CA Unified Communications Monitor Use Cases for

CA Unified Communications
Monitor
Use Cases for Managing Thresholds
Version 3.5
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Contents
Chapter 1: Creating and Assigning Call Setup Thresholds
7
Overview ...................................................................................................................................................................... 8
Prerequisites ................................................................................................................................................................ 8
Create an Incident Response ........................................................................................................................................ 9
Create a Call Setup Threshold .................................................................................................................................... 11
Assign a Call Setup Threshold ..................................................................................................................................... 13
Chapter 2: Creating and Assigning Call Quality Thresholds
15
Overview .................................................................................................................................................................... 16
Prerequisites .............................................................................................................................................................. 16
Create an Incident Response ...................................................................................................................................... 17
Create a Call Quality Threshold .................................................................................................................................. 19
Assign a Call Quality Threshold .................................................................................................................................. 21
Chapter 3: Creating and Assigning Call Server Thresholds
23
Overview .................................................................................................................................................................... 24
Understanding Call Server Thresholds ....................................................................................................................... 25
Create an Incident Response ...................................................................................................................................... 25
Create a Call Server Threshold ................................................................................................................................... 28
Assign a Call Server Threshold to a Call Server .......................................................................................................... 29
Chapter 4: Creating and Assigning Call Server Group Thresholds
31
Overview .................................................................................................................................................................... 32
Prerequisites .............................................................................................................................................................. 32
Understanding Call Server Group Thresholds ............................................................................................................ 33
Create an Incident Response ...................................................................................................................................... 34
Create a Call Server Group Threshold ........................................................................................................................ 36
Assign a Call Server Group Threshold to a Call Server ............................................................................................... 37
Chapter 5: Understanding and Managing Codec Thresholds
39
Overview .................................................................................................................................................................... 40
Codecs and Codec Thresholds .................................................................................................................................... 41
Default Codec Thresholds .......................................................................................................................................... 41
Create a Custom Codec Threshold ............................................................................................................................. 45
Change a Threshold Value .......................................................................................................................................... 46
Contents 5
Disable a Threshold .................................................................................................................................................... 46
Delete a Threshold ..................................................................................................................................................... 47
6 Use Cases for Managing Thresholds
Chapter 1: Creating and Assigning Call
Setup Thresholds
UC Monitor thresholds define the boundaries of acceptable performance. Call setup
thresholds trigger incident actions (email, SNMP traps, or traceroutes) in response to
poor call setup metrics, such as excessive delay to dial tone.
By creating call setup thresholds and assigning them to Locations and media devices,
you can determine the manner and frequency with which UC Monitor responds to
performance conditions in your unified communications system.
This use case shows UC Monitor administrators how to perform the following tasks:
■
Create a custom incident response.
■
Create a call setup threshold, which includes the incident response.
■
Assign a threshold to Locations or media devices.
This section contains the following topics:
Overview (see page 8)
Prerequisites (see page 8)
Create an Incident Response (see page 9)
Create a Call Setup Threshold (see page 11)
Assign a Call Setup Threshold (see page 13)
Chapter 1: Creating and Assigning Call Setup Thresholds 7
Overview
Overview
The following diagram illustrates the process for creating incident responses, and for
creating and assigning call setup thresholds:
The following topics describe how to create incident responses, and how to create and
assign call setup thresholds:
■
Create an incident response (see page 9).
■
Create a call setup threshold (see page 11).
■
Assign a call setup threshold to a Location or media device (see page 13).
Prerequisites
This use case assumes the following:
■
You created Location definitions, or UC Monitor discovered at least one voice
gateway or other media device. For information about defining Locations, see the
online help or the use case titled Creating Location Definitions in the CA Unified
Communications Monitor bookshelf on CA Support Online.
■
You identified the SMTP server on the Console Settings page in the management
console. For more information, click Administration, Console, Settings in the
navigation bar, and then click Help.
8 Use Cases for Managing Thresholds
Create an Incident Response
Create an Incident Response
You can configure different responses for each Location, for each media device, for each
call server or call server group, or for pairs of Locations or media devices. You then
associate the responses with the different thresholds for call quality, call setup, or call
server incidents.
You can associate an incident response with more than one action.
Note: UC Monitor provides one default incident response, Default, which is not
associated with an action.
Follow these steps:
1.
Click Administration, Policies, Incident Responses in the navigation bar.
The Incident Response List opens.
2.
Click New to create an incident response.
The Incident Response Properties page opens.
3.
Type a name for the incident response in the Name field. The name helps you
identify the response in the list of responses on the Threshold Properties page.
4.
Click New to add an action.
The Add Action to Incident Response page opens.
5.
Select the Action Type, which determines the other selections on this page:
■
Send Email. Supply the email address of the person to notify when the
associated threshold is violated. You can specify multiple email addresses,
separated by commas or semicolons.
■
Send SNMP Trap. Supply parameters to send an SNMP trap to a third-party
network monitoring operating environment.
■
Launch Traceroute Investigation. Lets you run an automatic traceroute to
collect extra data about routing from the affected Location or voice gateway.
The Launch Traceroute Investigation action is designed for call setup and call
server group incidents only.
Chapter 1: Creating and Assigning Call Setup Thresholds 9
Create an Incident Response
6.
Set the Minimum Conditions for Taking Action:
■
Severity. Select the threshold severity level that can trigger this action when
crossed: degraded or excessive. Severity does not apply to the automatic
actions initiated in response to collector incidents, call server incidents, or call
server group incidents. These actions are always performed. Incidents of these
types always have a severity of “excessive.”
■
Duration. Select the interval during which a monitored metric must violate the
threshold before the action is launched. Use this option to launch actions
either more or less quickly in response to threshold violations.
For example, select 30 minutes to launch an action when latency exceeds the
threshold during a 30-minute interval. It does not matter how many times
during the interval that the threshold is crossed. It matters only that the
condition still exists at the end of the selected duration.
7.
Set the parameters that control the recipient and format of the notification. The
available parameters vary depending on the selected Action Type:
■
Recipients. Provide the full email address of the person to receive an automatic
email notification about this type of incident. Select someone who is most
likely to respond quickly and accurately to remedy the problem that caused the
incident. You can specify multiple email addresses, separated by commas or
semicolons.
■
Send SNMP Trap to. The IP address or host name of the computer to receive
the SNMP trap.
Note: UC Monitor includes a MIB file that contains unique OIDs. You can import
them into your trap receiver. The file is located in the following directory on
the management console:
<install path>\CA\VoIPMonitor\MIB\NETQOS-VMTRAP-MIB.txt
Tip: To send a trap to more than one computer, create additional actions
within the same response, one for each additional trap destination.
■
Send Test Trap: Click to send a trap to the IP address you entered in the "Send
SNMP Trap to" field. Results of the test appear at the top of the Add Action to
Incident Response page.
■
Severity Updates. Select when to send SNMP traps:
–
Send update traps when Incident severity changes. Send an SNMP trap if
the incident severity changes, but the incident remains open. Also send an
SNMP trap when a new incident is opened.
–
Send only Incident open and close traps. Send an SNMP trap only if a new
incident is opened or if an incident is closed.
