Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business

Oracle® Fusion Middleware
Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Release 12.2.1
E57383-04
February 2016
Describes how to install and configure Oracle Fusion
Middleware components in an enterprise deployment.
Oracle Fusion Middleware Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence, Release 12.2.1
E57383-04
Copyright © 2015, 2016, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.
Primary Authors: Susan Kornberg (MAA Engineer), Phil Stubbs (Writer), Srinivasan Varadarajan (Quality
Assurance)
Contributing Authors: Fermin Castro, Peter LaQuerre
Contributors: Joe Paul, Michael Rhys, Allwarappan Sundararaj, Chakravarthy Tenneti, Bonnie Vaughan
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Contents
Preface ................................................................................................................................................................ xi
Audience ....................................................................................................................................................... xi
Conventions.................................................................................................................................................. xi
Part I
1
2
3
Understanding an Enterprise Deployment
Enterprise Deployment Overview
1.1
About the Enterprise Deployment Guide ....................................................................................
1-1
1.2
When to Use the Enterprise Deployment Guide.........................................................................
1-2
Understanding a Typical Enterprise Deployment
2.1
Diagram of a Typical Enterprise Deployment.............................................................................
2-1
2.2
Understanding the Typical Enterprise Deployment Topology Diagram................................
2-2
2.2.1
Understanding the Firewalls and Zones of a Typical Enterprise Deployment...........
2-3
2.2.2
Understanding the Elements of a Typical Enterprise Deployment Topology ............
2-3
2.2.3
Receiving Requests Through Hardware Load Balancer.................................................
2-4
2.2.4
Understanding the Web Tier ..............................................................................................
2-6
2.2.5
Understanding the Application Tier .................................................................................
2-8
2.2.6
About the Data Tier............................................................................................................ 2-12
Understanding the Business Intelligence Enterprise Deployment Topology
3.1
Diagram of the Primary Business Intelligence Enterprise Topology.......................................
3-2
3.2
Understanding the Primary Business Intelligence Topology Diagrams .................................
3-3
3.2.1
3.2.2
Summary of Business Intelligence Load Balancer Virtual Server Names ...................
Summary of the Managed Servers and Cluster on the Business Intelligence
3-4
Application Tier ..........................................................................................................................
Flow Charts and Roadmaps for Implementing the Primary Business Intelligence
3-4
Enterprise Topologies.........................................................................................................................
3.3.1 Flow Chart of the Steps to Install and Configure the Primary Business Intelligence
3-5
Enterprise Topologies ................................................................................................................
3-5
3.3
3.3.2
Roadmap Table for Planning and Preparing for an Enterprise Deployment..............
3-6
3.3.3
Roadmap Table for Configuring the Business Intelligence Enterprise Topology ......
3-7
iii
Part II
4
Using the Enterprise Deployment Workbook
4.1
Introduction to the Enterprise Deployment Workbook.............................................................
4-1
4.2
Typical Use Case for Using the Workbook ..................................................................................
4-2
4.3
Using the Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Deployment Workbook...........................
4-2
4.3.1
4.3.2
Locating the Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Deployment Workbook ..........
Understanding the Contents of the Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise
4-2
Deployment Workbook .............................................................................................................
4-2
Who Should Use the Enterprise Deployment Workbook? ........................................................
4-5
4.4
5
Procuring Resources for an Enterprise Deployment
5.1
5.2
5.3
6
6.2
iv
5-1
Hardware Load Balancer Requirements...........................................................................
5-2
5.1.2
Host Computer Hardware Requirements ........................................................................
5-3
5.1.3
Operating System Requirements for the Enterprise Deployment Topology ..............
5-5
Reserving the Required IP Addresses for an Enterprise Deployment.....................................
5-6
5.2.1
What Is a Virtual IP (VIP) Address? ..................................................................................
5-6
5.2.2
Why Use Virtual Host Names and Virtual IP Addresses?.............................................
5-7
5.2.3
Physical and Virtual IP Addresses Required by the Enterprise Topology ..................
5-7
Identifying and Obtaining Software Downloads for an Enterprise Deployment..................
5-8
Configuring Virtual Hosts on the Hardware Load Balancer ....................................................
6-1
6.1.1
Overview of the Hardware Load Balancer Configuration.............................................
6-1
6.1.2
Typical Procedure for Configuring the Hardware Load Balancer................................
6-2
6.1.3
Summary of the Virtual Servers Required for an Enterprise Deployment..................
6-2
6.1.4
Additional Instructions for admin.example.com ............................................................
6-3
Configuring the Firewalls and Ports for an Enterprise Deployment .......................................
6-3
Preparing the File System for an Enterprise Deployment
7.1
7.2
8
Hardware and Software Requirements for the Enterprise Deployment Topology...............
5.1.1
Preparing the Load Balancer and Firewalls for an Enterprise Deployment
6.1
7
Preparing for an Enterprise Deployment
Overview of Preparing the File System for an Enterprise Deployment ..................................
Shared Storage Recommendations When Installing and Configuring an Enterprise
7-1
Deployment..........................................................................................................................................
7-2
7.3
Understanding the Recommended Directory Structure for an Enterprise Deployment ......
7-3
7.4
File System and Directory Variables Used in This Guide..........................................................
7-5
7.5
About Creating and Mounting the Directories for an Enterprise Deployment .....................
7-9
7.6
Summary of the Shared Storage Volumes in an Enterprise Deployment ...............................
7-9
Preparing the Host Computers for an Enterprise Deployment
8.1
Verifying the Minimum Hardware Requirements for Each Host ............................................
8-1
8.2
Verifying Linux Operating System Requirements......................................................................
8-2
9
8.2.1
Setting Linux Kernel Parameters .......................................................................................
8-2
8.2.2
Setting the Open File Limit and Number of Processes Settings on UNIX Systems....
8-3
8.2.3
Verifying IP Addresses and Host Names in DNS or hosts File.....................................
8-4
8.3
Configuring Operating System Users and Groups.....................................................................
8-4
8.4
Enabling Unicode Support .............................................................................................................
8-4
8.5
Mounting the Required Shared File Systems on Each Host......................................................
8-5
8.6
Enabling the Required Virtual IP Addresses on Each Host ......................................................
8-6
Preparing the Database for an Enterprise Deployment
9.1
Overview of Preparing the Database for an Enterprise Deployment ......................................
9-1
9.2
About Database Requirements .....................................................................................................
9-2
9.2.1
Supported Database Versions ............................................................................................
9-2
9.2.2
Additional Database Software Requirements ..................................................................
9-2
9.3
Creating Database Services ............................................................................................................
9-3
9.4
Using SecureFiles for Large Objects (LOBs) in an Oracle Database.........................................
9-4
9.5
About Database Backup Strategies ...............................................................................................
9-5
Part III
10
Configuring the Enterprise Deployment
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment
10.1
Variables Used When Creating the BI Domain ....................................................................... 10-3
10.2
Understanding the Initial BI Domain ....................................................................................... 10-3
10.2.1
About the Infrastructure Distribution ........................................................................... 10-4
10.2.2 Characteristics of the Initial BI Domain ........................................................................ 10-4
10.3 Installing the Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure in Preparation for an Enterprise
Deployment........................................................................................................................................ 10-4
10.4
10.5
10.6
10.3.1
Installing a Supported JDK ............................................................................................. 10-5
10.3.2
Starting the Infrastructure Installer on BIHOST1 ........................................................ 10-6
10.3.3
Navigating the Infrastructure Installation Screens ..................................................... 10-6
10.3.4
Checking the Directory Structure .................................................................................. 10-8
Installing Oracle Business Intelligence in Preparation for an Enterprise Deployment ..... 10-9
10.4.1
Starting the Installation Program................................................................................... 10-9
10.4.2
Navigating the Installation Screens ............................................................................... 10-9
10.4.3
Checking the Directory Structure ................................................................................ 10-10
Creating the Database Schemas............................................................................................... 10-11
10.5.1
Installing and Configuring a Certified Database....................................................... 10-12
10.5.2
Starting the Repository Creation Utility (RCU) ......................................................... 10-12
10.5.3
Navigating the RCU Screens to Create the Schemas ................................................ 10-12
Configuring the BI Domain...................................................................................................... 10-14
10.6.1
Starting the Configuration Wizard .............................................................................. 10-15
10.6.2
Navigating the Configuration Wizard Screens to Configure the BI Domain........ 10-15
10.7
Creating the System Components on BIHOST1.................................................................... 10-25
10.8
Creating a BI Service Instance.................................................................................................. 10-27
v
10.9
Configuring the Singleton Data Directory (SDD) ................................................................. 10-28
10.10
Configuring Security for Essbase in Oracle Business Intelligence ................................... 10-29
10.11 Configuring the Domain Directories and Starting the Servers on BIHOST1.................. 10-29
10.11.1 Starting the Node Manager in the Administration Server Domain Home on
BIHOST1 .................................................................................................................................. 10-30
10.11.2
Creating the boot.properties File................................................................................ 10-31
10.11.3
Starting the Administration Server............................................................................ 10-31
10.11.4
Validating the Administration Server ....................................................................... 10-32
10.11.5
Disabling the Derby Database .................................................................................... 10-32
10.11.6
Creating a Separate Domain Directory for Managed Servers on BIHOST1 ........ 10-33
10.11.7
Starting the Node Manager in the Managed Server Domain Directory on
BIHOST1 .................................................................................................................................. 10-35
10.11.8
Starting the WLS_BI1 Managed Server on BIHOST1.............................................. 10-35
10.11.9
Starting the System Components............................................................................... 10-36
10.12
Setting Up the Global Cache .................................................................................................. 10-37
10.13
Verifying Oracle Business Intelligence URLs on BIHOST1............................................... 10-39
10.14
Creating a New LDAP Authenticator and Provisioning Enterprise Deployment Users
and Group ........................................................................................................................................ 10-39
10.14.1
About the Supported Authentication Providers...................................................... 10-40
10.14.2
10.14.3
About the Enterprise Deployment Users and Groups............................................ 10-40
Prerequisites for Creating a New Authentication Provider and Provisioning
Users and Groups ................................................................................................................... 10-42
10.14.4
Provisioning a Domain Connector User in the LDAP Directory .......................... 10-42
10.14.5
Creating the New Authentication Provider ............................................................. 10-44
10.14.6
Provisioning an Enterprise Deployment Administration User and Group ........ 10-48
10.14.7
Adding the New Administration User to the Administration Group ................. 10-49
10.14.8
Updating the boot.properties File and Restarting the System............................... 10-50
10.15
11
Backing Up the Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration............................................. 10-51
Configuring the Web Tier for an Enterprise Deployment
11.1
Variables Used When Configuring the Web Tier ................................................................... 11-2
11.2
About the Web Tier Domains .................................................................................................... 11-2
11.3
Installing Oracle HTTP Server on WEBHOST1....................................................................... 11-3
11.3.1
11.4
11.5
11.6
Starting the Installer on WEBHOST1 ............................................................................ 11-3
11.3.2
Navigating the Oracle HTTP Server Installation Screens .......................................... 11-3
11.3.3
Verifying the Oracle HTTP Server Installation ............................................................ 11-4
Creating a Web Tier Domain on WEBHOST1 ......................................................................... 11-5
11.4.1
Starting the Configuration Wizard on WEBHOST1.................................................... 11-5
11.4.2
Navigating the Configuration Wizard Screens for a Web Tier Domain .................. 11-5
Installing and Configuring a Web Tier Domain on WEBHOST2 ......................................... 11-8
Starting the Node Manager and Oracle HTTP Server Instances on WEBHOST1 and
WEBHOST2........................................................................................................................................ 11-8
11.6.1
vi
Starting the Node Manager on WEBHOST1 and WEBHOST2.................................. 11-8
11.6.2
11.7
11.7.1
About the Oracle HTTP Server Configuration for an Enterprise Deployment....... 11-9
11.7.2
Modifying the httpd.conf File to Include Virtual Host Configuration Files.......... 11-10
11.7.3
Creating the Virtual Host Configuration Files for Oracle Business Intelligence .. 11-10
11.7.4
Validating the Virtual Server Configuration on the Load Balancer ....................... 11-16
11.7.5
Validating Access to the Management Consoles and Administration Server ...... 11-16
11.7.6
Validating Access to the HTTP Access to the Business Intelligence Components 11-16
11.8
12
Starting the Oracle HTTP Server Instances .................................................................. 11-8
Configuring Oracle HTTP Server to Route Requests to the Application Tier .................... 11-9
Backing Up the Configuration ................................................................................................. 11-17
Scaling Out Oracle Business Intelligence
12.1
Installing Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure on the Other Host Computers ........ 12-2
12.2
Installing Oracle Business Intelligence on the Other Host Computers ............................... 12-2
12.3
Stopping the Components on BIHOST1................................................................................... 12-3
12.3.1
Stopping the System Components................................................................................. 12-3
12.3.2
Stopping the WLS_BI1 Managed Server....................................................................... 12-4
12.3.3
Stopping the Administration Server.............................................................................. 12-5
12.3.4
Stopping the Node Manager in the Administration Server Domain Home............ 12-6
12.3.5
Stopping the Node Manager in the Managed Server Domain Directory ................ 12-6
12.4
Cloning the Components on BIHOST1 .................................................................................... 12-6
12.5
Packing Up the Initial Domain on BIHOST1 ........................................................................... 12-7
12.6
Unpacking the Domain on BIHOST2........................................................................................ 12-8
12.7
Starting the Components on BIHOST1 and BIHOST2 After Scaling Out ........................... 12-9
12.7.1
Starting the Node Manager in the Administration Server Domain Home.............. 12-9
12.7.2
Starting the Administration Server................................................................................ 12-9
12.7.3
Starting the Node Managers in the Managed Server Domain Directories .............. 12-9
12.7.4
Setting the Listen Address for the WLS_BI2 Managed Server .................................. 12-9
12.7.5
Configuring the WebLogic Proxy Plug-In .................................................................. 12-10
12.7.6
Starting the Managed Servers....................................................................................... 12-10
12.7.7
Starting the System Components................................................................................. 12-10
12.8
Verifying Oracle Business Intelligence URLs on BIHOST2................................................. 12-10
12.9
Configuring Oracle BI Publisher ............................................................................................. 12-11
12.9.1
Updating the JMS Shared Temp Directory................................................................. 12-11
12.9.2
Setting the Oracle BI EE Data Source .......................................................................... 12-12
12.10
Backing Up the Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration After Scaling Out............. 12-12
Part IV Common Configuration and Management Procedures for an Enterprise
Deployment
13
Common Configuration and Management Tasks for an Enterprise Deployment
13.1
Verifying Manual Failover of the Administration Server...................................................... 13-1
13.1.1
Failing Over the Administration Server to a Different Host...................................... 13-2
vii
13.1.2
Validating Access to the Administration Server on BIHOST2 Through Oracle
HTTP Server .............................................................................................................................. 13-3
13.1.3 Failing the Administration Server Back to BIHOST1.................................................. 13-3
13.2 Enabling SSL Communication Between the Middle Tier and the Hardware Load
Balancer .............................................................................................................................................. 13-4
13.2.1 When is SSL Communication Between the Middle Tier and Load Balancer
Necessary? ................................................................................................................................. 13-5
13.3
14
13.2.2
Generating Self-Signed Certificates Using the utils.CertGen Utility........................ 13-5
13.2.3
Creating an Identity Keystore Using the utils.ImportPrivateKey Utility ................ 13-6
13.2.4
Creating a Trust Keystore Using the Keytool Utility .................................................. 13-7
13.2.5
Importing the Load Balancer Certificate into the Trust Store.................................... 13-8
13.2.6
Adding the Updated Trust Store to the Oracle WebLogic Server Start Scripts ...... 13-8
13.2.7
Configuring Node Manager to Use the Custom Keystores ....................................... 13-9
13.2.8
Configuring WebLogic Servers to Use the Custom Keystores .................................. 13-9
Performing Backups and Recoveries for an Enterprise Deployment ................................ 13-11
Using Whole Server Migration and Service Migration in an Enterprise
Deployment
14.1
About Whole Server Migration and Automatic Service Migration in an Enterprise
Deployment........................................................................................................................................ 14-1
14.1.1 Understanding the Difference Between Whole Server and Service Migration....... 14-2
14.1.2 Implications of Using Whole Server Migration or Service Migration in an
Enterprise Deployment............................................................................................................ 14-2
14.1.3 Understanding Which Products and Components Require Whole Server
Migration and Service Migration ........................................................................................... 14-3
14.2
Creating a GridLink Data Source for Leasing ......................................................................... 14-3
14.3
Configuring Whole Server Migration for an Enterprise Deployment ................................. 14-6
14.4
14.3.1
Editing the Node Manager's Properties File to Enable Whole Server Migration ... 14-6
14.3.2
Setting Environment and Superuser Privileges for the wlsifconfig.sh Script ......... 14-7
14.3.3
Configuring Server Migration Targets.......................................................................... 14-8
14.3.4
Testing Whole Server Migration .................................................................................... 14-9
Configuring Automatic Service Migration in an Enterprise Deployment ........................ 14-10
14.4.1 Setting the Leasing Mechanism and Data Source for an Enterprise Deployment
Cluster ...................................................................................................................................... 14-11
15
viii
14.4.2
Changing the Migration Settings for the Managed Servers in the Cluster............ 14-11
14.4.3
About Selecting a Service Migration Policy ............................................................... 14-12
14.4.4
Setting the Service Migration Policy for Each Managed Server in the Cluster ..... 14-12
14.4.5
Restarting the Managed Servers and Validating Automatic Service Migration... 14-13
14.4.6
Failing Back Services After Automatic Service Migration ....................................... 14-14
Configuring Single Sign-On for an Enterprise Deployment
15.1
About Oracle HTTP Server Webgate ........................................................................................ 15-2
15.2
General Prerequisites for Configuring Oracle HTTP Server 12c Webgate.......................... 15-2
15.3
Enterprise Deployment Prerequisites for Configuring OHS 12c Webgate ......................... 15-2
15.4
Configuring Oracle HTTP Server 12c WebGate for an Enterprise Deployment ................ 15-3
15.5
Registering the Oracle HTTP Server 12c WebGate with Oracle Access Manager ............. 15-4
15.5.1
Locating and Preparing the RREG Tool........................................................................ 15-4
15.5.2
About RREG In-Band and Out-of-Band Mode ............................................................ 15-5
15.5.3
15.5.4
Updating the Standard Properties in the OAM11gRequest.xml File ....................... 15-5
Updating the Protected, Public, and Excluded Resources for an Enterprise
Deployment ............................................................................................................................... 15-7
15.5.5
Running the RREG Tool .................................................................................................. 15-8
15.5.6
Files and Artifacts Generated by RREG ...................................................................... 15-10
15.5.7
Copying Generated Artifacts to the Oracle HTTP Server WebGate Instance
Location .................................................................................................................................... 15-11
15.5.8
15.6
A
Restarting the Oracle HTTP Server Instance.............................................................. 15-12
Setting Up the WebLogic Server Authentication Providers................................................ 15-12
15.6.1
Backing Up Configuration Files ................................................................................... 15-12
15.6.2
Setting Up the Oracle Access Manager Identity Assertion Provider...................... 15-12
15.6.3
Setting the Order of Providers...................................................................................... 15-13
15.7
Configuring Oracle ADF and OPSS Security with Oracle Access Manager ..................... 15-14
15.8
Configuring Single Sign-On for Applications ....................................................................... 15-15
15.8.1
Enabling Single Sign-On and Oracle Access Manager for Oracle BI EE ................ 15-16
15.8.2
Enabling Single Sign-On and Oracle Access Manager for Oracle BI Publisher .... 15-16
Using Multi Data Sources with Oracle RAC
A.1
About Multi Data Sources and Oracle RAC........................................................................................ A-1
A.2
Typical Procedure for Configuring Multi Data Sources for an Enterprise Deployment.............. A-1
ix
x
Preface
This guide explains how to install, configure, and manage a highly available Oracle
Fusion Middleware enterprise deployment. For more information, see About the
Enterprise Deployment Guide.
See Also:
Audience
Conventions
Audience
In general, this document is intended for administrators of Oracle Fusion Middleware,
who are assigned the task of installing and configuring Oracle Fusion Middleware
software for production deployments.
Specific tasks can also be assigned to more specialized administrators, such as
database administrators (DBAs) and network administrators, where applicable.
Conventions
The following text conventions are used in this document:
Convention
Meaning
boldface
Boldface type indicates graphical user interface elements associated
with an action, or terms defined in text or the glossary.
italic
Italic type indicates book titles, emphasis, or placeholder variables for
which you supply particular values.
monospace
Monospace type indicates commands within a paragraph, URLs, code
in examples, text that appears on the screen, or text that you enter.
xi
Note:
This guide focuses on the implementation of the enterprise deployment
reference topology on Oracle Linux systems.
The topology can be implemented on any certified, supported operating
system, but the examples in this guide typically show the commands and
configuration steps as they should be performed using the bash shell on
Oracle Linux.
xii
Part I
Understanding an Enterprise Deployment
This part of the Enterprise Deployment Guide contains the following topics.
See Also:
Enterprise Deployment Overview
Understanding a Typical Enterprise Deployment
Understanding the Business Intelligence Enterprise Deployment Topology
1
Enterprise Deployment Overview
This chapter introduces the concept of an Oracle Fusion Middleware enterprise
deployment.
It also provides information on when to use the Enterprise Deployment guide.
See Also:
Understanding an Enterprise Deployment
About the Enterprise Deployment Guide
An Enterprise Deployment Guide provides a comprehensive, scalable
example for installing, configuring, and maintaining a secure, highly
available, production-quality deployment of selected Oracle Fusion
Middleware products. This resulting environment is known as an
enterprise deployment topology.
When to Use the Enterprise Deployment Guide
This guide describes one of three primary installation and configuration
options for Oracle Fusion Middleware. Use this guide to help you plan,
prepare, install, and configure a multi-host, secure, highly available,
production topology for selected Oracle Fusion Middleware products.
1.1 About the Enterprise Deployment Guide
An Enterprise Deployment Guide provides a comprehensive, scalable example for
installing, configuring, and maintaining a secure, highly available, production-quality
deployment of selected Oracle Fusion Middleware products. This resulting
environment is known as an enterprise deployment topology.
By example, the enterprise deployment topology introduces key concepts and best
practices that you can use to implement a similar Oracle Fusion Middleware
environment for your organization.
Each Enterprise Deployment Guide provides detailed, validated instructions for
implementing the reference topology. Along the way, the guide offers links to
supporting documentation that explains concepts, reference material, and additional
options for an Oracle Fusion Middleware enterprise deployment.
Note that the enterprise deployment topologies described in the enterprise
deployment guides cannot meet the exact requirements of all Oracle customers. In
some cases, you can consider alternatives to specific procedures in this guide,
depending on whether the variations to the topology are documented and supported
by Oracle.
Oracle recommends customers use the Enterprise Deployment Guides as a first option
for deployment. If variations are required, then those variations should be verified by
reviewing related Oracle documentation or by working with Oracle Support.
Enterprise Deployment Overview 1-1
When to Use the Enterprise Deployment Guide
1.2 When to Use the Enterprise Deployment Guide
This guide describes one of three primary installation and configuration options for
Oracle Fusion Middleware. Use this guide to help you plan, prepare, install, and
configure a multi-host, secure, highly available, production topology for selected
Oracle Fusion Middleware products.
Alternatively, you can:
• Use the instructions in one of the product-specific installation guides to install and
configure a standard installation topology for a selected set of Oracle Fusion
Middleware products.
A standard installation topology can be installed on a single host for evaluation
purposes, but it can also serve as a starting point for scaling out to a more complex
production environment.
For Oracle Business Intelligence, see:
– Installing and Configuring Oracle Business Intelligence
• Review Planning an Installation of Oracle Fusion Middleware, which provides
additional information to help you prepare for any Oracle Fusion Middleware
installation.
1-2 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
2
Understanding a Typical Enterprise
Deployment
This chapter describes the general characteristics of a typical Oracle Fusion
Middleware enterprise deployment. You can apply the concepts here to any productspecific enterprise deployment.
This chapter provides information on Enterprise Deployment Topology diagram.
See Also:
Understanding an Enterprise Deployment
Diagram of a Typical Enterprise Deployment
This section illustrates a typical enterprise deployment, including the
Web tier, application tier, and data tier.
Understanding the Typical Enterprise Deployment Topology Diagram
This section provides a detailed description of the typical enterprise
topology diagram.
2.1 Diagram of a Typical Enterprise Deployment
This section illustrates a typical enterprise deployment, including the Web tier,
application tier, and data tier.
All Oracle Fusion Middleware enterprise deployments are designed to demonstrate
the best practices for installing and configuring an Oracle Fusion Middleware
production environment.
A best practices approach starts with the basic concept of a multi-tiered deployment
and standard communications between the different software tiers.
Figure 2-1 shows a typical enterprise deployment, including the Web tier, application
tier and data tier. All enterprise deployments are based on these basic principles.
For a description of each tier and the standard protocols used for communications
within a typical Oracle Fusion Middleware enterprise deployment, see Understanding
the Typical Enterprise Deployment Topology Diagram.
Understanding a Typical Enterprise Deployment 2-1
Understanding the Typical Enterprise Deployment Topology Diagram
Figure 2-1
Typical Enterprise Deployment Topology Diagram
Internet
Workstation
Workstation
HTTPS: 443
HTTPS: 443
FW0
Web Tier
(DMZ)
VIP1: product.example.com | xxx.yyy.zzz.220
LBR
Ports Open:
443, 80
admin.example.com
edginternal.example.com
7777
NAT’d
Intranet URL’s
7777
OHS
OHS with all
Virtual URLs,
FTP site, and
Proxy
Mod_WL_OHS
OHS
Mod_WL_OHS
WEBHOST2
WEBHOST1
FW1
Application Tier
Ports Open:
HTTP, Mbean Proxy
HTTP
HTTP
Admin Server
WLS_WSM1
WLS_PROD1
WLS_WSM2
WLS_PROD2
Admin Console
WSM_PM
Product
WSM_PM
Product
JRF/OPSS
JRF/OPSS
JRF/OPSS
EM
Product
Console
JRF/OPSS
HOST1
JRF/OPSS
HOST2
389/636 (OPSS Authentication)
1521
Data Tier
FW2
Ports Open:
389, 636,1521, 6200
1521
389/636 (OPSS Authentication
1521
db-scan.example.com
RAC
DBHOST1
DBHOST2
RAC DB;
Product Schemas;
OPSS Authorization Store
Database
2.2 Understanding the Typical Enterprise Deployment Topology Diagram
This section provides a detailed description of the typical enterprise topology
diagram.
See Also:
Understanding the Firewalls and Zones of a Typical Enterprise Deployment
Understanding the Elements of a Typical Enterprise Deployment Topology
2-2 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Understanding the Typical Enterprise Deployment Topology Diagram
Receiving Requests Through Hardware Load Balancer
Understanding the Web Tier
Understanding the Application Tier
About the Data Tier
2.2.1 Understanding the Firewalls and Zones of a Typical Enterprise Deployment
The topology is divided into several security zones, which are separated by firewalls:
• The Web tier (or DMZ), which is used for the hardware load balancer and Web
servers (in this case, Oracle HTTP Server instances) that receive the initial requests
from users. This zone is accessible only through a single virtual server name
defined on the load balancer.
• The application tier, which is where the business and application logic resides.
• The data tier, which is not accessible from the Internet and reserved in this
topology for the highly available database instances.
The firewalls are configured to allow data to be transferred only through specific
communication ports. Those ports (or in some cases, the protocols that will need open
ports in the firewall) are shown on each firewall line in the diagram.
For example:
• On the firewall protecting the Web tier, only the HTTP ports are open: 443 for
HTTPS and 80 for HTTP.
• On the firewall protecting the Application tier, HTTP ports, and MBean proxy port
are open.
Applications that require external HTTP access can use the Oracle HTTP Server
instances as a proxy. Note that this port for outbound communications only and
the proxy capabilities on the Oracle HTTP Server must be enabled.
• On the firewall protecting the data tier, the database listener port (typically, 1521)
must be open.
The LDAP ports (typically, 389 and 636) are also required to be open for
communication between the authorization provider and the LDAP-based identity
store.
The ONS port (typically, 6200) is also required so the application tier can receive
notifications about workload and events in the Oracle RAC Database. These events
are used by the Oracle WebLogic Server connection pools to adjust quickly
(creating or destroying connections), depending on the availability and workload
on the Oracle RAC database instances.
For a complete list of the ports you must open for a specific Oracle Fusion Middleware
enterprise deployment topology, see the chapter that describes the topology you want
to implement, or refer to the Enterprise Deployment Workbook for the topology you are
implement. For more information, see Using the Enterprise Deployment Workbook .
2.2.2 Understanding the Elements of a Typical Enterprise Deployment Topology
The enterprise deployment topology consists of the following high-level elements:
Understanding a Typical Enterprise Deployment 2-3
Understanding the Typical Enterprise Deployment Topology Diagram
• A hardware load balancer that routes requests from the Internet to the Web servers
in the Web tier. It also routes requests from internal clients or other components
that are performing internal invocations within the corporate network.
• A Web tier, consisting of a hardware load balancer and two or more physical
computers that host the Web server instances (for high availability).
The Web server instances are configured to authenticate users (via an external
identity store and a single sign-on server) and then route the HTTP requests to the
Oracle Fusion Middleware products and components running in the Application
tier.
The Web server instances also host static Web content that does not require
application logic to be delivered. Placing such content in the Web tier reduces the
overhead on the application servers and eliminates unnecessary network activity.
• An Application tier, consisting of two or more physical computers that are hosting
a cluster of Oracle WebLogic Server Managed Servers, and the Administration
Server for the domain. The Managed Servers are configured to run the various
Oracle Fusion Middleware products, such as Oracle SOA Suite, Oracle Service Bus,
Oracle WebCenter Content, and Oracle WebCenter Portal, depending on your
choice of products in the enterprise deployment.
• A data tier, consisting of two or more physical hosts that are hosting an Oracle
RAC Database.
2.2.3 Receiving Requests Through Hardware Load Balancer
The following topics describe the hardware load balancer and its role in an enterprise
deployment.
See Also:
Purpose of the Hardware Load Balancer (LBR)
Summary of the Typical Load Balancer Virtual Server Names
HTTPS versus HTTP Requests to the External Virtual Server Name
2.2.3.1 Purpose of the Hardware Load Balancer (LBR)
The following topics describe the types of requests handled by the hardware load
balancer in an enterprise deployment.
See Also:
HTTP Requests from the Internet to the Web server instances in the Web tier
Specific internal-only communications between the components of the
Application tier
2.2.3.1.1 HTTP Requests from the Internet to the Web server instances in the Web tier
The hardware load balancer balances the load on the Web tier by receiving requests to
a single virtual host name and then routing each request to one of the Web server
instances, based on a load balancing algorithm. In this way, the load balancer ensures
that no one Web server is overloaded with HTTP requests.
For more information about the purpose of specific virtual host names on the
hardware load balancer, see Summary of the Typical Load Balancer Virtual Server
Names.
2-4 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Understanding the Typical Enterprise Deployment Topology Diagram
Note that in the reference topology, only HTTP requests are routed from the hardware
load balancer to the Web tier. Secure Socket Layer (SSL) requests are terminated at the
load balancer and only HTTP requests are forwarded to the Oracle HTTP Server
instances. This guide does not provide instructions for SSL configuration between the
load balancer and the Oracle HTTP Server instances or between the Web tier and the
Application tier.
The load balancer provides high availability by ensuring that if one Web server goes
down, requests will be routed to the remaining Web servers that are up and running.
Further, in a typical highly available configuration, the hardware load balancers are
configured such that a hot standby device is ready to resume service in case a failure
occurs in the main load balancing appliance. This is important because for many types
of services and systems, the hardware load balancer becomes the unique point of
access to make invocations and, as a result, becomes a single point of failure (SPOF)
for the whole system if it is not protected.
2.2.3.1.2 Specific internal-only communications between the components of the Application tier
In addition, the hardware load balancer routes specific communications between the
Oracle Fusion Middleware components and applications on the application tier. The
internal-only requests are also routed through the load balancer, using a unique
virtual host name.
2.2.3.2 Summary of the Typical Load Balancer Virtual Server Names
In order to balance the load on servers and to provide high availability, the hardware
load balancer is configured to recognize a set of virtual server names. As shown in the
diagram, the following virtual server names are recognized by the hardware load
balancer in this topology:
• product.example.com - This virtual server name is used for all incoming traffic.
Users enter this URL to access the Oracle Fusion Middleware product you have
deployed and the custom applications available on this server. The load balancer
then routes these requests (using a load balancing algorithm) to one of the servers
in the Web tier. In this way, the single virtual server name can be used to route
traffic to multiple servers for load balancing and high availability of the Web
servers instances.
• productinternal.example.com - This virtual server name is for internal
communications only.
The load balancer uses its Network Address Translation (NAT) capabilities to
route any internal communication from the Application tier components that are
directed to this URL. This URL is not exposed to external customers or users on the
Internet. Each product has specific uses for the internal URL, so in the deployment
instructions, we prefix it with the product name.
• admin.example.com - This virtual server name is for administrators who need to
access the Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control and Oracle
WebLogic Server Administration Console interfaces.
This URL is known only to internal administrators. It also uses the NAT
capabilities of the load balancer to route administrators to the active
Administration Server in the domain.
For the complete set of virtual server names you must define for your topology, see
the the chapter that describes the product-specific topology.
Understanding a Typical Enterprise Deployment 2-5
Understanding the Typical Enterprise Deployment Topology Diagram
2.2.3.3 HTTPS versus HTTP Requests to the External Virtual Server Name
Note that when you configure the hardware load balancer, a best practice is to assign
the main external URL (for example, http://myapplication.example.com) to
port 80 and port 443.
Any request on port 80 (non-SSL protocol) should be redirected to port 443 (SSL
protocol). Exceptions to this rule include requests from public WSDLs. For more
information, see Configuring Virtual Hosts on the Hardware Load Balancer.
2.2.4 Understanding the Web Tier
The Web tier of the reference topology consists of the Web servers that receive
requests from the load balancer. In the typical enterprise deployment, at least two
Oracle HTTP Server instances are configured in the Web tier. The following topics
provide more detail.
See Also:
Benefits of Using Oracle HTTP Server Instances to Route Requests
Alternatives to Using Oracle HTTP Server in the Web Tier
Configuration of Oracle HTTP Server in the Web Tier
About Mod_WL_OHS
2.2.4.1 Benefits of Using Oracle HTTP Server Instances to Route Requests
A Web tier with Oracle HTTP Server is not a requirement for many of the Oracle
Fusion Middleware products. You can route traffic directly from the hardware load
balancer to the WLS servers in the Application Tier. However, a Web tier does provide
several advantages, which is why it is recommended as part of the reference topology:
• The Web tier provides DMZ public zone, which is a common requirement in
security audits. If a load balancer routes directly to the WebLogic Server, requests
move from the load balancer to the application tier in one single HTTP jump,
which can cause security concerns.
• The Web tier allows the WebLogic Server cluster membership to be reconfigured
(new servers added, others removed) without having to change the Web server
configuration (as long as at least some of the servers in the configured list remain
alive).
• Oracle HTTP Server delivers static content more efficiently and faster than
WebLogic Server; it also provides FTP services, which are required for some
enterprise deployments, as well as the ability to create virtual hosts and proxies via
the Oracle HTTP Server configuration files.
• Oracle HTTP Server provides HTTP redirection over and above what WebLogic
Server provides. You can use Oracle HTTP Server as a front end against many
different WebLogic Server clusters, and in some cases, control the routing via
content based routing.
• Oracle HTTP Server provides the ability to integrate single sign-on capabilities into
your enterprise deployment. For example, you can later implement single sign-on
for the enterprise deployment, using Oracle Access Manager, which is part of the
Oracle Identity and Access Management family of products.
2-6 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Understanding the Typical Enterprise Deployment Topology Diagram
• Oracle HTTP Server provides support for WebSocket connections deployed within
WebLogic Server.
For more information about Oracle HTTP Server, see Introduction to Oracle HTTP
Server in Administrator's Guide for Oracle HTTP Server.
2.2.4.2 Alternatives to Using Oracle HTTP Server in the Web Tier
Although Oracle HTTP Server provides a variety of benefits in an enterprise topology,
Oracle also supports routing requests directly from the hardware load balancer to the
Managed Servers in the middle tier.
This approach provide the following advantages:
• Lower configuration and processing overhead than using a front-end Oracle HTTP
Server Web tier front-end.
• Monitoring at the application level since the LBR can be configured to monitor
specific URLS for each Managed Server (something that is not possible with OHS).
You can potentially use this load balancer feature to monitor SOA composite
application URLs. Note that this enables routing to the Managed Servers only
when all composites are deployed, and you must use the appropriate monitoring
software.
2.2.4.3 Configuration of Oracle HTTP Server in the Web Tier
Starting with Oracle Fusion Middleware 12c, the Oracle HTTP Server software can be
configured in one of two ways: as part of an existing Oracle WebLogic Server domain
or in its own standalone domain. Each configuration offers specific benefits.
When you configure Oracle HTTP Server instances as part of an existing WebLogic
Server domain, you can manage the Oracle HTTP Server instances, including the
wiring of communications between the Web servers and the Oracle WebLogic Server
Managed Servers using Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control. When
you configure Oracle HTTP Server in a standalone configuration, you can configure
and manage the Oracle HTTP Server instances independently of the application tier
domains.
For this enterprise deployment guide, the Oracle HTTP Server instances are
configured as separate standalone domains, one on each Web tier host. You can choose
to configure the Oracle HTTP Server instances as part of the application tier domain,
but this enterprise deployment guide does not provide specific steps to configure the
Oracle HTTP Server instances in that manner.
For more information, see "Understanding Oracle HTTP Server Installation Options"
in Installing and Configuring Oracle HTTP Server.
2.2.4.4 About Mod_WL_OHS
As shown in the diagram, the Oracle HTTP Server instances use the WebLogic Proxy
Plug-In (mod_wl_ohs) for proxying HTTP requests from Oracle HTTP Server to the
Oracle WebLogic Server Managed Servers in the Application tier.
For more information, see "Overview of Web Server Proxy Plug-Ins 12.1.3" in Using
Oracle WebLogic Server Proxy Plug-Ins 12.1.3.
Understanding a Typical Enterprise Deployment 2-7
Understanding the Typical Enterprise Deployment Topology Diagram
2.2.5 Understanding the Application Tier
The application tier consists of two physical host computers, where Oracle WebLogic
Server and the Oracle Fusion Middleware products are installed and configured. The
application tier computers reside in the secured zone between firewall 1 and firewall 2.
The following topics provide more information.
See Also:
Configuration of the Administration Server and Managed Servers Domain
Directories
Using Oracle Web Services Manager in the Application Tier
Best Practices and Variations on the Configuration of the Clusters and Hosts on
the Application Tier
About the Node Manager Configuration in a Typical Enterprise Deployment
About Using Unicast for Communications Within the Application Tier
Understanding OPSS and Requests to the Authentication and Authorization
Stores
2.2.5.1 Configuration of the Administration Server and Managed Servers Domain
Directories
Unlike the Managed Servers in the domain, the Administration Server uses an activepassive high availability configuration. This is because only one Administration Server
can be running within an Oracle WebLogic Server domain.
In the topology diagrams, the Administration Server on HOST1 is in the active state
and the Administration Server on HOST2 is in the passive (inactive) state.
To support the manual fail over of the Administration Server in the event of a system
failure, the typical enterprise deployment topology includes:
• A Virtual IP Address (VIP) for the routing of Administration Server requests
• The configuration of the Administration Server domain directory on a shared
storage device.
In the event of a system failure (for example a failure of HOST1), you can manually
reassign the Administration Server VIP address to another host in the domain, mount
the Administration Server domain directory on the new host, and then start the
Administration Server on the new host.
However, unlike the Administration Server, there is no benefit to storing the Managed
Servers on shared storage. In fact, there is a potential performance impact when
Managed Server configuration data is not stored on the local disk of the host
computer.
As a result, in the typical enterprise deployment, after you configure the
Administration Server domain on shared storage, a copy of the domain configuration
is placed on the local storage device of each host computer, and the Managed Servers
are started from this copy of the domain configuration. You create this copy using the
Oracle WebLogic Server pack and unpack utilities.
The resulting configuration consists of separate domain directories on each host: one
for the Administration Server (on shared storage) and one for the Managed Servers
2-8 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Understanding the Typical Enterprise Deployment Topology Diagram
(on local storage). Depending upon the action required, you must perform
configuration tasks from one domain directory or the other.
For more information about structure of the Administration Server domain directory
and the Managed Server domain directory, as well as the variables used to reference
these directories, see Understanding the Recommended Directory Structure for an
Enterprise Deployment.
There is an additional benefit to the multiple domain directory model. It allows you to
isolate the Administration Server from the Managed Servers. By default, the primary
enterprise deployment topology assumes the Administration Server domain directory
is on one of the Application Tier hosts, but if necessary, you could isolate the
Administration Server further by running it from its own host, for example in cases
where the Administration Server is consuming high CPU or RAM. Some
administrators prefer to configure the Administration Server on a separate, dedicated
host, and the multiple domain directory model makes that possible.
2.2.5.2 Using Oracle Web Services Manager in the Application Tier
Oracle Web Services Manager (Oracle WSM) provides a policy framework to manage
and secure Web services in the Enterprise Deployment topology.
In most enterprise deployment topologies, the Oracle Web Services Manager Policy
Manager runs on Managed Servers in a separate cluster, where it can be deployed in
an active-active highly available configuration.
You can choose to target Oracle Web Services Manager and Fusion Middleware
products or applications to the same cluster, as long as you are aware of the
implications.
The main reasons for deploying Oracle Web Services Manager on its own managed
servers is to improve performance and availability isolation. Oracle Web Services
Manager often provides policies to custom Web services or to other products and
components in the domain. In such a case, you do not want the additional Oracle Web
Services Manager activity to affect the performance of any applications that are
sharing the same managed server or cluster as Oracle Web Services Manager.
