep you from overwriting sequence steps that you have customized.
Installing SoundCheck 16.0 overwrites the contents of the SoundCheck 16.0 folder.
If upgrading from SoundCheck 15.x (or earlier), the folder name does not need to be changed. This way you
can run both versions of SoundCheck without disturbing any tests you have already created. If you want to run
your SoundCheck 15.x Sequences in the new version, you can use the Setup Wizard to convert those
sequences for SoundCheck 16.0. See Convert Sequences From Previous Version on page 12.
Rules - Installing SoundCheck
2

Do not copy Steps and Sequences folders from previous version and paste them into SoundCheck
16.0. See Convert Sequences From Previous Version on page 12.

SoundCheck 16.0 sequences are not backward compatible. They will not work in previous versions of
SoundCheck. Sequences from SoundCheck 4.x, 5.x and 6.x will run in SoundCheck 16.0 but will
require updating to conform to the new Multichannel parameters.

DAT files created with SoundCheck 16.0 are not viewable in versions of SoundCheck prior to and
including SoundCheck 6.0x. The updated DAT file format in SoundCheck 16.0 is not compatible with
versions of SoundCheck prior to and including SoundCheck 6.0x. The DAT file format was updated in
SoundCheck 6.1.

Status.dat files for SoundCheck 8.x and later will not work with previous versions of SoundCheck.
Installing SoundCheck for Windows
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Software Installation
Important! Do not unplug the hardware key while SoundCheck is running. Doing so could destroy the
hardware key.
1. Close all running applications before installation.
We recommend that you temporarily disable anitvirus software during the SoundCheck installation
process. Once complete, re-enable your antivirus software.
Make sure your IT department has allowed for the installation of SoundCheck.
2. Software downloaded from our website is installed by simply double clicking on the Setup.exe file.

You can also install from disc by placing the SoundCheck installation disc in the DVD-ROM drive of
your computer

If your computer is set to “Auto Run”, you will be prompted to install the software

You may also be prompted to “Run Launch.exe”

Click “Install SoundCheck”. Select either 32 bit or 64 bit installation. See SoundCheck 64 Bit vs
32 Bit on page 7.
Note:
The demo version is only available in the SoundCheck 32 bit installer. The 64 bit installation does
not allow you to install the demo version. Download the SoundCheck 32 bit installer from the
website or select the 32 bit installer from the DVD menu.
3. For first time installations, LabVIEW Run Time (LabVIEW
2016) is required as part of the installation process. This
will require a computer reboot before SoundCheck is
installed. The SoundCheck installation will resume after
reboot.
4. Follow the prompts for:

Device Driver Installation Wizard - For details see Listen Hardware Drivers on page 7.

SoundCheck 16.0 Setup Wizard

License Agreement

Installation Location

Check Hardware Key
5. You are prompted to insert the hardware key to continue installation.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Installing SoundCheck for Windows
3
Hardware Key

As of SoundCheck 13 a new type of
hardware key is required. This key is
compatible with Windows 64 bit as well
as 32 bit versions.

Previous versions of SoundCheck will
not work with this key

The SoundCheck hardware key must be
connected to the computer or
SoundCheck will not open

Figure 3-1: Hardware Key
SoundCheck 32 bit Demo version can be installed to preview the software without the hardware
key (64 bit demo not available)
Warning! Do not lose the hardware key!

Do not lose the hardware key for the SoundCheck system

It unlocks the functionality of your SoundCheck software

For insurance purposes, this key represents the full value of your system and should be noted in your
company's list of assets

We recommend that it be securely attached to the computer to avoid loss or theft
Hardware Key Installation

Insert the included hardware key into the USB port of the computer when prompted during the
SoundCheck installation process. The computer will recognize the new hardware key as the driver is
included in the software installation.
Important! Do not to remove the hardware key while SoundCheck is running. The hardware key can be
damaged. If damaged, it will need to be returned to Listen, Inc. for replacement.
Note:
If the USB key is moved from one USB port to another, the driver will automatically re-install for the
new USB port.
Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Precautions
Use the following precautions to help neutralize the difference in electrical charge between your hardware key
and the computer, before contact is made. This should help to protect your hardware key from ESD or Static
Shock.
4

Use a rubber mat that has been specifically designed as an electrical insulator. Do not use a mat
designed to decrease electrostatic discharge as protection from electrical shock.

Use a grounded wrist strap designed to prevent static discharge

Use antistatic or electrostatic discharge (ESD) preventive clothing or gloves

Avoid touching the USB contact pins

For grounding purposes, verify that your computer provides excellent conductivity between the power
supply, the case, the mounting fasteners, and the mainboard.
Installing SoundCheck for Windows
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Normal Mode with hardware key
With a valid Hardware Key and no Acquisition Channels enabled (0 Channels):

You can not open, edit, apply or insert an Acquisition Step into a sequence.

Acquisition Steps in the Sequence are skipped.
With a valid Hardware Key and Acquisition Channels enabled (2, 4, 8, 16, or 32):

When inserting or editing an Acquisition Step you are limited to the number of hardware channels
enabled on the Hardware Key. A warning is issued if you try to exceed this number.

If you open a sequence that uses a number of hardware channels that is greater than the number of
channels enabled on the Hardware Key, a detailed warning is issued when the sequence is pre-loaded,
indicating that the sequence was created using more channels than is available. Acquisition steps such
as this will be skipped when the sequence is run.
Hardware Key Laser ID
The Laser ID of the Hardware Key currently connected to the
system is shown on the SoundCheck Main Screen.
Figure 3-2: Hardware Key Laser ID
Demo Version
The SoundCheck 32 bit Demo version can be installed to preview the software without the hardware key.
Note:
The demo version is only available in the SoundCheck 32 bit installer. The 64 bit installation does
not allow you to install the demo version. Download the SoundCheck 32 bit installer from the
website or select the 32 bit installer from the DVD menu.
Follow the installation prompts to the Check Hardware Key
screen.
Select “Skip Hardware Key and install 32-bit Demo” as shown
in Figure 3-5.
All data generated in the demo version is randomly adjusted
in level and is therefore not valid. See Demo Version in the
SoundCheck Manual.
Figure 3-3: 32 Bit Demo Version
6. Confirm that the hardware key has been inserted, then click Install to finish the installation.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Installing SoundCheck for Windows
5
7. Open SoundCheck. The Setup
Wizard runs automatically at startup.
The wizard can also be run by clicking
File on the SoundCheck Main Screen
and selecting Setup Wizard (Ctrl+Z).
Figure 3-4: Setup Wizard
8. Proceed to Setup Wizard on page 11.
6
Installing SoundCheck for Windows
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Listen Hardware Drivers
Device Driver Installation Wizard
The Driver Installation runs automatically when the
SoundCheck installation runs. Drivers are included for Listen
Hardware such as: AudioConnect, SoundConnect 2,
AmpConnect, DC Connect and BTC-4148.
AmpConnect
The AmpConnect driver used in SoundCheck 16.0 creates the
following limitations for installations of SoundCheck 13 on the
same system:

Cannot control the AmpConnect headphone output (in SC13)

Serial number is removed from AmpConnect audio device name, necessitating a relink of audio
channels in the hardware editor (in SC13)
If you need to use AmpConnect in SoundCheck 13:

Go to Add/remove programs in Windows

Select “AmpConnect USB SC driver” and click Uninstall
AmpConnect and DC Connect
As of SoundCheck 13, new drivers for AmpConnect ISC & DC Connect have been included in the SoundCheck
installation process. The new driver will not work in versions prior to SoundCheck 13. To use AmpConnect or
DC Connect with SoundCheck 12 (and previously supported versions), you will need to manually Rollback the
device driver in Windows Device Manager. Please refer to the latest AmpConnect or DC Connect manual for
driver rollback procedures.
AudioConnect and SoundConnect 2
These drivers are included in the SoundCheck 16.0 software installation.
AudioConnect 4x4
These drivers are not included in the SoundCheck 16.0 software installation.
The AudioConnect 4x4 interface must be connected to the computer when the drivers are installed.
SoundCheck 64 Bit vs 32 Bit
SoundCheck 64 will access more system memory, which permits the use of much longer stimuli (over 1 minute
in length) and improves performance when using multiple channels. It also allows larger data sets, such as DAT
files with hundreds of curves, to be opened into the memory list for offline analysis and reporting.

SoundCheck 64 Bit can only be installed on a 64 bit Windows operating system. If you try to install it on
a 32 bit system you will get an error indicating that it is not compatible.

LabVIEW Run Time x64 is required and is installed with SoundCheck 64 Bit

SoundCheck 32 Bit can be installed on both 32 bit and 64 bit Windows operating systems

LabVIEW Run Time x32 is required and is installed with SoundCheck 32 Bit

Demo version is only available in SoundCheck x86, 32 bit. See Demo Version on page 8.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Installing SoundCheck for Windows
7
Demo Version
The SoundCheck 32 bit Demo version can be installed to preview
the software without the hardware key. Select the SoundCheck 32
Bit installer. Then select “Skip Hardware Key and install 32-bit
Demo” as shown in Figure 3-5.
All data generated in the demo version is randomly adjusted
in level, Randomized, and is therefore not valid.
The SoundCheck wall paper will change to indicate this as shown
in Figure 3-6.
Run C:\SoundCheck 16.0-x86\SoundCheck Demo-Viewer
16.0.exe

Only available in SoundCheck x86, 32 bit version

All data is randomized

Recall, save and print data is randomized

Create and modify test sequence but Save
sequence is disabled

2 channels of input/output hardware channels


Figure 3-5: 32 Bit Demo Version
Figure 3-6: Demo Wallpaper
A valid Hardware Key is required to register
ActiveX components during SoundCheck
installation. The Hardware Key is not required to use ActiveX in Demo Mode.
All other functionality of SoundCheck is available
SoundCheck executes the test sequence and adds random values to the data displayed or saved. All data
generated in the demo version is randomly adjusted in level and is therefore not valid.
8
Installing SoundCheck for Windows
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Optional Modules and Protected Sequences
Once SoundCheck is installed, with the proper status.dat file and hardware key, a list of Optional Modules and
Protected Sequences is available. Click on the Help menu of the SoundCheck Main Screen and then select
Optional Modules. The current list of modules and sequences available is found in Figure 3-7: Optional
Modules List. This indicates which modules and sequences are currently enabled on the system as well as
items that can be added.
Note:
Acquisition is now an option that allows only a specific number of hardware channels.
2000 Limits Editor
2017 Stimulus
1301 SoundMap CSD
2001 Harmonic Distortion
2018 Stepped Sine
1300 SoundMap Full
2002 Sequence Editor
2019 IM Distortion
2003 Spect Analyzer (Scope FFT)
2020 Multitone
3000 Hearing Aid Application for ANSI
3.22-1996
2004 Post-Processing
2021 Transfer Functions
2005 RTA Spect Analyzer
2022 2 Channel Acquisition
2006 Time Selective Response
2023 4 Channel Acquisition
3103 IEEE 1329, Clause 10 Seq
(JB03xx)
2007 Loudness Rating
2024 8 Channel Acquisition
3104 TIA-470 Seq (JB04xx)
2008 Attack and Release
2025 16 Channel Acquisition
3105 IEEE 269, Clause 9 Seq (JB05xx)
2009 Statistics
2026 32 Channel Acquisition
2010 Save to Database
2027 64 Channel Acquisition
3106 Hearing Aid Magnetic Comp Seq
(JB06xx)
2011 Polar Plot
2029 SoundCheck ONE
2012 Equation Editor
2030 Perceptual Rub & Buzz
2013 EQ a Wav File
2031 Zwicker Loudness Rating
2014 Signal Generator
2032 Waveform Filter
2015 Multimeter
2033 Active Speech Level
2016 Loose Particle
2099 SC Win
2100 SC Mac
3102 EN50332-1 Max SPL for Headphones
3107 TIA USB Headsets Seq (JB07xx)
3108 TIA 810 Seq (JB08xx)
3109 TIA 920 Seq (JB09xx)
3110 ETSI TBR 38 Seq (JB10xx)
3111 (JB11xx) Reserved
3112 (JB12xx) Reserved
3113 (JB13xx) Reserved
3114 (JB14xx) Reserved
Figure 3-7: Optional Modules List
NI Visa
If you intend to use a GPIB controller, an external footswitch or external buzzer with SoundCheck (optional
equipment), NIVisa is required and is included in the SoundCheck installation process.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Installing SoundCheck for Windows
9
Windows Text Size
The Windows default display setting is for text to be at 100%. It is sometimes changed when individual users
are trying to make icons larger on the Windows desktop or make program menu fields larger. Setting this higher
than 100% causes fields in SoundCheck to overlap and in some cases become “not visible”.
Medium (125%) and Large (150%) should not be used. Menus will not be readable.
See Windows Display - Text Size on page 495.
European Decimal Notation
The “Decimal Display Format” can be changed to European Style in Windows. (comma in place of period)
See European Decimal Notation on page 494.
Windows Setup Instructions
See Appendix B:Windows Setup Recommendations on page 493 for additional Windows computer setup
instructions.
10
Installing SoundCheck for Windows
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Setup Wizard
SoundCheck®, when installed at Listen onto a purchased computer, is configured with the appropriate audio
interface driver. If a different audio interface is installed, you will have to configure it manually.
Note:
Please refer to Minimum Computer Requirements on page 1.
If only the software is purchased, you should use this section to setup your audio interface for use with
SoundCheck.
Note:
For complete computer setup recommendations, please refer to Windows Setup
Recommendations on page 493.
First Run
The Setup Wizard runs the first time SoundCheck runs. The wizard can also be run by clicking File on the
SoundCheck Main Screen and selecting Setup Wizard (Ctrl+Z).

Click on the items in the Menu to
select a function

Check box for “Do not show on
start up”

Assists in setting up new
hardware, including autodetection of audio interface

Allows you to transfer over
sequences as well as hardware
and calibration settings from
previous versions of
SoundCheck
Figure 1: Setup Wizard Greeting
Locate Status.dat File
This allows you to navigate to the appropriate Status.dat file for your hardware key.

The status.dat file is normally sent
by email from Listen, Inc.
Automatically Select Status.dat
If the status.dat path is pointed to
a folder containing multiple
status.dat files, the software will
automatically load the file that
corresponds to the hardware key
that is currently plugged in.
Figure 2: Locate Status.dat File
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Setup Wizard
11
Import Settings
You can import Preferences as well as Hardware and Calibration setups from previous installations of
SoundCheck.

You will be prompted to choose if
Signal Paths should be
overwritten and then if Calibrated
Device Files should be imported

Select or ignore import of
Preferences or Hardware/
Calibration setups
Figure 3: Import Settings
Figure 3: Import Settings
Note:
Calibration .DAT files from devices not in use in System Calibration will not be
copied into the new version of SoundCheck. These files will need to be manually
imported later.
Convert Sequences From Previous Version
Right click to:

Add a sequence or a
directory of sequences
to the list

Remove a sequence
from the list

Clear the list

Select the Desination
Folder for the converted
sequences

Click Convert
Figure 4: Convert Sequences
12
Setup Wizard
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Setup New Hardware
You are prompted when new Listen hardware is detected.

In the Hardware Editor, Automatic Startup Configuration is enabled by default for Listen Hardware. The
Vp value fields for supported Listen Hardware will automatically update.

See Automatic Startup Configuration on page 49

Hardware from other manufacturer’s is not detected

Click on the Arrow button to open the Hardware Editor or Self Test sequence
Figure 5: Setup New Hardware
Creating Sequences
A sequence tutorial is available in the main SoundCheck manual in the Sequence Editor Chapter. See
Creating a New Sequence on page 401.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Setup Wizard
13
Audio Interface
Important! Before setting up an audio interface for use with SoundCheck, please refer to
Hardware Compatibility List on page 483. This contains important information
regarding approved audio interfaces.
For manual setup of the audio interface in SoundCheck:
1. Open SoundCheck and select Hardware from the Setup menu.
2. Click Import and browse the list of Hardware Steps in the SoundCheck 16.0\Steps\Hardware folder.

Steps are grouped first by operating system

Steps are configured for individual audio interfaces and are named by brand and/or model of that
audio interface

If an appropriate step exists for your audio interface, select that step from appropriate operating
system folder

If the audio interface is not listed, the setup for the audio interface will have to be created manually
Figure 4-1: Hardware Editor
Note:
Please contact Listen for the most recent list of Hardware Configurations, or for help creating a
new step.
When using a audio interface with Balanced Inputs and Outputs please follow the calibration and wiring
guidelines found in Balanced Audio Interface Calibration Connections on page 508.
Note:
14
When using the Digital Audio Labs “CardDeluxe“ in conjunction with Listen’s “SoundConnect“
microphone power supply, the Max In value of the Input Hardware Channel must be multiplied by
1.125. This is to account for the impedance difference between the SoundConnect and the
CardDeluxe.
Setup Wizard
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
A Note About Calibration
The Calibration Configuration includes all devices in the signal path including the Audio Interface, Amplifier,
and/or Microphone.
The Calibration Editor allows you to create a Signal Path for each device that might be used on the system.
The Table View of the editor acts as a database of all calibrated devices.
Figure 4-2: Calibration Table
The accuracy of your SoundCheck system depends upon accurate calibration of your input and output devices.
Nominal calibration values for many devices typically used are included with SoundCheck. For more accurate
measurements, calibration of individual signal paths should be performed for each device. Frequency of
calibration of these devices depends upon the stability of the device.
For more information refer to Calibration Configuration on page 65.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Setup Wizard
15
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SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Setup Wizard
16
SoundCheck® 16.0 New Features
Faster & more accurate THD+N analysis algorithm
Listen’s completely re-designed THD+N analysis algorithm is compliant with the
AES17 standard, and is more accurate and significantly faster than other audio test
systems. High accuracy is achieved, even with short and/or low level test signals,
through the use of a synthetic notch filter - an extremely precise digital notch filter. A
traditional notch filter option is also offered to enable correlation with measurements
made on legacy systems. The algorithm also includes high and low pass filters for
controlling the measurement bandwidth and for filtering noise in electronic
measurements.
See THD + Noise on page 157.
New Real Time Distortion Analyzer (optional module)
A new distortion analyzer provides continuous real time measurement of output
distortion including THD and THD+N, THD and THD+N residual level and SINAD.
A, B, and C weighting filters along with user-defined arbitrary weighting functions can
be used. Data from the distortion analyzer can also be saved to the memory list. This
enables distortion to be quickly viewed without having to set up a sequence. With the
optional strip chart recorder, distortion can also be viewed over time.
See Distortion Analyzer on page 434.
New Frequency Counter (optional module)
The new high resolution frequency counter offers an accurate and clear visual
indication of frequency, determining the dominant signal in a selected signal path
and returning a precise frequency measurement. This measurement can be saved to
the memory list and can be used in a sequence, for example for triggering a
measurement at a certain frequency. This feature is useful for calibration (e.g.
calibrating audiometers), for testing playback systems to ensure that they are playing
back audio at a constant rate, and for any other application requiring a high precision
frequency measurement.
See Frequency Counter on page 435.
Save to Memory List for All Meters
The multimeter, distortion analyzer and frequency counter can all now save results to
the memory list, even when used interactively. This enables an instantaneous
measurement to be recorded without having to run a sequence, and also enables
these saved values to be used within sequences.
See Common Instrument Controls on page 409.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
SoundCheck 16.0 New Features
17
New Strip Chart Recorder (optional module)
The Strip Chart Recorder module provides the multimeter,
distortion analyzer and frequency counter the ability to plot
measurements over time. This functionality is directly
equivalent to connecting a paper chart recorder to a
classic, stand-alone hardware instrument. The Strip Chart
Recorder can plot continuously or for a predefined amount
of time and can plot instantaneous results or repeating
averages. This is an invaluable feature for environmental
and reliability testing and for any engineer that needs to
characterize the behavior of a device over time. Results
from the Strip Chart Recorder can be saved to the memory
list and used inside a sequence just like any other virtual
instrument.
See Strip Chart Recorder on page 420.
Sweep Equalization for Minimized Transients
In stepped sine amplitude and frequency sweeps,
selecting equalization now also enables a smooth
transition between steps. These smooth transitions
minimize the transient response in the device under test.
This results in shorter test times, smoother sounding
sweeps, and is particularly useful for microphone testing
where a source speaker needs to be equalized.
See Sweep Equalization for Minimized Transients on
page 103.
Without Sweep Equalization
With Sweep Equalization
18
SoundCheck 16.0 New Features
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Upgraded Multimeter
The multimeter has a new, fixed or auto-tracking bandpass filter option. This is
useful for measuring a specific signal in the presence of background noise.
In addition a new ‘Linear Repeating’ averaging mode is available. In this mode a
linear average is made and then repeated. This is useful when, for example, you
would like to plot a repeating 1 second Leq of the environmental noise level.
See Filters Tab on page 419.
See Averaging Tab (Avg.) on page 418.
Simplified Setup
SoundCheck automatically scans for new
devices and setting changes when opened,
and updates the Hardware Editor, Audio
Hardware and Listen Hardware Tabs. This
makes setup much faster. The ability to also
manually adjust hardware setup and preserve
3rd party hardware settings offers flexibility and
makes it easier to integrate Listen and 3rd
party hardware. To simplify audio interface
setup, sample rates are restricted to the
selection valid for that device. If changes are
made during a SoundCheck session, a simple
‘refresh’ will scan for changes and update the
settings.
Software installation for multiple systems is also simplified; when pointing to a folder of multiple status.dat files
in the setup wizard, the correct status.dat file is automatically selected based on the connected hardware key. A
new conversion tool facilitates updating custom VIs from an older version to the latest version of SoundCheck
by automatically re-linking the appropriate vi and ctl files, saving time over doing it manually.
See Setup Wizard on page 11.
Outline ET250-3D Turntable Control
Custom Steps are available to control the Outline Turntable model
ET250-3D, and an example sequence is available.
See Outline Ethernet on page 347.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
SoundCheck 16.0 New Features
19
SoundCheck Control Via Python
SoundCheck can be controlled via Python, an objectoriented scripting language that offers some advantages over
C++. An included example (which can be used as a starting
point and modified) demonstrates the simplicity of controlling
SoundCheck using Python. Compatible with Python 2 and 3,
this script opens SoundCheck, loads and runs the “Complete
Test” sequence, and passes results back to the Python script
for further processing.
See Python Example on page 449.
Externally Launch and Close Virtual Instruments
A new virtual instrument wrapper allows you to open and close virtual instruments from a custom VI or using
TCP/IP.
See Instrument Open Close on page 348.
Open Before Converting Old Custom VIs
A new conversion tool facilitates updating custom VIs from an older version to the latest version of
SoundCheck by automatically re-linking the appropriate VI and CTL files, saving time over doing it manually.
See Open Before Converting Old Custom VIs on page 352.
The Exit Status of Custom Steps Is Now Indicated
Like other SoundCheck steps, the Sequence Editor now highlights in red or green whether a custom step
completed successfully or not.
20
SoundCheck 16.0 New Features
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Introduction
Congratulations on your purchase of SoundCheck®, created by Listen, Inc. SoundCheck is the first dedicated
electroacoustic test and measurement system for production line quality control testing as well as research and
development applications. SoundCheck was developed by some of the most knowledgeable and skilled
engineers and software programmers in the world. Our goal is to provide fast and accurate testing with an
intuitive user interface. Listen will constantly be looking for new ways to improve SoundCheck. Customer
feedback helps us develop better sound measurement solutions and is greatly appreciated. Please call or
email us at support@listeninc.com.
Listen Hardware Support
As of SoundCheck 14, support for the control of AudioConnect,
SoundConnect 2, as well as the Portland Tool & Die BTC-4148
Bluetooth interface are available.
SoundCheck 16.0 supports AmpConnect ISC™, Listen's
integrated hardware box which replaces a power amplifier,
microphone power supply, impedance box and digital I/O card
in your testing setup. AmpConnect ISC can be fully controlled
either via the sequence editor, or directly via a control panel
that replicates the appearance of the front of the hardware.
See AmpConnect USB Control Via SoundCheck on page
253. Please refer to the AmpConnect ISC manual for more
information.
Note:
SoundCheck 10.11 and above is required to use
AmpConnect ISC™. For driver change note See
AmpConnect and DC Connect on page 7.
Figure 6-1: Listen Hardware Control
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Introduction
21
Full Multichannel Acquisition
An unlimited number of hardware channels enables you to use as many channels simultaneously as your
hardware and computer memory can support.
This offers advantages for many types of testing including:

Production testing of surround sound electronics


Stereo headset testing


Two channels of acoustic signal and two channels of impedance can be measured simultaneously,
increasing the speed of test.
Multichannel devices


all channels can be measured simultaneously, enabling an entire surround sound test to be carried
out much faster.
Pro audio mixers and other multichannel devices can be tested faster using SoundCheck.
Batch mode testing

Multiple channels can be utilized for batch-mode testing of multiple devices at once, such as
microphones.
The multichannel capability of SoundCheck also means that you can play and record simultaneously on
different devices (audio interfaces, or data acquisition devices). This allows an NI data acquisition card (such
as the PXI/PCI 4461 and 4462) to be used in conjunction with an audio interface, combining the flexibility of a
Windows Multimedia environment with the high accuracy of the NI hardware.
SoundCheck communicates with Windows Multimedia devices in real time by sending WAV files. It is the only
audio test system that offers complete control of Windows multimedia devices, making it the ideal solution for
testing audio electronics and multimedia devices such as IP phones, MP3 players and Bluetooth headphones.
22
Introduction
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
SoundCheck ONE™
SoundCheck ONE is an entry-level SoundCheck system which is essentially a lower cost, simplified, version of
SoundCheck coupled with the AmpConnect ISC or AudioConnect hardware. SoundCheck ONE offers the
capability to test loudspeakers, microphones and headphones within predetermined sequence templates.
Although the user interface is the same as in the full version of SoundCheck, rather than using the Sequence
Editor, SoundCheck ONE users are supplied with sequence templates. These templates serve as the starting
point for all SoundCheck ONE tests and can be used to generate as many product specific sequences as
desired by selecting parameters such as the stimulus signal, characteristics to be measured, frequency range,
level and limits.
SoundCheck 16.0 hardware keys can be programmed to also work in SoundCheck ONE mode. This enables
you to easily switch between SoundCheck 16.0 and SoundCheck ONE.
Refer to SoundCheck ONE™ on page 437 for more information.
Global System Hardware and Calibration

System Hardware - One Hardware Configuration to define and configure data acquisition equipment
for all sequences

System Calibration - One System Configuration to define the sensitivity of the input or output
transducers along with any needed EQ and Correction curves
Test Sequence
SoundCheck allows you to develop tests or modify existing tests from our extensive library.
Each test, referred to as a "Sequence" is essentially a script. A Sequence is a series of "Steps", with each
step performing a specific task. An extremely simple Sequence might have the following structure:

Stimulus Step - Define and generate the signal to be sent to the DUT

Acquisition Step - To play the Stimulus and record the DUTs response

Analysis Step - For example, to calculate frequency response of the DUT

Limits Step - To apply Pass/Fail criteria on acquired data

Display Step - To Display data and results
Many other Step types are available, including Post-Processing, Printing, Statistics, etc. Each step type is
clearly defined and explained later in the manual.
See Sequence Editor on page 387.
Virtual Instruments
In addition to running pre-defined Sequences, you can also generate stimuli and analyze data using standalone "Virtual Instruments" (optional). These can be launched from the "Instruments" menu, and replicate
familiar laboratory equipment. These include the following: Signal Generator, Multimeter, Oscilloscope, FFTSpectrum, Real-Time Analyzer, Distortion Analyzer, Frequency Counter and Strip Chart.
See Virtual Instruments on page 407.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Introduction
23
Operating Principles
Speaker
SoundCheck operates on the same principles as a
traditional, stand-alone measurement system
consisting of a Signal Generator, RMS Multimeter,
tracking filter, and level recorder. With SoundCheck, all
of these functions are implemented in software as VI’s,
or Virtual Instruments.
Microphone
Tracking
Filter
Device Under Test
1000 Hz
Sine Generator
Voltmeter
Level Recorder
Figure 6-2: Traditional Hardwarebased Test System
The advantages of software-based instruments are numerous. SoundCheck takes advantage of today’s highspeed personal computers, professional audio interfaces, data acquisition cards and Windows software
platforms. This saves thousands of dollars in hardware cost compared with traditional audio test and
measurement systems. The system is modular, which means you can easily upgrade as your needs change.
Speaker
Microphone
Input
Amplifer
Device Under Test
PASSED
Computer
SoundCheck Software
Signal Generator
Module
Display
Module
Analysis Module
D/A
Audio Interface
A/D
Figure 6-3: SoundCheck Softwarebased Test System
24
Introduction
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Sequences
Running a Sequence performs most measurements in
SoundCheck. A Sequence is made up of individual steps, or
operations that are strung together to create an overall test.
Custom test procedures can be written or modified using the
Sequence Editor. Typically, sequence names are product model
numbers or device names. SoundCheck includes example sequences to aid in developing new sequences.
See Sequence Editor on page 387.
Steps
A step is a unique operation that is executed in the order it occurs in a sequence. To edit a step in the active
sequence:

Choose Setup from the main screen drop down menu

Select the category for the Step in the sequence to be edited (e.g., Stimulus, Acquisition, etc)

You can also open the Sequence Editor and select a step from the right side of the editor.

A step can also be saved as a template in the library on the left side of the Sequence Editor. The step
templates are then available for use in other sequences. Every Step has a Step Category and a Step
Editor.
As of SoundCheck 12, all attributes and fields of a step in the active sequence are linked to that sequence.
Changes to the steps in the active sequence appear only in that sequence.
Sequence Run Status

After pushing Start, the Stop button
turns red to indicate that the sequence
is running
Test Time
Stop Button

The Test Time field shows the elapsed
time of the sequence run

Click the Stop button at any time during the sequence run to halt operation

You can also hit the Escape key on the keyboard to Stop
Figure 6-4: Stop Button
See SoundCheck Main Screen on page 31.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Introduction
25
Test Equipment Setup for Typical Applications
Note:
Chose the proper input and output Hardware Channels that correspond to the Signal Paths
used in the selected test sequence.
Loudspeaker Setup
1. Connect an output of the audio interface to the input of the power amplifier.
2. Connect the output of the power amplifier to the loudspeaker under test.
3. Connect the microphone preamp cable to the microphone input on the microphone power supply (e.g.,
SoundConnect).
4. Connect the output of the microphone power supply to an input on the audio interface.
5. Select the appropriate sequence in SoundCheck and click Start.
SoundCheck™ for
Loudspeaker Testing
PASSED
Microphone
Power Supply
Audio Interface
Audio Output
to Amp Input
Mic Supply
Output to Audio
Input
Microphone
Power Amplifier
Loudspeaker
Figure 6-5: Loudspeaker Equipment Setup
26
Introduction
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Earphone/Headphone Setup
Note:
Chose the proper input and output Hardware Channels that correspond to the Signal Paths
used in the selected test sequence.
1. Connect an output of the audio interface to the input of the power amplifier.
2. Connect the output of the power amplifier to the earphone/headphone under test.
3. Connect the ear simulator preamp cable to the microphone input on the microphone power supply
(e.g., SoundConnect).
4. Connect the output of the microphone power supply to an Input on the audio interface.
5. Select the appropriate sequence in SoundCheck and click Start.
SoundCheck™ for Earphone/
Headphone Testing
PASSED
Microphone
Power Supply
Earphone/
Headphone
under test
Audio Interface
Mic Supply
Output to Audio
Input
Audio Output
to Amp Input
Ear Simulator
Power Amplifier
Figure 6-6: Earphone Equipment Setup
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Introduction
27
Microphone Setup
Note:
Chose the proper input and output Hardware Channels that correspond to the Signal Paths
used in the selected test sequence.
1. Connect an output of the audio interface to the Input of the Power Amplifier.
2. Connect the output of the power amplifier to the mouth simulator.
3. Connect the microphone under test either to the direct input of the microphone power supply (e.g.,
SoundConnect BNC Input), or if no additional gain is needed, connect directly to the input of the audio
interface.
4. If using a microphone power supply, connect the output to an Input on the audio interface.
5. Select the appropriate sequence in SoundCheck and click Start.
SoundCheck™ for
Microphone Testing
PASSED
Microphone
Power Supply
Audio Interface
Audio Output
to Amp Input
Mic Supply
Output to Audio
Input
Microphone
under test
Power Amplifier
Mouth Simulator
Figure 6-7: Microphone Equipment Setup
28
Introduction
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Hearing Aid Setup
Note:
Chose the proper input and output Hardware Channels that correspond to the Signal Paths
used in the selected test sequence.
1. Connect an output of the audio interface to the Input of the power amplifier.
2. Connect the output of the power amplifier to the anechoic chamber.
3. Connect the hearing aid under test to a coupler, sealing the transmitter of the hearing aid towards a
calibrated microphone.
4. Connect this mic to the microphone input on the microphone power supply (e.g., SoundConnect).
5. Connect the output of the power supply to an input on the audio interface.
6. Select the appropriate sequence in SoundCheck and click Start.
SoundCheck™ for Hearing Aid Testing
PASSED
Audio Interface
DC Connect
DC Voltage
to Battery
Adapter
Input
USB to PC
Anechoic Test Chamber
SoundConnect
Mic Supply
to Audio Input
Audio Outputs
to Amp Inputs
Right Amp Output to Telecoil Loop Input
Power Amplifier
Hearing Aid
in coupler
Left Amp Output to Speaker Input
Figure 6-8: Hearing Aid Equipment Setup
Note:
DC Connect is an optional hardware item available from Listen, Inc.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Introduction
29
Telephone/Cell Phone Setup
Note:
Chose the proper input and output Hardware Channels that correspond to the Signal Paths
used in the selected test sequence.
1. Connect an output of the audio interface to the input of the power amplifier.
2. Connect the output of the power amplifier to the mouth simulator cable for the head and torso
simulator.
3. Connect the microphone (Ear Simulator) to the microphone input of the microphone power supply
(e.g., SoundConnect).
4. Connect the output of the microphone power supply to an input on the audio interface.
5. Connect an output of the audio interface to the input of the Telephone interface to send signal to the
device in the positioner.
6. Select the appropriate sequence in SoundCheck and click Start.
SoundCheck™ for
Telephone Testing
To
Positioner
Telephone Interface
PASSED
Microphone
Power Supply
Audio Interface
Audio Output
to Amp Input
Mic Supply
Output to Audio
Input
From Ear
Simulator
Head &
Torso
Simulator
To Mouth Simulator
Power Amplifier
Figure 6-9: Telephone Equipment Setup
30
Introduction
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
SoundCheck Main Screen
Start, Continuous, and
Redo measurement
controls
Test time of running
test in Stopwatch
fashion
Drop down list for selecting test
sequences in the current folder
Track lot and
serial numbers
# of units
tested
During sequence run this field
shows the current running step
Figure 7-1: SoundCheck Main Screen
Quick Start Menu
The optional Quick Start Menu provides a simple interface for choosing a sequence to
open or starting a new sequence. It also allows easy access to recently used
sequences as well as examples.

Recent Sequences: Select a recently used sequence to open

Open: Opens a Windows browser so you select a sequence to open (Same as
the File > Open function)

New: This opens the Sequence Editor with a blank sequence. See Creating a
New Sequence on page 401 for more information.

Figure 7-2: Quick
Start Menu
Examples: Opens the Example
Sequence Browser as shown in Figure
7-3. You can select from any of the
default sequences included with
SoundCheck. The Sequence Information
field provides an explanation of the
selected sequence. You can also select
View Sequence Document to open the
PDF file included with that sequence.
See Appendix P:Default Sequence
List on page 543.
Figure 7-3: Example Sequence Menu
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
SoundCheck Main Screen
31
Control Buttons
Start - To start a measurement, left click the Green Start button. You can
also click the F2 key on your keyboard, or use an optional foot switch or bar
code reader.
Select Mode (down arrow) - allows you to select the following options:
Continue
Step
Stop
Select Mode
Start
Start
- Runs the sequence one time
Cont.
(Continuous) - Repeats the sequence until Stop is selected
Redo
- Runs the same measurement again and overwrites the results of
the previous measurement
Stop - Ends the run of the sequence at the current running step

Click the Stop button at any time during the sequence run to halt operation

You can also hit the Escape key on the keyboard to Stop
Step - Runs one step of the sequence at a time. Available when Breakpoints are set in a sequence. See
Debugging Tools on page 396.
Continue - Runs the remaining steps in a sequence when:
A previous step is set to Wait for Confirmation. Hit the Enter key to continue. See Configure Step on page
398.
Breakpoints are set in a sequence. Hit the Enter key to continue. The sequence will continue to the next
Breakpoint or to the end of the sequence. You can also click the Step button to run one step at a time. See
Debugging Tools on page 396.
The keyboard shortcuts will also change “Select Mode” and the Start Icon will change accordingly:
Start = F2, Continuous = F3, Redo = F4, Continue = Enter and Stop = Esc. See Keyboard Shortcuts on
page 521.
Note:
Clicking Stop ends the sequence run at the current running step. The sequence does not run to
the end.
Running Step Display
When a sequence is running, the Current Running Step is
displayed in the sequence name field.
Offline Tab Display
The Offline Tab is available with or without a sequence loaded. This allows you to
open, process, and view data without loading a test sequence. In the Offline Tab,
data can be examined or analyzed without affecting the layout of the display
steps of the sequence. It minimizes the risk of accidentally editing sequences.
This is also useful to customers who view data on a regular basis, but may not be
opening a sequence.
See Offline Tab on page 295.
32
SoundCheck Main Screen
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Drop down menus
All SoundCheck functions are divided into individual modules, accessible from drop down menus.
Left click on a menu heading and then click on the desired selection.
File

Create a New sequence or Open an existing sequence

Save changes to a sequence or Save As to save with a new name

Export Sequences - See Exporting Sequences on page 403.

Mass Export - Multiple sequences can be exported in a single operation.
See Mass Export on page 40.

Document Sequence - Allows you to export a list of the steps of the active
sequence along with information regarding the configuration of the steps.
Edit

Open the Login window to change the Access Level or User Name

Preferences allows you to customize and maintain various SoundCheck operations and
functions including Status.dat file location. See Preferences on page 35. See Folder
Paths on page 36.
Instruments

Select single or multiple Virtual Instruments
See Virtual Instruments on page 407

Open or Save Virtual Instrument Configuration files (.VIC) Setup
Setup

Open System Hardware and Calibration
See Page 47 for Hardware and Page 65 for Calibration

Open steps that are used in the Active Sequence
(Grayed out steps are not in use)

Open the Memory List or Sequence Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
SoundCheck Main Screen
33
Offline
The Offline Menu on the SoundCheck Main Screen features steps that can be used to process data without
affecting the active sequence.

The processed data can be saved

Changes to steps can only be saved by selecting Save As, giving the step a new name and saving it to
the appropriate SoundCheck step folder.

None of the changes to a step will be saved with the active sequence when it is closed and saved
This allows you to try different functions and ideas, modify the display to show data in a different ways and then
save the results.
1. In Figure 7-4, Post-Processing has
been selected from the Offline menu.
2. The Curve Division step is selected.
3. Curves for Operand A and B are
selected from the existing Memory List
of the Active Sequence.
4. After pressing the Apply button, the
result shows up in the Memory List as
Protected Data.
Rules
Steps called from the Offline menu
Figure 7-4: Offline Menu Example
must be opened from their default
location: C:\SoundCheck 16.0\Steps folders. You should not use steps from a different SoundCheck
folder or from a stand-alone folder on your local drive or network. Any steps that you wish to use that
are not part of the default SoundCheck installation should be copied to the appropriate folders in the
SoundCheck 16.0 directory you are operating from.
Window

Promote SoundCheck Main Screen to fill the desktop
(the Main Screen can be resized manually)

34
Shows the Open windows for the current sequence. You
can select specific windows that may have become
hidden.
SoundCheck Main Screen
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Help

Turn on Pop Up Context Sensitive Help

Open the SoundCheck Instruction Manual

Open additional documentation

Check for Updates, visit the User Community, Download example sequences

Request support, request new features or report a bug

Show the Optional Modules installed on the system
To display context sensitive help, choose Help from the drop down menu or click on the question mark (?) in
the upper right corner of the screen. Move your cursor over the control or field of interest and the help text will
show information for that control.
Preferences
The Preferences Menu consolidates program-wide preferences such as folder paths and
background wallpaper into a single menu. This menu also includes new options such as toggling
sequence documentation and whether or not to automatically load a sequence on startup.
Click Edit on the Main Screen and select Preferences.
Startup
Select:

Load last used sequence

Run Setup Wizard

Show Quick Start Menu

Automatically load virtual instrument config
Select a saved virtual instrument configuration to load
at startup. See Virtual Instrument Configuration on
page 409.
Login

Show or Hide Login Window on Startup

Select Access Level: Engineer, Technician or
Operator

Set the Password for each Access Level
See Login on page 45.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
SoundCheck Main Screen
35
Display

Wallpaper Image File - Browse to select an
image file for use as a Main Screen
background.
Use

Solid Color - Ignores the Wallpaper Image
selection and sets the Main Screen
background to the Color selected below

Wallpaper Image - Uses the selected
Wallpaper Image file
Position

Center - The graphic is not resized and is
placed in the center of the Main Screen background

Tile - The graphic is not resized and is duplicated, filling the Main Screen background

Stretch - The graphic is stretched to fill the Main Screen background
Color
Set a custom color for the desktop background which includes any area not covered by a Wallpaper Image
Anti-Aliasing
This is a visual smoothing option for graphed data. Older or lower performance computers may experience a
slow down when updating displays with a large amount of data. Anti-Aliasing can be shut off to speed up
display rendering. Anti-Aliasing Waveforms is off by default.
Folder Paths
The Folder Paths dialog window allows you to
customize where files are located as well as file
selection.
36

Default Step Templates Folder - Location of
Step Templates

Import Export folder - Default directory for
exporting sequences

Logo path - Path to logo file used for printing

Default Data Path - Default path used in
Autosave and Recall Steps

Status File Path - Location of status.dat file(s)
Figure 7-5: Folder Paths
SoundCheck Main Screen
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Status.dat File Path
Note:
As of SoundCheck 15, you can automatically select the Status.dat file.
The location for the Status.dat file can be selected by clicking Edit on the SoundCheck Main Screen, then
Preferences and then selecting Folder Paths. Click the folder icon for Status File Path or Containting
Folder.
If the status.dat path is pointed to a folder containing multiple status.dat files, with the Key ID in the file name,
the software will automatically load the one that corresponds to the currently plugged in hardware key.
1. Click Browse and select a
Status.dat file
or click on Current Folder
to allow SoundCheck to
automatically select.
2. Click OK to continue.
3. Click on OK to close the
Folders path dialog

SoundCheck will
automatically switch to using
the new Status.dat file

SoundCheck does not have
to restart once the new
Status file has been selected

Figure 7-6: Status File Path
If the status.dat path is
pointed to a folder containing multiple status.dat files, the software will automatically load the file that
corresponds to the hardware key that is currently plugged in.
This allows you to use multiple Status.dat files for multiple hardware keys, or Status.dat files with
different functionality for a single hardware key.
The Status.dat file must have the Key ID in the file name; e.g., "status SC 1111.dat". This allows for use of
multiple hardware keys on one system.
You can also switch between SoundCheck full version and SoundCheck ONE, if you have a SoundCheck ONE
Status.dat file. In this case you will need to select the specific status.dat file instead of selecting the folder.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
SoundCheck Main Screen
37
Wrong Status.dat Warning
If an invalid Status.dat file is selected, the SoundCheck wall paper will change to indicate that “Data is
Randomized”. There is also a message in the upper right corner of the SoundCheck Main Screen indicating the
condition of the Status.dat file. See Figure 7-7.
Figure 7-7: Data Randomized Warning
Miscellaneous

Show Sequence Documentation
This allows you to globally turn off Show
Sequence Documentation in all sequences.

Show ‘Protect Data’ option when switching
sequences
Turns off the warning: “This action will remove
any unused pre-run curves and unprotected
measured data from the Memory List.”
Figure 7-8: Miscellaneous Tab
38
SoundCheck Main Screen
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Advanced
Important! Please don't use the options in this tab unless directed to by Listen Support
personnel. These are only for troubleshooting.

Log sequence duration and memory usage:
Produces a log file in the SoundCheck folder
containing the length of time the sequence ran
and the memory consumption of each
sequence run
C:\SoundCheck 16.0\Time Mem Log.txt

Log assertions:
Creates log of failed programmer sanity
checks (programmer errors)

Show assertions:
Show failed programmer sanity checks
(programmer errors) on screen

Enable TCP/IP Server:
Check to allow TCP/IP Server (Automatically
updates SoundCheck 16.0.ini file with True/
False status and port number)
Figure 7-9: Advanced Tab
TCP IP Server Port: The Port number of this SoundCheck system
See Controlling SoundCheck with TCP/IP on page 443 for more information.
Process Priority
Raising the Process Priority level helps to minimize fluctuation in sequence execution time.
The default value is set to Normal. The appropriate values are listed below.
SCProcessPriority=

Low

BelowNormal

Normal

AboveNormal

High

Realtime
When the priority is set to “Realtime”, SoundCheck takes priority over all other applications. We do not
recommend using “Realtime” as it can dramatically change the performance of the system.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
SoundCheck Main Screen
39
Mass Export
Multiple sequences can be exported in a single operation. This saves time when upgrading from one version of
SoundCheck to another and when transferring your sequences from one system to another.
See Exporting Sequences on page 403.

Click File on the SoundCheck Main Screen

Open the appropriate sequence folder

Select the sequences you want to export as shown
in Figure 7-10
Figure 7-10: Select Sequences
40

Navigate to and open the export destination
folder (or create a new one)

Click Current Folder. We do not
recommend exporting directly to your
desktop, but a folder on your desktop is OK.

You will be prompted to confirm the export
destination

Click OK to export
SoundCheck Main Screen
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
SoundCheck 16.0.ini Files
The SoundCheck 16.0.ini and SoundCheck 16.0 (x64).ini files are used to
store various settings for SoundCheck including the settings made in the
preferences menu. (The x64 file is only available in the 64 bit version.)
For example, when changing sequences, you are prompted if you want to
preserve unprotected data in your Memory List, in a dialog box like Figure 711. When the Don't ask me again is selected, SoundCheck will use the chosen
action (Discard or Protect) as the default action each time the sequence is
changed, and the dialog box will no longer appear. You can review this setting
in the SoundCheck 16.0.ini files, found in the root of the SoundCheck folder.
//Signal Generator: Specifies the minimum size of the user interface buffer
when playing a WAV file to the driver. Playing a WAV file is not as CPU
intensive as a sine wave because it is a finite sample length being read
from disk. Lowering this value will improve response time from the signal
generator user interface when playing a WAV file. Raising this number
should reduce dropouts. Min = 1, Max=40, Default=2
[SoundCheck 16.0]
;appFont = "Tahoma" 20
;dialogFont = "Tahoma" 20
OutputBufSizeGuiWAV = 2
;systemFont = "Tahoma" 20
[MicCal]
[Files]
CALIBRATOR TYPE = "3"
RecentFiles.list = ""
MICROPHONE TYPE = "0"
RecentDATFiles.list = ""
PRE-GAIN = "0.000000"
RecentRESFiles.list = ""
[Dialogs]
RecentWFMFiles.list = ""
PROMPT TO REMOVE WHEN EDIT DISPLAY = "True"
RecentDISFiles.list = ""
PROMPT TO REMOVE PRE-RUNS = "True"
RecentVIConfigFiles.list = ""
PROTECT MEASURED = "False"
[Execution]
PROMPT TO OVERWRITE FILE = "True"
SCProcessPriority = "Normal"
SHOW SPLASHSCREEN = "False"
[Debug]
[MiscSettings]
LogTimeAndMemoryPerRun = FALSE
RUN SETUP WIZARD = "TRUE"
LogAssertions = FALSE
LOAD LAST USED SEQUENCE = "FALSE"
ShowAssertions = FALSE
FIRST RUN = "FALSE"
[Virtual Instruments]
SHOW NEW FEATURES DOC = "True"
StartupConfig = ""
//Input Virtual Instruments: If buffer size of samples fetched from input
device drops below this value, new samples are fetched. Increasing
this number should reduce dropouts on the input side (very rare). Min
= 1, Max=500,Default=100
InputBufSizeDll = 100
//Signal Generator: Specifies the minimum % of the ASIO output buffer below which new samples will be written to the driver. Lowering
this number will reduce response time to changes in the signal generator user interface. Raising this number should reduce dropouts. Min
= 10, Max=95, Default=70
OutputBufPercentDllASIO = 70
Figure 7-11: Prompt to
Keep Unprotected Data
ANTI ALIASING CURVES = "TRUE"
ANTI ALIASING WAVEFORMS = "FALSE"
DEMO MODE = "False"
DEMO VERSION = "SoundCheck"
PROTECT MEASURED DATA WHEN EDIT DISPLAY = "True"
PRINT IMAGE FORMAT = "bmp"
SHOW DATA IN OUT = "True"
STEP DEFAULT OVERWRITE CURVES = "True"
SERIAL NO = ""
Figure 7-12: Example of SoundCheck 16.0.ini
In Figure 7-12, you can See two entries in the SoundCheck 16.0.ini file labeled Prompt to remove pre-runs
and Protect Measured. When Prompt to remove pre-runs is set to False, the dialog is disabled. SoundCheck is
then using the Protect Measured field to determine whether measured curves are protected when sequences
are changed. When Protect Measured is set to True, the Memory List will preserve all measured curves from
one sequence to the next. When it is set to False, all unprotected data is discarded when the sequence is
changed. See Sequence Editor on page 387 for more information on changing sequences.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
SoundCheck Main Screen
41
INI File Rules
42

Stores the preferences that were last used in SoundCheck and settings specifically for the 64 bit
version

SoundCheck 16.0 (x64).ini is only available in the 64 installation

When using SoundCheck 64 bit, the x64 INI file is created the first time you manually edit a color in a
display. You can also create the file by making a blank INI file with the same name as the SoundCheck
executable, e.g.: SoundCheck 16.0 (x64).ini.)
SoundCheck Main Screen
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Controls and Details
SI Units
SoundCheck uses SI Units throughout
the system. It is important to note that
values entered, such as 0.1 Volts, will
change to 100 m when SI Units are
selected in the Preferences for a Virtual
Instrument. Values can also be entered
directly with SI Units by typing 150 m. It
is then important to note the following
table of abbreviations for SI Units that
should be used in SoundCheck.
Symbol
Name
Factor
Symbol
Name
Factor
m
milli
10-3
k
kilo
103
u
micro
10-6
M
mega
106
n
nano
10-9
G
giga
109
p
pico
10-12
T
tera
1012
f
femto
10-15
P
peta
1015
a
atto
10-18
E
exa
1018
z
zepto
10-21
Z
zeta
1021
y
yocto
10-24
Y
yotta
1024
Numeric Fields
Figure 8-1: SI Units
Highlight the value in a numeric field by
dragging the mouse cursor over the number while holding down
the left-button, or by repeatedly pressing the Tab button on the
keyboard until you find the correct entry field. You can enter the
correct value by highlighting the value in the numeric field and
entering the correct number using the keyboard, or by using the
left-button of your mouse to click on the up/down arrow keys next
to the numeric field to increase/decrease the present value.
With the cursor placed
after the 3, click the Up
Arrow key to raise the
value to 401 mV
Another method is to place the blinking cursor to the right of the value you want to increase or decrease. In this
example, the cursor is placed in the Voltage field. Using the up/down arrows on the keyboard allows you to
change the value in 1, 0.1 or 0.01 increments, depending on which digit the cursor is placed next to. By using
the Page Up/Down keys you can change the output level in 1 dB increments. In this example, the up arrow will
increment the level by 1.00 V. Pressing the up arrow once increases the level to 1.01 V.
By putting the cursor in the Frequency field you can use the Page Up/Down keys to change the frequency in
R80 or 24th octave steps.
Right Click Functions
Many of SoundCheck’s settings can be found under Right Click Functions. Refer to the following list for some of
the main Right Click functions.
Convert Sequences From Previous Version on page 12
Right Click Functions on page 53
Right Click Function on page 74
Right Click Functions on page 98
Virtual Instruments on page 126
Right Click - Memory List on page 281
Right Click on Graph on page 297
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Controls and Details
43
Resolution
In the Signal Generator click Preferences and then Resolution to change
the settings as shown in Figure 8-2.
Knobs
Instead of entering the desired value with the
keyboard, you can also dial in the value with the
virtual knob located below the numeric field. Simply
place the cursor over the knob, hold down the left
mouse button and rotate the knob to change the
level.
Figure 8-2: Preferences Signal Generator
Graphs and Cursors
The cursor can be moved by Left Clicking and dragging the cursor marker (+) to the desired point on the
measurement curve. The cursor will snap to the closest curve you drag to.
The XY coordinates of a cursor are displayed next to the cursor on the display. The XY coordinate box can be
moved so that it does not cover the graph line. See Cursors on page 297.
Right Click
on Display
for options
Delta X axis
Delta Y axis
Figure 8-3: Frequency Response Graph
Modifying Graph Display
Right Click on a Display and select Preferences to show the
Graph Preferences editor.
See Display Editing on page 296.
Cursor Controls
Cursor color is controlled by through the Graph Preferences
window.
Figure 8-4: Graph Preferences
44
Controls and Details
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Login
To view and change the system's login settings, select Login from the Edit drop down menu on the
SoundCheck® Main Screen. The Login screen also appears when first starting the SoundCheck program.
Login allows the SoundCheck administrator to prevent use of certain test system functions by other users. For
instance, unauthorized users can be blocked from editing Calibration or Sequences with password protection.
Access Level
There are three access levels: Engineer, Technician, and Operator.

Engineer - The Engineer level is the highest access level, and
therefore all functionality is accessible

Technician - The Technician level allows access to Calibration
procedures, and may measure, print and save data

Operator - The Operator level can only measure and print
Figure 9-1: Login
User Name
The User Name entered in Login can be stored with data, results, and included with printouts. It is useful for
keeping track of who performed the measurement. The user name is typed in at the login prompt or can be
scanned in with a barcode reader. Once the user name has been entered SoundCheck will remember the
name and use it for all future sessions. The name is remembered when SoundCheck is closed and re-opened.
If a new user name needs to be entered, simply open the Login screen from the Edit menu in SoundCheck and
enter a new operator name, or enter a new name in the Login screen upon opening SoundCheck.
Password
The default passwords are not specified (blank) when SoundCheck is shipped. You must click Setup to create
passwords. See Figure 9-2: Login Setup.
Passwords are case sensitive, so be careful with capital letters. Click Setup to open the Login Setup dialog in
order to create new passwords. (Always keep a written copy of your passwords and keep them in a secure
place.)
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Login
45
Login Setup
The Login Setup dialog allows you to
change the login password or bypass
the user login.
Bypasses Login
Screen
This can be changed at any time by
selecting Edit on the SoundCheck
Main Screen and then selecting
Login.
Figure 9-2: Login Setup

Select Edit from the SoundCheck Main Screen
and then select Login to access the Login
Screen.
Figure 9-3: Login Screen
46
Login
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Hardware Configuration
Hardware - System.Har
This serves as a database for all of the hardware that the specific SoundCheck system uses.
To edit the Hardware Configuration, click Setup on the SoundCheck
Main Screen and then select Hardware as shown in Figure 10-1
(shortcut Ctrl+Shift+H).
Note:
As of SoundCheck 11, Hardware is a “System Level”
configuration. It is unique to a specific SoundCheck
system and is used by all sequences. Settings from
earlier step versions can be imported in the Hardware
Configuration Editor.
Note:
Hardware (.HAR) Steps created with SoundCheck 16
and later are not backward compatible with previous
versions of SoundCheck.
Figure 10-1: Setup - Hardware
Features
Listen hardware is configure automatically but can be adjusted, making setup faster and more flexible. This
allows you to more easily add 3rd party hardware to use along with Listen Hardware

Easier integration of Listen and 3rd party hardware

3rd party hardware settings are preserved (not overwritten) when adding Listen Hardware

Easier integration of Listen and 3rd party hardware
See Listen Hardware Page on page 56.
Hardware Compatibility
SoundCheck will work with a variety of audio interfaces, including other multimedia sound devices such as the
Bluetooth headsets and USB microphones shown under Windows Sound and Audio Devices Properties. There
are a wide variety of audio interfaces available with varying degrees of performance but we recommend that
you use one of the audio interfaces certified by Listen. See Appendix A: Hardware Compatibility List on
page 483.
SoundCheck will also work with a variety of National Instruments data acquisition cards such as digital input/
output and IEEE/GPIB that are supported by DAQmx. This includes dynamic signal measurement cards such
as the NI 4461, which requires DAQmx. See Appendix C: PXI/PCI 4461 Installation on page 497 for
information on setting up the NI 4461.
Other manufacturers’ cards can be used, but require some knowledge of LabVIEW programming to create a
Custom VI Step inside SoundCheck. See Creating a Custom VI and Custom Step on page 353.

I/O devices that are not manufactured by NI must conform to DAQmx and must be recognized by NI
MAX, in order to be used with SoundCheck

As of SC 9.1, Digital I/O functions are compatible with DAQmx devices

DaqMX devices cannot be used simultaneously with ASIO audio interfaces
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Hardware Configuration
47
Hardware Editor Rules For Production Lines
When setting up multiple SoundCheck systems that will use the same sequence, it is important to follow some
basic rules:
48

The minimum number of Audio Interface channels should be the same on all systems

Calibration Editor channels must use the same naming convention across all systems. See Naming Best Practices on page 73.

When controlling Listen Hardware with Message Steps, e.g.: AmpConnect ISC, AudioConnect and
SoundConnect 2, the same hardware must be used across all systems so that the Message Steps
perform the specified commands. See Listen Hardware Control Message on page 237.

The Listen Hardware Startup Default settings should be the same across all systems. See Listen
Hardware Page on page 56.

External Interfaces must use the same Interface Numbering scheme across all SoundCheck systems
so that Message Steps communicate correctly. See External Interface on page 246.

NI Daq device ports must have the same minimum number of ports. Each port number must be
configured with the same Input or Output status across all SoundCheck systems. See NI DAQ Digital
I/O Table on page 61.

Select Save As in the Hardware Editor to save the System.HAR file so it can be imported to other
SoundCheck Systems. We recommend that you save it with a name identifying the specific hardware
in use. Note that the Hardware Interface Vp and Latency values for a specific interface should be
entered on each SoundCheck system after importing the settings for Listen Hardware and External
Interfaces.

Hardware (.HAR) Steps created with SoundCheck 16 and later are not backward compatible with
previous versions of SoundCheck
Hardware Configuration
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Audio Page
The following settings will affect how WAV files are created and played by SoundCheck, such as in the
Stimulus and Acquisition Editors.
Figure 10-2 shows the default System Hardware Configuration for AudioConnect. This shows the hardware
channels available when using this audio interface and default Vp values. Channels and other values are
Grayed out until the actual device is selected in the Device column.
Figure 10-2: System Hardware Table
Hardware settings for other audio interfaces or from previous sequences can be imported into the Hardware
Editor as well.
If items in the list become obsolete they can be deleted. This will of course affect channels in the
Calibration Editor that link to that device and any sequence that might use one of the deleted channels.
Each Channel Name should be unique to avoid confusion when editing a sequence or adding hardware at a
later date.
Automatic Startup Configuration
As of SoundCheck 16, Auto Mode has been replaced with Automatic Startup Configuration. This allows
SoundCheck to detect and maintain Listen hardware so that most users will never have to open the hardware
editor or modify hardware settings.
SoundCheck will always scan for available devices on startup. SoundCheck will only automatically configure
Listen Hardware devices on startup if Automatic Startup Configuration is selected. When Refresh is clicked
SoundCheck scans for hardware and then configures what it can, no matter what.

Automatic Startup Configuration is on by default

The Automatic Startup Configuration check box and Refresh button affect both the Audio and Listen
Hardware tabs

Input and Output Vp values are stored in the firmware of AmpConnect ISC, AudioConnect and future
Listen interfaces. These values are automatically loaded in the Hardware Editor when SoundCheck
discovers new hardware on startup or when you click Refresh.

Automatic Startup Configuration configures new channels only at startup, if Automatic Startup
Configuration is selected. You can manually scan by clicking on the Refresh button. (The system does
not continuously poll for changes to hardware.)

After automatic configuration you can further edit the hardware configuration. For example, this
allows you to use automatic configuration to detect and configure the AudioConnect 4x4, but then
easily change its configuration to 192 kHz sample rate.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Hardware Configuration
49

When “Refresh” is selected SoundCheck scans for Listen hardware and automatically configures
discovered hardware channels in the same way Automatic Startup Configuration works at startup,
regardless of the state of Automatic Startup Configuration.

Automatic Startup Configuration or Refresh will not overwrite the settings of an existing audio channel
where those settings are allowed values. Only Vp and Sampling Rate are checked for validity.

If you are using audio interfaces other than those made by Listen, Automatic Startup Configuration
will not affect your “already configured channels” as long as the device is connected.
Selection Buttons
Five buttons at the bottom of the editor allow you to:

Refresh - Click to scan for Listen hardware and automatically configure discovered hardware
channels

Import - Allows you to import hardware settings from the Hardware Configuration examples provided
with SoundCheck or from other SoundCheck sequences. This will overwrite the settings of current
channels in the table if they have the same channel name.

Save - Save changes to hard disk and closes the Hardware Editor

Save As - Allows you to save the configuration for a specific hardware setup. You can create different
hardware configurations so you can easily switch between them using the Import function.

Cancel - Discard any changes made while the editor window was open
Importing Hardware Settings
This can be useful when sequences are created on a different
SoundCheck system, with different hardware.
When Import is selected, the Hardware Configuration Editor will check
for Input and Output channel name duplication. You are prompted to
select Yes or No to overwrite existing channels.

Yes/Yes to All: The current channel settings will be replaced
with the settings from the imported channel(s)

No/No to All: You can choose to not update individual
channels or all channels

New Channels: If the imported Hardware Configuration has channels with different names from the
current configuration, the channels will be added to the Hardware Configuration.
Note:
50
Figure 10-3: Import Overwrite
Message
When channels are added to the Hardware Configuration, each channel must have a unique
name. The Hardware Configuration cannot be saved if there are duplicate channel names.
Hardware Configuration
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
The example in Figure 10-4 shows new
Input and Output channel names after
importing channels from a hardware file
for another device.

The new channels can be
renamed. In this case they might
be named Input 3, Input 4,
Output 3 and Output 4. This
flexibility allows the Hardware
Configuration to be used as a
database for any device that you
might have available, even if it is
not always connected to the
system.

Right click on a channel and
select Rename

Figure 10-4: Import Channels
The settings for the Lynx audio
interface are grayed out and
cannot be edited since the device is not present in the system
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Hardware Configuration
51
Hardware Table Fields
The Hardware Configuration Table view allows you to add, delete, duplicate and edit hardware settings for all
devices available on the SoundCheck system. Each device is defined in a row with column headings of:

Channel Name - Defined by user. Default = Input 1..n, Output 1..n

Driver - Audio Interface or NI DAQmx

WDM/MME - Select when using an audio interface that only has WDM or MME drivers

DAQmx - Select to setup an NI DAQmx compatible Digital IO device. See NI DAQmx on page 62
for more information.

ASIO - If the installed audio interface features ASIO drivers, this can be selected to take advantage
of the benefits of ASIO

Core Audio - Available only on Mac OS

Device Name - The name of the audio interface as it appears in the Windows Multimedia Stack

Select Ch (Channel 1..n or L/R of Audio Interface Channel Pair) Click on the Drop Down list to select a
channel.

Vp (max voltage) - Determined in Hardware Channel Calibration process or entered by user

Analog/Digital - Set by user

Sampling Rate - Select from list (For devices using WDM drivers, some listed sampling rates may not
be compatible with SoundCheck.)

Alias Freq - Anti-aliasing filter frequency, automatically determined but can be edited by user

Bit Depth - Select from list

Latency - Determined in Hardware Channel Calibration process or entered by user
Note:
As of SoundCheck 14, the Hardware Editor uses only the Table View.
The essential hardware settings for all channels of a multichannel Hardware Configuration can be viewed and
edited in the table as shown in Figure: 10-5.
Latency is defined on
the Input channels
Figure: 10-5 Hardware Editor
52
Hardware Configuration
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Waveforms
The Hardware & Calibration info of a channel are attached to any waveform that was played or recorded
through that channel. This allows it to be analyzed on another computer. Please refer to Calibration
Configuration on page 65 for more information.
Sort
In the table view of the Hardware Editor you can sort the table by Left Clicking on a column header. This
simplifies viewing and editing when you have a lot of channels. For example, sort by Channel Name or sort by
Input Channel.
Right Click Functions
Right Click on a line of the table to Add, Delete, Duplicate or Rename hardware
channels.
Multiple channels can be selected. Click and hold on the shift key to select a range of
channels or the control key to select specific channels.
Figure: 10-6 Right
Click

Add Channel - Create a new channel in the drop down list

Delete Channel(s) - Remove the selected channel(s) from the list. This will affect any Acquisition Step
in the sequence that uses this channel.

Duplicate Channel(s) - Creates a duplicate of the selected channel(s) and appends “- Copy” to the
name

Rename - Change the name of the selected channel

Calibrate Using - Select the proper input or output channel to calibrate with. This automatically starts
the Audio Interface Calibration sequence.

ASIO Control Panel - Click to open the ASIO Control Panel for the selected device (grayed out when
no ASIO device is present)
Audio Interface Calibration
Right click on a channel and select Calibrate Using then select the proper
input or output channel. The Audio Interface Calibration Sequence will run
automatically on the selected Input/Output channel signal chain. See Figure:
10-7.
The Audio Interface Calibration process will instruct you on the required
connections and procedure. See Balanced Audio Interface Calibration
Connections on page 508 when using a balanced audio interface.
When finished, the essential hardware values for that Input/Output channel of
the audio interface are entered into the appropriate fields of the Hardware
Table.
Figure: 10-7 Calibrate
Using...
Important! Only one channel pair, Input to Output, is calibrated at a time. A four channel audio interface
will require four different calibration tests, one for each channel.
Important! The calibration sequence should not be modified!
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Hardware Configuration
53
ASIO

Right Click on the Channel Name Field and select ASIO Control Panel

Audio interfaces with ASIO drivers are supported as of SoundCheck
10. (Previous versions of SoundCheck only support WDM and MME
drivers.)

ASIO is a driver standard geared towards Pro Audio equipment, which
allows for more stable latencies

ASIO drivers offer excellent audio interface control and allow for use of
a wide range of professional audio multichannel audio interfaces
Figure 10-8: Hardware
Using ASIO
When using ASIO devices, the Hardware Editor in SoundCheck looks similar to MME/WDM audio interfaces.
The channel number is selected after selecting the device name. Right click on a Channel Name and select
ASIO Control Panel to adjust ASIO settings for that device.
ASIO Control Panel
ASIO devices have their own control panel. The buffer size of the
device, and in some cases USB Streaming Mode, is set here. This is
directly related to the latency value in the Hardware Editor in
SoundCheck. The example shown is the control panel for an
AudioConnect 4x4 audio interface.

USB Streaming Mode is set to Safe

The Buffer Size is set to 2048 Samples. Other interfaces may
require larger or smaller buffer sizes. The buffer size is also
dependent on the Sample Rate and the number of channels
used simultaneously. Please refer to the instructions for your
audio interface.
Figure 10-9: ASIO Control
Panel
Some ASIO control panels also allow you to set the gain settings for the device. These values must be set
before calibrating the ASIO audio interface in SoundCheck.
Sampling Rate
Sampling Rate refers to the audio interface’s sampling rate in samples per second (e.g.,
8000, 11025, 22050, 32000, 44100, 48000, 96000, 192000, etc.). Refer to the
documentation provided with the audio interface for appropriate sampling rates.
SoundCheck will attempt to test the audio interface at different sampling rates and bit
depths. If they are supported, SoundCheck will only show those that work. See Figure:
10-5 Hardware Editor on page 52.
54
Note:
Audio Interfaces with WDM driver (Windows Driver Model) support all sample rates through
“sample rate conversion”. For SoundCheck we recommend that you only use the sample rates
supported by the audio interface. If the sample rate between the audio interface and device under
test are different, use Frequency Shift and Resample Post Processing steps as indicated in Rules
- Resampling and Frequency Shift on page 228.
Note:
Using a higher sample rate proportionally increases the amount of memory required.
Hardware Configuration
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Alias Freq (Alias free freq limit (Hz))
This shows the limit of the upper frequency range to which the audio interface can measure. This is dependent
on the Sample Rate setting and the filter applied by the selected audio interface.
Bit Depth
Select the bit depth used by the A/D and D/A converters of the audio interface. Typical values are 16
and 24 bits (sometimes 32 bit words are used to convey 24 bits of information as in the Lynx Studio
and RME audio interfaces).
24-bit audio will provide the greatest dynamic range (approximately 120 dB). However, when using 24-bit
audio, more computer memory is required. If there is insufficient RAM, SoundCheck may slow down
significantly, because the computer is using the hard drive as virtual memory. If this occurs, you may need to
upgrade the computer’s RAM.
Device Selection - Input or Output
Select the device to be used for Input or Output from the drop down list.
These are stored by device name with the Hardware Configuration.
If the device is not available (Hardware removed from PC or sequence
imported on another PC without the proper hardware), a warning
message will appear. Open the editor to update the Hardware Table or
select Ignore.
Figure 10-10: Hardware Not
Found
Input (Vp) and Output (Vp)
This defines the maximum peak voltage that the audio interface can handle before overloading, sometimes
referred to as full-scale deflection (FSD). All audio interfaces provided by Listen Inc. have predefined
Hardware Configurations in SoundCheck, which include the nominal FSD values for the input and output
channels for that audio interface. If you have another audio interface, enter the appropriate values when editing
your Hardware Configuration. These calibration values can be measured by following the Audio Interface
calibration procedure. See Audio Interface Calibration on page 53.
Latency
This is the time delay or latency between input and output hardware channels when operating in full-duplex
mode (record and play simultaneously). This value is expressed in seconds and in samples. The latency
expressed in seconds is calculated from the integer number of samples. SoundCheck uses samples in
measurements, since there are no rounding errors. (For audio interfaces that Listen provides, this value will be
known.)
Most audio interfaces cannot record and play simultaneously. There is almost always a delay between the two
and the delay should not vary from measurement to measurement. The audio interfaces that Listen provides
are certified to have high performance in making audio-related measurements. If you are using an audio
interface that Listen, Inc has not certified, the measurement performance of SoundCheck may be severely
compromised!
Important! If the latency is not consistent, (as with WDM audio interface drivers), Autodelay must be
enabled in the Analysis Steps of all sequences or measurements will NOT be reliable. See
Delay on page 177.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Hardware Configuration
55
A/D - Analog/Digital Selection
When set to Analog, the Max Input and Output values of the audio interface can be set. (Values determined by
the Audio Interface Calibration Sequence.)
When set to Digital the Input/Output values change to 100% FSD (Full Scale Deflection) of the audio device
selected. The Vp value should be set to 1.
Listen Hardware Page
Listen Hardware is automatically added to this
page when it is detected by SoundCheck. Once
added, items will remain on the page until
manually removed. Disconnected items are noted
as “Disconnected” in the Status column.
The fields below apply to all Listen Hardware
devices.
Figure 10-11: Listen Hardware
Device ID
Shows the device identification for all devices that have been connected to the SoundCheck system. Device
IDs can be changed to make it easier to keep track of multiple devices of the same Device Name.

Rename - The device name default can be changed by right clicking on the device line

Delete Device - Right click on the device line to remove a device from the table
Device Name
Shows the product name of the device
Serial Number
Shows the Serial number of the connected device
Startup Default
Right click on the device line to set the initial settings that the Listen hardware device will adopt
when SoundCheck opens
Status
Indicates if the device is connected and recognized by SoundCheck or disconnected
Firmware Version
Shows the firmware of the connected device
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Hardware Configuration
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
AudioConnectTM
Right-click on the AudioConnect line and select Assign Startup Default. The
controls in Figure 10-12 are the same as the AudioConnect Message Step.
The AudioConnect audio interface can be controlled through a SoundCheck
Message Step. This allows you to change the input and output configuration
of the device during the operation of a SoundCheck sequence.
For details on step settings see AudioConnect Message on page 239.
Note:
Automatic Startup Configuration cannot be used if
changing the input routing between Mic and Line
during the run of a sequence. If you wish to switch
inputs using Message Steps in a SoundCheck
sequence you should disable Automatic Startup
Configuration on the Audio Page and use separate
channels for Inputs 1/2 and Mic Input 1/2. This
limitation does not apply to Gain changes.
Figure 10-12: AudioConnect
Startup Default
AmpConnect ISCTM
In order to control AmpConnect ISC from a SoundCheck sequence,
it must be Enabled in the Hardware Editor. Refer to the
AmpConnect ISC Manual for more detailed information.
Important! After installing SC 14, prior versions of
SoundCheck will not have control over
the device. Additionally, the serial
number of the AmpConnect ISC audio
interface will not be read properly which
changes the name of the device in the
Hardware Editor.
For details on step settings see AmpConnect Message on page
238.
Figure 10-13: AmpConnect Startup
Default
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Hardware Configuration
57
SoundConnect 2TM
SoundConnect 2 is a compact and rugged USB controlled
microphone power supply and conditioning amplifier.
It can be controlled through a SoundCheck Message Step. This
allows you to change the input signal routing, Gain and High/Low
Pass filters during the operation of a SoundCheck sequence.
Right-click on the SoundConnect 2 line and select Assign Startup
Default. The controls in Figure 10-14 are the same as the
SoundConnect 2 Message Step.
For details on step settings see SoundConnect 2 Message on
page 239.
Figure 10-14: SoundConnect 2
Startup Default
DC ConnectTM
The Listen DC Connect is a USB-controlled DC power supply and measuring
amplifier used for measuring the DC voltage and current consumption on
DC-powered audio devices. The Listen Hardware table shows any DC
Connect device that has been setup in the Hardware Editor.
DC Connect can be controlled in SoundCheck by using Message Steps as
well as the Stimulus Editor and Acquisition Editor.
Important! As of SoundCheck 13, after installing SoundCheck you
cannot use DC Connect with versions prior to
SoundCheck 13, unless you manually switch the drivers in
Windows Device Manger. Download the latest DC
Connect manual from the Listen website for a step by step
procedure.
Figure 10-15: DC Connect
Startup Default
The DC Connect startup default editor is shown in Figure 10-15. This allows you to set DC Connect to 0 VDC
output when SoundCheck is launched, along with other device settings.
For details on step settings see DC Connect Message on page 240.
58
Hardware Configuration
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
BTC-4148 by Portland Tool & Die
This is a complete interface for measuring and characterizing Bluetooth audio devices including handsets,
headsets, speakers, car kits and other devices with Bluetooth audio input or output.
It can be controlled through a SoundCheck Message Step. This allows you to change the pairing of devices
and the profiles used when testing, during the operation of a SoundCheck sequence.
In the Listen Hardware Table, Right-click on the BTC-4148 line and select Assign Startup Default.
The controls in Figure 10-16 are the same as the BTC-4148 Message Step.

A2DP Profile - Select SBC or AptX

HFP Profile - Select CVSD or mSBC

Audio Source - Only available in Startup Default


Select USB or SPDIF
Role - Only available in Startup Default

Source - Use when connecting to transducer

Sink - Use when connecting to a phone or laptop
Figure 10-16: BTC-4148
Startup Default
For details on step settings see BTC-4148 Message on page 240.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Hardware Configuration
59
External Hardware Page
Interface Table
Select which Computer Interface type is being used to
control external devices, such as a multiplexer or
turntable. To send or receive IEEE-488 (GPIB) and
RS232 commands, use the Message Editor.
Interface #
Each external interface is assigned an Interface
Number which is used to identify the device in
Messages Steps used in SoundCheck sequences.
Right Click on the Interface Number line and select
Add Interface.
Figure 10-17: External Interface Setup
This can be a mixture of IEEE-488, RS-232, Serial Footswitches or Serial Buzzers. See Serial Port Control on
page 511 for footswitch and buzzer wiring.
Note:
The IEEE interface card must have a LabVIEW driver.
Important! The Interface Number for external devices must be the same across multiple
SoundCheck systems that share a common Message Step in a sequence.
Message Steps use these device numbers to identify the device used in the
step. See External Interface on page 246. Any change in the order of devices
in the Hardware Editor will cause communication errors with the external
devices. See Hardware Editor Rules For Production Lines on page 48.
Type
Type of communication interface, such as IEEE-488, RS232, Footswitch, or Buzzer. If the Footswitch is
installed and configured in the Hardware Configuration, it can control the Start button of SoundCheck and the
Continue button on the Main Screen. A second Footswitch can control the Redo and Stop button.
COM Port
Communication port number as defined by the Windows System Properties Device Manager.
Baud rate
Transfer rate speed of the communication port (in bits per second).
Data bits
Specify the data bits for this port. Consult your hardware manufacturer for more information.
Parity
Specify the parity for this port if your serial device requires this setting.
60
Hardware Configuration
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Stop bits
Specify the stop bits for this port if your serial device requires this setting.
Flow control
Specify the flow control for this port if your serial device requires this setting.
Important! SoundCheck cannot access a Com Port that is also be being referenced by Windows or
another app. Make sure that no other software applications are using the Com Port that is
used in the Hardware Configuration.
NI DAQ Digital I/O Table
Configure the Digital Input and Output card being used to
control external devices, such as relays. To send and receive
digital I/O commands (for example for controlling relays), use
the Message Editor. These settings will be reflected in the
Message Editor when programming digital I/O commands.
Right click on a line to Add, Delete or Duplicate.
Dev ID
Device identification number for digital I/O board. To
determine the ID number in Windows, look at the System
Device Manager to locate your board.
Figure 10-18: External
For DAQmx devices, look in the Ni MAX software application to determine device info.
Note that new DAQmx devices require that all ports are setup and defined in External Hardware page. Even
though you may only be using two ports of a four port device, you must define all ports.
No. of Ports
Number of Input/Output Ports available on the digital I/O board.
Port No.
Port currently being configured. In Figure 10-18, Port 1 is an input port. To configure whether a particular port
is an Input or Output, select the Port No. and then click either Input or Output in the I/O column.
Note:
On some devices the function of ports may be fixed: e.g., Ports 1, 2 are input and 3, 4 are output.
Port Width
National Instrument devices that use the DAQmx driver must be setup with the exact number of bits specified
for a port.
I/O - Input/Output
You must indicate the Port direction, for each port enabled, i.e.:
Port 1 = Input, Port 2 = Output, Port 3 = Output
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Hardware Configuration
61
NI DAQmx
This sets the properties of the NI 4461 Analog Data Acquisition Card. (optional hardware for testing electronics
devices such as audio interfaces, amplifiers, preamps, etc.)
Notes:

The NI 4461 card requires the installation of NI-DAQmx. Use the latest approved DAQmx version from
the SoundCheck installation DVD. See “Hardware Compatibility List” on page 483.

DaqMX devices cannot be used simultaneously with ASIO audio interfaces.

As of SoundCheck 11.0, the RTA virtual instrument is compatible with NI DAQmx devices. Also note
that the Multimeter and Scope/FFT cannot be used simultaneously with NI DAQmx devices.
Important: Output and input sample rates must match in the hardware editor. The NI 4461
clock defaults to the output sample rate.
When the NI-Daq Acquisition device is selected the Hardware Editor has the following constraints:

Digital In and Out are not available. Only Analog is available.

Input and Output Vp values are in Volts and relate to the Sensitivity of the channel. See “Input and
Output Vp” on page 63.

Bit Depth is fixed at 24 Bit
Driver: Select NI DAQmx
Figure 10-19: NI 4461
Device: Select proper device ID
Select Ch: Select Channels according to Device ID, Select ai0 (Input 1) or ai1 (Input 2)
Vp: Set the Vp value for desired sensitivity (See “Input and Output Vp” on page 63.)
Sample Rate: Set according to chart (See “Sample Rate / Latency” on page 63.)
Latency: Set according to chart (See “Sample Rate / Latency” on page 63.)
Term Config: Select Default, RSE, NRSE, Differential or Pseudo-Differential
Coupling: Select AC, DC or GND
IEPE: Enable to turn on ICP power for the NI 4461 Inputs. See Figure 10-19.
The IEPE check box on the Audio Input tab is used to turn on ICP power for the inputs of the NI 4461. This will
power the SCM microphone as well as any ICP powered transducer (4 mA current standard).
62
Hardware Configuration
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Input and Output Vp settings
Input Range
Vp (Hardware Config Setting)1
0.316
1.00
3.16
10.0
31.6
42.4
Gain (dB)
30
20
10
0
-10
-20
1 Each
input channel gain is independently set in the Hardware Config.
Output Range
Attenuation (dB)
0
-20
-40
2 Each
Vp (Hardware Config Setting)2
10.00
1.0
0.1
output channel attenuation is independently set in the Hardware
Config.
Figure 10-20: Input and Output Vp
Latency and Sample Rate
The Latency of the 4461 will change as the sample rate of the Hardware Configuration changes. The following
chart shows recommended Latency values for the sample rates supported in SoundCheck.
Sample Rate (Hz)
200k
192,000
176,400
96,000
88,200
48,000
44,100
32,000
16,000
8,000
Latency (Samples)
100
100
100
114
114
109
109
109
90
80
Figure 10-21: Sample Rate / Latency
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Hardware Configuration
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SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Hardware Configuration
64
Calibration Configuration
The accuracy of your SoundCheck system depends upon accurate calibration of your input and output devices.
Nominal calibration values for many devices typically used are included with SoundCheck. For more accurate
measurements, calibration of individual signal paths should be performed for each device. Frequency of
calibration of these devices depends upon the stability of the device.
Important! As of SoundCheck 11, Calibration is a “System Level” configuration. It is unique to a specific
SoundCheck system and is used by all sequences. Individual Calibration Steps are no
longer used. Settings from these steps can be imported in the Calibration Configuration
Editor. See Input Tab on page 69.
The Calibration Editor (Ctrl+Shift+C) is used to calibrate the complete SoundCheck® test setup including
signal conditioning (e.g., amps and preamps) and transducers (e.g., microphones and sound sources). This
allows absolute measurements of acoustic, electroacoustic, electrical, and electronic devices. This step
calibrates the entire system. See Figure 11-12 for a system diagram.
The System Calibration Configuration input/output sensitivities and units are also used for calibrating the virtual
instruments accessed in SoundCheck’s Instruments drop down menu.
System.Cal
This is the database for all signal path setups and calibration data for the system.
Figure 11-1 shows the table view of the Calibration Configuration supplied with SoundCheck.

Channel setups can be imported from
previous SoundCheck sequences

Obsolete channels can be deleted.
(Note that this can effect the curves
used by this and other sequences.)

Best Naming practices should be
followed when creating new
calibration items. See Naming - Best
Practices on page 73.

Each line defines the following for use
in a sequence or virtual instrument:

Input or Output path

Calibration data file

Physical connection to hardware

Tab View shows information for
selected Input/Output channels.

Table View shows all input and output
channels.
Figure 11-1: System Calibration Table
For more information on calibration procedures and specifics, please refer to Calibrating SoundCheck on
page 76.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Calibration Configuration
65
Features

As of SoundCheck 15, accelerometer and other vibration transducer calibration and related force units
(dB re 1 m/s2, dB re 1 N and dB re 1 g) are supported. See Accelerometer Calibration Procedure on
Page 82.

Auto Read



This allows you to change the preamp gain of a Listen Hardware device to optimize the dynamic
range of the system without needing to re-calibrate the microphone. See Auto Read on Page 70.
Accounts for all of the equipment in the measured chain:

Amplifiers

Measurement Microphones

Sound Sources

Preamplifiers
Calibration information for each channel includes:

Magnitude and phase response

Sensitivity

dB reference units

Serves as a database of stored devices

Assigns a set of calibration data to a physical Hardware Input/Output channel

Calibration information can be shown in Table View making it easier to review multiple devices

Custom curves are easily imported

A single calibrated device can be associated with any number of hardware channels

Calibration History allows you to view past calibration data for a device
Sort
In the table view of the Calibration Editor you can sort the table by Left Clicking on a column header. This
simplifies viewing and editing when you have a lot of channels. For example, sort by Signal Path or sort by HW
Channel.
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Calibration Configuration
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Calibration Basics
System Calibration Structure
Input and Output Signal Paths are defined in the Calibration Editor.
A Signal Path links a Calibrated Device (mic, amp, etc.) to a physical Hardware Channel (audio interface
in/out).
The following diagram shows the basic structure of a channel in System Calibration.
System Calibration Layout
Input Channels
1. Input Signal Path
2. Calibrated Device
3. Hardware Channel
Name of Channel
Unique DAT file with correction data
for a specific input device
Input channel of sound card
(Named in Hardware Step)
1. Output Signal Path
2. Calibrated Device
3. Hardware Channel
4. Input Signal Path
Name of Channel
Unique DAT file with correction data
for a specific output device
Output channel of sound card
(Named in Hardware Step)
Input Signal Path used for calibration
(Named in Calibration Step)
Output Channels
The next diagram shows how this structure would be used for specific devices.
System Calibration Example
Input Channels
Signal Path
Calibrated Device
Hardware Channel
Reference Mic
SCM 2 Mic.dat
Input 1
Direct In 2
Unity Cal (Read Only).dat
Input 2
Signal Path
Calibrated Device
Hardware Channel
Input Signal Path
Amp Ch 1
Crown Amp- L.dat
Output 1
Direct In 1
Amp Ch 2
Crown Amp- R.dat
Output 2
Direct In 2
Output Channels
This structure allows you to have one calibrated device associated with many hardware channels, or have
many calibrated devices associated with one hardware channel.
The Input and Output Tabs divide the calibration settings for the Signal Paths into two groups. Both groups can
have multiple Input or Output Signal Paths.

Direct In 1 and 2, and Direct Out 1 and 2 are projected paths that cannot be removed
Each Signal Path is linked to a set of calibration data (calibrated device) as well as a physical hardware
channel. This information is also available in the Table View.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Calibration Configuration
67
SoundCheck Signal Flow
The diagram in Figure 11-2 shows the successive transfer functions that occur in the signal chain, from the
output of SoundCheck back to the input.
S
EQ
V0
H0
X
Output
Transducer
G
DUT
Y
H1
V1
C0
C1
R
Input
Transducer
Figure 11-2: Signal Flow
1. S: Stimulus created in Stimulus Step
2. EQ: Equalization is applied to the stimulus to correct for the response of the output transducer (e.g.,
Mouth) [NAME eq-out.dat, NAME eq-out.dat]
3. V0: Electrical stimulus played out the audio interface
4. X: Physical input to the DUT (G)
5. Y: Physical output from the DUT (G)
6. V1: Electrical response acquired by the audio interface
7. C0: Correction out for the output transducer [NAME corr-out.dat, NAME corr-out.dat] (applied after
analysis)
8. C1: Correction in for the input transducer (e.g., Microphone) [NAME corr-in.dat, NAME corr-in.dat]
(applied after analysis)
9. R: Response calculated with output and input transducers compensated

The EQ correction curve is used to compensate for the response of the output transducer. This is
applied to the stimulus before it is played out of the audio interface.

C0 is used to fine-tune the compensation for the output transducer, after the measurement has been
made. The net result of this two part compensation is: EQ.H0.C0 = 1

C1 is used to compensate for the input transducer: H1.C1 = 1

This way, R is the response of the DUT to the stimulus S

R= S. EQ. H0.G.H1.C0.C1 = G. S
All of the Correction Curves can be viewed in the Memory List by selecting an XY Display from the Display drop
down list. The following curves will be present for both Input and Output Signal Paths:
Inputs

corr-in.dat

sens-in.dat

gain-in.dat
Outputs
68

corr-out.dat

eq-out.dat

sens-out.dat
Calibration Configuration
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Input Tab
Input Signal Paths, as shown in Figure 11-3, are made up
of the following:

The Calibrated Input Device

The sensitivity of that specific device and its units

The Gain of the specified Listen Hardware device
See Input Hardware Channel on Page 70 for
more information.

The type of calibration that is used for the device

The hardware channel that it is connected to
The Signal Path names are used in any editor where “Use
Signal Path Name“ can be selected, e.g., in the Acquisition
step, when “Use Signal Path Name“ is selected, the Input
name will be: “Recorded Time Waveform [Input Signal
Path Name]“.
Figure 11-3: Input Channel Definition
Important! Changing an Input Signal Path name in the System Calibration Configuration will change
the channel name reference throughout the sequence and any sequence that uses that
Channel Name, if “Use Signal Path Name“, is used in an Analysis Step. Remember that as
curve names change, subsequent steps in the sequence will need to be redirected to the
new names in the Memory List. See “Naming - Best Practices” on page 73..
Calibrated Device - The transducer or input device used for acquiring signal. This may be a Microphone,
Direct audio interface input, USB or Bluetooth device, etc. The Dat file associated with this device is where the
correction curves for that device are stored. The Dat file is created when a new Calibrated Device is added to
the list.
Sensitivity and Gain
Calibration input sensitivity has now been divided into two parts: sensitivity of the
transducer and preamplifier gain. These values show up in the Memory List
following the naming of the Calibrated Input Device, e.g.:

SCM 3 Mic sens-in (Sensitivity)S

SCM 3 Mic gain-in (Preamp Gain)
Sensitivity - Shows the measured sensitivity that is acquired through the
Calibrate Device process. This value can also be manually entered.
Gain - The total gain in dB of the preamplifier the transducer is connected to. This value can be entered
manually or automatically read from Listen hardware devices.
Units - Input physical units and the dB reference are entered by clicking on Units. Refer to Common Units for
Inputs and Outputs on Page 74.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Calibration Configuration
69
Auto Read
When enabled, this option automatically reads and updates the gain from a
single channel of USB-connected Listen Hardware. This allows the preamp
gain to be changed manually or programmatically in a sequence. This can be
used to optimize dynamic range without needing to re-calibrate the input path.
Device - After enabling Auto Read select a Listen Hardware device from the
dropdown menu
Channel - Select the appropriate preamplifier channel. The gain value will automatically be read and populated
in the editor.
Input Hardware Channel
Allows you to select which channel of the audio interface the Calibrated Device is connected to. In this case the
SCM 3 Mic is connected to Input 1 of the AudioConnect audio interface.
Copy from Memory List
Allows you to select a curve from the Memory List to be used
as a Correction or Equalization curve

The default Reference Frequency is 1 kHz as shown
in Figure 11-4.
Importing Correction Curves From Other
Manufacturers
If an imported curve does not have a 0dB value at 1 kHz you
must change the calibration Reference Frequency in the
editor to a point on the correction curve that is at 0dB.
This may also have to be done when importing Diffuse Field
or other such correction curves without data at 1 kHz.
Calibration Sequence
Select the sequence that runs when the Calibrate button is
selected
Figure 11-4: Copy From Memory List
Calibrate Device
Run the selected calibration sequence
Note:
Calibration Sequences are never run on their own. They are always run from the Calibration
Configuration Editor.
Open Table
Opens the Calibration Editor Table View. See Table View on Page 72 for more information
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Import
Allows you to import settings from SoundCheck sequences from previous versions or other systems. This
imports settings for both Input and Output tabs.
Save
Stores calibration changes to hard disk
Cancel
Discard all changes made to the Calibration Configuration
Copy From Memory List - Input
This allows you to overwrite the Destination correction file with a curve from the
Memory List. The curve may need to be Inverted if it is the fundamental response
curve as opposed to a Reciprocal Curve.
See Figure 11-6: SCM 3 Correction Curve.
Note:
The EQ & correction curves will be normalized to 0dB at the
frequency specified in the Sensitivity field [Sens(Hz)]. Units are
automatically set to + dB re 1 so that pure gain is applied.
Figure 11-5: Copy
From Memory List -
The curve in the example is from the DAT file that comes
with an SCM 3 microphone. This is a response curve of
the SCM 3 and is normalized to 0dB at 1 kHz. In this
case, to create a reciprocal curve, Invert Curve must be
checked.
Click Apply to overwrite the Destination Curve with the
Source Curve selected. Click OK to leave the selection
window and click OK to close the editor.
Save the sequence to save the change to disk.
Figure 11-6: SCM 3 Correction Curve
Subsequent measurements will apply this new correction
curve to the input response, provided that “Apply Correction In“ is checked in the Analysis Step. See Apply
Correction on Page 140 for more information.
Copy From Memory List - Output
Similarly, curves can be copied in the Output Tab as well. These can be used as
correction curves or as equalization curves. For more information see
Equalization and Correction Curve on Page 77.
Figure 11-7: Copy From
Memory List - Output
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Instruction Manual
Calibration Configuration
71
Output Tab
Output Signal Paths are made up of the following:

The Calibrated Output Device

The sensitivity of that specific device and its units

The hardware channel that it is connected to

The type of calibration that is used for the device
The Calibration Sequence selected is the sequence that
runs when the Calibrate button is selected.
The functions in the Output Tab are identical to those in the
Input Tab with one addition:

Input Signal Path - Must be selected so that the
system knows where the Output Device is
connected to

The functions of Open Table, Import, Save and
Cancel are the same as the Input Tab. See Input
Tab on Page 69 for more information.
Figure 11-8: Output Channel Definition
Table View
Figure 11-9: Table View
Click on Table View at the bottom of the editor to open the complete list of Signal Paths. The “Last Cal Date“
field cannot be edited. This updates when a new calibration is run on a Signal Path. Similarly the “Sens Unit”
field can only be changed by selecting a new setting under “Physical Unit”.
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The following fields can be edited directly:

Signal Path

Sens

Sens (dB)

Sens (Hz)

dB Ref
The following fields have drop down selection menus:

Calibrated Device

Phys Unit - Button opens Units Setup menu

HW Channel

Calibration Sequence

Input Channel (Output Channels Only)

Calibrate (Button)
Figure 11-10: Table Drop Down Example
Click Calibrate to run the selected calibration sequence. See Figure 11-10. Remember that the Input Signal
Path must be selected prior to running the output calibration.
Note:
All calibration procedures are specialized sequences located in the folder C:\SoundCheck
16.0\Sequences\Calibration. You can create your own calibration sequences as well. If you save
the new calibration sequence in the calibration input or output sub-folders, it will appear in the
respective drop down list in the Calibration Editor. See Reference Codec & dBm0 on Page 90 for
more information.
Naming - Best Practices
Signal Path - This name is used in the sequence (i.e.;
Analysis Step - The Channel name can be appended to the
output curve name). A generic name should be used that
indicates the type of device being used. Since the name is
used in the sequence, it is hard to change once the sequence
is created. Changing this name could effect how subsequent
steps in the sequence operate.
Calibrated Device - Specific name of the device being used
(i.e.; type of microphone). It is also the name of the .DAT file
for the specific calibration data. This can be changed easily
since the name is not used in sequence steps. This allows
you to have several different possible devices to use under
the generic Signal Path name.
HW Channel - This is the name of the physical channel of the
audio interface. In this example, the Ref Mic is an SCM 3
which is connected to Input 1 of the audio interface. (This is
named in the System Hardware Configuration, e.g., Input 1).
Figure 11-11: Naming Convention
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Calibration Configuration
73
Right Click Function
Right Click on the table to open the Channel Modification window. With this, you can Add, Delete Signal Paths
to the table as well as Copy a channel to a new row of the table.
Defining the Units
Input Physical
unit is defined
at this point
Output Physical
unit is defined at
this point.
This is the signal from the
DUT.
This is the signal
to the DUT.
Figure 11-12: Input and Output Calibration of a Measurement System
The Figure 11-12 shows the Input and Output Calibration of a Measurement System and Definition of the Input
and the Output Terminals of the DUT.

The Physical Units are specifically related to each Calibrated Device in the Calibration Editor.

They are dependent on the type of device that is used in the input or output of the calibration.
Input: Signal from DUT
Output: Signal to DUT
DUT Type
Unit
Output Signal Conditioning
Response Unit
Examples
Unit
Input Signal Conditioning
Loudspeaker
Pa
Microphone
V
Amplifier
Pa/V
Microphone
V
Microphone (Itself)
Pa
Mouth or Anechoic Chamber
V/Pa
Amplifier, analog
electronics
V
Direct
V
Amplifier (no longer Direct
In)
V/V
Motor, Fan, Bearings, etc.
G
Accelerometer
V
DUT Itself or Shaker
G/V
Haptic Sensor
N
Force Transducer
V
DUT Itself
V/N
Hearing Aid
Pa
Microphone (in coupler)
Pa
Anechoic Chamber
Pa/Pa
Telephone
Pa
Microphone (in coupler)
Pa
Mouth
Pa/Pa
Figure 11-13: Common Units for Inputs and Outputs
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Instruction Manual
The Calibration Sequence selected determines what type of calibration sequence is performed after selecting
Calibrate.
The ratio of the audio interface signal to the Device Under Test Unit is automatically determined by
SoundCheck. You are required to determine the units of the DUT in the Calibration. SoundCheck uses the
physical units when displaying measurement data.
Define Linear and Logarithmic Units
Linear units are absolute (e.g., Voltage, Watt, Pascal, G). Logarithmic units are
relative to a reference level (e.g., dB re 20µPa). For example:
dBSPL = 20 log
dBV = 20 log
? Pa
20 µPa
?V
1V
Convert Linear to Logarithmic Units
To convert linear units to logarithmic units, the following examples are useful
references:
0 dBV = 20 log
1V
1V
94 dBSPL = 20 log
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Calibration Configuration
1 Pa
20 µPa
75
Calibrating SoundCheck
Important! Do not open the Calibration Sequences found in the Calibration folder. These sequences are
accessed from the Calibration Editor when performing a calibration.
The calibration of SoundCheck enables response measurements to be performed directly in terms of the input
and output terminals of the Device Under Test (DUT). The Calibrate Device function in the System
Calibration Configuration measures the sensitivity or gain of any external device such as a microphone or
amplifier in the measurement chain. Once this is done, the values and units in the Calibration Setup menu
correspond to the signal level at the DUT and not at the connectors of the audio interface in the computer.
Default calibration sequences are included with SoundCheck. You can also create custom calibration
sequences. Please refer to Reference Codec & dBm0 on Page 90 for more information.

