Designing, Implementing, And Managing Security On Windows

Designing, Implementing, and Managing
Security on Windows Server 2012 R2
Esmaeil Sarabadani
Copyright © Esmaeil Sarabadani
All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or
transited in any form or by any means, without the prior written consent of the author, except in
the case of brief quotations embedded in critical articles or reviews.
Every effort has been made in the preparation of this book to ensure the accuracy of the
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This is an independent publication and is not affiliated with, nor has it been authorized,
sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft® Corporation. Microsoft® Windows® Server
2012 R2 is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other
countries.
Cover Design: Golnar Shishehgaran
First published: September 2014
About the Author
Esmaeil Sarabadani is a technology professional with numerous
years of experience managing small to global scale IT
infrastructure projects for multiple companies. Since the very first
days he got his personal computer, he found an interest in the field
of information security and began his exploration in gaining more
knowledge in this area. Since then, he has worked in different
companies as a system and security consultant and is currently
working as a project manager on global projects implementing
Microsoft latest technologies and systems.
Esmaeil is an active conference speaker and has given deep-dive
technical talks in many well-known Microsoft events and conferences on the topic of security. As
a Microsoft Certified Trainer for more than four years, he provided training on the latest IT
courses in the market and coming from that background he decided to write his first technical
book dedicated thoroughly to the topic of security on the latest Windows server platform.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTER 1: IMPLEMENTING AND CONFIGURING SECURITY BASELINES AND POLICIES
WHAT’S NEW IN WINDOWS SERVER 2012 R2 SECURITY
OVERVIEW OF SECURITY ANALYSIS ON WINDOWS SERVER 2012 R2
MEASURING AND ASSESSING SECURITY RISKS USING MICROSOFT SECURITY ASSESSMENT TOOL (MSAT)
Infrastructure
Applications
Operations
People
MICROSOFT SECURITY ASSESSMENT TOOL REPORTS
Summary Report
Complete Report
OVERVIEW OF MICROSOFT SECURITY COMPLIANCE M ANAGER (SCM)
Setup Requirements
CREATING AND CONFIGURING SECURITY BASELINES USING MICROSOFT SECURITY COMPLIANCE MANAGER
(SCM)
Compare / Merge
Export
Import
EXERCISE: CONFIGURING SECURITY COMPLIANCE MANAGER
LAB 1-A: ANALYZING AND IMPLEMENTING SECURITY POLICIES
Exercise: Creating and implementing security baselines using Security Compliance Manager
LAB 1-A ANSWERS: ANALYZING AND IMPLEMENTING SECURITY POLICIES
Exercise: Creating and implementing security baselines using Security Compliance Manager
OVERVIEW OF SECURITY THREATS
PREVENTING AND STOPPING SECURITY THREATS
STOPPING 0-DAY ATTACKS USING MICROSOFT ENHANCED MITIGATION EXPERIENCE TOOLKIT (EMET)
PROTECTION LEVELS
SYSTEM SETTINGS
APPLICATION SETTINGS
CERTIFICATE TRUST
EXERCISE: CONFIGURING ENHANCED MITIGATION EXPERIENCE TOOLKIT
ANALYZING SECURITY BY CATALOGUING CHANGES USING MICROSOFT ATTACK SURFACE ANALYZER (ASA)
ATTACK SURFACE ANALYZER REPORTS
EXERCISE: CONFIGURING MICROSOFT ATTACK SURFACE ANALYZER (ASA)
CREATING AND DEPLOYING SECURITY POLICIES USING SECURITY CONFIGURATION WIZARD (SCW)
CONFIGURATION ACTION
SECURITY CONFIGURATION DATABASE
ROLE-BASED SERVICE CONFIGURATION
Server Roles
Client Features
Administration and Other Options
Additional Services
Handling Unspecified Services
NETWORK SECURITY
Windows Firewall with Advanced Security
REGISTRY SETTINGS
Require SMB Security Signatures
Require LDAP Signing
Outbound Authentication Methods
AUDIT POLICY
WHAT'S NEW IN SERVICE ACCOUNTS
GROUP MANAGED SERVICE ACCOUNTS
EXERCISE: CONFIGURING GROUP MANAGED SERVICE ACCOUNTS
USER ACCOUNT CONTROL
USER ACCOUNT CONTROL MECHANISM
USER ACCOUNT CONTROL MODES
EXERCISE: CONFIGURING USER ACCOUNT CONTROL
LAB 1-B: CONFIGURING SECURITY ON WINDOWS SERVER 2012 R2
Exercise 1: Creating and applying security policies using Security Configuration Wizard
Exercise 2: Configuring Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit (EMET)
LAB 1-B ANSWERS: CONFIGURING SECURITY ON WINDOWS SERVER 2012 R2
Exercise 1: Creating and applying security policies using Security Configuration Wizard
Exercise 2: Configuring Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit (EMET)
CHAPTER 2: CONFIGURING FILE ACCESS AUTHORIZATION AND ENCRYPTION
OVERVIEW OF NTFS PERMISSIONS
IMPLEMENTING AND CONFIGURING NTFS PERMISSIONS
ACCESS CONTROL LIST (ACL), ACCESS CONTROL ENTRY (ACE)
Adding and Removing NTFS Permissions for users/Groups
Advanced Permissions
Cumulative Permissions
NTFS Permissions Inheritance
Files/Folders Ownership
Effective Access
EXERCISE: CONFIGURING NTFS PERMISSIONS
OVERVIEW OF SHARE PERMISSIONS
BEST PRACTICES ON COMBINING NTFS AND SHARE PERMISSIONS
EXERCISE: COMBINING NTFS AND SHARE PERMISSIONS
OVERVIEW OF ENCRYPTING FILE SYSTEM (EFS)
PRIVACY
EFS OPERATION
DATA RECOVERY
Private Keys Location
IMPLEMENTING AND CONFIGURING ENCRYPTING FILE SYSTEM (EFS)
HOW EFS IS USED AND OPERATED
CIPHER COMMAND-LINE UTILITY
BACK UP AND RESTORE ENCRYPTED FILES
DISABLE EFS
EXERCISE: CONFIGURING ENCRYPTING FILE SYSTEM
LAB 2-A: CONFIGURING FILE ACCESS AUTHORIZATION AND ENCRYPTION ON WINDOWS SERVER 2012 R2
Exercise 1: Configuring and combining NTFS and Share permissions
