Revision History
Rev Number
Date of
Release
Reason for Release
00
April 2015
Initial Release of document
that coincided with Software
Release 10.1.0.0
01
July 2015
Optimizations for black and
white printing
02
November
2015
Corrected several errors and
added some additional
descriptions
03
December
2016
Update to accompany
Software Release 10.2.0.0
04
March 2017
Formatting changes to
improve printed copies
05
February 2018
Update to accompany
Software Release 10.2.1.0
06
March 2018
Added network connection
description 10.2.1.0
IFD540 Integrated Flight Display | PILOT GUIDE
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1
System Overview.................................................................................... 1-1
INTENDED FUNCTION ........................................................................... 1-2
FUNCTIONAL OVERVIEW ...................................................................... 1-2
BASIC CONCEPTS ................................................................................. 1-4
Page Function Keys .............................................................................. 1-4
Line Select Keys ................................................................................... 1-4
Right Knob Labeling.............................................................................. 1-5
Color Philosophy ................................................................................... 1-6
GENERAL IFD OPERATIONS ................................................................. 1-7
Bezel Layout ......................................................................................... 1-7
Power Control ....................................................................................... 1-9
Brightness Controls............................................................................. 1-10
Start-Up Sequence ............................................................................. 1-11
Database Currency States .................................................................. 1-13
Page Layout and Formats ................................................................... 1-14
Com-Nav ............................................................................................ 1-17
Transponder Control and Display ........................................................ 1-25
Direct-To Operations........................................................................... 1-30
Function Keys ..................................................................................... 1-32
Touch screen ...................................................................................... 1-34
Use of External Keyboard ................................................................... 1-38
Dual IFD Operatons ............................................................................ 1-40
WiFi Operations .................................................................................. 1-44
WAAS vs Non-WAAS Operations ....................................................... 1-46
Interaction with External Devices ........................................................ 1-46
Before Takeoff Techniques ................................................................. 1-48
2
FMS Pages .............................................................................................. 2-1
FPL (FLIGHT PLAN) TAB ........................................................................ 2-1
FMS Basic concepts ............................................................................. 2-1
Creating A New Flight Plan ................................................................... 2-4
Selecting a Departure ........................................................................... 2-9
Saving/Naming A Flight Plan............................................................... 2-12
Activating A Flight Plan ....................................................................... 2-13
Copying A Flight Plan ......................................................................... 2-13
Inverting A Flight Plan ......................................................................... 2-13
Preview Flight Plans ........................................................................... 2-13
Modifying A Flight Plan ....................................................................... 2-14
Inserting a Waypoint ........................................................................... 2-14
Deleting a Waypoint ............................................................................ 2-15
Editing a Waypoint .............................................................................. 2-15
Adding a Vertical Constraint ................................................................ 2-16
Entering and Intercepting A Radial ...................................................... 2-17
Deleting A Flight Plan ......................................................................... 2-18
Creating a Holding Pattern .................................................................. 2-18
Circular Orbits ..................................................................................... 2-20
Deleting a Holding Pattern .................................................................. 2-22
Editing a Holding Pattern .................................................................... 2-22
Flight Plan Sequencing ....................................................................... 2-23
Lateral Offsets .................................................................................... 2-24
Gaps or Discontinuities in Flight Plans ................................................ 2-24
Enroute Descents ............................................................................... 2-26
Entering an Arrival and Approach........................................................ 2-28
Activating a Leg .................................................................................. 2-32
Use of the Map-FPL Split Page ........................................................... 2-33
Chart Access ...................................................................................... 2-34
INFO TAB .............................................................................................. 2-36
ROUTE TAB .......................................................................................... 2-40
Creating a New Route ......................................................................... 2-41
Naming a Route .................................................................................. 2-42
Copying a Route ................................................................................. 2-43
Inverting a Route ................................................................................ 2-44
Activating a Route ............................................................................... 2-45
Deleting a Route ................................................................................. 2-46
WPT (USER WAYPOINTS) TAB ............................................................ 2-47
Creating a User Waypoint ................................................................... 2-47
Naming A User Waypoint .................................................................... 2-48
Deleting a User Waypoint ................................................................... 2-49
Designating a User Waypoint as an Airfield......................................... 2-49
NRST (NEAREST) TAB ......................................................................... 2-51
3
Map Pages .............................................................................................. 3-1
MAP TAB ................................................................................................. 3-1
Map Controls ........................................................................................ 3-1
Other Map Features .............................................................................. 3-5
Decluttering the Map ........................................................................... 3-10
Map Panning....................................................................................... 3-11
Graphical Flight Planning (“Rubber Banding”) ..................................... 3-12
Altitude Constraints on Map ................................................................ 3-14
Map Information Pop-Up Boxes .......................................................... 3-15
Datalink Weather Overlays and Operations......................................... 3-17
Datalink RADAR ................................................................................. 3-18
Weather Overlays on Map .................................................................. 3-20
TFRs .................................................................................................. 3-26
Indications of Data Age ....................................................................... 3-26
Weather Radar Selection for Map Overlay .......................................... 3-27
Terrain ................................................................................................ 3-29
Terrain Awareness (TA) ...................................................................... 3-29
Forward Looking Terrain Alerting (FLTA) ............................................ 3-31
500’ Callout ......................................................................................... 3-35
TERRAIN ALERTING WARNING SYSTEM (TAWS).............................. 3-36
Premature Descent Alert (PDA) .......................................................... 3-39
Excessive Descent Rate (EDR) .......................................................... 3-40
Negative Climb Rate / Altitude Lost After Takeoff ................................ 3-41
TAWS Inhibit Control .......................................................................... 3-43
TAWS Self-Test .................................................................................. 3-43
Degraded or No TAWS Conditions...................................................... 3-43
Traffic Display ..................................................................................... 3-44
SYNTHETIC VISION (SVS) TAB ........................................................... 3-51
CHART TAB .......................................................................................... 3-57
RADAR TAB .......................................................................................... 3-63
VIDEO TAB............................................................................................ 3-70
4
Aux Pages............................................................................................... 4-1
AUDIO TAB ............................................................................................. 4-1
Volume Control ..................................................................................... 4-1
Satellite Radio Tuning ........................................................................... 4-3
Com Presets ......................................................................................... 4-5
UTILITIES TAB ........................................................................................ 4-7
Timers .................................................................................................. 4-7
Calculators .......................................................................................... 4-10
Electronic Checklist............................................................................. 4-13
SETUP TAB ........................................................................................... 4-18
Datablock Setup ................................................................................. 4-18
Map Setup .......................................................................................... 4-34
FMS Setup.......................................................................................... 4-35
User Options ....................................................................................... 4-37
Custom User Settings ......................................................................... 4-50
SYSTEM TAB ........................................................................................ 4-51
Fuel Management ............................................................................... 4-51
System Status..................................................................................... 4-52
5
Navigation............................................................................................... 5-1
GENERAL................................................................................................ 5-1
LEVELS OF INTEGRATION .................................................................... 5-1
NAV SOURCE KNOB .............................................................................. 5-4
OBS MODE ............................................................................................. 5-7
VOR COURSE DEPICTION................................................................... 5-11
ARMED VS ENGAGED/ACTIVE INDICATIONS .................................... 5-12
FMS HOOKS ......................................................................................... 5-13
COURSE CHANGES AND HOLDS........................................................ 5-15
AUTO VLOC TUNING............................................................................ 5-15
TRANSITION ALTITUDES/LEVELS....................................................... 5-16
NAVIGATION MODE/CDI SCALE CHANGING ...................................... 5-18
APPROACH PROCEDURES ................................................................. 5-19
Precision Approaches ......................................................................... 5-21
Non-Precision Approaches ................................................................. 5-22
Back Course Approaches ................................................................... 5-22
Procedure Turns and holds in Lieu of Procedure turns ........................ 5-22
WAAS Approaches ............................................................................. 5-23
MISSED APPROACH ............................................................................ 5-27
RETRY APPROACH .............................................................................. 5-29
RNP/RNAV OPERATIONS .................................................................... 5-30
RECOMMENDED ICAO EQUIPMENT CODES ..................................... 5-32
6
General.................................................................................................... 6-1
CAUTION ADVISORY SYSTEM (CAS) / ALERTS ................................... 6-1
Master Caution Lamps .......................................................................... 6-1
Warning-Caution-Advisory Message Bar............................................... 6-2
ALERTS TAB ........................................................................................... 6-3
EXCEEDANCES | WARNINGS RED .................................................... 6-4
Exceedances | Cautions Yellow ........................................................... 6-5
Exceedances | Advisories CYAN ........................................................ 6-11
NIGHT OPERATIONS ........................................................................... 6-21
IFD Display Brightness........................................................................ 6-21
IFD Bezel Brightness .......................................................................... 6-21
Charts Lighting Scheme ...................................................................... 6-21
Display of Terrain on Map ................................................................... 6-22
SYSTEM FAILURES .............................................................................. 6-23
Power distribution ............................................................................... 6-23
Loss of IFD ......................................................................................... 6-23
Loss of Display ................................................................................... 6-24
Loss of Bezel Controls ........................................................................ 6-25
Loss of Touchscreen Control .............................................................. 6-26
Loss of GPS (Dead Reckoning) .......................................................... 6-27
Other Anomalies ................................................................................. 6-28
FCC RF Exposure Requirements ........................................................ 6-28
SUBSCRIPTIONS .................................................................................. 6-29
DATA UPDATES ................................................................................... 6-29
DATA TRANSFER TO/FROM EXTERNAL DEVICES ............................ 6-37
INTEGRATION WITH THE IFD100 MOBILE APP .................................. 6-41
USER DATA BACKUP/RESTORATION PROCEDURE ......................... 6-42
Saving User Data ................................................................................ 6-42
Reloading Previously Stored User Data .............................................. 6-44
DATALOGS DOWNLOAD...................................................................... 6-45
SOFTWARE UPDATES ......................................................................... 6-49
HIGH TEMPERATURE OPERATIONS .................................................. 6-49
COLD TEMPERATURE OPERATIONS ................................................. 6-50
LOW POWER OPERATIONS ................................................................ 6-50
HIGH POWER OPERATIONS ............................................................... 6-51
CHARGING FROM THE USB ................................................................ 6-52
PLUG AND PLAY DETAILS ................................................................... 6-53
CLEANING THE DISPLAY..................................................................... 6-55
PAIRING A BLUETOOTH® KEYBOARD ............................................... 6-56
SELF TEST OUTPUT ............................................................................ 6-63
USE OF GLOVES .................................................................................. 6-64
DEMO MODE ........................................................................................ 6-66
1
System Overview
This manual assumes that the pilot is appropriately licensed, is
proficient in operation of the aircraft and its equipment, and is in
compliance with all Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs).
All images contained in this manual are for reference use only,
and are subject to change.
Avidyne strongly recommends that pilots use the IFD540 system
only under VFR conditions until completely familiar with its
operation and use.