Sensitivity is a relative measurement of output to input. By definition, an electroacoustic transducer
converts either voltage into acoustical output (e.g., loudspeaker); acoustical input into an electrical
voltage (e.g., microphone); or both, an acoustical input into electrical voltage and back again to an
acoustical output (e.g., hearing aid). As another example, analog electronics, which usually amplify,
attenuate, or shape the electrical signal (e.g., Preamplifiers, Amplifiers or Signal Processors).

Calibrating the Input establishes the correlation between the input voltage to the audio interface and
the measured units. Input sensitivity is represented as Volts per measured unit (e.g., V/Pa).

Calibrating the Output establishes the correlation between the output voltage of the audio interface and
the measured units. Output sensitivity is represented as measured units per Volt (e.g., Pa/V).
Note:
The units selected for calibration can be redefined when displaying data and results. Select units
for displaying data in the Analysis Editor (See Units on Page 176). In addition, the Device (e.g.,
microphone or amp) Sensitivity is measured when Calibrate Device is clicked.
Note:
We recommend that you Not use periods or commas in step names. This is known to cause a
problem with System Calibration Configuration not saving the calibration information when the
configuration is saved.
Note:
Upon completing a calibration sequence, the newly acquired date is stored to the calibrated device
file. Any Signal Paths that are set to this calibrated device will use the updated data.
Calibration History
This feature allows you to view past calibration data for a device. This data can be used to identify trends such
as “changing sensitivity”. The history is stored in the .DAT file for the calibrated device. Each time you
recalibrate and save the System Calibration Configuration, a new entry is created in the calibration history.
Theses entries are tracked by calibration date (e.g., SCM 2 Mic corr-in 9/17/2008 10:16 AM). The history can
be viewed by opening the Memory List, selecting File and then Open Data. Browse to the calibrated device
.DAT file (e.g., SCM 2 Mic.dat), select and click OK. The calibration history is then loaded into the Memory List.
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Digital signals
When an audio interface channel is set to digital in the Hardware Editor, the Units for that channel in the
Calibration Editor will change such that V (Volts) is replaced by FS (Full Scale). This is because the input/
output values of the audio interface are expressed relative to 100% Full Scale Deflection instead of Volts. The
choice of physical unit remains the same. Sensitivities are expressed in Unit/FS for output or FS/Unit for inputs.
The input and output of the audio interface are normalized to 100% FS. Any digital signal cannot exceed +1/-1
FS, where 1 represents the maximum number of bits selected in the System Hardware Configuration.
Please refer to Reference Codec & dBm0 on Page 90 for more information.
Equalization and Correction Curve
Correction vs Equalization can be a little tricky to understand at first. Let's start with the input side.
The input correction will typically be a correction curve for a reference microphone. This would be utilized when
performing loudspeaker measurements or when that reference mic is being used to calibrate a speaker for
microphone measurements.
All output calibrated devices have two curves, the correction and the EQ. The EQ is only used in cases where
you want to change the stimulus before it gets played, e.g.: equalizing a loudspeaker. EQ (if selected in
stimulus) will modify the voltage that gets sent out of the audio interface on a per frequency basis in
accordance with the curve. If calibrated correctly, this results in a flat acoustical output from the speaker.
The output correction curve is optionally applied in the analysis step as a sort of post processing operation.
This is a mathematical correction that is performed after the signal has already been played and acquired. If
you have equalized a speaker you will find that the correction is very small. It is just the residual part of the
speaker response that the calibration sequence could not perfectly flatten. To view this look in your memory list
and graph the eq-out and corr-out curves for a given calibrated device.
The time when the output correction is more important is in loudspeaker testing. In this case we are calibrating
an amplifier. Because the amplifier has a flat magnitude response there is no need to use equalization.
However, we do want to account for the amp's phase response, which we do by generating the correction.
Input Signal Path
The System Calibration Configuration loads a complete set of EQ and correction curves into memory from
the calibration folders. When a Calibration Sequence is run, from the System Calibration Configuration,
these curves are updated. These curves are used to correct for the response of devices in the input or output
signal chain. The correction curves can be displayed since they are selectable items in the Memory List.
An example of this is to correct the measured signal for the measurement microphone’s frequency and phase
response (typically on its calibration chart) or for telephone measurements, where the DRP to ERP correction
curve is needed to compensate for the microphone’s position in the artificial ear. The correction file is named
according to the Calibrated Device:
<Calibrated Device Name> corr-in.dat for Input Signal Path correction
See Copy From Memory List - Input on Page 71 for more information.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Calibration Configuration
77
Output Signal Path
An equalization curve will equalize the stimulus when the EQ check box is selected in the Stimulus Editor or
Signal Generator. (See Stimulus Editor on Page 97) The output correction curve is applied when it is selected
in the Analysis Editor.
The Output Signal Path correction and equalization files are named according to the Calibrated Device:
<Calibrated Device Name> corr-out.dat for Output Signal Path correction
<Calibrated Device Name> eq-out.dat for Output Signal Path equalization
See Copy From Memory List - Output on Page 71 for more information.
The files are updated when an Output calibration is run and the step is saved.
If you Import a frequency response curve to use for Correction or
Equalization you have to “Invert“ it by selecting Invert Curve as shown in
Figure 11-14. If the curve is the result of a process that creates a
reciprocal of the response, it will not need to be inverted.
Note:
EQ out correction curves are populated with data when the
Speaker Equalization or Simulated Free Field calibration
sequences are selected in the output calibration process.
Important! Correction Curve Units should be set to + dB re 1 so
that pure gain is applied.
Figure 11-14: Copy From
Memory List - Correction Curve
SI units are used throughout SoundCheck 16.0. For example, to display
decibel values referenced to 20 microPascals, the dB ref value would be twenty (20) with a “u“ added at the
end and the unit would be Pa resulting in 20 µPa. See SI Units on Page 43 for more information.
For output calibration, the measured response will automatically be stored and used to correct any future
measurements. (e.g., if the amplifier’s magnitude and phase responses are not perfectly flat, the system will
correct the measured response as if it were perfectly flat.)
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Input Calibration
Direct Calibration Sequence
Direct refers to the input of the audio interface. Direct
Calibration should be used when there is no signal
conditioning between the device under test (DUT) and the
audio interface. For example, when measuring electronics
such as amplifiers, the direct input sensitivity should be set
to 1 V/V or 0 dBV.
Note:
Direct Calibration cannot be done on the
default input channels Direct In 1 and 2, which
are protected. Create a new Direct In channel
that uses a new Unity Gain Calibrated Input
Device as shown in Figure 11-15.
Clicking Calibrate Device will bring up a Multimeter virtual
instrument. Check the input calibration of the test system
by applying a known signal source, e.g., 1 VRMS at 1 kHz
from an external signal generator, into the audio interface.
You should read the same level, e.g., 1 volt, on the
SoundCheck Multimeter virtual instrument.
Note:
Figure 11-15: Direct In Calibration
Please be aware that the input impedance of the audio interface and the output impedance of the
signal generator can affect the reading.
Attenuator Calibration Sequence
The Attenuator setting should be used when there is an attenuator or pre-amplifier between the DUT and the
input of an audio interface. For example, this would be used to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio of a
measurement when using a measuring amplifier with gain and/or attenuation, such as the Listen
SoundConnect™ microphone power supply. This allows for a wider dynamic range of test levels and a better
match to the input range of the audio interface.
Clicking Calibrate will open the manually-controlled Signal Generator and Multimeter instruments. Use these
virtual instruments to measure the input gain or attenuation of your measuring amplifier.
Microphone Calibration Sequence
Use the Microphone setting when measuring the sound pressure level from the DUT (e.g., earphone or mouth
simulator) with a measurement microphone, e.g., SCM 3 microphone.
Enter the correct sensitivity from the calibration chart or click Calibrate to measure its sensitivity with an
acoustic calibrator. This is the preferred method since it takes into account the entire Input Signal Path
including signal conditioning from the microphone power supply.
Accelerometer Calibration Sequence
Used when making measurements with an accelerometer or other vibration transducer, e.g.: B&K 4533-B,
where force units are used. dB re 1 m/s2, dB re 1 N and dB re 1 g are currently supported.
As with Microphone Calibration above, the sensitivity can be entered manually or click Calibrate to measure its
sensitivity with an accelerometer calibrator such as the B&K 4294.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Calibration Configuration
79
Microphone Calibration Procedure
This procedure will allow you to check your measured microphone’s sensitivity against the microphone
manufacturer’s specifications.
1. Enter the gain or attenuation in dB that
corresponds to the settings on your
microphone power supply or measuring
amplifier in the Gain field. This gain will be
used in the Gain field of the Transducer
Calibration window.
If you are using Listen Hardware you can
select Auto Read to automatically get the
gain for the selected channel from the device.
Using Auto Read in Calibration allows you to
change the gain of the input without having to
re-calibrate the mic. Current supported
hardware includes AudioConnect and
SoundConnect 2.
Figure 11-16 shows AudioConnect is set to
20 dB of gain on Channel 1. This gain is
automatically updated in the Transducer
Calibration window.
Figure 11-16: Microphone Calibration
If you are using a Brüel & Kjær Nexus, please
see Calibrating using a Brüel & Kjær Nexus on page 81.
2. Open the Calibration Editor and select the Input tab. The Calibration Sequence should be set to
Microphone.
3. Click Calibrate
4. Select your calibrator model # from the drop down menu or select Other Calibrator and enter the
acoustic calibrator’s reference level and frequency.

The microphone calibrator's reference level should be indicated in its specifications as a given dB SPL
value (relative to 20µPa) at a reference frequency.

e.g., for the Brüel & Kjær Type 4231 Acoustic Calibrator:

Sound Pressure Level: 94.00 dB ± 0.20 dB

Frequency: 1000 Hz ± 0.1%

(When calibrating an artificial ear mic, you may need to select “B&K 4231 and UA1546”.)
5. Select your measurement microphone model number from the drop down menu. If your microphone is
not listed in the drop down menu, choose Add New Mic.
6. Place your acoustic calibrator on your reference microphone and click Calibrate to measure its
sensitivity.
80

The measured sensitivity of your reference microphone is displayed under Measured Sensitivity
in mV/Pa. If the measured sensitivity is outside the manufacturer’s specifications, a flashing
FAILED message will appear. Check first to see if your connections are correct or if the calibrator is
turned on before assuming something is wrong with the microphone.

The FAILED message can also appear if the Calibrator’s frequency is not correct. If a Reference
Frequency of 1000 Hz is entered, but the Calibrator’s actual frequency is 1008 Hz, the Calibration
Calibration Configuration
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
may Fail. To verify the Calibrator’s frequency, use the Spectrum Analyzer under the Instruments
menu on the SoundCheck Main Screen.

The meter on the right side indicates the corresponding dB level relative to 1 Volt per Pascal. If it
varies by a few tenths of a dB from your last calibration measurement, do not be alarmed, this is
normal. If it varies by more than 1 dB or failed the sensitivity test, you may want to have your
microphone checked by a qualified calibration lab.
Add New Mic
This allows you to enter a different microphone into the list. The sensitivity limits can be
entered for each new mic so that calibrations are made according to the microphone’s
specifications.

The check box for 1/2” Free Field Microphone should be checked only when
using this type of microphone
The calibration level is set to 93.85 dB SPL @ 1 kHz when measured in a
pressure field, (such as a B&K 4231 Acoustical Calibrator).
Figure 11-17: Add
New Mic
Calibrating using a Brüel & Kjær Nexus
Method 1: Nexus Unity Gain

Set the Microphone Input Sensitivity of the Nexus to 100 mV/Pa (or other appropriate input value)

Set the Nexus Output to the same level: 100 mV/Pa

As long as the input and output levels of Nexus are the same, the Gain value for the SoundCheck
Microphone Calibration Editor is 0 dB

Changes in the Nexus output setting can be easily converted to Gain in dB. A change of a factor 10 in
the Nexus output is equivalent to an increase of 20 dB, e.g.: 100 mV/Pa to 1 V/Pa = 20 dB of gain.
Method 2
The Brüel & Kjær Nexus Type 2690 is designed to provide an output voltage regulated in 10 dB steps (e.g., 100
mV/unit, 316 mV/unit, etc.). To ensure proper calibration using SoundCheck, you must do the following to enter
the proper Gain field value:
1. Enter the transducer sensitivity in Nexus per the Brüel & Kjær instructions.
2. Choose the Nexus output level you want (e.g., 1.00 volt
per Pascal).
 NexusOutputVoltage 

− Gain = 20 Log 
3. Enter the Gain value in SoundCheck using the following
 TransducerSensitivity 
equation:
Example:
A B&K microphone is used with a sensitivity of 50 mV/Pa and the Nexus
is set to an output of 1.00 V/Pa.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Calibration Configuration
 1.00V 
− Gain = 20 Log 

 0.050V 
81
Accelerometer Calibration Procedure
This procedure will allow you to check your
measured accelerometer’s sensitivity against the
accelerometer manufacturer’s specifications.
1. Enter the gain or attenuation in dB that
corresponds to the settings on your
microphone power supply or measuring
amplifier in the Gain field. This gain will be
used in the Gain field of the Transducer
Calibration window.
If you are using Listen Hardware you can
select Auto Read to automatically get the
gain for the selected channel from the
device. Using Auto Read in Calibration
allows you to change the gain of the input
without having to re-calibrate the mic.
Current supported hardware includes
AudioConnect and SoundConnect 2.
2. Open the Calibration Editor and select the
Input tab. The Calibration Sequence
should be set to Accelerometer.
Figure 11-18: Accelerometer Calibration
3. Select your calibrator model # from the drop down menu or select Other Calibrator and enter the
calibrator’s reference level and frequency.

The accelerometer calibrator's reference level should be indicated in its specifications as a given V/m/
s2, at a reference frequency, e.g.: for the Brüel & Kjær Type 4294 Calibrator:

Cal Input: 10 m/s2

Frequency: 159.2 Hz
4. Select your measurement accelerometer model number from the drop down menu. If your
accelerometer is not listed in the drop down menu, choose Add New Accelerometer. The add process
is the same as shown in Add New Mic on Page 81.
5. Mount the accelerometer on the accelerometer calibrator according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
Click Calibrate to measure the sensitivity.
82

The measured sensitivity of your reference accelerometer is displayed under Measured
Sensitivity in V/m/s2. If the measured sensitivity is outside the manufacturer’s specifications, a
flashing FAILED message will appear. Check first to see if your connections are correct or if the
calibrator is turned on before assuming something is wrong with the accelerometer.

The FAILED message can also appear if the Calibrator’s frequency is not correct. If a Reference
Frequency of 159.2 Hz is entered, but the Calibrator’s actual frequency is 162 Hz, the calibration
may Fail. To verify the Calibrator’s frequency, use the Spectrum Analyzer under the Instruments
menu on the SoundCheck Main Screen.

The meter on the right side indicates the corresponding dB level relative to 1 V/m/s2. If it varies by
a few tenths of a dB from your last calibration measurement, do not be alarmed, this is normal. If it
varies by more than 1 dB or failed the sensitivity test, you may want to have your accelerometer
checked by a qualified calibration lab.
Calibration Configuration
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Output Calibration
Amplifier
The Amplifier setting should be used when there is an amplifier between the
output of the audio interface and the device under test. This might be required
for loudspeaker measurements, to drive difficult loads (e.g., low impedance
devices) or to test at levels above 2 VRMS.
Enter the gain of your amplifier or run the Calibration test to measure it. If you
are going to measure it, make sure your input is calibrated first, and then
follow the Amplifier Calibration Procedure (below).
Figure 11-19: Output
Calibration Sequence List
Important! For Amplifier Calibration, select an Input Signal Path in the Calibration Editor that is set to 1
V/V, to get an accurate calibration.
Important! Note that the AmpConnect Amplifier Calibration sequence must be used to correctly
calibrate AmpConnect ISC.
Headphone Amplifier Calibration Procedure
The procedure is the same as noted below, except that the sequence used is called Headphone Amplifier
Calibration and the wiring requirements are different. Please refer to the AudioConnect and AmpConnect ISC
manuals for wiring examples.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Calibration Configuration
83
Amplifier Calibration Procedure
A general wiring diagram and outline of the steps for amp calibration can be found in Connection Procedures
on page 501.
1. In SoundCheck, open the System Calibration Editor
from the Setup drop down menu on the
SoundCheck Main Screen.
Important! Do not open the Amplifier Calibration
sequence. Run the calibration from the
System Calibration Editor.
2. Select the Output Tab and select the Output Signal
Path to calibrate. In the example in Figure 11-20
“Amp ch 1” is selected.
3. Select the proper Calibrated Device: “Crown AmpL.dat“
If a new device is used with the system, click Add
and enter a name. Calibration values will be stored
for this new device when the calibration process is
complete.
4. Select the Output Hardware Channel that provides
signal to the Amplifier Input: “Output 1“
Figure 11-20: Amp Calibration
5. Calibration Sequence should be set to “Amplifier Calibration“
6. The Input Signal Path should be set to a Direct Input that is set for Unity Gain. The sensitivity of this
channel must be unity gain in order to get an accurate calibration.
7. Turn the power amplifier off.
8. Connect SoundCheck Output 1 to the input of the Amplifier.
9. Connect the corresponding output of the amplifier to SoundCheck Direct In 1. The amplifier output
should not have an added Load.
10. Turn the power amplifier on. If it has a gain control, set it to maximum. This is the most stable position
for a gain control.
Note:
Some applications may require a lower gain amp. In that case, setting the volume control to a
lower level is acceptable, but less stable. If anyone bumps the control, the calibration will be off.
11. Click Calibrate to measure the amplifier’s sensitivity (gain) and frequency response.
The measured sensitivity of your amplifier is automatically entered in the output sensitivity field. If the
measured sensitivity fails, check your wiring and connections and try calibrating again.
If the measured response margin fails, check to see that the amplifier is not connected to anything
other than the audio interface and that it is properly grounded. If there is a bump around 120 Hz (or 100
Hz if line frequency is 50 Hz), you might be picking up hum due to poor grounding or bad cabling.
For more troubleshooting information, go to www.listeninc.com and click Support.
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Calibration Configuration
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Direct
This is for calibrating low gain electronics with a sensitivity range between 700 mV/V and 1.4 V/V.
This creates a Correction Out curve for the device which can be used in Analysis Steps to correct for the output
response of the device, e.g.: correcting for the frequency response of an audio interface or transducer preamp.
Headphone Amp
The Headphone Amp calibration process is the same as Amplifier calibration. The Headphone Amp
sequence is setup to account for the lower sensitivity typical of headphone amplifiers. These amps may have
no gain or negative gain.
Simulated Free Field Calibration
This is required when using Frequency Log Sweep Stimulus and Time Selective Response Analysis.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Calibration Configuration
85
Speaker Equalization
This calibration sequence prompts you to input a Stimulus Level, in dB, for the calibration signal. Usually this is
the level that will be used in the actual test sequence.
The sequence will Loop to “Fine Tune“ the equalization curve and output correction.
Use when calibrating one of the following devices:

Mouth Simulator

Anechoic Chamber/speaker

Anechoic Test Box
Note:
Speaker Equalization must be done at the same resolution or higher than the
stimulus resolution of test sequence. This can be done by making a copy of the
Speaker EQ sequence and changing the resolution of the 2 stimulus steps. If using
a Compound Resolution Stimulus Step in the test sequence, the resolution in the
Speaker Equalization sequence should be no less than the highest resolution of the
Compound Stimulus.
Mouth Simulator Calibration and Correction Example
When calibrating a Mouth Simulator the recommended
calibration sequence is Speaker Equalization. This is normally
for use with an acoustic mouth simulator or sound source for
testing microphones close to the source (e.g., vocal mics) with a
swept sine at a constant sound pressure level.

Output Signal Path set to Source Speaker

Mouth Simulator.dat selected under Calibrated
Device

Output Hardware Channel set to Output 1

Speaker Equalization selected under Calibration
Sequence

Input Signal Path set to Reference Mic
Figure 11-21: Mouth Simulator
Calibration
Figure 11-22: Calibration Sequence Menu
1. Using a calibrated reference microphone (e.g.; SCM 3), place the microphone in the same position that
you intend to measure the Device Under Test.
2. Click the Calibrate Device button at the bottom of the Output Tab to begin the calibration procedure.
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Calibration Configuration
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
3. The first step in the calibration procedure is a message stating
that the reference microphone needs to be calibrated first. Click
Enter.
4. Enter the level in dB SPL for the calibration signal. This should
be the level that will be used in the test sequence. This
example uses a level of 80 dB SPL. Click OK or Enter to
continue.
The system will play back a short sine tone to get the sensitivity
of the speaker. This allows the sequence to automatically
adjust the stimulus level to 80 dB SPL.
Figure 11-23: Set Signal Level
5. Set the lowest frequency to equalize down to. In this example,
100 Hz. Click OK or Enter to continue.
6. Set the highest frequency to equalize up to. In this example,
10 kHz. Click OK or Enter to continue.
Important! Do not try to EQ beyond the designed range of the
loudspeaker or mouth simulator. Damage can occur
due to excessive low or high frequency output, as the
correction process attempts to create a Flat Output
Response from the speaker.
Figure 11-24: Set EQ Stop
Points
7. SoundCheck will measure the speaker’s
response and sensitivity. These are compared to
preset upper and lower limits. Figure 11-25
shows the response before it is corrected.
8. If the Mouth frequency response is within
acceptable limits, the sequence will continue. If
the response is not within limits you will be
prompted to stop the equalization process and
change the equalization range.
Figure 11-25: Response Before Correction
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Instruction Manual
Calibration Configuration
87
9. SoundCheck will generate an equalized stimulus
and play it through the speaker.
The typical equalized response for a Mouth
Simulator is ±0.5 dB from 100 Hz to 10 kHz.
Figure 11-26: Equalized Response
10. If the equalized response or sensitivity are outside of the limits set in the calibration sequence, the
sequence will prompt you to stop or attempt equalization anyway.
If both pass, a sequence prompt asks if the EQ’s Response is flat
enough.
Selecting “No” will run another pass of equalization to “fine tune“
the correction curve. This can be run as many times as desired,
but at some point the correction will show no further improvement.
Select “Yes” to complete the calibration and correction process.
Figure 11-27: Prompt To
Measure Again
11. Once the calibration procedure is complete,
SoundCheck will update the Mouth sensitivity. You
can then choose Save to overwrite the original
Mouth Simulator.dat calibration. Select Rename
under Calibrated Device to give the calibration a
different name.
12. Select Save to store the changes to the System
Calibration Configuration.
Figure 11-28: Updated Mouth
Sensitivity
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Calibration Configuration
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Digital Channel Calibration
FS and dB re 1 FS Definition
Digital Full Scale (FS) and dB relative to 1 FS (dBFS) though widely used are not normatively defined. In
SoundCheck, FS as a unit is used to express peak and RMS amplitude. When used to define peak amplitude
the maximum values are +1 and -1 FS which correspond to the maximum positive and negative digital codes in
a digital audio sample stream. 1 FS RMS or 0 dB re 1 FS correspond to the RMS amplitude of a square wave
that reaches the maximum positive and negative digital codes. The maximum amplitude of a sine wave in this
scheme is therefore .707 FS or -3.01 dB re 1 FS. This represents the maximum amplitude of a sine wave
where the peak positive and negative deflections reach the maximum positive and negative digital code.
The other commonly used definition of FS comes from the
Audio Engineering Society standard 17 (AES17) which
defines FS as the RMS amplitude of a sine whose peak
positive and negative values reach the maximum digital code
of the system.
+1
SoundCheck
Digital Definition
1 FS Peak
.707 FS RMS
-3 dB FS
-1
+1
AES17
Digital Definition
Peak = Undefined
1 FS RMS
0 dB FS
-1
In AES17, the maximum amplitude of a sine wave is 1 FS or 0 dBFS and the maximum amplitude of a
square wave is 1.414 FS or +3 dBFS.
The AES17 definition of FS cannot be used to express peak signal amplitudes. For a signal of given amplitude
the AES17 and SoundCheck definition of FS differ by 3.01 dB.
This difference in scaling between SoundCheck and AES17 can be compensated for by using FS (AES17)
when importing a .wav file or Unity Digital (AES) calibration with digital inputs and outputs. See WAV File
General Rules on page 293.
As of SoundCheck 14, Unity Digital In (AES17).dat and Unity Digital Out (AES17).dat are included as
calibrated devices. When these devices are used in the Calibration Editor, they adjust the sensitivity to match
the AES17 definition and include the proper units. See Figure 11-29.
Figure 11-29: Calibration Editor Digital Channels
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Calibration Configuration
89
WAV Analysis
When analyzing a WAV file no signal path is used and results will be scaled according to the SoundCheck
definition of FS. In order to scale the results according to the AES17 definition of FS you must add 3 dB to your
results using a Post Processing step.
Reference Codec & dBm0
Bluetooth HeadSet (Receive)
SoundCheck
Digital Output
FS
Ref Codec
V
Receiver
Pa
SoundCheck
Analog Input
Figure 11-30: Bluetooth Test - Signal Chain
When performing a Receive test on a Bluetooth Headset, SoundCheck sends a digital audio signal to the DUT.
SoundCheck then records and analyzes the acoustic output of the DUT.
Therefore, assuming that the DUT operates in a linear manner, a digital sine wave in yields an acoustic sine
wave out. Moreover, you will be able to measure the overall Receive Gain of the DUT in Pa/FS.
Definition: 1 Full Scale = maximum absolute value of the digital wave. e.g., 32767 ≡ 1 FS for a 16 bit encoded
wave. (FSD: Full Scale Deflection)
Normally, in telephone testing, the output units are expressed in Pa/Volt. Since the input signal is digital audio
we need to translate the FSD units to Volts using a virtual reference CODEC.
The ref CODEC of the blue tooth device handles the conversion of the digital signal into volts (Virtual Volts).
The ref CODEC states that a digital sine at zero dBm0 applied at the input yields 0.775 Vrms at the output of
the CODEC.
The ref level of zero dBm0 is defined differently, depending on which coding law is used: A-law or
law).
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Calibration Configuration
μ -law (mu-
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
A-law
0 dBm0 is the level of a sine signal which is 3.14 dB below
saturation. That means that the absolute peak amplitude of
the sine is 10^(-3.14/20) = 0.6966 FS and the rms value is
0.4927 FS, equivalent to –3.14 -3.01 = -6.15 dB FS.1
0dBm0 ≡ – 6.15dBFS = 0.4927FS
μ -law
0 dBm0 the level of the sine signal is 3.17 dB below
saturation. That yields: 0.6942 FS pk ≡ 0.4910 FS rms,
equivalent to –6.18 dB FS.
Note:
0dBm0 ≡ – 6.18dBFS = 0.4910FS
dBm0: A reference voltage of 775 mV applied to a load of 600 Ohm yields 1 mW.
Distortion
1.5787
1
-3.17 dB
0.6942
-6.18 dB
Peak Level
-3.01 dB
RMS Level
0 dBm0
0.775
FS
Virtual Volts
0.4909
Time__
μ-law coding
Figure 11-31:
μ -law Coding - Sine @ 0 dBm0
1. 3.01 dB ≡ √2, crest-factor of sine.
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Instruction Manual
Calibration Configuration
91
Bluetooth Sequence Setup Example
The following example is from the Bluetooth Receive sequence which is part of the default sequences included
with SoundCheck. It is located in the Headphones & Headsets folder.
Hardware Settings

In System Hardware create an
input channel and an output
channel for the Bluetooth
interface

Select Digital for both

Set the Sampling Rate and Bit
Depth appropriately for the device
under test (typically 8 kHz and 16
bit)

The Max Out value is
automatically set to100% since
Digital Output has been selected
Figure 11-32: Bluetooth Headset
System Calibration Configuration
92

Click on the Output Tab of the Calibration Editor and
select the ‘BT Headset’ Signal Path from the list

Set the hardware channel to the Bluetooth interface
output

For purely digital data leave the sensitivity and units
as-is

For µ -law: Set the Output Calibration Sensitivity to
1.578 V/FS (0.775/0.491 = 1.578)

For A-law: Set the Output Calibration Sensitivity to
1.573 V/FS (0.775/0.4927 = 1.573)

If using either codec, set the Output Calibration
Units dB ref to: 0.775 V (0 dBm0)

In the end, 0 dB = 0.775 “Volts“. The saturation
point for µ-law is +3.17 dB above this level. For Alaw it is +3.14.

Anything above saturation (1 FS) is distortion.

You can also use vV (virtual Volt) as an output
calibration unit.
Figure 11-33: Calibration Bluetooth
Headset
Calibration Configuration
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Units
Units Overview
SoundCheck® 16.0 is set up to provide you with a great deal of flexibility regarding measurement units. Units
can be defined in five different places. The Calibration Editor, Analysis Editor, Post-processing Editor, Display
Editor, and Message Editor allow you to make changes to the units of the curves, single values and results
generated by the sequence.
SI Units are used throughout SoundCheck 16.0. For more explanation on SI Units please refer to SI Units on
page 43.
Calibration Editor
The Units button in the Calibration Editor will set the units
for only the Signal Generator, Multimeter, FFT, and Real
Time Analyzer (RTA) virtual instruments. In the example
below, the microphone that is connected to the Left Signal
Path has a sensitivity of 14 mV (0.014 Volts) per Pascal. By
clicking Units, you can choose the units for the decibel
reference. In Figure 12-1 the reference has been chosen to
be 20 µPa. This enables the Multimeter to display the
measurement in both dB re 20 µPa and absolute units
(Pascals).
Figure 12-1: Input Signal Path Units Affect
Units of Virtual Instruments
In Figure 12-2, we switch the
Signal Path to Accelerometer
which has a decibel reference of
dB re 1 m/s^2.
The Multimeter will now read out in
dB re 1 m/s^2.
The virtual instruments adopt the
unit of the selected channel.
Any changes made to the units in
the Calibration Editor will change
the units that are displayed in the
virtual instruments.
Figure 12-2: Virtual Instrument Units
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Instruction Manual
Units
93
Several common dB references are already pre-programmed in SoundCheck.
dB SPL
Re 20 μPa
dB Pa
Re 1 Pa
dB V
Re 1 Volt
dB m
Re 1 mWatt
dB u
Re 0.775 V (600 Ohm load)
dB FS
Re 1 FS
dB m/s^2 Re 1 m/s2
Figure 12-3: Common Decibel
References
dB N
Re 1 N
dB g
Re 1 g
Note:
The Use Custom Units check box is available in the following editors: Analysis, Post-Processing,
User Equation and Memory List. If the box is left unchecked, the units from the Input and Output
Calibration editors will be used. If the Analysis-Response Measurement is set to Absolute, the
units will be that of the Input in the Calibration Configuration. If it is set to Relative then the units
will be the Input Units over the Output Units. Please refer to Defining the Units on page 74 for
more information on Physical Units.
Note:
When Use Custom Units is checked, the units can be modified to be any type desired.
Analysis Editor
The Analysis Editor enables you to
process measured time signals using
a variety of analysis algorithms. The
curves and single values created by
this step will use the units indicated in
the Units tab. The units selected
here apply to the DUT response and
typically agree with the units selected
for your input and output devices in
the System Calibration Configuration.
For more details on how to use this
editor, please refer Analysis Editor
on page 135.
The Units button in the Analysis
Editor will set the units for the data
generated by that particular Analysis
Figure 12-4: Analysis Editor Units
Step (e.g., frequency response). In
the example below, the units were
changed from electrical voltage
decibels (dB V) to electrical power decibels (dBm) by choosing “dBm” from the drop down menu (See Figure
12-4: Analysis Editor Units).
The corresponding data display will show the measured curves in dBm (dB re 1 mW).
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Units
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Instruction Manual
Display Editor – Memory List
Use the Display Editor to format the presentation of data on the screen using six types of display windows.
Refer to Display Editing on page 296.
Typically the units for the curves and single values are
set up in the Analysis Editor. However, the units can be
temporarily modified if a curve needs to be rescaled, for
example by changing the decibel reference. These
changes will disappear when the sequence is run
again, unless the curve or value with the new units is
protected in the Memory List. Refer to Display Editing
on page 296 for more information on Protected Items.
Figure 12-5: Memory List Units
In Figure 12-5, the units of the y-axis for the curve Harmonic 10 are modified in the Display Editor. To do this,
open the Memory List and choose a curve or single value with values in the y-axis. Note that only one curve
can be selected in the current tab of the Memory List. The Units Setup window will then appear and userdefined units can be entered once the Use Custom Units box has been checked. These new units are only
valid while the display is open. Once the test sequence is run again, the units for the measured data will revert
back to the units defined in the Analysis Editor.
Post-Processing Editor
By clicking Units in the Post-Processing Editor, the Units Setup screen
appears. The default units in this editor are that of Operand A, as
modified by the post-processing operation. In this example, the units of
Operand A are dBm re 1.00 mW. Since the operation being performed
is Reciprocal Value, the new units will be dB re 1.00 x 103 Watts since
this is the reciprocal of 1 mW. This unit can be changed by clicking Use
custom units in the Units Setup window. The post-processed result
will then be displayed in these user-defined units.
Each mode of the Post-Processing Editor has a Units button located
as in Figure 12-6, except the User Equation. In the User Equation
mode, you must designate the units of the equation results on the right
of the editor, and set the units for any User Defined Constants
created on the left side of the Editor. Units cannot be changed on
curves or single values created by other steps in the sequence.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Units
Figure 12-6: Post-Processing
Units
95
The units can also be changed in the User Equation Post
Processing step. After selecting an Input Curve or Value, and then
filling in the other associated fields, Click on the “Select Unit” field
to open the Units Setup window.
Figure 12-7: Equation Editor Units
Message Step Editor
The Units button becomes available when
the Message Step is set to ask the Operator
for a numerical value during the sequence.
The Units Setup screen appears when this
button is clicked. There are no units for this
value by default.
Figure 12-8: Message Editor Units
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Units
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Stimulus Editor
Features
The Stimulus Editor offers two views, basic and advanced. Basic view shows only the commonly adjusted
settings, and by clicking on the advanced tab, more are visible. This keeps the software simple for novice and
production line users while retaining the flexibility demanded by R&D applications.
Note:
As of SC 8.1, when "Memory List Selection" is selected in the Stimulus Editor, a message will
pop up as a reminder to "shut off" Preload Stimulus in the Sequence Configuration. See Configure
Sequence on page 397.
The Stimulus Editor (Ctrl+Shift+S) creates or loads a WAV file that the Acquisition Step can play. See Stimulus
Type on page 99.
Frequency Stepped Sweep (Stweep™) Excitation Signal Parameters
The Stweep stimulus offers faster and more accurate measurements.
Typically a digitally generated stepped-sine excitation will contain discontinuities because the frequencies do
not change at a zero phase and amplitude crossing. By using an integer number of cycles at each frequency
step, the STWEEP ensures that transition from frequency to frequency is always smooth. This ensures
significantly less transducer settling time and results in faster and more accurate measurements.
New - Sweep Equalization for Minimized Transients
In stepped sine, amplitude and frequency sweeps, selecting equalization now also enables a smooth transition
between steps. These smooth transitions minimize the transient response in the device under test. This results
in shorter test times, and is particularly useful for microphone testing where a source speaker needs to be
equalized. Select “Apply EQ” in a Stimulus Step. See Sweep Equalization for Minimized Transients on
page 103.
Sweeping Hi Frequency to Low Frequency
The default sweep direction of Stimulus Steps using Frequency Stepped Sweep is from Hi to Low.
A device's fundamental frequency response should not change with frequency sweep direction or test signal
since it is a linear approximation. Since loudspeakers are inherently non-linear, extra care should be taken in
getting a reliable and repeatable linear response e.g. the fundamental.
The non-linear response, e.g. distortion, is a different matter and is even more affected by how the test signal is
applied. The goal is to get the loudspeaker in a stable state before measuring it in order to get repeatable
results.
When sweeping from low to high frequencies, the loudspeaker sees a burst of energy at the first low frequency
and can continue ringing throughout the measurement before reaching a stable state. When sweeping from
high to low frequencies, the first high frequency has very little energy compared to a low frequency. It reaches
stability faster and consequently there is less chance for the loudspeaker to ring throughout the measurement.
The other advantage to sweeping from high to low frequencies has to do with system delays but that should not
matter when testing a simple loudspeaker driver without any electronics.
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Instruction Manual
Stimulus Editor
97
Stimulus Settings
The following uses a stepped sine sweep
(Stweep™) as an example. Some Stimulus
Types will require different settings.
To view and change the Stimulus step settings,
select Stimulus from the Setup drop down
menu on the SoundCheck Main Screen or
double click the Stimulus Step in the Sequence
Editor.
The Stimulus Editor will appear indicating the
current test signal settings for the selected step.
Figure 13-1: Stimulus Editor
Right Click Functions
Right click on the fields for Level, Start Frequency and Stop Frequency to select Memory List Selection or
User Input.
The Memory List item must be created or added to the Memory List before the Stimulus Step occurs in the
order of steps in the sequence.
When setting the units for the stimulus, remember to set the units in the Message Step that
is used to generate the Memory List item. See “Numeric Message” on page 245.
Important! When selecting “Memory List Selection“ in the Stimulus Editor, the
sequence must be configured to NOT Preload the Stimulus. In the
Sequence Editor select Sequence from the Drop Down Menu and select
Configure Sequence. Uncheck “Preload Stimulus“.
Level
This allows you to set the stimulus level dynamically during the sequence execution. Examples: The default
sequence, “Headphones”, shows an example of how the Level is entered through a Message Step at the start
of the sequence. The Speaker Equalization sequence also shows how the level is determined through Post
Processing.
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Instruction Manual
Start and Stop Frequencies from Memory List Values
Right click on the Start or Stop Frequency fields and select Memory
List Selection as shown in Figure 13-2.
Stimulus frequencies can be entered from a prompt in the
sequence, automatically generated, or even automatically
incremented. This is particularly useful when you need to use a
different test frequency range for each test run. You can also
automatically increment the stimulus frequency and perform
sequential measurements at different frequencies, e.g.: testing Max
SPL.
Figure 13-2: Memory List Selection
Important! Select the Y axis in the Stimulus Editor for Start/Stop Frequency values. The
Index generated by Step Configuration is always a Y axis value. See Index (Loop
Index) on page 399 for more on setting this in Step Configuration.
Stimulus Step Controls
Stimulus Type
Select the type of stimulus the step will use from the dropdown list. Note that DC Connect stimulus can
only be created using Listen's DC-Connect™ interface.

Stepped-sine Frequency sweep (Stweep™) – a stepped-sine sweep using an
integer number of cycles at each frequency step, ensuring a smooth transition from
frequency to frequency. This ensures significantly less transducer settling time and
results in faster and more accurate measurements.

Frequency Log Sweep - an optional continuous log sine sweep used for simulated free-field
measurements.

Log Amplitude Sweep at a single frequency. As of SoundCheck 8, the Log Sweep can use a faster
sweep rate, e.g., 100 ms/decade, which dramatically decreases the measurement time.

WAV file (Windows audio file), user selectable.
Note:
Stimulus Editor
The WAV file must have the same
sample rate as the System Hardware
configuration. See Figure 13-3. See
WAV File Types on page 293 for
supported WAV file types.
Hardware Editor
Figure 13-3: WAV file sample rate
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Instruction Manual
Stimulus Editor
99

DC Connect – allowing SoundCheck® to control DC Connect™ for making DC voltage/current
measurements (requires DC Connect™ optional hardware).

Two Tone – two simultaneous stimuli to use for IM and Difference distortion measurements.

Noise – featuring Pink and White Noise, with scalable Duration (s) and Band limits: Fmin and Fmax.
MLS (Maximum Length Sequence) noise - equalized and band limited in the same way as white noise.
SoundCheck includes MLS stimulus to enable direct comparison with other measurement systems.

Multitone – an ensemble of tones regularly spaced in frequency. The amplitudes are equal. The
phases follow a deterministic mathematical law and are optimized to lower the crest-factor. An example
of the step setup is shown in Figure 13-33: Multitone Stimulus - Frequency Rounding.

Memory List Selection - (Right Click Function) allows the Level and Start/Stop Frequencies to be
read from Memory List values. See Right Click Functions on page 98.
Step Progression
Resolution
Determines the number of measurable frequencies, including the start and stop frequency.

Sweep Low to Hi, Hi to Low or Single
Frequency

You can choose standard ISO frequency
steps such as R10, which corresponds to
preferred 1/3 octave center frequency
steps, or choose User Defined linear or
log step sizes.

Steps (#) - Shows the number of
steps according to the selected
resolution. If User Defined is
selected, the number of steps is
manually set in this field. The
number of steps will determine how
many unique frequencies are
generated. See Step Size on page
101.
Figure 13-4: Step Progression
Start Frequency
First excitation frequency in the Stweep. Generally it is best to set this to the highest frequency you want to
measure, so that the measurement sweeps from high to low frequency in order to minimize transducer settling
time (low frequencies have more energy than high frequencies).
Stop Frequency
Last excitation frequency in the Stweep. Generally it is best to set this to the lowest frequency you want to
measure, so that the measurement sweeps from high to low frequency in order to minimize transducer settling
time.
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Instruction Manual
Step Size
Min Cycles (#) & Min Duration (s)
To ensure proper measurement accuracy, each sine step must have a minimum number of cycles AND a
minimum duration. To properly measure the level of a sine, you need at least three (3) cycles. In the presence
of background noise, it is likely more cycles will be required. Because of noise, settling time and input-output
delay, you also need a minimum duration to achieve a precise measurement.
In regard to noise only, the S/N ratio measurement increases by three (3) dB each time the duration is doubled.
The Stweep algorithm ensures that each step has a duration that is greater than the Min Duration AND
contains an integer number of sine cycles that is at least equal to Min Cycles.
As the Stweep covers the specified range of frequencies, each step has a number of cycles equal to Min
Cycles in frequencies below the transition frequency, and a duration equal to Min Duration in frequencies above
the transition frequency. By adjusting these two parameters, it is possible to optimize the total duration of your
Stweep as well as the measurement accuracy.

Min Cycles – Minimum number of cycles of sine at each step (See Figure 13-4)

Min Duration – Minimum Dwell time or the minimum time in seconds at each step
Note:
Stimulus steps using the Stweep excitation from SC4.x and SC5.x will have a Min Duration
value of zero (0) s.

Transition - The frequency at which the Minimum Duration exactly matches the Minimum Cycles as
selected in the editor. Below that frequency the Min Cycles condition is applied. Above that frequency
the Min Duration condition is applied.

Example: If a Stweep of 20k to 20 Hz is set to have eight (8) Cycles minimum per step and 10 mSec
minimum duration, then the transition frequency will be 800 Hz. Below 800 Hz, all steps will be eight (8)
cycles long and above 800 Hz all steps will be 10 ms long. If you do the math, at 20 Hz, eight cycles will
require 400 ms and at 20 KHz, 10 ms contains 200 cycles.
User Defined Stimulus Frequency Points
The following formula are used to determine the number of
frequency points in a User Defined Stimulus.
For example, a step size of one (1) allows only one frequency
(the stop frequency) to be entered. In Figure 13-5, a 100-cycle, 1
kHz tone has been generated.
Figure 13-5: User Defined Step size
Log Formula
Linear Formula
n
N
 f stop  – 1
f n = f start  -------------
 f start
-----------------
n
f n = f start + ( f stop – f start ) ------------N–1
Where:

N is the number of steps

n is the frequency index from 0 to N-1
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Stimulus Editor
101
Level
Enter the correct test level in either dB or linear units. The output level and units
are influenced by the output calibration sensitivity and units. The level set in the
Stimulus Editor is the RMS (root mean square) value at the terminals of the device
under test (e.g., if an amplifier is powering a loudspeaker and its gain has been
entered in the output calibration sensitivity field, the output level in the Stimulus
Editor will be the output level coming out of the amplifier).

Define the output level in linear or dB units based on the selected Output
Signal Path

Select User Input, Memory List Selection or Copy/Paste Data

Copy/Paste Data is used to copy the value for use in another step
Figure 13-6: Level
Duration (s)
Figure 13-7: Buttons and Lower Fields
Shows the total duration in seconds required to complete the playback of the stimulus. This field is updated
after clicking on the Update or Play buttons. This calculated time is dependent on the test parameters selected
in the Stimulus Editor (for example, step size and cycles (#); this does not include system overhead time for
data and display processing). See Figure 13-7.
Custom Stimulus Name
Names the stimulus waveform created in the Memory List. This item is selected in the Acquistion and Analysis
Steps.
Apply EQ
As of SoundCheck 16, Apply EQ also features “Sweep Equalization for Minimized Transients”. See Sweep
Equalization for Minimized Transients on page 103.
When checked, this applies the EQ curve to the Stimulus Signal for the Output Signal Path that the Stimulus is
played out of. See Figure 13-7.

If you click Play, it will use the EQ curve for the Output Signal Path selected in the Output Path section.

When the sequence is run, it will use the EQ curve for the Output Signal Path selected in the
Acquisition Step.
The EQ curve is a correction for the response of the Output Signal Path device selected in the System
Calibration Configuration. This curve is created in the Calibration process for each Output Signal Path. The
curve is always present, even though it may be a Flat Curve. (The curve can also be imported. See Copy From
Memory List - Output on page 71.)
Important! A complete calibration of the Output Signal Path must be run in order to store an EQ curve.
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Instruction Manual
Important! Equalization curves are applied, no matter what is selected in the Output Calibration
Sequence field of the System Calibration Configuration, e.g., Amplifier Calibration, Speaker
Equalization, etc. The “Apply EQ” selection must be checked in the Stimulus Step, Signal
Generator VI or “Acquisition Step using Generator” in order to utilize this function. See
“Calibration Configuration” on page 65.
Sweep Equalization for Minimized Transients
In stepped sine, amplitude and frequency sweeps, selecting
equalization will also enable a smooth transition between
steps. These “smooth transitions” minimize the transient
response in the device under test. This results in shorter test
times, and is particularly useful for microphone testing where
a source speaker needs to be equalized.
Select “Apply EQ” in a Stimulus Step.
The example SoundMap 3D plots show the difference
between a sine sweep without Sweep Equalization compared
to the same stimulus with “Apply EQ” on.
Figure 13-8: Without Sweep Equalization
The ringing circled in Figure 13-8 is not present in Figure
13-9.
Advanced View
Used to show or hide advanced settings
Figure 13-9: With Sweep Equalization
Output Path
This allows you to select the Output Signal Path for this Stimulus Step.
This determines the Units of the Level field, the max/min frequencies for Frequency Range and the amplitude
range of the stimulus.
Any Output Signal Path defined in the System Calibration Configuration can be selected as the Output Signal
Path for the stimulus.
Note:
As of SoundCheck 8, a separate Stimulus Step is required for each Output Signal Path “with a
unique Calibrated Device” used in the sequence. Using this method, each Stimulus Step will
conform to the settings of that Channel in the System Calibration Configuration. To create signals
on multiple channels, multiple Stimulus Steps are used, each one referencing a different Output
Signal Path. A single Acquisition Step is used to start the multiple stimulus signals.
Important! When multiple output devices use Unity Gain, a single Stimulus Step can be used.
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103
The Acquisition Step will determine
which channel the Stimulus is
played out of when the sequence
runs.
Multiple channels can be selected
and the same stimulus can be used
for those channels.
The Play button in the Stimulus
Editor uses the Output Path specified in the Stimulus Editor.
Figure 13-10: Output Path
View Table
Used to create and modify Compound Stimulus, e.g.; 1/12th oct High with 1/3rd oct Low in a single sweep
See Signal Parameters for Amplitude Sweep Excitation on page 110 and Compound Stimulus - WAV File
With Pilot Tone on page 108.
Play
Plays the stimulus that is present in the Stimulus Editor to
the Output Signal Path selected in the Output Path section.
This allows you to hear the signal from the editor, without
having to run the entire sequence.
Update
Click to update the stimulus display after making changes
Load
Loads the settings from a previously saved Stimulus Step
Figure 13-11: Channel Selection
Revert
Discards any changes made to the Stimulus Editor since
the last time it was saved
Save As
Allows you to save the Stimulus Step to the Steps library
OK
Accept changes and closes the Stimulus Editor. Save the sequence to save the changes to disk.
Cancel
Closes the editor and discards all changes made since the last save
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Analyze/Ignore Option
The 'Analyze' option in the Stimulus Editor allows you to choose whether or not sections of the stimulus will be
analyzed or ignored by an analysis step. This feature is particularly useful for telephony testing and for other
devices that need to be conditioned before achieving a stable measurement. For example, the first section of
the stimulus will contain a conditioning signal (like artificial speech) that will open the Voice Activity Detector. A
second section will be the sine-based test signal to analyze (e.g., multitone or sine sweep). The StimulusAnalyze option will tell the analysis step to process only the test signal and ignore the conditioning signal.

The Stimulus Step is opened in Table
View as shown in Figure 13-12.

The first section is a Pink Noise signal,
played for 500 mSec. The analyze field
is set to “No”. When the Stimulus Step
runs, this section will be ignored.

The second and third sections are
frequency stepped sweeps, each with
start and stop frequencies set. This is the
signal area in the blue box. Analyze is
set to “Yes”.
Figure 13-12: Analyze Option
Important! Compound Stimulus of other types, created in the table, will analyze only the first stimulus
element flagged to Analyze and ignore the following ones. For example, if you have a Log
Sweep followed by a Multitone, both setup to be analyzed, only the Log Sweep will be
analyzed.
Note:
Multiple Stweeps can be chained and analyzed as one Compound Stimulus. See Signal
Parameters for Amplitude Sweep Excitation on page 110 and Compound Stimulus - WAV
File With Pilot Tone on page 108.
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105
Compound Stimulus - Stweep Optimized
Combinations of different stimuli can be created using the View Table function of the Stimulus Editor. Each line
in the stimulus can have its own Cycles (#), Level, Start/Stop Frequency, etc. This enables you to create a
variety of stimuli that can accentuate the DUT’s linear and non-linear characteristics.
In this case, we will use the default Stimulus Step
“Stweep - 12th&3rd Oct” as shown in Figure
13-13.
If the stimulus was in a single resolution of R40
the duration would be 2.58 seconds. Instead, this
optimized stimulus has a duration of approx. 1.46
seconds.
Highlight a line and click Edit or double click on a
line to open the Line Editor window.
Table Buttons
Edit - Each line can be edited separately
Double click on a line to edit or
highlight the line and click edit.
Insert - Add new lines to the table
Move Up/Move Down - Any section can be
moved independently.
Click Update to show the changes in the graphic
display and to see the new duration.
Figure 13-13: Stweep - 12th&3rd Oct
Figure 13-14 shows how Table Mode allows
editing of each line.
Stimulus Line 1:

Resolution: R40

Start: 20k Hz

Stop: 300 Hz

Min Cycles: 6

Min Duration: 10m
Stimulus Line 2:

Resolution: R10

Start: 250 Hz

Stop: 50 Hz

Min Cycles: 8

Min Duration: 10m
Figure 13-14: Table Editing
Both lines are set to Analyze and the Level is 100mV.
Note:
106
Use “Memory List Selection” for the Level values in a Compound Stimulus so that editing the
level is easier. You only need to set the level once, at the start of the sequence. A Message Step
creates the value “Level” in the Memory List, which is then used in the Stimulus Step. This
Message Step must occur before any Stimulus Step that uses the Memory List value it creates.
The Message Step does not need to be set to “Display Step when run” in Step Configuration.
Stimulus Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
ISO Frequency Points
Each Start Frequency must be at the next ISO frequency point, for
that resolution, following the stop frequency of the previous step.
Example:
The Line 1 Stweep ends at 300 Hz. Line 2, with a resolution
of R10, must start at 250 Hz.
Stimulus Line 1
Stimulus Line 2
Figure 13-15: ISO Frequency
Points
You can easily find the appropriate start frequency:

Enter the stop frequency from the previous step, 300 Hz, and
click Enter. The frequency automatically jumps up to the nearest
frequency point, 315 Hz.

Click on the down arrow next to the field and value will switch to
the next available ISO point that is below 300 Hz (250Hz).

This prevents an overlap of frequencies between the two lines of
stimulus.
Click the
down
arrow
A complete ISO frequency chart for all available resolutions can be found in Windows Keyboard Shortcuts
on page 521.
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107
Compound Stimulus - WAV File With Pilot Tone
In this example a 1 kHz Pilot Tone is added to a
WAV file. This is used in some of the Open Loop
test sequences available on the Listen Website.
Step 1
Start with a Stimulus Step set to play a WAV file.
Figure 13-16 shows the initial step. The table is
not visible since there is only one stimulus.

Click View Table
Figure 13-16: WAV Stimulus

Click Insert and the Add Stimulus
window will open

Enter the stimulus parameters for
the new line as shown in Figure
13-17
Level: 84 dB
Analyze: Unchecked
Resolution: R10
Start Frequency: 1 kHz
(Automatically “greyed out” when
Stop Frequency is the same)
Stop Frequency: 1 kHz
Min Cycles: 1
Min Duration: 500 mSec
Analyze: Unchecked
Analyze must not be enabled so that only
the recorded response of the WAV file is
analyzed.
Figure 13-17: Insert Frequency Sweep
See Analyze/Ignore Option on page 105.

108
Click OK to close the line editor
Stimulus Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Step 3

Click Update to show the actual
Duration of the stimulus and to update
the waveform view
Figure 13-18: Compound Stimulus
Note:
Use “Memory List Selection” for the Level values in a Compound Stimulus so that editing the
level is easier. You only need to set the level once, at the start of the sequence. A Message Step
creates the value “Level” in the Memory List, which is then used in the Stimulus Step. This
Message Step must occur before any Stimulus Step that uses the Memory List value it creates.
The Message Step does not need to be set to “Display Step when run” in Step Configuration.
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109
Signal Parameters for Amplitude Sweep Excitation
Frequency
Enter the frequency you want to sweep in
amplitude. You can only choose a single
frequency here.
Start Level & Stop Level
Choose the amplitude level, either in linear or
dB units.
Cycles (#)
Choose the number of cycles of the selected
frequency for each step.
Steps #
The number of steps is the total number of
equal level increments needed to go from Start
Level to Stop Level. The progression is done in
dB.
Figure 13-19: Amplitude Sweep
The Start Level counts for one step. Then, the step size (in dB) is given by: (Stop Level dB – Start Level dB)/
(Steps # -1).
Tip:
110
To increase the level in integer increments, (e.g., 1 dB steps), enter the Start and Stop levels and
select the proper unit (dB). Increment the value in the Steps field until the value in the Step Size
field is 1. By putting the cursor to the right of the Steps Value, you can use the Up/Down arrow
keys of the keyboard to quickly scroll to the desired value.
Stimulus Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
WAV File Excitation
SoundCheck can load any stereo or mono WAV file to be used as an excitation signal. See System
Requirements on page 1 for information regarding large WAV files and computer memory. See WAV File
Types on page 293 for more information on supported WAV file types.
Important! The sampling rate of the WAV file must match the sampling rate of the System Hardware
configuration.
The Stimulus Step creates a signal for only one channel at a time. To output a stereo WAV file with a different
signal on each channel, you need to use two Stimulus Steps with the proper channel assignment; one Stimulus
Step plays the left channel of the WAV file, the other plays the right. You also need to assign them to two
appropriate channels in the Acquisition Editor.
You need to play a WAV using the Stimulus Step if you want to capture the Time Record of the WAV as a test
signal in the Acquisition Editor later in the sequence. In Figure 13-20, WAV File is selected as the Stimulus
Type. The Duration refers to the actual length of the WAV file. In this case, an 11 second sample of artificial
speech is displayed.
Note:
Using the WAV File option in the Stimulus Editor limits you to the Broadband or Spectrum
Algorithms in the Analysis Editor.
Level
The Output Level field allows you to set the playback level of the WAV file. The level is set in physical units. The
output units will vary depending on the output units of the System Calibration Configuration. For example, if
using an artificial mouth or anechoic test box the output level will be Pa rms. For an amplifier or direct output
the level will be V rms.
The output level will be the actual level out of the
calibrated output transducer or device. This
requires an accurate calibration of the output
signal chain. (See Calibration Configuration
on page 65 for instructions on output
calibration.)
The Drop Down Menu next to the Level field has
the following selections:

RMS level (Pa rms, V rms)

dB level

Peak level
Memory List Selection
This option gets the WAV playback level
from a Memory List value.
Figure 13-20: P50 Artificial Speech
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111
WAV Info
This section shows the properties of the selected WAV file. These values are for reference only, they cannot be
changed.

Peak: The maximum absolute value of the file (in dB FS, or %FS).

RMS: The RMS value of the entire wave file (in dB FS, or %FS).

WAV format: Stereo/mono, sampling rate, bit depth.

Time: Total duration of the wave file in mm:ss.ms.

WAV file Channel: Allows you to choose the left or right side of a Stereo WAV file.
Apply EQ
This allows you to create an Equalized version of the WAV file. Refer to Equalize a WAV file on page 414 for
more information.
When checked, this applies the EQ curve to the WAV file for the Output Signal Path that the Stimulus is played
out of.

If you click Play, it will use the EQ curve for the Output Signal Path selected in the Output Path section.

When the sequence is run, it will use the EQ curve for the Output Signal Path selected in the
Acquisition Step.
The EQ curve is a correction for the response of the Output Signal Path device selected in the System
Calibration Configuration. This curve is created in the Calibration process for each Output Signal Path. The
curve is always present, even though it may be a Flat Curve. (The curve can also be imported. See Copy From
Memory List - Output on page 71.)
Important! A complete calibration of the Output Signal Path must be run in order to store an EQ curve.
Important! Equalization curves are applied, no matter what is selected in the Output Calibration
Sequence field of the System Calibration Configuration, e.g., Amplifier Calibration, Speaker
Equalization, etc. The “Apply EQ” selection must be checked in the Stimulus Step, Signal
Generator VI or “Acquisition Step using Generator” in order to utilize this function. See
“Calibration Configuration” on page 65.
More information on the use of WAV files in SoundCheck can be found in: WAV file playback on page 413
and WAV File Types on page 293.
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DC Connect
Control Method: USB
This method is used to produce a steady voltage
or current output from DC Connect.
The Stimulus Step in Figure 13-21 will send the
following settings to the DC Connect™ device
assigned to this channel:

Control Method = USB

Source Type = Voltage

Polarity = Positive

Max Current = 30mA range

Level = 100mV
If your Sequence Configuration is set to Preload
Stimulus (which is a default setting), the first
Figure 13-21: DC Connect USB Control
Stimulus Step of this type will run when the
sequence is loaded, and the DC Connect LEDs
will show all the settings designated in these four fields before you run the sequence. If Preload Stimulus is
not selected, you will see the LEDs on the front panel of the DC Connect light up to match these four settings
when the Stimulus Step runs.
Important! Preload Stimulus in Sequence Configuration will make DC Connect operational even if the
sequence Start button has not been clicked. For example, if DC Connect is set to provide
9 VDC to power the DUT, the 9 V will be applied to the DUT once the sequence is loaded
into memory. This will take place BEFORE you click Start.
Use the Level field to set the output voltage source or current source level. That level will be output when the
Stimulus Step runs, which again, may be when the sequence is loaded. If Source Type is set to voltage, the
Level unit is V (volts). If the Source Type is set to current, the Level unit is mA (milliamps).
DC Output - rate of change
When controlling DC Connect via USB with SoundCheck, the maximum source level stepping rate is about 5
steps per second. When controlling the source level with an audio interface (Analog Control), the maximum
stepping rate is 500 steps per second. This means that the Time/Step, as set in the Stimulus Editor, can be as
small as 2 mSec.
Single Output Setting When Sequence Loads
If the Sequence Configuration is set to “Preload Stimulus” (which is the default setting), the first Stimulus Step
of the sequence will load when the sequence is loaded. If this is a DC Connect stimulus, DC Connect will switch
to the settings for that stimulus step and output the voltage or current selected in the step. The DC Connect
LEDs will show all the settings designated in the Instrument Settings field of the Stimulus Editor. By selecting
Preload Stimulus, DC Connect will be operational even if the sequence “Start” button has not been
clicked as in the Note above.
Important! DC Connect levels and settings cannot be changed with subsequent Stimulus Steps when
Preload Stimulus is selected. DC Connect will use the settings of the first Stimulus Step until
a new sequence is loaded. Subsequent Stimulus Steps will be ignored.
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Dynamic Control In Sequence
If “Preload Stimulus” is not selected in the Configure Sequence menu, DC Connect will switch to the settings of
each DC Connect Stimulus Step as they occur in the sequence. This can be useful if the output of DC Connect
needs to change during the operation of the sequence.
The example sequence in Figure 13-22, shows a DC Connect stimulus set to output 1.5 VDC when the
sequence is started. After the Broadband RMS Analysis is complete a second DC Connect Stimulus switches
to 0 VDC, shutting the device under test off, until another test is made. The Configure Sequence window for the
overall sequence shows that Preload Stimulus is not checked.
Figure 13-22: DC Connect
Voltage Switching in Sequence
Control Method: Analog
This method allows you to have Dynamic control
over the output level of DC Connect. Analog
Control provides a much faster rate of change
than what is available with USB control. See DC
Output - rate of change on page 113.
When the Control Method is set to analog, the
Level field is replaced with the Settings/Sweep
selector. The remaining settings allow for
selection of Source Type, Output Polarity and
Maximum Current. Confirmation of these
settings is indicated by LEDs on the DC Connect
front panel.
When Analog Sweep is selected, the controls
allow you to construct a voltage source (or
current source) stepped waveform. Do not use
a compound stimulus as it is not compatible.
Figure 13-23: Analog Sweep Settings
These are the same controls used in the audio
log amplitude sweep stimulus type, and they
operate in the same way regarding number of steps, Start and Stop levels, and the View Table function. Here
the units are V or mA. See Signal Parameters for Amplitude Sweep Excitation on page 110.
Note:
114
Please refer to the DC Connect Instruction Manual for more information on this product. This can
be found on the Listen website; https://support.listeninc.com/hc/en-us/sections/200836954Hardware-User-Manuals.
Stimulus Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Two Tone Stimulus
When you play two tones in a non-linear system, they interact in such a way that frequencies are present at the
output that were not part of the stimulus. These by-product frequencies are different linear combinations of the
two original frequencies and are called Intermodulation Products. Intermodulation Products are highly
undesirable since they have no harmonic relationship to the original signal.
Types of two-tone stimulus available:

Intermodulation stimulus: This superimposes a sweeping frequency tone against a fixed frequency
tone. The fixed slave tone is usually a low frequency tone.
For IM distortion, the Stweep Master
and fixed Slave frequencies should be
set according to the equation:
f min ≥ f slave + 14 ⁄ T
fmin
where T= the minimum step duration
and fmin is the minimum frequency of
the Master Tone.
T
Figure 13-24: Two Tone IM Stimulus
This method insures that there are at least 14 beat cycles in each step and the closest IM products can
be resolved with good accuracy.
For example: If fslave is set to 43.1 Hz and T= 100 ms, then fmin should be set to at least 183 Hz in
order to yield good results. In the Stimulus Editor, pick the closest value available depending on the
resolution of the stimulus. For the example in Figure 13-24, the minimum frequency for a resolution of
R40 is 190 Hz. (Refer to Stweep Table - ISO Stepped-sine Frequencies on page 522.)
As a sanity check you can select the stimulus itself in the Analysis Step. Apply the analysis and there
should be no IM distortion in the result.

Difference frequency stimulus: This consists of two sweeping tones which are separated by a
specified frequency interval. This frequency interval can be a fixed difference or a fixed ratio. Similar to
Intermodulation stimulus, the difference between the two frequencies should be greater than or equal
to 14/T.
Application to Loudspeaker measurements
Intermodulation distortion is useful to detect amplitude and Doppler modulations on high frequencies when a
low frequency signal produces a large excursion of the diaphragm.
Difference frequency distortion is useful to detect distortion at high frequencies, where single tone harmonic
distortion would fall far out of the frequency range of the loudspeaker or the ear.
For more details on these techniques see : Steve Temme, “Audio Distortion Measurements”, Bruel & Kjaer,
Application Note BO 0385-11.
Note:
An example sequence is included in the Default Sequences: C:\SoundCheck
16.0\Sequences\How To examples\IM Distortion.sqc and Diff Distortion.sqc.
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Stimulus Editor
115
Two Tone Stimulus
Type
Sweep Type set to IM
Master Tone settings
Figure 13-25: Stimulus for IM Distortion – Master Tone Settings
Slave Tone
Fixed tone frequency
Level
Set Value or
Use value from
Memory List Option
Figure 13-26: Stimulus for IM Distortion – Slave Tone Settings
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Instruction Manual
Sweep Type - Difference
Set Master Tone
properties
Sweep Type set to
Difference
Figure 13-27: Stimulus for Difference Distortion – Master Tone Settings
Slave Tone
Select Fixed and
set difference
frequency.
Figure 13-28: Stimulus for Difference Distortion – Slave Tone
Settings
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Instruction Manual
Stimulus Editor
117
As an alternative
the Slave Tone can
be set to Ratio.
Figure 13-29: Slave Tone Set to Ratios
Active Speech Level Stimulus Control
(requires active speech module p/n 2033)
In telephony standards (IEEE, TIA), speech
stimuli levels are often specified in term of Active
Speech Level (ASL). That way the pauses are
ignored and the level is set only for the active
portion.

Select WAV under Stimulus Type

Select the WAV file to use
The RMS level of the WAV file itself can
be shown in dB ASL

From the Level drop down menu select
dB ASL, as shown in Figure 13-30, and
set the level of the stimulus

The Active Speech Module calculates
the ASL of the WAV file rather than its
average level
ASL is calculated according to P56
Method B
118
Figure 13-30: Active Speech Level
Stimulus Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Noise
Pink and White noise stimulus is available with
variable Duration, Band limits (Freq-min and
Freq-max) and control of RMS Level in physical
unit (linear or dB).

Pink Noise: Noise with a continuous
frequency spectrum and with equal
power per constant percentage
bandwidth. For example, equal power is
any one-third octave band.

White Noise: Noise with a continuous
frequency spectrum and with equal
power per unit bandwidth. For example,
equal power in any band of 100 Hz
width.

MLS (Maximum Length Sequence): A
special kind of white noise with low crest
factor. Technically it is a square wave
Figure 13-31: Band Limited Pink Noise
with randomly varied duty cycle.
Therefore, the crest-factor is 1, which is only true for full-band MLS (DC to Nyquist). If the signal is
filtered or band-limited, the crest factor may rise up to 4, as with standard white noise. In SoundCheck
the MLS signal is intended to be used as a stimulus for transfer function measurements (Analysis
algorithm = transfer functions). It will yield about the same results as the standard (Gaussian) White
Noise also available in Stimulus. Notably, it is a legacy stimulus made available in SoundCheck for
comparison purposes with other acoustic measurement systems.
The white noise and pink noise used in SoundCheck have a Gaussian amplitude distribution. Theoretically, the
crest-factor is infinite. Of course that doesn't happen in a WAV file. Practically, the expected crest-factor can be
anywhere between 3 and 5. The longer the wave file, the greater the chance of being close to 5.
Figure 13-32: RTA display of Band Limited Pink Noise
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119
Multitone
A Multitone is an ensemble of tones that are regularly spaced in frequency. The amplitudes are equal and the
phases follow a deterministic mathematical law so that they are optimized to lower the crest-factor.

Choice of Fmin, Fmax

Choice of resolution (frequency spacing): R10 to R80, User Defined Log and User Defined Linear

Control of Duration (s)

Control of global RMS or Peak level
Frequency Rounding
An option has been created to align the frequencies of tones in order to round integer values (e.g.multiple of 5).
The Rounding Value chosen in the Stimulus Step must be the same as the Curve Resolution specified in the
Analysis Step Frequency tab. This helps to avoid leakage and makes the multitone analysis more accurate.
The example in Figure 13-33 shows the Stimulus Rounding Value set to 5 Hz with the corresponding Analysis
Step set to 5 Hz Curve Resolution. By doing this, the spacing of the stimulus tones match the FFT spacing in
Analysis.
Figure 13-33: Multitone Stimulus - Frequency
Rounding
The Stimulus Editor has two unique fields for Multitone Stimulus:

Check-box for Frequency Rounding

Rounding value control in Hz. Min rounding value= 0.1 Hz. Default= 5 Hz. All frequencies are rounded
to the nearest Rounding Value. Frequencies that are duplicated, as a result of the rounding process,
are deleted.
Multitone is repeatable (Not Random) which is useful for MP3 testing. You can now recreate in memory, a
perfect copy of the multitone stimulus that has been transferred to an MP3 player. By playing the stimulus on
the MP3 player and comparing it to the stimulus in memory, the response of the MP3 player can be analyzed.
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Instruction Manual
Acquisition Editor
Acquisition determines how test signals (Stimuli) are played and how measured signals are recorded or
analyzed in a sequence. The flexibility of the Acquisition Step allows measurements to be made in a variety of
ways.
The Acquisition Step establishes:

The relationship between the Input/Output Signal Paths defined in the System Calibration
Configuration

The Stimulus that is to be applied on each Output Signal Path

The resulting Waveform at each Input Signal Path
A simple table interface is used to show the Signal Path names and the Input/Output waveforms.
Select Acquisition (Ctrl + Shift + A) from the Setup drop down menu on the main SoundCheck® menu bar to
view and change the system's acquisition settings.
Features

Auto Range - When using Listen hardware, you can automatically adjust the microphone preamplifier
gain in order to optimize the dynamic range of the test

Table interface for selecting Play and Record channels

Multiple channels are selected by holding down the Control key while clicking on channels in the table

Capability to mix different sampling rates within a measurement, using different output and input
interfaces for each of the different sample rates

Max FSD - Record level monitoring allows you to optimize the dynamic range of the measurement,
resulting in a better SNR ratio and therefore more accurate measurements

Multiple Virtual Instruments can be opened simultaneously in the acquisition step for automation. See
Virtual Instruments on page 126.
Record Level Monitoring - Max FSD
The Input and Output Max FSD values are added to the Memory List for recorded waveforms. These values
can be used to optimize the signal to noise and to show that the signal is in a "comfortable" operating range;
i.e., not clipping.
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121
Auto-Range
This feature allows those using Listen hardware to automatically adjust
the microphone preamplifier gain in order to optimize the dynamic
range of the test. When auto-ranging is enabled in an Acquisition Step,
SoundCheck will monitor the digital headroom of the audio interface
and if necessary increase or decrease the preamp gain, selecting the
optimal setting for maximum signal to noise ratio. If a change to the
gain is made, the acquisition step runs again with the new settings.

Available for input channels only

Click on the Auto Range field drop down to turn on and off

This can only be selected if Auto Read is enabled for that input
channel in the Calibration Editor. See Input Hardware
Channel on page 70.
Figure 14-1: Auto-Range
Play & Record
Simultaneously play a stimulus and record the time response. This common mode is used when measuring a
device’s response to a test signal and then analyzing its response (e.g., magnitude, phase, distortion) in an
Analysis Step.
Available Measurement
modes
Record
Padding:
add extra
time to the
Record time
Custom Curve
Name
The Waveforms in the Memory List are named according to the Curve
Names in Acquisition Step plus the Signal Path Name. For this, “Use Signal Path Name” must be selected.
Figure 14-2: Play and Record Acquisition Step
The Channel Name, as seen in the input or output section of the Acquisition Step, is set in the System
Calibration Configuration. The resulting Waveform is a combination of the Curve Name plus the Channel
Name, as shown in Figure 14-2. The default name, “Recorded Time Waveform”, is used unless a custom
curve name is entered. When an Acquisition Step is added to a sequence, you are prompted to select the Input
Channel(s) and Output Channel(s). This can also be edited by clicking on the Input/Output Channel buttons.
(To select multiple channels, hold down the Control key while clicking on channels.)
Tip:
122
When appending Long Channels names to Curve Names it may be a good idea to shorten the
curve name. RTW is used in place of Recorded Time Waveform in Figure 14-2.
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You can choose the specific stimulus to play for each Output Signal Path.
The stimulus is selected from the drop down list as shown in Figure
14-3.
Note:
The sampling rate and the bit depth must be the same for all
inputs and outputs of a specific audio interface.
Time (sec)
In Record mode, Time (sec) specifies the total record time. This is
typically used for measuring background noise or noise from the DUT.
The minimum Record time is 50 mSeconds.
Figure 14-3: Select Stimulus
for Output Signal Paths
Record Padding (sec)
Available in Play & Record mode. This allows you to add extra time to the Record process to capture
information beyond the length of the stimulus. This can be used to compensate for "Time of Flight" when there
is a great distance between the mic and the source. (Especially useful for Telephony measurements where
there can be a long delay due to the signal chain.)
Record Delay (sec)
With Virtual Instrument modes, the Record Delay (sec) is the time in seconds before the acquisition of signal
starts. (Not available in all modes.)
Note:
SI units are used throughout SoundCheck. A time of 0.5 seconds will be represented as 500 mSec.
Curve Name
This field allows you to use a custom name for the acquired waveform or curve. (Not available in all modes.)
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123
Use Signal Path Name
When this is checked, the acquired waveform or
curve will also have the Signal Path name
appended to the Curve Name. This can be seen in
the Memory List. See Figure 14-4 as an example.
(Refer to Display Editor and Memory List on
page 279 for more information.)
“Use Signal Path Name”
Unchecked
“Use Signal Path Name“
Checked [Reference Mic]
is appended to the name
Figure 14-4: Waveform Name in
Memory List
Stimulus
Any stimulus in memory can be selected. (Only available in Play & Record mode.)
Input/Output Channel
Input and Output Signal Paths are selected here. Any channel that has been set up in the System Calibration
Configuration can be selected. Refer to Calibration Configuration on page 65 for more information.
Configure Record / Configure Generator
Configure Record / Configure Generator is used to set the properties of the Virtual Instruments that are
selected in the Mode field. (Not available in all modes.) Refer to Virtual Instruments on page 407 for more
information.
Mode
Measurements can be made in the following ways:

Record a time signal from a device under test (DUT).

Play a stimulus into a DUT and record a DUT’s time response.

Use the Multimeter, Oscilloscope, Spectrum Analyzer, or Real
Time Analyzer (RTA) as stand-alone instruments. (Refer to
Virtual Instruments on page 407 for more details.)

Use the Signal Generator in combination with the Multimeter,
Oscilloscope, Spectrum Analyzer, or RTA.
The Acquisition Step allows you to combine SoundCheck’s Virtual
Instruments to play test signals and acquire signals for analysis. The
following are the different Acquisition modes available:
Figure 14-5: Play and Record
Acquisition Step
Play & Record
Simultaneously play a stimulus and record the time response. This common mode is used when measuring a
device’s response to a test signal and then analyzing its response (e.g., magnitude, phase, distortion) in an
Analysis Step. See Figure 14-5.
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Record Only
When the Acquisition Mode is set to Record, Triggering can be used to
automatically capture a spectrum when the signal level exceeds the
value set in the “Trigger Level” field. One of the Input Signal Paths can
be selected as the Trigger Source.
Record Trigger Parameters
The Trigger Options are the same as what are available in the Scope
FFT Virtual Instrument.

Trigger Channel - Any input from the Calibration Table can be
used

Trigger Level - Sets level of measurement trigger, in either
Physical Units or dB
If dB is chosen, the trigger threshold is on the positive value of
the waveform
The trigger level is a Peak value. The trigger value has the
same dB reference as the trigger signal path.
Figure 14-6: Record Only with
Triggered Input

Slope - Selects whether Positive going signal triggers before
negative going signal

Time Out - The amount of time the Acquisition Step should wait for a signal before issuing an error
message

Trigger Offset - Sets the amount of time that the Acquired Signal is shifted, relative to the point at which
it is triggered. A negative offset indicates that the signal will be shifted to the right by the time that is in
the field e.g., -100 mSec
When recording a time signal (in Record, Play & Record or Oscilloscope mode), the recorded time waveform
will appear in the WFM tab of the Memory List. You can give this waveform a custom name in the Acquisition
Editor. You can then analyze the recorded time waveform from the DUT, to find the peak SPL, for example. You
can also display or save the DUT time signal to disk, using the WAV file format in the Autosave Step, or by
using Save Data As… WAV in the Data Menu of the Memory List.
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Virtual Instruments
Multiple Virtual Instruments can be opened simultaneously in the
acquisition step for automation in a sequence.

Select Virtual Instruments from the Mode drop down menu

This displays a table showing all the virtual instruments in that
step

Right Click on a row to configure the item

Virtual instrument configuration files can be loaded into the
acquisition step for quick setup in any sequence

Under Panel, select Show to have the Virtual Instrument visible
during sequence run or Hide to have it run in the background
Figure 14-7: Multiple Virtual
Instruments
Show/Hide

You can’t Hide a Virtual Instrument that is configured to run Continuously or Exponential. The editor
must be set to Duration or Linear as shown in Figure 14-8 in order to see the Show/Hide option.
Figure 14-8: Show/Hide Panel
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Rules - Virtual Instrument Acquisition Step Configuration

When the virtual instruments in a step are set to Run Continuously, they
are expecting you to hit the Enter key in order to stop the operation and
close the step.

If the virtual instruments in a step are set to Run for Duration, Linear,
etc, the step will automatically close when the virtual instruments finish.

In either case, the step should not be configured to Wait for
Confirmation. Right click on the step in the Sequence Editor and
Select Configure Step as shown in Figure 14-9 to change the setting.
Figure 14-9: Step
Configuration
Signal Generator
The Signal Generator can be used for manual control of a test signal during a
sequence, (e.g., audible tuning of a transducer), or playing a WAV file (Refer
to the Virtual Instruments on page 407). Specify a Frequency and Output
Level for a Sine Wave, or the file path and percentage of the originally
recorded level of a WAV file.

Select Stimulus type from the drop down menu

Select Signal Path

Set Stimulus Frequency, and Level in physical units

Play a sine wave or a WAV file continuously or for a specified duration
of time

WAV files can also be configured to play a user defined (N) number of
times

The WAV file can also be equalized to a target spectrum stored in the
System Calibration Configuration (Refer to Signal Generator on
page 411 for more information).

Sync allows you to Start, Stop and Mute multiple signal generators by clicking on only 1 button. It also
synchronizes the phase of sine signals and the start of WAV files.
Figure 14-10: Signal
Generator Options
The EQ output function can be applied to all types of output signals available in the Signal Generator (Sine
Wave as well as WAV and noise). When the EQ box is checked the EQ Out Correction curve that is created in
the output calibration process is applied to the output signal. This allows you to equalize the response of an
artificial mouth or anechoic chamber. EQ out correction curves are populated with data when the Speaker
Equalization or Simulated Free Field calibration sequences are selected in the output calibration process.
See Equalization and Correction Curve on page 77 in the Calibration chapter.
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Multimeter
The Multimeter can be used for measuring overall signal level. Choose between linear and exponential
averaging and the number of averages you wish to make.

Linear - The Multimeter will run for the duration set in the Time field

Exponential - The Multimeter will run continuously until you click OK or
Cancel in the Multimeter window

Averaging Time: Fast (250 mSec), Slow (2 Sec) or User Defined

Limits On - The Multimeter Limits function can be used to set a visual
Pass/Fail indicator on the multimeter. A Limit Step should be added after
the Multimeter Acquisition Step to read the value and put the Result in the
Memory List.

Hide Panel (Acquistion Step window) - The Multimeter is not shown
during the sequence run. If Exponential Averaging is selected, the Hide
Panel option is not available since the Virtual Instrument requires user
intervention to be stopped.

Data Name (Acquistion Step window) - Enter a custom name for the
Multimeter Value in the Memory List
For more information on the individual controls of the Multimeter refer to
Multimeter on page 417.

The Multimeter step can generate is the Linear or Log values.

These values are dependent on the calibrated values of the signal path selected in the Multimeter.

The Pass/Fail state of the Multimeter Acquisition can be used for conditional branching.

In some cases you may need to put the Meter in a “loop” while the DUT is being adjusted to produce a
passing level. Have the second Limit Step “Jump on fail” back to the first Limit Step. When the level
passes, the sequence will continue past the loop.
Note:
128
Figure 14-11: Multimeter
Options
The Multimeter frequency range is the full range of the audio interface based on its sampling rate.
The broadband dynamic range of most audio interfaces is limited by their DC offset. Their AC
dynamic range is typically much greater and sometimes it makes more sense to use the Spectrum
Analyzer and power sum the “frequency range of interest” in a Post-Processing Step.
Acquisition Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Oscilloscope (Scope-FFT/Time)
The Oscilloscope can be used to make sure the recorded waveform does not look clipped or distorted. Note
that delta µs cannot be changed, since this is based on the sampling rate of the audio interface.
If you want the Oscilloscope to run for a preset time, choose Lin and the number of averages multiplied by the
record time will determine the total measurement time.
If you choose Exp, the Oscilloscope will run continuously until you click OK or Cancel in the Oscilloscope
window. If running as a step in a sequence you can click Enter or Stop.
If you do not want the Oscilloscope to appear during the sequence, check Hide Panel. As with the Multimeter,
if exponential averaging is selected, the Hide Panel option is not available since the Virtual Instrument requires
user intervention to be stopped. Refer to Virtual Instruments on page 407 regarding functions available for
the Oscilloscope via the Acquisition Step. The minimum Time value is 50 mSec.
Calculate Spectrum

Off - FFTs are not being done in the background which makes it faster.

On - Collect data while the Scope is running and then switch to FFT scope to view or save the
spectrum.
Note:
As of SoundCheck 7, all spectrum are summable. Sequences from versions prior to SoundCheck 7
will need to be revised if Summable Spectrum is selected from the Memory List for use in other
steps.
Figure 14-12: Oscilloscope Options
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129
Spectrum Analyzer (Scope-FFT/Spectrum)
Note:
As of SoundCheck 7, all spectrum are summable. Sequences from versions prior to SoundCheck 7
will need to be revised if Summable Spectrum is selected from the Memory List for use in other
steps.
The Spectrum Analyzer can be used for analyzing pure tones or noise coming from the DUT, since these
signals are typically flat when plotted on a linear frequency scale. Lin will average for only the number of
averages entered (e.g., 3). Exp applies an exponential time weighting where Time Sec is the exponential time
constant tau (τ). Power averages the RMS amplitude of each FFT bin and excludes phase information.
Complex averages the RMS amplitude of each FFT bin but includes phase information. Note that the delta µs
is based on the audio interface’s sampling frequency. Because of this, it can only be changed via the audio
interface driver and/or switching jumper cables on the see itself.
If you do not want the Spectrum Analyzer to appear during the sequence, check Hide Panel. As with the
Multimeter, if exponential averaging is selected, the Hide Panel option is not available since the Virtual
Instrument requires user intervention to be stopped. Refer to Virtual Instruments on page 407 regarding
functions available for the Spectrum Analyzer via the Acquisition Step.
FFT record
length in
seconds and/or
number of
Spectral lines.
Minimum value
of 50 mSec.
Figure 14-13: Spectrum Analyzer Options
The “Snap to Max” button on the Scope-FFT control panel moves Cursor 1 to the peak of the acquired
spectrum. The Estimated Frequency and Estimated Level are shown in the fields at the top of the Spectrum
Display. This function is available when the mode is set to Time or Spectrum but the cursor location is only
shown when the mode is set to Spectrum as shown in Figure 14-13. The Estimated Frequency and Level are
shown in either mode. Clicking on the Harmonic Cursor will then plot and show the Harmonics on the FFT
display as well as calculate the THD.
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Save to Memory
When “Save to Memory” is selected, the FFT Spectrum will be added to the Curves tab in the Memory List. If
Snap to Max is selected before hand, the FFT Cursor values will be added to the Memory List: Est. Freq, Est.
Level and THD. This value can then be shown in a Display Table as shown in Figure 14-14.
Figure 14-14: Memory List - Snap to Max Values
Real Time Analyzer
The Real Time Analyzer (RTA) analyzes a signal, using constant-percentage bandwidth (1-Nth octave) filters.
This can be used to analyze background noise, since it is usually flat when plotted on a log frequency scale.
The RTA has 1/1, 1/3, 1/6, 1/12, and 1/24 octave digital recursive filters. The upper frequency range is based
on the audio interface’s sampling frequency. The highest frequency that can be measured will be no more than
one-half the audio interface sampling rate (Fsample). For example, if you are using an audio interface with a
44.1 kHz maximum sampling rate, the maximum measurement you can acquire will be at approximately 22
kHz. The Detector Time determines the time duration of the window to be sampled. Fast sampling averages
every 0.25 Sec of data, and Slow averages every 2 Sec of data. You can input your own averaging time by
using Other and entering a value in the field to the right.
As with the above Virtual Instruments, you can choose Linear or Exponential averaging. Additionally, you can
choose A, B, or C Weighting to display, but not save, the overall weighted level of your measurement (this
setting will not affect the display or saving of the acquired data).
If you do not want the RTA to appear during the sequence, check Hide Panel. As with the Multimeter, if
exponential averaging is selected, the Hide Panel option is not available since the Virtual Instrument requires
user intervention to be stopped. Refer to Virtual Instruments on page 407 regarding functions available for
the Real Time Analyzer via the Acquisition Step.
Figure 14-15: RTA Options
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Acquisition Editor
131
Signal Generator & Multimeter
The Signal Generator and Multimeter are typically used
for trimming output or input levels on electronic devices,
e.g., active loudspeakers or crossovers. Refer to Virtual
Instruments on page 407 regarding functions available
for the Signal Generator and Multimeter via the
Acquisition Step.
The Record Delay (sec) allows for a wait time before the
Multimeter is started.
Record Delay
sets the amount
of time before the
Multimeter is
started
Create custom
curve names
Figure 14-16: Generator and Multimeter
Figure 14-17: Signal Generator & Multimeter
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Generator & Oscilloscope or Generator & Spectrum Analyzer
The Signal Generator and Oscilloscope or Signal Generator and Spectrum Analyzer are used to play and
analyze a test signal in a sequence. The Signal Generator produces a constant frequency sine wave, or plays
a WAV file. The Oscilloscope displays the time signal on the screen. The Oscilloscope will add the Oscilloscope
time record to the WFM tab of the Memory List. The Spectrum Analyzer will add the FFT Spectrum to the
Curves tab of the Memory List. Typically, white noise is used as a test signal when analyzing a DUT with a
spectrum analyzer, since it is flat when analyzed with constant bandwidth (FFT) filters. Refer to Virtual
Instruments on page 407 regarding functions available for the Oscilloscope via the Acquisition Step.
Note:
All FFT spectrum are summable spectrum as of SoundCheck 7.
Figure 14-18: Combine Signal Generator and Oscilloscope or Spectrum Analyzer
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133
Generator & Real Time Analyzer
The Signal Generator and Real Time Analyzer will play and analyze the test signal. Typically, pink noise is used
as a test signal when analyzing a DUT with an RTA, since it is flat when analyzed with constant percentage
bandwidth (Nth octave) filters. Check Hide Panel if you do not want the Signal Generator or RTA to open when
the sequence is run. As with the Multimeter, if exponential averaging is selected, the Hide Panel option is not
available, since the Virtual Instrument requires user intervention to be stopped. The RTA will add the 1/Nth
Octave RTA to the Curves tab of the Memory List. Refer to Virtual Instruments on page 407 regarding
functions available for the Signal Generator or RTA via the Acquisition Step.
Figure 14-19: Generator & RTA
Read from DC Connect™
When you select Read from DC Connect from the Mode drop down list,
the Acquisition Step will read a single measured value from the DC
Connect device over the USB interface. Ignore the channel assignment,
since the communication with the device is through USB. This type of
Acquisition Step would likely follow a Stimulus Step that sets the DC
Connect output voltage or current source level.
If DC Connect is set up as a voltage source, choose units of mA DC, since
the current draw of the load is being measured. If DC Connect is set up as
a current source, choose units of V, since the voltage across the load that
results from the applied source current is being measured.
Figure 14-20: DC Connect
Options
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134
Analysis Editor
The Analysis Editor (Ctrl+Shift+N) enables you to process measured time signals using a variety of analysis
algorithms. Choose an algorithm based on the type of measurement needed.

See Algorithms and Suggested Use on page 136 for more information on what measurements are
possible with each algorithm.

Please note that the HarmonicTrak and Time Selective Response algorithms are optional and only
available in advanced versions of SoundCheck®.
To view and change the system's analysis settings, select Analysis from the Setup drop down menu on the
SoundCheck Main Screen. The Analysis setup allows for a variety of measurement types which generate many
different types of curves that can be viewed from the Memory List and further processed in SoundCheck.
Note:
Apply allows you to change the settings in the editor and apply a new analysis without making a
new measurement. The result of the new calculations will appear immediately in Memory List.
Features

Optimized THD+N algorithm with Traditional and Synthetic Notch Filters - See THD + Noise on page
157

Simplified Polarity measurement - See Simplified Polarity Test on page 178

Curve Resolution is selectable in any FFT based algorithm - See Curve Resolution on page 153

Maximum Valid Harmonic indication - See Max Valid Harmonic on page 147

Impedance Box vs. AmpConnect ISC or SC Amp measurement method is selectable - See
Impedance Box Measurement Method on page 169

Loose Particle Algorithm - See Loose Particle on page 174

Loose Particle Relative Envelope - See Absolute or Relative envelope on page 174

Loose Particle Maximum Stimulus Frequency - See Maximum Stimulus Frequency on page 174

Waveform Batch Processing allows a group of waveforms to be analyzed with just one step in a
sequence, rather than having to program multiple analysis steps - See Waveform Batch Processing
on page 141
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Algorithms
The following table shows the algorithms available in SoundCheck along with suggestions for use of each.
Algorithm
Broadband
Feature
No filtering other
than bandwidth of
sound card
Stimulus
Desired Measurement
Stweep
Unfiltered Frequency
Response, DC values
Application
Some Hearing Aid
standards, DC Connect
measurements
General purpose: near
field acoustic or
electronics
measurements
Most often used for
noise measurements background noise of
microphones or
electronics
Near field acoustic or
electronics
measurements
DualChannel
(Transfer
Function)
Can be used with
program material
Noise,
speech or
music
Frequency Response,
Phase, Non-Coherent
Distortion, Impedance,
Impulse Response
FFT
Spectrum
Single Channel
Noise
Response spectrum
Stweep
Frequency Response,
Phase, Harmonic
Distortion, Impedance
Stweep
Frequency Response,
Phase, Impedance
High precision
frequency response
measurements
Frequency Response,
Phase, Non-Coherent
Distortion, Impedance
Input, Output Nth
Octave Spectrum and
Nth Octave Frequency
Response
Fast frequency
response
measurements
Very useful for
telephony and devices
with DSP, Some
Hearing Aid standards
Frequency Response,
Phase, Harmonic
Distortion, Impedance,
Impulse Response
Measurement of
acoustic devices in a
real room
HarmonicTrak
Heterodyne
Tracks level and
phase of any userselected harmonics
Measure frequency
and phase response
with optimal
accuracy
Plays a group of
tones simultaneously
Multitone
RTA
Spectrum
Nth octave spectrum
Noise,
speech or
music
Time
Selective
Response
(TSR)
Simulated Free Field
- Suppress the
effects of reflections
in an ordinary room,
Fast
Log
Sweep
Multitone
Figure 15-1: Algorithms and Suggested Use
Note:
136
Time Envelope and Loose Particles are available in all algorithms. See Figure 15-2: Appropriate
Algorithm vs. Desired Measurement.
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SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Appropriate Algorithm vs. Desired Measurement
Noise
X
Heterodyne
Time
Selective
Response
Transfer
Functions
Multitone
RTA
Spectrum
Frequency Response
Harmonic
Trak
Desired
Measurement
FFT
Spectrum
Broadband
RMS
You can select options from the Analysis Editor to add curves and single values in the sequence. For example,
checking the Loose Particles box will add a Loose Particle Count single value to the Memory List. In the
Analysis Editor, many of the options become available only when an appropriate algorithm is selected. Figure
15-2: Appropriate Algorithm vs. Desired Measurement, shows a chart displaying available measurements
when each algorithm is active.
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Harmonic Distortion
X
X
X
Non-Coherent Distortion
Impedance
Loose Particles
X
X
X
DC
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Impulse Response
Time Envelope
X
X
X
Figure 15-2: Appropriate Algorithm vs. Desired Measurement
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Analysis Editor
137
Curve Names
SoundCheck allows you to alter the curve names created in the Analysis Step
through the Curve Names tab. Highlight the default names and enter custom
names for your curves and single values. This may be especially helpful when
using multiple Analysis Steps to measure multiple Stimuli, in a single sequence
or in subsequences. If two Analysis Steps in the same sequence have the
same curve name, the 2nd Analysis Step will append a 2 in front of the curve
name, e.g.; 2-Fundamental, 3-Fundamental, and so on.

Add Input Data Name - Select to append the Input Waveform name to
the curve name, e.g.; Fundamental + (Recorded Time Waveform)

Use Signal Path Name - Select to append the Signal Path name to the
curve name, e.g.; Fundamental + (Dut Mic)

Use Default - Select to delete changes to all curve names. The
Custom Curve Names field will be grayed out and revert the names
back to their original state. No edits will be possible. To create edits,
uncheck the Use Default box.
Note:
Changing curve names in an existing sequence may affect your
displays.
Figure 15-3: Use
Default Curve Names
For example:

Fundamental (DUT Mic) was originally selected to display on the XY Graph

The curve name is then changed to Model ABC Frequency Response (DUT Mic),

The display will cease to display Fundamental (DUT Mic)

You then need to open your Display Step and Memory list. Then drag Model ABC Frequency
Response (DUT Mic) to the appropriate XY Graph.
Naming - Best Practices
Selecting Add Input Data Name and Use Signal Path Name can create long file names that are difficult to
read in the Memory List. We recommend that shorter names should be used in the Calibration Editor and the
Acquisition Steps if you plan to append the Input Data Name or Signal Path Name.
For example:
Calibration Signal Path = Reference Mic SCM 3 SN 1234. Selecting Use Signal Path Name as in Figure 15-3
results in a Memory List name of: Fundamental [Reference Mic SCM 3 SN 1234].
An alternative would be to name the Signal Path: RefMic-SN1234 which yields a Memory List name of:
Fundamental [RefMic-SN1234]
Long Acquisition names can cause similar problems when Use Signal Path Name is selected in the
Acquisition Step. This can result in a Memory List data name of: Fundamental (Recorded Time Wave Form
[Reference Mic SCM 3 SN 1234])
1. Further post processing of the data can result in even longer names, so shortening names in Analysis
can be beneficial.
2. It can be helpful to abbreviate the Waveform Name in Acquisition to RTW, especially when Use Signal
Path Name is selected in Acquisition.
3. Additionally, shortening the Curve Names in the Analysis Curves Tab can help make data names
shorter and easier to manage.
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View Modes
The Analysis editor has two modes to view step information: Simple and Advanced. Figure 15-4 shows the low
level information that is provided in Simple View. This is the default view.
Figure 15-4: Analysis Editor - Simple View
Additional settings can be accessed by switching to Advanced View as shown in Figure 15-5. The settings of
the items on these screens is active whether the view is Advanced or Simple.
Figure: 15-5 Analysis Editor - Advanced View
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139
Waveforms
Apply is used to update the Memory List with the new results and curves. You can also change the settings in
the Analysis Step and then click Apply to run a new analysis without making a new measurement. This
analysis can be applied to any waveform in the Memory List by selecting it in the Response - Waveform In
section.

Seven Algorithms for analyzing time domain signals

Relative response is the response level divided by the stimulus
level

Absolute Response is the response level only

All waveforms in memory appear in the Waveform drop down
menus


Select the desired Stimulus from the Waveform Out drop
down menu

Select the Response from the Waveform In menu that is
related to the selected Stimulus
Apply allows you to change the settings and apply a new analysis
without making a new measurement. The result of calculation will
appear immediately in Memory List
Relative or Absolute
Relative response is the response level divided by the stimulus level. The
response is stimulus level independent or “normalized” to the input level.
When increasing the input level, the relative response amplitude level will
not change if the system is linear, because the output level will increase by
the same amount as the stimulus level.

Sensitivity measurements use Relative.

This is also useful when looking at compression.
Figure 15-6: Analysis
Setup
Absolute Response is the response level only and is stimulus level dependent. i.e.: If the stimulus increases
from 1 Volts to 2 Volts, there will be a 6 dB output level increase.

