Oracle Database Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System

Oracle Database Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System
Oracle® Database
Installation Guide
10g Release 2 (10.2) for Solaris Operating System (SPARC
64-Bit)
B15690-01
August 2005
Oracle Database Installation Guide, 10g Release 2 (10.2) for Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit)
B15690-01
Copyright © 2005, Oracle. All rights reserved.
Primary Authors:
Apolina Das, Sanjay Sharma, Lyju Vadassery
Contributing Authors:
Kevin Flood, Pat Huey, Clara Jaeckel, Emily Murphy, Terri Winters
Contributors: David Austin, Subhranshu Banerjee, Mark Bauer, Robert Chang, Jonathan Creighton, Sudip
Datta, Padmanabhan Ganapathy, Thirumaleshwara Hasandka, Joel Kallman, George Kotsovolos, Simon
Law, Richard Long, Rolly Lv, Padmanabhan Manavazhi, Sreejith Minnanghat, Krishna Mohan, Rajendra
Pingte, Hanlin Qian, Janelle Simmons, Preeti Shukla, Roy Swonger, Douglas Williams
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Contents
Preface ................................................................................................................................................................. ix
Audience.......................................................................................................................................................
Documentation Accessibility .....................................................................................................................
Command Syntax ........................................................................................................................................
Accessing Documentation..........................................................................................................................
Related Documentation ..............................................................................................................................
Typographic Conventions..........................................................................................................................
1
ix
ix
x
x
xi
xi
Installation Overview
Overview of Oracle Database Installation .......................................................................................... 1-1
Oracle Database Installation Methods................................................................................................. 1-2
Interactive Installation Methods ...................................................................................................... 1-2
Automated Installation Methods Using Response Files .............................................................. 1-2
Oracle Database Installation Types ...................................................................................................... 1-3
Database Configuration Options .......................................................................................................... 1-3
Preconfigured Database Types ........................................................................................................ 1-4
Installation Choices that Affect Database Creation....................................................................... 1-4
Creating a Database After Installation............................................................................................ 1-4
Available Installation Options .............................................................................................................. 1-4
Database Storage Options ................................................................................................................. 1-5
File System ................................................................................................................................... 1-5
Automatic Storage Management .............................................................................................. 1-5
Raw Devices................................................................................................................................. 1-8
Database Management Options ....................................................................................................... 1-8
Management Options for Preconfigured Databases.............................................................. 1-9
Management Options for Custom Databases ........................................................................ 1-9
Features Provided by Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control ................................ 1-9
Database Backup and Recovery Options..................................................................................... 1-10
Enabling Automated Backups ............................................................................................... 1-10
Backup Job Default Settings .................................................................................................. 1-11
More Information About Automated Backups and Recovery ......................................... 1-11
E-mail Notification Options........................................................................................................... 1-11
Installation Considerations ................................................................................................................. 1-11
Hardware and Software Certification .......................................................................................... 1-12
Multiple Oracle Homes .................................................................................................................. 1-12
iii
Installing the Software on a System with an Existing Oracle Installation.......................
Oracle Cluster Synchronization Services.....................................................................................
Using Network Attached Storage or NFS File Systems ............................................................
Upgrade Issues.......................................................................................................................................
AL24UTFFSS Character Set ...........................................................................................................
Deprecated Components in Oracle Database 10g Release 2 (10.2) ..............................................
2
1-12
1-12
1-13
1-13
1-13
1-14
Preinstallation Tasks
Logging In to the System as root ........................................................................................................... 2-1
Checking the Hardware Requirements................................................................................................ 2-2
Checking the Software Requirements ................................................................................................. 2-4
Checking the Network Setup................................................................................................................. 2-8
Configuring Name Resolution ......................................................................................................... 2-8
Installing on DHCP Computers ....................................................................................................... 2-9
Installing on Multihomed Computers ............................................................................................ 2-9
Installing on Computers with Multiple Aliases ............................................................................ 2-9
Installing on Non-Networked Computers ..................................................................................... 2-9
Creating Required Operating System Groups and Users ............................................................. 2-10
Creating the Oracle Inventory Group .......................................................................................... 2-11
Creating the OSDBA Group .......................................................................................................... 2-12
Creating an OSOPER Group (Optional) ...................................................................................... 2-12
Creating the Oracle Software Owner User.................................................................................. 2-13
Determining Whether an Oracle Software Owner User Exists ......................................... 2-13
Creating an Oracle Software Owner User............................................................................ 2-13
Modifying an Oracle Software Owner User ........................................................................ 2-14
Verifying that the User nobody Exists ......................................................................................... 2-14
Configuring Kernel Parameters.......................................................................................................... 2-14
Identifying Required Software Directories ..................................................................................... 2-16
Oracle Base Directory ..................................................................................................................... 2-16
Oracle Inventory Directory............................................................................................................ 2-17
Oracle Home Directory .................................................................................................................. 2-17
Identifying or Creating an Oracle Base Directory .......................................................................... 2-17
Identifying an Existing Oracle Base Directory............................................................................ 2-18
Creating an Oracle Base Directory................................................................................................ 2-19
Choosing a Storage Option for Oracle Database and Recovery Files......................................... 2-20
Creating Directories for Oracle Database or Recovery Files ........................................................ 2-20
Guidelines for Placing Oracle Database Files on a File System................................................ 2-21
Guidelines for Placing Oracle Recovery Files on a File System ............................................... 2-21
Creating Required Directories....................................................................................................... 2-22
Preparing Disk Groups for an Automatic Storage Management Installation .......................... 2-23
General Steps for Configuring Automatic Storage Management ............................................ 2-23
Step 1: Identifying Storage Requirements for Automatic Storage Management................... 2-24
Step 2: Using an Existing Automatic Storage Management Disk Group ............................... 2-26
Step 3: Creating DAS or SAN Disk Partitions for Automatic Storage Management ............ 2-28
Step 4: Configuring Disks for Automatic Storage Management.............................................. 2-28
Configuring Raw Partitions or Raw Logical Volumes ................................................................... 2-29
Stopping Existing Oracle Processes................................................................................................... 2-37
iv
Configuring the oracle User’s Environment .................................................................................... 2-38
3
Installation Tasks
Preinstallation Considerations .............................................................................................................. 3-1
Performing Multiple Oracle Database Installations in Noninteractive Mode .......................... 3-1
Reviewing Component-Specific Installation Guidelines ................................................................ 3-1
Accessing the Installation Software ..................................................................................................... 3-2
Downloading Oracle Software from the OTN Web Site .............................................................. 3-2
Downloading the Installation Archive Files ........................................................................... 3-3
Extracting the Installation Files................................................................................................. 3-3
Copying the Software to the Hard Disk ......................................................................................... 3-4
Mounting Discs ........................................................................................................................... 3-4
Copying the Oracle Database Software to a Hard Disk ........................................................ 3-5
Installing the Oracle Database Software ............................................................................................. 3-5
Reviewing Installation Guidelines .................................................................................................. 3-6
Running Oracle Universal Installer ................................................................................................. 3-7
Installing Automatic Storage Management ........................................................................................ 3-9
Step 1: Reviewing Automatic Storage Management Installation Considerations.................... 3-9
Step 2: Creating the Automatic Storage Management Instance and Disk Groups................... 3-9
Step 3: Installing Oracle Database to Use with Automatic Storage Management................. 3-12
Step 4: Testing the Automatic Storage Management Installation............................................ 3-13
4
Postinstallation Tasks
Required Postinstallation Tasks ............................................................................................................
Downloading and Installing Patches ..............................................................................................
Configuring Oracle Products............................................................................................................
Recommended Postinstallation Tasks..................................................................................................
Creating a Backup of the root.sh Script ..........................................................................................
Configuring New or Upgraded Databases.....................................................................................
Setting Up User Accounts .................................................................................................................
Setting the NLS_LANG Environment Variable.............................................................................
Generating the Client Static Library................................................................................................
Required Product-Specific Postinstallation Tasks.............................................................................
Configuring Oracle Net Services .....................................................................................................
Configuring Oracle Label Security ..................................................................................................
Installing Natively Compiled Java Libraries for Oracle JVM and Oracle interMedia .............
Installing Oracle Text Supplied Knowledge Bases .......................................................................
Configuring Oracle Messaging Gateway .......................................................................................
Modifying the listener.ora File for External Procedures .......................................................
Modifying the tnsnames.ora File for External Procedures ...................................................
Setting Up the mgw.ora Initialization File ..............................................................................
Configuring Oracle Precompilers ....................................................................................................
Configuring Pro*C/C++ ............................................................................................................
Configuring the 64-Bit Oracle JDBC/OCI Driver for JDK 1.4 .....................................................
Configuring GCC as the Primary Compiler...................................................................................
Installing Oracle Database 10g Products from the Companion CD...............................................
4-1
4-1
4-2
4-2
4-2
4-2
4-3
4-3
4-3
4-4
4-4
4-5
4-5
4-5
4-5
4-6
4-6
4-7
4-7
4-7
4-8
4-8
4-9
v
5
Getting Started with Oracle Database
Checking the Installed Oracle Database Contents and Directory Location ................................. 5-1
Logging In to Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control .......................................................... 5-1
Managing Automatic Storage Management ....................................................................................... 5-2
Starting and Stopping Automatic Storage Management ............................................................. 5-3
Automatic Storage Management Utilities ...................................................................................... 5-3
Reviewing Accounts and Passwords .................................................................................................... 5-3
Unlocking and Resetting User Passwords........................................................................................... 5-6
Using Database Control to Unlock Accounts and Reset Passwords .......................................... 5-6
Using SQL*Plus to Unlock Accounts and Reset Passwords ........................................................ 5-7
Identifying Databases ............................................................................................................................. 5-7
Locating the Server Parameter File ....................................................................................................... 5-8
Reviewing Tablespaces and Data Files, Redo Log Files, and Control Files ................................. 5-8
Identifying Tablespaces and Data Files .......................................................................................... 5-8
Locating Redo Log Files .................................................................................................................... 5-9
Locating Control Files..................................................................................................................... 5-10
6
Removing Oracle Software
Overview....................................................................................................................................................
Identifying All Instances ........................................................................................................................
Removing an Oracle Database...............................................................................................................
Removing an Automatic Storage Management Instance .................................................................
Reconfiguring Oracle Cluster Synchronization Services.................................................................
Identifying Oracle Database 10g Oracle Homes............................................................................
Reconfiguring the Oracle CSS Daemon ..........................................................................................
Deleting the Oracle CSS Daemon Configuration ..........................................................................
Removing Oracle Software.....................................................................................................................
A
6-1
6-1
6-2
6-2
6-4
6-4
6-5
6-6
6-6
Installing and Configuring Oracle Database Using Response Files
How Response Files Work..................................................................................................................... A-1
Reasons for Using Silent Mode or Noninteractive Mode............................................................ A-2
Creating a Database Using Automatic Storage Management as the Storage Option for Database
Files A-2
General Procedure for Using Response Files ................................................................................ A-3
Creating the oraInst.loc File .................................................................................................................. A-3
Preparing a Response File ..................................................................................................................... A-4
Editing a Response File Template................................................................................................... A-4
Recording a Response File ............................................................................................................... A-5
Running Oracle Universal Installer Using a Response File ........................................................... A-6
Running NetCA Using a Response File.............................................................................................. A-8
Running Database Configuration Assistant Using a Response File............................................. A-8
Using Database Configuration Assistant in Noninteractive Mode ........................................... A-9
Using Database Configuration Assistant in Silent Mode............................................................ A-9
Running Database Configuration Assistant in Noninteractive or Silent Mode....................... A-9
vi
B
Cloning an Oracle Home
C
Using NAS Devices
General Configuration Guidelines for NAS Devices ......................................................................
Choosing Mount Points .........................................................................................................................
Choosing Mount Points for Oracle Software Files .......................................................................
Choosing Mount Points for Oracle Database and Recovery Files .............................................
Creating Files on a NAS Device for Use with Automatic Storage Management........................
NFS Mount Options................................................................................................................................
D
Optimal Flexible Architecture
Overview of the Optimal Flexible Architecture Standard ..............................................................
Characteristics of an Optimal Flexible Architecture Compliant Installation ...........................
Changes to the Optimal Flexible Architecture for Oracle Database 10g......................................
Implementing Optimal Flexible Architecture ...................................................................................
File Systems........................................................................................................................................
Number of File Systems ............................................................................................................
Naming Conventions ................................................................................................................
Naming Mount Points for Very Large Databases (VLDBs).................................................
Naming Directories...........................................................................................................................
Oracle Base Directory Naming Convention...........................................................................
Referring to Path Names...........................................................................................................
Oracle Home Directory Naming Convention........................................................................
Naming Subdirectories .............................................................................................................
Naming Database Files.....................................................................................................................
Separating Segments with Different Requirements.....................................................................
Naming Tablespaces.........................................................................................................................
Exploiting the Optimal Flexible Architecture Structure for Oracle Files..................................
Optimal Flexible Architecture File Mapping ................................................................................
Improving Reliability and Performance.............................................................................................
Disk Mirroring ...................................................................................................................................
Disk Striping ......................................................................................................................................
E
D-1
D-1
D-3
D-3
D-3
D-4
D-4
D-4
D-4
D-4
D-5
D-5
D-5
D-6
D-7
D-7
D-7
D-8
D-9
D-9
D-9
Managing Oracle Database Port Numbers
About Managing Ports ...........................................................................................................................
Viewing Port Numbers and Access URLs ..........................................................................................
Port Numbers and Protocols of Oracle Components .......................................................................
Changing the Oracle Enterprise Management Agent Port..............................................................
Changing the Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Console Ports ..............................................
Changing the iSQL*Plus Ports .............................................................................................................
Changing the Oracle Ultra Search Ports .............................................................................................
Changing the Oracle XML DB Ports....................................................................................................
F
C-1
C-2
C-2
C-3
C-4
C-5
E-1
E-2
E-2
E-4
E-4
E-5
E-5
E-6
Configuring Oracle Database Globalization Support
About NLS_LANG Environment Variable......................................................................................... F-1
vii
Running Oracle Universal Installer in Different Languages ......................................................... F-2
G
Troubleshooting
Verify Requirements...............................................................................................................................
X Window Display Errors ......................................................................................................................
What to Do If an Installation Error Occurs?.......................................................................................
Reviewing the Log of an Installation Session ...................................................................................
Troubleshooting Configuration Assistants ........................................................................................
Configuration Assistant Failure......................................................................................................
Fatal Errors .........................................................................................................................................
Silent-Mode Response File Error Handling.......................................................................................
Cleaning Up After a Failed Installation..............................................................................................
H
Frequently Asked Questions About Installation
Installing Oracle Database or Oracle Database Client ....................................................................
Installing Oracle Database Tools .........................................................................................................
Installing Oracle Database with Oracle Applications .....................................................................
Installing Oracle Database Heterogeneous Connectivity Tools (Gateways)...............................
Index
viii
G-1
G-1
G-2
G-3
G-3
G-4
G-4
G-4
G-5
H-1
H-3
H-7
H-8
Preface
This guide describes how to install and configure Oracle Database 10g release 2 (10.2)
on Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-bit).
Audience
This guide is intended for anyone responsible for installing Oracle Database10g release
2 (10.2) on a single SPARC system. If you want to install Oracle Real Application
Clusters on a UNIX cluster, refer to Oracle Real Application Clusters Installation and
Configuration Guide for installation instructions.
Documentation Accessibility
Our goal is to make Oracle products, services, and supporting documentation
accessible, with good usability, to the disabled community. To that end, our
documentation includes features that make information available to users of assistive
technology. This documentation is available in HTML format, and contains markup to
facilitate access by the disabled community. Accessibility standards will continue to
evolve over time, and Oracle is actively engaged with other market-leading
technology vendors to address technical obstacles so that our documentation can be
accessible to all of our customers. For more information, visit the Oracle Accessibility
Program Web site at
http://www.oracle.com/accessibility/
Accessibility of Code Examples in Documentation
Screen readers may not always correctly read the code examples in this document. The
conventions for writing code require that closing braces should appear on an
otherwise empty line; however, some screen readers may not always read a line of text
that consists solely of a bracket or brace.
Accessibility of Links to External Web Sites in Documentation
This documentation may contain links to Web sites of other companies or
organizations that Oracle does not own or control. Oracle neither evaluates nor makes
any representations regarding the accessibility of these Web sites.
TTY Access to Oracle Support Services
Oracle provides dedicated Text Telephone (TTY) access to Oracle Support Services
within the United States of America 24 hours a day, seven days a week. For TTY
support, call 800.446.2398.
ix
Command Syntax
UNIX command syntax appears in monospace font. The dollar character ($), number
sign (#), or percent character (%) are UNIX command prompts. Do not enter them as
part of the command. The following command syntax conventions are used in this
guide:
Convention
Description
backslash \
A backslash is the UNIX command continuation character. It is used in
command examples that are too long to fit on a single line. Enter the
command as displayed (with a backslash) or enter it on a single line
without a backslash:
dd if=/dev/rdsk/c0t1d0s6 of=/dev/rst0 bs=10b \
count=10000
braces { }
Braces indicate required items:
.DEFINE {macro1}
brackets [ ]
Brackets indicate optional items:
cvtcrt termname [outfile]
ellipses ...
Ellipses indicate an arbitrary number of similar items:
CHKVAL fieldname value1 value2 ... valueN
italics
Italic type indicates a variable. Substitute a value for the variable:
library_name
vertical line |
A vertical line indicates a choice within braces or brackets:
FILE filesize [K|M]
Accessing Documentation
The documentation for this release includes platform-specific documentation and
generic product documentation.
Platform-Specific Documentation
Platform-specific documentation includes information about installing and using
Oracle products on particular platforms. The platform-specific documentation for this
product is available in both Adobe portable document format (PDF) and HTML
format on the product disc. To access the platform-specific documentation on disc:
1.
Use a Web browser to open the welcome.htm file in the top-level directory of the
disc.
2.
For DVD only, select the appropriate product link.
3.
Select the Documentation tab.
If you prefer paper documentation, then open and print the PDF files.
Product Documentation
Product documentation includes information about configuring, using, or
administering Oracle products on any platform. The product documentation for
Oracle Database 10g products is available in both HTML and PDF formats in the
following locations:
■
x
In the doc subdirectory on the Oracle Database 10g DVD
To access the documentation from the DVD, use a Web browser to view the
welcome.htm file in the top-level directory on the disc, then select the Oracle
Database 10g Documentation Library link.
■
Online on the Oracle Technology Network (OTN) Web site:
http://www.oracle.com/technology/documentation/
Related Documentation
The platform-specific documentation for Oracle Database 10g products includes the
following manuals:
■
■
■
Oracle Database
–
Oracle Database Release Notes for Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit)
–
Oracle Database Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit)
–
Oracle Database Quick Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System (SPARC
64-Bit)
–
Oracle Database Oracle Clusterware and Oracle Real Application Clusters
Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System
–
Oracle Database Administrator’s Reference for UNIX-Based Operating Systems
Oracle Database Client
–
Oracle Database Client Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System (SPARC
64-Bit)
–
Oracle Database Client Quick Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System
(SPARC 64-Bit)
Oracle Database Companion CD
–
Oracle Database Companion CD Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System
(SPARC 64-Bit)
–
Oracle Database Companion CD Quick Installation Guide for Solaris Operating
System (SPARC 64-Bit)
Refer to Oracle Database Release Notes for Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit) for
important information that was not available when this book was released. The release
notes for Oracle Database 10g are updated regularly. You can get the most recent
version from Oracle Technology Network at
http://www.oracle.com/technology/documentation/index.html
Typographic Conventions
The following text conventions are used in this document:
Convention
Meaning
boldface
Boldface type indicates graphical user interface elements associated
with an action, or terms defined in text or the glossary.
italic
Italic type indicates book titles, emphasis, or placeholder variables for
which you supply particular values.
monospace
Monospace type indicates commands within a paragraph, URLs, code
in examples, text that appears on the screen, or text that you enter.
xi
xii
1
Installation Overview
This chapter describes the different types of Oracle Database installations that you can
perform, and issues that you should consider before installing the software. It includes
information about the following topics:
■
Overview of Oracle Database Installation
■
Oracle Database Installation Methods
■
Oracle Database Installation Types
■
Database Configuration Options
■
Available Installation Options
■
Installation Considerations
■
Upgrade Issues
■
Deprecated Components in Oracle Database 10g Release 2 (10.2)
Overview of Oracle Database Installation
The Oracle Database installation process consists of the following phases:
1.
Read the release notes: Read the Oracle Database 10g release 2 (10.2) release notes
before you begin the installation. The release notes are available with the
platform-specific documentation. The latest version of the release notes is
available on Oracle Technology Network at:
http://www.oracle.com/technology/documentation
2.
Planning the installation: This chapter describes the Oracle products that you can
install and issues that you must consider before starting the installation.
You can also refer to Appendix H which covers frequently asked questions about
installing Oracle Database components, such as how to install Oracle Database if
the site uses Oracle applications or if you need multiple Oracle Database client
connections.
3.
Completing preinstallation tasks: Chapter 2 describes preinstallation tasks that
you must complete before installing the product.
4.
Installing software: Use the following section to install Oracle Database:
■
Chapter 3 describes how to use Oracle Universal Installer to install Oracle
Database and Automatic Storage Management.
Installation Overview
1-1
Oracle Database Installation Methods
■
Appendix A provides information on performing noninteractive (silent)
installations, which you may want to use if you need to perform multiple
installations of Oracle Database.
■
Appendix B provides information on cloning Oracle home.
■
Appendix F describes globalization support information.
■
■
Appendix G provides troubleshooting advice in case you encounter problems
with the installation.
Chapter 6 describes how to remove Oracle Database.
5.
Completing postinstallation tasks: Chapter 4 describes recommended and
required post-installation tasks.
6.
Get started using Oracle Database: Chapter 5 describes how to check the contents
of the installed Oracle Database, how to start various tools, and how to locate
various files. You can also read Appendix C on network attached storage devices,
which you can use to store Oracle database files and Oracle software. Appendix D
describes the Optimal Flexible Architecture, which is a set of guidelines that
ensure reliable Oracle installations that require little maintenance, and Appendix E
explains how to manage Oracle Database port numbers.
Oracle Database Installation Methods
You can choose different installation methods to install Oracle Database, as follows:
■
Interactive Installation Methods
■
Automated Installation Methods Using Response Files
Interactive Installation Methods
When you use the interactive method to install Oracle Database, Oracle Universal
Installer displays a series of screens that enable you to specify all of the required
information to install the Oracle Database software and optionally create a database.
The Available Product Components installation screen automatically selects the
components most customers need in their Oracle Database installation. It also lists
several components that are not selected by default, but which you may want to
include. To find the listing of available components, select Advanced, and then in the
Installation Type screen, select Custom.
Automated Installation Methods Using Response Files
By creating a response file and specifying this file when you start Oracle Universal
Installer, you can automate some or all of the Oracle Database installation. These
automated installation methods are useful if you need to perform multiple
installations on similarly configured systems or if the system where you want to install
the software does not have X Window system software installed.
When you use a response file, you can run Oracle Universal Installer in the following
modes, depending on whether you specify all of the required information or not:
■
Silent Mode: Oracle Universal Installer runs in silent mode if you use a response
file that specifies all required information. None of the Oracle Universal Installer
screens are displayed.
1-2 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Database Configuration Options
■
Suppressed Mode: Oracle Universal Installer runs in suppressed mode if you do
not specify all required information in the response file. Oracle Universal Installer
displays only the screens that prompt for the information that you did not specify.
For more information about these modes and about how to complete an installation
using response files, refer to Appendix A.
Oracle Database Installation Types
Oracle Client is installed separately. You cannot install
Oracle Database Client during an Oracle Database installation.
Note:
You can choose one of the following installation types when installing Oracle Database
10g:
For more information about the features available with each
Oracle Database edition and for information about licensing, refer
to the Oracle Database Licensing Information guide.
Note:
■
■
Enterprise Edition: Installs licensable Oracle Database options and database
configuration and management tools in addition to all of the products that are
installed during a Standard Edition installation. It also installs products most
commonly used for data warehousing and transaction processing.
Standard Edition: Installs an integrated set of management tools, full distribution,
replication, Web features, and facilities for building business-critical applications.
If you purchased a Standard Edition license, and you perform
a Custom installation, then ensure that you install only the
components covered by the Standard Edition license.
Note:
■
Custom: Enables you to select the individual components that you want to install
from the list of all available components.
Database Configuration Options
During the installation, you can choose whether you want to create an Oracle database
as part of the installation. If you choose to create an Oracle database, then Oracle
Universal Installer uses Database Configuration Assistant to create it. You can choose
to create one of the preconfigured database types, which are designed for a variety of
different applications, modify one of the preconfigured database types, or create a
customized database to suit your requirements.
This section describes the following database configuration options:
■
Preconfigured Database Types
■
Installation Choices that Affect Database Creation
■
Creating a Database After Installation
Installation Overview
1-3
Available Installation Options
Preconfigured Database Types
Oracle provides the following preconfigured database types that you can create or
customize during the installation:
■
General Purpose
■
Transaction Processing
■
Data Warehouse
Refer to the online help provided by either Oracle Universal Installer or Database
Configuration Assitant for a description of these preconfigured database types.
Installation Choices that Affect Database Creation
Oracle Universal Installer runs Database Configuration Assistant in one of two modes,
depending on the choices that you make during the installation:
■
Noninteractive mode
If you choose either the Enterprise Edition or Standard Edition installation type,
then choose to create a preconfigured database type, Oracle Universal Installer
prompts you for the minimum amount of information required to create a
database of the type you choose. It then runs Database Configuration Assistant in
noninteractive mode to create the database after it installs the software.
■
Interactive mode
If you choose the Custom installation type or choose the Advanced database
configuration option, then Oracle Universal Installer does not prompt you for
database information. Instead, it installs the software and then runs Database
Configuration Assistant in interactive mode. Using the screens in Database
Configuration Assistant, you can either modify one of the preconfigured database
types or create a custom database and specify precisely how you want to configure
it.
Note: If you choose this method to create a database, then click
Help on any of the Database Configuration Assistant screens for a
description of the information that you must specify on that screen.
Creating a Database After Installation
If you decide not to create a database during the installation, then you can use
Database Configuration Assistant to create one after you have installed the software.
For more information about using Database Configuration Assistant to create a
database after installation, refer to the Oracle Database 2 Day DBA manual.
Available Installation Options
This release of Oracle Database provides options that you can choose during
installation to simplify database administration tasks. These options include:
■
Database Storage Options
■
Database Management Options
■
Database Backup and Recovery Options
■
E-mail Notification Options
1-4 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Available Installation Options
The following sections describe these options.
Database Storage Options
If you choose to create a database during the installation, you can specify one of three
storage options for database files:
■
File System
■
Automatic Storage Management
■
Raw Devices
File System
If you choose the file system option, then Database Configuration Assistant creates the
database files in a directory on a file system mounted on the computer. Oracle
recommends that the file system you choose be separate from the file systems used by
the operating system or the Oracle software. The file system that you choose can be
any of the following:
■
A file system on a disk that is physically attached to the system
If you are creating a database on basic disks that are not logical volumes or RAID
devices, then Oracle recommends that you follow the Optimal Flexible
Architecture (OFA) recommendations described in Appendix D and distribute the
database files over more than one disk.
■
A file system on a logical volume manager (LVM) volume or a RAID device
If you are using multiple disks in an LVM or RAID configuration, then Oracle
recommends that you use the stripe and mirror everything (SAME) methodology
to increase performance and reliability. Using this methodology, you do not need
to specify more than one file system mount point for database storage.
■
A network file system (NFS) mounted from a certified network attached storage
(NAS) device
You can store database files on NAS devices provided that the NAS device is
certified by Oracle.
See Also: The "Using Network Attached Storage or NFS File
Systems" section on page 1-13 for more information about certified
NAS and NFS devices
If you choose the Custom installation type or the Advanced database creation option,
then you can also choose to use the Oracle-managed files feature with the new
database. If you use this feature, then you need to specify only the database object
name instead of file names when creating or deleting database files.
See Also: Oracle Database Administrator’s Guide for more
information about Oracle-managed files
Automatic Storage Management
Automatic Storage Management is a high-performance storage management solution
for Oracle Database files. It simplifies the management of a dynamic database
environment, such as creating and laying out databases and managing disk space.
Automatic Storage Management can be used with single database installations,
multiple database installations, and in Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC)
Installation Overview
1-5
Available Installation Options
environments. It can be used with databases created in Oracle Database 10g release 1
(10.1.0.3 or later). However, Oracle Database 10g release 2 (10.2) databases can use
Automatic Storage Management from Oracle Database 10g release 1 (10.1). If a site has
multiple single-instance databases, then you can use Oracle Clusterware to consolidate
multiple islands of databases into a single clustered pool of storage managed by
Automatic Storage Management. Automatic Storage Management manages the
storage of all database files, such as redo logs, control files, data pump export files, and
so on. However, it does not manage Oracle Database executable binary files.
At a high level, implementing Automatic Storage Management involves allocating
partitioned disks for Oracle Database with preferences for striping and mirroring.
Automatic Storage Management manages the disk space for you. This helps avoid the
need for traditional disk management tools such as Logical Volume Managers (LVM),
file systems, and the numerous commands necessary to manage both. The
synchronization between Automatic Storage Management and the database instance is
handled by Oracle Cluster Synchronization Services (CSS).
The following are components of an Automatic Storage Management installation:
■
ASM Disk Groups
■
ASM Instance
ASM Disk Groups
A disk group is a set of disk devices that Automatic Storage Management manages as
a single unit. Each disk device can be an individual physical disk, a multiple disk
device such as a RAID storage array or logical volume, or even a partition on a
physical disk. However, in most cases, disk groups consist of one or more individual
physical disks. To enable Automatic Storage Management to balance I/O and storage
efficiently within the disk group, you must ensure that all devices in the disk group
have similar, if not identical, storage capacity and performance.
You can set the redundancy and striping attributes of individual file types within a
disk group by using ASM disk group templates. When you create a disk group,
Automatic Storage Management creates a set of default templates for that disk group.
Default template settings depend on the disk group type. For example, the default
template for control files for a normal redundancy disk group sets three-way
mirroring. All other file templates are two-way mirrored. For a high redundancy disk
group, the default mirroring cannot be changed; that is, all files are always three-way
mirrored in a high redundancy disk group. You can modify the default templates to
suit your site’s needs. See Oracle Database Administrator's Guide for more information.
Automatic Storage Management spreads data evenly across all the devices in the disk
group to optimize performance and utilization. You can add or remove disk devices
from a disk group without shutting down the database. When you add or remove
disks, Automatic Storage Management rebalances the files across the disk group. You
can create multiple disk groups to handle specific tasks, such as backup and recovery
operations, in addition to regular file storage activities.
When you add a device to a disk group, you can specify a failure group for that
device. Failure groups identify disk devices that have common failure characteristics,
for example, devices that are attached to the same controller. If the controller fails,
then all devices attached to it become unavailable. By default, each device also belongs
to its own failure group. By using the failure groups you specify, Automatic Storage
Management can distribute data among the devices in the disk group to minimize the
risk of data loss caused by component failures.
1-6 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Available Installation Options
ASM Instance
The ASM instance manages ASM disk groups. This instance must be running before
you can start a database instance that uses Automatic Storage Management. When you
choose Automatic Storage Management as a database storage mechanism, this
instance is created and started, if necessary. For a single-instance Oracle Database
installation, you only need one Automatic Storage Management instance, regardless of
the number of database instances on the system. The ASM instance on any node in a
single cluster can handle any combination of disk group types.
General Steps for Installing Automatic Storage Management
To install Automatic Storage Management, you use Oracle Universal Installer. This
installation guide provides the following general steps for installing Automatic
Storage Management:
1.
Determine the disk requirements of the site and, if necessary, create one or more
disk partitions for Automatic Storage Management.
"Preparing Disk Groups for an Automatic Storage Management Installation" on
page 2-23 provides guidelines on how to determine the disk requirements of the
site.
2.
Run Oracle Universal Installer to install and create an Automatic Storage
Management instance and to create Automatic Storage Management disk groups.
"Step 1: Reviewing Automatic Storage Management Installation Considerations"
on page 3-9 provides guidelines on where to install Automatic Storage
Management and other installation considerations. "Step 2: Creating the
Automatic Storage Management Instance and Disk Groups" on page 3-9 describes
how to create an Automatic Storage Management instance and disk groups.
After you create an Automatic Storage Management instance and its associated
disk groups, subsequent databases that you create will be able to use Automatic
Storage Management for file storage management. If you have databases that were
created before you installed Automatic Storage Management, then you can
migrate them to Automatic Storage Management by using the Enterprise Manager
Migrate Database Wizard. This wizard is available in Enterprise Manager Grid
Control or Database Control. Alternatively, you can use Oracle Database Recovery
Manager (RMAN) to perform the migration.
3.
Create the databases that you want to use Automatic Storage Management.
"Step 3: Installing Oracle Database to Use with Automatic Storage Management"
on page 3-12 describes how to create and a database for Automatic Storage
Management.
4.
Test the Automatic Storage Management installation.
"Step 3: Installing Oracle Database to Use with Automatic Storage Management"
on page 3-12 provides a simple test you can try to check that the Automatic
Storage Management installation was successful. "Managing Automatic Storage
Management" on page 5-2 explains how to start and access Automatic Storage
Management and which Oracle Database tools you can use to manage it.
Installation Overview
1-7
Available Installation Options
See Also:
■
■
■
■
■
"Oracle Cluster Synchronization Services" on page 1-12
Oracle Database 2 Day DBA for a general overview, from a
non-platform perspective, of Automatic Storage Management
Oracle Database New Features for information about new features in
this release of Automatic Storage Management
Oracle Database Administrator's Guide for a more detailed
description of Automatic Storage Management
The Oracle Technology Network Web site, for additional
information on Automatic Storage Management, which you can
visit at
http://www.oracle.com/technology/products/database/asm
Raw Devices
Raw devices are disk partitions or logical volumes that have not been formatted with a
file system. When you use raw devices for database file storage, Oracle writes data
directly to the partition or volume, bypassing the operating system file system layer.
For this reason, you can sometimes achieve performance gains by using raw devices.
However, because raw devices can be difficult to create and administer, and because
the performance gains over modern file systems are minimal, Oracle recommends that
you choose Automatic Storage Management or file system storage in preference to raw
devices.
Database Management Options
To simplify database administration, Oracle provides a Web-based management tool
called Oracle Enterprise Manager. There are two ways that you can deploy Oracle
Enterprise Manager:
■
Deploy Oracle Enterprise Manager 10g centrally in the environment
To deploy Oracle Enterprise Manager centrally, you must install at least one
Oracle Management Repository and one Oracle Management Service within the
environment, then install an Oracle Enterprise Management Agent on every
computer that you want to manage. You can then use a single HTML interface to
manage and monitor software and hardware targets on all of those systems.
Targets can include Oracle databases, application servers, Net listeners, and
third-party software. This single interface is called Oracle Enterprise Manager
Grid Control (or simply Grid Control).
Oracle Enterprise Manager 10g is available separately in the
Oracle Database media pack. For more information about Oracle
Enterprise Manager 10g, refer to the Oracle Enterprise Manager 10g
Concepts manual and the Oracle Enterprise Manager 10g Installation
and Basic Configuration manual.
Note:
■
Deploy Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control locally on the database
system
Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control software is installed by default with
every Oracle Database installation except Custom. During a Custom installation,
you can choose not to install Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control.
1-8 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Available Installation Options
However, Oracle recommends that you do install it. This local installation
provides a Web-based interface called Oracle Enterprise Manager Database
Control. The Database Control is similar in function to the Grid Control, but it can
manage only a single database. If you want to administer more than one database
on this system, then you must either configure a separate Database Control for
each database, or install Oracle Enterprise Manager 10g Grid Control.
This section contains the following topics:
■
Management Options for Preconfigured Databases
■
Management Options for Custom Databases
■
Features Provided by Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control
Management Options for Preconfigured Databases
When you choose to create a preconfigured database during the installation, you must
select the Oracle Enterprise Manager interface that you want to use to manage the
database. The following options are available:
■
Use Grid Control for central database management
This option is available only if an Oracle Management Agent is installed on the
system. When Oracle Universal Installer detects an Oracle Management Agent on
the system, you can choose this option and specify the Oracle Management Service
that you want to use to manage the database.
If an Oracle Management Agent is not installed, then you must choose to use
Database Control to manage the database. However, if you install Oracle
Management Agent after you install Oracle Database, then you can then use Grid
Control to manage this database.
■
Use Database Control for local database management
This option is selected by default if an Oracle Management Agent is not installed
on the system. However, even if a Management Agent is installed, you can still
choose to configure Database Control to manage the database.
Management Options for Custom Databases
If you choose the Advanced database configuration option or choose to create a
database during a Custom installation, then Oracle Universal Installer runs Database
Configuration Assistant in interactive mode. Using a screen in Database Configuration
Assistant, you can specify the Oracle Enterprise Manager interface that you want to
use to manage the database. Alternatively, you can also choose not to configure the
database with Enterprise Manager.
Oracle recommends that you configure the database to use
Enterprise Manager during installation. However, if you choose not to
configure the database to use Enterprise Manager during the
installation, then you can use Database Configuration Assistant after
the installation to configure the database to use it.
Note:
Features Provided by Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control
Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control provides a Web-based user interface that
enables you to monitor, administer, and maintain an Oracle database. You can use it to
perform all of the database administration tasks. You can also use it to determine
information about the database, such as:
Installation Overview
1-9
Available Installation Options
■
Instance name, database version, Oracle home location, media recovery options,
and other instance data
■
Current instance availability
■
Database alert information
■
Session and SQL-related performance information
■
Space usage metrics
In addition, it provides you with automatic notification of security alerts and it
provides the ability to download and apply patches for the software.
Database Backup and Recovery Options
If you choose to use Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control during the
installation, then you can optionally enable automated database backups that use the
Oracle-suggested default backup strategy.
You do not have to enable automated backups during the
installation. If you prefer, you can use Oracle Enterprise Manager
Database Control or Grid Control to configure automated backups
after you install the software and create a database.
Note:
This section contains the following topics:
■
Enabling Automated Backups
■
Backup Job Default Settings
■
More Information About Automated Backups and Recovery
Enabling Automated Backups
If you enable automated backups, then Oracle Enterprise Manager schedules a daily
backup job that uses Oracle Recovery Manager (RMAN) to back up all of the database
files to an on-disk storage area called the flash recovery area. The first time the backup
job runs, it creates a full backup of the database. Subsequent backup jobs perform
incremental backups, which enable you to recover the database to its state at any point
during the preceding 24 hours.
To enable automated backup jobs during installation, you must specify the following
information:
■
The location of the flash recovery area
You can choose to use either a file system directory or an Automatic Storage
Management disk group for the flash recovery area. The default disk quota
configured for the flash recovery area is 2 GB. For Automatic Storage Management
disk groups, the required disk space depends on the redundancy level of the disk
group that you choose. Chapter 2 describes how to choose the location of the flash
recovery area and identifies its disk space requirements.
■
An operating system user name and password for the backup job
Oracle Enterprise Manager uses the operating system credentials that you specify
when running the backup job. The user name that you specify must belong to the
UNIX group that identifies database administrators (the OSDBA group, typically
dba). The Oracle software owner user (typically oracle) that you use to install
the software is a suitable choice for this user. Chapter 2 describes the requirements
1-10 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Installation Considerations
for the OSDBA group and Oracle software owner user and describes how to create
them.
Backup Job Default Settings
If you enable automated backups after choosing one of the preconfigured databases
during the installation, then automated backup is configured with the following
default settings:
■
The backup job is scheduled to run nightly at 2 a.m.
■
The disk quota for the flash recovery area is 2 GB.
If you enable automated backups by using Database Configuration Assistant, either
during or after the installation, then you can specify a different start time for the
backup job and a different disk quota for the flash recovery area.
More Information About Automated Backups and Recovery
For information about using Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control to configure
or customize automated backups or to recover a backed up database, refer to the
Oracle Database 2 Day DBA manual.
For more detailed information about defining a backup strategy and backing up and
recovering Oracle databases, refer to the Oracle Database Backup and Recovery Basics
manual or Oracle Database Backup and Recovery Advanced User's Guide.
E-mail Notification Options
If you choose to use the Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control during the
installation, then you can configure Enterprise Manager to send e-mail when specific
events occur. These events can include occurrences such as disk space reaching a
critical limit (a threshold), or a database shutting down unexpectedly.
If you choose to enable e-mail notifications, then you must specify the following
information:
■
The host name of a Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) server
■
The e-mail address that should receive the alerts
The e-mail address that you specify could belong to an individual or it could be a
shared e-mail account or a distribution list.
You can use Enterprise Manager Database Control to set up, change, or customize
e-mail notifications after you have created the database.
