AIX
Installation Guide
Version 4.2
SC23-1924-00
AIX
Installation Guide
Version 4.2
First Edition (April 1996)
This edition of the AIX Version 4.2 Installation Guide applies to the AIX Version 4.2 Licensed
Program and to all subsequent releases of this product until otherwise indicated in new
releases or technical newsletters.
The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any country where
such provisions are inconsistent with local law: THIS MANUAL IS PROVIDED "AS IS"
WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING,
BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND
FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states do not allow disclaimer of express
or implied warranties in certain transactions; therefore, this statement may not apply to you.
It is not warranted that the contents of this publication or the accompanying source code
examples, whether individually or as one or more groups, will meet your requirements or
that the publication or the accompanying source code examples are error-free.
This publication could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. Changes are
periodically made to the information herein; these changes will be incorporated in new
editions of the publication.
It is possible that this publication may contain references to, or information about, products
(machines and programs), programming, or services that are not announced in your country.
Such references or information must not be construed to mean that such products,
programming, or services will be offered in your country. Any reference to a licensed
program in this publication is not intended to state or imply that you can use only that
licensed program. You can use any functionally equivalent program instead.
A reader's comment form is provided at the back of this publication. If the form has been
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Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 1996. All rights reserved.
Notice to U.S. Government Users - Documentation Related to Restricted Rights - Use,
duplication or disclosure is subject to restrictions set forth in GSA ADP Schedule Contract.
Trademarks and Acknowledgements
The following trademarks and acknowledgements apply to this information:
AIX is a registered trademark of International Business Machines Corporation.
AIXwindows is a registered trademark of International Business Machines Corporation.
IBM is a registered trademark of International Business Machines Corporation.
InfoExplorer is a trademark of International Business Machines Corporation.
Motif is a trademark of Open Software Foundation, Inc.
NFS is a trademark of Sun Microsystems, Inc.
NIS is a trademark of Sun Microsystems, Inc.
PEX is a trademark of Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
PowerPC is a trademark of International Business Machines Corporation.
RISC System/6000 is a registered trademark of International Business Machines
Corporation.
SNA is a trademark of International Business Machines Corporation.
UNIX is a registered trademark in the United States and other countries, licensed exclusively
through X/Open Company Limited.
X/Open is a trademark of X/Open Company Limited.
Preface
iii
iv
Installation Guide
Contents
About This Guide ...................................................... .
ix
Chapter 1. Determining Your Starting Point .............................. .
Installing BOS on a New Machine ......................................... .
Upgrading to Version 4.2 from an Earlier Version ............................ .
Installing Optional Software .............................................. .
Customizing the BOS Install Program ..................................... .
Installing BOS from a System Backup ..................................... .
1-1
1-1
1-1
1-1
1-2
1-2
Chapter 2. Installing BOS from GO-ROM or Tape ......................... .
Flowchart for BOS Installation from CD-ROM or Tape ........................ .
Installing the Base Operating System ...................................... .
Prerequisites ......................................................... .
To Start the System ................................................... .
To Install from CD-ROM or Tape ........................................ .
To Verify the Default Instaliation and System Settings ..................... .
To Change the Installation Method (Preservation or Migration Only) ......... .
To Change the Destination Disk ........................................ .
To Change the Primary Language Environment .......................... .
To Change the Trusted Computing Base Setting .......................... .
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-5
2-7
2-8
2-11
2-13
2-15
Chapter 3. Customizing Your Installation ................................ .
Customization Tasks .................................................... .
Flowchart for Installation Assistant Tasks ................................... .
TCP/IP Minimum Configuration and Startup Worksheet ...................... .
Updating the Host List Worksheet ......................................... .
Mounting Remote File Systems Worksheet ................................. .
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-5
3-6
3-7
4-1
Chapter 4. Customizing the BOS Install Program ......................... .
Introduction to Customizing the BOS Install Program ........................ .
Using a Customized bosinst.data File ...................................... .
To Create and Use a Backup Tape ....................... , .. , ... '" ..... .
To Create and Use a Client File ........................................ .
To Create and Use a Supplementary Diskette ............................ .
bosinst.data File Stanza Descriptions ...................................... .
control_flow Stanza ................................................... .
targeCdisk_data Stanza ............................................... .
locale Stanza ........................................................ .
Example bosinst.data Files ............................................... .
mksysb Backup Restoration ........................................... .
Nonprompted Installation .............................................. .
Preface
4-1
4-2
4-2
4-2
4-2
4-3
4-3
4-5
4-6
4-6
4-7
4-7
v
Chapter 5. Installing BOS from a System Backup .........................
Introduction to Backup Installations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setup Considerations ..................................................
Flowchart for Backup Installations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To Install BOS from a System Backup ......................................
Prerequisites. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To Start the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonprompted Installation ...............................................
Prompted Installation ..................................................
5-1
5-1
5-1
5-2
5-2
5-2
5-3
5-5
5-6
Chapter 6. Installing Optional Software and Service Updates ..............
Introduction to Installing Software and Service Updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing and Running Hardware Diagnostics .............................
Software Licensing ....................................................
Software Packaging ...................................................
Migrating Software to AIX Version 4.2 ....................................
Flowchart for Installing Optional Software and Service Updates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To Install Optional Software and Service Updates ............................
Determine Your Starting Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Prerequisites. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To Install Optional Software and Service Updates with SMIT ................
To Install Optional Software and Service Updates with a VSM Application . . . . .
6-1
6-1
6-2
6-2
6-2
6-3
6-4
6-4
6-5
6-5
6-6
6-13
Chapter 7. Maintaining Optional Software ................................
7-1
Introduction to Software Maintenance ......................................
7-1
Maintaining Optional Software and Service Updates with SMIT ................
7-2
Maintaining Optional Software and Service Updates with a Visual System Management
Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-3
Chapter 8. Backing Up Your System......................................
Introduction to Backing Up Your System ....................................
Configuring before the Backup ..........................................
Mounting and Unmounting File Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Restoring a Backup Image. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To Back Up Your System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Complete the Prerequisites .............................................
To Back Up the Root Volume Group. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To Verify a Backup Tape. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To Back Up a User Volume Group .......................................
vi
Installation Guide
8-1
8-1
8-1
8-2
8-2
8-3
8-3
8-3
8-5
8-6
Chapter 9. Troubleshooting ............................................. .
Creating Bootable Tapes ................................................. .
Accessing a System That Will Not Boot .................................... .
Prerequisites ......................................................... .
To Access the System ................................................. .
Troubleshooting an Installation from a System Backup ....................... .
Bootup Failure ....................................................... .
Source and Target Differences ......................................... .
Suggestions for Reported Problems .................................... .
Cleaning Up Optional Software and Service Updates ........................ .
To Clean Up Software with SMIT ....................................... .
To Clean Up Software with a VSM Application ............................ .
Troubleshooting a Full /usr File System .................................... .
BOS Install Logs .................. , .............. '" .................... .
Using the snap Problem Determination Tool ................................ .
Disk Space Requirements ............................................. .
Output Directory ...................................................... .
Execution Permissions ................................................ .
Cleanup ............................................................. .
Options ............................................................. .
To View the Usage Instructions ......................................... .
Recovery ............................................................ .
9-10
9-11
9-11
9-11
9-11
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-13
9-13
Chapter 10. Acting on System and Error Messages ....................... .
10-1
Chapter 11. Viewing README Files ..................................... .
11-1
Appendix A. Optional Software Installation and Update Concepts ......... .
Packaging of Software Products .......................................... .
Software Product Identification ........................................... .
Applying, Committing, Rejecting, and Removing Software Products and Updates
Apply Action (for Service Updates) ...................................... .
Commit Action (for Service Updates) .................................... .
Reject Action (for Service Updates) ..................................... .
Remove Action (for Software Products) ................................. .
Error Messages and Output from the installp Command ..................... .
Reinstalling a Software Product ........................................... .
Creating Installation Images on a Hard Disk ........ , ....................... .
Updating Software ...................................................... .
Explanation of Requisites and Dependents ................................. .
A-1
A-1
A-2
A-2
A-2
A-3
A-3
A-3
A-3
A-5
A-5
A-6
A-6
Preface
9-1
9-1
9-2
9-2
9-2
9-7
9-7
9-8
9-8
9-8
vii
viii
Appendix B. Software Installed Automatically during BOS Installation . . . . . .
B-1
Appendix C. Compatibility between AIX Version 3.2 and AIX Version 4.2 ....
C-1
Appendix O. Migrating from AIX Version 3.2 or AIX Version 4.1 .............
User and Group Oefinitions ...............................................
Migrating Network Software ...............................................
Migrating TCP/IP from Version 3.2 . . . . . .. . . .. . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . ..
Migrating NFS and NIS from Version 3.2 .................................
Migrating XStations from Version 3.2 or Version 4.1 ........................
0-1
0-1
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
Glossary ...............................................................
X-1
Related Information.....................................................
X-7
Index..................................................................
X-9
Installation Guide
About This Guide
This AIX Version 4.2 Installation Guide describes different ways to install Version 4.2 of the
AIX Base Operating System (BOS). This guide also describes how to use the applications
available for configuring your system and installing additional software.
You only need to use a portion of this Installation Guide to install BOS. "Determining Your
Starting Point" on page 1-1 indicates which portions of this guide are necessary to complete
different types of installations and how to proceed to perform post-installation tasks, such as
configuring and backing up your system and installing additional software.
The information in this book can also be found in the Hypertext Information Base Library
Version 1 for AIX. This online documentation is designed for use with the InfoExplorer
hypertext retrieval system. The booklet that accompanies the InfoExplorer CD-ROM
provides instructions for mounting the CD-ROM.
Who Should Use This Guide
This Installation Guide is intended for customers installing AIX Version 4.2 on standalone
systems. A standalone system is a machine that can boot (start up) by itself. It mayor may
not be on a network. If it is on a network, it does not need the assistance of a server to boot.
If you want to manage the installation and configuration of diskless, dataless, or standalone
systems from a network installation server, refer to the AIX Version 4.2 Network Installation
Management Guide and Reference. Diskless and dataless systems cannot boot (start up) by
themselves. They must use a remote server system to boot. Diskless and dataless systems
may have disk drives installed, but they do not boot from them.
If the run-time part of BOS AIX Version 4.2 was preinstalled at the factory, refer to Startup
Instructions for Preinstalled Systems that came with your system. After you start up your
preinstalled system, you may want to refer to portions of this guide to do further
configuration.
Overview of Contents
The chapters of this Installation Guide are organized into the following categories. This
section summarizes the contents of this guide by chapter within major tasks.
Installing the Base Operating System (80S) from CD-ROM or Tape
"Installing BOS from CD-ROM or Tape" on page 2-1 describes the different BOS installation
procedures you can use depending on the state or operating system level of your system.
You can accept default settings and begin the installation immediately, or you can verify or
change system settings before beginning the installation.
Customizing the Installation Method
"Customizing the BOS Install Program" on page 4-1 contains information about the
bosinst.data file, which system administrators can modify to change the default settings
used by the BOS installation program. Customizing the bosinst.data file enables you to
install BOS without the set of menus that are usually displayed, thus facilitating unattended
installations.
Preface
ix
"Installing 80S from a System 8ackup" on page 5-1 describes how to install 80S from a
previously created backup copy of your system. Use the procedure in this chapter to restore
your own system, if necessary, or to install identical configurations on other machines.
Customizing the Installed System
"Customizing Your Installation" on page 3-1 describes the tasks you may need to perform
after you have installed 80S. These tasks include setting the date and time, creating a user
account for performing nonadministrative tasks, setting up your local and network
environments, installing collections of software, and backing up your system.
Installing and Maintaining Optional Software
"Installing Optional Software and Service Updates" on page 6-1 describes how to install
software products and fixes. You may either install an entire software product or those parts
of a product that are designed to be installed separately. This chapter also describes how to
get information about software products you may want to install.
"Maintaining Optional Software" on page 7-1 describes how to commit and reject updates
and remove installed software.
Backing Up Your System
"8acking up Your System" on page 8-1 describes how to create a backup image of your AIX
Version 4.2 system. You can use this backup image to restore your configuration if your
system becomes corrupted. You can also use a backup image to duplicate one system's
configuration on other machines by installing the backup image on those machines.
Troubleshooting the Installation
"Troubleshooting" on page 9-1 provides instructions for resolving installation problems.
"Acting on System and Error Messages" on page 10-1 provides information about messages
you may receive while performing installation procedures.
Reference Information
"Viewing README Files" on page 11-1 provides instructions for viewing README files that
contain late-breaking news about software you may have installed.
"Optional Software Installation and Update Concepts" on page A-1 provides information
about the packaging of software products and provides details about install and update
functionality. This information is useful but not usually required to complete software
installation and update tasks.
"Software Installed Automatically during 80S Install" on page 8-1 describes the software
that is automatically installed when you install 80S.
"Compatibility between AIX Version 3.2 and AIX Version 4.2" on page C-1 provides
information about application compatibility between AIX Version 3.2 and AIX Version 4.2.
Migrating from AIX Version 3.1 or AIX Version 4.1 on page D-1 provides information about
things to consider before migrating to AIX Version 4.2.
"Glossary" on page X-1 defines terms used in this guide.
"Related Information" on page X-7 lists additional documentation on topics related to the
concepts and procedures discussed in this guide.
X
Installation Guide
Summary of Changes
This section discusses the following elements of AIX Version 4.2 installation that differ from
previous versions of AIX.
BOS Installation
The installation of the Base Operating System is customized to the state of your system.
The installation interface offers recommended default settings, which, if you accept them,
reduce the amount of information you need to provide to the installation program. The
installation menus are translated for eight languages. If you use a graphical display to install,
the AIXwindows environment is automatically installed. You can customize the installation
and bypass installation prompts by editing a data file read by the installation program.
System Backup
Following are some of the new features available when you back up your system:
• Preservation of system-defined paging space
• Ability to shrink the file systems to minimum-used size when a system is reinstalled
• Ability to back up and restore user volume groups separately, as well as back up and
restore the full system
• Ability to exclude specified files and directories from the system backup
Software Migration
A migration installation path allows you to move from AIX Version 3.2 or Version 4.1 to AIX
Version 4.2, while keeping customized configuration information and installed optional
software. Any configuration files that cannot be migrated will be saved in a specific directory.
System messages will inform you of the location of the saved files. Information will also be
stored in the system installation log in Ivar/adm/ras/devinst.log.
"Installing BOS from CD-ROM or Tape" on page D-1 describes the BOS installation
migration path. "Installing Optional Software and Service Updates" on page 6-1 provides
information about the migration of optional software. An InfoExplorer database provides
special migration instructions that may exist for the individual software products you want to
install. "Installing Optional Software and Service Updates" on page 6-1 contains instructions
for installing and accessing this database.
"Compatibility between AIX Version 3.2 and AIX Version 4.2" on page C-1 discusses
compatibility between the two release levels.
Software Licensing
AIX Version 4.1 introduced a software license management system that allows an
application to operate in compliance with the terms and conditions of its license agreement.
To obtain a license password, contact your point of sale.
The iFORILS documentation provides information for system administrators who need to set
up and manage a network license server. A network license server enables users to run
software governed by a license that is shared by the systems in a network.
Software Packaging
Three types of units comprise the Base Operating System and optional software products:
• A licensed program is a purchasable product. The Base Operating System (BOS) is an
example of a licensed program.
Preface
xi
• A licensed program may be made up of packages. In some cases, the licensed program
and the package may be the same, or a licensed program may have numerous
packages. bos.net is an example of a package that is part of the BOS licensed program.
• A fileset is an installable unit within a package. bos.net.tcp.client is a fileset in the
bos.net package.
Optional software may be organized into bundles, which are groups of products that are
suited for a particular use. For example, a client bundle provides client AIX functionality with
minimum disk utilization~ For more information about bundles, see "Installing Optional
Software and Service Updates" on page 6-1. An InfoExplorer database describes the filesets
and packages that comprise individual software products.
User Interfaces
User interfaces provide a sil1')plified means of performing installation and configuration tasks.
These interfaces are:
• Installation Assistant, which facilitates performing a set of configuration tasks after 80S is
installed on the system. "Customizing Your Installation," on page 3-1, describes the
Installation Assistant application.
• Easy Install, which provides the simplest way of installing software bundles. "Installing
Optional Software and Service Updates," on page 6-1, describes the Easy Install
application.
• Install and Update Software, which provides additional software installation functionality,
including installing individual software packages and filesets. "Installing Optional Software
and Service Updates, "on page 6-1, describes the Install and Update application.
• Maintain Installed Software, which allows you to commit software updates that are
applied to your system, reject software updates, and remove installed software.
"Maintaining Optional Software," on page 7-1, describes the Maintain Installed Software
application.
Optional Software Installation
AIX Version 4.2 provides functions for installing optional software, including removing
installed software and previewing the software installation.
The remove function (sometimes referred to as deinstall) allows you to remove an optional
software product that has been previously installed on your system. Removing software
differs from rejecting software in several ways:
• The remove function is independent of the installation state, while software must be in the
applied state for reject.
• You can remove product filesets but not individual updates.
• The remove function attempts to delete all traces of the product fileset.
"Maintaining Optional Software," on page 7-1, provides more information about removing
software from your system.
The preview function allows you to preview the results of installing software before the
installation has actually begun. Information provided by the preview function includes: .
• Whether the software you are installing passed its preinstallation checks
• Which (if any) requisite software will be installed along with the software you are installing
• Estimates on how much file system space is needed by the software you are installing
xii
Installation Guide
Network Installation Management
Network Installation Management (NIM) enables you to centrally manage the installation of
BOS and optional software on diskless, dataless, and standalone systems within the same
environment.
See the AIX Version 4.2 Network Installation Management Guide and Reference for
information about managing network installations.
Highlighting
This book uses the following highlighting conventions:
Bold
Identifies commands, key words, files, directories, and other items whose
names are predefined by the system.
Italics
Identifies parameters whose actual names or values are to be supplied by
the user. Italics are also used to emphasize an important word or phrase or
to identify a term when it is being defined.
Monospace
Identifies information you should actually type, as well as examples of
specific data values, examples of text similar to what you might see
displayed, examples of portions of program code similar to what you might
write as a programmer, and messages from the system.
Sample Screens
Many chapters in this book contain sample screens, which help verify that you reached the
correct step. Not all screen depictions, however, are identical to what you see on your
display screen. The degree of variance between a sample screen and your display screen
depends on your system configuration, but the sample screens should be similarto what
you see on your display screen.
ISO 9000
ISO 9000 registered quality systems were used in the development and manufacturing of
this product.
AIX Support for the, XlOpen UNIX95 Specification (also known
as Spec1170)
Beginning with AIX Version 4.2, the operating system is designed to support the XlOpen
UNIX95 Specification (also known as Spec1170) for portability of UNIX-based operating
systems. Many new interfaces, and some current ones, have been added or enhanced to
meet this specification. Beginning with Version 4.2, AIX is even more open and portable for
applications.
At the same time, compatibility with previous AIX releases is preserved. This is
accomplished by the creation of a new environment variable, which can be used to set the
system environment on a per-system, per-user, or per-process basis.
To determine the proper way to develop a UNIX95-portable application, you may need to
refer to the XlOpen UNIX95 Specification (also known as Spec1170), which can be obtained
on a CD-ROM by ordering the printed copy of AIX Version 4 Commands Reference, order
Preface
xiii
.number SBOF-1851 , or by ordering Go Solo: How to Implement and Go Solo with the Single
Unix Specification, order number SR28-5705,a book which includes the )(JOpen UNIX95
Specification (also known as Spec1170) on a CD-ROM.
Corequisite Publications
The following documents, if they apply to your installation, supplement this book:
• Documentation for installation and update media is shipped with each new release of AIX.
These documents discuss updates provided by the new release, and include last minute
information you should be aware of before beginning the installation.
• AIX Version 4. 1 Installation Guide, order number SC23-2550. Describes how to create a
backup copy of an AIX Version 4.1 system.
• AIX Version 3.2 Installation Guide, order number SC23-2341. Describes how to create a
backup copy of an AIX Version 3.2 system.
• Installation Guide for AIX Version 3, order number SC23-2341. Describes how to create a
backup copy of an AIX Version 3.1 system.
Related Publications
The following publications contain additional information related to the installation and
management of AIX Version 4.2:
• Hypertext Information Base Library Version 1 for AIX. Once BaS is installed, you can
install this complete hypertext library from CD-ROM.
• AIX Version 4 System Management Guide: Operating System and Devices, order number
SC23-2525.
• AIX Version 4 System Management Guide: Communications and Networks, order number
SC23-2526.
• AIX Version 4.2 Network Installation Management Guide and Reference, order number
SC23-1926
• AIX Version 4 Commands Reference (six volumes), order number SBOF-1851.
• AIX Version 4 Problem Solving Guide and Reference, order number SC23-2606.
• A/X Version 4 Files Reference, order number SC23-2512
• AIX Version 4 Messages Guide and Reference, order number SC23-2641
• AIX Version 4 General Programming Concepts: Writing and Debugging Programs, order
number SC23-2533.
Other useful publications:
• AIX and Related Products Documentation Overview, order number SC23-2456.
• AIX Version 4 Topic Index and Glossary, order number SC23-2513.
• AIX Version 4 System User's Guide: Operating System and Devices, order number
SC23-2544.
• AIX Version 4 System User's Guide: Communications and Networks, order number
SC23-2545.
xiv
Installation Guide
• AIX Version 4 Getting Started, order number SC23-2527.
• AIX Version 4 Quick Reference, order number SC23-2529.
• POWERstation and POWERserver Common Diagnostics Information Manual, order
number SA23-2765
Ordering Publications
You can order publications from your sales representative or from your point of sale.
If you received a printed copy of Documentation Overview with your system, use that book
for information on related publications and for instructions on ordering them.
To order additional copies of this book, use order number SC23-1924.
Preface
XV
xvi
Installation Guide
Chapter 1. Determining Your Starting Point
This installation guide assumes that all of the required hardware is already installed on your
system. The procedures in this guide identify prerequisite tasks or conditions that must be
met before performing the procedures.
This section helps you determine how to proceed in completing installation tasks.
Installation conditions are listed, followed by the chapters you need to consult. You may
want to use procedures in chapters other than those in the following list. This section
suggests a minimal path through the Installation Guide.
Installing BOS on a New Machine
If you are installing BOS on a new machine, follow these steps:
1. Go to "Installing BOS from CD-ROM or Tape" on page 2-1.
2. Continue with "Customizing Your Installation" on page 3-1.
Upgrading to Version 4.2 from an Earlier Version
If you are installing AIX Version 4.2 on a machine that has AIX already installed, follow
these steps:
1. Back up your system.
a. To back up an AIX Version 3.2 system, follow the instructions in the AIX Version 3.2
Installation Guide.
b. To back up an AIX Version 3.1 system, follow the instructions in the Installation Guide
for Version 3.
c. To back up ari AIX Version 4.1 , system follow the instructions in the AIX Version 4. 1
Installation Guide.
2. Go to "Installing BOS from CD-ROM or Tape" on page 2-1.
3. Go to "Customizing Your Installation" on page 3-1.
Installing Optional Software
If you have already installed AIX Version 4.2, and you only want to install optional software
products or service updates:
• Go to "Installing Optional Software and Service Updates" on page 6-1 to install either
bundles of software or individual software packages and filesets.
OR
Go to "Customizing Your Installation" on page 3-1 to install bundles of software using the
Easy Install interface.
• You may also need to perform some of the tasks described in "Maintaining Optional
Software" on page 7-1. For detailed information about software packaging and software
installation functions, refer to the "Optional Software Installation and Update Concepts"
on page A-1.
Determining Your Starting Point
1-1
Customizing the BOS Install Program
If you have already installed a machine with AIX Version 4.2, and you want to customize the
bosinst.data file to set installation parameters for installing other machines, follow these
steps:
1. Go to "Customizing the BOS Install Program" on page 4-1.
2. Back up the machines you want to install with customized installation parameters.
3. Go to "Customizing Your Installation" on page 3-1 if the installed system requires further
configu ration.
Installing BOS from a System Backup
If you are installing from a backup image you made of your system, follow these steps:
1. Go to "Installing BOS from a System Backup" on page 5-1 .
2. Go to "Customizing Your Installation" on page 3-1 if the installed system requires further
configuration.
1-2
Installation Guide
Chapter 2. Installing BOS from CD-ROM or Tape
This chapter describes the installation methods and procedures for installing AIX Version 4.2
of the Base Operating System (BOS) from CD-ROM or tape.
Flowchart for BOS Installation from CD-ROM or Tape
This flowchart outlines the steps required to install BOS from CD-ROM or tape.
Start the system.
Select the console.
Select the language for the
installation menus.
Begin installation
with default settin s.
No
Verify the default installation
method and system settings.
Do any that apply:
Change the
the
Change the
Change the
"">-___..1 Change
installation method.
destination disk.
primary language environment.
Trusted Computing Base setting.
Install from CD-ROM or tape.
Go to "Customizing Your Installation."
Installing the Base Operating System
The basic steps for installing the Base Operating System are summarized below. Detailed
procedures for performing these steps are included in this chapter. The procedures in this
chapter contain illustrations of the online screens used during installation. These illustrations
are provided as examples. only. The actual online screens may be somewhat different in
appearance.
1. Prerequisites on page 2-2
2. Start the System on page 2-3
Installing BOS from CD-ROM or Tape
2-1
3. Verify the Default Installation and System Settings on page 2-7
4. Change the Installation Method on page 2-8, if needed
5. Change the Destination Disk on page 2-11, if needed
6. Change the Primary Language Environment on page 2-13, if needed
7. Change the Trusted Computing Base setting on page 2-15, if needed
8. Install from CD-ROM or Tape on page 2-5
Press the Reset button on the system unit if you need to cancel the installation once it is in
progress. If you cancel an installation, you must start from the beginning of the installation
process to continue installing the system.
Prerequisites
Before installing the Base Operating System, complete the following prerequisites:
• All hardware must already be connected, including any external devices, such as tape
and CD-ROM drives. If you need instructions, refer to the hardware documentation that
accompanied your system.
• Obtain the system key for the lock (if present) on your system unit.
• Locate your installation CD-ROMs or tapes. If you are installing from CD-ROM, you
should have two volumes. If you are installing from tape, you will have one or more
volumes.
• If you need to determine whether a display adapter is installed, consult the "About Your
Machine" document shipped with the system. This document contains a list of the factory
hardware that came with your system.
• Refer to the documentation that came with the product installation media if you have not
already done so.
• If other users have access to your system, make sure they are logged off before you
begin the installation.
• If AIX Version 3.2 is currently installed and you want to use the Migration Installation
method to install AIX Version 4.2, ensure that the root user has a primary authentication
method of SYSTEM. To check the value, enter:
lsuser -a authl root
To change the value, enter:
chuser authl=SYSTEM root
For information about the Migration Installation method, see "Installation Methods" on
page 2-9.
• If the system you are installing contains data, create or locate a backup of the system:
- If AIX Version 4.1 is currently installed, refer to the AIX Version 4. 1 Installation Guide
for instructions on how to create a backup copy of your Version 4.1 system. After you
have created a backup of your system, continue with "To Start the System."
- If AIX Version 3.2 is currently installed, refer to the AIX Version 3.2 Installation Guide
for instructions on how to create a backup copy of your Version 3.2 system. After you
have created a backup of your system, continue with "To Start the System."
- If AIX Version 3.1 is currently installed, refer to the Installation Guide for Version 3 for
instructions on how to create a backup copy of your Version 3.1 system. After you have
created a backup of your system, continue with "To Start the System."
2-2
Installation Guide
-
If you are reinstalling AIX Version 4.2, refer to "Backing Up Your System" on page 8-1 .
After you have created a backup of your system, continue with "To Start the System."
• If the system you are installing will communicate with other systems and access their
resources, determine the following information: network interface, IP address, hostname,
and route to the network. Contact your system administrator for the correct information for
your system.
