Installation and Operation Manual
Blackmagic
Design Compact
Cameras
July 2016
English, 日本語, Français, Deutsch,
Español, 中文, 한국어 and Русский.
Languages
To go directly to your preferred language, simply click on the hyperlinks listed in the
contents below.
English
3
日本語
78
Français
154
Deutsch
230
Español
306
中文
382
한국어
458
Русский
534
English
Welcome
Thank you for purchasing your Blackmagic Camera!
We have worked hard to produce four cameras that have been designed from the
ground up to fit any kind of workflow. Our Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera is a
Super 16 digital film camera with 13 stops of dynamic range that is small enough to
take anywhere. Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera takes the size and capability of
the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera even further. With an incredibly tiny chassis
and a customizable expansion port complete with a host of remote control options,
now you can capture footage from practically any angle and tricky locations.
Our Cinema Camera records lossless compressed CinemaDNG RAW files for pristine
images, and the Production Camera 4K is a Super 35 4K camera with a global shutter
and 6G-SDI output.
Our cameras are designed to produce files that are “flat,” which means they preserve
the wide dynamic range from the sensor, as well as standard file formats that work with
all video software. This allows you to make creative decisions by using the included
DaVinci color correction software!
We think this means you get a cinema style shooting experience where you capture
and preserve more of the image so you have as many creative options as possible.
We have also included large screens on our cameras for easy focus and metadata entry.
We hope you connect to our cameras in creative ways and produce some amazing
looking images! We are extremely excited to see what creative work you produce!
Grant Petty
CEO Blackmagic Design
Contents
Blackmagic Design Compact Cameras
Getting Started 5
Using DaVinci Resolve 46
Attaching a Lens 5
Introducing DaVinci Resolve 46
Turning Your Camera On 6
Importing your Clips 46
Installing Media 8
Editing your Clips 47
Using an SD Card 9
Trimming Clips 48
Using an SSD 9
Mapping Keyboard Shortcuts 49
About SD Cards and SSDs Cards 10
Adding Transitions 50
Choosing a Fast SD Card 10
Adding Titles 51
Choosing a Fast SSD 11
Adding Audio Tracks 51
Checking Disk Speed 16
Color Correcting your Clips 52
Using Scopes 53
Recording 16
Recording Clips 16
Secondary Color Correction 54
Trigger Record 18
Qualifying a Color 55
Adding a Power Window 55
Playback 19
Playing Back Clips 19
Tracking a Window 56
Camera Connections 20
Using Plugins 57
Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 20
Mastering your Edit 58
Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera 21
Camera Video Output 59
Wiring Diagram for the
Blackmagic Micro Cinema
Camera Expansion Cable 23
Monitoring using SDI 59
Blackmagic Cinema Camera
and Blackmagic Production Camera 4K 24
Waveform Monitoring using
Thunderbolt 60
Using Blackmagic UltraScope 61
Tally Light Indicators 25
Blackmagic Camera Setup Software 65
Blackmagic Micro Cinema
Camera Tally Light 25
Post Production Workflow 66
Menu Settings 26
Dashboard 26
Camera Settings 27
Audio Settings 30
Recording Settings 32
File Naming Convention 34
Display Settings 35
Working with Files from SSDs 66
Working with Files from SD Cards 67
Working with 3rd Party Sofware 67
Using Final Cut Pro X 67
Using Avid Media Composer 68
Using Adobe Premiere Pro CC 69
Using Autodesk Smoke 69
Remote Settings 38
Attaching Accessories 70
On Screen Meters 39
Shimming the PL Mount 72
Adjusting Settings 41
Status Strip 42
Replacing the Fan 74
Entering Metadata 44
Help 76
What is the Slate? 44
Warranty 77
Getting Started
Getting started with your Blackmagic Camera is as simple as attaching a lens and turning the
camera on. If you are looking for information on using the Blackmagic URSA, URSA Mini or
Blackmagic Studio Camera, please refer to the manuals for those cameras. These manuals
are available to download from the Blackmagic Design support center at
www.blackmagicdesign.com/support.
Attaching a Lens
To remove the protective dust cap from the an EF or MFT lens mount, hold down the locking
button and rotate the cap counterclockwise until it is released. For the PL mount, rotate the PL
locking ring counterclockwise. We recommend always turning off your Blackmagic camera prior
to attaching or removing a lens.
To attach an EF or MFT mount lens:
1
Align the dot on your lens with the dot on the camera mount. Many lenses have a visual
indicator, for example a blue, red or white dot.
2 Twist the lens clockwise until it locks into place.
SD CARD
SD CARD
12V
12V
HDMI
HDMI
3 To remove the lens, hold down the locking button, rotate the lens counterclockwise
until its dot or indicator reaches the 12 o’clock position, and gently remove.
Attaching and removing an MFT lens on Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera
and Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera.
Attaching and removing an EF lens on Blackmagic Cinema Camera and
Blackmagic Production Camera 4K.
Getting Started
5
To attach a PL mount lens:
1
Open your camera’s PL locking ring by rotating it counterclockwise until it stops.
2 Align one of the lens’ four flange notches with the locating pin on the camera mount.
Be sure to align the lens for easy viewing of the lens marks.
3 Tighten the camera’s PL locking ring by rotating it clockwise.
4 T
o remove the lens, rotate the locking ring counterclockwise until it stops, then gently
remove the lens.
NOTE When no lens is attached to the camera, the glass filter covering the
sensor is exposed to dust and other debris so you’ll want to keep the dust cap
on whenever possible.
SS
D
SS
D
SS
D
Attaching and removing a PL lens on Blackmagic Cinema Camera PL and
Blackmagic Production Camera 4K PL.
Turning Your Camera On
SS
D
To turn your camera on, you’ll first need to supply power to your camera.
All Blackmagic Cameras can be powered simply by plugging the supplied power adapter into
their power input. This also recharges the battery, either built in or removable.
Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera and Micro Cinema Camera have removable, rechargeable
batteries, while Blackmagic Cinema Camera and Production Camera 4K have rechargeable
batteries built in.
TIP The Micro Cinema Camera powers up automatically when power is
supplied via an AC adapter using the expansion port. This means that if you
have the camera installed in a remote location or mounted in an awkward or
inconvenient position to access, you don’t have to manually turn the camera on
because as long as it is connected to an external power supply, it will always
stay powered on.
Inserting a Battery and Powering Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera
Your Pocket Cinema Camera uses an EN-EL20 battery. One is included with the camera, but if
you need additional batteries, they can be purchased from your Blackmagic Design reseller or
from most video or photography equipment stores.
Getting Started
6
1
On the under side of the camera, push the door release towards the lens to access the
battery terminal.
2 With the gold contacts facing into the terminal and the white arrow facing the lens,
hook the lip of the battery under the orange tab and insert the battery until you feel it
press into place. Push the orange tab to release the battery.
3 Close the door to the battery terminal and slide the door release to the right to lock it.
4 Press the power button on the bottom right of the back panel. The status strip will
appear along the top of the LCD.
5 Press and hold the power button to switch off the camera.
Inserting the battery into Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera.
Inserting a Battery and Powering Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera
Your Micro Cinema Camera uses an LP-E6 or LP-E6N battery. One is included with the camera
but if you need additional batteries, they can be purchased from your Blackmagic Design
reseller or from any video or photography equipment store.
1
With the battery’s contacts facing the bottom of the camera, gently press the battery
against the battery slot, then slide it down until you feel it click and lock into place.
Press the battery release button on the top panel to remove the battery.
2 To switch on your camera, press the ‘power’ button located on the right panel of the
camera. To switch off, press and hold the ‘power’ button.
You are now ready to insert an SD card and start recording!
Use the supplied power adapter to charge the internal battery and power the camera.
Getting Started
7
Press the power button to turn the camera on.
Press and hold to turn the camera off.
Using Built in Batteries
Blackmagic Cinema Camera and Blackmagic Production Camera 4K have internal batteries that
can be charged using the supplied power adapter. The camera can be charged and operated
while connected via external power and will switch between power sources without any
interruption.
1
Press the power button below the touchscreen. The status strip will appear along the
top of the LCD.
2 Press and hold the power button to switch off the camera.
TIP You can also charge your Blackmagic Cinema Camera or Production
Camera 4K via a powered USB connection, however it takes longer to charge
so we recommend using the power adapter when possible.
You are now ready to insert an SSD and start recording!
Installing Media
Your Blackmagic Camera uses readily available media to record high bit rate RAW video data
without the need for expensive, proprietary storage. Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera and
Micro Cinema Camera use SD cards to record HD footage, while Blackmagic Cinema Camera
and Production Camera 4K use computer solid state drives, or SSDs, to record video at up to
2.5K and Ultra HD resolutions, respectively.
NOTE SD cards and SSDs are available in a range of speeds and capacities,
not all of which as suitable for recording high bit rate video. To ensure reliable
recording at your chosen resolution and video quality, use only the
recommended SD cards and SSDs listed in the ‘about SD cards and SSDs’
section of this manual, or check the Blackmagic Design website for the latest
information.
www.blackmagicdesign.com
Installing Media
8
Using an SD Card
If your camera uses an SD card for recording clips, you can insert an SDXC or SDHC card. To
insert an SD card into your camera:
Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera
On the underside of the camera, push the battery door release towards the lens. The SD card
slot is located next to the battery terminal. With the metal contacts on the SD card facing towards
the lens, insert the SD card until you feel it lock into place. Push on the SD card to release it.
After inserting the SD card and powering your camera, the status strip will display a moving dot
while the camera checks the SD card and then it will say ‘ready’.
Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera
With the SD card’s metal contacts facing away from the lens, point the SD card towards the SD
card slot and gently insert the card until you feel it lock into place. Push on the SD card to
release it. The front tally light on the Micro Cinema Camera will flash green three times while the
camera checks the SD card and will stay green when the card is ready.
SD CARD
The supplied SD card is for software installation only and not suitable for video recording. You’ll
find a list of recommended SD cards in the ‘about SSD and SD cards’ section.
Inserting an SD card into the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera and
Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera.
Using an SSD
If your camera uses an SSD to record clips, you can insert a 2.5” 9.5 mm SSD formatted in either
the HFS+ or exFAT file systems. To insert an SSD into Blackmagic Cinema Camera and
Blackmagic Production Camera 4K:
1
Open the SSD door on the right hand side of the camera.
2 With the gold SATA contacts facing towards the camera door, insert the SSD until you
feel it press into place. Close the SSD door.
3 Power on the camera. The status strip will display a moving dot while the camera
checks the SSD and then it will say ‘ready’
You’ll find a list of recommended SSDs in the ‘About SD Cards and SSDs Cards’ section.
Installing Media
9
Inserting an SSD into the Blackmagic Cinema Camera
and the Blackmagic Production Camera 4K.
About SD Cards and SSDs Cards
Choosing a Fast SD Card
It’s important to use SDHC and SDXC cards with Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera and
Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera. These cards are rated for fast data speeds and support
larger storage sizes.
We have provided a table showing SD cards that have tested reliable for video recording and
playback. From a quick glance you can see which SD card is fast enough to handle a
chosen format.
Please check the tech notes at the Blackmagic Design support center for the latest information.
Brand
Delkin
Devices
SanDisk
SD Card Name/Type
Storage
Supported Formats
RAW
ProRes
Elite SDHC UHS-I
32GB
No
Yes
Elite SDHC UHS-I
16GB
No
Yes
Extreme Pro. 95 MB/sec SDXC UHS-I
512GB
Yes
Yes
Extreme Pro. 95 MB/sec SDXC UHS-I
256GB
Yes
Yes
Extreme Pro. 95 MB/sec SDXC UHS-I
128GB
Yes
Yes
Extreme Pro. 95 MB/sec SDXC UHS-I
64GB
Yes
Yes
Extreme Pro. 95 MB/sec SDHC UHS-I
32GB
Yes
Yes
Extreme Plus. 80 MB/sec SDXC UHS-I
128GB
Yes
Yes
Extreme Plus. 80 MB/sec SDXC UHS-I
64GB
No
Yes
Extreme Plus. 80 MB/sec SDHC UHS-I
32GB
No
Yes
Extreme Plus. 80 MB/sec SDHC UHS-I
16GB
No
Yes
Extreme Plus. 80 MB/sec SDHC UHS-I
8GB
No
Yes
About SD Cards and SSDs Cards
10
Brand
SD Card Name/Type
Storage
Supported Formats
RAW
ProRes
Extreme. 45 MB/sec SDXC UHS-I
128GB
No
Yes
Extreme. 45 MB/sec SDXC UHS-I
64GB
No
Yes
Extreme. 45 MB/sec SDHC UHS-I
32GB
No
Yes
Extreme. 45 MB/sec SDHC UHS-I
16GB
No
Yes
Extreme. 45 MB/sec SDHC UHS-I
8GB
No
Yes
Choosing a Fast SSD
When working with high data rate video it’s important to carefully check the SSD you would like
to use. This is because some SSDs can have a lower sustained write speed than the
manufacturer’s claimed speed, so even though a disk specification can claim an SSD is fast
enough to handle video, in reality the disk may not be fast enough for real time video recording.
Use Blackmagic Disk Speed Test to accurately measure whether your SSD will be able to
handle uncompressed video capture and playback. Blackmagic Disk Speed Test uses data to
simulate the storage of video so you get results similar to what you’ll see when capturing video
to a disk. During Blackmagic testing, we have found newer, larger models of SSD and larger
capacity SSDs are generally faster.
We have provided a table showing SSDs that have tested reliable for video recording and
playback. From a quick glance you can see which SSD is fast enough to handle a
chosen format.
Please check the tech notes at the Blackmagic Design support center for the latest information.
