Lucent Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide

Lucent Cajun
A500 ATM Switch
Installation Guide
Release 3.0
TM
Part #: 49040009
TM
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
© Copyright LUCENT TECHNOLOGIES 1999 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Printed in USA, April 1999
The products, specifications, and other technical information regarding the products contained in this
document are subject to change without notice. All information in this document is believed to be accurate
and reliable, but is presented without warranty of any kind, express or implied, and users must take full
responsibility for their application of any products specified in this document. Lucent disclaims
responsibility for errors which may appear in this document, and it reserves the right, in its sole discretion
and without notice, to make substitutions and modifications in the products and practices described in this
document.
CajunDocs, CajunView, Cajun P550, Cajun A500, Lucent Definity ATM ECS, and Lucent MMCX are
trademarks of Lucent Technologies. The following products are trademaked by their respective companies:
Cajun P550, Cajun A500, Lucent Definity ATM ECS, and Lucent MMCX are trademarks of Lucent
Technologies. The following products are trademaked by their respective companies: Bay Networks, Cisco,
Fore, 3COM, Sun, HP, Compaq, and Microsoft.
All other trademarks mentioned in this document are property of their respective owners.
Part Number 49040009 Revision 3
Cajun A500 Software Release 3.00
Contents
Preface
Chapter 1 — Cajun A500 ATM Switch Overview
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 - 1
Inter operability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 - 1
Product Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 - 2
Hardware Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 - 3
Port Numbering Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 - 3
Cajun A500 System Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 - 4
Basic Cajun A500 System Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 - 4
Maximum Cajun A500 System Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 - 4
Hardware Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 5
Switch Fabric . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 - 6
Shared Memory Switch Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 - 8
Switch Fabric Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 - 8
Switch Processor Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 - 9
Switch Processor Front Panel Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 - 11
Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 - 13
Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 14
Cooling Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 - 15
Cajun A500 Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 - 16
Data Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 - 17
Chapter 2 — Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 - 1
Pre-installation Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 - 1
Verify the Packing List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 - 1
Environmental and Physical Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 - 2
Rack Space Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 - 2
Power Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 - 3
Environmental Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 - 3
Cabling Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 - 4
Console and Modem Port Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 - 4
Installing the Cajun A500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 - 5
Required Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 - 6
Unpacking the Cajun A500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 - 6
Rack Mount Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 - 7
Placing the Cajun A500 in a Rack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 - 7
Surface Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 - 8
Connecting Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 - 8
Connecting AC Power Cord(s) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 - 8
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
iii
Connecting the Management Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 9
Connecting the 10BaseT Ethernet Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 10
Connecting the RJ45 Serial Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 11
Modem Port Functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 12
Configuring the Modem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 13
Installing/Removing System Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 13
Required Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 13
Installing/Removing a Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 14
Replacing Fans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 15
Installing/Removing Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 16
Installing The Cajun A500 Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 17
Installing New Cajun A500 Software Using a New PCMCIA Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 - 17
Obtaining a New Image From an Ftp Site and Using it Via a PCMCIA Card . . . . . .2 - 17
Chapter 3 — Cajun A500 Initialization and Initial Configuration
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 - 1
The Cajun A500 Initial Configuration Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 - 1
Powering the Cajun A500 Up and Down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 - 2
Cajun A500 Boot Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 - 2
Cajun A500 Boot Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 - 2
Logging Into the A500 Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 - 3
Supported User Accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 - 4
Assigning the System Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 - 4
Assigning Basic Configuration Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 - 5
Completing the Initial Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 - 5
Entering the IP Address and IP Mask . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 - 6
Entering the Default IP Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 - 6
Entering TFTP server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 - 7
Verifying the Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 - 7
Creating consolerc Configuration Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 - 8
Logging In to the Cajun A500 Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 - 8
Installing Cajun A500 Help Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 - 9
Entering the Server Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 - 10
Getting Updated Help Files on the Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 - 11
Using the Cajun A500 Command Line Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 - 11
Command Line Editing Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 - 12
Command Short Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 - 12
Using a “?” in a Command Line Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 - 13
Appendix A — Cajun A500 Quick Start Installation
Configuration Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PNNI Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LEC Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IISP Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ATM Static Routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manual UNI Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manual ESI Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
iv
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
A-1
A-3
A-3
A-4
A-4
A-4
A-5
A-5
Static-IP Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Static-IP Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Permanent Virtual Circuits (PVCs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Permanent Virtual Paths (PVPs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PPP Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Password Authentication Protocol (PAP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Challenge Handshake Authentcation Protocol (CHAP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SNMP Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clock Syncronization Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Copying Image to FLASH:/PCMCIA: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-6
A- 6
A-6
A-6
A-7
A-7
A-7
A-7
A-8
A-8
Appendix B — Cajun A500 Event & Alarm Logs
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B - 1
Managing Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B - 1
Event and Alarm Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B - 1
Appendix C — Emissions
Emissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C - 1
Canadian Equipment Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C - 1
Japanese Equipment Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C - 2
Appendix D — Cajun A500 Safety and Power Information
Safety Symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
French . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Symboles de sécurité . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
German . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Japanese . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Supply Warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
French . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
German . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Japenese . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Spanish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Korean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
International Power Cord Compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D-1
D-1
D-1
D-1
D -2
D-2
D-3
D-3
D-3
D -3
D-3
D-3
D -4
D-4
Appendix E — Cajun A500 Laser Safety
Laser Safety Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E - 1
General Laser Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E - 1
Lasers and Eye Damage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E - 1
Classification of Lasers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E - 2
Lightwave Safety Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E - 2
Safety Precautions for Enclosed Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E - 3
Safety Precautions for Unenclosed Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E - 4
Optical Specifications of Internal Laser Circuit Packs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E - 4
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
v
Glossary
Index
vi
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Preface
This guide explains how to install, initially configure, and operate the LucentTM CajunTM
A500 ATM Switch. It also includes information on the Command Line Interface (CLI).
Documentation Feedback
If you have comments about the technical accuracy or general quality of this document
please contact us at:
documentation@lucentctc.com
Please cite the document title, part number, and page reference, if appropriate.
Online and Related Documentation
Lucent Technologies maintains copies of all technical documentation on the
documentation web server. To access online documentation, including HTML and PDF
documents, use Netscape Navigator version 4.x or above or Microsoft Internet Explorer
version 4.x or above and enter the URL:
http://pubs.lucentctc.com/
The following document provides additional information on the Cajun A500 ATM
Switch:
Lucent Cajun A500 ATM Switch User Guide
If you are unfamiliar with ATM technology, on which the Cajun A500 design is based,
we suggest reading one of the following texts which provide a strong summary of ATM:
U ATM: Foundation for Broadband Networks: Uyless Black, Prentice-Hall, 1995.
ISBN: 0-13-297178-X (Note that this book provides a high level technical view of
ATM).
U ATM for Dummies: Kathy Gadecki and Christine Heckart, IDG Books Worldwide,
1997. ISBN: 0-7645-0065-1
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
-1
Preface
Conventions
7KLVGRFXPHQWXVHVWKHIROORZLQJFRQYHQWLRQV
Convention
User Input
Represents
User entered text.
Examples
To create a new password, enter admin
passwd greyhound
Emphasis
A new term, text
emphasis, or a
document title.
The system settings are permanently saved
to NVRAM if you use the store command.
Boldface
Text
Menu command or
button name.
Select File | Save to save your current
work session.
Click Cancel to cancel the installation.
System
Output
Text displayed by the
system.
If you attempt the find the physical
location of port 30, the system displays
Unit 2 Port 2
Note: Provides additional information about a procedure or topic.
CAUTION: Indicates a condition that may damage hardware or software.
WARNING:Indicates a condition that may cause bodily injury or death. Before
working on equipment, ensure that you turn the power off and unplug
the equipment in question.
Failure to follow proper safety precautions can result in electrical shock.
Audience
This guide is intended for the following users at your site:
t Network managers
t Network administrators
U Hardware installers
-2
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Preface
Overview of The Contents
This guide contains the following chapters:
Chapter 1, Cajun A500 ATM Switch Overview — Provides an overview of the Cajun
Switch and theory of operation.
Chapter 2, Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation — Explains how to unpack and
assemble your switch.
Chapter 3, Cajun A500 Initialization and Initial Configuration — Explains how to
perform the initial configuration of the switch.
Appendix A, Cajun A500 Event and Alarn Log — Explains events and alarms
related to the Cajun A500.
Appendix B, Emmissions — Explains emmissions information.
Appendix C, Cajun A500 Safety and Power Information — Explains safety and
power information related to the Cajun A500.
Appendix D, Cajun A500 Laser Safety — Explains laser safety information.
Glossary — Provides a listing of terms and definitions.
Index
Contacting Lucent Corporation
For information about Lucent Data Networking products and services, please consult the
Lucent World Wide Web site at http://www.lucent.com/dns.
If you have any questions, please call Technical Support at 1-800-237-0016, press 0 at
the prompt, then dial ext. 73300. From outside of the United States please call
1-813-217-2425.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
-3
Preface
-4
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
1
Cajun A500 ATM Switch
Overview
Overview
Lucent’s Cajun A500 ATM Switch is targeted at campus backbone installations. The
Cajun A500 provides intelligent broadband services for LAN switches, routers, host
computers (servers and endstations), voice switches (PBXs), video communication
systems, multimedia servers, and other devices in a campus backbone. The Cajun A500
supports multiple network services, including data, voice, and video communications
and delivers multiple Quality of Service (QoS) levels to facilitate these services.
The Cajun A500 provides:
U High-speed internetworking for either conventional layer 2 and layer 3 over ATM
configurations, such as IP over Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM), or LAN
Emulation (LANE).
U Connectivity for LAN switches and routers and servers.
The Cajun A500 is an integral part of the Lucent end-to-end family of products,
providing an intelligent, cell-based platform for campus backbones. The Cajun A500 is
intended to provide a lower cost per port, compact chassis design than ATM switches
designed primarily for enterprise WAN or carrier applications. Such switches tend to
have redundancy, port fan-out, service adaptation (frame relay-to-ATM interworking or
integrated circuit emulation services, for example), and buffering features not needed in
a campus networking product.
Inter operability
The Cajun A500 supports inter operability with multiple network products, including:
U LAN switches (Bay Networks Centillion™ 50/100; Cisco’s Catalyst™ 5000/5500)
U ATM switches (Fore ASX-200™ and ASX-1000™, Cisco LightStream™ 1010,
Lucent’s MX™ 1000, and GlobeView™ 2000, 3COM Corebuilder™, and others)
U Routers (Bay, Cisco, 3Com)
U ATM Attached Servers (Sun, HP, Compaq)
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
1-1
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Overview
U Video conference systems (via AAL1 Codecs)
U Voice switches (Lucent Definity ATM ECS)
U Multimedia servers (Lucent MMCX)
Product Features
The Cajun A500 supports the following capabilities:
U High-density, 8-port, 155 Mbps single-mode, multi-mode, and UTP OC-3c and
2-port, 622 Mbps single-mode and multi-mode OC-12c ATM interface modules.
U Non-blocking wire speed throughput on all ports simultaneously.
U Redundant power and cooling and interface module hot swap.
U ATM UNI V 3.0, 3.1 signaling for both switched point-to-point and multi-point
Virtual Channel Connections (VCCs). Also permanent VCCs and Soft Permanent
Virtual Circuits (SPVCs) are supported.
U ILMI (Integrated Local Management Interface) to enable ATM endstations and the
Cajun A500 to exchange ATM addressing and User Network Interface (UNI)
version information.
U Interim Inter-Switch Protocol (IISP) for standards-based static routing between
ATM switches.
U Partial Packet Discard (PPD) and Early Packet Discard (EPD) congestion
management for AAL5 flows. These work in conjunction with each other and both
must be enabled to function correctly. The PPD works on a switch-wide basis, while
the EPD works as a per port parameter.
U Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) support for management. In-band
and out-band communications to manage a network of Cajun A500s.
U Modem support.
U Connection Admission Control (CAC) for supporting traffic belonging to different
Quality of Service (QoS) classes and queues.
U Network-wide clock synchronization.
U Static Route Distribution to lessen the need for manual configurations.
Release 3.0 offers the following additional features to the Cajun A500 system:
U ATM Forum Private Network-to-Network Interface (PNNI)
U ATM Forum UNI 4.0 Signaling and QoS.
U T3/E3 Physical Layer Interface Support (four Ports T3/E3, four Ports OC-3c)
1-2
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Overview
U In Band (Static IP) Based Management
U Non-zero VPI signaling and routing
U Embedded Web Interface
U PPP Dial Up
Hardware Features
The Cajun A500 system includes:
U T3/E3 Physical Layer Module - This line card can occupy any of the four existing
line card slots and includes 4 T3/E3 interface ports and 4 OC-3c SONET
multi-mode or single-mode fiber-optic interfaces. The board includes hot-swap
capability.
U Switch Processor (SWP) Board CPU upgrade - The Release 3 CPU includes an
upgrade to an i960HD66 processor. This processor replaces the existing i960CF33
processor and occupies the original processor socket. This processor upgrade
facilitates implementation of UNI 4.0 signalling with Call Admission Control (CAC)
and PNNI.
U Clock Sync Card - The Cajun A500 clock sync card has the ability to sync to
external T3/E3 sources as well as OC-3c and OC-12c sources, in systems configured
with a T3/E3 card.
Port Numbering Conventions
The port numbering conventions used in an Cajun A500 network are listed in Table 1-1 :
Table 1-1. Port Numbering Conventions
Port Type
Numbering Method
ATM Link Ports (8
port OC-3c)
A1.1 through A4.8 (A1.1-A1.8, A2.1-A2.8, A3.1-A3.8,
A4.1-A4.8)
ATM Link Ports (2
port OC-12c)
A1.1 through A4.2 (A1.1-A1.2, A2.1-A2.2, A3.1-A3.2,
A4.1-A4.2)
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
1-3
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Overview
Cajun A500 System Configurations
The following sections describe the basic and maximum system configurations available
with the Cajun A500.
Basic Cajun A500 System Configuration
The Cajun A500 comes in a basic configuration, that is expandable to suit changing
network requirements. The basic configuration for a Cajun A500 system contains the
following components:
U 19-inch rack mounting chassis (six slots)
U Redundant, hot-swappable 110/220 VAC power supplies
U Redundant hot-swappable fan assemblies (two fans per assembly)
U One Switch Processor module (SWP) with PCMCIA flash memory card and 16 MB
RAM
U One 5 Gbps non-blocking ATM Switch Fabric Module (SWF)
U One 8-port 155 Mb/s SONET/SDH OC-3c module, or one 2-port 622 Mb/s
SONET/SDH OC-12c module
Maximum Cajun A500 System Configuration
The maximum configuration for a Cajun A500 system enables the following:
U 19-inch rack mounting chassis (six slots)
U Redundant, hot-swappable 110/220 VAC power supplies
U Redundant hot-swappable fan assemblies (two fans per assembly)
U One Switch Processor module (SWP) with PCMCIA flash memory card and 16 MB
RAM
U One 5 Gbps non-blocking ATM Switch Fabric module (SWF)
U Four 8-port 155 Mb/s SONET/SDH OC-3c modules, or four 2-port 622 Mb/s
SONET/SDH OC-12c modules
The following sections provide an overview of the system’s hardware and software
architecture, as background for your installation.
1-4
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Overview
Hardware Components
The Cajun A500 hardware system architecture consists of the following modules, as
shown in Figure 1-1:
U Chassis
U Backplane
U Switch fabric
U Switch processor subsystem
U PHY interface modules
U Power supplies
U Fan assemblies
Figure 1-1: Cajun A500 Chassis
SWP-T
Switch Processor
Cajun A500
ATM Switch
SWP-T
CLK 1
CLK 2
10BASE-T
CONSOLE MODEM
RX
DIAG
MBOOT
MGT
RUN
PWR
LX
VOLT
TEMP
FAN
SYS ERR
FAULT
Switch Processor
8 OC3 UTP
OC-3c UTP card
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
RX
CD
RPRD
PWR
FAULT
OC-3c Module
8 OC3 MM
OC-3c MM Card
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
RX
CD
RPRD
PWR
FAULT
OC-3c Module
5 Gbps Switch
Fabric Card
SWF
PWR
FAULT
Switch Fabric
8 OC3 MM
OC-3c MM Card
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
RX
CD
RPRD
PWR
FAULT
OC-3c Module
2 OC12 SM
1
OC-12c SM Card
2
RX
CD
RPRD
RX
CD
RPRD
PWR
FAULT
OC-12c Module
5.5A - 120V~
2.5A - 230V~
50 / 60 Hz
Power Supply
(2)
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
5.5A - 120V~
2.5A - 230V~
50 / 60 Hz
AC OK
AC OK
DC OK
DC OK
Fan
Assembly
(2)
1-5
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Overview
The arrows in Figure 1-2. represent the functional relationship of these components.
