null  null
Enable Rich Media
Communications (RMC) with
HP and Polycom
Solution Configuration Guide
Revision History
Version
Date
Description
1.0
January 1, 2012
Initial Document Created
Table of contents
Designing Networks for Rich Media Communications .......................................................................4
Introduction ..............................................................................................................................4
Solution Blueprint Overview .......................................................................................................5
FlexNetwork Architecture ...........................................................................................................5
HP Networking Components ..........................................................................................................6
HP 7500 Modular Core Switch Series .........................................................................................6
HP 5400zl Switch Series ...........................................................................................................7
HP 2910al Switch Series ...........................................................................................................8
Core Routers ............................................................................................................................8
Access Routers ..........................................................................................................................9
Wireless LAN ...........................................................................................................................9
LLDP ......................................................................................................................................10
WAN optimization .................................................................................................................10
Virtual services .......................................................................................................................10
HP 4110 IP Phone ..................................................................................................................11
HP 4120 IP Phone ..................................................................................................................11
Polycom Conferencing Systems and Servers ...................................................................................11
Polycom RealPresence Platform, including RMX, DMA, CMA........................................................12
Polycom RMX Multipoint Conferencing Platforms.........................................................................12
Polycom Distributed Media Application (DMA) 7000 ..................................................................12
Polycom Converged Management Application (CMA) .................................................................13
Polycom CMA Desktop ............................................................................................................13
Polycom HDX 7000 Video Conferencing Series..........................................................................13
Polycom CX5000 Unified Conference Station.............................................................................14
Microsoft Lync Server and Client Applications ............................................................................14
Configuration Guidelines for HP Devices .......................................................................................15
Core Switches ........................................................................................................................15
Distribution/Aggregation Switches ............................................................................................16
Best Practices for Implementing an RMC-enabled Network ...............................................................19
Traffic Engineering and Service Quality Considerations ...............................................................19
Security Considerations ...........................................................................................................20
Configuration Considerations ...................................................................................................20
VoIP Resiliency & Redundancy Considerations............................................................................21
Power over Ethernet (PoE and PoE+) Considerations....................................................................21
HP Network Services...................................................................................................................21
Appendix A: FlexCampus and FlexBranch Solution Portfolio ............................................................22
Appendix B: Concise Summary of HP RMC Interoperability Test Results.............................................23
Overview ...............................................................................................................................23
Interoperability .......................................................................................................................23
QoS and Contention ...............................................................................................................23
Extended Topology Operation ..................................................................................................24
Appendix C: Reference Manuals and URL Summary .......................................................................24
Designing Networks for Rich Media Communications
Introduction
We live in an increasingly visual society and video communications is everywhere—it’s in our laptops, smart phones,
running on demand in conference rooms and throughout the enterprise and home in portable devices like tablets. For
ubiquitous and effective use of video, IP networks are becoming the de facto standard for delivering converged
applications like video collaboration, voice over IP, IP surveillance and on-demand video. Real-time visual
communication technologies like TelePresence are more susceptible to packet loss and network congestion than other
video technologies, and have different quality of service requirements. The proliferation of real-time and live-streaming
video has a profound impact on network traffic, bandwidth management and quality of service delivery for
enterprises. Most legacy enterprise networks were designed to enable conventional client/server applications and
traditional “bursty” data communication flows. As such, legacy networks are not well suited for bandwidth-intensive,
delay-sensitive RMC.
This guide presents a blueprint for a next-generation RMC-enabled enterprise network infrastructure based on the HP
FlexNetwork architecture. The infrastructure enables the secure and reliable delivery of interactive IP voice, video and
unified communications traffic over wired and wireless networks. The blueprint encompasses the entire enterprise
network – core, data center, campus and branch. HP has validated the RMC solution blueprint with select voice and
video collaboration solutions from our exclusive partner in video, Polycom®, as well as Microsoft® Lync™ unified
communications solutions. Together, HP and its partners Polycom and Microsoft, deliver open, standards-based rich
media solutions that mitigate the risk and cost of enabling productivity-enhancing RMC.
Intended for networking and IT professionals responsible for planning, designing, and implementing, video
conferencing, telepresence and UC solutions, this guide provides an overview of the blueprint components and
describes best practices for implementing an RMC-enabled infrastructure. This guide also provides links to HP,
Polycom, and Microsoft product manuals that elaborate on many of the concepts and technologies introduced within
this document. In addition, the links offer much greater detail in regards to the numerous tasks involved with
managing, configuring, and securing an RMC-enabled network.
4
Solution Blueprint Overview
Figure 1 serves as a generalized reference diagram for a typical enterprise network. UC, VoIP, video and audio
conferencing, and management servers are consolidated into a centralized data center. RMC services are delivered
to campus and branch users across an extended enterprise network comprised of wired and wireless infrastructure.
Figure 1: Generalized reference diagram for a typical enterprise network
Data Center
Headquarters
Lync Client
HP 3800 Switch
HP 6100-N IPS
HP 10500 Switch
HP 6608 Router
HP 12500 Switch
MSM460
Virtual Meeting Rooms
Ploycom HDX Series
Polycom CX5000
CX3000
Polycom
Video
Border Proxy
HP 5830 Switch
RMX 2000
MPLS/VPN
WAN
HDX Series executive desktop
Lync Client
Microsoft
Lync Clint
MSM460 AP
Polycom CMA
Microsoft Milestone
5000
Lync
Polycom
DMA
7000
HP MSR20
HDX Series
HP 5406 Switch
CX3000
Polycom
RMX 2000
Branch Office
RMX 2000
RMX 4000
Polycom VVX 1500
FlexNetwork Architecture
HP FlexNetwork – the industry’s only unified architecture for the data center, campus and branch – is specifically
designed to help IT planners align their networks with their business needs – even as needs change. With
FlexNetwork, IT organizations can segment their networks into the four interrelated modular building blocks:
FlexFabric, FlexCampus, FlexBranch and FlexManagement (See Figure 2).
Figure 2: The four interrelated modular building blocks
FlexFabric
FlexCampus
FlexBranch
FlexManagement
FlexNetwork Architecture
Open
Scalable
Secure
Agile
Consistent
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FlexFabric converges data center network, compute and storage resources, delivering the predictable performance
and high availability and extensibility needed to enable large-scale virtualization and consolidation initiatives and a
range of IT deployment models. FlexCampus converges wired and wireless networks to deliver rich-media-optimized,
secure, identity-based access to business-critical applications and services. FlexBranch converges network functionality
with key enterprise services providing branch office employees fast and reliable access to data, voice, video and UC
applications. And FlexManagement converges network management and orchestration across the entire multi-vendor
enterprise network, simplifying administration, monitoring and control functions.
Enterprises can leverage the HP FlexNetwork architecture and HP FlexFabric, FlexCampus and FlexBranch solutions to
implement RMC-optimized networks.
See Appendix A for a complete list of FlexFabric, FlexCampus and FlexBranch product options.
This guide focuses on the specific HP FlexCampus and FlexBranch product options and specific Polycom and
Microsoft solutions tested by HP to validate the RMC solution blueprint.
HP Networking Components
This section provides a brief overview of selected HP Networking switching equipment that was used to validate the
blueprint, and describes additional HP solutions that may be used to construct an RMC-enabled network. Links are
provided at the end of each overview pointing to technical documentation supporting the components described.
• Modular Core Switches
o HP Networking 7500, 10500 Series Switches
• Intelligent Distribution/Aggregation Switches
o HP Networking 3800, 5400zl Series Switches
• Edge Switches
o HP 2910al Series Switches
• Core and Access Routers
o 6600/8800 Series Routers
o MSR Series Routers
• Wireless LAN
o MSM 710/765 Controllers
o MSM46X Access Points
• Supplementary Technology
o Intelligent Management Center (IMC)
o Intelligent Resilient Framework (IRF)

QOS

LLDP

WAN optimization
• HP IP Phones
o HP 4110 IP Phone
o HP 4120 IP Phone
HP 7500 Modular Core Switch Series
The HP 7500 Series of modular core switches is designed to meet stringent enterprise data center applications
requirements. These multilayer switches feature cost-effective wire-speed 10 Gigabit Ethernet ports to provide the
throughput and bandwidth necessary for mission-critical data and high-speed communications, while delivering wirespeed Layer 2 and Layer 3 routing services for the most demanding applications. The 7500 supports Intelligent
Resilient Framework (IRF) technology – virtual resilient switching fabrics comprised of two or more switches that
perform as a single Layer 2 switch and Layer 3 router to enable high availability; rich QoS features including IEEE
802.1p prioritization, bandwidth shaping, and traffic policing; and extensive Layer 3 routing and convergence
features including IP multicast that are critical for IP video conferencing and streaming applications.
