Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and

Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch
Modules SBCEGBESW1 and
SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
A Guide for System Administrators of Intel® Server Products
Intel Order Number D67147-002
Disclaimer
Information in this document is provided in connection with Intel® products. No license, express or implied, by
estoppel or otherwise, to any intellectual property rights is granted by this document. Except as provided in Intel's
Terms and Conditions of Sale for such products, Intel assumes no liability whatsoever, and Intel disclaims any
express or implied warranty, relating to sale and/or use of Intel products including liability or warranties relating to
fitness for a particular purpose, merchantability, or infringement of any patent, copyright or other intellectual property
right. Intel products are not intended for use in medical, life saving, or life sustaining applications.
Intel may make changes to specifications and product descriptions at any time, without notice.
Intel and Intel Xeon are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United
States and other countries.
Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.
Copyright © 2006, Intel Corporation. All Rights Reserved.
This product includes software developed by the OpenSSL Project for use in the Open SSL Toolkit (http://
wwww.openssl.org/).
This product includes software developed by the NetBSD Foundation, Inc., and its contributors.
This product includes crytographic software written by Eric Young (eay@cryptsoft.com).
This product includes software written by Tim Hudson (tjh@cryptsoft.com).
SECURE SOCKETS LAYER DELIVERABLE: The Secure Sockets Layer shall constitute “OpenSSL Deliverables”
hereunder. The OpenSSL Deliverables are provided to Licensee under the terms of this Agreement and the
OpenSSL License Agreement (the “OpenSSL License”), and any use of such OpenSSL Deliverables shall comply
with the terms and conditions of the OpenSSL License and this Agreement. A copy of the OpenSSL License is
available in the license.txt file accompanying the Deliverables and at http://www.openssl.org/source/license.html.
SSH PROTOCOL SUITE OF NETWORK CONNECTIVITY TOOLS DELIVERABLES: The SSH protocol suite of
network connectivity tools shall constitute “Open SSH Deliverables” hereunder. The OpenSSH Deliverables are
provided to Licensee under the terms of this Agreement and the BSD License (the “BSD License”), and any use of
such OpenSSH Deliverables shall comply with the terms and conditions fo the BSD License and this Agreement. A
copy of the BSD License is set forth as below:
Copyright © Marvell International Ltd. and its affiliates.
All rights reserved.
Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted provided that the
following conditions are met:
1. Redistribution of source code must retain the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following
disclaimer.
2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following
disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
3. All advertising materials mentioning features or use of this software must display the following acknowledgement:
This product includes software developed by the NetBSD Foundation, Inc. and its contributors.
4. Neither the name of Marvell nor the names of its contributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived
from this software without specific prior written permission.
THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS “AS IS” AND ANY
EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL
THE COPYRIGHT OWNER OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL,
SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO,
PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS
INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT,
STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE
USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.
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Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
Safety Precautions
Important Safety Instructions
Read all caution and safety statements in this document before performing any of the
instructions.
Wichtige Sicherheitshinweise
Lesen Sie zunächst sämtliche Warnund Sicherheitshinweise in diesem Dokument, bevor
Sie eine der Anweisungen ausführen.
Consignes de sécurité
Lisez attention toutes les consignes de sécurité et les mises en garde indiquées dans ce
document avant de suivre toute instruction.
Instrucciones de seguridad importantes
Lea todas las declaraciones de seguridad y precaución de este documento antes de realizar
cualquiera de las instrucciones.
重要安全指导
在执行任何指令之前,请阅读本文档中的所有注意事项及安全声明。 和/或
http://support.intel.com/support/motherboards/server/sb/CS-010770.htm 上的 Intel
Server Boards and Server Chassis Safety Information(《Intel
服务器主板与服务器机箱安全信息》)。
Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
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Warnings
Heed safety instructions: Before working with your server product, whether you are
using this guide or any other resource as a reference, pay close attention to the safety
instructions. You must adhere to the assembly instructions in this guide to ensure and
maintain compliance with existing product certifications and approvals. Use only the
described, regulated components specified in this guide. Use of other products /
components will void the UL listing and other regulatory approvals of the product and
will most likely result in noncompliance with product regulations in the region(s) in which
the product is sold.
System power on/off: The power button DOES NOT turn off the system AC power. To
remove power from system, you must unplug the AC power cord from the wall outlet.
Make sure the AC power cord is unplugged before you open the chassis, add, or remove
any components.
Hazardous conditions, devices and cables: Hazardous electrical conditions may be
present on power, telephone, and communication cables. Turn off the server and
disconnect the power cord, telecommunications systems, networks, and modems attached
to the server before opening it. Otherwise, personal injury or equipment damage can
result.
Electrostatic discharge (ESD) and ESD protection: ESD can damage disk drives,
boards, and other parts. We recommend that you perform all procedures in this chapter
only at an ESD workstation. If one is not available, provide some ESD protection by
wearing an antistatic wrist strap attached to chassis ground any unpainted metal surface on
your server when handling parts.
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Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
Before installing this product, read the Safety Information.
Antes de instalar este produto, leia as Informações de Segurança.
Pred instalací tohoto produktu si prectete prírucku bezpecnostních instrukcí.
Læs sikkerhedsforskrifterne, før du installerer dette produkt.
Lees voordat u dit product installeert eerst de veiligheidsvoorschriften.
Ennen kuin asennat tämän tuotteen, lue turvaohjeet kohdasta Safety Information.
Avant d'installer ce produit, lisez les consignes de sécurité.
Vor der Installation dieses Produkts die Sicherheitshinweise lesen.
Prima di installare questo prodotto, leggere le Informazioni sulla Sicurezza.
Les sikkerhetsinformasjonen (Safety Information) før du installerer dette produktet.
Antes de instalar este produto, leia as Informações sobre Segurança.
Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
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Statement 1:
DANGER
Electrical current from power, telephone, and communication cables is hazardous.To
avoid a shock hazard:
• Do not connect or disconnect any cables or perform installation, maintenance, or
reconfiguration of this product during an electrical storm.
•
•
•
•
Connect all power cords to a properly wired and grounded electrical outlet.
Connect to properly wired outlets any equipment that will be attached to this product.
When possible, use one hand only to connect or disconnect signal cables.
Never turn on any equipment when there is evidence of fire, water, or structural
damage.
• Disconnect the attached power cords, telecommunications systems, networks, and
modems before you open the device covers, unless instructed otherwise in the
installation and configuration procedures.
• Connect and disconnect cables as described in the following table when installing,
moving, or opening covers on this product or attached devices.
To Connect:
To Disconnect:
1. Turn everything OFF.
1. Turn everything OFF.
2. First, attach all cables to devices.
2. First, remove power cords from outlet.
3. Attach signal cables to connectors.
3. Remove signal cables from connectors.
4. Attach power cords to outlet.
4. Remove all cables from devices.
5. Turn device ON.
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Statement 2:
CAUTION
When laser products (such as CD-ROMs, DVD drives, fiber optic devices, or transmitters)
are installed, note the following:
• Do not remove the covers. Removing the covers of the laser product could result in
exposure to hazardous laser radiation. There are no serviceable parts inside the device.
• Use of controls or adjustments or performance of procedures other than those
specified herein might result in hazardous radiation exposure.
DANGER
Some laser products contain an embedded Class 3A or Class 3B laser diode. Note the
following.
Laser radiation when open. Do not stare into the beam, do not view directly with optical
Class 1 Laser Product
Laser Klasse 1
Laser Klass 1
Luokan 1 Laserlaite
Appareil A` Laser de Classe 1
Statement 3:
≥ 18 kg (39.7 lb)
≥ 32 kg (70.5 lb)
≥ 55 kg (121.2 lb)
CAUTION:
Use safe practices when lifting.
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Statement 4:
CAUTION:
If you install a strain-relief bracket option over the end of the power cord that is connected
to the device, you must connect the other end of the power cord to an easily accessible
power source.
Statement 5:
CAUTION:
Never remove the cover on a power supply or any part that has the following label
attached.
Hazardous voltage, current, and energy levels are present inside any component that has
this label attached. There are no serviceable parts inside these components. If you suspect
a problem with one of these parts, contact a service technician.
Statement 6:
DANGER
Overloading a branch circuit is potentially a fire hazard and a shock hazard under certain
conditions. To avoid these hazards, ensure that your system electrical requirements do not
exceed branch circuit protection requirements.
Statement 7:
CAUTION:
Hazardous voltage, current, and energy levels might be present. Only a qualified service
technician is authorized to remove the covers where the following label is attached.
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Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
Preface
The Embedded Web System (EWS) is a network management system. The Embedded Web
Interface configures, monitors, and troubleshoots network devices from a remote web
browser. The Embedded Web Interface web pages are easy-to-use and easy-to-navigate. In
addition, The Embedded Web Interface provides real time graphs and RMON statistics to
help system administrators monitor network performance.
This preface provides an overview to the Embedded Interface User Guide, and includes
the following sections:
• User Guide Overview
• Intended Audience
User Guide Overview
This section provides an overview of this User Guide:
• Safety Precautions — Provides safety precautions for using the device. It is
recommended to read the safety precautions before using the device.
• Section 1, Device Description — Provides a device description, including the port
descriptions, supported RFCs and standards, and a brief description of the device
features.
• Section 2, Installing and Removing the Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch
Module SBCEGBESW1/SBCEGBESW10 — Provides instructions for unpacking
and installing the device.
• Section 3, Information Panel LEDs and External Ports — Provides a description
of device LEDs and external ports.
• Section 4, Getting Started — Provides information about using the EWS, including
The Embedded Web Interface interface, management, and information buttons, as
well as information about adding, modifying, and deleting device information.
• Section 5, Managing Device Information — Provides information about opening
the device zoom view, defining general system information, and enabling Jumbo
frames.
• Section 6, Configuring Device Security — Provides information about configuring
device security for management security, traffic control, and network security.
• Section 7, Configuring Ports — Provides information about configuring ports.
• Section 8, Aggregating Ports — Provides information about configuring Link
Aggregated Groups and LACP.
Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
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• Section 9, Configuring VLANs — Provides information about configuring and
managing VLANs, including information about GARP and GVRP, and defining
VLAN groups.
• Section 10, Configuring IP Information — Provides information about defining
device IP addresses, ARP, and Domain Name Servers.
• Section 11, Defining the Forwarding Database and Static Routes — Provides
information about defining Static Forwarding Database Entries and Dynamic Forward
Database Entries.
• Section 12, Configuring Multicast Forwarding — Provides information about
Multicast Forwarding.
• Section 13, Configuring Spanning Tree — Provides information about configuring
Spanning Tree Protocol and the Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol.
• Section 14, Configuring SNMP — Provides information about defining SNMP
v1,v2c, and v3 management, including SNMP filters and notifications.
• Section 15, Configuring Quality of Service (QoS) — Provides information about
configuring Quality of Service on the device.
• Section 16, Managing System Files — Provides information about downloading,
uploading, and copying system files.
• Section 17 Managing System Logs — Provides information about enabling and
defining system logs.
• Section 18, Managing Device Diagnostics — Provides information on Configuring
Port Mirroring, Ethernet Ports, and Viewing Optical Transceivers.
• Section 19, Configuring System Time — Provides information about configuring
system time, including Daylight Savings Time parameters and Simple Network Time
Protocol (SNTP) parameters.
• Section 20, Viewing Statistics — Provides information about viewing device
statistics, including RMON statistics, device history events, and port and LAG
utilization statistics.
• Appendix A, Getting Help — Provides information for getting technical support.
• Appendix B, Regulatory and Compliance Information — Provides information
about safety compliances, compliance markings, product certifications,
electromagnetic compatibility, RoHS, and recycling.
• Appendix C, Troubleshooting — Provides information for troubleshooting the
device.
• Appendix D, Intel® Server Issue Report Form — Provides a customer service form
for reporting problems with the device.
Intended Audience
This guide is intended for network administrators familiar with IT concepts and
terminology.
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Contents
Safety Precautions .................................................................................................... iii
Important Safety Instructions ................................................................................................ iii
Wichtige Sicherheitshinweise ............................................................................................... iii
Consignes de sécurité .......................................................................................................... iii
Instrucciones de seguridad importantes ............................................................................... iii
Preface ........................................................................................................................ ix
User Guide Overview ............................................................................................................ ix
Intended Audience ................................................................................................................. x
Device Description ..................................................................................................... 1
Specifications and Features .................................................................................................. 1
Ports ............................................................................................................................ 1
Standards ...................................................................................................................... 1
Network Cable Support .................................................................................................3
Device Features ............................................................................................................ 3
Installing and Removing the Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Module
SBCEGBESW1/SBCEGBESW10 ............................................................................... 9
Overview ........................................................................................................................ 9
Package Contents ......................................................................................................... 9
Unpacking the Switch Module ....................................................................................... 9
Hardware Components ................................................................................................10
Configuration Information Requirements .............................................................................11
Installation Guidelines .................................................................................................12
System Reliability Considerations .......................................................................................12
Installing the Switch Module ................................................................................................12
Information Panel LEDs and External Ports .......................................................... 17
Information Panel .................................................................................................................17
LEDs ....................................................................................................................................18
Getting Started .......................................................................................................... 19
Starting the Embedded Web Interface .................................................................................19
Understanding the Embedded Web Interface ......................................................................21
Device Representation ................................................................................................22
Using the Embedded Web Interface Management Buttons ........................................23
Using Screen and Table Options .........................................................................................24
Adding Configuration Information ................................................................................24
Modifying Configuration Information ............................................................................25
Deleting Configuration Information ..............................................................................25
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Resetting the Device ........................................................................................................... 26
Logging Off from the Device ................................................................................................ 26
Managing Device Information ..................................................................................27
Configuring Device Security ....................................................................................29
Configuring Management Security ...................................................................................... 29
Configuring Authentication Methods ........................................................................... 29
Configuring Passwords ............................................................................................... 47
Configuring Network Security .............................................................................................. 52
Network Security Overview ......................................................................................... 52
Defining Network Authentication Properties ................................................................ 54
Defining Port Authentication ........................................................................................ 55
Configuring Traffic Control .......................................................................................... 61
Defining Access Control Lists ..................................................................................... 66
Configuring Ports .....................................................................................................77
Aggregating Ports .....................................................................................................81
Configuring LAGs ................................................................................................................ 82
Defining LAG Members ....................................................................................................... 84
Configuring LACP ................................................................................................................ 86
Configuring VLANs ...................................................................................................89
Defining VLAN Properties ................................................................................................... 90
Defining VLAN Membership ................................................................................................ 92
Defining VLAN Interface Settings ........................................................................................ 94
Defining VLAN Groups ........................................................................................................ 95
Defining VLAN MAC Based Groups ............................................................................ 96
Defining VLAN Subnet Based Groups ........................................................................ 98
Defining VLAN Protocol Based Groups .................................................................... 100
Mapping Groups to VLANs ....................................................................................... 102
Defining GARP .......................................................................................................... 104
Defining GVRP .......................................................................................................... 106
Configuring IP Information ....................................................................................109
Configuring IP Interfaces ................................................................................................... 109
Defining IP Addresses ............................................................................................... 109
Defining ARP Settings ............................................................................................... 111
Configuring Domain Name Servers ................................................................................... 112
Defining DNS Servers ............................................................................................... 113
Defining DNS Host Mapping ..................................................................................... 115
Defining the Forwarding Database and Static Routes ........................................117
Defining Static Forwarding Database Entries .................................................................... 117
Defining Dynamic Forwarding Database Entries ............................................................... 119
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Configuring Multicast Forwarding ........................................................................ 121
Defining IGMP Snooping ...................................................................................................121
Defining Multicast Groups ..................................................................................................123
Defining Multicast Forward All Settings .............................................................................126
Configuring Spanning Tree ................................................................................... 129
Defining Classic Spanning Tree ........................................................................................130
Defining Spanning Tree Interface Settings ........................................................................132
Defining Rapid STP ...........................................................................................................136
Defining Multiple STP ........................................................................................................138
Defining Multiple STP Instance To VLAN Settings ....................................................139
Defining Multiple STP Instance Settings ...................................................................140
Defining Multiple STP Interface Settings ...................................................................141
Configuring SNMP .................................................................................................. 145
SNMP v1 and v2c ..............................................................................................................145
SNMP v3 ............................................................................................................................145
Configuring SNMP Security ...............................................................................................146
Defining SNMP Security ............................................................................................146
Defining SNMP Views ...............................................................................................148
Defining SNMP Group Profiles ..................................................................................149
Defining SNMP Group Members ...............................................................................152
Defining SNMP Communities ....................................................................................155
Configuring SNMP Notifications ........................................................................................158
Defining SNMP Notification Global Parameters ........................................................159
Defining SNMP Notification Recipients .....................................................................160
Defining SNMP Notification Filters ............................................................................162
Configuring Quality of Service (QoS) ................................................................... 165
Quality of Service Overview ...............................................................................................165
VPT Classification Information ..................................................................................165
CoS Services .............................................................................................................165
Defining General QoS Settings ..........................................................................................166
Configuring CoS General Parameters .......................................................................166
Restoring Factory Default QoS Interface Settings .....................................................168
Defining Queues ........................................................................................................169
Configure Bandwidth Settings ...................................................................................170
Configuring QoS Mapping .........................................................................................171
Mapping DSCP Values to Queues ............................................................................173
Configuring Basic QoS Settings ........................................................................................174
Configuring Basic General Parameters .....................................................................174
Configuring DSCP Rewrite ........................................................................................175
Configuring Advanced QoS Settings .................................................................................177
Defining Policy Properties .........................................................................................177
Defining Policy Profiles ..............................................................................................182
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Managing System Files ..........................................................................................189
File Management Overview ............................................................................................... 189
Downloading System Files ................................................................................................ 190
Firmware Download .................................................................................................. 191
Configuration Download ............................................................................................ 191
Uploading System Files ..................................................................................................... 192
Software Image Upload ............................................................................................. 192
Configuration Upload ................................................................................................ 193
Copying Files ..................................................................................................................... 194
Restoring the Default Configuration File ................................................................... 195
Activating Image Files ....................................................................................................... 196
Managing System Logs ..........................................................................................197
Enabling System Logs ....................................................................................................... 198
Viewing the FLASH Logs .................................................................................................. 200
Clearing FLASH Logs ............................................................................................... 201
Viewing the Device Memory Logs ..................................................................................... 201
Defining Servers Log Parameters ..................................................................................... 202
Managing Device Diagnostics ...............................................................................205
Configuring Port Mirroring ................................................................................................. 205
Ethernet Ports Diagnostics ................................................................................................ 208
Configuring System Time ......................................................................................211
Configuring Daylight Savings Time ................................................................................... 211
Configuring SNTP ............................................................................................................. 216
Polling for Unicast Time Information ......................................................................... 216
Polling for Anycast Time Information ........................................................................ 216
Broadcast Time Information ...................................................................................... 217
Defining SNTP Global Settings ......................................................................................... 217
Defining SNTP Authentication ........................................................................................... 221
Adding an SNTP Interface ................................................................................................. 223
Viewing Statistics ...................................................................................................225
Viewing Interface Statistics ............................................................................................... 225
Viewing Device Interface Statistics ........................................................................... 225
Resetting Interface Statistics Counters ..................................................................... 227
Resetting Etherlike Statistics Counters ..................................................................... 229
Resetting GVRP Statistics Counters ......................................................................... 231
Viewing EAP Statistics .............................................................................................. 232
Managing RMON Statistics ............................................................................................... 233
Resetting RMON Statistics Counters ........................................................................ 236
Configuring RMON History ........................................................................................ 236
A. Getting Help ........................................................................................................247
World Wide Web ............................................................................................................... 247
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Telephone ..........................................................................................................................247
B. Troubleshooting ................................................................................................. 251
Problems following Initial System Installation ....................................................................251
First Steps Checklist ..................................................................................................251
Hardware Diagnostic Testing .............................................................................................251
Verifying Proper Operation of Key System Lights .....................................................252
Confirming Loading of the Operating System ............................................................252
Specific Problems and Corrective Actions .........................................................................252
Power Light Does Not Light .......................................................................................252
No Characters Appear on Screen .............................................................................252
Characters Are Distorted or Incorrect ........................................................................253
System Cooling Fans Do Not Rotate Properly ..........................................................253
Cannot Connect to a Server ......................................................................................253
Problems with Network ..............................................................................................254
Problems with Application Software that Ran Correctly Earlier .................................254
C. Regulatory and Compliance Information ......................................................... 255
Product Regulatory Compliance ........................................................................................255
Product Safety Compliance .......................................................................................255
Certifications / Registrations / Declarations ...............................................................256
Product Regulatory Compliance Markings ................................................................256
Electromagnetic Compatibility Notices ..............................................................................257
FCC (USA) ................................................................................................................257
ICES-003 (Canada) ...................................................................................................258
Europe (CE Declaration of Conformity) .....................................................................258
VCCI (Japan) .............................................................................................................258
RRL (Korea) ..............................................................................................................259
Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) Compliance ...............................................259
End-of-Life / Product Recycling .........................................................................................260
D. Intel® Server Issue Report Form ...................................................................... 261
E. Installation/Assembly Safety Instructions ....................................................... 265
English ...............................................................................................................................265
Deutsch ..............................................................................................................................267
Français .............................................................................................................................270
Español ..............................................................................................................................272
Italiano ...............................................................................................................................274
F. Safety Information .............................................................................................. 277
English ...............................................................................................................................277
Server Safety Information ..........................................................................................277
Safety Warnings and Cautions ..................................................................................277
Intended Application Uses .........................................................................................278
Site Selection .............................................................................................................278
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Equipment Handling Practices .................................................................................. 278
Power and Electrical Warnings ................................................................................. 278
System Access Warnings ......................................................................................... 279
Rack Mount Warnings ............................................................................................... 280
Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) ................................................................................... 280
Other Hazards ........................................................................................................... 281
Sicherheitshinweise für den Server ........................................................................... 282
Sicherheitshinweise und Vorsichtsmaßnahmen ....................................................... 282
Zielbenutzer der Anwendung .................................................................................... 283
Standortauswahl ....................................................................................................... 283
Handhabung von Geräten ......................................................................................... 283
Warnhinweise für den Systemzugang ....................................................................... 285
Elektrostatische Entladungen (ESD) ......................................................................... 286
Andere Gefahren ....................................................................................................... 287
Français ............................................................................................................................. 288
Consignes de sécurité sur le serveur ........................................................................ 288
Sécurité: avertissements et mises en garde ............................................................. 288
Domaines d’utilisation prévus ................................................................................... 289
Sélection d’un emplacement ..................................................................................... 289
Pratiques de manipulation de l’équipement .............................................................. 289
Décharges électrostatiques (ESD) ............................................................................ 292
Autres risques ........................................................................................................... 293
Información de seguridad del servidor ...................................................................... 294
Advertencias y precauciones sobre seguridad ......................................................... 294
Aplicaciones y usos previstos ................................................................................... 294
Selección de la ubicación .......................................................................................... 295
Manipulación del equipo ........................................................................................... 295
Advertencias el acceso al sistema ............................................................................ 297
Descarga electrostática (ESD) .................................................................................. 298
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Device Description
This document provides basic information on how to install and establish a basic
configuration for the Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Module SBCEGBESW1/
SBCEGBESW10. For the latest updates on documentation and software, check the Intel
support website at http://support.intel.com.
Note: Support for a 3rd or 4th Ethernet switch module requires installation of an Intel® Blade
Server Ethernet Expansion Card SBGBE.
The Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Module SBCEGBESW1/SBCEGBESW10 is
installed in one of the I/O module bays of the Intel® Blade Server Chassis SBCE, which is
a system that supports up to 14 server modules and up to four Ethernet switch modules.
Note: Before proceeding, read the release notes for this product. The release notes can be
downloaded from the Intel support website at http://support.intel.com.
For more information about the components of the information panel, see Chapter 3
“Information Panel LEDs and External Ports” on page 17. For more information about the
MAC address, see “IP addresses and SNMP community names” on page 21.
Specifications and Features
Ports
• Six external 1000BASE-T ports for making 10/100/1000 Mbps connections to a
backbone, end stations, and servers
• Fourteen internal full-duplex gigabit ports, one connected to each of the blade servers
• Two internal full-duplex 100 Mbps ports connected to the management modules
• Two XFP10Gbps ports
Standards
The following standards apply to the switch module.
• Switching Support
•
•
•
•
IEEE 802.3 10BASE-T Ethernet
IEEE 802.3 Auto-negotiation
IEEE 802.3u 100BASE-TX Fast Ethernet
IEEE 802.3z Gigabit Ethernet
Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
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• IEEE 802.3ab 1000BASE-T
• IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN
• IEEE 802.1p Priority
•
•
•
•
•
•
GARP
GVRP
IEEE 802.3ac - VLAN Tagging
IEEE 802.3ad - Link Aggregation
IEEE 802.1s - Spanning Tree
IEEE 802.1w - Rapid Spanning Tree
• IEEE 802.1X - Port Based Authentication
• IEEE 802.3X - Flow Control
• RFC 768 - UDP
• RFC 783 - TFTP
•
•
•
•
•
•
RFC 791 - IP
RFC 792 - ICMP
RFC 793 - TCP
RFC 826 - ARP
RFC 2131 - DHCP Client
RFC 2865 - RADIUS Client
— RFC 2866 - RADIUS Accounting
— RFC 2868 - RADIUS Attributes for Tunnel Protocol Support
— RFC 2869 - RADIUS Extensions
— RFC 2869bis - RADIUS Support for Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP)
• Advanced Layer 2 Functionality:
— Broadcast Storm Recovery
— Multicast Storm Recovery
— Port Mirroring
— IGMP Snooping
— Static MAC Filtering
• System Facilities
— Event and Error Logging Facility
— Run-time and Configuration Download Capability
— PING Utility
• Quality of Service (QOS) Support
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Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
• Bandwidth Provisioning
— Per Interface
• Access Control Lists
— Source IP•Destination IP
— Source L4 Port
— Destination L4 Port
Network Cable Support
• 10BASE-T
— UTP Category 3, 4, 5 (100 meters maximum)
— 100-ohm STP (100 meters maximum)
• 100BASE-TX
— UTP Category 5, 5e (100 meters maximum)
— EIA/TIA-568B 100-ohm STP (100 meters maximum)
— XFP 10Gbps
Device Features
The following table contains information regarding the software and hardware features:
Feature
Description
Access Control Lists
Access Control Lists (ACL) provides rules for either forwarding or
blocking network traffic. Users can define ACLs to enforce security.
This is done by defining classification rules and assigning an
action per rule. An ACL can be assigned to an ingress interface
(port or VLAN).
Address Resolution Protocol
IP routing generally utilizes routers and Layer 3 switches to intercommunicate using various routing protocols to discover network
topology and define Routing tables. Device Next-Hop MAC
addresses are automatically derived by ARP. This includes directly
attached end systems. Users can override and supplement this by
defining additional ARP Table entries.
Automatic Aging for MAC Addresses
Media Access Control Address (MAC) addresses from which no
traffic is received for a given period are aged out. This prevents the
Bridging Table from overflowing.
Back Pressure Support
On half-duplex links, the receiving port prevents buffer overflows,
by occupying the link so that it is unavailable for additional traffic.
BootP and DHCP Clients
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) enables additional
setup parameters to be received from a network server upon
system startup. DHCP service is an on-going process. DHCP is an
extension to BootP.
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Feature
4
Description
BootP Relay
BootP enables a device to solicit and receive configuration data
from servers. BootP relies on UDP broadcasts as the underlying
transport mechanism. If the intended BootP server is not directly
attached to a client’s broadcast domain, a BootP relay service
enables the client to reach the server.
Class Of Service
The IEEE 802.1p signalling technique is an OSI Layer 2 standard
for marking and prioritizing network traffic at the data link/MAC
sub-layer. 802.1p traffic is classified and sent to the destination.
No bandwidth reservations or limits are established or enforced.
802.1p is a spin-off of the 802.1Q (Vlans) standard. 802.1p
establishes eight levels of priority, similar to the IP Precedence IP
Header bit-field.
Command Line Interface
Command Line Interface (CLI) syntax and semantics conform as
much as possible to common industry practice. CLI is composed
of mandatory and optional elements. The CLI interpreter provides
command and keyword completion to assist user and shorten
typing.
DNS Client
Domain Name System (DNS) converts user-defined domain
names into IP addresses. Each time a domain name is assigned
the DNS service translates the name into a numeric IP address.
For example, www.ipexample.com is translated to 192.87.56.2.
DNS servers maintain domain name databases and their
corresponding IP addresses.
Fast Link
STP can take up to 30-60 seconds to converge. During this time,
STP detects possible loops, allowing time for status changes to
propagate and for relevant devices to respond. 30-60 seconds is
considered too long of a response time for many applications. The
Fast Link option bypasses this delay, and can be used in network
topologies where forwarding loops do not occur.
Flow Control Support (IEEE 802.3X)
Flow control enables lower speed devices to communicate with
higher speed devices, requesting that the higher speed device
refrains from sending packets. Transmissions are temporarily
halted to prevent buffer overflows.
GVRP
GARP VLAN Registration Protocol (GVRP) provides IEEE
802.1Q-compliant VLAN pruning and dynamic VLAN creation on
802.1Q trunk ports. When GVRP is enabled, the device registers
and propagates VLAN membership on all ports that are part of the
active underlying Spanning Tree Protocol Features topology.
Hardware Watchdog Support
The device enables detection and corrective action for instances
where the device software stops responding.
ICMP Messages
Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) messages are used for
OOB messages related to network operation or malfunction
IGMP Snooping
Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) Snooping examines
IGMP frame contents, when they are forwarded by the device from
stations to an upstream Multicast router. From the frame, the
device identifies stations configured for Multicast sessions, and
which Multicast routers are sending Multicast frames.
Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
Feature
Link Aggregated Groups
Description
Up to seven Aggregated Links may be defined, each with up to
four member ports, to form a single Link Aggregated Group (LAG).
This enables:
•
•
•
•
Fault tolerance protection from physical link disruption
Higher bandwidth connections
Improved bandwidth granularity
High bandwidth server connectivity
LAG is composed of ports with the same speed, set to full-duplex
operation.
Link Aggregation and LACP
Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) uses peer exchanges
across links to determine, on an ongoing basis, the aggregation
capability of various links, and continuously provides the maximum
level of aggregation capability achievable between a given pair of
systems. LACP automatically determines, configures, binds and
monitors the port binding to aggregators within the system.
Locked Port Support
Locked Port increases network security by limiting access on a
specific port only to users with specific MAC addresses. These
addresses are either manually defined or learned on that port.
When a frame is seen on a locked port, and the frame source MAC
address is not tied to that port, the protection mechanism is
invoked
Longest Prefix Match Support
Within the CIDR recommendation, longest prefix matches are
used primarily to determine the best next-hop route for a packet
based on the destination address contained in the packet header.
Since IP addresses are generally assigned in a manner that
reflects the topology of the network, the result of a longest prefix
match reflects the shortest route to the destination. There may be
many entries matching a given address, and the LPM algorithm
entails searching for a matching entry with the longest prefix.
MAC Address Capacity Support
The device supports up to 16K MAC addresses. The device
reserves specific MAC addresses for system use.
MAC Multicast Support
Multicast service is a limited broadcast service, which allows oneto-many and many-to-many connections for information
distribution. Layer 2 multicast service is where a single frame is
addressed to a specific multicast address, and copies of the frame
transmitted to relevant port are created to receive its packets.
MDI/MDIX Support
The device supports auto-detection between crossed and straightthrough cables. Standard wiring for end stations is MediaDependent Interface (MDI) and the standard wiring for hubs and
switches is known as Media-Dependent Interface with Crossover
(MDIX).
Multiple Spanning Tree
Multiple Spanning Tree (MSTP) operation maps VLANs into STP
instances. MSTP provides differing load balancing scenario.
Packets assigned to various VLANs are transmitted along different
paths within MSTP Regions (MST Regions). Regions are one or
more MSTP bridges by which frames can be transmitted. The
standard lets administrators assign VLAN traffic to unique paths
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Feature
6
Description
Port Based Authentication
Port based authentication enables authenticating system users on
a per-port basis via a external server. Only authenticated and
approved system users can transmit and receive data. Ports are
authenticated via the Remote Authentication Dial In User Service
(RADIUS) server using the Extensible Authentication Protocol
(EAP).
Port Based Virtual LANs (VLANs)
Port-based VLANs classify incoming packets to VLANs based on
their ingress port.
Port Mirroring
Port mirroring monitors and mirrors network traffic by forwarding
copies of incoming and outgoing packets from a monitored port to
a monitoring port. Users specify which target port receives copies
of all traffic passing through a specified source port.
Quality of Service (QoS) Support
Network traffic is usually unpredictable, and the only basic
assurance that can be offered is Best Effort traffic delivery. To
overcome this challenge, Quality of Service (QoS) is applied
throughout the network. This ensures that network traffic is
prioritized according to specified criteria, and that specific traffic
receives preferential treatment. QoS in the network optimizes
network performance.
RADIUS
Remote Authentication Dial In User Service (RADIUS) is a client/
server-based protocol. A RADIUS server maintains a user
database, which contains per-user authentication information,
such as user name, password and accounting information.
Rapid Spanning Tree
Spanning Tree can take 30-60 seconds for each host to decide
whether its ports are actively forward traffic. Rapid Spanning Tree
(RSTP) detects and uses of network topologies to enable faster
convergence, without creating forwarding loops
Remote Monitoring
Remote Monitoring (RMON) is an extension to SNMP, which
provides comprehensive network traffic monitoring capabilities (as
opposed to SNMP which allows network device management and
monitoring). RMON is a standard MIB that defines current and
historical MAC-layer statistics and control objects, allowing realtime information to be captured across the entire network.
Self-Learning MAC Addresses
The device enables automatic MAC addresses learning from
incoming packets.
SNMP Alarms and Trap Logs
The system logs events with severity codes and timestamps.
Events are sent as SNMP traps to a Trap Recipient List.
SNMP Version 1 and Version 2
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) over the UDP/IP
protocol. To control access to the system, a list of community
entries is defined, each of which consists of a community string
and its access privileges. There are 3 levels of SNMP security
read-only, read-write and super. Only a super user can access the
community table.
SNMP Version 3
The SNMPv3 architecture introduces three main features to
existing SNMPv1 and SNMPv2 infrastructure: security, access
control and sending traps mechanism. It also describes how to
apply the access control and the new sending traps mechanism on
SNMPv1 and SNMPv2 PDUs.
Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
Feature
Description
SNTP
The Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) assures accurate
network device clock time synchronization up to the millisecond.
Time synchronization is performed by a network SNTP server.
Time sources are established by Stratums. Stratums define the
distance from the reference clock. The higher the stratum (where
zero is the highest), the more accurate the clock.
Spanning Tree
The Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) is a standard Layer 2 switch
requirement that allows bridges to automatically prevent and
resolve L2 forwarding loops. Switches exchange configuration
messages using specifically formatted frames and selectively
enable and disable forwarding on ports. Spanning Tree can be
enabled in the following modes:
•
•
•
Classic Spanning Tree
Rapid Spanning Tree
Multiple Spanning Tree
SSH
Secure Shell (SSH) is a protocol that provides a secure, remote
connection to a device. There are currently two versions of SSH
available: version 1 and 2. The SSH server feature enables an
SSH client to establish a secure, encrypted connection with a
device. This connection provides functionality that is similar to an
inbound telnet connection. SSH uses RSA Public Key
cryptography for device connections and authentication
Static MAC Entries
User defined static MAC entries are stored in the Bridging Table, in
addition to the Self Learned MAC addresses.
Storm Control
Storm Control enables limiting the amount of Multicast and
Broadcast frames accepted and forwarded by the device.
When Layer 2 frames are forwarded, Broadcast and Multicast
frames are flooded to all ports on the relevant VLAN. This
occupies bandwidth, and loads all nodes connected on all ports.
TACACS+
In addition to RADIUS support, the device also supports the
Terminal Access Controller Access Control System (TACACS+).
TACACS+ is a security application implemented in a Client/Server
based protocol that provides centralized validation of users
attempting to gain access to a router or network access server.
TCP
Transport Control Protocol (TCP) hides applications errors. TCP
connections are defined between 2 ports by an initial
synchronization exchange. TCP ports are identified by an IP
address and a 16-bit port number. Octets streams are divided into
TCP packets, each carrying a sequence number.
TFTP Trivial File Transfer Protocol
The device supports boot image, software and configuration
upload/download via TFTP
UDP Relay
UDP Relay enables the device to forward specific UDP broadcasts
from one interface to another. IP broadcast packets from one
interface are not generally forwarded to another interface.
However, some applications use UDP broadcast to detect the
availability of a service. Other services require Broadcast packets
to be routed to provide services to clients on another subnet.
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Feature
8
Description
Virtual Cable Testing (VCT)
VCT detects and reports copper link cabling occurrences,
such as open cables and cable shorts.
VLAN Support
VLANs are collections of switching ports that comprise a single
broadcast domain. Packets are classified as belonging to a VLAN
based on either the VLAN tag or based on a combination of the
ingress port and packet contents. Packets sharing common
attributes can be grouped in the same VLAN.
VLAN Tagging
IEEE 802.1Q defines an architecture for virtual bridged LANs, the
services provided in VLANs and the protocols and algorithms
involved in the provision of these services.
VLAN-Aware MAC-based Switching
Packets arriving from an unknown source address are sent to the
CPU. When source addresses are added to the Hardware Table.
Packets addressed to or from this address are more efficiently
forwarded in the future.
Web Based Management
With web based management, the system can be managed from
any web browser. The system contains an Embedded Web Server
(EWS), which serves HTML pages, through which the system can
be monitored and configured. The system internally converts webbased input into configuration commands, MIB variable settings
and other management-related settings.
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Installing and Removing the Intel®
Blade Server Ethernet Switch
Module SBCEGBESW1/
SBCEGBESW10
Overview
The process of installing an Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Module
SBCEGBESW1/SBCEGBESW10 into an Intel® Blade Server Chassis SBCE consists of
both hardware and software instructions. There are two main tasks:
• Physically installing the switch module into the Intel® Blade Server Chassis SBCE.
• Configuring the switch module.
The initial configuration process consists of setting the user name and password,
configuring the static IP address, and configuring the SNMP read/write access and
community strings.
After the IP address is set, the switch module can be managed through the network via
Telnet, SNMP, or Web interfaces.
Package Contents
While unpacking the switch module, ensure that the following items are included:
• The switch module
• Resource CD
• Safety and Regulatory Information Document
Unpacking the Switch Module
To unpack the switch module:
Note: Before unpacking the switch module, inspect the packaging and report any evidence of
damage immediately to Intel.
Note: An ESD strap is not provided; however, it is recommended to wear one for the following
procedure.
1. Open the container.
Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
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2. Carefully remove the switch module from the container and place it on a secure,
stable and clean surface.
3. Remove all packing material.
4. Inspect the switch module for damage. Report any damage immediately to Intel.
Hardware Components
Switch Module Components
Note: The illustrations in this document might differ slightly from the actual switch module and
blade server chassis.
Ethernet switch module
Release latch
Information panel
Serial number/
media access
control (MAC)
address label
Ethernet ports
Media access
control (MAC)
address label
Figure 1. Switch Module Components
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Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
Intel® Blade Server Chassis SBCE Architecture
The following illustration shows the four bays reserved for I/O modules.
Bay 3 Switch module 1
Bay 4 Switch module 2
Figure 2. Chassis I/O Module Bay Locations
The four I/O module bays are located at the rear panel of the Intel® Blade Server Chassis
SBCE. Although the Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Module SBCEGBESW1/
SBCEGBESW10 can be inserted in any of the I/O module bays it is important to
understand that not all bays are necessarily intended for switch modules. The usage of the
bays is dependent on the system I/O requirements.
Specifically, I/O module bays 1 and 2 are intended to house the Intel® Blade Server
Ethernet Switch Module SBCEGBESW1/SBCEGBESW10. Bays 3 and 4 should only be
populated with an Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Module SBCEGBESW1/
SBCEGBESW10 if an Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Expansion Card SBGBE is installed
as an option on the supported blade. For details of the Ethernet expansion card options,
refer to the applicable user guide that shipped with your blade server. The Intel® Blade
Server Chassis SBCE user guide also provides additional details on I/O expansion card
options.
Configuration Information Requirements
Before applying the initial configuration procedure to the switch module, the following
information must be obtained from the network administrator:
• The IP address to be assigned to a VLAN through which the switch module is
managed.
• The IP subnet mask for the network.
• The default gateway IP address.
Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
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• The SNMP community.
