6
Adding Comments to a Document
Adding
Comments
to a Document
The annotation feature in Acrobat is so
extensive and important that it occupies
the next three chapters in this book, concentrating on adding comments to a PDF
document, reading and managing those
documents, and conducting a shared review
of a document.
Adobe Acrobat 9 for Windows and Macintosh: Visual QuickStart Guide by John
Deubert. Copyright © 2009. Prepared for Adobe Systems, Inc. All rights
reserved. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Book 1.indb 89
Adding Comments to a Document
One of the longest-standing features in
Acrobat is the ability to add comments to a
PDF document. Originally, these comments
were simple, electronic sticky notes that a
reader could attach to the page. The PDF
annotation mechanism has since grown to
include a broad set of highlighting, drawing, and other tools that you can use to do
full-featured commentary on a document.
Additionally, there are tools for reading and
summarizing these comments, and even for
conducting a document review involving
your entire workgroup or company.
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Chapter 6
Examining Acrobat’s
Commenting Tools
Examining Acrobat’s Commenting Tools
Acrobat’s commenting tools are accessible in
three locations:

The Tools menu and the Comments
menu both have Comment & Markup
submenus that contain items for all the
comment tools (Figure 6.1).

The Comment & Markup toolbar
includes tools for the most commonly
used comment tools (Figure 6.2).
You may add buttons to the Comment &
Markup toolbar for the missing tools; see
Chapter 1 for directions on how to add tools
to a toolbar.
Figure 6.1 All of Acrobat’s comment tools are
available through the Tools menu (shown here)
or the Comments menu.
Figure 6.2 The most commonly used comment tools are on the Comment & Markup toolbar.
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Deubert. Copyright © 2009. Prepared for Adobe Systems, Inc. All rights
reserved. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
7/25/08 12:38:08 PM
Adding Comments to a Document
Comment icons and pop-ups
Every comment on a page has two visual parts.
Figure 6.3 Every comment
has an icon that indicates
its position on the page.
A comment’s icon is a graphic that indicates
the position of the comment on the page
(Figure 6.3). The icon differs for each comment type: a speech bubble for a Sticky Note,
a piece of text for a Text Box, and a Sign Here
pointer for a Stamp.
Tips
Figure 6.4 Most comments have a
pop-up window that holds the text
for that comment.
Figure 6.5 When you first use the comment tools,
Acrobat may ask you for some information about
yourself. This is strictly optional.
n
Acrobat’s Preferences dialog box has a
pane full of controls determining the
behavior of comments. The default
values for these options are sensible, so
you can safely ignore them. However,
once you’ve worked with comments for a
while, you may want take a look at them.
Choose Edit > Preferences, or Acrobat >
Preferences on a Mac, to see Acrobat’s
preferences.
n
The first time you use one of Acrobat’s
comment tools, it may present you with
a dialog box that asks for your name,
company, and so on (Figure 6.5). If
you choose to provide this information,
Acrobat uses it for some of the dynamic
comments that add your name and other
data to the comment on the fly.
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Deubert. Copyright © 2009. Prepared for Adobe Systems, Inc. All rights
reserved. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Book 1.indb 91
Examining Acrobat’s Commenting Tools
Most comments also have a pop-up window
that displays the text associated with the
comment (Figure 6.4). Double-clicking the
comment’s icon opens its pop-up, allowing
you to read and edit the comment’s text.
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Chapter 6
Adding a Sticky Note
Comment
The Sticky Note comment is Acrobat’s oldest
annotation type, dating back to Acrobat 1.0.
This annotation type is the functional equivalent of the paper sticky note after which
it’s named; it holds a small amount of text
attached to the page in a pop-up window.
Figure 6.6 When you place a Sticky Note on the page,
Acrobat opens a pop-up window into which you can
type your text.
Adding a Sticky Note Comment
To add a Sticky Note to a page:
1. Click the Sticky Note tool in the
Comment & Markup toolbar.
The pointer turns into crosshairs.
2. Click the page.
Acrobat places the comment’s icon on
the page and opens the comment’s popup window (Figure 6.6).
Figure 6.7 Sticky Notes may
be represented on the page
by an assortment of icons.