Exercise 2: Performing Encrypting File System (EFS) Recovery
LAB 2-A ANSWERS: CONFIGURING FILE ACCESS AUTHORIZATION AND ENCRYPTION
Exercise 1: Configuring and combining NTFS and Share permissions
Exercise 2: Performing Encrypting File System (EFS) Recovery
INTRODUCTION TO BITLOCKER
IMPLEMENTING BITLOCKER ON SERVERS
BITLOCKER COMMAND-LINE TOOLS AND W INDOWS POWERSHELL CMDLETS
Manage-bde
Repair-bde
BITLOCKER W INDOWS POWERSHELL CMDLETS
EXERCISE: CONFIGURING BITLOCKER ON W INDOWS SERVER 2012 R2
BACKING UP BITLOCKER OR TPM RECOVERY KEY IN ACTIVE DIRECTORY DOMAIN SERVICES
LAB 2-B: CONFIGURING BITLOCKER DRIVE ENCRYPTION AND RECOVERY
Exercise 1: Backing up/Restoring BitLocker recovery information to/from Active Directory
LAB 2-B ANSWERS: CONFIGURING BITLOCKER DRIVE ENCRYPTION AND RECOVERY
Exercise 1: Backing up/Restoring BitLocker recovery information to/from Active Directory
CHAPTER 3: IMPLEMENTING DEFENSE IN DEPTH
INTRODUCTION TO DESIGNING PERIMETER NETWORKS
PLANNING AND DESIGNING SECURITY FOR PERIMETER NETWORKS
DMZ DESIGN OBJECTIVES
BASIC DESIGN (THREE-LEGGED FIREWALL)
MODERATE DESIGN (BACK-TO-BACK FIREWALLS)
ADVANCED DESIGN (BACK-TO-BACK AND THREE-LEGGED FIREWALLS)
PLANNING AND IMPLEMENTING ACTIVE DIRECTORY DOMAIN SERVICES IN PERIMETER NETWORK
NO ACTIVE DIRECTORY DOMAIN SERVICES
ISOLATED FOREST MODEL
EXTENDED FOREST
FOREST TRUST MODEL
DNS SECURITY ON WINDOWS SERVER 2012 R2
OVERVIEW OF DNSSEC
DNSSEC MECHANISM
NSEC3 AND AUTHENTICATED DENIAL-OF-EXISTENCE
DNSSEC KEY MANAGEMENT
Key Signing using DNSSEC
Key Signing Key (KSK)
DNSSEC on the Client Side
Name Resolution Policy Table
DNS SECURITY COMMON PRACTICES
ZONE TRANSFER RESTRICTION
SECURE DYNAMIC UPDATES
GLOBAL QUERY BLOCK LIST
DISCRETIONARY ACCESS CONTROL LIST (DACL)
SOCKET POOL
CACHE LOCKING
DNS SERVER INTERFACE RESTRICTION
DISABLING RECURSION
ZONE TRANSFER USING IPSEC
EXERCISE: CONFIGURING SECURITY FOR DNS ON W INDOWS SERVER 2012 R2
INTRODUCTION TO IPSEC
Traffic Filtering
End-to-End Transmission Security
Securing the Traffic Passing through Network Address Translator (NAT)
Secure Servers
L2TP over IPSec (L2TP/IPSec)
Site-to-Site IPSec Tunneling with Non-Microsoft IPSec Gateways
IPSEC OPERATION MODES
Tunnel Mode
Transport Mode
IPSEC ENCRYPTION METHODS
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
Authentication Header (AH)
INTRODUCTION TO DEFENSE IN DEPTH
OVERVIEW OF DOMAIN AND SERVER ISOLATION MODEL
PLANNING AND IMPLEMENTING DOMAIN AND SERVER ISOLATION
ISOLATION SCOPE
Hosts to be isolated
Servers to be isolated
Firewalls
PLANNING PHASE
DEPLOYMENT PHASE
Things to consider when designing domain and server isolation
Risks that cannot be mitigated
EXERCISE: CONFIGURING IPSEC POLICY USING GROUP POLICIES
OVERVIEW OF WINDOWS FIREWALL WITH ADVANCED SECURITY
FIREWALL TYPES
Network Firewalls
Host-Based Firewalls
Location-aware host-based firewalls
NEW FUNCTIONALITIES IN W INDOWS SERVER 2012/2012 R2
EXERCISE: CONFIGURING W INDOWS FIREWALL WITH ADVANCED SECURITY
LAB 3: CONFIGURING DEFENSE IN DEPTH
Exercise 1: Configuring IPSec policies
Exercise 2: Configuring security for DNS
LAB 3 ANSWERS: CONFIGURING DEFENSE IN DEPTH
Exercise 1: Configuring IPSec policies
Exercise 2: Configuring security for DNS
CHAPTER 4: IMPLEMENTING AND CONFIGURING NETWORK POLICY AND ACCESS SERVICES
OVERVIEW OF NETWORK POLICY AND ACCESS SERVICES
NETWORK POLICY SERVER (NPS)
HEALTH REGISTRATION AUTHORITY (HRA)
HOST CREDENTIAL AUTHORIZATION PROTOCOL (HCAP)
NEW AND CHANGED FUNCTIONALITIES IN W INDOWS SERVER 2012 R2
INTRODUCTION TO NETWORK POLICY SERVER (NPS)
RADIUS SERVER
RADIUS PROXY
NETWORK ACCESS PROTECTION (NAP)
EXERCISE: INSTALLATION AND BASIC CONFIGURATION OF NETWORK POLICY AND ACCESS SERVICES ON
W INDOWS SERVER 2012 R2
CONFIGURING NETWORK POLICY SERVER (NPS)
UDP Port Configuration on NPS
Disabling NAS Notification Forwarding
Exporting and Importing NPS Configuration
Registering an NPS Server in another Domain
Creating and Using Templates in NPS
Managing RADIUS Clients
Managing Network Policies
Rules Processing Order
VLAN Configuration for Remote Users on NPS
Managing Accounting
EXERCISE: CONFIGURING NETWORK ACCESS SERVER AND NETWORK POLICY SERVICE
INTRODUCTION TO NETWORK ACCESS PROTECTION (NAP)
EXERCISE: CONFIGURING NAP INTEGRATION WITH DHCP
LAB 4: IMPLEMENTING AND CONFIGURING NETWORK POLICY AND ACCESS SERVICES
Exercise 1: Configuring VPN and Network Policy and Access Services
Exercise 2: Configuring and Integrating VPN with Network Access Protection
LAB 4 ANSWERS: IMPLEMENTING AND CONFIGURING NETWORK POLICY AND ACCESS SERVICES
Exercise 1: Configuring VPN and Network Policy and Access Services
Exercise 2: Configuring and Integrating VPN with Network Access Protection
CHAPTER 5: IMPLEMENTING DYNAMIC ACCESS CONTROL
INTRODUCTION TO DYNAMIC ACCESS CONTROL ON WINDOWS SERVER 2012 R2
OVERVIEW OF FILE CLASSIFICATION INFRASTRUCTURE (FCI)
FILE SERVER RESOURCE MANAGER
AUTOMATIC FILE CLASSIFICATION PLANNING
EXERCISE: CONFIGURING AUTOMATIC FILE CLASSIFICATION
PLANNING AND CONFIGURING A CENTRAL ACCESS POLICY DEPLOYMENT WITH DYNAMIC ACCESS CONTROL
Using Security Groups for Dynamic Access Control
Using User Claims
Device Claims and Device Security Groups
Creating Claim Types
Creating Central Access Rules
EXERCISE: CONFIGURING A CENTRAL ACCESS POLICY DEPLOYMENT WITH DYNAMIC ACCESS CONTROL
LAB 5: IMPLEMENTING DYNAMIC ACCESS CONTROL
Exercise: Configuring Dynamic Access Control
LAB 5 ANSWERS: IMPLEMENTING DYNAMIC ACCESS CONTROL
Exercise: Configuring Dynamic Access Control
