Model PM-1236 Lathe - Precision Matthews

Model PM-1236 Lathe
High precision gap-bed machine
36 in. between centers, 12 in. swing over bed, 17-1/2 in. over gap
2 HP (1500W) motor, 220 Vac single phase
Speed range from 65 to 1810 rpm
Power cross-feed, traveling motor controls
D1-4 camlock spindle mount, 1-1/2 inch spindle bore
Weight, including stand, 1200 lb
PM-1236 with optional coolant system, live center and QC toolpost
701 Parkway View Drive
Pittsburgh, PA 15205
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
Copyright © 2016 Quality Machine Tools, LLC
PM-1236
FAQ
My lathe doesn’t
run at all (1)
My lathe doesn’t
run at all (2)
Belt cover in place? This closes the interlock switch, bottom arrow.
FOOTBRAKE working, not stuck down?
If working properly, the footbrake should
close the microswitch, top arrow, opening
it when released.
The motor didn’t run when
power was connected
By design it should NOT run if the Motor
Control switch was UP or DOWN when
power is connected.
Electrical schematic, Section 5: Move
the Motor Control switch to neutral, mid
travel, to energise the power-switching contactor KA, thus restoring normal
conditions.
CHUCK GUARD swung back? Close the
guard.
POWER light off, bottom arrow?
240 Vac power connected?
Circuit breaker in the electrical box
tripped?
E-STOP button in, top arrow?
Rotate it, should pop out.
This manual contains essential safety advice on the proper setup, operation, maintenance, and service
of the PM-1236 lathe. Failure to read, understand and follow the manual may result in property damage
or serious personal injury.
There are many alternative ways to install and use a lathe. As the owner of the lathe you are solely responsible for its proper installation and safe use. Consider the material contained in this manual to be
advisory only. Precision Matthews, LLC cannot be held liable for injury or property damage during installation or use, or from negligence, improper training, machine modifications or misuse.
This manual describes PM-1236 machines as shipped from April 2016. There may be detail differences between your specific machine and the information given here (with little or no impact on
functionality). If you have questions about any aspect of the manual or your machine, please call
412-787-2876 (east coast time), or email us at admin@machinetoolonline.com. Your feedback is
welcomed!
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
Section 1 INSTALLATION
THESE ARE THE MAIN POINTS TO WATCH OUT FOR!
But read the following pages for more information
•
•
•
•
•
•
Handling the lathe is at least a two-man job.
Lifting gear – sling, hoist or forklift – must be rated for at least 1 ton.
Working location of the mill must allow space for removal of the belt cover at left, also access to the coolant system (back of right hand cabinet) and the electrical box at the back
of the headstock.
Power requirement is 240V, 60Hz, 1φ, 20A circuit protection (spindle motor 14A full load).
Extension cord not recommended; if no alternative, use 12 AWG not longer than 20 ft.
Before connecting power be sure that:
. The machine is on a firm footing, adequately secured to its stand.
2. Chuck camlocks tight, no wrench left in chuck.
3. Carriage and cross slide approx. mid-travel, power feed disengaged (Figure 1-10).
4. The headstock gear selectors are set for the lowest spindle speed.
SETTING UP THE LATHE
The PM-1236 is shipped in three packing cases, one for
the machine/chip tray/front panel/back splash, one each
for the left and right hand stand cabinets. The following procedure makes use of an engine hoist, minimum
weight rating 1 ton.
1. Prepare the working location for the stand. If you intend to use an engine hoist, there must be room for
the hoist, Figure 1-5. If not, a forklift and slings may
be a better option. If only an engine hoist is available, with limited space either side, the machine can
be fully assembled on a pair of 4-wheel dollies, then
rolled to its final position. The assembly can then be
raised by screw jack or other means to free the dollies.
2. Position the LH and RH stand cabinets 34 inches
apart in the lathe’s final location. Mark the floor to
allow the cabinets to be repositioned in the same
locations for final assembly, when the front panel
and footbrake components have been installed.
Figure 1-1 Coolant pump and tank
3. Remove the coolant tank and pump assembly, if
supplied, from the RH cabinet, Figure 1-1.
4. Highly recommended!
Install leveling mounts rated for 250 lb each at the
corners of the two stand cabinets. (Alternatively,
plan on using metal shims under the cabinets to
level the lathe after securing it to the cabinets.)
5. Install front panel brackets on the two cabinets, Figure 1-2, using four M6 screws and washers.
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Figure 1-2 In-facing side of cabinets
6. With the RH cabinet in its approximate final location,
insert the footbrake pivot shaft, then locate the other
end of the shaft in the LH cabinet while easing the
cabinet into its final location.
7. Install the front panel on the brackets using four M6
screws, washers and nuts.
8. Position the chip tray on the stands, aligning the
6 holes for mounting bolts with the corresponding
threaded holes on top of the cabinets..
9. Unpack the footbrake components stowed in the
LH cabinet, then assemble the drawbar (2 pieces),
crank and extension spring as Figure 1-3 (see Footbrake adjustment, next page, also Stand and Coolant Components diagram, Section 5).
Figure 1-3
Footbrake
components
10. Remove the packing case from the pallet, then unbolt the machine from the pallet.
11. Run two 1000 lb slings under the lathe bed and up
to the hoist hook. The slings must be inboard of the
leadscrew, feed shaft and motor control rod to
avoid damage to those components.
12. Slowly lift the lathe, controlling any tendency for it to
swing as it clears the pallet.
13. Roll the lathe into position, Figure 1-5, then hover it
an inch or so over the chip tray. This will allow you
to mark the perimeters of the lathe bed pedestals for
the purpose of caulking.
14. Apply a thick bead of silicone caulk just inside the
marked perimeters on the tray.
Figure 1-4 Hoisting the lathe
15. Lower the lathe onto the chip tray, making sure that
its six mounting holes are properly aligned. Excess
caulk squeezed out by the pedestals will form a
coolant-proof seal.
16. Install the six supplied M12 x 40 hex head bolts with
washers. Fully tighten the bolts. Re-check the caulking on both pedestals.
17. Install the backsplash using four M6 screws and
washers.
CLEANUP
Metal surfaces may be protected by thick grease and/
or paper. Carefully remove these using a plastic paint
scraper, disposable rags and a light-oil such as WD-40.
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Figure 1-5 Lowering onto stand
LEVELING
the floor.
4. Tighten all four socket heads on the connecting
sleeve.
5. While observing the footbrake switch as before, press
and release the treadle a few times to ensure that the
switch opens and closes reliably.
6. Lubricate the footbrake shaft.
Make sure the lathe is in its permanent location. The
leveling procedure ensures that the lathe bed is in the
same state as it was when the lathe was checked for accuracy in manufacture — level from end to end along the
bed, and from front to back. In other words, no warping.
Make sure all leveling mounts and/or shims are properly weight bearing, firmly in contact with the floor. Check
and adjust level from end to end using a “precision
machinist’s level”, if available. If not, use the most reliable level on hand. Check and adjust level front-to-back
across the bed using a matched pair of spacer blocks to
clear the Vee tenons on the bed ways. The blocks need
to be at least 1/4 inch thick, ground or otherwise accurately dimensioned. Alternatively, check for level on the
ground surface of the cross slide as the carriage is traversed from end to end. See also "Checking Alignment"
later in this section.
CONNECTING POWER
As shipped. the PM-1236 is set for 220 V. If your supply
is nominally 240 V, it may be desirable to alter connections to the 24V transformer in the electrical box.
If the lathe did not come with a pre-installed power cord,
connect to the power source using 12 AWG (minimum)
3-wire cord through a strain relief bushing sized for the
electrical box ports. Depending on installed options and
other factors, the entry point shown in Figure 1-7 may
not be available. Connect the ground wire (PE) to the
grounding plate at bottom left. Connect L1, L2 to the leftmost two terminals on the bottom terminal strip.
FOOTBRAKE ADJUSTMENT
This is a two-man procedure, see Figure 1-3:
. Unhook the extension spring 1, and fully loosen all
four socket heads on the connecting sleeve 2.
2. While observing the switch arm and follower, Figure
1-6, raise the drawbar 3, adjusting the stop screw 4
to stop further upward movement of the drawbar at
the point where the microswitch is actuated, but no
further (additional travel may bend the switch arm).
3. Hook the extension spring onto its anchor bolt, then
raise the footbrake treadle to the desired height off
Figure 1-7 Electrical box inputs/outputs
Figure 1-6 Footbrake switch
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This configuration may vary depending on installed options, etc.
INITIAL CHECKS
7. Check that there are no clamps or locks on moving
parts.
8. Check that the footbrake treadle is released (UP).
9. Set the carriage and cross slide to approximate
mid-travel.
0. Make certain that the power feed levers are disengaged, Figure 1-10.
. Make certain that the motor control switch is set to
OFF, mid-travel, Figure 1-9.
Read Section 3 if unsure about any item in the following
. Check oil level (sight glasses) in the headstock,
the carriage feed gearbox, and the apron. See
Section 4, Figures 4-1 to 4-6.
2. Remove the belt cover left of the headstock. Make
sure the belt is properly tensioned and set for the
desired speed range. If not, re-position the belt,
Figure 1-8, also see Figure 3-4.
Figure 1-8 Drive belt adjustment
Figure 1-9 Forward/Reverse motor control
Mid-travel OFF, Down FORWARD, Up REVERSE
3. Replace the belt cover.
4. If a chuck is installed check tightness of the three
Camlocks on the spindle nose, Figure 3-8.
5. Lower the chuck guard, if installed, Figure 1-9.
2. Connect 220 Vac power. The power lamp (far left
of the orange color E-Stop button) should light,
unless circuit breaker QF1 in the electrical box has
tripped.
3. Be sure the E-Stop button has not been pushed in
(it should pop out when twisted clockwise).
4. Shift the motor control lever DOWN. The spindle
should turn forward, counter clockwise, viewed at
the chuck (nose) end.