The eventual process of scaling out or scaling up is also better addressed when the
components are isolated. You can scale out or scale up only the Fusion Middleware
application Managed Servers where your products are deployed or only the Managed
Servers where Oracle Web Services Manager is deployed, without affecting the other
product.
2.2.5.3 Best Practices and Variations on the Configuration of the Clusters and Hosts
on the Application Tier
In a typical enterprise deployment, you configure the Managed Servers in a cluster on
two or more hosts in the application tier. For specific Oracle Fusion Middleware
products, the enterprise deployment reference topologies demonstrate best practices
for the number of Managed Servers, the number of clusters, and what services are
targeted to each cluster.
These best practices take into account typical performance, maintenance, and scale-out
requirements for each product. The result is the grouping of Managed Servers into an
appropriate set of clusters within the domain.
Variations of the enterprise deployment topology allow the targeting of specific
products or components to additional clusters or hosts for improved performance and
isolation.
Understanding a Typical Enterprise Deployment 2-9
Understanding the Typical Enterprise Deployment Topology Diagram
For example, you can consider hosting the Administration Server on a separate and
smaller host computer, which allows the FMW components and products to be
isolated from the Administration Server.
These variations in the topology are supported, but the enterprise deployment
reference topology uses the minimum hardware resources while keeping high
availability, scalability and security in mind. You should perform the appropriate
resource planning and sizing, based on the system requirements for each type of
server and the load that the system needs to sustain. Based on these decisions, you
must adapt the steps to install and configure these variations accordingly from the
instructions presented in this guide.
2.2.5.4 About the Node Manager Configuration in a Typical Enterprise Deployment
Starting with Oracle Fusion Middleware 12c, you can use either a per domain Node
Manager or a per host Node Manager. The following sections of this topic provide
more information on the impact of the Node Manager configuration on a typical
enterprise deployment.
Note:
For general information about these two types of Node Managers, see
Overview in Administering Node Manager for Oracle WebLogic Server.
About Using a Per Domain Node Manager Configuration
In a per domain Node Manager configuration—as opposed to a per host Node
Manager configuration—you actually start two Node Manager instances on the
Administration Server host: one from the Administration Server domain directory and
one from the Managed Servers domain directory. In addition, a separate Node
Manager instance runs on each of the other hosts in the topology.
The Node Manager controlling the Administration Server uses the listen address of
the virtual host name created for the Administration Server. The Node Manager
controlling the Managed Servers uses the listen address of the physical host. When the
Administration Server fails over to another host, an additional instance of Node
Manager is started to control the Administration Server on the failover host.
The key advantages of the per domain configuration are an easier and simpler initial
setup of the Node Manager and the ability to set Node Manager properties that are
unique to the Administration Server. This last feature was important in previous
releases because some features, such as Crash Recovery, applied only to the
Administration Server and not to the Managed servers. In the current release, the
Oracle SOA Suite products can be configured for Automated Service Migration, rather
than Whole Server Migration. This means the Managed Servers, as well as the
Administration Server, can take advantage of Crash Recovery, so there is no need to
apply different properties to the Administration Server and Managed Server domain
directories.
Another advantage is that the per domain Node Manager provides a default SSL
configuration for Node Manager-to-Server communication, based on the Demo
Identity store created for each domain.
2-10 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Understanding the Typical Enterprise Deployment Topology Diagram
About Using a Per Host Domain Manager Configuration
In a per-host Node Manager configuration, you start a single Node Manager instance
to control the Administration Server and all Managed Servers on a host, even those
that reside in different domains. This reduces the footprint and resource utilization on
the Administration Server host, especially in those cases where multiple domains
coexist on the same machine.
A per-host Node Manager configuration allows all Node Managers to use a listen
address of ANY, so they listen on all addresses available on the host. This means that
when the Administration Server fails over to a new host, no additional configuration is
necessary. The per host configuration allows for simpler maintenance, because you
can update and maintain a single Node Manager properties file on each host, rather
than multiple node manager property files.
The per-host Node Manager configuration requires additional configuration steps. If
you want SSL for Node Manager-to-Server communication, then you must configure
an additional Identity and Trust store, and it also requires using Subject Alternate
Names (SAN), because the Node Manager listens on multiple addresses. Note that SSL
communications are typically not required for the application tier, because it is
protected by two firewalls.
2.2.5.5 About Using Unicast for Communications Within the Application Tier
Oracle recommends the unicast communication protocol for communication between
the Managed Servers and hosts within the Oracle WebLogic Server clusters in an
enterprise deployment. Unlike multicast communication, unicast does not require
cross-network configuration and it reduces potential network errors that can occur
from multicast address conflicts as well.
When you consider using the multicast or unicast protocol for your own deployment,
consider the type of network, the number of members in the cluster, and the reliability
requirements for cluster membership. Also consider the following benefits of each
protocol.
Benefits of unicast in an enterprise deployment:
• Uses a group leader that every server sends messages directly to. This leader is
responsible for retransmitting the message to every other group member and other
group leaders, if applicable.
• Works out of the box in most network topologies
• Requires no additional configuration, regardless of the network topology.
• Uses a single missed heartbeat to remove a server from the cluster membership list.
Benefits of multicast in an enterprise deployment:
• Multicast uses a more scalable peer-to-peer model where a server sends each
message directly to the network once and the network makes sure that each cluster
member receives the message directly from the network.
• Works out of the box in most modern environments where the cluster members are
in a single subnet.
• Requires additional configuration in the router(s) and WebLogic Server (that is.,
Multicast TTL) if the cluster members span more than one subnet.
Understanding a Typical Enterprise Deployment 2-11
Understanding the Typical Enterprise Deployment Topology Diagram
• Uses three consecutive missed heartbeats to remove a server from the cluster
membership list.
Depending on the number of servers in your cluster and on whether the cluster
membership is critical for the underlying application (for example in sessionreplication intensive applications or clusters with intensive RMI invocations across the
cluster), each model may behave better.
Consider whether your topology is going to be part of an Active-Active disaster
recovery system or if the cluster is going to traverse multiple subnets. In general,
unicast will behave better in those cases.
For more information see the following resources:
• "Configuring Multicast Messaging for WebLogic Server Clusters" in the High
Availability Guide
• "One-to-Many Communication Using Unicast" in Administering Clusters for Oracle
WebLogic Server.
2.2.5.6 Understanding OPSS and Requests to the Authentication and Authorization
Stores
Many of the Oracle Fusion Middleware products and components require an Oracle
Platform Security Services (OPSS) security store for authentication providers (an
identity store), policies, credentials, keystores, and for audit data. As a result,
communications must be enabled so the Application tier can send requests to and
from the security providers.
For authentication, this communication is to an LDAP directory, such as Oracle
Internet Directory (OID) or Oracle Unified Directory (OUD), which typically
communicates over port 389 or 636. When you configure an Oracle Fusion
Middleware domain, the domain is configured by default to use the WebLogic Server
Authentication provider. However, for an enterprise deployment, you must use a
dedicated, centralized LDAP-compliant authentication provider.
For authorization (and the policy store), the location of the security store varies,
depending upon the tier:
• For the application tier, the authorization store is database-based, so frequent
connections from the Oracle WebLogic Server Managed Servers to the database are
required for the purpose of retrieving the required OPSS data.
• For the Web tier, the authorization store is file-based, so connections to the
database are not required.
For more information about OPSS security stores, see the following sections of
Securing Applications with Oracle Platform Security Services:
• "Authentication Basics"
• "The OPSS Policy Model"
2.2.6 About the Data Tier
In the Data tier, an Oracle RAC database runs on the two hosts (DBHOST1 and
DBHOST2). The database contains the schemas required by the Oracle Business
Intelligence components and the Oracle Platform Security Services (OPSS) policy store.
2-12 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Understanding the Typical Enterprise Deployment Topology Diagram
You can define multiple services for the different products and components in an
enterprise deployment to isolate and prioritize throughput and performance
accordingly. In this guide, one database service is used as an example. Furthermore,
you can use other high availability database solutions to protect the database:
• Oracle Data Guard; for more information, see the Oracle Data Guard Concepts and
Administration
• Oracle RAC One Node; for more information, see "Overview of Oracle RAC One
Node" in the Oracle Real Application Clusters Administration and Deployment Guide
These solutions above provide protection for the database beyond the information
provided in this guide, which focuses on using an Oracle RAC Database, given the
scalability and availability requirements that typically apply to an enterprise
deployment.
For more information about using Oracle Databases in a high availability
environment, see "Database Considerations" in the High Availability Guide.
Understanding a Typical Enterprise Deployment 2-13
Understanding the Typical Enterprise Deployment Topology Diagram
2-14 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
3
Understanding the Business Intelligence
Enterprise Deployment Topology
The following topics describe the Oracle Business Intelligence enterprise deployment
topologies.
These topologies represent specific reference implementations of the concepts
described in Understanding a Typical Enterprise Deployment.
See Also:
Understanding an Enterprise Deployment
Understanding the Business Intelligence Enterprise Deployment Topology 3-1
Diagram of the Primary Business Intelligence Enterprise Topology
Diagram of the Primary Business Intelligence Enterprise Topology
This diagram shows the primary Oracle Business Intelligence enterprise
deployment topology.
Understanding the Primary Business Intelligence Topology Diagrams
This section provides information about the elements that are unique to
the primary topology.
Flow Charts and Roadmaps for Implementing the Primary Business Intelligence
Enterprise Topologies
This section summarizes the high-level steps you must perform to install
and configure the enterprise topology described in this chapter.
3.1 Diagram of the Primary Business Intelligence Enterprise Topology
This diagram shows the primary Oracle Business Intelligence enterprise deployment
topology.
3-2 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Understanding the Primary Business Intelligence Topology Diagrams
Internet
Workstation
Workstation
HTTPS: 443
HTTPS: 443
DMZ Public Zone
Firewall
FW1
LBR
Ports Open:
443, 80
https://[bi.example.com]: 443
admin.example.com
biinternal.example.com
7777
OHS with all
Virtual URLs,
FTP site, and
Proxy
OHS
WebGate
NAT’d Intranet URL’s
7777
OHS
WebGate
Mod_WL_OHS
Mod_WL_OHS
WEBHOST1
WEBHOST2
OAP
Firewall FW2
Application Tier
DMZ (Secure Zone)
Ports Open:
HTTP, proxy, OAP
HTTP
HTTP
OAP
HTTP
BI ODBC Datasource
Cluster
Controller
Action Service
Admin
Console
Visual Analyzer
Enterprise
Manager
Visual Analyzer
BI Scheduler
BI Publisher
Web Service SOA
JRF/JPS
Admin Server
WLS_BI1
BI Presentation
Server
Analytics
Security
JRF/JPS
BI Server
Essbase JAgent
BI Presentation
Server
Analytics
BI Java Host
Web Service SOA
BI Server
Essbase JAgent
BI Scheduler
BI Publisher
Enterprise
Manager
BI Java Host
Cluster
Controller
Action Service
Admin
Console
Security
System Components
JRF/JPS
JRF/JPS
Admin Server
WLS_BI2
BIHOST1
System Components
BIHOST2
OID (OPSS Authz)
Singelton Data
Directory (SDD)
BIEE Metadata
OVD (OPSS
1521
OWSM-PM wiring to
Central MDS Policy Store
1521
OID/OVD(OPSS Authz Authn)
Firewall FW3
Intranet (Data Tier)
Ports Open:
389, 636,1521
1521
RAC
BIDBHOST1
BIDBHOST2
RAC DB
UMS, MDS, WLS, STB, OPSS
IAU, IAU_APPEND, IAU_VIEWER,
WLS_RUNTIME, BIPLATFORM Schemas
BI Database
3.2 Understanding the Primary Business Intelligence Topology Diagrams
This section provides information about the elements that are unique to the primary
topology.
Most of the elements of Oracle Business Intelligence topologies represent standard
features of any enterprise topology that follows the Oracle-recommended best
practices. These elements are described in detail in Understanding a Typical
Enterprise Deployment.
Before you review the information here, it is assumed you have reviewed the
information in Understanding a Typical Enterprise Deployment and that you are
familiar with the general concepts of an enterprise deployment topology.
Understanding the Business Intelligence Enterprise Deployment Topology 3-3
Understanding the Primary Business Intelligence Topology Diagrams
See the following sections for information about the elements that are unique to the
topology described in this chapter.
See Also:
Summary of Business Intelligence Load Balancer Virtual Server Names
Summary of the Managed Servers and Cluster on the Business Intelligence
Application Tier
3.2.1 Summary of Business Intelligence Load Balancer Virtual Server Names
In order to balance the load on servers and to provide high availability, the hardware
load balancer is configured to recognize a set of virtual server names.
For information about the purpose of each of these server names, see Summary of the
Typical Load Balancer Virtual Server Names.
The following virtual server names are recognized by the hardware load balancer in
Oracle Business Intelligence topologies:
• bi.example.com - This virtual server name is used for all incoming traffic. It acts
as the access point for all HTTP traffic to the runtime Business Intelligence
components. The load balancer routes all requests to this virtual server name over
SSL. As a result, clients access this service using the following secure address:
bi.example.com:443
• biinternal.example.com - This virtual server name is for internal
communications between the application tier components only and is not exposed
to the Internet.
The traffic from clients to this URL is not SSL-enabled. Clients access this service
using the following address and the requests are forwarded to port 7777 on
WEBHOST1 and WEBHOST2:
biinternal.example.com:80
• admin.example.com - This virtual server name is for administrators who need to
access the Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control and Oracle
WebLogic Server Administration Console interfaces.
Use instructions later in this guide to perform the following tasks:
• Configure the hardware load balancer to recognize and route requests to the virtual
host names
• Configure the Oracle HTTP Server instances on the Web Tier to recognize and
properly route requests to these virtual host names to the correct host computers.
3.2.2 Summary of the Managed Servers and Cluster on the Business Intelligence
Application Tier
The Application tier hosts the Administration Server and Managed Servers in the
Oracle WebLogic Server domain.
Depending upon the topology you select, the Oracle WebLogic Server domain for the
domain consists of the cluster shown in Summary of the Managed Servers and
Clusters on the Business Intelligence Application Tier. This cluster functions as activeactive high availability configurations.
3-4 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Flow Charts and Roadmaps for Implementing the Primary Business Intelligence Enterprise Topologies
Table 3-1 Summary of the Cluster in the Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise
Deployment Topology
Cluster
Managed Servers
Oracle Business Intelligence
WLS_BI1, WLS_BI2
3.3 Flow Charts and Roadmaps for Implementing the Primary Business
Intelligence Enterprise Topologies
This section summarizes the high-level steps you must perform to install and
configure the enterprise topology described in this chapter.
See Also:
Flow Chart of the Steps to Install and Configure the Primary Business
Intelligence Enterprise Topologies
Roadmap Table for Planning and Preparing for an Enterprise Deployment
Roadmap Table for Configuring the Business Intelligence Enterprise Topology
3.3.1 Flow Chart of the Steps to Install and Configure the Primary Business Intelligence
Enterprise Topologies
Flow Chart of the Steps to Install and Configure the Primary Business Intelligence
Enterprise Topologies shows a flow chart of the steps required to install and configure
the primary enterprise deployment topologies described in this chapter. The sections
following the flow chart explain each step in the flow chart.
This guide is designed so you can start with a working Business Intelligence domain
and then later scale out the domain to add additional capabilities.
This modular approach to building the topology allows you to make strategic
decisions, based on your hardware and software resources, as well as the Oracle
Business Intelligence features that are most important to your organization.
It also allows you to validate and troubleshoot each individual product or component
as they are configured.
This does not imply that configuring multiple products in one Configuration Wizard
session is not supported; it is possible to group various extensions like the ones
presented in this guide in one Configuration Wizard execution. However, the
instructions in this guide focus primarily on the modular approach to building an
enterprise deployment.
Understanding the Business Intelligence Enterprise Deployment Topology 3-5
Flow Charts and Roadmaps for Implementing the Primary Business Intelligence Enterprise Topologies
Figure 3-1
Flow Chart of the Enterprise Topology Configuration Steps
Planning an Enterprise Deployment
Understand the
basics of a Typical
Enterprise
Deployment
Start
Understand the
Oracle BI
Reference
Topology
Review the Oracle
BI EDG
Workbook
Procure the
hardware, IP
addresses and
software downloads
Preparing for an Enterprise Deployment
Prepare the
hardware load
balancer and
firewalls
Prepare the file
system
Create the initial
BI domain
Verify system
requirements, mount
shared storage, and
enable virtual IPs
Add Oracle HTTP Server
to the Web Tier
Identify or install a
supported Oracle
RAC Database
Scale out the initial
BI domain
Post-Configuration Tasks
Whole Server
Migration or Automated
Server Migration?
No
JDBC Stores
for JMS and TLOGs?
Yes
Yes
Review Chapter
on WSM and ASM
Review Common
Configuration
Chapter
No
Finish
3.3.2 Roadmap Table for Planning and Preparing for an Enterprise Deployment
The following table describes each of the planning and preparing steps shown in the
enterprise topology flow chart.
Flow Chart Step
More Information
Understand the
basics of a
Typical
Enterprise
Deployment
Understanding a Typical Enterprise Deployment
Understand the
specific reference
topology for the
products you
plan to deploy.
Review the product-specific topologies and the description of the topologies, including the
virtual servers required and the summary of clusters and Managed Servers recommended for
the product-specific deployment.
3-6 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Flow Charts and Roadmaps for Implementing the Primary Business Intelligence Enterprise Topologies
Flow Chart Step
More Information
Review the
Oracle Business
Intelligence EDG
Workbook
Using the Enterprise Deployment Workbook
Procure the
hardware, IP
addresses and
software
downloads
Procuring Resources for an Enterprise Deployment
Prepare the
hardware load
balancer and
firewalls
Preparing the Load Balancer and Firewalls for an Enterprise Deployment
Prepare the file
system
Preparing the File System for an Enterprise Deployment
Verify system
requirements,
mount shared
storage, and
enable virtual IPs
Preparing the Host Computers for an Enterprise Deployment
Identify or install
a supported
Oracle RAC
Database
Preparing the Database for an Enterprise Deployment
3.3.3 Roadmap Table for Configuring the Business Intelligence Enterprise Topology
Table 3-2 describes each of the configuration steps required when configuring the
topology shown in Diagram of the Primary Business Intelligence Enterprise Topology.
These steps correspond to the steps shown in the flow chart in Flow Chart of the Steps
to Install and Configure the Primary Business Intelligence Enterprise Topologies.
Table 3-2
Roadmap Table for Configuring the Business Intelligence Enterprise Topology
Flow Chart Step
More Information
Create the initial Business
Intelligence domain
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment
Extend the domain to
include the Web Tier
Configuring the Web Tier for an Enterprise Deployment
Scale out the initial
Business Intelligence
domain
Scaling Out Oracle Business Intelligence
Understanding the Business Intelligence Enterprise Deployment Topology 3-7
Flow Charts and Roadmaps for Implementing the Primary Business Intelligence Enterprise Topologies
3-8 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Part II
Preparing for an Enterprise Deployment
This part of the of the enterprise deployment guide contains the following topics.
See Also:
Using the Enterprise Deployment Workbook
Procuring Resources for an Enterprise Deployment
Preparing the Load Balancer and Firewalls for an Enterprise Deployment
Preparing the File System for an Enterprise Deployment
Preparing the Host Computers for an Enterprise Deployment
Preparing the Database for an Enterprise Deployment
4
Using the Enterprise Deployment Workbook
This chapter introduces the Enterprise Deployment Workbook; it describes how you
can use the workbook to plan an enterprise deployment for your organization.
This chapter provides an introduction to the Enterprise Deployment workbook, use
cases and information on who should use the Enterprise Deployment workbook.
See Also:
Preparing for an Enterprise Deployment
Introduction to the Enterprise Deployment Workbook
This section provides a brief introduction of the enterprise deployment
workbook.
Typical Use Case for Using the Workbook
This section lists the roles and tasks involved in a typical use case of the
enterprise deployment workbook.
Using the Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Deployment Workbook
This section provides details for using the enterprise deployment
workbook.
Who Should Use the Enterprise Deployment Workbook?
The information in the Enterprise Deployment Workbook is divided into
categories. Depending on the structure of your organization and roles
defined for your team, you can assign specific individuals in your
organization to fill in the details of the workbook. Similarly the
information in each category can be assigned to the individual or team
responsible for planning, procuring, or setting up each category of
resources.
4.1 Introduction to the Enterprise Deployment Workbook
This section provides a brief introduction of the enterprise deployment workbook.
The Oracle Fusion Middleware Enterprise Deployment Workbook is a companion
document to this guide. It is a spreadsheet that can be used by architects, system
engineers, database administrators, and others to plan and record all the details for an
environment installation (such as server names, URLs, port numbers, installation
paths, and other resources).
The Enterprise Deployment Workbook serves as a single document you can use to
track input variables for the entire process, allowing for:
• Separation of tasks between architects, system engineers, database administrators,
and other key organizational roles
• Comprehensive planning before the implementation
Using the Enterprise Deployment Workbook 4-1
Typical Use Case for Using the Workbook
• Validation of planned decisions before actual implementation
• Consistency during implementation
• A record of the environment for future use
4.2 Typical Use Case for Using the Workbook
This section lists the roles and tasks involved in a typical use case of the enterprise
deployment workbook.
A typical use case for the Enterprise Deployment Workbook involves the following
roles and tasks, in preparation for an Oracle Fusion Middleware enterprise
deployment:
• Architects read through the first five chapters of this guide, and fill in the
corresponding sections of the Workbook.
• The Workbook is validated by other architects and system engineers.
• The architect uses the validated workbook to initiate network and system change
requests with system engineering departments;
• The Administrators and System Integrators who are installing and configuring the
software refer to the workbook and the subsequent chapters of this guide to
perform the installation and configuration tasks.
4.3 Using the Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Deployment
Workbook
This section provides details for using the enterprise deployment workbook.
The following sections provide an introduction to the location and contents of the
Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Deployment Workbook:
See Also:
Locating the Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Deployment Workbook
Understanding the Contents of the Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise
Deployment Workbook
4.3.1 Locating the Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Deployment Workbook
The Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Deployment Workbook is available as a
Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet in the Oracle Fusion Middleware documentation library.
It is available as a link on the Install, Patch, and Upgrade page of the library.
4.3.2 Understanding the Contents of the Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise
Deployment Workbook
The following sections describe the contents of the Oracle Business Intelligence
Enterprise Deployment Workbook. The workbook is divided into tabs, each
containing a set of related variables and values you will need to install and configure
the Enterprise Deployment topologies.
See Also:
Using the Start Tab
4-2 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Using the Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Deployment Workbook
Using the Hardware - Host Computers Tab
Using the Network - Virtual Hosts & Ports Tab
Using the Storage - Directory Variables Tab
Using the Database - Connection Details Tab
4.3.2.1 Using the Start Tab
The Start tab of the Enterprise Deployment Workbook serves as a table of contents for
the rest of the workbook. You can also use it to identify the people who will be
completing the spreadsheet.
The Start tab also provides a key to identify the colors used to identify workbook
fields that need values, as well as those that are provided for informational purposes.
The following image shows the Start tab of the spreadsheet.
4.3.2.2 Using the Hardware - Host Computers Tab
The Hardware - Host Computers tab lists the host computers required to install and
configure the Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Deployment Topology.
The reference topologies typically require a minimum of six host computers: two for
the Web tier, two for the application tier, and two for the Oracle RAC database on the
data tier. If you decide to expand the environment to include more systems, add a row
for each additional host computer.
The Abstract Host Name is the name used throughout this guide to reference the host.
For each row, procure a host computer, and enter the Actual Host Name. You can
Using the Enterprise Deployment Workbook 4-3
Using the Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Deployment Workbook
then use the actual host name when any of the abstract names is referenced in this
guide.
For example, if a procedure in this guide references BIHOST1, you can then replace
the BIHOST1variable with the actual name provided on the Hardware - Host
Computers tab of the workbook.
For easy reference, Oracle also recommends that you include the IP address,
Operating System (including the version), number of CPUs, and the amount of RAM
for each host. This information can be useful during the installation, configuration,
and maintenance of the enterprise deployment.
For more information, see Preparing the Host Computers for an Enterprise
Deployment.
4.3.2.3 Using the Network - Virtual Hosts & Ports Tab
The Network - Virtual Hosts & Ports tab lists the virtual hosts that must be defined by
your network administrator before you can install and configure the enterprise
deployment topology.
The port numbers are important for several reasons. You must have quick reference to
the port numbers so you can access the management consoles; the firewalls must also
be configured to allow network traffic via specific ports.
Each virtual host, virtual IP address, and each network port serves a distinct purpose
in the deployment. For more information, see Preparing the Load Balancer and
Firewalls for an Enterprise Deployment.
In the Network - Virtual Hosts table, review the items in the Abstract Virtual Host or
Virtual IP Name column. These are the virtual host and virtual IP names used in the
procedures in this guide. For each abstract name, enter the actual virtual host name
defined by your network administrator. Whenever this guide references one of the
abstract virtual host or virtual IP names, replace that value with the actual
corresponding value in this table.
Similarly, in many cases, this guide assumes you are using default port numbers for
the components or products you install and configure. However, in reality, you will
likely have to use different port numbers. Use the Network - Port Numbers table to
map the default port values to the actual values used in your specific installation.
4.3.2.4 Using the Storage - Directory Variables Tab
As part of preparing for an enterprise deployment, it is assumed you will be using a
standard directory structure, which is recommended for Oracle enterprise
deployments.
In addition, procedures in this book reference specific directory locations. Within the
procedures, each directory is assigned a consistent variable, which you should replace
with the actual location of the directory in your installation.
For each of the directory locations listed on this tab, provide the actual directory path
in your installation.
In addition, for the application tier, it is recommended that many of these standard
directories be created on a shared storage device. For those directories, the table also
provides fields so you can enter the name of the shared storage location and the
mount point used when you mounted the shared location.
For more information, see Preparing the File System for an Enterprise Deployment.
4-4 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Who Should Use the Enterprise Deployment Workbook?
4.3.2.5 Using the Database - Connection Details Tab
When you are installing and configuring the enterprise deployment topology, you will
often have to make connections to a highly available Oracle Real Application Clusters
(RAC) database. In this guide, the procedures reference a set of variables that identify
the information you will need to provide to connect to the database from tools, such as
the Configuration Wizard and the Repository Creation Utility.
To be sure you have these values handy, use this tab to enter the actual values for
these variables in your database installation.
For more information, see Preparing the Database for an Enterprise Deployment.
4.4 Who Should Use the Enterprise Deployment Workbook?
The information in the Enterprise Deployment Workbook is divided into categories.
Depending on the structure of your organization and roles defined for your team, you
can assign specific individuals in your organization to fill in the details of the
workbook. Similarly the information in each category can be assigned to the
individual or team responsible for planning, procuring, or setting up each category of
resources.
For example, the workbook can be filled in, reviewed, and used by people in your
organization that fill the following roles:
• Information Technology (IT) Director
• Architect
• System Administrator
• Network Engineer
• Database Administrator
Using the Enterprise Deployment Workbook 4-5
Who Should Use the Enterprise Deployment Workbook?
4-6 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
5
Procuring Resources for an Enterprise
Deployment
Use the following topics to procure the required hardware, software, and network
settings before you begin configuring the Oracle Business Intelligence reference
topology.
This chapter provides information on reserving the required IP addresses and
identifying and obtaining software downloads for an enterprise deployment.
See Also:
Preparing for an Enterprise Deployment
Hardware and Software Requirements for the Enterprise Deployment Topology
This section specifies the hardware load balancer requirements, host
computer hardware requirements, and operating system requirements
for the enterprise deployment topology.
Reserving the Required IP Addresses for an Enterprise Deployment
This section lists the set of IP addresses that you must obtain and reserve
before installation and configuration.
Identifying and Obtaining Software Downloads for an Enterprise Deployment
Before you begin installing and configuring the enterprise topology, you
should locate and download the software distributions that you will
need to implement the topology.
5.1 Hardware and Software Requirements for the Enterprise Deployment
Topology
This section specifies the hardware load balancer requirements, host computer
hardware requirements, and operating system requirements for the enterprise
deployment topology.
This section includes the following sections.
Procuring Resources for an Enterprise Deployment 5-1
Hardware and Software Requirements for the Enterprise Deployment Topology
See Also:
Hardware Load Balancer Requirements
This section lists the desired features of the external load balancer.
Host Computer Hardware Requirements
This section provides information to help you procure host computers
that are configured to support the enterprise deployment topologies.
Operating System Requirements for the Enterprise Deployment Topology
This section provides details about the operating system requirements.
5.1.1 Hardware Load Balancer Requirements
This section lists the desired features of the external load balancer.
This enterprise topology uses an external load balancer. This external load balancer
should have the following features:
• Ability to load-balance traffic to a pool of real servers through a virtual host name:
Clients access services using the virtual host name (instead of using actual host
names). The load balancer can then load balance requests to the servers in the pool.
• Port translation configuration should be possible so that incoming requests on the
virtual host name and port are directed to a different port on the backend servers.
• Monitoring of ports on the servers in the pool to determine availability of a service.
• Virtual servers and port configuration: Ability to configure virtual server names
and ports on your external load balancer, and the virtual server names and ports
must meet the following requirements:
– The load balancer should allow configuration of multiple virtual servers. For
each virtual server, the load balancer should allow configuration of traffic
management on more than one port. For example, for Oracle HTTP Server in
the web tier, the load balancer needs to be configured with a virtual server and
ports for HTTP and HTTPS traffic.
– The virtual server names must be associated with IP addresses and be part of
your DNS. Clients must be able to access the external load balancer through the
virtual server names.
• Ability to detect node failures and immediately stop routing traffic to the failed
node.
• Fault-tolerant mode: It is highly recommended that you configure the load balancer
to be in fault-tolerant mode.
• It is highly recommended that you configure the load balancer virtual server to
return immediately to the calling client when the backend services to which it
forwards traffic are unavailable. This is preferred over the client disconnecting on
its own after a timeout based on the TCP/IP settings on the client machine.
• Sticky routing capability: Ability to maintain sticky connections to components.
Examples of this include cookie-based persistence, IP-based persistence, and so on.
• The load balancer should be able to terminate SSL requests at the load balancer and
forward traffic to the backend real servers using the equivalent non-SSL protocol
(for example, HTTPS to HTTP).
5-2 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Hardware and Software Requirements for the Enterprise Deployment Topology
• SSL acceleration (this feature is recommended, but not required for the enterprise
topology).
• The ability to route TCP/IP requests; this is a requirement for Oracle SOA Suite for
healthcare integration, which uses the Minimum Lower Layer Protocol (MLLP)
over TCP.
5.1.2 Host Computer Hardware Requirements
This section provides information to help you procure host computers that are
configured to support the enterprise deployment topologies.
It includes the following topics.
See Also:
General Considerations for Enterprise Deployment Host Computers
This section specifies the general considerations required for the
enterprise deployment host computers.
Reviewing the Oracle Fusion Middleware System Requirements
This section provides reference to the system requirements information
to help you ensure that the environment meets the necessary minimum
requirements.
Typical Memory, File Descriptors, and Processes Required for an Enterprise
Deployment
This section specifies the typical memory, number of file descriptors,
and operating system processes and tasks details required for an
enterprise deployment.
Typical Disk Space Requirements for an Enterprise Deployment
This section specifies the disk space typically required for this enterprise
deployment.
5.1.2.1 General Considerations for Enterprise Deployment Host Computers
This section specifies the general considerations required for the enterprise
deployment host computers.
Before you start the process of configuring an Oracle Fusion Middleware enterprise
deployment, you must perform the appropriate capacity planning to determine the
number of nodes, CPUs, and memory requirements for each node depending on the
specific system's load as well as the throughput and response requirements. These
requirements will vary for each application or custom Oracle Business Intelligence
system being used.
The information in this chapter provides general guidelines and information that will
help you determine the host computer requirements. It does not replace the need to
perform capacity planning for your specific production environment.
Procuring Resources for an Enterprise Deployment 5-3
Hardware and Software Requirements for the Enterprise Deployment Topology
Note:
As you obtain and reserve the host computers in this section, note the host
names and system characteristics in the Enterprise Deployment Workbook.
You will use these addresses later when you enable the IP addresses on each
host computer.
For more information, see Using the Enterprise Deployment Workbook
5.1.2.2 Reviewing the Oracle Fusion Middleware System Requirements
This section provides reference to the system requirements information to help you
ensure that the environment meets the necessary minimum requirements.
Review the Oracle Fusion Middleware System Requirements and Specifications to ensure
that your environment meets the minimum installation requirements for the products
you are installing.
The Requirements and Specifications document contains information about general
Oracle Fusion Middleware hardware and software requirements, minimum disk space
and memory requirements, database schema requirements, and required operating
system libraries and packages.
It also provides some general guidelines for estimating the memory requirements for
your Oracle Fusion Middleware deployment.
5.1.2.3 Typical Memory, File Descriptors, and Processes Required for an Enterprise
Deployment
This section specifies the typical memory, number of file descriptors, and operating
system processes and tasks details required for an enterprise deployment.
The following table summarizes the memory, file descriptors, and processes required
for the Administration Server and each of the Managed Servers computers in a typical
Oracle Business Intelligence enterprise deployment. These values are provided as an
example only, but they can be used to estimate the minimum amount of memory
required for an initial enterprise deployment.
The example in this topic reflects the minimum requirements for configuring the
Managed Servers and other services required on BIHOST1, as depicted in the
reference topologies.
When you are procuring machines, use the information in the Approximate Top
Memory column as a guide when determining how much physical memory each host
computer should have available.
After you procure the host computer hardware and verify the operating system
requirements, review the software configuration to be sure the operating system
settings are configured to accommodate the number of open files listed in the File
Descriptors column and the number processes listed in the Operating System
Processes and Tasks column.
For more information, see Setting the Open File Limit and Number of Processes
Settings on UNIX Systems.
Managed Server, Utility,
or Service
Approximate Top
Memory
Number of File
Descriptors
Operating System
Processes and Tasks
Administration Server
3.5 GB
3500
165
5-4 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Hardware and Software Requirements for the Enterprise Deployment Topology
Managed Server, Utility,
or Service
Approximate Top
Memory
Number of File
Descriptors
Operating System
Processes and Tasks
WLS_BI
4.0 GB
31000
130
WLST (connection to the
Node Manager)
1.5 GB
910
20
Configuration Wizard
1.5 GB
700
20
Node Manager
1.0 GB
720
15
System components
TBD
TBD
TBD
TOTAL
11.0 GB*
17000
1200
* Approximate total, with consideration for Operating System and other additional
memory requirements.
5.1.2.4 Typical Disk Space Requirements for an Enterprise Deployment
This section specifies the disk space typically required for this enterprise deployment.
For the latest disk space requirements for the Oracle Fusion Middleware 12c (12.2.1)
products, including the Oracle Business Intelligence products, review the Oracle Fusion
Middleware System Requirements and Specifications.
In addition, the following table summarizes the disk space typically required for an
Oracle Business Intelligence enterprise deployment.
Use the this information and the information in Preparing the File System for an
Enterprise Deployment to determine the disk space requirements required for your
deployment.
Server
Disk
Database
nXm
n = number of disks, at least 4 (striped as one disk)
m = size of the disk (minimum of 30 GB)
WEBHOSTn
10 GB
BIHOSTn
10 GB*
* For a shared storage Oracle home configuration, two installations suffice by making
a total of 20 GB.
5.1.3 Operating System Requirements for the Enterprise Deployment Topology
This section provides details about the operating system requirements.
The Oracle Fusion Middleware software products and components described in this
guide are certified on various operating systems and platforms, which are listed in the
Oracle Fusion Middleware System Requirements and Specifications.
Procuring Resources for an Enterprise Deployment 5-5
Reserving the Required IP Addresses for an Enterprise Deployment
Note:
This guide focuses on the implementation of the enterprise deployment
reference topology on Oracle Linux systems.
The topology can be implemented on any certified, supported operating
system, but the examples in this guide typically show the commands and
configuration steps as they should be performed using the bash shell on
Oracle Linux.
5.2 Reserving the Required IP Addresses for an Enterprise Deployment
This section lists the set of IP addresses that you must obtain and reserve before
installation and configuration.
Before you begin installing and configuring the enterprise topology, you must obtain
and reserve a set of IP addresses:
• Physical IP (IP) addresses for each of the host computers you have procured for the
topology
• A virtual IP (VIP) address for the Administration Server
• Additional VIP addresses for each Managed Server that is configured for Whole
Server Migration
For Fusion Middleware 12c products that support Automatic Service Migration,
VIPs for the Managed Servers are typically not necessary.
• A unique virtual host name to be mapped to each VIP.
You can then work with your network administrator to be sure these required VIPs
are defined in your DNS server. (Alternatively, for non-production environments, you
can use the /etc/hosts file to define these virtual hosts).
For more information, see the following topics.
See Also:
What Is a Virtual IP (VIP) Address?
This section defines the virtual IP address and specifies its purpose.
Why Use Virtual Host Names and Virtual IP Addresses?
For an enterprise deployment, in particular, it is important that a set of
VIPs--and the virtual host names to which they are mapped--are
reserved and enabled on the corporate network.
Physical and Virtual IP Addresses Required by the Enterprise Topology
This section describes the physical IP (IP) and virtual IP (VIP) addresses
required for the Administration Server and each of the Managed Servers
in a typical Oracle Business Intelligence enterprise deployment topology.
5.2.1 What Is a Virtual IP (VIP) Address?
This section defines the virtual IP address and specifies its purpose.
A virtual IP address is an unused IP Address that belongs to the same subnet as the
host's primary IP address. It is assigned to a host manually. If a host computer fails,
the virtual address can be assigned to a new host in the topology. For the purposes of
this guide, we reference virtual IP addresses, which can be re-assigned from one host
5-6 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Reserving the Required IP Addresses for an Enterprise Deployment
to another, and physical IP addresses, which are assigned permanently to hardware
host computer.
5.2.2 Why Use Virtual Host Names and Virtual IP Addresses?
For an enterprise deployment, in particular, it is important that a set of VIPs--and the
virtual host names to which they are mapped--are reserved and enabled on the
corporate network.
Alternatively, host names can be resolved through appropriate /etc/hosts file
propagated through the different nodes.
In the event of the failure of the host computer where the IP address is assigned, the IP
address can be assigned to another host in the same subnet, so that the new host can
take responsibility for running the Managed Servers assigned to it.
The reassignment of virtual IP address for the Administration Server must be
performed manually, but the reassignment of virtual IP addresses for Managed
Servers can be performed automatically using the Whole Server Migration feature of
Oracle WebLogic Server.
Whether you should use Whole Server Migration or not depends upon the products
you are deploying and whether they support Automatic Service Migration.
5.2.3 Physical and Virtual IP Addresses Required by the Enterprise Topology
This section describes the physical IP (IP) and virtual IP (VIP) addresses required for
the Administration Server and each of the Managed Servers in a typical Oracle
Business Intelligence enterprise deployment topology.
Before you begin to install and configure the enterprise deployment, reserve a set of
host names and IP addresses that correspond to the VIPs in Table 5-1.
You can assign any unique host name to the VIPs, but in this guide, we reference each
VIP using the suggested host names in the table.
Note:
As you obtain and reserve the IP addresses and their corresponding virtual
host names in this section, note the values of the IP addresses and host names
in the Enterprise Deployment Workbook. You will use these addresses later
when you enable the IP addresses on each host computer.
For more information, see Using the Enterprise Deployment Workbook
Table 5-1
Summary of the Virtual IP Addresses Required for the Enterprise Deployment
Virtual IP
VIP Maps to...
Description
VIP1
ADMINVHN
ADMINVHN is the virtual host
name used as the listen address for
the Administration Server and fails
over with manual failover of the
Administration Server. It is enabled
on the node where the
Administration Server process is
running.
Procuring Resources for an Enterprise Deployment 5-7
Identifying and Obtaining Software Downloads for an Enterprise Deployment
Table 5-1
(Cont.) Summary of the Virtual IP Addresses Required for the Enterprise Deployment
Virtual IP
VIP Maps to...
Description
VIP2
BIHOST1VHN
BIHOST1VHN serves as the virtual
host name that maps to the listen
address for the WLS_BI1 Managed
Server and fails over with Whole
Server Migration of this server.
It is enabled in the node where the
WLS_BI1 process is running
(BIHOST1).
VIP3
BIHOST2VHN
BIHOST2VHN serves as the virtual
host name that maps to the listen
address for the WLS_BI2 Managed
Server and fails over with Whole
Server Migration of this server.
It is enabled in the node where the
WLS_BI2 process is running
(BIHOST2).
5.3 Identifying and Obtaining Software Downloads for an Enterprise
Deployment
Before you begin installing and configuring the enterprise topology, you should locate
and download the software distributions that you will need to implement the
topology.
The following table lists the downloads you will need to obtain.
For general information about how to obtain Oracle Fusion Middleware software, see
"Understanding and Obtaining Product Distributions" in Planning an Installation of
Oracle Fusion Middleware.
For more specific information about locating and downloading specific Oracle Fusion
Middleware products, see the Oracle Fusion Middleware Download, Installation, and
Configuration Readme Files on OTN.
Distribution
Description
Oracle Fusion Middleware 12c (12.2.1.0.0)
Infrastructure
Download this distribution to install the Oracle Fusion
Middleware Infrastructure, which includes Oracle
WebLogic Server and Java Required Files software
required for Oracle Fusion Middleware products.
This distribution also installs the Repository Creation
Utility (RCU), which in previous Oracle Fusion
Middleware releases was packaged in its own
distribution.
Oracle HTTP Server 12c (12.2.1.0.0)
Download this distribution to install the Oracle HTTP
Server software on the Web Tier.
Oracle Fusion Middleware 12c (12.2.1.0.0) Business
Intelligence
Download this distribution to install the Oracle
Business Intelligence software.
5-8 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
6
Preparing the Load Balancer and Firewalls
for an Enterprise Deployment
This chapter describes how to configure your network for an enterprise deployment.