Intel 335 Series 240GB SSD
Brand
SanDisk Extreme 480GB SSD
SSD Name/Model Number
Kingston HyperX 240GB SSD
Storage
Supported Formats
4K
RAW
2.5K
RAW
ProRes and
DNxHD
ADATA
XPG SX900 ASX900S3-256GM-C
256GB
No
Yes
Yes
Angelbird
AV Pro
500GB
Yes
Yes
Yes
AV Pro
250GB
Yes
Yes
Yes
AV Pro
480GB
No
Yes
Yes
AV Pro
240GB
No
Yes
Yes
M4 (firmware 009 only). CT512M4SSD2
512GB
No
No
Yes
M4 (firmware 000F only).
CT256M4SSD2
256GB
No
No
Yes
Crucial
About SD Cards and SSDs Cards
11
Brand
SSD Name/Model Number
Storage
Supported Formats
4K
RAW
2.5K
RAW
ProRes and
DNxHD
4K Professional Video Series
DIG-PVD1000, pre-formatted exFat
1TB
Yes
Yes
Yes
Professional Video Series
DIG-PVD480S, pre-formatted exFat
480GB
No
Yes
Yes
Professional Video Series
DIG-PVD240S, pre-formatted exFat
240GB
No
Yes
Yes
520 series. SSDSC2CW480A310
480GB
No
Yes
Yes
520 series. SSDSC2CW240A310
240GB
No
Yes
Yes
530 series. SSDSC2BW240A401
240GB
No
Yes
Yes
530 series. SSDSC2BW180A401
180GB
No
Yes
Yes
335 series. SSDSC2CT240A4K5
240GB
No
Yes
Yes
HyperX Savage. SHSS37A/960G
960GB
Yes
Yes
Yes
HyperX Savage. SHSS37A/480G
480GB
Yes
Yes
Yes
HyperX Savage. SHSS37A/240G
240GB
Yes
Yes
Yes
HyperX Savage. SHSS37A/120G
120GB
Yes
Yes
Yes
HyperX 3K. SH103S3/480G
480GB
No
Yes
Yes
HyperX 3K. SH103S3/240G
240GB
No
Yes
Yes
SSDNow KC300. SKC300S37A/480G
480GB
No
Yes
Yes
SSDNow KC300.SKC300S37A/240G
240GB
No
Yes
Yes
OCZ
Agility 3. AGT3-25SAT3-240G
240GB
No
No
Yes
OWC
Mercury Extreme Pro 6G.
OWCSSD7P6G480
480GB
No
Yes
Yes
Mercury Extreme Pro 6G.
OWCSSD7P6G240
240GB
No
Yes
Yes
Mercury Extreme Pro 6G.
OWCSSD7P6G120
120GB
No
Yes
Yes
850 Pro. MZ-7KE2T0BW,
spacer required
2TB
Yes
Yes
Yes
850 Pro. MZ-7KE1T0BW,
spacer required
1TB
Yes
Yes
Yes
850 Pro. MZ-7KE512BW, spacer required
512GB
Yes
Yes
Yes
850 Pro. MZ-7KE256BW, spacer required
256GB
Yes
Yes
Yes
SanDisk
Extreme Pro. SDSSDXPS-240G-G25
240GB
Yes
Yes
Yes
SanDisk
Extreme Pro. SDSSDXPS-480G-G25
480GB
Yes
Yes
Yes
Extreme Pro. SDSSDXPS-960G-G25
960GB
Yes
Yes
Yes
Digistor
Intel
Kingston
Samsung
About SD Cards and SSDs Cards
12
Brand
SanDisk
PNY
SSD Name/Model Number
Supported Formats
4K
RAW
2.5K
RAW
ProRes and
DNxHD
Extreme. SDSSDX-480G-G25
480GB
No
Yes
Yes
Extreme. SDSSDX-240G-G25
240GB
No
Yes
Yes
Extreme. SDSSDX-120G-G25
120GB
No
No
Yes
Prevail. SSD9SC480GCDA-PB
480GB
No
Yes
Yes
Prevail. SSD9SC240GCDA-PB
240GB
No
Yes
Yes
XLR8. SSD9SC480GMDA-RB
480GB
No
Yes
Yes
CL4100. SSD7S480GCL4
480GB
No
No
Yes
CL4100. SSD7S240GCL4
240GB
No
No
Yes
1TB
No
Yes
Yes
SSD370. TS512GSSD370
512GB
No
Yes
Yes
SSD370. TS256GSSD370
256GB
No
Yes
Yes
SSD720. TS256GSSD720
256GB
No
Yes
Yes
CMS-0240
240GB
Yes
Yes
Yes
Transcend SSD370. TS1TSSD370
Wise
Cinema
Storage
NOTE If your SSD is dropping frames, try a different SSD or use a compressed
HD recording format such as ProRes or DNxHD for lower data rates. Check the
Blackmagic Design website for the latest information.
Preparing Media for Recording
SD cards used by Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera and Micro Cinema Camera, and SSDs
used by Blackmagic Cinema Camera and Production Camera 4K must be formatted as either
HFS+ or exFAT. These disk formats allow long clips to be recorded as single files and can be
formatted using the ‘format disk’ feature on the dashboard, or using the ‘settings menu’ on
Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera. To see the ‘settings menu’ on Blackmagic Micro Cinema
Camera, plug in an HDMI monitor into the HDMI port or plug in a composite video display unit
using the composite video out connector from the expansion cable.
TIP We recommend formatting SD cards and SSDs in your Blackmagic Camera
for best results.
You can also format SD cards and SSDs via a Mac or PC computer. SSDs can be formatted
using an SSD dock such as Blackmagic MultiDock.
About SD Cards and SSDs Cards
13
HFS+ is also known as Mac OS Extended. It is the recommended format as it supports
“journaling”. Data on journaled media is more recoverable and less likely to be corrupted. HFS+
is natively supported by Mac OS X.
ExFAT is supported natively by Mac OS X and Windows without needing to purchase any
additional software. However, exFAT does not support journaling which means data is less
protected against the rare event your media card or SSD is corrupted.
Select the ‘format disk’ or ‘format card’ icon on
the camera dashboard to format your SSD or SD card.
Choose from HFS+ or exFAT formats. Confirm your selection by tapping the ‘yes, format my disk/card’
icon to continue, or ‘cancel’ to cancel the format.
Preparing SD cards and SSDs using your camera
1
Press the ‘menu’ button to open the dashboard, or to open the settings menu on
Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera.
2 Select the ‘format disk’ or ‘format card’ icon by tapping on the touchscreen or using the
navigation and ‘ok’ buttons on the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera. On Blackmagic
Micro Cinema Camera, press the ‘right’ arrow button to navigate through the settings
and press the ‘play’ button to select ‘setup’>’card’.
3 Choose your format by selecting the HFS+ or exFAT icon.
4 A warning will appear asking you to confirm the format. Select ‘yes, format my disk/
card’ to continue, or ‘cancel’ to cancel the format.
5 A progress bar shows you the progress of the format. ‘Complete’ will appear when the
format is done. It is important not to remove SD cards or SSDs while they are formatting.
6 Select the ‘done’ icon to return to the dashboard, or press the ‘menu’ button on
Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera to return to the main menu settings.
Preparing SD cards or SSDs on a Mac OS X computer
Use the ‘disk utility’ application included with Mac OS X to format or initialize your SSD or SD
card in the HFS+ or exFAT formats. If your SSD or SD card already has files recorded on them,
remember to back up your media as all data will be lost when it is formatted.
About SD Cards and SSDs Cards
14
7 Plug an SD card into your computer’s SD card slot or via an SD card reader. Connect
the SSD to your computer with an external dock, such as Blackmagic MultiDock,
or cable adapter and dismiss any message offering to use your SSD for time
machine backups.
8 Go to ‘applications/utilities’ and launch ‘disk utility’.
9 Click on the disk icon of your SD card or SSD and then click the ‘erase’ tab.
10 Set the format to ‘Mac OS extended ( journaled)’ or “exFAT”.
11 Type a ‘name’ for the new volume and then click ‘erase’. Your SD card or SSD will
quickly be formatted and made ready for use.
Use ‘disk utility’ on Mac OS X to erase your SD card or SSD
in the Mac OS extended ( journaled) or exFAT format.
Use the ‘format’ dialog box feature in Windows
to format your SD card or SSD in the exFAT format.
About SD Cards and SSDs Cards
15
Preparing SD cards or SSDs on a Windows computer
The ‘format’ dialog box can format an SD card or SSD in the exFAT format on a Windows PC.
Remember to back up anything important from your media as all data will be lost when it is
formatted.
1
Plug an SD card into your computer’s SD card slot or via an SD card reader. Connect
the SSD to your computer with an external dock, such as Blackmagic MultiDock, or
cable adapter.
2 Open the ‘start menu’ or ‘start screen’ and choose ‘computer’. Right-click on your
SD card or SSD.
3 From the contextual menu, choose ‘format’.
4 Set the file system to ‘exFAT’ and the allocation unit size to 128 kilobytes.
5 Type a volume label, select ‘quick format’ and click ‘start’.
6 Your SD card or SSD will quickly be formatted and made ready for use.
Checking Disk Speed
Blackmagic Disk Speed Test is a fun application that measures the read and write performance
of storage media, then displays the results using video formats.
If you have ever wondered whether your hard drive is suitable for recording (“write”) or
playback (“read”) of a particular video format, you can use Disk Speed Test to find out. Test the
performance of your media drives with a single click of the ‘start’ button! Disk Speed Test will
even show you how many streams of video your storage is capable of handling.
Disk Speed Test is installed by the Desktop Video Software. It is also available as a free
download for Mac OS X from the Mac App Store.
Use Disk Speed Test to find out the
performance of your media drives.
Recording
Recording Clips
Press the ‘rec’ button on your camera to begin recording immediately. Press ‘rec’ again to stop
recording.
About SD Cards and SSDs Cards
16
To record a clip, press the ‘rec’ button on the
top of Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera.
Choosing the Recording Format
Blackmagic cameras record to several different formats, depending on which model you
are using.
All Blackmagic cameras record lossless compressed CinemaDNG RAW, plus Apple ProRes
codecs including ProRes 422 HQ, ProRes 422, ProRes 422 LT and ProRes 422 Proxy. ProRes
codecs let you fit more video on your SSD or SD card. ProRes 422 HQ provides the highest
quality video with the lowest compression. Alternatively, ProRes 422 Proxy gives you far more
recording time with greater compression.
Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera also records RAW 3:1.
Blackmagic Cinema Camera can also record using the Avid DNxHD codec for more options
when you need high quality HD compressed video. You may decide to experiment to see which
format best suits your workflow.
To record a clip on Blackmagic Cinema Camera or Production Camera 4K,
press the ‘rec’ button on the front face or on the transport control panel.
Recording
17
To select your desired video format:
1
Press the ‘menu’ button to open the dashboard and select Settings.
2 Select the ‘recording’ menu and use the selection arrows to set the desired
recording format.
3 Press the ‘menu’ button twice to exit.
Your camera is now ready to record in the video format you have selected. On Blackmagic
cameras with a built in LCD, the current recording format is shown on the LCD status strip.
Blackmagic Cameras Supported Video Formats
Blackmagic Pocket
Cinema Camera
Blackmagic Micro
Cinema Camera
Blackmagic
Cinema Camera
Blackmagic Production
Camera 4K
1080p23.98
1080p23.98
2400 x 1350
12-bit 2.5K RAW
4000 x 2160
12-bit 4K RAW
1080p24
1080p24
1080p23.98
2160p23.98
1080p25
1080p25
1080p24
2160p24
1080p29.97
1080p29.97
1080p25
2160p25
1080p30
1080p30
1080p29.97
2160p29.97
–
1080p50
1080p30
2160p30
–
1080p59.94
1080i50 (output)
1080p23.98
–
1080p60
1080i59.94 (output)
1080p24
–
–
–
1080p25
–
–
–
1080p29.97
–
–
–
1080p30
Trigger Record
Blackmagic Production Camera 4K automatically sends a signal via the SDI outputs that will
trigger recording when connected to an external recorder that supports SDI trigger record
feature, such as Blackmagic Video Assist.
This means when you press record on your Production Camera 4K, your external recorder will
also start recording, then will stop recording when you stop recording on the camera.
You will also need to set your recorder to enable SDI trigger recording to make sure it responds
to the trigger signal from your Production Camera 4K. If your external recorder supports SDI
trigger recording, it can usually be enabled via its settings menu.
Recording
18
Playback
Playing Back Clips
Once you have recorded your video, you can use the transport control buttons to play back
your video on the LCD.
Press the play button once for instant playback and you’ll see your video on the LCD and on
any display connected to the HDMI or SDI output. Hold down the forward or reverse buttons to
fast forward or reverse through the clip. Playback will finish when the end of the current clip
is reached.
The controls of your camera work just like a CD player, so pressing the forward button will skip
to the start of the next clip. Press the reverse button once to go to the start of the current clip or
press twice to skip back to the start of the previous clip.
On Blackmagic Cinema Camera and Production Camera 4K you can also connect to a Mac or
Windows PC via the Thunderbolt port and monitor your clips using Blackmagic UltraScope. You
can check exposure with the waveform scope, clipping on color channels using RGB parade,
color balance using the vectorscope, audio levels, phase, and more.
To immediately view your recorded clip on a Blackmagic Camera
simply press the ‘play’ button on the transport controls.
Playback
19
Camera Connections
12V
HDMI
Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera
LANC Remote Control
The remote port on your camera is used to remotely control record starting and stopping, iris
adjustments and manual focus adjustments when using a compatible lens.
The port is a 2.5 mm stereo jack using the standard LANC protocol.
Headphones
Monitor audio while recording or playing back clips by plugging your headphones into the
3.5mm stereo headphones jack.
Audio In
The 3.5mm stereo audio connector accepts microphone or line level audio. It’s important to
select the appropriate setting or your audio may sound too quiet or too loud. The camera
automatically switches to line level if the audio is too loud for a sustained period.
HDMI Out
The micro HDMI port outputs 10-bit uncompressed HD1080p video, even while recording. It can
be used to output video to routers, monitors, capture devices, broadcast switchers and other
HDMI devices.
Power
Use the 0.7mm 12 – 20V power input for connecting your power supply and to charge
the battery.