Installation Guidelines
Before beginning to install the switch module in the Intel® Blade Server Chassis SBCE,
read the following information:
• Review and become familiar with the safety and handling guidelines specified in
Appendix E, “Installation/Assembly Safety Instructions” and Appendix F, “Safety
Information”.
• The Intel® Blade Server Chassis SBCE does not need to be powered down to install
or replace any of the hot-swap modules.
• For a list of supported options for your Intel® Blade Server Chassis SBCE, go to
http://support.intel.com.
System Reliability Considerations
Note: To help ensure proper cooling and system reliability, make sure that:
To maintain proper system cooling, each I/O module bay must contain either a module or
a filler module.
A removed hot-swap module must be replaced with an identical module or a filler module
within 1 minute of removal.
Installing the Switch Module
Note: Neither the blade servers nor the Intel® Blade Server Chassis SBCE needs to be powered
down to install an Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Module SBCEGBESW1/
SBCEGBESW10.
Note: The initial simple configuration uses the following assumptions:
The switch module was never configured before and is in the same state as when it was
received.
The switch module is configured with a default user name and password.
This section applies only to additional or replacement switch modules not included in the
initial system order.
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Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
To install a switch module into an Intel® Blade Server Chassis SBCE perform the
following:
1. Remove the acoustic attenuation module, if installed, from the rear of the Intel®
Blade Server Chassis SBCE. The following illustration shows how to remove the
acoustic attenuation module.
Figure 3. Removing the Acoustic Attenuation Module
2. Select an I/O module bay in which to install the switch module. In this example, a
switch module is being installed in I/O module bay 1.
3. Remove the filler module from the selected bay. Store the filler module for future
use.
4. If not already done, touch the static-protective package that contains the switch
module to an unpainted metal part of Intel® Blade Server Chassis SBCE for at least
two seconds.
5. Remove the switch module from its static-protective package.
6. Ensure that the release latch on the switch module is in the open position
(perpendicular to the module).
7. Slide the switch module into the appropriate bay until it stops.
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8. Push the release latch on the front of the switch module to the closed position.
Switch module
Figure 4. Inserting a Switch Module into the Intel® Blade Server Chassis
SBCE
9. Replace the acoustic attenuation module if you removed it in Step 1. The following
illustration shows how to replace the acoustic attenuation module in the Intel®
Blade Server Chassis SBCE
.
Figure 5. Replacing the Acoustic Attenuation Module
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Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
Removing the Switch Module
Complete the following steps to remove the switch module.
1. Remove the acoustic attenuation module, if installed, from the rear of the Intel®
Blade Server Chassis SBCE. The following illustration shows how to remove the
acoustic attenuation module.
Figure 6. Removing the Acoustic Attenuation Module
2. Unplug any cables from the selected switch module.
3. For the Intel® Blade Server Chassis SBCE, pull the release latch toward the side of
the switch module. The module moves out of the I/O module bay about 0.64 cm
(0.25 inch).
4. Slide the switch module out of the I/O module bay and set it aside.
5. Place either another switch module or a filler module in the I/O module bay within
1 minute.
6. If you placed another switch module in the I/O module bay, reconnect any cables
that you unplugged in Step 2.
7. Replace the acoustic attenuation module option if you removed it in Step 1.
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Information Panel LEDs and
External Ports
This chapter describes the information panel and LEDs (also known as indicators) on the
Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Module SBCEGBESW1/SBCEGBESW10. This
chapter also identifies the external ports on the information panel.
Information Panel
The information panel of the switch module consists of LEDs, six external 1000BASE-T
ports and two XFP ports as shown in the following illustration.
Figure 7. Ports and LED Locations
The Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Module SBCEGBESW1/SBCEGBESW10
contains:
• Comprehensive LEDs, which display the status of the switch module and the network
(see “LEDs”).
• Fourteen internal ports, one connected to each of the processor blades.
• Two internal full-duplex 100 Mbps ports connected to the management module.
• Six external 1000BASE-T Ethernet ports for 10/100/1000 Mbps connections to
external Ethernet devices such as backbones, end stations and servers. These ports are
identified as Ext1, Ext2, Ext3, Ext4, Ext5 and Ext6 in the switch configuration menus.
• Two XFP 10Gbps ports. These ports are identified on the switch module as XFP1 and
XFP2.
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LEDs
The LEDs on the information panel of the switch module include OK, Fault, Ethernet link,
and Ethernet activity. The following illustration shows the LEDs on the switch module. A
description of each LED follows the illustration.
Figure 8. LED Indicators
Note: 1.The illustrations in this document may differ slightly from your hardware.
2.An amber LED illuminates when a system error or event has occurred. To identify the
error or event, check the LEDs on the information panel of the switch module.
OK (power-on): This green LED is located above the six external 10/100/1000 Mbps
ports on the information panel. When this LED is on, it indicates that the switch module
has passed the Power-On Self-Test (POST) and is operational.
Fault (Ethernet switch error): This amber LED is located next to the OK (power-on) LED
on the information panel. This LED indicates that the switch module has a fault. If the
switch module fails the POST, this fault LED will be lit.
Ethernet link: This green link status LED is located at the top of each external 10/100/
1000 Mbps port. When this LED is lit on a port, it indicates that there is a connection (or
link) to a device on that port.
Ethernet activity: This green activity LED is located at the bottom of each external 10/
100/1000 Mbps port. When this LED blinks on a port, it indicates that data is being
received or transmitted (that is, activity is occurring) on that port. The blink frequency is
proportional to the amount of traffic on that port.
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Getting Started
This section provides an introduction to the user interface, and includes the following
topics:
•
•
•
•
•
Starting the Embedded Web Interface
Understanding the Embedded Web Interface
Using Screen and Table Options
Resetting the Device
Logging Off from the Device
Starting the Embedded Web Interface
Note: Disable the popup blocker in your internet browser before beginning device configuration
using the EWS.
This section contains information on starting the Embedded Web Interface.
To access the user interface:
1. Open an internet browser.
2. Ensure that pop-up blockers are disabled. If pop-up blockers are enabled, the edit,
add, and device information messages may not open.
3. Enter the device IP address in the address bar and press Enter. The Enter Network
Password Page opens:
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Figure 9. Enter Network Password Page
4. Enter your user name and password.
Note:
• The device is pre-configured with the user name “USERID” and password
“PASSW0RD”.
• Passwords are case sensitive.
5. Click
20
. The Embedded Web Interface Home Page opens:
Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
Figure 10. Embedded Web Interface Home Page
Understanding the Embedded Web Interface
The Embedded Web Interface Home Page contains the following views:
• Port LED Indicators — Located at the top of the home page, the port LED indicators
provide a visual representation of the ports on the front panel.
• Tab Area — Located under the LED indicators, the tab area contains a list of the
device features and their components.
• Device View — Located in the main part of the home page, the device view provides
a view of the device, an information or table area, and configuration instructions.
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Figure 11. Embedded Web Interface Components
The following table lists the user interface components with their corresponding numbers:
Table 1. Interface Components
View
Description
1 Tree View
Tree View provides easy navigation through the configurable device
features. The main branches expand to display the sub-features.
2 Device Information View
Device View provides information about device ports, current
configuration and status, table information, and feature
components. Device View also displays other device information
and dialog boxes for configuring parameters.
3 Zoom View
Provides a graphic of the device on which the Web Interface runs.
4 Web Interface Information
Links
Provides user information, and allows users to save the current
device configuration, and sign out of the Web Interface.
This section provides the following additional information:
• Device Representation — Provides an explanation of the user interface buttons,
including both management buttons and task icons.
• Using the Embedded Web Interface Management Buttons — Provides
instructions for adding, modifying, and deleting configuration parameters.
Device Representation
The Embedded Web Interface Home Page contains a graphical panel representation of the
device. An explanation of the port settings displays when you move your mouse over the
port.
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Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
Figure 12. Device Representation
Using the Embedded Web Interface Management Buttons
Configuration Management buttons and icons provide an easy method of configuring
device information, and include the following:
Table 2. Web Interface Configuration Buttons
Button
Button Name
Description
Clear Logs
Clears system logs.
Clear All Counters
Clears statistics.
Create
Enables creation of configuration
entries.
Edit
Modifies configuration settings.
Apply
Applies configuration changes to the
device.
Test
Performs cable tests.
Advanced
Performs advanced tests.
Query
Queries the device table.
Delete
Deletes a configuration entries.
Reset
Resets configuration to before
changes were entered by user.
Next
Allows you to view the next page in a
table.
Back
Allows you to view the previous page
in a table.
Help
Opens the online help.
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Using Screen and Table Options
This option contains screens and tables for configuring devices. This section contains the
following topics:
• Adding Configuration Information
• Modifying Configuration Information
• Deleting Configuration Information
Adding Configuration Information
User-defined information can be added to specific Web Interface pages, by opening a new
Add page.
To add information to tables or Web Interface pages:
1. Open an Embedded Web Interface page.
2. Click
. An add page opens, such as the Add SNMP Community Page:
Figure 13. Add SNMP Community Page
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
updated.
24
. The configuration information is saved, and the device is
Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
Modifying Configuration Information
1. Open an Embedded Web Interface page.
2. Select a table entry.
3. Click
. A modification page, such as the Bind ACL Page opens:
Figure 14. Bind ACL Page
4. Modify the relevant fields.
5. Click
device.
. The fields are modified, and the information is saved to the
Deleting Configuration Information
1. Open The Embedded Web Interface page.
2. Select a table row.
3. Select the Remove checkbox.
4. Click
. The information is deleted, and the device is updated.
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Resetting the Device
The enables resetting the device from a remote location.
Note: To prevent the current configuration from being lost, save all changes from the running
configuration file to the startup configuration file before resetting the device.
To reset the device:
1. Click System > Reset. The opens.
Figure 15. Reset Page
2. Click
.
The device reboots and a confirmation prompt appears.
3. Click OK. The device is reset, and a prompt for a user name and password is
displayed.
4. Enter a user name and password to reconnect to the Web Interface.
Logging Off from the Device
1. Click Sign Out. The Embedded Web Interface Home Page closes.
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5
Managing Device Information
The System Information Page contains parameters for configuring general device
information, including the system name, location, and contact, the system MAC Address,
System Object ID, System Up Time, System IP and MAC addresses, and both software
and hardware versions.
To define the general system information:
1. Click System > System Information. The System Information Page opens:
Figure 16. System Information Page
The System Information Page contains the following fields:
• Model Name — Displays the device model number and name.
• System Name — Defines the user-defined device name. The field range is 0-160
characters.
• System Location — Defines the location where the system is currently running. The
field range is 0-160 characters.
• System Contact — Defines the name of the contact person. The field range is 0-160
characters.
• System Object ID — Displays the vendor’s authoritative identification of the
network management subsystem contained in the entity.
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• System Up Time — Displays the amount of time since the most recent device reset.
The system time is displayed in the following format: Days, Hours, Minutes, and
Seconds. For example, 41 days, 2 hours, 22 minutes, and 15 seconds.
• Base MAC Address — Displays the device MAC address.
•
•
•
•
•
Hardware Version — Displays the installed device hardware version number.
Software Version — Displays the installed software version number.
Boot Version — Displays the current boot version running on the device.
MCU Version — Displays the Multicontroller Unit (MCU) version number.
VPD Version — Displays the version of the VPD (Vital Product Data) EEPROM
used. The VPD stores information about a device that allows the device to be
administered at a system or network level. Typical VPD information includes a
product model number, a unique serial number, MAC address, Firmware and
Hardware revisions, and other information specific to the device type.
• Jumbo Frames — Indicates if Jumbo Frames are enabled on the device. The possible
field values are:
— Selected — Enables Jumbo Frames on the device.
— Unselected — Disables Jumbo Frames on the device
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6
Configuring Device Security
This section provides access to security pages that contain fields for setting security
parameters for ports, device management methods, users, and server security. This section
contains the following topics:
• Configuring Management Security
• Configuring Network Security
Configuring Management Security
This section provides information for configuring device management security. This
section includes the following topics:
• Configuring Authentication Methods
• Configuring Passwords
• Defining Access Control Lists
Configuring Authentication Methods
This section provides information for configuring device authentication methods. This
section includes the following topics:
•
•
•
•
Defining Access Profiles
Defining Profile Rules
Defining Authentication Profiles
Mapping Authentication Methods
• Defining TACACS+ Authentication
• Defining RADIUS Settings
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Defining Access Profiles
Access profiles are profiles and rules for accessing the device. Access to management
functions can be limited to user groups. User groups are defined for interfaces according
to IP addresses or IP subnets. Access profiles contain management methods for accessing
and managing the device. The device management methods include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
All
Telnet
Secure Telnet (SSH)
HTTP
Secure HTTP (HTTPS)
SNMP
Management access to different management methods may differ between user groups.
For example, User Group 1 can access the switch module only via an HTTPS session,
while User Group 2 can access the switch module via both HTTPS and Telnet sessions.
The Access Profiles Page contains the currently configured access profiles and their
activity status. Assigning an access profile to an interface denies access via other
interfaces. If an access profile is assigned to any interface, the device can be accessed by
all interfaces.
To configure access profiles:
1. Click Management Security > Access Method > Access Profiles. The Access
Profiles Page opens:
Figure 17. Access Profiles Page
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Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
The Access Profiles Page contains the following fields:
• Remove — Removes the selected access profile. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes the selected access profile. Access Profiles cannot be
removed when Active.
— Unchecked — Maintains the access profiles.
• Access Profile Name — Defines the access profile name. The access profile name
can contain up to 32 characters.
• Current Active Access Profile — Defines the access profile currently active.
2. Click
. The Add Access Profile Page opens:
Figure 18. Add Access Profile Page
The Add Access Profile Page contains the following fields:
• Access Profile Name — Defines the access profile name. The access profile name
can contain up to 32 characters.
• Rule Priority — Defines the rule priority. When the packet is matched to a rule, user
groups are either granted permission or denied device management access. The rule
number is essential to matching packets to rules, as packets are matched on a first-fit
basis. The rule priorities are assigned in the Profile Rules Page.
• Management Method — Defines the management method for which the rule is
defined. Users with this access profile can access the device using the management
method selected. The possible field values are:
— All — Assigns all management methods to the rule.
— Telnet — Assigns Telnet access to the rule. If selected, users accessing the
device using Telnet meeting access profile criteria are permitted or denied
access to the device.
— Secure Telnet (SSH) — Assigns SSH access to the rule. If selected, users
accessing the device using Telnet meeting access profile criteria are permitted or
denied access to the device.
— HTTP — Assigns HTTP access to the rule. If selected, users accessing the
device using HTTP meeting access profile criteria are permitted or denied
access to the device.
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31
— Secure HTTP (HTTPS) — Assigns HTTPS access to the rule. If selected, users
accessing the device using HTTPS meeting access profile criteria are permitted
or denied access to the device.
— SNMP — Assigns SNMP access to the rule. If selected, users accessing the
device using SNMP meeting access profile criteria are permitted or denied
access to the device.
• Interface — Defines the interface on which the access profile is defined. The possible
field values are:
— Port — Specifies the port on which the access profile is defined.
— LAG — Specifies the LAG on which the access profile is defined.
— VLAN — Specifies the VLAN on which the access profile is defined.
• Source IP Address — Defines the interface source IP address to which the access
profile applies. The Source IP Address field is valid for a subnet work.
• Network Mask — Indicates the interface network mask to which the packet is
matched.
• Prefix Length — Indicates the prefix length to which the packet is matched.
• Action — Defines the action taken. The possible field values are:
— Permit — Permits the addition of the access profile.
— Deny — Denies the addition of the access profile.
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
. The access profile is created, and the device is updated.
Defining Profile Rules
Access profiles can contain up to 128 rules that determine which users can manage the
switch module, and by which methods. Users can also be blocked from accessing the
device. Rules are composed of filters including:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Rule Priority
Interface
Management Method
Source IP Address
Prefix Length
Forwarding Action
The rule order is essential as packets are matched on a first-fit basis.
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Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
To define profile rules:
1. Click Management Security > Access Methods > Profile Rules. The Profile
Rules Page opens:
Figure 19. Profile Rules Page
The Profile Rules Page contains the following fields:
• Access Profile Name — Displays the access profile (AP) to which the rule is
attached.
• Remove — Removes rules from the selected access profiles. The possible field values
are:
— Checked — Removes the selected rule from the access profile.
— Unchecked — Maintains the rules attached to the access profile.
• Unit No. — Displays the unit number.
• Priority — Defines the rule priority. When the packet is matched to a rule, user
groups are either granted permission or denied device management access. The rule
number is essential to matching packets to rules, as packets are matched on a first-fit
basis.
• Interface — Indicates the interface type to which the rule applies. The possible field
values are:
— Port — Attaches the rule to the selected port.
— LAG — Attaches the rule to the selected LAG.
— VLAN — Attaches the rule to the selected VLAN.
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33
• Management Method — Defines the management method for which the rule is
defined. Users with this access profile can access the device using the management
method selected. The possible field values are:
— All — Assigns all management methods to the rule.
— Telnet — Assigns Telnet access to the rule. If selected, users accessing the
device using Telnet meeting access profile criteria are permitted or denied
access to the device.
— Secure Telnet (SSH) — Assigns SSH access to the rule. If selected, users
accessing the device using Telnet meeting access profile criteria are permitted or
denied access to the device.
— HTTP — Assigns HTTP access to the rule. If selected, users accessing the
device using HTTP meeting access profile criteria are permitted or denied
access to the device.
— Secure HTTP (HTTPS) — Assigns HTTPS access to the rule. If selected, users
accessing the device using HTTPS meeting access profile criteria are permitted
or denied access to the device.
— SNMP — Assigns SNMP access to the rule. If selected, users accessing the
device using SNMP meeting access profile criteria are permitted or denied
access to the device.
• Source IP Address — Defines the interface source IP address to which the rule
applies.
• Prefix Length — Defines the number of bits that comprise the source IP address
prefix, or the network mask of the source IP address.
• Action —Defines the action attached to the rule. The possible field values are:
— Permit — Permits access to the device.
— Deny — Denies access to the device. This is the default.
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Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
2. Click
. The Add Profile Rule Page opens:
Figure 20. Add Profile Rule Page
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
updated.
. The profile rule is added to the access profile, and the device is
To modify a profile rule:
1. Click Management Security > Access Method > Profile Rules. The Access
Profiles Page opens
2. Click
. The Profile Rules Setting Page opens.
3. Modify the desired fields.
4. Click
. The profile rule is modified, and the device is updated.
Defining Authentication Profiles
Authentication profiles allow network administrators to assign authentication methods for
user authentication. User authentication can be performed either locally or on an external
server. User authentication occurs in the order the methods are selected. If the first
authentication method is not available, the next selected method is used. For example, if
the selected authentication methods are RADIUS and Local, and the RADIUS server is
not available, then the user is authenticated locally.
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35
To define authentication profiles:
1. Click Management Security > Authentication > Authentication Profiles. The
Authentication Profiles Page opens:
Figure 21. Authentication Profiles Page
The Authentication Profiles Page is separated into two tables, Login Authentication
Profiles and Enable Authentication Profiles, and contains the following fields:
• Remove — Removes the selected authentication profile. The possible field values
are:
— Checked — Removes the selected authentication profile.
— Unchecked — Maintains the authentication profiles.
• Unit No. — Displays the unit number.
• Profile Name — Contains a list of user-defined authentication profile lists to which
user-defined authentication profiles are added.
• Methods — Defines the user authentication methods. The possible field values are:
— None — Assigns no authentication method to the authentication profile.
— Line — Authenticates the user using a line password.
—
Enable — Authenticates the user using an enabled password.
— Local — Authenticates the user at the device level. The device checks the user
name and password for authentication.
— RADIUS — Authenticates the user at the RADIUS server.
— TACACS+ — Authenticates the user at the TACACS+
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Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
2. Click
. The Add Authentication Profile Page opens:
Figure 22. Add Authentication Profile Page
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
. The authentication profile is defined, and the device is updated.
To modify an authentication profile:
1. Click Management Security > Authentication > Authentication Profiles. The
Authentication Profiles Page opens.
2. Click
. The Authentication Mapping Page opens.
3. Select an authentication method from the Optional Methods list.
4. Click
updated.
. The authentication method is selected, and the device is
Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
37
Mapping Authentication Methods
After authentication profiles are defined, they can be applied to management access
methods.
Authentication methods are selected using arrows. The order in which the methods are
selected is the order by which the authentication methods are used.
To map authentication methods:
1. Click Management Security > Authentication > Authentication Mapping. The
Authentication Mapping Page opens:
Figure 23. Authentication Mapping Page
The Authentication Mapping Page contains the following fields:
• Telnet — Indicates that authentication profiles are used to authenticate Telnet users.
• Secure Telnet (SSH) — Indicates that authentication profiles are used to authenticate
Secure Shell (SSH) users. SSH provides clients secure and encrypted remote
connections to a device.
• Secure HTTP — Indicates that authentication methods used for Secure HTTP access.
Possible field values are:
— RADIUS (Optional) — Indicates that authentication occurs at the RADIUS
server.
— TACACS+(Optional) — Indicates that authentication occurs at the TACACS+.
— None (Optional) — Indicates that no authentication method is used for access.
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Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
— Local (Selected) — Indicates that the authentication method is on the device’s
local user database.
• HTTP — Indicates that Authentication methods are used for HTTP access. Possible
field values are:
— RADIUS (Optional) — Indicates that authentication occurs at the RADIUS
server.
— TACACS+(Optional) — Indicates that authentication occurs at the TACACS+.
— None — (Optional) Indicates that no authentication method is used for access.
— Local (Selected) — Indicates that the authentication method is on the device’s
local user database.
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Map the respective authentication methods.
4. Click
updated.
. The authentication mapping is saved, and the device is
Defining TACACS+ Authentication
Terminal Access Controller Access Control System (TACACS+) provides centralized
security user access validation. The system supports up-to 4 TACACS+ servers.
TACACS+ provides a centralized user management system, while still retaining
consistency with RADIUS and other authentication processes. TACACS+ provides the
following services:
• Authentication — Provides authentication during login and via user names and userdefined passwords.
• Authorization — Performed at login. Once the authentication session is completed,
an authorization session starts using the authenticated user name.
The TACACS+ protocol ensures network integrity through encrypted protocol exchanges
between the client and TACACS+ server.
The TACACS+ default parameters are user-assigned defaults. The default settings are
applied to newly defined TACACS+ servers. If default values are not defined, the system
defaults are applied to the new TACACS+ new servers.
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39
To define TACACS+ authentication settings:
1. Click Management Security > Authentication > TACACS+. The TACACS+
Page opens:
Figure 24. TACACS+ Page
The Default Parameters section contains the following fields:
• Source IP Address — Defines the default device source IP address used for the
TACACS+ session between the device and the TACACS+ server.
• Key String — Defines the default authentication and encryption key for TACACS+
communication between the device and the TACACS+ server.
• Timeout for Reply — Defines the default time that passes before the connection
between the device and the TACACS+ times out. The default is 5.
The TACACS+ Page also contains the following fields:
• Remove — Removes TACACS+ server. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes the selected TACACS+ server.
— Unchecked — Maintains the TACACS+ servers.
• Unit No. — Displays the unit number.
• Host IP Address — Defines the TACACS+ Server IP address.
• Priority — Defines the order in which the TACACS+ servers are used. The field
range is 0-65535. The default is 0.
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Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
• Source IP Address — Defines the device source IP address used for the TACACS+
session between the device and the TACACS+ server.
• Authentication Port — Defines the port number via which the TACACS+ session
occurs. The field range is 0-65535. The default port is port 49.
• Timeout for Reply— Defines the amount of time in seconds that passes before the
connection between the device and the TACACS+ times out. The field range is 11000 seconds.
• Single Connection — Maintains a single open connection between the device and the
TACACS+ server. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Enables a single connection.
— Unchecked — Disables a single connection.
• Status — Indicates the connection status between the device and the TACACS+
server. The possible field values are:
— Connected — Indicates there is currently a connection between the device and
the TACACS+ server.
— Not Connected — Indicates there is not currently a connection between the
device and the TACACS+ server.
2. Click
. The Add TACACS+ Host Page. opens.
Figure 25. Add TACACS+ Host Page.
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
. The TACACS+ server is define, and the device is updated.
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41
To modify the TACACS+ server settings:
1. Click Management Security >Authentication > TACACS+. The TACACS+
Page opens.
2. Select TACACS+ server entry.
3. Click
. The TACACS+ Host Settings Page opens:
Figure 26. TACACS+ Host Settings Page
4. Modify the relevant fields.
5. Click
updated.
. The TACACS+ host settings are saved, and the device is
Defining RADIUS Settings
Remote Authorization Dial-In User Service (RADIUS) servers provide additional security
for networks. RADIUS servers provide a centralized authentication method for web
access.
The default parameters are user-defined, and are applied to newly defined RADIUS
servers. If new default parameters are not defined, the system default values are applied to
newly defined RADIUS servers.
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Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
To configure RADIUS servers:
1. Click Management Security > Authentication > RADIUS. The RADIUS Page
opens:
Figure 27. RADIUS Page
The RADIUS Page Default Parameters section contains the following fields:
• Default Retries — Defines the number of transmitted requests sent to the RADIUS
server before a failure occurs. Possible field values are 1-10. The default value is 3.
• Default Timeout for Reply — Defines the amount of time (in seconds) the device
waits for an answer from the RADIUS server before retrying the query, or switching
to the next server. Possible field values are 1-30. The default value is 3.
• Default Dead Time — Defines the default amount of time (in minutes) that a
RADIUS server is bypassed for service requests. The range is 0-2000. The default
value is 0.
• Default Key String — Defines the default key string used for authenticating and
encrypting all RADIUS-communications between the device and the RADIUS server.
This key must match the RADIUS encryption.
• Source IP Address — Defines the default IP address of a device accessing the
RADIUS server.
The RADIUS Page also contains the following fields:
• Remove— Removes a RADIUS server. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes the selected RADIUS server.
— Unchecked — Maintains the RADIUS servers.
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43
• IP Address — Lists the RADIUS server IP addresses.
• Priority — Displays the RADIUS server priority. The possible values are 1-65535,
where 1 is the highest value. The RADIUS server priority is used to configure the
server query order.
• Authentication Port — Identifies the authentication port. The authentication port is
used to verify the RADIUS server authentication. The authenticated port default is
1812.
• Number of Retries — Defines the number of transmitted requests sent to the
RADIUS server before a failure occurs. The possible field values are 1-10. Three is
the default value.
• Timeout for Reply — Defines the amount of time (in seconds) the device waits for
an answer from the RADIUS server before retrying the query, or switching to the next
server. The possible field values are 1-30. Three is the default value.
• Dead Time — Defines the amount of time (in minutes) that a RADIUS server is
bypassed for service requests. The range is 0-2000. The default is 0 minutes.
• Key String — Defines the default key string used for authenticating and encrypting
all RADIUS-communications between the device and the RADIUS server. This key
must match the RADIUS encryption.
• Source IP Address — Defines the source IP address that is used for communication
with RADIUS servers.
• Usage Type — Specifies the RADIUS server authentication type. The default value is
All. The possible field values are:
— Log in — Indicates the RADIUS server is used for authenticating user name and
passwords.
— 802.1X — Indicates the RADIUS server is used for 802.1X authentication.
— All — Indicates the RADIUS server is used for authenticating user names and
passwords, and 802.1X port authentication.
2. Click
44
. The Add RADIUS Server Page opens:
Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
Figure 28. Add RADIUS Server Page
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
. The RADIUS server is added, and the device is updated.
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45
To modify RADIUS Server Settings:
1. Click Management Security > Authentication > RADIUS. The RADIUS Page
opens.
2. Click
. The RADIUS Server Settings Page opens:
Figure 29. RADIUS Server Settings Page
3. Modify the relevant fields.
4. Click
updated.
46
. The RADIUS server settings are saved, and the device is
Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
Configuring Passwords
This section contains information for defining device passwords, and includes the
following topics.
• Defining Local Users
• Defining Line Passwords
• Defining Enable Passwords
Defining Local Users
Network administrators can define users, passwords, and access levels for users using the
Local Users Page.
To define local users:
1. Click Management Security > Passwords > Local Users. The Local Users Page
opens:
Figure 30. Local Users Page
The Local Users Page contains the following fields:
• Remove — Removes the user from the User Name list. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes the selected local user.
— Unchecked — Maintains the local users.
• Unit No. — Displays the unit number.
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47
• User Name — Displays the user name.
• Access Level — Displays the user access level. The lowest user access level is 1 and
the highest is 15. Users with access level 15 are Privileged Users.
2. Click
. The Add Local User Page opens:
Figure 31. Add Local User Page
In addition to the fields in the Local Users Page, the Add Local User Page contains the
following fields:
• Password — Defines the local user password. Local user passwords can contain up
to 159 characters.
• Confirm Password — Verifies the password.
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Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
To modify the settings for a local user:
1. Click Management Security > Passwords > Local Users. The Local Users Page
opens.
2. Click
. The Local User Settings Page opens:
Figure 32. Local User Settings Page
3. Modify the relevant fields.
4. Click
updated.
. The local user passwords settings are saved, and the device is
Defining Line Passwords
Network administrators can define line passwords in the Line Password Page. After the
line password is defined, a management method is assigned to the password. The device
can be accessed using the following methods:
• Telnet Line Passwords
• Secure Telnet Line Passwords
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To define line passwords:
1. Click Management Security > Passwords > Line Password. The Line Password
Page opens:
Figure 33. Line Password Page
The Line Password Page contains the following fields:
• Telnet Line Password — Defines the line password for accessing the device via a
Telnet session. Passwords can contain a maximum of 159 characters.
• Secure Telnet Line Password — Defines the line password for accessing the device
via a secure Telnet session. Passwords can contain a maximum of 159 characters.
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Redefine the Confirm Password field for each of the passwords defined in the
previous steps to verify the passwords.
4. Click
50
. The line passwords are saved, and the device is updated.
Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
Defining Enable Passwords
The Enable Password Page sets a local password for a particular access level.
To enable passwords:
1. Click Management Security > Passwords > Enable Password. The Enable
Password Page opens:
Figure 34. Enable Password Page
The Enable Password Page contains the following fields:
• Level — Defines the access level associated with the enable password. Possible field
values are 1-15.
• Password — Defines the enable password.
• Confirm Password — Confirms the new enable password. The password is hidden
and appears in the ***** format.
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
. The enable password is defined, and the device is updated.
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Configuring Network Security
Network security manages both access control lists and locked ports. This section contains
the following topics:
•
•
•
•
Network Security Overview
Defining Network Authentication Properties
Defining Port Authentication
Configuring Traffic Control
Network Security Overview
This section provides an overview of network security and contains the following topics:
• Port-Based Authentication
• Advanced Port-Based Authentication
Port-Based Authentication
Port-based authentication authenticates users on a per-port basis via an external server.
Only authenticated and approved system users can transmit and receive data. Ports are
authenticated via the RADIUS server using the Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP).
Port-based authentication includes:
• Authenticators — Specifies the device port which is authenticated before permitting
system access.
• Supplicants — Specifies the host connected to the authenticated port requesting to
access the system services.
• Authentication Server — Specifies the server that performs the authentication on
behalf of the authenticator, and indicates whether the supplicant is authorized to
access system services.
Port-based authentication creates two access states:
• Controlled Access — Permits communication between the supplicant and the system,
if the supplicant is authorized.
• Uncontrolled Access — Permits uncontrolled communication regardless of the port
state.
The device currently supports port-based authentication via RADIUS servers.
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Advanced Port-Based Authentication
Advanced port-based authentication enables multiple hosts to be attached to a single port.
Advanced port-based authentication requires only one host to be authorized for all hosts to
have system access. If the port is unauthorized, all attached hosts are denied access to the
network.
Advanced port-based authentication also enables user-based authentication. Specific
VLANs in the device are always available, even if specific ports attached to the VLAN are
unauthorized. For example, Voice over IP does not require authentication, while data
traffic requires authentication. VLANs for which authorization is not required can be
defined. Unauthenticated VLANs are available to users, even if the ports attached to the
VLAN are defined as authorized.
Advanced port-based authentication is implemented in the following modes:
• Single Host Mode — Allows port access only to the authorized host.
• Multiple Host Mode — Multiple hosts can be attached to a single port. Only one host
must be authorized for all hosts to access the network. If the host authentication fails,
or an EAPOL-logoff message is received, all attached clients are denied access to the
network.
• Guest VLANs — Provides limited network access to authorized ports. If a port is
denied network access via port-based authorization, but the Guest VLAN is enabled,
the port receives limited network access. For example, a network administrator can
use Guest VLANs to deny network access via port-based authentication, but grant
internet access to unauthorized users.
• Unauthenticated VLANS — Are available to users, even if the ports attached to the
VLAN are defined as unauthorized.
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Defining Network Authentication Properties
The 802.1x Properties Page allows network managers to configure network
authentication parameters. In addition, Guest VLANs are enabled from the 802.1x
Properties Page.
To define the network authentication properties:
1. Click Network Security > 802.1x > Properties. The 802.1x Properties Page
opens.
Figure 35. 802.1x Properties Page
The 802.1x Properties Page contains the following fields:
• Port-based Authentication State — Indicates if Port Authentication is enabled on
the device. The possible field values are:
— Enable — Enables port-based authentication on the device.
— Disable — Disables port-based authentication on the device.
• Authentication Method — Specifies the authentication method used for port
authentication. The possible field values are:
— RADIUS, None — Provides port authentication, first using the RADIUS server.
If the port is not authenticated, then no authentication method is used, and the
session is permitted.
— RADIUS — Provides port authentication using the RADIUS server.
— None — Indicates that no authentication method is used to authenticate the port.
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• Guest VLAN — Specifies whether the Guest VLAN is enabled on the device. The
possible field values are:
— Enable — Enables using a Guest VLAN for unauthorized ports. If a Guest
VLAN is enabled, the unauthorized port automatically joins the VLAN selected
in the VLAN List field.
— Disable — Disables port-based authentication on the device. This is the default.
• Guest VLAN ID — Contains a list of VLANs. The Guest VLAN is selected from the
VLAN list.
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
updated.
. The network authentication properties are set, and the device is
Defining Port Authentication
The Port Authentication Page allows network managers to configure port-based
authentication global parameters.
To define the port-based authentication global properties:
1. Click Network Security > 802.1x > Port Authentication. The Port Authentication
Page opens:
Figure 36. Port Authentication Page
The Port Authentication Page contains the following fields:
• Copy From Entry Number — Copies port authentication information from the
selected port.
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• To Entry Number(s) — Copies port authentication information to the selected port.
• Unit No. — Indicates the unit number.
• Port — Displays a list of interfaces on which port-based authentication is enabled.
• User Name — Displays the supplicant user name.
• Current Port Control — Displays the current port authorization state.
• Guest VLAN — Specifies whether the Guest VLAN is enabled on the device. The
possible field values are:
— Enable — Enables using a Guest VLAN for unauthorized ports. If a Guest
VLAN is enabled, the unauthorized port automatically joins the VLAN selected
in the VLAN List field.
— Disable — Disables port-based authentication on the device. This is the default.
• Periodic Reauthentication — Permits immediate port reauthentication. The possible
field values are:
— Enable — Enables immediate port reauthentication. This is the default value.
— Disable — Disables port reauthentication.
• Reauthentication Period — Displays the time span (in seconds) in which the
selected port is reauthenticated. The field default is 3600 seconds.
— Reauthenticate Now — Reauthenticates all selected ports immediately.
• Authenticator State — Displays the current authenticator state.
• Quiet Period — Indicates the number of seconds that the device remains in the quiet
state following a failed authentication exchange. The possible field range is 0-65535.
The field default is 60 seconds.
• Resending EAP — Defines the amount of time (in seconds) that lapses before EAP
requests are resent. The field default is 30 seconds.
• Max EAP Requests — Displays the total amount of EAP requests sent. If a response
is not received after the defined period, the authentication process is restarted. The
field default is 2 retries.
• Supplicant Timeout — Displays the amount of time (in seconds) that lapses before
EAP requests are resent to the supplicant. The field default is 30 seconds.
• Server Timeout — Displays the amount of time (in seconds) that lapses before the
device re-sends a request to the authentication server. The field default is 30 seconds.
• Termination Cause — Indicates the reason for which the port authentication was
terminated.
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2. Click
. The Port Authentication Settings Page opens:
Figure 37. Port Authentication Settings Page
3. Modify the relevant fields.
4. Click
updated.
. The port authentication settings are defined, and the device is
Configuring Multiple Hosts
The Multiple Host Page allows network managers to configure advanced port-based
authentication settings for specific ports and VLANs. For more information on advanced
port-based authentication, see Advanced Port-Based Authentication.
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To define the network authentication global properties:
1. Click Network Security > 802.1x > Multiple Host. The Multiple Host Page
opens.
Figure 38. Multiple Host Page
• The Multiple Host Page contains the following fields:
• Unit No. — Indicates the unit number.
• Port — Displays the port number for which advanced port-based authentication is
enabled.
• Multiple Hosts — Indicates whether multiple hosts are enabled. Multiple hosts must
be enabled to either disable the ingress-filter, or to use port-lock security on the
selected port. The possible field values are:
— Multiple — Multiple hosts are enabled.
— Single— A single host is enabled.
• Action on Violation — Defines the action to be applied to packets arriving in singlehost mode, from a host whose MAC address is not the supplicant MAC address. The
possible field values are:
— Forward — Forwards the packet.
— Discard — Discards the packets. This is the default value.
— Shutdown — Discards the packets and shuts down the port. The port remains
shut down until reactivated, or until the device is reset.
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• Traps — Indicates if traps are enabled for Multiple Hosts. The possible field values
are:
— Enable — Indicates that traps are enabled for Multiple hosts.
— Disable — Indicates that traps are disabled for Multiple hosts.
• Trap Frequency — Defines the time period by which traps are sent to the host. The
Trap Frequency (1-1000000) field can be defined only if multiple hosts are disabled.
The default is 10 seconds.
• Status — Indicates the host status. If there is an asterisk (*), the port is either not
linked or is down. The possible field values are:
— Unauthorized — Indicates that either the port control is Force Unauthorized and
the port link is down, or the port control is Auto but a client has not been
authenticated via the port.
— Not in Auto Mode — Indicates that the port control is Forced Authorized, and
clients have full port access.
— Single-host Lock — Indicates that the port control is Auto and a single client has
been authenticated via the port.
— No Single Host — Indicates that Multiple Host is enabled.
• Number of Violations — Indicates the number of packets that arrived on the
interface in single-host mode, from a host whose MAC address is not the supplicant
MAC address.
2. Click
. The Multiple Host Settings Page opens:
Figure 39. Multiple Host Settings Page
3. Modify the relevant fields.
4. Click
updated.
. The multiple host settings are modified, and the device is
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Defining Authentication Hosts
The Authenticated Host Page contains a list of authenticated users.
To define authenticated users:
1. Click Network Security > 802.1x > Authenticated Host. The Authenticated Host
Page opens:
Figure 40. Authenticated Host Page
The Authenticated Host Page contains the following fields:
• Unit No. — Indicates the unit number.
• User Name — Lists the supplicants that were authenticated, and are permitted on
each port.
• Port — Displays the port number.
• Session Time — Displays the amount of time (in seconds) the supplicant was logged
on the port.
• Authentication Method — Displays the method by which the last session was
authenticated. The possible field values are:
— Remote — 802.1x authentication is not used on this port (port is forcedauthorized).
— None — The supplicant was not authenticated.
— RADIUS — The supplicant was authenticated by a RADIUS server.
• MAC Address — Displays the supplicant MAC address.
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Configuring Traffic Control
This section contains information for managing both port security and storm control, and
includes the following topics:
• Enabling Storm Control
• Managing Port Security
Enabling Storm Control
Storm control limits the amount of Multicast and Broadcast frames accepted and
forwarded by the device. When Layer 2 frames are forwarded, Broadcast, and Multicast
frames are flooded to all ports on the relevant VLAN. This occupies bandwidth, and loads
all nodes on all ports.
A Broadcast Storm is a result of an excessive amount of broadcast messages
simultaneously transmitted across a network by a single port. Forwarded message
responses are heaped onto the network, straining network resources or causing the
network to time out.
Storm control is enabled for all Gigabit ports by defining the packet type and the rate the
packets are transmitted. The system measures the incoming Broadcast and Multicast
frame rates separately on each port, and discards the frames when the rate exceeds a userdefined rate.
The Storm Control Page provides fields for configuring broadcast storm control.
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To enable storm control:
1. Click Network Security > Traffic Control > Storm Control. The Storm Control
Page opens.