3. Type the text you want for the comment
in the pop-up window.
Tips
n
To change the location of a comment’s
icon, click and drag it to a new location.
n
You can change the text of an existing
comment. To do so, double-click the icon
to get to the pop-up, then click the text
and edit it as usual. This works with any
type of comment that has text.
A Sticky Note’s default icon is a speech
bubble. This is a perfectly serviceable icon,
but Acrobat supplies a collection of other
icons that may be used for Sticky Note
comments (Figure 6.7).
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Adding Comments to a Document
To change a Sticky Note’s icon:
1. Right-click the Sticky Note comment’s
icon to get a contextual menu.
2. Choose Properties in the contextual
menu (Figure 6.8).
Acrobat presents you with the Sticky
Note Properties dialog box (Figure 6.9).
Figure 6.8 You change a Sticky Note’s icon (and other
characteristics) by modifying its properties.
3. Choose a new icon from the list.
5. To change the note’s color, click the
square Color control and choose a new
color from the resulting color picker.
6. To change the opacity of the note, drag the
Opacity slider to the desired level or type a
number in the Opacity percentage field.
7. Click OK.
Figure 6.9 The Sticky Note Properties dialog box lets
you modify a variety of Appearance settings.
Tips
n
You can prevent a comment from being
edited by clicking the Locked check box
shown in Figure 6.9.
n
You can delete a comment the way
you delete most everything else in the
computer world: Select it, then press the
Delete key.
n
You can also get to the contextual menu
by clicking the little Options arrow in a
comment’s pop-up window (Figure 6.10).
Adding a Sticky Note Comment
4. If you want this icon to become the
default icon for future Sticky Note comments, click the Make Properties Default
check box.
Figure 6.10 You can also get to a comment’s properties
by clicking the pop-up window’s Options control.
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Deubert. Copyright © 2009. Prepared for Adobe Systems, Inc. All rights
reserved. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
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Chapter 6
Adding a Text Box
Comment
A Text Box comment is similar to a Sticky
Note, but it has no pop-up window. Instead,
the comment displays its text in a rectangular, editable field directly on the page
(Figure 6.11).
To place a Text Box on the page:
Adding a Text Box Comment
1. Click the Text Box tool in the Comment
& Markup toolbar.
2. Click and drag a rectangle on the page.
Acrobat places the Text Box at that location on the page.
3. Type your comment into the text box.
Figure 6.11 A Text Box
comment presents a text
annotation in a rectangular
field placed directly on
the page.
Figure 6.12 The Select
& Zoom toolbar has the
Selection tool and the Hand
tool, which may both be
used to move a comment’s
icon around on the page.
Figure 6.13 When you
select a comment’s icon,
handles appear at the
corners and sides.
Having placed your Text Box on the
page, you can move it around and resize
it very easily.
To move and resize a Text Box:
1. Select the Hand or Selection tool, if necessary. These are on the Select & Zoom
toolbar (Figure 6.12).
2. Click the Text Box.
Handles appear at the sides and corners
of the Text Box (Figure 6.13).
3. Click and drag the Text Box to change its
position on the page.
4. Click and drag one of the handles to
change the box’s size.
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Adding Comments to a Document
You can also control a Text Box’s appearance to quite a large extent. Following are
instructions for changing some of these
characteristics.
To change a Text Box’s colors:
1. With the Hand or Selection tool selected,
right-click the Text Box to get a contextual menu.
Figure 6.14 The Text Box Properties dialog box lets
you change the appearance of the box that contains
the text.
3. Click the square Border Color control.
The color well drops down a standard
color picker (Figure 6.15).
4. Choose the color you want for your border.
5. To choose a fill color, repeat Steps 3 and
4, clicking the square Fill Color control in
Figure 6.14.
6. Click OK.
Figure 6.15 Clicking one of the color-well
controls results in a standard color picker.
Tip
n
Adding a Text Box Comment
2. Select Properties at the bottom of the
contextual menu.
Acrobat presents you with the Text Box
Properties dialog box (Figure 6.14).
If you examine the Text Box Properties
dialog box, you’ll see that you can also
change the style and thickness of the
Text Box’s border as well as the box’s
opacity. Feel free to experiment with
these settings.
