the control of dust and emissions from construction and demolition

the control of dust and emissions from construction and demolition
Method Statement For
THE CONTROL OF DUST AND EMISSIONS
FROM CONSTRUCTION AND DEMOLITION
(Code of Construction Conducts)
FOR
2 Chesnut Road, London. N17 9EN
February 2017
149a Clapton Common | London | E5 9AE
Tel: 0208 800 6939
Contents
1- Introduction..................................................................................................................................................... 4
2- Project Description.......................................................................................................................................... 4
3- Air Quality Impact Evaluation .......................................................................................................................... 4
3.1 Location of Site ......................................................................................................................................... 5
4. The Site .......................................................................................................................................................... 5
4.1 Working Hours .......................................................................................................................................... 5
4.2 High Impact Hours .................................................................................................................................... 5
5.0 Training......................................................................................................................................................... 6
5.1 Legislation ................................................................................................................................................ 6
5.2 Codes of practice ...................................................................................................................................... 6
5.2.1 Electrical codes of practice ................................................................................................................ 6
6.0 Demolition..................................................................................................................................................... 7
6.1 Asbestos ....................................................................................................................................................... 8
6.2 Risk Assessment for Demolition Works ..................................................................................................... 8
7.0 General Waste Handling ............................................................................................................................... 9
7.1 Contaminated Land................................................................................................................................. 10
8.0 Emission, Dust Mitigation & Control Measures ............................................................................................ 10
8.1 Site planning: .......................................................................................................................................... 10
8.2 Classification .......................................................................................................................................... 11
8.1 Air Quality Dust Risk Assesment ............................................................................................................. 13
8.2 Fencing and Hoarding............................................................................................................................. 15
8.3 Painting the Hoardings ............................................................................................................................ 15
8.4 Measures to minimise the impact of construction activities ...................................................................... 15
9.0 Local Suppliers ........................................................................................................................................... 15
10.0 Public Transport ........................................................................................................................................ 16
10.1 Avoiding Peak Hour Deliveries .............................................................................................................. 16
11.0Noise ......................................................................................................................................................... 16
11.1 Requirements under the law:................................................................................................................. 18
11.2 Using hearing protection effectively: ...................................................................................................... 19
2
12.0 Vibration ................................................................................................................................................... 20
13.0 Construction Lighting and Measures to Minimise Light Pollution ................................................................ 21
14.0 Communication Strategy and Neighbour Liaison ....................................................................................... 21
14.1 Complaints Procedures ......................................................................................................................... 22
14.3 Environmental Code of Construction ..................................................................................................... 22
14.4 Documentation...................................................................................................................................... 23