Note: Some incident types do not have a severity parameter, such as the
Poor Call Quality incident, or their severity is always excessive. The option
to send only open and close traps is always used for these incidents.
■
SNMP Profile. Select the SNMP profile to use for the trap.
10 Use Cases for Managing Thresholds
Create a Call Setup Threshold
■
8.
Time Zone. Select the time zone of the recipient. The default time zone
corresponds to the locale where the management console is installed.
Click OK.
The action appears on the Incident Response Properties page.
9.
Save the response:
■
Click Save to save the response and return to the Incident Response List.
■
Click Save & Add Another to save the response and create another response.
You can now associate the incident response with a threshold.
Create a Call Setup Threshold
Call setup thresholds trigger incidents in response to poor call setup, such as excessive
delay to dial tone.
A call setup threshold includes degraded and excessive severity settings for each metric
that is monitored.
Follow these steps:
1.
Click Administration, Policies, Call Performance, Call Setup Thresholds in the
navigation bar.
The Call Setup Threshold List opens.
2.
Click New.
The Call Setup Threshold Properties page opens.
3.
Provide a name for the custom threshold in the Name field.
4.
Select an incident response from the Incident Response field. The response is
launched when the threshold is violated. The incident response you created
appears in this field.
5.
(Optional) Describe the threshold in the Description field. For example, the
description can indicate which Locations or media devices are assigned these
custom settings, or why a particular metric has a higher threshold.
Chapter 1: Creating and Assigning Call Setup Thresholds 11
Create a Call Setup Threshold
6.
Set threshold values for the following metrics:
■
Delay to Dial Tone. The default values are 2000 milliseconds for the degraded
threshold, 4000 milliseconds for the excessive threshold, and a minimum of
five calls.
■
Post Dial Delay. The default values are 2000 milliseconds for the degraded
threshold, 4000 milliseconds for the excessive threshold, and a minimum of
five calls.
■
Call Setup Failures. The default values are 2 percent for the degraded
threshold, 10 percent for the excessive threshold, and a minimum of five calls.
Note: Threshold values are not inclusive. Metrics must exceed a threshold to
create an incident. For example, based on the default values, a delay to dial
tone of 2000 milliseconds does not launch an incident. A delay to dial tone of
2001 milliseconds does launch an incident.
7.
Select Milliseconds or Percentage as the unit of measure, or select None to disable
the degraded threshold or excessive threshold. Disabling thresholds is not
recommended.
8.
Set values for the units of measure. The value for the excessive threshold must be
larger than the value for the degraded threshold. The larger value indicates more
severe delay or more setup failures.
9.
(Optional) Provide a value in the Minimum Calls Originated field. This value sets a
minimum number of calls that must be initiated during a monitoring interval before
an incident is created.
Note: Set a lower value in the Minimum Calls Originated field to see incidents more
quickly in response to poor call setup performance. Set a higher value to see
incidents more slowly, after more data is collected.
10. Save the threshold:
■
Click Save to save the threshold and return to the Call Setup Threshold List. The
threshold appears in the list.
■
Click Save & Add Another to save the threshold and create another threshold.
You can now assign the threshold to a Location or a media device.
12 Use Cases for Managing Thresholds
Assign a Call Setup Threshold
Assign a Call Setup Threshold
During call monitoring, call setup thresholds are applied to the Locations or devices
from which calls are made. You can assign the same call setup threshold to multiple
Locations or media devices. You cannot assign call setup thresholds to groups.
Follow these steps:
1.
Click Administration, Policies, Call Performance, Call Setup Threshold Assignments
in the navigation bar.
The Call Setup Threshold Assignment List opens.
2.
Click New.
The Call Setup Threshold Assignment Properties page opens. The Available
Locations/Media Devices list displays all Locations and media devices that have not
been assigned to a threshold.
Note: Two call setup threshold metrics do not apply to Microsoft media devices:
Delay to Dial Tone and Post Dial Delay.
3.
Select a threshold to assign from the Threshold list.
4.
Double-click an item in the Available Locations/Media Devices list to move it to the
Selected list.
Tip: The Filter field accepts wildcard (*) search strings to limit the data shown in the
list. For a string with no asterisks, the Filter field assumes wildcards (for example,
“*abc*”) when it searches. Filtering can be useful when you have a long list of
Locations and media devices. For example, to see only items for the Raleigh office,
enter ral for the filter and click Apply. Only items whose name begins with Ral are
shown in the list.
5.
Save the assignment:
■
Click Save to save the assignment and return to the Call Setup Threshold
Assignment List. The new assignment appears in the list.
■
Click Save & Add Another to save the assignment and assign another threshold.
The threshold is now applied to the Location or media device you selected.
Chapter 1: Creating and Assigning Call Setup Thresholds 13
Chapter 2: Creating and Assigning Call
Quality Thresholds
UC Monitor thresholds define the boundaries of acceptable performance. Call quality
thresholds trigger incidents in response to poor call quality, such as low MOS, and poor
video quality, such as video packet loss.
By creating call quality thresholds and assigning them to pairs of Locations and media
devices, you can determine the manner and frequency with which UC Monitor responds
to performance conditions in your unified communications system.
This use case shows UC Monitor administrators how to perform the following tasks:
■
Create a custom incident response.
■
Create a call quality threshold, which includes the incident response.
■
Assign the threshold to pairs of Locations or media devices.
This section contains the following topics:
Overview (see page 16)
Prerequisites (see page 16)
Create an Incident Response (see page 17)
Create a Call Quality Threshold (see page 19)
Assign a Call Quality Threshold (see page 21)
Chapter 2: Creating and Assigning Call Quality Thresholds 15
Overview
Overview
The following diagram illustrates the process for creating incident responses, and for
creating and assigning call quality thresholds:
The following topics describe how to create incident responses, and how to create and
assign call quality thresholds:
■
Create an incident response (see page 9).
■
Create a call quality threshold (see page 19).
■
Assign a call quality threshold to a Location or media device pair (see page 21).
Prerequisites
This use case assumes the following:
■
You created Location definitions, or UC Monitor discovered at least one voice
gateway or other media device. For information about defining Locations, see the
online help or the use case titled Creating Location Definitions in the CA Unified
Communications Monitor bookshelf on CA Support Online.
■
You identified the SMTP server on the Console Settings page in the management
console. For more information, click Administration, Console, Settings in the
navigation bar, and then click Help.
16 Use Cases for Managing Thresholds
Create an Incident Response
Create an Incident Response
You can configure different responses for each Location, for each media device, for each
call server or call server group, or for pairs of Locations or media devices. You then
associate the responses with the different thresholds for call quality, call setup, or call
server incidents.
You can associate an incident response with more than one action.
Note: UC Monitor provides one default incident response, Default, which is not
associated with an action.
Follow these steps:
1.
Click Administration, Policies, Incident Responses in the navigation bar.
The Incident Response List opens.
2.
Click New to create an incident response.
The Incident Response Properties page opens.
3.
Type a name for the incident response in the Name field. The name helps you
identify the response in the list of responses on the Threshold Properties page.
4.
Click New to add an action.
The Add Action to Incident Response page opens.
5.