CHAPTER 6: IMPLEMENTING SECURITY ON HYPER-V
OVERVIEW OF MICROSOFT PRIVATE CLOUDS
PRIVATE CLOUD COMPONENTS
INTRODUCTION TO SECURITY FOR PRIVATE CLOUDS
PLANNING AND DESIGNING SECURITY FOR HYPER-V
HYPER-V VIRTUAL NETWORK SWITCHES
HOST VM CONNECTIVITY
EXERCISE: DISCONNECTING THE HOST VIRTUAL MACHINE FROM THE NETWORK
EXERCISE: CONFIGURING HYPER-V SECURITY ON W INDOWS SERVER 2012 R2
IMPLEMENTING SECURITY FEATURES ON HYPER-V
PORT ACCESS CONTROL LIST (ACLS)
Stateful Port Access Control List Rules
MAC ADDRESS SPOOFING
ROUTER GUARD
DHCP GUARD
VIRTUAL LOCAL AREA NETWORKS (VLANS) ON HYPER-V
EXERCISE: CONFIGURE VLAN SETTINGS ON A VIRTUAL MACHINE
PORT VIRTUAL LOCAL AREA NETWORK (PVLAN)
LAB 6: DESIGNING AND IMPLEMENTING SECURITY ON HYPER-V
Exercise: Configuring security on Hyper-V
LAB 6 ANSWERS: DESIGNING AND IMPLEMENTING SECURITY ON HYPER-V
Exercise: Configuring security on Hyper-V
APPENDIX
LAB PREPARATION
Sample Lesson
Introduction to Designing Perimeter Networks
Perimeter network, also known as the DMZ (Demilitarized Zone), is one of the most critical parts
of the network infrastructure which is more than any other parts exposed to the Internet. As the
name suggests, it is a specific zone placed between the internal network and the Internet
providing services to users from outside the company network.
Any company or organization has remote users, remote offices, customers and partners who
may need to access services offered internally. The availability of these services is vital to the
type of business these companies provide and that is why they need to be always accessible.
The perimeter network is in fact a section in the network where these services reside. The
servers hosting such services are in most cases assigned public IP addresses. A server with a
public IP address can be easily accessible from the Internet. In fact a server with a public IP
address is part of the Internet with the difference that it is only placed behind the company's
firewall boundary. The firewall boundary helps protect the services from all sorts of attacks
coming from the Internet.
Services placed in DMZ are mostly critical and need to be always available for people inside
and outside the network. An important point here is even if specific services are not placed in
DMZ, there might be connections to them from the services in DMZ. An example here is a
domain controller which we might not prefer to place in DMZ but almost any service is
dependent on it for authentication and authorization of their users.
There are different designs of the perimeter network depending on your network infrastructure
and the ultimate goal of a proper design is to never put security at stake for the sake of
availability and also never underestimate the possibility of security threats imposed on your
whole internal infrastructure in case your DMZ is penetrated. In this chapter, different scenarios
will be discussed to help you design a secure and reliable perimeter network.
Planning and Designing Security for Perimeter
Networks
In the previous section of this chapter, you got an idea of what DMZ is and why we need it.
Today with this fast growth of networks and with different types of services offered to users, it is
no more the question of whether we need a DMZ but more the question of how we need to
design it. There are different approaches in designing the DMZ but it takes a great amount of
smartness and creativity to create a really secure design. Having mentioned that, there are still
rules and goals to follow to make sure the basic requirements are met.
DMZ Design Objectives
The main goal in designing a reliable DMZ, as mentioned before, is the segmentation of
services, devices, systems and, of course data in your network based on the risk. So before
going about the design, one thing to make sure about is to really well classify the importance of
such resources in your network and also identify up to which level each of the services needs to
be accessible. This actually means whatever services, systems or data which will be placed in
your DMZ will need to be segregated by the operating system, data classification schemes, trust
levels or business unit. You need to know the risk imposed on the services in DMZ, internal
network and in general the whole company if one of your services were attacked. With this
analysis, you will have a good understanding of how many layers of security your DMZ will
require in order to protect your critical services and data. For instance, in most designs you can
see the web application and the database are separated and placed in different segments in the
DMZ. Now let's have a closer look at different DMZ designs:
Basic Design (Three-Legged Firewall)
This design, which is unfortunately quite popular among network engineers, is the most basic
way of implementing your perimeter network. In this design, you will use a single firewall as the
only secure gateway to both your perimeter and internal networks. The firewall is connecting on
one side to your internal LAN and on the other two sides to your perimeter and external
networks. The downside of having such a design is first of all you have one single point of
protection which, if successfully penetrated, will not only put the servers in DMZ at stake but
also your internal network and all your confidential data on your internal servers. It is never
suggested to have one single firewall protecting your whole infrastructure.