14.5 Dealing with Complaints ........................................................................................................................ 23
15.0 Review and Update ................................................................................................................................... 23
3
1- Introduction
The purpose of this method statement is to ensure that the emission and adverse effects of dust are
minimised during the demolition & construction period. Also, The Code follows a methodical approach
to construction works and sets standards to be followed by the Principal Contractor during the
construction of Proposed Development at 2 Chesnut Road, London. N17 9EN.
2- Project Description
The scheme consists of demolition of all existing structures on the site with the exception of the front
facade of the original 19th Century Victorian villa, which is to be retained and restored. Behind this and
facing onto Rycroft Way to the east will be a new development between three and four-storeys in height
plus basement for the use as student accommodation. This Proposal consists of a total of 64 individual
rooms (including 2 rooms for disabled persons, with potential for two more) and associated communal
kitchen and living areas for the students.
3- Air Quality Impact Evaluation
A site evaluation should be conducted before any work activities begin on site. This should assess the
likely impact of a development, based on size and location, will have on local air quality both inside and
outside the site boundary. This applies to all proposed construction activities, including demolition, site
clearing and construction phases.
To successfully control demolition and construction activity, it is important to evaluate the risk from
pollutants emitted from site. It is envisaged that this approach will bring additional benefits, such as a
reduction in the number of nuisance complaints; the majority of which relate to dust and noise emitted
from construction activities.
4
3.1 Location of Site
4. The Site
The construction site, with an address of 2 Chestnut Road is located to the rear of Tottenham Police
Station, which is on the High Road, and faces onto Chestnut Road with its shorter north boundary. The
principal eastern boundary is on to Rycroft Way.
4.1 Working Hours
All construction works will be carried out during the hours of 0800 to 1700hrs Monday to Friday and no working on
Saturdays , Sundays or bank holidays.
4.2 High Impact Hours
No work will be carried out caused ‘high impact activities’ such as demolition and concrete-breaking
works:
9am to noon and 2pm to 5.30pm, Monday to Friday
At no time Saturdays, Sundays and Public/Bank Holidays
5
5.0 Training
All operatives are adequately trained to carry out required tasks.
Site Foreman is SSSTS approved.
Site Managers are SMSTS approved.
All site operatives hold current certification and have the following training:
• CSCS certification
• Stepladder training
• Working at heights training
• Asbestos awareness training
• Abrasive wheels training
• ECS certification
5.1 Legislation
• Health and Safety Work Act 1974
• The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999, amendment 2006
• Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992
• The Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012
• Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations (PUWER) 1998
• The Reportable Injuries Diseases & Dangerous Occurrence Regulations 2013 (RIDDOR)
• Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002
• The Work at Height Regulations 2005
• The Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 2002
• The Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992
• The Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015
• The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 2006
• Electricity at Work Regulations 1989
5.2 Codes of practice
5.2.1 Electrical codes of practice
• BS EN 61439 2009 - 2012 Low-voltage switchgear and control gear assemblies.
• BS 5266 Parts 1-10 & BS EN 50172 1999 - 2008 Code of practice for emergency lighting.
• BS 5424 Parts 2 and 3, and IEC 60158 part 3 1985 - 1988 Specification for low voltage control gear.
6
• BS EN 60422 2008 Monitoring and maintenance guide for mineral insulating oils in electrical
equipment.
• BS EN 60079-30-2 2007 Electric surface heating.
• BS 6423 1983 Code of practice for maintenance of electrical switchgear and control gear for voltages
up to and including 1 kV.
• BS 6626 2010 Code of practice for maintenance of electrical switchgear and control gear for voltages
above l kV and up to and including 36 kV.
• BS EN 62305, 4 parts 2006-2011 Code of practice for protection of structures against lightning.
• BS 7375 2010 Code of practice for distribution of electricity on construction and building sites.
• BS 7430 1998 Code of practice for earthling.
• BS 7671 2008 - 2015 Requirements for electrical installations. IEE Wiring Regulations. Seventeenth
edition.
• BS 7909 2008 - 2011 Code of practice for temporary electrical systems for entertainment and related
purposes.
• BS EN 50110 Parts 1- 2, 2004 - 2010 Operation of electrical installations.
• IEC 60479 Parts 1-4, & PD6519 1994-2005 Guide to effects of current on human beings and
livestock.
• BS EN 60529 1992 Specification for degrees of protection provided by enclosures (IP code).
• BS EN 60947 Parts 1-8 2001 - 2011 Specification for low voltage switch gear and control gear.
6.0 Demolition
The Building Control Team of the relevant local authority will be notified of any building demolition
works under sections 80 and 81 of the Building Act 1984.
Demolition may commence after six weeks has elapsed from the submission of the notification or after
the local authority has issued a counter notice, which will require certain tasks to be carried out
