Saguaro Astronomy Club Saguaro Astronomy Club

Saguaro Astronomy Club
Sacnews
Volume 25 Issue 4
April 2001
SAC Officers
IN THE TWINKLING OF AN EYE . . .
President: Jack Jones
By Dr. Peggy Kain
602-944-5488
Spicastar@mindspring.com
My wish came true. One of my
goals as Treasurer of the Saguaro
Astronomy Club is to find ways for
our monies to work to benefit the
Club and for the good of the field
of astronomy and the community.
In the late summer of 2000, I proposed the idea of providing scholarships and grants to students in
astronomy and astrophysics so
that we could “give back” to the
profession. The Board agreed to
this idea, but alas we could not begin until there was a method to secure the needed funds.
Vice President: Diane Hope
602-431-6959
di.hope@asu.edu
Treasurer: Peggy Kain
Pegsi@interwrx.com
Secretary: A. J. Crayon
602-938-3277
Acrayon@primenet.com
Properties: Adam Sunshine
623-780-1386
Public Events:
Adam Sunshine
623-780-1386
Asunshine@netzone.com
Deep Sky Group: A. J. Crayon
602-938-3277
Acrayon@primenet.com
SACNEWS Editor:
Rick Tejera, 623-572-0713
SaguaroAstro@aol.com
ATM Subgroup : Thad Robosson
602-527-0455
Tmrob@primenet.com
Inside this issue:
In the Twinkling of an
Eye
1
Delta Geminorum
Occultation
3
Fuzzy Spot, Crater
Seeing Double
4-5
6
Calendar of Events
7
Presidents Message,
AZ Science Center
4th Anniversary
8
Bits & Pieces
Membership Info
9
1010-11
Ironically, just after that Board
meeting, I received an email from
Nanci Allen in Mesa. She had a
collection of astronomical parts in
her garage and she wanted to give
them to someone or a club who
would use them to make a telescope. SAC President Jack Jones
and I drove over to Mesa to check
out the parts. When we saw the
large cache of parts and optics it
occurred to us that several telescopes could be constructed. The
remaining parts would be sold and
the money placed into an account
for scholarships, grants and other
beneficial projects.
It was about the same time that
our Amateur Telescope Makers
(ATM) group was formed and
chaired by Thad Robosson. One
evening we inventoried all the
parts and then Jack Jones and
SAC Properties Director Adam
Sunshine took the parts over to
Thad’s guitar shop. Since that
time, ATM members have been
working to construct a 4.25", an 8"
and a 10" telescope. Gradually,
the remaining parts are being sold
and approximately $500 in monies
has been placed in our savings
account earmarked as a scholarships and grants fund.
There was still a mystery to be
solved . . . who was the owner of
all the astronomical parts? It
seems that Nanci and her sister
Charlotte had purchased their
house from an estate and the astronomical parts had belonged to
the late owner. Nanci contacted
his daughter for permission and
the following story began to unfold.
JOHN E. HOLMQUIST
1919 - 1996
Electrical Engineer,
Telescope Maker and Observer
(Continued on page 2)
PAGE 2
SACNEWS
(Continued from page 1)
The late John Holmquist was born in the small
mining community of Ramsey in the Upper
Peninsula of Michigan. He attended Michigan
Technological University where he was
awarded a degree in Electrical Engineering.
He served as a second lieutenant in the Army
in WWII. After the war, he married and took a
job with Michigan Bell Telephone Co. in the
Upper Peninsula area. His career took him to
Detroit and Grand Rapids until he retired in
Mesa at the age of 53. His first wife died in
1978. The Holmquists had two children, Marsha and Gary, and this story is about their father who had a genius for mathematics and
astronomy.
As a child of 6 or 7, Marsha recalls watching
her father grinding mirrors for hours. “He was
such a perfectionist” she says. “After the
grinding process, he would perform Foucault
tests and then send the mirrors away to be
aluminized.” She remembers the observatory
her father built in the backyard of their home
that had a retractable dome and a clock drive.