Installation Considerations
This section contains information that you should consider before deciding how to
install this product. It contains the following sections:
■
Hardware and Software Certification
■
Multiple Oracle Homes
■
Oracle Cluster Synchronization Services
■
Using Network Attached Storage or NFS File Systems
Installation Overview 1-11
Installation Considerations
Hardware and Software Certification
The platform-specific hardware and software requirements included in this
installation guide were current at the time this guide was published. However,
because new platforms and operating system software versions might be certified after
this guide is published, review the certification matrix on the OracleMetaLink Web site
for the most up-to-date list of certified hardware platforms and operating system
versions. The OracleMetaLink Web site is available at the following URL:
http://metalink.oracle.com
If you do not have a current Oracle Support Services contract, then you can access the
same information at the following Web site:
http://www.oracle.com/technology/support/metalink/content.html
Multiple Oracle Homes
This product supports multiple Oracle homes. This means that you can install this
release or previous releases of the software more than once on the same system, in
different Oracle home directories.
Installing the Software on a System with an Existing Oracle Installation
You must install this product into a new Oracle home directory. You cannot install
products from one release of Oracle Database into an Oracle home directory of a
different release. For example, you cannot install release 10.2 software into an existing
Oracle9i Oracle home directory. If you attempt to install this release into an Oracle
home directory that contains software from an earlier Oracle release, then the
installation fails.
You can install this release more than once on the same system if each installation is
installed in a separate Oracle home directory.
Oracle Cluster Synchronization Services
The first time you install Oracle Database 10g on a system, the installation configures
and starts a single-node version of the Oracle Cluster Synchronization Services (CSS)
daemon. The CSS daemon is required to enable synchronization between an
Automatic Storage Management instance and the database instances that rely on it for
database file storage. By default, Oracle Universal Installer does not configure Oracle
Cluster Synchronization Services. Oracle Universal Installer configures these services
only if you choose Automatic Storage Management as a storage or recovery option.
Because it must be running before any Automatic Storage Management instance or
database instance starts, it is configured to start automatically when the system boots.
For Oracle Real Application Clusters installations, the CSS daemon is installed with
Oracle Clusterware in a separate Oracle home directory (also called the Clusterware
home directory). For single-node installations, the CSS daemon is installed in and runs
from the same Oracle home as Oracle Database.
If you have installed Oracle Cluster Synchronization Services from the same Oracle
home as Oracle Database, then use caution when removing Oracle Database 10g
software from the system. Before you remove an Oracle home directory that contains
Oracle Database 10g, you must either delete the CSS daemon configuration, or if
necessary, reconfigure the CSS daemon to run from another Oracle home directory.
1-12 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Upgrade Issues
See Also: The "Reconfiguring Oracle Cluster Synchronization
Services" section on page 6-4 for more information about deleting or
reconfiguring the Oracle CSS daemon
If you plan to have more than one Oracle Database 10g
installation on a single system and you want to use Automatic
Storage Management for database file storage, then Oracle
recommends that you run the CSS daemon and the Automatic
Storage Management instance from the same Oracle home
directory and use different Oracle home directories for the database
instances.
Note:
Using Network Attached Storage or NFS File Systems
Oracle Database 10g must be able to verify that writes to a disk are completed
successfully. NFS file systems, including file systems on NAS devices, may not be able
to guarantee that writes to a disk are completed successfully, and this may lead to
possible data file corruption. Oracle recommends that you do not store files on NFS
mounted file systems unless the storage vendor and storage device are listed in the
Oracle Storage Compatibility Program list. This list is available from the following
Web site:
http://www.oracle.com/technology/deploy/availability/htdocs/oscp.html
If a storage device is supported, then you can use it to store Oracle software files,
Oracle database files, or both.
Appendix C for guidelines about using NFS and NAS
devices for Oracle software or database files
See Also:
Upgrade Issues
For information about upgrading a previous release of Oracle Database to Oracle
Database 10g release 2 (10.2), refer to Oracle Database Upgrade Guide. The following
section provides additional platform-specific upgrade information that you should
review before upgrading an existing database.
AL24UTFFSS Character Set
Note: The information in this section does not apply to an upgrade of
a release 9.0.1 or later release of Oracle Database.
Before you upgrade an existing database that uses the AL24UTFFSS character set, you
must upgrade the database character set to UTF8. Oracle recommends that you use the
Character Set Scanner (csscan) utility for data analysis before attempting to upgrade
the existing database character set.
The Character Set Scanner utility checks all character data in the database and tests for
the effects of, and problems with, changing the character set encoding. Before running
the Character Set Scanner utility, set the shared library path environment variable for
the platform to include the $ORACLE_HOME/lib directory. The shared library path
environment path that you need to set is LD_LIBRARY_PATH.
Installation Overview 1-13
Deprecated Components in Oracle Database 10g Release 2 (10.2)
Caution: AL32UTF8 is the Oracle Database character set that is
appropriate for XMLType data. It is equivalent to the IANA registered
standard UTF-8 encoding, which supports all valid XML characters.
Do not confuse Oracle Database database character set UTF8 (no
hyphen) with database character set AL32UTF8 or with character
encoding UTF-8. Database character set UTF8 has been superseded by
AL32UTF8. Do not use UTF8 for XML data. UTF8 supports only
Unicode version 3.1 and earlier; it does not support all valid XML
characters. AL32UTF8 has no such limitation.
Using database character set UTF8 for XML data could potentially
cause a fatal error or affect security negatively. If a character that is
not supported by the database character set appears in an
input-document element name, then a replacement character (usually
"?") is substituted for it. This will terminate parsing and raise an
exception.
Deprecated Components in Oracle Database 10g Release 2 (10.2)
The following Oracle Database 10g release 2 (10.2) components that were part of
Oracle Database 10g release 1 (10.1) are not available for installation with Oracle
Database 10g release 2 (10.2):
■
■
Legato Single Server Version (LSSV) (instead, use Oracle Database Recovery
Manager (RMAN)
Distributed Computing Environment (DCE) component of Oracle Advanced
Security
1-14 Oracle Database Installation Guide
2
Preinstallation Tasks
This chapter describes the tasks that you must complete before you start Oracle
Universal Installer. It includes information about the following tasks:
■
Logging In to the System as root
■
Checking the Hardware Requirements
■
Checking the Software Requirements
■
Checking the Network Setup
■
Creating Required Operating System Groups and Users
■
Configuring Kernel Parameters
■
Identifying Required Software Directories
■
Identifying or Creating an Oracle Base Directory
■
Choosing a Storage Option for Oracle Database and Recovery Files
■
Creating Directories for Oracle Database or Recovery Files
■
Preparing Disk Groups for an Automatic Storage Management Installation
■
Configuring Raw Partitions or Raw Logical Volumes
■
Stopping Existing Oracle Processes
■
Configuring the oracle User’s Environment
Logging In to the System as root
Before you install the Oracle software, you must complete several tasks as the root
user. To log in as the root user, complete one of the following procedures:
Unless you intend to complete a silent-mode installation,
you must install the software from an X Window System
workstation, an X terminal, or a PC or other system with X server
software installed.
Note:
For more information about silent-mode installations, refer to
Appendix A.
■
If you are installing the software from an X Window System workstation or X
terminal, then:
1.
Start a local terminal session, for example, an X terminal (xterm).
Preinstallation Tasks 2-1
Checking the Hardware Requirements
2.
If you are not installing the software on the local system, then enter the
following command to enable the remote host to display X applications on the
local X server:
$ xhost fully_qualified_remote_host_name
For example:
$ xhost somehost.us.acme.com
3.
If you are not installing the software on the local system, then use the ssh,
rlogin, or telnet command to connect to the system where you want to
install the software:
$ telnet fully_qualified_remote_host_name
4.
If you are not logged in as the root user, then enter the following command
to switch user to root:
$ su - root
password:
#
■
If you are installing the software from a PC or other system with X server software
installed, then:
If necessary, refer to your X server documentation for more
information about completing this procedure. Depending on the X
server software that you are using, you may need to complete the
tasks in a different order.
Note:
1.
Start the X server software.
2.
Configure the security settings of the X server software to permit remote hosts
to display X applications on the local system.
3.
Connect to the remote system where you want to install the software and start
a terminal session on that system, for example, an X terminal (xterm).
4.
If you are not logged in as the root user on the remote system, then enter the
following command to switch user to root:
$ su - root
password:
#
Checking the Hardware Requirements
The system must meet the following minimum hardware requirements:
■
■
At least 1024 MB of physical RAM
The following table describes the relationship between installed RAM and the
configured swap space requirement.
RAM
Swap Space
Between 1024 MB and 2048 MB
1.5 times the size of RAM
Between 2049 MB and 8192 MB
Equal to the size of RAM
2-2 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Checking the Hardware Requirements
RAM
Swap Space
More than 8192 MB
0.75 times the size of RAM
■
■
■
400 MB of disk space in the /tmp directory
Between 1.5 GB and 3.5 GB of disk space for the Oracle software, depending on
the installation type
1.2 GB of disk space for a preconfigured database that uses file system storage
(optional)
The disk space requirement for databases that use
Automatic Storage Management or raw device storage is described
later in this chapter.
Note:
Additional disk space, either on a file system or in an Automatic Storage
Management disk group, is required for the flash recovery area if you choose to
configure automated backups.
To ensure that the system meets these requirements:
1.
To determine the physical RAM size, enter the following command:
# /usr/sbin/prtconf | grep "Memory size"
If the size of the physical RAM is less than the required size, then you must install
more memory before continuing.
2.
To determine the size of the configured swap space, enter the following command:
# /usr/sbin/swap -s
If necessary, refer to the operating system documentation for information about
how to configure additional swap space.
3.
To determine the amount of disk space available in the /tmp directory, enter the
following command:
# df -k /tmp
# df -h /tmp (on Solaris 10)
If there is less than 400 MB of free disk space available in the /tmp directory, then
complete one of the following steps:
■
■
■
4.
Delete unnecessary files from the /tmp directory to meet the disk space
requirement.
Set the TEMP and TMPDIR environment variables when setting the oracle
user’s environment (described later).
Extend the file system that contains the /tmp directory. If necessary, contact
your system administrator for information about extending file systems.
To determine the amount of free disk space on the system, enter the following
command:
# df -k
# df -h (on Solaris 10)
Preinstallation Tasks 2-3
Checking the Software Requirements
The following table shows the approximate disk space requirements for software
files for each installation type:
5.
Installation Type
Requirement for Software Files (GB)
Enterprise Edition
2.0
Standard Edition
1.5
Custom (maximum)
2.5
To determine whether the system architecture can run the software, enter the
following command:
# /bin/isainfo -kv
Note:
The following is the expected output of this command:
64-bit sparcv9 kernel modules
If you do not see the expected output, then you cannot install the
software on this system.
Checking the Software Requirements
Depending on the products that you intend to install, verify that the following
software is installed on the system. The procedure following the table describes how to
verify whether these requirements are addressed.
Oracle Universal Installer performs checks on your system
to verify that it meets the listed requirements. To ensure that these
checks pass, verify the requirements before you start Oracle
Universal Installer.
Note:
Item
Requirement
Operating system
One of the following 64-bit operating system versions:
2-4 Oracle Database Installation Guide
■
Solaris 8 Update 7 or later
■
Solaris 9 Update 6 or later
■
Solaris 10
Checking the Software Requirements
Item
Requirement
Packages
SUNWarc
SUNWbtool
SUNWhea
SUNWlibm
SUNWlibms
SUNWsprot
SUNWtoo
SUNWi1of
SUNWi1cs
SUNWi15cs
SUNWxwfnt
SUNWsprox
Note: You may also require additional font packages for Java,
depending on your locale. Refer to the following Web site for
more information:
http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.4.2/font-requirements.html
Oracle Messaging
Gateway
Oracle Messaging Gateway supports the integration of Oracle
Streams Advanced Queuing (AQ) with the following software:
IBM MQSeries V5.3, client and server
Tibco Rendezvous 7.2
PL/SQL native
Sun ONE Studio 8 (C and C++ 5.5)
compilation,
gcc 3.4.2
Pro*C/C++,
Oracle Call Interface,
Oracle C++ Call Interface,
Oracle XML Developer’s
Kit (XDK), GNU Compiler
Collection (GCC)
Oracle JDBC/OCI Drivers
You can use the following optional JDK versions with the Oracle
JDBC/OCI drivers, however they are not required for the
installation:
■
■
■
Sun Java 2 SDK Standard Edition 1.2.2_14 and the JNDI
extension
Sun Java 2 SDK Standard Edition 1.3.1_09 and the JNDI
extension
Sun Java 2 SDK Standard Edition 1.4.2-b05 or later for 32- and
64-bit with the JNDI extension
Note: JDK 1.4.2 is installed with this release.
To ensure that the system meets these requirements:
1.
To determine which version of Solaris is installed, enter the following command:
# uname -r
5.9
In this example, the version shown is Solaris 9 (5.9). If necessary, refer to your
operating system documentation for information about upgrading the operating
system.
2.
To determine whether the required packages are installed, enter a command
similar to the following:
# pkginfo -i SUNWarc SUNWbtool SUNWhea SUNWlibm SUNWlibms SUNWsprot \
SUNWsprox SUNWtoo SUNWi1of SUNWi1cs SUNWi15cs SUNWxwfnt
Preinstallation Tasks 2-5
Checking the Software Requirements
If a package is not installed, then install it. Refer to your operating system or
software documentation for information about installing packages.
In addition, you need to verify that the following patches are installed on the system.
The procedure following the table describes how to check these requirements.
There may be more recent versions of the patches listed
installed on the system. If a listed patch is not installed, then
determine whether a more recent version is installed before
installing the version listed.
Note:
Installation Type or
Product
Requirement
All installations
Patches for Solaris 8:
All of the patches included in the J2SE Patch Cluster for Solaris 8:
■
108528-23, SunOS 5.8: kernel update patch
■
108652-66, X11 6.4.1: Xsun patch
■
108773-18, SunOS 5.8: IIIM and X I/O Method patch
■
108921-16, CDE 1.4: dtwm patch
■
108940-53, Motif 1.2.7 and 2.1.1: Runtime lib. patch for Solaris 8
■
108987-13, SunOS 5.8: Patch for patchadd and patchrm
■
108989-02, /usr/kernel/sys/acctctl & /.../exacctsys patch
■
108993-45, SunOS 5.8: LDAP2 client, libc, libthread and libnsl
libraries patch
■
109147-24, SunOS 5.8: linker patch
■
110386-03, SunOS 5.8: RBAC Feature Patch
■
111023-02, SunOS 5.8: /kernel/fs/mntfs and ... sparcv9/mntfs
■
111111-03, SunOS 5.8: /usr/bin/nawk patch
■
111308-03, SunOS 5.8: /usr/lib/libmtmalloc.so.1 patch
■
111310-01, SunOS 5.8: /usr/lib/libdhcpagent.so.1 patch
■
112396-02, SunOS 5.8: /usr/bin/fgrep patch
The following additional patches:
All installations
■
111721-04, SunOS 5.8: Math Library (libm) patch
■
112003-03, SunOS 5.8: Unable to load fontset ... iso-1 or iso-15
■
112138-01, SunOS 5.8: usr/bin/domainname patch
Patches for Solaris 9:
■
112233-11, SunOS 5.9: Kernel Patch
■
111722-04, SunOS 5.9: Math Library (libm) patch
The following additional patches are required for Numa Systems:
2-6 Oracle Database Installation Guide
■
115675-01, unOS 5.9: liblgrp API
■
113471-08, SunOS 5.9: Miscellaneous SunOS Commands Patch
■
115675-01, SunOS 5.9: /usr/lib/liblgrp.so Patch
Checking the Software Requirements
Installation Type or
Product
Requirement
Patches for Solaris 8 and Solaris 9 :
PL/SQL native
compilation,
112760-05, C 5.5: Patch for S1S8CC C compiler
Pro*C/C++,
Pro*FORTRAN,
Oracle Call Interface,
Oracle C++ Call
Interface,
Oracle XML Developer’s
Kit (XDK)
Oracle Messaging
Gateway
Corrective service diskettes (CSDs) for WebSphere MQ:
■
■
CSD09 or later for MQSeries V5.1
MQSeries Client for Sun Solaris, Intel Platform Edition- V5.1
SupportPac MACE
The following patches are not required required for silent
installations:
Note:
■
108652-66, X11 6.4.1: Xsun patch
■
108773-18, SunOS 5.8: IIIM and X I/O Method patch
■
108921-16, CDE 1.4: dtwm patch
■
108940-53, Motif 1.2.7 and 2.1.1: Runtime lib. patch for Solaris 8
For more information about silent installations, refer to
Appendix A.
To ensure that the system meets these requirements:
1.
To determine whether an operating system patch is installed, enter a command
similar to the following:
# /usr/sbin/patchadd -p | grep patch_number(without version number)
For example, to determine if any version of the 111713 patch is istalled, use the
follwing command:
# /usr/sbin/patchadd -p | grep 111713
If an operating system patch is not installed, then download it from the following
Web site and install it:
http://sunsolve.sun.com
2.
If you require a CSD or a SupportPac for WebSphere MQ, then refer to the
following Web site for download and installation information:
http://www.ibm.com/software/integration/mqfamily/support/summary/su
n.html
Preinstallation Tasks 2-7
Checking the Network Setup
Checking the Network Setup
Typically, the computer on which you want to install Oracle Database is connected to
the network, has local storage to contain the Oracle Database installation, has a display
monitor, and has a CD-ROM or DVD drive.
This section describes how to install Oracle Database on computers that do not meet
the typical scenario. It covers the following cases:
■
Configuring Name Resolution
■
Installing on DHCP Computers
■
Installing on Multihomed Computers
■
Installing on Computers with Multiple Aliases
■
Installing on Non-Networked Computers
Configuring Name Resolution
When you run Oracle Universal Installer, an error may occur if name resolution is not
set up. To avoid this error, before you begin installation, you must ensure that host
names are resolved only through the /etc/hosts file.
To ensure that host names are resolved only through the /etc/hosts file:
1.
Verify that the /etc/hosts file is used for name resolution. You can do this by
checking the hosts file entry in the nsswitch.conf file as follows:
# cat /etc/nsswitch.conf | grep hosts
The output of this command should contain an entry for files.
2.
Verify that the host name has been set by using the hostname command as
follows:
# hostname
The output of this command should be similar to the following:
myhost.mycomputer.com
3.
Verify that the domain name has not been set dynamically by using the
domainname command as follows:
# domainname
This command should not return any results.
4.
Verify that the hosts file contains the fully qualified host name by using the
following command:
# cat /etc/hosts | grep `eval hostname`
The output of this command should contain an entry for the fully qualified host
name and for localhost.
For example:
192.168.100.16
127.0.0.1
myhost.us.mycompany.com
localhost
myhost
localhost.localdomain
If the hosts file does not contain the fully qualified host name, then open the file
and make the required changes in it.
2-8 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Checking the Network Setup
Installing on DHCP Computers
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) assigns dynamic IP addresses on a
network. Dynamic addressing enables a computer to have a different IP address each
time it connects to the network. In some cases, the IP address can change while the
computer is still connected. You can have a mix of static and dynamic IP addressing in
a DHCP system.
In a DHCP setup, the software tracks IP addresses, which simplifies network
administration. This lets you add a new computer to the network without having to
manually assign that computer a unique IP address.
Installing on Multihomed Computers
You can install Oracle Database on a multihomed computer. A multihomed computer
is associated with multiple IP addresses. This is typically achieved by having multiple
network cards on the computer. Each IP address is associated with a host name. In
addition, you can set up aliases for the host name. By default, Oracle Universal
Installer uses the ORACLE_HOSTNAME environment variable setting to find the host
name. If ORACLE_HOSTNAME is not set and you are installing on a computer that has
multiple network cards, then Oracle Universal Installer determines the host name by
using the first entry in the /etc/hosts file.
Clients must be able to access the computer either by using this host name or by using
aliases for this host name. To verify this, ping the host name from the client computers
using the short name (hostname only) and the full name (hostname and domain
name). Both tests must be successful.
Setting the ORACLE_HOSTNAME Environment Variable
Use the following procedure to set the ORACLE_HOSTNAME environment variable.
For example, if the fully qualified host name is somehost.us.acme.com, then enter
one of the following commands:
Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:
$ ORACLE_HOSTNAME=somehost.us.acme.com
$ export ORACLE_HOSTNAME
C shell:
% setenv ORACLE_HOSTNAME somehost.us.acme.com
Installing on Computers with Multiple Aliases
A computer with multiple aliases is registered with the naming service under a single
IP but with multiple aliases. The naming service resolves any of those aliases to the
same computer. Before installing Oracle Database on such a computer, set the
ORACLE_HOSTNAME environment variable to the computer whose host name you
want to use.
Installing on Non-Networked Computers
You can install Oracle Database on a non-networked computer. If the computer, such
as a laptop, is configured for DHCP and you plan to connect the computer to the
network after the Oracle Database installation, then use the ping command on the
computer on which you want to install the database to check if the computer can
connect to itself. Perform this step by first using only the host name and then using the
fully qualified name, which should be in the /etc/hosts file.
Preinstallation Tasks 2-9
Creating Required Operating System Groups and Users
When you run the ping command on the computer itself, the
ping command should return the IP address of the computer.
Note:
If the ping command fails, then contact your network administrator.
Connecting the Computer to the Network after Installation
If you connect the computer to a network after installation, then the Oracle Database
instance on your computer can work with other instances on the network. The
computer can use a static IP or DHCP, depending on the network to which you are
connected.
Creating Required Operating System Groups and Users
Depending on whether this is the first time Oracle software is being installed on this
system and on the products that you are installing, you may need to create several
operating system groups and users.
The following operating system groups and user are required if you are installing
Oracle Database:
■
The OSDBA group (dba)
You must create this group the first time you install Oracle Database software on
the system. It identifies operating system user accounts that have database
administrative privileges (the SYSDBA privilege). The default name for this group
is dba.
If you want to specify a group name other than the default dba group, then you
must choose the Custom installation type to install the software or start Oracle
Universal Installer as a user that is not a member of this group. In this case, Oracle
Universal Installer prompts you to specify the name of this group.
■
The OSOPER group (oper)
This is an optional group. Create this group if you want a separate group of
operating system users to have a limited set of database administrative privileges
(the SYSOPER privilege). By default, members of the OSDBA group also have the
SYSOPER privilege.
If you want to specify a separate OSOPER group, other than the default dba
group, then you must choose the Custom installation type to install the software
or start Oracle Universal Installer as a user that is not a member of the dba group.
In this case, Oracle Universal Installer prompts you to specify the name of this
group. The usual name chosen for this group is oper.
■
An unprivileged user
Verify that the unprivileged user nobody exists on the system. The nobody user
must own the external jobs (extjob) executable after the installation.
The following operating system group and user are required for all installations:
■
The Oracle Inventory group (oinstall)
You must create this group the first time you install Oracle software on the
system. The usual name chosen for this group is oinstall. This group owns the
Oracle inventory, which is a catalog of all Oracle software installed on the system.
2-10 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Creating Required Operating System Groups and Users
If Oracle software is already installed on the system, then
the existing Oracle Inventory group must be the primary group of
the operating system user that you use to install new Oracle
software.
Note:
■
The Oracle software owner user (typically, oracle)
You must create this user the first time you install Oracle software on the system.
This user owns all of the software installed during the installation. This user must
have the Oracle Inventory group as its primary group. It must also have the
OSDBA and OSOPER groups as secondary groups.
In Oracle documentation, this user is referred to as the
oracle user.
Note:
A single Oracle Inventory group is required for all installations of Oracle software on
the system. After the first installation of Oracle software, you must use the same
Oracle Inventory group for all subsequent Oracle software installations on that system.
However, you can choose to create different Oracle software owner users, OSDBA
groups, and OSOPER groups (other than oracle, dba, and oper) for separate
installations. By using different groups for different installations, members of these
different groups have DBA privileges only on the associated databases rather than on
all databases on the system.
See Also: Oracle Database Administrator's Reference for UNIX-Based
Operating Systems and Oracle Database Administrator's Guide for
more information about the OSDBA and OSOPER groups and the
SYSDBA and SYSOPER privileges
The following sections describe how to create local users and
groups. As an alternative to creating local users and groups, you
could create the appropriate users and groups in a directory service,
for example, Network Information Services (NIS). For information
about using directory services, contact your system administrator or
refer to your operating system documentation.
Note:
The following sections describe how to create the required operating system users and
groups:
■
Creating the Oracle Inventory Group
■
Creating the OSDBA Group
■
Creating an OSOPER Group (Optional)
■
Creating the Oracle Software Owner User
Creating the Oracle Inventory Group
You must create the Oracle Inventory group if it does not already exist. The following
subsections describe how to determine the Oracle Inventory group name, if it exists,
and how to create it if necessary.
Preinstallation Tasks 2-11
Creating Required Operating System Groups and Users
Determining Whether the Oracle Inventory Group Exists
When you install Oracle software on the system for the first time, Oracle Universal
Installer creates the oraInst.loc file. This file identifies the name of the Oracle
Inventory group and the path of the Oracle Inventory directory.
To determine whether the Oracle Inventory group exists, enter the following
command:
# more /var/opt/oracle/oraInst.loc
If the oraInst.loc file exists, then the output from this command is similar to the
following:
inventory_loc=/u01/app/oracle/oraInventory
inst_group=oinstall
The inst_group parameter shows the name of the Oracle Inventory group,
oinstall.
Creating the Oracle Inventory Group
If the oraInst.loc file does not exist, then create the Oracle Inventory group by
entering the following command:
# /usr/sbin/groupadd oinstall
Creating the OSDBA Group
You must create an OSDBA group in the following circumstances:
■
■
An OSDBA group does not exist, for example, if this is the first installation of
Oracle Database software on the system
An OSDBA group exists, but you want to give a different group of operating
system users database administrative privileges in a new Oracle installation
If the OSDBA group does not exist or if you require a new OSDBA group, then create
it as follows. In the following command, use the group name dba unless a group with
that name already exists.
# /usr/sbin/groupadd dba
Creating an OSOPER Group (Optional)
Create an OSOPER group only if you want to identify a group of operating system
users with a limited set of database administrative privileges (SYSOPER operator
privileges). For most installations, it is sufficient to create only the OSDBA group. If
you want to use an OSOPER group, then you must create it in the following
circumstances:
■
■
If an OSOPER group does not exist, for example, if this is the first installation of
Oracle Database software on the system
If an OSOPER group exists, but you want to give a different group of operating
system users database operator privileges in a new Oracle installation
If you require a new OSOPER group, then create it as follows. In the following
command, use the group name oper unless a group with that name already exists.
# /usr/sbin/groupadd oper
2-12 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Creating Required Operating System Groups and Users
Creating the Oracle Software Owner User
You must create an Oracle software owner user in the following circumstances:
■
■
If an Oracle software owner user does not exist, for example, if this is the first
installation of Oracle software on the system
If an Oracle software owner user exists, but you want to use a different operating
system user, with different group membership, to give database administrative
privileges to those groups in a new Oracle Database installation
Determining Whether an Oracle Software Owner User Exists
To determine whether an Oracle software owner user named oracle exists, enter the
following command:
# id -a oracle
If the oracle user exists, then the output from this command is similar to the
following:
uid=440(oracle) gid=200(oinstall) groups=201(dba),202(oper)
If the user exists, then determine whether you want to use the existing user or create
another oracle user. If you want to use the existing user, then ensure that the user’s
primary group is the Oracle Inventory group and that it is a member of the
appropriate OSDBA and OSOPER groups. Refer to one of the following sections for
more information:
Note: If necessary, contact your system administrator before using
or modifying an existing user.
■
■
■
If you want to use an existing Oracle software owner user, and the user’s primary
group is the Oracle Inventory group, then refer to the "Determining Whether an
Oracle Software Owner User Exists" section on page 2-13.
To modify an existing user, refer to the "Modifying an Oracle Software Owner
User" section on page 2-14.
To create a user, refer to the following section.
Creating an Oracle Software Owner User
If the Oracle software owner user does not exist or if you require a new Oracle
software owner user, then create it as follows. In the following procedure, use the user
name oracle unless a user with that name already exists.
1.
To create the oracle user, enter a command similar to the following:
# /usr/sbin/useradd -g oinstall -G dba[,oper] oracle
In this command:
■
■
2.
The -g option specifies the primary group, which must be the Oracle
Inventory group, for example oinstall
The -G option specifies the secondary groups, which must include the OSDBA
group and if required, the OSOPER group. For example, dba or dba,oper
Set the password of the oracle user:
# passwd -r files oracle
Preinstallation Tasks 2-13
Configuring Kernel Parameters
Refer to the "Verifying that the User nobody Exists" section on page 2-14 to continue.
Modifying an Oracle Software Owner User
If the oracle user exists, but its primary group is not oinstall or it is not a member
of the appropriate OSDBA or OSOPER groups, then enter a command similar to the
following to modify it. Specify the primary group using the -g option and any
required secondary group using the -G option:
# /usr/sbin/usermod -g oinstall -G dba[,oper] oracle
Verifying that the User nobody Exists
Before installing the software, perform the following procedure to verify that the
nobody user exists on the system:
1.
To determine whether the user exists, enter the following command:
# id nobody
If this command displays information about the nobody user, then you do not
have to create that user.
2.
If the nobody user does not exist, then enter the following command to create it:
# /usr/sbin/useradd nobody
Configuring Kernel Parameters
Note: The kernel parameter and shell limit values shown in the
following section are recommended values only. For production
database systems, Oracle recommends that you tune these values to
optimize the performance of the system. Refer to your operating
system documentation for more information about tuning kernel
parameters.
Verify that the kernel parameters shown in the following table are set to values greater
than or equal to the recommended value shown on Solaris 8 and Solaris 9 operating
systems. The procedure following the table describes how to verify and set the values.
Parameter
Recommended Value
noexec_user_stack
1
semsys:seminfo_semmni
100
semsys:seminfo_semmns
1024
semsys:seminfo_semmsl
256
semsys:seminfo_semvmx
32767
shmsys:shminfo_shmmax
4294967295
shmsys:shminfo_shmmin
1
shmsys:shminfo_shmmni
100
shmsys:shminfo_shmseg
10
2-14 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Configuring Kernel Parameters
Note:
The following parameters are obsolete in Solaris 9:
■
shmsys:shminfo_shmmin
■
shmsys:shminfo_shmseg
On Solaris 10, verify that the kernel parameters shown in the following table are set to
values greater than or equal to the recommended value shown. The table aslo contains
the resource controls that replace the /etc/system file for a specific kernel
parameter.
In Solaris 10, you are not required to make changes to the
/etc/system file to implement the System V TPC. Solaris 10 uses
the resource control facility for its implementation.
Note:
Parameter
Replaced by Resource Control
Recommended Value
noexec_user_stack
NA
1
semsys:seminfo_semmni
project.max-sem-ids
100
semsys:seminfo_semmsl
project.max-sem-nsems
256
shmsys:shminfo_shmmax project.max-shm-memory
4294967295
shmsys:shminfo_shmmni project.max-shm-ids
100
On Solaris 8 and Solaris 9 operating systems, use the following procedure to view the
current value specified for these kernel parameters, and to change them if necessary:
1.
To view the current values of these parameters, enter the following commands:
# grep noexec_user_stack /etc/system
# /usr/sbin/sysdef | grep SEM
# /usr/sbin/sysdef | grep SHM
2.
If you must change any of the current values, then:
a.
Create a backup copy of the /etc/system file, for example:
# cp /etc/system /etc/system.orig
b.
Open the /etc/system file in any text editor and, if necessary, add lines
similar to the following (edit the lines if the file already contains them):
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
c.
noexec_user_stack=1
semsys:seminfo_semmni=100
semsys:seminfo_semmns=1024
semsys:seminfo_semmsl=256
semsys:seminfo_semvmx=32767
shmsys:shminfo_shmmax=4294967295
shmsys:shminfo_shmmin=1
shmsys:shminfo_shmmni=100
shmsys:shminfo_shmseg=10
Enter the following command to restart the system:
# /usr/sbin/reboot
d.
When the system restarts, log in and switch user to root.
Preinstallation Tasks 2-15
Identifying Required Software Directories
On Solaris 10, use the following procedure to view the current value specified for
resource controls, and to change them if necessary:
1.
To view the current values of the resource control, enter the following commands:
# id -p // to verify the project id
uid=0(root) gid=0(root) projid=1 (user.root)
# prctl -n project.max-shm-memory -i project user.root
# prctl -n project.max-sem-ids -i project user.root
2.
If you must change any of the current values, then:
a.
To modify the value of max-shm-memory to 6 GB:
# prctl -n project.max-shm-memory -v 6gb -r -i project user.root
b.
To modify the value of max-sem-ids to 256:
# prctl -n project.max-sem-ids -v 256 -r -i project user.root
Identifying Required Software Directories
You must identify or create the following directories for the Oracle software:
■
Oracle Base Directory
■
Oracle Inventory Directory
■
Oracle Home Directory
Oracle Base Directory
The Oracle base directory is a top-level directory for Oracle software installations. It is
analogous to the C:\Oracle directory used for Oracle software installations on
Microsoft Windows systems. On Solaris systems, the Optimal Flexible Architecture
(OFA) guidelines recommend that you use a path similar to the following for the
Oracle base directory:
/mount_point/app/oracle_sw_owner
In this example:
■
mount_point is the mount point directory for the file system that will contain the
Oracle software.
The examples in this guide use /u01 for the mount point directory. However, you
could choose another mount point directory, such as /oracle or /opt/oracle.
■
oracle_sw_owner is the operating system user name of the Oracle software
owner, for example oracle.
You can use the same Oracle base directory for more than one installation or you can
create separate Oracle base directories for different installations. If different operating
system users install Oracle software on the same system, then each user must create a
separate Oracle base directory. The following example Oracle base directories could all
exist on the same system:
/u01/app/oracle
/u01/app/orauser
/opt/oracle/app/oracle
2-16 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Identifying or Creating an Oracle Base Directory
The following sections describe how to identify existing Oracle base directories that
may be suitable for your installation and how to create an Oracle base directory if
necessary.
Regardless of whether you create an Oracle base directory or decide to use an existing
one, you must set the ORACLE_BASE environment variable to specify the full path to
this directory.
Oracle Inventory Directory
The Oracle Inventory directory (oraInventory) stores an inventory of all software
installed on the system. It is required by, and shared by, all Oracle software
installations on a single system. The first time you install Oracle software on a system,
Oracle Universal Installer prompts you to specify the path to this directory. then
Oracle recommends that you choose the following path:
oracle_base/oraInventory
Oracle Universal Installer creates the directory that you specify and sets the correct
owner, group, and permissions for it. You do not need to create it.
All Oracle software installations rely on this directory.
Ensure that you back it up regularly.
Note:
Do not delete this directory unless you have completely removed
all Oracle software from the system.
Oracle Home Directory
The Oracle home directory is the directory where you choose to install the software for
a particular Oracle product. You must install different Oracle products, or different
releases of the same Oracle product, in separate Oracle home directories. When you
run Oracle Universal Installer, it prompts you to specify the path to this directory, as
well as a name that identifies it. The directory that you specify must be a subdirectory
of the Oracle base directory. Oracle recommends that you specify a path similar to the
following for the Oracle home directory:
oracle_base/product/10.2.0/db_1
Oracle Universal Installer creates the directory path that you specify under the Oracle
base directory. It also sets the correct owner, group, and permissions on it. You do not
need to create this directory.
Identifying or Creating an Oracle Base Directory
Before starting the installation, you must either identify an existing Oracle base
directory or if required, create one. This section contains information about the
following:
■
Identifying an Existing Oracle Base Directory
■
Creating an Oracle Base Directory
Note: You can choose to create an Oracle base directory, even if
other Oracle base directories exist on the system.
Preinstallation Tasks 2-17
Identifying or Creating an Oracle Base Directory
Identifying an Existing Oracle Base Directory
Existing Oracle base directories may not have paths that comply with OFA guidelines.
However, if you identify an existing Oracle Inventory directory or existing Oracle
home directories, then you can usually identify the Oracle base directories, as follows:
■
Identifying an existing Oracle Inventory directory
Enter the following command to view the contents of the oraInst.loc file:
# more /var/opt/oracle/oraInst.loc
If the oraInst.loc file exists, then the output from this command is similar to
the following:
inventory_loc=/u01/app/oracle/oraInventory
inst_group=oinstall
The inventory_loc parameter identifies the Oracle Inventory directory
(oraInventory). The parent directory of the oraInventory directory is
typically an Oracle base directory. In the previous example, /u01/app/oracle is
an Oracle base directory.
■
Identifying existing Oracle home directories
Enter the following command to view the contents of the oratab file:
# more /var/opt/oracle/oratab
If the oratab file exists, then it contains lines similar to the following:
*:/u03/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1:N
*:/opt/orauser/infra_904:N
*:/oracle/9.2.0:N
The directory paths specified on each line identify Oracle home directories.
Directory paths that end with the user name of the Oracle software owner that you
want to use are valid choices for an Oracle base directory. If you intend to use the
oracle user to install the software, then you could choose one of the following
directories from the previous example:
/u03/app/oracle
/oracle
If possible, choose a directory path similar to the first
(/u03/app/oracle). This path complies with the OFA guidelines.
Note:
Before deciding to use an existing Oracle base directory for this installation, ensure
that it satisfies the following conditions:
■
It should not be on the same file system as the operating system.
■
It must have sufficient free disk space, as follows:
Requirement
Free Disk Space
The Oracle base directory will contain only
software files.
Up to 3 GB
The Oracle base directory will contain both
software and database files (not recommended for
production databases).
Up to 4 GB
2-18 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Identifying or Creating an Oracle Base Directory
To determine the free disk space on the file system where the Oracle base
directory is located, enter the following command:
# df -k oracle_base_path
To continue:
■
If an Oracle base directory exists and you want to use it, then refer to the
"Choosing a Storage Option for Oracle Database and Recovery Files" section on
page 2-20.
When you configure the oracle user’s environment later in this chapter, set the
ORACLE_BASE environment variable to specify the directory you chose.
■
If an Oracle base directory does not exist on the system or if you want to create an
Oracle base directory, then refer to the following section.
Creating an Oracle Base Directory
Before you create an Oracle base directory, you must identify an appropriate file
system with sufficient free disk space, as follows:
Requirement
Free Disk Space
The Oracle base directory will contain only
software files.
Up to 3 GB, depending on the platform
The Oracle base directory will contain both
software and database files (not recommended for
production databases).
Up to 4 GB, depending on the platform
To identify an appropriate file system:
1.
Use the df -k command to determine the free disk space on each mounted file
system.
2.
From the display, identify a file system that has appropriate free space.
The file system that you identify can be a local file system, a cluster file system, or
an NFS file system on a certified NAS device.
3.
Note the name of the mount point directory for the file system that you identified.
To create the Oracle base directory and specify the correct owner, group, and
permissions for it:
1.
Enter commands similar to the following to create the recommended
subdirectories in the mount point directory that you identified and set the
appropriate owner, group, and permissions on them:
# mkdir -p /mount_point/app/oracle_sw_owner
# chown -R oracle:oinstall /mount_point/app/oracle_sw_owner
# chmod -R 775 /mount_point/app/oracle_sw_owner
For example, if the mount point you identify is /u01 and oracle is the user name
of the Oracle software owner, then the recommended Oracle base directory path is
as follows:
/u01/app/oracle
2.
When you configure the oracle user’s environment later in this chapter, set the
ORACLE_BASE environment variable to specify the Oracle base directory that
you have created.
Preinstallation Tasks 2-19
Choosing a Storage Option for Oracle Database and Recovery Files
Choosing a Storage Option for Oracle Database and Recovery Files
The following table shows the storage options supported for storing Oracle Database
files and Oracle Database recovery files. Oracle Database files include data files,
control files, redo log files, the server parameter file, and the password file.
For all installations, you must choose the storage option that you want to use for
Oracle Database files. If you want to enable automated backups during the
installation, then you must also choose the storage option that you want to use for
recovery files (the flash recovery area). You do not have to use the same storage option
for each file type.
Database files are supported on file systems, Automatic
Storage Management, and raw devices. Recovery files are supported
only on file systems and Automatic Storage Management.
Important:
File Types Supported
Storage Option
Database
Recovery
File system
Yes
Yes
Automatic Storage Management
Yes
Yes
Raw devices
Yes
No
Use the following guidelines when choosing the storage options that you want to use
for each file type:
■
■
■
You can choose any combination of the supported storage options for each file
type.
Oracle recommends that you choose Automatic Storage Management as the
storage option for database and recovery files.
For more information about these storage options, refer to the "Database Storage
Options" section on page 1-5.
For information about how to configure disk storage before you start the installation,
refer to one of the following sections depending on your choice:
■
■
To use a file system for database or recovery file storage, refer to the "Creating
Directories for Oracle Database or Recovery Files" section on page 2-20.
To use raw devices for database file storage, refer to the following section:
"Configuring Raw Partitions or Raw Logical Volumes" on page 2-29
Creating Directories for Oracle Database or Recovery Files
This section contains the following topics:
■
Guidelines for Placing Oracle Database Files on a File System
■
Guidelines for Placing Oracle Recovery Files on a File System
■
Creating Required Directories
2-20 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Creating Directories for Oracle Database or Recovery Files
Guidelines for Placing Oracle Database Files on a File System
If you choose to place the Oracle Database files on a file system, then use the following
guidelines when deciding where to place them:
■
■
The default path suggested by Oracle Universal Installer for the database file
directory is a subdirectory of the Oracle base directory.
You can choose either a single file system or more than one file system to store the
database files:
–
If you want to use a single file system, then choose a file system on a physical
device that is dedicated to the database.