5. Check the emergency function by pressing the EStop button. The motor should stop. If this doesn’t
happen, the E-stop function is defective, and
needs attention.
6. Reset (twist) the E-Stop button to restore power.
7. Check that the chip guard switch stops the motor
when the guard is swung up.
8. Check that the belt cover interlock stops the motor
when the belt cover is removed.
9. Check that the footbrake stops the motor.
20. Return the motor control lever to OFF, mid-travel.
The motor should stop.
2. Shift the motor control lever UP. The spindle should
reverse, clockwise rotation, viewed at the chuck
(nose) end.
Figure 1-9 Chuck guard
6. Set the spindle speed gear levers to B-1. Depending on the drive belt configuration, High or Low
speed, this will give a speed of 65 or 100 rpm. Do
not change speed when the motor is running.
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OPTIONAL TEST RUN PROCEDURE
ALIGNING THE LATHE
Run the spindle for a few minutes, forward and reverse,
at a selection of the 9 speeds available for the as-shipped
Vee belt configuration. See Section 3 if a different configuration is preferred.
The most important attribute of a properly set up lathe
is its ability to “machine parallel”, to cut a cylinder of uniform diameter over its entire length. In other words, no
taper.
The carriage feed gearbox should also be run at this
time, but first make certain that the leadscrew and feed
shaft oilers at the tailstock end have been lubricated.
Leveling of the lathe is a part of this, see earlier in this
section. Equally important is the alignment of the centerto-center axis with the lathe bed, as seen from above.
[Vertical alignment is nowhere near as critical, rarely
a cause of taper unless the lathe is damaged or badly
worn.] For more information see the final pages of Section 4, Servicing the Lathe.
Also note: In initial tests, because the saddle and cross
slide should first be exercised manually, the leadscrew
split-nut should be disengaged — ditto the saddle/crossslide power feed lever, Figure 1-10.
After the initial test run, perhaps with a few additional
hours of machine time, some users drain and refill the
headstock and carriage feed gearbox. Lubricants are
specified in Section 4. Other users prefer to delay this
service action for at least 50 hours of running time. No
specific recommendation is given by the manufacturer.
Figure 1-10 Feed control levers on apron
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Section 2 FEATURES & SPECIFICATIONS
MODEL PM-1236 Lathe
General information
The PM-1236 is a robust gap-bed lathe designed for day-in, day-out use in the model shop. Distance between
centers is 36 in., swing over the bed 12 in. With an all-up weight of 1000 lb, plus a wide range of speeds from 65
to 1810 rpm, the PM-1236 can handle far more than the typical small machine. The spindle nose is D1-4 Camlock. A quick-change carriage feed gearbox provdes a full range of leadscrew ratios for U.S. and metric screw
cutting, together with an independent power feed for both saddle and cross slide. The power feed shaft is driven
through a friction clutch that allows the saddle to be stopped precisely at any point along the bed.
The spindle has a 1-1/2 in. clearance bore and MT5 internal taper. It runs in tapered-roller bearings, and is driven
by a 9-speed gearbox, coupled by Vee-belts to a 2 HP (1500 W) 220 Vac single-phase motor. Two-step pulleys
provide a choice of high and low speed drives, giving a total of 18 spindle speeds — 9 high range plus 9 low
range. A treadle-operated disc brake stops the spindle in milliseconds, even at the highest speeds. A circulating
coolant system (optional) may be installed in the right hand stand cabinet.
Supplied accessories
• 6 in. 3-jaw self centering chuck with two sets of jaws,
in-facing and out-facing
• 8 in. 4-jaw independent chuck with reversible jaws
• Steady rest
• Follower rest
• Micrometer saddle stop
PM-1236 Floor plan: dimensions approximate (not to scale)
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PM-1236 SPECIFICATIONS
Dimensions, approximate overall
Including stand: Width 61-1/2 in., Height 55 in.
Depth 19 in. at chip tray, add 8 in. for cross slide
Weight (approximate numbers)
Lathe
960 lb net, 1020 lb shipping
Cabinet, left hand, incl. foot brake linkage
100 lb shipping weight, each
Cabinet, right hand, incl. coolant pump (option)
Power requirement
Motor
220 - 240Vac, 60 Hz, 1Ø, 12A full load
TEFC type, cap start, 1.5 kW (2 HP), 1725 rpm
Work envelope
Distance between centers
Gap insert length
Swing over gap
Swing over bed
Swing over cross slide
Saddle travel
Cross-slide travel
Compound (top slide) travel
36 in.
9 in.
17-1/2 in. diameter
12 in. diameter
7 in. diameter
30-1/2 in.
6-1/8 in.
3-1/4 in.
Drive system
(High/Low belt drive with 9-speed gearbox)
Low range, rpm
High range, rpm
65, 180, 200, 235, 330, 550, 700, 910, 1200
100, 280, 300, 360, 500, 840, 1095, 1400, 1810
Carriage drive, thread cutting
Inch threads
Metric threads
Leadscrew 8 tpi
Choice of 36, from 4 to 60 tpi
Choice of 32, from 0.4 to 7 mm pitch
Carriage drive, turning operations
Choice of feed rates from 0.002 to 0.048 in./spindle rev
Cross slide drive
Choice of feed rates from 0.001 to 0.009 in./spindle rev
Spindle
Chuck/faceplate attachment
Internal taper
Spindle bore
Spindle length
D1-4 Camlock
MT5
Clearance for 1-1/2 in. diameter
15-5/8" overall
Tailstock
Internal taper
Quill travel
MT3
4 in.
Work holding
3-jaw chuck, 6 in., self-centering (scroll)
4-jaw chuck, 8 in., independent
Faceplate
Center rest (steady rest) capacity
Follower rest capacity
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Capacity, 1/8 in. to 6 in. diameter
Weight: 22 lb
Capacity: 3/8 in. to 8 in. diameter
Weight: 34 lb
10 in. diameter
3/16 to 1-1/2 in. diameter
1/4 to 3/4 in. diameter
Everyday precautions
• This machine is intended for use by experienced users familiar with metalworking hazards.
• Untrained or unsupervised operators risk serious injury.
• Wear ANSI-approved full-face or eye protection at all times when using the machine (everyday eyeglasses are not reliable protection against flying particles).
• Wear proper apparel and non-slip footwear – be sure to prevent hair, clothing or jewelry from becoming entangled in moving parts. Gloves – including tightfitting disposables – can be hazardous!
• Be sure the work area is properly lit.
• Never leave chuck keys, wrenches or other loose tools on the machine.
• Be sure the workpiece, toolholder(s) and machine ways are secure before
commencing operations.
• Use moderation: light cuts, low spindle speeds and slow table motion give
better, safer results than “hogging”.
• Don’t try to stop a moving spindle by hand – allow it to stop on its own.
• Disconnect 220 Vac power from the mill before maintenance operations such
as oiling or adjustments.
• Maintain the machine with care – check lubrication and adjustments daily
before use.
• Clean the machine routinely – remove chips by brush or vacuum, not compressed air (which can force debris into the ways).
No list of precautions can cover everything.
You cannot be too careful!
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10
Section 3 USING THE LATHE
WHAT IS NOT IN THIS SECTION ...
• Belt cover (to the left of the headstock).
• Footbrake
The PM-1236 is a conventional engine lathe that requires little explanation except for details specific to this
particular model — speed selection, thread cutting, and
the carriage/cross slide power feed system. Because
the user is assumed to be familiar with general purpose
metal lathes, this section contains very little tutorial.
CONTROL PANEL
In addition to three gear shift levers (speed and feed
direction) the main control panel also includes a “jog”
control. This a momentary type push-button independent of the motor control switch right of the apron. When
operated, ithe jog button runs the spindle in the forward
direction, stopping when released.
Figure 3-2 Set the motor control to OFF (mid travel)
SPINDLE DRIVE TRAIN
Two-step double-groove pulleys connect the motor to
the gearbox, Figure 3-3. The low speed configuration
gives spindle speeds from 65 to 1200, high speed from
100 to 1810 rpm. Because many users find that the low
range is suitable for most of their work, there is typically
no need to swap belts — unless a particular job calls for
a 50% speed increase. If the drive needs to be reconfigured, Loosen the three hex head bolts securing the
Figure 3-1 Main control panel
MOTOR CONTROLS
Before doing anything, check the installation instructions and power-up procedure in Section 1
Before connecting power to the lathe, be sure the motor
control lever is set to OFF, Figure 3-2. Connect the lathe
to a 220 Vac outlet — the POWER lamp should light
— then operate the motor control lever to run the spindle
in both directions.
Check that the following interlocks function correctly:
• E-Stop button.
• Chuck guard, if installed.
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Figure 3-3 Twin Vee belts drive the headstock gearbox
11
CHUCKS & FACEPLATE
motor, Figure 3-4. Raise the motor to de-tension the Vee
belts. Move the belts to select the other speed range,
then lower the motor to re-tension. Make certain the motor is properly aligned, then re-tighten the bolts.
The spindle nose on the PM-1236 accepts D1-4 Camlock chucks, faceplates and other work holding devices.
A D1-4 chuck or faceplate is held by three threaded
studs, each with a D-shape crosscut to engage a corresponding cam in the spindle nose, Figure 3-5. The function of the cams is to pull the chuck backplate inward to
locate its internal taper firmly on the spindle nose.
Alongside each stud is a stop screw, the head of which
fits closely in a groove at the threaded end of the stud.
The function of the stop screw is not to clamp the stud
in place, but instead to prevent it from being unscrewed
when the chuck is not installed.
Figure 3-4 Motor bolts
SPINDLE SPEEDS
The PM-1236 has a nine-speed headstock gearbox with
two shift levers C-B-A and 1-2-3, Figure 3-1. Before
changing speed, STOP THE MOTOR, Figure 3-2, then
move each shift lever to the desired setting. This may
need a little patience because it is not always possible to
go directly from one mesh to another. Move the spindle
back and forth by hand while trying to ease the lever into
its detent (meshed) position. Don’t use the JOG button
in this process — this may cause gear damage.