“When I came home from college with my
boyfriend I recall seeing a clear image of Saturn with its rings through one of my dad’s telescopes out in that observatory.” Her dad
owned a 6-inch Cassegrain, an f/4, 6-inch Rich
Field (RFT) telescope and made his own flats
for diagonals.
Mr. Holmquist belonged to the Grand Rapids
Astronomical Association. When the Association decided to build an observatory, he took
over the grinding of the 12-inch mirror for the
telescope. Marsha says “it tested to perfection.” Later, Mr. Holmquist gave a telescope to
her family as a gift. Marsha remembers her father as a kind and unassuming man who also
had quite an imagination and loved science
fiction. “He was also a ham radio operator and
was in contact with people across the fifty
VOLUME 25 ISSUE 4
states,” she said. Marsha emphasized how
happy her dad was in his waning years. “He
married a second time to Margo, a Canadian
lady, and later took up round, ballroom and
square dancing”.
Gary Holmquist recalls that his father took on
the challenge of finding all the Messier objects
at a marathon in Phoenix in the 1970's. “Dad
belonged to an astronomical society or association in Phoenix after he moved to Mesa. He
had such a passion for solar eclipses. Dad
and I went to view one in northern Georgia in
1970.” Gary also mentioned solar eclipse
cruises: Labrador, Newfoundland, and the Canadian Maritimes in 1972 and a cruise off the
west coast of Africa in 1974. Gary said that his
dad met Dr. Stephen Hawking and Issac Assimov in his travels.
The Holmquist family is very pleased to know
that the astronomical parts found their way to
the Saguaro Astronomy Club. Marsha, a
graduate of Michigan State University, is a former medical technologist and mother of Laura
and Kara and lives near Lansing, Michigan.
Laura is working on an MS in geography to
compliment her undergraduate degree in fisheries and wildlife from Michigan State University. Kara will graduate from Michigan State in
May with a degree in food science with a specialty area of food safety. Gary is single and
works as an engineer for Lockheed Martin in
San Jose, California. He has worked on the
ceramic tiles for the heat shield for the Space
Shuttle and the windows and other materials
for the Hubble Telescope and communication
satellites. He plans to retire to Mesa himself in
a few years.
Author’s Note: See the December issue for
news of the ATM group and the astronomical
parts and optics donation.
VOLUME 25 ISSUE 4
SACNEWS
PAGE 3
Delta Geminorum Occultation
By Gene Lucas
PRELIMINARY REPORT ON FEBRUARY 5 - 6
2001 DELTA GEM GRAZE
Early reports collected from four observers of
the lunar grazing occultation of the 3.5 magnitude star Delta Geminorum on Monday evening, February 5 - 6, 2001 indicate mixed results for this "marginal" southern limit graze by
the near-full Moon. The "expedition" was attempted mainly because this was the brightest
star predicted to be occulted in central Arizona
this year. The location was Attaway Road
south of Hunt Highway, about 35 miles southeast of Mesa/Gilbert, Arizona and several miles
west of Florence, Arizona, which was selected
on the basis of the graze profile information
supplied by IOTA (the International Occultation
Timing Association). In the Phoenix area, only
a total occultation would have been visible as
the Moon passed in front of the star. Near the
graze limit line, the star was seen to wink on
and off in a "grazing" occultation as it passed
behind the mountains on the southern (lower)
edge or limb of the Moon.
The four observers included seasoned IOTA
observers Gerry Rattley (Gilbert, AZ) and Gene
Lucas (Fountain Hills, AZ), and Don Wrigley
(Apache Junction, AZ), all members of the
East Valley Astronomy Club (EVAC); and Sam
Herchak (Gilbert, AZ), also an IOTA member.
Rattley and Lucas are long-time members of
the Saguaro Astronomy Club (SAC) in Phoenix, and have frequently collaborated on setting up graze lines for occultation events in
central Arizona.