USB
Use the USB port to connect your Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera to your computer and
update the internal software. The USB port can be found inside the battery compartment.
Camera Connections
20
Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera
HDMI Out
The HDMI output supports 10-bit 4:2:2 1080p HD video with 2 channels of embedded audio.
This gives you the option to either send a clean video feed or insert overlays on the HDMI
output from the camera menu.
Expansion Port
The expansion port is a standard DB-HD15 connector which includes connections such as +12v
power, analog servo, BNC and RCA connectors. The DB-HD15 is actually quite an old fashioned
connector and it was chosen because its extremely easy to solder wires to it and the plugs are
very common so are easy to purchase. This means you don’t have to use the included breakout
cable as you can make up your own custom cables simply by soldering the wires you need to
the relevant pins on the DB-HD15 plug. If you look closely at the pins you can see the
pin numbers.
This makes it easy to look up the connector signal layout and connect the wires you need. You
can add a backshell to the DB-HD15 on custom cables or you can even put a little silicon
compound on the plug to keep it small when the camera is being used on a moving mount.
TIP For more information about the expansion port and expansion cable, refer
to the ‘Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera Expansion Port and Expansion Cable’
section on the following page.
Analog Audio In
The 3.5mm stereo audio connector accepts both microphone and line level audio, selectable in
the camera menu. The microphone level audio is lower than the line level audio so if you are
connecting a microphone to the camera and have the line level selected, you will find that the
levels will be too low. You can also use the analog audio input for embedding timecode onto
your video clip by sending an SMPTE compliant LTC timecode in the left audio channel and
selecting the timecode option in the camera menu.
Camera Connections
21
USB
Use the mini USB port to connect your Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera to your computer for
software updates. The USB port can be found on the bottom of the camera.
The USB port is located on the bottom
of the Micro Cinema Camera.
Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera Expansion Port and Expansion Cable
There are two ways to access the expansion port’s functions. You can use the expansion cable
that comes with your Micro Cinema Camera, or solder your own custom connectors.
Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera has a standard DB-HD15 serial connector and can be used
with the included expansion cable for the following control options:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera Expansion Cable
1
Power Input
The 12V power input connects via a DC jack and provides power to the Micro Cinema
Camera, as well as trickle charging any batteries attached. When mains power is
supplied, the camera will automatically turn on.
Camera Connections
22
2
Reference Input
This allows multiple cameras to be genlocked to a blackburst or tri-level reference
signal. Genlocking cameras to an external reference signal helps to prevent timing
errors which may result in the picture jumping when switching between
different cameras.
3
LANC
Connect wired LANC remote controllers to the 2.5mm jack for controlling functions like
recording start and stop, iris adjustment, and manual focus from a tripod arm when
using compatible lenses. On some compatible lenses, you can also remotely control
the zoom via LANC.
4
Composite Video Out
Standard definition composite video output via an RCA connector. You can connect this
output to any low cost composite display device or even a wireless composite
transmitter. The output can be selected to be either NTSC or PAL standard from the
camera’s menu.
5-8 Analog Servo Ch1 - Ch4
The four analog servo ports are connected with the Futaba J connectors to a
compatible receiver unit. This is used to wirelessly control your camera. Each PWM
analog input operates a single channel that can drive a feature such as lens focus, iris
and servo zooms. You can also connect a simple switch so that you can quickly toggle
the camera to start and stop recording. The camera will treat each of the analog
channel as a switch until it detects a PWM signal. Once a PWM signal is detected, it will
automatically latch on and respond to PWM signals. Power cycle the camera if you want
to use a switch to control the camera.
9
S.Bus Digital Servo
By connecting to a compatible S.Bus receiver using the Futaba J cable, you have 18 S.
Bus remote channels where features of the camera can be assigned to and remotely
controlled. These features can include focus, servo zoom, iris control and other such
features. For more information about mapping functions to S.Bus remote channels, see
the ‘Remote Settings’ section of this manual.
Wiring Diagram for the Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera
Expansion Cable
When using Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera’s expansion port, you may only want to access
one or two functions. For example, you may want to use the composite video output feature
while simultaneously controlling the zoom function. It’s easy to make a connector that will give
you just these functions without the clutter of additional, unused connectors.
Use the following diagram when wiring the expansion cable included or use it as an example of
how you can wire up the connections on you own custom cable correctly. The full range of
available pins are listed under group P1, while subsets used for particular functions, as well as
their layout within the appropriate connectors, are shown in groups P2 through P10.
Camera Connections
23
P1
PIN ASSIGNMENT
2
S. Bus
1
2
3
P2
Analog Servo Ch1
1
2
3
P3
Analog Servo Ch2
1
2
3
P4
Analog Servo Ch3
1
2
3
P5
Analog Servo Ch4
1
2
3
P6
GROUND
3
GROUND
8
GROUND
12
5
4
3
2
1
1
2
3
4
5
10
9
8
7
6
GROUND
15
14
13
13
12
GROUND
11
Ground
S. Bus
Analog Servo Ch1
Ground
Reference Input
6
7
8
9
10
Power +12V in
Ground
Analog Servo Ch2
LANC Data
LANC Power
11
12
13
14
15
Ground
Analog Servo Ch3
Analog Servo Ch4
+5V 400mA Out
Composite Video Out
15
GROUND
Composite Video Out
TIP
RING
P7
5
GROUND
Reference Input
TIP
RING
P8
9
10
GROUND
LANC Data
LANC Power
TIP
RING
SLEEVE
P9
6
GROUND
Power +12V in
PIN
SLEEVE
P10
Blackmagic Cinema Camera and
Blackmagic Production Camera 4K
LANC Remote Control
The remote port on your camera is used to remotely control record starting and stopping, plus
iris and focus adjustments when using a compatible lens on Blackmagic Cinema Camera and
Production Camera 4K EF models.
The port is a 2.5 mm stereo jack using the standard LANC protocol.
Headphones
Monitor audio while recording or playing back clips by plugging your headphones into the
3.5mm stereo headphones jack.
Camera Connections
24
Audio In
The 1/4 inch TRS Phone audio connectors accept microphone or line level audio. It’s important
to select the appropriate setting or your audio may sound too quiet or too loud. The camera
automatically switches to line level if the audio is too loud for a sustained period.
SDI Out
Blackmagic Cinema Camera supports 3G-SDI so it can be used to output uncompressed 10-bit
4:2:2 video to routers, monitors, SDI capture devices, broadcast switchers and any other
SDI devices.
Blackmagic Production Camera 4K supports 6G-SDI, so it can be used to connect to any SDI
monitor as well as 4K switchers such as ATEM Production Studio 4K.
Thunderbolt
When connected to a Mac OS X or Windows computer with Thunderbolt technology, your
Blackmagic Cinema Camera or Production Camera 4K can be used as a powerful solution for
waveform monitoring and color correction. Blackmagic Cinema Camera’s Thunderbolt port
always outputs 10-bit uncompressed HD1080p video. Production Camera 4K’s Thunderbolt
port matches the SDI output, which can be 10-bit uncompressed HD1080p or Ultra HD.
Power
Use the 12 – 30V power input for connecting your power supply and to charge the
internal battery.
USB
Use the USB port to connect your Blackmagic Cinema Camera or Production Camera 4K to
your computer and update the internal software. Open the SSD door to access the USB port.
REMOTE
1
AUDIO IN
2
SDI OUT
SSD
SSD
POWER
12V - 30V
Tally Light Indicators
Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera Tally Light
REC
IRIS
FOCUS
Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera includes a tally light feature. The tally light indicates the
following camera scenarios to the camera operator:
‚‚
White - Power On
‚‚
Red - Recording
‚‚
Green (flashes 3 times) - SD card is being inserted and recognised
‚‚
Green - SD card is present in the camera / camera is playing back.
MENU
Tally Light Indicators
REC
25
‚‚
Red (flashing slowly) - Card filling up
‚‚
Red (flashing quickly) - Dropped Frames
‚‚
Red, Orange (alternating slowly) - Battery low when recording
‚‚
White, Orange (alternating slowly) - Battery low when in standby
SD CARD
You can adjust the brightness of the tally light in Micro Cinema Camera’s settings. See the
‘camera settings’ section for more information.
The tally light is located at the top of
Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera’s lens.
Menu Settings
Dashboard
The dashboard feature is opened by pressing the ‘menu’ button. From the dashboard you can
access the ‘settings’ menu and key features such as metadata, media formatting, activating
meters, frame guides and focus peaking. Press ‘menu’ again to exit the dashboard.
Press the ‘menu’ button to open the dashboard.
To view menu settings on Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera, simply connect an external
monitor such as the Blackmagic Video Assist to the HDMI port or use the composite output
on the expansion cable to connect to a low cost composite display. Pressing the ‘menu’ button
brings you directly to the menu screen. You can also use the composite output on the
expansion cable to connect to a low cost composite display.
Menu Settings
26
Camera Settings
To configure camera settings on your Blackmagic camera, press the ‘menu’ button to open the
dashboard, select the ‘settings’ icon, then select the camera icon to the left of the settings
menu. If you want to bypass the dashboard for direct access to the menu screen, simply hold
down the menu button. Pressing the ‘menu’ button in Micro Cinema Camera opens the menu
settings display.
Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera
Press the up and down buttons to highlight each settings menu. Press ‘ok’ to enter a settings
menu. Use the left and right directional arrows to adjust values and the up and down arrows to
move between settings. Press ‘menu’ again to return to selecting between main settings pages.
Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera
Press the left and right arrow buttons to navigate and change settings. Press the ‘play’ button to
highlight a setting and to confirm a change. Press the ‘menu’ button to return to the
menu screen.
Blackmagic Cinema Camera & Production Camera 4K
Tap or slide the relevant arrows and icons on the touchscreen to change values or switch
between settings menus.
The ‘camera’ settings screen lets you adjust key features such as
ISO, white balance, shutter angle, date, time and camera ID.
Camera ID
If using more than one Blackmagic Camera, it’s helpful to set each camera’s ID which will be
included with any metadata recorded with your clips. Set the camera ID with the onscreen
keyboard. When you have finished entering a new camera ID, select ‘enter’ to save, or select
‘cancel’ to discard any changes.
Change the camera ID using the onscreen keyboard.
Menu Settings
27
TIP The camera ID becomes part of the filename in the recorded file.
Therefore if you would like to shorten the length of your filename, you may do
so by shortening the camera ID. For example to ‘BMCC4’.
The ‘camera’ settings screen.
If you’re using the Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera, you will find the ‘camera number’, ‘date’
and ‘time’ settings in the ‘setup’ menu.
Setting Date and Time
To set date and time on your Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera, select the + or - buttons to
change the year, month and day settings.
Time is set to 24 hour format on Blackmagic Cameras. To set the time, select the + and - keys to
make adjustments to the time. If traveling with your Blackmagic Camera, remember to change
the date and time to local time zones.
TIP If you have your Blackmagic Camera stored for long periods, the time may
need to be reset. It is always a good idea to check the time and date prior to
recording. When connecting your camera to your computer via USB and
launching Blackmagic Camera Setup, your computer’s time is synced to
your camera.
ISO
ISO settings are helpful when you are shooting in a variety of light conditions. The optimum ISO
setting for the Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera, Pocket Cinema Camera and Cinema Camera
is 800 with a maximum ISO of 1600. For Production Camera 4K the optimum setting is 400 with
a maximum ISO of 800.
Depending on your situation, however, you may choose a lower or higher ISO setting. For
example, in low light conditions 1600 would be suitable, or 800 for Production Camera 4K, but
may introduce some visible noise. In bright conditions 400, or 200 on Production Camera 4K,
would be best to record richer colors.
Adjust the ISO settings using the arrow icons in the menu.
Menu Settings
28
White Balance
Blackmagic Cameras include white balance presets for a variety of color temperature
conditions. Each light source emits a warm or cool color. Warm appears red and cool appears
blue, so the white balance setting adds opposing red or blue to compensate. This makes sure
white stays white in your image.
Color temperature also changes depending on the position of the sun and the cloud conditions.
For example, light is warm at sunrise, cools down until midday, then warms up again as the sun
sets. Shady areas in your picture, including overcast conditions, will generally appear blue.
Use the following guide to set your white balance to compensate for the changing light
conditions:
‚‚
2500, 2800, 3000, 3200, 3400, 3600, 4000, 4500 and 4800K for various conditions
under tungsten, incandescent or fluorescent light, or under dull natural light including
candle light, sunrise/sunset, morning, and after noon light.
‚‚
5000, 5200, 5400 and 5600K for outdoors on a clear, sunny day.
‚‚
6000, 6500, 7000, 7500 and 8000K for a variety of daylight conditions.
Adjust the White Balance settings using the arrow icons in the menu.
Shutter Angle
Shutter angle complements the ISO setting by regulating the amount of light on the sensor.
180 degrees is the optimum shutter angle, however as lighting conditions change you may
need to adjust accordingly. For example, 360 degrees is considered ‘wide open’ and allows
maximum light onto the sensor. This is useful for low light conditions. If you notice lights are
flickering, 172.8 degrees will minimize this effect when shooting 24p in countries with 50 hertz
power supplies.
Adjust the ‘shutter angle’ settings using the arrow icons in the menu.
Auto Exposure
Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera has the following auto exposure options.
Iris
Maintains a constant shutter speed while changing the aperture to achieve a
constant exposure.
Shutter
Maintains a constant aperture while changing the shutter speed to achieve a
constant exposure.
Iris + Shutter
Maintains a constant exposure level by adjusting the aperture. If the maximum or minimum
available aperture is reached and exposure still cannot be maintained, Micro Cinema Camera
will begin adjusting the shutter speed to keep exposure constant.
Shutter + Iris
Maintains the correct exposure levels by adjusting the shutter speed. If the maximum
or minimum available shutter speed is reached and exposure still cannot be maintained,
Micro Cinema Camera will begin adjusting the aperture to keep exposure constant.
Manual Trigger
Iris aperture and shutter speed are set manually and exposure may vary with changing light
conditions.