Max SPL measurements use Absolute.
Apply Correction
Checking the Apply Correction boxes will apply the input or output correction curves to the input or output
signal, as part of the analysis process. This is particularly useful for removing the response curve of an
amplifier from a loudspeaker test as well as removing the response of the measurement microphone. This is
not the same thing as an Equalization Curve. (See Equalization and Correction Curve on page 77.) It occurs
in Analysis, after the signal has been acquired.
Apply Correction In
This is usually checked if you are using a reference microphone in your test and you have imported the
correction curve for that specific microphone (usually supplied by the manufacturer).
Another less common usage is to import a correction curve for an ear simulator, like a free-field or diffuse-field
correction curve for a manikin.
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Apply Correction Out
Generally, this is always checked unless you have a very specific exception. Here are the two most common
scenarios:
Microphone Test - When testing microphones you have likely equalized a loudspeaker. In this case the output
correction is the remaining few tenths of a dB that the equalization was unable to flatten. In this case the EQ will
be accounting for 99% of the loudspeaker response, and the correction accounts for that last 1%. You will
probably not even notice it.
Loudspeaker Test - When testing a loudspeaker using an external amplifier, the amp needs to be calibrated.
During the calibration SoundCheck creates an output correction curve that compensates for the magnitude and
phase response of the amp. The magnitude is typically very flat, but the phase curve is not. Having the Apply
Correction Out checked compensates for this phase response.
Waveform Batch Processing
1
Waveform batch processing is a powerful analysis tool that enables a group of
waveforms to be analyzed with just one step in a sequence, rather than having
to program multiple analysis steps. This significantly simplifies sequences with
multichannel acquisition. The feature is also available in offline mode where
multiple waveforms can be grouped together in a custom group and the batch
processing operand applied to all simultaneously. Such offline analysis may be
useful for detailed analysis of production line data. To help distinguish the
output curves and values, the name of the response waveform can optionally
be appended to the resulting data via a new option to “Add Input Data Name”.
The following procedure should be used for Waveform Batch Processing: (See
Figure 15-7)
1. In the sequence Memory List create a Custom Group of the
waveforms
This example shows a group named “Multichannel“. The number of
curves in the group is indicated by the value in parenthesis (4), which
is added automatically.
2
2. In the Analysis Step > Waveform Tab > under Waveform In > select custom group: Multichannel (4), from the drop down list
3. Switch to the Curves Tab, select “Add Input Data Name“ to append
this to the Output Curve Name
3
This makes identifying the output curves much easier.
4. After the Analysis step runs the output curves are populated in the
Memory List
4
Figure 15-7: Batch Process
Procedure
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Algorithm Details
You can select an algorithm from the drop down list at the top of the Analysis Editor.
Algorithm details start on page.
Figure 15-8:
Algorithm
Broadband RMS
This algorithm does not utilize any filtering. This measures the total RMS energy at each excitation frequency.
The upper frequency limit used to determine the total RMS energy is based on the audio interface's sampling
rate. For example, at a sampling rate of 44.1 kHz, the upper frequency limit is approximately 22 kHz. Please
note that this value is also influenced by the audio interface's anti-aliasing filter. Typically the highest usable
frequency is 45% of the maximum sampling rate.
Uses include measuring buzzers and other harmonically-rich devices. To measure OSPL on hearing aids
according to ANSI S3.22 and other similar standards, you must use this algorithm.
FFT Spectrum
The spectrum algorithm calculates an averaged FFT of the response
waveform. This is performed according to the Frequency Resolution Weighting
and Overlap settings in the editor. This algorithm can be used to measure the
background noise prior to applying a stimulus to the Device Under Test (DUT).
Resolution
The default resolution of 20 Hz requires a measurement length of at least 0.1
Second. A resolution of 1 Hz requires a measurement length of at least 1
Second. The resolution is inversely proportional to the time required.


Figure 15-9: Default
Resolution
When acquiring the signal with a Play/Record Acquisition step the
following should be selected in the Waveform Tab of the Analysis Step:

Waveform In = Recorded Time Waveform of the Acquisition

Waveform Out = Stimulus Waveform of the Acquisition
The resolution is determined by the length of the stimulus waveform
(See Figure 15-10)
Figure 15-10: Waveform
Selection Play/Record
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
When acquiring the signal with a Record Only Acquisition step (See
Figure 15-11)

The Waveform In and Out should be the Recorded Time Waveform of
the Acquisition
Note:
Warning! A resolution smaller than 1 Hz can require a great amount
of system memory. Out of memory errors may result.
Figure 15-11: Waveform
Selection Record Only
Weighting
The Weighting function selected will also set default values for the Overlap Percentage.
Figure 15-12 shows the selections of the Time Tab for Spectrum Analysis. It also includes a table of Weighting
and the Default Overlap Percentage.
Weighting
Type
Select proper weighting window
type
Refer to Table of Weighting
Window Applications on page
153 for more information
Default
Overlap %
None
0
Hanning
4 Term BlackmanHarris
7 Term BlackmanHarris
75
85
90
Figure: 15-12 Weighting and Default Overlap %
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Spectral Scaling

RMS - The result is the RMS level according to the FFT resolution.
This is best used for Pure Tone/Sine measurements.

Spectral Density - The result is independent of the frequency
resolution of the FFT. This is used for noise based measurements,
e.g., Self Noise, noise stimulus, speech or music.
The unit of the result will be:
InputUnits
---------------------------Hz
Note:
Custom Units can be used to simplify the Spectral Density unit,
e.g., “dB V“ instead of “dB V/sqrt(Hz)”.
Figure 15-13: Spectral
Scaling
HarmonicTrak™
This module allows multiple harmonics to be measured in one stepped-sine
sweep (Stweep™). You would also choose this algorithm in order to
measure the DUT's THD and/or Rub & Buzz distortion characteristics. To
choose a specific range of Harmonics, click Edit List in the Editor (See THD
w H2, H3 on page 154)
This measures the levels of any harmonic or sub-harmonic when using
sinusoidal excitation. This algorithm also includes Two Tone distortion and
normalized distortion.
Figure 15-14: HarmonicTrak
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Heterodyne
This is the same algorithm used in the Brüel & Kjær Type 2010 and 2012
analyzers. This algorithm is very accurate but, unlike HarmonicTrak, it cannot
measure the harmonics and fundamental simultaneously. It serves as an
alternative to HarmonicTrak, when distortion measurements are not required
or when the distortion module is not available.
Heterodyne measures just the fundamental response using sinusoidal
excitation with excellent background noise rejection and fast calculation
speed.

Detection in synchronous

A Quadrature Detector is employed, i.e., mixing or multiplication is by
both sine and cosine, in order to obtain the phase for the complete
complex steady state response.
Figure 15-15: Heterodyne
Time Selective Response (TSR)
This module enables time selective measurements with a logarithmically swept sine wave, which can be used
for simulated free-field measurements in non-anechoic environments. By removing the stimulus from the
response waveform (deconvolution operation) the global impulse response is calculated directly, and from that,
the frequency response is determined. The result of the deconvolution process can be added to the Memory
List by selecting ”Deconvolved Response” in the time tab. See Deconvolved Response on page 181 for more
information.
Note:
The time window used by the Time Selective Response algorithm
has a 10% taper at each end. The Fundamental Impulse Response
must be inside these tapers. See Figure 15-62: TSR Window Cosine Taper on Pg 181 for more information.
In just one sweep, the free-field response of the fundamental and harmonics
can be measured and analyzed (See Time Selective Measurements With
Log Sweep on page 527 for technical details). This algorithm is only available
when using a Frequency Log Sweep in the Stimulus Step of the current
sequence. Please note that the Frequency Log Sweep must sweep from low to
high frequency.
Use this to measure free-field frequency response without requiring an
anechoic environment. The Impulse response of the fundamental can be
displayed using linear or log amplitude.
Figure 15-16: Curve
Resolution
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Curve Resolution
This is the Base Resolution for the analysis. e.g.: 10 Hz
The Resolution can be set to a number of predetermined ranges or User Defined Log or User Defined Lin. This
allows you to manually set the resolution of the result curve as shown in Figure 15-16.
Start and Stop Time Selection
You can enter values in the Start and Stop Time fields from the Time
Tab. This determines the Windowed Resolution. See example below.
See TSR Window on page 181 for instructions.
TSR Window Type
Adrienne is the default. Other available types are: None, Cosine
Tapered, Half-Cosine Tapered, Exponential, Half-Hanning and HalfBH4.
Windowed Resolution (Hz)
This can be considered "Smoothing" rather than interpolation.
e.g.: 66.7 Hz
Figure 15-17: Memory List
Start/Stop Time
For example:
Figure 15-16 and Figure 15-17 show the Curve Resolution set to 10 Hz and the Windowed Resolution at
66.7 Hz. The Windowed Resolution always takes priority over Curve Resolution.
BT=1 (Bandwidth x Time equals unity)
This means that the “truly realizable frequency resolution” is determined by the reciprocal of the measured
signal duration (F=1/T). So even if you measure for many seconds, what matters is the time from the beginning
of your impulse response to the end of the time window. Think of the actual frequency response Curve
Resolution as oversampling and the time Windowed Resolution as smoothing.
Good old fashion chart recorders had something similar relating to the pen and paper speed. If the paper speed
was too fast, the effect was like curve smoothing. If the pen moved too fast, the effect was like oversampling.
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Memory List Selection
This allows the window to be set dynamically during the sequence using recalled or calculated values rather
than fixed.
You can use two message steps prior to the TSR Analysis Step to set the desired Start and Stop times. The
operator can be prompted to enter the Start and Stop times during the run of the sequence.
Right click on the Start and Stop Time fields and click on Memory List Selection as shown in Figure 15-17.
TSR requires a LogTSR Stimulus
A faster LogTSR stimulus with a choice of time windows enables LogTSR testing of loudspeakers,
microphones, etc. at production line throughput rates up to six times as fast as earlier versions. The TSR
window waveform is output in the Memory List and can be displayed on top of the impulse response or the
deconvolved response to check the time alignment.
Max Valid Harmonic
The maximum valid harmonic is the maximum harmonic order that can be time
separated from its immediate harmonic neighbors. This is a function of the Start
Time, Stop Time and Sweep Rate.
(This is the Maximum Harmonic that can be selected while still having a valid
result.)
While Log TSR sweeps are a popular test method, users unfamiliar with this
method may inadvertently miss important measurement details by sweeping too
fast.
For example, a given combination of window size and speed may be adequate
for measuring Rub & Buzz, but insufficient to enable analysis of individual
harmonics. The new indicator shows the maximum harmonic that can be
selected independently of its neighbors. The indicator, while it does not place
any restrictions on your ability to define the speed and window size, will offer an
advisory when the settings are such that individual harmonics will not be
accurately calculated.
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Figure 15-18: Max Valid
Harmonic
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Transfer Functions
Stimulus
Response
Dual-Channel spectrum analysis yields the true transfer function between the input and output.
This technique should be used mainly with broadband stimulus such as noise. However, it could also be used
with arbitrary waveforms such as voice or music.
Spectral Scaling

Spectral Density should be used and is necessary for determining NonCoherent Distortion. Refer to
Spectral Scaling on page 144 for more information.
A scan FFT is performed in parallel on x(t) and y(t), which yields to two series of spectrum: {X0, X1,… , XN-1}
and {Y0, Y1,… , YN-1}.
By averaging these spectrum together we get:
Auto-spectrum:
G XX = E XX
Stimulus Average Power Spectrum
E[.] is the mean and
X denotes the complex conjugate of X.
Auto-spectrum:
G YY = E YY
Response Average Power Spectrum
Cross-spectrum:
G XY = E XY
Stimulus/Response Average Cross Spectrum
The average cross-spectrum between stimulus & response.
Frequency Response:
G XY An unbiased estimator when noise is present at the output.
H 1 = ---------G XX
Impulse Response:
–1
h1( t ) = ℑ [ H1( f ) ]
Response of the DUT to an ideally short impulse.
ℑ
–1
is the inverse Fourier Transform.
Coherence & Non-coherence:
2
G XY
γ = ---------------------G XX G YY
2
1-γ2, these functions give you the degree of linear relationship between the stimulus and
response for each frequency.
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Coherent Power (CP)
2
CP = γ ⋅ G YY CP is the part of GYY which is linearly related to the stimulus.
Non-Coherent Power (NCP)
2
NCP = ( 1 – γ ) ⋅ G YY
NCP is the part of GYY which is not linearly related to the stimulus, such as noise
and distortion.
Signal to Noise Ratio:
2
γ
CP SNR = -------------2 = ----------NCP
1–γ
The Signal to Noise Ratio is the ratio at each frequency, between the power linearly
related to the stimulus and the part non-linearly related, such as noise and distortion.
Non-Coherent Distortion in %
NCP NCD ( f ) = 100 ---------------- GYY
The NCD gives the proportion of noise and distortion which is present in the
f
Response Spectrum GYY. It is a function of frequency. Making a power sum of it with Post-processing will give
you a single Noise & Distortion number. The NCD function used along with multitone or noise stimulus will give
you a global assessment of the non-linearizes of your DUT.
Auto Correlation of Stimulus:
–1
C xx ( t ) = ℑ [ G XX ( f ) ]
Stimulus Auto Correlation
The peak value is equal to the total power of the stimulus.
Auto Correlation of Response:
–1
C yy ( t ) = ℑ [ G YY ( f ) ]
Response Auto Correlation
The peak value is equal to the total power of the response.
Cross Correlation of Stimulus and Response:
–1
C xy ( t ) = ℑ [ G XY ( f ) ]
Stimulus & Response Cross Correlation
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The position of the peak yields the delay of the input to the output.
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Multitone
The results are similar to Dual-Channel Analysis but the Frequency Response is the amplitude and phase of
only the tones that are present.
Because all the tones are analyzed in parallel, Multitone is the fastest way to get the Frequency Response.
Regarding distortion; because a Multitone stimulus has a rich frequency content (like "real-life" signals, e.g.,
music), it produces more realistic distortion components.
Using Multitone, the Non-Coherent Distortion curve yields a quick and global distortion assessment of the DUT.
In addition, one can make the Power Sum (using Post-Processing) of the Non-Coherent Distortion curve to get
a single percentage. That number quantifies the global Distortion & Noise present at the DUT and can be used
as a quality figure.
Spectral Scaling

In most cases, RMS should be used since Multitone is a collection of fixed sine tones. Spectral
Density should be used and is necessary for determining Non-Coherent Distortion. Refer to Spectral
Scaling on page 144 for more information.
Applying EQ
In Dual Channel and Multitone Analysis, the frequency response of the DUT is normally obtained by dividing
the Response Spectrum (Y) by the Spectrum at the input of the DUT (X).
Frequency Response = Y
---X
When EQ is applied in the Stimulus Step, the Spectrum at the input of DUT (X) is assumed to be the Stimulus
Spectrum (S) divided by the EQ Curve (EQ).
Y Frequency Response = -------------S ⁄ EQ
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Complex vs. Power Averaging
For Dual-Channel and Multitone Analysis, the cross-spectrum yields the average phase relationship between
input and output. The cross-spectrum is calculated when the Complex Averaging option is selected from the
Frequency tab of the Analysis Editor. See Figure 15-19: Complex vs. Power Averaging.
Figure 15-19: Complex vs. Power Averaging
Complex is selected by default.
Cross-spectrum cannot be used when making measurements on devices with non-stable phase due to
frequency shift or jitter (e.g., Bluetooth headsets or MP3 players).
As an alternative, select Power, which gives an estimate of the frequency response based on the Auto-Spectra
only. In this case, the cross-spectrum is not calculated so phase information is no longer available and the list
of analysis functions is reduced.
When Power is selected, the following functions are available in the Analysis Editor:

Auto Spectrum - Stimulus and Response

Frequency Response (Magnitude Only)

Time Envelope (Time Tab)

Auto Correlation - Stimulus and Response (Time Tab - Dual-Channel only)
The Complex and Power options apply only to Dual-channel and Multitone Analysis.
Note:
A faster frequency shift algorithm with output of the jitter curve in the Memory List offers increased
testing speeds for digital devices which have their own digital clock.
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RTA Spectrum
In addition to calculating the RTA spectrum of the response waveform, the
RTA analysis algorithm now allows the option to calculate the spectrum of the
stimulus as well as the overall frequency response (comparing the response to
the stimulus). This is useful when analyzing non-stationary signals, for
example speech signals in telephony where compensation needs to be made
for a non-flat stimulus.
The RTA Algorithm applies the RTA filter bank on the selected response
waveform and yields the average 1/n octave spectrum in the Memory List. The
advantage of this method over the RTA virtual instrument is that the analysis is
perfectly synchronized with the stimulus, and the averaging time fits exactly to
the length of the waveform. This eliminates the need for several stimulus
repetitions and reduces the total test time.
This algorithm yields the exact same response spectrum measured with the
RTA virtual instrument, and it conforms to the ANSI S1.11 - 2004 class 0
standard.
Figure 15-20: RTA
Spectrum
This can also be used to perform a multichannel acquisition
and analysis of the stimulus, which yields a synchronized
RTA spectrum for all channels, with only one run of the
stimulus. It is sometimes difficult to start the RTA virtual
instrument at exactly the right time to capture the desired
spectrum. This process eliminates such a synchronization
problem. For example:

Play P50 speech only one time

Record two channels (send and receive or left and
right)
Figure 15-21: RTA Spectrum Graph

Both spectrums are synchronous since they were
recorded at the same time

The RTA spectrum for both channels requires only two analysis steps

The algorithm processing time has been optimized to reduce sequence runtime
In addition to calculating the RTA spectrum of the response waveform, the RTA
analysis algorithm also allows the option to calculate the spectrum of the
stimulus as well as the overall frequency response (comparing the response to
the stimulus).

Spectra - Select to output either of the RTA curves to the Memory List

Functions - Select Frequency Response to output the curve to the
Memory List
Applying EQ
In RTA Spectrum Analysis, the frequency response of the DUT is normally
obtained by dividing the Response Spectrum (Y) by the Spectrum at the input of
the DUT (X).

When EQ is applied in the Stimulus Step, the Spectrum at the input of
DUT (X) is assumed to be the Stimulus Spectrum (S) divided by the EQ
Curve (EQ).
Figure 15-22: RTA
Spectrum Settings
Y Frequency Response = Y
---- = -------------X
S ⁄ EQ
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Analysis Settings
Curve Resolution
Curve Resolution is available for all FFT based frequency curves: LogTSR,
Spectrum, Transfer Functions and Multitone.
Selecting 1/Nth Octave resolution automatically sets the resolution of the
curves that are output by the sequence, and performs smoothing on those
curves. This resolution change reduces the number of points in the resulting
curve, making the sequence operate faster.

Preset selections:
1/1, 1/3, 1/6, 1/12, 1/24 octave (ISO frequencies)

User Defined lin (Hz)
For backward compatibility, Analysis Steps from previous versions of
SoundCheck will copy the frequency resolution value from the old
version into the User defined lin resolution field.

Figure 15-23: Curve
Resolution
User Defined log (1/n oct)
Allows you to define the 1/Nth octave resolution.
Distortion
Weighting
HarmonicTrak uses a step FFT analysis: at each sine step of the response, a weighting window is applied and
an FFT is performed.
The available Weighting Window types are: Hanning, 4 Term Blackman-Harris and 7 Term Blackman-Harris.
The performances of the windows are shown in Figure 15-24: Table of Weighting Window Applications.
Min
Cycles
per Step
Min H2
Lowest
Measurable
Distortion
Hanning
5
-40 dB
1.0%
General purpose, high-speed but sidelobe
attenuation is low compared to other windows
Blackman-Harris 4
Term
10
-90 dB
0.003%
More precise but require more time. Good
for most electroacoustic measurements.
Blackman-Harris 7
Term
15
-120 dB
0.0001%
Most precise due to greatest attenuation of
side lobes. Best window to use when measuring very low distortion devices, such as
electronic circuits and products.
Weighting
Window Type
Comment
Figure 15-24: Table of Weighting Window Applications
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Harmonic Distortion
Harmonics
The Harmonics field value indicates the harmonic number; 1 is the
fundamental, 2 is the 2nd harmonic, etc. Select which harmonics to measure,
either individually or as a group. You can also measure sub-harmonics, e.g.,
0.5 harmonic. Use the Edit List button to modify list preferences.
Note:
Checking 1 in the Harmonics list of the Analysis Editor does not
change the analysis process. The Fundamental is always
available, even if 1 is not checked.
Data added to Memory List is shown in the Curves Tab.
Default names are:
Fundamental, Harmonic 2, Harmonic 3, etc.
These can be shortened if you are checking “Add Input Data Name” or “Use
Signal Path Name”.
Figure 15-25: THD w H2,
H3
Edit List
This button enables modification of the list of harmonics. To add a
single harmonic, enter the single harmonic value (e.g., 5) and click
Add. To enter a range (e.g., 10 through 15) enter the starting
harmonic in the box to the left of the To button. Then click To and
enter the ending harmonic. Clicking Add will add the harmonic family
to the list.
Figure 15-26: Edit List
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Harmonics Plotted at Actual Measured Frequency
Traditionally, the harmonics of the signal are displayed at the excitation frequency. When Harmonics at
measured frequency is selected, harmonics will be displayed on the XY Graph at the actual measured
frequency. By displaying the shifted harmonics and the Fundamental, one can determine whether harmonic
amplitude levels increase or decrease due to amplitude changes in the frequency response or are actual
increases or decreases in distortion energy. THD and Rub & Buzz distortion calculated using the amplitude
normalized distortion method removes the effects of DUT's frequency response modifying distortion levels.
For more information, please see: How to Graph
Distortion Measurements by Steve F.Temme,
found at the Listen website, https://
www.listeninc.com/how-to-graph-distortionmeasurements/
In Harmonics at Actual Measured Frequency
on page 155 you can see the harmonics plotted
at actual measured frequencies.
Figure 15-27: Harmonics at Actual Measured
Frequency
Total Distortion
Total Distortion (TD) is the power sum of all the harmonics selected in the
Analysis Step. It is presented in the units of the Harmonics themselves. It
represents the level of distortion at each excitation frequency. The calculation
is based on the Harmonics selected in the Analysis Editor.
TD =
2
2
2
( H2 + H3 + … + Hn )
Total Distortion
References:
 Values in the equations are RMS engineering units,
unless labeled in %. However, the final distortion
curves are frequently shown in dB (SoundCheck
default).
 All above equations are a function of frequency (f)
 n indicates the distortion order
 F is the Fundamental (aka H1)
Figure 15-28: Total
Distortion
 Hn is the harmonic of nth order
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Total Harmonic Distortion
Total Harmonic Distortion (THD) is the percentage of the total signal that is
affected by distortion due to the harmonics. Total Distortion (TD) is referenced
in the equations. See Total Distortion on page 155.
Selecting IEC method means that the distortion ratio is the power sum of the
distortion components divided by the total input power (fundamental +
distortion components). The square root of this ratio is presented in percent.
The distortion is always <100%.
TD
% THD = 100 × -------------------------2
2
F + TD
Total Harmonic Distortion in % (IEC)
Selecting IEEE method means that the distortion ratio is the power sum of the
distortion components divided by the power of the fundamental. The square
root of this ratio is presented in percent. The distortion may be >100%.
(The IEEE standard allows for this method and what is described as the IEC
method mentioned above.)
Figure 15-29: THD
TD% THD = 100 × ------F
Total Harmonic Distortion in % (IEEE)
(See Intermodulation and Difference Distortion on page 164 for more options).
The THD measurement only takes into account the harmonics selected in the Analysis Step Distortion tab.
Note:
Checking 1 in the Harmonics list of the Analysis Editor does not change the analysis process. The
Fundamental is always available, even if 1 is not checked.
References:
 Values in the equations are RMS engineering units,
unless labeled in %. However, the final distortion
curves are frequently shown in dB (SoundCheck
default).
 All above equations are a function of frequency (f)
 n indicates the distortion order
 F is the Fundamental (aka H1)
 Hn is the harmonic of nth order
 N is Noise
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THD + Noise
Total Harmonic Distortion plus Noise (THD+N) is a measurement that expresses the ratio of all the harmonic
and noise energy to the total signal. DC is excluded.
As of SoundCheck 16, the THD+N algorithm has been improved as follows:

Accurate THD+N measurements can now be made with far shorter
stimulus times

The notch filter used complies with AES17 and will produce identical
results to alternative measurement systems

Optionally, a Synthetic Notch Filter will produce more accurate and
much faster results

User defined High Pass and Low Pass filters are available to define the
bandwidth of the measurement
Controls:
Checking THD+Noise (%) produces a curve in the Memory List.

If High Pass Filter is unchecked, no High Pass filter is applied

If the Low Pass Filter is not checked a default low pass filter defined by
the Anti-alias Frequency set in Hardware Editor is used

If High Pass Filter is checked, you are able to set the low frequency limit
of the measurement

High-pass filter is Elliptic, Brick Wall, 5th order. The Corner Frequency is
set in the Corner (Hz) field. Default value is 10Hz.

Low-pass filter is Elliptic, Brick Wall, 8th order. The Corner Frequency is
set in the Corner (Hz) field. Default value is 20kHz.
Note:
Figure 15-30: THD+N
The THD+N algorithm requires a Stimulus Step Minimum Duration of 20 mSec. Any time discarded
in Analysis requires a corresponding increase in Stimulus Step Duration.
Measurement Accuracy and Repeatability
The key to measuring THD+N accurately is to understand that the Noise component is a broadband
measurement. The Step Size defined for the stimulus must be sufficiently long in time to accurately measure a
signal at the High Pass Frequency. In addition, if the device is noise dominated, to produce repeatable
measurements will require a long Step Size in order to average the random noise.
Example:

The high pass frequency is set to 20 Hz.

The Step Size cannot be less than 1 cycle or 50 mSec.

The practical minimum Step Size would be 3 cycles or 150 mSec.

To account for typical transients between sweep steps, would normally require 5 cycles or 250 mSec.

For a typical noise dominated electronic device, dwell times of 1 second or more may be required for
repeatable measurements.

These time constants will scale with the High Pass frequency.
See Transition Discard Time on page 179.
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THD+N Equations
THD+N IEC
2
2
2
2
H2 + H 3 + … + H n + N
-------------------------------------------------------------------------% THD+N = 100 ×
2
2
2
2
2
F + H2 + H 3 + … + H n + N
Total Harmonic Distortion in % (IEC)
THD+N IEEE
2
2
2
2
H2 + H 3 + … + H n + N
% THD+N = 100 × --------------------------------------------------------------F
Total Harmonic Distortion in % (IEEE)
Figure 15-31: THD+N
Virtual Instrument THD+N Options
THD+N Residual - The level of all the noise and distortion products in the measurement bandwidth
SINAD - Is the reciprocal of THD+N, if and only if THD+N is calculated without High and Low Pass filters in the
Analysis Editor
P signal + P noise + P distortion
SINAD = ---------------------------------------------------------------P noise + P distortion
SINAD (Signal to noise and distortion ratio)
References:
 Values in the equations are RMS engineering units,
unless labeled in %. However, the final distortion
curves are frequently shown in dB (SoundCheck
default).
 All above equations are a function of frequency (f)
 n indicates the distortion order
 F is the Fundamental (aka H1)
 Hn is the harmonic of nth order
 N is Noise
 Pn is the Average Power of the n component
158
Analysis Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Rub & Buzz
Rub & Buzz is the power sum of all harmonics selected above the 9th
harmonic divided by the fundamental. Harmonics 10 and higher are the main
contributors to the audible rub and buzz even though lower order harmonics
may be higher in level. For more information refer to: Are you Shipping
Defective Speakers to your Customers by Steve F. Temme, found on the
Listen website.

Hn ( f ) 2
≥ 10
Rub & Buzz ( f ) = 100 n---------------------------------H1 ( f ) 2
Rub and Buzz in %
Normalized THD or Normalized Rub and Buzz
An alternate algorithm for the THD and Rub & Buzz measurements is
calculated using the harmonics after re-plotting them at the actual measured
frequency of their signals (See Harmonics Plotted at Actual Measured
Frequency on page 155). The % THD and % Rub & Buzz is then calculated
using the following methods:
THD Normalized Equation
Normalized THD ( f ) = 100
Normalized THD in %

n≠1
Figure 15-32: Rub and
Buzz
Hn ( f ) 2
------------------H1 ( n f )
Rub & Buzz Normalized Equation
Normalized Rub & Buzz ( f ) = 100
Normalized Rub and Buzz in %

n ≥ 10
Hn ( f ) 2
-------------------H1 ( n f )
The values of THD Normalized and Rub & Buzz Normalized can be compared to the Harmonic “n” shifted
curves (where “n” is from 2 to your highest harmonic requested).
The formulas above use the IEEE method. The IEC method can also be used. Please Refer to
Intermodulation and Difference Distortion on page 164 for information on IEC vs. IEEE.
References:
 Values in the equations are RMS engineering units,
unless labeled in %. However, the final distortion
curves are frequently shown in dB (SoundCheck
default).
 All above equations are a function of frequency (f)
 n indicates the distortion order
 H1 (or F) is the Fundamental
 Hn is the harmonic of nth order
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Analysis Editor
159
Rules - Normalized THD/Normalized Rub and Buzz

Even though your response measurement may go to 20 kHz, Normalized THD measurements
stop at 10 kHz. For a normalized distortion measurement, the maximum measured frequency is
the stimulus frequency divided by the highest order harmonic being measured.
For example: if you are sweeping up to 20 kHz and measuring the 2nd through 5th harmonic (as is
common for THD measurements): the 2nd harmonic distortion product will be measured up to 10 kHz,
the 3rd up to 6.67 kHz, the 4th up to 5 kHz and the 5th up to 4 kHz. Your measurement will therefore
stop at 10 kHz as you have no normalized harmonic distortion components calculated above this
frequency. You should also be aware that above 4 kHz, you are not including all the harmonics.

In other words, it is impossible to normalize (ratio) the “harmonics at their measured frequencies” to the
fundamental, at stimulus frequencies not present in the measurement. [i.e., If the stimulus range does
not include the frequency range of high order harmonics.] In regular Rub and Buzz, the ratio of the
harmonics to the fundamental are compared at the stimulus frequency but still have to be within the
passband (Alias free Freq) of the sampling rate.
Please refer to the following papers on the Listen website: Harmonic Distortion Measurement: The
effects of sampling rate and stimulus frequency on the measured harmonic frequency
(including THD and Rub & Buzz) by Steve F. Temme.
How to Graph Distortion Measurements by Steve F. Temme.
Measure Relative to Fundamental Only
THD and Rub & Buzz measurements can be calculated using one of two
methods. Choose IEC to include the fundamental and all the harmonics (Total
Distortion) in the denominator (typically used in Europe), or IEEE to use the
fundamental (first harmonic, typically used in the USA). These are selected in
the bottom section of the Analysis Editor - HarmonicTrak Algorithm - Distortion
Tab as shown in Figure 15-33.
Figure 15-33: THD and
Rub & Buzz Selections
160
Analysis Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Perceptual Rub & Buzz - CLEARTM Distortion Measurement (optional module required)
The new CLEAR (Cepstral Loudness Enhanced Algorithm for Rub & Buzz)
algorithm from Listen offers true Perceptual Rub & Buzz analysis for production
line applications.
This is selected in the bottom section of the Analysis Editor - Distortion Tab as
shown in Figure 15-34.
Note:
The Distortion Tab is only available for the HarmonicTrak and Time
Selective Response algorithms.
It uses a simplified auditory perceptual model to measure the loudness of Rub
& Buzz distortion in phons rather than the more traditional dB SPL and %
distortion units. These better identify whether distortion due to manufacturing
defects can be heard by the listener than conventional measurements. In
addition to a result which corresponds more accurately to the human ear, this
new test method also offers two significant advantages for use on the
production line:

It is less sensitive to transient background noises than traditional
methods, therefore is reliable in noisy environments

It is much simpler to set limits than when using conventional distortion
measurements
Figure 15-34: Perceptual
Rub & Buzz
Important! As of SoundCheck 11.0, a threshold was added to the Perceptual Rub &
Buzz algorithm that will output zero if that threshold isn’t met. In this case
it is normal to see a flat line at 0 Phons. See Comparison on page 162.
Perceptual vs. Conventional Rub & Buzz
Conventional Rub & Buzz detection has been widely used on the production line since Listen introduced it in
SoundCheck Version 1 back in 1996. It offers excellent identification of Rub and Buzz defects caused by
manufacturing problems, and will continue to do so. In recent years, some manufacturers have moved to a
defect detection model where they prefer only speakers with audible faults to fail QC checks. This is because
yields are higher when only speakers with audible faults are rejected rather than any faults at all. Perceptual
Rub & Buzz offers a means of identifying and precisely quantifying this with all the benefits and reliability of an
automated test system.
Perceptual Rub & Buzz using the CLEAR™ algorithm shows audible distortion more clearly. Traditional Rub &
Buzz measurements do not take into account the insensitivity of the human ear to low and high frequencies,
therefore it is more difficult to identify problem areas and set limits on a production line.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Analysis Editor
161
Comparison
Figure 15-35: Example A - Good Speaker:

Rub and Buzz is a low percentage - Red
line

Perceptual Rub and Buzz is below the
threshold of perception across the range
of the measurement, so the resulting
curve is a flat line at 0_Phons - Black
dotted line
Perceptual
Rub & Buzz Dashed Line
Figure 15-35: Example A - Good Speaker
Figure 15-36: Example B - Bad Speaker:

Rub and Buzz is very high at low
frequencies with an 8% peak at 160_Hz Red line

The Perceptual Rub and Buzz curve
shows the more audible cone breakup of
8.9 Phons at 530 Hz, along with the
noticeable low frequency distortion at
125_Hz - Black dotted line
Perceptual
Rub & Buzz Dashed Line
Figure 15-36: Example B - Bad Speaker
The CLEAR Rub & Buzz Detection Algorithm
Listen’s CLEARTM Rub & Buzz detection algorithm uses true perceptual analysis to ‘hear’ any faults in the
speaker. It offers many advantages over other ‘perceptual’ Rub & Buzz analysis systems:

True Perceptual Rub & Buzz: The CLEAR Algorithm is a true perceptual Rub & Buzz algorithm. Based
on well-proven psychoacoustic principles, it accurately replicates the human ear using mathematical
models found in MP3 encoders that mimic the way that both the ear and the brain interpret sound. This
results in close to 100% correlation to the human ear.

Less sensitive to transient background noise: A significant advantage of our Perceptual Rub & Buzz
algorithm is that it is very insensitive to transient background noise – tests show that it offers far more
consistent results with high background noise levels than other Rub & Buzz measurement methods.
This makes it ideal for noisy factory environments.

Flexible: The CLEAR Rub & Buzz detection system is extremely flexible. While it can of course be
configured for a simple pass/fail result, it can also offer detailed results including defect analysis and
offers a calibrated loudness value rather than simply a comparison to a reference.

Better Correlation to Human Ear: Testing carried out by an independent laboratory shows excellent
correlation to the human ear.
More details of the research leading to the development of this algorithm are presented in the paper: 'Practical
Measurement of Loudspeaker Distortion Using a Simplified Auditory Perceptual Model', found on the
Listen website.
162
Analysis Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
CLEARTM Algorithm For Perceptual Rub & Buzz Analysis
FFT Spectrum
Stimulus applied
to transducer
The algorithm uses a sine wave stimulus
because this is widely accepted as the
standard test signal for production line
testing in the loudspeaker industry.
Response Spectrum
Hz to Bark
Auditory Filter Bands
Auditory
Filter
Bands
Auditory filter bands are applied to the response signal
to convert the FFT spectrum (constant bandwidth) to a
Bark scale (auditory filter bands). This replicates the
way the ear filters sound.
Internal Noise Floor
Harmonic
Structure
The harmonic structure of the response is
quantified using the power cepstrum
(a cepstrum is a spectrum of a log spectrum).
A strong and extended harmonic structure is
a signature of Rub & Buzz.
Ear
Weighting
Ear Weighting Filter
An ear weighting filter compensates for the transfer
function of the outer to inner ear, and the internal noise of
the ear (noise floor due to blood flow) is added. Together
these model the frequency response of the ear.
Internal
Noise
Frequency
Spreading
A frequency spreading function is applied. This is
a simple mathematical representation of auditory
masking curves.
Partial
Loudness
Calculation
PARTIAL LOUDNESS
combined with
HARMONIC STRUCTURE
This is how the algorithm mimics the
psychoacoustic filters of the ear in hearing Rub &
Buzz defects. These complex curves change with
frequency and level.
The fundamental and its masking effects are
subtracted out from the result for the response
signal to give the distortion of the speaker plus
noise. This is summed over the frequency range to
give the perceptual partial loudness (in phons) for
a single tone of the input signal.
The result of the harmonic analysis (a percentage
measurement) is combined with the perceptual
distortion for each frequency. This accentuates
the rub & buzz, making it easier to identify and
set limits.
PERCEPTUAL
RUB & BUZZ
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Analysis Editor
163
Intermodulation and Difference Distortion
When you play two tones in a non-linear system, they interact in such a way
that you get new frequencies at the output. These frequencies are different
linear combinations of the two original frequencies and are called orders. This
is the case when music is played through a loudspeaker. These orders are
particularly annoying because they have no harmonic relationship with the
original frequencies.
Two types of two-tone distortion are commonly used.

Intermodulation distortion (IM): this distortion occurs when a high
frequency tone is superimposed on a high-level, low frequency tone.
The high frequency signal is modulated by the low frequency.

Difference frequency distortion (DF): this distortion arises when 2
tones are separated by a small frequency difference. This distortion is
similar to harmonic distortion but is especially noticeable when the 2
tones are at high frequencies.
Figure 15-37: Total IMD
Application to Loudspeakers Measurements
Intermodulation distortion is used to detect amplitude and Doppler modulations that occur when low frequency
signals produce large excursions of the speaker voice coil.
Difference frequency distortion is used to detect distortion at high frequencies, where single tone harmonic
distortion would fall far out the frequency range of the loudspeaker or of the ear.
For more details on these techniques see: Steve Temme, Audio Distortion Measurements, Bruel & Kjaer,
Application Note BO 0385-11, found on the Listen website.
IM (or difference frequencies) are measured using step FFT analysis in a method similar to HarmonicTrak. For
each step frequency, processing is applied on the entire spectrum of the signal.
164
Analysis Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
IM Distortion Formulas
Total IM
Total IM =
 ( H n + H –n )
2
n>1
Total IM Distortion dB (IEC)
Total IM =
 ( H n + H –n )
2
2
n>1
Total IM Distortion dB (IEEE)
Total IMD %
Figure 15-38: Total IMD
Total IM
% IMD = 100 × --------------------------( F1 + F2 )
Total IM Distortion % (IEC)
Total IM % IMD = 100 × -------------------------2
2
F1 + F2
Total IM Distortion % (IEEE)
References:
 All above equations are a function of frequency (f)
 Values in the equations are RMS engineering units,
unless labeled in %. However, the final distortion
curves are frequently shown in dB (SoundCheck
default).
 n indicates the distortion order
 F1 is the IM Fundamental
 F2 is the IM Fixed Tone
 Hn are the nth distortion orders
 N is Noise
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Analysis Editor
165
Difference Distortion Formulas
DFD =
 Hn
2
n < 0, even
+
 ( Hn + H–n )
2
n > 1, odd
Total Diff Distortion in dB (IEC)
DFD =
 Hn2
Total Diff Distortion in dB (IEEE)
DFD
TotalDFD = 100 × ---------------------( F1 + F2 )
Figure 15-39: Total DFD
Total DF Distortion in % (IEC)
DFD
TotalDFD = 100 × ---------------------2
2
F1 + F2
Total DF Distortion in % (IEEE)
References:
 All above equations are a function of frequency (f)
 Values in the equations are RMS engineering units,
unless labeled in %. However, the final distortion
curves are frequently shown in dB (SoundCheck
default).
 n indicates the distortion order
 F1 is the Diff Upper Fundamental
 F2 is the Diff Lower Fundamental
 Hn are the nth distortion orders
 N is Noise
166
Analysis Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Total Distortion + Noise
The power sum of TD and Noise (IM or Diff)
2
2
TD + N
TotalD + N = 100 × ----------------------------F1 + F2
Total Distortion + Noise in % (IEC)
TotalD + N = 100 ×
2
2
TD
+ N----------------------2
2
F1 + F2
Total Distortion + Noise in % (IEEE)
Figure 15-40: Total DFD +
Noise
References:
 All above equations are a function of frequency (f)
 Values in the equations are RMS engineering units,
unless labeled in %. However, the final distortion
curves are frequently shown in dB (SoundCheck
default).
 n indicates the distortion order
 Hn are the nth distortion orders
 N is Noise
For IM Distortion:
 F1 is the IM Fundamental
 F2 is the IM Fixed Tone
For Diff Distortion:
 F1 is the Diff Upper Fundamental
 F2 is the Diff Lower Fundamental
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Analysis Editor
167
Confidence and Noise
When making any measurement there is always a level of measurement
uncertainty, partly due to noise. That noise adds randomness to the level of the
measurement. Therefore a measurement is only an estimate of the true value.
Since we know the level of noise, it is possible to calculate the Standard Error
(σ) of the estimated level.
Confidence Limits
If we consider one measurement with a value of x and a standard error of σ,
then the confidence that the true value will be within the limits ±nσ is as follows:

[x-σ , x+σ] with 68% confidence

[x-2σ , x+2σ] with 97% confidence

[x-3σ , x+3σ] with 99.7% confidence.
These are the Confidence Limits, as selected in Figure 15-41.
Figure 15-41: Confidence
Standard Error
The Standard Error for the Fundamental as well as every selected harmonic or order can be displayed. The
Standard Error is calculated in the same units as the Fundamental and the resulting curve is based on one
standard deviation (σ).
There is a choice of having the Standard Error as a single curve (σ) or the Confidence Limits as 2 curves
(measured curve ±a σ). The factor a, is chosen by the user.
Total Noise
A Noise curve can also be displayed. This is the RMS level of Total Noise for each stimulus frequency.
Note:
Please refer to the How To Example sequence: Confidence and Noise
This can also be used for frequency pairs when measuring Intermodulation and Difference Frequency
distortion.
For more information on the Stimulus required for these measurements please Refer to Two Tone Stimulus
on page 115.
Note:
Please refer to the How To Example sequences: IM Distortion.sqc and Diff Distortion.sqc.
Measurement Confidence Rules:
Here are some general recommendations to help to increase the measurement confidence and
improve the repeatability of THD and THD+N results.
168

Increase the input gain if Max FSD is below -30 dB

Change the sweep direction to “High to Low”

Increase the bit depth to 24 Bit

Increase the min cycles/min duration in the Stimulus Step
Analysis Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Impedance
Impedance measures the voltage level across a known reference resistor
and calculates the impedance.
SI units are used throughout SoundCheck 16.0.
0.25 Ohms is represented as 250 milliohms as shown in Figure 15-42.
Ref Resistor
Value of the reference resistor, in Ohms, placed in series with the
transducer under test. See Impedance Setup on page 170 for more
details.
Impedance Box Measurement Method
Select Impedance Box if using the Impedance Measurement Interface box
from Listen, Inc. as shown in Figure 15-42.
Enter the value of the internal reference resistor in the Analysis editor.
Figure 15-42: Enter Known
Reference Resistor
AmpConnect/SC Amp Measurement Method
If using the AmpConnect ISC test and measurement interface or SC Amp™,
select AmpConnect/SC Amp under Measurement Method. Z-High is selected
by default. See Figure 15-43.
If the Z-Low Rref resistor is needed for a test, it can be selected manually. The
AmpConnect ISC front panel will switch to Z-Low after the Analysis step is
Applied or runs in a sequence.
Note:
The AmpConnect ISC power amplifier uses a proprietary system
to push the output impedance close to 0 Ohms even when the 1Ohm / Z-High Reference Resistor is selected. No changes need to
be made to the Amplifier Sensitivity in the SoundCheck Calibration
Configuration.
The AmpConnect front panel or AmpConnect Message Step will need to be set
to the same Reference Resistor value as set in the Analysis Step of the
sequence.
Figure 15-43: Impedance AmpConnect/SC Amp
SC Amp™
Important! Select AmpConnect/SC Amp as shown above but Z-Low must be selected for
the Reference Resistor.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Analysis Editor
169
Impedance Setup
Listen offers an optional Impedance Measurement Interface Box for connecting the power amplifier,
transducer, and SoundCheck system. This features dual banana leads, alligator clips, a removable cable for
the impedance measurement channel input and a removable cover for easy access when changing the
reference resistor. For more information, please contact Listen, Inc.
(Refer to Loudspeaker Test Connections with Impedance Box on page 506 for a detailed drawing of the
impedance box)
To measure the transducer's impedance, a small resistor is connected in series with the transducer between its
negative terminal and ground. A general rule of thumb is that the DUT Impedance should be somewhere
between 20 to 40 times greater than the Reference Resistor. Refer to Impedance Measurement Details on
page 171 for more information.

For example, use a 0.25 Ohm resistor for an 8 Ohm loudspeaker. This way both the acoustic response
(e.g., left channel) and impedance response (e.g., right channel) of the transducer can be measured at
the same time.
To measure the current flow through the resistor, connect Input 2 of the audio interface across the Reference
Resistor as shown in Figure 15-44.
Important! WARNING! Make sure to connect the ground of the output from the amplifier to the ground
on Input 2 of the audio interface. The positive lead of Input 2 should be connected to the
negative terminal of the transducer, the same as the resistor.
Enter the value of current sensing resistor in series with the transducer in the Ref. Resistor field of the Analysis
Editor as shown in Figure 15-42. The formulas below apply only to the Impedance Box Method.
VS
Measurement Mic
Amplifier
+
+
-
i
Sound Card
Left Input
Z (DUT)
Sound Card
Left Output
VR
-
RREF
Common Ground
+
Sound Card
Input 2
-
Figure 15-44: Impedance Measurement Circuit Using Impedance Box

Z = impedance of device under test (e.g., loudspeaker)

VS = voltage out of amplifier (measured during calibration)

VR = voltage across resistor (e.g., 0.1 W reference)

i = current running through DUT and reference resistor
Z=
170
(VS − VR )
i
i=
VR
V R
=> Z = ( S × REF ) − RREF
RREF
VR
Analysis Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Impedance Measurement Details
When measuring impedance with SoundCheck, it helps to know the expected impedance of the Device Under
Test.‘
This allows you to select a Reference Resistor value that provides a signal level to return to SoundCheck that is
significantly above the noise floor of the system, but not so high that it overloads the inputs. If the Impedance
curve as measured in SoundCheck appears to have jagged edges, this would indicate that the signal across
the Reference Resistor is too low.
You also have to take into consideration the signal drop at the DUT due to the added Reference Resistor. This
signal drop is not included in the Amp Calibration process, so it needs to be as small as possible.
The idea is to minimize the Signal Drop at the DUT while maintaining a sufficient signal level across the
Reference Resistor.
Rules - Impedance Measurement

A general rule of thumb is that the DUT Impedance should be somewhere between 20 to 40 times
greater than the Reference Resistor.
To calculate the Signal Drop at the DUT:
DUT Imp
DUT Signal Drop (dB) = 20 × log 10  --------------------------------------------------
 DUT Imp + Ref Res 
Signal Drop at DUT in dB
To calculate the Signal Level at the Reference Resistor:
Ref Res
Ref Res Level (dBV) = 20 × log 10   -------------------------------------------------- × Stimulus Level
  DUT Imp + Ref Res 

Level Across Reference Resistor in dBV
The charts in Figure 15-45 and Figure 15-46 show how the Drop at the DUT and Level across Ref Res
change, depending on the equation variables.
For example:
If you are testing an 8 Ω loudspeaker with a Stimulus of 3 Volt and a Ref Res of 0.25 Ohms:

Signal Drop at DUT (due to added resistance) = -0.267 dB

Level across Ref Res = -20.83 dBV or 91 mVolts
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Analysis Editor
171
Spe a ke r Im p
(Ohm s)
2
4
8
16
32
64
150
250
Re f Re s
Drop a t
Re f
(Ohm s)
Stim ulus (V) DUT (dB) Le ve l
0.25
3
-1.023
0.25
3
-0.527
0.25
3
-0.267
0.25
3
-0.135
0.25
3
-0.068
0.25
3
-0.034
0.25
3
-0.014
0.25
3
-0.009
Re s
Re f Re s
(dBV) Le ve l (V)
-9.54
0.333
-15.07
0.176
-20.83
0.091
-26.72
0.046
-32.67
0.023
-38.66
0.012
-46.04
0.005
-50.47
0.003
Figure 15-45: Reference Resistor 0.25 Ohm
By changing the Ref Res to 1 Ohm the values are:

Signal Drop at DUT = -1.023 dB

Level across Ref Res = -9.54 dBV or 333 mVolts
Spe a ke r Im p
(Ohm s)
2
4
8
16
32
64
150
250
Re f Re s
(Ohm s)
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Stim ulus (V)
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Drop a t
Re f
DUT (dB) Le ve l
-3.522
-1.938
-1.023
-0.527
-0.267
-0.135
-0.058
-0.035
Re s
Re f Re s
(dBV) Le ve l (V)
0.00
1.000
-4.44
0.600
-9.54
0.333
-15.07
0.176
-20.83
0.091
-26.72
0.046
-34.04
0.020
-38.45
0.012
Figure 15-46: Reference Resistor 1 Ohm
The 1 Ohm Ref Res provides a sufficient level to SoundCheck, but there is a large signal drop of -1.023 dB at
the DUT.
The 0.25 Ohm Ref Res only presents a drop of -0.267 dB, but still has a signal level well above the noise floor
of the audio interface: 91 mVolts. The 0.25 Ohm Ref Res would be a better choice in this case.
Note:
As the DUT impedance goes up or down significantly, you will want to scale the Ref Res value
accordingly.
Reference Information
For more information on Impedance please refer to:
Practical Impedance measurements using SoundCheck found on the Listen website.
172
Analysis Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Headphone Impedance Testing
The larger impedance of headphones will of course require the use of a larger reference resistor.
Important! The amplifier used to drive the headphones should have an output impedance of near
zero Ohms. Headphone amplifiers, which tend to have higher output impedances (5 to
30 Ohms), should not be used.
If the DUT impedance is 150 Ohms with a stimulus of 0.5 V, the calculator chart shows that a Ref Res of 15
yields sufficient signal while presenting a reasonable drop at the DUT.
Spe a ke r Im p
(Ohm s)
2
4
8
16
32
64
150
250
Re f Re s
Drop a t
Re f
(Ohm s)
Stim ulus (V) DUT (dB) Le ve l
15
0.5
-18.588
15
0.5
-13.534
15
0.5
-9.173
15
0.5
-5.745
15
0.5
-3.339
15
0.5
-1.829
15
0.5
-0.828
15
0.5
-0.506
Re s
Re f Re s
(dBV) Le ve l (V)
-7.11
0.441
-8.07
0.395
-9.73
0.326
-12.33
0.242
-15.94
0.160
-20.45
0.095
-26.85
0.045
-30.96
0.028
Figure 15-47: Headphone Impedance vs Reference Resistor
Measuring Left and Right Headphone Impedance Simultaneously
Due to the common ground between left and right headphones, feedback loops can occur when measuring
headphone impedance. In this case, you can use two Impedance Boxes connected to a stereo amplifier. Both
Impedance Boxes must use the same resistor value. The boxes should be wired as follows:
Simply reverse the Red and Black connectors for both impedance boxes at both ends:

Red Left + Red Right to Amp Common

Black L and R to Amp L and R
and

Red Left + Red Right to Headphone Common

Black L and R to Headphone L and R
15
This puts the load resistor in the positive side of the signal path.
The Impedance Analysis Step in the SoundCheck sequence must also be
modified as shown in Figure 15-48.

Click on the electrical tab and change the Method to AmpConnect.
This method expects the load resistor to be on the positive side of the
signal path.

Set Rref to Custom.

Under Reference Resistor, enter the value of the resistor in the
impedance boxes.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Analysis Editor
Figure 15-48: Modify
Electrical Tab
173
Loose Particle
During the manufacturing process of a loudspeaker, some loose particles of foreign material may stay trapped
in the gap behind the diaphragm or dust cap. During operation at low frequencies, these particles randomly hit
the diaphragm making a click or pop noise. This algorithm detects loose particles as impulses in the sound
emitted by a loudspeaker during a measurement. Loose particle defects are easier to catch at low frequencies
(typically at or below resonance) where maximum driver displacement occurs. A Sine Sweep stimulus should
be used for this type of measurement. For greater accuracy, a Stepped Sine Sweep (Stweep) should be used.
The Loose Particle Algorithm in SoundCheck offers better noise immunity in production and other noisy
environments as limits float with the normalized background noise rather than being set absolutely.
In addition to simplifying limit setting, false rejections due to sudden increases in background noise are less
likely. There is also a setting for choosing a maximum stimulus frequency, above which the loose particle
envelope is not calculated. As loose particles tend to present themselves during the low frequency portion of a
stimulus sweep, this feature further prevents false rejects.
The Loose Particle algorithm has the following features:

The loose particles algorithm is optimized for speed and offers a
cleaner envelope, which makes it easier to set limits

The Loose Particle tab is always available in the Analysis Editor, for all
of the Analysis Algorithms

In Basic View the only available parameter to edit is Attack Threshold

In Advanced View the following parameters are available with the
noted default values

Threshold: Absolute

Attack Threshold: 50 dB

Averaging Time: 5 ms

Minimum Duration: 2.5 ms

Max Duration: 25 ms

Hysteresis: -3 dB

Max Stimulus Frequency

The Loose Particle Waveform can be added to the Memory List by clicking on the check box. See
Figure 15-49.
Figure 15-49: Loose
Particle Detection Settings
Absolute or Relative envelope
Relative envelope has a steady state at 0. This makes the Threshold become relative to the steady state level
as well. This allows you to utilize a standard detection threshold independent of the test level.
Absolute envelope will reflect the Response level as before.
Maximum Stimulus Frequency
This allows you to choose a maximum stimulus frequency, above which the loose particle envelope is not
calculated. As loose particles tend to present themselves during the low frequency portion of a stimulus sweep,
this feature further prevents false rejects.
A typical default value for max Stimulus frequency would be 1 kHz.
174
Analysis Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Averaging Time
This is the width of the running rms averaging applied on the time signal to generate the time envelope used to
detect loose particles.
Min/Max Duration
Allows you to ignore transients which do not fit within these limits.
Figure 15-50: Min and Max Duration
Attack Threshold & Hysteresis
All peaks that exceed the threshold are
counted as loose particles. You must define
this threshold and set it high enough to
exclude random background noise.
Establishing the threshold level will require
some trial and error. Use a known good
speaker (or Golden Speaker) to choose a
level above the background noise. Then,
measure a loudspeaker with known loose
particle defects to verify that the threshold is
exceeded.
To avoid false peak detection, the hysteresis
level should be set to a value greater than
the background noise.
Note:
Figure 15-52: Threshold and Hysteresis
The Loose Particle Detection Algorithm gives you the total number of individual peaks that exceed
the threshold (Particle Count). Sometimes you will get false peaks from transient background noise
events such as a box dropping or an air gun going off. This can be limited by setting the Min/Max
Duration levels. The hysteresis level can be used to ignore steady state background noise.
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175
For more information regarding Loose
Particle Analysis please refer to two
AES papers presented by Listen, Inc.:
Enhancements for Loose Particle
Detection in Loudspeakers by
Pascal Brunet & Steve Temme;
Listen, Inc.
Loose Particle Detection in
Loudspeakers, found on the Listen
website.
A Single Value Limit Step is used to
obtain a Pass/Fail verdict for the DUT.
Figure 15-53: Loose Particle Count Limits
Units
Abs/relative - the measurement can be relative or absolute
(Waveform Tab). See “Relative or Absolute” on page 140.

Default Unit: In case of Absolute, the frequency
curves are in the physical unit of the response
waveform (e.g Pa). The dB ref is the one setup in
calibration at acquisition time. In case of Relative, the
frequency curves are in relative unit (e.g., Pa/V). The
unit is the ratio of the response unit over stimulus unit,
with a dB ref of 1. All algorithms are subjected to Rel/
Abs except Spectrum, Time Envelope & Loose
Particles, which are always in abs unit.

Custom Unit: the unit is set by the user and
determines the string used and the dB ref.
Figure 15-54: Set Units
Important! Be aware, the math applied for absolute/relative stays the same.
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Instruction Manual
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176
Delay
Auto Delay
The Auto Delay is the delay, in seconds (then converted to meters and inches
based on the speed of sound in air), between the output and input terminals of
the SoundCheck system. By clicking Set Values you can manually enter the
delay based on the distance in meters or inches from the acoustic center of the
loudspeaker to the microphone. By selecting Auto Delay, SoundCheck will
automatically calculate the delay. Using Auto Delay will cause the test time to
increase due to additional CPU usage required for calculating the crosscorrelation. Memory List Selection allows you to set the delay by selecting an
item from the Memory List. A value named Record Delay will appear in the
Memory List, enabling you to save this value with other test information.
Auto Delay uses the peak of the impulse response to determine the delay.
Several situations may arise where Auto Delay can be “fooled”.

High background noise: noisy production environment

Strong reflection: side wall reflections during Polar Plot measurement

Sampling rate errors: sample rate variation in Blue Tooth devices
Note:
Figure 15-55: Auto Delay
Selection
The Auto Delay value will only be correct if the proper audio interface delay is entered in the
Hardware Editor. Calibrate the audio interface to determine/confirm the hardware delay.
Additionally, be aware that measuring in an environment that has strong reflections can produce an
erroneous time delay.
Set Values
This allows you to enter the specific distance or time in the Record Delay fields.

Delay can be set in Samples, Seconds or Distance

Distance can be set in Feet or Meters
Memory List Selection

Select a Memory List item in order to set the delay

Select X, Y or Z axis depending on the Memory List data
Figure 15-56: Set Values
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Instruction Manual
Analysis Editor
177
Simplified Polarity Test
A polarity test is often used to verify that a device is wired correctly. The quick polarity test is performed in an
analysis step, and uses the impulse response from the Auto Delay function (See Figure 15-55). It analyzes
the peak of this impulse response and measures if it is negative or positive to determine overall polarity. It is a
simple and easy alternative to phase domain testing for simple devices or single drivers where the phase does
not change more than 180 degrees. Polarity measurement using phase response is still available as an
alternative method for more complex devices.
Speaker wired
correctly
+
Positive Impulse
yields y-axis
value of +1
Speaker wiring
reversed
+
Negative Impulse
yields y-axis
value of -1
Figure 15-57: Speaker Polarity Impulse

Auto Delay must be selected on the Delay tab in order to use this feature

The polarity function is available in any of the analysis algorithms

Polarity will appear as a value in the Memory List

A value of +1 shows that the device under
test has a positive polarity

A value of -1 shows the device under test
has a negative polarity

This value can then be used in a limit step
with a lower limit set to zero to show when a
device has been wired correctly or has
correct polarity
Note:
The limit step allows you to determine if
a value of +1 is a pass or fail,
depending on the overall phase of the
measurement chain. (e.g., the
microphone output is inverted)
Note:
Polarity measurement using phase
response is still available as an
alternative method for more complex
devices.
Figure 15-58: Limit Step and Results
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Instruction Manual
Analysis Editor
178
Transition Discard Time
Most devices exhibit some transient phenomena between each step of a
stepped sweep. Transition Discard Time allows you to exclude these transients
for the measurement and return the true steady state response of the device
under test. The analysis algorithm will ignore the beginning of the step defined
as a number of cycles of the fundamental stimulus or a fixed amount of time,
which ever is longer in time.
Minimum Cycles
This is the number of cycles that are discarded at the beginning of each
frequency step, up to the Transition Frequency.
Transition (Hz)
Below this frequency the analysis algorithm will discard the Minimum Cycles.
Above this frequency the Minimum Duration will be discarded.
Minimum Duration
This is the minimum amount of time that will be discarded from the beginning of
each step.
NOTE:
The Stimulus Step settings for “Min Cycles” and “Min Duration per step” must
be greater than the Transition Discard Time settings in Analysis. If either of the
discard settings are equal to or greater than the corresponding values in the
Stimulus Step, there will be nothing left over for SoundCheck to analyze. No
data will be passed to the Memory List.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Analysis Editor
Figure 15-59: Transition
Discard Time
179
DC
If your audio interface or data acquisition card is DC coupled, select DC to
measure the DC voltage. If the audio interface is not DC coupled, the DC
current or voltage waveform can be read from a DC Connect™† instrument
using your AC coupled, audio interface. An audio interface input is connected
to the DC Connect Analog Monitor back-panel output. The Analysis Step is
preceded by an Acquisition Step set to Record or Play & Record. Be sure to
assign the Analysis and the Acquisition Step’s Input Signal Path to the audio
interface input channel that you've connected to the DC Connect™.
Note:
† DC Connect, made by Listen, Inc., is a USB-controlled DC
voltage and current source and measuring amplifier. See the
Listen website for more details. https://www.listeninc.com/
products/
Figure 15-60: DC Coupling
When you check the DC Connect measurement checkbox, a mA or V choice
appears. Choose the mA current measurement if you are operating DC
Connect in voltage source mode, or choose the V voltage measurement if you
are in current source mode. This step will create a DC Current Waveform or DC Voltage Waveform curve.
For example, when this type of Analysis Step follows a Play & Record Acquisition Step, the X-axis of the DC
Current Waveform curve matches the X-axis of the played stimulus. The stimulus will likely be an audio
amplitude/frequency sweep, or a sweep of the DC voltage.
If you also check the Time Envelope checkbox, you create a Time Envelope curve whose units are also in mA
or V. The x-axis of this curve is time.
Time
Time Envelope
The Time Envelope is used to view the magnitude of the response time
signal. This is useful in analyzing the effects of compression in an electrical
circuit and/or an electroacoustic transducer. The Scaling can be set to dB
or Linear.
The magnitude is calculated only between Fmin and Fmax. This helps to
create a cleaner, smoother or “less noisy” envelope.
Note:
To avoid ripple effects in the time domain, Fmin and Fmax
must be outside the stimulus bandwidth.
Figure 15-61: Define Envelope
& Impulse Response Units
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Analysis Editor
180
Impulse Response
The Impulse Response is the time domain response of a system to an idealized infinitely short impulse. An
impulse response is the time domain equivalent of a frequency response function, and can be computed using
the Inverse Fourier Transform on a frequency response function. This can only be accessed when Time
Selective Response or Dual-Channel is the chosen algorithm.
The units for the impulse response can either be dB, where the resulting display is an Energy Time Curve, or
linear values. With linear units, the impulse response will look like a ring-down curve that you would see on an
oscilloscope. To change the impulse response units, select the Units tab.
Deconvolved Response
The Deconvolved Response is the response waveform divided by the stimulus waveform, in the spectral
domain. It shows the Linear or Fundamental Impulse Response of the DUT, the Harmonic Impulse Response
that occurs before it and the reflections (if any) that occur after it. The deconvolved Response is a result of the
Time Selective Response algorithm. This helps you to properly position the time window so that the
Fundamental Impulse Response is between the start and stop time, while leaving the Harmonic Impulse
Response and Reflections outside the window. This can be tested by clicking the Apply button before using the
algorithm in a sequence.
TSR Window
The Cosine Taper window used by the
Time Selective Response algorithm, has a
10% taper at each end. The Fundamental
Impulse Response must be inside these
tapers. The example in Figure 15-62: TSR
Window - Cosine Taper shows a
100 mSec window set on an impulse
response. The taper of the TSR window
disregards the first and last 10 mSec of the
impulse.
10mS Total
1mS
1mS
H1
10 %
10 %
H2
H3
Harmonic IR
Fundamental IR
Reflections
Figure 15-62: TSR Window - Cosine Taper
Definitions of each of the window types can be found in Weighting
and Window Types on page 525.
Note:
As of SoundCheck 8, you can choose other window
types, as shown in Figure 15-63.
Figure 15-63: TSR Window Type
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Instruction Manual
Analysis Editor
181
The TSR Window is output in the Memory
List as a waveform. This can be displayed
on top of the Impulse Response or the
Deconvolved Response waveforms to
check the time alignment as shown in
Figure 15-64.
The fundamental impulse response must
fall inside the window. If it does not, simply
edit the Start and Stop times in the Analysis
Editor as shown in Figure 15-63. The start
time should be slightly before the start of
the impulse (0.20 mSec for Adrienne) and
the stop time should be before the first
reflection.
Figure 15-64: Impulse Response and TSR Window
Curve Names
SoundCheck allows you to alter the curve names created in the Analysis Step
through the Curve Names tab. Highlight the default names and enter custom
names for your curves and single values. This may be especially helpful when
using multiple Analysis Steps to measure multiple Stimuli, in a single sequence
or in subsequences. If two Analysis Steps in the same sequence have the
same curve name, the 2nd Analysis Step will append a 2 in front of the curve
name, e.g.; 2-Fundamental, 3-Fundamental, and so on.

Add Input Data Name - Select to append the Input Waveform name to
the curve name, e.g.; Fundamental + (Recorded Time Waveform)

Use Signal Path Name - Select to append the Signal Path name to the
curve name, e.g.; Fundamental + (Dut Mic)

Use Default - Select to delete changes to all curve names. The
Custom Curve Names field will be grayed out and revert the names
back to their original state. No edits will be possible. To create edits,
uncheck the Use Default box.
Figure 15-65: Curve
Name Options
Note:
Changing curve names in an existing sequence may affect your displays. For example, if
Fundamental (DUT Mic) was originally selected to display on the XY Graph and the curve name is
changed to Model ABC Frequency Response (DUT Mic), the display will cease to display
Fundamental (DUT Mic). You then need to open your Display Step, select the XY Graph to make
it active, and select Model ABC Frequency Response (DUT Mic) from the Curves tab of the
Memory List.
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Instruction Manual
Analysis Editor
182
Autosave Editor
SoundCheck® can automatically store data from the Memory List by using an Autosave Step (Ctrl+Shift+U).
This allows any item appearing in the Memory List to be saved to disk when the sequence runs. The following
file types are available:

Text (.txt) - delimited text file

Curves and Single Values (.DAT) - SoundCheck specific
file

Results (.res) - SoundCheck specific file

Waveforms (.wfm) - SoundCheck specific file

Database - DB: save to an SQL database

Excel (.xls or .xlsx) - each data item is saved or
appended to a separate worksheet of the Excel file.

WAV (.wav) - Any Waveform (WFM) in the Memory List
can be saved as a WAV file. The WAV file will be saved
with the sample rate and bit depth that are set in the
System Hardware configuration. See WAV File Types
on page 293 for more information on supported WAV file
types.
Figure 16-1: Autosave - to Excel
Note:
As of SoundCheck 14.01, Excel Macro-enabled files with the XLSM file extension are allowed. The
XLSM file extension is used in the generated file.
Note:
Separate Autosave Steps must be used to save Data and Results. When converting sequences
from versions prior to SoundCheck 8, Autosave Steps will need to be updated if a single step is
used for both Data and Results.
Important! As of SoundCheck 8, the functionality of the Autosave and Recall Steps has been matched.
This assures that data saved with an Autosave Step can easily be accessed by a Recall
Step. Refer to Recall Editor on page 195 for more information.
To view and change the Autosave settings, select Autosave from the Setup drop down menu on the
SoundCheck Main Screen. You can also create a new Autosave Step, or insert an Autosave Step into an
existing sequence using the Sequence Editor.
The Autosave Editor is divided into four major sections – Save, Format, Test Information, and Filename.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Autosave Editor
183
Save
You can choose to save only Data, only Results, or only Waveforms. Separate Autosave Steps must be used
for each data type. They can all be saved to the same folder. Figure 16-2 shows that three Autosave steps
save data to the same folder. In this case, the files have different extensions (.DAT, .RES and .WFM) so the file
names can be the same without the possibility of files being overwritten.
When saving to Excel, Data and Results can be appended to a single Excel file. Each data item will appear in
its own worksheet. See Excel Mode on page 321 for another method of saving to Excel.
Note:
It is not possible to save both Data and Results to the same text file.
If you intend to import SoundCheck data into other applications that use .TXT files, Data and Results must be in
separate files. You can do this by specifying different file names in the File Name field of each Autosave Step.
This has very little effect on the speed of a measurement.
Figure 16-2: Saving Data, Results or Waveforms
Autosave Folder Path

Select Use Default to use the “Default Data Path” that is selected in the Edit > Preferences > Folder
Paths options on the SoundCheck Main Screen. See Folder Paths on page 36.

You can specify the file path by unchecking Use Default and Browsing to file location.

When converting a sequence to SoundCheck 16.0, Autosave and Recall Steps will need to be updated
if the file location on the new computer is not identical to the original computer.
Rules - Relative File Path Rules in Autosave
184

This indicates that the location of the saved file is relative to the folder path of the sequence, e.g., an
exported sequence folder. This is useful when sharing sequences with other SoundCheck users as it
keeps the data in the same location as the sequence. The relative path can even include sub-folders.

Delete any text in the File Path field and leave it blank. This
indicates that the file will be saved in the same folder as the
sequence file location.

This also applies to the Template File location

Sub-folders are indicated by just the name of the folder (no back
slash): My DATA.

If the sub-folder does not exist, SoundCheck will automatically
create it.

A 2nd level of sub-folder does require a back slash: My
DATA\Product 1
Autosave Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Format
In this area of the Autosave Editor, the file type selected by
the user (e.g., Text, Dat, DB, etc.) defines the other options
that can be configured. All options are linked to the format
selected; many fields will toggle between active and
inactive as the file type is changed.
Figure 16-3: Custom Formatting Options
File Type
There are five options to choose from. You must use a separate Autosave Step in the sequence for each File
Type required.
Text Files
Save output to a text file. Output can be imported into other programs such as a filter design program. When
Text is selected, you can then choose to store either frequency or time headers (x), amplitude (y), and/or phase
data (z). A test saving five 3-D curves (x, y, and z axes) of 100 points each takes under 200 mSec, and creates
a file size of 15KB. Data and Results must be saved using separate Autosave Steps.
Rules of use for Text Files:

SoundCheck saves the x-axis values at least once when saving to a text file. If you want to append y
and or z values to a text file, DO NOT check the x-axis box. The x-axis will be written in the first row or
column, depending on the layout. Subsequent curves will then only contain y and/or z data, since the x
values would be redundant.

If the X axis values change, the x axis will be saved, even if the x axis box is unchecked. If multiple
curves are saved to one text file, the x axis will always appear, even if x axis is unchecked.

See Delimiter on page 188.
DAT, RES, WFM
Data (*.DAT), Results (*.RES) and Waveform (*.WFM) are saved to a binary file. This can be used with
SoundCheck’s internal data processing modules. The x, y, and z data are stored automatically in the DAT
format. A test saving five 3-D curves of 100 points each takes under 200 mSec, and creates a file of 11KB.
DB
Save directly to database. You are required to enter
a Universal Data Link (UDL) or Data Source Name
(DSN) to gain access to a database either on the
local machine or on a connected server. A test
saving 5 3-D curves of 100 points each takes 6 to 8
seconds, and adds approximately 200KB to a
Microsoft Access file. Below is an example of one
table created by SoundCheck. You can find a more
extensive description of the relational table structure
in Relationship of Access Tables for
SoundCheck on page 469.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Figure 16-4: Database Schema
Autosave Editor
185

UDL or DSN - If DB (Database) is selected, you MUST browse for a Universal Data Link (UDL) or Data
Source Name (DSN) to access their target database. See Database Setup for use with SoundCheck
on page 467 for more information on using DSNs and UDLs. You must select a pre-existing UDL or
DSN file. Create a UDL or DSN with the help of your company database administrator or consult your
Windows manual to create one, using the correct provider for your database software. When you
browse for this file, SoundCheck will verify the connection to your database, and create the set of
tables for your SoundCheck data.
Note:
The fastest way to save directly to a database is to save single values or results, such as the
Pass/Fail verdict of a Limit Step. The curves can be saved to a *.DAT file for subsequent
analysis. By adding Serial Number to the curve in the DAT file, it will be easy to correlate the
curve to the items saved in the database.
Excel
Saves selected curves and/or results to an Excel file. Each selected curve, value, or result is saved on a
separate worksheet, that has the same name as the item selected from the Memory List (e.g., there will be a
worksheet named Fundamental if the Fundamental curve is selected). A test saving five 3-D curves of 100
points each takes 2 to 5 seconds, and creates a file of 21KB. Save to a new Excel file, or append a file
previously created by SoundCheck.
See Excel Template on page 187 for a note on Excel templates.
See Excel Template Tutorial on page 529.
Note:
SoundCheck saves the x-axis values at least once when saving to Excel. If you want to
append y and or z values to an Excel workbook, DO NOT check the x-axis box. The x-axis will
be written in the first row or column, depending on the layout. Subsequent curves will then only
contain y and/or z data, since the x values would be redundant.
Figure 16-5: Save to Excel in Rows
Important! Excel files that are Targets of an Autosave Step should not be open when the sequence is
run. Open files may prevent data from being saved. Do not attempt to close Excel manually
when it is opened by an Autosave Step. Let SoundCheck close Excel in the run of the
sequence. Office 97 and 2000 are no longer compatible with SoundCheck.
Note:
186
Waveform and WAV files cannot be saved to Excel.
Autosave Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Excel Template
If Excel is selected from the File Type choices, you have the option of browsing to a pre-defined Excel template
to arrange or analyze data. This template can utilize a master worksheet to collect data from other worksheets
in the Excel workbook.
The master worksheet can then be used for presentation and graphing of the data in any format that can be
utilized in Excel. Refer to Excel Template Tutorial on page 529 for step by step instructions.
Note:
If an error exists in a cell of an Excel template, SoundCheck cannot create a new Excel file for
saving data. SoundCheck will open and close Excel but is not able to report an error. If this occurs,
check the Excel template, repair the broken cells, save the template and run the SoundCheck test
again.
Important! Excel files that are Targets of an Autosave Step should not be open when the sequence is
run. Open files may prevent data from being saved. Do not attempt to close Excel manually
when it is opened by an Autosave Step. Let SoundCheck close Excel in the run of the
sequence. Office 97 and 2000 are no longer compatible with SoundCheck.
Note:
As of SoundCheck 14.01, Excel Macro-enabled files with the XLSM file extension are allowed. The
XLSM file extension is used in the generated file..
WAV
SoundCheck will create a *.WAV file of the selected Data or
Waveform. In data mode, this option is only appropriate for timebased curves.

WAV File Scaling - When saving a waveform to WAV file,
three options are available:

Normalize to peak: Saves the waveform so that the peak
value of the WAV file is 100% Full Scale (FS), regardless of
the level of the waveform

Audio Interface Values: Replicates what was recorded by
the audio interface, according to the Hardware and
Calibration data for the SoundCheck system.
The WAV file is scaled according to the full scale deflection
of the audio interface digital level.

User defined: Scales the waveform relative to a user
defined Maximum Level in physical units
WAV File = Input Waveform (in physical units) / Maximum
Level
The resulting WAV cannot be scaled so that its peak value
is above 100% FS.
Figure 16-6: WAV File Scaling
The last two options make it simple to return the measurement back to the physical unit. This can be used to
export data for customized mathematical analysis using other tools such as MatLab™.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Autosave Editor
187
Axes
Choose one or more axes to be saved. To store only the magnitude data (e.g., decibel values), check just the
Y-axis box. Selecting axes only applies to Text and Excel file types. For Dat, Res, and DB, x, y, and z-axes are
automatically stored.
Header

None – For a *.TXT file, the first row or column will contain the frequencies. The Data is in subsequent
rows or columns based on the Display being used.

Standard – Header information related
to the data and/or results will be the first
row or column. (Curve name, axis units,
freq. points, etc.)

Custom – Allows user to define header
for compatibility with other programs
and personal preferences. When using
this option, you can choose among tab,
comma, space, or other as the delimiter.
Figure 16-7: Text File With Standard Header
For tab, use \t between the custom header fields (e.g., Header1\tHeader2\tHeader3).
Layout

Rows – Aligns data in rows with headers above each column.

Columns – Aligns data in columns with headers along each row.
Important! Excel .XLS files are limited to 256 Columns. Rows are unlimited. In Excel 2007 and later the
.XLSX file maximum worksheet size is 1048576 rows by 16384 columns.
Delimiter

When saving a *.TXT file, you can choose to separate
data values using commas, tabs, spaces, or a user
defined character

Space Delimited can only be used with files that have
NO HEADER INFO. If there are spaces in the header
info, the Autosave Step will reject the file.
Notation
188

Scientific – Scientific notation is used. (1.03E+2)

Floating Point – Floating Point notation is used. (102.86)

Decimal places – Enter the desired precision for your data.
Autosave Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Test Information
These settings will need to be configured after you insert an
Autosave Step into a new sequence. When DB is selected as your
Figure 16-8: Select Test Information
file type, Operator, Time Stamp, Lot No, and Serial No will be
automatically saved to database. See Relationship of Access
Tables for SoundCheck on page 469 for more information on
the data stored in your database. All other file types allow you to save only the selected test information.

Operator – Keeps the Operator name (login name) with the curves or results being saved.

Time – Attaches a time and date stamp to the information being saved (up to one second resolution).

Lot No. – The lot number entered on the SoundCheck Main Screen is recorded with the data.

Serial No. – The serial number entered on the SoundCheck Main Screen is recorded with the data. To
have a unique serial number assigned to each row or column of data, choose the SN auto increment
step in the Serial No sequence step category.

Prompt for comment – After the test has run, the operator can enter a text note. This appears as a
separate field on the same line as the test data.
Note:
As of SoundCheck 15, the clipboard is cleared after each Autosave Step. You will not be able to
Copy the text from one Comment field and Paste it into another Autosave prompt.
Figure 16-9 shows an example of a Text file
with the lot number and serial number added.
Other Test information would be added to the
left of the serial number, and would also follow
the row or column format selected by the user.
If a *.DAT, *.RES or *.WFM file is chosen, all
Test Information will be appended to the curve
or result name.
Figure 16-9: Text File With Comment
Filename
The Autosave Step saves the selected curves, values or results to a file whose type is pre-selected. The name
of the file being saved can also be determined in the Autosave Editor.

New – Every time the Autosave Step runs, it will create a new file and overwrite an existing file of the
same name without prompting you. The first time SoundCheck is asked to copy over an existing file, it
will ask if the file should be replaced. Select Always Replace without Prompting to disable this
message in the future.


You can change this setting back to enable prompting by exiting SoundCheck and opening
SoundCheck 16.0.ini from the SoundCheck directory. Find the entry PROMPT TO OVERWRITE
FILE=False and set it to PROMPT TO OVERWRITE FILE=True. Save the SoundCheck 16.0.ini
file and open SoundCheck.)
Append – If a file of the same name exists in the same folder, the Autosave Step will append the new
data to it. If a file of the same name does not exist in the folder, Autosave will create a new file. It the
name template includes the date, the file will only be appended if the current date is the same as the
date in the file name. If not, a new file will be created.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Autosave Editor
189


Automatic – SoundCheck automatically stores the file to the specified location using the constructed
filename template. This option can also be used to append multiple tests to the same file (e.g., as a
table).

In the example below, Option is set to Automatic.

From the Construction Drop Down Menu select “Sequence Name” and click Add. Select “Lot
Number” and click Add.

To erase the Template name, click Clear.

To make a User Defined name (e.g., Prototype or Pilot Run), click User Defined from the
Construction drop down menu. Click Add. Any text in the User Defined field will be added to the
filename.
Prompt Operator – SoundCheck will prompt the Operator to enter a filename without an extension.
Construction & Template
Choose the item(s) to add to the filename template. In the
following example, the sequence name is “Autosave” and the lot
number entered on the SoundCheck Main Screen is “Demo 99”.
The template adds these two together to form the filename:
“Autosave Demo 99.txt”.
Figure 16-10: Filename Construction
Choose from the options listed in the Construction list box to build a filename for your data.

Sequence name – uses current sequence name for filename. The sequence name is typically the
model number of the product being tested.

Lot name or number – uses current lot name for filename.

User defined – text entered in the User Defined field is added to the
filename, e.g., DUT model name or model number. Entries in this box
will only be applied to the filename when <user> is added to the
Template field. Invalid characters are shown in Figure 16-11.

Serial number – uses current serial number for filename.
Note:
Figure 16-11: Character
Type Error

Date – uses current date for filename.

Time – uses current time for filename. This has one-second resolution and will generate a unique
filename each time the sequence is run. For this reason it is not appropriate to be used with the
“Append” option.
Note:
190
If the test sequence automatically increments the serial number
(SN auto increment step), a separate file will be created for
each measurement. To store all the measurements in one file,
do not use this text string (<sn>) as part of the file name.
If you want to append a file and include date/time stamp information, check the Time checkbox
in the Test Information section of the Autosave Editor.

Data or Results – append “data” or “results” to the filename to distinguish data files from results files.

Memory List Selection – a value from the Memory List can be used as part of the filename. See
Memory List Value Example on page 193 for an example. This could be the Loop Index of a Step
Configuration, e.g., the Degrees that a turntable turns for each increment of a polar plot measurement.
Autosave Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
The Loop Index field is always a Y axis value. See Step Configuration on page 251 and Index (Loop
Index) on page 399 for more information.

User Name – the User Name from the SoundCheck Login can be added to the file name.
Separator
Both the Autosave and Recall Steps feature a Separator to add to the file name template. This insures that the
filename saved in the Autosave Step can be accessed in a Recall Step. The selected separator will be used
between every item added to the template.
The following options are available:

Spaces - a single space will be added between each item in the template.

Underscores - a single underscore will be added between each item in the template.

None - no space or underscore is added between items in the template.
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Instruction Manual
Autosave Editor
191
Apply Button
The Apply Button allows you to test the action of the Autosave Step without having to run the sequence.
In a Sequence
Using the Autosave Step with the Sequence Editor, the
Autosave Step can be inserted into any existing test
sequence. It should be inserted after any analysis or post
processing. In this example, it has been placed
immediately before the Display Step.
Figure 16-12: Autosave Step in Sequence
With the variety of file types available to save user data, keep in mind that one Autosave Step is needed for
each type of file you wish to create or append. If you wish to save curves to a *.TXT file and results to a *.RES
file, two steps must be inserted in the sequence to accomplish this. Similarly, you may wish to use three
Autosave Steps to save the Time Response in a *.WAV file, the curves to an *.XLS file and then record all the
results information to database.
The default Autosave sequence that is delivered with SoundCheck uses a Serial Number Step to automatically
increment the serial number before proceeding to the Autosave Step. (The sequence can be found in the “How
To examples“ folder.) The functions of the Sequence Editor (such as Step Configuration of the Limit Steps)
could be adjusted to jump over the Serial Number and Autosave Steps if the device under test failed the Limit
Step conditions. In a sequence without jumps, data for all items tested would be saved, regardless whether the
DUT passes or fails.
Note:
192
Autosave Steps from SoundCheck 4.13 and earlier may need to be revised. Previous versions
allowed you to choose two file types in a single Autosave Step. If you copy a 4.13 or earlier
sequence into the new folders, the data file type (*.DAT) will be used in the sequence and the
results file type (.RES) will be ignored.
Autosave Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Memory List Value Example
The following example uses the “Polar Plot with Turntable” example
sequence that is included with SoundCheck.
Figure 16-13 shows the configuration of the first Rotate Speaker Message
Step.

It is set to create a value in the Memory List named “Angle“.

The starting value of “Angle” is 0 degrees.

Each time the step runs the value “Angle” is incremented 10 degrees.

After 18 repetitions, (180 degrees) the step instructs the sequence to
jump to the second Rotate Speaker Message.
Figure 16-13: Loop Index
If you add an Autosave Step to the sequence that saves the
fundamental curve at each angle, the Filename of the step can
be set as shown in Figure 16-14 through Figure 16-16.

The User Defined name entered is “DUT“.

The Separator is set to Spaces.

Memory list value is added to the Template. This opens
the Memory List Value Field.

Angle is chosen in the Memory List Value field.

The Axis of the value is set to “Y”.

The Format Value window is shown in Figure 16-14. It is
important to note that Hide Trailing Zeros is checked.

The .DAT files are saved starting at “DUT 0.dat“ as shown
in Figure 16-16.
Figure 16-14: Memory List Value
Figure 16-15: Number Format
Figure 16-16: Output
Example
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Instruction Manual
Autosave Editor
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194
Autosave Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Recall Editor
The Recall Editor (Ctrl+Shift+R) allows you to open previously saved data into your current sequence for postprocessing or display. Any SoundCheck® data or results file (marked by *.DAT and *.RES file extensions) can
be accessed and entered into the current Memory List. Waveform (WFM) files saved with SoundCheck can be
recalled as well.
The Recall Step uses the same controls as the Autosave Step:

Specify File Path - A specific file can be picked from any available folder location.

Prompt Operator - You can choose the file when prompted during the sequence run.

Automatic - Allows the sequence to recall saved data with the same rules or criteria used in the
Autosave Step which saved the data. This can be useful when running Statistics, e.g., Recall all curves
with the model name; “xyz“.

File selection can be limited to “Last Only” or any specific curve from the list.

Automatic File Addressing using Index values from the Memory List. The Index number generated by
the Configuration of a Step can be used in the File Name Template for Dynamic file naming.

The Apply Button is used to test the validity of a file path/address, e.g., Test recalling files from a
network folder.
Note:
DAT files created with SoundCheck 16.0 are not viewable in versions of SoundCheck prior to and
including SoundCheck 6.0x. The DAT file format was updated in SoundCheck 6.1.
Note:
Recalled data can be added to a Custom Group. See Sorting and Grouping on page 289.
File Path

When a sequence is exported, dependent files are exported to the selected folder along with the .SQC
file, i.e.; DAT, RES, WFM and TXT files that are the object of the Recall Step.

When converting a sequence to SoundCheck 16.0, Autosave and Recall Steps will need to be updated
if the file location on the new computer is not identical to the original computer.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Recall Editor
195
Specify File Path
The default behavior for the Recall Step is Specify File Path. The
step will operate in the same manner as in previous versions of
SoundCheck. (Figure 17-1 shows that individual curves can be
selected in the list.)
Exact File Path
By indicating the exact path in the File Path field, the file will be
recalled from that location, even if the sequence is saved to a new
location. Select the Folder Browse button to the right of the file
path window to select the proper folder.
Figure 17-1: Specify File Path
Rules - Relative File Path Rules in Recall Editor
196

This indicates that the location of the file selected is relative to the folder path of the sequence, e.g.,
from an exported sequence folder. This is useful when sharing sequences with other SoundCheck
users as it keeps the data in the same location as the sequence. The relative path can even include
sub-folders.

This is for Automatic and Prompt Operator selections only.

Delete any text in the File Path field and leave it blank. This indicates
that the file to be recalled is in the same folder as the sequence file
location.

Sub-folders are indicated by just the name of the folder (no back
slash): My DATA.

If the sub-folder does not exist, SoundCheck will automatically
create it.

A 2nd level of sub-folder does require a back slash: My
DATA\Product 1
Recall Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Automatic
With Automatic mode, only the Base Path for the file is specified.
The Base Path is the location the step will open files from. The file
name is created using the controls for the Template field.
In the Construction List, the option(s) for the file name are
selected and added to the Template. This forms the full filename,
which is to be recalled by the step.
Figure 17-2 shows a User Defined name in the Template. The
Serial Number entered is “1”. When the step runs, it will look for
any file, in the Base Path, with the name “DUT 1.dat“.
The standard Autosave options for Filename Construction apply to
the Recall Step. Please refer to Filename on page 189 for a
description of each of the Filename Construction options.
Separator
The separator used in the Recall Step must match what is used in
the Autosave Step.
Figure 17-2: Automatic
The Memory List Value option has the same function as in Autosave, so that users can select a Memory List
value (such as loop index) to be added to the Recall file name. See Memory List Value Example on page 193
for an example of this type of construction.
Prompt Operator
With a Prompt Operator step, a “Select File” window will
open when the step runs in the sequence. The operator
can then select any file available for recall. Base Path
allows for a default directory to be specified. This directs
the operator to a specific folder for file selection.
Under Recalled Curves, a custom name has been
entered. When “Pro Mic 2.dat” is opened, the curve will
be added to the Memory List as “Fundamental“.
Figure 17-3: Prompt Operator
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Instruction Manual
Recall Editor
197
File Types
The following files types can be recalled: Curves (.DAT), Results (.RES), Waveforms (.WFM and .WAV), Text
(.TXT) and Values (.DAT).
WAV files must match the sample rate of the System Hardware configuration in order to be used. See WAV
File Types on page 293 for more information on supported WAV types.
WAV Recall
Recalled WAV files can now be scaled so that subsequent
analysis will provide results in FS and dBFS as defined by AES17.

When recalling a WAV file, select units of FS or
FS(AES17) from the drop down menu as shown in Figure
17-4

When opening a stereo WAV file, SoundCheck will
automatically split the file into two waveforms, adding [L]
or [R] to the file names
Wav File Scaling Options:

‘FS’ – SoundCheck default value, the max amplitude of a
digital sine wave is -3 dBFS

‘FS (AES17)’ – Value corresponding to AES17 standard
definition, the max amplitude of a digital sine wave is
0 dBFS
Figure 17-4: WAV Recall
Data Import Wizard
As of SoundCheck 14, the first time you recall text in the step, the
Data Import Wizard runs. Once the text import settings are correct,
you can create an .IMP file which saves the settings used in the
Data Import Wizard. When the Recall Step runs in a sequence the
.IMP file allows the step to run with no operator action required.
The Data Import Wizard also runs when importing text files in the
Memory List. For more information refer to Data Import Wizard
Tutorial on page 539.
File Path Info
Browse to the .DAT or .RES file you wish to reference. The file
path and file name will appear in the File Path field.
Figure 17-5: Import Wizard
198
Recall Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Curve Names to be Recalled
After selecting the file, the Recall Editor will display the names of the curves, results or waveforms saved to that
file in the Curve or Result Names to be Recalled text box. These names will be inserted into the Memory list
as placeholders for data that will be created during the sequence run. These names will include any Test
Information that was saved with the file. See the Autosave Editor on page 183 for more information.
The Add… and Clear buttons on the right hand side of the editor allow you to edit your selected list of data.
The Add… button will allow you to add a name (an empty curve, single value or result) to the Curve Names to
be Recalled text box. You may wish to do this when you know the data will be created later in the sequence.
Clear will empty the text box of all information, removing placeholders from the Memory List until the step is
executed in the sequence.
Order of Data
The recall data list is only generated the first time you point to the file. If the order of the data changes after that
it will be populated into the wrong names in the memory list.
This can occur when the order of Autosave Steps changes, putting the data into the .DAT file in the wrong
order. It can also happen when you manually save the data from the Memory List.
Pointing directly to the file again refreshes the list to fix the issue.
Recall in a Sequence
The Recall selection is the only information specific to the step.
You can choose to enter All Curves into the current sequence, or use the Last Curve Only choice to recall
only the most recent curve or result saved to the file.
Note:
When a SoundCheck 16.0 sequence that contains a Recall Step(s) is exported, a copy of the
recalled file(s) is also exported to the Exported Sequence Folder. The file path to this data will
change once the sequence is exported (to point to the file when it is in the exported folder that the
"*.SQC" file is in).
An example of the use of the Recall Editor can be found in the
Limits in Reference to Standard sequence located in the How
To examples folder.
In the example sequence, the curve of a reference standard
“golden” loudspeaker is stored and then recalled by the
sequence in order to compare it to the response of the speaker
under test.

The Recall step must be placed before the Post
Processing step that will be using the recalled data.

An example of the Post Processing step can be found in
Figure 17-8: Curve used in Post Processing.
Figure 17-6: Recall Step in Sequence
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Recall Editor
199
The Reference Standard.dat file is located by browsing to the
Data folder. The proper curve is then selected. Note that in this
example Last Curve Only has been selected to use the latest
Reference Standard calibration. This limits the list to only one
item.
Figure 17-7: Last Only Selected
This curve can now be used in the Post Processing Step to perform a curve
division calculation. Figure 17-8 shows the recalled curve selected as Operand
B in the Post Processing step.
Figure 17-8: Curve used
in Post Processing
Rename
By clicking on Rename, the name of any curve or result can
be given a custom name. The example in Figure 17-9
shows that the name has been changed from “Reference
Std” to “Golden Unit“.
By selecting New Curve, the original item will remain in the
list and a copy of the item will be added, using the new
name.
Clear All
By clicking on Clear All, all the curves in the list are
unchecked. This can be used to de-select a large number of
curves and then select the desired curve(s).
200
Recall Editor
Select specific curve
from drop down list.
Figure 17-9: Custom Curve Name
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Add
This allows you to add curve names to the list, as replacement names for existing items to be recalled. This is
useful for changing a long list of curve names; e.g., Polar Plot Curves.
Clear
This will clear the contents of the Names to be Recalled. You can then add custom names using the Add
button. It is important to know the number of curves in the list and the order of the curves, so that a
corresponding number of new names are added.
Renaming Example
The example in Figure 17-10 shows 20 curves are present
in the Polar.Dat file. After clicking the Clear button, 20 new
names can be added to the list. These new names will
replace the old curve names in the Memory List.
1. The Polar.dat file contains named from
“Fundamental” to “19-Fundamental”
2. Click Clear to empty the list
3. Click the Add button to enter new curve names
4. Each curve must be entered one at a time
Note that the curves must be entered in the proper order: 0
Degrees to 180 Degrees.
This puts “place markers” in the Memory List for each of
the curves, without actually having to recall the Polar.dat
file. When the sequence runs, the new step names will be
used.
This can be used to open polar plot.DAT files and rename
the curves with more descriptive names.
Figure 17-10: Renaming Example
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Instruction Manual
Recall Editor
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SoundCheck® 16.0
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Recall Editor
202
Post-Processing Editor
Note:
As of SoundCheck® 7, all spectrum are summable. Sequences from previous versions of
SoundCheck will need to be revised if Summable Spectrum is selected from the Memory List.
To view and change the system’s post-processing settings;
select Post-Processing from the Setup drop down menu
on the SoundCheck Main Screen, or use the shortcut
Ctrl+Shift+O. Post-Processing allows a variety of
operations to be applied to measurement data, including
additional calculations, smoothing, and statistics.
The Post Processing Use Chart on page 233 provides an
overview of the Post Processing functions available in
SoundCheck along with examples of use. Post Processing
and the Equation Editor are optional modules and may not
be available depending on the modules enabled on your
Hardware Key. They can always be purchased from Listen
and added to a Hardware Key license if needed.
Select Calculation Type
Select Curves from the
Memory List
Select Operation type
Uncheck "Use Default" to
create a custom result name
Check to Show Data for
the selected axes
Create custom Units
Click on "Apply" to update
result in the Memory List
Figure 18-1: Post-processing Editor
Search Range
Many post processing operations in SoundCheck have a search range,
which allows the user to select discrete points or ranges along the x-axis
over which to perform the desired calculation. Examples include scalar
functions such as average, max and min, as well as windowing
intersection, and more.
As of SoundCheck 14, the search range function uses a very simple table
control and allows memory list values to be selected. This means that
search range parameters can be variables that are dynamically
calculated by the sequence.
If Search Range is unchecked, this indicates it is set to “All” points in the
selected data.
Figure 18-2: Search Range
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Post-Processing Editor
203
Batch Processing
This allows you to select a group of items from the Memory List to Post Process.
Any Custom Group created in the Memory List can be used for the appropriate Postprocessing type. Please refer to Sorting and Grouping on page 289 for instructions
on creating a Custom Group.
Figure 18-1 shows a group of 4 curves selected in Operand A.

Add Input Data Name is checked. The curves are labeled, Mic 1 through Mic
4.

The result of this step will be 4 values added to the Memory List. The values
are labeled: “Sens @ 1 kHz (Mic 1)“ to “Sens @ 1 kHz (Mic 4)“

When using Batch Processing it is recommended that you use the Add Input
Data Name option so that the results are clearly named.
Figure 18-3: Batch
Processing
Desired Result
This is the name of the newly created curve. If Use default is checked, the Result name is automatically
generated. A new name will be created using the original curve name concatenated with the mathematical
operator, e.g., <Operand A><mathematical operator><Operand B>. This applies to all types of Post Processing
steps except the User Equation. See User Equation (optional module) Equation Editor on page 221 for
more details.
When this box is unchecked, a custom name can be entered manually. In Figure 18-1 the result has been
named Relative to Reference.
Arithmetic
Select Type
Allows block arithmetic operations (e.g., addition, subtraction,
multiplication, and division) to be performed between two complex data
sets (magnitude and phase vs. frequency) or waveforms. Operand A
and B can be any curve, waveform or value chosen from the Memory
List. Mathematical operations are performed in parallel on Operand A
and B: Point by point operation. Interpolation is performed when the
frequency axis of the two operands do not match.


Available Operations: Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication
and Division
Work in mode: Mathematical operations can be performed on
the dB or power values instead of Linear values (for Y axis)
Select
Operand A
Select
Operand B
Select Operation
and
"Work in" Mode
Example of Work in dB: 90 dB + 90 dB = 180 dB (The math is
applied on the dB values.)
Example of Work in Linear: 90 dB + 90 dB = 96 dB (The math
is applied on the linear values.)
Example of Work in Power: 90 dB + 90 dB = 93 dB (The math
is applied on the power values.)
Note:
204
Choose axes
for Result
Figure 18-4: Arithmetic Postprocessing
Multiplication or Division of dB to dB values is NOT allowed.
Post-Processing Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual

Units are combined according to the operation chosen. For more information on the combination of
units, refer to Equation Editor Functions on page 523. (The units of the final result can be modified
by clicking Units in the editor.)