Rattley reports seeing and timing 3 or 4 events
visually with his Pierre Schwaar 14 inch f:6
equatorially mounted Newtonian. Herchak
videotaped 6 events with a camcorder used in
an afocal setup (camera pointing into the eyepiece) on his 8 inch f:6 equatorially mounted
Newtonian reflector, while observing the camcorder viewfinder. Wrigley and Lucas also attempted video recordings, but were unsuccessful. Wrigley used a camcorder in afocal
mode (camera pointing into a 15mm eyepiece -- 80 X visually) on his Meade 8 inch f:6
equatorially mounted Newtonian, but lost the
star in the glare from the lunar disk and did not
recover it visually in the eyepiece. Lucas employed a PC-23C camera at prime focus on an
8 inch f:10 Meade 2080 SCT reflector. Lucas
reports that the bright disk of the Moon affected the automatic gain control (AGC) on the
PC-23C camera such that the lunar image
"bloomed" strongly and the star image was
lost as it drew near to the limb, even while
placing the lunar disk nearly out of the field.
Switching to visual mode with a 16 mm eyepiece at 125X, the star was quickly lost in the
glare of the limb, so no events were timed.
Two prominent, sunlit peaks off the bright limb
presented some confusion. Intermittent bands
of light cirrus clouds hampered the observations, although the sky had been very clear
during the daytime. The temperature was 50
degrees Fahrenheit, wind calm during the occultation.
Timing data for the observed events will be reduced from Rattley's audio tape and Herchak's
videotape and reported to IOTA. WWV presented a strong signal during the event.
WWVH was also heard. Position data from
several GPS receivers was recorded and will
be compared against ground positions from
the Florence, Arizona 7.5 minute USGS topo
map.
For more information, contact:
Gene Lucas
gene.lucas@honeywell.com
geneluca@ix.netcom.com
(480) 837-3718
PAGE 4
SACNEWS
VOLUME 25 ISSUE 4
Fuzzy Spot, Crater
By Ken Reeves
Crater, the Cup, is a small constellation in the
southern sky adjacent to Hydra and Corvus. According to the Greco-Roman stories, the three constellations are related in the legend of the bird.
Apollo sent Corvus, the Crow with the Cup to fetch
some pure water for a sacrifice to Jupiter. However, the Crow came upon a fig tree and dallied in
its branches until the fruit had ripened. When the
Crow finally came back with the Cup full of water,
he also was holding Hydra, the Water Serpent, in
his claws claiming that the Serpent was the cause
for his delay. However Apollo was not fooled and
punished the Crow by placing him in the heavens
along with the Cup and the Water Serpent, such
that the Crow could not dip his beak into the cooling waters of the Cup, hence the harsh, poached
croaking call the Crow makes.
For such a rich story, the constellation is poor both
in bright stars and in deep sky objects. It's brightest star, delta, is only magnitude 3.56. I only have
one observation of a deep sky object (NGC 3962),
which was needed for the Herschel-400 list. However Luginbuhl and Skiff list 9 objects visible in a
15 cm (6 inch) scope in their book "Observing
Handbook and Catalog of Deep-Sky Objects", and
Kepple and Sanner have a total of 18 objects in
"The Night Sky Observer's Guide", of which 5 are
rated "4 star" and 3 more are rated "3 star". As
such, I will be focusing on these objects, and the
observations taken from either of these great
books will be cited.
NGC 3511 (11h03.4 -23 05): In Luginbuhl and
Skiff's book, it is described as "In 15 cm this galaxy has a low surface brightness and is difficult to
view. The halo is a dim 2.5' x 1' streak elongated
nearly E-W. The broad uncondensed galaxy is 4' x
1' in 25cm, elongated in pa 75 degrees. A stellar
ring is visible N of center, and a mag. 12.5 star lies
at the E tip. 30 cm shows it 5' x 1' with a broad core
and no nucleus. Three stars (including the mag.