Menu Settings
29
The ‘camera’ settings screen in Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera.
Audio Settings
To adjust audio input and audio monitoring settings on your Blackmagic Camera, press the
‘menu’ button to open the dashboard, select the ‘settings’ icon, then select the microphone
icon to the left of the settings menu.
On Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera, press the ‘menu’ button to enter the menu settings
display. Use the left and right arrow buttons to move and select ‘audio’, then press the ‘play’
button to confirm your selection.
The ‘audio’ settings in Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera.
Menu Settings
30
The ‘audio’ settings screen lets you adjust the microphone
input level, input level type, audio channel levels, mirror
ch 1 audio to ch 2, and adjust the headphones or speaker volume.
Microphone Input
Microphone input adjusts the recording levels of the built in microphone. Move the audio slider
left or right to increase or decrease levels. Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera and Blackmagic
Pocket Cinema Camera have built in stereo microphones, and Blackmagic Cinema Camera and
Production Camera 4K have built in mono microphones. The built in microphones record to
audio channels 1 and 2 when no external audio source is connected.
Input Levels
External audio connectors accept audio at microphone level or line level. It’s important to select
‘mic’ or ‘line’ level audio as appropriate to avoid your external audio sounding almost inaudible
or too hot and distorted.
Set the external audio input levels by using the left and right arrows, or if you’re using the
Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera, use the left and right arrow buttons on the camera.
Channel 1 Input
To increase or decrease levels for channel 1, move the audio slider icon left or right. If you’re
using the Micro Cinema Camera, use the left and right arrow buttons on the camera. The
external audio input overrides the built in microphone and is recorded to audio channel 1.
Channel 2 uses Channel 1 Input
Select ‘yes’ if you only have channel 1 input and want to record the same external audio to
channels 1 and 2. You can leave this set to ‘no’ if you only want to record one channel of audio.
Channel 2 Input
To increase or decrease levels for channel 2, move the audio slider icon left or right. If you’re
using the Micro Cinema Camera, use the left and right arrow buttons on the camera. The
external audio input overrides the built in microphone and is recorded to audio channel 2.
Headphone and Speaker Volume
When headphones are connected, a headphone icon will be displayed. When no headphones
are detected, a speaker icon will be displayed. Headphones will always be active when
recording or playing back, however speakers will only work when playing back. Move the
volume slider left or right to increase or decrease audio monitoring levels.
Menu Settings
31
Audio Input
Select if your audio input is from the ‘camera’ or from an external audio ‘input’ such as a
microphone.
Automatic Gain Control
Setting the automatic gain control to ‘on’ will allow your Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera to
automatically adjust the audio input levels during recording. The gain control will automatically
increase or decrease the recording level depending on the strength of the sound in your
environment. This is useful in environments where sound levels can be unpredictably loud or
quiet. For example, loud unpredictable bursts and moments of quiet during a fireworks display
or a live performance.
Audio Timecode Input
Select ‘on’ if you want to embed LTC timecode via the ‘mic’ input into your recording on
Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera. Having embedded timecode is useful for syncing multiple
clips during post production. For example, when using the multi camera editing feature in
DaVinci Resolve 12 or newer.
Recording Settings
The recording settings are used to set the video format recorded to your SD card or SSD. Press
the ‘menu’ button to open the dashboard, select the settings icon, then select the circular
record icon to the left of the settings menu.
On Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera, you will find recording settings under the ‘camera’
settings. Press the ‘menu’ button to enter the menu settings display. Use the left and right arrow
buttons to move and select ‘camera’, then press the ‘play’ button to confirm your selection.
Recording Format
Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera
Press the left and right arrow buttons to switch between ProRes HQ, ProRes 422, ProRes LT,
ProRes Proxy or RAW recording formats.
Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera
Press the left and right arrow buttons to switch between ProRes HQ, ProRes 422, ProRes LT,
ProRes Proxy, RAW or RAW 3:1 recording formats.
Blackmagic Cinema Camera
Tap the arrow icons to switch between 2.5K RAW, ProRes HQ, ProRes 422, ProRes LT, ProRes
Proxy or DNxHD recording formats.
Blackmagic Production Camera 4K
On Production Camera 4K, tap the arrows on the ‘codec’ setting to select from RAW, ProRes
HQ, ProRes 422, ProRes LT, or ProRes Proxy recording formats. After setting your codec, tap
the arrows on the ‘resolution’ setting to select from Ultra HD, or HD video resolutions. The
resolutions available will depend on your chosen codec.
Menu Settings
32
On Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera the ‘recording’ settings
are located in the ‘camera’ settings.
The ‘recording’ settings screen.
Dynamic Range
Blackmagic Cameras have two dynamic range settings:
Film
The film setting shoots video using a log curve and gives you 13 stops of dynamic range, or 12
stops on Blackmagic Production Camera 4K. The ‘film’ dynamic range setting maximizes the
information in your video signal to help you get the most out of color grading software, such as
DaVinci Resolve. When recording in CinemaDNG RAW formats, only the film dynamic range
setting is available.
Video
The video setting uses the REC709 standard for high definition video. This lets you work faster
by recording directly to the compressed video formats your camera supports, which are
compatible with popular post production software. Adjust the dynamic range settings using the
arrow icons in the menu.
Menu Settings
33
Frame Rate
The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera, Cinema Camera and Production Camera 4K have five
different frame rate settings for shooting common film and video frame rates: 23.98 fps, 24 fps,
25 fps, 29.97 fps, 30 fps. The Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera includes the same, plus
additional frame rates, including 50 fps, 59.94 fps and 60 fps.
Adjust the frame rate setting using the arrow icons in the menu, or the left and right arrow
buttons on Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera.
Time Lapse Interval
This setting allows you to record a still frame at the following intervals:
Frames: 2 - 10
Seconds: 1 - 10, 20, 30, 40, 50
Minutes: 1 - 10
For example, you can set the camera to record a still frame every 10 frames, 5 seconds, 30
seconds, 5 minutes etc.
The time lapse feature offers many creative options. For example, if the time lapse interval is set
to record a frame at 2 frame intervals, this will give your recorded video a high speed effect
when played back.
The format of each still frame is based on your recording format, so if you set the camera to
record in ProRes 422 HQ, the time lapse setting will maintain this format. The frame rate will be
based on the video frame rate you have set the camera to, i.e., 24fps, so your time lapse
footage can be incorporated into your workflow easily.
When the ‘rec’ button is pressed in time lapse mode, the ‘time lapse record’ icon will replace
the standard record icon. The timecode counter updates when a frame of video is recorded,
meaning the rate of timecode increments depends on the time lapse interval setting.
Use the arrow icons to choose a time lapse interval or leave it set to ‘off’ if you do not want to
use the time lapse feature.
File Naming Convention
Blackmagic cameras use the following file naming convention when recording video.
[Camera ID]_[Reel Number]_[yyyy-mm--dd]_[hhmm]_C[Clip number].mov
The table below shows an example of the file naming convention.
BMC01_1_2012-08-08_1631_C0002.mov
QuickTime Movie Filename
BMC01_1_2012-08-08_1631_C0002.mov
Camera ID
BMC01_1_2012-08-08_1631_C0002.mov
Reel Number
BMC01_1_2012-08-08_1631_C0002.mov
Date (2012 Aug 08)
BMC01_1_2012-08-08_1631_C0002.mov
Time (16:31pm - 24hrs)
BMC01_1_2012-08-08_1631_C0002.mov
Clip Number
Menu Settings
34
Display Settings
To adjust the display settings for the LCD and SDI or HDMI output, press the ‘menu’ button to
open the dashboard, select the ‘settings’ icon, then select the television icon to the left of the
settings menu.
In Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera, you will find display settings under the ‘monitoring’
section. Press the ‘menu’ button to enter the menu settings display. Use the left and right arrow
buttons to move and select ‘monitoring’, then press the ‘play’ button to confirm your selection.
Scroll the menu to reveal
more Display settings.
The ‘display’ settings screen on Blackmagic Production Camera 4K. Display settings on
Blackmagic cameras lets you set the brightness of the LCD, turn LCD overlays on or off,
adjust the display dynamic range and zebra settings. You can also choose what overlays
are visible on your camera’s SDI or HDMI output and select your desired frame guides.
Dynamic Range
The LCD allows you to view your video as you are recording. You can set the dynamic range of
the LCD by selecting ‘video’ or ‘film’.
The dynamic range setting of the LCD is independent to the dynamic range set in the recorder
settings. Some people prefer to monitor video with the LCD set to ‘video’ even when the
recording format is set to ‘film’.
Adjust the dynamic range setting of the LCD using the arrow icons in the menu.
Brightness
On Blackmagic cameras with a built in display, move the slider icon left or right to adjust
brightness settings for the LCD.
Tally Light Brightness
Changes the brightness of the Tally Light on Micro Cinema Camera. Settings include: low,
medium and high. The default setting is medium. You can also set the Tally Light to ‘off’.
Menu Settings
35
Zebra
The zebra feature helps you achieve optimum exposure by displaying diagonal lines over areas
of the video that exceed your set zebra level. Turn the zebra feature on or off and adjust the
‘zebra level’ by tapping the left and right arrow icons. Setting the zebra to 100% shows which
areas are clipped.
Language
The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera menu can be set to display various languages.
To set the language:
1
Press the ‘menu’ button to open the dashboard on the LCD. You can also bypass
the dashboard by pressing and holding the ‘menu’ button. Select ‘settings’ using the
navigation buttons and press ‘ok’.
2 Navigate to the ‘display’ settings and select ‘language’.
3 Cycle through the different languages by pressing the right and left navigation buttons
and press ‘ok’ to confirm. You can also confirm your language setting by pressing the
‘menu’ button. It may take a second to two for the display to update.
Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera lets you change the ‘language’
setting so you can view the menu in various languages.
SDI Mode
Use this setting to switch Blackmagic Production Camera 4K’s 6G-SDI output between Ultra HD
and HD video. This can be handy when monitoring Ultra HD using Blackmagic UltraScope
which is compatible with HD video signals.
SDI/HDMI Overlays
You can monitor your video on an external display using the HDMI port on Blackmagic Pocket
Cinema Camera and Micro Cinema Camera, or the SDI port on Blackmagic Cinema Camera and
Production Camera 4K.
Set the HDMI overlays to ‘on’ or ‘off’ in
Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera.
Menu Settings
36
The ‘SDI overlay’ or ‘HDMI overlay’ setting lets you display useful information on your monitor.
On all Blackmagic cameras except the Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera, use the arrow icons
to select which overlays to display on your SDI or HDMI feed.
All: displays both frame guides and recording information.
Status: displays only the recording information, such as f-stop number, frame rate,
battery life etc.
Guides: displays only the frame guides.
Off: gives you a clean feed.
On Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera, you can set HDMI overlays to ‘on’ or ‘off’. Use the left
and right arrow buttons to select, then press the ‘play’ button to confirm your selection.
LCD Overlay
On Blackmagic cameras with a built in display, you can turn the frame guides on or off for the
LCD independently of the SDI/HDMI output. For example, you may want to view frame guides
on the LCD, but output a clean video feed over the camera’s SDI/HDMI output.
Scroll the menu to reveal
more Display settings.
The frame guides setting on Blackmagic Cameras lets you display
overlays on the camera’s LCD and SDI/HDMI output.
Frame Guides
On Blackmagic cameras with a built in display, you can choose from several different frame
guides to display on your camera’s LCD. The frame guides can also be viewed on the HDMI
output on Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera.
On Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera, frame guides can be viewed on the HDMI output or the
composite output. Frame guides include aspect ratios for various cinema, television and online
standards, plus a rule of thirds composition grid. Use the ‘frame guides’ setting arrow icons to
select your desired frame guide. Frame guide settings can be found under the
‘monitoring’ section.
Menu Settings
37
HDTV: Displays action and title safe regions of your image within a 1.78:1 aspect ratio
compatible with 16:9 HD television and computer screens.
4:3: Displays the 4:3 aspect ratio compatible with SD television screens, or to help frame shots
when using 2x anamorphic adapters.
2.35:1, 2.39:1 and 2.40:1: Displays the broad widescreen aspect ratio compatible with
anamorphic or flat widescreen cinema presentation. The three widescreen settings differ
slightly based on the changing cinema standards over time. 2.39:1 is one of the most prominent
standards in use today.
1.85:1: Displays another common flat widescreen cinema aspect ratio. This ratio is slightly wider
than HDTV 1.78:1 but not as wide as 2.39:1.
Thirds: Displays a grid with two vertical and horizontal lines placed in each third of the image.
Thirds are an extremely powerful tool to help compose your shots. For example, the human eye
typically looks for action near the points where the lines intersect, so it’s helpful to frame key
points of interest in these zones. An actor’s eyeline is commonly framed along the top third of
the screen, so you can use the top horizontal third to guide your framing. Thirds are also useful
to maintain framing consistency between shots.
Frame guides provide helpful markers so you can accurately compose
your shots for various television, online and cinema aspect ratios, for
example the popular 2.39:1 flat widescreen ratio as shown above.
Guide Opacity: Aspect ratios are displayed as mattes on the top and bottom of your LCD display.
You can adjust the opacity of the matte by adjusting the ‘guide opacity’ setting. For example, if
you prefer to view your guides as solid mattes, select 100%. Alternatively, if you would like to view
guides at maximum transparency, set the guide opacity to 25%.
Remote Settings
Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera’s ‘remote’ settings are used to configure the S.Bus and PWM
channels connected to the expansion port. For example, if the dial on your remote controller is
assigned to S.Bus channel 2 and you want to control the ‘zoom’ feature of the camera with that
dial, assign S.Bus 2 to ‘zoom’ in the ‘remote’ settings menu.
In remote settings, you can change the channel input configuration for the following controls:
REC start/stop
Iris, focus and zoom control using compatible lenses
ISO settings
Shutter angle settings
White balance settings
Audio level adjustments
Menu Settings
38
To configure an input channel, select your desired S.Bus or PWM channel next to each
control feature.
