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iPhoto ’08: Visual
QuickStart Guide
Greetings!
Welcome to iPhoto ’08 for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide.
I appreciate having you as a reader, and I hope you find the
book helpful as you use Apple’s iPhoto.
Why make this entire book available in electronic format
when everyone already has it or can get it on paper? Because
in some cases, the electronic version is better. Imagine you
want to go on vacation with your MacBook and digital camera. The electronic version won’t add any weight to your bag,
and you’ll still have all the advice you need about iPhoto at
your fingertips. Plus, because of the bookmarks for each page
in the book and the clickable entries in the Table of Contents
and index, the electronic version can be faster and easier to
use. (All email addresses and Web links are also clickable to
help you avoid unnecessary typing and navigating.)
A quick word about copying. I didn’t add copy prevention to
this PDF file because it makes life harder for everyone. So I
ask two favors. If you want to share this electronic book with
a friend, please do so as you would a physical book, meaning
that if your friend uses it regularly, ask them to buy their own
copy. Or if someone has given you a copy of this book, and
you find it useful, please buy your own copy to support my
efforts helping people with iPhoto.
No matter what, I hope you enjoy the book, and I welcome
any corrections or comments you may have via email at
iphoto-vqs@tidbits.com.
–Adam Engst, December 2007
This is a free sample of “iPhoto ’08: Visual QuickStart Guide.”
Click here to buy the full 220-page ebook for only $15!
This is a free sample of “iPhoto ’08: Visual QuickStart Guide.”
Click here to buy the full 220-page ebook for only $15!
VISUAL QUICKSTART GUIDE
iPhoto ’08
for Mac OS X
Adam C. Engst
Peachpit Press
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Visual QuickStart Guide
iPhoto ’08 for Mac OS X
Adam C. Engst
Peachpit Press
1249 Eighth Street • Berkeley, CA 94710
510/524-2178 • 510/524-2221 (fax)
Find us on the Web at www.peachpit.com.
To report errors, please send a note to errata@peachpit.com.
Peachpit Press is a division of Pearson Education.
Copyright © 2008 by Adam C. Engst
Editor: Nancy Davis
Production Coordinator: Lisa Brazieal
Copyeditor: Tonya Engst
Compositor: Adam C. Engst
Proofreader: Valerie Witte
Indexer: Rebecca Plunkett
Cover Design: Peachpit Press
Notice of rights
All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form by any means, electronic,
mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher. For
information on getting permission for reprints and excerpts, contact permissions@peachpit.com.
Notice of liability
The information in this book is distributed on an “As Is” basis, without warranty. While every precaution has
been taken in the preparation of the book, neither the author nor Peachpit Press shall have any liability to any
person or entity with respect to any loss or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly by the
instructions contained in this book or by the computer software and hardware products described in it.
Trademarks
Visual QuickStart Guide is a registered trademark of Peachpit Press, a division of Pearson Education. iPhoto,
iTunes, iDVD, and iMovie are registered trademarks and/or registered service marks of Apple Inc.
Many of the designations used by manufacturers and sellers to distinguish their products are claimed as
trademarks. Where those designations appear in this book, and Peachpit was aware of a trademark claim, the
designations appear as requested by the owner of the trademark. All other product names and services identified
throughout this book are used in editorial fashion only and for the benefit of such companies with no intention
of infringement of the trademark. No such use, or the use of any trade name, is intended to convey endorsement
or other affiliation with this book.
ISBN 13: 978-0-321-50188-2
ISBN 10:
0-321-50188-8
9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Printed and bound in the United States of America
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Dedication
To my son, Tristan Mackay Engst, the
subject of so many of my photographs.
About the Author
Adam C. Engst is the publisher of TidBITS,
one of the oldest and largest Internet-based
newsletters, and the Take Control electronic
book series (with print collections published
by Peachpit Press), both of which have
helped tens of thousands of readers (find
them at www.tidbits.com). He has written numerous computer books, including
the best-selling Internet Starter Kit series,
and many articles for magazines, including
Macworld, where he is currently a contributing editor. His photos have appeared in
juried photography shows.
His indefatigable support of the Macintosh
community has resulted in numerous
awards and recognition at the highest
levels. In the annual MDJ Power 25 survey of
industry insiders, he consistently ranks as
one of the top five most influential people in
the Macintosh industry, and he was named
one of MacDirectory’s top ten visionaries.
And how many industry figures can boast of
being turned into an action figure?
Please send comments about this book
to Adam at iphoto-vqs@tidbits.com.
Other Books
by Adam C. Engst
Take Control of Your Wi-Fi Security
Take Control of iKey 2
Take Control of Buying a Mac
The Wireless Networking Starter Kit
Internet Starter Kit for Macintosh
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Special Thanks
Featured Photographers
No book is the work of a single person, and
many people helped with this one, including:
I took most of the photos in this book, but I
also included some pictures from my sister,
Jennifer Upson, and my father, Chris Engst.
And of course, any photos that I’m in were
probably taken by Tonya Engst or Tristan
Engst (who is now 8 years old and loves to
take pictures with my older cameras).

Tonya Engst (not only my wonderful
wife, but also a great copyeditor)

Nancy Davis (an excellent editor and the
woman who makes all the books happen)

Lisa Brazieal (spotter of wayward pixels!)

Nancy Ruenzel (for giving me the
nod on this book with iPhoto 1.0)

Scott Cowlin (for marketing wizardry)

Chris Engst (for watching Tristan!)

Glenn Fleishman, Marshall Clow, Fred
Johnson, and David Blatner (without
whose help I could never have explained
color management and resolution)

Keith Kubarek, Sandro Menzel, Cory
Byard, and Laurie Clow (for their
photography knowledge and tips)

Jeff Carlson, Glenn Fleishman, Joe Kissell,
Matt Neuburg, and Mark Anbinder (for
helping keep TidBITS running)

The High Noon Athletic Club, whose
noontime runs kept me more or less sane.
Technical Colophon
I wrote this book using the following
hardware and software:

A dual-processor 2 GHz Power Mac
G5 with a pair of 17-inch Apple Studio
Display monitors, Canon PowerShot
S100, S400, and SD870IS digital cameras,
and an Addonics Pocket DigiDrive card
reader

Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger, iPhoto 7, Adobe
InDesign CS2, Snapz Pro X for screen
shots, and the Peachpit VQS template
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Contents at a Glance
Chapter 1: Getting Started
1
11
Chapter 3: Organizing Photos
29
Chapter 4: Editing Photos
63
Chapter 5: Showing Photos Onscreen
99
Chapter 6: Printing Photos
129
Chapter 7: Sharing Photos
159
Chapter 8: Troubleshooting
171
Appendix A: Deep Background
185
Appendix B: Taking Better Photos
193
Index
205
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Contents at a Glance
Chapter 2: Importing and Managing Photos
Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Getting Started
1
Table of Contents
Hardware and Software Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . 2
Acquiring iPhoto. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Installing iPhoto. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Updating iPhoto via Software Update. . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Updating to iPhoto 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Launching iPhoto. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
iPhoto’s Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Interface Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Chapter 2: Importing and Managing Photos
11
Entering Import Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Importing from a Camera. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Importing from a Card Reader. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Importing from Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Importing from Mail, Safari, and Other Apps . . . .
Importing from an iPhoto Disc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Importing via Image Capture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
iPhoto Directory Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Leaving Photos in Place . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting Photos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Culling Photos Quickly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recovering Photos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Multiple iPhoto Libraries. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Switching between iPhoto Libraries. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Backing Up Your Photos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other Backup Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Merging iPhoto Libraries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 3: Organizing Photos
29
What’s New in Organize Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Organize Tools Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Display Pane’s Layout. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other Display Preferences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Contextual Menu Shortcuts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving around in iPhoto. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Splitting and Merging Events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
vi
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Table of Contents
Chapter 4: Editing Photos
Entering Edit Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edit Tools Overview (Main Window). . . . . . . . . . . .
Edit Tools Overview (Full Screen). . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edit Tools Overview (Separate Window) . . . . . . . .
Editing RAW Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Contextual Menu Shortcuts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Zooming Photos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Duplicating Photos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rotating Photos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Portions of Photos for Cropping. . . . . . .
Specific Aspect Ratios. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cropping Photos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Straightening Photos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enhancing Photos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reducing Red-Eye. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Retouching Photos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Effects Panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Adjust Panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding the Levels Histogram. . . . . . . . . . . .
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vii
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Table of Contents
Creating and Working with Folders. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Albums. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating and Editing Smart Albums. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Smart Album Ideas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Duplicating Sources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Renaming and Rearranging Sources. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting Sources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Photos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Photos to Sources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing Photos from Sources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sorting Photos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assigning Titles to Photos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assigning Descriptions to Photos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing Photo Dates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assigning Ratings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assigning and Removing Keywords. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hiding Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flagging Photos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Searching with the Search Field. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Searching by Date. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Searching by Keyword. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Searching by Rating. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing Photo Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table of Contents
Adjusting Exposure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adjusting Levels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adjusting Contrast. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adjusting Highlight Detail. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adjusting Shadow Detail. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adjusting Saturation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adjusting Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adjusting Tint. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adjusting Sharpness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reducing Noise. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Undoing Changes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using an External Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Try GraphicConverter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Try Photoshop Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table of Contents
Chapter 5: Showing Photos Onscreen
Types of Slideshows. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Slideshow Tools Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up Basic Slideshows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assigning Music to Slideshows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating and Deleting Saved Slideshows. . . . . . . .
Manipulating Slideshow Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Default Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing Slides. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing Slide Photos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the Ken Burns Effect. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controlling Slideshows. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exporting Slideshows to QuickTime Movies. . . .
Distributing QuickTime Movies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating an iMovie Slideshow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a DVD Slideshow with iDVD. . . . . . . . . .
iDVD Slideshow Tips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Desktop Picture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Screen Saver. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up a .Mac Account. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Some Major .Mac Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Web Galleries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Web Galleries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Publishing Photo Pages with iWeb. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Publishing Blog Photos with iWeb. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Publishing .Mac Slides. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Subscribing to .Mac Slides. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exporting to Web Pages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Web Page Export Tips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Copying Photos to an iPod. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
viii
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Table of Contents
Chapter 6: Printing Photos
129
Chapter 7: Sharing Photos
159
Sharing a Library via iPhoto Library Manager. . .
Sharing a Library via a Shared Volume . . . . . . . . .
Sharing Photos via iPhoto Sharing . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing Shared Photos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing Photos in Web Galleries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Subscribing to Web Galleries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exporting Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exporting Files by Dragging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Emailing Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sharing Photos on Disc with iPhoto Users. . . . . .
Sharing Photos on Disc with Windows Users. . .
160
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ix
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Table of Contents
Printing Photos Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Designing Print Projects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Previewing Prints. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Printing Tips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Printing Standard Prints. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Printing Contact Sheets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Setting up an Apple ID. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Using Your Apple ID. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Preparing to Order Prints. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Ordering Prints. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Creating Cards Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Designing Your Card. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
Creating Calendars Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Designing Calendar Pages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Creating Books Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Designing Book Pages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
Adding, Deleting, and Moving Book Pages. . . . . . 146
Arranging Photos on Book and Calendar Pages 147
Editing Photos on Pages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
Dealing with Warning Icons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Entering and Editing Text. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Typing Text “Correctly” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Changing Fonts, Styles, and Sizes Globally. . . . . . 152
Changing Fonts, Styles, and Sizes per Text Box 153
Changing Text Color. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Checking Spelling as You Type. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Printing on Your Own Printer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Ordering Cards, Calendars, and Books. . . . . . . . . . 157
Table of Contents
Chapter 8: Troubleshooting
171
General Problems and Solutions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Importing Problems and Solutions. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing Problems and Solutions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAW File Facts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Slideshow Problems and Solutions. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printing Problems and Solutions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Print and Book Problems and Solutions. . . . . . . .
Dealing with Warning Icons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Help Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix A: Deep Background
172
174
176
177
177
178
179
182
183
185
Understanding Aspect Ratios. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
Understanding Resolution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Understanding Color Management . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Table of Contents
Appendix B: Taking Better Photos
193
What Kind of Photographer Are You?. . . . . . . . . .
Choosing a Camera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Where to Read Camera Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Camera Accessories. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General Photo Tips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
More General Photo Tips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Portrait Photo Tips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Child and Pet Photo Tips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Landscape Photo Tips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Travel Photo Tips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Index
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194
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205
1
Getting Started
But iPhoto’s popularity doesn’t stem just
from the fact that Apple bundles it with
every Mac—it’s a genuinely useful program,
providing a broad set of features while
remaining easy to use. With iPhoto, you can
organize your photos, perform common
editing tasks, and create professional-looking printed works (prints, greeting cards,
hardcover books, and even calendars).
iPhoto 7, not iPhoto ’08
Annoyingly, Apple refers to the various
programs in iLife ’08 interchangeably as
“iPhoto ’08” and “iPhoto 7,” “GarageBand
’08” and “GarageBand 4,” and so on. I
prefer the actual version numbers to the
year, since otherwise the full name would
be the insanely confusing iPhoto ’08 7.1.1.
As a result, I’ll use the iPhoto 7 name
throughout this book. (Peachpit made me
put iPhoto ’08 on the cover to match their
other iLife titles. But I still like them.)
If iPhoto is so easy, why write this book?
Even though iPhoto 7 is the best version of
the program that Apple has released so far,
it still doesn’t entirely demystify the process
of importing a digital photograph, editing it, and presenting it on paper or on the
computer screen. And iPhoto comes with no
documentation beyond minimal and often
incomplete online help. Read on, then, not
just for the manual iPhoto lacks, but also for
the help you need to take digital photos and
make the most of them.
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Getting Started
Digital cameras have become commonplace,
and few people even consider purchasing a
traditional analog camera anymore. But with
digital photos, the camera is only part of the
equation. Once you’ve taken photos, you
need software to help you import, organize,
edit, and share your photos. Since 2001, the
most popular application for that task on the
Mac has been Apple’s iPhoto.
Chapter 1
Hardware and
Software Requirements
iPhoto 7 has fairly significant system requirements thanks to the difficulty of working
with large numbers of digital images.
Hardware and Software Requirements
To run iPhoto, you need:

A Macintosh with a PowerPC G4,
PowerPC G5, or Intel Core processor with
512 MB of RAM (though 1 GB of RAM is
better). Realistically, the more CPU power
and RAM you can throw at iPhoto, the
better its performance. You’ll also find
a large monitor extremely helpful.

Mac OS X. Specifically, Mac OS X 10.4.9
or later and QuickTime 7.2 or later.

An optical drive that can read DVD discs,
since iLife ’08 comes on DVD. Burning
DVDs directly from iDVD requires a drive
that can write to DVD as well, such as an
Apple SuperDrive or a third-party DVD
burner.

A source of digital images, which could
be an iPhoto-compatible digital camera,
scanned images, Kodak Photo CDs, or a
service that provides digital images along
with traditional film developing.
Tips

To be able to use iDVD for creating and
burning slideshows to DVD, you need at
least a 733 MHz PowerPC G4-based Mac.

iPhoto can import photos in RAW format, which is an uncompressed image file
format used by some high-end cameras.
However, there are multiple flavors of
RAW, and iPhoto does not support all
of them.
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Getting Started
Acquiring iPhoto
Apple offers several methods of acquiring
iPhoto, although it’s worth noting that Apple
does not offer free upgrades between major
versions of the program. In other words,
even if you got iPhoto 6 bundled with your
last iMac, you must still buy iLife ’08 to get
iPhoto 7.
Ways to get iPhoto 7:
Look in your Applications folder. If you
purchased your Mac since August 2007,
iPhoto 7 may already be installed.

Buy a $79 copy of Apple’s iLife ’08, which
is a DVD package containing all five of
Apple’s digital hub applications:
iPhoto 7, iMovie 7, iTunes 7, iDVD 7,
GarageBand 4, and iWeb 2. Although
these applications come free with new
Macs, the iLife package is the only way
for current owners of iPhoto, iMovie,
iDVD, iWeb, and GarageBand to get
updates for those products. For details,
visit www.apple.com/ilife/.

Buy a new Mac, which will come with
iPhoto pre-installed. Steve Jobs and his
private jet thank you!
Tip

Rather than buy multiple copies of iLife
’08 to use on all the Macs in your house,
you can buy a $99 family pack that’s
licensed for up to five users.
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Acquiring iPhoto

2
Importing and
Managing Photos
Although iPhoto supports a large number of digital cameras, some extremely
inexpensive cameras still lack support
from Apple. Luckily, a small firm of driver
gurus called IOXperts has stepped up to
the plate. To add support for many cameras with similar guts, download a copy of
the USB Still Camera Driver for Mac OS X
Driver from www.ioxperts.com/products/
usbstillcamera.html. That page links to
the full list of supported cameras.
Multitasking While Importing
Although you may not realize it, you can
work in other parts of iPhoto while it is
importing images. While this is worth
keeping in mind, it’s not always as much
of a help as you might think, since you
usually want to work with the images that
are being imported.
In this chapter, we’ll look at all the ways you
can import pictures into iPhoto and manage them afterward, including such tasks as
trashing and recovering photos, making and
switching between different iPhoto libraries,
backing up your images to CD or DVD, and
learning exactly how iPhoto stores images on
your hard disk.
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Importing and Managing Photos
Supporting More Cameras
One of the most common things you’ll
find yourself doing in iPhoto is importing
photos. iPhoto provides a number of ways
you can import photos, including the most
obvious: from a digital camera. You can
also import files that you downloaded from
your camera previously, acquired on a CD,
scanned in from prints, or received from a
photo-processing company that provides
digital images along with traditional prints.
It’s also possible to use a card reader—a USB
or FireWire device into which you put the
memory card from your camera and which
presents the contents of your memory card
as files on a disk—with the twist that iPhoto
recognizes many card readers and can
import from them just as though they were
cameras. And lastly, you can copy photos
that other iPhoto users make available to you
on disc or over a network.
Chapter 2
Entering Import Mode
It’s easy to bring your photos into iPhoto no
matter where they may originate because
iPhoto offers four different importing
approaches, all of which switch you into
import mode automatically. The only
time you need to switch into import mode
manually is if you switch modes after
connecting a camera but before clicking
either Import Selected or Import All.
Entering Import Mode
Ways to enter import mode:

Connect your digital camera to your
Mac’s USB port and turn the camera on.
iPhoto need not be running; it launches
automatically if necessary (Figure 2.1).

Insert your camera’s memory card into
the card reader. iPhoto need not be
running; it launches if necessary.

From iPhoto’s File menu, choose Import
to Library (xsI ). iPhoto displays
an Import Photos dialog from which you
can select a file, a folder, or multiple items
before clicking Open.

Figure 2.1 After you attach a camera or insert a media
card, it shows up in the Source pane, and thumbnails
of its pictures appear in the display pane.
Figure 2.2 To see the last set of images you imported,
click the Last Import album in Recent.
From the Finder, drag and drop one or
more files or an entire folder of images
into the iPhoto window or onto the
iPhoto icon in the Dock.
Tips


The Last Import album in the Recent
collection remembers the last set of
images you imported. Click it to see
just those images (Figure 2.2).
By default, iPhoto shows you all the photos on your card, but if you have already
imported some of them, select Hide
Photos Already Imported to avoid seeing
the already imported photos.
Launching Automatically
iPhoto launches automatically only if you
allow it to do so. The first time iPhoto
runs, it asks if you want it to launch
automatically from then on. If you agree,
iPhoto takes over as the application that
launches when you connect a camera.
You can change this setting in iPhoto’s
General preference pane if you wish.
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Importing and Managing Photos
Importing from a Camera
Most people will probably import most of
their photos directly from a digital camera.
To import from a digital camera:
Figure 2.3 Use either Import Selected or Import All to
import photos from your camera.
1. Connect your camera to your Mac using
the USB cable included with the camera,
turn it on, and make sure the camera is
set to view pictures.
iPhoto switches into import mode
(Figure 2.1, opposite).
3. Click the Keep Originals button.
Figure 2.4 While iPhoto imports photos, it displays
the image being downloaded along with a progress
bar. To stop the process before it completes, click the
Stop Import button.
Figure 2.5 When iPhoto finishes importing, it gives
you the choice of keeping or deleting the original
photos on the camera. I recommend keeping them
and deleting them later from the camera itself.
Tips

To be safe, always click Keep Originals.
Then erase the card in your camera after
verifying that the import succeeded.