The other problem with such a design is that your internal network is only one hop away from
the Internet. In simple words, in case of an intrusion of the firewall, attackers would easily
access your internal LAN and servers. Illustration 3.1 below shows what a three-legged firewall
design looks like:
Illustration 3.1: Three-Legged Firewall Design
There is also another variation to our basic design where we will have only one firewall but in a
slightly different setup. In this design, there will be multiple DMZ zones connected to the firewall
and the firewall will no more be connected to only three networks. Depending on the criticality of
the services in DMZ, they are placed in different zones. In this design, none of the
aforementioned problems with the three-legged firewall will be tackled as they are almost similar
in design but it will bring some more benefits to make it a better choice when it comes to a very
basic design.
Illustration 3.2: Basic Firewall Design
One of the benefits is the segregation of services even in the DMZ. With such separation, you
could configure the firewall in a way that only specific requests are routed to the critical DMZ
zone while the other zone is open to all sorts of requests from the Internet. This design can also
be of great benefit when it comes to the communication of the servers in the DMZ with the ones
in the internal network. You can place the servers that do not need to communicate with the
internal hosts in a separate zone and remove any network routes set on the firewall between
that zone and the internal network. In this way, you will be reducing the risk of access to your
internal network through your DMZ zone.
As mentioned before, to a large extent, it depends on how creative you are with your design and
how efficiently you can reduce the risk of penetration into your network. Another downside to
this variation of firewall design could come from the complexity that might exist when you have a
lot of static routes defined on your firewall. This could potentially complicate troubleshooting and
lead to mistakes.
Moderate Design (Back-to-Back Firewalls)
In this design we will have an added layer of protection to our internal network as well as DMZ
by adding one more firewall. In the back-to-back firewall scenario, we will have more flexibility
since we can connect our one or multiple DMZ zone(s) to one of the two firewalls and create
more advanced setups. However in this section we will not go deep into more advanced
implementations and we will just cover an ordinary setup of a back-to-back firewall design.
In a back-to-back firewall scenario, as the picture below shows, there is a firewall which on one
side is directly connected to the internet and on the other side is connected to a second firewall.
The second firewall then connects the perimeter network to the internal network. As it is clear in
illustration 3.3, the perimeter network is placed between the two firewalls where all the servers
which need to be publicly accessible are located.
Illustration 3.3: Back-to-Back Firewall Design
The advantage this design has over the basic DMZ design is the fact that the internal network is
two hops away from the internet and therefore there are two layers of protection guarding the
internal network against possible attacks. The DMZ itself is also behind the first firewall
protecting it from any possible intrusion. For any sort of communication between the DMZ
servers and the internal hosts, static routes can be created on the back-end firewall. This design
is more tolerant to mistakes and is very popular and widely-practiced in many networks around
the world.
Advanced Design (Back-to-Back and Three-Legged Firewalls)
Now that you have a solid understanding of the previous two designs, we can dig a bit deeper
into a more advanced DMZ setup which combines the three-legged and back-to-back firewall
implementations. The idea behind this design is to place both the internal and perimeter
networks behind two firewalls. In the simple back-to-back firewall model discussed previously,
the perimeter network was defined in the area between the two firewalls but in this new design
we still keep the back-to-back setup the same way it was, however we will use our back-end
firewall in a three-legged design connected to the internal network on one side and to the DMZ
on the other side and finally its third adapter connects it to the front-end firewall.
Illustration 3.4: Advanced Firewall Design
This design is very secure because firstly we have two firewalls protecting our DMZ and internal
network and secondly we are flexible in creating even more advanced setups. One of the best
techniques used to mislead attackers is creating honeypots and placing them in a segment
connected directly to the front-end firewall. Honeypots are fake replicas of the production
servers placed somewhere on the network and they are used to confuse attackers by making
them think they are the production servers so that they will spend plenty of their time working on
penetrating into these servers. As the picture below shows, the network segment between the
two firewalls is the best place for placing the honeypot servers and in case intruders manage to
break in to the first firewall, they only manage to get to the honeypot servers and it gives you
more time to detect the attack and get them off your network.
Planning and Implementing Active Directory Domain
Services in Perimeter Network
In this section, we will discuss the deployment of Active Directory within perimeter network or
DMZ. Many people believe deploying Active Directory in perimeter network is not the right
decision because of the security risks which could be potentially imposed on the organization’s
directory service. In this section we will discuss different deployments of Active Directory in
perimeter network. Below is an illustrated and descriptive list of different designs:
No Active Directory Domain Services
This simply means that we do not create any connectivity between the directory service in the
network and any of the other services. You may prefer using the servers’ SAM (Security
Accounts Manager) database file which stores the local user and group accounts but that
creates management inconvenience. There are many other disadvantages such a design could
bring about like the lack of security and central management and, so more.
Illustration 3.5: Perimeter Network without Directory Service
Isolated Forest Model
As illustration 3.6 shows, it is possible to create two separate Active Directory forests for the
internal and the perimeter networks. In this way we have the directory service in the perimeter
network but it is still isolated from the rest of the network meaning that any update on the
directory services in the internal network such as adding or modifying user accounts, will not
affect the directory services in the perimeter network and vice versa. And the disadvantage with
this design is that you need to place a writable domain controller of the perimeter forest in the
perimeter network, so there is always a risk the Domain Controller could get penetrated. A
disadvantage to this design is that there is no connectivity between the forests and if the domain
users in the internal network require access to any of the resources in the perimeter network, it
is not possible to give them such an access since there is no connectivity between the forests.
Illustration 3.6: Perimeter Network Design – Isolated Forest
Extended Forest
In this design there will be one single forest covering both the internal and the perimeter
networks. If you place a writable Domain Controller in the perimeter network, any changes by a
hacker on the DC could be replicated to all the other DCs inside the internal network.
The good choice is using an RODC (Read-Only Domain Controller) inside the perimeter
network which is in replication with the DCs inside the internal network. This way if by any
chance one of the DCs in the DMZ is at risk of getting penetrated, the data is not at risk of
getting changed and then replicated to the entire domain or forest.
Illustration 3.6: Perimeter Network Design – Isolated Forest
Below are some of the benefits of placing Read-Only Domain Controllers in the DMZ:



Reducing the attack surface by placing an RODC instead of a writable domain controller.
Giving directory service to applications that require access to Active Directory and are
located in the perimeter network
Decreasing the type of the traffic passing from the DMZ to the LAN and vice versa
You have to keep in mind that the clients and member servers running in the perimeter network
need to be Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008 and above, otherwise a hotfix called
RODC compatibility pack needs to be applied to them. You can download the hotfix from here.