Select the Action Type, which determines the other selections on this page:
■
Send Email. Supply the email address of the person to notify when the
associated threshold is violated. You can specify multiple email addresses,
separated by commas or semicolons.
■
Send SNMP Trap. Supply parameters to send an SNMP trap to a third-party
network monitoring operating environment.
■
Launch Traceroute Investigation. Lets you run an automatic traceroute to
collect extra data about routing from the affected Location or voice gateway.
The Launch Traceroute Investigation action is designed for call setup and call
server group incidents only.
Chapter 2: Creating and Assigning Call Quality Thresholds 17
Create an Incident Response
6.
Set the Minimum Conditions for Taking Action:
■
Severity. Select the threshold severity level that can trigger this action when
crossed: degraded or excessive. Severity does not apply to the automatic
actions initiated in response to collector incidents, call server incidents, or call
server group incidents. These actions are always performed. Incidents of these
types always have a severity of “excessive.”
■
Duration. Select the interval during which a monitored metric must violate the
threshold before the action is launched. Use this option to launch actions
either more or less quickly in response to threshold violations.
For example, select 30 minutes to launch an action when latency exceeds the
threshold during a 30-minute interval. It does not matter how many times
during the interval that the threshold is crossed. It matters only that the
condition still exists at the end of the selected duration.
7.
Set the parameters that control the recipient and format of the notification. The
available parameters vary depending on the selected Action Type:
■
Recipients. Provide the full email address of the person to receive an automatic
email notification about this type of incident. Select someone who is most
likely to respond quickly and accurately to remedy the problem that caused the
incident. You can specify multiple email addresses, separated by commas or
semicolons.
■
Send SNMP Trap to. The IP address or host name of the computer to receive
the SNMP trap.
Note: UC Monitor includes a MIB file that contains unique OIDs. You can import
them into your trap receiver. The file is located in the following directory on
the management console:
<install path>\CA\VoIPMonitor\MIB\NETQOS-VMTRAP-MIB.txt
Tip: To send a trap to more than one computer, create additional actions
within the same response, one for each additional trap destination.
■
Send Test Trap: Click to send a trap to the IP address you entered in the "Send
SNMP Trap to" field. Results of the test appear at the top of the Add Action to
Incident Response page.
■
Severity Updates. Select when to send SNMP traps:
–
Send update traps when Incident severity changes. Send an SNMP trap if
the incident severity changes, but the incident remains open. Also send an
SNMP trap when a new incident is opened.
–
Send only Incident open and close traps. Send an SNMP trap only if a new
incident is opened or if an incident is closed.
Note: Some incident types do not have a severity parameter, such as the
Poor Call Quality incident, or their severity is always excessive. The option
to send only open and close traps is always used for these incidents.
■
SNMP Profile. Select the SNMP profile to use for the trap.
18 Use Cases for Managing Thresholds
Create a Call Quality Threshold
■
8.
Time Zone. Select the time zone of the recipient. The default time zone
corresponds to the locale where the management console is installed.
Click OK.
The action appears on the Incident Response Properties page.
9.
Save the response:
■
Click Save to save the response and return to the Incident Response List.
■
Click Save & Add Another to save the response and create another response.
You can now associate the incident response with a threshold.
Create a Call Quality Threshold
A call quality threshold includes degraded and excessive severity settings for each
metric that is monitored. Threshold properties include a unique name for the custom
settings, an incident response, and an optional description of the settings.
Threshold values are not inclusive. Metrics must exceed a threshold to create an
incident. For example, based on the default values, latency of 150 milliseconds does not
launch an incident. Latency of 151 milliseconds does launch an incident.
Follow these steps:
1.
Click Administration, Policies, Call Performance, Call Quality Thresholds in the
navigation bar.
The Call Quality Threshold List opens.
2.
Click New.
The Call Quality Threshold Properties page opens.
3.
Provide a name for the custom threshold in the Name field.
4.
Select an incident response from the Incident Response field. This response is
launched when the threshold is violated. The response you created appears in this
list.
5.
(Optional) Briefly describe the threshold in the Description field. The description
can indicate which pairs of Locations and media devices are assigned the threshold,
for example.
Chapter 2: Creating and Assigning Call Quality Thresholds 19
Create a Call Quality Threshold
6.
Select a unit of measure for the MOS and Network MOS metrics, or select None to
disable the threshold:
■
MOS: Select this option to monitor call quality that is based on a fixed MOS
value for the degraded and excessive thresholds.
■
Codec: Select this option to monitor call quality that is based on the codec that
is detected during call monitoring. UC Monitor uses the degraded and
excessive thresholds for the detected codec. Codec is the default unit of
measure.
Note: For information about setting codec thresholds, see the use case titled
Understanding and Managing Codec Thresholds in the CA Unified
Communications Monitor bookshelf on CA Support Online.
7.
Select Milliseconds, Percentage, or Decibel (dB) as the unit of measure for the
remaining audio and video metrics, or select None to disable the threshold.
Disabling thresholds is not recommended.
8.
Provide a value for the units of measure. The value for the excessive threshold must
be larger than the degraded threshold value.
9.
Provide a new value in the Minimum Calls Minutes field. This value sets the
minimum amount of time that a metric can cross the threshold during a monitoring
interval before an incident is created. The following list describes the default values
for each field.
■
MOS and Network MOS: The default values are 4.03 for the degraded MOS
threshold, 3.6 for the excessive MOS threshold, and a minimum of 15 call
minutes.
■
Packet Loss and Jitter Buffer Loss: The default values are 1 percent for the
degraded threshold, 5 percent for the excessive threshold, and a minimum of
15 call minutes.
■
Latency and Video Latency: The default values are 150 milliseconds for the
degraded threshold, 400 milliseconds for the excessive threshold, and a
minimum of 15 call minutes.
■
ACOM: The default values are 15 dB for the degraded threshold, 6 dB for the
excessive threshold, and a minimum of 15 call minutes.
20 Use Cases for Managing Thresholds
Assign a Call Quality Threshold
■
Frozen Video, Video Frame Loss, and Video Packet Loss: The default values are
1 percent for the degraded threshold, 5 percent for the excessive threshold,
and a minimum of 15 call minutes.
Tip: Set a lower value for the Minimum Call Minutes field to see incidents more
quickly in response to poor call quality performance. Set a higher value to see
incidents more slowly, after more data is collected.
10. Save the threshold:
■
Click Save to save the threshold and return to the Call Quality Threshold List.
The new threshold appears in the list.
■
Click Save & Add Another to save the threshold add another custom threshold.
You can now assign the threshold to a Location or a media device.
Assign a Call Quality Threshold
VoIP and video call performance occurs between pairs of related endpoints. Therefore,
you want to understand the call quality data that is reported for paired network
locations. By default, the Default call quality threshold is assigned to all pairs of
Locations and media devices. In addition, you can assign custom call quality thresholds
to selected pairs of Locations and media devices:
■
Pairs of Locations to include all computers in the relevant Location subnets
■
Pairs of media devices
■
Pairs that consist of a Location and a media device
You can assign the same call quality thresholds to multiple pairs, such as all Locations in
one geographical region of your enterprise. You cannot assign call quality thresholds to
CA Performance Center groups.
