Chapter 2
Troubleshooting
This chapter gives information about troubleshooting your wireless ADSL modem router. After
each problem description, instructions are provided to help you diagnose and solve the problem.
For the common problems listed, go to the section indicated.
•
Is the router on?
Go to “Basic Functioning” on page 2-1.
•
Have I connected the router correctly?
Go to “Basic Functioning” on page 2-1.
•
I cannot access the router’s configuration with my browser.
Go to “Troubleshooting the Web Configuration Interface” on page 2-3.
•
I have configured the router but I can’t access the Internet.
Go to “Troubleshooting the ISP Connection” on page 2-4.
•
I cannot remember the router’s configuration password.
Go to “Using the Reset Button” on page 2-9.
•
I want to clear the configuration and start over again.
Go to “Restoring the Default Configuration and Password” on page 2-8.
Basic Functioning
After you turn on power to the router, the following sequence of events should occur:
1. When power is first applied, verify that the Power LED is on (see “The Router’s Front Panel”
on page 1-2 for an illustration and explanation of the LEDs).
2. After approximately 10 seconds, verify that:
a. The LAN port LEDs are lit for any local ports that are connected.
b. The ADSL Internet port LED is lit.
Troubleshooting
2-1
v1.0, 2006-4
Wireless ADSL2+ Modem Router Setup Manual
If a port’s LED is lit, a link has been established to the connected device. If a LAN port is
connected to a 100 Mbps device, verify that the port’s LED is green. If the port is 10 Mbps, the
LED will be amber.
If any of these conditions does not occur, refer to the appropriate following section.
Power LED Not On
If the Power and other LEDs are off when your router is turned on:
•
Make sure that the power cord is properly connected to your router and that the power supply
adapter is properly connected to a functioning power outlet.
•
Check that you are using the power adapter supplied by NETGEAR for this product.
If the error persists, you have a hardware problem and should contact technical support.
Power LED is Red
When the router is turned on, it performs a power-on self test. If the Power LED turns red after a
few seconds or at any other time during normal operation, there is a fault within the router. The
power LED also turns red when you depress the factory default reset push button, and blinks red 3
times when that button is released. However, in this case, the wireless ADSL modem router is
working normally.
If the power LED turns red to indicate a router fault:
•
Cycle the power to see if the router recovers.
If the power LED is still red one minute after power up:
•
Cycle the power to see if the router recovers.
•
Clear the router’s configuration to factory defaults. This will set the router’s IP address to
192.168.0.1. This procedure is explained in “Using the Reset Button” on page 2-9.
If the error persists, you might have a hardware problem and should contact technical support.
LAN or Internet Port LEDs Not On
If either the LAN LEDs or ADSL Internet LED do not light when the Ethernet connection is made,
check the following:
2-2
Troubleshooting
v1.0, 2006-4
Wireless ADSL2+ Modem Router Setup Manual
•
Make sure that the Ethernet cable connections are secure at the router and at the hub or
workstation.
•
Make sure that power is turned on to the connected hub or workstation.
•
Be sure you are using the correct cable: when connecting the ADSL port, use the cable that
was supplied with the wireless ADSL modem router. If the Internet LED is still off, this may
mean that there is no ADSL service or the cable connected to the ADSL port is bad.
Troubleshooting the Web Configuration Interface
If you are unable to access the router’s Web Configuration interface from a computer on your local
network, check the following:
•
If you are using an Ethernet-connected computer, check the Ethernet connection between the
computer and the router as described in the previous section.
•
Make sure your computer’s IP address is on the same subnet as the router. If you are using the
recommended addressing scheme, your computer’s address should be in the range of
192.168.0.2 to 192.168.0.254. Refer to “Preparing a Computer for Network Access” to find
your computer’s IP address.
Note: If your computer’s IP address is shown as 169.254.x.x:
Recent versions of Windows and MacOS will generate and assign an IP address if the
computer cannot reach a DHCP server. These auto-generated addresses are in the range of
169.254.x.x. If your IP address is in this range, check the connection from the computer to the
router and reboot your computer.
•
If your router’s IP address was changed and you do not know the current IP address, clear the
router’s configuration to factory defaults. This will set the router’s IP address to 192.168.0.1.
This procedure is explained in “Using the Reset Button” on page 2-9.
•
Make sure your browser has Java, JavaScript, or ActiveX enabled. If you are using Internet
Explorer, click Refresh to be sure the Java applet is loaded.
•
Try quitting the browser and launching it again.
•
Make sure you are using the correct login information. The factory default login name is
admin and the password is password. Make sure that CAPS LOCK is off when entering this
information.