See Also:
Preparing for an Enterprise Deployment
Configuring Virtual Hosts on the Hardware Load Balancer
This section explains how to configure the hardware load balancer for an
enterprise deployment.
Configuring the Firewalls and Ports for an Enterprise Deployment
This section lists the ports that muse be opened on the firewalls for an
enterprise deployment.
6.1 Configuring Virtual Hosts on the Hardware Load Balancer
This section explains how to configure the hardware load balancer for an enterprise
deployment.
The following topics explain how to configure the hardware load balancer, provide the
summary of the virtual servers required, and provide additional instructions for these
virtual servers.
See Also:
Overview of the Hardware Load Balancer Configuration
Typical Procedure for Configuring the Hardware Load Balancer
Summary of the Virtual Servers Required for an Enterprise Deployment
Additional Instructions for admin.example.com
6.1.1 Overview of the Hardware Load Balancer Configuration
As shown in the topology diagrams, you must configure the hardware load balancer
to recognize and route requests to several virtual servers and associated ports for
different types of network traffic and monitoring.
In the context of a load-balancing device, a virtual server is a construct that allows
multiple physical servers to appear as one for load-balancing purposes. It is typically
represented by an IP address and a service, and it is used to distribute incoming client
requests to the servers in the server pool.
The virtual servers should be configured to direct traffic to the appropriate host
computers and ports for the various services available in the enterprise deployment.
Preparing the Load Balancer and Firewalls for an Enterprise Deployment 6-1
Configuring Virtual Hosts on the Hardware Load Balancer
In addition, you should configure the load balancer to monitor the host computers and
ports for availability so that the traffic to a particular server is stopped as soon as
possible when a service is down. This ensures that incoming traffic on a given virtual
host is not directed to an unavailable service in the other tiers.
Note that after you configure the load balancer, you can later configure the Web server
instances in the Web tier to recognize a set of virtual hosts that use the same names as
the virtual servers you defined for the load balancer. For each request coming from the
hardware load balancer, the Web server can then route the request appropriately,
based on the server name included in the header in the request. For more information,
see Configuring Oracle HTTP Server for Administration and Oracle Web Services
Manager.
6.1.2 Typical Procedure for Configuring the Hardware Load Balancer
The following procedure outlines the typical steps for configuring a hardware load
balancer for an enterprise deployment.
Note that the actual procedures for configuring a specific load balancer will differ,
depending on the specific type of load balancer. Refer to the vendor-supplied
documentation for actual steps.
1.
Create a pool of servers. This pool contains a list of servers and the ports that are
included in the load-balancing definition.
For example, for load balancing between the Web hosts, create a pool of servers
that would direct requests to hosts WEBHOST1 and WEBHOST2 on port 7777.
2.
Create rules to determine whether or not a given host and service is available and
assign it to the pool of servers described in Step 1.
3.
Create the required virtual servers on the load balancer for the addresses and
ports that receive requests for the applications.
For a complete list of the virtual servers required for the enterprise deployment,
see Summary of the Virtual Servers Required for an Enterprise Deployment.
When you define each virtual server on the load balancer, consider the following:
a.
If your load balancer supports it, specify whether or not the virtual server is
available internally, externally or both. Ensure that internal addresses are
only resolvable from inside the network.
b.
Configure SSL Termination, if applicable, for the virtual server.
c.
Assign the pool of servers created in Step 1 to the virtual server.
6.1.3 Summary of the Virtual Servers Required for an Enterprise Deployment
This section provides the details of the virtual servers required for an enterprise
deployment.
The following table provides a list of the virtual servers you must define on the
hardware load balancer for the Oracle Business Intelligence enterprise topology.
6-2 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Configuring the Firewalls and Ports for an Enterprise Deployment
Virtual Host
Server Pool
Protocol
SSL
Termination?
External?
admin.example.com:80
WEBHOST1.example.com:7777
WEBHOST2.example.com:7777
HTTP
No
No
bi.example.com:443
WEBHOST1.example.com:7777
WEBHOST2.example.com:7777
HTTPS
Yes
Yes
biinternal.example.com:
80
WEBHOST1.example.com:7777
WEBHOST2.example.com:7777
HTTP
No
No
6.1.4 Additional Instructions for admin.example.com
This section provides the additional instructions required for the virtual server—
admin.example.com.
When you configure this virtual server on the hardware load balancer:
• Enable address and port translation.
• Enable reset of connections when services or hosts are down.
6.2 Configuring the Firewalls and Ports for an Enterprise Deployment
This section lists the ports that muse be opened on the firewalls for an enterprise
deployment.
As an administrator, you should be familiar with the port numbers used by the
various Oracle Fusion Middleware products and services. You can then ensure that
the same port number is not used by two services on a host, and you can make sure
that the proper ports are open on the firewalls in the enterprise topology.
The following tables lists the ports that you must open on the firewalls in the
topology.
Firewall notation:
• FW0 refers to the outermost firewall.
• FW1 refers to the firewall between the web tier and the application tier.
• FW2 refers to the firewall between the application tier and the data tier.
Firewall Ports Common to All Fusion Middleware Enterprise Deployments
Type
Firewall
Port and Port
Range
Protocol /
Application
Inbound /
Outbound
Other
Considerations
and Timeout
Guidelines
Browser request
FW0
80
HTTP / Load
Balancer
Inbound
Timeout
depends on the
size and type of
HTML content.
Preparing the Load Balancer and Firewalls for an Enterprise Deployment 6-3
Configuring the Firewalls and Ports for an Enterprise Deployment
Type
Firewall
Port and Port
Range
Protocol /
Application
Inbound /
Outbound
Other
Considerations
and Timeout
Guidelines
Browser request
FW0
443
HTTPS / Load
Balancer
Inbound
Timeout
depends on the
size and type of
HTML content.
Browser request
FW1
80
HTTPS / Load
Balancer
Outbound (for
intranet clients)
Timeout
depends on the
size and type of
HTML content.
Browser request
FW1
443
HTTPS / Load
Balancer
Outbound (for
intranet clients)
Timeout
depends on the
size and type of
HTML content.
Callbacks and
Outbound
invocations
FW1
80
HTTPS / Load
Balancer
Outbound
Timeout
depends on the
size and type of
HTML content.
Callbacks and
Outbound
invocations
FW1
443
HTTPS / Load
Balancer
Outbound
Timeout
depends on the
size and type of
HTML content.
Load balancer to
Oracle HTTP
Server
n/a
7777
HTTP
n/a
n/a
OHS registration
with
Administration
Server
FW1
7001
HTTP/t3
Inbound
Set the timeout
to a short period
(5-10 seconds).
OHS
management by
Administration
Server
FW1
OHS Admin
Port (7779)
TCP and HTTP,
respectively
Outbound
Set the timeout
to a short period
(5-10 seconds).
Session
replication
within a
WebLogic
Server cluster
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
By default, this
communication
uses the same
port as the
server's listen
address.
6-4 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Configuring the Firewalls and Ports for an Enterprise Deployment
Type
Firewall
Port and Port
Range
Protocol /
Application
Inbound /
Outbound
Other
Considerations
and Timeout
Guidelines
Administration
Console access
FW1
7001
HTTP /
Administration
Server and
Enterprise
Manager
Both
You should tune
this timeout
based on the
type of access to
the admin
console
(whether it is
planned to use
the Oracle
WebLogic
Server
Administration
Console from
application tier
clients or clients
external to the
application tier).
Both
Timeout
depends on
database content
and on the type
of process model
used for SOA.
n/a
n/a
t3
Database access
FW2
1521
Coherence for
deployment
n/a
8088
Oracle Unified
Directory access
FW2
Oracle
Notification
Server (ONS)
FW2
SQL*Net
Range: 8000 8090
389
LDAP or
LDAP/ssl
Inbound
636 (SSL)
You should tune
the directory
server's
parameters
based on load
balancer, and
not the other
way around.
6200
ONS
Both
Required for
Gridlink. An
ONS server runs
on each database
server.
Preparing the Load Balancer and Firewalls for an Enterprise Deployment 6-5
Configuring the Firewalls and Ports for an Enterprise Deployment
Firewall Ports Specific to Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Deployments
Type
Firewall
Port and Port
Range
Protocol /
Application
Inbound /
Outbound
Other
Considerations
and Timeout
Guidelines
WSM-PM access
FW1
7010
HTTP /
WLS_WSM-PMn
Inbound
Set the timeout
to 60 seconds.
Range: 7010 7999
BI Server access
FW1
9704
HTTP /
WLS_BIn
Inbound
Timeout varies
based on the
type of process
model used for
BI.
Communication
between BI
Cluster
members
n/a
9704
TCP/IP Unicast
n/a
By default, this
communication
uses the same
port as the
server's listen
address.
Database access
for BI Server and
BI Publisher
JDBC data
sources
FW1
Listening port
for client
connections to
the listener
SQL*Net
Inbound/
Outbound
Timeout
depends on all
database content
and on the type
of process model
used for BI.
6-6 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
7
Preparing the File System for an Enterprise
Deployment
Involves understanding the requirements for local and shared storage, as well as the
terminology used to reference important directories and file locations during the
installation and configuration of the enterprise topology.
This chapter describes how to prepare the file system for an Oracle Fusion
Middleware enterprise deployment.
See Also:
Preparing for an Enterprise Deployment
Overview of Preparing the File System for an Enterprise Deployment
This section provides an overview of the process of preparing the file
system for an enterprise deployment.
Shared Storage Recommendations When Installing and Configuring an
Enterprise Deployment
This section provides reference to the shared storage recommendations
when installing and configuring an enterprise deployment.
Understanding the Recommended Directory Structure for an Enterprise
Deployment
The diagrams in this section show the recommended directory structure
for a typical Oracle Fusion Middleware enterprise deployment.
File System and Directory Variables Used in This Guide
This section lists and describes the file system and directory variables
used throughout this guide.
About Creating and Mounting the Directories for an Enterprise Deployment
This section lists the best practices to be followed when creating or
mounting the top-level directories in an enterprise deployment.
Summary of the Shared Storage Volumes in an Enterprise Deployment
This section provides a summary of the shared storage volumes required
for an enterprise deployment.
7.1 Overview of Preparing the File System for an Enterprise Deployment
This section provides an overview of the process of preparing the file system for an
enterprise deployment.
It is important to set up your storage in a way that makes the enterprise deployment
easy to understand, configure, and manage. Oracle recommends setting up your
storage according to information in this chapter. The terminology defined in this
chapter is used in diagrams and procedures throughout the guide.
Preparing the File System for an Enterprise Deployment 7-1
Shared Storage Recommendations When Installing and Configuring an Enterprise Deployment
Use this chapter as a reference to help understand the directory variables used in the
installation and configuration procedures.
Other directory layouts are possible and supported, but the model adopted in this
guide was designed for maximum availability, providing both the best isolation of
components and symmetry in the configuration and facilitating backup and disaster
recovery. The rest of the document uses this directory structure and directory
terminology.
7.2 Shared Storage Recommendations When Installing and Configuring
an Enterprise Deployment
This section provides reference to the shared storage recommendations when
installing and configuring an enterprise deployment.
Before you implement the detailed recommendations in this chapter, be sure to review
the recommendations and general information about using shared storage in the High
Availability Guide.
The recommendations in this chapter are based on the concepts and guidelines
described in the High Availability Guide.
Table 7-1 lists the key sections you should review and how those concepts apply to an
enterprise deployment.
Table 7-1
Shared Storage Resources in the High Availability Guide
Section in High Availability
Guide
Importance to an Enterprise Deployment
Shared Storage Prerequisites
Describes guidelines for disk format and the requirements for hardware
devices that are optimized for shared storage.
Using Shared Storage for Binary
(Oracle Home) Directories
Describes your options for storing the Oracle home on a shared storage
device that is available to multiple hosts.
For the purposes of the enterprise deployment, Oracle recommends using
redundant Oracle homes on separate storage volumes.
If a separate volume is not available, a separate partition on the shared disk
should be used to provide redundant Oracle homes to application tier hosts.
Using Shared Storage for Domain
Configuration Files
Describes the concept of creating separate domain homes for the
Administration Server and the Managed Servers in the domain.
For an enterprise deployment, the Administration Server domain home
location is referenced by the ASERVER_HOME variable.
Shared Storage Requirements for
JMS Stores and JTA Logs
Provides instructions for setting the location of the transaction logs and JMS
stores for an enterprise deployment.
Note: Oracle Business Intelligence has an additional shared storage
requirement for setting the location of specific Business Intelligence metadata.
For more information, see Configuring the Singleton Data Directory (SDD).
7-2 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Understanding the Recommended Directory Structure for an Enterprise Deployment
7.3 Understanding the Recommended Directory Structure for an
Enterprise Deployment
The diagrams in this section show the recommended directory structure for a typical
Oracle Fusion Middleware enterprise deployment.
The directories shown in the diagrams contain binary files that are installed on disk by
the Oracle Fusion Middleware installers, domain-specific files generated via the
domain configuration process, as well as domain configuration files that are
propagated to the various host computers via the Oracle WebLogic Server pack and
unpack commands:
• Figure 7-1 shows the resulting directory structure on the shared storage device
after you have installed and configured a typical Oracle Fusion Middleware
enterprise deployment. The shared storage directories are accessible by the
application tier host computers.
• Figure 7-2 shows the resulting directory structure on the local storage device for a
typical application tier host after you have installed and configured an Oracle
Fusion Middleware enterprise deployment. The Managed Servers in particular are
stored on the local storage device for the application tier host computers.
• Figure 7-3 shows the resulting directory structure on the local storage device for a
typical Web tier host after you have installed and configured an Oracle Fusion
Middleware enterprise deployment. Note that the software binaries (in the Oracle
home) are installed on the local storage device for each Web tier host.
Where applicable, the diagrams also include the standard variables used to reference
the directory locations in the installation and configuration procedures in this guide.
Figure 7-1 Recommended Shared Storage Directory Structure for an Enterprise
Deployment
ORACLE_BASE
/u01/oracle
NFS Volume 3
DEPLOY_PLAN_HOME
/dp
/domains
HOST1: NFS Volume 1
HOST2: NFS Volume 2
SHARED_CONFIG_DIR
/config
/applications
Product Binary Files
/products
NFS Volume 4
ORACLE_RUNTIME
/runtime
/domain_name
KEYSTORE_HOME
/keystores
/cluster_name
ASERVER_HOME
/domain_name
/bin
/nodemanager
APPLICATION_HOME
/domain_name
/servers
ORACLE_HOME
/fmw
JAVA_HOME
/jdk
...
* Used for per-domain
Node Manager
/config
WL_HOME
/wlserver
/AdminServer
PROD_DIR
/prod1
ORACLE_COMMON_HOME
/oracle_common
/fmwconfig
EM_DIR
/em
PROD_DIR
/prod2
...
/components
* For more information, see About the Node Manager Configuration in a Typical
Enterprise Deployment.
Preparing the File System for an Enterprise Deployment 7-3
Understanding the Recommended Directory Structure for an Enterprise Deployment
Figure 7-2 Recommended Local Storage Directory Structure for an Application Tier
Host Computer in an Enterprise Deployment
ORACLE_BASE
/u02/oracle
HOST1: NFS Volume 5 Domain Configuration Files
/config
HOST2: NFS Volume 6
/domains
NM_HOME
/nodemanager
* Used for per-host
Node Manager
MSERVER_HOME
/domain_home
/bin
/servers
/nodemanager
...
* Used for per-domain
Node Manager
/WLS_PROD1
/WLS_PROD1
...
* For more information, see About the Node Manager Configuration in a Typical
Enterprise Deployment.
7-4 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
File System and Directory Variables Used in This Guide
Figure 7-3 Recommended Local Storage Directory Structure for a Web Tier Host
Computer in an Enterprise Deployment
ORACLE_BASE
/u02/oracle
Web Tier directories can be on
shared (/u01) or local (/u02) storage
Domain Configuration Files
/config
Product Binary Files
/products
ORACLE_HOME
/fmw
/domains
JAVA_HOME
/jdk
OHS_DOMAIN_HOME
/domain_home
/bin
/servers
/nodemanager
...
WL_HOME
/wlserver
OHS_DIR
/ohs
EM_DIR
/em
/config
ORACLE_COMMON_HOME
/oracle_common
...
/fmconfig
/components
/OHS
/instances
OHS_CONFIG_DIR
/instance_name
/instance_name
(OHS Runtime Directory)
7.4 File System and Directory Variables Used in This Guide
This section lists and describes the file system and directory variables used throughout
this guide.
Table 7-2 lists the file system directories and the directory variables used to reference
the directories on the Application tier. Table 7-3 lists the file system directories and
variables used to reference the directories on the Web tier.
For additional information about mounting these directories when you are using
shared storage, see About Creating and Mounting the Directories for an Enterprise
Deployment.
Throughout this guide, the instructions for installing and configuring the topology
refer to the directory locations using the variables shown here.
You can also define operating system variables for each of the directories listed in this
section. If you define system variables for the particular UNIX shell you are using, you
can then use the variables as they are used in this document, without having to map
the variables to the actual values for your environment.
Note:
As you configure your storage devices to accommodate the recommended
directory structure, note the actual directory paths in the Enterprise
Deployment Workbook. You will use these addresses later when you enable
the IP addresses on each host computer.
For more information, see Using the Enterprise Deployment Workbook..
Preparing the File System for an Enterprise Deployment 7-5
File System and Directory Variables Used in This Guide
Table 7-2
Sample Values for Key Directory Variables on the Application Tier
Directory Variable
Description
Sample Value on the Application
Tier
ORACLE_BASE
The base directory, under which Oracle
products are installed.
/u01/oracle
ORACLE_HOME
The read-only location for the product
binaries. For the application tier host
computers, it is stored on shared disk.
/u01/oracle/products/fmw
The Oracle home is created when you install
the Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure
software.
You can then install additional Oracle Fusion
Middleware products into the same Oracle
home.
ORACLE_COMMON_H
OME
The directory within the Oracle Fusion
Middleware Oracle home where common
utilities, libraries, and other common Oracle
Fusion Middleware products are stored.
/u01/oracle/products/fmw/
oracle_common
WL_HOME
The directory within the Oracle home where
the Oracle WebLogic Server software binaries
are stored.
/u01/oracle/products/fmw/wlserver
PROD_DIR
Individual product directories for each Oracle
Fusion Middleware product you install.
/u01/oracle/products/fmw/prod_dir
The product can be soa, wcc, bi, or
another value, depending on your
enterprise deployment.
EM_DIR
The product directory used to store the
Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion
Middleware Control software binaries.
/u01/oracle/products/fmw/em
JAVA_HOME
The location where you install the supported
Java Development Kit (JDK).
/u01/oracle/products/jdk
SHARED_CONFIG_DIR
The shared parent directory for shared
environment configuration files, including
domain configuration, keystores, runtime
artifacts, and application deployments
ASERVER_HOME
The Administration Server domain home,
which is installed on shared disk.
/u01/oracle/config
/u01/oracle/config/domains/
domain_name
In this example, replace
domain_name with the name of the
WebLogic Server domain.
MSERVER_HOME
The Managed Server domain home, which is
created via the unpack command on the local
disk of each application tier host.
7-6 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
/u02/oracle/config/domains/
domain_name
File System and Directory Variables Used in This Guide
Table 7-2
(Cont.) Sample Values for Key Directory Variables on the Application Tier
Directory Variable
Description
Sample Value on the Application
Tier
APPLICATION_HOME
The Application home directory, which is
installed on shared disk, so the directory is
accessible by all the application tier host
computers.
/u01/oracle/config/applications
/domain_name
ORACLE_RUNTIME
This directory contains the Oracle runtime
artifacts, such as the JMS logs and TLogs.
/u01/oracle/runtime/
Typically, you mount this directory as a
separate shared file system, which is
accessible by all hosts in the domain.
When you run the Configuration Wizard or
perform post-configuration tasks, and you
identify the location of JMS stores or tlogs
persistent stores, then you can use this
directory, qualified with the name of the
domain, the name of the cluster, and the
purpose of the directory.
For example:
ORACLE_RUNTIME/cluster_name/jms
NM_HOME
The directory used by the Per Machine Node
Manager start script and configuration files.
/u02/oracle/config/node_manager
Note:
This directory is
necessary only if
you are using a
Per Machine
Node Manager
configuration.
For more information, see About the Node
Manager Configuration in a Typical
Enterprise Deployment.
DEPLOY_PLAN_HOME
The deployment plan directory, which is
used as the default location for application
deployment plans.
/u01/oracle/config/dp
Note:
This directory is
required only
when you are
deploying custom
applications to the
application tier.
Preparing the File System for an Enterprise Deployment 7-7
File System and Directory Variables Used in This Guide
Table 7-2
(Cont.) Sample Values for Key Directory Variables on the Application Tier
Directory Variable
Description
KEYSTORE_HOME
The shared location for custom certificates
and keystores.
Table 7-3
Sample Value on the Application
Tier
/u01/oracle/config/keystores
Sample Values for Key Directory Variables on the Web Tier
Directory
Variable
Description
OHS_ORACLE
_HOME
The read-only location for the Oracle HTTP Server product binaries.
For the Web tier host computers, this directory is stored on local disk.
The Oracle home is created when you install the Oracle HTTP Server
software.
ORACLE_COM
MON_HOME
The directory within the Oracle HTTP Server Oracle home where
common utilities, libraries, and other common Oracle Fusion
Middleware products are stored.
WL_HOME
The directory within the Oracle home where the Oracle WebLogic
Server software binaries are stored.
PROD_DIR
Individual product directories for each Oracle Fusion Middleware
product you install.
JAVA_HOME
The location where you install the supported Java Development Kit
(JDK).
OHS_DOMAIN
_HOME
The Domain home for the standalone Oracle HTTP Server domain,
which is created when you install Oracle HTTP Server on the local
disk of each Web tier host.
OHS_CONFIG_
DIR
This is the location where you edit the Oracle HTTP Server
configuration files (for example, httpd.conf and moduleconf/
*.conf) on each Web host.
Note this directory is also referred to as the OHS Staging Directory.
Changes made here are later propagated to the OHS Runtime
Directory.
For more information, see “Staging and Run-time Configuration
Directories” in the Administrator's Guide for Oracle HTTP Server.
7-8 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Sample Value on the
Web Tier
/u02/oracle/
products/fmw
/u02/oracle/
products/fmw
/oracle_common
/u02/oracle/
products/fmw/
wlserver
/u02/oracle/
products/fmw/ohs
/u02/oracle/
products/jdk
/u02/oracle/config/
domains/domain_name
/u02/oracle/config/
domains
/domain_name/
config/fmwconfig
/components/OHS
/instance_name
About Creating and Mounting the Directories for an Enterprise Deployment
7.5 About Creating and Mounting the Directories for an Enterprise
Deployment
This section lists the best practices to be followed when creating or mounting the toplevel directories in an enterprise deployment.
When creating or mounting the top-level directories, note the following best practices:
• For the application tier, install the Oracle home (which contains the software
binaries) on a second shared storage volume or second partition that is mounted to
BIHOST2. Be sure the directory path to the binaries on BIHOST2 is identical to the
directory path on BIHOST1.
For example:
/u01/oracle/products/fmw/
For more information, see Shared Storage Recommendations When Installing and
Configuring an Enterprise Deployment.
• This enterprise deployment guide assumes that the Oracle Web tier software will
be installed on a local disk.
The Web tier installation is typically performed on local storage to the WEBHOST
nodes. When using shared storage, you can install the Oracle Web tier binaries
(and create the Oracle HTTP Server instances) on shared disk. However, if you do
so, then the shared disk must be separate from the shared disk used for the
application tier, and you must consider the appropriate security restrictions for
access to the storage device across tiers.
As with the application tier servers (BIHOST1 and BIHOST2), use the same
directory path on both computers.
For example:
/u02/oracle/products/fmw/
7.6 Summary of the Shared Storage Volumes in an Enterprise Deployment
This section provides a summary of the shared storage volumes required for an
enterprise deployment.
The following table summarizes the shared volumes and their purpose in a typical
Oracle Fusion Middleware enterprise deployment.
For more information, see Shared Storage Recommendations When Installing and
Configuring an Enterprise Deployment.
Volume in Shared
Storage
Mounted to Host
Mount Directories
Description and Purpose
NFS Volume 1
BIHOST1
/u01/oracle/
products/
Local storage for the
product binaries to be
used by BIHOST1; this is
where the Oracle home
directory and product
directories are installed.
Preparing the File System for an Enterprise Deployment 7-9
Summary of the Shared Storage Volumes in an Enterprise Deployment
Volume in Shared
Storage
Mounted to Host
Mount Directories
Description and Purpose
NFS Volume 2
BIHOST2
/u01/oracle/
products/
Local storage for the
product binaries to be
used by BIHOST2; this is
where the Oracle home
directory and product
directories are installed.
NFS Volume 3
BIHOST1 BIHOST2
/u01/oracle/config/
Administration Server
domain configuration,
mounted to all hosts; used
initially by BIHOST1, but
can be failed over to any
host.
NFS Volume 4
BIHOST1 BIHOST2
/u01/oracle/
runtime/
The runtime artifacts
directory, mounted to all
hosts, contains runtime
artifacts such as JMS logs,
blogs, and any clusterdependent shared files
needed.
NFS Volume 5
BIHOST1
/u02/oracle/config/
Local storage for the
Managed Server domain
directory to be used by
BIHOST1, if the private
Managed Server domain
directory resides on
shared storage.
NFS Volume 6
BIHOST2
/u02/oracle/config/
Local storage for the
Managed Server domain
directory to be used by
BIHOST2, if the private
Managed Server domain
directory resides on
shared storage.
NFS Volume 7
WEBHOST1
/u02/oracle/
Local storage for the
Oracle HTTP Server
software binaries (Oracle
home) and domain
configuration files used by
WEBHOST1, if the private
Managed Server domain
directory resides on
shared storage.
7-10 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Summary of the Shared Storage Volumes in an Enterprise Deployment
Volume in Shared
Storage
Mounted to Host
Mount Directories
Description and Purpose
NFS Volume 8
WEBHOST2
/u02/oracle/
Local storage for the
Oracle HTTP Server
software binaries (Oracle
home) and domain
configuration files used by
WEBHOST2, if the private
Managed Server domain
directory resides on
shared storage.
Preparing the File System for an Enterprise Deployment 7-11
Summary of the Shared Storage Volumes in an Enterprise Deployment
7-12 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
8
Preparing the Host Computers for an
Enterprise Deployment
It explains how to mount the required shared storage systems to the host and how to
enable the required virtual IP addresses on each host.
This chapter describes the tasks you must perform from each computer or server that
will be hosting the enterprise deployment.
See Also:
Preparing for an Enterprise Deployment
Verifying the Minimum Hardware Requirements for Each Host
This section provides information about the minimum hardware
requirements for each host.
Verifying Linux Operating System Requirements
Review this section for typical Linux operating system settings for an
enterprise deployment.
Configuring Operating System Users and Groups
The lists in this section show the users and groups to define on each of
the computers that will host the enterprise deployment.
Enabling Unicode Support
This section provides information about enabling Unicode support.
Mounting the Required Shared File Systems on Each Host
This section provides information about mounting the required shared
file systems on each host.
Enabling the Required Virtual IP Addresses on Each Host
This section provides instruction to enable the required virtual IP
addresses on each host.
8.1 Verifying the Minimum Hardware Requirements for Each Host
This section provides information about the minimum hardware requirements for
each host.
After you have procured the required hardware for the enterprise deployment, log in
to each host computer and verify the system requirements listed in Hardware and
Software Requirements for the Enterprise Deployment Topology.
If you are deploying to a virtual server environment, such as Oracle Exalogic, ensure
that each of the virtual servers meets the minimum requirements.
Ensure that you have sufficient local disk storage and shared storage configured as
described in Preparing the File System for an Enterprise Deployment.
Preparing the Host Computers for an Enterprise Deployment 8-1
Verifying Linux Operating System Requirements
Allow sufficient swap and temporary space; specifically:
• Swap Space–The system must have at least 500 MB.
• Temporary Space–There must be a minimum of 500 MB of free space in /tmp.
8.2 Verifying Linux Operating System Requirements
Review this section for typical Linux operating system settings for an enterprise
deployment.
To ensure the host computers meet the minimum operating system requirements, be
sure you have installed a certified operating system and that you have applied all the
necessary patches for the operating system.
In addition, review the following sections for typical Linux operating system settings
for an enterprise deployment.
See Also:
Setting Linux Kernel Parameters
Setting the Open File Limit and Number of Processes Settings on UNIX Systems
Verifying IP Addresses and Host Names in DNS or hosts File
8.2.1 Setting Linux Kernel Parameters
The kernel-parameter and shell-limit values shown below are recommended values
only. Oracle recommends that you tune these values to optimize the performance of
the system. See your operating system documentation for more information about
tuning kernel parameters.
Kernel parameters must be set to a minimum of those in Table on all nodes in the
topology.
The values in the following table are the current Linux recommendations. For the
latest recommendations for Linux and other operating systems, see Oracle Fusion
Middleware System Requirements and Specifications.
If you are deploying a database onto the host, you might need to modify additional
kernel parameters. Refer to the 12c (12.2.1) Oracle Grid Infrastructure Installation Guide
for your platform.
Table 8-1
UNIX Kernel Parameters
Parameter
Value
kernel.sem
256 32000 100 142
kernel.shmmax
4294967295
To set these parameters:
1. Log in as root and add or amend the entries in the file /etc/sysctl.conf.
2. Save the file.
3. Activate the changes by issuing the command:
/sbin/sysctl -p
8-2 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Verifying Linux Operating System Requirements
8.2.2 Setting the Open File Limit and Number of Processes Settings on UNIX Systems
On UNIX operating systems, the Open File Limit is an important system setting,
which can affect the overall performance of the software running on the host
computer.
For guidance on setting the Open File Limit for an Oracle Fusion Middleware
enterprise deployment, see Host Computer Hardware Requirements.
Note:
The following examples are for Linux operating systems. Consult your
operating system documentation to determine the commands to be used on
your system.
For more information, see the following sections.
See Also:
Viewing the Number of Currently Open Files
Setting the Operating System Open File and Processes Limits
8.2.2.1 Viewing the Number of Currently Open Files
You can see how many files are open with the following command:
/usr/sbin/lsof | wc -l
To check your open file limits, use the following commands.
C shell:
limit descriptors
Bash:
ulimit -n
8.2.2.2 Setting the Operating System Open File and Processes Limits
To change the Open File Limit values:
1. Log in as root and edit the following file:
/etc/security/limits.conf
2. Add the following lines to the limits.conf file. (The values shown here are for
example only):
*
*
*
*
soft
hard
soft
hard
nofile
nofile
nproc
nproc
4096
65536
2047
16384
The nofiles values represent the open file limit; the nproc values represent the
number of processes limit.
3. Save the changes, and close the limits.conf file.
Preparing the Host Computers for an Enterprise Deployment 8-3
Configuring Operating System Users and Groups
4. Reboot the host computer.
8.2.3 Verifying IP Addresses and Host Names in DNS or hosts File
Before you begin the installation of the Oracle software, ensure that the IP address,
fully qualified host name, and the short name of the host are all registered with your
DNS server. Alternatively, you can use the local hosts file and add an entry similar to
the following:
IP_Address Fully_Qualified_Name Short_Name
For example:
10.229.188.205 host1.example.com host1
8.3 Configuring Operating System Users and Groups
The lists in this section show the users and groups to define on each of the computers
that will host the enterprise deployment.
Groups
You must create the following groups on each node.
• oinstall
• dba
Users
You must create the following user on each node.
• nobody–An unprivileged user.
• oracle–The owner of the Oracle software. You may use a different name. The
primary group for this account must be oinstall. The account must also be in the
dba group.
Note:
• The group oinstall must have write privileges to all the file systems on
shared and local storage that are used by the Oracle software.
• Each group must have the same Group ID on every node.
• Each user must have the same User ID on every node.
8.4 Enabling Unicode Support
This section provides information about enabling Unicode support.
Your operating system configuration can influence the behavior of characters
supported by Oracle Fusion Middleware products.
On UNIX operating systems, Oracle highly recommends that you enable Unicode
support by setting the LANG and LC_ALL environment variables to a locale with the
UTF-8 character set. This enables the operating system to process any character in
Unicode. Oracle Business Intelligence technologies, for example, are based on
Unicode.
8-4 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Mounting the Required Shared File Systems on Each Host
If the operating system is configured to use a non-UTF-8 encoding, Oracle Business
Intelligence components may function in an unexpected way. For example, a nonASCII file name might make the file inaccessible and cause an error. Oracle does not
support problems caused by operating system constraints.
8.5 Mounting the Required Shared File Systems on Each Host
This section provides information about mounting the required shared file systems on
each host.
The shared storage configured, as described in Shared Storage Recommendations
When Installing and Configuring an Enterprise Deployment, must be available on the
hosts that use it.
In an enterprise deployment, it is assumed that you have a hardware storage filer,
which is available and connected to each of the host computers you have procured for
the depoyment.
You must mount the shared storage to all servers that require access.
Each host must have appropriate privileges set within the Network Attached Storage
(NAS) or Storage Area Network (SAN) so that it can write to the shared storage.
Follow the best practices of your organization for mounting shared storage. This
section provides an example of how to do this on Linux using NFS storage.
You must create and mount shared storage locations so that BIHOST1 and BIHOST2
can see the same location if it is a binary installation in two separate volumes.
For more information, see Shared Storage Recommendations When Installing and
Configuring an Enterprise Deployment.
You use the following command to mount shared storage from a NAS storage device
to a Linux host. If you are using a different type of storage device or operating system,
refer to your manufacturer documentation for information about how to do this.
Note:
The user account used to create a shared storage file system owns and has
read, write, and execute privileges for those files. Other users in the operating
system group can read and execute the files, but they do not have write
privileges.
For more information about installation and configuration privileges, see
"Selecting an Installation User" in the Oracle Fusion Middleware Installation
Planning Guide.
In the following example, nasfiler represents the shared storage filer. Also note that
these are examples only. Typically, the mounting of these shared storage locations
should be done using the /etc/fstabs file on UNIX systems, so that the mounting
of these devices survives a reboot. Refer to your operating system documentation for
more information.
1.
Create the mount directories on BIHOST1, as described in Summary of the Shared
Storage Volumes in an Enterprise Deployment, and then mount the shared
storage. For example:
mount -t nfs nasfiler:VOL1/oracle/products/ /u01/oracle/products/
2.
Repeat the procedure on BIHOST2 using VOL2.
Preparing the Host Computers for an Enterprise Deployment 8-5
Enabling the Required Virtual IP Addresses on Each Host
Validating the Shared Storage Configuration
Ensure that you can read and write files to the newly mounted directories by creating
a test file in the shared storage location you just configured.
For example:
$ cd newly mounted directory
$ touch testfile
Verify that the owner and permissions are correct:
$ ls -l testfile
Then remove the file:
$ rm testfile
Note:
The shared storage can be a NAS or SAN device. The following example
illustrates creating storage for a NAS device from BIHOST1. The options may
differ depending on the specific storage device.
mount -t nfs -o
rw,bg,hard,nointr,tcp,vers=3,timeo=300,rsize=32768,wsize=32768 nasfiler:VOL1/
Oracle /u01/oracle
Contact your storage vendor and machine administrator for the correct
options for your environment.
8.6 Enabling the Required Virtual IP Addresses on Each Host
This section provides instruction to enable the required virtual IP addresses on each
host.
To prepare each host for the enterprise deployment, you must enable the virtual IP
(VIP) addresses described in Reserving the Required IP Addresses for an Enterprise
Deployment.
It is assumed that you have already reserved the VIP addresses and host names and
that they have been enabled by your network administrator. You can then enable the
VIPs on the appropriate host.
Note that the virtual IP addresses used for the enterprise topology are not persisted
because they are managed by Whole Server Migration (for selected Managed Servers
and clusters) or by manual failover (for the Administration Server).
To enable the VIP addresses on each host, run the following commands as root:
/sbin/ifconfig interface:index IPAddress netmask netmask
/sbin/arping -q -U -c 3 -I interface IPAddress
where interface is eth0, or eth1, and index is 0, 1, or 2.
For example:
/sbin/ifconfig eth0:1 100.200.140.206 netmask 255.255.255.0
Enable your network to register the new location of the virtual IP address:
/sbin/arping -q -U -c 3 -I eth0 100.200.140.206
8-6 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Enabling the Required Virtual IP Addresses on Each Host
Validate that the address is available by using the ping command from another node,
for example:
/bin/ping 100.200.140.206
Preparing the Host Computers for an Enterprise Deployment 8-7
Enabling the Required Virtual IP Addresses on Each Host
8-8 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
9
Preparing the Database for an Enterprise
Deployment
This chapter describes procedures for preparing your database for an Oracle Business
Intelligence enterprise deployment.
This chapter provides information about the database requirements, creating database
services and about the database backup strategies.
See Also:
Preparing for an Enterprise Deployment
Overview of Preparing the Database for an Enterprise Deployment
This section provides information about how to configure a supported
database as part of an Oracle Fusion Middleware enterprise deployment.
About Database Requirements
Check that the database meets the requirements described in these
sections.
Creating Database Services
When multiple Oracle Fusion Middleware products are sharing the
same database, each product should be configured to connect to a
separate, dedicated database service.
Using SecureFiles for Large Objects (LOBs) in an Oracle Database
Beginning with Oracle Database 11g Release 1, Oracle introduced
SecureFiles, a new LOB storage architecture. Oracle recommends using
SecureFiles for the Oracle Fusion Middleware schemas, in particular for
the Oracle SOA Suite schemas.
About Database Backup Strategies
This section provides brief information about the necessity of database
backup strategies.
9.1 Overview of Preparing the Database for an Enterprise Deployment
This section provides information about how to configure a supported database as
part of an Oracle Fusion Middleware enterprise deployment.
Most Oracle Fusion Middleware products require a specific set of schemas that must
be installed in a supported database. The schemas are installed using the Oracle
Fusion Middleware Repository Creation Utility (RCU).
In an enterprise deployment, Oracle recommends a highly available Real Application
Clusters (Oracle RAC) database for the Oracle Fusion Middleware product schemas.
Preparing the Database for an Enterprise Deployment 9-1
About Database Requirements
9.2 About Database Requirements
Check that the database meets the requirements described in these sections.
See Also:
Supported Database Versions
Additional Database Software Requirements
9.2.1 Supported Database Versions
Use the following information to verify what databases are supported by each Oracle
Fusion Middleware release and which version of the Oracle database you are currently
running:
• For a list of all certified databases, refer to Oracle Fusion Middleware Supported
System Configurations.
• To check the release of your database, query the PRODUCT_COMPONENT_VERSION
view:
SQL> SELECT VERSION FROM SYS.PRODUCT_COMPONENT_VERSION WHERE
PRODUCT LIKE 'Oracle%';
Oracle Fusion Middleware requires that the database supports the AL32UTF8
character set. Check the database documentation for information on choosing a
character set for the database.
For enterprise deployments, Oracle recommends using GridLink data sources to
connect to Oracle RAC databases.
Note:
For more information about using GridLink data sources and SCAN, see
"Using Active GridLink Data Sources" in Administering JDBC Data Sources for
Oracle WebLogic Server.
9.2.2 Additional Database Software Requirements
In the enterprise topology, there are two database host computers in the data tier that
host the two instances of the RAC database. We refer to these hosts as DBHOST1 and
DBHOST2.
Before you install or configure the enterprise topology, you must be sure the following
software is installed and available on DBHOST1 and DBHOST2:
• Oracle Clusterware
For more information, see the Oracle Grid Infrastructure Installation Guide for Linux.
• Oracle Real Application Clusters
For more information, see the Oracle Real Application Clusters Installation Guide for
Linux and UNIX.
• Time synchronization between Oracle RAC database instances
9-2 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Creating Database Services
The clocks of the database instances being used by servers in a Fusion Middleware
cluster that is configured with server migration must be in sync.
• Automatic Storage Management (optional)
For more information, see the Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's
Guide.
9.3 Creating Database Services
When multiple Oracle Fusion Middleware products are sharing the same database,
each product should be configured to connect to a separate, dedicated database
service.
Note:
The instructions in this section are for the Oracle Database 12c (12.1) release. If
you are using another supported database, refer to the appropriate
documentation library for more up-to-date and release-specific information.
For more information about connecting to Oracle databases using services, see
“Overview of Using Dynamic Database Services to Connect to Oracle Databases” in
the Real Application Clusters Administration and Deployment Guide.
In addition, the database service should be different from the default database service.
For complete instructions on creating and managing database services for an Oracle
Database 12c database, see “Overview of Automatic Workload Management with
Dynamic Database Services” in the Real Application Clusters Administration and
Deployment Guide.
Run-time connection load balancing requires configuring Oracle RAC Load Balancing
Advisory with service-level goals for each service for which load balancing is enabled.
You can configure the Oracle RAC Load Balancing Advisory for SERVICE_TIME or
THROUGHPUT. Set the connection load-balancing goal to SHORT.
You create and modify Oracle Database services using the srvctl utility.
To create and modify a database service:
1. Log in to SQL*Plus and create the service:
sqlplus "sys/password as sysdba"
SQL> EXECUTE DBMS_SERVICE.CREATE_SERVICE
(SERVICE_NAME => 'biedg.example.com',
NETWORK_NAME => 'biedg.example.com'
);
Note:
For the Service Name of the Oracle RAC database, use lowercase letters,
followed by the domain name. For example:
biedg.example.com
Preparing the Database for an Enterprise Deployment 9-3
Using SecureFiles for Large Objects (LOBs) in an Oracle Database
Note:
Enter the EXECUTE DBMS_SERVICE command shown on a single line.
For more information about the DBMS_SERVICE package, see Oracle Database
PL/SQL Packages and Types Reference.
2. Add the service to the database and assign it to the instances using srvctl:
srvctl add service -d bidb -s biedg.example.com -r bidb1,bidb2
3. Start the service:
srvctl start service -d bidb -s biedg.example.com
Note:
For complete instructions on creating and managing database services with
SRVCTL, see "Creating Services with SRVCTL" in the Real Application Clusters
Administration and Deployment Guide.