For best performance and reliability, choose a RAID device or a logical volume
on more than one physical device and implement the
stripe-and-mirror-everything (SAME) methodology.
–
If you want to use more than one file system, then choose file systems on
separate physical devices that are dedicated to the database.
This method enables you to distribute physical I/O and create separate
control files on different devices for increased reliability. It also enables you to
fully implement the OFA guidelines described in Appendix D, "Optimal
Flexible Architecture". You must choose either the Advanced database creation
option or the Custom installation type during the installation to implement
this method.
■
If you intend to create a preconfigured database during the installation, then the
file system (or file systems) that you choose must have at least 1.2 GB of free disk
space.
For production databases, you must estimate the disk space requirement
depending on the use that you want to make of the database.
■
■
For optimum performance, the file systems that you choose should be on physical
devices that are used only by the database.
The oracle user must have write permissions to create the files in the path that
you specify.
Guidelines for Placing Oracle Recovery Files on a File System
Note: You must choose a location for recovery files only if you
intend to enable automated backups during the installation.
If you choose to place the Oracle recovery files on a file system, then use the following
guidelines when deciding where to place them:
■
To prevent disk failure from making both the database files and the recovery files
unavailable, place the recovery files in a file system on a different physical disk
from the database files.
Alternatively, use an Automatic Storage Management disk
group for both data and recovery files.
Note:
■
The file system that you choose should have at least 2 GB of free disk space.
Preinstallation Tasks 2-21
Creating Directories for Oracle Database or Recovery Files
The disk space requirement is the default disk quota configured for the flash
recovery area (specified by the DB_RECOVERY_FILE_DEST_SIZE initialization
parameter).
If you choose the Custom installation type or the Advanced database
configuration option, then you can specify a different disk quota value. After you
create the database, you can also use Oracle Enterprise Manager Grid Control or
Database Control to specify a different value.
See Also: Oracle Database Backup and Recovery Basics for more
information about sizing the flash recovery area
■
The default path suggested by Oracle Universal Installer for the flash recovery
area is a subdirectory of the Oracle base directory.
This default location is not recommended for production databases.
■
The oracle user must have write permissions to create the files in the path that you
specify.
Creating Required Directories
You must perform this procedure only if you want to place
the Oracle Database or recovery files on a separate file system to
the Oracle base directory.
Note:
To create directories for the Oracle database, or recovery files on separate file systems
to the Oracle base directory:
1.
Use the df -k command to determine the free disk space on each mounted file
system.
2.
From the display, identify the file systems that you want to use:
File Type
File System Requirements
Database files
Choose either:
■
■
Recovery files
A single file system with at least 1.2 GB of free disk space
Two or more file systems with at least 1.2 GB of free disk space in
total
Choose a file system with at least 2.4 GB of free disk space.
If you are using the same file system for more than one type of file, then add the
disk space requirements for each type to determine the total disk space
requirement.
3.
Note the names of the mount point directories for the file systems that you
identified.
4.
Enter commands similar to the following to create the recommended
subdirectories in each of the mount point directories and set the appropriate
owner, group, and permissions on them:
■
Database file directory:
# mkdir /mount_point/oradata
2-22 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Preparing Disk Groups for an Automatic Storage Management Installation
# chown oracle:oinstall /mount_point/oradata
# chmod 775 /mount_point/oradata
■
Recovery file directory (flash recovery area):
# mkdir /mount_point/flash_recovery_area
# chown oracle:oinstall /mount_point/flash_recovery_area
# chmod 775 /mount_point/flash_recovery_area
5.
If you also want to use Automatic Storage Management or raw devices for storage,
then refer to one of the following sections:
■
■
Preparing Disk Groups for an Automatic Storage Management Installation on
page 2-23
Configuring Raw Partitions or Raw Logical Volumes on page 2-29
Preparing Disk Groups for an Automatic Storage Management Installation
This section describes how to configure disks for use with Automatic Storage
Management. Before you configure the disks, you must determine the number of disks
and the amount of free disk space that you require. The following sections describe
how to identify the requirements and configure the disks on each platform:
■
General Steps for Configuring Automatic Storage Management
■
Step 1: Identifying Storage Requirements for Automatic Storage Management
■
Step 2: Using an Existing Automatic Storage Management Disk Group
■
Step 3: Creating DAS or SAN Disk Partitions for Automatic Storage Management
■
Step 4: Configuring Disks for Automatic Storage Management
Although this section refers to disks, you can also use
zero-padded files on a certified NAS storage device in an
Automatic Storage Management disk group. Refer to Appendix C
for information about creating and configuring NAS-based files for
use in an Automatic Storage Management disk group.
Note:
General Steps for Configuring Automatic Storage Management
The following are the general steps to configure Automatic Storage Management:
1.
Identify the storage requirements of the site.
2.
Optionally, use an existing Automatic Storage Management disk group.
3.
If you are creating a new Automatic Storage Management disk group, create
partitions for DAS or SAN disks.
4.
Use one of the following methods to complete the Automatic Storage Management
configuration:
■
■
If you plan to install Oracle Database using interactive mode, Oracle Universal
Installer prompts you for the Automatic Storage Management disk
configuration information during the installation.
If you plan to install Oracle Database using noninteractive mode, you will
need to manually configure the disks before performing the installation.
Preinstallation Tasks 2-23
Preparing Disk Groups for an Automatic Storage Management Installation
Step 1: Identifying Storage Requirements for Automatic Storage Management
To identify the storage requirements for using Automatic Storage Management, you
must determine the number of devices and the amount of free disk space that you
require. To complete this task:
1.
Determine whether you want to use Automatic Storage Management for Oracle
Database files, recovery files, or both.
You do not have to use the same storage mechanism for
data files and recovery files. You can use the file system for one file
type and Automatic Storage Management for the other. If you plan
to use Automatic Storage Management for both data files and
recovery files, then you should create separate Automatic Storage
Management disk groups for the data files and the recovery files.
Note:
If you plan to enable automated backups during the installation, then you can
choose Automatic Storage Management as the storage mechanism for recovery
files by specifying an Automatic Storage Management disk group for the flash
recovery area. Depending on how you choose to create a database during the
installation, you have the following options:
■
If you select an installation method that runs Oracle Database Configuration
Assistant in interactive mode, by choosing the Advanced database
configuration option for example, then you can decide whether you want to
use the same Automatic Storage Management disk group for database files
and recovery files, or you can choose to use different disk groups for each file
type. Ideally, you should create separate Automatic Storage Management disk
groups for data files and for recovery files.
The same choice is available to you if you use Oracle Database Configuration
Assistant after the installation to create a database.
■
2.
If you select an installation type that runs Oracle Database Configuration
Assistant in noninteractive mode, then you must use the same Automatic
Storage Management disk group for data files and recovery files.
Choose the Automatic Storage Management redundancy level that you want to
use for each Automatic Storage Management disk group that you create.
The redundancy level that you choose for the Automatic Storage Management
disk group determines how Automatic Storage Management mirrors files in the
disk group and determines the number of disks and amount of disk space that you
require, as follows:
■
External redundancy
An external redundancy disk group requires a minimum of one disk device.
The effective disk space in an external redundancy disk group is the sum of
the disk space in all of its devices.
If you select this option, Automatic Storage Management does not mirror the
contents of the disk group. Choose this redundancy level under any one of the
following conditions:
–
When the disk group contains devices, such as RAID devices, that provide
their own data protection
2-24 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Preparing Disk Groups for an Automatic Storage Management Installation
–
■
The use of the database does not require uninterrupted access to data, for
example, in a development environment where you have a suitable
backup strategy
Normal redundancy
In a normal redundancy disk group, by default Automatic Storage
Management uses two-way mirroring for datafiles and three-way mirroring
for control files, to increase performance and reliability. Alternatively, you can
use two-way mirroring or no mirroring. A normal redundancy disk group
requires a minimum of two failure groups (or two disk devices) if you are
using two-way mirroring. The effective disk space in a normal redundancy
disk group is half the sum of the disk space in all of its devices.
For most installations, Oracle recommends that you use normal redundancy
disk groups.
■
High redundancy
With this option, the contents of the disk group are three-way mirrored by
default. To create a disk group with high redundancy, you must specify at
least 3 failure groups (a minimum of 3 devices).
Although high-redundancy disk groups provide a high level of data
protection, you must consider the higher cost of additional storage devices
before deciding to use this redundancy level.
3.
Determine the total amount of disk space that you require for the database files
and recovery files.
Use the following table to determine the minimum number of disks and the
minimum disk space requirements for the installation:
Redundancy
Level
Minimum Number
of Disks
Data Files
Recovery
Files
Both File
Types
External
1
1.15 GB
2.3 GB
3.45 GB
Normal
2
2.3 GB
4.6 GB
6.9 GB
High
3
3.45 GB
6.9 GB
10.35 GB
If an ASM instance is already running on the system, then you can use an existing
disk group to meet these storage requirements. If necessary, you can add disks to
an existing disk group during the installation.
The following step describes how to identify existing disk groups and determine
the free disk space that they contain.
4.
Optionally, identify failure groups for the Automatic Storage Management disk
group devices.
You need to perform this step only if you intend to use an
installation method that runs Oracle Database Configuration
Assistant in interactive mode. For example, if you intend to choose
the Custom installation type or the Advanced database
configuration option. Other installation types do not enable you to
specify failure groups.
Note:
Preinstallation Tasks 2-25
Preparing Disk Groups for an Automatic Storage Management Installation
If you intend to use a normal or high redundancy disk group, then you can further
protect the database against hardware failure by associating a set of disk devices
in a custom failure group. By default, each device comprises its failure group.
However, if two disk devices in a normal redundancy disk group are attached to
the same SCSI controller, then the disk group becomes unavailable if the controller
fails. The controller in this example is a single point of failure.
To avoid failures of this type, you can use two SCSI controllers, each with two
disks, and define a failure group for the disks attached to each controller. This
configuration would enable the disk group to tolerate the failure of one SCSI
controller.
If you define custom failure groups, then you must specify
a minimum of two failure groups for normal redundancy disk
groups and three failure groups for high redundancy disk groups.
Note:
5.
If you are sure that a suitable disk group does not exist on the system, then install
or identify appropriate disk devices to add to a new disk group. Apply the
following guidelines when identifying appropriate disk devices:
■
■
■
All the devices in an Automatic Storage Management disk group should be
the same size and have the same performance characteristics.
Do not specify more than one partition on a single physical disk as a disk
group device. Automatic Storage Management expects each disk group device
to be on a separate physical disk.
Although you can specify a logical volume as a device in an Automatic
Storage Management disk group, Oracle does not recommend its use. Logical
volume managers can hide the physical disk architecture. This would prevent
Automatic Storage Management from optimizing I/O across the physical
devices.
See Also: "Step 4: Configuring Disks for Automatic Storage
Management" on page 2-28 for information about completing this task
Step 2: Using an Existing Automatic Storage Management Disk Group
Note:
This is an optional step.
If you want to store either database or recovery files in an existing Automatic Storage
Management disk group, then you have the following choices, depending on the
installation method that you select:
■
If you select an installation method that runs Oracle Database Configuration
Assistant in interactive mode (for example, choosing the Advanced database
configuration option), then you can decide whether you want to create a disk
group or use an existing one.
The same choice is available to you if you use Oracle Database Configuration
Assistant after the installation to create a database.
■
If you select an installation method that runs Oracle Database Configuration
Assistant in noninteractive mode, then you must choose an existing disk group for
the new database; you cannot create a disk group. However, you can add disk
2-26 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Preparing Disk Groups for an Automatic Storage Management Installation
devices to an existing disk group if it has insufficient free space for your
requirements.
The ASM instance that manages the existing disk group can
be running in a different Oracle home directory.
Note:
To determine whether an existing Automatic Storage Management disk group exists,
or to determine whether there is sufficient disk space in a disk group, you can use
Oracle Enterprise Manager Grid Control or Database Control. Alternatively, you can
use the following procedure:
1.
View the contents of the oratab file to determine whether an ASM instance is
configured on the system:
# more /var/opt/oracle/oratab
# more /etc/oratab
If an ASM instance is configured on the system, then the oratab file should
contain a line similar to the following:
+ASM:oracle_home_path:N
In this example, +ASM is the system identifier (SID) of the ASM instance and
oracle_home_path is the Oracle home directory where it is installed. By
convention, the SID for an ASM instance begins with a plus sign.
2.
Open a shell window and temporarily set the ORACLE_SID and ORACLE_HOME
environment variables to specify the appropriate values for the ASM instance that
you want to use.
For example, if the Automatic Storage Management SID is named OraDB10g+ASM
and is located in the asm subdirectory of the ORACLE_BASE directory, then enter
the following commands to create the required settings:
■
Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:
$
$
$
$
■
ORACLE_SID=OraDB10g+ASM
export ORACLE_SID
ORACLE_HOME=/u01/app/oracle/product/10.1.0/asm
export ORACLE_HOME
C shell:
% setenv ORACLE_SID OraDB10g+ASM
% setenv ORACLE_HOME /u01/app/oracle/product/10.1.0/asm
3.
By using SQL*Plus, connect to the ASM instance as the SYS user with SYSDBA
privilege and start the instance if necessary:
# $ORACLE_HOME/bin/sqlplus "SYS/SYS_password as SYSDBA"
SQL> STARTUP
4.
Enter the following command to view the existing disk groups, their redundancy
level, and the amount of free disk space in each one:
SQL> SELECT NAME,TYPE,TOTAL_MB,FREE_MB FROM V$ASM_DISKGROUP;
5.
From the output, identify a disk group with the appropriate redundancy level and
note the free space that it contains.
Preinstallation Tasks 2-27
Preparing Disk Groups for an Automatic Storage Management Installation
6.
If necessary, install or identify the additional disk devices required to meet the
storage requirements listed in the previous section.
If you are adding devices to an existing disk group, then
Oracle recommends that you use devices that have the same size
and performance characteristics as the existing devices in that disk
group.
Note:
Step 3: Creating DAS or SAN Disk Partitions for Automatic Storage Management
In order to use a DAS or SAN disk in Automatic Storage Management, the disk must
have a partition table. Oracle recommends creating exactly one partition for each disk
containing the entire disk.
You can use any physical disk for Automatic Storage
Management, as long as it is partitioned.
Note:
Step 4: Configuring Disks for Automatic Storage Management
To configure disks for use with Automatic Storage Management:
1.
If necessary, install the disks that you intend to use for the disk group and restart
the system.
2.
Enter the following commands to identify devices that are part of a logical volume
manager (LVM) disk group:
The following command displays information about
VERITAS Volume Manager disks. If you use a different LVM, then
refer to the appropriate documentation for information about
determining which disk devices it is managing.
Note:
# vxdiskconfig
# /usr/sbin/vxdisk list
If this command displays disk group information associated with a disk device,
then the disk is already part of an LVM disk group. Do not use disks that are part
of an LVM disk group.
3.
To create or identify the disk slices (partitions) that you want to include in the
Automatic Storage Management disk group:
a.
To list the disks attached to the system, enter the following command:
# /usr/sbin/format
The output from this command is similar to the following:
AVAILABLE DISK SELECTIONS:
0. c0t0d0 <ST34321A cyl 8892 alt 2 hd 15 sec 63>
/[email protected],0/[email protected],1/[email protected]/[email protected],0
1. c1t5d0 <SUN9.0G cyl 4924 alt 2 hd 27 sec 133>
/[email protected],0/[email protected]/[email protected]/[email protected],0
This command displays information about each disk attached to the system,
including the device name (cxtydz).
2-28 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Configuring Raw Partitions or Raw Logical Volumes
b.
Enter the number corresponding to the disk that you want to use.
c.
Enter the partition command, followed by the print command to display
the partition table for the disk that you want to use.
d.
If necessary, create a single whole-disk slice, starting at cylinder 1.
To prevent Automatic Storage Management from overwriting
the partition table, you cannot use slices that start at cylinder 0 (for
example, slice 2).
Note:
4.
e.
Make a note of the number of the slice that you want to use.
f.
If you modified a partition table or created a new one, then enter the label
command to write the partition table and label to the disk.
g.
Enter q to return to the format menu.
h.
If you have finished creating slices, then enter q to quit from the format
utility. Otherwise, enter the disk command to select a new disk and repeat
steps b to g to create or identify the slices on that disks.
If you plan to use existing slices, then enter the following command to verify that
they are not mounted as file systems:
# df -k
This command displays information about the slices on disk devices that are
mounted as file systems. The device name for a slice includes the disk device name
followed by the slice number, for example cxtydzsn, where sn is the slice
number.
5.
Enter commands similar to the following on every node to change the owner,
group, and permissions on the character raw device file for each disk slice that you
want to add to a disk group:
# chown oracle:dba /dev/rdsk/cxtydzs6
# chmod 660 /dev/rdsk/cxtydzs6
In this example, the device name specifies slice 6.
If you are using a multi-pathing disk driver with Automatic
Storage Management, then ensure that you set the permissions only
on the correct logical device name for the disk.
Note:
6.
If you also want to use raw devices for storage, then refer to the "Configuring Raw
Partitions or Raw Logical Volumes" section on page 2-29.
Otherwise, refer to the following section:
Stopping Existing Oracle Processes on page 2-37.
Configuring Raw Partitions or Raw Logical Volumes
The following subsections describe how to configure raw partitions or raw logical
volumes.
■
"Configuring Raw Partitions for Oracle Database File Storage" on page 2-30
Preinstallation Tasks 2-29
Configuring Raw Partitions or Raw Logical Volumes
Follow the procedures described in this section if you want to use raw partitions
for Oracle Database file storage. You can use either raw disk slices or Solaris
Volume Manager soft partitions to store the required database files.
■
"Configuring Raw Logical Volumes for Oracle Database File Storage" on page 2-33
Follow the procedures described in this section only if you are using VERITAS
Volume Manager (VxVM) on SPARC systems.
Configuring Raw Partitions for Oracle Database File Storage
This section describes how to configure raw partitions for Oracle database files.
A partition is a slice defined on a disk or on a disk array volume. It can also be a soft
partition created using Solaris Volume Manager.
Table 2–1 lists the number and size of the raw partitions that you must configure for
database files.
Table 2–1
Raw Partitions Required for Database Files
Number
Size (MB)
Purpose and Database Object Identifier
1
500
SYSTEM tablespace:
system
1
500
SYSAUX tablespace:
sysaux
1
500
UNDOTBS1 tablespace:
undotbs1
1
250
TEMP tablespace:
temp
1
160
EXAMPLE tablespace:
example
1
120
USERS tablespace:
users
2
120
Two online redo log files (where m is the log number, 1 or
2):
redo1_m
2
110
First and second control files:
control{1|2}
1
5
Server parameter file (SPFILE):
spfile
1
5
Password file:
pwdfile
To configure raw partitions for database files:
1.
Choose a name for the database that you want to create.
The name that you choose must start with a letter and have no more than four
characters, for example, orcl.
2.
If necessary, install or configure the disks that you intend to use and restart the
system.
2-30 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Configuring Raw Partitions or Raw Logical Volumes
3.
If you want to use Solaris Volume Manager soft partitions, then refer to the Solaris
Volume Manager documentation for information about how to create them.
The previous table shows the number and size of the partitions that you require.
4.
If you want to use disk slices, then follow these steps to create or identify the
required disk slices:
a.
To list the disks attached to the system, enter the following command:
# /usr/sbin/format
The output from this command is similar to the following:
AVAILABLE DISK SELECTIONS:
0. c0t0d0 <ST34321A cyl 8892 alt 2 hd 15 sec 63>
/[email protected],0/[email protected],1/[email protected]/[email protected],0
1. c1t5d0 <SUN9.0G cyl 4924 alt 2 hd 27 sec 133>
/[email protected],0/[email protected]/[email protected]/[email protected],0
This command displays information about each disk attached to the system,
including the device name (cxtydz).
b.
Enter the number corresponding to the disk that you want to use.
Ensure that the disk you choose is not being used for another
purpose. For example, ensure that it is not being used as a component
for a logical volume manager volume.
Note:
c.
Use the fdisk command to create a Solaris partition on the disk if one does
not already exist.
Solaris fdisk partitions must start at cylinder 1, not cylinder 0. If you create
an fdisk partition, then you must label the disk before continuing.
d.
Enter the partition command, followed by the print command to display
the partition table for the disk that you want to use.
e.
Identify or create slices for each of the partitions that you require.
The previous table shows the number and size of the partitions that you
require for database files.
To prevent the database files from overwriting the partition
table, do not use slices that start at cylinder 0 (for example, slice 2).
Note:
5.
f.
Make a note of the number of the slices that you want to use.
g.
If you modified a partition table or created a new one, then enter the label
command to write the partition table and label to the disk.
h.
Enter q to return to the format menu.
i.
After you have finished creating slices, enter q to quit from the format utility.
If you plan to use existing partitions, then enter the following command to verify
that they are not mounted as file systems:
# df -k
Preinstallation Tasks 2-31
Configuring Raw Partitions or Raw Logical Volumes
This command displays information about the devices that are mounted as file
systems. The device name for a slice includes the disk device name followed by
the slice number, for example cxtydzsn, where sn is the slice number. The
device name for a Solaris Volume Manager partition is similar to
/dev/md/dsk/dnnn, where dnnn is the soft partition name.
6.
Enter commands similar to the following to change the owner, group, and
permissions on the character raw device file for each partition:
If you are using a multi-pathing disk driver, then ensure
that you set the permissions only on the correct logical device name
for the partition.
Note:
■
Solaris Volume Manager soft partitions:
# chown oracle:dba /dev/md/rdsk/d100
# chmod 660 /dev/md/rdsk/d100
■
Disk slices:
# chown oracle:dba /dev/rdsk/cxtydzsn
# chmod 660 /dev/rdsk/cxtydzsn
7.
Follow these steps to create the Oracle Database Configuration Assistant raw
device mapping file:
a.
Set the ORACLE_BASE environment variable to specify the Oracle base
directory that you identified or created previously:
–
Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:
$ ORACLE_BASE=/u01/app/oracle ; export ORACLE_BASE
–
C shell:
% setenv ORACLE_BASE /u01/app/oracle
b.
Create a database file subdirectory under the Oracle base directory and set the
appropriate owner, group, and permissions on it:
# mkdir -p $ORACLE_BASE/oradata/dbname
# chown -R oracle:oinstall $ORACLE_BASE/oradata
# chmod -R 775 $ORACLE_BASE/oradata
In this example, dbname is the name of the database that you chose
previously.
c.
Change directory to the $ORACLE_BASE/oradata/dbname directory.
d.
Using any text editor, create a text file similar to the following that identifies
the device file name associated with each database file.
Oracle recommends that you use a file name similar to dbname_raw.conf
for this file.
2-32 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Configuring Raw Partitions or Raw Logical Volumes
The following example shows a sample mapping file that
specifies Solaris Volume Manager soft partitions. If you are using
disk slices, then specify the appropriate device file name for each
slice, for example:
Note:
/dev/rdsk/cxdytzsn
system=/dev/md/rdsk/d100
sysaux=/dev/md/rdsk/d101
example=/dev/md/rdsk/d102
users=/dev/md/rdsk/d103
temp=/dev/md/rdsk/d104
undotbs1=/dev/md/rdsk/d105
redo1_1=/dev/md/rdsk/d106
redo1_2=/dev/md/rdsk/d107
control1=/dev/md/rdsk/d108
control2=/dev/md/rdsk/d109
spfile=/dev/md/rdsk/d110
pwdfile=/dev/md/rdsk/d111
In this example, dbname is the name of the database.
Use the following guidelines when creating or editing this file:
–
Each line in the file must have the following format:
database_object_identifier=device_file_name
–
Specify one automatic undo tablespace data file (undotbs1) and two redo
log files (redo1_1, redo1_2).
–
Specify at least two control files (control1, control2).
–
To use manual instead of automatic undo management, specify a single
RBS tablespace data file (rbs) instead of the automatic undo management
tablespace data files.
e.
Save the file and note the file name that you specified.
f.
When you are configuring the oracle user’s environment later in this
chapter, set the DBCA_RAW_CONFIG environment variable to specify the
full path to this file.
Configuring Raw Logical Volumes for Oracle Database File Storage
This section describes how to configure raw logical volumes using VERITAS Volume
Manager (VxVM) on SPARC systems.
Creating a Disk Group
To create a disk group:
1.
If necessary, install the disks that you intend to use for the disk group and restart
the system.
2.
To ensure that the disks are available, enter the following command:
# /usr/sbin/format
The output from this command is similar to the following:
AVAILABLE DISK SELECTIONS:
0. c0t0d0 <ST34321A cyl 8892 alt 2 hd 15 sec 63>
Preinstallation Tasks 2-33
Configuring Raw Partitions or Raw Logical Volumes
/[email protected],0/[email protected],1/[email protected]/[email protected],0
1. c1t5d0 <SUN9.0G cyl 4924 alt 2 hd 27 sec 133>
/[email protected],0/[email protected]/[email protected]/[email protected],0
This command displays information about each disk attached to the system,
including the device name (cxtydz).
3.
From the list, identify the device names for the disk devices that you want to add
to a disk group, then use Ctrl+D to exit from the format utility.
4.
Enter the following command to verify that the devices you identified are not
mounted as file systems:
# df -k
This command displays information about the partitions (slices) on disk devices
that are mounted as file systems. The device name for a slice includes the disk
device name followed by the slice number, for example cxtydzsn, where sn is
the slice number. Slice 2 (s2) represents the entire disk. The disk devices that you
choose must not be shown as mounted partitions.
5.
Enter the following commands to verify that the devices you identified are not
already part of a disk group:
The following command displays information about
VERITAS Volume Manager (VxVM) disks. If you use a different
LVM, then refer to the appropriate documentation for information
about determining which disk devices it is managing.
Note:
# /usr/sbin/vxdiskconfig
# /usr/sbin/vxdisk list
The vxdisk list command identifies the disk devices that are already
configured in a disk group. The word online in the STATUS column also identifies
disks that have been initialized and placed under VxVM control. The word error
in the STATUS column identifies disks that are not initialized.
The disk devices that you choose must not be in an existing disk group.
6.
If the disk devices that you want to use are not initialized, then enter a command
similar to the following to initialize each disk:
# /usr/sbin/vxdiskadd cxtydz
7.
To create a disk group, enter a command similar to the following, specifying all of
the disks that you want to add to the group:
# /usr/sbin/vxdg init diskgroup diskname=devicename ...
In this example:
■
■
■
diskgroup is the name of the disk group that you want to create, for
example, oradg
diskname is an administrative name that you assign to a disk, for example
orad01
devicename is the device name, for example, c1t0d0
2-34 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Configuring Raw Partitions or Raw Logical Volumes
Creating Raw Logical Volumes in the New Disk Group
To create the required raw logical volumes in the new disk group:
1.
Choose a name for the database that you want to create.
The name that you choose must start with a letter and have no more than four
characters, for example, orcl.
2.
Identify the logical volumes that you must create.
Table 2–2 lists the number and size of the logical volumes that you must create for
database files.
Table 2–2
Raw Logical Volumes Required for Database Files on Solaris
Number
Size (MB)
1
500
Purpose and Sample Logical Volume Name
SYSTEM tablespace:
dbname_system_raw_500m
1
500
SYSAUX tablespace:
dbname_sysaux_raw_500m
1
500
UNDOTBS1 tablespace:
dbname_undotbs1_raw_500m
1
250
TEMP tablespace:
dbname_temp_raw_250m
1
160
EXAMPLE tablespace:
dbname_example_raw_160m
1
120
USERS tablespace:
dbname_users_raw_120m
2
120
Two online redo log files (where m is the log number, 1 or 2):
dbname_redo1_m_raw_120m
2
110
First and second control files:
dbname_control{1|2}_raw_110m
1
5
Server parameter file (SPFILE):
dbname_spfile_raw_5m
1
5
Password file:
dbname_pwdfile_raw_5m
3.
To create the required logical volumes, enter commands similar to the following:
# /usr/sbin/vxassist -g diskgroup make volume size user=oracle \
group=dba mode=660
In this example:
■
■
diskgroup is the name of the disk group that you created previously, for
example oradg
volume is the name of the logical volume that you want to create
Oracle recommends that you use the sample names shown in the previous
table for the logical volumes. Substitute the dbname variable in the sample
logical volume name with the name you chose for the database in step 1.
Preinstallation Tasks 2-35
Configuring Raw Partitions or Raw Logical Volumes
■
■
size is the size of the logical volume, for example, 500m represents 500 MB
user=oracle group=dba mode=660 specifies the owner, group, and
permissions on the volume
Specify the Oracle software owner user and the OSDBA group for the user
and group values (typically oracle and dba).
The following example shows a sample command used to create a 500 MB logical
volume in the oradg disk group for the SYSAUX tablespace of a database named
test:
# /usr/sbin/vxassist -g oradb make test_sysaux_500m 500m \
user=oracle group=dba mode=660
Creating the Oracle Database Configuration Assistant Raw Device Mapping File
To enable Oracle Database Configuration Assistant to identify the appropriate raw
device for each database file, you must create a raw device mapping file, as follows:
1.
Set the ORACLE_BASE environment variable to specify the Oracle base directory
that you identified or created previously:
■
Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:
$ ORACLE_BASE=/u01/app/oracle ; export ORACLE_BASE
■
C shell:
% setenv ORACLE_BASE /u01/app/oracle
2.
Create a database file subdirectory under the Oracle base directory and set the
appropriate owner, group, and permissions on it:
# mkdir -p $ORACLE_BASE/oradata/dbname
# chown -R oracle:oinstall $ORACLE_BASE/oradata
# chmod -R 775 $ORACLE_BASE/oradata
In this example, dbname is the name of the database that you chose previously.
3.
Change directory to the $ORACLE_BASE/oradata/dbname directory.
4.
Enter the following command to create a text file that you can use to create the raw
device mapping file:
# find /dev/vx/rdsk/diskgroup -user oracle -name dbname* \
-print > dbname_raw.conf
5.
Edit the dbname_raw.conf file in any text editor to create a file similar to the
following:
system=/dev/vx/rdsk/diskgroup/dbname_system_raw_500m
sysaux=/dev/vx/rdsk/diskgroup/dbname_sysaux_raw_500m
example=/dev/vx/rdsk/diskgroup/dbname_example_raw_160m
users=/dev/vx/rdsk/diskgroup/dbname_users_raw_120m
temp=/dev/vx/rdsk/diskgroup/dbname_temp_raw_250m
undotbs1=/dev/vx/rdsk/diskgroup/dbname_undotbs1_raw_500m
redo1_1=/dev/vx/rdsk/diskgroup/dbname_redo1_1_raw_120m
redo1_2=/dev/vx/rdsk/diskgroup/dbname_redo1_2_raw_120m
control1=/dev/vx/rdsk/diskgroup/dbname_control1_raw_110m
control2=/dev/vx/rdsk/diskgroup/dbname_control2_raw_110m
spfile=/dev/vx/rdsk/diskgroup/dbname_spfile_raw_5m
pwdfile=/dev/vx/rdsk/diskgroup/dbname_pwdfile_raw_5m
2-36 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Stopping Existing Oracle Processes
In this example:
■
diskgroup is the name of the disk group
■
dbname is the name of the database
Use the following guidelines when creating or editing this file:
■
Each line in the file must have the following format:
database_object_identifier=logical_volume
The logical volume names suggested in this manual include the database
object identifier that you must use in this mapping file. For example, in the
following logical volume name, redo1_1 is the database object identifier:
/dev/vx/rdsk/oradg/rac_redo1_1_raw_120m
■
■
■
For a single-instance database, the file must specify one automatic undo
tablespace data file (undotbs1), and at least two redo log files (redo1_1,
redo1_2).
Specify at least two control files (control1, control2).
To use manual instead of automatic undo management, specify a single RBS
tablespace data file (rbs) instead of the automatic undo management
tablespace data file.
6.
Save the file and note the file name that you specified.
7.
When you are configuring the oracle user’s environment later in this chapter, set
the DBCA_RAW_CONFIG environment variable to specify the full path to this
file.
8.
To continue, refer to the "Stopping Existing Oracle Processes" section on page 2-37.
See Also: Oracle Real Application Clusters Installation and
Configuration Guide for Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit) for
more information about raw devices on RAC
Stopping Existing Oracle Processes
If you are installing additional Oracle Database 10g
products in an existing Oracle home, then stop all processes
running in the Oracle home. You must complete this task to enable
Oracle Universal Installer to relink certain executables and libraries.
Caution:
If you choose to create a database during the installation, then most installation types
configure and start a default Oracle Net listener using TCP/IP port 1521 and the IPC
key value EXTPROC. However, if an existing Oracle Net listener process is using the
same port or key value, Oracle Universal Installer can only configure the new listener;
it cannot start it. To ensure that the new listener process starts during the installation,
you must shut down any existing listeners before starting Oracle Universal Installer.
To determine whether an existing listener process is running and to shut it down if
necessary:
1.
Switch user to oracle:
# su - oracle
Preinstallation Tasks 2-37
Configuring the oracle User’s Environment
2.
Enter the following command to determine whether a listener process is running
and to identify its name and the Oracle home directory in which it is installed:
$ ps -ef | grep tnslsnr
This command displays information about the Oracle Net listeners running on the
system:
... oracle_home1/bin/tnslsnr LISTENER -inherit
In this example, oracle_home1 is the Oracle home directory where the listener is
installed and LISTENER is the listener name.
If no Oracle Net listeners are running, then refer to the
"Configuring the oracle User’s Environment" section on page 2-38
to continue.
Note:
3.
Set the ORACLE_HOME environment variable to specify the appropriate Oracle
home directory for the listener:
■
Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:
$ ORACLE_HOME=oracle_home1
$ export ORACLE_HOME
■
C or tcsh shell:
% setenv ORACLE_HOME oracle_home1
4.
Enter the following command to identify the TCP/IP port number and IPC key
value that the listener is using:
$ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/lsnrctl status listenername
If the listener uses the default name LISTENER, then you do
not have to specify the listener name in this command.
Note:
5.
Enter a command similar to the following to stop the listener process:
$ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/lsnrctl stop listenername
6.
Repeat this procedure to stop all listeners running on this system.
Configuring the oracle User’s Environment
You run Oracle Universal Installer from the oracle account. However, before you
start Oracle Universal Installer you must configure the environment of the oracle
user. To configure the environment, you must:
■
Set the default file mode creation mask (umask) to 022 in the shell startup file.
■
Set the DISPLAY environment variable.
To set the oracle user’s environment:
1.
Start a new terminal session, for example, an X terminal (xterm).
2-38 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Configuring the oracle User’s Environment
2.
Enter the following command to ensure that X Window applications can display
on this system:
$ xhost fully_qualified_remote_host_name
For example:
$ xhost somehost.us.acme.com
3.
If you are not already logged in to the system where you want to install the
software, then log in to that system as the oracle user.
4.
If you are not logged in as the oracle user, then switch user to oracle:
$ su - oracle
5.
To determine the default shell for the oracle user, enter the following command:
$ echo $SHELL
6.
Open the oracle user’s shell startup file in any text editor:
■
C shell (csh or tcsh):
% vi .login
7.
Enter or edit the following line, specifying a value of 022 for the default file mode
creation mask:
umask 022
8.
If the ORACLE_SID, ORACLE_HOME, or ORACLE_BASE environment variable
is set in the file, then remove the appropriate lines from the file.
9.
Save the file, and exit from the editor.
10. To run the shell startup script, enter one of the following commands:
■
Bash shell:
$ . ./.bash_profile
■
Bourne or Korn shell:
$ . ./.profile
■
C shell:
% source ./.login
11. If you are not installing the software on the local system, then enter a command
similar to the following to direct X applications to display on the local system:
■
Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:
$ DISPLAY=local_host:0.0 ; export DISPLAY
■
C shell:
% setenv DISPLAY local_host:0.0
In this example, local_host is the host name or IP address of the system that
you want to use to display Oracle Universal Installer (your workstation or PC).
12. If you determined that the /tmp directory has less than 400 MB of free disk space,
then identify a file system with at least 400 MB of free space and set the TEMP and
Preinstallation Tasks 2-39
Configuring the oracle User’s Environment
TMPDIR environment variables to specify a temporary directory on this file
system:
a.
Use the df -k command to identify a suitable file system with sufficient free
space.
b.
If necessary, enter commands similar to the following to create a temporary
directory on the file system that you identified, and set the appropriate
permissions on the directory:
$
#
#
#
c.
su - root
mkdir /mount_point/tmp
chmod a+wr /mount_point/tmp
exit
Enter commands similar to the following to set the TEMP and TMPDIR
environment variables:
*
Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:
$ TEMP=/mount_point/tmp
$ TMPDIR=/mount_point/tmp
$ export TEMP TMPDIR
*
C shell:
% setenv TEMP /mount_point/tmp
% setenv TMPDIR /mount_point/tmp
13. Enter commands similar to the following to set the ORACLE_BASE and
ORACLE_SID environment variables:
■
Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:
$ ORACLE_BASE=/u01/app/oracle
$ ORACLE_SID=sales
$ export ORACLE_BASE ORACLE_SID
■
C shell:
% setenv ORACLE_BASE /u01/app/oracle
% setenv ORACLE_SID sales
In these examples, /u01/app/oracle is the Oracle base directory that you
created or identified earlier and sales is the name that you want to call the
database (typically no more than five characters).
14. If you are using raw devices for database storage, then set the
DBCA_RAW_CONFIG environment variable to specify the full path to the raw
device mapping file:
■
Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:
$ DBCA_RAW_CONFIG=$ORACLE_BASE/oradata/dbname/dbname_raw.conf
$ export DBCA_RAW_CONFIG
■
C shell:
% setenv DBCA_RAW_CONFIG=$ORACLE_BASE/oradata/dbname/dbname_raw.conf
15. Enter the following commands to ensure that the ORACLE_HOME and
TNS_ADMIN environment variables are not set:
■
Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:
2-40 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Configuring the oracle User’s Environment
$ unset ORACLE_HOME
$ unset TNS_ADMIN
■
C shell:
% unsetenv ORACLE_HOME
% unsetenv TNS_ADMIN
If the ORACLE_HOME environment variable is set, then
Oracle Universal Installer uses the value that it specifies as the
default path for the Oracle home directory. However, if you set the
ORACLE_BASE environment variable, then Oracle recommends
that you unset the ORACLE_HOME environment variable and
choose the default path suggested by Oracle Universal Installer.
Note:
16. To verify that the environment has been set correctly, enter the following
commands:
$ umask
$ env | more
Verify that the umask command displays a value of 22, 022, or 0022 and the
environment variables that you set in this section have the correct values.
Preinstallation Tasks 2-41
Configuring the oracle User’s Environment
2-42 Oracle Database Installation Guide
3
Installation Tasks
The Oracle Database software is available on disc (DVD) or you can download it from
the Oracle Technology Network Web site. In most cases, you use the graphical user
interface (GUI) provided by Oracle Universal Installer to install the software.
However, you can also use Oracle Universal Installer to complete silent-mode
installations, without using the GUI.
See Also: Appendix A for information about silent-mode
installations
This chapter includes information about the following topics:
■
Preinstallation Considerations
■
Reviewing Component-Specific Installation Guidelines
■
Accessing the Installation Software
■
Installing the Oracle Database Software
■
Installing Automatic Storage Management
Preinstallation Considerations
After reviewing the information in Chapter 1, "Installation Overview" and completing
the tasks listed in Chapter 2, "Preinstallation Tasks", consider the following issues:
Performing Multiple Oracle Database Installations in Noninteractive Mode
If you need to perform multiple installations of Oracle Database, you may want to use
noninteractive mode. In noninteractive mode, at each node, you run Oracle Universal
Installer from the command line using a response file. The response file is a text file
containing the settings you normally enter in the Oracle Universal Installer GUI dialog
boxes.
See Also: Appendix A for information about silent-mode
installations.
Reviewing Component-Specific Installation Guidelines
Review the following guidelines before starting Oracle Universal Installer:
■
Oracle Universal Installer
Do not use Oracle Universal Installer from an earlier Oracle release to install
components from this release.
Installation Tasks
3-1
Accessing the Installation Software
■
Installations on a Cluster
If Oracle Clusterware and Oracle Real Application Clusters are already installed
on the system, Oracle Universal Installer displays the Specify Hardware Cluster
Installation Mode screen. You must select Local Installation on this screen, unless
you want to install Oracle Real Application Clusters.
See Also: Oracle Real Application Clusters Installation and
Configuration Guide for Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit) for
information on installing Oracle Real Application Clusters
■
Products not installed by default: choose Advanced Installation and then the
Custom installation type. These products are:
–
Oracle Connection Manager
–
Oracle Label Security
To configure Oracle Label Security to use Oracle Internet Directory, choose the
Oracle Internet Directory option when running Database Configuration
Assistant. If you are installing Oracle Label Security in an existing Oracle
home, then shut down each database in the Oracle home.
–
■
Data Mining Scoring Engine
Reinstalling Oracle Software
If you reinstall Oracle software into an Oracle home directory where Oracle
Database is already installed, you must also reinstall any components, such as
Oracle Partitioning, that were installed before you began the reinstallation.
Accessing the Installation Software
The Oracle Database software is available on compact disc (DVD) or you can
download it from the Oracle Technology Network Web site. To install the software
from the hard disk, you must either download it from Oracle Technology Network
and unpack it, or copy it from the disc, if you have it.