To Start the System
Use this procedure to start your machine:
1. If you have a new system or your system is turned off, skip to step 2. If the system is
already turned on, do the following to insert the installation media into the appropriate
drive and then shut down the system:
a. Log in as root user.
b. Insert Volume 1 of the installation media into the tape or CD-ROM drive. Some
CD-ROM drives have a removable disc caddy, while others have a sliding drawer. If
the CD-ROM drive on your system has a sliding drawer, place the CD-ROM in the
drawer and push the drawer in. If the CD-ROM drive on your system does not have a
sliding drawer, insert the CD-ROM into the disc caddy and then insert the caddy into
the CD-ROM drive.
Hinged Cover __
CD-ROM Disc
Loading Arrow
Disc Caddy
c. Enter the following command:
shutdown -F
The Hal t completed ... message is displayed when the shutdown process
completes.
Note: On some models, the shutdown command turns off the power to the system
unit. It does not, however, automatically flip the power switch to the Off (0)
position.
d. Flip the system unit power switch to the Off (0) position when the shutdown process is
complete.
2. Turn the
syst~m
key (if present) to the Service position.
3. Turn on all attached external devices, such as terminals, CD-ROM drives, tape drives,
monitors, and external disk drives. Do not turn the system unit on until step 6. Turning on
the external devices first is necessary so that the system unit can identify them during the
startup (boot) process.
4. If you have not already inserted the installation media into the tape or CD-ROM drive,
insert Volume 1 now. Some CD-ROM drives have a removable disc caddy, while others
have a sliding drawer. If the CD-ROM drive on your system has a sliding drawer, place
the CD-ROM in the drawer and push the drawer in. If the CD-ROM drive on your system
Installing BOS from CD-ROM or Tape
2-3
does not have a sliding drawer, insert the CD-ROM into the disc caddy and then insert
the caddy into the CD-ROM drive.
Notes:
• You may find that on specific hardware, the tape drive door will not open while
the system unit is turned off. If you have trouble opening the tape drive door
during installation, use the following procedure:
a. Turn the system unit on.
b. Insert the AIX Version 4.2 installation tape (insert Volume 1 if you received
more than one volume).
c. Turn the system unit off and wait for 30 seconds.
• On some models that have a door to the tape drive, there may be a waiting
period of up to three minutes before the tape drive door opens after you have
pressed the button to open the tape drive. Some models also require that the
button for the tape drive door be held in the depressed position for a few
seconds before the tape drive door will open.
• On some models, the eject button must be pressed for at least 2 seconds in
order to eject a CD-ROM that is already in the disc caddy.
5. If you are not using an ASCII terminal, skip to step 6. If you are using an ASCII terminal,
set the communications options as follows:
• Line Speed (baud rate) = 9600
• Word Length (bits per character) = 8
• Parity = no (none)
• Number of Stop Bits = 1
• Interface = RS-232C (or RS-422A)
• Line Control = IPRTS
Set the keyboard and display options as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Screen = normal
Rowand Column = 24x80
Scroll = jump
Auto LF (line feed) = off
Line Wrap = on
Forcing Insert = line (or both)
Tab = field
Operating Mode = echo
Turnaround Character = CR
Enter = return
Return = new line
New Line = CR
Send = page
Insert Character = space
Note: If your terminal is an IBM 3151, 3161, or 3164, press the Ctrl+Setup keys to
display the Setup Menu and follow the on-screen instructions to set these options.
If you are using some other ASCII terminal, refer to the appropriate documents
for information about how to set these options. Some terminals have different
option names and settings than those listed here.
6. Turn the system unit power switch from Off (0) to On (I). The system begins booting
from the installation media. If your system is booting from tape, it is normal for the tape to
move back and forth. After several minutes, the three-digit LED displays c31.
2-4
Installation Guide
If you have more than one console, each terminal and direct-attached display device (or
console) may display a screen that directs you to press a key to identify your system
console. A different key is specified for each terminal displaying this screen. If this screen
is displayed, then press the specified key on the device to be used as the system
console. The system console is the keyboard and display device used for installation and
system administration. Press a key on only one console.
7. A screen is displayed that prompts you to select an installation language. Follow the
directions on this screen to select the language in which the installation instructions will
be displayed.
8. The Welcome to the Base Operating System Installation and Maintenance screen is
displayed.
Welcome to Base Operating System
Installation and Maintenance
Type the number of your choice and press Enter.
1 Start Installation Now with Default Settings
2 Change/Show Installation Settings and Install
3 Start Maintenance Mode for System Recovery
88 Help?
Choice:
• To begin the installation immediately, type 1 and press Enter.
After prompting for confirmation, the Installation process begins. Continue with the next
section, ''To Install from CD-ROM or Tape."
• To confirm or change the installation and system settings that have been set for this
machine, type 2 and press Enter.
The Installation and Settings screen is displayed. Continue with "To Verify the Default
Installation and System Settings" on page 2-7.
You can select 88 to display help on this or any subsequent installation screen.
To Install from CD-ROM or Tape
If you chose to confirm or change installation and system settings, enter
and Settings menu to begin the installation process.
a on the Installation
If the system key is present and is not already in the Normal position, turn the system key to
the Normal position when you are prompted with the message:
Turn the system key to the NORMAL position.
The Installing Base Operating System screen is displayed.
Installing BOS from CD-ROM or Tape
2-5
Installing Base Operating System
Please Wait. ..
Approximate
%tasks
complete
25
Elapsed time
(in minutes)
5
Restoring Base Operating System
If you select Migration Installation, after a few minutes, the Migration Confirmation screen
is displayed.
Note:
To skip the Migration Confirmation screen, press Enter when the Installing
Base Operating System screen displays.
The Migration Confirmation screen enables you to do the following:
• List the software on your system that is incompatible with AIX Version 4.2 and that will
be installed at the new level.
• Reboot the system without completing the migration. This selection cancels the
installation.
• Continue with the installation.
After you enter a selection from the Migration Confirmation screen, the installation status
screen is redisplayed.
As the installation progresses, the numbers in the Approximate percent complete and
Elapsed time fields increment to indicate the installation status. After the base run-time
environment is installed, status information about other software that is being installed is
displayed. After the installation is complete, the system automatically reboots.
2-6
Installation Guide
Where Do I Go Next?
The type of install you are doing and the type of media you are installing from determines
what you do next:
• If you are installing from tape and you are doing either a preservation install or a
complete-overwrite install:
Go to "Customizing Your Installation" on page 3-1 and complete the post-installation
tasks.
• If you are installing from tape and and you are doing a migration install:
Go to "Customizing Your Installation" on page 3-1 and complete the post-installation
tasks. If you received multiple tape volumes, the system prompts you to insert the next
tape to complete the migration install for software you have installed on your system.
• If you are installing from CD-ROM and you are doing either a preservation install or a
complete-overwrite install:
Install the software from Volume 1 of the CD-ROM, then go to "Customizing Your
Installation" on page 3-1 and complete the post-installation tasks. After you complete the
post-installation tasks, refer to "Installing Optional Software and Service Updates" on
page 6-1 for instructions on installing the software on Volume 2 of the CD-ROM.
• If you are installing from CD-ROM and you are doing a migration install:
Go to "Customizing Your Installation" on page 3-1 and complete the post-installation
tasks. After you complete the post-installation tasks, insert Volume 2 of the CD-ROM and
enter the command:
smit update_all
This will complete the migration install for software you have installed on your system
that is shipped on Volume 2 of the CD-ROM. Refer to "Installing Optional Software and
Service Updates" on page 6-1 for more information.
To Verify the Default Installation and System Settings
The Installation and Settings screen displays the default installation settings for your
machine. The default settings are determined by the state of your system. For example, the
default installation method for a new machine is different from the default installation method
for a machine that has an earlier version of AIX installed. Usually, you can use the default
settings for your installation.
If you want to change the default installation method, be sure to read'''To Change the
Installation Method" on page 2-8.
The default installation method is based on the following:
New and Complete Overwrite This is the only possible installation method for a new
machine.
Preservation Install
This is the default setting for a machine installed with
Version 3.1 or 4.2.
Migration Install
This is the default setting for a machine installed with
Version 3.2 or 4.1.
Installing BOS from CD-ROM or Tape
2-7
The default settings for a new machine with a standard U.S. keyboard are shown in the
following screen.
Installation and Settings
Either type 0 and press Enter to install with current settings, or type
the number of the setting you want to change and press Enter.
System Settings
Method of Instaliation ..................................... New and Complete Overwrite
Disk Where You Want to InstalL ..................... hdiskO
2 Primary Language Environment Settings (AFTER Install):
Cultural Convention ....................................... English (United States)
Language ....................................................... English (United States)
Keyboard ....................................................... English (United States)
3 Install Trusted Computing Base ........................ no
»> 0 Install with the settings listed above.
+----------------------------------88 Help.?
99 PrevIous Menu
I
»> Choice [0]:
Warning: Base Operating System Installation will
destroy or impair recovery of ALL data on the
destination disk hdiskO.
Attention: Do not select the 0 option on the Installation and Settings screen until you have
either verified the default settings or changed them to the correct settings. Selecting the 0
option on this screen begins the installation process.
To verify the default installation settings, check the default settings on the Installation and
Settings screen.
• If the default settings do not need to be changed, type 0 and press Enter to confirm that
these settings are correct. Skip the rest of this procedure and go to "To Install from
CD-ROM or Tape" on page 2-5.
• If the default settings need to be changed, continue with one of the following:
- To Change the Installation Method (Preservation or Migration Only) on page 2-8.
- To Change the Destination Disk on page 2-11.
- To Change the Primary Language Environment on page 2-13.
- To Change the Trusted Computing Base Setting on page 2-15.
To Change the Installation
M~thod
(Preservation or Migration Only)
This section describes the different installation methods and the procedure for changing the
default setting. The following terms are used in this section:
Volume Group A single hard disk or group of hard disks on your system.
Root Volume Group (rootvg)
A volume group containing the Base Operating System.
lusr
2-8
Installation Guide
A file system containing files and programs that can be shared among
machines. Some of the directories included in the lusr file system are:
lusr/bin, which contains ordinary commands and shell scripts; lusr/lib,
which contains architecture-independent libraries; lusr/lpp, which contains
optionally installed software.
Itmp
A file system providing a temporary shared storage location for files.
Ivar
A file system containing files that are variable on a per-client basis, such as
spool and mail files.
I
The root file system contains files that have machine-specific configuration
data.
Installation Methods
This section describes AIX Version 4.2 installation methods.
• New and Complete Overwrite Installation. Use this method if:
- You have a new machine. In this case the hard disk or disks on which you are installing
BOS are empty. This is the only possible installation method for a new machine.
- You want to completely overwrite an existing version of BOS that is installed on your
system. Be sure to back up your system before doing a New and Complete Overwrite
installation. You may want to use the New and Complete Overwrite installation when:
- You want to install onto a hard disk that contains an existing root volume group that
you wish to completely overwrite. For example, this might occur if your root volume
group has become corrupted.
- You want to reassign your hard disks. For example, assume you have four hard
disks belonging to one root volume group, and you want to separate these disks into
two volume groups. You might first do a Complete Overwrite installation and select
the first disk as the installation destination. This disk would become the new root
volume group. You could then use System Management Interface Tool (SMIT) to
combine the remaining disks into a second (nonroot) volume group. The result
would be two separate volume groups. All of the operating system files would be in
the root volume group, and you could store user data in the second volume group.
The advantage is that you can update or reinstall the operating system without
affecting the user's data.
Attention: The New and Complete Overwrite installation overwrites all data on the
selected destination disk. This means that after the installation is complete, you will have
to manually configure your system using SMIT, the command line, or the Installation
Assistant application. If you want to preserve your system configuration and you do not
need to completely overwrite your root volume group, do not use Complete Overwrite.
Instead, use the Migration installation. {The Migration installation is available only for
Version 3.2 or 4.1 machines.)
• Migration Installation. Use this installation method to upgrade AIX Version 3.2 or AIX
Version 4.1 to AIX Version 4.2 while preserving the existing root volume group. This
method preserves all file systems except Itmp, as well as the root volume group, logical
volumes and system configuration files. Migration is the default installation method for
AIX Version 3.2 and AIX Version 4.1 machines.
During a Migration installation, the installation process determines which optional
software products need to be installed on AIX Version 4.2. AIX Version 3.2 or AIX
Version 4.1 software that exists on the system and has been replaced by new software in
AIX Version 4.2 is installed at the AIX Version 4.2 level. When migrating from version 3.2
all files in lusrllib/drivers, lusrllib/microcode, lusrllib/methods and Idev are removed
from the system, so software support for non-AIX device drivers must be reinstalled.
Non-AIX software products remain on the system. They are expected to function if they
conform to the binary compatibility conditions described in "Compatibility between AIX
Version 3.2 and AIX Version 4.2" on page C-1.
Installing BOS from CD-ROM or Tape
2-9
When migrating from AIX Version 3.2, the following software products are removed from
the system:
- AIXwindows Interface Composer
- Remote Customer Services
- AIXwindows Development Environment
- Display PostScript functionality from AIXwindows Run-Time Environment Extensions
- Performance Tools functionality from Extended Commands
In most cases, user configuration files from the previous version of a product are saved
when the new version is installed during a Migration installation.
To complete the Migration Installation, you need to have at least 8MB of free disk space.
If there is insufficient space to complete the Migration Installation during the BOS
installation process, a message similar to the following is displayed at the end of the
installation:
An error occurred while migrating packages.
Some packages have not been installed.
Please see /var/adm/ras/devinst.log for details or perform an
overwrite or preservation install.
If space limitations prevent the migration of all software that is usually automatically
migrated, the installation program attempts to install the software that is usually installed
for a Preservation of Overwrite installation. If there is still not enough disk space
available, the minimum set of software required to support the use of the system is
installed.
If there is not enough space to migrate all of the usually migrated software, a collection of
software called a Migration Bundle will be available when you install additional software
later. If the minimum set of software is installed, or if the installation is not performed from
a graphics console, a Graphics_Startup Bundle is created. Before installing either of
these bundles, you will need to create additional disk space on the machine you want to
install. Refer to "Installing Optional Software and Service Updates" on page 6-1 for more
information about installing software bundles and for information on migrating or installing
optional software products. "Maintaining Optional Software" on page 7-1 describes how
to remove software from the system to free up disk space .
• Preservation Installation. Use this installation method when a version of BOS is
installed on your system and you want to preserve the user data in the root volume group.
However, this method overwrites the lusr, Itmp, Ivar, and I (root) file systems by default,
so any user data in these directories is lost. System configuration must be done after
doing a Preservation installation.
The /etc/preserve.list file contains a list of system files to be copied and saved during a
preservation BOS installation. The letc/filesystems file is listed by default. Add the full
path names of any additional files that you want to save during the Preservation
Installation to the preserve.list file. You need to create the /etc/preserve.list file on an
AIX Version 3.1 machine. On an AIX Version 4.1 or later system, edit the file that exists
on your system.
You can modify the preserve.list file and copy it to a diskette to be used during BOS
installation. For information about creating a supplemental diskette, see "Customizing the
BOS Install Program" on page 4-1. If a preserve. list file exists on diskette, the installation
program uses this information instead of the default file on the installation media or a
user-created file on the system you are installing. If no diskette data exists, the installation
2-10 Installation Guide
program uses the preserve.list file you created on the system you are installing. Lastly,
the program uses the preserve.list file on the installation media if no other file is found.
In addition to the amount of disk space required for BOS installation, be sure you have
sufficient disk space in the Itmp file system to store the files listed in the etc/preserve.list
file.
To Change the Installation Method
Use the following procedure to change the default installation method if your default
installation method is either the Preservation or the Migration installation. If your default
installation method is New or Complete Overwrite, then this installation method cannot be
changed.
1. Enter 1 to select the System Settings option. The Change Method of Installation
screen is displayed.
Change Method of Installation
Type the number of the installation method and press Enter.
1 New and Complete Overwrite
Overwrites EVERYTHING on the disk selected for installation. Warning:
Only use this method if the disk is totally empty or if there is nothing on
the disk you want to preserve.
2 Preservation Install
Preserves SOME of the existing data on the disk selected for installation.
Warning: This method overwrites the usr (/usr), variable (/var), temporary
(/tmp), and root (/) file systems. Other product (applications) files and
configuration data will be destroyed.
»> 3 Migration Install
Upgrades the Base Operating System to current release. Other product
(applications) files and configuration data are saved.
88 Help?
99 Previous Menu
»> Choice [3]:
2. Enter the number indicating the installation method you want to use. The Change Disks
Where You Want to Install screen is displayed.
If you need to change the default installation disk, continue with "To Change the
Destination Disk" on page 2-11. Otherwise, return to the Installation and Settings screen
by pressing Enter and continue with one of the following:
• To Change the Primary Language Environment on page 2-13.
• To Change the Trusted Computing Base Setting on page 2-15.
• To Install from CD-ROM or Tape on page 2-5.
To Change the Destination Disk
The Change Disks Where You Want to Install screen allows you to change the hard disk
where BOS will be installed. The location codes of the hard disks are displayed in the
Location Code column of the Change Disks Where You Want to Install screen. The format
for the location code for a direct-attached disk is: AA-aa where AA is 00 (zero) and aa is the
slot number for the hard disk. The format for the location codes for all other hard disks is
Installing BOS from CD-ROM or Tape
2-11
described in "Location Codes," in POWERstation and POWERserver Common Diagnostics
Information Manual.
Note: You may wish to keep a record of the location code for the destination disk. In the
future, you can use this location code to identify which disk contains the root volume
group in order to do system maintenance.
For a New or Complete Overwrite Installation
Use the following procedure to change the destination disk when performing a new or
Complete Overwrite installation:
1. If necessary, enter option 1 to select System Settings on the Installation and
Settings screen. The Change Disk(s) Where You Wantto Install screen is displayed.
Change Disk(s) Where You Want to Install
Type one or more numbers for the disk(s) to be used for installation and press
Enter. To cancel a choice, type the corresponding number and press Enter. At
least one bootable disk must be selected. The current choice is indicated by»>.
Name
Location Code
Size (MB)
1 hdiskO
2 hdisk1
00-01-00-0,0
00-01-00-1,0
305
305
VG Status
Bootable
rootvg
rootvg
yes
no
»> 0 Continue with choices indicated above
66 Disks not known to Base Operating System Installation
88 Help?
99 Previous Menu
»> Choice [0]:
2. Type the number, but do not press Enter, for each disk you choose. Type the number of a
selected disk to deselect it. You can select more than one disk.
You can also specify a supplemental disk by entering 66 (type 66 and press the Enter
key) for the Disks not known to Base Operating System Installation option. This
option opens a new menu that prompts for a device support diskette for the supplemental
disk. A supplemental device diskette is only needed when the device will not configure
with the generic SCSI or bus attached device drivers. BOS installation configures the
system for the disk and then returns to the Change Disk(s) Where You Want to Install
screen.
3. Press the Enter key when you finish selecting disks.
After you have selected one or more installation disks,the Installation and Settings Screen
is displayed with the selected disks or the newly configured disk listed under System
Settings.
Continue with one of the following:
• To Change the Primary Language Environment on page 2-13.
• To Change the Trusted Computing Base Setting on page 2;,.15.
• To Install from CD-ROM or Tape on page 2-5.
2-12
Installation Guide
For a Preservation or Migration Installation
Use the following procedure to change the destination disk or root volume group when
installing AIX Version 4.2 on a Version 3.1, 3.2 or 4.1 machine.
1. If necessary, display the Change Disks Where You Want to Install screen by doing the
following:
• If the Installation and Settings screen is displayed, then enter option 1 to select the
System Settings option.
• If the Change Method of Installation screen is displayed, then either select an
installation method or keep the default method and press Enter.
Change Disks Where You Want to Install
Type the number of the disks to be used for the installation and press Enter.
Level
»>
1 3.2
2 3.1
Disks in Rootvg
Location Code
hdiskO
hdisk2
hdisk1
00-11-80-00
00-12-06-00
00-11-05-00
Size (MB)
200
80
120
88 Help?
99 Previous Menu
»> Choice [1]:
2. Enter the number indicating the root volume group where you want to install AIX Version
4.2 on the Change Disks Where You Want to Install screen. After you have selected a
root volume group, the Installation and Settings screen is displayed.
Attention: It is extremely important to select the correct root volume group because
some of the existing data in the destination root volume group will be destroyed during
BOS installation.
Continue with one of the following:
• To Change the Primary Language Environment on page 2-13.
• To Change the Trusted Computing Base Setting on page 2-15.
• To Install from CD-ROM or Tape on page 2-5.
To Change the Primary Language Environment
The Set Primary Language Environment screen allows you to change the language
environment used to display text and messages after BOS installation. The Cultural
Convention field determines the way numeric, monetary, and time characters are displayed.
The Language field determines the language used to display text and system messages.
The environments that are available depend on the type of keyboard you are using.
Installing BOS from CD-ROM or Tape
2-13
Note: Changes to the primary language environment do not take effect until after BOS is
installed and your system is rebooted. The Latin-1 countries (U. S., Canada, Western
Europe) and Japan are supported by two code sets. The default code set for the
Latin-1 countries is IS08859-1, and for Japan the default code set is IBM-932. For
information about changing language .environments and code sets after installation,
refer to "Understanding Locale" and "Changing Your Locale" in A/X Version 4 System
Management Guide: Operating System and Devices. These articles provide
information on identifying language conventions and on uSing the Manage
Language Environment menu option of the System Management Interface Tool
(SMIT) to change your language environment and code set after installation.
Use the following procedure to change the language environment:
1. Enter 2 on the Installation and Settings screen to select the Primary Language
Environment Settings option. The Set Primary Language Environment screen is
displayed.
Set Primary Language Environment
Type the number for the Cultural Convention (such as date, time, and
money), Language, and Keyboard for this system and press Enter, or type
25 and press Enter to create your own combination.
Cultural Convention
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
»> 10
C (POSIX)
Arabic (ISO)
Arabic (PC)
Bulgarian
Croatian
Czech
Danish
Dutch (Belgium)
Dutch
MORE CHOICES
Language
C (POSIX)
English (United States)
English (United States)
English (Unisted States)
English (United States)
English (United States)
English (United States)
Dutch (Belgium)
English (United States)
Keyboard
C (POSIX)
Arabic (ISO)
Arabic (PC)
Bulgarian
Croatian
Czech
Danish
Dutch (Belgium)
Dutch
88 Help?
99 Previous Menu
»> Choice [10]:
2. View the options listed on the Set Primary Language Environment screen. The full list of
options may be displayed on more than one screen. Select the MORE CHOICES option
to view the next screen. Most of the options are a predefined combination of cultural
convention, language, and keyboard. There is, however, an option for defining your own
combination of cultural convention, language, and keyboard.
3. Select an option on the Set Primary Language Environment screen .
• If you selected a predefined option, then the Installation and Settings screen is
displayed. Skip the rest of this procedure and continue with one of the following:
- "To Change the Trusted Computing Base Setting" on page 2-15.
- "To Install from CD-ROM or Tape" on page 2-5 .
• If you selected the option to define your own combination of cultural convention,
language and keyboard, then the Set Primary Cultural Convention screen is displayed.
2-14 Installation Guide
4. Enter the number indicating the cultural convention required on the Set Primary Cultural
Convention screen. The Set Primary Language screen is displayed.
5. Enter the number indicating the primary language required. The program displays the Set
Keyboard screen.
6. Enter the number indicating the keyboard attached to the system. The Installation and
Settings menu is displayed again, reflecting your changes.
7. Continue with one of the following:
- "To Change the Trusted Computing Base Setting" on page 2-15.
- "To Install from CD-ROM or Tape" on page 2-5.
To Change the Trusted Computing Base Setting
When you install the Trusted Computing Base (TCB), the trusted path, the trusted shell, and
system integrity checking are installed. The trusted path protects your system in case a
program is masquerading as the program you want to use. The trusted path tries to ensure
that the programs you run are trusted programs.
If you want to enable the TCB setting, you must do so now. The TCB setting cannot be
enabled later. However, the TCB setting can be disabled later. When TCB is not installed,
installation time is reduced.
To change the setting for installing TCB to yes, enter 3. Entering 3 again changes the
setting back to no.
Note: When migrating from AIX Version 4.1, the install menu TCB setting is ignored. The
TCB setting of the installed system will be the same as on the AIX Version 4.1
system.
Continue with "To Install from CD-ROM or Tape" on page 2-5.
Installing BOS from CD-ROM or Tape
2-15
2-16 Installation Guide
Chapter 3. Customizing Your Installation
This chapter provides an overview of tasks you may need to perform after installing the
8ase Operating System (80S).
After installing 80S, the operating system will run with default settings: one user (root), the
date and time set for where the system was manufactured, and other very general settings.
You probably want to change some or all of these settings. Also, you must provide system
and network information if you want to communicate with other systems.
The newly installed 80S reboots and starts Installation Assistant, which guides you through
completing customization tasks. When you use Installation Assistant immediately after 80S
installation, only the tasks that apply to your type of installation display. Once you have
exited Installation Assistant through the Tasks Completed-Exit to AIX Login task, all
customization tasks except Exit will display the next time you use Installation Assistant.
The graphical interface for Installation Assistant provides step-by-step instructions for
completing each customization task. You can also access online help that explains why you
would perform each task. For example, much of the processing on a system uses the date
and time; therefore, you need to be sure the date and time are set correctly. You also must
set up network communications if your system needs to access other systems in a
networked environment. If you are familiar with the tasks listed, you can bypass the
explanation and instructions and move directly from task to task.
Complete the tasks in the order that Installation Assistant lists them. It is helpful to complete
all customization tasks before you use your system. After you exit Installation Assistant, you
can log in to your system.
You must have root user authority to use Installation Assistant. To access Installation
Assistant later, enter the following command:
install_assist
To access the graphical interface, you can also select its icon from the AIX Common
Desktop Environment. See A/X Version 4 Getting Started for more information about how to
access the graphical interface.
Notes:
1. If your terminal type is not set, the first menu displayed by the ASCII Installation
Assistant requires you to enter your terminal type (tty.) If you enter an invalid
terminal type, this menu redisplays until a valid type is entered.
If you enter a valid terminal type that does not match your terminal, the next
screen displayed may be unreadable. In this case, press the break key sequence
to return to the Set Terminal Type screen. For most terminal types, the break key
sequence is Ctrl-C.
2. If your system was installed by a network installation server, Installation Assistant
may not display when the 80S installation program completes.
If your system was installed using a system backup image, or if your 80S
installation was customized, or if you selected Migration Installation from AIX
Version 4.1, Installation Assistant may not display when the 80S installation
program completes.
Customizing Your Installation
3-1
3. In general, the Installation Assistant does not contain the tasks needed to
configure your machine as a server. If you need to configure your system to serve
a certain resource, refer to the documentation pertaining to that resource.
Customization Tasks
Complete all customization tasks that apply to your newly installed system.
• Set the system date and time for your time zone.
• Set a root user account password to restrict access to system resources.
• Confirm or change the device you use to install additional software. The device may be a
CD-ROM, tape drive, diskette drive, or a local or remote directory.
• Set your system to communicate with other systems and access their resources. Use the
worksheets beginning on page 3-5 to gather information necessary to configure network
communications. Contact your system and network administrators for the correct
information for your system.
If you need to configure your machine as an NFS server, refer to "NFS Installation and
Configuration" in A/X Version 4 System Management Guide: Communications and
Networks.
• Check the system storage and paging space needed to install and use additional
software applications.
Attention: You may not have enough paging space if you terminate the Installation
Assistant with Task Not Complete.
• Change the primary language environment or add a secondary language environment.
• Create user accounts.
• Configure your printer and add print queues for local printers and remote print servers.
• Import any existing volume groups.
• Install additional software and add license passwords, if required, to enable the software
to run. If you need to configure the system to serve license passwords, refer to the
iFORILS documentation.
• Back up the system.
• Exit Installation Assistant and log in to the system.
3-2
Installation Guide
Flowchart for Installation Assistant Tasks
The following flowchart shows all the tasks in the Installation Assistant task list. The content
of the list of tasks that is displayed immediately after BOS installation depends on the
method of installation.
Set date and time.
Set root password.
Set installation device.
Configure network
communications.
Manage language
environment.
No
Create users.
Define printers and print
queues.
Add
license
passwords.
No
Back up your system.