Figure 1-2. A500 System Architecture
Auxiliary HW Module
Auxiliary Processor Module
Switch Fabric
Switch Processor
Subsystem
PHYModules
Modules
PHY
PHY
Modules
PHY
Module
Power
Power
Supply
Cooling
Cooling
The system also contains a backplane, that interconnects the PHY modules, power
supplies, and cooling fans to the Cajun A500 Switch Fabric and Switch Processor boards.
The following sections describe the Cajun A500 system modules.
Switch Fabric
The Switch Fabric in the Cajun A500 is responsible for transferring cells through the
switch and maintaining its virtual connections. The fabric is based on the MMCN ATMS
2000 chip set, designed for line-rate switching of OC-3c and OC-12c cell streams and full
support of ATM traffic management functions. The chip set has a shared memory
architecture. The switch fabric contains the following elements, as shown in Figure 1-3:
1-6
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Overview
Figure 1-3. A500 Switch fabric Architecture
Aux. HW Features Module
Common Cell Payload Memory
Control Memory
Common Memory Buffer
Switch Controller
Port IF Port IF Port IF
Control Tables
Port IF
PHY Interface Modules
Switch Processor Subsystem
The switch fabric elements include the following:
U PIF (Port Interface) Chip - A port interface chip transfers cell data between the
fabric’s cell memory staging buffers and the port’s physical layer hardware. The PIF
transfers cell payloads to and from the staging buffers over a parallel interface, and
simultaneously transfers cell headers serially to and from the switch controller
module. The physical layer interface is UTOPIA1. Each port interface contains four
ports, each with a bidirectional UTOPIA interface. The 32 Port Interfaces are
implemented as 8 quad-interface devices, where each PIF device may be
configured for four OC-3c or a single OC-12c interface(s).
U Common Memory Buffer - The common memory buffer stages cell payloads for
transfer to and from the common cell memory. Note that for cell traffic originating
or terminating at the local switch, the common memory buffers stages cell payloads
for transfer between the common cell payload memory module and the switch
controller. The common memory buffer is implemented as six dual-buffer devices.
Each buffer provides a 32-bit parallel interface to the common cell memory, and a
single-bit interface to each of the 32 Port Interfaces. An additional bit per buffer is
dedicated to transferring a longitudinal parity calculation between the PIF and the
common cell memory.
U Common Cell Payload Memory - Consists of 24, 64Kx16, 15ns SRAM devices.
These devices collectively provide a shared pool of 65,536 cell buffers. An
additional 64Kx16, 15ns SRAM device is used to store 12 parity bits per cell buffer.
An entire cell payload is transferred between the common memory buffer and
common cell payload memory each clock cycle.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
1-7
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Overview
U Control Memory - Is divided into attribute memory, stack memory, and link
memory. This memory is implemented in 64k x 16, 15ns SRAM devices. Attribute
memory stores the cell header, its multicast status, and a pointer to the output
lookup table. Stack memory contains the list of free cell buffers. Link memory
maintains the linked list of cell buffer pointers to the common cell payload
memory.
U Switch Controller - Is the switch’s engine. Its functions include:
•
Routing table address generation
•
Admission policy enforcement
•
Queue data structure maintenance
•
Output queue service arbitration
•
Multicast state machine, traffic, and data queue statistic maintenance
U Control Tables - Consist of lookup and translation tables. There is one lookup
table for input cell traffic, and one for output cell traffic. Each of these tables
provides pointers to the corresponding translation table. The input translation table
provides the switch controller with the output queue number for an incoming cell,
the connection’s multicast status, additional control information, and a pointer to
the output lookup table. The output translation table provides the outgoing cell
with its translated Virtual Path Identifier/Virtual Channel Identifier (VPI/VCI) and
gives the switch controller a pointer to the next port in the multicast chain.
Shared Memory Switch Architecture
The switch fabric uses a shared memory switch architecture. This shared memory
architecture enables information in each cell to be divided and handled as follows:
U Cell payloads are transferred to/from the Port Interface devices (PIFs) through a
common memory buffer.
U Cell headers are sent directly to the switch controller, where their address
information is examined and an appropriate queueing decision is made.
Switch Fabric Features
The Switch Fabric includes the following features:
U A cell buffer capacity of 130 queues, with a total of 64,000 cell buffers.
U Hardware multicast support from one input port to a maximum of 32 output ports.
U Support for four priority queues.
U Switch fabric aggregate throughput of 4.988 Gbps.
1-8
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Overview
U Latency of 1 cell-time (2.72 us) between the port interface device and the common
memory buffer during ingress, and a second cell-time at the same interface during
egress.
Figure 1-4. Switch Fabric Module
SWF
PWR
FAULT
Switch Fabric
Power
and Fault
Indicators
Switch Processor Subsystem
The Switch Processor subsystem (Figure 1-5) is the supervisory engine for the Cajun
A500, and is based on the Intel i960 microprocessor. It is the module on which the ATM
signaling, routing, and management software are run.
Figure 1-5. Switch Processor Module
Cajun A500
ATM Switch
SWP-T
CLK 1
CLK 2
10BASE-T
CONSOLE MODEM
RX
DIAG
MBOOT
MGT
RUN
LX
VOLT
TEMP
FAN
SYS ERR
PWR
FAULT
Switch Processor
PCMCIA Flash
Card Slot
Status Indicators
Power
and Fault
Indicators
Figure 1-6 on page 1-10 illustrates the switch processor subsystem architecture.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
1-9
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Overview
Figure 1-6. Switch Processor Subsystem Architecture
AXHF
M EM
NVRAM
(RT C )
AXHF
A ux . H W F eatu re
C ontroller
Tim er/
C o u n ter
D U A RT
AAC
AXP
DRAM
A ux iliary P rocesso r
REGs
FLA SH
S tatu s/C trl
B oot/D iag/C ode
A A L 5 A ssist
C ontroller
SW C
S w itch C on troller
DRAM
F ram e M em /
E xecutio n M em
PHY0
PH Y 1
PH Y 3
ETH
CTL
SW P
S w itch P rocessor
The switch processor’s responsibilities include the following:
Figure 1-7. Switch Processor Responsibilities
• System boot
• LEC functionality
• System diagnostics
• PHY module configuration
• System initialization
• PHY module statistics monitoring
• Signalling/connection management
• SNMP agent
• NNI processing (ANNI, IISP, PNNI)
• IP stack
• Switch connection table configuration
• Console/modem driver
• Switch statistics monitoring
• PCMCIA driver
• AAL5 segmentation/reassembly
• Ethernet driver
• Auxiliary hardware feature module supervision
• Auxiliary processor module cooperation
• Exception handling
1-10
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Overview
Switch Processor Front Panel Interfaces
The switch processor contains the following front panel interfaces (Figure 1-5 on page
1-9):
U PCMCIA slot - this interface uses a standard PCMCIA Flash memory card to
provide software updates.
U Console/modem ports - these two RJ-45 interfaces are used for serial port
connectivity and communicate using a 9600 baud default ASCII character mode.
U Ethernet 10BaseT port - this interface is a standard 10BaseT RJ-45 port that
enables Ethernet connectivity to the Cajun A500, for management purposes.
U Physical Layer (PHY) Modules - Cajun A500 physical layer modules perform all
the physical layer processing and some of the ATM layer processing for the Cajun
A500. The Cajun A500 system can support up to four of these modules. Each
module can support ATM traffic bandwidth of up to 1.2 Gbps, and each
communicates with the Switch Processor through an identical dedicated interface.
Physical Layer Module varieties include ATM over OC-3c SONET (see Figure 1-8)
in three media types. The module supports Multimode fiber (MM), Singlemode
fiber (SM), and Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) cabling. OC-3 and singlemode optics
board are a Class I laser product (See Appendix D, "Laser Safety Information" for
more information).
Figure 1-8. OC-3c Module
8 OC3 MM
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
RX
CD
RPRD
M
PWR
FAULT
OC-3c Module
Power
and Fault
Indicators
OC-3c modules (a block diagram is shown in Figure 1-9) include eight port interfaces,
whereas OC-12c modules (a block diagram is shown in Figure 1-11) include two port
interfaces.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
1-11
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Overview
Figure 1-9. OC-3c Interfaces Diagram
BACKPLA NE
P IF
P IF
U T O P IA 1
P H Y S IC A L L AY E R
FRA M ERS
O PT IC A L D ATA
L IN K S (O D L )
F IB E R /U T P
ATM over OC-12c SONET (Figure 1-10) supports multi-mode fiber and singlemode fiber.
OC-12 and singlemode optics board are a Class I laser product (See Appendix D, "Laser
Safety Information" for more information).
Figure 1-10. OC-12c Module
2 OC12 SM
1
2
RX
CD
RPRD
RX
CD
RPRD
PWR
FAULT
OC-12c Module
Power
and Fault
Indicators
Note: The OC-3c and OC-12c modules are hot swappable.
1-12
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Overview
Figure 1-11. OC-12c Interfaces Diagram
BA CKPLA NE
P IF
P IF
BU FFERS
U T O P IA 2
FRA M ERS
XCUR
XCUR
ODL
ODL
Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) Module
You connect an Cajun A500 to an end device, using UTP regular CAT 5 straight-through
ethernet cable. The maximum length allowed between the Cajun A500 and end device is
100 meters of Unshielded Twisted Pair, Category 5 cable.
Figure 1-12. UTP Module
8 OC3 UTP
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
RX
CD
RPRD
PWR
FAULT
OC-3c Module
Power
and Fault
Indicators
The UTP modules have RJ45 8-pin connectors and the pin configuration must be
crossed-over to go from one Cajun A500 to another. If you are connecting one UTP port
to another UTP port in either one Cajun A500 (for a loopback test), or two Cajun A500s,
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
1-13
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Overview
for a network to network connection, the UTP boards require the following cross-over
pin configuration. From the first Cajun A500 RJ45 connector to the second Cajun A500
RJ45 connector the pins must match up as follows:
Figure 1-13. UTP A500 to A500 Pin Configuration
1
1
8
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
8
-7
-8
N ot used
N ot used
N ot used
N ot used
-1
-2
Power Supplies
The Cajun A500 system supports two 5 and 12 volt outputs, 200 Watt power supplies
(see Figure 1-14). When a system is configured with two power supplies, they load
share. If a power supply fails in this configuration, the remaining supply assumes the full
power load, and you can hot swap the failed supply.
Figure 1-14. A500 Power Supply
5.5A - 120V~
2.5A - 230V~
50 / 60 Hz
AC OK
DC OK
1-14
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Overview
Cooling Subsystem
The cooling subsystem (see Figure 1-15) consists of a bank of four, 5 volt, DC electric
fans. These fans include Hall-effect sensors and amplifiers that enable detection of fan
rotation or failure. If a fan fails, the FAN LED on the System Management Processor
lights. An additional fan is integrated with each installed power supply.
Figure 1-15. A500 Chassis with Fans Partially Inserted
Cajun A500
ATM Switch
SWP-T
CLK 1
CLK 2
10BASE-T
CONSOLE MODEM
RX
DIAG
MBOOT
MGT
RUN
PWR
LX
VOLT
TEMP
FAN
SYS ERR
FAULT
Switch Processor
8 OC3 UTP
2
1
3
4
5
6
7
8
RX
CD
RPRD
PWR
FAULT
OC-3c Module
8 OC3 MM
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
RX
CD
RPRD
PWR
FAULT
OC-3c Module
SWF
PWR
FAULT
Switch Fabric
8 OC3 MM
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
RX
CD
RPRD
PWR
FAULT
OC-3c Module
2 OC12 SM
1
2
RX
CD
RPRD
RX
CD
RPRD
PWR
FAULT
OC-12c Module
5.5A - 120V~
2.5A - 230V~
50 / 60 Hz
5.5A - 120V~
2.5A - 230V~
50 / 60 Hz
AC OK
AC OK
DC OK
DC OK
Fan Assembly slides in
Second Fan Assembly
Note: If a fan fails, the LED on the SWP lights. Fan trays are hot-swappable.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
1-15
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Overview
Cajun A500 Software
The Cajun A500 software consists of an embedded intelligent ATM processing system
running under a real-time OS on the Switch Processor module. The Cajun A500 system
software architecture, as shown in Figure 1-16, is comprised of the following
components:
U User-to-Network Interface (UNI) Management Task (UNI mgmt task)
manages the call control signalling messages. These messages pertain to the calls
terminated locally in the switch control processor.
U Signaling Task sets up, maintains, and tears down connections used for control
information within an Cajun A500 system. These connections are used both for
Shortest Path First (SPF) messages and for connections enabling remote access to a
Cajun A500 via ATM.
U Routing Task computes and maintains neighboring system (“neighbor”)
connectivity and distributes the link state database.
U Switch Monitor Task manages overall Cajun A500 operation, including event
handling and statistic gathering, as well as the Operations Administration and
Maintenance (OAM) of the PHY modules.
U Ethernet Driver initializes and monitors the AMD Ethernet controller.
U Segmentation and Reassembly (SAR) Driver reassembles incoming traffic to
the switch processor and segments outgoing traffic from the switch processor.
U Chassis Monitor Task monitors the physical components on the Cajun A500,
including fan operation and system temperature.
U LAN Emulation (LANE) Client Task exchanges traffic (primarily telnet) to the
Cajun A500 system. This task receive and transmits in-band 1483 traffic from
remote management entities, including a LAN Emulation Configuration Server
(LECS) and LAN Emulation Service (LES).
U Console Task controls the command line interface for the Cajun A500.
U Switch Driver controls and monitors the ATMS200 and ATM Switch chip set. This
chip set is primarily responsible for creating and maintaining connections.
U SNMP Agent implements the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP),
that enables remote management of the devices.
1-16
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Overview
Figure 1-16: Cajun A500 Software Architecture
SWP
P
P
P
IP
TC P
Telnet
UD P
MAKER
LANE
BUS
L
F
H
LEC
SAR
S
I
G
N
A
L
TFTP
CA C
P
N
N
I
ETHER
Data Flow
Figure 1-17 shows the high level data flow path in the Cajun A500 product:
Figure 1-17. A500 Data Flow Path
S w itch P rocessors
S w itch
Fabric
1
S
A
R
.
AT M
P orts
155/622 M bps
.
.
8-32
CPU
port
S ignalling/
R outing
E ngine
E ther
S egm ent
10 M bps
D ata
F low
1. ATM cells from the ATM ports are stored in the cell memory under the switch
fabric control.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
1-17
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Overview
2. ATM cells are either forwarded to another ATM port at the line speed or to the
SAR, if circuit terminates locally (signalling/routing engine, etc.).
3. The SAR reassembles the cells to a Protocol Data Unit (PDU) and notifies the
appropriate local task.
4. The local task processes the PDU and performs the appropriate action. For example,
the Signalling/Routing Engine parses the PDU and determines the forwarding path.
A cross-connection through the switch is setup, if necessary.
5. The forwarded PDUs are passed to the SAR unit.
6. The SAR segments the PDU and hands off the cells to the switch for transmission.
7. Ethernet traffic is management traffic that is handled locally.
1-18
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
2
Cajun A500 ATM Switch
Installation
Overview
This chapter explains how to install the Cajun A500 at your site. It also explains how to
add or replace fans, power supplies, and ATM interface modules.
Pre-installation Requirements
Before you install the Cajun A500, verify the following:
U You have received the hardware you ordered and the related items needed for
installation ("Verify the Packing List" later in this chapter).
U The site meets the environmental and physical requirements according to the
specifications as listed in "Environmental and Physical Requirements" later in this
chapter.
Verify the Packing List
Your shipment should contain the following items:
U Cajun A500 ATM switch with the components you ordered installed. The
components include:
•
Chassis (system cabinet, backplane, power supplie(s), and two fan trays).
•
Switch processor (top most slot) and switch fabric (4th slot from the top).
•
ATM Interface modules of the type and quantity you ordered in the remaining
chassis slots.
U Blank slot cover panels for slots that are not filled with an interface module.
U A power cord for each power supply (U.S. and Canada).
U Mounting screws and feet.
U PCMCIA card with the current revision of the software.