Remote Settings menu on Micro Cinema Camera
TIP See the ‘Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera Expansion Port and Expansion
Cable’ section for more information about the expansion port and its specific
connections.
On Screen Meters
Your Blackmagic Camera features meters such as recording time remaining, histogram and
peak audio to assist when setting optimum exposure, checking how much space is left on your
media, and to prevent your audio from clipping.
View meters by swiping up from the bottom of the touchscreen with your finger. Hide the
meters by swiping down. On the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera, press the ‘up’ directional
button to reveal the meters and press the ‘down’ button to hide them. On screen meters can
also be opened or hidden by selecting or deselecting the ‘meters’ feature on the dashboard.
On Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera, HDMI meters can be found under the ‘monitoring’
section. Use the left and right arrow buttons to move and select your desired meters, then
press the ‘play’ button to confirm your selection.
On screen meters and status strip on the Blackmagic Cinema Camera.
Swipe up from the bottom of the screen to reveal the meters.
Menu Settings
39
Histogram
The histogram display shows the distribution of the luminance in your video. Pure black is on
the far left side of the display and pure white is on the far right of the display. Keeping your
video signal within these limits prevents your shadows and highlights from being clipped and
preserves detail in the tonal ranges.
Recording Time Remaining
The recording time remaining indicator shows the remaining recording time for your SSD or SD
card. The time is shown in hours and minutes and will vary according to your selected frame
rate and codec. For example, ProRes 422 HQ at 24 frames per second. The indicator will
automatically recalculate if either of these settings are changed. When there is approximately 5
minutes remaining on your SSD or SD card, the indicator will turn red, and will blink
intermittently when there is only 2 minutes remaining.
Peak Audio
The peak audio meters display audio levels for channels 1 and 2 when using the internal
microphone, or via external audio when connected. The display is calibrated to dBFS units and
features peak hold indicators which stay visible for a short time so you can clearly see the
maximum levels reached. To achieve optimum audio quality, adjust your audio levels until the
peak averages at -12bB. If the audio level reaches 0dB the peak hold indicators will turn red,
indicating that the audio signal is being clipped.
In Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera, the status strip and on screen
meters can be viewed on the HDMI or composite output display.
For optimum exposure, open or close your aperture until the histogram
curve sharpens to a point at the bottom edges. A flat vertical edge on
the sides of the histogram means your blacks or whites are clipped.
For optimum audio quality, adjust your audio levels until the peak
averages at -12dB.
Menu Settings
40
Adjusting Settings
Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera, Cinema Camera EF and Production Camera 4K EF support
electronic lens control, which allows you to adjust lens controls from the camera such as
aperture and auto focus. Cinema Camera MFT and PL mount camera models have a passive
lens mount if you want to use manual lenses without electronic control. The focus peaking
feature creates a green edge around the sharpest parts of the image so you can easily confirm
your focus. Focus peaking is visible on the LCD and via SDI or HDMI out with overlays set to
‘on’, but does not affect your recorded picture.
Iris Button
When using ‘video’ dynamic range settings, a single press of the ‘iris’ button will set an average
exposure based on the highlights and shadows in your shot. When using film dynamic range
settings, pressing the ‘iris’ button sets your exposure to the brightest highlight in your shot.
On all Blackmagic Cameras except the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera, you can adjust your
lens aperture manually by pressing the forward or reverse transport control buttons. To adjust
your aperture on Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera, press the left and right directional
buttons on the back panel.
NOTE It’s important to know that while most lenses support electronic focus,
some lenses can be set to manual or auto focus modes, and so you need to
ensure your lens is set to auto focus mode.
Focus Button
When using a compatible auto focus lens with Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera or EF mount
Blackmagic cameras, press the ‘focus’ button once to auto focus. A quick double press of the
focus button activates focus peaking.
When using a manual lens, press the focus button once for focus peaking.
IRIS
IRIS
FOCUS
FOCUS
OK
OK
MENU
MENU
On Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera, press the ‘iris’ button,
then use the left and right directional buttons to adjust aperture
control. Press the ‘focus’ button for focus peaking.
Menu Settings
41
On Blackmagic Cinema Camera and Production Camera
4K EF models, press the ‘iris’ button, or use the transport
controls to adjust aperture control. Press the ‘focus’ button
for focus peaking. The ‘focus’ button also activates auto
focus on EF mount models using a compatible lens.
Focus Zoom
When using Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera, double press ‘ok’ to zoom in for adjusting
focus at the 1:1 pixel scale. Double press ‘ok’ again to zoom out.
On Blackmagic Cinema Camera and Production Camera 4K, double tap the touchscreen
display to zoom into the image for adjusting focus at the 1:1 pixel scale. Double tap the display
again to zoom out.
Image Stabilizer
Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera, Micro Cinema Camera, Cinema Camera EF and Production
Camera 4K EF support the image stabilizer (IS) feature found in many active lenses. Simply set
the stabilizer switch to ‘on’ to use it with your camera. If your lens also features a stabilizer mode
switch, set it to the appropriate mode for still shots or for movement.
TIP When using battery power, the camera will only activate the image
stabilizer while recording, as the lens draws additional power from the camera
to operate the image stabilizer. When external power is connected to the
camera, the image stabilizer will be active any time you set the lens stabilizer
switch to ‘on’.
Status Strip
Your chosen settings are always displayed on a status strip, which runs the length of the LCD,
HDMI or composite display, showing a convenient summary of the camera’s current settings.
Menu Settings
42
Battery Life Indicator
When the remaining charge drops below 25% capacity, the status strip will show the battery
status in red to warn you that battery life is running low.
SD/SSD Activity Icons
The status strip displays important information showing the state of the inserted media.
Moving DotsWhen you see the moving dots, the camera is checking and
preparing the media.
No Card/SSD
Ready
This means no media is detected or present in the camera.
Ready to record.
Red Icon Recording.
Flashing Red Icon
Dropped frames were detected.
Card/Disk Full Appears when SD card or SSD is full.
Playback mode Displays play, fast forward and reverse icons.
Timecode
Displays the duration of clips during recording and playback from
your SD card or SSD.
Additionally, the following information is displayed along the bottom of the screen.
HistogramIf this setting is enabled in ‘main’ menu, the histogram shows the
distribution of luminance in your video
Time remainingDisplays the remaining recording time available with the
current settings.
Audio metersIf this setting is enabled in the ‘monitoring’ menu, the peak audio
meters display peak audio levels.
1
2
3
4
10
5
11
6
7
8
9
12
1Media and Recording Status
7 Shutter Angle
2Timecode
8 White Balance
3 Recording Format
9 Battery Life Indicator
4 Video Format/Frame Rate
10Histogram
5F-Stop
11 Time remaining
6 ISO Setting
12 Audio meters
Menu Settings
43
Entering Metadata
What is the Slate?
On Blackmagic cameras with an LCD, the slate feature allows you to easily log metadata directly
into the camera. Metadata is stored in the recorded files and is easily accessed by editing
software.
Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera
1
Press ‘ok’ once to make the slate appear, or press the ‘menu’ button to open the
dashboard and select ‘metadata’.
2 Use the directional buttons to select the text you wish to change and press ‘ok’. An
onscreen keyboard will appear. Use the directional buttons to select characters on the
keyboard and press ‘ok’ to confirm each character selection.
3 Once you have typed in your information, select ‘save’ and press ‘ok’ to return to the
metadata screen.
4 If you want the scene, shot or take number to auto-increment, select the corresponding
auto-increment icon so it is illuminated and press ‘ok’.
Entering words into the ‘keywords’ field allows them to be used as search terms in your library
database. This may be particularly useful for large projects with lots of material. The use of
keywords narrows down the number of clips to search through, saving valuable time when you
are editing.
All metadata is compatible with popular software such as Final Cut Pro X and DaVinci Resolve.
The ‘slate’ feature lets you include metadata information
in your clip files for post production.
Entering Metadata
44
Select the auto-increment icon if you want the scene,
shot or take number to auto increment.
Blackmagic Cinema Camera and Production Camera 4K
1
Tap the touchscreen once to make the slate appear. You can also access the slate from
the dashboard by pressing ‘menu’, then selecting the metadata icon.
2 To enter or change details, tap the text you wish to change and an onscreen keyboard
will appear. Type in the desired information and press the save button.
3 If you want the scene, shot or take number to auto-increment, tap the corresponding
auto increment icon so it is illuminated. Tap it again if you want to turn off the auto
increment feature.
Entering words into the keywords field will allow you to use them as search terms in your library
database. This may be particularly useful for large projects where you have lots of material. The
use of keywords narrows down the number of clips to search through, saving valuable time
when you are editing. All metadata is compatible with popular software such as Final Cut Pro X
and DaVinci Resolve.
On Blackmagic Cinema Camera and Production
Camera 4K you can simply tap the display once
with your finger and the slate will appear.
Entering Metadata
45
Using DaVinci Resolve
Introducing DaVinci Resolve
Shooting with your Blackmagic Design camera is only part of the process of creating film and
television content, and just as important is the process of media backup and management as
well as editing, color correction and encoding final master files. Blackmagic Cinema Camera
and Production Camera 4K includes a version of DaVinci Resolve Studio and Blackmagic
Pocket Cinema Camera and Micro Cinema Camera include a version of DaVinci Resolve, both
for Mac OS X and Windows. With DaVinci Resolve you have a complete solution for shooting
and post-production!
After connecting your SSD, SD Card or CFast card to your computer, you can use DaVinci
Resolve’s ‘clone’ tool, in the’media’ page, to create running backups as you shoot. This is
recommended as any type of media is susceptible to becoming damaged or developing a fault
so creating backups ensures your shots will be immune to loss. Once you have used DaVinci
Resolve to back up your media, you can then add your clips to the DaVinci media pool, then
edit, color correct, and finish your production without ever having to leave DaVinci Resolve.
Because Blackmagic Design cameras shoot a much wider dynamic range than regular video
cameras, DaVinci Resolve will help you adjust your shots to get any kind of look you are after.
DaVinci Resolve is the same tool used on most major blockbuster movies, so it’s much more
than a simple NLE software tool, as it has extremely advanced technology built in for high end
digital film. You get the advantage of this technology when you use DaVinci Resolve to edit and
color correct your work.
Included here is information on how to get started using DaVinci Resolve with your camera files.
Of course, DaVinci Resolve is extremely advanced and includes a lot more features than you
immediately see when first looking at its user interface. To learn more about how to use DaVinci
Resolve, please check for the DaVinci Resolve instruction manual pdf file on the DaVinci Resolve
software disk, or check online for the many training courses and tutorial videos available.
Importing your Clips
To start editing your clips, you’ll first need to import them into the media pool:
1
Launch DaVinci Resolve. If this is the first time you’ve opened DaVinci Resolve, wait
for the Project Manager to appear, and double click the ‘untitled project’ icon in the
project manager window. If the log in window appears, that means you have the
Resolve multi‑user environment enabled. In this case, click Add New at the bottom left
of the log in window and create a new user by entering a user name and clicking Setup
New User. Then double-click the user icon to proceed to the Project Manager. Now
click ‘new project’, enter a title for your project and click ‘create’.This will add your new
project to the project manager. Double click on your project to open it.
2 You’ll now see the ‘media’ page with a ‘media storage’ browser at the top left. The
‘media storage’ browser displays all your linked media folders from where you’ll drag
your clips and drop them into the media pool.
Using DaVinci Resolve
46
3 If your clip folder doesn’t appear in the library, you’ll need to add it. This is easily
done by clicking on preferences in the DaVinci Resolve title bar and clicking on the
‘add’ button in the ‘media storage’ tab. Browse to and select a drive or folder path,
click ‘open’, restart DaVinci Resolve and reopen your project to refresh the ‘media
storage’ settings.
4 In the ‘media storage’ browser, click on your newly added clip folder. Now simply drag
your clips from your storage folder and drop them into the media pool. If your project
settings are different to your clip settings, you’ll be prompted to either change the
project settings to match your clips, or leave the settings as they are. To get started
quickly, click ‘change’. Now your project settings match your clips.
To import your clips, simply drag them from the ‘media storage’ browser and drop
them into the media pool. You can also drag and drop files from your desktop.
Editing your Clips
With your clips in the media pool, click on the ‘edit’ tab to open the edit page.
Now you can start building your edit!
1
You’ll first need to create a new timeline. Right click anywhere within the media
pool and choose Timelines > New Timeline. When the dialog box appears, click the
‘create’ button.
To start editing your clips, you’ll need to create a new
timeline. The timeline is the stage upon which all your
editing will take place.
Using DaVinci Resolve
47
2 Double click a clip in the media pool to open the clip in the source viewer. Use the
mouse pointer to scrub the play head in the source viewer left and right until you find
the start frame you want for the clip. Mark the in point with the ‘I’ shortcut. Do the same
for the end frame using the ‘O’ shortcut.
3 Go to the timeline and position the timeline play head where you want your clip to
be inserted.
4 To insert the clip onto the timeline, click inside the source viewer then drag the mouse
pointer across to the timeline viewer. A list of edit options will appear. Select the type of
edit you want.
Your clip will be placed onto the timeline using the edit type you selected. You’ll find a
description of each edit type and how to use them in the DaVinci Resolve manual.
A faster way to add clips to your edit is by dragging them from the media pool and dropping
them directly onto the timeline where you can adjust your in and out points, position your clips,
try different plug in effects, titles, and more. This particular workflow is like using the timeline as
an artist’s palette.
The ‘edit’ page. You can trim your clips, change their order, move them
around and add transitions between them using the timeline editor.
Trimming Clips
When editing clips you’ll want to trim them to include only the specific actions you want in each
shot. There are various ways, but the easiest is to adjust the clips’ in and out points on
the timeline:
1
After adding clips to your timeline, hover your mouse pointer over the start of a clip until
the pointer becomes a ‘trim’ icon.
2 When the ‘trim’ icon appears, click on the start of your clip and drag it forwards or
backwards to trim the in point. Watch the timeline monitor as you trim to find the
edit point.