Boxed areas marked as NOTE within this manual identify certain
situations or areas of operation having heightened safety
implications. While it is important for the operator to be familiar
with all of the information in the manual, it is essential to the safe
use of the IFD540 that pilots give careful attention to the material
contained within these NOTEs.
In order to avoid a diversion of attention from the task of safely
taxiing, pilots should avoid performing the described cockpit tasks
while the aircraft is in motion on the ground. It remains the pilot’s
duty to monitor the IFD for proper function upon activation and
during use.
Internal IFD540 data logs and the storage devices that record and
store data are property of Avidyne.
IFD540 Integrated Flight Display
System Overview
1-1
INTENDED FUNCTION
The Avidyne IFD540 is a GPS-nav-com radio whose primary
function is to conduct nav-com-transponder tuning and
communication, and serve as the principal navigation
sensor/system for all IFR VHF (“VLOC”) and GPS-based
navigation and instrument flying (enroute and approach),
provided it is connected to an external CDI/HSI indicator that is
installed in the required field of view as well as a source selection
annunciator.
Supplemental functions include serving as a moving-map flight
management system (FMS), and electronic charts and checklists
along with a number of timer and calculator types of utilities and
options for weather radar control and display and a video display.
The system includes terrain alerting as well as an option for
TAWS.
FUNCTIONAL OVERVIEW
The Avidyne IFD540 Integrated Flight Display (IFD) system
supports the following functions:
1-2
•
Flight Management System (FMS)
•
WAAS and non-WAAS GPS Navigation
•
VHF Radio Nav/Com (16W and 10W variants)
•
Moving Map including synthetic vision view
•
Terrain Awareness
•
Forward Looking Terrain Alerting (FLTA)
•
Terrain Alerting Warning System (TAWS)
[optional]
•
Weather Datalink
•
ADS-B position and display
•
Lightning sensor depictions
•
Weather radar [optional]
•
Video input [optional]
•
Traffic
•
Electronic Approach Plates
System Overview
•
Electronic Checklists
•
Data Logging
•
Caution Advisory System (CAS)
•
Utilities (e.g. Schedulers, Timers, Calculators)
•
Multi-touch Touch screen Control
•
Multiple IFD Operations
•
Remote Transponder Control and Display
•
WiFi and Bluetooth® Communication [optional]
COOL FEATURE
Multi-Touch Touch Screen Control
The IFD supports multi-touch touch screen
technology meaning that features such as twofingered pinch zoom for range changing on maps
and charts is fully enabled.
The system has been designed for single-pilot IFR operation and
features a Page and Tab user interface.
Most functions revolve around the three Page Function Keys
that appear across the bottom edge of the bezel. Each of the
three functional pages has associated tabs, which contain related
data, often in different views. These functions and tabs are
covered in detail throughout this reference manual.
System Overview
1-3
BASIC CONCEPTS
PAGE FUNCTION KEYS
The 3 buttons along the bottom of the IFD bezel are called Page
Function Keys. Each key is labeled by function:
•
FMS (Flight Management System)
•
MAP (Moving Map)
•
AUX (System Pages)
Each page has a number of associated tabs. Each Page
Function key has a left and right rocker nature to it. Select the
page of interest by pressing the middle of the Page Function Key
and navigate through the available tabs by pressing the left or
right side of the Page Function Key. Continual pressing of one
side of the function key will automatically step through the tabs.
Page Function Keys and Tabs
LINE SELECT KEYS
Line Select Keys, typically abbreviated to LSK in this manual,
are the buttons found along the left vertical side of the bezel.
These are different from Page Function Keys in that they also
have a label, just inside the bezel adjacent to the physical LSK
which indicates the function of the LSK. Pressing the LSK or
touching the LSK label on the display either performs the labeled
action or changes the state. For the cases where there is a list of
selectable options, browse the list by pressing the LSK.
LSK Types
•
1-4
State LSKs – Green button title in the first row
and a white state display in the second row
indicates a list of choices. Traverse the list in one
direction by pressing the line select key or in the
other direction by touching the label.
System Overview
•
Action LSKs – Pressing the LSK or display label
enables the action indicated on the label.
LSK Types
State LSKs – Push the
button or touch the label
to cycle through the list of
choices
Action LSK – Press the
button or touch the label
to engage an action (bring
up Wx Overlay on map)
RIGHT KNOB LABELING
The bottom right IFD knob is a modal knob in that its function is
context dependent and is “soft-labeled” on the display. As a
general rule, the inner and outer rings of the dual concentric knob
perform the same function – it’s just that the inner ring is “fine”
control and the outer ring is “coarse” control of that function. The
symbol used to represent the right knob is a ring with a center
dot.
Right Knob Label Scheme
In the example above, the outer ring scrolls through a list in a
coarse manner and the inner ring scrolls through the same list
stopping at each minor field along the way. Pushing the knob
generates a drop-down menu.
System Overview
1-5
COLOR PHILOSOPHY
There are a few generalities with the use of color that are
consistent across the IFD as described in the table below:
IFD Feature/Function
Page Function Keys
Color
Green – Active;
White – Available but not
currently active.
Note: AUX can also be
Red, Yellow or Cyan if there
is an active alert as
described later in this
manual.
FMS “Fly To” Data (e.g. active leg
of flight plan, To Waypoint
datablock)
Magenta
Active Nav Data (e.g. Active Com
freq, Active Nav freq, Active Nav
Source mode)
Green
Line Select Key Labels
Light Green
Line Select Key States
White
1-6
System Overview
GENERAL IFD OPERATIONS
The IFD540 Integrated Flight Display (IFD) is a touch screen
GPS-Nav-Com that has been designed to be both a retrofit GPSNav-Com or a clean install GPS-Nav-Com. As a retrofit
installation, the unit was designed to be plug-and-play compatible
with a Garmin 530/W unit.
BEZEL LAYOUT
CDI Nav Source Knob
Volume / Power /
Squelch Knob
USB Port
Frequency Swap
Line Select
Keys (LSKs)
Cam Latch
Page Function
Keys
Com/Nav Manual
Tuning Knob
Ambient
Light Sensor
Dedicated
Function Keys
Context Sensitive
IFD Knob
Starting in the top left corner and working counter-clockwise
around the bezel, the IFD540 has:
•
Power/Volume/Squelch knob;
System Overview
1-7
•
Frequency (Active
button;
•
USB port for database updates, datalog
downloads, software updates and powering USB
devices in-flight;
•
Four (4) Line Select Keys (LSKs) that are page
dependent with soft key labels adjacent to each;
•
Dual Concentric Rotary Knob as a means of
manually tuning Com and Nav frequencies;
•
Three (3) Page Function keys along the bottom
(FMS, MAP, AUX);
•
Mechanical Cam Latch control for tray installation;
•
Dual Concentric Rotary Knob that is page
dependent;
•
Six (6) Dedicated Function Keys consisting of:
Standby) Swap dedicated
o
Direct-To (“-D->”)
o
Procedure (“PROC”)
o
Nearest (“NRST”)
o
Frequency List (“FREQ)
o
Enter (“ENTR”)
o
Clear (“CLR”)
•
Ambient Light Sensor;
•
CDI Nav Source knob.
COOL FEATURE
Integrated WiFi/Bluetooth®
The IFD has an integrated WiFi/Bluetooth®
transceiver located underneath the Avidyne logo on
the bottom of the bezel. No additional hardware is
required to take advantage of the capability.
1-8
System Overview
POWER CONTROL
The IFD is regulated by a pair of circuit breakers. There is also a
power control on the top left corner of the unit but the IFD will
automatically start when the aircraft bus power is applied. The
power button can be used to turn the unit off (press and hold and
watch 5 second count down expire) or to turn the unit back on if it
had been manually turned off.
Manual Power Down
After power application, the bezel keys backlighting will be turned
on. Several seconds later, the IFD display will begin to have
indications.
System Overview
1-9
BRIGHTNESS CONTROLS
Each IFD has brightness controls to control both the bezel and
the display brightness. The user can access individual controls to
allow for either manual control of brightness, automatic control of
brightness in response to the cockpit dimming controls/rheostats
or automatic control of brightness in response to the ambient light
sensor that is embedded in the bezel. The user accessible
controls for all are on the AUX page using the User Options LSK
of the Setup tab.
Brightness Controls
Depending on how the installer configured the brightness controls
at time of installation, the “Auto” setting will typically revert to the
dimming bus setting in low ambient light conditions.
If the IFD540 appears to be inoperative or non-responsive from a
lighting perspective, check the aircraft instrument lighting rheostat
to ensure it is not set to a night position.
1-10
System Overview
START-UP SEQUENCE
The startup sequence of the IFD is as follows:
•
A splash screen will be displayed during system
initialization and will be automatically removed
when the IFD is initialized. The Page Function
keys (e.g. FMS, MAP, AUX) will not be lit up while
the splash screen is present;
•
An agreement of the limitation of your legal rights
must be made via the bezel “ENTR” button. Note:
For the duration that the agreement page is
displayed, the IFD is activating the signals that
connect with a remote annunciator panel as well
out outputting self-test data to external devices.
Use that condition as a lamp test and external
signal check;
•
If there is a 3 party weather or traffic sensor
connected to the IFD, then a vendor mandated
disclaimer page is presented advising the pilot it is
their responsibility to see and avoid traffic and
determine weather conditions. There is no pilot
action that must be performed on this page and it
will automatically be removed after several
seconds;
•
A software version and database currency page is
displayed IF there any expired databases.
Avidyne does not recommend operating with
expired databases but the system will allow
operation by pressing the “Proceed” followed by
the “Confirm” LSKs;
•
If the IFD has been enabled for Bluetooth and
WiFi (Network) and either of those subsystems
have been configured “On” on the User Options
page, then the IFD will present an Allow/Ignore
page to allow external data receipt via Bluetooth
and/or WiFi. Press the Allow button if such input
is desired or the Ignore button if no external input
is desired. Pressing Ignore will automatically
toggle the User Option selections to Off and will
remain that way until manually turned back on;
rd
System Overview
1-11
•
If there is a fuel flow system connected to the IFD,
then the IFD will automatically transition to the
Fuel Management Page. If the fuel flow system
does not provide fuel totalizer data, you will need
to input the fuel on board and press the “ENTR”
key. If the fuel flow system does provide fuel
totalizer data, confirm the total is correct and press
the “ENTR” key.
If there is no fuel flow system connected, then the
unit progresses directly to the FMS page and FPL
tab, in principle ready for a flight plan to be loaded
or verified;
•
The IFD is now ready for normal use.
The agreement page, database expiration and fuel management
entries are all skipped if the unit is powered on in-flight.
NOTE
Some Data May Be Delayed at Startup
Some data such as fuel flow and fuel totalizer may
experience a 5-10 second delay during post start
initialization. For those aircraft configured with fuel
totalizers, this may result in some fuel display
changes on the Fuel Mgmt tab during that period
including prompting the pilot to enter in initial fuel.
That should resolve itself within a few seconds.