4. Modify the service so it uses the Load Balancing Advisory and the appropriate
service-level goals for run-time connection load balancing.
More specifically, use the following resources in the Oracle Database 12c Real
Application Clusters Administration and Deployment Guide to set the SERVICE_TIME
and THROUGHPUT service-level goals:
• “Overview of the Load Balancing Advisory”
• “Configuring Your Environment to Use the Load Balancing Advisory”
9.4 Using SecureFiles for Large Objects (LOBs) in an Oracle Database
Beginning with Oracle Database 11g Release 1, Oracle introduced SecureFiles, a new
LOB storage architecture. Oracle recommends using SecureFiles for the Oracle Fusion
Middleware schemas, in particular for the Oracle SOA Suite schemas.
For more information, see "Using Oracle SecureFiles LOBs" in the Oracle Database
SecureFiles and Large Objects Developer's Guide.
In Oracle 12c Databases, the default setting for using SecureFiles is PREFERRED . This
means that the database attempts to create a SecureFiles LOB unless a BasicFiles LOB
is explicitly specified for the LOB or the parent LOB (if the LOB is in a partition or subpartition). The Oracle Fusion Middleware schemas do not explicitely specify
BasicFiles, which means that Oracle Fusion Middleware LOBs will default to
SecureFiles when installed in an Oracle 12c database.
For Oracle 11g databases, the db_securefile system parameter controls the
SecureFiles usage policy. This parameter can be modified dynamically. The following
options can be used for using SecureFiles:
• PERMITTED: allows SecureFiles to be created (This is the default setting for
db_securefile. The default storage method uses BasicFiles)
• FORCE: create all (new) LOBs as SecureFiles
9-4 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
About Database Backup Strategies
• ALWAYS: try to create LOBs as SecureFiles, but fall back to BasicFiles if not possible
(if ASSM is disabled)
Other values for the db_securefile parameter are:
• IGNORE: ignore attempts to create SecureFiles
• NEVER: disallow new SecureFiles creations
For Oracle 11g Databases, Oracle recommends that you set the db_securefile
parameter to FORCE before creating the Oracle Fusion Middleware schemas with the
Repository Creation Utility (RCU).
Note that the SecureFiles segments require tablespaces managed with automatic
segment space management (ASSM). This means that LOB creation on SecureFiles will
fail if ASSM is not enabled. However, the Oracle Fusion Middleware tablespaces are
created by default with ASSM enabled. As a result, with the default configuration,
nothing needs to be changed to enable SecureFiles for the Oracle Fusion Middleware
schemas.
9.5 About Database Backup Strategies
This section provides brief information about the necessity of database backup
strategies.
At key points in the installation and configuration of an enterprise deployment, this
guide recommends that you back up your current environment. For example, after
you install the product software and create the schemas for a particular Oracle Fusion
Middleware product, you should perform a database backup. Performing a backup
allows you to perform a quick recovery from any issue that might occur in the later
configuration steps.
You can choose to use your own backup strategy for the database, or you can simply
make a backup using operating system tools or RMAN for this purpose.
Oracle recommends using Oracle Recovery Manager for the database, particularly if
the database was created using Oracle Automatic Storage Management. If possible,
you can also perform a cold backup using operating system tools such as tar.
Preparing the Database for an Enterprise Deployment 9-5
About Database Backup Strategies
9-6 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Part III
Configuring the Enterprise Deployment
This part of the Enterprise Deployment Guide contains the following topics:
See Also:
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment
Configuring the Web Tier for an Enterprise Deployment
Scaling Out Oracle Business Intelligence
This chapter describes the steps to scale out your initial Oracle Business
Intelligence domain to BIHOST2.
10
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an
Enterprise Deployment
This chapter describes how to install and configure an Oracle Business Intelligence (BI)
domain, which can be used as the starting point for an enterprise deployment.
This chapter contains information on variables used when creating the BI domain,
creating database schemas and configuring the BI domain.
See Also:
Configuring the Enterprise Deployment
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment 10-1
Variables Used When Creating the BI Domain
As you perform the tasks in this chapter, you will be referencing the
directory variables listed in this section.
Understanding the Initial BI Domain
Before you being creating the initial Business Intelligence (BI) domain,
be sure to review the following key concepts.
Installing the Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure in Preparation for an
Enterprise Deployment
Use this section to install the Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure
software in preparation for configuring a new domain for an enterprise
deployment.
Installing Oracle Business Intelligence in Preparation for an Enterprise
Deployment
Use this section to install the Oracle Business Intelligence software in
preparation for configuring a new domain for an enterprise deployment.
Creating the Database Schemas
Before you can configure a BI domain, you must install the schemas
listed in this section on a certified database for use with this release of
Oracle Fusion Middleware.
Configuring the BI Domain
This section provides instructions for creating a WebLogic domain using
the configuration wizard.
Creating the System Components on BIHOST1
Perform the steps in this section to create the BI Cluster Controller, BI
Scheduler, BI Presentation Services, and BI JavaHost system components
on BIHOST1.
Creating a BI Service Instance
Perform the steps in this section to create a new BI Service instance.
Configuring the Singleton Data Directory (SDD)
Oracle Business Intelligence metadata is stored in a Singleton Data
Directory (SDD). Metadata is managed in an Oracle Business Intelligence
archive (BAR) file containing information about the Presentation
Catalog, the metadata repository, and security authentication.
Configuring Security for Essbase in Oracle Business Intelligence
Essbase components installed using the Oracle Business Intelligence
installer cannot use Native Essbase or Hyperion Shared Services (HSS)
security.
Configuring the Domain Directories and Starting the Servers on BIHOST1
After the domain is created, you must perform a series of additional
configuration tasks on BIHOST1. For example, you start the Node
Manager and Administration Server. You then create a separate domain
directory for the Managed Server. In this new and separate Managed
Server directory, you start a second Node Manager instance and start the
Managed Server and the Business Intelligence system components.
Setting Up the Global Cache
The global cache is a query cache that is shared by all Oracle BI servers
participating in a cluster. It is recommended that you configure the
10-2 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Variables Used When Creating the BI Domain
global cache so that cache seeding and purging events can be shared by
all Oracle BI servers participating in a cluster.
Verifying Oracle Business Intelligence URLs on BIHOST1
After starting the components in the domain on BIHOST1, access these
URLs to verify the configuration of Oracle Business Intelligence.
Creating a New LDAP Authenticator and Provisioning Enterprise Deployment
Users and Group
When you configure an Oracle Fusion Middleware domain, the domain
is configured by default to use the WebLogic Server authentication
provider (DefaultAuthenticator). However, for an enterprise
deployment, Oracle recommends that you use a dedicated, centralized
LDAP-compliant authentication provider.
Backing Up the Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration
It is an Oracle best practices recommendation to create a backup after
successfully configuring a domain or at another logical point. Create a
backup after verifying that the installation so far is successful. This is a
quick backup for the express purpose of immediate restoration in case of
problems in later steps.
10.1 Variables Used When Creating the BI Domain
As you perform the tasks in this chapter, you will be referencing the directory
variables listed in this section.
The directory variables are defined in File System and Directory Variables Used in
This Guide.
• ORACLE_HOME
• ASERVER_HOME
• MSERVER_HOME
• APPLICATION_HOME
• JAVA_HOME
In addition, you'll be referencing the following virtual IP (VIP) addresses and host
names defined in Physical and Virtual IP Addresses Required by the Enterprise
Topology:
• ADMINVHN
• BIHOST1VHN1
• BIHOST1
• SCAN Address for the Oracle RAC Database (DB-SCAN.example.com)
10.2 Understanding the Initial BI Domain
Before you being creating the initial Business Intelligence (BI) domain, be sure to
review the following key concepts.
See Also:
About the Infrastructure Distribution
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment 10-3
Installing the Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure in Preparation for an Enterprise Deployment
Characteristics of the Initial BI Domain
10.2.1 About the Infrastructure Distribution
You create the initial Business Intelligence domain for an enterprise deployment,
using the Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure distribution. This distribution
contains both the Oracle WebLogic Server software and the Oracle JRF software in one
distribution.
The Oracle JRF software consists of Oracle Web Services Manager, Oracle Application
Development Framework (Oracle ADF), Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion
Middleware Control, the Repository Creation Utility (RCU), and other libraries and
technologies required to support the Oracle Fusion Middleware products.
For more information, see "Understanding Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure"
in Understanding Oracle Fusion Middleware.
10.2.2 Characteristics of the Initial BI Domain
Review these key characteristics of the initial BI domain. By reviewing and
understanding these characteristics, you can better understand the purpose and
context of the procedures used to configure the domain.
Many of these characteristics are described in more detail in Understanding a Typical
Enterprise Deployment.
Table 10-1
Characteristics of the Initial BI domain
Characteristic of the Domain
More Information
Uses a separate virtual IP (VIP) address for the
Administration Server.
Configuration of the Administration Server and
Managed Servers Domain Directories
Uses separate domain directories for the
Administration Server and the Managed Servers in the
domain.
Configuration of the Administration Server and
Managed Servers Domain Directories
Uses Per Domain Node Manager and separate Node
Manager processes for the Administration Server and
Managed Servers on each host.
About the Node Manager Configuration in a Typical
Enterprise Deployment
Requires a separately installed LDAP-based
authentication provider.
Understanding OPSS and Requests to the
Authentication and Authorization Stores
10.3 Installing the Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure in Preparation
for an Enterprise Deployment
Use this section to install the Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure software in
preparation for configuring a new domain for an enterprise deployment.
See Also:
Installing a Supported JDK
Starting the Infrastructure Installer on BIHOST1
Navigating the Infrastructure Installation Screens
Checking the Directory Structure
10-4 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Installing the Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure in Preparation for an Enterprise Deployment
10.3.1 Installing a Supported JDK
Oracle Fusion Middleware requires that a certified Java Development Kit (JDK) is
installed on your system. See the following sections for more information:
See Also:
Locating and Downloading the JDK Software
Installing the JDK Software
10.3.1.1 Locating and Downloading the JDK Software
To find a certified JDK, see the certification document for your release on the Oracle
Fusion Middleware Supported System Configurations page.
After you identify the Oracle JDK for the current Oracle Fusion Middleware release,
you can download an Oracle JDK from the following location on Oracle Technology
Network:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/index.html
Be sure to navigate to the download for the Java SE JDK.
10.3.1.2 Installing the JDK Software
Install the JDK in the following locations:
• On the shared storage device, where it will be accessible from each of the
application tier host computers.
• On the local storage device for each of the Web tier host computers.
The Web tier host computers, which reside in the DMZ, do not necessarily have
access to the shared storage on the application tier.
For more information about the recommended location for the JDK software, see the
Understanding the Recommended Directory Structure for an Enterprise Deployment.
The following example describes how to install a recent version of JDK 1.8:
1. Change directory to the location where you downloaded the JDK archive file.
2. Unpack the archive into the JDK home directory, and then run these commands:
cd download_dir
tar -xzvf jdk-8u51-linux-x64.tar.gz
Note that the JDK version listed here was accurate at the time this document was
published. For the latest supported JDK, see the Oracle Fusion Middleware System
Requirements and Specifications for the current Oracle Fusion Middleware release.
3. Move the JDK directory to the recommended location in the directory structure.
For example:
mv ./jdk1.8.0_51 /u01/oracle/products/jdk
For more information, see File System and Directory Variables Used in This Guide.
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment 10-5
Installing the Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure in Preparation for an Enterprise Deployment
4. Define the JAVA_HOME and PATH environment variables for running Java on the
host computer.
For example:
export JAVA_HOME=/u01/oracle/products/jdk
export PATH=$JAVA_HOME/bin:$PATH
5. Run the following command to verify that the appropriate java executable is in
the path and your environment variables are set correctly:
java -version
java version "1.8.0_51"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.8.0_51-b16)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 25.51-b03, mixed mode)
10.3.2 Starting the Infrastructure Installer on BIHOST1
To start the installation program, perform the following steps.
1. Log in to BIHOST1.
2. Go to the directory where you downloaded the installation program.
3. Launch the installation program by invoking the java executable from the JDK
directory on your system, as shown in the example below.
JAVA_HOME/bin/java -d64 -jar distribution_file_name.jar
In this example:
• Replace JAVA_HOME with the environment variable or actual JDK location on
your system.
• Replace distribution_file_name with the actual name of the distribution
JAR file.
Note that if you download the distribution from the Oracle Technology
Network (OTN), then the JAR file is typically packaged inside a downloadable
ZIP file.
To install the software required for the initial Infrastructure domain, the
distribution you want to install is fmw_12.2.1.0.0_infrastructure.jar.
For more information about the actual file names of each distribution, see
Identifying and Obtaining Software Downloads for an Enterprise Deployment.
When the installation program appears, you are ready to begin the installation. See
Navigating the Installation Screens for a description of each installation program
screen.
10.3.3 Navigating the Infrastructure Installation Screens
The installation program displays a series of screens, in the order listed in the
following table.
If you need additional help with any of the installation screens, click the screen name.
10-6 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Installing the Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure in Preparation for an Enterprise Deployment
Screen
Description
Installation Inventory Setup
On UNIX operating systems, this screen will appear if this is the first time
you are installing any Oracle product on this host. Specify the location where
you want to create your central inventory. Make sure that the operating
system group name selected on this screen has write permissions to the
central inventory location.
For more information about the central inventory, see "Understanding the
Oracle Central Inventory" in Installing Software with the Oracle Universal
Installer.
Welcome
This screen introduces you to the product installer.
Auto Updates
Use this screen to automatically search My Oracle Support for available
patches or automatically search a local directory for patches that you’ve
already downloaded for your organization.
Installation Location
Use this screen to specify the location of your Oracle home directory.
For the purposes of an enterprise deployment, enter the value of the
ORACLE_HOME variable listed in Table 7-2.
Installation Type
Use this screen to select the type of installation and consequently, the
products and feature sets you want to install.
For this topology, select Fusion Middleware Infrastructure.
Note: The topology in this document does not include server examples.
Oracle strongly recommends that you do not install the examples into a
production environment.
Prerequisite Checks
This screen verifies that your system meets the minimum necessary
requirements.
If there are any warning or error messages, refer to the Oracle Fusion
Middleware System Requirements and Specifications document on the
Oracle Technology Network (OTN).
Security Updates
If you already have an Oracle Support account, use this screen to indicate
how you would like to receive security updates.
If you do not have one and are sure you want to skip this step, clear the
check box and verify your selection in the follow-up dialog box.
Auto Updates - Patch Selection
This screen appears if both of the following statements are true:
• You searched for available patches earlier in the installation session,
using the Auto Updates screen.
• The Auto Updates feature located one or more application patches that
must be applied to the Oracle home you are creating in this installation
session.
This screen lists the patches that were found by the Auto Updates feature.
Select one or more patches and click Next to apply the selected patches to the
Oracle home.
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment 10-7
Installing the Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure in Preparation for an Enterprise Deployment
Screen
Description
Installation Summary
Use this screen to verify the installation options you selected. If you want to
save these options to a response file, click Save Response File and provide
the location and name of the response file. Response files can be used later in
a silent installation situation.
For more information about silent or command-line installation, see "Using
the Oracle Universal Installer in Silent Mode" in Installing Software with the
Oracle Universal Installer.
Installation Progress
This screen allows you to see the progress of the installation.
Installation Complete
This screen appears when the installation is complete. Review the
information on this screen, then click Finish to dismiss the installer.
10.3.4 Checking the Directory Structure
After you install the Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure and create the Oracle
home, you should see the following directory and sub-directories. The contents of
your installation vary based on the options you selected during the installation.
To check the directory structure:
1. Change directory to the ORACLE_HOMEdirectory.
2. Enter the following command:
ls -l
The directory structure on your system should match the structure shown in the
following example:
/u01/oracle/products/fmw/
cfgtoollogs
coherence
em
install
inventory
OPatch
oracle_common
oraInst.loc
oui
root.sh
wlserver
For more information about the directory structure after the installation complete,
see "What are the Key Oracle Fusion Middleware Directories?" in Understanding
Oracle Fusion Middleware.
10-8 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Installing Oracle Business Intelligence in Preparation for an Enterprise Deployment
10.4 Installing Oracle Business Intelligence in Preparation for an
Enterprise Deployment
Use this section to install the Oracle Business Intelligence software in preparation for
configuring a new domain for an enterprise deployment.
See Also:
Starting the Installation Program
Navigating the Installation Screens
Checking the Directory Structure
10.4.1 Starting the Installation Program
Use these steps to start the BI Installer.
1. Log in to BIHOST1.
2. Go to the directory where you downloaded the installation program.
3. Launch the installation program by invoking the executable, as shown in the
example below.
./bi_platform-12.2.1.0.0_linux64.bin
For more information about the actual file names for each distribution, see Identifying
and Obtaining Software Downloads for an Enterprise Deployment.
When the installation program appears, you are ready to begin the installation. See
Navigating the Installation Screens for a description of each installation program
screen.
10.4.2 Navigating the Installation Screens
The installation program displays a series of screens, in the order listed in Table 10-2.
If you need additional help with any of the installation screens, click the screen name.
Table 10-2
Oracle Business Intelligence Install Screens
Screen
Description
Installation Inventory Setup
On UNIX operating systems, this screen will appear if this is the first time
you are installing any Oracle product on this host. Specify the location where
you want to create your central inventory. Make sure that the operating
system group name selected on this screen has write permissions to the
central inventory location.
For more information about the central inventory, see "Understanding the
Oracle Central Inventory" in Installing Software with the Oracle Universal
Installer.
Welcome
This screen introduces you to the product installer.
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment 10-9
Installing Oracle Business Intelligence in Preparation for an Enterprise Deployment
Table 10-2
(Cont.) Oracle Business Intelligence Install Screens
Screen
Description
Auto Updates
Use this screen to automatically search My Oracle Support for available
patches or automatically search a local directory for patches that you’ve
already downloaded for your organization
Installation Location
Use this screen to specify the location of your Oracle home directory.
For the purposes of an enterprise deployment, enter the value of the
ORACLE_HOME variable listed in Table 7-2.
Installation Type
Use this screen to select the type of installation and consequently, the
products and feature sets you want to install.
For this topology, select BI Platform Distribution with Samples.
Prerequisite Checks
This screen verifies that your system meets the minimum necessary
requirements.
If there are any warning or error messages, refer to the Oracle Fusion
Middleware System Requirements and Specifications document on the
Oracle Technology Network (OTN).
Auto Updates - Patch Selection
This screen appears if the both of the following statements are true:
• You searched for available patches earlier in the installation session,
using the Auto Updates screen.
• The Auto Updates feature located one or more application patches that
must be applied to the Oracle home you are creating in this installation
session.
This screen lists the patches that were found by the Auto Updates feature.
Select one or more patches and click Next to apply the selected patches to the
Oracle home.
Installation Summary
Use this screen to verify the installation options you selected. If you want to
save these options to a response file, click Save Response File and provide
the location and name of the response file. Response files can be used later in
a silent installation situation.
For more information about silent or command line installation, see "Using
the Oracle Universal Installer in Silent Mode" in Installing Software with the
Oracle Universal Installer.
Installation Progress
This screen allows you to see the progress of the installation.
Installation Complete
This screen appears when the installation is complete. Review the
information on this screen, then click Finish to dismiss the installer.
10.4.3 Checking the Directory Structure
The contents of your installation vary based on the options you selected during the
installation.
After you install Oracle Business Intelligence, you should see the following directory
and sub-directories.
10-10 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Creating the Database Schemas
/u01/oracle/products/fmw1221/bi
bi-epm-registry
bifoundation
bin
clients
common
endpointmanager
file_templates
jlib
lib
migration-tool
modules
nls
oracore
plugins
products
schema
vcredist_x64.exe
vcredist_x86.exe
xsd
10.5 Creating the Database Schemas
Before you can configure a BI domain, you must install the schemas listed in this
section on a certified database for use with this release of Oracle Fusion Middleware.
• Metadata Services (MDS)
• Audit Services (IAU)
• Audit Services Append (IAU_APPEND)
• Audit Services Viewer (IAU_VIEWER)
• Oracle Platform Security Services (OPSS)
• User Messaging Service (UMS)
• WebLogic Services (WLS)
• WebLogic Runtime Services (WLS_RUNTIME)
• Common Infrastructure Services (STB)
• Business Intelligence Platform (BIPLATFORM)
You use the Repository Creation Utility (RCU) to create the schemas. This utility is
installed in the Oracle home for each Oracle Fusion Middleware product. For more
information about RCU and how the schemas are created and stored in the database,
see "Preparing for Schema Creation" in Creating Schemas with the Repository Creation
Utility.
See Also:
Installing and Configuring a Certified Database
Starting the Repository Creation Utility (RCU)
Navigating the RCU Screens to Create the Schemas
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment 10-11
Creating the Database Schemas
10.5.1 Installing and Configuring a Certified Database
Make sure you have installed and configured a certified database, and that the
database is up and running.
For more information, see the following resources:
• Preparing the Database for an Enterprise Deployment, which includes information
about creating database services, using SecureFiles for Large Objects (LOBs), and
other topics important in an enterprise deployment.
• Understanding Database Requirements for an Oracle Fusion Middleware
Installation in Planning an Installation of Oracle Fusion Middleware.
10.5.2 Starting the Repository Creation Utility (RCU)
To start the Repository Creation Utility (RCU):
1. Set the JAVA_HOME environment variable so it references the location where you
installed a supported JDK.
For more information, see File System and Directory Variables Used in This Guide.
2. Navigate to the following directory on BIHOST1:
ORACLE_HOME/oracle_common/bin
3. Start RCU:
./rcu
10.5.3 Navigating the RCU Screens to Create the Schemas
Follow the instructions in this section to create the schemas for the Oracle Business
Intelligence domain.
Task 1 Introducing RCU
Review the Welcome screen and verify the version number for RCU. Click Next to
begin.
Task 2 Selecting a Method of Schema Creation
If you have the necessary permission and privileges to perform DBA activities on
your database, select System Load and Product Load on the Create Repository
screen. The procedure in this document assumes that you have the necessary
privileges.
If you do not have the necessary permission or privileges to perform DBA activities in
the database, you must select Prepare Scripts for System Load on this screen. This
option will generate a SQL script, which can be provided to your database
administrator. See "Understanding System Load and Product Load" in Creating
Schemas with the Repository Creation Utility.
10-12 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Creating the Database Schemas
Tip:
For more information about the options on this screen, see "Create
Repository" in Creating Schemas with the Repository Creation Utility.
Task 3 Providing Database Credentials
On the Database Connection Details screen, provide the database connection details
for RCU to connect to your database.
In the Host Name field, enter the SCAN address of the Oracle RAC Database.
Click Next to proceed, then click OK on the dialog window confirming that
connection to the database was successful.
Tip:
For more information about the options on this screen, see "Database
Connection Details" in Creating Schemas with the Repository Creation Utility.
Task 4 Specifying a Custom Prefix and Selecting Schemas
1.
Specify the custom prefix you want to use to identify the Oracle Fusion
Middleware schemas.
The custom prefix is used to logically group these schemas together for use in
this domain. For the purposes of this guide, use the prefix FMW1221.
Tip:
Make a note of the custom prefix you choose to enter here; you will need this
later during the domain creation process.
2.
Select AS Common Schemas.
When you select AS Common Schemas, all of the schemas in this section are
automatically selected.
A schema called Common Infrastructure Services is also automatically created;
this schema is grayed out and cannot be selected or deselected. This schema (the
STB schema) enables you to retrieve information from RCU during domain
configuration. For more information, see "Understanding the Service Table
Schema" in Creating Schemas with the Repository Creation Utility.
3.
Select Business Intelligence Platform.
Tip:
For more information about custom prefixes, see "Understanding Custom
Prefixes" in Creating Schemas with the Repository Creation Utility.
For more information about how to organize your schemas in a multi-domain
environment, see "Planning Your Schema Creation" in Creating Schemas with
the Repository Creation Utility.
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment 10-13
Configuring the BI Domain
Click Next to proceed, then click OK on the dialog window confirming that
prerequisite checking for schema creation was successful.
Task 5 Specifying Schema Passwords
Specify how you want to set the schema passwords on your database, then specify
and confirm your passwords.
Tip:
You must make a note of the passwords you set on this screen; you will need
them later on during the domain creation process.
Task 6 Completing Schema Creation
Navigate through the remainder of the RCU screens to complete schema creation.
For the purposes of this guide, you can accept the default settings on the remaining
screens, or you can customize how RCU creates and uses the required tablespaces for
the Oracle Fusion Middleware schemas.
For more information about RCU and its features and concepts, see Creating Schemas
with the Repository Creation Utility.
When you reach the Completion Summary screen, click Close to dismiss RCU.
10.6 Configuring the BI Domain
This section provides instructions for creating a WebLogic domain using the
configuration wizard.
For more information on other methods available for domain creation, see "Additional
Tools for Creating, Extending, and Managing WebLogic Domains" in Creating
WebLogic Domains Using the Configuration Wizard.
The following tasks are covered in this section.
See Also:
Starting the Configuration Wizard
Navigating the Configuration Wizard Screens to Configure the BI Domain
10-14 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Configuring the BI Domain
10.6.1 Starting the Configuration Wizard
To begin domain configuration, run the following command in the Oracle Fusion
Middleware Oracle home.
ORACLE_HOME/oracle_common/common/bin/config.sh
10.6.2 Navigating the Configuration Wizard Screens to Configure the BI Domain
Follow the instructions in this section to create and configure the domain for the
topology.
Task 1 Selecting the Domain Type and Domain Home Location
On the Configuration Type screen, select Create a new domain.
In the Domain Location field, specify the value of the ASERVER_HOME variable, as
defined in File System and Directory Variables Used in This Guide.
Tip:
More information about the other options on this screen can be found in
"Configuration Type" in Creating WebLogic Domains Using the Configuration
Wizard.
Task 2 Selecting the Configuration Templates
On the Templates screen, make sure Create Domain Using Product Templates is
selected, then select the following templates:
• Oracle BIEE Suite – 12.2.1.0 [bi]
Selecting this template automatically selects the following dependencies:
– Oracle MapViewer –12.2.1 [oracle_common]
– Oracle Enterprise Manager – 12.2.1 [em]
– Oracle WSM Policy Manager – 12.2.1.0 [oracle_common]
– Oracle JRF - 12.2.1 [oracle_common]
– WebLogic Coherence Cluster Extension - 12.2.1 [wlserver]
• Oracle BI Publisher Suite – 12.2.1.0 [bi]
• Oracle BI Essbase Suite – 12.2.1 [bi]
In addition, the Basic WebLogic Server Domain – 12.2.1 [wlserver] template should
already be selected and grayed out.
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment 10-15
Configuring the BI Domain
Tip:
More information about the options on this screen can be found in Templates
in Creating WebLogic Domains Using the Configuration Wizard.
Task 3 Selecting the Application Home Location
On the Application Location screen, specify the value of the APPLICATION_HOME
variable, as defined in File System and Directory Variables Used in This Guide.
Tip:
More information about the options on this screen can be found in
Application Location in Creating WebLogic Domains Using the Configuration
Wizard.
Task 4 Configuring the Administrator Account
On the Administrator Account screen, specify the user name and password for the
default WebLogic Administrator account for the domain.
Make a note of the user name and password specified on this screen; you will need
these credentials later to boot and connect to the domain's Administration Server.
Task 5 Specifying the Domain Mode and JDK
On the Domain Mode and JDK screen:
• Select Production in the Domain Mode field.
• Select the Oracle Hotspot JDK in the JDK field.
Selecting Production Mode on this screen gives your environment a higher degree of
security, requiring a user name and password to deploy applications and to start the
Administration Server.
10-16 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Configuring the BI Domain
Tip:
More information about the options on this screen, including the differences
between development mode and production mode, can be found in Domain
Mode and JDK in Creating WebLogic Domains Using the Configuration Wizard.
In production mode, a boot identity file can be created to bypass the need to
provide a user name and password when starting the Administration Server.
For more information, see Creating the boot.properties File.
Task 6 Specifying the Database Configuration Type
Select RCU Data to activate the fields on this screen.
The RCU Data option instructs the Configuration Wizard to connect to the database
and Service Table (STB) schema to automatically retrieve schema information for the
schemas needed to configure the domain.
Note:
If you choose to select Manual Configuration on this screen, you will have to
manually fill in the parameters for your schema on the JDBC Component
Schema screen.
After selecting RCU Data, fill in the fields as shown in the following table. Refer to
Figure 10-1 for a partial screen shot of a sample Database Configuration Type screen.
Field
Description
DBMS/Service
Enter the service name for the Oracle RAC database
where you will install the product schemas. For
example:
orcl.example.com
Be sure this is the common service name that is used to
identify all the instances in the Oracle RAC database;
do not use the host-specific service name.
For more information, see Preparing the Database for
an Enterprise Deployment.
Host Name
Enter the Single Client Access Name (SCAN) Address
for the Oracle RAC database, which you entered in the
Enterprise Deployment Workbook.
Port
Enter the port number on which the database listens.
For example, 1521.
Schema Owner
Schema Password
Enter the user name and password for connecting to
the database's Service Table schema.
This is the schema user name and password that was
specified for the Service Table component on the
Schema Passwords screen in RCU.
The default user name is prefix_STB, where prefix
is the custom prefix that you defined in RCU.
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment 10-17
Configuring the BI Domain
Figure 10-1
Setting the Database Configuration Type for an Enterprise Deployment
Click Get RCU Configuration when you are finished specifying the database
connection information. The following output in the Connection Result Log indicates
that the operation succeeded:
Connecting to the database server...OK
Retrieving schema data from database server...OK
Binding local schema components with retrieved data...OK
Successfully Done.
Click Next if the connection to the database is successful.
Tip:
More information about the RCU Data option can be found in
"Understanding the Service Table Schema" in Creating Schemas with the
Repository Creation Utility.
More information about the other options on this screen can be found in
Datasource Defaults in Creating WebLogic Domains Using the Configuration
Wizard
Task 7 Specifying JDBC Component Schema Information
Verify that the values on the JDBC Component Schema screen are correct for all
schemas.
The schema table should be populated because you selected Get RCU Data on the
previous screen. As a result, the Configuration Wizard locates the database
connection values for all the schemas required for this domain.
At this point, the values are configured to connect to a single-instance database.
However, for an enterprise deployment, you should use a highly available Real
Application Clusters (RAC) database, as described in Preparing the Database for an
Enterprise Deployment.
In addition, Oracle recommends that you use an Active GridLink datasource for each
of the component schemas. For more information about the advantages of using
GridLink data sources to connect to a RAC database, see "Database Considerations" in
the High Availability Guide.
To convert the data sources to GridLink:
10-18 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Configuring the BI Domain
1.
Select all the schemas by selecting the check box in the first header row of the
schema table.
2.
Click Convert to GridLink and click Next.
Task 8 Providing the GridLink Oracle RAC Database Connection Details
On the GridLink Oracle RAC Component Schema screen, provide the information
required to connect to the RAC database and component schemas, as shown in Table
10-3 and in Figure 10-2.
Element
Description and Recommended Value
SCAN, Host Name, and Port
Select the SCAN check box.
In the Host Name field, enter the Single Client Access
Name (SCAN) Address for the Oracle RAC database.
In the Port field, enter the SCAN listening port for the
database (for example, 1521)
ONS Host and Port
In the ONS Port field, enter the SCAN address for the
Oracle RAC database.
In the Port field, enter the ONS Remote port (typically,
6200).
Enable Fan
Select the Enable Fan check box to receive and process
FAN events,
Figure 10-2
Screen
Sample Values for the GridLink Oracle RAC Component Schema
For more information about specifying the information on this screen, as well as
information about how to identify the correct SCAN address, see "Configuring Active
GridLink Data Sources with Oracle RAC" in the High Availability Guide.
You can also click Help to display a brief description of each field on the screen.
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment 10-19
Configuring the BI Domain
Task 9 Testing the JDBC Connections
Use the JDBC Component Schema Test screen to test the data source connections you
have just configured.
A green check mark in the Status column indicates a successful test. If you encounter
any issues, see the error message in the Connection Result Log section of the screen,
fix the problem, then try to test the connection again.
Tip:
More information about the other options on this screen can be found in Test
Component Schema in Creating WebLogic Domains Using the Configuration
Wizard
Task 10 Specifying Credentials
Enter a unique user name and password for the Business Intelligence system.user
account. Note that the system.user account is not an actual user. It is used for
internal authentication between the different Business Intelligence components. You
must provide a unique, random user name and password that are not used by an
actual system user to log in and use BI applications with.
Enter a user name and password for the jms.queue.auth user account. This user
must be a user in the WebLogic Administrator group.
Task 11 Selecting Advanced Configuration
To complete domain configuration for the topology, select the following options on
the Advanced Configuration screen:
• Administration Server
This is required to properly configure the listen address of the Administration
Server.
• Node Manager
This is required to configure Node Manager.
• Managed Servers, Clusters and Coherence
This is required to configure the Managed Server and cluster, and also for
configuring the machine and targeting the Managed Server to the machine.
• JMS File Store
This is required to configure the appropriate shared storage for JMS persistent
stores.
10-20 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Configuring the BI Domain
Note:
When using the Advanced Configuration screen in the Configuration Wizard:
• If any of the above options are not available on the screen, then return to
the Templates screen, and be sure you selected the required templates for
this topology.
• Do not select the Domain Frontend Host Capture advanced configuration
option. You will later configure the frontend host property for specific
clusters, rather than for the domain.
Task 12 Configuring the Administration Server Listen Address
On the Administration Server screen:
1.
In the Server Name field, retain the default value - AdminServer.
2.
In the Listen Address field, enter the virtual host name that corresponds to the
VIP of the ADMINVHN that you procured in Procuring Resources for an
Enterprise Deployment and enabled in Preparing the Host Computers for an
Enterprise Deployment.
For more information on the reasons for using the ADMINVHN virtual host, see
Reserving the Required IP Addresses for an Enterprise Deployment.
3.
Leave the other fields at their default values.
In particular, be sure that no server groups are assigned to the Administration
Server.
Task 13 Configuring Node Manager
Select Per Domain Default Location as the Node Manager type, then specify the
Node Manager credentials you will use to connect to the Node Manager.
Tip:
For more information about the options on this screen, see "Node Manager"
in Creating WebLogic Domains Using the Configuration Wizard.
For more information about per domain and per host Node Manager
implementations, see About the Node Manager Configuration in a Typical
Enterprise Deployment.
For additional information, see “Configuring Node Manager on Multiple
Machines” in Administering Node Manager for Oracle WebLogic Server.
Task 14 Configuring the Managed Server
On the Managed Servers screen, a new Managed Server for Oracle Business
Intelligence appears in the list of servers. This server was created automatically by the
Oracle BIEE Suite configuration template you selected on the Templates screen.
Perform the following tasks to modify the default Oracle Business Intelligence
Managed Server (bi_server1).
1.
Rename the default Managed Server to WLS_BI1.
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment 10-21
Configuring the BI Domain
Tip:
The server name recommended here will be used throughout this document;
if you choose a different name, be sure to replace it as needed.
2.
Use the information in the following table to fill in the rest of the columns for the
Oracle Business Intelligence Managed Server.
Tip:
More information about the options on the Managed Server screen can be
found in Managed Servers in Creating WebLogic Domains Using the
Configuration Wizard.
Server Name Listen Address
Listen
Port
Enable
SSL
SSL Listen
Port
Server Groups
WLS_BI1
7003
No
Disabled
BISUITE_MAN-SVR
BIHOST1
Task 15 Configuring a Cluster
In this task, you create a cluster to which you can target the Oracle BI software.
You will also set the Frontend Host property for the cluster, which ensures that, when
necessary, WebLogic Server will redirect Web services callbacks and other redirects to
bi.example.com on the load balancer rather than the address in the HOST header
of each request.
For more information about the bi.example.com virtual server address, see
Configuring Virtual Hosts on the Hardware Load Balancer.
On the Clusters screen, a new cluster (bi_cluster) for Oracle Business Intelligence
appears in the list of clusters. Perform the following tasks to modify the default
Oracle Business Intelligence cluster:
1.
Specify bi.example.com in the Frontend Host field.
2.
Specify 80 as the Frontend HTTP Port and 443 as the Frontend HTTPS port.
Note:
By default, server instances in a cluster communicate with one another using
unicast. If you want to change your cluster communications to use multicast,
refer to "Considerations for Choosing Unicast or Multicast" in Administering
Clusters for Oracle WebLogic Server.
Tip:
More information about the options on this screen can be found in Clusters in
Creating WebLogic Domains Using the Configuration Wizard.
Task 16 Assigning the Managed Server to the Cluster
Use the Assign Servers to Clusters screen to assign WLS_BI1 to the new cluster
bi_cluster:
1.
In the Clusters pane, select the cluster to which you want to assign the servers; in
this case, bi_cluster.
10-22 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Configuring the BI Domain
2.
In the Servers pane, assign WLS_BI1 to bi_cluster by doing one of the
following:
• Click once on WLS_BI1 Managed Server to select it, then click on the right
arrow to move it beneath the selected cluster in the Clusters pane.
• Double-click on WLS_BI1 to move it beneath the selected cluster in the
clusters pane.
Tip:
More information about the options on this screen can be found in Assign
Servers to Clusters in Creating WebLogic Domains Using the Configuration
Wizard.
Task 17 Configuring Coherence Clusters
Use the Coherence Clusters screen to configure the Coherence cluster that is
automatically added to the domain.
In the Cluster Listen Port, enter 9991.
Note:
For Coherence licensing information, refer to "Oracle Coherence" in Oracle
Fusion Middleware Licensing Information.
Task 18 Creating Machines
Use the Machines screen to create a new machine in the domain. A machine is
required in order for the Node Manager to be able to start and stop the servers.
1.
Select the Unix Machine tab.
2.
Click the Add button to create the new UNIX machine.
Use the values in the following table to define the Name and Node Manager
Listen Address of each machine.
3.
Verify the port in the Node Manager Listen Port field.
The port number 5556, shown in this example, may be referenced by other
examples in the documentation. Replace this port number with your own port
number as needed.
Name
Node Manager Listen Address
Node Manager Listen
Port
BIHOST1
The value of the BIHOST1 host name variable. For example,
BIHOST1.example.com.
5556
ADMINHOST
Enter the value of the ADMINVHN variable.
5556
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment 10-23
Configuring the BI Domain
Figure 10-3
Example Values for the Configuration Wizard Unix Machines Screen
Tip:
More information about the options on this screen can be found in Machines
in Creating WebLogic Domains Using the Configuration Wizard.
Task 19 Assigning Servers to Machines
Use the Assign Servers to Machines screen to assign the Administration Server and
the Oracle BI EE Suite Managed Server to the appropriate machine.
The Assign Servers to Machines screen is similar to the Assign Managed Servers to
Clusters screen. Select the target machine in the Machines column, select the Managed
Server in the left column, and click the right arrow to assign the server to the
appropriate machine.
Assign the servers as follows:
• Assign the AdminServer to the ADMINHOST machine.
• Assign the WLS_BI1 Managed Server to the BIHOST1 machine.
Tip:
More information about the options on this screen can be found in Assign
Servers to Machines in Creating WebLogic Domains Using the Configuration
Wizard.
Task 20 Configuring the JMS File Store
When you configure a domain using the Oracle WSM Policy Manager configuration
template, you should select the proper location of the Metadata Services (MDS) JMS
File Store, especially when you are configuring an enterprise deployment.
In the JMS File Stores screen, assign the following directory for each of the BI
Persistence stores:
ASERVER_HOME/bi_cluster
10-24 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Creating the System Components on BIHOST1
In this example, replace ASERVER_HOME with the actual value of the
ASERVER_HOME variable, as defined in File System and Directory Variables Used in
This Guide. Replace bi_cluster with the name you assigned to the Oracle BI
cluster.
Task 21 Reviewing Your Configuration Specifications and Configuring the
Domain
The Configuration Summary screen contains the detailed configuration information
for the domain you are about to create. Review the details of each item on the screen
and verify that the information is correct.
You can go back to any previous screen if you need to make any changes, either by
using the Back button or by selecting the screen in the navigation pane.
Domain creation will not begin until you click Create.
Tip:
More information about the options on this screen can be found in
Configuration Summary in Creating WebLogic Domains Using the Configuration
Wizard.
Task 22 Writing Down Your Domain Home and Administration Server URL
The Configuration Success screen will show the following items about the domain
you just configured:
• Domain Location
• Administration Server URL
You must make a note of both items as you will need them later; the domain location
is needed to access the scripts used to start the Node Manager and Administration
Server, and the URL is needed to access the Administration Server.
Click Finish to dismiss the configuration wizard.
10.7 Creating the System Components on BIHOST1
Perform the steps in this section to create the BI Cluster Controller, BI Scheduler, BI
Presentation Services, and BI JavaHost system components on BIHOST1.
Note:
Replace ASERVER_HOME with the actual path to the domain directory you
created on the shared storage device.