Figure 3-5 Camlock stud
TO INSTALL A CHUCK
Disconnect the 220V supply from the lathe!
SPINDLE SPEED (RPM)
HIGH
RANGE
LOW
RANGE
1
2
3
A
360
1810
1095
B
100
500
300
C
280
1400
840
A
235
1200
700
B
65
330
200
C
180
910
550
Chucks and faceplates are heavy — the 6 in. and 8 in.
chucks weigh 22 lb and 34 lb. They will cause serious
damage if allowed to fall. Even if a chuck is light enough
to be supported by one hand, the lathe bed should be
protected by a wood scrap, as Figure 3-6. Some users
add packing pieces, even custom-made cradles, to assist “straight line” installation and removal.
CARRIAGE FEED DIRECTION
Before installing make certain that the mating surfaces
of the chuck/faceplate and spindle are free of grit and
chips.
The lever below the speed selectors on the front panel,
Figure 3-1, determines whether the power feed is right
to left — the usual direction for turning and thread cutting
— or reversed. The selected direction applies to both the
leadscrew and the carriage/cross slide power feed.
The cams on the spindle are turned with a square-tip
wrench similar to the chuck key (may be same tool in
some cases).
Before changing feed direction, STOP THE MOTOR.
Hand-turn (jiggle) the spindle while feeling for the mesh,
as above
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Recommended procedure:
. Select the highest spindle speed (A-2) to allow easier
hand rotation of the spindle. (Alternatively, try moving
the speed selection levers between detents to find
12
•
•
replace the stop screw.
If the cam marker goes beyond the second Vee (6
o’clock), screw the stud IN one more turn, then replace the stop screw.
If the markers are correctly aligned, repeat the tightening sequence as step 3, light force. Repeat the
sequence two more times, first with moderate force,
then fully tighten.
Figure 3-6 Protect the lathe bed
2.
3.
4.
5.
•
•
a “between teeth” condition to disengage the gear
train.)
Turn the spindle by hand, checking that all three cam
markers are at 12 o’clock.
While supporting its full weight, install the chuck
without tilting, see Figure 3-7, then gently turn each
of the cams clockwise — snug, firm, but not locked
in this first pass.
Check that each of the cam markers lies between 3
and 6 o’clock, between the two Vees stamped on the
spindle, Figure 3-4.
If any cam marker is not within the Vees, first be sure
that there is no gap between chuck backplate and
spindle flange. Also, remove the chuck to inspect the
studs — burrs can be a problem, hone if necessary.
If there are no visible problems, the stud in question may need adjustment as follows:
Figure 3-8 Cam in locked condition
TO REMOVE A CHUCK
Disconnect the 220V supply from the lathe!
Remove the stop screw from the stud.
If the cam marker in question can’t get to the first
Vee (3 o’clock), back the stud OUT one full turn, then
Protect the lathe bed, as Figure 3-6. While supporting its
weight, turn each of the cams to 12 o’clock, Figure 3-7,
then remove the chuck. If the chuck does not come free,
try tapping the backplate gently with a soft (dead blow)
mallet.
CROSS SLIDE AND COMPOUND
The cross slide and compound, Figure 3-9, both have
10 TPI leadscrews, with 100-division graduated collars,
so each division represents a “real” motion of 0.001”. On
the cross slide dial, only, this shows as ϕ 0.002”, meaning that a 0.001” depth of cut reduces the diameter of
the workpiece by 0.002”. The second row of divisions on
each collar reads in millimeters, 0.02 mm/division on the
compound, 0.04 mm/division on the cross slide. [These
collars have 127 divisions, so the reading is “true metric”.]
Figure 3-7 Installing a Camlock chuck
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13
Figure 3-9 Cross slide and compound dials
Figure 3-10 Tailstock
TAILSTOCK
The tailstock leadscrew is 10 TPI, with a travel of 4
inches. Like the compound, the tailstock has two graduated collars, one reading 0.001”/division, the other 0.02
mm/division. To remove tooling from the tailstock taper
(MT3) turn the handwheel counter-clockwise (handle
end view) until resistance is felt, then turn the handle a
little more to eject the tool. Conversely, to install a taper
tool make certain that the quill is out far enough to allow
firm seating.
A visual indication of the offset is provided by the scale,
but this is not a reliable measure for precise work. In
practice, the only way to determine the offset precisely
is to "cut and try' on the workpiece, homing in on the correct degree of offset in small increments.
The same issues arise when re-establishing "true zero"
of the tailstock, in other words returning it to the normal
axis for routine operations. One way to avoid cut-and-try
is to prepare in advance a bar of (say) 1" diameter quality ground stock, with precise center drillings at both
ends (do this by indicating for zero TIR in a 4-jaw chuck,
not in a 3-jaw unless known to be equally accurate). The
prepared bar can then be installed between centers and
indicated along its length.
For taper turning the tailstock may be offset by adjusting
the set screws on either side, arrowed in Figure 3-10.
To move the tailstock to the rear, for instance, the screw
on the lever side would be unscrewed, then the opposing set screw would be screwed in to move the upper
assembly.
CARRIAGE FEED GEARBOX
The rate of power feed relative to spindle speed is set
by the four shifter knobs below the main control panel,
Figure 3-11.
The S-M knob at right determines which is the driven
shaft, leadscrew (M) or carriage feed (S).
Unliike speed and feed direction changing at the main
control panel, there is no need to stop the motor while
selecting a different carriage feed. The same applies to
switching between M and S.
In the table on the following page, Figure 3-13, the external "change gears" are 24T and 48T, Figure 3-12 (24T
is the output from the headstock, 48T the input to the
carriage feed gearbox). This is a frequently used setup
for these two reasons:
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
Figure 3-11 Carriage feed gearbox
14
1. It provides a useful range of carriage and cross feeds,
respectively (in./rev) carriage 0.0019 to 0.012, cross
slide 0.0004 to 0.0023.
2. It cuts 10 of the most popular U.S. threads found in
the model shop, simply by making gearbox selections.
In addition, the 24T/48T combination cuts the entire
range of metric pitches from 0.4 to 7 mm.
Note that switching from SI to SII doubles the feed rate.
Exchanging the gears (48T upper, 24T lower) increases
all speeds by a factor of 4.
Figure 3-12 External change gears
Movement per spindle revolution (mm)
SI
S II
E2
E3
A2
E4
E1
C3
C4
A5
D5
B5
0.153
0.135
0.131
0.122
0.101
0.098
0.078
0.075
0.062
0.049
0.030
0.026
0.025
0.024
0.019
0.017
0.015
0.014
0.012
0.009
0.305
0.271
0.262
0.244
0.202
0.196
0.156
0.149
0.124
0.099
0.059
0.052
0.050
0.048
0.039
0.034
0.030
0.028
0.024
0.018
METRIC
SI
S II
0.612
0.542
0.524
0.489
0.406
0.392
0.314
0.299
0.249
0.199
0.118
0.105
0.101
0.095
0.078
0.067
0.061
0.058
0.048
0.036
1.220
1.084
1.049
0.979
0.813
0.784
0.627
0.597
0.498
0.398
0.236
0.209
0.203
0.189
0.157
0.135
0.122
0.116
0.096
0.072
Carriage motion
Cross slide motion
Movement per spindle revolution (in.)
SI
S II
E2
E3
A2
E4
E1
0.0060
0.0012
C3
C4
A5
D5
B5
0.0053
0.0052
0.0048
0.0040
0.0039
0.0031
0.0030
0.0024
0.0019
0.0010
0.0010
0.0009
0.0007
0.0007
0.0006
0.0006
0.0005
0.0004
0.0120
0.0107
0.0103
0.0096
0.0080
0.0077
0.0061
0.0059
0.0049
0.0039
0.0023
0.0020
0.0020
0.0019
0.0015
0.0013
0.0012
0.0011
0.0009
0.0007
U.S.
SI
S II
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0.0241
0.0213
0.0206
0.0193
0.0160
0.0154
0.0124
0.0118
0.0098
0.0078
0.0046
0.0041
0.0040
0.0037
0.0031
0.0026
0.0024
0.0023
0.0019
0.0014
0.0480
0.0427
0.0413
0.0385
0.0320
0.0309
0.0247
0.0235
0.0196
0.0157
0.0093
0.0082
0.0080
0.0074
0.0062
0.0053
0.0048
0.0046
0.0038
0.0028
15
Figure 3-13
Table of feed rates
ENGAGING THE POWER FEED
Power feed controls are located on the apron, Figure
3-14. The split-nut lever engages the leadscrew, and is
typically used only for thread cutting (S-M knob on gear
box set to M), described later.
The power feed lever is active only when the feed shaft
is rotating, S-M knob on gear box set to S. In its neutral
position the lever tip is captive between two offset stop
blocks. This prevents vertical movement of the lever unless it is first shifted to the left or right — a safety measure to avoid accidental engagement of the power feed.
Carriage feed — lever left & up
Cross slide feed — lever right & down
Figure 3-15 Feedshaft clutch
When engaging either power feed, move the lever gently, feeling for the gears to mesh as you go. If the gears
don’t engage at the first try, use the appropriate handwheel to jiggle the carriage or cross slide, whichever one
you wish to move under power.
gearbox. Spring pressure is adjusted by two set screws
on either side of the feed shaft, arrowed in Figure 3-15.
Setting the spring pressure is a process of aiming for the
best compromise between too high — damaging feed
pressure — and too low, which might mean unexpected
stopping for no good reason. Setting the clutch to work
reliably with the micrometer carriage stop is a good example of such a compromise: start with low spring force,
then work up in small increments until the carriage stops
in the same location (say ± 0.002”, assuming a constant
depth of cut and feed rate).
CARRIAGE STOP
The stop asembly, Figure 3-16, has a micrometer-style
collar graduated in 0.001 in. divisions. It can be clamped
at any point along the lathe bed (two M6 socket head
screws on the underside secure the clamp plate to the
block). Make certain that the stop rod seats firmly on the
carriage casting, not on the rubber wiper.