Figure 41. Storm Control Page
The Storm Control Page contains the following fields:
• Copy From Entry Number — Copies the storm control parameters from the selected
port.
• To Entry Number(s) — Copies the storm control parameters to the selected port.
• Unit No. — Indicates the unit number.
• Port — Indicates the port from which storm control is enabled.
• Enable Broadcast Control — Indicates if forwarding Broadcast packet types on the
interface. The possible field values are:
— Enable — Enables storm control on the selected port.
— Disable — Disables storm control on the selected port.
• Broadcast Rate Threshold — Indicates the maximum rate (kilobits per second) at
which unknown packets are forwarded. The range is 70-1,000,000. The default value
is 3500 and it is not possible to set the value lower than 3500.
• Broadcast Mode — Specifies the Broadcast mode currently enabled on the device.
The possible field values are:
— Broadcast, Multicast, & Unknown Unicast — Counts Unicast, Multicast, and
Broadcast traffic.
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— Multicast & Broadcast — Counts Broadcast and Multicast traffic together.
— Broadcast Only — Counts only Broadcast traffic.
2. Click
. The Storm Control Settings Page opens:
Figure 42. Storm Control Settings Page
3. Modify the relevant fields.
4. Click.
.
Storm control is enabled on the device.
Managing Port Security
Network security can be increased by limiting access on a specific port only to users with
specific MAC addresses. The MAC addresses can be dynamically learned or statically
configured. Locked port security monitors both received and learned packets that are
received on specific ports. Access to the locked port is limited to users with specific MAC
addresses. These addresses are either manually defined on the port, or learned on that port
up to the point when it is locked. When a packet is received on a locked port, and the
packet source MAC address is not tied to that port (either it was learned on a different
port, or it is unknown to the system), the protection mechanism is invoked, and can
provide various options. Unauthorized packets arriving at a locked port are either:
•
•
•
•
Forwarded
Discarded with no trap
Discarded with a trap
Shuts down the port.
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Locked port security also enables storing a list of MAC addresses in the configuration file.
The MAC address list can be restored after the device has been reset.
Disabled ports are activated from the Port Security Page.
To define port security:
1. Click Network Security > Traffic Control > Port Security. The Port Security
Page opens.
Figure 43. Port Security Page
The Port Security Page contains the following fields:
•
•
•
•
Port — Indicates the port membership.
LAGs — Indicates the LAG membership.
Interface — Displays the port or LAG name.
Interface Status — Indicates the host status. The possible field values are:
— Unlocked — Indicates that the port is unlocked. This is the default value.
— Locked — Indicates that the port is locked.
• Learning Mode — Defines the locked port type. The Learning Mode field is enabled
only if Locked is selected in the Set Port field. The possible field values are:
— Classic Lock — Locks the port using the classic lock mechanism. The port is
immediately locked, regardless of the number of addresses that have already
been learned.
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— Limited Dynamic Lock — Locks the port by deleting the current dynamic MAC
addresses associated with the port. The port learns up to the maximum addresses
allowed on the port. Both relearning and aging MAC addresses are enabled.
• MAX Entries — Specifies the number of MAC address that can be learned on the
port. The Max Entries field is enabled only if Locked is selected in the Set Port field.
In addition, the Limited Dynamic Lock mode is selected. The default is 1.
• Action — Indicates the action to be applied to packets arriving on a locked port. The
possible field values are:
—
Discard — Discards packets from any unlearned source. This is the default
value.
— Forward — Forwards packets from an unknown source without learning the
MAC address.
— Shutdown — Discards packets from any unlearned source and shuts down the
port. The port remains shut down until reactivated, or until the device is reset.
• Trap — Enables traps when a packet is received on a locked port. The possible field
values are:
— Enable — Enables traps.
— Disable — Disables traps.
• Trap Frequency (Sec) — The amount of time (in seconds) between traps. The default
value is 10 seconds.
2. Click
. The Edit Port Security Settings Page opens:
Figure 44. Edit Port Security Settings Page
3. Modify the relevant fields.
4. Click
updated.
. The port security settings are defined, and the device is
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Defining Access Control Lists
Access Control Lists (ACL) allow network managers to define classification actions and
rules for specific ingress ports. Packets entering an ingress port, with an active ACL, are
either admitted or denied entry and the ingress port is disabled. If they are denied entry,
the user can disable the port.
For example, an ACL rule is defined that states, port number 20 can receive TCP packets,
however, if a UDP packet is received, the packet is dropped. ACLs are composed of
access control entries (ACEs) that are made of the filters that determine traffic
classifications. The total number of ACEs that can be defined in all ACLs together is
1024. The following filters can be defined as ACEs:
• Source Port IP Address and Wildcard Mask — Filters the packets by the Source
port IP address and wildcard mask.
• Destination Port IP Address and Wildcard Mask — Filters the packets by the
Source port IP address and wildcard mask.
•
•
•
•
•
ACE Priority — Filters the packets by the ACE priority.
Protocol — Filters the packets by the IP protocol.
DSCP — Filters the packets by the DiffServ Code Point (DSCP) value.
IP Precedence — Filters the packets by the IP Precedence.
Action — Indicates the action assigned to the packet matching the ACL. Packets are
forwarded or dropped. In addition, the port can be shut down, a trap can be sent to the
network administrator, or packet is assigned rate limiting restrictions for forwarding.
This section contains the following topics:
• Defining MAC Based Access Control Lists.
• Defining IP Based Access Control Lists.
Defining MAC Based Access Control Lists
The MAC Based ACL Page page allows a MAC-based ACL to be defined. ACEs can be
added only if the ACL is not bound to an interface.
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To define MAC Based ACLs:
1. Click Network Security > Access Control List > MAC Based ACL. The MAC
Based ACL Page opens:
Figure 45. MAC Based ACL Page
The MAC Based ACL Page contains the following fields:
• ACL Name — Displays the user-defined MAC based ACLs.
• Remove — Removes the IP based ACLs. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes the selected MAC based ACL.
— Unchecked — Maintains the MAC based ACLs.
• Priority — Indicates the ACE priority, which determines which ACE is matched to a
packet on a first-match basis. The possible field values are 1-2147483647.
• Source Address — Matches the source MAC address to which packets are addressed
to the ACE.
• Source Mask — Masks all or parts of the source IP address.
• Destination Address — Matches the destination MAC address to which packets are
addressed to the ACE.
• Destination Mask — Masks all or parts of the destination IP address.
• VLAN ID — Matches the packet’s VLAN ID to the ACE. The possible field values
are 1 to 4095.
• CoS — Classifies traffic based on the CoS tag value.
• CoS Mask — Defines the Cost of Service mask.
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• Ethertype — Provides an identifier that differentiates between various types of
protocols.
• Action — Indicates the ACL forwarding action. Possible field values are:
— Permit — Forwards packets which meet the ACL criteria.
— Deny — Drops packets which meet the ACL criteria.
— Shutdown — Drops packet that meet the ACL criteria, and disables the port to
which the packet was addressed. Ports are reactivated from the Interface
Configuration Page.
2. Click
. The Add MAC Based ACL Page opens:
Figure 46. Add MAC Based ACL Page
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
68
. The MAC Based ACLs are defined, and the device is updated.
Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
To modify an IP-based ACL:
1. Click Network Security > Access Control List > MAC Based ACL. The Edit
Rule Page opens.
2. Click
. The Edit Rule Page opens:
Figure 47. Edit Rule Page
3. Modify the relevant fields.
4. Click
. The MAC based protocol is defined, and the device is updated.
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Defining IP Based Access Control Lists
The IP Based ACL Page contains information for defining IP Based ACLs, including
defining the ACEs defined for IP Based ACLs.
To define IP Based ACLs:
1. Click Network Security > Access Control List > IP Based ACL. The IP Based
ACL Page opens:
Figure 48. IP Based ACL Page
The IP Based ACL Page contains the following fields:
• ACL Name — Displays the user-defined IP based ACLs.
• Remove — Removes the IP based ACLs. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes the selected IP based ACL.
— Unchecked — Maintains the IP based ACLs.
• Priority — Indicates the ACE priority that determines which ACE is matched to a
packet based on a first-match basis. The possible field value is 1-2147483647.
• Protocol — Creates an ACE based on a specific protocol.
— Select from List — Selects from a protocols list on which ACE can be based.
The possible field values are:
ICMP — Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP). The ICMP allows the
gateway or destination host to communicate with the source host. For
example, to report a processing error.
IGMP — Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP). Allows hosts to
notify their local switch or router that they want to receive transmissions
assigned to a specific multicast group.
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IP — Internet Protocol (IP). Specifies the format of packets and their
addressing method. IP addresses packets and forwards the packets to the
correct port.
TCP — Transmission Control Protocol (TCP). Enables two hosts to
communicate and exchange data streams. TCP guarantees packet delivery,
and guarantees packets are transmitted and received in the order the are sent.
EGP — Exterior Gateway Protocol (EGP). Permits exchanging routing
information between two neighboring gateway hosts in an autonomous
systems network.
IGP — Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP). Allows for routing information
exchange between gateways in an autonomous network.
UDP — User Datagram Protocol (UDP). Communication protocol that
transmits packets but does not guarantee their delivery.
HMP — Host Mapping Protocol (HMP). Collects network information from
various networks hosts. HMP monitors hosts spread over the internet as well
as hosts in a single network.
RDP — Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP). Allows a clients to communicate
with the Terminal Server over the network.
IPV6 — Internet Routing Protocol version 6 (IPv6). Provides a newer
version of the Internet Protocol, and follows IP version 4 (IPv4). IPv6
increases the IP address size from 32 bits to 128 bits. In addition, IPv6
support more levels of addressing hierarchy, more addressable nodes, and
supports simpler auto-configuration of addresses.
IPV6:ROUTE — Matches packets to the IPv6 Route through a Gateway
(IPV6:ROUTE).
IPV6:FRAG — Matches packets to the IPv6 Fragment Header
(IPV6:FRAG).
IDRP— Matches the packet to the Inter-Domain Routing Protocol (IDRP).
RVSP — Matches the packet to the ReSerVation Protocol (RSVP).
AH — Authentication Header (AH). Provides source host authentication and
data integrity.
IPV6:ICMP — Matches packets to the Matches packets to the IPv6 and
Internet Control Message Protocol.
EIGRP — Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP). Provides
fast convergence, support for variable-length subnet mask, and supports
multiple network layer protocols.
OSPF — The Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) protocol is a link-state,
hierarchical interior gateway protocol (IGP) for network routing Layer Two
(2) Tunnelling Protocol, an extension to the PPP protocol that enables ISPs to
operate Virtual Private Networks (VPNs).
IPIP — IP over IP (IPIP). Encapsulates IP packets to create tunnels between
two routers. This ensures that the IPIP tunnel appears as a single interface,
rather than several separate interfaces. IPIP enables tunnel intranets to access
the internet, and provides an alternative to source routing.
PIM — Matches the packet to Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM).
L2TP— Matches the packet to Layer 2 Internet Protocol (L2IP).
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ISIS — Intermediate System - Intermediate System (ISIS). Distributes IP
routing information throughout a single Autonomous System in IP networks
Any — Matches the protocol to any protocol.
— Protocol ID To Match— Adds user-defined protocols by which packets are
matched to the ACE. Each protocol has a specific protocol number which is
unique. The possible field range is 0-255.
• Flag Set — Displays the TCP flag that can be triggered.
• ICMP Type — Specifies an ICMP message type for filtering ICMP packets.
• ICMP Code —Specifies an ICMP message code for filtering ICMP packets. ICMP
packets that are filtered by ICMP message type can also be filtered by the ICMP
message code.
• IGMP Type — Displays the IGMP message type. IGMP packets can be filtered by
IGMP message type.
• Source IP Address — Matches the source port IP address to which packets are
addressed to the ACE.
• Source Mask — Defines the source IP address wildcard mask. Wildcard masks
specify which bits are used and which bits are ignored. A wild card mask of
255.255.255.255 indicates that no bit is important. A wildcard of 0.0.0.0 indicates that
all the bits are important. For example, if the source IP address 149.36.184.198 and
the wildcard mask is 255.36.184.00, the first eight bits of the IP address are ignored,
while the last eight bits are used.
• Destination IP Address — Matches the destination IP address to which packets are
addressed to the ACE.
• Destination Mask —Indicates the destination IP Address wild card mask. Wild cards
are used to mask all or part of a destination IP Address. Wild card masks specify
which bits are used and which bits are ignored. A wild card mask of 255.255.255.255
indicates that no bit is important. A wildcard of 00.00.00.00 indicates that all the bits
are important. For example, if the destination IP address 149.36.184.198 and the
wildcard mask are 255.36.184.00, the first two bits of the IP address are used, while
the last two bits are ignored.
• Source Port — Defines the TCP/UDP source port to which the ACE is matched. This
field is active only if 800/6-TCP or 800/17-UDP are selected in the Select from List
drop-down menu. The possible field range is 0 - 65535.
• Destination Port — Defines the TCP/UDP destination port. This field is active only
if 800/6-TCP or 800/17-UDP are selected in the Select from List drop-down menu.
The possible field range is 0 - 65535.
• DSCP — Matches the destination port IP address to which packets are addressed to
the ACE.
• IP - Prec. — Defines the destination IP address wildcard mask. Select either Match
DSCP or Match IP Precedence:
— Match DSCP — Matches the packet DSCP value to the ACE. Either the DSCP
value or the IP Precedence value is used to match packets to ACLs. The possible
field range is 0-63.
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— Match IP Precedence — Matches the packet IP Precedence value to the ACE.
Either the DSCP value or the IP Precedence value is used to match packets to
ACLs. The possible field range is 0-7.
• Action — The ACL forwarding action. Possible values are:
— Permit — Forwards packets which meet the ACL criteria.
— Deny — Drops packets which meet the ACL criteria.
— Shutdown — Drops packet that meets the ACL criteria, and disables the port to
which the packet was addressed.
2. Click
. The Add IP Based ACL Page opens:
Figure 49. Add IP Based ACL Page
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
. The IP based protocol is defined, and the device is updated.
To modify an IP-based ACL:
1. Click Network Security > Access Control List > IP Based ACL. The IP Based
ACL Page opens.
2. Select an ACL.
3. Click
. The IP Based ACL Settings Page opens:
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Figure 50. IP Based ACL Settings Page
4. Modify the relevant fields.
5. Click
. The IP based protocol is defined, and the device is updated.
Binding Device Security ACLs
When an ACL is bound to an interface, all the ACE rules that have been defined are applied to the
selected interface.Whenever an ACL is assigned on a port, LAG or, VLAN, flows from that
ingress interface that do not match the ACL are matched to the default rule, which is Drop
unmatched packets.
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To bind ACLs to interfaces:
1. Click Network Security > Access Control List > ACL Binding. The ACL
Binding Page opens:
Figure 51. ACL Binding Page
The ACL Binding Page contains the following fields:
• Copy from Entry Number — Copies the ACL information from the defined
interface.
•
•
•
•
To Entry Number(s) — Copies the ACL information to the defined interface.
Ports — Indicates the port membership.
LAGs — Indicates the LAG membership.
Unit No. — Indicates the unit number.
• Interface — Indicates the interface to which the ACL is bound.
• ACL Name — Indicates the ACL which is bound the interface.
2. Select an interface.
3. Click
. The Bind ACL Settings Page opens:
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Figure 52. Bind ACL Settings Page
4. Define the relevant fields.
5. Click
76
. The ACL is bound the interface, and the device is updated.
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Configuring Ports
The Port Configuration Page contains fields for defining port parameters.
To define port parameters:
1. Click Layer 2 > Interface > Port Configuration. The Port Configuration Page
opens.
Figure 53. Port Configuration Page
The Port Configuration Page contains the following fields:
• Copy From Entry Number — Copies port authentication information from the
selected port.
• To Entry Number(s) — Copies port authentication information to the selected
port(s).
• Interface — Displays the port number.
• PortType — Displays the port type. The possible field values are:
— 1000M-Copper — Indicates the port has a copper port connection.
— 10G-FiberOptics — Indicates the port has a fiber optic port connection.
• Port Status — Indicates whether the port is currently operational or non-operational.
The possible field values are:
— Up — Indicates the port is currently operating.
— Down — Indicates the port is currently not operating.
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• Port Speed — Displays the configured rate for the port. The port type determines
what speed setting options are available. Port speeds can only be configured when
auto negotiation is disabled. The possible field values are:
— 10 — Indicates the port is currently operating at 10 Mbps.
— 10G — Indicates the port is currently operating at 10 Gbps.
— 100 — Indicates the port is currently operating at 100 Mbps.
— 1000 — Indicates the port is currently operating at 1000 Mbps.
• Duplex Mode — Displays the port duplex mode. This field is configurable only when
auto negotiation is disabled, and the port speed is set to 10M or 100M. This field
cannot be configured on LAGs. The possible field values are:
— Full — The interface supports transmission between the device and its link
partner in both directions simultaneously.
— Half — The interface supports transmission between the device and the client in
only one direction at a time.
• Auto Negotiation — Displays the auto negotiation status on the port. Auto
negotiation is a protocol between two link partners that enables a port to advertise its
transmission rate, duplex mode, and flow control abilities to its partner.
• Advertisement — Defines the auto negotiation setting the port advertises. The
possible field values are:
— Max Capability — Indicates that all port speeds and duplex mode settings are
accepted.
— 10 Half — Indicates that the port advertises for a 10 Mbps speed port and half
duplex mode setting.
— 10 Full — Indicates that the port advertises for a 10 Mbps speed port and full
duplex mode setting.
— 100 Half — Indicates that the port advertises for a 100 Mbps speed port and half
duplex mode setting.
— 100 Full — Indicates that the port advertises for a 100 Mbps speed port and full
duplex mode setting.
— 1000 Full — Indicates that the port advertises for a 1000 Mbps speed port and
full duplex mode setting.
• Back Pressure — Displays the back pressure mode on the Port. Back pressure mode
is used with half duplex mode to disable ports from receiving messages.
• Flow Control — Displays the flow control status on the port. Operates when the port
is in full duplex mode. The possible field values are:
— Enable — Enables the flow control.
— Disable — Disables the flow control.
— Auto-Negotiation — Detects the flow control and automatically configures the
highest performance mode.
• MDI/MDIX — Displays the MDI/MDIX status on the port. Hubs and switches are
deliberately wired opposite the way end stations are wired, so that when a hub or
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switch is connected to an end station, a straight through Ethernet cable can be used,
and the pairs are matched up properly. When two hubs or switches are connected to
each other, or two end stations are connected to each other, a crossover cable is used
to ensure that the correct pairs are connected. The possible field values are:
— MDIX (Media Dependent Interface with Crossover) — Use for hubs and
switches.
— MDI (Media Dependent Interface) — Use for end stations.
— AUTO — Use to automatically detect the cable type.
• PVE — Indicates the Private VLAN Edge.
• LAG — Indicates whether the port is part of a Link Aggregation Group (LAG).
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
updated.
. The port configuration settings are defined, and the device is
To modify the port configuration:
1. Click
. The Port Configuration Settings Page opens:
Figure 54. Port Configuration Settings Page
2. Modify the relevant fields.
3. Click
updated.
. The port configuration settings are defined, and the device is
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Aggregating Ports
Link Aggregation optimizes port usage by linking a group of ports together to form a
single LAG. Aggregating ports multiplies the bandwidth between the devices, increases
port flexibility, and provides link redundancy.
The device supports both static LAGs and Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP)
LAGs. LACP LAGs negotiate aggregating port links with other LACP ports located on a
different device. If the other device ports are also LACP ports, the devices establish a
LAG between them. Ensure the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
All ports within a LAG must be the same media type.
A VLAN is not configured on the port.
The port is not assigned to a different LAG.
Auto-negotiation mode is not configured on the port.
The port is in full-duplex mode.
All ports in the LAG have the same ingress filtering and tagged modes.
All ports in the LAG have the same back pressure and flow control modes.
All ports in the LAG have the same priority.
All ports in the LAG have the same transceiver type.
The device supports up to 64 LAGs, and eight ports in each LAG.
Ports can be configured as LACP ports only if the ports are not part of a previously
configured LAG.
• Ports added to a LAG lose their individual port configuration. When ports are
removed from the LAG, the original port configuration is applied to the ports.
This section contains the following topics:
• Configuring LAGs
• Defining LAG Members
• Configuring LACP
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Configuring LAGs
The LAG Configuration Page contains information for configured LAGs.
To view LAG information:
1. Click Layer 2 > Interface > LAG Configuration. The LAG Configuration Page
opens:
Figure 55. LAG Configuration Page
The LAG Configuration Page contains the following fields:
• Copy From Entry Number — Copies LAG configuration information from the
selected port.
•
•
•
•
•
•
To Entry Number(s) — Copies LAG configuration information to the selected port.
Unit No. — Indicates the unit number.
LAG — Indicate the LAG for which the information is displayed.
Description — Provides a user-defined LAG description.
Type — Displays the port types included in the LAG.
Status — Indicates if traffic forwarding via the LAG is enabled. The possible field
values are:
— Up — Indicates that the LAG is currently forwarding network traffic.
— Down — Indicates that the LAG is not currently forwarding network traffic.
• Speed — Displays the LAG speed.
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• Auto Negotiation — Indicates if auto-negotiation is enabled on the LAG. The
possible field values are:
— Enable — Indicates that auto-negotiation is enabled on the LAG.
— Disable — Indicates that auto-negotiation is disable on the LAG.
• Flow Control — Indicates if flow control auto-negotiation is enabled on the LAG.
The possible field values are:
— Enable — Indicates that flow control is enabled on the LAG.
— Disable — Indicates that flow control is disable on the LAG.
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
updated.
. The LAG configuration settings are saved, and the device is
To modify the LAG configuration:
1. Click
. The LAG Configuration Settings Page opens:
Figure 56. LAG Configuration Settings Page
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
. The LAG configuration is saved, and the device is updated.
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Defining LAG Members
The LAG Membership Page contains fields for configuring parameters for configured
LAGs. The device supports up to eight ports per LAG, and eight LAGs per system.
To define LAG parameters:
1. Click Layer 2 > Interface > LAG Membership. The LAG Membership Page
opens.
Figure 57. LAG Membership Page
The LAG Membership Page contains the following fields:
•
•
•
•
LAG — Displays the ports which can be assigned to the LAG.
Name — Indicates the LAG name.
Link State — Displays the status of the link.
Member — Displays the ports which are currently configured to the LAG.
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
updated.
84
. The LAG membership settings are saved, and the device is
Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
To modify the LAG membership:
1. Click
. The LAG Membership Settings Page opens:
Figure 58. LAG Membership Settings Page
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
. The LAG configuration is saved, and the device is updated.
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Configuring LACP
LAG ports can contain different media types if the ports are operating at the same speed.
Aggregated links can be set up manually or automatically established by enabling LACP
on the relevant links. Aggregate ports can be linked into link-aggregation port-groups.
Each group is comprised of ports with the same speed. The LACP Parameters Page
contains fields for configuring LACP LAGs.
To configure LACP for LAGs:
1. Click Layer 2 > Interface > LACP Parameters tab. The LACP Parameters Page
opens:
Figure 59. LACP Parameters Page
The LACP Parameters Page contains the following fields:
• LACP System Priority — Specifies system priority value. The field range is 165535. The field default is 1.
• Unit No. — Indicates the unit number.
• Port — Displays the port number to which timeout and priority values are assigned.
• Port-Priority — Displays the LACP priority value for the port. The field range is 165535.
• LACP Timeout — Displays the administrative LACP timeout. The possible field
values are:
— Long — Specifies the long timeout value. (Range: 1 - 200,000,000)
— Short — Specifies the short timeout value. (Range: 1 - 65,535)
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2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
. The LACP parameters are saved, and the device is updated.
To modify the LACP parameters:
1. Click
. The LACP Parameters Settings Page opens:
Figure 60. LACP Parameters Settings Page
2. Modify the relevant fields.
3. Click
. The LACP parameters are saved, and the device is updated.
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Configuring VLANs
VLANs are logical subgroups with a Local Area Network (LAN) which combine user
stations and network devices into a single unit, regardless of the physical LAN segment to
which they are attached. VLANs allow network traffic to flow more efficiently within
subgroups. VLANs use software to reduce the amount of time it takes for network
changes, additions, and moves to be implemented.
VLANs have no minimum number of ports, and can be created per unit, per device, or
through any other logical connection combination, since they are software-based and not
defined by physical attributes.
VLANs function at Layer 2. Since VLANs isolate traffic within the VLAN, a Layer 3
router working at a protocol level is required to allow traffic flow between VLANs. Layer
3 routers identify segments and coordinate with VLANs. VLANs are Broadcast and
Multicast domains. Broadcast and Multicast traffic is transmitted only in the VLAN in
which the traffic is generated.
VLAN tagging provides a method of transferring VLAN information between VLAN
groups. VLAN tagging attaches a 4-byte tag to packet headers. The VLAN tag indicates to
which VLAN the packets belong. VLAN tags are attached to the VLAN by either the end
station or the network device. VLAN tags also contain VLAN network priority
information.
Combining VLANs and GARP (Generic Attribute Registration Protocol) allows network
managers to define network nodes into Broadcast domains.
This section contains the following topics:
•
•
•
•
Defining VLAN Properties
Defining VLAN Membership
Defining VLAN Interface Settings
Configuring GARP
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Defining VLAN Properties
The VLAN Properties Page provides information and global parameters for configuring
and working with VLANs.
To define VLAN properties:
1. Click Layer 2 > VLAN > Properties. The VLAN Properties Page opens.
Figure 61. VLAN Properties Page
The VLAN Properties Page contains the following fields:
• Remove— Removes VLANs. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes the selected VLAN.
— Unchecked — Maintains VLANs.
• VLAN ID — Displays the VLAN ID.
• VLAN Name — Displays the user-defined VLAN name.
• Type— Displays the VLAN type. The possible field values are:
— Dynamic — Indicates the VLAN was dynamically created through GARP.
— Static — Indicates the VLAN is user-defined.
— Default — Indicates the VLAN is the default VLAN.
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• Authentication — Indicates whether unauthorized users can access a Guest VLAN.
The possible field values are:
— Enable — Enables unauthorized users to use the Guest VLAN.
— Disable — Disables unauthorized users from using the Guest VLAN.
• Back — Allows you to view the previous page in a table.
• Next — Allows you to view the next page in a table when there are more than 20
entries.
2. Click
. The Add VLAN page opens:
Figure 62. Add VLAN Page
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
. The VLAN ID is defined, and the device is updated.
To modify the VLAN ID:
1. Click
. The Authentication VLAN Settings Page opens:
Figure 63. Authentication VLAN Settings Page
2. Modify the relevant fields.
3. Click
. The VLAN ID is defined, and the device is updated.
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Defining VLAN Membership
The VLAN Membership Page contains a table that maps VLAN parameters to ports. Ports
are assigned VLAN membership by toggling through the Port Control settings.
To define VLAN membership:
1. Click Layer 2 > VLAN > Membership. The VLAN Membership Page opens.
Figure 64. VLAN Membership Page
The VLAN Membership Page contains the following fields:
• VLAN ID — Displays the user-defined VLAN ID.
• VLAN Name — Displays the name of the VLAN
• VLAN Type— Indicates the VLAN type. The possible field values are:
— Dynamic — Indicates the VLAN was dynamically created through GARP.
— Static — Indicates the VLAN is user-defined.
— Default — Indicates the VLAN is the default VLAN.
• Ports — Indicates the port membership.
• LAGs — Indicates the LAG membership.
• Unit No. — Displays the unit number.
• Interface — Displays the VLAN interfaces.
• Interface Status — Indicates the port status. The possible field values are:
—
92
Excluded — Excludes the interface from the VLAN. However, the interface can
be added to the VLAN through GARP.
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—
Forbidden — Denies the interface VLAN membership, even if GARP indicates
the port is to be added.
— Tagged — Indicates the interface is a tagged member of a VLAN. All packets
forwarded by the interface are tagged. The packets contain VLAN information.
— Untagged — Indicates the interface is an untagged VLAN member. Packets
forwarded by the interface are untagged.
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
. The VLAN membership is defined, and the device is updated.
To modify the VLAN membership:
1. Click
. The Edit VLAN Membership Page opens:
Figure 65. Edit VLAN Membership Page
2. Modify the relevant fields.
3. Click
. The VLAN membership is modified
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Defining VLAN Interface Settings
The VLAN Interface Settings Page contains fields for managing ports that are part of a
VLAN. The Port Default VLAN ID (PVID) is configured on the VLAN Interface Settings
Page. All untagged packets arriving at the device are tagged with the port PVID.
To define VLAN interfaces:
1. Click Layer 2 > VLAN > Interface Settings. The VLAN Interface Settings Page
opens.
Figure 66. VLAN Interface Settings Page
The VLAN Interface Settings Page contains the following fields:
•
•
•
•
Ports — Indicates the port membership.
LAGs — Indicates the LAG membership.
Interface — Displays the port number included in the VLAN.
Interface VLAN Mode — Displays the port mode. The possible values are:
— General — Indicates the port belongs to VLANs, and each VLAN is userdefined as tagged or untagged (full IEEE802.1q mode).
— Access — Indicates a port belongs to a single untagged VLAN. When a port is
in Access mode, the packet types which are accepted on the port cannot be
designated. Ingress filtering cannot be enabled or disabled on an access port.
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— Trunk — Indicates the port belongs to VLANs in which all ports are tagged,
except for one port that can be untagged.
• PVID — Assigns a VLAN ID to untagged packets. The possible values are 1-4094.
VLAN 4095 is defined as per standard and industry practice as the Discard VLAN.
Packets classified to the Discard VLAN are dropped.
• Frame Type — Specifies the packet type accepted on the port. The possible field
values are:
— Admit All — Both tagged and untagged packets are accepted on the port.
— Admit Tag Only — Only tagged packets are accepted on the port.
• Ingress Filtering— Indicates whether ingress filtering is enabled on the port. The
possible field values are:
— Enable — Enables ingress filtering on the device. Ingress filtering discards
packets that are defined to VLANs of which the specific port is not a member.
— Disable — Disables ingress filtering on the device.
• Reserve VLAN — Indicates the VLAN selected by the user to be the reserved VLAN
if not in use by the system.
Defining VLAN Groups
VLAN groups increase network flexibility and portability. For example, network users
grouped by MAC address can log on to the network from multiple locations without
moving between VLANs.
VLANs can be grouped by MAC address, Subnets, and Protocols. Once a user logs on, the
system attempts to classify the user by MAC address. If the user cannot be classified by
MAC address, the system attempts to classify the user by Subnet. If the subnet
classification is unsuccessful, the system attempts to classify the user by protocol. If the
protocol classification is unsuccessful, the user is classified by PVID.
VLAN groups allow network managers to define VLAN groups based on specific criteria,
including MAC addresses, network subnets, and protocols. This section contains the
following topics:
•
•
•
•
Defining VLAN MAC Based Groups
Defining VLAN Subnet Based Groups
Defining VLAN Protocol Based Groups
Mapping Groups to VLANs
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Defining VLAN MAC Based Groups
The VLAN Interface Settings Page allows network managers to group VLANs based on
the VLAN MAC address.
To define VLAN MAC Based Groups:
1. Click Layer 2 > VLAN > VLAN Groups > MAC-based Groups. The VLAN
Interface Settings Page opens:
Figure 67. VLAN MAC-based Groups Page
The VLAN Interface Settings Page contains the following fields:
• MAC Address — Displays the MAC address associated with the VLAN group.
• Prefix — Displays the network prefix associated with the VLAN group. Prefix
matches determine the best next-hop route for a packet based solely on the
destination address contained in the packet header.
• Group ID — Displays the VLAN Group ID.
2. Click
96
. The VLAN Interface Settings Page opens:
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Figure 68. Add VLAN MAC-based Groups Page
In addition to the fields in the VLAN Interface Settings Page, the VLAN Interface Settings
Page contains the following additional fields:
•
•
•
•
MAC Group ID — Defines the Group ID associated with the VLAN group.
MAC Address — Defines the MAC address associated with the VLAN group.
Prefix — Defines the network prefix associated with the VLAN group.
Host — Defines the Host associated with the VLAN group.
3. Define the fields.
4. Click
updated.
. The MAC based VLAN group is defined, and the device is
To modify a MAC Based VLAN Group:
1. Click Layer 2 > VLAN > VLAN Groups > MAC-based Groups. The VLAN
Interface Settings Page opens.
2. Click
. The MAC Groups Settings Page opens:
Figure 69. MAC Groups Settings Page
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3. Modify the fields.
4. Click
updated.
. The MAC based VLAN group is modified, and the device is
Defining VLAN Subnet Based Groups
The VLAN Interface Settings Page allows network managers to group VLANs based on
their subnet. To define VLAN MAC Based Groups:
1. Click Layer 2 > VLAN > VLAN Groups > Subnet-based Groups. The VLAN
Interface Settings Page opens:
Figure 70. VLAN Subnet-based Groups Page
The VLAN Interface Settings Page contains the following fields:
• MAC Address — Displays the MAC address associated with the VLAN subnet
group.
• Prefix — Displays the network prefix associated with the VLAN group. Prefix
matches determine the best next-hop route for a packet based solely on the
destination address contained in the packet header.
• Group ID — Displays the VLAN group ID associated with the VLAN subnet
group.
2. Click
98
. The VLAN Interface Settings Page opens:
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Figure 71. Add VLAN Subnet-based Groups Page
In addition to the fields in the VLAN Interface Settings Page, the VLAN Interface Settings
Page contains the following additional field:
• IP Address — Displays the IP address associated with the VLAN subnet group.
3. Define the fields.
4. Click
updated.
. The Subnet based VLAN group is defined, and the device is
To modify a Subnet VLAN Group:
1. Click Layer 2 > VLAN > VLAN Groups > Subnet-based Groups. The VLAN
Interface Settings Page opens.
2. Click
. The Subnet-based Group Settings opens.
Figure 72. Subnet-based Group Settings
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Defining VLAN Protocol Based Groups
The VLAN Protocol Groups Page contains information regarding protocol names and the
VLAN Ethernet type. Interfaces can be classified as a specific protocol based interface.
The classification places the interface into a protocol group. To define protocol based
VLANs:
1. Click Layer 2 > VLAN > VLAN Groups > Protocol Based Groups. The VLAN
Interface Settings Page opens:
Figure 73. VLAN Protocol Groups Page
The VLAN Interface Settings Page contains the following fields:
• Protocol Value — Displays the user-defined protocol name.
• Group ID — Displays the ID number assigned to frames containing specified
protocol value The possible field range is 1 - 2147483647.
2. Click
100
. The VLAN Interface Settings Page opens:
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Figure 74. Add Protocol-based Groups Page
In addition to the fields in the VLAN Interface Settings Page, the VLAN Interface Settings
Page contains the following additional fields:
• Protocol Value — Displays the protocol group type. The possible field values are:
—
IP
—
IPX
—
IPv6
—
ARP
• Ethernet-Based Protocol Value — Displays the Ethernet protocol value.
3. Define the fields.
4. Click
updated.
. The protocol based VLAN group is defined, and the device is
To Modify a Protocol Based VLAN Group:
1. Click Layer 2 > VLAN > VLAN Groups > Protocol Based Groups. The VLAN
Interface Settings Page opens.
2. Click
. The Protocol-based Groups Settings Page opens:
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Figure 75. Protocol-based Groups Settings Page
3. Modify the fields.
4. Click
updated.
. The protocol based VLAN group is defined, and the device is
Mapping Groups to VLANs
The VLAN Interface Settings Page allows network managers to assign specific interfaces
to specific VLAN groups. To map interfaces to VLAN groups:
1. Click Layer 2 > VLAN > VLAN Groups > Protocol Based Groups. The VLAN
Interface Settings Page opens:
Figure 76. Mapping Groups to VLAN Page
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The VLAN Interface Settings Page contains the following fields:
• Group Type — Displays the VLAN Group type to which the interface is attached.
The possible field values are:
— MAC Based — Indicates the interface is attached to a MAC based VLAN group.
— Subnet Based — Indicates the interface is attached to a Subnet based VLAN
group.
— Protocol Based — Indicates the interface is attached to a Protocol based VLAN
group.
• Interface — Displays the interface attached to the VLAN group. The possible field
values are:
— Checked — Indicates the VLAN is attached to the selected VLAN group.
— Unchecked — Indicates the VLAN is not attached to the selected VLAN group.
• Group ID — Displays the VLAN Group ID.
• VLAN ID — Displays the VLAN ID.
2. Select a port.
3. Click
. The VLAN Interface Settings Page opens:
Figure 77. VLAN Interface Settings Page
4. Define the relevant fields.
5. Click
updated.
. The VLAN interface settings are modified, and the device is
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Configuring GARP
This section contains information for configuring Generic Attribute Registration Protocol
(GARP). This section includes the following topics:
• Defining GARP
• Defining GVRP
Defining GARP
Generic Attribute Registration Protocol (GARP) protocol is a general-purpose protocol
that registers any network connectivity or membership-style information. GARP defines a
set of devices interested in a given network attribute, such as VLAN or multicast address.
When configuring GARP, ensure the following:
• The leave time must be greater than or equal to three times the join time.
• The leave-all time must be greater than the leave time.
• Set the same GARP timer values on all Layer 2-connected devices. If the GARP
timers are set differently on the Layer 2-connected devices, the GARP application
does not operate successfully.
To define the GARP settings on the device:
1. Click Layer 2 > VLAN > GARP Settings. The GARP Settings Page opens:
Figure 78. GARP Settings Page
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The GARP Settings Page contains the following fields:
• Ports — Displays the Port GARP settings.
• LAGs — Displays the LAG GARP settings.
• Unit No. — Indicates the unit number.
• Interface — Displays the port or LAG on which GARP is enabled.
• Join Timer— Indicates the amount of time, in milliseconds, that PDUs are
transmitted. The default value is 200 milliseconds.
• Leave Timer— Indicates the amount of time lapse, in milliseconds, that the device
waits before leaving its GARP state. Leave time is activated by a Leave All Time
message sent/received, and cancelled by the Join message received. Leave time must
be greater than or equal to three times the join time. The default value is 600
milliseconds.
• Leave All Timer — Indicates the amount of time lapse, in milliseconds, that all
device waits before leaving the GARP state. The leave all time must be greater than
the leave time. The default value is 10,000 milliseconds.
2. Click
. The GARP Parameters Settings Page opens:
Figure 79. GARP Parameters Settings Page
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
. The GARP parameters are defined, and the device is updated.
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Defining GVRP
GARP VLAN Registration Protocol (GVRP) is specifically provided for automatic
distribution of VLAN membership information among VLAN-aware bridges. GVRP
allows VLAN-aware bridges to automatically learn VLANs to bridge ports mapping,
without having to individually configure each bridge and register VLAN membership.
To define the GVRP parameters on the device:
1. Click Layer 2 > VLAN > GVRP Parameters. The GVRP Parameters Page
opens:
Figure 80. GVRP Parameters Page
The GVRP Parameters Page is divided into Port and LAG parameters. The field
definitions are the same. The GVRP Parameters Page contains the following fields:
• GVRP Global Status — Indicates if GVRP is enabled on the device. The possible
field values are:
— Enable — Enables GVRP on the selected device.
— Disable — Disables GVRP on the selected device.
•
•
•
•
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Ports — Displays the Port GVRP settings.
LAGs — Displays the LAG GVRP settings.
Unit No. — Indicates the row number from which GVRP parameters are copied.
Interface — Displays the port or LAG on which GVRP is enabled.
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• GVRP State— Indicates if GVRP is enabled on the port. The possible field values
are:
— Enable — Enables GVRP on the selected port.
— Disable — Disables GVRP on the selected port.
• Dynamic VLAN Creation — Indicates if Dynamic VLAN creation is enabled on the
interface. The possible field values are:
— Enable — Enables Dynamic VLAN creation on the interface.
— Disable — Disables Dynamic VLAN creation on the interface.
• GVRP Registration — Indicates if VLAN registration through GVRP is enabled on
the device. The possible field values are:
— Enable — Enables GVRP registration on the device.
— Disable — Disables GVRP registration on the device.
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
. The GVRP parameters are defined, and the device is updated.
To modify the GVRP parameters:
1. Click
. The GVRP Parameters Settings Page opens:
Figure 81. GVRP Parameters Settings Page
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
updated.