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For more information about the HP 7500 Switch Series, refer to the following technical documentation:
• HP 7500 Configuration Guide
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02985997/c02985997.pdf
HP 5400zl Switch Series
The chassis-based modular HP 5400zl Switch Series of intelligent switches is ideal for enterprise edge,
distribution/aggregation layer, and branch deployments. 5400zl Series switches leverage a purpose-built,
programmable ProVision ASIC that enables rich QoS and security capabilities without sacrificing performance or
scalability. With 10/100, Gigabit Ethernet, and 10 Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, choice of PoE+ and non-PoE, and
integrated Layer 3 features with Energy Efficient Ethernet (EEE), the 5400zl switches offer excellent scalability,
flexibility, and investment protection, as well as ease of deployment and management.
For more information about the HP 5400zl Switch Series, refer to the following technical documentation:
• HP 5400zl Switch Series Management and Configuration Guide
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c03015912/c03015912.pdf
• Power over Ethernet (PoE/PoE+)
o Power over Ethernet technology allows IP telephones, wireless LAN Access Points, IP cameras and other
appliances to receive power as well as data over existing LAN cabling, without needing to modify the existing
Ethernet infrastructure.
http://bizsupport1.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02613461/c02613461.pdf
• When used in branch, the modular platform integrates services critical for branch operations like
DNS/DHCP/LDAP/Print services and provides survivability allowing branch to continue operating.
o HP Survivable Branch Communication (SBM) zl Module powered by Microsoft Lync™
The HP Survivable Branch Communication zl Module (SBM) powered by Microsoft Lync is a branch office
survivable voice gateway for the Microsoft Lync solution. The SBM also includes a mediation server and a
media gateway, which enable local Microsoft Lync devices to communicate with the public switched telephone
network (PSTN). The SBM connects to the PSTN using T1, E1, or analog FXO for integrating analog phones or
fax machines into the system. Finally, the SBM provides survivability; if the WAN connection to the main office
data center fails, the SBM routes all calls over its PSTN connection.
http://bizsupport1.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02616696/c02616696.pdf
o HP Advanced Services zl Module with Citrix XenServer platform
The HP Advanced Services zl Module with Citrix XenServer is an industry-standard open architecture platform
that provides the capability to host one or multiple applications within the networking infrastructure. The solution
has its own processor, storage, network interfaces, and memory—all of which are interconnected with a
network switch ASIC on a single platform that hosts a virtualized environment, helping to ensure greater
switching and multi-application performance while reducing physical footprint, lowering power consumption,
and consolidating management. The HP Advanced Services zl Module virtualized platform is installed into an
HP 5400zl or 8200zl series switch. Using virtualization management tools, applications and services can be
installed and configured remotely. With this high degree of flexibility, IT organizations can quickly deploy
extended application monitoring to virtually any branch office location
http://h17007.www1.hp.com/us/en/products/applicationdelivery/HP_Adv_zlMod_Citrix_XenServer/index.aspx
o HP Advanced Services zl Module VMware vSphere Platform
The HP Advanced Services zl Module with VMware vSphere is an industry-standard open architecture platform
that provides the capability to host one or multiple applications within the networking infrastructure. The solution
has its own processor, storage, network interfaces, and memory all interconnected with a network switch ASIC
on a single platform that hosts a virtualized environment, helping to ensure maximum switching and multiapplication performance while reducing physical footprint, lower power consumption, and consolidating
management. The HP Advanced Services zl Module virtualized platform is installed into a HP 5400zl or 8200zl
series switch. Using virtualization management tools, applications and services can get installed and configured
remotely.
7
With this high degree of flexibility, IT organizations can quickly deploy extended application monitoring to
virtually any branch office location.
http://h17007.www1.hp.com/us/en/products/applicationdelivery/HP_Adv_zlMod_VMware_vsphere/index.aspx
HP 2910al Switch Series
The HP 2910al Switch Series is a family of cost-effective, high-performance Gigabit Ethernet access switches. 2910al
Series switches can be deployed at the enterprise edge and remote branch offices, converged networks, and data
center top of rack. The solutions support static and RIP IPv4 routing, robust security and management, and other
enterprise-class features.
For more information about the HP 2910al Edge Switch, refer to the following technical documentation:
• HP 2910al Switch Management and Configuration Guide
o Use this guide for information on topics such as, various interfaces available on the switch, memory and
configuration operation, interface access, IP addressing, time protocols, port configuration, trunking, traffic
control, PoE operation, SNMP, LLDP, other network management topics, file transfers, switch monitoring,
troubleshooting, and MAC address management.
http://bizsupport1.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02564351/c02564351.pdf
Core Routers
HP 6600 and HP 8800 Routers deliver high performance and reliability to enable rich media communications in the
core, data center or campus.
HP 6600 Routers
As the first service convergence routers based on a multi-core processor, the HP 6600 series routers dramatically
enhance service processing capacity with HP FlexNetwork architecture. Distributed processing architecture, isolated
routing, and service engines, as well as isolated control and service panels, provide higher reliability and continual
services. Different software service engines can handle different services such as network address translation (NAT),
Quality of Service (QoS), IPsec, and NetStream with no services modules needed. HP 6600 routers feature a modular
design, embedded hardware encryption, and flexible deployment configurations, including High-speed Interface
Modules (HIMs), Multi-function Interface Modules (MIMs), and Open Application Architecture (OAA)-enabled modules
that provide network customization and investment protection.
For more information about the HP 6600 router series, refer to the following technical documentation:
• HP 6600 Routers Fundamentals Configuration Guide
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02976399/c02976399.pdf
HP 8800 Routers
The HP 8800 routers series features a distributed high-performance network processor as well as high-capacity
crossbar non-blocking switching technology that delivers high performance and flexibility. A distributed quality of
service (QoS) control unit provides end-to-end service with granular control. The routers' distributed operation,
administration, and maintenance detection engines implement fault detection within 30 ms to provide uninterrupted
core services. These innovative technologies, paired with the QoS control mechanism, deliver smooth operation and
high availability of multiple services within HP FlexNetwork.
For more information about the HP 8800 router series, refer to the following Web page:
http://h17007.www1.hp.com/us/en/products/routers/HP_8800_Router_Series/index.aspx
8
Access Routers
HP MSR20 and MSR50 Routers bring high flexibility and simplicity to the Branch enabling enterprises to easily extend
interactive voice and video services to remote locations.
HP MSR20 Routers
The HP MSR20 router series features a modular design that delivers unmatched flexibility for small branch offices and
small to medium-sized businesses while reducing complexity, simplifying management, and increasing control. The
MSR20 routers provide a full-featured, resilient routing platform, including IPv6 and MPLS. They offer lasting
investment protection, and help reduce capital and operating expenses. These routers provide an agile, flexible
network infrastructure that offers the ability to quickly adapt to changing business requirements while delivering
integrated, concurrent services on a single, easy-to-manage platform. For more information about the HP MSR20
Router Series, refer to the following Web page:
http://h17007.www1.hp.com/us/en/products/routers/HP_MSR20_Series/index.aspx
HP MSR50 Routers
The HP MSR50 router series is designed for connecting large branch and regional offices to corporate networks over
WANs and delivers high-performance, security, and integrated services on a single platform. They feature optional
embedded hardware-based encryption and voice processing. The routers with a full-featured, resilient routing
platform, including IPv6 and MPLS support, as well as comprehensive integrated security services, MSR50 routers
enhance network functionality simplify management, and reduce complexity. For more information about the HP
MSR50 Router Series, refer to the following Web page:
http://h17007.www1.hp.com/us/en/products/routers/HP_MSR50_Series/index.aspx
Wireless LAN
HP Wireless LAN solutions are specifically designed to meet rapidly-expanding wireless LAN scalability, performance
and reliability requirements. HP’s optimized WLAN architecture supports flexible traffic distribution models and
combines centralized management and control with intelligent access points at the edge of the network for
unparalleled scalability, performance and ease-of-deployment. The highly extensible architecture enables optimal
application delivery, with low impact on the wired backbone, no single point of failure or performance bottlenecks,
cost-effective scalability and strong investment protection.
