Using the Conductor - Micro Focus Supportline

Using the Conductor
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iii
Using the Conductor
Table Of Contents
Conductor ......................................................................................................................................................... 1
Overview of the QALoad Conductor............................................................................................................. 2
Using the Conductor Start Page .................................................................................................................... 3
Recent Session ............................................................................................................................................ 3
Tasks ........................................................................................................................................................... 3
Help............................................................................................................................................................ 3
About Setting Up a Test................................................................................................................................. 4
Determining General Conductor Behavior ............................................................................................... 4
Setting Up a Specific Test Session .............................................................................................................. 4
Generating Random Number Seeds........................................................................................................... 4
Setting Up a Test Session ............................................................................................................................... 5
Configuring the Conductor .......................................................................................................................... 6
Checking Out Virtual User Licenses.............................................................................................................. 7
Running the Conductor from the Command Line....................................................................................... 8
Setting Up a Test............................................................................................................................................ 9
Creating a New Session .............................................................................................................................. 9
Opening an Existing Session...................................................................................................................... 9
About the Test Configuration Wizard ..................................................................................................... 10
Creating a Test Session Using the Test Configuration Wizard ................................................................ 10
Modifying a Test Session Using the Test Configuration Wizard ............................................................. 11
Anticipating Error Conditions ................................................................................................................. 11
Managing Large Amounts of Test Data ................................................................................................... 11
Removing Used Datapool Records After a Test........................................................................................ 12
Validating Scripts in Conductor .............................................................................................................. 12
Enabling Expert User................................................................................................................................ 12
Overview of Expert User .......................................................................................................................... 13
Assigning Scripts to the Test Session ....................................................................................................... 14
Assigning Player Machines ...................................................................................................................... 15
Setting Script Properties ........................................................................................................................... 19
Setting Player Properties .......................................................................................................................... 26
Managing Players and Groups ................................................................................................................. 28
Integration and Server Monitoring.......................................................................................................... 32
Test Setup Interface................................................................................................................................ 117
Running a Test........................................................................................................................................... 121
iv
Table Of Contents
Running a Load Test .............................................................................................................................. 121
Running a Load Test .............................................................................................................................. 121
Dialing Up/Down Virtual Users ............................................................................................................. 122
Increase/Decrease Runtime Timing Updates ......................................................................................... 123
Stopping a Load Test.............................................................................................................................. 123
Adding Post-test Comments .................................................................................................................. 123
Monitoring a Load Test.......................................................................................................................... 124
Viewing Test Statistics............................................................................................................................ 124
Conductor Runtime Interface................................................................................................................ 125
Monitoring a Running Test ................................................................................................................... 133
Running a Series of Tests (Batch) ........................................................................................................... 136
Troubleshooting ........................................................................................................................................ 139
Conductor pre-test checks ..................................................................................................................... 139
Executing SSL scripts that use client certificates.................................................................................... 139
Heartbeat message failure on a virtual user ........................................................................................... 139
Timing file is too big .............................................................................................................................. 139
Tips for running QALoad tests on UNIX systems.................................................................................. 140
Index ............................................................................................................................................................. 143
v
Conductor
1
Using the Conductor
Overview of the QALoad Conductor
Use the QALoad Conductor to configure, run, and monitor a load test that utilizes the scripts created in the
Script Development Workbench. The Conductor controls the QALoad Players and manages tests while they
are running. When the Conductor process stops for any reason during a load test, the associated Player
processes automatically terminate.
The primary windows in the Conductor are:
Conductor Start Page - This is the page that appears when you first open the Conductor. From the Start Page, you
can open an existing Conductor session, create a new session, configure the Conductor, or open the Test
Configuration Wizard.
Once you create or open a session, the main Conductor window appears. The Conductor's interface is
dynamic — it changes depending whether you are setting up a test or running a test.
Test Setup Interface - This is the first window that appears when you open a session in the Conductor. Before
running a test, you must set up general test options, configure Player workstations, assign compiled test scripts to
Players, and set up monitoring options. You then save the test setup in a file called a session ID. Once you have
configured and saved a test session ID, you can reuse it without re-entering any test information.
The Test Setup Interface presents two ways you can enter information about your test:

The Visual Designer is the Conductor's main window. The Visual Designer graphically displays
a collection of icons and nodes that represent your test session. Use this to enter information
about your test and set up the machines and scripts for the test.

The Grid View window presents another way to perform these functions. The Grid View is a
dockable window that contains two tabs in which you can enter the information for your test
session.
Runtime Window - While a test is running, the Conductor interface changes to the Runtime Window, which facilitates
monitoring of individual machines and Players, and displays real-time test results. You can view default graphs of
performance data that are created for you by the Conductor and create custom graphs based on the data being
collected during the test. You can save custom graph layouts in the session ID file and reuse them in future tests.
2
Conductor
Using the Conductor Start Page
When you first start the Conductor, the Start Page displays. This provides a concise selection of options to
help you start defining or modifying a Conductor session.
From the Start Page, you can perform the following tasks:
Recent Session
In the Recent Sessions section, you can:
Create a new test session
Open an existing session
Tasks
In the Tasks section, you can:
Open the Test Configuration Wizard
Create monitoring tasks
Edit monitoring tasks
Discover and verify Player machines
Configure the Conductor session options
Help
Use the selections in the Help section to access the QALoad online help.
Note: If you select the Don't show this panel again option, you'll skip the start page and go directly to
the Conductor Session Startup dialog box when you open the Conductor. To display the Start Page again
when you open the Conductor, you must open a session, go to Tools>Options>Startup, and select Show
Start Page.
3
Using the Conductor
About Setting Up a Test
When you set up a load test, you set options related to general Conductor behavior as well as information
about your specific test environment. Before you can successfully set up a load test, you must have
recorded and compiled one or more test scripts. For information about recording a test script, see
Developing Scripts.
Determining General Conductor Behavior
General Conductor options you set are applicable for all tests run until you change the options. Conductor
options are related to the following:
Viewing options for real-time results
Global Player options
Player machine performance data
Options for runtime reporting
And more...
All of the above information, and more, can be configured on the Conductor's Options dialog box.
Setting Up a Specific Test Session
To prepare the Conductor for a specific test, save information and parameters specific to that test into a
reusable session ID file (.id). You must enter the following types of information to set up a test's session ID
file:
General information about the test such as a description, the size of the database, the length of the test, and any
notes or comments
Information about the test script(s) included in the test, including script name, middleware/protocol type, pacing,
whether to include external data, and so on
Information about the workstations where the QALoad Players reside, including which script is assigned to each
workstation, how many virtual users are assigned to each workstation, the machine name, and so on
All of the above information can be entered and saved when you set up a test from the Conductor's main
window or by using the Test Configuration Wizard. Once you open the new session in the Conductor, you
can do the following:
(Optional) configuration for server monitoring
(Optional) integration with other products
Generating Random Number Seeds
Random number seeds are used to inject random delays in script execution for each load test. The seed (or
value) is automatically generated by QALoad. The random value used within the end of transaction
function is used to generate the pacing time. The Player uses a system-generated sequence of numbers, so
that each virtual user (VU) has its own seed value.
4
Conductor
Setting Up a Test Session
You can enter all the information necessary for your session ID file in the Conductor using one of the
following methods:
Grid View window
Visual Designer
Test Configuration Wizard
5
Using the Conductor
Configuring the Conductor
There are several settings for the Conductor that you should review before beginning your load test.
To set Conductor session options that are not specific to one test:
1.
Do one of the following:

From the Conductor Start Page, click Session Options in the Tasks area.
OR

With a session open, click Tools>Options.
2.
On the Options dialog box, set options related to post-test activity, warnings and prompts, runtime grids, timing
settings, interface refresh intervals, Conductor/Player communications, monitoring intervals, and more. For detailed
descriptions of the options that are available, see Options dialog box.
3.
6
When you are finished, click OK to save your changes. Any options you set apply to all tests until you change them.
Conductor
Checking Out Virtual User Licenses
If you are licensed to run multiple copies of the Conductor, for example so different work groups have
access to QALoad, you can check out virtual user licenses before running a load test to ensure that enough
are available for your test run.
If you do not choose to check out your licenses before starting a test, QALoad prompts you after you start
the test and attempts to check out the appropriate number of licenses. We recommend that you check
your licenses out manually before starting so you can be sure you have enough virtual users available
before beginning your test run.
To check out virtual user licenses:
1.
From the Conductor menu, select Tools>Licensing. The License Information dialog box appears.

If you are licensed for concurrent licensing (multiple Conductors) the Conductor
queries your license server to determine how many licenses are currently available, and
returns the results to this dialog box. Go to step 2.

If you have a node-locked license (a single Conductor), then most of the options on
this dialog box are unavailable, as you will not need to, or be able to, check out virtual
user licenses. All virtual users for which you are licensed are available only to this
Conductor. Click OK to return to your test setup.
2.
In the Licensing Operations area, select Check Out Virtual User Licenses, then type how many virtual user
licenses you want to check out in the Number of Licenses field.
3.
Click Check Out. The licenses are checked out to your Conductor, and are unavailable to any other Conductor
workstations on the network.
When you are done using your licensed virtual users, check them back in so they are once again available
to other Conductor workstations on your network.
To check in virtual user licenses:
1.
From the Conductor menu, choose Tools>Licensing. The License Information dialog box appears.
2.
If you have licenses checked out, the Check in Virtual User License option is automatically selected for you.
3.
Click Check In. The licenses are made available to other Conductor workstations on the network.
7
Using the Conductor
Running the Conductor from the Command Line
The following procedure describes how to run the Conductor from the command line.
To start the Conductor from the command prompt:
Type conductor <session_file_name> /l /e /a /t
The applicable parameters are defined in the following table.
Parameter
Definition
/l (Optional)
Creates a log file showing error messages
and test status.
/e (Optional)
Exits the Conductor when the test
completes.
/a (Optional)
Launches Analyze when the test
completes.
/t (Optional)
Executes Conductor at a set time. Valid
time formats are /txx:xx or
/txx/xx/xx /txx:xx.
The Conductor start page appears.
8
Conductor
Setting Up a Test
Creating a New Session
To create a new load test session:
1.
Do one of the following:

From the Start page, click New.

From the Visual Designer window, click File>New. A confirmation dialog box prompts
you to Save or discard changes to your current session.
The Create New Session dialog box appears.
2.
In the Name field, type a name for the new session.
3.
(Optional) In the Description field, type a description for the new session.
4.
(Optional) Select Launch Test Configuration Wizard to start the Test Configuration Wizard,
which walks you through creating a load test session. If you do not select this option, the new test session
opens in Conductor's Visual Designer, where you can manually configure the load test session.
Opening an Existing Session
When you open the Conductor, the Conductor Start Page appears. Use these procedures to open an
existing session.
Note: If you choose not to display this page, the Conductor opens to the Visual Designer window. You can
choose to show the Start Page again in the Startup page of the Conductor Sessions Options dialog box.
To create a new session from the Conductor Start page:
1.
Do one of the following:

In the Recent Sessions area, click the name of the session to open.
OR

Click Open Session, then select the name of the appropriate saved session, and click Open.
2.
The Conductor's Visual Designer opens with the session you selected displayed. You can make any changes to the
session or run the load test.
To open an existing session in the Visual Designer:
1.
From the Visual Designer window, click File>Open. A confirmation dialog box prompts you to Save or discard
changes to your current session.
2.
Select the name of the appropriate saved session, and click Open. The selected test session opens in Conductor's
Visual Designer, where you can manually configure the load test session.
9
Using the Conductor
About the Test Configuration Wizard
The Test Configuration Wizard consists of a series of screens that guide you through the process of setting
up a load test. Use the Test Configuration Wizard to select scripts, configure the script's transaction
settings, select players or groups to assign to the test, and specify desired Virtual User configurations. You
also can add scripts to an existing session using the Test Configuration Wizard. Once you setup your load
test with the Test Configuration Wizard, you can run the test immediately without additional
configuration.
You can use the Test Configuration Wizard to:
Create a New Test Session Using the Test Configuration Wizard
Modifying an Existing Test Session Using the Test Configuration Wizard
Creating a Test Session Using the Test Configuration Wizard
The Test Configuration Wizard guides you through the process of setting up a load test. Use the series of
screens in the Test Configuration Wizard to:
1.
Select scripts
2.
Configure the script's transaction settings
3.
Select players or groups to assign to the test
4.
Specify desired Virtual User configurations
You can open the Test Configuration Wizard from the Conductor Start page or with a test session open in
the Conductor.
To access the Test Configuration Wizard from the Conductor Start page:
1.
Do one of the following:

In the Tasks area, click Test Configuration Wizard to open the first screen of the
wizard.
OR

In the Recent Sessions area, click New to open the Create New Session dialog box. Select the
Launch Test Configuration Wizard option.
Note: If you do not select the Launch Test Configuration Wizard option, the new test session
opens in Conductor's Visual Designer, where you can manually configure the load test session.
2.
In the Name field, type a name for the new session.
3.
(Optional) In the Description field, type a description for the new session.
4.
Click Next to start configuration of your test session.
To access the Test Configuration Wizard with a session open in Conductor:
Click File>New, then follow steps 2 through 4 above.
10
Conductor
Modifying a Test Session Using the Test Configuration Wizard
You can use the Test Configuration Wizard to add a script to an open test session by following the steps for
each screen in the Test Configuration Wizard.
To start the process of adding a script using the Test Configuration Wizard:
On the toolbar, click the Test Configuration Wizard button. The Select Script to Configure dialog box
appears.
Anticipating Error Conditions
You know before beginning a load test that errors are a possibility, but you may not always want them to
stop your progress during testing.
QALoad helps anticipate error conditions and determine, before running the test, how Players react to nonfatal errors. By setting one option, you can instruct a Player to continue as if no error was encountered,
stop running immediately, or restart at the beginning of the transaction.
Note: When the Conductor process stops for any reason during a load test, the associated Players
automatically terminate.
Managing Large Amounts of Test Data
With a large number of virtual users, it is possible to create a timing file containing hundreds of thousands
of timing records for each checkpoint. Attempting to graph just a few of those checkpoints can slow down
QALoad Analyze considerably.
For example, if a timing file contained 250,000 timing records for each data point, attempting to graph
even one checkpoint means that QALoad Analyze must paint 250,000 lines on the graph. Since most
monitors only have 1024 pixels across the screen, the 250,000 data points would mostly be plotted atop
one another and the results would be unreadable.
Now imagine attempting to graph the data of several data points of that size. The sheer amount of data
could easily overwhelm a workstation. And every time you move the window, resize the window, or rightclick on the graph, QALoad Analyze has to re-draw the graph. You could conceivably spend enormous
amounts of time simply attempting to graph data.
To make large amounts of data manageable, QALoad Analyze provides an option that allows you to
determine how to thin data. That is, how to determine how many data points to plot.
When your test is running and your Conductor is collecting timing information from your Player
machines, the sheer amount of data can take up more of your resources than you would like to expend.
Use QALoad's Timing Data Thinning option to thin the amount of timing data being transferred back to
the Conductor during the test so that your test can run longer without stressing your resources.
11
Using the Conductor
Removing Used Datapool Records After a Test
You can remove used datapool records from a Central datapool after a test completes by setting the Strip
Datapool function before you run the test. Use this function when running a test where you have data in
the external datapool that can only be used once by one virtual user at a time. (For example, when running
transactions that have unique data constraints.) When activated, the Strip Datapool function marks each
piece of data in the datapool that is used during your test. When the test is over, the Strip Datapool
function prompts you to remove the identified used data from the datapool. If you run the test again, only
new data is used for your subsequent test.
To use the Strip Datapool function:
1.
With the current test's session ID file open, do one of the following:

Click the script icon
for the appropriate script to display the Script Properties
panel on the right-hand of the window. In the External Data area, click Central
Datapool field and click the browse [...] button in the adjacent field.
OR

In Grid View window's Script Assignment tab, click the browse [...] button in the External
Data field of the appropriate script. When the Script Properties dialog box appears, click
Central Datapool.
2.
In the Central Datapool dialog box, click the browse [...] button to select the Central Datapool file, then select the
Strip check box. Click OK.
3.
At the end of your test, a Strip Datapools prompt appears asking if you wish to go to the Strip Datapools screen.
Click Yes.
4.
The Strip Central Datapool dialog box appears with the Strip option selected. Click the Strip button.
5.
When you are finished, click Close.
Validating Scripts in Conductor
Before running a test, you should run your script in a simple test to ensure that it runs without errors. You
can validate UNIX or Win32 scripts in the Conductor.
Enabling Expert User
When you enable the Expert User, this VU collects more detailed information about requests that are made
while the script is running. Every main request and subrequest logs the amount of server and network time
used. This helps diagnose why page loads may be taking longer than expected. You enable Expert User
from the Conductor, either before or during a load test. Expert User uses the existing custom counter
support so Conductor can graph the custom counter information. Once the load test is complete, you can
view the data in Analyze.
Note: Currently, Expert User capability is provided only for the WWW middleware.
You can enable the Expert User:
Before a load test begins from the Visual Designer or Grid View windows.
During a load test from the Runtime window.
12
Conductor
To enable Expert User before the load test begins:
1.
Do one of the following:

Using the Visual Designer:
a.
Click an individual player machine in the script test setup node to display the Player Properties panel on the
right-hand side of the window.
b.
Click the browse [...] button in the Expert User Options field to open the Expert User Options dialog box.
OR

a.
Using the Grid View window:
Click the Machine Assignment tab.
b.
In the Middleware field for the appropriate WWW script, click the browse [...] button to display the Expert
User Options dialog box.
2.
Click Enable Expert User timings.
3.
In the Virtual User Number field, type the Virtual User (VU) number to represent the Expert User. The default VU
number is zero (0).
4.
Click OK.
To enable Expert User during the load test:
1.
In the Runtime window, click Actions>Set Expert User Options. The Update Expert User Options dialog box
displays listing all the scripts that support Expert User counters.
2.
Click the scripts in which you want to enable Expert User, then click OK.
Note: Selecting Expert User Scripts at the top level enables or disables expert user on all associated scripts.
Overview of Expert User
Expert User provides an easy, logical guide for drilling down to the root performance problems for
applications. It enables you to break web pages down into their individual components, providing more
detailed response time data. Response time for each component is broken into network and server time.
More detailed information helps troubleshoot application performance problems. The ability to see timing
files on a component level can spotlight where the majority of time is being spent. A breakdown of
network and server times per component can identify areas for improvement in either the network or
server hardware or configuration, or in application performance.
The main functionality is provided by a special virtual user (VU). When you enable the Expert User, this
VU collects more detailed information about requests that are made while the script is running. Every
main request and subrequest logs the amount of server and network time used. This helps diagnose why
page loads may be taking longer than expected. For example, a particular subrequest, such as css, gif, html,
and so forth, may be taking more time to download from the server than other requests. Expert User data
can show you this. It also can help you determine whether the problem is a network or a server problem.
You enable Expert User from the Conductor, either before or during a load test. Expert User uses the
existing custom counter support so Conductor can graph the custom counter information.
Once the load test is complete, you can view the data in Analyze. The Analyze Workspace includes an
Expert User tab, from which you can access detail reports and graphs on server and network data. The predefined reports include an Expert User report.
Note: Currently, Expert User capability is provided only for the WWW middleware.
13
Using the Conductor
Assigning Scripts to the Test Session
Script Assignment
Use the Assign Scripts button on the Visual Designer toolbar, or the Script Assignment tab in the Grid
View window to set up any scripts that have previously been recorded and compiled. Any script you add
here is included in your load test, and one virtual user is automatically assigned to your script. After setting
up your scripts here, you must assign additional virtual users to your script from the Properties pane in the
Visual Designer, or from the Machine Assignment tab in the Grid View window.
You can also add scripts to a test session using the Test Configuration Wizard. For more information, see
About the Test Configuration Wizard.
Adding a Script to a Test
To add a script to a test session:
1.
On the Visual Designer toolbar, click Assign Scripts...
OR
In the Grid View window, click the Script Assignment tab, then click New in the toolbar. The
Assign Scripts dialog box displays.
2.
In the Middleware Type box, select your middleware type.
3.
From the list of available scripts that appears in the Available Scripts pane, highlight a script name and click
The script is moved to the Selected Scripts pane.
.
Note: To select more than one script, hold down the Ctrl key and click then scripts to select, the click
To select all scripts in the Available Scripts pane, click
.
4.
Click Next to display the script transaction configuration dialog box.
5.
In the Selected Scripts pane, highlight a script.
.
6.
In the Transactions field, specify the maximum number of transactions that you want each virtual user running this
script to run. Once a workstation executes the number you specify, script execution continues with the line following the
End_Transaction command rather than jumping to the beginning of the transaction loop.
7.
Enter a value, in seconds, in the Pacing field. Pacing is the time interval between the start of a transaction and the
start of the next transaction for each virtual user running a script.
8.
Enter a value in the Sleep Factor % field to specify the percentage of any originally-recorded delay to preserve in
the script (for example, a value of 80 means preserve 80% of the original delay). Valid values are 0-1000, or Random. The
default value is 100%.
9.
To apply these options to all scripts in the Selected Scripts pane, click Apply this to all selected scripts.
10.
Click Finish to save your changes to the current session ID file.
Replacing a Script in a Test
You can replace a script in a test session using the Visual Designer or the Grid View window. Use the
following procedure to replace a script in a test:
14
Conductor
To replace a script using the Visual Designer:
1.
In the Conductor's menu bar, click Actions>Replace Script. The Select Replacement Script dialog box appears.
2.
In the Middleware Type field, select the middleware environment of the replacement script.
3.
Select the replacement script, then click OK.
4.
Assign the script to Player machines, if necessary.
To replace a script using the Grid View window:
1.
In the Grid View window, click the Machine Assignment tab.
2.
In the Script Name field, select the script to replace, then select the new script from the drop-down dialog box.
3.
Assign the script to Player machines, if necessary.
Removing a Script or a Player from a Test
To remove a script from a test:
1.
Right-click on the script icon
for the appropriate script, then select Remove Script.
2.
In the confirmation dialog box, click Remove.
To remove all scripts from a test:
1.
Click Actions>Remove All Scripts.
2.
In the confirmation dialog box, click Remove.
To remove a single Player from a test:
1.
In the script test setup node, right-click on the Player to remove, then select Remove Selected.
2.
In the confirmation dialog box, click Remove.
To remove all Players from a test:
1.
Click Actions>Remove All Players/Groups.
2.
In the confirmation dialog box, click Remove.
Assigning Player Machines
Machine Assignment
Use the Assign Players/Groups button on the Visual Designer toolbar, or use the Machine Assignment
tab in the Grid View window to open the Assign Players/Groups dialog box and assign scripts to specific
Player workstations. You also can drag and drop individual Player machines in selected script test setup
nodes in the Visual Designer.
15
Using the Conductor
Saving Machine Configurations
After configuring the machines to use for a load test, you can save the machine configuration information
into a configuration file (.cfg) that can be reused in later tests. This saves you significant time setting up
later tests. A configuration file includes information about which machines on the network were used as
Player machines. You can save multiple configurations under different names. By default, when first using
QALoad, the Conductor uses a configuration file named Default.cfg. The Conductor saves any changes
to your machine configurations to this file unless you save your configuration to a new file with a different
name.
You can open or save .cfg files from the Manage Players/Groups dialog box. The .cfg field always displays
the active configuration.
To create a new, empty .cfg file:
1.
On the Conductor toolbar, click Tools>Manage Players. The Manage Players/Groups dialog box displays.
2.
Click File>New>Player or click the New icon
3.
In the Player Information area of the window, type a name in the Machine [hostname or IP] field.
4.
Click File>Save as... On the Save As dialog box, specify a name for the new file and click Save.
5.
Add the necessary Player and agent machines using the fields and buttons on the Manage Players/Groups dialog
box. The machines you configure are saved automatically to the file you just created.
on the toolbar.
To rename the current .cfg file:
1.
On the Manage Players/Groups dialog box, click File>Save As...
2.
On the Save As dialog box, specify a name for the new file and click Save.
3.
Make any necessary changes to the configuration. Your changes are saved automatically to the file you just created.
To open a previously created .cfg file:
1.
On the Manage Players/Groups dialog box, click File>Open. The Open Machine Configuration dialog box displays.
2.
Choose the .cfg file to open.
Note: The .cfg file only stores information about Player machines. It does not store information specific to a
test, such as script names or settings. Test specific information is saved in the session ID file. A session ID file
for a specific test saves the name of the .cfg file associated with that test, and opens it automatically when the
session ID file is opened. You can change the .cfg file at any time without being concerned about the session
ID file.
Removing a Script or a Player from a Test
To remove a script from a test:
16
Conductor
1.
Right-click on the script icon
for the appropriate script, then select Remove Script.
2.
In the confirmation dialog box, click Remove.
To remove all scripts from a test:
1.
Click Actions>Remove All Scripts.
2.
In the confirmation dialog box, click Remove.
To remove a single Player from a test:
1.
In the script test setup node, right-click on the Player to remove, then select Remove Selected.
2.
In the confirmation dialog box, click Remove.
To remove all Players from a test:
1.
Click Actions>Remove All Players/Groups.
2.
In the confirmation dialog box, click Remove.
Assigning Scripts to Player Workstations
Once you've added scripts to your test session, you must assign scripts to Player workstations and set up
Virtual User configurations. You can use:
the drag and drop method from the Players/Groups panel
the toolbar in the Visual Designer
the Machine Assignment tab in the Grid View
Note: You cannot run multiple OFS scripts with different Forms Environment settings or different
Connection Mode settings on the same player.
To assign players using the drag and drop method from the Players/Groups panel:
Note: Use the Player Properties panel in the Visual Designer to set the optional Expert User options for
WWW scripts.
1.
Select a machine or group from the list in the Players/Groups window, then drag and drop it into the appropriate
script test setup node. The Configure All Players/Groups dialog box appears.
2.
Use the arrow keys in each field to set the following options:

Starting VUs - Number of Virtual Users to launch the script on the machine when the
test begins.

Ending VUs - Number of Virtual Users at the end of the test.

VU increment - Number of virtual users to add at intervals throughout the test.
Note: If you add incremental virtual users, you must designate the time interval and the ending
virtual users.

Time interval - Time interval at which incremental virtual users should be added to the test.

Mode - The test mode for the machine. You can select thread based or process based.
17
Using the Conductor
3.
To use these options for all players and groups in the script, click Assign to all selected players and groups.
4.
Click Finish.
5.
Click File>Save in the Conductor main menu.
To assign players using the toolbar in the Visual Designer:
Note: Use the Player Properties panel in the Visual Designer to set the optional Expert User options for
WWW scripts.
1.
Click the appropriate script icon in the Visual Designer.
2.
Click the Assign Players/Groups button
3.
Select the Player machine or group, then click Next to display the Configure All Players/Groups dialog box.
4.
in the toolbar. The Assign Players/Groups dialog box appears.
Click the arrows in the fields to set the following options:

Starting VUs - Number of Virtual Users to launch the script on the machine when the
test begins.

Ending VUs - Number of Virtual Users at the end of the test.

VU increment - Number of virtual users to add at intervals throughout the test.
Note: If you add incremental virtual users, you must designate the time interval and the ending
virtual users.

Time interval - Time interval at which incremental virtual users should be added to the test.

Mode - The test mode for the machine. You can select thread based or process based.
5.
To use these options for all players and groups in the script, click Assign to all selected players and groups.
6.
Click Finish.
7.
Click File>Save in the Conductor main menu.
To assign players using the Grid View:
1.
In the Machine Assignment tab, click the down arrow in the Player Name field, then select a player from the list.
2.
(Optional - WWW only) In the Middleware field, click the browse [...] button to open the Expert User Options dialog
box. If you enable the Expert User, select the Virtual User number to represent the Expert User.
3.
Click each of the following fields to set options for:

Starting VUs - Type the number of Virtual Users to launch the script on the machine
when the test begins.

Ending VUs - Type the number of Virtual Users at the end of the test.

VU Increment - Use the arrows in the field to set the number of virtual users to add at
intervals throughout the test.

Timing Interval - Click the browse [...] button in the field to open the Set Time
Interval dialog box. Set the time interval at which incremental virtual users should be
added to the test.
Note: If you add incremental virtual users, you must designate the time interval and the
ending virtual users.