3 Now click and drag the end of your clip to adjust the out point.
The zoom slider is located above the timeline, to the right of the tools that are centered in the
toolbar. By dragging the slider left and right you can zoom in and out of your timeline to make
fine adjustments.
Using DaVinci Resolve
48
Turning the ‘snapping’ feature off is handy when fine tuning edits, but it’s a helpful feature to
keep your clips held tightly against each other, so it’s worth turning back on once you’re done.
Press the ’N’ key to quickly turn snapping on or off.
The ‘edit’ page. You can trim your clips, change their order, move them
around and add transitions between them using the timeline editor.
Mapping Keyboard Shortcuts
If you are familiar with keyboard shortcuts using other editing software, you can easily map your
own in DaVinci Resolve to increase speed and optimise your workflow.
To map your own keyboard shortcuts:
1
Click on the project setting ‘gear’ icon at the bottom right of your DaVinci workspace,
then select ‘keyboard mapping’ from the settings list.
2 Select the shortcut you want to change from the categories provided, for example
timeline cut and paste shortcuts will be in the ‘edit’ category.
3 Click on the shortcut once to highlight the setting. Double click on the shortcut to
enable the change.
4 Press your new shortcut keys on the keyboard. If you make a mistake you can easily
undo the change by clicking the ‘undo’ icon next to the setting.
5 Click ‘save’ to confirm your new shortcut setting.
Trim your clips by dragging their start and end points left or right.
The ‘snapping’ feature can be turned off when making fine adjustments.
Using DaVinci Resolve
49
Adding Transitions
A transition is a visual effect used to bridge one clip to another in a pleasing way, for example
dissolves, wipes, dips to color, and more. These can add a layer of excitement to your edit.
Transitions don’t always have to be joining two clips, for example you can apply a dissolve
transition to the end of one clip to create a quick and easy fade to black.
The transitions palette contains many types of transition effects.
To add a dissolve transition between two clips:
1
Make sure there are two clips edited right next to one another on the timeline. Click the
‘effects library’ button in the UI toolbar at the top of the ‘edit’ page, and make sure the
‘toolbox’ panel is open.
2 Click on the ‘cross dissolve’ transition, drag it to your timeline and hover it over the edit
point between two clips. You’ll see the mouse pointer highlight both the end section of
the first clip, and the start of the second. Drop the transition onto the clips. It’s important
both clips have enough length before and after their edit points to make room for
the dissolve.
You now have a smooth transition mixing from one clip to the other. If you want to adjust the
length of the transition you can lengthen or shorten its start and end point using a similar
approach to trimming a clip. Hover your mouse pointer over the start or end of the transition
until the transition ‘trim’ icon appears, then drag it left or right.
Simply drag and drop transitions between adjoining clips.
Using DaVinci Resolve
50
Adding Titles
It’s easy to create titles for your edit. You can place a title on any video track just as you would a
clip. If you run out of tracks you can easily add new ones by right clicking next to an existing
track name and selecting ‘add track’.
To create a title:
1
Scroll down towards the middle of the toolbox in the ‘effects library’ located underneath
the media pool and you’ll see the ‘titles’ generators. Use the scroll bar to reveal more
‘titles’ options.
2 Drag and drop a text title on the empty video track above the clip you want the title
to appear. You can even drop your title next to a clip on Video 1 if you just want it to
appear over black. To see the title, make sure the timeline playhead is on the title.
3 Double click on the title clip. The ‘inspector’ will appear showing you the settings for
your title. Type your title into the ‘text’ field.
You can choose from a variety of fonts and adjust the appearance of your title by changing
settings such as color, size, alignment, position, and more. Transitions can be added to titles,
just like they can for clips.
Drag a title type from the ‘titles’ palette and drop it on an empty track.
Adding Audio Tracks
If you want to mix a large sound edit with lots of sound effects and music, you can easily add
more audio tracks when you need them.
To add an audio track:
1
Right click next to the name of the last audio track on your timeline and select
‘add track’.
2 Select the type of audio track you want, such as stereo, mono, 5.1 or adaptive.
Your new audio track will appear on the timeline.
This can be handy when you want to separate your audio elements into individual tracks for a
sound mix, for example voice, sound effects, and music.
Using DaVinci Resolve
51
Refer to the DaVinci Resolve manual for more information on how you can use all the powerful
editing tools.
To add a new audio or video track, right click next to a track name
and select ‘add track’. For audio, select the track type you want.
Color Correcting your Clips
Once you have edited your sequence of clips, you can start color correcting. This is best begun
after you have finished editing your sequence so you can maintain a consistent look, but part of
the fun of DaVinci Resolve is being able to move between the edit and color page to make fine
adjustments and discover new creative choices.
With the ‘color’ page you get absolute control over the look of your clips.
First, click on the ‘color’ tab to open the ‘color’ page.
You’ll see the color wheels, curves palettes and general color correction tools as well as the
preview and nodes window. Don’t feel overwhelmed by the vast array of features in front of you,
they are all there to help you get the most amazing looking pictures. The DaVinci Resolve
manual will show you exactly what the tools are for and how to use them in easy to follow steps.
Using DaVinci Resolve
52
You’ll learn the same techniques the professionals use in high end color correction facilities.
Generally, the first thing you’ll want do is optimize the shadows, mid tones and highlights in your
clips. In other words adjust the ‘lift’, ‘gamma’ and ‘gain’ settings. This will help get your pictures
looking their brightest and best with a clean, uniform starting point from where you can begin
grading the ‘look’ of your film.
Using Scopes
Most colorists make creative color choices by focusing on the emotion and the look they want
their program to have and then simply work using the monitor to achieve that look. You can look
at everyday objects and how different types of light interact with them to generate ideas on
what you can do with your images with a little practice.
Another way to color grade is to use the built in scopes to help you balance shots. You can
open a single video scope by clicking the ‘scope’ button, which is the second from the right on
the palette toolbar. You can choose to display a waveform, parade, vectorscope and histogram.
Using these scopes you can monitor your tonal balance, check the levels of your video to avoid
crushing your blacks and clipping the highlights, plus monitor any color cast in your clips.
The ‘color wheels’ palette contains the ‘lift’, ‘gamma’ and ‘gain’ controls which will generally
constitute your first adjustment. These should resemble controls you’ve seen in other
applications for doing color and contrast adjustments. For more accurate control of each color
using a mouse, you can change the color wheels to ‘primaries bars’ which let you adjust each
color and luminance channel for the lift, gamma and gain controls separately. Simply select
‘primaries bars’ from the drop down menu near the top right of the color wheels.
The parade scope helps you optimize highlights, mid tones and shadows.
The ‘lift, ‘gamma’, ‘gain’ and ‘offset’ color wheels give you total control over the
color and tonal balance of your clips. To make a uniform adjustment to all colors
for each tonal region, drag the dial underneath the color wheels back and forth.
Using DaVinci Resolve
53
1
Adjusting the ‘lift’
With your first clip selected on the color timeline, click on the ‘lift’ dial underneath the
first color wheel. Slide it back and forth and watch how it affects your image. You’ll see
the brightness of the dark regions of your picture increase and decrease. Set it to
where you want the dark areas to look their best. If you decrease the lift too much,
you’ll lose details in the blacks and you can use the parade scope to help avoid this.
The optimal position for blacks on the waveform is just above the bottom line of the
parade scope.
2 Adjusting the ‘gain’
Click on the ‘gain’ dial and slide it back and forth. This adjusts the highlights which are
the brightest areas of your clip. The highlights are shown on the top section of the
waveform on the parade scope. For a brightly lit shot, these are best positioned just
below the top line of the waveform scope. If the highlights rise above the top line of the
waveform scope, they will clip and you will lose details in the brightest regions of
your image.
3 Adjusting the ‘gamma’
Click on the ‘gamma’ dial underneath the color wheel and slide it back and forth. As
you increase the gamma you’ll see the brightness of the image increase. Notice the
middle section of the waveform will also move as you adjust the gamma. This
represents the mid tones of your clip. The optimal position for mid tones generally falls
between 50 to 70% on the waveform scope. However, this can be subjective based on
the look you are creating and the lighting conditions in the clip.
You can also use the curves palette to make primary color corrections. Simply click to create
control points on the diagonal line inside the curve graph, and drag them up or down to adjust
the master RGB contrast at different areas of image tonality. The optimum points to adjust are
the bottom third, mid, and top third of the curve line.
There are many more ways of doing primary color correction in DaVinci Resolve. Check the
DaVinci Resolve manual to learn how to use them all.
The curves palette is another tool you can use to make primary color corrections,
or enhance specific areas of your clip when using a power window.
Secondary Color Correction
If you want to adjust a specific part of your image then you need to use secondary corrections.
The adjustments you have been doing up until now using the color wheels and lift, gamma and
gain adjustments affect the whole image at the same time and so they are called primary color
corrections.
Using DaVinci Resolve
54
However if you need to adjust specific parts of your image, say for example you wanted to
improve the color in the grass in a scene, or you wanted to deepen the blue in a sky, then you
can use secondary corrections. Secondary color corrections are where you select a part of the
image and then adjust just that part. With nodes, you can stack multiple secondary corrections
so you can keep working parts of your image until everything is just right! You can even use
windows and tracking to allow the selections to follow movement in your images.
Qualifying a Color
Often you’ll find a specific color in your clip can be enhanced, for example grass by the side of
a road, or the blue in a sky, or you may need to adjust color on a specific object to focus the
audience’s attention on it. You can easily do this by using the HSL qualifier tool.
Use the HSL qualifier feature to select specific colors in
your image. This is handy when you want to make areas
of your image ‘pop’, to add contrast, or to help draw the
audience’s attention to certain areas of your shot.
To qualify a color:
1
Add a new serial node.
2 Open the ‘qualifier’ palette and make sure the ‘color range’ sample eyedropper tool
is selected.
3 Click on the color in your clip you want to affect.
Usually you’ll need to make some adjustments to soften the edges of your selection
and limit the region to only the desired color. Click on the ‘highlight’ button to see your
selection.
4 Adjust the ‘width’ control in the ‘hue’ window to broaden or narrow your selection.
Experiment with the high, low and softness controls to see how to refine your selection. Now
you can make corrections to your selected color using the color wheels or custom curves.
Sometimes your selection can spill into areas of the shot you don’t want to affect. You can easily
mask out the unwanted areas using a power window. Simply create a new window and shape it
to select only the area of color you want. If your selected color moves in the shot, you can use
the tracking feature to track your power window.
Adding a Power Window
Power windows are an extremely effective secondary color correction tool that can be used to
isolate specific regions of your clips. These regions don’t have to be static, but can be tracked
to move with a camera pan, tilt or rotation, plus the movement of the region itself. For example,
you can track a window on a person in order to make color and contrast changes just to that
person without affecting his/her surroundings. By making corrections like this you can influence
the audience’s attention on areas you want them to look at.
Using DaVinci Resolve
55
Use power windows to mask out areas you don’t want to be
affected by the HSL qualifier secondary adjustments.
To add a power window to your clip:
1
Add a new serial node.
2 Open the ‘window’ palette and select a window shape by clicking on a shape icon.
Your selected window shape will appear on the node.
3 Resize the shape by clicking and dragging the blue points around the shape. The pink
points adjust the edge softness. You can position the shape by clicking the center
point and moving it to the area you want to isolate. Rotate the window using the point
connected to the center.
Now you can make color corrections to your image in just the area you want.
Power windows let you make secondary corrections
to specific parts of your image.
Tracking a Window
The camera, object or area in your shot may be moving, so to make sure your window stays on
your selected object or area, you’ll need to use DaVinci Resolve’s powerful tracking feature.
The tracker analyzes the pan, tilt, zoom and rotation of the camera or object in your clip so you
can match your windows to that movement. If this isn’t done, your correction can move off the
selected target and call attention to itself, which you probably don’t want.
Using DaVinci Resolve
56
You can track objects or areas in your clip using the tracker
feature so power windows can follow the action.
To track a window to a moving object:
1
Create a new serial node and add a power window.
2 Go to the start of your clip and position and size the window to highlight just the object
or area you want.
3 Open the ‘tracker’ palette. Select the pan, tilt, zoom, rotate, and perspective
3D settings appropriate for the movement in your clip by checking or unchecking
the relevant ‘analyse’ checkboxes.
4 Click on the ‘forward’ arrow to the left of the checkboxes. DaVinci Resolve will now
apply a cluster of tracking points on your clip and then step through the frames to
analyze the movement. When the tracking is done, your power window will follow the
path of the movement in your clip.
Most of the time automatic tracking is successful, but scenes can be complex and sometimes
an object can pass in front of your selected area, interrupting or affecting your track. This can
be solved manually using the keyframe editor. Refer to the DaVinci Resolve manual to
find out more.
Using Plugins
While making secondary color corrections you can also add OpenFX plugins to create fast,
interesting looks and effects using the ‘color’ page, or imaginative transitions and effects on your
clips on the ‘edit’ page. OFX plugins can be purchased and downloaded from third party suppliers.
OFX plugins are a quick and easy way to create imaginative and interesting looks.
Using DaVinci Resolve
57
After installing a set of plugins, you can access them on the color page by opening the OpenFX
inspector to the right of the ‘node editor’ Simply click the ‘OpenFX’ button to open the OpenFX
inspector, create a new serial node and drag and drop a plugin onto the new node. If the plugin
has editable settings, you can adjust these in the adjoining ‘settings’ panel.
In the ‘edit’ page you can add plugin generators and transitions to clips by opening the
‘OpenFX’ panel in the ‘effects library’ and dragging your selected plugin onto the video track
above your clip on the timeline.
Mastering your Edit
So now you’ve edited, color corrected and graded your clips you’ll want to export a render of
your edit in the ‘deliver’ page. This page lets you select the range of clips you want to export,
plus the format, codec and resolution you want. You can export in many types of formats such
as QuickTime, AVI, MXF and DPX using codecs such as 8-bit or 10-bit uncompressed RGB/YUV,
ProRes, DNxHD, H.264 and more.