U Documentation set
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
2-1
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation
Environmental and Physical Requirements
The following sections discuss the environmental and physical requirements needed for
installing the Cajun A500. These requirements fall into the following categories:
U Rack space dimensions
U Power requirements
U Environmental requirements
U Cabling requirements
U Console and modem port requirements
Rack Space Dimensions
This section describes the space requirements for installing your Cajun A500.
U You can install the Cajun A500 into a standard 19-inch mounting rack. A
minimum of 13 1/2 inches (the height of the Cajun A500) must be available
vertically to place the Cajun A500 in the rack.
U A minimum of 18 1/2 inches in depth (front to back) must be available to
accommodate the Cajun A500. If the racks have doors, this 18 1/2-inch depth
requirement plus an additional several inches, must be maintained with the doors
shut. This ensures proper air flow around the unit.
U The interface cables attach to the front of the Cajun A500. It is important to plan
your cable and equipment layout so that the placement and connection of the
Cajun A500 is manageable relative to where the other items it is connecting to are
located. The location, nature, and specifications for each type of interface port on
the Cajun A500 are included in this manual.
U The Cajun A500 includes a modem port to enable remote access to the units. If the
modem is placed in the same rack or installation area as the Cajun A500, make
sure you have enough space for the modem and its associated cables.
U The rack must be capable of supporting the combined weight of the Cajun A500s
you plan to install (one fully populated Cajun A500 weighs 75 lbs.).
CAUTION: Ensure adequate air flow around the Cajun A500 by making sure
that the vents in the rear and on the sides are not blocked. Damage
can occur to the Cajun A500 if adequate air flow is not available for
cooling. Use the show system chassis command once you have
completed the installation to check the Cajun A500 temperature.
2-2
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation
Power Requirements
The Cajun A500 draws power from AC power outlets.The power supplies are voltage
auto-sensing, meaning that they detect and adjust automatically to the type of AC power
outlet to which they are connected. The Cajun A500 can be installed in numerous
countries and their respective electrical power environments. To increase the reliability
of the installation against power problems, you can connect the power cords on the
Cajun A500 redundant power supplies to an outlet on a separate, independent electrical
circuit. You must have a 10-foot, 3-prong, 110 VAC cord for each power supply (U.S. and
Canada).
Environmental Requirements
Table 2-1 lists environmental and descriptive information:
Table 2-1: Environmental Requirements
Catagory
Dimensions
Requirements
Height: 13.5" (34.3 cm)
Width: 17" (43 cm)
Depth: 18" (45.7 cm)
Min. Weight: 55 lb (25 kg)
Max.Weight:75 lb (34/1 kg)
Environmental
Operating Temperature: 0 - 500 C
Storage Temperature: -30-650 C
Operating Humidity: 15-95% relative humidity, non-condensing
Storage Humidity: 15-90% relative humidity, non-condensing
Thermal Rating
300 watts maximum, 1,000 BTU/hour maximum
Safety
ETL (UL1950), ETLc (CSA 22.2#950), T Mark
Electronic Emissions
FCC part 15A, EN55022, VCCI Electromagnetic Immunity
EN50082-1, IEC 801-2, IEC 802-4
Power Supplies
AC Line Frequency: 47-63 Hz
Input Voltage (auto-sensing):
120 volts selected - 85-132 VAC
220 volts selected - 180-264 VAC
Current Rating:
120 volts selected - 6.1 amps maximum
220 volts selected - 3.1 amps maximum
Connections
32,000 virtual connections
VC & VP switching
Ping on IP or ATM address
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
2-3
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation
Table 2-1: Environmental Requirements
Catagory
Voltage & Frequency
Requirements
Rated voltage: 100-240vac
rated current: 2.5A
rated frequency: 50/60Hz
Cabling Requirements
Your Cajun A500 kit contains one 10-foot, 3-prong, 110 VAC cord for each power supply
(U.S. and Canada). For installation in other countries, a cord with the appropriate outlet
plug for that environment must be procured. The plug connecting to the Cajun A500
power supply must conform to the 3-prong receptacle design of the Cajun A500. To
remove a power cord, you pull steadily but firmly on the plug.
Console and Modem Port Requirements
There are three ports on the Cajun A500 Switch Processor module (always located in slot
1, the uppermost slot in the chassis) that you can use to connect a management console
to the Cajun A500. These ports are:
U 10BaseT Ethernet port
U RJ45 serial line console interface port
U RJ45 modem interface port
The cable attachment requirements for each of these ports are described in later sections.
The Cajun A500 base system ships with a serial port I/O adapter kit. This kit provides
adapter assemblies for common terminal attachment types that allow a cable to be
constructed that provides the proper attachment to the Cajun A500 SWP, as well as, the
external device. This is provided to ease installation in a variety of environments.
2-4
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation
Installing the Cajun A500
This section contains the following information:
U Required tools
U Unpacking and mounting the Cajun A500
U Connecting the cables and setting the pin configurations
You can mount the Cajun A500 on a flat surface, in a standard EIA rack, or in a relay
rack. Mounting brackets are located at the front sides of the chassis. You can reposition
these brackets to the center or the rear of the unit (Figure 2-2).
CAUTION: ESD precautions must be taken to prevent damage to the electrical
components within the system. Wear a grounded wrist strap at all
times and place components on a grounded mat. It is recommended
that you use two people to lift and install the Cajun A500.
Figure 2-2: Cajun A500 Rack Installation
Cajun A500
ATM Switch
SWP-T
CLK 1
CLK 2
10BASE-T
CONSOLE MODEM
RX
DIAG
MBOOT
MGT
RUN
LX
VOLT
TEMP
FAN
SYS ERR
PWR
FAULT
Switch Processor
8 OC3 UTP
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
RX
CD
RPRD
PWR
FAULT
OC-3c Module
8 OC3 MM
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
RX
CD
RPRD
PWR
FAULT
OC-3c Module
SWF
PWR
FAULT
Switch Fabric
8 OC3 MM
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
RX
CD
RPRD
PWR
FAULT
OC-3c Module
2 OC12 SM
1
2
RX
CD
RPRD
RX
CD
RPRD
PWR
FAULT
OC-12c Module
5.5A - 120V~
2.5A - 230V~
50 / 60 Hz
5.5A - 120V~
2.5A - 230V~
50 / 60 Hz
AC OK
AC OK
DC OK
DC OK
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
2-5
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation
To install the Cajun A500 complete the following steps:
1. Remove the Cajun A500 from its packaging and place it on a sturdy table. The
Cajun A500 is shipped with the port modules installed and one power cord per
power supply (US and Canada). See "Unpacking the Cajun A500".
2. Confirm that the Cajun A500 is properly equipped, and no damage has occurred
during shipping. Contact your customer support representative if there are any
problems. See "Verify the Packing List" and "Unpacking the Cajun A500".
3. Mount the Cajun A500. See "Rack Mount Installation", "Placing the Cajun A500 in
a Rack", or "Surface Mounting".
4. Connect the cables and connectors. See "Connecting AC Power Cord(s)".
The following sections describe how to mount the Cajun A500 and connect the cables
and connectors.
Required Tools
The following tools are required for mounting the Cajun A500:
U A Phillips head screwdriver
U ESD wrist straps
Unpacking the Cajun A500
To ensure trouble-free operation for your Cajun A500, observe the following cautions:
CAUTION: Do not handle the Cajun A500 roughly; damage can occur to the
chassis. Do not move the Cajun A500 while the power is on. This
could cause damage to the boards in the system.
Confirm that your Cajun A500 rack mount kit contains the following parts:
U 8 - flat washers and 8 - lock washers
U 8 - #10 3/4 inch phillips head screws
U 8 - #10 Tinerman clips (these clips are used if you are not installing into a universal
19-inch rack. The clips go behind the holes in the rack to secure the unit to the
rack.)
2-6
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation
Rack Mount Installation
Most Cajun A500s will be installed in a standard 19-inch mounting rack. The 19-inch
racks typically include mounting rails for attachment of devices, and occasionally other
features to help with power and communication cable routing. Each Cajun A500 space
in the rack must meet these requirements:
U A minimum of 13 1/2 inches for each unit, the height of each Cajun A500 unit,
when multiple Cajun A500s are installed.
U A minimum of 18 1/2 inches in depth (front to back) to accommodate the Cajun
A500. If the racks have doors, this 18 1/2-inch depth requirement must be
maintained with the doors shut, to ensure proper air flow around the unit.
U The rack must be capable of supporting the combined weight of the Cajun A500s
you plan to install (one fully populated Cajun A500 weighs 75 lbs.).
CAUTION: To ensure adequate air flow around the Cajun A500, make sure the
vents in the rear and on the sides are not blocked. Damage can
occur to the Cajun A500 if adequate air flow is not available for
cooling. Use the show system temperature command to check the
Cajun A500 temperature.
Placing the Cajun A500 in a Rack
The weight of the Cajun A500 requires two people to lift the system onto the adjustable
mounting supports. As indicated earlier, the mounting brackets attached to the Cajun
A500 must be located adjacent to the shelf end of the adjustable mounting supports. To
place the Cajun A500 on the rack:
1. Place two of the #10 3/4 inch phillips head screws with a flat and lock washer into
the rack where you plan to install the Cajun A500. Tighten the screw, leaving
about 1/4 inch exposed. These screws lock the Cajun A500 into place when you
slide them into the keyhole cutouts (second from the bottom keyhole cutouts on
the mounting brackets attached to the chassis). See Figure 2-2.
2. Lift the Cajun A500 and slide the system into place until the mounting brackets
meet the vertical mounting rail.
3. Slide the keyhole slot over the screws you previously installed. Placing the keyhole
slots over the screws locks the Cajun A500 into place and supports it while you
install the rest of the screws.
4. Secure the mounting brackets to the vertical rails with the remaining screws. It is
recommended that you use a minimum of four additional screws to secure the
Cajun A500 to the rack.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
2-7
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation
Surface Mounting
If you choose to place the Cajun A500 on a lateral surface and not in an equipment rack,
you must ensure that the following conditions are met:
U Ensure the height, width, and depth specifications for the Cajun A500 are met by
the space.
U Ensure proper power and cable attachment needs are met.
U Ensure that the surface can bear the load properly.
To install on a surface, complete the following steps:
1. Attach the rubber feet in position on the bottom of the unit by removing the
backing and attaching them to the bottom of the Cajun A500.
2. Place the unit on a level surface. The surface must be capable of supporting the
combined weight of the Cajun A500s you plan to install (one fully populated Cajun
A500 weighs 75 lbs.)
Connecting Cables
This section explains how to connect the following cables and cords:
U AC power cords
U Management station (console, modem, and/or Ethernet ports)
Connecting AC Power Cord(s)
The power cord connection plugs and on/off switches are located at the base of the front
of the Cajun A500 (see Figure 2-3) on its power supply modules. If you use only one
supply, it can be installed in either slot.
2-8
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation
Figure 2-3: AC Power Cord Connection
5.5A - 120V~
2.5A - 230V~
50 / 60 Hz
AC OK
DC OK
Power Cord plugs
in here
To plug in the power cord:
1. Plug the cord into the front of the unit with a steady, firm pressure.
2. Turn on the power switch located above the plug. The power indicator LEDs light
up.
For information regarding Emissions requirements, see Appendix B, “Emissions” of this
guide.
Connecting the Management Station
Configuration requirements for devices and management stations connected to each of
the ports are provided in their associated user documentation. Some of the configuration
information you need about the other devices includes:
U Supported modem speed ranges
U Parity settings on modem and/or serial port interfaces
U IP host address specifications for management stations attached to the Ethernet
port
Console port cable attachments are described in the following order:
U 10BaseT Ethernet
U RJ45 serial line
U RJ45 modem
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
2-9
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation
Connecting the 10BaseT Ethernet Port
The switch processor has a 10BaseT Ethernet port that you can use to connect a
management station to the Cajun A500 over a LAN segment. This is the only directly
connected Ethernet port on an Cajun A500. A LAN-based management station can also
connect with the Cajun A500 over the Cajun A500’s ATM ports using a LAN Emulation
(LANE) service, if that is available in your network. However, this information applies to
the directly connected Ethernet port. 10BaseT Ethernet connections to the Cajun A500
switch processor require a category-3 or category-5 UTP cable.
The following table lists the 10BaseT Ethernet port pin configuration required for
connection.
10Base-T Port Pin Out:
Pin
Signal
Category
1
Receive+
(Rx+)
2
Receive-
(Rx-)
3
Transmit+
(Tx+)
4
not used
5
not used
6
Transmit-
7
not used
8
not used
(Tx-)
After you connect a cable to the port, the port LEDs on the switch processor do the
following:
U Link (LK) LED lights up
U Receive (RX) LED flickers as traffic is received
Table 2-4 describes the LEDs for the Switch Processor module:
Table 2-4: SWP LEDs
LED
Description
LK
When lit, indicates when 10BaseT has established a link.
RX
When lit, indicates when 10BaseT is receiving traffic.
A management station connecting to the Cajun A500 over an Ethernet link can then use
a telnet session to log into the Cajun A500 and operate the system using its Command
Line Interface (CLI) and/or SNMP. Operation and use of the CLI after installation is
addressed in the Cajun A500 ATM Switch User Guide.
2-10
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation
Connecting the RJ45 Serial Port
The Cajun A500 also has a serial line interface port on its switch processor module
(Figure 2-5) for direct, local connection of a management console to the Cajun A500.
This is an alternative to the Ethernet connection. Either one can be used. It is not
necessary to use both at the same time.
Figure 2-5: Switch Processor Module
Cajun A500
ATM Switch
SWP-T
CLK 1
CLK 2
10BASE-T
CONSOLE MODEM
RX
DIAG
MBOOT
MGT
RUN
LX
VOLT
TEMP
FAN
SYS ERR
PWR
FAULT
Switch Processor
PCMCIA Flash
Card Slot
Status Indicators
Power
and Fault
Indicators
Table 2-6 describes the function of each status and problem indicator on the Switch
Processor (SWP):
Table 2-6: Status Indicators on the Switch Processor
LED
Function
Diag - Green
Lit, indicates the system is powering up; darkens after power up.
Volt - Yellow
Lit, indicates voltage is out of range.
NBoot - Green
Lit, indicates that software is loading to the SWP; darkens when loading
completes.
Temp - Yellow
Lit, indicates ambient temperature is out of range.
RUN - Green
Lit, indicates Switch Processor is communicating.
Sys err - Yellow Lit, indicates there is a software problem on the switch processor.
Pwr - Green
Lit, indicates when system is receiving DC power.
Fault - Yellow
Lit, indicates when there is a hardware fault.
The console can be a PC or UNIX workstation. In either case the device must be capable
of communicating in character mode over a serial interface port. Access to the Cajun
A500 Command Line Interface (CLI) is gained in this way.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
2-11
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation
The following table contains the Switch Processor pin configuration for connection to
this port.
Console Port Pin Out:
Pin
Signal
Category
1
RTS
Not Used
2
DTR
Not Used
3
RX Data
Input
4
DCD
Not Used
5
TX Data
Output
6
GND
GND
7
DSR
Not Used
8
CTS
Not Used
As soon as you connect the cable, if the system is booting, messages begin to display on
the console screen.
Modem Port Functionality
The Cajun A500 supports modem functionality. The terminal emulation for this is
VT100. Table 2-7 describes configuration information for setting up this capability on a
Cajun A500:
Table 2-7: Modem Port Configuration
Host
Switch Configuration
Enter this AT Command
USRobotics Sportster Modem
Switches 1, 3 and 8 down, the rest up
AT&F&B1&H2&I2&W
USRobotics Sportster Modem
Switch 8 down, the rest up
AT&F&B1&H2&I2&W
Cajun A500 Modem Port Cable Configuration
Cajun A500 RJ45
PIN(Male)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
2-12
USRobotics DB25
PIN (Male)
4
20
2
8
3
7
6
5
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation
Configuring the Modem
Your modem must be configured for N-8-1 as follows:
1. Initialized your modem for auto-answer.
2. Configure the modem for:
9600 baud (the default for the Cajun A500 modem port)
no parity bits
1 stop bits
8 data bits
Use the modify modem command to set up the Cajun A500 . Use the show system
modem command to display the current settings.
For information on setting your modem, see your modem’s installation/initialization
guide.
Installing/Removing System Components
You can install or remove several Cajun A500 components after the initial installation.
These include:
U Power supplies and fans
U Filler panels
U ATM interface modules
U Switch processor and switch fabric modules (special procedures apply)
The procedures for installing and removing these are described in the following sections.