. The GVRP Interface parameters are sent, and the device is
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Configuring IP Information
This section provides information for defining device IP addresses, and includes the
following topics:
• Configuring IP Interfaces
• Configuring Domain Name Servers
Configuring IP Interfaces
This section contains information for defining IP interfaces and ARP settings, and
includes the following sections:
• Defining IP Addresses
• Defining ARP Settings
Defining IP Addresses
The IP Interface Page contains fields for assigning IP addresses. Packets are forwarded to
the default IP when frames are sent to a remote network. The configured IP address must
belong to the same IP address subnet of one of the IP interfaces. Packets are forwarded to
the default IP when frames are sent to a remote network via the default gateway. The
configured IP address must belong to the same subnet of one of the IP interfaces. The
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) assigns dynamic IP addresses to devices
on a network. DHCP ensures that network devices can have a different IP address every
time the device connects to the network.
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To define an IP interface:
1. Click System > IP Addressing > IP Interface. The IP Interface Page opens:
Figure 82. IP Interface Page
The IP Interface Page contains the following fields:
• Default Gateway — Defines the default gateway IP address.
• Remove Default Gateway — Removes the user defined IP address from the
interface. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes the user defined IP address from the interface.
— Unchecked — Maintains the user defined IP address assigned to the Interface.
• Static IP Address — Indicates the currently configured IP address. The possible field
values are:
— IP Address — Displays the currently configured IP address.
— Network Mask — Displays the currently configured IP address mask.
— Prefix Length — Defines the number of bits that comprise the static IP address
prefix.
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2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
updated.
. The IP configuration fields are saved, and the device is
Defining ARP Settings
To define ARP settings:
1. Click System > IP Addressing > ARP. The ARP Settings Page opens:
Figure 83. ARP Settings Page
The Address Resolution Protocol converts IP addresses into physical addresses. The ARP
Settings page allows network managers to define ARP settings on the system.The ARP
Settings Page contains the following fields:
• ARP Entry Age Out — Specifies the amount of time (in seconds) that passes
between ARP Table entry requests. Following the ARP Entry Age period, the entry is
deleted from the table. The range is 1 - 40000000. The default value is 60000 seconds.
• Clear ARP Table Entries — Specifies the types of ARP entries that are cleared. The
possible values are:
— None — Maintains the ARP entries.
— All — Clears all ARP entries.
— Dynamic — Clears only dynamic ARP entries.
— Static — Clears only static ARP entries.
• Unit No. — Displays the unit number.
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• Interface — Displays the interface used to manage the device. The possible
selections are:
— Port — Displays the port for which the IP address is defined.
—
LAG — Displays the LAG for which the IP address is defined.
—
VLAN — Displays the VLAN for which the IP address is defined.
• IP Address — Displays the IP address.
• MAC Address — Displays the MAC address.
• Status — Displays the status of the IP address. The possible selections are:
— Dynamic — Displays the IP address dynamically retrieved from the DHCP
Server.
— Static — Displays the currently configured IP address.
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
. The ARP settings are saved, and the device is updated.
Configuring Domain Name Servers
Domain Name System (DNS) converts user-defined domain names into IP addresses. Each
time a domain name is assigned, the DNS service translates the name into a numeric IP
address. For example, www.ipexample.com is translated into 192.87.56.2. DNS servers
maintain databases of domain names and their corresponding IP addresses.
This section contains the following topics:
• Defining DNS Servers
• Defining DNS Host Mapping
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Defining DNS Servers
The DNS Server Page contains fields for enabling and activating specific DNS servers.
To enable a DNS server:
1. Click System > Domain Name System > DNS Server. The DNS Server Page
opens:
Figure 84. DNS Server Page
The DNS Server Page contains the following fields:
• Enable DNS — Enables translating the DNS names into IP addresses. The possible
field values are:
— Checked — Translates the domains into IP addresses.
— Unchecked — Disables translating domains into IP addresses.
Default Parameters
• Default Domain Name (1 -158 Characters) — Specifies the user-defined DNS server
name.
• Type — Displays the IP address type. The possible field values are:
— DHCP — The IP address is dynamically created.
— Static — The IP address is a static IP address.
• Remove — Removes DNS servers. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes the selected DNS server.
— Unchecked — Maintains the current DNS server list.
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The DNS Server Page also contains the following fields:
• Remove— The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes the selected server.
— Unchecked — Maintains the current server list.
• Unit No. — Displays the unit number.
• DNS Server — Displays the DNS server IP address. DNS servers are added in the
Add DNS Server Page.
• Active Server— Specifies the DNS server that is currently active.
2. Select Enable DNS Status.
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
. The DNS server is enabled, and the device is updated.
To add a new DNS Server:
1. Click System > Domain Name System > DNS Server. The DNS Server Page
opens.
2. Click
. The Add DNS Server Page opens:
Figure 85. Add DNS Server Page
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
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. The DNS server is added, and the device is updated.
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Defining DNS Host Mapping
The DNS Host Mapping Page provides information for defining DNS Host Mapping.
To define DNS host mapping:
1. Click System > Domain Name System > Host Mapping. The DNS Host Mapping
Page opens:
Figure 86. DNS Host Mapping Page
The DNS Host Mapping Page contains the following fields:
• Remove — Removes default domain names. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes the selected DNS host.
— Unchecked — Maintains the current DNS host mapping list.
• Unit No. — Displays the unit number.
• Host Names — Displays a user-defined default domain name. When defined, the
default domain name is applied to all unqualified host names. The Host Name field
can contain up to 158 characters.
• IP Address — Displays the DNS host IP address.
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2. Click
. The Add DNS Host Page opens:
Figure 87. Add DNS Host Page
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
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. The DNS host is added, and the device is updated.
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Defining the Forwarding Database
and Static Routes
Packets addressed to destinations stored in either the Static or Dynamic databases are immediately
forwarded to the port. The Dynamic MAC Address Table can be sorted by interface, VLAN, or MAC
Address, whereas MAC addresses are dynamically learned as packets from sources that arrive at the
device. Static addresses are configured manually.
An address becomes associated with a port by learning the port from the frame’s source address, but if a
frame that is addressed to a destination MAC address is not associated with a port, that frame is flooded
to all relevant VLAN ports. To prevent the bridging table from overflowing, a dynamic MAC address,
from which no traffic arrives for a set period, is erased.
This section contains information for defining both static and dynamic forwarding database entries, and
includes the following topics:
• Defining Static Forwarding Database Entries
• Defining Dynamic Forwarding Database Entries
Defining Static Forwarding Database Entries
The Forwarding Database Static Addresses Page contains parameters for defining the age interval on the
device. To prevent static MAC addresses from being deleted when the device is reset, ensure that the port
attached to the MAC address is locked.
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To configure the static forwarding database:
1. Click Layer 2 > Address Table > Static Addresses. The Forwarding Database Static Addresses
Page opens.
Figure 88. Forwarding Database Static Addresses Page
The Forwarding Database Static Addresses Page contains the following fields:
• Remove — Removes the entry. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes the selected entry.
— Unchecked — Maintains the current static forwarding database.
• VLAN ID — Displays the VLAN ID number to which the entry refers.
• MAC Address — Displays the MAC address to which the entry refers.
• Interface — Displays the interface to which the entry refers:
— Port — The specific port number to which the forwarding database parameters refer.
— LAG — The specific LAG number to which the forwarding database parameters refer.
• Status — Displays how the entry was created. The possible field values are:
— Secure — The MAC Address is defined for locked ports.
— Permanent — The MAC address is permanent.
— Delete on Reset — The MAC address is deleted when the device is reset.
— Delete on Timeout — The MAC address is deleted when a timeout occurs.
Note: To prevent static MAC addresses from being deleted when the device is reset, make sure
that the port attached to the MAC address is locked.
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To add a new static forwarding database entry:
1. Click Layer 2 > Address Table > Static Addresses. The Forwarding Database Static Addresses
Page opens.
2. Click
. The Add Forwarding Database Page opens:
Figure 89. Add Forwarding Database Page
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
. The forwarding database information is modified, and the device is updated.
Defining Dynamic Forwarding Database Entries
The contains parameters for querying information in the Dynamic MAC Address Table, including the
interface type, MAC addresses, VLAN, and table storing. The Dynamic MAC Address table contains
information about the aging time before a dynamic MAC address is erased, and includes parameters for
querying and viewing the Dynamic MAC Address table. The Dynamic MAC Address table contains
address parameters by which packets are directly forwarded to the ports. The Dynamic Address Table
can be sorted by interface, VLAN, and MAC Address.
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To configure the Dynamic MAC Address table:
1. Click Layer 2 > Address Table > Dynamic Addresses. The opens.
Figure 90. Dynamic Addresses Page
The contains the following fields:
• Aging Interval (secs) — Specifies the amount of time the MAC Address remains in the Dynamic
Address Table before it times out. The default value is 300 seconds.
• Clear Table — Clears the current Address Table entries.
• Query by: — Sorts the addresses table by:
— Interface — Displays the interface to for which the dynamic address is defined.
— MAC Address — Specifies the MAC address for which the table is queried.
— VLAN ID — Specifies the VLAN ID for which the table is queried.
• Address Table Sort Key —Specifies the means by which the Dynamic MAC Address Table is
sorted. The address table can be sorted by address, VLAN, or interface.
2. Define the fields.
3. Click
. The Dynamic Address Aging field is defined, and the device is updated.
To query the Dynamic MAC Address Table:
1. Click Layer 2 > Address Table > Dynamic Addresses. The opens.
2. Select a port, MAC Address, and VLAN ID.
3. Select an Address Table Sort Key.
4. Click
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. The Dynamic MAC Address Table is queried, and the results are displayed.
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Configuring Multicast Forwarding
This section contains information for configuring Multicast forwarding and Multicast TV,
and includes the following sections:
• Defining IGMP Snooping
• Defining Multicast Groups
• Defining Multicast Forward All Settings
Defining IGMP Snooping
When IGMP Snooping is enabled globally, all IGMP packets are forwarded to the CPU.
The CPU analyzes the incoming packets and determines:
• Which ports want to join which Multicast groups.
• Which ports have Multicast routers generating IGMP queries.
• Which routing protocols are forwarding packets and Multicast traffic.
Ports requesting to join a specific Multicast group issue an IGMP report, specifying that
Multicast group is accepting members. This results in the creation of the Multicast
filtering database.
Note: Ensure that Bridge Multicast Forwarding is enabled before enabling IGMP Snooping.
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To enable IGMP Snooping:
1. Click Layer 2 > Multicast > IGMP Snooping. The IGMP Snooping Page opens:
Figure 91. IGMP Snooping Page
The IGMP Snooping Page contains the following fields:
• Enable IGMP Snooping Status — Indicates if IGMP Snooping is enabled on the
device. IGMP Snooping can be enabled only if Bridge Multicast Filtering is enabled.
The possible field values are:
— Checked — Enables IGMP Snooping on the device.
— Unchecked — Disables IGMP Snooping on the device.
• Unit No. — Displays the unit number.
• VLAN ID — Specifies the VLAN ID.
• IGMP Snooping Status — Indicates if IGMP snooping is enabled on the VLAN. The
possible field values are:
— Enable — Enables IGMP Snooping on the VLAN.
— Disable — Disables IGMP Snooping on the VLAN.
• Auto Learn — Indicates if Auto Learn is enabled on the device. If Auto Learn is
enabled, the devices automatically learns where other Multicast groups are located.
Enables or disables Auto Learn on the Ethernet device.The possible field values are:
— Enable — Enables auto learn
— Disable — Disables auto learn.
• Host Timeout — Indicates the amount of time host waits to receive a message before
timing out. The default time is 260 seconds.
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• MRouter Timeout — Indicates the amount of the time the Multicast router waits to
receive a message before it times out. The default value is 300 seconds.
• Leave Timeout — Indicates the amount of time the host waits, after requesting to
leave the IGMP group and not receiving a Join message from another station, before
timing out. If a Leave Timeout occurs, the switch notifies the Multicast device to stop
sending traffic The Leave Timeout value is either user-defined, or an immediate leave
value. The default timeout is 10 seconds.
2. Check the Enable IGMP Snooping Status checkbox.
3. Click
. The IGMP Snooping Settings Page opens:
Figure 92. IGMP Snooping Settings Page
4. Modify the relevant fields.
5. Click
updated.
. The IGMP global parameters are sent, and the device is
Defining Multicast Groups
The Multicast Group Page displays the ports and LAGs attached to the Multicast service
group in the Ports and LAGs tables. The Port and LAG tables also reflect the manner in
which the port or LAGs joined the Multicast group. Ports can be added either to existing
groups or to new Multicast service groups. The Multicast Group Page permits new
Multicast service groups to be created. The Multicast Group Page also assigns ports to a
specific Multicast service address group.
To define multicast groups:
1. Click Layer 2 > Multicast > Multicast Group. The Multicast Group Page opens:
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Figure 93. Multicast Group Page
The Multicast Group Page contains the following fields:
• Enable Bridge Multicast Filtering — Indicate if bridge Multicast filtering is enabled
on the device. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Enables multicast filtering on the device.
— Unchecked — Disables multicast filtering on the device. If multicast filtering is
disabled, multicast frames are flooded to all ports in the relevant VLAN.
Disabled is the default value.
• VLAN ID — Identifies a VLAN and contains information about the multicast group
address.
• Bridge Multicast Address — Identifies the multicast group MAC address/IP
address.
•
•
•
•
•
Ports — Displays port that can be added to a multicast service.
LAGs — Displays LAGs that can be added to a multicast service.
Unit No. — Displays the unit number.
Interface — Displays the port number.
Interface Status — Indicates the port status. The possible field values are:
— Non — Indicates the port is not part of a Multicast group.
— Static — Attaches the port to the Multicast group as static member.
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— Forbidden — Indicates the port is not included in the Multicast group, even if
IGMP snooping designated the port to join a Multicast group.
2. Click
. The Add Multicast Group Page opens:
Figure 94. Add Multicast Group Page
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
. The Multicast group is defined, and the device is updated.
To modify the multicast group:
1. Click
. The Edit Multicast Group Page opens:
Figure 95. Edit Multicast Group Page
2. Modify the relevant fields.
3. Click
. The Multicast group is defined, and the device is updated.
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Defining Multicast Forward All Settings
The Multicast Forward All Page contains fields for attaching ports or LAGs to a device
that is attached to a neighboring Multicast router/switch. Once IGMP Snooping is
enabled, multicast packets are forwarded to the appropriate port or VLAN. Unless LAGs
are defined, only a Multicast Forward All table displays.
To define multicast forward all settings:
1. Click Layer 2 > Multicast > Multicast Forward All. The Multicast Forward All
Page opens:
Figure 96. Multicast Forward All Page
The Multicast Forward All Page contains the following fields:
•
•
•
•
•
VLAN ID — Displays the VLAN for which multicast parameters are displayed.
Ports — Displays port that can be added to a multicast service.
LAGs — Displays LAGs that can be added to a multicast service.
Interface — Displays the interface used to manage the device.
Interface Status — Indicates the port status. The possible field values are:
— Static — Attaches the port to the Multicast group as static member.
— Forbidden — Indicates the port is not included in the Multicast group, even if
IGMP snooping designated the port to join a Multicast group.
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— Exclude — Indicates the port is not part of a Multicast group.
2. Select a VLAN in the VLAN ID drop-down box.
3. Define the VLAN port settings.
4. Click
is updated.
. The Multicast Forward All settings are defined, and the device
To modify the Multicast Forward All settings:
1. Click
. The Multicast Forward All Page opens:
Figure 97. Edit Multicast Forward All Page
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
is updated.
. The Multicast Forward All settings are defined, and the device
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Configuring Spanning Tree
The Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) provides tree topography for any arrangement of
bridges. STP also provides a single path between end stations on a network, eliminating
loops.
Loops occur when alternate routes exist between hosts. Loops in an extended network can
cause bridges to forward traffic indefinitely, resulting in increased traffic and reducing
network efficiency.
The device supports the following STP versions:
• Classic STP — Provides a single path between end stations, avoiding and eliminating
loops. For more information on configuring Classic STP, see Defining Classic
Spanning Tree.
• Rapid STP — Detects and uses network topologies that provide faster convergence
of the spanning tree, without creating forwarding loops. For more information on
configuring Rapid STP, see Defining Rapid STP.
• Multiple STP — Provides various load balancing scenarios. For example, if port A is
blocked in one STP instance, the same port can be placed in the Forwarding State in
another STP instance. For more information on configuring Multiple STP, see
Defining Multiple STP.
This section contains the following topics:
•
•
•
•
Defining Classic Spanning Tree
Defining Spanning Tree Interface Settings
Defining Rapid STP
Defining Multiple STP
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Defining Classic Spanning Tree
The Spanning Tree Properties Page contains parameters for enabling STP on the device.
To enable STP on the device:
1. Click Layer 2 > Spanning Tree > Properties. The Spanning Tree Properties Page
opens:
Figure 98. Spanning Tree Properties Page
The Spanning Tree Properties Page contains the following fields:
Global Settings
• Spanning Tree State — Indicates whether STP is enabled on the device. The possible
field values are:
— Enable — Enables STP on the device.
— Disable — Disables STP on the device.
• STP Operation Mode — Specifies the STP mode that is enabled on the device. The
possible field values are:
— Classic STP — Enables Classic STP on the device. This is the default value.
— Rapid STP — Enables Rapid STP on the device.
— Multiple STP — Enables Multiple STP on the device.
• BPDU Handling — Determines how BPDU packets are managed when STP is
disabled on the port or device. BPDUs are used to transmit spanning tree information.
The possible field values are:
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— Filtering — Filters BPDU packets when spanning tree is disabled on an
interface. This is the default value.
— Flooding — Floods BPDU packets when spanning tree is disabled on an
interface.
• Path Cost Default Values — Specifies the method used to assign default path cost to
STP ports. The possible field values are:
— Short — Specifies 1 through 65,535 range for port path cost. This is the default
value.
— Long — Specifies 1 through 200,000,000 range for port path cost. The default
path cost assigned to an interface varies according to the selected method (Hello
Time, Max Age, or Forward Delay).
Bridge Settings
• Priority (0-65535) — Specifies the bridge priority value. When switches or bridges
are running STP, each is assigned a priority. After exchanging BPDUs, the device
with the lowest priority value becomes the Root Bridge. The default value is 32768.
The port priority value is provided in increments of 4096.
• Hello Time (1-10) — Specifies the device Hello Time. The Hello Time indicates the
amount of time in seconds a Root Bridge waits between configuration messages. The
default is 2 seconds.
• Max Age (6-40) — Specifies the device Maximum Age Time. The Maximum Age
Time is the amount of time in seconds a bridge waits before sending configuration
messages. The default Maximum Age Time is 20 seconds.
• Forward Delay (4-30) — Specifies the device Forward Delay Time. The Forward
Delay Time is the amount of time in seconds a bridge remains in a listening and
learning state before forwarding packets. The default is 15 seconds.
Designated Root
• Bridge ID — Identifies the Bridge priority and MAC address.
• Root Bridge ID — Identifies the Root Bridge priority and MAC address.
• Root Port — Indicates the port number that offers the lowest cost path from this
bridge to the Root Bridge. This field is significant when the bridge is not the Root
Bridge. The default is zero.
• Root Path Cost — The cost of the path from this bridge to the Root Bridge.
• Topology Changes Counts — Specifies the total amount of STP state changes that
have occurred.
• Last Topology Change — Indicates the amount of time that has elapsed since the
bridge was initialized or reset, and the last topographic change that occurred. The time
is displayed in a day-hour-minute-second format, such as 2 days 5 hours 10 minutes
and 4 seconds.
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
. STP is enabled, and the device is updated.
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Defining Spanning Tree Interface Settings
Network administrators can assign STP settings to specific interfaces using the Spanning
Tree Interface Settings Page. The Global LAGs section displays the STP information for
Link Aggregated Groups.
To assign STP settings to an interface:
1. Click Layer 2 > Spanning Tree > Interface Settings. The Spanning Tree Interface
Settings Page opens:
Figure 99. Spanning Tree Interface Settings Page
The Spanning Tree Interface Settings Page contains the following fields:
• Ports — Displays the port on which STP is enabled.
• LAGs — Displays the LAG on which STP is enabled.
If Ports is selected, the following fields are displayed:
• Unit No. — Displays the unit number.
• Port — Displays the port on which STP is enabled.
• STP — Indicates if STP is enabled on the port. The possible field values are:
— Enabled — Indicates that STP is enabled on the port.
— Disabled — Indicates that STP is disabled on the port.
• Port Fast— Indicates if Fast Link is enabled on the port. If Fast Link mode is enabled
for a port, the Port State is automatically placed in the Forwarding state when the port
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link is up. Fast Link optimizes the STP protocol convergence. STP convergence can
take 30-60 seconds in large networks. The possible field values are:
— Enable — Port Fast is enabled.
— Disable — Port Fast is disabled.
— Auto — Port Fast mode is enabled a few seconds after the interface becomes
active.
• Root Guard — Prevents devices outside the network core from being assigned the
spanning tree root.
• Port State — Displays the current STP state of a port. If enabled, the port state
determines what forwarding action is taken on traffic. Possible port states are:
—
Forwarding — Indicates that the port can forward traffic or learn MAC
addresses.
— Disabled — Indicates that STP is currently disabled on the port. The port
forwards traffic while learning MAC addresses.
• Port Role — Displays the port role assigned by the STP algorithm to provide to STP
paths. The possible field values are:
— Root — Provides the lowest cost path to forward packets to the root switch.
— Designated — The port or LAG through which the designated switch is attached
to the LAN.
— Alternate — Provides an alternate path to the root switch from the root interface.
— Backup — Provides a backup path to the designated port path toward the
Spanning Tree leaves. Backup ports occur only when two ports are connected in
a loop by a point-to-point link, or when a LAN has two or more connections
connected to a shared segment.
— Disable — The port is not participating in the Spanning Tree.
• Speed — Indicates the speed at which the port is operating.
• Path Cost — Indicates the port contribution to the root path cost. The path cost is
adjusted to a higher or lower value, and is used to forward traffic when a path is rerouted.
• Priority — Priority value of the port. The priority value influences the port choice
when a bridge has two ports connected in a loop. The priority value is between 0 -240.
The priority value is determined in increments of 16.
• Designated Bridge ID — Indicates the bridge priority and the MAC Address of the
designated bridge.
• Designated Port ID — Indicates the selected port priority and interface.
• Designated Cost — Indicates the cost of the port participating in the STP topology.
Ports with a lower cost are less likely to be blocked if STP detects loops.
• Forward Transitions — Indicates the number of times the port has changed from
Blocking state to Forwarding state.
• LAG — Indicates the LAG to which the port belongs.
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If LAGs is selected, the following fields are displayed:
• LAG — Indicates the LAG to which the port belongs.
• STP — Indicates if STP is enabled on the port. The possible field values are:
— Enabled — Indicates that STP is enabled on the port.
— Disabled — Indicates that STP is disabled on the port.
• Port Fast— Indicates if Fast Link is enabled on the port. If Fast Link mode is enabled
for a port, the Port State is automatically placed in the Forwarding state when the port
link is up. Fast Link optimizes the STP protocol convergence. STP convergence can
take 30-60 seconds in large networks. The possible field values are:
— Enable — Port Fast is enabled.
— Disable — Port Fast is disabled.
— Auto — Port Fast mode is enabled a few seconds after the interface becomes
active.
• Root Guard — Prevents devices outside the network core from being assigned the
spanning tree root.
• State — Displays the current STP state of a port. If enabled, the port state determines
what forwarding action is taken on traffic. Possible port states are:
— Disabled — Indicates that STP is currently disabled on the port. The port
forwards traffic while learning MAC addresses.
— Blocking — Indicates that the port is currently blocked and cannot forward
traffic or learn MAC addresses. Blocking is displayed when Classic STP is
enabled.
• Port Role — Displays the port role assigned by the STP algorithm to provide to STP
paths. The possible field values are:
— Root — Provides the lowest cost path to forward packets to the root switch.
— Designated — The port or LAG through which the designated switch is attached
to the LAN.
— Alternate — Provides an alternate path to the root switch from the root interface.
— Backup — Provides a backup path to the designated port path toward the
Spanning Tree leaves. Backup ports occur only when two ports are connected in
a loop by a point-to-point link, or when a LAN has two or more connections
connected to a shared segment.
— Disable — The port is not participating in the Spanning Tree.
• Path Cost — Indicates the port contribution to the root path cost. The path cost is
adjusted to a higher or lower value, and is used to forward traffic when a path is rerouted.
• Priority — Priority value of the port. The priority value influences the port choice
when a bridge has two ports connected in a loop. The priority value is between 0 -240.
The priority value is determined in increments of 16.
• Designated Bridge ID — Indicates the bridge priority and the MAC Address of the
designated bridge.
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• Designated Port ID — Indicates the selected port priority and interface.
• Designated Cost — Indicates the cost of the port participating in the STP topology.
Ports with a lower cost are less likely to be blocked if STP detects loops.
• Forward Transitions — Indicates the number of times the port has changed from
Blocking state to Forwarding state.
2. Click
. The Spanning Tree Interface Settings Page opens:
Figure 100. Spanning Tree Interface Settings Page
3. Select Enable in the STP field.
4. Define the relevant fields.
5. Click
. STP is enabled on the interface, and the device is updated.
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Defining Rapid STP
While Classic STP prevents Layer 2 forwarding loops in a general network topology,
convergence can take between 30-60 seconds. This time may delay detecting possible
loops and propagating status topology changes. Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP)
detects and uses network topologies that allow a faster STP convergence without creating
forwarding loops. The Global System LAG information displays the same field
information as the ports, but represent the LAG RSTP information.
To define Rapid STP on the device:
1. Click Layer 2 > Spanning Tree > Rapid STP. The Rapid STP Page opens:
Figure 101. Rapid STP Page
The Rapid STP Page contains the following fields:
•
•
•
•
•
Ports — Displays the port on which RSTP is enabled.
LAGs — Indicates the LAG to which the port belongs.
Unit No. — Indicates the unit number.
Interface — Displays the port or LAG on which Rapid STP is enabled.
Role — Displays the port role assigned by the STP algorithm to provide to STP paths.
The possible field values are:
— Root — Provides the lowest cost path to forward packets to the root switch.
— Designated — The port or LAG through which the designated switch is attached
to the LAN.
— Alternate — Provides an alternate path to the root switch from the root interface.
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— Backup — Provides a backup path to the designated port path toward the
Spanning Tree leaves. Backup ports occur only when two ports are connected in
a loop by a point-to-point link, or when a LAN has two or more connections
connected to a shared segment.
— Disabled — The port is not participating in the Spanning Tree.
• Mode—Displays the current STP mode. The STP mode is selected in the Rapid STP
Page. The possible field values are:
— STP — Classic STP is enabled on the device.
— Rapid STP — Rapid STP is enabled on the device.
— Multiple STP — Multiple STP is enabled on the device.
• Fast Link Operational Status — Indicates whether Fast Link is enabled or disabled
for the port or LAG. If Fast Link is enabled for a port, the port is automatically placed
in the forwarding state.
• Port Status — Displays the current status of a the port.
• Point-to-Point Operational Status — Displays the point-to-point operating state.
• Activate Protocol Migration — Indicates whether sending Link Control Protocol
(LCP) packets to configure and test the data link is enabled.
2. Click
. The Rapid Spanning Tree Settings Page opens:
Figure 102. Rapid Spanning Tree Settings Page
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
updated.
. Rapid STP is defined for the interface, and the device is
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Defining Multiple STP
Multiple Spanning Tree (MSTP) provides differing load balancing scenarios. For
example, while port A is blocked in one STP instance, the same port can be placed in the
Forwarding state in another STP instance. The Multiple STP Properties Page contains
information for defining global MSTP settings, including region names, MSTP revisions,
and maximum hops.
To define MSTP:
1. Click Layer 2 > Multiple STP > Properties. The Multiple STP Properties Page
opens:
Figure 103. Multiple STP Properties Page
The Multiple STP Properties Page contains the following fields:
• Region Name — User-defined STP region name.
• Revision — An unsigned 16-bit number that identifies the revision of the current
MSTP configuration. The revision number is required as part of the MSTP
configuration. The possible field range is 0-65535.
• Max Hops — Specifies the total number of hops that occur in a specific region before
the BPDU is discarded. Once the BPDU is discarded, the port information is aged out.
The possible field range is 1-40. The field default is 20 hops.
• IST Master — Identifies the Spanning Tree Master instance. The IST Master is the
specified instance root.
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
updated.
138
. The Multiple STP properties are defined, and the device is
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Defining Multiple STP Instance To VLAN Settings
The Instance To VLAN Settings Page enables mapping VLANs to MSTP Instances. When
configuring VLANs to MSTP instances, note the following:
• VLAN 1 mapped to MSTP instance 1 by default.
• VLAN 2 mapped to MSTP instance 2 by default.
Network administrators can define the Multiple STP Instance To VLAN settings using the
Instance To VLAN Settings Page.
To define the instance to VLAN settings:
1. Click Layer 2 > Multiple STP > Instance To VLAN Settings. The Instance To
VLAN Settings Page opens:
Figure 104. Instance To VLAN Settings Page
The Instance To VLAN Settings Page contains the following fields:
• Unit No. — Displays the unit number.
• VLAN — Maps the selected VLANs to the selected instance. Each VLAN belongs to
one instance.
• Instance ID (0-15) — Specifies the VLAN group to which the interface is assigned.
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
is updated.
. The Instance To VLAN Settings Page is defined, and the device
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Defining Multiple STP Instance Settings
Multiple STP maps VLANs into STP instances. Packets assigned to various VLANs are
transmitted along different paths within Multiple Spanning Tree Regions (MST Regions).
Regions are one or more Multiple Spanning Tree bridges by which frames can be
transmitted. In configuring Multiple STP, the MST region to which the device belongs is
defined. A configuration consists of the name, revision, and region to which the device
belongs.
Network administrators can define the Multiple STP instance settings using the Instance
Settings Page.
To define the Instance settings:
1. Click Layer 2 > Multiple STP > Instance Settings. The Instance Settings Page
opens:
Figure 105. Instance Settings Page
The Instance Settings Page contains the following fields:
• Instance ID — Specifies the VLAN group to which the interface is assigned.
• Included VLAN — Maps the selected VLANs to the selected instance. Each VLAN
belongs to one instance.
• Bridge Priority — Specifies the selected spanning tree instance device priority. The
field range is 0-61440
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• Designated Root Bridge ID — Indicates the ID of the bridge with the lowest path
cost to the instance ID.
• Root Port — Indicates the selected instance’s root port.
• Root Path Cost — Indicates the selected instance’s path cost.
• Bridge ID — Indicates the bridge ID of the selected instance.
• Remaining Hops — Indicates the number of hops remaining to the next destination.
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
updated.
. The Instance Settings Page is defined, and the device is
Defining Multiple STP Interface Settings
Network Administrators can assign Multiple STP Interface Settings in the Interface
Settings Page.
To define Interface settings:
1. Click Layer 2 > Multiple STP > Interface Settings. The Interface Settings Page
opens:
Figure 106. Interface Settings Page
The Interface Settings Page contains the following fields:
• Instance ID — Lists the MSTP instances configured on the device. Possible field
range is 0-15.
• Interface — Displays the interface for which the MSTP settings are displayed. The
possible field values are:
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— Port — Specifies the port for which the MSTP settings are displayed.
— LAG — Specifies the LAG for which the MSTP settings are displayed.
• MSTP — Specifies whether or not MSTP is enable on the interface. The possible
field values are:
— Enabled — Enables MSTP on the interface.
— Disabled — Disables MSTP on the interface.
• Port State— Indicates whether the port is enabled for the specific instance. The
possible field values are:
— Enabled — Enables the port for the specific instance.
— Disabled — Disables the port for the specific instance.
• Type — Indicates whether the port is a Boundary or Master port. The possible field
values are:
— Boundary Port — Indicates that the port is a Boundary port. A Boundary port
attaches MST bridges to LANs in an outlying region. If the port is a Boundary
port, this field also indicates whether the device on the other side of the link is
working in RSTP or STP mode
— Master Port — Indicates the port is a master port. A Master port provides
connectivity from a MSTP region to the outlying CIST root.
• Role — Indicates the port role assigned by the STP algorithm to provide to STP paths.
The possible field values are:
— Root — Provides the lowest cost path to forward packets to the root device.
— Designated — Indicates the port or LAG through which the designated device is
attached to the LAN.
— Alternate — Provides an alternate path to the root device from the root interface.
— Backup — Provides a backup path to the designated port path toward the
Spanning Tree leaves. Backup ports occur only when two ports are connected in
a loop by a point-to-point link or when a LAN has two or more connections
connected to a shared segment.
— Disabled — Indicates the port is not participating in the Spanning Tree.
• Mode — Indicates the STP mode by which STP is enabled on the device. The
possible field values are:
— Classic STP — Classic STP is enabled on the device. This is the default value.
— Rapid STP — Rapid STP is enabled on the device.
— Multiple STP — Multiple STP is enabled on the device.
• Interface Priority — Defines the interface priority for the specified instance. The
default value is 128.
• Path Cost — Indicates the port contribution to the Spanning Tree instance. The range
should always be 1-200,000,000.
• Designated Bridge ID — Displays the ID of the bridge that connects the link or
shared LAN to the root.
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• Designated Port ID — Displays the ID of the port on the designated bridge that
connects the link or the shared LAN to the root.
• Designated Cost — Indicates that the default path cost is assigned according to the
method selected on the Spanning Tree Global Settings page.
• Forward Transitions — Indicates the number of times the LAG State has changed
from a Forwarding state to a Blocking state.
• Remain Hops — Indicates the hops remaining to the next destination.
2. Click
. The Interface Table Page opens.
Figure 107. Interface Table Page
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
updated.
. The Interface Settings Page is defined, and the device is
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Configuring SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) provides a method for managing network
devices. The device supports the following SNMP versions:
• SNMP v1 and v2c
• SNMP v3
SNMP v1 and v2c
The SNMP agents maintain a list of variables, which are used to manage the device. The
variables are defined in the Management Information Base (MIB). The SNMP agent
defines the MIB specification format, as well as the format used to access the information
over the network. Access rights to the SNMP agents are controlled by access strings.
SNMP v3
SNMP v3 applies access control and a new traps mechanism. In addition, User Security
Model (USM) parameters are defined for SNMPv3, including:
• Authentication — Provides data integrity and data origin authentication.
• Privacy — Protects against the disclosure of message content. Cipher Block-
Chaining (CBC) is used for encryption. Either authentication is enabled on a SNMP
message, or both authentication and privacy are enabled on a SNMP message.
However, privacy cannot be enabled without authentication.
• Timeliness — Protects against message delay or message redundancy. The SNMP
agent compares incoming message to the message time information.
• Key Management — Defines key generation, key updates, and key use.
The device supports SNMP notification filters based on Object IDs (OIDs). OIDs are used
by the system to manage device features.
SNMP v3 supports the following features:
• Security
• Feature Access Control
• Traps
The device generates the Copy trap.
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This section contains the following topics:
• Configuring SNMP Notifications
• Configuring SNMP Security
Configuring SNMP Security
This section contains information for configuring SNMP security parameters, and
contains the following topics:
•
•
•
•
•
Defining SNMP Security
Defining SNMP Views
Defining SNMP Group Profiles
Defining SNMP Group Members
Defining SNMP Communities
Defining SNMP Security
The SNMP Security Global Parameters Page permits the enabling of both SNMP and
Authentication notifications.
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To define the SNMP security parameters:
1. Click SNMP > Security > Global Parameters. The SNMP Security Global
Parameters Page opens:
Figure 108. SNMP Security Global Parameters Page
The SNMP Security Global Parameters Page contains the following fields:
• Local Engine ID (10-64 Characters)— Displays the local device Engine ID. The
field value is a hexadecimal string. Each byte in hexadecimal character strings is two
hexadecimal digits. Each byte can be separated by a period or a colon. The Engine ID
must be defined before SNMPv3 is enabled. Select a default Engine ID that is
comprised of an Enterprise number and the default MAC address.
• Use Default — Uses the device-generated Engine ID. The default Engine ID is based
on the device MAC address and is defined per standard as:
— First 4 octets — first bit = 1, the rest is IANA Enterprise number.
— Fifth octet — Set to 3 to indicate the MAC address that follows.
— Last 6 octets — MAC address of the device.
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
is updated.
. The SNMP Global Security Parameters are set, and the device
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Defining SNMP Views
SNMP insert space views provide or block access to device features or portions of
features. For example, a view can be defined, which provides that SNMP group A has
Read Only (R/O) access to Multicast groups, while SNMP group B has Read-Write (R/W)
access to Multicast groups. Feature access is granted via the MIB name or MIB Object ID.
To define SNMP views:
1. Click SNMP > Security > Views. The SNMP Security Views Page opens:
Figure 109. SNMP Security Views Page
The SNMP Security Views Page contains the following fields:
• View Name — Displays the user-defined views. The view name can contain a
maximum of 30 alphanumeric characters.The possible field values are:
— Default — Enables read-only access for the default view.
— Default Super — Enables Super read-only, read-write, and management access
to the default SNMP view.
• Remove — Deletes the currently selected view. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes the selected view.
— Unchecked — Maintains the list of views.
• Unit No. — Displays the unit number.
• Object ID Subtree — Displays the device feature OID included in or excluded from
the selected SNMP view.
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• View Type — Indicates whether the defined OID branch is included in or excluded
from the selected SNMP view.
2. Click
. The Add SNMP View Page opens:
Figure 110. Add SNMP View Page
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
. The View is defined, and the device is updated.
Defining SNMP Group Profiles
The SNMP Group Profile Page provides information for creating SNMP groups, and
assigning SNMP access control privileges to SNMP groups. Groups allow network
managers to assign access rights to specific device features, or feature aspects.
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To define an SNMP group:
1. Click SNMP > Security > Group Profile. The SNMP Group Profile Page opens:
Figure 111. SNMP Group Profile Page
The SNMP Group Profile Page contains the following fields:
• Remove — Removes SNMP groups. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes the selected SNMP group.
— Unchecked — Maintains the SNMP groups.
• Unit No. — Displays the unit number.
• Group Name — Displays the user-defined group to which access control rules are
applied. The field range is up to 30 characters.
• Security Model — Defines the SNMP version attached to the group. The possible
field values are:
— SNMPv1 — SNMPv1 is defined for the group.
— SNMPv2c — SNMPv2c is defined for the group.
— SNMPv3 — SNMPv3 is defined for the group.
• Security Level — Defines the security level attached to the group. Security levels
apply to SNMPv3 only. The possible field values are:
— No Authentication — Indicates that neither the Authentication nor the Privacy
security levels are assigned to the group.
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— Authentication — Authenticates SNMP messages, and ensures that the SNMP
message’s origin is authenticated.
— Privacy — Encrypts SNMP messages.
• Operation — Defines the group access rights. The possible field values are:
— Read — Management access is restricted to read-only, and changes cannot be
made to the assigned SNMP view.
— Write — Management access is read-write and changes can be made to the
assigned SNMP view.
— Notify — Sends traps for the assigned SNMP view.
2. Click
. The Add SNMP Group Profile Page opens:
Figure 112. Add SNMP Group Profile Page
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
. The SNMP Group Profile is added, and the device is updated.
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To modify SNMP Group Settings:
1. Click SNMP > Security > Group Profile. The SNMP Group Profile Page opens.
2. Click
. The SNMP Group Profile Settings Page opens:
Figure 113. SNMP Group Profile Settings Page
3. Modify the relevant fields.
4. Click
updated.
. The SNMP Group Profile is modified, and the device is
Defining SNMP Group Members
The SNMP Group Membership Page enables assigning system users to SNMP groups and
defines the user authentication method.
1. Click SNMP > Security > Group Membership. The SNMP Group Membership
Page opens:
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Figure 114. SNMP Group Membership Page
The SNMP Group Membership Page contains the following fields:
• Remove — Removes users from a specified group. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes the selected user.
— Unchecked — Maintains the list of users.
• Unit No. — Displays the unit number.
• User Name — Contains a list of user-defined user names. The field range is up to 30
alphanumeric characters.
• Group Name — Contains a list of user-defined SNMP groups. SNMP groups are
defined in the SNMP Group Profile Page.
• Engine ID — Displays either the local or remote SNMP entity to which the user is
connected. Changing or removing the local SNMP Engine ID deletes the SNMPv3
user database. The possible field values are:
• Authentication — Displays the method used to authenticate users. The possible field
values are:
— None — No user authentication is used.
— MD5 Password — The HMAC-MD5-96 password is used for authentication.
The user should enter a password.
—
SHA Password — Users are authenticated using the HMAC-SHA-96
authentication level. The user should enter a password.
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— MD5 Key — Users are authenticated using the HMAC-MD5 algorithm.
— SHA Key — Users are authenticated using the HMAC-SHA-96 authentication
level.