Figure 3-14 Power feed levers on the apron
FEEDSHAFT CLUTCH
The clutch shown in Figure 3-15 disengages the power
feed if the carriage or cross slide hits an obstruction
when power feeding, thus minimizing the potential for
damage. This could be the result of either an accidental
event, or deliberately stopping the carriage at a precise
location set by the stop, Figure 3-16.
The clutch comprises a pair of spring loaded steel balls
bearing on a detent disc driven by the carriage feed
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
Figure 3-16 Micrometer carriage stop
16
COMPOUND SETUP FOR THREAD CUTTING
Thread cutting on the lathe is unlike most other turning
operations, for two reasons: 1. The cutting tool must be
precisely ground with an included angle of 60 degrees
for most American and metric threads, and; 2. It is preferable to feed the tool into the workpiece at an angle so
it cuts mostly on the left flank of the thread. The correct
angle relative to the cross slide (zero degrees) is a subject of debate — should it be 29, 29-1/2 or 30 degrees?
Many machinists prefer 29 degrees because it holds
the cutting tool marginally clear of the right flank of the
thread, close enough for cleanup of the flank while at the
same time avoiding appreciable rubbing.
The 45o - 0o - 45o scale on the compound is not directly
helpful in setting the thread cutting angle, but it can be
used for that purpose if a second reference mark is applied to the cross slide. First make certain that the compound is truly aligned with the lathe axis when 0o on the
scale is on the cross slide reference mark — do this by
indicating against a ground bar between centers while
advancing the indicator using only the compound. Allow
for the variance, if any, when applying the new reference
mark. Grind a chisel edge on a 1/4 in. square HS tool bit,
align it precisely on the left hand 30o scale mark; then,
wearing safety glasses, rap the tool bit sharply with a
hammer.
Figure 3-17 Setting up the compound for 30o infeed
A new reference mark is stamped on the cross slide at 30 degrees. To set the compound for thread cutting, rotate it clockwise to bring the right hand 30o scale mark in line with the new
reference mark. For 29o rotate the compound 1 degree more.
CHANGE GEARS FOR THREAD CUTTING
The large gears in Figure 3-12 are transposing gears,
120T and 127T. They allow a standard-thread leadscrew,
in this case 8 tpi, to cut metric threads. The transposing
gears are keyed together.
Figure 3-18
Standard TPI setup
Key facts to remember:
For U.S. thread cutting, the 127T larger gear is simply
an idler, transferring the drive from the upper gear to the
lower gear. In this configuration, the spacer bushing is
outside the lower gear, as Figure 3-12.
For all TPI standard
threads (U.S.A.) the
127T gear is an idler
between upper and
lower gears.
For metric thread cutting, the lower gear is driven by the
120T transposing gear. In this configuration, not shown,
the spacer bushing is inside the lower gear.
by a larger or smaller gear. This will require the transposing gear pair to be repositioned. The procedure for
this is:
Any change to the drive train typically calls for one or
both of the upper and lower gears to be exchanged for
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
• Remove the M6 socket head screws from the upper
17
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
and lower gear shafts.
Remove the gears, washers, keys and bushing (lower
gear only).
While holding the gear support casting (quadrant)
with one hand, use a 15 mm wrench to loosen the
M10 hex nut hidden under the 127T gear. Allow the
casting to swing downward.
Loosen the M10 hex nut securing the transposing
gears to the support casting.
Install the upper and lower gears.
Bring the transposing gears into mesh with the lower
gear, trapping a scrap of bond paper (letter stock) between the two to hold them at the correct separation.
Tighten the transposing gears in position, then remove
the paper. Check for working clearance between the
gears.
Swing the gear support casting upward to mesh the
127T gear with the upper gear, again using a paper
scrap for separation.
Tighten the gear support casting.
a precise included angle of 60o. It is installed so that its
flanks are exactly 30o either side of the cross axis, ideally with the compound offset as Figure 3-17. Single-point
threads are cut in 10 or more successive passes, each
shaving a little more material off the workpiece.
To make the first thread-cutting pass the leadscrew is
run at the selected setting, Figure 3-20, and the carriage
is moved by hand to set the cutting tool at the starting
point of the thread. With the tool just grazing the workpiece, the split-nut lever is lowered to engage the leadscrew. This can be done at any point, provided the splitnut remains engaged throughout the entire multi-pass
process.
When the first pass is completed, the tool is backed out
clear the workpiece (using the cross slide), and the spindle is reversed to bring the carriage back to the starting
point. The cross slide is returned to its former setting,
then the tool is advanced a few thousandths by the compound for the next pass. Each successive pass is done
in the same way, each with a slightly increased infeed
settting of the compound.
STANDARD THREADS
Standard threads in the U.S.A., often referred to as “TPI”
(threads per inch), are mostly cut using the same external gears as for the finer pitch metric threads — 24T upper, 48T lower. The table in Figure 3-19 lists all threads
available with that setup.
TPI
Many users save time by disengaging the split-nut at the
end of each pass, reversing the carriage by hand, then
re-engaging, usually by reference to the threading dial,
Figure 3-21.
TYPICAL USAGE (standard threads)
16
3/4
3/8
18
5/8
9/16
20
1/2
7/16
1/4
24
3/8
5/16
#12
28
1/4
#12
32
#10
#8
#6
36
#8
40
1/4
#6
#5
48
#4
56
#3
If the TPI number is divisible by 4 re-engagement can be
done at any point — forget the threading dial.
5/16
For all other TPI numbers every engagement, including the first, must at the point where a specific line
on the threading dial comes into alignment with the datum mark. If not, the second and subsequent passes will
be out of sync. In some cases, Figure 3-21, there is a
choice of lines for re-engagement, but in every case the
process calls for careful timing. [NOTE: Disengagement
and re-engagement of the split-nut is not applicable to
metric threads].
#10
#4
Typical depths of cut per pass vary from an initial 0.005”
or so, to as little as 0.001”, even less. A finishing pass
or two with increments of only 0.0005” (or none at all)
to deal with the spring-back effect can make all the difference between a too-tight thread and one that runs
perfectly. Assuming that the compound is set over at
between 29 and 30 degrees, the total depth of cut is approximately 0.69 times the thread pitch, P (this equates
to a straight-in thread depth of 0.6 times P). There may
be a need for a few thousandths more in-feed than
0.69P, almost certainly not less.
Figure 3-19 Popular threads cut with the 24T/48T setup
CUTTING PROCEDURE FOR TPI THREADS
This procedure assumes that a single point thread cutting tool will be used, and that the threading dial assembly has been pivoted forward to engage worm gear with
leadscrew, Figure 3-14. Note that the threading dial is
not used for metric threads.
For metric and UNC/UNF threads the tool is ground to
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
18
Figure 3-20 Gearbox and external
gear selections
for standard
threads
THREADS PER INCH
UPPER
GEAR 24T
Speed
MII
16
18
19
20
22
24
26
28
30
MI
32
36
38
40
44
48
52
56
60
A2
A3
C3
A4
C3
C3
C3
A5
B4
7
7-1/2
Gearbox
Lower gear 48T, exceptions in RED
38
44
52
THREADS PER INCH
UPPER
GEAR 48T
Speed
MII
MI
Gearbox
4
4-1/2
9-1/2
5
5-1/2
6
6-1/2
8
9
19
10
11
12
13
14
15
A2
A3
C3
A4
C3
C3
C3
A5
B4
Lower gear 24T, exceptions in RED
38
Figure 3-21 Using the threading dial
The dial worm gear has 16T; the leadscrew is 8 TPI,
so the carriage moves 2 inches for each revolution of
the dial when the split-nut is disengaged (when the
split-nut is engaged the dial is stationary).
The symbol "/" in the table means "forget the dial"
— engage at random for any TPI value that is an
even multiple of 4. For all other standard TPI threads
the split-nut is engaged when the datum coincides
with a specific line — or lines — on the threading dial.
1 - 8 Not the same as "/" (re-engage anywhere). Applies to TPI values that are odd multiples of 4; start on
any line (not a half space), re-engage on any line.
22
26
TPI
Line
TPI
Line
TPI
Line
TPI
Line
4
/
8
/
16
/
32
/
4-1/2
8
9
4.8
18
2.4.6.8
36
1-8
9-1/2
8
19
8
38
2.4.6.8
5
4.8
10
2.4.6.8
20
1-8
40
/
5-1/2
8
11
4.8
22
2.4.6.8
44
1-8
6
4.8
12
1-8
24
/
48
/
6-1/2
8
13
4.8
26
2.4.6.8
52
1-8
7
4.8
14
2.4.6.8
28
1-8
56
/
7-1/2
8
15
4.8
30
2.4.6.8
2.4.6.8 Applies to even number TPI values that are not multiples of 4 (10, 14, etc.): re-engage at the line you started with OR
any other line at right angles to it — start on 1, re-engage on 3, 5 or 7; or, start on 2, re-engage on 4, 6 or 8.
4.8 Applies to odd number TPI values (7, etc.): re-engage at the line you started with OR the diametrically opposite line — can
be any line pair, 1 & 5, 2 & 6, etc., not necessarily 4 & 8.
8 Applies to fractional values (4-1/2, etc.): re-engage on the same line you started with for the first pass — can be any line
number, not just the 8.
Figure 3-22
Threading dial
visualization for
selected U.S.
threads
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19
THREAD CUTTING (METRIC THREADS)
Practically all metric thread pitches from 0.4 mm to 1.75
mm are cut with one external gear setup: 24T upper,
48T lower. For thread pitches from 1.6 mm to 7 mm, the
inverse setup is used: 48T upper, 24T lower.
Figure 3-23
Metric setup
For all metric threads
the top gear drives
the 127T gear. The
lower gear is driven
by the 120T gear.