Required Tools
The following tools are required for hot-swapping Cajun A500 components:
U A Phillips head screwdriver for removing covers and attaching filler panels
U ESD wrist straps
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
2-13
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation
Installing/Removing a Power Supply
To install a power supply, complete the following steps:
1. If you are installing a secondary power supply, use a Phillips screwdriver to remove
the blank panel on the empty power supply slot.
2. Slide the power supply firmly into the slot (Figure 2-8).
3. Tighten the two captive screws.
4. Turn off the power switch.
5. Plug in the power cord.
6. Turn on the power switch. The LEDs on the power supply light up.
Figure 2-8: Power Supply Insertion/Removal
Cajun A500
ATM Switch
SWP-T
CLK 1
CLK 2
10BASE-T
CONSOLE MODEM
RX
DIAG
MBOOT
MGT
RUN
PWR
LX
VOLT
TEMP
FAN
SYS ERR
FAULT
Switch Processor
8 OC3 UTP
2
1
3
4
5
6
7
8
RX
CD
RPRD
PWR
FAULT
OC-3c Module
8 OC3 MM
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
RX
CD
RPRD
PWR
FAULT
OC-3c Module
SWF
PWR
FAULT
Switch Fabric
8 OC3 MM
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
RX
CD
RPRD
PWR
FAULT
OC-3c Module
2 OC12 SM
1
2
RX
CD
RPRD
RX
CD
RPRD
PWR
FAULT
OC-12c Module
5.5A - 120V~
2.5A - 230V~
50 / 60 Hz
AC OK
DC OK
Power Supply
slides in
Captive
Screws
5.5A - 120V~
2.5A - 230V~
50 / 60 Hz
AC OK
Captive
screw
Captive
screw
DC OK
To remove a power supply:
1. Turn off the power switch above the plug.
2. Remove the power cord from the outlet and then the power supply.
3. Using a phillips screwdriver, loosen the two captive screws (Figure 2-8) on the
power supply cover.
4. Slide the power supply out of the Cajun A500.
2-14
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation
Replacing Fans
The Cajun A500 contains four fans (Figure 2-9). Fans 1 and 2 are located in the upper
tray; fans 3 and 4 (second fan assembly) are located in the lower tray on the right side of
the box.
Figure 2-9: Fan Replacement
Cajun A500
ATM Switch
SWP-T
CLK 1
CLK 2
10BASE-T
CONSOLE MODEM
RX
DIAG
MBOOT
MGT
RUN
PWR
LX
VOLT
TEMP
FAN
SYS ERR
FAULT
Switch Processor
8 OC3 UTP
2
1
3
4
5
6
7
8
RX
CD
RPRD
PWR
FAULT
OC-3c Module
8 OC3 MM
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
RX
CD
RPRD
PWR
FAULT
OC-3c Module
SWF
PWR
FAULT
Switch Fabric
8 OC3 MM
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
RX
CD
RPRD
PWR
FAULT
OC-3c Module
2 OC12 SM
1
2
RX
CD
RPRD
RX
CD
RPRD
PWR
FAULT
OC-12c Module
5.5A - 120V~
2.5A - 230V~
50 / 60 Hz
5.5A - 120V~
2.5A - 230V~
50 / 60 Hz
AC OK
AC OK
DC OK
DC OK
Fan Assembly slides in
Second Fan Assembly
If a fan fails, the TEMP LED on the switch processor lights up. You can determine which
fan has failed using the following command:
A500: show system chassis
If you want to replace a fan that has failed, you must replace the entire tray.
To replace the tray:
1. Using a flat blade screwdriver, loosen the captive screw on the fan tray.
2. Pull the tray out.
3. Insert a new tray and tighten the thumb screw. The TEMP LED on the switch
processor goes dark.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
2-15
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation
Installing/Removing Modules
This section describes the procedure for installing and removing modules.
CAUTION: Only the interface modules on the Cajun A500 are hot swappable.
These modules can be inserted/removed during system operation.
To insert/remove the system control modules (SWP and SWF) the
system must first be powered down.
To install a module:
1. Slide the module firmly into the slot along the side rails.
2. Use the ejector tabs to lock the board into place (Figure 2-10). The module
initializes as soon as it is in place.
3. Tighten the thumb screws by hand.
Figure 2-10: Ejector Tabs
Thumb
Screw
8 OC3 MM
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
RX
CD
RPRD
PWR
FAULT
OC-3c Module
Ejector
Tab
Power
and Fault
Indicators
M
Thumb
Screw
Ejector
Tab
To remove a module:
1. Loosen the thumb screws by hand.
2. Grasp the levers on each side of the module.
3. Pull the ejector tabs on the module to pull it out of the slot (Figure 2-10).
2-16
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation
Installing The Cajun A500 Software
Cajun A500 units come with the current version of software already loaded. However, in
some cases, it may be necessary to obtain and load a new software image for an Cajun
A500. This may be necessary because:
U A switch processor module has been replaced, and the pre-existing software
version and PCMCIA card are not available.
U A new software version has been made available and needs to be installed.
If you need to load a new software version, this section describes the available
procedures. To install the Cajun A500 software, use one of the procedures in the
following subsections.
Installing New Cajun A500 Software Using a New PCMCIA Card
To install new software using a PCMCIA card:
1. Insert the new PCMCIA card into the PCMCIA card slot on the SWP module.
2. Download the image to Flash from the PCMCIA card to the SWP’s memory.
3.
Reboot the system.
Obtaining a New Image From an Ftp Site and Using it Via a
PCMCIA Card
The steps for this procedure include changing the boot source. To obtain a new image:
1. Load the new image onto a card from the Lucent FTP site, using the tftp get
command.
2. Use the admin changeboot command to indicate the new boot source.
3. Download the image from the PCMCIA card to Boot Flash memory.
4.
Reboot the system.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
2-17
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation
2-18
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
3
Cajun A500 Initialization and
Initial Configuration
Overview
This chapter describes the process for powering up and initializing your Cajun A500
switch, including the following sections:
U Initializing the Cajun A500 system
U Rebooting the Cajun A500 system, if needed
U Loading the initial Cajun A500 system configuration parameters
U Viewing the Cajun A500 system's configured parameters
The Cajun A500 Initial Configuration Process
To initially configure the Cajun A500:
1. Power on the system, if it is not already on.
2. Confirm that the system initialization has succeeded.
3. Log in as root and modify the root password.
4. Assign a name and prompt for the Cajun A500.
5. Assign the IP, subnet mask, gateway, and Trivial File Transfer protocol (TFTP) server
addresses.
6. Download the Cajun A500 configuration files.
7. Reboot the Cajun A500.
Each of these steps are described in detail in the following sections.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
3-1
Cajun A500 Initialization and Initial Configuration
Powering the Cajun A500 Up and Down
Note: It is recommended that you attach a console to the system before initializing.
This enables you to view any error messages that may occur during the boot
process.
1. To power the Cajun A500 up, turn on the power by setting the power switch of
each power supply unit to the ON position. The PWR LED on each supply lights
green.
2. To power the Cajun A500 down, set the power switch on each power supply unit
to OFF. The PWR LED on each supply extinguishes.
Cajun A500 Boot Process
When the Cajun A500 power is turned on, the system automatically starts up. It does
this by initializing, or “booting” its operational software from the Flash memory on the
switch processor or the PCMCIA card, depending on which boot source you selected.
When booting completes, the Cajun A500 is ready for further configuration and
operation using management commands and operational code. The Cajun A500 boot
process follows these steps:
1. Software boot image is loaded into the switch processor RAM and executes.
2.
The TCP/IP stack initializes using the parameters in NVRAM (IP address, subnet
mask, gateway).
3. The configuration information loads from NVRAM and starts up the internal
processes. It begins forwarding traffic.
4. The SNMP configuration stored in flash memory is compared to that on the TFTP
server (this server is typically the same workstation that is running the Lucent
Cajun A500 Network Management Tool. If the configuration information does not
match, the configuration file is downloaded from the TFTP server.
Cajun A500 Boot Sources
In addition to setting up user accounts and passwords, it is also necessary to specify what
memory source the system uses for reading the operational software at boot time. This
enables the system to be pre-configured for where to get the code. The Cajun A500 boots
from one of two sources:
U From the PCMCIA Flash memory card
U From internal Flash RAM on the SWP, if a valid image resides there
3-2
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 Initialization and Initial Configuration
To select the boot source, use one of the two following commands:
U For the PCMCIA flash memory card:
A500: admin changeboot PCMCIA: SWP_IMAGE.IMG
U For the internal Flash RAM:
A500: admin changeboot FLASH1: SWP_IMAGE.IMG
The source is then stored in NVRAM and saved as part of the basic configuration.
Note: If a PCMCIA Flash memory card is not present in the system, and there is not
a valid image in the internal flash memory, the system cannot boot. The
system console displays the boot> prompt. If this situation occurs, place the
PCMCIA Flash memory card into the Flash memory card interface slot of the
Switch Processor module, and reboot the system by typing the reset
command at the boot> prompt.
If you do not have a PCMCIA card with an Cajun A500 software image, contact
Customer Support at: 1-800-237-0016 press 0 then dial extension 73300 to obtain one.
Logging Into the A500 Console
When installing each Cajun A500, it is necessary to establish user accounts and
passwords to control access to the system. Information on accounts and passwords is
saved as part of the Cajun A500 configuration. Access to procedures is obtained from the
management console Command Line Interface (CLI), that displays after the system
initializes. This begins with the display of the product and company logo, and starts the
login: prompt, as follows:
Cajun A500 System Console
(c) 1998 Lucent Technologies
login:
1. At the login: prompt, type root. The password: prompt appears.
2. At the password: prompt, press Return without entering a password. The default
Cajun A500 console prompt A500: appears.
3. Proceed to set up your accounts.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
3-3
Cajun A500 Initialization and Initial Configuration
Supported User Accounts
The Cajun A500 supports two levels of users:
U Super user
U “Regular” users
The super user account is root. This account enables you to execute all possible
commands from the Cajun A500 console. All other accounts enable you to view, but not
modify, information in an Cajun A500. For information on creating/changing passwords,
see the Cajun A500 ATM Switch Configuration and Operations Guide.
Assigning the System Name
The system enables you to enter basic system identification information from the Web
Agent. To change these values:
1. In the System section of the Web Agent window, select General. The System
Information dialog box opens.(Figure 3-1)
Figure 3-1. System Information Dialog Box
2. In the Name field, enter a name for the switch.
3. In the Time field, enter the time using 24-hour time format (for example, 10 p.m.
is 22 00 00).
4. In the Date field, enter the current date.
5. Click Apply to save your changes, or Cancel to restore previous settings.
3-4
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 Initialization and Initial Configuration
To change the system name, using the CLI:
1. In the ATM Switch A500 section of the Web Agent window, select CLI. A shell
window opens.
2. Execute the admin changename command. For more information on these
commands, see admin Commands in the Cajun A500 ATM Switch User Guide.
Assigning Basic Configuration Parameters
Additional information must be entered to enable the system to be addressed in an IP
network so that management messages can get to and from the unit. This section
describes how to specify and save this information in the system. NVRAM on the switch
processor stores several of these configuration parameters. Some of them remain intact if
the system reboots; you must reset others again after the system reboots. The following
parameters keep their values after the system reboots. When you set the following
parameters, you must reboot the system in order for them to take effect:
U IP address of the device
U IP mask used by the device
U IP default router
U TFTP server
The following additional parameters take effect immediately. They are also retained after
the Cajun A500 reboots:
U Console prompt
U Cajun A500 system name
U Port types (ANNI/IISP/UNI/ILMI)
Additional configuration parameters, that implement a variety of Cajun A500 network
services, take effect immediately but are not retained after reboot. They must be reset
after each reboot, or they can be permanently set through the consolerc file.
Procedures for doing this are provided in the Cajun A500 ATM Switch User Guide.
Completing the Initial Configuration
As previously mentioned, you must enter values for the following parameters for IP
applications such as Telnet, Ping, and TFTP to work with the Cajun A500.
U IP address of the device and IP mask used by the device and IP default router
U TFTP server
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
3-5
Cajun A500 Initialization and Initial Configuration
Entering the IP Address and IP Mask
To set or modify addresses (IP Address, IP Mask, Ethernet, Inband (Client), PPP, Default
Gateway, ATM Address):
1. In the System section of the Web Agent window, select Addresses. The Addresses
dialog box opens.
2. In the appropriate box, enter the new address.
3. Click Apply to save your changes, or Cancel to restore previous settings.
To enter the IP address and IP mask of the Cajun A500, using the CLI:
1. In the ATM Switch A500 section of the Web Agent window, select CLI. A shell
window opens.
2. Execute the admin address command. For more information on these
commands, see admin Commands in the Cajun A500 ATM Switch User Guide.
Note: The new IP address and mask are not used until the device reboots.
Entering the Default IP Router
For the Cajun A500 switch to communicate with a device, like a management station
whose IP address is not on the local Sonet. To set or modify the Default Gateway:
1. In the System section of the Web Agent window, select Addresses. The Addresses
dialog box opens.
2. In the appropriate box, enter the new address.
3. Click Apply to save your changes, or Cancel to restore previous settings.
To set or modify the Default Gateway, using the CLI:
1. In the ATM Switch A500 section of the Web Agent window, select CLI. A shell
window opens.
2. Execute the admin gateway command. For more information on these
commands, see admin Commands in the Cajun A500 ATM Switch User Guide.
Note: The new IP address and mask are not utilized until the Cajun A500 reboots.
3-6
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 Initialization and Initial Configuration
Entering TFTP server
In order to tftp images or files to the Cajun A500 switch, you must enter the address of
the TFTP server. To set up the TFTP server:
1. In the ATM Switch A500 section of the Web Agent window, select TFTP. The
TFTP Set Server window opens.
2. Enter the TFTP Server Address information.
3. Click Apply to save your changes, or Cancel to restore previous settings.
To setup the TFTP server, using the CLI:
1. In the ATM Switch A500 section of the Web Agent window, select CLI. A shell
window opens.
2. Execute the tftp setserver command. For more information on these
commands, see tftp Commands in the Cajun A500 ATM Switch User Guide.
Verifying the Configuration
To verify the configuration that you entered:
1. In the ATM Switch A500 section of the Web Agent window, select System.
2. Select Status. The Status window opens.
To verify the configuration, using the CLI:
1. In the ATM Switch A500 section of the Web Agent window, select CLI. A shell
window opens.
2. Execute the status command. For more information on these commands, see
miscellaneous Commands in the Cajun A500 ATM Switch User Guide.
After completing the initial configuration as described earlier, the system is ready for
additional configuration and operation. These additional configuration steps include:
U Configuring Link Types
U Setting up Static Routes
U Registering Static ESID
U Setting up PVCs and SVCs
Note: For more information about configuring and operating the Cajun A500, see
the Cajun A500 ATM Switch User Guide.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
3-7
Cajun A500 Initialization and Initial Configuration
Creating consolerc Configuration Files
You can create a consolerc file to store volatile configuration parameters (those Cajun
A500 configuration parameters that are not maintained through a reboot). To create a
consolerc:
1. Log into the TFTP file server (the workstation where your management software is)
and change to one of the following directories:
/tftpboot (on Solaris SunOS)
/usr/tftpdir (on HPUX)
2. Create a file named consolerc, using a UNIX text editor.
3. Add the settings for the volatile parameters.
4. When you have finished entering commands, save the file and exit it. It
automatically loads when the system initializes. The contents take effect the next
time the system reboots.
Logging In to the Cajun A500 Manager
Although the Web Agent supports any frames-capable browser, the system has been
qualified with the following browsers:
U Netscape Navigator 4.5 or later
U Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.0 or later
To log in to the Web Agent:
1. Start your browser.
2. In the Location field, enter the URL of the switch you want to manage
(for example: http://127.255.255.0).
3. Press Enter. The login window opens.
4. Enter a valid user name. The default super user name is root.
5. Enter a valid password (if one has been set by your System Administrator). There
is no default password. The Web Agent window opens (Figure 3-2).
3-8
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 Initialization and Initial Configuration
Figure 3-2. Web Agent Window
Installing Cajun A500 Help Files
Certain resources used by the Web Agent are located off the switch to preserve switch
memory. Setting up a help server location for the switch enables the switch to access
online help files for the Web Agent. Figure 3-3.provides a diagram of how the
communication works.
Figure 3-3. Online Help Server
Separate web server serves
on-line help and bitmaps.
Management
Station
Switch serves page content
and receives responses.