2. Click
. The Add SNMP Group Membership Page opens:
Figure 115. Add SNMP Group Membership Page
In addition to the fields in the SNMP Group Membership Page, the Add SNMP Group
Membership Page contains the following fields:
• Authentication Method — Defines the SNMP Authentication Method.
• Password — Defines the password for the group member
• Authentication Key — Defines the HMAC-MD5-96 or HMAC-SHA-96
authentication level. The authentication and privacy keys are entered to define the
authentication key. If only authentication is required, 16 bytes are defined. If both
privacy and authentication are required, 32 bytes are defined. Each byte in
hexadecimal character strings is two hexadecimal digits. Each byte can be separated
by a period or a colon.
• Privacy Key — Defines the privacy key (LSB). If only authentication is required, 20
bytes are defined. If both privacy and authentication are required, 36 bytes are
defined. Each byte in hexadecimal character strings is two hexadecimal digits. Each
byte can be separated by a period or colon.
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
updated.
154
. The SNMP Group Membership is modified, and the device is
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To modify SNMP Group Membership Settings:
1. Click SNMP > Security > Group Membership. The SNMP Group Membership
Page opens.
2. Click
. The SNMP Group Membership Settings Page opens:
Figure 116. SNMP Group Membership Settings Page
3. Modify the relevant fields.
4. Click
updated.
. The SNMP Group Membership is modified, and the device is
Defining SNMP Communities
Access rights are managed by defining communities in the SNMP Communities Page.
When the community names are changed, access rights are also changed. SNMP
communities are defined only for SNMP v1 and SNMP v2c.
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To define SNMP communities:
1. Click SNMP > Security > Communities. The SNMP Communities Page opens:
Figure 117. SNMP Communities Page
The SNMP Communities Page is divided into the following tables:
• SNMP Communities Basic Table
• SNMP Communities Advanced Tables
SNMP Communities Basic Table
The SNMP Communities Basic Table contains the following fields:
• Remove — Removes a community. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes the selected SNMP community.
— Unchecked — Maintains the SNMP communities.
• Unit No. — Displays the unit number.
• Management Station — Displays the management station IP address for which the
basic SNMP community is defined.
• Community String — Defines the password used to authenticate the management
station to the device.
• Access Mode — Defines the access rights of the community. The possible field
values are:
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— Read Only — Management access is restricted to read-only, and changes cannot
be made to the community.
— Read Write — Management access is read-write and changes can be made to the
device configuration, but not to the community.
— SNMP Admin — User has access to all device configuration options, as well as
permissions to modify the community.
• View Name — Contains a list of user-defined SNMP views
SNMP Communities Advanced Tables
The SNMP Communities Advanced Table contains the following fields:
• Remove — Removes a community. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes the selected SNMP communities.
— Unchecked — Maintains the SNMP communities.
• Unit No. — Displays the unit number.
• Management Station — Displays the management station IP address for which the
advanced SNMP community is defined.
• Community String — Defines the password used to authenticate the management
station to the device.
• Group Name — Defines advanced SNMP community group names.
1. Click
. The Add SNMP Community Page opens:
Figure 118. Add SNMP Community Page
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
. The SNMP Community is added, and the device is updated.
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To modify SNMP Group Membership Settings:
1. Click SNMP > Security > Communities. The SNMP Communities Page opens.
2. Click
. The SNMP Community Settings Page opens:
Figure 119. SNMP Community Settings Page
3. Modify the relevant fields.
4. Click
. The SNMP Community is modified, and the device is updated.
Configuring SNMP Notifications
This section contains information for configuring SNMP Notifications, and contains the
following topics:
• Defining SNMP Notification Global Parameters
• Defining SNMP Notification Recipients
• Defining SNMP Notification Recipients
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Defining SNMP Notification Global Parameters
The SNMP Trap Management Properties Page contains parameters for defining SNMP
notification parameters.
To define SNMP notification global parameters:
1. Click SNMP > Trap Management > Properties. The SNMP Trap Management
Properties Page opens:
Figure 120. SNMP Trap Management Properties Page
The SNMP Trap Management Properties Page contains the following fields:
• Enable SNMP Notifications — Specifies whether the device can send SNMP
notifications. The possible field values are:
— Enable — Enables SNMP notifications.
— Disable — Disables SNMP notifications.
• Enable Authentication Notifications — Specifies whether SNMP authentication
failure notification is enabled on the device. The possible field values are:
— Enable — Enables the device to send authentication failure notifications.
— Disable — Disables the device from sending authentication failure notifications.
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
. The SNMP Trap Management properties are defined, and the
device is updated.
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Defining SNMP Notification Recipients
The SNMP Trap Management Notification Recipient Page contains information for
defining filters that determine whether traps are sent to specific users, and the trap type
sent. SNMP notification filters provide the following services:
•
•
•
•
Identifying Management Trap Targets
Trap Filtering
Selecting Trap Generation Parameters
Providing Access Control Checks
To define SNMP notification filters:
1. Click SNMP > Trap Management > Notification Recipient. The SNMP Trap
Management Notification Recipient Page opens:
Figure 121. SNMP Trap Management Notification Recipient Page
The SNMP Trap Management Notification Recipient Page is divided into the following
tables:
• SNMPv1,2c Notification Recipient
• SNMPv3 Notification Recipient
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SNMPv1,2c Notification Recipient
The SNMP v1, v2c Recipient table contains the following fields:
• Remove — Deletes the currently selected recipient. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes the selected recipient from the list of recipients.
— Unchecked — Maintains the list of recipients.
• Recipients IP — Displays the IP address to which the traps are sent.
• Notification Type — Displays the notification sent. The possible field values are:
— Trap — Indicates traps are sent.
— Inform — Indicates informs are sent.
• Community String — Displays the community string of the trap manager.
• Notification Version — Displays the trap type. The possible field values are:
— SNMP V1 — Indicates that SNMP Version 1 traps are sent.
— SNMP V2c — Indicates that SNMP Version 2 traps are sent.
• UDP Port — Displays the UDP port used to send notifications. The default is 162.
• Filter Name — Indicates if the SNMP filter for which the SNMP Notification filter is
defined.
• Timeout — Indicates the amount of time (in seconds) the device waits before resending informs. The default is 15 seconds.
• Retries — Indicates the amount of times the device re-sends an inform request. The
default is 3 seconds.
SNMPv3 Notification Recipient
The SNMPv3 Notification Recipient table contains the following fields:
• Remove — Deletes the currently selected recipient. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes the selected recipient from the list of recipients.
— Unchecked — Maintains the list of recipients.
• Recipients IP — Displays the IP address to which the traps are sent.
• Notification Type — Displays the type of notification sent. The possible field values
are:
— Trap — Indicates that traps are sent.
— Inform — Indicates that informs are sent.
• User Name — Displays the user to which SNMP notifications are sent.
• Security Level — Displays the means by which the packet is authenticated. The
possible field values are:
— No Authentication — Indicates that the packet is neither authenticated nor
encrypted.
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— Authentication — Indicates that the packet is authenticated.
• UDP Port — The UDP port used to send notifications. The field range is 1-65535.
The default is 162.
• Filter Name — Includes or excludes SNMP filters.
• Timeout — The amount of time (seconds) the device waits before resending informs.
The field range is 1-300. The default is 10 seconds.
• Retries — The amount of times the device resends an inform request. The field range
is 1-255. The default is 3.
2. Click
. The Add SNMP Notification Recipient Page opens:
Figure 122. Add SNMP Notification Recipient Page
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
updated.
. The SNMP Notification Recipient is defined, and the device is
Defining SNMP Notification Filters
TheSNMP Trap Management Notification Filter Page permits filtering traps based on
OIDs. Each OID is linked to a device feature or a portion of a feature. The SNMP Trap
Management Notification Filter Page also allows network managers to filter notifications.
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To define SNMP notification filters:
1. Click SNMP > Trap Management > Notification Filter. The SNMP Trap
Management Notification Filter Page opens:
Figure 123. SNMP Trap Management Notification Filter Page
The SNMP Trap Management Notification Filter Page contains the following fields:
• Filter Name — Contains a list of user-defined notification filters.
• Remove — Deletes filters.
— Checked — Deletes the selected filter.
— Unchecked — Maintains the list of filters.
• Object Identifier Subtree — Displays the OID for which notifications are sent or
blocked. If a filter is attached to an OID, traps or informs are generated and sent to the
trap recipients. OIDs are selected from either the Select from field or the Object ID
field.
• Filter Type — Indicates whether to send traps or informs relating to the selected OID.
—
Included — Sends traps or informs.
— Excluded — Does not send traps or informs.
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2. Click
. The Add SNMP Notification Filter Page opens:
Figure 124. Add SNMP Notification Filter Page
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
updated.
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. The SNMP Notification Filter is defined, and the device is
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Configuring Quality of Service
(QoS)
This section contains information for configuring QoS, and includes the following topics:
•
•
•
•
Quality of Service Overview
Defining General QoS Settings
Configuring Basic QoS Settings
Configuring Advanced QoS Settings
Quality of Service Overview
Quality of Service (QoS) provides the ability to implement QoS and priority queuing
within a network. For example, certain types of traffic that require minimal delay, such as
Voice, Video, and real-time traffic can be assigned a high priority queue, while other
traffic can be assigned a lower priority queue. The result is an improved traffic flow for
traffic with high demand. QoS is defined by:
• Classification — Specifies which packet fields are matched to specific values. All
packets matching the user-defined specifications are classified together.
• Action — Defines traffic management where packets are forwarded are based on
packet information, and packet field values such as VLAN Priority Tag (VPT) and
DiffServ Code Point (DSCP).
VPT Classification Information
VLAN Priority Tags (VPT) are used to classify packets by mapping packets to one of the
egress queues. VPT-to-queue assignments are user-definable. Packets arriving untagged
are assigned a default VPT value, which is set on a per-port basis. The assigned VPT is
used to map the packet to the egress queue.
CoS Services
After packets are assigned to a specific egress queue, CoS services can be assigned to the
queue. Egress queues are configured with a scheduling scheme by one of the following
methods:
• Strict Priority — Ensures that time-sensitive applications are always forwarded.
Strict Priority (SP) allows the prioritization of mission-critical, time-sensitive traffic
over less time-sensitive applications.
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For example, under SP, voice over IP (VoIP) traffic can be prioritized so that it is
forwarded before FTP or e-mail (SMTP) traffic.
• Weighted Round Robin — Ensures that a single application does not dominate the
device forwarding capacity. Weighted Round Robin (WRR) forwards entire queues in
a round robin order. All queues can participate in WRR, expect SP queues. SP queues
are serviced before WRR queues. If the traffic flow is minimal, and SP queues do not
occupy the whole bandwidth allocated to a port, the WRR queues can share the
bandwidth with the SP queues. This ensures that the remaining bandwidth is
distributed according to the weight ratio. If WRR is selected, the following weights
are assigned to the queues: 1, 2, 4, 8.
Defining General QoS Settings
This section contains information for defining general QoS settings and includes the
following topics:
• Configuring CoS General Parameters
• Configure Bandwidth Settings
• Defining Queues
Configuring CoS General Parameters
The CoS Global Settings Page contains information for enabling QoS globally and on
specific interfaces. After QoS has been configured, the original device QoS default
settings can be reassigned to the interface in the CoS Global Settings Page.
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To enable QoS:
1. Click QoS > General > CoS. The CoS Global Settings Page opens:
Figure 125. CoS Global Settings Page
The CoS Global Settings Page contains the following:
• QoS Mode — Determines whether QoS is enabled on the interface. The possible
values are:
— Disable — Disables QoS on the interface.
— Basic — Enables CoS Basic mode on the device.
— Advanced — Enables Advanced CoS mode on the device.
• Copy from Entry Number — Indicates the row number from which CoS parameters
are copied.
• To Entry Number(s) — Indicates the row number to which CoS parameters are
copied.
• Ports - Displays the ports on which CoS is enabled.
• LAGs - Displays the LAGs on which CoS is enabled.
• Interface — Displays the interface for which the global QoS parameters are defined.
— Port — Selects the port for which the global QoS parameters are defined.
— LAG — Selects the LAG for which the global QoS parameters are defined.
• Default CoS— Determines the default CoS value for incoming packets for which a
VLAN tag is not defined. The possible field values are 0-7. The default CoS is 0.
• Restore Defaults — Restores the QoS Interface factory defaults.
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2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
. Quality of Service is enabled on the device.
To modify the QoS:
1. Click
. The Modify Port Priority Page opens:
Figure 126. Modify Port Priority Page
2. Modify the relevant fields.
3. Click
is updated.
. The Port Priority settings are saved to interface, and the device
Restoring Factory Default QoS Interface Settings
1. Click QoS > General > CoS. The CoS Global Settings Page opens.
2. Check the Restore Defaults checkbox next to the corresponding Interface.
3. Click
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. The factory defaults are restored on the interface.
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Defining Queues
The Queue Page contains fields for defining the QoS queue forwarding types.The Queue
Page allows network managers to define bandwidth to specific QoS service queues.
To set the queue settings:
1. Click QoS > General > Queue. The Queue Page opens.
Figure 127. Queue Page
The Queue Page contains the following fields:
• Strict Priority — Specifies whether traffic scheduling is based strictly on the queue
priority.
• WRR — Assigns WRR weights to queues. This field is enabled only for queues in
WRR queue mode. If a queue is set to 0 weight, the queue is not operational and is
effectively closed. Each queue has a weight range, queues 1-3 have the range 0-255,
and queue 4 has the range 1-255.
• Queue — Displays the CoS queue for which the bandwidth settings are defined.
• Schedule — Displays WWR weight assigned to a specific queue. The possible field
values are:
— WRR Weight — Assigns WRR weights to queues. This field is enabled only for
queues in WRR queue mode. If a queue is set to 0 weight, the queue is not
operational and is effectively closed. Each queue has a weight range.
— % of WRR Bandwidth — Indicates the amount of bandwidth assigned to the
QoS queue.
2. Define the relevant fields.
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3. Click
. The Queue settings are set, and the device is updated.
Configure Bandwidth Settings
The Bandwidth Settings Page allows network managers to define the bandwidth settings
for a specified egress interface. Modifying queue scheduling affects the queue settings
globally.
Queue shaping can be based per queue and/or per interface. Shaping is determined by the
lower specified value. The queue shaping type is selected in the Bandwidth Settings Page.
To define bandwidth settings:
1. Click QoS > General > Bandwidth Setting. The Bandwidth Settings Page opens:
Figure 128. Bandwidth Settings Page
The Bandwidth Settings Page contains the following fields:
• Ports — Indicates the specific port for which the bandwidth settings are defined.
• LAGs — Indicates the specific LAG for which the bandwidth settings are defined.
• Ingress Rate Limit — Indicates the traffic limit for the port.
— Status — Indicates if Ingress Rate Limit is enabled on the interface.
— Rate Limit — Defines the rate limit rate at which network traffic is forwarded.
• Egress Shaping Rates — Configures the traffic shaping type for selected interfaces.
The possible field values are:
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— CIR — Defines CIR as the queue shaping type. The possible field value is 4096
- 1,000,000,000 bits per second.
— CbS — Defines CbS as the queue shaping type. The possible field value is 409616,000,000 bytes.
2. Select an interface.
3. Click
. The Modify Bandwidth Settings Page opens.
Figure 129. Modify Bandwidth Settings Page
4. Modify the relevant fields.
5. Click
updated.
. The Bandwidth Settings are saved to interface, and the device is
Configuring QoS Mapping
This section contains information for mapping CoS and DSCP values to queues. The CoS
to Queue Page contains fields for mapping CoS values to traffic queues.
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To map CoS values to queues:
1. Click QoS > General > CoS to Queue. The CoS to Queue Page opens.
Figure 130. CoS to Queue Page
The CoS to Queue Page contains the following fields:
• Restore Defaults — Restores the device factory defaults for mapping CoS values to a
forwarding queue.
• Unit No. — Displays the unit number.
• Class of Service — Specifies the CoS priority tag values, where zero is the lowest
and 7 is the highest.
• Queue — Defines the traffic forwarding queue to which the CoS priority is mapped.
Eight traffic priority queues are supported.
2. Define the queue number in the Queue field next to the required CoS value.
3. Click
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. The CoS value is mapped to a queue, and the device is updated.
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Mapping DSCP Values to Queues
The DSCP to Queue Page contains fields for mapping DSCP settings to traffic queues.
For example, a packet with a DSCP tag value of 3 can be assigned to queue 2.
To map CoS values to queues:
1. Click QoS > General > DSCP to Queue. The DSCP to Queue Page opens.
Figure 131. DSCP to Queue Page
The DSCP to Queue Page contains the following fields:
• DSCP In — Displays the incoming packet’s DSCP value.
• Queue — Specifies the traffic forwarding queue to which the DSCP priority is
mapped. Eight traffic priority queues are supported.
2. Define the queue number in the Queue field next to the required DSCP value.
3. Click
updated.
. The DSCP value is mapped to a queue, and the device is
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Configuring Basic QoS Settings
This section contains information for defining basic QoS settings and includes the
following topics:
• Configuring Basic General Parameters
• Configuring DSCP Rewrite
Configuring Basic General Parameters
The Basic Mode General Settings Page contains parameters for enabling the Basic QoS
Mode on the device.
To configure QoS general parameters:
1. Click QoS > Basic Mode > General. The Basic Mode General Settings Page
opens:
Figure 132. Basic Mode General Settings Page
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The Basic Mode General Settings Page contains the following fields:
• Trust Mode — Defines which packet fields to use for classifying packets entering the
device. When no rules are defined, the traffic containing the predefined packet CoS
field is mapped according to the relevant trust modes table. Traffic not containing a
predefined packet field is mapped to best effort. The possible Trust Mode field values
are:
— CoS — Classifies traffic based on the CoS tag value.
— DSCP — Classifies traffic based on the DSCP tag values.
• Always Rewrite DSCP — Indicates if the DSCP value is always reassigned. The
possible field values are:
— Checked — Enables reassigning the DSCP value.
— Unchecked — Disables reassigning the DSCP value. This is the default value..
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
updated.
. The QoS General Settings are configure, and the device is
Configuring DSCP Rewrite
When traffic exceeds user-defined limits, use the Advanced DSCP Rewrite Page to
configure the DSCP tag to use in place of the incoming DSCP tags.
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To configure the DSCP rewrite:
1. Click QoS > Basic Mode > DSCP Rewrite. The QoS DSCP Rewrite Page opens:
Figure 133. QoS DSCP Rewrite Page
The QoS DSCP Rewrite Page contains the following fields:
• DSCP In — Displays the incoming packet’s DSCP value.
• DSCP Out — Reassigns the DSCP value on incoming packets.
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
is updated.
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. The QoS DSCP Rewrite Settings are configure, and the device
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Configuring Advanced QoS Settings
This section contains information for configuring advanced QoS features, and includes the
following topics:
• Defining Policy Properties
• Defining Policy Profiles
Defining Policy Properties
This section contains information for configuring advanced policy properties, and
includes the following topics:
• Mapping DSCP Values
• Creating Class Maps
• Aggregating Policiers
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Mapping DSCP Values
When traffic exceeds user-defined limits, use the Policied DSCP Page to configure the
DSCP tag to use in place of the incoming DSCP tags.
To define advance QoS DSCP mapping:
1. Click QoS > Advance Mode > Policied DSCP. The Policied DSCP Page opens.
Figure 134. Policied DSCP Page
The Policied DSCP Page contains the following fields:
• DSCP In — Displays the incoming packet’s DSCP value.
• DSCP Out — Reassigns the DSCP value on incoming packets.
2. Define the relevant values.
3. Click
is updated.
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. The Policed DSCP value is mapped to a queue, and the device
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Creating Class Maps
One IP ACL and/or one MAC ACL comprise a class map. Class maps are configured to
match packet criteria, and are matched to packets on a first-fit basis. For example, Class
Map A is assigned packets based only on an IP-based ACL or a MAC-based ACL. Class
Map B is assigned to packets based on both an IP-based and a MAC-based ACL.
To define class maps:
1. Click QoS > Advanced Mode > Class Map. The Class Map Page opens:
Figure 135. Class Map Page
The Class Map Page contains the following fields:
• Remove — Removes Class Maps. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes the selected Class Maps.
— Unchecked — Maintains the current Class Maps.
• Class-Map Name — Displays the user-defined name of the class map.
• ACL 1— Contains a list of the user defined ACLs.
• Match — Indicates the criteria used to match class maps with an ACL’s address.
Possible values are:
— And — Matches both ACL 1 and ACL 2 to the packet.
— Or — Matches either ACL 1 or ACL 2 to the packet.
• ACL 2 — Contains a list of the user defined ACLs.
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2. Click
. The Add Class Map Page opens.
Figure 136. Add Class Map Page
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
. The Class Map is defined, and the device is updated.
Aggregating Policiers
After a packet is classified, the policing process begins. A policier specifies the bandwidth
limit for incoming traffic on the classified flow and actions are defined for packets that
exceed the limits. These actions include forwarding packets, dropping packets, or
remarking packets with a new DSCP value. The device supports per flow and aggregate
policiers.
Aggregate policiers enforce limits on a group of flows. An aggregate policier cannot be
deleted if it is being used in a policy map. The Aggregated Policier Page contains
information for defining the bandwidth limits and define actions to take on packets that do
not meet the requirements.
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To configure Aggregated Policiers:
1. Click QoS > Advanced Mode >Aggregated Policier. The Aggregated Policier
Page opens:
Figure 137. Aggregated Policier Page
The Aggregated Policier Page contains the following fields:
• Remove — Removes Aggregated Policy. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes the selected Aggregated Policy.
— Unchecked — Maintains the current Aggregated Policy.
•
•
•
•
Aggregate Policer Name — Specifies the aggregate policer name.
Ingress CIR— Defines the CIR in bits per second.
Ingress CBS — Defines the CBS in bytes per second.
Exceed Action — Indicates the action assigned to incoming information exceeds the
traffic limits. Possible values are:
—
None — Packets exceeding the limits are forwarded.
— Drop — Packets exceeding the limits are dropped.
— Remark DSCP — Packets exceeding the limits are forwarded with a flagged/
remarked DSCP value.
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2. Click
. The Add Aggregated Policier Page opens.
Figure 138. Add Aggregated Policier Page
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
. The Aggregated Policier is defined, and the device is updated.
To modify Aggregated Policiers:
1. Click
. The Edit QoS Aggregate Policier Page opens:
Figure 139. Edit QoS Aggregate Policier Page
2. Modify the relevant fields.
3. Click
. The Aggregated Policier is defined, and the device is updated.
Defining Policy Profiles
This section contains information for configuring policy profiles, and includes the
following topics:
• Defining Policies
• Attaching Policies to Interfaces
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Defining Policies
A policy is a collection of classes, each of which is a combination of a class map and a
QoS action to apply to matching traffic. Classes are applied in a first-fit manner within a
policy.
Before configuring policies for classes whose match criteria are defined in a class map, a
class map must first be defined, or the name of the policy map to be created, added to, or
modified must first be specified. Class policies can be configured in a policy map only if
the classes have defined match criteria.
An aggregate policer can be applied to multiple classes in the same policy map, but an
aggregate policer cannot be used across different policy maps. Define an aggregate policer
if the policer is shared with multiple classes. Policiers in one port cannot be shared with
other policers in another device. Traffic from two different ports can be aggregated for
policing purposes.
To define policies:
1. Click QoS > Advanced Mode >Policy Table. The Policy Table Page opens:
Figure 140. Policy Table Page
The Policy Table Page contains the following fields:
• Remove — Removes policies. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes the selected policy.
— Unchecked — Maintains policies.
• Policy Name — Displays the user-defined policy name.
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2. Click
. The Add QoS Policy Profile Page opens:
Figure 141. Add QoS Policy Profile Page
In addition to the fields in the Policy Table Page, the Add QoS Policy Profile Page
contains the following fields:
• Class Map — Selects a class map for the class.
• Action — Indicates the action performed on incoming packets matching the policy
profile. The possible field values are:
— Trust - Applies the selected Trust settings.
— Set - Redefines the DSCP settings.
• Police — Policer type for the class. Possible values are:
— Aggregate — Configures the class to use a configured aggregate policer selected
from the drop-down menu. An aggregate policer is defined if the policer is
shared with multiple classes. Traffic from two different ports can be configured
for policing purposes. An aggregate policer can be applied to multiple classes in
the same policy map, but cannot be used across different policy maps.
— Single — Configures the class to use manually configured information rates and
exceed actions.
• Aggregate Policer — User-defined aggregate policers.
• Ingress Committed Information Rate (CIR) — CIR in bits per second. This field is
only relevant when the Police value is Single.
• Ingress Committed Burst Size (CBS) — CBS in bytes per second. This field is only
relevant when the Police value is Single.
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• Exceed Action — Action assigned to incoming packets exceeding the CIR. This field
is only relevant when the Police value is Single. Possible values are:
— Drop — Drops packets exceeding the defined CIR value.
— Remark DSCP — Remarks packets’ DSCP values exceeding the defined CIR
value.
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
. The policy is defined, and the device is updated.
To modify policies:
1. Click
. The Edit QoS Policy Profile Page opens:
Figure 142. Edit QoS Policy Profile Page
2. Modify the relevant fields.
3. Click
. The policies are defined, and the device is updated.
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Attaching Policies to Interfaces
The Policy Binding Page contains information for attaching policies on interfaces.
To attach a policy to an interface:
1. Click QoS > Advanced Mode > Policy Binding. The Policy Binding Page opens:
Figure 143. Policy Binding Page
The Policy Binding Page contains the following fields:
• Remove — Removes policies.
— Checked — Removes the selected policies.
— Unchecked — Maintains the policies.
• Interface — Selects an interface.
• Policy Name — Contains a list of user-defined policies that can be attached to the
interface.
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2. Click
. The Add Qos Policy Binding Page opens.
Figure 144. Add Qos Policy Binding Page
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
updated.
. The Add Qos Policy Binding Page is defined, and the device is
To modify the QoS policy binding settings:
1. Click
. The Qos Policy Binding Settings Page opens:
Figure 145. Qos Policy Binding Settings Page
2. Modify the relevant fields.
3. Click
. The Qos Policy Binding Settings Page is defined, and the
device is updated.
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Managing System Files
File maintenance includes both configuration file management and device access. This
section contains the following topics:
•
•
•
•
File Management Overview
Downloading System Files
Uploading System Files
Activating Image Files
File Management Overview
The configuration file structure consists of the following configuration files:
• Startup Configuration File — Contains the commands required to reconfigure the
device to the same settings as when the device is powered down or rebooted. The
Startup file is created by copying the configuration commands from the Running
Configuration file or the Backup Configuration file.
• Running Configuration File — Contains all configuration file commands, as well as
all commands entered during the current session. After the device is powered down or
rebooted, all commands stored in the Running Configuration file are lost. During the
startup process, all commands in the Startup file are copied to the Running
Configuration File and applied to the device. During the session, all new commands
entered are added to the commands existing in the Running Configuration file.
Commands are not overwritten. To update the Startup file, before powering down the
device, the Running Configuration file must be copied to the Startup Configuration
file. The next time the device is restarted, the commands are copied back into the
Running Configuration file from the Startup Configuration file.
• Image files — Software upgrades are used when a new version file is downloaded.
The file is checked for the right format, and that it is complete. After a successful
download, the new version is marked, and is used after the device is reset.
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Downloading System Files
There are two types of files, firmware files and configuration files. The firmware files
manage the device, and the configuration files configure the device for transmissions.
Only one type of download can be performed at any one time.
The File Download page contains parameters for downloading system files.
To download system files via TFTP or HTTP:
1. Click System > File Management > File Download. The File Download Page
opens.
Figure 146. File Download Page
The File Download Page contains the following download types:
• Download via TFTP — Enables downloading through the Trivial File Transfer
Protocol.
• Download via HTTP — Enables downloading through the HyperText Transfer
Protocol.
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The File Download Page is divided into the following sections:
• Firmware Download
• Configuration Download
Firmware Download
The Firmware Download section contains the following fields:
• Firmware Download — Indicates that the download is for firmware. If Firmware
Download is selected, the Configuration Download fields are grayed out.
• Server IP Address — Specifies the Server IP Address from which files are
downloaded.
• Source File Name — Specifies the file to be downloaded.
• Destination File — Specifies the destination file type to which to the file is
downloaded. The possible field values are:
— Software Image — Downloads the Image file.
— Boot Code — Downloads the Boot file.
Configuration Download
The Configuration Download section contains the following fields:
• Configuration Download — Indicates that the download is for configuration files. If
Configuration Download is selected, the Firmware Download fields are grayed out.
• Server IP Address — Specifies the Server IP Address from which the configuration
files are downloaded.
• Source File Name — Specifies the configuration files to be downloaded.
• Destination File — Specifies the destination file to which to the configuration file is
downloaded. The possible field values are:
— Running Configuration — Downloads commands into the Running
Configuration file.
— Startup Configuration — Downloads the Startup Configuration file, and
overwrites the old Startup Configuration file.
— Backup Configuration — Downloads the Backup Configuration file. One only
Backup Configuration file can be saved
To download files via TFTP or HTTP:
1. Open the File Download Page.
2. Select the file type.
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
. The files are downloaded.
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Uploading System Files
The File Upload Page contains fields for uploading the software from the device to the
TFTP server.
To upload system files:
1. Click System > File Management > File Upload. The File Upload Page opens:
Figure 147. File Upload Page
The File Upload Page is divided into the following sections:
• Software Image Upload
• Configuration Upload
Software Image Upload
The Software Image Upload section contains the following fields:
• TFTP Server IP Address — Specifies the TFTP Server IP Address to which the
Software Image is uploaded.
• Destination File Name — Specifies the software image file path to which the file is
uploaded.
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Configuration Upload
The Configuration Upload section contains the following fields:
• TFTP Server IP Address — Specifies the TFTP Server IP Address to which the
Configuration file is uploaded.
• Destination File Name— Specifies the file name to which the Startup Configuration
file is uploaded.
• Transfer file name — Specifies the Configuration file name that is uploaded. The
possible field values are:
— Running Configuration — Uploads the Running Configuration file.
— Startup Configuration — Uploads the Startup Configuration file.
— Backup Configuration — Uploads the Backup Configuration file. One only
Backup Configuration file can be saved
To upload files:
1. Open the File Upload Page.
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
. The software is uploaded to the device.
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Copying Files
Files can be copied and deleted from the Copy Files Page.
To copy files:
1. Click System > File Management > Copy Files. The Copy Files Page opens.
Figure 148. Copy Files Page
The Copy Files Page contains the following fields:
• Restore Configuration Factory Defaults — Resets the Configuration file to the
factory defaults. The factory defaults are reset after the device is reset. When
unselected, the device maintains the current Configuration file.
• Source — Indicates the system file to be copied. The possible field values are:
— Software Image — Copies the software Image file.
— Boot Code — Copies the boot code.
• Destination Unit — Indicates the Startup Configuration file is selected.
• Copy Configuration — Copies the Running Configuration file to the Startup
Configuration file.
• Source — Indicates the Running Configuration file is selected. The possible field
values are:
— Running Configuration — Copies the Running Configuration file.
— Startup Configuration — Copies the Startup Configuration file.
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— Backup Configuration — Copies the Backup Configuration file.
• Destination — Indicates the Startup Configuration file is selected. The possible field
values are:
— Running Configuration — Specifies the destination of the Running
Configuration file.
— Startup Configuration — Specifies the destination of the Startup Configuration
file.
— Backup Configuration — Specifies the destination of the Backup Configuration
file. One only Backup Configuration file can be saved.
2. Select the relevant fields.
3. Click
. The file is copied.
Restoring the Default Configuration File
1. Click System > File Management > Copy Files. The Copy Files Page opens.
2. Select Restore Configuration Factory Defaults.
3. Click
. The factory defaults are restored, and the device is updated.
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Activating Image Files
The Active Image Page allows network managers to select and reset the Image files. The
Active Image file for each unit can be individually selected.
To select an active image:
1. Click System > File Management > Active Image. The Active Image Page opens:
Figure 149. Active Image Page
The Active Image Page contains the following fields:
• Active Image — The Image file which is currently active on the unit.
• After Reset — The Image file which is active on the unit after the device is reset. The
possible field values are:
— Image 1 — Activates Image file 1 after the device is reset.
— Image 2 — Activates Image file 2 after the device is reset.
2. Define the Active Image field.
3. Click
196
. The select image file is activated after the device is reset.
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Managing System Logs
This section provides information for managing system logs. The system logs enable
viewing device events in real time, and recording the events for later usage. System Logs
record and manage events and report errors and informational messages.
Event messages have a unique format, as per the Syslog protocols recommended message
format for all error reporting. For example, Syslog and local device reporting messages
are assigned a severity code, and include a message mnemonic, which identifies the
source application generating the message. It allows messages to be filtered based on their
urgency or relevancy. Each message severity determines the set of event logging devices
that are sent per each event message.
The following table lists the log severity levels:
Table 3. System Log Severity Levels
Severity
Level
Message
Emergency
Highest (0)
The system is not functioning.
Alert
1
The system needs immediate attention.
Critical
2
The system is in a critical state.
Error
3
A system error has occurred.
Warning
4
A system warning has occurred.
Notice
5
The system is functioning properly, but a
system notice has occurred.
Informational
6
Provides device information.
Debug
7
Provides detailed information about the log. If
a Debug error occurs, contact Customer Tech
Support.
This section includes the following topics:
• Enabling System Logs
• Viewing the FLASH Logs
• Viewing the Device Memory Logs
• Defining Servers Log Parameters
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Enabling System Logs
The Syslog Properties Page contains fields for defining which events are recorded to
which logs. It contains fields for enabling logs globally, and parameters for defining logs.
Log messages are listed from the highest severity to the lowest severity level.
To define system log parameters:
1. Click System > Logs > Properties. The System Logs Properties Page opens.
Figure 150. System Logs Properties Page
The System Logs Properties Page contains the following fields:
• Enable Logging — Indicates if device global logs for Cache, File, and Server Logs
are enabled. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Enables device logs.
— Unchecked — Disables device logs.
• Severity — The following are the available log severity levels for Memory Logs and
Log Flash:
— Emergency — The highest warning level. If the device is down or not
functioning properly, an emergency log message is saved to the specified
logging location.
— Alert — The second highest warning level. An alert log is saved, if there is a
serious device malfunction; for example, all device features are down.
— Critical — The third highest warning level. A critical log is saved if a critical
device malfunction occurs; for example, two device ports are not functioning,
while the rest of the device ports remain functional.
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— Error — A device error has occurred, for example, if a single port is offline.
— Warning — The lowest level of a device warning. The device is functioning, but
an operational problem has occurred.
— Notice — Provides device information.
— Informational — Provides device information.
— Debug — Provides debugging messages.
Note: When a severity level is selected, all severity level choices above the selection are selected
automatically.
• Memory Logs — Defines the minimum severity level from which logs are sent to the
RAM Log kept in RAM (Cache).
• Log Flash — Defines the minimum severity level from which logs are sent to the log
file kept in FLASH memory.
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
. The global log parameters are set, and the device is updated.
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Viewing the FLASH Logs
The System Logs Flash Page contains information about log entries saved to the log file in
Flash, including the time the log was generated, the log severity, and a description of the
log message. The message log is available after reboot.
To view the message logs:
1. Click System > Logs > Flash. The System Logs Flash Page opens:
Figure 151. System Logs Flash Page
The System Logs Flash Page contains the following fields:
•
•
•
•
200
Log Index — Displays the log number.
Log Time — Displays the time at which the log was generated.
Severity — Displays the log severity.
Description — Displays the log message text.
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Clearing FLASH Logs
Message logs can be cleared from the System Log Flash Page.
To clear message logs:
1. Click System > Logs > Flash. The System Log Flash Page opens.
2. Click
. The message logs are cleared.
Viewing the Device Memory Logs
The Device Memory Log Page contains all system logs in a chronological order that are
saved in RAM (Cache).
To open the Device Memory Log Page:
1. Click System > Logs > Memory. The Device Memory Log Page opens.
Figure 152. Device Memory Log Page
The Device Memory Log Page contains the following fields:
•
•
•
•
Log Index — Displays the log number.
Log Time — Displays the time at which the log was generated.
Severity — Displays the log severity.
Description — Displays the log message text.
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Clearing Device Memory Logs
Message logs can be cleared from the Device Memory Log Page.
To clear message logs:
1. Click System > Logs > Memory. The Device Memory Log Page opens.
2. Click
. The message logs are cleared.
Defining Servers Log Parameters
The System Log Servers Settings Page contains information for viewing and configuring
the remote log servers. New log servers can be defined, and the log severity sent to each
server.
To open the System Log Servers Settings Page:
1. Click System > Syslog > Servers. The System Log Servers Settings Page opens.
Figure 153. System Log Servers Settings Page
The System Log Servers Settings Page contains the following fields:
• Remove — Deletes the currently selected server from the Servers list. The possible
field values are:
— Checked — Removes the selected server from the Servers Log Parameters
Page. Once removed, logs are no longer sent to the removed server.
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— Unchecked — Maintains the remote servers.
• Server — Specifies the server to which logs can be sent.
• UDP Port — Defines the UDP port to which the server logs are sent. The possible
range is 1 - 65535. The default value is 514.
• Facility — Defines an application from which system logs are sent to the remote
server. Only one facility can be assigned to a single server. If a second facility level is
assigned, the first facility is overridden. All applications defined for a device utilize
the same facility on a server. The field default is Local 7. The possible field values are
Local 0 - Local 7.
• Description — Provides a user-defined server description.
• Minimum Severity — Indicates the minimum severity from which logs are sent to
the server. For example, if Notice is selected, all logs with a severity level of Notice
and higher are sent to the remote server.
2. Click
. The Add Syslog Server Settings Page opens:
Figure 154. Add Syslog Server Settings Page
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
. The System Log Server is defined, and the device is updated.
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To modify the :
1. Click System > Logs > Servers. The opens.
2. Click
. The opens:
Figure 155. Syslog Server Settings Page
3. Modify the relevant fields.
4. Click
204
. The System Log Server is modified, and the device is updated.
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Managing Device Diagnostics
This section contains the following topics:
• Configuring Port Mirroring
• Ethernet Ports Diagnostics
Configuring Port Mirroring
Port mirroring monitors and mirrors network traffic by forwarding copies of incoming and outgoing
packets from one port to a monitoring port. Port mirroring can be used as a diagnostic tool as well as a
debugging feature. Port mirroring also enables switch performance monitoring.
Network administrators can configure port mirroring by selecting a specific port from which to copy all
packets, and other ports to which the packets copied.
To enable port mirroring:
1. Click Physical > Diagnostics > Port Mirroring. The Ethernet Ports Page opens:
Figure 156. Port Mirroring Page
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The Ethernet Ports Page contains the following fields:
• Destination Port — Defines the port number to which port traffic is copied.
• Remove — Removes the port mirroring session. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes the selected port mirroring sessions.
— Unchecked — Maintains the port mirroring session.
• Source Port — Indicates the port from which the packets are mirrored.
• Type — Indicates the port mode configuration for port mirroring. The possible field values are:
— RX — Defines the port mirroring on receiving ports.
— TX — Defines the port mirroring on transmitting ports.
— Both — Defines the port mirroring on both receiving and transmitting ports. This is the default
value.
• Status — Indicates if the port is currently monitored. The possible field values are:
— Active — Indicates the port is currently monitored.
— Ready — Indicates the port is not currently monitored.
2. Click
. The Add Port Mirroring Page opens:
Figure 157. Add Port Mirroring Page
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
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. The port mirroring session is defined, and the device is updated.
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To modify the port mirroring settings:
1. Click Physical > Diagnostics > Port Mirroring. The Ethernet Ports Page opens.
2. Click
. The Port Mirroring Settings Page opens:
Figure 158. Port Mirroring Settings Page
3. Modify the relevant fields.
4. Click
. The port mirroring settings are modified, and the device is updated.
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Ethernet Ports Diagnostics
To test ethernet ports:
1. Click Physical > Diagnostics > Ethernet Ports. The Ethernet Ports Page opens:
Figure 159. Ethernet Ports Page
The Ethernet Ports Page contains the following fields:
• Port — Selects the port to be configured.
• Test Result — Displays the cable test results. Possible values are:
— No Cable — Indicates that there is not a cable connected to the port.
— Open Cable — Indicates that the cable is open.
— Short Cable — Indicates that a short has occurred in the cable.
— OK — Indicates that the cable passed the test.
— Fiber Cable — Indicates that a fiber cable is connected to the port.