You can name and describe the event
that will be created by the import, though
it can be easier to do so later. The name
and description are applied only to the
first event if more than one are created.

Select Autosplit Events After Importing
unless you’re importing photos from one
event that spans multiple days.

If you attempt to import an already
imported photo, iPhoto asks if you want
duplicates or only new images.

Some cameras mount on your Desktop
like a hard disk. Eject the camera using
the eject button next to its name in the
Source pane before disconnecting it!
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Importing from a Camera
2. Either select one or more photos to
import and click Import Selected, or
click Import All (Figure 2.3).
iPhoto starts importing the photos. If
you’ve made a mistake, click the Stop
Import button (Figure 2.4).
iPhoto asks if you’d like it to delete the
original photos from the camera after
importing (Figure 2.5).
3
Organizing Photos
One of the best things, in my opinion, about
digital photographs is that they come with
their own organizational tags built in. We
may not have cameras that can recognize
specific people, but every modern digital
camera records a great deal of information
about when each picture was taken and its
associated settings. For many people, including me, that information provides enough
organizational power.
iPhoto keeps you in organize mode,
except when you’re importing photos;
editing photos; creating a slideshow; or
working on a book, card, or calendar.
Thus, there are only two basic ways to
return to organize mode from another
mode:

In the Source pane, click any item
in Library, Recent, Subscriptions,
or Albums to switch to organize
mode and display the contents of
the selected album.

When you have switched into edit
mode from organize mode but are not
using the Crop, Red-Eye, or Retouch
tools, double-click the picture to
switch back to organize mode.
Of course, the only reason to organize photos
at all is so you can find them quickly and
easily later, and iPhoto also shines in that
department, making it easy to scroll through
your entire photo collection chronologically
or home in on a specific set of photos with
sophisticated yet simple searching tools.
Want to find all the photos taken in June,
July, and August of the last 5 years? Want to
find all the photos whose titles or descriptions mention your mother? No problem.
You can even make smart albums that constantly search your entire library for matching photos and present them in an album.
Let’s take a look.
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Organizing Photos
Switching to Organize Mode
However, many people want to do more, and
iPhoto provides a wide variety of tools for
assigning keywords to your photos, collecting them in albums, and more. We’ll look at
each of those capabilities in this chapter.
Chapter 3
What’s New in
Organize Mode
If you’ve used previous versions of iPhoto,
you’ll want to pay attention to the new features iPhoto 7 brings to organize mode.
New features in organize mode:
What’s New in Organize Mode

Film rolls have been replaced by events,
and a new Event view shows a key photo
(which you can change) from the set
of pictures that make up the event
(Figure 3.1). Technically speaking,
there’s no real difference between events
and film rolls, since you’ve been able to
change the contents of a film roll for
quite a number of iPhoto revisions now.
But events provide a good overview of
your photos.

The Source pane on the left side of the
iPhoto window now contains a number of categories—Library, Recent,
Subscriptions, Devices, Albums, Web
Gallery, Projects, and Slideshows, plus
others on occasion—that can be opened
and closed with expansion triangles.

The interface for defining, assigning, and
searching for keywords has changed completely, and for the better.

You can flag photos temporarily, and
then work on all flagged photos in the
Flagged album in the Recent category.

The Calendar pane is gone, and a new
search interface brings together searching by text, date, keyword, and rating.

You can title photos and name events
directly, rather than being forced to do
so in the Info pane. Finally!
Figure 3.1 iPhoto 7’s new Events view provides a key
picture for each set of photos in the library.
Vanishing Events
Events are a little like smart albums in
that they exist only as long as they have
contents. If you remove all the photos
from an event, or merge an event into
another one, the event that no longer
contains any photos simply disappears.
You can also delete an event by selecting
it in Events and pressing xd . Be very
careful, since this sends the photos in that
event to iPhoto’s Trash!
Source Pane?
I follow Apple’s lead in calling the items
in the left-hand pane in iPhoto “sources”
and the pane itself the “Source pane,”
even though iPhoto 7 no longer explicitly
labels it as previous versions did. In most
cases, things you can do to one type of
source (like delete it, move it around, or
add photos to it), you can do to all the
types of sources. When that’s the case,
I’ll use the term “sources;” when there are
exceptions, I’ll use the specific term or call
out the exception.
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Organizing Photos
Organize Tools Overview
Here’s a quick reference to the controls available in organize mode (Figure 3.2). Note
that this screenshot shows the Photos view,
whereas Figure 3.1 shows the Events view.
Source pane. Create
and work with collections of photos here.
Drag the divider to
change the size of
the Source pane.
Event, showing its thumbnail, name, date, and number of photos.
Drag a photo to the thumbnail to set it as the key photo; double-click
the title to change it. Click an event’s triangle to open and close it.
A folder containing other
items. Click
its triangle
to open and
close.
Photo metadata: title,
rating, and
keywords.
Click any one
to change it.
Size slider.
Adjust this
slider to display more or
fewer thumbnails. Drag
the slider
or click the
desired location. Click the
end icons for
smallest and
largest sizes.
Click to add
a new item
to the Source
pane.
Click to hide
and show the
Information
pane.
Figure 3.2
Click to
enter fullscreen
mode.
Click to
play a basic
slideshow.
Search field.
Click to hide or flag
Enter text here the selected photos.
to find matching photos.
The buttons in the organize
mode’s toolbar help you switch
between modes and offer different methods of sharing photos.
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Organize Tools Overview
Information
pane. Info
about the
selected
item(s) shows
up here.
Modify titles,
dates, and
descriptions.
Editing
Photos
Nondestructive Editing
In the first few versions of iPhoto, the
program saved each change as you made
it, which was a bad idea because the lossy
JPEG compression that was applied each
time could degrade the image quality. In
iPhoto 5, Apple reduced the number of
times an edited photo would be recompressed by writing all changes out at
once when you clicked Done or moved
to another photo.
iPhoto still maintains the current edited
version of each photo in the Modified
folder; those files are still necessary for
display and export.
If you’re anything like me, not all your
photos come out perfect. In fact, lots of
them are probably pretty bad, and those
you can delete after import. No harm, no
foul, and you didn’t pay for developing.
What about those pictures that are okay,
but not great? Much of the time they merely
require a little work. Perhaps you need to
crop out extraneous background that distracts the eye from the subject of the photo,
or maybe you want to remove the red glow
from that cute baby’s eyes (it’s the fault of
the camera flash, not necessarily the sign of
a demon child). iPhoto can help with those
tasks and more.
I’m not suggesting that you whip out an
image-editing application, clip your cousin’s
ex-husband out of the family reunion photo,
and use filters that sound like alien death
rays (Gaussian blur?) to make it appear as
though he was never there. If you can do
that, great, and iPhoto will even let you use
any other image-editing application, including Photoshop and Photoshop Elements. But
for most people, iPhoto provides all the basic
editing tools that they need.
The main thing to remember is that there’s
no shame in editing photos to improve them.
All the best photographers do it, and you can
do it, too.
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Editing Photos
In iPhoto 7, Apple has switched again, to
the nondestructive editing approach used
by Aperture, iPhoto’s high-end sibling.
Now, all changes you make to new photos,
or those that have never been edited, are
saved in an edit list and applied to the
original. (Previously edited photos don’t
use nondestructive editing unless you
first revert to the original photo.) So in
theory, image degradation due to multiple
applications of JPEG compression should
be a thing of the past.
4
Chapter 4
Entering Edit Mode
Since you can edit in the main window, in
full screen mode, in a separate window, or in
another application, it makes sense that you
can enter edit mode in several ways. Which
you choose is purely personal preference.
To choose how to edit photos:
1. From the iPhoto application menu,
choose Preferences (x, ).
iPhoto opens the Preferences window.
Click the General button (Figure 4.1).
2. Select whether double-clicking a photo
edits it (what I’m used to) or magnifies it.
Figure 4.1 In the Preferences window, choose
how you want iPhoto to react when you click the
Edit button or double-click a photo.
3. From the Edit Photo pop-up menu,
choose how you want iPhoto to edit
photos by default.
4. To use another program, choose In
Application, and select a program in the
Open dialog (Figure 4.2).
5. Close iPhoto’s Preferences window.
Entering Edit Mode
Ways to enter edit mode:

Double-click a photo in any mode
(o -double-click in organize mode
if you set double-click to magnify), or
double-click a photo twice if it’s a small
photo on a calendar page. In organize
mode, you can also just press r .
iPhoto switches to edit mode and
displays the photo.

In organize mode, click the Full Screen
button or choose Full Screen from the
View menu (xoF ) to edit the
selected photos in full screen mode.

C -click a photo in organize mode,
and choose an editing command from
the contextual menu (Figure 4.3). Book
mode offers a different contextual menu
that also has an Edit Photo command.
Figure 4.2 To use another program, choose In
Application, and then find your desired program
in the Open dialog.
Figure 4.3 Control-click
a photo in organize
mode and choose one of
the editing commands
from the contextual
menu. This is a particularly good way to edit in
an external application
on an occasional basis.
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Editing Photos
Edit Tools Overview
(Main Window)
Tip

Hide or show the Thumbnail list at the
top of the window by choosing Hide
or Show (xoT ) from the View
menu’s Thumbnail submenu.
Images around the
photo being edited
appear in the Thumbnail
list. Click one to edit it.
Here’s a quick look at the tools available
when you edit an image in the main window
(Figure 4.4).
The selected image
appears in the display
pane for editing.
Click Done to save your
changes to the photo (and
return to the previous mode).
Click to
switch to
full screen
mode.
Size slider.
Adjust this
slider to zoom
in and out of
the picture in
the display
pane.
Click to hide
or show the
Information
pane (now
hidden).
Click to add
an item to
the Source
pane.
Click to
rotate the
image
counterclockwise.
Option-click
to rotate
clockwise.
Figure 4.4
Click to open the
crop panel.
Click to open
the straighten
panel.
Click the
Adjust button
to open the
Adjust panel.
Click the
Enhance button
to fix photos
automatically.
To eliminate red-eye in
a picture of a person or
pet, click the Red-Eye
button and then click
the subject’s eyes.
Click the Effects
button to open the
Effects panel.
Use the
Retouch tool
to scrub out
unwanted
blemishes.
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Edit Tools Overview (Main Window)
Use the previous and next
buttons to
navigate to
the previous
or next photo
in the current
album.
Chapter 4
Edit Tools Overview
(Full Screen)
Tips
When you edit a photo in full screen mode,
the editing tools and thumbnails are the
same, but they automatically appear and
disappear at the bottom and top of the
screen when you move your pointer to those
locations, and there are several other buttons
that provide necessary features (Figure 4.5).
Effects panel. Click The selected image
an effect to apply
takes over the entire
it to the image.
screen for editing.