Follow these steps:
1.
Click Administration, Policies, Call Performance, Call Quality Threshold Assignments
in the navigation bar.
The Call Quality Threshold Assignment List opens.
2.
Click New.
The Call Quality Threshold Assignment Properties page opens. The Available
Locations/Media Device Pairs list displays all Locations and media devices that have
not been assigned to a threshold.
3.
Select the threshold that you want to assign from the Threshold field.
Chapter 2: Creating and Assigning Call Quality Thresholds 21
Assign a Call Quality Threshold
4.
(Optional) Select IP Domain if you are monitoring an environment with multiple
custom IP domains.
The Available Locations/Media Device Pairs list is filtered to show only pairs of
Locations and media devices from the selected domain.
5.
Select an item in the Available Locations/Media Device Pairs list.
The Filter field accepts wildcard (*) search strings to limit the data in the list. For a
string with no asterisks, the Filter field assumes wildcards (for example, “*abc*”)
when it searches. Filtering can be useful when you have a long list of Locations and
media devices.
For example, to see only items for the Raleigh office, enter ral for the filter and click
Apply. Only items whose name begins with Ral are shown in the list.
6.
Double-click the item in the Available list to move it to the Selected Location/Media
Device Pairs list.
Tip: You can use the Shift or Control key or click and drag with the left mouse
button to select multiple items. Then click the Right arrow to move the items to the
Selected list.
7.
Save the assignment.
■
Click Save to save the assignment and return to the Call Quality Threshold
Assignment List. The new assignment appears in the list.
■
Click Save & Add Another to save the assignment and assign another threshold.
The threshold is now applied to the Locations and media devices you selected.
22 Use Cases for Managing Thresholds
Chapter 3: Creating and Assigning Call
Server Thresholds
UC Monitor thresholds define the boundaries of acceptable performance. Call server
thresholds trigger incidents in response to registration failures and poor call quality (the
Cisco QRT feature), based on information in the Phone Details reports. For example,
when a Registration Failures incident is reported, multiple endpoints in the Phones
report have a status of Registration Failed.
By creating call server thresholds and assigning them to individual call servers, you can
determine the manner and frequency with which UC Monitor responds to registration
failures and poor call quality conditions in your Cisco Unified Communications Manager
system.
This use case shows UC Monitor administrators how to perform the following tasks:
■
Create a custom incident response.
■
Create a call server threshold, which includes the incident response.
■
Assign a threshold to one or more call servers.
Note: Call server thresholds apply only to Cisco Unified Communications Manager
environments.
This section contains the following topics:
Overview (see page 24)
Understanding Call Server Thresholds (see page 25)
Create an Incident Response (see page 25)
Create a Call Server Threshold (see page 28)
Assign a Call Server Threshold to a Call Server (see page 29)
Chapter 3: Creating and Assigning Call Server Thresholds 23
Overview
Overview
The following diagram illustrates the process for creating and assigning call server
thresholds:
The following topics describe the process for creating and assigning call server
thresholds:
■
Create an incident response (see page 9).
■
Create a call server threshold (see page 28).
■
Assign a call server threshold to a call server (see page 29).
24 Use Cases for Managing Thresholds
Understanding Call Server Thresholds
Understanding Call Server Thresholds
The call server threshold consists of the following metrics, each of which has its own
threshold values.
Registration Failures threshold
The Registration Failures threshold creates an incident when devices repeatedly,
but unsuccessfully, try to register with a call server. Excessive registration failures
can indicate a configuration problem, a call server issue, or a security problem that
can impede server performance. When an endpoint tries to register from an
unauthorized address, the call server ultimately denies the request. The call server
responds to every registration request. Therefore, excessive registrations consume
bandwidth and tie up the call server while it tries to resolve device addresses and
process requests.
Poor Call Quality threshold
The Poor Call Quality threshold is based on the Quality Report Tool (QRT), a feature
of some Cisco IP telephone models. The QRT allows users to press a key during or
after a call to report poor call quality. When the key is pressed, the QRT collects
information useful for troubleshooting the poor performance from various sources.
The QRT then formats the information and sends it to its call server. The call server
places the information in a call detail record.
The Poor Call Quality threshold creates an incident when a user presses the QRT
key. When a Poor Call Quality incident is reported, a Phone Details table is available
from the Incidents Overview report. The Phone Details table shows call legs for the
15 minutes before the QRT key was pressed and identifies the associated
telephone.
Create an Incident Response
You can configure different responses for each Location, for each media device, for each
call server or call server group, or for pairs of Locations or media devices. You then
associate the responses with the different thresholds for call quality, call setup, or call
server incidents.
You can associate an incident response with more than one action.
Note: UC Monitor provides one default incident response, Default, which is not
associated with an action.
Chapter 3: Creating and Assigning Call Server Thresholds 25
Create an Incident Response
Follow these steps:
1.
Click Administration, Policies, Incident Responses in the navigation bar.
The Incident Response List opens.
2.
Click New to create an incident response.
The Incident Response Properties page opens.
3.
Type a name for the incident response in the Name field. The name helps you
identify the response in the list of responses on the Threshold Properties page.
4.
Click New to add an action.
The Add Action to Incident Response page opens.
5.
6.
Select the Action Type, which determines the other selections on this page:
■
Send Email. Supply the email address of the person to notify when the
associated threshold is violated. You can specify multiple email addresses,
separated by commas or semicolons.
■
Send SNMP Trap. Supply parameters to send an SNMP trap to a third-party
network monitoring operating environment.
■
Launch Traceroute Investigation. Lets you run an automatic traceroute to
collect extra data about routing from the affected Location or voice gateway.
The Launch Traceroute Investigation action is designed for call setup and call
server group incidents only.
Set the Minimum Conditions for Taking Action:
■
Severity. Select the threshold severity level that can trigger this action when
crossed: degraded or excessive. Severity does not apply to the automatic
actions initiated in response to collector incidents, call server incidents, or call
server group incidents. These actions are always performed. Incidents of these
types always have a severity of “excessive.”
■
Duration. Select the interval during which a monitored metric must violate the
threshold before the action is launched. Use this option to launch actions
either more or less quickly in response to threshold violations.
For example, select 30 minutes to launch an action when latency exceeds the
threshold during a 30-minute interval. It does not matter how many times
during the interval that the threshold is crossed. It matters only that the
condition still exists at the end of the selected duration.
26 Use Cases for Managing Thresholds
Create an Incident Response
7.
Set the parameters that control the recipient and format of the notification. The
available parameters vary depending on the selected Action Type:
■
Recipients. Provide the full email address of the person to receive an automatic
email notification about this type of incident. Select someone who is most
likely to respond quickly and accurately to remedy the problem that caused the
incident. You can specify multiple email addresses, separated by commas or
semicolons.
■
Send SNMP Trap to. The IP address or host name of the computer to receive
the SNMP trap.
Note: UC Monitor includes a MIB file that contains unique OIDs. You can import
them into your trap receiver. The file is located in the following directory on
the management console:
<install path>\CA\VoIPMonitor\MIB\NETQOS-VMTRAP-MIB.txt
Tip: To send a trap to more than one computer, create additional actions
within the same response, one for each additional trap destination.