18
Mode - Use the arrows in the field to select the test mode for the machine. You can select
thread based or process based.
Conductor
4.
Click File>Save in the Conductor main menu.
Setting Script Properties
Enabling and Disabling ApplicationVantage Mode
Use the Script Properties panel to enable ApplicationVantage mode. This option is only available if
Compuware ApplicationVantage is installed on the Player machine.
Note: Setup the ApplicationVantage settings using the Tools menu, then selecting Manage Players to
open the Manage Players/Groups dialog box.
To enable ApplicationVantage mode from the Script Properties panel:
Click the script icon
for the appropriate script to display the Script Properties panel on the right-had
side of the window. In the Script Properties panel, click the ApplicationVantage Mode field, then use the
arrow key to enable or disable ApplicationVantage mode. Selecting:
True enables ApplicationVantage mode
False disables ApplicationVantage mode
Setting External Data Options
Use the external data options to add or remove attached files, specify a central datapool file, or specify
local datapool files used by your script. You can setup external options using the Script Properties panel in
the Visual Designer, or using the Grid View window.
To assign a Local Datapool file used by the script:
Note: A local datapool file must reside in the directory \QALoad\Datapools on the Player workstation.
1.
Do one of the following:

In the Visual Designer, click the script icon
for the appropriate script to display
the Script Properties panel on the right-hand side of the window, then click the browse
[...] button in the Local Datapools field. The Script Properties dialog box appears with
the Attached Files window displayed.
OR

In the Grid View window, select the Script Assignment tab, then click the browse [...] button
in the External Data column. The Script Properties dialog box appears. Click Local Datapools.
2.
Click Add. The Choose a Local Datapool File dialog box appears.
3.
Select a file, and click Open.
Note: If adding a shared datapool to a script using remote machines, it is possible to overwrite datapools.
This will counteract the shared datapool automatic stripping. To avoid this, use the FTP Transer functionality
in the Workbench.
4.
Repeat steps 2 and 3 to include additional datapool files.
19
Using the Conductor
5.
Click OK.
To assign attached files used by the script:
1.
Do one of the following:

Open the Script Properties panel for the appropriate script, then click the browse [...]
button in the Attached Files field. The Script Properties dialog box appears with the
Attached Files window displayed.
OR

In the Grid View window, select the Script Assignment tab, then click the browse [...] button
in the External Data column. The Script Properties dialog box appears. Click Attached Files.
2.
Click Add. The Choose a file to attach dialog box appears.
3.
Select a file, and click Open.
To assign a Central Datapool file used by the script:
1.
Do one of the following:

Open the Script Properties panel for the appropriate script, then click the browse [...]
button in the Central Datapool field. The Script Properties dialog box appears with the
Central Datapool window displayed.
OR

In the Grid View window, select the Script Assignment tab, then click the browse [...] button
in the External Data column. The Script Properties dialog box appears. Click Central
Datapool.
2.
Click Browse. The Choose a Central Datapool File dialog box appears.
3.
Select a file, and click Open.
4.
(Optional) Select Rewind to rewind the records from this datapool at the end of a test. This enables you to reuse the
records in a subsequent test of this session.
5.
(Optional) Select Strip to remove the datapool records from the test so that they cannot be used again.
Setting Middleware Options for Citrix and SAP
You can set the following custom options for Citrix and SAP middlewares:
Middleware
Type
Option
Description
Citrix
Hide Graphical User Interface
for Citrix Users
Runs Citrix in "windowless" mode.
SAPGUI
Hide Graphical User Interface
for SAP Users
Runs SAP in "windowless" mode.
You can setup Citrix and SAP middleware options using the Script Properties panel in the Visual Designer
or in the Grid View window.
20
Conductor
To set the middleware options in the Visual Designer's Script Properties panel:
1.
Click the appropriate Citrix or SAP script icon
window.
2.
Select the Hide Citrix/SAP graphical user interface field, and use the arrow key to select the desired middleware
option. You can select:
3.
. The Script Properties panel appears on the right-hand of the

True - to hide the graphical user interface

False - to display the graphical user interface
Click OK.
To set the middleware options in the Grid View window:
1.
In the Script Assignment tab, select the appropriate Citrix or SAP script.
2.
In the Middleware column, click the browse [...] button. The Middleware Options dialog box appears.
3.
Select Hide graphical user interface during replay to run the script in windowless mode.
4.
Click OK.
Setting Debugging Options for a Script
If you encountered errors while validating or testing a script, use QALoad's debugging options to monitor
the Player(s) that generated errors while they are running or after the test.
You can watch a virtual user execute a script on a Player Workstation while it is running. To monitor
selected virtual users at runtime, enable the Debug Trace option before you run your test. Each virtual user
for which you enabled Debug Trace displays messages on its assigned Player workstation indicating which
commands are being executed.
You can instruct the Conductor to generate and save details about the script execution of selected virtual
users by enabling Logfile Generation before you run your test. This applies to Citrix, ODBC, Oracle, Oracle
Forms Server, SAP, Winsock, or WWW only.
You can set the Debug Options using the Script Properties panel in the Visual Designer, or using the Grid
View window.
To enable the Debug options:
1.
Do one of the following:

In the Visual Designer, click the script icon
for the appropriate script to display the Script
Properties panel on the right-hand side of the window, then click the browse [...] button in the
Debug Options field. The Debug window of the Script Properties dialog box appears.
OR

2.
In the Grid View window, select the Script Assignment tab, then click the browse [...] button
in the Debug Options column, for the appropriate script. The Debug window of the Script
Properties dialog box appears.
On the Debug Options dialog box, you can choose the following options:

To enable the Debug Trace option: in the Debug Trace Virtual User Range area, choose which
virtual users (if any) to monitor. You can choose None or All Virtual Users, or choose Virtual
21
Using the Conductor
User(s) and then type the numbers assigned to the virtual users you want to monitor. You can
monitor individual virtual users or ranges of virtual users.

To enable Logfile Generation: in the Logfile Generation Virtual User Range area, choose
which virtual users (if any) to monitor. You can choose None or All Virtual Users, or
choose Virtual User(s) and then type the numbers assigned to the virtual users you want
to monitor. You can monitor individual virtual users or ranges of virtual users.
3.
Click OK to save your changes.
4.
From the Conductor's main menu, click File>Save to save your test session ID.
5.
Run your test as usual.
Note: Some log files are generated automatically when you run a test in the Script Development
Workbench or Player.
Setting Error Handling Options
You can configure the behavior of a virtual user when an error occurs during the load test so that the test
aborts or continues executing. You can set the Error Handling Options using the Script Properties panel in
the Visual Designer, or using the Grid View window.
To set the Error Handling options:
1.
Do one of the following:

In the Visual Designer, click the script icon
for the appropriate script to display the Script
Properties panel on the right-hand side of the window, then click the browse [...] button in the
Error Handling field. The Error Handling page of the Script Properties dialog box appears.
OR

2.
In the Grid View window, click the Script Assignment tab, then click the browse [...] button
in the Error Handling field for the appropriate script . The Error Handling page of the Script
Properties dialog box appears.
Select the option you want applied to the script. You can select:

Abort, stopping further execution of transactions. Use this option when errors will make the
virtual user invalid for executing more transactions.

Continue executing and ignore the error. Select this option when errors are not critical to the
performance of the load test

(WWW, SAPGUI, and Citrix scripts only) Restart the transaction from the beginning. When
you select this option, you must type a number for the attempts made to restart the transaction
in the Maximum restart attempts field.
Note:The transaction count increases for each transaction that is restarted.
3.
(Optional) Select Apply Error Handling to all scripts in this session. This ensures that all scripts in the session
respond to errors the same way.
Setting Script Pacing
Script Pacing is the time interval between the start of a transaction and the beginning of the next
transaction on each workstation running the script. For example: if a transaction is designed to duplicate
the process of someone handling incoming telephone calls and those calls arrive at a rate of 40 per
22
Conductor
hour/per person, set the pacing rate at 90 seconds. The default pacing value is one second, which enables
the Conductor to control runaway virtual users.
Note: QALoad randomly schedules transactions so that each transaction executes on an average according
to this predetermined rate. When a transaction completes faster than its pacing rate, QALoad delays the
execution of the next transaction for that workstation so that proper pacing is met. Since we do not normally
time events according to this predetermined rate, QALoad randomly accelerates or delays the pacing on a
workstation-by-workstation basis. However, on the average, QALoad provides pacing according to the value
that you assign.
You can set the Pacing rate using the Script Properties panel in the Visual Designer, or using the Grid View
window.
To set the Pacing rate:
1.
Do one of the following:

In the Visual Designer, click the script icon
for the appropriate script to display the Script
Properties panel on the right-hand side of the window, then click the browse [...] button in the
Pacing field. The Set Script Pacing dialog box appears.
OR

In the Grid View window, click the Script Assignment tab, then click the browse [...] button
in the Pacing field. The Set Script Pacing dialog box appears.
2.
Use the arrows in each field to set the pacing rate. You can set Hours, Minutes, Seconds, and Milliseconds.
3.
Click OK.
Setting the Service Level Threshold
Use the service level threshold to specify a response time that is used to compare against incoming
response time data. The threshold appears as a horizontal line in the runtime Graphs view.
Service level thresholds are similar to thresholds that can be specified for real-time graphs in the
Conductor, but are limited to transaction time and must be specified before a test runs.
Set the Service Level Threshold in the Visual Designer's Script Properties panel.
To set the service level threshold:
1.
In the Visual Designer, click the script icon
panel on the right-hand side of the window.
for the appropriate script to display open the Script Properties
2.
In the Service Level Threshold field, click the browse [...] button to open the Set Service Level Threshold dialog
box.
3.
Use the arrow keys in the Hours, Minutes, and Seconds fields to set the threshold.
4.
Click OK.
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Using the Conductor
Setting the Sleep Factor Percentage
Use the Sleep Factor % field to specify the percentage of any originally recorded delay to preserve in the
script. QALoad records the actual delays between requests and inserts the DO_SLEEP command in the
script to mimic those delays when the script is played back in a test. You can maintain the exact length of
the recorded delays at playback, or shorten them by entering a smaller percentage of the originally
recorded delay to play back. For example, if you recorded a delay of 10 seconds, then DO_SLEEP (10); is
written to your script. Then, if a Sleep Factor of 50% is specified here, the Player sleeps for 5 seconds at that
statement when the test is executed.
Valid values for Sleep Factor % are 0-1000%, and Random. Random causes the Player to sleep for a
randomly selected duration between 0 and 100. A value of 100% causes the script to execute at exactly the
same speed at which it was recorded; therefore, you can simulate the performance of faster users by
specifying a lower Sleep Factor % value.
Hint: Enter a value of zero during unit testing to eliminate the actual sleeps from the script. After you unit
test the script, you can restore the original recorded delays by changing the Sleep Factor to a higher
percentage.
You can set the sleep factor percentage using the Script Properties panel in the Visual Designer, or using
the Grid View window.
To set the Sleep Factor percentage:
1.
Do one of the following:

In the Visual Designer, click the script icon
for the appropriate script to display
the Script Properties panel on the right-hand side of the window.

In the Grid View window, click the Script Assignment tab, then click the Sleep Factor
% field for the appropriate script.
OR
2.
In the Sleep Factor % field, do one of the following:

Click the arrow in the field to select Random or 100
OR

3.
Type the number representing the percent of the originally recorded delay to keep in the script.
In the Conductor, click File>Save.
Setting Options for Large Amounts of Timing Data
Your load test probably includes a large number of checkpoints and virtual users in order to adequately test
your system. When your test is running and your Conductor is collecting timing information from your
Player machines, the sheer amount of data can take up more of your resources than you'd like to expend.
Use QALoad's Timing Data Thinning option to thin the amount of timing data being transferred back to
the Conductor during the test so that your test can run longer without stressing your resources.
You can set the Timing Options using the Script Properties panel in the Visual Designer, or using the Grid
View window.
To open the Timing Options dialog box:
In the Visual Designer:
24
Conductor
1.
Click the script icon
the window.
for the appropriate script to display the Script Properties panel on the right-hand side of
2.
In the Timing Options field in the Script Properties panel, click the browse [...] button. The Timing page of the
Script Properties dialog box appears.
In the Grid View window:
0.
Click the Script Assignment tab.
1.
In the Timing Options column, click the browse [...] button. The Timing page of the Script Properties
dialog box appears.
To set timing options:
In the Timing Options area of the dialog box, select options for checkpoints and for custom counter data
collection. For more information on these options, refer to Timing Options.
To thin timing data:
1.
3.
In the Timing Data Thinning area of the dialog box, choose one or both of the following:

Thin counter timing data by to control the amount of counter timing data that is
collected and saved in the timing file. Do not select this option if you want to collect all
available timing data for counters.

Thin checkpoint timing data by to control the amount of checkpoint timing data
that is collected and saved in the timing file. Do not select this option if you want to
collect all available timing data for checkpoints.
Do one of the following:

Select Script to thin data by script. In the Summary interval field, type the number of
seconds between each data collection.

Select Virtual User to thin data by virtual user. In the Summary interval field, type the
number of seconds between each data collection.
Note: Thinning by script minimizes the amount of data collected.
4.
The average is sent to the Conductor for inclusion in the timing file, rather than every value.
5.
Click OK.
6.
Save your changes to your test session ID file by choosing File>Save from the Conductor main menu.
Setting the Number of Transactions
Use the Transactions field to set the number of transactions that each Virtual User running the script
should run. Once the workstation executes the number of transactions that you specify, script execution
continues with the line following the End Transaction command rather than jumping to the beginning of
the transaction loop.
You can set the number of transactions using the Script Properties panel in the Visual Designer, or using
the Grid View window.
25
Using the Conductor
To set the number of transactions in the Visual Designer:
1.
Click the script icon
the window.
for the appropriate script. The Script Properties panel displays on the right-hand side of
2.
In the Transactions field, type the number of transactions that each Virtual User should run.
3.
From the Conductor menus, click File>Save.
To set the number of transactions in the Grid View window:
1.
Click the Script Assignment tab.
2.
In the Transactions column for the appropriate script, use the arrow keys to select the number of transactions that
each Virtual User should run.
3.
From the Conductor menus, click File>Save.
Setting Player Properties
Specify Virtual User Configurations
Once you've selected the scripts and configured the transaction settings, you must assign Player machines
and groups, and set the Virtual User configurations. You can set the Virtual User configurations using:
the toolbar in the script test setup node in the Visual Designer
the Player Properties panel in the Visual Designer
the Machine Assignment tab in the Grid View
the toolbar in the main Visual Designer window
To set the Virtual User configurations in the script test setup node:
1.
Click the appropriate Player in the script test setup node in the Visual Designer.
2.
Click the Configure All button
box appears.
3.
Click the arrows in the fields to set the following options:
in the script test setup node toolbar. The Configure All Players/Groups dialog

Starting VUs - Number of Virtual Users to launch the script on the machine when the
test begins.

Ending VUs - Number of Virtual Users at the end of the test.

VU increment - Number of virtual users to add at intervals throughout the test.
Note: If you add incremental virtual users, you must designate the time interval and the ending
virtual users.

Time interval - Time interval at which incremental virtual users should be added to the test.

26
Mode - The test mode for the machine. You can select thread based or process based.
5.
To use these options for all players and groups in the script, click Assign to all selected players and groups.
6.
Click Finish.
Conductor
7.
Click File>Save in the Conductor main menu.
To set the Virtual User configurations using the Player Properties panel of the Visual Designer:
1.
Click the individual Player in the script test setup node in the Visual Designer. The Player Properties panel displays
on the right-hand side of the window.
2.
In the [Starting VUs] field, type the number of Virtual Users to launch the script on this machine when the test
begins.
3.
(Optional) In the [VU Increment] field, type the number of virtual users that should be added at intervals. When you
fill in this field, you must also fill in the Time Interval and Ending VUs fields.
4.
In the Ending VUs field, type the number of Virtual Users at the end of the test.
5.
In the Mode field, use the arrow to select the test mode, process-based or thread-based, for this Player.
6.
(Optional) In the Time Interval field, click the browse [...] button to display the Set Time Interval dialog box.
Note: If you filled in the VU Increment field, you must fill in the Time Interval.
7.
Use the arrows in the Hours, Minutes, and Seconds fields to set the time interval at which incremental Virtual
Users should be added to the test, then click OK.
8.
Click File>Save in the Conductor main menu.
To set the Virtual User configurations using the Grid View:
1.
In the Machine Assignment tab, click the down arrow in the Player Name field, then select a player from the list.
2.
(Optional - WWW only) In the Middleware field, click the browse [...] button to open the Expert User Options dialog
box. If you enable the Expert User, select the Virtual User number to represent the Expert User.
3.
Click each of the following fields to set options for:

Starting VUs - Type the number of Virtual Users to launch the script on the machine
when the test begins.

Ending VUs - Type the number of Virtual Users at the end of the test.

VU Increment - Use the arrows in the field to set the number of virtual users to add at
intervals throughout the test.

Timing Interval - Click the browse [...] button in the field to open the Set Time
Interval dialog box. Set the time interval at which incremental virtual users should be
added to the test.
Note: If you add incremental virtual users, you must designate the time interval and the
ending virtual users.

4.
Mode - Use the arrows in the field to select the test mode for the machine. You can select
thread based or process based.
Click File>Save in the Conductor main menu.
To set the Virtual User Configurations using the Visual Designer toolbar:
1.
Select the appropriate script test setup node, then click Review Virtual Users in the Visual Designer toolbar.
2.
Use the columns in the Review Virtual Configuration dialog box to set the Virtual User configurations for each Player
listed.
27
Using the Conductor
Changing the Number of Virtual Users
Change the number of virtual users assigned to a script using the Visual Designer or on the Machine
Assignment tab of the Grid View window.
To change the number of virtual users using the Visual Designer:
1.
Do one of the following:

In the Visual Designer window, select a player machine in the appropriate script node.
The Player Properties panel displays on the right-hand of the window. Type a new value
in the Starting VUs column of the Player Properties panel.
OR

in the Visual Designer toolbar, then type a
Click Review Virtual Users
new value in the Starting VUs column for the selected script. Click OK.
2.
If you have assigned incremental virtual users, change the values in the VU Increment column and the Ending
VUs column to determine how many virtual users to add at the interval specified in the Time Interval column.
3.
Select File>Save to save your changes to the current session ID file, or File>Save As to save them to a new
session ID file.
To change the number of virtual users using the Grid View:
1.
In the Machine Assignment tab, type a new value in the Starting VUs column for the selected script.
2.
If you have assigned incremental virtual users, change the values in the VU Increment column and the Ending
VUs column to determine how many virtual users to add at the interval specified in the Time Interval column.
3.
Select File>Save to save your changes to the current session ID file, or File>Save As to save them to a new
session ID file.
Managing Players and Groups
Overview of Players and Groups
You can configure the various machines and agents that will participate in a load test from a single screen.
Click Tools>Manage Players to display the Manage Players/Groups dialog box, where you can configure
Player Machines, Player Groups, and ApplicationVantage settings information from a single screen.
You should use this option to update Player or Agent information whenever a Player or Agent is added to
the test network, removed from the test network, or the network address of a Player or Agent has changed.
You can collect Player machines into logical groups using the Group Membership options in the dialog
box.
Player Agents
Player machines execute the virtual users that perform the transactions recorded in your test scripts. You
can view information on Player machines from either the Visual Designer or the Grid View window. If no
Player machines are listed, you can retrieve information from Player machines on the local network, or you
can add Player machines manually.
28
Conductor
Adding Player Machines to a Test Session
Follow these instructions to add a Player workstation to your pool of available Players in a test's session ID
file.
To add a new Player machine:
1.
From the Conductor's main menu, click Tools>Manage Players. The Manage Players/Groups dialog box displays.
2.
Click File>New>Player. A new page displays in the detail area of the dialog box, where you enter information and
settings for the new Player.
To enter information and settings for the new Player:
Enter information for the new Player in the following areas of the dialog box.
In the Player Information area:
1.
In the Machine (hostname or IP) field, type a name for the Player Machine.
2.
In the Communications [TCP] port field, type the port number the Conductor should use to communicate (using
TCP) with this machine during a test. The default is 3032.
3.
Click Verify to check that the machine is active. The Player or Agent returns the operating system, processor type,
amount of memory, and the maximum threads and processes available on the machine.
Note: If a Player does not respond, a message box appears indicating that the Player is not responding. If
the Player is not responding, one of the following scenarios is likely:

The host name and/or port number you entered may not be correct. Check your
parameters and network connections, then try to send another request.