Result x-axis same as: Allows you to set the x-axis scale from the selected operand or combination of
operands.
X-axis combination:
Operand type
X-axis Combin
A
B
A
Curve
Point
x
Curve
Point
Curve
Point
Curve
Curve
Curve
Curve
Curve
Curve
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
B
A&B
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
Output type
Rule applied
Curve
YB, ZB is applied as a complex constant on the entire
curve A regardless of XB.
Point
Curve value is applied on point value @ XB using interpolation.
Curve
Result curve is the same as A except at XB, where points
A and B are combined.
Curve
Points with XA only.
Curve
Points with XB only.
Curve
Points with XA & XB combined.
Point
One point with XA..
Point
One point with XB.
Curve
Two points of same values @ XA & XB.
You can choose A & B combined as your x-axis, instead of
choosing to combine magnitude values regardless of
frequency. This allows you to splice curves with different
ranges together. This works best when the range of one
curve ends when the range of the next curve begins (See
Windowing on page 223). Figure 18-5 shows a Low
Frequency and a High Frequency curve (in the XY Graph of
the Display Editor). Figure 18-6 shows the resulting curve
when the two curves are added and the x-axis is the same as
A & B combined.
Figure 18-5: Separate Curves
Microphone or loudspeaker measurements that require two
different measurements to acquire the proper response data
can be combined into one curve using this technique.
Figure 18-6: Combined Curves
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Post-Processing Editor
205
Constant
Allows any curve, value or waveform in the Memory List (Operand A) to be
modified by block arithmetic operations (e.g., addition, subtraction,
multiplication, and division). Operand B can either be a single value or a
user defined constant. The operation is made on real data. The constant is
applied on only one axis: each value of a single axis of Operand A is
combined with the constant, Operand B.
Select Type
Select
Operand A
Select
Operand B
Rules - Axis choices for Operand A in Post Processing

X – Modifies (+, -, x, /) Operand A by the factor entered in the
Constant value box, ONLY ON THE X Axis. e.g., Frequency

Y – Modifies (+, -, x, /) Operand A by the amount entered in the
Constant value box, ONLY ON THE Y Axis. e.g., Magnitude

Z – Modifies (+, -, x, /) Operand A by the amount entered in the
Constant value box, ONLY ON THE Z Axis. e.g., Phase curve
Operand B can be a Single Value item from the Memory List. In this
case you can chose the x, y or z value in the Operand B selection
field. This value can then be applied to Operand A as per the rules
stated above.
Select
Operation
& Work In
Mode
Enter
Name
Figure 18-7: Curve Shifting
Using a Constant
Work in mode is the same as in Arithmetic except: Multiplication or Division of dB to dB values is
allowed. Units combination is the same as in Arithmetic. Refer to Arithmetic on page 204 for more
information.
206
Post-Processing Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Unary
Select Type
Allows unary operations to be performed on a complex data curve as well as
waveforms.
Single values, curves and waveforms are available as Operand A.
However, it should be noted that not all operations are valid with all operand
types. Please refer to Figure 18-9.
Select
Operand A
Select
Operation
All operations allow you to select the axis and Default or Custom Name for
the Desired Result.
Figure 18-8: Unary Options
Change Sign
Multiplies the Operand by -1
Inv FFT
Typically Used For
Same as Operand A
Same as Operand A
Same as Operand A
Same as Operand A
Same as Operand A
Math operations on linear values
Inverting curves used as correction curves
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
N
Y
N
N
Calculates the Group Delay (negative
Y
derivative of Phase) of Operand A
N
N
N
N
Y
Same as OperMath operation
and A
Allows Unwrapped Phase to
Curve
be exported as a curve
Loudspeaker or other freCurve
quency response function
analysis
Curve
Spectrum analysis
Y
N
N
Waveform
Calculates the Inverse (1/X) of Operand A
Returns the positive valued magnitude
Absolute Value
of Operand A
Returns the Square of Operand A
Square
(Operand A x Operand A)
Returns the Square Root of Operand
Square Root
A
Calculates the exponential of Operand
Exp
A (expOperand A)
Returns the natural Logarithm of
Ln
Operand A
Returns the Unwrapped phase of
Unwrap Phase
Operand A
FFT
Result Type
Y
Reciprocal
Value
Group Delay
Waveforms
Operation
Values
Name
Curves
Operand A
Calculates the FFT of a Waveform
Returns a real-valued time signal
(waveform) from a complex (Mag &
Phase) spectrum or response
Math operation
Math operation
Math operation
Same as OperMath operation
and A
Time Domain Analysis
Figure 18-9: Unary Operations Chart
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Instruction Manual
Post-Processing Editor
207







208
Change Sign: Changes the sign from + to - (or - to +)

Curves - Only affects the phase (Z axis). Magnitude remains unchanged.

Values - You are allowed to select one axis to process: x, y or z.

Waveforms - Creates inverse of waveform, swapping positive and negative values of only the Y
axis
Reciprocal Value: Calculates the Reciprocal (1/X) or Inverse of Operand A

Curves - Creates inverse of curve, swapping positive and negative values of the y and z axis

Values - Allowed to select one axis to process; x, y or z. For log data in dB, calculates the inverted
transfer function (Input/Output). Useful for setting target equalization curves.
Absolute Value: Returns the non-negative value of Operand A

Curves - Returns the magnitude (all values positive) of Operand A. Works on complex frequency
domain data and deletes the phase (sets all phase values to zero).

Values - Allowed to select one axis to process; x, y or z. Returns the magnitude of the item
selected
Square: Returns the Square of Operand A: Operand A x Operand A

Select axis for result

Curves -

Values - Allowed to select one axis to process; x, y or z.

Waveforms -
Square Root: Returns the Square Root of Operand A

Select axis for result

Curves -

Values - Allowed to select one axis to process; x, y or z.

Waveforms -
Exp: Calculates the exponential of Operand A (expOperand A)

Curves - Convert dB back to real values, calculate the exponential, then convert the result back to
dB.

Values - Allows you to select one axis to process; x, y or z.
Ln: Returns the Natural Logarithm of Operand A

Curves - To extract the all-pass portion (pure delay) from the linear phase of a response. Many
steps are required, but this is a key element.

Values - Allowed to select one axis to process; x, y or z.
Post-Processing Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual




Unwrap Phase: Allows Unwrapped Phase to be exported as a curve. It also allows Unwrapped Phase
to be shown in a Display without having to select Unwrapped Phase from the Right Click Options of the
display window. See Unwrap Phase on page 298 for details and an example.

Options: Under “Show Data” X, Y and Z must be selected.

Curves - Returns Unwrapped Phase as a curve.
Group Delay: The derivative of the ‘unwrapped phase’ as delay (not absolute time) vs.
frequency.

Options: Under “Show Data”, X, Y and Z must be selected

Curves - This is a curve only operation.

Smoothing width in Hz - Increasing width can obscure details
1dϕτ = – ----------2πdf
FFT: Calculates the FFT of a waveform.

Select the Impulse Response Waveform from the Memory
List. The Waveform must be in linear Y units only (not
dB).

Select the Weighting window: None (Rectangular), Cosine
Tapered, Exponential, etc.

Check Search Range and right click in the field

Select Add, Edit or Remove

Select Single Point or Range

In the Select Search Range section, edit the time
range on which to apply the FFT and weighting

Data outside of the time range is ignored

The result will be a frequency curve with a linear X axis,
default Y unit in dB and Phase in degrees.

If Search Range is unchecked, this indicates it is set to “All”
points in the selected data.
Figure 18-10: FFT and
Inverse FFT
Inv FFT: Returns a real-valued time signal (waveform) from a complex (Mag & Phase) spectrum or
response.

Select the response curve from the Memory List.

The output is a Linear or dB (envelope) Waveform.
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Instruction Manual
Post-Processing Editor
209
Scalar (Statistics)
This allows calculations of a single value from a specified
curve or waveform. Again, not all operations are valid for all
operand types.
Select Type
Select Operand A

None of these functions can be applied on single
values.

IEEE and ITU loudness operations can only be
performed on frequency curves.
Select Operation
Optional modules for
telephone loudness
measurements
Optional modules
for hearing aid
measurements
Figure 18-11: Scalar Operations
Average
N
Calculates the mean of the curve Y values
y =

i=1
 y----i over the search range, regardless of the units (e.g.,
 N
averaging a curve with 3 points, 10, 12 and 14 dB, will yield a value of 12 dB.
Power Sum
Calculates the square root of the sum of the squares of each Y value in a spectrum.
PwrSum =
1- 
2
--  yi 
B

i
This is dependent on the Bandwidth Value, “B”. The Bandwidth Value varies, depending the analysis method
selected in the Analysis Step.
e.g., The square root of the sum of the power of each RTA bin, or the sum of the power of a specific frequency
band of an FFT spectrum.
Note:
As of SoundCheck® 7, all spectrum are summable. Sequences from previous versions of
SoundCheck will need to be revised if Summable Spectrum is selected from the Memory List.
Maximum
Finds the maximum curve Y value in the specified search range and returns X, Y and Z values at that point.
210
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SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Minimum
Finds the minimum curve Y value in the specified search range and returns X, Y and Z values at that point.
Est. Resonance
Finds the resonance frequency, amplitude, and quality factor (Q) of a peak in a curve. The calculation is based
on an algorithm that fits a quadratic polynomial to sequential groups of data points. The number of data points
used in the fit is specified by the width control in terms of either how many dB down from the peak or % of the
peak. For most woofers, -3 dB will suffice, but for low Q drivers (such as tweeters) -1 dB may be required in
order to resolve the resonance frequency from the fitted curve.
Est. Notch
Finds the antiresonance frequency, amplitude, and quality factor of a dip or notch in a curve.
IEEE-661 OLR
This calculates the average of the Freq. Response from Start Freq to Stop Freq. The average is taken of the
amplitude raised to the power of (1/Exponent). The Freq. Response must be given in dB. The average is
calculated using the trapezoid rule. Values for Freq. Response at the exact Start and Stop Frequencies are
found by interpolation.
To calculate OLR according to ANSI/IEEE 661, the Start Freq must be no higher than 300 Hz and the Stop
Freq must be no lower than 3300 Hz. The Frequency Response shall (according to the standard) cover this
frequency range and include at least 12 measurement points within the frequency range.
α
S
S
i
i–1
---------
 --------20α
20α
 10

+ 10


N 
fi  

 log ----------- ⋅ -----------------------------------------2
LoudnessRating = – 20log i = 2  f i – 1
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- f N
log  -----
 f1 


α = Loudness compression exponent. The default value, based on the standard, is 2.2.

N = number of measured frequencies

fi = frequency at index i. The frequency range is usually 300 - 3300 Hz

Si = electroacoustic sensitivity of the path at frequency fi. This sensitivity is usually expressed in units
of dB mV/Pa or dB Pa/mV
A correction may be applied to the sensitivities in these formula to account for leakage of (legacy) Type
1 ear simulators, or for impedance, depending on the application and/or applicable performance
standards.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Post-Processing Editor
211
ITU-T SLR & RLR (Optional Module Required)
Calculates the send and receive loudness ratings according to the ITU-T Rec. P79 Loudness Rating from the
m ( Si – Wi )
 N2
---------------------------
10
10


values in the Freq. Response. The formula is: LoudnessRating = – ------ log  10


m
 i = N1


m = Loudness growth exponent

i = frequency band index (ISO R10 1/3-octave bands)

Wi = frequency weighting in dB

Si = electroacoustic sensitivity of the path at frequency fi

N = frequency band number (typically 4-17 where band no. 1 = 100 Hz)
A correction may be applied to the sensitivities in these formula to account for leakage of (legacy) Type
1 ear simulators, or for impedance, depending on the application and/or applicable performance
standards.
ITU-T STMR (Optional Module Required)
Calculates the sidetone loudness ratings according to the ITU-T Rec. P79
Loudness Rating from the values in Freq. Response.
For IEEE standards, the exponent can be user defined. For ITU standards, both
the exponent and the weighting curve can be user defined. This is for future use
and modifications of standards. The step is set to Use Default Values by
default.

Select Type: Scalar

Select Operand A: Fundamental

Operation: ITU-T options; SLR, RLR, RLR with Leak and STMR

Weighting Function: Select “Use Default Values” or select an item
from the Memory List

Search Range
If Search Range is unchecked, this indicates it is set to “All” points in
the selected data.
Check Search Range and right click in the field

212
Figure 18-12: ITU-T
SLR Settings

Select Add, Edit or Remove

Select Single Point or Range

In the Select Search Range section, edit the frequency range From and To values
Select Name option: Use Default or Custom Name for output
Post-Processing Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
ITU Wideband Weighting Curves
The default ITU weighting curves used for loudness rating are narrowband (200-4
kHz). They are from ITU Recommendation P.79, Table 1.
Wideband weighting curves (100-10 kHz) can be used instead. They are from ITU
Recommendation P.79, Table A.2. They are intended for use on devices that
can operate both in narrowband and wideband modes.
Wideband weighting curves are available in the SoundCheck Data folder:
C:\SoundCheck 16.0\data\.
Figure 18-13 shows an example of how the weighting curves are used.
1. Open the RLR or SLR DAT file in the Memory List
2. The weighting curve can then be selected in the Post Processing step
3. Exponent is same as default
4. If Search Range is unchecked, this indicates it is set to “All” points in the
selected data. RLR is calculated on each point in the weighting curve,
according to the standard.
5. For better results, Operand A should be the received frequency response
in 1/3rd octave resolution. This can be the result of a 1/3rd octave RTA
measurement, or conversion from another format using “band-averaging”
as described in IEEE 269-2012
Figure 18-13: Wideband
Weighting Curve
6. For use in a sequence, use a Recall Step to load the RLR or SLR DAT file into the Memory List
Attack and Release (Optional Module
Required)
This function can be used to test the time it
takes for the signal from a DUT to stabilize
after a sudden change in signal level.

This function requires optional module
2008 - Attack and Release

In this example, Stimulus is set to 2
kHz, with 2 different stimulus levels
(Figure 18-14)

Time Envelope must be turned on in
the Analysis Step of the sequence
(Figure 18-14)

See the default sequence “Release
Time“ in the Hearing Aid folder for an
example
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Figure 18-14: Stimulus and
Analysis Step Settings
Post-Processing Editor
213
Attack Time
Figure 18-15 shows the settings for the Attack Time function in Post Processing. By
making an initial measurement of the device under test, you can look at the Attack
Time Envelope to determine if the Search Range of the example sequence is
correct for that particular device.
In this case, the Attack level is set to 3 dB and the search range is set at 1 to
2.5 seconds.
Note:
The Search Range of the Post Processing step must be set to start
before the onset of the transient and end well after the point were the
signal has become stable. An initial measurement of the device will
provide and Attack Envelope so that you can determine what the actual
range should be. See Figure 18-16. Right click on the Search Range
field to edit.
Figure 18-15: Attack
Time
Important! In order to avoid “turn on transients”
the Search Range should never
start at 0 mS.
Figure 18-16: Attack Envelope
The process starts by searching the
Attack Time Envelope in reverse, from the
Search Range End Point as specified in
the Post Processing step. The green
cursor in Figure 18-17 indicates this
point. From here, the Post Processing
step searches back to the point where the
signal is 3 dB greater than the stable
level. The red cursor indicates this point.
The difference in level between the two
points is shown in the Delta Y field (Δ y);
3 dB as specified in the Parameters
section of the Post Processing step.
214
-0.348
3.0013
Figure 18-17: Start of stability after Attack
Post-Processing Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
The next step is to determine the actual
attack time. Cursor 1 and Cursor 2 are
positioned
Attack time is the difference
between the transient onset time
and the 3 dB up time: Δ t.
This is the time from the onset of the
transient to the “3 dB up” point. Figure 1818 shows the attack time in the Delta X –
Time box (Δ t).
(Delta X and Delta Y are visible by clicking
the Double Down Arrow at the right side of
the display window.)
Figure 18-18: Attack Time
Release Time
In the example sequence, the Release level Parameter is set to –4 dB with a Search
Range of 1 to 2.5 seconds. The Search Range may need to be increased if testing a
device with a long release time.
The Release Time function in the Post Processing step works in a similar fashion to
the Attack Time.
Figure 18-19: Release
Time
It searches in reverse for the point where the signal
becomes stable after release. From this point it then
searches for the point where the envelope level drops
below the stable level, by the value specified in the
Parameters section of the Post Processing Step.
-0.308
The Release time is then determined to be the time from
where the level of the envelope drops below the threshold
level to the point where the envelope level is 4 dB down
from the stable level.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
-4.038
Figure 18-20: Start of stability after Release
Post-Processing Editor
215
This method of determining the attack and release time,
as well as the values noted in the setup of the sequence,
is in accordance with ANSI standard S3.22 – 1996,
section 6.15.2. The actual Attack and Release Limits will
vary according to the specifications of the device under
test.
0.4687
-31.650
Figure 18-21: Release Time
216
Post-Processing Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Zwicker Loudness (Optional Module Required)
Zwicker Loudness calculates the overall perceived loudness of a sound. This post-processing operation uses a
psycho-acoustic model which takes into account the nonlinearity of the human ear to sound at different
frequencies and levels. It provides the capability to measure the perceived loudness of complex sounds, e.g.,
telephone ring tones.
This is the actual loudness of the sound recorded, with a value in PHONS and SONES.
Spectrum
dB SPL
Auditory
Bands
Ear
Weighting
Freq.
Spreading
Level
Compression
Loudness
in Phons
Figure 18-22: Zwicker Loudness Process
The Zwicker Loudness process from Figure 18-22 is detailed below.
1. The spectrum in dB SPL is recorded. It must be a "Calibrated Acoustic
Pressure" in Pascals or dB SPL.
2. It is regrouped into auditory bands, according to Bark Scale
3. The spectrum is remapped
4. A frequency weighting is then applied to take into account the response of
the ear
5. A frequency masking effect is applied
6. A mathematical compression is applied to achieve the final loudness
number
7. This yields the actual loudness in PHONS, by power summing the
compressed level
Figure 18-23: Zwicker
Settings

Zwicker Loudness uses an up-to-date algorithm that conforms to the ITU-R Rec. BS.1387 PEAQ
standard. It is similar to ISO532, which is simpler and only processes 3rd Octave spectrums.

Zwicker Loudness is intended for use with broadband signals such as speech. It is not for use with
single tones.

Zwicker can be applied to any spectrum, as long as it is a calibrated acoustic spectrum in Pascals or
dB SPL.

The curve must be consistent in resolution, e.g.: 5 Hz, 3rd Octave, etc. The frequency resolution of the
spectrum is not necessarily important. The algorithm converts the spectrum to power spectral density
before calculating the loudness.

Zwicker Loudness also features an option to output the Loudness Spectrum to the Memory List. The
units for the X-axis are selectable between Hz and Bark scale (See Bark Scale on page 219). The
loudness spectrum allows you to determine which frequencies are responsible for the loudness, and is
useful for analysis of signals such as: telephone ring tones, speech and music.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Post-Processing Editor
217
Zwicker Example
This example shows the Zwicker Loudness results for a set of headphones.

The Post-Processing step in Figure 18-23 shows the Corrected
Fundamental selected under Operand A

Two Post Processing steps are required to create separate results with
unique names for left and right headphones

Loudness Spectrum is checked and the X-axis unit is set to Hz

You have the option of selecting which axis to show in the Loudness Value
Figure 18-24: Zwicker
Example
Output
The Zwicker Loudness Post Processing output is
shown in Figure 18-25.

Separate Loudness values are shown for
Left and Right Headphones

The Diffuse Field Corrected Response is
used as Operand A in the Zwicker Post
Processing step

X axis = Loudness in Phons

Y axis = Power sum of original spectrum

Z axis = Loudness in Sones

Zwicker Loudness Spectrum - This shows
which frequencies are responsible for the
loudness
Figure 18-25: Zwicker Loudness Output
218
Post-Processing Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Bark Scale
The auditory pitch scale is expressed in Barks. The
relationship between Barks and Frequency (Hz) is
shown in Figure 18-26.
Figure 18-26: Bark Scale
Active Speech Level - P56 (Optional Module
Required)
Used with a speech signal, this operation evaluates levels for only the parts of the
waveform where speech is actually present. Silent gaps are excluded but short
interruptions that are part of continuous speech are included.
It is widely used in telephony applications, i.e.: testing to ITU-T P.56 05/93 Method B.
The Active Speech Level of the WAV file can be set in the Stimulus Editor.
See Stimulus Settings on page 98.
Parameters:

Operand A - This should be a speech waveform

Time Constant (Sec) - Time constant of exponential averaging used to
smooth the envelope of the speech signal (30 ms default)

Hangover Time (Sec) - Allowable time for silence during active speech.
Longer silent gaps between active speech sections are ignored and left out of the calculation. (200 ms
default)

Margin (dB) - Difference, in dB, between threshold of activity and active speech level. When the level
of the background noise is high, the margin can be reduced in order to exclude the noise. (15.9 dB
default)
Figure 18-27: Active
Speech Level
Output:
The Active Speech Level value in the Memory List shows the following:

X - Activity Factor (%): Percentage of time during waveform where speech
is active

Y - Active Speech Level (dB): Mean power of speech measured over the
aggregate time of activity

Z - Long-term Level (dB): Mean power of the waveform measured over its
entire duration
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Post-Processing Editor
Figure 18-28: Value
in Memory List
219
Smoothing
Selects the degree of smoothing for the displayed
curve. Smoothing corresponds to a running average
on a frequency axis with a window of the given width
(1/n octave or number of Hertz). The running
average can be weighted using a Hanning window in
order to get a smoother curve result. Figure 18-29:
One-third Octave Curve Smoothing compares an
8196-line with the same curve smoothed by 1/3
octave.
Figure 18-29: One-third Octave Curve Smoothing
Note:
To keep both the beginning and end points of the smoothed curve untouched, the smoothing width
is gradually reduced down to zero when it reaches the extremities of the curve. In Figure 18-29,
the two curves merge at 20 kHz.
Intersection (search)
This is used to find the intersection points between two curves or
waveforms, or between a curve/waveform and a single point.
Search Up - Determines the first intersection point
Select Type
Select Operand A
Search Down - Determines the last intersection point
Return all intersection points - Yields a curve of all of the
intersection points. (This can also be displayed as a table of values in
a Display Step.)
Search Range allows you to narrow the range of the search or to
exclude regions that a search should not occur within.
Select Operand B
Select Search
Criteria
If Search Range is unchecked, this indicates it is set to “All” points in
the selected data.
Result
The Intersection Value is available in the Memory List.
Figure 18-30: Intersection of Two
Curves
Figure 18-31: Intersection
Value
220
Post-Processing Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
User Equation (optional module) Equation Editor
This section allows you to build an arithmetic equation using constants and the values generated by the
sequence. You can build an equation (similar syntax to writing an equation in Excel) and define the variables
and results at the top of the editor. Build this equation by selecting a curve, single value name, or defining a
constant from the pull down lists that appear in the top table of the User Equation Parameters window.
Assign variable names for these data in the Variables column, using numbers and letters, but no spaces.
Choose which axis of the curve or value you wish to use. The Values and Units columns are only accessible if
you are in a user defined constant row.
Curves and Values from the Memory List have sequence-determined values and units. Use these variables in
the equation box in the Post Processing Editor. ALL CALCULATIONS ARE PERFORMED IN LINEAR UNITS
IN THE REAL DOMAIN. Units drawn from the Memory List are analyzed, and if a log scale is in use, it will be
first converted to linear before being used in calculation. The Editor will then convert back to the log scale to
output results, if desired. Define the units of the results by clicking Units.
Complex Math operations are not supported. You will need to break the operation down to its arithmetic
equivalent.
Operations on the Z axis (phase) is not supported in the Equation Editor.
Create Variables
Create equation(s).
Use the syntax in the
Appendix for User
Equations
Assign units
Clears the Equation
window and all fields
in the Parameters
Table
Input Name for results
Figure 18-32: Assign Variable Names to Curves and Values From the Memory List
You can find a list of valid function syntax for this equation box in Equation Editor Functions on page 523.
Each equation must produce only one new variable as the result. In the equation box, the result must be on the
left, an equal sign immediately to the right of the result, and then the remainder of the equation. A semicolon (;)
should end every individual equation.
Each result will be listed on the right hand of the editor, and will appear in the Memory List as you have named
it. You can use numbers and letters, but no spaces. You must assign unit information for this new value,
created in your equation.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Post-Processing Editor
221
User Equation Syntax
Each equation must start with the result variable, followed by
the equal sign, then the operators, variables and constants
that will produce your result. Equations shall be separated by
a semi colon.
Help menus are available for the User Equation (optional
module) Equation Editor section of SoundCheck. Press
Ctrl+H on your keyboard or Click the “? mark” on the editor
to open the Context Help window (See Figure 18-33:
Equation Context Help). It will give information on the last
item your mouse has scrolled over. Press Ctrl+H again to
make the Context Help window disappear, or click the close
box button in the upper right hand corner.
Figure 18-33: Equation
Context Help
In general, use the following procedures:
1. Define the Input Operands

Define the variables of input operands. Default is “a0, a1 …aX”.

Define the units of user defined variables.
2. Create Equation

The desired results list will be generated by the equation.

Default curve names are the same as the result variables but can be changed manually by the user.
3. Modify results parameters

Change the name of the desired results. (This name will appear in the Memory List.)

Define the units of the desired results. In the column labeled Select Units and then click Units… to
change the units for that line.

(See Figure 18-32: Assign Variable Names to Curves and Values From the Memory List).
Note:
222
When creating or editing very large equations, it may be helpful to use a text editor such as
Wordpad since it has more space for typing. The equation can then be copied and pasted into the
Equation field in SoundCheck. A useful tool in Wordpad is Find and Replace.
Post-Processing Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Windowing
This type allows you to trim the curve selected in Operand A with respect
to the X axis. Select a range of X values to include in the new curve from
the Search Range list box, or define a new range by clicking Edit Range
(See Search Range) then name the new windowed curve before leaving
the step. by default, the new curve will be named as seen in Figure 1834: Frequency Window Options, with the range appended to the
original name). You can select All Points to include the entire acquired
range of the test signal. This feature allows you to splice curves together
cleanly. You can trim curves first by setting the Frequency Window and
then splice them in an additional Post Processing step.

If Search Range is unchecked, this indicates it is set to “All”
points in the selected data.

Check Search Range and right click in the field

Select Add

Select Range

In the Select Search Range section, edit the frequency
range From and To values
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Post-Processing Editor
Figure 18-34: Frequency
Window Options
223
Resolution
A curve can be resampled according to a new resolution. e.g., a Linear
Spectrum can be resampled to 1/3 octave.
The Resolution Post-Processing operation should be used on signals
acquired with HarmonicTrak, Heterodyne and Time Selective
Response Analysis modes.
Smoothing
There is no need to use a separate Smoothing Step before a
Resolution Step as this operation is available with the step.

The smoothing function is applied before resampling

The smoothing width is the same as the selected resolution
Select Type
Select Operand A
Original
Resolution
Select New
Resolution
Select
Smoothing
Operation
Smoothing Off: The Resolution step creates the output curve by
linearly interpolating the magnitude and phase data (y and z axes) of
Operand A at frequencies (x-axis values) defined by the selected
resolution.
Figure 18-35: Resolution
Smoothing On: Resolution will first linearly interpolate Operand A data to the highest possible resolution. (This
is the equivalent of the original curve being “User defined lin” with a value of 1 Hz).
Next, the Resolution Step resamples the interpolated data at the selected resolution to create the result curve
in the Memory List.
Smoothing is only likely useful if the final curve resolution is higher than or “not a mathematical factor” of the
original resolution. See Example 2 and Example 3.
Example 1
Operand A is smoothed at 1/24th (R80) octave resolution and the desired resolution is 1/3rd octave
(R10). Smoothing is optional.
The values corresponding to the 1/3rd octave frequencies will be picked out of Operand A to create the
result curve in the Memory List.
Example 2
Operand A is smoothed at 1/24th (R80) octave resolution and the selected resolution is User Defined,
1/10th octave. Smoothing is optional.
Without smoothing: New 1/10th octave frequencies will be calculated and the original values in
Operand A will be used to linearly interpolate new values for the output curve.
With smoothing: Operand A will be used to interpolate values for every frequency between the
original 1/24th octave frequencies. Then the calculated values that correspond to the 1/10th octave
frequencies will be used to create the output curve.
Example 3
Operand A is non-standard 1/10th octave resolution and the selected result resolution is standard R40
1/12th octave. In this case, smoothing should applied.
Resolution will interpolate values for basically every frequency between the original 1/10th octave
frequencies. Then, just the values corresponding to 1/12th octave frequencies will be picked out to
create the result curve in the Memory List.
224
Post-Processing Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
The example in Figure 18-36 shows a comparison
of the original spectrum to two different results: 1/3
octave with no smoothing and 1/3 octave with
smoothing.
Smoothing yields a curve that better tracks the midline of the original spectrum.
Figure 18-36: Resolution Comparison
ISO or RTA Frequencies
In measurement resolutions above 1/3rd octave, ISO and RTA frequency points
no longer coincide.
When the “New Resolution” field is set to 1/6TH octave or above, you can select
either ISO or RTA frequencies. This is useful for comparing measurements
made with HarmonicTrak to measurements made with the RTA virtual
instrument.

When set to ISO, the result can be compared to a curve made with the
HarmonicTrak algorithm

When set to RTA, the result can be compared to measurements made
with the RTA virtual instrument
When using a Stweep with a resolution of R40 (1/12th Octave), the ISO
frequency points of the measured response curve can be converted to RTA
frequency points. The result of the example in Figure 18-37 can be compared
to a curve made with the RTA virtual instrument.
Conversely, RTA curves can be converted to ISO curves.
Please refer to Appendix H: Windows Keyboard Shortcuts on page 521, for
a chart of ISO frequencies according to resolution.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Post-Processing Editor
Figure 18-37: Resolution:
ISO and RTA frequency
225
Directivity Index
This function is used to calculate the Directivity Index from a set of off
axis response curves. These curves must be measured on an arc,
around the DUT (based on Polar Response). This process yields a
single curve that indicates the directivity at specific frequencies.



Reference Curve: This is the On Axis measurement (0
degrees).
Weighting Function: This is a means of applying a weighting
curve that will emphasize/de-emphasize measurement values
according to the angle of the measurement. This is applied to
the group of selected curves. The standard is: w(q)=|Sine q|.
Select Type
Select Reference
Curve A
Select Curve
Group
Select Weighting
and Increment
Formula Applied: For a set of off-axis frequency responses
L(f, q) and a defined weighting function w(q), the directivity
index function is defined by:
maxθ
L ( f, 0 ) ⋅ 
w ( θ ) dθ
0
Index ( f ) = 10 log -----------------------------------------------------------maxθ
2
 w ( θ ) ⋅ L ( f, θ ) dθ
2
0
Figure 18-38: Directivity Index
Directivity Index
where Maxθ is the total range of angle.
The formula used for Directivity Index is the one described in [1], with the assumption that the DUT is
symmetrical around its nominal axis.
[1] Beranek LL. Acoustics. New York: McGraw-Hill Electrical and Electronic Engineering Series,
McGraw Hill; 1954
Incrementation:

Auto Increment: equally divides the selected curves across the Total Rotation in degrees,
e.g.; If Total Rotation is set to 180 degrees and there is one Reference curve and nineteen Off Axis
curves, Auto Increment will calculate an angle of 10 degrees between each measurement.
226

Increment (deg.): Sets the Angle of increment in degrees for each measured curve

Desired Result: This can use the default name or a user selected name
Post-Processing Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Nth Octave Synthesis
This operator is meant to transform an FFT Spectrum into an RTA Spectrum. The transform is done by making
a power sum of all adjacent FFT lines that are encompassed in the target Nth-octave bands. The final RTA
Spectrum has the same frequencies as the RTA analyzer.

This can be used after an analysis step using the Spectrum or Dual-Channel algorithms. e.g., A
response auto-spectrum with 1 Hz resolution can then be transformed into a 3rd octave spectrum, from
20 Hz to 20 kHz.

It can be used to reduce the resolution of an RTA spectrum, e.g., going from a 1/24th octave to a 1/3rd
octave spectrum.

The algorithm can be used to convert the Summable Spectrum saved from a “pre-SoundCheck 7 FFT
Spectrum Analyzer”.
Note:
All FFT spectrum are summable spectrum as of SoundCheck 7.
Any FFT Spectrum acquired with SoundCheck
can be processed with Nth Octave Synthesis.
The example in Figure 18-39: 1/Nth Octave
Synthesis shows the Spectrum (acquired with
the Spectrum Analysis module) being
synthesized to an RTA Spectrum with a
resolution of 3rd Octave. The result is compared
to the Summable Spectrum in the XY Graph.
The FFT Spectrum is in Blue (lower) and the
RTA Spectrum is in Red (upper).
Note:
This operation should not be used
on a frequency response result
(Fundamental from HarmonicTrak),
because one cannot make a power
sum of the ratios of output over
input. In the case of frequency
response, use the Resolution and
Smoothing operations in Post
Processing.
FFT Spectrum
Minim um Tim e
Resolution
Required
Figure 18-39: 1/Nth Octave Synthesis
nth Octave RTA Low Frequency Cut-off
apply
nth octave
synthesis
R10 Cut-off
(1/3rd oct)
R20 Cut-off
(1/6th oct)
R40 Cut-off
(1/12th oct)
R80 Cut-off
(1/24th oct)
100 Hz
10 mS
>
2000 Hz
4000 Hz
8000 Hz
16000 Hz
10 Hz
100 mS
>
200 Hz
400 Hz
800 Hz
1600 Hz
1 Hz
1S
>
20 Hz
40 Hz
80 Hz
160 Hz
Figure 18-40: FFT to RTA Nth Octave Synthesis
A minimum of 5 lines is enforced to ensure ANSI Nth octave filter compliance. That constraint gives a lower
frequency cut-off for the operation. The chart in Figure 18-40: FFT to RTA Nth Octave Synthesis shows the
relationship between the resolution of the FFT Spectrum and the result of applying Nth Octave Synthesis to get
the RTA Spectrum. The chart shows the resulting low frequency cut-off point.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Post-Processing Editor
227
Rules - Resampling and Frequency Shift
SoundCheck cannot analyze response signals that do not match the sample rate of the
corresponding stimulus. Resampling and Frequency Shift post-processing steps allow
you to synchronize waveforms that do not have the same sample rate or where
generated and recorded by systems with different sample clock sources.
Resampling and Frequency Shift may be required when:

Different audio interfaces operating at different sample rates are used to generate the stimulus and
record the response waveforms: e.g. AmpConnect ISC (44.1 kHz) generates the stimulus and DCC1448 (48 kHz) records it.

The sample rate of the device under test does not match the SoundCheck sample rate, e.g.: Bluetooth
Headsets that have a fixed sample rate of 8 kHz

The audio interface(s) and DUT do not have a common clock source, which means that the resulting
waveforms may not match in sample rate.

In general, first apply a Resampling Step, then apply a Frequency Shift Step.
Please see Resampling and Frequency Shift on page 229.
Resampling
This function changes the sampling rate of a waveform up or down. The
original sampling rate is displayed and the new sampling rate is entered by the
user.
For example, when measuring Bluetooth devices that only support a sample
rate of 8000 Hz, the measured waveform can be resampled to 44.1 kHz as
shown in Figure 18-41.
Since the original sample rate of the DUT may not be exactly 8 kHz, the result
waveform should have Frequency Shift applied as well.
This will correct for any sample rate error.
Figure 18-41: Resampling
228
Post-Processing Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Frequency Shift
Essentially it allows you to match the sample rate of the device under test
to the sample rate of the stimulus used in SoundCheck.
When a stimulus is played back as a WAV file on a digital device, such as
an MP3 player, the device may not play the file at its original sample rate.
The frequencies present in the response are artificially offset, which
corrupts the analysis. In order to perform the analysis, the response
waveform must be adjusted so its frequency points match the stimulus
waveform.
Figure 18-42 shows the Frequency Shift function used to shift the
measured Response to match the original stimulus.
After the Response Waveform is shifted, the Analysis Step will yield an
accurate frequency response.

Dualchannel or Multitone analysis will then have the correct
coherence function

Frequency Shift can also be used with a Stweep stimulus and
HarmonicTrak Analysis
Figure 18-42: Frequency Shift
Waveform Selection
Operand A: Select the Input waveform that should be corrected, e.g.; Response Waveform

Playback Sampling Rate: This is the method used to estimate the playback sampling rate of Operand A

Automatically Calculated: The playback sampling rate is calculated by comparing the frequency
content of Operand A to the selected Reference Frequency

User Def: Use if the sampling rate of Waveform A is already known
Reference Frequency
Reference Waveform: Select the waveform to be used as the target sampling rate, e.g.; Stimulus Waveform

Automatic: The sampling rate of the Reference Waveform is used. (This is the recommended method.)

User Defined mode: Enter the Reference Frequency to use for synchronization. (present in Reference
Waveform and shifted in Response Waveform (Operand A)
Desired Result
Enter a custom name for the new Shifted Waveform or select Use Default.
The new waveform is the result of Operand A being shifted to match the sampling rate of the Reference
Waveform. This new waveform should be used in subsequent Analysis steps.
For an example sequence using this step refer to the default sequences: Bluetooth Headset - Send and
Bluetooth Headset - Receive.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Post-Processing Editor
229
Time Domain Waveform Filter (Optional Module Required)
Arbitrary Waveform Filter
FFT-1
The Waveform Filter post-processing operation
allows you to choose a curve from the Memory
List, use it as the frequency response and apply
it to a waveform in the Memory List. The result
is a new waveform that has its spectral content
shaped by the selected curve. There is also an
option for minimum phase and inverting the
curve. This may be used, for example, for
measuring the A-weighted peak acoustic
pressure of a waveform. The A-weighting curve
is first applied to the acoustic waveform via the
waveform filtering post processing step, and
then the peak value of the resulting waveform is
measured. This method is used in the IEEE 269
and TIA 920 telephony standards.
FFT
Input Waveform
Output Waveform
Filter
Operation
Memory List
Curve
A weighting
Figure 18-43: Waveform Filter Process
The example in Figure 18-43 shows the process of using an arbitrary waveform
filter:

A target waveform is selected from the Memory List: P50 Speech

A curve from the Memory List is then applied: A Weighting curve

The result is a new waveform that is shaped by the A weighting curve:
P50 (Filtered-min phase)
Filter Options:
230

Min Phase - use when selected curve for filter has no phase information

Invert Curve - useful for creating the inverse of the selected curve when
using it as a correction curve

The filtering process can be applied on the incoming waveform and can
be used in a sequence in real-time

This is the same algorithm used in the Stimulus Step for creating
Equalization Curves

Waveform filtering can also be useful for applying ERP to DRP correction
Post-Processing Editor
Figure 18-44: Waveform
Filter
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Standard Waveform Filter
In addition to the Arbitrary waveform filters (introduced in SoundCheck 11.0), a selection of Standard Waveform
filters are also available, including Butterworth high-pass, low-pass, band-pass and band-stop filters. These
standard filters are useful for conditioning stimulus and response waveforms when you are making time domain
measurements, or for band pass analysis in the time domain (e.g., speech intelligibility or attack and release
testing). The arbitrary filters are often used for telephony and hearing aid applications and can also be used
when you need to listen to the processed time signal for subjective evaluation.
Both the Arbitrary and Standard waveform filters require Optional Module 2032: Waveform Filter.
When the post processing step is applied, the filtered waveform is output to the
Memory List.
Filter Options:

Filter Shape - Select Lowpass, Highpass, Bandpass and Bandstop
Lowpass and Highpass filters only show one Cutoff field.
Bandpass and Bandstop show Low Cutoff and High Cutoff fields.

Cutoff (Hz) – the corner frequency for lowpass and highpass filters
(nominal 3 dB – down point)

Low Cutoff (Hz) – the lower corner frequency for bandpass and bandstop
filters (nominal 3 dB – down point)

High Cutoff (Hz) - the upper corner frequency for bandpass and
bandstop filters (nominal 3 dB – down point)

Filter Order - Enter 1 to n as a value for the filter order
Figure 18-45: Standard
Waveform Filter
The slope of the attenuation is proportional to
the filter order: An order “n” will result in an
attenuation rate of 20*n dB/ decade = 6*n dB/
octave. e.g.; A 5th order filter will have an
attenuation slope of 100 dB/decade. In other
words, the higher the order of the filter, the
steeper the attenuation.
Figure 18-46: Comparison of Filters
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Post-Processing Editor
231
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SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Post-Processing Editor
232
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Post Processing Use Chart
Post P
Type
Operation
Description
Unary
Change Sign
Multiplies the Operand by -1
Unary
Reciprocal
Value
Absolute
Value
Calculates the Inverse (1/X) of
Unary
Example use
Operand A
Axis
X
Y
Z
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
Returns the positive valued magnitude of Operand A
change polarity e.g. polarized mics which invert
time signal
Inverting curves used for equalization and correction curves
Removes phase e.g. when adding harmonics to
calculate total distortion
Y
Y
N
Square
Returns the Square of Operand
A (Operand A x Operand A)
e.g. first step in calculating RMS and removes
phase
Y
Y
Unary
Square Root
e.g. last step in RMS calculation
Y
Unary
Exp
Math operation
Unary
Ln
Unary
Unwrap Phase
Unary
Group Delay
Unary
FFT
Unary
Inv FFT
Arithmetic
"+, -, x, /"
Constant
"+, -, x, /"
Scalar
Average
Returns the Square Root of
Operand A
Raises the Operand to the user
input power (exponent)
Returns the natural Logarithm of
Operand A
Returns the Unwrapped phase of
Operand A
Calculates the Group Delay
(negative derivative of Phase) of
Operand A
Calculates the FFT of a Waveform
Returns a real-valued time signal
(waveform) from a complex (Mag
& Phase) spectrum or response
Allows you to perform basic math
operations on data. Work In
allows math to be done on the y
axis dB or Power values as well
as Linear values.
Allows you to apply a single
value constant from the Memory
List or from the User Defined
field to the selected axis of the
data.
Calculates the mean of the curve
Y values over the search range,
regardless of the units.
Unary
Post Processing Use Chart
(Statistics)
Result Type
Post P Step Template
233
Same as
Operand A
Same as
Operand A
Same as
Operand A
none
Y
Same as
Operand A
none
Y
Y
none
Y
Y
N
Math operation
Y
Y
N
Allows Unwrapped Phase to be treated as a
separate curve from magnitude
converts phase response to delay in seconds vs.
frequency
Y
N
N
Same as
Operand A
Same as
Operand A
Same as
Operand A
Curve
Y
N
N
Curve
Group Delay
Spectrum analysis
N
N
Y
Curve
FFT
Time Domain Analysis
Y
N
N
Waveform
See FFT
Block math operations are performed between
two complex data sets (magnitude and phase
vs. frequency) or waveforms. Multiplication or
Division of dB to dB values is NOT allowed
Y
Y
Y
Same as
Operand A
Curve Addition dB, Curve
Addition, Curve division,
Curve Subtraction dB, Curve
Subtraction
Multiplication or Division of dB to dB values is
allowed
Y
Y
Y
Same as
Operand A
Can be used to determine the Sensitivity from a
Fundamental curve at a single frequency or
series of frequencies
Y
N
Y
Value
Curve divided by constant,
Curve minus constant dB,
Curve multiplied by constant,
Curve plus constant dB,
Curve plus constant
Sensitivity & HFA (OSPL 90
sequence)
Reciprocal
Absolute Value
none
none
Unwrap Phase
234
Post P
Type
Scalar
Operation
Power Sum
(Statistics)
Scalar
Maximum /
(Statistics)
Minimum
Scalar
Est. Resonance
(Statistics)
Scalar
Est. Notch
(Statistics)
Post Processing Use Chart
Scalar
IEEE TOLR
(Statistics)
Scalar
IEEE ROLR
(Statistics)
Scalar
IEEE SOLR
(Statistics)
Scalar
ITU-T SLR
(Statistics)
Scalar
ITU-T RLR
(Statistics)
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Scalar
(Statistics)
Scalar
(Statistics)
ITU-T RLR w/
Leak
ITU-T STMR
Description
Calculates the square root of the
sum of the squares of each Y
value in a spectrum
Finds the max or min Y value of
a curve in the specified search
range and returns X, Y and Z values at that point.
Finds the resonance frequency,
amplitude, and quality factor (Q)
of a peak in a curve.
Finds the antiresonance frequency, amplitude, and quality
factor of a dip or notch in a curve.
This calculates the average of
the Freq. Response from Start
Freq to Stop Freq according to
IEEE Standard.
This calculates the average of
the Freq. Response from Start
Freq to Stop Freq according to
IEEE Standard.
This calculates the average of
the Freq. Response from Start
Freq to Stop Freq according to
IEEE Standard.
Calculates the send loudness
rating according to the ITU-T
Rec. P79 from the Freq.
Response.
Calculates the receive loudness
rating according to the ITU-T
Rec. P79 from the Freq.
Response.
Calculates the receive loudness
rating according to the ITU-T
Rec. P79 from the Freq.
Response.
Calculates the sidetone loudness
rating according to the ITU-T
Rec. P79 from the Freq.
Response.
Example use
Operand A
Axis
X
Y
Z
Result Type
Post P Step Template
Y
N
Y
Value
Power sum
Y
N
Y
Value
Maximum, Minimum
Y
N
N
Value
Est. Resonance
Y
N
N
Value
none
Transmitting Objective Loudness Rating
Y
N
N
Value
none
Receiving Objective Loudness Rating
Y
N
N
Value
none
Sidetone Objective Loudness Rating
Y
N
N
Value
none
For IEEE standards, the exponent can be user
defined. For ITU standards, both the exponent
and the weighting curve can be user defined.
Y
N
N
Value
none
For ITU standards
Y
N
N
Value
none
For ITU standards
Y
N
N
Value
none
For ITU standards
Y
N
N
Value
none
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Post P
Type
Scalar
(Statistics)
Scalar
(Statistics)
Scalar
(Statistics)
Post Processing Use Chart
Description
Attack Time /
Release Time
Used to test the time it takes for
the signal from a DUT to stabilize
after a sudden change in signal
level.
Calculates the overall perceived
loudness of a sound.
Requires a time envelope waveform in dB.
N
N
Y
Value
Attack Time & Release time
Used to measure the perceived loudness of
complex sounds, e.g., telephone ring tones.
Y
N
N
Curve & Value
Zwicker Loudness
Used with a speech signal, this
operation evaluates levels for
only the parts of the waveform
where speech is actually present.
Used to find the intersection
points between two curves or
waveforms, or between a curve/
waveform and a single point.
corresponds to a running average on a frequency axis with a
window of the given width: 1/n
octave.
Used to calculate the Directivity
Index from a set of off axis
response curves (Polar
Response).
Used to transform an FFT Spectrum into an RTA Spectrum.
Curves acquired with HarmonicTrak, Heterodyne and Time
Selective Response Analysis can
be resampled according to a new
resolution: 1/3rd Octave.
Used to trim the selected curve
according to the selected X axis
range.
Allows you to match the sample
rate of the device under test to
the sample rate of the stimulus
used in SoundCheck.
Changes the sampling rate of a
waveform up or down.
Widely used in telephony applications, i.e.: testing to ITU-T P.56 05/93 Method B.
N
N
Y
Value
Active Speech Level
Y
Y
N
Value
Intersection
Y
Y
N
Curve or
Smoothing
Y
N
N
Curve
Directivity Index
Y
N
N
Curve
none
Y
N
N
Curve
Resolution
Y
Y
N
Curve or
Windowing
Commonly used to account for sample rate inaccuracies of portable audio devices. Apply after
using a Resampling step.
N
N
Y
Waveform
Frequency Shift
Example: measuring Bluetooth devices with a
sample rate of 8000Hz, the waveform can be
resampled to 44.1kHz.
N
N
Y
Waveform
none
Zwicker Loudness
Active Speech
Level
Intersection
same
Smoothing
same
Directivity
Index
same
1/n Octave
Synthesis
Resolution
same
same
Windowing
same
Frequency
Shift
same
Resampling
same
Example use
Operand A
Axis
X
Y
Z
Operation
Result Type
Post P Step Template
235
236
Post P
Type
Operation
Waveform
Filter
same
User
same
Equation
Module
Description
Allows you to choose a Memory
List Curve, apply it to a Memory
List Waveform and create a new
waveform shaped by the spectral
content of the selected curve.
Allows you to build an arithmetic
equation using constants and the
values generated by the
sequence.
Example use
Operand A
Axis
X
Y
Z
Example: measuring the A-weighted peak
acoustic pressure of a waveform. Used in the
IEEE 269 and TIA 920 telephony standards
N
N
Y
Complex Math operations are not supported.
You will need to break the operation down to its
arithmetic equivalent.
Y
Y
Y
Result Type
Waveform
Post P Step Template
Waveform Filter
none
Post Processing Use Chart
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Message Step
The Message Step (Ctrl+Shift+M) is used in a test sequence to:

Provide messages to the operator.

Enable the operator to input information needed to complete the test (e.g., a reference resistance value
when measuring loudspeaker impedance).

Communicate to devices through the PC’s RS232 or IEEE-488 (GPIB) interface.
To view and change the system’s message settings, select Messages from the Setup drop down menu on the
main SoundCheck® menu bar. The Message Setup dialog provides user prompts, control of external
equipment and calls to other programs.
There are three choices for communication of your message. You can send a message to the Operator, a
Digital I/O card, or an external Interface connected to your PC.
Note:
Messages Steps can be run from the Offline menu as well as from a sequence.
Listen Hardware Control Message
Message steps can be used to control the functions of the following Listen hardware products:

AmpConnect ISC, AudioConnect, SoundConnect 2 and DC Connect

Also included is software control for the Portland Tool & Die BTC-4148 Bluetooth interface
Specific details on how a device is controlled through Message Steps is covered in the manuals for each
device.
The settings of the Listen Hardware Message Step are the same as the Startup Default found in the Hardware
Editor > Listen Hardware page.
We recommend that you set the Startup Default for each piece of Listen Hardware. See Listen Hardware
Page on page 56. The alternative is to always use Listen Hardware Message Steps at the beginning of each
sequence to configure the devices for use in the sequence. (AudioConnect requires either a Startup Default or
a Message Step in order to be used properly in SoundCheck.)
An AudioConnect Message Step is shown in Figure 20-1. The use of
message steps in a sequence allows you to automate gain settings, signal
routing, microphone bias and other features so that the settings are stored
with the test sequence.
Common Controls

Apply - This is used to send the setting to the device without having
to run the sequence

Read Settings - Click to load the current settings from the device

OK - Exit the step editor. Save the sequence in order to save the
step changes.

Cancel - Close the step editor and discard changes
Figure: 20-1 AudioConnect
Control
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Message Step
237
AmpConnectTM Message
The following controls are available in an AmpConnect Message
Step (details are in the AmpConnect ISC manual):
Inputs

Gain - Select: -20 dB, -10 dB, 0 dB, +10 dB, +20 dB,
+30 dB, +40 dB
This gain value is used in Calibration Configuration > Auto
Read. See Auto Read on Page 70.

Bias - None, Voltage (for SCM Mic) and IEPE
Signal Routing
Input

Select Ref/Dut, Impedance, Amp and Toggle Ref & DUT.
See Toggle Inputs/Toggle Outputs below.
Amplifier

Select Output A or Output B

Toggle Amplifier Output
Figure: 20-2 AmpConnect Control
Toggle Inputs/Toggle Outputs
The Toggle control can be used to switch the Microphone Input and
Amplifier Output as a test sequence runs in Continuous or Loop operation. This can be used to test a
loudspeaker on one test fixture while setting up a different speaker on another fixture. (The fixtures and test
microphones should be identical.)

Toggle Inputs (Ch.1 only): Switches so that on the first pass of the sequence, Channel 1 uses the
Reference Microphone Input and the second pass uses the DUT Microphone Input. (Output section.)
This works on Channel 1 only.

Toggle Outputs: Switches so that the first pass of the sequence uses Amplifier Output A and the
second pass uses Amplifier Output B.
Control

Digital I/O - The AmpConnect ISC DIO can read or write external TTL voltage levels and switch closures
in a SoundCheck test sequence

Panel Lock - When On the front panel buttons are disabled
Headphone

SoundCheck Output - Sends the SoundCheck Stimulus to the headphone output. This setting should
be used when testing 2 channel headphones. Gain is grayed out when SoundCheck Output is selected
and fixed at 0.1 dB.

Input Monitor - Allows you to monitor the Left Input of the internal audio interface
Gain - Allows you to adjust the level of the Headphone Out. The default setting is 0 dB. (Available only
when Input Monitor is selected.)

238
Mute - Mute signal to headphone output
Message Step
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
AudioConnectTM Message
The following controls are available in an AudioConnect Message Step
(details are in the AudioConnect manual):

Mic Bias - Turns mic bias voltage on for both Mic Input channels

Source - Set to Line or Mic independently for each channel

Gain - Set to 0 dB or +20 dB independently for each channel
This gain value is used in Calibration Configuration > Auto Read.
See Auto Read on Page 70.
Headphone


SoundCheck Output - Sends the SoundCheck Stimulus to the
headphone output. Gain is grayed out when SoundCheck Output is
selected and fixed at 0.1 dB.
Figure: 20-3 AudioConnect
Control
Input Monitor - Allows you to monitor the Left Input of the internal
audio interface
Gain - Allows you to adjust the level of the Headphone Out. The default setting is 0 dB. (Available only
when Input Monitor is selected.)

Mute - Mute signal to headphone output
SoundConnect 2TM Message
The following controls are available in an SoundConnect Message
Step (details are in the SoundConnect 2 manual):

Input - Muted, Line In, Mic In, Mic SCM, Mic IEPE and Lemo

Gain - Select: -20 dB, -10 dB, 0 dB, +10 dB, +20 dB,
+30 dB, +40 dB
This gain value is used in Calibration Configuration > Auto
Read. See Auto Read on Page 70.

Bias - No Bias, 7.5 kOhm (for SCM mics), 2.2 kOhm
(typically used for testing electret capsules)

High Pass - 1 Hz, 10 Hz, 20 Hz, 100 Hz

Low Pass - 22.4 kHz, 120 kHz
Figure: 20-4 SoundConnect 2
Control
Overall settings for unit:

Panel Lock - When On the front panel buttons are disabled

Output Gain - When on the Output Gain of channels 1 and 2 are increased by 6 dB. (Refer to the
SoundConnect 2 manual for an explanation of this feature.)

Ground Lift - Off = Chassis Ground (default). Allows you to interrupt the connection between the Line
In/Out Grounds and the Chassis Ground. Only select Lift when you are trying to resolve noise issues
due to a Ground Loop.
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Message Step
239
DC ConnectTM Message
The following controls are available in a DC Connect Message Step (details are
in the DC Connect manual):

Output Mode - Voltage or Current

Control - USB or Analog

Polarity - Pos or Neg

Max I - Select maximum current range for measurement

Voltage Level - Set output voltage level

DC Measured - Shows the DC value measured by DC Connect
Figure: 20-5 DC Connect
Control
BTC-4148 Message
The following Message Type selections for the BTC-4148 are presented in the order they typically appear in a
sequence. The settings of each step are applied to BTC-4148 when the step is run in a sequence or when the
Apply button is pressed. (Details of use are in the BTC-4148 manual):
Codec Selection
Select an item from both profile drop downs.

A2DP Profile - Select SBC or AptX

HFP Profile - Select CVSD or mSBC
Figure: 20-6 Codec
Selection
Device Connections
This Message Type allows you to choose which device to connect to.
Device Connection Type

Connect by Name - Friendly name

Connect by Address - Bluetooth address

Disconnect - This disables the audio and closes both profiles. You can
also select the “Clear the paired list” check box at the same time.
(These options are typically used at the end of the sequence.)
Device Selection Method
Automatic:

Fill in the field - Connect To: (This field is grayed out when Prompt is
selected.)
Figure: 20-7 Device
Connections
Prompt:
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Message Step
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Instruction Manual

Run Inquiry - BTC-4148 will scan for any available Bluetooth devices

Inquiry time - Set time limit to search for devices

Show paired list - Shows history of devices previously paired with BTC-4148

Clear paired list - Removes devices from history list. Usually done at the end of sequence.
See Example of Prompt on page 241.
Example of Prompt
When the step runs you are presented with a window as shown in Figure 20-8.
Name/Address

This is populated by selecting a device in the fields:
Available Devices or Paired Devices

You can also type the address in manually or scan it in
using a bar code reader

The Refresh Icon
allows you to run the inquiry again
Available Devices

Shows all devices found during the scan

The Paired Devices field will be filled in once the pairing
process has been completed in the next step. See
Audio Connections below.
Figure: 20-8 Prompt Example
Click OK to close the window and continue with the sequence.
Audio Connections
A2DP and HFP Connections
From the two connection type drop down menus select the profiles you would
like to use.

Connected - Connect using the selected profile

No change - Allows you to leave BTC-4148 in the state of a previous
step so another connection method can be added
Audio Channel
This is where the profile is enabled.

Select A2DP, HFP or Close audio channel
Figure: 20-9 Audio
Connections
The pairing process starts when this step is Applied or run in the sequence.
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Message Step
241
Operator Message - Dialog
Display messages or instructions on the computer screen for the operator to read (e.g., test signal is not
present or the DUT needs to be placed in a test fixture). You can send a text message to the operator during
the sequence, or poll the user for information during the sequence (such as temperature or humidity
conditions).
Pass/Fail
Sets the Pass or Fail verdict the message is associated with, e.g., No Signal Detected – Fail.
Wait
Control length of time (in milliseconds) the Message Step waits before finishing. This can be used to ensure
commands or devices settle before continuing to measure.
Format
Text Formatting is available Operator Message Steps. This allows you to change the settings for the text that
will be displayed so the message is easier to read.
Default Value
By setting the Default Value to “Yes (F2)“ in the Message Step, the Key Focus is to the Yes button by default.
This means that the Yes button will be “Highlighted“ each time the step runs in the sequence. The operator can
then click the Enter key to answer Yes. (As well as the F2 key or clicking on Yes in the message.)
242
Note:
The Message Step must be configured to “Display step when run“ in order for the Dialog to display
in the sequence.
Note:
Operator messages can be displayed in local languages based on the Windows operating system
in use on the machine running SoundCheck. See Display Local Language Characters on page
244.
Message Step
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
The Dialog Message allows you to select one of
two conditions: yes or no. This can be used to
determine functionality of the test system, (Was
the test signal audible?) or to determine how the
sequence will proceed (Do you want to save this
data?).
Figure: 20-10 Operator Message - Dialog,
shows an example of a Message that can be
used to prompt the operator to enter a Yes/No
answer regarding Visual Inspection.
The displayed Message
Title can be different
than the step name
Default value setting
Format Text
This allows you to set the font, font size, font
color and attributes.
The Dialog Window that the operator sees will
resize according to the font size chosen for the
text. Only one font format can be set in each
message step. In other words, you cannot mix
text colors or font sizes.
Message Step when
run in the sequence
shows alternate title
Memory List Item
This result will show up on the Memory List.
The name of the result is the Name of the
Message Step.
The result of the Message Step
is available in the Memory List
and can be added to the Result
window
Figure: 20-10 Operator Message - Dialog
The Apply Button in the message editor allows you to test the message to see if it is displayed as required. This
also allows you to test the communication of the message step with external devices that are connected via
Serial - RS232 or GPIB.
You can also Right Click on a Message step in the Sequence Editor to test the action of the step without having
to run the sequence.
The Default Value setting is available when the Operator Message Step is set to Dialog or Numeric.
Note:
If the step is configured to “not display when run”, the default value for either Dialog (T/F) or
Numeric (#), is sent to the Memory list for that step's result/value.
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Message Step
243
Display Local Language Characters
In order to display Local Language Characters in a SoundCheck Message Step or Text Display, the following
changes must be made to your Windows operating system. In this example Simplified Chinese is selected.
Note:
These instructions apply to Windows 7 operating systems. The instructions may vary in other
versions of Windows.
1. Install the Chinese (Simplified) Language Pack via Windows
Updates. For detailed instructions see:
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/14236/
language-packs
2. Go to Control Panel > Clock, Language and Region. Select
Keyboards and other input methods
3. Click the Change Keyboards button and add Chinese
(Simplified, PRC)
4. Select the Administrative Tab, click the Change
system locale button and select Chinese
(Simplified, PRC)
5. Click OK to exit all editors
6. You must restart your computer for these
changes to take effect
7. You can now enter and display Simplified
Chinese characters in SoundCheck Message Steps and
Text Displays.
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Message Step
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Numeric Message
When the Operator Message is set to Numeric, a number can be entered by the operator for use as a value in
the sequence.
This prompts the operator when a numeric value needs to be entered in a sequence. An example of a Message
Step setup to request a numeric during the sequence is shown in Figure 20-11.
The example shown in Figure 20-11, shows
how the Numeric Message prompts the
operator for a Stimulus Level. Since the name
of the Message Step is “Stimulus Level“, an
item is added to the Memory List called
Stimulus Level. This item can then be used in
Stimulus Step. This will allow the operator to
change the stimulus level on each run of the
sequence.
The Memory List item
is named the same as
the Message Step
name
When Apply is selected in the Message Editor,
the value is sent to the Memory List.

The specific axis of a numeric value to
be stored can be selected, e.g., Y axis
only. Other axes will have NAN as a
value and will be shown this way when
selected in a Display Table.

Units are shown next to numeric inputs
when specified.

Preload Stimulus must be Off in the
Sequence Configuration. See Preload
Stimulus vs Memory List Selection
on page 397.
The message as it is
displayed during the
run of the sequence
See Units on page 93 for more information on
using the Units dialog box.
In the Stimulus Editor,
Right Click on the level
field and select Memory
List Selection.
Select
“Stimulus Level”
from the Memory List.
Figure: 20-11 Operator Message - Numeric
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Instruction Manual
Message Step
245
Digital I/O
Bit State
Bits 0-7 can be controlled through the Message Step Editor. Check the
box above the appropriate bit to enable it. Next, set the bit to ON or OFF
depending on the required state of the Digital I/O. This is the state of the
bit that will occur when the Message Step runs in the sequence.
Corresponding Message Steps with opposite Bit States may be required,
e.g.: Switch Bit 0 On at the beginning of the sequence and the switch it
Off at the end.
Pass/Fail
Set the Pass/Fail condition the message should show when it runs in the
sequence. This can be used in Conditional Branching. See Configure
Step on page 398 and Conditional Branching Rules - Sequence
Editor on page 400.
Figure 20-12: Digital I/O
Message Setup
Port
Select Port number (1, 2, 3, etc). The text field below the Port number will indicate whether you have selected
an Input or Output Port. Inputs and Outputs are configured in the External page of the Hardware Editor. See
Figure 20-12.
Wait
You can set an amount of time for the step to pause before proceeding to the next step in the sequence. This
may be needed to allow for settling time or operation time of external devices.
External Interface
Communicate with other devices via a
computer interface such as RS232 or IEEE488 (GPIB). Select the Interface Number and
the Interface Type field will update according
to the matching device number in the
Hardware Editor - External Tab. For more
information see Interface Table on page 60.
When setting up multiple devices in the
Hardware Editor - External Tab, the Interface
Number order must be the same
Figure 20-13: Hardware Editor - External
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SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
RS232
Setting the Interface Type to RS232 enables
SoundCheck to send control messages to an
external device that accepts RS232 commands.
Add a Message Step to the sequence to send a
command to the selected device.
Choose the interface
type (RS232 or IEEE488) by selecting the
device number
Figure 20-14: RS232 - Write/Read Message
RS232 Interface Actions
1. Invoke RS232 command based on the PASS/FAIL status of the
previous step in the sequence.
2. Read message from another instrument or write (send) message
to another instrument.
3. Wait for n number of milliseconds before executing the RS232
step configured in the Message Step Editor.
Figure 20-15: RS232 - Set
Control Lines
Figure 20-16: RS232 - Read
Control Lines
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Instruction Manual
Message Step
247
IEEE-488 (GPIB)
Setting the Interface Type to IEEE-488 enables SoundCheck to send
control messages to an external device that accepts IEEE-488
commands.
Output Message
IEEE commands that SoundCheck uses to control an addressed
device. Messages must be entered in full (e.g., including Header,
Header Separator, Data and Data Separator where appropriate). Only
ASCII characters are allowed.
Interface Message
Figure 20-17: IEEE Message
Setup
The IEEE commands listed below. These commands are used to setup
and control the interface itself, rather than a particular device.

Device Clear (DCL) – causes all connected devices that
implement the command to return to a predefined devicedependent state.

Selected Device Clear (SDC) – sets all devices currently
addressed as listeners to a predefined device-dependent state.
Otherwise identical to Device Clear.

Group Execute Trigger (GET) – provides a means of triggering
devices simultaneously. GET causes all capable devices, which
are currently addressed as listeners, to initiate a preprogrammed
action (e.g., trigger, start a sweep etc.)
Figure 20-18: Interface Message
Choices

Go To Local (GTL) – returns all devices currently addressed as
listeners to local control. A device will return to remote when it is
again addressed as a listener with REN true.

Unlisten (UNL) – unaddresses all current listeners connected to the bus. UNL is used to guarantee
that only the desired listeners are addressed.
Remote Enable
Enables SoundCheck to be controlled.
Serial Poll
SoundCheck interrogates an addressed device to ascertain the state of each bit in its status byte. A serial poll
is typically used to synchronize SoundCheck with an external device, such as a turntable, to make sure it is in
the desired position before making a measurement.
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Message Step
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Syntax for Sending RS232 (serial) or IEEE-488 (GPIB)
Commands in SoundCheck
S
Y
S
Visible Characters:
T
In SoundCheck, you need to use a specific syntax in the Message Step Editor
to send generic ASCII commands to your device. Any visible characters in the
command field of the Message Step Editor are sent through without being
altered. For example, the command SYSTEM would be sent to the device as
the ASCII byte stream for the characters shown in the example on the right.
E
M
which would be:
83
89
Non-visible (Termination) Characters:
83
Some devices require a termination character at the end of each sent
command, which most often is not a visible character. To send any non-visible
characters using the SoundCheck Message Step, you must enclose the
decimal ASCII code for that character in brackets like this: <10>
Note:
84
69
77
Some external devices state that termination characters are entered as: (CR) or [CR]. Always
replace parenthesis or braces with bracket arrows: <CR>. Termination characters must use this
format in SoundCheck message steps.
Here are a few characters that are not visible but are often used in
serial communication, followed by their decimal ASCII codes:
To include any of these characters in the command string, you must
surround the decimal ASCII code for that character in brackets (e.g.,
line feed is <10> and carriage return is <13>). Parenthesis () and Bar
Braces [] are not allowed. To produce an end-of-line character (\r\n),
you need to combine both line feed and carriage return characters:

Line Feed (or \n): 10

Carriage Return (or \r): 13

Tab: 9
Line Feed + Carriage Return: <10><13>
Example:
When sending commands to a device like the Agilent 34401a, you must
terminate each command with a line feed character. To initiate RS232
control over this device, you must send a SYSTEM:REMOTE command
before sending any other commas.
In the SoundCheck Message Step, this command would look like:
SYSTEM:REMOTE<10>
Figure 20-19: Message Step
RS232 Example
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Instruction Manual
Message Step
249
Reading RS232 Messages
SoundCheck can “Poll” the RS232 input for a
“start” command. The trigger can be any
alpha/numeric character or a simple string.
(Single characters are preferred since there
is less chance that there will be a
communication error during the transmission
of one character.) The Message Step can be
set to automatically “Loop” back to itself, until
the RS232 string has been received.
Once a sequence has been started, a
Message Step can be set to look for input on
the Serial Port specified in the Message
Figure 20-20: Hardware Config - RS232 Settings
Editor. This device must be Enabled in the
System Hardware configuration before it can
be selected in the Message Step. See Figure 20-20.
The Hardware Configuration must match the RS232 settings of the device that is sending RS232 data. This is
extremely important since incorrect settings can cause the SoundCheck computer to shut down when a
message is sent.
The Message Step is then set according to the example in Figure 20-21.

Select “Interface“

Select number of RS232 line that is set in the System Hardware
Configuration

Select Function: Write/Read Message

Enter the character string that will be sent from the external device.
In this example: “start“ (case sensitive)

Settings: Select “Pass” and “Read” with a Timeout that is slightly
greater than the amount of time needed for the external device to
send its string of characters. (Using single characters for a trigger
is preferred.) Do not set the Timeout to 0 mSec. This can cause a
communication error.
Figure 20-21: RS232
Settings
Click OK to exit or Save As to give the step a new name.
When the sequence is run, the Message Step will appear as shown in.
When the serial message has been received, the text will be displayed
and the step will close so the that the sequence can continue. The
Configuration of the Message Step must be set in order for it to Loop and
Display.
Figure 20-22: Displayed
Message Step
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SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Step Configuration
The Step Configuration of the Message Step should be set as shown in . (Step
Configuration is found in the Sequence Drop Down Menu of the Sequence
Editor window.)

“Display step when run“ should be checked if you want to see the
“Waiting for message prompt” during the run of the sequence.
Normally this can be set to 0 seconds.

Check “Jump on FAIL“ and select the same message step. This
creates the loop that recycles until the RS232 text has been received.

Select “Overwrite Data“ so that only one instance of the Index value
(Loop Index) is created in the Memory List.
See Index (Loop Index) on page 399.
Figure 20-23: Message
Step Configuration
The Message Step must be positioned in the sequence so that all
desired measurement operations occur after it.
shows the Message Step in the sequence along with its configuration
settings. Once the RS232 string has been received, (and the message
status changes to “Passed“) the sequence will proceed to the next step
(Sti - 20k-20 Hz R10) and the operation of the sequence will finish.
Figure 20-24: RS232 Step In
Sequence
Testing with HyperTerminal
A second computer can use Windows HyperTerminal to send RS232 Test Commands. The Message Step in
SoundCheck, that is reading RS232, must be configured to “Display step when run“, long enough for all of the
characters sent to be present in the RS232 buffer of the SoundCheck computer. It is important to note that
characters are sent from HyperTerminal as soon as they are typed.
A message of “start“ may take a person 2 or 3 seconds to type into HyperTerminal. If the Message Step is not
open for this period of time, all of the characters may not make it into the buffer before the step recycles. Since
the complete string was not read, the step status will indicate “Failed“ and the loop will continue. This is one of
the reasons that single characters are recommended for use as triggers.
Connection Type
The connection between two computers should be a Serial Port Null Modem cable. Other devices with RS232
outputs may use a standard serial port cable. Please refer to the documentation for that device for the correct
cable type.
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AmpConnect USB Control Via SoundCheck
AmpConnect ISC is fully controllable via SoundCheck which means that adjustments of parameters such as
gain can be included in test sequences. All Front Panel settings can be changed via USB during the run of a
test sequence. An eight-bit digital I/O port provides digital control and/or status monitoring of external devices
for operator feedback, test fixture control, etc. Digital I/O is only accessed by USB through SoundCheck. The
following example shows how to use a Message Step in SoundCheck to control AmpConnect ISC.
Important! As of SoundCheck 13, after installing SoundCheck you cannot use AmpConnect ISC with
versions prior to SoundCheck 13, unless you manually switch the drivers in Windows Device
Manger. See the AmpConnect ISC manual for a step by step driver rollback procedure.
Note:
In SoundCheck ONE, you do not have access to creating a new Message Step. Only the settings
in the existing step can be changed.
AmpConnect Message Step

Open the SoundCheck sequence editor

Select the Messages Category

Select "AmpConnect Step" and drag it into the first step
position in the sequence
You should rename the step after it has been added to a sequence.
Creating unique names helps make future sequence editing easier.

Open the AmpConnect Message Step

Click Configure Listen Hardware

Refer to Configure AmpConnect on page 254 and
AmpConnect Message Step on page 254 for information
on settings
Figure 21-1: Add Message Step
When the sequence runs, this step will set the AmpConnect options
for its first use in the sequence.
Important! Turning Bias on at the beginning of a sequence may require the use of “Wait
Time” in the first panel of the AmpConnect Message Step. As an alternative,
we recommend that Bias should be turned on in the Startup Default settings
for Listen Hardware. See Listen Hardware Page on page 56.
Other AmpConnect Steps may appear in the sequence with different settings. These steps should be named to
identify the function of the step. This will make later sequence editing and trouble shooting easier.
Note:
AmpConnect settings can be changed during the run of a test sequence. This will require individual
Message Steps at various points in the sequence.
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AmpConnect USB Control Via SoundCheck
253
AmpConnect Message Step
Open the AmpConnect Message Step from the Active Sequence in the right
hand section of the editor, as shown in Figure 21-1.
Message Title - This is the text that will be in the top of the step window as
it is run
Message - The example in Figure 21-2 shows that the Message Step is set
to AmpConnect
Listen Hardware - Must be selected to select Device ID of hardware
Device ID - Select AmpConnect from the list of Listen Hardware available
in the drop down menu.
Figure 21-2: AmpConnect
Listen Hardware
Configure AmpConnect - Set the front panel settings of AmpConnect
(See below)
Settings - Select the Pass/Fail state the step will yield in the Results section of the Memory List
Wait - Allows you to set a time period for the step to pause the run of the sequence. This allows for “switch
closure times” associated with external devices connected to the Digital IO of AmpConnect.
Apply - Click Apply to switch AmpConnect to the new settings from Configure AmpConnect without having to
run the sequence. This is useful for testing the settings.
Configure AmpConnect
Click on Configure Listen Hardware to set the front panel settings of AmpConnect. The standard front panel
controls are explained in the Front Panel Functions chapter of the AmpConnect ISC Manual.
Inputs

Gain - Select: -20 dB, -10 dB, 0 dB, +10 dB, +20 dB,
+30 dB, +40 dB

Bias - Select: None, Voltage (for SCM Mic) and IEPE
Signal Routing - Input

Select: Quiet, Reference, DUT, Impedance (Z-High/Low),
Amp, 1 V Sine and Toggle Ref & DUT. See Toggle Inputs/
Toggle Outputs on page 255.
Signal Routing - Amplifier

Select: Output A or Output B

Toggle Amplifier Output - See Toggle Inputs/Toggle
Outputs on page 255.
Apply - Click to send new settings to AmpConnect ISC
Read Settings - Allows you to update the settings of the Message
Step by Reading the current settings of the AmpConnect ISC Front
Panel
OK - Accept changes and close configuration window
Cancel - Disregard changes and close configuration window
Figure 21-3: AmpConnect Panel
In addition to the physical front panel controls, the AmpConnect Message Step allows you to control the
following:
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Instruction Manual
Control - Digital I/O

Bit 0 through 7: Shows the state that the Bit expects to see when set to Read. If the actual state of the
input agrees with the setting, the step result will be “Pass“. If it does not agree, the result will be “Fail“.
When set to write, this is the state that the Bit will change to when the Message Step runs in the
sequence.

AmpConnect ISC must be connect to SoundCheck system via USB
Toggle Inputs/Toggle Outputs
The Toggle control can be used to switch the Microphone Input and Amplifier Output as a test sequence runs in
Continuous or Loop operation. This can be used to test a loudspeaker on one test fixture while setting up a
different speaker on another fixture. (The fixtures and test microphones should be identical.)

Toggle Inputs: The input toggle control is in the Signal Routing drop down for Channel 1 only.
Switches so that on the first pass of the sequence, Channel 1 uses the Reference Microphone Input
and the second pass uses the DUT Microphone Input.

Toggle Outputs: The output toggle control is in the Amplifier section. Switches so that the first pass of
the sequence uses Amplifier Output A and the second pass uses Amplifier Output B.
Headphone Monitoring
This allows you to monitor the input and output signal on headphones, during the run of a test.

Input Monitor - Listen to signal at input of SoundCheck audio interface

SoundCheck Output - Listen to output of SoundCheck audio interface

Mute - Mute Headphone output

Gain - Headphone output level can be adjusted: -60 dB to +4 dB

A Message Step must be added to the beginning of a sequence to set the AmpConnect ISC
Headphone output to it’s maximum level. Inserting this step turns off the 27 dB output pad on the
Headphone Output (AmpConnect ISC default).
WARNING! When monitoring AmpConnect ISC signals with headphones, REMOVE HEADPHONES
before making any changes to AmpConnect settings or SoundCheck settings. This is to
prevent hearing damage due to high sound pressure levels.
Caution!
Dynamic headphones typically need very little voltage, e.g., 100 mV to produce high sound
pressure levels. A dedicated headphone amplifier, like the AmpConnect ISC headphone
amplifier, is recommended to limit sound pressure levels. A normal power amplifier can
output a voltage level that will damage most headphones if used at full gain.
Important! The maximum output voltage of the Headphone Output is limited to 1.5 Vp (1.06 V rms)
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
AmpConnect USB Control Via SoundCheck
255
Sequence Example
The Loudspeaker Impedance Test Sequence will require the
settings as shown in Figure 21-4. (Refer to the Single
Loudspeaker Test section of the SoundCheck ONE manual for
wiring suggestions.)

Panel Lock is ON. This disables the front panel controls.
Input Section

Reference In Bias is set to Voltage

DUT In Bias is set to None

Gain set to 0 dB for both
Signal Routing

Reference Mic is selected on Channel 1

Amplifier output is set to Output A

Z-Low is selected on Channel 2. This is used for the
Impedance measurement input in the SoundCheck
sequence.
Figure 21-4: AmpConnect Settings
Click Apply to send these settings to AmpConnect. This allows you to check the settings without having to run
the sequence. Verify the settings on the front panel of the AmpConnect.
When the sequence runs, AmpConnect ISC will automatically change to these settings.
Note:
Overload of the Front Panel Input Level or Output Level indicators currently requires a hard reset
of AmpConnect ISC. Turn the AmpConnect ISC power switch off and then back on to reset.
Custom Step Conversion
SoundCheck 9 users controlling AmpConnect with the Custom Step will need to use the following procedure to
re-create the step in SoundCheck 16.0.
256

Open the AmpConnect Custom Step(s) in SoundCheck 9

Write down the settings for the step. (The AmpConnect ISC manual has a blank front panel drawing
which makes notation of settings easier.)

In SoundCheck 16.0, edit the Hardware Configuration for AmpConnect. See AmpConnect ISC on
page 57

Make a new Message Step in SoundCheck 16.0 and enter the settings from the front panel notation

SoundCheck 16.0 will not open AmpConnect Custom Steps
AmpConnect USB Control Via SoundCheck
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Limits Editor
To view and change the system’s test limits, select Limits from the Setup drop down menu on the main
SoundCheck® menu bar, or use the shortcut Ctrl+Shift+L. You can use this step to set Pass/Fail bounds for
your measured curves, waveforms and single values. A curve or value that crosses the upper or lower limit set
by the step will give a Fail result, while a curve or value that lies between or equal to the set boundaries will
Pass. There are many different ways of applying limits to measurement data.
Features include:

Floating limit curves to fixed data

Floating data to fixed limit curves

Setting Absolute limits

Allowing data to float on the x axis

Data from the Memory List can be used to create limit curves which can be offset by a predetermined
amount in the Limits Editor

Data from the Memory List can be used as a limit curve, e.g., +/- 3 sigma of running statistics.
The Limits Editor functions are divided between two tabs; Data and Parameters. Figure 22-1 shows the
settings available under the two tabs.
Drag limit points
with a mouse.
Resolution of the
X and Y axis can
be set from 0 to 6
decimal places
Data Tab
Select one curve
from the Memory
List that limits will
be applied to
Remove existing Limits (Clear). Use
current measurements to create limits
(Copy), or use previously saved measurements or test items as limits.
Parameters tab
Figure 22-1: Limits Editor Tabs: Data and Parameters
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Instruction Manual
Limits Editor
257
Features
The Limits Editor offers two views. Basic view shows only the commonly adjusted settings, and by clicking on
the Advanced tab, many more are revealed. This keeps the software simple for novice and production line
users while retaining the flexibility required in R&D applications.

Batch Processing allows you to select a Custom Group of multiple curves to apply limits on

Custom Result Name allows you to change the default name for the limit curves in the Memory List
without having to rename the step

Add Input Data Name appends the name of the selected data to the Limit name in the Memory List

Click on Apply and the limit curves and results are updated in the Memory List. Settings can be
changed and tested without having to run a new measurement. Note the additional condition in Save
or OK Warning after Apply on page 270.

Dynamic Selection of limit curves in Memory List, so that limits can come from another measurement
or Recalled DAT file

Show measurement curve on table (disabled for waveform)

SI Units are implemented

The editor incorporates the look and behavior of the Display Step.

Easy “dragging” of limit points

Graph or Plot items such as the Mapping Mode or Precision of the X and Y axis are stored when the
step is saved

Failed Points can be stored as curves in the Memory List
Note:
258
Limits can be applied to single data items or a Custom Group created in the Memory List.
Sequences from SoundCheck 6.01 (and previous versions) that applied limits to multiple curves in
one step (e.g.; Self Test) will need to be updated to work in SoundCheck 16.0.
Limits Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Precision of Limits Display
The precision of the Limits Editor display is set through the graph controls located below the graph. Click on
x.xx or y.yy, click on Precision and select the number of decimal places to display. This changes only the
precision of the graph. It does not change the precision of how the limits are applied to the data. See Absolute
Comparison Precision on page 273 for an explanation of changing the precision of the applied limits.
Note:
Setting the Absolute Comparison Precision overrides the Display Precision set by the user.
Format and Mapping Mode selections are also available.
Format - Select Decimal, Scientific, Engineering, etc.
Mapping Mode - Select Linear or Logarithmic
Critical Points
One critical point is generated for the upper limit and a second is generated for the lower limit. These points
show up as yellow circles on the Limits Editor Display but are not passed on to the Memory List. This is to be
used as a visual marker to aid in building and editing limit steps.
In the case where the data is within the bounds of the limit curve, this point shows where the data is closest to
the limit curve.
In the case where the data lies outside the bounds of the limit curve, this point shows the greatest deviation of
the data relative to that limit curve.
Limits Editor Summary Table
Limits Type
Data
Tolerance(s)
Individual Points
Stays fixed at measured level.
Same as Absolute but with no
interpolation between data and limits
resolution.
Absolute
Stays fixed at measured level.
Stays fixed at values entered in Limits
Editor.
Floating Limits
Stays fixed at measured level.
Moves up or down such that maximum
number of points in data curve can fit
between tolerances.
Floating Data
Moves up or down such that maximum number of
points in data curve can fit between tolerances.
Stays fixed at values entered in Limits
Editor.
Aligned Limits
Stays fixed at measured level. Used in some
telephone (e.g., TIA 470B) and military
standards. (not used in new TIA 470C standard)
Moves up or down to align the Reference
x, y value to the measurement curve.
Aligned Data
Moves up or down to the anchor point (X and Y
values entered in Alignment Reference
section of Limits Editor). An example is
anchoring the 1 kHz measured curve value at
0 dB.
Stays fixed at values entered in Limits
Editor.
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Instruction Manual
Limits Editor
259
Using the Limits Editor
You only need to specify the minimum number of X-Y data pairs (or knee points) that define the shape of the
tolerance curve. All other points in between the specified knee points of the limit curve will be interpolated and
compared to see if any point on the measurement curve intersects. In the example below, a frequency
response curve for a telephone headset is shown in green. The upper and lower limits (red) were entered in the
table manually. After the points are entered you can click on any of the limit curve points on the graph to move
them. Holding down the control key restricts the movement of the graph point so it can only move along the y
axis.
Frequencies and
dB levels can be
entered/deleted
manually in table
Figure 22-2: Entering Limits in Table
Upper and Lower Limits
Note:
Floating Limits or Floating Data will require upper and lower limits.
Select whether to apply an upper, lower limit or both. Distortion, for example, should only require an upper limit,
but response limits will require both an upper and lower limits if Floating Limits or Floating Data is selected. See
Alignment on page 268 for more information.
Clear
Deletes all of the limit data in the cells. This
allows you to enter new limits data manually
or copy Data from a Memory List curve into
the cells (single value or curve).
Figure 22-3: Clearing (deleting) Values
To select a range of cells to delete, left mouse click and hold on the first cell and drag the mouse to highlight the
desired cells. The selected cells will be highlighted in blue. Click the Delete button at the right of the editor.
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Instruction Manual
Copy
Copies the selected data curve from the Memory List and inserts the curve values into the Upper or Lower
Limits table. In the example in Figure 22-4:
1. Select Advanced View
2. In the Data section, select a data curve from the Memory List.
3. Click Copy on both Upper and Lower Limits table buttons. Data points are copied into these fields.
4. Enter the Offset for the Upper and Lower tables. +6 dB for the Upper and -6 dB for the Lower.
5. Click the Offset button for both tables. The upper limit is offset by +6 dB and the lower limit is offset by
-6 dB.
1. Select
Advanced
View
3. Copy Data
4. Enter Offset in dB
2. Selected
Curve
5. Click Offset in both
upper and lower sections to shift Limit
Curve
Figure 22-4: Creating Limits by Using Data From Memory List
Note:
SoundCheck may have difficulty copying very large arrays (>2000 points). For example, copying
an FFT Spectrum into the Limits Table may cause you difficulty. Computer hardware will dictate full
capability.
Delete
Removes those points that have been selected in the Upper Limit and/or Lower Limit curves. To select one or
more points, Left click on the first UPPER cell in the range and then click on the last Lower cell in the range. In
the example in Figure 22-5, points above 6300 Hz will be deleted. You can also Left-click the mouse and drag
it to the right to highlight both frequency and amplitude values. A blue border surrounds the cells in the
table that will be deleted.
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261
Clicking the Delete button will remove these
cells from the table. By deleting the same cells in
Lower Limit, the resulting Pass/Fail limits are
shown in Figure 22-5.
Offset
Enables you to move or offset the entire or
selected section of a limit curve(s) by a specified
amount. The values you want to offset must be
highlighted in blue. Enter the number you want to
offset by (usually you will offset in the Y-axis,
leave the X-axis field at 0.0 to make no changes
there) and then click Offset. You can select all
the values in the limit table by clicking the
horizontal line between the two unit
specifications.
Figure 22-5: Deleting Values in Limits Table
To select the entire table, hold down the control
key and click on any cell in the table.
Offset by Percent
Offset by percent allows you to set the percent difference from a mean value that is acceptable for upper and/or
lower limits. In Figure 22-6 the mean value is 1 and the limits should be + or - 10%.
1. Enter the mean value (1) in the Upper and Lower Limit value boxes.
2. Enter the Percent of offset in the Upper and Lower Limit Offset boxes and select %.
3. Click Offset for the Upper and Lower Limits.
4. The Upper and Lower Limit values are updated in the value boxes and on the meter or graphs.
Figure: 22-6 Offset by Percent
Insert
X-Y cells can be added to the limit table by clicking on a cell and then clicking on the Insert button.
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Instruction Manual
Pass/Fail Tolerance Axis
You can choose which axis will be compared to a
Pass/Fail tolerance. Typically it is the y (magnitude)
axis, but tolerances can be generated for the other
axes. The units for the tolerance curves or values are
automatically assigned based on the x, y, or z-axis
units.
Dynamic Limits - Recall from Memory List
Limits can be called from an item in the Memory List by clicking on the Drop Down Menu. These limits could be
recalled from a DAT file or from a previous measurement in the sequence. The example in Figure 22-7 shows
the upper and lower limits being called from 2 files; +3 Sigma and -3 Sigma.
Only applicable data types from the Memory List are available to be used as dynamic limits for any given data
type. i.e; Only single values and curves can be applied as limits on curves. If a curve is selected as data, a
waveform cannot be selected from the Memory List.
Select
“Memory List”
and then
Select Curves
from Memory
List Drop
Figure: 22-7 Limits from Memory List
Note:
No offset is available when using dynamic limits.
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Instruction Manual
Limits Editor
263
Data Tab Settings
The following choices are available in
the Data selection field:

Single Values - Any single
number value or group of
values from the Memory List

Curves - Any curve or group of
curves in the Memory List

Waveforms - WFM and WAV
files and groups

Batch Processing allows you
to select a group of curves as
show in Figure 22-5. Any
Custom Group created in the
Memory List can be used for
Figure 22-8: Batch Processing in Limits Editor
the appropriate limit type.
Please refer to Sorting and
Grouping on page 289 for
instructions on creating a Custom Group.
Single Values
Single Values is used when applying limits to items from the Memory List that are single number values. This
can be used for comparing the measured level at a specified frequency to a lower and upper threshold or a
single value created from a Post-processing Step, such Curve Average or Loose Particle Count.
The use of Single Value is not limited to values acquired by a measurement. Figure 22-9 shows limits applied
to the value of “Diaphragm Diameter”. This number was entered by a technician during the execution of the
sequence. The number was passed from a Message step to the Memory List.
User defined limit values can be entered manually in the numeric input field or by clicking and dragging the
Upper and/or Lower Limit arrows. If either the upper or lower limit is defined from the Memory List, the ability to
click and drag the arrows is disabled.
Figure: 22-9 Single Values
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SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Offset for single value (linear or %)

Linear allows you to select specific upper and/or lower values. Offset by percent allows you to select
the percent difference from a target mean value that is acceptable for upper and/or lower limits. See
Figure 22-6 for an example.
Curves
Select Curve
from Memory
List
Figure: 22-10 Curve selected, User Defined Limits
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Limits Editor
265
Waveforms
Select
Waveform
from Memory List
Figure: 22-11 Waveform
Rules - Waveform in Limit Steps
Because waveforms have so many points, the following rules apply:
266

User defined limits may be created as X-Y (Time-Amplitude) "knee points" by the user.

User defined limits will be converted to waveforms and output to the Memory List so you can plot data
and limits together.

Dynamic limits may be applied to waveforms. However, You can not copy a waveform in the Limits
Editor to create "static Limits" (i.e., limits saved with the step) because of the large waveform size.

A Single Value may be applied as a limit on a waveform.

User will not be able to view the waveform data in the table to which the limits are to be applied in the
Limits Editor. This will only be visible in the graph.
Limits Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Multimeter Limit Steps
Important! Sequences prior to SoundCheck 15: Multimeter Limit
steps that were used to set the Limit Range of the Multimeter
Virtual Instrument Acquisition Step require changes.
The Multimeter Acquisition Step must be modified to set the
Limit Range. The Limit Step used for setting the limit range
can be deleted from the sequence. When opening
sequences from prior versions you will encounter the
message as shown in Figure 22-12.
Figure: 22-12 Multimeter
Update
A separate Limit Step is then used after the Multimeter Acquisition Step to add
the Results to the Memory List. See Limits Tab on page 419 for more
information.
Batch Processing
This allows you to select a group of curves from the Memory List to apply limits on. Figure 22-13 shows the
custom group Array at the top of the Memory List. This custom group is then selected in the Limit Step.
Any Custom Group created in the Memory List can be used for the appropriate limit type. Please refer to
Sorting and Grouping on page 289 for instructions on creating a Custom Group.
Custom Result Name
The default name for a Limit Step is the name of the step itself. Custom Result Name allows you to change that
name. This name will only appear in the sequence it is used in. The example in Figure 22-13 shows a Limit
Step with the name “Resp“. The Memory List shows the new limit name, “Resp lower limit...“. You can have a
unique name for the limits in the Memory List, for every instance of the step.
Figure: 22-13 Naming Features
Add Input Data Name
When using the Batch Limits feature to apply limits to a Custom Group of curves, it is recommend that you use
Add Input Data Name to make it easier to keep track of the resulting limit curves in the Memory List.
Figure 22-13 shows the nine data curves in the Custom Group: Array. Each curve name, in parenthesis, is
appended to the limit curve names, e.g.; “RESP lower limit (Driver 1)“ through “RESP lower limit (Driver 9)“.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
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267
Parameters Tab - Settings
Note:
Advanced View is enabled in examples to show all features.
Note:
The Resolution for X & Y can be set independently.
Alignment
Five methods of Aligning Limits to the selected data can be found on the Parameters Tab.

Individual Points

Absolute Limits

Floating Limits

Floating Data

Aligned Limits

Aligned Data
Individual Points
The measurement is compared to the absolute values of the individual
tolerance points. Only when the measurement exceeds the tolerance
at specific limit points will a failure be indicated. In Figure 22-14 the
level at 1700 Hz is above the level of the limits at 1000 and 2000 Hz,
but the limit status indicates Passed. There is no interpolation between
limit points.
Select Individual
Points
Since there is no
Limit Line or Single Limit Point at
3.35k Hz, the
limit status indicates Passed
Figure 22-14: Individual Limit Points
268
Limits Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Absolute Limits
The measurement is compared to the absolute values of the tolerance limit(s). When Apply is clicked,
SoundCheck will highlight those points where the data exceeds the upper and lower limits by the greatest
amount. In Figure 22-15, the measured curve (Test Monitor) failed by -1.0 dB at 4250 Hz (note the small yellow
circle at 4250 Hz).
Yellow circle at
point of maximum
deviation
Failure Margin
Figure 22-15: Curve Compared to Absolute Limits
Floating Limits
The tolerance limits will float (shift up and down) in reference to the measurement curve such that the
maximum number of data points will fit between the tolerances. By clicking Apply, the curve that previously
failed now passes by 0.8 dB, because the tolerances have shifted so the measured data fits between the limits.
When Floating Limits is chosen, SoundCheck will execute a “Best Fit” curve fitting routine between the upper
and lower limits. Yellow circles will highlight those points closest to the limits (in this case 4250 Hz).
Limits have shifted
up to “Best Fit” the
data
Figure 22-16: Curve Compared to Floating Limits
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Limits Editor
269
Save or OK Warning after Apply
When using Floating Limits or Floating Data a warning message
will appear when you click on “Ok” or “Save as”, after clicking
Apply. This warning appears because “Apply” may have moved
the limits. You are then prompted to:

Save Current - Save using the new position of the limits.

Cancel & Revert - Undo the modified limit step settings
and return to the editor.

Save Previous - Save the limits as they were before the
last time the Apply button was clicked.
Figure: 22-17 Warning - Floated/
Aligned
Output to Memory List

Upper and Lower Limits are added to the Memory List for the data item selected

Limits are named according to the name entered in the Custom Result Name field

Add Input Data Name will append the data name to the Custom Result Name, e.g., “Response
margin Upper Limit (Fundamental)”

If a Custom Group is selected for Batch Limits, limits are created for each item in the group. Selecting
“Add Input Data Name“ is recommended when selecting a Custom Group. See Sorting and Grouping
on page 289.
Note:
Floating Limits or Floating Data always create upper and lower limits.
Floating Limits on y axis
Limit curves will adjust to “Best Fit“ the selected data. This
adjustment is made each time the data curve changes for each
sequence run.
Floating Limits on x axis
In many instances, electroacoustic transducers will exhibit sharp
resonance or anti-resonance in their frequency response
curves.
Figure: 22-18 Y axis Floating Limits
For example, a small shift or reflection due to a slight change in
microphone position can cause false rejects. SoundCheck can
take into account these slight changes in peaks and dips in the
frequency response curve by floating an X-axis tolerance.
When the x-axis Float Limits box is checked, SoundCheck will
shift the frequency response curve by the amount specified in
the Step Size box. See Figure 22-19.
The X-axis tolerance can be either logarithmic or linear. If it is
set to Log, the step size (amount that SoundCheck will shift the
Figure: 22-19 X axis Floating Limits
curve in the X direction) is in percent (%). If you want to shift the
curve by 1/24th of an octave, you would set this value to 3
percent. Maximum and Minimum refer to the greatest amount, in percent, that the curve will be shifted. If Lin
is chosen, the step size is in Hz as well as the Maximum and Minimum frequency limits (e.g., ± 10 Hz).
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Instruction Manual
Floating Data
The amplitude of the Limit Curves stays fixed as it does when set to Absolute. The data points will float (shift
up and down) in reference to the upper and lower tolerances, such that the maximum number of data points will
fit between these tolerances. The example in Figure 22-20 shows a reference point of 1 kHz at 82.3 dB. In the
first frame, the Data curve is obviously outside the range of the limits even though the shape of the response is
correct. By selecting Float Data from the Parameters Tab, the Upper and Lower Limit Curves will remain at
their current levels. After clicking Apply the Data curve has shifted to best fit the Limit Curves. Note that the
reference point of 1 kHz is now at 77.3 dB.
Note:
A copy of the Floating Data is passed to the Memory List with “Floated“ appended to the end of the
name.
Before Floating Data:
Data curve is above
Limits.
Reference point 1 kHz
at 109 dB.
Select Floating Data
Click Apply to
Float Data &
update the editor
Data curve shifts.
The Reference
point is at
106.2 dB.
Figure 22-20: Data Floats and Tolerance Curves Stay Fixed
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Instruction Manual
Limits Editor
271
Aligned Limits
Positions the tolerance limits relative to the curve by a
specified offset at a user-defined reference point in the Align
Reference fields. The Alignment Reference numeric fields
are enabled when this tolerance type is selected. See Figure
22-21.

Select a frequency point on the Data Curve and enter
it in the x axis Alignment Reference field

Select the midpoint of the Upper and Lower Limits
curves, at the frequency point entered in the x axis field. Enter this in the y axis Alignment Reference
field

On each sequence run, the limits will adjust so that selected center point of the limits always tracks the
specified frequency point on the data curve

Used in older telecom and military standards
Figure: 22-21 Aligned Limits
Output to Memory List

Upper and Lower Limits are added to the Memory List for the data item selected

Limits are named according to the name entered in the Custom Result Name field

Add Input Data Name will append the data name to the Custom Result Name, e.g., “Response
margin Upper Limit (Fundamental)”

If a Custom Group is selected for Batch Limits, limits are created for each item in the group. Selecting
“Add Input Data Name“ is recommended when selecting a Custom Group. See Sorting and Grouping
on page 289.
Aligned Data
Moves the selected data curve so that
the specified x axis point of the curve is
at the specified y axis point on the
graph. Limit curves are not adjusted.

On each sequence run, the
data curve will adjust so that
selected center point of the
limits always tracks the
specified frequency point on
the data curve

Commonly used for
microphone frequency
response, as shown in the
“Microphone” example
sequence. Figure 22-22 shows
the response, Normalized to 0 dB at 1 kHz.
Figure 22-22: Aligned Data Selection
Output to Memory List
272

Upper Limits, Lower Limits or both are added to the Memory List for the data item selected

Limits are named according to the name entered in the Custom Result Name field
Limits Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual

A new version of the data curve is created with “Aligned” append to the data curve name, e.g.,
“Fundamental Aligned“. This appears in the Limits Group when Autogroup is turned on.