You can access and install Oracle Database by using one of the following methods:
If the Oracle Database 10g software is on two discs, you can
avoid having to change discs during the installation by running
Oracle Universal Installer from the DVD or by copying the contents
of the installation discs to a hard disk.
Note:
■
To copy the software to a hard disk, refer to the following section:
"Copying the Software to the Hard Disk" on page 3-4
■
■
To install the software from a disc or from an existing hard disk location, refer to
the "Installing the Oracle Database Software" section on page 3-5.
To download the software from Oracle Technology Network, refer to the
following section.
Downloading Oracle Software from the OTN Web Site
This section describes how to download the installation archive files and extract them
on your hard disk. It contains the following topics:
3-2 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Accessing the Installation Software
■
Downloading the Installation Archive Files
■
Extracting the Installation Files
Downloading the Installation Archive Files
To download the installation archive files from Oracle Technology Network:
1.
Use any browser to access the software download page from Oracle Technology
Network:
http://www.oracle.com/technology/software/
2.
Navigate to the download page for the product that you want to install.
3.
On the download page, identify the required disk space by adding the file sizes for
each required file.
The file sizes are listed next to the file names.
4.
Select a file system with enough free space to store and expand the archive files.
In most cases, the available disk space must be at least twice the size of all of the
archive files.
5.
On the file system that you selected in step 4, create a parent directory for each
product, for example OraDB10g, to hold the installation directories.
6.
Download all of the installation archive files to the directory that you created in
step 5.
7.
Verify that the files you downloaded are the same size as the corresponding files
on Oracle Technology Network.
Extracting the Installation Files
To extract the installation archive files, perform the following steps:
1.
If necessary, change directory to the directory that contains the downloaded
installation archive files.
2.
To uncompress each file, enter a command similar to the following:
$ gunzip filename.cpio.gz
This command creates files with names similar to the following:
filename.cpio
3.
To extract the installation files, enter a command similar to the following:
$ cpio -idmv < filename.cpio
Refer to the download page for information about the
correct options to use with the cpio command.
Note:
Some browsers uncompress files while downloading them, but
leave the .gz file extension. If these steps do not work, remove the
.gz extension from the files and repeat step 3.
For each file, this command creates a subdirectory named Diskn, where n is either
1 or the disk number identified in the file name.
Installation Tasks
3-3
Accessing the Installation Software
When you have extracted all of the required installation files, refer to the following
section:
"Installing the Oracle Database Software" on page 3-5
Copying the Software to the Hard Disk
Before installing Oracle Database, you might want to copy the softare to the hard disk.
This enables the installation process to run a bit faster. Before copying the disc content
to the hard disk, you must mount the disc. The following sections describe to mount
disc and copy its content to the hard disk.
Mounting Discs
On most Solaris systems, the disc mounts automatically when you insert it into the
disc drive. If the disc does not mount automatically, follow these steps to mount it:
1.
Switch user to root:
$ su - root
2.
If necessary, enter the following command to eject the currently mounted disc,
then remove it from the drive:
# eject
3.
Insert the appropriate disc into the disc drive.
4.
To verify that the disc mounted automatically, enter the following command:
# ls /dvd/dvd0
5.
If this command fails to display the contents of the disc, enter a command similar
to the following to mount it:
# /usr/sbin/mount -r -F hsfs /dev/dsk/cxtydzs2 /dvd
In this example, /dvd is the disc mount point directory and
/dev/dsk/cxtydzs2 is the device name for the disc device, for example
/dev/dsk/c0t2d0s2.
6.
If Oracle Universal Installer is displaying the Disk Location dialog box, enter the
disc mount point directory path, for example:
■
Disc mounted automatically:
/dvd/dvd0
■
Disc mounted manually:
/dvd
To continue, go to one of the following sections:
■
If you want to copy software to a hard disk, refer to the following section:
"Copying the Oracle Database Software to a Hard Disk" on page 3-5
■
If you want to install the software from the discs, refer to the "Installing the Oracle
Database Software" section.
3-4 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Installing the Oracle Database Software
Copying the Oracle Database Software to a Hard Disk
If the system does not have a DVD drive, you can copy the
software from the disc to a file system on another system, then
either mount that file system using NFS, or use FTP to copy the
files to the system where you want to install the software.
Note:
To copy the contents of the disc to a hard disk:
1.
Create a directory on the hard disk to hold the Oracle software:
$ mkdir OraDb10g
2.
Change directory to the directory you created in step 1:
$ cd OraDb10g
3.
Mount the disc, if it is not already mounted.
Some platforms automatically mount the disc when you insert it into the drive. If
the disc does not mount automatically, refer to the "Mounting Discs" section on
page 3-4 for platform-specific information about mounting it.
4.
Copy the contents of the mounted disc to the corresponding new subdirectory as
follows:
$ cp -R /directory_path OraDb10g
In this example, /directory_path is the disc mount point directory, for
example /dvd, or the path of the db directory on the DVD. The mount point
directory is /dvd.
5.
If necessary, mount the next disc and repeat step 5.
After you have copied all the required discs, refer to the "Installing the Oracle
Database Software" section on page 3-5.
Installing the Oracle Database Software
The following sections describe how to install the Oracle software:
■
Reviewing Installation Guidelines
■
Running Oracle Universal Installer
See Also:
■
■
"Installing Automatic Storage Management" on page 3-9 if you
want to install Oracle Database and use Automatic Storage
Management
Appendix A, "Installing and Configuring Oracle Database Using
Response Files" if you want to install Oracle Database by using the
noninteractive installation method, without the GUI. This method
is useful if you need to perform multiple installations of Oracle
Database. This appendix covers other advanced installation topics
as well.
Installation Tasks
3-5
Installing the Oracle Database Software
Reviewing Installation Guidelines
Review the following guidelines before starting Oracle Universal Installer:
■
Oracle Universal Installer
Do not use Oracle Universal Installer from an earlier Oracle product release to
install components from this release.
■
Password recommendations
Apply the following guidelines when specifying passwords:
–
Passwords must be between 4 and 30 characters long.
–
Passwords must be from the database character set and can include the
underscore (_), dollar ($), and pound sign (#) characters.
–
Passwords must not start with a numeral.
–
Passwords must not be the same as the user name.
–
Passwords must not be Oracle reserved words.
–
The SYS account password must not be change_on_install.
–
The SYSTEM account password must not be manager.
–
The SYSMAN account password must not be sysman.
–
The DBSNMP account password must not be dbsnmp.
–
If you choose to use the same password for all the accounts, then that
password must not be change_on_install, manager, sysman, or dbsnmp.
–
Passwords should have at least 1 alphabetic, 1 numeric, and 1 punctuation
mark character
–
Passwords should not be simple or obvious words, such as welcome,
account, database, and user.
See Also: "Reviewing Accounts and Passwords" on page 5-3 for
more information about accounts and passwords
■
Products requiring a custom installation
To install the following products, you must choose the Custom installation type:
–
Oracle Label Security
Before you perform a custom installation, make sure all
databases in the Oracle home where you want to install Oracle
Label Security are shut down.
Note:
If you want to configure OLS to use Oracle Internet Directory, you must
choose the OID option when running the Database Configuration Assistant.
■
–
Oracle Connection Manager
–
Data Mining Scoring Engine
Installations on a cluster
If Oracle Clusterware and Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC) are already
installed on the system, Oracle Universal Installer displays the Specify Hardware
3-6 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Installing the Oracle Database Software
Cluster Installation Mode screen. You must select Local Installation on this
screen, unless you want to install Oracle Real Application Clusters.
If you do want to install Oracle Real Application Clusters, refer to the Oracle Real
Application Clusters Installation and Configuration Guide for Solaris Operating System
(SPARC 64-Bit) instead of using this guide.
■
Reinstalling Oracle software
If you reinstall Oracle software into an Oracle home directory where Oracle
Database is already installed, you must also re-install any components, such as
Oracle Partitioning, that were installed before you began the re-installation.
Running Oracle Universal Installer
This section describes the Basic Installation as a default setting. For any type of
installation process, start Oracle Universal Installer and install the software, as follows:
1.
If you are installing the software from disc, mount the first disc if it is not already
mounted.
Some platforms automatically mount the disc when you insert the disc into the
drive.
If the disc does not mount automatically, refer to the "Mounting Discs" section on
page 3-4 for platform-specific information about mounting it.
2.
To start Oracle Universal Installer, complete one of the following steps depending
on the location of the installation files:
Start Oracle Universal Installer from the terminal session
where you logged in as the oracle user and set the user’s
environment (described in Chapter 2).
Note:
■
If the installation files are on disc, enter commands similar to the following,
where directory_path is the path of the db directory on the DVD:
$ cd /tmp
$ /directory_path/runInstaller
■
If the installation files are on the hard disk, change directory to the db
directory and enter the following command:
$ ./runInstaller
If Oracle Universal Installer does not appear, refer to the "X Window Display
Errors" section on page G-1 for information about troubleshooting.
3.
Use the following guidelines to complete the installation:
■
■
Follow the instructions displayed on the Oracle Universal Installer screens. If
you need additional information, click Help.
When Oracle Universal Installer prompts you to run a script with root
privileges, enter a command similar to the following in a terminal where you
are logged in as the root user, then click Continue or OK:
# /script_path/script_name
The following table lists the various screens displayed and the recomended
actions required when you select the Basic Installation option.
Installation Tasks
3-7
Installing the Oracle Database Software
Screen
Recommended Action
Select Installation Method
The Basic Installation option is selected by default.
Specify the directory path of the Oracle home. Ensure that the
UNIX DBA group oinstall is selected. If you want to create
a starter database, then specify a name and password for it.
Then, click Next.
Specify Inventory Directory
and Credentials
This screen is displayed only during the first installation of
Oracle products on a system.
Specify the full path of the Oracle Inventory directory. Ensure
that the operating system group selected is oinstall. Then,
click Next.
Product-Specific Prerequisite
Checks
Verify that all of the prerequisite checks succeed, then click
Next.
Oracle Universal Installer checks the system to verify that it is
configured correctly to run Oracle software. If you have
completed all of the preinstallation steps in this guide, all of
the checks should pass.
If a check fails, then review the cause of the failure listed for
that check on the screen. If possible, rectify the problem and
rerun the check. Alternatively, if you are satisfied that your
system meets the requirements, then you can select the check
box for the failed check to manually verify the requirement.
Summary
Review the information displayed on this screen, and then
click Install.
Install
This screen displays status information while the product is
being installed.
Configuration Assistants
This screen displays status information for the configuration
assistants that configure the software and create a database.
When the message is displayed at the end of DBCA process,
click OK to continue.
Execute Configuration Scripts When prompted, read the instructions and then run the scripts
mentioned on this screen. Click OK to continue.
End of Installation
The configuration assistants configure several Web-based
applications, including Oracle Enterprise Manager Database
Control. This screen displays the URLs configured for these
applications. Make a note of the URLs used. The port numbers
used in these URLs are also recorded in the following file:
oracle_home/install/portlist.ini
To exit from Oracle Universal Installer, click Exit and then click
Yes.
■
4.
If you encounter errors while installing or linking the software, refer to
Appendix G for information about troubleshooting.
If you chose an installation type that runs Database Configuration Assistant and
Oracle Net Configuration Assistant (NetCA) in interactive mode, you must
provide detailed information about configuring the database and network.
If you need assistance when using the Database Configuration Assistant or NetCA
in interactive mode, then click Help on the screen.
If you chose a default installation, the Database
Configuration Assistant and NetCA run in noninteractive mode.
Note:
3-8 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Installing Automatic Storage Management
5.
When all of the configuration tools have finished, click Exit, then click Yes to exit
from Oracle Universal Installer.
Installing Automatic Storage Management
Follow the procedures in this section to install and configure Automatic Storage
Management, and then to install Oracle Database so that it can use Automatic Storage
Management. If you do not plan to use Automatic Storage Management, then follow
the procedure given in "Installing the Oracle Database Software" on page 3-5 to install
Oracle Database.
This section covers the following topics:
■
Step 1: Reviewing Automatic Storage Management Installation Considerations
■
Step 2: Creating the Automatic Storage Management Instance and Disk Groups
■
Step 3: Installing Oracle Database to Use with Automatic Storage Management
■
Step 4: Testing the Automatic Storage Management Installation
Step 1: Reviewing Automatic Storage Management Installation Considerations
Apply these guidelines when you install Automatic Storage Management:
■
■
You must complete the steps in "Preparing Disk Groups for an Automatic Storage
Management Installation" on page 2-23 to prepare a disk partition to use for the
Automatic Storage Management disk groups.
Oracle recommends that you install Automatic Storage Management in its own
Oracle home, regardless of whether you plan to only have one or multiple
database instances. Installing Automatic Storage Management in its own Oracle
home helps ensure higher availability and manageability.
With separate Oracle homes, you can upgrade Automatic Storage Management
and databases independently, and you can remove database software without
impacting the Automatic Storage Management instance. Ensure that the
Automatic Storage Management version is the same or later than the Oracle
Database version.
If an Automatic Storage Management installation does not already exist and you
select the Oracle Universal Installer option to install and configure Automatic
Storage Management only, then Oracle Universal Installer installs Automatic
Storage Management in its own Oracle home.
■
■
Each computer that has one or more Oracle Database instances that will use
Automatic Storage Management must have one ASM instance. For example, if a
computer has two Oracle Database instances that use Automatic Storage
Management, you need only one ASM instance for that computer, to manage the
two database instances that use Automatic Storage Management.
When you install Automatic Storage Management, Oracle Database Configuration
Assistant creates a separate server parameter file (SPFILE) and password file for
the Automatic Storage Management instance.
Step 2: Creating the Automatic Storage Management Instance and Disk Groups
The following steps explain how to create an Automatic Storage Management instance
and a disk group for storing Oracle Database files. You can create multiple disk
groups for the Automatic Storage Management instance to manage, if you want. If you
Installation Tasks
3-9
Installing Automatic Storage Management
plan to use Automatic Storage Management for backup and recovery operations, then
Oracle recommends that you create a separate disk group for this purpose.
To install an Automatic Storage Management instance and configure its disk groups:
1.
If you are installing the software from disc, mount the first disc if it is not already
mounted.
Some platforms automatically mount the disc when you insert the disc into the
drive.
If the disc does not mount automatically, refer to the "Mounting Discs" section on
page 3-4 for platform-specific information about mounting it.
2.
To start Oracle Universal Installer, complete one of the following steps depending
on the location of the installation files:
Start Oracle Universal Installer from the terminal session
where you logged in as the oracle user and set the user’s
environment (described in Chapter 2).
Note:
■
If the installation files are on disc, enter commands similar to the following,
where directory_path is the path of the db directory on the DVD:
$ cd /tmp
$ /directory_path/runInstaller
■
If the installation files are on the hard disk, change directory to the db
directory and enter the following command:
$ ./runInstaller
If Oracle Universal Installer does not appear, refer to the "X Window Display
Errors" section on page G-1 for information about troubleshooting.
3.
On the Welcome screen, select Advanced Installation and then click Next.
See Also: "Running Oracle Universal Installer" on page 3-7 for a
detailed description of the screens used in this procedure
4.
On the Select Installation Type screen, select either Enterprise Edition, Standard
Edition, or Custom, and then click Next.
5.
On the Specify Home Details screen, enter an Automatic Storage
Management-specific name and directory location for the Automatic Storage
Management instance.
For example, you could change name to OraDB10g+ASM and the directory
location to the following:
/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/asm
6.
Click Next.
7.
On the Product-Specific Prerequisite Checks screen, check that the requirements
have been met and then click Next.
8.
On the Select Configuration Option screen, select Configure Automatic Storage
Management (ASM) and then specify and confirm the ASM SYS password. Then,
click Next.
3-10 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Installing Automatic Storage Management
9.
On the Configure Automatic Storage Management screen, enter the following
settings:
This screen lets you create the disk groups to use with the
Automatic Storage Management instance. You must have an available
partition in order to create disk groups.
Note:
■
■
■
Disk Group Name: Enter a name for the disk group.
Redundancy: Select one of the following choices to set the redundancy level
for the disks within the disk group. f you do not specify a redundancy level,
the disk group defaults to normal redundancy.
–
High: The contents of the disk group are three-way mirrored by default.
To create a disk group with high redundancy, you must specify at least
three failure groups (a minimum of three devices).
–
Normal: By default, the datafiles of the disk group are two-way mirrored
and the control files are three-way mirrored. You can choose to create
certain files that are three-way mirrored or not mirrored. To create a disk
group with normal redundancy, you must specify at least two failure
groups (a minimum of two devices) for two-way mirroring.
–
External: Automatic Storage Management does not mirror the contents of
the disk group. Choose this redundancy level when 1) the disk group
contains devices, such as RAID devices, that provide their own data
protection; or 2) your use of the database does not require uninterrupted
access to data, for example, in a development environment where you
have a suitable backup strategy.
Add Disks: Enter /dev/raw as the disk recovery path. You can also clisk
Disk Recovery Path and enter the required disk recovery path in the dialog
box and clisk OK.
10. Click Next.
11. On the Install screen, check the installed contents, and then click Install.
12. To create another disk group for this instance, run Oracle Database Control
Assistant from the $ORACLE_HOME/bin directory manually, and select the
Configure Automatic Storage Management option.
At this stage, subsequent databases that you create are able to use Automatic Storage
Management. If you have databases that were created before you installed Automatic
Storage Management, then you now can migrate them to Automatic Storage
Management by using the Enterprise Manager Migrate Database Wizard. This wizard
is available in Enterprise Manager Grid Control or Database Control. Alternatively,
you can use Oracle Database Recovery Manager (RMAN) to perform the migration.
See Also:
■
■
Enterprise Manager Migrate Database Wizard online Help
instructions on how to migrate an existing Oracle Database to
Automatic Storage Management
Oracle Database Backup and Recovery Advanced User's Guide for
information about migrating an existing Oracle Database to
Automatic Storage Management using Oracle Database Recovery
Manager
Installation Tasks 3-11
Installing Automatic Storage Management
Step 3: Installing Oracle Database to Use with Automatic Storage Management
After you have created the Automatic Storage Management instance and Automatic
Storage Management disk groups, you are ready to create a database instance that can
use Automatic Storage Management.
To create a database instance to use with Automatic Storage Management:
1.
Start Oracle Universal Installer.
2.
On the Welcome screen, select Advanced Installation and then click Next.
3.
On the Select Installation Type screen, select one of the installation types, and then
click Next.
4.
On the Specify Home Details screen, select a different Oracle home from the home
used for Automatic Storage Management.
5.
If you selected the Custom installation type, then select from the products to
install.
6.
On the Product-Specific Prerequisite Checks screen, check that the requirements
have been met and then click Next.
7.
On the Select Configuration Option screen, select Create a Database.
8.
On the Select Database Configuration screen, select from the database types
displayed and click Next.
9.
On the Specify Database Configuration Options screen, enter the following
settings and then click Next.
■
■
■
Database Naming: Enter a name for the database.
Database Character Set: Select the database character set that you want to use.
The default offered is based on the character set that the operating system
uses.
Database Examples: Select this option to create the EXAMPLE tablespace,
which contains sample schemas. This is optional, but recommended.
10. On the Select Database Management Option screen, select either Use Grid Control
for Database Management if you have Oracle Enterprise Manager installed, or if
you do not have Enterprise Manager, select Use Database Control for Database
Management. Optionally, select Enable Email Notifications and then enter the
outgoing SMTP server and e-mail address. Then, click Next.
After you complete the installation, you can use either of these utilities to manage
the Automatic Storage Management instance.
11. On the Specify Database Storage Option screen, select Automatic Storage
Management (ASM) and click Next.
12. On the Specify Backup and Recovery Options screen, perform the following
actions:
■
■
Enable Automated Backups: Select this option, and then select Automatic
Storage Management.
Backup Job Credentials: Enter the user name and password of the person
responsible for managing backups.
13. Click Next.
3-12 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Installing Automatic Storage Management
14. On the Select ASM Disk Group screen, select the Automatic Storage Management
disk group that you created in "Step 2: Creating the Automatic Storage
Management Instance and Disk Groups" on page 3-9 for recovery and backups.
If the Automatic Storage Management disks that you select do not provide enough
space, then the Configure Storage Management screen is displayed so that you can
select additional disks as needed. As you select the disks, the adjusted sizes are
displayed in the Required Storage Space region. Ideally, the Additional Space
Needed value should be a negative number.
15. Click Next.
16. On the Specify Database Schema Passwords screen, enter and confirm passwords
for the privileged database accounts, then click Next.
17. On the Summary screen, check that the contents to be installed are correct, and
then click Install.
Step 4: Testing the Automatic Storage Management Installation
To test the Automatic Storage Management installation, try logging in by using the
asmcmd command-line utility, which lets you manage Automatic Storage
Management disk group files and directories. To do this:
1.
Open a shell window, and temporarily set the ORACLE_SID and ORACLE_HOME
environment variables to specify the appropriate values for the Automatic Storage
Management instance that you want to use.
For example, if the Automatic Storage Management SID, which is named +ASM
and is located in the asm subdirectory of the ORACLE_BASE directory, then enter
the following commands to create the required settings:
■
Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:
$
$
$
$
■
ORACLE_SID=+ASM
export ORACLE_SID
ORACLE_HOME=/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/asm
export ORACLE_HOME
C shell:
% setenv ORACLE_SID +ASM
% setenv ORACLE_HOME /u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/asm
2.
By using SQL*Plus, connect to the Automatic Storage Management instance as the
SYS user with SYSDBA privilege and start the instance if necessary:
# $ORACLE_HOME/bin/sqlplus "SYS/SYS_password as SYSDBA"
SQL> STARTUP
3.
Enter the following command to view the existing disk groups, their redundancy
level, and the amount of free disk space in each one:
SQL> SELECT NAME,TYPE,TOTAL_MB,FREE_MB FROM V$ASM_DISKGROUP;
Installation Tasks 3-13
Installing Automatic Storage Management
See Also:
■
■
■
Oracle Database Utilities for more information about asmcmd
"Managing Automatic Storage Management" on page 5-2 for
information about other tools that you can use to manage
Automatic Storage Management
Oracle Database Administrator's Guide for a more detailed
description of Automatic Storage Management
3-14 Oracle Database Installation Guide
4
Postinstallation Tasks
This chapter describes how to complete postinstallation tasks after you have installed
the software. It includes information about the following sections:
■
Required Postinstallation Tasks
■
Recommended Postinstallation Tasks
■
Required Product-Specific Postinstallation Tasks
■
Installing Oracle Database 10g Products from the Companion CD
You must perform the tasks listed in the "Required Postinstallation Tasks" section.
Oracle recommends that you perform the tasks listed in the "Recommended
Postinstallation Tasks" section after all installations.
If you installed and intend to use any of the products listed in the "Required
Product-Specific Postinstallation Tasks" section, then you must perform the tasks listed
in the product-specific subsections.
This chapter describes basic configuration only. Refer to
Oracle Database Administrator's Reference for UNIX-Based Operating
Systems and product-specific administration and tuning guides for
more detailed configuration and tuning information.
Note:
Required Postinstallation Tasks
You must perform the tasks described in the following sections after completing an
installation:
■
Downloading and Installing Patches
■
Configuring Oracle Products
Downloading and Installing Patches
Check the OracleMetaLink Web site for required patches for the installation.
To download required patches:
1.
Use a Web browser to view the OracleMetaLink Web site:
http://metalink.oracle.com
2.
Log in to OracleMetaLink.
Postinstallation Tasks
4-1
Recommended Postinstallation Tasks
Note: If you are not an OracleMetaLink registered user, click
Register for MetaLink! and follow the registration instructions.
3.
On the main OracleMetaLink page, click Patches.
4.
Select Simple Search.
5.
Specify the following information, then click Go:
■
In the Search By field, choose Product or Family, then specify RDBMS Server.
■
In the Release field, specify the current release number.
■
In the Patch Type field, specify Patchset/Minipack.
■
In the Platform or Language field, select your platform.
Configuring Oracle Products
Many Oracle products and options must be configured before you use them for the
first time. Before using individual Oracle products or options, refer to the appropriate
manual in the product documentation library.
Recommended Postinstallation Tasks
Oracle recommends that you perform the tasks described in the following section after
completing an installation:
■
Creating a Backup of the root.sh Script
■
Configuring New or Upgraded Databases
■
Setting Up User Accounts
■
Setting the NLS_LANG Environment Variable
■
Generating the Client Static Library
Creating a Backup of the root.sh Script
Oracle recommends that you back up the root.sh script after you complete an
installation. If you install other products in the same Oracle home directory, then
Oracle Universal Installer updates the contents of the existing root.sh script during
the installation. If you require information contained in the original root.sh script,
then you can recover it from the backed up root.sh file.
Configuring New or Upgraded Databases
Oracle recommends that you run the utlrp.sql script after creating or upgrading a
database. This script recompiles all PL/SQL modules that might be in an invalid state,
including packages, procedures, and types. This is an optional step but Oracle
recommends that you do it during installation and not at a later date.
To run the utlrp.sql script, follow these steps:
1.
Switch user to oracle.
2.
Use the oraenv or coraenv script to set the environment for the database where
you want to run the utlrp.sql script:
■
Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:
4-2 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Recommended Postinstallation Tasks
$ . /usr/local/bin/oraenv
■
C shell:
% source /usr/local/bin/coraenv
When prompted, specify the SID for the database.
3.
Start SQL*Plus, as follows:
$ sqlplus "/ AS SYSDBA"
4.
If necessary, start the database:
SQL> STARTUP
5.
Run the utlrp.sql script:
SQL> @?/rdbms/admin/utlrp.sql
Setting Up User Accounts
For information about setting up additional user accounts, refer to Oracle Database
Administrator's Reference for UNIX-Based Operating Systems.
Setting the NLS_LANG Environment Variable
NLS_LANG is an environment variable that specifies the locale behavior for Oracle
software. This variable sets the language and territory used by the client application
and the database server. It also sets the character set for the client, which is the
character set for data entered or displayed by an Oracle client program, such as
SQL*PLUS.
See Also: Appendix F, "Configuring Oracle Database
Globalization Support" for more information about the NLS_LANG
environment variable
Generating the Client Static Library
The client static library (libclntst10.a) is not generated during installation. If you
want to link your applications to the client static library, you must first generate it as
follows:
1.
Switch user to oracle.
2.
Set the ORACLE_HOME environment variable to specify the Oracle home
directory used by the Oracle Database installation. For example:
■
Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:
$ ORACLE_HOME=/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1
$ export ORACLE_HOME
■
C shell:
% setenv ORACLE_HOME /u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1
3.
Enter the following command:
$ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/genclntst
Postinstallation Tasks
4-3
Required Product-Specific Postinstallation Tasks
Required Product-Specific Postinstallation Tasks
The following sections describe platform-specific postinstallation tasks that you must
perform if you install and intend to use the products mentioned:
■
Configuring Oracle Net Services
■
Configuring Oracle Label Security
■
Installing Natively Compiled Java Libraries for Oracle JVM and Oracle interMedia
■
Installing Oracle Text Supplied Knowledge Bases
■
Configuring Oracle Messaging Gateway
■
Configuring Oracle Precompilers
■
Configuring the 64-Bit Oracle JDBC/OCI Driver for JDK 1.4
■
Configuring GCC as the Primary Compiler
Note: You need only perform postinstallation tasks for products
that you intend to use.
Configuring Oracle Net Services
If you have a previous release of Oracle software installed on this system, you might
want to copy information from the Oracle Net tnsnames.ora and listener.ora
configuration files from the previous release to the corresponding files for the new
release.
The default location for the tnsnames.ora and
listener.ora files is the $ORACLE_HOME/network/admin/
directory. However, you can also use a central location for these
files, for example /var/opt/oracle.
Note:
Modifying the listener.ora File
If you are upgrading from a previous release of Oracle Database, Oracle recommends
that you use the current release of Oracle Net listener instead of the listener from the
previous release.
To use the listener from the current release, you may need to copy static service
information from the listener.ora file from the previous release to the version of
that file used by the new release.
For any database instances earlier than release 8.0.3, add static service information to
the listener.ora file. Oracle Database releases later than release 8.0.3 do not
require static service information.
Modifying the tnsnames.ora File
Unless you are using a central tnsnames.ora file, copy Oracle Net service names
and connect descriptors from the previous release tnsnames.ora file to the version
of that file used by the new release.
If necessary, you can also add connection information for additional database
instances to the new file.
4-4 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Required Product-Specific Postinstallation Tasks
Configuring Oracle Label Security
If you installed Oracle Label Security, you must configure it in a database before you
use it. You can configure Oracle Label Security in two ways; with Oracle Internet
Directory integration and without Oracle Internet Directory integration. If you
configure Oracle Label Security without Oracle Internet Directory integration, you
cannot configure it to use Oracle Internet Directory at a later stage.
To configure Oracle Label Security with Oracle Internet
Directory integration, Oracle Internet Directory must be installed in
your environment and the Oracle database must be registered in
the directory.
Note:
See Also: Oracle Label Security Administrator's Guide for more
information about Oracle Label Security enabled with Oracle
Internet Directory
Installing Natively Compiled Java Libraries for Oracle JVM and Oracle interMedia
If you plan to use Oracle JVM or Oracle interMedia, Oracle strongly recommends that
you install the natively compiled Java libraries (NCOMPs) used by those products
from the Oracle Database 10g Companion CD. These libraries are required to improve
the performance of the products on your platform.
For information about how to install products from the Companion CD, refer to the
"Installing Oracle Database 10g Products from the Companion CD" section on
page 4-9.
Installing Oracle Text Supplied Knowledge Bases
An Oracle Text knowledge base is a hierarchical tree of concepts used for theme
indexing, ABOUT queries, and deriving themes for document services. If you plan to
use any of these Oracle Text features, you can install two supplied knowledge bases
(English and French) from the Oracle Database 10g Companion CD.
You can extend the supplied knowledge bases depending
on your requirements. Alternatively, you can create your own
knowledge bases, possibly in languages other than English and
French.
Note:
See Also: Oracle Text Reference for more information about creating
and extending knowledge bases.
The "Installing Oracle Database 10g Products from the Companion
CD" section on page 4-9 for information about how to install products
from the Companion CD
Configuring Oracle Messaging Gateway
To configure Oracle Messaging Gateway, refer to the section about Messaging
Gateway in Oracle Streams Advanced Queuing User's Guide and Reference. When
following the instructions listed in that manual, refer to this section for additional
instructions about configuring the listener.ora, tnsnames.ora, and mgw.ora
files.
Postinstallation Tasks
4-5
Required Product-Specific Postinstallation Tasks
Modifying the listener.ora File for External Procedures
To modify the $ORACLE_HOME/network/admin/listener.ora file for external
procedures:
1.
Back up the listener.ora file.
2.
Ensure that the default IPC protocol address for external procedures is set as
follows:
(ADDRESS = (PROTOCOL=IPC)(KEY=EXTPROC))
3.
Add static service information for a service called mgwextproc by adding lines
similar to the following to the SID_LIST parameter for the listener in the
listener.ora file:
(SID_DESC =
(SID_NAME = mgwextproc)
(ENVS = EXTPROC_DLLS=/oracle_home/lib32/libmgwagent.so,
LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/oracle_home/jdk/jre/lib/sparc:/oracle_home/lib32)
(ORACLE_HOME = oracle_home)
(PROGRAM = extproc32)
)
In this example:
■
The ENVS parameter defines the shared library path environment variable
and any other required environment variables.
In the settings for the shared library path environment variable, you must also
add any additional library paths required for non-Oracle messaging systems,
for example WebSphere MQ or TIBCO Rendezvous.
■
oracle_home is the path of the Oracle home directory.
■
extproc32 is the external procedure agent executable file
The following example shows a sample listener.ora file:
SID_LIST_LISTENER =
(SID_LIST =
(SID_DESC =
(SID_NAME = PLSExtProc)
(ORACLE_HOME = /u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1)
(PROGRAM = extproc)
)
(SID_DESC =
(SID_NAME = mgwextproc)
(ENVS = EXTPROC_DLLS=/oracle_home/lib/libmgwagent.so,
LD_LIBRARY_PATH =/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1/jdk/jre/
lib/sparc:/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1/jdk/jre/lib32
(ORACLE_HOME = /u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1)
(PROGRAM = extproc32)
)
)
Modifying the tnsnames.ora File for External Procedures
To modify the $ORACLE_HOME/network/admin/tnsnames.ora file for external
procedures:
1.
Back up the tnsnames.ora file.
2.
In the tnsnames.ora file, add a connect descriptor with the net service name
MGW_AGENT, as follows:
4-6 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Required Product-Specific Postinstallation Tasks
MGW_AGENT =
(DESCRIPTION=
(ADDRESS_LIST= (ADDRESS= (PROTOCOL=IPC)(KEY=EXTPROC)))
(CONNECT_DATA= (SID=mgwextproc) (PRESENTATION=RO)))
In this example:
■
■
The value specified for the KEY parameter must match the value specified for
that parameter in the IPC protocol address in the listener.ora file.
The value of the SID parameter must match the service name in the
listener.ora file that you specified for the Oracle Messaging Gateway
external procedure agent in the previous section (mgwextproc).
Setting Up the mgw.ora Initialization File
To modify the $ORACLE_HOME/mgw/admin/mgw.ora file for external procedures,
set the CLASSPATH environment variable to include the classes in the following table
and any additional classes required for Oracle Messaging Gateway to access
non-Oracle messaging systems, for example WebSphere MQ or TIBCO Rendezvous
classes:
Classes
Path
Oracle Messaging Gateway
ORACLE_HOME/mgw/classes/mgw.jar
JRE internationalization
ORACLE_HOME/jdk/jre/lib/i18n.jar
JRE runtime
ORACLE_HOME/jdk/jre/lib/rt.jar
Oracle JDBC
ORACLE_HOME/jdbc/lib/ojdbc14.jar
Oracle internationalization
ORACLE_HOME/jdbc/lib/orai18n.jar
SQLJ
ORACLE_HOME/oc4j/sqlj/lib/translator.jar
ORACLE_HOME/sqlj/lib/runtime12.tar
JMS Interface
ORACLE_HOME/rdbms/jlib/jmscommon.jar
Oracle JMS implementation
ORACLE_HOME/rdbms/jlib/aqapil3.jar
Java Transaction API
ORACLE_HOME/jlib/jta.jar
All the lines in the mgw.ora file should consist of less than
1024 characters.
Note:
Configuring Oracle Precompilers
This section describes post-installation tasks for Oracle precompilers.
All precompiler configuration files are located in the
$ORACLE_HOME/precomp/admin directory.
Note:
Configuring Pro*C/C++
Verify that the PATH environment variable setting includes the directory that contains
the C compiler executable.
Table 4–1 shows the default directories and the appropriate command to verify the
path setting of the compiler.
Postinstallation Tasks
4-7
Required Product-Specific Postinstallation Tasks
Table 4–1
C/C++ Compiler Directory
Path
Command
/opt/SUNWspro/bin
$ which cc
Configuring the 64-Bit Oracle JDBC/OCI Driver for JDK 1.4
To configure the 64-bit Oracle JDBC/OCI Driver for JDK 1.4, include the
$ORACLE_HOME/lib directory in the value specified by the shared library path
environment variable for your platform. You need to set the set the required path in
the LD_LIBRARY_PATH_64 variable by using the following command.
$ LD_LIBRARY_PATH_64=$ORACLE_HOME/lib:$LD_LIBRARY_PATH_64
Configuring GCC as the Primary Compiler
You can configure GCC as the primary compiler if primary supported compiler is not
available. This enables you to speed up the performance of PL/SQL modules such as
packages by compiling them into native code that resides in shared libraries. This
method translates the module into C code, compiles it with a C compiler, and then
links it into the Oracle process. Remember that you must use one compiler to compile
all your Oracle modules. You cannot compile some modules with the primary
compiler and others with a different compiler.
If both the primary supported compiler for the operating system and GNU Compiler
Collection (GCC) are available, then use the primary supported compiler. However, if
the primary supported compiler is not available, then use GCC.
To configure GCC as the primary compiler:
1.
Using a text editor, open the spnc_commands configuration file. In a default
installation, the spnc_commands file is located in the $ORACLE_HOME/plsql
directory.
2.
Look for the following line of text and comment it out:
/opt/SunProd/SUNWspro8/bin/cc %(src) -xO1 -Xa -xstrconst -dalign -xF -mr
-xildoff -errtags=yes -xarch=v9 -xchip=ultra3 -W2,-AKNR_S -Wd,-xsafe=unboundsym
-Wc,-Qiselect-funcalign=32 -xcode=abs44 -Wc,-Qgsched-trace_late=1
-Wc,-Qgsched-T5 -KPIC -I$(ORACLE_HOME)/plsql/include
-I$(ORACLE_HOME)/plsql/public -G -o %(so)
3.
Look for the following lines, which pertain to GCC, and uncomment them:
# /usr/local/bin/gcc -B/usr/ccs/bin %(src) -c -fPIC -mhard-float
-mhard-quad-float -mcpu=v9 -DSLU8NATIVE -DSLS8NATIVE -D_REENTRANT -DSOLARIS
-DSLMXMX_ENABLE -DSLTS_ENABLE -D_SVID_GETTOD -DEO_SUPPRESS_DEBUG
-DEO_SUPPRESS_TRACE -O1 -m64 -I$(ORACLE_HOME)/plsql/include
-I$(ORACLE_HOME)/plsql/public -o %(obj)
4.
Save and close the spnc_commands configuration file.
Oracle Database PL/SQL User's Guide and Reference for more
information on PL/SQL native compilation and the spnc_commands
configuration file
See Also:
4-8 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Installing Oracle Database 10g Products from the Companion CD
Installing Oracle Database 10g Products from the Companion CD
The Oracle Database 10g Companion CD contains additional products that you can
install. Whether you need to install these products depends on which Oracle Database
products or features you plan to use. If you plan to use the following products or
features, then you must complete the Oracle Database 10g Products installation from
the Companion CD:
■
JPublisher
■
Oracle JVM
■
Oracle interMedia
■
Oracle JDBC development drivers
■
Oracle SQLJ
■
Oracle Database Examples
■
Oracle Text supplied knowledge bases
■
Oracle Ultra Search
■
Oracle HTML DB
■
Oracle Workflow server and middle-tier components
For information about installing software from the Companion CD, refer to Oracle
Database Companion CD Quick Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System (SPARC
64-Bit).
Postinstallation Tasks
4-9
Installing Oracle Database 10g Products from the Companion CD
4-10 Oracle Database Installation Guide
5
Getting Started with Oracle Database
This chapter provides information about the default preconfigured database,
including information about Oracle database accounts, passwords, and file locations. It
includes information about the following topics:
■
Checking the Installed Oracle Database Contents and Directory Location
■
Logging In to Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control
■
Managing Automatic Storage Management
■
Reviewing Accounts and Passwords
■
Unlocking and Resetting User Passwords
■
Identifying Databases
■
Locating the Server Parameter File
■
Reviewing Tablespaces and Data Files, Redo Log Files, and Control Files
Checking the Installed Oracle Database Contents and Directory Location
You can use Oracle Universal Installer to check the contents and directory location of
an Oracle Database installation. To do this:
1.
Start Oracle Universal Installer, follow the instructions in "Running Oracle
Universal Installer" on page 3-7.
2.
Click Installed Products to display the Inventory dialog box on the Welcome
screen.
3.
Select the Oracle Database product from the list to check the installed contents.
4.
Click Details to find additional information about an installed product.
5.
Click the Environment tab to check the directory location of the installed contents.
6.
Click Close to close the Inventory dialog box.
7.
Click Cancel to close Oracle Universal Installer, and then click Yes to confirm.
Logging In to Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control
If you configured Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control during the installation,
you can use it to manage your database. Alternatively, you can use Oracle Enterprise
Manager Grid Control to manage your database. To display the Database Control:
1.
Use a Web browser to access the Database Control URL:
http://host:port/em
Getting Started with Oracle Database 5-1
Managing Automatic Storage Management
In this example:
■
host is the name of the computer on which you installed Oracle Database
■
port is the port number reserved for the Database Control during installation
If you do not know the correct port number to use, look for the following line in
the $ORACLE_HOME/install/portlist.ini file:
Enterprise Manager Console HTTP Port (db_name) = 1158
The installation reserves the first available port from the range 5500 to 5519. For
example, if you installed Oracle Database on host mgmt42, and the Database
Control uses port 1158, use the following URL:
http://mgmt42:1158/em
Oracle Enterprise Manager displays the Database Control login page.
2.
Log in to the database using the user name SYS and connect as SYSDBA.
Use the password that you specified for the SYS account during the installation.
You can also log in to the Database Control using the
SYSTEM or SYSMAN accounts or you can grant login privileges to
other database users.
Note:
Understanding Database Control Login Privileges
When you log in to the Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control using the
SYSMAN user account, you are logging in as the Oracle Enterprise Manager super
user. The SYSMAN account is automatically granted the roles and privileges required
to access all the management features provided by the Database Control.
You can also use the SYS and SYSTEM accounts to log in to the Database Control. In
addition, you can grant login privileges to other database users, as follows:
1.
Log in to the Database Control.