Finally, you can change the font and other
characteristics of the text inside the Text Box.
This takes a bit more effort, because you need
to use the Properties toolbar (Figure 6.16).
Continues on next page
Figure 6.16 The Text Box Text Properties toolbar presents information on whatever is selected on the page. You can
use it to change the characteristics of text.
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reserved. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
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Chapter 6
To change a Text Box’s font
and text size:
1. Make the Properties toolbar visible,
if necessary; to do so, choose View >
Toolbars > Properties Bar.
2. Select the Hand or Selection tool in the
Select & Zoom toolbar.
Figure 6.17 Using the Properties
toolbar, you can change the
font, size, and style of your Text
Box text.
Adding a Text Box Comment
3. Double-click the text in the Text Box.
A blinking cursor appears at the point
where you double-clicked.
4. Choose the text in the Text Box whose
font or size you want to change.
The Properties toolbar reports the current font and size.
5. In the Properties toolbar, change the font
and size to the values you want.
6. Click outside the Text Box to finish.
Tips
n
The Properties toolbar lets you change
many characteristic of your Text Box
text, including alignment, color, and
placement above or below the baseline
(Figure 6.17).
n
You can also change the style of your text
to some combination of bold and italic.
Once you’ve selected text in the Text Box
(Step 4 in the task above), right-click the
text, and choose Text Style in the contextual menu (Figure 6.18).
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Figure 6.18 You can also change the style of your Text
Box text via the Text Style submenu.
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reserved. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
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Adding Comments to a Document
Adding a Callout Comment
Figure 6.19 A Callout comment is just a
Text Box with an arrow.
A Callout comment is a Text Box with an
arrow attached (Figure 6.19). It lets you
point to the page’s object that your
comment discusses.
To add a Callout to a page:
1. On the Comment & Markup toolbar,
select the Callout tool .
3. Type your comment into the text field.
4. Click the border of the comment to make
handles appear (Figure 6.20).
5. Drag the handles to position the arrow as
you want it.
A Callout comments has the same set of
properties as a Text Box comment (font,
point size, and so on). See the previous section for a discussion of these properties and
instructions on how to change them.
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Deubert. Copyright © 2009. Prepared for Adobe Systems, Inc. All rights
reserved. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
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Adding a Callout Comment
Figure 6.20 Clicking a Callout gives you
handles you can use to position the box
and its arrow.
2. Click and drag a rectangle on the page.
Acrobat adds a Callout comment with
a default arrow pointing at nothing in
particular.
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Chapter 6
Adding Lines and Arrows
Several of Acrobat’s commenting tools let
you add graphic items to your document’s
pages. The Line and Arrow tools let you add
lines and arrows to the page (Figure 6.21).
To add a line or an arrow to the page:
1. Click the Line or Arrow tool on the
Comment & Markup toolbar.
Adding Lines and Arrows
2. Click and hold on the page at one end of
your line or arrow.
3. Click and drag to where you want the
other end of the line or arrow to go.
4. Release the mouse button.
Tips
n
Lines can be turned into arrows and vice
versa. In the Properties dialog box (rightclick the item and select Properties in the
resulting contextual menu), you can apply
an End type to the line (Figure 6.22). A
value of None turns an arrow into a line;
a value of Open (for open arrow) turns a
line into an arrow. You can choose from
several other line ends.
n
You can reverse an arrow by right-clicking it and selecting Flip Line in the contextual menu.
n
Lines and arrows can have text comments associated with them. Doubleclick the line or arrow to see its pop-up
window. Even when the pop-up window
is closed, you can tell that an arrow or
a line (or any graphic annotation) has a
text comment because Acrobat adds a
tiny speech bubble to it (Figure 6.23).
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Figure 6.21 The Arrow and Line
tools let you draw arrows and
lines on the page. This explains
their names.
Figure 6.22 The Line Properties dialog box lets you
add an End to a line, converting it into an arrow, for
example. Choosing None turns an arrow into a line.
Figure 6.23 A comment icon
that has text associated with it
displays a tiny speech bubble.