Add Input Data Name will append the data name to the Custom Result Name, e.g., “Response
margin Upper Limit (Fundamental)”

If a Custom Group is selected for Batch Limits, selected limits are created for each item in the group.
Selecting “Add Input Data Name“ is recommended when selecting a Custom Group.
Absolute Comparison Precision
To pass or fail the device under test to within 1 dB, choose Precision = 0; within 0.1 dB choose Precision = 1;
within 0.01 dB choose Precision = 2, etc. The default precision is one (1) decimal place. In this case, a data
point of 0.05 is rounded up to 0.1 and then the limit, which has also be rounded to the selected precision, is
applied. When the data equals the limit, a Pass verdict is returned. Only when the data is outside the bounds of
the limits is a Fail verdict returned.
Note:
Regardless of the resolution set in the Limits step, the default resolution for the Results Display
window is two (2) digits of precision.
Note:
Setting the Absolute Comparison Precision overrides the Display Precision set by the user. See
Precision of Limits Display on page 259.
The example in Figure 22-23 show the Absolute Comparison Precision set to 2 decimal places on the y axis.
The value of 77.79 dB at 6.3 kHz is outside the limit tolerance by 0.01 B (-10m dB). In this case the Limit step
returns a Failed verdict.
Figure: 22-23 Absolute Comparison Precision 2 decimal places
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Instruction Manual
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273
By changing the Absolute Comparison Precision to 1 decimal place the y axis value is rounded to 77.8 dB. The
data values have not changed. Only the precision of the application of the data has changed. Since the Limit
value and the Data value are the same, a Pass verdict is returned with a margin of 0 dB. This is shown in
Figure 22-24.
Figure: 22-24 Absolute Comparison Precision 1 decimal place
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Instruction Manual
X Axis - Log vs. Linear Interpolation
If a data point lies between two points along a limit curve, SoundCheck must interpolate along the Limit Curve
in order to determine how the data point is compared to the limit curve. When Log is selected, the data value is
compared to the limit curve using a Log, X axis scale. See Figure 22-25. The data point is 4.4 dB at 1000 Hz.
The Lower Limit curve starts at 5 dB at 100 Hz and ends at 3 dB at 10 kHz. In this case, log interpolation
compares the data to a value of 4 dB at 1 kHz. This is the default setting for the Limit Step.
The result is PASS since the Data Point is ABOVE the Interpolated Point along the limit curve.
Data point:
4.4 dB at 1 kHz
Log Interpolated Point:
4.0 dB at 1 kHz
Result: Pass since the
Interpolated point is
Above the Data point
Figure 22-25: Log Interpolation
Using the same limit curve and data point, Figure 22-26 shows the Linear Interpolation result. The Limit Curve
is interpolated to be 4.82 dB at 1 kHz. The X axis of the graph has been switched to Linear to match the Linear
Mapping selected in Parameters. The result is FAIL since the data point is BELOW the Interpolated Point
along the limit curve.
Log Interpolated Point:
4.82 dB at 1 kHz
Data point: 4.4 dB at 1 kHz
X axis set to linear in both the
Parameters tab and on the Graph
control
Result: Fail since the Interpolated
point is BELOW the Data point
Figure 22-26: Linear Interpolation
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275
This shows why the display X axis mapping and the interpolation control should be set to the same scale. This
way, the interpolation matches the visual representation of the curves. This should prevent false visual failures.

Interpolation along the Y axis is always Linear regardless of the settings of the X Y Graph Display

For no interpolation between limit points, select Individual Points under Limits Parameters - Alignment.
See Individual Points on page 268

For Displays with Linearity Limits, where both axis’ are dB, select Linear Mapping for the X axis on both
the Parameters Tab and on the Limit Graph Selection. See Precision of Limits Display on page 259
Failed Points
When Failed Points is selected on the
Parameters tab the points of failure are
stored in the Memory List as a curve.

One curve for Upper Limit
and another for Lower Limit

If a Custom Group is
selected, Upper and Lower
Failed Points are created for
each curve in the group

Curve of failed points
contains all (and only) the
points that exceed the limit
curve

If only one failed point is
produced, the curve will
not show up in a Display
Step unless the curve is
set to Solid Points (See
Figure 22-26)

Figure: 22-27 Failed Points
If the limit step is
executed and there are
no failed points (PASS
situation), the failed points curve is populated with a value of NaN (Not a Number).

If the limit step is not executed, the failed points curve will remain empty
Display Step example of Failed Points
Green and Purple
Failed Points
curves are set to
have “Square
Point Style”.
Figure: 22-28 Failed Points
276
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SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Comparison of Absolute Limits, Floating Limits and Floating Data
The following three figures show how the same response curve can have limits applied in three different ways.
Absolute Limits
The measured curve is outside of
absolute value of the limits, so the
condition is FAIL. The level of the
response is 108.9 dB at 1 kHz.
Figure 22-29: Absolute Limits
Floating Limits
The measured curve stays at its
measured level,108.9 dB at 1 kHz, but
the limits shift downward to match this
level (Best Fit to Average).
No values exceed the limits, so the
result is a PASS verdict.
Figure 22-30: Floating Limits
Floating Data
The measured curve shifts upward to
fit in between the absolute values of
the limit curves. The 108.9 dB level at
1 kHz shifts upward to 113.9 dB. No
values exceed the limits so the result is
a PASS verdict.
A copy of the Floated Data is added to
the Memory List with “Floated”
appended to the data name.
Figure 22-31: Floating Data
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Display Editor and Memory List
Figure 23-1: Display Step Example
The Display Editor (Ctrl+Shift+D) allows you to control the “on screen” display of:

XY Graphs for data

Waveform graphs

Polar plots (optional)

Result windows

Table of values

Text boxes

Pictures
To edit an existing Display Step in a sequence, choose Display from the Setup menu.
See Display Editing on page 296 for more information on displays and their properties.
Memory List
The control center of the Display Editor is the Memory List. Select Memory List
from the Setup menu in the main SoundCheck® window (Ctrl+Shift+Y).

To edit a Display, click on the desired Display Tab on the Main Screen.

When a sequence contains multiple Display Steps you can select
Display from the Setup menu and select a Display Step from the list
(Ctrl+Shift+D). See Display Editing on page 296.

Open the Memory List to show the data available for displays.
The Memory List can produce seven types of Display windows as shown in
Figure 23-2. See Display Editing on page 296.
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Instruction Manual
Display Editor and Memory List
Figure 23-2: Display
Drop down
279
Memory List
Tabs (Curves, Values, Results and WFM)
Data in the Memory List is divided into four tabs: Curves, Values, Results and WFM (Waveforms). The data
content of these items is generated by the sequence can be accessed by clicking on any of these tabs. Names
with an empty circle contain no data and act as placeholders when creating a sequence. After the sequence is
run, the circle will be filled indicating that data is in memory and can be displayed. If one or more steps are
added to the sequence after it is run, the associated names will be preceded by an open circle until the
sequence is run. Data items can also be filled by clicking on the Apply button in some editors and by recalling
data from disk.
Only certain types of data are appropriate for each display.

Curves - Can be added to an XY Graph, Table or Polar Plot

Values - Can be added to a Table

Results - Can be added to a Results display or a Table

WFM - Can be added to a Waveform Graph or a Table
For example, if the display consists of only XY Graphs, and a result item is selected from the Results tab of the
Memory List, you will not be able to “Left Click and Drag” the item to a display.
Memory List Data Items
Prior to running a sequence, the only curves in the Memory List that contain data,
are the calibration curves (filled circles at top of list as in Figure 23-3).

Empty Circle - Item contains no data

Filled Circle - Item contains data

Blue Group Heading - Data added to Custom Group. See Sorting and
Grouping on page 289.

Check Mark - Protected data

Empty Diamond - Autoprotected & contains no data

Filled Diamond - Autoprotected & contains data

Grey Group Heading - Protected data. See Auto Grouping General
Rules - Memory List on page 290.
Figure 23-3: Empty
Circle - No Data
After the sequence has been run, the Memory List indicates that the curves
contain data (filled circles).
Figure 23-3: Curve
Contains Data
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Memory List Features

Clicking on items in the Memory List does not break the relationship of those items to a display

Simply double clicking on a memory list item will open it in its default display window

You can use Drag and Drop to add other items to an Active Display

Autogroup items in the Memory List and create Custom Groups (See Sorting and Grouping on page
289)

Right Click on items to set properties (See Right Click - Memory List on page 281)

Right click on an item to display it on the Active Display, on a different display or create a new display

Alt+click on an item to add or remove it from an Active Display

The Protect and Autoprotect functions append the serial number to the Protected Data name. This
offers a quick and easy way to annotate data by typing a comment into the Serial Number field on the
SoundCheck Main Screen.

Open Multiple Dat Files in the Memory List

Lock Display to prevent unwanted changes to displays - See Lock Display Off on page 282

Report Generator - Replaces printing to Word, Excel, HTML or image file from the Memory List Report
Menu. Templates are now used to add flexibility and repeatability when printing data. See Report
Generator on page 317 for more information.

Set Text Size and Text Color of a Value Table. See Table - Preferences on page 314.
Right Click - Memory List
Right click on a single item or several items in any of the Memory List
Tabs and select:

Show on Active Display - For data that is not linked to the
active display, select an item, right click on it and select Show.

Select a range of items by selecting the top item, hold the
Shift Key and select the bottom item. Right click to Show or
select another function.

An alternative is to hold the Alt Key and left click on an item
to add it to the selected display window.

Hold Alt and Ctrl then left click on items to add them
Figure 23-4: Right Click
Menu

Remove from Active Display - Use the above methods to break the connection of the items to the
active display

Display On - Add the selected item(s) to an existing display

New Group - Creates a new group in the Memory List
See Sorting and Grouping on page 289.
The following features are available in the Right Click menu as well as in the Data Drop Down Menu: Delete,
Protect, Autoprotect, Undo Autoprotect, Rename, Overwrite, Units and Comment. Explanations can be
found starting under Data Menu on page 284.
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281
Memory List Drop Down Menus
Display Menu
Open display layouts, data, results and Waveforms previously saved to disk. Lock
Display prevents display overwrite.

Load Display - Opens a new display in place of the currently selected
Display Tab.

This display is added to the active sequence and will overwrite the
existing step.

The sequence editor is updated the next time the sequence is run or
when it is saved.
Figure 23-5: Display
Menu

Save Display As Template - Renames the step in the sequence and saves
the current display as a template. You are prompted for a file name and the
location to save the file. The default location is the Display folder in SoundCheck. The sequence must
be saved in order to remember the name change in the active sequence.

Revert - Discard changes, returning display to last saved version

New - Open a blank display for: XY Graph, Waveform Graph, Text, Results, Polar Plot, Table and
Picture

Lock Display - This control prevents you from closing the displays out of
habit, as one would in other windows applications. Locked displays can be
edited, but the changes are lost when the sequence is changed or the
application is closed.
When the lock is off, displays can be edited. For Technician and Operator
login level, the lock is always on. The Lock feature can only be unlocked
by the Engineer user level.
Figure 23-6: Lock
Display Off
Display Lock Rules
When Display Lock is on:
282

Locking the display affects all displays in all sequences (until it is explicitly unlocked)

The display windows cannot be closed, resized or "minimized". The Minimize/Maximize buttons are
removed from the display headers.

New displays can be opened, but will not be saved in memory. The display will revert back to the “Last
Saved State“ when the sequence is run. The ONLY exception to this rule is when the display is left
open, if you have added or moved some display windows, they will stay in their new positions until they
are closed (either by File->Close in the Memory List, by the sequence, or by another display opening).

None of the temporary edits (like positioning) will be saved in memory. You will not be prompted to
save display-related changes upon sequence exit

Changes to the displays are not saved when the sequence is saved

You can select Save Display as Template from the Memory List - Display menu

A new display cannot be loaded into Active Display Tabs (you can load a display in the Offline Tab)

The lock state is remembered in the SoundCheck 16.0.ini file
Display Editor and Memory List
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual

Duplicate - Opens a copy of a display window, retaining the Properties of the display but not the link to
Memory List items.
This allows you to “Clone“ the Active Display type. This way, all displays within a sequence can have
the same preferences. The Line Style settings; width, color, etc, are not duplicated.
Figure 23-7: Save as Default

Save as Default - This allows you to save the Display Preferences for the Active Display, as the default
settings for that type of display. There is a default template for each type of display; XY Graph,
Waveform, etc.

Close Memory List - Closes only the Memory List, leaves display windows open

Close Display - Closes all display windows and the Memory List. Allows you to clear the display
windows from the desktop without deleting the display layout.
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283
Data Menu
The Memory List can be used to recall saved *.DAT and *.RES files and display saved curves, values and
results in the current Memory List. (See alsoRecall Editor on pg 195)
You can also open text (*.TXT) files. This will automatically open the Data Import Wizard (See Importing text
from a saved file on pg 539).

Open Data - Opens selected .DAT file
Multiple DAT files can be opened at once from the Memory List. This is
convenient when running statistics on a batch of curves and working with
large numbers of files. If a DAT file contains multiple curves, a new Group is
created in the Memory List, which contains the curves for that DAT file. When
opening data, hold down the Control Key to select individual files. Click on
the first item in the list and hold down the Shift Key while clicking on the last
item to select that range of items.

All items opened from disk are Protected Data, denoted with a check
mark.

Protected Data can only be added to Protected Groups. See Auto
Grouping General Rules - Memory List on page 290.

When opening a Dat file in the Memory List, a Protected Group is added
Figure 23-8: Data
to the Memory List that contains all the curves from the Dat file. The
Drop down
curves are not automatically added to the Active Display. The curves can
be individually selected (or selected as a group) so that only the required curves show up in the
display. This makes loading a large number of curves into memory much faster. Grouping makes it
easier to manage a large number of curves.
Note:
DAT files created with SoundCheck 16.0 are not viewable in versions of SoundCheck prior to and
including SoundCheck 6.0x. The DAT file format was updated in SoundCheck 6.1.

284
Save Data as - Saves the data selected in the Memory List to a .DAT and allows you to specify the
name for the file

If the hardware is set to 24 bit, the waveform saved will be 24 bit

Lock Display prevents display overwrite

The item name is used as the default file name when saving an item to disk

Waveforms can be saved to a WAV file:

You are prompted to select the Bit Depth to save as and the
scaling

Select two Waveforms (WFM), select "Save As” then select
.WAV". This creates a single stereo WAV file. The first
waveform selected will be the left and the second will be the
right.

If three or more WFM files are selected, an error message will
indicate that this is not allowed.

Save multiple Waveforms to a single *.WFM file.

You can save curves, values or results to a *.TXT file
Display Editor and Memory List
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
If save to a *.TXT file is selected, you will be asked to make formatting choices,
as shown in Figure 23-9.
The options available in this window are identical to those of the Autosave
Editor when saving to a Text file. You can choose which axes to save, whether
to include a standard or custom header, to orient the data into rows or columns,
and the notation and precision of the numerical values.
See Autosave Editor on page 183.
Figure 23-9: Formatting
Choices

Recently Opened Files - Shows the most recent Displays, DAT, RES and WFM files (useful when
opening the same files on a regular basis)

Delete - will remove only the selected item(s) from the active Memory List Tab (Available in both the
Right Click and Data Menu)

Delete All In Tab - removes all of the items from the active Memory List Tab (Data Menu Only)

Delete All In All Tabs - removes all of the items from all tabs: Curves, Values, Results and WFM (Data
Menu Only)

Protect Data - Items in the Memory List can be protected so
that subsequent runs of the sequence do not overwrite the data
Any unprotected Curves, Values, Results and WFMs generated
by a sequence are overwritten in memory each time the
sequence is run. To keep the current data and results in
memory as more tests are run, highlight the item(s), Right
Click or click on the Data Menu and select Protect . Protecting
items will keep them in the Memory List until they are deleted or
the application is restarted.
Protected Data will be shown in the Memory List with the same
name as the original curve, with a suffix of "-p" appended to the
data name. Protected items are also identified with a Check
Mark to the left of the name, which only appears in the Memory
List.
Figure 23-10: Protect Data
You can also choose to Protect any information after the
sequence has been run. Protected data is not discarded when changing sequences.

The Protect and Autoprotect functions append the serial number to the Protected Data name. This
offers a quick and easy way to annotate data by typing a comment into the Serial Number field.

The protected data should be removed by using the Delete option in the Data Menu or the Right Click
Menu.

Protected Data can only be added to Protected Groups. See Auto Grouping General Rules Memory List on page 290.
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285

Autoprotect data - Used to keep data contents of items in memory every time a sequence is run
When an item is highlighted in the Memory List and Autoprotect is selected, the icon to the left of the
item(s) changes to a diamond shape ().
Autoprotecting allows you to designate items that should be protected before the sequence is run. A
copy of the item is generated each time the sequence is run and will be protected in the Memory List
(until Undo Autoprotect is selected).
Each time the sequence runs, the selected item will be protected and numbered in ascending order.
If a serial number is entered in the Serial Number field, either manually or with a Serial Number step,
that number will be appended to the Autoprotected items.
Choosing Autoprotect for the Fundamental curve will create a
diamond  next to that curve, and all information will be protected.
Fundamental [L] is a place holder for information, indicating that the
item is to be Protected. Each time the sequence is run the data for
Fundamental [L] is appended to the end of the Memory List and
protected.
Protected Data will have checkmarks on the left, and items that are
protected multiple times, with the same name, will be given a prefix
number.
Note:
If the Serial Number Step is used at the beginning of the
sequence, the Autoprotected data has the serial number
automatically appended to the data name, for all autoprotected
items in the Memory List.
Figure 23-11: Fundamental
Autoprotected
Autoprotect/Undo Autoprotect Rules

The Autoprotect and Undo Autoprotect functions require that a Display Step is in the sequence

The Display MUST be open to access the Autoprotect and Undo functions in the Memory List

Autoprotect with multiple Displayes: The Autoprotect state of a Memory List item is unique for
each Display Step in a sequence. You should only autoprotect data on one display, unless you have
a step in between the displays which regenerates the data such that there is new data to autoprotect
on the second display.
Remember: Autoprotect renames the data, e.g.: 2 - Fundamental - p, 3 - Fundamental - p, etc.

The display does not need to be configured to “Display Step When Run”. See Configure Step on
page 398.

Once the item is selected for Autoprotect, the Diamond marker is only visible while the display is open.
Items are still Autoprotected, but not marked with a Diamond.

Autoprotected data will remain in the Memory List after changing sequences. The data is deleted when
SoundCheck is closed or the data is selected and deleted manually.
When Autogrouping is enabled, a “Protected Group” (Grey Text) is automatically created. See Figure
23-11. See Auto Grouping General Rules - Memory List on page 290.

Undo Autoprotect - Selected Items are no longer Autoprotected in subsequent measurements
To stop Autoprotecting an item, highlight the original name (with the diamond to the left []) and select
Undo Autoprotect. The Protected Data will remain in the Memory List, but all measurements following
286
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Instruction Manual
this action will only remain in the list until the next time the sequence is run. Future measurements will
no longer protect the item automatically.
The data and results are in Memory and will only be saved to disk by using commands in the Data
Menu or using one or more Autosave Steps.

Rename - Creates a Protected copy of the item and prompts you for a new name
The new item appears in the Memory List with a Check Mark and a “-p” suffix.
A Memory List item can be renamed at any time. Renaming an item will automatically protect it, since a
curve of that name may not exist in the sequence. Select the item(s) from the current tab to rename.
Right Click on an item and select Rename. (Or select Rename from the Data Menu of the Memory
List.)

Units - To increase flexibility, the units of Memory List Items can be temporarily changed
These changes disappear each time the sequence is executed. To retain the Unit changes the Item
must be Protected. Otherwise, the unit information will revert to the values created by the sequence, on
the next sequence run. Unit changes are not available on Autoprotected Items. The sequence Units
will be used in the Autoprotected item.
TIP:

To temporarily change the Units of a curve in a display (or table), right click on the curve in the
Memory List and select Units. The new Units will appear in the display. This is a one time change.
The next time the sequence runs, the units will revert back to the original units.
Overwrite - Allows you to select a Subject item from the Memory List and then choose another item as
the Target to be overwritten
Note:
In general, overwriting a correction in or out curve with a Reference Calibration File is handled in
the Calibration Editor by using the “Copy from Memory List” button.
In special cases, you might want to overwrite a curve
in the Memory List manually.
The data of a Reference.DAT file (magnitude and
phase of a curve) can be used to replace the
contents of a Correction In or Out.DAT in the Memory
List.
This can be used in special cases for importing
custom correction curves and/or EQ curves.
Figure 23-12: Overwrite a curve - step 1
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Instruction Manual
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287
1. In Figure 23-12, we have loaded a Microphone Correction Curve into the Memory List (See Data
Menu on pg 284).
2. Right click on the curve and click Overwrite or select Overwrite from the
Data Drop Down menu.
3. In Figure 23-13 the Calibration Curve for the Input is selected:
Special Reference corr-in
4. Click on OK to replace the data of this curve with the data from “Special
Reference Corr s/n: X1234“.


The name of the target curve does not change, only the data
changes

The new curve can be used in the Calibration Editor to correct for the
response of the microphone in future measurements
Figure 23-13: Overwrite
- step 2
Comment - Comments can be attached to Curves in
the Memory List. They appear in green text, to the right
of the item, in the Memory List.


Comments are normally added to curves or items
that have already been protected or recalled from
disk
Comments on an Autoprotected source curve ()
only appear on the next curve that is protected.
Subsequent runs will have no comment. This will
also leave a copy of the comment on associated
Limits. (Remove these by entering a blank
comment on the source curve)

The comment is saved with the data when saved
as a .DAT file

When importing the .DAT file, the comment will still
be attached to the data
Figure 23-14: Comment Protected
Memory List Item
Right Click on an item and select Comment or select an item and then click on Comment from the
Memory Drop Down menu. See Figure 23-14. The comment can then be entered in the editing
window.
Long comments will not “text wrap“ in the Memory List, so the entire comment may not be easily
visible. Use the Comment function to view the text in the editor window.
Important! Comments should only be added to Protected or Recalled items in the Memory List.
Adding comments to Unprotected items is not recommended. Comments added to empty
items, before sequence run, will be erased. Comments added to Unprotected items after
sequence run will duplicate the comments to related Limits and other related items.
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Sorting and Grouping
In order to improve organization and ease of use, items in the Memory List can be
grouped and sorted.

Data can be sorted alphabetically by Name or by the Order in which
generated by sequence

Data cannot be manually sorted by moving an item in the list

Data can be set to Auto Group by Category or Step

Sort and Auto Group are continuously applied to all data in the Memory
List so data is automatically sorted into the correct place

Custom Groups can be created allowing you to put selected data into a
custom named group
Figure 23-15: Group
Curves

Items can be added to a Custom Group through the menu option or by clicking on an item and
dragging it to a group

Items can also be removed from a Custom Group by clicking and dragging them to the root of the
Memory List Tab

Custom Groups can also have Subgroups

Custom Groups always appear at the top of the list

Group names should not contain Parenthesis, ( ), or other types of brackets

Protected Data can only be added to Protected Groups. See Auto Grouping General Rules Memory List on page 290.

Grouping is constantly updated as steps are added to a sequence

Sorting and Grouping functions are independent for the four items tabs: Data, Values, Results and
WFM

New Group - Selected items will be added to a Custom Group and you
are prompted to enter a name for the group

Uncheck “Group Selected Items“ to create a Group without adding
items to it

Ungroup - Removes the Group heading and returns the Items to the root of
the Memory List

Expand All - Opens all Groups in the Memory List (show all Items)

Contract All - Closes all Groups in the Memory List

Sorting and Grouping
Figure 23-16: Group
Clicking on any of the following functions will Undo all
AutoGroups in the current Tab. Sort functions will return the
grouped items to the root of the Memory List. This does not
effect Custom Groups (User Groups).

Sort By Order - Arranges all items in the current Tab in the
order created by the sequence

Sort By Name - Arranges all items in the current Tab in
alphabetical order
Figure 23-17: Sorting
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289

Autogrouping Off - Autogroups are disolved, returning Autogrouped items in the current Tab to
the root of the Memory List and sorted according to the Sort function (Custom Groups are not
effected)

Autogroup By Category - Automatically creates groups for items in the current Tab based on the
data type of the Items

Autogroup By Step - Automatically creates groups for items in the current Tab based on the
Sequence Step that created the items
Auto Grouping General Rules - Memory List

Memory List items can be moved to Custom Groups. The group title is in Blue Text.

Protected Data (noted with a check mark before the curve name) can only be added to Protected
Groups indicated by Grey Text, not Custom Groups (Blue Text)

Turning off auto grouping does not remove Custom Groups

Memory List items cannot be moved between Auto Groups

Switching between sort by category or sort by step does not break sorting of Custom Group items

Memory List items can be moved back to auto groups if the Custom Group remains (is not deleted)

When all items in a Protected group are deleted, the group is not visible in the Memory List until new
items fill the group

When saving an Autogroup of items, the default file name will be the first item in the group

Search - The Data Drop Down Menu has a search function feature
to find and highlight all items which match a search string.
Advanced searching through the use of regular expressions is also
possible as described in the context sensitive help window of the
search string (See Figure 23-18). This is particularly useful when
the Memory List contains a large number of curves such as in
production line applications.
Example: A user wants to display a group of curves from a large list, all on
the same graph, even though each curve has an appended number, e.g., 2Fundamental, 3-Fundamental, etc.
Use the Memory List Search function to find all the curves with the
characters, “Fun”. Then Right Click on the any of the highlighted curves
and select Display On - Graph or New Group.

Figure 23-18: Search
Function
Select All - Highlights all of the items in the current Memory List tab
From the Data Menu click on Select All (not available in Right Click Menu). This is useful for adding all
Results to a Results display for an Overall Pass/Fail verdict, or to add a long series of curves to a XY
Graph or Polar Plot.
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Report Menu

Load Logo - select .BMP or .JPG file for the heading of a report

Report Setup - Opens the Report Generator
Create and print company reports in Word, Excel, HTML and image
files. The Report Menu is available in the Memory List - Report Menu,
and in each of the Display Windows. See Report Generator on page
317 for more information.

Open Report - Opens a report based on the current display and the
settings in Report Setup

Print Preview - Opens the report in Print Preview

Print Report - Sends the report to the default system printer
Figure 23-19: Report
Generator
Right Click
Right Click on a single item or several items in any of the Memory List Tabs and select:

Add/Remove from Active Display - (Press Alt+Left Click on an
item to break the connection of all items to the active display)

Display On - Add the selected item(s) to an existing or new
display window
The options vary depending on which Memory List Tab is
selected. The example in Figure 23-20 shows that a curve can be
added to:


One of the current display windows in the “Display On“ list

New XY Graph - Creates a graph for the selected items

New Table - Creates a table for the selected items

New Polar Plot - Creates a polar plot for the selected items
Figure 23-20: Right Click
Menu
New Group - Creates a new group in the Memory List
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The following features are available in the Right Click menu as well as in the Data Menu. They follow the
same explanations and rules. For more information See Data Menu on page 284.

Rename - Creates a Protected copy of the item and prompts you for a new name

Overwrite - Allows you to select a Subject item from the Memory List and then choose another item as
the Target to be overwritten

Delete - will remove only the selected item(s) from the active Memory List Tab (Available in both the
Right Click and Data Menus)

Units - To increase flexibility, the units of Memory List Items can be temporarily changed

Comment - Comments can be attached to Curves in the Memory List

Protect - Items in the Memory List can be protected so that subsequent runs of the sequence do not
overwrite the data

Autoprotect - Used to keep data contents of Items in memory every time a sequence is run

Undo Autoprotect - Selected Items are no longer Autoprotected in subsequent measurements
Right Click on a Group

Show on Active Display - Add all items in group to display

Display On - Select display to add group items to

Save Data As - Save all items in group as selectable data type

Ungroup - Removes the selected Custom Group heading and returns the
Items to the root of the Memory List (Will not remove Auto Groups)

Delete Group and Data - Deletes the selected Custom Group heading
and all of the Items under that heading (Cannot be Undone)
Figure 23-21: Right
Click on Group
Will not delete Autogroups but will clear data in items

Rename - Change the name of the selected Group

New Group - Creates a new Group and adds the selected Group to it
Window Menu

Full Size - Set the SoundCheck Main Screen to fill the
computer desktop (Does not allow application window to
be resized)

Clicking on an Open Window Title brings that display
window to the front - useful when smaller windows are
inadvertently hidden behind larger display windows
Figure 23-22: Window Menu
Help Menu

Context Help menus are available for many items in SoundCheck.
Press Ctrl+H to open the Context Help window or select it from the Help
Drop Down menu. This will give information on the last item the mouse
has scrolled over. Press Ctrl+H again to make the Context Help window
disappear, or click the close box button in the upper right hand corner.
Figure 23-23: Help
Menu
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WAV File Types
SoundCheck will read and write 8, 16, 24 and 32 bit WAV files.
8 bit WAV files in PCM format are stored as unsigned integers, each sample ranging from 0-255. However,
there are two other compressed formats, A-law and mu-law (commonly used in telephony). These files are
stored as 8 bit files, but decompress to 16 bit Integer when read.
SoundCheck will read 8 bit files in all three formats, PCM, A-law and mu-law, but writes only in PCM format.
See table below.
WAV File General Rules

When opening a WAV file, SoundCheck will prompt you to select units of FS or
FS(AES17)

‘FS’ – SoundCheck default value, the max amplitude of a digital sine wave is
-3 dBFS

‘FS (AES17)’ – Value corresponding to AES17 standard definition, the max
amplitude of a digital sine wave is 0 dBFS

When opening a stereo WAV file, SoundCheck will automatically split the file into two waveforms in the
memory list, adding [L] or [R] to the file names

16 bit files are stored as 16 bit Integer PCM format WAV. SoundCheck reads and writes 16 bit WAV
files in PCM format.

24 bit files are stored as 32 bit Integer PCM format WAV. SoundCheck reads and writes 24 bit WAV
files in PCM format.

32 bit files are stored as 32 bit Integer PCM format WAV ranging from -2147483648 to +2147483648.
SoundCheck reads PCM and IEEE float but writes only PCM format.

The sample rate of the WAV file must match the sample rate of the System Hardware Configuration
WAV File Format Table
SoundCheck reads and writes WAV files according to the following table.
Bit Depth
Read
Write
8 bit PCM uncompressed unsigned
8
8 bit A-law compressed unsigned
8 bit PCM uncompressed unsigned
8 bit mu-law compressed unsigned
16
24
32
16 bit Integer PCM
16 bit Integer PCM
32 bit Integer PCM
32 bit Integer PCM
32 bit Integer PCM
32 bit IEEE Floating Point
32 bit Integer PCM
A-law and mu-law WAV files are mostly used in Telephony (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G.711).
Most popular audio editing programs can write WAV files in these formats.
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WAV File Scaling
In SoundCheck versions 6.11 and higher, WAV files are scaled according the following rules. (In versions 6.00,
6.01, and 6.10 WAV files were normalized to +/- full scale deflection when saved).
Rules for scaling Waveforms when they are saved as WAV files:

A Waveform is not scaled or normalized if the amplitude unit is FS, FSD, dB re:FS, or dB re:FSD.

Waveforms with dB re:[any unit] get converted to their linear version upon being saved as a WAV.

If the waveform has units based on Full Scale Deflection (dB FS or dB FSD), but the Absolute Linear
Peak Amplitude is greater than 1.0, the data of the resultant WAV file will be clipped.

For any waveform with units that are not based on FSD (e.g., Pa, dB SPL, V/V, etc.), data will be
normalized to +/- 1.0 FS (or 0 dB FSD), which is the maximum allowed amplitude of a WAV file. The
scaling either increases or decreases the amplitude values of the data so that the Peak value of the
data in the WAV file is +/- 1.0 FS.

It is possible for a SoundCheck user to convert the units of a waveform from anything to FS (either
directly from the Memory List or via Post-Processing), so its peak amplitude could be greater than +/1.0. In this case, no scaling occurs. Saving such a waveform as a WAV file means that there are points
lying outside the allowable range. Upon saving this WAV file, these points will be coerced to either +1.0
or -1.0 FS (i.e., clipped). See Figure 23-24
When a WFM with an amplitude greater than 1 FS is saved to a WAV file, the resulting WAV file is clipped.
When a WFM with an amplitude less than 1 FS is saved to a WAV file, the resulting WAV file is not scaled.
Figure 23-24: WFM saved as WAV examples

When acquiring data on a digital channel or creating a stimulus for a digital channel, the waveform will,
by definition, have an absolute peak amplitude of less than or equal to 1.0 FS. Saving these WFMs as
WAV files will not result in clipping.

When saving the waveform as a WFM, the data is never scaled, normalized, or clipped.

In SoundCheck, when a WAV is opened from disk, it has units of FS. (Peak allowable range of +/- 1.0)
More information on the use of WAV files in SoundCheck can be found in: WAV File Excitation on page 111
and WAV file playback on page 413.
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Displays
The SoundCheck Main Screen tool bar allows you to quickly switch between display steps when viewing
sequence results.
Offline Tab
The Offline Tab is available with or without a sequence loaded. This allows you to open, process, and view
data without loading a test sequence. In the Offline Tab, data can be examined or analyzed without affecting
the layout of the display steps of the sequence. It minimizes the risk of accidentally editing sequences. In this
mode, virtual instruments such as the signal generator, multimeter etc. can also be used, without a sequence
being open.
This is especially useful for those who view data on a regular basis:

Development engineers who run a series of experiments and then post-process the data

Production engineers who need to view large sets of data from the factory
Note:
The Lock Display function does not apply to the Offline Tab.
Display Tabs
The Display Steps in a sequence are always available via the
Display Tabs on the SoundCheck Main Screen as shown in
Figure 23-25. This allows you to easily manage multiple displays
in a sequence. When a sequence is loaded, new tabs are added
for each display step in the sequence.
Figure 23-25: Display Tabs

When the Memory List is Unlocked, any changes to the
display windows, in any of the tabs, are saved when the
sequence is saved. See Lock Display Off on page 282.

If you remove the display windows and save the sequence, those windows are deleted from the display
tab

In a sequence with multiple displays, clicking Setup and then
Display opens a drop down list of available Display Steps to
choose from. Selecting a step opens that Display Tab.

In a sequence with only one display, simply click on that Display
Tab to edit

You can Revert the display to its most recently saved form

Opening a Display Step DOES NOT open the Memory List

Opening the Memory List DOES NOT open a Display Step

Closing the Display Step will close the display windows for that tab as well as the Memory List. This is
not saved with the sequence.
For more information See Memory List Display Menu on page 282.
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295
Display Editing
You can easily display info from the Memory List in a sequence by adding a Display Step. Under the Display
Menu - New, you can choose from six types of displays:

XY Graph

Waveform Graph

Table

Results

Polar Plot (optional module required)

Text Box

Picture
A Display Step can have many display windows, in any combination. The only limitation is in organizing the
displays so that they can be seen on the computer screen.

To view the data associated with the items in the Memory List, select one or
more items under the Curves, Values, Results or WFM tabs.

Select a single item by left clicking on it once

To select more than one item, hold down the Control key while making
multiple selections

To de-select an item, click on it a second time while holding down the
Control key

To select a range of curves highlight the first curve in the range, hold down
the Shift key and then select the last curve in the range
Figure 23-26: Multiple
Items Selected
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Right Click on Graph
Copy Image
This takes a screen shot of only the selected graph window and puts it in the Windows
Clipboard. This graphic can be cut and pasted into a document or image editor to save
it.
Tool

Arrow - When active you can click on the XY axis to change the values. You
can also click on the cursor to drag it to a location.

Zoom - Click to zoom into a specific part of the display

XY allows you to drag a box to select zoom area

X allows you to drag between two points on the X Axis

Y allows you to drag between two points on the Y Axis

Hand - Click on the graph and move it within the graph window

Original - Graph returns to the view from the last saved version of the sequence

Annotation - Right click on the graph and select Annotation to put the Curve name and its co-ordinates
on the graph. When multiple curves are displayed in the same X axis range, only the curve coordinates are shown.
Cursors
Cur1 and Cur2
Right click on a graph, Select Cur1 or Cur2, then select:

Drop Here - Places the cursor on the closest curve

Drag the cursor to any point on the curve

Drag the cursor to a different curve

Snap to Max - The cursor jumps to the maximum value of the curve

Snap to Min - The cursor jumps to the minimum value of the curve

Remove the cursor from the graph window
The cursor can be moved by Left Clicking and dragging the cursor marker (+) to the desired point on the curve.
The cursor will snap to the closest curve you drag to.

The XY coordinates of a cursor are displayed next to the cursor on the
display. The XY coordinate box can be moved so that it does not cover the
graph line.

Cursors can be placed on the graph to note specific coordinates or find
the X/Y difference between 2 cursors.

Delta X and Delta Y are displayed in the bottom right corner of the graph
window.
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Legend
Legend - The curve legend can be placed on the Top
of the graph or on the Right as shown in Figure 23-27.
Autosize Legend - Insures that the full title of curves or
waveforms in the legend is visible. When Autosize is
disabled, placing the mouse pointer over a curve or
waveform name will display the entire name.
Legend Visible - Allows you to hide the legend
Figure 23-27: Legend On Right
Magnitude

Shows the XY relationship of the selected curve
Phase

Shows the XZ relationship of the selected curve
Unwrap Phase

Allows you to show the phase as a continuous plot, even if the phase exceeds + 180 degrees.
Note:
Magnitude, Phase and Unwrap Phase are not available on Waveform Graphs.
In a wrapped phase graph, the phase offset of the device
under test is only expressed between 180 and -180
degrees.
If the device has a fixed delay that exceeds the wavelength
of the highest frequency of interest, then the results in the
phase graph will "wrap around" as shown in Figure 23-28.
Figure 23-28: Wrapped Phase
When you un-wrap the phase you take this into account
and plot phase offset values greater than 180 degrees.
This allows phase to be shown as a continuous plot.
Figure 23-29 shows the same Fundamental phase curved
with Unwrap Phase selected.
Figure 23-29: Unwrap Phase
Note:
298
Unwrap Phase can also be accomplished in a Post Processing step if you want to save the Unwrap
Phase data. See Unary on page 207.
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SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Open Report

Follows same rules from Memory List Report Generator. See Report Generator on page 317.
Print Preview

Opens report in print preview
Print Report

Sends report to printer. No print preview or print setup.
Save Image as

You can save the current view of the selected display window as a JPG or PNG file. The graph header
and footer can be expanded so that they are included in the image.
Randomize Colors
This function is especially useful in polar plot
measurements or sequences with a large number of
curves.
Right click on the graph area and click Randomize
Colors.
It creates a random list of colors for the curves displayed
in the active graph. These new colors are linked to the
curves in the Memory List. If one of the curves is added
to a different display, it will use the same color assigned
by “Randomize Color”.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Figure 23-30: Randomize Colors
Display Editor and Memory List
299
Preferences
Right Click on the graph window and select Preferences. Click on a tab to change graph settings.

Graph Title - Enter a name for the graph window. This name
appears on exported graphics for reports.

Color - Select colors for: Plot Area, Cursor 1, Cursor 2, X and Y
Major and Minor divisions.

When the Major or Minor divisions are not selected, the color
selection is marked with “T” to indicate Transparent.

Logo - The Listen Logo is displayed in all graph windows



Autosize - The logo will change size as the graph window is
changed. When Autosize is not selected you can select fixed
sizes of small, medium and large.

Position - Select: Upper Right or Left, Lower Right or Left

Color - Select black logo background or white logo background
Legend

The Legend can be Autosized so that it alway shows all of the
curves selected for a graph. This disables the re-sizing bar on
the graph.

Visible allows chose whether or not to show the legend

Legend Position allows you to place the legend on top or on
the right side of the graph
X Axis

Lin or Log Axis

Show Major and/or Minor Grid lines

Free or Autoscale

300

Autoscale will automatically scale the graph to fit the full X
Axis extents of the graph information

Free allows you to set fixed Max and Min values
Standard axis ratio (requires that Auto Offset is on in Y Axis). See Standard Axis Ratio on page
301 for instructions.
Display Editor and Memory List
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual

Y Axis

Lin or Log Axis

Show Major and/or Minor Grid lines

Free or Autoscale

Note:

Autoscale will automatically scale the graph to fit the full Y
Axis extents of the graph information

Free allows you to set fixed Max and Min values
Auto Offset - Used to fix the Y Axis scale to a set range. The graph will always perform a Best Fit
on full extents of the graph information. In this example the Y Axis range is 30 dB.
Y Axis 2 is available if two graph items have different Unit Sets. Only two unit sets are supported
on a graph window. If an third type is added you will see the following message: “Cannot plot these
data together! You must select curves with a maximum of two different unit sets, including phase.”
Standard Axis Ratio
This allows the XY Graph to display a user-defined dB range per decade of frequencies. The example below
insures that the XY Graph will always be 50 dB per decade, regardless of actual size of the screen.
Note:
IEC 263 specifies 10, 25, and 50 dB/decade. B&K chart paper conforms to this standard.
1. Right Click on the display and select Preferences.
2. Click on the Y Axis tab, click the Auto
Offset radio button and enter the proper
decibel range as in Figure 23-31. The
typical ranges are 25 or 50 however any
value can be used.
In this example the Y Axis will always have
a scale of 50 dB.
Figure 23-31: Y Axis Auto Offset
3. Select the X Axis tab, click Standard axis ratio as in Figure 2332. Make sure that the X Axis is set to Free and NOT Autoscale.
4. Click OK to close
Figure 23-32: X Axis Standard
Axis Ratio
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301
Graph Header
Click the up/down arrows to the right of the Plot
Legend to select other curves.
You can also Left click and pull down the divider
bar at the top of the graph to expand the header to
show all the curves in the Plot Legend.
Right Click on a graph line in the Plot Legend to
adjust its properties.
Plot Visible - The selected plot can be hidden.
Common Plots - Select the line style for the selected item: Continuous Line, Dots,
Connected Dots, Fill Baseline, Vertical Lines and Bar Plot.
Color - You have several options using the color spectrum bars: Greyscale, Soft Colors
and Bright Colors. You can also click on the artist palette in the lower right and create a
custom color. The selected color is shown in the bottom left hand box.
Color History
You can view and edit the Color History of the Display Editor in the
SoundCheck 16.0 (x64).ini file.
(for 32 bit versions only SoundCheck 16.0.ini is used)
When using SoundCheck 64 bit, the x64 INI file is created the first time
you manually edit a color in a display. You can also create the file by
making a blank INI file with the same name as the SoundCheck
executable.
This shows a list of up to 11 colors used in the most recent run
sequence.
Colors in the list follow the standard HEX color code with “00”
prepended to the value.
The color history and INI file text are shown in Figure 23-33.
[SoundCheck 16.0 (x64)]
colorHistoryItemA=000411D4
colorHistoryItemB=00CA0D00
colorHistoryItemC=00E84D00
colorHistoryItemD=00FFD900
colorHistoryItemE=0012FF00
Figure 23-33: Color History
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User Colors
18 Colors can be defined in the SoundCheck 16.0 (x64).ini
file. (SoundCheck 16.0.ini for 32 bit versions).
Colors in the list follow the standard HEX color code and can
be named as shown in Figure 23-34. This also shows the text
of the INI file used in the example.
This is a continuous string with no line breaks. All color items
must be within quotes and semi-colons must be used as
delimiters.
[SoundCheck 16.0 (x64)]
colorUserItem="Limits_Red=FF0000;Yellow=F7FF
00;L_Green=00DE25;Red=FF5080;;Blue=2500DF
;Violet=E060FF;Lt._Gray=C3C3C3;Dark_Violet=C
80FE8;Light Violet=FFAFFF;Dark
Green=008000;Dark Red=A00000"
Figure 23-34: User Colors
Line Style - Set the selected line to solid or dashed
Line Width - Set the width of the selected item
Anti-Aliased - Select this item to make plot lines appear smoother. Note that anti-aliased lines can make
sequences run slower if a large number of lines are drawn.
Bar Plots - Select between Line Style and a variety of Bar Plots.
Useful for display of RTA Spectrums.
Fill Base Line - This is used to fill the area above or below the
selected item in the Plot Legend.
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303
This is useful for creating masks as in Figure 23-35, making
it easier to see the response curve inside the limits mask.

Infinity - Fills the area above the selected item

-Infinity - Fills the area below the selected item

Zero - Fills the area from the selected down to zero

Memory List Items - You can fill the area from the
item to another curve
Figure 23-35: Fill Base Line Mask
Interpolation - Determines how the line between known points
will be drawn. The most commonly used method in SoundCheck
sequences is Point to Point line.

Point to point - (Linear interpolation) is the straight line
between each point

Points only - No interpolation between points
Points Only
Point to Point
Point Style - Select None or a variety of point styles.
X Scale - This function is not supported and should not be used.
Y Scale - This function is not supported and should not be used.
Export - This function is not supported and should not be used.
Important: As of SoundCheck 8, Display Windows do not allow the user to export data to
Excel. This has been replaced with the Report Function. See Report Generator on
page 317 for more information.
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Graph Footer
To view the tools, click on the Expand Footer icon (down arrow)
in the bottom right corner of the graph.
Tools
Select the tool icons in the Graph Footer:


Arrow - When active you can click on the XY axis to
change the values. You can also click on the cursor to
drag it to a location.
Figure 23-36: Expand Footer
Magnifying Glass - Click to zoom into a specific part of the display.

XY allows you to drag a box to select zoom area

X allows you to drag between two points on the X Axis

Y allows you to drag between two points on the Y Axis

Hand - Click on the graph and move it within the graph window

Original - Graph returns to the view from the last saved version of the sequence

Annotation - Right Click on the graph and select Annotation to put the Curve name and its coordinates on the graph. When multiple curves are displayed in the same X axis range, only the curve
co-ordinates are shown.
Axis Controls
Left clicking on the X, Y1 or Y2 buttons acts as a “One-time” AutoScale.
You can also set the X and Y axis to automatically AutoScale with the Right Click
functions noted below.
Y2 is only enabled when there is a graph item requiring a Y Axis that is different from
Y1, e.g.; Y1 = Frequency Response and Y2 = Impedance
Right Click on the X, Y1 or Y2 buttons to open the properties for that axis.

AutoScale - Set the preference to automatically scale the graph
so the selected axis always fits the screen.

Format - The appearance of the numbers on the axis can be changed.
This is set to Decimal by default.


Decimal - Standard decimal point number

SI - International system of units
Precision - Set the number of decimal points that should be
represented on the axis.

Mapping Mode - Sets the scale of the axis to linear or logarithmic
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305
Creating a Display Step
1. Open the sequence editor
2. Open the Display Category folder in the library
3. Right click on the area under Display and select New
4. Type in a name for the Display Step. This example is
named “Final Test”.
5. Click OK.
6. Left click on the new display template and drag it into the
Active Sequence. Make sure it is at the end of the sequence.
You can left click on the Display step to drag it to a new location
in the sequence.
Display Step Rules
When using multiple Display Steps, each Display Step
in the sequence must have a unique name or data will
not be displayed correctly. This includes subsequences.
7. Open the Memory List. In this example we have already run the sequence so that we have data ready
to view in display windows.
8. Open the Curves tab. Simply double clicking on a memory
list item will open it in its default display window. You can use
Drag and Drop to add other items to that window.
9. As an alternative, select multiple data items for the XY
Graph. Right click on the selected items. Select Display On
and select New XY Graph.
10. A new graph display opens on the SoundCheck Main Screen
in the Final Test Tab.
11. You can modify the settings of the graph following the instructions seen in Display Editing on pg 296.
12. Right click on the graph of the new display. Select Preferences and name the window. In this case it is
named Response.
13. Next we click on just the Response 3rd Oct curve.
Right Click and select Display On and select New XY Graph.
This creates another XY Graph in the Final Test Tab.
14. Right click on the graph of the new display. Select Preferences
and name the window. In this case it is named Phase.
15. The example phase curve is not displayed as a continuous curve,
shown in the example to the right.
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16. Right click on the graph again and select Unwrap Phase. This makes the phase a continuous curve as
shown in Figure 23-37. See Unwrap Phase on page 298 for more information.
17. In the Memory List, click on the Results tab.
18. Select all of the result items. Right click on the group. Select
Display On and select New Results.
19. The final display has three windows for Response,
Phase and Results.
20. Other windows can be added in the same manner.
21. See Display Examples on pg 308 for more
information on available displays.
Figure 23-37: New Display
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307
Display Examples
XY Graph
The XY Graph can only be used to display curves.
Figure 23-38: XY Graph

Multiple curves may be shown on one graph, with one or two Y-axes in use.

You can change the colors of a line on the graph by right clicking on the name of the target curve and
choosing Color.

Other XY Graph properties such as Line Width, Line Style, and Point Style may be configured through
the Plot Legend as well. See Graph Header on pg 302.
See Display Editing on pg 296.
Results
The Results window displays the test results,
margins, and actual yield percentage if one or
more Statistics Steps are in the sequence.
The Display Step must occur after the Statistics
Steps.
Only items in the Results tab of the Memory List
can be displayed in this window.
Figure 23-39: Results Window
Export to Excel
Note:
308
To export the information to Excel you must export the entire display from the Report function in
the Memory List. See Report Menu on pg 291.
Display Editor and Memory List
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Results - Display Menu
Set the options for the Results window by clicking on Display and then selecting
Preferences.
The name of the Results display window can be changed in the Preferences
dialog box. Use Show Limits and Show Yield to display more information about
the limits that produce the pass/fail result. Change the notation and precision
(decimal places) to further customize the numerical values.
Figure 23-40: Results Preferences
The Overall Pass/Fail selection performs a “Boolean AND” function on the
selected results and shows the final Pass or Fail verdict.
When Overall Pass/Fail is selected, the verdict is shown as a Green “Passed” or
Red “Failed” window as shown in Figure 23-41.
Figure 23-41: Overall
Pass/Fail
Polar Plot (optional module required)
The Polar Plot allows you to visualize directionality
characteristics of the device under test. The list of Responses in
the Memory List should be in order (from lowest angle to highest
or highest to lowest). SoundCheck will assume that all
measurements have been taken consecutively. When all the
curves are selected (there must be more than one to show data
on the Polar Plot), there will be one color for each.
By default:

The Polar Plot is Autoscaled

It displays the magnitude of the response at a frequency
of 1000 Hz

The curves will be set at an interval of 10 degrees

These default settings may be altered by selecting
Preferences from the Display Menu of the Polar Plot
window
Note:
Figure 23-42: Polar Plot Display
The “Polar Plot (Linear X turntable)” default sequence has several display examples.
Adding Polar Curves to Display Rules

Click on the Polar Display to make it the “Active Display”
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Display Editor and Memory List
309

If the number of curves for the polar plot changes you must remove the curves from the Polar Display,
Re-select the curves in the Memory List and add them back to the Polar Display. This keeps the curves
in the proper order so they are displayed correctly.

Select the group of curves for the Polar Plot in the Memory List. They must be selected in order,
from 0 degrees to the last degree measured and added as a group.

Right click on the curves and select “Show On Active Display”
Polar - Display Menu
The Display Menu in the Polar Plot display window allows you to:

Show Legend - of Frequencies next to the Polar Plot as in Figure 23-42

Show XY Graph - in the Polar Plot window as shown in Figure 23-49
A check mark next to these items means they are visible.

Open Report - Opens a report based on the current display and the settings in
Report Setup. See Report Generator on page 317.

Print Preview - Opens the report in Print Preview

Print Report - Sends the report to the default system printer

Save to Image File - Allows you to save the display window as a JPG or BMP file
Preferences
Display Title
Allows you to enter a unique name for the polar window.
Tabs
There are two tabs in the Polar Plot Preferences window, Polar
Plot and XY Graph. Click on the tab to access the options for the
desired graph.
Figure 23-43: Polar Plot Settings
310
Display Editor and Memory List
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Polar Plot Options
Visible Section
This is used to change the viewable portion of the 360 degrees available.
Use the arrow buttons to scroll through the options, or left click the current
selection to view the possible displays.
Figure 23-44: Polar Plot
Quadrants
Mirror
If the curves represent less than 360 degrees of data, you can choose to Mirror the information around the
vertical axis of the polar plot. The data will start at 0º at the North position of the circular grid, and proceed
counter-clockwise. By clicking the Mirror check box, the right side of the polar display will be a Mirror Image of
the left side of the display.
Background and Grid Color
The color of the plot background or plot grid lines can be
selected by left clicking on the color control icon, and then
selecting a new color from the color palette.
See Figure 23-45.
Figure 23-45: Background and Grid Color
Angle of Increment
The Polar Plot display assumes that the first curve in the series of
curves is at the 0º mark of the rotation.

Auto Increment requires that you enter the Total
Rotation, in degrees, of the polar measurements. The
number of points is then automatically divided and
displayed in even increments. The And Increment field
changes so you can enter the Total Rotation. Auto
Increment is off in the default sequence example.

Angle Increment is used to set the degrees of rotation
used when rotating the turntable. This is to Increment the
curves so they are equally spaced from zero degrees.

Zero Adjust is used to reflect the true angle of the first measurement. Every other curve is assumed to
be taken in increments as set in the Angel Increment field above.

Angle Increment should match the degrees of rotation used in rotating the turntable. The default
sequence step configuration is set to 10 degrees.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Display Editor and Memory List
Figure 23-46: Zero Adjust
311
Scaling
The Polar Plot, like the XY Graph, is set to Autoscale the curves by default.
You can set this to Manual and set a minimum and maximum range. As curves
are added or removed to the display using the Memory List, this value will not
change.
The Precision field sets the number of decimal places displayed on the Polar
Plot.
You can show magnitude on a log scale by checking the Log box, or make the
minimum value of the Polar Plot the minimum magnitude in the selected range
of curves by using the clip to min check box.
Figure 23-47: Autoscale Manual
Cursors
Once all the curves to be displayed are selected, one
line will be visible. This line represents the response
level for each curve at a frequency of 1000 Hz. If the XY
Plot is displayed, the selected curves will be visible with
one cursor labeled 1000. This is a discrete cursor. Other
discrete cursors can be added at other frequencies. An
additional line will be added to the Polar Plot with each
discrete cursor. The default frequency increments are
one-octave widths (e.g., 1000, 2000, 4000, 8000, etc.)
Figure 23-48: Cursors
To see the response over many frequencies, select the Range option. You can set the start and end values of
the range, and one line will be added to the Polar Plot for each measured frequency. These frequencies are
shown in the legend to the right of the Polar Plot.
Polar Plot Example

A color is assigned to each Cursor Point
within the designated range

Each measured point within the range
will create a vertical line in the polar plot
You can add an XY graph to the Polar Plot
display window as noted inPolar - Display
Menu on pg 310.
This graph (See Figure 23-49) will show all the
curves that have been selected from the
Memory List as well as the Cursor Lines
selected in the Polar Plot Options tab. See
Polar Plot Options on pg 311.
Figure 23-49: Polar Plot with XY Graph
312
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SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
XY Graph Options
This is a subset of the functions available in the XY Graph
Preferences as described inDisplay Editing on pg 296.
There are no settings for:

auto-offset

standard axis ratio
(See Randomize Colors on pg 299 for information on how to
easily change the plot colors.)
Figure 23-50: XY Graph
Options
Table
A Table displays the numerical values, the name, and units of the
Curves, Values, Results or WFM selected from the Memory List.
Any combination of these three types of information can be
displayed in the same table.
Figure 23-51: Table of Curves,
in Column Format
Table - Display Menu
Table properties can be set by choosing Preferences from the Display Menu.
You can change the title of the Table display window, and set the notation and precision for the numerical
values in the table. By default, the names selected from the Memory List for display on the Table are displayed
in columns. This can be changed to Rows by selecting Transpose in the Table Format section.
When the Memory List Items are displayed in column format, the width of
all the columns can be manually adjusted. Put the mouse cursor over the
grid lines in the table until it becomes a double-sided arrow, then drag it
left or right.
Figure 23-52: Manual Resize
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Instruction Manual
Display Editor and Memory List
313
Table - Preferences
This allows for a great deal of flexibility in how table data
is presented. From the Active Table window select
Display and then Preferences.
Column

Auto Size sets the column width to widest table
cell (default setting)

Fixed Width allows you to enter a value for the
cell width

Manual Resize allows you to click on a column
boundary and move it to the desired width
Table Format

Transpose changes the x and y orientation of the
data in the table
When Transpose is selected, you can set the
width of the row header (which then contains the
name and unit information of the curves, values
and results). The rest of the table is no longer
manually adjustable.
Figure 23-53: Table Preferences

Row Header Width can be set to a specific value

Display Units show the units along with the column header (default setting)
Number Format

Choose between SI Notation or Floating Point

Enter value for Significant Digits

Hide Trailing Zeros
Font

Choose from a drop down list of fonts

Set Size, Color and Attributes of selected font (See Figure 23-53)

Set color of the Background of the table
Text
The Text box can be used to annotate tests. The text box allows you to enter freeform notes into the display layout, although it is not a full-fledged text editor.
Local Language Characters
Text can also be entered in Local Language Characters. See Display Local
Language Characters on page 244.
314
Display Editor and Memory List
Figure 23-54: Display
Menu Options
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Text - Display Menu
The Display Menu in the Text display window allows you to change the
formatting of the words and numbers of the display. The size, font, style,
and color of the displayed text can be changed as well as the title of the
Text display window.
Figure 23-55: Text
Preferences
Picture
The Picture display window allows jpeg (*.JPG) or bitmap (*.BMP) images to
be opened in the display.
Mic __
Placement
Picture - File Menu
The File menu of the Picture Display window allows you to select an image
to display.
Direction of
Rotation
Figure 23-57: Select an Image
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Display Editor and Memory List
Figure 23-56: Picture
Display
315
Picture - Display Menu - Preferences

Picture Title - Set the name of the window

Image Path - Select the image file to be displayed

Resize Window to Picture - The display window automatically
adjusts according to the size of the image file

Resize Picture to Window - The image file automatically adjusts to
the size of the display window. Left Click on the border of the
window and drag it to adjust the window size.
Figure 23-58: Preferences
Waveform
Waveforms can be displayed on a graph. They cannot
be displayed on the same graph as a curve.
The Preferences for Waveform graphs are the same
as XY Graphs. See XY Graph on pg 308.
Figure 23-59: Waveform Graph
316
Display Editor and Memory List
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Report Generator
Create and print company reports in Word, Excel, HTML and image files.
The Report Menu is found in the Memory List and Open Report is in each of
the Display Windows.


Load Logo - Company logos can be added to the heading of a
report. Click here to select .BMP or .JPG file.
Figure 23-60: Report Setup
Report Setup - Select the Export Settings for the
report:

Report Selection - Word, Excel or HTML:
Export settings change depending on the type
of report selected

Report title - None, Standard or Custom

Template - Must follow rules as noted in
Report Template Rules on page 317

Test Information - Operator, Time, Lot Number
and Serial Number

Option to Create New File or Append to Existing File
Figure 23-61: Report Setup

Open Report - Opens a report based on the current display and the settings in Report Setup

Print Preview - Opens the report in Print Preview

Print Report - Sends the report to the default system printer
Note:
When printing to PDF Writer or PDF Distiller, the file is not automatically named.
Report Template Rules
When creating a template, the following fields must be present or an error message will display
indicating that the template is corrupt or invalid. These fields are case sensitive and must be included
in every report even if they are not used.

'seq_name' - Sequence Name

'operator' - Operator's Name

'time' - Time the sequence was run

'lot' - Lot number

'serial' - Serial number

Graph name (case-sensitive, no spaces)
Regarding graph names: Bookmarks in Word and Excel use the name of the Display Window:
Response, Distortion, Harmonics, Results, etc. The name in the title bar of the display will be used as a
bookmark. Excel and Word do not allow spaces in bookmark names, e.g., "Waveform Graph 1" should
be "WaveformGraph1" (case-sensitive).
Creating Templates
Word and Excel Bookmark instructions can be found at: http://office.microsoft.com/ by searching for Work
Bookmark or Excel Bookmark.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Display Editor and Memory List
317
REPORTS USING EXCEL
An Excel worksheet will appear on the desktop with the data filled in. This file is named and saved to retain the
data. The other option, Excel format… is used to set up the way the data is exported to Excel. These
preferences are saved when the Display is saved. If the preferences for exporting to Excel are not set, default
settings will be used.
You can choose which axes to include. This may become useful, for example, if all the data has the same Xaxis. In that case, it is recommended to avoid taking up disk space by omitting the X-axis from all Exports after
the first one. Data exported to Excel will be displayed in columns by default, but export to rows can also be
used. If the data requires a Header, the Standard Header can be used, which includes unit information. A
custom header can also be created.
You can choose to export the data in scientific or floating point notation. Test Information such as Operator
name, Time of test, Lot number, and Serial number can be exported with the numerical data. All data will be
exported to a new Excel spreadsheet, each time, by default. Data can also be appended to an existing Excel
file that was created by SoundCheck. Each different name of a curve, value, or result will be saved to an
individual worksheet in the Excel workbook. The worksheet will have the same name as the curve, value, or
result saved there.
Note:
If selected, time information is exported with one second resolution, but the default Time/Date
format in Excel is one minute resolution. To display the complete time information, format the cell,
row, or column in Excel that contains the data. For example to show hour, minute, and second
information format the row or column to HH:MM:SS.
Figure 23-62: XY Data Curves In Excel
318
Display Editor and Memory List
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Print Step
A Print Step in a sequence allows you to produce a printed report each time the sequence runs. Printing can be
done in the background with no operator action required. A standard SoundCheck® report is shown in Figure
24-1: Printing Editor Standard Report. This can be sent to your printer, or reports can be output to Word,
Excel, HTML or Images.
A print step must be inserted after a Display Step in the sequence and the Display Step must be configured to
“Display when run”.
Figure 24-1: Printing Editor Standard Report

The Test Info and Test Parameters fields on the left side of the printout are linked to the test
information of the sequence. All of the fields can be modified except for the date, which is fixed.
Printing is also available in the Offline menu on the SoundCheck Main Screen. Reports can be created in the
Memory List. See Report Generator on page 317.
Print Type Modes
There are five modes to choose from in the Select Print Type field; Standard, Word, HTML,
Excel and Images.
Important! A Display Step MUST come before the Printing Step in the sequence and be open when the
Printing Step runs.
Standard Mode
This mode allows you to setup a report in the Print Editor. You can choose any combination of two graphs,
tables, and/or results displays for your printout.
sends a report to your printer formatted as Printing Editor.
This mode is compatible with the Printing Editor available in previous versions of SoundCheck.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Print Step
319
Report Generator Modes
The Report Modes for Word, Excel, HTML and Images each create a report based on the layout of the currently
open Display Step that occurs prior to the Printing Step in the sequence. The Filename options are the same as
those used for Autosave and Recall.
Rules for the generation of reports are the same as those for the Display Step. See Report Generator on
page 317 for more information.
Word Mode
Print to Word options:

Report Title - None, Standard or
Custom

Report Template and Path (See
Report Template Rules on page 325)

Test Information to include:


Operator

Time

Lot Number

Serial Number
Printing Options

Open Report - Opens the report in
Word (Word must be installed)

Print - Prints the file to the default
printer (opens Word in the
background)

Save to File - Saves Word file to the location specified in “Report Folder“. Check “Use Default“ to
use the “Default Data Path“. See Folder Paths on page 36.
Figure 24-2: Printing Editor - Word Mode
Save to File Options

Filename for the report

New/Overwrite - Creates a report using the Template name

Append - Add to an existing report

Automatic - Creates the file when the step is run

Prompt Operator - Requires operator to enter name for report
Automatic Filename uses the same options as found in the Autosave and Recall Steps:
320

Construction - Select an item and click Add> to put the item in the Template

Separator - Specify what is to be added between items: Spaces, Underscores or None

When Memory List is added to the Template, the Memory List Value field is enabled. This allows you to
select a value from the Memory List to add to the name template; e.g., Index number of Loop. The Axis
and number Format of the value can be set as well.

User Defined - User entered text

Clear button empties the Template field
Print Step
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
HTML Mode
HTML mode requires that you designate a path
and filename for your HTML file, and decide
whether you would like to simply create the HTML
file and save it to disk, or send it directly to a
printer.
HTML files can be edited with any type of HTML
editor.
The individual graphic files associated with the
HTML file, are uniquely named but not according
to the output file name.
Some options are common to all print modes.
The rules for setting the common options are the
same as those for Word. See Word Mode on
page 320 for more information.
Figure 24-3: Printing Editor - HTML Mode
Note:
As of SoundCheck 8, it is no longer necessary to set the Page Setup options in Internet Explorer.
Note:
The default graphic format for HTML mode is BMP. The format can be set to JPG or BMP by
editing the “SoundCheck 16.0.ini“ file. This file is located in the root of the SoundCheck folder.
Excel Mode
Some options are common to all print modes. The
rules for setting the common options are the same
as those for Word. See Word Mode on page 320
and Report Template Rules on page 325 for
more information.
The options for setting Axes, Layout, Data Format
and Notation are the same as Autosave and
Recall Steps.
Axes - Choose axes to include in export. The X
axis is always included on the first save to Excel.
Layout - Set in Columns or Rows.
Data Format - Save Data, Images or Both.
Notation - Scientific or Floating Point.
Figure 24-4: Printing Editor - Excel Mode
Note:
As of SoundCheck 14.01, Excel Macro-enabled files with the XLSM file extension are allowed. The
XLSM file extension is used in the generated file.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Print Step
321
Important! Excel .XLS files are limited to 256 Columns. Rows are unlimited. In Excel 2007 and later the
.XLSX file maximum worksheet size is 1048576 rows by 16384 columns.
Images Mode
Some options are common to all print modes. The
rules for setting the common options are the same
as those for Word. See Word Mode on page 320
for more information.
Image Format - Select JPG or BMP.
BMP files have a higher resolution but a larger file
size.
Figure 24-5: Printing Editor - Image Mode
Standard Mode
Many functions of the Printing Editor are contained in the menu bar. The following sections describe what
options are available.
File
In the File menu, you can open saved data or results files to be displayed for printing.
Additionally, Data or Results in the current sequence can be saved to a *.DAT, .RES,
*.TXT, or *.WAV file.
Click Logo to load your company logo to customize your reports.
Print Preview shows a preview of your report only if you are in Standard mode.
Print sends the report in the Print Editor to the selected printer without having to run
the sequence. This allows you to make adjustments to the Print Step and then test the
results.
322
Print Step
Figure 24-6: File
Menu
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Page Setup allows you to choose page formatting and printer options.
Figure 24-7: File - Page Setup
Display
The Display menu enables you to configure your printout while in Standard
mode. (The Display Drop Down Menu is disabled for all other modes.)
Figure 24-8: Display
Menu Options
The Preferences command opens the dialog box shown in Figure 24-9.
Here, you have the option of enabling one or two displays (marked Display A
and Display B). If you choose to show one display, options for Display B will
become disabled, and Display A will be the only display. For each display you
can choose to show a Graph, a Table, or Results.
Figure 24-9: Preferences
Figure 24-10 shows a graph and a
table on the Standard Print report.
Notice that unlike the Display Step,
the Printing Step has two Memory
Lists, one for each type of display.
XY Graphs and Tables can display
curves and single values, and a
Results display can display the
result margins and verdicts.
Figure 24-10: Show Graph and Table
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Print Step
323
Use Graph Options, Figure 24-11, to adjust scale options on the x or
y-axis. You can remove grid lines or change from a linear to a
logarithmic scale. You can also cancel the default Autoscaling of the
graphs, allowing you to choose your own scale.
In the Y Axis options, Auto Offset is available. Here you can set the
visible range on the Y-axis. This enables the XY Graph to display a
user-defined dB range per decade of frequencies. When this is
selected on the Y-Axis box, the Standard axis ratio becomes
available on the X-Axis box. Selecting this option will ensure that the
aspect ratio set by the Auto Offset will remain constant. Since you
cannot alter the graph size in the Printing Editor, the Standard axis
ratio is set by default.
Figure 24-11: Configure Graphs
The table data can be transposed from rows to columns, and the width of
the columns can be controlled for each of the two possible tables.
Figure 24-12: Table Options
Show Limits displays the upper and/or lower bound of your Limits Step in
the results display. The results can be displayed individually, or by
choosing Overall Pass/Fail, you can perform a Boolean AND on the
results selected for display, and receive one Pass or Fail notice. To
choose Overall Pass/Fail in this example, you would first need to
uncheck the Show Limits box, and then the Overall Pass/Fail box will
become available. The choices in Figure 24-13: Results Options are
mutually exclusive.
Figure 24-13: Results Options
Curve
In the Curve menu, you can alter the properties of the curves and single
values in the Memory List box of the Printing Editor. Delete enables you
to delete curves, single values or results selected from the Memory List
box on either Display A or Display B (called “Graph A” and “Graph B” in
Figure 24-14: Curve menu options. You can rename one selected
curve, single value or result at a time in either Display A or Display B.
Similarly, you can change the units of the Y axis of one curve or single
value (not valid for results) at a time from either of the two displays.
Figure 24-14: Curve menu
options
324
Print Step
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Report Templates
Office 2003, 2007 and 2010 are supported for generating reports. Office 97, 2000, XP and 2002 are not
compatible.
Report Template Rules
When creating a template, Bookmarks must be added to the template so that these items are automatically
placed in the correct location in the report. These fields are case sensitive.

logo - Uses the file specified under Edit > Preferences > Folder Paths > Logo Path. Maximum size
of 260 x 60 pixels

seq_name - Sequence Name, Custom Name or None, depending on what is selected in the Report
Title field

operator - The User Name used in the SoundCheck Login window

time - Date and Time the sequence was run

lot - Lot number from the SoundCheck Main Screen

serial - Serial number entered on the SoundCheck Main Screen or from a Serial Number Step that
occurs prior to the Print Step/Report generation

Display Window Name - Each Display window must have an individual bookmark or it will be ignored
when the report is generated. (case-sensitive, no spaces)

Bookmarks in Word and Excel use the Graph Title set in Graph Preferences of the Display Window:
Response, Distortion, Harmonics, Results, etc. HOWEVER - Spaces are not allowed in Excel or Word
bookmarks.
Example:
SoundCheck graph title "Waveform Graph 1" should be bookmarked with the spaces
removed; "WaveformGraph1" (case-sensitive)

Only letters and numbers are allowed. No other characters or punctuation can be used.
In addition, the following rules apply:

Reports require that a Display Step, along with all its windows, be open in SoundCheck prior to
generating the report. The properties of each of the windows must be set in advance since the report
will use a Bitmap of each display window.

The graphic of a Display Window cannot be automatically scaled in Word or Excel. The graphic size is
set in the SoundCheck display. The Excel template can have its page scaling set to reduce the size of
report graphics.

A Report Template is matched to a sequence since the Bookmark names must match the titles of the
Display windows

Changing the name of a Display in SoundCheck will break the link to the Bookmark in the template

The Report Setup in a display window or the Memory List cannot be saved with the sequence. The
Report Title is not remembered after you switch sequences or close SoundCheck. The information will
need to be re-selected the next time SoundCheck is run.

Reports can be in Landscape or Portrait orientation

Bookmarks can be added to the Header or Footer of the template

Tables can be used to group graphics with text
For more examples of report templates, refer to the Report Templates folder in SoundCheck. The “Self Test“
sequence has template examples in Landscape and Portrait orientation.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Report Templates
325
Manually Creating Reports
Reports can be created from the Memory List for the whole display, or from individual display windows.
1. In the Memory List click on File > Report Setup.
2. Under Report Selection select a report type from
the drop down list. Selections are: Word, HTML
and Excel. The Export Settings will change
depending on the Report Type selected.
3. For this example, Word is selected.
4. Under Report Title you can choose the title name
that will be used on the report. This is the value
that is used for the template field - “seq_name“.
Selections are:
Figure 25-1: Report Setup

None - report title will be blank.

Standard - report title will be the name of current sequence.

Custom - text entered into the field on the right will be used for the report title.
For this example, Custom is selected and the name entered is “GS Model 6”.
5. Under Test Information, select which of the four items are to be included on the report. These
correspond to the required fields as noted in Report Template Rules on page 325.
6. Click OK to close the Report Setup menu.
7. Click Open Report and a generic report opens
in Word as shown in Figure 25-2.
The logo is included at the top along with a table that
contains the Report Title and the four items selected
under Test Information. Bitmaps of all of the display
windows follow.
Note:
The manual report setup cannot be saved
with the sequence. Changes to the table or
graphic size and position are not
remembered. The Report Title is not
remembered after you switch sequences or
close SoundCheck. The information will
need to be re-selected the next time
SoundCheck is run.
Figure 25-2: Generic Report, Page 1
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Creating a Word Template
For the next example, a Word Template is created so that the layout of the
report can be customized.
1. Open Word and create a new document named “Speaker Test
Template.doc“.
2. In Word, select Page Setup.
3. Set the Orientation of the page to “Landscape”.
4. Set the Margins as desired.
5. Add a page number field to the Footer of the document. (View Header and Footer)
Figure 25-3: Page Setup
Create Bookmarks
Bookmarks are used in Word to set the location of text and graphic fields that
SoundCheck will use as targets when generating the report.
The window names from the generic report in the previous example are used to create a report template for this
sequence.
1. Click on Insert and then Bookmark.
2. Under Bookmark name type in “logo“ and then click Add. Since this
is the first Bookmark entered, it will appear in the upper left corner of
the document. The Bookmark appears as a simple “I” bracket as long
as Show Bookmarks is checked under: Tools - Options - View.
(The size of the logo must be set in advance.)
3. Set the location of the next Bookmark in the document. In this case, a
Tab is entered so that the next field is moved away from the logo.
4. Click on Insert and then Bookmark. Enter the Report Title field
name, seq_name and then click Add.
5. Set the location of the next Bookmark in the document. Hit Enter to
move to a new paragraph.
Figure 25-4: Set
Bookmarks
6. Type “Serial Number: “. Click on Insert and then Bookmark. Enter the field name, serial and then
click Add.
7. Repeat the procedure to enter the other required field names as noted in Report Template Rules on
page 325. Enter the bookmarks for the display windows as well. The bookmarks must be in place for
the display window graphics to be added to the document.
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8. The Word example in Figure 25-5 shows the final
template for this sequence. The document is simply
a collection of bookmarks as listed in Figure 25-4.
Text can be added before or after the bookmark so
that a text marker for the graphic is included.
9. Save and close the word template, “Speaker Test
Template.doc“ to the Report Template folder in
SoundCheck: C:\SoundCheck 16.0\Report
Templates\Word.
Figure 25-5: Template Bookmark Layout
Manual Report With Template
10. In SoundCheck, the Report Setup will be modified
as in Figure 25-6. Select the template from the
previous step. The example title has been changed
to “GS 6.5 Woofer”.
11. Click OK to close the setup window.
12. Click Open Report to generate a new report using
the template.
Figure 25-6: Report Setup 2
13. The report example in Figure 25-7 shows the two pages of the report. The Bookmarks are visible on
the screen but are not printed. The size of each display graphic is set in the SoundCheck Display. If the
graphics in the report are too large, change the size in SoundCheck and re-open the report.
Figure 25-7: Report Example in Word
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Print Step Reports
By adding a Print Step to a sequence, generating reports can be an automatic process. Reports can be saved
to Word without being visible to the user.
In the following process, the same sequence from previous examples has been used. The same template can
then be used in the Print Step.
1. Insert a Print Step to the sequence. It must occur after a Display
Step that is configured to “Display Step when run“ (See Adding
Multiple Steps on page 392 for more information). If not, an
error will occur when the sequence is run. See Figure 25-8.
The settings in the upper section are the same as the Report Setup in
the previous example: Manual Report With Template on page 328.
Figure 25-8: Error
2. Under Select Print Type, choose
Word from the Drop Down Menu.
See Figure 25-9.
3. Under Report Title select Custom
and enter ”GS 65 Woofer”.
4. Under Report Template select
“Speaker Test Template.doc“.
5. Under Test Information select all
four items.
The settings in the lower section follow the
same rules as found in Word Mode on page
320.
6. Under Printing Options select
Open Report then click Apply to
test the report. A new report will
Figure 25-9: Print Step Setup
open in word so that you can verify
the above settings. The report will
be the same as the previous example: Manual Report With Template on page 328.
7. Under Printing Options change the selection to Save File. The filename
options are now enabled.
8. Under Filename select New/Overwrite to create a new report for each
measurement.
9. Select Automatic to enable the Construction fields. Select User Defined
and click Add. Select Serial Number and click Add. The Separator
should be set to “Spaces”. In the User Defined field enter “GS 65 W“. For
every sequence run, with a new serial number, a new report will be
generated.
Figure 25-10: Report
Folder
10. Click Apply and a new report is generated in the selected Report Folder.
Remember: The Display Step of the sequence must be open in order to
generate a report. As seen in Figure 25-10, ten reports were generated after testing ten speakers.
Each file has the serial number appended to the name.
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File Path
The Report Template and Report Folder fields do not follow Relative File Path rules. The path must be reentered if the sequence is run from a different computer.
Creating an Excel Template
Note:
When printing to an Excel template, it is important to keep the File Name short since there is a
maximum File Name Length when saving to some versions of Excel.
Defined Names are used in cells as field markers for information and graphics when SoundCheck saves to
Excel using a template. In this example, we have created a new Excel file named
“Speaker Test Template.xlsx“.
1. Right click on a cell where you want to
locate a field marker. (A1)
2. Select Define Name and enter the name
in the editor. See Figure 25-11.
3. In the Define Name window enter “logo”
and click OK.
4. The Defined Name can now be seen in
the Name Box above column A.
5. Select cells for the other required field
markers and markers for the graphics of
the report.
Figure 25-11: Excel Template
6. In this example, the markers are in the following fields:
(Cells A6 through A10 must be sized to allow enough room for the
graphics.)
7. Save and close the template.
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Report Templates
A1 - logo
A6 - Results
A7 - Fundamental
A8 - Impedance
A9 - THD
A10- RubandBuzz
C1 - seq_name
E1 - serial
E2 - lot
E3 - Operator
E4 - time
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
In our example sequence we have changed the Print Step to Excel as the Print Type. See Figure 25-12.
The settings for an Excel Print Step are covered in Excel Mode on page 303, Word Mode on page 302 and
Autosave Editor on page 173.
8. Under Report Template select “Speaker Test
Template.xls”.
9. Under Printing Options select Open Report
and click Apply.
10. Note that the Data Format is set to Both. This
will save both the graphics and the raw data to
the report. The data for each of display
windows will appear in a separate worksheet in
the Excel file.
11. The Excel Report is opened and the size of the
cells can be Fined Tuned to fit the display
graphics. See Figure 25-13.
Figure 25-12: Print Step - Excel
12. Once the cells in the Excel report have been
adjusted, delete the graphics and text from the variable
fields. Then delete the worksheets for the display data.
This leaves the Defined Names and Cell Titles for the
template.
13. Save and close the Excel template.
14. In the Print Step in SoundCheck, set Printing Options
to Save to File. When the sequence is run, a new
Excel spreadsheet is created for each new device
tested: “GS 65 W 2001.xls“.
Figure 25-13: Excel Template With Data
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Important! The font size of the cells in the Excel template cannot be adjusted. The setting is over written
by SoundCheck. The font size is fixed at 10 point.
Important! The size of graphics is not remembered when they are adjusted in the Excel template.
Display windows must be scaled in the SoundCheck display.
Note:
As of SoundCheck 14.01, Excel Macro-enabled files with the XLSM file extension are allowed. The
XLSM file extension is used in the generated file.
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Serial Number Editor
You can choose to automatically increment the serial number each time the sequence is run, or to prompt the
operator to manually enter the serial number of the DUT. When used in a sequence along with the Autosave
Step (See Autosave Editor on pg 183) the updated serial number can be saved with measurement data. The
serial number also appears at the top of the main SoundCheck® window and in reports generated by the
Printing Step. To view and change the system’s serial number settings, select Serial Number from the Setup
drop down menu on the SoundCheck Main Screen, or use the shortcut Ctrl+Shift+E.
When exiting SoundCheck, the last recorded serial number is saved in the SoundCheck 16.0.ini file. The next
time SoundCheck is opened, the last serial number is automatically recalled to the S/N field of the SoundCheck
Main Screen. This enables the operator to continue measuring a lot that was not finished before their shift was
over.
Auto Increment
With Auto Increment selected, the S/N prefix appears along with the
incremented number. Using a step configured as in Figure 26-1: Serial
Number Setup, the serial number for the first three items tested would
be; ABC1, ABC2 and ABC3.
Figure 26-1: Serial Number Setup
Prompt Operator
When Prompt Operator is selected, any alpha-numeric combination can
be entered by the user. This number is then used to identify the data. Once
the number is entered, you can Click OK or Enter to continue running the
sequence.
Note:
Note:
The Serial Number Step must precede the Autosave Step in a
sequence for the serial number to be correctly recorded with
the measurement data.
Figure 26-2: Serial Number
Prompt
As of SoundCheck 7, the Serial Number category in the Step Library has been changed from
“Serial #” to “Serial No”. To use steps from previous versions of SoundCheck, copy the steps
from the Serial # folder of SoundCheck x.x to the Serial No. folder in the SoundCheck 16.0
directory. These can then be used as step templates.
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Serial Number Editor
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Instruction Manual
Statistics Editor
The Statistics Editor allows you to perform a variety of statistical measurements on the data that is produced.
These measurements include: minimum, maximum, mean, standard deviation, Cp, Cpk, and Best/Worst fit to
Average for curves.
The editor can operate in either of two modes depending on the application. The Online mode allows for the
use of the statistics step in a sequence. You can use this mode to determine the standard deviation after each
run and determine whether the spread of the results is outside of acceptable limits. Statistical calculations are
made upon the consecutive runs of a sequence when using Online mode.
Online Mode
The values calculated by the Statistics Step are created from curves, values, and results generated during the
run of the current sequence.
Important! If the Hardware, Calibration, Acquisition, Analysis or Statistics Steps are changed, all
unsaved statistical data is lost.
It is important to understand the circumstances that will enable you to keep building upon the current statistics
values. The first time the sequence is run, the statistical values begin to fill. This first run produces curves and
values that are based on only one set of data. In other words, the curve Minimum, Maximum, Mean, and
Standard Deviation are all identical curves the first time the sequence is run.
The second time the sequence runs, all the statistics calculations are performed using the current and previous
data together. The third time, the algorithm integrates the current run values with the running statistics
calculated from the last two runs, and so on.
Redo
When Redo is selected from the SoundCheck® Main screen, the last
measurement gets overwritten and the statistics recalculated to include the new
measurement. This is an unlimited Redo, so it can be selected as many times as is
necessary.
A change in the lot number, changing the sequence or changing certain steps of
the current sequence (See Note above) will reset and empty all your Statistics
curves. Any statistics values from this point on will not take old curves/values into
account.
Figure: 27-1 Unlimited
Redo
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Offline Mode
You can use the Offline Display Tab to calculate statistics on previously
measured data. The Offline mode is used outside of a sequence and can be
used on protected data or other previously collected data. Offline mode allows
you to compare each of the selected curves to each other, rather than to
previous runs. The results are output to the Memory List in the form of
protected data.
If you want to calculate the average of a group of impedance curves, you can
use the Offline mode to compare these curves.
Note:
Figure: 27-2 Offline Mode
Histogram, Best and Worst Fit to Average options are only available in Offline mode, and can be
used to determine "Golden Units" and "Outliers".
When using stored *.DAT files to create statistics, verify that the *.DAT file contains multiple tests of the same
measurement. Please note that any statistical analysis becomes more valid with a large number of samples.
Depending on the variability of your measurements, you may need 60 to 100 tests. You can adjust your Sigma
value based on the number of samples available.
Note:
Mean, Maximum, Minimum, and Standard Deviation calculations are done on the numerical values
as they are stored in the file. No conversion is made to use a linear scale.
Note:
Protected Data can only be added to Protected Groups. See Auto Grouping General Rules Memory List on page 290.
Important! Any display windows added to the Offline Tab are temporary. They are not
stored with a sequence.
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Statistical Process Control
Statistical Process Control measurements are also available in SoundCheck. These options allow users to
track the quality of the production by comparing deviations to user-defined limits. For more information See
SPC - Statistical Process Control on page 341.

Select Statistics from Offline
Menu

Select Data, Results or both

Work In mode allows for calculation
in Linear, dB or Power units

Select items from Memory List

Select statistical processes to run for
Data and Results

Click Apply and the statistics results
are updated in the Memory List
Figure: 27-1 Statistics Offline
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Choosing What Statistics to Create
You can decide what curves, values and/or results to analyze
statistically. In Figure 27-3: Choosing Data and/or Results the top
area of the editor indicates the number of times this particular step
has run in this sequence. All statistical values calculated are based
on the “No. of Curves Selected”.
Figure 27-3: Choosing Data and/or
Results
You can choose to calculate statistics on Data (curves and values),
Results or both. The Data or Results items are selected form the
Data and Results lists, respectively. Data items will include the curve and/or value names displayed in the
Memory List. Each selected name in the list box will have between one and four calculations performed, which
depends on how many statistics boxes are checked.
Statistics for Curves and Values
The Data section of the Statistics Editor (See Figure: 27-1 Statistics Offline) contains all the options for
statistical measurements that this step may perform.

Work in mode: Statistics can be calculated using Linear (RMS), dB or Power Units for the Y axis.
Linear Example: 90 dB + 90 dB = 96 dB (The math is applied on the linear values.)
dB Example: 90 dB + 90 dB = 180 dB (The math is applied on the dB values.)
Power Example: 90 dB + 90 dB = 93 dB (The math is applied on the power values.)

Max – Compares the current Y (magnitude) and Z (phase) value at point X (frequency or time) with the
existing maximum for point X. If the new value is higher, the maximum value is rewritten. The Memory
List is updated with a new curve or value whose name ends in Max (e.g., Fundamental [L] Max). This
enables you to track the upper extreme of the range of the DUT.
Note:
To view the Z values in the Display Step, select Phase from the Display menu in the XY
Graph, or use a table to display the numerical values of the curve or single value.

Min – Compares the current Y and Z value at point X with the existing minimum for point X. If the new
value is lower, the minimum value is rewritten. The Memory List is updated with a new curve or value
whose name ends in Min (e.g., Fundamental [L] Min). This enables you to track the lower extreme of
the range of the DUT.

Mean - Calculates the mean Y and Z value at every X point along the curve. If a single value, this
command calculates the average single value. The Memory List is updated with a new curve or value
whose name ends in Mean (e.g., Fundamental [L] Mean). Variation in the mean after many tests have
been run indicates a new factor has been introduced that may be causing problems.
Note:

This is not to be confused with Statistics: Average in the Post-Processing Editor, a single value
which is the average of all the Y values in one curve.
Standard Deviation - The standard deviation is a measure of the dispersion
of the Y and Z dimension of the selected curve or value. SoundCheck uses
the equation, where xi is the current Y or Z value at point X, M is the mean of
all the past values at point X, and n is the number of values in the set.
σ=
 (χ
i
−M)
2
n −1
Choosing this option creates two new curves. These may be viewed as bounds around the curve being
measured. For example, if Fundamental [L] is chosen from the Data list box, and the Standard
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SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Deviation box is checked, you will see two new curves in the Memory List: Fundamental [L]
+1.00sigma and Fundamental [L] -1.00sigma (this is assuming 1 sigma was indicated, as in Figure:
27-1 Statistics Offline). When these two curves are displayed on the XY Graph with the Fundamental
[L] Mean curve, the Mean curve should fall directly between the two Standard Deviation curves. Future
Fundamental curves have a 68% chance of falling within these bounds. If 2 sigma is chosen, you know
that there is a 95% chance new curves will fall between these bounds. At 3 sigma, there is a 99%
chance that new curves will fall within the bounds. Responses that fall outside the Standard Deviation
of the Mean may indicate erratic problems with the DUT or the test environment.
Please note that Standard Deviation values become more accurate when a large number of samples
are taken.

Absolute Standard Deviation - The absolute standard deviation is the pure σ value. The curve that is
the result of this calculation is available in the Memory List.

Histogram

Available only in Off Line Statistics, on single
values (cannot be used on curves)

Select which axis of value to apply statistics on: X,
Y or Z

Select Bin Width - Sets the width of the bar plots
of the Histogram Curve and sets the resolution of
the counting process. Enter any value greater
than 0.
The example in Figure 27-5 shows a Bin Width of 1.
The bar at 90-91 Pa shows the number of samples
that fall in that bin.

Enter Custom Name for the resulting curves

Users will be able to select a series of single
values and output a histogram curve Figure 27-5:
Histogram Display

Histogram and Distribution (Gaussian bell) curves will
appear as new Curves in the memory list

These curves can be added to a display
Figure 27-4: Offline Histogram Settings
Figure 27-5: Histogram Display
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Histogram Display Setup
The setup of a Histogram Display window is different than other display types. Follow the example in Figure
27-6 when creating a Histogram Display.
1. Add Histogram curves from the Memory List
to a new X Y Graph.
2
2. Right click on the Histogram Curve in the
Legend.

Select Common Plots and click Bar Plots

Select Fill Base Line and click “-Infinity”

Set the curve colors as well
3. Right click on an X axis value to open the X
Axis Tools.

Set Format to Decimal

Set Precision as needed

Set Mapping Mode to Linear

Do the same for the Y axis
3
4
4. Right click on the graph of the display and
select Preferences.

Enter the Graph Title

Set the desired Plot Area color on the
Colors tab

Set Legend properties as desired

Turn off Major and Minor Grid Lines for both
the X and Y axis

Set both X and Y axis to Free.

Click OK to exit

You will need to double click on the X and Y
axis values on the graph to change the
graph window scaling
5. From the Memory List click Display and
select Save Display as Template to save
the layout for future use.
Figure 27-6: Histogram Display Setup
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SPC - Statistical Process Control
Statistical Process Control can be used to monitor the quality of the production run.
Statistics can be calculated on a specific scalar parameter (e.g., THD or sensitivity @ 1 kHz) for a group of
loudspeakers (e.g., the production of the day). The Statistics module calculates the capability indexes and the
results are made available in the Memory List. These can then be saved using an Autosave Step. The history
of these indexes can be used to check the trend of production using some external software (e.g., EXCEL).
Figure: 27-7 USL/LSL Settings
Menu choices:

USL: Upper Specification Limit. The maximum tolerance of the production limits. Constants set by the
user. e.g., 92.5 dB SPL. (See Figure: 27-7 USL/LSL Settings)

LSL: Lower Specification Limit. The minimum tolerance of the production limits. Constants set by the
user. e.g., 88.5 dB SPL.

Process Capability indexes Cp and Cpk. These indexes are added to the existing list: min, max, mean,
sigma. These indexes are calculated in real time and appear in the Memory List.
Cp - A measure of process performance
Essentially it is a measure of variance/spread of one's data with respect to specification limits. Values greater
than 1 indicate that the 6 sigma range is within the limits. If Cp is equal to 1, the range of 6 sigma exactly equals
the range of the limits. If it is less than one, the 6 sigma range exceeds the limits. Ideally or to be safe, the
process would yield a result of 1.33 (8 sigma) or higher. This means that your measured parameter will not
exceed the limits more than 0.0063% of the time. To the right is a table of Cp values and the related
Percentage of Failure. The formula for Cp is:
C p = ( USL – LSL ) ⁄ ( 6σ )
Cpk - Process performance index
This is similar to Cp, except that it takes into consideration any off-centered alignment of the data. The 6 sigma
range may be much smaller than the limits range, but the mean could still be close to one of the limits. This
would result in a high Cp but a low Cpk. The formula for Cpk is:
C pk = Min [ ( USL – mean ), ( m ean – LSL ) ] ⁄ ( 3σ )
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If the spread of data is Well Centered, then Cpk
equals Cp. This would be a good situation. In this
example, Cp = 1.5 and Cpk =1.5 on day 1.
If the spread of data is Off Centered, Cpk is less
than Cp. This is a warning sign of a bad trend. In
this example, Cp = 1.5 and Cpk =1.05 on day 2.
If the spread of data is outside the USL/LSL limits,
Cpk will be below 1. This of course, indicates production problems. In this example, Cp = 1.5 and
Cpk = 0.66 on day 3.
If the mean is outside the USL/LSL limits, Cpk will be
less than zero. This indicates a serious problem. In
this example, Cp = 1.5 and Cpk = -0.28 on day 4.
The graph shows the Cp and Cpk values plotted over
the course of the days indicated in the above examples. An ideal situation would be to have Cp and Cpk
equal on all days. In this case, Cp (solid blue line) is
constant indicating that the spread of the data is consistent. Cpk (dashed green line) is unfortunately not
consistent. Tracking the two values in such a way
gives you a quick check on your production performance for a particular line.
342
Note:
Careful selection of USL and LSL numbers is essential to have meaningful Cp and Cpk numbers.
Calibration of the SoundCheck system is also critical.
Note:
Cpk - Process capability index (and Cp): SoundCheck provides Cpk (and Cp) instead of Ppk (and
Pp), but they are mathematically identical. Once a process is put into a state of statistical control,
process capability is described using process capability indices, which uses the same formula as
Cpk (and Cp). The indices are named differently to call attention to whether the process under
study is believed to be in control or not. For more information, please visit: www.isixsigma.com.
Statistics Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Best Fit to Average
You can select the number of Best or Worst Fit curves that you want to produce. For
example, if you have five hundred curves representing the impedances of five hundred
speakers, you might want to determine which ten of those were the closest to the average
(to find "Golden" reference unit). To do this, you should enter "10" in the "No. Ranked" field
in the editor. This will determine which ten curves are the closest to the average, and rank
them according to how close they are.
In addition to determining which curves are the best fit, the option also produces a deviation curve for each of
the "best fit" curves. These curves are the arithmetic difference between the mean curve and the "best fit"
curves.
The best fit is the curve, which minimizes the quadratic distance to the average curve:
, where X is the average curve and Y is one of the result curves.
ε =
 Xi – Yi
2
i
Best fit curves with
ranking appears in
Memory List
ranking number
Deviation curves
Figure: 27-8 Memory List - Best Fit to Average
The curves selected in Statistics Offline on pg 337, that meet the Best Fit criteria, appear in the Memory List.
The numbers of the curves are indicated along with their ranking. See Figure 27-8 for an example of the items
created in the Memory List.
In addition to the Best Fit to Average function, a Worst Fit to Average function is also included. This function
maximizes the quadratic distance to the average curve using the same formula as shown above. With this
option, you can isolate a specified number of outliers. As with the Best Fit function, this option will generate a
group of curves whose quantity is specified in the editor along with a group of corresponding deviation curves.
This function can be useful in determining which of the tests represent useless data. You can remove these
curves from their data group and re-perform the statistical measurements in order to get results that are more
meaningful.
Statistics for Results
The Results section of the Statistics Editor (See Statistics Offline on pg 337) holds the options for Statistical
calculations you can perform on a Result, the Margin or the Verdict.

Individual Limits Yield [%] - Each Result chosen from the list box has its own Verdict (Pass/Fail).
Selecting Individual Limits Yield will create a running tally of the success rate of each result, as the
sequence runs multiple times. This value will reflect the percent of times the Individual Limit has
passed and can be viewed next to the Limit Result in the Results Display (See Results on pg 308), or
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as a Value in a Table of the Display Step. You could use this value to set a Limits Step, and alert the
operator when a Result is failing over 75% of the time.

Overall Yield [%] -A Boolean AND function is performed on the Verdicts of the result names selected
in the Statistics Step. A PASS or FAIL Verdict is recorded for that test run. The next time the sequence
runs, the new value (after the Boolean AND) will be compared with the previous. For example, after
two runs, if one run passed and one failed, the Overall Yield will be 50%.

Margin Mean - Each time the sequence is run, the Margin mean value is recalculated. There will be a
unique Margin Mean for each Result selected, named e.g., Response Margin [L] Margin Mean.
Tracking the Margin Mean can give advance notice that a particular process is drifting towards an outof-specification condition (e.g., if the Margin Mean is getting smaller over time).