Add the files to an existing web server on your network.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
3-9
Cajun A500 Initialization and Initial Configuration
The Cajun A500 online Help files used by the web agent are located off the switch to
preserve switch memory. Setting up a help server location for the switch allows the
switch to access the Help files.
To install your online help on a your web server, transfer the help subdirectory to that
web server and enter the URL for that web server in the Help Server Location field.
For example, if you transfer the CajunA500 help directory to your company server (e.g.,
http://www.abc-company.com) you would need to perform the following:
1. Install the online help to a windows 95 or NT node in your network.
2. Transfer the entire help subdirectory into the root of your web server.
3. Ensure that you transfer the entire directory and not just the contents of the
directory.
4. Launch a browser and connect to your Cajun A500 switch.
5. Click Server Location in the System Configuration section of the Web Agent
window. The
6. Enter the server location (e.g., http://www.abc-company.com) in the HTTP
Server Location field.
7. Enter the directory name of your help files in the HELP Directory Location field.
8. The default for the help directory is help. You should not need to change this
unless you changed the name of your help directory prior to transferring it to your
web server.
Entering the Server Location
To set the location of the documentation server on the switch:
1. Launch a web browser and connect to your Cajun A500 switch.
2. From the menu on the left-hand side of the web browser display, select Help
Server. The Online Help Configuration dialog box opens.
3. Enter the host name or IP address of the HTTP server you are using in the Help
Server Location text field.
4. Enter the Help Directory name in the Help Directory text field.
5. Click Apply to save your changes, or Cancel to restore previous settings.
3-10
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 Initialization and Initial Configuration
Getting Updated Help Files on the Internet
The help files are available on the internet. To download this archive:
1. Create a directory on the server machine where the help files will reside (for
example, c:helpinstall).
2. Use the change directory command (cd) to change to the directory you just created.
3. Launch a web browser and go to the Cajun Installer web page at:
http://pubs.lucentctc.com/
4. Click cajun_A500.zip to download the latest help files into the directory you
previously created.
For more information on this product, refer to the documentation that comes on your
Cajun A500 ATM Switch or refer to http://pubs.lucentctc.com to review the online
documentation there.
Using the Cajun A500 Command Line Interface
The Cajun A500’s system console provides access to a number of commands, which are
fully documented in the Cajun A500 ATM Switch Commands Reference Guide. The following
sections provide a brief overview of the Command Line Interface for preliminary
reference. The Cajun A500 Command Line Interface (CLI) console enables you to
execute commands that monitor and control a Cajun A500. These commands are:
Table 3-1. Cajun A500 Commands
Command
Action
admin
Executes administrative tasks, such as enabling/disabling the LANE Emulation Client
(LEC).
conmsg
Controls console message printing.
exec
Executes a script file.
file
Administers file operations.
help
Displays information about various Command Line Interface (CLI) options.
modify
Modifies Cajun A500 configuration parameters.
pang
Ping an Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) endstation.
ping
Ping an IP endstation.
show
Displays certain information about the Cajun A500 and its view of the network.
status
Prints system status.
sync
Execute tasks on the Cajun A500 associated with clock synchronization.
tftp
Uses the Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) to download files/images over the
network.
Command entries are case sensitive; use lower case only when specifying commands.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
3-11
Cajun A500 Initialization and Initial Configuration
Command Line Editing Options
Commands are entered by simultaneously pressing the Control key (^) and a character.
The line editing options are:
Table 3-2. Command Line Editing Options
Press Key
Result
^p
Moves to the previous line (circular buffer of 10 lines).
^n
Moves to the next line.
^a
Moves to the beginning of line.
^e
Moves to the end of line.
^b
Moves back one character.
^f
Moves forward one character.
^l
Moves left one word.
^r
Moves right one word.
^h
Deletes previous character (backspace).
^d
Deletes character under cursor.
^g
Deletes rightward to left of word (“gobble”).
^w
Deletes leftward to beginning of word (“wipe”).
^k
Deletes rightward from cursor through end of line (“kill”).
^u
Deletes the whole line (“undo”).
<tab>
Completes the word of a command.
Command Short Forms
The first unique string of each word in a command line is the short form of the
command. Typically, the unique string would be the first letter of the word, such as “s”
for show. For example:
AX500: show stats sar
Its short form would most likely be:
A500: sh st sa
However, if you supplied the following short form:
A500: s s s
The Cajun A500 system is not able to interpret the command since the second ‘s’ could
be intended as either ‘system’ or ‘stats’. In this case, you must supply additional
characters to establish a unique string. For example, to execute show system status:
A500: s sy s
3-12
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 Initialization and Initial Configuration
Using a “?” in a Command Line Sequence
You can use a “?” at selected points in a command line sequence to obtain more
information about the command. Enter a command verb, such as show, followed by a
space and a question mark (show ?) at the AX500: prompt to receive a list of show
commands, as shown in the following example:
A500: show ?
----------------------------------------------------COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
----------------------------------------------------[ ethernet ]
ethernet port info
[ lec ]
Display LEC commands
[ link_type ]
Display ATM link type configuration
[ pnni ]
Display pnni mibs
[ ppp ]
Display ppp configuration
[ signaling ]
View UNI Signaling information
[ static_ip ]
Show in-band management information
[ stats ]
show Ethernet and SAR statistics
[ switch ]
View switch related tables
[ system ]
show system info
[ time ]
show the system time/date
[ trapinfo ]
Display information about trap info
[ users ]
Display currently logged in users
[ version ]
display version of images
Enter a command verb and object, such as show switch, followed by a question mark
(show switch ?) at the A500: prompt to receive a list of show switch subcommands.
Enter a command verb, object, and info_type, such as show switch queue, followed by
a question mark (show switch queue ?) at the A500: prompt to receive a one-line
explanation of the command’s function.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
3-13
Cajun A500 Initialization and Initial Configuration
3-14
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
A
Cajun A500 Quick Start
Installation
Configuration Summary
This section provides a summary of the CLI commands to use in virtually all Cajun A500
installations. Complete the following checklist for each Cajun A500 Switch. For a
detailed description of each command see the Cajun A500 ATM Switch User Guide.
1. Set the following parameters:
a. A500 Name
b. A500 ATM Prefix
c. A500 PNNI level
d. A500 PNNI Peer Group ID
2. If using standard Ethernet interface, set the following parameters:
a. A500 IP Address: ___.___.___.___
b. A500 IP Subnet Mask:___.___.___.___
c. A500 IP Gateway:___.___.___.___
d. A500 TFTP Server IP:___.___.___.___
3. If you are using LAN Emulation Client (LEC):
a. A500 In-band IP Address:___.___.___.___
b. A500 In-band IP Subnet Mask:___.___.___.___
c. A500 LEC Initialization Method: wellknown LECS | manual LECS | manual LES
d. A500 LEC ELAN Name
e. A500 Manual LECS/LES Address
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
A-1
Cajun A500 Quick Start Installation
4. If you are using Static-IP:
a. Static IP Server (standard ethernet address above is disabled):
b. A500 In-band IP Address:___.___.___.___
c. A500 In-band IP Subnet Mask: ___.___.___.___
d. A500 IP Gateway:___.___.___.___
Must be same subnet as In-band IP Address
e. List of Static-IP Clients:
Client ATM Addr - Client IP Addr - Client MAC Addr
f. Static-IP Client:
A500 In-band IP Address:___.___.___.___
A500 In-band IP Subnet Mask: ___.___.___.___
A500 IP Gateway:___.___.___.___
A500 Static-IP IP Address:___.___.___.___
A500 Static-IP Server ATM Address:
5. If you are using PPP:
a. Local PPP IP Address:___.___.___.___
b. Local PPP IP Subnet Mask:___.___.___.___
c. Remote PPP IP Address:___.___.___.___
For PAP: UsernamePassword
For CHAP: CHAP HostnameCHAP Secret
6. Port Configuration:
In general, most ports should auto-configure to the correct UNI or PNNI version.
However, some map of port to link type should be known to verify that all links are
functioning correctly. If any problems are discovered, see the manual port
configuration or troubleshooting sections at the end of this manual. PVC/PVP
configuration is also described below.
A-2
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 Quick Start Installation
System Configuration
The following are the CLI commands you use to set the system configuration:
U admin changename { A500_name }
U admin changeprompt { A500_prompt }
U admin address { A500_IP_addr } { A500_IP_mask }
U admin gateway { A500_gateway }
U tftp set server { A500_tftp_server_addr }
U admin date
PNNI Configuration
The following are the CLI commands you use to set the PNNI configuration:
U modify atmprefix { A500_ATM_prefix }
U admin pnnilevel { PNNI_Peer_Group_Level }
U admin pgid { PNNI_Peer_Group_ID }
U admin downInterface { port }
If a port needs to support PNNI w/o ILMI:
U admin link_type { port } { vpi } 6 { max_vci } { cell_rate } disable
If a port needs to be manually configured for PNNI w/ ILMI:
U admin link_type { port } { vpi } 6 { max_vci } { cell_rate } enable
U admin upInterface { port }
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
A-3
Cajun A500 Quick Start Installation
LEC Configuration
The following are the CLI commands you use to set the LEC configuration:
U admin inband_address { A500_Inband_IP } { A500_In-band_IP_mask }
U admin gateway { A500_IP_gateway} (must be on the In-band IP subnet, if LEC is
default interface.)
U admin lec enable
U admin lec init { wklecs | mlecs | mles}
U admin lec elan_name MANG
U admin lec server_addr { <mlecs_addr } | <mles_addr }{ }
IISP Configuration
The following are the CLI commands you use to set the IISP configuration:
If A500 is the Network Side:
U admin downInterface { port }
U admin link_type { port } { vpi } 7 { max_vci } { cell_rate } disable
U admin upInterface { port }
If A500 is the User Side:
U admin downInterface { port }
U admin link_type { port } { vpi } 8 { max_vci } { cell_rate } disable
U admin upInterface { port }
Note: Static Routes must also be configured.
ATM Static Routes
To advertise a Static Route as part of PNNI:
U admin signaling route add { port } { vpi } { atm_addr } { mask } advertise
To create a local Static Route (not advertised to other PNNI nodes):
U admin signaling route add { port } { vpi } { atm_addr } { mask } noadv
To remove a Static Route:
U admin signaling route remove { port } { vpi } { atm_addr } { mask }
A-4
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 Quick Start Installation
Manual UNI Configuration
Note: Should only be required if auto-configuration fails.
To manually configure UNI:
U admin downInterface { port }
For UNI 3.0:
U admin link_type { port } { vpi } 2 { max_vci } { cell_rate } { disable | enable }
For UNI 3.1:
U admin link_type { port } { vpi } 3 { max_vci } { cell_rate } { disable | enable }
For UNI 4.0:
U admin link_type { port } { vpi } 2 { max_vci } { cell_rate } { disable | enable }
U admin upInterface { port }
If no ILMI on a UNI link:
U admin signaling esi add { port } { vpi } { ESI }
Note: The ATM prefix of the A500 must also be manually configured on the remote
device.
Manual ESI Configuration
To add an ESI:
U admin signaling esi add { port } { vpi } { ESI }
Note: The ATM prefix of the A500 must also be manually configured on the remote
device.
To remove an ESI:
U admin signaling esi remove { port } { vpi } { ESI }
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
A-5
Cajun A500 Quick Start Installation
Static-IP Server
To configure a static IP server:
U admin inband_address { A500_Inband_IP } { A500_In-band_IP_mask }
U admin gateway { A500_gateway }
Note: Must be on same IP subnet as the In-band IP Address.
U admin static_ip enable_server
U admin static_ip add_client { client_atm_addr } { client_ip_addr } { client_mac_addr }
Static-IP Client
To configure a static IP client:
U admin inband_address { A500_Inband_IP } { A500_In-band_IP_mask }
U admin static_ip set_server { server_atm_addr }
Permanent Virtual Circuits (PVCs)
To configure a PVC:
U modify add_channel { point_to_point | point_to multipoint| { in_port } { in_vpi } {
in_vci } { out_port } { out_vpi } { out_vci } { cbr | vbr | ubr } { in_pcr } { in_scr } {
in_mbs } { out_pcr } }out_scr } { out_mbs }
Permanent Virtual Paths (PVPs)
To configure a PVP:
U modify add_path { point_to_point | point_to multipoint| { in_port } { in_vpi } {
out_port } { out_vpi } { cbr | vbr | ubr } { in_pcr } { in_scr } { in_mbs } { out_pcr } {
out_scr } { out_mbs }
A-6
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 Quick Start Installation
PPP Configuration
If using a Hayes or Zoom Modem no changes are necessary. If using a US Robotics
modem, the following changes need to be made:
On the A500:
Ppp modem modemDialStrIn
When prompted, enter: \N \d2+++\c\d5\AT&F1 OK \N
On the US Robotics modem:
Set DIP Switches 3, 7, and 8 down (or as listed below)
Function
Switch Position
1
Up
Data Terminal Ready normal
2
Up
Verbal Result Code
3
Down
Display Result Codes
4
Up
Echo Offline Commands
5
Up
Auto Answer 1st Ring
6
Up
Carrier Detect Normal
7
Down
Load Factory Defaults
8
Down
Smart Mode
Password Authentication Protocol (PAP)
To set PAP for PPP:
U ppp setPAP { username | password | message }
Challenge Handshake Authentcation Protocol (CHAP)
To set CHAP for PPP:
U ppp setCHAP { hostname | secret }
SNMP Configuration
To set SNMP configurarion:
U admin readcommunity { SNMP_Read_Community_String }
U admin writecommunity { SNMP_Write_Community_String }
U admin trapcommunity { SNMP_Trap_Community_String }
U admin trapdestination { SNMP_Trap_Destination_IP_addr }
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
A-7
Cajun A500 Quick Start Installation
Clock Syncronization Configuration
To configure clock sync:
U admin sync
Copying Image to FLASH:/PCMCIA:
To copy operational code from PCMCIA: to FLASH:
U file cp PCMCIA:SWP_IMAGE.IMG FLASH:SWP_IMAGE.IMG
To copy operational code from FLASH: to PCMCIA:
U File cp FLASH:SWP_IMAGE.IMG PCMCIA:SWP_IMAGE.IMG
To copy operational code from the TFTP Server to FLASH:
U tftp get { tftp_src_dir }/SWP_IMAGE.IMG FLASH:SWP_IMAGE.IMG { tftp_ip }
A-8
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
A
Cajun A500 Event & Alarm Logs
Overview
Each Cajun A500 has its own log of events and alarms. This log can store up to 50
alarms. When the maximum number is reached, each new event or alarm will over
write the oldest alarm or event in the log. The following sections explain how to access,
acknowledge, and clear events and alarms.
Managing Alarms
Alarms are critical messages that may require you to take an action. When the system
generates an alarm, it is displayed on the screen whenever you press the Return key.
When you log into the console, any alarms that have not been acknowledged display on
the screen. You can press any key to acknowledge the alarm(s).
Event and Alarm Messages
The following is a list of each event and alarm, along with a possible cause and proposed
remedy for alarms. The list of alarms includes the alarm number.
U - = Possible cause of the event
U
> = Proposed remedy
Table 1-1. Events
Events
Events
Possible Cause/Remedy
Status Only: No Action Required
Number
N/A
Succeeded fetching configuration files Status Only: No Action Required
--
Power supplies OK
Status Only: No Action Required
--
Fan recovered
Status Only: No Action Required
--
Voltage OK
Status Only: No Action Required
--
Temperature OK
Status Only: No Action Required
--
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
A-1
Cajun A500 Event & Alarm Logs
Table 1-1. Events
Events
Possible Cause/Remedy
Number
TFTP server not set
Status Only: No Action Required
--
TFTP server set
Status Only: No Action Required
--
System alarms cleared
Status Only: No Action Required
--
New notifyrc processed
Status Only: No Action Required
--
New SNMP files processed
Status Only: No Action Required
--
Event log cleared
Status Only: No Action Required
--
SPF bringing down neighbor due to
time out
Status Only: No Action Required
--
Table 1-2. Alarms
Alarms
Failed to fetch configuration files
Possible Cause/Remedy
Number
0
-No TFTP server set:
>Use tftp setserver to set address.
-TFTP files do not reside on TFTP server.
>Connection problems to tftp server:
>Verify server connection.
No IP address set at boot
-No Cajun A500 IP address set.
>Use admin address and reboot.
IP configuration problems detected at -Address not compatible with mask:
boot
-Default gateway set to different subnet than IP
address.
1
2
-No IP mask set:
>Use status command and then set correctly.