Install software bundles.
Exit and log in.
Customizing Your Installation
3-3
Where Do I Go· Next?
To learn about late-breaking information that may include information on the configuration
process and installed software, you can refer to README files. For information on how to
view README files, refer to "Viewing README Files" on page 11-1.
If you are installing from CD-ROM, refer to "Installing Optional Software and Service
Updates" on page 6-1 for information on installing software from CD-ROM Volume 2.
For more information on installing optional software, refer to "Installing Optional Software
and Service Updates" on page 6~ 1.
For information on how to mount the InfoExplorer hypertext library, refer to the booklet that
accompanied your InfoExplorer CD-ROM.
3-4
Installation Guide
TCP/IP Minimum Configuration and Startup Worksheet
System Name:,_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Network Administrator: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Date: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
YOUR SYSTEM:
A. Network Interface: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Standard Ethernet, IEEE 802.3 Ethernet, or Token-Ring
B. Host Name: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Name of your system
C. Internet Address: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Address on the Internet. Do not write in leading zeroes.
For example, do not write 002.020.120.010; instead, write 2.20.120.10
D. Subnet Mask:,_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Required if your network uses mask addresses
E. Name Server Internet Address:, _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Required if your network uses a name server
F. Name Server Domain Name: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Required if your network uses a name server
G. Default Gateway Internet Address:, _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Required if your network uses a gateway
H. Ring Speed: (4 or 16),_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Required for Token-Ring
I. Cable Type: (bnc or dix)_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Required for Ethernet
Customizing Your Installation
3-5
Updating the Host List Worksheet
Network Administrator: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Date: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
• For each system you want to communicate with in the network, write the system's host
name and Internet address. Each host name and Internet address must be unique. Do
not enter the leading zeroes in an Internet address. For example, for the Internet address
002.020.120.010 write 2.20.120.10.
• An alias is a optional synonym for the host name.
• Comments are optional notes for your reference.
Host Name
3-6
Installation Guide
Internet Address
Aliases
Comments
Mounting Remote File Systems Worksheet
System Name: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
System Administrator: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Date: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
YOUR SYSTEM:
A. Full Path Name of Mount Point _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Mount point for server file system
B. Full Path Name of Remote Directory: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Path on the server
C. Host Name where Remote Directory Resides: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Host name of server
D. Mount Now_ _ Add to letc/filesystems
or Both_ _ _ _ __
both makes the file system available each time the system starts
E. letc/filesystems Mount Directory on System Restart: yes__ no _ __
yes makes the file system available each time the system starts
F. Mode for this NFS File System: read-only___ read-write_ _ _ _ __
Customizing Your Installation
3-7
3-8
Installation Guide
Chapter 4. Customizing the BOS Install Program
This chapter describes how to customize subsequent installations once AIX is installed. The
steps involve editing the bosinst.data file and using it with your installation media.
Introduction to Customizing the BOS Install Program
The first time you install AIX, the Base Operating System (BOS) installation program
presents menus from which you must choose setup options. This initial installation also
automatically starts a post-installation configuration program, the Installation Assistant.
Refer to "Customizing Your Installation" on page 3-1 for more information about Installation
Assistant.
For subsequent installations, you can change many aspects of the default BOS install
program by editing the bosinst.data file. For example, by specifying no prompts, you can
customize the program to install BOS without menus. You can also customize BOS
installation to bypass the Installation Assistant and start your own configuration script. You
can use the bosinst.data file to replicate one set of installation settings on other machines.
For example, system administrators can create a bosinst.data file with settings that can be
used to install all the machines they support that have the same configuration.
Notes:
1. Another installation file, image.data, can also be modified and used during BOS
installation. The image.data file contains information describing the image
installed during the BOS installation process. This information includes the sizes,
names, maps, and mount points of logical volumes and file systems in the root
volume group. The installation program also takes input from the image.data file
regarding defaults for the machine being installed. See AIX Version 4 Files
Reference for a description of the image.data file. The procedure for using the
bosinst.data file to customize BOS installation can also be used for the
image.data file. The modified files can be used together to override BOS
installation defaults.
2. You can also use the instructions in this chapter to create a supplemental diskette
containing a modified preserve.list file, which is used during a Preservation
Installation. For more information about the preserve. list file, see "Installation
Methods" on page 2-9.
The bosinst.data file directs the actions of the BOS installation program. The file resides in
the Ivar/adm/ras directory on the installed machine only, and it is not accessible on the
commercial tape or the CD-ROM on which you received AIX.
The bosinst.data file contains stanzas with variables set to default values. Each variable is
on a new line, in the Variable=. Value form. A blank line separates each stanza. The
information in these stanzas informs the installation program about such things as the
method and type of installation, the disks in the machine, and the language used. By editing
the file with an ASCII text editor, you can substitute new values for the default variables.
Customizing the BOS Install Program
4-1
Using a Customized bosinst.data File
You must install the Base Operating System (BOS) before you can access and modify the
default bosinst.data file. Once you have installed BOS, retrieve and edit the file like any
other ASCII file. Use one of the following procedures:
• Customize the bosinst.data file, then create a backup image of the system to use in
subsequent installations from a backup tape.
• Customize a bosinst.data file for each client you want to install via the network.
• Customize the bosinst.data file, then copy the modified file to a diskette that
supplements your installation medium, either tape or CD-ROM.
Refer to "bosinst.data File Stanza Descriptions" on page 4-3 and "Example bosinst.data
Files" on page 4-6 for information about the contents of the file and examples of edited
files.
To Create and Use a Backup Tape
1. Customize the bosinst.data file:
a. Change your directory, with the cd command, to the Ivar/adm/ras directory.
b. Copy the Ivar/adm/ras/bosinst.data file to a new name, such as bosinst.data.orig.
This step preserves the original bosinst.data file.
c. Edit the bosinst.data file with an ASCII editor. Refer to the stanza descriptions,
starting on page 4-3, for more information about variables and values.
d. Copy the edited file to the root directory:
cp /var/adm/ras/bosinst.data /bosinst.data
2. Create a backup image of the system:
Back up the system, using either the mksysb command or the System Management
Interface Tool (SMIT). Refer to "Backing Up Your System" on page 8-1 for more
information.
BOS installations from this backup will behave according to your customized
bosinst.data file.
To Create and Use a Client File
Create one customized bosinst.data file for each client and, using the Network Installation
Manager (NIM), define the files as NIM resources. Refer to AIX Version 4.2 Network
Installation Management Guide and Reference for more information about how to use the
bosinst.data file as a resource in network installations.
To Create and Use a Supplementary Diskette
This procedure describes how to create the supplementary diskette and use it in future
installations:
1. Customize the bosinst.data file:
a. Change your directory, with the cd command, to the Ivar/adm/ras directory.
b. Copy the Ivar/adm/ras/bosinst.data file to a new name, such as bosinst.data.orig.
This step preserves the original bosinst.data file.
4-2
Installation Guide
c. Edit the bosinst.data file with an ASCII editor. Refer to the stanza descriptions
starting on page 4-3 for more information about variables and values.
d. Create an ASCII file consisting of one word:
data
e. Save the new ASCII file, naming it signature.
2. Create the diskette and use it for installation:
a. Back up the edited bosinst.data file and the new signature file to diskette with the
following command:
ls ./bosinst.data ./signature I backup -iqv
OR
If you create a bundle file named mybund1e, back up the edited bosinst.data file,
the new signature file, and the bundle file to diskette with the following command:
ls ./bosinst.data ./signature ./mybund1e I backup -iqv
b. Put the diskette in the diskette drive of the target machine you are installing.
c. Boot the target machine from an install medium (tape, CD-ROM, or network) and
install AIX.
The BOS installation program will use the diskette file, rather than the default
bosinst.data file shipped with the installation media.
bosinst.data File Stanza Descriptions
This section describes the contents of the bosinst.data file. Two example files follow the
stanza descriptions.
control_flow Stanza
The controLfiow stanza contains variables that control the way the installation program
works:
CONSOLE
Specifies the full path name of the device you want to use as the console.
This value is blank in the default bosinst.data file because the file specifies
a prompted installation, which requires you to press a key to identify your
console. (Instructions for which key to press are displayed on the screen.)
If you change the PROMPT variable to no, you must specify a console
here.
INSTALL_METHOD
Specifies a method of installation: migrate, preserve, or overwrite. The
default value is initially blank. The installation program assigns a value,
depending on which version of AIX was previously installed. See
"Installation Methods" on page 2-9 for more information about installation
methods.
The default method of installation is migrate if AIX 3.2 or 4.1 is on the
machine. The default is preserve if AIX 3.1 or 4.2 is on the machine. If no
AIX exists, the default method is overwrite.
Customizing the 80S Install Program
4-3
PROMPT
Specifies whether the installation program uses menus from which you
makes choices. The possible values are yes (default) and no.
Note: You must fill in values for all variables in the locale stanza if you set
the PROMPT variable to no. Similarly, if PROMPT equals no, you
must supply values for all variables in the controLflow stanza, with
two exceptions: the ERROR_EXIT and CUSTOMIZATION_FILE
variables, which are optional.
Attention: Fill in values for all variables in the target_disk_data
stanza if you set the PROMPT variable to no. The BOS installation
program assigns target disks for blank variables. You can lose data
if the install program assigns a disk where you store data.
EXISTING_SYSTEM_OVERWRITE
Confirms that the install program will overwrite existing files. This variable is
applicable only for a nonprompted overwrite installation. The possible
values are no (default) and yes.
If the installation program detects an existing volume group when PROMPT
is set to no and EXISTING_SYSTEM_OVERWRITE is set to no, an error
message instructs you to set installation parameters.
INSTALL_X_IF_ADAPTER
Installs AIXwindows. The possible values are:
yes (default)
no
all
Install AIXwindows if the selected console is a graphics
terminal
Do not install AIXwindows
Always install AIXwindows.
RUN_STARTUP
Starts the Installation Assistant on first boot after the BOS installation
completes. The possible values are yes (default) and no.
BOS starts either the ASCII or the graphical version of Installation Assistant,
depending on the type of display adapter in the machine.
RM_INST_ROOTS
Removes all files and directories in the lusr/lpp/*/inst_roots directories.
The possible values are no (default) and yes.
The lusr/lpp/bos/inst_roots directories must remain if the machine will be
used as a network server. You can, to save disk space, set this value to yes
if the machine will not be a network server.
ERROR_EXIT Starts an executable program if an error occurs in the installation program.
The default value is blank, which signals BOS installation to use a
command that is shipped on the installation media. The command starts an
error message routine when the installation program halts due to an error.
As an alternative to the default, you can enter the path name of your own
script or command for a customized error routine.
CUSTOMIZATION_FILE
Specifies the path name of a customization file you create. The default
value is blank. The customization file is a script that starts immediately after
the installation program concludes.
TCB
4-4
Installation Guide
Specifies whether you want to install the Trusted Computing Base (TCB).
When you install the TCB, the trusted path, the trusted shell, and system
integrity checking are installed. The TCB must be installed and initialized
when the operating system is installed. The TCB cannot be installated later.
By not installing the TCB, installation time is reduced. The possible values
are no (default) and yes.
INSTALL_TYPE
Specifies what software to install on the machine. The values are full
(full-function configuration), client (client configuration), and personal
(personal workstation configuration). The full configuration includes all the
software in client and personal. Change full to client or personal if you
want to install one of these subsets of the full-function configuration.
The default setting depends on the software configuration that you
purchased. For example, if the installed machine has a full-function (server)
configuration, the setting will be full. You should not change the default
setting.
BUNDLES
Specifies what software bundles to install. Type the full path name of each
bundle file. Be sure there is sufficient disk space and paging space on the
target machine for the software you specify in the BUNDLES variable.
This list of bundle file names is limited to 139 bytes. If your list of bundle file
names is longer than 139 bytes, use the cat command to combine the
bundle files into a single custom bundle file and enter the name of your
custom bundle file in this field.
If you are installing from CD-ROM or using a network installation server,
specify the full path name of each bundle file as follows:
/sPOT/usr/sys/inst.data/sys_bundles/BundleFileName
If you are installing from tape, to specify system-defined bundles on the
product media, use the full path name of each bundle file as follows:
/usr/sys/inst.data/sys_bundles/BundleFileName
If you are using a bosinst.data diskette to define your own bundle files,
specify the full path name of each bundle file as follows:
'
/ .. / DirectoryName/ BundleFileName. For example, if you put a bundle file
named rnybundle in the root directory, the full path name would be
/ .. /rnybundle.
If you are using Preservation Installation, create bundle files before you
start the installation. Create the files in thorne and specify the full path
name of each bundle file as follows:
/horne/BundleFileName
target_disk_data Stanza
The target_disk_data stanza contains variables for disks in the machine where the program
will install BOS. The default bosinst.data file has one target_disk_data stanza, but you can
add new stanzas to install BOS on multiple disks, one stanza for each disk.
The installation program determines a target disk by checking the variables in hierarchical
order. For example, if the LOCATION variable specifies a location code, the program installs
BOS on that disk, regardless of the remaining variables.
If you accept the default values, which are blank, the installation program chooses a target
disk based on the initial hardware query.
Customizing the BOS Install Program
4-5
Attention: You can lose data if you leave the variables blank in a nonprompted installation.
LOCATION
Specifies a location code for the disk where the program will install BOS.
The default value is blank. If you do not specify a value, the installation
program assigns a value based on the next two variables. "Vital Product
Data and Location Codes" in POWERstation and POWERserver Common
Diagnostics Information Manual provides information about the format of
location codes.
Specifies the formatted size of the disk, in megabytes, where the program
will install 80S. The default value is blank. You can specify the size of your
target disk by typing the number of megabytes available on the formatted
disk. Also, you can type largest if you want to use the largest disk (that
has not already been selected) found by the installation program.
HDISKNAME
Specifies the path name of the target disk. The default value is blank. To
name a target disk, use the hdiskname format, where hdiskname is the
device name of your disk (for example, hdiskO).
locale Stanza
The locale stanza contains variables for the primary language the installed machine will use.
Refer to "Understanding Locales" in AIX Version 4 System Management Guide: Operating
System and Devices for a list of languages and the format to use when editing variables.
BOSINST_LANG
Specifies the language the installation program uses for prompts, menus,
and error messages. The default value is blank.
CULTURAL_CONVENTION
Specifies the primary locale to install. The default value is blank.
MESSAGES
Specifies the locale for messages catalogs to install. The default value is
blank.
KEYBOARD
Specifies the keyboard map to install. The default value is blank.
Example bosinst.data Files
These example bosinst.data files show edits you might make for the following kinds of
installations:
• mksysb 8ackup Restoration
• Nonprompted Installation
The depicted values illustrate formatting only and do not apply to your installation.
4-6
Installation Guide
mksysb Backup Restoration
control_flow:
CONSOLE=
INSTALL_METHOD = overwrite
PROMPT = yes
EXISTING_SYSTEM_OVERWRITE
INSTALL_X_IF_ADAPTER = no
RUN_STARTUP = no
RM_INST_ROOTS = no
ERROR_EXIT =
CUSTOMIZATION_FILE
TCB =
INSTALL_TYPE = full
BUNDLES =
yes
target_disk_data:
LOCATION = OO-OO-OS-OO
SIZE_MB =
HDISKNAME =
target_disk_data:
LOCATION = OO-OO-OS-Ol
SIZE_MB =
HDISKNAME
locale
BOSINST_LANG = en US
CULTURAL_CONVENTION
MESSAGES
KEYBOARD = en_US
Nonprompted Installation
control_flow:
CONSOLE = /dev/lftO
INSTALL_METHOD = preserve
PROMPT = no
EXISTING_SYSTEM_OVERWRITE
INSTALL_X_IF_ADAPTER = yes
RUN_STARTUP = yes
RM_INST_ROOTS = no
ERROR_EXIT =
CUSTOMIZATION_FILE
TCB =
INSTALL_TYPE = full
BUNDLES =
yes
target_disk_data:
LOCATION =
SIZE_MB = largest
HDISKNAME
locale
BOSINST_LANG = da DK
CULTURAL_CONVENTION
MESSAGES
C
KEYBOARD = da_DK
Customizing the BOS Install Program
4-7
4-8
Installation Guide
Chapter 5. Installing BOS from a System Backup
This chapter describes how to install the Base Operating System (BOS) from a backup
image of a previously installed system.
Introduction to Backup Installations
You can install a system from a backup image that is stored either on tape or in a file. This
chapter describes the procedure for installing a backup image stored on tape. To install a
backup stored in a directory on your network installation server, refer to AIX Version 4.2
Network Installation Management Guide and Reference.
Typical uses for a backup are to:
• Restore a corrupted system.
• Install and configure software on one system, then duplicate that installation on other
systems.
This discussion refers to source system and target system. The source system is the system
from which you created the backup copy; the target system is the system on which you are
installing the backup copy.
Installing a system from backup reduces, and often eliminates, repetitive installation and
configuration tasks. For example, a backup installation can copy optional software installed
on the source system, in addition to the basic operating system. The backup image also
transfers many user configuration settings.
An installation from backup operates in either prompted or nonprompted mode, depending
on conditions set in the bosinst.data file and on compatibility between the backup image
and the installed machine. See "Customizing the BOS Installation Program" on page 4-1 for
information on how to modify the bosinst.data file to preset installation parameters when
you create a system backup.
The procedure in this chapter requires the backup copy to be created using AIX Version 4.2.
AIX provides different ways to create backups: either the SMIT Backup the System menu or
the command line, using the mksysb -i TargetDevice command. See "Backing Up Your
System" on page 8-1 for more information about the System Management Interface Tool
(SMIT) method.
During the installation of the backup, the system checks to see if the target system has
enough disk space to create all the logical volumes that are stored on the backup. If there is
not enough disk space, the system prompts you to choose more destination hard disks.
When file systems are created on the target system, they are the same size as they were on
the source.
After the installation completes, the Object Data Manager (ODM) and Idev directory on the
target system are reconfigured. The installation modifies device attributes for all files
beginning with 'Cu' in the letc/objrepos directory on the target system. The installation also
deletes and recreates all files in the target Idev directory.
Setup Considerations
Consider altering passwords and network addresses if you use a backup to make master
copies of a source system. Copying passwords from the source to a target system can
create security problems. Also, if network addresses are copied to a target system, duplicate
Installing BOS from a System Backup
5-1
addresses can disrupt network communications. See "Source and Target Differences" on
page 9-8 for more information.
Use the following techniques if you do not want certain information saved on your target
system:
• Use a backup image that was created before the source system was configured with this
information.
• Manually modify this information on the target system immediately after installing the
backup image.
Flowchart for Backup Installations
The flowchart outlines basic steps to install the Base Operating System (BOS) from backup.
Start the system.
Nonprompted
Specify system settings.
Yes
Configure the device
driver diskette.
Begin the installation.
Go to
"Customizing Your Installation."
To Install BOS from a System Backup
This section details the procedure for installing BOS from a system backup.
Prerequ isites
The following conditions should be met before beginning the procedure:
• All hardware must already be installed, including external devices, such as tape and
CD-ROM drives.
• Obtain the system key for the lock (if present) on your system unit.
• Obtain your system backup image:
5-2
Installation Guide
BOS tapes, created in one of two ways:
Tape
• Using the SMIT Backup the System menu
OR
• From the command line, using the mksysb -i Target command.
Network
The path to your backup image file. Refer to AIX Version 4.2 Network
Installation Management Guide and Reference for information about
installing a backup across a network.
To Start the System
Use this procedure to start your machine:
1. Skip to step 2 if you have a new system or your system is turned off. If the system is
already turned on, do the following to put the backup tape in the tape drive and then shut
down the system:
a. Log in as root user.
b. Put the backup tape in the drive.
c. Enter the following command:
shutdown -F
The Hal t completed ... message appears when the shutdown process
completes.
Note: On some models, the shutdown command turns off the power to the system
unit. It does not, however, automatically turn the power switch to the" Off
position.
d. Turn the system unit power switch to the Off (0) position when the shutdown process
completes.
2. Turn the system key (if present) to the Service position.
3. Turn on all attached external devices, such as terminals, CD-ROM drives, tape drives,
monitors, and external disk drives. Do not turn the system unit on until step 6. Turning on
the external devices first is necessary so that the system unit can identify them during the
startup (boot) process.
4. If you have not already put the backup tape in the drive, do so now.
Notes:
• You may find that on specific hardware the tape drive door will not open while
the system unit is turned off. If you have trouble opening the tape drive door
during installation, use the following procedure:
a. Turn the system unit on.
b. Put the tape in the drive.
c. Turn the system unit off and wait 30 seconds.
• On some models that have a door to the tape drive, there may be a waiting
period of up to three minutes before the tape drive door opens after you have
pressed the button to open the tape drive. Some models also require that the
button for the tape drive door be held in the pressed position for a few seconds
before the tape drive door will open.
Installing BOS from a System Backup
5-3
5. If you are not using an ASCII terminal, skip to step 6. If you are using an ASCII terminal,
set the communications options as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Line Speed (baud rate) = 9600
Word Length (bits per character) = S
Parity = no (none)
Number of Stop Bits = 1
Interface = RS-232C (or RS-422A)
Line Control = IPRTS
Set the keyboard and display options as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Screen = normal
Rowand Column = 24xSO
Scroll =jump
Auto LF (line feed) = off
Line Wrap = on
Forcing Insert = line (or both)
Tab = field
Operating Mode = echo
Turnaround Character = CR
Enter = return
Return = new line
New Line = CR
Send = page
Insert Character = space
Note: If your terminal is an IBM 3151, 3161, or 3164, press the Ctrl+Setup keys to
display the Setup Menu and follow the on-screen instructions to set these options.
If you are using some other ASCII terminal, refer to the appropriate documents
for information about how to set these options. Some terminals have different
option names and settings than those listed here.
6. Turn the system unit power switch from the Off (0) to the On ( I ) position. The system
begins booting from the backup tape, which might move back and forth, or the CD-ROM.
Note: You can boot from production media (tape or CD-ROM) if your backup tape fails
to boot. The initial Welcome screen includes an option to enter a maintenance
mode in which you can continue the installation from your backup tape. Refer to
"Troubleshooting an Installation from a System Backup" on page 9-7 for more
information.
After several minutes, c31 is displayed in the LED.
7. Choose the system console, if necessary.
If you have more than one console on your machine, each terminal and direct-attached
display device may present a screen that instructs you to press a key to identify your
system console. If these screens appear, press the specified key on the device you
choose for your system console. (The system console is the keyboard and display device
used for installation and system administration.) Press a key on only one console.
However, if the bosinst.data file lists a valid display device for the CONSOLE variable,
you do not manually choose a system console. Read "Customizing the BOS Install
Program" on page 4-1 for more information about the bosinst.data file.
S. The type of screen that appears next depends on whether you are attempting a
prompted or nonprompted installation. Go to one of the following sections:
5-4
Installation Guide
• "Nonprompted Installation" on page 5-5 if the backup image is configured to install
automatically, without having to respond to the installation program.
OR
• "Prompted Installation" on page 5-6 if you need to use menu prompts to install the
backup image. Use these instructions also if a nonprompted installation halts and the
Welcome to Base Operating System Installation and Maintenance screen appears.
Nonprompted Installation
A successful nonprompted installation requires no further instructions because the
installation is automatic. The sequence of events follows:
1. The first BOS installation screen appears on the monitor. This screen is untitled and
blank, except for a zero digit in the bottom left corner.
The screen pauses for five to 10 seconds before the next screen appears. If you wish,
you can use the short pause to interrupt the automatic installation and start a prompted
session. Do this by typing three 000 (zeros) at the terminal. The installation will continue
in a prompted mode.
Note: The nonprompted installation stops and prints the Welcome to Base Operating
System Installation and Maintenance screen if the backup image holds
configuration information incompatible with the machine you are installing. For
example, if the image specifies a target disk that does not match what is in the
machine, BOS installation starts a prompted session in which you can modify the
installation.
2. The Installing Base Operating System screen appears next.
Installing Base Operating System
Please turn the system key to the NORMAL Position.
Please wait..
Approximate
% tasks
complete
20
Elapsed Time
(in minutes)
15
Restoring Base Operating System
This second screen signals the start of the BOS installation, reporting the rate of
completion and duration.
The Please turn the system key to the NORMAL position message
appears on this screen if the key is not already in the Normal position. You can turn the
key at any time while the screen is showing. The installation continues regardless of the
key position.
3. The system reboots when the installation completes.
Installing BOS from a System Backup
5-5
The reboot is automatic if the system key (if present) is in the Normal position.
Otherwise, another screen directs you, at the end of the installation, to turn the key to
Normal and press Enter. The system reboots, in this case, when you press the Enter key.
Prompted Installation
The Welcome to the Base Operating System Installation and Maintenance screen is the first
screen to appear for prompted installations. This and subsequent BOS installation screens
provide help text, which you can view by entering 88.
Welcome to Base Operating System
Installation and Maintenance
Type the number of your choice and press Enter.
1 Start Install Now with Default Settings
2 Change/Show Installation Settings and Install
3 Start Maintenance Mode for System Recovery
88 Help?
Choice:
1. Choose the Change/Show Installation Settings and Install option.
The System Backup Installation and Settings screen appears.
System Backup Installation and Settings
Either type 0 and press Enter to install with current settings, or type
the number of the setting you want to change and press Enter.
Setting:
Current Choice(s):
Disk(s) Where You Want to InstalL ..................... hdiskO .. .
Use Maps ....................................................... Yes
2 Shrink File Systems ............................................ Yes
»> 0 Install with the settings listed above.
88 Help?
99 Previous Menu
»> Choice: 0
This screen shows current settings for the system. An ellipsis follows the disk listed in the
first line if there is more than one disk selected.
5-6
Installation Guide
2. Either accept the settings or change them. For more information on using map files, see
"Backing Up Your System" on page 8-1.
To accept the settings and begin the installation, skip to step 8.
To change the settings, continue with step 3.
3. Enter 1 in the System Backup Installation and Settings screen to specify disks where you
want to install the backup image. The Change Disk(s) Where You Want to Install screen
appears.
Change Disk(s) Where You Want to Install
Type one or more numbers for the disk(s) to be used for installation and press
Enter. To cancel a choice, type the corresponding number and press Enter. At
least one boatable disk must be selected. The current choice is indicated by»>.
Name
Location Code
Size (MB)
VG Status
Boatable
Maps
»> 1 hdiskO
2 hdisk1
OO-OO-OS-O,O
00-01-00-1,0
80
60
rootvg
not in VG
yes
yes
yes
no
»> 0 Continue with choices indicated above.
66 Disks not known to Base Operating System Installation
88 Help?
99 Previous Menu
»> Choice [0]:
This screen lists all available disks on which you can install the system backup image.
The »> (three greater-than signs) mark each selected disk.
4. Type the number and press Enter, for each disk you choose. Type the number of a
selected disk to deselect it. You can select more than one disk.
You can also specify a supplemental disk by entering 66 (type 66 and press the Enter
key) for the Disks not known to Base Operating System Installation option. This
option opens a new menu that prompts for a device support diskette for the supplemental
disk. BOS installation configures the system for the disk and then returns to the Change
Disk(s) Where You Want to Install screen.
5. Press the Enter key when you finish selecting disks.
The screen that appears next depends on whether al/ the selected disks have map files
available:
• If one or more selected disks have no maps, BOS installation returns directly to the
System Backup Installation and Settings screen. Skip to step 7.
• If all selected disks have maps, the Change Use Maps Status screen appears, where
you choose either to use or not use the maps for installation. Continue with step 6.
To preserve the placement of files during a future restoration of the backup, you can
create map files before backing up a system. Map files, stored in the Itmp/vgdatalrootvg
directory, match the physical partitions on a drive to its logical partitions. Create map files
either with the SMIT Backup the System menu or the mkszfile command, or specify the
-m option when you run the mksysb command.
Installing BOS from a System Backup
5-7
For more information about map files, see "Using Map Files for Precise Allocation" in
AIX Version 4 System Management Guide: Operating System and Devices.
6. Enter either 1 or 2 in the Change Use Maps Status screen to specify whether the
installation program is to use maps.
When you complete this choice, BOS installation returns to the System Backup
Installation and Settings screen.