The Player is not running. Start the Player and then try to send another request.
Expand the Machine Settings area (Optional):
4.
Select desired options to ping the host before attempting connection to the player, generate IP spoof data, or
override the default machine settings.
5.
Close the Machine Settings.
Expand the Group Membership area (Optional):
6.
In the Available Groups pane, select a group to which you want this Player Machine added, then click Add.
7.
The selected groups are moved to the Member of Groups pane.
8.
Close the Group Membership.
Note: You also can add a Player to a Group by dragging and dropping the Player from the list in the
Players area to the appropriate Group in the Groups area, or by dragging and dropping a Group in there
Groups area to a Player int he Players area.
In the ApplicationVantage Settings area:
Note: The fields on this tab are available only if ApplicationVantage is installed on the Player Machine and
ApplicationVantage Mode is selected when you choose a script in the Script Assignment tab.
From the drop-down list in the NIC Name field, select the Network Interface Card (NIC) that is used by
the machine, if necessary.
To save the Player machine:
Click Save, then click OK. The Player Machine appears in the Manage Players and Groups dialog box
in the All Player Machines and Groups tree.
29
Using the Conductor
Editing a Player Machine
From the Conductor's main menu, click Tools>Manage Players. The Manage Player Machines and Groups
dialog box displays. Use the following procedure to edit Player Machines.
To edit a Player machine:
Select an individual Player Machine in the Players list.
In the Player Information area:
1.
In the Communications port field, type the port number the Conductor should use to communicate (using TCP) with
this machine during a test. The default is 3032.
2.
Click Verify to check that the machine is active. The Player or Agent returns the operating system, processor type,
and amount of memory on the machine.
In the Machine Settings area:
1.
Open the Machine Settings area.
2.
Make any necessary selection or changes here, then close the Machine Settings.
In the Group Membership area (Optional):
1.
Open the Group Membership area.
2.
Add the Player to appropriate groups by selecting a group in the Available Groups pane and clicking Add.
3.
Close the Group Membership.
In the ApplicationVantage Settings area:
Note: These fields are enabled only if Application Vantage is installed on the Player machine.
In the NIC Name field, select the Network Interface Card (NIC) that is used by the machine.
Save the edits to the Player machine:
Click Save to save your settings for this player machine, then click OK.
To delete a Player machine:
Select the Player machine in the Players panel, then click Edit>Delete.
Discovering and Verifying Player Machines
In Conductor, you can retrieve information from Player machines on the local network by doing the
following:
To discover and information on Player machines:
30
1.
Click Tools>Manage Players. The Manage Players/Groups dialog box displays.
2.
Click Actions>Discover Players. QALoad Conductor queries the network for available Player workstations and
adds the results under Player Machines in the Players area.
Conductor
To verify a Player machine:
1.
In the Players area of the screen, select the Player machine to verify.
2.
In the Communications [TCP] port field in the Player Information area, click Verify. A confirmation dialog box
appears when the verification is successful.
Viewing Information on Player Machines
In Conductor, you can retrieve information from Player machines on the local network by doing the one
of following:
To view information on Player machines in the Visual Designer:
In the script node, select the individual Player you want to view. The information on the Player appears in
the Properties panel on the right-hand side of the window.
To view information on the Player in the Grid View:
Click View>Grid Window to display the Grid View window, then click the Machine Assignment tab to
display information on the Player.
Adding a Group
You can combine players into logical groups using the following procedure:
To create a group:
1.
From Conductor's main menu, click Tools>Manage Players. The Manage Players/Groups dialog box displays.
2.
Click File>New> Group. The Group Information dialog box appears.
3.
In the Name field, type a name for the group.
4.
In the Description field, type a description for the group.
To add Players to the group:
1.
In the Available Players panel, select the player or players to add to the group.
2.
Click Add. The Player is moved to the Member Players pane.
Note: You can select more than one machine by holding down the Ctrl key and selecting each Player
Machine to select. Select all the available Player Machines by clicking Add All.
3.
Click Save, then click OK.
31
Using the Conductor
Editing a Group
Use the following procedure to edit a group.
To edit a group:
1.
On Conductor's main menu, select Tools>Manage Players. The Manage Players/Groups dialog box displays.
2.
Select a group in the Groups panel to display the Group Information window.
3.
Use the fields in this dialog box to change the Group Name or Description.
4.
To add a Player Machine to the group, use the procedures for adding a Player machine to a group.
To remove a Player from the group:
1.
Select the Player machine in the Member Players panel, then click Remove.
2.
Click Save to save your changes, then click OK to return to the main Conductor window.
Integration and Server Monitoring
Server and Performance Monitoring
QALoad integrates several mechanisms for merging load test response time data with server utilization data
and performance metrics. Select the method that best suits your needs, or for which you are licensed (if
applicable). Most methods produce data that is included in your load test timing results and processed in
QALoad Analyze. The only exception is Compuware Application Vantage. Data captured from
ApplicationVantage can be opened in ApplicationVantage, but not in QALoad.
This section briefly describes each method, and provides links to more detailed information about setting
up a test that includes the appropriate method.
Remote Monitoring — allows you to monitor server utilization statistics from a remote machine without installing any
software on the remote machine.
ServerVantage — integrates with your existing Compuware ServerVantage installation. You must be licensed for
and have installed and configured the appropriate product in order to integrate with QALoad .
ApplicationVantage — collects test data that you can open in ApplicationVantage.
Vantage Analyzer - enables you to easily drill into specific problem transactions to determine the cause of
bottlenecks in your production applications
See also:
Integration and Monitoring Requirements
Integration and Monitoring Requirements
Integration Requirements
ApplicationVantage
QALoad supports integration with Compuware ApplicationVantage 10.0 Service Pack 2, 10.1,l 10.2, and 11.0.
32
Conductor
Integration with ApplicationVantage is supported on the Windows platform only.
ServerVantage
QALoad supports integration with Compuware ServerVantage (SVI Monitoring) 10.0, 10.1, 10.2, and 11.0.
QALoad supports integration with Compuware ServerVantage (Remote Monitoring) 10.1 Service Pack 1.5 only.
ClientVantage
QALoad supports integration with Compuware ClientVantage. QALoad is packaged with the current
version of ClientVantage at time of release.
Vantage Analyzer
QALoad supports integration with Compuware Vantage Analyzer 10.1 Service Pack 1.
Monitoring Requirements
In addition to the integration requirements, your system may need to meet specific requirements to
support remote monitoring.
JVM Requirements
Oracle Application Server (AS), JVM, SAP, WebLogic, WebSphere, and WebSphere MQ monitoring all
require JVM installed on the Conductor machine.
For Oracle AS monitoring, if monitoring Oracle AS 10g, you must use Java Virtual Machine 1.5.
For SAP monitoring, you must use JVM 1.4.
For WebLogic monitoring version 7 and earlier versions, use JVM 1.3. For WebLogic version 8.1, use JVM 1.4. For
WebLogic 9, use JVM 1.5. You may also use the JVM that is distributed with the WebLogic Application Server.
For WebSphere monitoring, you must use the JVM provided with the WebSphere client or server.
For WebSphere MQ monitoring, you must use JVM 1.4.
File Installation Requirements
Oracle Application Server (AS), SAP, WebLogic, WebSphere, WebSphere MQ, WMI, and Cold Fusion
monitoring require the following files.
Oracle AS
For Oracle AS 10g, you must store copies of the dms.jar, xmlparserv2.jar, ons.jar, and optic.jar files from
the monitored Oracle AS server on the Conductor machine.
SAP Monitoring
The SAP files listed below must be placed on the Conductor machine:
librfc32.dll
sapjco.jar
sapjcorfc
To obtain these files, install the SAP Java Connector package (JCo) on the Conductor machine. The JCo
package is available from SAP. Add the location of the files, to the Path System Variable of the Conductor
machine. For more information, refer to the Requirements for SAP Remote Monitoring topic in the
ServerVantage Reconfigure Agent Online Help.
WebLogic Monitoring
33
Using the Conductor
The weblogic.jar file must be placed on the Conductor machine. Copy the jar file from the lib directory of
the WebLogic application server to a separate directory in the Conductor machine. If you are monitoring
WebLogic version 8.1, copy the weblogic.jar and webservices.jar files to the same directory. If you are
monitoring WebLogic 9.x, copy the weblogic.jar and wljmxclient.jar file to the same directory. For more
information, refer to Requirements for WebLogic Remote Monitoring in the ServerVantage Reconfigure
Agent Online Help.
WebSphere Monitoring
Note the following requirements for WebSphere monitoring:
The WebSphere client files must be installed on the Conductor machine. Installing the WebSphere
Application Server Admin Server software on the Conductor machine provides the necessary client
files. Note the directory path of the WebSphere\AppServer\Java files. For more information, refer
to Requirements for WebSphere Remote Monitoring in the ServerVantage Reconfigure Agent
Online Help.
The Java Home for the monitoring task must be setup for compatible Java version; for example,
WebSphere\AppServer\Java.
If authentication is required and soap.client.props and ssl.client.props authentication files are
installed in a custom directory, you must also place copies of the files in
WebSphere\AppServer\properties.
WebSphere MQ Monitoring
The WebSphere client files listed below must be placed in a directory on the Conductor machine:
com.ibm.mq.jar
com.ibm.mq.pcf.jar
connector.jar
The files may be obtained from the installation of the WebSphere Application Server Admin Server
software on the Conductor machine. If the installation does not include the com.ibm.mq.pcf.jar file,
obtain the file from the IBM Support Pac MS0B. See "http://www1.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?rs=171&uid=swg24000668&loc=en_US&cs=utf-8&lang=en".
For more information, refer to Configuring WebSphere MQ for Remote Monitoring in the ServerVantage
Reconfigure Agent Online Help.
WMI Monitoring
WMI security must be enabled on the monitored server machine and the WMI service must be started. For
more information, refer to Configuring WMI for Remote Monitoring in the ServerVantage Reconfigure
Agent Online Help.
Cold Fusion Monitoring
Performance Monitoring must be enabled from the Cold Fusion Administrator Page – Debugging Settings
of the monitored server machine. Cold Fusion is available under Windows Registry monitoring.
Rstat Monitoring
ServerVantage Agent must be installed with QALoad.
Host Verification for QALoad Monitoring
Ensure host accessibility. Add an entry for the monitored machine to the system hosts file of the Conductor
machine. Consult the network administrator for more information.
Test host availability. Type the following command at the Run command: ping <monitored machine name>.
34
Conductor
Remote Monitoring
Overview of Remote Monitoring
Remote Monitoring enables you to extract data from Windows Registry, JVM, Oracle Application Server
(AS), SAP, SNMP, Compuware ServerVantage, Compuware Vantage Analyzer, WebLogic, WebSphere,
WebSphere MQ, Rstat, and WMI counters on the servers under stress without installing any software on
the servers.
Note: Select counters for monitor types in the application.
To use Remote Monitoring:
You must have login access to the machines you want to monitor.
You must select the servers and counters to monitor on the machines you identify using the monitoring options on
Conductor's Manage Monitoring Tasks window.
To collect SNMP counters, SNMP must be enabled on the Remote Monitor machine. Refer to your operating system
help for information about enabling SNMP.
To collect Windows registry counters, you must have a valid sign-on for the servers under test.
For requirements for Oracle AS, SAP, WebLogic, WebSphere, WebSphere MQ, and WMI, see Integration and
Monitoring Requirements.
QALoad uses the default ports 7790 and 7788 when it communicates with the ServerVantage agent and
client. You can override the default ports if your ServerVantage installation requires it.
While your test is running, QALoad collects the appropriate counter data and writes it to your timing file
where you can view it in Analyze after the test. What counters are available?
You can simplify the configuration process by creating or applying pre-defined monitoring templates. A
monitoring template is a predefined group of counters not associated with a specific machine.
To set up Remote Monitoring, see Creating a New Monitoring Task.
Monitoring Counters
About Counters and Instances
You use counters and, in some cases, specific instances of counters when you monitor servers.
Counters
Counters are the numeric data values that are collected when monitoring servers. Counters exist for
components such as processor, memory, processes, hard disk, and cache, with a set of counters that
measure statistical information. For Windows, a large number of performance counters are provided by
the operating system registry and Windows server applications. Registry counters can monitor external
components of the environment such as databases, applications, and printers.
Many of the counters that are collected are points in time data values, such as Process\thread count. Some
counters are cumulative, such as server logon errors, and some are averages, such as the page faults per
second in Job Object Details.
In addition to the numeric value counters, a set of extended data counters is provided for a number of key
performance indicators. These extended data counters can provide intelligent data points that have
associated textual data for the numeric value. For example, the extended CPU usage counter's intelligent
datapoint shows the top 10 processes consuming CPU at that time.
35
Using the Conductor
Instances
When you select a counter to monitor, the available instances, or occurrences, for that counter appear.
Counters can have several instances or no instances. For example, if a system has multiple processors, then
the Processor counter has multiple instances. For counters with multiple instances, a list of the available
instances for that counter is presented. Many counters also have an instance called _Total, which is an
aggregate of the individual instances.
Counters for an object, such as processor, have instances that are numbered, beginning with 0 (zero). A
machine with a single processor has an instance of _Total and 0. A dual-processor machine has instances of
_Total, 0, and 1. Other instances are based on what is currently running on the server, and the instance list
displays these for each process name or service name that is active.
Some instances represent the most recent value for the resource, for example, Processes. This is the number
of processes in the computer at the time of data collection. Other instances are average values between the
last two measurements.
Windows NT Registry Server Counters
QALoad supports the following MS Windows NT Server counter categories:
Counter Category
Description
Active Server Pages
This object type handles the Active Server Pages device on your
system.
Browser
This object type displays Browser Statistics.
Cache
The Cache object type manages memory for rapid access to files. Files
on Windows NT are cached in main memory in units of pages. Main
memory not being used in the working sets of processes is available to
the Cache for this purpose. The Cache preserves file pages in memory
for as long as possible to permit access to the data through the file
system without accessing the disk.
Context Index
This object type handles the Content Index.
Context Index Filter
This object type handles the Content Index Filter.
ICMP
The ICMP object type includes the counters that describe the rates that
ICMP Messages are received and sent by a certain entity using the
ICMP protocol. It also describes various error counts for the ICMP
protocol.
IP
This object type includes those counters that describe the rates that IP
datagrams are received and sent by a certain computer using the IP
protocol. It also describes various error counts for the IP protocol.
LogicalDisk
A LogicalDisk object type is a partition on a hard or fixed disk drive
and assigned a drive letter, such as C. Disks can be partitioned into
distinct sections where they can store file, program, and page data. The
disk is read to retrieve these items and written to record changes to
them.
Memory
The Memory object type includes those counters that describe the
36
Conductor
behavior of both real and virtual memory on the computer. Real
memory is allocated in units of pages. Virtual memory can exceed real
memory in size, causing page traffic as virtual pages are moved
between disk and real memory.
Network Interface
The Network Interface Object Type includes those counters that
describe the rates that bytes and packets are received and sent over a
Network TCP/IP connection. It also describes various error counts for
the same connection.
Objects
The Objects object type is a meta-object that contains information
about the objects in existence on the computer. This information can
be used to detect the unnecessary consumption of computer resources.
Each object requires memory to store basic information about the
object.
Paging File
This object displays information about the system's Page File(s).
PhysicalDisk
A PhysicalDisk object type is a hard or fixed disk drive. It contains 1 or
more logical partitions. Disks are used to store file, program, and
paging data. The disk is read to retrieve these items and written to
record changes to them.
Process
The Process object type is created when a program is run. All the
threads in a process share the same address space and have access to
the same data.
Process Address Space
Process Address Space object type displays details about the virtual
memory usage and allocation of the selected process.
Processor
The Processor object type includes as instances all processors on the
computer. A processor is the part in the computer that performs
arithmetic and logical computations, and initiates operations on
peripherals. It executes (such as runs) programs on the computer.
Redirector
The Redirector is the object that manages network connections to
other computers that originate from your own computer.
Server
The Server object type is the process that interfaces the services from
the local computer to the network services.
Server Work Queues
The Server Work Queues object type handles explain text performance
data.
SMTP Server
This object type handles the counters specific to the SMTP Server.
System
This object type includes those counters that apply to all processors on
the computer collectively. These counters represent the activity of all
processors on the computer.
TCP
The TCP object type includes the counters that describe the rates that
TCP Segments are received and sent by a certain entity using the TCP
protocol. In addition, it describes the number of TCP connections in
each possible TCP connection state.
Telephony
This object type handles the Telephony System.
37
Using the Conductor
Thread
The Thread object type is the basic object that executes instructions in
a processor. Every running process has at least one thread.
UDP
The UDP object type includes the counters that describe the rates that
UDP datagrams are received and sent by a certain entity using the UDP
protocol. It also describes various error counts for the UDP protocol.
For information on the registry counters refer to the documentation or developer network for that product
or the developer kit provided with the product. For Microsoft products, refer to
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.aspx.
Windows Server Registry Counters
Remote Monitoring Agents can monitor the same Windows registry counters as PERFMON, the
performance monitoring application available with the Windows operating system. To retrieve Windows
Registry Counters, you must have access, via a user name and password, to the remote machine.
QALoad supports the following MS Windows counter categories:
Counter Category
Description
ACS/RSVP Service
RSVP or ACS service performance counters.
Active Server Pages
This object type handles the Active Server Pages device on your
system.
Browser
The Browser performance object consists of counters that measure the
rates of announcements, enumerations, and other Browser
transmissions.
Cache
The Cache performance object consists of counters that monitor the
file system cache, an area of physical memory that stores recently used
data as long as possible to permit access to the data without reading
from the disk. Because applications typically use the cache, the cache
is monitored as an indicator of application I/O operations. When
memory is plentiful, the cache can grow, but when memory is scarce,
the cache can become too small to be effective.
IAS Accounting Clients
IAS Accounting Clients
IAS Accounting Server
IAS Accounting Server
IAS Authentication Clients
IAS Authentication Clients
IAS Authentication Server
IAS Authentication Server
ICMP
The ICMP performance object consists of counters that measure the
rates at which messages are sent and received by using ICMP
protocols. It also includes counters that monitor ICMP protocol errors.
IP
The IP performance object consists of counters that measure the rates
at which IP datagrams are sent and received by using IP protocols. It
also includes counters that monitor IP protocol errors.
LogicalDisk
The Logical Disk performance object consists of counters that monitor
logical partitions of a hard or fixed disk drives. Performance Monitor
38
Conductor
identifies logical disks by their a drive letter, such as C.
Memory
The Memory performance object consists of counters that describe the
behavior of physical and virtual memory on the computer. Physical
memory is the amount of random access memory on the computer..
Virtual memory consists of the space in physical memory and on disk.
Many of the memory counters monitor paging, which is the
movement of pages of code and data between disk and physical
memory. Excessive paging, a symptom of a memory shortage, can
cause delays which interfere with all system processes.
NBT Connection
The NBT Connection performance object consists of counters that
measure the rates at which bytes are sent and received over the NBT
connection between the local computer and a remote computer. The
connection is identified by the name of the remote computer.
Network Interface
The Network Interface performance object consists of counters that
measure the rates at which bytes and packets are sent and received
over a TCP/IP network connection. It includes counters that monitor
connection errors.
Objects
The Object performance object consists of counters that monitor
logical objects in the system, such as processes, threads, mutexes, and
semaphores. This information can be used to detect the unnecessary
consumption of computer resources. Each object requires memory to
store basic information about the object.
Paging File
The Paging File performance object consists of counters that monitor
the paging file(s) on the computer. The paging file is a reserved space
on disk that backs up committed physical memory on the computer.
PhysicalDisk
The Physical Disk performance object consists of counters that
monitor hard or fixed disk drive on a computer. Disks are used to store
file, program, and paging data and are read to retrieve these items, and
written to record changes to them. The values of physical disk
counters are sums of the values of the logical disks (or partitions) into
which they are divided.
Print Queue
Displays performance statistics about a Print Queue.
Process
The Process performance object consists of counters that monitor
running application program and system processes. All the threads in
a process share the same address space and have access to the same
data.
Process Address Space
The Process Address Space performance object consists of counters
that monitor memory allocation and use for a selected process.
Processor
The Processor performance object consists of counters that measure
aspects of processor activity The processor is the part of the computer
that performs arithmetic and logical computations, initiates
operations on peripherals, and runs the threads of processes. A
computer can have multiple processors. The processor object
represents each processor as an instance of the object.
Redirector
The Redirector performance object consists of counter that monitor
39
Using the Conductor
network connections originating at the local computer.
Server
The Server performance object consists of counters that measure
communication between the local computer and the network.
Server Work Queues
The Server Work Queues performance object consists of counters that
monitor the length of the queues and objects in the queues.
SMTP NTFS Store Driver
This object represents global counters for the Exchange NTFS Store
driver.
SMTP Server
The counters specific to the SMTP Server.
System
The System performance object consists of counters that apply to
more than one instance of a component processors on the computer.
TCP
The TCP performance object consists of counters that measure the
rates at which TCP Segments are sent and received by using the TCP
protocol. It includes counters that monitor the number of TCP
connections in each TCP connection state.
Telephony
The Telephony System.
Thread
The Thread performance object consists of counters that measure
aspects of thread behavior. A thread is the basic object that executes
instructions on a processor. All running processes have at least one
thread.
UCP
The UCP performance object consists of counters that measure the
rates at which UCP datagrams are sent and received by using the UCP
protocol. It includes counters that monitor UCP protocol errors.
For information on the registry counters refer to the documentation or developer network for that product
or the developer kit provided with the product. For Microsoft products, refer to
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.aspx.
SAP R/3 Remote Extended Counters
The following extended SAP R/3 remote counters are provided. These counters extend the monitoring of
your SAP R/3 system:
Active Servers
Page/Roll Area
Active Users
Page/Roll Area Max
Alerts
Process Monitoring
Buffer Statistics
Spool Queue
CCMS Monitoring
System Log Entries
Connection Test (SM59)
Top CPU Utilization
CPU Consumption
Top Load
Itemized Active Users
User Function Call
Itemized Job Status
Workload Statistic
Itemized Spool Queue
Work Processes
40
Conductor
Job Status
Memory Usage
Number of Dumps
SNMP Counters
SNMP Counters
SNMP Remote Monitoring uses the SNMP service to provide network and system counters. SNMP counters
can be retrieved from any machine that is running an SNMP server. QALoad uses the default SNMP port
(161) and default Community (public). If necessary, you can enter a different port and community in the
Configure Monitor Dialog screen when you create or edit an SNMP monitoring task and when you create
or edit an SNMP monitoring template. Although SNMP does not require a user name and password, the
SNMP agent must be configured to allow read-only access from the Conductor machine.
In addition to the standard SNMP counters supported by QALoad Remote Monitoring, you can create your
own custom Object Identifier (OID) file with counters you define. See Customizing SNMP Counter
Discovery for more information.
Standard SNMP Counters
Standard SNMP counters that are supported by QALoad Remote Monitoring are categorized below.
ICMP
icmpInMsgs/sec: the rate at which ICMP messages are received
icmpInErrors: the number of ICMP messages received having ICMP errors
IcmpInDestUnreachs: the number of ICMP Destination Unreachable messages received
IcmpInTimeExcds: the number of ICMP Time Exceeded messages received
IcmpInParmProbs: the number of ICMP Parameter Problem messages received
IcmpInSrcQuenchs: the number of ICMP Source Quench messages received
icmpInRedirects/sec: the rate at which ICMP Redirect messages are received
icmpInEchos/sec: the rate at which ICMP Echo messages are received
icmpInEchoReps/sec: the rate at which ICMP Echo Reply messages are received
icmpInTimestamps/sec: the rate at which ICMP Timestamp messages are received
icmpInTimestampReps/sec: the rate at which ICMP Timestamp Reply messages are received
icmpInAddrMasks: the number of ICMP Address Mask Request messages received
icmpInAddrMaskReps: the number of ICMP Address Mask Reply messages received
icmpOutMsgs/sec: the rate at which ICMP messages are sent
icmpOutMsgs/sec: the number of ICMP messages not sent due to ICMP errors
icmpOutDestUnreachs: the number of ICMP Destination Unreachable messages sent
icmpOutTimeExcds: the number of ICMP Time Exceeded messages sent
icmpOutParmProbs: the number of ICMP Parameter Problem messages sent
icmpOutSrcQuenchs: the number of ICMP Source Quench messages sent
icmpOutRedirects/sec: the number of ICMP Redirect messages sent
icmpOutEchos/sec: the number of ICMP Echo messages sent
icmpOutEchoReps/sec: the number of ICMP Echo Reply messages sent
icmpOutTimestamps/sec: the number of ICMP Timestamp messages sent
icmpOutTimestampReps/sec: the number of ICMP Timestamp Reply messages sent
icmpOutAddrMasks: the number of ICMP Address Mask Request messages sent
icmpOutAddrMaskReps: the number of ICMP Address Mask Reply messages sent
IP
41
Using the Conductor
ipForwarding: the indication of whether this entity is acting as an IP router in respect to the forwarding of
datagrams received by, but not addressed to, this entity.
ipDefaultTTL: the default value inserted into the Time-To-Live field of the IP header of datagrams
originated at this entity, whenever a TTL value is not supplied by the transport layer protocol.
ipInReceives/sec: the rate of input datagrams received from interfaces, including those received in error.
ipInHdrErrors: the number of input datagrams discarded due to errors in their IP headers, including bad
checksums, version number mismatch, other format errors, time-to-live exceeded, errors discovered in
processing their IP options, and so on.
ipInAddrErrors: the number of input datagrams discarded because the IP address in their IP header's
destination field was not a valid address to be received at this entity.
ipForwDatagrams/sec: the rate of input datagrams for which this entity was not their final IP destination,
as a result of which an attempt was made to find a route to forward them to that final destination.
ipInUnknownProtos: the number of locally-addressed datagrams receive successfully but discarded
because of an unknown or unsupported protocol.
ipInDiscards: the number of input IP datagrams for which no problems were encountered to prevent their
continued processing, but which were discarded (for example, for lack of buffer space).
ipInDelivers/sec: the rate of input datagrams successfully delivered to IP user-protocols (including ICMP).
ipOutRequests: the number of IP datagrams which local IP user-protocols (including ICMP) supplied to IP
in requests for transmission.
ipOutDiscards: the number of output IP datagrams for which no problem was encountered to prevent
their transmission to their destination, but which were discarded (for example, for lack of buffer space).
ipOutNoRoutes: the number of IP datagrams discarded because no route could be found to transmit them
to their destination.
ipReasmTimeout: the maximum number of seconds which received fragments are held while they are
awaiting reassembling at this entity.
ipReasmReqds: the number of IP fragments received which needed to be reassembled at this entity.
ipReasmOKs: the number of IP datagrams successfully re-assembled.
ipReasmFails: the number of failures detected by the IP re-assembly algorithm (for whatever reason: timed
out, errors, etc).
ipFragOKs: the number of IP datagrams that have been successfully fragmented at this entity.
ipFragFails: the number of IP datagrams that have been discarded because they needed to be fragmented at
this entity but could not be, for example, because their Don't Fragment flag was set.
ipFragCreates/sec: the rate of IP datagram fragments that have been generated as a result of fragmentation
at this entity.
ipRoutingDiscards: the number of routing entries which were chosen to be discarded even though they
are valid.
SNMP
snmpInPkts/sec: the rate of messages delivered to the SNMP entity from the transport service.
snmpOutPkts/sec: the rate at which SNMP Messages were passed from the SNMP protocol entity to the
transport service.
snmpInBadVersions: the number of SNMP messages which were delivered to the SNMP entity and were
for an unsupported SNMP version.
snmpInBadCommunityNames: the number of SNMP messages delivered to the SNMP entity which used a
SNMP community name not known to said entity.
snmpInBadCommunityUses: the number of SNMP messages delivered to the SNMP entity which
represented an SNMP operation which was not allowed by the SNMP community named in the message.
snmpInASNParseErrs: the number of ASN.1 or BER errors encountered by the SNMP entity when decoding
received SNMP messages.
snmpInTooBigs: the number of SNMP PDUs which were delivered to the SNMP protocol entity and for
which the value of the error-status field is tooBig.
snmpInNoSuchNames: the number of SNMP PDUs which were delivered to the SNMP protocol entity and
for which the value of the error-status field is noSuchName.
snmpInBadValues: the number of SNMP PDUs which were delivered to the SNMP protocol entity and for
which the value of the error-status field is badValue.
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snmpInReadOnlys: the number valid SNMP PDUs which were delivered to the SNMP protocol entity and
for which the value of the error-status field is readOnly.
snmpInGenErrs: the number of SNMP PDUs which were delivered to the SNMP protocol entity and for
which the value of the error-status field is genErr.
snmpInTotalReqVars/sec: the rate of MIB objects which have been retrieved successfully by the SNMP
protocol entity as the result of receiving valid SNMP Get-Request and Get-Next PDUs.
snmpInTotalSetVars/sec: the rate of MIB objects which have been altered successfully by the SNMP
protocol entity as the result of receiving valid SNMP Set-Request PDUs.
snmpInGetRequests/sec: the rate of SNMP Get-Request PDUs which have been accepted and processed by
the SNMP protocol entity.
snmpInGetNexts/sec: the rate of SNMP Get-Next PDUs which have been accepted and processed by the
SNMP protocol entity.
snmpInSetRequests/sec: the rate of SNMP Get-Response PDUs which have been accepted and processed
by the SNMP protocol entity.
snmpInGetResponses/sec: the rate of SNMP Set-Request PDUs which have been accepted and processed
by the SNMP protocol entity.
snmpInTraps: the number of SNMP Trap PDUs which have been accepted and processed by the SNMP
protocol entity.
snmpOutTooBigs: the number of SNMP PDUs which were generated by the SNMP protocol entity and for
which the value of the error-status field is tooBig.
snmpOutNoSuchNames: the number of SNMP PDUs which were generated by the SNMP protocol entity
and for which the value of the error-status is noSuchName.
snmpOutBadValues: the number of SNMP PDUs which were generated by the SNMP protocol entity and
for which the value of the error-status field is badValue.
snmpOutGenErrs: the number of SNMP PDUs which were generated by the SNMP protocol entity and for
which the value of the error-status field is genErr.
snmpOutGetRequests/sec: the rate of SNMP Get-Request PDUs which have been generated by the SNMP
protocol entity.
snmpOutGetNexts/sec: the rate of SNMP Get-Next PDUs which have been generated by the SNMP
protocol entity.
snmpOutSetRequests/sec: the rate of SNMP Set-Request PDUs which have been generated by the SNMP
protocol entity.
snmpOutGetResponses/sec: the rate of SNMP Get-Response PDUs which have been generated by the
SNMP protocol entity.
snmpOutTraps: the number of SNMP Trap PDUs which have been generated by the SNMP protocol entity.
snmpOutTraps: indicates whether the SNMP entity is permitted to generate authenticationFailure traps.
TCP
tcpRtoAlgorithm: the algorithm used to determine the timeout value used for retransmitting
unacknowledged octets.
tcpRtoMin: the minimum value permitted by a TCP implementation for the retransmission timeout.
tcpRtoMax: the maximum value permitted by a TCP implementation for the retransmission timeout.
tcpMaxConn: the limit on the total number of TCP connections the entity can support.
tcpActiveOpens: the number of times TCP connections have made a direct transition to the SYN-SENT
state from the CLOSED state.
tcpAttemptFails: the number of times TCP connections have made a direct transition to the SYN-RCVD
state from the LISTEN state.
tcpEstabResets: the number of times TCP connections have made a direct transition to the CLOSED state
from either the ESTABLISHED state or the CLOSE-WAIT state.
tcpCurrEstab: the number of TCP connections for which the current state is either ESTABLISHED or
CLOSE-WAIT.
tcpInSegs/sec: the rate at which segments are received, including those received in error.
tcpOutSegs/sec: the rate at which segments are sent, including those on current connections but
excluding those containing only retransmitted octets.
tcpRetransSegs/sec: the rate at which segments are retransmitted.
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tcpInErrs/sec: the rate at which segments are received in error.
tcpOutRsts/sec: the rate at which segments containing the RST flag are sent.
tcpPassiveOpens: the total number of times TCP connections have made a direct transition to the SYNRCVD state from the LISTEN state.
UDP
udpInDatagrams/sec: the rate of UDP datagrams being delivered to UDP users.
udpNoPorts/sec: the rate of received UDP datagrams for which there was no application at the destination
port.
udpInErrors: the number of received UDP datagrams that could not be delivered for reasons other than
the lack of an application at the destination port.
udpOutDatagrams/sec: the rate at which UDP datagrams are sent.
Solaris: Sun System
Collisions/sec: the rate of output collisions.
CpuUser%: the percentage of non-idle processor time that is spent in user mode.
CpuNice%: the percentage of non-idle processor time that is spent in nice mode.
CpuSys%: the percentage of non-idle processor time that is spent in system mode.
CpuIdle%: the percentage of idle processor time.
IfInPackets/sec: the rate of input packets.
IfOutPackets/sec: the rate of output packets.
IfInErrors: the total number of input errors.
IfOutErrors: the total number of output errors.
Interrupts/sec: the rate of system interrupts.
PagesIn KBytes/sec: the rate of pages read in from disk.
PagesOut KBytes/sec: the rate of pages written to disk.
SwapIn KBytes/sec: the rate at which pages are being swapped in.
SwapOut KBytes/sec: the rate at which pages are being swapped out.
HP-UX: HP System
AvgJobs1: the average number of jobs in the last minute * 100.
AvgJobs5: the average number of jobs in the last 5 minutes * 100.
AvgJobs15: the average number of jobs in the last 15 minutes * 100.
CpuUser%: the percentage of non-idle processor time that is spent in user mode.
CpuNice%: the percentage of non-idle processor time that is spent in nice mode.
CpuSys%: the percentage of non-idle processor time that is spent in system mode.
CpuIdle%: the percentage of idle processor time.
FreeMemory KBytes: the amount of idle memory.
FreeSwap KBytes: the amount of free swap space on the system.
MaxProc: the maximum number of processes allowed.
MaxUserMem KBytes: the amount of maximum user memory on the system.
PhysMemory KBytes: the amount of physical memory on the system.
Users: the number of users logged on to the machine.
LINUX Memory
AvailableSwap KBytes: the available swap on the system.
Buffered KBytes: the amount of memory used as buffers.
Cached KBytes: the amount of memory cached.
FreeMemory KBytes: the amount of idle memory.
Shared KBytes: the amount of memory shared.
TotalMemory KBytes: the total amount of memory on the system.
TotalSwap KBytes: the total swap size for the system.
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LINUX System
CpuUser%: the percentage of non-idle processor time that is spent in user mode.
CpuNice%: the percentage of non-idle processor time that is spent in nice mode.
CpuSys%: the percentage of non-idle processor time that is spent in system mode.
CpuIdle%: the percentage of idle processor time.
Windows HTTP Server
httpTotalFilesSent: the total number of files sent by this HTTP server.
httpTotalFilesReceived: the total number of files received by this HTTP server.
httpCurrentAnonymousUsers: the number of anonymous users currently connected to this HTTP server.
httpCurrentNonAnonymousUsers: the number of non-anonymous users currently connected to this
HTTP server.
httpTotalAnonymousUsers: the total number of anonymous users that have ever connected to this HTTP
server.
httpTotalNonAnonymousUsers: the total number of non-anonymous users that have ever connected to
this HTTP server.
httpMaximumAnonymousUsers: the maximum number of anonymous users simultaneously connected
to this HTTP server.
httpMaximumNonAnonymousUsers: the maximum number of non-anonymous users simultaneously
connected to this HTTP server.
httpCurrentConnections: the current number of connections to the HTTP server.
httpMaximumConnections: the maximum number of simultaneous connections to the HTTP server.
httpConnectionAttempts: the total number of connection attempts to the HTTP server.
httpLogonAttempts: the total number of logon attempts to the HTTP server.
httpTotalOptions: the total number of requests made to this HTTP server using the OPTIONS method.
httpTotalGets: the total number of requests made to this HTTP server using the GET method.
httpTotalPosts: the total number of requests made to this HTTP server using the POST method.
httpTotalHeads: the total number of requests made to this HTTP server using the HEAD method.
httpTotalPuts: the total number of requests made to this HTTP server using the PUT method.
httpTotalDeletes: the total number of requests made to this HTTP server using the DELETE method.
httpTotalTraces: the total number of requests made to this HTTP server using the TRACE method.
httpTotalMove: the total number of requests made to this HTTP server using the MOVE method.
httpTotalCopy: the total number of requests made to this HTTP server using the COPY method.
httpTotalMkcol: the total number of requests made to this HTTP server using the MKCOL method.
httpTotalPropfind: the total number of requests made to this HTTP server using the PROPFIND method.
httpTotalProppatch: the total number of requests made to this HTTP server using the PROPPATCH
method.
httpTotalSearch: the total number of requests made to this HTTP server using the MS-SEARCH method.
httpTotalLock: the total number of requests made to this HTTP server using the LOCK method.
httpTotalUnlock: the total number of requests made to this HTTP server using the UNLOCK method.
httpTotalOthers: the total number of requests made to this HTTP server not using the OPTIONS, GET,
HEAD, POST, PUT, DELETE, TRACE, MOVE, MKCOL, PROPFIND, PROPPATCH, MS-SEARCH, LOCK or
UNLOCK methods.
httpCurrentCGIRequests: the number of Common Gateway Interface requests currently being serviced by
this HTTP server.
httpCurrentBGIRequests: the number of Binary Gateway Interface requests currently being serviced by
this HTTP server.
httpTotalCGIRequests: the total number of Common Gateway Interface requests made to this HTTP
server.
httpTotalBGIRequests: the total number Binary Gateway Interface requests made to this HTTP server.
httpMaximumCGIRequests: the maximum number of Common Gateway Interface requests
simultaneously processed by this HTTP server.
httpMaximumBGIRequests: the maximum number of Binary Gateway Interface requests simultaneously
processed by this HTTP server.
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Using the Conductor
httpCurrentBlockedRequests: the current number of requests being temporarily blocked by this HTTP
server.
httpTotalBlockedRequests: the total number of requests that have been temporarily blocked by this HTTP
server.
httpTotalRejectedRequests: the total number of requests that have been rejected by this HTTP server.
Windows FTP Server
ftpTotalFilesSent: the total number of files sent by this FTP server.
ftpTotalFilesReceived: the total number of files received by this FTP server.
ftpCurrentAnonymousUsers: the number of anonymous users currently connected to this FTP server.
ftpCurrentNonAnonymousUsers: the number of non-anonymous users currently connected to this FTP
server.
ftpTotalAnonymousUsers: the total number of anonymous users that have ever connected to this FTP
server.
ftpTotalNonAnonymousUsers: the total number of non-anonymous users that have ever connected to
this FTP server.
ftpMaximumAnonymousUsers: the maximum number of anonymous users simultaneously connected to
this FTP server.
ftpMaximumNonAnonymousUsers: the maximum number of non-anonymous users simultaneously
connected to this FTP server.
ftpCurrentConnections: the current number of connections to the FTP server.
ftpMaximumConnections: the maximum number of simultaneous connections to the FTP server.
ftpConnectionAttempts: the total number of connection attempts to the FTP server.
ftpLogonAttempts: the total number of logon attempts to the FTP server.
Customizing SNMP Counter Discovery
QALoad currently has a standard list of Object Identifiers (OID) that it searches when discovering SNMP
counters. You can create and import a list of additional OIDs in an XML file. The XML file, called the
Custom OID File, introduces additional SNMP counters that you want to include during the counter
discovery phase when you create or edit tasks and templates.
Note: You can include multiple categories and multiple counters in the custom OID file.
Once you create the custom OID file, you select it using the Custom OID File field in the Configure
Monitor Dialog screen of the monitoring wizards. Since there is a one to one relationship between
monitoring tasks and the custom file, multiple files can exist. These reside in a common, default location:
QALoad\Monitoring\SNMP. The browse button for the Custom OID File field defaults to this location.
This directory also contains two files to assist you in developing your Custom OID File:
OID structure.xml - a template you can use for creating your custom supplemental file. This contains the basic XML
structure you need to create your own Custom OID file. The Table of Custom OID File Elements describes and gives
the rules for each of the XML elements in the structure.
OID example.xml - a custom OID XML file structure. This is a sample Custom OID File.
Custom OID Template File
Use the following template, located in QALoad\Monitoring\SNMP\OID structure.xml, to create your custom OID
file:
Table of Custom OID File Elements
The following table shows each element in the XML file structure, and describes its purpose and the rules
that apply.
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Tag
<?xml version="1.0" ?>
Description
XML file header
indicating files structural
version.
<OIDCustom>
Begin bracket for entire
OID custom information.
Used to both identify
content type and
begin/end of file.
<CategoryList>
Begin bracket for list of
categories defined in this
file. Used to help group all
the contained categories.
Rules
Must be first element of
file.
Only one per file.
Only one per file.
Must immediately follow
XML version header.
Only one per file.
Must immediately follow
<OIDCustom> tag.
One required per
category group.
<Category>
Begin bracket for an
individual category within
the category list. Used to
help group individual
categories.
<CategoryName>?</CategoryName>
The display name for the
category group. The “?”
represents where the user
defines the category
name.
<Counter>
Begin bracket for
individual counter
information contained in
a category. Multiple
counters can exist per
category.
<CounterName>?</CounterName>
The display name for the
counter. The “?”
represents where the user
defines the counter name.
<OID>?</OID>
The OID for the counter.
The OID must start with a
period “.” (see example
below). The “?” represents
where the user defines the
OID.
First instance must
immediately follow
<CategoryList> tag.
Subsequent instances
immediately follow
</Category> end tag of
previous group.
One required per
category. Must
immediately follow
<Category> tag.
One required per
counter.
First instance must
immediately follow
</CategoryName> tag.
Subsequent instances
immediately follow
</Counter> tag.
One required per
counter.
Only one allowed per
counter.
One required per
counter.
Only one allowed per
counter.
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The optional calculation
units for the counter. The
“?” represents where the
user defines the
calculation type which is
one of the following:
<Units>?</Units>
“/sec” – for counters that
must take into account
the time between
samplings.
“Cpu%” – for counters
that must take into
account the number of
processors. A counter for
which this applies is
CpuIlde%.
Optionally, one per
counter.
Only one allowed per
counter.
“Kbits/sec” – for
converting counters that
natively report in Kbit/sec
to Kbytes/sec.
Optionally, one per
counter.
<Description>?</Description>
The optional description
for the counter. The “?”
represents where the user
defines the OID.
</Counter>
The end bracket for an
individual counter
information set. Used to
denote the end of
individual counters
attribute information.
One required per
counter.
</Category>
The end bracket for an
individual category, used
to denote the end of a
category and all of its
associated counters.
One required per
category.
</CategoryList>
End bracket for list of
categories.
Must immediately
precede <OIDCustom>
tag.
</OIDCustom>
End bracket for entire OID
custom information. Used
to identify the end of file.
Only one per file.
Only one allowed per
counter.
Only one per file.
Must be last file element.
Custom OID Sample File
The sample Custom OID File shown here is located in QALoad\Monitoring\SNMP\OID example.xml:
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WebLogic7/8 Remote Counters
The following dynamically discovered WebLogic remote extended counter categories are provided in
QALoad. Each category provides counters that extend the monitoring of your WebLogic system. The
categories, counter names, and parameters are all dynamically discovered by processing the set of MBeans
available in the WebLogic JMX Server.
WebLogic Application Runtime
WebLogic JMS Session Runtime
WebLogic Connector Service Runtime
WebLogic JTA Recovery Runtime
WebLogic Deployer Runtime
WebLogic JTA Runtime
WebLogic Domain Log Handler Runtime
WebLogic JVM Runtime
WebLogic Domain Runtime
WebLogic Log Broadcaster Runtime
WebLogic EJB Cache Runtime
WebLogic Message Driven EJB Runtime
WebLogic EJB Component Runtime
WebLogic Migratable Service Coordinator
49
Using the Conductor
WebLogic EJB Locking Runtime
Runtime
WebLogic EJB Pool Runtime
WebLogic Server Life Cycle Runtime
WebLogic EJB Transaction Runtime
WebLogic Server Runtime
WebLogic Entity EJB Runtime
WebLogic Server Security Runtime
WebLogic Execute Queue Runtime
WebLogic Servlet Runtime
WebLogic JDBC Connection Pool Runtime
WebLogic Stateful EJB Runtime
WebLogic JMS Connection Runtime
WebLogic Stateless EJB Runtime
WebLogic JMS Consumer Runtime
WebLogic Time Service Runtime
WebLogic JMS Destination Runtime
WebLogic Transaction Resource Runtime
WebLogic JMS Runtime
WebLogic Web App Component Runtime
WebLogic JMS Server Runtime
WebLogic Web Server Runtime
WebLogic9 Counters
ServerVantage provides the following dynamically discovered WebLogic9 remote counter categories. Each
category provides counters that extend the monitoring of your WebLogic system. The categories, counters
names, and parameters are all dynamically discovered by processing the set of MBeans available in the
WebLogic JMX Server.
WebLogic App Client Component Runtime
WebLogic JVM Runtime
WebLogic Application Runtime
WebLogic Library Runtime
WebLogic Cluster Runtime
WebLogic Log Broadcaster Runtime
WebLogic Component Runtime
WebLogic Max Threads Constraint Runtime
WebLogic Connector Component Runtime
WebLogic Message Driven EJB Runtime
WebLogic Connector Connection Pool Runtime
WebLogic Min Threads Constraint Runtime
WebLogic Connector Connection Runtime
WebLogic NonXA Resource Runtime
WebLogic Connector Service Runtime
WebLogic Persistent Store Connection Runtime
WebLogic EJB Cache Runtime
WebLogic Persistent Store Runtime
WebLogic EJB Component Runtime
WebLogic Query Cache Runtime
WebLogic EJB Locking Runtime
WebLogic Request Class Runtime
WebLogic EJB Pool Runtime
WebLogic SAF Agent Runtime
WebLogic EJB Timer Runtime
WebLogic SAF Remote Endpoint Runtime
WebLogic EJB Transaction Runtime
WebLogic Server Channel Runtime
WebLogic Entity Cache Cumulative Runtime
WebLogic Server Life Cycle Runtime
WebLogic Entity Cache Current State Runtime
WebLogic Server Life Cycle Task Runtime
WebLogic Execute Queue Runtime
WebLogic Server Runtime
WebLogic Interception Component Runtime
WebLogic Server Security Runtime
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Conductor
WebLogic JDBC Data Source Runtime
WebLogic Servlet Runtime
WebLogic JDBC Data Source Task Runtime
WebLogic Task Runtime
WebLogic JMS Component Runtime
WebLogic Thread Pool Runtime
WebLogic JMS Connection Runtime
WebLogic Transaction Name Runtime
WebLogic JMS Consumer Runtime
WebLogic Transaction Resource Runtime
WebLogic JMS Destination Runtime
WebLogic User Lockout Manager Runtime
WebLogic JMS Durable Subscriber Runtime
WebLogic WAN Replication Runtime
WebLogic JMS Pooled Connection Runtime
WebLogic Web App Component Runtime
WebLogic JMS Producer Runtime
WebLogic Web Server Runtime
WebLogic JMS Remote Endpoint Runtime
WebLogic WLDF Archive Runtime
WebLogic JMS Runtime
WebLogic WLDF Data Access Runtime
WebLogic JMS Server Runtime
WebLogic WLDF Dbstore Archive Runtime
WebLogic JMS Session Pool Runtime
WebLogic WLDF File Archive Runtime
WebLogic JMS Session Runtime
WebLogic WLDF Harvester Runtime
WebLogic Jolt Connection Pool Runtime
WebLogic WLDF Image Creation Task Runtime
WebLogic Jolt Connection Service Runtime
WebLogic WLDF Instrumentation Runtime
WebLogic JRockit Runtime
WebLogic WLDF Watch Notification Runtime
WebLogic JTA Recovery Runtime
WebLogic WLDF Wlstore ArchiveRuntime
WebLogic JTA Runtime
WebLogic Work Manager Runtime
WebLogic Wsee Operation Runtime
WebLogic WSRM Remote Endpoint Runtime
WebSphere Remote Extended Counters
The following dynamically discovered WebSphere remote extended counter categories are provided in
QALoad. Each category provides counters that extend the monitoring of your WebSphere system. The
categories, counter names, and parameters are all dynamically discovered by processing data available from
the WebSphere Performance Monitoring Infrastructure.
Remote monitoring supports WebSphere versions: 4.0+, 5.0, and 6.0. The counters supported vary by
version.
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Using the Conductor
WebSphere Alarm Manager Counters
WebSphere ORB Perf Module
WebSphere Bean Module
WebSphere Scheduler Module
WebSphere Cache Module
WebSphere Servlet Sessions Module
WebSphere Connection Pool Module
WebSphere System Module
WebSphere DCS Stack Counters
WebSphere Thread Pool Module
WebSphere High Availability Manager Counters
WebSphere Transaction Module
WebSphere J2C Module
WebSphere Web App Module
WebSphere JVM Runtime Module
WebSphere Web Services Counters
WebSphere MQ Remote Extended Counters
The following extended WebSphere MQ remote counters are provided in QALoad. These counters extend
the monitoring of your WebSphere MQ system:
Channel Events
Queue Manager Connections
Channel Status
Queue Manager Events
Error Log Entries
Queue Manager Statistics
Percent Queue Depth
Queue Manager Up/Down
Performance Events
Queue Statistics
Queue Depth
WMI Remote Extended Counters
The following extended WMI (Windows Management Instrument) remote counters are provided in
QALoad. To display and use the extended counters in task configuration, you must configure user access
with the MMC (Microsoft Management Console) and configure the WMI agent using the ServerVantage
Agent Console (Reconfigure Agent). These procedures are described in the topic Configuring WMI in the
ServerVantage Agent Configuration online help. Once configuration is complete, and you select WMI
collector as your Server Type during task configuration on the Select Counters page, ServerVantage
discovers the Windows registry counters and the extended counters for each WMI-configured server.
These counters extend the monitoring of your WMI system:
WMI WQL
WMI Top Ten Counters:
CPU Utilization % - Top Ten
Memory Utilization % - Top Ten
I/O Utilization % - Top Ten
Oracle Application Server Counters
ServerVantage provides the following dynamically discovered Oracle Application Server (AS) remote
extended counter categories for remote monitoring of Oracle10g Application Server performance metrics.
Each category provides counters and parameters that extend the monitoring of your Oracle AS system. The
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Conductor
Oracle AS agent dynamically discovers all available counters and parameter values. The available categories
and metrics vary by installation. The Oracle AS agent supports wild-carded parameters and resource
blackouts.
Supported platforms for Oracle AS include:
Solaris
Microsoft Windows Server 2003 (32-bit)
AIX
Microsoft Windows XP (not all components are supported)
HP
Linux
Oracle AS Counter Categories
Oracle AS EJB Method Metrics
Oracle AS JMS Session Metrics
Oracle AS Entity Bean Metrics
Oracle AS JMS Store Metrics
Oracle AS HTTP OC4J Metrics
Oracle AS JMS Temp Destination Metrics
Oracle AS HTTP Server Metrics
Oracle AS JServ JSP Metrics
Oracle AS HTTP Server Module Metrics
Oracle AS JServ Metrics
Oracle AS HTTP Server Response Metrics
Oracle AS JServ Servlet Metrics
Oracle AS HTTP Server Virtual Host Metrics
Oracle AS JServ Zone Metrics
Oracle AS JDBC Connection Metrics
Oracle AS JSP Metrics
Oracle AS JDBC Connection Source Metrics
Oracle AS JVM Metrics
Oracle AS JDBC Metrics
Oracle AS Notification Server Metrics
Oracle AS JDBC Statement Metrics
Oracle AS OC4J Transaction Manager Metrics
Oracle AS JMS Browser Metrics
Oracle AS PLSQL Metrics
Oracle AS JMS Connection Metrics
Oracle AS Portal Engine Metrics
Oracle AS JMS Consumer Metrics
Oracle AS Process Manager Metrics
Oracle AS JMS Durable Subscription Metrics
Oracle AS Servlet Metrics
Oracle AS JMS Metrics
Oracle AS Task Manager Metrics
Oracle AS JMS Persistence Metrics
Oracle AS Web Module Metrics
Oracle AS JMS Producer Metrics
10g Release 2 Counter Categories
Oracle AS Portal Cache Metrics
Oracle AS Portal Page Metrics
Oracle AS Portal Cache Summary Metrics
Oracle AS Portal DB Repository Metrics
Oracle AS Portal DB Provider Metrics
Oracle AS Portal Web Provider Metrics
JVM Counters
ServerVantage provides the following statically discovered categories for monitoring a Java Virtual Machine
(JVM). Each category provides counters that allow the monitoring of your JVM. ServerVantage utilizes the
Java Monitoring and Management API which were introduced in J2SE 5.0 for counter data.
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Using the Conductor
JVM Class Loading
JVM Memory
JVM Compilation
JVM Operating System
JVM Garbage Collection
JVM Threads
Guideline:
You must start your JVM as a "JMX-enabled JVM"by inserting the following properties:
C:\...\java -Dcom.sun.management.jmxremote.port=1095 Dcom.sum.management.jmxremote.ssl=false Dcom.sun.management.jmxremote.authenticate=false
For more information, see http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.5.0/docs/guide/management/agent.html.
RStat Counters
ServerVantage Agent provides statically discovered categories for monitoring Unix using RStat. RStat is a
Unix command to acquire statistics about the network including socket status, interfaces that have been
auto-configured, memory statistics, and routing tables.
Collision Rate
Packets In
Context Switches
Packets Out
Disk Transfer Rate
Page In Rate
Fifteen Minute Load Average
Page Out Rate
Five Minute Load Average
Paging I/O Rate
Incoming Packet Error Rate
RPC Status
Interrupt Rate
Swap In Rate
Network Errors
Swap Out Rate
Nice Mode CPU Utilization Percentage
System Mode CPU Utilization Percentage
One Minute Load Average
System Uptime
Outgoing Packet Error Rate
Total CPU Utilization Percentage
Total Packet Rate
Use Mode CPU Utilization Percentage
Managing Counters
Adding Counters to a Task Using New Discovery Data
Add counters to a monitoring task by generating the available counter data and selecting the counters and
instances to add to the task.
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Conductor
To add counters and instances to a monitoring task:
1.
From the Conductor menu bar, click Tools>Monitor Tasks to open the Manage Monitoring Tasks dialog window.
2.
Open or create a task.
3.
In the menu bar, click Actions>Add counter>Use new discovery counters. The Edit Existing Monitor Wizard
appears.
4.
Follow the instructions for using the wizard to discover and add counters to the monitoring task.
Notes:

(WebLogic and WebSphere) When the monitor to which you are adding counters is managed
by an administrative server, the Edit Existing Monitor wizard appears and the counter discovery
process begins immediately.

(SNMP) You can supplement the counter discovery list by creating and specifying a custom
OID file. See Customizing SNMP Counter Discovery for more information.
Adding Counters to a Task Using Cached Discovery Data
It is possible to add counters to monitor for a machine and monitor type using cached discovery data. To
add counters to a task using cached discovery, do the following:
Step 1: Select the counter to add or modify
Step 2: Choose the instances of the counter to monitor
Step 3: Review the monitor definition
Step 4: Save the task
Step 1: Select the counter to add or modify:
1.
From the Conductor menu bar, click Tools>Monitor Tasks to open the Manage Monitoring Tasks dialog window.
2.
In the menu bar, click Actions>Add counter>Use cached discovery counters. This Add/Edit Counters dialog
box appears.
3.
From the Available Items pane, select the Template tab or the Counter tab.
4.
To add an item, select a template or a counter, and click Add, or double-click the item to display it in the Selected
Items pane. Click Add All to add all the items on the selected tab to the Selected Items pane.
5.
To remove an item, double-click the item in the Selected Items pane or select the item and click Remove. The item
is returned to the Available Items pane.
Note: Select multiple counters and templates by doing one of the following:
6.

To select nonadjacent counter items, click a counter item, and then hold down Ctrl and click
each additional counter item.

To select adjacent counter items, click the first counter item in the sequence, and then hold
down Shift and click the last counter item.
Click Next. The Choose Instances dialog box displays.
Note: When you select a template, and some of the counters it contains are not present on the machine
you are defining, you receive a message with a list of the counters that will not be added to the task.
Step 2: Choose the instances of the counter to monitor:
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Using the Conductor
When clicking Next in the previous dialog box. The Choose Instances dialog box appears.
1.
Review the counters selected. When a red dot appears next to a counter, select an instance of the counter.
2.
Double-click the counter group to display the counters.
3.
Select a counter and click Edit. The Select instance for counter dialog box appears.
4.
In the Available Instance pane, select an instance and click Add.
5.
Repeat until all instances of the counter that you want to apply to the task are selected.
6.
Click Save. The Choose Instances dialog box appears.
7.
Repeat this process for each designated counter.
8.
Click Next. The Summary dialog box displays.
Step 3: Review the monitor definition:
1. In the Review Monitor Definition dialog box, review the information for the monitoring machine
you defined.
2. Select one of the following:

Set up another monitor for this task - returns to the Enter properties of the monitoring
machine dialog box so you can add another monitor to the monitoring task. When complete,
proceed with Step 3 below.

Continue without adding any more monitors - continues in this dialog box.
Note: (WebLogic and WebSphere) When you set up another monitor in a managed server environment,
you only can add another monitor using a different administrative server.

To add a WebLogic monitor, you must use the same WebLogic jar files and WebLogic version
as the current monitor.