To export a single clip of your edit:
1
Click on the ‘deliver’ tab to open the deliver page.
2 Go to the ‘render settings’ window on the top left of the page. In the ‘format’ settings,
select ‘single clip’. You can now choose from a number of export presets, for example
YouTube, Vimeo and audio presets, or you can set your own export settings manually
by leaving it set to the default ‘custom’ preset and entering your own parameters. For
this example, select YouTube, then click on the arrow next to the preset and select the
1080p video format.
The frame rate will be locked to your project frame rate setting.
3 Underneath the presets you will see the timeline filename and the target location for
your exported video. Click the ‘browse’ button and choose the location where you want
to save your exported file.
4 Immediately above the timeline, you’ll see an options box with ‘entire timeline’ selected.
This will export the entire timeline, however you can select a range of the timeline if
you want to. Simply choose ‘in/out range’ and then use the ‘i’ and ‘o’ hot key shortcuts
to choose the in and out points in your timeline.
5 Go to the bottom of the ‘render settings’ and click on the ‘add to render queue’ button.
The ‘deliver’ page is where you export your edit. You can select
from many different video formats and codecs
Using DaVinci Resolve
58
Your render settings will be added to the render queue on the right side of the page. Now all
you have to do is click ‘start render’ and monitor the progress of your render in the
render queue.
When your render is complete you can open the folder location, double click on your new
rendered clip and watch your finished edit.
After adding your render settings to the render queue,
click the ‘start render’ button to export your edit.
Camera Video Output
Monitoring using SDI
Blackmagic Cinema Camera supports 3G-SDI so it can be used to output uncompressed 10-bit
4:2:2 video to routers, monitors, SDI capture devices, broadcast switchers and other
SDI devices.
Blackmagic Production Camera 4K supports 6G-SDI, so it can be used to connect to any SDI
monitor as well as 4K switchers such as ATEM Production Studio 4K.
Connecting to Video Switchers
The SDI output allows you to use your camera as a television production camera. You can
connect the SDI output directly to production switchers for studio work or to ATEM Camera
Converters to convert your signal to optical so you can send it hundreds of meters to a
broadcast truck for live production on location.
If you are using Blackmagic Cinema Camera and have selected to record in 25 or 29.97 fps and
set the SDI Overlays to Off, the SDI output will be set to 1080i50 and 1080i59.94 respectively.
This allows you to work with most switchers, which only support interlaced high
definition formats.
Connecting to Monitors
SDI monitoring can be really handy when accessing the LCD is impractical, such as when
secured high on a jib arm, on a crane, or mounted on a vehicle.
Camera Video Output
59
Monitoring information is displayed on your SDI output by adjusting the SDI Overlays options in
the Display Settings menu. SDI Overlays provide frame guides and information such as
recording details and camera settings. If you simply want to monitor your shots, you can always
turn overlays off for a clean SDI output.
Connect the SDI output to SDI monitors for full 10-bit uncompressed monitoring or Blackmagic
SmartScope Duo for live waveform monitoring.
Connect a SDI cable from the BNC port of your Blackmagic
Cinema Camera or Production Camera 4K to any SDI device.
Waveform Monitoring using Thunderbolt
When connected to a Mac OS X or Windows computer with Thunderbolt technology, your
Blackmagic Cinema Camera or Production Camera 4K can be used as a powerful solution for
waveform monitoring. Blackmagic Cinema Camera’s Thunderbolt port always outputs
uncompressed 10-bit 1080p HD video. Production Camera 4K matches the SDI output in either
10-bit 1080p HD or compressed Ultra HD. For waveform monitoring using Production Camera
4K set the recording format to HD.
Blackmagic UltraScope allows you to monitor almost every aspect of the video you record with
your Cinema Camera or Production Camera 4K.
Blackmagic UltraScope software is available to download from the Blackmagic Design support
center at www.blackmagicdesign.com/support.
Connect to your computer via the Thunderbolt port of your
Blackmagic Cinema Camera or Production Camera 4K.
Camera Video Output
60
Blackmagic UltraScope software gives you accurate waveform monitoring via Thunderbolt.
Using Blackmagic UltraScope
What is Blackmagic UltraScope?
Blackmagic UltraScope software provides waveform monitoring of the video output from your
Blackmagic Cinema Camera or Production Camera 4K.
Previously, broadcast quality television and post production scopes were incredibly expensive
and bulky solutions that only let you see one scope at a time on a tiny screen! Some scopes
look ugly and unappealing to your client. With Blackmagic UltraScope, you get 6 wonderful
scopes to monitor all aspects of your video signal, perfect for checking levels on your camera
while shooting. Any camera adjustments are immediately seen using Blackmagic UltraScope!
Simply connect a Thunderbolt cable from your camera to the Thunderbolt port on your
computer, turn on your camera and launch UltraScope!
Installation Requirements
The Blackmagic UltraScope software interface requires a computer display with a minimum
resolution of 1280 x 800 pixels to view two scopes simultaneously. Blackmagic Design
recommends viewing all 6 scopes simultaneously by using a computer display resolution of
1920 x 1200 or 1920 x 1080 pixels.
Please see the support pages at www.blackmagicdesign.com/support for a comprehensive list
of the latest minimum system requirements for Blackmagic UltraScope.
Understanding Blackmagic UltraScope Views
Blackmagic UltraScope has two different views available depending on your workflow needs
and screen resolution. You have the choice of viewing six displays in ‘full screen’ view, or for
more compact viewing, choose any 2 displays in ‘2-up’ view.
The display view can be selected from the ‘view’ menu.
Choose ‘full screen’ to enter Full Screen view. If this option is unchecked, 2-up view will be
displayed. You can quickly switch between Full Screen view and 2-up view by using the hot key
CMD-F on Mac OS X, or CTRL F on Windows.
Camera Video Output
61
In 2-up view, select the desired left and right scopes by opening the ‘view’ menu or by rightclicking anywhere in the UltraScope window. Make your selections from the ‘left view’ and ‘right
view’ menu options.
If you want the scopes to swap sides, select the left or right view and set it to be the same as
the other view. The scopes will swap sides because the 2-up view never displays the same
scope in both the left and right views.
Blackmagic UltraScope - full screen view. Blackmagic UltraScope
lets you accurately monitor the video and audio levels from
your Blackmagic Cinema Camera or Production Camera 4K.
Screen Resolution Requirements for Display Views
‚‚
Full screen view: 1920 x 1200 pixels or 1920 x 1080 pixels. If your monitor doesn’t
support these resolutions, then full screen view will not be available.
‚‚
2-up view: minimum resolution of 1280 x 800 pixels.
2-up view
Blackmagic UltraScope Displays
Blackmagic UltraScope software is a great tool for maintaining accurate video and audio levels
from your Blackmagic camera so you can make the most of your digital footage in
post‑production. Scopes used to monitor your levels include vectorscope, RGB parade,
histogram and audio metering display.
Camera Video Output
62
RGB Parade Display
RGB parade displays the red, green and blue channels of your Blackmagic camera’s image.
If one of the channels is elevated, it will indicate the presence of a color cast. For instance, any
excessive elevation of a color channel will indicate that your white balance is incorrect.
You may want a certain color effect in your shot, for example when using a colored filter on your
lens, like a warming filter. An elevated red channel will be normal, but you can also check the
other color channels aren’t being overly crushed. The same applies if using intensely colored
gels on your lights. Remember that any “look” you create in camera can be easily enhanced
during post-production using a vectorscope and RGB parade in DaVinci Resolve.
The waveform of the RGB parade is great for checking if your Blackmagic camera’s image is
clipped or crushed. Any clipping of highlights will be visible by a flat horizontal line at 100 IRE, or
the upper level of your scope. Clipping results in a loss of image detail, so if there is image
detail in your highlights that you want to preserve, adjust your lighting or exposure accordingly.
Remember, it’s easy to clip out image information during color grading in DaVinci Resolve, but if
detail is not present in the original exposure then it cannot be recovered in the grade.
RGB parade display
Vectorscope Display
Vectorscope is useful for monitoring the color balance and saturation of your Blackmagic
camera’s video signal. If your signal has a dominant green color cast then the majority of image
information will be located towards the green area of the vectorscope. In comparison, an image
with a neutral color balance will have information evenly distributed around the center.
The center of the vectorscope represents zero saturation. The further an object is from the
center, the more saturated it appears. For example, if shooting green screen for compositing,
you want the green screen to be as saturated as legally possible to achieve the best key or
matte. Broadcast legal colors are maintained by ensuring the saturation levels don’t go beyond
the graticule boxes on your vectorscope display.
Vectorscope display
Camera Video Output
63
The vectorscope can also be used to check your camera’s white balance on location. When
zooming into a white object so it fills the camera’s frame, the vectorscope will show a cluster of
information. Correct white balance will display information evenly clustered around the center.
Adjust your camera’s white balance setting to see how it affects the display.
Histogram Display
Using histogram is another way to check for clipping, crushing and image contrast in your
Blackmagic camera signal. The horizontal axis represents the luminance range with black on
the left (0 in a 10 bit image) and white on the right (1023 in a 10 bit image). Clipping is displayed
as image information clustered at the 1023 mark. Crushing is displayed as information clustered
at the 0 mark. An image with good contrast will display information covering the entire
horizontal axis, whereas a low contrast image will display information predominantly in
the middle.
Histogram display
Audio Metering Display
Audio metering display shows you the audio levels embedded in your Blackmagic Camera’s
video signal. The 2 channels of embedded audio are displayed in either dBFS or VU format.
dBFS is essentially a meter of the overall digital audio signal and is common on modern digital
equipment. The VU meter shows average signal levels, is easy to use and very common on
older equipment.
To monitor your audio levels, watch the VU meter and ensure the levels never peak above 0dB.
Peaking above 0dB means your audio is clipping.
You can also monitor audio phase and balance using the audio metering display.
Audio metering display
Camera Video Output
64
Blackmagic Camera Setup Software
How to Update Your Camera Software on Mac OS X
After downloading the ‘Blackmagic Camera Setup’ software, unzip the downloaded file and
double click on the .dmg disk image file. Launch the ‘Blackmagic Camera Setup’ installer and
follow the onscreen instructions.
How to Update Your Camera Software on Windows
After downloading the ‘Blackmagic Camera Setup’ software and unzipping the downloaded file,
you should see a ‘Blackmagic Camera Setup’ installer window. Double click on the installer icon
and follow the onscreen prompts to complete the installation.
After the installation is complete, click on the Windows ‘start’ menu, and go to ‘all programs’.
Click on the Blackmagic Design folder to open the Blackmagic Camera setup software and
instruction manuals.
How to Update your Camera’s Internal Software
After installing the latest Blackmagic Camera setup software on your computer, connect a USB
cable between the computer and your camera. On Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera, the
Mini USB 2.0 port is located inside the battery terminal. On Blackmagic Cinema Camera and
Production Camera 4K, the Mini USB 2.0 port is located behind the SSD door.
Launch ‘Blackmagic Camera Setup’ and follow the onscreen prompts to update the
camera software.
The Mini-USB 2.0 port can be found behind the battery
terminal door on Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera.
Blackmagic Camera Setup Software
65
The Mini-USB 2.0 port can be found behind the SSD door on
Blackmagic Cinema Camera and Production Camera 4K.
Post Production Workflow
Working with Files from SSDs
To import your clips from a SSD:
1
Remove the SSD from your Blackmagic Cinema Camera or Production Camera 4K.
2 You can mount the SSD to your Mac OS X or Windows computer using either an eSATA
or Thunderbolt dock, for example Blackmagic MultiDock. You can also use an eSATA to
USB adapter cable to plug the SSD straight into a USB port on your computer. USB 3.0
is preferable as USB 2.0 is not fast enough to edit video in real time.
3 Double click on the SSD to open it and you should see a list of QuickTime movie files
or folders that contain your CinemaDNG RAW image files. Depending on the format
you chose to record in, you might have a mixture of files, but they will all use the same
naming convention.
4 Now you can simply drag the files you want from the SSD onto your desktop or another
hard drive, or you can access the files straight from the SSD using your NLE software.
CinemaDNG RAW files are saved to the SSD as separate DNG images for each frame.
This is an open format and you can use many software applications to view your RAW
2.5K images as a video sequence.
5 Before you unplug the SSD from your computer, it’s always a good idea to eject the
SSD safely using either Mac OS X or Windows first.
Edit directly from the SSD by removing it from your camera and mounting it
on your computer using an eSATA Thunderbolt dock or USB 2.0 docking cable.
Post Production Workflow
66
Working with Files from SD Cards
You can access your ProRes or CinemaDNG files straight from your SD card with any Mac OS X
or Windows computer that features an SD card slot or by using an SD card reader.
1
Remove the SD card from your Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera or Blackmagic
Micro Cinema Camera and insert it into the SD card slot of your computer, or SD card
reader. The SD card can be accessed the same way as you would an external hard
drive, USB drive or any other media storage device attached to your computer.
2 Double click on the SD card to open it and you should see a list of QuickTime movie
files or folders which contain your CinemaDNG RAW image files. Depending on the
format you chose to record in, you might have a mixture of files and folders, but they
will all use the same naming convention.
3 Now you can simply drag the files you want from the SD card onto your desktop or
another hard drive, or you can access the files straight from the SD card using your
NLE software.
4 Before you physically remove the SD card from the SD card slot, it’s always a good idea
to eject the SD card safely using either Mac OS X or Windows first.
HDMI
Insert your SD card into any computer with an
SD card slot to access your clips immediately.
Working with 3rd Party Sofware
If you have your own favourite editing software you’d like to use, you can easily copy your clips
to an internal/external drive or RAID and then import your clips into the software. If you want to,
you can even edit your clips directly from the SD card or SSD using a card reader, external
SATA adaptor or SSD Dock.