7. Decide whether BOS installation is to shrink file systems on the disks where you install
the system. When you choose this option, the logical volumes and file systems within a
volume group are recreated to the minimum size required to contain the data. This
reduces wasted free space in a file system.
File systems on your backup image might be larger than required for the installed files.
Press the 2 key to toggle the Shrink File Systems option between Yes and No in the
System Backup Installation and Settings screen. The default setting is No.
Note: Shrinking the file system will disable the use of maps.
8. Enter 0 to accept the settings in the System Backup Installation and Settings screen.
The Installing Base Operating System screen appears, reporting the rate of completion
and duration. Step 2 on page 5-5 shows an example depiction of this screen.
The Please turn the system key to the NORMAL position message
appears on this screen if the key is not already in the Normal position. You can turn the
key at any time while the screen is showing. The installation continues regardless of the
key position.
An untitled screen temporarily replaces the Installing Base Operating System screen if
you specified a supplemental disk in step 4 on page 5-7. This screen pops up about
halfway through the installation, instructing you to again put the device-support diskette
in the drive and press the Enter key. BOS installation reconfigures the supplemental disk,
then returns to the Installing Base Operating System screen, which continues to report
the progress of the installation.
The system reboots automatically when the installation completes.
The reboot is automatic if the system key (if present) is in the Normal position. Otherwise, a
new screen directs you, at the end of the installation, to turn the key to Normal and press
Enter. The system reboots, in this case, when you press the Enter key.
Where Do I Go Next?
In new installations, a post-installation configuration program, the Installation Assistant,
starts automatically when BOS installation reboots the system. Whether this configuration
program starts following your backup installation depends on settings in your backup image:
• If the bosinst.data file in your backup image specifies a customization script, the
Installation Assistant does not start. The script, which takes the place of the Installation
Assistant, configures your system before the BOS installation program reboots.
• If the system on which your backup image was made has not been configured with the
Installation Assistant, the Installation Assistant starts immediately following the BOS
installation reboot.
• If the system on which your backup image was made has already been configured with
the Installation Assistant, the system prompt appears immediately following the BOS
installation reboot. The Installation Assistant does not start.
5-8
Installation Guide
Go to "Customizing Your Installation" on page 3-1 to configure the installed machine with
optional software, network communications, user accounts, and other settings.
If the Installation Assistant does not start automatically, and you do not want to configure the
machine, the installation from backup is complete.
Installing BOS from a System Backup
5-9
5-10
Installation Guide
Chapter 6. Installing Optional Software and Service
Updates
This chapter describes how to install optional software and service updates onto standalone
systems using the System Management Interface Tool (SMIT) or one of two Visual System
Management (VSM) applications.
Introduction to Installing Software and Service Updates
After the 8ase Operating System (80S) is installed, you may want to install optional
software or service updates. This chapter discusses software installation and applying
service updates, but does not discuss committing service updates after installation. For
information on committing, rejecting, and removing software after installation, refer to
"Maintaining Optional Software" on page 7-1 and "Optional Software Installation and Update
Concepts" on page A-1 .
For information on cleaning up after an interrupted software installation, refer to "Cleaning
Up Optional Software and Service Updates" on page 9-8.
"Compatibility between AIX Version 3.2 and AIX Version 4.2" on page C-1 discusses
compatibility between the two release levels and lists the compatibility software for machines
running mixed levels of AIX. It is recommended that you install this compatibility software if
you did not perform a Migration Installation.
Information about individual software products is available in InfoExplorer and is not
included in this book. To view the software products information:
1. Install the Package Installation Database for Current Media software package (pkg_gd)
using the instructions in this chapter.
2. Enter the following command:
info -1 1p_info
To view information about individuallnfoExplorer databases, click the Search option from
the first screen that is displayed (the List of Licensed Programs screen), and search for
8ase System InfoExplorer Databases. Check to see if there is migration information for the
databases you want to install.
Optionally installed software includes the following:
Optional Software Products. An optional software product is software that is not
automatically installed on your system when you install 80S.
Service Updates. A service update is software that corrects a defect in or adds new
function to the 80S or an optional software product.
Service updates are organized by filesets. Filesets are sets of files that are part of the same
optional software product. Some products, such as InfoExplorer, are not organized as fileset
updates. Such products can only be updated by installing a newer version.
For more information on updating software, see "Optional Software Installation and Update
Concepts" on page A-1 .
Installing Optional Software and Service Updates
6-1
Installing and Running Hardware Diagnostics
If your system is not equipped with a CD-ROM drive, install the hardware diagnostics bundle
from your installation media to enable concurrent hardware diagnostics.
If your system is equipped with a CD-ROM drive, use the diag command to run concurrent
diagnostics from the diagnostics CD-ROM. Run diagnostics in the standalone mode by
booting from the diagnostics CD-ROM.
Software Licensing
Software is selected for installation if it is in the bundle you choose and on the installation
media. Normally, software requiring a license is only selected if you have the license for that
software. The SMIT Custom Install and the VSM Install and Update Software Manager
applications do, however, allow you to install software requiring a license even if you do not
have a license. You will not be able to run this software, however, until you have obtained
the license.
Software Packaging
Software products include those shipped with AIX and those purchased separately. Each
software product can contain separately installable units. The following explains how
software products are organized:
Licensed Program
A licensed program is a complete software product including all packages
associated with that licensed program. For example, bos (the Base
Operating System) is a licensed program.
Package
A group of separately installable units that provide a set of related functions.
For example, bos.net is a package.
Fileset
An individually installable option. Filesets provide a specific function. For
example, bos.net.tcp.nfs 4.1.0.0 is a fileset.
Fileset Update An individually installable update. Fileset updates either enhance or correct
a defect in a previously installed fileset. For example,
bos.net.tcp.nfs 4.1.0.3 is a fileset update.
Bundle
A collection of packages or individual filesets that suit a specific purpose,
such as providing personal productivity software or software for a client
machine in a network environment. A set of bundles is provided with BOS
which contain a specific set of optional software. You can, however, create
your own bundle by using the Install and Update Software Manager desktop
application. These applications provide a list of individually installable
filesets from the different packages. You can select the filesets you want
installed whether or not they belong to the same package group. A bundle
may include several licensed programs or parts of several licensed
programs.
InfoExplorer databases are not automatically installed when you install BOS
or a predefined bundle. Install the individuallnfoExplorer databases you
require, using the instructions in this chapter, before· or after installing
bundles.
The following are examples of the predefined bundles:
• Client Bundle. A collection of commonly installed software packages for
single-user machines running AIX in a standalone or networked client
environment. This bundle minimizes disk utilization by only installing
6-2
Installation Guide
software required for a single-user machine rather than installing server
code and the other software available on the installation media.
• Server Bundle. A collection of software packages for machines running
AIX in a multiuser standalone or networked environment. This bundle
emphasizes functionality over disk utilization.
• Personal Productivity Bundle. A collection of software packages used for
graphical desktop systems running AIX and personal computer (PC)
applications.
• Application Development Bundle. A collection of software packages
used for developing application programs.
• Hardware Diagnostic Bundle. A collection of software packages that
provides hardware diagnostic tools.
• Graphics_Startup Bundle. A collection of software packages that
provides support of graphical environments. Graphical support may be
automatically installed on some systems during BOS installation. See
"Software Installed Automatically during BOS Installation" on page B-1
for more information.
The following bundles only appear in the Easy Install Software VSM
application:
• All Licensed Bundle. A collection of software packages that includes all
the software on the installation media for which you have a license.
• All Update Bundle. One or more fileset updates.
The following bundle only appears if there was not enough disk space
available to complete a Migration Installation during the BOS installation
process:
• Migration Bundle. A collection of migration software packages. Install
this bundle if you want to complete the Migration Installation. You may
also need to install the Graphics_Startup Bundle. See "Migration
Installation" on page 2-9 for more information.
Migrating Software to AIX Version 4.2
If you are migrating AIX Version 3.2 programs, a BOS Migration Installation only migrates
those optional software products that do not run on BOS Version 4.2. If you are migrating
AIX Version 4.1 programs and there is a newer level of a previously installed fileset on the
installation media, a BOS Migration Installation attempts to install the newer level. Any
previously installed products that can be run on BOS Version 4.2 will not be altered during
the Migration Installation. In cases where a BOS Migration Installation does "migrate" a
product, it does so by running the installp command to install the latest version of that
product at the base level. After installation, the product is in the committed state, and the
previous version of the product is deleted from the system. When the latest base level of a
product is installed (whether it is installed by the user or through a Migration Installation), the
user configuration files from the previous version of the product are saved. In some cases
you may need to compare the previous configuration files with the new ones and resolve
any differences.
Installing Optional Software and Service Updates
6-3
Flowchart for Installing Optional Software and Service Updates
The flowchart outlines steps for installing optional software and service
update~.
Back up your system.
SMIT
VSM
Installing Software Bundles:
Install software bundles
using a defaulted path.
Easy Install:
Install software bundles
using a defaulted path.
Selecting Specific Software:
Install software products
at latest level with option to
change default settings.
Applying Updates:
Update software by fix
Install and Update Software
Manager:
Install updates and software
products with option to create
new bundles and change default
settings.
Read any late-breaking news about the
software you installed.
Back up your system.
To Install Optional Software and Service Updates
After completing the prerequisites in this section, you need to decide whether to install
software with the SMIT or one of the Visual System Management applications with the
graphical interface. Descriptions of both types of applications are included in this section.
Before you install optional software and service updates, refer to the specific instructions
that accompany your installation media. If you ever need to reinstall your system, be sure to
refer to the installation media instructions.
6-4
Installation Guide
Note: Vendors who want information about how to develop software products that are to be
installed using the installp command should refer to "Software Product Packaging"
in AIX Version 4 General Programming Concepts: Writing and Debugging Programs.
Determine Your Starting Point
If either of the following conditions apply to you, go to the referenced item; otherwise, .
continue with the procedures in this chapter.
• If you need to commit updates or remove previously installed software, go to the chapter
"Maintaining Optional Software" on page 7-1.
• If you are using a network installation server, refer to the AIX Version 4.2 Network
Installation Management Guide and Reference.
Prerequisites
Before installing optional software or service updates, complete the following prerequisites:
1. BOS AIX Version 4.2 must be installed on your system. If BOS is not yet installed on your
system, go to "Installing BOS from CD-ROM or Tape" on page 2-1, or if you are installing
over a network, refer to the AIX Version 4.2 Network Installation Management Guide and
Reference.
2. The software you are installing is available on either CD-ROM, tape, or diskette, or it is
located in a directory on your system (for example, the lusrlsys/inst.images directory).
3. If you are installing service updates and do not have a current backup of your system,
use the procedures in "Backing Up Your System" on page 8-1 or the Installation Assistant
application to create one. To create a system backup, you must have the backup fileset
(bos.sysmgt.sysbr) installed on your system. If you back up your system using the
Installation Assistant application, then the backup fileset will be automatically installed for
you. To access In,stallation Assistant, select its icon from your desktop for the graphical
interface or enter the following at the command line prompt:
install_assist
To access the SMIT interface:
smit assist
4. Log in as root user if you have not already done so.
5. If you are installing from CD-ROM and currently have a mounted InfoExplorer CD-ROM
in the same CD-ROM drive that you want to install from, do the following:
a. Determine if the InfoExplorer process is running. Enter:
ps -ef
I
grep info
If the info process is found, enter:
kill process_id
where process_id is the number associated with the info process.
b. Use the umount command to unmount the CD-ROM. For example, if you currently
have InfoExplorer mounted from a CD-ROM, you would enter:
umount /usr/lpp/info/Language
where Language is the name of the language you are using.
c. Press the eject button on the CD-ROM drive for at least two seconds to eject the
InfoExplorer CD-ROM.
Installing Optional Software and Service Updates
6-5
If you install from CD-ROM, then the installation application that you use (SMIT or one of
the VSM applications) will create a temporary mount pOint for the CD-ROM.
6. If you are using CD-ROM, tapes, or diskettes, insert the media that contains the optional
software or service updates into the appropriate drive. Some CD-ROM drives have a
removable disc caddy, while others have a sliding drawer. If the CD-ROM drive on your
system has a sliding drawer, place the CD-ROM in the drawer and push the drawer in. If
the CD-ROM drive on your system does not have a sliding drawer, insert the CD-ROM
into the disc caddy and then insert the caddy into the CD-ROM drive.
7. Based on whether you are installing with SMIT or one of the VSM applications, continue
with either "To Install Optional Software and Service Updates with SMIT" on page 6-6
or To Install Optional Software and Service Updates with a Visual System Management
(VSM) Application "To Install Optional Software and Service Updates with a Visual
System Management (VSM) Application" on page 6-13.
To Install Optional Software and Service Updates with SMIT
This procedure describes how to use SMIT to install optional software and service updates.
There are three installation paths available in SMIT: Bundles (easy install), Selective Install,
and Fixes:
Bundles
Using the Install Software Bundle (Easy Install) path, you only need to
specify the input device and which bundle you are installing. You can
also preview a bundle install to see what software will be installed and
how much space is required in the file system to install the bundle.
Install and Update Using Install and Update, you can choose specific software to install,
apply or commit updates, and preview the install to see what software
will be installed and how much space is required in the file system to
install the software.
Fixes
To install a specific fix for a problem, use the Update Software by Fix
(APAR) menu. This menu allows you to list all service fixes on the
media and select a fix to install. You can also preview the installation
to see what software will be updated and how much space is required
in the file system to apply the fix.
Note: Should a problem occur during the installation of optional software that causes the
installation process to halt abnormally, you may have to complete a cleanup
procedure to remove the partially installed software from the system before
attempting to reinstall it. If the system instructs you to do a cleanup, go to "Cleaning
Up Optional Software and Service Updates" on page 9-8.
To Get Help on Using SMIT
If you are not familiar with the SMIT interface and want help on using SMIT, complete the
following steps:
1. At the command line prompt, enter:
smit
2. Select the Using SMIT (information only) option and press Enter. The General Help
screen is displayed.
3. Use the following keys to view the information:
\
6-6
Installation Guide
• Home shows the start of the message list.
• End shows the bottom line of text.
• Page Down shows the next screen of text.
• Page Up shows the previous screen of text.
• The Up and Down Arrow keys move through the message list line by line.
To Access SMIT Installation Menus
At the system prompt, enter:
srnit install_update
(or srni t -C install_update in the AIXwindows environment)
The SMIT application opens with the Install and Update Software screen displayed. From
this screen, you can choose whether to continue along the Easy Install or Custom Install
path.
Install and Update Software
Move Cursor to desired item and press Enter.
Install and Update from LATEST Available Software
Update Installed Software to Latest Level (Update All)
Install and Update Software by Package Name (includes devices and printers)
Install Software Bundle (Easy Install)
Update Software by Fix (APAR)
Install and Update from ALL Available Software
F1=Help
F9=Sheil
F2=Refresh
F10=Exit
F3=Cancel
Enter=Do
F8=lmage
To Install Bundles of Software (Easy Install)
This section details the procedure for installing the bundle contents. The same procedure
can be followed for viewing the bundle contents. The SMIT screens that you use vary
depending on which option you choose.
If you are not familiar with the SMIT interface and want help on using SMIT, see "To Get
Help on Using SMIT" on page 6-6.
Use the following procedure to install the bundle contents:
1. Use the arrow keys to highlight the Install Software Bundle (Easy Install) option from
the Install and Update Software screen and press Enter. The Install Software Bundle
(Easy Install) screen is displayed.
Installing Optional Software and Service Updates
6-7
Install Software Bundle (Easy Install)
Type or select values in entry fields.
Press Enter AFTER making all desired changes.
[Entry Fields]
* INPUT device / directory for software
* BUNDLE
* SOFlWARE to install
PREVIEW only? (install operation will NOT occur)
COMMIT software updates?
SAVE Replaced. Files?
AUTOMATICALLY install· requisite software?
EXTEND file systems if spac~ needed?
VERIFY install and check file sizes?
Include·corresponding LANGUAGE filesets?
DETAILED output?
F1=Help
FS=Reset
F9=Sheli
F2=Refresh
F6=Command
F10=Exit
F3=Cancel
F7=Edit
Enter=Do
APrrDev
LaliJicensed]
no
yes
no
yes
yes
no
yes
no
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
F4=List
F8=lmage
2. The INPUT device/directory for software option is highlighted. Press the F4 key to
display a list of the available input devices or directories. The input device is the tape,
diskette, or CD-ROM drive that you are using to install the software. The input directory is
the directory on your system containing software for installation (for example, the
/usr/sys/inst.images directory).
3. Select an input device or directory and press Enter. The device or directory you selected
is now displayed in the INPUT device/directory for software entry field.
Note: If you are installing from CD-ROM, the CD-ROM device must be mounted to a
CD-ROM file system. SMIT automatically creates this mount point for you. If you
install from the command line using the installp command, however, you must
specify the directory on which the CD-ROM is mounted with the -d option of the
installp command.
4. The Bundle field is now displayed below the INPUT device/directory for software field.
a. The Bundle field is highlighted. Press the F4 key to display a list of bundles to be
installed.
b. Select a bundle from the list and press Enter. The bundle you selected is now
displayed in the new entry field.
5. Press Enter to begin the installation process. After pressing Enter, an ARE YOU SURE?
pop-up message is displayed to confirm that you want to continue with the installation.
Note: If you are installing from tape, it may be several minutes before the contents of
the bundle are displayed or installed.
To Install Software and Service Updates
This section details the procedure for installing software products at the latest level. The
same procedure can be followed for the other options listed in the Install and Update
Software screen in step 1 of the following procedure. The SMIT screens that you use vary
depending on which option you choose to update your system.
• Select the Install and Update from LATEST Available Software option to install one or
more of the opti9pal software products that exist on the installation media. If any updates
6-8
Installation Guide
exist for these products, they will also be installed. Individual updates are displayed for
software that you currently have installed.
• Select the Update Installed Software to Latest Level (Update All) option to update
your currently installed software to the latest level. You can use this option to update
currently installed software to a maintenance level or apply all updates to currently
installed software from a selective fix media.
• Select the Install and Update Software by Package Name (includes devices and
printers) option to install software by package name. This option first displays a list of
the products available on the media, for example printers, communications and devices.
When you select a product, a list of packages for the product you selected is displayed.
You can then select one or more software packages to install.
• Select the Install Software Bundle (Easy Install) option to install a collection (bundle)
of software products.
• Select the Update Software by Fix (APAR) option to install one or more of the fileset
updates that exist on the installation media, including all messages and locales.
• Select the Install and Update From ALL Available Software option to install all the
optional software products and updates that exist on the installation media.
If you are not familiar with the SMIT interface and want help on using SMIT, see ''To Get
Help on Using SMIT" on page 6-6.
Use the following procedure to install software products at the latest level:
1. Select the Install and Update Software option from the Software Installation and
Maintenance screen and press Enter. The Install and Update Software screen is
displayed.
Install and Update Software
Move Cursor to desired item and press Enter.
Install and Update from LATEST Available Software
Update Installed Software to Latest Level (Update All)
Install and Update Software by Package Name (includes devices and printers)
Install Software Bundle (Easy Install)
Update Software by Fix (APAR)
Install and Update from ALL Available Software
F1=Help
F9=Shell
F2=Refresh
F10=Exit
F3=Cancel
Enter=Do
F8=lmage
2. Select the Install and Update from LATEST Available Software option from the Install
and Install and Update Software screen and press Enter. After the option is selected, a
screen asking you to specify the input device or directory is displayed.
3. The INPUT device/directory for software option will be highlighted. Press the F4 key to
display a list of the available input devices or directories. The input device is the tape,
diskette, or CD-ROM drive that you are using to install the software. The input directory is
Installing Optional Software and Service Updates
6-9
the directory on your system containing software for installation (for example, the
lusrlsys/inst.images directory).
4. Select an input device or directory and press Enter. The device or directory you selected
is now displayed in the INPUT device/directory for software entry field.
Note: If you are installing from CD-ROM, the CD-ROM device must be mounted to a
CD.,ROM file system. SMIT automatically creates this mount point for you. If you
install from the command line using the installp command, however, you must
specify the directory on which the CD-ROM is mounted with the -d option of the
installp command.
The screen that is displayed next lists the different installation options.
Install and Update from LATEST Available Software
Type or select values in entry fields.
Press Enter AFTER making all desired changes.
[Entry Fields]
* INPUT device / directory for software
* SOFTWARE to install
PREVIEW only? (install operation will NOT occur)
COMMIT software updates?
SAVE replaced files?
AUTOMATICALLY install requisite software?
EXTEND file systems if space needed?
OVERWRITE same or newer versions?
VERIFY install and check file sizes?
Include corresponding LANGUAGE filesets?
DETAILED output?
F1=Help
F5=Reset
F9=Shell
F2=Refresh
F6=Command
F10=Exit
/usr/sys/inst.images
Lall_latest]
no
yes
no
yes
yes
no
no
yes
no
F3=Cancel
F7=Edit
Enter=Do
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
F4=List
F8=lmage
5. The default setting for the SOFTWARE to Install menu options is _all_latest, which
installs all the software on the media, except devices and printers. Or select _all_licensed
for the SOFTWARE to Install menu option, which installs all the software for which you
have a license or for which no license is required (this is the default option on the Install
Software Bundle (Easy Install) menu).
To display a list of software products from which you can selectively install, press the F4
key to display a list of available software products or bundles. Use the Page Up and
Page Down keys or the arrow keys to scroll through the list. To select one or more items,
highlight the item and press the F7 key. A greater-than ( » symbol is displayed next to
the selected item. To deselect a previously selected item, move the cursor to highlight
that item again and press the F7 key again.
6-10
Installation Guide
Note: The screen containing the default settings can include one of the following
options. Which option appears on this screen depends on which option you
selected from the Install and Update from LATEST Available Software screen.
SOFTWARE to install
Lall_latest]
BUNDLE
Lall_licensed]
SOFTWARE to update
[_update_all]
[_update_all] applies only the updates for software that is installed on your
system.
If you are installing a maintenance level, it should be committed in order to
receive all fixes issued since the base level release. If your disk space is limited,
you can save space in the lusr and root file systems by not saving replaced files.
Note: If you are installing from tape, it may take several minutes to display a listing of
the tape's contents after pressing the F4 key.
6. Verify whether you want to keep or change the remaining default installation settings.
Use the SMIT online help for each field to determine if you want to use the default
setting. To change the settings with a yes or no value, highlight the field and use the Tab
key to toggle yes or no.
Note: The elements selected for Include corresponding LANGUAGE filesets? are the
elements that are used in the main SMIT and VSM install applications. The
values for these elements are stored in the file Ivar/adm/ras/bosinst.data. If you
want different messages and locales installed when installing additional software
or bundles of software, edit the Ivar/adm/ras/bosinst.data file and change the
values of the locale stanza.
If you wish to preview the results of the installation before actually installing the software,
highlight the PREVIEW only? (install operation will NOT occur) field and change the
setting to a yes value. The preview information indicates any software that is requisite to
software you are installing.
7. Press Enter when you are satisfied with all the settings on this screen. The ARE YOU
SURE? pop-up message is displayed to confirm that you want to continue with the
installation.
If you set the preview function to yes, then installation will not actually occur. In this case,
repeat this procedure with the preview function set to no when you want to install the
software.
Completing the Installation and Reading the Status Messages
This section describes the system's activity and actions required of you after the installation
process has begun.
1. When you press Enter to start the installation, the COMMAND STATUS screen is
displayed.
A series of messages are displayed as the installation proceeds. The amount of time the
installation takes varies depending on your system and the software you are installing
and updating.
Note: The system may prompt you, with a message similar to the following, to insert the
next tape or diskette:
Mount volume 2 on /dev/rmtO.
Press the Enter key to continue.
Installing Optional Software and Service Updates
6-11
When this message is displayed, insert the specified tape or diskette and press
Enter.
When the installation finishes, the Command: status field on the COMMAND STATUS
screen changes to OK or failed. OK means the installation ran to completion, though
some filesets may not have installed successfully. The failed status means that not
everything you requested was installed. A preview install always finishes with an OK
status.
For information about error messages, refer to "Error Messages and Output from the
installp Command" on page A-3.
2. When the installation halts or finishes, the screen returns to the top of the list of
messages that are displayed during installation. You can review the message list as
described in the next step, or you can exit SMIT and review the smit.log file. (/smit.log
or Ihomeluser_idlsmit.log)
3. Review the message list for error messages and software products or service updates
that may not have been successfully installed. Use the following keys to review the
system message list:
• Home shows the start of the message list.
• End shows the bottom line of text.
• Page Down shows the next screen of text.
• Page Up shows the previous screen of text.
• The Up and Down Arrow keys move through the message list line by line.
Use the following procedure to correct any errors in the installation:
a. Look at the pre- and post-installation summaries at the end of the message list to see
whether any installation failure occurred.
b. Use the message list to determine problems and find which software products or
service updates were involved. For example, space limits may have been exceeded
or the requisites may not have been met for some software. The system lists how
much extra space is needed and which requisite software products or service updates
to install.
c. Any product that is marked as FAILED, BROKEN, or CANCELLED must be
reinstalled. You do not need to reinstall any service update or software product that
was marked as SUCCESS in the Installp Summary report. If you need to perform the
installation again, change installation settings as appropriate. For example, if
requisites were missing, set AUTOMATICALLY install requisite software? to yes. If
there was not enough space to complete the installation, set EXTEND file systems if
space needed? to yes.
If you need to perform the installation again and you have more than one tape or
diskette, remove the tape or diskette from the drive, press F10 to exit SMIT, and
return to "Prerequisites" on page 6-5. See "Acting on System and Error Messages"
on page 10-1 for information about bosboot command errors that may occur while
the install program is running, and about recovery procedures for these errors.
d. If the installation was interrupted (for example, a power failure), you may need to use
the cleanup procedure before continuing. Press F10 to exit SMIT and refer to
"Cleaning Up Optional Software and Service Updates" on page 9-8.
e. When all software has been installed successfully, continue with the next step.
6-12
Installation Guide
4. If you have additional software to install that is on a different CD-ROf\l1, tape, or diskette,
do the following:
a. Remove the CD-ROM, tape, or diskette from the drive.
b. Insert the CD-ROM, tape, or diskette for the software you are installing into the drive.
c. Press F3 to return to the previous screen and continue installing the software product
or service update from tape or diskette.
5. Press F10 to exit SMIT.
6. Remove the installation media from the drive.
7. Reboot your system when a message directs you to do so. To reboot your system, enter:
shutdown -Fr
To Install Optional Software and Service Updates with a VSM
Application
The graphical interface provides access to two Visual System Management (VSM)
applications for installing optional software and service updates. You must have root
authority to install software with these applications. Select the applications from your
desktop or enter one of the following commands from AIXwindows or the AIX Common
Desktop Environment:
To invoke Easy Install:
xinstallm -ez
To invoke Install and Update Software Manager:
xinstallm
See "Using the Visual System Management Applications" in A/X Version 4 Getting Started
for information about how to access the graphical interface and how to work with VSM
applications.
Easy Install
The Easy Install application provides a means of installing a software
bundle that requires minimal decision-making. Selecting how the software
bundle is to be installed (from a tape or directory, for example) and which
software bundle is to be installed (the client or server bundle, for example)
are the basic decisions required by this application. This application is
intended for users whose software needs are met by an existing bundle.
This application only installs the software for which you have a license or
that does not require a license. The software is committed at the same time
it is installed without saving the previous version of the software.
Installing Optional Software and Service Updates
6-13
The following figure shows the Easy Install application:
Install and Update Software Manager
The Install and Update Software Manager application allows you to install
software as well as to change the system's default install settings and
specify other options. For example, you can choose whether to commit a
software update while installing it. This application also allows you to create
your own bundle for installation by selecting software packages and filesets
from different bundles and the installation media. By default, the Install and
Update Software Manager application applies any software updates you are
installing but does not commit them. You can, however, change this default
setting and have software updates committed during installation. (Base
software applications are always committed. If a previous version of the
software is installed, it cannot be saved.) Using this application, you can
also specify that software for which you do not have a license be installed,
although you won't be able to run this software until you acquire the license
for it.