■
Send Test Trap: Click to send a trap to the IP address you entered in the "Send
SNMP Trap to" field. Results of the test appear at the top of the Add Action to
Incident Response page.
■
Severity Updates. Select when to send SNMP traps:
–
Send update traps when Incident severity changes. Send an SNMP trap if
the incident severity changes, but the incident remains open. Also send an
SNMP trap when a new incident is opened.
–
Send only Incident open and close traps. Send an SNMP trap only if a new
incident is opened or if an incident is closed.
Note: Some incident types do not have a severity parameter, such as the
Poor Call Quality incident, or their severity is always excessive. The option
to send only open and close traps is always used for these incidents.
8.
■
SNMP Profile. Select the SNMP profile to use for the trap.
■
Time Zone. Select the time zone of the recipient. The default time zone
corresponds to the locale where the management console is installed.
Click OK.
The action appears on the Incident Response Properties page.
9.
Save the response:
■
Click Save to save the response and return to the Incident Response List.
■
Click Save & Add Another to save the response and create another response.
You can now associate the incident response with a threshold.
Chapter 3: Creating and Assigning Call Server Thresholds 27
Create a Call Server Threshold
Create a Call Server Threshold
Call server thresholds trigger incidents in response to registration failures and poor call
quality (the Cisco QRT feature), based on information in the Phone Details reports.
When you create a call server threshold, you select the incident response to launch
when the threshold is violated.
Follow these steps:
1.
Click Administration, Policies, Call Servers, Call Server Thresholds in the navigation
bar.
The Call Server Threshold List opens.
2.
Click New.
The Call Server Threshold Properties page opens.
3.
Provide a name for the threshold in the Name field.
4.
Select an incident response from the Incident Response field. This incident is
launched when the threshold is violated. The incident response you created
appears in this list.
5.
(Optional) Briefly describe the threshold in the Description field. The description
can indicate which server is assigned these custom settings, or why a particular
metric has a higher threshold, for example.
6.
Set the values for the Registration Failures threshold:
■
Accept Number as the unit of measure, or select None to disable the threshold.
Disabling thresholds is not recommended.
■
Provide a value for the unit of measure. This value sets the minimum number
of registration failures that can occur during a monitoring interval before an
incident is created.
Note: The default value for a Registration Failures threshold is 15 failures per
reporting interval. The severity is always excessive.
7.
Enable the Poor Call Quality (QRT) threshold, or select None to disable the
threshold. Disabling thresholds is not recommended.
Note: The Poor Call Quality threshold is enabled by default, and its severity is
always excessive.
8.
Save the threshold:
■
Click Save to save the threshold and return to the Call Server Threshold List.
■
Click Save & Add Another to save the threshold and create another threshold.
The threshold is saved and can be assigned to one or more call servers. Your
changes are applied to the next data-collection interval. Data that is already
collected is not reevaluated with the new settings.
28 Use Cases for Managing Thresholds
Assign a Call Server Threshold to a Call Server
Assign a Call Server Threshold to a Call Server
The Default call server threshold is applied to all call servers when the call servers are
discovered during monitoring. However, you can assign custom call server thresholds to
selected call servers. You can assign a threshold to multiple call servers.
Follow these steps:
1.
Click Administration, Policies, Call Servers, Call Server Threshold Assignments in the
navigation bar.
The Call Server Threshold Assignment List opens.
2.
Click New.
The Call Server Threshold Assignment Properties page opens. The Available Call
Servers list displays all call servers that have not been assigned to a customized
threshold.
3.
Select the threshold that you want to assign from the Threshold field.
4.
Select a call server in the Available Call Servers list.
The Filter field accepts wildcard (*) search strings to limit the data shown in the list.
For strings with no asterisks, the Filter field assumes wildcards (for example,
“*abc*”) when it searches. Filtering can be useful when you have a long list of call
servers.
For example, to see only items for the Raleigh office, enter ral for the filter and click
Apply. Only items whose name begins with Ral are shown in the list.
5.
Double-click the call server in the Available list to move it to the Selected Call
Servers list.
Tip: You can use the Shift or Control key or click and drag with the left mouse
button to select multiple items. Then click the Right arrow to move the items to the
Selected list.
6.
Save the assignment:
■
Click Save to save the assignment and return to the Call Server Threshold
Assignment List.
■
Click Save & Add Another to save the assignment and assign another threshold.
The threshold is now applied to the call servers you selected.
Chapter 3: Creating and Assigning Call Server Thresholds 29
Chapter 4: Creating and Assigning Call
Server Group Thresholds
UC Monitor thresholds define the boundaries of acceptable performance. Call server
group thresholds trigger incidents in response to changes in phone status, such as
missing, moved, or new phones.
Call server group thresholds are designed to be applied to your Cisco call server clusters,
or to other logical groupings of call servers. Each call server in a cluster can play several
different roles to provide failover safeguards and load balancing. The call server group
thresholds apply to all call servers in a cluster.
By creating call server group thresholds and assigning them to your Cisco call server
clusters, you can determine the manner and frequency with which UC Monitor responds
to status changes in your unified communications system.
This use case shows UC Monitor administrators how to perform the following tasks:
■
Create a custom incident response.
■
Create a call server group threshold, which includes the incident response.
■
Assign a threshold to call server clusters or other logical groupings of call servers.
Note: Call server group thresholds apply only to Cisco Unified Communications Manager
environments.
This section contains the following topics:
Overview (see page 32)
Prerequisites (see page 32)
Understanding Call Server Group Thresholds (see page 33)
Create an Incident Response (see page 34)
Create a Call Server Group Threshold (see page 36)
Assign a Call Server Group Threshold to a Call Server (see page 37)
Chapter 4: Creating and Assigning Call Server Group Thresholds 31
Overview
Overview
The following diagram illustrates the process for creating and assigning call server group
thresholds.
The following topics describe the process for creating and assigning call server group
thresholds.
■
Create an incident response (see page 9).
■
Create a call server group threshold (see page 36).
■
Assign a call server group threshold to a call server group (see page 37).
Prerequisites
This use case assumes you created at least one call server group that contains at least
one Cisco call server. For information about creating call server groups, see the online
help or the use case titled Creating Call Server Groups in the CA Unified Communications
Monitor bookshelf on CA Support Online.
32 Use Cases for Managing Thresholds
Understanding Call Server Group Thresholds
Understanding Call Server Group Thresholds
Call server group thresholds are designed for your Cisco call server clusters and other
logical groupings of call servers. Each call server in a cluster can play several different
roles to provide failover safeguards and load balancing. The call server group thresholds
apply to all call servers in a cluster.
Note: Call server group thresholds apply only to Cisco Unified Communications Manager
environments.
Call server group thresholds trigger incidents when status changes exceed the Phone
Status Changes metric. The Phone Status Changes incident helps you detect failover
events and branch office outages. The incident also helps identify call server
performance issues and costly branch office connectivity failures. Typically, the incident
itself provides enough information to help you identify the affected devices and call
server group. The Phone Status Changes incident helps you distinguish between
endpoints that access call servers over a WAN link and endpoints that use a local cluster.
The Default call server group threshold triggers incidents when 50 percent of all devices
had status changes during the reporting interval.