1. Start WLST:
cd ORACLE_HOME/oracle_common/common/bin/
./wlst.sh
2. Open the BI Administration Server domain for updating:
wls:/offline>readDomain(‘ASERVER_HOME’)
3. Create a new BI Cluster Controller system component:
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment 10-25
Creating the System Components on BIHOST1
wls:/offline/
bi_domain>createOBICCSComponent('ASERVER_HOME','BIHOST1',port='OBICCS__port',por
tMonitor='OBICCS_monitor_port')
For example:
wls:/offline/bi_domain>createOBICCSComponent('/u01/oracle/config/domains/
bi_domain','BIHOST1',port='10006',portMonitor='10007')
4. Create a new BI Scheduler system component:
wls:/offline/
bi_domain>createOBISCHComponent(‘ASERVER_HOME’,'BIHOST1’,port='OBISCH_port',port
Monitor='OBISCH_monitor_port')
For example:
wls:/offline/bi_domain>createOBISCHComponent(‘/u01/oracle/config/domains/
bi_domain','BIHOST1’,port='10008',portMonitor='10009')
5. Create a new BI Presentation Services system component:
wls:/offline/
bi_domain>createOBIPSComponent('ASERVER_HOME’,'BIHOST1',port='OBIPS_port')
For example:
wls:/offline/bi_domain>createOBIPSComponent('/u01/oracle/config/domains/
bi_domain’,'BIHOST1',port='10010')
6. Create a new BI JavaHost system component:
wls:/offline/
bi_domain>createOBIJHComponent('ASERVER_HOME','BIHOST1',port='OBIJH_port')
For example:
wls:/offline/bi_domain>createOBIJHComponent('/u01/oracle/config/domains/
bi_domain','BIHOST1',port='10011')
7. Update and save the domain:
wls:/offline/bi_domain/SystemComponent/obijh1>updateDomain()
8. Close the domain:
wls:/offline/bi_domain/SystemComponent/obijh1>closeDomain()
9. Synchronize the changes with the WebLogic Server JDBC connection pools. This
updates the midtier schema endpoints stored outside of WebLogic Server (for
example, odbc.ini).
wls:/offline>syncMidtierDb(‘ASERVER_HOME’)
10. Exit WLST:
wls:/offline>exit()
10-26 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Creating a BI Service Instance
10.8 Creating a BI Service Instance
Perform the steps in this section to create a new BI Service instance.
Note:
Replace ASERVER_HOME with the actual path to the domain directory you
created on the shared storage device.
1. Start WLST:
cd ORACLE_HOME/oracle_common/common/bin/
./wlst.sh
2. Open the BI Administration Server domain for updating:
wls:/offline>readDomain(‘ASERVER_HOME’)
3. Run the following command to create a new BI Service instance:
wls:/offline/bi_domain>createBIServiceInstance(‘ASERVER_HOME’,
‘service1’,owner='weblogic',
description=’Default Service’, bar=’ORACLE_HOME/bi/bifoundation/samples/
sampleapplite/SampleAppLite.bar’,
port='OBIS_port', portMonitor='OBIS_monitor_port',machine='BIHOST1')
For example:
wls:/offline/bi_domain>createBIServiceInstance(‘/u01/oracle/config/domains/
bi_domain’,‘service1’,owner='weblogic',
description=’Default Service’, bar=’/u01/oracle/products/fmw/bi/bifoundation/
samples/sampleapplite/SampleAppLite.bar’,
port='10020', portMonitor='10021',machine='BIHOST1')
4. Update and save the domain:
wls:/offline/bi_domain/SystemComponent/obis1>updateDomain()
5. Close the domain for editing:
wls:/offline/bi_domain/SystemComponent/obis1>closeDomain()
6. Optional: Configure the default key to allow standard URLs to be used for the BI
Service instance:
wls:/offline>f = open('ASERVER_HOME/config/fmwconfig/biconfig/bi-security/
config.properties', 'a')
wls:/offline>f.write ("defaultServiceInstanceKey=" + 'service1')
wls:/offline>f.close()
7. SampleAppLite uses XML data, which needs to be unzipped to the correct
location.
import os
import zipfile
def unzip(srcZip, destDir):
# no native unzip-to-dest in jython 2.2 :-(
z = zipfile.ZipFile(srcZip)
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment 10-27
Configuring the Singleton Data Directory (SDD)
if not destDir.endswith('/'):
destDir += '/'
if not os.path.exists(destDir):
os.makedirs(destDir)
for f in z.namelist():
outpath = destDir + f
if f.endswith('/'):
os.makedirs(outpath)
else:
outfile = open(outpath, 'wb')
outfile.write(z.read(f))
outfile.close()
wls:/offline>srcZip='ORACLE_HOME/bi/bifoundation/samples/sampleapplite/
SampleAppLite-datafiles.zip'
wls:/offline>destDir='ASERVER_HOME/bidata/service_instances/service1/data'
wls:/offline>unzip(srcZip,destDir)
8. Exit WLST:
exit()
10.9 Configuring the Singleton Data Directory (SDD)
Oracle Business Intelligence metadata is stored in a Singleton Data Directory (SDD).
Metadata is managed in an Oracle Business Intelligence archive (BAR) file containing
information about the Presentation Catalog, the metadata repository, and security
authentication.
Perform the following steps to set up a shared directory for the Singleton Data
Directory:
The path to the Singleton Data Directory (SDD) is defined in the
ASERVER_HOME/config/fmwconfig/bienv/core/bienvironment.xml file.
Note:
1. Create a shared directory for the Singleton Data Directory (SDD):
For example:
mkdir Shared_Storage_Location/biconfig
2. Move the data in the ASERVER_HOME/bidata directory to the shared directory
you just created:
mv ASERVER_HOME/bidata Shared_Storage_Location/biconfig
3. Update the Singleton Data Directory location in the bi-environment.xml file by
doing the following:
a. Open the ASERVER_HOME/config/fmwconfig/bienv/core/bi-
environment.xml file for editing.
b. Edit the file to change the Singleton Data Directory location from the default
$DOMAIN_HOME/bidata directory to the absolute path of the shared bidata
directory.
For example:
10-28 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Configuring Security for Essbase in Oracle Business Intelligence
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
<bi:environment xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:bi="http://
bi.oracle.com/lcm">
<bi:logoff-url></bi:logoff-url>
<bi:singleton-data-directory>Shared_Storage_Location/biconfig/bidata</
bi:singleton-data-directory>
<bi:services-domain-name-suffix>bi.outsourcing.com</bi:services-domain-namesuffix>
</bi:environment>
4. Save and close the file.
10.10 Configuring Security for Essbase in Oracle Business Intelligence
Essbase components installed using the Oracle Business Intelligence installer cannot
use Native Essbase or Hyperion Shared Services (HSS) security.
However, when you install Essbase with Oracle Business Intelligence, the Common
Security Service (CSS) token-based identity assertion continues to be available and
enables Oracle Business Intelligence to connect to Essbase data sources (both Essbase
installed with Oracle Business Intelligence and Essbase installed with Enterprise
Performance Management (EPM)) with the credentials of the end user. For this
mechanism to work with an Essbase data source external to the Oracle Business
Intelligence installation, you must follow the documentation. Also note that if multiple
Essbase data sources are being used by Oracle Business Intelligence and there is a
requirement to use this mechanism, all Essbase data sources must use the same shared
secret for producing CSS tokens.
For more information, see Configuring Oracle Business Intelligence to Use Hyperion
SSO Tokens when Communicating with Essbase, Hyperion Financial Management,
Hyperion Planning in the System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Enterprise Edition.
To configure Common Security Services (CSS) security for Essbase components, you
must run the following after creating the initial BI domain and before starting the
domain:
cd ASERVER_HOME/bitools/bin
./generate_css_secrets.sh
10.11 Configuring the Domain Directories and Starting the Servers on
BIHOST1
After the domain is created, you must perform a series of additional configuration
tasks on BIHOST1. For example, you start the Node Manager and Administration
Server. You then create a separate domain directory for the Managed Server. In this
new and separate Managed Server directory, you start a second Node Manager
instance and start the Managed Server and the Business Intelligence system
components.
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment 10-29
Configuring the Domain Directories and Starting the Servers on BIHOST1
See Also:
Starting the Node Manager in the Administration Server Domain Home on
BIHOST1
Use these steps to start the per-domain Node Manager for the
ASERVER_HOME domain directory.
Creating the boot.properties File
You must create a boot.properties if you want start the Node
Manager without being prompted for the Node Manager credentials.
This step is required in an enterprise deployment. The credentials you
enter in this file are encrypted when you start the Administration Server.
Starting the Administration Server
Use these steps to start the Administration Server using the Node
Manager.
Validating the Administration Server
Before proceeding with the configuration steps, validate that the
Administration Server has started successfully by making sure you have
access to the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console and
Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control, which both are
installed and configured on the Administration Serverls.
Disabling the Derby Database
Creating a Separate Domain Directory for Managed Servers on BIHOST1
When you initially create the domain for enterprise deployment, the
domain directory resides on a shared disk. This default domain
directory will be used to run the Administration Server. You can now
create a copy of the domain on the local storage for both BIHOST1 and
BIHOST2. The domain directory on the local (or private) storage will be
used to run the Managed Servers.
Starting the Node Manager in the Managed Server Domain Directory on
BIHOST1
Starting the WLS_BI1 Managed Server on BIHOST1
Use Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control to start the
Managed Server on BIHOST1.
Starting the System Components
Use Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control to start the
system components for Oracle Business Intelligence.
10.11.1 Starting the Node Manager in the Administration Server Domain Home on
BIHOST1
Use these steps to start the per-domain Node Manager for the ASERVER_HOME
domain directory.
1. Verify that the listen address in the nodemanager.properties file is set
correctly:
a. Open the following file, using a text editor:
ASERVER_HOME/nodemanager/nodemanager.properties
10-30 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Configuring the Domain Directories and Starting the Servers on BIHOST1
b. Make sure the ListenAddress property is set to the value of the ADMINVHN
virtual IP address.
2. Navigate to the following directory:
ASERVER_HOME/bin
3. Use the following command to start the Node Manager:
nohup ./startNodeManager.sh > ASERVER_HOME/nodemanager/nodemanager.out 2>&1 &
For more information about additional Node Manager configuration options, see
Administering Node Manager for Oracle WebLogic Server.
10.11.2 Creating the boot.properties File
You must create a boot.properties if you want start the Node Manager without
being prompted for the Node Manager credentials. This step is required in an
enterprise deployment. The credentials you enter in this file are encrypted when you
start the Administration Server.
To create a boot.properties file for the Administration Server:
1. Create the following directory structure:
mkdir -p ASERVER_HOME/servers/AdminServer/security
2. In a text editor, create a file called boot.properties in the security directory
created in the previous step, and enter the Administration Server credentials that
you defined when you ran the Configuration Wizard to create the domain:
username=adminuser
password=password
Note:
When you start the Administration Server, the username and password
entries in the file get encrypted.
For security reasons, minimize the amount of time the entries in the file are
left unencrypted; after you edit the file, you should start the server as soon as
possible so that the entries get encrypted.
3. Save the file and close the editor.
10.11.3 Starting the Administration Server
Use these steps to start the Administration Server using the Node Manager.
1. Start WLST:
cd ORACLE_COMMON_HOME/common/bin
./wlst.sh
2. Connect to Node Manager using the Node Manager credentials you defined in
when you created the domain in the Configuration Wizard:
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment 10-31
Configuring the Domain Directories and Starting the Servers on BIHOST1
wls:/offline>nmConnect('nodemanager_username','nodemanager_password',
'ADMINVHN','5556','domain_name',
'ASERVER_HOME')
Note:
This username and password are used only to authenticate connections
between Node Manager and clients. They are independent of the server admin
ID and password and are stored in the nm_password.properties file
located in the following directory:
ASERVER_HOME/config/nodemanager
3. Start the Administration Server:
nmStart('AdminServer')
4. Exit WLST:
exit()
10.11.4 Validating the Administration Server
Before proceeding with the configuration steps, validate that the Administration
Server has started successfully by making sure you have access to the Oracle
WebLogic Server Administration Console and Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion
Middleware Control, which both are installed and configured on the Administration
Serverls.
To navigate to Fusion Middleware Control, enter the following URL, and log in with
the Oracle WebLogic Server administrator credentials:
ADMINVHN:7001/em
To navigate to the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console, enter the
following URL, and log in with the same administration credentials:
ADMINVHN:7001/console
10.11.5 Disabling the Derby Database
Before you create the Managed Server directory and start the Managed Servers,
disable the embedded Derby database, which is a file-based database, packaged with
Oracle WebLogic Server. The Derby database is used primarily for development
environments. As a result, you must disable it when you are configuring a productionready enterprise deployment environment; otherwise, the Derby database process will
start automatically when you start the Managed Servers.
To disable the Derby database:
1. Navigate to the following directory in the Oracle home.
WL_HOME/common/derby/lib
2. Rename the Derber library jar file:
mv derby.jar disable_derby.jar
10-32 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Configuring the Domain Directories and Starting the Servers on BIHOST1
10.11.6 Creating a Separate Domain Directory for Managed Servers on BIHOST1
When you initially create the domain for enterprise deployment, the domain directory
resides on a shared disk. This default domain directory will be used to run the
Administration Server. You can now create a copy of the domain on the local storage
for both BIHOST1 and BIHOST2. The domain directory on the local (or private)
storage will be used to run the Managed Servers.
Placing the MSERVER_HOME on local storage is recommended to eliminate the
potential contention and overhead cause by servers writing logs to shared storage. It is
also faster to load classes and jars need from the domain directory, so any tmp or
cache data that Managed Servers use from the domain directory is processed quicker.
As described in Preparing the File System for an Enterprise Deployment, the path to
the Administration Server domain home is represented by the ASERVER_HOME
variable, and the path to the Managed Server domain home is represented by the
MSERVER_HOME variable.
To create the Managed Server domain directory:
1. Log in to BIHOST1 and run the pack command to create a template as follows:
cd ORACLE_COMMON_HOME/common/bin
./pack.sh -managed=true
-domain=ASERVER_HOME
-template=complete_path/bidomaintemplate.jar
-template_name=bi_domain_template
In this example:
• Replace ASERVER_HOME with the actual path to the domain directory you
created on the shared storage device.
• Replace complete_path with the complete path to the location where you want to
create the domain template jar file. You will need to reference this location
when you copy or unpack the domain template jar file.
• bidomaintemplate.jar is a sample name for the jar file you are creating,
which will contain the domain configuration files.
• bi_domain_template is the name assigned to the domain template file.
2. Make a note of the location of the bidomaintemplate.jar file you just created
with the pack command.
You must specify a full path for the template jar file as part of the -template
argument to the pack command:
ORACLE_COMMON_HOME/common/bin/
Tip:
For more information about the pack and unpack commands, see "Overview
of the Pack and Unpack Commands" in Creating Templates and Domains Using
the Pack and Unpack Commands.
3. If you haven't already, create the recommended directory structure for the
Managed Server domain on the BIHOST1 local storage device.
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment 10-33
Configuring the Domain Directories and Starting the Servers on BIHOST1
Use the examples in File System and Directory Variables Used in This Guide as a
guide.
4. Run the unpack command to unpack the template in the domain directory onto
the local storage, as follows:
cd ORACLE_COMMON_HOME/common/bin
./unpack.sh -domain=MSERVER_HOME \
-overwrite_domain=true \
-template=complete_path/bidomaintemplate.jar \
-log_priority=DEBUG \
-log=/tmp/unpack.log \
-app_dir=APPLICATION_HOME \
Note:
The -overwrite_domain option in the unpack command allows unpacking
a managed server template into an existing domain and existing applications
directories. For any file that is overwritten, a backup copy of the original is
created. If any modifications had been applied to the start scripts and ear files
in the managed server domain directory, they must be restored after this
unpack operation.
Additionally, to customize server startup parameters that apply to all servers
in a domain, you can create a file called setUserOverrides.sh and configure it
to, for example, add custom libraries to the WebLogic Server classpath, specify
additional java command line options for running the servers, or specify
additional environment variables. Any customizations you add to this file are
preserved during domain upgrade operations, and are carried over to remote
servers when using the pack and unpack commands.
In this example:
• Replace MSERVER_HOME with the complete path to the domain home to be
created on the local storage disk. This is the location where the copy of the
domain will be unpacked.
• Replace complete_path with the complete path to the location where you created
or copied the template jar file.
• bidomaintemplate.jar is the name of the template jar file you created when
you ran the pack command to pack up the domain on the shared storage device.
Tip:
For more information about the pack and unpack commands, see "Overview
of the Pack and Unpack Commands" in Creating Templates and Domains Using
the Pack and Unpack Commands.
5. Change directory to the newly created Managed Server directory and verify that
the domain configuration files were copied to the correct location on the BIHOST1
local storage device.
10-34 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Configuring the Domain Directories and Starting the Servers on BIHOST1
10.11.7 Starting the Node Manager in the Managed Server Domain Directory on
BIHOST1
After you create the Managed Server domain directory, there are two domain home
directories and two corresponding Node Manager instances on BIHOST1. You use one
Node Manager to control the Administration Server, running from Administration
Server domain home, and you use the other Node Manager to control the Managed
Servers, running from the Managed Server domain home.
You must start the two Node Managers independently.
Follow these steps to start the Node Manager from the Managed Server home:
1. Navigate to the following directory:
MSERVER_HOME/bin
2. Use the following command to start the Node Manager:
nohup ./startNodeManager.sh > ./nodemanager.out 2>&1 &
For information about additional Node Manager configuration options, see
Administering Node Manager for Oracle WebLogic Server.
10.11.8 Starting the WLS_BI1 Managed Server on BIHOST1
Use Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control to start the Managed
Server on BIHOST1.
Fusion Middleware Control is available because you already started the Node
Manager and Administration Server in a previous step:
1. Enter the following URL into a browser to display the Fusion Middleware Control
login screen:
http://ADMINVHN:7001/em
In this example:
• Replace ADMINVHN with the host name assigned to the ADMINVHN Virtual
IP address.
• Port 7001 is the typical port used for the Administration Server console and
Fusion Middleware Control. However, you should use the actual URL that was
displayed at the end of the Configuration Wizard session when you created the
domain.
Tip:
For more information about managing Oracle Fusion Middleware using
Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control, see "Getting Started
Using Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control" in
Administering Oracle Fusion Middleware.
2. Log in to Fusion Middleware Control using the Administration Server credentials.
3. Select the Servers pane to view the Managed Servers in the domain.
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment 10-35
Configuring the Domain Directories and Starting the Servers on BIHOST1
4. Select only the WLS_BI1 Managed Server and click Control on the tool bar. Then,
under Control, select Start.
10.11.9 Starting the System Components
Use Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control to start the system
components for Oracle Business Intelligence.
Fusion Middleware Control is already available because you already started the Node
Manager and the Administration Server in a previous step.
1. Enter the following URL into a browser to display the Fusion Middleware Control
login screen:
http://ADMINVHN:7001/em
2. Log into Fusion Middleware Control using the Administration Server credentials.
3. If not already displayed, click the Target Navigation icon
of the page to display the Target Navigation pane.
in the top left corner
4. In the Target Navigation pane, expand the Business Intelligence folder and select
biinstance.
10-36 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Setting Up the Global Cache
The Business Intelligence Overview page appears.
5. Click Availability and then Processes to display the Processes tab on the
Availability page.
6. Click Start All to start all the components.
10.12 Setting Up the Global Cache
The global cache is a query cache that is shared by all Oracle BI servers participating in
a cluster. It is recommended that you configure the global cache so that cache seeding
and purging events can be shared by all Oracle BI servers participating in a cluster.
For more information about the global cache, see About the Global Cache in the System
Administrator's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.
To set up the global cache:
1. Create a shared directory for the global cache.
mkdir Shared_Storage_Location/global_cache
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment 10-37
Setting Up the Global Cache
All Oracle BI servers must have read and write access to this directory.
2. Use the Performance tab of the Configuration page in Fusion Middleware Control
to set the Global cache path and Global cache size.
a. Enter the following URL into a browser to display the Fusion Middleware
Control login screen:
http://ADMINVHN:7001/em
b. Log in to Fusion Middleware Control using the Administration Server
credentials.
c. If not already displayed, click the Target Navigation icon
corner of the page to display the Target Navigation pane.
in the top left
d. In the Target Navigation pane, expand the Business Intelligence folder and
select biinstance.
The Business Intelligence Overview page appears.
e. Click Configuration and then Performance to display the Performance tab of
the Configuration page.
f. Click Lock & Edit in the Change Center menu at the top right corner of the
page.
g. Specify the shared directory you created for storing purging and seeding cache
entries in the Global cache path field. Enter a value for the Global cache size to
specify the maximum size of the global cache (for example, 250 MB).
h. Click Apply.
i.
Click Activate Changes in the Change Center menu at the top right corner of
the page.
10-38 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Verifying Oracle Business Intelligence URLs on BIHOST1
10.13 Verifying Oracle Business Intelligence URLs on BIHOST1
After starting the components in the domain on BIHOST1, access these URLs to verify
the configuration of Oracle Business Intelligence.
• Access the following URL to verify the status of WLS_BI1:
http://BIHOST1VHN1:7003/analytics
You will be redirected to:
http://bi.example.com/analytics
• Access the following URL to verify the status of the BI Publisher application:
http://BIHOST1VHN1:7003/xmlpserver
You will be redirected to:
http://bi.example.com/xmlpserver
• Access the following URL to verify the status of the Oracle Essbase application:
http://BIHOST1VHN1:7003/aps/Essbase
10.14 Creating a New LDAP Authenticator and Provisioning Enterprise
Deployment Users and Group
When you configure an Oracle Fusion Middleware domain, the domain is configured
by default to use the WebLogic Server authentication provider
(DefaultAuthenticator). However, for an enterprise deployment, Oracle
recommends that you use a dedicated, centralized LDAP-compliant authentication
provider.
The following topics describe how to use the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration
Console to create a new authentication provider for the enterprise deployment
domain. This procedure assumes you have already installed and configured a
supported LDAP directory, such as Oracle Unified Directory or Oracle Internet
Directory.
See Also:
About the Supported Authentication Providers
About the Enterprise Deployment Users and Groups
Prerequisites for Creating a New Authentication Provider and Provisioning
Users and Groups
Provisioning a Domain Connector User in the LDAP Directory
Creating the New Authentication Provider
Provisioning an Enterprise Deployment Administration User and Group
Adding the New Administration User to the Administration Group
Updating the boot.properties File and Restarting the System
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment 10-39
Creating a New LDAP Authenticator and Provisioning Enterprise Deployment Users and Group
10.14.1 About the Supported Authentication Providers
Oracle Fusion Middleware supports a variety of LDAP authentication providers. For
more information, see "Identity Store Types and WebLogic Authenticators" in Securing
Applications with Oracle Platform Security Services.
The instructions in this guide assume you will be using one of the following providers:
• Oracle Unified Directory
• Oracle Internet Directory
• Oracle Virtual Directory
Note:
By default, the instructions here describe how to configure the identity service
instance to support querying against a single LDAP identity store.
However, you can configure the service to support a virtualized identity store,
which queries multiple LDAP identity stores, using LibOVD.
For more information about configuring a Multi-LDAP lookup, refer to
"Configuring the Identity Store Service" in Securing Applications with Oracle
Platform Security Services.
10.14.2 About the Enterprise Deployment Users and Groups
The following topics provide important information on the purpose and
characteristics of the enterprise deployment administration users and groups.
See Also:
About Using Unique Administration Users for Each Domain
About the Domain Connector User
About Adding Users to the Central LDAP Directory
About Product-Specific Roles and Groups for Oracle Business Intelligence
Example Users and Roles Used in This Guide
10.14.2.1 About Using Unique Administration Users for Each Domain
When you use a central LDAP user store, you can provision users and groups for use
with multiple Oracle WebLogic Server domains. As a result, there is a possibility that
one WebLogic administration user can have access to all the domains within an
enterprise.
Such an approach is not recommended. Instead, it is a best practice to assign a unique
distinguished name (DN) within the directory tree for the users and groups you
provision for the administration of your Oracle Fusion Middleware domains.
For example, if you plan to install and configure an Oracle Business Intelligence
enterprise deployment domain, then create a user called weblogic_bi and an
administration group called BI Administrators.
10-40 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Creating a New LDAP Authenticator and Provisioning Enterprise Deployment Users and Group
10.14.2.2 About the Domain Connector User
Oracle recommends that you create a separate domain connector user (for example,
biLDAP) in your LDAP directory. This user allows the domain to connect to the LDAP
directory for the purposes of user authentication. It is recommended that this user be a
non-administrative user.
In a typical Oracle Identity and Access Management deployment, you create this user
in the systemids container. This container is used for system users that are not
normally visible to users. Placing the user into the systemids container ensures that
customers who have Oracle Identity Manager do not reconcile this user.
10.14.2.3 About Adding Users to the Central LDAP Directory
After you configure a central LDAP directory to be the authenticator for the enterprise
domain, then you should add all new users to the new authenticator and not to the
default WebLogic Server authenticator.
To add new users to the central LDAP directory, you cannot use the WebLogic
Administration Console. Instead, you must use the appropriate LDAP modification
tools, such as ldapbrowser or JXplorer.
When you are using multiple authenticators (a requirement for an enterprise
deployment), login and authentication will work, but role retrieval will not. The role is
retrieved from the first authenticator only. If you want to retrieve roles using any
other authenticator, then you must enable virtualization for the domain.
Enabling virtualization involves the following steps:
1.
Locate and open the following configuration file with a text editor:
DOMAIN_HOME/config/fmwconfig/jps-config.xml
2.
Add or update the following property, as follows:
<property name="virtualize" value="true"/>
For more information about the virtualize property, see “OPSS System and
Configuration Properties” in Securing Applications with Oracle Platform Security
Services.
10.14.2.4 About Product-Specific Roles and Groups for Oracle Business Intelligence
Each Oracle Fusion Middleware product implements its own predefined roles and
groups for administration and monitoring.
As a result, as you extend the domain to add additional products, you can add these
product-specific roles to the BI Administrators group. After they are added to the
BI Administrators group, each product administrator user can administer the
domain with the same set of privileges for performing administration tasks.
Instructions for adding additional roles to the BI Administrators group are
provided in Common Configuration and Management Tasks for an Enterprise
Deployment.
10.14.2.5 Example Users and Roles Used in This Guide
In this guide, the examples assume that you provision the following administration
user and group with the DNs shown below:
• Admin User DN:
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment 10-41
Creating a New LDAP Authenticator and Provisioning Enterprise Deployment Users and Group
cn=weblogic_bi,cn=users,dc=example,dc=com
• Admin Group DN:
cn=BI Administrators,cn=groups,dc=example,dc=com
• Product-specific LDAP Connector User:
cn=biLDAP,cn=systemids,dc=example,dc=com
This is the user you will use to connect WebLogic Managed Servers to the LDAP
authentication provider. This user must have permissions to read and write to the
Directory Trees:
cn=users,dc=example,dc=com
cn=groups,dc=example,dc=com
Note:
When using Oracle Unified Directory, this user will need to be granted
membership in the following groups to provide read and write access:
cn=orclFAUserReadPrivilegeGroup,cn=groups,dc=example,dc=com
cn=orclFAUserWritePrivilegeGroup,cn=groups,dc=example,dc=com
cn=orclFAGroupReadPrivilegeGroup,cn=groups,dc=example,dc=com
cn=orclFAGroupWritePrivilegeGroup,cn=groups,dc=example,dc=com
10.14.3 Prerequisites for Creating a New Authentication Provider and Provisioning
Users and Groups
Before you create a new LDAP authentication provider, back up the relevant
configuration files:
ASERVER_HOME/config/config.xml
ASERVER_HOME/config/fmwconfig/jps-config.xml
ASERVER_HOME/config/fmwconfig/system-jazn-data.xml
In addition, back up the boot.properties file for the Administration Server in the
following directory:
DOMAIN_HOME/servers/AdminServer/security
10.14.4 Provisioning a Domain Connector User in the LDAP Directory
This example shows how to create a user called biLDAP in the central LDAP directory.
To provision the user in the LDAP provider:
1.
Create an ldif file named domain_user.ldif with the contents shown below
and then save the file:
dn: cn=biLDAP,cn=systemids,dc=example,dc=com
changetype: add
orclsamaccountname: biLDAP
userpassword: password
objectclass: top
objectclass: person
objectclass: organizationalPerson
objectclass: inetorgperson
10-42 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Creating a New LDAP Authenticator and Provisioning Enterprise Deployment Users and Group
objectclass: orcluser
objectclass: orcluserV2
mail: biLDAP@example.com
givenname: biLDAP
sn: biLDAP
cn: biLDAP
uid: biLDAP
Note:
If you are using Oracle Unified Directory, then add the following four group
memberships to the end of the LDIF file to grant the appropriate read/write
privileges:
dn:
cn=orclFAUserReadPrivilegeGroup,cn=groups,dc=us,dc=oracle,dc=com
changetype: modify
add: uniquemember
uniquemember: cn=biLDAP,cn=systemids,dc=us,dc=oracle,dc=com
dn: cn=orclFAGroupReadPrivilegeGroup,cn=groups,dc=us,dc=oracle,dc=com
changetype: modify
add: uniquemember
uniquemember: cn=biLDAP,cn=systemids,dc=us,dc=oracle,dc=com
dn: cn=orclFAUserWritePrivilegeGroup,cn=groups,dc=example,dc=com
changetype: modify
add: uniquemember
uniquemember: cn=biLDAP,cn=systemids,dc=example,dc=com
dn: cn=orclFAGroupWritePrivilegeGroup,cn=groups,dc=example,dc=com
changetype: modify
add: uniquemember
uniquemember: cn=biLDAP,cn=systemids,dc=example,dc=com
2.
Provision the user in the LDAP directory.
For example, for an Oracle Unified Directory LDAP provider:
OUD_INSTANCE_HOME/bin/ldapmodify -a
-h
-D
-w
-p
-f
\
oudhost.example.com
"cn=oudadmin" \
password \
1389 \
domain_user.ldif
For Oracle Internet Directory:
OID_ORACLE_HOME/bin/ldapadd -h oidhost.example.com \
-p 3060 \
-D cn="orcladmin" \
-w password \
-c \
-v \
-f domain_user.ldif
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment 10-43
Creating a New LDAP Authenticator and Provisioning Enterprise Deployment Users and Group
10.14.5 Creating the New Authentication Provider
To configure a new LDAP-based authentication provider:
1.
Log in to the WebLogic Server Administration Console.
2.
Click Security Realms in the left navigational bar.
3.
Click the myrealm default realm entry.
4.
Click the Providers tab.
Note that there is a DefaultAuthenticator provider configured for the realm.
This is the default WebLogic Server authentication provider.
5.
Click Lock & Edit in the Change Center.
6.
Click the New button below the Authentication Providers table.
7.
Enter a name for the provider.
Use one of the following names, based on the LDAP directory service you are
planning to use as your credential store:
• OUDAuthenticator for Oracle Unified Directory
• OIDAuthenticator for Oracle Internet Directory
• OVDAuthenticator for Oracle Virtual Directory
8.
Select the authenticator type from the Type drop-down list.
Select one of the following types, based on the LDAP directory service you are
planning to use as your credential store:
• OracleUnifiedDirectoryAuthenticator for Oracle Unified Directory
• OracleInternetDirectoryAuthenticator for Oracle Internet Directory
• OracleVirtualDirectoryAuthenticator for Oracle Virtual Directory
9.
Click OK to return to the Providers screen.
10. On the Providers screen, click the newly created authenticator in the table.
11. Select SUFFICIENT from the Control Flag drop-down menu.
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Creating a New LDAP Authenticator and Provisioning Enterprise Deployment Users and Group
Setting the control flag to SUFFICIENT indicates that if the authenticator can
successfully authenticate a user, then the authenticator should accept that
authentication and should not continue to invoke any additional authenticators.
If the authentication fails, it will fall through to the next authenticator in the chain.
Make sure all subsequent authenticators also have their control flags set to
SUFFICIENT; in particular, check the DefaultAuthenticator and make sure
that its control flag is set to SUFFICIENT.
12. Click Save to save the control flag settings.
13. Click the Provider Specific tab and enter the details specific to your LDAP server,
as shown in the following table.
Note that only the required fields are discussed in this procedure. For information
about all the fields on this page, consider the following resources:
• To display a description of each field, click Help on the Provider Specific tab.
• For more information on setting the User Base DN, User From Name Filter,
and User Attribute fields, see "Configuring Users and Groups in the Oracle
Internet Directory and Oracle Virtual Directory Authentication Providers" in
Administering Security for Oracle WebLogic Server.
Parameter
Sample Value
Value Description
Host
For example: oud.example.com
The LDAP server's server ID.
Port
For example: 1689
The LDAP server's port number.
Principal
For example: cn=biLDAP,
cn=systemids,dc=example,dc=com
The LDAP user DN used to connect to
the LDAP server.
Credential
Enter LDAP password.
The password used to connect to the
LDAP server.
SSL Enabled
Unchecked (clear)
Specifies whether SSL protocol is used
when connecting to the LDAP server.
User Base DN
For example:
cn=users,dc=example,dc=com
Specify the DN under which your users
start.
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment 10-45
Creating a New LDAP Authenticator and Provisioning Enterprise Deployment Users and Group
Parameter
Sample Value
Value Description
All Users Filter
(&(uid=*)(objectclass=person))
Instead of a default search criteria for All
Users Filter, search all users based on
the uid value.
If the User Name Attribute for the user
object class in the LDAP directory
structure is a type other than uid, then
change that type in the User From Name
Filter field.
For example, if the User Name Attribute
type is cn, then this field should be set
to:
(&(cn=*)(objectclass=person)))
User From Name Filter
For example:
(&(uid=%u)(objectclass=person))
If the User Name Attribute for the user
object class in the LDAP directory
structure is a type other than uid, then
change that type in the settings for the
User From Name Filter.
For example, if the User Name Attribute
type is cn, then this field should be set
to:
(&(cn=%u)
(objectclass=person))).
User Name Attribute
For example: uid
The attribute of an LDAP user object that
specifies the name of the user.
Group Base DN
For example:
cn=groups,dc=example,dc=com
Specify the DN that points to your
Groups node.
Use Retrieved User
Name as Principal
Checked
Must be turned on.
GUID Attribute
entryuuid
This value is prepopulated with
entryuuid when
OracleUnifiedDirectoryAuthenti
cator is used for OUD. Check this value
if you are using Oracle Unified Directory
as your authentication provider.
14. Click Save to save the changes.
15. Return to the Providers page by clicking Security Realms in the right navigation
pane, clicking the default realm name (myrealm), and then Providers.
16. Click Reorder, and then use the resulting page to make the Provider you just
created first in the list of authentication providers.
10-46 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Creating a New LDAP Authenticator and Provisioning Enterprise Deployment Users and Group
17. Click OK.
18. In the Change Center, click Activate Changes .
19. Restart the Administration Server and all managed servers.
To stop the Managed Servers, log in to Fusion Middleware Control, select the
Managed Servers in the Target Navigator and click Shut Down in the toolbar.
To stop and start the Administration Server using the Node Manager:
a.
Start WLST:
cd ORACLE_COMMON_HOME/common/bin
./wlst.sh
b.
Connect to Node Manager using the Node Manager credentials you defined
in when you created the domain in the Configuration Wizard:
wls:/offline>nmConnect('nodemanager_username','nodemanager_password',
'ADMINVHN','5556','domain_name',
'ASERVER_HOME')
c.
Stop the Administration Server:
nmKill('AdminServer')
d.
Start the Administration Server:
nmStart('AdminServer')
e.
Exit WLST:
exit()
To start the Managed Servers, log in to Fusion Middleware Control, select the
Managed Servers, and click Start Up in the toolbar.
20. After the restart, review the contents of the following log file:
ASERVER_HOME/servers/AdminServer/logs/AdminServer.log
Verify that no LDAP connection errors occurred. For example, look for errors such
as the following:
The LDAP authentication provider named "OUDAuthenticator" failed to make
connection to ldap server at ...
If you see such errors in the log file, then check the authorization provider
connection details to verify they are correct and try saving and restarting the
Administration Server again.
21. After you restart and verify that no LDAP connection errors are in the log file, try
browsing the users and groups that exist in the LDAP provider:
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment 10-47
Creating a New LDAP Authenticator and Provisioning Enterprise Deployment Users and Group
In the Administration Console, navigate to the Security Realms > myrealm >
Users and Groups page. You should be able to see all users and groups that exist
in the LDAP provider structure.
10.14.6 Provisioning an Enterprise Deployment Administration User and Group
This example shows how to create a user called weblogic_bi and a group called BI
Administrators.
To provision the administration user and group in LDAP provider:
1.
Create an ldif file named admin_user.ldif with the contents shown below and
then save the file:
dn: cn=weblogic_bi,cn=users,dc=example,dc=com
changetype: add
orclsamaccountname: weblogic_bi
userpassword: password
objectclass: top
objectclass: person
objectclass: organizationalPerson
objectclass: inetorgperson
objectclass: orcluser
objectclass: orcluserV2
mail: weblogic_bi@example.com
givenname: weblogic_bi
sn: weblogic_bi
cn: weblogic_bi
uid: weblogic_bi
2.
Provision the user in the LDAP directory.
For example, for an Oracle Unified Directory LDAP provider:
OUD_INSTANCE_HOME/bin/ldapmodify -a
-h
-D
-w
-p
-f
\
oudhost.example.com
"cn=oudadmin" \
password \
1389 \
admin_user.ldif
For Oracle Internet Directory:
OID_ORACLE_HOME/bin/ldapadd -h oidhost.example.com \
-p 3060 \
-D cn="orcladmin" \
-w password \
-c \
-v \
-f admin_user.ldif
3.
Create an ldif file named admin_group.ldif with the contents shown below
and then save the file:
dn: cn=WCCAdministrators,cn=Groups,dc=example,dc=com
displayname: WCCAdministrators
objectclass: top
objectclass: WCCAdministrators
objectclass: orclGroup
uniquemember: cn=weblogic_wcc,cn=users,dc=example,dc=com
10-48 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Creating a New LDAP Authenticator and Provisioning Enterprise Deployment Users and Group
cn: WCCAdministrators
description: Administrators Group for the Oracle WebCenter Content Domain
4.
Provision the group in the LDAP Directory.
For Oracle Unified Directory:
OUD_INSTANCE_HOME/bin/ldapmodify -a
-D
-h
-w
-p
-f
\
"cn=oudadmin" \
oudhost.example.com \
password \
3060 \
admin_group.ldif
For Oracle Internet Directory:
OID_ORACLE_HOME/bin/ldapadd -h
-p
-D
-w
-c
-v
-f
5.
oid.example.com \
3060 \
cn="orcladmin" \
password \
\
\
admin_group.ldif
Verify that the changes were made successfully:
a.
Log in to the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console.
b.
In the left pane of the console, click Security Realms.
c.
Click the default security realm (myrealm).
d.
Click the Users and Groups tab.
e.
Verify that the administrator user and group you provisioned are listed on
the page.
10.14.7 Adding the New Administration User to the Administration Group
After adding the users and groups to Oracle Internet Directory, the group must be
assigned the Administration role within the WebLogic domain security realm. This
enables all users that belong to the group to be administrators for the domain.
To assign the Administration role to the new enterprise deployment administration
group:
1. Log in to the WebLogic Administration Server Console using the administration
credentials that you provided in the Configuration Wizard.
Do not use the credentials for the administration user you created and provided for
the new authentication provider.
2. In the left pane of the Administration Console, click Security Realms.
3. Click the default security realm (myrealm).
4. Click the Roles and Policies tab.
5. Expand the Global Roles entry in the table and click Roles.
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment 10-49
Creating a New LDAP Authenticator and Provisioning Enterprise Deployment Users and Group
6. Click the Admin role.
7. Click Add Conditions button.
8. Select Group from the Predicate List drop-down menu, and then click Next.
9. Enter BI Administrators in the Group Argument Name field, and then click
Add.
BI Administrators is added to the list box of arguments.
10. Click Finish to return to the Edit Global Role page.
The BI Administrators group is now listed.
11. Click Save to finish adding the Admin Role to the BI Administrators group.
12. Validate that the changes were made by logging in to the WebLogic
Administration Server Console using the new weblogic_bi user credentials.
If you can log in to the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console and
Fusion Middleware Control with the credentials of the new administration user
you just provisioned in the new authentication provider, then you have configured
the provider successfully.
10.14.8 Updating the boot.properties File and Restarting the System
After you create the new administration user and group, you must update the
Administration Server boot.properties file with the administration user
credentials that you created in the LDAP directory:
1. On BIHOST1, go the following directory:
ASERVER_HOME/servers/AdminServer/security
2. Rename the existing boot.properties file:
mv boot.properties boot.properties.backup
3. Use a text editor to create a file called boot.properties under the security
directory.
4. Enter the following lines in the file:
username=weblogic_bi
password=password
10-50 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Backing Up the Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration
5. Save the file.
6. Restart the Administration Server.
10.15 Backing Up the Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration
It is an Oracle best practices recommendation to create a backup after successfully
configuring a domain or at another logical point. Create a backup after verifying that
the installation so far is successful. This is a quick backup for the express purpose of
immediate restoration in case of problems in later steps.
The backup destination is the local disk. You can discard this backup when the
enterprise deployment setup is complete. After the enterprise deployment setup is
complete, you can initiate the regular deployment-specific Backup and Recovery
process.
For information about backing up your configuration, see Performing Backups and
Recoveries for an Enterprise Deployment.
Creating the Initial BI Domain for an Enterprise Deployment 10-51
Backing Up the Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration
10-52 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
11
Configuring the Web Tier for an Enterprise
Deployment
This chapter describes how to install and configure a standalone Oracle HTTP Server
domain that contains two Oracle HTTP Server instances: one on WEBHOST1 and one
on WEBHOST2.
This chapter provides information on variables used when configuring the web tier
and installing and configuring a web tier domain.
See Also:
Configuring the Enterprise Deployment
Variables Used When Configuring the Web Tier
As you perform the tasks in this chapter, you will be referencing the
directory variables listed in this section.
About the Web Tier Domains
In an enterprise deployment, each Oracle HTTP Server instance is
configured on a separate host and in its own standalone domain. This
Configuring the Web Tier for an Enterprise Deployment 11-1
Variables Used When Configuring the Web Tier
allows for a simple configuration that requires a minimum amount of
configuration and a minimum amount of resouces to run and maintain.
Installing Oracle HTTP Server on WEBHOST1
The following sections describe how to install the Oracle HTTP Server
software on the web tier.
Creating a Web Tier Domain on WEBHOST1
The following sections describe how to create a new Oracle HTTP Server
standalone domain on the first Web tier host.
Installing and Configuring a Web Tier Domain on WEBHOST2
After you install Oracle HTTP Server and configure a Web Tier domain
on WEBHOST1, then you must also perform the same tasks on
WEBHOST2.
Starting the Node Manager and Oracle HTTP Server Instances on WEBHOST1
and WEBHOST2
The following sections describe how to start the Oracle HTTP Server
instances on WEBHOST1 and WEBHOST2.