Choose Always Show from the
Thumbnails submenu in the View
menu to display thumbnails all the time.
You can also set the thumbnail column
position and number of columns in the
Thumbnails submenu.

Choose Show Toolbar from the View
menu to display the toolbar all the time.
Images around the photo being
edited appear in the thumbnail
list. Click one to edit it.
Adjust panel. Use
the controls in
here to modify the
image.
Edit Tools Overview (Full Screen)
Information panel.
Use it to view
information, and
change titles,
date, and time.
Navigation panel.
Drag the selection
rectangle to scroll
around in the
image.
Use the previous
and next buttons
to navigate to the
previous or next
photo in the current album.
Close button. Click
to leave full screen
mode.
Size slider. Adjust
this slider to
zoom in and out
of the picture.
Automatically
opens the
Navigation panel.
Figure 4.5
Click to
open the
Information
panel.
Click to
Click to
open
open the
the crop
straighten
panel.
panel.
Click to compare
this image with
the next one to
the right.
Click to rotate
the current image
counter-clockwise.
Option-click to
rotate clockwise.
Click the
Enhance button
to fix photos
automatically.
Use the
Retouch tool
to scrub out
unwanted
blemishes.
Click the Effects Click the Adjust
button to open
button to open the
the Effects panel. Adjust panel.
To eliminate red-eye in a
picture of a person or pet,
click the Red-Eye button and
then click the subject’s eyes.
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5
Showing
Photos Onscreen
Although there are those for whom a photo
isn’t real unless it appears on a piece of paper
(and iPhoto can satisfy those people too),
one of iPhoto’s coolest features is its capability to present photos on screen in a wide
variety of ways—ranging from slideshows on
your Mac and Web-based presentations that
anyone can view to customized screen savers
and QuickTime movies.
iPhoto’s various onscreen presentation tools
are not only the best way to display your
photographs to friends and relatives, but also
the best way for you to experience your own
photos, whether through a constantly changing Desktop picture or a slideshow-based
screen saver that kicks in whenever your
Mac is idle.
Read on for instructions and advice on how
to present your photos on screen!
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Showing Photos Onscreen
Gone are the days of the carousel projector and a darkened room; now a slideshow
involves high-resolution photographs
slipping on and off a computer screen,
complete with elegant transitions between
pictures. But that’s only the beginning with
iPhoto. Your slideshows can take advantage
of the Ken Burns Effect, which zooms and
pans around photos, turning them from still
images to scenes in a movie.
Chapter 5
Types of Slideshows
iPhoto offers two types of slideshows,
which I call “basic” slideshows and “saved”
slideshows.
About basic slideshows:
Basic slideshows are simple to use and offer
a basic set of options that apply equally to all
slides.
Use basic slideshows when you want to show
someone a set of photos quickly, without any
fuss or bother. Basic slideshows can also be
useful for reviewing just-taken photos and
culling the lousy shots.
Lastly, you can use only basic slideshows
when viewing images from a shared iPhoto
Library over a network.
About saved slideshows:
Types of Slideshows
Saved slideshows appear in the Source pane
like albums, books, cards, and calendars,
and any changes you make to them are
saved for the future. You can organize saved
slideshows in folders, duplicate them to
experiment with different approaches, and
export them to QuickTime movies.
Use saved slideshows when you want to
put some effort into making a slideshow
as visually impressive as possible. You can
add and remove individual photos from the
slideshow, apply temporary effects to photos
during the slideshow, change the time each
slide appears on screen, adjust the Ken
Burns Effect for each slide, set the transition
between any two slides, and more.
What’s particularly neat about saved
slideshows is that they’re created with
default settings, so you can customize them
as much or as little as you like.
Book Slideshows
iPhoto also offers “book slideshows” that
are almost identical to basic slideshows.
When in book mode, you can click the
Play button under the Information pane
to display the standard Slideshow dialog;
clicking Play in it displays each page in
the book in a slideshow format.
The only difference between a book
slideshow and a basic slideshow (other
than showing a book page instead of a
single photo at a time) is that a number of
the options in the Slideshow dialog aren’t
available for book slideshows because
they don’t make sense in the context of a
book page. In particular, you cannot scale
photos; turn on the Ken Burns Effect; or
show titles, ratings, or controls.
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Showing Photos Onscreen
Tip
Slideshow Tools Overview

When you select a saved slideshow in the
Source pane, iPhoto displays a new set
of tools for customizing your slideshow
(Figure 5.1).
The Play button underneath the
Information pane normally starts a basic
slideshow, but when you’re in a saved
slideshow, it starts the saved slideshow.
Source pane. Create and work
with saved slideshows here.
Thumbnails of the photos
in the slideshow, in order.
Click one to display it.
Command- or Shift-click to
select multiple photos.
The current
photo on
which you’re
working.
Saved
slideshow in
the Source
pane.
Click to open
the default
slideshow
settings
dialog.
Click to
move back
and forward
through
slides.
Figure 5.1
Click to play the
saved slideshow.
Click to preview a
few frames of the
slideshow in the display pane; click again
to stop the preview.
Choose a
Choose an effect
transition
(black-and-white
to assign to
or sepia) to apply the currently
to the currently
selected
selected photo(s). photo(s).
Toggle between
the starting point
(Start) and the
finishing point
(End) for manual
overrides of the
Ken Burns Effect.
Click to open
the music settings dialog.
Use the size slider
to set the start
and end magnifications for the
Ken Burns Effect.
Select to override the default
Ken Burns Effect settings for the
selected photo(s).
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Slideshow Tools Overview
Click to create a saved
slideshow
from the
selected
photos.
Click to open
a panel that
lets you
adjust the
slide duration, transition, and
transition
speed.
Printing
Photos
What your printer can do is determined
by its driver, system-level software
provided by Apple or the manufacturer.
There’s also Gutenprint (formerly called
Gimp-Print), an open source set of drivers
for over 700 printers, which offers support
for printer options that the manufacturers may not expose, such as printing on
roll paper or other unusual paper sizes.
Learn more at: http://gutenprint.
sourceforge.net/MacOSX.php3.
How to Find Info in This Chapter
iPhoto 7’s printing interface is completely
new, but it borrows heavily from the
interface used to create books, cards, and
calendars. As a result, if you’ve created
any of those items, you’ll be at home with
creating prints. To avoid duplication in
this chapter, I first give an overview of
creating each type of project, followed by
details that are specific to each (such as
adding photos to dates on a calendar),
and then I finish up with general instructions (such as how to enter and edit text)
that are common to all of them.
If I had to pick a single feature that sets
iPhoto apart from most photo management programs, I’d choose the way iPhoto
enables you to create professional-looking
prints, cards, calendars, and photo books.
Numerous programs can help you edit and
organize photos. But iPhoto is the undisputed champion of creating high-quality
printed products in an easy fashion.
The beauty of iPhoto’s prints, cards, calendars, and books, apart from their quality
printing on heavy, glossy paper, is that they
help bridge the gap between the analog and
digital worlds. Many people still prefer prints
displayed in a traditional photo album, and
there’s no denying the attraction of a glossy
color calendar on the wall that’s displaying
your photos or the slickness of a professionally printed postcard showing your latest
photographic favorite on the front.
In addition, with a modern inkjet printer,
anyone can create prints that rival those
ordered from a commercial service. iPhoto 7
has completely revamped printing capabilities, so if you’ve written it off in the past, take
a closer look now.
Whatever your preference, by the time you’re
done with this chapter, you’ll be able to turn
your digital photography collection into
stunning prints, cards, books, and calendars.
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Printing Photos
Gutenprint/Gimp-Print Drivers
6
Chapter 6
Printing Photos Overview
Many people prefer to print their photos on
inexpensive color inkjet printers rather than
waiting for online orders.
To print photos:
1. Select one or more photos to print and
choose Print from the File menu (xP )
to bring up the print settings dialog
(Figure 6.1).
Printing Photos Overview
2. Select the desired theme from the list.
3. From the four pop-up menus, choose
the appropriate printer, printer-specific
presets, paper size, and print size.
Figure 6.1 Choose basic printing options in the Print
dialog, and then click Print. Or click Customize to set
more advanced options before printing.
4. Either click Print to print right away with
the default settings (and jump to step 9),
or click Customize to switch to the print
project interface, which makes a Printing
album in the Recent list (Figure 6.2).
5. From the Themes, Background, Borders,
and Layout pop-up menus in the toolbar,
choose settings to lay out your photos as
you wish.
6. Enter text if the layout provides it; you
can adjust text settings by clicking the
Settings button in the toolbar.
Figure 6.2 In the print customization interface, you
can choose alternate themes, backgrounds, borders,
text settings, and layouts, including those that put
multiple photos on a single page.
7. To make temporary adjustments to an
image, select it, click the Adjust button,
and use the buttons and sliders in the
Adjust panel as you would in the normal
Adjust and Effects panels (Figure 6.3).
See Chapter 4, “Editing Photos.”
8. When you’re ready, click the Print button.
iPhoto displays the standard Mac OS X
Print dialog (Figure 6.7, page 132).
9. Verify your printer and preset settings,
enter the number of copies to print, and
access other settings by clicking the
Advanced button. Click Print when done.
iPhoto sends your photos to the printer.
Figure 6.3 Make
non-permanent
adjustments to
photos using the
modified Adjust
panel.
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Printing Photos
Designing Print Projects
iPhoto 7 enables you to print not just a
single photo at standard sizes, but also
multiple photos with themed frame styles,
colored backgrounds, and text. While you’re
designing your prints, they appear in a
special Printing album in the Recent list in
the Source pane; you can perform other tasks
and return to the Printing album at any time.
Figure 6.4 Choose the desired border design from the
Borders pop-up menu.
To design a print project:
1. In the print project, click a page.
3. From the Background pop-up menu,
choose the color for your background.
4. From the Borders pop-up menu, choose
the desired border style (Figure 6.4).
Figure 6.5 Choose the desired page layout from the
Layout pop-up menu.
5. From the Layout pop-up menu, choose
the desired page layout (Figure 6.5).
6. Click the photo icon to switch from viewing pages to viewing the available photos,
and then drag photos to the desired spots
in your layout.
Figure 6.6 Change settings for the entire print project
in the Settings dialog.
7. Tweak each photo so it is zoomed and
centered appropriately; see “Editing
Photos on Pages” on page 148 for details.
8. Enter text in any provided text boxes, and
change text settings as you would in any
other program.
9. Click an arrow button or press < or > to
move to another page, and repeat steps
3–8.
Tip