• Cable Fault Distance — Displays the distance from the port where the cable error occurred.
• Last Update — Specifies the last time the port was tested.
• Cable Length — Indicates the approximate cable length. This test can only be performed when the
port is up and operating at 1 gbps.
2. Click
208
. The ethernet port is tested.
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To perform an advance test on the ethernet port:
1. Click Physical > Diagnostics > Ethernet Ports. The Ethernet Ports Page opens.
2. Select a port and click
. The Copper Cable Extended Feature Page opens.
Figure 160. Copper Cable Extended Feature Page
3. Click
. The ethernet port is tested.
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Configuring System Time
This section provides information for configuring system time parameters, including:
•
•
•
•
Configuring Daylight Savings Time
Configuring SNTP
Defining SNTP Global Settings
Defining SNTP Authentication
Configuring Daylight Savings Time
The System Time Page contains fields for defining system time parameters for both the
local hardware clock and the external SNTP clock. If the system time is kept using an
external SNTP clock, and the external SNTP clock fails, the system time reverts to the
local hardware clock. Daylight Savings Time can be enabled on the device.
The following is a list of Daylight Savings Time start and end times in specific countries:
• Albania — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
• Australia — From the end of October until the end of March.
•
•
•
•
Australia - Tasmania — From the beginning of October until the end of March.
Armenia — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
Austria — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
Bahamas — From April to October, in conjunction with Daylight Savings Time in
the United States.
• Belarus — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
• Belgium — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
• Brazil — From the third Sunday in October until the third Saturday in March. During
the period of Daylight Saving Time, Brazilian clocks go forward one hour in most of
the Brazilian southeast.
• Chile — In Easter Island, from March 9 until October 12. In the rest of the country,
from the first Sunday in March or after 9th March.
• China — China does not use Daylight Saving Time.
• Canada — From the first Sunday in April until the last Sunday of October. Daylight
Saving Time is usually regulated by provincial and territorial governments.
Exceptions may exist in certain municipalities.
• Cuba — From the last Sunday of March to the last Sunday of October.
• Cyprus — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
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• Denmark — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
• Egypt — From the last Friday in April until the last Thursday in September.
• Estonia — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
•
•
•
•
•
•
Finland — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
France — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
Germany — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
Greece — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
Hungary — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
India — India does not use Daylight Saving Time.
• Iran — From Farvardin 1 until Mehr 1.
• Iraq — From April 1 until October 1.
• Ireland — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
• Israel — Varies year-to-year.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Italy — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
Japan — Japan does not use Daylight Saving Time.
Jordan — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
Latvia — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
Lebanon — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
Lithuania — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
Luxembourg — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
Macedonia — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
Mexico — From the first Sunday in April at 02:00 to the last Sunday in October at
02:00.
• Moldova — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
• Montenegro — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
• Netherlands — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
• New Zealand — From the first Sunday in October until the first Sunday on or after
March 15.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
212
Norway — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
Paraguay — From April 6 until September 7.
Poland — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
Portugal — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
Romania — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
Russia — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
Serbia — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
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• Slovak Republic - From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
• South Africa — South Africa does not use Daylight Saving Time.
• Spain — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
•
•
•
•
•
•
Sweden — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
Switzerland — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
Syria — From March 31 until October 30.
Taiwan — Taiwan does not use Daylight Saving Time.
Turkey — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of October.
United Kingdom — From the last weekend of March until the last weekend of
October.
• United States of America — From the first Sunday in April at 02:00 to the last
Sunday in October at 02:00.
To configure the system time:
1. Click System > Time > System Time. The System Time Page opens.
Figure 161. System Time Page
The System Time Page contains the following sections:
• Clock Source — Displays the source used to set the system clock. The possible field
values are:
— Use Local Settings — Indicates that a clock source is not used. The clock is set
locally.
— Use SNTP Server— Indicates that the system time is set via an SNTP server.
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• Date — Displays the system date. The field format is Day/Month/Year. For example:
04/May/50 (May 4, 2050).
• Local Time — Displays the system time. The field format is HH:MM:SS. For
example: 21:15:03.
• Time Zone Offset — Displays the difference between Greenwich Mean Time (GMT)
and local time. For example, the Time Zone Offset for Paris is GMT +1, while the
Time Zone Offset for New York is GMT –5.
— Daylight Savings — Enables automatic Daylight Savings Time (DST) on the
device based on the device’s location. There are two types of daylight settings,
either by a specific date in a particular year or a recurring setting irrespective of
the year. For a specific setting in a particular year complete the Daylight Savings
area, and for a recurring setting, complete the Recurring area. The possible field
values are:
— USA — Indicates the device switches to DST at 2:00 a.m. on the first Sunday of
April, and reverts to standard time at 2:00 a.m. on the last Sunday of October.
— European — Indicates the device switches to DST at 1:00 am on the last Sunday
in March and reverts to standard time at 1:00 am on the last Sunday in October.
The European option applies to EU members, and other European countries
using the EU standard.
— Other — Indicates the DST definitions are user-defined based on the device
locality. If Other is selected, the From and To fields must be defined.
• Time Set Offset (1-1440) — Indicates the time offset for non-USA and European
countries to set the amount of time for DST (in minutes). The default time is 60
minutes.
— From — Indicates the time that DST begins in countries other than the USA and
Europe, in the format Day/Month/Year in one field and HH:MM in another. For
example, if DST begins on October 25, 2007 at 5:00 am, the two fields are set to
25/Oct/07 and 05:00. The possible field values are:
— Date — Indicates the date on which DST begins. The possible field range is 131.
— Month — Indicates the month of the year in which DST begins. The possible
field range is Jan-Dec.
— Year — Indicates the year in which the configured DST begins.
— Time — Indicates the time at which DST begins. The field format is HH:MM.
For example: 05:30.
— To — Indicates the time that DST ends in countries other than the USA and
Europe, in the format Day/Month/Year in one field and HH:MM in another. For
example, if DST ends on March 23, 2008 at midnight, the two fields are 23/Mar/
08 and 00:00. The possible field values are:
— Date — Indicates the date on which DST ends. The possible field range is 1-31.
— Month — Indicates the month of the year in which DST ends. The possible field
range is Jan-Dec.
— Year— Indicates the year in which the configured DST ends.
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• Time — Indicates the time at which DST starts. The field format is HH:MM. For
example: 05:30.
• Recurring — Enables user-defined DST for countries in which DST is constant from
year to year, other than the USA and Europe.
— From — Indicates the time that DST begins each year. In the example, DST
begins locally every first Sunday in April at midnight. The possible field values
are:
— Day — Indicates the day of the week from which DST begins every year. The
possible field range is Sunday-Saturday.
— Week — Indicates the week within the month from which DST begins every
year. The possible field range is 1-5.
— Month — Indicates the month of the year in which DST begins every year. The
possible field range is Jan-Dec.
— Time — Indicates the time at which DST begins every year. The field format is
Hour:Minute. For example: 02:10.
— To — Indicates the time that DST ends each year. In the example, DST ends
locally every first Sunday in October at midnight. The possible field values are:
— Day — Indicates the day of the week at which DST ends every year. The
possible field range is Sunday-Saturday.
— Week — Indicates the week within the month at which DST ends every year.
The possible field range is 1-5.
— Month — Indicates the month of the year in which DST ends every year. The
possible field range is Jan-Dec.
— Time — Indicates the time at which DST ends every year. The field format is
HH:MM. For example: 05:30.
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. To configure the device to automatic, switch to DST, select Daylight Savings and
select either USA, European, or Other. If you select Other, you must define its
From and To fields. To configure DST parameters that will recur every year, select
Recurring and define its From and To fields.
4. Click
. The DST settings are saved, and the device is updated.
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Configuring SNTP
The device supports the Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP). SNTP assures accurate
network device clock time synchronization up to the millisecond. Time synchronization is
performed by a network SNTP server. The device operates only as an SNTP client, and
cannot provide time services to other systems. The device can poll the following server
types for the server time:
• Unicast
• Anycast
• Broadcast
Time sources are established by stratums. Stratums define the accuracy of the reference
clock. The higher the stratum (where zero is the highest), the more accurate the clock. The
device receives time from stratum 1 and above.
The following is an example of stratums:
• Stratum 0 — A real time clock (such as a GPS system) is used as the time source.
• Stratum 1 — A server that is directly linked to a Stratum 0 time source is used.
Stratum 1 time servers provide primary network time standards.
• Stratum 2 — The time source is distanced from the Stratum 1 server over a network
path. For example, a Stratum 2 server receives the time over a network link, via NTP,
from a Stratum 1 server.
Information received from SNTP servers is evaluated based on the Time level and server
type. SNTP time definitions are assessed and determined by the following time levels:
•
•
•
•
T1 — The time at which the original request was sent by the client.
T2 — The time at which the original request was received by the server.
T3 — The time at which the server sent the client a reply.
T4 — The time at which the client received the server's reply.
Polling for Unicast Time Information
Polling for Unicast information is used for polling a server for which the IP address is
known. T1 - T4 are used to determine the server time. This is the preferred method for
synchronizing device time.
Polling for Anycast Time Information
Polling for Anycast information is used when the SNTP server IP address is unknown.
The first Anycast server to return a response is used to set the time value. Time levels T3
and T4 are used to determine the server time. Using Anycast time information for
synchronizing device time is preferred to using Broadcast time information.
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Broadcast Time Information
Broadcast information is used when the server IP address is unknown. When a broadcast
message is sent from an SNTP server, the SNTP client listens for the response. The SNTP
client neither sends time information requests nor receives responses from the Broadcast
server.
Message Digest 5 (MD5) Authentication safeguards device synchronization paths to
SNTP servers. MD5 is an algorithm that produces a 128-bit hash. MD5 is a variation of
MD4, and increases MD4 security. MD5 verifies the integrity of the communication,
authenticates the origin of the communication.
This section contains the following topics:
• Defining SNTP Global Settings
• Defining SNTP Authentication
Defining SNTP Global Settings
To configure SNTP:
1. Click System > Time > SNTP Configuration. The SNTP Configuration Page
opens:
Figure 162. SNTP Configuration Page
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The SNTP Configuration Page contains the following fields:
• Poll Interval — Defines the interval (in seconds) at which the SNTP server is polled
for Unicast information. The Poll Interval default is 1024 seconds.
• Enable Receive Broadcast Servers Updates — Enables updates for receiving
broadcasts.
• Enable Receive Anycast Servers Updates — Enables updates for receiving anycast.
• Enable Receive Unicast Servers Updates — Enables updates for unicast broadcasts.
2. Enable Poll Unicast Servers — Enables poll unicast servers.Define the relevant
fields.
3. Click
. The SNTP is configured, and the device is updated.
•
The SNTP Servers Page provides information for defining SNTP parameters globally.
To define SNTP global parameters:
1. Click System > Time > SNTP Servers. The SNTP Servers Page opens:
Figure 163. SNTP Servers Page
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The SNTP Servers Page contains the following fields:
• SNTP Server — Displays user-defined SNTP server IP addresses. Up to eight SNTP
servers can be defined.
• Poll Interval — Indicates whether or not the device polls the selected SNTP server
for system time information.
• Encryption Key ID — Displays the encryption key identification used to
communicate between the SNTP server and device. The field range is 1-4294967295.
• Preference — Indicates which SNTP server provides the SNTP system time. The
possible field values are:
— Primary — Indicates the primary server provides SNTP information.
— Secondary — Indicates the backup server provides SNTP information.
— Status — The operating SNTP server status. The possible field values are:
— Up — Indicates the SNTP server is currently operating normally.
— Down — Indicates that a SNTP server is currently not available. For example,
the SNTP server is currently not connected or is currently down.
— In progress — Indicates the SNTP server is currently sending or receiving
SNTP information.
— Unknown — Indicates the progress of the SNTP information currently being
sent is unknown. For example, the device is currently looking for an interface.
• Status — Indicates the SNTP server status.
• Last Response — Displays the last time a response was received from the SNTP
server.
• Offset — Indicates the time difference between the device local clock and the
acquired time from the SNTP server.
• Delay — Indicates the amount of time it takes for a device request to reach the SNTP
server.
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2. Click
. The Add SNTP Servers Page opens:
Figure 164. Add SNTP Servers Page
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
. The SNTP Server is added, and the device is updated.
To edit the SNTP global parameters:
1. Click
. The SNTP Server Settings Page opens:
Figure 165. SNTP Server Settings Page
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
220
. The SNTP Server is modified, and the device is updated.
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Defining SNTP Authentication
The SNTP Authentication Page provides parameters for defining the means by which the
SNTP server is authenticated.
To define SNTP authentication:
1. Click System > Time > SNTP Authentication. The SNTP Authentication Page
opens:
Figure 166. SNTP Authentication Page
The SNTP Authentication Page contains the following fields:
• Enable SNTP Authentication — Indicates if authenticating an SNTP session
between the device and an SNTP server is enabled on the device. The possible field
values are:
— Checked — Authenticates SNTP sessions between the device and SNTP server.
— Unchecked — Disables authenticating SNTP sessions between the device and
SNTP server.
• Remove — Removes Encryption Key IDs. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes the selected Encryption Key ID.
— Unchecked — Maintains the Encryption Key IDs. This is the default value.
• Encryption Key ID — Indicates if the encryption key identification is used to
authenticate the SNTP server and device. The field value is up to 4294967295.
• Authentication Key — Indicates the key used for authentication.
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• Trusted Key — Indicates the encryption key used (Unicast/Anycast) or elected
(Broadcast) to authenticate the SNTP server.
2. To enable SNTP Authentication, select Enable SNTP Authentication
3. Click
. SNTP Authentication is defined, and the device is updated.
To define SNTP authentication parameters:
1. Click
. The Add SNTP Authentication page opens:
Figure 167. Add SNTP Authentication
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
updated.
222
. The SNTP Authentication Key is added, and the device is
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Adding an SNTP Interface
To add an SNTP interface:
1. Click System > Time > SNTP Interface. The SNTP Authentication Page opens:
Figure 168. SNTP Interface Page
The SNTP Interface Page contains the following fields:
• Interface — Indicates the device for the SNTP interface.
• Receive Server Updates — Indicates receiving server updates for the device.
2. Click
. The Add SNTP Authentication page opens:
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Figure 169. Add SNTP Interface
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
224
. The SNTP interface is added, and the device is updated.
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Viewing Statistics
This section provides device statistics for RMON, interfaces, GVRP, EAP, and Etherlike
statistics. This section contains the following topics:
• Viewing Interface Statistics
• Managing RMON Statistics
Viewing Interface Statistics
This section contains the following topics:
•
•
•
•
Viewing Device Interface Statistics
Viewing Etherlike Statistics
Viewing GVRP Statistics
Viewing EAP Statistics
Viewing Device Interface Statistics
The Interface Statistics Page contains statistics for both received and transmitted packets.
To view interface statistics:
1. Click Statistics/RMON > Interface Statistics > Interface. The Interface Statistics
Page opens.
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Figure 170. Interface Statistics Page
The Interface Statistics Page contains the following fields:
• Interface — Indicates the device for which statistics are displayed. The possible field
values are:
— Port — Defines the specific port for which interface statistics are displayed.
— LAG — Defines the specific LAG for which interface statistics are displayed.
• Refresh Rate — Defines the amount of time that passes before the interface statistics
are refreshed. The possible field values are:
—
No Refresh—Indicates that the Interface statistics are not refreshed.
— 15 Sec—Indicates that the Interface statistics are refreshed every 15 seconds.
— 30 Sec—Indicates that the Interface statistics are refreshed every 30 seconds.
— 60 Sec—Indicates that the Interface statistics are refreshed every 60 seconds.
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Receive Statistics
• Total Bytes (Octets) — Displays the number of octets received on the selected
interface.
• Unicast Packets — Displays the number of Unicast packets received on the selected
interface.
• Multicast Packets — Displays the number of Multicast packets received on the
selected interface.
• Broadcast Packets — Displays the number of Broadcast packets received on the
selected interface.
Transmit Statistics
• Total Bytes (Octets) — Displays the number of octets transmitted from the selected
interface.
• Unicast Packets — Displays the number of Unicast packets transmitted from the
selected interface.
• Multicast Packets — Displays the number of Multicast packets transmitted from the
selected interface.
• Broadcast Packets — Displays the number of Broadcast packets transmitted from
the selected interface.
2. Select an interface in the Interface field. The interface statistics are displayed.
Resetting Interface Statistics Counters
To reset the Interface statistics counters:
1. Open the Interface Statistics Page.
2. Click
. The interface statistics counters are cleared.
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Viewing Etherlike Statistics
The Etherlike Statistics Page contains interface statistics.
To view Etherlike Statistics:
1. Click Statistics/RMON > Interfaces Statistics > Etherlike. The Etherlike
Statistics Page opens.
Figure 171. Etherlike Statistics Page
The Etherlike Statistics Page contains the following fields:
• Interface — Indicates the device for which statistics are displayed. The possible field
values are:
— Port — Defines the specific port for which Etherlike statistics are displayed.
— LAG — Defines the specific LAG for which Etherlike statistics are displayed.
• Refresh Rate — Defines the amount of time that passes before the etherlike statistics
are refreshed. The possible field values are:
—
No Refresh—Indicates that the Etherlike statistics are not refreshed.
— 15 Sec—Indicates that the Etherlike statistics are refreshed every 15 seconds.
— 30 Sec—Indicates that the Etherlike statistics are refreshed every 30 seconds.
— 60 Sec—Indicates that the Etherlike statistics are refreshed every 60 seconds.
• Frame Check Sequence (FCS) Errors — Displays the number of FCS errors
received on the selected interface.
• Single Collision Frames — Displays the number of single collision frames received
on the selected interface.
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• Late Collisions — Displays the number of late collision frames received on the
selected interface.
• Oversize Packets — Displays the number of oversized packet errors on the selected
interface.
• Internal MAC Receive Errors — Number of internal MAC received errors on the
selected interface.
• Received Pause Frames — Displays the number of received paused frames on the
selected interface.
• Transmitted Paused Frames — Displays the number of paused frames transmitted
from the selected interface.
2. Select an interface in the Interface field. The Etherlike statistics are displayed.
Resetting Etherlike Statistics Counters
To reset the Etherlike statistics counters:
1. Open the Etherlike Statistics Page.
2. Click
. The Etherlike statistics counters are cleared.
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Viewing GVRP Statistics
The GVRP Statistics Page contains device statistics for GVRP.
To view GVRP statistics:
1. Click Layer 2 > VLAN > GVRP Statistics. The GVRP Statistics Page opens.
Figure 172. GVRP Statistics Page
The GVRP Statistics Page contains the following fields:
• Interface—Specifies the interface type for which the statistics are displayed.
— Port—Indicates port statistics are displayed.
— LAG—Indicates LAG statistics are displayed.
• Refresh Rate—Indicates the amount of time that passes before the GVRP statistics
are refreshed. The possible field values are:
— No Refresh—Indicates that the GVRP statistics are not refreshed.
— 15 Sec—Indicates that the GVRP statistics are refreshed every 15 seconds.
— 30 Sec—Indicates that the GVRP statistics are refreshed every 30 seconds.
— 60 Sec—Indicates that the GVRP statistics are refreshed every 60 seconds.
Attribute (Counter) Received Transmitted
• Join Empty—Displays the device GVRP Join Empty statistics.
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• Empty—Displays the device GVRP Empty statistics.
• Leave Empty—Displays the device GVRP Leave Empty statistics.
• Join In—Displays the device GVRP Join In statistics.
• Leave In—Displays the device GVRP Leave in statistics.
• Leave All—Displays the device GVRP Leave all statistics.
GVRP Error Statistics
• Invalid Protocol ID—Displays the device GVRP Invalid Protocol ID statistics.
• Invalid Attribute Type—Displays the device GVRP Invalid Attribute ID statistics.
• Invalid Attribute Value—Displays the device GVRP Invalid Attribute Value
statistics.
• Invalid Attribute Length—Displays the device GVRP Invalid Attribute Length
statistics.
• Invalid Event—Displays the device GVRP Invalid Event statistics.
2. Select an interface in the Interface field. The GVRP statistics are displayed.
Resetting GVRP Statistics Counters
To reset the GVRP statistics counter:
1. Open the GVRP Statistics Page.
2. Click
. The GVRP statistics counters are cleared.
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Viewing EAP Statistics
The EAP Statistics Page contains information about EAP packets received on a specific
port.
To view the EAP statistics:
1. Click Network Security > 802.1x > EAP Statistics. The EAP Statistics Page
opens.
Figure 173. EAP Statistics Page
The EAP Statistics Page contains the following fields:
• Port—Indicates the port, which is polled for statistics.
• Refresh Rate—Indicates the amount of time that passes before the EAP statistics are
refreshed. The possible field values are:
— No Refresh — Indicates that the EAP statistics are not refreshed.
— 15 Sec—Indicates that the EAP statistics are refreshed every 15 seconds.
— 30 Sec — Indicates that the EAP statistics are refreshed every 30 seconds.
— 60 Sec — Indicates that the EAP statistics are refreshed every 60 seconds.
• Frames Receive — Indicates the number of valid EAPOL frames received on the
port.
• Frames Transmit — Indicates the number of EAPOL frames transmitted via the port.
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• Start Frames Receive — Indicates the number of EAPOL Start frames received on
the port.
• Log off Frames Receive — Indicates the number of EAPOL Logoff frames that have
been received on the port.
• Respond ID Frames Receive — Indicates the number of EAP Resp/Id frames that
have been received on the port.
• Respond Frames Receive — Indicates the number of valid EAP Response frames
received on the port.
• Request ID Frames Transmit — Indicates the number of EAP Req/Id frames
transmitted via the port.
• Request Frames Transmit — Indicates the number of EAP Request frames
transmitted via the port.
• Invalid Frames Receive — Indicates the number of unrecognized EAPOL frames
that have been received by on this port.
• Length Error Frames Receive — Indicates the number of EAPOL frames with an
invalid Packet Body Length received on this port.
• Last Frame Version — Indicates the protocol version number attached to the most
recently received EAPOL frame.
• Last Frame Source — Indicates the source MAC address attached to the most
recently received EAPOL frame.
Managing RMON Statistics
This section contains the following topics:
• Viewing RMON Statistics
• Configuring RMON History
• Configuring RMON Events
• Defining RMON Alarms
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Viewing RMON Statistics
The Viewing RMON Statistics contains fields for viewing information about device
utilization and errors that occurred on the device.
To view RMON statistics:
1. Click Statistics/RMON > Statistics. The RMON Statistics Page opens.
Figure 174. RMON Statistics Page
The RMON Statistics Page contains the following fields:
• Interface — Indicates the device for which statistics are displayed. The possible field
values are:
— Port — Defines the specific port for which RMON statistics are displayed.
— LAG — Defines the specific LAG for which RMON statistics are displayed.
• Refresh Rate — Defines the amount of time that passes before the interface statistics
are refreshed. The possible field values are:
— No Refresh — Indicates that the Interface statistics are not refreshed.
— 15 Sec—Indicates that the Interface statistics are refreshed every 15 seconds.
— 30 Sec — Indicates that the Interface statistics are refreshed every 30 seconds.
— 60 Sec — Indicates that the Interface statistics are refreshed every 60 seconds.
• Received Bytes (Octets) — Displays the number of octets received on the interface
since the device was last refreshed. This number includes bad packets and FCS octets,
but excludes framing bits.
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• Received Packets — Displays the number of packets received on the interface,
including bad packets, Multicast and broadcast packets, since the device was last
refreshed.
• Broadcast Packets Received — Displays the number of good broadcast packets
received on the interface since the device was last refreshed. This number does not
include Multicast packets.
• Multicast Packets Received — Displays the number of good Multicast packets
received on the interface since the device was last refreshed.
• CRC & Align Errors — Displays the number of CRC and Align errors that have
occurred on the interface since the device was last refreshed.
• Undersize Packets — Displays the number of undersized packets (less than 64
octets) received on the interface since the device was last refreshed.
• Oversize Packets — Displays the number of oversized packets (over 1518 octets)
received on the interface since the device was last refreshed.
• Fragments — Displays the number of fragments (packets with less than 64 octets,
excluding framing bits, but including FCS octets) received on the interface since the
device was last refreshed.
• Jabbers — Displays the total number of received packets that were longer than 1518
octets. This number excludes frame bits, but includes FCS octets that had either a bad
Frame Check Sequence (FCS) with an integral number of octets (FCS Error) or a bad
FCS with a non-integral octet (Alignment Error) number. The field range to detect
jabbers is between 20 ms and 150 ms.
• Collisions — Displays the number of collisions received on the interface since the
device was last refreshed.
• Drop Event — Displays the number of dropped events that have occurred on the
interface since the device was last refreshed.
• Frames of xx Bytes — Number of xx-byte frames received on the interface since the
device was last refreshed.
2. Select an interface in the Interface field. The RMON statistics are displayed.
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Resetting RMON Statistics Counters
To reset the RMON statistics counters:
1. Open the RMON Statistics Page.
2. Click
. The RMON statistics counters are cleared.
Configuring RMON History
This section contains the following topics:
• Defining RMON History Control
• Viewing the RMON History Table
• Configuring RMON Events
Defining RMON History Control
The RMON History Control Page contains information about samples of data taken from
ports. For example, the samples may include interface definitions or polling periods.
To view RMON history information:
1. Click Statistics/RMON > History > History Control. The RMON History Control
Page opens.
Figure 175. RMON History Control Page
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The RMON History Control Page contains the following fields:
• Remove — Removes History Control entries. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes the selected History Control entry.
— Unchecked — Maintains the current History Control entries.
• History Entry No. — Displays the entry number for the History Control Table page.
• Source Interface — Displays the interface from which the history samples were
taken. The possible field values are:
— Port — Specifies the port from which the RMON information was taken.
— LAG — Specifies the port from which the RMON information was taken.
• Sampling Interval — Indicates in seconds the time that samplings are taken from the
ports. The field range is 1-3600. The default is 1800 seconds (equal to 30 minutes).
• Samples Requested— Displays the number of samples to be saved. The field range is
1-65535. The default value is 50.
• Current Number of Samples— Displays the current number of samples taken.
• Owner — Displays the RMON station or user that requested the RMON information.
The field range is 0-20 characters.
2. Click
. The Add History Entry Settings Page opens:
Figure 176. Add History Entry Settings Page
3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
. The entry is added to the Add History Entry Settings Page, and
the device is updated.
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To modify the RMON History Control Settings:
1. Click
. The RMON History Control Settings Page opens:
Figure 177. RMON History Control Settings Page
2. Modify the relevant fields.
3. Click
. The entry is added to the RMON History Control Settings
Page, and the device is updated.
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Viewing the RMON History Table
The RMON History Table Page contains interface specific statistical network samplings.
Each table entry represents all counter values compiled during a single sample.
To view the RMON History Table:
1. Click Statistics/RMON > History > History Table. The RMON History Table
Page opens.
Figure 178. RMON History Table Page
The RMON History Table Page contains the following fields:
• History Entry No. — Displays the entry number for the History Control Table page.
• Owner — Displays the RMON station or user that requested the RMON information.
The field range is 0-20 characters.
• Sample No.— Indicates the sample number from which the statistics were taken.
• Received Bytes (Octets) — Displays the number of octets received on the interface
since the device was last refreshed. This number includes bad packets and FCS octets,
but excludes framing bits.
• Received Packets — Displays the number of packets received on the interface since
the device was last refreshed, including bad packets, Multicast and Broadcast packets.
• Broadcast Packets — Displays the number of good Broadcast packets received on
the interface since the device was last refreshed. This number does not include
Multicast packets.
• Multicast Packets — Displays the number of good Multicast packets received on the
interface since the device was last refreshed.
• CRC Align Errors — Displays the number of CRC and Align errors that have
occurred on the interface since the device was last refreshed.
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• Undersize Packets — Displays the number of undersized packets (less than 64
octets) received on the interface since the device was last refreshed.
• Oversize Packets — Displays the number of oversized packets (over 1518 octets)
received on the interface since the device was last refreshed.
• Fragments — Displays the number of fragments (packets with less than 64 octets,
excluding framing bits, but including FCS octets) received on the interface since the
device was last refreshed.
• Jabbers — Displays the total number of received packets that were longer than 1518
octets. This number excludes frame bits, but includes FCS octets that had either a bad
Frame Check Sequence (FCS) with an integral number of octets (FCS Error) or a bad
FCS with a non-integral octet (Alignment Error) number. The field range to detect
jabbers is between 20 ms and 150 ms.
• Collisions — Displays the number of collisions received on the interface since the
device was last refreshed.
• Utilization — Displays the percentage of the interface utilized.
2. Select an entry in the History Entry No.field. The Statistics are displayed.
Configuring RMON Events
This section includes the following topics:
• Defining RMON Events Control
• Viewing the RMON Events Logs
Defining RMON Events Control
The RMON Events Control Page contains fields for defining RMON events.
To view RMON events:
1. Click Statistics/RMON > Events > Events Control. The RMON Events Control
Page opens.
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Figure 179. RMON Events Control Page
The RMON Events Control Page contains the following fields:
• Remove — Removes a RMON event. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes a selected RMON event.
— Unchecked — Maintains RMON events.
•
•
•
•
Event Entry — Displays the event.
Community — Displays the community to which the event belongs.
Description — Displays the user-defined event description.
Type — Describes the event type. Possible values are:
—
None — Indicates that no event occurred.
— Log — Indicates that the event is a log entry.
— Trap — Indicates that the event is a trap.
— Log and Trap — Indicates that the event is both a log entry and a trap.
• Time — Displays the time that the event occurred.
• Owner — Displays the device or user that defined the event.
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Viewing the RMON Events Logs
The RMON Events Logs Page contains a list of RMON events.
To view RMON event logs:
1. Click Statistics/RMON > Events > Events Logs. The RMON Events Logs Page
opens.
Figure 180. RMON Events Logs Page
The RMON Events Logs Page contains the following fields:
• Event — Displays the RMON Events Log entry number.
• Log No.— Displays the log number.
• Log Time — Displays the time when the log entry was entered.
• Description — Displays the log entry description.
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Defining RMON Alarms
The RMON Alarm Page contains fields for setting network alarms. Network alarms occur
when a network problem, or event, is detected. Rising and falling thresholds generate
events.
To set RMON alarms:
1. Click Statistics/RMON > Alarm. The RMON Alarm Page opens.
Figure 181. RMON Alarm Page
The RMON Alarm Page contains the following fields:
• Remove — Removes the RMON Alarms Table entry. The possible field values are:
— Checked — Removes a selected RMON Alarms Table entry.
— Unchecked — Maintains RMON Alarms Table entry.
• Alarm Entry — Indicates a specific alarm.
• Counter Name — Displays the selected MIB variable.
• Interface — Displays interface for which RMON statistics are displayed. The
possible field values are:
— Port — Displays the RMON statistics for the selected port.
— LAG — Displays the RMON statistics for the selected LAG.
• Counter Value — Displays the selected MIB variable value.
• Sample Type — Defines the sampling method for the selected variable and
comparing the value against the thresholds. The possible field values are:
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—
Absolute — Compares the values directly with the thresholds at the end of the
sampling interval.
— Delta — Subtracts the last sampled value from the current value. The difference
in the values is compared to the threshold.
• Rising Threshold — Displays the rising counter value that triggers the rising
threshold alarm. The rising threshold is presented on top of the graph bars. Each
monitored variable is designated a color.
• Rising Event — Displays the mechanism in which the alarms are reported. The
possible field values are:
— LOG — Indicates there is not a saving mechanism for either the device or in the
management system. If the device is not reset, the entry remains in the Log
Table.
— TRAP — Indicates that an SNMP trap is generated, and sent via the Trap
mechanism. The Trap can also be saved using the Trap mechanism.
— Both— Indicates that both the Log and Trap mechanism are used to report
alarms.
• Falling Threshold — Displays the falling counter value that triggers the falling
threshold alarm. The falling threshold is graphically presented on top of the graph
bars. Each monitored variable is designated a color.
• Falling Event — Displays the mechanism in which the alarms are reported.
• Startup Alarm — Displays the trigger that activates the alarm generation. Rising is
defined by crossing the threshold from a low-value threshold to a higher-value
threshold.
• Interval (sec) — Defines the alarm interval time in seconds.
• Owner — Displays the device or user that defined the alarm.
2. Click
. The Add Alarm Entry Page opens:
Figure 182. Add Alarm Entry Page
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3. Define the relevant fields.
4. Click
. The entry is added to the Add Alarm Entry Page, and the
device is updated.
To edit RMON alarms:
1. Click
. The RMON Alarms Definition Page opens:
Figure 183. RMON Alarms Definition Page
2. Define the relevant fields.
3. Click
. The RMON alarm is added, and the device is updated.
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Appendix A: Getting Help
World Wide Web
http://support.intel.com/support/motherboards/server/blade.htm.
Telephone
All calls are billed US $25.00 per incident, levied in local currency at the applicable credit
card exchange rate plus applicable taxes. (Intel reserves the right to change the pricing for
telephone support at any time without notice).
Before calling, fill out an “Intel® Server Issue Report Form”. A sample form is provided
on the following pages. However, for the fastest service, please submit your form via the
Internet.
For an updated support contact list, see http://www.intel.com/support/9089.htm/
U.S. and Canada
1-800-404-2284
Europe
Belgium ..... 02 714 3182
Denmark ... 38 487077
Finland ...... 9 693 79297
France ........ 01 41 918529
Germany ... 069 9509 6099
Holland ...... 020 487 4562
Italy ............ 02 696 33276
Norway ...... 23 1620 50
Spain .......... 91 377 8166
Sweden....... 08 445 1251
UK .............. 870 6072439
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In Asia-Pacific Region
Australia.... 1800 649931
Cambodia .. 63 2 636 9797 (via Philippines)
China ......... 800 820 1100 (toll-free)
.................... 8 621 33104691 (not toll-free)
Hong Kong 852 2 844 4456
India........... 0006517 2 68303634 (manual toll-free. You need an IDD-equipped
telephone)
Indonesia ... 803 65 7249
Korea ......... 822 767 2595
Malaysia .... 1 800 80 1390
Myanmar... 63 2 636 9796 (via Philippines)
New Zealand 0800 444 365
Pakistan ..... 632 63684 15 (IDD via Philippines)
Philippines 1 800 1 651 0117
Singapore .. 65 6213-1311
Taiwan ....... 2 2545-1640
Thailand .... 1 800 631 0003
Vietnam ..... 632 6368416 (IDD via Philippines)
Japan
Domestic .... 0120 868686
Outside country
81 298 47 0800
Latin America
Argentina .. Contact AT&T USA at 0-800 222 1288. Once connected, dial 800 843 4481
Brazil ......... 001-916 377 0180
Chile
248
Easter Island.. ............ Contact AT&T USA at 800 800 311. Once
connected, dial 800 843 4481
Mainland and Juan .. Contact AT&T USA at 800 225 288. Once
connected, dial 800 843 4481
Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
Colombia ... Contact AT&T USA at 01 800 911 0010. Once connected, dial 800 843 4481
Costa Rica . Contact AT&T USA at 0 800 0 114 114. Once connected, dial 800 843 4481
Ecuador
(Andimate) .... Contact AT&T USA at 1 999 119. Once connected,
dial 800 843 4481
(Pacifictel) ..... Contact AT&T USA at 1 800 225 528. Once connected, dial
800 843 4481
Guatemala . Contact AT&T USA at 99 99 190. Once connected, dial 800 843 4481
Mexico ....... Contact AT&T USA at 001 800 462 628 4240. Once connected, dial 800 843
4481
Miami ........ 1 800 621 8423
Panama ...... Contact AT&T USA at 00 800 001 0109. Once connected, dial 800 843 4481
Paraguay ... 001 916 377 0114
Peru ........... 001 916 377 0114
Uruguay..... 001 916 377 0114
Venezuela... Contact AT&T USA at 0 800 2255 288. Once connected, dial 800 843 4481
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Appendix B: Troubleshooting
This chapter helps you identify and solve problems that might occur while you are using
the system.
Problems following Initial System Installation
Problems that occur at initial system startup are usually caused by an incorrect installation
or configuration. Hardware failure is a less frequent cause.
First Steps Checklist
• Is AC power available at the wall outlet?
• Are the power supplies plugged in? Check the AC cable(s) on the back of the chassis
and at the AC source.
•
•
•
•
Are all cables correctly connected and secured?
Are the configuration settings made in Setup correct?
Is the operating system properly loaded? See the operating system documentation.
Is the system power cord properly connected to the system and plugged into a
NEMA 5 15R outlet for 100-120V or a NEMA 6-15R outlet for 200-240V?
Hardware Diagnostic Testing
This section provides a more detailed approach to identifying a hardware problem and
locating its source.
Caution: Turn off devices before disconnecting cables: Before disconnecting any peripheral cables
from the system, turn off the system and any external peripheral devices. Failure to do so
can cause permanent damage to the system and/or the peripheral devices.
1. Turn off the system and all external peripheral devices. Disconnect each device
from the system, except for the keyboard and the video monitor.
2. Make sure the system power cord is plugged into a properly grounded AC outlet.
3. If the power LED does light............................
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Verifying Proper Operation of Key System Lights
As POST determines the system configuration, it tests for the presence of each mass
storage device installed in the system. As each device is checked, its activity light should
turn on briefly. Check for the following:
•
Confirming Loading of the Operating System
Once the system boots up, the operating system prompt appears on the screen.
Specific Problems and Corrective Actions
This section provides possible solutions for these specific problems:
•
•
•
•
Power light does not light.
No characters appear on screen.
Characters on the screen appear distorted or incorrect.
System cooling fans do not rotate.
Try the solutions below in the order given. If you cannot correct the problem, contact your
service representative or authorized dealer for help.
Power Light Does Not Light
Check the following:
• Did you press the power-on button?
• Is the system operating normally? If so, the power LED might be defective or the
cable from the control panel to the server board might be loose.
• Have you securely plugged the server AC power cord into the power supply?
No Characters Appear on Screen
Check the following:
• Is the keyboard functioning? Test it by turning the "Num Lock" function on and off
to make sure the Num Lock light is functioning.
• Is the video monitor plugged in and turned on? If you are using a switch box, is it
switched to the correct system?
• Are the brightness and contrast controls on the video monitor properly adjusted?
• Is the video monitor signal cable properly installed?
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• Does this video monitor work correctly if plugged into a different system?
Characters Are Distorted or Incorrect
Check the following:
• Are the brightness and contrast controls properly adjusted on the video monitor? See
the manufacturer's documentation.
• Are the video monitor's signal and power cables properly installed?
• Does this video monitor work correctly if plugged into a different system?
System Cooling Fans Do Not Rotate Properly
If the system cooling fans are not operating properly, it is an indication of possible system
component failure.
Check the following:
•
•
•
•
Is the power-on light lit?
If your system has LED lights for the fans, is one or more of these LEDs lit?
Are any other control panel LEDs lit?
Have any of the fan motors stopped? Use the server management subsystem to
check the fan status.
• Have your fans speeded up in response to an overheating situation?
• Have your fans speeded up in response to a fan that has failed?
• Are the power supply cables properly connected to the server board?
• Are there any shorted wires caused by pinched-cables or have power connector
plugs been forced into power connector sockets the wrong way?
Cannot Connect to a Server
• Make sure the network cable is securely attached to the correct connector at the
system back panel.
• Try a different network cable.
• Make sure the hub port is configured for the same duplex mode as the network
controller.
• Make sure the correct networking software is installed.
• If you are directly connecting two servers (without a hub), you will need a crossover
cable.
• Check the network controller LEDs next to the NIC connectors.
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Problems with Network
Diagnostics pass but the connection fails
• Make sure the network cable is securely attached.
• Make sure the cable is connected to the port from the onboard network controller.
Problems with Application Software that Ran Correctly
Earlier
Problems that occur after the system hardware and software have been running correctly
sometimes indicate equipment failure. However, they can also be caused by file
corruption or changes to the software configuration.
Check the following:
• If the problems are intermittent, there may be a loose cable, dirt in the keyboard (if
keyboard input is incorrect), a marginal power supply, or other random component
failures.
• If you suspect that a transient voltage spike, power outage, or brownout might have
occurred, reload the software and try running it again. Symptoms of voltage spikes
include a flickering video display, unexpected system reboots, and the system not
responding to user commands.
Note: Random errors in data files: If you are getting random errors in your data files, they may
be getting corrupted by voltage spikes on your power line. If you are experiencing any of
the above symptoms that might indicate voltage spikes on the power line, you may want to
install a surge suppressor between the power outlet and the system power cord.