For metric thread cutting the split-nut on the apron must
be left engaged throughout the entire process. This
not the case for U.S. standard TPI threads, for which the
normal procedure is to disengage the half-nut after each
pass, reverse the carriage, then re-engage at a specific
indication on the threading dial (see above).
GEARS:
UPPER 24T
LOWER 48T
GEARS:
UPPER 48T
LOWER 24T
METRIC THREAD PITCHES (mm)
Speed
MI
MII
Gearbox
0.4
0.45
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.75
0.8
0.9
1
1.2
1.25
1.4
1.5
1.75
B4
C4
C3
A4
D2
E4
A2
E2
C2
METRIC THREAD PITCHES (mm)
Speed
MI
MII
Gearbox
1.6
1.8
2
2.25
2.4
2.5
2.8
3
3.5
3.2
3.6
4
4.5
4.8
5
5.6
6
7
B4
C4
C3
C2
A4
D2
E4
A2
E2
Figure 3-24 Table of metric pitches vs. gearbox settings
GAP BED
A 9 inch long section of the bed at the headstock end
can be removed to allow turning of diameters up to 171/2 in., Figure 3-25.
Figure 3-26 Gap insert hardware
soft-face mallet.
Before re-installing the insert, be certain that all mating
surfaces are scrupulously clean. Set the insert in place,
lightly tap in the two locating pins, then install the four
large bolts (snug, but not fully tightened). Jack the insert
to the right with the pusher screw to close the gap, if any,
between the ground surfaces of the bed ways at the join
(a visible parting line is acceptable, but a discontinuity
that snags the carriage is not). If a satisfactory join cannot be achieved, it may be necessary to remove and
reinstall the insert from scratch.
Figure 3-25 Gap insert
To remove the gap insert back out the arrowed "pusher"
screw two or three turns, then remove the four large
socket head screws securing the insert to the bed. To
minimize cosmetic damage, cut through the paint and
filler along the joint between insert and bed using a
sharp knife or pointed scraper.
Using a 14 mm wrench jack out the two locating pins,
arrowed in Figure 3-26, then tap the insert free with a
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20
LOCKING THE SLIDES
STEADY & FOLLOWER RESTS
When face-cutting large diameter surfaces, for example, it is often desirable to lock the carriage. Less frequently it can be helpful to lock, or at least stiffen, the
sliding motion of the cross slide or compound, Figures
3-27 and 3-28.
The hinge-type steady rest, see also Figure 1-9, can be
mounted anywhere along the lathe bed. It makes possible cutting operations on long, slender workpieces between centers, or held at one end by chuck. The steady
rest is often used in combination with the carriagemounted follower rest, Figure 3-29.
To set the fingers on the workpiece, first swing open the
upper casting. Make certain that all three fingers are
freely adjustable by thumbwheel. If not, loosen and relock the set screws, arrowed in Figure 3-29. Raise the
two lower fingers to just touch the workpiece — not deflecting it — then close and secure the upper casting.
Lower the top finger to just touch the workpiece, then
apply oil at the point of contact.
Figure 3-27 Compound lock screw
Figure 3-28 Carriage and cross slide lock screws
Figure 3-29 Steady rest
The follower rest, Figure 3-30,is secured to the saddle
with two 8 mm socket head screws. Adjust the follower
fingers as described for the steady rest.
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21
for corrosion and other undesirable effects on the lathe
and the coolant pump.
If you use water-miscible cutting fluid, bear in mind that
the ratio of product to water is important — too much
water causes excessive corrosion and other problems.
Check the mix from time to time using a refractometer.
If this is not available, make up a small batch according
to the product directions, then replace with a fresh batch
when the old one becomes unusable due to reduced
performance, oil/water separation, or bad odor.
Disposal of used cutting fluid can be a problem. It is
about 95% water, so its volume can be drastically reduced by evaporation in an open tank. The residue may
then be handled like any other waste oil.
Figure 3-30 Follower rest
COOLANT SYSTEM
The coolant system is typically used with water-miscible
(emulsified) cutting fluid. It can also be used with lightweight neat cutting oil straight from the can. Synthetic
cutting fluids are not recommended due to their potential
Figure 3-32 Gasket on supply line at chip tray
Figure 3-33 Coolant pump connections
Figure 3-31 Coolant pump assembly, RH stand cabinet
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22
Section 4 SERVICING THE LATHE
Disconnect 220V power before any maintenance operation!
Remove all machining debris and foreign objects before lubricating ANYTHING! If need
be, any oil is better than no oil – but use the recommended lubricants when you can.
GENERAL
Recommended lubricants
Aside from abrasive particles and machining debris,
lack of proper lubrication is the main cause of premature
wear. Rotating parts are easy to lubricate, sliding parts
are not. Gibs are tightened for the best compromise between rigidity and slideability, which means practically
zero gap between the ways. It is not obvious which are
the bearing surfaces on the various dovetail surfaces
— some of the interfaces look like bearing surfaces, but
are simply narrow gaps.
Gearboxes: ISO 68, such as Mobil DTE Heavy/Medium circulating oil. Quantity required:
Headstock 3.5 quarts
Carriage feed gearbox 1 quart
Apron 1/2 quart
Ball oilers: ISO 68 way oil, such as Mobil Vactra No.
2, or equivalent.
Machine ways (dovetails): ISO 68 way oil, such as
Mobil Vactra No. 2, or equivalent.
External change gears: light general purpose grease,
NLGI No. 2, or equivalent.
Leadscrews: ISO 68 way oil, such as Mobil Vactra
No. 2, or equivalent.
Every few hours of operation: 1. Apply the recommended way-oil with a dedicated short-bristle brush such as
the type used for applying flux; 2. Use a similar brush to
apply oil or grease to the leadscrews; 3. Apply oil to the
ball oilers, see below.
The spindle runs on sealed, pre-lubricated roller bearings requiring no routine attention.
HEADSTOCK GEARBOX DRAIN & REFILL
3.5 quarts is a lot of oil! Take time to prepare.
. Remove the belt cover, left of the headstock.
2. Remove the fill plug on the top surface of the headstock, Figure 4-1.
3. Place a drain pan (2-gallons minimum) on a stool or
other support at about the height of the chip tray.
4. Fold a sheet of card stock to make a Vee-shape drain
channel. This will be pressed against the headstock
below the drain plug, angled downward into the drain
pan; trim the upstream end of the Vee so that it seals
against the headstock.
5. Run the lathe a few minutes to warm the oil if necessary.
6. With the drain channel in place, remove the drain
plug, Figure 4-2.
7. Allow the oil to drain completely. Replace the drain
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
Figure 4-1 Headstock fill plug
plug, then add just a few ounces of oil.
8. When satisfied that the headstock is oil-tight, add oil
to the halfway mark on the sight glass, Figure 4-3
(about 3.5 qt).
9. Replace the fill plug.
23
CARRIAGE FEED GEARBOX DRAIN & REFILL
Make a card-stock Vee channel as described for draining
the headstock. Run the lathe for a few minutes to warm
the oil if necessary, then remove fill plug (2), Figure 4-2.
With the Vee channel in place, remove drain plug (3)
and allow the gearbox to empty completely. Replace the
drain plug. To refill the gearbox use a funnel attached to
a flexible plastic tube inserted into the fill hole. Add oil to
the halfway mark on the sight glass, Figure 4-4 (about
1 qt).
APRON DRAIN & REFILL
Remove the fill plug, Figure 4-5. Remove the drain plug,
Figure 4-6, and allow the apron to empty completely.
Replace the drain plug. Add oil to the halfway mark on
the sight glass (about 1/2 qt).
Figure 4-2 Gearbox fill & drain plugs
Headstock drain plug (1); Carriage Feed Gearbox fill plug (2),
Carriage Feed Gearbox drain plug (3)
Figure 4-3 Headstock sight glass
Figure 4-5 Apron fill plug
Figure 4-6 Apron sight glass & drain plug
Figure 4-4 Carriage feed gearbox sight glass
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24
BALL OILERS
GIB ADJUSTMENT
Use a pump-type oil can, preferably with a flexible spout
tipped with a soft tube. The ID of the tip should be large
enough to seat on the oiler's brass flange, more than
spanning the spring-loaded steel ball. When the oil can
tip is firmly pressed onto the brass surface oil pressure
will displace the ball, allowing oil to flow into the bearing.
Before oiling check that the ball is not stuck – press it
lightly with a probe.
Gibs on the cross slide and compound are gently-tapered lengths of ground cast iron held fast by opposing
screws at each end (Figures 4-10 and 4-11 show only
the screw facing the handwheel). Adjusting them is a
trial and error process that takes time and patience. Aim
for the best compromise of rigidity and reasonably free
table movement. Too tight means accelerated wear on
the ways and leadscrews. Too free means instability of
the cutting tool, inaccuracies and chatter.
Both screw heads must be tight against the gib ends. If
you loosen one, tighten the other.
Figure 4-7 Carriage, cross slide and compound oilers
Figure 4-10 Cross slide front gib screw
Figure 4-8 Leadscrew and feed shaft oilers
Figure 4-11 Compound front gib screw
The carriage gib, Figure 4-12, is not a tapered insert like
those on the cross slide and compound. It is a three-part
assembly on the underside of the bed way at the back
Figure 4-9 Tailstock oilers
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25
outer (lock) nut. Adjust the innner nut to take up the endfloat, then re-tighten the lock nut.
of the lathe. It comprises a support bar, attached to the
carriage, and two separate gib strips each with two adjusting screws.
Split nut adjustment
If the split nut becomes excessively loose, with appreciable side to side movement, this may be corrected
by adjusting the gib at the back of the apron, item 67
on the apron schematic, Section 5. Loosen screws 68
holding the gib to the apron casting, then tighten the gib
by screws 72 (left of the threading dial assembly). Retighten the securing screws and lock nuts.