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Deubert. Copyright © 2009. Prepared for Adobe Systems, Inc. All rights
reserved. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
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Adding Comments to a Document
Drawing Ovals and
Rectangles
Figure 6.24 You can
use the Oval tool to
draw attention to
items of interest on
the page.
Figure 6.25 The Rectangle and
Oval tools have icons on the
Comment & Markup toolbar.
The Oval and Rectangle comment tools let
you call attention to items on the Acrobat
page (Figure 6.24). These tools are on the
Comment & Markup toolbar or from the
Comments > Comment & Markup submenu.
To add an Oval or Rectangle comment
to the page:
Figure 6.26 Clicking
a Rectangle or an
Oval icon produces
handles you can use
to resize that icon.
2. Click and drag the crosshairs on the page.
Acrobat draws a rectangle or an oval as
you drag.
3. Release the mouse button.
Acrobat adds the oval or rectangle to
the page.
4. Click the oval or rectangle.
Acrobat adds handles to the sides and
corners (Figure 6.26).
Drawing Ovals and Rectangles
1. Click the Oval or Rectangle tool
on the Comment & Markup toolbar
(Figure 6.25).
The pointer changes to crosshairs.
5. Reposition and resize the oval or
rectangle as you wish.
Tip
n
You can get a perfect square or circle by
holding down the Option/Alt key while
clicking and dragging in Step 2.
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Chapter 6
Adding Polygons and
Clouds
The polygon-related comment tools work
the way similar tools work in most graphics software: you click sequentially on the
vertices of the shape you want, and Acrobat
connects the dots, making the polygon.
Adding Polygons and Clouds
Acrobat supplies three polygon annotation
tools (Figure 6.27):
Polygon tool. This tool creates a closed
polygon. When you’re finished clicking vertices, Acrobat adds a final side that connects
the last point with the first.
Polygon Line tool. This is identical to the
Polygon tool, except that Acrobat doesn’t
close the figure for you.
Figure 6.27 There are three polygon-related comment
tools: Polygon, Polygon Line, and Cloud.
Cloud tool. This is identical to the Polygon
tool, except that Acrobat draws the polygon
as a cloud (Figure 6.27).
Unfortunately, only the Cloud tool is available by default on the Comment & Markup
toolbar; you can add the other tools following the steps in Chapter 1.
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Adding Comments to a Document
To add a polygon or cloud to a page:
1. Do one of the following:
To add a cloud, click the Cloud tool on
the Comment & Markup toolbar.
To add a closed polygon, choose Tools >
Comment & Markup > Polygon Tool.
To add an open polygon, choose
Tools > Comment & Markup >
Polygon Line Tool.
3. Click sequentially on all the corners in
your polygon.
Acrobat draws the line segments as you
go so you can see how your polygon or
cloud is looking.
4. Double-click the final point to finish the
polygon.
Tip
n
You can convert polygons to clouds and
vice versa. Right-click the object, and look
at its properties. One of the controls is a
pop-up menu of line styles (Figure 6.28).
Choose one of the cloud styles to convert
your polygon to a cloud.
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Deubert. Copyright © 2009. Prepared for Adobe Systems, Inc. All rights
reserved. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Book 1.indb 101
Adding Polygons and Clouds
Figure 6.28 You can turn a polygon into a cloud by
changing its line style.
2. Click the starting point of your polygon
or cloud.
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Chapter 6
Text Edits
Acrobat provides a complete set of tools for
indicating changes that need to be made to
text on a page. These include annotations to
mark text for replacement and deletion, and
to mark an insertion point for missing text.
The way you mark up text is a little counterintuitive at first, but it quickly becomes
second nature with practice. Broadly, there
are two steps to indicating a text change:
Text Edits
1. Indicate the position of the change.
This entails placing the cursor at the location of an insertion or selecting the text
that needs to be deleted or changed.
Figure 6.29 The text-markup tools reside in the Text
Edits menu on the Comment & Markup toolbar.
2. Apply the comment for the markup
you want.
The tools you use to do this are most conveniently accessed through the Text Edits
menu on the Comment & Markup toolbar
(Figure 6.29).
The markup tools in Acrobat are as follows, from top to bottom in the illustration
(Figure 6.30):
Figure 6.30 Acrobat provides all
the tools you need to do full text
markup on an Acrobat file.