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Appendix C: Regulatory and
Compliance Information
Product Regulatory Compliance
Product Safety Compliance
This product complies with the following safety requirements:
• UL60950-1 / CSA 60950-1 (USA / Canada)
• EN60950-1 (Europe)
• CB Certificate & Report, IEC60950-1 (report to include all country national
deviations)
• CE - Low Voltage Directive 73/23/EEE (Europe)
• GOST Approval (Russia)
Product EMC Compliance - Class A Compliance
Note: Legally this product is required to comply with Class A emission requirements because it
is intended for a commercial type market place. Intel targets 10db margin to Class A
Limits.
This product has been tested and verified to comply with the following electromagnetic
compatibility (EMC) regulations when installed in a compatible Intel® host system. For
information on compatible host system(s), see Intel's Server Builder Web site or contact
your local Intel representative.
•
•
•
•
•
•
FCC /ICES-003 - Emissions (USA/Canada) Verification
CISPR 22 - Emissions (International)
EN55022 - Emissions (Europe)
EN55024 - Immunity (Europe)
CE - EMC Directive 89/336/EEC (Europe)
VCCI Emissions (Japan)
• AS/NZS Emissions (Australia / New Zealand)
• GOST Approval (Russia)
• RRL MIC Notice No. 1997-41 (EMC) & 1997-42 (EMI) (Korea)
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Certifications / Registrations / Declarations
•
•
•
•
•
•
UL/cUL Listed Accessory (US/Canada)
CE Declaration of Conformity (CENELEC Europe)
C-Tick Declaration of Conformity (Australia/New Zealand)
VCCI Registration (Japan)
GOST Certification (Russia)
RRL Certification (Korea)
Product Regulatory Compliance Markings
This product is marked with the following Product Certification Markings:
Table 4. Product Certification Markings
Regulatory
Compliance
Region
cULus Listings Marks
USA/Canada
CE Mark
Europe
FCC Marking (Class A)
USA
Marking
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules.
Operation of this device is subject ot the following two
conditions:
(1) This device may not cause harmful interference, and ;
(2) This device must accept any interference received,
including interference that may cause undesired
operation.
EMC Marking (Class A)
Canada
VCCI Marking (Class A)
Japan
C-Tick Marking
Australia / New Zealand
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CANADA ICES-003 CLASS A
CANADA NMB-003 CLASSE A
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Table 4. Product Certification Markings
Regulatory
Compliance
RRL MIC Mark
Region
Marking
Korea
Electromagnetic Compatibility Notices
FCC (USA)
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following
two conditions: (1) this device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device
must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired
operation.
For questions related to the EMC performance of this product, contact:
Intel Corporation
5200 N.E. Elam Young Parkway
Hillsboro, OR 97124-6497
1-800-628-8686
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital
device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide
reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential installation. This
equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and
used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio
communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a
particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or
television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the
user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following
measures:
• Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
• Increase the separation between the equipment and the receiver.
• Connect the equipment to an outlet on a circuit other than the one to which the
receiver is connected.
• Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
Any changes or modifications not expressly approved by the grantee of this device could
void the user's authority to operate the equipment. The customer is responsible for
ensuring compliance of the modified product.
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Only peripherals (computer input/output devices, terminals, printers, etc.) that comply
with FCC Class A or B limits may be attached to this computer product. Operation with
noncompliant peripherals is likely to result in interference to radio and TV reception.
All cables used to connect to peripherals must be shielded and grounded. Operation with
cables, connected to peripherals, that are not shielded and grounded may result in
interference to radio and TV reception.
ICES-003 (Canada)
Cet appareil numérique respecte les limites bruits radioélectriques applicables aux
appareils numériques de Classe A prescrites dans la norme sur le matériel brouilleur:
"Apparelis Numériques", NMB-003 édictee par le Ministre Canadian des
Communications.
This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class A limits for radio noise emissions from
digital apparatus set out in the interference-causing equipment standard entitled: "Digital
Apparatus," ICES-003 of the Canadian Department of Communications.
Europe (CE Declaration of Conformity)
This product has been tested in accordance too, and complies with the Low Voltage
Directive (73/23/EEC) and EMC Directive (89/336/EEC). The product has been marked
with the CE Mark to illustrate its compliance.
VCCI (Japan)
English translation of the notice above:
This is a Class A product based on the standard of the Voluntary Control Council for
Interference (VCCI) from Information Technology Equipment. If this is used near a radio
or television receiver in a domestic environment, it may cause radio interference. Install
and use the equipment according to the instruction manual.
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RRL (Korea)
English translation of the notice above:
1. Type of Equipment (Model Name): On License and Product
2. Certification No.: On RRL certificate. Obtain certificate from local Intel
representative
3. Name of Certification Recipient: Intel Corporation
4. Date of Manufacturer: Refer to date code on product
5. Manufacturer/Nation: Intel Corporation/Refer to country of origin marked on
product
Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS)
Compliance
Intel has a system in place to restrict the use of banned substances in accordance with the
European Directive 2002/95/EC. Compliance is based on declaration that materials
banned in the RoHS Directive are either (1) below all applicable threshold limits or (2) an
approved / pending RoHS exemption applies.
RoHS implementing details are not fully defined and may change.
Threshold limits and banned substances are noted below:
• Quantity limit of 0.1% by mass (1000 PPM) for:
— Lead
— Mercury
— Hexavalent Chromium
— Polybrominated Biphenyls Diphenyl Ethers (PBDE)
• Quantity limit of 0.01% by mass (100 PPM) for:
— Cadmium
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End-of-Life / Product Recycling
Product recycling and end-of-life take-back systems and requirements vary by country.
Contact the retailer or distributor of this product for information about product recycling
and / or take-back.
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Appendix D: Intel® Server Issue Report
Form
Note: An on-line / automatic submission version of this form is available at http://
support.intel.com/support/. For the fastest service, please submit your form via the
Internet.
Date Submitted: _______________________________________________________
Company Name: ______________________________________________________
Contact Name: ________________________________________________________
Email Address: _______________________________________________________
Intel Server Product: ___________________________________________________
Priority (Critical, Hot, High, Low): _______________________________________
Brief Problem Description. Provide a brief description below. See the last page for space
to include a detailed problem description.
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
Board / Chassis Information
Baseboard Revision - PBA#: _____________________________________________
Baseboard Serial Number: _______________________________________________
Chassis Model: ________________________________________________________
CPU1 Speed/Stepping/Spec: _____________________________________________
CPU2 Speed/Stepping/Spec: _____________________________________________
System BIOS Version: __________________________________________________
HSC Firmware Version: _________________________________________________
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DIMM Configuration
DIMM1A MB and Vendor / part number: __________________________________
DIMM1B MB and Vendor / part number: __________________________________
DIMM2A MB and Vendor / part number: __________________________________
DIMM2B MB and Vendor / part number: __________________________________
DIMM3A MB and Vendor / part number: __________________________________
DIMM3B MB and Vendor / part number: __________________________________
DIMM4A MB and Vendor / part number: __________________________________
DIMM4B MB and Vendor / part number: __________________________________
Operating System Information
Operating System:_____________________________________________________
Version: _____________________________________________________________
Service Pack:_________________________________________________________
Add-in Card, Peripheral, Video, NIC
Check each box below as applicable, and provide the requested information.
Peripheral Card or Peripheral Description Driver Revision IRQ # I/O Base Address NIC
Peripheral
Description
Driver
Revision
IRQ
I/O Base
Address
FW
Revision
Low-profile Riser
PCI Slot 1
PCI Slot 2
PCI Slot 3
Full-height Riser
PCI Slot 1
PCI Slot 2
PCI Slot 3
Video
On-board Video
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Peripheral
Description
Driver
Revision
IRQ
I/O Base
Address
Make/Model
Hot-swap
or Fixed
IRQ
FW
Revision
FW
Revision
Add-in Video
NIC
On-Board NIC1
On-Board NIC2
Hard Drive Information
Drive Type (SCSI,
SATA, etc)
Management Information
On-Board Platform Instrumentation only ___________________________________
Intel® Server Management - Professional Edition_____________________________
Intel® Server Management - Advanced Edition ______________________________
Control Panel Information
Standard Control Panel _________________________________________________
Intel® Local Control Panel_______________________________________________
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Complete Problem Description
In the space below, provide a complete description of the steps used to reproduce the
problem or a complete description of where the problem can be found. Please also include
any details on troubleshooting already done.
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
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Appendix E: Installation/Assembly
Safety Instructions
English
The power supply in this product contains no user-serviceable parts.
Refer servicing only to qualified personnel.
Do not attempt to modify or use the supplied AC power cord if it is
not the exact type required. A product with more than one power
supply will have a separate AC power cord for each supply.
The power button on the system does not turn off system AC power.
To remove AC power from the system, you must unplug each AC
power cord from the wall outlet or power supply.
The power cord(s) is considered the disconnect device to the main
(AC) power. The socket outlet that the system plugs into shall be
installed near the equipment and shall be easily accessible.
SAFETY STEPS: Whenever you remove the chassis covers to
access the inside of the system, follow these steps:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Turn off all peripheral devices connected to the system.
Turn off the system by pressing the power button.
Unplug all AC power cords from the system or from wall outlets.
Label and disconnect all cables connected to I/O connectors or
ports on the back of the system.
5. Provide some electrostatic discharge (ESD) protection by
wearing an antistatic wrist strap attached to chassis ground of
the system-any unpainted metal surface-when handling
components.
6. Do not operate the system with the chassis covers removed.
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After you have completed the six SAFETY steps above, you can
remove the system covers. To do this:
1. Unlock and remove the padlock from the back of the system if a
padlock has been installed.
2. Remove and save all screws from the covers.
3. Remove the cover(s).
For proper cooling and airflow, always reinstall the chassis covers
before turning on the system. Operating the system without the
covers in place can damage system parts. To install the covers:
1. Check first to make sure you have not left loose tools or parts
inside the system.
2. Check that cables, add-in boards, and other components are
properly installed.
3. Attach the covers to the chassis with the screws removed earlier,
and tighten them firmly.
4. Insert and lock the padlock to the system to prevent
unauthorized access inside the system.
5. Connect all external cables and the AC power cord(s) to the
system.
A microprocessor and heat sink may be hot if the system has been
running. Also, there may be sharp pins and edges on some board
and chassis parts. Contact should be made with care. Consider
wearing protective gloves.
Danger of explosion if the battery is incorrectly replaced. Replace
only with the same or equivalent type recommended by the
equipment manufacturer. Dispose of used batteries according to
manufacturer's instructions.
The system is designed to operate in a typical office environment.
Choose a site that is:
266
•
Clean and free of airborne particles (other than normal room
dust).
•
Well ventilated and away from sources of heat including direct
sunlight.
•
•
Away from sources of vibration or physical shock.
•
In regions that are susceptible to electrical storms, we
recommend you plug your system into a surge suppressor and
disconnect telecommunication lines to your modem during an
electrical storm.
•
•
Provided with a properly grounded wall outlet.
Isolated from strong electromagnetic fields produced by
electrical devices.
Provided with sufficient space to access the power supply
cord(s), because they serve as the product's main power
disconnect.
Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
Deutsch
Benutzer können am Netzgerät dieses Produkts keine Reparaturen
vornehmen. Das Produkt enthält möglicherweise mehrere
Netzgeräte. Wartungsarbeiten müssen von qualifizierten Technikern
ausgeführt werden.
Versuchen Sie nicht, das mitgelieferte Netzkabel zu ändern oder zu
verwenden, wenn es sich nicht genau um den erforderlichen Typ
handelt. Ein Produkt mit mehreren Netzgeräten hat für jedes
Netzgerät ein eigenes Netzkabel.
Der Wechselstrom des Systems wird durch den Ein-/Aus-Schalter
für Gleichstrom nicht ausgeschaltet. Ziehen Sie jedes
Wechselstrom-Netzkabel aus der Steckdose bzw. dem Netzgerät,
um den Stromanschluß des Systems zu unterbrechen.
SICHERHEISMASSNAHMEN: Immer wenn Sie die
Gehäuseabdeckung abnehmen um an das Systeminnere zu
gelangen, sollten Sie folgende Schritte beachten:
1. Schalten Sie alle an Ihr System angeschlossenen
Peripheriegeräte aus.
2. Schalten Sie das System mit dem Hauptschalter aus.
3. Ziehen Sie den Stromanschlußstecker Ihres Systems aus der
Steckdose.
4. Auf der Rückseite des Systems beschriften und ziehen Sie alle
Anschlußkabel von den I/O Anschlüssen oder Ports ab.
5. Tragen Sie ein geerdetes Antistatik Gelenkband, um
elektrostatische Ladungen (ESD) über blanke Metallstellen bei
der Handhabung der Komponenten zu vermeiden.
6. Schalten Sie das System niemals ohne ordnungsgemäß
montiertes Gehäuse ein.
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SICHERHEISMASSNAHMEN: Immer wenn Sie die
Gehäuseabdeckung abnehmen um an das Systeminnere zu
gelangen, sollten Sie folgende Schritte beachten:
1. Schalten Sie alle an Ihr System angeschlossenen
Peripheriegeräte aus.
2. Schalten Sie das System mit dem Hauptschalter aus.
3. Ziehen Sie den Stromanschlußstecker Ihres Systems aus der
Steckdose.
4. Auf der Rückseite des Systems beschriften und ziehen Sie alle
Anschlußkabel von den I/O Anschlüssen oder Ports ab.
5. Tragen Sie ein geerdetes Antistatik Gelenkband, um
elektrostatische Ladungen (ESD) über blanke Metallstellen bei
der Handhabung der Komponenten zu vermeiden.
6. Schalten Sie das System niemals ohne ordnungsgemäß
montiertes Gehäuse ein.
Zur ordnungsgemäßen Kühlung und Lüftung muß die
Gehäuseabdeckung immer wieder vor dem Einschalten installiert
werden. Ein Betrieb des Systems ohne angebrachte Abdeckung
kann Ihrem System oder Teile darin beschädigen. Um die
Abdeckung wieder anzubringen:
1. Vergewissern Sie sich, daß Sie keine Werkzeuge oder Teile im
Innern des Systems zurückgelassen haben.
2. Überprüfen Sie alle Kabel, Zusatzkarten und andere
Komponenten auf ordnungsgemäßen Sitz und Installation.
3. Bringen Sie die Abdeckungen wieder am Gehäuse an, indem Sie
die zuvor gelösten Schrauben wieder anbringen. Ziehen Sie
diese gut an.
4. Bringen Sie die Verschlußeinrichtung (Padlock) wieder an und
schließen Sie diese, um ein unerlaubtes Öffnen des Systems zu
verhindern.
5. Schließen Sie alle externen Kabel und den AC
Stromanschlußstecker Ihres Systems wieder an.
Der Mikroprozessor und der Kühler sind möglicherweise erhitzt,
wenn das System in Betrieb ist. Außerdem können einige Platinen
und Gehäuseteile scharfe Spitzen und Kanten aufweisen. Arbeiten
an Platinen und Gehäuse sollten vorsichtig ausgeführt werden. Sie
sollten Schutzhandschuhe tragen.
Bei falschem Einsetzen einer neuen Batterie besteht
Explosionsgefahr. Die Batterie darf nur durch denselben oder einen
entsprechenden, vom Hersteller empfohlenen Batterietyp ersetzt
werden. Entsorgen Sie verbrauchte Batterien den Anweisungen des
Herstellers entsprechend.
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Das System wurde für den Betrieb in einer normalen Büroumgebung
entwickelt. Der Standort sollte:
•
•
"sauber und staubfrei sein (Hausstaub ausgenommen);
•
•
"keinen Erschütterungen ausgesetzt sein;
•
"in Regionen, in denen elektrische Stürme auftreten, mit einem
Überspannungsschutzgerät verbunden sein; während eines
elektrischen Sturms sollte keine Verbindung der
Telekommunikationsleitungen mit dem Modem bestehen;
•
•
"mit einer geerdeten Wechselstromsteckdose ausgerüstet sein;
"gut gelüftet und keinen Heizquellen ausgesetzt sein
(einschließlich direkter Sonneneinstrahlung);
"keine starken, von elektrischen Geräten erzeugten
elektromagnetischen Felder aufweisen;
"über ausreichend Platz verfügen, um Zugang zu den
Netzkabeln zu gewährleisten, da der Stromanschluß des
Produkts hauptsächlich über die Kabel unterbrochen wird
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Français
Le bloc d'alimentation de ce produit ne contient aucune pièce
pouvant être réparée par l'utilisateur. Ce produit peut contenir plus
d'un bloc d'alimentation. Veuillez contacter un technicien qualifié en
cas de problème.
Ne pas essayer d'utiliser ni modifier le câble d'alimentation CA
fourni, s'il ne correspond pas exactement au type requis. Le nombre
de câbles d'alimentation CA fournis correspond au nombre de blocs
d'alimentation du produit
Notez que le commutateur CC de mise sous tension /hors tension
du panneau avant n'éteint pas l'alimentation CA du système. Pour
mettre le système hors tension, vous devez débrancher chaque
câble d'alimentation de sa prise.
CONSIGNES DE SÉCURITÉ -Lorsque vous ouvrez le boîtier pour
accéder à l'intérieur du système, suivez les consignes suivantes:
1. Mettez hors tension tous les périphériques connectés au
système.
2. Mettez le système hors tension en mettant l'interrupteur général
en position OFF (bouton-poussoir).
3. Débranchez tous les cordons d'alimentation c.a. du système et
des prises murales.
4. Identifiez et débranchez tous les câbles reliés aux connecteurs
d'E-S ou aux accès derrière le système.
5. Pour prévenir les décharges électrostatiques lorsque vous
touchez aux composants, portez une bande antistatique pour
poignet et reliez-la à la masse du système (toute surface
métallique non peinte du boîtier).
6. Ne faites pas fonctionner le système tandis que le boîtier est
ouvert.
Une fois TOUTES les étapes précédentes accomplies, vous pouvez
retirer les panneaux du système. Procédez comme suit:
1. Si un cadenas a été installé sur à l'arrière du système,
déverrouillez-le et retirez-le.
2. Retirez toutes les vis des panneaux et mettez-les dans un
endroit sûr.
3. Retirez les panneaux.
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Afin de permettre le refroidissement et l'aération du système,
réinstallez toujours les panneaux du boîtier avant de mettre le
système sous tension. Le fonctionnement du système en l'absence
des panneaux risque d'endommager ses pièces. Pour installer les
panneaux, procédez comme suit:
1. Assurez-vous de ne pas avoir oublié d'outils ou de pièces
démontées dans le système.
2. Assurez-vous que les câbles, les cartes d'extension et les autres
composants sont bien installés.
3. Revissez solidement les panneaux du boîtier avec les vis
retirées plus tôt.
4. Remettez le cadenas en place et verrouillez-le afin de prévenir
tout accès non autorisé à l'intérieur du système.
5. Rebranchez tous les cordons d'alimentation c. a. et câbles
externes au système.
Le microprocesseur et le dissipateur de chaleur peuvent être chauds
si le système a été sous tension. Faites également attention aux
broches aiguës des cartes et aux bords tranchants du capot. Nous
vous recommandons l'usage de gants de protection.
Danger d'explosion si la batterie n'est pas remontée correctement.
Remplacer uniquement avec une batterie du même type ou d'un
type équivalent recommandé par le fabricant. Disposez des piles
usées selon les instructions du fabricant.
Le système a été conçu pour fonctionner dans un cadre de travail
normal. L'emplacement choisi doit être:
•
"Propre et dépourvu de poussière en suspension (sauf la
poussière normale).
•
"Bien aéré et loin des sources de chaleur, y compris du soleil
direct.
•
•
"A l'abri des chocs et des sources de vibrations.
•
"Dans les régions sujettes aux orages magnétiques il est
recomandé de brancher votre système à un supresseur de
surtension, et de débrancher toutes les lignes de
télécommunications de votre modem durant un orage.
•
•
"Muni d'une prise murale correctement mise à la terre.
"Isolé de forts champs électromagnétiques géenérés par des
appareils électriques.
"Suffisamment spacieux pour vous permettre d'accéder aux
câbles d'alimentation (ceux-ci étant le seul moyen de mettre le
système hors tension).
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Español
El usuario debe abstenerse de manipular los componentes de la
fuente de alimentación de este producto, cuya reparación debe
dejarse exclusivamente en manos de personal técnico
especializado. Puede que este producto disponga de más de una
fuente de alimentación
No intente modificar ni usar el cable de alimentación de corriente
alterna, si no corresponde exactamente con el tipo requerido.
El número de cables suministrados se corresponden con el número
de fuentes de alimentación de corriente alterna que tenga el
producto
Nótese que el interruptor activado/desactivado en el panel frontal no
desconecta la corriente alterna del sistema. Para desconectarla,
deberá desenchufar todos los cables de corriente alterna de la
pared o desconectar la fuente de alimentación.
INSTRUCCIONES DE SEGURIDAD: Cuando extraiga la tapa del
chasis para acceder al interior del sistema, siga las siguientes
instrucciones:
1. Apague todos los dispositivos periféricos conectados al sistema.
2. Apague el sistema presionando el interruptor encendido/
apagado.
3. Desconecte todos los cables de alimentación CA del sistema o
de las tomas de corriente alterna.
4. Identifique y desconecte todos los cables enchufados a los
conectores E/S o a los puertos situados en la parte posterior del
sistema.
5. Cuando manipule los componentes, es importante protegerse
contra la descarga electrostática (ESD). Puede hacerlo si utiliza
una muñequera antiestática sujetada a la toma de tierra del
chasis - o a cualquier tipo de superficie de metal sin pintar.
6. No ponga en marcha el sistema si se han extraído las tapas del
chasis.
Después de completar las seis instrucciones de SEGURIDAD
mencionadas, ya puede extraer las tapas del sistema. Para ello:
1. Desbloquee y extraiga el bloqueo de seguridad de la parte
posterior del sistema, si se ha instalado uno.
2. Extraiga y guarde todos los tornillos de las tapas.Extraiga las
tapas.
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Para obtener un enfriamiento y un flujo de aire adecuados, reinstale
siempre las tapas del chasis antes de poner en marcha el sistema.
Si pone en funcionamiento el sistema sin las tapas bien colocadas
puede dañar los componentes del sistema. Para instalar las tapas:
1. Asegúrese primero de no haber dejado herramientas o
componentes sueltos dentro del sistema.
2. Compruebe que los cables, las placas adicionales y otros
componentes se hayan instalado correctamente.
3. Incorpore las tapas al chasis mediante los tornillos extraídos
anteriormente, tensándolos firmemente.
4. Inserte el bloqueo de seguridad en el sistema y bloquéelo para
impedir que pueda accederse al mismo sin autorización.
5. Conecte todos los cables externos y los cables de alimentación
CA al sistema.
Si el sistema ha estado en funcionamiento, el microprocesador y el
disipador de calor pueden estar aún calientes. También conviene
tener en cuenta que en el chasis o en el tablero puede haber piezas
cortantes o punzantes. Por ello, se recomienda precaución y el uso
de guantes protectores.
Existe peligro de explosión si la pila no se cambia de forma
adecuada. Utilice solamente pilas iguales o del mismo tipo que las
recomendadas por el fabricante del equipo. Para deshacerse de las
pilas usadas, siga igualmente las instrucciones del fabricante.
El sistema está diseñado para funcionar en un entorno de trabajo
normal. Escoja un lugar:
•
"Limpio y libre de partículas en suspensión (salvo el polvo
normal).
•
"Bien ventilado y alejado de fuentes de calor, incluida la luz
solar directa.
•
•
"Alejado de fuentes de vibración.
•
"En regiones con frecuentes tormentas eléctricas, se
recomienda conectar su sistema a un eliminador de
sobrevoltage y desconectar el módem de las líneas de
telecomunicación durante las tormentas.
•
•
"Provisto de una toma de tierra correctamente instalada.
"Aislado de campos electromagnéticos fuertes producidos por
dispositivos eléctricos.
"Provisto de espacio suficiente como para acceder a los cables
de alimentación, ya que éstos hacen de medio principal de
desconexión del sistema.
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Italiano
Rivolgersi ad un tecnico specializzato per la riparazione dei
componenti dell'alimentazione di questo prodotto. È possibile che il
prodotto disponga di più fonti di alimentazione.
Non modificare o utilizzare il cavo di alimentazione in c.a. fornito dal
produttore, se non corrisponde esattamente al tipo richiesto. Ad ogni
fonte di alimentazione corrisponde un cavo di alimentazione in c.a.
separato
L'interruttore attivato/disattivato nel pannello anteriore non
interrompe l'alimentazione in c.a. del sistema. Per interromperla, è
necessario scollegare tutti i cavi di alimentazione in c.a. dalle prese
a muro o dall'alimentazione di corrente.
PASSI DI SICUREZZA: Qualora si rimuovano le coperture del telaio
per accedere all'interno del sistema, seguire i seguenti passi:
1. Spegnere tutti i dispositivi periferici collegati al sistema.
2. Spegnere il sistema, usando il pulsante spento/acceso
dell'interruttore del sistema.
3. Togliere tutte le spine dei cavi del sistema dalle prese elettriche.
4. Identificare e sconnettere tutti i cavi attaccati ai collegamenti I/O
od alle prese installate sul retro del sistema.
5. Qualora si tocchino i componenti, proteggersi dallo scarico
elettrostatico (SES), portando un cinghia anti-statica da polso
che è attaccata alla presa a terra del telaio del sistema qualsiasi superficie non dipinta - .
6. Non far operare il sistema quando il telaio è senza le coperture.
Dopo aver seguito i sei passi di SICUREZZA sopracitati, togliere le
coperture del telaio del sistema come seque:
1. Aprire e rimuovere il lucchetto dal retro del sistema qualora ve ne
fosse uno installato.
2. Togliere e mettere in un posto sicuro tutte le viti delle coperture.
3. Togliere le coperture.
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Per il giusto flusso dell'aria e raffreddamento del sistema, rimettere
sempre le coperture del telaio prima di riaccendere il sistema.
Operare il sistema senza le coperture al loro proprio posto potrebbe
danneggiare i componenti del sistema. Per rimettere le coperture del
telaio:
1. Controllare prima che non si siano lasciati degli attrezzi o dei
componenti dentro il sistema.
2. Controllare che i cavi, dei supporti aggiuntivi ed altri componenti
siano stati installati appropriatamente.
3. Attaccare le coperture al telaio con le viti tolte in precedenza e
avvitarle strettamente.
4. Inserire e chiudere a chiave il lucchetto sul retro del sistema per
impedire l'accesso non autorizzato al sistema.
5. Ricollegare tutti i cavi esterni e le prolunghe AC del sistema.
Se il sistema è stato a lungo in funzione, il microprocessore e il
dissipatore di calore potrebbero essere surriscaldati. Fare
attenzione alla presenza di piedini appuntiti e parti taglienti sulle
schede e sul telaio. È consigliabile l'uso di guanti di protezione.
Esiste il pericolo di un esplosione se la pila non viene sostituita in
modo corretto. Utilizzare solo pile uguali o di tipo equivalente a
quelle consigliate dal produttore. Per disfarsi delle pile usate, seguire
le istruzioni del produttore.
Il sistema è progettato per funzionare in un ambiente di lavoro tipo.
Scegliere una postazione che sia:
•
"Pulita e libera da particelle in sospensione (a parte la normale
polvere presente nell'ambiente).
•
"Ben ventilata e lontana da fonti di calore, compresa la luce
solare diretta.
•
•
•
"Al riparo da urti e lontana da fonti di vibrazione.
•
•
"Dotata di una presa a muro correttamente installata.
"Isolata dai forti campi magnetici prodotti da dispositivi elettrici.
"In aree soggette a temporali, è consigliabile collegare il
sistema ad un limitatore di corrente. In caso di temporali,
scollegare le linee di comunicazione dal modem.
"Dotata di spazio sufficiente ad accedere ai cavi di
alimentazione, i quali rappresentano il mezzo principale di
scollegamento del sistema.
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Appendix F: Safety Information
English
Server Safety Information
This document applies to Intel® server boards, Intel® server chassis (pedestal and rackmount) and installed peripherals. To reduce the risk of bodily injury, electrical shock, fire,
and equipment damage, read this document and observe all warnings and precautions in
this guide before installing or maintaining your Intel® server product.
In the event of a conflict between the information in this document and information
provided with the product or on the website for a particular product, the product
documentation takes precedence.
Your server should be integrated and serviced only by technically qualified persons.
You must adhere to the guidelines in this guide and the assembly instructions in your
server manuals to ensure and maintain compliance with existing product certifications and
approvals. Use only the described, regulated components specified in this guide. Use of
other products / components will void the UL Listing and other regulatory approvals of
the product, and may result in noncompliance with product regulations in the region(s) in
which the product is sold.
Safety Warnings and Cautions
To avoid personal injury or property damage, before you begin installing the product,
read, observe, and adhere to all of the following safety instructions and information. The
following safety symbols may be used throughout the documentation and may be marked
on the product and / or the product packaging.
CAUTION
WARNING
Indicates the presence of a hazard that may cause minor personal injury or
property damage if the CAUTION is ignored.
Indicates the presence of a hazard that may result in serious personal injury
if the WARNING is ignored.
Indicates potential hazard if indicated information is ignored.
Indicates shock hazards that result in serious injury or death if safety
instructions are not followed.
Indicates hot components or surfaces.
Indicates do not touch fan blades, may result in injury.
Indicates to unplug all AC power cord(s) to disconnect AC power
Please recycle battery
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Intended Application Uses
This product was evaluated as Information Technology Equipment (ITE), which may be
installed in offices, schools, computer rooms, and similar commercial type locations. The
suitability of this product for other product categories and environments (such as medical,
industrial, residential, alarm systems, and test equipment), other than an ITE application,
may require further evaluation.
Site Selection
The system is designed to operate in a typical office environment. Choose a site that is:
• Clean, dry, and free of airborne particles (other than normal room dust).
• Well-ventilated and away from sources of heat including direct sunlight and
radiators.
• Away from sources of vibration or physical shock.
• Isolated from strong electromagnetic fields produced by electrical devices.
• In regions that are susceptible to electrical storms, we recommend you plug your
system into a surge suppressor and disconnect telecommunication lines to your
modem during an electrical storm.
• Provided with a properly grounded wall outlet.
• Provided with sufficient space to access the power supply cord(s), because they serve
as the product's main power disconnect.
Equipment Handling Practices
Reduce the risk of personal injury or equipment damage:
• Conform to local occupational health and safety requirements when moving and
lifting equipment.
• Use mechanical assistance or other suitable assistance when moving and lifting
equipment.
• To reduce the weight for easier handling, remove any easily detachable components.
Power and Electrical Warnings
Caution: The power button, indicated by the stand-by power marking, DOES NOT completely turn
off the system AC power, 5V standby power is active whenever the system is plugged in.
To remove power from system, you must unplug the AC power cord from the wall outlet.
Your system may use more than one AC power cord. Make sure all AC power cords are
unplugged. Make sure the AC power cord(s) is/are unplugged before you open the
chassis, or add or remove any non hot-plug components.
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Do not attempt to modify or use an AC power cord if it is not the exact type required. A
separate AC cord is required for each system power supply.
Some power supplies in Intel® servers use Neutral Pole Fusing. To avoid risk of shock use
caution when working with power supplies that use Neutral Pole Fusing.
The power supply in this product contains no user-serviceable parts. Do not open the
power supply. Hazardous voltage, current and energy levels are present inside the power
supply. Return to manufacturer for servicing.
When replacing a hot-plug power supply, unplug the power cord to the power supply
being replaced before removing it from the server.
To avoid risk of electric shock, turn off the server and disconnect the power cord,
telecommunications systems, networks, and modems attached to the server before opening
it.
Power Cord Warnings
If an AC power cord was not provided with your product, purchase one that is approved
for use in your country.
Caution: To avoid electrical shock or fire, check the power cord(s) that will be used with the
product as follows:
• Do not attempt to modify or use the AC power cord(s) if they are not the exact type
required to fit into the grounded electrical outlets
• The power cord(s) must meet the following criteria:
• The power cord must have an electrical rating that is greater than that of the
electrical current rating marked on the product.
• The power cord must have safety ground pin or contact that is suitable for the
electrical outlet.
• The power supply cord(s) is/are the main disconnect device to AC power. The socket
outlet(s) must be near the equipment and readily accessible for disconnection.
• The power supply cord(s) must be plugged into socket-outlet(s) that is /are provided
with a suitable earth ground.
System Access Warnings
Caution: To avoid personal injury or property damage, the following safety instructions apply
whenever accessing the inside of the product:
• Turn off all peripheral devices connected to this product.
• Turn off the system by pressing the power button to off.
• Disconnect the AC power by unplugging all AC power cords from the system or wall
outlet.
• Disconnect all cables and telecommunication lines that are connected to the system.
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• Retain all screws or other fasteners when removing access cover(s). Upon
completion of accessing inside the product, refasten access cover with original
screws or fasteners.
• Do not access the inside of the power supply. There are no serviceable parts in the
power supply. Return to manufacturer for servicing.
• Power down the server and disconnect all power cords before adding or replacing
any non hot-plug component.
• When replacing a hot-plug power supply, unplug the power cord to the power supply
being replaced before removing the power supply from the server.
Caution: If the server has been running, any installed processor(s) and heat sink(s) may be hot.
Unless you are adding or removing a hot-plug component, allow the system to cool before
opening the covers. To avoid the possibility of coming into contact with hot component(s)
during a hot-plug installation, be careful when removing or installing the hot-plug
component(s).
Caution: To avoid injury do not contact moving fan blades. If your system is supplied with a guard
over the fan, do not operate the system without the fan guard in place.
Rack Mount Warnings
The equipment rack must be anchored to an unmovable support to prevent it from tipping
when a server or piece of equipment is extended from it. The equipment rack must be
installed according to the rack manufacturer's instructions.
Install equipment in the rack from the bottom up, with the heaviest equipment at the
bottom of the rack.
Extend only one piece of equipment from the rack at a time.
You are responsible for installing a main power disconnect for the entire rack unit. This
main disconnect must be readily accessible, and it must be labeled as controlling power to
the entire unit, not just to the server(s).
To avoid risk of potential electric shock, a proper safety ground must be implemented for
the rack and each piece of equipment installed in it.
Electrostatic Discharge (ESD)
Caution: ESD can damage disk drives, boards, and other parts. We recommend that you perform
all procedures at an ESD workstation. If one is not available, provide some ESD
protection by wearing an antistatic wrist strap attached to chassis ground -- any
unpainted metal surface -- on your server when handling parts.
Always handle boards carefully. They can be extremely sensitive to ESD. Hold boards
only by their edges. After removing a board from its protective wrapper or from the
server, place the board component side up on a grounded, static free surface. Use a
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conductive foam pad if available but not the board wrapper. Do not slide board over any
surface.
Other Hazards
Battery Replacement
Caution: There is the danger of explosion if the battery is incorrectly replaced. When replacing the
battery, use only the battery recommended by the equipment manufacturer.
Dispose of batteries according to local ordinances and regulations.
Do not attempt to recharge a battery.
Do not attempt to disassemble, puncture, or otherwise damage a battery.
Cooling and Airflow
Caution: Carefully route cables as directed to minimize airflow blockage and cooling problems.
For proper cooling and airflow, operate the system only with the chassis covers installed.
Operating the system without the covers in place can damage system parts. To install the
covers:
• Check first to make sure you have not left loose tools or parts inside the system.
• Check that cables, add-in boards, and other components are properly installed.
• Attach the covers to the chassis according to the product instructions.
Laser Peripherals or Devices
Caution: To avoid risk of radiation exposure and/or personal injury:
• Do not open the enclosure of any laser peripheral or device
• Laser peripherals or devices have are not user serviceable
• Return to manufacturer for servicing
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Deutsch
Sicherheitshinweise für den Server
Das vorliegende Dokument bezieht sich auf Intel® Serverplatinen, Intel® Servergehäuse
(Standfuß und Rack) sowie installierte Peripheriegeräte. Es enthält Warnungen und
Vorsichtsmaßnahmen zur Vermeidung von Gefahren durch Verletzung, Stromschlag,
Feuer und Beschädigungen von Geräten. Lesen Sie diese Dokument daher sorgfältig,
bevor Sie Ihr Intel® Serverprodukt installieren oder warten.
Bei Widersprüchen zwischen den hier vorliegenden Angaben und den Informationen im
Lieferumfang des Produkts oder auf der Website des betreffenden Produkts hat die
Produktdokumentation Vorrang.
Die Integration und Wartung des Servers darf nur durch technisch qualifizierte Personen
erfolgen.
Um die Einhaltung der vorhandenen Zulassungen und Genehmigungen für das Produkt zu
gewährleisten, sind die Richtlinien in diesem Handbuch sowie die Montageanleitungen in
den Serverhandbüchern zu beachten. Verwenden Sie nur die beschriebenen, zugelassenen
Komponenten, die im vorliegenden Handbuch angegeben werden. Die Verwendung
anderer Produkte oder Komponenten führt zum Erlöschen der UL-Zulassung und anderer
Genehmigungen für das Produkt. Dadurch kann das Produkt gegen Produktbestimmungen
verstoßen, die im Verkaufsland gelten.
Sicherheitshinweise und Vorsichtsmaßnahmen
Um Verletzungen und Beschädigungen zu vermeiden, sollten Sie vor dem Beginn der
Produktinstallation die nachfolgend aufgeführten Sicherheitshinweise und -informationen
sorgfältig lesen und befolgen. In dem vorliegenden Handbuch sowie auf dem Produkt und
auf der Verpackung werden folgende Sicherheitssymbole verwendet:
VORSICHT
WARNUNG
282
Weist auf eine Gefahrenquelle hin, die bei Nichtbeachtung des
VORSICHTSHINWEISES zu leichteren Verletzungen bzw.
Sachbeschädigungen führen kann.
Weist auf eine Gefahrenquelle hin, die bei Nichtbeachtung der WARNUNG zu
ernsten Verletzungen führen kann.
Weist auf potentielle Gefahr bei Nichtbeachtung der angezeigten Informationen
hin.
Weist auf die Gefahr eines Stromschlags hin, der bei Nichtbeachtung der
Sicherheitshinweise zu schweren oder tödlichen Verletzungen führen kann.
Weist auf Verbrennungsgefahr an heißen Bauteilen bzw. Oberflächen hin.
Weist darauf hin, daß das Anfassen des Gebläses zu Verletzungen führen kann.
Bedeutet, alle Netzkabel abzuziehen und das Gerät von der Netzspannung zu
trennen.
Bereiten Sie bitte Batterie auf
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Zielbenutzer der Anwendung
Dieses Produkt wurde in seiner Eigenschaft als IT-Gerät getestet, das in Büros, Schulen,
Computerräumen und ähnlichen öffentlichen Räumlichkeiten installiert werden kann. Die
Eignung dieses Produkts für andere Einsatzbereiche als IT (z. B. Medizin, Industrie,
Alarmsysteme oder Prüfgeräte) kann u. U. weitere Tests erfordern.
Standortauswahl
Das System ist für den Betrieb innerhalb normaler Büroumgebungen geeignet. Wählen
Sie einen Standort, der folgenden Kriterien entspricht:
• Sauber, trocken und frei von Partikeln in der Luft (außer dem normalen Raumstaub).
• Gut belüftet, nicht in der Nähe von Wärmequellen und keiner direkten
Sonnenbestrahlung ausgesetzt.
• Nicht in der Nähe von Vibrations- oder Erschütterungsquellen.
• Abgeschirmt von starken elektromagnetischen Feldern, die durch elektrische Geräte
erzeugt werden.
• In gewittergefährdeten Gebieten sollten Sie das System an einen
Überspannungsschutz anschließen und bei einem Gewitter die
Telekommunikationskabel zum Modem abziehen.
• Eine ordnungsgemäß geerdete Wandsteckdose muß vorhanden sein.
• Ausreichender Freiraum für den Zugang zu den Netzkabeln, da diese die
Hauptvorrichtung zum Trennen des Produkts von der Stromversorgung sind.
Handhabung von Geräten
Beachten Sie zur Vermeidung von Verletzungen oder Beschädigungen an den Geräten die
folgenden Hinweise:
• Halten Sie beim Transportieren und Anheben von Geräten die örtlichen
Gesundheits- und Sicherheitsvorschriften ein.
• Verwenden Sie mechanische oder andere geeignete Hilfsmittel zum Transportieren
oder Anheben von Geräten.
• Entfernen Sie alle Komponenten, die sich leicht abnehmen lassen, um das Gewicht zu
reduzieren und die Handhabung zu erleichtern.