Power Supply failure
-An active supply has been unplugged/shut off:
3
>Check power to supply.
-One of the active supplies has been removed from
the chassis:
>Insert power supply.
-One of the active power supplies has failed:
>Replace faulty supply.
Fan failure
-A system fan is no longer functional:
4
>Inspect the fans and replace faulty units.
Check voltage
-System voltage is not within acceptable range:
5
>Use show system configuration command to
inspect voltage. Connect unit to conforming outlet.
A-2
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 Event & Alarm Logs
Table 1-2. Alarms
Alarms
Possible Cause/Remedy
Number
Check temperature
-System temperature is not within acceptable range: 6
>Use show system configuration command to
inspect temperature. Adjust the A500’s
environment, enabling the temperature to remain in
the acceptable range.
Rapid endstation move detected
Status Only: No Action Required
7
Board Added
Status Only: No Action Required
24
Board Removed
Status Only: No Action Required
25
Sync Card Entered LOCKED Mode
Status Only: No Action Required
28
Sync Card Entered HOLDOVER
Mode
Status Only: No Action Required
29
Sync Card Entered FREE Mode
Status Only: No Action Required
30
Switch Queue Threshold Exceeded
- Output port is receiving more cells than it cab
31
transmit, probably due to a burst of UBR traffic.
> Modify the switch configuration so traffic is routed
through another output port.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
A-3
Cajun A500 Event & Alarm Logs
A-4
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
B
Emissions
Emissions
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following
two conditions:
U This device may not cause harmful interference.
U This device must accept any interference received, including interference that may
cause undesired operation.
WARNING:Changes or modifications to this unit not expressly approved by the
party responsible for compliance could void the user’s authority to
operate the equipment.
Note: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a
Class A digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are
designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when
the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment
generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed
and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful
interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a
residential area is likely to cause harmful interference in which case the user
will be required to correct the interference at his own expense.
Canadian Equipment Identification
This digital apparatus does not exceed the CLASS A limits for radio noise emissions from
digital apparatus set out in the Radio Interference Regulations of the Canadian
Department of Communications.
Le present appareil numerique n’emet pas de bruits radioelectriques depassant les limites
applicables aux appareils numeriques de la class A prescrites dans le Regiement sur le
broullage radioelectrique edicte par leministere des Communications du Canada.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
B-1
Emissions
Japanese Equipment Identification
Translation:
This equipment is in the 1st Class category (information equipment to be used in
commercial and/or industrial areas) and conforms to the standards set by the Voluntary
Control Council For Interference by Data Processing Equipment and Electronic Office
machines aimed at preventing radio interference in commercial and/or indutrial areas.
Consequently, when used in a residential area or in an adjacent area thereto, radio
interference may be caused to radios and TV receivers, etc.
Read the instructions for correct handling.
B-2
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
C
Cajun A500 Safety and Power
Information
Safety Symbols
English
Documentation reference symbols. If the product is marked with either of the following
symbols, refer to the user documentation for more information.
WARNING:A warning in the manual denotes a hazard that can cause injury or
death.
CAUTION: A caution in the manual denotes a hazard that can cause damage to
equipment.
French
Symboles de sécurité
Symbole de référence de documentation. Si le produit est identifié par ce symbole, se
reporter à la documentation du produit pour obtenir des informations supplémentaires
sur ce dernier.
ADVERTISSEMENT: Un ADVERTISSEMENT dans le manuel dénote un danger
pouvant être à l’origine de blessures graves, voire mortelles.
ATTENTION: L’indication ATTENTION dans le manuel dénote un danger pouvant être
à l’origine de dommages matériels.
A la vue des avis ADVERTISSEMENT et ATTENTION, interrompre toutes les opérations
tant que les conditions de danger n’ont pas été comprises et les mesures appropriées
prises.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
C-1
Cajun A500 Safety and Power Information
German
Sicherheitszeichen
Unterlagenhinweiszeichen. Wenn das Produkt mit diesem Zeichen gekennzeichnet ist, siehe dazu auch
die produkt-spezifischen, um Detailinformationen über das Produkt zu erhalten.
WARNUNG
Wo WARNUNG im Manual erscheint, weist das auf eine Gefahr hin, die zur
Korperverletzung bzw. zum Tod fuhren kann.
VORSICHT
Wo VORSICHT im Manual erscheint, weist das auf eine Gefahr hin, die zu Sachschaden
fuhren kann.
Wo WARNUNG oder VORSICHT erscheint, soll unter keinen Umständen weitergearbeitet
werden, bis die Gefahrenstellen zur Kenntnis genommen wird und geeignete MaBnahmen
vorgenommen werden können.
Japanese
C-2
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 Safety and Power Information
Power Supply Warnings
English
CAUTION: If this unit has more than one power supply cord, disconnect both
power supply cords before servicing to avoid electric shock.
French
ATTENTION: SI CETTE UNITÉ DISPOSE DE PLUS D’UN CORDON D’ALIMENTATION
DÉBRANCHER LES DEUX CORDONS AVANT D’EFFECTUER LA RÉPARATION POUR
ÉVITER LES RISQUES D’ÉLECTROCUTION.
German
VORSICHT: WENN DIESES GERÄT EIN ZWEITES NETZKABEL HAT, SO MËSSEN
BEIDE NETZKABEL AUSGESTECKT WERDEN, BEVOR MIT SERVICE ANGEFANGEN
WIRD, UM ELEKTRISCHEN SCHLAG ZU VERMEIDEN.
Japenese
Spanish
WARNING: PRECAUTIÓN! SI ESTA UNIDAD TIENE MÁS DE UN CORDÓN DE
ENTRADA DE ENERGÍA ELÉCTRICA, DESCONECTE AMBOS
CORDONES DE ENTRADA DE ENERGÍA ANTES DE DARLE SERVICO
PARA EVITAR EL RIESGO DE RECIBIR UNA DESCARGA ELÉCTRICA.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
C-3
Cajun A500 Safety and Power Information
Korean
International Power Cord Compliance
The following table lists A500 power cord compliance:
Country
C-4
Power Cord Information
Australia
AS 3300 approved
Canada
CSA certified
Japan
JIS C 8303 approved
Switzerland
Plugs comply with SEV/ASE 1011
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
D
Cajun A500 Laser Safety
Laser Safety Information
General Laser Information
Lightwave/lightguide systems, their associated test sets, and similar operating systems
use semiconductor laser transmitters that emit infrared (IR) light at wavelengths
between approximately 800 nanometers and 1600 nanometers. The emitted light is
above the red end of the visible spectrum, which is normally not visible to the human
eye. Although radiant energy at near-IR wavelengths is officially designated invisible,
some people can see the shorter wavelength energy even at power levels several orders
of magnitude below any that have been shown to cause injury to the eye.
Conventional lasers can produce an intense beam of monochromatic light. The term
monochromaticity means a single wavelength output of pure color that may be visible or
invisible to the eye. A conventional laser produces a small-size beam of light, and
because the beam size is small the power density (also called irradiance) is very high.
Consequently, lasers and laser products are subject to federal and applicable state
regulations as well as international standards for their safe operation.
A conventional laser beam expands very little over distance, or is said to be very well
collimated. Thus, conventional laser irradiance remains relatively constant over distance.
However, lasers used in lightwave systems have a large beam divergence, typically 10 to
20 degrees. Here, irradiance obeys the inverse square law (doubling the distance reduces
the irradiance by a factor of 4) and rapidly decreases over distance.
Lasers and Eye Damage
The optical energy emitted by laser and high-radiance LEDs in the 400-1400 nm range
may cause eye damage if absorbed by the retina. When a beam of light enters the eye,
the eye magnifies and focuses the energy on the retina magnifying the irradiance. The
irradiance of the energy that reaches the retina is approximately 105 or 100,000 times
that at the cornea and, if sufficiently intense, may cause a retinal burn.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
D-1
Cajun A500 Laser Safety
The damage mechanism at the wavelengths used in telecommunications is thermal in
origin i.e., damage caused by heating. Therefore, a specific amount of energy is required
for a definite time to heat an area of retinal tissue. Damage is to the retina occurs only
when one looks at the light sufficiently long that the product of the retinal irradiance
and the viewing time exceeds the damage threshold. Optical energies above 1400 nm
cause corneal and skin burns but do not affect the retina. The thresholds for injury at
wavelengths greater than 1400 nm are significantly higher than for wavelengths in the
retinal hazard region.
Classification of Lasers
Manufacturers of lasers and laser products in the U.S. are regulated by the Food and
Drug Administration's Center for Devices and Radiological Health (FDA/CDRH) under
21 CFR 1040. These regulations require manufacturers to certify each laser or laser
product as belonging to one of four major Classes I, II, lla, IlIa, lllb, or IV. The
International Electro-technical Commission is an international standards body that
writes laser safety standards. Classification schemes are similar with Classes divided into
Classes 1, 2, 3A, 3B, and 4. Lasers are classified according to the accessible emission
limits and their potential for causing injury. Lightwave systems are generally classified as
Class I/1, because, under normal operating conditions, all energized laser transmitting
circuit packs are terminated on optical fibers which enclose the laser energy with the
fiber sheath forming a protective housing. Also, covers are typically in place over the
circuit pack shelves. The circuit packs themselves, however, may be FDA/CDRH Class I
or IIIb or IEC Class 1 or 3B.
Lightwave Safety Precautions
In its normal operating mode, a lightwave system is totally enclosed and presents no risk
of eye injury. It is a Class I/1 system under the FDA and IEC classifications.
The lightguide cables that interconnect various components of a lightwave system can
disconnect or break, and may expose people to lightwave emission. Also, certain
measures and maintenance procedures may expose the technician to emission from the
semiconductor laser during installation and servicing. Unlike more familiar laser devices,
such as solid-state and gas lasers, the emission pattern of a semiconductor laser results in
a highly divergent beam. In a divergent beam, the irradiance (power density) decreases
rapidly with distance. The greater the distance, the less energy will enter the eye, and the
less potential risk for eye injury.
D-2
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Cajun A500 Laser Safety
Inadvertently viewing an un-terminated fiber or damaged fiber with the unaided eye at
distances greater than 5 to 6 inches normally will not cause eye injury provided the
power in the fiber is less than a few milliwatts at the shorter wavelengths and a few tens
of milliwatts at the longer wavelengths. However, damage may occur if an optical
instrument such as a microscope, magnifying glass or eye loupe is used to stare at the
energized fiber end.
CAUTION:Use of controls, adjustments and procedures other than those
specified herein may result in hazardous laser radiation exposure.
Safety Precautions for Enclosed Systems
Under normal operating conditions, lightwave transmission systems are completely
enclosed; nonetheless, the following precautions shall be observed:
1. Because of the potential for eye damage, technicians should not stare into optical
connectors or broken fibers.
2. Under no circumstance shall lightwave/lightguide operations be performed by a
technician before satisfactorily completing an approved training course.
3. Since viewing lightwave emission directly in excess of Class I limits with an optical
instrument such as an eye loupe greatly increases the risk of eye damage, an
appropriate label must appear in plain view, in close proximity to the optical port,
on the terminal equipment.
The label shall read as follows:
DANGER - INVISIBLE LASER RADIATION WHEN OPEN
AND FIBER DISCONNECTED
AVOID DIRECT EXPOSURE TO BEAM
DO NOT VIEW BEAM DIRECTLY WITH OPTICAL INSTRUMENTS
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
D-3
Cajun A500 Laser Safety
Safety Precautions for Unenclosed Systems
During service, maintenance, or restoration, a lightwave transmission system is
considered unenclosed. Under these conditions, follow these practices:
1. Only authorized, trained personnel shall be permitted to do service, maintenance
and restoration. Avoid exposing the eye to emissions from un-terminated,
energized optical connectors at close distances. Connectors associated with
lightwave regenerators are recessed, which limits the exposure distance. However,
technicians removing or replacing regenerators should not stare or look directly
into the vacant regenerator slot with optical instruments or magnifying lenses.
(Normal eye wear or indirect viewing instruments such as Find-R-Scopes are not
considered magnifying lenses or optical instruments.)
2. Only authorized, trained personnel shall use the lightwave test equipment during
installation or servicing since this equipment contains semiconductor lasers. (Some
examples of lightguide test equipment are OTDR's, Hand-Held Loss Test Sets, and
Feature Finders.)
3. Under no circumstances shall any personnel scan a fiber with an optical test set
without verifying that all lightwave sources on the fiber are turned off.
4. All unauthorized personnel shall be excluded from the immediate area of
lightwave transmission systems during installation and service.
Consult ANSI Z136.2 American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers in the U.S. or
outside the U.S., IEC-60825, Part 2 for guidance on the safe use of optical fiber optic
communication systems in the workplace.
Optical Specifications of Internal Laser Circuit Packs
D-4
Circuit Pack Code:
8-OC-3-SM
2-OC-12-SM
Optical Wavelength:
1310 nm
1310 nm
Output Power:
.158 mW
.158 mW
Divergence or Fiber Characteristic:
9 um Core
9 um Core
FDA/IEC Classification:
Class I/1
Class I/1
Optical Source (Laser Type):
Laser Diode
Laser Diode
Connector
SC
SC
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Glossary
ACM - ATM Connection
Manager
A software entity within each device that is responsible for setting up
and maintaining ATM virtual channel connections.
Address Resolution
Protocol (ARP)
A protocol used to map 32-bit IP addresses into 48-bit Ethernet
addresses. Conforms to RFC 826.
Asynchronous Transfer
Mode (ATM)
A high-speed, connection-oriented switching and multiplexing
technology that uses 53-byte cells (5-byte header, 48-byte payload) to
transmit different types of traffic simultaneously, including voice,
video, and data. It is asynchronous in that information streams can be
sent independently without a common clock.
ATM Adaptation Layer
(AAL)
A set of four standard protocols that translate user traffic from the
higher layers of the protocol stack into a size and format that can be
contained in the payload of an ATM cell and return it to its original
form at the destination. Each AAL consists of two sublayers: the
Segmentation And Reassembly (SAR) sublayer and the convergence
sublayer. Each is geared to a particular class of traffic, with specific
characteristics concerning delay and cell loss. All AAL functions occur
at the ATM endstation rather than at the switch.
AAL 1 addresses CBR (Constant Bit Rate) traffic, such as digital voice
and video and is used for applications that are sensitive to both cell
loss and delay and to emulate conventional leased lines. It requires an
additional byte of header information for sequence numbering,
leaving 47 bytes for payload.
AAL 2 is used with time-sensitive VBR (Variable Bit Rate) traffic, such
as packetized voice. It allows ATM cells to be transmitted before the
payload is full to accommodate an application’s timing requirements.
The AAL 2 specification has not been completed by the ATM Forum.
AAL 3/4 handles bursty connection-oriented traffic, like error
messages, or variable rate connection less traffic, such as LAN file
transfers. It is intended for traffic that can tolerate delay but not cell
loss. To ensure that cell loss is kept to a minimum, AAL 3/4 performs
error detection on each cell and uses a sophisticated error-checking
mechanism that consumes four (4) bytes of each 48-byte payload.
AAL 3/4 allows ATM cells to be multiplexed.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
-1
Glossary
-2
ATM Adaptation Layer
(AAL) continued
AAL 5 accommodates bursty LAN data traffic with less overhead than
AAL 3/4. Also known as the Simple And Efficient Adaptation Layer
(SEAL), AAL 5 uses a conventional five-byte header. It does not
support cell multiplexing.
ATM Address
Consists of 20 bytes. Addressing is hierarchical, as in a phone network,
using prefixes similar to area codes and exchanges. ATM switches
share address information with attached endstations and maintain
endstation addresses in routing tables.
ATM Address Resolution
Protocol (ATMARP)
Maps IP addresses to ATM hardware addresses. The process works in
much the same way as conventional ARP works when mapping
network-layer addresses to addresses at the MAC (Media Access
Control) layer.
ATM Forum
Organization that develops and defines ATM standards. Principal
members participate in committees and vote on specifications.
ATM Forum LAN
Emulation
Provides connectivity between LAN-attached endstations and devices,
and ATM-attached endstations and devices.
Authenticator
The end of the link requiring the authentication. The authenticator
specifies the authentication protocol to be used in the
Configure-Request during Link Establishment phase.
Available Bit Rate (ABR)
A class of service in which the ATM network makes a “best effort” to
meet the traffic’s bit-rate requirements. ABR requires the transmitting
endstation to assume responsibility for data that cannot get through,
and does not guarantee delivery.