Forest Trust Model
This is one of the best designs where there is a separate forest for both the perimeter and the
Internal networks just like the Isolated Forest Model but there is a forest trust between the two.
The trust could be unidirectional meaning that we can only let the internal users access the
resources inside the perimeter network. For example, if you have a SQL server in your
perimeter network and you want both your internal and external users to access it, you could
follow this model to have two forests and make a unidirectional trust between them making the
server in the DMZ accessible to the internal users but still preventing the outside users in the
perimeter network to access any resources inside the internal network. A drawback to this
model is the administration cost of two different forests.
Illustration 3.7: Perimeter Network Design – Forest Trust
Sample Exercise
Exercise: Configuring Security for DNS on Windows Server
2012 R2
Exercise 1.1
In this exercise you will learn how to configure secure dynamic updates and also zone transfers
for a zone on a Windows Server 2012 R2 DNS server:
1.


2.
3.
Log on to Example-Server01 using the following credentials:
Username: Example.com\Administrator
Password: P@ssw0rd
On the Start screen type DNS and press Enter.
Expand Example-Server01 and right click Forward Lookup Zones and click New Zone to
open the New Zone Wizard.
4. On the Welcome to the New Zone Wizard page, click Next.
5. On the Zone Type page, select Secondary zone and click Next.
6. On the Zone Name page, type Example.com in the Zone name textbox and click Next.
7. On the Master DNS Server page, in the Master Servers box type Example-DC01 and click
Next.
8. On the Completing the New Zone Wizard page, click Finish.
9. Log on to Example-DC01 using the following credentials:
 Username: Example.com\Administrator
 Password: P@ssw0rd
10. On the Start screen type DNS and press Enter.
11. On the DNS Manager Console tree expand Example-DC01 > Forward Lookup Zones and
right click Example.com and click Properties.
12. On the Example.com Properties window select the Zone Transfers tab.
13. Check the box next to Allow zone transfers and then click Only to servers listed on
Name Servers tab.
14. Select the Name Servers tab and click Add.
15. On the New Name Server Record window, type Example-Server01.Example.com for the
Server fully qualified domain name (FQDN) and click Resolve and then OK twice.
16. Go back to Example-Server01 and right click Example.com zone and click Transfer from
Master.
17. Right click again on the Example.com zone and click Refresh and all the transferred
records will be visible.
18. Go back to Example-DC01 and right click the Example.com zone and click Properties.
19. Select the General tab and at the bottom of the window, click the drop-down menu next to
Dynamic updates and select Secure only.
20. Click OK to close the Example.com Properties window.
Exercise 1.2
In this exercise you will learn how to enable and update the global query block list on a
Windows Server 2012 R2 with the DNS service installed:
1.


2.
Log on to Example-DC01 using the following credentials:
Username: Example.com\Administrator
Password: P@ssw0rd
Open a command prompt window and type the following command and press Enter to
enable the global query block list:
Dnscmd Example-DC01.Example.com /config /enableglobalqueryblocklist 1
3. Type the following command and press Enter to update the global query block list with the
specified hostname:
Dnscmd Example-DC01.Example.com /config /globalqueryblocklist wpad.Example.com
4. Type the following command and press Enter to see the global query block list:
Dnscmd Example-DC01.Example.com /info /globalqueryblocklist
Exercise 1.3
In this exercise you will learn how to enable cache locking, disable recursion and configure a
DNS socket pool on a Windows Server 2012 R2 with the DNS service installed:
1. Log on to Example-DC01 open a command prompt window and type the following
command and press Enter to enable cache locking:
Dnscmd /config /CacheLockingPercent 100
Note: Cache locking is configured as a percent value. For example, if it is configured as 50,
then the DNS server will not overwrite a cached entry for half of the duration of the TTL. The
default value is 100.
2. Type the following command and press Enter to disable recursion:
Dnscmd Example-DC01.Example.com /config /NoRecursion 1
3. Type the following command and press Enter to configure a socket pool size of 5000 with
an excluded port range of 1-1500:
Dnscmd /config /SocketPoolSize 5000
Dnscmd /config SocketPoolExcludedRanges 1-1500
Sample Lab Scenario
w/ Answers
Lab 4: Implementing and Configuring Network Policy
and Access Services
In these lab exercises we will configure different components of Network Policy and Access
services and will learn how to integrate them with the other services in our environment.
Through the exercises in this lab you will acquire a deep knowledge and understanding on how
to strengthen security in your environment using Network Policy and Access services.
Objectives
After completing this lab, you will be able to:



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Understand the different components of Network Policy and Access services
Configure network policies to restrict access to the network
Configure Network Access Protection
Integrate the remote access server with Network Access Protection
Prerequisites
The following virtual machines are necessary to complete this lab:
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Example-DC01
Example-Server01
Example-Server02
Example-Client01
Exercise 1: Configuring VPN and Network Policy and Access Services
Scenario
You are working as a security consultant in a consulting firm based in Kuala Lumpur. The
company has hundreds of consultants working for them and some of them work also on
international projects which requires them to travel abroad. While working for customers in
different countries, these consultants require access to the company network to access files and
reports saved on the file servers. Some of these reports are very confidential and apart from the
security and access permissions set on the file servers, the company needs to ensure any
remote connection to the network is secured and only specific people with specified
requirements are able to connect to the network and access the resources.
The security team has been assigned the task of securing remote access connections to the
network and for this purpose the team has decided to implement Network Policy and Access
services.
Exercise Overview
In this exercise you will need to perform following four tasks:
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Task 1: Configure a VPN server for the network
Log on to Example-Server02 using the following credentials:
Username: Example.com\Administrator
Password: P@ssw0rd
2. Configure Routing and Remote Access Service to work as a remote VPN server.
3. Redirect the authentication traffic to Example-Server01 which will be configured in Task 2
as a RADIUS server.
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Task 2: Create a new Active Directory group for remote access users
Log on to Example-DC01 using the following credentials:
Username: Example.com\Administrator
Password: P@ssw0rd
2. Create two new Active Directory groups named Example-Remote-Access-Users and
Example-Remote-Access-Computers.
3. Add the Active Directory user Mikem to the group Example-Remote-Access-Users.
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Task 3: Configure a RADIUS server and network policies
Log on to Example-Server01 using the following credentials:
Username: Example.com\Administrator
Password: P@ssw0rd
2. Create a shared folder named Example_Reports to contain sample reports and
documents.