If the router does not save changes you have made in the Web Configuration Interface, check the
following:
Troubleshooting
2-3
v1.0, 2006-4
Wireless ADSL2+ Modem Router Setup Manual
•
When entering configuration settings, be sure to click the Apply button before moving to
another menu or tab, or your changes are lost.
•
Click the Refresh or Reload button in the Web browser. The changes may have occurred, but
the Web browser may be caching the old configuration.
Troubleshooting the ISP Connection
If your router is unable to access the Internet, you should check the ADSL connection, then the
Internet TCP/IP connection.
ADSL link
If your router is unable to access the Internet, you should first determine whether you have an
ADSL link with the service provider. The state of this connection is indicated with the Internet
LED.
Internet LED Green or Blinking Green
If your ADSL Internet LED is green or blinking green, then you have a good ADSL connection.
You can be confident that the service provider has connected your line correctly and that your
wiring is correct.
Internet LED Blinking Amber
If your ADSL Internet LED is blinking amber, then your wireless ADSL modem router is
attempting to make an ADSL connection with the service provider. The LED should turn green
within several minutes.
If the Internet LED does not turn green, disconnect all telephones on the line. If this solves the
problem, reconnect the telephones one at a time, being careful to use a microfilter on each
telephone. If the microfilters are connected correctly, you should be able to connect all your
telephones.
If disconnecting telephones does not result in a green ADSL Internet LED, there may be a problem
with your wiring. If the telephone company has tested the ADSL signal at your Network Interface
Device (NID), then you may have poor quality wiring in your house.
2-4
Troubleshooting
v1.0, 2006-4
Wireless ADSL2+ Modem Router Setup Manual
ADSL Internet LED Off
If the ADSL Internet LED is off, disconnect all telephones on the line. If this solves the problem,
reconnect the telephones one at a time, being careful to use a microfilter on each telephone. If the
microfilters are connected correctly, you should be able to connect all your telephones.
If disconnecting telephones does not result in a green ADSL Internet LED the problem may be one
of the following:
•
Check that the telephone company has made the connection to your line and tested it.
•
Verify that you are connected to the correct telephone line. If you have more than one phone
line, be sure that you are connected to the line with the ADSL service. It may be necessary to
use a swapper if you ADSL signal is on pins 1 and 4 of the RJ-11 jack. The RangeMax Next
Wireless ADSL2+ Modem Router uses pins 2 and 3.
Obtaining an Internet IP Address
If your wireless ADSL modem router is unable to access the internet, and your Internet LED is
green or blinking green, you should determine whether the wireless ADSL modem router is able to
obtain a Internet IP address from the ISP. Unless you have been assigned a static IP address, your
wireless ADSL modem router must request an IP address from the ISP. You can determine whether
the request was successful using the browser interface.
To check the Internet IP address from the browser interface:
1. Launch your browser and select an external site such as http://www.netgear.com.
2. Access the Main Menu of the wireless ADSL modem router’s configuration at
http://192.168.0.1.
3. Under the Maintenance heading, click on “Router Status” and check that an IP address is
shown for the Internet port. If 0.0.0.0 is shown, your wireless ADSL modem router has not
obtained an IP address from your ISP.
If your router is unable to obtain an IP address from the ISP, the problem may be one of the
following:
•
If you have selected a login program, you may have incorrectly set the Service Name, User
Name and Password. See “Troubleshooting PPPoE or PPPoA”, below.
•
Your ISP may check for your computer's host name.
Assign the computer Host Name of your ISP account to the wireless ADSL modem router in
the browser-based Setup Wizard.
Troubleshooting
2-5
v1.0, 2006-4
Wireless ADSL2+ Modem Router Setup Manual
•
Your ISP only allows one Ethernet MAC address to connect to Internet, and may check for
your computer’s MAC address. In this case:
Inform your ISP that you have bought a new network device, and ask them to use the router’s
MAC address.
OR
Configure your router to spoof your computer’s MAC address. This can be done in the Basic
Settings menu. Refer to the online help in the wireless ADSL modem router main menu.
Troubleshooting PPPoE or PPPoA
The PPPoA or PPPoA connection can be debugged as follows:
1. Access the Main Menu of the router at http://192.168.0.1.
2. Under the Maintenance heading, select the Router Status link.
3. Click the Connection Status button.
4. If all of the steps indicate “OK” then your PPPoE or PPPoA connection is up and working.
5. If any of the steps indicates “Failed”, you can attempt to reconnect by clicking “Connect”. The
wireless ADSL modem router will continue to attempt to connect indefinitely.