6-14
Installation Guide
The following figure shows the Install and Update Software Manager application:
Should a problem occur during the installation of optional software that interrupts the
installation process, you may have to perform a cleanup procedure to remove the partially
installed software from the system before attempting to reinstall it. If the system instructs you
to do a cleanup, go to "Cleaning Up Optional Software and Service Updates" on page 9-8.
Neither the Easy Install nor the Install and Update Software Manager application allows you
to remove a software fileset or to commit or reject an applied update. To perform these tasks
using a VSM application, refer to "Maintaining Optional Software" on page 7-1.
Installing Optional Software and Service Updates
6-15
Where Do I Go Next?
The installation of optional software and service updates is now complete. You may want to
do two more things before using your system:
• The software you installed may contain README files with late-breaking news. For
information on how to view README files, refer to "Viewing README Files" on page
11-1.
• You may want to create a new backup of your system. Refer to "Backing Up Your System"
on page 8-1 or "Customizing Your Installation" on page 3-1.
6-16
Installation Guide
Chapter 7. Maintaining Optional Software
This chapter describes how to commit previously installed service updates, reject
uncommitted service updates, and remove a software option from the system. You can use
either the System Management Interface Tool (SMIT) or a Visual System Management
(VSM) application to perform these tasks.
Introduction to Software Maintenance
If the service update was not committed during installation, then you need to commit it after
installation once you have decided that you will not be returning to the previous version of
the software. Committing the updated version of the service update deletes all previous
versions from the system and recovers the disk space that was used to store the previous
version. When you are sure that you want to keep the updated version of the software, you
should commit it. By freeing up disk space, it is faster and easier to process any new
updates you apply at a later date. Before installing a new set of updates, you may want to
consider committing any previous updates that have not yet been committed.
If, however, you decide to return to the previous version of the software, you must reject the
updated version that was installed. Rejecting a service update deletes the update from the
system and returns the system to its former state. A service update can only be rejected if it
has not yet been committed. Once committed, there is no way to delete an update except
by removing the entire fileset.
When you install a base level fileset, it is automatically committed during installation. If you
want to delete a fileset, it must be removed (as opposed to rejected) from the system. A
fileset is always removed with all of its updates. The Base Operating System (bos.rte)
cannot be removed, and certain other products cannot be removed if the software is in use.
For example, the devices.scsi.disk fileset cannot be removed from a standalone system,
because it controls the disk on the system.
If something should go wrong during the software installation so that the installation is
prematurely canceled or interrupted, a cleanup must be run. Detailed information and the
procedure for cleaning up software are included in "Cleaning Up Optional Software and
Service Updates" on page 9-8.
For more information about commit, reject, and remove, refer to "Optional Software
Installation and Update Concepts" on page A-1.
Maintaining Optional Software
7-1
Maintaining Optional Software and Service Updates with SMIT
This chapter details the procedure for committing software updates. The same procedure
can be followed for rejecting service updates and removing software filesets. The SMIT
screens that you use vary depending on which action you are performing on the software.
To reject service updates, use the following command:
smit install_reject
(or smi t
-C install_rej ect in the AIXwindows environment)
To remove software filesets, use the following command:
smit install_remove
(or smi t
-C ins tall_remove in the AIXwindows environment)
If you are not familiar with the SMIT interface and want help on using SMIT, see "To Get
Help on Using SMIT" on page 6-6.
To Commit Service Updates
If you already committed the installed service update using the Apply/Commit option of the
Install and Update Software Manager application, you do not need to commit the service
update again.
Note: You can determine the software products installed on your system by entering the
following at the command line:
lslpp -L
Use the following procedure to commit service updates that are in the applied state.
1. Log in as root user if you have not already done so.
2. Enter the following SMIT command:
smit install_commit
(or smi t
-C install_commit in the AIXwindows environment)
The Commit Applied Software Updates (Remove Saved Files) screen is displayed.
Commit Applied Software Updates (Remove Saved Files)
Type or select values in entry fields.
Press Enter AFTER making all desired changes.
[Entry Fields]
* SOFTWARE name
PREVIEW only? (commit operation will NOT occur)
COMMIT requisites?
DETAILED output?
F1 = Help
F5 = Undo
F9 =Shell
7-2
Installation Guide
F2 = Refresh
F6 = Command
F10=Exit
F3 = Cancel
F7=Edit
Enter=Do
[all]
no
yes
no
F4 = List
Fa = Image
+
+
+
+
3. Are you committing all uncommitted service updates or only selected service updates?
All Service Updates
Verify that the SOFTWARE name entry field is set to all and continue
with step 4.
Selected Service Updates
Press the F4 key with the SOFTWARE name field highlighted to display
a list of applied, but not committed, software updates. The SOFTWARE
name screen pops up over the previous screen.
Select the update to be committed by highlighting it and pressing the F7
key. The> (greater-than) symbol is displayed next to each item you
select. To deselect an item, highlight the item again and press F7 again.
Press Enter when you are finished selecting the software to be
committed. The Commit Applied Software Updates (Remove Saved
Files) screen is displayed again.
Note: If you are rejecting service updates or removing software filesets, you must
select software from a list.
4. Verify the default settings in the remaining fields of the Commit Applied Software
Updates (Remove Saved Files) screen. Use the SMIT online help for each field to
determine if you want to use the default setting. To change the settings with a yes or no
value, highlight the field and use the Tab key to toggle yes or no.
In particular, you may want to preview the results of the commit action before actually
committing the software. The preview information indicates any requisite software that
will be committed with your update if you have set the COMMIT requisites? option to
Yes. Requisite software is software that is required by an update when the update is
installed.
5. Press Enter when you are satisfied with all the settings on this screen. The ARE YOU
SURE? message pops up over the previous screen. If you set the preview function to
Yes, then commit will not actually occur. In this case, repeat this procedure with the
preview function set to No when you want to commit the software.
Maintaining Optional Software and Service Updates with a
Visual System Management Application
The graphical interface provides access to the Visual System Management Maintain
Installed Software application. The Maintain Installed Software application illustrates the
relationships among products, packages, filesets, maintenance levels, and updates in a
graphical format. The application enables you to select software and perform maintenance
functions, such as committing and rejecting service updates and removing and verifying
software. You must have root authority to use this application. You can select the application
from your desktop, or you can enter the following command from AIXwindows or the AIX
Common Desktop Environment:
xmaintm
See A/X Version 4 Getting Started for information about how to access the graphical
interface and how to work with VSM applications.
Maintaining Optional Software
7-3
The following figure shows the Maintain Installed Software application:
7-4
Installation Guide
Chapter 8. Backing Up Your System
This chapter describes using the System Management Interface Tool (SMIT) to create and
verify a bootable backup copy, or image, of your root volume group. This chapter also
describes how to make separate backup copies of user volume groups.
You can also use Installation Assistant to back up your system. Refer to "Customizing Your
Installation," on page 3-1, for more information. When you back up your system using
Installation Assistant, the required bos.sysmgt.sysbr fileset is automatically installed.
Introduction to Backing Up Your System
A backup image serves two purposes. One is to have a working copy of your system in case
your system becomes corrupted. The other is to transfer installed and configured software
from one system to others. You can use the SMIT 8ack Up the System menu to make a
backup image of the root volume group. Use the SMIT Save a Volume Group menu to make
a backup image of user volume groups.
The root volume group is a hard disk, or group of disks, containing start up files, 80S,
configuration information, and any optional software products. A user volume group (also
called nonroot volume group) typically contains data files and application software.
The SMIT Back Up the System menu uses the mksysb command to create a backup
image, stored either on tape or in a file. If you choose tape, the backup program by default
writes a boot image to the tape, which makes it suitable for installing.
Configuring before the Backup
The source system is the system from which you created the backup copy. The target
system is the system on which you are installing the backup copy.
Configure the source system before creating a backup image of it if you want the source and
target to be identical. If, however, you plan to use a backup image for installing other,
differently configured target systems, create the image before configuring the source
system, or set the RECOVER_DEVICES variable to no in the bosinst.data file. Refer to
"Customizing the 80S Install Program" on page 4-1 for more information about the
bosinst.data file.
The installation program automatically installs only the device support required for the
hardware configuration of the source system. Therefore, if you are using a system backup to
install other machines, install additional devices on the source system before making the
backup image and using this backup image to install one or more target systems, or boot
the target system from a product media, then use the mksysb tape to install the target
system. Any additional device support required on the target system is automatically
installed after the mksysb image is restored.
To install additional device support on the source system, use the Install Additional Device
Software SMIT menu option.
• If there is sufficient disk space on the source and target systems, install all device
support. After installing the target system, you can selectively remove the device support
not needed by the target.
• If there is limited disk space on the source and target systems, selectively install the
device support required for the target machines.
Backing Up Your System
8-1
For information on installing optional software, see "Installing Optional Software and Service
Updates" on page 6-1 .
Refer to "Customizing the BOS Install Program" on page 4-1 for information about how to
set installation parameters to enable you to bypass menu prompts when you install the
target machine from a system backup.
If you install the backup image on other systems, you might not, for security reasons, want
passwords and network addresses copied to the target systems. Also, copying network
addresses to a target system creates duplicate addresses that can disrupt network
communications.
Using the SMIT backup menu lets you preserve configuration information, thus avoiding
some of the configuring tasks normally required after restoring a system backup. A backup
preserves the configuration if:
• The target system has the same hardware configuration as the source system.
AND
• The target has enough disk space to hold the backup image.
A backup transfers the following configurations from the source system to the target system:
• Paging space information
• Logical volume information
• rootvg volume group information
• Placement of logical partitions (if the Create Map Files field is set to yes in the SMIT
menu).
Mounting and Unmounting File Systems
The procedure in this chapter backs up only mounted file systems in the root volume group.
You must, therefore, mount all file systems you want to back up before starting. Similarly,
you must unmount file systems you do not want backed up, or use the letc/exclude.rootvg
file to list files you do not want backed up. See "Backing Up Your System" in the
A/X Version 4 System Management Guide: Operating System and Devices for more
information.
This backup procedure backs up files twice if a local directory is mounted over another local
directory in the same file system. For example, if you mount Itmp over lusr/tmp, the files in
the Itmp directory will be backed up twice. This duplication might exceed the number of files
a file system can hold, which can cause a future installation of the backup image to fail.
Restoring a Backup Image
When installing the backup image, the system checks whether the target system has
enough disk space to create all the logical volumes stored on the backup. If there is enough
space, the entire backup is recovered. Otherwise, the installation halts and the system
prompts you to choose more destination hard disks.
File systems created on the target system will be the same size as they were on the source
system, unless the SHRINK variable was set to yes in the image.data file before the
backup image was made. An exception is the Itmp directory, which can be increased to
allocate enough space for the bosboot command. For information about setting variables,
refer to the image.data file in A/X Version 4 Files Reference.
When it finishes installing the backup image, the installation program reconfigures the
Object Data Manager (ODM)on the target system. If the target system does not have
8-2
Installation Guide
exactly the same hardware configuration as the source system, the program may modify
device attributes in the following target system files:
• All files in letc/objrepos beginning with Cu
• All files in the Idev directory
For more information about installing (or restoring) a backup image, see "Installing BOS
from a System Backup" on page 5-1 .
To Back Up Your System
This section provides instructions for backing up your system, including how to back up the
root volume group, verify a backup tape, and back up a user volume group.
Complete the Prerequisites
• All hardware must already be installed, including external devices, such as tape and
CD-ROM drives.
• The sysbr fileset in the BOS System Management Tools and Applications software
package must be installed. Enter the following command to determine if the sysbr fileset
is installed on your system:
lslpp -1 bos.sysmgt.sysbr
If your system has the sysbr fileset installed, continue with either "To Back Up the Root
Volume Group" on page 8-3 or "To Back Up a User Volume Group" on page 8-6.
If the Islpp command does not list the sysbr fileset, install it before continuing with the
backup procedure. Refer to "To Install Software and Service Updates with Custom Install"
on page 6-8 for instructions, or enter the following command:
insta11p -agqXd device bos.sysmgt.sysbr
where device is the location of the software; for example, / dev / rmt 0 for tape drive.
To Back Up the Root Volume Group
Use this procedure to create a system backup, stored either on a tape or in a file. To boot
from a system backup, the backup image must be stored on a tape.
1. Log in as root user.
2. Mount all file systems you want to back up. Refer to the mount command for details.
Note: The mksysb command does not back up file systems mounted across an NFS
network.
3. Unmount any local directories that are mounted over another local directory.
4. Make at least 8.8MB of free disk space available in the Itmp directory. The mksysb
command requires this working space for the duration of the backup.
Use the df command, which reports in units of 512-byte blocks, to determine the free
space in the Itmp directory. Use the chfs command to change the size of the file
system, if necessary.
For example, the following command adds 12MB of disk space to the Itmp directory of a
system with 4MB partitions:
chfs -a size=+24000 /tmp
Backing Up Your System
8-3
5. Enter the following SMIT command:
smit mksysb
(or smit -c mksysb in the AIXwindows environment)
The Back Up the System screen appears, highlighting the Backup DEVICE or File field.
Back Up the System
Type or select values in entry fields.
Press Enter AFTER making all desired changes.
[Entry Fields]
WARNING: Execution of the mksysb command will result
in the loss of all material previously stored on
the selected output medium. This command
backs up only rootvg volume group.
*Backup DEVICE or File
Create MAP files?
EXCLUDE files?
List files as they are backed up?
Generate new limage.data file?
EXPAND Itmp if needed?
(Applies only to bootable tape)
Disable software packing of backup?
Number of BLOCKS to write in a single output
(Leave blank to use a system default)
F1=Help
F5=Reset
F9=Shell
F2=Refresh
F6=Command
F10=Exit
F3=Cancel
F7=Edit
Enter=Do
[]
no
no
no
yes
no
+1
+
+
+
+
+
no
[]
+
#
F4=List
F8=lmage
6. Decide which medium you will use to store the backup and select the Back Up DEVICE
or FILE field. If you want to create a bootable backup, the medium must be tape.
Depending on the medium you chose, follow the appropriate step below:
TAPE
Press the F4 key to list available tape devices and highlight the device
name.
FILE
Enter a full path and file name in the entry field.
7. If you want to create map files, select the Create Map Files? field and press the Tab key
once to change the default value to yes.
Map files match the physical partitions on a drive to its logical partitions. When installing
from a backup image, the BOS installation program uses map files to position the logical
volumes on the target drive in the same partitions they were on in the source system. If
you do not create map files, the installation program relies on the Logical Volume
Manager (LVM) to determine placement for the logical volumes. For more information,
see "Using Map Files for Precise Allocation" in A/X Version 4 System Management
Guide: Operating System and Devices.
8. If you want to exclude certain files from the backup, create the /etc/exclude.rootvg file,
with an ASCII editor, and enter the patterns of file names that you do not want included in
your system backup image. The patterns in this file are input to the pattern matching
conventions of the grep command to determine which files will be excluded from the
8-4
Installation Guide
backup. If you want to exclude files listed in the letc/exclude.rootvg file, select the
Exclude Files field and press the Tab key once to change the default value to yes.
9. If you want each file listed as it is backed up, press the Tab key once to change the
default value of List files as they are backed up? to yes. Otherwise, you will see a
percentage-completed progress message while the backup is created.
10. The image.data file contains information about the sizes of all the file systems and
logical volumes in your rootvg. If you modified the image.data file and don't want a new
file created, press the Tab key once to set the value to no for Generate new limage.data
file?
11 . If you chose to create a bootable tape and you want to expand the system's Itmp file
system (if required by the backup program), press the Tab key once to change the value
for EXPAND Itmp if needed? to yes.
12.lf the tape drive you are using provides packing (or compression), set the Disable
software packing of backup? field to yes.
13.lf you chose tape as the backup medium, select the Number of BLOCKS to write in a
single output field and enter the number of blocks to write for the tape device used to
create the backup image, or leave the field blank to accept the system default.
14.lf you chose file as the backup medium, press the Enter key. If you chose tape as the
backup medium, insert the first blank backup tape into the drive and press the Enter key.
15. The COMMAND STATUS screen appears, showing status messages while the system
makes the backup image.
If you chose tape as the backup medium, the system may prompt you to insert the next
tape during the backup by displaying a message similar to the following:
Mount next Volume on /dev/rmtO and type return.
If this message appears, remove the tape and label it, including the BOS version number.
Then insert another tape and press Enter.
When the backup process finishes, the COMMAND: field changes to OK.
16. Press F10 to exit SMIT when the backup completes.
17.lf you chose tape as the backup medium, remove the last tape and label it. Write-protect
the backup tapes.
18. Record any backed up root and user passwords. Remember, these passwords will be
active if you use the backup to either restore this system or install another system.
You have created the backup of your root volume group (rootvg). If you created bootable
tapes, these tapes can be used to start your system if for some reason you cannot boot from
hard disks.
To Verify a Backup Tape
Use this procedure to list the contents of a mksysb backup tape. The contents list verifies
most of the information on the tape, but does not verify that the tape can be booted for
installations. The only way to verify that the boot image on a mksysb tape functions properly
is by booting from the tape.
1. Enter the following SMIT command:
Backing Up Your System
8-5
smit lsmksysb
(or smi t -c lsmksysb in the AIXwindows environment)
The List Files in a System Image screen appears.
Note: Do not press the Enter key until you finish providing values in the entry fields.
2. Either type the tape device name in the DEVICE or FILE field, or accept the value given.
3. Either type the number of blocks to read for your tape device in the Number of BLOCKS
field, or leave it blank to accept the system default.
4. Press the Enter key.
The COMMAND STATUS screen appears, listing the contents of the backup tape.
To Back Up a User Volume Group
Back up user volume groups, to images different than root volume group images, with the
following SMITcommand:
smit savevg
(or smit -c savevg in the AIXwindows environment)
The Save a Volume Group screen appears. Use the steps for backing up the root volume
group as a guide for backing up user volume groups, with the following exception: If you
want to exclude files in a user volume group from the backup image, create a file named
/etc/exclude. volume_group_name, where volume_group_name is the name of the volume
group you want to backup. Then edit /etc/exclude. volume_group_name and enter the
patterns of file names that you do not want included in your backup image. The patterns in
this file are input to the pattern matching conventions of the grep command to determine
which files will be excluded from the backup.
8-6
Installation Guide
Chapter 9. Troubleshooting
This chapter suggests solutions for typical installation problems. Refer to "Acting on System
and Error Messages" on page 10-1 and A/X Version 4 Messages Guide and Reference for
information about error messages that appear during an installation.
Creating Bootable Tapes
Following is the procedure for creating a bootable tape, which you might use to maintain
your AIX Version 4.2 Base Operating System (BOS). The tape works only with a copy of
BOS that is the same version as the BOS used to create them. Earlier versions of BOS
required bootable diskettes. To create bootable diskettes for an earlier version, refer to the
documentation for that version.
1. To create the Ibosinst.data file, enter:
cp /var/adm/ras/bosinst.data /bosinst.data
or enter:
cp /usr/1pp/bosinst/bosinst.ternp1ate /bosinst.data
2. To create the limage.data file, enter:
mkszfi1e
Note: This file is created by the mksysb command.
3. Put a tape in the drive.
4. Make sure the Tape Device Block size is set to 512.
To check the Tape Device Block size, enter:
/dev/rmtTapeDriveNamestatus
where rmt TapeDriveName is the name of the tape drive you are using (for example,
tct1 -f
rmtO).
To change the Tape Device Block size, enter:
chdev -1
rmtTapeDriveName -a b1ock_size=512
5. Make sure the tape is rewound. To rewind the tape, enter:
tct1 -f/dev/rmt TapeDriveName rewind
6. To create the boot image on the tape, enter:
bosboot -ad /dev/rmt TapeDriveName.l
7. To create the BOS Install/Maintenance image on the tape, enter:
mkinsttape
/dev/rmtTapeDriveName.l
8. If the Tape Device Block size was changed in step 2, be sure to set it back to its previous
size. To change the Tape Device Block size, enter:
rmtTapeDriveName -a b1ock_size=BlockSize
where B/ockSize is the previous Tape Device Block size.
chdev -1
Troubleshooting
9-1
Accessing a System That Will Not Boot
The procedure in this section describes how to access a system that will not boot from the
hard disk. Read "Troubleshooting Installation from a System Backup" on page 9-7 for
instructions if a mksysb backup tape fails to boot.
This procedure enables you to get a system prompt so that you may attempt to recover data
from the system or perform corrective action that will enable the system to boot from the
hard disk.
Notes:
1. This procedure is intended only for experienced users who have knowledge of
how to boot or recover data from a system that is unable to boot from the hard
disk. Most users should not attempt this procedure but instead should follow local
problem-reporting procedures.
2. This procedure is not intended for users who have just completed a New
Installation, because the system will not contain data that needs to be recovered.
If you are unable to boot from the hard disk after completing a New Installation,
follow your local problem-reporting procedures.
The following steps summarize the procedure for accessing a system that will not boot.
1. Boot the system from Volume 1 of the BOS CD-ROM or stacked bootable system
installation tape.
2. Select maintenance options.
3. Recover data or perform corrective action using the system prompt.
Prerequisites
• Your system cannot be booted from the hard disk.
• All hardware is installed.
• AIX Version 4.2 Base Operating System (BOS) is installed.
• Your system unit is set to Off.
• Obtain the system key for the key lock (if present) on your system unit.
To Access the System
Use this procedure if you are unable to boot from the hard disk. The beginning of this
procedure is similar to the one you used to install the Base Operating System. You will, .
however, be using the maintenance screens instead of the installation screens to complete
this procedure. The maintenance screen illustrations in this procedure are provided as
examples only. The actual online screens may be somewhat different in appearance.
1. Turn the system key (if present) to the Service position.
2. Turn on all attached external devices, such as terminals, CD-ROM drives, tape drives,
monitors, and external disk drives before turning on the system unit. Do not turn the
system unit on until step 5. Turning on the external devices first is necessary so that the
system unit can identify them during the startup (boot) process.
• If you are booting from a network device, refer to AIX Version 4.2 Network Installation
Management Guide and Reference.
• If you are not booting from a network device, go to Step 3.
9-2
Installation Guide
3. Insert Volume 1 of the installation media into the tape or CD-ROM drive. Some CD-ROM
drives have a removable disc caddy, while others have a sliding drawer. If the CD-ROM
drive on your system has a sliding drawer, place the CD-ROM in the drawer and push the
drawer in. If the CD-ROM drive on your system does not have a sliding drawer, insert the
CD-ROM into the disc caddy and then insert the caddy into the CD-ROM drive.
Notes:
• You may find that on specific hardware, the tape drive door will not open while
the system unit is turned off. If you have trouble opening the tape drive door
during installation, use the following procedure:
a. Turn the system unit on.
b. Insert the AIX Version 4.2 BaS tape (insert Volume 1 if you received more
than one volume).
c. Turn the system unit off and wait 30 seconds.
• On some models that have a door to the tape drive, there may be a waiting
period of up to three minutes before the tape drive door opens after you have
pressed the button to open the tape drive. Some models also require that the
button for the tape drive door be held in the pressed position for a few seconds
before the tape drive door will open.
• On some models, the eject button must be pressed for at least 2 seconds to
eject a CD-ROM that is already in the disc caddy.
4. If you are not using an ASCII terminal, skip to step 5. If you are using an ASCII terminal,
set the communications options as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Line Speed (baud rate) = 9600
Word Length (bits per character) = 8
Parity = no (none)
Number of Stop Bits = 1
Interface = RS-232C (or RS-422A)
Line Control = IPRTS
Set the keyboard and display options as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Screen = Normal
Rowand Column = 24x80
Scroll = jump
Auto LF (line feed) = off
Line Wrap = on
Forcing Insert = line (or both)
Tab =field
Operating Mode = echo
Turnaround Character = CR
Enter = return
Return = new line
New Line =CR
Send = page
Insert Character = space
Troubleshooting
9-3
Note: If your terminal is an IBM 3151, 3161, or 3164, press the Ctrl+Setup keys to
display the Setup Menu and follow the on-screen instructions to set these options.
If you are using some other ASCII terminal, refer to the appropriate documents
for information about how to set these options. Some terminals have different
option names and settings than those listed here.
5. Turn the system unit power switch to the On position. The system begins booting from
the installation media. If your system is booting from tape, it is normal for the tape to
move back and forth. After several minutes, c31 is displayed in the LED.
If you have more than one console, each terminal and direct-attach display device (or
console) may display a screen that directs you to press a key to identify your system
console. A different key is specified for each terminal displaying this screen. If this screen
is displayed, then press the specified key on the device to be used as the system
console. The system console is the keyboard and display device used for installation and
system administration. Press a key on only one console.
6. Enter option 3 to select Start Maintenance Mode for System Recovery from the
Welcome to the Base Operating System Installation and Maintenance screen when it is
displayed.
Note: If you customized the bosinst.data file in your installation media to specify a
nonprompted installation, the installation and maintenance screens will not be
displayed. The system will instead reboot from the installation media using the
settings already defined in the bosinst.data file. To access the installation and
maintenance screens, you need to override the nonprompted mode. An
opportunity to do this occurs when three zeros are displayed on the screen.
When you observe the three zeros, enter 000 (zeros) at the terminal.
Welcome to Base Operating System
Installation and Maintenance
Type the number of your choice and press Enter.
Start Install Now with Default Settings
2 Change/Show Installation Settings and Install
3 Start Maintenance Mode for System Recovery
88 Help?
Choice:
You can select 88 to display help on this or any subsequent screen.
9-4
Installation Guide
After you have selected the Start Maintenance Mode for System Recovery option, the
Maintenance screen is displayed.
Maintenance
Type the number of your choice and press Enter.
»> 1 Access a Root Volume Group
2 Copy a System Dump to Removable Media
3 Access Advanced Maintenance Functions
4 Install from a System Backup
88 Help?
99 Previous Menu
»> Choice [1]:
7. Select option 1, Access a Root Volume Group, from the Maintenance screen. The
Warning screen is displayed.
8. Read through the information displayed on the Warning screen. When you are ready to
continue, type 0 and press Enter. The Access a Root Volume Group screen is displayed.
Access a Root Volume Group
Type the number for a volume group to display logical volume information
and press Enter.
1) Volume Group 00002433a01 d4c83 contains these disks:
hdisk3 670 00-07-00-10
hdisk4 670 00-07-00-20
hdisk5 670 00-07-00-30
2) Volume Group 00002433c9a746ca contains these disks:
hdiskO 857 00-08-00-10
3) Volume Group 00002433ge3f1037 contains these disks:
hdisk1 857 00-08-00-00
4) Volume Group 00002433c880188a contains these disks:
hdisk2 670 00-07-00-00
»> Choice [3]:
Troubleshooting
9-5
9. Select the option for the root volume group whose logical volume information you want to
display. The Access a Root Volume Group screen lists all of the volume groups (root and
otherwise) on your system. After entering your selection, the Volume Group Information
screen is displayed.
Volume Group Information
Volume Group 10 00002433ge3f1037 includes the following logical volumes:
hd6
hd9var
hd5
hd7
hd3 afs_cache
hd8
fslvOO
hd4
hd
Type the number of your choice and press Enter.
1 Access this Volume Group and start a shell.
2 Access this Volume Group and start a shell before mounting
file systems.
99 Previous Menu
»> Choice [99]:
Note: Reviewing the disk and location code information on the Volume Group
Information screen enables you to determine whether the volume group you
selected was the root volume group. You can return to the Access a Root Volume
Group screen if the choice you made was not the root volume group. If you have
not chosen a root volume group, you will not be able to continue beyond the
Volume Group Information screen.
10.Select one of the options from the Volume Group Information screen and press Enter.
Each option does the following:
Choice 1
Access this volume group and start a shell. Selecting this choice
imports and activates the volume group and mounts the file systems for
this root volume group before providing you with a shell and a system
prompt.
Choice 2
Access this volume group and start a shell before mounting file
systems. Selecting this choice imports and activates the volume group
and provides you with a shell and system prompt before mounting the
file systems for this root volume group.
Choice 99
Entering 99 returns you to the Access a Root Volume Group screen.
After either choice 1 or 2 is selected and processed, a shell and system prompt are
displayed.