Margin Standard Deviation - The standard deviation is a measure of the dispersion of the result
margins. The equation used is the same as the one used for calculating the standard deviation for a
curve or value. When choosing this option, two new values are created, named Response Margin
+1.00 sigma and Response Margin -1.00 sigma (assuming 1 sigma was specified). These may be
viewed as bounds about the margin being estimated. When these two values are displayed on the
Table with the Response Margin Mean value, the Margin Mean value should fall between the two
Standard Deviation values. If you choose one 1 sigma (one Standard Deviation) then the bounds
created will indicate that 68% of future runs will fall with in these bounds. If 2 sigma is chosen, you
know that there is a 95% chance new Margin values will fall between these bounds. At 3 sigma, there
is a 99% chance that new Margin values will fall within the bounds. Response signals that fall outside
the Standard Deviation curves may indicate a new issue in the DUT or the test environment.
Note:

Please note that Standard Deviation values become more accurate when a large number of
samples are taken.
Absolute Margin Standard Deviation - Applies only to the Margin of the Results. It is calculated in the
same method as Absolute Margin Standard Deviation.
Adding Statistics Steps to the Sequence
In the case that more than one Statistics Step exists within a sequence, the Statistical values remain
completely exclusive to the step. For example, you can insert a jump condition into your sequence, and run a
Statistics Step called Passing Stats if a Limits Step passes and Failing Stats if the Limits Step fails. In this way,
you can keep your averages, maxima and minima comprised of only Passing, or of only Failing data.
Verdict of the Step
In the sequence, the Verdict of the Statistics Step is dependant on whether you have selected an Overall Yield
calculation in that step. If the Overall Yield box has been checked, the step’s Verdict will be Pass if all the
Results selected are Pass. If any of the Result verdicts are Fail, the Overall Yield will fail, causing the step
verdict to be Fail. If Overall Yield has not been selected in the step, the step will pass by default.
Note:
All Mean and Standard Deviation calculations are done on the numerical values of the data or
result. No conversion is made to linear units.
Rules - Statistics

344
The Statistics Step must occur before the Display Step that shows the Yield Results tied to those
statistics.
Statistics Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Statistics Example Sequence
The Statistics sequence located in the “How to Example”
sequence folder can be used as a template when creating a new
sequence. These steps can be added to an already existing
sequence as well.
Figure 27-9 and Figure 27-10 show the settings of the Statistics
steps in the sequence.
The first step is used to calculate statistics on the Fundamental
curve and the Response Limits results.
Figure: 27-9 Statistics Step 1
The second Statistics Step is used to calculate Process
Performance on the Max SPL value.
Figure: 27-10 Statistic Step 2
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Instruction Manual
Statistics Editor
345
Figure 27-11 shows the results screen of a sample run of speakers.
Figure: 27-11 Statistics Sequence Display
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Statistics Editor
346
Custom Steps Included With SoundCheck
Outline Ethernet
As of SoundCheck 16, ethernet control for the Outline
ET250-3D turntable is included in a custom step.
Note:
In order to configure the Outline Ethernet
custom step, it must first be inserted into a
sequence from the Template Library.
Address Selection
Scan Network
Under Address Selection, select Scan Network and then
click the Scan Network button. SoundCheck will search for
the turntable and automatically populate the address
information into the Detected Units table. If the host
computer is on both a LAN and wireless network, multiple
instances of the turntable may be visible in the Detected
Units table. This is the recommended method.
Figure: 28-1 Outline Ethernet Control
User Entry
If you are writing a sequence which will be used at another location, you may want to manually enter the known
Network Adapter address.
Enter the host computer's Ethernet IP address in the Network Adapter field and the turntable's address in the IP
address field. Note that the computer Ethernet IP address must be set in Windows prior to using the custom
step in SoundCheck. If the computer is connected to a network using an ethernet connection, a separate
ethernet interface will be required for the connection to the turntable.
Movement Type
Move to Angle
Input a specific target angle into the Angle entry box, e.g.: Enter 0° to return the turntable to its Home position.
Move in Angled Steps
Input the desired angular increment of rotation into the Angle entry box. This would be used to move the
turntable in 10° increments for measurement of polar data.
Direction
Specify clockwise or counter-clockwise rotation of the turntable
Wait Until Rotation Stops
This will pause the operation of the Sound Check sequence until the turntable stops moving before continuing
on to the next step.
For complete setup instructions, please refer to the example sequence and sequence note included with
SoundCheck.
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Custom Steps Included With SoundCheck
347
Instrument Open Close
This demonstrates opening and closing Virtual Instruments from a Custom Step. It serves as a template so you
can create a custom step that combines your LabVIEW code with the operation of virtual instruments.
1. Open the necessary Virtual Instruments in SoundCheck. Set them as required for use with your code.
See Virtual Instruments on page 407.
2. Save them as a .VIC file. See Virtual Instrument Configuration on page 409.
3. Open your LabVIEW development system.
4. Open “Instrument Open Close.vi” to use as a template.
5. Before doing anything else, select "Save As" from the file menu and
give the template a new name, e.g.: “My Code with SigGen.vi”.
6. It must be saved in your current SoundCheck installation, e.g.:
C:\SoundCheck 16.0\System\Custom VIs\.
7. The example shows where you should enter your code.
8. Specify the location of the .VIC file.
Note:
The file path to the .VIC file is absolute.The VIC file will need to
be copied to new versions of SoundCheck and the file path used
in your Custom Step will need to be updated when you update to
a new version of SoundCheck.
Figure: 28-2 Instrument
Open Close
9. Next, open the LabVIEW VI template
"SoundCheck\System\Custom
VIs\Instrument Open Close
Editor.vi".
10. Select "Save As" and use the same
name from the previous step. Make
sure it contains ' Editor.vi' after the
custom name. For example: and “My
Code with SigGen Editor.vi”
11. Edit the new custom step in
LabVIEW 2016. A place marker for
your code has been left in the
template as shown in Figure 28-3.
12. For more information refer to the
instructions in Creating a Custom VI
and Custom Step on page 353.
Figure: 28-3 Put Your Code Here
See Instrument Open Close Custom Step on page 444 for instructions for use in TCP IP.
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Instruction Manual
System Custom Step
Included in SoundCheck Steps library is the Custom Step, System.cus. This allows you to run Command Line
operations as part of a sequence. This includes:

executable files (.EXE)

batch files (.BAT)
Command Line Field
If the executable is not in a directory listed in the Windows PATH
environment variable, the command line must contain the full path to
the executable.
When executing Batch Files or Executable Files that require a
Command Line Interface, cmd/c must be added before the file name
in the Command Line Field as shown in Figure 28-4: cmd /c
openlatest.bat.
Batch files may require that the Working Directory is specified
Figure: 28-4 System Step Command Line
When the System Step is executed in the sequence, it will perform
the functions in the batch file.
The example batch file is useful for opening the latest Excel file, according to the “Date Modified”, from the
specified folder.
@echo off
for /f "eol=: delims=" %%F in ('dir /b /od *.xls') do @set "newest=%%F"
"%newest%"
In order to open the latest Word document you would change *.xls to *.doc.
Windows Executable Files
When running an executable file that runs from the standard
desktop, only the name of the executable needs to be in the
Command Line Field as shown in Figure 28-5. The Working
Directory is not required for this type of executable file.
Figure: 28-5 Open Calc.exe
Working Directory
Working Directory is the file system directory from which you want to execute the command.
Note: Do not use working directory to locate the executable you want to run. Working Directory applies to the
executable only after it launches.
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Wait for completion
When checked, SoundCheck will wait for the operation called in the Command Line field to complete or be
closed, depending on type of operation called.
When this is left un-checked, SoundCheck will execute the Command Line and continue to the next step in the
sequence.
Run as administrator
The next step is optional depending on where the batch file is located and what the batch file tries to access.
When you launch SoundCheck, it launches under the current user account. By default, this account only has
read/write access to its own user folder. So you can run SoundCheck as the administrator by right-clicking on
the shortcut and clicking “Run as administrator”. This will open up the privileges. Another way to work around
that is to move the batch file and restrict it’s “movement” to the account user’s folder.
Mixer Volume
Each Mixer Volume Step in a sequence, allows you to control the input
and output levels of a 2 channel WDM or Core Audio device.
For example, the volume of a headset may be controlled while testing it,
or the levels of a device can be fixed at unity gain for consistent
calibration.
Figure 28-6 shows the Input and Output of a Bluetooth Headset set to
100%. This will require 2 steps in the sequence.

Compatible with Windows and Mac OS

Compatible with WDM or Core Audio devices

Separate steps are required for Playback and Record

Separate steps are required for each device being controlled

The steps cannot be renamed in a sequence. The name must
remain “Mixer Volume” for each instance. Use Step Comments to
name the function of each step.
Figure: 28-6 Mixer Volume
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Instruction Manual
RS232 Read Integer

Intended for use as a programming example only. Not for use
“as is” in a sequence.

Reads the integer value from an external device connected
via RS232

Generates a value in the memory list: Read Integer
Serial Number Write Read

Intended for use as a programming example only. Not for use “as is” in a sequence.

This step writes the value "1234" to the serial number field

Next, it reads the serial number and writes it to the memory
list in a value named "Serial Num"
It is useful as a template for creating your own custom vi's which
read/write the serial number field of SoundCheck.
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Custom Steps Included With SoundCheck
351
Open Before Converting Old Custom VIs
This serves as a tool to be used when updating your Custom VIs to the latest version of SoundCheck and
LabVIEW.

Easier to use Custom VI templates

Updating Custom vis from previous SoundCheck versions is easier
Important! This must not be used in a sequence!
To convert Custom VI’s from a previous version of SoundCheck:
1. Copy the Custom VI’s into the Custom VI folder of this SoundCheck version.
Example: C:\SoundCheck 16.0\System\Custom VIs\
2. Open the version of LabVIEW which is appropriate for the SoundCheck version and bitness
you are upgrading to. In LabVIEW open the vi, “Open Before Converting Old Custom
VIs.vi”. (SoundCheck 16.0 requires LabVIEW 2016)
3. From the File menu of “Open Before Converting Old Custom VIs.vi”, open the custom vi(s) you
are converting.
4. They should automatically relink to the appropriate vi and ctl files. These are located in the file
“custom and SC Run Seq Sub VIs(xXX).llb” found in the root of the SoundCheck folder.
5. Save the vi’s, Start SoundCheck and verify the functions of your vi.
Issues you may encounter:
Some user Custom VI’s may refer to “Global Data Stack DB Dynamic.vi”. You should relink to “Global
Data Stack DB.vi”
Some user Custom VI’s may read the “Abort” global from previous versions of SoundCheck. Instead,
you must use “Query Sequence Abort Flag.vi”
Figure: 28-7 Open Before Converting Old Custom VIs
When opening your vi you should see a solid arrow as in Figure 28-7. This indicates
that the vi opened correctly.
Figure: 28-7 Solid
Arrow
If you see a broken arrow (Figure 28-8), debugging is required.
Figure: 28-8 Broken
Arrow
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SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Creating a Custom VI and Custom Step
Important! The contents of this chapter requires the use of LabVIEW. It is suggested that users have an
advanced level of experience with the LabVIEW development environment in order to use
these examples.
Creating a Custom VI for SoundCheck®
SoundCheck provides a way for you to integrate your own LabVIEW code into your SoundCheck sequence as
a step. Included with SoundCheck are templates to create your own Custom Steps which can be run in a
SoundCheck sequence. Once the files are created according the instructions, you can use those steps in the
SoundCheck sequence editor.
Note:
LabVIEW 2016 English Language version is required to create custom steps and step editors for
SoundCheck 16.0. The "Save for Previous Version" option in LabVIEW is not recommended.
your step name here.vi
1. Make sure the SoundCheck application is closed.
2. Open your LabVIEW development system.
3. Open the LabVIEW VI template: C:\SoundCheck 16.0\System\Custom VIs\your step name here.vi.
Figure: 29-1 Open VI Template
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Instruction Manual
Creating a Custom VI and Custom Step
353
4. Before doing anything else, select "Save As" from the file menu and give the template a new name.
For example: 'RS232 Read Integer.vi' (This example is installed with SoundCheck by default.) The new
name cannot be the same as a pre-existing custom vi.
5. This must be saved in the "Custom VIs" folder. Make sure it has the ".vi" extension (lower case).
6. Make note of the VI name. The step name used must be the same as the VI name (minus the ".vi"). It
is also CASE SPECIFIC.
7. Combine your code with the existing code in the SoundCheck template.
Figure: 29-2 Add LabVIEW Code To Template
8. Save the VI.
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Instruction Manual
your step name here Editor.vi
9. Next, open the LabVIEW VI template "C:\SoundCheck 16.0\System\Custom VIs\your step name here
Editor.vi".
Figure: 29-3 Open VI Editor Template
10. Select "Save As" and use the same name from the previous step. Make sure it contains ' Editor.vi' after
the custom name. For example: 'RS232 Read Integer Editor.vi' (This example is installed with
SoundCheck by default.)
Note:
These two VIs work together within SoundCheck and must be located in the System\Custom VIs
folder. In this example, 'RS232 Read Integer Editor.vi' is used to create the custom step, and
'RS232 Read Integer.vi' is called when the custom step is run in the sequence to execute the
custom code.
11. Follow the instructions highlighted in yellow on the VI diagram, and "wire in" all the custom code.
Important! The curves listed in the 'Curves Generated' array in the custom editor must have exactly the
same name as those created by the custom vi. This ensures that the placeholder for the
curve in the Memory List is filled with the correct data when the sequence is run.
Important! If the VI has any subVIs, put them in the folder: "...\Custom VIs\subVIs\". If the folder does
not exist, it must be created and must be located in the "SoundCheck\System\Custom Vis"
folder.
Note:
If you make your custom VI wait for user interaction, such as clicking a Done button, the Custom
Step must be configured to "Display step when run" as shown in Figure 29-4. Otherwise,
SoundCheck may get stuck inside the custom VI, in an infinite loop. (See Sequence Editor on pg
387)
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Creating a Custom VI and Custom Step
355
Creating a Custom Step
1. Start SoundCheck and open the Sequence Editor.
2. Select "Custom" from the left hand Step Category menu. By default, this list contains the example step
'RS232 Read Integer'.
3. Select "New..." from the Step menu and enter the name for the new step, using the same name as
your step VI and step Editor VI.
Important! The step name should be exactly the custom VI name, minus the ".vi" (e.g., RS232 Read
Integer).
In this example, the new step would be called RS232 Read Integer (do not include the .CUS extension
in this dialog). This opens your Custom Editor of the same name (RS232 Read Integer Editor.vi).
4. A Custom Step is created and saved when you click OK. The new step can now be used in a
sequence.
Note:
The settings of the Custom Step must be made after inserting it into a sequence.
Using your Custom Step in a Sequence
1. Open SoundCheck and open the sequence
editor.
2. Insert the step in a sequence and then open it
from the right side of the editor Figure 29-4.
If you have used the Curves Generated option
in your Editor, you will add names to the Memory
List with your step. These curve, value, and
result names will allow steps, such as Limits and
Display Steps, that occur later in the sequence,
to act on your custom curves. Open the Memory
List to view the curves, values, and results
generated by your sequence.
3. Edit and save the parameters for the step as you
would any other step in SoundCheck, and save
the sequence.
Configure step to
“Display when
run” if it requires
user interaction
To edit the parameters of a Custom Step in a sequence,
select “Custom” from the Setup menu, or use the
shortcut Ctrl+Shift+X. If there is a Custom Step in the
sequence, either method will open the editor for the
Custom Step.
Figure: 29-4 Custom Step In Sequence
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Creating a Custom VI and Custom Step
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
SoundMap
SoundMapTM
Time Frequency Analysis Introduction
SoundMap™ Time Frequency Analysis is a module which enables detailed analysis of signals simultaneously
in both the time and frequency domain. This off-line analysis module can read measurement data from any
WAV file or any waveform file created with SoundCheck [.wav, .TIM (MLSSA), .WFM, .TXT and .MAP].
SoundMap offers the following transforms:

Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT)

Cumulative Spectral Decay (CSD)

Wigner-Ville

Wavelet
These transforms are ideal for loose particle detection, Rub & Buzz detection and impulse response analysis of
loudspeakers. They are also used for identification of transient effects such as drop out in digital devices
including VoIP, Bluetooth headsets or transient distortion in MP3 players.
Example data is included in SoundCheck: C:\SoundCheck 16.0\data\SoundMap\Demo Data
When opening SoundMap™, the initial
display is a Time-Frequency Analysis window
which displays the time signal to be analyzed.
From this, you can select which of the four
algorithms to use, and define the analysis
parameters. The time signal to be analyzed is
shown in Figure: 30-1.
Displays
SoundMap™ offers a variety of display
options including:

3D waterfall plot

Intensity map with time and
frequency slices

Global Energy Spectrum

Instantaneous spectrum

Partial Average Spectrum

Group delay

Time envelope

Partial time envelope

Frequency time curve

Instantaneous frequency
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Figure: 30-1 Analysis Window
SoundMap
357
Controls
Axis Controls
These controls allow you to move the graph, zoom in or out to
select the area to be analyzed, and move the cursor by
dragging the mouse target along the curve.
Advanced Graph Controls
Autoscale: Left click on the Lock symbol to turn Autoscale
on and off. The Green light indicates that Autoscale is on
(as well as the Lock/Unlock symbol). Clicking on the X or Y
axis symbol, autoscales the axis without turning autoscale
on. This is a “one shot“ autoscale.
Autoscale OFF for X
axis (Unlocked)
Autoscale ON for X
axis (Locked)
X and Y-axis formatting: Choose value type, number of
decimal places and Log or Linear scale by left clicking on the “x.xx” or “y.yy” buttons.
Left click on x.xx or y.yy
Grid Color: Changes the gridline color for X or Y axis.
Zoom: Choose to zoom in to different areas of
the graph
Cursor: Click to activate cursor control
tool
Hand: Choose to move graph with hand control
Graph Background: Click to change
color of background
Figure 30-2: Axis Scaling, Zoom and Style Controls
Zoom
To zoom different sections of the graph, place the mouse pointer on top of
the magnifying glass and left click. This will open the zoom window,
allowing you six (6) different choices.
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Zoom in any area of graph
Zoom vertically along the Y axis
Zoom horizontally along the X axis
Undo zoom
Left-click on the zoom-in or zoom-out buttons. Move mouse pointer inside graph and single
click. Graph will zoom in or out automatically.
Figure: 30-3 Zoom Modes
Cursor Controls
By clicking on a cursor line on the graph, or on the cursor icon in the control box, you can make that cursor
active. Once active, the cursor is highlighted and its attributes can be modified.
(Snap to is an unused function.)
Click on a cursor
to make it active.
Change cursor
attributes
Bring to Center moves the cursor
to the center of the graph screen
Go to Cursor moves the graph
screen so that it is centered on the
cursor position
Figure: 30-4 Cursor Controls
Right Click on Graph
Right click on any graph in the Analysis or Map windows:

Copy Data - The selected graph is copied to the clipboard so it
can be pasted into a report

Export Simplified Image - You can choose to save as .BMP,
.EPSor .EMF. Choose to Export to clipboard or Save to file. Hide
Grid simply removes the grid lines of the graph.
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Instruction Manual
SoundMap
359
Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT)
The Short Time Fourier Transform is a general purpose algorithm which enables observation of the spectral
changes of a signal over time. This method is ideal for the detection of manufacturing defects such as:

Loose particles and Rub & Buzz in
loudspeakers

Measurement of settling time and
ringing in devices including
loudspeakers and telephones

Analysis of dropouts,
discontinuities and instabilities in
digital devices
Figure: 30-5 shows the STFT Analysis of a
loudspeaker with loose particles.
Figure: 30-5 STFT Analysis
Cumulative Spectral Decay (CSD)
Cumulative Spectral Decay is the traditional tool for impulse response analysis of loudspeakers. It calculates
the “ringing” of the loudspeaker for each frequency using the impulse response.
Data can be output in a variety of formats
including the widely-used threedimensional ‘waterfall plots’.
An example of a 3D waterfall plot is
shown in Figure: 30-6. This is from the
analysis of an impulse response of a
loudspeaker.
Figure: 30-6 3D Waterfall Plot
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Wigner-Ville
Wigner-Ville is the ultimate algorithm for detailed analysis of very short events.

Fine analysis of transients or indepth observation of rapidly
evolving signals are two examples.

This algorithm offers an output
resolution down to one spectrum
per sample

Wigner-Ville provides the best
resolution of all the algorithms

It complements the more
commonly used analysis methods
discussed above

Figure: 30-7 show the analysis of
the impulse response of a
loudspeaker with a time-slice at
3.69 kHz and the group-delay
curve
Figure: 30-7 Wigner-Ville Analysis
Wavelet
Wavelet analysis differs from CSD and STFT analysis in that it uses constant percentage bandwidth rather than
constant frequency bandwidth. This offers better time resolution at high frequencies and better frequency
resolution at the lower end of the spectrum. This is advantageous as it is more psycho-acoustically significant
and it is easy to see the entire 20 Hz – 20 kHz spectrum in one picture.

Applications for wavelet analysis
are generally the same as for STFT
analysis described above

The algorithm selected depends on
whether constant frequency or
constant percentage bandwidth is
preferred

Wavelet analysis presented as a
time-frequency map to show
Bluetooth dropout is shown in
Figure: 30-8
Figure: 30-8 Wavelet Analysis
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361
Time-Frequency Analysis Window
The Analysis Window is displayed when SoundMap is started. This window allows you to select the file to be
analyzed, the region of the file to be analyzed and the type of transform to be used.
Data Selection
Select a Waveform from the Memory List or click on the
Browse button and navigate to the file.
Allowable files types are:

.MAP - SoundMap data file. Opening a .MAP
file automatically opens the Time-Frequency
Map window using waveform information stored
in the MAP file.

.WAV - Standard Windows PCM file. See WAV
File Types on page 293 for more information
on supported WAV file types.

.TIM - MLSSA time file.

.WFM - SoundCheck waveform (This must be a
linear format waveform - y axis not in dB.)

.TXT - a text file with specific format (See Text
File Format on page 385).
A Waveform file may contain more than one waveform.
You will be prompted to select which file should be opened for analysis.
Important! The waveform must be in linear units such as V or Pa, not dB V or dB Pa.
Bargraph Indicators
The bargraph above the Intensity
Display shows information on the
following:

Window - A graphic display of the window size that is applied to the waveform being analyzed.

Smoothing - The amount of time smoothing applied when using the Wigner-Ville algorithm.

Analysis Segment - Shows the location and block size of the waveform portion being analyzed in
relation to the full waveform.
Axis Controls
These controls allow you to move the graph, zoom in or out to select the area to be
analyzed, and move the cursor by dragging the mouse target along the curve. The
operation of these controls is outlined inControls on pg 358.
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Analysis Process
Frequency
Figure: 30-9 shows the breakdown of how the analysis window moves along a waveform in Time Resolution
steps. For each step, a Spectra is created. The resulting Multispectrum is used in the Time-Frequency Map and
3D Waterfall Window.
Intensity Display
Multispectrum
Time
# of Spectra
Gaussian
Window
1
2
3
n n+1
Waveform
Window Size
Time Resolution
Overlap %
Start
Stop
Analysis Duration
Figure: 30-9 Analysis Process
Analysis Parameters
Algorithm
You can select one of four available algorithms:

Short Time Fourier Transform - STFT: General purpose
algorithm. Not recommended for low frequency analysis.

Cumulative Spectral Decay - CSD: Specifically for impulse
response analysis.

Wigner-Ville - For tightly focused analysis of waveform
details. Sharper resolution than STFT (Super-STFT).

Wavelet - Much better for general acoustic measurements (logarithmic frequency spacing).
Default Parameters
Using the Default Parameters allows SoundMap to calculate a sensible number of spectra and size of spectra
for the block of time data displayed. The default values depend on the algorithm chosen and the current block
duration selected in the graph window.
Time Resolution
Decreasing the Time Resolution increases the number of spectra in the analysis.
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Frequency Resolution
For the first three algorithms this is set in Hz. For Wavelet this is set in octaves, selected from a drop down list;
1/3, 1/6, 1/12, 1/24, and user defined.
Setting a lower Frequency Resolution increases the analysis window size. The Frequency Resolution is
inversely proportional to the window size, i.e.: changing the Frequency Resolution from 100 Hz to 10 Hz will
make the window 10 times larger.
Information

# of Spectra - The number of spectra calculated in the analysis
segment. This is directly proportional to the Time Resolution.

Lines/Spectra - The number of frequency lines calculated
according to the Frequency Resolution specified.

# of Points - The # of Spectra multiplied by the Lines/
Spectra. This is the number of points in the Time Frequency
Map (similar to the number of pixels in a digital photo).

Sampling Rate - The sampling rate of the selected file.

Analysis Duration - Time length of the analyzed portion.This is equal to the # of Spectra multiplied by
the Time Resolution (1000 spectra x 1 mSec Time Resolution = 1 Second Analysis Duration).

Window - Shows the size of the analysis window as determined by the Frequency Resolution setting.
For Wavelet, this will be the minimum window size.

Overlap - The amount one analysis window overlaps the previous.

BT Product - Time Resolution multiplied by the Frequency Resolution. Normally this is 100% but for
Wigner-Ville this value varies according to the degree of smoothing applied. See Algorithm
Definitions on pg 382. (BT=1 or Bandwidth x Time equals unity)

Analysis - This shows the Analysis Completeness. “Gapless” means that the Overlap of the Analysis
Window is sufficient to ensure that no information is lost between windows. This helps to prevent
missing short term transient details. If “Gaps” are indicated, some data is lost and the curves for
Global Spectrum, Partial Spectrum and Group Delay, as well as the values for Total Energy and Partial
Energy cannot be calculated. These curves and values will not be available in the Time-Frequency
Map. See Frequency Display on pg 366 and Cursor, Parameters and Information on pg 367.
+
=
Important! Using a high number of Points (great number of spectra and/or a very high accuracy in
frequency resolution) can use all available computer memory and lead to program instability.
Analyze
Click Analyze to run the selected algorithm on the portion of the file selected in
the graph display.
Click Exit to close the SoundMap program.
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Time-Frequency Map
The Time-Frequency Map is available after clicking “Analyze” or after opening a .Map file.
The Map is an arrangement of three displays and a set of Tabs. The Tabs contain information about the Map
and how it was analyzed.
The top left window is the Time-Frequency Intensity Plot.
The top right window is the Frequency Display which shows the different frequency functions.
The bottom left window is the Time Display. Different time functions can be displayed as well.
The information panel at the bottom right side of the screen shows current cursor positions and values as well
as information on how the analysis was processed.
Intensity Map Display
This provides a 3 dimensional map of the multispectrum
created in the analysis process. The three axis of the map are:

Vertical Scale - Frequency (axis on right). Linear Scale
except for Wavelet, which is Logarithmic.

Horizontal Scale - Time in seconds (axis on the
bottom).

Color Scale - Indicates the level of power at a specific
time and a specific frequency (scale on the left).
Figure: 30-10 Intensity Plot Axis
The three display windows share the X and Y axis. As the cursor is moved in the Intensity display, the
horizontal cursor line is linked to the Frequency Display. Changes in the vertical cursor line are also linked in
the Time Display.
The graduated color scale shows level in dB U. In the example, the color scale transitions from bright red at a
high level (-63 dB U), to dark blue at a low level (-93 dB U).
Note:
U is the unit of the waveform used in analysis. All dB are at a reference of 1.
Color Table
There are five different color settings for the plot and color scale thermometer.

Rainbow

Fire

Sunset

Grey Scale

Inverse Grey Scale
Auto-Offset - Applies the dynamic range to the Map and side curves, below the maximum value. You can
modify the max and min scale numbers by double clicking on a number and editing it. Level values that are
below the minimum of the color scale will be displayed with the background color (not visible).
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Dynamic range: The dynamic range of the display is set by typing a value into the Z Dyn (dB) field or by
clicking on the up/down arrows.
Snap to Max sets the horizontal and vertical lines of Cursor 1 to the absolute peak energy point of the Intensity
Plot.
The 3D button opens the 3D Waterfall display. See 3D View on pg 368.
Frequency Display
The Frequency Display axis are transposed compared to the conventional way of looking at level vs frequency.
This is done so that the spectrum can be viewed in direct relation to the Intensity Plot. Cursors 1 and 2 of the
Frequency Display are linked to the cursors in the Intensity Plot.
The following display modes are available:

Instantaneous Spectrum (U2/Hz) - Shows the power density spectrum slice at the time location of
cursor 1.

Global Spectrum (U2.s/Hz) - The sum of all spectra of the multispectrum in the Intensity Plot.

Partial Spectrum (U2.s/Hz) - The sum of all spectra of the multispectrum that are between the two
vertical cursors.

Group Delay (s) - The time of arrival for the energy of each frequency. This shows the mean time of
arrival of each horizontal time slice over frequency. See Multispectrum Exploitation: on pg 385 for
formula.
The X and Y axis controls function the same as those in the Analysis Window. See Controls on pg 358 for
more information.
Time Display
The following display modes are available:

Waveform - Shows the waveform of the analyzed
segment.

Time Slice (U2/Hz) - The horizontal time slice is taken at
the frequency location of cursor 1.

Time Envelope (U2) - The sum of all the horizontal time
slices in the Intensity Map Display.

Partial Time Envelope (U2) - The sum of all the horizontal
time slices between the two horizontal cursors in the Intensity Map Display.

Instantaneous Frequency - This is the plot of frequency vs time which shows the frequency location of
the energy at each time point (shows the mean time of arrival for each spectra vs time).
Figure: 30-11 Time Display
The X and Y axis controls function the same as those in the Analysis Window. See Controls on pg 358 for
more information.
The name of the analyzed file is shown below the Time Display.
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
Save - Click “Save Map” to store the current analysis as a .Map file. The analyzed portion of the
waveform is stored as part of the Map file. This allows you to open the Map file and change the
analysis and display parameters.

Save Image - This saves the entire Time-Frequency Map screen as a .JPG or .BMP file

Close - Closes the Time-Frequency Map and returns you to the Analysis Window
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Cursor, Parameters and Information
The Cursor tab shows the values for the current locations of the cursors.

t (s) - The time at cursor 1.

f (Hz) - The frequency at cursor 1.

A (dB U2/Hz) - The power level at cursor 1.
Delta

t (s) - The time difference between cursor 1 and cursor 2.

f (Hz) - The frequency difference between cursor 1 and cursor 2.

A (dB U2/Hz) - The power level difference between cursor 1 and cursor
2.
Energy (dB U2. s)

Total Energy - This is the sum of the entire multispectrum analyzed,
both in time and frequency. This is equal to the energy of the waveform
analyzed.

Partial Energy - This is the sum of the multispectrum that occupies the
area between both the horizontal and vertical cursor lines.
Figure: 30-12 Info Tabs
The Parameters tab shows the Analysis Parameters that were used to create the current Map. These are
reference values and cannot be edited.
The Information tab shows the information from the original Analysis window that was used to create the
current Map. These are reference values and cannot be edited.
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3D View
The 3D View or Waterfall Plot allows you to
display the analyzed segment in a threedimensional window showing Level vs
Frequency vs Time.
Additional controls on the right side of the
window allow you to show 2D displays showing
aspects of the current analysis.
Note:
The units of the display are in dB
FS.
Figure: 30-13 3D View Waterfall
Manual Scaling

Min Freq, Max Freq - Adjust the Frequency Axis range

Min Time, Max Time - Adjust the Time Axis range

Min dB, Max dB - Adjust the vertical scale

Apply - Click Apply to use the new axis settings.

Default View - Click to return to the original display angle. This does not change the time or frequency
axis ranges.

Cursor On - Activates Cursor
3D Axis and Color
Select from four options for 3D display:

Logarithmic, Surface - Color Intensity with log frequency scale

Linear, Surface - Color Intensity with linear frequency scale

Logarithmic, Waterfall - Monochrome with log frequency scale

Linear, Waterfall - Monochrome with linear frequency scale
Save Image - Save 3D view to .JPG or .BMP
Close 3D View window
2D View Controls
The 2D control buttons to the right side of the window allow you to select 2d Intensity Plots from the
current 3D display. This allows you to put the cursor on a specific point of interest and then switch back
to the 3D view.
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
Time vs Frequency (X,Y)

dB vs Time (Z,X)

dB vs Frequency (Z,Y)

3D View (X,Y,Z) - Returns to the 3D view
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Rotate
Change the viewing angle of the display.

Put the cursor on the plot.

Click and hold on the left mouse button.

Rotate the plot by moving the mouse.

Release the mouse button and the plot will
be redrawn using the new viewing angle.

Default View: Click to return to the original
display angle. This does not change the time
or frequency axis ranges.
Figure: 30-14 Rotate Viewing Angle
Zoom
You can zoom in and out of the plot view.

Hold down the “Shift key”. The cursor
changes to a magnifying glass.

Left click and hold on the mouse button.

Move the mouse up and down while left
clicking on the mouse to zoom in and out.
Figure: 30-15 Zoom In/Out
Move
The plot can be moved on the screen.

Hold down the “Control key”. The cursor
changes to cross hairs.

Left click and hold on the mouse button.

Move the mouse to drag the plot to a new
location.
Figure: 30-16 Move Plot
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3D Axis and Color
You can choose from 4 different types of plot.

Logarithmic, Surface - Logarithmic
frequency axis 3 dimensional surface
map. In addition, the level is color
coded using a rainbow scale.

Linear, Surface - Linear frequency axis
3 dimensional surface map.

Logarithmic, Waterfall - Logarithmic
frequency axis, traditional black and
white waterfall plot.

Linear, Waterfall - Linear frequency
axis, traditional black and white
waterfall plot.
The spectrum shown are a subset of the
complete multispectrum. This is done for
display clarity.
The examples in Figure: 30-17 show the two
waterfall versions of the same analysis shown
in Figure: 30-13.
Figure: 30-17 3D View Waterfall Versions
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Analysis Examples
The following section shows the four analysis types and examples of how they can be used. The example
.MAP files are installed with SoundMap and can be found in the Demo Data folder. Please use these .MAP files
while reading this section of the manual.
The “Linear Chirp” and “4 Pulses” files are provided for educational purposes. They do not represent typical
signals to be analyzed.
Linear Chirp
Open the “Linear Chirp - Wigner.map” file. This
file was created using a linear sine sweep from
near 0 Hz to approximately 22 kHz. The diagonal
response line in the Intensity Display shows how
the frequency content changes over time. By
moving Cursor 1, you can track the frequency
response in the Intensity Display and see the
time of arrival of each frequency in the Time
Display.
(Time Display set to “Time Slice“.)
The Frequency Display shows the Instantaneous
Power Spectrum at that point in time. See Figure:
30-18.
Figure: 30-18 Linear Chirp - Wigner-Ville
Analysis
Click Close and change the Analysis type to
Short Term Fourier (STFT).
Click Analyze.
With this analysis method there is less resolution
in the Intensity Display but the Time and
Frequency Displays are clearer. See Figure: 3019.
Figure: 30-19 Linear Chirp - STFT Analysis
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If you increase the Frequency Resolution in the
Analysis Window, you can see that the width of the
Intensity Display gets smaller. Experimentation with
Frequency Resolution values will help you optimize the
resolution of the analysis of future waveforms.
Figure: 30-20 STFT
Change the Analysis type back to Wigner-Ville. Use
the default Frequency Resolution but decrease the
Smoothing to 1 mSec.
Click Analyze and you will see the Intensity Display
is more narrow, compared to the width in Figure: 3018.
Figure: 30-21 Wigner-Ville
4 Pulses
Open the file, “4 Pulses - Wigner.map“. This is
from a waveform of two overlapping tone bursts
followed by a copy of the same pair of tone
bursts. The Analysis Type is Wigner-Ville.
In the Time Display you can’t determine the
difference between the two tones. In the
Frequency Display you can see two tones but you
don’t see their occurrence in time. Only in the
Intensity Display do you see four distinct pulses.
Figure: 30-22 4 Pulses - Wigner-Ville Analysis
1. Click Close and uncheck Default Parameters in the Analysis Window.
2. Change the Smoothing and Time Resolution values to 0. Note that
the field automatically changes to 22.7 μSec. This is the minimum value
for these fields. 22.7 μSec is the sampling interval.
3. Increase the Frequency Resolution from 100 Hz to 25 Hz.
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4. Click Analyze to see the changes in the
Intensity Display. The resulting Analysis
Window will encompass both sets of
pulses. This introduces interferences in
the Intensity Display. Note the “Ghosting“
of pulses in the example.
Figure: 30-23 Ghost Interference
General Rules For Wigner-Ville:

The interferences or “Ghost“ will always occur at the midpoint between two components of the signal.

The ripple pattern or “Beating“ is perpendicular to the axis drawn between the two components. In the
example, you can see the ghosts on the horizontal, vertical and diagonal axes. The center ghost
pattern is a product of both diagonal axes.

The Global Spectrum shows that the ghost interference adds no residual energy to the Total Spectrum.

The frequency of the ripple pattern in inversely proportional to the distance between the two
components. As the distance grows, the beating of the ripple becomes more rapid.

In the Time Display you can see that the ghost interference adds no residual energy in the time
domain.

To eliminate the ghost that appears between two successive components, the Analysis Window size
should be less than the distance between the two components.

To eliminate the ghost that appears between two simultaneous components, the Smoothing should be
long enough to encompass 10 periods of the ghost ripple pattern.
Although the interferences are the representation of real phenomena, such as: time beating between two
simultaneous frequencies or harmonic patterns due to signal periodicity, they may obscure the distribution of a
complex signal.
In the end, these ghost interferences are caused by having excess resolution and/or insufficient smoothing in
the analysis process. Decreasing the Frequency Resolution from 25 Hz to 100 Hz removes the interference
along the frequency axis. Increasing the Smoothing from 22.7 μSec to 1 ms removes the interference along
the time axis.
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Short Term Fourier Transform (STFT)
Open the file, “Stweep + Loose Particles Fourier.map”. This map was made from a
Stweep on a loudspeaker with loose particles
under the dust cap.
The log curve of the Stweep is visible as the red
curve in the Intensity Display.
Along the time axis, the loose particle impacts are
very obvious as shown by the randomly spaced,
vertical, blue lines.
Figure: 30-24 STFT
Note that you cannot see the loose particles in the
Global Spectrum. Only by zooming into the Time
Display can you see the transients added to the
waveform.
Switching the analysis type to Wigner-Ville will
increase the resolution so the transients are more
defined.
Figure: 30-25 Time Display Zoom
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Cumulative Spectral Decay (CSD)
Open “Loudspeaker 1 Impulse Response CSD.map“. This is the impulse response of a
Loudspeaker analyzed by Cumulative Spectral
Decay. This was made from a MLSSA time file
(.TIM).
Notice the high frequency ringing between 15 kHz
and 20 kHz. There is also ringing below 1000 Hz.
Move Cursor 1 before the start of the impulse
response (before 17.5 ms). The Instantaneous
Spectrum Display shows the actual frequency
response of the device under test. This is one of
the special features of using CSD.
Next, click the 3D button to show the Waterfall
Display. The default view shows a log waterfall
plot with the intensity indicated by color.
Clicking on Logarithmic, Waterfall under 3D
Axis and Color shows a black and white
waterfall display that is equivalent to a MLSSA
display.
Under Manual Scaling, enter min/max
frequencies of 250 and 20 kHz. Enter min/max
times of 17 and 23 mSec. Then click Apply.
This allows the waterfall plot to fill the grid so
that the screen is optimized.
Any of the display modes can be rotated on any
of the three dimensional axes. The cursor can
be switched on and moved to highlight any
point in three dimensions to indicate its
coordinates.
Click “Save Image“ to save a screenshot of the display.
Clicking Default View allows you to return to the default three dimensional orientation. This does not change
the Min/Max Frequency or Min/Max Time settings.
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CSD Analysis Window
W
in
do
w
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1
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in
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do
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w
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2
st
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w
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With CSD analysis the end point of the analysis window is fixed at the endpoint of the analysis segment. The
start point of the window is what changes, as shown in Figure 30-26. As the window moves from one analysis
point to another, it gets smaller. As this happens frequencies that have less than one cycle within the remaining
analysis window are removed because they cannot be reliably measured.
Each window becomes progressively smaller
Window End
Figure: 30-26 CSD Analysis Window
Wigner-Ville
Loudspeaker 2 Impulse Response
Open “Loudspeaker 2 Impulse Response Wigner.map”. This example was made from the
impulse response of a two way, near-field monitor.
The Global Spectrum shows the overall frequency
response. There is a large resonance at 23 kHz.
The large spread of energy at this frequency
indicates the loudspeaker is ringing at this
frequency. There is also a long ring at 31 kHz.
Below 3 kHz the signal not only rings but lags
behind the high frequency, as evident from the
Group Delay Display. This indicates that the
woofer and tweeter are not time aligned.
Figure: 30-27 Wigner-Ville
Set the Frequency Display to Group Delay. The delay peaks are seen here.
Ideally, this would be a straight, vertical line.
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The ring time or decay time for specific
frequencies is also viewed in the Time Slice
Display. By comparing the position of Cursor 1 to
Cursor 2, you can find the decay rate at specific
frequencies.
This can be seen in Figure: 30-28.

Set Cursor 1 at the peak of the signal at
31.1 kHz.

Move Cursor 2 to a Delta of approximately
2 ms and then adjust it to the point where
the Frequency Delta is 0 Hz.

The Amplitude Delta in this example is
10.38 dB. This indicates that the time
constant of the resonance at 31.1 kHz is
about 0.83 ms.
Figure: 30-28 Decay Rate
2ms -------------------× 4.34dB = 0.83ms
10.38dB
Note:
4.34 dB is exp(1) expressed in dB.
In the Time Display, Time Slice shows the
ringing that occurs between two frequencies.
The beating pattern can easily be seen by
setting Cursor 1 at approximately 30.1 kHz,
between the two frequency peaks as shown in
Figure: 30-29.
Figure: 30-29 Set Cursor 1 between HF peaks
The Time Slice in Figure: 30-30 shows the
beating pattern.
Figure: 30-30 Beating Pattern
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To reduce the amount of information in the
Intensity Display, you can decrease the
Frequency Resolution in the Analysis Window.
This will tend to smooth the distribution of energy
along the vertical frequency axis of the Intensity
Display.
The example in Figure: 30-31 has been
reanalyzed with a Frequency Resolution of 250
Hz.
It is now easier to see the main features of the
distribution. Notice that the duration of the ringing
frequencies is shorter. This shows that too much
smoothing can throw away useful information. It is
recommended to always start with a high definition
and then smooth gradually. This way you can
determine when you have gone to far and return to
a more appropriate resolution.
Figure: 30-31 Lower Frequency Resolution
Analysis
Click on 3D to show the same information as
the Intensity Map, with a more intuitive method
of viewing.
Note that the Min/Max Frequency and Min/Max
Time values have been adjusted to so that the
3D plot is filled with information.
MP3 Encoded Dirac Impulse
Open “MP3 Encoded Dirac Impulse Wigner.map”.
This was made by encoding a Dirac impulse WAV
file to MP3 and then decoding it back to WAV. This
is a single impulse at 44100 Hz that is 1 sample
long with a level of 0 dB Full Scale.
Instead of seeing a single vertical bar in the
Intensity Display, there is a lot of added noise
after the signal and even some added noise
before the signal.
The pre-ringing in the high and low frequencies is
due to the low-pass filtering that occurs in the MP3
encoding process.
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The Global Spectrum Display shows the high frequency cut off above 17 kHz.
The signal after the impulse shows the noise created by the encoding process. This is most likely quantization
noise due to perceptual encoding.
You can get the spectrum of the noise part by
selection it with the two vertical cursors and using
the Partial Spectrum Display as shown in
Figure: 30-32.
Notice that the noise is not flat. There is less
energy at approximately 5.53 kHz.
Using Cursors 1 and 2 you can see the duration of
the noise in the Waveform Display. This is
approximately 20 ms.
Wavelet
Figure: 30-32 MP3 Noise
p50 Male Artificial Speech
Open “p50 male artificial speech Wavelet.map”. This file is the Wavelet Analysis of
the p50 speech file that is included with
SoundCheck.
The frequency axis of Wavelet Analysis is
logarithmic. Logarithmic is the more typically used
type of axis for electoacoustic signals.
You can see fundamental of each syllable of the
speech waveform as well as each harmonic.
Figure: 30-33 p50 Speech
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Bluetooth Dropouts
Open “Bluetooth Dropouts - Wavelet.map“. This
is a Bluetooth headset measurement using a
steady sine wave at 1 kHz.
The constant signal at 1 kHz can be seen in the
Instantaneous Spectrum Display.
Due to intermittent loss of signal, you can see the
effect on the constant tone in the Intensity
Display.
You can easily see the dropouts by looking at the
Time Slice Display. Each dropout appears as a
vertical spike over time. Move the Cursor 1
horizontal line to the top of the dropout peaks as
shown in Figure: 30-34. The cursor value shows
that the peaks of the drop out extend above 1.15
kHz.
Figure: 30-34 Bluetooth Dropouts
With this information you can now make a 12th octave filter, centered at approximately 1.2 kHz, to act as a
dropout detector when testing this device in SoundCheck.
Note:
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In SoundCheck this is done by limiting the Analysis Step - Time Envelope values to around
1.2 kHz.
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The resolution of the analysis can be changed to 1/6th octave by closing the
Intensity Display, unchecking Default Parameters and then selecting 1/6 octave
from the Frequency Resolution drop down menu.
Click Analyze.
Wavelet Analysis has low time resolution/
high frequency resolution in the low
frequencies and high time resolution/low
frequency resolution in the high frequencies.
This time resolution is logarithmic, as in an
RTA.
As you increase frequency resolution, the
time resolution decreases. The two are
inversely related.
You can see this by moving Cursor 1 from
high frequencies to low frequencies while
looking at the Time Slice Display.
High frequencies are very defined as shown
in the Time Slice Display of Figure: 30-35.
Figure: 30-35 High Frequencies
As you move lower in frequency, the details
diminish which can be seen in the Time
Slice Display of Figure: 30-36
Figure: 30-36 Low Frequencies
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Algorithm Definitions
Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT) Definition
SoundMap uses the following formulae: S x ( t,
f)=
 h( u) × ( t + u)e
– i2πuf
du
2
With:

x(t) = time function to analyze

h(u)= weighting function for time window
Window
The window used is a truncated Gaussian function. Gaussian functions provide the best time-frequency
precision.
Analysis Completeness
If the time increment is below a certain threshold, there is no loss of data and the energy of the signal is
conserved. The analysis is then complete. The threshold of completeness is the windows rms duration.
BT Product
It is the normalized product of the window duration by the window bandwidth. It is always 100% for the STFT. It
is called the Heisenberg-Gabor limit in the signal processing world. (BT=1 or Bandwidth x Time equals unity)
Cumulative Spectral Decay Transform Definition
At each frequency, the CSD time-frequency distribution yields the temporal decay of a “stopping tone burst” of
that frequency. This is applied on the analyzed impulse response. This allows you to see which frequencies are
“ringing“ in the Device Under Test, including the room.
CSD is meaningful only when applied on an impulse response. It should not be used on other types of
waveforms.
CSD Transform
With x(t) being the signal to analyze, the CSD is defined in SoundMap for a frequency, f, as the squared
magnitude of the convolution of x by the stopping tone burst 1 [ – T, 0 ] ( t )Exp ( j2πf t ) .
C ( t, f ) =
t+T
t
x ( τ ) e– j2πfτ dτ
2
The CSD can be expressed as a STFT with a rectangular, right-sided window.
Low frequency limit
Because the analyzed data gets shorter as the integration window slides, the frequency limit for each spectrum
gets lower. Under this limit the values are meaningless and set to zero. The limit is equal to the inverse of the
effective duration of the integration.
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Analysis Completeness
The completeness is determined in the same way as for the STFT.
BT Product
The BT Product is always 100%. (BT=1 or Bandwidth x Time equals unity)
Wigner-Ville Definition
SoundMap uses the following formulae, which is a Smoothed Pseudo Wigner-Ville Transform (SPWT):
W x ( t, f ) =
τ
τ
τ
  h  --2- g ( u ) x̃  t + u + --2- x̃∗  t + u – --2- e
– i2πτf
du dτ
With:

x̃ ( t ) = analytical signal from time signal x(t)

h = window function

g = smoothing function
The window function h is used to limit the time integration range for practical implementation. Each Wigner-Ville
spectrum is localized around its time location.
The smoothing function, g, is used to smooth the values along the time axis.
With a smoothing value equal to the sampling interval, the result is an effective time resolution down to the
sample. In this case, there may be a lot of interference on a complex signal. See BT Product on pg 383.
Analytical Filtering
The analytical filtering removes the negative frequencies of the signal. It is used in the Wigner-Ville analysis to
avoid frequency aliasing.
Window
SoundMap uses two separate Gaussian windows for windowing and smoothing. When the window and
smoothing functions have the same duration, the SPWT is equivalent to an STFT.
Analysis Completeness
With the SPWV, the Analysis Completeness depends only on the smoothing. The threshold of completeness is
the rms duration of the smoothing.
BT Product
With the SPWT, it is the normalized product of the smoothing duration multiplied by the window bandwidth. The
two can be adjusted independently.
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When BT is smaller than 100%, the time-frequency resolution is better than with the other transforms, but
interference appears between components of the signal. This is the price paid when breaking the HeisenbergGabor limit. (BT=1 or Bandwidth x Time equals unity)
The smaller the BT, the better the time-frequency resolution, but interference is stronger. Increasing the
smoothing allows you to smooth out the time aligned interferences. Increasing the frequency resolution value
smoothes out the frequency aligned interferences. When the BT Product is 100%, the result is equivalent to an
STFT.
Wavelet Transform Definition
SoundMap uses the spectral expression of the continuous Wavelet Transform:
2
1
v
j2πvt
WLT x ( t, f ) = ------ ⋅  X ( v ) ⋅ Ψ∗  ---  ⋅ e
dv
 f
f
With:

X(í) = spectrum of the signal to analyze

Ø(í) = wavelet spectrum
For the wavelet, SoundMap uses a Gaussian analytical wavelet (modified Morlet wavelet) defined in the
frequency domain as:
v
Ψ  ---  = e
 f
π v–f 2
– ---  ----------- 
2 γf
Frequency Scale
The center frequencies of the analyzing wavelets will follow the standardized, 1/3, 1/6, 1/12, 1/24 octave (RTA)
frequencies. The center frequency of each band will use the RTA scale so the analysis can be compared to an
acquisition from the SoundCheck RTA analyzer.
Analysis Completeness
As for STFT, the threshold of completeness is the rms duration of the shortest wavelet (maximum analysis
frequency).
BT Product
The BT Product is 100%. (BT=1 or Bandwidth x Time equals unity)
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Multispectrum Exploitation:
Global Energy Spectrum †: sum of all spectrum of the multispectrum. It is the energy spectrum of the analyzed
signal.
Sub-Total Spectrum †: sum of all spectrum of the multispectrum, between the two vertical cursors. It is the
energy spectrum of the portion of signal that lies between the two vertical cursors.
Energy Calculus †: the total energy of the analyzed signal is obtained by summing of all time-frequency values
of the multispectrum. The partial energy is obtained by summing the multispectrum values in the timefrequency region delimited by the two cross-cursors.
Energy Time Curve: sum of all time slices of the multispectrum. This yields the time envelope of the signal.
Partial Energy Time Curve: sum of all time slices of the multispectrum, between the two horizontal cursors. This
yields the time envelope of the filtered signal, limited to the frequency band delimited by the two horizontal
cursors.
Mean Group Delay †: center of gravity of each time slice over frequency. It is the time of arrival of the energy for
each frequency.
 t ρx ( t, v ) dt
T x ( v ) = ---------------------------- ρx ( t, v ) dt
Mean Instantaneous Frequency: center of gravity of each frequency slice over time. It is the frequency location
of the energy at each time.
 v ρx ( t, v ) dv
F x ( t ) = ------------------------------- ρx ( t, v ) dv
Note:
†: These functions are only available when Analysis Completeness is attained.
Text File Format

Physical unit string <CR-LF> (Must be linear units such as V or Pa, not dB V or dB Pa.)

Sampling rate in Hz <CR-LF> (Such as 44.1 kHz sampling rate)

Real Values (floating point) <CR-LF> .. <CR-LF> (one value per line. For a sampling rate of 44.1 kHz
there will be 44100 value lines.)
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
SoundMap
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386
SoundMap
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Sequence Editor
What is a sequence?

A script to carry out a "sequence" of events

A series of individual Steps

The sequence (.SQC file) contains all of the steps and settings for those steps. It does not contain the
settings for Hardware and Calibration. (See Hardware - System.Har on page 47 and System.Cal on
page 65)

A sequence contains steps, test variables and Conditional Branching instructions. (See Configure
Step on page 398)
What is a step?

These are the building blocks of a sequence

Each step is from a specific category

Each step in the library of the sequence editor is a template for use in the active sequence on the
right side of the editor

The file extension of each step file matches the step type, e.g., Stimulus Step = .STI, Acquisition
Step = .ACQ

After a step is inserted into the active sequence, it has no connection back to the step in the library.

The step information for the active sequence is saved in the .SQC file (See Single-file Sequence
Format on page 388)
Default Sequences
SoundCheck comes with a library of sequences and step templates
that can be used with minor or no modifications.

These sequences serve as templates for making new
sequences

Step Templates are independent of sequences and are
reusable
Please refer to The following list of sequences is included with
SoundCheck on page 543 which includes descriptions of all the sequences included in the SoundCheck
installation.
Note:
Application specific sequences are also available on the Listen, Inc. website.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Sequence Editor
387
Features

The Sequence Editor runs in parallel with the rest of SoundCheck (See Sequence Operation on page
390)

Editor can remain open while running a sequence

Current running step is highlighted allowing you to see the progress of the sequence run

The SoundCheck Main Screen menu can be accessed

Editor can be moved to a second monitor

The step templates pane now features an expandable tree structure for template categories and can
be fully collapsed to maximize sequence space. See Step Template Library on page 393.

You can add single or multiple steps to a sequence simply by dragging and dropping. Steps can also
be moved in a sequence with drag and drop. All other functions are accessed by right clicking on the
step.


Drag and drop to insert and re-order single or multiple steps

Intuitive right click menu for all functions (See Right Click Functions on page 396)
Sequence Debugging Tools (See Debugging Tools on page 396)

Steps with Pass/Fail (Conditional Branching) (Mes, Lim, Dis) are highlighted green or red in the
editor after they are run

Breakpoints can be inserted into a sequence for debugging purposes. Control buttons on the
SoundCheck Main Screen can then be used to advance the sequence one step at a time or run the
remaining steps in the sequence. See Debugging Tools on page 396.



Insert as many break points as desired

New buttons for run a single step or continue from breakpoint

Steps and sequence may be edited while at a breakpoint
‘Run from here’ option allows you to run only a portion of the sequence
Undo functionality has also been added to the Sequence Editor both as a right click and the familiar
Ctrl+Z shortcut. This allows you to quickly revert changes made when developing and editing
sequences.
Single-file Sequence Format
As of SoundCheck 12:
388

The sequence file (.SQC) contains all sequence parameters and steps. Individual Step files are no
longer required.

All attributes and fields of a step in the active sequence are linked to that sequence.

Changes to the steps in the active sequence appear only in that sequence.

Changes are not linked back to the step template in the Step Template Library of the Sequence
Editor. See also Right Click Functions on page 396.

Selecting Save As when editing a step in the active sequence, saves the changes in the sequence and
makes it a template in the library

This feature greatly reduces the error of changing sequence fields that affect other sequences
(previously known as Step Specific black fields)

Sharing and updating sequences is greatly simplified. Only a single SQC file is required, rather than an
entire folder full of step files. See Exporting Sequences on page 403.
Sequence Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Converting Sequences
As of SoundCheck 12, sequences are no longer imported. The Setup Wizard allows you to convert sequences
from a previous version to the Single File Sequence format. Master sequences and sub-sequences from
versions prior to SoundCheck 12 should be handled as follows:
1. Export the sequence from SoundCheck 11 (or previous) into its own folder.
2. In SoundCheck 16.0, open each sub-sequence (from the exported folder) and click save. This will
convert the sub-sequences to the single file format.
3. Open the master sequence and click save so that it is in single file format.
4. See Exporting Sequences on page 403.
Sequence Editor Interface
The Sequence Editor (optional module 2002) allows you to create
and customize sequences to fit your specific testing needs.
Sequences can involve a few steps for a straightforward
measurement (e.g., loudspeaker frequency response), or include
dozens of steps for elaborate tests. To view and change the
current sequence, select Sequence from the Setup drop down
menu on the main SoundCheck® menu bar, or use the keyboard
shortcut Ctrl+Q.
Figure 31-1: Sequence Editor
The right side of the Sequence Editor shows the Active
Sequence being edited. Here you can expand or collapse step details.
The overall sequence configurations are listed first (Overall sequence) and take precedence over any
conflicting step configurations.
Any individual step configurations are displayed immediately after the step. You can expand the configuration
info by clicking the + button next to the step.
The left side shows the Step Template Library which gives you a variety of preset steps normally used in
SoundCheck. You can also create your own step templates.
The editor window allows the right side to be expanded for easier viewing of long step names.
Note:
Settings for the window and column size of the sequence editor window are stored in the
SoundCheck 16.0.ini file under [WinColBounds]. This will be recalled the next time SoundCheck
is run.
Relative File Paths
File path controls in a sequence step can be set relative to the folder path of the sequence itself. This is useful
when sharing sequences with other SoundCheck users and locations, as it makes it easy to move the
sequence and all of its related files (recalled DAT files, WAV file stimuli, etc.) from one place to another. The
relative path can even include sub-folders. See Rules - Relative File Path Rules in Recall Editor on page
196.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Sequence Editor
389
File Menu
The File menu on the SoundCheck Main Screen has the following sequence
related functions:

New - Create new sequences

Save current sequence being edited

Save As - Save current sequence with a new name and optional change
location folder

Revert allows you to discard all changes made since the last time the
sequence was saved to disk.

Delete - Deletes the selected sequence from the sequence folder. This
does not go to the Recycle Bin. Deleting is permanent.
Figure 31-2: Sequence
Menu
Document Sequence - Allows you to export a list of the steps of the active sequence along with information
regarding the configuration of the steps and sequence. See Document Sequence on page 404.
Sequence Operation
The Sequence Editor can remain open while a sequence is running. This
allows you to see the progress of the sequence as the steps run.

As a step is running it is highlighted in Yellow. See Display Step in
Figure 31-3.

Steps configured with Pass/Fail Conditional Branching functions are
highlighted in Green or Red after they have run. (.MES, .LIM and .DIS)

Breakpoints can be set to pause the sequence run for debugging.
Steps are marked with a red dot. See Debugging Tools on page 396.
Figure 31-3: Step
Highlighting

The SoundCheck Main Screen menu can be accessed while the
editor is open. The Start, Stop, Step and Continue buttons are located
in the top left corner.
Note:
As of SoundCheck 13, the Status window has been removed.
Use the Enter key or the Continue button as shown in Figure
31-4.
See SoundCheck Main Screen on page 31 for more information on
Sequence Control Buttons. Also See Keyboard Shortcuts on page
521.

390
Start
Stop
Continue
Step
Figure 31-4: Sequence
Control
The editor can be moved to a second monitor to leave more room for display windows.
Sequence Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Editing Sequences
Every sequence is comprised of several steps. The Sequence Editor
allows you to configure the sequence as a whole, as well as to
configure individual steps.
Figure 31-5: Sequence Editor
The active sequence name is shown on the SoundCheck Main Screen
as shown in Figure 31-6.
Figure 31-6: Active Sequence
All the steps are listed in the order that they are
executed. Steps can also be configured with one or
more Conditional Branches (or jumps) to change the
order of execution. See Configure Step on page
398.

Conditional
Branching or
“Jumps” show
the line number
and step name
You can change the order of these steps by
clicking on a step and dragging it to a new
location in the sequence. SoundCheck will
prompt you if you are moving steps that are
part of a jump.

Double click on a step to open its editor.

As the sequence runs, each step is
highlighted in Yellow as it is processing.

Steps marked with a Red Dot are set as
Breakpoints. See Debugging Tools on
page 396.

Line number for
each step in
sequence
Right Click to
change view with
Expand All or
Collapse All
Figure 31-7: Sequence Editor
You cannot edit sub-sequences from the master sequence. Instead, open the sub-sequence itself in
the Sequence Editor to edit it.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Sequence Editor
391
Insert/Remove Steps
You can also remove or insert steps into the current sequence.
Right click on a step (or select several steps), Right Click on them and select Remove
To insert a Step Template:
1. The default Step Template location is the Steps folder of your current SoundCheck installation.
2. Choose the desired Category from the drop down menu, left click on a step and drag it into the Active
Sequence.
3. You can then “Drag and Drop” the new step in the correct position in the sequence.
Note:
You can only browse to the Steps directory specified in Main Screen > Edit > Preferences > Folder
Paths. See Preferences on page 35.
After the step is added to the active sequence it is no longer connected to the Step Template Library. Changes
to the step in the sequence appear only in that sequence.
Note:
In the Step Template Library you can select Sequence to show the steps of a saved sequence.
This is an easy short-cut for re-using steps from another sequence.
Adding Multiple Steps
It is possible to “Add a Block“ of steps to a sequence. This
is very useful when adding steps from another saved
sequence.
Cursor Line
Figure 31-8 shows an example.
392

In the Step Template Library select Sequence and
pick a sequence from the list

Select a group of steps from the sequence in the
library. Left Click and drag them to the Active
Sequence

They will be added above the cursor line that
appears when you “mouse over” the Active
Sequence. In this example, the steps were inserted
above the Acquisition Step.
Sequence Editor
Figure 31-8: Add Multiple Steps
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Editing Steps
You can edit a step in the sequence by simply double-clicking on the step in the Active Sequence list box.
You can also click Setup on the SoundCheck Main Screen, select a Category and select a step to edit.
Step Template Library
The Step Template Library contains preset steps for use in building sequences. The
steps are arranged by Category as shown in Figure 31-9.

Double clicking a step name in the Step Template Library will open that step so
you can review its properties or edit its default settings.

To save changes click Save As in the editor.

You can give the step a new name or leave the name the same and overwrite
the existing step.
Figure 31-9: Step
Template Library
Categories

Messages - Specifies text based, digital I/O based messages, or
RS232 and/or IEEE messages.

Stimulus - Specifies the test signal (sine-based, WAV file)

Acquisition - Selects method of data acquisition, e.g., Play and
Record, Record only, Real Time Analyzer, etc.

Analysis - Selects the analysis algorithm

Recall - Recalls a saved data file (SoundCheck-specific *.DAT,
*.RES, *.WFM and standard *.WAV files) into the Memory List

Post-Processing - Allows for complex data operations

Limits - Checks measurement data against preset tolerances

Display - Selects how the data and results will be presented

Serial No - Selects automatic incrementing of a serial number, or
a prompt for the user to enter a Serial Number
Abbreviation
Mes
Sti
Acq
Ana
Rec
Pos
Lim
Dis
Ser
Sta
Aut
Pri
Cus
Seq
Associated
Editor
Messages
Stimulus
Acquisition
Analysis
Recall
Post-Processing
Limits
Display
Serial Number
Statistics
Autosave
Printing
Custom
Sub-sequence
Figure 31-10: Category
Abbreviations

Statistics - Calculates running statistics of curves and results
that are updated with each test run

Autosave - Saves data, results and/or wave forms to disk in one of five formats

Printing - Selects how the data and results will be printed

Custom - Allows you to integrate your own LabVIEW code into the sequence as a step. See Creating
a Custom VI and Custom Step on page 353.

Sequence - Allows you to copy a step from a pre-existing sequence into the selected sequence. See
Adding Multiple Steps on page 392.

This step will retain the settings it had in the saved sequence in the library.

You can also insert an entire sequence, making it a sub-sequence. You can choose sequences
that are in the same folder as the current Active Sequence.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Sequence Editor
393
Step Template Menu
Right click on a Step Template category and select:

New - Create new steps in the selected category

Import Step Templates allows you to bring steps in from previous versions
of SoundCheck or other SoundCheck folders. The entire folder of steps must
be selected. If you want specific steps it is recommended that you make a
copy of the original folder and remove the unwanted files before importing
the folder.
Figure 31-11: Step
Template Menu
Rules - Sub-sequences

You can insert an entire sequence into another sequence. This makes it a sub-sequence. The subsequence must be in the same folder location as the master sequence.

Batch Processing and Memory List Grouping is not allowed in Sub-sequences. If you want to use a
sequence which contains batch processing, as a sub-sequence, it will need to be re-configured to use
individual steps that do not require Memory List Groups and Batch Processing.

Reminder: Rules for Overwrite Data/Keep Repeated Data in Step Configuration applies to data in subsequences. Either use unique names for Data and Waveforms or, select “Add Input Data Name” or
“Use Signal Path Name”. Refer to Overwrite vs Keep repeated data on page 399 for more
information.
Example: When all Acquisition Steps use the name “Recorded Time Waveform” AND the subsequence acquisitions are configured to “Keep Repeated Data”, the resulting names are:
Recorded Time Waveform, 2- Recorded Time Waveform, 3-Recorded Time Waveform, etc.
The Analysis Steps then point at the first waveform generated, “Recorded Time Waveform”, instead of
the waveform that analysis is paired with in the Sub-sequence.
The best way to get around this is to use unique names for the acquisition waveforms in each subsequence.
394

When using the Memory List Sorting and Grouping function, “Autogroup By Category”, in the Master
Sequence, the Curves, Values, Results and Waveforms from the Sub-sequence are automatically
grouped under the heading “Seq” for each Memory List Tab.

The sub-sequence when inserted into the master
sequence is given a step number in relation to the
other steps of the master sequence

Steps of sub-sequences are numbered separately,
relative to the first step of the sub-sequence. Other
steps of the Master Sequence resume their numbering
after the sub-sequence.

Steps of a Sub-sequence are indented in relation to
steps in the Master Sequence.

You cannot edit sub-sequences from the master
sequence. Instead, open the sub-sequence itself in the
Sequence Editor to edit the steps.
Figure 31-12: Sequence Step Numbering

When exporting the Master Sequence, its sub-sequences are exported as well. This will also export the
Associated Files of the Sub-sequences. See Exporting Master Sequence and its Sub-sequences
on page 403.

See Converting Sequences on page 389 for information on converting Master and Sub-sequences
from previous versions of SoundCheck
Sequence Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Insert Sub-sequence

In the active sequence, select the step that you want the
Sub-sequence to occur before

Right Click on the step and select Insert Step

Select Category and Sequence

Choose a sequence

The sub-sequence must be in the same folder location as
the master sequence.

Sub-sequences show up in the active sequence as a single
step. The step category is identified as “Seq“.
In this example, the Display step was selected and the subsequence was inserted before it. See Figure 31-13.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Sequence Editor
Figure 31-13: Inserting a Subsequence
395
Right Click Functions
Right Clicking on a step or overall sequence opens a selection menu. This
makes it easier to change the configuration of any step or the overall
sequence.
Steps

Configure Step - Open step configuration window to set options for
how the step works in the sequence. See Configure Step on page
398.

Comment Step - Comments appear in the Comment column of the
sequence editor as well as the sequence Documentation

Insert Step/Replace Step - Allows you to select a step from the Step Library. See Figure 31-8.

Remove - Removes the selected step(s) from the sequence. Select multiple steps by holding down the
CTRL key while selecting Steps.

Rename - Change the name of the selected step

Undo [Name of Last Edit] - Revert last change(s) made. This remembers the order that changes are
made to the sequence and allows you to step back through multiple layers of Undo. You can also use
Ctrl+Z as long as the Sequence Editor window is Active (blue title bar).
Figure 31-14: Right Click
Sequence

Expand All / Collapse All - Used to Show or Hide the configuration of all steps in the sequence

Configure Sequence - Opens the sequence configuration window
Debugging Tools
These functions are typically used to test and fix sequence operation.

Set Breakpoint - Select a step for the sequence to stop on. This
step is denoted by a Red Dot. You can set as many breakpoints in
a sequence as required.

Clear Breakpoint - Removes the Breakpoint on the selected
step(s).

Run from here - Run the sequence from the selected point. This
allows you to run to the end of the sequence or to the next
Breakpoint. After the sequence stops at a Breakpoint, you can
select “Run from here” again to continue sequence run.

Figure 31-15: Set Breakpoint
Apply - Allows you to Apply the action of selected step without
having to open the step. For .MES, .LIM and .DIS steps this will show the Pass/Fail state of the step by
highlighting the step number in Green or Red. (Clicking Apply in the step editor will not change the step
highlighting.)
When a sequence run pauses at a breakpoint, the Step and Continue buttons
become available to either advance one step at a time or run the rest of the
sequence.
Start
Stop
Continue
While the sequence is paused at a breakpoint, you can edit the steps in the
sequence. This allows you to trouble shoot a sequence one section at a time,
without having to run the entire sequence.
Step
396
Sequence Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Breakpoints can also be set in Step Configuration. See Configure Step on page 398.
Configure Sequence
Double click on the first line of the sequence,
Overall sequence, at the top of the active
sequence or Right Click on the Sequence Editor
to open the Configure Sequence window.
Options:
Figure 31-16: Configure Sequence
When Sequence opens

Preload Stimulus - Creates and loads the Stimulus Waveform into memory when the sequence
opens.
Preload Stimulus vs Memory List Selection
When "Memory List Selection" is selected in the Stimulus
Editor, a message will pop up as a reminder to "shut off"
Preload Stimulus.

Open First Display Step when sequence opens

Open Memory List when sequence opens

Open Instruction File - PDF or other document types can be tied to a sequence so that the file opens
when the sequence opens. Example sequences included with SoundCheck use this function to open
sequence notes and instructions.

Browse to Location - Select the file to link to sequence

File - Shows the linked File Name and path
When Sequence Starts

Close Open Display Step - Only the SoundCheck Main Screen is visible after sequence start

Clear Measured Data - Used to clear displays of curves and values. Helps prevent confusion during
sequence run.

Sequence Comments - This field can be used to include notes about the sequence; version, date
created, author, etc.
When Sequence Runs

Update Data in Displays - Data is shows in the display in the order it is acquired, analyzed or
processed rather than waiting until the sequence run completes.

Display all steps for ___ Time - Useful for debugging. Allows you to see the operation of each step for
a preset time.

Display FAILED Steps for ___ Time - Same as above except that it only applies to steps that issue a
FAILED verdict.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Sequence Editor
397


Wait for confirmation - Waits for you to click Continue (Enter) or Stop
(Esc) on the SoundCheck Main Screen.
Start
Stop
Continue
Halt on Fail - Stops the sequence run when the verdict of any step is
FAIL.
Figure 31-17: Stop or
Continue Buttons
Configure Step
You can configure individual steps to fine tune their role in
the sequence.
Configuring individual steps allows implementation of loops
and Conditional Branching in the sequence.
Right click on a step and select Configure Step.
The example in Figure 31-18 shows how the “Test for
Signal” step is configured to Jump to a specific step if the
result of the step is PASS. It the result is FAIL, the No Signal
Message step is issued and the sequence stops since this
step is set to Halt on Fail.
Figure 31-18: Configure “Test for Signal”
Using these options, you can alter the operation and order
Step
of step execution in the sequence based on the outcome of
a particular step. See Conditional Branching Rules - Sequence Editor on page 400 for more information.
Options


398
Wait for Confirmation - The sequence will pause after the selected
step is completed and wait for user input before continuing. Click the
Continue or Stop buttons on the SoundCheck Main Screen as shown
in Figure 31-19.
Display step when run for / Display Step on FAIL for - Eliminates
the need for user confirmation. Enter the amount of time you wish the
sequence to pause while the step is displayed. The sequence will
resume once the step times out.
Start
Stop
Continue
Figure 31-19: Stop or
Continue Buttons

Halt on FAIL / Halt on Pass - Allows the sequence to be stopped
based on the result of the step (PASS or FAIL).

Jump on PASS to / Jump on FAIL to - Allows for Conditional Branching. Depending on the PASS/
FAIL result of the step, the sequence will jump to a different point in the sequence. The Drop Down
menus contain the names of all the steps in the sequence; you can jump forward or backward in the
sequence. You can also elect to loop through part of the sequence for a given number of iterations and
jump to a selected step. See Conditional Branching Rules - Sequence Editor on page 400 for more
information.
Sequence Editor
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual

After “n” repetitions - Sequence operation jumps to the selected step
for a set number of runs. This increments the Index value as noted
below. The Index value appears in the Memory List and can be used to
control stimulus level, set turntable angle for polar plots and other
uses. (Requires that “Jump on PASS or FAIL” is selected.)
Index (Loop Index)
You can create a Memory List value that increments according to the
following settings:

Start - Starting value of Memory List item

Name - Name of Index value created in Memory List

Increment - Amount the item will increase or decrease after each
repetition

Unit - Log or Linear units can be used. Uses standard editor.

See Loop Stimulus Level or Polar Plot (Linear X turntable) example sequences and sequence
notes for more information.

The Index is a "Y axis” value. When using the Index value to update Start and Stop Frequencies in
the Stimulus Editor, select Y axis. See Start and Stop Frequencies from Memory List Values on
page 99 for info on how this is used in a Stimulus Step.
Figure 31-20: Configure
Step - Loop Stimulus Level

Set Breakpoint - Allows you to set a Breakpoint to halt sequence operation. Useful for debugging.
Looping sequences. The step will have a red dot next to the step name in the Active Sequence to
indicate the Breakpoint. See Debugging Tools on page 396.

Comment Step - Comments appear in the Comment Column of the sequence editor as well as the
sequence Documentation.
Overwrite vs Keep repeated data

Overwrite data - This is selected so that the Memory List data generated by the step will be
overwritten in the each time a sequence loop occurs. This helps reduce the number of curves that
appear in the Memory List. This can be set on a per-step basis. In other words, you can overwrite data
for some curves in a loop and keep all repeated data for other curves. This is the default setting.

Keep repeated data - Allows you to keep the repeated measured curves in memory. They will be
added to the Memory List with an iteration prefix, e.g., 2-Fundamental, 3-Fundamental, etc. Curves are
only kept when the iteration logic produces a PASS.

Default Action for new steps - Any New Step added to the sequence, after this point in time, will use
the “Overwrite data/Keep repeated data” setting of this step. This applies to any new step added,
independent of its location in the sequence.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Sequence Editor
399
Conditional Branching Rules - Sequence Editor

Stimulus, Acquisition and Analysis steps should be configured to “Overwrite Data” when these steps
are within a Loop
The default state of steps when added to a sequence is “Overwrite Data”. When steps in a loop are
configured to “Keep Repeated Data”, redundant curves can be generated in the Memory List, e.g.,
Fundamental [L], 2-Fundamental [L], 3-Fundamental [L], etc. In most cases, steps should be set to
Overwrite Data so that only one instance of the curves is created. They will be updated each time the
sequence runs.

The final step of a sequence should not be used in a Loop
Jump on Pass or Fail may create an endless loop
In order to execute a jump at the end of a sequence, add a dummy display or message step at the end
of the sequence, e.g., Message Step named “End of Sequence“. Then configure the previous step to
jump to the desired location.

Step Configuration in the Sequence Editor shows the Line number
and Step name for the target of a “Jump“
Refer to Figure 31-21 for an example
For an example of how Conditional Branching and Loops work, open the
Loop Stimulus Level sequence from the SoundCheck Sequences - How
To Examples folder.
Figure 31-21: Step
Configuration Info
400
Sequence Editor
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Instruction Manual
Creating a New Sequence
This is the basic procedure required to complete a sequence. You can alter it to fit your test needs.
Note:
The order of the Step Categories in the Template Library is also the order that the steps are
normally used in a sequence: Stimulus, Acquisition, Analysis, etc.
Note:
Steps can be added to the sequence from the Step Template Library on the left side of the editor.
The step can be opened and edited from the Active Sequence on the right hand side of the editor.
Changes to the step are stored in the sequence and are not saved back to the Step Template
Library.
Note:
After opening any of these sequence steps in the active sequence, they can be saved under a
different name by clicking on Save As in the Step Editor. You can also right click on a step and
select Rename. This change is not saved in the library.
1. On the SoundCheck Main Screen select File > New. This opens the Sequence
Editor with a blank Active Sequence. Click File again and select Save to name
the sequence. You can also browse to save the sequence in a different folder.
2. The sequence will use the system Hardware and Calibration configurations.
3. Right click in the blank Active Sequence and select Insert
Step.

Select the Stimulus Category and select the Stimulus
Step to be used for the test.

You are prompted to select the Output Signal Path.
Note:
You can also drag and drop steps from the Step Template Library into the Active Sequence.
4. Right click in the blank Active Sequence and select Insert Step again.

Select Acquisition and select the method for playing the stimulus signal and recording the DUT
(device under test) response and drag it into the Active Sequence.

You are prompted to select the Input and Output Signal Path.
5. Repeat the process of right clicking on the Active Sequence to insert steps. You can always change
the order of the steps by clicking on them, using the “Drag and Drop” method.
6. Once a step is inserted in the sequence you can right click on it and select Rename to give it a unique
name to identify its function in the sequence.
7. Insert an Analysis step.

Select the type of signal analysis that will be performed.
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8. Insert a Display step.

Select a step to display your data

Add display windows as described in Creating a Display Step on
page 306 and Display Examples on page 308

Right click on the Display Step and select Configure step. See
Configure Step on page 398 for more information

Select Display step when run. This is required in order for the display to be shown when the
sequence is run.
Note:
When using multiple Display Steps, each Display Step in the sequence must have a
unique name or data will not be displayed correctly.
9. At the top of the Sequence Editor double click on “Overall
sequence”. This opens the Configure Sequence window.
You can also right click on the sequence and select
Configure Sequence. See Configure Sequence on page
397 for more information.

Select Preload Stimulus to optimize test speed
10. Insert other types of steps as noted above.
Note:
Remember that you can Drag and Drop steps to change the order that they occur in
the sequence.
11. Double click to open each step in the Active Sequence (right hand side of the editor) to fine tune the
operation of each step.
12. Right click on a step to Configure the Step. See Configure Step on page 398 for more information.
13. Now you can save and run your sequence.
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Sequence Editor
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Exporting Sequences
Sequences developed on one SoundCheck 16.0 installation can be used by other SoundCheck 16.0 (and later)
systems using the Export Seq command from the File menu. This will copy the saved sequence to a selected
folder.
Associated Files
In addition to the .SQC file, it also exports the following:

Any *.DAT, *.RES or *.WFM files from Recall Steps set to “Specify File Path”

Picture files being used in the Display Steps

WAV files used in the Acquisition or Stimulus Steps

Calibration .DAT files associated with the signal paths used in the sequence

Any instruction files from the Sequence Configuration
The sequence can be run from the exported folder. This folder can be on a network or on the local PC.
Exporting Master Sequence and its Sub-sequences
When exporting the Master Sequence, its sub-sequences are exported as well. This will also export the
Associated Files of the Sub-sequences.
Example - Exporting Sequences
To export sequences, do the following:
1. Make sure the sequences you want to export have been saved.
2. Select File→Export Seq….
3. Navigate to the sequence file(s) location, select the desired .SQC file(s) and click OK
4. Open the folder where the exported sequences will reside. This can be a folder on the local hard drive
or anywhere on a network.
5. Once you have opened the destination folder, click on Select Cur Dir
6. SoundCheck will then export the sequence files as noted above
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Document Sequence
From the SoundCheck Main Screen click File > Document Sequence.
Figure 31-22: Document
Sequence
Allows you to export a list of the steps of the active
sequence along with information regarding the
configuration of the steps and sequence.

Export the list of steps of a sequence to a text
file in 2 text formats or to an Excel file: (See
Figure 31-23)
1. Delimited txt file; tab, comma,
semicolon and other
2. Space-aligned for fixed width text
editors

The Documentation setup window allows you to
select:
1. Summary: Shows the Simple step
information first. For sequences with
sub-sequences, only the master
sequence setup is shown.
Figure 31-23: Documentation Editor
2. Current View: same layout as on screen
3. Expanded Details: Steps names, configuration and settings:
a. Line number
b. Output Signal Path / Input Signal Path
c. Category
d. Step title
e. Step configuration

The Comment window gives you a space to enter general notes about the sequence and it’s use. This
info shows up in the Quick-Start menu.
An example of the output from the Documentation Editor is shown in Figure 31-24.
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Documentation Spreadsheet
Listen SoundCheck 13w w w .listeninc.com
Sequence:
Limits in Reference to Standard
Thu Oct 31 2013
###
Operator:
Comment:
Sequence Title
Date & time of
documentation
TypeStep Name
#
Out
In
(Overall sequence)
preload Stimulus
display instructions
clear data at start
close display at start
Mes Measure Standard
1
// Measure standard or use stored data
display step
jump on pass to # 2: Fixture Standard
jump on fail to # 8: Reference Standard
overw rite curves
Mes Fixture Standard
2
display step
w ait for confirmation
overw rite curves
Sti 10k-100Hz (R40)
3 Amp ch 1
Data Out
Max FSD Out 10k-100Hz (R40)
10k-100Hz (R40)
Acq Play & Record
4 Amp ch Reference Mic
Data In
10k-100Hz (R40)
Data Out
Max FSD In
Recorded Time Waveform
Comment Lines are
denoted by a double
slash (//) starting in the
first column.
Figure 31-24: Documentation in Excel spreadsheet
The documentation example shows the result of selecting the “Expanded View” format. If “Summary“ were
selected, the step configuration information below each step would be omitted.
Sub-sequence Notation

The sub-sequence title is given a step number in relation to the other steps of the master sequence

Steps of sub-sequences are numbered separately, relative to the first step of the sub-sequence. Other
steps of the Master Sequence resume their number after the sub-sequence.
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Sequence Editor
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Virtual Instruments
Features
Distortion Analyzer with THD and Optimized THD+N
Real time distortion analyzer that allows you quickly get distortion values and plot
them over time with the Strip Chart Recorder.

THD Ratio - IEEE

THD Ratio - IEC

THD Residual

THD+N Ratio - IEEE

THD+N Ratio - IEC

THD+N Residual

SINAD

Weighting Filter options:


Available selections: A, B, C, and “Memory List”

Any arbitrary curve from the Memory List can be used
New Save to Memory List option
See Distortion Analyzer on pg 434.
Strip Chart Recorder (optional module)
This is available in the Multimeter, Distortion Analyzer
and Frequency Counter.
The Strip Chart plots the data from the instrument on a
graph, where X axis is time and Y axis is the output of
the meter.
See Strip Chart Recorder on pg 420.
Multimeter

New - Save to Memory List option. See Common Instrument Controls on
pg 409.

New - Linear-Repeating Averaging function

New - Bandpass Filter option with Auto or Fixed frequency selections

Auto: Tracks the most prominent tone

Fixed: Allows you to specify the frequency

The Q is the same value, for either mode, regardless of frequency
For more information on the Multimeter see Multimeter on pg 417.
New Frequency Counter
The new high resolution frequency counter offers an accurate and clear visual
indication of frequency, determining the dominant signal in a selected signal path
and returning a precise frequency measurement.
See Frequency Counter on pg 435.
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Instrument List
The Virtual Instruments offered by SoundCheck® allow you to manually operate the different components of
the test system as stand-alone instruments:

Signal Generator (Ctrl+F4) - generate sine waves, noise and WAV
files. The EQ output function can be applied to all types of output
signals available in the Signal Generator

Multimeter (Ctrl+F5) - display the weighted or unweighted RMS level
of an input signal

Oscilloscope (Ctrl+F6) - view time waveforms

Spectrum Analyzer (Ctrl+F7) - narrow-band frequency analysis

Real Time Analyzer (Ctrl+F8) - Nth octave analysis

Distortion Analyzer (Ctrl+F9)

Frequency Counter (Ctrl+F10)
Overload Indicator
An overload indicator is included in all Instruments. This appears when the amplitude of the input signal
exceeds the range of the hardware.

If the signal is within the Max FSD tolerances the value characters of the
meter are White

When the input signal is within 3 dB of Max FSD, the meter reading will
switch from White to Orange characters. See Record Level Monitoring Max FSD on pg 121.

When the input signal is actively overloading the hardware, the Overload
Indicator becomes visible and flashes Red

After the overload condition ceases, the indicator stops flashing, but it
remains highlighted in yellow to let you know that an overload condition had
been present in the current data acquisition session
The Overload Indicator is reset (closed) by clicking on the X (upper left corner), or
by stopping and starting the instrument. For the Spectrum Analyzer, Oscilloscope
and RTA, click on the Overload Indicator to close it.
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Common Instrument Controls
The following controls are used on all of the Instrument meters and analyzers:

Save to Memory - Saves the acquired data to the Memory List

Save Settings - Allows you save the current settings of the Instrument
to a .VIC file

Set as Default - Saves the current settings as the default settings for
this type of Instrument

Load Settings - Allows you load settings from a .VIC file
Figure 32-1: Common
Controls

If the selected .VIC file does not contain settings for the current instrument, an error is returned

If the .VIC file contains multiple configurations for the current instrument, the first entry is used

Close - Closes the Instrument

Save In Compact View - Sets the Instrument to open in Compact View when you select Save Settings
or Save as Default
Virtual Instrument Configuration
The set up of the multiple instruments can be
saved in a Virtual Instrument Configuration
file otherwise known as .VIC. This allows you
to save or recall a set of instruments that
might be used on a regular basis.
Note:
The Signal Generator output will
be muted when a .VIC file is
opened.
Figure 32-2: Save Config
Virtual Instrument Configurations are
managed from the Instruments Menu on the
SoundCheck Main Screen. See Figure 32-2.

Click Instruments Menu

Save Configuration or Save Configuration
As to save current Virtual Instrument setup

Open Configuration to open a .VIC file

Start Up Configuration - Opens the selected
virtual instrument set up when SoundCheck is
opened. See Figure 32-3.

Recently Opened Configurations - List of
recently used configurations
Figure 32-3: Startup Config
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Opening Multiple Instances of Instruments
Several instances of the same virtual instrument or combinations of instruments can be opened at the same
time.

For multichannel applications, a new instance of the VI can be opened for each channel

Both the Spectrum Analyzer and the RTA can run simultaneously while running a sequence so real
time live data can be viewed

Two Signal Generators can be used to mix signals (e.g., pink noise and a sine sweep) for signal
conditioning

Waveforms in the memory list may also now be played directly from the Signal Generator VI
Instrument Operation Time Rules
There is no deterministic link between the input and output of virtual instruments. They are completely
independent. In fact, all Input Instruments are independent from each other. The only deterministic
synchronization implemented between instruments in SoundCheck is “Sync” for Signal Generators (output side
only).
The best way to guarantee that the Signal Generator is
playing for the entire duration of the Multimeter record
operation is by setting up your acquisition as follows:

Include a record delay value that is long enough
to allow the Signal Generator to open and start
playing

Configure the Multimeter to record for the
duration of interest

Make sure the Signal Generator is configured to
play for long enough to cover:
a. The Record Delay entered in the Acquisition
Step field
b. The record duration set in the Multimeter Time
field
c. The time it takes for the Multimeter to open
and close
The example in Figure 32-4 shows the Signal Generator
set to run for 3.8 seconds.
This covers the times for:
Record Delay (1 Sec) + Multimeter Time (2 Sec) +
Multimeter Open & Close (0.8 sec)
Figure 32-4: Total Acquisition Time
These methods should be used when using any of the virtual instruments as stand-alone instruments or when
using them in an Acquisition Step.
The values used in this example are for demonstration purposes only. You should determine the optimal record
delay, signal generator duration and multimeter duration times for your setup. They will vary based on OS,
audio driver, and number of input and output channels acquiring during the step.
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Signal Generator
Choose the Output Signal Path, Frequency, and Output Level of the sine
wave or WAV file to play. The Signal Generator always opens with Mute
enabled to prevent playback of inadvertent, excessively high levels. When
you are ready to play your signal, click the blinking Muting button to disable
muting.
Features

Frequency steps are in non-integer values. A decimal frequency can
be entered as: 37.3 Hz.

Bandwidth is limited only by the sampling rate of the audio interface.
DC is not supported in the Signal Generator.

Drop Down Menu - select stimulus types

Sine Wave

WAV (See WAV file playback on pg 413)

Pink Noise

Waveform (See Play Waveform Option on pg 412)
Figure 32-5: Signal
Generator - Sine Wave

EQ - Apply EQ uses the correction curve associated with the selected Signal Path (See Below)

Drop Down Menu - select Output Signal Path

Max level and units defined in Calibration Editor, Output Signal Path

Vary frequency using linear or logarithmic scale

Vary level with linear or logarithmic scale

Reference 1 kHz tone

Sync

Temporarily mute output
Previous versions of SoundCheck allowed you to Sync multiple Sine Wave generators and multiple WAV file or
Noise players, the latter only under specific conditions. As of SoundCheck 15, you can unconditionally sync
WAV file and Noise playback with other WAV file/Noise generators and Sine Wave generators.

Sync only guarantees matching first sample output on the audio interface. Anything beyond that is up
to the user. That is, they are not “synced” in terms of overall Signal Generator configuration:

Frequency and level are unique to and controlled individually on each synced generator.

Changing the frequency on one synced signal generator will mute all synced generators. This is for
phase matching reasons. Syncing signal generators guarantees the signals match at Phase 0/Time 0.
Changing the frequency would change the phase relationship between two signals, so all generators
need to be reset. Muting all synced generators effectively forces the sync operation to reset. Un-muting
any synced generator is a signal for all in the group to start playing again in sync.

Changing the level of one synced signal generator has no effect on any other synced signal generator.

The same rules generally apply to synced WAV file/Noise Signal Generators. Clicking “Stop,” modifying
the WAV file path, or changing the Noise parameters will stop all synced generators. “Start” will start
them all. Other than that, each one is configured individually.
EQ
The EQ output function can be applied to all types of output signals available in the Signal Generator (Sine
Wave as well as WAV and noise). When the EQ box is checked the EQ Out Correction curve that is created in
the output calibration process is applied to the output signal. This allows you to equalize the response of an
artificial mouth or anechoic chamber. EQ out correction curves are populated with data when the Speaker
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Equalization or Simulated Free Field calibration sequences are selected in the output calibration process. See
Equalization and Correction Curve on pg 77.
The level and units are determined by the calibration setup. For example, if you have calibrated the output
sensitivity to include the gain of an amplifier in the path of the output signal, the level indicated will be the level
into the DUT. The output level is in physical units. Refer to Calibration Configuration on pg 65 for more
information on Physical Units.
Note:
The EQ out selection box is available for Sine Wave stimulus.
Pink or White Noise
When playing Pink or White Noise you can select the Duration of the noise
and the number of times it can be looped.

Select in Continuous Loop to playback until you hit Stop

Select Duration and enter the playback time in the Duration field
or

Select N Times and enter the number of times for file playback in
the N field
Figure 32-6: Play N Times
Play Waveform Option
Any waveform available in the memory list can be played from the Signal
Generator. Select Waveform from the first Drop Down Menu.
The waveform is selected from the Drop Down list under waveform
name.
Figure 32-7: Play Waveform
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WAV file playback
WAV file streaming in the signal generator with real time equalization removes memory limitations on the length
of test signals. Longer test signals such as those required for analysis of speech and music can easily be
accommodated. This applies to the standalone Signal Generator as well as the Signal Generator when used in
an Acquisition Step. (WAV file streaming is not available in the Stimulus Step.)
Important! See Instrument Operation Time Rules on pg 410 regarding syncing and operation time
with multiple instruments.
Level
The Output Level field allows you to set the playback level of the WAV file.
The level is set in physical units. The output units will vary depending on the
output units of the System Calibration Configuration. For example, if using
an artificial mouth or anechoic test box the output level will be Pa rms. For an
amplifier or direct output the level will be V rms. This requires an accurate
calibration of the output signal chain. (See Calibration Configuration on pg
65 for instructions on output calibration.)
The Drop Down Menu next to the Level field has the following selections:

RMS level (Pa rms, V rms)

dB level
WAV Info

File Path - Browse and select a WAV file. The sample rate of the
WAV file must match the sample rate of the System Hardware
Configuration.

WAV Channel - Select which channel of stereo WAV file to use for
playback.
The following section shows the properties of the selected WAV file.
These values are for reference only, and cannot be changed.

Peak: the maximum absolute value of the file (in dB FS, or %FS).

RMS: the RMS value of the entire wave file (in dB FS, or %FS).

WAV format: stereo/mono, sampling rate, bit depth.

Time: total duration of the wave file in mm:ss.ms.
Note:
Figure 32-8: Signal
Generator - WAV File
As of SoundCheck 10.0, WAV file playback “N times“ is available when using NI DAQmx hardware
devices such as the PCI/PXI 4461.
More information on the use of WAV files in SoundCheck can be found in WAV File Excitation on pg 111 and
WAV File Types on pg 293.
Why use an equalized WAV file?
Many modern electroacoustic products, in particular mobile phones, incorporate nonlinear digital signal
processing for noise suppression and speech encoding. Usually these products must be tested using complex
excitation signals such as real or simulated speech. Prior to their use, these special signals need to be
equalized to compensate for the non-flat response of the mouth simulator or loudspeaker used as the output
device.
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Equalize a WAV file
In order to obtain an accurate output level the WAV file should be equalized as shown in Figure 32-9. The
selected WAV file is equalized by applying the EQ curve defined in the System Calibration Configuration.
The System Calibration Configuration must have an equalization curve associated with the selected Output
Signal Path. EQ Out Correction curves are populated with data when the Speaker Equalization or Simulated
Free Field calibration sequences are selected in the output calibration process. See Equalization and
Correction Curve on pg 77.
Make sure that the desired Output Signal Path has an appropriate EQ curve available in the Memory List.
The EQ curve is unique to the Output Signal Path. The EQ curve is available in the Memory List and can be
manipulated via Post-processing or calibration.
(For more information on generating or manipulating EQ curves refer to Calibration Configuration on pg 65.)
How to example
1. Open the Signal Generator by choosing it from SoundCheck’s
Instruments menu. (Open the RTA as well if you wish to see the
measured signal change as the equalization is applied.)
2. Select WAV file from the radio button in the upper left hand corner of
the Signal Generator. Browse to the WAV file you would like to equalize,
and set your Output Level and number of times for the file to play. Press
Start to play the file, and watch the unequalized response on the RTA.
The WAV file will stop playing when the number of times to play has
passed, or, if you have chosen Continuous Loop, click Stop when you
are satisfied.
3. Select the EQ option at the top of the Signal Generator, make sure your
Output Level is appropriate, and the WAV file is set to play a fixed
number of times (for Duration will play the WAV file once).
4. The Analyzing Status light indicates that the EQ'd signal is being
calculated. When the light goes out the process is complete.
Figure 32-9: WAV File EQ
5. Press the Start button and watch the equalized
response of your WAV file on the RTA.
Important! As of SoundCheck 8, an equalized
version of the WAV file is no longer
created. The equalization is done in
real time.
6. Return to editing your sequence. Add a Virtual
Instrument Acquisition Step to play the WAV file
(e.g., P50 speech.wav) through the Signal
Generator. The EQ box must be checked in
order for SoundCheck to apply the EQ.
7. Record the response through the RTA, as in
Figure 32-10.
Figure 32-10: Equalize WAV in Sequence
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Signal Generator Synchronization
Multiple signal generators can be synced in
real time and in a sequence so they will start
and stop simultaneously. This is important
when checking the phasing of multiple
channels such as loudspeaker and microphone
arrays.

Figure 32-11 shows three Signal
Generators, all set to Sync

Output on multiple channels or on the
same channel

Clicking Start or Unmute on a signal
generator in the group will start all
signal generators in the group

Clicking Stop or Mute operates all
generators in the group

The output level of signal generators
can be changed independently while
the group is running
Figure 32-11: Signal Generator Synchronization

Changing the Signal Path or
Frequency on one generator in the
group will Stop/Mute the whole group

Different signal types can be mixed as shown in Figure 32-12

Sync allows you to Start, Stop and Mute multiple signal generators by clicking on only 1 button

It synchronizes the phase of sine signals and the start of WAV files
Important! See Instrument Operation Time Rules on pg 410 regarding syncing and operation time
with multiple instruments.
Signal Generator Mixing
In Figure 32-12, two Signal Generators are open, both sending to Direct Out 1 but with different frequencies
set in their respective control panels.

Signal Generator 1 is set to 1000 Hz

Signal Generator 2 is set to 2000 Hz
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
The Scope FFT shows the mix of the two signal generators
Figure 32-12: Multiple Signal Generator Mixing
Of course, other types of signals can be mixed. Signal Generator 1 can play a 1 kHz sine wave while a WAV file
is played from Signal Generator 2.
Note:
When playing WAV files, the sample rate of the WAV file must match the sample rate of the System
Hardware Configuration.
Note:
See WAV File Types on pg 293 for more information on supported WAV file types.
Important! See Instrument Operation Time Rules on pg 410 regarding syncing and operation time
with multiple instruments.
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Multimeter
The Multimeter allows for measurement of input signal in real time.
The level and units are determined by the Signal Path Calibration setup. For example, if you have calibrated
the input sensitivity to include the sensitivity of a microphone used to measure the input signal, the level
indicated will be the absolute SPL level at the microphone position.
Meter Display

Compact View Button - (double Up or Down arrows) Minimizes the
Multimeter to just the Thermometer and Numeric display. This helps to
save space on a computer monitor.

Strip Chart Recorder Button - Opens and Closes the Strip Chart
Recorder. See “Strip Chart Recorder” on page 420.

Thermometer - When Limits are active, a Yellow bar indicates passing. A
Red bar indicates the level is failing the set limits.
Compact View

Overload - The numeric display area will turn yellow when the signal into
the audio interface exceeds the Max In Vp level
Strip Chart Recorder
Figure 32-13: Buttons
Resolution
The Display Resolution can be set by right clicking on the numeric
display of the meter and setting the values for Linear Numeric and dB
Numeric as in Figure 32-16.
Linear Numeric Field

Choose between SI notation and Floating point

Select Digits of precision or Significant digits

Check to Hide Trailing Zeros
dB Numeric Field

Set Digits of precision. Setting a greater precision may be
required when using Multimeter Limits in a sequence as noted
above.

Figure 32-14: Numeric Display
Preferences
Check to Hide Trailing Zeros
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Measurement Tab

Signal Path - Select any signal path available in the Calibration Editor as
the Input to the Multimeter

Apply Correction - Allows you to apply input correction curves
associated with the selected, calibrated signal path

Measurement Type

Select AC RMS, AC Peak or DC RMS (DC requires a DC coupled
audio interface)

Peak - Within 50 mSec time blocks

Strip Chart Button - This opens the Strip Chart Recorder for the
Multimeter. Circled in Figure 32-15.

Autoscale - Default is 100 dB scale. You can manually change the upper
and lower scale values to “Zoom In’. This is not remembered when a
configuration is saved.

Save in Compact View - Changes the meter to Compact view when you
click Save Settings or Set as Default.
Figure 32-15: Multimeter
Averaging Tab (Avg.)

Averaging - The meter shows the Average value, updated according to
the Time or Time Weighting selected

Max Hold and Min Hold - The meter collects data for the duration the
meter is running and shows the Maximum or Minimum value

Linear


Click “Start” to run the meter

The Multimeter will run for the duration set in the Time field

The “Averaging” indicator is green when the Multimeter is running

The Elapsed Time window shows the amount of acquisition time
Linear - Repeating


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Measures the input signal for the duration set in the Time field.
Example: If Time is set to 1 second, the meter will measure for 1
second and then repeat. This is particularly useful when used with
the Strip Chart Recorder to output a curve with measurements taken
in blocks of time. The Value saved to the Memory List is the last
value taken.
Figure 32-16: Averaging

The Strip Chart Recorder Duration field will set the length of the
acquired curve. See Strip Chart Recorder (optional module) on
pg 407.

This will run in a loop until you click Stop. Only the data from the most recent acquisition is saved to
the Memory List from a Virtual Instrument Acquisition Step or when you click “Save to Memory”.
Continuous - Moving Avg.