Developers should consider referring to the demolition protocol set up by the ICE (Institution of Civil
Engineers) and CIWM (Institute of Waste Management) 14. This protocol provides best practice on
aspects such as building audits and use of recycled materials to be reused on site or elsewhere.
The contractor shall comply with the code `The Control of Dust & Emission from Construction
&Demolition`. Available on the below link;
https://www.london.gov.uk/file/18750/download?token=zV3ZKTpP
Figure 1: PPE Requirement
7
6.1 Asbestos
For sites with potentially asbestos-containing materials, An independent professional should approve
the statement to ensure that no person at work or member of public is exposed to a harmful release of
asbestos during works, A check will be carried out to ascertain whether asbestos, man-made mineral
fibres (MMMF) or other deleterious materials exist and include in the system of work proposed manner
of disposal of same.
6.2 Risk Assessment for Demolition Works
Activity: What is the
Hazard?
Harm: Who or What?
Public entering the site
Injury the person
Gas / Electric
Explosion / fire / Shock
Working at Height / Falls
Injury to person
from height
Slips / Trips
Injury to person
Road users and
pedestrians during
movement of lorries
Injury to person
General Site Hazards
including dust, cuts etc..
Injury to person
Manual Handling
Injury to person
Falling Masonry
uncontrolled collapse
Site operatives ,
possible public
Control Measures
Site to be securely fenced off and
locked at end of working day. Signage
warning of danger.
Services to be disconnected prior
demolition works and confirmed as
disconnected by licensed person only.
Use scaffolding
Use fall arrest system
Implement good housekeeping, all trip
hazard to be removed
Use of banks man all the times,
warning signs and where required
physical barriers.
Use of PPE all the times, dust
suppression system planned, full site
coverage of water mist when
required.
All the time to be checked before
manual handling.
During the soft strip, structural
stability of the building to be assessed
by the structural engineer, if any
Risk
Level
Medium
High
High
Medium
Low
Medium
Low
Medium
8
Working around or
causing construction
dust
Site operatives ,
Working in areas where
asbestos could be
present
Site operatives ,
possible public
Using portable hand
tools
Site operatives ,
Use of abrasive wheels
Using vibrating
machinery
Using ladders
Site operatives ,
Site operatives ,
Site operatives ,
section of the building is deemed at
risk then all person to be evacuated,
mechanical means to be used and
make safe all areas
Consider using a different method of
work altogether when operating tools
that create dust
Lung cancer, silicosis, Chronic
Obstructive Pulmonary Disorder or
asthma caused through inhaling
construction dust
Inspections on site should be carried
out before commencing work, if
asbestos is identified, or suspected,
work should be suspended and site
supervisor made aware
All operatives to be trained in the safe
use of hand tools before starting
works and have necessary
experience to use each hand tool
Only operatives with training and
authorised to use abrasive
wheel tools should undertake work
Where possible, try eliminate or
reduce exposure to the lowest
reasonably practicable level
All workers should have sufficient
training and competency in
using vibrating machinery
All users are trained in the safe use of
ladders and working at
height
Medium
High
Low
Low
Low
Low
7.0 General Waste Handling
A suitable route to transport waste must be considered prior to the work.
The waste route should be segregated using barrier fencing with suitable signage to direct the public to
the alternative pathway and prevent unauthorised persons accessing the waste route.
Ensure the correct PPE is worn when handling waste.
Always use a mechanical means of moving waste whenever possible (e.g. wheel barrow).
Use good manual handling techniques when mechanical assistance is not practical or safe.
Always dispose of waste in accordance with principle contractor’s environmental policy and waste
Management plan.
9
Report any environmental waste accidents or spillages immediately to the principle contractor who will
put into action the emergency waste containment plan and inform the relevant authorities. A spill kit will
be carried on site all times.
7.1 Contaminated Land
It will be required during the works to implement measures to prevent the contamination of the ground
or watercourse by fuels, plant, equipment, materials or human waste. Freed Construction will ensure
that all waste is managed on site and removed by a registered waste contractor to a licensed site
authorised to receive the waste. Any fuels, oils or other chemicals that are to be stored onsite shall be
contained within an impervious bund.
Land can be contaminated in many ways including leakage, accidental spillage or uncontrolled waste
disposal. Contaminated Land is defined under the Environmental Protection Act as land in such
condition by reason of substances in, on or under the land, that significant harm is being caused, or
there is a significant possibility of such harm being caused, or pollution of controlled waters is being, or
is likely to be caused.
Where contaminated land is identified, the principal contractor must contact local authority.
8.0 Emission, Dust Mitigation & Control Measures
Freed Construction will take all necessary measures to avoid creating a dust nuisance during both
construction and demolition works. Best practicable means will be used to minimise dust. Contractors
will be required to follow the Best Practice Guidance ‘The Control of Dust and Emissions from
Construction and Demolition’ published by the GLA and London Councils in November 2006
and adopt dust control measures for large sites of strategic importance as follows
8.1 Site planning:

Erect solid barriers to site boundary in dust sensitive locations

No bonfires

Plan site layout – work compounds will be laid out so that accesses and loading areas and
machinery and dust causing activities are located as far away from sensitive receptors as
practicable so that where practicable temporary structures screen these activities

All site personnel to be fully trained

Trained and responsible manager on site during working times to undertake observations of dust
and weather conditions, maintain a site logbook and carry out site inspections

Hard surface site haul routes

Put in place dust monitors at the perimeter of the site; and

All vehicles will switch off engines, no idling.
10

All loads entering and leaving site will be covered.

Site will not runoff water or mud on to the public highway.

Water will be used as a dust suppressant on site.

Cutting equipment will use water as a dust suppressant.

Rubbish skips will be covered.

Dust generating activities will be minimised.

Hard surfaces and haul routes will be regularly cleaned and maintained.

Mechanical sweepers will be employed as required.

All personnel will be inducted and / or trained as required.

Visual monitoring will be carried out on an ongoing basis.

We will always endeavour to operate with best practical means at all times.

Set site speed limits (5mph).
8.2 Classification
The scale of potential dust emissions from this phase should be determined using the following criteria.
Developers should use the highest category their development falls within
Classification Type
Large
Medium
Small
Criteria
Total volume of building to be demolished >50,000m3 , or
potentially dusty construction material (e.g. concrete), or
on-site crushing and screening, or demolition activities >20m above ground
level;
Total volume of building to be demolished 20,000m3 – 50,000m3 , or
potentially dusty construction material, or
demolition activities 10-20m above ground level;
total volume of building to be demolished <20.000m3 or
construction material with low potential for dust release (e.g. metal cladding or
timber), or
demolition activities <10m above ground demolition during wetter months.
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Figure 2: Dust Management Assessment and Mitigation Flow Chart.
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8.1 Air Quality Dust Risk Assesment
Table 1: Risk Assesment Table
Task
Eliminate or limit the dust by:
Chasing concrete and
raking mortar
-Limiting the need for chasing at the
design/layout stage
-Using a work method that limits/does not need
chasing, like over-covering cables
Cutting concrete
kerbs, blocks and
paving with a cut-off
saw
Cutting roofing tiles
with a cut-off saw
Scabbling or grinding
with hand-held tools
Short-duration drilling
totalling 15–30
minutes with handheld rotary power
tools
Drilling holes with
hand-held rotary
power tools as a ‘main
activity’
Limiting the number of cuts during design/layout
Using lower energy equipment like block
splitters
Getting material cut off site and delivered
Control the dust by using
-On-tool extraction using an H or M -Class
extraction unit and
RPE* with an APF of 20
– consider powered RPE for longer duration
work
-Water suppression and
RPE* with an APF of 20
-Hand cutting natural/fibre cement slates and
other tiles where possible
-Using ½ and 1½ tiles
-Correct setting out/design
-Minimising valleys/using dry valleys
-Water suppression and
-A dedicated cutting area with scaffold board
protection and
-RPE* with an APF of 20
-Specifying architectural finishes that do not
need scabbling
-Using (ultra) high-pressure water jetting
-Using chemical retarders and pressure washing
-Casting in proprietary joint formers, eg mesh
formwork
-Where possible use on-tool extraction using
an H or M Class extraction unit and
-RPE* with an APF of 20
-Limiting the number of holes during
design/planning
-Using direct fastening or screws
-Where possible use equipment that stops dust
getting into the air. The larger the holes the
better this needs to be. Options range from:
drilling through a dust ‘collector’ or using
cordless extraction attached to the drill (for
smaller drill bits) or
on-tool extraction using an H or M Class
extraction unit
-Otherwise use RPE* with an APF of 20
Limiting the number of holes during
design/planning
Using direct fastening or screws
-Where possible on-tool extraction using an H
or M Class extraction unit and
-RPE* with an APF of 20
Limiting the number of holes during
design/planning
-On-tool extraction using an H or M Class
extraction unit
-Longer duration work (ie over 15–30 minutes
accumulated time over the day) will also need
RPE.* Use an APF of 20
Limiting the number of holes during
design/planning
-Water suppression
-Long periods of wet coring in enclosed spaces
will also need RPE.
-Use an APF of 20
-Limiting the amount of breaking during
design/planning stage
-Bursting, crushing, cutting, sawing or other
-On-tool extraction using an H or M Class
extraction unit and
-RPE* with an APF of 20
Dry coring
Wet coring
Using a hand-held
breaker in enclosed
spaces with limited
ventilation
13
techniques
-Remote controlled demolition
Hydro demolition
Abrasive pressure
blasting
-Using a different method of work like (ultra)
high-pressure water jetting
-Using ‘silica free’ abrasive material
-Wet or vacuum blasting and
-RPE* will depend on silica content of building
materials, blasting equipment and length of
work: In most instances use RPE with an APF
of 40
-Use RPE with an APF of 20 for lower risk
work (including the ‘potman’ nearby)
-Shrouds or screens to contain the flying
abrasive
-Certain restricted/enclosed working places
may also need general mechanical ventilation
Soft strip demolition
Removing small
rubble, dust and
debris
Cutting wood with
power tools
Sanding wood with
power tools
Sanding plasterboard