Configuring Oracle HTTP Server to Route Requests to the Application Tier
The following sections describe how to update the Oracle HTTP Server
configuration files so the web server instances route requests to the
servers in the domain.
Backing Up the Configuration
It is an Oracle best practices recommendation to create a backup after
successfully configuring a domain or at another logical point. Create a
backup after verifying that the installation so far is successful. This is a
quick backup for the express purpose of immediate restoration in case of
problems in later steps.
11.1 Variables Used When Configuring the Web Tier
As you perform the tasks in this chapter, you will be referencing the directory
variables listed in this section.
The values for several directory variables are defined in File System and Directory
Variables Used in This Guide.
• OHS_ORACLE_HOME
• OHS_DOMAIN_HOME
In addition, you'll be referencing the following virtual IP (VIP) address and host
names:
• ADMINVHN
• WEBHOST1
• WEBHOST2
11.2 About the Web Tier Domains
In an enterprise deployment, each Oracle HTTP Server instance is configured on a
separate host and in its own standalone domain. This allows for a simple
11-2 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Installing Oracle HTTP Server on WEBHOST1
configuration that requires a minimum amount of configuration and a minimum
amount of resouces to run and maintain.
For more information about the role and configuration of the Oracle HTTP Server
instances in the web tier, see Understanding the Web Tier.
11.3 Installing Oracle HTTP Server on WEBHOST1
The following sections describe how to install the Oracle HTTP Server software on the
web tier.
See Also:
Starting the Installer on WEBHOST1
Navigating the Oracle HTTP Server Installation Screens
Verifying the Oracle HTTP Server Installation
11.3.1 Starting the Installer on WEBHOST1
To start the installation program, perform the following steps.
1. Log in to WEBHOST1.
2. Go to the directory in which you downloaded the installation program.
3. Launch the installation program by entering the following command:
./fmw_12.2.1.0.0_ohs_linux64.bin
When the installation program appears, you are ready to begin the installation.
11.3.2 Navigating the Oracle HTTP Server Installation Screens
The following table lists the screens in the order that the installation program displays
them.
If you need additional help with any of the installation screens, click the screen name.
Screen
Description
Welcome
This screen introduces you to the product installer.
Auto Updates
Use this screen to automatically search My Oracle
Support for available patches or automatically search a
local directory for patches that you’ve already
downloaded for your organization.
Installation Location
Use this screen to specify the location of your Oracle
home directory.
For the purposes of an enterprise deployment, enter the
value of the OHS_ORACLE_HOME variable listed in
Table 7-3.
Configuring the Web Tier for an Enterprise Deployment 11-3
Installing Oracle HTTP Server on WEBHOST1
Screen
Description
Installation Type
Select Standalone HTTP Server (Managed
independently of WebLogic server).
This installation type allows you to configure the
Oracle HTTP Server instances independently from any
other existing Oracle WebLogic Server domains.
Prerequisite Checks
This screen verifies that your system meets the
minimum necessary requirements.
If there are any warning or error messages, verify that
your host computers and the required software meet
the system requirements and certification information
described in Host Computer Hardware Requirements
and Operating System Requirements for the Enterprise
Deployment Topology.
Security Updates
If you already have an Oracle Support account, use this
screen to indicate how you would like to receive
security updates.
If you do not have an account, or if you are sure you
want to skip this step, then clear the check box and
verify your selection in the follow-up dialog box.
Installation Summary
Use this screen to verify the installation options you
selected. If you want to save these options to a response
file, click Save Response File and provide the location
and name of the response file. Response files can be
used later in a silent installation situation.
For more information about silent or command line
installation, see "Using the Oracle Universal Installer in
Silent Mode" in Installing Software with the Oracle
Universal Installer.
Installation Progress
This screen allows you to see the progress of the
installation.
Installation Complete
This screen appears when the installation is complete.
Review the information on this screen, then click Finish
to dismiss the installer.
11.3.3 Verifying the Oracle HTTP Server Installation
To verify that your Oracle HTTP Server installation completed successfully, list files
that were installed in the new Oracle home directory. You should see the following
directories in the Oracle HTTP Server Oracle home:
bin
cfgtoollogs
crs
css
has
install
inventory
11-4 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Creating a Web Tier Domain on WEBHOST1
jlib
ldap
lib
network
nls
ohs
OPatch
oracle_common
oracore
oraInst.loc
oui
perl
plsql
plugins
precomp
rdbms
root.sh
slax
sqlplus
srvm
webgate
wlserver
xdk
11.4 Creating a Web Tier Domain on WEBHOST1
The following sections describe how to create a new Oracle HTTP Server standalone
domain on the first Web tier host.
See Also:
Starting the Configuration Wizard on WEBHOST1
Navigating the Configuration Wizard Screens for a Web Tier Domain
11.4.1 Starting the Configuration Wizard on WEBHOST1
To start the Configuration Wizard, navigate to the following directory and start the
WebLogic Server Configuration Wizard, as follows:
cd OHS_ORACLE_HOME/oracle_common/common/bin
./config.sh
11.4.2 Navigating the Configuration Wizard Screens for a Web Tier Domain
Oracle recommends that you create a standalone domain for the Oracle HTTP Server
instances on each Web tier host.
The following topics describe how to create a new standalone Oracle HTTP Server:
• Task 1, "Selecting the Domain Type and Domain Home Location"
• Task 2, "Selecting the Configuration Templates"
• Task 3, "Selecting the JDK for the Web Tier Domain."
• Task 4, "Adding System Components"
• Task 5, "OHS Server Screen"
Configuring the Web Tier for an Enterprise Deployment 11-5
Creating a Web Tier Domain on WEBHOST1
• Task 6, "Reviewing Your Configuration Specifications and Configuring the
Domain"
• Task 7, "Writing Down Your Domain Home"
Task 1 Selecting the Domain Type and Domain Home Location
On the Configuration Type screen, select Create a new domain.
In the Domain Location field, enter the value assigned to the OHS_DOMAIN_HOME
variable.
Note the following:
• The Configuration Wizard will create the new directory that you specify here.
• Create the directory on local storage, so the web servers do not have any
dependencies on on storage devices outside the DMZ.
[other]:
• More information about the Domain home directory can be found in
"Choosing a Domain Home" in Planning an Installation of Oracle Fusion
Middleware.
• More information about the other options on this screen can be found in
"Configuration Type" in Creating WebLogic Domains Using the Configuration
Wizard.
• For more information about the Web tier and the DMZ, see Understanding
the Firewalls and Zones of a Typical Enterprise Deployment.
• For more information about the OHS_DOMAIN_HOME directory
variable, see File System and Directory Variables Used in This Guide.
Task 2 Selecting the Configuration Templates
On the Templates screen, select Oracle HTTP Server (Standalone) - 12.2.1.0 [ohs].
Tip:
More information about the options on this screen can be found in
"Templates" in Creating WebLogic Domains Using the Configuration Wizard.
Task 3 Selecting the JDK for the Web Tier Domain.
Select the Oracle Hotspot JDK, which was installed in the Web tier Oracle home when
you installed the Oracle HTTP Server software.
Task 4 Adding System Components
On the System Components screen, create one Oracle HTTP Server instance. The
screen should by default have a single instance defined.
1.
Note that the default instance name is ohs1 in the System Component field. You
use this default name.
11-6 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Creating a Web Tier Domain on WEBHOST1
2.
Make sure OHS is selected in the Component Type field.
3.
Use the Restart Interval Seconds field to specify the number of seconds to wait
before attempting a restart if an application is not responding.
4.
Use the Restart Delay Seconds field to specify the number of seconds to wait
between restart attempts.
Task 5 OHS Server Screen
Use the OHS Server screen to configure the OHS servers in your domain:
1.
Select ohs1 from the System Component drop-down menu.
2.
In the Listen Address field, enter WEBHOST1.
All of the remaining fields are pre-populated, but you can change the values as
required for your organization. For more information about the fields on this
screen, see "OHS Server" in Creating WebLogic Domains Using the Configuration
Wizard.
3.
In the Server Name field, verify the value of the listen address and listen port.
It should appear as follows:
WEBHOST1:7777
Task 6 Configuring Node Manager
Select Per Domain Default Location as the Node Manager type, and specify the Node
Manager credentials.
Note:
More information about the options on this screen can be found in "Node
Manager" in Creating Domains Using the Configuration Wizard.
More information about the Node Manager types can be found in "Node
Manager Overview" in Administering Node Manager for Oracle WebLogic Server.
Task 7 Reviewing Your Configuration Specifications and Configuring the Domain
The Configuration Summary screen contains the detailed configuration information
for the domain you are about to extend. Review the details of each item on the screen
and verify that the information is correct.
You can go back to any previous screen if you need to make any changes, either by
using the Back button or by selecting the screen in the navigation pane.
Domain creation will not begin until you click Create.
Tip:
More information about the options on this screen can be found in
"Configuration Summary" in Creating WebLogic Domains Using the
Configuration Wizard.
Task 8 Writing Down Your Domain Home
The Configuration Success screen will show the updated domain home location.
Configuring the Web Tier for an Enterprise Deployment 11-7
Installing and Configuring a Web Tier Domain on WEBHOST2
Make a note of the information provided here, as you will need it to start the servers
and access the Administration Server.
Click Finish to dismiss the configuration wizard.
11.5 Installing and Configuring a Web Tier Domain on WEBHOST2
After you install Oracle HTTP Server and configure a Web Tier domain on
WEBHOST1, then you must also perform the same tasks on WEBHOST2.
1.
Log in to WEBHOST2 and install Oracle HTTP Server, using the instructions in
Installing Oracle HTTP Server on WEBHOST1.
2.
Configure a new standalone domain on WEBHOST2, using the instructions in
Creating a Web Tier Domain on WEBHOST1.
Use the name ohs2 for the instance on WEBHOST2, and be sure to replace all
occurrences of WEBHOST1 with WEBHOST2 and all occurrences of ohs1 with
ohs2 in each of the examples.
11.6 Starting the Node Manager and Oracle HTTP Server Instances on
WEBHOST1 and WEBHOST2
The following sections describe how to start the Oracle HTTP Server instances on
WEBHOST1 and WEBHOST2.
See Also:
Starting the Node Manager on WEBHOST1 and WEBHOST2
Starting the Oracle HTTP Server Instances
11.6.1 Starting the Node Manager on WEBHOST1 and WEBHOST2
Before you can start the Oracle HTTP Server instances, you must start the Node
Manager on WEBHOST1 and WEBHOST2:
1. Log in to WEBHOST1 and navigate to the following directory:
OHS_DOMAIN_HOME/bin
2. Start the Node Manager as shown below, using nohup and nodemanager.out as
an example output file:
nohup OHS_DOMAIN_HOME/bin/startNodeManager.sh > OHS_DOMAIN_HOME/nodemanager/
nodemanager.out 2>&1 &
3. Log in to WEBHOST2 and perform steps 1 and 2.
For more information about additional Node Manager configuration options, see
Administering Node Manager for Oracle WebLogic Server.
11.6.2 Starting the Oracle HTTP Server Instances
To start the Oracle HTTP Server instances:
1. Navigate to the following directory on WEBHOST1:
OHS_DOMAIN_HOME/bin
11-8 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Configuring Oracle HTTP Server to Route Requests to the Application Tier
For more information about the location of the OHS_DOMAIN_HOME directory,
see File System and Directory Variables Used in This Guide.
2. Enter the following command:
./startComponent.sh ohs1
3. When prompted, enter the Node Manager password.
4. Repeat steps 1 through 3 to start the ohs2 instance on WEBHOST2.
For more information, see "Starting Oracle HTTP Server Instances" in Administering
Oracle HTTP Server.
11.7 Configuring Oracle HTTP Server to Route Requests to the
Application Tier
The following sections describe how to update the Oracle HTTP Server configuration
files so the web server instances route requests to the servers in the domain.
See Also:
About the Oracle HTTP Server Configuration for an Enterprise Deployment
Modifying the httpd.conf File to Include Virtual Host Configuration Files
Creating the Virtual Host Configuration Files for Oracle Business Intelligence
Validating the Virtual Server Configuration on the Load Balancer
Validating Access to the Management Consoles and Administration Server
Validating Access to the HTTP Access to the Business Intelligence Components
11.7.1 About the Oracle HTTP Server Configuration for an Enterprise Deployment
The following topics provide overview information about the changes required to the
Oracle HTTP Server configuration in an enterprise deployment.
See Also:
Purpose of the Oracle HTTP Server Virtual Hosts
Recommended Structure of the Oracle HTTP Server Configuration Files
11.7.1.1 Purpose of the Oracle HTTP Server Virtual Hosts
The reference topologies in this guide require that you define a set of virtual servers
on the hardware load balancer. You can then configure Oracle HTTP Server to
recognize requests to specific virtual hosts (that map to the load balancer virtual
servers) by adding <VirtualHost> directives to the Oracle HTTP Server instance
configuration files.
For each Oracle HTTP Server virtual host, you define a set of specific URLs (or context
strings) that route requests from the load balancer through the Oracle HTTP Server
instances to the appropriate Administration Server or Managed Server in the Oracle
WebLogic Server domain.
Configuring the Web Tier for an Enterprise Deployment 11-9
Configuring Oracle HTTP Server to Route Requests to the Application Tier
11.7.1.2 Recommended Structure of the Oracle HTTP Server Configuration Files
Rather than adding multiple virtual host definitions to the httpd.conf file, Oracle
recommends that you create separate, smaller, and more specific configuration files for
each of the virtual servers required for the products you are deploying. This avoids
populating an already large httpd.conf file with additional content, and it can make
troubleshooting configuration problems easier.
For example, in a typical Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure domain, you can
add a specific configuration file called admin_vh.conf that contains the virtual host
definition for the Administration Server virtual host (ADMINVHN).
11.7.2 Modifying the httpd.conf File to Include Virtual Host Configuration Files
Perform the following tasks to prepare the httpd.conf file for the additional virtual
hosts required for an enterprise topology:
1.
Log in to WEBHOST1.
2.
Locate the httpd.conf file for the first Oracle HTTP Server instance (ohs1) in
the domain directory:
cd OHS_DOMAIN_HOME/config/fmwconfig/components/OHS/ohs1/
3.
Open the httpd.conf file in a text editor and make the following changes:
a.
Create a NameVirtualHost entry as follows immediately below the
comment: "# Use name-based virtual hosting" and before the "# VirtualHost
example" comment:
NameVirtualHost WEBHOST1:7777
In this example, replace WEBHOST1 with the value of the WEBHOST1
variable. For more information, see File System and Directory Variables Used
in This Guide.
b.
Verify that there is an INCLUDE statement in the httpd.conf that includes
all *.conf files in the moduleconf subdirectory:
IncludeOptional "moduleconf/*.conf"
This statement makes it possible to create the separate virtual host files for
each component, making it easier to update, maintain, and scale out the
virtual host definitions.
4.
Save the httpd.conf file.
5.
Log in to WEBHOST2 and perform steps 2 through 4 to update the httpd.conf
file for the ohs2 instance.
On WEBHOST2, replace all instances of WEBHOST1 with WEBHOST2 and all
instances of ohs1 with ohs2.
11.7.3 Creating the Virtual Host Configuration Files for Oracle Business Intelligence
Use the following procedure to create the required configuration files so the Oracle
HTTP Server routes requests to the Oracle Business Intelligence servers.
11-10 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Configuring Oracle HTTP Server to Route Requests to the Application Tier
Note: Before you create the virtual host configuration files, be sure you have
configured the virtual servers on the load balancer, as described in Purpose of
the Oracle HTTP Server Virtual Hosts.
To create the virtual host configuration files:
1. Log in to WEBHOST1 and change directory to the configuration directory for the
first Oracle HTTP Server instance (ohs1):
cd OHS_DOMAIN_HOME/config/fmwconfig/components/OHS/ohs1/moduleconf
2. Create the admin_vh.conf file and add the following directive:
<VirtualHost *:7777>
ServerName admin.example.com:80
ServerAdmin you@your.address
RewriteEngine On
RewriteOptions inherit
</VirtualHost>
# Admin Server and EM
<Location /console>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WebLogicHost ADMINVHN
WeblogicPort 7001
</Location>
<Location /consolehelp>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WebLogicHost ADMINVHN
WeblogicPort 7001
</Location>
<Location /em>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WebLogicHost ADMINVHN
WeblogicPort 7001
</Location>
3. Create the biinternal_vh.conf file and add the following directives:
<VirtualHost WEBHOST1:7777>
ServerName biinternal.example.com
ServerAdmin you@your.address
RewriteEngine On
RewriteOptions inherit
</VirtualHost>
#redirect browser
RedirectMatch 301
RedirectMatch 301
RedirectMatch 301
RedirectMatch 301
RedirectMatch 301
RedirectMatch 301
RedirectMatch 301
RedirectMatch 301
RedirectMatch 301
RedirectMatch 301
RedirectMatch 301
requests that omit document/dir
/analytics$ /analytics/
/biservices$ /biservices/
/analytics-ws$ /analytics-ws/
/AdminService$ /AdminService/
/AsyncAdminService$ /AsyncAdminService/
/wsm-pm$ /wsm-pm/
/xmlpserver$ /xmlpserver/
/bisearch$ /bisearch/
/mapviewer$ /mapviewer/
/va$ /va/
/bicomposer$ /bicomposer/
Configuring the Web Tier for an Enterprise Deployment 11-11
Configuring Oracle HTTP Server to Route Requests to the Application Tier
RedirectMatch
RedirectMatch
RedirectMatch
RedirectMatch
301
301
301
301
/mobile$ /mobile/
/aps$ /aps/
/bi-security$ /bi-security/
/workspace$ /workspace/
# WSM-PM
<Location /wsm-pm>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WebLogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
</Location>
# BIEE Analytics
<Location /analytics>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WebLogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
</Location>
<Location /bicontent>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WebLogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
</Location>
<Location /mobile>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WebLogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
</Location>
<Location /va>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WebLogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
</Location>
# MapViewer
<Location /mapviewer>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WebLogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
</Location>
# BI Publisher
<Location /xmlpserver>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WebLogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
</Location>
# BI Search
<Location /bisearch>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WebLogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
</Location>
# BI Composer
<Location /bicomposer>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WebLogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
</Location>
# EPM Provider Services
<Location /aps>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WeblogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
</Location>
11-12 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Configuring Oracle HTTP Server to Route Requests to the Application Tier
# EPM Workspace
<Location /workspace>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WeblogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
</Location>
# BI SOA Services
<Location /biservices>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WeblogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
</Location>
# AdminService
<Location /AdminService>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WeblogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
</Location>
# AsyncAdminService
<Location /AsyncAdminService>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WeblogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
</Location>
#OWSM
<Location /wsm-pm>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WeblogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
</Location>
#BI Security
<Location /bi-security>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WebLogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
</Location>
4. Create the bi_vh.conf file and add the following directives
<VirtualHost *:7777>
ServerName https://bi.example.com:443
ServerAdmin you@your.address
RewriteEngine On
RewriteOptions inherit
</VirtualHost>
#redirect browser
RedirectMatch 301
RedirectMatch 301
RedirectMatch 301
RedirectMatch 301
RedirectMatch 301
RedirectMatch 301
RedirectMatch 301
RedirectMatch 301
RedirectMatch 301
RedirectMatch 301
RedirectMatch 301
RedirectMatch 301
RedirectMatch 301
RedirectMatch 301
requests that omit document/dir
/analytics$ /analytics/
/xmlpserver$ /xmlpserver/
/analytics/res$ /analytics/res/
/biofficeclient$ /biofficeclient/
/biservices$ /biservices/
/analytics-ws$ /analytics-ws/
/wsm-pm$ /wsm-pm/
/bisearch$ /bisearch/
/mapviewer$ /mapviewer/
/va$ /va/
/bicontent$ /bicontent/
/bicomposer$ /bicomposer/
/mobile$ /mobile/
/aps$ /aps/
Configuring the Web Tier for an Enterprise Deployment 11-13
Configuring Oracle HTTP Server to Route Requests to the Application Tier
RedirectMatch 301 /workspace$ /workspace/
# BIEE Analytics
<Location /analytics>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WebLogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
WLProxySSL ON
WLProxySSLPassThrough ON
</Location>
<Location /analytics-ws>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WebLogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
WLProxySSL ON
WLProxySSLPassThrough ON
</Location>
<Location /bicontent>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WebLogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
WLProxySSL ON
WLProxySSLPassThrough ON
</Location>
<Location /mobile>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WebLogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
WLProxySSL ON
WLProxySSLPassThrough ON
</Location>
<Location /va>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WebLogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
WLProxySSL ON
WLProxySSLPassThrough ON
</Location
# MapViewer
<Location /mapviewer>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WebLogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
WLProxySSL ON
WLProxySSLPassThrough ON
</Location>
# BI Publisher
<Location /xmlpserver>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WebLogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
WLProxySSL ON
WLProxySSLPassThrough ON
</Location>
# BI Search
<Location /bisearch>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WebLogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
WLProxySSL ON
WLProxySSLPassThrough ON
</Location>
11-14 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Configuring Oracle HTTP Server to Route Requests to the Application Tier
# BI Composer
<Location /bicomposer>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WebLogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
WLProxySSL ON
WLProxySSLPassThrough ON
</Location>
# EPM Provider Services
<Location /aps>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WeblogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
WLProxySSL ON
WLProxySSLPassThrough ON
</Location>
# EPM Workspace
<Location /workspace>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WeblogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
WLProxySSL ON
WLProxySSLPassThrough ON
</Location>
# OWSM
<Location /wsm-pm>
SetHandler weblogic-handler
WeblogicCluster APPHOST1VHN1:7003,APPHOST2VHN1:7003
WLProxySSL ON
WLProxySSLPassThrough ON
</Location>
5. Restart the ohs1 instance:
a. Change directory to the following location:
cd OHS_DOMAIN_HOME/bin
b. Enter the following commands to stop and start the instance; provide the node
manager password when prompted:
./stopComponent.sh ohs1
./startComponent.sh ohs1
6. Copy the three .conf files (admin_vh.conf, biinternal_vh.conf, and
biinternal_vh.conf) to the configuration directory for the second Oracle
HTTP Server instance (ohs2) on WEBHOST2:
OHS_DOMAIN_HOME/config/fmwconfig/components/OHS/ohs2/module_conf
7. Edit the .conf files and change any references from WEBHOST1 to WEBHOST2 in
the <VirtualHost> directives.
8. Restart the ohs2 instance:
a. Change directory to the following location:
cd OHS_DOMAIN_HOME/bin
b. Enter the following commands to stop and start the instance:
Configuring the Web Tier for an Enterprise Deployment 11-15
Configuring Oracle HTTP Server to Route Requests to the Application Tier
./stopComponent.sh ohs2
./startComponnet.sh ohs2
11.7.4 Validating the Virtual Server Configuration on the Load Balancer
From the load balancer, access the following URLs to ensure that your load balancer
and Oracle HTTP Server are configured properly. These URLs should show the initial
Oracle HTTP Server 12c web page.
• http://admin.example.com/index.html
• http://biinternal.example.com/index.html
• http://bi.example.com/index.html
11.7.5 Validating Access to the Management Consoles and Administration Server
To verify the changes you have made in this chapter:
1.
Use the following URL to the hardware load balancer to display the Oracle
WebLogic Server Administration Console, and log in using the Oracle WebLogic
Server administrator credentials:
http://admin.example.com/console
This validates that the admin.example.com virtual host on the load balancer is
able to route requests to the Oracle HTTP Server instances on the web tier, which
in turn can route requests for the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console
to the Administration Server in the application tier.
2.
Similarly, you should be able to access the Fusion Middleware Control using a
similar URL:
http://admin.example.com/em
11.7.6 Validating Access to the HTTP Access to the Business Intelligence Components
After you configure the Oracle HTTP Server instances, you can validate your work by
accessing key Oracle Business Intelligence URLs. If these URLs display the proper
content, then you can be assured the Web tier components are configured correctly.
To validate HTTP access to the Oracle Business Intelligence components, enter each of
the following URLs in your Web browser and make sure the proper content displays:
• http://bi.example.com/analytics
• http://bi.example.com/mapviewer
• http://bi.example.com/xmlpserver
• http://biinternal.example.com/wsm-pm
• http://bi.example.com/bicomposer
• http://bi.example.com/aps/Essbase
• http://bi.example.com/aps/SmartView
11-16 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Backing Up the Configuration
11.8 Backing Up the Configuration
It is an Oracle best practices recommendation to create a backup after successfully
configuring a domain or at another logical point. Create a backup after verifying that
the installation so far is successful. This is a quick backup for the express purpose of
immediate restoration in case of problems in later steps.
The backup destination is the local disk. You can discard this backup when the
enterprise deployment setup is complete. After the enterprise deployment setup is
complete, you can initiate the regular deployment-specific Backup and Recovery
process.
For information about backing up your configuration, see Performing Backups and
Recoveries for an Enterprise Deployment.
Configuring the Web Tier for an Enterprise Deployment 11-17
Backing Up the Configuration
11-18 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
12
Scaling Out Oracle Business Intelligence
This chapter describes the steps to scale out your initial Oracle Business Intelligence
domain to BIHOST2.
Scaling out your components involves installing the Oracle Business Intelligence on
the other host computers, stopping and cloning the components on BIHOST1, packing
and unpacking the domain and starting the components after scaling out.
See Also:
Configuring the Enterprise Deployment
Installing Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure on the Other Host
Computers
Installing Oracle Business Intelligence on the Other Host Computers
If you have configured a separate shared storage volume or partition for
BIHOST2, then you must also install the software on BIHOST2.
Stopping the Components on BIHOST1
Before you scale out, you must stop all the component processes in the
domain on BIHOST1.
Cloning the Components on BIHOST1
After stopping all the component processes, you must clone the
components in the domain on BIHOST1, which will create new
components on BIHOST2 based on the initial domain you created.
Packing Up the Initial Domain on BIHOST1
Use the steps in this section to create a template jar file that contains the
domain configuration information, which now includes configuration
information about the Oracle HTTP Server instances.
Unpacking the Domain on BIHOST2
Use the steps in this section to unpack the domain template containing
the domain configuration information and copy the
bidomaintemplate.jar file from BIHOST1 to BIHOST2.
Starting the Components on BIHOST1 and BIHOST2 After Scaling Out
This section describes the steps to start the component processes on
BIHOST1 and BIHOST2 after scale out. The component processes
Scaling Out Oracle Business Intelligence 12-1
Installing Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure on the Other Host Computers
include the Node Managers, the Administration Server for the WebLogic
domain, the system components, and the Managed Servers.
Verifying Oracle Business Intelligence URLs on BIHOST2
After starting the components in the domain on BIHOST2, access these
URLs to verify the configuration of Oracle Business Intelligence.
Configuring Oracle BI Publisher
Perform these manual tasks to configure Oracle BI Publisher.
Backing Up the Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration After Scaling Out
It is an Oracle best practices recommendation to create a backup after
successfully configuring a domain or at another logical point. Create a
backup after verifying that the installation so far is successful. This is a
quick backup for the express purpose of immediate restoration in case of
problems in later steps.
12.1 Installing Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure on the Other Host
Computers
If you have configured a separate shared storage volume or partition for BIHOST2,
then you must also install the Infrastructure on BIHOST2.
For more information, see Shared Storage Recommendations When Installing and
Configuring an Enterprise Deployment.
To install the software on the other host computers in the topology, log in to each host,
and use the instructions in Starting the Infrastructure Installer on BIHOST1 and
Navigating the Infrastructure Installation Screens to create the Oracle home on the
appropriate storage device.
Note:
In previous releases, the recommended enterprise topology included a
colocated set of Oracle HTTP Server instances. In those releases, there was a
requirement to install the Infrastructure on the Web Tier hosts (WEBHOST1
and WEBHOST2). However, for this release, the enterprise deployment
topology assumes the Web servers are installed and configured in standalone
mode, so they are not considered part of the application tier domain. For more
information, see Configuring the Web Tier for an Enterprise Deployment
12.2 Installing Oracle Business Intelligence on the Other Host Computers
If you have configured a separate shared storage volume or partition for BIHOST2,
then you must also install the software on BIHOST2.
For more information, see Shared Storage Recommendations When Installing and
Configuring an Enterprise Deployment.
To install the software on the other host computers in the topology, log in to each host,
and use the instructions in Starting the Installation Program and Navigating the
Installation Screens.
12-2 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Stopping the Components on BIHOST1
12.3 Stopping the Components on BIHOST1
Before you scale out, you must stop all the component processes in the domain on
BIHOST1.
The component processes include the Node Managers, the Administration Server for
the WebLogic domain, the system components, and the WLS_BI1 Managed Server,
which is controlled by the Node Manager.
To stop all the components in the domain on BIHOST1, perform the following tasks.
See Also:
Stopping the System Components
Stopping the WLS_BI1 Managed Server
Stopping the Administration Server
Stopping the Node Manager in the Administration Server Domain Home
Stopping the Node Manager in the Managed Server Domain Directory
12.3.1 Stopping the System Components
Follow these steps to stop the system components using Fusion Middleware Control.
1. Enter the following URL into a browser to display the Fusion Middleware Control
login screen:
http://ADMINVHN:7001/em
2. Log into Fusion Middleware Control using the Administration Server credentials.
3. If not already displayed, click the Target Navigation icon
of the page to display the Target Navigation pane.
in the top left corner
4. In the Target Navigation pane, expand the Business Intelligence folder and select
biinstance.
Scaling Out Oracle Business Intelligence 12-3
Stopping the Components on BIHOST1
The Business Intelligence Overview page appears.
5. Click Availability and then Processes to display the Processes tab on the
Availability page.
6. Click Stop All to stop all the system components.
12.3.2 Stopping the WLS_BI1 Managed Server
Follow these steps to stop the WLS_BI1 Managed Server using Fusion Middleware
Control.
1. Enter the following URL into a browser to display the Fusion Middleware Control
login screen:
http://ADMINVHN:7001/em
2. Log in to Fusion Middleware Control using the Administration Server credentials.
3. If not already displayed, click the Target Navigation icon
of the page to display the Target Navigation pane.
in the top left corner
4. In the Target Navigation pane, expand the domain under the WebLogic Domain
folder to view the Managed Servers in the domain.
12-4 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Stopping the Components on BIHOST1
5. Select only the WLS_BI1 Managed Server.
6. Click Shut Down... on the Oracle WebLogic Server toolbar.
7. When the shut down operation is complete, navigate to the Domain home page
and verify that the WLS_BI1 Managed Server is down.
12.3.3 Stopping the Administration Server
Use these steps to stop the Administration Server using the Node Manager.
1. Start WLST:
cd ORACLE_COMMON_HOME/common/bin
./wlst.sh
2. Connect to Node Manager using the Node Manager credentials you defined in
when you created the domain in the Configuration Wizard:
wls:/offline>nmConnect('nodemanager_username','nodemanager_password',
'ADMINVHN','5556','domain_name',
'ASERVER_HOME')
Note:
This username and password are used only to authenticate connections
between Node Manager and clients. They are independent of the server admin
ID and password and are stored in the nm_password.properties file
located in the following directory:
ASERVER_HOME/config/nodemanager
3. Stop the Administration Server:
nmKill('AdminServer')
4. Exit WLST:
exit()
Scaling Out Oracle Business Intelligence 12-5
Cloning the Components on BIHOST1
12.3.4 Stopping the Node Manager in the Administration Server Domain Home
Use these steps to stop the per-domain Node Manager for the ASERVER_HOME
domain directory.
1. Navigate to the following directory:
ASERVER_HOME/bin
2. Use the following command to stop the Node Manager:
./stopNodeManager.sh
12.3.5 Stopping the Node Manager in the Managed Server Domain Directory
Use these steps to stop the per-domain Node Manager for the MSERVER_HOME
domain directory.
1. Navigate to the following directory:
MSERVER_HOME/bin
2. Use the following command to stop the Node Manager:
./stopNodeManager.sh
12.4 Cloning the Components on BIHOST1
After stopping all the component processes, you must clone the components in the
domain on BIHOST1, which will create new components on BIHOST2 based on the
initial domain you created.
Perform the following steps on BIHOST1 to create additional components by cloning
your existing Managed Server, Node Manager, system components, and service
instance. You will later pack and unpack the new components on BIHOST2.
1. Start WLST:
cd ORACLE_HOME/oracle_common/common/bin
./wlst.sh
2. Open the BI Administration Server domain for updating:
wls:/offline> readDomain(‘ASERVER_HOME’)
In this example, replace ASERVER_HOME with the actual path to the domain
directory you created on the shared storage device.
3. Run the CloneBIMachine command to create additional components based on
the existing components in the initial BI domain:
wls:/offline/bi_domain>
cloneBIMachine('ASERVER_HOME','bihost2.example.com',baseMachine='BIHOST1',baseServ
er='WLS_BI1',machineName='BIHOST2')
In this example:
• Replace ASERVER_HOME with the actual path to the domain directory you
created on the shared storage device.
12-6 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Packing Up the Initial Domain on BIHOST1
• Replace bihost2.example.com with the listen address of the new machine,
BIHOST2.
• WLS_BI1 is the server name used throughout this document for the BI Managed
Server on BIHOST1. If you chose a different name, be sure to replace it as
needed.
4. Update and save the domain:
wls:/offline/bi_domain/SystemComponent/obis2> updateDomain()
5. Close the domain:
wls:/offline/bi_domain/SystemComponent/obis2> closeDomain()
6. Exit WLST:
wls:/offline> exit()
12.5 Packing Up the Initial Domain on BIHOST1
Use the steps in this section to create a template jar file that contains the domain
configuration information, which now includes configuration information about the
Oracle HTTP Server instances.
1. Log in to BIHOST1 and run the pack command to create a template jar file as
follows:
cd ORACLE_COMMON_HOME/common/bin
./pack.sh -managed=true \
-domain=ASERVER_HOME \
-template=complete_path/bidomaintemplate.jar \
-template_name=bi_domain_template
In this example:
• Replace ASERVER_HOME with the actual path to the domain directory you
created on the shared storage device.
• Replace complete_path with the complete path to the location where you want to
create the domain template jar file. You will need to reference this location
when you copy or unpack the domain template jar file.
• bidomaintemplate.jar is a sample name for the jar file you are creating,
which will contain the domain configuration files, including the configuration
files for the Oracle HTTP Server instances.
• bi_domain_template is the name assigned to the domain template file.
2. Make a note of the location of the bidomaintemplate.jar file you just created
with the pack command.
By default, the pack template file is created in the current directory where you ran
the pack command. In this example, it would be created in the
ORACLE_COMMON_HOME/common/bin directory, but you can specify a full path
for the template jar file as part of the -template argument to the pack command.
Scaling Out Oracle Business Intelligence 12-7
Unpacking the Domain on BIHOST2
Tip:
For more information about the pack and unpack commands, see "Overview
of the Pack and Unpack Commands" in Creating Templates and Domains Using
the Pack and Unpack Commands.
12.6 Unpacking the Domain on BIHOST2
Use the steps in this section to unpack the domain template containing the domain
configuration information and copy the bidomaintemplate.jar file from BIHOST1
to BIHOST2.
1. Log in to BIHOST2.
2. Copy the domain template jar file from BIHOST1 to BIHOST2.
3. If you haven't already, create the recommended directory structure for the
Managed Server domain on the BIHOST2 local storage device.
Use the examples in File System and Directory Variables Used in This Guide as a
guide.
4. Run the unpack command to unpack the template in the domain directory onto the
local storage, as follows:
complete_path
cd ORACLE_COMMON_HOME/common/bin
./unpack.sh -domain=MSERVER_HOME \
-template=complete_path/bidomaintemplate.jar \
-app_dir=APPLICATION_HOME \
-overwrite_domain=true \
-nodemanager_type=PerDomainNodeManager
In this example:
• Replace MSERVER_HOME with the complete path to the domain home to be
created on the local storage disk. This is the location where the copy of the
domain will be unpacked.
• Replace complete_path with the complete path to the location where you created
or copied the template jar file.
• bidomaintemplate.jar is the directory path and name of the template you
created when you ran the pack command to pack up the domain.
Note that if you are using a separate shared storage volume or partition for
BIHOST2 (and redundant Oracle homes), then you must first copy the template
to the volume or partition mounted to BIHOST2.
• Replace APPLICATION_HOME with the complete path to the Application
directory for the domain on shared storage.
Tip:
For more information about the pack and unpack commands, see "Overview
of the Pack and Unpack Commands" in Creating Templates and Domains Using
the Pack and Unpack Commands.
12-8 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Starting the Components on BIHOST1 and BIHOST2 After Scaling Out
5. Change directory to the newly created MSERVER_HOME directory and verify that
the domain configuration files were copied to the correct location on the BIHOST2
local storage device.
12.7 Starting the Components on BIHOST1 and BIHOST2 After Scaling
Out
This section describes the steps to start the component processes on BIHOST1 and
BIHOST2 after scale out. The component processes include the Node Managers, the
Administration Server for the WebLogic domain, the system components, and the
Managed Servers.
To start the components after scale out, perform the following tasks.
See Also:
Starting the Node Manager in the Administration Server Domain Home
Starting the Administration Server
Starting the Node Managers in the Managed Server Domain Directories
Setting the Listen Address for the WLS_BI2 Managed Server
Configuring the WebLogic Proxy Plug-In
Starting the Managed Servers
Starting the System Components
12.7.1 Starting the Node Manager in the Administration Server Domain Home
To start the per-domain Node Manager for the ASERVER_HOME domain directory on
BIHOST1, use the procedure in Starting the Node Manager in the Administration
Server Domain Home on BIHOST1.
12.7.2 Starting the Administration Server
To start the Administration Server using the Node Manager, use the procedure in
Starting the Administration Server.
12.7.3 Starting the Node Managers in the Managed Server Domain Directories
To start the per-domain Node Managers for the MSERVER_HOME directories on
BIHOST1 and BIHOST2, use the procedure in Starting the Node Manager in the
Managed Server Domain Directory on BIHOST1.
12.7.4 Setting the Listen Address for the WLS_BI2 Managed Server
Before you can start the WLS_BI2 Managed Server, you must update the listen address
of the Managed Server so that it is set to the value of the BIHOST2VHN virtual IP
address. To do this, you use the WebLogic Server Administration Console.
1. Log in to the WebLogic Server Administration Console using your WebLogic
administrator credentials.
2. Click Lock & Edit in the Change Center.
Scaling Out Oracle Business Intelligence 12-9
Verifying Oracle Business Intelligence URLs on BIHOST2
3. Expand the Environment node in the Domain Structure menu on the left and then
click Servers.
4. In the Servers table, click the name of the Managed Server (WLS_BI2).
5. In the Configuration tab, set the Listen Address to the value of BIHOST2VHN and
then click Save to save your changes.
6. Click Activate Changes in the Change Center.
12.7.5 Configuring the WebLogic Proxy Plug-In
Before you can validate that requests are routed correctly through the Oracle HTTP
Server instances, you must set the WebLogic Plug-In Enabled parameter for the
clusters you just configured.
1. Log in to the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console.
2. In the Domain Structure pane, expand the Environment node.
3. Click Clusters.
4. Select the cluster to which you want to proxy requests from Oracle HTTP Server.
The Configuration: General tab is displayed.
5. Scroll down to the Advanced section and expand it.
6. Click Lock & Edit in the Change Center.
7. Set WebLogic Plug-In Enabled to yes.
8. Click Save and click Activate Changes.
9. Click Activate Changes in the Change Center.
12.7.6 Starting the Managed Servers
Before starting the WLS_BI2 Managed Server, make sure that the listen address of
WLS_BI2 is set to the value of the BIHOST2VHN virtual IP address. For more
information, see Setting the Listen Address for the WLS_BI2 Managed Server.
To start the WLS_BI1 and WLS_BI2 Managed Servers, use the procedure in Starting
the WLS_BI1 Managed Server on BIHOST1.
12.7.7 Starting the System Components
To start all of the Oracle Business Intelligence system components, use the procedure
in Starting the System Components.
12.8 Verifying Oracle Business Intelligence URLs on BIHOST2
After starting the components in the domain on BIHOST2, access these URLs to verify
the configuration of Oracle Business Intelligence.
• Access the following URL to verify the status of WLS_BI2:
12-10 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Configuring Oracle BI Publisher
http://BIHOST2VHN1:7003/analytics
You will be redirected to:
http://bi.example.com/analytics
• Access the following URL to verify the status of the BI Publisher application:
http://BIHOST2VHN1:7003/xmlpserver
You will be redirected to:
http://bi.example.com/xmlpserver
• Access the following URL to verify the status of the Oracle Essbase application:
http://BIHOST2VHN1:7003/aps/Essbase
12.9 Configuring Oracle BI Publisher
Perform these manual tasks to configure Oracle BI Publisher.
See Also:
Updating the JMS Shared Temp Directory
Follow these steps to update the JMS Shared Temp Directory for BI
Publisher Scheduler. You need to perform the steps in this section on
only one of the BI hosts (either BIHOST1 or BIHOST2).
Setting the Oracle BI EE Data Source
The Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition (BI EE) data source
must point to the clustered Oracle BI Servers through the Cluster
Controllers. You must perform this task in BI Publisher.
12.9.1 Updating the JMS Shared Temp Directory
Follow these steps to update the JMS Shared Temp Directory for BI Publisher
Scheduler. You need to perform the steps in this section on only one of the BI hosts
(either BIHOST1 or BIHOST2).
Perform the following steps to update the BI Publisher Scheduler configuration:
1. Log in to BI Publisher using one of the following URLs:
• http://BIHOST1VHN1:7003/xmlpserver
• http://BIHOST2VHN1:7003/xmlpserver
2. Click the Administration tab.
3. Click Scheduler Configuration under System Maintenance.
The Scheduler Configuration screen is displayed.
4. Update the Shared Directory by entering a directory that is located in the shared
storage. This shared storage is accessible from both BIHOST1 and BIHOST2.
5. Click Test JMS.
You see a confirmation message that JMS tested successfully.