12.5 star) are visible in the nebula: in decreasing
order of brightness, they lie 1.7' E, 2.1' WSW, and
35" NE of center."
NGC 3672 (11h25.0 -09 48): In Kepple and Sanner's book, it is described as: "8/10" Scope -
100X: NGC 3672, located 20' west of a 7.5 magnitude star, appears faint, evenly concentrated, and
elongated 2.5' x 1' N-S. 12th magnitude stars are 3'
WNW and 4.5' north of the galaxy. 16/18" Scopes 150x: NGC 3672 has a fairly bright halo elongated
3.5' x 1.5' slightly NNE-SSW containing a highly extended but weak core with a stellar nucleus. The
halo is flanked by 13.5 magnitude stars 2' to its
west and 2.5' to its east."
NGC 3887 (11h47.1 -16 51):
51) According to Luginbuhl and Skiff, this object is "In 15 cm, this galaxy
is closely involved with two faint stars that make
the elongation uncertain. The halo is about 3' x 2',
elongated N-S. A mag. 13 star lies 1.3' NE, and a
very faint star is visible 2' ENE. 25 cm shows an irregular oval outline without central brightening.
The halo extends to 2.25' x 1' in pa 165 degrees.
With 30 cm the almost unconcentrated halo is 3.5'
x 2.25'. A darker area lies in the southern half of the
core, and a faint stellar nucleus is occasionally visible in the northern half with averted vision."
NGC 3955 (11h54.0 -23 10):
10) Luginbuhl and Skiff
description :"This galaxy is just visible in 15 cm, 5'
SW of a mag. 9 star. It is elongated approximately
N-S, but needs more aperture for details. The object is small and quite elongated with 30 cm, about
1.5' x 0.5' in pa 165 degrees. Overall the halo has
only a slight broad concentration to the center,
where a faint non-stellar nucleus can be discerned
at 250x. A threshold magnitude star lies 1' NNW."
NGC
NGC 3962 (11h54.7 -13 58):
58) The only object in
Crater that I've observed so far, at 100X in the 10"
scope I saw it as pretty big, pretty bright, bright
center and elongated NE/SW. No nucleus was
noted. There are 3 stars nearby. It is kind of hard to
find due to lack of guide stars.
NGC 3981 (11h56.1 -19 54):
54) In Kepple and Sanner's book, this object is described as "12/14"
Scopes - 125x: NGC 3981 is a faint 3' x 1' NNESSW streak with tapered ends and a uniform surface brightness. A 12th magnitude star is 1' ESE, a
12.5 magnitude star 2.5' east, and two 9th magnitude stars 4' NW and 5' SE , of the galaxy's center."
Fuzzy Spot
Crater
-5°
12h
11h20m
11h40m
N
3818
W
E
S
3865
-10°
11h40m
-10°
12h
-10°
11h
-10°
367211h20m
θ
ε
3892
κ
3411
ι
3962
-15°
11h40m
-15°
12h
4094
Crt
-15°
11h
-15°
11h20m δ
3887
η
γ
γ
4033
α
ζ
4024
NGC 4038 -4039
Ringtail Galaxy
4027
3957
-20°
3981
12h
λ
-20°
11h40m
-20°
11h
-20°
11h20m
3
MCG -0
β
ε
°
3955
α
STARS
<3
>8
4
5
6
7
IC 2627
-25°
11h40m
-25°
12h
Multiple star
Variable star
Comet
Galaxy
Bright nebula
3511
3513
SYMBOLS
Dark nebula
Globular cluster
Open cluster
Planetary nebula
Quasar
-25°
11h20m
-25°
11h
Herschel 400 object: NGC 3962
Radio source
X-ray source
Other object
Local Time: 21:08:08 24-Feb-2001
UTC: 04:08:08 25-Feb-2001
Location: 33° 39' 56" N 112° 49' 10" W RA: 11h31m24s Dec: -15° 25' Field: 20.6°
Sidereal Time: 06:57:13
Julian Day: 2451965.6723
PAGE 6
SACNEWS
VOLUME 25 ISSUE 4
Seeing Double
By Thad Robosson
Every once and a while for astronomy buffs, a
night, or set of nights, will happen that just
sticks in their minds. For me, those nights
were Feb. 15th and 16th. Feb. 15th marked the
test run of my latest version of my 8” f/6. It is
now on a equatorial mount, has a proper,
open air mirror cell with cooling fan, and a nice
stray light reducing tube.