Another example concerns the FMS nav database
initialization. In this case, the message “Please wait
– System Initializing” may be displayed on the FPL
tab for 10-30 seconds. Additionally, if the unit has
been exposed to extreme cold prior to start, it may
take a warm up period to achieve standard
performance.
1-12
System Overview
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
“GPS No Position” Message Possible at Startup
If the GPS alignment takes an unusually long time
(e.g more than 2 minutes) to acquire an initial
position fix, the “GPS No Position” advisory
message will be displayed. This message will
automatically clear itself when a position fix is
acquired. If the message does not remove itself by
the time you are ready to taxi, it is a clear indication
that your system has not determined its initial
position and action may be required on your part.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Bluetooth Initialization Period
The Bluetooth keyboard may experience a 1-2
minute delay during post-start initialization before
becoming functional. Depending on how fast you
are to start entering a flight plan, it is possible the
keyboard is not ready yet.
DATABASE CURRENCY STATES
The following table describes the various database currency
states that may be observed at startup:
Database Status
Message
Color
In Effect
Valid Thru <Month,
Day, Year >
Light Green
Has Expired
Expired <Month,
Day, Year>
Yellow
System Overview
1-13
Not Yet Effective
Effective <Month,
Day, Year>
Yellow
Charts Issue Date
Between 14 and 21
Days Old (i.e. up to
a week out of date)
Update Available
<Next Cycle Date>
Light Green
Charts Issue Date
Older Than 21 Days
(i.e. more than a
week out of date)
Update Required
<Date of
Expiration>
Yellow
Invalid
<Type> Database
Invalid
Yellow
NOTE
Use of Not Yet Effective Data
If attempting to use not-yet-effective data (e.g.
charts or nav), it is the responsibility of the pilot in
command to verify there are no differences between
the current data and the not-yet-effective data
before it is permissible to use the not-yet-effective
data.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Manual Check of Database Dates
Even if the databases are all current, you can still
view the date/status of each database from the AUX
page, Database Status display as described in
Section 4 of this manual.
1-14
System Overview
PAGE LAYOUT AND FORMATS
The left column (radio frequencies and context-sensitive line
select keys), top data strip and nav source knob indication, and
bottom edge set of page tabs are always displayed on every
page.
Page Layout
Com/Nav Blocks
Top strip datablock area
Page Tabs
Context sensitive
Line Select Keys
(LSKs)
Nav Source Label
Configurable
Data Strip
Use a combination of the page function keys (FMS, MAP, AUX)
and the associated tabs, to change the contents of the rest of the
display.
Each page has a number of associated tabs. Each Page Function
key has a left and right rocker nature to it. Select the page of
interest by pressing the middle of the Page Function key and
System Overview
1-15
navigate through the available tabs by pressing the left or right
side of the Page Function key. The desired tab can also be
touched to directly jump to that tab. The last tab selected on any
given page is retained in memory and will be displayed when you
return to that page.
COOL FEATURE
Split Pages
The split pages where extra data can be displayed
along the right edge can be handy pages in all
phases of flight.
Some pages can display a data strip along the right edge of the
display. The FPL tab and NRST tab on the FMS page and the
Map tab on the MAP page are prime examples. In the cases
where this is available, a labeled side tab is displayed. That extra
data strip can be pulled out for display or pushed back in for
hiding by using any of the following methods:
•
Touch the side tab (shown in gray boxes below);
•
Use a left or right swiping motion on the tab as
required to pull it out or push it back;
•
Press and momentarily hold the left or right side of
the Page Function key as required to uncover or
hide the extra data strip.
Map-Data Split
1-16
System Overview
Map-FPL Split
Map-NRST Split
COM-NAV
The VHF radio consists of a Com radio that covers the frequency
band from 118.0 MHz to 136.990 MHz and a Nav radio that
covers the frequency band from 108.0 MHz to 117.95 MHz. Both
25 kHz and 8.33 kHz spacing is supported. The radio can be
configured as a 16 watt or 10 watt transmitter at the factory prior
to shipping.
Display
The active com frequency (the frequency that the radio will
transmit on when the Push-To-Talk button is pressed) is
displayed in green and the standbys (there can be more than one
standby frequency) are displayed in white.
Display of the frequencies can be formatted in several ways via
the “User Options” and “Datablock Setup” LSKs of the SETUP tab
on the AUX page (see the Datablock Setup description in Section
4 for more details). The default display format is two com
frequencies (active and #1 standby) above two nav frequencies
(active and #1 standby). A custom display format can be set up
to display the active com and up to four standby com frequencies.
The frequency that will be swapped into the active frequency
when the bezel Frequency Swap button is pressed is called the
“# 1 Standby”. For example, in the case where the user has set
up 4 com slots to be displayed, any one of slots 2, 3 or 4 can be
selected to be the “#1 Standby” simply by touching the slot. In
every case, the “#1 Standby” slot is visually indicated by a cyan
outline.
COOL FEATURE
Multiple Standby Frequencies
The com (or nav) frequencies can be formatted to
act as a type of quick directory when set up ahead
of time. This can be handy in local area operations
when just a few standard frequencies are expected
to be used for a flight – for example ATIS, Ground,
and Tower frequencies can be entered in three com
slots for quick swapping into the active channel.
Touch the frequency slot that you want to be the #1
System Overview
1-17
Standby at any given time and then when the bezel
Frequency Swap button is pressed, that slot is what
is swapped with the Active channel.
Multiple Frequency Formats
COOL FEATURE
Decoded Agency Identifier
The agency (e.g. Clearance Delivery, Ground,
Tower, Approach, etc) for the Active and each
displayed Standby com frequency are displayed in
each com frequency slot. This is a handy reminder
of the agency to which you have tuned in each slot.
Similarly, if the frequency displayed is a nav
frequency, then the Morse code decoded identifier
will be displayed and will stay displayed for as long
as the IFD can decode the Morse code, which
serves as a usable means to Tune-Identify-Monitor.
1-18
System Overview
If a slot is receiving a voice transmission, a “RX” indication will be
displayed along the right edge of the given com slot.
When the active frequency is transmitting, a “TX” indication will
be displayed along the right edge of the Active com slot.
COOL FEATURE
Monitor Standby Com
If connected to an audio panel (e.g. Avidyne
AMX240) that can support this function, the IFD will
send the first standby com frequency audio to the
audio panel for audio monitoring. This permits the
nd
pilot to monitor a 2 com channel (e.g. ATIS) while
still connected to the active com channel.
Tuning
Tuning can be accomplished through several methods.
Whichever frequency slot has been selected as the #1 Standby
can be manually tuned by twisting the bottom left knob on the
bezel. The outer ring changes the digits to the left of the decimal
point and the inner ring changes the digits to the right of the
decimal point. The slot being tuned this way is highlighted in
reverse video as depicted in the 126.000 example below.
Manual Com/Nav Tuning Reverse Video Depiction
System Overview
1-19
A second way to manually tune a frequency is to touch the Active
or Standby frequency slot and when a virtual keyboard is
displayed, type the desired frequency into the numeric keypad
and press the Enter (“Enter” on the virtual keypad or “ENTR” on
the bezel) button. The numeric keypad will time out and be
removed after 10 seconds of inactivity.
Another way to manually tune a frequency (only useful for tuning
VOR Nav frequencies) is to type the identifier of the desired
frequency (e.g. “GDM” for the Gardner VOR) via the
alphanumeric virtual keypad. An automatic, geographic-based
prediction algorithm (“geofill”) is running such that the most likely
VOR station is filled in based on your geographic position.
Manual Entry of VOR Identifier
A more automated way to tune a com frequency is to press the
“FREQ” button along the right edge of the bezel. This will present
a list of likely frequencies and that list can be scrolled via an
up/down motion with touch or via twisting the right hand knob. If
touch was used, double tap on the row that you want to put into
the #1 Standby. If the knob was used to scroll through the list,
push the knob in to put the frequency into the #1 Standby slot.
1-20
System Overview
Frequencies can also be nominated to be put into the #1 Standby
from other pages on the IFD540 such as the INFO or NRST Tab
on the FMS page.
Switching Between Com, Nav, and Transponder
To access the Nav frequencies for display or editing, push in the
lower left knob to toggle between Com frequencies and Nav
frequencies. The displayed set of frequencies will always time
out back to com frequencies following 20 seconds of inactivity on
the Nav frequency display.
If the IFD is configured for an optional remote transponder, then
the push action of the lower left knob will toggle between Com
frequencies, Nav frequencies, Transponder tuning, then back to
Com frequencies.
Invalid Frequency Entry Attempt
Attempting to type an invalid frequency (e.g. typing a nav freq in a
com slot) will produce a temporary error message indicating the
mistake. This message is unavailable in dual IFD installations
that have Keyboard Convenience mode (described later) turned
on.
Notification of Invalid Frequency Entry Attempt
System Overview
1-21
Frequency List
The “FREQ” function key along the right edge of the bezel has
three tabs along the top edge of the page:
•
Airport – the most logical com frequencies (e.g.
ATIS, ASOS, AWOS, CTAF, Tower, Ground,
Clearance Delivery, etc) associated with the origin
airport and then when airborne and more than
5nm from the origin, the destination airport;
•
Enroute – the most likely enroute ARTCC (up to
50 entries out to 200nm from present position) and
other enroute com frequencies (e.g. FSS) for the
current geographic position;
•
Recent – a running list of the most recent 10 com
frequencies that had been selected for the Active
frequency slot across power cycles.
Freq List Page
Each additional press of the “FREQ” function key will cycle to the
next top tab. The top tabs can also be touched to activate that
specific list. The tabs only populate when there is a GPS position.
1-22
System Overview
When a desired frequency has been located in the list, it can be
placed into the #1 Standby slot by either double tapping it via
touch or pushing the bottom right dual concentric push knob.
COOL FEATURE
Shortcuts to Com Tuning
Shortcuts are provided to aid speed and ease of
manually entering a com frequency in the IFD. For
example, there is no need to type the leading “1” for
frequencies, the decimal point, trailing zeros or the
thousandth digit. For 121.700, type “217” and press
Enter.
Emergency Com Frequency
121.5 kHz can be quickly put into the Active com slot by pressing
and holding the bezel frequency swap button for approximately 3
seconds. The frequency that had been in the active slot is
swapped into the #1 standby position.
Stuck Mic
If the IFD determines that there is a stuck mic situation (defined
as 30 seconds or more of continuous transmission), a “Stuck Mic”
CAS message (Blue Advisory message) will be displayed and the
transmitter will be disabled until the stuck mic condition is
resolved.
Remote Tuning Control and Frequency Swapping
The IFD supports a host of remote tuning and frequency
swapping capability.