jointing
-Carefully planning the work
-Limiting the number of people that need to be in
the work area
-Screening off areas to prevent dust spreading
-Use water suppression or on-tool extraction
for those tasks where it is possible and
-RPE* with an APF of 20 – consider powered
RPE for longer duration work
-Enclosed spaces may also need general
mechanical ventilation to remove dusty air
-Limiting waste materials during design/
planning
-Considering where waste material is created
and how frequently it needs removing
-Using the correct dust controls when making
rubble/debris
-Damping down and using a brush, shovel and
bucket for minor/small ‘one-off’ amounts
-Using a less toxic wood1
-Ordering pre-cut materials
-Using dedicated cutting areas to minimise
spread
On-tool extraction using an H or M Class
extraction unit
Longer duration work (ie over 15–30 minutes
accumulated time over the day) will also need
RPE† suitable for the wood dust – particularly
in enclosed spaces
Using a less toxic wood1
Using ‘pre-finished’ materials
-On-tool extraction using an H or M Class
extraction unit and
-RPE† suitable for the wood dust in most
situations
-Using other finishes/systems
-On-tool extraction using an H, M, or L Class
extraction unit
Or for regular removal/site cleaning:
-Water spray for damping down
-Rake, shovel and bucket/wheelbarrow to
remove larger pieces
-Covered chutes and skips where needed
-Vacuum attachments fitted to an H or M Class
extraction unit
-RPE* with an APF of 20 depending upon
location, duration and type of work
14
8.2 Fencing and Hoarding
All work-sites will be completely fenced from public ingress. A range of allowable variations are as
follows:
 The Minimum Case A post chain link/mesh fence, where appropriate for minimum security and
noise limitation needs.
 The Standard Hoardings A 2.4m minimum height, plywood faced, timber framed boundary
hoarding, of a surface density of not less than 7kg/m2 for normal security and noise limitation
requirements. It may be necessary to increase the minimum height to protect buildings from
noise.
 Special Circumstances Where a particular appearance or acoustic rating is needed.
The provisions of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 will be followed in all cases. Hoardings
erected causing poorly lit walkways will have bulkhead lights fitted.
Gates in the fencing or hoarding should, as far as is practicable be positioned and constructed to
minimise the noise transmitted to nearby noise sensitive buildings from the worksite or from plant
entering or leaving the site. Hoardings will be provided and maintained, by the Contractor, and the
Conditions of Licence issued by London Borough of Harringay. Adequate security will be exercised by
the Contractor to prevent unauthorised entry to or exit from the site. Site gates will be closed and locked
when there is no site activity and site security provisions will be set in motion. Provision of alarms will
follow HSE requirements
8.3 Painting the Hoardings
The Contractor will ensure that all hoardings are painted on both faces. This should normally be in a
plain uniform manner, but in some cases, where they will not distract drivers on the adjacent highway,
approved murals to a high standard may be encouraged.
8.4 Measures to minimise the impact of construction activities
Properties neighbouring the construction areas can be impacted by construction for short periods of
time.
Every effort is to be made to keep the impacts of construction to a minimum.
9.0 Local Suppliers
As part of our Corporate Social Responsibility Agenda, we aim to promote local employment and
stimulate the local economy. Where feasible we will source services, materials and equipment locally.
This improves local health by reducing freight impacts such as fossil fuel usage, congestion, pollution,
and road construction and road casualties.
15
10.0 Public Transport
Site meetings are arranged with a view to ensuring that attendees can use the public transport system
to arrive and disperse from the meetings. Details of the local bus and rail networks – identifying key
routes to the project will be posted on site notice boards and will be covered in the site induction to
promote the use of public transport. The main contractor`s site team is encouraged to become familiar
with the local transport systems and operating times and to pass this information onto all personnel on
site.
10.1 Avoiding Peak Hour Deliveries
As part of the procedure for the allocation of delivery times to suppliers, care will be taken to reduce the
amount of vehicle travelling time within peak periods. Where possible deliveries will be taken on site
early to allow the vehicles to be offloaded during the peak period and then leave site once the peak
period has ended. This allows greater efficiency in predicting delivery times and reduces haulage costs.
11.0Noise
As an employer we will assess the risks to employees from noise at work; take action to reduce the
noise exposure that produces those risks; provide employees with hearing protection if we cannot
reduce noise exposure enough by other methods; make sure legal limits on noise exposure are not
exceeded and provide employees with information, instruction and training and carry out health
surveillance where there is a risk to health.
The noise regulations require us to take specific action at certain action values. These relate to levels
of exposure to noise of our employees averaged over a working day or week and mmaximum noise
(peak sound pressure) to which employees are exposed in a working day.
The aim of the risk assessment is to help us decide what we need to do to ensure the health & safety of
our employees who are exposed to noise. It is more than just taking measurements of noise
(sometimes measurements may not even be necessary). The risk assessment will:




Identify where there may be a risk from noise and who is likely to be affected
Contain a reliable estimate of employees’ exposures and compare exposure with the exposure
action values and limit values
Identify what we need to do to comply with the law (eg whether noise control measures or
hearing protection are needed and if so where and what type
Identify who needs to be provided with health surveillance and whether any are at particular
risk
It is essential that we show that our estimate of employees’ exposure is representative of the work that
they do. It needs to take account of the work they do or are likely to do the ways in which they do the
work and how it might vary from one day to the next. The estimate will be based on reliable
information. We will record the findings of our risk assessment. We will record in an action plan
anything we identify as being necessary to comply with the law, setting out what we have done and
16
what we are going to do, with a timetable and saying who will be responsible for the work. Review our
risk assessment if circumstances onsite change and affect noise exposures. Also review it regularly to
make sure that we continue to do all that is reasonably practicable to control the noise risks. Even if it
appears that nothing has changed, we will not leave it for more than about two years without checking
whether a review is needed. We will make sure that our risk assessment has been drawn up by
someone who is competent to carry out the task and is based on advice and information from people
who are competent to provide it.
Our risk assessment will produce information on the risks and an action plan for controlling
noise:






Tackle the immediate risk (eg by providing hearing protection)
Identify what is possible to control noise, how much reduction could be achieved and what is
reasonably practicable
Establish priorities for action and a timetable (eg consider where there could be immediate
benefits, what changes may need to be phased in over a longer period of time and the number
of people exposed to the noise in each case)
Assign responsibilities to people to deliver the various parts of the plan
Ensure the work on noise control is carried out
Check that what we have done has worked
The purpose of the regulations is to make sure that people do not suffer damage to their hearing so
controlling noise risks and noise exposure should be where you concentrate our efforts. Wherever
there is noise at work we will be looking for alternative processes, equipment and/or working methods
which would make the work quieter or mean people are exposed for shorter times. We will also keep
up with what is good practice or the standard for noise control within the industry. Where there are
things you can do to reduce risks from noise, that are reasonably practicable, they should be done.
However, where noise exposures are below the lower exposure action values, risks are low and so we
are only expected to take actions which are relatively inexpensive and simple to carry out. Where our
assessment shows that our employees are likely to be exposed at or above the upper exposure action
values, we will put in place a planned programme of noise control.
We will consider the following:





Use
a
different,
quieter
process
or
quieter
equipment
Modify the paths by which the noise travels through the air to the people exposed
Design and lay out the workplace for low noise emission
Limit the time spent in noisy areas (every halving of the time spent in a noisy area will reduce
noise exposure by 3 dB)
Proper and regular maintenance of machinery and equipment is essential as it will deteriorate
with age and can become noisier
Establish a low noise purchasing policy
17
Introducing a positive purchasing and hire policy is the most cost effective long term measure we can
take to reduce noise at work. Choosing quieter equipment and machinery whether it is bought or hired
from the start can save the cost of introducing noise reduction measures once it is installed or in use.
 Consider at an early stage how new or replacement machinery could reduce noise levels in the
workplace (set a target to reduce the noise levels if possible)
 Ensure we specify a realistic noise output level for all new machinery and check that tenderers
and suppliers are aware of their legal duties
 Ask suppliers about the likely noise levels under the particular conditions in which we will
operate the machinery as well as under standard test conditions
 If we ask the same question to all suppliers we can compare information (noise output data will
only ever be a guide as many factors affect the noise levels experienced by employees but it
will help us buy quieter machines)
 Try to purchase or hire only from suppliers who can demonstrate a low noise design with noise
control as a standard part of the machine, not as a costly optional extra
 Keep a record of our decision process, to help show that we have met our legal duties to
reduce workplace noise
Under the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 and the Supply of Machinery (Safety) Regulations
1992 (as amended) a supplier of machinery must provide equipment that is safe and without risk to
health with the necessary information to ensure it will be used to meet those aims; design and construct
machinery so that the noise produced is as low as possible and povide information about the noise the
machine produces under actual working conditions. New machinery will be provided with a Declaration
of Conformity to show that it meets essential health and safety requirements and CE mark; instructions
for safe installation, use and maintenance and information on the risks from noise at workstations,
including:
A-weighted sound pressure level, where this exceeds 70 dB
Maximum C-weighted instantaneous sound pressure level, where this exceeds 130 dB
Sound power (a measure of the total sound energy) emitted by the machinery where the A-weighted
sound pressure level exceeds 85 dB
Description of the operating conditions under which the noise tests were carried out
Hearing protection will be issued to employees where extra protection is needed above what can been
achieved using noise control and as a short term measure while other methods of controlling noise are
being developed. We will not use hearing protection as an alternative to controlling noise by technical
and organisational means.
11.1 Requirements under the law:


Provide employees with hearing protectors if they ask for them and their noise exposure is
between the lower and upper exposure action values
Provide employees with hearing protectors and make sure they use them properly when their
noise exposure exceeds the upper exposure action values
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Identify hearing protection zones (ie areas where the use of hearing protection is compulsory
and mark them with signs if possible)
Provide employees with training and information on how to use and care for the hearing
protectors
Ensure that the hearing protectors are properly used and maintained
11.2 Using hearing protection effectively:
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Make sure the protectors give enough protection (aim at least to get below 85 dB at the ear)
Target the use of protectors to the noisy tasks and jobs in a working days
Select protectors which are suitable for the working environment (consider how comfortable
and hygienic they are)
Think about how they will be worn with other protective equipment (eg hard hats, dust masks
and eye protection)
Provide a range of protectors so that employees can choose ones which suit them
Don’t:
 Provide protectors which cut out too much noise as this can cause isolation or lead to an
unwillingness to wear them
 Make the use of hearing protectors compulsory where the law doesn’t require it
 Have a ‘blanket’ approach to hearing protection (better to target its use and only encourage
people to wear it when they need to)
We will make sure that hearing protection works effectively and check that:
 It remains in good, clean condition
 Earmuff seals are undamaged and tension of the headbands is not reduced
 There are no unofficial modifications
 Compressible earplugs are soft, pliable and clean
We will make sure that employees use hearing protection when required to:
 Include the need to wear hearing protection in your safety policy (put someone in authority in
overall charge of issuing it and making sure replacements are readily available
 Carry out spot checks to see that the rules are being followed and that hearing protection is
being used properly (if employees carry on not using it properly we will follow our normal
company disciplinary procedures)
 Ensure all managers and supervisors set a good example and wear hearing protection at all
times when in hearing protection zones
 Ensure only people who need to be there enter hearing protection zones and do not stay longer
than they need to
It is important that employees understand the risks they may be exposed to. Where they are exposed
above the lower exposure action values we should at least tell them:
 Likely noise exposure and the risk to hearing this noise creates
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
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What we are doing to control risks and exposures
Where and how people can obtain hearing protection
How to report defects in hearing protection and noise control equipment
What their duties are under the Noise Regulations 2005
What they should do to minimise the risk such as the proper way to use hearing protection and
other noise control equipment, how to look after it and store it, and where to use it
Health surveillance systems
We will provide health surveillance (hearing checks) for all employees who are likely to be regularly
exposed above the upper exposure action values or are at risk for any reason (eg they already suffer
from hearing loss or are particularly sensitive to damage).
12.0 Vibration
By law, as an employer, we will assess and identify measures to eliminate or reduce risks from
exposure to hand-arm vibration so that we can protect our employees from risks to their health. Where
the risks are low, the actions we take may be simple and inexpensive, but where the risks are high, we
will manage them using a prioritised action plan to control exposure to hand-arm vibration. Where
required, ensure that control measures to reduce vibration are properly applied; we provide information,
training and health surveillance; review what you are doing if anything changes that may affect
exposures to vibration where you work and health effects of HAV at work.
Identifying signs and symptoms at an early stage is important. It will allow us, as the employer, to take
action to prevent the health effects from becoming serious for our employee. The symptoms include
any combination of tingling and numbness in the fingers; not being able to feel things properly; loss of
strength in the hands and fingers going white (blanching) and becoming red and painful on recovery
(particularly in the cold and wet and probably only in the tips at first).
In conducting a risk assessment, we will assess daily exposure to vibration by means of:
Observation of specific working practices
Reference to relevant information on the probable magnitude of the vibration corresponding to
the equipment used in the particular working conditions
 If necessary, measurement of the magnitude of vibration to which his employees are liable to
be exposed
 Employer shall assess whether any employees are likely to be exposed to vibration at or above
an exposure action value or above an exposure limit value
The risk assessment will include consideration of:

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
Magnitude, type and duration of exposure, including any exposure to intermittent vibration or
repeated shocks
Effects of exposure to vibration on employees whose health is at particular risk from such
exposure
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Any effects of vibration on the workplace and work equipment, including the proper handling of
controls, the reading of indicators, the stability of structures and the security of joints
Any information provided by the manufacturers of work equipment
Availability of replacement equipment designed to reduce exposure to vibration
Any extension of exposure at the workplace to whole-body vibration beyond normal working
hours, including exposure in rest facilities supervised by the employer
Specific working conditions such as low temperatures
Appropriate information obtained from health surveillance including where possible published
information
13.0 Construction Lighting and Measures to Minimise Light Pollution
Lighting to site boundaries will be provided with illumination sufficient for the safety of the passing
public, including disabled people. Wherever possible, such lighting will be fed from an electricity mains
supply. In particular, precautions will be taken to avoid shadows cast by the site hoarding on
surrounding footpaths and roads. Site lighting will also be positioned and directed as so to minimise
nuisance to residents or adjacent buildings and land uses, or to cause distraction or confusion to
passing traffic on adjoining public highways. The contractor shall comply with the Institute of Lighting
Engineers document Guidance Notes for Reductions of Light Pollution 2000 (revised 05/03).Noise and
vibration
All works must be carried in accordance with BS 5228: Part 1 and employ the `Best Practicable Means`
to minimise the effects of noise and vibration. Monitoring of noise and vibration levels may be
appropriate depending upon the proximity of sensitive receptors and the duration of work. Commitment to
consult with LBN Environmental Health regarding work.
14.0 Communication Strategy and Neighbour Liaison
Liaison with neighbours should take place before work gets underway and good communication must
continue throughout the works. Disruption to neighbours during a construction project may be
unavoidable, but the impact will be reduced if they are consulted and informed about problems and
potential solutions during each phase of the works. Often minor changes to working patterns, schedules
or methods can significantly improve the experience for neighbours; contractors are therefore strongly
encouraged to have a dialogue with affected residents throughout a project to determine what changes
can be accommodated.
It recommended that during liaison with immediate neighbours the following information, which may
influence schedules and work patterns for noisy/disruptive work, is obtained:

home working days and/or hours

details of any vulnerable persons in neighbouring properties who may have
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
special needs special occasions such as wakes, wedding receptions, children’s birthday
parties, etc
Site Category
Small (Cat 1)
Medium(cat 2)
Large(Cat 3)
Recommended communication measures and liaison strategy
 Contractor details, contact details for site manager, duration of project
and site working hours displayed clearly on site hoarding
 Person appointed to deal with complaints
 All staff and subcontractors briefed on noise mitigation and permitted
hours for noisy works
All Category 3 site measures and:
 Letter drops to neighbouring residents before work begins giving the
following information:
 the start date, duration and nature of the project
 the principal stages of the project
 all significant operations that have potential to cause disturbance from
noise and vibration
 approximate start and end dates of potentially disruptive works
 outline details of noise and vibration mitigation steps that are to be used
 contact names and numbers of appropriate site personnel
 Liaison with neighbouring construction sites to co-ordinate works are far
as practicable in order to minimise disruption to residents
All Category 2 and 3 site measures and:
Establish contact with the relevant residents‟ association
Meetings with residents at appropriate intervals including before work begins.
Minutes of meeting and agreed actions circulated to residents
website with site information and contact email address provided
14.1 Complaints Procedures
Freed Construction will clearly display contact details in prominent locations, at various points around the
site boundary.
Freed Construction will keep accurate records of any complaints received. We would propose that we will
advise the Haringay Environmental Protection Team of any complaints received and how we have
addressed them.
14.3 Environmental Code of Construction
The proposed work shall comply with council`s own code of construction practice and noise and vibration
limits. Contractor will minimise the adverse environmental impact of demolition and construction works at
the site
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14.4 Documentation
The contractor may hold appropriate documentation that may include vibration and dust monitoring
results, complaint logs and action taken record.
14.5 Dealing with Complaints
The contractor is responsible for responding to complaints within an adequate time frame and where
appropriate providing details of corrective action taken. On Category 1 sites, there should be regular
meetings and correspondence between the contractor and the Council to monitor the progress of the
works, to consider any concerns or complaints and to review noise monitoring results, and, for large
projects/high-impact sites, meetings should be held with residents and neighbours to review these
results.
15.0 Review and Update
Periodic review of this code is necessary to ensure that it is sufficiently current and robust. The
Environmental Health Service will lead a review of the document on a five-year cycle. Where necessary
intervening updates will be produced to make minor changes where a review of the whole document is
deemed not to be necessary
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Appendix A: Site Plan
Document Change Control
(This is a live document and will be updated as required during the life of the project)
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Revision No
Date
Description
Revised Pages
”
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