The following types of status changes contribute to a Phone Status Changes incident.
Currently Missing Phones status
The percentage of endpoints that were once registered to a server in the group, but
are not now registered to any server in the group, and were not observed to have
been formally unregistered. The total does not include endpoints that had normal
deregistration, which can occur during a restart.
Recently Moved Phones status
The percentage of endpoints that were registered to a call server in this group, but
are now registered to a different call server in the same group.
New/Found Phones status
The percentage of endpoints that are registered to a call server in this group, but
were not registered during the previous reporting interval.
■
A new endpoint has never registered to this call server group since monitoring
with UC Monitor began.
■
A found endpoint lost contact with this call server group in the past, but
registered again during the last reporting interval.
When the threshold is exceeded, a Phone Status Changes incident appears in the Call
Server Incident Details. Separate data views provide more information when you drill
down into the detailed incident report.
Chapter 4: Creating and Assigning Call Server Group Thresholds 33
Create an Incident Response
The incident is not dependent on the similar information reported in the Phones Report.
For example, when a Currently Missing Phones status change occurs, multiple devices in
the Phones List can show a status of Unavailable or Lost Contact. The status of an
endpoint is actually the device status at the end of the reporting interval. When a
change in status occurs, the incident is created before another status change occurs.
The later status is reflected in the Phones Report and is slightly out of sync with the
incident. Review the Phone Details Report, which includes the Previous Status for each
endpoint.
Create an Incident Response
You can configure different responses for each Location, for each media device, for each
call server or call server group, or for pairs of Locations or media devices. You then
associate the responses with the different thresholds for call quality, call setup, or call
server incidents.
You can associate an incident response with more than one action.
Note: UC Monitor provides one default incident response, Default, which is not
associated with an action.
Follow these steps:
1.
Click Administration, Policies, Incident Responses in the navigation bar.
The Incident Response List opens.
2.
Click New to create an incident response.
The Incident Response Properties page opens.
3.
Type a name for the incident response in the Name field. The name helps you
identify the response in the list of responses on the Threshold Properties page.
4.
Click New to add an action.
The Add Action to Incident Response page opens.
5.
Select the Action Type, which determines the other selections on this page:
■
Send Email. Supply the email address of the person to notify when the
associated threshold is violated. You can specify multiple email addresses,
separated by commas or semicolons.
■
Send SNMP Trap. Supply parameters to send an SNMP trap to a third-party
network monitoring operating environment.
■
Launch Traceroute Investigation. Lets you run an automatic traceroute to
collect extra data about routing from the affected Location or voice gateway.
The Launch Traceroute Investigation action is designed for call setup and call
server group incidents only.
34 Use Cases for Managing Thresholds
Create an Incident Response
6.
Set the Minimum Conditions for Taking Action:
■
Severity. Select the threshold severity level that can trigger this action when
crossed: degraded or excessive. Severity does not apply to the automatic
actions initiated in response to collector incidents, call server incidents, or call
server group incidents. These actions are always performed. Incidents of these
types always have a severity of “excessive.”
■
Duration. Select the interval during which a monitored metric must violate the
threshold before the action is launched. Use this option to launch actions
either more or less quickly in response to threshold violations.
For example, select 30 minutes to launch an action when latency exceeds the
threshold during a 30-minute interval. It does not matter how many times
during the interval that the threshold is crossed. It matters only that the
condition still exists at the end of the selected duration.
7.
Set the parameters that control the recipient and format of the notification. The
available parameters vary depending on the selected Action Type:
■
Recipients. Provide the full email address of the person to receive an automatic
email notification about this type of incident. Select someone who is most
likely to respond quickly and accurately to remedy the problem that caused the
incident. You can specify multiple email addresses, separated by commas or
semicolons.
■
Send SNMP Trap to. The IP address or host name of the computer to receive
the SNMP trap.
Note: UC Monitor includes a MIB file that contains unique OIDs. You can import
them into your trap receiver. The file is located in the following directory on
the management console:
<install path>\CA\VoIPMonitor\MIB\NETQOS-VMTRAP-MIB.txt
Tip: To send a trap to more than one computer, create additional actions
within the same response, one for each additional trap destination.
■
Send Test Trap: Click to send a trap to the IP address you entered in the "Send
SNMP Trap to" field. Results of the test appear at the top of the Add Action to
Incident Response page.
■
Severity Updates. Select when to send SNMP traps:
–
Send update traps when Incident severity changes. Send an SNMP trap if
the incident severity changes, but the incident remains open. Also send an
SNMP trap when a new incident is opened.
–
Send only Incident open and close traps. Send an SNMP trap only if a new
incident is opened or if an incident is closed.
Note: Some incident types do not have a severity parameter, such as the
Poor Call Quality incident, or their severity is always excessive. The option
to send only open and close traps is always used for these incidents.
■
SNMP Profile. Select the SNMP profile to use for the trap.
Chapter 4: Creating and Assigning Call Server Group Thresholds 35
Create a Call Server Group Threshold
■
8.
Time Zone. Select the time zone of the recipient. The default time zone
corresponds to the locale where the management console is installed.
Click OK.
The action appears on the Incident Response Properties page.
9.
Save the response:
■
Click Save to save the response and return to the Incident Response List.
■
Click Save & Add Another to save the response and create another response.
You can now associate the incident response with a threshold.
Create a Call Server Group Threshold
When you create a call server group threshold, you select the incident response to
launch when the threshold is violated.
Follow these steps:
1.
Click Administration, Policies, Call Servers, Call Server Group Thresholds in the
navigation bar.
The Call Server Group Threshold List opens.
2.
Click New.
The Call Server Group Threshold Properties page opens.
3.
Provide a name for the custom threshold in the Name field.
4.
Select an incident response in the Incident Response field. This incident is launched
when the threshold is violated. The incident response you created appears in this
list.
5.
(Optional) Briefly describe the threshold in the Description field. The description
can indicate which server group is assigned these custom settings, for example.
6.
Set the values for the Phone Status Changes threshold in the Threshold field.
■
Select Percentage as the unit of measure, or select None to disable the
threshold. Disabling thresholds is not recommended.
■
Provide a value for the unit of measure. An incident is created when the
percentage of devices that undergo a status change during the reporting
interval exceeds the value you specify. Set a lower value to see incidents more
quickly in response to status changes. Set a higher value to see incidents only
after more status changes are observed. An incident is created only if the
minimum value is met during a monitoring interval.
36 Use Cases for Managing Thresholds
Assign a Call Server Group Threshold to a Call Server
7.
Save the threshold:
■
Click Save to save the threshold and return to the Call Server Group Threshold
List.
■
Click Save & Add Another to save the threshold and create another threshold.
The threshold is saved, and can be assigned to one or more call server groups.
Assign a Call Server Group Threshold to a Call Server
The call server group thresholds are appropriate for Cisco call server clusters. These
thresholds apply to functionality that is shared among the call servers in a cluster. The
Default call server group threshold is assigned to all call server groups unless you assign
a custom threshold. You can assign a custom threshold to multiple call server groups.
Follow these steps:
1.
Click Administration, Policies, Call Servers, Call Server Group Threshold Assignments
in the navigation bar.