Bandwidth
The difference in Hertz (Hz) between the highest and lowest
frequencies of a transmission channel. Usually identifies the amount
of data that can be sent through a given circuit.
Best Effort
A Quality of Service (QoS) class in which no traffic parameters are
specified and no guarantee is given that traffic will be delivered. ATM’s
Available Bit Rate (ABR) and Unspecified Bit Rate (UBR) are both
“best effort” services.
BOOTP
The IETF’s boot protocol that lets an IP endstation acquire its IP
address and boot file from a server. Defined by RFC 951.
BOOTP Relay Agent
A software entity within each device that captures BOOTP requests
and responses, and forwards them appropriately. Defined by RFC
1532.
Broadcast Frame
An Ethernet frame transmitted with a broadcast destination address; it
is intended to be received by all endstations. In this documentation, a
broadcast frame is considered a multicast frame.
Broadcast and Unknown
Server (BUS)
Handles data sent by a LAN Emulation Client (LEC) to the broadcast
MAC address. This includes all multicast traffic, and initial unicast
frames that are sent by a LAN emulation client before the data direct
target ATM address is resolved (before a data direct VCC is
established).
Cell
An ATM cell consists of 53 bytes or “octets.” Of these, five constitute
the header; the remaining 48 carry the data payload.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Glossary
Cell Loss Priority (CLP)
Field
A priority bit in the cell header. When set, it indicates that the cell can
be discarded, if necessary.
Challenge-Handshake
Authentication Protocol
(CHAP)
The Challenge-Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP) is used to
periodically verify the identity of the peer using a 3-way handshake.
This is done upon initial link establishment, and MAY be repeated
anytime after the link has been established.
Classical IP and ARP over
ATM (CLIP)
An adaptation of TCP/IP and its Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) for
ATM, defined by the IETF (Internet Engineering Task Force) in RFCs
(Requests for Comments) 1483 and 1577. It places IP packets and ARP
requests directly into PDUs (Protocol Data Units) and converts them
into ATM cells. Classical IP does not recognize conventional MAC layer
protocols such as Ethernet or Token Ring.
Command Line Interface
(CLI)
Character-based command line interface.
Common Part
Convergence Sublayer
(CPCS)
The portion of the convergence sublayer of an AAL that remains the
same, regardless of the type of traffic.
Connection Admission
Control (CAC)
Two mechanisms used to control the setup of virtual circuits.
Overbooking, which allows one connection to exceed permissible
traffic limits, assumes that other active connections are not using the
maximum available resources. Full booking limits network access,
once maximum resources are committed, and only adds connections
that specify acceptable traffic parameters.
Console Interface
The local RS-232 ASCII interface on each Cajun A500 unit.
Constant Bit Rate (CBR)
Digital information, such as video and digitized voice, that must be
represented by a continuous stream of bits. CBR traffic requires
guaranteed throughput rates and service levels.
Cyclic Redundancy Check
(CRC)
A mathematical algorithm that computes a numerical value based on
the bits contained in a block of data.
Device Type
Model of the Cajun A500.
Dynamic Host
Configuration Protocol
(DHCP)
A superset of the BOOTP protocol. The two major
Emulated LAN (ELAN)
A collection of ATM endstations assigned to a particular virtual LAN.
Endstation
A MAC-level entity that is the source or destination of an Ethernet
frame.
Endstation Identifier
(ESI)
Endstation identifier.
ESID
LAN Emulation Client (LEC) endstation ID.
differences between DHCP and BOOTP are:
1) DHCP defines mechanisms through which clients can be assigned a
network address for a fixed lease, allowing for serial reassignment of
network addresses to different clients.
2) DHCP provides the mechanism for a client to acquire all of the IP
configuration parameters that it needs to operate. Defined by RFC
1531.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
-3
Glossary
Ethertype
A 16-bit identifier carried within an Ethernet frame to uniquely
identify its protocol type.
Event Log Browser
Displays network events from a file generated by the ATMman
daemon (atmmand).
Flash Memory
Non-volatile random access memory that can be written to and read
from.
Flood Frame
A unicast frame sent to all devices in the network; it is intended for an
endstation whose physical location has yet to be learned.
Generic Flow Control
(GFC) Field
Four priority bits in an ATM header. The default setting (four zeros)
indicates that the cell is uncontrolled, meaning that it does not take
precedence over another cell when contending for a virtual circuit.
Setting any of the bits in the GFC field tells the target endstation that
the switch can implement some form of congestion control. The
endstation echoes this bit back to the switch to confirm that it can set
priorities. The switch and endstation can use the GFC field to prioritize
voice over video, for example, or indicate that both voice and video
take precedence over other types of data.
-4
Header
The five bytes in an ATM cell that supply addressing and control
information, including generic flow control, virtual path identifier,
virtual circuit identifier, payload type, and cell-loss priority.
Header Error Control
(HEC)
The last one-byte field in an ATM cell’s five-byte header. The HEC field
contains information that is used to detect and correct errors in the
cell header. These types of errors are likely to corrupt addressing fields,
causing the network to deliver the cell to the wrong destination or
drop the cell and request retransmission.
Internet Engineering Task
Force (IETF)
The technical organization that establishes specifications and standards
for the Internet.
Internet Group
Management Protocol
(IGMP)
A protocol that allows the network to locate group members via
querying. Also allows endstations to join and leave the multicast
group.
Interim Interswitch
Protocol (IISP)
A signaling protocol that allows inter-switch connectivity in private
networks, in a multivendor environment.
Interim Local
Management Interface
(ILMI)
Supports bidirectional exchange of management information between
UNI Management Entities (UMEs) related to UNI ATM layer and
physical layer parameters.
IPmc
IP multicast is a set of IETF specifications that support user-defined
multicast groups.
LAN Emulation (LANE)
An ATM Forum method for bridging Ethernet and Token Ring traffic
over ATM, to provide multivendor networking. LANE defines a
standard interface between edge devices and the ATM backbone.
LANE operates at layer-2 of the OSI model, and supports all LAN
protocols.
LAN Emulation Client
(LEC)
Allows communication from endstations directly to the device to
participate in LANE with ATM-connected devices.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Glossary
LAN Emulation
Configuration Server
(LECS)
Gives a LEC its configuration parameters at the beginning of LANE
participation. Also provides predefined values for all configuration
parameters.
LAN Emulation Server
(LES)
Registers (learns) LANE-connected endstations. Also resolves MAC
addresses to ATM addresses.
LAN Emulation
Network-to-Network
Interface (LNNI)
Enables one vendor’s implementation of LAN emulation to work with
another’s. This specification is essential for building multivendor ATM
networks and is currently under development at the ATM Forum.
LAN Emulation User
Network Interface (LUNI)
Defines how legacy LAN applications and protocols work with ATM.
Currently in development at the ATM Forum, LUNI adapts layer-2
LAN packets to AAL 5 PDUs, which can then be divided into cells.
LUNI uses a client-server architecture to resolve LAN-to-ATM
addresses. A LAN Emulation Client (LEC) resides in each
ATM-attached device; a LAN Emulation Server (LES) and Broadcast
and Unknown Server (BUS) reside anywhere on the ATM network.
Link
A point-to-point duplex cable connection between two ATM cell
switch ports. A link’s ATM switch port is specified by its Cajun A500’s
IP host name and port number.
Link Control Protocol
(LCP)
Establishes, configures, and tests the data-link connection.
Local Service
Advertisement Protocol
(LSAP)
The local protocol for publicizing the current network address of
available services.
Maximum Burst Size
(MBS)
A traffic parameter that specifies the maximum number of cells that
can be transmitted at ATM’s Peak Cell Rate (PCR). Maximum burst
size is a key measurement in capacity planning and network
management.
Medium Access Control
(MAC)
A sublayer of the data link layer, as defined by the IEEE 802
committee, which defines frame format and media access procedures
for a particular type of LAN.
Management Information
Base (MIB)
A database of information on managed objects in the Cajun A500 unit
that can be accessed via the SNMP network management protocol.
Multicast Frame
An Ethernet frame transmitted with a multicast destination address; it
is intended to be received by one or more endstations. In this
documentation, a broadcast frame is considered a multicast frame.
Multiprotocol
Encapsulation Over ATM
Allows higher-layer protocols, such as IP or IPX, to be routed over
ATM by enabling an ATM-aware device or application to add a
standard protocol identifier to LAN data.
Multiprotocol Over ATM
(MPOA)
A proposed ATM Forum specification that defines how ATM traffic is
routed from one virtual LAN to another. MPOA is key to making LAN
emulation, Classical IP over ATM, and proprietary virtual LAN
schemes inter-operate in a multiprotocol environment.
Network Control
Protocols (NCPs)
Establishes and configures different network-layer protocols.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
-5
Glossary
-6
Network Interworking
A method of connecting two frame relay devices over an ATM
backbone network. In network interworking, ATM devices are
essentially pass-through devices; all frame relay header and payload
data is preserved as is. This is in contrast to service interworking,
where protocol conversion is used to connect frame relay and ATM
networks. Network interworking is defined in the Frame Relay
Forum’s FRF.5 spec and is recognized by the ATM Forum.
Network Service Access
Point (NSAP)
An OSI format defining a 20-byte format network address; also used
in ATM networks. Current ATM specifications define the International
Telecommunication Union’s E.164 standard for public networks and
NSAP for private networks, but some ATM users and vendors want to
standardize on NSAP addresses for all devices. The NSAP format
includes a 13-byte address prefix that can be used to describe a specific
location (including country, area, and end system).
Network-to-Network
Interface (NNI)
Interface between ATM network nodes (switches) defined in the ATM
Forum’s UNI (User Network Interface).
OAM
Operations Administration and Maintenance (OAM).
Optical Carrier (OC-n)
Fundamental unit of the SONET (Synchronous Optical Network)
hierarchy. OC indicates an optical signal and n represents increments
of 51.84 Mbits. Thus, OC-1, OC-3, and OC-12 equal optical signals of
51, 155,and 622 Mbits, respectively.
Organization Unique
Identifier (OUI)
The most significant 24-bits of an endstation’s MAC address; contains
the vendor ID name assigned by the IEEE.
Password Authentication
Protocol (PAP)
The Password Authentication Protocol (PAP) provides a simple
method for the peer to establish its identity using a 2-way handshake.
This is done only upon initial link establishment.
Partition
A physical subdivision of a virtual LAN; it is specified by the
assignment of LAN segments.
Payload
Information portion of an ATM cell, exclusive of header. ATM cells
typically have 48-byte payloads, but size can vary, depending upon
data type.
Peak Cell Rate (PCR)
The maximum rate at which cells can be transmitted across a virtual
circuit, specified in cells per second and defined by the interval
between the transmission of the last bit of one cell and the first bit of
the next.
Peer
The other end of the point-to-point link; the end which is being
authenticated by the authenticator.
Permanent Virtual Circuit
(PVC)
A virtual link with fixed end-points that are defined by the network
manager. A single virtual path may support multiple PVCs.
Physical Layer
Convergence Protocol
(PLCP)
A protocol specified within the TC sublayer that defines how cells are
formatted within a data stream for a particular transmission facility,
such as T1, T3, or OC-n.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Glossary
Physical Layer (PHY)
The bottom layer of the ATM protocol stack, which defines the
interface between ATM traffic and the physical media. The PHY
consists of two sublayers: the Physical Medium-Dependent (PMD)
sublayer and the Transmission Convergency (TC) sublayer.
Policy
A set of rules that control an endstation’s access to other segments in
the backbone network.
Point to Point Protocol
(PPP)
A protocol used to exchange IP frames (and others) over a serial link.
The Point-to-Point Protocol is designed for simple links which
transport packets between two peers. These links provide full-duplex
simultaneous bi-directional operation, and are assumed to deliver
packets in order.
Private
Network-to-Network
Interface (PNNI)
A routing information protocol that allows different vendors’ ATM
switches to be integrated in the same network. PNNI automatically
and dynamically distributes routing information, enabling any switch
to determine a path to any other switch.
Protocol Data Unit (PDU)
A discrete piece of information (such as a packet or frame) in the
appropriate format to be segmented and encapsulated in the payload
of an ATM cell.
Protocol Type
A field in an Ethernet frame that specifies the network-layer protocol
being used in the frame.
Quality of Service (QoS)
Classes
Consists of the following five broad categories outlined by the ATM
Forum:
• Class 1 specifies performance requirements and indicates that
ATM’s quality of service should be comparable with the service
offered by standard digital connections.
• Class 2 specifies necessary service levels for packetized video and
voice.
• Class 3 defines requirements for inter-operability with other
connection-oriented protocols, particularly Frame Relay.
• Class 4 specifies inter-operability requirements for connection less
protocols, including IP, IPX, and SMDS (Switched Multimegabit
Data Service).
• Class 5 is effectively a “best effort” attempt at delivery; it is
intended for applications that do not require a particular class of
service.
Reverse Address
Resolution Protocol
(RARP)
A protocol defined by RFC 903 that allows an endstation to acquire its
IP address from a server attached to the local segment.
Segment
An Ethernet connection with one or more endstations attached to it,
or an ATM link to an endstation operating as an ATM Forum LAN
Emulation client. A segment is specified by its device’s IP host name
and port number.
Segmentation and
Reassembly (SAR)
Sublayer
Converts PDUs into appropriate lengths and formats them to fit the
payload of an ATM cell. At the destination endstation, SAR extracts
the payloads from the cells and converts them back into PDUs, which
can be used by applications higher up the protocol stack.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
-7
Glossary
-8
Segmentation and
Reassembly Protocol Data
Unit (SAR-PDU)
Information that has passed through SAR and been loaded into ATM
cells, ready to be forwarded to the TC sublayer of the ATM physical
layer for actual transmission.
Shortest Path First
Algorithm (SPF)
A routing algorithm used to determine the shortest or lowest cost path
between two endpoints in a network.
Signaling
The standard process used to establish ATM point-to-point,
point-to-multipoint, and multipoint-to-multipoint connections.
Signaling ATM
Adaptation Layer (SAAL)
Resides between the ATM layer and the Q.2931 function. The SAAL
provides reliable transport of Q.2931 messages between Q.2931
entities (ATM switch and host, for example) over the ATM layer.
SAAL contains two sublayers: common part and service-specific part.
Simple Network
Management Protocol
(SNMP)
An application protocol between an SNMP management application
and an SNMP agent; it is based on the IP protocol.
SNMP Community String
A password that is included with each packet sent by an SNMP
management station to an SNMP agent. The community string
controls both the visibility and changeability of various portions of an
SNMP agent's MIB.
SNMPv2
The IETF’s latest version of the Simple Network Management Protocol
(SNMP) which adds new features including acknowledge traps and
secure sets.
Subnet
A logical subdivision within the IP internetwork architecture.
Subnet Mask
A 32-bit quantity indicating which of the least significant bits in an IP
address is to be used to identify the host ID portion of the address.
Subnetwork
A logical subdivision of a network protocol’s internetwork
architecture, such as an IP subnet, IPX network, or DECnet area.
Sustainable Cell Rate
(SCR)
Maximum throughput that bursty traffic can achieve within a given
virtual circuit without risking cell loss.
Switched Virtual Circuit
(SVC)
A virtual link, with variable endpoints, established through an ATM
network. With an SVC, the user defines the endpoints when the call is
initiated; with a PVC, the endpoints are predefined by the network
manager. A single virtual path may support multiple SVCs.
T1
A digital transmission service with a basic data rate of 1.544 Mbits per
second.
T3
A digital transmission service with a basic data rate of 44.736 Mbits
per second for transport of 28 T1 circuits.
Transmission
Convergence (TC)
Sublayer
Part of the ATM physical layer, it defines a protocol for preparing cells
for transmission across the physical media defined by the Physical
Media-dependent (PMD) sublayer. The function of the TC sublayer
differs according to physical medium.
Trivial File Transfer
Protocol (TFTP)
IETF’s file transfer protocol, which transfers files using UDP
datagrams.
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Glossary
User Network Interface
(UNI)
An interface point between ATM end users and a private ATM switch,
or between a private ATM switch and the public carrier ATM network;
defined by physical and protocol specifications per ATM Forum UNI
documents. The standard adopted by the ATM Forum to define
connections between user or endstations and a local switch.
Unicast frame
An Ethernet frame transmitted with a single destination address; it is
intended to be received by a single destination.
Unspecified Bit Rate
(UBR)
An ATM service category that does not specify traffic-related service
guarantees. UBR does not include the notion of a per-connection
negotiated bandwidth. No numerical commitments are made with
respect to the cell loss ratio experienced by a UBR connection, or as to
the cell transfer delay experienced by cells on the connection.