HP MSM46X Access Points
HP offers a wide variety of WLAN access point solutions to meet a broad range of business requirements, including
intelligent MSM APs that are capable of local data forwarding, QoS and security enforcement. Sitting at the
wired/wireless boundary, intelligent APs can apply policies and forward packets directly between clients and servers,
or forward traffic to a centralized WLAN controller for handling, giving network planners greater choice and
flexibility as they roll out wireless infrastructure.
HP delivers the highest performance in 802.11n AP technology available on the market today. The HP 802.11n Dual
Radio Access Point series is the first AP family in the industry to offer three spatial stream MIMO technology, bringing
IEEE 802.11n near Gigabit Ethernet performance of 450Mbps per radio for a total of 900Mbps. As wireless
technology takes on an increasingly prominent role in the workplace, many enterprises are looking to 802.11n
WLANs to meet expanding performance and capacity requirements.
For more information about the HP MSM46X Access Points, refer to the following technical documentation:
• HP MSM3xx/MSM4xx Access Points CLI Reference Guide
http://bizsupport1.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02564347/c02564347.pdf
HP MSM710 and MSM765zl Controllers
HP MSM Mobility Controllers maintain centralized control over intelligent MSM APs ensuring consistent service
delivery and strict enforcement of QoS and security polices across the entire WLAN. Some MSM Mobility Controllers
can be “teamed” together for high availability, scalability and ease-of-management. Controller teams can be
expanded in an incremental fashion for cost-effective scalability; they can be deployed in an N+1 redundant
configuration for high availability; and they can be managed as a single entity with a unique IP address.
9
For more information about the HP MSM46X Access Points, refer to the following technical documentation:
• HP MSM7xx Controllers CLI Reference Guide
http://bizsupport1.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02714165/c02714165.pdf
Intelligent Management Center (IMC)
Intelligent Management Center (IMC) is an advanced network management solution that provides comprehensive
fault, configuration, accounting, performance, and security management functions for large enterprise networks.
Based on a modular architecture that enables high flexibility and scalability, this intelligent management solution
provides rich resource and configuration management capabilities; extensive software and access control functions;
real-time alarm and event notifications, and detailed historical reports. Designed for diverse multi-vendor
environments, IMC manages over 2600 network devices from 35 different manufacturers.
For more information about IMC, refer to the following technical documentation:
• IMC Administrator’s Guide
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02652530/c02652530.pdf
Intelligent Resilient Framework (IRF)
Intelligent Resilient Framework (IRF) is an HP switch platform virtualization technology that allows enterprises to
construct flat, low-latency, highly-resilient networks. HP recommends customers implement IRF to optimize networks for
real-time, bandwidth-intensive rich media communications. IRF overcomes the limitations of legacy spanning tree
networks, enabling a simplified, higher performing, more resilient, and flatter network design – with fewer devices
and fewer networking layers. By deploying IRF in the core and access layers enterprises can completely eliminate the
requirement for a dedicated aggregation layer as they scale-out data center and campus networks. IRF is supported
on the following switch series: 5120, 5500, 5800/5820, 5830, 7500, 9500, 10500, and 12500 switches.
For more information about IRF, refer to the following technical documentation:
• HP 7500 Switch Series Configuration Guide
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02985997/c02985997.pdf
LLDP
HP supports Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP) and LLDP-Media Endpoint Discovery (LLDP-MED) to simplify the
deployment of IP audio and video equipment (end-points). LLDP defines a standard method for devices such as
switches, routers, wireless LAN access points and other devices such as IP phones to advertise information about
themselves to other nodes on the network and store the information they discover. Details such as device
configuration, device capabilities and device identification can be advertised using this protocol. LLDP – MED extends
the original LLDP standard to support emergency calling services and other critical VoIP and IP video features.
For more information about configuring LLDP, refer to the following technical documentation:
• HP 5400zl Switch Series Management and Configuration Guide
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c03015912/c03015912.pdf
WAN optimization
The HP AllianceONE Extended Services zl Module with Riverbed Steelhead RiOS Application, combined with
Riverbed’s Steelhead appliances and Steelhead Mobile software, allows enterprises to optimize application
performance while reducing bandwidth consumption. The solutions enable the bandwidth equivalent of up to 30
Mbps from a T1 circuit.
Virtual services
The HP Virtual Services zl Module solution offers flexibility, scalability, and agility into branch environments by
enabling virtualized modules on the 5400zl switching platforms. The solution consolidates infrastructure and delivers
an open platform to host applications and dramatically simplify application deployments, centralize management,
improve business productivity, and reduce IT costs. Customers can choose from a wide selection of best-in-class
AllianceONE applications in the areas of Security, Mobility, UC&C, and Infrastructure.
10
HP 4110 IP Phone
The HP 4110 IP Phone is a Microsoft Lync optimized common area telephone. The HP 4110 IP Phones are standalone, cost effective and mainstream phones that are ideal for deployment in common areas such as lobbies. The HP
4110 IP Phone provides Power over Ethernet (PoE) connectivity as well as an optional power adapter. Simplified wall
mount capability provides easy installation. The HP 4110 IP Phones are well suited for "hotdesking" applications.
Users are able to log into their Microsoft Lync user account by entering their PIN on the phone allowing them access
to voice mail, personal contacts and any customized user profile settings.
For more information about the HP 4110 IP Phone, refer to the following web page:
http://h17007.www1.hp.com/us/en/products/unified-communications/HP_4110_IP_Phone/index.aspx
HP 4120 IP Phone
The HP 4120 IP Phone is a Microsoft Lync optimized knowledge worker desktop telephone. The HP 4120 IP phones
can operate stand-alone in a Lync environment. The HP 4120 IP Phones are cost effective and ideal for deployment in
employee desktops for day to day usage. The HP 4120 IP Phones provide Power over Ethernet (PoE) connectivity as
well as an optional power adapter where PoE is not available. The HP 4120 IP Phones are well suited for day to day
usage in Microsoft Lync UC environment. Users are able to log into their Microsoft Lync user account by entering their
PIN on the phone allowing them access to voice mail, personal contacts and any customized user profile settings.
For more information about the HP 4120 IP Phone, refer to the following web page:
http://h17007.www1.hp.com/us/en/products/unified-communications/HP_4120_IP_Phone/index.aspx
Polycom Conferencing Systems and Servers
This section provides a brief overview of the following Polycom conferencing system components. Also included is a
brief overview of the Microsoft Lync Server and client application, both of which are integrated and used within
several Polycom components. Links are provided at the end of each overview pointing to technical documentation for
the components described.
• Universal Video Collaboration
o RMX 1500, RMX 2000, and RMX 4000 media servers
• Virtualization Management
o Distributed Media Application (DMA) 7000 server
• Video Resource Management and Client Application
o Converged Management Application (CMA) 4000, CMA 5000, CMA Desktop Application
• RealPresence Platform Video Conferencing System
o HDX 7000, HDX 7000 D
• Polycom Conferencing Devices for Microsoft UC environments
o CX3000 (IP conference phone), CX5000
• Business Media Phone
o VVX 1500 D
• Microsoft Lync Server 2010 and Client Applications
11
Polycom RealPresence Platform, including RMX, DMA, CMA
The Polycom RealPresence Platform is the most comprehensive software infrastructure for video collaboration. The
platform includes universal video collaboration, video resource management, virtualization management, universal
access and security, and video content management. The unique open-standards approach of the Polycom
RealPresence Platform ensures integration with hundreds of unified communications and social networking
applications, and integrates with core networking and security infrastructure to deliver secure collaboration with any
number of people across heterogeneous networks with up to 50 percent less bandwidth consumption than other
solutions. The Polycom RealPresence Platform also provides security, reliability, management, and massive scalability
to support video as a cloud-based service to enterprises, SMBs, and consumers. The RealPresence Platform already
supports up to 25,000 concurrent video sessions and 75,000 device registrations – five times more than Polycom's
closest competitor.