Highlight Selected Text adds a colored
backdrop to the selected text to draw attention to it.
Insert Text at Cursor indicates that text
should be inserted into the existing words. A
little caret appears at the place you click in
the text. The pop-up window associated with
the annotation contains the new text.
Crossout Text for Deletion strikes
through the selected text, indicating that
it should be removed.
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Adding Comments to a Document
Figure 6.31 Acrobat provides short­
cut tools for (from left) highlighting,
underlining, and crossing out text.
Unfortunately, only the highlighting
tool exists in the Comment & Markup
toolbar by default.
Replace Selected Text strikes through
the selected text, indicating that it should
be removed, and places an insert-text caret
at the end, indicating that new text should
be inserted. The pop-up window associated
with the annotation contains the new text.
Add Note to Selected Text highlights the
text. The pop-up window associated with the
annotation contains a comment about the
text. This seems to be in every way identical to the Highlight Text tool, except that
Acrobat automatically opens the pop-up
window so you can type your comment.
Underline Selected Text underlines the
text for emphasis.
1. Click the Text Edit tool (not its dropdown menu) in the Comment & Markup
toolbar.
The pointer turns into an I-beam shape.
Text Edits
To add text markup to a page:
2. If you’re indicating an insertion point,
click a location in the text on the page.
A blinking cursor appears at that point
on the page.
3. For all other types of edits, select the text
that you want to mark up.
Acrobat highlights the text. You may use
the Shift key to extend the selection, as is
usual in word processors.
Tip
n
The Comment & Markup toolbar
can contain tools that let you quickly
highlight, underline, and cross out text
(Figure 6.31). Unfortunately, only the
Highlight Text tool is on the toolbar by
default; see Chapter 1 for directions on
adding the other two.
4. In the menu attached to the Text Edits
tool (Figure 6.29), select the markup you
want.
Acrobat immediately applies the markup.
If your markup requires insertion or notation text, a pop-up window opens so you
can type your text.
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Chapter 6
Adding a Stamp Comment
One of the most popular annotation types
(well, I like it) is the Stamp. This comment
type is modeled on the traditional rubber
stamp once popular with banks and still
popular with four-year-old children and me.
Adding a Stamp Comment
The Stamps are available from the Stamp
drop-down menu on the Comment &
Markup toolbar (Figure 6.32).
The Stamps are organized into categories:
Dynamic, Sign Here, and Business are provided by default. You can also compile your
own Favorites menu, containing Stamps you
particularly like.
Note that some of the Stamps are dynamic,
incorporating the identity data you may have
supplied when you first started using the
comment tools (Figure 6.33).
Figure 6.32 Like a rubber stamp, the Stamp tool lets
you place predefined graphics on the page.
Figure 6.33 Dynamic Stamps incorporate
information from your system and
personal identity data.
You can create your own Stamps and your
own categories. The Acrobat version of a
Stamp lets you use any PDF graphic—any
combination of text, line art, and images—as
your rubber stamp. You’ll see how to do this
in the next section.
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Adding Comments to a Document
Figure 6.34 Having
selected a Stamp
in the Stamp menu,
you move a ghostly
version of it to the
desired location on
the page.
Figure 6.35 Clicking a
Stamp yields handles
you can use to resize
and rotate it.
1. In the Stamp menu (Figure 6.32), choose
the category and Stamp you want.
The pointer turns into a ghostly version
of the Stamp you choose, like the Draft
Stamp in Figure 6.34.
2. Click in the place on the page where you
want your Stamp to go.
Acrobat places the Stamp on the page in
its default size.
3. Click the Stamp image on the page to
select it.
Handles appear at the corners of the
Stamp (Figure 6.35).
4. Click and drag the handles to make the
Stamp the size you want. You can also
rotate the Stamp by dragging the handleon-a-stick rising above it (Figure 6.36).
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Adding a Stamp Comment
Figure 6.36 You rotate
a stamp by dragging
the “handle on a stick.”
To apply a Stamp to the page:
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Chapter 6
Creating Your Own Stamp
It is remarkably easy to create your own
Stamp comment for use with the Stamp tool.