To add a WebSphere monitor, you must use the same WebSphere Home, WebSphere client
version, and WebSphere server version as the current monitor.
3. (Optional) In the Monitors pane, select the monitor type and click Save as Template to create a
template for this monitoring task.
4. (Optional) In the Monitors pane, select a monitor and click Remove Monitor to delete a monitor
from the task.
5. (Optional) Type a new value in the Sample Interval field. This is the frequency, in seconds, at
which QALoad requests data during runtime data collection.
6. Click Next to proceed to the next step, where you review and save your selections.
Step 4: Save the task:
When clicking Next in the previous dialog box, the Summary dialog box appears.
1.
On the Summary dialog box, review the monitors and counters selected for the template. Click Back to return to a
dialog box and make changes to the information.
2.
Click Finish to add the counters.
Removing a Monitor or a Counter from a Monitoring Task
Remove a monitor or a counter from a monitoring task, by following this procedure.
56
Conductor
To remove a counter from a monitoring task:
1.
In the Monitors pane of the Manage Monitoring Tasks window, select the monitor, counter, or counter family to
delete.
2.
Click Actions>Remove Monitor/Counter.
3.
When the verification dialog box displays, click OK.
Note: You cannot remove the last monitor on a machine, the last counter in the family, or the last family of
counters in the task.
Monitoring Templates
About Monitoring Templates
Monitoring templates are designed to facilitate the configuration process. A monitoring template is a
predefined group of counters not associated with a specific machine. You can create a new template for a
monitoring task, or you can use one of QALoad's pre-defined templates.
When you create a custom template, QALoad's New Monitoring Template wizard guides you through the
process of defining the type of template you want to create, configuring the monitor properties, and
adding the counters and instances of counters to the template.
When you use one of QALoad's predefined templates, you select a stored template with the counters you
want to monitor. The templates have counters grouped by functionality, such as Network Traffic, Response
Time, or System Health. Where appropriate, the templates include the specific instances to monitor for
each counter.
You can add or edit counters in either custom or pre-defined templates. When you open a template to edit
it for the first time, Edit Monitoring Template wizard guides you through the process of discovering and
adding new counters to a template. When you've just completed the counter discovery process for a
template, either by creating a new template or by opening a template for editing, you can select counters
from those already available in memory by using the cached discovery.
Custom Templates
You can create templates of the monitoring tasks that you develop so that all of the counters and instances
for the task are saved. You can create new tasks and incorporate the template you created. Templates are
saved as .xml files in the Templates directory.
You can create a template when you define a monitoring task, or you can use the New Monitor Template
wizard to create and store a template for future use. Custom templates can be modified using either new
discovery data or cached discovery data.
Pre-defined Templates
About Pre-defined Templates
QALoad provides pre-defined templates for each monitor type. Each template includes the counters most
commonly used for particular task within each monitor type.
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Using the Conductor
QALoad provides the templates form the following monitor types:
Oracle Application Server
JVM
SAP
SNMP
WebLogic
WebSphere
WebSphere MQ
Windows Registry
WMI
Note: You cannot modify pre-defined templates.
Viewing Pre-defined Templates
QALoad provides pre-defined templates for each monitor type. These include the counters most commonly
used for particular task.
To access and review pre-defined templates:
1.
In the Conductor, select Tools>Monitor Tasks to open the Manage Monitoring Tasks window.
2.
In the Manage Monitoring Tasks menu bar, click Templates>Open Existing. The Select a Monitor Template File
dialog box appears and lists pre-defined templates and custom templates you created and saved.
3.
Double-click a monitor type, then select a template file and click Open.
4.
The template name displays in the Manage Monitoring Tasks dialog box.
JVM Templates
JVM Templates
ServerVantage has customized the following JVM Server templates:
JVM Availability
JVM Performance
Additionally, QALoad offers a customized JVM template for monitoring BlazeDS activity:
JVM BlazeDS
JVM Availability
This template monitors the availability of your JVM server.
The default sampling interval rate for this template is 5 minutes.
The JVM Availability template monitors the following counters and categories:
Category
Class Loading
58
Counters
Current Loaded Class Count
Description
Number of classes that are currently loaded in
the JVM.
Conductor
Memory
Total Used Memory
Amount of memeory (in bytes) currently in use
by the JVM.
Operating System
Available Processor Count
Number of processors available to the JVM.
Threads
Live Thread Count
Number of live threads.
JVM Performance
This template monitors the performance of your JVM server.
The default sampling interval rate for this template is 5 minutes.
The JVM Performance template monitors the following counters and categories:
Category
Counters
Description
Compilation
Compilation Time
Approximate time (in milliseconds) spent in
compilation by the JVM during the sample
interval.
Garbage
Collection
Total Garbage Collection Time
Total approximate time (in milliseconds) spent
garbage collecting by the JVM during the
sample interval.
JVM BlazeDS
This template monitors the BlazeDS server using JVM counters:
Category
Counters
Description
Class Loading
Current Loaded Class Count
Number of classes that are currently loaded in
BlazeDS.
Compilation
Compilation Time
Approximate time (in milliseconds) spent in
compilation by BlazeDS during the sample
interval.
Garbage
Collection
Total Garbage Collection Time
Total approximate time (in milliseconds) spent
garbage collecting by the BlazeDS during the
sample interval.
Memory
Total Used Memory
Amount of memory (in bytes) currently in use
by BlazeDS.
Threads
Live Thread Count
Number of live threads.
Oracle Application Server Templates
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Using the Conductor
Oracle Application Server Template Index
QALoad provides the following pre-defined Oracle Application Server (AS) 10g database templates:
Oracle AS Availability
Oracle AS Performance
Oracle Application Server Availability
This template monitors the availability of an Oracle Application Server (AS) 10g database.
Note: This template is only available if you have Oracle AS 10g installed on your monitored
server.
This template includes the following counters and categories:
Category
Oracle AS HTTP OC4J Metrics
Counters
OC4JUnavailable
Total number of times that an oc4j JVM could not
be found to service requests.
UnableToHandleReq
Total number of times mod_oc4j declined to handle
a request.
Oracle AS HTTP Server Metrics readyChildren
Oracle AS Process Manager
Metrics
Description
reqFail
Number of child processes that are ready to run.
Number of HTTP requests which fail.
Oracle Application Server Performance
This template monitors the availability of an Oracle Application Server (AS) 10g database.
Note: This template is only available if you have Oracle AS 10g installed on your monitored
server.
This template includes the following counters and categories:
Category
Oracle AS HTTP OC4J Metrics
Counters
ErrReqSess
Specifies the total number of session requests that
mod_oc4j failed to route to an OC4J process.
SucReqSess
Specifies the total number of session requests that
mod_oc4j successfully routed to an OC4J process.
Oracle AS HTTP Server Metrics busyChildren
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Description
Number of child processes active.
connection.avg
Average time spent servicing HTTP connections.
request.avg
Average time required to service an HTTP request.
Conductor
RStat Templates
QALoad RStatd Health
This template monitors the status of the Remote Procedure Call (RPC) to the monitored Unix computer.
The QALoad RStatd Health template uses the following RStat extended counters:
Counters
RPC Status
Description
a Boolean rstat parameter that shows the status of the
Remote Procedure Call (RPC) to the monitored Unix
computer. A status of Down means that the RSM cannot
communicate with or collect performance information
about the computer from the rstatd server.
QALoad Server Availability
This template monitors the availability of UNIX servers.
The QALoad Server Availability template uses the following RStat extended counters:
Counters
System Uptime
Description
shows the amount of time since the monitored element
was started.
QALoad Server Performance
This template monitors the performance of the UNIX server.
The QALoad Server Performance template uses the following RStat extended counters:
Counters
Description
Context Switches
shows the per-second number of CPU context switches.
Paging I/O Rate
shows the amount of CPU time across all processors that
was spent waiting for input and output operations.
RPC Status
a Boolean rstat parameter that shows the status of the
Remote Procedure Call (RPC) to the monitored Unix
computer. A status of Down means that the RSM cannot
communicate with or collect performance information
about the computer from the rstatd server.
Total CPU Utilization
Percentage
shows the percentage of CPU that currently is not in the
idle state for all CPUs on the monitored computer.
QALoad Server Health
This template monitors the overall condition of the UNIX server.
The QALoad Server Health template uses the following RStat extended counters:
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Using the Conductor
Counters
Description
Disk Transfer Rate
shows the per-second rate of disk transfers for each disk
on the monitored element.
Paging I/O Rate
shows the amount of CPU time across all processors that
was spent waiting for input and output operations.
Total CPU Utilization
Percentage
shows the percentage of CPU that currently is not in the
idle state for all CPUs on the monitored computer.
SAP Templates
SAP Templates
QALoad provides the following pre-defined SAP templates:
QALoad-SAP R3 Remote Availability
QALoad-SAP R3 Remote Performance
QALoad-SAP R3 Remote System Errors
QALoad-SAP R3 Remote Availability
This template monitors the availability of an SAP R/3 Instance. The SAP R/3 Availability template returns
critical information about the availability of your SAP installation. One metric used to determine the
availability of an SAP R/3 Instance is the status of the SAP collector.
The default event action assigned to this template issues an alarm if either the specified R/3 Instance or the
collector goes down. The default instance is the first SAP Instance configured for monitoring during
installation.
The SAP R/3 Availability template uses the following SAP R/3 extended counters:
Counters
Active Servers
Description
Returns the number of active SAP application servers for
a given instance. It detects when a remote server is
unavailable.
Rule: IF 'SAP R/3 Remote Extended.Active Servers(SAP
Instance: "**", Server Count: "10")' = 0 .
QALoad-SAP R3 Remote Performance
This template monitors the performance of your SAP R/3 Instance.
The default event action for this template raises an event if the number of alerts of critical status is greater
than 0, or if the buffer hit ratio falls below 95%.
All the counters associated with this template require the instance number of your SAP installation. By
default, this template uses the first instance configured for monitoring during ServerVantage installation. If
you use the task configuration wizard to change the instance that the template monitors, you must also
change the instance specified in the rule accordingly.
The SAP R/3 Performance template uses the following SAP R/3 extended counters:
62
Conductor
Counters
Buffer Statistic
Description
Returns different buffer statistics for selected buffer name. This
counter was chosen because buffering data is a key to the
performance of SAP.
Rule: IF 'SAP R/3 Remote Extended.Buffer Statistic(SAP Instance:
"**", Buffer Name: "TTAB", Statistic Name: "Hit rate SAP
buffer(%%)")' < 95.
Itemized Spool Queue
Return number of entries in the spool queue that match the
specified criteria.
Rule: IF 'SAP R/3 Remote Extended.Spool Queue(SAP Instance:
"**", Request Status: "Processing")' > 10.
Memory Usage
Returns current memory usage.
Rule: IF 'SAP R/3 Remote Extended.Memory Usage(SAP Instance:
"**", Count: "10", Metrics: "MB")' > 10000.
Page/Roll Area
Returns Used Paging Area % statistic. This counter was chosen
because roll memory is critical for work processes and page
memory is critical for internal data processing.
Work Processes
Counter for monitoring SAP R/3 work processes. Returns number
of stopped work processes.
Rule: IF 'SAP R/3 Remote Extended.Work Processes(SAP Instance:
"**", Process Type: "BGDDIAENQSPOUP2UPD", Process State:
"Stopped")' > 2.
QALoad-SAP R3 Remote System Errors
This template monitors the errors and critical situations that occur on a SAP R/3 system. Rules and
thresholds are preset to appropriate values for most sites.
The default sampling interval for this template is 5 minutes.
The SAP R/3 Performance template uses the following SAP R/3 Remote extended counters:
Counters
Alerts
Description
Counter for monitoring R/3 alerts. Returns number of alerts
according to the specified criteria. This counter checks all alerts
with error (red) status.
Rule: IF 'SAP R/3 Remote Extended.Alerts(SAP Instance: "**",
Monitor Set: "SAP CCMS Admin Workplace", Monitor:
"Database", Severity: "Error - Red", Pattern: "*", Show Alert Text:
"No")' > 0.
Itemized Spool Queue
Return number of entries in the spool queue that match the
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Using the Conductor
specified criteria.
Spool Queue
Return number of entries in the spool queue that match the
specified criteria. This counter checks all spool entries with
“Problem” status.
Rule: IF 'SAP R/3 Remote Extended.Spool Queue(SAP Instance:
"**", Request Status: "Problem")' > 0.
Work Processes
Counter for monitoring SAP R/3 work processes. Returns number
of work processes according to the specified criteria. This counter
checks stopped work processes.
Rule: IF 'SAP R/3 Remote Extended.Work Processes(SAP Instance:
"**", Process Type: "BGDDIAENQSPOUP2UPD", Process State:
"Stopped")' > 0.
SNMP Templates
SNMP Templates
QALoad provides the following pre-defined SNMP templates:
QALoad-HP Performance
QALoad-Linux Performance
QALoad-SUN Performance
QALoad-HP Performance
This template includes the following counters and categories:
Category
HP System
tcp
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Counters
Description
CpuIdle%
CpuSys% is the percentage of idle processor
time.
CpuSys%
CpuSys% is the percentage of non-idle
processor time that is spent in system mode.
CpuUser%
CpuUser% is the percentage of non-idle
processor time that is spent in user mode.
FreeMemory KBytes
FreeMemory KBytes is the amount of idle
memory.
FreeSwap KBytes
FreeSwap is the amount of free swap space on
the system.
MaxUserMem KBytes
MaxUserMem is the amount of maximum user
memory on the system.
Users
Users is the number of users logged on to the
machine.
tcpInSegs/sec
tcpInSegs/sec is the rate at which segments are
Conductor
received, including those received in error.
udp
tcpOutSegs/sec
tcpOutSegs/sec is the rate at which segments
are sent, including those on current
connections but excluding those containing
only retransmitted octets.
udpInDatagrams/sec
udpInDatagrams/sec is the rate of UDP
datagrams being delivered to UDP users.
udpOutDatagrams/sec
udpOutDatagrams/sec is the rate at which UDP
datagrams are sent.
QALoad-Linux Performance
This template includes the following counters and categories:
Category
Linux System
tcp
Counters
Description
CpuIdle%
CpuSys% is the percentage of idle processor
time.
CpuSys%
CpuSys% is the percentage of non-idle processor
time that is spent in system mode.
CpuUser%
CpuUser% is the percentage of non-idle
processor time that is spent in user mode.
Interrupts/sec
Interrupts/sec is the rate of system interrupts.
PagesIn KBytes/sec
PagesIn KBytes/sec is the rate of pages read in
from disk.
PagesOut KBytes/sec
PagesOut KBytes/sec is the rate of pages written
to disk.
SwapIn KBytes/sec
SwapIn KBytes/sec is the rate at which pages are
being swapped in.
SwapOut KBytes/sec
SwapOut KBytes/sec is the rate at which pages
are being swapped out.
tcpInSegs/sec
tcpInSegs/sec is the rate at which segments are
received, including those received in error.
tcpOutSegs/sec
tcpOutSegs/sec is the rate at which segments are
sent, including those on current connections
but excluding those containing only
retransmitted octets.
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Using the Conductor
udp
udpInDatagrams/sec
udpInDatagrams/sec is the rate of UDP
datagrams being delivered to UDP users.
udpOutDatagrams/sec
udpOutDatagrams/sec is the rate at which UDP
datagrams are sent.
QALoad-SUN Performance
This template includes the following counters and categories:
Category
Sun System
tcp
udp
Counters
CpuIdle%
CpuSys% is the percentage of idle processor
time.
CpuSys%
CpuSys% is the percentage of non-idle processor
time that is spent in system mode.
CpuUser%
CpuUser% is the percentage of non-idle
processor time that is spent in user mode.
Interrupts/sec
Interrupts/sec is the rate of system interrupts.
PagesIn KBytes/sec
PagesIn KBytes/sec is the rate of pages read in
from disk.
PagesOut KBytes/sec
PagesOut KBytes/sec is the rate of pages written
to disk.
SwapIn KBytes/sec
SwapIn KBytes/sec is the rate at which pages are
being swapped in.
SwapOut KBytes/sec
SwapOut KBytes/sec is the rate at which pages
are being swapped out.
tcpInSegs/sec
tcpInSegs/sec is the rate at which segments are
received, including those received in error.
tcpOutSegs/sec
tcpOutSegs/sec is the rate at which segments are
sent, including those on current connections
but excluding those containing only
retransmitted octets.
udpInDatagrams/sec
udpInDatagrams/sec is the rate of UDP
datagrams being delivered to UDP users.
udpOutDatagrams/sec
udpOutDatagrams/sec is the rate at which UDP
datagrams are sent.
WebLogic Templates
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Description
Conductor
WebLogic Templates
QALoad provides the following pre-defined WebLogic templates:
QALoad-WebLogic Availability
QALoad-WebLogic EJB Performance
QALoad-WebLogic JDBC Performance
QALoad-WebLogic JMS Performance
QALoad-WebLogic Performance
QALoad-WebLogic Server Security
QALoad-WebLogic Servlet Performance
QALoad-WebLogic Availability
This template monitors the availability of a WebLogic server. The WebLogic Availability template returns
critical information about the availability of your WebLogic installation.
The default sampling interval for this template is 5 minutes.
The WebLogic Availability template uses the following WebLogic extended counters:
Category
ExecuteQueueRuntime
Counters
Description
ExecuteQueueRuntime_PendingRequestOldestTime
Returns the time
that the longest
waiting request was
placed in the
queue.
Rule: The
Application Server
is not in running
mode if this
counter value is >
50.
ServerRuntime
ServerRuntime_StateVal
Returns current
state of the server.
This counter
provides a more
detailed state than
available or not.
Rule: The
Application Server
is not in running
mode if this
counter value is <>
2.
ServerSecurityRuntime
ServerSecurityRuntime_LockedUsersCurrentCount
Returns the
number of
currently locked
users on this
server.
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Using the Conductor
Rule: There are a
high number of
users locked out if
this counter value
is > 5.
QALoad-WebLogic EJB Performance
This template monitors the EJB performance of a WebLogic server. The WebLogic EJB Performance
template returns critical information about the performance of your WebLogic installation.
The default sampling interval for this template is 5 minutes.
The WebLogic EJB Performance template uses the following WebLogic extended counters:
Category
EJBCacheRuntime
Counters
EJBCacheRuntime_ActivationCount
Description
Returns the total number of times
the EJB was activated.
Rule: There is inefficient cache
access if the number of activations is
> 20.
EJBCacheRuntime_CacheAccessCount
Returns the total number of
attempts to access a bean from the
cache.
EJBCacheRuntime_CachedBeansCurrentC
ount
Returns the total number of beans
from this EJB Home currently in the
EJB cache.
EJBCacheRuntime_CacheHitCount
Returns the total number of times
an attempt to access a bean from the
cache succeeded. The
cacheHitCount value subtracting the
cache miss count from the cache
access count.
EJBCacheRuntime_PassivationCount
Returns the total number of beans
from this EJB Home that have been
passivated.
Rule: There is inefficient cache
access if the number of passivations
is > 20.
EJBLockingRuntime
68
EJBLockingRuntime_LockEntriesCurrent
Count
Returns the number of currently
locked users on this server.
EJBLockingRuntime_TimeoutTotalCount
Returns the current number Threads
Conductor
that have timed out waiting for a
lock on a bean.
EJBLockingRuntime_WaiterTotalCount
Returns the number of objects
waiting on the lock.
Rule: There are a lot of objects
waiting if the interval value of this
counter is > 10.
EJBPoolRuntime
EJBPoolRuntime_BeansInUseCurrentCou
nt
Returns the number of bean
instances currently being used from
the free pool.
EJBPoolRuntime_IdleBeansCount
Returns the total number of
available bean instances in the free
pool.
EJBPoolRuntime_TimeoutTotalCount
Returns the total number of Threads
that have timed out waiting for an
available bean instance from the free
pool.
Rule: There are a lot of objects
timing out if the interval value of
this counter is > 20.
EJBPoolRuntime_WaiterTotalCount
Returns the total number of Threads
currently waiting for an available
bean instance from the free pool.
Rule: There are a lot of objects
waiting if the interval value of this
counter is > 10.
EJBTransactionRuntime
EJBTransactionRuntime_TransactionsCo
mmittedTotalCount
Returns the total number of
transactions that have been
committed for this EJB.
Rule: There is high transaction
overhead if the interval value of this
counter is > 20.
EJBTransactionRuntime_TransactionsRoll
edBackTotalCount
Returns the total number of
transactions that have been rolled
back for this EJB.
Rule: There is high transaction
overhead if the interval value of this
counter is > 20.
EJBTransactionRuntime_TransactionsTim
edOutTotalCount
Returns the total number of
transactions that have timed out for
this EJB.
Rule: There is high transaction
overhead if the interval value of this
counter is > 20.
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Using the Conductor
MessageDrivenEJBRuntime
MessageDrivenEJBRuntime_JMSConnecti
onAlive
Returns a boolean of the status of
the connection. This counter
displays the state of a JMS
connection.
Rule: The JMS Connection is down if
this counter value is = 0.
QALoad-WebLogic JDBC Performance
This template monitors the JDBC performance of a WebLogic server. The WebLogic JDBC Performance
template returns critical information about the performance of your WebLogic installation.
The default sampling interval for this template is 5 minutes.
The WebLogic JDBC Performance template uses the following WebLogic extended counters:
Category
JDBC Connection Pool
Runtime
Counters
Description
ActiveConnectionsCurrentCount
Returns the current number of active
connections.
ActiveConnectionsHighCount
Returns the highest number of active
current connections. The count starts
at zero each time the
JDBCConnectionPoolRuntimeMBean
is instantiated.
ConnectionDelayTime
Returns the number of milliseconds it
takes to get a physical connection
from the database. It is calculated as
summary time to connect divided by
summary number of connections.
ConnectionsTotalCount
Returns the total number of JDBC
connections in this
DBCConnectionPoolRuntimeMBean
since the pool was instantiated.
FailuresToReconnectCount
Returns the number of attempts to
refresh a connection to a database
that failed. Failure may be due to the
database being unavailable or a
broken connection to the database.
Rule: There are a high number of
connection reconnect failures when
this counter value is > 1.
LeakedConnectionCount
70
Returns the number of connections
that were checked out from the
Conductor
connection pool but were not
returned to the pool by calling close
().
Rule: There is a lot of connection
pool leakage if this counter value is >
5.
PoolState
Current state of the connection pool.
Returns True if the pool is enabled,
False if the pool is disabled.
PrepStmtCacheMissCount
Returns a count of the cases when
the cache does not have a cached
statement to satisfy a request.
WaitingForConnectionHighCount
The high water mark of waiters for a
connection in this
JDBCConnectionPoolRuntimeMBean.
The count starts at zero each time the
JDBCConnectionPoolRuntimeMBean
is instantiated.
WaitSecondsHighCount
Returns the highest number of
seconds a connection waited.
Rule: There is a long wait for the
connection pool if this counter value
is > 120.
QALoad-WebLogic JMS Performance
This template monitors the JMS performance of a WebLogic server. The WebLogic JMS Performance
template returns critical information about the performance of your WebLogic installation.
The default sampling interval for this template is 5 minutes.
The WebLogic JMS Performance template uses the following WebLogic extended counters:
Category
JMSConnectionRuntime
JMSRuntime
Counters
Description
SessionsCurrentCount
Returns the current number of
sessions for this connection.
SessionsTotalCount
Returns the number of sessions
on this connection since the last
reset.
ConnectionsCurrentCount
Returns the current number of
connections to this WebLogic
Server.
ConnectionsTotalCount
Returns the total number of
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Using the Conductor
connections made to this
WebLogic Server since the last
reset.
JMSServerRuntime
MessagesPendingCount
Returns the current number of
messages pending
(unacknowledged or
uncommitted) stored on this
JMS server. Pending messages
are over and above the current
number of messages.
Rule: There are a large number
of pending messages if this
counter value is > 50.
JMSSessionRuntime
MessagesReceivedCount
Returns the number of messages
received on this destination
since the last reset.
ConsumersCurrentCount
Returns the current number of
consumers for this session.
MessagesPendingCount
Returns the number of messages
pending (uncommitted and
unacknowledged) for this
session.
Rule: There are a large number
of pending JMS Session
messages if this counter value is
> 50.
MessagesReceivedCount
Returns the number of messages
received on this destination
since the last reset.
MessagesSentCount
Returns the number of bytes
sent by this session since the
last reset.
QALoad-WebLogic Performance
This template monitors the performance of a WebLogic server. The WebLogic Performance template
returns critical information about the performance of your WebLogic installation.
The default sampling interval for this template is 5 minutes.
The WebLogic Performance template uses the following WebLogic extended counters:
Category
72
Counters
Description
Conductor
ConnectorServiceRuntime
ConnectionPoolCurrentCount
Returns the number of
currently deployed
connection pools.
ExecuteQueueRuntime
ExecuteThreadCurrentIdleCount
Returns the number of idle
threads assigned to the
queue.
PendingRequestCurrentCount
Returns the number of
waiting requests in the
queue.
Rule: There are a large
number of pending requests
if this counter value is > 50.
JMSRuntime
ServicedRequestTotalCount
Returns the number of
requests that have been
processed by this queue.
ConnectionsCurrentCount
Returns the current number
of connections to this
WebLogic Server.
Rule: There are a large
number of JMS connections
if this counter value is > 20.
ActiveTransactionsTotalCount
Returns the number of active
transactions on the server.
SecondsActiveTotalCount
Returns the total number of
seconds for all committed
transactions.
TransactionRolledBackResourceTotalCount
Returns the number of
transactions that were rolled
back due to a resource error.
TransactionTotalCount
Returns the total number of
transactions processed. This
total includes all committed,
rolled back and heuristic
transaction completions.
JVMRuntime
HeapFreeCurrent
Returns the current amount
of free memory (in bytes) in
the JVM heap.
TimeServiceRuntime
ExceptionCount
Returns the total number of
exceptions thrown while
executing scheduled triggers.
JTARuntime
Rule: There are a large
number of exceptions if the
interval value of this counter
is > 20.
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Using the Conductor
ExecutionsPerMinute
Returns the average number
of triggers executed per
minute.
QALoad-WebLogic Server Security
This template monitors the security of a WebLogic server. The WebLogic Server Security template returns
critical information about the security status of your WebLogic installation.
The default sampling interval for this template is 5 minutes.
The WebLogic Server Security template uses the following WebLogic extended counters:
Category
ServerSecurityRuntime
Counters
InvalidLoginAttemptsTotalCount
Description
Returns the cumulative number of
invalid login attempts made on this
server.
Rule: Multiple invalid login
attempts have occurred when the
interval value of this counter is > 5.
LockedUsersCurrentCount
Returns the number of currently
locked users on this server.
Rule: There are multiple locked
users if this counter value is > 5.
LoginAttemptsWhileLockedTotalCount
Returns the cumulative number of
invalid login attempts made on this
server while the user was locked.
UnlockedUsersTotalCount
Returns the number times users
have been unlocked on this server.
QALoad-WebLogic Servlet Performance
This template monitors the performance of your WebLogic servlet. The WebLogic Servlet Performance
template returns critical information about the servlet performance of your WebLogic installation.
The default sampling interval for this template is 5 minutes.
The WebLogic Servlet Performance template uses the following WebLogic extended counters:
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Conductor
Category
ServletRuntime
Counters
ExecutionTimeAverage
Description
Returns the average time all invocations of the
servlet that has executed since the task was
created.
Rule: The servlet is averaging high execution
times if this counter value average is > 10.
ExecutionTimeHigh
Returns the amount of time the single longest
invocation of the servlet that has executed
since the task was created.
ExecutionTimeTotal
Returns the total amount of time all
invocations of the servlet that has executed
since the task was created.
InternalServlet
whether this is an Internal Servlet or not
InvocationTotalCount
Returns the total number of times the servlet
has been invoked. Gets the
invocationTotalCount attribute of the
ServletRuntimeMBean object.
ReloadTotalCount
Returns the total number of times the servlet is
reloaded. Gets the reloadTotalCount attribute
of the ServletRuntimeMBean object.
WebSphere Templates
WebSphere Templates
QALoad provides the following pre-defined WebSphere templates:
QALoad-WebSphere 5.0 and Before JDBC Performance
QALoad WebSphere 5.0 and Before Performance
QALoad-WebSphere 5.0 and Before Web Application Performance
QAL-WS 6.0 and Later JDBC Performance
QAL-WS 6.0 and Later Performance
QAL-WS 6.0 and Later Web Application Performance
QALoad-WebSphere 5.x and Below JDBC Performance
This template monitors the performance of a WebSphere JDBC server. The WebSphere JDBC Performance
template returns critical information about the JDBC performance of your WebSphere installation.
The default sampling interval for this template is 5 minutes.
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Using the Conductor
The WebSphere JDBC Performance template uses the following WebSphere extended counters:
Category
JDBC
Connectio
n Pool
Module
Counters
Description
connectionPoolModule.avgWaitTime
Average waiting time in milliseconds until a connecti
connectionPoolModule.concurrentWaiters
WebSphere extended counter for monitoring
connectionPoolModule.concurrentWaiters
connectionPoolModule.faults
Average waiting time in milliseconds until a connecti
connectionPoolModule.percentMaxed
Average percent of the time that all connections are in
Rule: IF 'WebSphere
connectionPoolModule.connectionPoolModule.perce
"**", Server: "**", Data Source: "all")' > 25.
connectionPoolModule.percentUsed
Average percent of the pool that is in use.
QALoad-WebSphere 5.x and below Web Application Performance
This template monitors the performance of a WebSphere 5.0 and earlier Web Application server. The
WebSphere 5.0 and earlier Web Application Performance template returns critical information about the
Web Application performance of your WebSphere installation.
The default sampling interval for this template is 5 minutes.
The WebSphere 5.0 and earlier Web Application Performance template uses the following WebSphere
extended counters:
Category
WebSphere
servletSessionsModule
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Counters
Description
servletSessionsModule.activateNonExistSessions
Number of requests for a
session that no longer exists,
presumably because the
session timed out. This
counter may indicate a high
number of timeout
conditions.
servletSessionsModule.activeSessions
The number of concurrently
active sessions. A session is
active if WebSphere is
currently processing a
request, which uses that
session. This counter may
indicate high activity.
servletSessionsModule.cacheDiscards
Number of session objects
that have been forced out of
the cache. This counter may
Conductor
indicate a need for more
memory in the cache.
WebSphere
webAppModule
servletSessionsModule.invalidatedSessions
Number of sessions
invalidated. This counter
may indicate a high number
of invalidated sessions.
servletSessionsModule.invalidatedViaTimeout
Number of requests for a
session that no
CountStatistic exists,
presumably because the
session timed out. This
counter may indicate a high
number of timeout
conditions.
webAppModule.servlets.concurrentRequests
Number of requests that are
concurrently processed. This
counter may indicate high
activity for an application.
webAppModule.servlets.numErrors
Total number of errors in a
servlet or Java Server Page
(JSP). This counter may
indicate a high number of
error incidents.
webAppModule.servlets.responseTime
Response time, in
milliseconds, of a servlet
request. This counter may
indicate a slow response
time of a request.
QALoad WebSphere 5.x and below Performance
This template includes the following counters and categories:
Category
WebSphere
jvmRuntimeModul
e
Counters
Description
jvmRuntimeModule.freeMemory
WebSphere extended counter for
monitoring
jvmRuntimeModule.freeMemory
jvmRuntimeModule.usedMemory
WebSphere extended counter for
monitoring
jvmRuntimeModule.usedMemory
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Using the Conductor
WebSphere
orbPerfModule
WebSphere
systemModule
WebSphere
threadPoolModule
orbPerfModule.concurrentRequests
WebSphere extended counter for
monitoring
orbPerfModule.concurrentRequests
orbPerfModule.interceptors.processingTime
WebSphere extended counter for
monitoring
orbPerfModule.interceptors.processingTime
orbPerfModule.referenceLookupTime
WebSphere extended counter for
monitoring
orbPerfModule.referenceLookupTime
systemModule.avgCpuUtilization
WebSphere extended counter for
monitoring
systemModule.avgCpuUtilization
systemModule.freeMemory
WebSphere extended counter for
monitoring systemModule.freeMemory
hreadPoolModule.activeThreads
WebSphere extended counter for
monitoring
threadPoolModule.activeThreads
QALoad-WebSphere 6.x and Above Performance
This template includes the following counters and categories:
Category
WebSphere
jvmRuntimeModul
e
WebSphere
systemModule
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Counters
Description
jvmRuntimeModule.freeMemory
WebSphere extended counter for
monitoring
jvmRuntimeModule.freeMemory
jvmRuntimeModule.heapSize
Total memory in JVM run time.
jvmRuntimeModule.usedMemory
WebSphere extended counter for
monitoring
jvmRuntimeModule.usedMemor
y
systemModule.CPUUsageSinceLastMeasurement
Average system CPU utilization
taken over the time interval
since the last reading. Because
the first call is required to
perform initialization, an invalid
value such as 0 is returned. All
subsequent calls return the
expected value. On SMP
machines, the value returned is
the utilization averaged over all
Conductor
CPUs.
WebSphere
threadPoolModule
threadPoolModule.activeCount
Number of concurrently active
threads.
WebSphere
transactionModule
transactionModule.activeCount
Number of concurrently active
global transactions.
transactionModule.globalTimeoutCount
Number of global transactions
timed out.
transactionModule.localTimeoutCount
Number of local transactions
timed out.
transactionModule.rolledbackCount
Total number of global
transactions rolled back.
QALoad-WebSphere 6.x and Above Web Application Performance
This template monitors the performance of a WebSphere 6.0 and later Web Application server. The
WebSphere 6.0 and later Web Application Performance template returns critical information about the
Web Application performance of your WebSphere installation.
The default sampling interval for this template is 5 minutes.
The WebSphere 6.0 and later Web Application Performance template uses the following WebSphere
extended counters:
Category
WebSphere
servletSessionsModul
e
Counters
Description
servletSessionsModule.externalReadTime
Time (in milliseconds)
taken in reading the
session data from
persistent store. For
multi-row sessions, the
metrics are for the
attribute; for single-row
sessions, the metrics are
for the whole session.
Applicable only for
persistent sessions.
When using a JMS
persistent store, you
have the choice of
whether to serialize the
data being replicated. If
you choose not to
serialize the data, the
counter is not available.
servletSessionsModule.externalWriteTime
Time (milliseconds)
taken to write the
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Using the Conductor
session data from the
persistent store.
Applicable only for
(serialized) persistent
sessions. Similar to
externalReadTime
described above.
WebSphere
webAppModule
servletSessionsModule.liveCount
Number of sessions that
are currently cached in
memory.
servletSessionsModule.noRoomForNewSessionCount
Applies only to session
in memory with
AllowOverflow=false.
The number of times
that a request for a new
session cannot be
handled because it
would exceed the
maximum session count.
webAppModule.servlets.concurrentRequests
Number of requests that
are concurrently
processed. This counter
may indicate high
activity for an
application.
webAppModule.servlets.errorCount
Total number of errors in
a servlet or Java Server
Page (JSP). This counter
may indicate a high
number of error
incidents.
webAppModule.requestCount
Total number of requests
a servlet processed.
webAppModule.serviceTime
Response time, in
milliseconds, of a servlet
request.
QALoad-WebSphere 6.x and Above JDBC Performance
This template monitors the performance of a WebSphere JDBC server. The WebSphere JDBC Performance
template returns critical information about the JDBC performance of your WebSphere installation.
The default sampling interval for this template is 5 minutes.
The WebSphere JDBC Performance template uses the following WebSphere extended counters:
Category
WebSphere
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Counters
connectionPoolModule.faultCount
Description
Total number of faults, such
Conductor
as, timeouts, in connection
pool.
Connection Pool
Module
connectionPoolModule.percentUsed
Average percent of the pool
that is in use.
connectionPoolModule.prepStmtCacheDiscardCount
Total number of statements
discarded by the LRU
algorithm of the statement
cache.
connectionPoolModule.waitingThreadCount
Number of threads that are
currently waiting for a
connection.
connectionPoolModule.waitTime
Average waiting time in
milliseconds until a
connection is granted.
WebSphere MQ Templates
WebSphere MQ Templates
QALoad provides the following pre-defined WebSphere MQ templates:
QALoad-WebSphere MQ Availability
QALoad-WebSphere MQ Performance
QALoad-WebSphere MQ Availability
This template monitors the availability of a WebSphere MQ server. The WebSphere MQ Availability
template returns critical information about the availability of your WebSphere MQ installation.
The default sampling interval for this template is 5 minutes.
The WebSphere MQ Availability template uses the following WebSphere MQ extended counters:
Counters
Description
Channel Events
Return the number of channel events for the current
interval.
Queue Manager Events
Reports the number of queue manager events for the
current interval.
Queue Manager
Up/Down
Monitors the running state of a queue manager.
QALoad-WebSphere MQ Performance
This template monitors the performance of a WebSphere MQ server. The WebSphere MQ Performance
template returns critical information about the performance of your WebSphere MQ installation.
The default sampling interval for this template is 5 minutes.
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Using the Conductor
The WebSphere MQ Performance template uses the following WebSphere MQ extended counters:
Counters
Performance Events
Description
This counter reports the number of
performance events for the current
interval.
WMI Templates
WMI Templates
QALoad provides the following pre-defined WMI templates:
QALoad-Active Monitoring Availability
QALoad-Citrix IMA Networking
QALoad-Citrix Metaframe All
QALoad-Citrix MetaFrame IMA
QALoad-Citrix MetaFrame Zone
QALoad-Cold Fusion
QALoad-Generic Application Availability and Performance
QALoad-MS IIS Availability
QALoad-MS IIS Performance
QALoad-Active Monitoring Availability
This template includes the following counters and categories:
Category
Counters
Memory
Available MBytes
Processor
% Processor Time
System
System Up Time
Description
QALoad-Citrix IMA Networking
This template includes the following counters and categories:
Category
Citrix IMA Networking
82
Counters
Bytes Received/sec
Description
Conductor
Bytes Sent/sec
Network Connections
Network Interface
Bytes Total/sec
QALoad-Citrix Metaframe All
This template includes the following counters and categories:
Category
Citrix MetaFrame XP
Counters
Description
Application Enumerations/sec
Application Resolution Time
(ms)
Application Resolutions/sec
Data Store Connection Failure
DataStore bytes read/sec
DataStore bytes written/sec
DataStore reads/sec
DataStore writes/sec
Dynamic Store bytes read/sec
DynamicStore bytes
written/sec
DynamicStore reads/sec
DynamicStore writes/sec
Filtered Application
Enumerations/sec
LocalHostCache bytes
read/sec
LocalHostCache bytes
written/sec
LocalHostCache reads/sec
LocalHostCache writes/sec
Zone Elections
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Using the Conductor
Zone Elections Won
Memory
Page Reads/sec
PhysicalDisk
% Disk Time
Processor
% Processor Time
QALoad-Citrix MetaFrame IMA
This template includes the following counters and categories:
Category
Citrix MetaFrame
XP
Counters
Application Enumerations/sec
Application Resolution Time (ms)
Application Resolutions/sec
Data Store Connection Failure
DataStore bytes read/sec
DataStore bytes written/sec
DataStore reads/sec
DataStore writes/sec
Filtered Application
Enumerations/sec
LocalHostCache bytes read/sec
LocalHostCache bytes written/sec
LocalHostCache reads/sec
LocalHostCache writes/sec
Terminal Services
Active Sessions
Total Sessions
QALoad-Citrix MetaFrame Zone
This template includes the following counters and categories:
84
Description
Conductor
Category
Citrix MetaFrame
XP
Counters
Description
Dynamic Store bytes read/sec
DynamicStore bytes
written/sec
DynamicStore reads/sec
DynamicStore writes/sec
LocalHostCache bytes read/sec
LocalHostCache bytes
written/sec
LocalHostCache reads/sec
Zone Elections
Zone Elections Won
Network Interface
Bytes Total/sec
Current Bandwidth
Terminal Services
Active Sessions
Total Sessions
QALoad-Cold Fusion
This template includes the following counters and categories:
Category
ColdFusion MX
Server
Counters
Description
Avg DB Time (msec)
Avg Queue Time (msec)
Avg Req Time (msec)
Bytes In / Sec
Bytes Out / Sec
DB Hits / Sec
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Using the Conductor
Page Hits / Sec
Queued Requests
Running Requests
Timed Out Requests
Memory
% Committed Bytes In Use
Available Bytes
Page Faults/sec
Process
% Processor Time
QALoad-Generic Application Availability and Performance
This template includes the following counters and categories:
Category
Counters
Process
% Processor Time
System
System Up Time
Description
QALoad-MS IIS Availability
This template includes the following counters and categories:
Category
Counters
System
System Up Time
Web Service
Current Anonymous
Users
Current Connections
Logon Attempts/sec
NonAnonymous
Users/sec
Not Found Errors/sec
Total Delete Requests
Total Files Sent
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Description
Conductor
Total Get Requests
Total NonAnonymous
Users
Total Not Found Errors
QALoad-MS IIS Performance
This template includes the following counters and categories:
Category
Internet
Information
Services Global
Counters
Description
Current Blocked Async I/O
Requests
Total Blocked Async I/O
Requests
Total Rejected Async I/O
Requests
URI Cache Flushes
URI Cache Hits
URI Cache Hits %
URI Cache Misses
PhysicalDisk
% Disk Time
Process
% Processor Time
Redirector
Current Commands
Network Errors/sec
Server
Work Item Shortages
Server Work
Queues
Queue Length
Web Service
Not Found Errors/sec
Windows Registry Templates
Windows Registry Templates
87
Using the Conductor
QALoad provides the following pre-defined Windows Registry templates:
QALoad-Active Monitoring Availability
QALoad-Citrix IMA Networking
QALoad-Citrix Metaframe all
QALoad-Citrix Metaframe IMA
QALoad-Citrix Metaframe Zone
QALoad-Cold Fusion
QALoad-Generic Application Availability and Performance
QALoad-MS IIS Availability
QALoad-MS IIS Performance
QALoad-Server Health
QALoad-Windows Availability
QALoad-Windows Performance
QALoad-Active Monitoring Availability
This template includes the following counters and categories:
Category
Counters
Description
Memory
Available MBytes
This counter monitors the Active
Monitoring client site and notifies
you when it is low on resources,
where Processor time is > 95% for
more than 3 intervals. The parameter
for this counter is Instance. The
default is _Total.
Processor
% Processor Time
Raise an event when Active
Monitoring client site is low on
memory resources, where Available
Memory is at or below 1MB for more
than 3 intervals.
System
System Up Time
This counter tests the network
connection between two machines
and monitors the communication
status of the machine that receives
communication.
QALoad-Citrix IMA Networking
This template includes the following counters and categories:
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Conductor
Category
Citrix IMA
Networking
Network Interface
Counters
Description
Bytes
Received/sec(“_Total”)
This counter monitors the
total bytes received per
second.
Bytes
Sent/sec(“_Total”)
This counter monitors the
total bytes sent per second.
Network Connections
This counter monitors the
network connections.
Bytes Total/sec
This counter monitors the
network connection total
bytes/sec.
QALoad-Citrix Metaframe all
This template includes the following counters and categories:
Category
Counters
Description
Citrix MetaFrame XP
Application Enumerations/sec
This counter monitors
application enumerations /
sec.
Application Resolution Time
(ms)
This counter monitors
application resolution
time.
Application Resolutions/sec
This counter monitors
application resolutions.
Data Store Connection Failure This counter monitors
datastore connection failure.
DataStore bytes read/sec
This counter monitors
datastore bytes reads per
second.
DataStore bytes written/sec
This counter monitors
datastore bytes written per
second.
DataStore reads/sec
This counter monitors
datastore reads per second.
DataStore writes/sec
This counter monitors
datastore writes per second.
Dynamic Store bytes read/sec
This counter monitors
DynamicStore bytes read per
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Using the Conductor
second.
DynamicStore bytes
written/sec
This counter monitors
DynamicStore bytes written
per second.
DynamicStore reads/sec
This counter monitors
DynamicStore reads per
second.
DynamicStore writes/sec
This counter monitors
DynamicStore writes per
second.
Filtered Application
Enumerations/sec
This counter monitors
Filtered Application
Enumerations per second.
LocalHostCache bytes read/sec This counter monitors
LoadHostCache bytes read
per second.
LocalHostCache bytes
written/sec
This counter monitors
LoadHostCache bytes
written per second.
LocalHostCache reads/sec
This counter monitors
LoadHostCache reads per
second.
LocalHostCache writes/sec
This counter monitors
LoadHostCache writes per
second.
Zone Elections
This counter monitors zone
elections.
Zone Elections Won
This counter monitors zone
elections won.
Memory
Page Reads/sec
This counter monitors page
reads per second.
PhysicalDisk
% Disk Time
This counter monitors %
disk time.
Processor
% Processor Time
This counter monitors %
processor time.
QALoad-Citrix Metaframe IMA
This template includes the following counters and categories:
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Conductor
Category
Citrix MetaFrame
XP
Counters
Application Enumerations/sec
Description
This counter monitors the
application enumeration per
second.
Application Resolution Time (ms) This counter monitors the
application resolution time.
Application Resolutions/sec
This counter monitors the
application resolution.
Data Store Connection Failure
This counter monitors the
datastore connection failure.
DataStore bytes read/sec
This counter monitors the
datastore bytes read per second.
DataStore bytes written/sec
This counter monitors the
datastore bytes written per second.
DataStore reads/sec
This counter monitors the
datastore reads per second.
DataStore writes/sec
This counter monitors the
datastore writes per second.
Filtered Application
Enumerations/sec
This counter monitors filtered
application enumerations per
second.
LocalHostCache bytes read/sec
This counter monitors
LoadHostCache bytes read per
second.
LocalHostCache bytes written/sec This counter monitors
LoadHostCache bytes written per
second.
Terminal Services
LocalHostCache reads/sec
This counter monitors
LoadHostCache reads per second.
LocalHostCache writes/sec
This counter monitors
LoadHostCache writes per second.
Active Sessions
This counter monitors active
sessions.
Total Sessions
This counter monitors total
sessions.
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Using the Conductor
QALoad-Citrix Metaframe Zone
This template includes the following counters and categories:
Category
Citrix MetaFrame
XP
Counters
Description
Dynamic Store bytes read/sec
This counter monitors the dynamic
store bytes read / sec.
DynamicStore bytes
written/sec
This counter monitors the dynamic
store bytes written / sec.
DynamicStore reads/sec
This counter monitors the dynamic
store reads / sec.
DynamicStore writes/sec
This counter monitors the dynamic
store writes / sec.
LocalHostCache bytes read/sec This counter monitors the
LocalHostCache bytes read / sec.
Network Interface
Terminal Services
LocalHostCache bytes
written/sec
This counter monitors the
LocalHostCache bytes written / sec.
LocalHostCache reads/sec
This counter monitors the
LocalHostCache reads / sec.
Zone Elections
This counter monitors the zone
elections.
Zone Elections Won
This counter monitors the zone
elections won.
Bytes Total/sec
This counter monitors network
connection total bytes.
Current Bandwidth
This counter monitors network
connection current bandwidth.
Active Sessions
This counter monitors active sessions.
Total Sessions
This counter monitors total sessions.
QALoad-Cold Fusion
This template includes the following counters and categories:
Category
ColdFusion MX
Server
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Counters
Avg DB Time (msec)
Description
Conductor
Avg Queue Time (msec)
Avg Req Time (msec)
Bytes In / Sec
Bytes Out / Sec
DB Hits / Sec
Page Hits / Sec
Queued Requests
Running Requests
Timed Out Requests
Memory
% Committed Bytes In
Use
Available Bytes
Page Faults/sec
Process
% Processor Time
QALoad-Generic Application Availability and Performance
This template includes the following counters and categories:
Category
Counters
Description
Process
% Processor Time
This counter returns the
percentage of elapsed time
that all threads of a process
use the processor to execute
instructions. This process
could include code executed to
handle certain hardware
interrupts or trap conditions.
System
System Up Time
This counter monitors critical
tasks by verifying the existence
of processes. You can monitor
single or multiple tasks
running on the system by
selecting the Processes tab
from the task manager and
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Using the Conductor
then selecting processes that
you want to monitor. You can
also monitor only certain
instances of a task by
specifying a Process ID to
monitor. If you do not specify
a Process ID, this counter
monitors all instances of the
task.
QALoad-MS IIS Availability
This template includes the following counters and categories:
Category
Counters
System
System Up Time
Web Service
Current Anonymous
Users
Description
Current Connections
Logon Attempts/sec
NonAnonymous Users/sec
Not Found Errors/sec
Total Delete Requests
Total Files Sent
Total Get Requests
Total NonAnonymous
Users
Total Not Found Errors
QALoad-MS IIS Performance
This template includes the following counters and categories:
Category
Internet
Information
Services Global
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Counters
Current Blocked Async
I/O Requests
Description
Conductor
Total Blocked Async I/O
Requests
Total Rejected Async
I/O Requests
URI Cache Flushes
URI Cache Hits
URI Cache Hits %
URI Cache Misses
PhysicalDisk
% Disk Time
Process
% Processor Time
Redirector
Current Commands
Network Errors/sec
Server
Work Item Shortages
Server Work Queues
Queue Length
Web Service
Not Found Errors/sec
QALoad-Server Health
This template includes the following counters and categories:
Category
Memory
Counters
Description
% Committed Bytes In
Use
Pages/sec
PhysicalDisk
% Disk Time
Avg. Disk Queue Length
Processor
% Processor Time
System
Processor Queue Length
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Using the Conductor
QALoad-Windows Availability
This template monitors the availability of the Windows operating system, focusing on:
Logons
Security
Up time
The default sampling interval for this template is 5 minutes.
This template includes the following counters and categories:
Category
Server
Counters
Description
Errors Access Permissions
The Microsoft Windows
Availability template uses these
Server registry counters to
monitor errors due to logon
problems.
Errors Granted Access
Errors Logon
Errors System
Logon Total
Server Sessions
Sessions Errored Out
Sessions Forced Off
Sessions Logged Off
Sessions Timed Out
System
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System Up Time
To enable these counters, you
must configure your Windows
system to audit logon and
logoff events. You can do this
by configuring the Audit Policy
in the User Manager for
Domains program.
The Microsoft Windows
Availability template uses these
Server registry counters to
monitor how well users’
sessions are running.
If there is a large number of
session errors, it is usually due
to systems rebooting often or
network errors.
This counter returns the
number of seconds that a
system was available for use. If
this number continues to reset
to zero, it means that the
system is rebooting often. For a
report that lists the number of
times that the system has
rebooted over a period of time,
see the Microsoft Windows
Availability Report topic.
Conductor
QALoad-Windows Performance
This template monitors the performance of the Microsoft Windows system, focusing on:
CPU
Disk I/O
Disk space
Memory
Network
The default sampling interval for this template is 5 minutes.
This template includes the following counters and categories:
Category
LogicalDisk
Counters
Description
% Disk Time
This counter monitors the
percentage of elapsed time that
the disk services read and write
requests, including the time
that the disk driver waits in the
disk queue. If this value is
consistently near 100%, the disk
is in very heavy use. You can
determine which processes are
making the majority of the disk
requests by monitoring them
individually.
% Free Space
This counter monitors low freespace situations.
Avg. Disk Queue Length
This counter indicates the
number of pending I/O service
requests. If the returned value is
greater than 2, there is a disk
problem. On a multi-disk
subsystem, such as a striped set
or striped with parity, you can
perform a calculation to
determine the presence of a disk
problem. The basic formula is
(Disk Queue Length) - (Number
of Physical Disk Drives in the
multi-disk configuration).
For example, if you have a
striped set with 3 disk drives
and a queue length of 5, then
you get an acceptable value of 2
(5 - 3 = 2).
Memory
Available Bytes
If the value returned by this
counter falls under 10 MB,
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Using the Conductor
virtual memory is running low.
To resolve this, close some
applications or increase the
memory settings. If this counter
is consistently low after an
application is running, it
usually indicates a system
memory leak.
As the value returned by this
counter decreases, the value
returned by the Committed
Bytes counter increases. This
indicates that a process is
allocating memory from the
virtual address space but might
not be using it. Because the
virtual address space is a limited
resource, use these counters to
check for applications that
allocate memory but do not use
it. To resolve this, add more
physical memory. When an
application finishes processing,
note the last value. If this
counter does not return to the
original value, the application
has a memory leak or a hidden
process that has not properly
terminated.
The acceptable range for
committed bytes should be less
than the physical RAM. The
default value is 64 MB.
98
Cache Faults/sec
If the value returned by this
counter is less than the value
returned by the Page faults/sec
counter, the system is paging
too much for a normal system.
To resolve this, add more
physical memory.
Committed Bytes
This counter returns the
amount of virtual memory (in
bytes) that was committed, as
opposed to memory that has
was reserved.
Page Faults/sec
If the value returned by this
counter is greater than 5, the
system is paging too much. Add
more physical memory. A
consistent value of 10 or later
needs immediate attention.
Conductor
Page Reads/sec
Pages/sec
If this counter returns a high
peak value, the system is
experiencing a lot of paging
activity. A high value also
indicates that your system does
not contain enough physical
memory to handle the demands
placed on it by the application.
To resolve this, add more
physical memory. To calculate
the % disk time used for paging,
use the following calculation:
(% Disk Time used for paging) =
(Memory, Pages/sec) * (Average
Disk Transfer/sec) * 100
Transition Faults/sec
Paging File
% Usage Peak
PhysicalDisk
% Disk Time
This counter returns the
maximum use of your page file.
If the value the counter returns
consistently reaches 90%, the
virtual address space is too
small. You should increase the
size of your paging file. When
the value returned by the
counter exceeds 75%, a
significant system performance
degradation becomes
noticeable.
Avg. Disk Queue Length
Avg. Disk sec/Transfer
Disk Reads/sec
Disk Writes/sec
Processor
% Interrupt Time
This counter monitors the
percentage of time that the
processor spent receiving and
servicing hardware interrupts
during the sample interval.
% Processor Time
On single processor systems, if
the value returned by this
counter is consistently higher
than 90%, the CPU probably
has a bottleneck. You should
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Using the Conductor
examine each process in the
system to determine which one
is using more of the processor
than it should. The process with
the highest peak is generally the
performance bottleneck.
% User Time
This counter monitors non-idle
processor time spent in User
mode as a percentage of the
sample interval.
Redirector
Network Errors/sec
This counter indicates how
many serious network errors
have occurred. These errors are
generally logged in the system
event log, so you can check
there for more information. If
an error occurs, take immediate
action to resolve the problem.
Server
Bytes Received/sec
Bytes Total/sec
Bytes Transmitted/sec
System
Errors Logon
This counter determines if an
unauthorized user is trying to
access your system.
Work Item Shortages
This counter monitors the
number of times that a work
item was not allocated. You
might need to increase the
InitWorkItems and
MaxWorkItems parameters for
the LanMan Server if this
number continues to increase.
Context Switches/sec
If the value returned by this
counter value is high, assign a
higher priority to the use of
critical sections or semaphores
by the program. This achieves a
higher throughput and reduces
task switching.
Processor Queue Length
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Conductor
Managing Monitoring Templates
Creating a New Template
To open the New Monitoring Template wizard:
1.
In Conductor, click Tools>Monitor Tasks to open the Manage Monitoring Tasks window.
2.
Click Templates>New Template. The New Monitoring Template Wizard appears.
3.
Click Next to start the procedure.
To create a new template:
Use the following steps in the New Monitoring Template wizard to create a new monitoring template:
Note: (WebLogic and WebSphere) When QALoad detects a managed server environment, you must also
select the individual server on which to model the template.
1.
Enter the template properties
2.
Configure the monitor
3.
Server discovery (WebLogic and WebSphere)
4.
Choose the server (WebLogic and WebSphere)
5.
Process the server (WebLogic and WebSphere)
6.
Counter discovery
7.
Choose the counters
8.
Choose the instances
9.
Review, save, and create the template
Next: Enter the Template Properties
Opening an Existing Template
Use the following steps to apply a previously created or pre-defined template.
To open and review an existing template:
1.
In the Conductor, click Tools>Monitor Tasks to open the Manage Monitoring Tasks window.
2.
In the Manage Monitoring Tasks window, click Templates>Open Existing. The Select a Monitor Template File
dialog box displays.
3.
In the Look in field, select a template type, then select a template and click Open. The template and its counters
display in the Manage Monitoring Tasks window.
Note: To apply a template to a task, use the New Monitoring Task wizard.
Editing Instances for Templates
Use the following steps to modify the instances to monitor in a custom template:
Step 1: Open the Edit Template Instances Wizard
Step 2: Choose the instances to monitor
Step 3: Save the template
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Using the Conductor
Step 1: Open the Edit Template Instances wizard:
1.
In the Conductor, click Tools>Monitor Tasks to display the Manage Monitoring Tasks window.
2.
Open the template to edit.
3.
Click Templates>Edit instances. The Edit Template Instances Wizard appears.
Step 2: Choose the instances of the counter to monitor:
Review the counters you selected. When a red dot
instance for the counter.
appears next to a counter, you must select an
1.
Double-click the counter group to display the counters.
2.
Select an instance for a counter and click Edit. The Select instance for counter dialog box appears.
3.
To add an instance: In the Available Instance pane, select an instance and click Add.
4.
To remove an instance: In the Selected instances pane, select an instance and click Remove.
5.
Repeat until you select all instances of the counter that you want to apply to the task.
6.
Click Save. You return to the Choose Instances dialog box.
7.
Repeat this process for each designated counter.
8.
Click Next. The Summary dialog box displays.
Step 3: Save the template:
1.
On the Summary dialog box, review the monitors and counters you have selected for the template. Click Back to
return to a dialog box and make changes to the information.
2.
Click Back to return to the previous step and edit the instances.
3.
Click Finish to create the template.
Modifying Template Counters Using New Discovery Data
When you want to add or edit counters in a custom template, you can generate the discovery data that you
add to the template. The Edit Monitoring Template wizard guides you through the process of generating
and applying new discovery data. Use the following steps to modify template counters using new
discovery:
Step 1: Open the Edit Monitoring Template Wizard
Step 2: Enter properties of the template
Step 3: Configure the monitor
Step 4: Counter Discovery
Step 5: Choose the counters
Step 6: Choose the instances of the counter
Step 7: Save the template
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Conductor
Step 1: Open the Edit Monitoring Template wizard:
1.
In the Manage Monitoring Tasks window, open the template to edit.
2.
Click Templates>Add/Edit Counter>Use new discovery data. The Edit Monitoring Template wizard appears.
3.
Click Next in the Welcome dialog box. The Enter properties of the template dialog box displays.
Note: (WebLogic and WebSphere) You can change the Java Settings field, if necessary. If the Java file
location has changed, click the Browse button and select the new location.
Step 2: Enter properties of the template:
In the Enter properties of the template dialog box, do the following:
1.
Review the template information.
2.
Type or edit the description for the template in the Description field
3.
Click Next. The Configure Monitor dialog box displays.
Note: (WebLogic and WebSphere) You can modify any field in the Configure Monitor dialog box except
the Admin Server field.
Step 3: Configure the monitor:
In the Configure Monitor Dialog, do the following:
1.
2.
Type the configuration data for the host machine, if necessary. This data is used to connect to the host machine and
to the host database during counter discovery and runtime data collection. The required configuration data varies
depending on the monitor type selected. Click a link below to view the required configuration details for your monitor
type.