For more information about the Polycom RealPresence platform series, refer to the following technical documentation:
• Polycom RealPresence Deployment Guide
http://supportdocs.polycom.com/PolycomService/support/global/documents/support/setup_maintenance/produ
cts/video/RealPresence_Ready_Deployment_Guide.pdf
Polycom RMX Multipoint Conferencing Platforms
The key component within Polycom’s multipoint audio/video conferencing infrastructure is the RMX series for universal
video collaboration, consisting of the RMX 1500, RMX 2000, and RMX 4000 scalable platforms. RMX platforms
provide efficient delivery of conferencing and unified collaboration services across multiple and disparate network
types. RMX platforms support the ITU H.264 High Profile video compression standard enabling the delivery of one
gigabit of high definition video within a 512 Kbit/sec bandwidth stream. Utilizing Polycom’s Lost Packet Recovery
feature, RMX platforms dynamically allocate call, conferencing, and collaborative resources, while maintaining peak
real-time efficiency and delivering crisp imagery and latency-free audio, even across congested networks. RMX
platforms are integrated to support standards-based IP (H.323 and SIP), VoIP, PSTN and ISDN conferencing services.
For more information about the RMX platform series, refer to the following technical documentation:
• RMX 1500, RMX 2000 and RMX 4000 Getting Started Guide
http://supportdocs.polycom.com/PolycomService/support/global/documents/support/setup_maintenance/produ
cts/network/RMX_Getting_Started_Guide_V_7_2.pdf
• RMX 4000 Hardware Guide
http://supportdocs.polycom.com/PolycomService/support/global/documents/support/setup_maintenance/produ
cts/network/RMX_4000_Hardware_Guide_V_7_6.pdf
• RMX 4000 Administrator’s Guide
http://supportdocs.polycom.com/PolycomService/support/global/documents/support/user/products/network/R
MX_Administrators_Guide_V_7_6.pdf
Polycom Distributed Media Application (DMA) 7000
The Distributed Media Application (DMA 7000) virtualization manager is a highly resilient, bridge unifying
application, used to simplify the allocation and management of audio/video collaboration resources co-located
within geographically dispersed multi-site RMX cluster configurations. As such, the DMA 7000 platform is highly
scalable with the capability to manage and share resources across 64 RMX 1500/2000/4000 platforms supporting
up to 25,000 concurrent calls and 75,000 registrations for the largest available networks. Intelligent load-balancing
and redundant auto-failover provides high resiliency and ensures that telepresence is as reliable and available as
other mission critical communication, such as voice or data sharing solutions. Utilizing intelligent algorithms, the DMA
platform dynamically routes calls throughout the network based on priority, class of service, resource availability,
network outage, and highly efficient load balancing of bridging resources. Centralized reporting and monitoring and
native integration with Active Directory (AD) drastically simplifies ‘meeting room’ provisioning and slashes ongoing
administration costs.
12
For more information about the DMA 7000 application, refer to the following technical documentation:
• DMA 7000 Getting Started Guide
http://support.polycom.com/global/documents/support/user/products/network/DMAv400_Getting_Started_Gui
de.pdf
• DMA 7000 Operations Guide
http://support.polycom.com/global/documents/support/user/products/network/DMAv400_Operations_usg.pdf
Polycom Converged Management Application (CMA)
The Converged Management Application (CMA) video resource manager is an integrated and scalable scheduling
and device management application that enables organizations to manage and monitor the delivery of real-time
audio and video conferencing solutions throughout a geographically dispersed enterprise. Management tasks include
the configuration and provisioning of DMA and RMX units, network security, H.323 gatekeeper, as well as user role
policy management in support of audio and video collaboration functionality across conference rooms, personal
workspaces, desktops, and mobile devices. The CMA supports a web-based console interface and a wide range of
standards-based management applets integrated to provide large scale directory services, centralized provisioning,
and management of thousands of video endpoints. The core component within CMA is the CMA 4000 or CMA
5000 server system. For small organizations, the CMA 4000 server supports up to 400 concurrently registered
endpoints and 240 concurrent calls. For large multi-site organizations, the CMA 5000 server supports up to 5000
concurrently registered endpoints and 1500 concurrent calls. The CMA 5000 system is also available in an optional
redundant configuration.
For more information about the CMA management application, refer to the following technical documentation.
• CMA 4000/5000 Getting Started Guide
http://supportdocs.polycom.com/PolycomService/support/global/documents/support/setup_maintenance/produ
cts/network/CMA_Getting_Started_Guide.pdf
• CMA 4000/5000 Operations Guide
http://support.polycom.com/global/documents/support/user/products/network/CMA_Operations_Guide.pdf
Polycom CMA Desktop
The CMA Desktop is a software client application installed on personal workspaces, desktops, and mobile devices.
The CMA desktop provides high definition video and voice communication capabilities enabling collaboration and
content sharing with other desktop clients as well as with users located in interactive video-teleconference rooms. The
CMA Desktop supports an intuitive interface through which users point and click to call and interact with colleagues
via collaborative audio/video technology. The CMA Desktop application is integrated with Microsoft LDAP directory
services, enabling users to verify contact availability and status, simplifying management, and ensuring contact list
accuracy. For more information about CMA Desktop, refer to the following technical documentation:
• CMA Desktop Help Book
http://supportdocs.polycom.com/PolycomService/support/global/documents/support/user/products/video/Polyc
om_CMA_Desktop_Help_Book.pdf
Polycom HDX 7000 Video Conferencing Series
The Polycom RealPresence Room HDX 7000 video conferencing series provides voice, video, and content for small to
medium conference rooms. The Polycom HDX 7000 series has two models: the Polycom HDX 7000 system and the
Polycom HDX 7000 HD system. The Polycom HDX 7000 system is a standard definition (SD) system that sends and
receives video in SD resolutions. The Polycom HDX 7000 HD is a high definition (HD) system that sends and receives
HD video. Both models include a Polycom EagleEye HD camera, Polycom HDX microphone, and a Polycom HDX
remote control. The HDX 7000 HD system supports HD video up to 1080p/30 resolution, HD voice with stereo
surround sound technology, HD content sharing that includes collaboration technology for sharing graphics,
presentations and rich-media content. An optional four-way embedded multipoint bridge and H.320 interfaces for
access to BRI, PRI or serial networks is also supported.
13
For more information about HDX 7000 Video Conferencing systems, see the following technical guide:
• HDX System Administrator’s Guide
http://supportdocs.polycom.com/PolycomService/support/global/documents/support/setup_maintenance/produ
cts/video/hdx_ag.pdf
Polycom CX5000 Unified Conference Station
The Polycom CX5000 is a UC video conferencing system that provides a comprehensive conferencing experience
through the use of 360 degree video and active speaker detection. The CX5000 adds a unique group voice and
video collaboration experience to Microsoft Office Live Meeting 2007 and Microsoft Office Communications Server
2007, giving remote participants a 360-degree panoramic view of the conference room and video that automatically
tracks the flow of conversation for more productive and efficient meetings.
The PCX5000 is a USB device that easily connects to any PC running the Live Meeting 2007 or Office Communicator
2007 client. In a conference room, anyone with a laptop PC and one of these applications can simply plug the
Polycom CX5000 into their PC and start sharing voice, video, and content with remote participants. The remote
participants need no additional equipment, just a computer and a network connection, to join the meeting with
panoramic and active speaker video.
For more information about the CX5000 conference phone, see the following technical guides:
• CX5000 Deployment Guide
http://supportdocs.polycom.com/PolycomService/support/global/documents/support/setup_maintenance/produ
cts/voice/Polycom_CX5000_Deployment_Guide.pdf
• CX5000 User’s Guide
http://supportdocs.polycom.com/PolycomService/support/global/documents/support/user/products/voice/Polyc
om_CX5000_Users_Guide.pdf
Microsoft Lync Server and Client Applications
Polycom supports standards-based, end-to-end UC solutions optimized for Microsoft environments. Together, the
combined HP/Polycom/Microsoft solution provides a seamless environment for voice, video, conferencing, and
collaboration, giving enterprises a choice through the scalable Polycom infrastructure and Microsoft Lync platform
over HP FlexNetwork. The Polycom/Microsoft solution enables users to collaborate from their desks, on the road, at
home, or in a conference room.
Microsoft Lync Server 2010 communications software offers instant messaging (IM), presence, conferencing, and
telephony solutions that can support enterprise-level collaboration requirements. Microsoft Lync utilizes Active
Directory (AD) for its user information, which eliminates the need for separate user and policy databases.