3. Configure Network Policy and Access Services on Example-Server01 to work as a
RADIUS server and serve requests sent from Example-Server02.
4. Create network policies to grant access to users with the following requirements:
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Users must be a member of Active Directory Example-Remote-Access-Users group.
Users must be able to connect to the network on any day and at any time during the 24
hours.
Users must only use MS CHAP v2 authentication method.
Users must be allowed full network access.
Task 4: Configure clients to connect to network using VPN
Log on to Example-Client01 using the following credentials:
Username: Example.com\Mikem
Password: P@ssw0rd
2. Change the IP address on Example-Client01 to be in the same range with the external
network interface of Example-Server02.
3. Create a VPN connection to connect to Example-Server02 and ensure MS CHAP v2 has
been specified as the authentication method.
4. Try accessing the Example_Reports shared folder on Example-Server01.
Exercise 2: Configuring and Integrating VPN with Network Access
Protection
The company needs to add an additional layer of security to their remote access users by
implementing Network Access Protection. The security team needs to ensure remote VPN
computers' health status is validated using Network Access Protection and Protected Extensible
Authentication Protocol (PEAP) is used as the authentication method. This requires the
existence of a Certificate Authority (CA) to issue the required certificates.
Exercise Overview
In this exercise you will need to perform following four tasks:
 Task 1: Configure a VPN server for the network
1. Log on to Example-Server02 and configure Routing and Remote Access Service to work
as a remote VPN server.
2. Redirect the authentication traffic to Example-Server01 which will be configured as a
RADIUS server.
3. Ensure Protected Extensible Authentication Protocol (PEAP) is used as the
authentication method.
 Task 2: Configure the Certificate Authority (CA) server and issue PEAP certificate
1. Log on to Example-DC01 and create a new certificate template for the remote access
server and ensure the right security permissions are set on the template.
2. Create a new Active Directory group named Example-Remote-Access-Computers and
add Example-Client01 to it.
 Task 3: Configure Network Access Protection and create network policies
1. Log on to Example-Server01 and request and install a new certificate on ExampleServer01 from the certificate template created in task 2.
2. Configure Network Access Protection to integrate with the VPN server (ExampleServer02)
3. Configure Protected Extensible Authentication Protocol (PEAP) to be used as the main
method to authenticate remote clients.
4. Ensure the following requirements are considered when creating network and health
policies:
 Only NAP-capable client computers are able to connect to network.
 Client is NAP VPN compliant only if it passes all the SHV (System Health Validation)
checks.
 Client is NAP VPN noncompliant if it fails one or more SHV checks.
 Ensure Windows System Health Validator includes the following setting:
 A firewall is enabled for all network connections.
 Task 4: Configure clients to connect to network using VPN
1. Log on to Example-DC01 and create a new GPO named Clients NAP Policy at the domain
level and apply it only to the members of Example-Remote-Access-Computers.
2. Edit the Clients NAP Policy GPO to enable EAP Quarantine Enforcement Client on the
GPO.
3. Log on to Example-Client01 and create a VPN connection to connect to ExampleServer02.
4. Ensure Protected Extensible Authentication Protocol (PEAP) is selected as the
authentication method and also Network Access Protection is enforced.
5. Enable Windows Firewall on Example-Client01 and try connecting to the network using
the VPN connection.
6. Try the same while Windows Firewall is disabled.
Lab 4 Answers: Implementing and Configuring
Network Policy and Access Services
Exercise 1: Configuring VPN and Network Policy and Access Services
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Task 1: Configure a VPN server for the network
Log on to Example-Server02 using the following credentials:
Username: Example.com\Administrator
Password: P@ssw0rd
Open the Start screen, type Routing and Remote Access and press Enter.
On the Routing and Remote Access console, right click Example-Server02 on the left
pane and click Disable Routing and Remote Access to remove the configuration from the
last exercises.
Right click Example-Server02 again on the left pane and click Configure and Enable
Routing and Remote Access.
On the Welcome to the Routing and Remote Access Server Setup Wizard page, click
Next.
On the Configuration page, leave Remote access (dial-up or VPN) selected and click
Next.
On the Remote Access page, select VPN and click Next.
On the VPN Connections page, click Ethernet 2 and click Next.
On the IP Address Assignment page, select From a specified range of addresses and
click Next.
On the Address Range Assignment page, click New and on the New IPv4 Address
Range window enter a range within the internal IP address range. i.e. 192.168.0.30192.168.0.45 and then click Next.
On the Managing Multiple Remote Access Servers page, select Yes. Set up this server
to work with a RADIUS server and click Next.
On the RADIUS Server Selection page, enter Example-Server01.Example.com as the
Primary RADIUS server and $har3d$3cr3t as the Shared secret and click Next.
Click Finish to finish the configuration.
Task 2: Create a new Active Directory group for remote access users
Log on to Example-DC01 using the following credentials:
Username: Example.com\Administrator
Password: P@ssw0rd
2. Open the Start screen and type Active Directory Administrative Center and then press
Enter.
3. In the left pane of the Active Directory Administrative Center, click Example (local) and
then on the middle pane double click Users.
4. On the Tasks pane click New and then click Group.
5. On the Create Group window, type Example-Remote-Access-Users for Group name and
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click OK.
Right click the user Mike Mayer and click Properties.
On the left pane click Extensions and then click the Dial-in tab on the right pane and then
in the Network Access Permission section select Allow access and then click OK.
Right click Example-Remote-Access-Users group and click Properties.
On the left pane click Members and then click Add.
Type mikem in the textbox and click Check Names and then click OK.
Task 3: Configure a RADIUS server and network policies
Log on to Example-Server01 using the following credentials:
Username: Example.com\Administrator
Password: P@ssw0rd
Create a new shared folder in partition C and name it Example_Reports.
Right click Example_Reports and click Properties.
Select the Sharing tab and click Advance Sharing.
On Advance Sharing window, select Share this folder. Leave the Share name as default
and click Permissions to open the permissions window.
8. Select Everyone in the list of Group or user names and in the permissions entry list select
Allow for Full Control.
9. Click OK three times to close all windows.
10. Create a new text document in Example_Reports and name it Sample_Doc1.txt and then
open it with NotePad editor, add the following line to it: "This is a sample document." and
then save before closing it.