You can take graphics, text, or images from
any PDF file and turn them into a Stamp.
You can even create new categories for
your Stamps.
Creating Your Own Stamp
To create a stamp:
1. From the Stamp tool’s menu, choose
Create Custom Stamp (Figure 6.37).
Acrobat presents you with the Select
Image for Custom Stamp dialog box
(Figure 6.38).
Figure 6.37 To create your own
Stamp, choose Create Custom Stamp
from the Stamp menu.
2. Click the Browse button.
The standard Open dialog box opens.
3. Choose the file that contains the artwork
you want to use for your Stamp.
This can be a PDF file or any type of file
that Acrobat can convert to PDF. Acrobat
displays the first page of the document in
the dialog box.
4. Using the scroll bar, select the page in
the document that you want to use as
your Stamp.
Figure 6.38 Select a file as the
source for your Stamp’s graphic.
5. Click OK.
The Create Custom Stamp dialog box
opens (Figure 6.39).
6. Choose a category to which to add your
Stamp, or if you like, type the name of a
new category.
7. Type a name for your new Stamp.
Figure 6.39 Give your new Stamp a name and assign
it to a category. You may type a new category name
if you wish.
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Adding Comments to a Document
8. Click OK.
Your new Stamp (and new category,
if you made one) appears among the
other Stamps in the Stamp tool menu
(Figure 6.40).
Figure 6.40 Your new category and Stamp appear in
the Stamp menu.
n
If you never expect to use your Stamp
at a large size on the page, you can save
some space on your disk by checking the
“Down sample stamp to reduce file size”
check box in the Create Custom Stamp
dialog box (Figure 6.39). This option can
reduce your Stamp’s size considerably,
but it can also make your Stamp look
chunky if you use the Stamp’s handles to
enlarge it.
n
You can quickly create a one-off stamp
by copying a graphic to the Clipboard
(in whatever application you wish) and
then choosing Paste Clipboard Image As
Stamp Tool from the Stamp tool menu
(Figure 6.41).
Having created a custom stamp, you can
remove it using the Manage Custom Stamps
dialog box (Figure 6.42).
Creating Your Own Stamp
Figure 6.41 You can paste Clipboard
contents onto the page as a Stamp.
Tips
To delete a custom Stamp:
Figure 6.42 The Manage Custom Stamps dialog box
lets you delete and edit existing custom Stamps and
create new ones.
2. In the list of Stamps, select the Stamp you
want to delete.
Acrobat shows the Stamp’s graphic in the
dialog box.
Tip
n
1. In the Stamp tool’s menu, select Manage
Stamps.
Acrobat displays the Manage Custom
Stamps dialog box.
As you can see in Figure 6.42, you can
also edit the selected Stamp (rename it
and change its category) and create
new Stamps.
3. Click Delete.
Acrobat deletes the custom Stamp.
4. Click OK.
Adobe Acrobat 9 for Windows and Macintosh: Visual QuickStart Guide by John
Deubert. Copyright © 2009. Prepared for Adobe Systems, Inc. All rights
reserved. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Book 1.indb 107
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Chapter 6
Checking Spelling
in Comments
Acrobat has a built-in spelling checker that
looks for spelling errors in a document’s
comments and form fields. The only difficulty in using this feature is finding it; it’s
located in a submenu that’s otherwise unrelated to forms or commenting.
Checking Spelling in Comments
To check spelling in your comments:
1. Choose Edit > Spelling > In Comments,
Fields, & Editable Text.
The Check Spelling dialog box opens
(Figure 6.43).
2. Click the Start button.
Acrobat examines all the comments and
form text fields in your document, looking for spelling errors. When it finds a
misspelling, Acrobat presents the error in
context and shows you a list of replacements (Figure 6.44).
Figure 6.43 Use the Check Spelling dialog box to
check the spelling in your document’s comments
and form fields.
3. For each misspelled word, do one of the
following:
Click Ignore to ignore that instance of
the misspelled word.
Click Ignore All to ignore all instances
of that word.
Choose a replacement in the list, and
click either Change or Change All.
Click Add to add the word to Acrobat’s
dictionary of known words.
After you change, ignore, or add the misspelled word, Acrobat goes on to the next.