See Also: The "Logging In to Oracle Enterprise Manager
Database Control" section on page 5-1 for information about
logging in to the Database Control
2.
Click Setup at the top of the Database Control home page.
3.
Click Administrators in the left navigation bar.
4.
Click Create to create an Enterprise Manager user.
5.
In the Name field, enter the user name of an existing database user or click the
flashlight icon and select a user from the pop-up window.
6.
Enter the password for this user, and then click Finish.
Enterprise Manager assigns login privileges to the specified user and includes this
user in the list of Enterprise Manager users on the Setup Administrators page.
Managing Automatic Storage Management
This section provides information about managing an Automatic Storage Management
installation. It covers the following topics:
5-2 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Reviewing Accounts and Passwords
■
Starting and Stopping Automatic Storage Management
■
Automatic Storage Management Utilities
Starting and Stopping Automatic Storage Management
To start and stop Automatic Storage Management, refer to Oracle Database
Administrator's Reference for UNIX-Based Operating Systems.
Automatic Storage Management Utilities
To manage Automatic Storage Management, you can use the following tools:
■
■
■
■
asmcmd: This command-line tool enables you to manage Automatic Storage
Management disk group files and directories.
Oracle Enterprise Manager Grid Control: If you have Oracle Enterprise Manager
installed, you can use Grid Control to manage Automatic Storage Management
functions, such as migrating an existing database to Automatic Storage
Management, checking the status of the Automatic Storage Management instance,
checking the performance of the Automatic Storage Management disk groups, and
creating or dropping Automatic Storage Management disk groups.
Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control: This utility enables you to perform
functions similar to Grid Control.
SQL*Plus and iSQL*Plus: You can run commands that are specific to Automatic
Storage Management from either of these tools. To connect to an Automatic
Storage Management instance, use the same methods that you use to connect to an
Oracle database instance.
See Also:
■
■
■
"Logging In to Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control" on
page 5-1
Oracle Database Administrator's Guide for more information about
managing Automatic Storage Management
Oracle Database Utilities for more information about asmcmd
Reviewing Accounts and Passwords
All databases created by the Database Configuration Assistant (DBCA) include the
SYS, SYSTEM, SYSMAN, and DBSNMP database accounts. In addition, Oracle
provides several other administrative accounts. Before using these other accounts, you
must unlock them and reset their passwords. Table 5–1 describes these accounts,
listing their user names and default passwords.
See Also: The "Unlocking and Resetting User Passwords" section
on page 5-6 for information about unlocking and resetting
passwords.
You can use the Oracle Enterprise Manager Database
Control to view the complete list of database accounts. For more
information, refer to the "Unlocking and Resetting User Passwords"
section on page 5-6.
Note:
Getting Started with Oracle Database 5-3
Reviewing Accounts and Passwords
Table 5–1
Database Accounts
User Name
Default
Password
Description
See Also
ANONYMOUS
ANONYMOUS
Allows HTTP access to Oracle XML DB.
None
BI
BI
The account that owns the Business
Intelligence schema included in the
Oracle Sample Schemas. It is available
only if you loaded the Sample Schemas.
Oracle Database
Sample Schemas
CTXSYS
CTXSYS
The Oracle Text account.
Oracle Text Reference
DBSNMP
Password set
during
installation or in
the Database
Configuration
Assistant
The account used by the Management
Agent component of Oracle Enterprise
Manager to monitor and manage the
database. It is created only if you
configure the database to use the
Database Control.
Oracle Enterprise
Manager Grid Control
Installation and Basic
Configuration
DIP
DIP
The account used by the Directory
Integration Platform (DIP) to synchronize
the changes in Oracle Internet Directory
with the applications in the database.
Oracle Internet
Directory
Administrator’s
Guide
DMSYS
DMSYS
The data mining account. DMSYS
performs data mining operations.
Oracle Data Mining
Administrator’s
Guide
EXFSYS
EXFSYS
The account that owns the Expression
Filter schema.
None
HR
HR
The account that owns the Human
Resources schema included in the Oracle
Sample Schemas. It is available only if
you loaded the Sample Schemas.
Oracle Database
Sample Schemas
IX
IX
The account that owns the Information
Transport schema included in the Oracle
Sample Schemas. It is available only if
you loaded the Sample Schemas.
Oracle Database
Sample Schemas
LBACSYS
LBACSYS
The Oracle Label Security administrator
account.
Oracle Label Security
Administrator's
Guide
MDDATA
MDDATA
The schema used by Oracle Spatial for
storing Geocoder and router data.
Oracle Spatial User's
Guide and Reference
MDSYS
MDSYS
The Oracle Spatial and Oracle interMedia
Locator administrator account.
Oracle Spatial User's
Guide and Reference
MGMT_VIEW
Randomly
generated
An account used by Oracle Enterprise
Manager Database Control.
None
OE
OE
The account that owns the Order Entry
Oracle Database
schema included in the Oracle Sample
Sample Schemas
Schemas. It is available only if you loaded
the Sample Schemas.
OLAPSYS
MANAGER
The account that owns the OLAP
catalogs.
Oracle OLAP
Application
Developer's Guide
ORDPLUGINS
ORDPLUGINS
The Oracle interMedia user. Plugins
supplied by Oracle and third-party
plugins are installed in this schema.
Oracle interMedia
Reference
ORDSYS
ORDSYS
The Oracle interMedia administrator
account.
Oracle interMedia
Reference
5-4 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Reviewing Accounts and Passwords
Table 5–1 (Cont.) Database Accounts
User Name
Default
Password
OUTLN
Description
See Also
OUTLN
The account that supports plan stability.
Plan stability enables you to maintain the
same execution plans for the same SQL
statements. OUTLN acts as a role to
centrally manage metadata associated
with stored outlines.
Oracle Database
Concepts
PM
PM
The account that owns the Product Media Oracle Database
schema included in the Oracle Sample
Sample Schemas
Schemas. It is available only if you loaded
the Sample Schemas.
SCOTT
TIGER
An account used by Oracle sample
programs and examples.
SH
SH
Oracle Database
The account that owns the Sales History
Administrator's
schema included in the Oracle Sample
Schemas. It is available only if you loaded Guide
the Sample Schemas during an Enterprise
Edition installation.
SI_INFORMTN_SCHEMA
SI_INFORMTN_S The account that stores the information
CHEMA
views for the SQL/MM Still Image
Standard.
Oracle interMedia
Reference
SYS
Password set
during
installation or in
the Database
Configuration
Assistant
The account used to perform database
administration tasks.
Oracle Database
Administrator's
Guide
SYSMAN
Password set
during
installation or in
the Database
Configuration
Assistant
The account used to perform Oracle
Enterprise Manager database
administration tasks.It is created only if
you configure the database to use the
Database Control.
Oracle Enterprise
Manager Grid Control
Installation and Basic
Configuration
SYSTEM
Password set
during
installation or in
the Database
Configuration
Assistant
Another account used to perform
database administration tasks.
Oracle Database
Administrator's
Guide
WMSYS
WMSYS
The account used to store the metadata
information for Oracle Workspace
Manager.
Oracle Database
Application
Developer's Guide Workspace Manager
WKPROXY
WKSYS
The Ultra Search proxy user.
Oracle Ultra Search
Administrator's
Guide
Oracle Database
Administrator's
Guide
Getting Started with Oracle Database 5-5
Unlocking and Resetting User Passwords
Table 5–1 (Cont.) Database Accounts
User Name
Default
Password
WK_TEST
WK_TEST
The default Ultra Search instance schema. Oracle Ultra Search
Administrator's
Guide
WKSYS
WMSYS
The account used to store Ultra Search
system dictionaries and PL/SQL
packages.
Oracle Ultra Search
Administrator's
Guide
XDB
XDB
The account used for storing Oracle XML
DB data and metadata.
Oracle XML DB
Developer's Guide
Description
See Also
Unlocking and Resetting User Passwords
Passwords for all Oracle system administration accounts except SYS, SYSTEM,
SYSMAN, and DBSMP are revoked after installation. Before you use a locked account,
you must unlock it and reset its password. If you created a preconfigured database
during the installation, but you did not unlock a required account, you must unlock it
now, using one of the following methods:
■
Using Database Control to Unlock Accounts and Reset Passwords
■
Using SQL*Plus to Unlock Accounts and Reset Passwords
If you are creating a database using Database Configuration
Assistant, you can unlock accounts after the database is created by
clicking Password Management before you exit from Database
Configuration Assistant.
Note:
Using Database Control to Unlock Accounts and Reset Passwords
To unlock and reset user account passwords using Oracle Enterprise Manager
Database Control:
1.
Log in to the Database Control.
See Also: The "Logging In to Oracle Enterprise Manager
Database Control" section on page 5-1 for information about
logging in to the Database Control
2.
Click Administration.
3.
In the Security section of the Administration page, click Users.
Enterprise Manager displays a table listing all database accounts. The Account
Status column indicates whether the account is locked and whether the password
is expired.
4.
Select the user account that you want to modify, then click Edit.
5.
Use the General page of the Users property sheet to unlock the account and,
optionally, to change the password.
Click Help in the Database Control window for more
information about using the Database Control.
See Also:
5-6 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Identifying Databases
Using SQL*Plus to Unlock Accounts and Reset Passwords
To unlock and reset user account passwords using SQL*Plus:
1.
Start SQL*Plus and log in as the SYS user, connecting as SYSDBA:
$ sqlplus /nolog
SQL> CONNECT SYS/SYS_password AS SYSDBA
2.
Enter a command similar to the following, where account is the user account that
you want to unlock and password is the new password:
SQL> ALTER USER account [ IDENTIFIED BY password ] ACCOUNT UNLOCK;
In this example:
■
The ACCOUNT UNLOCK clause unlocks the account.
■
The IDENTIFED BY password clause resets the password.
If you unlock an account but do not reset the password,
then the password remains expired. The first time someone
connects as that user, they must change the user’s password.
Note:
To permit unauthenticated access to your data through HTTP,
unlock the ANONYMOUS user account.
See Also: Oracle Database Administrator's Guide for more
information about:
■
Unlocking and changing passwords after installation
■
Oracle security procedures
■
Best security practices
Identifying Databases
The Oracle Database 10g software identifies a database by its global database name. A
global database name consists of the database name and database domain. Usually,
the database domain is the same as the network domain, but it need not be. The global
database name uniquely distinguishes a database from any other database in the same
network. You specify the global database name when you create a database during the
installation, or using the Database Configuration Assistant. For example:
sales.us.oracle.com
In this example:
■
■
sales is the name of the database. The database name portion is a string of no
more than 30 characters that can contain alphanumeric, underscore (_), dollar ($),
and pound (#) characters. The DB_NAME initialization parameter specifies the
database name.
us.oracle.com is the database domain in which the database is located. In this
example, the database domain is the same as the network domain. Together, the
database name and the database domain make the global database name unique.
The domain portion is a string of no more than 128 characters that can contain
alphanumeric, underscore (_), and pound (#) characters. The DB_DOMAIN
initialization parameter specifies the database domain name.
Getting Started with Oracle Database 5-7
Locating the Server Parameter File
The DB_NAME parameter and the DB_DOMAIN name parameter combine to create
the global database name value assigned to the SERVICE_NAMES parameter in the
initialization parameter file.
The System Identifier (SID) identifies a specific database instance. The SID uniquely
distinguishes the instance from any other instance on the same computer. Each
database instance requires a unique SID and database name. In most cases, the SID is
the same as the database name portion of the global database name.
Locating the Server Parameter File
By default, the preconfigured database uses a server parameter file named
spfilesid.ora, which is stored in the $ORACLE_HOME/dbs directory. However, if
you choose Automatic Storage Management or raw device storage for the database,
Database Configuration Assistant typically uses the same storage mechanism for the
server parameter file.
If the server parameter file is not located in the $ORACLE_HOME/dbs directory, the
database uses the SPFILE parameter in an initialization parameter file to locate it. The
default initialization parameter file is $ORACLE_HOME/dbs/initsid.ora.
You can use the Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control to view the location of
the server parameter file and list all of the initialization parameters, as follows:
1.
Log in to the Database Control.
See Also: The "Logging In to Oracle Enterprise Manager
Database Control" section on page 5-1 for information about
logging in to the Database Control
2.
Click Administration.
3.
In the Instance section of the Administration page, click All Initialization
Parameters.
Enterprise Manager displays a table listing the current value of each initialization
parameter.
4.
Click SPFile.
Enterprise Manager displays a table listing the value of each initialization
parameter specified in the server parameter file. The location of the server
parameter file is displayed above the table.
Reviewing Tablespaces and Data Files, Redo Log Files, and Control Files
The following sections contain information about tablespaces and data files, redo log
files, and control files:
■
Identifying Tablespaces and Data Files
■
Locating Redo Log Files
■
Locating Control Files
Identifying Tablespaces and Data Files
An Oracle database is divided into smaller logical areas of space known as tablespaces.
Each tablespace corresponds to one or more physical data files. Data files contain the
5-8 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Reviewing Tablespaces and Data Files, Redo Log Files, and Control Files
contents of logical database structures such as tables and indexes. You can associate
each data file with only one tablespace and database.
The SYSAUX and SYSTEM tablespaces must be present in
all Oracle Database 10g databases.
Note:
Table 5–2 describes the tablespaces provided by the default preconfigured database.
Table 5–2
Tablespaces and Descriptions
Tablespace
Description
EXAMPLE
Stores the sample schemas, if you included them.
SYSAUX
Serves as an auxiliary tablespace to the SYSTEM tablespace.
Some products and options that previously used the SYSTEM
tablespace now use the SYSAUX tablespace, which reduces the
load on the SYSTEM tablespace.
SYSTEM
Stores the data dictionary, which includes definitions of tables,
views, and stored procedures needed by Oracle Database.
TEMP
Stores temporary tables and indexes when processing SQL
statements.
UNDOTBS1
Stores undo information.
USERS
Stores database objects created by database users.
Oracle Database Concepts and the Oracle Database
Administrator's Guide for more information about tablespaces and
data files
See Also:
To use the Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control to view the list of data files
used by the database and their associated tablespaces:
1.
Log in to the Database Control.
See Also: The "Logging In to Oracle Enterprise Manager
Database Control" section on page 5-1 for information about
logging in to the Database Control
2.
Click Administration.
3.
In the Storage section of the Administration page, click Datafiles.
Enterprise Manager displays a table listing each data file, and the tablespace with
which it is associated.
See Also: For more information about using the Database Control
to view, modify, and create tablespaces, click Help in the Database
Control window.
Locating Redo Log Files
The preconfigured database uses three redo log files. Redo log files record all changes
made to data in the database buffer cache. If an instance fails, then Oracle Database
10g uses the redo log files to recover the modified data in memory.
Oracle Database uses redo log files in a cyclical fashion. For example, if three files
constitute the online redo log, Oracle Database fills the first file, then the second file,
Getting Started with Oracle Database 5-9
Reviewing Tablespaces and Data Files, Redo Log Files, and Control Files
and then the third file. In the next cycle, it reuses and fills the first file, the second file,
and so on.
See Also: Oracle Database Backup and Recovery Basics for more
information about redo log files
To use the Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control to view or modify the redo
log files for your preconfigured database:
1.
Log in to the Database Control.
See Also: The "Logging In to Oracle Enterprise Manager
Database Control" section on page 5-1 for information about
logging in to the Database Control
2.
Click Administration.
3.
In the Storage section of the Administration page, click Redo Log Groups.
Enterprise Manager displays a table listing the redo log groups used by the
database.
4.
To view the name and location of the redo log file associated with a particular
group, select that group then click View.
See Also: For more information about using the Database Control
to view, modify, and create redo log files, click Help in the
Database Control window
Locating Control Files
The preconfigured database uses three control files. Oracle recommends that you keep
at least three control files for each database and set the CONTROL_FILES initialization
parameter to specify the location of each file.
A control file is an administrative file. Oracle Database 10g requires a control file to
start and run the database. The control file defines the physical structure of the
database. For example, it defines the database name and the names and locations of
the database data files and redo log files.
To use the Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control to view information about the
control files for your preconfigured database:
1.
Log in to the Database Control.
See Also: "Logging In to Oracle Enterprise Manager Database
Control" on page 5-1 for information about logging in to the
Database Control
2.
Click Administration.
3.
In the Storage section of the Administration page, click Controlfiles.
Enterprise Manager displays a table listing the control files used by the database.
5-10 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Reviewing Tablespaces and Data Files, Redo Log Files, and Control Files
See Also: For more information about using the Database Control
to view information about control files and creating backups of
these files to trace them, click Help in the Database Control
window
For more information about setting the CONTROL_FILES
initialization parameter value, refer to Oracle Database
Administrator's Guide
Getting Started with Oracle Database
5-11
Reviewing Tablespaces and Data Files, Redo Log Files, and Control Files
5-12 Oracle Database Installation Guide
6
Removing Oracle Software
This chapter describes how to completely remove all Oracle databases, instances, and
software from an Oracle home directory. It includes information about the following
topics:
■
Overview
■
Identifying All Instances
■
Removing an Oracle Database
■
Removing an Automatic Storage Management Instance
■
Reconfiguring Oracle Cluster Synchronization Services
■
Removing Oracle Software
See Also: If you want to remove an Oracle Real Application Clusters
installation, refer to Oracle Real Application Clusters Installation and
Configuration Guide for more information
If you want to remove an individual product, refer to the
product-specific documentation for requirements and restrictions
Overview
To completely remove all Oracle databases, instances, and software from an Oracle
home directory, you must:
■
Identify all instances associated with the Oracle home.
■
Remove database and Automatic Storage Management instances.
■
Shut down processes.
■
Reconfigure the Oracle Cluster Synchronization Services Daemon, if necessary.
■
Remove the Oracle software.
Identifying All Instances
To identify all instances associated with the Oracle home that you want to remove,
enter the following command:
$ more /var/opt/oracle/oratab
The output of this command contains entries similar to the following:
+ASM:/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1:N
CUST:/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1:N
Removing Oracle Software 6-1
Removing an Oracle Database
These entries show that the +ASM Automatic Storage Manager instance and the CUST
Oracle database instance are associated with the
/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1 Oracle home directory.
Removing an Oracle Database
To completely remove Oracle Database software, you must remove any installed
databases. To remove an Oracle database:
Removing an Oracle database deletes all of the data in the
database. If you want to keep this data, make sure that you back up
the database before deleting it.
Note:
1.
Log in as the oracle user:
$ su - oracle
2.
Run the oraenv or coraenv script to set the environment for the database that
you want to remove, for example:
■
Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:
$ . /usr/local/bin/oraenv
■
C shell:
% source /usr/local/bin/coraenv
3.
At the prompt, specify the SID for the database that you want to remove.
4.
Start the Database Configuration Assistant:
$ dbca
The Welcome window appears.
5.
Click Next.
The Operations window appears.
6.
Select Delete a Database, then click Next.
7.
Select the database that you want to delete, then click Finish.
8.
In the window that appears, confirm that you want to delete the database.
9.
When Database Configuration Assistant removes the database, you are prompted
to choose whether you want to perform another operation. Click Yes to return to
the Operations screen or click No to exit from Database Configuration Assistant. If
you want to remove another database, click Yes and repeat steps 6 through 8.
Removing an Automatic Storage Management Instance
To completely remove Oracle database software, you must also remove any Automatic
Storage Management instances running in the Oracle home. To remove an Automatic
Storage Management instance:
1.
If necessary, log in as the oracle user:
$ su - oracle
6-2 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Removing an Automatic Storage Management Instance
2.
Run the oraenv or coraenv script to set the environment for the Automatic
Storage Management instance that you want to remove, for example:
■
Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:
$ . /usr/local/bin/oraenv
■
C shell:
$ source /usr/local/bin/coraenv
3.
At the prompt, specify the SID for the Automatic Storage Management instance
that you want to remove.
4.
Connect to the Automatic Storage Management instance as the SYS user:
$ sqlplus "SYS/SYS_PASSWORD AS SYSDBA"
5.
Enter the following command to determine whether any Oracle database instance
is using the Automatic Storage Management instance:
SQL> SELECT INSTANCE_NAME FROM V$ASM_CLIENT;
This command lists all of the database instances that are using this Automatic
Storage Management instance.
This command only lists database instances that are
running. It is possible that other instances are associated with the
Automatic Storage Management instance, but they are not
currently running.
Note:
If you removed a database from this Oracle home but the output
from the command shows that this Automatic Storage
Management instance is supporting a database instance in another
Oracle home, do not remove the Automatic Storage Management
instance or the Oracle home.
6.
If there are no database instances associated with this Automatic Storage
Management instance, drop the disk groups associated with this instance as
follows:
Dropping the Automatic Storage Management disk group
makes the disk device available for use with another Automatic
Storage Management instance if required. However, all data in the
disk group is lost. Make sure that no other database instance
requires any data from this disk group before you drop it.
Note:
a.
Identify the disk groups associated with the Automatic Storage Management
instance:
SQL> SELECT NAME FROM V$ASM_DISKGROUP;
b.
For each disk group that you want to delete, enter a command similar to the
following:
SQL> DROP DISKGROUP name INCLUDING CONTENTS;
Removing Oracle Software 6-3
Reconfiguring Oracle Cluster Synchronization Services
7.
Enter the following command to shut down the Automatic Storage Management
instance:
SQL> SHUTDOWN
8.
Remove the entry for the Automatic Storage Management instance from the
/var/opt/oracle/oratab file.
Reconfiguring Oracle Cluster Synchronization Services
Oracle Cluster Synchronization Services (CSS) is a daemon process that is configured
by the root.sh script when you configure an Automatic Storage Management
instance. It is configured to start every time the system boots. This daemon process is
required to enable synchronization between Oracle Automatic Storage Management
and database instances. It must be running if an Oracle database is using Automatic
Storage Management for database file storage.
On cluster systems with Oracle Real Application Clusters
(RAC) installations, the CSS daemon is configured during the
Oracle Clusterware installation. If the system is running Oracle
CRS, refer to Oracle Real Application Clusters Installation and
Configuration Guide for Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit) for
information about removing RAC or Oracle Clusterware.
Note:
Before you remove an Oracle Database 10g Oracle home, you must determine whether
the CSS daemon is running from that Oracle home and whether any other Oracle
Database 10g Oracle homes exist on the system:
■
■
If the Oracle Database 10g Oracle home that you want to remove is the only Oracle
Database 10g installation on the system, you can delete the CSS daemon
configuration.
If the CSS daemon is running from the Oracle Database 10g Oracle home that you
want to remove and other Oracle Database 10g installations exist on the system,
you must reconfigure the CSS daemon to run from another Oracle Database 10g
Oracle home.
The following sections describe how to complete these tasks:
■
Identifying Oracle Database 10g Oracle Homes
■
Reconfiguring the Oracle CSS Daemon
■
Deleting the Oracle CSS Daemon Configuration
Identifying Oracle Database 10g Oracle Homes
To identify all of the Oracle Database 10g Oracle home directories, enter the following
command:
$ more /var/opt/oracle/oratab
From the output, identify any Oracle home directories where Oracle Database 10g is
installed. Oracle homes that contain Oracle Database 10g typically have paths similar
to the following. However, they might use different paths.
/mount_point/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_n
6-4 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Reconfiguring Oracle Cluster Synchronization Services
If there is only one Oracle home directory that contains Oracle Database 10g, refer to
the "Deleting the Oracle CSS Daemon Configuration" section on page 6-6 for
information about deleting the Oracle CSS daemon configuration.
If you identify more than one Oracle Database 10g Oracle home directory, refer to the
following section for information about reconfiguring the Oracle CSS daemon.
Reconfiguring the Oracle CSS Daemon
To reconfigure the Oracle CSS daemon so that it runs from an Oracle home that you
are not removing, follow these steps:
1.
In all Oracle home directories on the system, stop all Oracle Automatic Storage
Management instances and any Oracle Database instances that use Automatic
Storage Management for database file storage.
2.
Switch user to root.
3.
Enter the following command to identify the Oracle home directory being used to
run the CSS daemon:
# more /var/opt/oracle/ocr.loc
The output from this command is similar to the following:
ocrconfig_loc=/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1/cdata/localhost/local.ocr
local_only=TRUE
The ocrconfig_loc parameter specifies the location of the Oracle Cluster
Registry (OCR) used by the CSS daemon. The path up to the cdata directory is
the Oracle home directory where the CSS daemon is running
(/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1 in this example).
If the value of the local_only parameter is FALSE, Oracle
Clusterware is installed on this system.
Note:
See Also: Oracle Real Application Clusters Installation and
Configuration Guide for Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit) for
information about removing Oracle Real Applications Clusters or
Oracle Clusterware
If this Oracle home directory is not the Oracle home that you want to remove, go
to the "Removing Oracle Software" section on page 6-6.
4.
Change directory to the Oracle home directory for an Oracle Database 10g
installation that you are not removing.
5.
Set the ORACLE_HOME environment variable to specify the path to this Oracle
home directory:
■
Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:
# ORACLE_HOME=/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_2;
# export ORACLE_HOME
■
C shell:
# setenv ORACLE_HOME /u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_2
Removing Oracle Software 6-5
Removing Oracle Software
6.
Enter the following command to reconfigure the CSS daemon to run from this
Oracle home:
# $ORACLE_HOME/bin/localconfig reset $ORACLE_HOME
This command stops the Oracle CSS daemon, reconfigures it in the new Oracle
home, and then restarts it. When the system boots, the CSS daemon starts
automatically from the new Oracle home.
7.
To remove the original Oracle home directory, refer to the "Removing Oracle
Software" section on page 6-6.
Deleting the Oracle CSS Daemon Configuration
To delete the Oracle CSS daemon configuration, follow these steps:
Delete the CSS daemon configuration only if you are certain
that no other Oracle Database 10g installation requires it.
Note:
1.
Remove any databases or Automatic Storage Management instances associated
with this Oracle home. Refer to the preceding sections for information about how
to complete these tasks.
2.
Switch user to root.
3.
Change directory to the Oracle home directory that you are removing.
4.
Set the ORACLE_HOME environment variable to specify the path to this Oracle
home directory:
■
Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:
# ORACLE_HOME=/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1
# export ORACLE_HOME
■
C shell:
# setenv ORACLE_HOME /u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1
5.
Enter the following command to delete the CSS daemon configuration from this
Oracle home:
# $ORACLE_HOME/bin/localconfig delete
The script stops the Oracle CSS daemon, then deletes its configuration. When the
system boots, the CSS daemon no longer starts.
Removing Oracle Software
The following steps describe how to use Oracle Universal Installer to remove Oracle
software from an Oracle home:
Always use Oracle Universal Installer to remove Oracle
software. Do not delete any Oracle home directories without first
using Oracle Universal Installer to remove the software.
Note:
1.
If necessary, log in as the oracle user:
6-6 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Removing Oracle Software
$ su - oracle
2.
Set the ORACLE_HOME environment variable to specify the path of the Oracle
home directory that you want to remove:
■
Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:
$ ORACLE_HOME=/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1
$ export ORACLE_HOME
■
C shell:
$ setenv ORACLE_HOME /u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1
3.
Remove any databases or Automatic Storage Management instances associated
with this Oracle home and delete or reconfigure the Oracle CSS daemon.
Refer to the preceding sections for information about how to complete these tasks.
4.
5.
Stop any processes running in this Oracle home:
Process Name
Command
Database Control
$ORACLE_HOME/bin/emctl stop dbconsole
Oracle Net listener
$ORACLE_HOME/bin/lsnrctl stop
iSQL*Plus
$ORACLE_HOME/bin/isqlplusctl stop
Ultra Search
$ORACLE_HOME/bin/searchctl stop
Start Oracle Universal Installer as follows:
$ $ORACLE_HOME/oui/bin/runInstaller
6.
In the Welcome window, click Deinstall Products.
The Inventory screen appears, listing all of the Oracle homes on the system.
7.
In the Inventory screen, select the Oracle home and the products that you want to
remove, then click Remove.
If you choose to remove Oracle JVM, Oracle Universal
Installer removes all installed products that depend on Oracle JVM,
including Oracle Database 10g.
Note:
Oracle Universal Installer displays a confirmation window asking you to confirm
that you want to deinstall the products and their dependent components.
8.
Click Yes.
Oracle Universal Installer displays a progress indicator as it removes the software.
9.
Click Close on the Inventory screen.
10. When the products have been deleted, click Cancel to exit from Oracle Universal
Installer, and then click Yes.
Removing Oracle Software 6-7
Removing Oracle Software
6-8 Oracle Database Installation Guide
A
Installing and Configuring Oracle Database
Using Response Files
This appendix describes how to install and configure Oracle products using response
files. It includes information about the following topics:
■
How Response Files Work
■
Creating the oraInst.loc File
■
Preparing a Response File
■
Running Oracle Universal Installer Using a Response File
■
Running NetCA Using a Response File
■
Running Database Configuration Assistant Using a Response File
How Response Files Work
You can automate the installation and configuration of Oracle software, either fully or
partially, by specifying a response file when you start Oracle Universal Installer.
Oracle Universal Installer uses the values contained in the response file to provide
answers to some or all of Oracle Universal Installer prompts:
Typically, Oracle Universal Installer runs in interactive mode, which means that it
prompts you to provide information in graphical user interface (GUI) screens. When
you use response files to provide this information, you run Oracle Universal Installer
at a command prompt using either of the following modes:
■
Silent mode
If you include responses for all of the prompts in the response file and specify the
-silent option when starting Oracle Universal Installer, then Oracle Universal
Installer runs in silent mode. During a silent-mode installation, Oracle Universal
Installer does not display any screens. Instead, it displays progress information in
the terminal that you used to start it.
■
Noninteractive (or suppressed) mode
If you include responses for some or all of the prompts in the response file and
omit the -silent option, then Oracle Universal Installer runs in suppressed
mode. During a suppressed-mode installation, Oracle Universal Installer displays
only the screens for which you did not specify all required information. You can
also use variables in the response file or command-line options to suppress other
installer screens, such as the Welcome screen or Summary screen, that do not
prompt for information.
Installing and Configuring Oracle Database Using Response Files
A-1
How Response Files Work
You define the settings for a silent or noninteractive installation by entering values for
the variables listed in the response file. For instance, to specify the Oracle home name,
you would supply the appropriate value for the ORACLE_HOME_NAME variable, as in
the following example:
ORACLE_HOME_NAME="OraDBHome1"
Another way of specifying the response file’s variable settings is to pass them as
command line arguments when you run Oracle Universal Installer. For example:
-silent "ORACLE_HOME_NAME=OraDBHome1" ...
In this command, directory_path is the path of the db directory on the DVD or the
path of the Disk1 directory on the hard drive.
This method is particularly useful if you do not want to embed sensitive information,
such as passwords, in the response file. For example:
-silent "s_dlgRBOPassword=binks342" ...
Ensure that you enclose the variable and its setting in quotes.
See Also: Oracle Universal Installer and OPatch User's Guide for more
information about response file formats.
Reasons for Using Silent Mode or Noninteractive Mode
The following table describes several reasons why you might want to run Oracle
Universal Installer in silent mode or suppressed mode.
Mode
Uses
Silent
Use silent mode if you want to:
■
■
■
Complete an unattended installation, which you might schedule using
operating system utilities such as at
Complete several similar installations on multiple systems without user
interaction
Install the software on a system that does not have X Window System
software installed on it
Oracle Universal Installer displays progress information in the terminal that
you used to start it, but it does not display any of Oracle Universal Installer
screens.
Suppressed
(noninteractive)
Use suppressed mode if you want to complete similar Oracle software
installations on more than one system, providing default answers to some,
but not all of Oracle Universal Installer prompts.
If you do not specify information required for a particular Installer screen in
the response file, then Oracle Universal Installer displays that screen. It
suppresses screens for which you have provided all of the required
information.
Creating a Database Using Automatic Storage Management as the Storage Option for
Database Files
Before you create a database that uses Automatic Storage Management, you must run
the root.sh script. For this reason, you cannot create a database using Automatic
Storage Management as the storage option for database files during a silent-mode
installation. Instead, you can complete a software-only installation using silent-mode,
A-2 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Creating the oraInst.loc File
and then run the Oracle Net Configuration Assistant (NetCA) and Database
Configuration Assistant configuration assistants in silent mode after you have
completed the software-only installation and you have run the root.sh script.
This limitation applies only to databases that use Automatic
Storage Management as the storage option for database files. You can
create a database that uses the file system or raw devices storage
option during a silent-mode installation.
Note:
General Procedure for Using Response Files
The following are the general steps to install and configure Oracle products using
Oracle Universal Installer in silent or suppressed mode:
You must complete all required preinstallation tasks on a
system before running Oracle Universal Installer in silent or
suppressed mode.
Note:
1.
Create the oraInst.loc file.
2.
Prepare a response file.
3.
Run Oracle Universal Installer in silent or suppressed mode.
4.
If you completed a software-only installation, then run NetCA and Database
Configuration Assistant in silent or noninteractive mode if required.
These steps are described in the following sections.
Creating the oraInst.loc File
If you plan to install Oracle products using Oracle Universal Installer in silent or
suppressed mode, you must manually create the oraInst.loc file if it does not
already exist. This file specifies the location of the Oracle Inventory directory where
Oracle Universal Installer creates the inventory of Oracle products installed on the
system.
If Oracle software has been installed previously on the
system, the oraInst.loc file might already exist. If the file does
exist, you do not need to create a file.
Note:
To create the oraInst.loc file, follow these steps:
1.
Switch user to root:
$ su - root
2.
Create the /var/opt/oracle directory if it does not exist:
# mkdir -p /var/opt/oracle
3.
Change directory as follows:
# cd /var/opt/oracle
4.
Use a text editor to create the oraInst.loc file, containing the following lines:
Installing and Configuring Oracle Database Using Response Files
A-3
Preparing a Response File
inventory_loc=ORACLE_BASE/oraInventory
inst_group=
In this example, ORACLE_BASE is the path of the Oracle base directory, for
example, /01/app/oracle.
5.
Enter the following commands to set the appropriate owner, group, and
permissions on the oraInst.loc file:
# chown oracle:oinstall oraInst.loc
# chmod 664 oraInst.loc
Preparing a Response File
This section describes the following methods to prepare a response file for use during
silent-mode or suppressed-mode installations:
■
Editing a Response File Template
■
Recording a Response File
Editing a Response File Template
This method is most useful for the Enterprise Edition or Standard Edition installation
types.
Oracle provides response file templates for each product and installation type, and for
each configuration tool. These files are located in the db/response directory on the
installation media.
If you copied the software to a hard disk, the response files
are located in the Disk1/response directory.
Note:
Table A–1 lists the response files provided with Oracle Database.
Table A–1
Response Files
Response File
Description
enterprise.rsp
Enterprise Edition installation of Oracle Database 10g
standard.rsp
Standard Edition installation of Oracle Database 10g
custom.rsp
Custom installation of Oracle Database 10g
dbca.rsp
Database Configuration Assistant
netca.rsp
Oracle Net Configuration Assistant
emca.rsp
Enterprise Manager Configuration Assistant
To copy and modify a response file:
1.
Copy the response file from the response file directory to a directory on your
system:
$ cp /directory_path/response/response_file.rsp local_directory
In this example, directory_path is the path to the db directory on the
installation media. If you have copied the software to a hard drive, then you can
edit the file in the response directory if you prefer.
A-4 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Preparing a Response File
2.
Open the response file in a text editor:
$ vi /local_dir/response_file.rsp
In addition to editing settings specific to the Oracle Database installation, check
that the FROM_LOCATION path is correct and points to the products.xml file in
the stage directory in the installation media. You may want to set this variable to
point to an absolute path, for example:
FROM_LOCATION="/directory_path/stage/products.xml"
Remember that you can specify sensitive information, such as passwords, at the
command line rather than within the response file. "How Response Files Work" on
page A-1 explains this method.
See Also: Oracle Universal Installer and OPatch User’s Guide for
detailed information on creating response files.
3.
Follow the instructions in the file to edit it.
Note: Oracle Universal Installer or configuration assistant fails if
you do not correctly configure the response file. Refer to the
"Silent-Mode Response File Error Handling" section on page G-4 for
more information about troubleshooting a failed silent-mode
installation.
4.
Change the permissions on the file to 700:
$ chmod 700 /local_dir/response_file.rsp
Caution: A fully specified response file for an Oracle Database
installation contains the passwords for database administrative
accounts and for a user that is a member of the OSDBA group
(required for automated backups). Ensure that only the Oracle
software owner user can view or modify response files or consider
deleting them after the installation succeeds.
Recording a Response File
You can use Oracle Universal Installer in interactive mode to record a response file,
which you can edit and then use to complete silent-mode or suppressed-mode
installations. This method is useful for custom or software-only installations.
When you record the response file, you can either complete the installation, or you can
exit from Oracle Universal Installer on the Summary page, before it starts to copy the
software to the system.
If you use record mode during a noninteractive mode installation, then Oracle
Universal Installer records the variable values that were specified in the original
source response file into the new response file.
You cannot use record mode to create a response file during
an installation that uses the Basic installation method.
Note:
Installing and Configuring Oracle Database Using Response Files
A-5
Running Oracle Universal Installer Using a Response File
To record a response file:
1.
Complete the preinstallation tasks listed in Chapter 2.
When you run Oracle Universal Installer to record a response file, it checks the
system to verify that it meets the requirements to install the software. For this
reason, Oracle recommends that you complete all of the required preinstallation
tasks and record the response file while completing an installation.
2.
If you have not installed Oracle software on this system previously, create the
oraInst.loc file, as described in the previous section.
3.
Ensure that the Oracle software owner user (typically oracle) has permissions to
create or write to the Oracle home path that you will specify when you run Oracle
Universal Installer.
4.
To record a response file, enter a command similar to the following to start Oracle
Universal Installer:
Do not specify a relative path to the response file. If you
specify a relative path, Oracle Universal Installer fails.
Note:
$ /directory_path/runInstaller -record -destinationFile response_filename
In this command:
■
■
■
directory_path is the path of the db directory on the DVD or the path of
the Disk1 directory on the hard drive
The -record parameter specifies that you want to record the responses that
you enter in a response file
response_filename is the full path and file name of the response file that
you want to record
5.
On each Oracle Universal Installer screen, specify the required information.
6.
When Oracle Universal Installer displays the Summary screen, perform one of the
following actions:
■
■
Click Install to create the response file, then continue with the installation.
Click Cancel and then Yes to create the response file but exit from Oracle
Universal Installer without installing the software.
The response file is saved in the location that you specified using the
-destinationFile option.
7.
If you do not complete the installation, then delete the Oracle home directory that
Oracle Universal Installer created using the path you specified on the Specify File
Locations screen.
8.
Before using the recorded response file on another system, edit the file and make
any required changes.
Use the instructions in the file as a guide when editing it.
Running Oracle Universal Installer Using a Response File
Now, you are ready to run Oracle Universal Installer at the command line, specifying
the response file you created, to perform the installation. The Oracle Universal
A-6 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Running Oracle Universal Installer Using a Response File
Installer executable, runInstaller, provides several options. For help information
on the full set of these options, run setup.exe with the -help option, for example:
-help
The help information appears in a window after some time.
To run Oracle Universal using a response file:
1.
Complete the preinstallation tasks listed in Chapter 2.
2.
Log in as the Oracle software owner user (typically oracle).
3.
If you are completing a suppressed-mode installation, set the DISPLAY
environment variable.
You do not have to set the DISPLAY environment variable if
you are completing a silent-mode installation.
Note:
4.
To start Oracle Universal Installer in silent or suppressed mode, enter a command
similar to the following:
Do not specify a relative path to the response file. If you
specify a relative path, Oracle Universal Installer fails.
Note:
$ /directory_path/runInstaller [-silent] [-noconfig] -responseFile
responsefilename \
[-paramFile oraparamsilent.ini]
In this example:
■
■
■
■
■
directory_path is the path of the db directory on the DVD or the path of
the Disk1 directory on the hard drive.
-silent indicates that you want to run Oracle Universal Installer in silent
mode.
-noconfig suppresses running the configuration assistants during
installation, and a software-only installation is performed instead.
responsefilename is the full path and file name of the installation response
file that you configured.
The optional -paramFile option specifies an alternative parameter file
(oraparamsilent.ini) that you can use when performing silent
installations. This alternative parameter file does not include checks for CDE
or X Window System software patches for Solaris.
For more information about other options for the
runInstaller command, enter the following command:
Note:
$ /directory_path/runInstaller -help
5.
When the installation completes, log in as the root user and run the root.sh
script:
$ su
# /oracle_home_path/root.sh
Installing and Configuring Oracle Database Using Response Files
A-7
Running NetCA Using a Response File
Running NetCA Using a Response File
You can run NetCA in silent mode to configure and start an Oracle Net listener on the
system, configure naming methods, and configure Oracle Net service names. To run
NetCA in silent mode, you must copy and edit a response file template. Oracle
provides a response file template named netca.resp in the response directory in
the db/response directory on the DVD.
If you copied the software to a hard disk, the response file
template is located in the Disk1/response directory.
Note:
To run NetCA using a response file:
1.
Copy the netca.rsp response file template from the response file directory to a
directory on your system:
$ cp /directory_path/response/netca.rsp local_directory
In this example, directory_path is the path of the db directory on the DVD. If
you have copied the software to a hard drive, you can edit the file in the
response directory if you prefer.
2.
Open the response file in a text editor:
$ vi /local_dir/netca.rsp
3.