11. Take appropriate measures to recover data or take action (such as using the bosboot
command) to enable the system to boot normally.
9-6
Installation Guide
Troubleshooting an Installation from a System Backup
This section describes solutions for common problems when installing from a system image
created with the mksysb command.
Bootup Failure
If a backup tape fails to boot, you can still install using a mksysb image stored on the tape.
Boot the machine from Volume 1 of the AIX product media, then install the backup from
Maintenance mode. Refer to "Installing BOS from CD-ROM or Tape" on page 2-1 for
instructions on booting from product media. Follow the instructions to the point when the
Welcome to the Base Operating System Installation and Maintenance screen is displayed.
Booting from the Product CD-ROM
Complete the following steps when the Welcome screen is displayed:
1. Choose the Start Maintenance Mode for System Recovery option.
The Maintenance screen is displayed.
2. Choose the Install from a System Backup option.
The Choose Tape Drive screen is displayed.
3. Choose the drive containing the backup tape.
The system reads the tape and begins the installation.
4. Do not remove the CD from the CD-ROM drive.
The system reads the kernel and device support required on the target system from the
CD.
5. Return to step 7 on page 5-4 in "Installing BOS from a System Backup" and continue the
instructions for installing the backup.
Note: The Use Maps option is not supported in Maintenance Mode. The section Prompted
Installation "Prompted Installation" on page 3 includes a description of the use of
maps on disks selected in the System Backup Installation and Settings screen.
Booting from the Product Tape
1. Create a diskette that contains a .Isignature file that contains the characters 'data' and a
.Ibosinst.data file with SWITCH_TO_PRODUCT_TAPE yes in the control_flow
stanza. See "Customizing the BOS Install Program" on page 4-1 for information on
creating these files.
=
2. Insert the diskette that you created in Step 1 into the diskette drive.
3. Boot the system from Volume 1 of the product tape.
4. Choose the Start Maintenance Mode for System Recovery option when the Welcome
screen is displayed.
The Maintenance screen is displayed.
5. Choose the Install from a System Backup option.
6. Remove the product tape from the tape drive and insert the mksysb tape.
The Choose Tape Drive screen is displayed.
7. Choose the drive containing the backup tape.
Troubleshooting
9-7
The system reads the tape and begins the installation.
Note: The system will prompt you to remove the mksysb tape and insert the product
tape after the mksysb backup has been restored.
8. Return to step 7 on page 5-4 in "Installing BOS from a System Backup" and continue the
instructions for installing the backup.
Note: The Use Maps option is not supported in Maintenance Mode. The section "Prompted
Installation" on page 5-6 includes a description of the use of maps on disks selected
in the System Backup Installation and Settings screen.
Source and Target Differences
Consider the differences in the source and target systems when planning an installation
from a mksysb backup.
The original system image made with the mksysb command might not match your present
configuration. For example, if you changed devices after backing up your system, the
original source image does not have the correct device drivers for the target system. Avoid
system inequalities such as different communication adapters, TTY attributes, and printer
attributes. If you are using the Common Desktop Environment (CDE) on the target system,
make all configuration changes, then shutdown and reboot the system before you start CDE.
The same suggestion applies when using a backup image to install additional systems. First
configure the source system with drivers required for the target, then create the backup.
Suggestions for Reported Problems
The following troubleshooting tips apply to reported problems with installations from a
mksysb image:
• Check that you have sufficient free blocks in the file systems to write temporary files.
• Check that each file system has at least 500 blocks free when the mksysb backup image
is made. The system will need some work space in each file system when installing from
a mksysb backup image.
• Check that you are using the correct tape type for the density setting selected.
• Check that the tape is
not write protected.
• Clean the tape drive at the recommended intervals and use only approved data-grade
tapes (not video tapes for 8 mm).
• 7206 4-mm Digital Audio Tape (OAT) tape drives use only OAT tapes marked with the
Dataphone Digital Services (DDS) symbol. Any other OAT tapes (for example, voice
grade) will not work.
• Check the /smit.log file for any errors from SMIT.
• Check that your mksysb backup image contains an image.data file. If you create the
mksysb backup image through SMIT, it is done automatically. If you run mksysb from
the command line, you must either run the mkszfile command first, or use the -i flag with
the mksysb command.
Cleaning Up Optional Software and Service Updates
This procedure describes how to clean up after an interrupted installation of optional
software products. The cleanup procedure attempts to delete software products that were
partially installed or that have been left in an "ing" state. For example, if your attempt to
9-8
Installation Guide
install a service update was not successful, the update may be in the "applying" rather than
the "applied" state. The "ing" states (applying, committing, rejecting, removing) indicate that
the action you were attempting did not complete successfully. The output of the Islpp
command with the -I option indicates the state of the software products on the system.
The cleanup procedure attempts to revert the product to its previous state. For example, if
you are cleaning up an update that is in the committing state, the cleanup procedure
attempts to return the update to the applied state. If you have a product in the committing
state or an update in the applying state, then the cleanup procedure attempts to delete the
failed installation and restore the previous version of the product (if there is one). In this
case, the previous version of the product becomes the active version. If the previous version
of the product cannot be restored, then the software product enters the BROKEN state. If
the cleanup procedure has deleted the product or if the product is in the BROKEN state, you
can attempt to reinstall the software. Any product that was already in the BROKEN state
cannot be cleaned up; it can only be reinstalled or removed.
The system automatically performs a cleanup when an installation cannot be completed
because of a failure or interruption. Normally, the only condition under which you may have
to use the cleanup procedure described in this section is if the system shuts down or loses
power during an installation or if the installation process terminates abnormally.
Occasionally, you will be prompted to reboot (restart) the system after running the cleanup
procedure.
For more information on the cleanup process and the output from the installp command
(which includes the different software states), refer to "Optional Software Installation and
Update Concepts" on page A-1 .
Note: This procedure applies only to the installation of optional software products. If your
AIX Version 4.2 Base Operating System installation was unsuccessful, go to
"Accessing a System That Will Not Boot" on page 9-2.
This section contains a procedure for cleaning up software with the System Management
Interface Tool (SMIT) and information about cleaning up software with the Maintain Software
Manager graphical interface. The installp -C command can also be used to clean up
software.
Troubleshooting
9-9
The following flowchart outlines the cleanup procedure for a failed optional software
installation.
No
Use either the SMIT or the
Maintain Software Manager
application to clean up the
software.
The clean up
procedure cannot
be run on
BROKEN software.
The software
update must
be reinstalled.
If necessary, reinstall
the software.
To Clean Up Software with SMIT
This procedure describes how to clean up your system after an unsuccessful installation of
software other than the Base Operating System. Perform this procedure if the system
instructed you to perform a cleanup when you attempted to install optional software.
1. Log in as root user.
2. Enter the following SMIT command:
smit install_update
(or smit -C install_update in the AIXwindows environment)
The Install and Update Software screen is displayed.
3. Select the Clean Up After a Failed Installation option. The system performs the
following tasks:
• Attempts to delete software products that were partially installed.
• Attempts to revert to the previous version of any deleted products.
9-10
Installation Guide
If the system successfully reverts to the previous version, it becomes the currently
active version. If this cannot be done, then the software product is marked as
BROKEN.
The COMMAND STATUS screen is displayed.
4. When the Command: status field changes to OK in the upper-left corner of the screen,
you have two choices:
• If the cleanup process completes successfully, you can attempt to reinstall the
software.
• If you get a message indicating that no products were found that could be cleaned up,
then you may have executed the cleanup procedure when it was not needed. Try your
installation again. If you get a message indicating that you need to clean up a failed
installation, contact your point of sale for assistance.
To Clean Up Software with a VSM Application
If the installation you are performing with a Visual System Management (VSM) application
(Easy Install or Install or Update Software Manager) fails, attempt to restart the installation.
A pop-up window displays, indicating that the software needs to be cleaned up. After
performing the cleanup operation, restart the installation process. See AIX Version 4 Getting
Started for information about how to access the desktop and how to work with VSM
applications.
Troubleshooting a Full/usr File System
To free up space in a full/usr file system, complete one or more of the following tasks:
• Enter installp -c all to commit all updates and free up space in the lusr file
system.
• If the system is not a Network Installation Management (NIM) system serving a Shared
Product Object Tree (SPOT), enter lusr Ilibl instIl inurid -r to remove client
information for root file system installations. For information about NIM and SPOTs, see
AIX Version 4.2 Network Installation Management Guide and Reference.
• Remove software that you do not need. See "Maintaining Optional Software" on page 7-1.
BOS Install Logs
Information saved in BOS installation log files may help you determine the cause of
installation problems. To view BOS installation log files, enter cd Ivar I adml ras and view
the bosinst.log, bosmenus.log, and devinst.log files in this directory.
Using the snap Problem Determination Tool
The snap command assists you in compiling system configuration information quickly and
easily. Once this information is compiled, you can view it and compress it for downloading to
diskette or tape or for remote transmission. You may be asked by support specialists to
execute the snap command to help them accurately identify your system problem.
Troubleshooting
9-11
Disk Space Requirements
Approximately 8 MB of temporary disk space is required when executing al/ of the snap
options on an average system. If only one or two options are chosen, the disk space
required will be substantially less, depending on the option. The program automatically
checks for free space in the Itmp/ibmsupt directory or the directory specified with the -d
flag. If there is not enough space, you will have to expand the file system. You can suppress
this check for free space by using the -N option.
Output Directory
The default directory for the output from the snap command is Itmp/ibmsupt. If you desire
to name an optional directory, use the -d option with the path of the desired output directory.
Each execution of the snap command appends to previously created files. See "Cleaning
Up Optional Software and Service Updates" on page 9-8 for instructions on cleaning up the
files.
Execution Permissions
Only root has execute permissions for this command.
Cleanup
The cleanup option, -r, should be used to remove the information saved by the snap
command and to retrieve disk space.
Options
The main options of the snap command are:
-g
Gathers the output of the Islpp -L command. Support specialists use the
output to re-create your operating system environment if other problem
determination techniques fail. The output is stored in
Itmp/ibmsuptJgeneral/lslpp.L. Also, the -g flag gathers general system
information and outputs it to Itmp/ibmsuptJgeneral/general.snap.
-0
Gathers dump and lunix (assumes dump device to be Idev/hd7).
-a
Gathers information for all of the groups.
-c
Creates a compressed tar image of all files in the Itmp/ibmsupt directory
tree (or other output directory).
Note: Other information that is not gathered by the snap command can be
copied to the snap directory tree before executing the tar/compress
option.
For example, you may be asked by the support specialist to provide
a test case that demonstrates the problem. The test case should be
copied to the Itmp/ibmsupt directory. When the -c option of the
snap command is executed, the test case will be included.
9-12
-0
Creates a tar file and downloads it to removable media.
-v
Displays the output of the commands executed by the snap command.
Installation Guide
Before executing the snap -c or snap -0 commands, any additional information required by
the Support Center should be copied to the Itmp/ibmsuptltestcase directory (or an
alternate directory).
The snap -c and snap -0 commands are mutually exclusive. Do not execute both during
the same problem-determination session. The snap -c command should be used to
transmit information electronically. The snap -0 command should be used to transmit
information on a removable output device.
To View the Usage Instructions
For instructions on how to gather information on selected groups (kernel, printer, SNA, NFS,
TCP/IP, security, async, language, and file system), enter the snap command, with no
options, at the system prompt:
snap
Recovery
If you think a command started by the snap command is suspended due to an inaccessible
server, first press Ctrl+C. Then enter one of the following commands:
Enter
For no action; return to current operation.
s
To attempt to kill current operation.
q
To quit snap.
Troubleshooting
9-13
9-14
Installation Guide
Chapter 10. Acting on System and Error Messages
This section lists messages that can appear during the installation of AIX Version 4.2.
Information about each message is organized in the following manner:
System Message
The system message is displayed in bold type.
Explanation
Describes what is likely to have caused the system message to be
displayed.
System Action
Describes what the system does after the message is displayed.
User Action
Suggests a possible resolution to the problem suggested by the
system message.
0516-404 allocp: Not enough resources available to fulfill allocation. Either not
enough free partitions or not enough physical volumes to keep strictness. Try again
with different allocation characteristics.
0516-788: extendlv: Unable to extend logical volume
0503-008 installp: There is not enough free disk space in file system lusr (506935
more 512-byte blocks are required.) An attempt to extend this file system was
unsuccessful. Make more space available, then retry this operation.
Explanation
There is not enough space to complete the installation.
System Action The installation cannot begin until the problem is resolved.
User Action
• Select fewer filesets than the number originally selected for installation.
• Extend the root volume group to another disk. Enter:
extendvg rootvg hdiskNumber
where Number is the number of the specified disk.
• Remove user-defined file systems to free up space in the rootvg file
system.
• Follow the instructions in "Troubleshooting a Full /usr File System" on
page 9-11.
Acting on System and Error Messages
10-1
BOS Install: After saving all the data from the previous system into Itmp, it was
discovered that there will not be enough free space in Itmp to make the boot image.
Please reboot in normal mode and increase the size of Itmp or reduce the number of
files to save as listed in the letc/preserve.list file.
Explanation
During a preservation install, files listed in letc/preserve.list were copied
to Itmp. After doing so, there was not enough room in Itmp to create the
boot image.
System Action Installation cannot continue.
User Action
Reboot in normal mode and increase the size of Itmp or reduce the number
of files to be saved.
BOS Install: You chose to create logical volumes mapped exactly as they were on the
previous disks, but there are no map files specified in the image.data file.
Explanation
=
On system backup restore, EXACT_FIT yes was specified in the
image.data file, but no map files were specified in the image.data file.
System Action No prompt mode is terminated, the user is prompted.
User Action
Run the mkszfile with the -m option before creating the system backup
tape.
or
Do not specify EXACT_FIT
=yes in the image.data file.
BOS Install: Could not create boot image.
Explanation
The bosboot command failed.
System Action The boot image was not created.
User Action
Check the Ivar/adm/ras/devinst.log file for errors.
The bosinst.data file does not specify any bootable disks.
Explanation
The bosinst.data file does not specify any bootable disks.
System Action No-prompt mode is terminated, and the user is prompted.
User Action
When the system prompts, select bootable disks to install on.
or
Add a bootbale disk to the bosinst.data file target_disk_data stanzas.
The bosinst.data file specified doing a migration install, but there is no existing root
volume group of level 3.2 or 4.1.
Explanation
An BOS installation method of migration was specified in the bosinst.data
file, but the existing volume group is at level 3.1 or 4.2.
System Action This error only occurs during a nonprompted BOS installation. The
installation menus are displayed.
User Action
10-2
Installation Guide
Respond to the menu prompts to complete the installation.
The bosinst.data file specified doing either a migration or a preservation install, but
there is no existing root volume group.
Explanation
A BOS installation method of migration or preserve was specified in the
bosinst.data file, but no root volume group was found.
System Action This error only occurs during a nonprompted BOS installation. The
installation menus are displayed.
User Action
Respond to the menu prompts to complete the installation.
The data file did not specify enough disk space to contain the operating system.
Explanation
No-prompt mode was specified, and there were not enough disks specified
in the bosinst.data file to hold the operating system.
System Action No-prompt mode is terminated, the user is prompted.
User Action
When the system prompts, select disks to install on.
or
Add more target_disk_data stanzas to bosinst.data file.
Duplicate lv_data stanzas specified in the image.data file. The installation cannot
continue because data may be lost.
Explanation
An lv_data stanza was duplicated in the image.data file.
System Action Installation cannot continue.
User Action
Correct the problem and try the installation again.
Duplicate fs_data stanzas specified in the image.data file. The installation cannot
continue because data may be lost.
Explanation
An fs_data stanza was duplicated in the image.data file.
System Action Installation cannot continue.
User Action
Correct the problem and try the installation again.
The following disks failed the preliminary diagnostic tests: <disk name>
Explanation:
bosset: No hard disks can be accessed.
Explanation
The listed disks failed pretest.
System Action The system initiated a diagnostic pretest on the specified disk.
User Action
Run full diagnostics on the specified disks.
Acting on System and Error Messages
1 0-3
Disks specified in bosinst.data do not define a root volume group.
Explanation
No-prompt mode was specified, and the install method was set to preserve
, or migrate, and the disks specified in bosinst.data do not define a root
volume group.
System Action No-prompt mode is terminated, and the user is prompted.
User Action
When the system prompts, select a root volume group to install on.
or
Specify disks in the bosinst.data file that define a root volume group.
Encountered an unrecoverable error.
Explanation
The menus subsystem encountered an unrecoverable error.
System Action The menu is restarted.
User Action
None
The image.data file contains no vg_data stanza for rootvg. The installation cannot
continue.
Explanation
The image.data file is incomplete.
System Action Installation cannot continue.
User Action
Use the default image.data file supplied with product media.
image.data has invalid logical volume data. Cannot continue.
Explanation
The system could not parse the logical volume data stanzas in the
image.data file.
System Action Installation cannot continue.
User Action
Use the default image.data file supplied with product media.
image.data has invalid file system data. Cannot continue.
Explanation
The system detected invalid file system data stanzas in the image.data file.
System Action Installation cannot continue.
User Action
10-4
Installation Guide
Use the default image.data file supplied with product media.
0516-366 putlvodm: Volume group rootvg is locked. Try again.
0516-788: extendlv: Unable to extend logical volume.
0503-008 installp: There is not enough free disk space in file system lusr (506935
more 512-byte blocks are required.) An attempt to extend this file system was
unsuccessful. Make more space available, then retry this operation.
Explanation
You interrupted the installation of your optional software.
System Action Sometimes, when an installation is interrupted, the system locks the root
volume group.
User Action
You must unlock the root volume group. Then attempt the installation
procedure again.
To unlock a root volume group:
1. Be sure you have logged in as root.
2. Enter chvg -u rootvg
3. Enter smi t_install and attempt to install your optional software
products again.
installp: An error occurred during bosboot processing.
Please correct the problem and rerun.
0301-52 bosboot: not enough file space to create: Itmp/disk.image.
OR
0301-152 bosboot: not enough file space to create: Itmp/unix.
Explanation
The bosboot command was unable to finish processing because of
insufficient space in Itmp.
System Action The bosboot process is interrupted. The error message, the amount of disk
space required, and the available disk space are displayed. The disk space
required indicates the number of 1024KB blocks required.
User Action
Free up space in the Itmp file system or extend the Itmp file system.
Continue or restart the installation process.
To resize the Itmp file system and complete the installation:
1. Note the error message preceding this one. Either the message
bosboot verification starting orbosboot process
start ing will precede this message.
2. Change directories to Itmp. List the files and determine which can be
deleted. If there is sufficient space available, go to step 6. If you need to
expand Itmp, continue this procedure.
3. Enter smi t chf s
4. Select the Itmp file system from the displayed list.
5. Add the additional block space required. The smit chfs command
requires disk space to be defined in S12KB blocks. Double the required
disk space displayed in the system message.
6. If the message installp: An error occurred during bosboot
processing was displayed after the message bosboot
verification starting, rerun the installation procedure.
Acting on System and Error Messages
10-5
OR
If the message installp: An error occurred during bosboot
processing was displayed after the message bosboot process
starting, enter installp -c. Continue the installation process.
installp: An error occurred during bosboot processing.
Please correct the problem and rerun.
301-155 bosboot: Invalid or no boot device specified.
Explanation
An invalid device is specified with the bosboot -d command. The bosboot
command was unable to finish processing because it could not locate the
required boot device. The installp command calls the bosboot command
with Idev/ipldevice. If this error does occur, it is probably because
Idev/ipldevice does not exist. Idev/ipldevice is a link to the boot disk.
System Action The bosboot process is interrupted.
User Action
Determine if the link to the boot device is missing or incorrect, correct the
error and complete the installation process.
To identify the boot device and complete the installation:
1. To identify the boot disk, enter 1 s 1 v -m hd5. The boot disk name is
displayed.
2. Create a link between the boot device indicated and the Idev/ipldevice
file. Enter:
ln /dev/ boot_device_name Idev / ipldevice
(An example of booLdevice_name is rhdiskO.)
OR
3. If the message installp: An error occurred during bosboot
processing was displayed after the message bosboot
verification starting, rerun the installation procedure.
OR
If the message installp: An error occurred during bosboot
processing was displayed after the message bosboot process
starting, enter installp -c. Continue the installation process.
10-6
Installation Guide
Invalid table of contents.
Explanation
The installation of the operating system from a stacked tape (a bootable
tape with multiple software images) was unable to verify the validity of the
tape TOC. A valid TOC has a numeric string in the following format:
single_digit_number 12_digit_number single_digit_number
as the first entry in the TOC. For example, 1 042309235291 1 is a valid
TOC header. The TOC records the tape position installable images. Without
a valid TOC, the installation process cannot locate and install installable
images.
System Action The installation process returns to the System Settings menu.
User Action
Recreate your tape with a valid table of contents or contact your point of
sale for assistance. If you have another system installed, access
InfoExplorer for an explanation of how to recreate your tape.
The media contains an image designed for installing the base operating system.
Explanation
You have chosen Install the operating system from media
that was created with the 'smit install_assist' or
'mksysb' command. However, the media you are installing from contains
a BOS image. A mksysb image is an installable backup (backup format) of
a root volume group. This type of image can be created via the smit
instalLassist command or the mksysb command. Options 1 and 2 on the
second installation menu determine the installation type. Consequently, the
installation media must contain the corresponding image type (mksysb or
BOS).
System Action Installation cannot begin until the problem is resolved.
User Action
You have several options:
• Provide a mksysb image and continue with installation.
OR
• Return to the Main Installation menu, select the option to install the
operating system from factory media (option 1), and continue with the
installation.
OR
• Follow your local problem-reporting procedures.
The media contains an image designed for installing a mksysb image.
Explanation
You have chosen Install the operating system from factory
media, but the media contains an image that is an installable backup (tar
format) of a root volume group. This type of image is created with the smit
startup or the mksysb commands. Options 1 and 2 on the main
installation menu determine the installation type. Consequently the
installation media must contain the corresponding image type (mksysb or
BOS).
System Action The install process has returned to the Current System Settings menu.
User Action
You have several options:
• Provide a BOS image and continue with installation.
Acting on System and Error Messages
10-7
OR
• Return to the Main Installation menu, select the option to install a
mksysb image (option 2), and continue with the installation.
OR
• Follow your local problem reporting procedures.
Missing image.data file. The tape does not contain a valid install image.
Explanation
The system could not find an image.data file.
System Action Installation cannot continue.
User Action
The most likely cause of this error is the tape is bad. Try a different tape.
0512-004 mksysb: The I.fs.size file does not exist. System backup canceled.
Explanation
Either the I or Itmp file system is not large enough, or the mksysb
command was run from a command line without first running the mkszfile
command.
System Action The mksysb command did not find the I.fs.size file.
User Action
Enter the mkszfile command, then enter the mksysb command again.
0512-0016 mksysb: Attempt to create a bootable tape failed: bosboot -d Idev/device
-a failed with return code xxx.
OR
0512-0016 mksysb: Attempt to create a bootable tape failed: mkinsttape Idev/device
failed with return code xxx.
Explanation
The xxx return code indicates the error:
5 OR 1
Not enough space in one or more of three file systems:
• I must have at least 500 1KB blocks.
• Itmp must have at least 7400 1KB blocks.
• lusr must have at least 4000 1KB blocks.
11
Defective tape.
42 or 45
Either the lusr/lib/bootlunix file is corrupted (may be 0
length) or the link to lunix is missing.
48
Cannot write to the tape drive or cannot read Idev/blv.
This is probably caused by an incorrect density setting for
the tape drive. It could also be caused by either a
hardware problem with the tape drive or by dirty heads on
the drive.
System Action The mksysb command failed to make a bootable tape.
User Action
The return code xxx indicates the action required:
5 OR 1
10-8
Installation Guide
Check the I, Itmp, and lusr file systems and create more
space as required.
11
Replace the defective tape.
42 or 45
Either restore the lusr/lib/bootlunix file from the original
tape or create the missing link.
48
Check the tape drive settings and clean the heads.
No disks are available.
Explanation
No hard disks are configured on the system. Consequently, the only
functioning menu option is the maintenance option. The devices that the
configuration process was able to locate are listed in the
letc/objrepos/devs file.
System Action Installation cannot begin until the problem is resolved.
User Action
You have several options:
• View the devices file from the maintenance shell by typing the following
command:
cat /etc/objrepos/devs
OR
• Turn the system off and check the following on systems with SCSI
devices:
- Check all SCSI devices to ensure that all SCSI addresses are unique.
- Make sure the SCSI cards are properly terminated.
- If external SCSI devices are in use, make sure that the SCSI chain is
terminated and that the devices are turned on.
- Check the SCSI cabling and connections.
-
Reboot and attempt the install again.
OR
• Turn the system off and check the following on systems with IDE
devices:
- Check all IDE devices to ensure that all IDE master and slave
settings are unique per controller. If only one IDE device is connected
to a controller, it must be set to master. If an ATA device (disk) and
an ATAPI device (CD-ROM or tape) are connected to the same
controller, the ATA device must be set to the master device and the
ATAPI device must be set as the slave device.
- Check the IDE cabling and connections.
- Reboot and attempt the install again.
OR
• Boot from the diagnostics tape or CD-ROM and check the hard disks.
OR
• Follow your local problem-reporting procedures.
Acting on System and Error Messages
10-9
No entry for bos.rte in the table of contents.
Explanation
The installation of the operating system from a stacked tape (a bootable
tape with multiple software images) was unable to locate an entry for a
BOS image in the tape TOC. Without a BOS entry in the TOC, the
installation process cannot locate and install the BOS image.
System Action The installation process returns to the Current System Settings menu.
User Action
Ensure that the BOS image on the stacked tape is in the same position as
listed in the table of contents. Otherwise, contact your point of sale for
assistance.
There are no disks on this system which can be booted.
Explanation
The system could not find any bootable disks on the system.
System Action Installation cannot continue.
User Action
Some third-party disks are not bootable. If a disk should be bootable but is
not, run diagnostics.
You chose to install only onto disks which are not contained in a volume group, but
there are not enough of those disks to contain the mksysb image.
Explanation
The EXISTING_SYSTEM_OVERWRITE field in bosinst.data was set to
no, and prompt was set to no, and there were not enough disks on the
system which had no volume group on them.
System Action No-prompt mode is terminated, the user is prompted.
User Action
If you want the system to select which disks to install on, set
EXISTING_SYSTEM_OVERWRITE in the bosisnt.data file to yes.
OR
When the system prompts, select disks to install on.
10-10
Installation Guide
Chapter 11. Viewing README Files
This chapter describes how to view README files, which contain information not included
in other documentation. The 8ase Operating System (80S) includes a README file. Each
software product may also have its own README file with new information specific to that
product. After you install 80S, view these files to learn important changes before using your
system.
Use the following procedure to view the README files for 8ase Operating System
(80S) software and optional software products:
1. Log in as root user if you have not already done so.
2. Enter the following command at the system prompt:
cd /usr/lpp
3. Enter:
Is */*README*
The system lists README files for each software product installed on your system.
4. Access and exit specific README files by doing the following steps:
a. Enter the following command to view a README file for a specific software product:
pg xxx/README
In this example, xxx is the directory name associated with a particular software
product.
b. Press the Enter key when the copyright screen appears.
c. Press the following keys or key combinations to scroll through the README file:
To page down
Press Enter.
To page up
Type the minus (-) key, then Enter.
To move forward x pages
Type the plus (+) key and number of pages,
then Enter.
For example, to move forward five pages, type
+ 5 and press Enter.
To move backward x pages
Type the minus (-) key and number of pages,
then Enter.
For example, to move backward five pages,
type - 5 and press Enter.
d. Enter q at the: (colon) prompt to exit the README file.
Viewing README Files
11-1
11-2
Installation Guide
Appendix A. Optional Software Installation and Update
Concepts
This section supplements the procedures described in "Optional Software and Service
Updates Installation" on page 6-1. Understanding the concepts in this appendix may assist
you in installing optional software products and service updates on your system.
Packaging of Software Products
Note: Application developers who want to develop software packages to be installed using
the installp command should refer to "Software Product Packaging" in AIX Version 4
General Programming Concepts: Writing and Debugging Programs.