Click Settings to change font settings for
all the pages of your print project, among
other options (Figure 6.6).
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Designing Print Projects
2. From the Theme pop-up menu on the
toolbar, choose the desired theme (if
you want to switch from the currently
selected theme).
Sharing
Photos
7
But there’s an additional way in which you
can share photos in iPhoto—sharing of the
actual photo files. For instance, you might
want to share photos with a family member
who also uses your Mac, or a roommate
whose Mac is on your network. Or maybe
you want to send photos to friends via email
or on a CD or DVD. iPhoto can help in all of
these situations and more. I’ve organized this
chapter in roughly that order; think of it as
near (sharing on your Mac) to far (sending a
CD to a Windows-using relative).
It’s worth keeping in mind that although
Apple has provided various different tools
for sharing these original photos, there are
usually trade-offs. For instance, it’s trickier
to burn a CD of photos for someone who
uses Windows than for someone who uses
iPhoto on the Mac. Sharing photos via Web
galleries (but not accessing them) requires a
.Mac account. And Apple still hasn’t made it
easy for people on the same Mac to share an
iPhoto Library.
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Sharing Photos
Although there’s certainly nothing wrong
with taking photos and keeping them to
yourself, most people I know want to share
them with others. We’ve already looked at
a few ways of doing this, via .Mac Slides,
exporting to a Web page, and, of course, creating prints, cards, calendars, and books.
Chapter 7
Sharing a Library via
iPhoto Library Manager
Mac OS X is a multi-user operating system, so it’s common for people who share
a Mac each to have an account. But what if
you want to share the same iPhoto Library
among multiple users on the same Mac? You
can use Brian Webster’s $19.95 shareware
iPhoto Library Manager utility, available at
www.fatcatsoftware.com/iplm/.
Figure 7.1 Store your iPhoto Shared Library in the
Shared folder at the same level as your user folder.
Sharing via iPhoto Library Manager
To share your library among users:
1. With iPhoto not running, rename your
iPhoto Library to iPhoto Shared Library
(to avoid confusion) and move it from
the Pictures folder to the Shared folder
at the same level as your user folder
(Figure 7.1). The Shared folder may or
may not contain other items.
2. Open iPhoto Library Manager, and drag
the iPhoto Shared Library from the
Finder into the iPhoto Libraries list in
iPhoto Library Manager.
3. Select the iPhoto Shared Library in the
list, click the Options button, choose
Read & Write from each of the three
Permissions pop-up menus, and select
the three checkboxes underneath.
These settings cause iPhoto Library
Manager to fix the permissions on the
iPhoto Shared Library whenever necessary (Figure 7.2).
4. For each user, log in via Fast User
Switching and repeat steps 2 and 3.
5. From now on, each user on your Mac
should launch iPhoto by clicking the
Launch iPhoto button in iPhoto Library
Manager.
Figure 7.2 Set the permissions properly for shared
iPhoto Libraries in the Options dialog in iPhoto
Library Manager.
Permissions Problems
You must jump through these hoops to
share an iPhoto Library because of how
iPhoto assigns permissions to thumbnails
in the Data folder.
iPhoto Library Manager works around the
problem by fixing permissions constantly.
The techniques on the opposite page
have similar effects: turning on Ignore
Ownership on This Volume for an external drive ignores permissions entirely,
and the issue disappears with network
volumes because each user can log into
a shared account, thus ensuring that all
newly imported photos are written with
the same ownership.
For more on this, including yet another
technique that still works with iPhoto
7, see the article I wrote on the topic for
Macworld at www.macworld.com/2006/05/
secrets/junedigitalphoto/.
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Sharing Photos
Sharing a Library
via a Shared Volume
There’s another trick you can use to share
photos among multiple users of the same
Mac, and it also works for sharing an iPhoto
Library across a network.
Figure 7.3 To use
another hard drive to
store a shared iPhoto
Library, you must select
the Ignore Ownership
on This Volume
checkbox.
To share your library among users:
Choosing Network
Sharing Approaches
iPhoto’s official method of sharing photos
over a network is discussed on the next
page, “Sharing Photos via iPhoto Sharing.”
What’s the difference between that
approach and the shared volume method
discussed on this page?
Use the shared volume method to share
an entire iPhoto Library and have each
person make changes that are seen by
every other person. This method lets you
share the work of editing photos, making
albums, and assigning keywords.
Use iPhoto’s photo-sharing approach to
let other people see and potentially copy
your photos without making any other
changes. This approach works best when
each person has his or her own primary
collection of photos but wants to access a
few photos from other people.
Neither approach is “better,” and which
you choose depends mostly on whether
you consider photos community property
or personal property that can be shared.
1. If you are using another hard drive as
your shared volume, select it in the
Finder, choose Get Info (xI ) from the
File menu, and, in the Permissions area
of the Get Info window, select the Ignore
Ownership on This Volume checkbox
(Figure 7.3).
2. With iPhoto not running, copy your
iPhoto Library from the Pictures folder to
where you want to store it on the shared
volume.
3. Rename the iPhoto Library in your
Pictures folder to “Old iPhoto Library.”
4. For each user (whether on the same Mac
or over your network), open iPhoto while
holding down o , click the Choose
Library button, and select the iPhoto
Library on the shared volume.
o -launching iPhoto and selecting a
library teaches iPhoto to use the selected
library instead of the default.
5. From now on, each user should be able to
use iPhoto normally, although only one
person may use the shared iPhoto Library
at a time.
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Sharing a Library via a Shared Volume
This technique requires a “shared volume,”
which is either another hard drive or a Mac
with File Sharing turned on in the Sharing
preference pane. If you’re using a network, it
must be at least 54 Mbps AirPort Extreme, or
preferably 100 Mbps Ethernet; anything else
will be too slow.
8
Troubleshooting
The Trouble with Bugs
I continue to include these suggestions
even when I can’t verify them because
bugs are slippery, and just because I can’t
reproduce a particular problem in this or
any other version of iPhoto doesn’t mean
that you won’t experience it. And then
one of the suggestions in this chapter may
save your bacon (or at least your photos).
Also keep in mind that updates to iPhoto
very well may eliminate even those problems I’ve confirmed in iPhoto 7, so be sure
to use Software Update to check for new
versions on a regular basis.
One advantage iPhoto has in this respect is
that it saves your changes frequently and
automatically, so you’re unlikely to lose
much work even if it does crash. Put simply,
if iPhoto crashes (and it has crashed on me
a number of times while I was writing this
book), just relaunch the program and pick
up where you left off. (Also be sure to click
the Report button in the crash dialog and
report the crash to Apple so it can be fixed.)
If the crashes happen regularly, you may
need to do some troubleshooting. One way
or another, keep good backups! (See “Backing
Up Your Photos” on page 26.)
Of course, most of the problems you might
encounter won’t result in a crash. It’s more
likely you’ll have trouble importing photos
from an unusual camera, printing a photo
at the exact size you want, or dealing with
thumbnails that don’t display properly.
Those are the sorts of problems—and
solutions—I’ll focus on in this chapter.
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Troubleshooting
Many iPhoto problems that I’ve seen
people report seem to be specific to their
photos, a particular iPhoto Library, their
Mac, or the phase of the moon, and I have
been unable to reproduce them. I still
include here the potential problem and
any solutions I’ve heard of or can think of,
but this uncertainty makes it impossible
for me to say when or if Apple has fixed
the incorrect behavior. As such, some of
the problems and solutions listed in this
chapter may no longer apply to iPhoto 7;
there’s simply no way to tell.
The world of iPhoto is no more a perfect
place than the real world. No one, iPhoto’s
developers least of all, wants problems, but
bugs are a fact of life, and you may have a
problem with iPhoto at some point.
Chapter 8
General Problems
and Solutions
Some problems you may experience in
iPhoto aren’t related to particular activities.
Others are, and subsequent pages in this
chapter will address issues with importing,
editing, slideshows, printing, and more.
Performance Problems
General Problems and Solutions
If you find iPhoto slow to perform certain
operations, try these tricks. Some are
obvious (if expensive), others less so:

Turn off title, rating, and keyword display
using the View menu.

Shrink thumbnails to a smaller size.

Use the triangles next to events in Photos
view to hide photos you don’t need to see.

Quit other programs that are running.
In my experience, there is usually one
culprit, which you can identify by launching Activity Monitor from your Utilities
folder and clicking the %CPU column
title to see which applications are using
the most processor time.

Restart your Mac by choosing Restart
from the Apple menu. Restarting is
especially helpful if you don’t have much
free disk space, which cramps Mac OS X’s
virtual memory techniques.

Check your disk with DiskWarrior
(www.alsoft.com/DiskWarrior/);
sufficient disk corruption can cause
huge performance problems on startup.

Add more RAM to your Mac. iPhoto
works with 512 MB of RAM, but it likes
a lot more, and RAM is cheap. I always
recommend at least 1 GB these days.