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Warnungen zu Netzspannung und Elektrizität
Vorsicht: Durch Betätigen der mit dem Standby-Symbol gekennzeichneten Netztaste wird das
System NICHT vollständig vom Netz getrennt. Es sind weiterhin 5 V aktiv, solange das
System eingesteckt ist. Um das System vollständig vom Strom zu trennen, muß das
Netzkabel aus der Steckdose abgezogen werden. Das System verfügt möglicherweise über
mehrere Netzkabel. Vergewissern Sie sich in diesem Fall, daß alle Netzkabel abgezogen
sind. Wenn Sie Komponenten ein- oder ausbauen möchten, die nicht hot-plug-fähig sind,
stellen Sie sicher, daß zuvor alle Netzkabel abgezogen sind.
Nehmen Sie keine Änderungen am Netzkabel vor, und verwenden Sie kein Kabel, das nicht
genau dem geforderten Typ entspricht. Jedes Netzteil im System muß über ein eigenes
Netzkabel angeschlossen werden.
Einige Netzteile von Intel Servern verwenden Nullleitersicherungen. Vorsicht ist geboten
im Umgang mit Netzteilen, welche Nullleitersicherungen verwenden, um das Risiko eines
elektrischen Schlages zu vermeiden
Das Netzteil in diesem Produkt enthält keine Teile, die vom Benutzer gewartet werden
können. Öffnen Sie das Netzteil nicht. Im Netzteil bestehen gefährliche Spannungen,
Ströme und Energiequellen. Schicken Sie das Gerät für Wartungsarbeiten an den
Hersteller zurück.
Wenn Sie ein hot-plug-fähiges Netzteil austauschen, ziehen Sie dessen Netzkabel ab, bevor
Sie es aus dem Server ausbauen.
Zur Vermeidung von Stromschlägen schalten Sie den Server aus, und trennen Sie vor dem
Öffnen des Geräts das Netzkabel sowie alle an den Server angeschlossene
Telekommunikationssysteme, Netzwerke und Modems.
Hinweis für Netzkabel
Wenn kein Netzkabel mit dem Produkt geliefert wurde, kaufen Sie ein Kabel, das für die
Vorsicht: Prüfen Sie zur Vermeidung von Stromschlag- oder Feuergefahr die mit dem Produkt zu
verwendenden Netzkabel wie folgt:
• Nehmen Sie keine Änderungen an einem Netzkabel vor, und benutzen sie es nicht,
wenn es nicht genau in die geerdeten Netzsteckdosen paßt.
• Netzkabel müssen die folgenden Anforderungen erfüllen:
• Die Nennbelastbarkeit des Netzkabels muß mindestens so hoch sein wie die am
Produkt angegebenen Nennstromaufnahme.
• Das Netzkabel muß einen zur Netzsteckdose passenden Schutzkontakt besitzen.
• Die Netzkabel sind die Hauptvorrichtung zum Trennen des Geräts vom Stromnetz.
Die Steckdose muß in der Nähe der Anlage angebracht und gut erreichbar sein.
• Netzkabel müssen an eine ordnungsgemäß geerdete Steckdose angeschlossen sein.
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Warnhinweise für den Systemzugang
Vorsicht: Um Verletzungen und Beschädigungen zu vermeiden, sollten Sie vor Arbeiten im
Produktinneren folgende Sicherheitsanweisungen beachten:
• Schalten Sie alle am Produkt angeschlossenen Peripheriegeräte aus.
• Schalten Sie das System mit dem Netzschalter aus.
• Trennen Sie das Gerät von der Stromquelle, indem Sie alle Netzkabel vom System
bzw. aus der Steckdose ziehen.
• Ziehen Sie alle Kabel und alle an das System angeschlossenen
Telekommunikationsleitungen ab.
• Bewahren Sie alle Schrauben und anderen Befestigungselemente gut auf, nachdem
Sie die Gehäuseabdeckung entfernt haben. Wenn Sie Ihre Arbeiten im
Systeminneren beendet haben, befestigen Sie die Gehäuseabdeckung mit den
Originalschrauben bzw. -befestigungselementen.
• Führen Sie keine Arbeiten im Netzteil aus. Das Netzteil enthält keine für den
Benutzer wartungsbedürftigen Teile. Schicken Sie das Gerät für Wartungsarbeiten
an den Hersteller zurück.
• Schalten Sie den Server aus, und ziehen Sie alle Netzkabel ab, bevor Sie
Komponenten ein- oder ausbauen, die nicht hot-plug-fähig sind.
• Wenn Sie ein hot-plug-fähiges Netzteil austauschen, ziehen Sie dessen Netzkabel ab,
bevor Sie es aus dem Server ausbauen.
Vorsicht: War Ihr Server in Betrieb, können die installierten Prozessoren und Kühlkörper heiß sein.
Sofern Sie keine Hot-Plug-Komponenten ein- oder ausbauen, warten Sie mit dem
Abnehmen der Abdeckungen, bis das System abgekühlt ist. Gehen Sie beim Aus- oder
Einbauen von Hot-Plug-Komponenten sorgfältig vor, um nicht mit heißen Komponenten
in Berührung zu kommen.
Vorsicht: Berühren Sie nicht die rotierenden Lüfterflügel, um Verletzungen zu vermeiden. Falls Ihr
System mit eine Lüfterabdeckung besitzt, darf es nicht ohne diese Abdeckung betrieben
werden.
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Warnhinweise für Racks
Das Geräte-Rack muß auf einer geeigneten, festen Unterlage verankert werden, um ein
Umkippen zu vermeiden, wenn ein Server oder andere Geräte herausgezogen werden.
Bei der Installation des Racks müssen die Anweisungen des Rack-Herstellers beachtet
werden.
Gehen Sie bei der Installation von Geräten im Rack immer von unten nach oben vor, und
bauen Sie das schwerste Gerät an der untersten Position im Rack ein.
Ziehen Sie jeweils immer nur ein Gerät aus dem Rack heraus.
Sie müssen für die gesamte Rack-Einheit einen Netztrennschalter einrichten. Dieser
Netztrennschalter muß leicht zugänglich sein und über eine Kennzeichnung verfügen, die
besagt, daß er die Stromzufuhr zur gesamten Einheit steuert und nicht nur zu den Servern.
Zur Vermeidung von Stromschlaggefahr müssen das Rack selbst und alle darin
eingebauten Geräte ordnungsgemäß geerdet sein.
Elektrostatische Entladungen (ESD)
Vorsicht: Elektrostatische Entladungen können zur Beschädigung von Festplatten, Platinen und
anderen Komponenten führen. Daher sollten Sie alle Arbeiten an einer ESD-Workstation
ausführen. Steht ein solcher Arbeitsplatz nicht zur Verfügung, erzielen Sie einen gewissen
Schutz vor elektrostatischen Entladungen durch Tragen einer Antistatik-Manschette, die
Sie während der Arbeit zur Erdung an einem beliebigen unlackierten Metallteil des
Computergehäuses befestigen.
Gehen Sei bei der Handhabung von Platinen immer mit größter Vorsicht vor. Sie können
äußerst empfindlich gegenüber elektrostatischer Entladung sein. Halten Sie Platinen nur
an den Kanten fest. Legen Sie die Platinen nach dem Auspacken aus der Schutzhülle oder
nach dem Ausbau aus dem Server mit der Bauelementseite nach oben auf eine geerdete,
statisch entladene Unterlage.Verwenden Sie dazu, sofern verfügbar, eine leitfahige
Schaumstoffunterlage, aber niche die Schutzhülle der Platine. Ziehen Sie die Platine
nicht über eine Fläche.
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Andere Gefahren
Batterieaustausch
Vorsicht: Wird die Batterie unsachgemäß ausgetauscht, besteht Explosionsgefahr. Verwenden Sie
als Ersatz nur die vom Gerätehersteller empfohlene Batterie.
Beachten Sie bei der Entsorgung von Batterien die gültigen Bestimmungen.
Versuchen Sie nicht, eine Batterie aufzuladen.
Versuchen Sie nicht, eine Batterie zu öffnen oder sonstwie zu beschädigen.
Kühlung und Luftstrom
Vorsicht: Verlegen Sie Kabel sorgfältig entsprechend der Anleitung, um Störungen des Luftstroms
und Kühlungsprobleme zu vermeiden.
Zur Gewährleistung des ordnungsgemäßen Kühlungs- und Luftstromverhaltens darf das
System nur mit angebrachten Gehäuseabdeckungen betrieben werden. Die
Inbetriebnahme des Systems ohne Abdeckung kann zur Beschädigung von
Systemkomponenten führen. So bringen Sie die Abdeckung wieder an:
• Vergewissern Sie sich zunächst, daß Sie keine Werkzeuge oder Teile im Gehäuse
vergessen haben.
• Prüfen Sie, ob Kabel, Erweiterungskarten sowie weitere Komponenten
ordnungsgemäß angebracht sind.
• Befestigen Sie die Abdeckungen am Gehäuse des Produkts, wie in dessen Anleitung
beschrieben.
Laser-Peripheriegeräte oder -Komponenten
Vorsicht: Beachten Sie zur Vermeidung von Strahlung und Verletzungen die folgenden Hinweise:
• Öffnen Sie keinesfalls das Gehäuse von Laser-Peripheriegeräten oder LaserKomponenten.
• Laser-Peripheriegeräte oder -Komponenten besitzen keine für den Benutzer
wartungsbedürftigen Teile.
• Schicken Sie das Gerät für Wartungsarbeiten an den Hersteller zurück.
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Français
Consignes de sécurité sur le serveur
Ce document s’applique aux cartes serveur Intel®, au châssis de serveur Intel® (sur pieds
et sur rack) et aux périphériques installés. Pour réduire les risques de dommages
corporels, d’électrocution, d’incendie et de dommages matériels, lisez ce document et
respectez tous les avertissements et précautions mentionnés dans ce guide avant
d’installer ou de mettre à jour votre produit serveur Intel®.
En cas de conflit entre les informations fournies dans ce document et celles livrées avec le
produit ou publiées sur le site Web pour un produit particulier, la documentation du
produit prime.
Votre serveur doit être intégré et entretenu uniquement par des techniciens qualifiés.
Vous devez suivre les informations de ce guide et les instructions d’assemblage des
manuels de serveur pour vérifier et maintenir la conformité avec les certifications et
approbations de produit existantes. Utilisez uniquement les composants décrits et
réglementés spécifiés dans ce guide. L’utilisation d’autres produits/composants annulera
la liste UL et les autres approbations réglementaires du produit, et le produit peut ne pas
être conforme aux autres lois et réglementations locales applicables au produit.
Sécurité: avertissements et mises en garde
Pour éviter de vous blesser ou d’endommager votre équipement, lisez et respectez toutes
les informations et consignes de sécurité avant de commencer l’installation du produit.
Les symboles de sécurité suivants peuvent être utilisés tout au long de cette
documentation et peuvent figurer sur le produit ou sur son emballage.
ATTENTION
AVERTISSEMENT
288
Indique la présence d’un risque pouvant entraîner des blessures physiques
mineures ou endommager légèrement le matériel si la mise en garde n’est pas
prise en compte.
Indique la présence d’un risque pouvant entraîner des blessures corporelles
graves si l’avertissement n’est pas pris en compte.
Indique un risque potentiel si les informations signalées ne sont pas prises en
compte.
Indique des risques d’électrocution pouvant entraîner des blessures
corporelles graves ou mortelles si les consignes de sécurité ne sont pas
respectées.
Signale des composants ou des surfaces soumis à des températures élevées.
Indique de ne pas toucher aux pales de ventilateur, car cela peut entraîner des
blessures.
Indique de débrancher tous les cordons d’alimentation secteur pour
déconnecter l’alimentation.
Veuillez réutiliser la batterie
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Domaines d’utilisation prévus
Ce produit a été testé comme équipement informatique (ITE) et peut être installé dans des
bureaux, des écoles, des salles informatiques et des endroits commerciaux similaires.
L’utilisation du présent produit dans des catégories et environnements de produits et
domaines d’application (par exemple, le domaine médical, industriel, résidentiel, les
systèmes d’alarme et les appareils de contrôle) autres qu’ITE doit faire l’objet
d’évaluations supplémentaires.
Sélection d’un emplacement
Le système est conçu pour fonctionner dans un environnement standard de bureau.
Choisissez un emplacement respectant les conditions suivantes :
• Propre, sec et exempt de particules en suspension (autres que la poussière normale
d’une pièce).
• Bien ventilé et à l’écart des sources de chaleur telles que la lumière directe du soleil
et les radiateurs.
• À l’écart des sources de vibration ou des chocs physiques.
• Isolé des champs électromagnétiques importants produits par des appareils
électriques.
• Dans les régions sujettes aux orages magnétiques, nous vous recommandons de
brancher votre système à un suppresseur de surtension et de déconnecter les lignes
de télécommunication de votre modem pendant les orages.
• Équipé d’une prise murale reliée à la terre.
• Équipé d’un espace suffisant pour accéder aux cordons d’alimentation secteur, car ils
servent de disjoncteur principal d’alimentation du produit.
Pratiques de manipulation de l’équipement
Réduisez le risque de dommages personnels ou matériels :
• Conformez-vous aux exigences de médecine du travail et de sécurité lorsque vous
déplacez et soulevez le matériel.
• Utilisez l’assistance mécanique ou toute autre assistance appropriée lorsque vous
déplacez et soulevez le matériel.
• Pour réduire le poids en vue de faciliter la manipulation, retirez tout composant
amovible.
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Alimentation et avertissements en matière d’électricité
Attention: Le bouton d’alimentation, indiqué par le symbole de mise en veille, NE COUPE PAS
complètement l’alimentation secteur du système car le courant de veille 5 V reste actif
lorsque le système est sous tension. Pour couper l’alimentation du système, vous devez
débrancher le cordon d’alimentation secteur de la prise murale. Votre système peut
utiliser plusieurs cordons d’alimentation secteur. Assurez-vous que tous les cordons
d’alimentation sont débranchés. Vous devez les débrancher avant d’ouvrir le châssis,
d’ajouter ou de supprimer un composant non connectable à chaud.
Les alimentations de certains serveurs Intel sont munies de doubles fusibles pôle/neutre:
veuillez observer les précautions d'usage afin d'éviter tout risque d'eléctrocution.
N’essayez pas de modifier ou d’utiliser un cordon d’alimentation secteur s’il ne s’agit pas
du type exact requis. Un cordon secteur est requis pour chaque alimentation système.
Le bloc d’alimentation de ce produit ne contient aucun composant réparable par
l’utilisateur. N’ouvrez pas le bloc d’alimentation. L’intérieur de celui-ci est soumis à des
niveaux dangereux de tension, de courant et d’énergie. Renvoyez-le au fabricant en cas de
problème.
Lorsque vous remplacez un bloc d’alimentation à chaud, débranchez le cordon du bloc
d’alimentation en cours de remplacement avant de le retirer du serveur.
Pour éviter tout risque d’électrocution, mettez le système hors tension et débranchez les
cordons d’alimentation ainsi que les systèmes de télécommunication, réseaux et modems
reliés au système avant d’ouvrir ce dernier.
Avertissements sur le cordon d’alimentation
Si aucun cordon d’alimentation secteur n’a été fourni avec votre produit, vous devez vous
en procurer un qui soit approuvé pour une utilisation dans votre pays.
Attention: Pour éviter tout risque d’électrocution ou d’incendie, vérifiez les cordons d’alimentation
qui seront utilisés avec le produit comme suit:
• N’essayez pas d’utiliser ou de modifier les cordons d’alimentation en CA s’ils ne
correspondent pas exactement au type requis pour les prises électriques reliées à la
terre.
• Les cordons d’alimentation doivent répondre aux critères suivants :
• Le cordon d’alimentation doit supporter une intensité supérieure à celle indiquée
sur le produit.
• Le cordon d’alimentation doit posséder une broche ou un contact de mise à la terre
approprié à la prise électrique.
• Les cordons d’alimentation électrique représentent le principal dispositif de
déconnexion raccordé à l’alimentation secteur. Les prises de courant doivent se
trouver à proximité de l’équipement et être facilement accessibles pour une
déconnexion.
• Les cordons d’alimentation doivent être branchés sur des prises électriques
correctement reliées à la terre.
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Avertissements sur l’accès au système
Attention: Pour éviter de vous blesser ou d’endommager votre équipement, les consignes de sécurité
suivantes s’appliquent chaque fois que vous accédez à l’intérieur du produit:
• Mettez hors tension tous les périphériques connectés à ce produit.
• Éteignez le système en appuyant sur le bouton d’alimentation.
• Déconnectez l’alimentation secteur en débranchant tous les cordons d’alimentation
secteur du système ou de la prise murale.
• Déconnectez l’ensemble des câbles et lignes de télécommunication qui sont
connectés au système.
• Mettez toutes les vis ou autres attaches de côté lorsque vous retirez les panneaux
d’accès. Une fois que vous avez terminé d’accéder à l’intérieur du produit, refixez le
panneau d’accès avec les vis ou attaches d’origine.
• N’essayez pas d’accéder à l’intérieur du bloc d’alimentation. Il ne contient aucune
pièce réparable. Renvoyez-le au fabricant en cas de problème.
• Mettez le serveur hors tension et débranchez tous les cordons d’alimentation avant
d’ajouter ou de remplacer tout composant non connectable à chaud.
• Lorsque vous remplacez le bloc d’alimentation à chaud, débranchez le cordon du bloc
d’alimentation en cours de remplacement avant de retirer le bloc du serveur.
Attention: Si le serveur a été utilisé, les processeurs et dissipateurs de chaleur installés peuvent être
chauds. À moins que vous n’ajoutiez ou ne retiriez un composant connectable à chaud,
laissez le système refroidir avant d’ouvrir les panneaux. Pour éviter tout risque d’entrer
en contact avec un composant chaud lors d’une installation à chaud, prenez toutes les
précautions nécessaires lorsque vous retirez ou installez des composants connectables à
chaud.
Attention: Pour éviter de vous blesser, ne touchez pas les pales de ventilateur en mouvement. Si votre
système est fourni avec une protection sur le ventilateur, ne mettez pas le système en route
sans la protection en place.
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Avertissements sur le montage en rack
Le rack doit être fixé à un support inamovible pour éviter qu’il ne bascule lors de
l’extension d’un serveur ou d’un élément de l’équipement. Le rack doit être installé
conformément aux instructions du fabricant.
Installez les équipements dans le rack en partant du bas, en plaçant le plus lourd en bas du
rack.
N’étendez qu’un seul élément de l’équipement à partir du rack à la fois.
Vous êtes responsable de l’installation d’un disjoncteur principal d’alimentation pour la
totalité du rack. Ce disjoncteur principal doit être rapidement accessible et doit être
étiqueté comme contrôlant toute l’unité, et pas uniquement le ou les serveurs.
Pour éviter tout risque d’électrocution, le rack et chaque élément de l’équipement installé
dans le rack doivent être correctement reliés à la terre.
Décharges électrostatiques (ESD)
Attention: Les décharges électrostatiques (ESD) peuvent endommager les lecteurs de disque dur, les
cartes et d’autres pièces. Il est fortement conseillé d’effectuer l’ensemble des procédures
décrites à un poste de travail protégé contre les ESD. Au cas où aucun poste de ce type ne
serait disponible, protégez-vous contre les ESD en portant un bracelet antistatique relié à
la masse du châssis (n’importe quelle surface métallique non peinte) de votre serveur
lorsque que vous manipulez les pièces.
Manipulez toujours les cartes avec précaution. Elles peuvent être extrêmement sensibles
aux ESD. Ne tenez les cartes que par leurs bords. Après avoir retiré une carte de son
emballage de protection ou du serveur, placez-la sur une surface reliée à la terre, exempte
de charge statique, composants orientés vers le haut. Utilisez si possible un tapi de
mousse conducteru, mais pas l’emballage de la carte. Veillez à ce que la carte ne glisse
sur aucune surface.
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Autres risques
Remplacement de la pile
Attention: Il existe un risque d’explosion si la pile n’est pas correctement remplacée. Lors du
remplacement de la pile, utilisez uniquement celle recommandée par le fabricant du
matériel.
Mettez la pile au rebut en vous conformant aux réglementations locales.
N’essayez pas de recharger une pile.
N’essayez pas de démonter, de percer ou d’endommager la pile d’une quelconque façon.
Refroidissement et ventilation
Attention: Routez les câbles avec précaution comme indiqué pour minimiser les blocages de
circulation d’air et les problèmes de refroidissement.
Afin de permettre une ventilation et un refroidissement corrects, ne mettez le système en
marche que lorsque les panneaux du châssis sont en place. L’utilisation du système sans
les panneaux peut endommager les composants système. Pour installer les panneaux :
• Vérifiez tout d’abord que vous n’avez pas oublié d’outils ou de composants détachés
à l’intérieur du système.
• Vérifiez que les câbles, les cartes d’extension et les autres composants sont
correctement installés.
• Fixez les panneaux au châssis en suivant les instructions du produit.
Périphériques laser
Attention: Pour éviter tout risque d’exposition aux rayonnements et/ou de dommage personnel:
• N’ouvrez pas l’enceinte d’un périphérique laser.
• Les périphériques laser ne sont pas réparables par l’utilisateur.
• Retournez-les au fabricant en cas de problème.
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Español
Información de seguridad del servidor
Este documento se aplica a las tarjetas de servidor de Intel®, los gabinetes de servidor de
Intel® (montaje en rack y en pedestal) y los dispositivos periféricos. Para reducir el riesgo
de daños corporales, descargas eléctricas, fuego y en el equipo, lea este documento y
preste atención a todos las advertencias y precauciones de esta guía antes de instalar o
mantener el producto de servidor de Intel®.
En el caso de que haya diferencias entre la información para un producto en particular
contenida en este documento y la información proporcionada con dicho producto o en el
sitio Web, la documentación del producto es la que prevalece.
Sólo personal técnico calificado debe montar y prestar los servicios para el servidor.
Debe ceñirse a las directrices de esta guía y a las instrucciones de montaje de los manuales
del servidor para asegurar y mantener el cumplimiento con las certificaciones y
homologaciones existentes de los productos. Utilice sólo los componentes descritos y
homologados que se especifican en esta guía. El uso de otros productos o componentes
anulará la homologación UL y otras certificaciones oficiales del producto, pudiendo dejar
de ser compatible con las normativas locales de los países en los que se comercializa.
Advertencias y precauciones sobre seguridad
Para reducir la posibilidad de que se produzcan lesiones personales o daños en la
propiedad, antes de empezar a instalar el producto, lea, observe y cumpla toda la
información e instrucciones de seguridad siguientes. Puede que se utilicen los siguientes
símbolos de seguridad en la documentación y es posible que aparezcan en el producto o en
su embalaje.
PRECAUCIÓN
ADVERTENCIA
Indica la existencia de un riesgo que podría causar lesiones personales o daños
en la propiedad leves si no se tiene en cuenta la PRECAUCIÓN.
Indica la existencia de un riesgo que podría causar lesiones personales graves
si no se tiene en cuenta la ADVERTENCIA.
Indica un riesgo potencial si no se tiene en cuenta la información indicada.
Indica riesgo de descargas eléctricas que podrían causar lesiones graves o la
muerte si no se siguen las instrucciones de seguridad.
Indica componentes o superficies calientes.
Indica que no se deben tocar las aspas de los ventiladores, ya que de lo
contrario se podrían producir lesiones.
Indica que es necesario desenchufar los cables de alimentación de CA para
desconectar la alimentación de CA
Recicle por favor la batería
Aplicaciones y usos previstos
Este producto ha sido evaluado como equipo de tecnología informática (ITE) que puede
instalarse en oficinas, escuelas, salas de equipos informáticos o lugares de ámbito
comercial similares. Es posible que sea necesario llevar a cabo una evaluación adicional
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para comprobar si este producto es apropiado para otras categorías de productos y
entornos además de las aplicaciones informáticas (por ejemplo, soluciones médicas,
industriales, residenciales, sistemas de alarma y equipos de pruebas).
Selección de la ubicación
El sistema se ha diseñado para funcionar en un entorno normal de oficinas. Seleccione una
ubicación que esté:
• Limpia, seca y libre de macropartículas en suspensión en el aire (que no sean el
polvo habitual de la habitación).
• Bien ventilada y alejada de fuentes de calor, incluida la luz solar directa y los
radiadores.
• Alejada de fuentes de vibración o de golpes físicos.
• Aislada de campos electromagnéticos producidos por dispositivos eléctricos.
• En zonas propensas a tormentas eléctricas, se recomienda que conecte el servidor a
un supresor de sobretensiones y desconecte las líneas de telecomunicaciones al
módem durante una tormenta eléctrica.
• Provista de una toma de corriente alterna correctamente conectada a tierra.
• Provista de espacio suficiente para acceder a los cables de la fuente de alimentación
ya que constituyen la desconexión principal de la alimentación.
Manipulación del equipo
Reduzca el riesgo de daños personales o en el equipo:
• Respete los requisitos de sanidad y seguridad laborales de su país cuando traslade y
levante el equipo.
• Utilice medios mecánicos u otros que sean adecuados al trasladar o levantar el
equipo.
• Para que el peso sea menor para manipularlo con más facilidad, extraiga los
componentes que sean de fácil extracción.
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Advertencias de alimentación y eléctricas
Precaución: El botón de encendido, indicado con la marca del modo de reposo o stand-by, NO
DESCONECTA completamente la alimentación de CA del sistema, ya que el modo de
reposo de 5 V sigue activo mientras el sistema está enchufado. Para desconectar el
sistema debe desenchufar el cable de alimentación de CA de la toma de la pared. Puede
usar más de un cable de alimentación de CA con el sistema. Asegúrese de que todos los
cables de alimentación de CA están desenchufados. Asegúrese de que los cables de
alimentación de CA estén desenchufado antes de abrir le gabinete, agregar o extraer
cualquier componente que no es de conexión en funcionamiento.
Algunas fuentes de alimentación de electricidad de los servidores de Intel utilizan el polo
neutral del fuselaje. Para evitar riesgos de choques eléctricos use precauciones al
trabajar con las fuentes de alimentación que utilizan el polo neutral de fuselaje.
No intente modificar ni utilizar un cable de alimentación de CA si no es del tipo exacto
requerido. Se necesita un cable de CA para cada fuente de alimentación del sistema.
La fuente de alimentación de este producto no contiene piezas que puedan ser reparadas
por el usuario. No abra la fuente de alimentación. Dentro de la fuente de alimentación
puede haber niveles de tensión, corriente y energía peligrosos. Devuélvala al fabricante
para repararla.
Al reemplazar una fuente de alimentación de conexión en funcionamiento, desenchufe el
cable de alimentación de la fuente de alimentación que va a reemplazar antes de extraerla
del servidor.
Para evitar el riesgo de descargas eléctricas, antes de abrir el servidor, apáguelo,
desconecte el cable de alimentación, los sistemas de telecomunicaciones, las redes y los
módems conectados al mismo.
Advertencias sobre el cable de alimentación
Si no se ha proporcionado con el producto ningún cable de alimentación de CA, adquiera
alguno cuyo uso esté aprobado en su país.
Precaución: Para evitar descargas eléctricas o fuego, revise los cables de alimentación que usará con
el producto tal y como se describe a continuación:
• No intente modificar ni utilizar los cables de alimentación de CA si no son
exactamente del modelo especificado para ajustarse a las tomas de corriente
conectadas a tierra
• Los cables de alimentación deben reunir los siguientes requisitos:
• El cable de alimentación debe disponer de una capacidad nominal de corriente
eléctrica mayor que la capacidad especificada en el producto.
• El cable de alimentación debe disponer de una patilla o contacto de conexión a
tierra que sea apto para la toma de corriente.
• Los cables de la fuente de alimentación son los dispositivos de desconexión
principales a la corriente alterna. El enchufe o enchufes de zócalo deben
encontrarse cerca del equipo y el acceso a ellos debe poderse efectuar de forma
inmediata con el fin de desconectarlos.
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• Los cables de la fuente de alimentación deben estar conectados a los enchufes con
una toma de tierra adecuada.
Advertencias el acceso al sistema
Precaución: Para evitar lesiones personales o daños en la propiedad, se aplican las siguientes
instrucciones de seguridad siempre que se acceda al interior del producto:
• Apague todos los dispositivos periféricos conectados a este producto.
• Pulse el botón de alimentación para apagar el sistema.
• Desconecte la alimentación de CA desenchufando los cables de alimentación de CA
del sistema o de la toma de corriente alterna.
• Desconecte todos los cables y líneas de telecomunicación que estén conectados al
sistema.
• Guarde todos los tornillos o elementos de fijación cuando retire las cubiertas de
acceso. Cuando termine de operar en el interior del producto, vuelva a colocar los
tornillos o los elementos de fijación originales de la cubierta de acceso.
• No acceda al interior de la fuente de alimentación. No hay elementos en la fuente de
alimentación que usted pueda reparar y utilizar. Devuélvala al fabricante para
repararla.
• Apague el servidor y desconecte todos los cables de alimentación antes de agregar
o reemplazar cualquier componente que no es de conexión en funcionamiento.
• Al reemplazar una fuente de alimentación de conexión en funcionamiento, desenchufe
el cable de alimentación de la fuente de alimentación que va a reemplazar antes de
extraerla del servidor.
Precaución: Si el servidor se ha estado ejecutando, los procesadores y disipadores de calor estarán
recalentados. A no ser que esté instalando o extrayendo un componente de conexión en
funcionamiento, deje que el sistema se enfríe antes de abrir las cubiertas. Para que no
llegue a tocar los componentes que estén calientes cuando esté realizando una instalación
de conexión en funcionamiento, tenga cuidado al extraer o instalar los componentes de
conexión en funcionamiento.
Precaución: Para evitar posibles daños, no toque las aspas en movimiento de los ventiladores. Si el
sistema se le ha suministrado con una protección para el ventilador, asegúrese de que
cuando esté funcionando el sistema la protección esté en su sitio.
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Advertencias sobre el montaje en rack
El rack para el equipo se debe sujetar con un soporte fijo para evitar que se caiga cuando
se extraiga un servidor o una pieza del mismo. El rack debe instalarse siguiendo las
instrucciones del fabricante del bastidor.
Instale el equipo en el rack comenzando desde la parte de abajo, con el equipo más pesado
en la parte inferior del rack.
Extraiga las piezas del equipo del rack de una a una.
El usuario es el responsable de la instalación de un dispositivo de desconexión de la
alimentación principal para toda la unidad del rack. El acceso a este dispositivo de
desconexión deberá ser de fácil acceso y deberán incluirse indicaciones que lo
identifiquen como el control de alimentación eléctrica de toda la unidad, no sólo de los
servidores.
Para evitar el riesgo de descargas eléctricas, deberá instalar una conexión a tierra
apropiada para el rack y para cada pieza del equipo instalada en el mismo.
Descarga electrostática (ESD)
Precaución: Las descargas electrostáticas pueden dañar las unidades de disco, las tarjetas y otros
componentes. Recomendamos que realice todos los procedimientos en una estación de
trabajo protegida contra descargas electrostáticas. En caso de que no haya una
disponible, protéjase de alguna forma contra las descargas llevando un brazalete
antiestático conectado a la toma de tierra de la carcasa (cualquier superficie de metal
que no esté pintada) del servidor cuando manipule las piezas.
Manipule siempre las tarjetas con el máximo cuidado. Pueden ser sumamente sensibles a
las descargas electrostáticas. Sujételas sólo por los bordes. Una vez extraída la tarjeta de
su envoltorio de protección o del servidor, colóquela con el lado de los componentes
hacia arriba sobre una superficie con toma de tierra y sin carga estática. Utilice una
almohadilla de espuma conductora si dispone de ella, pero nunca el envoltorio de la
tarjeta. No deslice la tarjeta sobre ninguna superficie.
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Sustitución de la batería
Precaución: Existe el peligro de explosión si la batería no se reemplaza correctamente. Al reemplazar
la batería, utilice sólo la batería recomendada por el fabricante del equipo.
Deseche las baterías respetando la normativa local.
No intente recargar la batería.
No intente desmontar, pinchar o causar cualquier otro desperfecto a una batería.
Enfriamiento y circulación de aire
Precaución: El tendido de los cables debe realizarse cuidadosamente tal y como se le indica para
reducir al mínimo los problemas de obstrucción de la ventilación y de refrigeración.
Para conseguir una refrigeración y corriente de aire adecuadas, compruebe que cuando
sistema esté funcionando, las cubiertas de la carcasa están instaladas. Si utiliza el sistema
sin las cubiertas, podría dañar sus componentes. Para instalar las cubiertas:
• Compruebe primero que no ha dejado herramientas o piezas sueltas dentro del
sistema.
• Compruebe que los cables, tarjetas adicionales y otros componentes están
instalados correctamente.
• Sujete las cubiertas a la carcasa siguiendo las instrucciones del producto.
Periféricos o dispositivos láser
Precaución: Para evitar el riesgo de la exposición a radiaciones o de daños personales:
• No abra la caja de ningún periférico o dispositivo láser
• Los periféricos o dispositivos láser no pueden ser reparados por el usuario
• Haga que el fabricante los repare.
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简体中文
服务器安全信息
本文档适用于 I nt el ® 服务器主板、I nt el ®
服务器机箱(基座和机架固定件)和已安装的外设。为减少人身伤害、电击、火灾
以及设备毁坏的危险,请在安装或维护 I nt el ®
服务器产品之前阅读本文档并遵循本指南中的所有警告和预防措施。
如果本文档中的信息与特定产品的随附信息或 Web
站点信息之间存在不一致,请以产品文档为准。
服务器须由合格的技术人员进行集成和维护。
必须遵守本指南的规定和服务器手册的装配指导,以确保符合现有的产品认证和审
批。仅使用本指南中描述和规定的指定组件。使用其他产品 / 组件将使产品的 U
认证和其他管理审批无效,并可能导致产品不符合销售地的产品法规。
安全警告与注意事项
为避免人身伤害与财产损失,安装本产品之前,请阅读以下所有安全指导和信息
下面所列的安全符号可能在整个文档中使用并可能标注于产品和 /
或产品包装之上。
注意
表示如果无视此“ ? ? ? 项” ? ? ? ? ? ? ? 轻微人身伤害或财产损失的危险
警告
表示如果无视此“ ? ? ” ? ? ? ? ? ? ? 严重人身伤害的危险。
表示如果无视所示信息,即存在潜在的危险。
表示如果不遵守安全指导,存在可导致严重伤害或死亡的电击危险。
表示灼热组件或表面。
表示请勿触摸风机叶片,否则可能致伤。
表示拔下所有交流电线,断开交流电源
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预期应用使用
根据评估,本产品为信息技术设备
(ITE),可安装在办公室、学校、计算机房和类似的商业场所。本产品对于非 ITE
应用的其他产品种类和环境(如医疗、工业、住宅、报警系统和测试设备)的适用
性尚有待进一步的评估。
场地选择
本系统专为在典型办公环境运行而设计。请选择符合以下条件的地点:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
清洁、干燥,无气载微粒(而非一般的室内尘埃)。
通风良好,远离热源(包括直接日晒和散热器)。
远离振动源或物理震动。
与电气设备产生的强大电磁场隔离。
在易受闪电袭击的地区,我们建议将系统插入电涌抑制器并在闪电期间断开通
线路与调制解调器之间的连接。
提供正确接地的墙壁插座。
提供足够的空间,以便拿取电源供应线,因为这是本产品的主要电源断开器。
设备操作规范
减少人身伤害或设备受损的危险:
•
•
•
移举设备时遵守当地的职业健康与安全要求。
借助机械手段或其他合适的手段移举设备。
拆除一切易分离组件,以降低重量并方便操作。
电源与电气警告
注意事项
电源按钮(如待机电源标记所示)并不能完全关闭系统的交流电源,只要系统已接
通电源,就存在 5V
待机电源。要从系统切断电源,须从墙壁电源插座中拔下交流电线。您的系统可能
不止使用一根交流电线。请确保所有的交流电线都已拔下。打开机箱或增加或去除
任何热插拔组件之前,确保交流电线已拔下。
若非所需的确切类型,请勿尝试修改或使用交流电线。系统的每个电源供应设备都
需要一根单独的交流电线。
本产品的电源供应设备包含非用户维修部件。请勿打开电源供应设备。电源供应设
备包含非常危险的电压级、电流级和能量级。请与生产商联系维修事宜。
替换热插拔电源供应设备时,请先拔下需替换的电源供应设备上的电源线,再将其
从服务器上移除。
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为避免电击,请在打开服务器之前,关闭服务器并断开服务器上连接的电源线、
信系统、网络和调制解调器。
源线警告
如果产品未提供交流电线,请购买一根您所在国家批准使用的交流电线。
注意事项
为避免电击或火灾危险,请按如下所述对产品所用的电源线进行检查:
•
•
•
•
若非所需的符合接地插座的确切类型,请勿尝试修改或使用交流电线
电源线须符合以下标准:
⎯ 电源线的电气额定值须大于产品上标注的电流额定值。
⎯ 电源线须拥有适合插座的安全接地插头或触点。
电源线为交流电源的主要断开设备。插座须靠近设备并可随时断开。
电源线须插入所提供的拥有合适接地的插座。
统使用警告
注意事项
为避免人身伤害或财产损失,无论何时检查产品内部,以下安全指导都适用:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
关闭所有与本产品相连的外设。
按下电源按钮至关闭状态,关闭系统。
从系统或墙壁插座上拔下所有交流电线,断开交流电源。
断开与系统相连的所有线缆和通信线路。
卸除舱口盖时,保留所有螺钉及其他紧固件。完成产品内部检查之后,请
用螺钉或紧固件重新固定舱口盖。
请勿打开电源供应设备。电源供应设备内没有可维修部件。请与生产商
维修事宜.
增加或替换任何非热插拔组件之前,请关闭服务器电源并断开所有电源
。
替换热插拔电源供应设备时,请先拔下需替换的电源供应设备上的电源
,然后再从服务器上移除电源供应设备。
注意事项
如果服务器一直在运行,任何已安装的处理器和吸热设备都可能很热。除非要增加
或移除热插拔组件,否则请待系统冷却后再开盖。为避免在热插拔组件安装过程
接触灼热组件,移除或安装热插拔组件时务须小心。
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注意事项
为避免受伤,请勿触摸运转的风机叶片。如果系统的风机上配有防护装置,请勿卸
下风机防护装置运行系统。
机架固定件警告
设备的机架须固定在稳固的支座上,以防从中安装服务器或设备时倒塌。须按照机
架生产商提供的安装说明进行安装。
从下往上将设备安装在机架上,最重的设备安装在机架的最底层。
一次只从机架上安装一件设备。
您须负责安装整个机架装置的主要电源断开设备。此主要断开设备须随时可用,且
须标明为控制整个装置(而不仅限于服务器)的电源。
为避免潜在的电击危险,须对机架及其上所安装的每一件设备实行正确的安全接地
。
静电放电 (ESD)
注意事项
ESD 会损坏磁盘驱动器、主板及其他部件。我们建议您执行 ESD
工作站的所有步骤。如果没有 ESD
工作站,则采取一些静电放电保护措施,操作部件时,戴上与服务器上的机箱接地
或任何未喷漆金属表面连接的防静电腕带。
操作主板时始终保持小心。它们可能对 ESD
非常敏感。拿持主板时只接触边缘。从保护包装中或从服务器上取出主板后,请将
主板组件侧面朝上放置在无静电的接地表面上。请使用导电泡沫垫(若有),不要
使用主板包装。请勿将主板在任何表面上滑动。
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其他危险
换电池
注意事项
不正确替换电池可能导致爆炸危险。替换电池时,请只使用设备生产商推荐使用
电池。
请按当地法规处置电池。
请勿对电池充电。
请勿拆卸、刺穿或以其他方式损坏电池。
却和气流
注意事项
按照说明小心布置线缆,尽量减少气流阻塞和冷却问题。
为保证适当的冷却和气流,运行系统时请确保机箱盖已安装。未安装机箱盖即运行
系统可能导致系统部件受损。安装机箱盖的步骤如下:
•
•
•
首先检查并确保系统内没有遗留的未固定工具或部件。
检查线缆、内插板和其他组件已正确安装。
按产品说明安装机箱盖。
光外设或激光设备
注意事项
为避免幅射暴露和 / 或人身伤害:
•
请勿打开任何激光外设或激光设备的外壳
•
激光外设或激光设备为非用户维修设备
请与生产商联系维修事宜
Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide
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Intel® Blade Server Ethernet Switch Modules SBCEGBESW1 and SBCEGBESW10 EWS User Guide