A “Com Presets” LSK will be present on the AUDIO tab of the
AUX page and up to 16 com frequencies can be preset. Some
aircraft installations will also include a dedicated Remote Tuning
control (e.g. dedicated button on the yoke) which will step through
the list of preset com frequencies loading each into the #1
Standby slot. Each time that control is activated, the display will
pop up a dialog box next to the #1 Standby slot indicating which
item in the preset com list has been selected. In addition, a cyan
System Overview
1-23
arrowhead will be displayed next to the currently selected
frequency on the Com Preset page.
Another capability that can be added during installation is a
remote com frequency swapping function that, when activated,
performs the same action as pressing the bezel Frequency Swap
button. In this case, your hands do not need to leave the controls
to command a frequency swap. Typical installations that support
this feature include a dedicated Frequency Swap control (e.g.
dedicated button on the yoke). Pressing and holding the
dedicated Frequency Swap control button for approximately 3
seconds will insert 121.5 kHz into the Active com slot.
Other remote tuning and frequency swapping capability is present
when dedicated third-party radio control display units are wired
into the aircraft. Usually in these cases, when the radio control
display unit is active, the Active and #1 Standby frequencies are
only displayed on that external control display unit and not on the
IFD, even though the actual radio is still housed inside the IFD.
1-24
System Overview
TRANSPONDER CONTROL AND DISPLAY
If the IFD has been configured to communicate with a remote
transponder, then code and mode control and display is available.
Display
The transponder mode and code is displayed in a datablock that
can be configured to be displayed along the left, right, or top
sides of the display.
Typical Transponder Datablock Locations
System Overview
1-25
Switching Between Com, Nav, and Transponder
To access the transponder keyboard for display or editing, push
in the lower left knob to toggle between Com frequencies and
Nav frequencies and Transponder keyboard. The displayed set
of Com/Nav/Xndr data slots will always time out back to com
frequencies following 20 seconds of inactivity on the Nav
frequency display or transponder keyboard.
Cycling between Com  Nav  Transponder Display
Touching any of the displayed transponder mode/code
datablocks will generate the transponder keyboard.
Transponder Keyboard
1-26
System Overview
The keyboard will be dismissed through one of several methods
to include,
• Touching one of the Mode soft keys or the IDENT soft key;
• Touching the red-X in the top right corner of the keyboard;
• Letting it time-out on its own.
Presuming the transponder has been setup to accept the input
from the IFD, it will automatically toggle between air and ground
modes during takeoff and landing rolls.
IDENT can be performed via several means. If the IFD has been
configured for a transponder data block along the left side, then
there is a dedicated line select key button for the IDENT function.
Another method is via the transponder keyboard by pressing the
IDENT soft key. A third method is by pressing the IDENT soft key
that is displayed in the top left corner of the IFD when the bottom
left IFD Com/Nav/Xpndr knob is pressed.
Some aircraft may be equipped with an optional external IDENT
switch (e.g. on yoke).
Transponder Mode Descriptions and Entry
Mode S transponders have the following modes, each
represented by its own mode key on the transponder keyboard:
ALT
ON
The transponder will respond to all interrogations.
The transponder will respond to all interrogations, but
altitude reporting is suppressed.
GND
The transponder will respond to Mode S ground
interrogations from surface movement radar. This mode
is only available in installations that send a ground/air
discrete signal to transponder.
SBY
The transponder is on, but will not reply to any
interrogations.
When airborne, the transponder should always be set to ALT
unless otherwise directed by Air Traffic Control.
Aircraft installations that include a ground/air state input (such as
a gear squat switch or discrete input from an IFD540) will
automatically select GND on landing or while taxiing and will
automatically select ALT when airborne. In these installations, the
System Overview
1-27
pilot selectable states are ALT-ON-SBY when in-air and GNDSBY when on-ground.
Transponder Code Entry
Transponder codes can be entered in via one of two methods –
keyboard entry or bottom left bezel knob use.
When using the keyboard entry method, touch any of the numeric
buttons (0 through 7) to start modifying the squawk code. A new
squawk code is set when the fourth digit is entered.
If an incorrect digit is entered, press the CLR button as required
to backspace through the squawk code.
If the code entry is not completed within 3 seconds after starting
the edit, the changes are ignored and the previous code restored.
The cyan highlighted scratch pad is designed to be an aid to help
visually confirm the value being entered.
When using the bezel knob entry method, first ensure the
transponder mode/code data is displayed in the top left corner of
the display by pressing the bottom left knob twice, then twist the
outer ring of the bottom left knob to adjust the first two digits and
twist the inner ring of the bottom left knob to adjust the second
two digits. All new code entries are accepted and transmitted as
soon as the reverse highlighting is removed.
Other Transponder Keyboard Controls
VFR
Pressing the VFR soft key sets the transponder to the preprogrammed regional VFR code. Pressing the soft key again
restores the previous squawk code.
IDENT
Press the IDENT softkey or bezel button when ATC instructs you
to “Ident” or “Squawk Ident”. This activates the Ident pulse in the
transponder for 18 seconds. The “IDENT” display will be
highlighted in bright cyan during this period.
1-28
System Overview
CLR
Press the CLR softkey or the CLR button on the bezel to return to
original settings or back space through partially complete data
entry.
A round “R” reply lamp will light up in the transponder datablock
area whenever the transponder is in an active Reply state.
Transponder Configuration
Some typical pilot actions for configuration (e.g. Flight ID
definition and default VFR code definition) are accessed through
the User Options sub-page on the AUX page. The rest are
accomplished via the installer in Maintenance Mode. If the IFD is
unable to communicate with the remote transponder, an
associated CAS message is displayed and the transponder data
blocks may be replaced with Red-X’s.
System Overview
1-29
DIRECT-TO OPERATIONS
A dedicated Direct-To function key is located along the right edge
of the IFD bezel. Pressing that button from any page will display
a green Direct-To dialog box that will be pre-populated with a
logical waypoint.
Direct-To Dialog and Confirmation Dialog Boxes
If that pre-populated waypoint is the desired waypoint, press the
“ENTR” function key along the right edge of the bezel twice
(Direct-To, Enter, Enter) or touch the Activate dialog box that
pops up on the display to accept.
If a different waypoint is desired, there are a number of ways in
which the proper waypoint can be entered in that Direct-To dialog
box:
• Twist the outer ring of the bottom right IFD knob to scroll
up/down through a flight plan list that re-populates the
waypoint in the dialog box from the active FMS flight plan
(Note that the Missed Approach must be activated to use
this technique for points in the published missed approach).
1-30
System Overview
When the desired waypoint is displayed, press the knob in
to accept;
• Touch the waypoint field in the pop-up green Direct-To
dialog box to generate a virtual keyboard and type in the
desired waypoint name. When the desired waypoint is
displayed, press Enter on the keypad or bezel to accept;
• Twist the inner ring of the lower right IFD knob while the
pop-up green Direct-To dialog box is displayed to go into
edit mode. The inner ring changes the character and the
outer ring changes the cursor position in the waypoint name
field. It may not be necessary to fill in all letters of the
waypoint name since they will auto-fill. When the desired
waypoint is displayed, press Enter on the keypad or bezel
to accept.
System Overview
1-31
FUNCTION KEYS
In addition to the Direct-To and Frequency List function keys that
have already been described, the IFD has a Nearest (“NRST”)
function key and an Enter (“ENTR”) function key and a Clear
(“CLR”) function key that perform the following functions:
•
•
1-32
Nearest – Simultaneously jumps to a Nearest
page (if not already there) and presents a list of
the nearest airports to your present position. Each
additional press of the “NRST” function key
changes the nearest list to another category as
defined in the list below:
o
Nearest Airports
o
Nearest Airports to Destination
o
Nearest VORs
o
Nearest NDBs
o
Nearest Intersections
o
Nearest ARTCCs
o
Nearest FSS
o
Nearest Airspace
o
Nearest User Waypoints
Procedure – The “PROC” function key acts as a
shortcut for attaching a published arrival or
approach procedure to a waypoint in your flight
plan. It can be used at any time. The first press of
the function key results in the IFD displaying the
FPL tab of the FMS page with the Approach field
of the next destination after the active leg
highlighted in reverse video and a drop down list
of available published approaches listed.
System Overview
nd
Pressing it a 2 time will step the reverse video
over the Arrival field and present a drop down box
of available published arrivals. Each subsequent
press of the “PROC” key will step through all
following destination airfield approaches and
arrivals in the flight plan and wrap back around to
the top of the flight plan. When the drop down box
appears over the intended data field, twist the
bottom right IFD knob to scroll up or down the list
until the desired procedure is highlighted and then
push the knob in to add that procedure to the flight
plan. If there is no flight plan, pressing the
“PROC” key will present the FPL tab with an insert
cursor at the top of the page but will not present
any procedures.
•
Enter – The use can vary slightly depending on
the scenario, but “ENTR” is always related to the
Enter/Accept/Confirm use;
•
Clear – The use can vary slightly depending on
the scenario, but ”CLR” is always related to
Clear/Backspace/CAS Message Clear use.
System Overview
1-33
TOUCH SCREEN
The IFD uses a capacitive touch screen technology that allows
multi-touch operation (e.g. two-fingered pinch zoom). Many types
of gloves can be used during touch screen operations.
The IFD employs a “hybrid touch” design in that virtually every
interaction can be accomplished either through bezel controls or
touch. This allows for flexibility in operational use. Some
features or functions naturally lend themselves to being easier to
accomplish through touch (e.g. map panning) and some are
naturally easier to do via physical bezel controls (e.g. changing
pages or using dedicated functions like the Freq List). We have
found that individual usage patterns tend to emerge and personal
preference has a strong influence as well. Perhaps most
importantly, hybrid touch is useful during turbulent or bumpy flight
conditions where it is often very difficult to precisely and reliably
touch the desired point on the display. Having a physical bezel
control provides an “anchor point or control” to hold on to and
exercise the intended action.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
User Control to Turn Touch Off
The “User Options” LSK on the SETUP tab of the
AUX page provides a touch screen on/off selection
capability. This can come in handy in excessively
bumpy flight conditions when even attempting to
use physical bezel controls can result in inadvertent
touching of the screen and potentially causing
unintentional display changes. The on/off setting
will persist across power cycles.
Touch zone targets have been intentionally oversized wherever
possible to aid in accurate touch screen behavior.
As noted above, virtually every feature or function of the IFD can
be accomplished either by touch or by physical bezel control.
The following table identifies the exceptions to that rule:
1-34
System Overview
Bezel-only Control Input
Functions
Touch screen-only Control
Input Functions
Selecting page function keys
(e.g. changing the “major”
pages of FMS, MAP, AUX)
Map panning
Power on/off
Graphical Flight Planning
(“Rubber banding”)
Changing the Primary Nav
Source
Calling up a map page info box
Starting the Frequency List
Selecting a #2 or #3 standby
frequency for swapping into the
active frequency slot
Frequency Swap
Changing remote transponder
mode
System Overview
1-35
When editing data (e.g. FMS waypoint data or nav/com
frequencies) using touch, virtual keyboards are displayed on the
IFD. There are two formats – a numeric keyboard and an alpha
keyboard with a means to switch back and forth between formats.