Using Final Cut Pro X
To edit Apple ProRes 422 HQ clips using Final Cut Pro X, you need to create a new project
matching your clips’ video format and frame rate. For this example, clips are set using ProRes
422 HQ 1080p25 camera settings.
1
Launch Final Cut Pro X, go to the menu bar and select ‘file/new project’. A window will
open containing project settings.
2 Name your project and select the ‘custom’ checkbox.
3 Set the ‘video properties’ settings to 1080p HD, 1920x1080 and 25p.
4 Set your ‘audio and render properties’ settings to ‘stereo, 48kHz, and Apple
ProRes 422 HQ’
5 Click ‘ok’.
Post Production Workflow
67
To import your clips into your project, go to the menu bar and select ‘file/import/media’.
Choose your clips from your SSD or SD Card.
You can now drag your clips onto the timeline for editing.
Final Cut Pro X project settings.
Using Avid Media Composer
To edit your DNxHD clips using Avid Media Composer 7, create a new project matching the
clip’s video format and frame rate. For this example, clips are set using DNxHD 1080i59.94
camera settings.
1
Launch Media Composer and the ‘select project’ window will appear. Click the ‘new
project’ button.
2 In the ‘new project’ window name your project.
3 Go to the ‘format’ dropdown menu and select 1080i/59.94.
4 Go to the ‘color space’ dropdown menu and select YCbCr 709.
5 Go to the ‘raster dimension’ dropdown menu and select 1920x1080. Click ‘ok’.
6 Select ‘tools>background services’ and click the ‘start’ button if background services
are not already running and then click ‘ok’.
7 Select the media bin where you wish to import your files.
8 Select ‘file>AMA link...’ and select the files that you wish to import and then click ‘ok’.
When the clips appear within the media bin you can drag your clips onto the timeline and
begin editing.
Setting the project name and project
options in Avid Media Composer 7.
Post Production Workflow
68
Using Adobe Premiere Pro CC
To edit your Apple ProRes 422 HQ or DNxHD clips using Adobe Premiere Pro CC, you need to
create a new project matching your clips’ video format and frame rate. For this example, clips
are set using ProRes 422 HQ 1080p25 camera settings.
1
Launch Adobe Premiere Pro CC. In the ‘welcome’ window select ‘create new/new
project’. A window will open containing project settings.
2 Name your project. Choose the location for your project by clicking ‘browse’ and
selecting your desired folder. Once you’ve selected your location folder click ‘ok’ in the
‘welcome’ window.
3 Go to the Adobe Premiere Pro CC menu bar, select ‘file/import’ and choose the clips
you want to edit. Your clips will appear in the ‘project’ window.
4 Drag the first clip you wish to edit onto the ‘new item’ icon at the bottom right of the
‘project’ window. A new sequence will be created matching your clip settings.
You can now drag your clips onto the sequence timeline for editing.
Setting the project name and project
options in Adobe Premiere Pro CC.
Using Autodesk Smoke
To edit your clips using Autodesk Smoke 2013, create a new project matching the clips’ video
format, bit depth, frame type and frame rate. For this example, clips were shot using ProRes 422
HQ 1080p25 camera settings.
1
Launch Smoke and the project and user settings window will appear. Click on the ‘new’
button under the project heading.
2 The ‘create new project’ window will open. Name your project.
3 From the resolution dropdown menu, select 1920x1080 HD 1080.
4 Make sure bit depth is set to 10-bit and frame type is progressive.
5 From the config template dropdown menu select 1920x1080@25000p.cfg.
6 Leave the ‘preferred format’ set to ProRes 422 HQ and click ‘create’.
Post Production Workflow
69
7 Click on the ‘new’ button under the user heading.
8 When the ‘create new user profile’ window opens, type your user name and click ‘create’.
9 When the project and user settings window reopens, click the start button.
10 From the menu bar, select ‘file>import>file’ and select your clips to import.
11 Once the clips appear in the media library you can drag your clips onto the timeline and
begin editing.
Setting the project name and
project options in Autodesk Smoke.
Attaching Accessories
Wrist Strap
Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera comes with a wrist strap for convenient carrying of the
camera when on the move from location to location.
To fasten, loop the string on the end of the strap through the ring on the camera, located to the
bottom right of the LCD. Loop the rope end of the wrist strap back through the string, making a
secure knot.
Attaching Accessories
70
Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera wrist strap.
Sun Shield
Blackmagic Cinema Camera and Production Camera 4K include a detachable sun shield to
shade the touchscreen in bright conditions and ensure optimum viewing is possible at all times.
Line up the sun shield’s locking tabs and gently push into the camera.
To remove the sun shield either:
Option 1.Hold the top of the shield in the middle and gently pull out, making sure it
releases evenly on both sides.
Option 2.Using your thumbs, gently press the side locking tabs outwards using equal
pressure and pull out the shield. Do not pull the sun shield out one side at a
time, as you may damage the locking tabs.
Option 1.
Option 2.
Blackmagic Cinema Camera and Production Camera 4K Sun Shield.
Carry Strap
Blackmagic Cinema Camera and Production Camera 4K come with a carry strap for convenient
carrying of the camera when on the move from location to location.
To fasten, loop the end of the strap through the metal hook on the top of the camera, and
secure through the plastic clasp to the desired length.
Attaching Accessories
71
Blackmagic Cinema Camera and
Production Camera 4K carry strap.
Camera Handles
Optional handles for Blackmagic Cinema Camera and Production Camera 4K allow shooting in
locations where you need to move around quickly with your camera. The handles let you steady
your shot and keep up with the action!
On the underside of the camera, locate the ¼” screw thread and insert the guide pin, locking
the handles to the camera.
Shimming the PL Mount
Shimming your PL mount lens
Blackmagic Shims are thin disks of varying thickness that let you make fine adjustments to the
distance between a PL lens and a PL model Blackmagic camera’s sensor. This distance is
commonly known as the flange focal distance, or back focus, and can change slightly due to
variables such as lens age and the environmental conditions of your shoot. If you have a PL
model Blackmagic camera, you can easily adjust the back focus using shims.
Shimming the PL Mount
72
Shims are placed between the PL mount and the camera body so the distance from your
subject to the sensor matches the focus marks on your lens. Blackmagic camera PL models are
supplied with a 0.50mm shim already installed. You can purchase shim sets of varying thickness
from your local Blackmagic Design reseller. Use shim thicknesses depending on your back
focus requirements.
To shim the PL mount on your PL model Blackmagic camera you’ll need a torque wrench able to
accurately set a maximum torque of 0.45Nm, with 2.0mm and 2.5mm hex key drivers.
Removing and replacing the PL mount
REC
REC
1
2
Place your Blackmagic camera on a solid,
clean bench top and remove your lens or
dust cap. The glass filter covering the sensor
will be exposed for the duration of the
shimming process, so it’s important to keep
the filter as clean as possible.
Remove the six PL mount screws using the
2.5mm hex key. You may need to
occasionally rotate the PL locking ring
clockwise or counterclockwise to access
the screws.
REC
REC
0.50
3
4
Carefully lift the lens mount away from the
camera body. Keep the screws safely
located close to the lens mount.
Note the alignment of the existing 0.50mm
shim with the alignment pin at the 11
o’clock position.
Shimming the PL Mount
73
REC
REC
0.30
5
6
Remove the existing 0.50mm shim and
replace with the appropriate shim thickness
needed to bring your lens focus marks into
alignment with the focal distance.
Place the lens mount onto the camera body
ensuring the alignment hole is aligned with
the alignment pin at the 11 o’clock position.
REC
1
3
REC
5
6
4
2
7
8
Loosely turn the six mounting screws until
initial contact is made with the shoulder of
the lens mount.
Using the torque wrench, apply one full turn
of pressure to mounting screw 1, followed by
one full turn to screw 2, repeat for screws 3
and 4, then 5 and 6. Continue to apply one
full turn to each screw in the sequence
above until all screws have reached the
maximum torque of 0.45Nm.
Replacing the Fan
Blackmagic Cinema Camera and Production Camera 4K each contain a fan, which is necessary
for cooling. If you detect the fan is not working, or is making a strange noise, switch off the
camera and order a replacement fan by contacting Blackmagic Design Support. You should use
an anti-static strap to avoid damaging the camera while opened.
To replace the fan:
1
Switch off the camera and remove any external cables.
2 Place the camera upside down on a bench, with the tripod hole facing up, and the
touchsceen facing towards you. You will see a metal panel labelled “Fan”. This panel
is attached to a fan module inside the camera. Remove the four screws from this panel
using a number 01 size Phillips head screwdriver. Thread-locking fluid has been applied
to the screws which will require additional force to unscrew them. Keep the screws as
you will need them again.
Replacing the Fan
74
3 Gently lift the fan module up and out of the camera, taking care NOT to pull the wires
that connect to the inside of the camera. Accidentally pulling on these wires could
cause them to become unplugged from an inaccessible location inside the camera,
which would need to be fixed by a Blackmagic Design service center.
4 Locate the white plastic plug a short distance along the wires from the fan. Pull the plug
apart using both hands so that no stress is placed on the wires that continue inside the
camera. You can now discard the old fan module.
FAN
5 Connect the white plastic plug to the wires of the replacement fan module. Reinstate
the fan module in its hole with the “Fan” label the right way up. The fan module can
only be installed in one orientation. Reinstate the four screws into the fan plate to finish
replacing the fan.
6 Switch on the camera and you should feel a gentle flow of air coming from the vent
holes in the fan module.
Replacing the Fan
75
Help
Getting Help
The fastest way to obtain help is to go to the Blackmagic Design online support pages and
check the latest support material available for your camera.
Blackmagic Design Online Support Pages
The latest manual, software and support notes can be found at the Blackmagic Design support
center at www.blackmagicdesign.com/support.
Contacting Blackmagic Design Support
If you can’t find the help you need in our support material, please use the “Send us an email”
button on the support page to email a support request. Alternatively, click on the “Find your
local support team” button on the support page and call your nearest Blackmagic Design
support office.
Checking the Software Version Currently Installed
To check which version of Blackmagic Camera Utility software is installed on your computer,
open the About Blackmagic Camera Utility window.
‚‚
On Mac OS X, open Blackmagic Camera Setup from the Blackmagic Cameras folder in
the Applications Folder. Select About Blackmagic Camera Setup from the application
menu to reveal the version number.
‚‚
On Windows, open Blackmagic Camera Setup from your Start menu or Start Screen.
Click on the Help menu and select About Blackmagic Camera Setup to reveal the
version number.
How to Get the Latest Software Updates
After checking the version of Blackmagic Camera Utility software installed on your computer,
please visit the Blackmagic Design support center at www.blackmagicdesign.com/support to
check for the latest updates. While it is usually a good idea to run the latest updates, it is wise to
avoid updating any software if you are in the middle of an important project.
Help
76
Warranty
Limited Warranty
Blackmagic Design warrants that this product will be free from defects in materials and
workmanship for a period of 12 months from the date of purchase. If a product proves to be
defective during this warranty period, Blackmagic Design, at its option, either will repair the
defective product without charge for parts and labor, or will provide a replacement in exchange
for the defective product.
In order to obtain service under this warranty, you the Customer, must notify Blackmagic Design
of the defect before the expiration of the warranty period and make suitable arrangements for
the performance of service. The Customer shall be responsible for packaging and shipping the
defective product to a designated service center nominated by Blackmagic Design, with
shipping charges pre paid. Customer shall be responsible for paying all shipping charges,
insurance, duties, taxes, and any other charges for products returned to us for any reason.
This warranty shall not apply to any defect, failure or damage caused by improper use or
improper or inadequate maintenance and care. Blackmagic Design shall not be obliged under
this warranty: a) to repair damage resulting from attempts by personnel other than Blackmagic
Design representatives to install, repair or service the product, b) to repair damage resulting
from improper use or connection to incompatible equipment, c) to repair any damage or
malfunction caused by the use of non Blackmagic Design parts or supplies, or d) to service a
product that has been modified or integrated with other products when the effect of such a
modification or integration increases the time or difficulty of servicing the product.
Exposing URSA Viewfinder to direct sunlight could damage the viewfinder display as the
viewfinder optics act as a magnifying glass. Image retention or burn-in could happen on OLED
panels when static or high contrast images, such as frame guides, are displayed on the panels
for extended periods. To avoid this, ensure the IR sensor for face detection is not covered
deliberately and disconnect the viewfinder when not in use for prolonged periods. Image
retention is not covered by this product warranty.
THIS WARRANTY IS GIVEN BY BLACKMAGIC DESIGN IN LIEU OF ANY OTHER WARRANTIES,
EXPRESS OR IMPLIED. BLACKMAGIC DESIGN AND ITS VENDORS DISCLAIM ANY IMPLIED
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
BLACKMAGIC DESIGN’S RESPONSIBILITY TO REPAIR OR REPLACE DEFECTIVE PRODUCTS
DURING THE WARRANTY PERIOD IS THE WHOLE AND EXCLUSIVE REMEDY PROVIDED TO
THE CUSTOMER. BLACKMAGIC DESIGN WILL NOT BE LIABLE FOR ANY INDIRECT, SPECIAL,
INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES IRRESPECTIVE OF WHETHER BLACKMAGIC
DESIGN OR THE VENDOR HAS ADVANCE NOTICE OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.
BLACKMAGIC DESIGN IS NOT LIABLE FOR ANY ILLEGAL USE OF EQUIPMENT BY
CUSTOMER. BLACKMAGIC IS NOT LIABLE FOR ANY DAMAGES RESULTING FROM USE OF
THIS PRODUCT. USER OPERATES THIS PRODUCT AT OWN RISK.
© Copyright 2016 Blackmagic Design. All rights reserved. ‘Blackmagic Design’, ‘URSA’, ‘DeckLink’, ‘HDLink’, ‘Workgroup
Videohub’, ‘Multibridge Pro’, ‘Multibridge Extreme’, ‘Intensity’ and ‘Leading the creative video revolution’ are registered
trademarks in the US and other countries. All other company and product names may be trademarks of the respective
companies with which they are associated.
Warranty
77