The "packaging" of software products is divided into three categories: products, packages,
and filesets. A product may be composed of several packages, which in turn are composed
of different filesets. A product may be installed in its entirety, or only certain packages or
filesets for the product may be installed. The installation packaging of a software product is
divided in this way because many software products are large and have many pieces that
can be used independently of each other. Dividing a product into separately installable
filesets allows you to install only those filesets you need. You may prefer to install all the
filesets included in a package or the entire product, or you may want to install only selected
filesets, especially if you have limited hard disk space on your system.
The installation packaging of each fileset in a product may have been divided into three
parts: the usr, root, and share parts. Although this can add further complexity to the
understanding of the packaging, this parceling of a software product is necessary for the
product to be used by diskless and dataless clients in AIX Version 4.2. These functions allow
a product to be installed on one machine (called the server) and then be used remotely by
other machines on a network (called the clients).
usr part
The usr part of a software product contains the part of the product that can
be shared by machines that have the same hardware architecture. Most of
the software that is part of a product usually falls into this category.
In a standard system, the usr parts of products are stored in the lusr file
tree. For example, the Is command would be in the lusr/bin/ls file.
root part
The root part of a software product contains the part of the product that
cannot be shared. In a client/server environment, these are the files for
which there must be a unique copy for each client of a server. Most of the
root software is associated with the configuration of the machine or product.
In a standard system, the root parts of a product are stored in the root (I) file
tree. The letc/objrepos directory contains the root part of an installable
software product.
share part
The share part of a software product contains the part of the product that
can be shared among machines, even if they have different hardware
architectures. This would include nonexecutable text or data files. For
example, the share part of a product might contain documentation written in
ASCII text or data files containing special fonts.
Optional Software Installation and Update Concepts
A-1
In a standard system, the share parts of products are usually stored in the
lusrlshare file tree. For example, a dictionary database might be stored in
the lusrlshare/dictlwords file.
The share part of a product is optional because many products may not have any files that
can be shared among different hardware platforms. The share part of a product is always
packaged in a separately installable package. Every product has a usr part. The root part of
a product is optional because many products may not have any files that need to be specific
to each individual machine. The usr and root parts of a product are packaged together in the
same installable package.
Software Product Identification
The product name and level number identify a software product. The level of a software
product in AIX Version 4.2 is defined as vv.rr.mmmm.ffff, where:
• w is a numeric field of 1 to 2 digits that identifies the version number.
• rr is a numeric field of 1 to 2 digits that identifies the release number.
• mmmm is a numeric field of 1 to 4 digits that identifies the modification level.
• ffff is a numeric field of 1 to 4 digits that identifies the fix level.
For example, 04.01.0000.0000 is a software product level number, and 04.01.0001.0032 is
a software product update level. It is not necessary to include the leading zeroes in the
version, release, modification level, and fix level fields of the level. Level 04.01.0000.0000
can also be written as 4.1.0.0.
The vv.rr.mmmm.ffff part of the level field is what is checked to find if the level being installed
is later than that on the system. These fields increase for each subsequent release of a
product. The higher precedence of the four fields goes from left to right (that is, level 4.2.0.0
is a later level than 4.1.3.4).
Applying, Committing, Rejecting, and Removing Software
Products and Updates
During and after its installation, there are four major actions that can be taken with optional
software products and service updates. Optional software and service updates can be
applied, committed, rejected, and removed. Whether a particular action can be taken
depends on whether the action is being applied to the entire software product or only a
service update on which actions have previously been taken. These actions can be
performed using either the System Management Interface Tool (SMIT) or two applications
that have a graphical interface: the Easy Install application, and the Install and Update
Software Manager application. The following sections describe these actions.
Apply Action (for Service Updates)
When you install a service update, it is in the applied state. When you install or "apply" an
update, the former version of that software product is saved in the lusr/lpplPackageName
directory so that if you want to return to the former version, you can do so without having to
reinstall it. If you do not want to use the default save directory, you can specify another one
using the SMIT Custom Install path or the Install and Update Software Manager application.
Only service updates can be in the applied state after installation. If you are installing an
entire software product rather than just an update, then the software product is in the
committed state after installation. In this case, the previous version of the software product is
not saved, because you cannot have two versions installed.
A-2
Installation Guide
If you want to install a service update or software product from the command line, use the
installp -a command to only apply the update, or use the installp -a -c command to apply
and commit the update or software product.
Commit Action (for Service Updates)
When you install a software product, it is put into the committed state. Committing a
software update removes the previous version of the product from the system to conserve
disk space. Once a software product or update has been committed, it cannot be deleted
from the system except by removing the entire software product (the base level product and
all of its updates).
Although applying and committing a service update are considered separate actions, both
can be accomplished while installing the update. If you are using the SMIT Easy Install path
or the Easy Install application, the service update is automatically applied and committed
during installation. The default action of the SMIT Custom Install path and the Install and
Update Software Manager application is also to apply and commit the service update during
installation, although this default can be changed to only apply the update. From the
command line, you can use the installp -a -c command to apply and commit an update.
Applied service updates can also be committed after installation. The SMIT List All Applied
but Not Committed Software menu option (or the installp -s command) provides a list of
all service updates in the applied state. Use the SMIT Custom Install path or the Install and
Update Software Manager application to commit previously applied service updates.
Reject Action (for Service Updates)
When you reject an applied service update, the update's files are removed from the system
and the previous version of the software is restored. Only service updates in the applied
state can be rejected. Use the SMIT Custom Install path or the Install and Update Software
Manager application to reject applied service updates.
Remove Action (for Software Products)
When you remove a software product, the product's files are removed from the system and
the Software Vital Product Data information is changed to indicate that the product is
removed. The remove process also attempts to restore the system's configuration to its
previous state, although this is dependent on the product and may not always be complete.
Once a product is removed, there will no longer be a version of that product running on the
system. Use the SMIT Custom Install path or the Install and Update Software Manager
application to remove software products. Any requisite software (software that is dependent
on the product you are removing) will also be removed, unless it is required by other
software on your system.
Error Messages and Output from the installp Command
When the installp command is run from the SMIT installation menus, the Command Status
screen shows Command: OK if all of the installations that are attempted by the command
are successful. It shows Command: Failed if any of the attempted installations fail. These
messages are generated when the installp return codes are zero and nonzero, respectively.
Note that a Command: OK message does not mean that all products in the input list for
installp were installed. A Command: Failed message means that the installation of at
least one product was started but did not complete. If a product's installation is never
started, the Command: OK message may be displayed even though the product is not
installed. However, other error messages may be displayed for products for which the
installation cannot be started. Errors that can cause a product installation not to be started
Optional Software Installation and Update Concepts
A-3
include errors such as the necessary requisites not being installed, the specified product
being missing from the installation media, or the product already being installed at the
specified level.
As well as displaying error messages from the installp command, the Command Status
screen also displays many informational messages from installp on the progress of the
product installations. The output from the installp command can be quite long, and it is
recommended that the output be sent to a file when installp is run from the command line.
When run from the SMIT installation menus, the output from installp is stored in the
smit.log file. If you used the su command to become the root user, then the smit.log file is
in the home directory.
A summary report is given at the end of the installation process. This report lists the status
of each of the product installations that was attempted. For those products that could not be
installed or whose installation failed, you can search for the cause in the detailed messages
that appear during the installation process.
The output from the installp command contains both a preinstallation and post-installation
summary. To determine if there were any products for which the installation could not begin,
check the messages in the preinstallation summary. This information shows a statistic for
those products for which installation was not attempted due to missing requisite software or
other requisite problems. Once preinstallation checking is complete, you will see a message
similar to The following software products will be applied: (this message
varies depending on the installation action that is taken).
The error messages in the preinstallation and post-installation summaries reveal the
installation status of all products included in the input list. If any failures are noted in these
summaries, search on "FAIL" in the installp command's output to locate where the source of
the failure is documented.
An example summary report is given below, along with the command that produced it.
# installp -acd/usr/sys/inst.images sx2S.rte
Installation Summary
Name
Level
Part
Event
Result
bos.net.tcp.client
bos.net.tcp.client
bos.sysmgt.smit
bos.sysmgt.loginlic
4.1.0.0
4.1.0.0
4.1.0.0
4.1.0.0
USR
ROOT
USR
USR
APPLY
APPLY
APPLY
APPLY
SUCCESS
SUCCESS
SUCCESS
SUCCESS
The summary report that identifies the software that was acted upon gives the following
information:
• Product fileset name
• Fix ID (if applicable)
• Update ID (if applicable)
• Product part
• Requested action (Event)
• Result of the action
• Resultant state of the product fileset
A-4
Installation Guide
The Event column of the summary report identifies the action that has been requested of the
installp command. The following values may be found in this column:
Event
Definition
APPLY
An attempt was made to apply the specified fileset.
COMMIT
An attempt was made to commit the specified fileset.
REJECT
An attempt was made to reject the specified fileset.
CLEANUP
An attempt was made to perform cleanup for the specified fileset.
The Result column of the summary report gives the result of installp performing the
requested action. It can have the following values:
Result
Definition
SUCCESS
Specified action succeeded.
FAILED
Specified action failed.
CANCELLED
Although preinstallation checking passed for the specified fileset, it was
necessary to cancel the specified action before it was begun. Interrupting
the installation process with Ctrl-C can sometimes cause a cancelled action,
although, in general, a Ctrl-C interrupt causes unpredictable results. The
cancelled installation of an update can be attempted again later in the
installation process if a new installp program is being installed.
Note: CANCELLED is also displayed if you are installing an installp fix.
Reinstalling a Software Product
If you attempt to install the product level of a software product that is already installed on the
system, then you are reinstalling the product. A product can be reinstalled at the same,
earlier, or later level (level refers to the version and release of the product). If you are
reinstalling a product at the same or earlier level, then you must use the force option. If you
are installing from the command line, use the installp command with the -F option. If you
must use the force option, enter the smit install_selectable_all command and choose only
those product filesets you want to install. You can only select the base level of a product
because updates cannot be installed during a forced installation. After completing the forced
reinstallation of a product, you can update the product by entering SMIT with the
smit instalLfileset command. If you are reinstalling a product at a later version, then enter
SMIT with the smit install_latest command (without specifying the forced option) and the
updates will also be installed.
Creating Installation Images on a Hard Disk
Installable image files (or installation packages) can be copied to the disk for use in future
installations. These image files will be copied from your installation media (tape or diskette)
to a directory on the disk so that they may be installed later using the disk directory as the
input device. These files will be copied to a default directory named lusrlsys/inst.images.
The image files within the disk directory will be named prodname.part.level where prodname
is the name of the software product or update, part is usrfor the usr and root parts of a
product or shrfor share parts, and level is the complete version number of the product.
Optional Software Installation and Update Concepts
A-5
Updating Software
Software that is distributed to fix a problem in a product is called an update. The SM IT menu
Install/Update Selectable Software (Custom Install) is used to install updates. Updates are
also installed with the installp command.
If you choose to apply the updates during installation (rather than committing them at
installation time), you can still reject those updates later. If a particular update is causing
problems on your system, you can reject that update without having to reject all the other
updates that you installed. Once you are convinced that the updates cause no problems,
you may want to commit those updates to retrieve the disk space that is used to save the
previous levels of that software.
All software products have a version number and a release number that identify the release
level of the product. In addition to this, product updates are assigned a modification level
number and a fix level number to identify the level of the update.
Each AIX Version 4.2 formatted update package has a unique mod and fix level associated
with it. The mod and fix level becomes a part of the product level for each software product
fileset that is part of the update package. If the situation occurs where the fix for one
problem spans across filesets, then a separate mod and fix lOis assigned to each fileset
update package.
Following is an example of a fileset and a fileset update:
bos.net.tcp.client 4.1.0.0 is a fileset. bos.net.tcp.client 4.1.0.1 is an update to that fileset.
If another fileset update, bos.net.tcp.client 4.1.0.2, is generated, this update will contain all
the fixes that were in the bos.net.tcp.client 4.1.0.1. If a cumulative AIX update is
generated, the mod level of the fileset will increment, resulting in bos.net.tcp.client 4.1.1.0,
which would contain all previous fixes.
Explanation of Requisites and Dependents
A prerequisite software product or update is one that must be installed before another
specified product or update can be installed. A corequisite product or update is one that
must be installed at the same time as another specified product or update. If you want to
know more details about requisites, see the ckprereq command.
From any of the SMIT installation menus, you should answer yes to the question,
"Automatically install PREREQUISITE software?" to have requisites automatically installed.
From the command line, the -g flag of installp automatically installs any requisites for the
software you are installing. When you attempt to install products or updates for which
requisite software has not been installed, you receive an error message indicating that
certain requisite software must first be installed. If you want to see what requisites will be
installed, use the preview option. You may want to specify detailed output with the preview
option to see the complete information.
Before a software update can be committed, all updates that are requisites of the specified
product or update must also be committed. Committing these requisites must be done from
the command line by using the -g flag with the installp command.
A dependent software product or update is one that requires the specified product or update
to be installed before it can be installed. Before a version of a software product can be
removed, all products or updates that are dependent upon the specified product or update
must also be rejected or removed. From the SMIT menu Reject Applied Updates (Use
Previous Version), answer yes to the question "REJECT versions that depend on above
A-6
Installation Guide
version?" to have requisites automatically rejected. From the menu Remove Applied
Software Products, answer yes to the question "Automatically remove DEPENDENT
software?" From the command line, use the -g flag or installp.
Note: Any software updates dependent on another update that is eligible to be rejected
should always be in the applied, not the committed, state. The action of rejecting
software updates changes the currently active version of that software product on
the system. You should use extreme caution when automatically rejecting dependent
updates because that action could change the currently active version of some
product that you might prefer not to be altered. It is recommended that you preview
the reject process beforehand to see the list of requisites that will also be rejected.
When you attempt to reject software that has dependents that are not also being
rejected (with the command line list or automatic inclusion), you receive an error
message indicating what dependent software must first be rejected. Using the-g
flag with the installp command attempts to reject this software for you.
Optional Software Installation and Update Concepts
A-7
A-a
Installation Guide
Appendix B. Software Installed Automatically during
BOS Installation
The BOS installation program first installs the Base Operating System Runtime (bos.rte)
image, then installs a set of filesets taken from packages in two LPs:
• Base Operating System (bos). The disk space required to install this software is 59MB,
plus at least 32MB of paging space.
• AIXwindows (X11). The disk space required to install this software is 101 MB, plus at least
32MB of paging space.
The installation program automatically installs required message filesets and devices
filesets, according to the language you choose and the hardware configuration of the
installed machine.
To list all the software installed on your system, enter the following command:
lslpp -L I pg
To view information about additonal software that can be optionally installed, complete the
following steps:
1. Install the pkQ_Qd InfoExplorer database using the instructions in "Installing Optional
Software and Service Updates" on page 6-1 .
2. To access the database, enter:
info -lIp_info
8ase Operating System (80S) Licensed Program
The following list includes only bos filesets that the installation program automatically
installs:
•
•
•
•
ASCII System Management Interface Tool (SMIT)
Client Support for iFORILS
Client Support for TCP/IP
Support for the following terminal types:
- ibm3101
- ibm3151
- ibm3161
- ibm3162
- ibm3163
- ibm3164
- 1ft
-
sun
tvi912
tvi920
tvi925
tvi950
vs100
vt100
vt320
vt330
Software Installed Automatically during Installation
B-1
.....
-
vt340
wyse30
wyse50
wyse60
wyse100
wyse350
AIXwindows (X11) Licensed Program
This list includes only X11 filesets that the installation program automatically installs.
The installation program automatically installs the following products only if the installed
machine has a graphics adapter as the console. These products may be installed later by
selecting the Graphical Support bundle in one of the software installation applications.
• AIXwindows
- X11 Libraries
- Runtime Environment
- Motif Runtime Environment
- Motif Window Manager
- aixterm Client Compatibility
- Display PostScript Copyright
- Default Fonts
• The following graphical system mangement applications:
- Installation Assistant
- Graphical SMIT
- Visual System Management
• Language-Specific Locale Support
• Desktop Runtime Libraries
• Desktop Helps
8-2
Installation Guide
Appendix C. Compatibility between AIX Version 3.2 and
AIX Version 4.2
All AIX applications based on AIX Version 3.2 and for use with POWER, POWER/2, and
POWER PC-based models, will run compatibly on AIX Version 4.2 without recompilation for
those same models. The only exceptions to this statement are applications using:
• Unsupported own loadable kernel extensions
• Certain High Function Terminal control interfaces
• X11 R3 input device interfaces
• CIO LAN device driver interface
• SCSI device configuration methods (IHVs)
• nlistO interface
• DCE threads
or applications compiled using POWER2- or PowerPC-specific compiler options, but
executed on models other than POWER2 or PowerPC.
Any program that must run in all environments (POWER, POWER2, and PowerPC models
601 and higher) must be compiled using the common mode of the compiler. Programs
compiled to exploit POWER2 technology must be run on POWER2-based processors.
Existing code need not be recompiled to run.
Applications created on a system using AIX Version 4.2 may not function reliably on a
system using AIX Version 3.
Applications must have been created using the AIX shared libraries for these statements to
apply.
A system using AIX Version 3.2 can operate as a server system for client machines using
AIX Version 4.2 with the following exceptions:
• Network installation of AIX Version 4.2 clients
• Service SNA or X.25 to AIX Version 4.2 clients
• Service HCON to AIX Version 4.2 clients
• Service CGE extensions of PEX and PEX-PHIGS
• Use AIX Version 4.2 client installation formats
Note: With new packaging of AIX Version 4.2, some AIX Version 3 functions are no longer
part of the base operating system, but can be ordered as separate licensed
programs.
Font servers may be required on the AIX Version 4.2 clients to reliably handle AIXwindows
between server and client.
A system using AIX Version 4.2 may operate as a server system for client machines using
AIX Version 3.2 or greater as long as the necessary compatib.ility options are installed. All
statements about binary compatibility apply in this case. AIX Version 4.2 applications may
not execute reliably on AIX Version 3 systems using remote network mounts of AIX Version
4.2 file system.
Compatibility between AIX Version 3.2 and AIX Version 4.2
C-1
AIX Version 4.2 Installation and Compatibility with AIX Version
3.2.5
Users installing AIX Version 4.2 who are concerned about binary compatibility with AIX
Version 3.2 should install the compatibility filesets offered on the installation media. These
filesets offer commands, library versions, symbolic links and other items that, when added
to the system, make it look more like a AIX Version 3.2 system from an application point of
view.
While some of these filesets increase disk requirements (substantially, in the case of the
AIXwindows X11 R3 and R4 compatibility packages) and contain obsolete function, the
compatibility filesets increase portability in an environment with machines running mixed
levels of AIX. Installing the compatibility filesets is highly recommended.
If you performed a Migration Installation, you do not need to install these filesets.
Filesets are included for:
• Base operating system commands
• Base operating system libraries
• Base operating system curses/termcap
• Base operating system networking
• Base operating system directories/files (symlinks)
• Messages
• X11 R3
• X11 R4
• X11 fonts
Use the instructions in "Optional Software and Service Updates" on page 6-1 to install these
filesets. The filesets are listed with compat in the name. For example, the
bos.compat.cmds fileset contains the base operating system compatibility commands, and
the X11.compat.lib.X11 R3 fileset contains the AIXwindows X11 R3 compatibility libraries.
C-2
Installation Guide
Appendix D. Migrating from AIX Version 3.2 or AIX
Version 4.1
This section lists things to consider before migrating to AIX Version 4.2:
• User and Group Definitions
• Migrating Network Software
User and Group Definitions
For the migration and preservation processes to function correctly, all system users and
groups that were defined in the Jete/group and /ete/passwd files in the original AIX
distribution must be redefined.
The following is a list of the minimum that should exist in the /ete/passwd and Jete/group
files before installing, updating, or migrating to AIX Version 4.2.
Group Definitions
/ete/passwd
Jete/group
root:! :0:0: :/:bin/Ksh
system:!:O:root
daemon:!:1:1 ::/etc:
staff:!: 1:
bin:!:2:2::/bin:
bin:!:2:root,bin
sys:! :3:3: :/usrlsys:
sys:! :3: root,bin,sys
adm:!:4:4::/var/adm:
adm:!:4:bin,adm
uucp:! :5:5: :/usr/lib/uucp:
uucp:!:5:uucp
guest:!: 100: 100: :/home/guest
mail:!:6:
nobody:! :4294967294:4294967294: :/:
secu rity:!: 7: root
Ipd:!:9:4294967294::/:
cron:!:8:root
printq:!:9:
audit:!: 10: root
ecs:!:28:
nobody:! :4294967294:nobodY,lpd
usr:!: 1OO:guest
Migrating from AIX Version 3.2 or AIX Version 4.1
0-1
Migrating Network Software
The following must be considered when migrating Network Software:
Migrating TCP/IP from Version 3.2
Configuration files are saved in /Ipp/save.config/etc. The file from the previous release is
named filename. old , and the shipped file is named filename.new. For example, when
/etc/rc.tcpip is migrated:
/etc/rc.tcpip
is upgraded and your configuration information is
saved.
/Ipp/save.config/etc/rc.tcpip.old
is the original rc.tcpip file (with your configuration
changes).
/Ipp/save.config/etc/rc.tcpip.new
is the version shipped with Version 4.2 (without
your configuration changes).
The following files are migrated:
• /etc/rc.net
• /etc/rc.bsdnet
• /etc/services
All the services previously defined are kept. The AIX Version 4.2 letc/services file contains
all the defined services from the Request for Comment (RFC) and Internet Engineer Task
Force (IETF) standards document. Where a conflict exists between a service you have
previously defined and a globally defined service (from an RFC), your service will be kept
and the official one commented out.
• /etc/inetd.conf
• /etc/rc.tcpip
• /etc/bootptab
• /etc/3270.keys
• /etc/3270keys.hft
In most cases, your TCP/IP configuration will migrate without problems. If you have made
substantial changes to any of the preceding files, be sure everything you changed still works
after migration is complete.
Migrating NFS and NIS from Version 3.2
The /etc/rc.nfs and /var/yp/Makefile files are are not migrated. The old files are saved in
/Ipp/save.config/etc/rc.nfs and Ilpp/save.config/var/yp/Makefile. You must configure
your Network Information Service (NIS) domain name before an NIS client will work.
For NIS servers, the NIS databases are unchanged. You must reconfigure the NIS domain
and restore any changes you previously made to rc.nfs and the Makefile because rc.nfs
and Makefile get replaced. The old files are saved in /Ipp/save.config with their
corresponding path names. The user and group information is retained because the
passwd and group files are not changed in a migration install.
Migrating XStations from Version 3.2 or Version 4.1
The /etc/bootptab file is migrated during migration installation.
0-2
Installation Guide
Glossary
lusr file system. Contains files and programs
necessary for operating the machine.
Itmp file system. A shared storage location for
files.
Ivar file system. Contains files that are variable on
a per-client basis, such as spool and mail files.
I file system. The root file system; contains files
that contain machine-specific configuration data.
A
APAR. Authorized program analysis report. A
report of a problem caused by a suspected defect
in a current, unaltered release of a program.
apply. When a service update is installed or
applied, it enters the applied state and becomes
the currently active version of the software. When
an update is in the applied state, the previous
version of the update is stored in a special save
directory. This allows you to restore the previous
version, if necessary, without having to reinstall it.
Software that has been applied to the system can
be either committed or rejected. The installp -s
command can be used to get a list of applied
products and updates that are available to be either
committed or rejected. See also commit and reject.
B
boot device. The device that assigns the fixed disk
within the root volume group that will contain the
startup (boot) image.
BOS. The base operating system (BOS) is the
collection of programs that controls the resources
and the operations of the computer system.
bosinst.data. The file that controls the actions of
the 80S installation program.
bundle. A collection of software products available
for installation.
c
CD-ROM. High-capacity, read-only memory in the
form of an optically read compact disc.
clean up. The clean up procedure instructs the
system to attempt to remove software products that
were partially installed. The system also attempts
to revert to the previous version of the removed
product. If the system successfully reverts to the
previous version, it becomes the currently active
version. If this cannot be done, then the software
product is marked as broken. After the clean up
procedure is complete, you can attempt to install
the software again.
client. In a distributed file system environment, a
system that is dependent on a server to provide it
with programs or access to programs.
commit. When you commit software, you are
making a commitment to that version of the
software product. When you commit a product, the
saved files from all previous versions of the
software product are removed from the system,
thereby making it impossible to return to a previous
version of the software product. In SMIT, software
can be committed at the time of installation by
setting the COMMIT software? question to yes (or
by using the -ac flags with the installp command).
Note that committing already applied software does
not change the currently active version of the
software product. It merely removes saved files for
the previous version of the software product.
The rejection of the installation level of the product
does not have the same meaning as the rejection
of updates to the product. Once you commit a new
version of a product, you must reinstall the previous
version if you want to use that version again.
Compare to apply and contrast with reject and
remove.
complete overwrite installation. Use this method
to completely overwrite an existing version of the
8ase Operating System (80S) that is installed on
Glossary
X-1
your system. This procedure may impair recovery
of data or destroy all existing data on your hard
drives. Be sure to back up your system before
doing a complete overwrite installation.
configure. To describe to a system the devices,
optional features, and program products installed
on a system.
console device. During the installation of the Base
Operating System (BOS), the system console is the
display device at the system on which you are
installing the software.
corequisite. A product or update that must be
installed concurrently with another specified
product or update.
D
daemon. A program that runs in the background,
unattended, to perform a standard service. Some
daemons trigger automatically to perform their task
and others operate on a timed or periodic basis.
dataless. A workstation without local file systems
or local boot images that accesses some of its
resources remotely. Dataless clients use a local
disk used for paging and dump devices.
dependent. A software product that requires
another product or update to be installed before or
at the same time it is installed. Contrast with
prerequisite.
destination disk. The disk to which you are
installing.
directory. A type of file containing the names and
controlling information for other files or other
directories.
diskless. A workstation without local file systems
or local boot images that accesses some of its
resources remotely. Diskless clients boot remotely
from a diskless server and use the server for
remote paging.
display. A computer output screen on which visual
information is displayed.
display device. See display.
X-2
Installation Guide
E
Easy Install. An application used to install optional
software or service updates in the form of software
bundles.
environment. (1) The settings for shell variables
and paths that are set when the user logs in. These
variables can be modified later by the user. (2) A
named collection of logical and physical resources
used to support the performance of a function.
environment variable. (1) A variable that
describes the operating environment of the
process. Common environment variables describe
the home directory, command search path, the
terminal in use, and the current time zone (the
HOME, PATH, TERM, and TZ variables,
respectively). (2) A variable that is included in the
current software environment and is therefore
available to any called program that requests it.
F
file. The collection of related data that is stored and
retrieved by an assigned name.
file system. The collection of files and file
management structures on a physical or logical
mass storage device, such as a diskette or
minidisk.
fileset. An individually installable option or update.
Options provide specific function and updates
correct an error in, or enhance, a previously
installed option.
file tree. The complete directory and file structure
of a particular node, starting at the root directory. A
file tree contains all local and remote mounts
performed on directories and files.
fixed disk. See hard disk.
full path name. The name of any directory or file
expressed as a string of directories and files
beginning with the root directory. See path name.
G
graphical interface. A type of computer interface
consisting of a visual metaphor of a real-world
scene, often a desktop. Within that scene are
icons, representing actual objects, that the user can
access and manipulate with a pointing device.
H
hard disk. (1) A flat, circular, nonremoveable plate
with a magnetizable surface layer on which data
can be stored by magnetic recording. A rigid
magnetic disk used in a fixed-disk drive. (2) The
term fixed disk is also used loosely in the industry
for boards and cartridges containing microchips or
bubble memory that simulate the operations of a
fixed-disk drive.