Microsoft Lync Server and client applications support IM conferencing, audio conferencing, web conferencing, video
conferencing, and application sharing, for both scheduled and impromptu meetings. Also supported is dial-in
conferencing so that users of public switched telephone network (PSTN) phones can participate in the audio portion
of conferences. Conferences can seamlessly change and grow in real time. Telephony Support – Microsoft Lync
Server 2010 supports Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) with voice options to enhance or replace traditional private
branch exchange (PBX) systems. Features such as call answer, hold, resume, transfer, forward and divert are
supported directly, while personalized speed dialing keys are replaced by Contacts lists, and automatic intercom is
replaced with IM. In addition, call admission control (CAC), branch office survivability, and extended options for
data resiliency are also supported.
For more information about Microsoft Lync, refer to the following technical documentation:
• Microsoft TechNet Library – Lync Server Reference http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg293124.aspx
• Configuring DHCP Options to Enable Sign-in for IP Phones http://technet.microsoft.com/enus/library/gg398088.aspx
• Provisioning IP Phones http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg413077.aspx
14
Configuration Guidelines for HP Devices
Traditional networks, and the equipment manufactured to create them, are designed based on a three layer
hierarchical model. Viewing a network from the outside looking in, the three layers consist of an outermost area
called the access (or edge) layer, an intermediate area called the distribution (or aggregation) layer, and the center
or heart of the network, generally referred to as the core or backbone layer. Each layer, and the equipment built to
operate within that layer plays a definitive role in regards to the physical and logical functionality they support, as
well as the interfaces and services they provide.
Core Switches
The core layer is the IP backbone. The primary purpose of the core is to provide highly reliable, backbone
connectivity, with the ability to switch traffic as fast as possible. The core must provide the appropriate level of
redundancy to allow fault tolerance in case of hardware or software failure or during upgrades. Core switches are
high-end switches, with redundant switching fabrics, and high-speed cables to achieve high data transfer rates and
low latency period.
HP 7500 Switch Series
Fundamental IP routing protocols such as OSPF and MPLS are usually configured on the HP 7500 series switch when
it is deployed as a core switch. For detailed information about the configuring OSPF, MPLS and other relevant IP
routing functions, refer to the following technical documents:
• Layer 3 – IP Routing Configuration Guide
o Covers the routing technologies for IPv4 and IPv6 networks of different sizes. This guide includes: IP routing
basics configuration, Static routing configuration, RIP configuration, OSPF configuration, IS-IS configuration,
BGP configuration, IPv6 static routing configuration, RIPng configuration, OSPFv3 configuration, IPv6 IS-IS
configuration, IPv6 BGP configuration, Routing policy configuration, and Policy-based routing configuration.
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02987064/c02987064.pdf
• MPLS Configuration Guide
o Describes fundamentals and configuration of MPLS and its extended functions, including MCE, MPLS basics,
MPLS TE tunnels, VPLS, and L2VPN and L3VPN implemented by using MPLS labels. This guide includes: MCE
configuration, IPv6 MCE configuration, MPLS basics configuration, MPLS TE configuration, VPLS configuration,
MPLS L2VPN configuration, MPLS L3VPN configuration, and IPv6 MPLS L3VPN configuration.
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02985439/c02985439.pdf
• Fundamentals Configuration Guide
o Describes how to use the command line interface of the switch, log into and set up the switch. This guide
includes: CLI configuration, Login methods, CLI login, NMS login, User login control, FTP configuration, TFTP
configuration, File management, Configuration file management, and Software upgrade configuration.
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02987056/c02987056.pdf
• IP Multicast Configuration Guide
o Describes Layer 2 and Layer 3 multicast fundamentals and configuration. This guide includes: Multicast
overview, IGMP snooping configuration, PIM snooping configuration, Multicast VLAN configuration, Multicast
routing and forwarding configuration, IGMP configuration, PIM configuration, MSDP configuration, MBGP
configuration, Multicast VPN configuration, MLD snooping configuration, IPv6 PIM snooping configuration, IPv6
multicast VLAN configuration, IPv6 multicast routing and forwarding configuration, MLD configuration, IPv6 PIM
configuration, and IPv6 MBGP configuration.
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02985994/c02985994.pdf
15
• ACL and QoS Configuration Guide
o Describes how to classify traffic with ACLs, and allocate network resources and manage congestions with QoS
technologies to improve network performance and network use efficiency. This guide includes: ACL
configuration, QoS overview, QoS configuration approaches, Priority mapping configuration, Traffic policing,
traffic shaping, and line rate configuration, Congestion management configuration, Congestion avoidance
configuration, Traffic filtering configuration, Priority marking configuration, Traffic redirecting configuration,
Aggregation CAR configuration, Class-based accounting configuration, and QPPB configuration.
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02985444/c02985444.pdf
• Security Configuration Guide
o Covers security features. The major security features available on the switch include identity authentication
(AAA), access security (802.1X, MAC authentication, portal, and port security), secure management (SSH), and
attack protection (IP source guard, ARP attack protection, and URPF). This guide includes: AAA configuration,
802.1X fundamentals, 802.1X configuration, EAD fast deployment configuration, MAC authentication
configuration, Portal configuration, Port security configuration, User profile configuration, Public key
configuration, SSH2.0 configuration, SFTP configuration, TCP attack protection configuration, IP source guard
configuration, ARP attack protection configuration, ND attack defense configuration, and URPF configuration.
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02987069/c02987069.pdf
• High Availability Configuration Guide
o Describes high availability technologies and features available on the switch for failure detection and failover.
Failure detection technologies focus on fault detection and isolation. Failover technologies focus on network
recovery. This guide includes: High availability overview, Active and standby switchover configuration, Ethernet
OAM configuration, CFD configuration, DLDP configuration, RRPP configuration, Smart Link configuration,
Monitor Link configuration, VRRP configuration, BFD configuration, and Track configuration.
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02985454/c02985454.pdf
• Network Management and Monitoring Configuration Guide
o Describes features that help you manage and monitor your network, for example, manage system events,
sample packets, assess network performance, synchronize the clock for all devices with the clock in the network,
supply power for attached devices by using PoE, and test network connectivity. This guide includes: System
maintenance and debugging, NTP configuration, Information center configuration, SNMP configuration, RMON
configuration, Port mirroring configuration, Traffic mirroring configuration, NQA configuration, sFlow
configuration, NetStream configuration, IPv6 NetStream configuration, Sampler configuration, IPC
configuration, and PoE configuration.
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02985458/c02985458.pdf
Distribution/Aggregation Switches
The distribution layer acts as an interface between the access layer and the core/backbone layer. The distribution
layer is a multi-purpose layer in that it supports routing, filtering, WAN access, and the ability to determine how data
and voice packets gain access to the core, when necessary. The distribution layer must also serve as an aggregation
point for all of the access layer switches and ensure packets are properly routed between subnets and VLANs.
HP offers flexible network designs to meet diverse customer requirements. Customers looking to protect investments in
legacy core infrastructures can implement a three-tier traditional network design, and deploy cost-effective HP Top-ofrack server edge and aggregation platforms that interoperate with their existing core switches. This approach allows
customers to protect existing investments and gradually migrate to a more agile network design over time while
enjoying the benefits of IRF switch virtualization and cost-effective, energy-efficient HP switches in the server edge and
aggregation layers. Alternatively, customers can implement a two-tier collapsed network design that completely
eliminates a dedicated aggregation layer, reducing latency, CAPEX and OPEX.
16
Access / Edge Switches
In general, equipment operating within the access layer consists of hubs and switches that connect end-user devices.
The access layer is sometimes referred to as the desktop layer because it focuses on connecting client nodes, such as
workstations, PCs, IP audio/video phones, and conference room equipment to the network. Access equipment
supports high speed, easy to configure interface ports for network connectivity, and provide basic Layer 2 switching
functionality between multiple subnets, LANs, and the devices attached to them. To communicate beyond the subnet
or LAN environment, access equipment must provide a communication link between the access layer and the
equipment operating in the distribution layer.
Access equipments comes in various physical sizes depending upon the number of ports supported and are typically
categorized as low-density or high-density edge devices based on the features and functionality supported. Lowdensity devices, such as the HP 2910al Switch Series, are generally small in comparison, able to fit in a wiring closet
or at the top of an equipment rack, and focus primarily on providing physical connectivity and basic Layer 2 interface
capabilities. High-density access equipment, such as the HP 5400zl Series Switch, are physically larger, with many
more ports, and are generally more intelligent using ASIC technology to provide capabilities and features beyond
basic Layer 2 functionality.