11. Click Start, type nps.msc to open the NPS console.
12. In the NPS console, double-click RADIUS Clients and Servers. Click RADIUS Clients and
then on the right pane delete all the existing RADIUS clients you created in the previous
exercises.
13. Right-click RADIUS Clients, and then click New.
14. In New RADIUS Client, verify that the Enable this RADIUS client check box is selected.
15. In New RADIUS Client, in Friendly name, enter Example-Server02 as the name for the
remote access server. In Address (IP or DNS), enter the ExampleServer02.Example.com. To verify the FQDN, click Verify.
16. In New RADIUS Client, in Vendor, specify the manufacturer of the Remote Access Server
you are using. If you are not sure of it, select RADIUS standard.
17. In the Shared secret section, ensure that Manual is selected, and then in Shared secret,
enter $har3d$3cr3t. Retype the shared secret in Confirm shared secret.
18. Click OK. Your VPN Server will be listed as a RADIUS client configured on the NPS server.
19. On the NPS condole expand Policies, right click Network Policies and then click New to
open the New Network Policy wizard.
20. On the Specify Network Policy Name and Connection Type page, type VPN Users
Policy as the Policy name and select Remote Access Server (VPN-Dial up) as the Type
of network access server and then click Next.
21. On the Specify Conditions page, click Add to open the Select condition window.
22. Select User Groups and then click Add.
23. On the User Groups window click Add Groups and then type Example-Remote-AccessUsers in the textbox below Enter the object name to select and click Check Names and
click OK twice.
24. Click Add again to open the Select condition window.
25. Select Authentication Type and click Add.
26. On the Authentication Method window, select MS-CHAP v2 and then click OK and then
click Next.
27. On the Specify Access Permission page, select Access granted and then click Next.
28. On the Configure Authentication Methods page, select Microsoft Encrypted
Authentication version 2 (MS-CHAP-v2) and User can change password after it has
expired and then click Next.
29. On the Configure Constraints page, click Next.
30. On the Configure Settings page, click Next.
31. On the Completing New Network Policy page, click Finish.
 Task 4: Configure clients to connect to network using VPN
1. Log on to Example-Client01 using the following credentials:
2. Username: Example.com\Mikem
3. Password: P@ssw0rd
4. Open the Start screen and type Control Panel and press Enter on the keyboard.
5. On the Control Panel window, click View network status and tasks under Network and
Internet to open the Network and Sharing Center window and then on the left menu click
Change adapter settings.
6. On the Network Connections window right click the network adapter and click Properties
and when prompted for credentials, enter Example.com\Administrator for the username
and P@ssw0rd for the password and then press OK.
7. On the network adapter properties window, click Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4)
and then click Properties.
8. On the Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4) Properties window, click Use the
following IP address and then enter an IP address in the same range with ExampleServer02's external network adapter IP address. Enter a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 and
no default gateway.
9. Select Use the following DNS server addresses and then enter the IP address of
Example-Server02's external network adapter as the Preferred DNS server and then click
OK twice.
10. Go back to the Network and Sharing Center window and click Set up a new connection
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or network.
On the Set UP a Connection or Network page, select Connect to a workplace and click
Next.
On the Connect to a workplace page, click Use my Internet connection (VPN) and then
click I'll set up an Internet connection later.
On the Type the Internet address to connect to page, enter the IP address of ExampleServer02's external network adapter in the Internet address textbox and in the Destination
name textbox enter Example VPN Connection and click Create.
On the Network and Sharing Center window, click Change adapter settings on the left
menu.
On the Network Connections window, right click Example VPN Connection and click
Properties.
Select the Security tab and click Allow these protocols and then select Microsoft CHAP
Version 2 (MS-CHAP v2) and click OK.
Double click Example VPN Connection and then on the right side bar click Example VPN
Connection and click Connect.
Once prompted for credentials, enter Example.com\Mikem as the username and
P@ssw0rd as the password.
Once the connection is established, open the Start screen and type \\ExampleServer01.Example.com\Example_Reports and then make sure you can open
Sample_Doc1.txt and view the content.
Exercise 2: Configuring and Integrating VPN with Network Access
Protection
 Task 1: Configure a VPN server for the network
1. Log on to Example-Server02 and keep the configuration as-is from exercise 1.1.
2. Open the Routing and Remote Access console and right click Example-Server02 and
click Properties.
3. Select the Security tab and click Authentication Methods.
4. On the Authentication Methods window, only select Extensible authentication protocol
(EAP) and click OK twice.
 Task 2: Configure the Certificate Authority (CA) server and issue PEAP certificate
1. Log on to Example-DC01 and open the Start screen and type Certification Authority and
press Enter.
2. On the Certification Authority window, expand the Example-Example-DC01-CA node and
then right click Certificate Templates and click Manage.
3. On the Certificate Templates Console window, right click RAS and IAS Server and click
Duplicate Template.
4. On the Properties of New Template window, select the General tab and enter NPS
Certificate as the Template display name and then select Publish certificate in Active
Directory.
5. Select the Security tab and in the Group or user names list click Domain Admins and
ensure they have Allow Full Control permission.
6. Click Add and enter RAS and IAS Servers in the textbox below Enter the object names to
select and then click Check Names and then OK.
7. Make sure RAS and IAS Servers also are assigned Allow Full Control permission.
8. Click OK to create the template and then close the Certificate Template Console.
9. On the Certification Authority window, right click Certificate Templates and click New
and then Certificate Template to Issue.
10. On the Enable Certificate Template window, select NPS Certificate and then click OK to
add it to the list of available certificate templates.
11. Open the Start screen and type Active Directory Administrative Center and then press
Enter.
12. In the left pane of the Active Directory Administrative Center, click Example (local) and
then on the middle pane double click Users.
13. On the Tasks pane click New and then click Group.
14. On the Create Group window, type Example-Remote-Access-Computers for Group
name and click OK.
15. Right click Example-Remote-Access-Computers and click Properties.
16. On the right pane click Members.
17. Click Add and then click Object Types and select Computers and click OK.
18. Enter Example-Client01 in the textbox below Enter the object names to select and then
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click Check Names and then click OK twice.
Right click RAS and IAS Servers and click Properties.
On the right pane click Members.
Click Add and then click Object Types and select Computers and click OK.
Enter Example-Server01 in the textbox below Enter the object names to select and then
click Check Names and then click OK twice.