Note: The term hard disk is also used loosely in
the industry for boards and cartridges
containing microchips or bubble memory
that simulate the operations of a hard disk
drive.
hardware. The physical equipment of computing
and computer-directed activities. The phYSical
components of a computer system. Contrast with
software.
host. (1) The primary or controlling computer in a
communications network that has an Internet
address. A host with multiple network interfaces
may have multiple Internet addresses associated
with it. (2) A computer attached to a network.
host name. The Internet address of a machine in
the network. Also known as the host 10.
hypertext. A way of presenting information online
with connections between one piece of information
and another. These connections are called
hypertext links. Thousands of these hypertext links
enable you to explore additional or related
information throughout the online documentation.
See also hypertext link.
hypertext link. A connection between one piece of
information and another. In the graphics interface,
the link is displayed in a rectangular box. In the
ASCII interface, it is displayed as underlined text.
When you select one of these links, you are routed
to the target piece of information, which displays on
the screen.
icon. A picture or graphical representation of an
object on a display screen to which a user can
point with a device, such as a mouse, to select a
particular operation or perform a certain action.
initial program load (IPL). (1) The initialization
procedure that causes an operating system to
commence operation. (2) The process by which a
configuration image is loaded into storage at the
beginning of a work day or after a system
malfunction. (3) The process of loading system
programs and preparing a system to run jobs.
input device. The device that is the source of the
software you are installing. The input device can be
a tape drive, CD-ROM drive, diskette drive, or a
directory.
Installation Assistant. An application used to
perform system configuration tasks.
installation image. An installation image contains
a copy of the software you are installing in backup
format, as well as copies of other files the system
needs to install the software product.
Internet (IP) address. The numbering system
used in TCP/IP internetwork communications to
specify a particular network or a particular host on
that network with which to communicate. Internet
addresses are commonly denoted in dotted
decimal form.
IPL. See initial program load.
L
license password. The key that allows a software
product to be used.
licensed program. (1) A software program that
remains the property of the manufacturer, for which
customers pay a license fee. (2) A separately
priced program and its associated materials that
bear a copyright and are offered to customers
under the terms and conditions of a licensing
agreement.
Glossary
X-3
locale. A subset of a user's environment that
defines conventions for a specified culture, such as
time formatting, and character classification,
conversion, and collation.
logical partition. One to three physical partitions.
The number of logical partitions in a logical volume
is variable.
logical volume. A collection of physical partitions
organized into logical partitions all contained in a
single volume group. Logical volumes are
expandable and can span several physical volumes
in a volume group.
NIM. See Network Installation Management.
o
OOM. The Object Data Manager (ODM) is a data
manager intended for the storage of system data.
option. An installable unit of a software package.
Software product options are separately installable
units that can operate independently from other
options of that software package.
M
maintenance level update. The service updates
(fixes and enhancements) that are necessary to
upgrade the 8ase Operating System (80S) or an
optional software product to the current release
level.
migration installation. An installation method for
upgrading AIX to a later release while preserving
the existing root volume group. This method
preserves the lusr, Itmp, Ivar, and I (root) file
systems, as well as the root volume group, logical
volumes, and system configuration files.
monitor. (1) A device that observes and verifies
operations of a data processing system. (2)
Synonym for display.
mount. To make a file system accessible.
N
name server. A host that provides name resolution
for a network. Name servers translate symbolic
names assigned to networks and hosts into the
efficient Internet addresses used by machines.
Network Installation Management (NIM). An
environment that provides installation and
configuration of software within a network interface.
new installation. Use this method when the hard
disk or disks you are installing the 8ase Operating
System (80S) onto are empty. A hard disk is
considered empty if it does not contain any data or
if it contains some data, but the data is not in a
volume group.
NFS. Network File System is a distributed file
system that enables users to access files and
X-4
directories located on remote computers and treat
those files and directories as if they were local.
NFS is independent of machine types, operating
systems, and network architectures through the
use of remote procedure calls (RPe).
Installation Guide
optional software. Also referred to as optional
software products. Software that is not
automatically installed on your system when you
install the 8ase Operating System (80S). Optional
software can be products packaged and sold with
80S. Optional software can also be separately
purchased software products that are specially
ordered and not sold as part of 80S. In either case,
80S must be installed on your system before you
can install optional software.
p
package. An installable unit of a software product.
Software product packages are separately
installable units that can operate independently
from other packages of that software product.
paging. (1) The action of transferring instructions,
data, or both between real storage and external
page storage. (2) Moving data between memory
and a mass storage device as the data is needed.
path name. A file name specifying all directories
leading to the file.
physical volume. The portion of a single unit of
storage accessible to a single read/write
mechanism, for example, a drum, a disk pack, or
part of a disk storage module.
PMP. A preventive maintenance package (PMP) is
a maintenance level update for your system. A
PMP includes updates for the 8ase Operating
System (80S) and for each optional software
product that is installed on your system.
PMR. A Problem Management Record (PMR) is a
number assigned by a support center to a reported
problem.
preinstaHed. Software that is installed by the
manufacturer and ready to use.
prerequisite. A software product or a service
update that must be installed before another
software product or service update is installed. If
you attempt to install software products or service
updates without the required prerequisite software,
a system message displays the names of required
prerequisite software. Contrast with dependent.
preservation installation. Use this installation
method when a previous version of the Base
Operating System (BOS) is installed on your
system and you want to preserve the user data in
the root volume group. However, this method
overwrites the lusr, Itmp, Ivar, and I (root) file
systems, so any user data in these directories is
lost. System configuration will have to be done after
doing a preservation installation.
primary language. The primary locale you want
your system to use for screen information.
product. A software product is made up of
software packages that are separately installable.
R
reboot. To reinitialize the execution of a program
by repeating the initial program load (I PL)
operation.
reject. When you reject an applied service update,
the update's files are deleted and the software vital
product data (SWVPD) information is changed to
indicate that the update is no longer on the system.
The previous version of the software, if there is
one, is restored and becomes the active version of
the software. See apply and commit.
remove. When you remove a software option, the
option and all of its applied or committed updates
are deleted from the system. The software vital
product data (SWVPD) information is changed to
indicate that the option has been removed from the
system. Depending on the option, system
configuration information is also cleaned up,
although this is not always complete. If a previous
version, release, or level of the option is on the
system, the system will not restore the previous
version. Only an option with its updates can be
removed. Updates cannot be removed by
themselves.
requisite. A software product or a service update
that must be installed with another software product
or service update. If you attempt to install software
products or service updates without the required
software, a system message displays the names of
required software.
root user authority. The unrestricted ability to
access and modify any part of the operating
system, usually the user who manages the system.
root volume group (rootvg). A volume group
containing the Base Operating System (BOS).
s
server. On a network, the computer that contains
the data or provides the facilities to be accessed by
other computers on the network.
service update. Software that either corrects a
defect in or adds an enhancement to the Base
Operating System (BOS) or an optional software
product.
SMIT. The System Management Interface Tool
(SMIT) is a facility that provides menus and dialog
support for performing system management tasks.
software. Programs, procedures, rules, and any
associated documentation pertaining to the
operation of a system. Contrast with hardware.
source. A system, a program within a system, or a
device that makes a request to a target. Contrast
with target.
special file. Used in the operating system to
provide an interface to input/output devices. There
is at least one special file for each device
connected to the computer. Contrast with directory
and file.
stacked tape. A bootable tape with multiple
software images.
Glossary
X-5
v
T
target. A system, a program within a system, or a
device that interprets, rejects, or satisfies, and
replies to requests received from a source.
Contrast with source.
TCP/IP. Transmission Control Protocol/Internet
Protocol. A communications subsystem that allows
you to set up local area and wide area networks.
u
Universal Coordinated Time (UCT). The new
standard term for worldwide time-telling that has
the same meaning as Greenwich Mean Time.
update. See service update.
upgrade. Software that fixes a defect in a
previously released software product.
X-6
Installation Guide
verify. The verify procedure instructs the system to
verify the software you are installing. The system
confirms that your software files are the correct
length and contain the correct number of digits and
characters. If any errors are reported, it might be
necessary to install the software product again. The
verification process can add a significant amount of
time to the installation process.
Visual System Management (VSM). A graphical
interface that allows you to perform installation and
system management tasks through direct
manipulation of icons.
volume group. A single hard disk or group of hard
disks on your system.
Related Information
This section lists titles that provide more information about concepts and procedures
covered in A/X Version 4.2 /nstallation Guide.
"Getting Started (InfoExplorer Windows)" and "Getting Started (InfoExplorer ASCII)" in
A/X Version 4 Getting Started describe how to begin using InfoExplorer.
"Backup Files and Storage Media Overview" in A/X Version 4 System User's Guide:
Operating System and Devices explains different methods of backing up using various types
of backup media, restoring system backups, and guidelines for backup policies.
"System Management Interface Tool (SMIT) Overview" in A/X Version 4 System
Management Guide: Operating System and Devices explains the structure, main menus,
and tasks that are done with SMIT.
"File Systems Overview" in A/X Version 4 System Management Guide: Operating System
and Devices provides information on file system types and management.
"Logical Volume Storage Overview" in A/X Version 4 System Management Guide: Operating
System and Devices provides information about the Logical Volume Manager and how
logical volumes, physical volumes, and volume groups work together.
"Mounting Overview" in A/X Version 4 System Management Guide: Operating System and
Devices provides information on mounting files and directories, mount points, and automatic
mounts.
''Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol Overview" in A/X Version 4 System
Management Guide: Communications and Networks explains the basic functions of TCP/IP,
including Internet.
"Network File System (NFS) Overview for System Management" in A/X Version 4 System
Management Guide: Communications and Networks discusses NFS daemons, commands,
files, network services, and implementation.
A/X Version 4 Problem Solving Guide and Reference discusses ways to investigate, define,
and fix system problems.
The following commands in A/X Version 4 Commands Reference:
installp, Ippchk, Islpp, mksysb, backup, Is, smit.
Related Information
X-7
x-a
Installation Guide
Index
Symbols
.!.fs.size file, 10-8
/ file system
definition of, 2-9
messages, 10-8
root part, A-1
saving space, 6-11
/dev, after installing from system backup, 5-1
/dev directory, 8-3
/dev/ipldevice file, 10-6
/etc/exclude.rootvg file, 8-4
/etc/objrepos directory, after installing from system
backup, 5-1 , 8-3
/etc/objrepos/devs file, 10-9
/tmp file system
definition of, 2-9
free space in, 8-3
messages, 10-5, 10-8
size during installation from backup, 8-2
/tmp/disk.image file, 10-5
Itmp/ibmsupt directory, 9-12, 9-13
/tmp/unix file, 10-5
/tmp/vgdatairootvg directory, 5-7
/usr file system
definition of, 2-8
messages, 10-5, 10-8
saving space, 6-11
troubleshooting when full, 9-11
user part, A-1
/usr/share file system, A-2
/usr/sys/instimages file, A-5
/var file system, definition of, 2-9
A
accessing an unbootable system, 9-2
AIXwindows licensed program, B-2
American Standard Code for Information
Interchange. See ASCII
applying optional software
definition of, A-2
description, 6-1
ASCII Installation Assistant
See also Installation Assistant
introduction to tasks, 3-1
ASCII procedures. See procedures
ASCII terminals
setting communications options, 2-4
setting display and keyboard options, 2-4
B
backup image, 5-1-5-2
backup, of system
See also installing BOS from system backup
configuring source system, 8-1-8-2
introduction, 8-1
mounting and unmounting file systems, 8-2
procedure, 8-3
prerequisites, 8-3
root volume group, 8-3
verifying backup, user volume group, 8-6
verifying backup tape, 8-5
restoring, 8-2-8-3
Base Operating System licensed program. See
BOS licensed program
binary compatibility, C-1
booting the system
problems with, 9-2
See also bosboot, troubleshooting; error
messages
procedure, 2-3
BOS installation
CD-ROM, from. See installing BOS from
CD-ROM or tape
customizing, 1-2
migrating software products, 6-3
software installed during, 8-1
system backup, from, 5-1-5-11
tape, from. See installing BOS from CD-ROM
or tape
BOS licensed program, B-1
BOS maintenance mode, accessing, 9-2
bosboot
creating tapes, 9-1
troubleshooting, 10-5, 10-8
device problems, 10-6
space problems, 10-5
bosinst.data file
description, 4-1-4-4
examples of, 4-6-4-7
procedure for using, 4-2
prompted mode, with, 9-4
bundles
See also software products
definition of, 6-2
examples of, 6-2
Index
X-9
c
CD-ROM, installing BOS from. See installing BOS
from CD-ROM or tape
cleaning up failed software installation, 7-1,9-9
commands, installp
See a/so error messages
description of output, A-3
example output, A-4
committing service updates
definition of, A-3
description, 7-1
introduction, 6-1
procedure, 7-2
communications, setting options for ASCII
terminals, 2-4
compatibility, C-1
Complete Overwrite installation, definition of, 2-9
configuration, system. See customization, system
corequisite software, explanation of, A-6
customization, system
access remote resources, 3-2
add license passwords, 3-2
back up the system, 3~2
change language environment, 3-2
configure printer, 3-2
create user accounts, 3-2
date and time, 3-2
exit and log in, 3-2
flowchart, 3-3
install optional software, 3-2
introduction to, 3-1
list of tasks, 3-2
set root password, 3-2
worksheets
file systems, mounting remote, 3-7
host name and address, 3-6
TCP/IP configuration and startup, 3-5
customizing BOS installation
bosinst.data file, 4-1-4-5
procedure, 4-2
D
data recovery
introduction, 9-2
procedure, 9-2
when system will not boot, 9-2
defining groups, 0-1
defining users, 0-1
dependent software, explanation of, A-6
directories
Idev, 8-3
letc/objrepos, 8-3
Itmp/ibmsupt directory, 9-12
Itmp/vgdatalrootvg, 5-7
disk, specifying for BOS installation
CD-ROM or tape, 2-11
X-10
Installation Guide
system backup, 5-7
disk space
messages, 10-5
snap command requirements, 9-12
disks, hard (fixed). See hard disks
displays, setting options for ASCII terminals, 2-4
E
environment, changing language, 2-13
error conditions, 9-1
error messages
.!.fs.size file does not exist, 10-8
attempt to create bootable tape failed, 10-8
check available disk space, 10-5
error occurred during bosboot, 10-5, 10-6
format, 10-1
hard disks not accessed, 10-3
hard disks not configured, 10-3
installp command output, A-3
example of, A-4
invalid or no boot device specified, 10-6
invalid table of contents, 10-7
media contains an image designed for
installing BOS, 10-7
media contains an image designed for mksysb,
10-7
no disks are available, 10-9
no entry for bos.obj, 10-10
not enough file space to create:
Itmp/disk.image, 10-5
not enough file space to create: Itmp/unix, 10-5
unable to expand file system lusr, 10-5
error recovery, 9-1-9-14
F
file systems
I
definition of, 2-9
messages, 10-8
root part, A-1
saving space, 6-11
Itmp, 8-2
definition of, 2-9
free space in, 8-3
messages, 10-5, 10-8
lusr
definition of, 2-8
messages, 10-5, 10-8
saving space, 6-11
troubleshooting when full, 9-11
usr part, A-1
lusrlshare, A-2
Ivar, definition of, 2-9
mounting and unmounting, 8-2
mounting remote (worksheet), 3-7
files
.I.fs.size, 10-8
Idev/ipldevice, 10-6
letc/exclude.rootvg, 8-4
letc/objrepos/devs, 10-9
Itmp/disk.image, 10-5
Itmp/unix, 10-5
lusrlsys/instimages, A-5
bosinst.data
examples of, 4-6--4-7
explanation of, 4-1-4-4
introduction, 4-1
procedure for using, 4-2
prompted mode, with, 9-4
image.data, 4-1 , 8-2
map, 5-7
README, viewing, 11-1
filesets
See also software products
definition of, 6-2
software products. See software products
fixed disks. See hard disks
flowcharts
80S installation, 2-1
80S installation from system backup, 5-2
cleaning up failed software installation, 9-10
customizing the system, 3-3
installing optional software, 6-4
installing service updates, 6-4
G
graphical user interface, Easy Install
prerequisites, 6-5
procedural overview, 6-4
graphical user interfaces
Easy Install, description of, 6-13
Install and Update Software Manager,
description of, 6-14
Installation Assistant, introduction to tasks, 3-1
Maintain Software Manager, description. See
installing optional software
GUls. See graphical user interfaces
H
hard disks
See also disk space
creating installation image for, A-5
installing from system backup, 5-1
location codes of, 2-11
specifying for CD-ROM or tape installation,
2-11
specifying for system backup installation, 5-7
unaccessible, 10-3
unconfigured, 10-3, 10-9
host name and address (worksheet), 3-6
I
image.data file, 4-1, 8-2
images, creating for installation, A-5
install
from earlier version, 1-1
new machine, 1-1
optional software, 1-1
installation
changing to prompted mode, 5-5
new features, xi
installation (80S)
See also installing 80S from CD-ROM or tape
customizing with the bosinst.data file, 4-1-4-7
software installed during, 8-1
Installation Assistant, introduction to tasks, 3-1
installation images, creating on hard disk, A-5
installation methods
See also installing 80S from CD-ROM or tape
definition of, 2-8
specifying, 2-8
installation screens (80S)
Change Disk(s) Where You Want to Install,
2-12,5-7
Change Disks Where You Want to Install, 2-13
Change Method of Installation, 2-11
Installation and Settings, 2-8
Installing 8ase Operating System, 2-6, 5-5
Set Primary Language Envi ronment, 2-14
specifying installation language, 2-5
specifying system console, 2-5
System 8ackup Installation and Settings
(80S),5-6
Welcome to 8ase Operating System and
Maintenance (80S), 5-6
installation starting point, 1-1
installation, nonprompted, specifying with the
bosinst.data file, 4-1
installing 80S from CD-ROM or tape
customizing the installation, 4-1
default system settings, 2-7
flowchart of, 2-1
methods defined, 2-8
procedure
booting (starting) the system, 2-3
changing language environment, 2-13
initiating the installation, 2-5
introduction to, 2-1
prerequisites for, 2-2
specifying destination disk, 2-11
specifying installation method, 2-8
verifying system settings, 2-7
tape table of contents, 10-7
troubleshooting, 10-1-10-10
Index
X-11
installing BOS from system backup
flowchart of, 5-2
introduction to, 5-1
procedure, 5-2
resolving reported problems, 9-8
source system, 5-1-5-2, 9-:-8
target system, 5-1-5-2, 9-8
troubleshooting, 9-7, 10-7, 10-8
installing optional software
See also maintaining optional software;
optional software, concepts defined
applying, 6-1, A-2
cleaning up failed installation, 9-9
committing, 6-1, A-3
dependents, explanation of, A-6
flowchart, 6-4
installp command output, A-3
example of, A-4
introduction to, 6-1
migration, 6-3
prerequisites, 6-5
procedural overview, 6-4
procedure (graphical interface), 6-13
procedure (SMIT), 6-6
accessing SMIT, 6-7
Custom Install path, 6-8
Easy Install path, 6-7
status messages, 6-11
reinstalling, A-5
rejecting, 6-1, A-3
removing, 6-1, A-3
requisites, explanation of, A-6
selection criteria, 6-2
software licenses, 6-2
software packaging, 6-2
status messages (SMIT), 6-11
troubleshooting, 9-9, 10-5
updates, explanation of, A-6
installing service updates. See installing optional
software
installp command
See also error messages
description of output, A-3
example output, A-4
introduction to guide
new installation features, xi
publications
corequisite, xiv
ordering additional copies, xv
screens, explanation of examples, xiii
K
keyboards, setting options for ASCII terminals, 2-4
L
language environment, changing, 2-13
X-12
Installation Guide
licensed programs, 6-1
AIXwindows, B-2
Base Operating System, B-1
BOS, B-1
bos, B-1
definition of, 6-2
installing, 6-1
migration of, 6-3
packaging of, 6-2
selection criteria for installation, 6-2
updating. See installing optional software
X 11 , B-1, B-2
licenses, software, function of, 6-2
locale. See language environment
location codes, of the hard disk, 2-11
logical volumes, accessing, 9-2
introduction, 9-2
procedure, 9-2
M
Maintain Software Manager
description, 7-3
procedural overview, 7-3
maintaining, service updates., See maintaining
optional software
maintaining optional software
See also optional software, concepts defined
applying, A-2
committing, 7-1, A-3
concepts defined; A-2
introduction to, 7-1
procedural overview (SMIT), 7-2
procedural overview (vsm), 7-3
rejecting, 7-1, A-3
removing, 7-1, A-3
maintenance mode, accessing (BOS), 9-2
map files, 5-7
menus. See screens
messages, system and error. See error messages
migrating, 0-1
define groups, 0-1
define users, 0-1
network software, 0-2
network information service (NIS), 0-2
NFS, 0-2
TCP/IP, 0-2
xstation, 0-2
Migration installation, definition of, 2-9
mksysb
installation from. See installing BOS from
system backup
resolving reported problems, 9-8
troubleshooting installation from, 9-7
monitors, setting options for ASCII terminals, 2-4
N
network software, 0-2
New installation, definition of, 2-9
nonprompted installation, customizing for, 4-1
nonprompted mode, overriding, 5-5, 9-4
non root volume group, definition of. See user
volume group
o
optional software, 6-1
See a/so software products; software products
and service updates
cleaning up failed installation of
introduction, 9-9-9-10
procedure (SMIT), 9-10
concepts defined, A-1-A-14
definition of, 6-1
installation of. See installing optional software
maintenance of. See maintaining optional
software
optional software, packaging of. See software
packaging
options
language environment, 2-13
nonprompted installation, specifying with the
bosinst.data file, 4-1
prompted installation, changing to, 5-5
setting communications (ASCII), 2-4
setting display (ASCII), 2-4
setting monitor (ASCII), 2-4
software products. See software products
specifying installation disk (BOS)
CD-ROM or tape, 2-11
system backup, 5-7
specifying installation language, 2-5
specifying installation method (BOS), 2-8
specifying system console, 2-5
system configuration. See customization,
system
p
package, definition of, 6-2
paging space, 3-2
pkg_gd,6-1
prerequisite software, explanation of, A-6
Preservation installation, definition of, 2-10
problems, recovering from, 9-1
procedures
accessing BOS maintenance, 9-2
backing up the system, 8-3
cleaning up failed software installation (SMIT),
9-10
committing service updates (SMIT). See
installing optional software
creating bosboot tapes, 9-1
customizing BOS installation, 4-2
identifying boot device, 10-6
installing BOS from CD-ROM or tape. See
installing BOS from CD-ROM or tape
installing BOS from system backup. See
installing BOS from system backup
installing optional software. See installing
optional software
maintaining optional software (graphical). See
installing optional software
maintaining optional software (SMIT). See
installing optional software
resizing /tmp, 10-5
root volume group, backing up, 8-3
troubleshooting a mksysb installation, 9-7, 9-8
troubleshooting full /usr file system, 9-11
unlocking the root volume group, 10-5
user volume group, backing up, 8-6
verifying backup tape, 8-5
viewing README files, 11-1
product identification, optional software, A-2
product information, 6-1
prompted mode, changing to (BOS), 5-5, 9-4
R
README files, viewing, 11-1
recovery, 9-1-9-14
reinstalling optional software, A-5
rejecting optional software
definition of, A-3
introduction, 6-1
rejecting software, description, 7-1
removing optional software
definition of, A-3
introduction, 6-1
removing software, description, 7-1
requisite software, explanation of, A-6
root volume group (rootvg)
backing up, 8-3
definition of, 2-8, 8-1
unlocking, 10-5
rootvg. See root volume group
Index
X-13
s
screens
Access a Root Volume Group (BOS), 9-5
Backup the System (SMIT), 8-4
Change Disk(s) Where You Want to Install
(BOS), 2-12, 5-7
Change Disks Where You Want to Install
(BOS),2-13
Change Method of Installation (BOS), 2-11
Commit Applied Software Updates (Remove
Saved Files) (SMIT), 7-2
Install and Update Software (SMIT), 6-7
Install Bundles of Software (Easy Install)
(SMIT), 6-7-6-8
Install/Update Selectable Software (Custom
Install) (SMIT), 6-9
Install/Update Software at Latest Level (SMIT),
6-9-6-10
Installation and Settings (BOS), 2-8
Installing Base Operating System (BOS), 2-6,
5-5
Maintenance (BOS), 9-5
Remove Software Products (SMIT), 7-2
Set Primary Language Environment (BOS),
2-14
System Backup Installation and Settings, 5-6
Volume Group Information (BOS), 9-6
Welcome to Base Operating System and
Maintenance, 5-6
Welcome to Base Operating System
Installation and Maintenance (BOS), 9-4
screens, explanation of examples, xiii
service updates
See also software products
committing, A-3
committing (SMIT), 7-2
explanation of, A-6
rejecting, A-3
removing, A-3
SMIT, help, 6-6
SMIT interfaces
Custom Install path
description of, 6-6
procedure, 6-8
Easy Install path
description of, 6-6
prerequisites, 6-5
procedural overview, 6-4
procedure, 6-7
Installation Assistant, 3-1
SMIT procedures
cleaning up a failed software installation, 9-10
committing service updates, 7-2
installing optional software, 6-6
See also installing optional software
maintaining optional software, 7-2
snap command
compiling configuration information, 9-11
X-14
Installation Guide
options used with, 9-12
software
committing (SMIT), 7-2
installed with BOS, B-1
software bundles
See also software products
definition of, 6-2
examples of, 6-2
software filesets, definition of, 6-2
software licenses, function of, 6-2
software packages. See software products
software packaging, A-1
root part, A-1
share part, A-1 , A-2
user part, A-1
software products
applying, A-2
bundle, definition of, 6-2
bundle, examples of, 6-2
committing, A-3
concepts defined, A-1-A-14
fileset, definition of, 6-2
identification of, A-2
installation of. See installing optional software
licensed program, definition of, 6-2
maintenance of. See installing optional
software
migration of, 6-3
package, definition of, 6-2
packaging of, 6-2
rejecting, A-3
removing, A-3
selection criteria for installation, 6-2
software, optional
See also software products
definition of, 6-1
dependents, explanation of, A-6
installation of. See installing optional software
maintenance of. See installing optional
software
reinstalling, A-5
requisites, explanation of, A-6
updates, explanation of, A-6
source system, 5-1-5-2
troubleshooting, 9-8
starting the system. See booting the system
system
booting (starting). See booting the system
configuring. See customization, system
system backup. See backup, of system; installing
BOS from system backup
system backup, BOS installation from. See
installing BOS from system backup
system configuration. See customization, system
System Management Interface Tool. See SMIT
system messages. See error messages
system settings
changing during BOS installation, 2-8-2-13
defaults for installing BOS, 2-7
T
tape
creating bootable, troubleshooting, 10-8
installing BOS from. See installing BOS from
CD-ROM or tape
table of contents, 10-7
BOS entry, 10-1 0
target disk
specifying for CD-ROM or tape installation,
2-11
specifying for system backup installation, 5-7
target system, 5-1-5-2
troubleshooting, 9-8
TCB,2-15
TCP/IP, configuration and startup (worksheet), 3-5
terminals (ASCII), setting communications options,
2-4
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol.
See TCP/IP
troubleshooting
See also error messages
boot problems, 9-2
introduction, 9-2
procedure, 9-2
bootable tapes, creating, 9-1
cleaning up failed optional software installation
introduction, 9-9
procedure (SMIT), 9-10
configuration information, compiling, 9-11
full /usr file system, 9-11
installation from system backup (mksysb), 9-7
resolving reported problems, 9-8
introduction, 9-1
nonprompted mode, overriding, 9-4
problem determination (snap), 9-11
prompted mode, changing to, 9-4
trusted computing base, 2-15
U
updates, service
explanation of, 6-1-6-2
installation of. See installing optional software
maintenance of. See installing optional
software
updating optional software, overview, A-6
user volume group
backing up, 8-6
definition of, 8-1
v
visual system management, Maintain Software
Manager, procedural overview. See installing
optional software
volume groups
accessing, 9-2
introduction, 9-2
procedure, 9-2
backing up, 8-3, 8-6
definition of, 2-8
non root, 8-1
root, 8-1, 10-5
user, 8-1
w
worksheets
file systems, mounting remote, 3-7
host name and address, 3-6
TCP/IP configuration and startup, 3-5
x
X11 licensed program, B-2
X11 LP, B-1
Index
X-15
X-16
Installation Guide
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