HP 2910al Switch
The HP 2910al Switch is considered a low-density access switch. To configure the HP 2910al switch to support
interoperability with the various end-user IP audio/video equipment described within this document, the following
configuration tasks must be performed:
• Enable PoE/PoE+ Port Capabilities
• Enable DCHP and LLDP
• Configure VLANs
• Configure QoS settings
For detailed information about the configuration tasks listed above, refer to the technical documents located at the
end of this section.
Sample HP 2910al Switch CLI Command
The following example shows a sample of CLI commands executed on an Edge 2910al switch to create tagged and
untagged VLANs.
2910(config)#vlan 1112
2910(vlan-1112)#tagged 3-24
2910(vlan-1112)#untagged 1-2
2910(vlan-1112)#voice
2910(vlan-1112)#exit
2910(config)#vlan 1113
2910(vlan-1113)#untagged 3-24
2910(vlan-1113)#exit
For detailed information about the configuration tasks listed above, refer to the following technical documents:
• HP 2910al Switch Management and Configuration Guide
o Use this guide for information on topics such as, various interfaces available on the switch, memory and
configuration operation, interface access, IP addressing, time protocols, port configuration, trunking, traffic
control, PoE operation, SNMP, LLDP, other network management topics, file transfers, switch monitoring,
troubleshooting, and MAC address management.
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02564351/c02564351.pdf
17
HP 5400 Switch Series
The HP 5400 Switch is a high-density access switch. In addition to traditional Layer 2 switching, the HP 5400 switch
supports convergence applications for IP telephony and video-over-IP, providing new ways for businesses to serve
their customers, lower cost, and increase productivity. Traffic from these applications place different requirements on
the switch infrastructure and the HP 5400 switch offers various features to help enable traffic delivery given the more
stringent requirements. In particular, the HP 5400 switch provides multicast support via data-driven IGMP, and
advanced QoS, including eight hardware priority queues with selectable queue configurations. In addition, the HP
5400 switch provides the ability to set and enforce prioritization based on multiple match criteria such as Layer 2
(IEEE 802.1p, VLAN ID), Layer 3, (DSCP, IP address), and Layer 4 (TCP/UDP port) markings. Bandwidth shaping is
also supported by enforcing ingress/egress maximum and egress guaranteed minimum bandwidths. IP telephony is
further supported through interoperability with industry-leading IP telephony vendors with features such as LLDP-MED,
which enables automatic configuration of QoS and VLAN. RADIUS VLAN is also supported, which uses standard
RADIUS attributes to automatically configure VLAN for IP phones.
To configure the HP 5400 switch to support interoperability with the various end-user IP audio/video equipment
described with this document, the following configuration tasks must be performed:
• Enable PoE/PoE+ Port Capabilities
• Enable DCHP and LLDP
• Configure VLANs
• Configure QoS settings
Sample HP 5400 Switch CLI Command
The following example shows a sample of CLI commands executed on an HP 5400 switch to set the QoS value on a
VLAN to priority 7.
5400(config)#vlan 1112
5400(vlan-1112)#qos priority 7
For detailed information about the configuration tasks listed above, refer to the following technical documents:
• Power over Ethernet (PoE/PoE+)
o Power over Ethernet technology allows IP telephones, wireless LAN Access Points and other appliances to
receive power as well as data over existing LAN cabling, without needing to modify the existing Ethernet
infrastructure. Power over Ethernet has become a standard feature of Ethernet switches, as the cost of adding
power supplies to the Ethernet switches is small. IEEE 802.3af is an extension to the existing Ethernet standards.
Since the original introduction of PoE, the IEEE has developed a follow up standard called 802.3at which is
commonly referred to as PoE+. PoE+ enhances PoE in a couple of very important ways. First, it provides up to
30W of power to a Powered Device (PD), 25.5 watts to the device and 4.5 for line loss, and allows this power
to also run on cabling designed for 1000BASE-T. Secondly, it provides a new mechanism for communicating
power capability and requirements using the 802.1ab Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP).
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02613461/c02613461.pdf
• Layer 2 – LAN Switching Configuration Guide
o Covers Layer 2 technologies and features used on a LAN switched network, such as VLAN technology, port
isolation, Spanning Tree, how to divide broadcast domains, remove Layer 2 loops, isolate users within a VLAN,
re-mark VLAN tags, and implement VLAN VPNs over the Internet. This guide includes: Ethernet interface
configuration, Loopback and null interface configuration, MAC address table configuration, MAC Information
configuration, Ethernet link aggregation configuration, Port isolation configuration, Spanning tree configuration,
BPDU tunneling configuration, VLAN configuration, Super VLAN configuration, Isolate-user-VLAN configuration,
Voice VLAN configuration, GVRP configuration, QinQ configuration, VLAN mapping configuration, LLDP
configuration, and Service loopback group configuration.
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02985925/c02985925.pdf
18
• IP Services Configuration Guide
o Describes how to configure IP addressing, DHCP, IP performance optimization, ARP, DNS, NAT, UDP Helper,
IPv6 basics, DHCPv6, and Tunneling. This guide includes: ARP configuration, Gratuitous ARP configuration,
Proxy ARP configuration, IP addressing configuration, DHCP overview, DHCP server configuration, DHCP relay
agent configuration, DHCP client configuration, DHCP snooping configuration, IPv4 DNS configuration, NAT
configuration, IP performance optimization configuration, UDP helper configuration, IPv6 basics configuration,
DHCPv6 overview, DHCPv6 relay agent configuration, DHCPv6 client configuration, IPv6 DNS configuration,
Tunneling configuration, and GRE configuration.
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02985434/c02985434.pdf
Best Practices for Implementing an RMC-enabled Network
This section offers guidelines and considerations for network planners implementing RMC-enabled networks. The
following best practice topics are described in this section:
• Traffic Engineering and Service Quality Considerations
• Security Considerations
• Configuration Considerations
• Resiliency and Redundancy Considerations
• Power Over Ethernet (PoE and PoE+) Considerations
Traffic Engineering and Service Quality Considerations
Enable Quality of Service (QoS) and VLANs
HP recommends customers enable QoS to minimize packet loss, jitter and delay which can impair interactive IP voice
or video sessions. To enable high service quality on an end-to-end basis, voice and video traffic must be prioritized
higher than other traffic on every link along data paths supporting interactive voice and video sessions. HP switches
offer a weighted fair queuing (WFQ) mechanism to protect against packet loss, minimize delay and jitter, and
guarantee adequate bandwidth for real-time applications. This approach allows several traffic types to share the
same link while ensuring high service quality for delay-sensitive VoIP and video traffic. HP also recommends
customers implement VLANs to fully isolate voice, video, and data networks and ensure that the excessive broadcast
and multicast packets present on many data networks do not impair voice and video quality.
Sample HP 5400 Switch CLI Command
The following example shows a sample of CLI commands executed on an HP 5400 switch to set the QoS value on a
VLAN to priority 7.
5400(config)#vlan 1112
5400(vlan-1112)#qos priority 7
Deploy WAN Optimization Solutions
HP recommends customers implement WAN optimization technology to improve the performance of interactive IP
voice and video applications and make more efficient use of WAN bandwidth. WAN optimization is especially
useful for branch offices served by lower-speed WAN connections such as T1/E1 circuits.
The HP AllianceONE Extended Services zl Module with Riverbed Steelhead RiOS Application, combined with
Riverbed’s Steelhead appliances and Steelhead Mobile software, allows enterprises to optimize application
performance while reducing bandwidth consumption. The solutions enable the bandwidth equivalent of up to 30
Mbps from a T1 circuit.
Implement Flat, Low-latency, Highly-Resilient Networks
HP recommends customers implement flat networks with fewer layers and less equipment and cabling to
accommodate growing volumes of bandwidth-intensive, delay-sensitive traffic. HP Intelligent Resilient Framework (IRF)
is an innovative technology for building low-latency, highly-resilient networks using HP Ethernet switches. With IRF,
multiple physical switches can be combined to form a logical switching and routing entity with a single IP address. IRF
enables a simplified, higher performing, and flatter network design – with fewer devices and fewer networking layers.
A flatter design reduces latency and improves the performance of interactive IP voice, video and UC applications.