Buy a faster Mac. That’s always fun.
Photos Disappear
Some people have reported troubles with
photos disappearing, even when the files
are still present in the iPhoto Library (see
“iPhoto Directory Structure” on page 19).
Try the following procedure to fix the problem, keeping in mind that you may lose your
albums, keywords, and titles. Follow these
steps after backing up your iPhoto Library:
1. Hold down xo while clicking
the iPhoto icon in the Dock to launch it.
This causes iPhoto to display the Rebuild
Photo Library dialog.
Try each of the options, quitting and
relaunching in between attempts, and see
if one of them fixes the problem. If not…
2. Drag your corrupt iPhoto Library to the
Desktop, and launch iPhoto to create a
new iPhoto Library. Quit iPhoto.
3. C -click the corrupt iPhoto Library,
and choose Show Package Contents.
o -drag the Library6.iPhoto file, and
the Modified and Originals folders into
the new iPhoto Library to copy them into
it. Launch iPhoto with xo and
select the first two checkboxes to rebuild
thumbnails. If that doesn’t help…
4. Repeat step 2 to create yet another new
iPhoto Library, and then manually drag
the year folders contained in the Originals
folder into iPhoto’s display pane to
import them. If you wish, repeat with the
contents of the Modified folder, but don’t
import any exact duplicates.
Unfortunately, I can’t figure out any way
to trick iPhoto into connecting the modified versions of photos to the originals you
restored in step 4, so you’ll have to sort out
which version of each modified photo you
want to keep.
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A
Deep Background
Right off the bat, let me say that you don’t
need to read this appendix. It’s deep background, the kind of detail that you might
wish to delve into when you’re attempting
to understand how iPhoto works, perhaps
because you’ve just printed a photo and
you’re unhappy with the results.
Lastly, although I’ve called this appendix
“Deep Background,” these topics are so
complex that entire books have been written
about each one. If these discussions leave
you with more questions, I’d encourage you
to visit a library or bookstore and browse
its collection of books on photography,
digital imaging, and pre-press. I especially
recommend Real World Scanning and
Halftones, Third Edition, by David Blatner,
Conrad Chavez, Glenn Fleishman, and
Steve Roth.
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Deep Background
The following pages contain “Understanding
Aspect Ratios,” “Understanding Resolution,”
and “Understanding Color Management.”
Each of these discussions examines an
aspect of digital photography from which
iPhoto, for the most part, tries to shield you.
That’s great most of the time, but if you’re
trying to understand how cropping removes
information from a photo, thus making it
print at a lower quality, you’ll want to come
here for the explanation.
Appendix A
Understanding
Aspect Ratios
iPhoto makes it easy to select and crop a
portion of a photo using a specific aspect
ratio, but why is this important? It matters
because aspect ratios differ between
traditional and digital photos.
Understanding Aspect Ratios
An aspect ratio is the ratio between the
width of the image and its height, generally
expressed with both numbers, as in the line
from Arlo Guthrie’s song “Alice’s Restaurant
Massacree” about “Twenty-seven, eight-byten, color glossy photographs with circles
and arrows and a paragraph on the back
of each one.”
The aspect ratio of 35mm film is 4 x 6 (using
the standard print size rather than the least
common denominator of 2 x 3) because the
negative measures 24mm by 36mm. Thus,
traditional photographs are usually printed
at sizes like 4" x 6", 5" x 7", or 8" x 10", all of
which are close enough to that 4 x 6 aspect
ratio so photos scale well. When there’s a
mismatch between the aspect ratio of the
original negative and the final print, either
the image must be shrunk proportionally
to fit (producing unsightly borders) or some
portion of the image must be cropped. (The
alternative would be to resize the image
disproportionally, which makes people look
like they’re reflected in a funhouse mirror.)
The equivalent of film in digital photography
is the CCD (charge-coupled device), which
is essentially a grid of many light-sensitive
elements that gain a charge when exposed
to light. Through much digital wizardry,
the camera translates those charges into
the individual dots (called pixels) that, put
together, make up the image. Zoom in on a
picture all the way, and you can actually see
these pixels. So if your digital camera uses a
CCD that can capture a picture composed
Figure A.1 This is a 4 x 3 image with a 4 x 6
landscape selection. A bit of the bottom of
the image would be lost, which is fine.
Figure A.2 This is a 4 x 3 image with a 5 x 7
landscape selection. Very little of the bottom
of the image would be lost to cropping.
Figure A.3 This is a 4 x 3 image with an 8 x 10
landscape selection. Losing the right side of
the image would be somewhat problematic.
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Taking
Better Photos
B
iPhoto and your digital camera will make
you a better photographer, for the simple
reason that the best way to improve a skill
is constant practice. Thanks to iPhoto, it’s
easier to take and review photographs than
ever before.
So skim these few pages to find tips that you
can use to create better photos with minimal
extra effort.
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Taking Better Photos
But you need not discover all the ways you
can take better photos on your own. Having
the best equipment for the kind of photos
you want to take will help, as will learning
some of the basics of different types of photography. This appendix offers that advice,
ranging from choosing the best camera
for your needs to tips on how to take great
pictures of kids. (Hint: The posed portrait is
unlikely to work.)
Appendix B
What Kind of
Photographer Are You?
When choosing the camera that will help
you take the best photos, it’s important
to choose one that matches the kind of
photos you actually take. But what sort of
photographer are you? In one way of thinking, there are two types of photographers:
artistic and documentary (and as is usually
the case, most people overlap somewhat).
What Kind of Photographer Are You?
You’re an artistic photographer if:

You care more about the overall look of
a photo than the subject of the picture
(Figure B.1).

Objects and landscapes fill many of your
photos and stand alone as aesthetic representations of your reality.

Display and print quality is of the utmost
importance. You regularly print and display your best photos.

You’re willing to take time to set up the
perfect shot, and you do things because
they give you photo opportunities.
Figure B.1 There’s not much of a story in this photo—I
was just intrigued by the color of the leaf underneath
the new-fallen snow. We’re definitely looking at an
artistic photograph here.
You’re a documentary photographer if:

Who or what appears in the photo is
more important than the overall look
(Figure B.2).

The most common subjects of your
photos are people and places, and they
usually fit into and support a larger story.

You’re willing to trade quality for convenience, ease of use, or speed of shooting.