I eagerly set up in the parking lot of my shop,
amid a couple of streetlights and the building
lights that makes my shop anything but astronomy central. I lined up on Polaris, and
turned on the drive. My first test object was
Jupiter. At first, the image was kinda so-so,
telling me that the seeing was not too great,
but after quick star test on Aldebaran, I realized that tube currents were to blame. I
switched on the fan to suck out all the warm
air, and the results were amazing. Jupiter
quickly snapped into focus and looked like a
magazine photo over 2/3 the time. I had targeted this planet just in time to witness a transit. One of the moons was superimposed on
the limb of the planet, and a round, jet black
shadow on it’s face. I saw more little belts than
I had ever seen, the GRS showed some mottling, and there were actual swirls in the main
Eq. belts. Saturn was no less astounding, but
other than the E and F stars of the Trapezium
being extremely easy this night, this didn’t
have a lot to do about doubles. Which leads
me to the next night. Feb 16th turned out to be
just as clear, but the seeing wasn’t quite as
good, but good enough to split a lot of doubles in Gemini. Here are some of my observations…..
Alpha Gem (07h 34.5 +31 53.3, 2.5/3.5/9,
1.8”/72.5”, 140*/164*): A nice combo of
easy and tough. 80x showed AB as elongated
and AbxC wasn’t a problem. 120x gave up
AxB. I rated this one a 3.
Struve (1108 7h 32.8 +22 53,
6.5/8.5,
11.5”, 178*):
178*): A lovely yellow and blue pairing,
suspected at 39x, but confirmed at 80x. PA
noted at 175*. Rated a 2.
63 Gem (7h 27.75 + 2 1
26.6,
5.5/9.5,
42.9,324*): This one is proof that you shouldn’t judge a star by its’ numbers. While the stats
show it as wide, dull pair, it’s anything but dull.
Several faint stars reside very close by, and
makes for an interesting challenge for your
averted vision. I spent about 15 minutes taking this one in. Rated a 2.
Struve 1124 (7h 40.9 +21 48, 8/8, 19.4”,
326*): A nice equal pair that looks like “Jawa
eyes”. Easily split at 39x, both are white at
approx. PA of 315*. Rated a 3.
Struve 1116 (7h 34.5, +12 18.3, 7/7.5, 1 . 8 ” ,
99*): At 240x, I wasn’t quite sure I got this one.
I suspected elongation at around 90*. Rated
this one a 4.
Struve 1035 (7h 12, +22 16.7, 5/7.5, 8.7”,
41*): At 39x, both were easily seen as a slight
blue. Estimated the PA near 225*. Rated a 3..
I had a few more observations, but these represent the better ones I found residing in Gemini. All in all, it was a great couple of nights. I
got to get familiar with a new-old toy, and I
came to realize the joy and comfort that a well
aligned pair of setting circles can provide.