Oracle Application Server

JVM

SAP

ServerVantage

SNMP

WebLogic

WebSphere

WebSphere MQ

Windows Registry

WMI
Click Next.

WebLogic and WebSphere) The Processing Servers dialog box displays. Follow the procedure for
selecting a server. Once you select the server, the automatic counter discovery process begins.

(All other monitor types) The automatic counter discovery process begins.
Step 4: Counter discovery:
QALoad automatically performs the counter discovery. The default maximum time for counter discovery is
300 seconds. When counter discovery is complete, the Choose Counters dialog box displays.
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Using the Conductor
Step 5: Choose the counters:
When the counter discovery process completes, the Add the desired counter to this template dialog box
appears.
1.
From the Available Items pane in the Choose Counters dialog box, select the Template tab or the Counter tab.
2.
To add an item, select a template or a counter to monitor in the task for this machine and monitor type, and click
Add, or double-click the item to display it in the Selected Items pane. Click Add All to add all the items on the
selected tab to the Selected Items pane.
3.
To remove an item, double-click the item in the Selected Items pane or select the item and click Remove. The item
is returned to the Available Items pane.
Note: Select multiple counters and templates by doing one of the following:
4.

To select nonadjacent counter items, click one counter item, and then hold down CTRL and
click each additional counter item.

To select adjacent counter items, click the first counter item in the sequence, and then hold
down SHIFT and click the last counter item.
Click Next. The Choose Instances dialog box displays.
Note: When you select a template containing counters that are not present on the machine you are
defining, you receive a message with a list of the counters that will not be added to the task.
Step 6: Choose the instances of the counter to monitor:
Review the selected counters. When a red dot appears next to a counter, select an instance of the counter.
1.
Double-click the counter group to display the counters.
2.
Select a counter and click Edit. The Select instance for counter dialog box appears.
3.
In the Available Instance pane, select an instance and click Add.
4.
Repeat until you select all instances of the counter that you want to apply to the task.
5.
Click Save. The Choose Instances dialog box appears.
6.
Repeat this process for each designated counter.
7.
Click Next. The Summary dialog box displays.
Step 7: Save the template:
1.
On the Summary dialog box, review the counters and instances you have selected for the template. Click Back to
return to a dialog box and make changes to the information.
2.
Click Finish to create the template.
Modifying Template Counters Using Cached Discovery
When you need to add or edit counters in a template that you created, you can use the cached counter
discovery data to modify the template.
Note: You cannot modify the counters in pre-defined templates.
Follow these steps to modify template counters using cached discovery:
Step 1: Select the counter to add or remove
Step 2: Choose the instances of the counter
Step 3: Save the template
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Conductor
Step 1: Select the counter to add or remove:
1.
In Conductor, click Tools>Monitor Tasks to open the Manage Monitoring Tasks window.
2.
Open the template to edit, then click Templates>Add/Edit counter>Use cached discovery data. The Edit
Template Counters wizard appears with the Add/Edit/Remove Template Counters dialog box displayed.
3.
From the Available Items pane, select the Template tab or the Counter tab.
4.
To add an item, select a template or a counter to monitor for this machine and monitor type, and click Add, or
double-click the item to display it in the Selected Items pane. Click Add All to add all the items on the selected tab
to the Selected Items pane.
5.
To remove an item, select the item in the Selected Items pane and click Remove, or double-click the item to return
it to the Available Items pane.
Note: Select multiple counters and templates by doing one of the following:
6.

To select nonadjacent counter items, click one counter item, and then hold down Ctrl and
click each additional counter item.

To select adjacent counter items, click the first counter item in the sequence, and then hold
down Shift and click the last counter item.
Click Next. The Add/Edit/Remove Template Instances dialog box displays.
Note: When you select a template that contains counters not present on the machine you are defining, a
message displays with a list of the counters that will not be added.
Step 2: Choose the instances of the counter to monitor:
1.
Review the selected counters. When a red dot appears next to a counter, select an instance of the counter.
2.
Double-click the counter group to display the counters.
3.
Select a counter and click Edit. The Select instance for counter dialog box appears.
4.
In the Available Instance pane, select an instance and click Add.
5.
Repeat until you select all instances of the counter that you want to apply.
6.
Click Save. The Choose Instances dialog box appears.
7.
Repeat this process for each designated counter.
8.
Click Next. The Summary dialog box displays.
Step 3: Save the template:
1.
On the Summary dialog box, review the selected monitors and counters for the template. Click Back to return to a
dialog box and make changes to the information.
2.
Click Finish to create the template.
Removing a Counter from a Template
Remove a counter from a template by following this procedure.
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Using the Conductor
To remove a counter from a template:
1.
In Conductor, click Tools>Monitor Tasks to open the Manage Monitoring Tasks window.
2.
Select the counter or counter family to delete.
3.
Click Templates>Remove counter.
4.
When the verification dialog box displays, click OK.
Note: You cannot remove the only counter family in a template or the last counter in a family.
Creating and Editing Monitoring Tasks
Creating a New Monitoring Task
To open the New Monitoring Task wizard:
1.
From the Conductor Start Page, click Configure Monitoring in the Tasks area.
OR
In the Conductor's Visual Designer, click Tools>Monitor Tasks to open the Manage Monitoring
Tasks window.
2. Click File>New. The New Monitoring Task wizard appears.
3. Click Next to start the procedure.
Note: You can open the Manage Monitoring Tasks window to edit or create a task by clicking the browse
button next to the Monitor task field in the Session node.
To create a new monitoring task:
Use the following steps in the New Monitoring Task Wizard to create a new monitoring task:
1.
Define the monitor
2.
Configure the monitor
3.
Discover the servers (WebLogic and WebSphere)
4.
Choose the servers (WebLogic and WebSphere)
5.
Process the Server (WebLogic and WebSphere)
6.
Discover the counters
7.
Choose the counters for the monitoring task
8.
Choose the instances of the counter to monitor
9.
Review the monitor definition
10. Save and create the monitoring task
Next: Define the Monitor
Using an Existing Monitoring Task
To select an existing monitoring task:
1.
From the Conductor Start Page, click Configure Monitoring in the Tasks area.
OR
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Conductor
In the Conductor's Visual Designer, click Tools>Monitor Tasks to open the Manage Monitoring
Tasks window.
2.
Click File>Open. The Choose an Existing Task dialog box appears.
3.
Select a task and click OK. The task displays in Manage Monitoring Tasks window.
4.
Select Enable runtime monitoring at the bottom of the window to enable the monitoring task.
Note: You also can enable monitoring in the Session node of the Visual Designer. Use the drop-down
arrow in the Monitor task field to select an existing task, then select Enable monitoring. You can open the
Manage Monitoring Tasks window to edit or create a task by clicking the browse button next to the Monitor
task field.
See also:
Choose an Existing Monitoring Task Dialog Box
Adding a Monitoring Machine
Use this procedure to add a monitor to an existing task.
Note: (WebLogic and WebSphere) In a managed server environment, you only can add a monitor to a task
from a different administrative server.

For WebLogic, you must use the same WebLogic jar files and WebLogic version as the current
monitor.

For WebSphere, you must use the same WebSphere Home, WebSphere client version, and
WebSphere server version as the current monitor.
To add a monitor to an existing task under the same administrative server, use Edit an Existing Server Group.
To open the New Monitoring Task wizard:
1.
In the Conductor, click Tools>Monitor Tasks to open the Manage Monitoring Tasks window.
2.
Click Actions>Add monitor. The Add Monitoring Machine wizard appears. Click Next to start the procedure.
Note: You can open the Manage Monitoring Tasks window to edit or create a task by clicking the browse
button next to the Monitor task field.
To add a monitoring machine:
Use the following steps in the Add Monitoring Machine wizard to add a monitoring machine to the task:
Note: (WebLogic and WebSphere) When QALoad detects a managed server environment, you must also
select the individual servers to monitor.
1.
Enter properties of the monitoring machine
2.
Configure the monitor
3.
Discover the Servers (WebLogic and WebSphere)
4.
Choose the Servers (WebLogic and WebSphere)
5.
Process the Server (WebLogic and WebSphere)
6.
Discover the counters
7.
Choose the counters for the monitoring task
8.
Choose the instances of the counter to monitor
9.
Review the monitor definition
10. Save and create the monitoring task
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Using the Conductor
Note: See Setting Up Integration with ServerVantage for the procedure used for this monitor type.
Editing a Monitoring Machine
To open the Edit Monitoring Machine wizard:
1.
In Conductor, click Tools>Monitor Tasks to open the Manage Monitoring Tasks window.
2.
Select a monitor in the Monitors panel, then click Actions>Edit monitor. The Edit Existing Monitor wizard
appears.
3.
Click Next to start the procedure.
Notes:

You can open the Manage Monitoring Tasks window to edit or create a task by clicking the
browse button next to the Monitor task field in the Session node.
(WebLogic and WebSphere) In a managed server environment, the Edit Monitor dialog box appears. Do
one of the following:
o Select Edit Server Group and click OK. The Edit Existing Monitor Group wizard appears. Use this
option to add, edit, or remove monitors under the same administrative server.
o Select Edit This Server and click OK. The Edit Existing Monitor wizard appears. Use the procedure
for Editing a Single Server in a Managed Server Environment to edit the counters or instances of
a single monitor in the managed server group.
To edit a monitoring machine:
Use the following steps in the Edit Existing Monitor wizard to change the properties of a monitoring
machine:
1.
Enter properties of the monitoring machine
2.
Configure Monitor Dialog
3.
Discover the Counters
4.
Choose Counters
5.
Choose Instances
6.
Review Monitor Definition
7.
Summary
Note: See Setting Up Integration with ServerVantage for the procedure used for this monitor type.
Editing an Existing Server Group
(WebLogic and WebSphere) In a managed server environment, you can add, edit, or remove monitors
managed under the same administrative server using this procedure.
To open the Edit Existing Monitor Group wizard:
108
1.
In the Conductor, click Tools>Monitor Tasks. The Manage Monitoring Tasks dialog box appears.
2.
Select a monitor, then click Actions>Edit Monitor. The Edit Monitor dialog box appears.
Conductor
3.
Select Edit Server Group, then click OK. The Edit Existing Monitor Group wizard appears.
4.
Click Next.
Note: You can open the Manage Monitoring Tasks window to edit or create a task by clicking the browse
button next to the Monitor task field.
To add, edit, or remove a monitor:
Use the following steps in the Edit Existing Monitor Group Wizard:
1. Enter Properties of the Monitoring Machine
2. Configure Monitor Dialog
3. Discover Servers
4. Choose Servers
5. Process Server
6. Discover Counters
7. Choose Counters
8. Choose Instances
9. Review Monitor Definition
10. Summary
Editing a Single Server in a Managed Server Environment
(WebLogic and WebSphere) Use this procedure to edit the counters and instances for a single server in a
managed server group.
To open the Edit Monitoring Machine wizard:
1.
In the Conductor, click Tools>Monitor Tasks. The Manage Monitoring Tasks dialog box appears.
2.
Select a monitor, then click Actions>Edit Monitor. The Edit Monitor dialog box appears.
3.
Select Edit This Server, then click OK. The Edit Existing Monitor wizard appears.
4.
Click Next.
Note: You can open the Manage Monitoring Tasks window to edit or create a task by clicking the browse
button next to the Monitor task field.
To edit the server:
Use the following steps in the Edit Existing Monitor wizard:
1.
Discover the counters
2.
Choose counters
3.
Choose instances
4.
Review Monitor Definition
5.
Summary
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Using the Conductor
Editing Instances
Use the following procedure to edit instances if the counters you are monitoring:
Step 1: Open the Edit Instances dialog box
Step 2: Choose the instances to monitor
Step 3: Review the monitor definition
Step 4: Save the task
Step 1: Open the Edit Instances dialog boxes:
1.
In the Conductor, click Tools>Monitor Tasks to open the Manage Monitoring Tasks window.
2.
Select the machine, the counter, or the instance to edit.
3.
Click Tools>Monitoring>Edit instances. The Edit Instances dialog box displays.
Step 2: Edit the instances of a counter:
1.
In the Choose Instances dialog box, double-click the counter group in the left-hand pane to display the counters.
2.
Select a counter and click Edit. The Select instance for counter dialog box appears.
Note: When a counter can not be edited, the Edit button is unavailable.
3.
Perform the necessary edits. You can do the following:

In the Available Instances pane, select an instance and click Add. The instance is added to the
Selected Instances pane. Repeat until you select all instances of the counter that you want to
apply to the task.