The Call Server Group Threshold Assignment List opens.
2.
Click New.
The Call Server Group Threshold Assignment Properties page opens. The Available
Call Server Groups list displays all call servers that have not been assigned to a
customized threshold.
3.
Select the threshold that you want to assign from the Threshold field.
4.
Select a group in the Available Call Server Groups list.
The Filter field accepts wildcard (*) search strings to limit the data shown in the list.
For strings with no asterisks, the Filter field assumes wildcards (for example,
“*abc*”) when it searches. Filtering can be useful when you have a long list of call
server groups.
For example, to see only items for the Raleigh office, enter ral for the filter and click
Apply. Only items whose name begins with Ral are shown in the list.
5.
Double-click an item in the Available list to move it to the Selected Call Server
Groups list.
Tip: You can use the Shift or Control key or click and drag with the left mouse
button to select multiple items. Then click the Right arrow to move the items to the
Selected list.
Chapter 4: Creating and Assigning Call Server Group Thresholds 37
Assign a Call Server Group Threshold to a Call Server
6.
Save the assignment:
■
Click Save to save the assignment and return to the Call Server Groups
Threshold Assignment List. The new assignment appears in the list.
■
Click Save & Add Another to save the assignment and assign another threshold.
The threshold is now applied to the call server groups you selected.
38 Use Cases for Managing Thresholds
Chapter 5: Understanding and Managing
Codec Thresholds
The UC Monitor default codec thresholds let you monitor MOS relative to codec
performance or relative to absolute MOS value. The codecs that your endpoints use play
a critical role in call quality. Endpoints that use a low-bandwidth codec, such as G.729,
can require new thresholds. You can base the new thresholds on lower performance
expectations, or on the codec rather than a fixed threshold value.
If the settings of the default codec thresholds are inappropriate for your environment,
you can create your own thresholds for the codecs that UC Monitor supports. You
cannot create thresholds for unsupported codecs.
This use case describes the default codec thresholds, and shows a UC Monitor
administrator how to create, change, disable, and delete a codec threshold.
This section contains the following topics:
Overview (see page 40)
Codecs and Codec Thresholds (see page 41)
Default Codec Thresholds (see page 41)
Create a Custom Codec Threshold (see page 45)
Change a Threshold Value (see page 46)
Disable a Threshold (see page 46)
Delete a Threshold (see page 47)
Chapter 5: Understanding and Managing Codec Thresholds 39
Overview
Overview
The following diagram illustrates the process for managing codec thresholds:
The following topics describe the process of managing codec thresholds:
■
Review the settings for the default codec thresholds (see page 41).
■
Create a custom codec threshold (see page 45).
■
Change a threshold value (see page 46).
■
Disable a threshold (see page 46).
■
Delete a threshold (see page 47).
40 Use Cases for Managing Thresholds
Codecs and Codec Thresholds
Codecs and Codec Thresholds
The codec is a component of VoIP or video over IP devices. Codec performance has a
noticeable effect on VoIP and video performance. A high-performing codec encodes the
voice signal, breaks it into packets, and queues the packets faster and with less data loss
than a low-performing codec.
Many codecs are available to optimize VoIP or video performance. Some codec
characteristics can affect network performance:
■
Different codec types have different bandwidth requirements.
■
Some codecs do not compress the data that they send. These codecs use more
bandwidth than codecs that use a compression scheme. However, compression
often degrades the audio signal and adds delay.
Codecs provide a certain level of audio quality, which is expressed as a theoretical
maximum MOS. The software-only codecs from Microsoft receive ratings for theoretical
maximum MOS, and advertise different performance expectations in wideband and
narrowband environments. The theoretical maximum MOS is derived through testing.
The theoretical maximum represents the highest possible MOS that a codec can achieve
(without other impairments), such as delay due to network congestion.
Note: The Mean Opinion Score (MOS) is an industry standard method for gauging call
quality. MOS is an estimation of how impairments to a voice signal affect listener
perception of call quality.
Default Codec Thresholds
A codec threshold includes values for the following types of MOS.
■
MOS: Available for most codecs.
■
Network MOS: Offered by the Microsoft proprietary codecs.
■
Wideband Listening MOS: Offered by the G.711a, G.711u, G.722 64K, RTAudio NB,
RTAudio WB, and Siren codecs in a Microsoft Lync environment.
UC Monitor automatically applies the appropriate default threshold to the codec that is
detected during monitoring. The default threshold values are based on unique codec
attributes, such as theoretical maximum MOS.
Notes:
■
There are no industry standards for rating the Wideband Listening MOS for a
codec. The default threshold values for Wideband Listening MOS are based on
CA internal testing. Your environment may require different values. Adjust
them as necessary. For more information, see Manage Codec Thresholds.
Chapter 5: Understanding and Managing Codec Thresholds 41
Default Codec Thresholds
■
The collector attempts to identify unsupported codecs by the packet payload.
An unidentified codec can appear as Nonstandard or Dynamic Payload in
reports. Data from an unknown codec appears as Unrated because UC Monitor
does not have the commonly accepted MOS thresholds for that codec. These
values continue to be unrated until you assign a fixed-value MOS threshold to
the affected Locations.
The following list summarizes the default codec threshold settings:
G.711a
This variation of the G.711 codec uses the A-law sampling method, popular in
Europe and Asia. The default threshold values are as follows:
■
MOS: 4.03 (Degraded), 3.60 (Excessive)
■
Network MOS: 3.30 (Degraded), 2.95 (Excessive)
■
Wideband Listening MOS: 2.50 (Degraded), 1.75 (Excessive)
G.711u
This variation of the G.711 codec uses the U-law sampling method, popular in North
America and Japan. The default threshold values are as follows:
■
MOS: 4.03 (Degraded), 3.60 (Excessive)
■
Network MOS: 3.30 (Degraded), 2.95 (Excessive)
■
Wideband Listening MOS: 2.50 (Degraded), 2.00 (Excessive)
G.722 64k
This wideband speech codec offers high-quality audio with a faster sampling rate.
Cisco IP telephones report quality scores according to the G.711 wideband codecs,
with the same theoretical maximum MOS. The same threshold settings are used for
these two codecs. The default threshold values are as follows:
■
Degraded MOS: 4.03
■
Excessive MOS: 3.60
■
Wideband Listening MOS: 3.00 (Degraded), 2.50 (Excessive)
G.722.1 24k
This variation of the G.722 codec offers lower bit-rate compression. The default
threshold values are as follows:
■
MOS: 3.75 (Degraded), 3.35 (Excessive)
■
Network MOS: 3.58 (Degraded), 3.20 (Excessive)
42 Use Cases for Managing Thresholds
Default Codec Thresholds
G.723.1
Microsoft Exchange Unified Messaging uses this low-bandwidth codec. The default
threshold values are as follows:
■
MOS: 3.38 (Degraded), 3.02 (Excessive)
■
Network MOS: 2.41 (Degraded), 2.15 (Excessive)
G.726 32k
This codec offers adaptive differential pulse-code modulation (ADPCM) with low
bandwidth. The default threshold values are as follows:
■
MOS: 3.86 (Degraded), 3.45 (Excessive)
■
Network MOS: 3.17 (Degraded), 2.83 (Excessive)
G.729
This high-performance, low-bit-rate codec (8 Kbps) offers compression and coding
of speech using the conjugate-structure algebraic-code-excited linear prediction
(CS-ACELP) algorithm. The default threshold values are as follows:
■
Degraded MOS: 3.59
■
Excessive MOS: 3.21
G.729A
This reduced-complexity CS-ACELP codec is “Annex A” to the G.729 specification.