Click “Continuous” to run the meter

The Multimeter will run continuously until you click OK or Cancel in the Multimeter window

Averaging Time: Fast (250 mSec), Slow (2 Sec) or User Defined

The Strip Chart Recorder Duration field will set the length of the acquired curve
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Filters Tab

Weighting - Select A, B, C or any curve available in the Memory List

Check to enable the High Pass Filter and/or Low Pass Filter and enter values in Hz

The selected frequency will be the -0.1 dB point of a dynamically calculated filter

Bandpass Filter option with Auto or Fixed frequency selections

Auto: Tracks the most prominent tone

Fixed: Allows you to specify the frequency

The Q is the same value, for either mode, regardless of frequency
Figure 32-17: Filters
Limits Tab
Limits can be used when the Multimeter is opened from the Instruments menu. The
limit settings are remembered when the Multimeter is saved in a Configuration. The
Pass/Fail indicator is only for visual reference.

Check Limits On to enable

Upper and Lower Limit values are entered manually

When the condition of the limits is “Passing”, the Multimeter Thermometer
is yellow. When failing, the thermometer turns red.

Pass/Fail conditions can be set in Step Configuration to use for Conditional
Branching (Jump on Pass/Fail to ...). See Configure Step on pg 398.
Figure 32-18: Limits
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Strip Chart Recorder
The Strip Chart Recorder is an optional module available for the following Instruments:

Multimeter

Distortion Analyzer

Frequency Counter
Click the Strip Chart button to open the feature.
Docking
button
Strip Chart
button
Strip Chart
Active button
Figure 32-19: Strip Chart
The chart window can be “Undocked” from the meter, resized and moved on the desktop as an independent
window. Click the Docking button as shown in Figure 32-19.
The Strip Chart can be “Docked” to it’s Instrument by clicking the Docking button.
Click the Expand Menu button on Strip Chart for the following controls:

Cursor Arrow - Click on an X or Y axis endpoint value to change the extents of the graph

Magnifying Glass - Zoom on X, Y or and X and Y axis

Hand - Move the graph within the window. (Autoscale X and Y should be shut off when using this.)

XY Autoscale buttons

Time
Relative - Shows the time according to the start of signal acquisition

Actual - Shows the clock time of the SoundCheck Computer. Note: Data saved to the Memory
List uses Relative Time values.

Duration - Sets the maximum window size. The window scales to show as much data as possible until
the Duration value is reached. The Strip Chart will then stop unless Scroll is selected.

Scroll

420


Off - The Strip Chart recorder stops after the Duration value has been reached

On - The Strip Chart data will scroll to the left once the Duration value has been reached. The Strip
Chart window maximum width is set by the Duration value. This is also the available data that is
saved to the Memory List when you click Save to Memory.
Delta X and Delta Y - Shows the X and Y axis difference between Cursor 1 and Cursor 2
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
Right click on the Strip Chart window to place cursors, access the Zoom Tool and to
export the window as a JPG or BMP file. The remaining controls are not available.

Cur1/Cur2 - Two cursors are available in the Strip Chart window

Tool - An alternate means of accessing the Cursor Arrow, Zoom, Hand and
Autoscale controls
Averaging Tab
The Strip Chart Recorder follows the selected Averaging Mode. See Averaging
Tab (Avg.) on pg 418.
Linear - Makes one measurement that is integrated over the Time set in Averaging.
The Strip Chart shows all the measurements that comprise that measurement.
Linear Repeating - Makes one measurement every X seconds, depending on the
Time set.
Continuous - Makes a continuous measurement but the Strip Chart Output Curve
is set by the Duration Field.
Save to Memory
In the meter that is linked to the Strip Chart, click on Save to Memory to send the
data to the Memory List.
Figure 32-20: Linear
Repeating

Only the data in the window is saved

If Scroll is selected, data that scrolls past the left edge of the window is not
saved

You can click Save to Memory more than once while scrolling to save “Snapshots” of data

When used in a sequence, the data is saved to the Memory List when
acquisition is complete
The Value and Waveform data will be named with the Meter Input name, e.g.:
Multimeter - Direct In 1 and saved to the Memory List Values and WFM tabs. If
multiple data Snapshots are taken while scrolling the data will be Autoprotected
and the order number prepended to the data name.
Figure 32-21: Memory
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When used in a sequence, Limits can be
applied to the Strip Chart waveform (or
value) as shown in Figure 32-22.
This allows you to apply limits to
measurements of Level vs Time,
Distortion vs Time or Frequency vs Time.
Figure 32-22: Limits On Strip Chart Waveform
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Spectrum Analyzer
The spectrum analyzer allows detailed analysis of spectral components. The weighted spectrum is now
available. The weighting functions include: none, A, B, C or any other curve in the SoundCheck Memory List.
Estimated
Frequency and
Level
Choose
Window type
and Weighting
Units based on
Signal Channel
Calibration
Cursor 1 - Snap to
Max - Harmonics
and THD level
Cursor position
and level
Figure 32-23: FFT Screen Overview
FFT Controls
Display (Mode Select and Cursor Readout Controls)

Spectrum/Time: Selects mode of operation - frequency or time analysis. The Oscilloscope
will run in the time domain, while the Spectrum Analyzer will run in the frequency domain.

Est. Freq: Displays interpolated frequency estimate, in Hz, at Cursor 1. The
interpolated frequency value is significantly greater in resolution than the
measurement bandwidth.

Est. Level: Displays the calculated level estimate at Cursor 1, in units RMS. In order to get valid results
for Est. Frequency and Est Level, Cursor 1 must be positioned before or during measurement. The
interpolated level value is significantly great in resolution than the direct reading in the Cursor 1 legend.

Spectrum (Display properties): Allows you to change the
color and attributes of the Spectrum Line. For more
information on these controls refer to Display Editor and
Memory List on pg 279.

Cursor 1 & 2: Shows position on X and Y-axis of the two
cursors. Cursor position can be fine tuned by using the Diamond control
to the right of the cursor panel.
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
The Snap to Max button on the Scope-FFT control panel moves
Cursor 1 to the peak of the acquired spectrum. The Estimated
Frequency and Estimated Level are shown in the fields at the top of
the Spectrum Display. This function is available when the mode is
set to Time or Spectrum but the cursor location is only shown when
the mode is set to Spectrum. The Estimated Frequency and Level are shown in either mode. Clicking
on the Harmonic Cursor will then plot and show the Harmonics on the FFT display as well as calculate
the THD.

Delta: Difference (in relevant units) between the position of Cursor 1 and Cursor 2.

Axis Scaling, Zoom and Style Controls

Curve Attributes: Controls curve attributes. See Introduction on pg 21 for
more information on these graph controls.

Autoscale: Left click on the Lock symbol to turn Autoscale on and off. The Green light
indicates that Autoscale is on (as well as the Lock/Unlock symbol). Clicking on the X
or Y axis symbol, autoscales the axis without turning autoscale on. This is a “one shot“
autoscale
Autoscale OFF

Autoscale ON
Precision: Allows you to set the level of precision for the display of values.
Scale

424
Y axis: Provides choice of dB (relative) or linear (absolute) units.
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Right Click Functions
Right Click on the graph:

Copy Data - Creates a screen shot of the graph side of the instrument window,
including Cursor section and annotations

Description and Tip - Not used

Visible Items - Select/De-select items to show in the graph section of the
instrument

Clear Graph - Not used

Create Annotation - Allows you to post markers on the graph that are included
when exporting a screen shot of the graph

Delete All Annotations - Removes all annotations from the graph

Smooth Updates - Selected by default to minimize flicker as the display changes

Autosize Plot Legend - Always on

Optional Plane - Not used

Export

Data to Clipboard - Copies the graph
data to the clipboard so that it can be
pasted into another application

Data to Excel - Opens Excel and copies
the graph data to a new worksheet

Simplified Image - Sends a black and
white capture of only the graph window
to the clipboard. Annotations are
included.
Figure 32-24: Export Simplified Image
Right Click on a Cursor name:

Visible Items - Turn the Vertical Scroll Bar on and off (Other controls are not used)

Snap To - Not used

Attributes - The Standard Line Attribute settings are available. Refer to Cursor
Controls on pg 44.

Bring to Center - Moves the selected cursor to the center of the spectrum display

Go to Cursor - Centers the spectrum on the selected cursor

Create Cursor - Not used

Delete Cursor - Not used
Trigger Controls
Triggering can be used to automatically capture a spectrum when the signal level exceeds the value set in the
“Trigger Level” field.

Trigger Channel: Sets the Input Signal Path used for Trigger
Trigger Level: Sets level of measurement trigger, in either Physical Units or dB.
If dB is chosen, the trigger threshold is on the positive value of the waveform.
The trigger level is a Peak value. The trigger value has the same dB reference
as the trigger signal path.
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
Trig. Offset (sec): Sets the amount of time that the Acquired Signal is shifted, relative to the point at
which it is triggered. A negative offset indicates that the signal will be shifted to the right by the time that
is in the field e.g., -100 mSec.

Slope: Selects whether Positive going signal triggers before negative going signal

Indicator light next to Triggered button indicates when the signal is triggering measurement
Resolution
When the Display type is set to Time, only the Time [sec] field is available.
When the Display type is set to Spectrum both the Time and Spectral lines fields
are available.

Time [sec] indicates the total amount of time allowed before the next
trigger will be allowed. Measurement record length in seconds (sec).

dT [sec]: Sampling Interval of the time signal. This is the inverse of the sampling rate determined in the
System Hardware configuration.

Spectral lines: Number of FFT lines from 0 Hz to 0.5x (half) of the audio interface sampling frequency.

dF [Hz]: Resolution/spacing of Spectral Lines.
Averaging Controls

Linear/Exponential: Different averaging modes
Linear will average for only the number of averages entered (e.g., 12)
and then stops measuring. When Linear averaging is selected, the
Averages indicator will appear, specifying the number of averages
currently completed.
Exponential allows for continuous measurement. Averages, in this case,
sets the number of spectrum that are averaged together for each
measurement display. If this number is set to 1, there will be no
averaging. This will then be the raw spectrum.

Start Button (Available in Linear mode): Starts the acquisition of data.
Acquisition ends when the number of averages is complete.

Continuous (Available in Exponential mode): Starts the continuous
measurement of spectrum and ends when the Stop button is clicked.
The Continue button allows you to resume a previously started measurement.
Spectrum
426

Input Channel: Any predefined Input Signal Path will be
available for input.

Average: Displays the average spectrum, either Linear or
Exponential, as determined in the Averaging Field.

Power: The result is the average Power of each FFT bin,
excluding phase information.

Complex: The result is the average of the complex value of each FFT bin (amplitude and phase); this
must be used in conjunction with the trigger controls. The signal must be very stable when using
triggering, otherwise slight random variations in phase from one trigger cycle to the next will cause
synchronous components to be underestimated in amplitude. A greater signal to noise ratio can be
obtained by using this.

Maximum: Displays the maximum of each spectral line.
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Instruction Manual

Minimum: Displays the minimum of each spectral line.
Weighting Controls

Window: User selectable time window. Available windows are
shown above.

Weighting: Allows you to select A, B or C weighting.
Additionally, a curve from the Memory List can be used as a
weighting function. This is applied to the measured spectrum,
e.g., frequency domain.

Apply Correction: Applies the correction curve associated with
the Input Signal Path. Refer to Calibration Configuration on
pg 65 for information on the creation of Calibration Curves.
Window Types
Weighting Types
Operation Control Buttons

Save to Memory: Saves the current measurement data to the
Memory List. The curve will appear in the Memory List as “FFT
Spectrum [L]”. Change the file name by Selecting “Rename“ from
the Memory Drop Down Menu in the Memory List. The FFT Spectrum displays the amplitude corrected
for the noise energy bandwidth of the time window used in the FFT calculation (e.g., Hanning, 4-Term
Blackman-Harris, etc.). The FFT spectrum should be used when measuring pure tones and/or
sinusoidal distortion components, such as harmonics. The FFT Spectrum is used when using the
Power Sum post-processing function. Typical applications include determining the total power in a
frequency band when using Pink or White noise or program material.
Figure 32-25: Memory List - Snap to Max Values

If “Snap to Max” is selected before clicking “Save to Memory”, the FFT Cursor values will also be
added to the Memory List: Est. Freq, Est. Level and THD. This value can then be shown in a Display
Table as shown in Figure 32-25.
Note:
All FFT spectrum are summable spectrum as of SoundCheck 7.

Cancel: Closes the Spectrum Analyzer, any changes to user defined fields will not be stored

OK: Closes the Spectrum Analyzer, storing all settings.
Measurement Status

Buffer Use: This shows memory buffer use. If this indicator is not solid
red, there is no data loss (all data processed). Real time analysis is
performed.

Real Time: This shows the update rate of the data display. A solid green
bar indicates that the data is being displayed as quickly as it being
acquired. There will be circumstances where the display processor cannot
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keep up with the actual data processing. Since the display may not be able to be updated after each
completion of a new average, this field would be a partial green bar. The actual time data is still
processed even though the display is not updated with each new average. After the number of required
averages has been calculated, the final screen is the cumulative average of all averages.
Measurements
Listen’s Scope/FFT instrument allows straightforward measurements of acoustic, vibration and electrical
signals. The procedure to make a measurement is relatively simple:
1. Set up the Y-axis, X-axis, time window, and units in the Scale and Weighting sections.
In the Trigger and Averaging sections:
2. Select the proper Input Signal Path.
3. Input the Trigger Level and the Slope.
4. Determine the Time record length. For lower frequencies and higher resolution, a longer record length
is needed. The delta Hz will automatically be updated to reflect changes in record length and number
of FFT Lines.
5. Enter the number of FFT Lines desired and select type of averaging (Linear or Exponential).
6. Select and type in the number of Averages needed.
Running a Measurement
After set up of the above sections, pushing Start in linear averaging mode will start the measurement and
averaging and will stop the analyzer when finished (when the requested number of averages is reached). In
Exponential averaging mode, this button becomes the Continuous button which, when pressed, starts
exponential averaging. To stop exponential averaging, press the Continuous button again. Pressing Start in
linear averaging mode while running will stop the measurement and averaging. Use the cursors and/or saving
facilities to analyze and view data.
Note:
The Estimated Frequency and Level fields only update during measurements. When the
measurement is finished (as in the case of linear averaging), the fields will reflect the last cursor
position before the completion of the last average.
Using the Graph Cursors
When the cross (+) cursor appears (selected using the Return to Cursor button), click on the graph cursor and
drag it to the frequency line of interest to read the frequency and level data. Use the other cursor facilities to
zoom, scale and change the graph attributes. Refer to Introduction on pg 21 for tips on using graph controls.
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FFT Weighting Types
An FFT analysis must be made on a time record or measurement of finite length. The measurement is then
limited to a specified window. Spectral leakage occurs when the acquired data does not exactly correspond to
one of the spectrum frequency lines. This leakage leads to amplitude accuracy errors as well as obscuring
adjacent frequency peaks. For these reasons it is important to apply a Weighting function to obtain more useful
information from a measurement. Various windowing types affect the results of the measurement in different
ways.
None (Uniform)
Also referred to as Rectangular. No weighting is applied to the measurement. This works well with transients
that are shorter in length than the measurement time. Due to the flat characteristic in the time domain, all parts
of the signal are equally weighted.
Hanning
This is a smooth window function, which is one period of a cosine2 function and tapers to zero at the beginning
and end of the measurement. Hanning is recommended for the analysis of noisy signals. Its main advantage is
that it has excellent frequency selectivity.
Blackman-Harris
This window has a low ripple (<0.87 dB) in the pass-band and a low skirt (<-80 dB) in the stop-band. BlackmanHarris is recommended for harmonic and order analysis. Its main advantage is that it has an excellent dynamic
range combined with good frequency selectivity.
Flat-top
This window has very little ripple (<0.01 dB) in the pass-band (in the frequency domain). The window’s main
use is for level measurement of sinusoid (calibration), due to its negligible amplitude errors. Its main advantage
is that it has excellent amplitude accuracy.
Note:
Audio Analyzer Type 2012, Brüel & Kjær Technical Documentation, BE 1074-12, 1994.
Figure 32-26: Windowing Types
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Signal Content
Window Type
Sine wave or combination of sine waves
Hanning, Blackman-Harris
Sine wave (amplitude accuracy is important)
Flat Top
Narrow-band random signal (vibration detail)
Hanning
Broad-band random (white noise)
Hanning
Closely spaced sine waves
Blackman-Harris
Signals with harmonics
Blackman-Harris
Unknown content
Blackman-Harris
Figure 32-27: Table of Applications vs. Window Types
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Oscilloscope
The Oscilloscope allows you to display and analyze the waveform of the signal from your transducer. This
instrument draws a graph of the instantaneous input signal as a function of time. You can configure the settings
of the SoundCheck Oscilloscope to take a linear average of the input signals as well. The units of the Y axis of
the Oscilloscope are determined by the System Calibration Configuration. Controls for the Oscilloscope are
similar to those in the Spectrum Analyzer and are defined in more detail in the Spectrum Analyzer section.
Set to Time for
Oscilloscope
Select Start/Continuous
to begin measuring, click
this button again to
freeze or stop
the measurement
Figure 32-28: Oscilloscope

Triggering: All of the controls available in Spectrum are available except for the following: Average –
Maximum - Minimum, Power - Complex, Window, Weighting, Apply Correction, Spectral Lines, dF, THD
and X & Y Axis scale. Triggering can be used to automatically capture a spectrum when the signal level
exceeds the value set in the “Trigger Level” field. Refer to Spectrum Analyzer on pg 423 for more
information.

Calculate Spectrum

Off - FFTs are not being done in the background which makes it faster.

On - Collect data while the Scope is running and then switch to FFT scope to view or save the
spectrum. The spectrum acquired by Calculate Spectrum will be available in the Memory List.
Controls

Save to Memory: Saves the current measurement waveform to the Memory List. The data will appear
in the Memory List as “Oscilloscope Waveform [L]”. Change the file name by selecting “Rename“
from the Memory Drop Down Menu in the Memory List.
Right Click Functions

Refer to Right Click Functions on pg 425
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Real Time Analyzer
The Real Time Analyzer (RTA) allows you to analyze a signal using Constant-Percentage Bandwidth (1-Nth
octave) filters. This method of frequency analysis is inherently different than using the FFT. The FFT approach
operates on a whole block of time data; e.g., a time block of 100 ms in length. The recursive digital filtering
utilized in the RTA is a continuous process. For every input (each time sample from the audio interface), an
output data value is obtained. This way, the RTA functions like a bank of analog 1-Nth octave filters that are
wired in parallel.
An RTA should be used when

Analyzing non-linear audio devices (such as cell phones)

Using complex signals (such as simulated or actual speech)

Testing devices using pink noise or tone bursts
This algorithm conforms to the ANSI S1.11 - 2004 class 0 standard.
Note:
As of SoundCheck 10.0, the RTA instrument is compatible with NI DAQmx devices.
Note:
When using a National Instruments DAQmx interface hardware you cannot open Multimeter and
RTA instruments simultaneously.
To use the RTA, select Real Time Analyzer (Ctrl+F8) from the Instruments drop down menu.
The RTA will start as soon as it opens. The RTA wakes up in the same mode it was last used (e.g., Exp
averaging with a Slow time constant using 1/3 octave filters).
dB reference based on Signal Path
Calibration settings
Select Input
Signal Path
Select
Weighting
Figure 32-29: 1/Nth-Octave Real Time Analyzer
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Spectrum
Octave Band (was Filter Width)
The RTA has 1/1, 1/3, 1/6, 1/12, and 1/24 octave digital recursive filters. The upper frequency range is based
on the audio interface’s sampling frequency. The highest frequency that can be measured will be no more than
one-half the audio interface sampling rate (Fsample). To measure beyond 22 kHz, choose a sampling rate higher
than 44.1 kHz.
Because of the different filter widths, the highest filter that is displayed will typically be lower than Fsample/2. For
example, the highest 1/3 octave filter that can be used for a 44.1 kHz sampling rate is 16 kHz. To measure
closer to the actual upper limit of 22 kHz, you must use filters that are narrower (e.g., 1/12 or 1/24 octave).
The following controls operate the same as in the Spectrum Analyzer. Refer to Spectrum Analyzer on pg 423
for more information.

Input Signal Path – Any predefined channel will be available for input

Average

Maximum

Minimum

Buffer Use

Real Time Indicator

Weighting

Apply Correction
Averaging

Linear: Linear will average for only the number of averages entered (e.g., 13) and then stops
measuring. When Linear averaging is selected, the Averages indicator will appear, specifying the
number of averages currently completed.

Exponential: Exponential averaging is a continuous process. It is equivalent to a running average. As
the averaging time gets longer, the response of the filters slows down.

Choice of Averaging Time: Fast (250 ms), Slow (1 s), User Defined (s).
Controls

Save to Memory: Saves the current measurement data to the Memory List. The curve will appear in
the Memory List as “1/X Octave RTA [L]”. (1/X changes depending on the resolution of the
measurement.) Change the file name by Selecting “Rename“ from the Memory Drop Down Menu in the
Memory List.

The standard Scale Legend, Graph Palette and Cursor Legend appear below the graph. See Axis
Scaling, Zoom and Style Controls on pg 424 for more information.
Right Click Functions

Refer to Right Click Functions on pg 425
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Distortion Analyzer
The Distortion Analyzer measures the distortion or distortion and noise characteristics of the signal on the
selected signal path.
Measurement tab controls (Meas.)
Signal Path control - Select any input signal path available in the Calibration Configuration
Apply Correction control - Select to apply input correction is applied
Measurement Type
Select the type of distortion to be measured and then
select the appropriate harmonics from the Distortion
(Dist.) Tab. See Figure 32-30.

THD Ratio IEEE - Same as in HarmonicTrak

THD Ratio IEC - Same as in HarmonicTrak
See Total Harmonic Distortion on pg 156

THD Residual - The power sum of the harmonics
selected in the Dist. Tab.

THD+N Ratio IEEE - Same as in HarmonicTrak

THD+N Ratio IEC - Same as in HarmonicTrak
See THD + Noise on pg 157

THD+N Residual - The level of all the noise and
distortion products in the measurement
bandwidth

SINAD - Is the reciprocal of THD+N, if and only if
THD+N is calculated without High and Low Pass
filters in the Analysis Editor
Figure 32-30: Meas.
Tab
Figure 32-30: Dist.
Tab
See Virtual Instrument THD+N Options on pg 158
Averaging Tab (Avg.)
Averaging Type
When setting the averaging time, be aware that averaging times greater than
250 mSec my be required to produce repeatable THD+N measurements.
When selecting Continuous - Moving Avg, the default averaging time is
Fast (250 mSec).
When selecting Linear or Linear - Repeating, the default averaging time is 1 second
as shown in Figure 32-31.
The remaining tab controls are the same as the Multimeter.
See Averaging Tab (Avg.) on pg 418, Filters Tab on pg 419 and Limits Tab on
pg 419.
For more details on THD+N Optimized, refer to THD + Noise on pg 157.
Figure 32-31: Avg.
Tab
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Frequency Counter
The Frequency Counter returns a precision frequency measurement of the
dominant signal in the selected signal path.
Combined with the Strip Chart recorder this can be used to determine if the
device under test is playing back audio at a constant rate.
The remaining tab controls are the same as the Multimeter. See Averaging Tab
(Avg.) on pg 418, Filters Tab on pg 419 and Limits Tab on pg 419.
Figure 32-32: Frequency
Counter
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SoundCheck ONE™
Introduction
SoundCheck ONE is an entry-level SoundCheck system which is essentially a lower cost, simplified, version of
SoundCheck coupled with the AmpConnect ISC or AudioConnect. SoundCheck ONE offers the capability to
test loudspeakers, microphones and headphones within predetermined sequence templates.
Figure 33-1: Final Display
Although the user interface is the same as in the full version of SoundCheck, rather than using the Sequence
Editor, SoundCheck ONE users are supplied with sequence templates. These templates serve as the starting
point for all SoundCheck ONE tests and can be used to generate as many product specific sequences as
desired by selecting parameters such as the stimulus signal, characteristics to be measured, frequency range,
level and limits.
SoundCheck ONE is aimed at customers who do not own a full version of SoundCheck and need a low cost
and easy to set up system for basic production line tests of loudspeakers, microphones or headphones. While
it offers the same accuracy, advanced algorithms and speed as the regular version of SoundCheck, its flexibility
and test customization capabilities are restricted. It is a good entry point for a company testing their products for
the first time or moving up from a more rudimentary test system. It can be upgraded to the full version of
SoundCheck at any time for an additional fee.
Setup Wizard
The Setup Wizard runs when you start SoundCheck ONE. You can check “Do not show this dialog again” to
stop the wizard from running at each startup. See Setup Wizard on page 11 for details.
As of SoundCheck 16, hardware setup is simplified by Automatic Startup Configuration in the Hardware Editor.
AmpConnect ISC or AudioConnect are detected when SoundCheck starts and Vp values are loaded
automatically from the connected Listen Hardware device.
(SoundCheck ONE requires either AmpConnect ISC or AudioConnect.)
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AudioConnect Hardware Setup
Before calibrating the reference mic and/or before the
first run of the sequence, open the Hardware Editor and
select the Listen Hardware Tab. (This requires that the
user has signed in with Engineer or Technician Access
Level.)
Right click on AudioConnect Device ID and select
Assign Startup Default. Set the channels as instructed
in the Sequence Template - Sequence Note you are
using.
Typical settings for each template:
Loudspeaker

Inputs: Channel 1 Mic In, Channel 2 Line In

Mic Bias: On for SCM microphone
Figure 33-2: Assign S
Microphone

Inputs: Channel 1 Mic In, Channel 2 Line In

Mic Bias: On for SCM microphone
Headphone

Inputs: Channel 1 and 2 Line In

Mic Bias: Off
Template Sequences
SoundCheck ONE template sequences are used to create customized sequences that are specific to a given
product. The provided templates serve as a starting point, containing all the necessary steps to perform the
essential measurements for their test application.
The basic process of using SoundCheck ONE:

Choose the appropriate template for the application

Modify any necessary settings

Save the template as a new sequence

There is no limit as to how many custom sequences can be saved from these templates
The typical setup for a SoundCheck ONE system is to have a separate test sequence for each product model
that will be tested. Each sequence can have its own unique settings such as: stimulus range/level, tolerance
limits, graphical displays, and data saving. Unlike the full version of SoundCheck, sequences in SoundCheck
ONE cannot have their steps and layout modified, however the settings within the steps can be changed.
AmpConnect/AudioConnect Self Test for SC ONE
Included in the SC ONE sequence folder are Self Test sequences for AmpConnect ISC and AudioConnect.
These are used to verify the operation of the hardware. They should not to be used as template sequences.
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Instruction Manual
Setup & Calibration
The required calibration will depend on which application is being tested. Choose from the three sub-headings
below:
Loudspeaker:
AmpConnect: The calibration for the AmpConnect power amplifier is fixed, so no additional steps are required.
AudioConnect: Calibrate the power amplifier according to the instructions in Amplifier Calibration
Procedure on page 84.
The Reference Microphone should be calibrated in either case.
See Microphone Calibration Procedure on page 80.
Prior to calibrating the microphone, the gain of the AmpConnect/AudioConnect Reference Mic
channel must match the gain used in the AmpConnect/AudioConnect Message Step of the test
sequence. See Auto Read on page 70.
Microphone:
The SC ONE Microphone sequence uses a substitution method to account for the response of the reference
speaker.
1. Calibrate the Reference Microphone. See Microphone Calibration Procedure on page 80.
2. Open the sequence, C:\SoundCheck 16.0\Sequences\SC ONE\SC ONE Microphone (Measure
Reference).sqc
3. Position the reference microphone at the test point in front of the reference speaker
4. Run the sequence to measure and record the response of the speaker
5. Remove the reference microphone and replace it with the DUT
6. Open and run the SC ONE Microphone sequence
Note:
These steps should be run at a regular interval to ensure accurate calibration of the
reference speaker as environmental conditions change.
Headphones:
AmpConnect ISC: The headphone amplifier provides a unity gain output, so no calibration is required for the
output. The ear simulators or couplers (signal paths “Ear Sim L” and “Ear Sim R”) should be calibrated
according to the instructions in Microphone Calibration Procedure on page 80.
AudioConnect: The headphone amp (or external power amp) should be calibrated to account for gain and
frequency response. In this case, the two channels should be calibrated independently for more accurate
results. Use the Headphone Amplifier Calibration sequence and follow the instructions for Headphone
Amplifier Calibration in the AudioConnect Manual.
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Generating SoundCheck ONE Sequences
1. Refer to the sequence note PDF files for the
SoundCheck ONE sequences, included in the
Sequences > SC ONE folder, for complete
instructions on setup and use.
2. Open one of the three template sequences which will
serve as the starting point (Loudspeaker,
Microphone or Headphones). There are versions for
AudioConnect and AmpConnect ISC, named
accordingly. “Microphone (Measure Reference)” is
used to store the Reference Microphone
Fundamental and Sensitivity, before using the
“Microphone” measurement sequence.
Figure 33-3: Template Sequences
Important!: All sequences must be generated from one of these templates. Sequences
cannot be created from scratch.
3. Use File > Save As to save a copy of the sequence with a new name. The new sequence file can be
stored anywhere on the system. It does not need to be stored in the same folder as the template.
Note:
The templates are Read-only files and cannot be overwritten.
4. To modify sequence parameters click Setup from the SoundCheck
Main Screen then choose the step category that you would like to
modify (See the examples below).
Note:
The Sequence Editor can be opened to watch the progress
of a sequence, but steps can only be edited through the
Setup drop down list.
5. Click the green start button on the toolbar to run the sequence and see
the result.
6. When finished making changes save the sequence (File > Save) to
store your changes to disk.
Note:
440
Figure 33-4: Setup
Drop Down Menu
For more information on the Template Sequences, please refer to the sequence note:
“SoundCheck ONE Templates” found in the SoundCheck ONE sequence folder: C:\SoundCheck
16.0\Sequences\SC One.
SoundCheck ONE™
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Sequence Editing

The Sequence Editor is not used. All steps are grayed out. You can use it to view the progress of a
sequence.

All steps are accessed by using the Setup drop down menu on the SoundCheck Main Screen as noted
above in Step 3

Steps cannot be added or removed from a sequence

Step parameters can be modified

Breakpoints cannot be added to a sequence
Stimulus
To edit the stimulus level and frequency range in a
SoundCheck ONE sequence click Setup > Stimulus.
This will open the stimulus editor. Make the desired
changes then click 'OK'. The changes will be saved to
disk when the sequence is saved.
For details on Stimulus Step editing see Stimulus
Editor on page 97.
Note:
SoundCheck ONE uses only Frequency
stepped-sine sweep (Stweep™). No other
stimulus types are available. See
Frequency Stepped Sweep (Stweep™)
Excitation Signal Parameters on page
97.
Figure 33-5: Stimulus Step
Limits
To edit the limits in a SoundCheck ONE sequence
click Setup > Limits. You will see a list of all the
different limit steps in the sequence. Choose the
one you would like to edit, and click 'OK'. The editor
will open where you can make any desired changes
then click 'OK'. The changes will be saved to disk
when the sequence is saved.
For details on Limit Step editing see Limits Editor
on page 257.
Figure 33-6: Response Limits Step
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441
Display
To edit the display in a SoundCheck ONE sequence, first click the tab for 'Final Display'. The windows for the
sequence display will then open.
For details on Display editing see Display Editor and Memory List on page 279.
Add or remove windows, modify what data is shown via the Memory List, and change display preferences of
the individual windows. The entire display is configurable.
Once all necessary changes have been made click File > Save to save the sequence.
Note:
If you use both SoundCheck ONE and SoundCheck full version, you can switch between
the two versions by selecting the appropriate Status.dat file under preferences. See
Folder Paths on page 36. SoundCheck ONE operation mode is shown on the Main
Screen title bar. The desktop wallpaper is the same as the full version of SoundCheck.
Important!: If you save a sequence in SoundCheck Full Version, it cannot be opened in
SoundCheck ONE.
Figure 33-7: Final Display
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
SoundCheck ONE™
442
Controlling SoundCheck with TCP/IP
Overview
As of SoundCheck 15, you can control SoundCheck through TCP/IP.
External control of SoundCheck is simpler, yet more powerful with the new TCP/IP control. This offers many
advantages over the previous ActiveX controls (still available), such as the ability to connect to SoundCheck via
any programming language, on any operating system, either locally or through a network. It also features a
more powerful and expandable command format for interacting with SoundCheck. This is extremely valuable
for anyone who needs to control SoundCheck from an external program, for example as part of an overall test
plan or factory automation. For example, one computer can control multiple SoundCheck systems, simplifying
production line measurements. This helps when integrating with LabVIEW Test Stand.
TCP/IP control uses a JSON data format so that commands return information in a format that is easily parsed
by any programming language.

You can receive test data and results

SoundCheck sequences can be opened and run through this API, but not modified

Only one connection to SoundCheck can be used at any time
Setup

Click Edit on the Main Screen and select Preferences.

Select the Advanced tab

Check Enable TCP/IP Server. This automatically
updates the SoundCheck 16.0.ini file with the Enable
status and Port #.
Window Security
The first time you enable Telnet in SoundCheck Preferences, you
may get a Windows Security Alert prompting you to allow
SoundCheck to communicate on the selected network.
Click Allow Access and continue.
Figure 34-1: Advanced Tab
Manual Setup
The “Enable TCP/IP” and “Port #” settings are stored in the SoundCheck 16.0.ini file found in the root of the
SoundCheck folder.
[External Control]

TCP IP SERVER ENABLED = TRUE or FALSE

TCP IP SERVER PORT # = 4444
These settings can be modified manually if necessary.
Server IP address
If running on the local computer this is “127.0.0.1” or “localhost”. If accessing a computer on the network, it is
the IP address of the target PC, e.g.: 192.168.0.107. You will need to know the IP address of the computers
running SoundCheck in order to control them over a network.
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Instrument Open Close Custom Step
When calling the new custom step from TCP IP the command should be formatted as:

Instruments.OpenVICFile(path, mute?)

Instruments.CloseAll()
Controlling SoundCheck with TELNET
Windows Telnet Setup
Windows users will need to enable Telnet. Telnet is enabled by default on Mac computers.
1. Click Start > Control Panel
2. Click Programs and Features
3. Click Turn Windows features on or off
4. In the Windows Features dialog box, check the Telnet Client check box
5. Click OK. The system installs the appropriate files. This will take a few seconds to a minute.
Using Telnet
1. Edit SoundCheck Preferences. See Setup on page 443.
2. Open SoundCheck 16.0
3. Mac OS

Use the Terminal editor

enter: “telnet localhost 4444” and hit Return
Figure 34-2: Mac Telnet Editor
Windows OS

Open a Command Line window

enter: “telnet localhost 4444” and hit Return
Figure 34-3: Windows
Telnet
4. “Connected to SoundCheck” confirms that the connection to
SoundCheck is complete.
Then it is a matter of entering commands with the proper syntax and then
executing them. See Command Set Definition on page 450 & Command
List and Return Format on page 451.
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Controlling SoundCheck with TCP/IP
Figure 34-4: Connected
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Run a Sequence and Retrieve Data
Now that you have connected to SoundCheck through Telnet, you can start to execute commands.
The following example covers manually opening a sequence, running a sequence from Telnet and retrieving
results.
1. From the SoundCheck File menu, open the Calibration/Self Test.sqc file.
(Later you'll learn how to do this from Telnet as well.)
2. Open Telnet as shown in Using Telnet on page 444.
Telnet should show: Connected to SoundCheck
3. To Run the sequence, type the following then hit
Enter/Return:
Sequence.Run
You will need to click on the SoundCheck window
and answer any prompts from the sequence.
4. Telnet returns a JSON response:
{"cmdCompleted":true,"returnData":...
Figure 34-5: Sequence.Run Example
The response format is defined in Command List
and Return Format on page 451.
5. After the sequence has run you can retrieve a curve using: Command: MemoryList.Get('Curve',
'Parameter'). See Memory List Commands on page 454.
6. Type the following and hit Enter/Return:
MemoryList.Get('Curve', 'Fundamental [Direct In 1]')
The JSON response is:
{"cmdCompleted":true,"returnType":"MemoryListCurve","returnData":{"Found":true,"Curve":{"Name":"F
undamental [Direct In1]","XData":[20000,16000,...,31.5,25,20],"Data":[0.3442260151137711,...,3.0393
952906618722],"ZData":"","XUnit":"Hz","YUnit":"V/
V","ZUnit":"deg.","XDataScale":"Lin","YDataScale":"dB","ZDataScale":"Lin","XdBRef":1,"YdBRef":1,"Z
dBRef":1,"XAxisScale":"Log","YAxisScale":"Lin","ZAxisScale":"Lin","Protected":false}},"errorType":"","e
rrorDescription":"","originalCommand":"MemoryList.Get('Curve', 'Fundamental [Direct In
1]')","resolvedCommand":"MemoryList- Get('Curve', 'Fundamental [Direct In 1]')"}
Every command sent via TCP/IP gets back a JSON formatted text string. The definitions for these are found in
Command Returns on page 450.
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C# Example App
This shows what can be created using C# and how it can be used to control SoundCheck.
The example executable is in the main SoundCheck folder:
C:\SoundCheck 16.0-x64\External Control Examples\C Sharp\Application\C Sharp Example.exe.
Figure 34-6: C# API Example
1. Run SoundCheck - Click “Select Executable” and navigate to: C:\SoundCheck 16.0x64\SoundCheck 16.0 (x64).exe. Click “Run SoundCheck”. You can also have SoundCheck running
and then open the C Sharp Example.exe.
Window State - Allows you to select how SoundCheck opens: Standard, Hidden or Minimized.
2. Connect to SoundCheck - Enter the IP Address and Port number of the PC to control, e.g.: 127.0.0.1
and 4444. Click “Connect to SoundCheck”.
These fields are disabled as soon as the app has connected to SoundCheck, and enabled again if it is
determined that the connection has been lost.
3. Open Sequence - Click “Select Sequence” and navigate to your sequence folder and select a
sequence, e.g.: Complete test.sqc
Click “Open Sequence” to load it into SoundCheck.
4. Set Lot Number - Click “Set Lot Number” to send data to the Lot Number field on the SoundCheck
Main Toolbar.
5. Set Serial Number - Click “Set Serial Number” to send data to SoundCheck
6. Click “Run Sequence”
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7. Curves - Allows you to query curves from the Memory List. This is only a preview window. It does not
allow you to view multiple curves with limits.
Steps - Shows the order of steps in
the sequence along with channel
settings and Limits results.
8. Click “Exit SoundCheck” when
finished
Log Window - This shows all of the
activity occurring with the C Sharp App.
LabVIEW Example App
The example app shows what can be created in LabVIEW to control SoundCheck.
It also works as a control panel to test the operation of the available commands.
The example executable is in the main SoundCheck folder:
C:\SoundCheck 16.0-x64\External Control Examples\LabVIEW\Application\LabVIEW Example.exe
The LabVIEW example uses the same Command Set Definition as the C# Sharp example. See Command Set
Definition on page 450 and Command List and Return Format on page 451.
Figure 34-7: LabVIEW API Example
Server IP address: If running on the local computer this is “127.0.0.1” or “localhost”. If accessing a computer
on the network, it is the IP address of the target PC, e.g.: 192.168.0.107. You will need to know the IP address
of the computers running SoundCheck in order to control them over a network.
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Port: Port number of the selected SoundCheck system
Connected: Shows that the selected system is responding
Commands: List of available commands and the proper syntax to use when entering the command
Command: Enter a command from the list and click Execute Command
Return Data: Defines the format for each of the listed data types
It shows information based on the most recently run MemoryList Command, e.g.: “MemoryList.GetAllData”
shows the data fields in Figure 34-7. The Up/Down arrows to the left of each data type allow you to cycle
through the data from the sequence run.
Response Details: Shows if a command completed and the type of data returned as well as showing details
on errors.
Response JSON: Shows the data contents of the Response JSON. See Command Returns on page 450.
Each data return type has a uniform standard which is defined in Command List and Return Format on page
451.
LabVIEW Return Library
Located in C:\SoundCheck 16.0-x64\API\LabVIEW Return Library
This collection of VIs is included to help you get data out of the JSON Response.
Note:
448
LabVIEW 2016 or later is required to use these VIs.
Controlling SoundCheck with TCP/IP
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Python Example
Python is an object-oriented scripting language that
offers some advantages over C++.
The example included with SoundCheck shows off
the simplicity of SoundCheck control via Python.

Compatible with Python 2 and 3.
The example script included with SoundCheck will:

Open SoundCheck

Automatically run the “Complete Test” sequence

After the sequence is complete, results are passed back to the python script for further processing
Requirements
Before running the Python script you will need to:

Uncheck “Run Setup Wizard” in Preferences > Startup

Uncheck “Show Quick Start” in Preferences > Startup

Uncheck “Show Login Window on Startup” in Preferences > Login

Check “Enable TCP/IP Server” in Preferences > Advanced

See Preferences on page 35 for more information
From a Command Line, run the Python script by calling:
"python <SoundCheck root>\External Control Examples\Python\Scripts\ SimpleSoundCheckExample.py"
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Command Set Definition
The commands sent to SoundCheck via TCP/IP must conform to these rules. This is used in C Sharp, Telnet or
any other communication method, via TCP/IP.

SoundCheck commands are built of period (.) separated command segments, where each segment
may take parameters

All parameters must be enclosed by single-quotation marks, a.k.a. apostrophe ('). This includes both
string and numeric values.

All commands must be completed with the \r\n (Carriage Return + Line Feed) sequence. You don’t
need to add these when using Telnet or any other terminal app that automatically adds Carriage
Return & Line Feed.
Please note that you will need to do this only when programming your own TCP interface for sending
commands to SoundCheck.

The parentheses after a command are only needed if the command needs parameters. If there are no
parameters associated with a command or command segment, and parentheses are added anyway,
SoundCheck will ignore them.

Commands ARE case sensitive
Command Returns
Every command sent gets back a JSON formatted text string with
the following fields:

cmdCompleted: true or false
True indicates that the command was recognized as a valid
SoundCheck command and was executed to completion. If
the command is not recognized, it times out, or there is an
error while trying to execute the command, cmdCompleted will be false. It does not indicate what the
result was, e.g.: Sequence.Save - cmdCompleted = true can be returned even if the sequence is
marked “Read Only” and cannot be saved.

returnData - This field contains the data that is returned by SoundCheck after executing a command.
This may be the result of a query, e.g.: Sequence.GetName, or it may indicate if a requested operation
successfully completed, e.g.: SoundCheck.SetSerialNumber. returnData will be different for each
command.
See Command List and Return Format on page 451.

returnType - This field indicates the data type of the returnData, e.g.: Boolean, String, StringArray, etc.

errorType - If an error occurs, this field shows the error type, e.g.: Timeout, Unknown Command, etc.

errorDescription - If an error occurs, this field shows the error description

originalCommand - This is the original command that was sent to SoundCheck

resolvedCommand - This is the actual resolved command that SoundCheck executed
originalCommand and resolvedCommand fields are provided for troubleshooting.
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Command List and Return Format
The following legend may be used to determine the data type of a field by examining the value in the example
JSON data, returned by SoundCheck API.
For example, if you see “false” in the result, you can interpret that as a Boolean, which may be either false or
true.
Data Type
Value
Boolean
String
String (with three possible values: "a", "b", or "c")
Number (Integer)
Number (Double)
false
"string"
"a/b/c"
0
0.1
The following list of commands are currently available for use with SoundCheck. Every command issued gets
back a Return. Some Returns show as “Void” which simply means that no data was returned. An
acknowledgment is still returned indicating that the command completed.
SoundCheck Commands
Command/Parameter
Command: SoundCheck.SetLoginLevel('Parameter')
Return Data
Void
Parameter: Login level (0, 1, or 2)
0 = Engineer, 1 = Technician, 2 = Operator
Description: Used to set the user login level
Command: SoundCheck.SetUserName('Parameter')
Void
Parameter: User Name
Description: Used to set the user name of the currently logged in user
Command: SoundCheck.SetSerialNumber('Parameter')
Void
Parameter: Serial Number
Description: Used to set the serial number of the device under test
Command: SoundCheck.SetLotNumber('Parameter')
Void
Parameter: Lot Number
Description: Used to set the lot number for a batch of devices to be tested
Command: SoundCheck.GetLoginLevel
{"Value":0}
Parameter: None
Description: Used to get the login level of the currently logged in user. It
returns an integer: 0 = Engineer, 1 = Technician, 2 = Operator.
Command: SoundCheck.GetLotNumber
{"Value":"String"}
Parameter: None
Description: Used to get the lot number of the batch of devices currently
being tested
Command: SoundCheck.GetSerialNumber
{"Value":"String"}
Parameter: None
Description: Used to get the serial number for the device under test
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Command/Parameter
Command: SoundCheck.GetUserName
Return Data
{"Value":"String"}
Parameter: None
Description: Used to get the user name of the currently logged in user
Command: SoundCheck.GetLicenseStatus
{"Valid":false,"KeyID":"String"}
Parameter: None
Description: Used to get the license status of SoundCheck. It indicates
whether a valid hardware key was found, and if so, what the key ID is.
Command: SoundCheck.GetStatus
{"Busy":false}
Parameter: None
Description: Used to query SoundCheck for its status and determine if
SoundCheck is busy, or available to execute a command such as, run a
sequence.
Command: SoundCheck.Exit
Void
Parameter: None
Description: Used to request SoundCheck to exit.
Command: SoundCheck.SetFloatStrings('Parameter1','Parameter2','Parameter3')
Void
Parameter:
1.
String representing "Not a Number"
2.
String representing "Positive Infinity"
3.
String representing "Negative Infinity"
Description: For floating point numbers, SoundCheck uses "NaN" for "Not
a Number", "Infinity" for "Positive Infinity", and "-Infinity" for "Negative Infinity". If your programming environment use different strings to represent these
values, send this command with all three parameters.
For example, for clients written in Python and Matlab will need to send SetFloatStrings('NaN', 'Inf', '-Inf'). JavaScript does not support any of these values, so the command should be SetFloatStrings('null','null','null').
A client written in any language that uses "NaN", "Infinity", and "-Infinity",
which are the same strings that SoundCheck uses, does not need to send
the SetFloatStrings command, if it is the only TCP client connecting to
SoundCheck.
Command: Instruments.OpenVICFile(path, mute?)
Void
Parameter:
1.
‘x:\file path\VicFile.vic’
2.
‘TRUE’ or ‘FALSE’
Command: Instruments.CloseAll()
Parameter: None
Description: Allows you to open and close virtual instrument configuration
files (.VIC)
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Sequence Commands
Command/Parameter
Command: Sequence.Open('Parameter')
Return Data
{"Value":false}
Parameter: Sequence Path
Description: Used to request SoundCheck to open a
sequence. If a sequence is already open, SoundCheck
may display a dialog to save or discard the existing
sequence. That dialog needs to be closed for this command to complete, otherwise it will time out.
Command: Sequence.Run or
{
Sequence.Run('Parameter')
"Success?": false,
Optional Parameter: Timeout in milliseconds
"Pass?": false,
"Margin": 0.1,
Description: Used to request SoundCheck to run the
currently open sequence. SoundCheck has a default
timeout of 5 minutes to run a sequence. If a longer
sequence needs to be run, the optional timeout may be
included. For example, for a timeout of 10 minutes, the
command will be:
"StepResults": [{
"Evaluated": false,
"Verdict": false,
"Margin": 0.1,
Sequence.Run('600000')
"Limit": "String",
"Max/Min": "String"
}]
}
{"Value":false}
Command: Sequence.Save
Parameter: None
Description: Used to request SoundCheck to save the
currently open sequence.
Command: Sequence.GetDuration
{"Value":0.1}
Parameter: None
Description: Used to get the duration of the last run
sequence.
Command: Sequence.GetName
{"Value":"String"}
Parameter: None
Description: Used to get the name of the currently
open sequence.
Command: Sequence.GetPath
{"Value":"String"}
Parameter: None
Description: Used to get the path of the currently
open sequence.
Command: Sequence.GetStepsList
[{
Parameter: None
"Name": "String",
Description: Used to get a list of all the steps in the
currently open sequence.
"Type": "String",
"InputChannelNames": ["String"],
"OutputChannelNames": ["String"]
}]
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Memory List Commands
Command/Parameter
Command: MemoryList.GetAllNames
Return Data
{
Parameter: None
"Curves": ["String"],
Description: Used to get names of all curves,
values, results, and waveforms in the Memory
List
"Values": ["String"],
"Results": ["String"],
"Waveforms": ["String"]
}
{
Command:
MemoryList.Get('Curve', 'Parameter')
"Found": false,
Parameter: Curve Name
"Curve": {
"Name": "String",
Description: Used to get data for a specific
curve from the Memory List. The response indicates whether or not the curve was found, and
its data, if found.
"XData": [0.1],
"YData": [0.1],
"ZData": [0.1],
"XUnit": "String",
"YUnit": "String",
"ZUnit": "String",
"XDataScale": "dB/Lin/Pwr",
"YDataScale": "dB/Lin/Pwr",
"ZDataScale": "dB/Lin/Pwr",
"XdBRef": 0.1,
"YdBRef": 0.1,
"ZdBRef": 0.1,
"XAxisScale": "Log/Lin",
"YAxisScale": "Log/Lin",
"ZAxisScale": "Log/Lin",
"Protected": false
}
}
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Command/Parameter
Command:
Return Data
{
MemoryList.Get('Value', 'Parameter')
"Found": false,
Parameter: Value Name
"Value": {
"Name": "String",
Description: Used to get data for a specific
value from the Memory List. The response indicates whether or not the value was found, and
its data, if found.
"XData": 0.1,
"YData": 0.1,
"ZData": 0.1,
"XUnit": "String",
"YUnit": "String",
"ZUnit": "String",
"XDataScale": "dB/Lin/Pwr",
"YDataScale": "dB/Lin/Pwr",
"ZDataScale": "dB/Lin/Pwr",
"XdBRef": 0.1,
"YdBRef": 0.1,
"ZdBRef": 0.1,
"Protected": false
}
}
{
Command:
MemoryList.Get('Result', 'Parameter')
"Found": false,
Parameter: Result Name
"Result": {
"Name": "String",
Description: Used to get data for a specific
result from the Memory List. The response indicates whether or not the result was found, and
its data, if found.
"Passed": false,
"Limit": "String",
"Unit": "String",
"Scale": "String",
"Max/Min": "String",
"Margin": 0.1,
"Protected": false
}
}
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455
Command/Parameter
Return Data
{
Command:
MemoryList.Get('Waveform', 'Parameter')
"Found": false,
Parameter: Waveform Name
"Waveform": {
"Name": "String",
Description: Used to get data for a specific
waveform from the Memory List. The response
indicates whether or not the waveform was
found, and its data, if found.
"Waveform": {
"X0": 0.1,
"dX": 0.1,
"YData": [0.1]
},
"XUnit": "String",
"YUnit": "String",
"YDataScale": "dB/Lin/Pwr",
"YdBRef": 0.1,
"YAxisScale": "Log/Lin",
"Overload?": false,
"Protected": false
}
Command: MemoryList.GetAllData
Parameter: None
Description: Used to get data for all curves,
values, results, and waveforms in the Memory
List
}
{
"Curves":[<See data format for "Curve" in Return Data for
MemoryList.Get('Curve', 'Parameter')>],
"Values":[<See data format for "Value" in Return Data for
MemoryList.Get('Value', 'Parameter')>],
"Results":[<See data format for "Result" in Return Data for
MemoryList.Get('Result', 'Parameter')>],
"Waveforms":[<See data format for "Waveform" in Return
Data for MemoryList.Get('Waveform', 'Parameter')>]
}
Hardware Commands
Command/Parameter
Command: Hardware.Object('Parameter1').SetAddress(' Parameter2')
Return Data
Void
Parameter:
1.
Bluetooth Device Name - BTC device ID (e.g. 'BTC1')
2.
Bluetooth Address - (e.g. 'AA:BB:CC:DD:EE:FF')
Description: Used to set the bluetooth address for a Portland Tool & Die
BTC (or BQC) device
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Controlling SoundCheck with TCP/IP
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Controlling SoundCheck® From ActiveX - DEPRECATED
Important! ActiveX control is being replaced by TCP/IP control. Please refer to Controlling SoundCheck
with TCP/IP on page 443 for more information. The following information is provided for legacy purposes and
to assist with converting existing ActiveX controls to TCP/IP.
ActiveX Control - Legacy Examples (Windows Only)

You can run SoundCheck test sequences from any programming language that supports ActiveX

You can receive test data and results

SoundCheck is opened in this process, but the SoundCheck window can be hidden

SoundCheck sequences can be opened and run in this mode, but not modified

A valid Hardware Key is required to register ActiveX components during SoundCheck installation. The
Hardware Key is not required to use ActiveX in Demo Mode.
Important!
Please make sure only one version of SoundCheck is installed on the
computer before using ActiveX control. Otherwise, the wrong version might
get called.
In terms of Microsoft’s® Component Object Model (COM), SoundCheck is an ActiveX Server, while the
software to control SoundCheck is an ActiveX Client. It is important that the developer be familiar with these
programming concepts before attempting to use SoundCheck’s API. Listen, Inc. does not provide a static
library to link to.
Examples are in included in the SoundCheck installation folder: C:\SoundCheck 16.0\External Control
Examples\_Legacy ActiveX Examples

Visual Basic (2010): See Visual Basic Example on page 458

C#: See C # Example on page 459
LabVIEW’s ActiveX Library
SoundCheck is written in LabVIEW. There are many ways to programmatically obtain SoundCheck's ActiveX
object, but the most efficient way is to import its Type Library into your project. The SoundCheck program
folder contains a file: "SoundCheck 16.0.tlb". This is the SoundCheck Type Library which contains a superset
of LabVIEW 2016, plus SoundCheck’s interfaces. You add the TLB as a reference into your project.
The main ActiveX interface used to control SoundCheck is the Call Method of the VI object. The Call Method
defines inputs to a VI, runs the VI, and then receives the outputs from the VI. The Call is synchronous, so your
program execution will stay on that line of code until the Call is completed.
Starting Up SoundCheck
SoundCheck can be started via a shell object as a command line invocation, or when the COM object is
created. In our examples, ActiveX is not used to start SoundCheck. Instead, a Windows® "command line"
command is used.
Example: In Visual Basic the line of code is: Shell "C:\SoundCheck 16.0\SoundCheck 16.0.exe"
If your SoundCheck folder is not in the root directory, replace the beginning of the path, with the path to the
SoundCheck folder on your system.
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457
Command Line Options
SoundCheck interprets three command line options:

-m – Minimize SoundCheck immediately after it starts up (SoundCheck main screen is accessible)

-h – Hide the SoundCheck Main Screen so that it cannot be brought into view even by clicking the
SoundCheck task bar button (Prevents access to the SoundCheck main screen options)
Note:
The only restriction on these options is that -m and -h cannot be used together.
Visual Basic Example

The example executable file can be run to show its general use. The source code files are included in
the example folder.

C:\SoundCheck 16.0\External Control Examples\_Legacy ActiveX Examples\VB2010 Example.exe
This line of code is used to start SoundCheck. The Main window is hidden.
Shell """C:\SoundCheck 16.0\SoundCheck 16.0.exe"" -h -s"
Figure 35-1: Visual Basic Panel

Select Command Options:

None - SoundCheck opens in a normal window

Hidden - SoundCheck is hidden from view

Minimized - SoundCheck is opened but the window is minimized
1. Select SoundCheck version to run - SoundCheck 16.0, then click Run SoundCheck
2. Select sequence to open - ActiveX & Test Stand example, then click Open Sequence
3. Enter Serial Number and click Set Serial Number
4. Enter Lot Number and click Set Lot Number
5. Click Run Sequence - Get Curve Names
6. Click Exit SoundCheck to close
458
Controlling SoundCheck From ActiveX - DEPRECATED
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
C # Example

The example executable file can be run to show its
general use. The source code files are included in
the example folder.

C:\SoundCheck 16.0\External Control
Examples\_Legacy ActiveX Examples\C
Sharp\Application\C Sharp Example.exe
1. Launch SoundCheck. Check SoundCheck Main
Screen and dismiss open dialog windows.
2. Press any key to load sequence. Check
SoundCheck Main Screen and dismiss open
dialog windows.
Figure 35-2: C # Example
3. Run Sequence
Creating the VI ActiveX Object and Calling SoundCheck
Here are some Visual Basic lines of code that illustrate how to create the VI object you need and then how to
use it to communicate with SoundCheck.
Only paramValues (0) is an input to ControlSC.vi. You must set the remaining seven paramValues to dummy
values prior to making the Call. After the Call returns, paramValues (1) through (7) will contain values returned
by the VI.
Set lvApp = CreateObject("SoundCheck111.Application")
lvPath = "ControlSC.vi"
Set lvVI = lvApp.GetVIReference(lvPath)
paramNames(0) = "Command"
paramNames(1) = "Success?"
paramNames(2) = "Pass?"
paramNames(3) = "Margin"
paramNames(4) = "Table"
paramNames(5) = "Xdatapoints"
paramNames(6) = "Ydatapoints"
paramNames(7) = "Zdatapoints"
paramValues(0) = "serial " & txtSerialNum
paramValues(1) = False
paramValues(2) = False
paramValues(3) = 0#
paramValues(4) = ""
paramValues(5) = ""
paramValues(6) = ""
paramValues(7) = ""
lvVI.Call paramNames, paramValues
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Controlling SoundCheck From ActiveX - DEPRECATED
459
API Specification (Windows)
SoundCheck’s ControlSC.vi
The VI that you Call is ControlSC.vi, which is embedded in the application's executable file. ControlSC.vi has
the following inputs and outputs (not all outputs are returned by every command):
Parameter /
Function
Input or
Output?
Type
Description
[0] - Command
Input
string
One of seven commands directing SoundCheck perform an action. The
command word may be followed by parameters that are separated by
spaces, all in the same string.
[1] - Success?
Output
boolean
Tells whether or not the command and action were successful.
[2] - Pass?
Output
boolean
Tells whether or not the test sequence passed or failed overall, typically
as configured in the final Display Step.
[3] - Margin
Output
double float
The margin of Pass or Fail in the last Limits Step of a test sequence.
[4] - Table
Output
string
Multi-purpose table of information, in standard tab-delimited spreadsheet format, in which columns are separated by tabs and rows are
separated by CR-LF.
[5] - Xdatapoints
Output
array of
double floats
Array of X values of requested data curve.
Example: Frequency in Hz.
[6] - Ydatapoints
Output
array of
double floats
Array of Y values of requested data curve.
Example: Magnitude in dB.
[7] - Zdatapoints
Output
array of
double floats
Array of Z values of requested data curve.
Example: Phase in deg.
Common Properties of the Success? Returned Parameter
For all seven commands, the "Success?" parameter returns a FALSE if SoundCheck was busy or if the
command was not understood.
For example, SoundCheck is busy and cannot process any commands if it is not finished processing
the last command that was sent or a test sequence is running.
If "Success?" returns a FALSE, SoundCheck is probably busy, and therefore it is suggested practice to reissue
the command until Success? = True.
Note:
460
Do not reissue the command more than about 10 times, which should take a total of less than one
second.
Controlling SoundCheck From ActiveX - DEPRECATED
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
The Seven Commands of the “Command” Input
1. Open - Action: Loads a desired test sequence into SoundCheck and prepares it for execution.
Unloads the previously loaded sequence. If this command is not issued, SoundCheck will load its
default sequence at start-up.
Parameter /
Function
Input
Output
Remarks
[0] - Command
“open <sqc>”
string
<sqc> must contain full path of sequence file
[1] - Success?
FALSE
boolean
TRUE if the requested sequence was opened successfully. FALSE if:

Opening a sequence not currently permitted
[2] - Pass?
FALSE
[3] - Margin
0.0#
[4] - Table
NULL
boolean

Sequence file not found or path invalid

Sequence file corrupt

One or more steps in the sequence not found or is corrupt
Not used, but input should still be initialized to FALSE
Not used, input value should be zero.
string
Table – One row for each step in the sequence. Four columns, as follows:

Output channel

Input channel

Step category (3-letter abbreviation)

Step name
[5] - Xdatapoints
NULL
Not used
[6] - Ydatapoints
NULL
Not used
[7] - Zdatapoints
NULL
Not used
Example: open C:\SoundCheck 16.0\Sequences\Loudspeakers\Fundamental.sqc
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461
2. Lot - Action: Sets the Lot Number in SoundCheck. This Lot Number will remain in force until it is
changed.
Parameter /
Function
Input
Output
Remarks
[0] - Command
“lot <number>”
string
<number> - any alphanumeric characters
[1] - Success?
FALSE
boolean
TRUE if the Lot Number was set successfully
[2] - Pass?
FALSE
boolean
Not used; but input should still be initialized to FALSE
[3] - Margin
0.0#
double float
Not used; input value should be zero
[4] - Table
NULL
string
Table – One row for each step in the sequence. Four
columns, as follows:

Output channel

Input channel

Step category (3-letter abbreviation)

Step name
[5] - Xdatapoints
NULL
Not used
[6] - Ydatapoints
NULL
Not used
[7] - Zdatapoints
NULL
Not used
Example: lot SC200108
3. Serial - Action: Sets the Serial Number in SoundCheck. This Serial Number will remain in force until it
is changed (the sequence may be configured to change it as well).
Parameter /
Function
Input
Output
Remarks
[0] - Command
“serial <sn>”
string
<sn> - serial number (any alphanumeric characters)
[1] - Success?
FALSE
boolean
TRUE if the Serial Number was set successfully.
[2] - Pass?
FALSE
boolean
Not used; but input should still be initialized to FALSE
[3] - Margin
0.0#
double float
Not used; input value should be zero.
[4] - Table
NULL
Not used
[5] - Xdatapoints
NULL
Not used
[6] - Ydatapoints
NULL
Not used
[7] - Zdatapoints
NULL
Not used
Example: serial LSX00844
462
Controlling SoundCheck From ActiveX - DEPRECATED
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
4. Run - Action: Runs the test sequence currently loaded in SoundCheck.
Parameter /
Function
Input
Output
Remarks
[0] - Command
“run”
string
[1] - Success?
FALSE
boolean
TRUE if the sequence ran to completion, regardless of whether or not it
passed.
FALSE if running a sequence not currently permitted, or Sequence aborted
at some point.
[2] - Pass?
FALSE
boolean
TRUE if sequence passes
[3] - Margin
0.0#
double float
Overall margin
[4] - Table
NULL
string
One row for each step in the sequence. Three columns, as follows:
- Pass or FAIL
- Margin
- Limit-Max/Min info
[5] - Xdatapoints
NULL
Not used
[6] - Ydatapoints
NULL
Not used
[7] - Zdatapoints
NULL
Not used
5. Names - Action: Returns a list of curve names generated by the last test sequence run. If no
sequence was run or if the sequence did not generate any curves, the list is empty.
Parameter /
Function
Input
Output
Remarks
[0] - Command
“names”
string
[1] - Success?
FALSE
boolean
TRUE if a list of curve names was returned, even if it was empty.
[2] - Pass?
FALSE
boolean
TRUE if sequence passes
[3] - Margin
0.0#
double
float
Not used
[4] - Table
NULL
string
One column: the curve names
[5] - Xdatapoints
NULL
Not used
[6] - Ydatapoints
NULL
Not used
[7] - Zdatapoints
NULL
Not used
Command string: names
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463
6. Curve - Action: Returns a binary representation of the data from the requested curve, and other curve
info.
Parameter /
Function
Input
Output
Remarks
[0] - Command
“curve <cn>”
string
<cn> - curve name obtained from “names” command
[1] - Success?
FALSE
boolean
TRUE if the requested data was returned.
FALSE if the requested curve was not found among the curves generated by
the last sequence run.
[2] - Pass?
FALSE
boolean
Not used
[3] - Margin
0.0#
double
float
Not used
[4] - Table
NULL
string
17 rows, 2 columns. A table of information about the data values including
units and log scaling. The first column contains the item names, the second
column the item values:
N points - number of data points in the curve
X data - "dB" or "lin"
Y data - "dB" or "lin"
Z data - "dB" or "lin"
X axis - "log" or "lin"
Y axis - "log" or "lin"
Z axis - "log" or "lin"
X unit - such as "Hz"
Y unit - such as "Pa", "V" (floating point numbers are used so prefixes
such as mV are not used)
Z unit - such as "deg"
X dB ref - dB reference, in floating point or scientific notation
Y dB ref - dB reference, in floating point or scientific notation
Z dB ref - dB reference, in floating point or scientific notation
Single val? - "True" or "False", True meaning that only the Y value of
only the first data point is of interest.
[5] - Xdatapoints
NULL
double
float array
Xdatapoints
[6] - Ydatapoints
NULL
double
float array
Ydatapoints
[7] - Zdatapoints
NULL
double
float array
Zdatapoints
Example: “curve Fundamental [L]”
464
Controlling SoundCheck From ActiveX - DEPRECATED
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
7. Exit - Action: Exit SoundCheck. SoundCheck and LabVIEW Run-Time will quit and close.
Parameter /
Function
Input
Output
Remarks
[0] - Command
“exit”
string
[1] - Success?
FALSE
boolean
TRUE if SoundCheck started exiting.
[2] - Pass?
FALSE
boolean
Not used
[3] - Margin
0.0#
double
float
Not used
[4] - Table
NULL
Not used
[5] - Xdatapoints
NULL
Not used
[6] - Ydatapoints
NULL
Not used
[7] - Zdatapoints
NULL
Not used
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Controlling SoundCheck From ActiveX - DEPRECATED
465
Page Intentionally Left Blank
466
Controlling SoundCheck From ActiveX - DEPRECATED
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Database Setup for use with SoundCheck
Note:
This requires optional module 2010 - Save to Database.
Important! As of SoundCheck 8, the procedure for setting up a database has changed. The following
instructions should be reviewed even if you already have a database working with
SoundCheck.
Important!
As of SoundCheck 13, SoundCheck x86 requires 32 bit Access/SQL drivers for 32 bit
databases. SoundCheck x64 requires 64 bit Access/SQL drivers for 64 bit databases. You
cannot run 32 and 64 bit databases at the same time on a computer.
Creating an ODBC Connection for MS Access
ODBC Connection Rules
Windows 64 bit OS:
In Windows 64 bit you have the choice of using 64 bit SoundCheck and Access or 32 bit SoundCheck and
Access. The “bitness” of both must match.
SoundCheck 64 bit - You must use a 64 bit version of MS Access along with the 64 bit ODBC tool.

The 64-bit version of the Odbcad32.exe file is located in the %systemdrive%\Windows\System32
folder (both files are named Odbcad32.exe but they are not the same)

NOTE: The default installation of MS Office is 32 bit. You will need to install MS Office 64 bit
instead.
SoundCheck 32 bit - You must use a 32 bit version of MS Access along with the 32 bit ODBC tool.

The 32-bit version of the Odbcad32.exe file is located in: %systemdrive%\Windows\SysWoW64 folder
Windows 32 bit OS:
In Windows 32 bit you must use the 32 bit versions of all programs noted above.
As of SoundCheck 13, SoundCheck x86 requires 32 bit Access/SQL drivers for 32 bit databases. SoundCheck
x64 requires 64 bit Access/SQL drivers for 64 bit databases. You cannot run 32 and 64 bit databases at the
same time on a computer.
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Instruction Manual
Database Setup for use with SoundCheck
467
Example Database
Rather than set up your own database, please use the one included with SoundCheck.

Copy "C:\SoundCheck 16.0\Database\Blank SoundCheck Database.mdb" and paste it in the desired
location.

Rename it so it is relevant to your application.

Next, point your ODBC driver to it. The file must not be set to Ready Only.
If you start from our blank database, you will not need to open Access to start writing to the database.
32 bit Example:

Using SoundCheck 32 bit with MS Office 2010 (or later) 32 bit installed

Copy "Blank SoundCheck Database.mdb" to "SoundCheck Test.mdb". The default location is:
C:\SoundCheck 16.0\Database.

Open the 32 bit ODBC from
C:\Windows\SysWoW64\odbcad32.exe.

(The 32-bit version of the Odbcad32.exe file is located
in: %systemdrive%\Windows\SysWoW64

See Figure 36-1

Click the System DSN tab

Click Add to create a new DSN

Select the Microsoft Access Driver from the list and click
Finish
Figure 36-1: Create DSN

In the Data Source Name field enter "SoundCheck DSN"

In the Database section click Select

Navigate to the location of your .MDB file:
"C:\SoundCheck 16.0\Database\SoundCheck Test.mdb"

Click OK to exit out of the open editor windows
Figure 36-2: Select MDB
468
Database Setup for use with SoundCheck
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual

Open the default sequence, "C:\SoundCheck
16.0\Sequences\How To examples\Autosave.sqc"

Edit the Autosave to DB step and enter "SoundCheck
DSN" as the DSN name. Do not browse to the .MDB file.

Run the sequence and store data to the Access
database. Use Access to look at the Datarun_Table to
confirm that data was written.
Figure 36-3: Autosave to DB
Relationship of Access Tables for SoundCheck
Figure 36-4 shows the relationship of tables in an Access database used with SoundCheck.
Figure 36-4: Table Relationships - SoundCheck Database
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Instruction Manual
Database Setup for use with SoundCheck
469
Supported Databases
SoundCheck’s Autosave feature currently supports the following databases:

Microsoft Access 2003, 2007, 2010, 2013 (*.MDB files)

Microsoft SQL Server 2005, 2008, 2014 and 2016

See 64 bit vs 32 bit ODBC Connection Rules on page 467
Database Setup Steps
You need to perform the following steps in order to make a successful database connection:
1. Determine the required “bitness” of the programs used. See ODBC Connection Rules on page 467.
2. Determine the data store
3. Ensure that the data store contains the correct schema
4. Create the appropriate connection descriptor
5. Configure SoundCheck to use this descriptor
Determining the Data Store
The following data storage scenarios are supported:

Local data storage

Remote data storage
Local storage means that data is stored on a hard disk of the computer running SoundCheck. SoundCheck
can write to an Access database file (mdb) or to a local database such as SQL Server Express.
As a rule of thumb, if you want to set up a quick way of saving data for your own use and are familiar with MS
Access, then use a .MDB file. If you need System Administrators’ assistance in setting up the database, or you
plan on integrating this data into your enterprise, then SQL Server would be more appropriate.
Choosing MS Access for Local Storage
Installation of MS Access drivers (also known as Jet 4.0 Database Engine) is required for interfacing to .MDB
files. These drivers can be downloaded separately as 2007 Office System Driver: Data Connectivity
Components:
https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=23734
The MS Access application is not required to be installed for writing to a .MDB file, but you do need it to create
a new .MDB file.
Rather than set up your own database, please use the one included with SoundCheck. See Creating an
ODBC Connection for MS Access on page 467.
Make sure that the file is on a local disk, not a shared network disk, as this will significantly affect performance.
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Database Setup for use with SoundCheck
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
SQL Server for Local Storage
If you choose SQL Server Express, the database engine must be installed. SQL Server Express is freely
distributed by Microsoft at no cost.
Select SQL Server Express 32 bit or 64 bit depending on the “bitness” of the database application you will be
using. See ODBC Connection Rules on page 467.
Creating a Schema for Local Storage
1. Open a command prompt window, e.g Start Menu > Run… and type cmd.exe
2. Execute command: cd C:\SoundCheck 16.0\database (change path to your SoundCheck install
folder)
3. Execute command: sqlcmd -S localhost\SQLExpress -i createSchema.sql
“SQLExpress” is the default name created in the installation of SQL Server Express. If you use a
different name in the installation, you must use that same name here.
SQL Server for Remote Storage
Remote storage means that the data will be stored outside the computer, which must be connected to a
network. If this scenario matches your environment, you would need to know the following information:

The name of the database server

The name of the database table

The authentication parameters (account name and password)
No database software is required for remote storage, but drivers are required.
Since SQL Server is an enterprise class database, its installation should be performed by a qualified Database
Administrator (DBA), and is beyond the scope of this document. It is recommended that the SQL script included
in the SoundCheck Database folder, createSchema.sql, be forwarded to the DBA for installation. The DBA
may need to modify the script to accommodate your company’s database administration policy.
Creating the Connection Descriptor
Regardless of data store, SoundCheck relies upon Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) or Universal Data
Links (UDL) to describe how database connections are to be established. The descriptor specifies where the
storage is, and which driver SoundCheck will use to communicate with the database.
About DSN
A Data Source Name (DSN) descriptor is required for database connections using ODBC drivers. A DSN can
be of System, User or File types. Choose System DSN if you are not sure which one to use.
About UDL
A UDL descriptor is required for database connections using OLE DB drivers, as well as ODBC drivers. Like a
File DSN, UDL connection parameters are stored as a connection string in a text file.
DSN or UDL?
SoundCheck can use either set of drivers to connect to a database. Which set you will use would most likely
come from other software requirements, if any. For example, there may be a 3rd party application that requires
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Database Setup for use with SoundCheck
471
one or the other, and SoundCheck can use the same drivers to ease deployment. Sometimes a DSN would
already be created for you by your IT department.
The most straightforward method is to create a UDL file.
Creating a UDL Definition for SQL Server
Follow these directions to create an UDL file that connects to SQL Server (any edition).
1. Make sure that a database that contains SoundCheck’s schema has
been created and available on the network. If you are using local
storage, make sure that SQL Server Express is installed and
schema created.
2. Create a new Microsoft Data Link file from Windows Explorer. If this
choice is not available, you can create an empty text file and rename
it with a .udl extension. The file will then be displayed as Microsoft
Data Link document.
3. Double-click the .udl file. The Data Link Properties dialog is
displayed.
4. Click on the Provider tab as in Figure 36-5.
Figure 36-5: Provider Tab
5. Select Microsoft OLE DB Provider for SQL Server.
6. Select Next > to go to the Connection tab.

Item 1: Select a server from the drop down list

Item 2: Select the Use Windows NT Integrated security radio
button, unless specified otherwise

Item 3: Select the database that contains the SoundCheck
schema (here the database is named SoundCheck Test) from
the drop down list
Figure 36-6: Connection
Tab
7. Select the Test Connection button. A success dialog is displayed.
472
Database Setup for use with SoundCheck
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Creating an ODBC Connection for SQL Server
If you have installed a 32 bit database program on a 64 bit OS, you have to use the 32 bit ODBC admin
tool (Odbcad32.exe) when configuring a database DSN for SoundCheck. Do not use the default 64 bit
version in the Windows control panel. See ODBC Connection Rules on page 467.
You have to choose the ODBC tool depending upon the bitness of the database you have installed.
Follow these directions to create a DSN that connects to SQL Server (any edition).
1. Make sure that a database that contains
SoundCheck’s schema has been created and
available on the network. If you are using local
storage, make sure that SQL Server Express is
installed and schema created.
2. Open OBDC Data Source Administrator from the
Control Panel. Administrative Tools > Setup Data
sources (ODBC)
3. Select System DSN tab. Select Add… button. The
Create New Data Source dialog is displayed:
4. Select SQL Server from the list.
5. Select Finish. The Create a New Data Source to
SQL Server dialog is displayed as in Figure 36-7.
Figure 36-7: New Data Source
6. Enter a name and description of your choice for the data
source as shown in Figure 36-8.
7. In the Server drop down list, select (local) for local
storage, or select the database server on the network.
8. Do not click Finish. Select Next > to open Login
verification.
Figure 36-8: Wizard Screen 1
9. The wizard prompts to determine how SQL Server
should verify the network login as shown in Figure 36-9.
Select Next > to accept the defaults, or consult your IT
administrator.
Figure 36-9: Wizard Screen 2
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Database Setup for use with SoundCheck
473
10. The next dialog in the wizard appears Figure 36-10.
11. Check “Change the default database to:” and select
the database that contains the SoundCheck schema
(here the database is named SoundCheck Simple)
from the drop down list
Figure 36-10: Wizard Screen 3
12. Select Next. The next dialog in the wizard appears
Figure 36-11.
13. Unless specified by your IT administrator, use the
defaults.
Figure 36-11: Wizard Screen 4
14. Select Finish. A summary dialog is displayed Figure
36-12.
Figure 36-12: Summary
Dialog
474
Database Setup for use with SoundCheck
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
15. Select Test Data Source to make sure the configuration works. A
confirmation dialog is displayed as in Figure 36-13.
16. Select OK to dismiss close the windows. The new data source will
be listed in the System DSN tab:
Figure 36-13: Test Dialog
17. Select OK to close the OBDC Data Source Administrator.
Figure 36-14: New System DSN
18. In the Autosave Step you can select the .udl file from the
beginning of this example.
Figure 36-15: Select UDL in
Autosave
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Database Setup for use with SoundCheck
475
Creating a UDL Definition for MS Access
1. Create a new Microsoft Data Link file from Windows Explorer. If this
choice is not available, you can create an empty text file and rename
it with a .udl extension. The file will then be displayed as Microsoft
Data Link document.
2. If you are using a 64 bit Windows operating system, the provider tab
will not show the Microsoft Jet 4.0 OLE DB Provider or Microsoft
Office 12.0 Access Database Engine OLE DB Provider. This is
because they are 32 bit database providers.
To make 32 bit providers display in the Provider tab, follow these
steps:
a
Navigate to Start>All Programs>Accessories>Command Prompt
b
Type the following command:
C:\Windows\syswow64\rundll32.exe "C:\Program Files
(x86)\Common Files\System\Ole DB\oledb32.dll", OpenDSLFile
C:\SoundCheck 16.0\Database\SoundCheck Test.udl.
Figure 36-16: Provider Tab
c
C:\SoundCheck 16.0\Database\SoundCheck Test.udl is the file path to the UDL file you have
created. This will open the UDL file.
d
Click the Provider tab, the 32 bit database providers should now show.
3. Double-click the file. The Data Link Properties dialog is displayed.
4. Click on the Provider tab as in Figure 36-16.
5. Select Microsoft Jet 4.0 OLE DB Provider. Select Next > to go to the Connection tab.
6. For Item 1, specify the Access .MDB file as in Figure 36-1.
Figure 36-1: Connection
Tab
7. Select Test Connection button. A success dialog is displayed:
Figure 36-2: Success
476
Database Setup for use with SoundCheck
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Data File Format
SoundCheck®
versions
*.DAT and *.WFM file binary formats for most commonly used
1 DAT Binary Data File Format – SoundCheck 4.13 (DAT v2)
Key:
B=bytes, b=bits, uint=unsigned integer, float=floating point number in IEEE standard format
Note:
Strings do not have a termination character
ONCE AT BEGINNING OF FILE
4B 32b uint number of curves (curve structures) in file
BEGINNING OF FIRST CURVE STRUCTURE
4B 32b uint number of bytes in curve structure: header, data, and descriptors
64-BYTE HEADER USED TO GET INFO Prior TO LabVIEW CLUSTER UNFLATTEN
16B string SoundCheck flattened cluster type, "Data", right padded with spaces
2B 16b uint SoundCheck version number for this cluster type
1B 8b uint number of dimensions in data array (obsolete in SoundCheck, now set to 0)
42B string curve name, right padded with spaces
3B reserved for SoundCheck, binary 0 for now
FLATTENED LabVIEW CLUSTER
4B 32b uint number of chars (N) in curve name
NB string curve name
4B 32b uint number of X-Y-Z data points (N) in curve
N*3*8B 64b float data points in X-Y-Z X-Y-Z X-Y-Z order
2B 16b uint Xdata (0=dB, 1=linear)
2B 16b uint Ydata (0=dB, 1=linear)
2B 16b uint Zdata (0=dB, 1=linear)
2B 16b uint Xaxis (0=log, 1=linear)
2B 16b uint Yaxis (0=log, 1=linear)
2B 16b uint Zaxis (0=log, 1=linear)
4B 32b uint number of chars (N) in Xprefix
NB string Xprefix SI prefix for unit
4B 32b uint number of chars (N) in Yprefix
NB string Yprefix SI prefix for unit
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Data File Format
477
4B 32b uint number of chars (N) in Zprefix
NB string Zprefix SI prefix for unit
4B 32b uint number of chars (N) in Xunit
NB string Xunit
4B 32b uint number of chars (N) in Yunit
NB string Yunit
4B 32b uint number of chars (N) in Zunit
NB string Zunit
8B 64b float X dB ref
8B 64b float Y dB ref
8B 64b float Z dB ref
1B boolean single-value flag (0=normal curve, 1=single value)
BEGINNING OF SECOND CURVE STRUCTURE
4B 32b uint number of bytes in curve structure: header, data, and descriptors
2 DAT Binary Data File Format – SoundCheck 5.54 (DAT v3)
Key:
B=bytes, b=bits, uint=unsigned integer, float=floating point number in IEEE standard format
Note:
Strings do not have a termination character
ONCE AT BEGINNING OF FILE
4B 32b uint number of curves (curve structures) in file
BEGINNING OF FIRST CURVE STRUCTURE
4B 32b uint number of bytes in curve structure: header, data, and descriptors
64-BYTE HEADER USED TO GET INFO Prior TO LabVIEW CLUSTER UNFLATTEN
16B string SoundCheck flattened cluster type, "Data", right padded with spaces
2B 16b uint SoundCheck version number for this cluster type
1B 8b uint number of dimensions in data array (obsolete in SoundCheck, now set to 0)
42B string curve name, right padded with spaces
3B reserved for SoundCheck, binary 0 for now
FLATTENED LabVIEW CLUSTER
4B 32b uint number of chars (N) in curve name
NB string curve name
4B 32b uint number of X-Y-Z data points (N) in curve
N*3*8B 64b float data points in X-Y-Z X-Y-Z X-Y-Z order
2B 16b uint Xdata (0=dB, 1=linear)
478
Data File Format
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
2B 16b uint Ydata (0=dB, 1=linear)
2B 16b uint Zdata (0=dB, 1=linear)
2B 16b uint Xaxis (0=log, 1=linear)
2B 16b uint Yaxis (0=log, 1=linear)
2B 16b uint Zaxis (0=log, 1=linear)
4B 32b uint number of chars (N) in Xprefix
NB string Xprefix SI prefix for unit
4B 32b uint number of chars (N) in Yprefix
NB string Yprefix SI prefix for unit
4B 32b uint number of chars (N) in Zprefix
NB string Zprefix SI prefix for unit
4B 32b uint number of chars (N) in Xunit
NB string Xunit
4B 32b uint number of chars (N) in Yunit
NB string Yunit
4B 32b uint number of chars (N) in Zunit
NB string Zunit
8B 64b float X dB ref
8B 64b float Y dB ref
8B 64b float Z dB ref
1B boolean single-value flag (0=normal curve, 1=single value)
1B boolean protected flag (0=unprotected, 1=protected)
1B boolean display X flag (0=do not display, 1=display)
1B boolean display Y flag (0=do not display, 1=display)
1B boolean display Z flag (0=do not display, 1=display)
4B 32b uint Plot Color (RGBa)
BEGINNING OF SECOND CURVE STRUCTURE
4B 32b uint number of bytes in curve structure: header, data, and descriptors
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Data File Format
479
3 DAT Binary Data File Format SoundCheck 6.01-7.01 (DAT v6
Key:
B=bytes, b=bits, uint=unsigned integer, float=floating point number in IEEE standard format
Note:
Strings do not have a termination character
ONCE AT BEGINNING OF FILE
4B 32b uint number of curves (curve structures) in file
BEGINNING OF FIRST CURVE STRUCTURE
4B 32b uint number of bytes in curve structure: header, data, and descriptors
64-BYTE HEADER USED TO GET INFO Prior TO LabVIEW CLUSTER UNFLATTEN
16B string SoundCheck flattened cluster type, "Data", right padded with spaces
2B 16b uint SoundCheck version number for this cluster type
1B 8b uint number of dimensions in data array (obsolete in SoundCheck, now set to 0)
42B string curve name, right padded with spaces
3B reserved for SoundCheck, binary 0 for now
FLATTENED LabVIEW CLUSTER
4B 32b uint number of chars (N) in curve name
NB string curve name
4B 32b uint number of X-Y-Z data points (N) in curve
N*3*8B 64b float data points in X-Y-Z X-Y-Z X-Y-Z order
2B 16b uint Xdata (0=dB, 1=linear)
2B 16b uint Ydata (0=dB, 1=linear)
2B 16b uint Zdata (0=dB, 1=linear)
2B 16b uint Xaxis (0=log, 1=linear)
2B 16b uint Yaxis (0=log, 1=linear)
2B 16b uint Zaxis (0=log, 1=linear)
4B 32b uint number of chars (N) in Xunit
NB string Xunit
4B 32b uint number of chars (N) in Yunit
NB string Yunit
4B 32b uint number of chars (N) in Zunit
NB string Zunit
8B 64b float X dB ref
8B 64b float Y dB ref
8B 64b float Z dB ref
480
Data File Format
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
1B boolean single-value flag (0=normal curve, 1=single value)
1B boolean protected flag (0=unprotected, 1=protected)
1B boolean display X flag (0=do not display, 1=display)
1B boolean display Y flag (0=do not display, 1=display)
1B boolean display Z flag (0=do not display, 1=display)
4B 32b uint Plot Color (RGBa)
1B 8b uint Plot Interpolation (0-5)
1B 8b uint Plot Point Style (0-16)
1B 8b uint Plot Line Style (0-4)
4B 32b uint Plot Point Color (RGBa)
1B 8b uint Plot Line Width (0-5)
1B 8b uint Plot Bar Plot Style (0-10)
2B 16b int Fill Baseline (-1 – 32767)
4B 32b uint number of chars (N) in Test Info
NB string Test Info
BEGINNING OF SECOND CURVE STRUCTURE
4B 32b uint number of bytes in curve structure: header, data, and descriptors
4 WFM Binary File Format – SoundCheck 6.01-7.01 (WFM v3)
Key:
B=bytes, b=bits, uint=unsigned integer, int = signed integer, float=floating point number in IEEE standard
format
Note:
Strings do not have a termination character
ONCE AT BEGINNING OF FILE
4B 32b uint number of waveforms (waveform structures) in file
BEGINNING OF FIRST WAVEFORM STRUCTURE
4B 32b uint number of bytes in waveform structure: header, data, and descriptors
64-BYTE HEADER USED TO GET INFO Prior TO LabVIEW CLUSTER UNFLATTEN
16B string SoundCheck flattened cluster type, "Waveform", right padded with spaces
2B 16b uint SoundCheck version number for this cluster type
1B 8b uint number of dimensions in waveform array (obsolete in SoundCheck, now set to 0)
42B string waveform name, right padded with spaces
3B reserved for SoundCheck, binary 0 for now
FLATTENED LabVIEW CLUSTER
4B 32b uint number of chars (N) in waveform name
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Data File Format
481
NB string waveform name
8B 64b float X0 Waveform start value
8B 64b float dX Waveform increment
4B 32b uint number of points (N) in waveform
N*4B 32b float waveform points
2B 16b uint Xdata (0=dB, 1=linear)
2B 16b uint Ydata (0=dB, 1=linear)
2B 16b uint Yaxis (0=log, 1=linear)
4B 32b uint number of chars (N) in Xunit
NB string Xunit
4B 32b uint number of chars (N) in Yunit
NB string Yunit
8B 64b float Y dB ref
1B boolean display Y flag (0=do not display, 1=display)
1B boolean display X flag (0=do not display, 1=display)
1B boolean overload flag (0=no overload, 1=overload)
1B boolean protected flag (0=unprotected, 1=protected)
4B 32b uint number of flattened steps (N) in sequence history (for SoundCheck use)
N*(4B 32b uint number of chars (M) in flattened step string, MB string) (for SoundCheck use)
4B 32b int Waveform Channel Number (-1 – N Channels)
4B 32b uint Plot Color (RGBa)
1B 8b uint Plot Interpolation (0-5)
1B 8b uint Plot Point Style (0-16)
1B 8b uint Plot Line Style (0-4)
4B 32b uint Plot Point Color (RGBa)
1B 8b uint Plot Line Width (0-5)
1B 8b uint Plot Bar Plot Style (0-10)
2B 16b int Fill Baseline (-1 – 32767)
4B 32b uint number of chars (N) in Test Info
NB string Test Info
BEGINNING OF SECOND WAVEFORM STRUCTURE
4B 32b uint number of bytes in waveform structure: header, data, and descriptors
482
Data File Format
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Appendix A: Hardware Compatibility List
The devices in the following list are approved for use with SoundCheck. Other devices may be compatible but
have not been verified for use with SoundCheck and are not supported.
Windows OS - Hardware is no longer validated in Windows 8. Although most drivers will work,
default hardware files in SoundCheck may need to be adjusted (e.g. latency values, buffer setting)
These audio interfaces allow for repeatable delay, therefore they can be used for measurement of absolute
phase.
Audio Interface
Windows 7-32 & 64 bit, Windows 10-64 Driver Type
AudioConnect 4x4
Lynx E44/E22
LynxTWO (discontinued)
Lynx Aurora (n) 8/32 LT-USB & LT-TB
Lynx Aurora 8/16 LT-USB & LT-TB (discontinued)
Fireface UC
Fireface UCX USB & Firewire
MultiFace II
FireFace 802 USB & Firewire
FireFace 800 (discontinued)
NI 4461
CardDeluxe (discontinued)
ASIO
ASIO
ASIO
ASIO
ASIO
ASIO
ASIO
ASIO
ASIO
ASIO
DAQmx
MME (32 Bit OS Only)
The following audio interfaces require the use of Autodelay in SoundCheck Analysis Steps to compensate for
large and changing latencies. This is normal when using devices with WDM drivers. These devices should not
be used when measuring absolute phase.
Audio Interface
Windows 7-32 & 64 bit, Windows 10-64 Driver Type
AudioConnect & AmpConnect ISC
WDM 1
DCC-1448
WDM 2
PQC-3048
WDM 2
PIO-9216
WDM 2
BTC-4148 + BQC - 4148
WDM
Lynx E44/E22 & Aurora series
WDM 3,4
LynxTWO (discontinued)
WDM 3,4
FireFace 802 USB
WDM 3
WDM
CardDeluxe (discontinued)
WDM 3
MultiFace II
1. Can only be used at 44.1 kHz sampling rate for all operating systems.
2. Can only be used at 48 kHz sampling rate for all operating systems.
3. Sampling rate must be changed in the audio interface mixer/control panel program AND in the
SoundCheck Hardware configuration.
4. MME drivers are not supported.
For additional information on drivers see Approved Drivers - Windows on page 485.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Appendix A: Hardware Compatibility List
483
Mac OS
These audio interfaces allow for repeatable delay which can be used for measurement of absolute phase.
Audio Interface
Lynx Aurora (n) 8-16 LT-USB
Lynx Aurora (n) 8-32 LT-TB
Lynx Aurora 8-16 LT-USB (discontinued)
Lynx Aurora 8-16 LT-TB (discontinued)
Fireface UC
Fireface UCX
FireFace 802 USB
FireFace 800 (discontinued)
Mac OS X - El Capitan or later Driver Type
Core Audio
Lynx Core Audio Thunderbolt
Core Audio
Lynx Core Audio Thunderbolt
RME Intel Driver
RME Intel Driver
RME Intel Driver
RME Intel Driver
The following audio interfaces require the use of Autodelay in SoundCheck Analysis Steps to compensate for
large and changing latencies. These devices should not be used when measuring absolute phase.
Audio Interface
AudioConnect 4x4
Mac OS X - El Capitan or later Driver Type
Core Audio
AudioConnect
Core Audio 1
AmpConnect ISC
Core Audio 1
DCC-1448
Core Audio 2
PQC-3048
Core Audio 2
PIO-9216
Core Audio 2
Core Audio
BTC-4148 + BQC-4148
1. Can only be used at 44.1 kHz sampling rate for all operating systems.
2. Can only be used at 48 kHz sampling rate for all operating systems.
For additional information on drivers see Approved Drivers - Mac on page 486.
484
Appendix A: Hardware Compatibility List
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Approved Drivers - Windows
MFG
Listen
Listen
Listen
Device
AmpConnect
ISC (3)
AudioConnect
Lynx Studio
AudioConnect
4x4
Aurora (n) 8-32
LT-TB
Aurora (n) 8-16
LT-USB
E44, E22
NI
NI 4461
Lynx Studio
Lynx Studio
Appendix A: Hardware Compatibility List
USB
Driver
Type
WDM
Native Win
USB
WDM
Native Win
3.2.4.9 (3)
AUAB: 1.14
1.60
USB
ASIO
2.20.0
28, LTusb 10
Thunderbolt
ASIO
2.23G
1.5
USB
ASIO
3.34
28, LTusb 10
PCI
ASIO
2.23H
Connection
Driver Ver
Firmware
Default ASIO /
Default
USB Buffers
Latency
NA
250
Default Chan Trim Sample Rate
– In/Out
Auto Update
NA
44.1 kHz only
NA
250
NA
44.1 kHz only
2048 / Safe
Set In ASIO (1)
256
5145
NA
Yes
612
+4 dBu/+4 dBu
Yes
2565
+4 dBu/+4 dBu
Yes
20170817
1024 / Auto
Set In ASIO (1)
256
538
+4 dBu/+4 dBu
Yes
PCI/PXI
DAQmx
DAQmx 16.0
NA
NA
109
NA
Yes
Portland Tool DCC 1448
& Die (PTD)
PTD
PIO-9216
USB
WDM
Native Win
1.28
NA
250
NA
48 kHz only
USB
WDM
Native Win
1.07
NA
NA
NA
48 kHz only
PTD
PQC-3048
USB
WDM
Native Win
1.27
NA
NA
NA
48 kHz only
PTD
USB
WDM
Native Win
NA
NA
Firewire
ASIO
3.123
1.32,
1.8
34/27/7
NA
RME Audio
BTC-4148,
BQC-4148
Fireface 802
256
610
+4 dBu/+4 dBu
44.1kHz &
48kHz
Yes
RME Audio
Fireface 802
USB
ASIO
1.099
13/9/7/9
1024
2116
+4 dBu/+4 dBu
Yes
RME Audio
Fireface UC
USB
ASIO
1.099
117
1024
2114
-10/+4 (5)
Yes
RME Audio
Fireface UCX
Firewire
ASIO
3.123
46, 27
256
612
+4 dBu/+4 dBu (5) Yes
RME Audio
Fireface UCX
USB
ASIO
1.099
46
1024
2118
+4 dBu/+4 dBu (5) Yes
See Footnotes on page 486.
485
486
Approved Drivers - Mac
MFG
Device
Connection Driver Type
Driver
Default
Latency
Firmware
0
Default Chan
Trim – In/Out
NA
Sample Rate
Auto Update
44.1 kHz only
Listen
AudioConnect (4)
USB
Core Audio
Native Mac 1.60
Listen
AudioConnect 4x4 (4)
USB
Core Audio
Native Mac 28, LTusb 10 1276
+4 dBu/+4 dBu
Yes
Listen
AmpConnect ISC (3, 4)
USB
Core Audio
NA
44.1 kHz only
NA
48 kHz only
Appendix A: Hardware Compatibility List
Portland Tool DCC 1448 (4)
& Die (PTD)
PTD
PIO-9216 (4)
USB
Core Audio
Native Mac 3.2.4.9 (3)
0
AUAB: 1.14
Native Mac 1.28
0
USB
Core Audio
Native Mac 1.07
0
NA
48 kHz only
PTD
PQC-3048 (4)
USB
Core Audio
Native Mac 1.27
0
NA
48 kHz only
PTD
BTC-4148,
BQC-4148 (4)
Fireface UC USB (5)
USB
Core Audio
0
NA
USB
Core Audio
Native Mac 1.32,
1.8
2.17
12
1234
+4 dBu/+4 dBu
44.1kHz &
48kHz
Yes
RME Audio
Fireface UCX USB
USB
Core Audio
2.17
1269
+4 dBu/+4 dBu
Yes
RME Audio
Fireface 802 (5)
USB
Core Audio
2.17
1273
+4 dBu/+4 dBu
Yes
Lynx Studio
Aurora (n) 8-32 LT-TB
Thunderbolt
Lynx Studio
Aurora (n) 8-16 LT-USB
USB
RME Audio
12
Footnotes
See Hardware Configurations on page 489 for individual audio interface settings.
(1)
Requires change to ASIO defaults for proper operation. Follow setup guide provided with approved driver from www.listeninc.com.
(2)
Windows 8.x is no longer supported
(3)
For SoundCheck 10.11 and above, AmpConnect requires firmware version 3.2.4.6 or later. See AmpConnect ISC PN: 4042 on page 489.
(4)
Autodelay MUST be used in SoundCheck Analysis Steps.
(5)
Requires changes to default mixer settings.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Discontinued Hardware
The following hardware has been discontinued by the manufacturer.
Approved Drivers - Windows
Appendix A: Hardware Compatibility List
DAL
CardDeluxe x32 OS PCI
Driver
Type
MME
DAL
CardDeluxe x64 OS PCI
WDM
5.10.3523
Lynx Studio
Aurora 8-16 LT-USB USB
ASIO
3.34
Default ASIO / USB Default Default Chan Trim Sample Rate
Buffers
Latency
– In/Out
Auto Update
NA
NA
41
Set Jumpers:
No
+4dBu In /-10dBV No
NA
NA
250
Out
28, LTusb 10 1024 / Auto (1)
2564
+4 dBu/+4 dBu
Yes
Lynx Studio
Aurora 8-16 LT-TB
Thunderbolt
ASIO
2.0.23H
28, 6.2
256
610
+4 dBu/+4 dBu
Yes
Lynx Studio
LynxTwo, A, C
PCI
ASIO
2.0.23B
Build 24
256 (1)
618
+4 dBu/+4 dBu
Yes
RME Audio
Fireface 800 (discon- Firewire
tinued)
Multiface
PCI, PCIe &
PCMCIA
ASIO
3.114
2.77
256
653
(5)
ASIO
4.06
55
256
623
Front panel switch Yes
MFG
RME Audio
Device
Connection
Driver Ver
4.0.6.1037
Firmware
Approved Drivers - Mac
MFG
RME Audio
Device
Fireface 800
Connection Driver Type
Firewire
Core Audio
Driver
Firmware
3.27
33
Default
Latency
1265
Default Chan
Trim – In/Out
Sample Rate
Auto Update
Yes
Lynx
Aurora 8-16 LT-TB
Thunderbolt
Core Audio
Build 58B
2016.05.18
1287
+4 dBu/+4 dBu
Yes
Lynx
Aurora 8-16 LT-USB
USB
Core Audio
Native Mac 2015.07.23
1216
+4 dBu/+4 dBu
Yes
Footnotes
See Hardware Configurations on page 489 for individual audio interface settings.
(1)
Requires change to ASIO defaults for proper operation. Follow setup guide provided with approved driver from www.listeninc.com.
(2)
Windows 8.x is no longer supported
(3)
For SoundCheck 10.11 and above, AmpConnect requires firmware version 3.2.4.6 or later. See AmpConnect ISC PN: 4042 on page 489.
(4)
Autodelay MUST be used in SoundCheck Analysis Steps.
(5)
Requires changes to default mixer settings.
487
Minimum Computer Requirements - Windows
Before buying a series of new computers for use with SoundCheck, we recommend that you purchase a single
computer so it can be tested with all the related hardware, including the audio interface. Test the audio
interface using the SoundCheck Self Test sequence to insure that it is compatible with the computer. We
recommend that you purchase a high quality computer according to the guidelines below.
Note that some computers may not be compatible with all audio interfaces

Windows® 7 64 bit and 32 bit OS are supported along with Windows® 10 64 bit

Windows® 8.1 - Hardware is no longer validated in Windows 8. Although most drivers will work, default
hardware files in SoundCheck may need to be adjusted (e.g. latency values, buffer setting)

Windows® 98, Millennium Edition, Windows® 2000, NT® and Windows® XP are not supported
Intel Core Duo processor minimum or better (Celeron processors are not recommended)
To take advantage of using multiple virtual instruments, a multi-threaded processor is recommended,
e.g.; Intel-I3/I5/I7 processor / AMD Phenom II processor or better.
4 GB of RAM minimum (8 GB or more recommended for large WAV files or high resolution
measurements below 50 Hz). Windows 7 systems will require a minimum of 4 GB of RAM
500MB of free hard-disk space required for complete software installation




Thunderbolt audio interfaces perform better when used with Windows® 10 (See Thunderbolt Audio
Interfaces on page 489)

Thunderbolt audio interfaces cannot be used on a Mac using Bootcamp running Windows
We offer an evaluation service to customers who would like to have their computer and hardware compatibility
evaluated by Listen. Please contact sales@listeninc.com for pricing on this service.