Follow the instructions in the file to edit it.
Note:
NetCA fails if you do not correctly configure the response
file.
4.
Log in as the Oracle software owner user, and set the ORACLE_HOME environment
variable to specify the correct Oracle home directory.
5.
Enter a command similar to the following to run NetCA in silent mode:
$ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/netca /silent /responsefile /local_dir/netca.rsp
In this command:
■
■
The /silent option indicates that you want to run NetCA in silent mode.
local_dir is the full path of the directory where you copied the netca.rsp
response file template.
Running Database Configuration Assistant Using a Response File
You can run Database Configuration Assistant in noninteractive or silent mode to
configure and start an Oracle Database on your system. To run Database
Configuration Assistant in noninteractive or silent mode, you must copy and edit a
response file template. Oracle provides a response file template named dbca.resp in
the db/response directory on the DVD.
If you copied the software to a hard disk, the response file
template is located in the Disk1/response directory.
Note:
A-8 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Running Database Configuration Assistant Using a Response File
This section contains the following topics:
■
Using Database Configuration Assistant in Noninteractive Mode
■
Using Database Configuration Assistant in Silent Mode
■
Running Database Configuration Assistant in Noninteractive or Silent Mode
Using Database Configuration Assistant in Noninteractive Mode
In noninteractive mode, Database Configuration Assistant uses values that you
specify, in the response file or as command line options, to create a database. As it
configures and starts the database, it displays a window that contains status messages
and a progress bar. The window that it displays is the same window that is displayed
when you choose to create a preconfigured database during an Enterprise Edition or
Standard Edition installation.
To run Database Configuration Assistant in noninteractive mode, you must use a
graphical display and set the DISPLAY environment variable.
Using Database Configuration Assistant in Silent Mode
In silent mode, Database Configuration Assistant uses values that you specify, in the
response file or as command line options, to create a database. Database Configuration
Assistant does not display any screens or information while it creates the database.
Running Database Configuration Assistant in Noninteractive or Silent Mode
To run Database Configuration Assistant in noninteractive or silent mode:
As an alternative to editing the response file template, you can
also create a database by specifying all required information as
command line options when you run Database Configuration
Assistant. For information about the list of options supported, enter
the following command:
Note:
$ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/dbca -help
1.
Copy the dbca.rsp response file template from the response file directory to a
directory on your system:
$ cp /directory_path/response/dbca.rsp local_directory
In this example, directory_path is the path of the db directory on the DVD. If
you have copied the software to a hard drive, you can edit the file in the
response directory if you prefer.
2.
Open the response file in a text editor:
$ vi /local_dir/dbca.rsp
3.
Edit the file, following the instructions in the file.
Database Configuration Assistant fails if you do not
correctly configure the response file.
Note:
Installing and Configuring Oracle Database Using Response Files
A-9
Running Database Configuration Assistant Using a Response File
4.
Log in as the Oracle software owner user, and set the ORACLE_HOME environment
variable to specify the correct Oracle home directory.
5.
If you intend running Database Configuration Assistant in noninteractive mode,
set the DISPLAY environment variable.
6.
Enter a command similar to the following to run Database Configuration Assistant
in noninteractive or silent mode with a response file:
$ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/dbca {-progressOnly | -silent} [-cloneTemplate] \
[-datafileDestination /datafilepath] -responseFile /local_dir/dbca.rsp
In this example:
■
■
■
■
■
The -silent option indicates that you want to run Database Configuration
Assistant in silent mode.
The -progressOnly option indicates that you want to run Database
Configuration Assistant in noninteractive mode.
The -cloneTemplate option is required if you want to create one of the
following preconfigured databases:
–
General Purpose
–
Transaction Processing
–
Data Warehouse
-datafileDestination specifies the parent directory where you want to
create the database files. If you do not specify this option, the parent directory
for database files is the $ORACLE_BASE/oradata directory if the
ORACLE_BASE environment variable is set, or the $ORACLE_HOME/oradata
directory if ORACLE_BASE is not set.
local_dir is the full path of the directory where you copied the dbca.rsp
response file template.
A-10 Oracle Database Installation Guide
B
Cloning an Oracle Home
Cloning an Oracle home involves creating a copy of the Oracle home and then
configuring it for a new environment. If you are performing multiple Oracle Database
installations, then you may want to use this method to create each Oracle home,
because copying files from an existing Oracle Database installation takes less time than
creating a new version of them. This method is also useful if the Oracle home that you
are cloning has had patches applied to it. When you clone this Oracle home, the new
Oracle home will have the patch updates as well.
In addition to cloning an Oracle home, you can clone
individual Oracle Database installations by using Enterprise Manager
Database Control. Oracle Database Administrator's Guide provides
detailed information about cloning Oracle Database installations and
Oracle homes.
Note:
To clone an Oracle home:
1.
Verify that the installation of Oracle Database that you want to clone has been
successful.
You can do this by reviewing the installActionsdate_time.log file for the
installation session, which is normally located in the
/orainventory_location/logs directory.
If you have installed patches, then you can check their status by running the
following commands:
$ $ORACLE_HOME/OPatch ORACLE_HOME=ORACLE_HOME_using_patch
$ $ORACLE_HOME/OPatch opatch lsinventory
2.
Stop all processes related to the Oracle home. Refer to the "Removing Oracle
Software" section on page 6-6 for more information on stopping the processes for
an Oracle home.
3.
Create a ZIP file with the Oracle home (but not Oracle base) directory.
For example, if the source Oracle installation is in the
/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1, then you zip the db_1 directory
by using the following command:
# zip -r db_1.zip /u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1
Leave out the admin, flash_recovery_area, and oradata directories that are
in the 10.2.0 directory. These directories will be created in the target installation
later, when you create a new database there.
Cloning an Oracle Home B-1
4.
Copy the ZIP file to the root directory of the target computer.
5.
Extract the ZIP file contents by using the following command:
# unzip -d / db_1.zip
6.
Repeat steps 4 and 5 for each computer where you want to clone the Oracle home,
unless the Oracle home is on a shared storage device.
7.
On the target computer, change directory to the unzipped Oracle home directory,
and remove all the .ora (*.ora) files present in the unzipped
$ORACLE_HOME/network/admin directory.
8.
From the $ORACLE_HOME/oui/bin directory, run Oracle Universal Installer in
clone mode for the unzipped Oracle home. Use the following syntax:
$ORACLE_HOME/oui/bin/runInstaller -silent -clone ORACLE_HOME="target location"
ORACLE_HOME_NAME="unique_name_on node" [-responseFile full_directory_path]
For example:
$ORACLE_HOME/oui/bin/runInstaller -silent -clone
ORACLE_HOME="/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1" ORACLE_HOME_NAME="db_1"
The -responseFile parameter is optional. You can supply clone-time
parameters on the command line or by using the response file named on the
command line.
Oracle Universal Installer starts, and then records the cloning actions in the
cloneActionstimestamp.log file. This log file is normally located in
/orainventory_location/logs directory.
9.
To create a new database for the newly cloned Oracle home, run Database
Configuration Assistant as follows:
$ cd $ORACLE_HOME/bin
$ ./dbca
10. To configure connection information for the new database, run Net Configuration
Assistant.
$ cd $ORACLE_HOME/bin
$ ./netca
See Also:
■
■
Oracle Universal Installer and OPatch User's Guide for detailed
information about using Oracle Universal Installer to clone an
Oracle Database home
Oracle Database Administrator's Guide for information about
cloning an Oracle databases, as well as cloning an Oracle Database
home
B-2 Oracle Database Installation Guide
C
Using NAS Devices
If you have a network attached storage (NAS) device that has been certified through
the Oracle Storage Compatibility Program (OSCP), you can use it to store the Oracle
software, the Oracle database files, or both. This appendix provides guidelines for
using a NAS storage device for Oracle software and database files. It includes
information about the following:
■
General Configuration Guidelines for NAS Devices
■
Choosing Mount Points
■
Creating Files on a NAS Device for Use with Automatic Storage Management
■
NFS Mount Options
General Configuration Guidelines for NAS Devices
Refer to the documentation provided with your NAS device for specific information
about how to configure it. In addition, use the following guidelines to ensure that the
performance of the Oracle software meets your requirements:
■
Before using the NAS device for the installation, verify that it is certified. To
identify certified devices, check the Oracle Storage Compatibility Program list at
the following Web site:
http://www.oracle.com/technology/deploy/availability/htdocs/oscp.ht
ml
The OSCP certifies NAS devices only for single-instance
databases. For Oracle Real Application Clusters installations, refer
to the Certify page on the OracleMetaLink Web site for information
about certified storage solutions, including NAS:
Note:
http://metalink.oracle.com
■
The performance of Oracle software and databases stored on NAS devices
depends on the performance of the network connection between the Oracle server
and the NAS device.
For this reason, Oracle recommends that you connect the server to the NAS device
using a private dedicated network connection, which should be Gigabit Ethernet
or better.
■
For single instance installations (as opposed to RAC installations), you must create
a separate Oracle home directory for each installation. Run the software in this
Oracle home directory only from the system that you used to install it.
Using NAS Devices C-1
Choosing Mount Points
For Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC) installations, you can use a single
Oracle home directory mounted from each node in the cluster. You must mount
this Oracle home directory on each node so that it has the same directory path on
all nodes.
Choosing Mount Points
This section provides guidelines on how to choose the mount points for the file
systems that you want to use for the Oracle software and database files. The guidelines
contained in this section comply with the Optimal Flexible Architecture
recommendations.
Choosing Mount Points for Oracle Software Files
Oracle software files are stored in three different directories:
■
Oracle base directory
■
Oracle Inventory directory
■
Oracle home directory
For the first installation of Oracle software on a system, the Oracle base directory,
identified by the ORACLE_BASE environment variable, is normally the parent
directory for both the Oracle Inventory and Oracle home directories. For example, for
a first installation, the Oracle base, Oracle Inventory, and Oracle home directories
might have paths similar to the following:
Directory
Path
Oracle base ($ORACLE_BASE)
/u01/app/oracle
Oracle Inventory
$ORACLE_BASE/oraInventory
Oracle home
$ORACLE_BASE/product/10.2.0/db_1
For subsequent installations, you can choose to use either the same Oracle base
directory or a different one, but every subsequent installation uses the original Oracle
Inventory directory. For example, if you use the /u02/app/oracle directory as the
Oracle base directory for a new installation, the Oracle Inventory directory continues
to be /u01/app/oracle/oraInventory.
To enable you to effectively maintain the Oracle software on a particular system,
Oracle recommends that you locate the Oracle Inventory directory only on a local file
system, if possible. If you must place the Oracle Inventory directory on a NAS device,
create a specific directory for each system, to prevent more than one system from
writing to the same Inventory.
Directory-Specific Guidelines
You can use any of the following directories as mount points for NFS file systems used
to store Oracle software:
In the following examples, the paths shown are the defaults
if the ORACLE_BASE environment variable is set before you start
Oracle Universal Installer.
Note:
■
Oracle base directory or its parents (/u01/app/oracle for example)
C-2 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Choosing Mount Points
If you use the Oracle base directory of one of its parents as a mount point, the
default location for all Oracle software and database files will be on that file
system. During the installation, you might consider changing the default location
of the following directories:
–
The Oracle Inventory directory (oracle_base/oraInventory)
Specify a local file system or a host-specific directory on the NFS file system,
for example:
oracle_base/hostname/oraInventory
–
The Oracle database file directory (oracle_base/oradata)
You might want to use a different file system for database files, for example, to
enable you to specify different mount options or to distribute I/O.
–
The Oracle database recovery file directory
(oracle_base/flash_recovery_area)
Oracle recommends that you use different file systems for database and
recovery files.
If you use this mount point, all Oracle installations that use this Oracle base
directory will use the NFS file system.
■
The product directory (oracle_base/product)
By default, only software files will be located on the NFS file system. You can also
use this mount point to install software from different releases, for example:
/u01/app/oracle/product/9.2.0
/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1
■
The release directory (oracle_base/product/10.2.0)
By default, only software files will be located on the NFS file system. You can also
use this mount point to install different products from the same release, for
example:
/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/crs
/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1
/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/companion_1
■
The Oracle home directory (oracle_base/product/10.2.0/db_1)
By default, only software files will be located on the NFS file system. This is the
most restrictive mount point. You can use it only to install a single release of one
product:
/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1
Choosing Mount Points for Oracle Database and Recovery Files
To store Oracle database or recovery files on a NAS device, you can use different paths
depending on whether you want to store files from only one database or from more
than one database:
■
Use the NFS file system for files from more than one database
If you want to store the database files or recovery files from more than one
database on the same NFS file systems, use paths or mount points similar to the
following:
Using NAS Devices C-3
Creating Files on a NAS Device for Use with Automatic Storage Management
File Type
Path or Mount Point
Database files
/u02/oradata
Recovery files
/u03/flash_recovery_area
When Oracle Universal Installer prompts you for the data file and the recovery file
directories, specify these paths. The Database Configuration Assistant and
Enterprise Manager create subdirectories in these directories using the value you
specify for the database name (DB_NAME) as the directory name, for example:
/u02/oradata/db_name1
/u03/flash_recovery_area/db_name1
■
Use the NFS file system for files from only one database
If you want to store the database files or recovery files for only one database in the
NFS file system, you can create mount points similar to the following, where orcl
is the name that you want to use for the database:
/u02/oradata/orcl
/u03/flash_recovery_area/orcl
Specify the directory /u02/oradata when Oracle Universal Installer prompts
you for the data file directory and specify the directory
/u03/flash_recovery_area when Oracle Universal Installer prompts you for
the recovery file location. The orcl directory will be used automatically either by
Database Configuration Assistant or by Enterprise Manager.
Creating Files on a NAS Device for Use with Automatic Storage
Management
If you have a certified NAS storage device, you can create zero-padded files in an NFS
mounted directory and use those files as disk devices in an Automatic Storage
Management disk group. To create these files, follow these steps:
To use files as disk devices in an Automatic Storage
Management disk group, the files must be on an NFS mounted file
system. You cannot use files on local file systems.
Note:
1.
If necessary, create an exported directory for the disk group files on the NAS
device.
Refer to the NAS device documentation for more information about completing
this step.
2.
Switch user to root:
$ su -
3.
Create a mount point directory on the local system:
# mkdir -p /mnt/oracleasm
4.
To ensure that the NFS file system is mounted when the system reboots, add an
entry for the file system in the /etc/vfstab mount file.
C-4 Oracle Database Installation Guide
NFS Mount Options
For more information about editing the mount file for your operating system, refer
to the man pages. For more information about recommended mount options, refer
to the "NFS Mount Options" section on page C-5.
5.
Enter a command similar to the following to mount the NFS file system on the
local system:
# mount /mnt/oracleasm
6.
Choose a name for the disk group that you want to create, for example nfsdg.
7.
Create a directory for the files on the NFS file system, using the disk group name
as the directory name:
# mkdir /mnt/oracleasm/nfsdg
8.
Use commands similar to the following to create the required number of
zero-padded files in this directory:
# mkfile 1024M /mnt/oracleasm/nfsdg/disk1
This example creates 1 GB files on the NFS file system. You must create one, two,
or three files respectively to create an external, normal, or high redundancy disk
group.
9.
Enter the following commands to change the owner, group, and permissions on
the directory and files that you created:
# chown -R oracle:dba /mnt/oracleasm
# chmod -R 660 /mnt/oracleasm
10. When you are creating the database, edit the Automatic Storage Management disk
discovery string to specify a regular expression that matches the file names you
created. For example, you might specify a disk discovery string similar to the
following:
/mnt/oracleasm/nfsdg/*
NFS Mount Options
You must mount NFS volumes used for storing database files with special mount
options on the host where the database server is running. When mounting an NFS file
system, Oracle recommends that you use the same mount point options that your NAS
vendor used when certifying the device. Refer to your device documentation or
contact your vendor for information about recommended mount-point options.
In general, most vendors recommend that you use the NFS mount options listed in the
following table.
Option
Requirement
Description
hard
Mandatory
Generate a hard mount of the NFS file system. If the
connection to the server fails or is temporarily lost,
connection attempts are made until the NAS device
responds.
bg
Optional
Try to connect in the background if connection fails.
proto=tcp
Optional
Use the TCP protocol rather than UDP. TCP is more
reliable than UDP.
Using NAS Devices C-5
NFS Mount Options
Option
Requirement
Description
vers=3
Optional
Use NFS version 3. Oracle recommends that you use NFS
version 3 where available, unless the performance of
version 2 is later.
suid
Optional
Allow clients to run executables with SUID enabled. This
option is required for Oracle software mount points.
rsize
Mandatory
The number of bytes used when reading from the NAS
device. This value should be set to the maximum database
block size supported by this platform. A value of 8192 is
often recommended for NFS version 2 and 32768 is often
recommended for NFS version 3.
wsize
Mandatory
The number of bytes used when writing to the NAS
device. This value should be set to the maximum database
block size supported by this platform. A value of 8192 is
often recommended for NFS version 2 and 32768 is often
recommended for NFS version 3.
nointr (or intr) Optional
Do not allow (or allow) keyboard interrupts to kill a
process that is hung while waiting for a response on a
hard-mounted file system.
Note: Different vendors have different recommendations
about this option. Contact your vendor for advice.
noac
Mandatory
Disable attribute caching.
This option must be set when the database runs in RAC
mode. It is also recommended for database instances that
are started from different nodes (host systems) at different
times in a GRID-like environment.
Note: You must specify this option for NFS file systems
where you want to install the software. If you do not use
this option, Oracle Universal Installer will not install the
software in the directory that you specify.
forcedirectio
Optional
Use direct I/O (no buffering) for data transfers.
Note: You can use this option for file systems that contain
only Oracle database files. Do not use it for a file system
that contains Oracle software.
The mandatory mount options comprise the minimum set of mount options that you
must use while mounting the NFS volumes. These mount options are essential to
protect the integrity of the data and to prevent any database corruption. Failure to use
these mount options may result in the generation of file access errors. Refer to your
operating system or NAS device documentation for more information about the
specific options supported on your platform.
C-6 Oracle Database Installation Guide
D
Optimal Flexible Architecture
This appendix describes the Optimal Flexible Architecture standard. The standard is a
set of configuration guidelines created to ensure reliable Oracle installations that
require little maintenance. It includes information about the following topics:
■
Overview of the Optimal Flexible Architecture Standard
■
Changes to the Optimal Flexible Architecture for Oracle Database 10g
■
Implementing Optimal Flexible Architecture
■
Improving Reliability and Performance
Overview of the Optimal Flexible Architecture Standard
The Optimal Flexible Architecture standard is designed to:
■
■
Organize large amounts of complicated software and data on disk, to avoid device
bottlenecks and poor performance
Facilitate routine administrative tasks such as software and data backup, which
are often vulnerable to data corruption
■
Facilitate switching between multiple Oracle databases
■
Adequately manage and administer database growth
■
Help eliminate fragmentation of free space in the data dictionary, isolate other
fragmentation, and minimize resource contention
Optimal Flexible Architecture is a set of guidelines that you should adopt when
organizing Oracle directories and files on your computer. All Oracle components on
the installation media are compliant with Optimal Flexible Architecture. This means
that Oracle Universal Installer places Oracle Database components in directory
locations that follow Optimal Flexible Architecture guidelines.
Although using Optimal Flexible Architecture is not a requirement, Oracle
recommends that you use it if your database will grow in size, or if you plan to have
multiple databases.
Characteristics of an Optimal Flexible Architecture Compliant Installation
The following are the characteristics of an Oracle product installation that complies
with the Optimal Flexible Architecture standard:
■
File system organization
The file system is organized to enable easy administration and to facilitate:
Optimal Flexible Architecture
D-1
Overview of the Optimal Flexible Architecture Standard
■
–
Adding data into existing databases
–
Adding users
–
Creating databases
–
Adding hardware
Distributed I/O loads
I/O loads are distributed across enough disk drives to prevent performance
bottlenecks.
■
Hardware support
In most cases, you do not require new hardware to implement the Optimal
Flexible Architecture standard.
■
Safeguards Against Drive Failures
By distributing applications across more than one drive, drive failures affect as
few applications as possible.
■
Distribution of Oracle home directories
The following items can be distributed across more than one disk drive:
■
–
The collection of home directories
–
The contents of an individual home directory
Integrity of login home directories
You can add, move, or delete login home directories without having to revise
programs that refer to them.
■
Independence of UNIX directory subtrees
Categories of files are separated into independent UNIX directory subtrees so that
files in one category are minimally affected by operations on files in other
categories.
■
Supports concurrent execution of application software
You can run multiple versions of Oracle software simultaneously, enabling you to
test and use a new release before retiring the previous release. Transferring to a
new release after an upgrade is simple for the administrator and transparent for
the user.
■
Separates administrative information for each database
The ability to separate administrative information for each database ensures a
reasonable structure for the organization and storage of administrative data.
■
Uses consistent database file naming
Database files are named so that:
■
–
Database files are easy to distinguish from other files
–
Files belonging to one database are easy to distinguish from files that belong
to another database
–
Control files, redo log files, and data files can be identified as such
–
The association of data file to tablespace is clearly indicated
Separation of tablespace contents
Tablespace contents are separated to:
D-2 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Implementing Optimal Flexible Architecture
■
■
Minimize tablespace free space fragmentation
■
Minimize I/O request contention
■
Maximize administrative flexibility
I/O loads tuned across all drives
I/O loads are tuned across all drives, including drives storing Oracle data in either
Automatic Storage Management disk groups or in raw devices.
Changes to the Optimal Flexible Architecture for Oracle Database 10g
For previous releases of Oracle Database, the Optimal Flexible Architecture standard
recommended Oracle home path was similar to the following:
/u01/app/oracle/product/9.2.0
For Oracle Database 10g, the Optimal Flexible Architecture recommended Oracle
home path has changed. The Optimal Flexible Architecture recommended path is now
similar to the following:
/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/type[_n]
In this example, type is the type of Oracle home, for example Oracle Database (db) or
Oracle Client (client), and n is an optional counter. This syntax provides the
following benefits:
■
You can install different products with the same release number in the same
Oracle base directory, for example:
/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1
/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/client_1
■
You can install the same product more than once in the same Oracle base
directory, for example:
/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1
/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_2
Implementing Optimal Flexible Architecture
This section describes the naming strategy recommended by the Optimal Flexible
Architecture standard. It contains the following sections:
■
File Systems
■
Naming Directories
■
Naming Database Files
■
Separating Segments with Different Requirements
■
Naming Tablespaces
■
Exploiting the Optimal Flexible Architecture Structure for Oracle Files
■
Optimal Flexible Architecture File Mapping
File Systems
This section describes the conventions for mount points.
Optimal Flexible Architecture
D-3
Implementing Optimal Flexible Architecture
Number of File Systems
To fully implement the Optimal Flexible Architecture recommendations for a database
stored on file systems that are not striped or mirrored, you require at least three file
systems located on separate physical devices.
Naming Conventions
Name all file system mount points using the syntax /pm, where p is a string constant
and m is a unique fixed-length key (typically a two-digit number) used to distinguish
each mount point. For example: /u01 and /u02, or /disk01 and /disk02.
Naming Mount Points for Very Large Databases (VLDBs)
If each disk drive contains database files from one application and there are enough
drives for each database to prevent I/O bottlenecks, use the syntax /pm/q/dm for
naming mount points. Table D–1 describes the variables used in this syntax.
Table D–1
Syntax for Naming Mount Points for Very Large Databases
Variable
Description
pm
A mount point name
q
A string denoting that Oracle data is stored in this directory, for example,
oradata
dm
The value of the initialization parameter DB_NAME (typically the same as the
instance SID for single-instance databases)
For example, to allocate two drives exclusively for the test database, name the mount
points /u01/oradata/test and /u02/oradata/test.
Naming Directories
This section describes the naming conventions for directories that are compliant with
the Optimal Flexible Architecture standard.
Oracle Base Directory Naming Convention
The Oracle base directory is the top-level directory for Oracle products installed by the
same user. Name Oracle base directories using the syntax /pm/h/u. Table D–2
describes the variables used in this syntax.
Table D–2
Syntax for Naming Oracle Base Directories
Variable
Description
pm
A mount point name
h
A standard directory name
u
The name of the owner of the directory (the user running Oracle Universal
Installer)
For example, /u01/app/oracle is an Oracle base directory created by the oracle
user and /u01/app/applmgr is an Oracle base directory created by the applmgr
user.
Placing Oracle base directories at the same level in the UNIX file system is
advantageous because it enables you to refer to the collection of Oracle base directories
on different mount points using a single pattern matching string, /*/app/*.
D-4 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Implementing Optimal Flexible Architecture
Referring to Path Names
Refer to explicit path names only in files designed specifically to store them, such as
the password file, /etc/passwd, and the Oracle oratab file. Refer to group
memberships only in the /etc/group file.
Oracle Home Directory Naming Convention
To help fulfill the Optimal Flexible Architecture requirement of simultaneously
running multiple versions of Oracle software, install the software in a directory
matching the pattern /pm/h/u/product/v/type_[n].
Table D–3 describes the variables used in this syntax.
Table D–3
Syntax for Naming Oracle Home Directories
Variable
Description
pm
A mount point name
h
A standard directory name
u
The name of the owner of the directory
v
The version of the software
type
The type of installation, for example Database (db), Client (client),
Companion (companion), or CRS (crs)
n
An optional counter, which enables you to install the same product more than
once in the same Oracle base directory
For example:
■
■
/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1 indicates the Oracle home
directory for the first installation of Oracle Database on this system.
/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/crs indicates the Oracle home directory
for Oracle Clusterware (Clusterware is required for RAC installations).
Oracle Clusterware can be installed only once on the system, so the optional
counter is not required.
Set the ORACLE_HOME environment variable after installation to specify the Oracle
home directory.
Naming Subdirectories
To facilitate the organization of administrative data, Oracle recommends that you
store database-specific administration files in subdirectories matching the pattern
/h/admin/d/a/, where h is the Oracle base directory, d is the database name
(DB_NAME), and a is a subdirectory for specific types of database administration
files. Table D–4 describes the database administration file subdirectories.
Table D–4
Subdirectories for Database Administration Files
Subdirectory
Description
adhoc
Ad hoc SQL scripts
arch
Archived redo log files
adump
Audit files
(Set the AUDIT_FILE_DEST initialization parameter to specify the adump
directory. Clean out this subdirectory periodically.)
bdump
Background process trace files
Optimal Flexible Architecture
D-5
Implementing Optimal Flexible Architecture
Table D–4 (Cont.) Subdirectories for Database Administration Files
Subdirectory
Description
cdump
Core dump files
create
Scripts used to create the database
exp
Database export files
logbook
Files recording the status and history of the database
pfile
Instance parameter files
udump
User SQL trace files
For example, /u01/app/oracle/admin/sab/adhoc/ is the adhoc subdirectory
associated with the database named sab.
Naming Database Files
The following table lists the recommended file naming conventions for database files:
Oracle Managed Files (OMF) and files stored in Automatic
Storage Management disk groups use different naming
conventions. For more information about these naming
conventions, refer to the Oracle Database Administrator's Guide.
Note:
File Type
File Naming Convention
Control files
/pm/q/d/control.ctl
Redo log files
/pm/q/d/redon.log
Data files
/pm/q/d/tn.dbf
The following table describes this syntax:
Variable
Description
pm
A mount point name described previously in this appendix
q
A string (typically oradata) distinguishing Oracle data from all other files
d
The value of the DB_NAME initialization parameter (typically, the same as the
instance SID for single-instance databases)
t
An Oracle tablespace name
n
A two-digit string
Do not store files other than control files, redo log files, or
data files associated with database d in the path /pm/q/d.
Note:
Using this convention, it is easy to determine the database to which the
/u03/oradata/sab/system01.dbf file belongs.
D-6 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Implementing Optimal Flexible Architecture
Separating Segments with Different Requirements
Separate groups of segments with different lifespans, I/O request demands, and
backup frequencies across different tablespaces.
Table D–5 describes the special tablespaces that the Database Configuration Assistant
creates for each Oracle database. If you manually create a database, you must create
the required tablespaces. These tablespaces are in addition to those required for
application segments.
See Also: Oracle Database Administrator's Guide for information
about creating databases manually
Table D–5
Special Tablespaces
Tablespace
Required
Description
EXAMPLE
No
The EXAMPLE tablespace used to store the Sample
Schemas
SYSAUX
Yes
Auxiliary tablespace to the SYSTEM tablespace
SYSTEM
Yes
Data dictionary segments
TEMP
Yes
Temporary segments
UNDOTBS1
Yes
Used by Oracle to store undo information
USERS
No
Miscellaneous user segments
Creating these special tablespaces is effective because data dictionary segments are
never dropped, and no other segments that can be dropped are allowed in the
SYSTEM tablespace. Doing this ensures that the SYSTEM tablespace does not require a
rebuild due to tablespace free-space fragmentation.
Naming Tablespaces
Name tablespaces descriptively using a maximum of eight characters. Although
Oracle Database tablespace names can be 30 characters long, portable UNIX file names
are restricted to 14 characters. The recommended standard for a data file basename is
tn.dbf, where t is a descriptive tablespace name and n is a two-digit string. Because
the extension and the two-digit string take six characters, only eight characters remain
for the tablespace name.
Descriptive names enable the data file to be associated with the tablespace that uses it.
For example, the names GLD and GLX might be used for the tablespaces storing
General Ledger data and General Ledger indexes, respectively.
Do not embed reminders of the word "tablespace" in your
tablespace names. Tablespace names can be distinguished by
context. For example, do not name the General Ledger tablespace
GLD_TBS01.dbf.
Note:
Exploiting the Optimal Flexible Architecture Structure for Oracle Files
Table D–6 describes the syntax used for identifying classes of files.
Optimal Flexible Architecture
D-7
Implementing Optimal Flexible Architecture
Table D–6
Directory Structure Syntax for Identifying Classes of Files
Directory Structure Syntax
Description
/u[0-9][0-9]
User data directories
/*/home/*
User home directories
/*/app/*
User application software directories
/*/app/applmgr
Oracle applications software subtrees
/*/app/oracle/product
Oracle software subtrees
/*/app/oracle/product/10.2.0
Oracle software subtree for release 10.2.0
products
/*/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db* Oracle home directories for Oracle Database 10g
/*/app/oracle/admin/sab
sab database administrative subtrees
/*/app/oracle/admin/sab/arch/*
sab database archived log files
/*/oradata
Oracle data directories
/*/oradata/sab/*
sab database files
/*/oradata/sab/*.log
sab database redo log files
Optimal Flexible Architecture File Mapping
Table D–7 shows a hierarchical file mapping of a sample Optimal Flexible
Architecture-compliant installation with two Oracle home directories and two
databases. The database files are distributed across three mount points, /u02, /u03,
and /u04.
Table D–7
Hierarchical File Mapping for an Optimal Flexible Architecture Installation
Directory
Description
/
Root directory
/u01/
User data mount point 1
/u01/app/
Subtree for application software
/u01/app/oracle/
Oracle Base directory
/u01/app/oracle/admin/
Subtree for database administration files
/u01/app/oracle/admin/TAR
Subtree for support log files
/u01/app/oracle/admin/db_name1/
admin subtree for db_name1 database
/u01/app/oracle/admin/db_name2/
admin subtree for db_name2 database
/u01/app/oracle/doc/
Online documentation
/u01/app/oracle/flash_recovery_area/
Subtree for recovery files
/u01/app/oracle/flash_recovery_area/db_name1 Recovery files for db_name1 database
/u01/app/oracle/flash_recovery_area/db_name2 Recovery files for db_name2 database
/u01/app/oracle/product/
Distribution files
/u01/app/oracle/product/9.2.0
Oracle home directory for Oracle9i release 2 (9.2.0)
/u01/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1
Oracle home directory for Oracle Database 10g
release 2 (10.2)
/u01/app/kjf/
Oracle base directory for user kjf
/u01/app/edm/
Oracle base directory for user edm
D-8 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Improving Reliability and Performance
Table D–7 (Cont.) Hierarchical File Mapping for an Optimal Flexible Architecture Installation
Directory
Description
/u02
User data mount point 2
/u02/oradata/
Subtree for Oracle data
/u02/oradata/db_name1/
Subtree for db_name1 database files
/u02/oradata/db_name2/
Subtree for db_name2 database files
/u03/
User data mount point 3
/u03/oradata/
Subtree for Oracle data
/u03/oradata/db_name1/
Subtree for db_name1 database files
/u03/oradata/db_name2/
Subtree for db_name2 database files
/u04/
User data mount point 4
/u04/oradata/
Subtree for Oracle data
/u04/oradata/db_name1/
Subtree for db_name1 database files
/u04/oradata/db_name2/
Subtree for db_name2 database files
Improving Reliability and Performance
One of the goals of Optimal Flexible Architecture is to improve reliability and
performance by distributing I/O loads across different physical drives. The following
are methods to accomplish this:
■
Disk Mirroring
■
Disk Striping
Disk Mirroring
You can separate and treat Oracle Database log files and database files with different
levels of hardware reliability. Oracle Database log files are highly reliable to start with,
because they are stored redundantly. Creating similar reliability for database files may
require you to duplicate all of your data, using disk mirrors.
Disk mirroring usually involves two or more identical drives and a RAID controller. If
one disk fails, then the other disks can recover data that would otherwise be lost.
Using one of the disks to recover lost data may involve losing the mirror. If this
happens, then you must build a new mirror.
Disk mirroring is part of some levels of Redundant Array of Independent Disks
(RAID) configurations, provided by the disk controller. The RAID level determines the
amount of redundancy. Some RAID levels can use the hot swapping feature, which
means that you can replace a bad disk with a good one without turning off the
computer or losing functionality.
Disk Striping
How you set up disks for use in a database depends on the number of disks and the
type of hard disk controllers available. If the hard disk controllers support both
striping and mirroring, then Oracle recommends that you configure the controllers to
support striping.
Striping provides significant performance advantages. All the space from the striped
drives appears as a single logical drive. In addition, the space is used by interlacing
Optimal Flexible Architecture
D-9
Improving Reliability and Performance
stripes of space from all of the disks in the stripe. This means that a large file uses
some space from the first disk, then some from the second disk, and so on to the last
disk, and then starting back at the first disk again. Each file can be spread over all of
the striped disks. Multiple CPUs can access data randomly in such a file without
contention.
Controllers that support striping usually provide caching as well. This means that data
can be written to the controller and cached and saved for a time in storage not on the
disk. Data that is read can be cached on the controller in the same manner. Read
caching should not be used with Oracle Database, because all database reads are
already cached in the System Global Area (SGA). The value of the DB_CACHE_SIZE
parameter in the initialization parameter file, init.ora, determines the buffer size
that can be used in the SGA. This value also configures Oracle Database on startup.
Note:
■
■
Read caching should be disabled.
Disk write caching should be disabled on disks containing Oracle
Database data files and redo log files where the contents of the
write cache are not flushed to disk in the event of a power failure
or operating system failure. Consult your vendor documentation
for more information.
D-10 Oracle Database Installation Guide
E
Managing Oracle Database Port Numbers
During installation, Oracle Universal Installer assigns port numbers to components
from a set of default port numbers. This appendix lists the default port numbers and
describes how to change the assigned port after installation. It includes information
about the following topics:
■
About Managing Ports
■
Viewing Port Numbers and Access URLs
■
Port Numbers and Protocols of Oracle Components
■
Changing the Oracle Enterprise Management Agent Port
■
Changing the Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Console Ports
■
Changing the iSQL*Plus Ports
■
Changing the Oracle Ultra Search Ports
■
Changing the Oracle XML DB Ports
About Managing Ports
During installation, Oracle Universal Installer assigns port numbers to components
from a set of default port numbers. Many Oracle Database components and services
use ports. As an administrator, it is important to know the port numbers used by these
services, and to make sure that the same port number is not used by two services on
your host.
Most port numbers are assigned during installation. Every component and service has
an allotted port range, which is the set of port numbers Oracle Database attempts to
use when assigning a port. Oracle Database starts with the lowest number in the range
and performs the following checks:
■
Is the port used by another Oracle Database installation on the host?
The installation may be up or down at the time; Oracle Database can still detect if
the port is used.
■
Is the port used by a process that is currently running?
This could be any process on the host, even a non-Oracle Database process.
■
Is the port listed in the /etc/services files?
If the answer to any of the preceding questions is yes, Oracle Database moves to the
next highest port in the allotted port range and continues checking until it finds a free
port.
Managing Oracle Database Port Numbers E-1
Viewing Port Numbers and Access URLs
Viewing Port Numbers and Access URLs
In most cases, the Oracle Database component’s port number is listed in the tool used
to configure the port. In addition, ports for some Oracle Database applications are
listed in the portlist.ini file. This file is located in the $ORACLE_HOME/install
directory.
If you change a port number, it is not updated in the portlist.ini file, so you can
only rely on this file immediately after installation. To find or change a port number,
use the methods described in this appendix.
Port Numbers and Protocols of Oracle Components
The following table lists the port numbers and protocols used by components that are
configured during the installation. By default, the first port in the range is assigned to
the component, if it is available.
Table E–1
Ports Used in Oracle Components
Component and Description
Default Port Number
Port Range
Protocol
Oracle SQL*Net Listener
1521
1521
TCP
1521 (same value as the
listener)
1521
TCP
1630
1630
TCP
3938
1830–1849
HTTP
1158
5500–5519
TCP/HTTP
5520
5520–5539
TCP
Allows Oracle client connections to the database over
Oracle's SQL*Net protocol. You can configure it during
installation. To reconfigure this port, use Net
Configuration Assistant.
Data Guard
Shares the SQL*Net port and is configured during
installation. To reconfigure this port, use Net
Configuration Assistant to reconfigure the Oracle
SQL*Net listener.
Connection Manager
Listening port for Oracle client connections to Oracle
Connection Manager. It is not configured during
installation, but can be configured using Net
Configuration Assistant.
Oracle Management Agent
HTTP port for Enterprise Management Agent. It is
configured during installation.
"Changing the Oracle Enterprise Management Agent
Port" on page E-4 explains how to modify its port number
Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Console
HTTP port for Enterprise Manager Database Control. It is
configured during installation. "Changing the Oracle
Enterprise Manager Database Console Ports" on page E-4
explains how to modify its port number.
Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Console
RMI port for Enterprise Manager Database Control. It is
configured during installation."Changing the Oracle
Enterprise Manager Database Console Ports" on page E-4
explains how to modify its port number.
E-2 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Port Numbers and Protocols of Oracle Components
Table E–1
(Cont.) Ports Used in Oracle Components
Component and Description
Default Port Number
Port Range
Protocol
Enterprise Manager Database Console
5540
5540–5559
TCP
5560
5560–5579
TCP/HTTP
5580
5580–5599
TCP
5600
5600–5619
TCP
5620
5620–5639
TCP/HTTP
5640
5640–5659
TCP
5660
5660–5679
TCP
Dynamic
Dynamic
HTTP
Dynamic
Dynamic
FTP
JMS port for Enterprise Manager Database Control. It is
configured during installation. "Changing the Oracle
Enterprise Manager Database Console Ports" on page E-4
explains how to modify its port number.
iSQL*Plus
HTTP port for iSQL*Plus. The port number is
automatically assigned during installation. "Changing the
iSQL*Plus Ports" on page E-5 explains how to change its
port number.
iSQL*Plus
RMI port for iSQL*Plus. The port number is automatically
assigned during installation."Changing the iSQL*Plus
Ports" on page E-5 explains how to change its port
number.
iSQL*Plus
JMS port for iSQL*Plus. The port number is automatically
assigned during installation. "Changing the iSQL*Plus
Ports" on page E-5 explains how to change its port
number.
Oracle Ultra Search
HTTP port for Oracle Ultra Search. Its port number is
assigned automatically when you install Oracle Ultra
Search, by using the Custom installation type. "Changing
the Oracle Ultra Search Ports" on page E-5 explains how
to change its port number.
Oracle Ultra Search
RMI port for Oracle Ultra Search. Its port number is
assigned automatically when you install Oracle Ultra
Search, by using the Custom installation type. "Changing
the Oracle Ultra Search Ports" on page E-5 explains how
to change its port number.
Oracle Ultra Search
JMS port for Oracle Ultra Search. Its port number is
assigned automatically when you install Oracle Ultra
Search, by using the Custom installation type. "Changing
the Oracle Ultra Search Ports" on page E-5 explains how
to change its port number.
Oracle XML DB
The Oracle XML DB HTTP port is used if Web-based
applications need to access an Oracle database from an
HTTP listener. It is configured during installation, but
you cannot view it afterward. "Changing the Oracle XML
DB Ports" on page E-6 explains how to change its port
number.
Oracle XML DB
The Oracle XML DB FTP is used when applications need
to access an Oracle database from an FTP listener. It is
configured during installation, but you cannot view it
afterward. "Changing the Oracle XML DB Ports" on
page E-6 explains how to change its port number.