If you’d like to compare notes, of provide me
with some of your observations, please contact me at tmrob@primenet.com
( Ed. Note: The Jovian satellite transit that Thad referred
to was of Io)
SACNEWS
VOLUME 25 ISSUE 4
PAGE 7
April 2001
SUN
MON
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FRI
SAT
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Schedule of Events for April 2001
April 1st
Moon at First Quarter, 1049mst
April 6th
SAC General Meeting at Grand Canyon University, 1930 , Speaker TBA
April 8th
Full Moon at 0322
April 14th
5th Anniversary Celebration at the Arizona Science Center. For more info go to
Www.azscience.org
April 14th
SAC Star Party & Novice Group Session at Flat Iron Mountain, Sunset 1902, Ast
Twlight Ends 2029, Moonrise 0139. Novice group Speakers:
Speakers: A.J Crayon, Steve
Coe and Rick Tejera
April 15th
Moon at 3rd quarter at 1531
April 16th
Pierre Mechain, Contemporary & Colleague of Charles Messier born in in 1744
April 23rd
Moon is New at 1526 mst
April 30th
Moon at first Quarter 1708
Future Planning
April 2121-22
2001 Sentinel Schwaar Star Gaze, See map page 10 for directions
May 2525-28
Riverside Telescope Makers Conference
June 1616-25
Grand Canyon Star Party
SACNEWS
PAGE 8
VOLUME 25 ISSUE 4
Presidents Message
By Jack Jones
They say last year's Messier Marathon had
poor attendance due to the weather - Well it
wasn't due to the weather during the Marathon
however - it was clear all night - it was the
weather the days leading up to, and the day of
the Marathon that was the culprit. Only about
20 observers showed up when we usually
have a hundred-plus. Yet Bob Davidson got
108 objects, Paul Lind got 107 objects, Kevin
Bays got 106, and Wayne Thomas got 101!
I was able to pick up 94 myself with a 90
mm ETX! I also picked up the moniker "I'm
going no matter what" on the SEDS MM
2000 report! (http://www.seds.org/
messier/xtra/marathon/az00res.txt)
More and more it seems to me that I
get maximum observing time when I
do not even check the weather; do not
even go outside and look at the sky,
don't check the satellite pictures - but just go.
And as long as rain is not pelting me in the
face, way more often than not, I am rewarded
with a clear nighttime sky. Sometimes even if
it is dismally cloudy and raining when I start
out in the city, I will get a clear sky at the site
by 10 pm that has been thoroughly cleansed
of dust and pollution by the rain, with many
hours of good observing ahead of me. And
sometimes I will get a sky that may be partly
cloudy but steady as a rock and suitable for
hauling out the high-power eyepieces for rare
glimpses of exquisite planetary detail.
Which is worse, going and being clouded out,
or staying home and at 10 pm seeing clearing
yet gray light-polluted skies from your backyard? Why do feel we must shut down unless
we see a perfectly clear sky? It may be cloudfree, but we’ll never experience a dust and
particulate-free sky that way. I will say that
on star party dates, unless there is Monsoon electrical storm activity in progress or
an impenetrable cloud layer blanketing
the Southwest, I will be en route to
my favorite dark sky site. Since it
ends up eventually being a clear
night more often than not, the odds
of success are in my favor, not
against me.
Our club will be participating in Astronomy
Day at the Arizona Science Center on April 14
from 11-5, and will be hosting a picnic at the
Grand Canyon Star Party in June. Hope to see
you (and your scopes) there and at the Messier Marathon March 24!
Jack "I'm Going No Matter What" Jones
4th Anniversary Celebration: “About Arizona Astronomy"
Received from Christine Shupla
WHEN : Saturday April 14th
Where: Arizona Science Center
Time: 9:00 a.m. till 9:00 p.m.
The Arizona Science Center is celebrating their fourth
anniversary with a four-star celebration--of the astronomical kind. We're planning several hands-on activities for the day, presentations and displays by various
amateur astronomy clubs, and telescope viewing that
evening. There will also be some talks that evening, including star stories by Native American storyteller Ken
Duncan, and a presentation by Wil Milan. Other astronomers will also be invited; we are planning on 1 or two
additional presentations by astronomers or planetary
geologists, to be presented in the Flinn Theater that
evening. Planetarium shows will be given in the planetarium into evening hours.
VOLUME 25 ISSUE 4
SACNEWS
PAGE 9
Bits & Pieces
Minutes from the February 9th 2001 General Meeting
By A.J. Crayon
Jack Jones opened meeting at 7:30pm with a
request for visitors to introduce themselves.