19
IRF also improves service availability. Many legacy enterprise networks rely on some variant of the spanning tree
protocol (STP) for resiliency. STP can take several seconds to recover from link failures, impairing delay-sensitive voice
and video communications. IRF overcomes STP limitations by providing an ultra-resilient virtual switching fabric. One
IRF member operates as the primary system switch, maintaining the control plane and updating forwarding and
routing tables for the other members. If the primary switch fails, IRF instantly selects a new primary, preventing service
interruption. In addition, all IRF members are interconnected in a ring topology that is immune to individual device or
link failures.
Minimize Redundant Video Streams
HP recommends customers use IP multicast, stream splitting and video caching technologies to reduce duplicate video
transmissions and conserve WAN bandwidth.
• IP multicast or stream splitting
o Use IP multicast or stream splitting technology to eliminate duplicate video transmissions over any given link –
especially bandwidth-constrained WAN links.
• Local video caching
o Use video caching solutions to improve Quality of Experience (QoE) and conserve WAN bandwidth. HTTP
based video, large video file downloads and Peer-to-Peer (P2P) applications represent over two thirds of today’s
Internet traffic. By caching video content locally enterprises can eliminate redundant transmissions, save
bandwidth, and deliver better user experiences.
Security Considerations
Enterprise networks are susceptible to a vast array of security threats – malware and spyware; impersonation and
intellectual property theft; as well as denial of service attacks and other increasingly-sophisticated assaults from both
inside and outside the enterprise network. HP recommends customers take a multi-layer approach to security that
includes implementing firewalls, VPNs, network access control systems, intrusion prevention systems and anti-virus,
anti-spam, anti-malware systems. HP also recommends customers implement VLANs to segregate VoIP and IP video
traffic from other data traffic.
HP offers a complete set of security solutions that address complex security threats at the perimeter and interior of the
business. The HP TippingPoint IPS is particularly useful for safeguarding rich media communications. The solution
leverages custom ASICs and high-performance network processors to perform deep packet inspection at Layers 2-7 –
protecting enterprises against a wide range of VoIP and IP video threats without compromising interactive voice or
video service quality.
HP also recommends the use of a Session Border Controller (SBC) such as the Session Border Controller zl Module
with Avaya Aura™ for customers extending VoIP services over SIP trunks or un-trusted Internet connections. SBCs are
needed to protect and control SIP trunking borders and to enable VoIP traffic to traverse firewall and NAT devices.
Similarly, HP recommends customers deploy a Polycom Video Border Proxy when extending interactive video services
across un-trusted Internet connections and to enable interoperability with other vendor video end points
For more information about the Polycom Video Border Proxy, refer to the following technical documentation:
• Polycom VBP Configuration Guide
http://supportdocs.polycom.com/PolycomService/support/global/documents/support/setup_maintenance/produ
cts/network/VBP_Configuration_Guide_11_2_6.pdf
Configuration Considerations
HP recommends customers use Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP) and LLDP-Media Endpoint Discovery (LLDP-MED)
when deploying IP audio and video equipment (end-points). LLDP defines a standard method for devices such as
switches, routers, wireless LAN access points and other devices such as IP phones to advertise information about
themselves to other nodes on the network and store the information they discover. Details such as device
configuration, device capabilities and device identification can be advertised using this protocol. LLDP - MED extends
the original LLDP standard to support emergency calling services and other critical VoIP and IP video features.
20
LLDP-MED provides the following benefits:
• Interoperability: LLDP-MED offers vendor-independent management capabilities, enabling different convergence
endpoints to interoperate on one network.
• Automatic deployment of network policies: With LLDP-MED, administrators can automatically deploy voice or video
VLAN, Layer 2, and Layer 3 QoS policies.
• Location services: LLDP-MED allows deploying location services, including Emergency Call Service (ECS).
• Detailed inventory management capabilities: For each converged device, LLDP-MED can supply model,
manufacturer, firmware and asset information.
• Advanced PoE: LLDP-MED enables advanced Power over Ethernet capabilities, including fine-grained power
management.
• VoIP network troubleshooting: LLDP-MED enables detection of speed and duplex mismatches, and of improper
static voice policy configurations.
• More security: LLDP-MED runs after 802.1X, to prevent unauthenticated devices from gaining access to the network.
VoIP Resiliency & Redundancy Considerations
HP recommends customers build redundancy and resiliency into VoIP networks to optimize service availability.
• Resilient IP backbones
o Implement resilient, meshed backbone networks that are immune to individual switch/router or link failures
• Redundant WAN interfaces
o Implement redundant, autonomous WAN interfaces at larger campuses or larger remote offices to provide
continued VoIP service in the event of facility or IP service provider failures. This is especially important in cases
where VoIP/UC servers are consolidated into central data centers.
• Backup PSTN trunks
o Deploy local PSTN trunks to enable continued service and emergency calling services in the event of WAN or IP
service failures
• Backup and Redundant Power
o Deploy redundant external power supplies and uninterruptible power supplies (UPS) to minimize the impact of
power supply failures and power outages on VoIP services.
Power over Ethernet (PoE and PoE+) Considerations
Power over Ethernet (PoE) technology allows IP telephones, security cameras, wireless LAN Access Points and other
appliances to receive power over existing LAN cabling, without needing to modify the existing Ethernet infrastructure.
HP edge switches support both PoE and PoE+. PoE provides up to 15.4W of power per powered device (PD). PoE+
supports up to 30W of power per PD. Some newer endpoints require PoE+. Power considerations must be taken into
account when designing and sizing an RMC-enabled network. Be sure to consider current needs and future plans
when scoping out total power requirements. You may need to deploy external power supplies to meet your overall
power requirements.
HP Network Services
HP delivers a comprehensive set of services for the entire life cycles of the RMC infrastructure. Our experts conduct
business workshop to help you identify, develop and present the business justification for RMC implementation. HP
can design, stage, implement and service the complete solution including HP, Polycom and Microsoft components to
solve your business need. Contact your HP account manager or reseller to find out how HP Networking Services can
help you implement an RMC-enabled network infrastructure.
For more information about the HP Network Services, refer to the following web page:
http://www8.hp.com/us/en/services/services-detail.html?compURI=tcm:245-800976&pageTitle=Network-Services
21
Appendix A: FlexCampus and FlexBranch Solution Portfolio
FlexBranch
Table 1: FlexBranch
Main
Alternate
Routers
Switches
WLAN
MSR20
29XX
MSM46X
MSR50
5400
MSR30
25XX
MSM430
MSR900
26XX
MSM710
5500EI
FlexCampus
Table 2: FlexCampus
Main
Core
Wired Access
WLAN Access
WAN Edge
10500
5500EI
MSM76X
8800
5400
MSM46X
6600
8200
MSM76X
8800
7500
MSM430
6600
3800
3500
Alternate
7500
FlexFabric
Table 3: FlexFabric
Main
Alternate
22
Core
Core Aggregation
Enterprise Router
12500
12500
8800
5830
5830
6600
5820
5820
5800
5800
6120
6120
Appendix B: Concise Summary of HP RMC Interoperability
Test Results
Overview
HP performed the following testing to validate successful operation of the HP and Polycom components shown in the
solution blueprint and described in the body of this document. A brief summary of the tests performed, and the results,
are provided in this appendix.
The testing was split into the following three segments:
• Interoperability
• Extended Topology Operation
• QoS and Contention
Interoperability
Interoperability testing involved connecting different Polycom devices to HPN edge switches and verifying standard
operability with PoE, LLDP, and DHCP services. The goal of this testing was to verify interoperability with standard L2
edge protocols.
PoE
In regards to PoE, the objective was to determine whether adequate power was provided through the Ethernet
interface. In all cases, test results showed that when connecting Polycom VVX-1500, IP-7000, and CX3000
equipment to ports on HP 2910al Switch, 3500 Switch, and 5400 Switch, adequate power was provided. In all
cases, the attached devices requested and received power from the Ethernet port, and were able to successfully boot
up and initialize.
LLDP and DHCP
For LLDP and DHCP services, the objective was to determine whether VLAN and QoS policy information could be
obtained (learned) by Polycom equipment when connected to an LLDP configured HP port. In all cases, test results
showed that Polycom VVX-1500, IP-7000, and CX3000 equipment, connected to ports on HP 2910al, 3500, and
5400 switches, were able to learn VLAN and QoS parameters from the HP port. In each case, when a Polycom
device was connected to an HP switch port, it was able to interpret the switch’s LLDP packet, request and receive an
IP address on a preconfigured voice VLAN, and successfully boot to a dial tone, capable of placing calls.