Windows Computer Setup Recommendations
BIOS Settings: Hyper-threading, SpeedStep (Cool n Quiet) and C-States:
Problems may occur with audio and system performance on computers with Intel processors and
motherboards using chipsets that employ Hyper-threading, SpeedStep (EIST) and/or C-State functions.
While these functions work to improve power management and energy saving, they can have detrimental
effects on the performance of a computer used for SoundCheck.
If your system experiences performance issues, please follow the instructions below.
Speedstep – Allows the system to dynamically increase/decrease its clock speed between its minimum clock
and its normal operating frequency, as well as voltage, in order to optimize for power consumption. While this
helps save energy, it can unfortunately result in audio dropouts.
C-states – In order to save power, this reduces clock speed by adjusting the multiplier and to some extent, the
processor voltage. With multicore processors this can result in a single core partially shutting down to multiple
cores completely shutting down. This can cause large jumps in CPU usage as the processor adjusts to these
changes while processing audio.
In BIOS, turn off SpeedStep and all C-States (C1E; C3; C6). This may require a BIOS update.
Dell computers do not always allow control of these functions in Bios. Please contact Dell support for
information on disabling Hyper-threading, SpeedStep and C-States.
Hyper-threading – This can cause problems with system performance when SoundCheck is running. It can
interfere with real-time audio processes on some motherboards.
If the system is experiencing problems with performance we recommend that you shut off hyper-threading.
AMD Processors - Cool and Quiet is the equivalent to Speed Step and should be shut off along with C1E
488
Appendix A: Hardware Compatibility List
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Windows Settings
Set Windows power management scheme to high-performance. When Windows tells the processor to go into
low power mode, it can cause glitches in the audio stream. Please refer to: Appendix - Computer Setup, in
the SoundCheck Instruction Manual for more recommendations.
Thunderbolt Audio Interfaces
Windows® 10 has far superior support for Thunderbolt devices than Windows® 7. Windows® 10 supports hotplugging and no 3rd party software is required.
Hardware Configurations
Most audio interfaces cannot record and play simultaneously. There is almost always a delay between the two
and the delay should not vary from measurement to measurement. The audio interfaces that Listen provides
are certified to have high performance in making audio-related measurements. If you are using an audio
interface that Listen, Inc has not certified, the measurement performance of SoundCheck may be severely
compromised!
AudioConnect PN: 4050

Driver: Uses native USB audio driver in Windows. Large and changing latencies are to be expected.
You must use Autodelay in Analysis Steps. Firmware: 1.58 and later required.
Do not connect audio interfaces through USB hubs. Connect directly to computer USB port.
AudioConnect 4 x 4 PN: 4051




Driver: Version 2.20.0
Firmware: Board 29, LT-USB 11
Default ASIO buffer is 2048 & USB Streaming Mode is Safe (Hardware Step > ASIO control panel)
Prior to SoundCheck 14, large and changing latencies are to be expected. You must use Autodelay in
Analysis Steps.
Do not connect audio interfaces through USB hubs. Connect directly to computer USB port.
AmpConnect ISC PN: 4042
1. SoundCheck (or SoundCheck ONE) 10.11 as a minimum is required in order to control AmpConnect
ISC™ via USB. AmpConnect ISC requires firmware version 3.2.4.6 or later to work with SoundCheck
10.11 and higher. AmpConnect units with S/N 367 and above have this firmware pre-installed. Units
with S/N 366 and prior may require a firmware update. Please contact support@listeninc.com for
instructions on determining the firmware version.
2. Units with S/N AC432 and after (AUAB audio board firmware: 1.14), operate at 44.1 kHz and 24 bit
depth in Windows 7 and above. (Prior to that S/N, 44.1 and 48 kHz are supported) [Windows XP:
AmpConnect can only be used at 44.1 kHz sampling rate AND 16-bit]
3. As of SoundCheck 13, a new Driver: for AmpConnect ISC has been included in the SoundCheck
installation process. The new Driver: will not work in versions prior to SoundCheck 13. To use
AmpConnect ISC with SoundCheck 12 (and previously supported versions), you will need to manually
rollback the device Driver: in Windows Device Manager.
4. As of SN1536, the “3 dB Down Point” default jumper position is 2 Hz (Jumper removed).
5. As of serial number AC2402, the default jumper position sets the XLR inputs to Single Ended by putting
a jumper across pins 2 & 3 of J20 and J28. This also makes the XLR input single ended since the
jumper connects pin 3 of the XLR to pin 1 (common).
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Appendix A: Hardware Compatibility List
489
6. SoundCheck 14 requirements: Default Windows WDM audio driver, minimum of SoundCheck 14
control driver, minimum of firmware 3.2.4.6.
7. After installing SC 14, SC 13 users will not have control over the Headphone Amp. Other controls will
work correctly. Additionally, the serial number of the AmpConnect audio interface will not be read
properly, which changes the name of the device in the Hardware Editor.
Do not connect audio interfaces through USB hubs. Connect directly to computer USB port.
Portland Tool and Die
DCC-1448 PN: 5810 - MEMS Digital Microphone Measurement Interface Configuration
PQC-3048 PN: 5811 - Production Line MEMS Digital Microphone Measurement Interface
PIO-9216 PN: 5813 - Programmable Digital Serial Audio Data Interface

Driver: Uses native USB audio driver in Windows and Core Audio in Mac OS
Operates at 48 kHz and 24 bit depth (Select 16 bit depth if using Windows XP)
BTC-4148 PN: 5814 - Bluetooth Audio Measurement Interface

BQC-4148 PN: 5815 - Bluetooth Audio QC Interface


Driver: Uses native USB audio driver in Windows and Core Audio in Mac OS
Operates at 44.1 kHz & 48 kHz, and 24 bit depth (Select 16 bit depth if using Windows XP)
SoundCheck requires that input and output sample rates match.
You can either:

Use 48 kHz for your output Hardware Configuration in SoundCheck
Or


If the output configuration cannot be set to 48 kHz, for example because you are using an AmpConnect
ISC, you can use Re-sampling and Frequency Shift Post-Processing steps in your sequence to align
the stimulus and response waveforms.
DCC-1448 can be used as a clock source by connecting its SPDIF Out to the SPDIF In of the
SoundCheck audio interface. Then set the audio interface to synchronize its clock to the SPDIF Input.
Doing so insures that input and output are synchronous and will insure that re-sample and frequency
shift steps are not required.
Do not connect audio interfaces through USB hubs. Connect directly to computer USB port.
NI 4461

Tested with DAQmx 16.0 which can be found on the SoundCheck DVD
Sennheiser Blue Tooth USB Adapter - BTD 500 USB

Uses default Windows driver and appears as a WDM device in SoundCheck
LynxTWO/E44/E22





490
Windows 7 or 10 – 32 and 64 bit, Windows XP (ASIO only)
Driver and Firmware refer to Approved Drivers - Windows on page 485.
Important! - Open the ASIO Control Panel from the SoundCheck Hardware Configuration Editor
and then Turn Off “Double Buffer Output”
If you see periodic drop outs in SoundCheck Acquisition, increase the buffer size to the next highest
value. The latency value must be updated in the SoundCheck Hardware Editor.
Maximum Channels - The default is “Unlimited”. We recommend changing this to 4 or 8 channels in
order to save system resources. This limits the virtual channels of the device and limits the number of
Appendix A: Hardware Compatibility List
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual

channels that can be selected in the SoundCheck Hardware Editor. When using a 192 kHz sample rate
in SoundCheck, this may be essential. Otherwise, severe dropouts may occur.
203 kHz Maximum Sample Rate - The sample rate of 200 kHz is available in the Sample Rate field of
the Hardware Table but is not valid for the Lynx TWO. Instead, use the Input and Output Tabs of the
editor. There you can select “User” in the sample rate field of each channel and change the sample rate
to 203 kHz.
Lynx Aurora (n) 8-16 LT-USB or 8-32 LT-TB Interface



Windows 7 or 10 – 32 and 64 bit
Driver and Firmware refer to Approved Drivers - Windows on page 485.
LT-USB - Currently you must set the ASIO control panel to a buffer of 1024 and Safe in order to match
the latency values provided in the default hardware (HAR) file. LT-TB does not use USB buffers.
Lynx Aurora 8-16 with LT-USB or LT-TB Interface - discontinued



Windows 7 or 10 – 32 and 64 bit
Driver and Firmware refer to Approved Drivers - Windows on page 485.
LT-USB - Currently you must set the ASIO control panel to a buffer of 2048 and Safe in order to match
the latency values provided in the default hardware (HAR) file. LT-TB does not use USB buffers.
Lynx issues with Intel motherboards using SpeedStep and C-States:
Problems can occur with PCI audio interfaces on Intel motherboards using the Sandy Bridge chipset and
others that employ SpeedStep and C-State functions.

In BIOS, turn off SpeedStep and all C-States (C1E; C3; C6) – may require BIOS update.

Dell computers do not always allow control of these functions in Bios. Please contact Dell support for
information on disabling SpeedStep and C-States.
Set Windows power management scheme to high-performance. When Windows tells the processor to go into
low power mode, it can cause glitches in the audio stream.
RME (Multiface II, Fireface UC/UCX, Fireface 800)
Driver versions tested (firmware update may be required).

Driver and Firmware refer to Approved Drivers - Windows on page 485.
Configuration Details
The Multiface II does not use Firewire. It requires an RME PCI, PCI Express, ExpressCard or CardBus
interface card. Do not connect it to a FireWire port! It will damage the MultiFace II box beyond repair.

Fireface UCX and Fireface 800/802 are not compatible with all firewire chipsets: Texas Instruments and
VIA chipsets are generally known to work.

Fireface UC and UCX are both compatible with USB 3 (USB 2 transfer rate)

Fireface 802 USB will produce small changes in latency. Autodelay should be used in SoundCheck
Analysis Steps.
Do not connect audio interfaces through USB hubs. Connect directly to computer USB port.

Windows XP: ASIO driver supported, WDM driver supported for Fireface 800 only.

Windows 7 & 10: ASIO driver supported, WDM driver not recommended

Windows 8: RME USB audio interfaces not approved. With the FireFace UCX, use the FireWire
connection.
PCI Express Interface Card for Laptop

BIOS settings, "PCI Express Power Management" should be disabled
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Appendix A: Hardware Compatibility List
491
ASIO Configuration


The sample rate of the RME interfaces automatically updates to the rate set in the SoundCheck
Hardware Editor.
In Windows 7, if using Fireface UCX or 800/802, you must Rollback the system’s 1394 OHCI
Compliant (firewire) device driver to the legacy version in Device Manager as shown below.
CardDeluxe - discontinued
Please install SoundCheck BEFORE installing the CardDeluxe drivers. The SoundCheck installation process
sets the customized configuration of the CardDeluxe for use with SoundCheck.
If the CardDeluxe driver is already installed, you will need to configure the driver manually. Refer to the
CardDeluxe instructions in the driver folder on the SoundCheck install DVD or on the Listen, Inc. website.
Windows XP:

Driver: use MME Driver - Version 4.06.1037
Windows 7-32 & 8-32 bit:


Driver: use MME Driver - Version 4.06.1037
Driver: use the WDM/ASIO Driver – Version 5.10.3523

Set ASIO Buffer Size to 3 mSec via the configuration utility

Must set sample rate in CardDeluxe control panel (Click CardDeluxe icon in Windows tray)

Sample rate selection in hardware editor is over-ridden by CardDeluxe setting
Windows 7-64 & 8-64 bit:


Driver: Must use WDM Driver - Version 5.10.3523. Note issues from chart on page 1 of this document
Must also set the sample rate and the bit depth to 24-bit mode via the CardDeluxe control panel
AudioFire 12 - discontinued



Driver: Version 5.8 (Firmware update may be required. Requires internet connection.)
In Windows 7, you must Rollback the system’s 1394 OHCI Compliant (firewire) device driver to the
legacy version in Device Manager as shown under IEEE 1394 Legacy Driver (below).
The sample rate must be set in the AudioFire mixer, settings tab. The sample rate selection in the
SoundCheck Hardware Editor must agree with this setting.

492
Appendix A: Hardware Compatibility List
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Appendix B: Windows Setup Recommendations
Audio Device System Settings
The following settings are recommended to prevent Windows systems sounds from inadvertently playing
through a device under test or artificial mouth. Some system sounds are capable of damaging some
transducers.
Windows Audio Devices
1. Click Windows Start, Type ”Manage
Audio Devices” and hit Enter. This
opens the Sound Control Panel.
4. Select the Playback tab and set the
default device to the motherboard audio
interface (or any other device that is not
used for test and measurement)
2. Click the Sounds tab and set the default
scheme to No Sounds
3. Uncheck “Play Windows Startup sound”
5. Select the Recording tab and set the
default device to the motherboard audio
interface (or any other device that is not
used for test and measurement)
6. Click OK and close the remaining Control
Panel windows
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Windows Setup Recommendations
493
WDM Device Sample Rate
Note:
When using WDM audio interfaces with SoundCheck, you will need to set the
sample rate in the SoundCheck Hardware Editor and in the Windows Play and
Record panels for the audio interface.
1. Double click on a device in Playback or Recording
2. Select the Advanced Tab
3. Set the Sample Rate and Bit Depth to match the SoundCheck
Hardware Editor
Audio Device Enhancements
Some audio devices feature Enhancement settings. When testing such a
device, these enhancements should be shut off.
European Decimal Notation
The “Decimal Display Format” can be changed to European Style in
Windows. (comma in place of period)
SoundCheck must be closed before changing the decimal format.
Changes will be seen the next time it is started.
Windows Instructions
1. Click Start
2. Select Control Panel
3. Select Clocks, Language and Region Options
4. Click Change the date, time or number format
5. Click Additional Settings
6. Change the Decimal Symbol to "," (comma) and Digit Grouping
Symbol to "." (period)
7. Click Apply and click OK to close editing windows
494
Windows Setup Recommendations
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Change SoundCheck Default
If you want to overrule your regional settings, use the following method.
You can change the default behavior by changing the SoundCheck INI file found in the root of your
SoundCheck folder. This changes the decimal mark based on the language of the OS. This forces
SoundCheck to always use a dot for decimal notation.
1. Exit SoundCheck
2. Add the following line to SoundCheck 16.0 (x64).ini file. (for 32 bit versions only SoundCheck
16.0.ini is used)
useLocaleDecimalPt=False
3. Save the changes to the .ini file and start SoundCheck
(When using SoundCheck 64 bit, the x64 INI file is created the first time you manually edit a color in a
display. You can also create the file by making a blank INI file with the same name as the SoundCheck
executable, e.g.: SoundCheck 16.0 (x64).ini.)
Windows Display - Text Size
The settings of the Windows display resolution effects the display windows and information tabs in
SoundCheck. The following settings should always be used for a SoundCheck system.
1. SoundCheck must be closed
2. In Windows 7, Right click on the Windows desktop and
select Personalize In Windows 10, Right click on the
desktop and select Display Settings
3. Open the Display menu
4. Select Smaller or 100%
This is the typical default setting for Windows but
it is sometimes changed when individual users
are trying to make icons larger on the Windows
desktop or making program menu fields larger.
Setting this higher than 100% causes fields in
SoundCheck to overlap and in some cases
become “not visible”.
Medium (125%) and Large (150%) should not
be used. Menus will not be readable.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Windows Setup Recommendations
495
page intentionally left blank
496
Windows Setup Recommendations
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Appendix C: PXI/PCI 4461 Installation
Note:
When SoundCheck is off or not running, the default state of the NI 4461 is “Open
Outputs”. This means that noise will be present on the outputs of the card. As a
safety precaution we recommend that you shut off any amplifier connected to the
output of the NI 4461 before starting SoundCheck. The amplifier should be shut off
before exiting SoundCheck as well.
Always use the latest NI DAQmx driver that has been approved for use with SoundCheck.
See “Hardware Compatibility List” on page 483.
PXI 1031 Chassis Identification
The following is for installation of the PXI 4461 card in a PXI 1031 Chassis
Figure C-1 shows the Chassis Identification process
when using the PXI 1031 chassis and a PXI 4461
card.

Click on the “Chassis Unidentified” device

Select Identify As

Select PXI-1031 from the list
This is not required when installing the PCI 4461 in a
computer.
Figure C-1: Chassis Identification for PXI 1031
Note:
Some NI interface cards may
require the PXI platform services
driver. Please refer to the NI
documentation.
Figure C-2: PXI 4461 recognized in NI Explorer
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
PXI/PCI 4461 Installation
497
NI 4461 Install and Setup
Follow the instructions provided by NI for installing the NI 4461 card. The following screen shots are a step by
walk-through of the NI 4461 install process. Instructions are included on each screen of the install process.
Open NI Max, Measurement and
Automation Explorer to verify that the
4461 has been installed correctly.
Figure C-3: PCI 4461 DAQ-MX Properties
Self Calibration
Select the 4461 from the NIDAQmx device list as shown in
Figure C-4. Click on the SelfCalibrate button at the right hand
side of the window.
When the process is finished you
should get a response indicating the
device was calibrated successfully.
Figure C-4: Self-Calibrate
Self Test
Self Test can be run by clicking on Self Test in the
NI Max screen or by right clicking on the NI 4461 in
the Device list and selecting Self Test from the Drop
Down Menu.
When the process is finished you should get a response
indicating that Self Test was successful.
Figure C-5: Self Test
498
PXI/PCI 4461 Installation
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
SoundCheck®
Hardware Configuration
The System Hardware configuration should be setup according to the following examples.
Setting the Vp values for the NI 4461 in the Hardware Editor actually sets the hardware input range and
sends the Gain or Attenuation levels to the NI 4461 card. See Input and Output Vp settings on page 500
for more information.
In the SoundCheck Hardware Editor, click the Import Button and select “NI PCI-4461.Har” from the
appropriate operating system folder. Use the same file for the PXI-4461. This automatically sets up the
Hardware Editor with the basic settings for the 4461 interface.
Depending on the number of
DAQmx devices available, you may
need to click on the Device Fields
and select the appropriate Device
Number from the list.
This should be the same Device ID
as shown in the NI Explorer in
Figure C-3.
Select the proper Input and Output
channels from the Select Ch Fields.
Vp Values
The In (Vp) and Out (Vp) values in
the System Hardware configuration
sets the resolution of the NI 4461.
Figure C-6: NI 4461 Hardware Editor
If the signal level of the Device Under Test is low select a low value from the list, such as 1.
If the levels are high, select a larger value, such as 10. This is the default value in the NI PCI-4461.Har file.
Input Vp values can be different from Output Vp values. Refer to the table in Figure C-7 for a list of allowable
Vp settings. Using values other than what are listed in the table will produce unreliable results.
Max FSD
Note:
As you increase the input gain, the maximum input signal limit decreases proportionally.
Check the Max FSD value in the Memory List to make sure the input of the NI 4461 is not
clipping or under-loaded (signal too low which increases the noise floor). In general, if you
are measuring distortion, Max FSD should be greater than -30 dB FSD. If Max FSD reaches
0 dB FSD the signal is being clipped.
Hardware Defaults

Sampling Rate: 44100Hz

Bit Depth: 24 Bit

Latency: 109 (This will change if the Sampling Rate is changed. See “Sample Rate / Latency” on
page 500.)

Term Config: Default

Coupling: AC

IEPE: Disable - Enable only if connecting an IEPE powered transducer to the input of the 4461.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
PXI/PCI 4461 Installation
499
Input and Output Vp settings
In the Hardware Configuration Editor you must enter the Vp value from the chart in Figure C-7 that
corresponds to the Gain or Attenuation required on the NI 4461. These settings are sent to the NI 4461 after
saving the Hardware Configuration.
Input Range
NI 4461
Gain (dB)
SoundCheck Hardware Setting
Vp Value 1
30
20
10
0
-10
-20
0.316
1.00
3.16
10.0
31.6
42.4
Output Range
NI 4461
Attenuation (dB)
SoundCheck Hardware Setting
0
-20
-40
10.00
1.0
0.1
Vp Value 2
Figure C-7: Input and Output Vp
1, 2
The input gain and output attenuation is set independently for each channel in System Hardware.
Latency and Sample Rate
The Latency of the 4461 will change as the sample rate of the System Hardware configuration changes. The
following chart shows recommended Latency values for the sample rates supported in SoundCheck.
Sample Rate (Hz)
200k
192,000
176,400
96,000
88,200
48,000
44,100
32,000
16,000
8,000
Latency (Samples)
100
100
100
114
114
109
109
109
90
80
Figure C-8: Sample Rate / Latency
Note:
500
Output and Input sample rates must match in the Hardware Editor. The NI 4461 clock
defaults to the output sample rate.
PXI/PCI 4461 Installation
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Appendix D: Connection Procedures
Amp Calibration - Single Ended Connections
1. Make sure amplifier is OFF.
Amplifier
Input
Output
+
-
2. to 3. Connect Output 1 of the audio interface to the
input of the amplifier. (amp channel 1)
Step 6 - Amp On
Step 3
4. to 5. Connect the output of the amplifier (amp
channel 1) to Input 1 of the audio interface.
Step 4
Amp Output
(Connector may be
Binding Post or Screw
Terminal)
Balanced or Singleended amp input
(Connector may be
RCA phono as well)
Adapters:
Banana to BNC +
BNC to RCA +
RCA to ¼" Phone Plug
Important: The ground of the banana
adapter must be connected to the
amplifier minus (-) connection or a
"loop" condition will occur that
could result in damage to the amp
and audio interface.
Step 1 - Amp Off
Step 2
Step 5
Audio Interface
6. Turn the amplifier ON.
Input 1
(Left)
Input 2
(Right)
Output 1
(Left)
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Output 2
(Right)
Follow the procedure outlined in Amplifier
Calibration Procedure on page 84.
Figure D-1: Amplifier Calibration
Connections
Connection Procedures
501
Amp Calibration - XLR Balanced Connections
1. , 6.
Single-ended amp input
(Connector may be
RCA phono as well)
3.
Amp Output
(Connector may be
different than Banana)
Amp
+
+
-
-
Banana to BNC + BNC to RCA +
RCA to ¼" Phone Plug
4.
XLR male to RCA
phono male cable
Input 1
Audio Interface
with XLR In/Out
5.
XLR female to
¼" male cable
2.
Output 1
Figure D-2: Amplifier Calibration Connections - Balanced

1. Make sure amplifier is OFF.

2. to 3. Connect Output 1 of the audio interface to the input of the amplifier. (amp channel 1)
(Connection may be balanced or single ended.)

4. to 5. Connect the output of the amplifier (amp channel 1) to the Input 1 of the audio interface.
Note:

6. Turn the amplifier ON.

Follow the amplifier calibration procedure outlined in the Calibration chapter: Amplifier Calibration
Procedure on page 84.

502
The ground of the banana adapter (4) must be connected to the amplifier minus (-) connection
or a "loop" condition will occur that could result in damage to the amp and audio interface.
In SoundCheck®, open the Calibration Configuration Editor. Do not open the Amplifier Calibration
sequence. The Calibration Operation is run from the Calibration Editor.

Select the Amplifier Output channel to calibrate. Make sure the Input Signal Path is set the proper
Direct In as used in Step 4/5. It must be an Input Signal Path that is set for Unity Gain.

Click the Calibrate button in the Calibration Editor to calibrate the amplifier.

After receiving a PASS notification from the calibration sequence, click Save As to save the new
amplifier gain settings to disk with a new name or close the Calibration Editor and click File > Save to
save the entire sequence using the existing step name.
Connection Procedures
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
(Single-ended
amp input)
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
-
+
Amplifier
Amplifier set to
Bridged Mode.
-
+
Connection Procedures
Ring
Audio Interface Output
Single ended - Tip and
Sleeve
Amp output must be wired
according to manufacturer’s
instructions
Amp Output
Tip
Ring
Sleeve
Sound Card Input
Balanced using ONLY Tip
and Ring, sleeve is not
connected
Tip
(TRS
Connector)
Output 2
(Right)
Output 1
(Left)
Input 2
(Right)
Input 1
(Left)
Amp Calibration - Bridged Connections
Figure D-3: Bridged Amp Calibration Connections
503
Mic Calibration - SoundConnect™ Connections
Single-ended mic power supply
output (Connector may be
different than RCA phono if a
different supply is used)
* Based on using Listen
SoundConnectTM
Microphone Power Supply
Audio Interface
2.
Input 1
(Left)
3.
Input 2
(Right)
Output 1
(Left)
Output 2
(Right)
Digital
Input
4.
1.
Microphone
Calibrator
Digital
Output
Figure D-4: Microphone Calibration Connections
1. Plug microphone into front of SoundConnect. Make sure appropriate polarization voltage is selected.
2. Plug RCA phono (or other connector type appropriate for your power supply) to output connector on
back of SoundConnect.
3. Plug 1/4-inch jack into Input 1 of audio interface. This should be an input with a Unity Gain Signal Path
in the Calibration Configuration of SoundCheck.
4. Insert microphone into calibrator and turn the calibrator on.
5. Click Calibrate in the Input section of the SoundCheck® Calibration Editor to calibrate the microphone.
Make sure units are V/Pa and dB re 20 µ.
6. After calibration is successful, click OK to close the Microphone Calibration window, then click Save to
close the editor and save the new microphone gain settings to disk.
504
Connection Procedures
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Loudspeaker Test Connections
6.
Audio Interface
Single-ended mic power
supply output (Connector
may be different than
RCA phono if another
supply is used)
7.
Input 1
(Left)
Input 2
(Right)
2.
Output 1
(Left)
Output 2
(Right)
5.
Digital
Input
1. , 8.
(-)
(+)
4.
+
+
-
-
3.
Digital
Output
Figure D-5: Loudspeaker Test Connections

1. Make sure amplifier is OFF before connecting any cables.

2. to 3. Connect Output 1 of the audio interface to the amp input.

4. Connect the amp output to the DUT (loudspeaker). This example uses a banana connector.

5. Plug the measurement microphone into the front of SoundConnect. Make sure the appropriate
polarization voltage is selected and mic has been calibrated. (See Calibration Configuration on page
65.)

6. to 7. Connect the output of the mic power supply to Input 1 of the audio interface. Make sure the mic
power supply is ON.

8. Turn the amplifier ON. You are now ready to run your loudspeaker test sequence. Turn the amplifier
OFF before shutting down the PC.
Note:
If an external footswitch has been supplied, plug it into the computer's COM port (DB9
connector on back of PC). Make sure the footswitch is enabled in the system Hardware
Configuration. See Hardware Configuration on page 47. Make sure that Hardware Type >
External Interface is chosen and the selected interface is Footswitch. NI VISA is required
and is installed during the SoundCheck installation. This is required for the footswitch to
operate properly.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Connection Procedures
505
Loudspeaker Test Connections with Impedance Box
Single-ended mic power supply output
(Connector may be different than RCA
phono if another supply is used)
Audio Interface
6.
7.
Input 1
(Left)
9.
Input 2
(Right)
2.
Output 1
(Left)
Output 2
(Right)
5.
Digital
Input
8.
(-)
Digital
Output
1. ,10.
(+)
4.
Speaker
Side
(long lead)
Amp
Side
(short lead)
+
+
-
Impedance Box
3.
Amp
Figure D-6: Loudspeaker Test Connections with Impedance Box
Important: The Impedance Measurement Interface shown in Figure D-6: is available from
Listen. Part number: 4009 with 1/4" connector cable and 4010 with XLR connector
cable.

1. Make sure the amplifier is OFF before connecting any cables.
Note:
506
The amplifier should be calibrated before making any measurements. Refer to the Calibration
Configuration chapter for details.

2. to 3. Connect Output 1 of the audio interface to the amplifier input.

4. Connect the short Impedance Box leads to the amplifier output channel and then connect the long
Impedance Box leads to the loudspeaker.

5. Plug the microphone into the mic input of SoundConnect. Make sure the appropriate polarization
voltage is selected and that the mic has been calibrated.

6. to 7. Connect the RCA output on the back of SoundConnect to Input 1 of the audio interface. (The
BNC output on the front of SoundConnect can be used as an alternative.) Make sure the mic power
supply is ON.

8. to 9. Use a TRS cable (Tip-Ring-Sleeve) to connect the Impedance Box output to Input 2 of the
audio interface. (XLR audio interfaces will use a 1/4” TRS to XLR Male cable.)
Connection Procedures
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual

10. Turn the amplifier ON. You are now ready to run your loudspeaker test sequence. Turn the amplifier
OFF before shutting down the PC to avoid unwanted transients from potentially damaging the
loudspeaker.
Detailed Drawing of Impedance Box
Amplifier
(Single-ended
amp input)
Test Speaker
Amp Output
+
+
-
-
+
Load Resistor
-
(The shield of the TRS
cable is not connected at
the resistor)
Connect the amp
chassis to the
chassis of the
computer
Input 1
(Left)
Tip (XLR pin 2)
(TRS Connector)
Ring (XLR pin 3)
Sleeve
(Single-ended output)
Input 2
(Right)
Output 1
(Left)
Tip
Output 2
(Right)
(TRS Connector)
Tip
Sleeve Ring
View of Male XLR connector
when looking at the pins
Pin 2 = High (+)
Pin 3 = Low (-)
Pin 1 = not connected
at the resistor
1
Digital
Input
2
3
Digital
Output
Computer
Chassis
Ground
Audio Interface
Figure D-7: Impedance Box Layout
Important: In order to maintain a good signal to noise ratio, the Load Resistor value should
not be more than 100 times different than the load being measured. Please refer to
Impedance Setup on page 170 for more information.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Connection Procedures
507
Balanced Audio Interface Calibration Connections
When calibrating an audio interface with Balanced inputs and outputs it is important to follow the wiring
procedure noted in Figure D-8: Balanced Audio Interface Calibration Connection.
Audio Bandwidth
DMM
set to
Volts AC
+
-
Audio Interface Balanced
Input (from Meter)
Audio Interface Balanced
Output (to Meter)
+
+
-
NC
NC
Figure D-8: Balanced Audio Interface Calibration Connection

For the purpose of calibration, do not connect the ground of the XLR connectors. Leave them
“Floating”. (NC = Not Connected)

Do not short the Low (-) of a balanced output to ground. With some Active Output devices this will
result in distortion on the High (+) signal.

(The low (-) of the balanced input can be tied to ground. Shorting the low input insures that it is not a
source of noise and usually causes no problem.)

Note that many commonly available XLR to BNC adapters short
pins 1 and 3 together internally. This can cause problems in the
calibration process.
Important: When an audio interface is calibrated for Balanced mode but used in Single
Ended mode, there will be a 6 dB drop in the output level. Only one line of the
balanced output is being used. See Figure D-11: Balanced Output to Single Ended
Input.
When calibrating and/or using a Balanced Audio Interface in Single Ended mode it is important to follow the
guidelines outlined in the following section.
508
Connection Procedures
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Balanced vs Single Ended Connections
Single Ended or Unbalanced outputs can typically be connected to Balanced inputs in either of the two
methods shown in Figure D-9 and Figure D-10.
Single-Ended output to Balanced input
With the output
level of the Single
Ended Output
device set to 0 dB,
+
RCA or
¼" Phone
cable
XLR
+
-
0 dB is measured
at the Balanced
Input
Figure D-9: Single Ended Output to Balanced Input 1
Single-Ended output to Balanced input
With the output
level of the Single
Ended Output
device set to 0 dB,
+
RCA or
¼" Phone
cable
XLR
+
-
NC
0 dB is measured
at the Balanced
Input
Figure D-10: Single Ended Output to Balanced Input 2
Balanced output to Single Ended input wiring is a different matter. It is important to not short the Low (-) of a
balanced output to ground. With some devices with Active Balanced Outputs this will result in distortion on the
High (+) signal. (Transformer balanced outputs can have the low connected to ground.)
Figure D-11 shows the suggested wiring for connecting a Balanced output to a Single Ended input. The
measured level at the Single Ended input is down by 6 dB since only one line of the Balanced output it used.
Balanced output to Single-Ended input
+
-
With the output
level of the
Balanced Output
device set to 0 dB,
XLR
cable
RCA or
¼" Phone
+
NC
-6 dB is measured
at the Single Ended
input
Figure D-11: Balanced Output to Single Ended Input
Important: (NC = Not Connected)
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Connection Procedures
509
page intentionally left blank
510
Connection Procedures
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Appendix E: Serial Port Control
Footswitch and Buzzer Control Via Serial Port
Important: Use of the footswitch and buzzer with SoundCheck® requires that NIVisa is
installed on the system. This can be found on the SoundCheck installation CD
under Additional Software. (Footswitch and Buzzer control cannot be used with
Windows NT.)
Serial Port Pin Out Definition
Figure E-1: Serial Port Pin Out
Buzzer On/Off Message
The output of the serial ports of the computer can be used to
control remote devices such as a Piezo Buzzer. The voltages
are generally 11.2 VDC when the Line is high and -11.2 VDC
when the line is low. The standard wiring for a Piezoelectric
Buzzer is to connect the Positive lead to the DTR Line and the
Negative lead to Ground. Similarly, a second device can be
connected across the RTS Line and Ground to receive
completely separate On/Off messages. Footswitches or other
types of external devices cannot be used with a second buzzer
on the same COM port, e.g., Buzzer A and Buzzer B can be on
COM Port 1 and Footswitch 1 and Footswitch 2 can be on COM
Port 2.
Figure E-2: Buzzer A and B Wiring
Important: USB serial port adapters can be used but not all adapters are compatible with
NIVisa.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Serial Port Control
511
Insert a Message Step into a sequence and rename it
“Buzzer ON”.
Right Click on the step and select Configure Step.
Check Display step when run and set the time to 0.0
seconds.
Select "Wait for confirmation" only if the
buzzer is to remain on
until the operator
selects "Continue" on
the Main Screen
Check-off "Display
step when run" and
set the time to 0.0
seconds
Figure E-3: Configure Message Step
Open the SoundCheck Hardware Editor from
the SoundCheck Main Screen.
Select the External page.
Enter the COM Port number for the Serial Port
that is used. This can be found in the Windows
Device Manager. In this case the Serial port is
9.
Under Type select Buzzer.
Under Type select Buzzer
and set the COM Port
Click Save to close the editor.
The Interface settings are simply added to the
System Hardware Configuration.
Figure E-4: Hardware Config - Interfaces
512
Serial Port Control
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Setting the Message steps in the Sequence
Double click on the Buzzer On step on the right of the Sequence Editor. Function should be set to Set Control
Lines. Interface, Number 2 and DTR high are selected. Under Setup the following should be selected: Pass/
Fail and Wait. The wait time can then be set for the length of time the buzzer should sound. This will also be
the amount of time before the next step of the sequence is executed.

Select Interface

Select Interface number (must be setup in Hardware Editor External page)

Select Pass/Fail - this is the state that the message will report
when the step runs

Select Wait time - this is the amount of time in mSec that the
step will wait before moving to the next step in the sequence.
This is the length of time the buzzer will sound.

Function - Select “Set Control Lines”

Select DTR high
Figure E-5: Message Step Interface Settings
Insert the Buzzer Off message below (after) the Buzzer On Step in the Sequences section. Double click on it to
edit the step. The message section needs to be set to match the settings in the Buzzer On step. DTR low
should be selected to shut the buzzer off. Under Setup, Pass or Fail must be selected. Select Wait only if the
Buzzer Off message is to be displayed for a selected amount of time.

Select Interface

Select Interface number (must be setup in Hardware Editor External page)

Select Pass/Fail - this is the state that the message will report
when the step runs

Select Wait time - Off messages do not necessarily need any
Wait time

Function - Select “Set Control Lines”

Select DTR low
Figure E-6: Message Step Interface Settings
Important: Footswitches and a Buzzer can be connected to the same Serial Port connector
but there is usually limited room for wiring in standard connector housings.
Important: Two Buzzers can be connected to the same Serial Port at the same time with no
footswitches. Only one Buzzer can be connected to a Serial Port when two
Footswitches are in use on the same port.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Serial Port Control
513
Remote Control Switch
The serial port connections can also be used as a Remote Control Switch. A foot switch (or similar) can be
wired across pins 7 and 8 to act as a Start and Continue switch. A second switch can be added across pins 6
and 7 for the Stop and REDO function. These switch functions are pre-set in the SoundCheck system and
cannot be changed. These functions do not require the use of a Message Step in a sequence.
Important: When two switches are used on a single
serial port, a buzzer cannot be used on the
same serial port. Use a second serial port if
needed.
Figure E-7: Serial Port Switch
Wiring
1. To enable the Remote Control Switch function

Click Setup on the SoundCheck Main Screen

Open the Hardware Editor and select External Hardware
Open Hardware
Editor
Figure E-8: Open Hardware
Configuration
2. Right click on an empty line in the
Interface section and click Add
Interface.

Under Type select Footswitch

Under COM Port enter the COM
Port number for the Serial Port
(Found in Windows Device
Manager)
3. Click on Save to close the Hardware
Configuration
514
Select
Footswitch
Enter COM
port
Figure E-9: Hardware Setting For Footswitch
Serial Port Control
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Appendix F: System Verification Using SoundCheck
This section will enable users of SoundCheck to verify that their PC-based electroacoustic test system is
working properly.
Open the Self Test sequence from the Calibration folder in
SoundCheck. Figure F-1
This sequence requires that at least two channels of input and
output are setup in your System Hardware configuration. (See
Hardware Configuration on page 516.)
The Self Test sequence checks to see if your SoundCheck
installation is working properly and verifies the performance of
your audio interface. By looping back the audio interface output
directly into the audio interface input, the audio interface’s
Frequency Response, Sensitivity, THD, Play/Record Delay, and
Self Noise are measured. The sequence is setup to test two
channels of the selected audio interface as shown in Figure F2.
Note that audio interfaces using WDM drivers will not have a
consistent play/record delay, so the Delay results will show up
as a failure. This is normal for WDM devices. Autodelay must be
used in Analysis Steps when using WDM.
Figure: F-1 Open Self Test
Figure: F-2 Completed Sequence Showing Passing Results
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
System Verification Using SoundCheck
515
Hardware Configuration
Make sure that the correct System
Hardware settings are entered for your
audio interface.
The default settings shown are for the
AudioConnect.
To run Self Test on AudioConnect both
input channels must be set to Line In by
opening an AudioConnect Message Step
or by changing the Input Selection in the
Startup Configuration of AudioConnect in
the Listen Hardware Tab.
Figure: F-3 Default Hardware Settings
See AudioConnect on page 57.
Figure: F-3 Default Hardware Settings
Audio Interface
Connect Output 1 to Input 1 and Output 2 to Input 2 of the audio
interface. Figure F-4
WARNING! Do not connect the amplifier. The test level could damage
the amplifier/loudspeaker if connected while .
Sequence Parameters
2.
4.
1.
3.
The sequence will test the audio interface using a Frequency Stepped
Sweep with the following settings:
Input 1
(Left)
Input 2
(Right)
Output 1
(Left)
Output 2
(Right)
Digital
Input
Digital
Output

Frequency Stepped Sweep

Amplitude 1 V. (This level will provide a good signal-to-noise
ratio for most audio interfaces. For the LynxTwo, try increasing
the level to 5 V.)

20 kHz-20 Hz (To measure to higher frequencies, remember to increase the sampling rate for the
audio interface in the Hardware Configuration)

1/3 Oct Steps - This gives you 31 frequency points

24 Cycles/Step (if you change the number of cycles, you should stay above an effective 15 cycles/step
to insure proper THD+N measurement)
Figure: F-4 Loop Back Wiring
The results as shown in Figure F-2 cover the following parameters:
516

Frequency Response: 20 to 20 kHz, +/- 0.5 dB

Sensitivity @ 1 kHz: +/- 1 dB

THD (%) & THD+N (%): 20 to 20 kHz, 0.03%

Audio interface delay: +/- 0.05 ms

Overall Noise Level Limits: [0 Hz, -70 dB], [30 Hz, -90 dB], [22 kHz, -90 dB]
System Verification Using SoundCheck
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Appendix G: Verifying SoundConnect™ Performance
Checking the performance of the SoundConnect™ using the Amplifier THD+N sequence (Electronics folder).
The Generator and FFT instruments will be used as well.
Connect the audio interface to SoundConnect™ as shown in Figure G-1.
AUDIO INTERFACE
3.
4.
Chan 1
Input
(Left)
Chan 2
Input
(Right)
5.
1.
Chan 1
Output
(Left)
Chan 2
Output
(Right)
Digital
Input
2.
Digital
Output
Figure G-1: SoundConnect Performance Test Connections

1 to 2 Connect the Chan 1 Out of the audio interface to the BNC input on the SoundConnect front
panel. In this example a 1/4 inch-to-RCA cable and a BNC male to RCA female adapter is used.

3 to 4 Connect the RCA output connector on the back of SoundConnect to the Chan 1 In of the audio
interface. A 1/4 inch-to-RCA cable is used in the example. The BNC out on the front of SoundConnect
can also be used. The two jacks are connected in parallel and should not be used simultaneously.

5 Set A1, A2, and A3 switches to 0 dB.
Run the Amplifier THD+N sequence to check the frequency response and sensitivity of the SoundConnect.
The SoundConnect™ frequency should be very flat (less than 1.0 dB variation).
Even though the audio interface frequency and phase response may be within spec, ground loops may occur.
A more detailed analysis can be done using the built-in signal generator and FFT functions within
SoundCheck®.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Verifying SoundConnect™ Performance
517
Noise Floor and Ground Loop Detection
1. Open the Signal Generator and FFT instruments by clicking Instruments and click on Signal
Generator and Spectrum Analyzer. You can also use the keyboard shortcuts (Crtl + F4 and Ctrl +
F7).
2. Set the Generator Output Level to 1.000 V, Frequency to 1000, and Channel to Direct Out 1.
Figure G-2: Noise Floor
3. Set FFT controls as shown in Figure G-2. The Input Signal Path should be set to Direct In 1.
4. Click on Mute in Signal Generator so it no longer is blinking red. A 1.0 Volt, 1 kHz sine wave will be
sent to the SoundConnect. Click Start on the FFT screen and the frequency spectrum will appear. If
the SoundConnect and interconnecting cables are in good working condition, the FFT spectrum should
look like the one above. The FFT spectrum should only have a 1 kHz signal. If any harmonics are
present, they should be at least 60 dB below the 1 kHz level. Use the Snap to Max button to set
Cursor 1 to the peak of the signal and then click on the Harmonic Cursor to show the THD.
518
Verifying SoundConnect™ Performance
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
To check for any ground loops or electrical line frequency interference (50 Hz or 60 Hz), reduce the
frequency range of the FFT display from 20 kHz to 1 kHz. To do this, place the mouse cursor over the 20000
number and highlight it by double-clicking using the left mouse button. Enter 1k and the press then press the
Enter key on the computer keyboard. The display will look like Figure G-3.
If there is any electrical interference, there will be significant spikes at 60 Hz (or 50 Hz) and associated harmonics.
Figure G-3: Check for Ground Loop
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Verifying SoundConnect™ Performance
519
Page Intentionally Left Blank
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Verifying SoundConnect™ Performance
520
Appendix H: Keyboard Shortcuts & Stweep Chart
Windows Keyboard Shortcuts
Keyboard Shortcuts
Main Screen
Buttons
Shortcut
Instruments
(Alt+A)
Shortcut
SEQUENCE
Sequence Editor
Ctrl+Q
New…
Ctrl+N
Save
Ctrl+S
Delete
Ctrl+D
Start Sequence
F2
Signal Generator
Ctrl+F4
Continuous
F3
Multimeter
Ctrl+F5
Redo
F4
Oscilloscope
Ctrl+F6
Cursor to Lot # Field
F7
Spectrum Analyzer
Ctrl+F7
Cursor to Serial # Field
F8
RTA
Ctrl+F8
Continue
Enter
Distortion Analyzer
Ctrl+F9
OFFLINE (Alt+N)
Stop
Esc
Frequency Counter
Ctrl+F10
None
Signal Generator (Ctrl+F4)
Shortcut
Shortcut
None
Memory List (Ctrl+Shift+Y)
Memory List must be highlighted
FILE (Alt+F)
Shortcut
Mute
F5
Toggle between Frequency and Output
Level
F8
Increase
Decrease
FILE
Shortcut
New
Ctrl+N
Open
Ctrl+O
Close
Ctrl+W
Save
Ctrl+S
Save As
None
Revert
Ctrl+R
Hardware
Ctrl+Shift+H
Rename
None
Calibration
Ctrl+Shift+C
Delete
Ctrl+D
Messages
Ctrl+Shift+M
Export Seq
Ctrl+E
Stimulus
Ctrl+Shift+S
Setup Wizard
None
Acquisition
Ctrl+Shift+A
Show Context Help
Ctrl+H
Exit
None
Analysis
Ctrl+Shift+N
User Manual
None
Recall
Ctrl+Shift+R
Additional
Documentation
None
Post-Processing
Ctrl+Shift+O
Quick Start Menu…
Ctrl+G
Limits
Ctrl+Shift+L
Listen Inc Website
None
Display
Ctrl+Shift+D
Request Support
None
Serial Number
Ctrl+Shift+E
Ctrl+Shift+T
Request a New Feature
None
Statistics
Autosave
Ctrl+Shift+U
Report a Bug
None
Printing
Ctrl+Shift+P
Optional Modules…
None
Custom
Ctrl+Shift+X
About SoundCheck…
None
Memory List
Ctrl+Shift+Y
Sequence
Ctrl+Q
EDIT (Alt+E)
Login
Preferences
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
SETUP (Alt+S)
Load Display
Ctrl+L
Page Up
Search
Ctrl+F
Page Dn
Select All
Ctrl+A
Protect
Ctrl+M
Full Size
Ctrl+/
Print Current Display
Ctrl+P
Shortcut
Shortcut
None
None
Windows Keyboard Shortcuts
HELP (Alt+H)
Shortcut
521
StweepTM Table - ISO Stepped-sine Frequencies
R10
20
R20
20
R40
20
21.2
22.4
22.4
23.6
25
25
25
26.5
28
28
30
31.5
31.5
31.5
33.5
35.5
35.5
37.5
40
40
40
42.5
4.5
45
47.5
50
50
50
53
56
56
60
63
63
63
67
71
71
75
80
80
80
85
90
90
95
100
100
100
106
112
112
118
522
R80
20
20.6
21.2
21.8
22.4
23
23.6
24.3
25
25.8
26.5
27.2
28
29
30
30.7
31.5
32.5
33.5
34.5
35.5
36.5
37.5
38.7
40
41.2
42.5
43.7
45
46.2
47.5
48.7
50
51.5
53
54.5
56
58
60
61.5
63
65
67
69
71
73
75
77.5
80
82.5
85
87.5
90
92.5
95
97.5
100
103
106
109
112
115
118
122
R10
125
R20
125
R40
125
132
140
140
150
160
160
160
170
180
180
190
200
200
200
212
224
224
236
250
250
250
265
280
280
300
315
315
315
335
355
355
375
400
400
400
425
45
450
475
500
500
500
530
560
560
600
630
630
630
670
710
710
750
R80
125
128
132
136
140
145
150
155
160
165
170
175
180
185
190
195
200
206
212
218
224
230
236
243
250
258
265
272
280
290
300
307
315
325
335
345
355
365
375
387
400
412
425
437
450
462
475
487
500
515
530
545
560
580
600
615
630
650
670
690
710
730
750
775
R10
800
R20
800
R40
800
850
900
900
950
1000
1000
1000
1060
1120
1120
1180
1250
1250
1250
1320
1400
1400
1500
1600
1600
1600
1700
1800
1800
1900
2000
2000
2000
2120
2240
2240
2360
2500
2500
2500
2650
2800
2800
3000
3150
3150
3150
3350
3550
3550
3750
4000
4000
4000
4250
450
4500
4750
Windows Keyboard Shortcuts
R80
800
825
850
875
900
925
950
975
1000
1030
1060
1090
1120
1150
1180
1220
1250
1280
1320
1360
1400
1450
1500
1550
1600
1650
1700
1750
1800
1850
1900
1950
2000
2060
2120
2180
2240
2300
2360
2430
2500
2580
2650
2720
2800
2900
3000
3070
3150
3250
3350
3450
3550
3650
3750
3870
4000
4120
4250
4370
4500
4620
4750
4870
R10
5000
R20
5000
R40
5000
5300
5600
5600
6000
6300
6300
6300
6700
7100
7100
7500
8000
8000
8000
8500
9000
9000
9500
10000
10000
10000
10600
11200
11200
11800
12500
12500
12500
13200
14000
14000
15000
16000
16000
16000
17000
18000
18000
19000
20000
20000
20000
R80
5000
5150
5300
5450
5600
5800
6000
6150
6300
6500
6700
6900
7100
7300
7500
7750
8000
8250
8500
8750
9000
9250
9500
9750
10000
10300
10600
10900
11200
11500
11800
12200
12500
12800
13200
13600
14000
14500
15000
15500
16000
16500
17000
17500
18000
18500
19000
19500
20000
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Appendix I: Equation Editor Functions
+ and -
addition and subtraction
* and /
multiplication and division
^
Exponentiation
User Equation Syntax
Function
Corresponding LabVIEW
Function
Description
abs(x)
Absolute Value
Returns the absolute value of x.
acos(x)
Inverse Cosine
Computes the inverse cosine of x in
radians.
acosh(x)
Inverse Hyperbolic Cosine
Computes the inverse hyperbolic
cosine of x.
asin(x)
Inverse Sine
Computes the inverse sine of x in
radians.
asinh(x)
Inverse Hyperbolic Sine
Computes the inverse hyperbolic sine
of x.
atan(x)
Inverse Tangent
Computes the inverse tangent of x in
radians.
atanh(x)
Inverse Hyperbolic Tangent
Computes the inverse hyperbolic tangent of x.
ci(x)
Cosine Integral
Computes the cosine integral of x
where x is any real number.
cos(x)
Cosine
Computes the cosine of x, where x is
in radians.
cosh(x)
Hyperbolic Cosine
Computes the hyperbolic cosine of x.
cot(x)
Cotangent
Computes the cotangent of x (1/
tan(x)), where x is in radians.
csc(x)
Cosecant
Computes the cosecant of x (1/
sin(x)), where x is in radians.
exp(x)
Exponential
Computes the value of e raised to the
x power.
expm1(x)
Exponential (Arg) - 1
Computes one less than the value of
e raised to the x power ((e^x) - 1).
floor(x)
Round To -Infinity
Truncates x to the next lower integer
(largest integer £x).
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Equation Editor Functions
523
gamma(x)
Gamma Function
G (n + 1) = n! for all natural numbers
n.
int(x)
Round To Nearest
Rounds x to the nearest integer.
intrz(x)
-
Rounds x to the nearest integer
between x and zero.
ln(x)
Natural Logarithm
Computes the natural logarithm of x
(to the base of e).
lnp1(x)
Natural Logarithm (Arg +1)
Computes the natural logarithm of (x
+ 1).
log(x)
Logarithm Base 10
Computes the logarithm of x (to the
base of 10).
log2(x)
Logarithm Base 2
Computes the logarithm of x (to the
base of 2).
pi(x)
Represents the value = 3.14159...
pi(x) = x * ppi(1) = ppi(2.4) = 2.4 * p
rand( )
Random Number (0 - 1)
Produces a floating point number
between 0 and 1 exclusively.
sec(x)
Secant
Computes the secant of x, where x is
in radians (1/cos(x)).
si(x)
Sine Integral
Computes the sine integral of x where
x is any real number.
sign(x)
Sign
Returns 1 if x is greater than 0,
returns 0 if x is equal to 0, and returns
-1 if x is less than 0.
sin(x)
Sine
Computes the sine of x, where x is in
radians.
sinc(x)
Sinc
Computes the sine of x divided by x
(sin(x)/x), where x is in radians.
sinh(x)
Hyperbolic Sine
Computes the hyperbolic sine of x.
spike(x)
Spike Function
spike(x) returns: 1 if 0£ x £10 for any
other value of x.
sqrt(x)
Square Root
Computes the square root of x.
square(x)
Square Function
square (x) returns: 1 if 2n£ x£ (2n +
1)0 if 2n + 1£ x £(2n + 2)where x is
any real number and n is any integer.
step(x)
Step Function
step(x) returns: 0 if x < 01 if any other
condition obtains.
tan(x)
Tangent
Computes the tangent of x, where x is
in radians.
tanh(x)
Hyperbolic Tangent
Computes the hyperbolic tangent of x.
524
Equation Editor Functions
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Appendix J: Weighting and Window Types
TSR Window Type
As of SoundCheck 8, the TSR window waveform is output in the Memory List and can be displayed on top of
the impulse response or the deconvolved response to check the time alignment. The Start and Stop times of
the window are set in the Analysis Step. See Time Selective Response (TSR) on page 145 for more
information. The window is used to select the portion of the Deconvolved Response that contains the
fundamental impulse response (linear impulse response). This impulse response contains the frequency
response of the device under test.
The following examples use the same impulse response as a means of comparison.
None
Also referred to as Rectangular. No weighting is
applied to the measurement. This works well with
transients that are shorter in length than the
measurement time. Due to the flat characteristic
in the time domain, all parts of the signal are
equally weighted.
Figure J-1: None
Cosine Tapered
The Cosine Taper window used by the Time
Selective Response algorithm, has a 10% taper
at each end. The Fundamental Impulse
Response must be inside these tapers. In the
example, the taper of the window disregards the
first and last 1 mSec of the impulse. In versions
of SoundCheck prior to version 8, this was the
fixed window type for TSR.
Figure J-2: Cosine Tapered
Half-Cosine Tapered
This window has only a trailing Cosine taper. It is
well suited for impulses which have no content
before zero time. The taper removes any slight
discontinuity at the very end.
Figure J-3: Half-Cosine Tapered
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Weighting and Window Types
525
Exponential
This window is useful for impulses with a long
decay rate which exceeds the duration of the
time window. The exponential curve applies an
additional damping that forces a smoothing of the
impulse in the time window. The start value of the
exponential weighting is 100% and the final value
is 10%.”
Figure J-4: Exponential
Adrienne
This is an optimized window for time selective
response measurements. The leading and
trailing tapers are both half Blackman-Harris
functions. For optimal results the beginning of
the flat portion should be 0.2 mSec before the
impulse.
This window is specified in the British Standard,
"Road traffic noise reducing devices - test
method for determining the acoustic
performance - part 5: intrinsic characteristics - in
situ values of sound reflection and airborne
sound insulation" BS CEN/TS 1793-5:2003.
Figure J-5: Adrienne
Half-Hanning
This applies a Half-cosine taper to the end of the
window. It is well suited for long impulses that
exceed the duration of the time window.
The damping applied is stronger than what is
found in the Exponential window, yielding
smoother results in the frequency domain.
Figure J-6: Half-Hanning
Half-BH4
This is a Half Blackman-Harris function (4 terms).
The application is the same as for exponential
and Half-Hanning. It has the strongest damping
and therefore yields the greatest smoothing in the
frequency domain.
Figure J-7: Half Blackman-Harris 4 Term
526
Weighting and Window Types
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Appendix K: Time Selective Measurements With Log Sweep
A time selective measurement of a frequency response is (directly or indirectly) based on a measurement of
the impulse response, where a well-defined time window is applied to the impulse response. The frequency
response is simply the Fourier transform of the impulse response. Time selective measurements are often
used in electroacoustics to make simulated free-field measurements of transducers. This is to isolate the
directly transmitted, free field sound from reflections due to the surroundings. By using a time window applied
to the impulse response, it is possible to obtain results similar to those obtained in a non-echoic environment.
The accuracy of such measurements depends on several factors. Some basic properties apply generally to all
implementations, while some others relate to the actual algorithm and specific implementation.
The most basic requirement for simulated free-field measurements is that the reflections must not arrive so
early that they overlap the impulse response of the direct sound. If the reflections arrive so early that they
overlap the direct sound, the time window will cut away some of the impulse response of the direct sound, and
the measurement will loose accuracy. This applies to all time selective methods.
If the system is perfectly linear then the impulse response can be obtained by a direct measurement, simply by
applying a short pulse and recording the resulting "impulse response". In practice, however, such
measurements will usually suffer from either a poor S/N ratio due to the low energy in the short pulse or suffer
from overloading if the pulse is increased to improve the S/N ratio. The crest factor of the excitation is simply
too high for practical use.
Various types of noise signals have a much lower crest factor and combined with cross-spectrum or crosscorrelation analysis, the response of the linear behavior can be measured. Most systems, however, are not
perfectly linear. The non-linearity not only sets limits for which test signals can be used, but also introduces the
need for characterizing this non-linearity, e.g., measuring the distortion.
The Time Delay Spectrometry (TDS) introduced by Heyser uses a linear swept sine for time-selective
measurements. Like most other swept sine algorithms, it is based on the assumption that the response at a
certain point in time represents the response to just one particular frequency. That is approximately correct if
the sweep rate is low enough. A delay in the system under test, however, will result in a frequency shift
(proportional to the delay) of the measured response. If the signal follows different paths with different delays
(e.g., direct and reflected sound from a loudspeaker), the signal measured will contain slightly different
frequencies. Tracking the response with a narrow bandpass filter therefore makes it possible to isolate one
path (e.g., just the direct sound from a loudspeaker) from the others. It is proven that such a tracking bandpass
filter is simply equivalent to applying a time window to the impulse response. In addition, a tracking bandpass
filter can also be used to track the harmonics of the swept signal, thereby measure harmonic distortion as well
(and still in a time selective way). However, the sweep rate must be limited in order to measure the fundamental
correctly, measuring harmonics at low frequencies put further constraints on the maximum sweep rate.
The Time Selective Response (TSR) introduced by Brüel & Kjær also uses a linear swept sine, but removes the
limitation on the sweep rate (by mathematical refinement of the algorithm) so the fundamental response is
measured correctly even with very fast sweeps. For measuring distortion at low frequencies, the same
constraints still applies to the maximum sweep rate for TSR, as for TDS.
Both TDS and TSR, with the tracking bandpass filter approach, are linked to using a linear sweep. The linear
sweep, however, is not very ideal, if the measurements shall cover a broad frequency range:

Often the S/N ratio at low frequencies is critical, but the linear sweep has relatively little energy at low
frequencies: Half of the time (and thereby half of the energy) is used in the highest octave, only one
fourth of the time (and of the energy) is used in the second highest octave, etc. In order to achieve a
sufficient S/N ratio at low frequencies a very slow sweep has to be used, wasting time (and energy) at
high frequencies.

The linear sweep also becomes very slow, if the sweep rate has to be kept very low in order to
measure distortion at low frequencies - eventually even slower than required for a sufficient S/N ratio.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Time Selective Measurements With Log Sweep
527
The log TSR implemented in SoundCheck® uses a logarithmically swept sine for fast time selective
measurements of both the fundamental response and of distortion. The logarithmically swept sine is much
more suitable for electroacoustic measurements:

The logarithmic sweep uses the same time (and energy) for every octave, which is much more suitable
achieving a good S/N ration for all frequencies in typical electroacoustic measurements.

The logarithmic sweep also provides a sweep rate, which is low at low frequencies but increases with
the frequency. That makes it possible to measure distortion also at low frequencies without making the
whole sweep very slow. As a logarithmically swept sine is used the "tracking bandpass filter" method is
not applicable for the analysis. Instead, cross correlation analysis is used. By doing the cross
correlation of the response signal with a special energy weighted version of the excitation signal, the
impulse response is found directly, and from that the frequency response is easily calculated as well.
It is thereby possible to obtain a unique combination of features:

Time selectivity.

The very suitable energy distribution of the logarithmic sweep (increased energy at low frequencies).

The capability of measuring distortion due to the sine based nature of the signal.

An effective way measure distortion even at low frequencies due to the sweep rate of the logarithmic
sweep being low only at low frequencies just where it is needed.
Important: The time windows used by the Time Selective Response algorithm are defined
in Weighting and Window Types on page 525.
Please refer to the following AES paper for more information on this measurement technique:
“Simulated Free Field Measurements”, found on the Listen website.
528
Time Selective Measurements With Log Sweep
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Appendix L: Excel Template Tutorial
Excel templates are a great way to keep your data organized when you are running the same sequence
repeatedly and want to save several pieces of data each time. They allow you to customize the layout of data
and even create additional worksheets with graphs, statistics, or summaries.
Step 1 – Write Sequence

Before you can begin developing a template your sequence should be able to collect all the data that
should be saved to Excel

SoundCheck relies on the data names that are visible in the memory list to create the worksheets in
Excel

When saving to an Excel file, a new worksheet is created for each data item

The names for all Curves, Values and Results should be finalized before they are saved to Excel

If the data names are changed after you’ve created the Excel template, the Excel template will have to
be re-created
Step 2 – Create Autosave Step(s)

Insert an Autosave Step in the sequence, and configure
it to Save Data to Excel.
Important: If you are saving Data and Results, you
will need at least 2 Autosave Steps set to
Append.
In this case, the steps are set to Append Data so that all
the information is added to one Excel file.


Choose settings for all of the parameters, but select
‘None’ for the Header
Figure L-1: Autosave Steps
If saving curves you may wish to only select the ‘Y’ axis.
This will result in the X axis being printed once at the
beginning of the Excel file, and only the Y axis data will append after that.
Depending on the sequence, there may be multiple Autosave Steps appending to the same file. The benefit of
this is that you can save different data types with unique formats but keep the data confined to a single file.
Data and Results are autosaved via different steps. Figure L-1 shows 3 separate Autosave Steps in the
Sequence Editor.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Excel Template Tutorial
529
The Autosave Step in Figure L-2 is saving the bulk of the data to
Excel.

The Y axis is always saved on the first save to Excel
In this example, only the Y axis is saved since the Z axis values
are not needed.
Other settings used for all three Autosave Steps:
Autosave Folder Path: C:\SoundCheck\Data (or other folder on
your local drive)
Format: Excel
Header: None
Layout: Rows
Notation: Floating point, 2 Decimal places
Test Information: Serial No.
Filename: Append and Automatic
Filename Template: <Seq> (Sequence Name)
Figure L-2: Save Y Axis
The step in Figure L-3 is nearly identical to the previous step
except for the axis choice. Only the Z axis is saved since the data
is phase information.
These two steps are set to append to the same file. This is done
by selecting Excel as the data format, and choosing the same
data folder and filename settings. In this particular example the
first autosave step will open Excel, save the data, and then close
Excel. The second step will repeat this procedure, appending to
the file that was just created.
Figure L-3: Save Z Axis
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Instruction Manual
The third Autosave Step in Figure L-4 is set to save the Results
of the selected limit steps. Otherwise the settings are identical to
the first two steps, and the data will again be saved to the single
Excel file.
Note:
Saving Data and Results requires two
separate Autosave steps.
Figure L-4: Save Results
Step 3 – Create Initial Excel File
Now that the autosave step(s) have been created, it
is time to run the sequence so that an Excel file is
created. This initial file is used to create the
template.
Using an Excel file with real data saves a lot of
time in Step 4 since this initial file has the correct
structure for data including worksheet names
and data headers.
Figure L-5: Initial Excel File Example
Figure L-5 shows the “Fundamental Tab“ of the initial saved file from the example sequence.
Step 4 – Create Template
Open the Initial Excel File and save it as a new file, adding the word “Template” to the end of name. This
identifies it for use in the next step and to prevent it from accidentally being overwritten. For example:
Sequence Name Template.xls

This must be an .XLS or .XLSX file, not an .XLT Excel template. XLSM files are supported as of
SC14.01.
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Instruction Manual
Excel Template Tutorial
531
Create New Summary Worksheet
Excel allows you to link data from several worksheets to cells on a Master Page. This allows you to condense
and format data to suit your needs.
In the example template file, a ‘Summary’ worksheet has been added. It has been moved so it is the first
worksheet in the Excel file. All the required data from each worksheet can be presented on a single page
instead of having to scan through each of the tabs. This is especially useful for individual product reports or
creating an overall pass/fail report for a production run.
Summary for Production Run

Copy the entire Column of data from a worksheet for each
item you want on the Summary Page. This ensures that the
data from all sequence runs will be shown on the Summary
Page.

Go to the Summary Page and click on the Column Letter
where you would like that data to appear

Select Edit > Paste Special > Paste Link

Do this for each Data Column that should appear on the
Summary

See example in Figure L-8
Summary for Single DUT

Copy individual cells of data from a worksheet for each item needed and paste in the desired cell on
the Summary Page using “Edit > Paste Special > Paste Link” as noted above

You can also use the graph function in Excel, e.g.: Response or Distortion graphs
Prepare Template for New Data

Go through each Tab or Worksheet of the Excel Template that generated
by SoundCheck. Do not include the Summary Page. Perform the following
operation

Select all the Initial Data Cells by clicking on box in the upper left
corner of the first data worksheet

Select multiple worksheet by holding the Shift Key and clicking on all
of the Worksheets along the bottom.
DO NOT INCLUDE THE SUMMARY PAGE!
532

Right Click on the selected region(s) and select Clear Contents. (Do not use the Delete key. It is
not the same function.) You can also go to the Excel Edit menu, select Clear and then select
Contents.

This Clears the data from the cells but retains the formating and data pointers required by Excel
Excel Template Tutorial
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual

Figure L-6 shows the all the
worksheets are present in the
template but the data lines are
empty. This must be done for every
worksheet in the template.
Figure L-6: Clear Contents to Create Template
Step 5 – Use the Template in the
Sequence
In SoundCheck open the Sequence Editor and set each of the
Autosave Steps to use the new Excel Template. When the
sequence is run, SoundCheck will enter the data into this template
but save it as a new Excel file according to your Filename settings.
If the Autosave Step is set to Append, SoundCheck will continue
appending to an existing file.
Figure L-7 shows the new Excel file after
saving date on four units in a production run.
Figure L-7: New Production Run Excel File
Figure L-8 shows the Summary Tab which
links to data from the other worksheets.
Figure L-8: Summary Tab
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Instruction Manual
Excel Template Tutorial
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Page Intentionally Left Blank
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Instruction Manual
Excel Template Tutorial
534
Appendix M: Barcode Reader Integration
At its most basic functionality, a barcode reader can be used to input characters scanned from a barcode
directly into any available field in SoundCheck. This is useful for quickly entering long and/or complex serial
numbers or lot numbers in SoundCheck.
It is also possible to scan a barcode that performs an action in SoundCheck.

Scan a barcode that starts a SoundCheck sequence

Scan a barcode that opens the Signal Generator
This is possible because a barcode reader converts data read from the barcode into ASCII data that is sent to
your PC. Essentially, it’s emulating keyboard activity. This is great for production line systems where a
keyboard is not available to the operator and you want to simplify and minimize operator contact with the PC.
We can take advantage of this by creating barcodes which represent the keyboard shortcuts available in
SoundCheck. Referencing the first example, starting a sequence through the keyboard is done by pressing F2
on the keyboard. Therefore, by generating a barcode which contains the same ASCII data as F2, we are able
to mimic that function key being pressed by scanning that barcode. See Keyboard Shortcuts on page 521.
Programming
Most barcode readers need to be programmed to be able to read a barcode and emulate a key stroke. This is
done by scanning a series of barcodes in the bar code reader user manual. Sometimes an extended manual or
programming guide for the reader needs to be downloaded from the manufacturer’s website.
Important! The barcode reader must be able to “Emulate Keyboard Functions” so that SoundCheck
receives keystrokes when a barcode is scanned.
Before you buy a barcode reader for SoundCheck control, contact the technical support department of the bar
code reader manufacturer and ask if it supports:

Keyboard Emulation, Keyboard Wedge or Does it act as an HID (Human Interface Device)

Code 39 Full ASCII and Code 39 Extended

Function Key Mapping (See below)

Does the reader come pre-programmed to read Function Key barcodes from their programming guide
(cut and paste F key barcodes from their PDF file)
Symbology and Function Key Mapping
The first thing that needs to be activated is the symbology called “Code 39 Full ASCII” and Code 39 Extended.
Either of these may be required.
Bar Code Rules
Some bar code readers allow you to create special rules allowing you to emulate key strokes. The
process usually involves scanning a list of bar codes in the bar code reader instruction manual.
Instructions will vary depending on the make and model of bar code reader. This is only a general
example.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Barcode Reader Integration
535
Example
Scan the bar codes in the order listed.
1. Begin New Rule
2. Specific String at Start
3. Capital letter F code
4. Number 2 code
5. End of Message
6. Send F2 Key
7. Save Rule
With barcode creation software, make a barcode for “F2” (the letter F and the number 2 in one bar code), label
it “Start Sequence” and print it out. Scanning this bar code will emulate hitting the F2 key on the keyboard.
Repeat the process for other function keys. See Keyboard Shortcuts on page 521.
Check with the manufacturer regarding utilities that will assist with Function Key Mapping or programming the
reader.
Advanced
Function Key Mapping creates a “preset” in the barcode reader for selected keys on the keyboard, such as the
function keys. The mapping uses ASCII values that are rarely used. This is what allows a barcode reader to
send key strokes to the computer, such as F2, which is used to start a sequence is SoundCheck.
Some barcode readers also have “Advanced Data Editing” functionality. This allows you to program the
barcode reader to manipulate the data read by the barcode reader. You can program prefix and suffix
commands, so that when a bar code is scanned, other commands can be “chained“ together to control
SoundCheck. For example:

The barcode reader is programmed with the prefix F8 (which puts the cursor in the serial number field)
and the suffix F2 (which starts a SoundCheck sequence)

Scanning a serial number barcode on your DUT automatically adds the number to the serial number
field and then starts the currently open sequence
Barcode Software
You will also need a software application to create barcodes.

The software must be able to create Code 39 barcodes
The example in Figure M-1 shows a Code39 barcode for “capital F + 2”.
The barcode reader is programmed to read this code and send the “F2
key” to the computer.
Figure M-1: Code39
of Capital F + 2

You will need to create a separate barcode for each keyboard function
required (F2, F3, F4, etc.) See Keyboard Shortcuts on page 521.

These barcodes and instructions for use can be used to make to a ”Barcode Command Sheet” that is
printed out and posted with each SoundCheck system
There are a number of Barcode Software applications available that provide the basic functions required, such
as Code 39. There are also free barcode applications available.
536
Barcode Reader Integration
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Appendix N: Running Sequences from a Network Drive
As of SoundCheck 12, the sequence file (.SQC) contains all sequence parameters and steps. Individual Step
files are no longer required. See Single-file Sequence Format on page 388.

Sequences can be shared with workstations on the network

All systems must use the same version of SoundCheck as sequences are not backward compatible

Each workstation will use its own System Hardware and System Calibration Configurations, which will
have unique values

Once edited, sequences can be marked as ”Read-Only” to prevent unwanted changes on the
workstations (Right click on the sequence or folder of sequences, select Properties and check ReadOnly)
Important! The only downside to this practice is that the Master and Workstation PCs can only open
sequences if the network is operational. The reliability of the network should be considered
before implementing this system.

Server - A sub-server used solely for SoundCheck (preferred) or the main network server

Master PC - Used to create and edit SoundCheck sequences, storing them on the network

Workstation PC - A SoundCheck system that opens sequences stored on the server
Master PC Configuration
The Master PC is the computer that
sequences are developed and/or edited on.
This requires the Sequence Editor (optional
module 2002).
Server
S:\
Sequences can be stored on
the Master PC and then copied
to the Server or simply stored
and edited on the Server.
1. Any exported sequences from
previous versions should be saved
with SoundCheck 16.0 on the
Master PC. Doing this saves all of
the steps within the sequence file
as specified in Single-file
Sequence Format on page 388.
Master PC
SoundCheck
Sequence
Development
SoundCheck
Workstation
1
SoundCheck
Workstation
2
Figure N-1: SoundCheck Network Scheme
2. On the SoundCheck Main Screen, click on Edit and then select Folder Paths.
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Instruction Manual
Running Sequences from a Network Drive
537
3. Step Templates can remain on the local PC. They are not
linked to sequences.
4. Browse to the location for the Import/Export folder. In this
case it is on the network. Click on Select Cur Dir.
5. Browse to the location of the Logo for use in print-outs.
Click on Select Cur Dir.
6. Status.dat files can also be located on the network.
7. The Master PC can now open sequences from the
network. On the SoundCheck main window click on File
and then Open. Browse to the network sequence location
and open a sequence.
Note:
Changes to the Master PC System Hardware and System Calibration Configurations will not be
replicated on the Workstation PCs.
Workstation PC Configuration
8. For existing workstations: Make sure the
sequences unique to that workstation
have been exported and backed up. See
“Exporting Sequences” on page 403.
Server
S:\
Each workstation opens
sequences from the server.
Sequences can be made
Read-Only.
9. The Hardware Configuration of the
Workstation PC should be set up for the
specific audio interface used on each
machine. Note that the physical hardware
can be different on each machine. See
“Hardware Configuration” on page 47.
Of course, multichannel sequences will
require multichannel hardware.
10. Each workstation must have the same
Signal Path naming convention as the
Master PC. See “Naming - Best
Practices” on page 73.
Master PC
SoundCheck
Sequence
Development
SoundCheck
Workstation
1
SoundCheck
Workstation
2
Figure N-2: Workstation Configuration
As long as the “Signal Path naming convention” of the workstations matches the Master PC, the
sequence will access the hardware and work as expected.
Each workstation will have the same channel names and channel structure, but will have unique
calibration values for each input and Output Signal Path.
11. See Calibrating SoundCheck on page 76 for instructions on input and output calibration.
Set the folder paths in the same way the Master PC is setup. Generally, sequences are not edited on the
workstation computers. If this is the case, the Sequence Editor module is not needed for the workstations.
538
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SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Appendix O: Data Import Wizard Tutorial
Importing text from a saved file
1. From the Memory List click Data
2. Select Open Data
3. Select a .TXT file to start wizard
The first Import Wizard screen (Figure O-1)
will display the contents of the selected text
file. The default settings are:

Delimited

Column delimiter - tab

Data is in - columns

Data offset: 0 columns and 0 rows
The text file shown in Figure O-1 is tab
delimited in a row format and includes a
header row of frequency values.
Figure O-1: Data Import Wizard Screen 1
To configure the import wizard, do the following:
1. Choose whether data is delimited or fixed width. If the data is delimited, choose the type of delimiter
(tab, comma, space, other).
2. Choose the data format (columns or rows).
3. Choose whether the data file includes a header. The row/col: box refers to how many rows (or
columns) the header is offset from the first row (or column). In Figure O-1, the header information is in
the first row, therefore the offset value is 0. Check the Standard Header box if the data file was stored
using the SoundCheck Standard header format (See Autosave Editor on page 183 for more details
regarding the standard header format).
4. Increment the Data offset if the data
begins at a row (or column) other
than Row 1 (or Column 1). If the first
row or column contains the data (as
in Figure O-1), then the offset
should be 0.
5. Click Next when finished.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Figure O-2: Configuring Import Wizard Screen 1
Data Import Wizard Tutorial
539
The Import Wizard table in Figure O-3
shows if the X-axis/Y-axis appears in
Columns or Rows.
X-axis
This is typically set to common
Y-axis
Typically set set to increments.
If the X-axis is set to increments,
SoundCheck will interpret the first row (or
column) to be the X-axis and the second
row (or column) to be the corresponding
data values.
Figure O-3: Data Import Wizard Screen 2
For files containing multiple data sets:
The X and Y-axes are grouped in pairs (e.g., rows 1 and 2 are the X and Y data respectively for Data
Set #1
Rows 3 & 4 are the X and Y data respectively for Data Set #2, etc.)
The set individually option allows you to choose which rows or columns are X-axis values.
Click Next once the appropriate settings have been made.
Figure O-4: Data Import Wizard Screen 3
540
Note:
The import wizard keeps imported data in memory. Depending on the computer hardware, you
may not be able to import large data arrays such as an FFT spectrum or time waveform.
Note:
The example in Figure O-4 shows only X and Y data. For files with both Magnitude and Phase
please see Phase Data on page 541.
Data Import Wizard Tutorial
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
The following is a breakdown of the settings in Figure O-4.
X axis settings

Location of X-axis values

X-axis data type and units. Typically the X-axis
values are linear (Hz) and displayed on a
logarithmic axis.
Y axis settings
Location of Y-axis values. The Row/col: value is based on which curve is
highlighted in the Curves list. In this case, curve 1 (the highlighted curve) is
located in Row 2.
Phase Data
When importing a curve with Magnitude and Phase
data, select “Phase row/col included”.
Note:
When importing a reference curve with Magnitude and Phase you may need to remove extra
Curves created by the wizard. Then select “Phase row/col included”. This will enable the Phase
fields for editing and setup the proper Z-axis column for phase data.
Y-axis data type and units. Typically, the Y-axis values are in dB and
displayed on a linear axis. The decibel reference value can be entered.
Note:
When importing correction or equalization curves, choose Units with no prefix or unit name and set
the dB reference to 1.00.
Curves
Data curves are available in the imported text file. Curves can be added or removed by clicking
Add and Remove. Click Apply Setting to All to apply the settings for a highlighted curve;
e.g., Units of dB re 20 µPa to all the curves in the list.
Name
Allows you to create a custom name for a curve. The highlighted curve(s) can be
individually named by typing in the Name field.
Save Settings
The import configuration should be saved using Save Settings… This allows
you to recall these settings in the future by using the Load Settings... button
shown in Figure O-1. Once settings are loaded, click Finish and data is
immediately imported.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Data Import Wizard Tutorial
541
Apply Settings to All
Apply data/axis type, magnitude, units to all curves for import
Add
Add new curve to import
Remove
Remove curve from import list
Importing Correction Curves From Other Manufacturers
If an imported curve does not have a 0 dB value at 1 kHz you must change the calibration Reference
Frequency in the Calibration Editor to a point on the correction curve that is at 0 dB.
This may also have to be done when importing Diffuse Field or other such correction curves without data at
1 kHz.
See Importing Correction Curves From Other Manufacturers on page 70.
542
Data Import Wizard Tutorial
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Appendix P: Default Sequence List
The following list of sequences is included with SoundCheck
Sequence
Description
Calibration
AmpConnect Self Test Stepped Sine
Used to test the functionality and connections of AmpConnect. For use when Time Selective
Response option is not available.
AmpConnect Self Test
Used to test the functionality and connections of AmpConnect. Requires Time Selective
Response module.
Microphone Calibration
Self Test
This is not to be used as a sequence. It is only a placeholder for Calibration Editor functions.
A diagnostic tool used to check the settings and performance of the audio interface (sound
card)
Electronics
Amplifier THD+N
Tests the gain response and THD+N for an amplifier or other electronics
MP3 Player (Multitone)
Uses a multitone stimulus to test various parameters of a portable music player
Headphones and Headsets
Bluetooth Headset - Receive
Subsequence used in Bluetooth Headset sequence for testing the receive side
Bluetooth Headset - Send
Subsequence used in the Bluetooth Headset sequence for testing the send side
Bluetooth Headset
Uses a multitone stimulus to test a Bluetooth headset in both the send and receive directions
Headphones
An example headphone sequence that measures frequency response and distortion
Hearing Aids
Frequency Response
Basic frequency response measurement (gain versus frequency) for a hearing aid
Input vs Output
Uses amplitude sweeps at several frequencies to generate the input-output curves for a
hearing aid
OSPL 90
Performs the OSPL 90 test from the ANSI and IEC hearing aid standards
Release Time
Tests hearing aid release time according to ANSI S3-2003
How To Examples
ActiveX & Test Stand example
This sequence is called up by the Active X example code located at C:\SoundCheck
9.1\ActiveX Examples\ActiveX VB example.exe
Autosave
Demonstrates several methods for using the autosave step
Average Sensitivity
A very basic sequence that calculates the average sensitivity from a response curve
Complex Averaging in Loop
Calculates a complex average (magnitude and phase) over multiple measurements
Confidence & Noise
Demonstrates the confidence feature in the analysis editor by using 3 stimuli of varying
lengths
Diff Distortion
Dual-Channel Analysis
An example for testing difference frequency distortion
Measures frequency response with three different methods: stepped sine, log sweep + TSR,
pink noise and transfer function
IM Distortion
An example for testing intermodulation distortion
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Default Sequence List
543
Limits in Reference to Standard
Measures a reference standard and uses its response to automatically generate limits for
subsequent measurements
Loop Stimulus Level
A complex example of sequence logic that searches for the stimulus level that will generate
3% THD in the DUT
Multitone Analysis
A basic example of the multitone stimulus and analysis
Power Averaging
Uses the real time analyzer (RTA) to measure sound power
Statistics
THD at Actual Measured Frequency
Demonstrates the various uses of the statistics step
Plots the harmonics at their measured frequency and generates a normalized distortion
curve
Virtual Instrument Acquisition
Walks through each of the virtual instruments and demonstrates their uses in a simple
electrical loop back
Loudspeakers
Complete test
An example of a loudspeaker production test that measures frequency response, distortion,
impedance, and sensitivity all in one sweep
Impedance
Measures impedance of a loudspeaker
Loose Particles
Perceptual Rub & Buzz
Demonstrates the loose particle algorithm
Demonstrates the Perceptual Rub & Buzz function which measures distortion based on
human hearing models and masking curves (Analysis Editor)
Polar Plot (Linear X turntable)
Measures the polar response and directivity of a loudspeaker in the horizontal and vertical
axes by automatically controlling a Linear X turntable
Rub & Buzz
T-S Parameters – Added Mass
T-S Parameters – Known Mass
T-S Parameters – Known Volume
An example of measuring rub & buzz
Time Selective Response
An example of measuring frequency response using a log sweep and the TSR algorithm
Thiele-Small Parameters:
Generates Thiele-Small parameters via the added mass or fixed volume methods
Microphones
Mic substitution
Microphone Self Noise
Microphone
Measures the self noise of a microphone
Measures frequency response and sensitivity of a microphone with an equalized stepped
sine sweep
SC ONE
SC ONE – Headphones
SC ONE – Loudspeaker
SC ONE – Microphone (Measure
Reference)
SC ONE – Microphone
SoundCheck ONE template sequences serve as a starting point for making new
sequences. They contain all the necessary steps to perform the essential measurements
for their test application.
SC One AmpConnect Self Test
Used to test the functionality and connections of AmpConnect.
Telephones
Receive
Measures response, distortion, and loudness for the receive side of a telephone
Send
Measures response, distortion, and loudness for the send side of a telephone
544
Default Sequence List
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
SoundCheck 16.0 Available Functionality
SoundCheck® 16.0 Available Functionality
Industry Standard Sequences
Blackman-Harris, and 7 Term BlackmanHarris windows
(Please contact Listen for a complete list)
• IEEE • ITU • ANSI • IEC • TIA •TBR • ISO • AES • ALMA

Triggering

Complex or power averaging

Average, Maximum, Minimum level with
overload and real time indicators
SoundCheck Virtual Audio Test Bench

Run multiple instances of each virtual
instrument simultaneously

Selectable averaging time (Linear &
Exponential)

Save to Memory List available in all meters

A, B, C and user-defined weightings

Pure tone frequency and amplitude
extraction with “snap to max”

Delta and Harmonic cursor with THD
readout

Selectable graphical zoom

View last waveform of current spectrum

Save to memory of current spectrum
Manual Signal Generator

Sine

Pink and White Noise with user-defined
frequency range

Streaming .wav file from disk with RMS, Peak
level and active speech level calibration

Equalization using calibration measurements
or any user-defined curve

AC RMS, AC Peak and DC levels (Average,
Max Hold, Min Hold) with overload indication
1/1, 1/3, 1/6, 1/12, 1/24 octave filters with
true digital recursive filters

Linear and Continuous-Moving averaging time
(fast, slow, and user-defined)
Average, Maximum, Minimum level with
overload and real time indicators

A, B, C and user defined weighting filters

Complies with ANSI S1.11 and IEC 1260

Linear and Exponential averaging time
(Fast, Slow, and user-defined)
Multimeter


Real-Time Analyzer

Linear and Exponential averaging time (Fast,
Slow, and user-defined)

A, B, C and user-defined weightings

Selectable Max/Min limits with Pass/Fail
indication

Save and Recall specific multimeter settings

Fixed or auto-tracking bandpass filter option

‘Linear Repeating’ averaging mode
Oscilloscope

Triggering

Delta cursor

Selectable graphical zoom

View spectrum of current waveform
Spectrum Analyzer

FFT with arbitrary number of spectral lines
(only limited by computer speed and memory)

Hanning, Hamming, Blackman-Harris, Exact
Blackman, Blackman, Flat top, 4 Term
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Real Time Distortion Analyzer

continuous real time measurement of output
distortion

Select THD / THD+N, THD / THD+N
Residual and SINAD

A, B, and C weighting filters along with userdefined arbitrary weighting functions

Distortion over time using optional strip
chart recorder
Frequency Counter

High resolution frequency measurement

Frequency value can be saved to the
memory list for use in a sequence
SoundCheck 16.0 Available Functionality
545
equalize any test signal including arbitrary
signals.
Strip Chart Recorder



Provides measurement over time capability for
the multimeter, distortion analyzer and
frequency counter
Plot continuously or for a predefined amount of
time and plot instantaneous results or
repeating averages
Curves and Values can be saved to the
memory list for use in a sequence
SoundCheck Step Editors
Hardware

Windows Multimedia devices including sound
cards with ASIO drivers (PCI, PCMCIA, USB,
Fire wire), Bluetooth, and VoIP.

Apple’s Core Audio devices (SoundCheck Mac
version)

NI DAQmx data acquisition cards including NI
4461

Calibration and settings including sampling
rate, bit depth, analog or digital audio,
maximum voltage, and alias free frequency
limit.

I/O cards for TTL relay control

Computer interfaces control with RS-232,
GPIB (IEEE-488), footswitch and buzzer.

Configuration for AmpConnect™,
AudioConnect™, AudioConnect 4×4™,
SoundConnect 2™ , DC Connect™, BTC 4148 and BQC-4148

Multichannel configuration with table view of
channels

Messages

Message steps initiated based on Pass/Fail
conditions

Display text message in local language, input
numeric values, Yes/No dialog

Digital I/O

IEEE-488 and RS-232

AmpConnect™, AudioConnect™,
AudioConnect 4×4™ , SoundConnect 2™ ,
DC Connect™ BTC-4148 and BQC-4148
setup
Stimulus

Log sweep (“Farina” sweep)

Sine (stepped – any linear or logarithmic
resolution, and amplitude sweep)

Two-tone (two sweeping tones for Difference
Frequency Distortion or one fixed and one
sweeping tone for IM)

Multitone with linear or logarithmic spacing

Noise (pink, white, MLS with user-defined
bandpass range)

Arbitrary (any WAV file)

Equalization

DC (requires Listen DC Connect or National
Instruments hardware)

Sweep Equalization for Minimized Transients Selecting equalization enables a smooth
transition between steps in stepped sine
amplitude and frequency sweeps
Calibration

546
Measure Input and Output sensitivities for
transducers, amplifiers, and signal conditioning
devices using built-in routines and store
calibration history
Import of EQ/Correction curves for
transducers
Acquisition

Play & Record, or any combination of Signal
Generator, Multimeter, RTA, and FFT

Calibration with external, absolute source
including acoustic, vibration, or voltage.

Capture response time waveform as a WAV
file

User-defined physical units (e.g. Pa, V, G, etc.)


Complex Equalization (amplitude and phase)
of input and output devices (e.g. microphones
and amplifiers). If the output device is an
acoustic source, (e.g. loudspeaker, mouth
simulator), SoundCheck can automatically
Simultaneous acquisition using up to 64
channels

Triggered record

Record level monitoring
SoundCheck 16.0 Available Functionality
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Distortion

THD and Rub & Buzz
Analysis
Time

Impulse Response

Normalized THD and Rub & Buzz distortion
(harmonics compared to amplitude of
fundamental at measured frequency)

Auto-Correlation

Cross-Correlation

Perceptual Rub & Buzz in phons

Time Envelope

THD + Noise

Loose particle detection

Intermodulation or Difference Frequency

Automatic delay compensation

Difference Frequency

Non-Coherent Distortion
Frequency

FFT & DFT (any size), and Nth octave
resolution

Hann, Blackman-Harris and Flat Top windows

Auto-spectrum & Cross-spectrum

Spectral Scaling: RMS or Power Density

Frequency and phase response including
harmonics

Complex or power averaging

Relative or absolute response

Coherent Output Power

Recall

Automatically recall data or results
Post-processing

Complex math: Addition, subtraction,
multiplication, division, offset by constant (X,
Y, or Z dimensions), change sign, reciprocal,
absolute value, square, square root,
exponential, and logarithm

Scalar (Ave, Power, Max, Min, Resonant
Frequency, Q, Notch, Loudness)
Coherence & Non-Coherence

Windowing (time and frequency)

Signal-to-Noise Ratio


Measurement Confidence
User-defined Equations (e.g. Thiele-Small
parameters)

Impedance

Change resolution to Nth octave or user
defined linear or logarithmic

Nth Octave synthesis

Power Summation of any user-defined
frequency range

Group delay

Unwrapped phase

Search range to find intersection of two
curves (e.g. -3dB points of crossover
network)

Curve smoothing with 1/3, 1/6, 1/12, and 1/
24 octave or user-defined linear or log
resolution

Loudness rating according to IEEE and ITUT; example sequences for TIA and other
industry standards included

Attack & Release time calculates the time
for the response signal to rise or decay,
respectively, by a user-defined amplitude in
dB or linear units

Directivity Index

Resampling and sampling rate correction
Algorithms

Broadband RMS to measure unfiltered level
of an AC or DC signal

Average FFT Spectrum

Time Selective Response (‘Farina” method) to
measure free-field and impulse response of
fundamental AND harmonics. This includes
deconvolved time response and choice of
time windows.

Heterodyne to measure frequency and phase
response with optimal accuracy

HarmonicTrak™ Algorithm tracks level and
phase of any user-selected harmonics
including sub-harmonics or intermodulation
products; no limit to number of harmonics

Loose particle detection

Multitone

RTA Spectrum & frequency response

Transfer function between any two channels
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
SoundCheck 16.0 Available Functionality
547
Printing

FFT / Inverse FFT

Zwicker loudness (level and spectrum)

Standard & arbitrary waveform filtering

Active speech level (ITU-T P.56)
Statistics

Average

Max, Min, Mean

Standard Deviation with user-defined sigma

Process Control (Cp & Cpk)

Best and Worst Fit to Average with ranking

Yield

Histogram and bell curve fit
Limits

Pass/Fail

Absolute

Floating (x & y directions)

Aligned to a pre-defined value (e.g. 0 dB at 1
kHz)

Dynamic, using live measurements

Waveforms, single values, and curves

Control of significant digits

Margin, Critical and Failed points
548
Report generation to Excel, Word, HTML or
image files

Use of templates (Excel, Word)

Print preview

Direct print to file or printer

Automatic file naming
Custom Steps
Outline ET250-3D Turntable Control

Ethernet control for the Outline ET250-3D
turntable
Instrument Open Close

Template for creating a custom step
combining your LabVIEW code with
SoundCheck virtual instruments
System Custom Step

Run Command Line operations as part of a
sequence
Display


Multiple displays on separate tabs allow
viewing of curves, single values, and test
results with PASS/FAIL indicators; display
layout can be transferred to Word or as HTML
document; curves with different units (e.g.
dBSPL and Ohms) can be displayed in one
graph with no limit to number of curves
displayed in a single graph; data from any one
graph can be exported directly to a new Excel
file or pre-defined template

Displays include XY graph, table, results, text,
polar plots and embedded images

Default template and duplicate

Save to image file

Lock display to protect display layout

Data search function
Mixer Volume

Control input / output levels of a 2 channel
WDM / Core Audio device
RS232 Read Integer

Programming example that reads the integer
value from an external RS232 device
Serial Number Write Read

Programming example for creating a custom
vi to read or write to the SoundCheck serial
number field
Open Before Converting Old Custom VIs

Tool for updating your Custom VIs to latest
version of SoundCheck / LabVIEW
SoundCheck 16.0 Available Functionality
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Glossary
Term
Definition
Absolute Standard Deviation
The standard deviation calculated at each point of the curve. See Statistics chapter for formula.
algorithm
A procedure for solving a mathematical problem in a finite number of steps that frequently
involves repetition of an operation. Algorithm here refers specifically to a procedure that
encodes audio information (so that it can be sent at high speed across data lines) and decodes
the transmitted information into audio at the receiving end.
Amplitude
The instantaneous magnitude of an oscillating quantity such as sound pressure. The peak
amplitude is the maximum value.
Anechoic
Without echo
Area of Audibility
The area within which a specific sound or sounds are audible.
Best/Worst Fit to Average
Determines which of the selected curves is the closest/furthest from the average of the curves.
See Statistics chapter for formula.
Center Frequency
See IEEE 269 and/or B&K Frequency Analysis Text Book definition
Conditional Branching
Used in a sequence to Jump over steps in a sequence according to the Pass/Fail criteria of a
step.
CPB
Constant Percentage Bandwidth.
Crest Factor
crest factor = absolute peak value / rms value = max[|x|]/rms(x)
dB
See decibel
dB (A) or dBA
A sound-level meter reading with an A-weighting network simulating the human-ear response
at a loudness level of 40 phons.
dB (B)
A sound-level meter reading with a B-weighting network simulating the human-ear response at
a loudness level of 70 phons. C34
dBm0
dBm0 is a digital level. 0 dBu = 775 mV = 1 mW@600 Ω. A reference voltage of 775 mV yields
1 mW with a load of 600 Ohm.
dBSPL
A sound-level meter reading with no weighting network in the circuit, i.e., flat. The reference
level is 20 μPa.
Decade
Ten times any quantity or frequency range. The range of the human ear is about 3 decades.
Decibel
A logarithmic form of any measured physical quantity and commonly used in the measurement
of sound. The decibel provides the possibility of representing a large span of signal levels in a
simple manner as opposed to using the basic unit Pascal. The difference between the sound
pressure for silence versus a loud sound is a factor of 1,000,000:1 or more, and it is not
practical to use these large numbers. Doubling of Sound Pressure = 6 dB Doubling of Sound
Power = 3 dB Doubling of Perceived Sound Level = 10 dB (approximately)
Decibel
dB---the term used to identify ten times the common logarithm of the ratio of two like quantities
proportional to power or energy. (See level, sound transmission loss.) One decibel corresponds
to a power ratio of 100.1.
Directivity index (DI)
The difference between sound pressure level in any given direction in the acoustic far field and
the average sound pressure level in that field.
DUT
Device Under Test
Equal loudness contour
A contour representing a constant loudness for all audible frequencies. The contour having a
sound pressure level of 40 dB at 1,000 Hz is arbitrarily defined as the 40-phon contour.
Equalization
The process of adjusting the frequency response of a device or system to achieve a flat or
other desired response.
SoundCheck® 16.0
Instruction Manual
Glossary
549
Far field
That part of the sound field in which sound pressure decreases inversely with distance from
the source. This corresponds to a reduction of approximately 6 dB in level for each doubling
distance.
Feedback, acoustic
Unwanted interaction between the output and input of an acoustical system, e.g., between the
loudspeaker and the microphone of a system.
FFT
Efficient algorithm to calculate the Fourier Transform.
Filter, band pass
A filter that passes all frequencies between a low-frequency cutoff point or a high-frequency
cutoff point.C55
Filter, high pass
A filter that passes all frequencies above a cutoff frequency.
Filter, low pass
A filter that passes all frequencies below a certain cutoff frequency.
Fletcher-Munson Curve
Our sensitivity to sound depends on its frequency and volume. Human ears are most sensitive
to sounds in the midrange. At lower volume levels humans are less sensitive to so