If you cannot connect after several minutes, you may be using an incorrect Service Name, User
Name or Password. There also may be a provisioning problem with your ISP.
Note: Unless you connect manually, the wireless ADSL modem router will not
authenticate using PPPoE or PPPoA until data is transmitted to the network.
Troubleshooting Internet Browsing
If your wireless ADSL modem router can obtain an IP address but your computer is unable to load
any Web pages from the Internet:
•
Your computer may not recognize any DNS server addresses.
2-6
Troubleshooting
v1.0, 2006-4
Wireless ADSL2+ Modem Router Setup Manual
A DNS server is a host on the Internet that translates Internet names (such as www addresses)
to numeric IP addresses. Typically your ISP will provide the addresses of one or two DNS
servers for your use. If you entered a DNS address during the wireless ADSL modem router’s
configuration, reboot your computer and verify the DNS address as described in “Preparing a
Computer for Network Access”. Alternatively, you can configure your computer manually
with DNS addresses, as explained in your operating system documentation.
•
Your computer may not have the wireless ADSL modem router configured as its TCP/IP
default gateway.
If your computer obtains its information from the wireless ADSL modem router by DHCP,
reboot the computer and verify the wireless ADSL modem router address as described in
“Preparing a Computer for Network Access”.
Troubleshooting a TCP/IP Network Using the Ping Utility
Most TCP/IP terminal devices and routers contain a ping utility that sends an echo request packet
to the designated device. The device then responds with an echo reply. Troubleshooting a TCP/IP
network is made easy by using the ping utility in your computer.
Testing the LAN Path to Your Router
You can ping the router from your computer to verify that the LAN path to your router is set up
correctly.
To ping the router from a PC running Windows 95 or later:
1. From the Windows toolbar, click the Start button and select Run.
2. In the field provided, type Ping followed by the IP address of the router, as in this example:
ping 192.168.0.1
3. Click OK.
You should see a message like this one:
Pinging <IP address> with 32 bytes of data
If the path is working, you see this message:
Reply from < IP address >: bytes=32 time=NN ms TTL=xxx
If the path is not working, you see this message:
Request timed out
Troubleshooting
2-7
v1.0, 2006-4
Wireless ADSL2+ Modem Router Setup Manual
If the path is not functioning correctly, you could have one of the following problems:
• Wrong physical connections
— Make sure the LAN port LED is on. If the LED is off, follow the instructions in “LAN
or Internet Port LEDs Not On” on page 2-2.
— Check that the corresponding Link LEDs are on for your network interface card and
for the hub ports (if any) that are connected to your workstation and router.
• Wrong network configuration
— Verify that the Ethernet card driver software and TCP/IP software are both installed
and configured on your PC or workstation.
— Verify that the IP address for your router and your workstation are correct and that the
addresses are on the same subnet.
Testing the Path from Your Computer to a Remote Device
After verifying that the LAN path works correctly, test the path from your PC to a remote device.
From the Windows run menu, type:
PING -n 10 <IP address>
where <IP address> is the IP address of a remote device such as your ISP’s DNS server.
If the path is functioning correctly, replies as in the previous section are displayed. If you do not
receive replies:
— Check that your PC has the IP address of your router listed as the default gateway. If the IP
configuration of your PC is assigned by DHCP, this information will not be visible in your
PC’s Network Control Panel. Verify that the IP address of the router is listed as the TCP/IP
default gateway as described in “Preparing a Computer for Network Access”.
— Check to see that the network address of your PC (the portion of the IP address specified
by the netmask) is different from the network address of the remote device.
— If your ISP assigned a host name to your PC, enter that host name as the Account Name in
the Basic Settings menu.
Restoring the Default Configuration and Password
This section explains how to restore the factory default configuration settings, changing the
router’s administration password to password and the IP address to 192.168.0.1. You can erase the
current configuration and restore factory defaults in two ways:
2-8
Troubleshooting
v1.0, 2006-4
Wireless ADSL2+ Modem Router Setup Manual
•
Use the Erase function of the Web Configuration Manager.
•
Use the Reset button on the rear panel of the router. Use this method for cases when the
administration password or IP address is not known.
Using the Reset Button
To restore the factory default configuration settings without knowing the administration password
or IP address, you must use the Default Reset button on the rear panel of the router.
1. Press and hold the Reset button until the Test LED turns on (about 10 seconds).
2. Release the Default Reset button and wait for the router to reboot.
Troubleshooting
2-9
v1.0, 2006-4
Wireless ADSL2+ Modem Router Setup Manual
2-10
Troubleshooting
v1.0, 2006-4