The default threshold values are as follows:
■
Degraded MOS: 3.48
■
Excessive MOS: 3.11
G.7.29AB
This G.729 codec is fully compliant with ITU annexes A and B to the G.729 standard
specification. The codec uses CS-ACELP with silence suppression. The default
threshold values are as follows:
■
Degraded MOS: 3.48
■
Excessive MOS: 3.11
G.729B
This codec is “Annex B” to the G.729 specification and adds a silence compression
scheme. The default threshold values are as follows:
■
Degraded MOS: 3.59
■
Excessive MOS: 3.21
Chapter 5: Understanding and Managing Codec Thresholds 43
Default Codec Thresholds
GSM FR
This codec is an early speech coding standard for digital mobile telephone systems.
The codec uses a 13-kbit-per-second sampling rate and delivers relatively poor
quality. The default threshold values are as follows:
■
Degraded Network MOS: 2.49
■
Excessive Network MOS: 2.22
iLBC
The Internet Low Bit Rate Codec uses an 8-kHz/16-bit sampling rate and is designed
to handle lost data. The default threshold values are as follows:
■
Degraded MOS: 3.57
■
Excessive MOS: 3.19
RTAudio NB
This proprietary Microsoft codec offers Realtime Audio in narrowband mode and
uses an 8-kHz sampling rate. The default threshold values are as follows:
■
MOS: 3.48 (Degraded), 3.11 (Excessive)
■
Network MOS: 2.70 (Degraded), 2.41 (Excessive)
■
Wideband Listening MOS: 3.00 (Degraded), 2.25 (Excessive)
RTAudio WB
This proprietary Microsoft codec offers Realtime Audio in wideband mode and uses
a 16-kHz sampling rate. The default threshold values are as follows:
■
MOS: 3.84 (Degraded), 3.44 (Excessive)
■
Network MOS: 3.75 (Degraded), 3.35 (Excessive)
■
Wideband Listening MOS: 2.50 (Degraded), 1.75 (Excessive)
Siren
Microsoft Lync uses this proprietary Polycom codec for audio-visual conferencing.
The codec provides high-quality audio at low bit rates, and operates at 24 kbps and
32 kbps for wideband (50 Hz - 7 kHz). The default threshold values are as follows:
■
MOS: 3.66 (Degraded), 3.27 (Excessive)
■
Network MOS: 3.40 (Degraded), 3.04 (Excessive)
■
Wideband Listening MOS: 2.75 (Degraded), 2.00 (Excessive)
44 Use Cases for Managing Thresholds
Create a Custom Codec Threshold
Create a Custom Codec Threshold
If the settings of the default codec thresholds are inappropriate for your environment,
you can create custom thresholds based on the codecs that UC Monitor supports. You
cannot create thresholds for unsupported codecs.
Follow these steps:
1.
Click Administration, Policies, Call Performance, Codec Thresholds in the navigation
bar.
The Codec Threshold List opens.
2.
Click New.
The Codec Threshold Properties page opens.
3.
Select the codec for which you want to create a threshold in the Codec field.
Tip: Codec thresholds consist of degraded and excessive values for one type of
MOS. To set custom values for multiple MOS types, such as MOS and Network MOS,
and associate them with the same codec, create two codec thresholds. Select the
same codec in the Codec field.
4.
Select the metric you want to customize in the Metric field: MOS, Network MOS, or
Wideband Listening MOS.
5.
Complete the Degraded Threshold and Excessive Threshold fields:
■
Select Enabled to enable alerting for the metric, or select Disabled to disable
alerting for the metric. For example, you may want to receive alerts only for
MOS that exceeds the excessive threshold.
■
Provide a value for the metric. All codec thresholds accept MOS values from
1.00 to 5.00, inclusive.
Note: The value of the excessive threshold must be more severe than the value of
the degraded threshold. For example, when the value for the degraded threshold is
4.02, the value for the excessive threshold must be less than 4.02. The difference
indicates a lower MOS and, thus, a more severe decline in performance.
6.
Save the threshold:
■
Click Save to save the threshold and return to the Call Threshold List. The new
threshold appears in the list.
■
Click Save & Add Another to save the threshold and create another threshold.
The threshold is enabled, and can be changed, disabled, or deleted.
Chapter 5: Understanding and Managing Codec Thresholds 45
Change a Threshold Value
Change a Threshold Value
You can change the value of the degraded and excessive thresholds.
Follow these steps:
1.
Click Administration, Policies, Call Performance, Codec Thresholds in the navigation
bar.
The Codec Threshold List opens.
2.
Select the codec whose threshold values you want to change and click Edit.
The Codec Threshold Properties page opens.
3.
Provide new values for the metrics in the Degraded Threshold and Excessive
Threshold fields. All codec thresholds accept MOS values from 1.00 to 5.00,
inclusive.
Note: The value of the excessive threshold must be more severe than the value of
the degraded threshold. For example, when the value for the degraded threshold is
4.02, the value for the excessive threshold must be less than 4.02. The difference
indicates a lower MOS and, thus, a more severe decline in performance.
4.
Click Save.
The Call Threshold List displays the revised threshold values.
Disable a Threshold
When you do not want to monitor call quality for a particular codec, you can disable the
internal Degraded and Excessive Thresholds for that codec threshold. Disabling these
thresholds disables the entire codec threshold.
Follow these steps:
1.
Click Administration, Policies, Call Performance, Codec Thresholds in the navigation
bar.
The Codec Threshold List opens.
2.
Select the codec whose threshold you want to disable and click Edit.
The Codec Threshold Properties page opens.
3.
Select Disabled in the Degraded Threshold and Excessive Threshold fields to disable
the entire codec threshold.
46 Use Cases for Managing Thresholds
Delete a Threshold
4.
Select Disabled in either the Degraded Threshold or Excessive Threshold field to
disable only one of the thresholds. For example, you may want to receive alerts
only for MOS that exceeds the excessive threshold.
5.
Click Save.
The Call Threshold List indicates that the thresholds are disabled.
Delete a Threshold
You can delete custom codec thresholds. However, it is simpler to disable (see page 46)
them. You can easily enable a disabled codec threshold. In contrast, you must recreate a
deleted codec threshold.
Follow these steps:
1.
Click Administration, Policies, Call Performance, Codec Thresholds in the navigation
bar.
The Codec Threshold List opens.
2.
Select the codec whose threshold you want to delete.
3.
Click Delete.
The Confirm Delete page opens.
4.
Click Delete.
The threshold is deleted and no longer appears in the Codec Threshold List.
However, when that codec is detected during call quality monitoring, the threshold
is restored in the list with the default settings.
Chapter 5: Understanding and Managing Codec Thresholds 47