In the Selected Instances pane, select an instance and click Remove. The instance is removed
from the Selected Instances pane and added to the Available Instances pane.
4.
Click Save. The Choose Instances dialog box displays again.
5.
Repeat this process for each counter you want to edit.
6.
Click Next. The Review Monitor Definition dialog box displays.
Step 3: Review the monitor definition:
1.
Review the information for the monitoring machine you defined.
2.
Select one of the following:
Set up another monitor for this task - returns to the Define Monitor dialog box so you can add another
monitor to the monitoring task.
Continue without adding any more monitors - continues in this dialog box.
110
3.
(Optional) Click Save as Template to create a template for this monitoring task.
4.
(Optional) Select a monitor in the Monitors pane and click Remove Monitor to delete a monitor from the task.
5.
(Optional) Type a new value in the Sample Interval field. This is the frequency, in seconds, at which QALoad
requests data from ServerVantage during runtime data collection.
6.
Click Next. The Summary dialog box displays.
Conductor
Step 4: Save the task:
1.
Review the monitors and counters you have selected for the task. Click Back to return to a dialog box and make
changes to the information.
2.
In the Monitoring task name field, type a name for the monitoring task.
3.
In the Description field, type a description for the task.
4.
Select a monitor in the Monitors pane, and click View Monitor Details. The Properties of dialog box displays with
detailed information about the monitor configuration and the counters you selected.
5.
Click Finish to create the monitoring task.
6.
Select Enable runtime monitoring at the bottom of the window to enable the monitoring task.
Note: You also can enable monitoring in the Session node of the Visual Designer. Use the drop-down
arrow in the Monitor task field to select an existing task, then select Enable monitoring. You can open the
Manage Monitoring Tasks window to edit or create a task by clicking the browse button next to the Monitor
task field.
Removing a Monitor or a Counter from a Monitoring Task
Remove a monitor or a counter from a monitoring task, by following this procedure.
To remove a counter from a monitoring task:
1.
In the Monitors pane of the Manage Monitoring Tasks window, select the monitor, counter, or counter family to
delete.
2.
Click Actions>Remove Monitor/Counter.
3.
When the verification dialog box displays, click OK.
Note: You cannot remove the last monitor on a machine, the last counter in the family, or the last family of
counters in the task.
Monitoring Managed Server Environments
Monitoring Managed Server Environments
WebLogic and WebSphere servers can be configured into managed server environments, where a multiserver group is managed by an administrative server. You can create tasks and templates for managed
server environments using the procedures for creating and editing monitoring tasks and selecting the
servers from which to extract data.
When you select a WebLogic or WebSphere server to monitor and QALoad detects a managed server
environment, it automatically queries the administrative server for the individual servers it manages. All
servers that QALoad discovers are listed as available servers that you can select for monitoring. You also
can create a template in a managed server environment by selecting an individual server on which to
model the template.
Edit the counters and instances for a single server in a managed server group using the procedures for
creating and editing monitoring tasks. You also can add, edit, or remove monitors managed under the
same administrative server.
Creating Monitoring Tasks for Managed Servers
Use the New Monitoring Task wizard to create monitoring tasks for individual servers or groups of servers
in a managed server environment. When you create a monitoring task for a managed server environment,
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Using the Conductor
you select an administrative server to monitor. QALoad queries the administrative server for the individual
servers it manages. All servers discovered are listed as available for monitoring.
Note: When the information returned by the administrative server indicates that it does not manage any
other servers, the counter discovery process begins for the individual administrative server.
Once you select the servers to monitor, QALoad begins the counter discovery process for each server in
turn. Select the counters and instances of counters to monitor on the first server. QALoad includes these in
the task, and then begins the counter discovery process for the next server you selected.
Creating Monitoring Templates for Managed Servers
You can select counters and instances and save them to a template that you can use for other monitoring
tasks.
When you create a template in a managed server environment, you select a server on which to model the
template and adding the counters and instances of counters to the template.
QALoad queries the administrative server for all the servers it manages. From this list, select the server to
use as the model when creating the template. QALoad's New Monitoring Template wizard guides you
through the process of adding the counters and instances of counters to the template.
Note: You can select only one server as a model for the template. If the server you select is unavailable, you
are returned to the managed server selection dialog box to choose another server.
Editing Monitors in a Managed Server Environment
In a managed server environment, you can edit a single server or modify an existing group of servers in a
task.
Edit an individual server using the Edit Existing Monitor wizard. You can add or remove counters and
instances to monitor on the server. When you edit a server group, you use the Edit an Existing Server
Group wizard. You can add monitors, edit the properties of a monitor, or remove monitors managed
under the same administrative server. You also can change the counters and instances to monitor on an
individual machine.
ServerVantage
Overview of Server Monitoring with ServerVantage
If you are currently a licensed user of Compuware ServerVantage, you can integrate data from your existing
ServerVantage deployment directly into a QALoad timing file.
For this method to be successful, the following conditions must be met:
ServerVantage must be installed and configured correctly on your system.
ServerVantage must be scheduled to monitor the specified performance counters at a time that coincides with a
running QALoad test.
You must configure the port to use for the SQL database. The port must be open on the ServerVantage database
server so that QALoad can retrieve the counter data at the conclusion of the test. The default SQL port is1433.
QALoad must be able to access the ServerVantage database server on port 139 or 445 via tcp to obtain time stamps
at the beginning and end of the test.
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Conductor
QALoad must be able to access the ServerVantage agent using an ICMP ping during the monitor setup. If security
restrictions prevent pinging the agent, an entry can be added to the host's file on the Conductor machine mapping
the domain name of the agent to the IP address of a machine that can be pinged, such as the Conductor.
About ServerVantage
ServerVantage (formerly EcoTOOLS) monitors the availability and performance of applications, databases
and servers, allowing users to centrally manage events across all application components— Web servers,
firewalls, application servers, file systems, databases, middleware, and operating systems. ServerVantage
simultaneously monitors these components, analyzes both historical and real-time events, and correlates
monitored information for problem detection.
Integration with ServerVantage is configured from the QALoad Conductor. Performance counters collected
during a load test are included in the test's timing file and can be sorted and displayed in QALoad Analyze
in much the same way as QALoad timing data. For more information about installing or configuring
ServerVantage, refer to its product documentation.
Setting Up Integration with ServerVantage
Use the following steps to set up integration with Compuware ServerVantage:
Step 1: Open the New Monitoring Task Wizard
Step 2: Define and Configure the Monitor
Step 3: Review the Monitor Definition
Step 4: Review the Summary and Create the Task
Step 1: To open the New Monitoring Task wizard:
1.
Click Tools>Monitor Tasks.
2.
Click the Set up monitoring link, then select Set up a new monitoring task, then click OK to open the New
Monitoring Task wizard. Click Next.
Step 2: To define and configure the monitor:
1.
In the Define Monitor dialog box, click the arrow in the Monitor Type box and select ServerVantage.
2.
In the Control Server Database Host field, click the down arrow and select the hostname of the machine where the
ServerVantage server is located.
3.
Click Next. The Configure Monitor dialog box displays.
4.
In the Username field, type a valid user name to access the ServerVantage server, if necessary.
5.
In the Password field, type the password that corresponds to the user name above, if necessary.
6.
Select the Override Default Database check box to provide the ServerVantage database name. When this option is
not selected, QALoad uses the default ServerVantage database name. If you provided a different name during the
installation of ServerVantage, select this option and type the name in the Database Name field.
7.
In the Name field in the Vantage Agent area, type the hostname of a machine(s) where a ServerVantage Agent is
installed, and click the Add button to add it to your load test.
8.
Click Next to proceed to the next step, Review Monitor Definition.
Step 3: To review the monitor definition:
1.
Review the information for the monitoring machine you defined.
2.
Select one of the following:
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Using the Conductor
Set up another monitor for this task - returns to the Define Monitor dialog box so you can add another
monitor to the monitoring task.
Continue without adding any more monitors - continues in this dialog box.
3.
(Optional) In the Monitors pane, select the monitor, then click Save as Template to create a template for this
monitoring task.
4.
(Optional) In the Monitors pane, select the monitor type, then click Remove Monitor to delete a monitor from the
task.
5.
(Optional) Type a new value in the Sample Interval field. This is the frequency, in seconds, at which QALoad
requests data during runtime data collection.
6.
Click Next to proceed to the next step, where you review the summary and create the task.
Step 4: To review the summary and create the task:
1.
Review the monitors and counters you have selected for the task in the Summary dialog box. Click Back to return to
a dialog box and make changes to the information.
2.
In the Monitoring task name field, type a name for the monitoring task. The task is saved so you can reuse this
configuration of counters and instances.
3.
In the Description field, type a description for the task.
4.
Select a monitor in the Monitors pane, and click View Monitor Details. The Properties of dialog box displays with
detailed information about the monitor.
5.
Click Finish to create the monitoring task. The Manage Monitoring Tasks window displays.
Displaying ServerVantage Agent Data
If you set options to integrate Compuware ServerVantage resource utilization data before running a test,
that data is included in the resulting timing file. It can be sorted and displayed in QALoad Analyze in
much the same way as QALoad timing data. ServerVantage data provides a summary of all the Agents that
ServerVantage monitored during the load test and details aggregate statistics for Agent data points
including minimum, maximum, and mean data values.
When you open a timing file containing ServerVantage Agent data, QALoad Analyze displays test data with
QALoad timing data two ways:
ServerVantage Agent workstations are listed in the Server Monitoring group in the Workspace tree-view, under the
Resource Trends (ServerVantage) branch. From the Workspace, select Agent workstations to create detail or
graphical views of the Agent data points. Specifically, you can:

Display Agent data point details.

Graph Agent data point details.
Detailed data point information is displayed in the Data window. The ServerVantage detail view includes data such
as the name of the machine where you ran the ServerVantage Agent; the Agent name; and the minimum, maximum,
and mean data values for the Agent.
Note: ServerVantage resource utilization data is available only if you set the ServerVantage integration
options on the QALoad Conductor’s Test Information window before executing a load test.
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ApplicationVantage
Overview of ApplicationVantage
QALoad integrates with Compuware ApplicationVantage to help you analyze network performance during
a load test. ApplicationVantage provides granular thread details that allow network managers to identify
poorly performing applications. QALoad also provides test data that you can open in ApplicationVantage.
Before QALoad can collect network data during a load test, the following must be true:
The ApplicationVantage Agent is installed on the same machine as the QALoad Conductor. You can install either the
ApplicationVantage Agent or the ApplicationVantage Remote Agent.
You have specified on which NIC to capture in the Manage Players/Groups dialog box in Conductor. How?
At test time when a transaction is started, the Player configured to capture ApplicationVantage data starts
an ApplicationVantage trace. The trace stops when the transaction completes. When a Player is running a
script that is set to run in ApplicationVantage mode, every transaction generates a new trace file. At the
end of the test, these files are packaged into the test's timing file.
Hint: For information about ApplicationVantage, refer to the documentation you received with your
purchase of this tool.
Configuring a test to use ApplicationVantage
Integration with ApplicationVantage enables you to study network problems in detail. You can set up one
or more ApplicationVantage (AV) Player machines for the load test. These AV Player machines run a
QALoad script on a periodic basis while the AV Agent captures the network traffic that the script produces.
The resulting AV trace files (*.opx) are sent back to the Conductor with the regular QALoad timing file for
analysis after the test is complete.
To enable ApplicationVantage, you must be running ApplicationVantage 10.0 or greater. You must enable
ApplicationVantage in the Properties window, and set the Network Interface Card (NIC) Name used by the
machine on which the data is captured.
Enabling ApplicationVantage
You can enable or disable the ApplicationVantage for each load test on a script. To enable
ApplicationVantage, you must select the option, and then set the Network Interface Card (NIC) Name.
To enable ApplicationVantage:
1.
Click the script icon
for the appropriate script in the Visual Designer window. The Script Properties panel
appears on the right-hand side of the window.
2.
In the Script Properties panel, click the ApplicationVantage field, then select True.
3.
Click Tools>Manage Players.
4.
If necessary, set the NIC Name.
Setting up Network Interface Card Name
To use the ApplicationVantage Agent to collect data for ApplicationVantage, it is necessary to specify
which Network Interface Card (NIC) to capture on. This is the network information for the workstation
where your ApplicationVantage Remote Agent is installed.
To set up NIC Name:
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Using the Conductor
1.
On the Conductor's toolbar, select Tools>Manage Player. The Manage Players/Groups dialog box displays with
names of available Player machines listed in the Players area.
2.
Click the Player machine that will be running the virtual user to be captured. The information for that Player machine
displays in the Player Information area.
3.
If necessary, click the
4.
From the drop-down list in the NIC Name field, select the NIC that is used by the machine.
6.
Click Save, then click OK.
button next to Application Vantage Settings to expand the information.
ClientVantage
Overview of ClientVantage
Compuware ClientVantage manages end-user application performance and availability. Problems can be
diagnosed by powerful fault detection and analysis capabilities as well as resource monitoring.
ClientVantage must be installed on the same Windows workstation as the QALoad Conductor and the
QALoad Player.
Vantage Analyzer
Vantage Analyzer Integration
Compuware's Vantage Analyzer is designed for easy resolution of complex application performance issues.
It enables you to easily drill into specific problem transactions to determine the cause of bottlenecks in
your production applications. It also enables you to find Java code and SQL statements that are consuming
excessive resources. Troublesome memory leaks that are observed in your actual production servers can be
quickly resolved.
If you are currently a licensed user of Vantage Analyzer, you can integrate data from your existing Vantage
Analyzer deployment directly into a QALoad timing file.
For this method to be successful, the following conditions must be met:
The supported version of Vantage Analyzer must be installed and configured correctly on the same machine as
QALoad Analyze. For more information about installing or configuring Vantage Analyzer, refer to its product
documentation.
Time has to be synchronized between the QALoad Conductor machine and the Vantage Analyzer Nucleus Server
machine to make testing data more meaningful. The difference of the time between the two machines is saved in a
timing file.
Setting Up Integration with Vantage Analyzer
To set up integration with Compuware Vantage Analyzer:
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1.
Open or create a session in the Conductor. From the Tools menu, choose Monitor Tasks. The Manage Monitoring
Tasks dialog box displays.
2.
Click the Set up monitoring link and select Set up a new monitoring task. Click OK. If the Welcome to the New
Monitoring Task Wizard appears, click Next.
Conductor
3.
In the Define Monitor dialog box, click the arrow in the Monitor type box and select Vantage Analyzer.
4.
In the Nucleus Server Name or IP address field, type or select the machine host name or IP address of the machine
where the Vantage Analyzer Nucleus server runs.
5.
Click Next. The Configure Monitor Dialog box displays.
6.
In the Username field, type the login user ID for the Vantage Analyzer Nucleus server machine (not the Nucleus
server itself).
7.
In the Password field, type the login password for the Vantage Analyzer Nucleus server machine (not the Nucleus
server itself).
8.
Click Next. The Review Monitor Definition dialog box displays.
Capturing Vantage Analyzer Metrics
Capture several levels of Compuware Vantage Analyzer metrics during a conductor performance tests.
To capture Vantage Analzyer metrics:
1.
Set up capture of J2EE/ASP.Net web application for testing within Vantage Analzyer.
2.
Click Retrieve Vantage Analzyer Data button. The Retrieve Vantage Analyzer Data dialog box appears.
3.
Configure Vantage Analyzer monitoring tasks in the dialog box and click OK.
4.
Click the Capture Mode button to configure capture mode. The Vantage Analzyer Capture Mode-Settings dialog box
appears.
5.
Configure capture mode and click OK.
6.
Run the test.
Test Setup Interface
Overview of the Test Setup Interface
The Conductor provides two methods for designing a test session: the Visual Designer and the Grid View.
Visual Designer
The Conductor's main window is the Visual Designer. The Visual Designer consists of three parts that you
use to create the test session:
Visual Designer window - contains a series of nodes displayed in a tree view. The session displays as the top-level
node, while the scripts in the session are represented as nodes underneath the session.
Players/Groups panel - This is a dockable panel the appears on the left-hand side of the window. It displays all
Players and Groups available for the session.
Properties panel - This is a dockable panel the appears on the right-hand side of the window. Select a session node,
a script icon, or a Player machine in a script node to display information and set options for each one.
You can assign player machines to a script by dragging a player or a player group from the Player/Groups
panel and dropping it into the script in the Visual Designer window. Review and update properties of the
test elements in the Properties panel.
In addition, the Visual Designer's toolbar provides access to standard Windows functionality, such as Print
and Copy, as well as quick access to Conductor setup options and to QALoad Analyze.
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Using the Conductor
Grid View
Alternately, you can open the Grid View to enter test information and set up the machines and scripts for
the test. The Grid View is a dockable window that appears at the bottom of the Visual Designer window.
Changes made in the Grid View appear in the Visual Designer.
The fields you use to set options for your load test are displayed in two tabs:
Script Assignment tab - where you set up options for any scripts that have previously been recorded and compiled.
Machine Assignment tab - where you assign scripts to specific Player workstations, starting and ending virtual users
(VU), VU increments, and timing intervals.
The Grid View toolbars provides access to the main functions of assigning scripts and players to your load
test session.
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Conductor
Using the Visual Designer
The Visual Designer is the main window, the test setup interface, that displays a collection of icons and
nodes that represent your test session. The top level node is the current test session, and the child nodes
represent the scripts assigned to the session.
Use the Visual Designer to enter information about your test and set up the machines and scripts for the
test using the two panels in the Visual Designer window:
Players/Groups panel - This is a two-tabbed window that list the installed QALoad Players and any groups in which
they are members. Assign Players and groups to individual scripts by dragging and dropping them into the script
nodes.
Properties panel - This is a dynamic panel on the right-hand side of the Visual Designer that changes content
depending on the view you choose. Use the Properties panel to setup and review configurations for session, script,
and Player properties.
o
Session properties - Click the top-level Session node to display session properties in the Session
Properties panel. Use the Session Properties panel to enable recording and set session duration.
o
for any individual script to display its properties in
Script properties - Click the script icon
the Script Properties panel. Use the Script Properties panel to set options for Application
Vantage, external files and datapools, and additional script properties, such as debug options,
error handling, number of transactions, and timing options.
o
Player properties - Click an individual Player in a script node to view it's properties in the Player
Properties panel. You can set starting and ending virtual users (VU), VU increments, mode and
timing intervals, and set expert user options.
Use the toolbar buttons to assign scripts, assign players and groups, or to open the Test Configuration
Wizard, where you can easily configure your test session.
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Using the Conductor
Using the Grid View
You can use the Grid View to enter test information about your test and set up the machines and scripts
for the test. The Grid View contains two tabs:
Script Assignment tab - Use this tab to set up options for any scripts that have previously been recorded and
compiled. Any scripts you add here are included in your load test, and one virtual user is automatically assigned to
your script on the Machine Assignment tab. After setting up your scripts here, you must assign additional virtual
users to your script from the Machine Assignment tab.
Machine Assignment tab - Use the Machine Assignment tab in the Grid View to assign scripts to specific Player
workstations. You also assign starting and ending virtual users (VU), VU increments, and timing intervals.
To open the Grid View:
Click View>Grid Window. The Grid View pane appears below the Visual Designer window.
Runtime Window
When you start a test, the Conductor's interface changes to an interactive test control station called the
Runtime Window. From the Runtime Window, you can observe the progress of individual scripts and
Player machines, create real-time graphs, and change the behavior of scripts and Players from a running
test to better simulate the unpredictability of real users. This window has two unique areas:
Runtime main window - The information in the main Runtime window depends on the view you select in the Active
View field. You can view details for all test scripts, individual test scripts, all player machines, and individual player
machines.
Runtime Options Panel - The lower pane, called the Runtime Options Panel, displays data for the current view and
the individual script you select. This is a dockable control station that allows you to change virtual user options and
data transfer options while your test is running. The information in the Runtime Options panel is displayed in three
tabs: Virtual User Options Tab, Script Options Tab, Global Options Tab.
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Running a Test
Running a Load Test
After validating a script, it is safe to run a load test with that script.
To start a load test:
In the Conductor, click the Run button on the configuration and setup toolbar, or from the Actions menu,
choose Run. While a test is running, the Conductor's Interface changes to provide you with real-time test
options. For more information, see Runtime Window Interface.
Note: While any window on the desktop is re-sizing or re-positioning, all Windows applications pause. Do
not click and hold on a window caption or border for extended periods during a load test because it delays
message handling and may have an impact on test results.
While a load test is running, the Conductor’s toolbar changes from the Configuration and Setup Toolbar to
the Runtime Toolbar. The Runtime Toolbar buttons let you control the test and access detailed
information about the test while it is running. For more information, see Monitoring a Load Test. This
gives detailed information about what to expect from the QALoad Conductor while a test is running —
including descriptions of the Runtime Toolbar buttons
Running a Series of Tests
You can also run a series of tests — a batch test. A batch test comprises multiple session ID files. When you
run a batch test, the session files are executed sequentially until all of them are executed. The Conductor
enables you to run multiple batch tests without operator intervention. For more information, see Running
a Batch Test.
Running a Load Test
After validating a script, it is safe to run a load test with that script.
To start a load test:
In the Conductor, click the Run button on the configuration and setup toolbar, or from the Actions menu,
choose Run. While a test is running, the Conductor's Interface changes to provide you with real-time test
options. For more information, see Runtime Window Interface.
Note: While any window on the desktop is re-sizing or re-positioning, all Windows applications pause. Do
not click and hold on a window caption or border for extended periods during a load test because it delays
message handling and may have an impact on test results.
While a load test is running, the Conductor’s toolbar changes from the Configuration and Setup Toolbar to
the Runtime Toolbar. The Runtime Toolbar buttons let you control the test and access detailed
information about the test while it is running. For more information, see Monitoring a Load Test. This
gives detailed information about what to expect from the QALoad Conductor while a test is running —
including descriptions of the Runtime Toolbar buttons
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Running a Series of Tests
You can also run a series of tests — a batch test. A batch test comprises multiple session ID files. When you
run a batch test, the session files are executed sequentially until all of them are executed. The Conductor
enables you to run multiple batch tests without operator intervention. For more information, see Running
a Batch Test.
Dialing Up/Down Virtual Users
QALoad's dial-up/dial-down feature in Conductor allows you to dynamically add or reduce virtual users to
your test at the script or Player level while your test is running. This enables you to adjust your running
test according to test behavior on-the-fly, rather than stopping to re-configure playback criteria.
To use the dial-up/dial-down feature, you must:
be licensed for at least the number of virtual users requested
configure a dial-up/dial-down session before running the test
Notes:

If you have not configured a dial-up/dial-down session, you will not be allowed to add or
suspend virtual users while the test is running. For more information, see Configuring a Dial-up
Session.

Dial-up/dial-down is enabled only after all Virtual Users configured for the test session are
ramped up.

Dial-up/dial-down is not supported for a machine assignment entry that is using a player
group.
When your test is running, the bottom of the Test Information window turns into the dockable Runtime
Options panel, a portion of which is shown below:
When you click on a Player or script in the test's tree-view, the Runtime Options panel indicates how many
virtual users are currently running on the selected Player machine or script. You can change the number of
running virtual users per script or per Player by selecting the appropriate script or Player machine in the
tree-view, and then typing a new number in the Change Running To field (or by using the up/down
arrows).
To dial up or down (add or subtract) virtual users during a test:
1.
When your test is running, click on the script or Player workstation in the Runtime Window's tree-view for which you
want to add or subtract virtual users. On the Virtual User Options tab, the Currently Running/Available field shows
how many virtual users are currently running on that script or Player.
2.
In the Change Running To field, type a new number or use the up/down arrows to change the number.
3.
When you are done, click Apply. The Conductor will release or suspend the specified number of virtual users.
Notes:
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Conductor
Your changes do not take effect until you click Apply.
When you dial down a virtual user, the virtual user finishes the current transaction before going into a
suspended state.
Increase/Decrease Runtime Timing Updates
While a test is running, you can change the frequency at which timing updates are sent from the Players to
the Conductor in the Runtime window. Decreasing the update interval reduces the amount of overhead
incurred in large load tests due to the communications between the Conductor and large numbers of
virtual users.
To change the Runtime Timing updates:
1. On the Global Options tab of the Runtime Options panel (bottom pane), choose from the
following options:
2.

No Updates: Choose this option to stop sending timing data while the test is running. Data
will still be collected at the end of the test.

Send All: Choose this option to send all timing data as it is compiled.