Several volunteered.
Peggy Kain gave the treasurers report. She
also discussed club insurance coverage,
which appeared to only handle meeting nights
at Grand Canyon University. A club member
who is in the insurance industry volunteered to
review the policy. Peggy will update us at the
next board meeting now scheduled for March
9th.
At this time Jack Jones reviewed the SAC calendar of events. See elsewhere in the newsletter for dates and places. Marjorie Williams
reminded members of the Grand Canyon Star
Party to be held in June. There will be one on
both sides of the canyon. If interested contact
Dean Ketelson for more information especially
about reservations as this is the busiest time of
the year. Public Events chairman Adam Sunshine announced a school star party at Anthem for Tuesday, February 27th. See Adam
for map, directions and time.
Deep Sky chairman AJ Crayon announced the
Deep Sky Group meeting for the Thursday following club meeting and the upcoming All Arizona Messier Marathon. Observing awards
were presented to Jennifer Keller for the Messier Catalog and Joe Goss for the Herschel 400.
Jerry Belcher let the club know that David Levy
had come down with a case of pneumonia but
was now well on his way to recovering. The
entire SAC wishes him well. Get better David quickly!
Thad Robosson announced the next ATM
meeting is March 6th at 7pm in his shop. For
directions please contact him.
For Show and Tell Thad discussed his enhancements to a binocular viewer. It included
a knuckle joint to allow the observer to sit
down in a lounge chair and view along the
central meridian and, yes, even the zenith
without getting neck aches. Steve Dodder discussed his 6" English yoke mount, which he
uses to view sunspots. He made the yoke in
less than 30 minutes and that is no joke! Nick
Gilbert, an engineer with access to a machine
shop, discussed a motor driven mount that
sits on a tripod, for wide field photography.
The mount had a drive corrector for accurate
tracking. He also showed a CCD to be used
for lunar and planetary photography.
AJ Crayon had a slide presentation that reviewed the construction of his new 14.5" f5.23
DOB telescope. Hopefully all will be ready for
showing off at the next club star party.
Just after the break Gene Lucas discussed his
participation in the lunar graze of delta Gemenorium.
The vice president had two speakers for the
evening, John Casellas from Sierra Vista and
Bill Kelly from Verde Valley Astronomers. John
spoke about modifications to his 10" Meade
DOB and its metamorphosis into a beautiful
smoothly working telescope.
Bill spoke about making telescopes and grinding mirrors, from his first in 1927 to his current
projects. We were challenged to understand
how he found material for grinding a mirror in
1927!
After all was said and done we adjourned to a
not so near restaurant for food and more discussion about astronomy.
SACNEWS
PAGE 10
VOLUME 25 ISSUE 4
SAC Meeting and Observing Sites
Flatiron Star Parties
General Meetings
7:30 p.m. at Grand Canyon University, Fleming Building,
Room 105: 1 mile west of I-17 on Camelback Rd., North on
33rd Ave., Second building on the right.
Sentinel Schwaar Star Gaze
This years Sentinel Schwaar Star gaze will be held April 2021 at the Sentinel observing sight. To get there take I-10
west to exit 112; SR 85. Take SR85 south 30 miles through
Gila bend to I-8 westbound. Stay on I-8 for 29 miles to exit
87; Sentinel. There is a lighted tower at the exit. Turn left
and go under the over pass and continue straight ahead.
Cross the railroad tracks and take the dirt road 2.2 miles to
the site (see map below).
Sun & Moon Data
SunSet
Twilight
ends
Twilght
Begins
MoonMoonrise
Sunrise
Apr. 20
1906
2035
0424
0510
0553
Apr. 21
1907
2036
0423
0540
0552
Head west on I-10 to the 339th Ave exit (exit 103).
Turn North (right) and go two miles to Indian School
Rd. Turn West (left) on Indian School and go 1 mile
to 355th Ave. Turn North (right). This will turn into
Wickenburg Rd. Follow this road for about 12 miles.