Virtual Alpha Keyboard
Virtual Numeric Keyboard
1-36
System Overview
Each keyboard has a scratchpad in the lower right corner. The
scratchpad is a free text field for data entry with some data entry
validity logic applied to the data that is trying to be entered. For
example, when trying to type in an invalid frequency, the com
tuning application will immediately sense that entry to be invalid
and present an alert box stating the entry is invalid. Validity logic
is not applied on cross-side keyboards in dual IFD installations.
Invalid Keyboard Entry Alert
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Optimal Touch Performance
To maximize touch performance, the more surface
area of a finger that can make contact with the
glass, the better. Try to avoid using just fingernail
contact or just the tip of a finger. Increased
pressure on the glass by your finger should not
have any positive effect. Many types of gloves will
work (see “Use of Gloves” section in the back of this
manual), but performance will likely be degraded.
System Overview
1-37
USE OF EXTERNAL KEYBOARD
The IFD is capable of taking input from an external, properly
paired, Bluetooth® keyboard. It is intended to be used in lieu of,
or in conjunction with, the IFD touchscreen keyboard. Anywhere
and anytime the IFD touchscreen keyboard is used to enter data
(e.g. waypoint names, building flight plans, entering frequencies,
etc), the paired external keyboard can be used instead.
COOL FEATURE
Convenient Data Entry
If air is turbulent or touch is turned off, or physical
access to the controls is difficult, an external
keyboard can be an easier way to enter data on the
IFD.
NOTE
Dual IFD Installations Should Only Pair 1 IFD
To avoid issues arising from a keyboard only being
able to pair with one device at a time, dual IFD
installations should turn off Bluetooth in the User
Options page on one IFD.
See Section 6 of this manual for Bluetooth® keyboard pairing
procedures.
1-38
System Overview
At startup on IFDs with enabled Bluetooth or WiFi , a confirmation
page on which either the ALLOW or IGNORE options must be
selected.
Bluetooth® Keyboard Confirmation Dialog Box
All labeled keys are fully functional. The lightbulb key turns on
backlighting for the keyboard. The vertical two-headed arrow key
is primary/#1 standby swap. The Avidyne logo key is a space
bar. The up/down arrow keys can be used for page navigation in
the same way the inner and outer rings of the bottom right IFD
knob can navigate through page fields. Repeated presses of the
FMS, MAP, AUX keys step through the tabs on those pages.
Avidyne Supplied Bluetooth® Keyboard
System Overview
1-39
DUAL IFD OPERATONS
Some installations may involve two IFDs (e.g. IFD540-IFD540,
IFD540-IFD440, IFD440-IFD440) that can work in a more
integrated fashion.
Method of Data Share (Dual IFD Operations)
Dual IFDs will be connected via the Byteflight digital Databus.
While any of the com ports can be configured for the dual IFD
“CrossSync” communication, it is generally recommended that
Com 3 be used to stay consistent with the vast majority of fielded
GNS530/430 systems that the IFD will be replacing. In those
cases, Com 3 is already wired for box-to-box communication and
that connection is used for dual IFD connections with no further
work.
Keyboard Convenience Mode (Dual IFD Operations)
When Keyboard Convenience mode is enabled via the “User
Options” LSK of the SETUP tab on the AUX page, the second
IFD will automatically present a virtual keyboard when the other
IFD is in a mode where data is being entered or edited. In other
words, if Keyboard Convenience mode is turned on, a virtual
keyboard will be displayed on the “other” IFD at all the same
times as if the aircraft were configured for a single IFD and a
keyboard is displayed on that unit.
Shared Data (Dual IFD Operations)
The following list of data will be shared between two IFDs if
properly configured for data sharing:
1-40
•
Enables the integration of the Caution Alerting
System (CAS) to allow a single acknowledgement
of any of the Global messages to be removed from
both units by acknowledging them on either unit;
•
Enables flight plan synchronization, including
modification of the flight plan to be reflected on
both IFDs (this does allow for flight plan/procedure
preview on the second IFD).
This requires
identical nav databases to be loaded on each IFD;
System Overview
•
Enables stored routes to be synchronized across
both IFDs (this does allow for route preview on the
second IFD);
•
Enables fuel planning (e.g. initial fuel entry) to be
synchronized across both IFDs;
•
Enables user waypoints to be synchronized across
both IFDs;
•
Enables sensor settings and data (traffic, datalink,
lightning, air data, etc) to be shared across both
IFDs.
NOTE
Full Data Sharing Requires Consistent WAAS
For complete data sharing between dual IFDs, both
units will need to have the same WAAS antenna
configuration – either both are WAAS or both are
non-WAAS. If one IFD is set up with a WAAS
antenna and one is set up with a non-WAAS
antenna, then the FMS-related data (flight plans,
waypoints, routes) will not be shared between IFDs.
NOTE
Dissimilar Weather & Traffic Source Data Not
Shared
Dissimilar weather data sources (e.g. GDL-69 data
on one IFD and MLB100 data on the other IFD) will
not be shared between IFDs. Each IFD will display
its own weather data in this case.
Likewise, dissimilar traffic data sources (e.g.
TAS600 data on one IFD and MLB100 data on the
other IFD) will not be shared between IFDs. Each
IFD will display its own traffic data in this case.
System Overview
1-41
NOTE
Sensor and Control Data Sharing Requires
Consistent Software Versions
For complete data sharing between dual IFDs, both
units will need to have the same main software
version. If the IFDs have differerent software
versions, then the sensor and control data (e.g.
weather, traffic, fuel, volumes, keyboard
convenience mode, etc) will not be shared between
the IFDs.
So, in summary, to have full data sharing between dual panelmount IFDs, the following rules must be satisfied:
•
•
•
•
1-42
CrossSync must be turned on in both IFDs (this is a
maintenance mode setting);
Both IFDs must have the same SBAS antenna
configuration;
Both IFDs must have the same nav database cycle;
Both IFDs must have the same software version.
System Overview
Independent Data (Dual IFD Operations)
The following list of data will never be shared between two IFDs
no matter how they are configured:
•
IFD page and tab selection;
•
Map view, range, declutter, and overlay settings;
•
Chart extent box depiction on map;
•
Nav Source selection;
•
Com/Nav settings (e.g. 8.33 vs 25 kHz spacing);
•
Com/Nav frequency selections
cross-side tuning or display);
•
Nav deviation data (therefore no navigation
miscompare alerts are provided);
•
Local CAS alerts;
•
Datablock configuration;
•
Chart displayed;
•
Electronic Checklists data and state;
•
Calculators and Utilities data.
(therefore
no
NOTE
Data Sharing Tolerates Inconsistent Databases
While Avidyne strongly recommends the databases
on each IFD be kept up-to-date and on the same
cycle, data sharing between IFDs as defined above
in “Data Sharing (Dual IFD Operations)” is not
disabled when different data cycles are present on
the two IFDs. Flight plans do not share in that case
but the rest of the data will be shared.
System Overview
1-43
WIFI (NETWORK) OPERATIONS
NOTE
Increasing Functionality
rd
The supported capability and 3 party applications
supported are expected to grow over time. A list of
applications and devices supported can be viewed
at http://www.avidyne.com/products/ifd/wifidevices.html
The IFD is capable of supporting WiFi operations. Current
rd
supported functionality includes connectivity with 3 party
applications running on WiFi capable devices including:
•
Flight plan data streaming from IFD to 3
application;
•
Approach and transition data streaming from IFD
rd
party application to allow automatic
to 3
rd
approach chart selection and display on the 3
party application;
•
Traffic data streaming from IFD to 3 party
rd
application for display on the 3 party application;
•
Weather data streaming from IFD to 3 party
rd
application for display on the 3 party application;
•
Flight plan route data transmitted by the 3 party
application to the IFD for inclusion in the IFD540
stored routes and active flight plan.
•
Fully interactive copy of the IFD hosted on a
mobile device (e.g. “IFD100”).
rd
party
rd
rd
rd
The top strip datablock row will display Bluetooth and WiFi icons
when the respective function has been enabled.
With Release 10.2.1, the WiFi and Bluetooth icons will change
color depending on connection status.
1-44
System Overview
WiFi/Bluetooth logos will not appear when the user option is
set to off.
WiFi/Bluetooth logos will appear Gray when WiFi/Bluetooth
is on, the startup dialog box is accepted and active but not
connected.
WiFi and Bluetooth Active, Not Connected Icons
WiFi/Bluetooth logos will appear Green when
WiFi/Bluetooth is on, the startup dialog box is accepted and
connected.
If the user selects “Ignore” or disables the Network or BT
via the options page, the grey logos above are depicted with a
slash through them indicating they are not connected due to
being actively disabled by the user.
WiFi and Bluetooth Connected Icons
The WiFi system inside the IFD is a WLAN, 2.4 GHz system that
uses IEEE 802.11 A, B, G, N protocols.
The WiFi system can be configured to work in "Local" mode
where the IFD acts as a "server" or access point, or, "Remote"
mode where the IFD acts as a "client" and can attach to a
separate remote access point which allows the IFD to join other
existing WiFi networks (e.g. connect to an existing StratusForeFlight network).
The factory default WiFi network ID (SSID) and password are
“LIO_WIFI” and “abcdef1234”. Both are changeable values via
maintenance mode and separate SSID and passwords can be
created for both the "Local" and "Remote" modes – instructions
for doing so can be found in the Installation Manual.
System Overview
1-45
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Quick Method to Sever WiFi/Bluetooth Link
The power knob/button in the top left corner of the
IFD can be used to sever the WiFi and Bluetooth
link to the panel IFD. Press and hold the power
knob/button down until the countdown box on the
display appears and then let go. At that point, the
WiFi and Bluetooth links will be turned off and will
need a manual action on the User Options page or
press the “Accept” button on dialog box to turn back
on.
WAAS VS NON-WAAS OPERATIONS
The IFD supports both WAAS and non-WAAS operations. In
each case, the IFD is still considered a “/G” system for flight plan
filing purposes.
When configured to be connected to an approved WAAS antenna
at installation, the IFD serves as a fully-certified WAAS GPS
navigator. Published WAAS procedures will be available and
presented in the various drop-down list choices in the FMS and
WAAS glideslopes will be displayed, when appropriate.
When configured to be connected to a non-WAAS antenna or a
non-approved WAAS antenna at installation, the IFD will not
provide any WAAS functionality. For example, WAAS
approaches such as LPVs will not be presented as an available
choice within the FMS.
For dual IFD installations in which one IFD is WAAS capable and
the other IFD is non-WAAS capable (a perfectly acceptable
combination under the STC), there are some limitations on the
nature of data sharing between the IFDs. In this case, FMSrelated data is not shared between the IFDs (e.g. flight plans,
stored routes and user waypoints).