Managing Oracle Database Port Numbers E-3
Changing the Oracle Enterprise Management Agent Port
Table E–1
(Cont.) Ports Used in Oracle Components
Component and Description
Default Port Number
Port Range
Protocol
Oracle Real Application Clusters (Local Host: Windows
only)
61000
61000–61300
TCP
11000
11000–26000
TCP
Dynamic
Dynamic
UDP
49896
49896
TCP
49895
49895
TCP
Dynamic
Dynamic
TCP
49897
49897–49898
TCP
Dynamic
Dynamic
TCP
- On Rac is configured by default
- Is configurable
Oracle Real Application Clusters (Cluster Interconnect:
Windows only)
- On RAC is configured by default
- Is configurable
Oracle Real Application Clusters (UNIX)
The port number is assigned automatically during
installation. You cannot view or modify it afterward.
Oracle Clusterware
CRS daemon (Oracle Cluster Ready Services Daemon)
internode connection. The port number is assigned
automatically during installation. You cannot view or
modify it afterward.
Cluster Synchronization Service (CSS)
CSS daemon internode connection for the GM layer. The
port number is assigned automatically during
installation. You cannot view or modify it afterward.
Oracle Cluster Registry
The port number is assigned automatically during
installation. You cannot view or modify it afterward.
Oracle Event Manager
The port number is assigned automatically during
installation. You cannot view or modify it afterward.
Cluster Manager
The port number is assigned automatically during
installation. You cannot view or modify it afterward.
Changing the Oracle Enterprise Management Agent Port
To find the current setting for the Oracle Management agent port, search for EMD_URL
in the $ORACLE_HOME/host_sid/sysman/config/emd.properties file.
To change the Oracle Management Agent HTTP port, use the emca -reconfig ports
command:
emca -reconfig ports -AGENT_PORT 1831
Changing the Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Console Ports
To find the current HTTP, RMI, and JMS port settings, search in the following files:
■
■
HTTP port: Search for REPOSITORY_URL in the
$ORACLE_HOME/host_sid/sysman/config/emd.properties file.
RMI port: Search for the port attribute in the rmi-server tag in the
$ORACLE_HOME/oc4j/j2ee/OC4J_DBConsole_host_sid/config/rmi.xml
file.
E-4 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Changing the Oracle Ultra Search Ports
■
JMS port: Search for the port attribute in the jms-server tag in the
$ORACLE_HOME/oc4j/j2ee/OC4J_DBConsole_host_sid/config/jms.xml
file.
To change the Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control ports, use the emca
-reconfig ports command:
$ORACLE_HOME\bin> emca -reconfig ports option setting
where option can be:
■
DBCONTROL_HTTP_PORT: Sets the HTTP port, for example:
emca -reconfig ports -DBCONTROL_HTTP_PORT 1820
■
RMI_PORT: Sets the RMI port, for example:
emca -reconfig ports -RMI_PORT 5520
■
JMS_PORT: Sets the JMS port, for example:
emca -reconfig ports -JMS_PORT 5521
You can enter multiple -reconfig port settings in one line, for example:
emca -reconfig ports -DBCONTROL_HTTP_PORT 1820 -AGENT_PORT 1821 -RMI_PORT 5520
Changing the iSQL*Plus Ports
The following sections describe how to change the iSQL*Plus ports.
Changing the HTTP Port
To change the HTTP port, edit the following files:
■
$ORACLE_HOME/host_sid/sysman/config/emoms.properties
Modify the following port parameters (for example, 5560) in the file:
oracle.sysman.db.isqlplusUrl=http\://host.domain\:5560/isqlplus/dynamic
oracle.sysman.db.isqlplusWebDBAUrl=http\://host.domain\:5560/isqlplus/dynamic
■
$ORACLE_HOME/oc4j/j2ee/isqlplus/config/http-web-site.xml
Modify the port attribute of the web-site element:
<web-site port="5560" ...>
Changing the RMI Port
To change the RMI port, modify the port attribute of the rmi-server element in the
$ORACLE_HOME/oc4j/j2ee/isqlplus/config/rmi.xml file:
<rmi-server port="5580"...>
Changing the JMS Port
To change the JMS port, modify the port attribute of the jms-server element in the
$ORACLE_HOME/oc4j/j2ee/isqlplus/config/jms.xml file:
<jms-server port="5600"...>
Changing the Oracle Ultra Search Ports
The following sections describe how to change the Oracle Ultra Search ports.
Managing Oracle Database Port Numbers E-5
Changing the Oracle XML DB Ports
Changing the HTTP Port
To change the HTTP port, modify the port attribute of the web-site element in the
$ORACLE_HOME/oc4j/j2ee/OC4J_SEARCH/config/http-web-site.xml file:
<web-site port="5620"...>
Changing the RMI Port
To change the RMI port, modify the port attribute of the rmi-server element in the
$ORACLE_HOME/oc4j/j2ee/OC4J_SEARCH/config/rmi.xml file:
<rmi-server port="5640"...>
Changing the JMS Port
To change the JMS port, modify the port attribute of the jms-server element in the
$ORACLE_HOME/oc4j/j2ee/OC4J_SEARCH/config/jms.xml file:
<jms-server port="5660"...>
Changing the Oracle XML DB Ports
To change the Oracle XML DB FTP and HTTP ports, you need to run the
catxdbdbca.sql script, which in a default installation is located in
$ORACLE_HOME/rdbms/admin.
To change the Oracle XML DB ports:
1.
Check that the Oracle listener is running. To do so, in the Services control panel,
make sure that the Oracle TNS Listener service (for example,
OracleOraDb10g_home1TNSListener) is set to Started.
If you cannot start the listener, refer to Oracle Database Net Services Administrator's
Guide.
2.
Log into SQL*Plus or iSQL*Plus as SYS or XDB using the SYSDBA role.
For example, to log in to SQL*Plus as SYS using the password welcome:
# sqlplus "sys/welcome as SYSDBA"
3.
Run the catxdbdbca.sql script.
For example, to use 2200 for the FTP port and 8200 for the HTTP port, and
assuming your Oracle home is in the following location, enter the following
command:
SQL> $ORACLE_HOME\rdbms\admin\catxdbdbca.sql 2200 8200
4.
Exit SQL*Plus or iSQL*Plus.
E-6 Oracle Database Installation Guide
F
Configuring Oracle Database Globalization
Support
This appendix describes these Globalization Support topics:
■
About NLS_LANG Environment Variable
■
Running Oracle Universal Installer in Different Languages
About NLS_LANG Environment Variable
Oracle provides Globalization Support that enables users to interact with a database in
their preferred locale and character set settings. Setting the NLS_LANG environment
variable specifies locale behavior for Oracle software. It sets the language and territory
used by the client application and the database server. It also sets the character set for
entering and displaying data by a client program, such as SQL*Plus.
The NLS_LANG environment variable uses the following format:
NLS_LANG=language_territory.characterset
where:
Parameter
Description
language
Specifies the language used for displaying Oracle messages,
sorting, day names, and month names.
territory
Specifies the conventions for default date, monetary and numeric
formats.
characterset
Specifies the encoding used by the client application (normally the
Oracle character set that corresponds to the character set of the
user terminal or the operating system)
The NLS_LANG environment variable is set as a local environment variable for the
shell on all UNIX-based platforms. For example, if the operating system locale setting
is en_US.UTF-8, then the corresponding NLS_LANG environment variable should be
set to AMERICAN_AMERICA.AL32UTF8.
See Also: Oracle Database Globalization Support Guide for information
about the NLS_LANG parameter and Globalization Support
initialization parameters
Configuring Oracle Database Globalization Support F-1
Running Oracle Universal Installer in Different Languages
Caution: AL32UTF8 is the Oracle Database character set that is
appropriate for XMLType data. It is equivalent to the IANA registered
standard UTF-8 encoding, which supports all valid XML characters.
Do not confuse Oracle Database database character set UTF8 (no
hyphen) with database character set AL32UTF8 or with character
encoding UTF-8. Database character set UTF8 has been superseded by
AL32UTF8. Do not use UTF8 for XML data. UTF8 supports only
Unicode version 3.1 and earlier; it does not support all valid XML
characters. AL32UTF8 has no such limitation.
Using database character set UTF8 for XML data could potentially
cause a fatal error or affect security negatively. If a character that is
not supported by the database character set appears in an
input-document element name, a replacement character (usually "?")
is substituted for it. This will terminate parsing and raise an exception.
The following table lists some of the valid values for the NLS_LANG environment
variable.
Refer to the operating system specific documentation on
how to determine the operating system locale environment setting.
Note:
Operating system locale NLS_LANG values
French (France)
FRENCH_FRANCE.WE8ISO8859P15, FRENCH_
FRANCE.WE8ISO8859P1, FRENCH_FRANCE.WE8MSWIN1252,
FRENCH_FRANCE.AL32UTF8
Japanese (Japan)
JAPANESE_JAPAN.JA16EUC, JAPANESE_JAPAN.JA16SJIS,
JAPANESE_JAPAN.AL32UTF8
Running Oracle Universal Installer in Different Languages
Oracle Universal Installer runs by default in the selected language of your operating
system. You can also run Oracle Universal Installer in the following languages:
■
Brazilian Portuguese
■
German
■
Japanese
■
Simplified Chinese
■
Traditional Chinese
■
French
■
Italian
■
Korean
■
Spanish
To run Oracle Universal Installer in a different language, you can use any of the
following methods:
■
Change the language in which the operating system is running before you run
Oracle Universal Installer. You can change the language in which the operating
F-2 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Running Oracle Universal Installer in Different Languages
system is running by clicking Language on the Login screen and selecting the
required language from the list.
■
To run Oracle Universal Installer in another language from the shell prompt, use a
command similar to the following after changing to the Disk1 directory (or to the
directory that contains the runInstaller file):
# LANG=language_territory.characterset ./runInstaller
For example, to run Oracle Universal Installer in German, use the following
command:
# LANG=de_DE.UTF-8 ./runInstaller
Oracle Universal Installer and OPatch User's Guide for
information about running Oracle Universal Installer in different
languages
See Also:
Configuring Oracle Database Globalization Support F-3
Running Oracle Universal Installer in Different Languages
F-4 Oracle Database Installation Guide
G
Troubleshooting
This appendix contains information about troubleshooting. It includes information
about the following topics:
■
Verify Requirements
■
X Window Display Errors
■
What to Do If an Installation Error Occurs?
■
Reviewing the Log of an Installation Session
■
Troubleshooting Configuration Assistants
■
Silent-Mode Response File Error Handling
■
Cleaning Up After a Failed Installation
Verify Requirements
Before performing any of the troubleshooting steps in this appendix, ensure that the
system meets the requirements and that you have completed all of the preinstallation
tasks specified in Chapter 2.
Read the Release Notes
Read the release notes for the product before installing it. The release notes are
available on the Oracle Database 10g disc. The latest version of the release notes is also
available on the Oracle Technology Network Web site:
http://www.oracle.com/technology/documentation/
X Window Display Errors
If you are running Oracle Universal Installer on a remote system and you want to
display Oracle Universal Installer’s user interface on your local system, you might see
error messages similar to the following:
"Failed to connect to server"
"Connection refused by server"
"Can’t open display"
If you see one of these error messages, follow these steps:
Troubleshooting G-1
What to Do If an Installation Error Occurs?
This procedure applies only to users of UNIX workstations.
If you are using a PC or other system with X server software
installed, refer to the X server documentation for information about
how to permit remote systems to display X applications on the local
system.
Note:
1.
In a local terminal window, log in as the user that started the X Window session.
2.
Enter the following command:
$ xhost fully_qualified_remote_host_name
For example:
$ xhost somehost.us.acme.com
3.
Enter the following commands, where workstation_name is the host name or IP
address of your workstation:
■
Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:
$ DISPLAY=workstation_name:0.0
$ export DISPLAY
■
C shell:
% setenv DISPLAY workstation_name:0.0
4.
To determine whether X Window applications display correctly on the local
system, enter the following command:
$ xclock
The X clock should appear on your monitor.
5.
If the X clock appears, close the X clock and start Oracle Universal Installer again.
What to Do If an Installation Error Occurs?
If you encounter an error during installation:
■
■
■
■
■
Do not exit Oracle Universal Installer.
If you clicked Next after you entered incorrect information on one of the
installation screens, click Back to return to the screen and correct the information.
If you encounter an error while Oracle Universal Installer is copying or linking
files, refer to the "Reviewing the Log of an Installation Session" section on
page G-3.
If you encounter an error while a configuration assistant is running, refer to the
"Troubleshooting Configuration Assistants" section on page G-3.
If you cannot resolve the problem, remove the failed installation by following the
steps listed in the "Cleaning Up After a Failed Installation" section on page G-5.
G-2 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Troubleshooting Configuration Assistants
Reviewing the Log of an Installation Session
During an installation, Oracle Universal Installer records all of the actions that it
performs in a log file. If you encounter problems during the installation, review the log
file for information about possible causes of the problem.
To view the log file, follow these steps:
1.
If necessary, enter the following command to determine the location of the
oraInventory directory:
$ cat /var/opt/oracle/oraInst.loc
The inventory_loc parameter in this file specifies the location of the
oraInventory directory.
2.
Enter the following command to change directory to Oracle Universal Installer log
file directory, where orainventory_location is the location of the
oraInventory directory:
$ cd /orainventory_location/logs
3.
Enter the following command to determine the name of the log file:
$ ls -ltr
This command lists the files in the order of creation, with the most recent file
shown last. Installer log files have names similar to the following, where
date_time indicates the date and time that the installation started:
installActionsdate_time.log
4.
To view the most recent entries in the log file, where information about a problem
is most likely to appear, enter a command similar to the following:
$ tail -50 installActionsdate_time.log | more
This command displays the last 50 lines in the log file.
5.
If the error displayed by Oracle Universal Installer or listed in the log file indicates
a relinking problem, refer to the following file for more information:
$ORACLE_HOME/install/make.log
Troubleshooting Configuration Assistants
To troubleshoot an installation error that occurs when a configuration assistant is
running:
■
■
■
Review the installation log files listed in the "Reviewing the Log of an Installation
Session" section on page G-3.
Review the specific configuration assistant log file located in the
$ORACLE_HOME/cfgtoollogs directory. Try to fix the issue that caused the
error.
If you see the "Fatal Error. Reinstall" message, look for the cause of the problem by
reviewing the log files. Refer to the "Fatal Errors" section on page G-4 for further
instructions.
Troubleshooting G-3
Silent-Mode Response File Error Handling
Configuration Assistant Failure
Oracle configuration assistant failures are noted at the bottom of the installation
screen. The configuration assistant interface displays additional information, if
available. The configuration assistant execution status is stored in the following file:
oraInventory_location/logs/installActionsdate_time.log
The execution status codes are listed in the following table:
Status
Result Code
Configuration assistant succeeded
0
Configuration assistant failed
1
Configuration assistant cancelled
-1
Fatal Errors
If you receive a fatal error while a configuration assistant is running, you must remove
the current installation and reinstall the Oracle software, as follows:
1.
Remove the failed installation as described in the "Cleaning Up After a Failed
Installation" section on page G-5.
2.
Correct the cause of the fatal error.
3.
Reinstall the Oracle software.
Silent-Mode Response File Error Handling
To determine whether a silent-mode installation succeeds or fails, refer to the
following log file:
/oraInventory_location/logs/silentInstalldate_time.log
If necessary, refer to the previous section for information about determining the
location of the oraInventory directory.
A silent installation fails if:
■
You do not specify a response file
■
You specify an incorrect or incomplete response file
For example, a common problem is that while all the product-specific data is filled
out correctly, the staging area location may be incorrect. If this is the case, check
the FROM_LOCATION variable and make sure that it points to the products.xml
file in the installation media. In the installation media, this products.xml is in
response/stage.
■
Oracle Universal Installer encounters an error, such as insufficient disk space
Oracle Universal Installer or configuration assistant validates the response file at run
time. If the validation fails, the silent-mode installation or configuration process ends.
Oracle Universal Installer treats values for parameters that are of the wrong context,
format, or type as if no value was specified in the file.
G-4 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Cleaning Up After a Failed Installation
Cleaning Up After a Failed Installation
If an installation fails, you must remove files that Oracle Universal Installer created
during the attempted installation and remove the Oracle home directory. Perform the
following steps to remove the files:
1.
Start Oracle Universal Installer as described in the "Installing the Oracle Database
Software" section on page 3-5.
2.
Click Deinstall Products on the Welcome window or click Installed Products on
any Installer window.
The Inventory window appears, listing installed products.
3.
Select the Oracle home that contains the products that you want to remove, then
click Remove.
4.
Manually remove the Oracle home directory created during the failed installation.
5.
Reinstall the Oracle software.
Troubleshooting G-5
Cleaning Up After a Failed Installation
G-6 Oracle Database Installation Guide
H
Frequently Asked Questions About
Installation
Use the following guidelines to decide how to install Oracle Database components:
■
Installing Oracle Database or Oracle Database Client
■
Installing Oracle Database Tools
■
Installing Oracle Database with Oracle Applications
■
Installing Oracle Database Heterogeneous Connectivity Tools (Gateways)
Installing Oracle Database or Oracle Database Client
■
■
I only need one instance of Oracle Database or I just want to install a test database
to get familiar with the product. How do I install Oracle Database for these
situations?
How can I create an Oracle database that can handle transaction-heavy or data
warehousing applications?
■
What’s the best way to install multiple Oracle databases?
■
How do I configure client connections to an Oracle database?
■
■
■
■
What is the best way to install Oracle Database Client if my client nodes have
limited disk space?
How do I upgrade Oracle Database?
The computers at my site have been configured to run as a cluster. How should I
install Oracle Database?
How do I migrate my non-Oracle databases to Oracle Database?
I only need one instance of Oracle Database or I just want to install a test database
to get familiar with the product. How do I install Oracle Database for these
situations?
■
If you want a quick installation using the default installation settings, then refer to
Oracle Database Quick Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit).
■
If your site has special requirements, then refer to Oracle Database Installation Guide
for Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit).
Frequently Asked Questions About Installation
H-1
Installing Oracle Database or Oracle Database Client
How can I create an Oracle database that can handle transaction-heavy or data
warehousing applications?
If you want to create a starter database designed for transaction-heavy or data
warehousing applications, then refer to Oracle Database Installation Guide for Solaris
Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit). Select the Advanced Installation method, and then
select the database type you want on the Select Database Configuration screen.
See Also:
Oracle Database Data Warehousing Guide after installation
Alternatively, you can install Oracle OLAP during the Oracle Database installation.
Oracle OLAP provides optimal support for database environments that must meet
OLAP requirements. To do so, select Advanced Installation, then Custom, and on the
Available Product Components screen, select Oracle OLAP.
See Also:
■
Oracle OLAP Application Developer's Guide
■
Oracle OLAP Reference
■
Oracle OLAP DML Reference
■
Oracle OLAP Java API Reference
■
Oracle OLAP Analytic Workspace Java API Reference
What’s the best way to install multiple Oracle databases?
Use Oracle Database Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit) to
install Oracle Database using either of the following methods:
■
■
Installing with response files: This method lets you run Oracle Universal Installer
at a command line using a response file that contains settings specific to each
computer.
Cloning an existing Oracle home: Install Oracle Database in one computer using
interactive mode. Afterwards, you can clone its existing Oracle home in each
location and then create a new database from there. You can also clone databases,
which is described in Oracle Database Administrator's Guide.
How do I configure client connections to an Oracle database?
Install Oracle Database on a server by using Oracle Database Installation Guide for
Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit).
1.
2.
Use Oracle Database Client Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System (SPARC
64-Bit) to install Oracle Database Client on each client node.
If you have many client nodes, consider staging the software centrally, mapping
the drive, and running Oracle Universal Installer in noninteractive mode.
If the client nodes only require a default installation into a new Oracle home
directory, consider using Oracle Database Quick Installation Guide for Solaris
Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit).
What is the best way to install Oracle Database Client if my client nodes have
limited disk space?
1. Install Oracle Database onto a server by using Oracle Database Installation Guide for
Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit).
2.
Use Oracle Database Client Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System (SPARC
64-Bit) or Oracle Database Client Quick Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System
H-2 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Installing Oracle Database Tools
(SPARC 64-Bit) to install Oracle Database Client on each client node, and select the
Instant Client installation type.
If you have many client nodes, then consider running Oracle Universal Installer in
noninteractive mode.
How do I upgrade Oracle Database?
Refer to Oracle Database Upgrade Guide.
See Also: Oracle Database Administrator's Guide if you want to use
software cloning to upgrade Oracle Database
The computers at my site have been configured to run as a cluster. How should I
install Oracle Database?
Use any of the following installation scenarios:
■
■
■
If you want to run a single-instance Oracle Database in a clustered environment,
then install Oracle Clusterware either before or after you install Oracle Database.
If you want a consolidated pool of storage for all databases in a cluster, then install
Oracle Clusterware first and use Automatic Storage Management to manage this
storage. Afterwards, install Oracle Database (which can be either single instance or
Real Application Clusters).
If you plan to use Oracle Real Application Clusters, first install Oracle
Clusterware, and then install Oracle Real Application Clusters.
Refer to Oracle Real Application Clusters Installation and Configuration Guide for Solaris
Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit) for the platform to install Oracle Clusterware or
Oracle Real Application Clusters. Oracle Clusterware is available on the Oracle
Clusterware installation media. Oracle Database Installation Guide for Solaris Operating
System (SPARC 64-Bit) explains how to install Automatic Storage Management as well
as Oracle Database.
Oracle Clusterware is a key component required by Oracle Real Application Clusters
installations. Oracle Clusterware is an integrated cluster management solution that can
bind multiple servers together to act as a single system referred to as a cluster. It
performs workload management and component restart. For example, when an
instance supporting a particular service fails, Oracle Clusterware restarts the service
on the next available instance that you have configured for that service. Oracle
Clusterware can monitor non-Oracle programs, as long as they are defined within the
Oracle Clusterware environment using the High Availability API.
How do I migrate my non-Oracle databases to Oracle Database?
Use Oracle Migration Workbench to migrate your non-Oracle databases and
applications to Oracle. Oracle Migration Workbench software and documentation are
available at:
http://www.oracle.com/technology/tech/migration/
Installing Oracle Database Tools
■
How do I install Oracle Application Server?
■
How can I administer and monitor my Oracle Database products?
■
How do I manage security for my Oracle Database products?
Frequently Asked Questions About Installation
H-3
Installing Oracle Database Tools
■
■
■
Does Oracle Database provide OLAP tools so that I can analyze data such as
trends and time series in my database?
Does Oracle Database provide data mining tools that I can use to discover hidden
meaning in my data and predict likely outcomes based on my data?
How do I perform backup and recovery operations for Oracle Database?
How do I install Oracle Application Server?
See Oracle Application Server Installation Guide. How you install Application Server
depends on whether you already have Oracle Database installed:
■
■
If you do not have Oracle Database installed or you do not want Oracle
Application Server to use any of your existing Oracle Databases, the Oracle
Universal Installer lets you install Oracle Application Server with its own Oracle
Database. This database is populated with the metadata that Oracle Application
Server needs in order to run.
If you want Oracle Application Server to use an existing Oracle Database, do the
following:
1.
From the Oracle Application Server installation media, run Oracle Application
Server Repository Creation Assistant to populate your database with the
metadata that Application Server needs.
2.
Install the remaining Oracle Application Server components by following the
instructions in the Oracle Application Server Installation Guide.
How can I administer and monitor my Oracle Database products?
To perform regular administrative functions such as creating, configuring, or deleting
databases, or managing database templates, use one of the following methods:
To manage only the single database and listener that you are installing:
1.
Use Oracle Database Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit) to
install Oracle Database.
2.
From Oracle Database, use Database Configuration Assistant to manage your
databases.
You can also administer and monitor the database with Oracle Enterprise
Manager Grid Control, which is installed by default with Oracle Database. Oracle
Enterprise Manager Grid Control includes the Oracle Management Agent, Oracle
Management Service, and Oracle Management Repository, as well as Grid
Control, a browser-based central console through which administrators can
perform all monitoring, administration, and configuration tasks for the enterprise.
See Also: Oracle Enterprise Manager Grid Control Installation and Basic
Configuration available on the Enterprise Manager Grid Control
installation media
To perform advanced administration tasks, such as monitoring Oracle Database and
managing multiple hosts, application servers, and databases including the one that
you are installing, install Oracle Enterprise Manager as follows:
1.
Use Oracle Database Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit) to
install Oracle Database.
If you plan to use Oracle Real Application Clusters, then install Oracle Database
by using Oracle Real Application Clusters Installation and Configuration Guide for
Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit).
H-4 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Installing Oracle Database Tools
2.
Use Oracle Enterprise Manager Grid Control Installation and Basic Configuration to
install and configure Oracle Enterprise Manager. For postconfiguration tasks, use
Oracle Enterprise Manager Advanced Configuration.
How do I manage security for my Oracle Database products?
Oracle provides a wide range of security solutions for your enterprise environment,
including centralized administration and security features integrated with Oracle
Internet Directory. The set of Oracle security services called Oracle Platform Security
integrates the security features built into Oracle Database, Oracle Application Server,
and the Oracle Identity Management infrastructure. Combined, these features enable
the development and deployment of secure e-business applications.
Oracle Identity Management includes Oracle Internet Directory, a centralized
repository that simplifies administration of users and applications in the Oracle
environment by means of the following components:
■
■
Oracle Internet Directory client tools, including LDAP command-line tools, the
Oracle Internet Directory SDK, and Oracle Directory Manager.
Oracle Internet Directory server components, including the directory server, the
directory replication server, the directory integration server, and various tools for
starting and stopping them.
Oracle Database includes the Oracle Internet Directory client tools, but not the Oracle
Internet Directory server components. To install the Oracle Internet Directory server
components, run Oracle Universal Installer from an Oracle 10g Application Server
installation.
See Also:
■
Oracle Application Server Installation Guide (to install Oracle
Identity Management)
■
Oracle Database Security Guide
■
Oracle Database Advanced Security Administrator’s Guide
■
Oracle Database Enterprise User Administrator's Guide
■
Oracle Label Security Administrator's Guide
■
Oracle Application Server Security Guide
■
http://www.oracle.com/technology/deploy/security/in
dex.html for topics on database security on Oracle Technology
Network
Does Oracle Database provide OLAP tools so that I can analyze data such as
trends and time series in my database?
Yes, install Oracle OLAP, which is provided in the Oracle Database installation. Oracle
OLAP provides optimal support for database environments that must meet OLAP
requirements.
Use either of the following methods in Oracle Database Installation Guide to install
Oracle OLAP:
■
Select the Custom installation type, and in the Available Product Components
screen, select Oracle OLAP.
Frequently Asked Questions About Installation
H-5
Installing Oracle Database Tools
See Also:
■
The following manuals after you install Oracle OLAP:
■
Oracle OLAP Application Developer's Guide
■
Oracle OLAP Reference
■
Oracle OLAP DML Reference
■
Oracle OLAP Java API Reference
■
Oracle OLAP Analytic Workspace Java API Reference
Select the Enterprise Edition installation type, and then on the Select Database
Configuration screen, select the Data Warehouse configuration.
See Also:
Oracle Database Data Warehousing Guide after installation
Does Oracle Database provide data mining tools that I can use to discover hidden
meaning in my data and predict likely outcomes based on my data?
Yes. Install Oracle Data Mining, which is provided in the Oracle Database installation.
With the Oracle Data Mining option, you can create and execute predictive and
descriptive data mining models that use a variety of algorithms.
Use the following method in Oracle Database Installation Guide for Solaris Operating
System (SPARC 64-Bit) to install Oracle Data Mining:
1.
Select the Enterprise Edition installation type.
2.
On the Select Database Configuration screen, select the General Purpose
configuration.
If you want the Database to execute predefined mining models, but not support model
creation, install the Data Mining Scoring Engine instead of Oracle Data Mining. Use
the following method in Oracle Database Installation Guide to install the Data Mining
Scoring Engine:
1.
Select the Custom installation type.
2.
In the Available Product Components screen, select Data Mining Scoring Engine.
See Also: The following manuals after you have installed Oracle
Data Mining:
■
Oracle Data Mining Concepts
■
Oracle Data Mining Administrator's Guide
■
Oracle Data Mining Application Developer's Guide
■
Oracle Data Mining Java API Reference
■
■
Oracle Database PL/SQL Packages and Types Reference (search for
"Data Mining")
Oracle Database SQL Reference (search for "Data Mining")
How do I perform backup and recovery operations for Oracle Database?
Use Oracle Database Recovery Manager (RMAN), which is a backup and recovery tool
integrated into Oracle Database. This tool satisfies the pressing demands of
high-performance, manageable backup, and recovery. Recovery Manager is native to
the database server, automatically tracks database structure changes, and optimizes
operations accordingly. In addition, Recovery Manager is integrated with leading tape
H-6 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Installing Oracle Database with Oracle Applications
media management products, so that Oracle database backups can be integrated with
your existing networked data protection infrastructure.
See Also:
■
Oracle Database Backup and Recovery Basics
■
Oracle Database Backup and Recovery Advanced User's Guide
■
Oracle Database Backup and Recovery Reference
■
Oracle Database Backup and Recovery Quick Start Guide
Installing Oracle Database with Oracle Applications
■
How do I install my Oracle applications with Oracle Database?
■
How can I create Web applications that communicate with Oracle Database?
■
How can I automate and streamline my processes for both traditional
applications-based workflow as well as e-business integration workflow?
■
Which Web server can my Oracle applications use?
■
How can I migrate my non-Oracle applications to Oracle?
How do I install my Oracle applications with Oracle Database?
In most cases, install Oracle Database itself, then install the Oracle application. The
Oracle Universal Installer for that application prompts you for the connection
information. Check the application documentation requirements.
If you need to implement your applications with Oracle Real Applications Clusters
databases, refer to Oracle Real Application Clusters Installation and Configuration Guide for
Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit).
How can I create Web applications that communicate with Oracle Database?
Install Oracle HTML DB and Oracle HTTP Server:
1.
Use Oracle Database Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit) to
install Oracle Database.
2.
Use Oracle Database Companion CD Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System
(SPARC 64-Bit) to install Oracle HTML DB and Oracle HTTP Server.
The following components are available on the Oracle Database Companion CD
installation media:
■
Oracle JDBC Development Drivers
■
Oracle Ultra Search
■
Oracle SQLJ
■
JPublisher
■
Natively Compiled Java Libraries
■
Oracle Database Examples
■
Oracle HTML DB
■
Oracle HTTP Server
■
Oracle Workflow server and middle-tier components
■
Oracle Text Supplied Knowledge Bases
Frequently Asked Questions About Installation
H-7
Installing Oracle Database Heterogeneous Connectivity Tools (Gateways)
If you only need to install Oracle HTML DB and Oracle HTTP Server using the
default settings into a new Oracle home, consider using Oracle Database Companion
CD Quick Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit).
How can I automate and streamline my processes for both traditional
applications-based workflow as well as e-business integration workflow?
Install Oracle Workflow:
1.
Use Oracle Database Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit) to
install Oracle Database.
2.
Use Oracle Database Companion CD Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System
(SPARC 64-Bit) to install Oracle Workflow.
Which Web server can my Oracle applications use?
Install Oracle HTTP Server:
1.
Use Oracle Database Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit) to
install Oracle Database.
2.
Use Oracle Database Companion CD Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System
(SPARC 64-Bit) to install Oracle HTTP Server.
How can I migrate my non-Oracle applications to Oracle?
Use Oracle Migration Workbench to migrate your non-Oracle applications to Oracle.
Oracle Migration Workbench software and documentation are available at:
http://www.oracle.com/technology/tech/migration/index.html
Installing Oracle Database Heterogeneous Connectivity Tools (Gateways)
■
How can my AS/400 application access data in an Oracle database?
■
How can my Oracle applications access data in a non-Oracle database system?
How can my AS/400 application access data in an Oracle database?
Use Oracle Access Manager for AS/400, which enables AS/400 applications to access
data in an Oracle database. To install Oracle Access Manager for AS/400, use Oracle
Access Manager for AS/400 Installation and User's Guide for IBM iSeries OS/400.
How can my Oracle applications access data in a non-Oracle database system?
Use the following connectivity tools enable Oracle applications to access data in
non-Oracle databases:
■
■
Oracle Transparent Gateway: Integrates a non-Oracle database into your Oracle
Database environment.
Oracle Procedural Gateway: Enables Oracle PL/SQL applications to integrate with
APPC-enabled transactions, or access messages in IBM Websphere MQ.
You can install the Gateway product on a computer independent of the Oracle
application, Oracle database, and non-Oracle database.
For example, suppose you have the following scenario:
■
■
Oracle Database is installed on a Linux computer.
The Oracle application is installed on a Microsoft Windows computer and accesses
data from the Oracle database on the Linux computer.
H-8 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Installing Oracle Database Heterogeneous Connectivity Tools (Gateways)
■
The Oracle application needs to join data in a DB2 database on Solaris Operating
System and an Oracle Database on Linux.
You have the option of installing the Transparent Gateway for DRDA on the Solaris
computer where DB2 is running, on Linux where Oracle is running, or on a third
computer.
Table H–1 lists the non-Oracle database systems that you can access from Oracle
applications, and the Gateways products that are available for those systems.
Table H–1
Oracle Gateway Products
Non-Oracle Database
Oracle Gateway Products and Documentation
IBM DB2 Universal
Database (UDB)
Transparent Gateway for DRDA. Available on the following platforms:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
IBM DB2 z/OS
Linux x86: Use Oracle Transparent Gateway for DRDA Installation and User's Guide
for UNIX.
Linux Itanium: Use Oracle Transparent Gateway for DRDA Installation and User's
Guide for UNIX.
Microsoft Windows (32-bit): Use Oracle Transparent Gateway for DRDA
Installation and User's Guide for Microsoft Windows.
Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit): Use Oracle Transparent Gateway for
DRDA Installation and User's Guide for UNIX.
AIX 5L Based Systems (64-Bit): Use Oracle Transparent Gateway for DRDA
Installation and User's Guide for UNIX.
IBM zSeries Based Linux: Use Oracle Transparent Gateway for DRDA Installation
and User's Guide for UNIX.
hp-ux PA-RISC (64-Bit): Use Oracle Transparent Gateway for DRDA Installation
and User's Guide for UNIX.
Transparent Gateway for DB2. Available on z/OS. Use Oracle Transparent Gateway for
DB2 Installation and User's Guide for IBM z/OS (OS/390).
Transparent Gateway for DRDA. Available on the following platforms:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Linux x86: Use Oracle Transparent Gateway for DRDA Installation and User's Guide
for UNIX.
Linux Itanuim: Use Oracle Transparent Gateway for DRDA Installation and User's
Guide for UNIX.
Microsoft Windows (32-bit): Use Oracle Transparent Gateway for DRDA
Installation and User's Guide for Microsoft Windows.
Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit): Use Oracle Transparent Gateway for
DRDA Installation and User's Guide for UNIX.
AIX 5L Based Systems (64-Bit): Use Oracle Transparent Gateway for DRDA
Installation and User's Guide for UNIX.
IBM zSeries Based Linux: Use Oracle Transparent Gateway for DRDA Installation
and User's Guide for UNIX.
hp-ux PA-RISC (64-Bit): Use Oracle Transparent Gateway for DRDA Installation
and User's Guide for UNIX.
Frequently Asked Questions About Installation
H-9
Installing Oracle Database Heterogeneous Connectivity Tools (Gateways)
Table H–1 (Cont.) Oracle Gateway Products
Non-Oracle Database
Oracle Gateway Products and Documentation
IBM DB2/400
Transparent Gateway for DB2/400. Available on IBM AS/ 400. Use Oracle Transparent
Gateway for DB2/400 Installation and User's Guide for IBM iSeries OS/400.
Transparent Gateway for DRDA. Available on the following platforms:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
IBM MQSeries
■
■
■
■
Advantage
CA-Datacom/DB
Linux Itanuim: Use Oracle Transparent Gateway for DRDA Installation and User's
Guide for UNIX.
Microsoft Windows (32-bit): Use Oracle Transparent Gateway for DRDA
Installation and User's Guide for Microsoft Windows.
Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit): Use Oracle Transparent Gateway for
DRDA Installation and User's Guide for UNIX.
AIX 5L Based Systems (64-Bit): Use Oracle Transparent Gateway for DRDA
Installation and User's Guide for UNIX.
IBM zSeries Based Linux: Use Oracle Transparent Gateway for DRDA Installation
and User's Guide for UNIX.
hp-ux PA-RISC (64-Bit): Use Oracle Transparent Gateway for DRDA Installation
and User's Guide for UNIX.
Procedural Gateway for WebSphere MQ. Available on the following platforms:
■
Adabas
Linux x86: Use Oracle Transparent Gateway for DRDA Installation and User's Guide
for UNIX.
Linux x86: Use Oracle Procedural Gateway for WebSphere MQ Installation and User's
Guide for UNIX.
Microsoft Windows (32-bit): Use Oracle Procedural Gateway for WebSphere MQ
Installation and User's Guide for Microsoft Windows.
Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit): Use Oracle Procedural Gateway for
WebSphere MQ Installation and User's Guide for UNIX.
AIX 5L Based Systems (64-Bit): Use Oracle Procedural Gateway for WebSphere MQ
Installation and User's Guide for UNIX.
hp-ux PA-RISC (64-Bit): Use Oracle Procedural Gateway for WebSphere MQ
Installation and User's Guide for UNIX.
Transparent Gateway for iWAY. Available on z/OS. Use Oracle Transparent Gateway
for iWay Installation and User's Guide for IBM z/OS (OS/390).
Advantage CA-IDMS
Advantage
CA-IDMS/SQL
FOCUS
IMS/DB-DL/1
ISAM
Model 04
QSAM
Supra
System 2000
TOTAL
VSAM
H-10 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Installing Oracle Database Heterogeneous Connectivity Tools (Gateways)
Table H–1 (Cont.) Oracle Gateway Products
Non-Oracle Database
Oracle Gateway Products and Documentation
Advantage CA-IDMS/DC
Transaction Server
Procedural Gateway for APPC. Available on the following platforms:
■
CICS/TS
IMSTM
■
■
■
■
Linux x86: Use Oracle Procedural Gateway for APPC Installation and Configuration
Guide for UNIX.
Microsoft Windows (32-bit): Use Oracle Procedural Gateway for APPC Installation
and Configuration Guide for Microsoft Windows.
Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit): Use Oracle Procedural Gateway for
APPC Installation and Configuration Guide for UNIX.
AIX 5L Based Systems (64-Bit): Use Oracle Procedural Gateway for APPC
Installation and Configuration Guide for UNIX.
hp-ux PA-RISC (64-Bit): Use Oracle Procedural Gateway for APPC Installation and
Configuration Guide for UNIX.
Microsoft SQL Server
Transparent Gateway for SQL Server. Available on Microsoft Windows (32-Bit). Use
Oracle Transparent Gateway Installation Guide for Microsoft Windows (32-Bit), then Oracle
Transparent Gateway for Microsoft SQL Server Administrator's Guide for Microsoft
Windows.
Sybase Adaptive Server
Transparent Gateway for Sybase. Available on the following platforms:
■
■
■
■
■
Teradata
Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit): Use Oracle Transparent Gateway
Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System, hp-ux, IBM AIX, and hp Tru64 UNIX,
then Oracle Transparent Gateway for Sybase Administrator's Guide for Solaris
Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit).
AIX 5L Based Systems (64-Bit): Use Oracle Transparent Gateway Installation Guide
for Solaris Operating System, hp-ux, IBM AIX, and hp Tru64 UNIX, then Oracle
Transparent Gateway for Sybase Administrator's Guide for IBM AIX.
hp-ux PA-RISC (64-Bit): Use Oracle Transparent Gateway Installation Guide for
Solaris Operating System, hp-ux, IBM AIX, and hp Tru64 UNIX, then Oracle
Transparent Gateway for Sybase Administrator's Guide for hp-ux.
hp Tru64 UNIX: Use Oracle Transparent Gateway Installation Guide for Solaris
Operating System, hp-ux, IBM AIX, and hp Tru64 UNIX, then Oracle Transparent
Gateway for Sybase Administrator's Guide for hp Tru64 UNIX.
Transparent Gateway for Teradata. Available on the following platforms:
■
■
■
Informix Server
Microsoft Windows (32-bit): Use Oracle Transparent Gateway Installation Guide for
Microsoft Windows (32-Bit), then Oracle Transparent Gateway for Sybase
Administrator's Guide for Microsoft Windows.
Microsoft Windows (32-bit): Use Oracle Transparent Gateway Installation Guide for
Microsoft Windows (32-Bit), then Oracle Transparent Gateway for Teradata
Administrator's Guide for Microsoft Windows
Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit): Use Oracle Transparent Gateway
Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System, hp-ux, IBM AIX, and hp Tru64 UNIX,
then Oracle Transparent Gateway for Teradata Administrator's Guide for Solaris
Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit).
hp-ux PA-RISC (64-Bit): Use Oracle Transparent Gateway Installation Guide for
Solaris Operating System, hp-ux, IBM AIX, and hp Tru64 UNIX, then Oracle
Transparent Gateway for Teradata Administrator's Guide for hp-ux.
Transparent Gateway for Informix. Available on the following platforms:
■
■
Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit): Use Oracle Transparent Gateway
Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System, hp-ux, IBM AIX, and hp Tru64 UNIX,
then Oracle Transparent Gateway for Informix Administrator's Guide for Solaris
Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit).
hp-ux PA-RISC (64-Bit): Use Oracle Transparent Gateway Installation Guide for
Solaris Operating System, hp-ux, IBM AIX, and hp Tru64 UNIX, then Oracle
Transparent Gateway for Informix Administrator's Guide for hp-ux.