4. When there are no more misspellings,
click Done.
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Book 1.indb 108
Figure 6.44 When Acrobat finds a misspelled word, it
presents you with a list of alternatives.
Adobe Acrobat 9 for Windows and Macintosh: Visual QuickStart Guide by John
Deubert. Copyright © 2009. Prepared for Adobe Systems, Inc. All rights
reserved. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
7/25/08 12:38:13 PM
Adding Comments to a Document
Exporting and Importing
Comments
The data associated with a document’s comments is much smaller than the document
itself. A 10 MB PDF file may have less than
1 KB of comment data.
You do this by exporting the comments to a
Form Data Format (FDF) file (Figure 6.45).
This file contains only the text, images, position, and other data associated with your
comments. You can e-mail this relatively tiny
file to another person; they can then import
the FDF data into their copy of the same
PDF file.
When Acrobat imports an FDF file, it places
the comments into the new document in
their original locations. This is a much more
efficient way of sending comments from one
location to another.
Tip
n
If you import an FDF file into a document
that is not the same as the one you originally annotated, the imported comments
won’t correspond to any particular text or
graphic in the new document.
Figure 6.45 Exporting comments results in an FDF file
that contains only the document’s comment data.
1. Choose Comments > Export Comments
to Data File (Figure 6.46).
Acrobat presents you with a standard
Save dialog box.
2. Specify a name and location for your
FDF file.
3. Click OK.
Acrobat creates the FDF file.
Tip
n
If you examine Figure 6.46, you’ll see that
you can also export PDF comments to a
Microsoft Word or Autodesk AutoCAD
document. In this case, the PDF file
you’ve annotated must have been originally created in Word or AutoCAD. The
resulting file contains comments that
may be imported into the original Word
or AutoCAD document.
To import comments from an FDF file:
1. With the PDF file open, choose
Comments > Import Comments.
An Open dialog box appears.
2. Choose the FDF file that contains the
comments.
Acrobat reads the file and places the
comments it contains into the current
document.
Figure 6.46 To export your comments to an FDF file,
choose Comments > Export Comments to Data File.
In Windows, you can also export to Microsoft Word
and Autodesk AutoCAD.
Adobe Acrobat 9 for Windows and Macintosh: Visual QuickStart Guide by John
Deubert. Copyright © 2009. Prepared for Adobe Systems, Inc. All rights
reserved. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Book 1.indb 109
Exporting and Importing Comments
If someone sends you that 10 MB file for
comment and you want to return the annotated file, it’s more efficient to send just the
comment data than it is to send the entire
PDF file.
To export your comments to an FDF file:
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Chapter 6
Enabling Commenting
in Adobe Reader
Enabling Commenting in Adobe Reader
Acrobat Pro Only: By default, PDF documents cannot be modified in any way with
the free Adobe Reader. Unfortunately, this
ban includes attaching comments to a file.
If you want people to be able to review your
document in Adobe Reader, you must explicitly turn on that capability for the document.
Once your PDF document has been enabled
for commenting in Reader, you’re restricted
in what you can do to that document. Even
if you’re examining the file in Acrobat
Standard or Pro, you can no longer shuffle
pages, edit page contents, add form fields
or links, or otherwise modify the document.
This will be true until you disable Acrobat’s
ability to annotate the document in Reader.
Figure 6.47 You must explicitly enable the use of
Adobe Reader to comment on a document.
Figure 6.48 Acrobat warns you that once a document
is enabled for commenting in Adobe Reader, editing
capabilities are limited, even in Acrobat Pro.
To enable a document for commenting
in Adobe Reader:
1. Choose Document > Enable for
Commenting and Analysis in Adobe
Reader (Figure 6.47).
Acrobat presents you with a dialog box
warning you that file editing will be
restricted (Figure 6.48). Then a Save
dialog box opens, because Acrobat insists
that you resave the Reader-enabled file.
2. Save the Reader-enabled file with a new
name and new location on your disk.
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Adobe Acrobat 9 for Windows and Macintosh: Visual QuickStart Guide by John
Deubert. Copyright © 2009. Prepared for Adobe Systems, Inc. All rights
reserved. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
7/25/08 12:38:14 PM
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