INTERACTION WITH EXTERNAL DEVICES
1-46
System Overview
Each IFD is capable of communicating with several hundred thirdparty devices. Reference the Installation Manual for a complete
list of devices supported and any hardware/software baseline
restrictions or view the supported device list at
http://www.avidyne.com/products/ifd540/ifd-interfaces.asp
As a condition for certification, the IFD is approved for integration
with all equipment the GNS 530 is approved for, plus the IFD is
approved for integration with additional equipment beyond those
authorized for use with the GNS system.
TIPS AND TECHNIEQUES
Dual IFD Installations Should Only Use 1 WiFi
For reliable WiFi operations, Avidyne recommends
turning off WiFi (Network) from the User Options
page on one of the IFDs.
NOTE
Shared Data Between IFD540 and IFD100
Almost all of the same data sharing rules apply
between a panel mounted IFD540 and the IFD100
application running on a mobile device. Com/Nav
tuning however is shared between these two
devices.
The IFD100 application is running all the same code
that the panel mount IFD is running. When
connected via WiFi with a panel mount IFD, it will
behave as if it is another panel mount IFD and will
share all the data that two panel mount IFDs would
share plus Com/Nav tuning, not just the limited
rd
amount of data that 3 party applications may be
sharing with the IFDs.
System Overview
1-47
BEFORE TAKEOFF TECHNIQUES
Set up the flight plan per your plans or the assigned ATC IFR
clearance. If multiple pilots share the airplane, be sure to check
User Options and datablock selections to ensure set up for your
personal preferences.
Avidyne recommends creating and using the Checklist utility and
including a Before Takeoff checklist that meets your personal
needs.
TIPS AND TECHNIEQUES
Avoid The Use of Polarized Sunglasses
Avidyne recommends avoiding using polarized
sunglasses when using the IFD due to likely
washing out of colors and apparent dimming.
1-48
System Overview
2
FMS Pages
The Flight Management System (FMS) pages are where flight
plans are created, modified, stored and deleted. Ground
operations are the ideal time to enter the intended flight plan into
the FMS.
FPL (FLIGHT PLAN) TAB
FMS BASIC CONCEPTS
For properly configured dual IFD installations, enter your plan into
only one of the IFDs and the data is automatically shared
between them.
NOTE
FMS Centric Calculations
The FMS presumes the pilot intends to fly the flight
plan as created. All deviation data, most data block
data and the times to go and fuel calculations are all
based on that assumption.
Each leg of a flight plan has its own color-coded background
designed to make the overall flight plan easier to read at a
glance. Each flight plan can consist of up to 128 legs.
The origin and all airport waypoints are depicted with a blue
background. The active leg of the flight plan is always depicted
with a magenta background. All other legs of a flight plan are
depicted with a gray background.
2-1
FMS Pages
Flight Plan Detail
There are two types of cursors – an insert cursor and an edit
cursor. Rotate the “FMS” knob in the lower right corner of the IFD
to see the visual difference. The insert cursor will appear as a thin
blue horizontal line that appears between flight plan legs. This
allows you to insert new legs. The edit cursor appears as a wraparound blue box that encircles the entire leg and allows you to
edit an existing leg.
Insert Cursor
Edit Cursor
Edit Cursor
– wraparound blue
box
2-2
FMS Pages
Individual fields within a leg can be edited by rotating the bottom
right inner IFD knob that highlights each editable field within the
flight plan. When the desired field is highlighted with reverse
video, push the knob to get into edit mode. Turn the knob to edit
the value or type via the keyboard, then push the knob again to
exit edit mode.
Using a combination of the push and rotation actions of the knob,
along with the dropdown boxes (explained below), an entire flight
plan can be entered within seconds.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
ETE Granularity
The ETE fields in the flight plan legs will be in
HH:MM format until the time is under 10 minutes, at
which point it becomes MM:SS.
2-3
FMS Pages
CREATING A NEW FLIGHT PLAN
The first time the “Flight Plan” tab of the FMS page is accessed
following power-on, an empty flight plan page is presented with
the origin waypoint pre-populated. The origin will be the closest
airport to the current GPS position, or the airport from the
previous power down if GPS position has not locked on yet. If the
origin is not the point you want to start from, delete the prepopulated origin value via the CLR button and a new
Origin/Waypoint dropdown is presented from which a new starting
point can be entered. An “origin” must be an airport whereas a
“waypoint” can be any database location (e.g. user waypoint,
navaid, airport).
In almost every case, your hand can stay on the bottom right IFD
knob. Through a combination of pushes and turns, you can enter
the entire flight plan.
Flight Plan and Scroll Bar
2-4
FMS Pages
COOL FEATURE
Geofill™ is a geographic-based prediction
algorithm that significantly reduces the number of
pilot actions for entering waypoints. Usually after the
first character entry, the system uses existing
characters to determine the closest, and most likely,
waypoint based on your geographic position or
existing flight plan.
If a flight plan has more legs than can be displayed on a single
page, a scroll bar is presented along the right edge of the flight
plan. It indicates where the viewable window is with respect to the
entire flight plan as well as where the active leg in the flight plan
is. In the image above, the magenta vertical rectangle in the scroll
bar indicates the active leg is just below the origin. There are a
number of flight plan legs out of sight below the bottom of the
display.
There is an option available to configure the displayed flight plan
legs in single row format to see more legs at the same time (see
FMS Setup page from the AUX tab for that selection). Whichever
leg has the cursor focus automatically increases its height to the
full 3 or 4 row format.
Single Row Leg Format
2-5
FMS Pages
COOL FEATURE
Airways and Flight Plan Creation
The FMS can use published airways in its database
to quickly build long flight plans with few keystrokes.
When a flight plan waypoint is a valid airway entry
or exit point, the list of available airways is
presented in a drop down box. The list is quickly
scrolled to the desired exit point and then all
intermediate intersections along that airway are
automatically populated into the flight plan.
The pictures below are an example of the airway drop down box
that is displayed when building a flight plan and then the exit point
choices once the airway is chosen. Use the bottom right IFD
knob to scroll the list for the desired airway and exit point off the
airway. The exit list is presented in the order by which the
intersections will be reached, not in alphabetical order.
Airway Drop Down Box
2-6
FMS Pages
Airway Exit Points
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Expanding and Compacting the Flight Plan The
“Flight Plan” tab of the FMS page provides a means
to show every leg of the flight plan (“Expanded”) or
an abbreviated version of the flight plan (“Compact”)
via the “View” LSK. The compact view hides all
intermediate legs of an airway between the entry
and exit point. It also hides intermediate legs of
published departures, arrivals and approaches such
as step down fixes. The active procedure or airway
is always expanded.
2-7
FMS Pages
COOL FEATURE
FMS Cursor Centered View One of the Map
views available for use on the Map-FPL tab of the
FMS page is “FMS Cursor Centered” mode. It is
accessed by pressing the “View” LSK along the left
edge until the “Cursor” option is displayed and can
serve as a good way to conduct initial planning and
later review. Once in the view (indicated by the
annunciation “FMS Cursor Centered” overlaid on
the map), the map is centered on the fix surrounded
by the FMS cursor. As the FMS cursor is scrolled
up/down the flight plan, the map center point
changes. This allows you to see close up details of
the downpath flight plan.
2-8
FMS Pages
SELECTING A DEPARTURE
If a published departure exists for the origin/departure airfield,
then a drop down list of available departure procedures can be
displayed by using the inner ring of the bottom right IFD knob to
highlight the departure procedure window for that origin/departure
airfield and pushing in that knob.
Departure Procedure Drop Down List
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Vector Standard Instrument Departure (SID)
Vector (or Radar) SIDs are not likely to be part of
the list of available departures in the FMS
dropdown. This is due to the nature of the data
encoding from the supplier. They are however likely
to be present in the list of available charts for the
departure field. Vector (or Radar) SIDs are typically
straight out departures on assigned headings.
2-9
FMS Pages
When a SID/STAR is selected from the initial dropdown, a
sequence of dropdowns may be presented to allow the selection
of an enroute transition and a runway transition. The structure of
the SID/STAR and the presence of a selected runway will impact
whether a specific dropdown is presented.
The FMS processes enroute transitions first. If the SID/STAR
has more than one published enroute transition, the FMS will
present a dropdown menu showing those transitions and the pilot
will select the desired transition. If the SID/STAR has only one
published enroute transition, the FMS will automatically select
that one and no dropdown for enroute transitions will be
presented. There are SIDs/STARs that have no published
enroute transitions. In those cases, this entire step is skipped.
Once the enroute transition has been selected, the FMS will
process runway transitions. There are SIDs/STARs that do not
have published runway transitions. For those cases, the rest of
this process is skipped and the selected procedure and enroute
transition are inserted into the flight plan. Otherwise, the FMS
proceeds differently based on whether the airport (origin for SIDs,
destination for STARs) has a selected runway.
If the airport has a selected runway and that runway is applicable
to the selected SID/STAR, then the FMS will choose the runway
transition corresponding to the selected runway and the
procedure is inserted into the flight plan without further pilot
action. However, if the airport does not have a selected runway
or if the selected runway is not applicable to the SID/STAR, then
a runway transition must be selected. If the SID/STAR has only
one published runway transition, the FMS will automatically select
that one and then insert the procedure into the flight plan. If there
is more than one published transition, the FMS will present a
dropdown menu showing all of the runway transitions and the
pilot will select the desired transition. Once that selection has
been made, the procedure and all selected transitions will be
inserted into the flight plan.
2-10
FMS Pages
Selecting the Runway Transition of SID
If the inserted SID/STAR had a selected runway transition and
either the airport had no selected runway or the selected runway
was not applicable to the SID/STAR, then the FMS will set the
runway for the airport based on the runway transition that was
selected. There are cases where a runway transition applies to
all runways at the airport or to a set of parallel runways. In those
cases, if there was no selected runway for the airport, the FMS
will select the first runway (numerically) that is applicable.
2-11
FMS Pages
SAVING/NAMING A FLIGHT PLAN
From the Route tab of the FMS page, the current route, labeled
Current Route, will be highlighted in magenta. If a valid origin and
destination have been created in the flight plan (e.g. “KBED –
CYQI”), the title will include these.
To edit the name of a flight plan, use the outer ring of the bottom
right bezel knob. Scroll up or down the route list until the desired
flight plan is highlighted by a surround cursor. By pushing the
knob, the selected route will load and the route name field will be
shown in reverse video. Touch the reverse highlighted name field
or push the bottom right IFD knob to generate a virtual keyboard
with which to type the desired name. To accept the new route
name press either the “ENTR” bezel key or the Enter button on
the keyboard.
Saving a Flight Plan
Active Route
Route Management
Controls
2-12
FMS Pages
Origin Airport
Route Identifier
that you entered
Destination
Airport
Routes
ACTIVATING A FLIGHT PLAN
While you always have the option to manually activate the flight
plan via a LSK on the Flight Plan tab, the created plan on the
Flight Plan tab will automatically activate on takeoff roll when a
threshold groundspeed is achieved (which is approximately 40
knots). If you built the flight plan on the “Route” tab, then you will
need to manually activate it via the “Activate Route” LSK on the
left side of the display.