Frequently Asked Questions About Installation
H-11
Installing Oracle Database Heterogeneous Connectivity Tools (Gateways)
Table H–1 (Cont.) Oracle Gateway Products
Non-Oracle Database
Oracle Gateway Products and Documentation
Ingres II
Transparent Gateway for Ingres II. Available on the following platforms:
■
■
Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit): Use Oracle Transparent Gateway
Installation Guide for Solaris Operating System, hp-ux, IBM AIX, and hp Tru64 UNIX,
then Oracle Transparent Gateway for Ingres II Administrator's Guide for Solaris
Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit).
hp-ux PA-RISC (64-Bit): Use Oracle Transparent Gateway Installation Guide for
Solaris Operating System, hp-ux, IBM AIX, and hp Tru64 UNIX, then Oracle
Transparent Gateway for Ingres II Administrator's Guide for hp-ux.
Rdb
Transparent Gateway for Rdb. Available on hp OpenVMS Alpha. Use Oracle
Transparent Gateway Installation Guide for hp OpenVMS, then Oracle Transparent
Gateway for Rdb Administrator's Guide for hp OpenVMS.
RMS
Transparent Gateway for RMS. Available on hp OpenVMS Alpha. Use Oracle
Transparent Gateway Installation Guide for hp OpenVMS, then Oracle Transparent
Gateway for RMS Administrator's Guide for hp OpenVMS.
H-12 Oracle Database Installation Guide
Index
A
Access Manager for AS/400, H-8
accounts
reviewing, 5-3
unauthenticated access to, 5-7
Advantage family of databases, H-10
aliases, multiple on computers, 2-9
ANONYMOUS user
unauthenticated account access with, 5-7
APPC-enabled databases, H-11
APPC-enabled systems, H-11
applications, migrating non-Oracle applications to
Oracle, H-8
applications-based workflows, H-8
architecture
checking system architecture, 2-4
AS/400 applications, accessing Oracle database, H-8
ASM See Automatic Storage Management
asmcmd utility, 3-13
authorized problem analysis report
See APAR
Automatic Storage Management
asmcmd utility, 3-13
block and character device names
on Solaris, 2-28, 2-31
changing owner and permissions of disks
on Solaris, 2-29
characteristics of failure groups, 2-25
checking disk availability on Solaris, 2-28, 2-31
configuring disks, 2-23 to ??, 2-28
on Solaris, 2-28
considerations before installing, 3-9
DAS disks, 2-28
database creation for, 3-12
disk devices, 1-6
disk groups, 2-24
disks, supported, 2-28
Enterprise Manager Migrate Database
wizard, 3-11
failure groups
examples, 2-26
identifying, 2-26
identifying available disks on Solaris, 2-28, 2-31
identifying disks on Solaris, 2-28, 2-31
installation, testing, 3-13
installing, 3-9 to ??
managing, 5-3
migrating existing databases to, 3-11
mirroring, 2-24
Optimal Flexible Architecture file naming
conventions, D-6
Oracle Clusterware, 1-6
Oracle home location for new installation, 3-9
partition creation, 2-28
password file, 3-9
recommendations for disk groups, 2-24
redundancy levels, 2-24
removing, 6-2
response files, A-2
running multiple databases on a single
server, 3-9
SAN disks, 2-28
space required for preconfigured database, 2-25
SPFILE server parameter file, 3-9
starting and stopping, 5-3
storage option for data files, 2-20
upgrade advantages with separate Oracle
homes, 3-9
Automatic Storage Management (ASM)
ASM disk group templates, 1-6
templates, 1-6
Automatic Storage Management disk groups
about, 1-6
creating, 3-9
managing, 5-3
Automatic Storage Management failure groups
about, 1-6
Automatic Storage Management instance
about, 1-7
creating, 3-9
B
backups of database
Oracle Database Recovery Manager,
base directory
See Oracle base directory
Bash shell
default user startup file, 2-39
.bash_profile file, 2-39
Basic installation type
H-6
Index-1
noninteractive installations, A-5
block device
device name on Solaris, 2-28, 2-31, 2-34
Bourne shell
default user startup file, 2-39
C
C shell
default user startup file, 2-39
CD-ROMs
mounting, 3-4
certification, hardware and software, 1-12
character device
device name on Solaris, 2-28, 2-31, 2-34
Character Set Scanner, 1-13
chmod command, 2-19, 2-22, 2-29
chown command, 2-19, 2-22, 2-29
CLASSPATH environment variable, 4-7
client static library, generating, 4-3
cloning
Oracle home, B-1
Cluster Manager
ports, ranges and protocol, E-4
Cluster Ready Services (CSS). See Oracle Clusterware
Cluster Synchronization Services (CSS)
Automatic Storage Management, 1-6
ports, ranges and protocol, E-4
clusters
installation guidelines, 3-2
See also Oracle Clusterware, Oracle Real
Application Clusters
Clusterware
installed before Oracle Database, 3-2
Clusterware. See Oracle Clusterware
compilers
GNU Compiler Collection (GCC), 4-8
primary, 4-8
computers with multiple aliases, 2-9
computers, non-networked, 2-9
configuration assistants
failure, G-4
troubleshooting, G-3
configuring disks for Automatic Storage
Management, 2-23 to ??, 2-28
Connection Manager
ports, ranges and protocol, E-2
connectivity tools
Oracle Procedural Gateway, H-8
Oracle Transparent Gateway, H-8
See also databases, non-Oracle
control files
locating, 5-10
naming, D-6
raw devices for
on Solaris, 2-30, 2-35
reviewing, 5-8
using Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control
with, 5-10
CONTROL_FILES initialization parameter, 5-10
Index-2
CSD
download location for WebSphere MQ
on Solaris, 2-7
requirements
on Solaris, 2-7
custom database
failure groups for Automatic Storage
Management, 2-26
requirements when using Automatic Storage
Management, 2-25
Custom installation type
reasons for choosing, 2-10
custom.rsp file, A-4
D
DAS (direct attached storage) disks, 2-28
data files
creating separate directories for, 2-22
defined, 5-8
managing with Automatic Storage
Management, 1-5
minimum disk space for, 2-21
naming, D-6
options for placing on file system, 2-20
recommendations for file system, 2-21
reviewing, 5-8
setting permissions on data file directories, 2-22
setting up, 5-8
Data Guard
ports, ranges and protocol, E-2
data loss
minimizing with Automatic Storage
Management, 2-25
Data Mining Scoring Engine
about, H-6
installing, H-6
Data Mining Scoring Engine, installation
guidelines, 3-2
data mining tools
Data Mining Scoring Engine, H-6
Oracle Data Mining, H-6
data warehousing tool
Oracle OLAP, H-5
Database Configuration Assistant
running in silent mode, A-8
troubleshooting, G-3
databases
administrative information, D-2
Automatic Storage Management
requirements, 2-25
files, 5-8
identifying, 5-7
initialization parameter file, 5-8
migrating non-Oracle databases to Oracle, H-3
non-Oracle
APPC-enabled, H-11
iWay, H-10
non-Oracle, listed, H-9
OLAP support (Oracle OLAP), H-5
Optimal Flexible Architecture file naming
conventions, D-6
recovery with Oracle Backup and Recovery, H-6
redo log files, 5-9
removing, 6-2
security management, H-5
tablespaces, 5-8
DB_DOMAIN initialization parameter, 5-7
DB_NAME initialization parameter, 5-7
DB2 database, H-9
DB2 z/OS database, H-9
DB2/400 database, H-10
dba group
and Automatic Storage Management disks on
Solaris, 2-29
and SYSDBA privilege, 2-10
creating, 2-12
description, 2-10
raw device group
on Solaris, 2-36
DBCA_RAW_CONFIG environment variable, 2-40
on Solaris, 2-37
on SPARC, 2-33
dbca.rsp file, A-4
DBSNMP user password, 3-6
default file mode creation mask
setting, 2-38
deprecated and desupported components, 14
device names
on Solaris, 2-28, 2-31, 2-34
DHCP computers, installing on, 2-9
directory
creating separate data file directories, 2-22
database file directory, 2-21
Oracle base directory, 2-16
Oracle home directory, 2-17
Oracle Inventory directory, 2-17
oraInventory, 2-17
permission for data file directories, 2-22
disk devices
in Automatic Storage Management, 1-6
managing with Automatic Storage
Management, 1-5
disk mirroring, D-9
disk space
checking, 2-3
requirement for Oracle base directory, 2-18, 2-19
requirements for preconfigured database in
Automatic Storage Management, 2-25
disk striping, D-9
disks
changing permissions and owner for Automatic
Storage Management
on Solaris, 2-29
checking availability for Automatic Storage
Management on Solaris, 2-28, 2-31
checking availability for raw devices on
Solaris, 2-33
configuring for Automatic Storage
Management, 2-23 to ??, 2-28
configuring for Automatic Storage Management on
Solaris, 2-28
configuring raw devices on Solaris, 2-29
device names on Solaris, 2-34
identifying file systems on Solaris, 2-29, 2-31, 2-34
identifying LVM disks on Solaris, 2-28, 2-34
supported for Automatic Storage
Management, 2-28
DISPLAY environment variable
setting, 2-38, 2-39
Distributed Computing Environment (DCE), 14
DOMAIN_NAME initialization parameter, 5-7
drive failure safeguards, D-2
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol. See DHCP
E
e-business integration workflows, H-8
enterprise.rsp file, A-4
env command, 2-41
environment
checking settings, 2-41
configuring for oracle user, 2-38
environment variables
DBCA_RAW_CONFIG, 2-33, 2-37
DISPLAY, 2-38, 2-39
NLS_LANG, F-1
ORACLE_BASE, 2-17, 2-19, 2-38
ORACLE_HOME, 2-38, 2-40
ORACLE_HOSTNAME, 2-9
ORACLE_SID, 2-38
PATH, 2-38
removing from shell startup file, 2-39
SHELL, 2-39
TEMP and TMPDIR, 2-3, 2-40
TNS_ADMIN, 2-40
errors
configuration assistants, G-3
installation, G-2, G-3, G-4
noninteractive installation, G-4
silent mode, G-4
X Window, G-1
X Window display errors, G-1
/etc/system file, 2-15, 2-16
EXAMPLE tablespace
raw device for
on Solaris, 2-30, 2-35
examples
Automatic Storage Management failure
groups, 2-26
Oracle base directories, 2-16
external jobs
operating system user required for, 2-10
external redundancy
Automatic Storage Management redundancy
level, 2-24
extjob executable
operating system user required for, 2-10
Index-3
F
failure group
examples of Automatic Storage Management
failure groups, 2-26
failure groups
characteristics of Automatic Storage Management
failure group, 2-25
examples in Automatic Storage
Management, 2-26
in Automatic Storage Management, 1-6
FAQ for installation, H-1
fatal errors, G-4
features
deprecated, 14
file mode creation mask
setting, 2-38
file naming, D-2
file sets, 2-4
file system
appropriate for Oracle base directory, 2-19
data file and recovery file placement
options, 2-20
identifying formatted devices on Solaris, 2-29,
2-31, 2-34
NFS, 1-13
organization, D-1
requirements for Oracle base directory, 2-19
using for data files, 2-21
writing to, 1-13
files, D-6
$ORACLE_HOME/dbs/initsid.ora, 5-8
$ORACLE_HOME/install/portlist.ini, 5-2
.bash_profile, 2-39
contol, D-6
control, 5-10
control files
raw devices for on Solaris, 2-30, 2-35
custom.rsp, A-4
data files, D-6
dbca.rsp, A-4
editing shell startup file, 2-39
enterprise.rsp, A-4
/etc/group, D-5
/etc/passwd, D-5
/etc/system, 2-15, 2-16
listener.ora, 4-4
.login, 2-39
mgw.ora, 4-7
oraInst.loc, 2-12, 2-18
oraInst.loc file, A-3
oratab, 2-18
password file
raw device for on Solaris, 2-30, 2-35
.profile, 2-39
raw device mapping file, 2-40
on Solaris, 2-36
redo log, 5-9
redo log files
raw devices for on Solaris, 2-30, 2-35
response files, A-4
Index-4
server parameter file
raw devices for on Solaris, 2-30, 2-35
SPFILE
raw device for on Solaris, 2-30
raw devices for on Solaris, 2-35
spnc_commands, 4-8
standard.rsp, A-4
tnsnames.ora, 4-4
/var/opt/oracle/oraInst.loc, G-3
format command, 2-28, 2-31, 2-33
frequently asked installation questions, H-1
G
Gateways products FAQ, H-8
GCC
postinstallation tasks, 4-8
GCC See GNU Compiler Collection (GCC)
global database name, 5-7
globalization support, F-1
GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) configuration, 4-8
Grid Control. See Oracle Enterprise Manager Grid
Control
group file, D-5
groups
checking for existing oinstall group, 2-12
creating the dba group, 2-12
creating the oinstall group, 2-11
H
hardware certification, 1-12
hardware requirements, 2-2
high redundancy
Automatic Storage Management redundancy
level, 2-24
home directory
distribution, D-2
login, D-2
See Oracle home directory
host name, setting before installation, 2-9
I
IBM DB2 database, H-9
IBM DB2 z/OS database, H-9
IBM DB2/400 database, H-10
IBM DRDA databases, connecting to, H-9
IBM mainframe data, connecting to, H-11
IBM WebSphere MQ Series databases, H-10
id command, 2-14
Informix Server database, H-11
Ingres II database, H-12
initialization parameter file
description, 5-8
in databases, 5-8
initsid.ora, 5-8
initialization parameters
DB_NAME, 5-7
DOMAIN_NAME, 5-7
SERVICE_NAMES, 5-7
initsid.ora file, 5-8
initsid.ora initialization parameter file, 5-8
installation
accessing installation software, 3-2
Automatic Storage Management
requirements, 2-25
available products, 1-3
cleaning up after a failed installation, G-5
clusters, installation guidelines, 3-2
completing, 3-8
component-specific guidelines, 3-1
computer aliases, multiple, 2-9
considerations, 1-11
errors, G-3, G-4
silent mode, G-4
FAQ for Oracle Database products, H-1
guidelines, 3-6
laptops, 2-9
log files, G-2
noninteractive
error handling, G-4
oraInst.loc file, A-3
reinstalling Oracle software, 3-2
response files, A-1, A-4
preparing, A-4, A-5
silent mode, G-4
templates, A-4
silent mode, A-6, A-7
upgrading, H-3
with other components, H-1
installation errors
steps to resolve, G-2
installation guidelines, 3-6, 3-7
Oracle Label Security, 3-6
Oracle Universal Installer, 3-6
re-installing Oracle software, 3-7
installation overview, 1-1
installation software
copying to a hard disk, 3-5
extracting, 3-3
re-installing, 3-7
installation software, accessing, 3-2
installation types
disk space requirements, 2-4
instance
instance identifier (SID), 2-38
instfix command, 2-7
I/O loads, D-3
Optimal Flexible Architecture, D-2
IP addresses, multiple, 2-9
IPC protocol address
Oracle Messaging Gateway setting, 4-6
iSQL*Plus
ports, changing, E-5
ports, ranges and protocol, E-3
iWay databases, H-10
J
font package requirements for Solaris, 2-5
Java Libraries for Oracle JVM and Oracle interMedia
postinstallation tasks, 4-5
JDK
font packages required on Solaris, 2-5
internationalization class, 4-7
run-time class, 4-7
JDK requirements, 2-4
JPublisher, H-7
K
kernel parameters
checking on Solaris, 2-15, 2-16
configuring on Solaris, 2-14
making changes persist on Solaris, 2-15, 2-16
Korn shell
default user startup file, 2-39
L
languages
installing Oracle components in different
languages, F-2
laptops, installing Oracle Database on, 2-9
Legato Single Server Version (LSSV), 14
licensing information, 1-3
listener
identifying Oracle home for, 2-38
lsnrctl command, 2-38
stopping, 2-37, 2-38
stopping existing listener process, 2-37
listener.ora file, 4-4
modifying for external procedures, 4-6
local device
using for data files, 2-21
log files, G-2
troubleshooting, G-3
logical volume manager
See LVM
logical volumes
creating on Solaris, 2-35
.login file, 2-39
loopback adapters
non-networked computers, 2-9
lsnrctl command, 2-38
LVM
configuring raw devices on Solaris, 2-29
creating a volume group on Solaris, 2-33
creating raw logical volumes on Solaris, 2-35
creating volume groups on Solaris, 2-34
identifying available disks on Solaris, 2-33
identifying volume group devices on
Solaris, 2-28, 2-34
initializing disks on Solaris, 2-34
recommendations for Automatic Storage
Management, 2-24
Veritas Volume Manager on Solaris, 2-28, 2-34
Java
Index-5
M
mapping file
for raw devices, 2-40
on Solaris, 2-36
mask
setting default file mode creation mask, 2-38
memory requirements, 2-2
MGW_AGENT service name, 4-6
mgwextproc service
adding static service information, 4-6
mgw.ora file
modifying, 4-7
Microsoft SQL Server database, H-11
migrating
See upgrading
migrating applications to Oracle, H-8
migrating databases to Oracle, H-3
mirroring Automatic Storage Management disk
groups, 2-24
mkdir command, 2-19, 2-22
mode
setting default file mode creation mask, 2-38
mount point
for Oracle base directory, 2-16
mount point directories, 3-5
mount point directory
choosing, C-2
mount points
Optimal Flexible Architecture conventions for
creating, D-3
MQSeries
class, 4-7
multihomed computers, installing on, 2-9
multiple aliases, computers with, 2-9
multiple Oracle homes, 1-12
N
naming subdirectories, D-5
NAS devices
creating files on for use with Automatic Storage
Management, C-4
guidelines for configuration, C-1
Natively Compiled Java Libraries, H-7
Net Configuration Assistant
troubleshooting, G-3
Net Configuration Assistant (NetCA)
response files, A-8
running at command prompt, A-8
netca.rsp file, A-4
network adapters
computers with multiple aliases, 2-9
non-networked computers, 2-9
primary, on computers with multiple aliases, 2-9
See also loopback adapters, primary network
adapters
network attached storage devices
See NAS devices
network cards, multiple, 2-9
Network File System See NFS
Index-6
network setup
about, 2-8
computers with multiple aliases, 2-9
network topics
DHCP computers, 2-9
laptops, 2-9
multiple network cards, 2-9
non-networked computers, 2-9
NFS
mount options, C-5
using for installation, 1-13
NLS_LANG environment variable, F-1
NLS_LANG parameter
about, F-1
nobody user
checking existence of, 2-14
description, 2-10
noninteractive installation
oraInst.loc file, A-3
response files
preparing, A-4, A-5
templates, A-4
silent mode, A-6, A-7
errors, G-4
noninteractive mode
about, A-1
reasons for using, A-2
See also response files, silent mode, A-1
non-networked computers, 2-9
non-Oracle databases, listed, H-9
normal redundancy, Automatic Storage Management
redundancy level, 2-24
O
OEM
See Oracle Enterprise Manager
oinstall group
checking for existing, 2-12
creating, 2-11
description, 2-10
OLAP tools
Oracle OLAP, H-2, H-5
OLS
See Oracle Label Security
OMF
See Oracle Managed Files
oper group
and SYSOPER privilege, 2-10
creating, 2-12
description, 2-10
operating system
checking version of Solaris, 2-5
operating system groups
creating the dba group, 2-12
creating the oinstall group, 2-11
oinstall, 2-10
OSDBA, 2-10
OSOPER, 2-10
osoper, 2-10
requirements, 2-10
operating system requirements, 2-4
operating system users
checking existence of the nobody user, 2-14
creating the oracle user, 2-13
nobody, 2-10
oracle, 2-11
requirements, 2-10
root user, 3-7
unprivileged user, 2-10
Optimal Flexible Architecture
administrative information, D-2
Automatic Storage Management, D-6
changes for Oracle Database 10g, D-3
characteristics of an installation compliant
with, D-1
concurrent execution of application software, D-2
conventions for creating mount points, D-3
distributed I/O loads, D-2
drive failure safeguards, D-2
file identification, D-7
file mapping, D-2, D-8
file naming, D-2
file system organization, D-1
files systems, D-4
hardware support, D-2
home directory distribution, D-2
I/O loads, D-3
login home directories, D-2
naming, D-3
database files, D-6
Oracle base directory, D-4
subdirectories, D-5
tablespaces, D-7
very large databases, D-4
Oracle Managed Files, D-6
pathnames, D-5
recommendations for Oracle base directory, 2-16
recommended path for Oracle base
directory, 2-16
recommended path for Oracle home
directory, 2-17
recommended path for Oracle Inventory
directory, 2-17
special tablespaces, D-7
standard, D-1
tablespace contents, D-2
UNIX directory subtrees, D-2
using seperate segments, D-7
Oracle Advanced Security
deprecated component, 14
Oracle Application Server, H-4
Oracle applications
APPC-enabled systems, connecting to, H-11
IBM DRDA databases, connecting to, H-9
Oracle applications, installing with Oracle
Database, H-7
Oracle base directory
and ORACLE_BASE environment variable, 2-17
creating, 2-19
creating new, 2-19
description, 2-16
determining disk space on, 2-19
disk space requirements, 2-18, 2-19
equivalent directory on Microsoft Windows, 2-16
examples, 2-16
identifying appropriate file system, 2-19
identifying existing, 2-18
mount point for, 2-16
naming conventions, D-4
recommended path, 2-16
relationship with Oracle software owner
user, 2-16
requirement for, 2-16
requirements for existing directory, 2-18
requirements on file system, 2-19
Oracle Cluster Registry
See OCR
Oracle Cluster Registry port, E-4
Oracle Clusterware
about, H-3
ports, E-4
ports, ranges and protocol, E-4
used with Automatic Storage Management, 1-6
used with Oracle Real Application Clusters, H-3
Oracle Connection Manager, installation
guidelines, 3-2
Oracle CSS Daemon
configuration, deleting, 6-6
Oracle Data Mining
about, H-6
installing, H-6
Oracle Database
administering and monitoring, H-4
AS/400 applications, H-8
creating data file directories, 2-22
Custom installation, 1-3
Enterprise Edition installation, 1-3
installing with Oracle applications, H-7
installing with other Oracle components, H-1
minimum disk space requirements, 2-21
multiple databases on a single server with
Automatic Storage Management, 3-9
privileged groups, 2-10
requirements with Automatic Storage
Management, 2-25
security management, H-5
setting ORACLE_SID environment variable, 2-38
Standard Edition installation, 1-3
upgrading, H-3
Web application development tools (HTML
DB), H-7
Web servers, H-8
workflows, H-8
Oracle Database Client, H-2
Oracle Database Companion CD
components, H-7
Oracle Database components
administering and monitoring, H-4
connectivity FAQ, H-8
Index-7
FAQ for installing, H-1
FAQ on installing, H-1
installing with Oracle applications, H-7
installing with Oracle Database tools, H-4
Oracle Database Configuration Assistant
response file, A-4
Oracle Database Examples, H-7
Oracle Database Recovery Manager (RMAN)
about, H-6
Automatic Storage Management, 1-7, 3-11
Oracle Enterprise Management Agent
HTTP port, changing, E-4
ports
ranges and protocol, E-2
Oracle Enterprise Manager, 1-8
Database Control
logging into, 5-1
port number, 5-1
using to modify control files, 5-10
using to modify redo log files, 5-10
using to view control files, 5-10
using to view redo log files, 5-10
database migration to Automatic Storage
Management, 3-11
login privileges, 5-2
Migrate Wizard, 3-11
Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Console
ports, ranges and protocol, E-2
Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control
ports, changing, E-4
Oracle Enterprise Manager Migrate Database
wizard, 3-11
Oracle Event Manager
ports, ranges and protocol, E-4
Oracle home
cloning, B-1
Oracle home directory
Automatic Storage Management
considerations, 3-9
description, 2-17
identifying for listener, 2-38
multiple homes, network considerations, 2-9
recommended path, 2-17
requirement for, 2-17
requirements, 2-17
using to identify Oracle base directory, 2-18
Oracle home name, 2-17
Oracle host name, setting before installation, 2-9
Oracle HTML DB, H-7
Oracle HTTP Server, H-7, H-8
Oracle internationalization class, 4-7
Oracle Internet Directory, H-5
Oracle Inventory
description, 2-17
pointer file, 2-12
Oracle Inventory directory
description, 2-17
recommended path, 2-17
Oracle Inventory group
checking for existing, 2-12
Index-8
creating, 2-11, 2-12
description, 2-10
Oracle JDBC class, 4-7
Oracle JDBC development drivers, H-7
Oracle Label Security
installation guidelines, 3-2, 3-6
post-installation tasks, 4-5
Oracle Managed Files
Optimal Flexible Architecture naming
conventions, D-6
Oracle Messaging Gateway
CSD requirements
on Solaris, 2-7
postinstallation tasks, 4-5
Oracle Messaging Gateway class, 4-7
Oracle Migration Workbench, H-3, H-8
Oracle Net
configuration file directory, 4-4
identifying Oracle home for listener, 2-38
lsnrctl command, 2-38
stopping existing listener, 2-37
stopping listener, 2-37
stopping the listener, 2-38
Oracle Net Configuration Assistant
response file, A-4
Oracle Net Services
post-installation tasks, 4-4
Oracle OLAP, H-2, H-5
Oracle Precompilers
postinstallation tasks, 4-7
Oracle Procedural Gateway
about, H-8
listed products, H-9
Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC)
installed before Oracle Database, 3-2
installing with Oracle Enterprise Manager, H-4
Oracle Clusterware
about, H-3
ports, ranges and protocol, E-4
Oracle software
removing, 6-6
Oracle Software Owner user
and Automatic Storage Management disks, 2-29
creating, 2-13
raw device owner
on Solaris, 2-36
Oracle software owner user
configuring environment for, 2-38
creating, 2-13
description, 2-11
determining default shell, 2-39
relationship with Oracle base directory, 2-16
Oracle SQL*Net Listener
ports, ranges and protocol, E-2
Oracle SQLJ, H-7
Oracle Storage Compatibility Program (OSCP)
certification of NAS devices, C-1
Oracle Text Supplied Knowledge Bases, H-7
Oracle Text supplied knowledge bases
postinstallation tasks, 4-5
Oracle Transparent Gateway
about, H-8
listed products, H-9
Oracle Ultra Search, H-7
ports, changing, E-5
ports, ranges and protocol, E-3
Oracle Universal Installer
Automatic Storage Management behavior, 3-9
guidelines for using, 3-1
installation guidelines, 3-1, 3-6
response files, A-1
list of, A-4
running, 3-7
running in different languages, F-2
oracle user
and Automatic Storage Management disks, 2-29
configuring environment for, 2-38
creating, 2-13
description, 2-11
determining default shell, 2-39
relationship with Oracle base directory, 2-16
Oracle Workflow, H-7, H-8
Oracle XML DB
ports, E-6
ports, changing, E-6
ports, ranges and protocol, E-3
ORACLE_BASE environment variable, 2-17, 2-19
removing from shell startup file, 2-39
setting, 2-38
ORACLE_HOME environment variable
removing from shell startup file, 2-39
setting, 2-38
unsetting, 2-40
ORACLE_HOSTNAME environment variable
about, 2-9
computers with multiple aliases, 2-9
multihomed computers, 2-9
setting before installation, 2-9
ORACLE_SID environment variable
removing from shell startup file, 2-39
setting, 2-38
oraInst.loc file, 2-18
location, 2-12
location of, 2-12
oraInventory directory
See Oracle Inventory directory
oratab file, 2-18
formats, 2-18
location of, 2-18
OSDBA group
and Automatic Storage Management disks on
Solaris, 2-29
and SYSDBA privilege, 2-10
creating, 2-12
description, 2-10
raw device group
on Solaris, 2-36
OSOPER group
and SYSOPER privilege, 2-10
description, 2-10
OTN Web site
downloading installation software from, 3-2
OUI
See Oracle Universal Installer
P
packages
checking on Solaris, 2-5
partition
using with Automatic Storage Management, 2-24
partitions
creation for Automatic Storage Management
disks, 2-28
slices on Solaris, 2-29, 2-32, 2-34
passwd command, 2-13
passwd file, D-5
password file
raw device for
on Solaris, 2-30, 2-35
password file for Automatic Storage
Management, 3-9
passwords
DBSNMP, 3-6
guidelines, 3-6
resetting, 5-6
with Database Control, 5-6
with SQL*Plus, 5-7
reviewing, 5-3
specifying for response files, A-2
SYS, 3-6
SYSMAN, 3-6
SYSTEM, 3-6
unlocking, 5-6
with Database Control, 5-6
with SQL*Plus, 5-7
See alsosecurity
patchadd command, 2-7
patches
download location for Solaris, 2-7
PATH environment variable
setting, 2-38
pathnames
Optimal Flexible Architecture, D-5
permissions
for data file directories, 2-22
for Oracle base directory, 2-19
pkginfo command, 2-5
PL/SQL native compilaton, 4-8
port numbers
managing, E-1
portlist.ini file, 5-2, E-2
ports
access URLs, E-2
Cluster Manager, ranges and protocol, E-4
Cluster Synchronization Services, ranges and
protocol, E-4
configured for applications, E-2
Connection Manager, ranges and protocol, E-2
Data Guard, ranges and protocol, E-2
Index-9
default ranges, E-1
iSQL*Plus, changing, E-5
iSQL*Plus, ranges and protocol, E-3
Oracle Cluster Registry, E-4
Oracle Clusterware, E-4
Oracle Clusterware, ranges and protocol, E-4
Oracle Enterprise Management Agent HTTP,
changing, E-4
Oracle Enterprise Management Agent, ranges and
protocol, E-2
Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Console,
ranges and protocol, E-2
Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control,
changing, E-4
Oracle Event Manager, ranges and protocol, E-4
Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC), ranges
and protocol, E-4
Oracle SQL*Net Listener, ranges and
protocol, E-2
Oracle Ultra Search, changing, E-5
Oracle Ultra Search, ranges and protocol, E-3
Oracle XML DB, E-6
Oracle XML DB, changing, E-6
Oracle XML DB, ranges and protocol, E-3
post-installation
recommended tasks
user accounts, setting up, 4-3
required tasks, 4-1
Oracle Label Security, configuring, 4-5
Oracle Net Services, configuring, 4-4
patches, installing and downloading, 4-1
postinstallation
recommended tasks
client static library, generating, 4-3
root.sh script, backing up, 4-2
required tasks
configuring GCC as the primary compiler, 4-8
configuring Oracle Messaging Gateway, 4-5
installing natively compiled Java Libraries for
Oracle JVM and Oracle interMedia, 4-5
installing Oracle Text supplied knowledge
bases, 4-5
Oracle Precompilers, 4-7
preconfigured database
Automatic Storage Management disk space
requirements, 2-25
requirements when using Automatic Storage
Management, 2-25
privilege, 2-10
privileged groups
for Oracle Database, 2-10
Pro*C/C++
configuring, 4-7
patches required on Solaris, 2-7
See also C compiler
process
stopping existing, 2-37
stopping existing listener process, 2-37
stopping listener process, 2-37
processor
Index-10
checking system architecture, 2-4
.profile file, 2-39
program technical fix
See PTF
ps command, 2-38
R
RAC
configuring disks for Automatic Storage
Management on Solaris, 2-30
RAID
recommended Automatic Storage Management
redundancy level, 2-24
using for Oracle data files, 2-21
RAM requirements, 2-2
raw device
for password file
on Solaris, 2-30, 2-35
for server parameter file
on Solaris, 2-30, 2-35
for SPFILE
on Solaris, 2-30, 2-35
raw devices
block and character device names on Solaris, 2-34
checking disk availability on Solaris, 2-33
configuring on Solaris, 2-29
creating a raw device mapping file
on Solaris, 2-36
creating logical volumes on Solaris, 2-35
creating raw logical volumes on Solaris, 2-35
DBCA_RAW_CONFIG environment
variable, 2-40
for control files
on Solaris, 2-30, 2-35
for EXAMPLE tablespace
on Solaris, 2-30, 2-35
for redo log files
on Solaris, 2-30, 2-35
for SYSAUX tablespace
on Solaris, 2-30, 2-35
for SYSTEM tablespace
on Solaris, 2-30, 2-35
for TEMP tablespace
on Solaris, 2-30, 2-35
for UNDOTBS tablespace
on Solaris, 2-30, 2-35
for USER tablespace
on Solaris, 2-30, 2-35
identifying disks on Solaris, 2-33
initializing disks for LVM on Solaris, 2-34
required sizes
on Solaris, 2-35
specifing location of mapping file, 2-40
specifying owner and permissions on
Solaris, 2-36
storage option for data files, 2-20
value for DBCA_RAW_CONFIG environment
variable
on Solaris, 2-37
on SPARC, 2-33
raw partitions
configuring on Solaris, 2-30
Rdb database, H-12
readme.txt file, E-2
reboot command, 2-15
reconfiguring CSS, 6-4
recovery files
options for placing on file system, 2-20
recovery of databases
Oracle Backup and Recovery, H-6
redo log, D-6
redo log files
in starter database, 5-9
locating, 5-9
naming, D-6
raw devices for
on Solaris, 2-30, 2-35
reviewing, 5-8
using Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control
with, 5-10
redundancy level
and space requirements for preconfigured
database, 2-25
for Automatic Storage Management, 2-24
redundant array of independent disks
See RAID
reinstalling Oracle software, 3-2
requirements
hardware, 2-2
response files
about, A-1
Automatic Storage Management, A-2
creating with template, A-4
custom.rsp, A-4
dbca.rsp, A-4
enterprise.rsp, A-4
general procedure, A-3
Net Configuration Assistant, A-8
netca.rsp, A-4
passing values at command line, A-2
passwords, A-2
security, A-2
specifying with Oracle Universal Installer, A-6
standard.rsp, A-4
See also silent mode, noninteractive mode, A-1
response files installation
about, A-1
RMS database, H-12
roadmap for installing Oracle Database
components, H-1
root user, 3-7
logging in as, 2-1
root.sh script
backing up, 4-2
S
SAN (storage area network) disks,
security
2-28
management tools, H-5
See alsopasswords
seminfo_semmni parameter
recommended value on Solaris, 2-14, 2-15
seminfo_semmns parameter
recommended value on Solaris, 2-14
seminfo_semmsl parameter
recommended value on Solaris, 2-14, 2-15
seminfo_semvmx parameter
recommended value on Solaris, 2-14
semmni parameter
recommended value on Solaris, 2-14, 2-15
semmns parameter
recommended value on Solaris, 2-14
semmsl parameter
recommended value on Solaris, 2-14, 2-15
semvmx parameter
recommended value on Solaris, 2-14
server parameter file
raw device for
on Solaris, 2-30, 2-35
server parameter file (SPFILE), 3-9
SERVICE_NAMES initialization parameter, 5-7
shell
determining default shell for oracle user, 2-39
SHELL environment variable
checking value of, 2-39
shell startup file
editing, 2-39
removing environment variables, 2-39
shminfo_shmmax parameter
recommended value on Solaris, 2-14, 2-15
shminfo_shmmin parameter
recommended value on Solaris, 2-14
shminfo_shmmni parameter
recommended value on Solaris, 2-14, 2-15
shminfo_shmseg parameter
recommended value on Solaris, 2-14
shmmax parameter
recommended value on Solaris, 2-14, 2-15
shmmin parameter
recommended value on Solaris, 2-14
shmmni parameter
recommended value on Solaris, 2-14, 2-15
shmseg parameter
recommended value on Solaris, 2-14
SID, 5-8
setting ORACLE_SID environment variable, 2-38
silent mode
about, A-1
reasons for using, A-2
See also noninteractive mode, response files, A-1
silent mode installation, A-6, A-7
software certification, 1-12
software requirements, 2-4
checking software requirements, 2-5
Solaris
block and character device names, 2-28, 2-31, 2-34
checking disk availability for Automatic Storage
Management, 2-28, 2-31
Index-11
checking disk availability for raw devices, 2-33
checking kernel parameters, 2-15, 2-16
checking version, 2-5
configuring disks for Automatic Storage
Management, 2-28
configuring kernel parameters, 2-14
configuring raw devices, 2-29
configuring raw partitions, 2-30
creating a raw device mapping file, 2-36
creating a volume group, 2-33
creating logical volumes, 2-35
creating raw logical volumes, 2-35
creating volume groups, 2-34
font packages for Java, 2-5
identifying disks for Automatic Storage
Management, 2-28, 2-31
identifying disks for LVM, 2-33
identifying file systems, 2-29, 2-31, 2-34
identifying LVM disks, 2-28, 2-34
initializing disks for LVM, 2-34
making kernel parameter changes persist, 2-15,
2-16
patch download location, 2-7
raw device sizes, 2-35
specifying owner and permissions on raw
devices, 2-36
Veritas Volume Manager, 2-28, 2-34
SPFILE
raw device for
on Solaris, 2-30, 2-35
SPFILE server parameter file, 3-9
spnc_commands configuration file, 4-8
SQL Server database, H-11
SQLJ class, 4-7
standard.rsp files, A-4
startup file
for shell, 2-39
static service information
adding for mgwextproc service, 4-6
storage area network disks, 2-28
storage management See Automatic Storage
Management
suppressed mode
reasons for using, A-2
suppressed mode. See noninteractive mode
swap space
checking, 2-3
requirements, 2-2
Sybase Adapter Server database, H-11
SYS user password, 3-6
SYSAUX tablespace
raw device for
on Solaris, 2-30, 2-35
SYSDBA privilege
associated operating system group, 2-10
sysdef command, 2-15, 2-16
SYSMAN user password, 3-6
SYSOPER privilege
associated operating system group, 2-10
system architecture
Index-12
checking, 2-4
system file, 2-15, 2-16
System Identifier, 5-8
See SID
SYSTEM tablespace
raw device for
on Solaris, 2-30, 2-35
SYSTEM user password, 3-6
T
tablespaces
defined, 5-8
in databases, 5-8
reviewing, 5-8
setting up, 5-8
Optimal Flexible Architecture
naming, D-7
special tablespaces, D-7
TEMP environment variable, 2-3
setting, 2-40
TEMP tablespace
raw device for
on Solaris, 2-30, 2-35
temporary disk space
requirements, 2-2
Teradata database, H-11
TMPDIR environment variable, 2-3
setting, 2-40
TNS_ADMIN environment variable
unsetting, 2-40
tnsnames.ora file, 4-4
adding a connect descriptor, 4-6
MGW_AGENT service name, 4-6
modifying for external procedures, 4-6
troubleshooting, G-1
fatal errors, G-4
U
umask, 2-41
umask command, 2-38, 2-41
uname command, 2-5
UNDOTBS tablespace
raw device for
on Solaris, 2-30, 2-35
UNIX commands, 2-41
chmod, 2-19, 2-22, 2-29
chown, 2-19, 2-22, 2-29
env, 2-41
format, 2-28, 2-31, 2-33
id, 2-14
instfix, 2-7
mkdir, 2-19, 2-22
passwd, 2-13
patchadd, 2-7
pkginfo, 2-5
ps, 2-38
reboot, 2-15
sysdef, 2-15, 2-16
umask, 2-38
uname, 2-5
unset, 2-40
unsetenv, 2-40
useradd, 2-13
vxassist, 2-35
vxdg, 2-34
vxdisk, 2-28, 2-34
vxdiskadd, 2-34
vxdiskconfig, 2-34
xhost, 2-1
xterm, 2-2
UNIX directory subtrees, D-2
UNIX groups
checking for existing oinstall group, 2-12
creating the dba group, 2-12
UNIX users
creating the oracle user, 2-13
UNIX workstation
installing from, 2-1
unprivileged user
checking existence of, 2-14
nobody user, 2-10
unset command, 2-40
unsetenv command, 2-40
upgraded databases
configuring, 4-2
upgrading, 1-13
advantages with separate Oracle homes, 3-9
USER tablespace
raw device for
on Solaris, 2-30, 2-35
useradd command, 2-13
users
checking existence of the nobody user, 2-14
creating the oracle user, 2-13
operating system nobody user, 2-10
Oracle software owner user, 2-11
UTLRP.SQL
recompiling invalid SQL modules, 4-2
VxVM, 2-28, 2-34
creating raw logical volumes on Solaris, 2-35
W
Web applications, Oracle HTML DB, H-7
Web servers (Oracle HTTP Server), H-8
WebSphere MQ
CSD download location
for Solaris, 2-7
CSDs required
on Solaris, 2-7
WebSphere MQ class, 4-7
WebSphere MQ Series database, H-10
Windows
analogy for Oracle base directory, 2-16
workflows
applications based, H-8
e-business integration, H-8
X
X Window
display errors, G-1
X Window system
enabling remote hosts, 2-1, 2-2
xhost command, 2-1
xterm command, 2-2
V
/var/opt/oracle/oraInst.loc file
reviewing log files, G-3
Veritas Volume Manager, 2-28, 2-34
very large databases
Optimal Flexible Architecture naming mount
points, D-4
volume group
creating on Solaris, 2-33
volume groups
creating on Solaris, 2-34
volumes
creating logical volumes on Solaris, 2-35
vxassist command, 2-35
vxdg command, 2-34
vxdisk command, 2-28, 2-34
vxdiskadd command, 2-34
vxdiskconfig command, 2-34
Index-13
Index-14
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