CROSS SLIDE BACKLASH
Figure 4-12 Carriage gib assembly
When alternating between clockwise and counter
clockwise rotation of the cross slide leadscrew, the
handwheel moves freely a few degrees but the cross
slide table stays put. The acceptable amount of lost
motion depends on the user, but 0.005” is generally a
good compromise. Smaller numbers are possible, but
overdoing it can lead to premature wear of leadscrew
and nut.
LEADSCREW
The shear pin, (1) in Figure 4-13, is designed to minimise damage if the carriage encounters an obstruction
when traversing under leadscrew power. [If that should
occur when the carriage is powered instead by the
feed shaft, the drive is automatically disengaged by the
clutch, bottom of Figure 4-12, also Figure 3-15.] If the
shear pin breaks, use a 1/8" drift to clear remaining fragments, and replace the pin with a 5/32" brass rod. When
hammering on the drift avoid damage to the gearbox
ouput shaft by placing a solid support block under the
leadscrew collar.
Excessive backlash in the cross slide can be corrected
by expanding the leadscrew nut, Figure 4-14. Referring
to the carriage schematic, Section 5, remove the socket
head screw 16 securing the cross slide to nut 20. Turn
the handwheel counter-clockwise (this is a LH leadscrew) to drive the nut backward to the point where the
two set screws at the back the nut are accessible. Use
a flat-blade screwdriver turned clockwise to expand the
gap, tightening the nut.
The compound leadscrew nut is not adjustable.
Figure 4-13 Leadscrew shear pin & end float adjustment
If the leadscrew develops end-float — can be moved
side to side by hand more than a few thousandths — this
is correctable by adjusting the spanner nuts (2) in Figure 4-12. If a suitable C-spanner is not available use a
soft metal (brass) drift and light hammer taps to free the
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
Figure 4-14 Carriage leadscrew nut
26
ALIGNING THE LATHE
Quick method
This method works only if the centers are in new condition, sharp and clean.
. Carefully clean the taper sockets and the tapers
themselves. Install the tapers.
2. Move the carriage left as far as it will go, then slide
the tailstock left to touch the carriage.
3. Lock the tailstock (this is important — unlocked to
locked can mean an offset of several thousandths).
4. Advance the tailstock quill to bring the centers together.
5. Place a scrap of hard shim stock or an old-style double-edge razor blade between the centers, Figure B.
The most important attribute of a properly set up lathe
is its ability to “machine parallel”, to cut a cylinder of uniform diameter over its entire length. In other words, no
taper.
Leveling of the lathe is a part of this, see Section 1.
Equally important is the alignment of the center-to-center axis with the lathe bed, as seen from above. [Vertical alignment is nowhere near as critical, rarely a cause
of taper unless the lathe is damaged or badly worn.]
How to align lathe centers
Practically all lathes come with some means of offsetting the tailstock, typically for taper turning. For routine
operations, the offset must be zero, Figure A.
Figure B Quick alignment check
Figure A Center-to-center axis
6. Advance the tailstock quill to trap the blade, then lock
the quill. If the centers are aligned, the blade will point
squarely front to back. If not, adjust the tailstock offset by a series of very small adjustments.
7. If the range of quill motion permits, check the blade
alignment at various extensions of the quill. There
should be no appreciable variation.
The scale usually provided on the tailstock is not
reliable for precision work — think of it as only a starting point. What follows are two methods for aligning centers, one quick and easy, the other more precise.
Precise method
This method uses a precision ground steel rod at least 10" long. Look for 3/4 or 1
inch "drill rod" with a diameter tolerance of ± 0.001" or less.
Straightness and uniform diameter are both important (absolute diameter is
not).
. Set the rod in a collet chuck, or independent 4-jaw chuck, with the outer end
about 1/2 inch clear of the chuck.
2. Use a dial indicator to check for runout. If using a 4-jaw adjust as necessary for
minimum TIR (aim for 0.0005" or less).
3. Center-drill the end of the ground rod.
4. Reverse the rod, re-adjust for minimum TIR, then drill the other end.
5. Set the drill rod snugly between centers, as Figure C. Lock the tailstock.
6. Set a dial indicator on the cross slide (to eliminate vertical error use a flat disc
contact point, not the usual spherical type — if not available, machine a cap to fit
over the contact point you have on hand).
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
27
Figure C Drill rod between
centers
7. Starting at location (1), note which way the pointer rotates when the cross slide is
moved inward. In this setup the pointer is assumed to turn clockwise as the cross
slide moves in.
8. Pre-load the indicator by a few thousandths, then traverse the carriage from end
to end. In a perfect the setup the pointer will not move at all.
If the pointer turns clockwise as you go toward the tailstock, as Figure C, the tailstock
is biased to the front. This will cause the lathe to cut a tapered workpiece with the
larger diameter at the headstock end. Correct this by a series of very small adjustments to the tailstock offset.
Another important question has to do with headstock/spindle alignment relative to
the lathe bed. For turning between centers this doesn't matter at all; the headstock
can be wildly out of square, Figure D, but the lathe will still machine parallel if the
centers have been aligned as previously described.
Figure D Misalignment of the
headstock has no effect on
center turning
When headstock alignment really matters
Headstock alignment may not matter for center turning,
but it's critical when the workpiece is held in a chuck or
a collet — often about 90% of the workload in a typical
model shop. Assuming no appreciable deflection of the
workpiece (too thin, too far from the chuck), taper problems in a chuck/collet setup are due to misalignment of
the spindle axis relative to the lathe bed. This is usually
correctable by re-aligning the headstock.
a tiny amount even if jacking screws are provided. What
this amounts to is that headstock adjustment is a highly
sensitive, iterative procedure that should not be attempted casually. What follows is a general outline. Specific instructions for the PM-1236 follow this section.
HEADSTOCK ALIGNMENT METHODS
Method 1
Make a series of "cut-and-try" passes on scrap material. If the workpiece is thinner at the tailstock end, the
headstock needs to be pivoted away from the tool, and
vice versa.
Misalignment of the spindle by even the smallest fraction of a degree causes a very measurable taper, even
over short lengths of material. For example, a misalignment as small as one hundredth of a degree will give
a taper of 0.001” in 3 inches. If the headstock is (say) 10
inches long, this would be corrected by tapping one end
of the headstock forward or back by as little as 0.002”,
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
Method 2
This uses the test rod described for center-to-center
alignment (3/4 or 1 inch diameter ground drill rod).
28
Method 2 (continued)
Install the drill rod in a collet or independent 4-jaw chuck with about 5 inches protruding. Center drilling is not needed.
. Adjust the chuck for minimum runout at position (1).
2. Check the runout at (2). Pointer movement when traversing is not a concern at
this stage.
3. If the drill rod is perfectly aligned with the spindle axis, there should be no difference in TIR at (1) and (2).
4. If there is a significant difference in TIR* from (1) to (2), try to correct this by loosening, then re-tightening the chuck/collet, while levering the outer end of the rod
(gentle tapping with a non-marring hammer can also be helpful). When the runout
at (2) has been minimized, re-check at (1), then repeat at (2), etc.
5. When (and only when) the TIR at both locations is the same, or very close, can it
be said that the rod is concentric with the spindle.
6. Compare dial indications when traversing from (1) to (2). Ideally, there will no
change, Figure E.
* Factors that may affect runout: Straightness and roundness of the drill rod;
Chuck installation (check for cleanliness and tightness); "Pointing accuracy" of the
chuck (the gripping surfaces of chuck jaws may not be parallel with the axis of the
chuck and spindle — especially likely if the chuck is worn).
Figure E Perfect alignment:
zero indicator change between locations 1and 2
Method 3 - Morse Taper Test Bar
This is a catalog-only item available from many suppliers (depending on the source
it may be named differently). The test bar in Figure F has a tapered shank to fit the
spindle, and a parallel portion several inches long. The diameter of the parallel portion is unimportant. What matters more is its finish and lack of taper— check before
installing. Whatever taper there may be can be allowed for in the alignment test, as
Figure E. Runout should be less than 0.005" TIR.
Figure F Morse taper test bar
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
29
PM-1236 HEADSTOCK ALIGNMENT
Figure A1 is an exaggerated view of what happens if
the spindle is not precisely aligned with the lathe bed.
This is correctable by slightly loosening the attachment
screws, Figures A2 and A3, then adjusting the screws
set into a tab rail below the headstock, Figure A4.
Figure A4 Adjustment screws below the headstock
The recessed socket head screws lock the adjustment by pulling the tab rail toward the lathe bed. Loosen the socket heads
a fraction before touching the hex heads.
CAUTION!
Correcting headstock misalignment is a multi-step process requiring a number of extremely small adjustments, each one followed by an alignment test, either
cut-and-try, or one of the other methods described previously.
Figure A3 Misaligned headstock
In this illustration the workpiece diameter increases as the cutting tool moves toward the chuck. Correct this by screwing in
(A) a fraction of a turn to rotate the headstock counter clockwise, moving the workpiece away from the tool. Screw in (B) if
the taper is in the other direction, thinner toward the chuck.
A scarcely detectable rotation of an adjusting screw
can be the difference between perfect alignment and
unacceptable taper. In other words, think in terms of
thousandths of an inch or less. Simply loosening the
socket heads, Figure A4, can be enough to correct a
taper problem — or add to it in the wrong direction.
Figure A2 Headstock attachment screws, RH
Figure A3 Headstock attachment screws, LH
Remove the large transposing gears for access to
these screw heads.