Just after mile marker 12 you will go through Jackrabbit wash and pass a cattle guard sign. There is a
dirt road just after the sign, marked by white painted
rocks. Turn on to this road and follow it about .9
miles. Just after you pass through a wash, you’ll see
the field on your left. If you hit the cattle guard, or the
dirt road your on is next to a fence, you’ve missed the
correct road. Go back and look for the white rocks.
(see detail map above).
SACNEWS
VOLUME 25 ISSUE 4
PAGE 11
SAC Membership Services
Membership
Memberships are for the following calendar year and are pro-rated as follows:
Jan.-Mar. 100%, Apr.-Jun. 75%; Jul.-Sep. 50%, Oct.- Dec, 25%
$ 28.00
$ 42.00
$100.00
$ 14.00
$ 6.00
Individual Membership
Family Membership (one newsletter)
Business Membership (includes advertising)
Newsletter only
Nametag for Members
Subscription Services
The following magazines are available to members. Subscribe or renew by paying the club treasurer. You will
receive the discounted club rate only by allowing the club treasurer to renew your subscription.
$ 30.00/yr
$ 29.00/yr
Sky & Telescope
Astronomy
Please Print
Name:_______________________________
Name:_______________________________
Address:_____________________________
Address:_____________________________
Make Checks Payable to SAC
Mail Completed form to:
______________________________________
______________________________________
Phone;________________________________
Phone;________________________________
E-mail:________________________________
mail:________________________________
Peggy Kain
SAC Treasurer
P.O Box 30424
Phoenix AZ 85046-0424
Such A Deal
FOR SALE
Items from Pierre Schwaar's Estate. His 16" f/4 optical
tube assembly with excellent mirror: $2,000 OBO. 20"
f/5 Super Bigfoot telescope with good optics: $3,000
OBO. Numerous coated and signed mirrors: 4.25 to 10".
Small glass blanks and telescope tubes: 3 to 10". Call or
email for price list.
Digital photos available for 16 and 20" scopes. All proceeds to be donated by the Schwaar Family to charity
in Pierre's name. Contact: Sam Herchak, 480-924-5981,
76627.3322@compuserve.com
Pedro Jane', 480-833-2002
FOR SALE
Do you know anyone who would be interested in purchasing my JMI reflector?
It has:
- NGC Max
- Wheely bars
- Teleview Paracorr lens
- Black cloth shroud
- 24 mm Plossl eyepiece
- Mirror cover has 4" diameter (~f/11) Laser collimator
- Cheshire collimating eyepiece
All for $4200
contact: Chris Schur at cschur@goodnet.com
S A G U A R O A S T R O N O M Y C LU
LU B
5643 W. Pontiac Dr
Glendale, AZ 8530885308-9117
Phone: 623-572-0713
Fax: 623-572-8575
Email: Saguaro Astro@aol.com
Videmus Stellae
www. Saguaroastro.org
SAC Schedule of Events
SAC Meetings
January 12, 2001
July 6, 2001
Feb 9, 2001
March 9, 2001
August 3, 2001
September 28, 2001
April 6, 2001
May 4, 2001
October 26, 2001
November 30, 2001
Jun 8, 20010
December :TBA
(Holiday Party)
Deep Sky Group Meetings
February 15, 2001
August 9, 2001
April 12, 2001
November 1, 2001
June 14, 2001
SAC Star Parties
Date Sunset
1/20
2/17
3/17
4/14
5/19
6/16
7/14
8/11
9/15
10/13
11/10
12/8
1751
1818
1841
1902
1928
1944
1943
1922
1837
1800
1731
1723
Astronomical Moonrise
Twilight Ends
1918
0525
1941
0431
2004
0258
2029
0139
2106
0410
2127
0239
2123
0109
2053
2341
2001
0513
1933
0401
1857
0254
1852
0151