COPYING A FLIGHT PLAN
From the “Route” tab of the “FMS” page, first select the route you
wish to copy via the bottom right-hand knob or by touching the
desired route, then press the “Copy” LSK on the left side of the
bezel. This will present the route name in reverse video. You can
either retain the pre-filled name or type a new one via the
keyboard. Follow by pressing “Enter”. Now use the knob to scroll
up or down the flight plan and edit it as required. If no editing is
required, you have successfully saved or copied a flight plan.
INVERTING A FLIGHT PLAN
From the “Route” tab of the “FMS” page, use the bottom right
knob on the IFD to scroll up or down the list of routes to the
desired flight plan or touch the desired route to invert. Press the
“Invert” LSK. This automatically inverts the flight plan and leaves
the route name field highlighted in reverse video, allowing you
type a new flight plan name, if desired.
PREVIEW FLIGHT PLANS
The flight plans (and procedures) can be previewed as they are
being built while on the FMS page, using the FPL tab with the
map partially exposed (Map-FPL split page as defined in Section
1 of this manual). As a flight plan is being built from that page,
the map will automatically resize to continue to display the entire
flight plan. Similarly, if a procedure is being added to a flight plan,
the procedure selected from the dropdown list and the selected
transition are drawn in real time on the automatically re-sizing
map for visual confirmation of the choice.
2-13
FMS Pages
Previewing a Flight Plan While Building It
While in this mode, a temporary “FMS Preview - Waypoint”,
“FMS Preview - Airway”, or “FMS Preview – Approach” message
is displayed at the top of the page.
MODIFYING A FLIGHT PLAN
You can modify an existing flight plan in the FMS or create a new
route while you are flying an existing one without affecting the
existing active route. Several of the more common tasks are
described below.
INSERTING A WAYPOINT
From the FPL tab, use the bottom right knob on the IFD to scroll
up or down the flight plan until the insert cursor is positioned
where the new waypoint is to be inserted. At that point, push the
knob to generate a drop-down box from the cursor position. Scroll
up and down in that drop down box until you find the option you
seek. Press the knob again on the desired option. If it involves
typing in a waypoint identifier, start typing on the virtual keyboard
that is displayed. Geofill™ will typically find the correct waypoint
nd
by the 2 character.
2-14
FMS Pages
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Back-to-Back Duplicate Waypoints Restriction
The FMS will not permit entering back-to-back
duplicate waypoints. A duplicate waypoint can be
inserted elsewhere in the active flight plan (e.g.
“above” the active approach or as a dummy
waypoint “below” the published missed approach
waypoints.) if this becomes operationally required
during a flight scenario.
DELETING A WAYPOINT
From the FPL tab, use the bottom right knob on the IFD to scroll
up and down the flight plan until the edit cursor surrounds the
waypoint to be deleted. Press the “CLR” button on the right side
of the bezel to delete the waypoint. Continue pressing the “CLR”
button and it will walk up the flight plan deleting earlier waypoints
as you go. Waypoints can also be deleted by touching the
waypoint to be deleted and then selecting the L4 “Delete
Waypoint” LSK.
NOTE
Unable to Delete Published Procedure Waypoint
Waypoints that are part of a published procedure
(departure or arrival) may not be deleted.
EDITING A WAYPOINT
From the FPL tab, the bottom right knob on the IFD can be used
to edit an existing waypoint. Using the knob, scroll up or down the
flight plan until an edit cursor surrounds the waypoint to be
modified. Use the inner ring of that knob to highlight one of the
editable fields with reverse video. Pushing the knob provides a
drop down box from which the changes can be made.
Alternatively, touching the field to be edited will display a virtual
keyboard which can be used to enter the desired data/changes.
2-15
FMS Pages
ADDING A VERTICAL CONSTRAINT
On virtually every waypoint, you can elect to assign a vertical
constraint (e.g. cross the waypoint at or above a specific altitude,
be at a specific altitude a specified distance prior to the waypoint,
etc). This is accomplished by ensuring an edit cursor surrounds
the waypoint of interest to select the waypoint and then either use
the bottom right inner knob or touch the desired field to highlight
one of the vertical constraint fields of the flight plan leg. Push the
knob and enter the desired value or double tap the field to display
a virtual keypad. This can be accomplished at any time on the
ground or in-air and are depicted on the map display as well.
Vertical Constraint Choices
Cross
Number field
(selecting distance
in NM from
waypoint for
crossing constraint)
Type
At Or Below;
At;
At or Above.
Altitude
Altitude field
(selecting the target
altitude). Minimum
allowable value is
100’.
Vertical Constraint Fields
The default value for the crossing distance is 5.0nm for airports
and 0.0nm for all other waypoints.
The only waypoints that do not permit vertical constraints are:
2-16
•
Origin
•
Destination, if it has an approach selected
•
Missed Approach Point
•
Altitude Terminated Legs
FMS Pages
ENTERING AND INTERCEPTING A RADIAL
FMS Method
The FMS Course function will allow the pilot to navigate “To” or
“From” the active waypoint while OBS is selected as the nav
source. Push the Nav Source knob in to make OBS the active
nav mode and then adjust the FMS (OBS) course using the
external course adjust knob (i.e. course set knob on a CDI or HSI
or EFIS). If there is no installed external course setting device,
then twist the IFD nav source knob to adjust the FMS Course
value.
FMS Course mode makes the current waypoint act like a VOR.
Select the desired radial to fly inbound or outbound. Adjusting the
course to or from the active waypoint will be reflected by the
To/From flag as in a traditional HSI. The course deviation
indicator will be presented in relation to the selected course.
As the FMS course is adjusted via the external course set knob
(or the IFD nav source knob if no external device is installed), the
active leg on the FPL tab will change to “Fly Course xxx°” as
shown in the image below.
The FMS Course function will always be armed (i.e. it will always
intercept the flight plan) in a To intercept. If the airplane is in a
From course, it will intercept only if the dialed course trajectory
intercepts the flight plan. If the dialed course does not intercept
the flight plan, the airplane will fly that course indefinitely.
2-17
FMS Pages
The FMS Course function will be exited when the airplane
intercepts the active waypoint in a To intercept or when
intercepting a downpath leg in the From case. Pressing the nav
source knob while the FMS course function is active will also
cancel the FMS Course mode and return to GPS as the active
nav source mode. The FMS Course will remain active if a From
course is dialed and the airplane does not intercept the FPL.
VLOC Method
If the Nav Source knob is set to VLOC as the active nav mode
and a VOR station is tuned and received, then use the external
course knob on the CDI/HSI/EFIS/etc to set the desired inbound
or outbound radial as required.
DELETING A FLIGHT PLAN
Select the “Routes” tab of the FMS page. Use the bottom right
IFD knob to scroll to the desired flight plan in the list or touch the
flight plan to highlight the route. Press the “CLR” button on the
bezel and a green confirm dialog box pops up. Press “Enter” or
“Cancel” LSKs or use the bezel “ENTR” or “CLR” buttons to finish
the deletion.
CREATING A HOLDING PATTERN
A hold can be put on any waypoint that has a fix terminated leg –
waypoints that terminate with a lat or lon position such as
navaids, enroute waypoints, user waypoints, airports, etc. Legs
that terminate at an altitude, DME distance, radial crossings, etc.
do not support attaching a hold. Hold fixes are always fly-over
waypoints and not fly-by waypoints.
Use the edit cursor on the flight plan to select the waypoint of
interest, then push the bottom right IFD knob or touch the desired
location to display a drop down list of options. Near the top of that
list, you will see “Hold at <waypoint name>”. Scroll to highlight
that drop down list entry and push the knob again. You have just
added a holding leg, populated with standard hold data.
Alternatively, use an insert cursor by positioning it where you
want to insert a hold in your flight plan. Push in the bottom right
IFD knob or touch the position on the glass. Note that a hold is
available via the drop down list. Scroll up or down the dropdown
2-18
FMS Pages
list as required and push the bottom right knob or touch the hold
option in the list to insert a hold flight plan leg.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Using Holding Patterns
The hold pattern leg type has a field for the inbound
course to the hold waypoint. The hold pattern turns
left or right as specified in the hold pattern at the
hold waypoint. For example, if ATC issues a “Hold
east of <waypoint>”, a hold course of 270 deg
should be entered in the hold leg.
The nav database may contain multiple published holding
patterns for a given fix (e.g. enroute hold, high altitude hold, low
altitude hold, SID hold, STAR hold, etc). The FMS will use a
standard hold pattern when there is no defined published hold.
For those fixes that have multiple published holds associated with
them, a dropdown menu will be presented showing the various
hold patterns, thereby allowing you to choose the desired or
assigned hold pattern (course, turn direction, and leg length/time).
Once a published hold has been inserted, when the FMS cursor
is on one of the hold parameters, the L3 LSK will display
“Standard Hold”. Pressing that LSK will change the parameters
to be standard (right turns, 1 min legs, and an inbound course
matching the course of the leg before the hold). If any of the
parameters are different from what is published, the LSK will then
display “Hold As Published” and pressing the LSK will restore the
original parameters. Note that this only applies to holds that are
inserted versus holds that are defined as a leg in a terminal area
procedure, the most common case being a course reversal on an
approach – for those holds, there’s no “Standard Hold” LSK since
it’s unlikely this would be a desired course of action. If however,
a hold parameter is manually changed, the “Hold As Published”
LSK does appear.
2-19
FMS Pages
CIRCULAR ORBITS
If the optional Search and Rescue (SAR) / Special Use Mission
package is active, then circular orbits can be added to the plan.
Circular Orbit Depiction on Map
The function is activated by selecting the “On” choice in the
“Patterns” field on the FMS Setup page.
Circular Orbit Pattern Selection in FMS Setup
2-20
FMS Pages
Once on, the leg type is selected just like all other leg types but is
only available after a leg that is not part of a terminal procedure.
Select the “Orbit <waypoint>” option in the standard FMS insert
cursor drop down list.
The orbit radius can range from 1nm to 20nm. The FMS will not
actually fly to the orbit fix and instead, will fly to the point where
the leg to the fix intercepts the orbit.
Orbit Row in Flight Plan
2-21
FMS Pages
If the orbit radius is larger than the distance from the aircraft to
the orbit fix, then the aircraft will intercept the orbit on the
extended radial between the orbit fix and the aircraft. Just like a
traditional holding pattern, there is no insert cursor between a fix
and a subsequent orbit. The only way to get out of an orbit is do
command a Direct-To or activate a different leg. The orbit size
can be changed while it is active but no path to reacquire the orbit
is depicted on the map.
DELETING A HOLDING PATTERN
To delete a holding pattern in your flight plan, use the bottom right
IFD to scroll as required to create an edit cursor surrounding the
holding leg, or touch the hold leg to be deleted then press the
“Delete Hold” LSK.