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
30
Section 5 PARTS
Mdel PM-1236 Electrical schematic
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
31
Two sets of this assembly: C-B-A
shifter (LH) and 1-2-3 shifter (RH)
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
Leadscrew direction control
Lever/pinion assembly (qty 2)
for C-B-A and 1-2-3 gear shifters (#114 meshes with #108)
HEADSTOCK
32
HEADSTOCK
Ref.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
Mfr. No. Description
2034
Spindle: D1-4 camlock, MT5
2035
Lock pin
Spring: 0.6 × 4 × 22
Screw: M8 x 16 skt hd
2038
End cap
2006
Oil seal
D7212 Taper roller bearing 60 x 110
2031
Gear: 83T
2030
Gear: 46T
2029
Gear: 59T
2024
Nut
2008
Gear: 45T
D7211 Taper roller bearing 55 x 110
2007
Nut, special
2005A End cap
2023
Oil seal
Screw: M8 x 16 skt hd
Screw: M8 x 8 set
2025
Pin
Screw: M8 x 16 skt hd
Screw: M3 x 8 skt hd
Key: 8 x 45
Key: 8 x 80
2037
Locking cam
Screw: M8 x 16 skt hd
2040
End cap
2028
Oil seal
Ball bearing: 20 x 52 x 15
2039
Top shaft
2017
Gear: 21T
Key: 5 x 18
2015
Gear: 58T
2016
Gear: 45T
Circlip
2022
Gear: 31T
2020
Gear: 55T
2021
Gear: 36T
Circlip
Ball bearing: 20 x 42 x 12
2009
End cap
2009A Oil seal
Key: 8 x 108
Screw: M3 x 8 skt hd
Oil seal
2055
Faceplate
Screw: M3 x 8 skt hd
Screw: M6 x 12 skt hd
2003
Washer
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
Qty. Ref. Mfr. No.
1
62
3
63 2063
3
64
3
65
1
66 2010B
1
67
1
68
1
69 2019
1
70 2018
1
71 2013
1
72 47
1
73
1
74
2
75 2012B
1
76
1
77
4
78 2014
2
79 2011
2
80
4
81
2
82
1
83 2001
1
84
3
85 2032
5
86
1
87
1
88
1
89
1
90
1
91
2
92
1
93 2044
1
94 2062
1
95 2033
1
96
1
97
1
98 2046
1
99 2042
1
100
1
101
1
102 2041
1
103
2
104 2058
1
105 2059
1
106
6
107
2
108 2047
2
109
33
Description
Key: 5 x 20
Plug
Circlip
Ball bearing: 20 x 42 x 12
Shaft (input)
Key: 5 x 80
Key: 5 x 24
Gear: 47T
Gear: 23T
Gear: 42T
Circlip
Ball bearing: 25 x 47 x 12
Circlip
Flange
Oil seal: 25 x 40 x 10
Screw: M6 x 20 skt hd
Pulley
Washer
Screw: M8 x 20 skt hd
Oil seal
Screw: M6 x 8 set
Shaft, idler **
Circlip
Gear: pair 40/45T
Ball bearing: 20 x 47 x 14
Circlip
Screw: M6 x 30 skt hd
Screw: M6 x 20 set
Plug, oil drain, M16/1.5
Oil seal: 16 x 2.4
Plug, oil fill, M16/1.5
Headstock cover
Oil seal
Headstock casting
Pin: 4 x 24
Oil seal: 16 x 2.4
Shaft, gear shifter
Crank
Pin: 4 x 24
Circlip
Shoe, gear shift
Key: 5 x 16
Shift lever
Hub
Steel ball: Ø5
Spring: 1 x 6 x 20
Gear, meshes with 114
Screw: M8 x 8 set
Qty.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
6
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
7
2
2
3
3
2
2
3
2
4
4
2
4
NOTE
Dimensions are in millimeters.
All gears: pressure
angle 20 degrees,
module M2 (except
item 59).
Bearings: reference
numbers in this list
may not be recognized
by stockists.
If replacing a bearing
or oil seal, remove
and measure the item
in question. Order replacement parts from
Quality Machines.
HEADSTOCK (continued)
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
2026
25
2027A
42
20
2004A
2066
Gear: pair 40/45T
Circlip
Ball bearing: 25 x 47 x 12
Shaft (output)
Circlip
Ball bearing: 20 x 42 x 12
Circlip
Oil seal: 20 × 40 × 10
Flange
Oil seal
Gear: M1.25 (external)*
Screw: M6 x 12 skt hd
Key: 5 x 8
* Gear size depends on pitch of thread being cut
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
110
Screw: M12 x 25 skt hd
111
Screw: M3 x 6 skt hd
112 2060
Pointer disk
113
Screw: M6 x 20 set
114 2061
Gear, meshes with 108
115
Screw: M6 x 8 set
116 2054A
Crank
117 2079
Collar
118 2048
Shoe, forward/reverse
119 2052
Shaft, leadscrew fwd/rev**
120
Pin: 5 x 30
121 2051
Hub
** #83, #119, and related items, select fwd. or rev.
leadscrew rotation relative to the spindle
CHANGE GEARS
NOTE
Gear sizes shown are for illustration. Actual sizes of the headstock output gear
and carriage feed input gear depend on the thread pitch or carriage feed rate
desired. Order replacement gears by tooth count.
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
34
2
4
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
CARRIAGE FEED GEARBOX
Input (from external gear train)
Leadscrew
drive
Carriage
feed
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
35
CARRIAGE FEED GEARBOX
Ref.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
Mfr. No.
3034B
3035C
89103
3041B
3005B
3066B
3027C
3067B
3025C
89102
3017B
3044B
3046B
3045B
3033B
3029B
3031B
3032B
3003B
3030B
3002B
3026C
3007C
3008C
89103
3009B
3019C
3004B
3006C
3018C
8103
3084D
3068D
8104
3021C
3020E
Description
Oiler
Screw: M6 x 12 skt hd
Input shaft (1) flange
Oil seal
Ball bearing: 17 x 35 x 10
Key: 5 x13
Input shaft (1)
Key: 6 x 90
Gear: triple, 18/X/18
Spacer
Screw: M6 x 8 set
Gear: 27T
Key: 6 x 15
Key: 6 x 35
Shaft
Gear: 21T
Ball bearing: 15 x 32 x 9
Plug
Shaft end cap
Oil seal
Bushing
Shaft (2)
Gear: 24T
Gear: 16T
Gear: 18T
Gear: 20T
Spacer
Gear: 28T
Gear: pair 18T/30T
Gear: 22T
Spacer
Circlip
Ball bearing: 17x 35 x 10
Gear: 23T
Key: 5 x 40
Shaft
Shaft (3)
Key: 5 x 35
Circlip
Gear: pair 15T/22T
Pin: 5 x 6
Gear: 21T
Thrust bearing: 17 x 32 x 8
Leadscrew flange
Oil seal
Thrust bearing: 20 x 35 x 10
Shaft. leadscrew drive
Nut: M20 x 1.5, special
Pin: 5 x 6
Leadscrew connector
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
Qty. Ref. Mfr. No.
1
51 3060E
7
52 3071D
1
53 3059D
1
54 3042C
8
55 3070C
1
56 3001C
1
57
3
58
2
59
2
60
1
61
1
62
1
63 B1260
1
64 3016C
1
65
1
66 3015C
3
67
3
68 3014C
2
69 3022F
2
70 3086D
1
71
1
72 3013E
1
73
1
74
1
75
1
76
1
77
1
78 3012D
1
79 7003B
1
80
1
81 3011D
2
82 3050C
1
83 3049C
1
84 3089A
1
85
1
86
1
87 3062C
1
88
1
89 2060
1
90
2
91
1
92
1
93
1
94
1
95 3054F
1
96
1
97 3088
2
98 A12
1
99
1
36
Description
Front panel
Oil seal
Faceplate
Back plate
Oil seal
Gearbox casting
Screw: M6 x 12 skt hd
Pin: 5 x 25
Washer: M10, spring
Screw: M10 x 30 skt hd
Screw: M6 x 12 skt hd
Spacer: 6 x 32 x 5
Bushing
Gear: 17T
Screw: M6 x 16 set
Shaft
Oil seal: 22 x 2.65
Gear: 15T
Sleeve
Oil seal
Screw: M6 x 25 skt hd
Shaft
Oil seal: 18 x 30 x 10
Plug, oil fill, M16/1.5
Oil seal: 16 x 2.4
Screw: M8 x 15 skt hd
Screw: M6 x 10 set
Bushing
Support bracket
Screw: M4 x 20 skt hd
Shaft
Shift fork
Shift fork
Shaft, gear shifters
O-ring seal: 12 x 1.8
Screw: M4 × 6 set
Shift fork
Screw: M3 x 6 skt hd
Pointer disk
Screw: M8 × 6 set
Spring: 1 x 5 x 25
Steel ball: Ø5
Screw: M6 x 10 skt hd
Washer
Knurled knob
Key: 5 x 8
Gear, shift fork drive
Sight glass
O-ring seal: 16 x 2.4
Qty.
1
1
1
1
1
1
6
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
2
2
8
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
4
2
1
12
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
1
4
NOTE
Dimensions are in millimeters.
All gears: pressure angle
20 degrees, module
M2.25.
Bearings: reference
numbers in this list may
not be recognized by
stockists.
If replacing a bearing
or oil seal, remove and
measure the item in
question. Order replacement parts from Quality
Machines.
STAND & COOLANT COMPONENTS
Ref.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
Mfr. No.
1023
Description
Back plate
Circlip
Spindle brake
1040
Shaft
Screw: M6 x 16 skt hd
Coolant flex pipe
Work lamp
1022
Tray
Screw: M5 x 12 skt hd
9206
Pipe connector
9207
Washer, nitrile
7015
Bracket
Screw: M5 x 12 skt hd
9208
Pipe base
X6121-06011A Pipe connector
Screw: M6 x 12 skt hd
Screw: M8 x 35 skt hd
Screw: M4 x 10 skt hd
1043
Draw bar
1053
Bracket
1042
Pivot
Screw: M8 x 20 shoulder
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
Qty. Ref. Mfr. No.