 Task 3: Configure Network Access Protection and create network policies
1. Log on to Example-Server01 and open the Start screen and type mmc and press Enter.
2. On the Microsoft Management Console window, click File and then Add/Remove Snapin.
3. On the Add or Remove Snap-ins window, from the list of Available snap-ins on the left
select Certificates and then click Add.
4. On the Certificates snap-in window select Computer account and click Next and then
click Finish.
5. Click OK to add the snap-in to the console.
6. Expand Certificates (Local Computer) and right click All Tasks and then Request New
Certificate to open the Certificate Enrollment wizard.
7. Click Next twice and on the Request Certificates page, select NPS Certificate and then
click Enroll and then Finish.
8. Expand Personal > Certificates to ensure the certificate has been added.
9. Open the Start screen and type NPS and press Enter.
10. On the NPS console, expand the RADIUS Clients and Servers and click RADIUS Clients.
11. On the right pane right click Example-Server01.Example.com and click Properties.
12. On the Example-Server01.Example.com Properties window, click the Advanced tab and
then select RADIUS client is NAP-capable and then click OK.
13. Expand the Policies node and click Network Policies and on the right pane delete all the
policies created in the previous exercises.
14. On the NPS console, click NPS (local) and on the right pane click Configure NAP.
15. On the Select Network Connection Method for Use with NAP page, select Virtual
Private Network (VPN) as the Network connection method and enter NAP VPN as the
Policy name and then click Next.
16. On the Specify NAP Enforcement Servers Running VPN Server page, ensure ExampleServer01.Example.com is listed under the RADIUS clients and click Next.
17. On the Configure User Groups and Machine Groups page, click Add in the Machine
Groups section.
18. Enter Example-Remote-Access-Computers in the textbox below Enter the object names
to select and then click Check Names and then OK.
19. Click Add in the User Groups section.
20. Enter Example-Remote-Access-Users in the textbox below Enter the object names to
select and then click Check Names and then OK and then click Next.
21. On the Configure an Authentication Method page, ensure the certificate added in this
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task has been automatically selected by clicking View and checking the details of the
certificate. Click Next twice.
On the Define NAP Health Policy page, uncheck Enable auto-remediation of client
computers and ensure Windows System Health Validator has been selected and then
click Next.
Click Finish.
Expand the Policies node and click Network Policies and on the right pane right click NAP
VPN Non Nap-Capable and click Properties.
On the NAP VPN Non Nap-Capable Properties select the Overview tab and in the
Access Permission section, select Deny access. Deny access if the connection request
matches this policy and then click OK.
Click Health Policies node on the left pane and on the right pane double click NAP VPN
Compliant and on the NAP VPN Compliant Properties window, ensure Client passes all
SHV checks has been selected for Client SHV Checks and then click OK.
Double click NAP VPN Noncompliant and on the NAP VPN Noncompliant Properties
window, ensure Client fails one or more SHV checks has been selected for Client SHV
Checks and then click OK.
On the NPS console, expand Network Access Protection > System Health Validators >
Windows Security Health Validator and click Settings and then on the right pane double
click Default Configuration.
On the Windows System Health Validator window, ensure Windows 8/Windows
7/Windows Vista on the left pane is selected and then on the right pane only A firewall is
enabled for all network connections is selected.
Click OK.
 Task 4: Configure clients to connect to network using VPN
1. Log on to Example-DC01 and open the Start screen and type Group Policy Management
and then press Enter.
2. Expand the following nodes Forest: Example.com > Domains > Example.com.
3. Right-click Group Policy Objects and click New.
4. In the New GPO dialog box, type Clients NAP Policy as the name for your new GPO in the
Name field. Click OK.
5. Right-click Clients NAP Policy, and then click Edit.
6. In the Group Policy Management Editor window, expand the following nodes Computer
Configuration > Policies > Windows Settings > Security Settings > System Services.
7. In the details pane, double-click Network Access Protection Agent and on the Network
Access Protection Agent Properties window, select the Define this policy setting check
box, select Automatic, and then click OK.
8. Expand Computer Configuration > Policies > Windows Settings > Security Settings >
Network Access Protection > NAP Client Configuration > Enforcement Clients.
9. In the details pane, right click EAP Quarantine Enforcement Client, and then click Enable.
10. Close the Group Policy Management Editor window and on the middle pane and in the
Security Filtering section click Authenticated Users and click Remove and on the Group
Policy Management dialog box click OK.
11. Click Add and then enter Example-Remote-Access-Users; Example-Remote-AccessComputers in the textbox below Enter the object names to select and then click Check
Names and then click OK.
12. Right click Example.com and then click Link an Existing GPO.
13. On the Select GPO dialog box, select Clients NAP Policy and click OK.
14. Log on to Example-Client01 using the following credentials:
 Username: Example.com\Mikem
 Password: P@ssw0rd
15. Open the Start screen and type CMD and then press Enter.
16. On the command prompt window enter the following command to update the policies on
Example-Client01: gpupdate /force
17. Enter the following command to ensure EAP Quarantine Enforcement Policy is enabled:
netsh nap client show grouppolicy
18. Enter the following command to ensure the Initialized status of the EAP Quarantine
Enforcement Client is set to Yes: netsh nap client show state
19. Open the Start screen and type Windows Firewall and then click to open it.
20. On the left menu click Turn Windows Firewall on or off and enter the
Example.com\Administrator credentials. Make sure Turn on Windows Firewall is
selected for Domain, Private and Public networks and click OK.
21. Open the Start screen and type Control Panel and press Enter on the keyboard.
22. On the Control Panel window, click View network status and tasks under Network and
Internet to open the Network and Sharing Center window and then on the left menu click
Change adapter settings.
23. Do not remove the Example VPN Connection you created in exercise 1.1 and right click
on it and click Properties.
24. Select the Security tab, select Use Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) and
choose Microsoft: Protected EAP (PEAP) (encryption enabled) and then click
Properties and select Validate server certificate and then select Enforce Network
Access Protection option. Click OK twice.
25. Double click Example VPN Connection and then on the right side bar click Example VPN
Connection and click Connect.
26. Once prompted for credentials, enter Example.com\Mikem as the username and
P@ssw0rd as the password.
27. Once the connection is established, open the Start screen and type \\ExampleServer01.Example.com\Example_Reports and then make sure you can open
Sample_Doc1.txt and view the content.
28. Disconnect the VPN connection and then go back to Windows Firewall and this time make
sure Turn off Windows Firewall (not recommended) is selected for all Domain, Private
and Public networks and then try again establishing the VPN connection.