You don’t have the free time or patience
to set up shots, and you prefer to snap a
few pictures quickly, hoping that at least
one will turn out well. You carry your
camera to record events or in the hope
of getting a good shot.
Figure B.2 In contrast, here we have a picture of
me and my grandmother at my 35th birthday party.
Whether or not it’s a good photo is almost immaterial—what’s important is that it reminds me of a
special meal with my family. It’s a pure documentary
photograph.
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i
Index
+ (Add) button (Source pane), 39, 40, 104
1-Click ordering, 136, 179
A
B
Background pop-up menu, 141, 145
backing up photos, 26, 27
basic slideshows, 100, 101, 102
batch operations
date changes as, 51
rotating photos as, 72
title assignments as, 49
batteries, 195, 197
black point adjustments, 85
blog photos, 123
book mode, 8, 146
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Index
accessing shared photos, 163
accessories, 197
Account Info dialog, 127, 136
Add (+) button (Source pane), 39, 40, 104
Add to iPhoto button, 16
Adjust panel
adjusting highlight detail in, 87
Contrast slider of, 86
exposure adjustments on, 84
features of, 82
histogram on, 83
Levels sliders adjustments, 85
modifying photos temporarily in, 130
reducing noise, 92, 93
saturation adjustments, 89
shadow detail adjustments, 88
sharpness modifications with, 92
temperature adjustments, 90
tint adjustments from, 91
Adjust This Slide window, 107
Advanced pane (Preferences window), 20
albums
creating, 39
deleting photos from, 21
keywords vs., 53
.Mac Slides, 124
removing photos from, 47
selecting multiple, 45
sorting photos in, 48
Appearance pane (Preferences window), 33, 35
Apple. See also .Mac accounts; shipping
1-Click ordering, 136
Apple ID for orders from, 136, 137
international shipping details, 139
ordering cards, calendars, and books, 157
pricing and shipping for orders, 157
print orders from, 138, 139
Apple ID, 136, 137
applications
importing photos from other, 16
selecting default external editor, 95
unable to open photos in other, 176
archiving photos, 27
artistic vs. documentary photos, 194
aspect ratios
book page designs and, 145
choosing, 73, 74
print sizes and, 138
selecting for slideshows, 110
understanding, 186–187
assigning
batch titles, 49
keywords, 54
ratings, 52
Autoflow option, 144
Automatic Ken Burns Effect, 109
autosplit feature, 37
Index
book slideshows, 100
books
adding, deleting, and moving pages in, 146
aspect ratios of, 187
autoflowing text into, 144
changing text fonts, styles, and sizes, 152–153
creating, 144
designing pages for, 145
editing photos in, 148
entering and editing text in, 150, 151
ordering, 157
placing photos on pages, 147
printing own, 156
quality not what expected, 181
removing photos from, 47
troubleshooting orders for, 180–181
burning iPhoto discs, 26, 169
buying cameras, 195, 196
Index
C
calendar mode, 8
calendars
arranging photos on, 147
creating, 142
designing, 143
ordering, 157
printing own, 156
cameras. See digital cameras
card mode, 8
card readers. See also memory cards
about, 197
defined, 11
importing photos from, 14
problems importing images from, 175
cards
creating, 140
designing, 141
ordering, 157
printing own, 156
CCD (charge-coupled device), 186
CDs
burning iPhoto disc, 169
checking readability of backups, 27
CD-R vs. CD-RW, 27, 28
importing photos from iPhoto, 17, 169
Kodak Photo and Picture, 14
CDs & DVDs pane (Preferences window), 170
checkmark keyword, 53
children, 201
clean installations, 6
color
adjusting temperature of photo, 90
correcting, 191
on-screen vs. color management, 82
perception of, 190
rendering, 190
text, 154
color management, 82, 190–191
color-matching systems, 191
Colors palette, 154
ColorSync technology, 191
comparing photos onscreen, 22
compression, 63, 68
Constrain pop-up menu, 73
contact sheets, 135
contextual menu shortcuts, 34, 69
Contrast slider (Adjust panel), 86
copying. See duplicating
corruption, 172, 176
crashes, 171, 173, 176
criteria for smart albums, 40, 41
crop marks, 134
cropping
choosing aspect ratios before, 73, 74
including extra space when, 75
interpolation and, 189
opening crop panel for, 66, 67
steps for, 75
culling photos, 22
customizing slides, 107
D
Data folder, 19
Date pop-up, 58
deleting
book pages, 146
contents of events, 30
folders, 38
keywords, 53–54
originals photos from camera, 13
photos, 21
saved slideshows, 104
sources, 44
Descriptions field, 50
deselecting photos, 45
Design pop-up menu, 141
designing print projects, 131
Desktop photo, 116
devices compatible with iPhoto, 2
digital cameras
accessories for, 197
aspect ratios in film vs., 186–187
choosing, 195, 196
color rendering and, 190
drivers for, 11
ejecting mounted on Desktop, 13
206
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Index
importing photos from, 13
launching iPhoto automatically, 12
reviews of, 196
supported by iPhoto, 11
unrecognized by iPhoto, 174
directory structure in iPhoto, 19
disappearing photos, 172
discs. See CDs; DVDs
Display Calibrator Assistant, 181, 191
display pane, 9, 32, 33
Dock, 21
downloading
photos with Image Capture, 18
QuickTime for Windows, 112
Web galleries, 165
downsampling, 188, 189
dragging
exporting multiple files by, 167
files to Source pane, 15
importing photos by, 16
photo to Trash or Dock, 21
photos onto Albums list title, 39
drivers, 11
duplicating
folder and contents, 38
photos for editing, 71
source items on Source pane, 42
duration of slides, 107, 109, 115
DVDs
burning iPhoto disc, 169
hardware requirements for drives, 2
slideshows on, 114–115
E
207
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Index
Edit Keywords window, 53
edit mode
defined, 8
entering, 64
switching to organize mode from, 29
Edit Photos pop-up menu, 95
editing, 63–97. See also Adjust panel; external
editors
about, 63
adjusting exposure, 84
choosing aspect ratios, 73, 74
color of text, 154
contrast adjustments for, 86
dates of photos, 51
duplicating photos for, 71
Effects panel for, 65, 66, 80–81
enhancing photos, 77
external editors for, 95
highlight detail, 87
histograms and, 83
making saturation adjustments, 89
noise, 92, 93
nondestructive, 63
photos on book pages, 148
photos unavailable for, 176
RAW files, 68
reducing red-eye, 78
retouching photos, 79
rotating photos, 65, 72, 108
selecting part of photo for, 73
shadow detail, 88
shared photos not allowed, 163
sharpness of image, 92
slide photos, 108
smart albums, 40
straightening photos, 76
temperature of photo, 90
tint of photo, 91
tools for, 65–67
undoing changes, 94
ways to enter edit mode, 64
zooming photos for, 70
Effects panel
features of, 80–81
opening, 65, 66
ejecting cameras on Desktop, 13
electronic version of book, 1
emailing photos, 168
Enhance tool, 77
events
changing key photo, 36
deleting contents or removing, 30
making from flagged photos, 56
moving photos between, 37
renaming, 36
selected after search in Event view, 57
splitting and merging, 37
viewing photos in, 36
Events pane (Preferences window), 33, 37
Events view, 30, 32
EXIF (Exchangeable Image File) data, 15, 61
Export Photos dialog, 126, 166
exporting photos
keywords not exported, 54
merging libraries and, 28
to QuickTime movie, 111
transferring multiple files by dragging, 167
to Web pages, 126–127
exposure adjustments, 84
external editors
GraphicConverter, 96, 175, 182
Photoshop, 182
Photoshop Elements, 97
Index
external editors (continued)
selecting, 64
setting default for, 95
using RAW files with, 68
F
Index
File Export pane (Export Photos dialog), 166
filenames
duplicate photo, 71
naming exported files, 166
using photo title as, 28
files
finding original, 19, 20
formats supported in iPhoto, 15
importing photos from, 15
music formats, 103
RAW, 2, 68
film rolls, 30
Finder, 170
finding
camera reviews, 196
original files, 19, 20
fitting photo to frame size, 148
flagged photos, 53, 56
folders
creating and working with, 38
directory structure for, 19
downloading photos to, 18
duplicating, 42
Font dialog, 153
fonts
changing, 152–153
choosing, 141
copying information about, 153
customizing calendar text, 143
trouble with Type 1 PostScript fonts, 180
foreground objects, 202
form factor, 195
full screen mode, 66, 70
G
gamma, 181
gamut, 190
GarageBand, 103
General pane (Preferences window)
configuring iPhoto for email, 168
rotation direction preferences in, 72
setting Edit button preferences, 64
Gimp-Print drivers, 129
GraphicConverter, 96, 175, 182
greeting cards. See cards
Gutenprint drivers, 129
H
hardware requirements, 2
help resources, 183
hiding/showing
Information pane, 65
photos, 55
Thumbnail list, 65
Highlight slider (Adjust panel), 87
histograms, 83
HomePage, 119
I
icons
orange X, 55
orange flag, 56
spinning progress, 121
warning, 139, 149, 182, 188–189
iDisk, 119
iDVD, 2, 114–115
Ignore Ownership on This Volume checkbox
(Get Info window), 161
iLife, 3, 4
Image Capture, 18
Image Puzzle screen saver, 117
iMovie slideshows, 113
import mode, 8, 12
Import Photos dialog, 15
importing photos
cameras supported for, 11
entering import mode, 12
from files, 15
from Mail, Safari, and other applications, 16
leaving in place when, 20
located in shared albums, 163
solving problems with, 174–175
transferring from camera, 13
transferring from card reader, 14
using Image Capture, 18
using iPhoto disc, 17, 169
Information pane
hiding/showing, 65
illustrated, 9, 31
viewing photo’s metadata in, 61, 66
inkjet printers
color rendering and, 190
printing tips for, 133
installing iPhoto, 4
interpolation, 189
iPhone, 128
iPhoto
directory structure of, 19
file formats supported in, 15
208
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Index
hardware/software requirements, 2
installing, 4
interface for, 9
launching, 7, 12
modes in, 8
new features of version 7, 6
reading text to you, 155
relaunching after crash, 171, 173
sharing photos in, 161, 162
updating, 5–6
version numbers for, 3
ways to acquire, 3
iPhoto Buddy, 25
iPhoto discs, 17, 169, 175
iPhoto Library Manager, 25, 28, 160
iPhoto Library packages. See also libraries
creating multiple, 24
importing photos without bringing into, 20
items OK for deleting from, 19
merging, 28
opening, 19, 25
recovering photos from, 19
switching between, 25
iPod, 128
IPTC metadata, 54
iTunes, 103
iWeb
about, 119, 127
blog photo publishing with, 123
publishing photos with, 122
J
JPEG compression, 63
K
L
landscape orientation, 73, 115, 116, 199
landscapes, 202
Last Import album, 12
launching iPhoto, 7, 12, 171, 173
M
.Mac accounts
applications in, 119
changes to HomePage, 119
distributing QuickTime movies with, 112
.Mac Slides, 124, 125
setting up, 118
Web galleries, 120–121, 127
Mail, 16, 119
Mail Photo dialog, 168
managing photos
archiving photos, 27
backing up photos, 26–27
creating multiple iPhoto libraries, 24
culling, 22
deleting, 21
leaving in place when importing photos, 20
recovering photos, 23
structure of iPhoto directories, 19
megapixels, 195
memory cards
buying larger, 197
removing from card reader, 14
saving original photos on, 13
unrecognized by iPhoto, 174
merging
events, 37
libraries, 28
metadata
EXIF, 15, 61
IPTC, 54
viewing photo’s, 61, 66
Modified folder, 19
monitors
aspect ratios and, 187
color rendering and, 190
light emitted by, 189, 191
using dual, 110
209
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Index
Ken Burns Effect, 101, 107, 109, 113
key photos, 36
keywords
albums vs., 53
categorizing album photos with, 39
searching photos by, 59
unable to assign for shared photos, 163
using on iPhoto discs, 17
working with, 53–54
Kodak Photo/Picture CDs, 14
layers, 97
lens, 195, 197
Levels histogram, 83
Levels sliders (Adjust panel), 85
libraries. See also iPhoto Library packages
creating multiple, 24
iPhoto Library folders, 26
merging, 28
rebuilding, 172
sharing, 160
switching between, 25
lighting adjustments, 90
lossy vs. lossless compression, 68
low-resolution warning icons, 149
Index
monopod/tripod, 197
moving
book pages, 146
items into and out of folders, 38
photos between events, 37
multiple libraries, 24
multiple photos
assigning descriptions for, 50
assigning titles for, 49
batch changing dates for, 51
hiding, 55
multiple prints, 135
music
choosing for slideshows, 115