Variable Bit Rate (VBR)
Information that can be represented digitally by groups of bits (as
opposed to streams) is characterized by a variable bit rate. Most data
applications generate VBR traffic, which can tolerate delays and
fluctuating throughput.
Virtual Channel
A defined route between two endpoints in an ATM network that may
traverse several virtual paths.
Virtual Channel
Connection (VCC)
The end-to-end connection, either point-to-point or
point-to-multipoint, between two endstations. Consists of one or
more Virtual Channels (VCs) concatenated together.
Virtual Channel Identifier
(VCI)
A 16-bit identifier in each ATM cell header that identifies the virtual
connection associated with the cell. Each VCI value has local
significance to only one ATM port in an Cajun A500.
Virtual Circuit (VC)
A portion of a virtual path or virtual channel that is used to establish a
single virtual connection between two endpoints.
Virtual Ethernet (VE)
A non-physical Ethernet connection created by the network between
an
Cajun A500 and an endstation, based on the endstation ID
and the Cajun A500 node name.
Virtual Network
A network paradigm that interconnects users based on relationships
instead of physical location. Physically consists of one or more virtual
switches and all attached endstations. Logically consists of one or
more virtual LANs.
Virtual Path
A group of virtual channels that can support multiple virtual circuits.
Virtual Path Identifier
(VPI)
An 8-bit identifier in each ATM cell header that identifies the virtual
path associated with the cell. Each virtual path can support up to 64K
virtual channels.
Virtual Segment
Part of a network that also consists of Virtual LANs (VLANs).
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
-9
Glossary
-10
Cajun A500 ATM Switch Installation Guide
Index
Symbols
B
10BaseT ports
connecting 2 - 10
backplane 1 - 6
Bandwidth Gl - 2
Best Effort Gl - 2
bidirectional UTOPIA interface 1 - 7
boot process
steps for 3 - 2
boot prompt
meaning of 3 - 3
booting
parameters 3 - 2, 3 - 5
sources for 3 - 2
BOOTP Gl - 2
BOOTP Relay Agent Gl - 2
Broadcast and Unknown Server (BUS Gl - 2
Broadcast Frame Gl - 2
browser
default password 3 - 8
default user name 3 - 8
logging in 3 - 8
starting 3 - 8
browsers 3 - 8
A
A500
alarms B - 1
basic configuration 1 - 4
description of 1 - 1
maximum configuration 1 - 4
software 1 - 16
accessing
console 1 - 3
the A500 console 3 - 3
ACM - ATM Connection Manager Gl - 1
addresses
changing 3 - 6
air flow
caution 2 - 2, 2 - 7
alarms
list of B - 1
managing B - 1
AMD Ethernet controller 1 - 16
ARP - Address Resolution Protocol Gl - 1
assigning
IP address 3 - 6
IP mask 3 - 6
TFTP server 3 - 7
ATM Gl - 1
ATM Adaptation Layer (AAL) Gl - 1
ATM Address Gl - 2
ATM Address Resolution Protocol (ATMARP) Gl - 2
ATM attached servers 1 - 1
ATM cells 1 - 17
ATM Forum Gl - 2
ATM Forum LAN Emulation Gl - 2
ATM layer processing 1 - 11
ATM ports 1 - 17
ATM switches 2, 1 - 1
ATM technology Preface - 1
ATM traffic bandwidth 1 - 11
ATM traffic management 1 - 6
ATM UNI 1 - 2
attribute memory 1 - 8
Available Bit Rate (ABR) Gl - 2
C
cable configuration
modem port 2 - 12
Cajun A500
Web Agent 3 - 8
Cajun A500 Chassis
figure 1 - 5
Cajun A500 Software Architecture
figure 1 - 17
Canadian Equipment Identification C - 1
CAT 5 straight-through ethernet cable 1 - 13
cautions
air flow 2 - 2, 2 - 7
grounding requirements
when unpacking 2 - 5, D - 1, D - 2
Cell Gl - 2
Cell Loss Priority (CLP) Field Gl - 3
cell streams 1 - 6
cell-time 1 - 9
Challenge-Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP)
Gl - 3
chassis monitor task 1 - 16
Index 1
chipset 1 - 6
Classical IP and ARP over ATM Gl - 3
classification schemes
laser E - 2
Command Line Interface (CLI) 3 - 3, Gl - 3
commands
admin 3 - 11
conmsg 3 - 11
console
short forms 3 - 12
entering
line editing 3 - 12
exec 3 - 11
file 3 - 11
help 3 - 11
modify 3 - 11
names and functions
(table) 3 - 11
pang 3 - 11
ping 3 - 11
show 3 - 11
sync 3 - 11
tftp 3 - 11
common cell memory 1 - 7
common cell payload memory 1 - 7
common memory buffer 1 - 7
Common Part Convergence Sublayer (CPCS) Gl - 3
components
hardware 1 - 5
installing/removing 2 - 13
configuration
initial 3 - 5
configuration files
consolerc 3 - 8
configuration parameters 3 - 5
connecting
10BaseT ports 2 - 10
Connection Admission Control (CAC) Gl - 3
console
accessing 1 - 3
command names and functions, (table) 3 - 11
features 3 - 11
Console Interface Gl - 3
console prompt 3 - 5
console task 1 - 16
console/modem ports 1 - 11
consolerc
creating 3 - 8
consolerc configuration files 3 - 8
Constant Bit Rate (CBR) Gl - 3
Contacing Lucent Preface - 3
control memory 1 - 8
control tables 1 - 8
2 Index
conventions Preface - 2
port numbering 1 - 3
cooling subsystem
fans 1 - 15
Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC) Gl - 3
D
data flow
figure 1 - 17
Date field 3 - 4
DC electric fans 1 - 15
default
password 3 - 8
super user name 3 - 8
default IP Router
setting 3 - 6
Device Type Gl - 3
dimensions
for rack space 2 - 2
document conventions Preface - 2
documentation
feedback Preface - 1
online Preface - 1
documentation feedback Preface - 1
drivers
Ethernet 1 - 16
SAR 1 - 16
switch 1 - 16
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) Gl - 3
E
editing options
line editing 3 - 12
egress 1 - 9
emissions
information C - 1
Emulated LAN (ELAN) Gl - 3
Endstation Gl - 3
Endstation Identifier (ESI) Gl - 3
environmental requirements 2 - 2
ESD
requirements 2 - 5, D - 1, D - 2
ESID Gl - 3
Ethernet 10BaseT port 1 - 11
Ethernet connectivity 1 - 11
Ethernet driver 1 - 16
Ethertype Gl - 4
Event Log Browser Gl - 4
events
list of B - 1
F
fan
LED 1 - 15
fan assemblies 1 - 4
fans 1 - 15
replacing 2 - 15
FDA/CDRH E - 2
Flash Memory Gl - 4
Flash memory
failed to boot 3 - 3
Flash memory card 3 - 3
Flood Frame Gl - 4
front panel interfaces 1 - 11
G
General window 3 - 4
Generic Flow Control (GFC) Field Gl - 4
German
power information D - 2
H
Hall-effect sensors 1 - 15
hardware
components 1 - 5
hardware system architecture 1 - 5
Header Gl - 4
Header Error Control (HEC) Gl - 4
help
obtaining
for console commands 3 - 13
help files
entering a server location 3 - 10
getting over the internet 3 - 11
installing
on a server 3 - 9
help server location
setting up 3 - 9
I
IGMP - Internet Group Management Protocol Gl - 4
IISP - Interim Inter Switch Protocol Gl - 4
IISP (PNNI Phase 0) 1 - 2
ILMI - Interim Local Management Interface Gl - 4
ILMI (Interim Local Management Interface) 1 - 2
in-band 1483 traffic 1 - 16
ingress 1 - 9
initial configuration 3 - 5
initialization
steps for 3 - 1, 3 - 2
installation requirements 2 - 1
installing
modules 2 - 16
power supply 2 - 14
installing/removing
components 2 - 13
international power cord compliance D - 4
Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) Gl - 4
IP address 3 - 5
assigning 3 - 6
IP applications 3 - 5
IP default router 3 - 5
IP mask 3 - 5
assigning 3 - 6
IP network
addressing the A500 3 - 5
IPmc Gl - 4
IR wavelengths E - 1
J
Japanese
power information D - 2
Japanese Equipment Identification C - 2
L
LAN Emulation (LANE Gl - 4
LAN Emulation Client (LEC) Gl - 4
LAN Emulation Configuration Server (LECS) Gl - 5
LAN Emulation Network-to-Network Interface (LNNI)
Gl - 5
LAN Emulation Server (LES) Gl - 5
LAN Emulation User Network Interface (LUNI) Gl - 5
LAN switches 2, 1 - 1
LANE client task 1 - 16
laser transmitters E - 1
LED
fan 1 - 15
limits
laser E - 3
line editing
options 3 - 12
line-rate switching 1 - 6
Link Gl - 5
Link Control Protocol (LCP) Gl - 5
link memory 1 - 8
load share
power supplies 1 - 14
Local Service Advertisement Protocol (LSAP) Gl - 5
loggin in
at first boot 1 - 3
logging in
web browser 3 - 8
Index 3
M
P
Maximum Burst Size (MBS) Gl - 5
Medium Access Control (MAC) Gl - 5
MIB - Management Information Base Gl - 5
MMCN 1 - 6
modem
functionality 2 - 12
port cable configuration 2 - 12
setting switches 2 - 12
modifying
system name 3 - 5
modules
installing 2 - 16
physical layer 1 - 11
removing 2 - 16
monochromatic light E - 1
monochromaticity E - 1
mounting
placing A500 on the shelf
packing list
verifying 2 - 1
Partition Gl - 6
password
default 3 - 8
Password Authentication Protocol (PAP) Gl - 6
Payload Gl - 6
PCMCIA Flash memory card 1 - 11, 3 - 3
PCMCIA flash memory card 1 - 4
PCMCIA slot 1 - 11
Peak Cell Rate (PCR) Gl - 6
Peer Gl - 6
Permanent Virtual Circuit (PVC) Gl - 6
PHY modules 1 - 6
physical layer
modules 1 - 11
Physical Layer (PHY) Gl - 7
Physical Layer (PHY) Modules 1 - 11
Physical Layer Convergence Protocol (PLCP) Gl - 6
physical requirements 2 - 2
PIF chip 1 - 7
pin configuration
RJ45 1 - 13
Point to Point Protocol (PPP) Gl - 7
Policy Gl - 7
port interface 1 - 7
Port Interface devices 1 - 8
port numbering
conventions 1 - 3
port types 3 - 5
power
setting on/off
2-7
surface 2 - 8
Multicast Frame Gl - 5
multimedia servers 1 - 2
multi-mode fiber 1 - 12
multimode fiber (MM) 1 - 11
multiple network services
support 1 - 1
Multiprotocol Encapsulation Over ATM Gl - 5
Multiprotocol Over ATM (MPOA) Gl - 5
N
Name field 3 - 4
Network Control Protocols (NCPs) Gl - 5
Network Interworking Gl - 6
Network Service Access Point (NSAP) Gl - 6
Network-to-Network Interface (NNI) Gl - 6
NVRAM 3 - 5
O
OAM Gl - 6
OC-12 SONET 1 - 12
OC-3 SONET 1 - 11
online documentation Preface - 1
online Help Server
figure of 3 - 9
Operations Administration and Maintenance (OAM)
1 - 16
Optical Carrier (OC-n) Gl - 6
Organization Unique Identifier (OUI) Gl - 6
4 Index
3-2
power requirements 2 - 3
power supplies 1 - 4, 1 - 6, 1 - 14
power supply
installing 2 - 14
removing 2 - 14
power supply warnings D - 3
English D - 3
French D - 3
German D - 3
Japenese D - 3
Korean D - 4
Spanish D - 3
priority queues 1 - 8
Private Network-to-Network Interface (PNNI) Gl - 7
procedures
booting 3 - 2
initialization 3 - 1
Protocol Data Unit (PDU) 1 - 18, Gl - 7
Protocol Type Gl - 7
Q
Quality of Service (QoS) Classes Gl - 7
Quality of Service (QoS) levels 1 - 1
question mark (?)
obtaining command help with 3 - 13
queueing decision 1 - 8
R
rack mount kit
components of 2 - 6
rack space
dimensions 2 - 2
rebooting
from Flash memory 3 - 3
removing
modules 2 - 16
power supply 2 - 14
replacing
fans 2 - 15
requirements
environmental 2 - 2
grounding 2 - 5, D - 1, D - 2
physical 2 - 2
power 2 - 3
preinstallation 2 - 1
Reverse Address Resolution Protocol (RARP) Gl - 7
RJ-45 interfaces 1 - 11
ross-over pin configuration
UTP boards 1 - 14
routers 1 - 1
routing task 1 - 16
S
safety symbols D - 1
English D - 1
French D - 1
SAR driver 1 - 16
Segment Gl - 7
Segmentation and Reassembly (SAR) Sublayer Gl - 7
Segmentation and Reassembly Protocol Data Unit
(SAR-PDU) Gl - 8
server
entering 3 - 10
setting
default IP router 3 - 6
setting up
TFTP server 3 - 7
shared memory architecture 1 - 6
shared memory switch architecture 1 - 8
short forms
command line 3 - 12
Signaling ATM Adaptation Layer (SAAL) Gl - 8
Signalling Gl - 8
signalling task 1 - 16
Signalling/Routing Engine 1 - 18
singlemode fiber 1 - 12
singlemode fiber (SM) 1 - 11
singlemode optics board 1 - 12
SNMP 1 - 2
SNMP - Simple Network Management Protocol Gl - 8
SNMP Agent 1 - 16
SNMP Community String Gl - 8
SNMPv2 Gl - 8
software
console
command names and functions, (table) 3 - 11
software architecture 1 - 16
SPF - Shortest Path First Algorithm Gl - 8
stack memory 1 - 8
status 3 - 11
Subnet Gl - 8
Subnet Mask Gl - 8
Subnetwork Gl - 8
super user name
default 3 - 8
super user 3 - 4
supervisory engine 1 - 9
supported browsers 3 - 8
surface mounting 2 - 8
Sustainable Cell Rate Gl - 8
switch controller 1 - 8
switch driver 1 - 16
switch engine 1 - 8
switch fabric
elements 1 - 6
features 1 - 8
Switch Fabric Module (SWF) 1 - 4
Switch Fabric module (SWF) 1 - 4
description 1 - 6
switch monitor task 1 - 16
switch processor
responsibilities 1 - 10
Switch Processor module (SWP) 1 - 4
switch processor subsystem 1 - 9
Switched Virtual Circuit (SVC) Gl - 8
system
information
entering 3 - 4
system name 3 - 5
modifying 3 - 5
Index 5
T
T1 Gl - 8
T3 Gl - 8
tasks
chassis monitor 1 - 16
console 1 - 16
LANE client 1 - 16
routing 1 - 16
signalling 1 - 16
switch monitor 1 - 16
UNI management 1 - 16
Technical Support
Contacting Preface - 3
TFTP server 3 - 5
setting 3 - 7
setting up 3 - 7
Time field 3 - 4
Transmission Convergence (TC) Sublayer Gl - 8
Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) Gl - 8
troubleshooting
booting difficulties 3 - 2
command line help 3 - 13
prevention suggestions 2 - 6
turning off
A500 3 - 2
turning on
A500 3 - 2
U
UNI management task 1 - 16
Unicast frame Gl - 9
unshielded twisted pair 1 - 13
unshielded twisted pair (UTP) copper 1 - 11
Unspecified Bit Rate (UBR) Gl - 9
user accounts
supported levels 3 - 4
user name
default super user 3 - 8
User Network Interface (UNI) Gl - 9
UTP modules 1 - 13
UTP port
connection 1 - 13
V
Variable Bit Rate (VBR) Gl - 9
VCC - Virtual Channel Connection Gl - 9
video conferencing systems 1 - 2
Virtual Channel (VC) Gl - 9
Virtual Channel Identifier (VCI) Gl - 9
Virtual Circuit (VC) Gl - 9
Virtual Ethernet (VE) Gl - 9
6 Index
Virtual Network Gl - 9
Virtual Path Gl - 9
Virtual Path Identifier (VPI) Gl - 9
Virtual Segment Gl - 9
voice switches 1 - 2
W
Web Agent
Cajun A500 3 - 8
Web Agent Window
figure of 3 - 9