Scaling Out Oracle Business Intelligence 12-11
Backing Up the Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration After Scaling Out
Note:
If you do not see a confirmation message for a successful test, then verify that
the JNDI URL is set to the following:
cluster:t3://bi_cluster
6. Click Apply.
7. Check the Scheduler status from the Scheduler Diagnostics tab.
12.9.2 Setting the Oracle BI EE Data Source
The Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition (BI EE) data source must point to
the clustered Oracle BI Servers through the Cluster Controllers. You must perform this
task in BI Publisher.
Perform the following steps to set the Oracle BI EE data source in BI Publisher:
1. Log in to BI Publisher using the following URL with administrator credentials.
http://BIHOST1VHN1:7003/xmlpserver
2. Select the Administration tab.
3. Under Data Sources, select JDBC Connection.
4. Update the Oracle BI EE data source setting by changing the Connection String
parameter to the following:
jdbc:oraclebi://primary_cluster_controller_host:primary_cluster_controller_
port/PrimaryCCS=primary_cluster_controller_host;PrimaryCCSPort=primary_cluster_
controller_port;SecondaryCCS=secondary_cluster_controller_host
;SecondaryCCSPort=secondary_cluster_controller_port
For example:
jdbc:oraclebi://BIHOST1:9706/PrimaryCCS=BIHOST1;PrimaryCCSPort=9706;
SecondaryCCS=BIHOST2;SecondaryCCSPort=9706;
5. Select Use System User.
If you do not want to use the system user for the connection, then deselect Use
System User and specify the BIImpersonateUser credentials for Username and
Password. For more information about the BIImpersonateUser user in this context,
see Credentials for Connecting to the Oracle BI Presentation Catalog in the Oracle
Fusion Middleware Developer's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.
6. Click Test Connection. You see a "Connection established successfully" message.
7. Click Apply.
12.10 Backing Up the Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration After
Scaling Out
It is an Oracle best practices recommendation to create a backup after successfully
configuring a domain or at another logical point. Create a backup after verifying that
12-12 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Backing Up the Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration After Scaling Out
the installation so far is successful. This is a quick backup for the express purpose of
immediate restoration in case of problems in later steps.
The backup destination is the local disk. You can discard this backup when the
enterprise deployment setup is complete. After the enterprise deployment setup is
complete, you can initiate the regular deployment-specific Backup and Recovery
process.
For information about backing up your configuration, see Performing Backups and
Recoveries for an Enterprise Deployment.
Scaling Out Oracle Business Intelligence 12-13
Backing Up the Oracle Business Intelligence Configuration After Scaling Out
12-14 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Part IV
Common Configuration and Management
Procedures for an Enterprise Deployment
The following topics contain configuration and management procedures that are
required or recommended for a typical enterprise deployment.
See Also:
Common Configuration and Management Tasks for an Enterprise Deployment
Using Whole Server Migration and Service Migration in an Enterprise
Deployment
Configuring Single Sign-On for an Enterprise Deployment
This chapter describes how to configure the Oracle HTTP Server
WebGate to enable single sign-on with Oracle Access Manager.
13
Common Configuration and Management
Tasks for an Enterprise Deployment
The following topics describe configuration and management tasks you will likely
need to perform on the enterprise deployment environment.
See Also:
Common Configuration and Management Procedures for an Enterprise
Deployment
Verifying Manual Failover of the Administration Server
In case a host computer fails, you can fail over the Administration Server
to another host. The following sections provide the steps to verify the
failover and failback of the Administration Server from BIHOST1 and
BIHOST2.
Enabling SSL Communication Between the Middle Tier and the Hardware Load
Balancer
This section describes how to enable SSL communication between the
middle tier and the hardware load balancer.
Performing Backups and Recoveries for an Enterprise Deployment
This section provides guidelines for making sure you back up the
necessary directories and configuration data for an Oracle Business
Intelligence enterprise deployment.
13.1 Verifying Manual Failover of the Administration Server
In case a host computer fails, you can fail over the Administration Server to another
host. The following sections provide the steps to verify the failover and failback of the
Administration Server from BIHOST1 and BIHOST2.
Assumptions:
• The Administration Server is configured to listen on ADMINVHN, and not on
localhost or ANY address.
For more information about the ADMINVHN virtual IP address, see Reserving the
Required IP Addresses for an Enterprise Deployment.
• These procedures assume that the Administration Server domain home
(ASERVER_HOME) has been mounted on both host computers. This ensures that
the Administration Server domain configuration files and the persistent stores are
saved on the shared storage device.
• The Administration Server is failed over from BIHOST1 to BIHOST2, and the two
nodes have these IPs:
Common Configuration and Management Tasks for an Enterprise Deployment 13-1
Verifying Manual Failover of the Administration Server
– BIHOST1: 100.200.140.165
– BIHOST2: 100.200.140.205
– ADMINVHN : 100.200.140.206. This is the Virtual IP where the Administration
Server is running, assigned to ethX:Y, available in BIHOST1 and BIHOST2.
• Oracle WebLogic Server and Oracle Fusion Middleware components have been
installed in BIHOST2 as described in the specific configuration chapters in this
guide.
Specifically, both host computers use the exact same path to reference the binary
files in the Oracle home.
The following topics provide details on how to perform a test of the Administration
failover procedure.
See Also:
Failing Over the Administration Server to a Different Host
The following procedure shows how to fail over the Administration
Server to a different node (BIHOST2). Note that even after failover, the
Administration Server will still use the same Oracle WebLogic Server
machine (which is a logical machine, not a physical machine).
Validating Access to the Administration Server on BIHOST2 Through Oracle
HTTP Server
After you perform a manual failover of the Administation Server, it is
important to verify that you can access the Administration Server, using
the standard administration URLs.
Failing the Administration Server Back to BIHOST1
After you have tested a manual Administration Server failover, and after
you have validated that you can access the administration URLs after the
failover, you can then migrate the Administration Server back to its
original host.
13.1.1 Failing Over the Administration Server to a Different Host
The following procedure shows how to fail over the Administration Server to a
different node (BIHOST2). Note that even after failover, the Administration Server will
still use the same Oracle WebLogic Server machine (which is a logical machine, not a
physical machine).
This procedure assumes you’ve configured a per domain Node Manager for the
enterprise topology. For more information, see About the Node Manager
Configuration in a Typical Enterprise Deployment
To fail over the Administration Server to a different host:
1.
Stop the Administration Server.
2.
Stop the Node Manager in the Administration Server domain directory
(ASERVER_HOME).
3.
Migrate the ADMINVHN virtual IP address to the second host:
a.
Run the following command as root on BIHOST1(where X:Y is the current
interface used by ADMINVHN):
/sbin/ifconfig ethX:Y down
13-2 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Verifying Manual Failover of the Administration Server
b.
Run the following command as root on BIHOST2:
/sbin/ifconfig <interface:index> ADMINVHN netmask <netmask>
For example:
/sbin/ifconfig eth0:1 100.200.140.206 netmask 255.255.255.0
Note:
Ensure that the netmask and interface to be used to match the available
network configuration in BIHOST2.
4.
Update the routing tables using arping, for example:
/sbin/arping -q -U -c 3 -I eth0 100.200.140.206
5.
Start the Node Manager in the Administration Server domain home on BIHOST2.
6.
Start the Administration Server on BIHOST2.
7.
Test that you can access the Administration Server on BIHOST2 as follows:
a.
Ensure that you can access the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration
Console using the following URL:
http://ADMINVHN:7001/console
b.
Check that you can access and verify the status of components in Fusion
Middleware Control using the following URL:
http://ADMINVHN:7001/em
13.1.2 Validating Access to the Administration Server on BIHOST2 Through Oracle
HTTP Server
After you perform a manual failover of the Administation Server, it is important to
verify that you can access the Administration Server, using the standard
administration URLs.
From the load balancer, access the following URLs to ensure that you can access the
Administration Server when it is running on BIHOST2:
• http://admin.example.com/console
This URL should display the WebLogic Server Administration console.
• http://admin.example.com/em
This URL should display Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control.
13.1.3 Failing the Administration Server Back to BIHOST1
After you have tested a manual Administration Server failover, and after you have
validated that you can access the administration URLs after the failover, you can then
migrate the Administration Server back to its original host.
1. Stop the Administration Server.
Common Configuration and Management Tasks for an Enterprise Deployment 13-3
Enabling SSL Communication Between the Middle Tier and the Hardware Load Balancer
2. Stop the Node Manager in the Administration Server domain home onBIHOST2.
3. Run the following command as root on BIHOST2.
/sbin/ifconfig ethZ:N down
4. Run the following command as root on BIHOST1:
/sbin/ifconfig ethX:Y 100.200.140.206 netmask 255.255.255.0
Note:
Ensure that the netmask and interface to be used match the available network
configuration in BIHOST1
5. Update the routing tables using arping on BIHOST1:
/sbin/arping -q -U -c 3 -I ethX 100.200.140.206
6. Start the Node Manager in the Administration Server domain home on BIHOST1.
7. Start the Administration Server on BIHOST1.
8. Test that you can access the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console using
the following URL:
http://ADMINVHN:7001/console
9. Check that you can access and verify the status of components in the Oracle
Enterprise Manager using the following URL:
http://ADMINVHN:7001/em
13.2 Enabling SSL Communication Between the Middle Tier and the
Hardware Load Balancer
This section describes how to enable SSL communication between the middle tier and
the hardware load balancer.
Note:
This steps are applicable if the hardware load balancer is configured with SSL
and the front end address of the system has been secured accordingly.
See Also:
When is SSL Communication Between the Middle Tier and Load Balancer
Necessary?
Generating Self-Signed Certificates Using the utils.CertGen Utility
Creating an Identity Keystore Using the utils.ImportPrivateKey Utility
Creating a Trust Keystore Using the Keytool Utility
13-4 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Enabling SSL Communication Between the Middle Tier and the Hardware Load Balancer
Importing the Load Balancer Certificate into the Trust Store
Adding the Updated Trust Store to the Oracle WebLogic Server Start Scripts
Configuring Node Manager to Use the Custom Keystores
Configuring WebLogic Servers to Use the Custom Keystores
13.2.1 When is SSL Communication Between the Middle Tier and Load Balancer
Necessary?
In an enterprise deployment, there are scenarios where the software running on the
middle tier must access the front-end SSL address of the hardware load balancer. In
these scenarios, an appropriate SSL handshake must take place between the load
balancer and the invoking servers. This handshake is not possible unless the
Administration Server and Managed Servers on the middle tier are started using the
appropriate SSL configuration.
13.2.2 Generating Self-Signed Certificates Using the utils.CertGen Utility
This section describes the procedure for creating self-signed certificates on BIHOST1.
Create these certificates using the network name or alias of the host.
The directory where keystores and trust keystores are maintained must be on shared
storage that is accessible from all nodes so that when the servers fail over (manually or
with server migration), the appropriate certificates can be accessed from the failover
node. Oracle recommends using central or shared stores for the certificates used for
different purposes (for example, SSL set up for HTTP invocations). In this case,
BIHOST2 uses the cert directory created for BIHOST1certificates.
For information on using trust CA certificates instead, see the information about
configuring identity and trust in Oracle Fusion Middleware Securing Oracle WebLogic
Server.
About Passwords
The passwords used in this guide are used only as examples. Use secure passwords in
a production environment. For example, use passwords that include both uppercase
and lowercase characters as well as numbers.
To create self-signed certificates:
1. Set up your environment by running the WL_HOME/server/bin/setWLSEnv.sh
script:
2. Verify that the CLASSPATH environment variable is set:
echo $CLASSPATH
3. Verify that the shared configuration directory folder has been created and mounted
to shared storage correctly as described in Preparing the File System for an
Enterprise Deployment.
For example, use the following command to verify that the shared configuration
directory is available to each host:
df -h | grep -B1 SHARED_CONFIG_DIR
Common Configuration and Management Tasks for an Enterprise Deployment 13-5
Enabling SSL Communication Between the Middle Tier and the Hardware Load Balancer
Replace SHARED_CONFIG_DIR with the actual path to your shared configuration
directory.
You can also do a listing of the directory to ensure it is available to the host:
ls -al SHARED_CONFIG_DIR
4. Create the keystore home folder structure if does not already exist.
For example:
cd SHARED_CONFIG_DIR
mkdir keystores
chown oracle:oinstall keystores
chmod 750 keystores
5. Change directory to the keystore home:
cd KEYSTORE_HOME
6. Run the utils.CertGen tool to create the certificates for both the physical host
names and the virtual host names used by servers in the node.
Syntax:
java utils.CertGen key_passphrase cert_file_name key_file_name [export |
domestic] [hostname]
Examples:
java utils.CertGen password ADMINVHN.example.com_cert \
ADMINVHN.example.com_key domestic ADMINVHN.example.com
java utils.CertGen password BIHOST1.example.com_cert \
BIHOST1.example.com_key domestic BIHOST1.example.com
13.2.3 Creating an Identity Keystore Using the utils.ImportPrivateKey Utility
This section describes how to create an Identity Keystore on BIHOST1.example.com.
In previous sections you have created certificates and keys that reside in a shared
storage. In this section, the certificate and private key for both BIHOST1 and
ADMINVHN are imported into a new Identity Store. Make sure that you use a
different alias for each of the certificate/key pair imported.
Note:
The Identity Store is created (if none exists) when you import a certificate and
the corresponding key into the Identity Store using the
utils.ImportPrivateKey utility.
1. Import the certificate and private key for ADMINVHN and BIHOST1 into the
Identity Store. Make sure that you use a different alias for each of the
certificate/key pair imported.
Syntax:
java utils.ImportPrivateKey
-certfile cert_file
13-6 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Enabling SSL Communication Between the Middle Tier and the Hardware Load Balancer
-keyfile private_key_file
[-keyfilepass private_key_password]
-keystore keystore
-storepass storepass
[-storetype storetype]
-alias alias
[-keypass keypass]
Note:
Default keystore_type is jks.
Examples:
Java utils.ImportPrivateKey
-certfile KEYSTORE_HOME/ADMINVHN.example.com_cert.pem
-keyfile KEYSTORE_HOME/ADMINVHN.example.com_key.pem
-keyfilepass password
-keystore appIdentityKeyStore.jks
-storepass password
-alias ADMINVHN
-keypass password
java utils.ImportPrivateKey
-certfile KEYSTORE_HOME/BIHOST1.example.com_cert.pem
-keyfile KEYSTORE_HOME/BIHOST1.example.com_key.pem
-keyfilepass password
-keystore appIdentityKeyStore.jks
-storepass password
-alias BIHOST1
-keypass password
2. Repeat the above step for all the remaining hosts used in the system (for example,
BIHOST2).
13.2.4 Creating a Trust Keystore Using the Keytool Utility
To create the Trust Keystore on BIHOST1.example.com.
1. Copy the standard java keystore to create the new trust keystore since it already
contains most of the root CA certificates needed.
Oracle does not recommend modifying the standard Java trust key store directly.
Copy the standard Java keystore CA certificates located under the WL_HOME/
server/lib directory to the same directory as the certificates. For example:
cp WL_HOME/server/lib/cacerts KEYSTORE_HOME/appTrustKeyStore.jks
2. Use the keytool utility to change the default password.
The default password for the standard Java keystore is changeit. Oracle
recommends always changing the default password, as follows:
keytool -storepasswd -new NewPassword -keystore TrustKeyStore -storepass
Original_Password
For example:
keytool -storepasswd -new password -keystore appTrustKeyStore.jks -storepass
changeit
Common Configuration and Management Tasks for an Enterprise Deployment 13-7
Enabling SSL Communication Between the Middle Tier and the Hardware Load Balancer
3. Import the CA certificate into the appTrustKeyStore using the keytool utility.
The CA certificate CertGenCA.der is used to sign all certificates generated by the
utils.CertGen tool and is located at WL_HOME/server/lib directory.
Use the following syntax to import the certificate:
keytool -import -v -noprompt -trustcacerts -alias AliasName -file CAFileLocation keystore KeyStoreLocation -storepass KeyStore_Password
For example:
keytool -import -v -noprompt -trustcacerts -alias clientCACert -file WL_HOME/
server/lib/CertGenCA.der -keystore appTrustKeyStore.jks -storepass password
13.2.5 Importing the Load Balancer Certificate into the Trust Store
For the SSL handshake to behave properly, the load balancer's certificate needs to be
added to the WLS servers trust store. For adding it, follow these steps:
1. Access the site on SSL with a browser (this add the server's certificate to the
browser's repository).
2. From the browser's certificate management tool, export the certificate to a file that
is on the server's file system (with a file name like bi.example.com).
3. Use the keytool to import the load balancer's certificate into the truststore:
keytool -import -file bi.example.com -v -keystore appTrustKeyStore.jks
13.2.6 Adding the Updated Trust Store to the Oracle WebLogic Server Start Scripts
To ensure each server can access the updated trust store, edit the setDomainEnv.sh
script in each of the domain home directories in the enterprise deployment.
1. Log in to BIHOST1 and open the following file with a text editor:
ASERVER_HOME/bin/setDomainEnv.sh
2. Replace reference to the existing DemoTrustStore entry with the location of the
appTrustKeyStore.jks file.
Note that all the values for EXTRA_JAVA_PROPERTIES must be on one line in the
file, followed by the export command on a new line. For example:
EXTRA_JAVA_PROPERTIES="${EXTRA_JAVA_PROPERTIES}
-Djavax.net.ssl.trustStore=KEYSTORE_HOME/appTrustKeyStore.jks..."
export EXTRA_JAVA_PROPERTIES
3. Make the same change to the setDomainEnv.sh file in the MSERVER_HOME/bin
directory on BIHOST1 and BIHOST2.
Alternatively, you can use the setUserOverrides.sh file to place these options,
this way they will not get overwritten when the domain's scripts are extended with the
configuration wizard or updated with unpack operations. For more information, see
"Customizing Domain Wide Server Parameters" in Administering Server Startup and
Shutdown for Oracle WebLogic Server.
13-8 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Enabling SSL Communication Between the Middle Tier and the Hardware Load Balancer
13.2.7 Configuring Node Manager to Use the Custom Keystores
To configure the Node Manager to use the custom keystores, add the following lines
to the end of the nodemanager.properties files located both in ASERVER_HOME/
nodemanager and MSERVER_HOME/nodemanager directories in all nodes:
KeyStores=CustomIdentityAndCustomTrust
CustomIdentityKeyStoreFileName=Identity KeyStore
CustomIdentityKeyStorePassPhrase=Identity KeyStore Passwd
CustomIdentityAlias=Identity Key Store Alias
CustomIdentityPrivateKeyPassPhrase=Private Key used when creating Certificate
Make sure to use the correct value for CustomIdentityAlias for Node Manager's
listen address. For example on BIHOST1, use appIdentity2 according to the steps in
Creating a Trust Keystore Using the Keytool Utility
(appIdentity2 mapped to the BIHOST1 listen address).
Example for Node 1:
KeyStores=CustomIdentityAndCustomTrust
CustomIdentityKeyStoreFileName=KEYSTORE_HOME/appIdentityKeyStore.jks
CustomIdentityKeyStorePassPhrase=password
CustomIdentityAlias=appIdentity1
CustomIdentityPrivateKeyPassPhrase=password
The passphrase entries in the nodemanager.properties file are encrypted when
you start Node Manager as described in "Starting the Node Manager on BIHOST1."
For security reasons, minimize the time the entries in the
nodemanager.properties file are left unencrypted. After you edit the file, start
Node Manager as soon as possible so that the entries are encrypted.
13.2.8 Configuring WebLogic Servers to Use the Custom Keystores
Configure the WebLogic Servers to use the custom keystores using the Oracle
WebLogic Server Administration Console. Complete this procedure for the
Administration Server and the Managed Servers that require access to the front end
LBR on SSL.
To configure the identity and trust keystores:
1. Log in to the Administration Console, and click Lock & Edit.
2. In the left pane, expand Environment, and select Servers.
3. Click the name of the server for which you want to configure the identity and trust
keystores.
4. Select Configuration, and then Keystores.
5. In the Keystores field, click Change, and select Custom Identity and Custom Trust
method for storing and managing private keys/digital certificate pairs and trusted
CA certificates, and click Save.
6. In the Identity section, define attributes for the identity keystore.
Common Configuration and Management Tasks for an Enterprise Deployment 13-9
Enabling SSL Communication Between the Middle Tier and the Hardware Load Balancer
• Custom Identity Keystore: Enter the fully qualified path to the identity keystore:
KEYSTORE_HOME/appIdentityKeyStore.jks
• Custom Identity Keystore Type: Leave this field blank, it defaults to JKS.
• Custom Identity Keystore Passphrase: Enter the password Keystore_Password
you provided in Creating an Identity Keystore Using the utils.ImportPrivateKey
Utility
This attribute may be optional or required depending on the type of keystore.
All keystores require the passphrase in order to write to the keystore. However,
some keystores do not require the passphrase to read from the keystore.
WebLogic Server reads only from the keystore, so whether or not you define
this property depends on the requirements of the keystore.
7. In the Trust section, define properties for the trust keystore:
• Custom Trust Keystore: Enter the fully qualified path to the trust keystore:
KEYSTORE_HOME/appTrustKeyStore.jks
• Custom Trust Keystore Type: Leave this field blank, it defaults to JKS.
• Custom Trust Keystore Passphrase: The password you provided in as
New_Password in "Creating a Trust Keystore Using the Keytool Utility."
As mentioned in the previous step, this attribute may be optional or required
depending on the type of keystore.
8. Click Save.
9. To activate these changes, in the Change Center of the Administration Console,
click Activate Changes.
10. Click Lock & Edit.
11. Select Configuration, then SSL.
12. In the Private Key Alias field, enter the alias you used for the host name the
managed server listens on.
In the Private Key Passphrase and the Confirm Private Key Passphrase fields, enter
the password for the keystore that you created in Creating an Identity Keystore
Using the utils.ImportPrivateKey Utility
13. Click Save.
14. Click Activate Changes in the Administration Console's Change Center to make
the changes take effect.
15. Restart the server for which the changes have been applied. The fact that servers
can be restarted using the Administration Console/Node Manager is a good
verification that the communication between Node Manager, Administration
Server and the managed servers is correct.
13-10 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Performing Backups and Recoveries for an Enterprise Deployment
13.3 Performing Backups and Recoveries for an Enterprise Deployment
This section provides guidelines for making sure you back up the necessary directories
and configuration data for an Oracle Business Intelligence enterprise deployment.
Note:
Some of the static and run-time artifacts listed in this section are hosted from
Network Attached Storage (NAS). If possible, backup and recover these
volumes from the NAS filer directly rather than from the application servers.
For general information about backing up and recovering Oracle Fusion Middleware
products, see the following sections in Administering Oracle Fusion Middleware:
• "Backing Up Your Environment"
• "Recovering Your Environment"
Table 13-1 lists the static artifacts to back up in a typical Oracle Business Intelligence
enterprise deployment.
Table 13-1
Static Artifacts to Back Up in the Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Deployment
Type
Host
Tier
Database Oracle home
DBHOST1 and DBHOST2
Data Tier
Oracle Fusion Middleware Oracle
home
WEBHOST1 and WEBHOST2
Web Tier
Oracle Fusion Middleware Oracle
home
BIHOST1 and BIHOST2
Application Tier
Installation-related files
WEBHOST1, WEHOST2, and
shared storage
N/A
Table 13-2 lists the runtime artifacts to back up in a typical Oracle Business Intelligence
enterprise deployment.
Table 13-2
Run-Time Artifacts to Back Up in the Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Deployment
Type
Host
Tier
Administration Server domain
home (ASERVER_HOME)
BIHOST1 and BIHOST2
Application Tier
Application home
(APPLICATION_HOME)
BIHOST1 and BIHOST2
Application Tier
Oracle RAC databases
DBHOST1 and DBHOST2
Data Tier
Scripts and Customizations
BIHOST1 and BIHOST2
Application Tier
Deployment Plan home
(DEPLOY_PLAN_HOME)
BIHOST1 and BIHOST2
Application Tier
Common Configuration and Management Tasks for an Enterprise Deployment 13-11
Performing Backups and Recoveries for an Enterprise Deployment
Table 13-2 (Cont.) Run-Time Artifacts to Back Up in the Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise
Deployment
Type
Host
Tier
Singleton Data Directory (SDD)
BIHOST1 and BIHOST2
Application Tier
13-12 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
14
Using Whole Server Migration and Service
Migration in an Enterprise Deployment
The following topics describe Oracle WebLogic Server Whole Server migration and
Oracle WebLogic Server Automatic Service Migration. The also explain how these
features can be used in an Oracle Fusion Middleware enterprise topology.
See Also:
Common Configuration and Management Procedures for an Enterprise
Deployment
About Whole Server Migration and Automatic Service Migration in an
Enterprise Deployment
Oracle WebLogic Server provides a migration framework that is integral
part of any highly available environment. The following sections
provide more information about how this framework can be used
effectively in an enterprise deployment.
Creating a GridLink Data Source for Leasing
Both Whole Server Migration and Automatic Service Migration require a
data source for the leasing table, which is a tablespace created
automatically as part of the Oracle WebLogic Server schemas by the
Repository Creation Utility (RCU).
Configuring Whole Server Migration for an Enterprise Deployment
After you have prepared your domain for whole server migration or
automatic service migration, you can then configure Whole Server
Migration for specific Managed Servers within a cluster. See the
following topics for more information.
Configuring Automatic Service Migration in an Enterprise Deployment
To configure automatic service migration for specific services in an
enterprise deployment, refer to the topics in this section.
14.1 About Whole Server Migration and Automatic Service Migration in an
Enterprise Deployment
Oracle WebLogic Server provides a migration framework that is integral part of any
highly available environment. The following sections provide more information about
how this framework can be used effectively in an enterprise deployment.
See Also:
Understanding the Difference Between Whole Server and Service Migration
Implications of Using Whole Server Migration or Service Migration in an
Enterprise Deployment
Using Whole Server Migration and Service Migration in an Enterprise Deployment 14-1
About Whole Server Migration and Automatic Service Migration in an Enterprise Deployment
Understanding Which Products and Components Require Whole Server
Migration and Service Migration
14.1.1 Understanding the Difference Between Whole Server and Service Migration
The Oracle WebLogic Server migration framework supports two distinct types of
automatic migration:
• Whole Server Migration, where the Managed Server instance is migrated to a
different physical system upon failure.
Whole server migration provides for the automatic restart of a server instance, with
all of its services, on a different physical machine. When a failure occurs in a server
that is part of a cluster that is configured with server migration, the server is
restarted on any of the other machines that host members of the cluster.
For this to happen, the servers need to use a a floating IP as listen address and the
required resources (transactions logs and JMS persistent stores) must be available
on the candidate machines.
For more information, see "Whole Server Migration" in Administering Clusters for
Oracle WebLogic Server.
• Service Migration, where specific services are moved to a different Managed
Server within the cluster.
To understand service migration, it's important to understand pinned services.
In a WebLogic Server cluster, most subsystem services are hosted homogeneously
on all server instances in the cluster, enabling transparent failover from one server
to another. In contrast, pinned services, such as JMS-related services, the JTA
Transaction Recovery Service, and user-defined singleton services, are hosted on
individual server instances within a cluster—for these services, the WebLogic
Server migration framework supports failure recovery with service migration, as
opposed to failover.
For more information, see "Understanding the Service Migration Framework" in
Administering Clusters for Oracle WebLogic Server.
14.1.2 Implications of Using Whole Server Migration or Service Migration in an
Enterprise Deployment
When a server or service is started in another system, the required resources (such as
services data and logs) must be available to both the original system and to the
failover system; otherwise, the service cannot resume the same operations successfully
on the failover system.
For this reason, both whole server and service migration require that all members of
the cluster have access to the same transaction and JMS persistent stores (whether the
persistent store is file-based or database-based).
This is another reason why shared storage is important in an enterprise deployment.
When you properly configure shared storage, you ensure that in the event of a manual
failover (Administration Server failover) or an automatic failover (whole server
migration or service migration), both the original machine and the failover machine
can access the same file store with no change in service.
In the case of an automatic service migration, when a pinned service needs to be
resumed, the JMS and JTA logs that it was using before failover need to be accessible.
14-2 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Creating a GridLink Data Source for Leasing
In addition to shared storage, Whole Server Migration requires the procurement and
assignment of a virtual IP address (VIP). When a Managed Server fails over to another
machine, the VIP is automatically reassigned to the new machine.
Note that service migration does not require a VIP.
14.1.3 Understanding Which Products and Components Require Whole Server
Migration and Service Migration
The following table summarizes the products and components you should configure
for whole server migration and the products you should configure for Automatic
Service Migration.
Note that the table lists the recommended best practice. It does not preclude you from
using Whole Server or Automatic Server Migration for those components that support
it.
Component
Whole Server Migration (WSM)
Automatic Service Migration
(ASM)
Oracle Business Intelligence
Publisher
YES
NO
14.2 Creating a GridLink Data Source for Leasing
Both Whole Server Migration and Automatic Service Migration require a data source
for the leasing table, which is a tablespace created automatically as part of the Oracle
WebLogic Server schemas by the Repository Creation Utility (RCU).
For an enterprise deployment, you should use create a GridLink data source:
1. Log in to the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console.
2. If you have not already done so, in the Change Center, click Lock & Edit.
3. In the Domain Structure tree, expand Services, then select Data Sources.
4. On the Summary of Data Sources page, click New and select GridLink Data
Source, and enter the following:
• Enter a logical name for the data source in the Name field. For example,
Leasing.
• Enter a name for JNDI. For example, jdbc/leasing.
• For the Database Driver, select Oracle's Driver (Thin) for GridLink
Connections Versions: Any.
• Click Next.
5. In the Transaction Options page, clear the Supports Global Transactions check
box, and then click Next.
Using Whole Server Migration and Service Migration in an Enterprise Deployment 14-3
Creating a GridLink Data Source for Leasing
6. In the GridLink Data Source Connection Properties Options screen, select Enter
individual listener information and click Next.
7. Enter the following connection properties:
• Service Name: Enter the service name of the database with lowercase
characters. For a GridLink data source, you must enter the Oracle RAC service
name. For example:
biedg.example.com
• Host Name and Port: Enter the SCAN address and port for the RAC database,
separated by a colon. For example:
db-scan.example.com:1521
Click Add to add the host name and port to the list box below the field.
You can identify the SCAN address by querying the appropriate parameter in
the database using the TCP Protocol:
SQL>show parameter remote_listener;
NAME
TYPE
VALUE
-------------------------------------------------remote_listener
string
db-scan.example.com
Note:
For Oracle Database 11g Release 1 (11.1), use the virtual IP and port of each
database instance listener, for example:
dbhost1-vip.mycompany.com (port 1521)
and
dbhost2-vip.mycompany.com (1521)
For Oracle Database 10g, use multi data sources to connect to an Oracle RAC
database. For information about configuring multi data sources see Using
Multi Data Sources with Oracle RAC.
• Database User Name: Enter the following:
FMW1221_WLS_RUNTIME
In this example, FMW1221 is the prefix you used when you created the schemas
as you prepared to configure the initial enterprise manager domain.
14-4 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Creating a GridLink Data Source for Leasing
Note that in previous versions of Oracle Fusion Middleware, you had to
manually create a user and tablespace for the migration leasing table. In Fusion
Middleware 12c (12.2.1), the leasing table is created automatically when you
create the WLS schemas with the Repository Creation Utility (RCU).
• Password: Enter the password you used when you created the WLS schema in
RCU.
• Confirm Password: Enter the password again and click Next.
8. On the Test GridLink Database Connection page, review the connection parameters
and click Test All Listeners.
Here is an example of a successful connection notification:
Connection test for
jdbc:oracle:thin:@(DESCRIPTION=(ADDRESS_LIST=(ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=TCP)(HOST=dbscan.example.com)
(PORT=1521)))(CONNECT_DATA=(SERVICE_NAME=biedg.example.com))) succeeded.
Click Next.
9. In the ONS Client Configuration page, do the following:
• Select FAN Enabled to subscribe to and process Oracle FAN events.
• Enter the SCAN address in the ONS Host and Port field, and then click Add
and click Add:
This value should be the ONS host and ONS remote port for the RAC database.
To find the ONS remote port for the database, you can use the following
command on the database host:
[orcl@db-scan1 ~]$ srvctl config nodeapps -s
ONS exists: Local port 6100, remote port 6200, EM port 2016
• Click Next.
Note:
For Oracle Database 11g Release 1 (11.1), use the hostname and port of each
database's ONS service, for example:
custdbhost1.example.com (port 6200)
and
custdbhost2.example.com (6200)
10. On the Test ONS Client Configuration page, review the connection parameters and
click Test All ONS Nodes.
Here is an example of a successful connection notification:
Connection test for db-scan.example.com:6200 succeeded.
Click Next.
Using Whole Server Migration and Service Migration in an Enterprise Deployment 14-5
Configuring Whole Server Migration for an Enterprise Deployment
11. In the Select Targets page, select the cluster that you are configuring for Whole
Server Migration or Automatic Service Migration, and then select All Servers in
the cluster.
12. Click Finish.
13. Click Activate Changes.
14.3 Configuring Whole Server Migration for an Enterprise Deployment
After you have prepared your domain for whole server migration or automatic service
migration, you can then configure Whole Server Migration for specific Managed
Servers within a cluster. See the following topics for more information.
See Also:
Editing the Node Manager's Properties File to Enable Whole Server Migration
Setting Environment and Superuser Privileges for the wlsifconfig.sh Script
Configuring Server Migration Targets
Testing Whole Server Migration
14.3.1 Editing the Node Manager's Properties File to Enable Whole Server Migration
Use the section to edit the Node Manager properties file on the two nodes where the
servers are running.
1. Locate and open the following file with a text editor:
MSERVER_HOME/nodemanager/nodmeanager.properties
2. If not done already, set the StartScriptEnabled property in the
nodemanager.properties file to true.
This is required to enable Node Manager to start the managed servers.
3. Add the following properties to the nodemanager.properties file to enable
server migration to work properly:
• Interface
Interface=eth0
This property specifies the interface name for the floating IP (eth0, for
example).
Note:
Do not specify the sub interface, such as eth0:1 or eth0:2. This interface is
to be used without the :0, or :1.
The Node Manager's scripts traverse the different :X enabled IPs to determine
which to add or remove. For example, the valid values in Linux environments
are eth0, eth1, or, eth2, eth3, ethn, depending on the number of interfaces
configured.
14-6 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Configuring Whole Server Migration for an Enterprise Deployment
• NetMask
NetMask=255.255.255.0
This property specifies the net mask for the interface for the floating IP.
• UseMACBroadcast
UseMACBroadcast=true
This property specifies whether or not to use a node's MAC address when
sending ARP packets, that is, whether or not to use the -b flag in the arping
command.
4. Restart the Node Manager.
5. Verify in the output of Node Manager (the shell where the Node Manager is
started) that these properties are in use. Otherwise, problems may occur during
migration. The output should be similar to the following:
...
SecureListener=true
LogCount=1
eth0=*,NetMask=255.255.255.0
...
14.3.2 Setting Environment and Superuser Privileges for the wlsifconfig.sh Script
Use this section to set the environment and superuser privileges for the
wlsifconfig.sh script, which is used to transfer IP addresses from one machine to
another during migration. It must be able to run ifconfig, which is generally only
available to superusers.
For more information about the wlsifconfig.sh script, see "Configuring Automatic
Whole Server Migration" in Administering Clusters for Oracle WebLogic Server.
Refer to the following sections for instructions on preparing your system to run the
wlsifconfig.sh script.
See Also:
Setting the PATH Environment Variable for the wlsifconfig.sh Script
Granting Privileges to the wlsifconfig.sh Script
14.3.2.1 Setting the PATH Environment Variable for the wlsifconfig.sh Script
Ensure that the commands listed in the following table are included in the PATH
environment variable for each host computers.
File
wlsifconfig.sh
wlscontrol.sh
Directory Location
MSERVER_HOME/bin/server_migration
WL_HOME/common/bin
Using Whole Server Migration and Service Migration in an Enterprise Deployment 14-7
Configuring Whole Server Migration for an Enterprise Deployment
File
Directory Location
nodemanager.domains
MSERVER_HOME/nodemanager
14.3.2.2 Granting Privileges to the wlsifconfig.sh Script
Grant sudo privilege to the operating system user (for example, oracle) with no
password restriction, and grant execute privilege on the /sbin/ifconfig and /
sbin/arping binaries.
Note:
For security reasons, sudo should be restricted to the subset of commands
required to run the wlsifconfig.sh script.
Ask the system administrator for the sudo and system rights as appropriate to
perform this required configuration task.
The following is an example of an entry inside /etc/sudoers granting sudo execution
privilege for oracle to run ifconfig and arping:
Defaults:oracle !requiretty
oracle ALL=NOPASSWD: /sbin/ifconfig,/sbin/arping
14.3.3 Configuring Server Migration Targets
To configure migration in a cluster:
1.
Log in to the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console.
2.
In the Domain Structure window, expand Environment and select Clusters. The
Summary of Clusters page appears.
3.
Click the cluster for which you want to configure migration in the Name column
of the table.
4.
Click the Migration tab.
5.
Click Lock & Edit.
6.
Verify that Database is the selected leasing mechanism.
If necessary, select Database as the leasing mechanism.
7.
Under Candidate Machines For Migratable Server, in the Available filed, select
the Managed Servers in the cluster and click the right arrow to move them to
Chosen.
8.
Select the Leasing data source that you created in Creating a GridLink Data
Source for Leasing.
9.
Click Save.
10. Set the Candidate Machines for Server Migration. You must perform this task for
all of the managed servers as follows:
14-8 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Configuring Whole Server Migration for an Enterprise Deployment
a.
In Domain Structure window of the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration
Console, expand Environment and select Servers.
b.
Select the server for which you want to configure migration.
c.
Click the Migration tab.
d.
Select Automatic Server Migration Enabled and click Save.
This enables the Node Manager to start a failed server on the target node
automatically.
For information on targeting applications and resources, see Using Multi Data
Sources with Oracle RAC.
e.
In the Available field, located in the Migration Configuration section, select
the machines to which to allow migration and click the right arrow.
In this step, you are identifying host to which the Managed Server should
failover if the current host is unavailable. For example, for the Managed
Server on the HOST1, select HOST2; for the Managed Server on HOST2,
select HOST1.
Tip:
Click Customize this table in the Summary of Servers page, move Current
Machine from the Available Window to the Chosen window to view the
machine on which the server is running. This is different from the
configuration if the server is migrated automatically.
11. Click Activate Changes.
12. Restart the Administration Server and the servers for which server migration has
been configured.
14.3.4 Testing Whole Server Migration
Perform the steps in this section to verify that automatic whole server migration is
working properly.
To test from Node 1:
1.
Stop the managed server process.
kill -9 pid
pid specifies the process ID of the managed server. You can identify the pid in the
node by running this command:
ps -ef | grep WLS_BI1
2.
Watch the Node Manager console (the terminal window where you performed
the kill command): you should see a message indicating that the managed server's
floating IP has been disabled.
3.
Wait for the Node Manager to try a second restart of the Managed Server. Node
Manager waits for a period of 30 seconds before trying this restart.
4.
After node manager restarts the server and before it reaches "RUNNING" state,
kill the associated process again.
Using Whole Server Migration and Service Migration in an Enterprise Deployment 14-9
Configuring Automatic Service Migration in an Enterprise Deployment
Node Manager should log a message indicating that the server will not be
restarted again locally.
Note:
The number of restarts required is determined by the RestartMax parameter
in the following configuration file:
MSERVER_HOME/servers/WLS_BI1/data/nodemanager/startup.properties
The default value is RestartMax=2.
To test from Node 2:
1.
Watch the local Node Manager console. After 30 seconds since the last try to
restart the managed server on Node 1, Node Manager on Node 2 should prompt
that the floating IP for the managed server is being brought up and that the server
is being restarted in this node.
2.
Access a product URL using same IP address. If the URL is successful, then the
migration was successful.
Verification From the Administration Console
You can also verify migration using the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration
Console:
1. Log in to the Administration Console.
2. Click Domain on the left console.
3. Click the Monitoring tab and then the Migration subtab.
The Migration Status table provides information on the status of the migration.
Note:
After a server is migrated, to fail it back to its original machine, stop the
managed server from the Oracle WebLogic Administration Console and then
start it again. The appropriate Node Manager starts the managed server on the
machine to which it was originally assigned.
14.4 Configuring Automatic Service Migration in an Enterprise
Deployment
To configure automatic service migration for specific services in an enterprise
deployment, refer to the topics in this section.
Note:
Oracle Business Intelligence currently does not support automatic service
migration. The information is included here for users who are deploying other
Fusion Middleware products that do support automatic service migration.
14-10 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Configuring Automatic Service Migration in an Enterprise Deployment
See Also:
Setting the Leasing Mechanism and Data Source for an Enterprise Deployment
Cluster
Changing the Migration Settings for the Managed Servers in the Cluster
About Selecting a Service Migration Policy
Setting the Service Migration Policy for Each Managed Server in the Cluster
Restarting the Managed Servers and Validating Automatic Service Migration
Failing Back Services After Automatic Service Migration
14.4.1 Setting the Leasing Mechanism and Data Source for an Enterprise Deployment
Cluster
Before you can configure automatic service migration, you must verify the leasing
mechanism and data source that will be used by the automatic service migration
feature:
Note:
The following procedure assumes you have already created the Leasing data
source, as described in Creating a GridLink Data Source for Leasing.
1. Log in to the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console.
2. Click Lock & Edit.
3. In the Domain Structure window, expand Environment and select Clusters.
The Summary of Clusters page appears.
4. In the Name column of the table, click the cluster for which you want to configure
migration.
5. Click the Migration tab.
6. Verify that Database is selected in the Migration Basis drop-down menu.
7. From the Data Source for Automatic Migration drop-down menu, select the
Leasing data source that you created in Creating a GridLink Data Source for
Leasing.
8. Click Save.
9. Activate changes.
14.4.2 Changing the Migration Settings for the Managed Servers in the Cluster
After you set the leasing mechanism and data source for the cluster, you can then
enable automatic JTA migration for the Managed Servers that you want to configure
for service migration. Note that this topic applies only if you are deploying JTA
services as part of your enterprise deployment.