fitting slideshow to, 107
formats for slideshows, 103
saved slideshow, 106
selecting playlist for slideshows, 110
troubleshooting problems with, 177
Music pane (Slideshow dialog), 103
N
naming exported files, 166
Navigation panel, 66
network photo sharing, 161, 162, 173
noise reduction, 92, 93
nondestructive editing, 63
Index
O
Open dialog, 64
orange X icon, 55
orange flag icon, 56
Order Prints dialog, 139, 182
Order window, 157
ordering
Apple ID for 1-Click, 136
book or photo processing problems, 180–181
cards, calendars, and books, 157
getting help, 183
photos don’t upload when, 180
pricing and shipping costs, 157
prints, 138–139
quality not what expected, 181
troubleshooting, 179
unreceived or damaged orders, 181
organize mode, 8, 29–31
organizing photos, 29–61. See also organize
mode; searching
adding photos to sources, 46
albums, 39
changing display pane layout, 32
contextual menu shortcuts, 34
deleting sources, 44
duplicating items on Source pane, 42
editing photo dates, 51
events, 36
flagging photos, 53, 56
folders for, 38
hiding/showing photos, 55
managing keywords, 53–54
navigating in iPhoto, 35
new features in organize mode, 30
overview, 29
photo descriptions for, 50
ratings for, 52
removing photos from sources, 47
renaming and rearranging sources, 43
selecting photos, 45
smart albums, 40–41
sorting photos, 48
splitting and merging events, 37
titles for photos, 49
viewing photo information, 61
Originals folder, 19
P
packages. See iPhoto Library packages
panel keyboard shortcuts, 69
paper
choosing size of, 134
light reflected by, 189, 191
prints appear incorrectly on, 178
selecting, 133
passwords
forgotten Apple ID, 137
strong, 136
Web gallery, 120
PDF file for book, 1
perception of color, 190
performance
Reduce Noise slider effect on, 93
troubleshooting, 172
permissions, 160, 174
pet photos, 201
photo feeds, 165
Photo Info window, 61
photos. See also sharing photos; taking better
photos
accessing shared, 163
adding to sources, 46
adding to Web galleries, 120
artistic vs. documentary, 194
assigning descriptions of, 50
black and white point adjustments of, 85
can’t open in external program, 176
210
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Index
undoing changes, 94
viewing in events, 36
viewing onscreen, 99
Photos Per Page pop-up menu, 134
Photoshop, 182
Photoshop Elements, 97
picture books, 42
pixels
aspect ratios and, 138
defined, 186
removed when cropping, 75
resolution and, 188–189
playing saved slideshows, 101
playlists for slideshows, 103, 110
plug-ins, 6, 126
portrait orientation, 73, 115, 116, 199
portraits, 200
post cards, 140, 141. See also cards
Preferences window
Check for iPhoto Updates Automatically
checkbox, 5
choosing default external editor, 95
configuring iPhoto for email, 168
General, Appearance, and Events panes, 33
selecting way to enter edit mode in, 64
setting rotation direction for photos, 72
previewing
photos on memory card, 14
prints, 132
saved slideshows, 101
Print dialog, 130, 156
print mode, 8
print settings dialog, 130, 134, 135
Print Size pop-up menu, 134
printers
color rendering and inkjet, 190
selecting for photo printing, 197
testing output for, 132
tips for inkjet, 133
printing
advantages of iPhoto, 129
books, 144–147, 156
calendars, 142–143, 156
cards, 140, 156
contact sheets, 135
designing print projects, 131
paper selections when, 133
preparing photos for, 138
previewing prints before, 132
selected pages, 156
standard-sized prints, 134
steps for, 130
tips for, 133
troubleshooting, 178
211
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Index
changing key, 36
choosing aspect ratios for, 73, 74
contrast adjustments, 86
copying to iPod or iPhone, 128
damaged during import, 175
dates of, 51
deleting, 21
disappearing, 172
editing in external editor, 64, 68, 69, 95
editing slide, 108
emailing, 168
enhancing, 77
exporting to Web pages, 126–127
exposure adjustments, 84
filenames of duplicate, 71
flagging, 53, 56
hiding/showing, 55
highlight adjustments in, 87
information about, 61
layouts for books, 146
leaving in place when importing, 20
making saturation adjustments, 89
managing keywords for, 53–54
modifying tint of, 91
moving between events, 37
orientation of, 73, 115, 116, 199
pixels and dots in, 188
placing in slideshows, 105
preparing for printing, 138
previewing prints, 132
print quality not what expected, 181
processing problems for, 180–181
publishing on Web, 122, 124
rating, 40, 52
recovering, 7, 94, 175
reducing noise in, 92, 93
removing from sources, 47
retouching, 79
reverting to original unavailable, 176
rotating, 65, 72, 108
saving originals on memory card, 13
scaling to fill slideshow screen, 102, 106
searching for, 57–60
selecting, 45, 73
shadow detail adjustments for, 88
sharpness of, 92
sorting, 48
standard-sized prints of, 134
stored in Trash, 23
straightening, 76
temperature of, 90
titles for, 49
trouble printing, 178
unable to upload when ordering, 180
Index
prints
ordering, 138, 139
quality not what expected, 181
sizes and aspect ratios for, 138
Q
QuickTime movies
distributing, 112
exporting photos and slideshows to, 111
Windows errors playing, 177
Index
R
RAM, 172
ratings
assigning, 52
searching by, 60
for smart albums, 40
unable to assign for shared photos, 163
RAW files
editing, 68
facts about, 177
formats supported for, 2
rearranging
book pages, 146
source items, 43
rebuilding libraries, 172
recovering photos
during upgrade, 7
from iPhoto Library package, 19
original photos, 94, 175
from Trash, 23
Red-Eye button, 65, 66, 67, 78
red-eye reduction, 78
Reduce Noise slider, 92, 93
reinstalling iPhoto, 173
removing
keywords from photos, 54
photos from Web galleries, 120
slideshow photos, 105
smart album photos, 41
renaming
events, 36
keywords, 53–54
source items, 43
rendering color, 190
reporting iPhoto problems, 173
resizing Source and Information panes, 9
resolution, 75, 188–189
restoring photos
from iPhoto disc, 17
from Trash, 23
retouching photos, 79
reverting to original photo unavailable, 176
reviews of digital cameras, 196
rotating photos, 65, 72, 108
RSS readers, 165
Rule of Thirds, 198, 202
S
Safari, 16
Saturation slider (Adjust panel), 89
saved slideshows
about, 100
adding, deleting, or moving photos in, 105
configuring Ken Burns Effect for, 109
creating and deleting, 104
customizing slides for, 107
designing iMovie slideshows from, 113
duration of slides, 107, 109
editing photos in, 108
exporting to QuickTime movie, 111
making DVD slideshows from, 114–115
music and default settings for, 106
running, 110
scaling to fill screen, 102, 106
Source pane display of, 101
tips for, 110
screen savers, 116–117, 125
scrolling behavior in iPhoto, 35
scrubbing, 36
Search field, 57, 58
searching
by date, 58
by keywords, 59
by rating, 60
for photos, 57
selecting
multiple files in Import Photos dialog, 15
pages for printing, 156
part of photo, 73
photos and albums, 45
Set Up Account dialog, 136, 137
Settings pane (Slideshow dialog), 102
Shadows slider (Adjust panel), 88
Shared Photos folder, 163
shared volumes, 161
Sharing pane, 162
sharing photos, 159–170
accessing shared photos, 163
actions allowed for, 163
burning CD or DVD for, 169
discs for non-iPhoto users, 170
emailing photos, 168
exporting files for, 166–167
overview, 159
212
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Index
smart albums, 21, 40, 48
software requirements for iPhoto, 2
Software Update, 5, 171, 174
sorting
changing order of slideshows and, 102
photos, 48
Source pane
categories in, 30
changing size of, 31
dragging files to, 15
dragging photos onto Albums list title, 39
duplicating sources on, 42
illustrated, 9, 31
importing pictures from iPhoto disc, 17, 169
saved slideshows in, 101
switching to organize mode in, 29
sources
adding photos to, 46
defined, 30
deleting, 44
duplicating, 42
removing photos from, 47
renaming and rearranging, 43
Speech menu, 155
spelling checks, 50, 155
splitting events, 37
standard-sized prints, 134
straightening panel, 66, 67
straightening photos, 76
strong passwords, 136
styles, 152–153
Subscriptions dialog, 125
switching between libraries, 25
synchronizing Web galleries, 121
T
taking better photos
artistic vs. documentary photos, 194
camera accessories, 197
children and pets, 201
choosing camera, 195
finding camera reviews, 196
landscapes, 202
portraits, 200
tips for, 198–199
travel photos, 203
television slideshows, 110, 115
Temperature slider (Adjust panel), 90
testing printer output, 132
text
changing fonts, styles, and sizes, 152–153
checking spelling of, 50, 155
copying font and styling information, 153
213
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Index
sharing libraries, 160
troubleshooting network photo sharing, 173
turning on, 28, 162
using shared volume for, 161
via iPhoto sharing, 161, 162
viewing in Web galleries, 164
sharing tools, 32
Sharpness slider (Adjust panel), 92
shipping
costs for orders, 157
international details for, 139
providing addresses for Apple, 137
shortcuts
contextual menu, 69
keyword, 53, 54
showing photos onscreen, 99–128. See also .Mac
account; slideshows
basic slideshows, 100, 101, 102
DVD slideshows, 114–115
iMovie slideshows, 113
iPod or iPhone displays, 128
publishing as .Mac Slides, 124
QuickTime movies for, 111, 112
saved slideshows, 100, 101, 104–106, 110
screen savers, 116–117, 125
selecting slideshow music, 103
slideshow tools, 101, 107
types of slideshows for, 100
Web galleries for, 120–121, 127
Web pages, 126–127
size
aspect ratios and print, 138
changing Source pane, 31
changing text, 152–153
fitting photo to frame, 148
paper, 134
Size pop-up menu (Export Photos dialog), 166
size slider, 9, 31, 65
slideshow mode, 8
slideshows. See also basic slideshows; saved
slideshows
controls for, 110
creating DVD, 114–115
dual monitors and, 110
iMovie, 113
music for, 103
ratings assignments during, 52
removing photos from, 47
setting up basic, 102
tips for, 110
tools for, 101, 107
troubleshooting, 177
types of, 100
viewing in Mail messages, 16
Index
Index
text (continued)
editing color of, 154
entering and editing in book, 150
rules for typing, 151
text warning icons, 149
thumbnails
corrupted, 176
hiding/showing list of, 65
permissions assigned to, 160
slideshow, 101
TidBITS, 183
Tint slider (Adjust panel), 91
titles for photos, 49
toolbar, 31, 32
tools. See also Adjust panel
editing, 65–67
Effects panel, 80–81
Red-eye, 78
Retouch, 79
sharing, 32
slideshow, 101, 107
using Enhance, 77
Web export, 127
transitions for slideshows, 106, 177
Trash, 21, 23
travel photos, 203
troubleshooting, 171–183
book or photo processing, 180–181
can’t open photos in external program, 176
corrupted thumbnails, 176
disappearing photos, 172
getting help, 183
iPhoto crashes, 171, 173, 176
memory cards or camera not recognized, 174
nothing appears after import, 174
order doesn’t arrive or is damaged, 181
ordering, 179
performance problems, 172
photos damaged during import, 175
photos don’t upload, 180
photos that can’t be edited, 176
printing, 178
prints or books not what expected, 181
RAW files, 177
slideshows, 177
unable to revert to original, 176
warning icons, 182
turning off/on photo sharing, 28, 162
U
undoing
changes, 94
deleted book pages, 146
unflagging photos, 56
updating iPhoto, 5, 6
upgrading, recovering photos during, 7
uploading prints, 139, 180
user names for Web galleries, 120
V
Verify Burned Data option, 27
viewing
photo information, 61
photos in events, 36
photos on iPod or iPhone, 128
shared photos in Web galleries, 164
Voiceover dialog, 113
W
warning icons
appearing when ordering prints, 139
dealing with low-resolution, 149
handling, 182
understanding resolution and, 188–189
Web galleries
adding and removing photos in, 120
subscribing to, 165
synchronizing, 121
tips for exporting Web photos, 127
viewing shared photos in, 164
Web sites. See also .Mac accounts
camera review, 196
changes to .Mac HomePage, 119
distributing QuickTime movies on, 112
exporting photos to, 126–127
setting up .Mac account, 118
white point adjustments, 85
white space, 198
Windows computers
burning discs for non-iPhoto users, 170
errors playing QuickTime movies, 177
Z
zooming, 70, 108, 148
214
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