1
23 1041
1
24
1
25
1
26 8400
4
27 1044
1
28
1
34
1
35
4
36
1
37 9201A
1
38 9205
1
39 9203
2
40 9204
1
41
1
42
2
43
2
44
1
45 8500
1
48 9210
1
49 9206
1
50 9209
1
53
37
Description
Linkage
Washer
Clip: 2.5 x 16
Stand cabinet, left hand
Draw bar
Screw: M10 x 30 skt hd
Coolant feed pipe
Coolant feed pipe
Screw: M6 x 12 button hd
Louvred cover
Gasket
Filter
Flange
Pipe clip
Pipe 16 x 1000
Coolant pump
Screw: M5 x 10 skt hd
Stand cabinet, right hand
Coolant box cover
Pipe connector
Coolant box
Roll pin: 5 x 25
Qty.
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
STAND & COOLANT COMPONENTS (continued)
Ref.
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
Mfr. No.
1048
1047
1045
1052
1054
Description
Spring, extension
Spring anchor
Collar: 20 ID
Crank
Stop post
Stop screw, M6 x 30
Draw bar
Qty. Ref. Mfr. No.
1
61
1
62 1049-1
1
63
1
64 1049-3
1
65 1049-2
1
66 1050
1
Description
Roll pin: 5 x 40
Shaft
Screw: M6 x 12 skt hd
Connecting sleeve
Brake shaft
Brake treadle
Qty.
1
1
1
1
1
1
MOTOR MOUNT & COVER
Ref.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Mfr. No.
1021
1002
1001
1024
1013
Description
Cover
Threaded stud
Knurled nut
Motor mount
Washer
Screw
Key: 8 x 40
1003A5 Double pulley
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
Qty. Ref. Mfr. No.
1
9
2
10
2
11
1
12
3
13
3
14
1
15
1
38
Description
Screw: M6 x 8 set
Motor
Washer
Screw
Nut: M6
Screw: M8 x 45 hex hd
Screw: M8 x 30 hex hd
Qty.
1
1
4
4
2
2
2
TAILSTOCK
Ref.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
Mfr. No. Description
4033
Shoulder bolt
4032
Nut: M10
Washer
6005
Handwheel
4037
Leaf spring
6010
Graduated collar
Screw: M6 x 16
6011
Flange
Oiler
Thrust bearing: 12 x 26 x 8
Key: 4 x 15
6006
Tailstock leadscrew
6023
Nut: M10
Oiler
Screw: M6 x 8
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
Ref.
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Mfr. No.
6012
6013
6001
6022
6021
6017
6004
6018
6003
6002
6019
6020
Description
Nut: M10
Tailstock quill
Tailstock body
Clamp screw
Lever
Clamp screw
Lever
Pin: 5 x 30
Collar (cam)
Screw: M10 x 50
Screw
Tailstock base
Pull rod
Shoe
Nut: M12
39
COMPOUND REST
Ref.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
Mfr. No.
5010
5009
5008
5005
5006
5003
5004
5001
5107
5002
5024
Description
Clamp lever
Clamp boss, M16
Collar
Screw: sq hd, M10 x 45
4-way toolholder
Tool post bolt, M16
Slide T-nut
Detent pin
Spring, comp. 1.2 x 4.8 x 8
Oiler
Nut: M6
Screw: set, M6 x 16
Compound swivel base
T-bolt, M10
Nut: M10
Compound rest
Pressure pin
Screw: set, M6 x 8
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
Qty. Ref. Mfr. No.
1
19 5023
1
20 5021
1
21 5012A1
8
22 5011A3
1
23
1
24 8101
1
25 5026A2
1
26
1
27
1
28 5013
1
29 8101
1 30 5014A3
31 5016A
2
32 5028
2
33
34 5031
35 4037
Description
Compound rest gib
Gib screw
Leadscrew barrel nut
Compound rest leadscrew
Key: 4 x 8
Thrust bearing: 12 x 26 x 9
Datum plate
Rivet: 2 x 4
Screw: skt hd, M6 x 25
Leadscrew flange
Thrust bearing: 12 x 26 x 9
Graduated collar
Handwheel
Washer
Screw: skt hd, M6 x 12
Handle (pr., diff. lengths)
Leaf spring
40
Qty.
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
LATHE BED
Lathe bed 10047
NOT SHOWN Removable gap
plug and related hardware
NOTE Racks are attached by M6 x 15 skt hd screws (6) and 5 x 20
pins (6). Bed is attached to stands by M12 x 40 hex hd bolts (6)
CARRIAGE (diagram on following page)
Ref.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
Mfr. No. Description
5101
Carriage
Screw: M5 x 12
5108
Wiper
5106
Wiper cover
Screw: M3 x 8
5130
Carriage gib
5110
Wiper cover
5109
Wiper
5113
Screw: oil cap
5128
Screw: carriage locking
Pin: 6 x 45
Screw: M10 x 30 skt hd
Oiler
5115
Cross slide gib screw
5102
Cross slide
Screw: M6 x 12
5105
Bushing
5114
Cross slide gib
Screw: M4 x 12
5104A2 Split nut
Gear
Screw: M6 x 8 set
Screw: M8 x 25 skt hd
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
Qty. Ref.
24
8
25
1
26
1
27
1
28
2
29
2
30
2
31
1
32
1
33
2
34
4
35
5
36
2
37
1
38
1
39
1
40
1
41
1
42
1
43
1
44
1
45
7
46
Mfr. No. Description
Nut: M8
Screw: M8 x 25 skt hd
5112
Wiper cover
5111
Wiper
5131
Gib support bar
5116
Slider plate
Key: 5 x 20
5129
Carriage lock plate
Pin: 3 x 20
5124A3 Graduated collar
4037
Leaf spring
5122A Handwheel
5028
Washer
Screw: M6 x 16 skt hd
4033
Shoulder bolt
4032
Handle
8102
Thrust bearing: 15 x 28 x 9
5125A Leadscrew hub
Screw: M8 x 30 skt hd
5126
Collar
5103A3 Cross slide leadscrew
Rivet: 2 x 4
5133A2 Datum plate
41
Qty.
4
4
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
CARRIAGE (continued)
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
42
FOLLOWER & STEADY RESTS
STEADY REST
FOLLOWER REST
Ref.
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
A10
A11
Mfr. No. Description
Screw: set, M6 x 6
8205
Knob
8207
Bushing
8206
Pressure screw
8208
Sleeve
8209
Nose
Screw: set, M6 x 10
Nut: M6
Screw: set, M6 x 16
8201
Follower base
Screw: skt hd, M8 x 40
B1 8205
B2
B3 8207
B4 8206
Knob
Screw: set, M6 x 6
Bushing
Pressure screw
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
Qty.
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
2
3
3
3
3
Ref.
B5
B6
B7
B8
B9
B10
B11
B12
B13
B14
B15
B16
B17
B18
B19
B20
Mfr. No.
8208
8209
8202
8201
6020
8203
8204
Description
Sleeve
Nose
Upper frame
Screw: set, M6 x 10
Screw: set, M6 x 16
Nut: M6
Nut: M6
Screw: skt hd, M8 x 25
Steady rest base
Nut: M12
Washer
Shoe
Screw: sq hd, M12 x 60
Roll pin: 4 x 25
Clamp screw
Clamp knob
43
Qty.
3
3
1
3
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
APRON
Worm rides on feed
shaft, not shown,
drives gear #45
Splines on #39 engage
with grooves on #24
#52, #57 and related components
prevent accidental closing of the half
nuts #70 when cross slide feed or
carriage feed is engaged by lever #39
Ref.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
Mfr. No. Description
4026
Bushing
4029
Gear: 50T
Pin: 5 x 30
4027
Spacer
4028
Gear shaft: 11T
4008
Worm bracket
4009
Worm
Key: 5 x 36
4032
Handle
4033
Shoulder bolt
4034
Handwheel
4036
Graduated collar
Screw: skt hd M6 x 20
4031
Hub
Oiler
4030
Gear shaft: 15T
Screw: skt hd M6 x 12
4035
Washer
Screw: skt hd M6 x 10
4038
Washer
4039
Post
Key: 5 x 16
4037
Leaf spring
4015
Shaft, power feed select
4012
Gear: 48T
Pin: 5 x 33
4013
Gear: 51T
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
Qty. Ref. Mfr.
28 4014
1
29 4016
1
30 4001
1
31
1
32 4010
1
33 4011
1
1
34
1
35
36
1
1
37
1
38 4041
1
39 4042
2
40
41 4020
42 4019
43
1
44 4018
1
45 4017
4
47
1
49
1
50
1
51 4043
1
52 4025
53 4024
54
1
55 4045
56
Not shown Oil sight glass
Description
Gear: 25T
Hub
Apron case
Screw: set M6 x 6
Gear: 25T
Shaft
Screw: skt hd M6 x 45
Screw: set M8 x 8
Qty.
Ball
Lever
Splined shaft
Pin: 5 x 25
Bushing
Gear: 14T
Pin: 5 x 25
Shaft
Worm gear, 24T
Screw: set M5 x 33
Screw: skt hd M6 x 10
Screw: set M6 x 6
Limit stop
Lock collar
Shaft
Screw: set M8 x 8
Boss, split-nut shaft
Pin: 5 x 40
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Spring: 1 x 45 x 6
44
1
1
1
3
1
2
APRON (continued)
Ref.
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
Mfr. No. Description
4021
Stop flag
Screw: set M5 x 12
4023
Split-nut shaft
Screw: skt hd M8 x 30
Washer
Screw: skt hd M10 x 20
Washer
Nut: M6
4044
Lever, split-nut shaft
Pin: 5 x 10
Qty. Ref. Mfr.
1
67 3022
1
69
1
70
1
72
2
73
74 4006
2
75 4005
1
76
1
77 4044
1
78
2
Description
Gib, split-nut casing
Screw: skt hd M5
Split-nut assembly
Set screw
Nut
Threading dial
Housing
Screw: skt hd M6 x 65
Gear, leadscrew follower, 16T
Screw: M6 x 15
Qty.
2
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
MOTOR CONTROL
Motor switches at left end of control shaft, front cover removed
Motor switches, end-on from left, showing D-shape cam attached to end of
control shaft
COOLANT PUMP WIRING
CARRIAGE STOP
PM-1236 v4 1-2017.indd
45