Periodic Updates: Choose this option to specify a time interval for sending updates, then type
the time interval (in seconds) below.
Click Apply. Any change takes effect immediately, and applies to all scripts in the test.
Stopping a Load Test
A load test is complete when all virtual users exit. A virtual user automatically exits when one of the
following occurs:
A script encounters an EXIT command.
A script completes its transaction loop.
A QALoad function fails and Abort on Error is set in Error Handling
To stop a load test:
Click the Exit All Virtual Users button or click the Quit Current Test button. The Virtual User icon
changes to
and the message, "Session aborted by User", displays.
Adding Post-test Comments
If you selected the Display post test comments dialog option when you configured the Conductor, the
Post Test Comments window opens when you click the Quit Current Test button. Type any comments,
which are saved to the test’s Summary Report that you can view in QALoad Analyze.
Adding Post-test Comments
By setting the appropriate options when you configure the Conductor, you can add comments to a
completed test. The comments appear in the test's Summary Report in QALoad Analyze.
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Using the Conductor
To configure the Conductor for adding post-test comments:
1.
Select Tools>Options. The Options dialog box appears.
2.
In the Dialog section of the Conductor Sessions page , select Display post test comments dialog.
3.
Click OK. The Conductor is now configured so that you can add comments when a test completes.
To add post-test comments:
1.
In the Test Completed dialog box, click Exit Test.
OR
In the Runtime toolbar, click the Quit current test button. The Post Test Comments dialog box
displays.
2.
Type any comments in the dialog box, then click OK. Your comments are saved in the Post Test Comments field of
the Summary Report in
3.
QALoad Analyze.
Monitoring a Load Test
When you start a test, the QALoad Conductor’s interface changes to an interactive test control station,
referred to as the Runtime Window. The Runtime Window displays information about the scripts,
machines, and virtual users that are executing the load test. From the Runtime Window, you can observe
the progress of individual scripts and Player machines, create and view real-time graphs, and start or
suspend scripts and Players from a running test to better simulate the unpredictability of real users. For
more information, see Runtime Window Interface.
In addition to the test data shown by default on the Runtime Window, you can access detailed test
information using the QALoad Conductor’s Runtime Toolbar Buttons. You can:
View statistics for a single virtual user
View the activities of a virtual user in a browser-like window (WWW only)
Step to the next request (WWW only)
View the current datapool record
Display the script running on a single virtual user
Display messages sent from a Player workstation to the QALoad Conductor
Display statistics about Conductor/Player communication
Show/hide the Runtime Tree or Runtime Control Panel
Exit, abort, or quit the test
For more information, see Runtime Toolbar Buttons.
Viewing Test Statistics
Once all workstations stop executing, click the Quit Current Test button
on the toolbar to complete
the test and automatically create the timing file (.tim). To compute and view test statistics from the timing
file in QALoad Analyze, open Analyze from Conductor.
To access Analyze from the Conductor:
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Conductor
From the Conductor's Tools menu, choose Analyze.
Conductor Runtime Interface
Runtime Window Interface
When you start a test, the Conductor's interface changes to an interactive test control station called the
Runtime Window. The Runtime Window displays information about the scripts, machines, and virtual
users that are executing the load test. The Runtime window is divided into two areas – the main Runtime
window, and the dockable Runtime Options panel at the bottom of the window.
On the Runtime Window, you can observe the progress of individual scripts and Player machines, view
real-time graphs, and start or suspend scripts and Players from a running test to better simulate the
unpredictability of real users. The Runtime main window dynamically displays test details according to the
type of information you select in the Active View field.
The lower pane, the Runtime Options panel, displays data for the current view and the individual script
you select. This is a dockable control station that allows you to change virtual user options and data
transfer options while your test is running.
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Using the Conductor
Runtime Window
When you start a test, the Conductor's interface changes to an interactive test control station called the
Runtime Window. From the Runtime Window, you can observe the progress of individual scripts and
Player machines, create real-time graphs, and change the behavior of scripts and Players from a running
test to better simulate the unpredictability of real users. This window has two unique areas:
Runtime main window - The information in the main Runtime window depends on the view you select in the Active
View field. You can view details for all test scripts, individual test scripts, all player machines, and individual player
machines.
Runtime Options Panel - The lower pane, called the Runtime Options Panel, displays data for the current view and
the individual script you select. This is a dockable control station that allows you to change virtual user options and
data transfer options while your test is running. The information in the Runtime Options panel is displayed in three
tabs: Virtual User Options Tab, Script Options Tab, Global Options Tab.
Active View Details
Details for a running load test are displayed in the Runtime main window. The details displayed depend on
the option you select in the Active View field. You can choose:
All Virtual Users
Virtual Users by Script
Virtual Users by Machine
All Scripts
All Player Machines
Graphs View
Sessions View
VantageAnalyzer MReports View
All Virtual Users
Lists the script and player machine involved in the test and other detail information by each virtual user.
Double-click a virtual user to display the Virtual User Info window. Select this option to view details about
each virtual user running a script in the test:
Status icon: The first column displays an icon that indicates the status of the virtual user. A moving icon
represents a running virtual user; a still icon represents a virtual user that hasn't yet started or is suspended;
and an icon with a checkmark through it represents a virtual user that has exited. A red circle with an X
indicates errors have occurred on that virtual user, or that the test session was manually terminated using
the Exit, Abort, or Quit Current Test buttons.
User: Virtual User's identification number assigned by QALoad.
Script: Name of the script the virtual user is running.
Machine: Name of the Player machine on which the script is running.
Pass: Number of transactions successfully completed.
Fail: Number of transaction that have failed to complete successfully.
Min: Lists the shortest response time recorded for a transaction on the virtual user.
Max: Lists the longest response time recorded for a transaction on the virtual user.
Last: Lists the most recent response time recorded on the virtual user.
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Conductor
Status: Lists a status for the virtual user if any errors have been encountered, or lists the name of the
checkpoint the user has encountered if the option Send all timing data including Checkpoint information
was selected on the Runtime window of the Session Options dialog box during test setup. Double-click a
virtual user for more information, or if the error message is to long to read.
Errors:
Error Message:
Note: Double-click in any field to display the Virtual User Info dialog box with the details about each virtual
user.
back to top
Virtual Users by Script
Lists Virtual User and Player machine information within each assigned script. Double-click a virtual user
to display the Virtual User Info window. Select this option to view the following details for each virtual
user sorted by script:
User: Virtual User's identification number assigned by QALoad.
Machine: Name of the Player machine on which the script is running.
Pass: Number of transactions successfully completed.
Fail: Number of transaction that have failed to complete successfully.
Min: Lists the shortest response time recorded for a transaction on the virtual user.
Max: Lists the longest response time recorded for a transaction on the virtual user.
Last: Lists the most recent response time recorded on the virtual user.
Status: Lists a status for the virtual user if any errors have been encountered, or lists the name of the
checkpoint the user has encountered if the option Send all timing data including Checkpoint information
was selected on the Runtime window of the Session Options dialog box during test setup. Double-click a
virtual user for more information, or if the error message is to long to read.
Errors:
Error Message:
Note: Double-click in any field to display the Virtual User Info dialog box with the details about each virtual
user.
back to top
Virtual Users by Machine
Lists Virtual User and script information within each assigned player machine. Double-click a virtual user
to display the Virtual User Info window. Select this option to view the following details for each virtual
user sorted by Player machine:
User: Virtual User's identification number assigned by QALoad.
Script: Name of the script the virtual user is running.
Pass: Number of transactions successfully completed.
Fail: Number of transaction that have failed to complete successfully.
Min: Lists the shortest response time recorded for a transaction on the virtual user.
Max: Lists the longest response time recorded for a transaction on the virtual user.
Last: Lists the most recent response time recorded on the virtual user.
Status: Lists a status for the virtual user if any errors have been encountered, or lists the name of the
checkpoint the user has encountered if the option Send all timing data including Checkpoint information
was selected on the Runtime window of the Session Options dialog box during test setup. Double-click a
virtual user for more information, or if the error message is to long to read.
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Using the Conductor
Errors:
Error Message:
Note: Double-click in any field to display the Virtual User Info dialog box with the details about each virtual
user.
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All Scripts
Lists detail information for each script assigned to the test. Select this option to display the following
summary details about every script in the test:
Script: The name of the script.
Total Users: The total number of virtual users assigned to run the script.
Running: The total number of virtual users currently running the script. This number may vary at different
times in a single test if you are configured for dial-up virtual users, or have configured the test as a ramp-up
test.
Pass: The number of transactions successfully completed.
Fail: The number of transactions that have failed to complete successfully.
Response Time: The average response time of all virtual users currently running the test script.
Throughput: The average number of transactions per second this script is running.
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All Player machines
Lists detail information for each player machine assigned to the test. Select this option to display the
following summary information about each Player machine running the test.
Machine: The machine name, preceded by an icon indicating whether the test is currently running on the
machine or finished. A blue checkmark indicates a successfully completed test.
Total Users: The total number of virtual users controlled by that Player Agent.
Running: The total number of virtual users currently running on that Player Agent machine.
% Processor: The percentage of the Player Agent machine's processor that is currently in use.
% Memory: The percentage of the Player Agent machine's memory that is currently in use.
% Disk: The percentage of the Player Agent machine's disk space that is currently in use.
Status: Lists a general status for the test. For example, Test is running.
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Graphs View
Displays real-time graphs for checkpoints, performance counters, and Player machine health statistics. You
can control which types of data are graphed in addition to how the graphs appear. For detailed
information, refer to Graphs View.
Sessions View
Displays summary information about the test and the Player machine. For more information, refer to
Session View
VantageAnalyzer MReports View
Displays the latest retrieved VantageAnalyzer reports. If there are no VantageAnalyzer monitoring task
associated with the tests, the active view is not available. For more information, refer to VantageAnalyzer
MReports View.
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Conductor
Session View
When you select Session in the Active View field, the Conductor Runtime Window provides summary
information about the test session that is currently running. The Session view can be printed as a report by
right-clicking and choosing Print from the shortcut menu.
Note: The Session view below has been cropped to better fit this help topic, while still representing what a
real Session view might look like.
Click on the sections in the following graphic for more information about the Session view.
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130
Conductor
Graphs View
The Graphs view in the Conductor Runtime Window displays graphs of data collected during the test. By
default, the Graphs view displays graphs for response times, test status, and player machine health.
Other graphs, such as user-defined checkpoints and Remote Monitoring counters, can also be plotted in
the right pane of the Graphs view if they were enabled for the session.
To display graphs:
1.
Right-click on a counter or other data type in the tree view that you want to plot in a graph.
2.
Choose Add Graph or Add Plot To.
You can also modify a graph's appearance by right-clicking on the graph and choosing one of the
formatting options, such as colors and axes properties. To increase the visibility of a plot when you have
multiple plots on a graph, click on a plot (or that plot's number in the legend) to highlight it.
VantageAnalyzer MReports View
When selecting VantageAnalyzer MReports from the Active View field, the Conductor Runtime Window
provides the last retrieved VantageAnalyzer MReport. The three toolbar buttons available in this view allow
you to display the VantageAnalyzer Configuration dialog box, to refresh the VantageAnalzyer report, and
to launch the VantageAnalyzer Performance Console.
This view is not available if the VantageAnalyzer reports retrieval is not configured. To set up
VantageAnalyzer reports retrieval, refer to Retrieve VantageAnalyzer Data.
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Using the Conductor
Runtime Options Panel
This dockable control station enables you to change virtual user options and data transfer options while
your test is running. The information in the Runtime Options panel is displayed in three tabs:
Virtual User Options Tab
Currently Running/Available: Displays the number of currently running Virtual Users.
Change Running To: Click the arrows to change the number of Virtual Users in the test.
Apply: Click to apply your changes.
Script Options Tab
Changes made in this window will override options set during the original Script Assignment.
Note: Options on this tab are available only when Virtual Users by Script or All Scripts are selected in the
Active View.
Error Handling: Choose how to respond when an error occurs during execution of the transaction. During
large load tests, errors can sometimes indicate that the test is straining the limits of the hardware/software
in the testing environment. Options are:
Abort Transaction — If an error occurs while a transaction is being executed, the Player should abort the current
transaction and the virtual user who encountered the error should exit the test. Use this option when errors will make
the virtual user invalid for executing more transactions.
Continue Transaction — If an error occurs while a transaction is being executed, the Player should continue
executing the transaction as if the error didn’t occur. Select this option when errors are not critical to the performance
of the load test and can be safely ignored.
Restart Transaction (WWW, SAPGUI, and Citrix scripts only) — If an error occurs while a transaction is being
executed, the Player should abort the current transaction entirely and restart a new transaction from the beginning.
Note that the transaction count will increase for each transaction that is restarted.
Pacing: Enter a value in this field to change the rate of pacing. Pacing is the time interval between the start
of a transaction and the beginning of the next transaction on each workstation running the script. For
example: if a transaction is designed to duplicate the process of someone handling incoming telephone
calls and those calls arrive at a rate of 40 per hour/per person, set the pacing rate at 90 seconds.
Sleep: QALoad records the actual delays between requests and inserts the DO_SLEEP command in the
script to mimic those delays when the script is played back in a test. You can maintain the exact length of
the recorded delays at playback, or shorten them by entering a smaller percentage of the originally
recorded delay to play back. For example, if you recorded a delay of 10 seconds then DO_SLEEP (10); is
written to your script. Then, if a Sleep Factor of 50% is specified here, the Player will sleep for 5 seconds at
that statement when the test is executed.
Apply: Click to apply your changes to the running script.
Cancel: Click to cancel any changes you have not yet applied to the running script.
Global Options Tab
Global Options apply to all scripts.
Timing Updates: Select when the Players in your test should send timing information to the Conductor.
You can choose:
No Updates - No timing updates are sent to the Conductor
Send All - Sends all timing updates to the Conductor
Periodic Updates - If you chose Periodic Updates, type how often, in seconds, timing updates
should be sent to the Conductor in the (1 - 1000 Sec.) field.
Apply: Click to apply your changes to the running script.
Cancel: Click to cancel any changes you have not yet applied to the running script.
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Conductor
Monitoring a Running Test
Monitoring a Load Test
When you start a test, the QALoad Conductor’s interface changes to an interactive test control station,
referred to as the Runtime Window. The Runtime Window displays information about the scripts,
machines, and virtual users that are executing the load test. From the Runtime Window, you can observe
the progress of individual scripts and Player machines, create and view real-time graphs, and start or
suspend scripts and Players from a running test to better simulate the unpredictability of real users. For
more information, see Runtime Window Interface.
In addition to the test data shown by default on the Runtime Window, you can access detailed test
information using the QALoad Conductor’s Runtime Toolbar Buttons. You can:
View statistics for a single virtual user
View the activities of a virtual user in a browser-like window (WWW only)
Step to the next request (WWW only)
View the current datapool record
Display the script running on a single virtual user
Display messages sent from a Player workstation to the QALoad Conductor
Display statistics about Conductor/Player communication
Show/hide the Runtime Tree or Runtime Control Panel
Exit, abort, or quit the test
For more information, see Runtime Toolbar Buttons.
Monitoring CPU Usage
To help you monitor the impact of running a load test on a server, QALoad can collect data from selected
Players about CPU usage during a load test. The statistics collected during the test are merged into the test's
timing file so you can view them in QALoad Analyze after the test.
Note: During a load test, if the CPU idle time of your machine falls below 25%, check the individual
processes on your machine. If the Players and virtual users are utilizing most of the active CPU time, you
should use additional Player machines and fewer virtual users per Player to conduct your load test.
Watching a Script Execute
Use the Debug tab in the Conductor Runtime window to view the executing script. Note that it is possible
that you will not see the execution of every statement. In order to minimize network traffic between the
Conductor and the Players, the Player sends its script debug status to the Conductor once per second, so
that the Player can execute several statements without sending a debug message to the Conductor.
To open the Debug tab:
Select a Player in the Runtime window, then click the Debug Virtual User
toolbar button.
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Using the Conductor
Note: The Conductor highlights the script line that it is currently executing.
Graphing Checkpoints in Conductor
Use the Graphs view of the runtime Conductor to create real-time graphs of checkpoint response times
during script execution.
Note: Similar graphs are also available for post-test analysis in QALoad Analyze.
Checkpoints are listed in the tree view on the left side of the Graphs view of the runtime Conductor, as
shown in the example below. Both automatic and user-defined checkpoints appear in the Response Times
folder of each running script.
Creating a Graph of Checkpoint Response Times
Before you can review checkpoint response times in graph form, you must select the checkpoint counters
to include. To choose a checkpoint that should appear in a graph, highlight the checkpoint name, rightclick and choose either Add Graph to create a new graph or Add Plot To to add a data plot to an existing
graph.
If you choose the Add Graph option, the Add Graph dialog box appears. Select the options for how the
graph should appear and click OK.
Adding Thresholds
To better identify problem checkpoints, you can set thresholds on plots or graphs that indicate the number
of times the data record for that checkpoint has gone above or below the number you set. Thresholds can
be set from the Advanced tab of the Add Graph dialog box or by right-clicking on an existing graph and
choosing Thresholds.
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Highlighting Individual Plots
If you create several plots on a single graph, it may become difficult to see individual plots. To increase a
plot's visibility, click on a plot in the graph or a plot's number in the graph's legend. When highlighted,
the plot appears thicker and darker on the graph.
Saving Checkpoint Graphs to a Session ID
Checkpoint graphs that are created in the Conductor are automatically saved to the current session ID file.
To remove all graphs you added, click Graph>Restore Default Graph Layout.
Graphing Remote Monitoring
Use the Graphs view of the runtime Conductor to create real-time graphs of counter data during script
execution. Similar graphs are also available for post-test analysis in QALoad Analyze.
Selecting Counters to /*Graph
All counter data that is available for graphing is located in the tree view on the left side of the of the
Graphs view Data window, as shown below.
Scripts of any middleware type collect the following default counter data, which is available in the
Conductor for real-time graphing:
Global counters: Running VU%, total running VUs, and errors
Script counters: Running VUs, response times, and transactions
Player machine health: % processor, % memory used, % disk space, %disk time, % paging file
Additional middleware-based graphs are also generated by default and vary by middleware. For example,
for the WWW middleware, several performance-based counters are automatically collected and available
for graphing, including server responses and WWW traffic. You can monitor this data to determine the
optimum rate of performance of the application that is running.
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Graphing Counter Statistics
To choose a counter that should appear in a graph, highlight the checkpoint counter name or group of
counters (folder), right-click and choose either Add Graph to create a new graph or Add Plot To to add a
data plot to an existing graph.
If you choose the Add Graph option, the Add Graph dialog box appears. Select the options for how the
graph should appear and click OK.
To better identify problems in the test, you can set thresholds on plots or graphs that indicate the number
of times the data record for that counter has gone above or below the number you set. Thresholds can be
set from the Advanced tab of the Add Graph dialog box or by right-clicking on an existing graph and
choosing Thresholds.
Highlighting Individual Plots
If you create several plots on a single graph, it may become difficult to see individual plots. To increase a
plot's visibility, click on a plot in the graph or a plot's number in the graph's legend. When highlighted,
the plot appears thicker and darker on the graph.
Saving Counter Data Graphs to a Session ID
Counter data graphs that are created in the Conductor are automatically saved to the current session ID
file. To remove all graphs you added, click Graph>Restore Default Graph Layout.
Running a Series of Tests (Batch)
Running a Batch Test
By setting the appropriate options in the Conductor, you can elect to run a series of tests as a batch, rather
than one at a time. A batch test comprises multiple session ID files that are executed sequentially.
You can create a batch test by adding a number of session ID files to a batch file. Before you can add a
session ID to a batch file, the following conditions must be true:
The session must include a defined number of transactions. Sessions of unlimited transactions cannot be used in a
batch test.
All scripts to be included must exist before starting the batch test.
To run a batch test:
1.
Select Actions>Batch Test. The Configure Batch Test dialog box appears.
2.
Select the required session ID files in the Available Session Files list and click Add to add them to the Selected
Sessions list.
3.
If you want to run a previously defined batch, click the Load Batch File button in the toolbar to navigate to the
directory where the batch file (.run) resides. Select it, and click OK.
4.
In the Delay Between Tests field, click the up or down arrow to set the number of seconds to wait before starting
the next test.
5.
Click Save to save the current batch file, or click Save As... to save the batch file under a new name.
6.
Click OK to return to the main Visual Designer window
OR
Click Start to begin running the batch test.
The Conductor then executes each of the session ID files in sequence.
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Conductor
Adding Sessions to a Batch Test
Before a session is added, the following conditions must be true:
The session must include a defined number of transactions. Sessions of unlimited transactions cannot be used in a
batch test.
All scripts must exist prior to starting the batch test. This means that the files referenced in the selected session ID
files are present in the script directory.
A session can be placed in a batch multiple times. This feature might be used to re-run a test or to perform
housekeeping chores, such as logging users in or out of a host or database.
To add a session:
1.
From the Actions menu, choose Batch Test. The Configure Batch Test dialog box displays.
2.
In the Available Session Files box, highlight the session you want to add, and click the Add
button.
If you want to run a previously defined batch, click the Load button to navigate to the directory
where the batch file (.run) resides. Select it, and click OK.
The session is added to the Selected Sessions list on the right side of the dialog box.
3.
In the Delay Between Tests field, click the up or down arrow to set the number of seconds to wait before starting
the next test.
4.
Click Save to save the current batch file, or click Save As... to save the batch file under a new name.
5.
Click Start to begin running the batch test, or click OK to return to the main Visual Designer window.
Setting Delays Between Tests
You can set a fixed delay or pause between tests by specifying a value in the Delay Between Tests field on
the Configure Batch Test dialog box. After each test is complete, the Conductor delays for the specified
amount of time before starting the next test. To set up a series of tests, see Running a Batch Test.
Removing a Session from a Batch Test
To remove a session from a batch test:
1.
Select Actions>Batch Test. The Configure Batch Test dialog box appears.
2.
Click Load Batch File and select the file you want to modify.
3.
In the Selected Sessions pane, highlight the session to remove and click Remove.
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4.
Click OK.
Terminating a Batch Test
Stop a batch of tests the same way you would stop a single session test, by clicking the Abort All Virtual
Users or Exit All Virtual Users on the toolbar. The Virtual User icon changes to
and the message,
"Session aborted by User", displays. When the Conductor process stops for any reason during a load test,
the associated Player processes automatically terminate.
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Conductor
Troubleshooting
Conductor pre-test checks
Before a test begins, the Conductor completes the following pre-test checks of the parameter files and
Players. If any of these checks fail, the Conductor displays an error message.
Are there enough Players configured to support the number of users specified in the session ID file?
Does the number of users specified in the session ID file exceed the maximum number of users defined by your
authorization key?
Can the specified compiled script files be accessed?
Are all Players communicating with the Conductor? (The Conductor sends a request message to all the Players to
verify that they are up and running.)
Executing SSL scripts that use client certificates
If you are executing SSL scripts that use client certificates, you must manually copy the client certificates in
use to the Player machine(s) executing the script(s).
Manually copy the client certificates from the \Program Files\Micro Focus\QALoad\Certificates
directory to the same default directory on the Player machine.
Note: On the Unix player platform, you must create the Certificates sub-directory in the QALoad
directory. The directory name is case sensitive.
See also:
Create a Client Certificate in QALoad
Heartbeat message failure on a virtual user
When a Player machine crashes or experiences a loss of communication, the heartbeat message that the
Conductor sends out (if enabled) fails. This situation is indicated in the runtime Conductor through a
message on each virtual user that is affected. When the heartbeat message fails for a virtual user, the Status
column of the Details view of a script displays the following message: "The Player running this user failed
to respond to a heartbeat message."
The option for enabling a heartbeat message is located on the Player page of the Options dialog box in the
Conductor.
Timing file is too big
Depending on the length of the load test and the amount of data that was collected, timing files can grow
to excessively large sizes that become difficult to handle. To prevent timing files from becoming too large,
try modifying the following settings:
Disable automatic middleware checkpoint timings in the Conductor
Use the Conductor's timing data thinning options
Both of these settings are located on the Timing page of the Script Properties dialog box.
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To access the Script Properties dialog box:
1.
In the Visual Designer window, click the script icon
side of the window.
to display the script Properties panel on the right-hand
2.
In the Script Properties section, click the Timing Options field to display the browse [...] button.
3.
Click the browse [...] button.
Tips for running QALoad tests on UNIX systems
To successfully run large QALoad tests on UNIX systems, you may need to make adjustments to your
settings as described below:
General (AIX, Solaris, and RedHat Linux)
When you attempt to run a large number of virtual users on UNIX platforms, the virtual users do not
always synch. If virtual users do not synch, try increasing the Virtual User Startup Delay. By default,
QALoad Conductor sets the VU Startup Delay to 1 millisecond. This default is not high enough for UNIX
platforms. If the UNIX Player receives a value less than 15 milliseconds, the delay will be 15 milliseconds
or more.
To increase the delay:
1.
In the QALoad Conductor, click Tools>Options.
2.
Click Player in the tree view to display the Player page.
3.
In the VU Startup Delay field, type the number of milliseconds to delay virtual user startup.
Solaris
The default file descriptor limit on Solaris has a "soft" limit of 64, and a "hard" limit of 1024 (Solaris 2.6).
Per the Solaris 2 FAQ (refer to http://www.wins.uva.nl/pub/solaris/solaris2.html), the file descriptor limit is
described in the getrlimit() manual page as: "One more than the maximum value that the system may
assign to a newly created descriptor. This limit constrains the number of file descriptors that a process may
create."
To increase this limit, system administrators can modify the /etc/system file and reboot the system. For
example:
* set hard limit on file descriptors
set rlim_fd_max - 4096
*set soft limit on file descriptors
set rlim_fd_cur = 1024
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141
Index
.
new monitoring task .................................... 111
.cfg file................................................................ 13
new monitoring template ............................ 106
.rip file
player machine................................... 26, 28, 29
Logfile Generation.......................................... 18
Runtime Window......................................... 132
A
script assignment ........................................... 14
Analyze
scripts ............................................................... 9
test statistics.................................................. 132
Session view.................................................. 137
ApplicationVantage ................................. 121, 122
starting ............................................................. 4
B
test setup .............................................. 124, 147
batch test
timing file..................................................... 147
adding sessions ............................................. 145
Using the Grid View..................................... 127
removing a session ....................................... 146
Using the Visual Designer ............................ 126
running......................................................... 145
Conductor............................................................ 1
terminating................................................... 146
Conductor............................................................ 6
BlazeDS server monitoring................................. 60
Conductor........................................................ 126
bulk license checkout........................................... 4
Conductor main window
C
About the Grid View .................................... 127
checkpoints
About the Visual Designer............................ 126
graphing ....................................................... 142
Citrix
Setting Middleware Options for Citrix and SAP
..................................................................... 18
client certificate................................................ 147
ClientVantage .................................................. 122
concurrent
license ............................................................... 4
Conductor
About the Test Configuration Wizard.............. 6
Adding a Group .......................................... 6, 29
configuring ....................................................... 3
debug ............................................................ 142
graphs ........................................... 139, 142, 143
group............................................................... 29
Test setup interface....................................... 124
configuring
Conductor ........................................................ 3
counters
adding to a task .............................................. 55
graphing ....................................................... 143
JVM................................................................. 54
Oracle AS ........................................................ 53
remote monitoring............................... 107, 110
removing from a task ............................. 57, 117
SAP.................................................................. 39
SNMP .............................................................. 40
template................................................ 107, 110
WebLogic........................................................ 50
WebSphere ..................................................... 52
machine assignment ...................................... 13
143
Using the Conductor
Windows NT................................................... 34
JVM BlazeDS monitoring template.................... 60
Windows Registry........................................... 36
L
WMI................................................................ 53
licenses
counters/Rstat .................................................... 54
check out/in ..................................................... 4
CPU usage ........................................................ 141
virtual users ...................................................... 4
load test
D
data thinning ....................................................... 7
adding players ................................................ 26
datapool
monitoring ........................................... 131, 141
running......................................................... 128
removing used data .......................................... 8
stopping........................................................ 130
debug
script ....................................................... 18, 142
logfile generation............................................... 18
dial-up/down virtual users ............................... 129
M
E
machine configuration ...................................... 13
error handling ................................................ 7, 19
managed server environment
Editing a Single Monitor in a Managed Server
Environment............................................. 115
expert user
enabling ............................................................ 9
Editing Existing Monitor Group .................. 114
expert user.......................................................... 10
managed server environment.......................... 117
G
graph
monitor
removing from a task ............................. 57, 117
displaying ..................................................... 139
grid view window
monitoring
creating a new task....................................... 111
About the Grid View..................................... 127
creating a new template ............................... 106
Test setup interface....................................... 124
requirements .................................................. 30
H
heartbeat message ............................................ 147
MReports.......................................................... 139
N
I
instances........................................................... 115
integration
Application Vantage ..................................... 121
NIC Service Name ............................................ 122
O
options
Conductor
ClientVantage............................................... 122
Middleware Options for Citrix and SAP ..... 18
requirements................................................... 30
ServerVantage ............................................... 120
Oracle AS
counters.......................................................... 53
Vantage Analyzer.......................................... 123
templates ........................................................ 60
integration/Application Vantage ..................... 121
P
J
JVM
counters .......................................................... 54
144
performance monitoring ................................... 30
Player
Index
adding to a test session................................... 26
executing ...................................................... 142
errors............................................................... 18
validating.......................................................... 9
players and groups ............................................. 26
server monitoring
Remote Monitoring........................................ 33
Q
QALoad
Conductor ............................................ 1, 6, 126
QALoad RStatd Health Template ....................... 61
server monitoring .............................................. 30
ServerVantage .......................................... 119, 120
SLEEP
QALoad server availability template.................. 61
QALoad server health template ......................... 62
Runtime Options Panel ................................ 140
sleep factor
QALoad server performance template ............... 62
R
Setting the Sleep Factor Percentage................ 21
SNMP
ramp-up session ............................................... 129
counters.......................................................... 40
random seeds ....................................................... 2
templates ........................................................ 64
Remote Monitoring
SSL
counters ................................................ 107, 110
scripts ........................................................... 147
task........................................ 111, 112, 114, 115
statistics............................................................ 132
templates .................................. 57, 58, 107, 110
summary test results ........................................ 137
Remote Monitoring............................................ 33
T
Rstat counters..................................................... 54
task................................................................... 111
running a test................................................... 132
template
runtime data transfer ....................................... 130
counters........................................ 107, 110, 111
Runtime Window
creating................................................... 57, 106
Active View Details....................................... 134
instances....................................................... 107
Graphs view.................................................. 139
Oracle AS ........................................................ 60
Overview of the Runtime window interface 132
pre-defined ..................................................... 58
Runtime Options Panel ................................ 140
remote monitoring................................. 57, 106
Runtime Window ................................. 127, 133
SAP.................................................................. 62
Session view.................................................. 137
SNMP .............................................................. 64
S
WebLogic........................................................ 67
SAP
WebSphere ..................................................... 79
counters .......................................................... 39
WebSphere MQ .............................................. 85
Setting Middleware Options for Citrix and SAP
..................................................................... 18
Windows Registry........................................... 92
templates ........................................................ 62
script
assignment...................................................... 14
debugging ....................................................... 18
WMI................................................................ 86
template/QALoad server availability ................. 61
template/QALoad server health......................... 62
template/QALoad server performance............... 62
templates/QALoad RStatd health ...................... 61
145
Using the Conductor
V
test
adding a player ............................................... 26
Vantage Analyzer ............................................. 123
adding a script ................................................ 11
Vantage Analyzer metrics ................................ 124
pre-test checks .............................................. 147
VantageAnalyzer .............................................. 139
progress................................................. 127, 133
VantageAnalyzer MReports ............................. 139
removing a script...................................... 12, 14
virtual user
replacing a script ............................................ 11
adding to a test............................................. 129
results
changing the number..................................... 25
thinning data ................................................ 7
expert user ...................................................... 10
running................................................. 128, 145
licensing ........................................................... 4
setting up.......................................................... 2
visual designer
statistics ........................................................ 132
About the Visual Designer............................ 126
test configuration wizard ................................. 6, 7
Test setup interface....................................... 124
test setup interface ........................................... 124
W
thinning test data ................................................ 7
WebLogic
timing file
thinning............................................................ 7
troubleshooting ............................................ 147
timing options
counters.......................................................... 50
templates ........................................................ 67
WebSphere
counters.......................................................... 52
Setting Options for Timing Data.................... 22
templates ........................................................ 79
timing updates ................................................. 130
WebSphere MQ.................................................. 52
tips
Win 2K ............................................................... 36
Running QALoad Tests on UNIX Systems ... 148
troubleshooting
Windows NT ...................................................... 34
Windows Registry
running QALoad tests on UNIX................... 148
counters.......................................................... 36
timing file too big......................................... 147
templates ........................................................ 92
wizard
U
UNIX
running tests................................................. 148
Tips for Running QALoad Tests on UNIX
Systems...................................................... 148
146
Test Configuration Wizard............................... 6
WMI
counters.......................................................... 53
templates ........................................................ 86