To change the migration settings for the Managed Servers in each cluster:
Using Whole Server Migration and Service Migration in an Enterprise Deployment 14-11
Configuring Automatic Service Migration in an Enterprise Deployment
1. If you haven’t already, log in to the Administration Console, and click Lock & Edit.
2. In the Domain Structure pane, expand the Environment node and then click
Servers.
The Summary of Servers page appears.
3. Click the name of the server you want to modify in Name column of the table.
The settings page for the selected server appears and defaults to the Configuration
tab.
4. Click the Migration tab.
5. From the JTA Migration Policy drop-down menu, select Failure Recovery.
6. In the JTA Candidate Servers section of the page, select the Managed Servers in
the Available list box, and then click the move button to move them into the
Chosen list box.
7. In the JMS Candidate Servers section of the page, select the Managed Servers in
the Available list box, and then click the move button to move them into the
Chosen list box.
8. Click Save.
14.4.3 About Selecting a Service Migration Policy
When you configure Automatic Service Migration, you select a Service Migration
Policy for each cluster. This topic provides guidelines and considerations when
selecting the Service Migration Policy.
For example, products or components running singletons or using Path services can
benefit from the Auto-Migrate Exactly-Once policy. With this policy, if at least one
Managed Server in the candidate server list is running, the services hosted by this
migratable target will be active somewhere in the cluster if servers fail or are
administratively shut down (either gracefully or forcibly). This can cause multiple
homogenous services to end up in one server on startup.
When you are using this policy, you should monitor the cluster startup to identify
what servers are running on each server. You can then perform a manual failback, if
necessary, to place the system in a balanced configuration.
Other Fusion Middleware components are better suited for the Auto-Migrate FailureRecovery Services policy. With this policy, the services hosted by the migratable
target will start only if the migratable target's User Preferred Server (UPS) is started.
For more information, see Policies for Manual and Automatic Service Migration in
Administering Clusters for Oracle WebLogic Server.
14.4.4 Setting the Service Migration Policy for Each Managed Server in the Cluster
After you modify the migration settings for each server in the cluster, you can then
identify the services and set the migration policy for each Managed Server in the
cluster, using the WebLogic Administration Console:
1. If you haven’t already, log in to the Administration Console, and click Lock & Edit.
2. In the Domain Structure pane, expand Environment, then expand Clusters, then
select Migratable Targets.
14-12 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Configuring Automatic Service Migration in an Enterprise Deployment
3. Click the name of the first Managed Server in the cluster.
4. Click the Migration tab.
5. From the Service Migration Policy drop-down menu, select the appropriate policy
for the cluster.
For more information, see About Selecting a Service Migration Policy.
6. Click Save.
7. Repeat steps 2 through 6 for each of the additional Managed Servers in the cluster.
8. Activate the changes.
9. Restart the Managed Servers in the cluster.
14.4.5 Restarting the Managed Servers and Validating Automatic Service Migration
After you configure automatic service migration for your cluster and Managed
Servers, validate the configuration, as follows:
1. If you haven’t already, log in to the Administration Console.
2. In the Domain Structure pane, select Environment, then Clusters, and restart the
cluster you just configured for automatic service migration.
3. In the Domain Structure pane, expand Environment, and then expand Clusters.
4. Click Migratable Targets.
5. Click the Control tab.
The console displays a list of migratable targets and their current hosting server.
6. In the Migratable Targets table, select a row for the one of the migratable targets.
7. Note the value in the Current Hosting Server column.
8. Use the operating system command line to stop the the first Managed Server.
Use the following command to kill the Managed Server Process and simulate a
crash scenario:
kill -9 pid
In this example, replace pid with the process ID (PID) of the Managed Server. You
can identify the PID by running the following UNIX command:
ps -ef | grep managed_server_name
Note that after you kill the process, the Managed Server might be configured to
start automatically after you initially kill the process. In this case, you must kill the
second process using the kill –9 command again.
9. Watch the terminal window (or console) where the Node Manager is running.
You should see a message indicating that the selected Managed Server has failed.
The message will be similar to the following:
<INFO> <domain_name> <server_name>
<The server 'server_name' with process id 4668 is no longer alive; waiting for
Using Whole Server Migration and Service Migration in an Enterprise Deployment 14-13
Configuring Automatic Service Migration in an Enterprise Deployment
the process to die.>
<INFO> <domain_name> <server_name>
<Server failed so attempting to restart (restart count = 1)>.
10. Return to the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console and refresh the
table of migratable targets; verify that the migratable targets are transferred to the
remaining, running Managed Server in the cluster:
• Verify that the Current Hosting Server for the process you killed is now
updated to show that it has been migrated to a different host.
• Verify that the value in the Status of Last Migration column for the process is
"Succeeded".
11. Open and review the log files for the Managed Servers that are now hosting the
services; look for any JTA or JMS errors.
Note:
For JMS tests, it is a good practice to get message counts from destinations and
make sure that there are no stuck messages in any of the migratable targets:
For example, for uniform distributed destintations (UDDs):
a.
Access the JMS Subdeployment module in the Administration Console:
In the Domain Structure pane, select Services, then Messaging, and then
JMS Modules.
b.
Click the JMS Module.
c.
Click the destination in the Summary of Resources table. destination>Select monitoring and get the Messages Total and Messages Pending
Counts
d.
Select the Monitoring tab, and review the Messages Total and Messages
Pending values in the Destinations table.
14.4.6 Failing Back Services After Automatic Service Migration
When Automatic Service Migration occurs, Oracle WebLogic Server does not support
failing back services to their original server when a server is back online and rejoins
the cluster.
As a result, after the Automatic Service Migration migrates specific JMS services to a
backup server during a fail-over, it does not migrate the services back to the original
server after the original server is back online. Instead, you must migrate the services
back to the original server manually.
To fail back a service to its original server, follow these steps:
1.
If you have not already done so, in the Change Center of the Administration
Console, click Lock & Edit.
2.
In the Domain Structure tree, expand Environment, expand Clusters, and then
select Migratable Targets.
3.
To migrate one or more migratable targets at once, on the Summary of Migratable
Targets page:
14-14 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Configuring Automatic Service Migration in an Enterprise Deployment
a.
Click the Control tab.
b.
Use the check boxes to select one or more migratable targets to migrate.
c.
Click Migrate.
d.
Use the New hosting server drop-down to select the original Managed
Server.
e.
Click OK.
A request is submitted to migrate the JMS-related service and the
configuration edit lock is released. In the Migratable Targets table, the Status
of Last Migration column indicates whether the requested migration has
succeeded or failed.
4.
To migrate a specific migratable target, on the Summary of Migratable Targets
page:
a.
Select the migratable target to migrate.
b.
Click the Control tab.
c.
Reselect the migratable target to migrate.
d.
Click Migrate.
e.
Use the New hosting server drop-down to select a new server for the
migratable target.
f.
Click OK.
Using Whole Server Migration and Service Migration in an Enterprise Deployment 14-15
Configuring Automatic Service Migration in an Enterprise Deployment
14-16 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
15
Configuring Single Sign-On for an
Enterprise Deployment
This chapter describes how to configure the Oracle HTTP Server WebGate to enable
single sign-on with Oracle Access Manager.
See Also:
Common Configuration and Management Procedures for an Enterprise
Deployment
About Oracle HTTP Server Webgate
Oracle HTTP Server WebGate is a Web server plug-in that intercepts
HTTP requests and forwards them to an existing Oracle Access Manager
instance for authentication and authorization.
General Prerequisites for Configuring Oracle HTTP Server 12c Webgate
Before you can configure Oracle HTTP Server 12c WebGate, you must
have installed and configured a certified version of Oracle Access
Manager.
Enterprise Deployment Prerequisites for Configuring OHS 12c Webgate
When you are configuring Oracle HTTP Server Webgate to enable Single
Sign-On for an enterprise deployment, consider the prerequisites
mentioned in this section.
Configuring Oracle HTTP Server 12c WebGate for an Enterprise Deployment
Perform the following steps to configure Oracle HTTP Server 12c
WebGate for Oracle Access Manager on both WEBHOST1 and
WEBHOST2.
Registering the Oracle HTTP Server 12c WebGate with Oracle Access Manager
You can register the WebGate agent with Oracle Access Manager by
using the Oracle Access Manager Administration console.
Setting Up the WebLogic Server Authentication Providers
To set up the WebLogic Server authentication providers, back up the
configuration files, set up the Oracle Access Manager Identity Assertion
Provider and set the order of providers.
Configuring Oracle ADF and OPSS Security with Oracle Access Manager
Some Oracle Fusion Middleware management consoles use Oracle
Application Development Framework (Oracle ADF) security, which can
integrate with Oracle Access Manager Single Sign On (SSO). These
applications can take advantage of Oracle Platform Security Services
(OPSS) SSO for user authentication, but you must first configure the
domain-level jps-config.xml file to enable these capabilities.
Configuring Single Sign-On for an Enterprise Deployment 15-1
About Oracle HTTP Server Webgate
Configuring Single Sign-On for Applications
This section describes how to enable single sign-on (SSO) for BI
applications.
15.1 About Oracle HTTP Server Webgate
Oracle HTTP Server WebGate is a Web server plug-in that intercepts HTTP requests
and forwards them to an existing Oracle Access Manager instance for authentication
and authorization.
For Oracle Fusion Middleware 12c, the WebGate software is installed as part of the
Oracle HTTP Server 12c software installation.
For more extensive information about WebGates, see “Registering and Managing
OAM 11g Agents” in the Adminstrator’s Guide for Oracle Access Management.
15.2 General Prerequisites for Configuring Oracle HTTP Server 12c
Webgate
Before you can configure Oracle HTTP Server 12c WebGate, you must have installed
and configured a certified version of Oracle Access Manager.
At the time this document was published, the supported versions of Oracle Access
Manager were 11g Relase 2 (11.1.2.2) and 11g Release 2 (11.1.2.3). For the most up-todate information, see the certification document for your release on the Oracle Fusion
Middleware Supported System Configurations page.
Note:
For production environments, it is highly recommended that you install
Oracle Access Manager in its own environment and not on the machines that
are hosting the enterprise deployment.
For more information about Oracle Access Manager, see the latest Oracle Identity and
Access Management documentation, which you can find in the Middleware
documentation on the Oracle Help Center.
15.3 Enterprise Deployment Prerequisites for Configuring OHS 12c
Webgate
When you are configuring Oracle HTTP Server Webgate to enable Single Sign-On for
an enterprise deployment, consider the prerequisites mentioned in this section.
• Oracle recommends that you deploy Oracle Access Manager as part a highly
available, secure, production environment. For more information about deploying
Oracle Access Manager in an enterprise environment, see the Enterprise
Deployment Guide for your version of Oracle Identity and Access Mangement.
• To enable single sign-on for the WebLogic Server Administration Console and the
Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control, you must add a central
LDAP-provisioned administration user to the directory service that Oracle Access
Manager is using (for example, Oracle Internet Directory or Oracle Unified
Directory). For more information about the required user and groups to add to the
LDAP directory, follow the instructions in Creating a New LDAP Authenticator
and Provisioning Enterprise Deployment Users and Group.
15-2 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Configuring Oracle HTTP Server 12c WebGate for an Enterprise Deployment
15.4 Configuring Oracle HTTP Server 12c WebGate for an Enterprise
Deployment
Perform the following steps to configure Oracle HTTP Server 12c WebGate for Oracle
Access Manager on both WEBHOST1 and WEBHOST2.
In the following procedure, replace the directory variables, such as
OHS_ORACLE_HOME and OHS_CONFIG_DIR, with the values, as defined in File
System and Directory Variables Used in This Guide.
1.
Perform a complete backup of the Web Tier domain.
2.
Change directory to the following location in the Oracle HTTP Server Oracle
home:
cd OHS_ORACLE_HOME/webgate/ohs/tools/deployWebGate/
3.
Run the following command to create the WebGate Instance directory and enable
WebGate logging on OHS Instance:
./deployWebGateInstance.sh -w OHS_CONFIG_DIR -oh OHS_ORACLE_HOME
4.
Verify that a webgate directory and subdirectories was created by the
deployWebGateInstance command:
ls -lart OHS_CONFIG_DIR/webgate/
total 6
drwxr-x---+ 8 orcl oinstall 20 Oct
drwxr-xr-x+ 4 orcl oinstall 4 Oct
drwxr-xr-x+ 3 orcl oinstall 3 Oct
drwxr-xr-x+ 3 orcl oinstall 4 Oct
5.
2
2
2
2
07:14
07:14
07:14
07:14
..
.
tools
config
Run the following command to ensure that the LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment
variable contains OHS_ORACLE_HOME/lib directory path:
export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=$LD_LIBRARY_PATH:OHS_ORACLE_HOME/lib
6.
Change directory to the following directory
OHS_ORACLE_HOME/webgate/ohs/tools/setup/InstallTools
7.
Run the following command from the InstallTools directory.
./EditHttpConf -w OHS_CONFIG_DIR -oh OHS_ORACLE_HOME -o
output_file_name
This command:
• Copies the apache_webgate.template file from the Oracle HTTP Server
Oracle home to a new webgate.conf file in the Oracle HTTP Server
configuration directory.
• Updates the httpd.conf file to add one line, so it includes the
webgate.conf.
• Generates a WebGate configuration file. The default name of the file is
webgate.conf, but you can use a custom name by using the output_file
argument to the command.
Configuring Single Sign-On for an Enterprise Deployment 15-3
Registering the Oracle HTTP Server 12c WebGate with Oracle Access Manager
15.5 Registering the Oracle HTTP Server 12c WebGate with Oracle Access
Manager
You can register the WebGate agent with Oracle Access Manager by using the Oracle
Access Manager Administration console.
For more information, see "Registering an OAM Agent Using the Console" in the
Oracle Fusion Middleware Administrator's Guide for Oracle Access Management.
For more information, see the following topics:
See Also:
Locating and Preparing the RREG Tool
About RREG In-Band and Out-of-Band Mode
Updating the Standard Properties in the OAM11gRequest.xml File
Updating the Protected, Public, and Excluded Resources for an Enterprise
Deployment
Running the RREG Tool
Files and Artifacts Generated by RREG
Copying Generated Artifacts to the Oracle HTTP Server WebGate Instance
Location
Restarting the Oracle HTTP Server Instance
15.5.1 Locating and Preparing the RREG Tool
To set up the RREG tool, complete the following steps:
1.
Log in to one of the Oracle Access Manager hosts in the Application tier.
2.
Change directory to the following directory in the Oracle Access Manager Oracle
home:
OAM_ORACLE_HOME/oam/server/rreg/client
In this example, OAM_ORACLE_HOME refers to the Oracle home on the system
where the Oracle Access Manager software was installed.
Note: If you do not have privileges or access to the Oracle Access Manager
server, then you can use out-of-band mode to generate the required files and
register the WebGate with Oracle Access Manager. For more information, see
About RREG In-Band and Out-of-Band Mode.
3.
Open the oamreg.sh file and set the following environment variables in the file,
as follows:
• Set OAM_REG_HOME to the absolute path to the directory in which you
extracted the contents of RREG archive.
Set JDK_HOME to the absolute path of the directory in which a supported JDK
is installed on your machine.
15-4 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Registering the Oracle HTTP Server 12c WebGate with Oracle Access Manager
15.5.2 About RREG In-Band and Out-of-Band Mode
You can run the RREG Tool in one of two modes: in-band and out-of-band.
Use in-band mode when you have the privileges to access the Oracle Access Manager
server and run the RREG tool yourself from the Oracle Access Manager Oracle home.
You can then copy the generated artifacts and files to the Web server configuration
directory after you run the RREG Tool.
Use out-of-band mode if you do not have privileges or access to the Oracle Access
Manager server. For example, in some organizations, only the Oracle Access Manager
server administrators have privileges access the server directories and perform
administration tasks on the server. In out-of-band mode, the process can work as
follows:
1.
The Oracle Access Manager server administrator provides you with a copy of the
RREG archive file (RREG.tar.gz), which the server administrator can find in the
location described in Locating and Preparing the RREG Tool.
2.
Untar the RREG.tar.gz file that was provided to you by the server
administrator.
For example:
gunzip RREG.tar.gz
tar -xvf RREG.tar
After you unpack the RREG archive, you can find the tool for registering the agent
in the following location:
RREG_HOME/bin/oamreg.sh
In this example, RREG_Home is the directory in which you extracted the contents
of RREG archive.
3.
Use the instructions in Updating the Standard Properties in the
OAM11gRequest.xml File to update the OAM11GRequest.xml file, and send the
completed OAM11GRequest.xml file to the Oracle Access Manager server
administrator.
4.
The Oracle Access Manager server administrator then uses the instructions in
Running the RREG Tool in Out-Of-Band Mode to run the RREG Tool and
generate the AgentID_response.xml file.
5.
The Oracle Access Manager server administrator sends the
AgentID_response.xml file to you.
6.
Use the instructions in Running the RREG Tool in Out-Of-Band Mode to run the
RREG Tool with the AgentID_response.xml file and generate the required
artifacts and files on the client system.
15.5.3 Updating the Standard Properties in the OAM11gRequest.xml File
Before you can register the Webgate agent with Oracle Access Manager, you must
update some required properties in the OAM11gRequest.xml file.
Configuring Single Sign-On for an Enterprise Deployment 15-5
Registering the Oracle HTTP Server 12c WebGate with Oracle Access Manager
Note:
If you plan to use the default values for most of the parameters in the
provided XML file, then you can use the shorter version
(OAM11gRequest_short.xml, in which all non-listed fields will take a
default value.
To perform this task:
1.
If you are using in-band mode, then change directory to the following location in
the directory:
OAM_ORACLE_HOME/oam/server/rreg/client
If you are using out-of-band mode, then change directory to the location where
you unpacked the RREG archive.
2.
Make a copy of the OAM11gRequest.xml file template.
3.
Review the properties listed in the file, and then update your copy of the
OAM11gRequest.xml file to make sure the properties reference the host names
and other values specific to your environment.
OAM11gRequest.xml Property
Set to...
serverAddress
The host and the port of the Administration Server for
the Oracle Access Manager domain.
agentName
Any custom name for the agent. Typically, you use a
name that identifies the Fusion Middleware product
you are configuring for single sign-on.
applicationDomain
A value that identifies the Web tier host and the FMW
component you are configuring for single sign-on.
security
The security mode of the Oracle Access Manager
server, which can be open, simple, or certificate mode.
For an enterprise deployment, Oracle recommends
simple mode, unless additional requirements exist to
implement custom security certificates for the
encryption of authentication and authorization traffic.
In most cases, avoid using open mode, because in open
mode, traffic to and from the Oracle Access Manager
server is not encrypted.
For more information using certificate mode or about
Oracle Access Manager supported security modes in
general, see Securing Communication Between OAM
Servers and WebGatesin the Administrator's Guide for
Oracle Access Management.
cachePragmaHeader
private
cacheControlHeader
private
ipValidation
0
<ipValidation>0<ipValidation>
15-6 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Registering the Oracle HTTP Server 12c WebGate with Oracle Access Manager
The IP address of the front-end load balancer. For
example:
ipValidationExceptions
<ipValidationExceptions>
<ipAddress>130.35.165.42</ipAddress>
</ipValidation>
The host and the port of the machine on which Oracle
HTTP Server 12c WebGate is installed.
agentBaseUrl
15.5.4 Updating the Protected, Public, and Excluded Resources for an Enterprise
Deployment
When you set up an Oracle Fusion Middleware environment for single sign-on, you
identify a set of URLs that you want Oracle Access Manager to protect with single
sign-on. You identify these using specific sections of the OAM11gRequest.xml file.
To identify the URLs:
1. If you haven’t already opened OAM11gRequest.xml file for editing, locate and
open the file in a text editor.
For more information, see the following:
• Locating and Preparing the RREG Tool
• Updating the Standard Properties in the OAM11gRequest.xml File
2. Remove the sample entries from the file, and then enter the list of protected, public,
and excluded resources in the appropriate sections of the file, as shown in the
following example.
Note:
If you are using Oracle Access Manager 11g Release 2 (11.1.2.2) or later, then
note that the entries with the wildcard syntax (“.../*”) are included for
backward compatibility with previous versions of Oracle Access Manager.
<protectedResourcesList>
<resource>/analytics/saw.dll</resource>
<resource>/bicontent</resource>
<resource>/xmlpserver</resource>
<resource>/mapviewer</resource>
<resource>/bicomposer</resource>
<resource>/bisearch</resource>
<resource>/em</resource>
<resource>/em/…/*</resource>
<resource>/console</resource>
<resource>/console/…/*</resource>
<resource>/mobile</resource>
<resource>/mobile/.../*</resource>
<resource>/va</resource>
</protectedResourcesList>
<publicResourcesList>
<resource>/analytics</resource>
<resource>/analytics-ws/saw.dll</resource>
Configuring Single Sign-On for an Enterprise Deployment 15-7
Registering the Oracle HTTP Server 12c WebGate with Oracle Access Manager
<resource>/aps</resource>
<resource>/aps/JAPI</resource>
<resource>/aps/Essbase</resource>
</publicResourcesList>
<excludedResourcesList>
<resource>/biservices</resource>
<resource>/analytics-bi-adf</resource>
<resource>/xmlpserver/Guest</resource>
<resource>/xmlpserver/ReportTemplateService.xls</resource>
<resource>/xmlpserver/report_service</resource>
<resource>/xmlpserver/services</resource>
<resource>/analytics/saw.dll/wsdl</resource>
<resource>/analytics-ws</resource>
<resource>/ws/.../*</resource>
<resource>/wsm-pm</resource>
<resource>/wsm-pm/.../*</resource>
</excludedResourcesList>
3. Save and close the OAM11GRequest.xml file.
15.5.5 Running the RREG Tool
The following topics provide information about running the RREG tool to register
your Oracle HTTP Server Webgate with Oracle Access Manager.
See Also:
Running the RREG Tool in In-Band Mode
Running the RREG Tool in Out-Of-Band Mode
15.5.5.1 Running the RREG Tool in In-Band Mode
To run the RREG Tool in in-band mode:
1.
Change directory the RREG home directory.
If you are using in-band mode, the RREG directory is inside the Oracle Access
Manager Oracle home:
OAM_ORACLE_HOME/oam/server/rreg/client
If you are using out-of-band mode, then the RREG home directory is the location
where you unpacked the RREG archive.
2.
Change directory to the bin directory inside the RREG home directory:
cd RREG_HOME/bin/
3.
Set the permissions of the oamreg.sh command so you can execute the file:
chmod +x oamreg.sh
4.
Run the following command:
./oamreg.sh inband input/OAM11GRequest.xml
In this example:
• It is assumed the edited OAM11GRequest.xml file is located in the RREG_HOME/
input directory.
• The output from this command will be saved to the following directory:
15-8 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Registering the Oracle HTTP Server 12c WebGate with Oracle Access Manager
RREG_HOME/output/
The following example shows a sample RREG session:
Welcome to OAM Remote Registration Tool!
Parameters passed to the registration tool are:
Mode: inband
Filename: /u01/oracle/products/fmw/iam_home/oam/server/rreg/client/rreg/input/
OAM11GWCCDomainRequest.xml
Enter admin username:weblogic_idm
Username: weblogic_idm
Enter admin password:
Do you want to enter a Webgate password?(y/n):
n
Do you want to import an URIs file?(y/n):
n
---------------------------------------Request summary:
OAM11G Agent Name:WCC1221_EDG_AGENT
URL String:null
Registering in Mode:inband
Your registration request is being sent to the Admin server at: http://
host1.example.com:7001
---------------------------------------Jul 08, 2015 7:18:13 PM oracle.security.jps.util.JpsUtil disableAudit
INFO: JpsUtil: isAuditDisabled set to true
Jul 08, 2015 7:18:14 PM oracle.security.jps.util.JpsUtil disableAudit
INFO: JpsUtil: isAuditDisabled set to true
Inband registration process completed successfully! Output artifacts are created in
the output folder.
15.5.5.2 Running the RREG Tool in Out-Of-Band Mode
To run the RREG Tool in out-of-band mode on the Oracle Access Manager server, the
Oracle Access Manager server administrator uses the following command:
RREG_HOME/bin/oamreg.sh outofband input/OAM11GRequest.xml
In this example:
• Replace RREG_HOME with the location where the RREG archive file was
unpacked on the server.
• The edited OAM11GRequest.xml file is located in the RREG_HOME/input
directory.
• The RREG Tool saves the output from this command (the
AgentID_response.xml file) to the following directory:
RREG_HOME/output/
The Oracle Access Manager server administrator can then send the
AgentID_response.xml to the user who provided the OAM11GRequest.xml
file.
To run the RREG Tool in out-of-band mode on the Web server client machine, use the
following command:
RREG_HOME/bin/oamreg.sh outofband input/AgentID_response.xml
Configuring Single Sign-On for an Enterprise Deployment 15-9
Registering the Oracle HTTP Server 12c WebGate with Oracle Access Manager
In this example:
• Replace RREG_HOME with the location where you unpacked the RREG archive
file on the client system.
• The AgentID_response.xml file, which was provided by the Oracle Access
Manager server administrator, is located in the RREG_HOME/input directory.
• The RREG Tool saves the output from this command (the artifacts and files
required to register the Webgate software) to the following directory on the client
machine:
RREG_HOME/output/
15.5.6 Files and Artifacts Generated by RREG
The files that get generated by the RREG Tool vary, depending on the security level
you are using for communications between the WebGate and the Oracle Access
Manager server. For more information about the supported security levels, see
Securing Communication Between OAM Servers and WebGates in the Administrator's
Guide for Oracle Access Management.
Note that in this topic any references to RREG_HOME should be replaced with the
path to the directory where you ran the RREG tool. This is typically the following
directory on the Oracle Access Manager server, or (if you are using out-of-band mode)
the directory where you unpacked the RREG archive:
OAM_ORACLE_HOME/oam/server/rreg/client
The following table lists the artifacts that are always generated by the RREG Tool,
regardless of the Oracle Access Manager security level.
File
Location
cwallet.sso
RREG_HOME/output/Agent_ID/
ObAccessClient.xml
RREG_HOME/output/Agent_ID/
The following table lists the additional files that are created if you are using the
SIMPLE or CERT security level for Oracle Access Manager:
File
Location
aaa_key.pem
RREG_HOME/output/Agent_ID/
aaa_cert.pem
RREG_HOME/output/Agent_ID/
password.xml
RREG_HOME/output/Agent_ID/
Note that the password.xml file contains the obfuscated global passphrase to
encrypt the private key used in SSL. This passphrase can be different than the
passphrase used on the server.
You can use the files generated by RREG to generate a certificate request and get it
signed by a third-party Certification Authority. To install an existing certificate, you
must use the existing aaa_cert.pem and aaa_chain.pem files along with
password.xml and aaa_key.pem.
15-10 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Registering the Oracle HTTP Server 12c WebGate with Oracle Access Manager
15.5.7 Copying Generated Artifacts to the Oracle HTTP Server WebGate Instance
Location
After the RREG Tool generates the required artifacts, manually copy the artifacts from
the RREG_Home/output/agent_ID directory to the Oracle HTTP Server
configuration directory on the Web tier host.
The location of the files in the Oracle HTTP Server configuration directory depends
upon the Oracle Access Manager security mode setting (OPEN, SIMPLE, or CERT).
The following table lists the required location of each generated artifact in the Oracle
HTTP configuration directory, based on the security mode setting for Oracle Access
Manager. In some cases, you might have to create the directories if they do not exist
already. For example, the wallet directory might not exist in the configuration
directory.
Note:
For an enterprise deployment, Oracle recommends simple mode, unless
additional requirements exist to implement custom security certificates for the
encryption of authentication and authorization traffic. The information about
using open or certification mode is provided here as a convenience.
Avoid using open mode, because in open mode, traffic to and from the Oracle
Access Manager server is not encrypted.
For more information using certificate mode or about Oracle Access Manager
supported security modes in general, see Securing Communication Between
OAM Servers and WebGatesin the Administrator's Guide for Oracle Access
Management.
File
Location When Using
OPEN Mode
Location When Using
SIMPLE Mode
Location When Using
CERT Mode
wallet/cwallet.sso
OHS_CONFIG_DIR/
webgate/config/
wallet
OHS_CONFIG_DIR/
webgate/config/
wallet/
OHS_CONFIG_DIR/
webgate/config/
wallet/
ObAccessClient.xml
OHS_CONFIG_DIR/
webgate/config
OHS_CONFIG_DIR/
webgate/config/
OHS_CONFIG_DIR/
webgate/config/
password.xml
N/A
OHS_CONFIG_DIR/
webgate/config/
OHS_CONFIG_DIR/
webgate/config/
aaa_key.pem
N/A
OHS_CONFIG_DIR/
webgate/config/
simple/
OHS_CONFIG_DIR/
webgate/config/
aaa_cert.pem
N/A
OHS_CONFIG_DIR/
webgate/config/
simple/
OHS_CONFIG_DIR/
webgate/config/
Configuring Single Sign-On for an Enterprise Deployment 15-11
Setting Up the WebLogic Server Authentication Providers
Note: When you copy ObAccessClient.xml to a new directory, you will
need to delete the old ObAccessClient.xml file from the first Oracle HTTP
Server location cache location on WEBHOST1:
OHS_DOMAIN_HOME/servers/ohs1/cache/config/
And you must perform the similar step for the second Oracle HTTP Server
instance on WEBHOST2:
OHS_DOMAIN_HOME/servers/ohs2/cache/config/
15.5.8 Restarting the Oracle HTTP Server Instance
For information about restarting the Oracle HTTP Server Instance, see "Restarting
Oracle HTTP Server Instances by Using WLST" in Administering Oracle HTTP Server.
If you have configured Oracle HTTP Server in a WebLogic Server domain, you can
also use Oracle Fusion Middleware Control to restart the Oracle HTTP Server
Instances. For more information, see "Restarting Oracle HTTP Server Instances by
Using Fusion Middleware Control" in Administrator's Guide for Oracle HTTP Server.
15.6 Setting Up the WebLogic Server Authentication Providers
To set up the WebLogic Server authentication providers, back up the configuration
files, set up the Oracle Access Manager Identity Assertion Provider and set the order
of providers.
The following topics assumes that you have already configured the LDAP
authenticator by following the steps in Creating a New LDAP Authenticator and
Provisioning Enterprise Deployment Users and Group. If you have not already created
the LDAP authenticator, then do so before continuing with this section.
See Also:
Backing Up Configuration Files
Setting Up the Oracle Access Manager Identity Assertion Provider
Setting the Order of Providers
15.6.1 Backing Up Configuration Files
To be safe, you should first back up the relevant configuration files:
ASERVER_HOME/config/config.xml
ASERVER_HOME/config/fmwconfig/jps-config.xml
ASERVER_HOME/config/fmwconfig/system-jazn-data.xml
Also back up the boot.properties file for the Administration Server:
ASERVER_HOME/servers/AdminServer/security/boot.properties
15.6.2 Setting Up the Oracle Access Manager Identity Assertion Provider
Set up an Oracle Access Manager identity assertion provider in the Oracle WebLogic
Server Administration Console.
To set up the Oracle Access Manager identity assertion provider:
15-12 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Setting Up the WebLogic Server Authentication Providers
1. Log in to the WebLogic Server Administration Console, if not already logged in.
2. Click Lock & Edit.
3. Click Security Realms in the left navigation bar.
4. Click the myrealm default realm entry.
5. Click the Providers tab.
6. Click New, and select the asserter type OAMIdentityAsserter from the drop-down
menu.
7. Name the asserter (for example, OAM ID Asserter) and click OK.
8. Click the newly added asserter to see the configuration screen for the Oracle Access
Manager identity assertion provider.
9. Set the control flag to REQUIRED.
10. Select both the ObSSOCookie and OAM_REMOTE_USER options under Chosen
types.
11. Click Save to save the settings.
12. Click Activate Changes to propagate the changes.
13. Restart the Administration Server and Managed Servers.
15.6.3 Setting the Order of Providers
Set the order of identity assertion and authentication providers in the WebLogic
Server Administration Console.
To set the order of the providers:
1. Log in to the WebLogic Server Administration Console, if not already logged in.
2. Click Lock & Edit.
3. Click Security Realms in the left navigation bar.
4. Click the myrealm default realm entry.
5. Click the Providers tab.
6. Reorder the Oracle Access Manager identity assertion provider, the LDAP
authentication provider, and the default authentication provider by ensuring that
the control flag for each provider is set as follows:
• Oracle Access Manager identity assertion provider: REQUIRED
• LDAP authentication provider: SUFFICIENT
• Default authentication provider (DefaultAuthenticator): SUFFICIENT
7. Click OK.
8. Click Activate Changes to propagate the changes.
9. Restart the Administration Server, Managed Servers, and system components.
Configuring Single Sign-On for an Enterprise Deployment 15-13
Configuring Oracle ADF and OPSS Security with Oracle Access Manager
15.7 Configuring Oracle ADF and OPSS Security with Oracle Access
Manager
Some Oracle Fusion Middleware management consoles use Oracle Application
Development Framework (Oracle ADF) security, which can integrate with Oracle
Access Manager Single Sign On (SSO). These applications can take advantage of
Oracle Platform Security Services (OPSS) SSO for user authentication, but you must
first configure the domain-level jps-config.xml file to enable these capabilities.
The domain-level jps-config.xml file is located in the following location after you
create an Oracle Fusion Middleware domain:
DOMAIN_HOME/config/fmwconfig/jps-config.xml
Note:
The domain-level jps-config.xml should not be confused with the jpsconfig.xml that is deployed with custom applications.
To update the OPSS configuration to delegate in SSO actions in Oracle Access
Manager, complete the following steps:
1. Change directory to the following directory:
cd ORACLE_COMMON_HOME/common/bin
2. Start the WebLogic Server Scripting Tool (WLST):
./wlst.sh
3. Connect to the Administration Server, using the following WLST command:
connect(‘admin_user’,’admin_password’,’admin_url’)
For example:
connect(‘weblogic’,’mypassword’,’t3://ADMINVHN:7001’)
4. Execute the addOAMSSOProvider command, as follows:
addOAMSSOProvider(loginuri="/${app.context}/adfAuthentication", logouturi="/
oamsso/logout.html")
The following table defines the expected value for each argument in the
addOAMSSOProvider command.
Argument
Definition
15-14 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Configuring Single Sign-On for Applications
loginuri
Specifies the URI of the login page
Note: For ADF security enabled applications, "<contextroot/adfAuthentication" should be provided for the
'loginuri' parameter.
For example:
/${app.context}/adfAuthentication
Here is the flow:
logouturi
a.
User accesses a resource that has been protected
by authorization policies in OPSS, fox example.
b.
If the user is not yet authenticated, ADF redirects
the user to the URI configured in 'loginuri'.
c.
Access Manager, should have a policy to protect
the value in 'loginuri': for example, "/<contextroot/adfAuthentication.
d.
When ADF redirects to this URI, Access Manager
displays a Login Page (depending on the
authentication scheme configured in Access
Manager for this URI).
Specifies the URI of the logout page
Notes:
• For ADF security enabled applications, logouturi
should be configured based on logout guidelines in
“Configuring Centralized Logout for Sessions
Involving 11g WebGates” in the Administrator's
Guide for Oracle Access Management.
• When using WebGate 11g, the value of the
logouturi should be sought from the 11g
WebGate Administrator.
• When using WebGate 10g, the value of logouturi
should be /oamsso/logout.html.
autologinuri
Specifies the URI of the autologin page. This is an
optional parameter.
5. Disconnect from the Administration Server:
disconnect()
6. Restart the Administration Server and all the Managed Servers.
15.8 Configuring Single Sign-On for Applications
This section describes how to enable single sign-on (SSO) for BI applications.
It includes the following topics.
See Also:
Enabling Single Sign-On and Oracle Access Manager for Oracle BI EE
Enabling Single Sign-On and Oracle Access Manager for Oracle BI Publisher
Configuring Single Sign-On for an Enterprise Deployment 15-15
Configuring Single Sign-On for Applications
15.8.1 Enabling Single Sign-On and Oracle Access Manager for Oracle BI EE
Perform the following steps to enable single sign-on (SSO) and Oracle Access Manager
for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition (BI EE):
1. Start WLST:
cd ORACLE_HOME/oracle_common/common/bin
./wlst.sh
2. Open the BI Administration Server domain for updating:
wls:/offline> readDomain(‘ASERVER_HOME’)
In this example, replace ASERVER_HOME with the actual path to the domain
directory you created on the shared storage device.
3. Run the following command to enable SSO in Oracle BI EE and configure the
logout information for the Oracle BI Presentation Services processes:
wls:/offline/bi_domain> enableBISingleSignOn('ASERVER_HOME','http://
oam_host:oam_port/oamsso/logout.html')
In this example:
• Replace ASERVER_HOME with the actual path to the domain directory you
created on the shared storage device.
• http://oam_host:oam_port/oamsso/logout.html is the SSO provider (Oracle
Access Manager) logoff URL.
4. Update and save the domain:
wls:/offline/bi_domain> updateDomain()
5. Close the domain:
wls:/offline/bi_domain> closeDomain()
6. Exit WLST:
wls:/offline> exit()
7. Restart the Administration Server, Managed Servers, and system components.
15.8.2 Enabling Single Sign-On and Oracle Access Manager for Oracle BI Publisher
Perform the following steps to enable single sign-on (SSO) and Oracle Access Manager
for Oracle BI Publisher:
1. Log in to BI Publisher using one of the following URLs:
• http://BIHOST1VHN1:7003/xmlpserver
• http://BIHOST2VHN1:7003/xmlpserver
You will be redirected to:
http://bi.example.com/xmlpserver
15-16 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Configuring Single Sign-On for Applications
2. In BI Publisher, go to the Administration > Security Configuration page to enable
SSO.
3. On the Security Configuration page, provide the following information in the
Single Sign-On section:
a. Select Use Single Sign-On.
b. For Single Sign-On Type, select Oracle Access Manager.
c. For Single Sign-Off URL, enter a URL of the following format:
http://oam_host:oam_port/oamsso/logout.html
d. For User Name Parameter, enter OAM_REMOTE_USER.
4. Click Apply.
5. Restart the bipublisher application from the WebLogic Administration Console.
For information on how to restart the bipublisher application, see Using Oracle
WebLogic Server Administration Console to Start and Stop Java Components in the
System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.
Configuring Single Sign-On for an Enterprise Deployment 15-17
Configuring Single Sign-On for Applications
15-18 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
A
Using Multi Data Sources with Oracle RAC
Oracle recommends using GridLink data sources when developing new Oracle RAC
applications. However, if you are using legacy applications and databases that do not
support GridLink data sources, refer to the information in this appendix.
This appendix provides information about multi data sources and Oracle RAC and
procedure for configuring multi data sources for an Enterprise Deployment.
See Also:
About Multi Data Sources and Oracle RAC
A multi data source provides an ordered list of data sources to use to
satisfy connection requests.
Typical Procedure for Configuring Multi Data Sources for an Enterprise
Deployment
You configure data sources when you configure a domain. If you want
to use Multi Data Sources instead of GridLink data sources, replace the
GridLink instructions with the instructions provided in this section.
A.1 About Multi Data Sources and Oracle RAC
A multi data source provides an ordered list of data sources to use to satisfy
connection requests.
Normally, every connection request to this kind of multi data source is served by the
first data source in the list. If a database connection test fails and the connection cannot
be replaced, or if the data source is suspended, a connection is sought sequentially
from the next data source on the list.
For more information about configuring Multi Data Sources with Oracle RAC, see
"Using Multi Data Sources with Oracle RAC" in the Oracle Fusion Middleware
Configuring and Managing JDBC Data Sources for Oracle WebLogic Server.
A.2 Typical Procedure for Configuring Multi Data Sources for an
Enterprise Deployment
You configure data sources when you configure a domain. If you want to use Multi
Data Sources instead of GridLink data sources, replace the GridLink instructions with
the instructions provided in this section.
For example, when you are configuring the initial Administration domain for an
Enterprise Deployment reference topology, you use the configuration wizard to define
the characteristics of the domain, as well as the data sources.
The procedures for configuring the topologies in this Enterprise Deployment Guide
include specific instructions for defining GridLink data sources with Oracle RAC. If
you want to use Multi Data Sources instead of GridLink data sources, replace the
GridLink instructions with the following:
Using Multi Data Sources with Oracle RAC A-1
Typical Procedure for Configuring Multi Data Sources for an Enterprise Deployment
1.
2.
Figure A-1
In the Configure JDBC Component Schema screen:
a.
Select the appropriate schemas.
b.
For the RAC configuration for component schemas, Convert to RAC multi
data source.
c.
Ensure that the following data source appears on the screen with the schema
prefix when you ran the Repository Creation Utility.
d.
Click Next.
The Configure RAC Multi Data Sources Component Schema screen appears
(Figure A-1).
Configure RAC Multi Data Source Component Schema Screen
In this screen, do the following:
a.
Enter values for the following fields, specifying the connect information for
the Oracle RAC database that was seeded with RCU.
• Driver: Select Oracle driver (Thin) for RAC Service-Instance
connections, Versions:10, 11.
• Service Name: Enter the service name of the database.
• Username: Enter the complete user name (including the prefix) for the
schemas.
• Password: Enter the password to use to access the schemas.
A-2 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Typical Procedure for Configuring Multi Data Sources for an Enterprise Deployment
3.
b.
Enter the host name, instance name, and port.
c.
Click Add.
d.
Repeat this for each Oracle RAC instance.
e.
Click Next.
In the Test JDBC Data Sources screen, the connections are tested automatically.
The Status column displays the results. Ensure that all connections were
successful. If not, click Previous to return to the previous screen and correct your
entries.
Click Next when all the connections are successful.
Using Multi Data Sources with Oracle RAC A-3
Typical Procedure for Configuring Multi Data Sources for an Enterprise Deployment
A-4 Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence
Index
D
data sources, A-2
V
virtual servers, 5-2
R
RAC database, A-2
Index-1
Index-2