QoS and Contention
QoS and contention testing was performed to evaluate the operation of Lync client and Polycom equipment when
contention for network services was present. The testing included Polycom conferencing service operation and Lync
Client operation when the network was overloaded by other traffic with and without QoS services enabled. The goal
of this testing was to verify that with network QoS policies enabled, the Polycom conference services and Lync client
operation were not affected by the overloaded nature of the network. To support the validation process, the following
three tests were performed.
• Default Test Environment – Operation with contention and no QoS elevation
• No QoS – Operation with contention and QoS forced to 0
• QoS Elevation – Operation with contention and QoS elevation
In all three scenarios, expected results were achieved. With default settings, the VXX 1500 video phone and the Lync
Client were able to dial/connect to the HDX device, and maintain a connection over a link between HP 5400 switch
to HP 3500 switch ports. Using the default settings (QoS at 5), the connected call continued when the link was
oversubscribed. Repeating the same call procedure with the QoS set to 0 (No QoS testing environment), it was
verified that calls were dropped, as expected, once the links between the switches were oversubscribed with
contention traffic. The final test showed the same VXX 1500 and Lynx client call procedure to be successful when the
QoS level was elevated to the highest priority (7), though the links between the switches were oversubscribed with
significant contention traffic.
23
Extended Topology Operation
The third part of the testing was standard operation within an extended topology. During this testing the Polycom and
devices were placed into a detailed topology consisting of edge switches, aggregate switches, and core routers. The
Polycom and Lync back-end services were placed in a datacenter and traffic was profiled across the entire network.
The goal of this testing was to verify operation across a diverse network and interoperability with a broader range of
networking protocols.
The core of the test environment included six A7500 switch configured with OSPF and MPLS. With regards to QoS,
the A7500 switches were set with default mappings that allow for propagation of QoS values between 802.1p
(Layer 2) and DSCP (Layer 3). As such, the 802.1p level on the Edge switches were set to 6, the value was then
converted into DSCP at the Core Edge, and then converted back to 802.1p at the far side.
Extended Topology Results
The test results verified that the Lync client and the HDX were able to successfully connect to a conference on the RMX
and maintain a conference before contention was added to the link. It also demonstrated that the conference
continued to operate when the links between the switches on the HDX side were oversubscribed. Finally, the extended
topology test was able to verify that the DiffServ policy value was set at the ingress to the backbone, interpreted at the
egress of the backbone, and then propagated into the 802.1p bit.
Appendix C: Reference Manuals and URL Summary
HP Solutions and Services
HP 7500 Switch Series Configuration Guide:
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02985997/c02985997.pdf
HP 5400zl Switch Series Management and Configuration Guide:
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c03015912/c03015912.pdf
Power over Ethernet (PoE/PoE+):
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02613461/c02613461.pdf
HP Survivable Branch Communication (SBM) zl Module powered by Microsoft Lync:
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02616696/c02616696.pdf
HP Advanced Services zl Module with Citrix XenServer platform:
http://h17007.www1.hp.com/us/en/products/application-delivery/HP_Adv_zlMod_Citrix_XenServer/index.aspx
HP Advanced Services zl Module VMware vSphere Platform:
http://h17007.www1.hp.com/us/en/products/application-delivery/HP_Adv_zlMod_VMware_vsphere/index.aspx
HP 2910al Switch Management and Configuration Guide:
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02564351/c02564351.pdf
HP 6600 Routers Fundamentals Configuration Guide:
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02976399/c02976399.pdf
HP 8800 Router Series Web page
http://h17007.www1.hp.com/us/en/products/routers/HP_8800_Router_Series/index.aspx
HP MSR20 Router Series Web page
http://h17007.www1.hp.com/us/en/products/routers/HP_MSR20_Series/index.aspx
HP MSR50 Router Series Web page
http://h17007.www1.hp.com/us/en/products/routers/HP_MSR50_Series/index.aspx
HP MSM3xx/MSM4xx Access Points CLI Reference Guide:
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02564347/c02564347.pdf
HP MSM7xx Controllers CLI Reference Guide:
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02714165/c02714165.pdf
IMC Administrator’s Guide:
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02652530/c02652530.pdf
24
HP 4110 IP Phone Web page:
http://h17007.www1.hp.com/us/en/products/unified-communications/HP_4110_IP_Phone/index.aspx
HP 4120 IP Phone Web page
http://h17007.www1.hp.com/us/en/products/unified-communications/HP_4120_IP_Phone/index.aspx
Layer 3 – IP Routing Configuration Guide:
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02987064/c02987064.pdf
MPLS Configuration Guide:
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02985439/c02985439.pdf
Fundamentals Configuration Guide:
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02987056/c02987056.pdf
IP Multicast Configuration Guide:
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02985994/c02985994.pdf
ACL and QoS Configuration Guide:
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02985444/c02985444.pdf
Security Configuration Guide:
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02987069/c02987069.pdf
High Availability Configuration Guide:
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02985454/c02985454.pdf
Network Management and Monitoring Configuration Guide:
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02985458/c02985458.pdf
Layer 2 – LAN Switching Configuration Guide:
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02985925/c02985925.pdf
IP Services Configuration Guide:
http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02985434/c02985434.pdf
HP Network Services Web page
http://www8.hp.com/us/en/services/services-detail.html?compURI=tcm:245-800976&pageTitle=Network-Services
Polycom Solutions
Polycom RealPresence Deployment Guide:
http://supportdocs.polycom.com/PolycomService/support/global/documents/support/setup_maintenance/products
/video/RealPresence_Ready_Deployment_Guide.pdf
RMX 1500, RMX 2000 and RMX 4000 Getting Started Guide:
http://supportdocs.polycom.com/PolycomService/support/global/documents/support/setup_maintenance/products
/network/RMX_Getting_Started_Guide_V_7_2.pdf
RMX 4000 Hardware Guide:
http://supportdocs.polycom.com/PolycomService/support/global/documents/support/setup_maintenance/products
/network/RMX_4000_Hardware_Guide_V_7_6.pdf
RMX 4000 Administrator’s Guide:
http://supportdocs.polycom.com/PolycomService/support/global/documents/support/user/products/network/RMX
_Administrators_Guide_V_7_6.pdf
DMA 7000 Getting Started Guide:
http://support.polycom.com/global/documents/support/user/products/network/DMAv400_Getting_Started_Guide.
pdf
DMA 7000 Operations Guide:
http://support.polycom.com/global/documents/support/user/products/network/DMAv400_Operations_usg.pdf
25
CMA 4000/5000 Getting Started Guide:
http://supportdocs.polycom.com/PolycomService/support/global/documents/support/setup_maintenance/products
/network/CMA_Getting_Started_Guide.pdf
CMA 4000/5000 Operations Guide:
http://support.polycom.com/global/documents/support/user/products/network/CMA_Operations_Guide.pdf
CMA Desktop Help Book:
http://supportdocs.polycom.com/PolycomService/support/global/documents/support/user/products/video/Polyco
m_CMA_Desktop_Help_Book.pdf
HDX System Administrator’s Guide:
http://supportdocs.polycom.com/PolycomService/support/global/documents/support/setup_maintenance/products
/video/hdx_ag.pdf
CX5000 Deployment Guide:
http://supportdocs.polycom.com/PolycomService/support/global/documents/support/setup_maintenance/products
/voice/Polycom_CX5000_Deployment_Guide.pdf
CX5000 User’s Guide:
http://supportdocs.polycom.com/PolycomService/support/global/documents/support/user/products/voice/Polyco
m_CX5000_Users_Guide.pdf
Polycom VBP Configuration Guide:
http://supportdocs.polycom.com/PolycomService/support/global/documents/support/setup_maintenance/products
/network/VBP_Configuration_Guide_11_2_6.pdf
Microsoft Solutions
Microsoft TechNet Library – Lync Server Reference
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg293124.aspx
Configuring DHCP Options to Enable Sign-in for IP Phones
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg398088.aspx
Provisioning IP Phones
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg413077.aspx
Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change
without notice. The only warranties for HP products and services are set forth in the express warranty statements
accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an additional
warranty. HP shall not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions contained herein.
Microsoft is a U.S. registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.
4AA3-8997ENW, Created January 2012
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