EDITING A HOLDING PATTERN
Position an edit cursor around the holding leg of interest in your
flight plan. Use the inner ring of the bottom right IFD knob or
touch the field to be edited to highlight the desired field (e.g. turn
direction, leg length, leg units, inbound leg course) and make
your edit. Any changes made will immediately be applied.
COOL FEATURE
Graphical Flight Plan Leg A graphical
representation of each leg of a flight plan may be
displayed within the FPL leg as shown in the image
below. This is especially useful for procedure turns
and holding patterns.
Procedure Turn with Course Reversal
2-22
FMS Pages
FLIGHT PLAN SEQUENCING
The FMS assumes that the pilot will fly the flight plan as defined.
If that does not occur, legs may not sequence as expected.
Therefore, to manually sequence the desired leg, select it by
either using the bottom right IFD knob or touch it and press the
“Activate Leg” LSK followed by accepting the confirm dialog box
when it is displayed. Doing so will turn that leg magenta,
confirming that it is now the active leg.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Impending Turn Notification
If flying the defined flight plan, the IFD will provide a
message about an impending turn that includes the
upcoming desired track (DTK) and a 10 second (30
second if the required turn is more than 120
degrees) count down.
COOL FEATURE
Automatic VOR Tuning
The FMS will automatically tune the next down-path
VOR in the active flight plan into the primary nav
frequency slot.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Times to Turn Off Automatic VOR Tuning
Sometimes it is desirable to turn off the Automatic
VOR tuning feature via the “Auto-VLOC Tuning”
selection in User Options on one of the IFDs in a
dual IFD installation. An example of when this
might be desirable is if you want to depict a crossing
radial on IFD #2 for reference before crossing a
VOR.
2-23
FMS Pages
LATERAL OFFSETS
The system supports a capability to create and fly a lateral offset
from your flight plan. From the “FPL” tab of the FMS page, press
the “Offset Route” LSK and use the right-hand knob on the IFD to
dial in the desired offset. Use the outer ring for coarse control (1
nm increments) and the inner ring for fine control (0.1 nm
increments). Rotate the knob left for left offsets and right for right
offsets. Once the intended offset has been entered, press the
“Confirm Right/Left x.x NM” LSK. At that point, the original LSK
will indicate “Offset Route Right/Left X.X NM”. To delete a lateral
offset, press the “Delete Offset” LSK. The maximum offset that
can be dialed in is 20 NM. Lateral offsets are not available when
in OBS mode. Lateral offsets are unaffected by graphical route
planning (“rubber banding”) operations.
Lateral Offset Map Depiction
GAPS OR DISCONTINUITIES IN FLIGHT PLANS
A “Gap In Route” will appear within the flight plan when there is a
discontinuity between legs. A discontinuity occurs when the FMS
cannot compute the guidance to the next leg due to an invalid leg
type combination based on preset guidance rules. The objective
is to inform the pilot that the Gap must be manually closed if you
wish to sequence to the next waypoint. Otherwise, the leg before
the Gap will not be sequenced and guidance will not be provided
2-24
FMS Pages
to the next waypoint. If desired, close the gap by placing the
cursor on it using the bottom right IFD knob or by touching it.
Press the “CLR” bezel key or the L4 LSK on the FPL tab,
“Connect <wpt1> & <wpt2>”. Closing a Gap connects the
waypoint prior to the Gap with the waypoint that follows by a
direct (straight) leg.
Connecting Gap in Route
Avidyne recommends that you input the arrival and approach for
the destination airfield and alternates into the FMS flight plan.
Selecting a published arrival and/or approach will automatically
load the procedure including all altitude constraints into the FMS.
Take advantage of the system to stay ahead of the airplane by
using the wind vector datablock selection (a constant calculation
of estimated wind direction and speed) for arrival planning, and
the electronic checklists and various map views.
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FMS Pages
ENROUTE DESCENTS
A green circular top of descent (TOD) marker and label is drawn
on the map when flying “on-path” along the FMS flight plan, giving
a clear visual cue when it is appropriate to begin the enroute
descent. It is based on the vertical constraint associated with a
down-path waypoint.
To generate the TOD feature:
• There must be an altitude constraint defined on at least one
down-path waypoint at least 50’ below present altitude;
• There must be a valid GPS MSL Altitude or Baro Altitude;
• The aircraft is less than 2nm from the active leg centerline;
• Aircraft course is within 45 degrees of Desired Track (DTK).
The TOD function is not available on any waypoint of an
approach past the Final Approach Fix (FAF), or in holds, or
procedures turns.
The FMS uses a default of 500 feet per minute descent rate (or
as edited in the “Preferred Descent Rate” field on the FMS Setup
page). Keep these the same values in dual IFD installations.
There is an associated tone (sounds like a door bell and requires
wiring to the audio panel) and CAS countdown message 10
seconds prior to reaching the TOD point.
The “TOD” label may be auto-decluttered from the map
depending on map range and feature density. The TOD depiction
and CAS message are removed from the map immediately after
passing the TOD point.
Top of Descent (TOD) Marker
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FMS Pages
COOL FEATURE
Range to Altitude Indication A small green arc will
be drawn on the map that depicts the geographic
point where, at the current vertical speed, the
aircraft will reach the altitude target. The altitude
target is any crossing restriction on a waypoint that
is either manually entered or a part of a procedure
(see section 2-16). It will be removed from the map
when current aircraft altitude is within 150’ of the
target altitude.
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FMS Pages
COOL FEATURE
Enter Approaches for Multiple “Destinations”
The FMS will allow multiple airfields or destinations
to be built into the flight plan. Each can have the
published approach and missed approach as part of
the plan. This is useful in pre-building your primary
destination with a missed approach, expected
alternate and its published approach. Similarly, a
training flight with multiple intended approaches and
locations can all be created in a single flight plan,
before takeoff.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Check Altitude Too Low CAS Message
The IFD contains a yellow caution CAS message
that is active whenever an approach has been
activated and the aircraft altitude is below the Final
Approach Fix (FAF) published altitude.
If your flight plan contains consecutive approaches
and you activate the next approach during climb out
from the previous approach and prior to reaching
the next approach’s FAF altitude, this “Check
Altitude Too Low” message may be displayed.
ENTERING AN ARRIVAL AND APPROACH
From the FPL tab, use the bottom right knob on the IFD to scroll
up or down the flight plan as required until the edit cursor
surrounds the waypoint from which a published arrival and/or
approach is to be inputted. Twist the inner knob until either the
arrival or approach fields are highlighted. Push the knob to
generate a dropdown list from which to select the desired arrival
and/or approach, including Vectors-To-Final (VTF). As soon as
one is selected, the arrival or approach field displays the name of
the selected procedure and new legs are automatically added to
the flight plan. If a runway is entered before an arrival is entered
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FMS Pages
and the runway does not belong to the arrival, the arrival is not
accepted in the flight plan. A labeled white vertical line then
brackets the procedure in the flight plan as another visual cue
that the procedure is part of the flight plan.
Adding an Arrival
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
FMS Preview
A FMS Preview mode is available on the FPL tab
(split Map-FPL view) of the FMS page. As soon as
changes start to be made to the FMS flight plan
while on that tab, real-time overlays of the edited
procedure, hold pattern, waypoint or airway are
presented on the map in cyan. There may be a fewsecond delay when drawing the edited route as the
system determines the optimum map range for
display. This feature provides a graphical preview
of the edited route before it is officially part of the
flight plan, to aid in flight planning. It can be used on
the ground or in-flight and is additionally identified
by an annunciation on the map part of the tab, “FMS
Preview - <type field being edited>”.
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FMS Pages
Approaches Dropdown Box
Procedures Brackets
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FMS Pages
COOL FEATURE
PROC button The “PROC” function key on the
bezel acts as a shortcut for attaching a published
arrival or approach procedure to a waypoint in your
flight plan. It can be used at any time. The first press
of the function key results in the IFD displaying the
“FPL” tab (Map-FPL view) of the FMS page with the
Approach field of the next destination after the
active leg highlighted in reverse video and a drop
down box of available published approaches listed.
Pressing it a 2nd time will step the reverse video
over the Arrival field and present a drop down box of
available published arrivals. Each subsequent press
of the “PROC” key will step through all following
destination airfields approaches and arrivals in the
flight plan and wrap back around to the top of the
flight plan. When you have the drop down box over
the intended field, use either the bottom right knob
on the IFD or touch the list to scroll up or down the
list until the desired procedure is selected, then
push that knob in to add that procedure to the flight
plan.
If there is no flight plan, then pressing the “PROC”
function key will present the “FPL” tab on the IFD
with an insert cursor at the top of the page but will
not present any procedures.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Changing Selected Approach Type on Final
If a VHF-based approach has been activated and
then is replaced with a new GPS-based approach
prior to activating the missed approach, it may be
necessary to manually change the nav source mode
(e.g. manually change VLOC to GPS if switching
from an ILS to a RNAV).
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FMS Pages
ACTIVATING A LEG
To activate a different leg of the flight plan from the FPL tab,
either use the bottom right IFD knob or touch the desired leg to
highlight it and then select the “Activate Leg” L2 LSK.
Activating a Leg
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Deleting an Approach From Active Flight Plan
One of two techniques is recommended to delete a
an approach from an active flight plan – if you want
to replace the approach with another one for the
same airfield, press the PROC key and select a new
approach. If you just want to delete the approach
altogether, scroll the flight plan to the blue airfield
leg, ensure the cyan highlight in on the approach
field (“App:”) and press the CLR button.
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FMS Pages
USE OF THE MAP-FPL SPLIT PAGE
The Map-FPL split tab on the FMS page presents the moving
map on the left and the FMS flight plan in a thin strip on the right.
While it can be useful in many phases of flight and scenarios, the
split page is especially helpful during arrivals. This can be most
useful to instantly correlate your flight plan with the graphical
depiction on the map. This aids in error reduction and helps
visually see options for diverts, weather avoidance, etc.
Map-FPL Split Page
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FMS Pages
CHART ACCESS
A green chart extent box is separately drawn on the map and
represents the geographic boundaries of an instrument approach
plate associated with a FMS destination. When the ownship
symbol crosses the boundary of the chart extent box, this is a
good time to switch over to the Chart tab on the MAP page.
Chart Extent Box
COOL FEATURE
Hot Links to Charts in Flight Plan Whenever a
flight plan leg (blue airfield legs) has at least one
published approach associated with it, a chart icon
is presented on the right edge of the flight plan leg.
By using the right-hand knob on the IFD, scroll
through the flight plan elements until the chart icon
is highlighted in reverse video. If, at that time, the
knob is pushed in, the IFD will display either the
specific chart for that associated procedure or the
directory of possible procedures for that airfield.
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FMS Pages
Hot Links to Charts
COOL FEATURE
METAR Flags in Flight Plan
When a weather datalink device is installed in the
airplane and providing METAR data to the IFD,
color METAR flags will be included in the flight plan
leg depiction along the right edge. This is designed
to give you a quick weather reference for the
waypoint and/or its vicinity. The exact station to
which that METAR applies is provided via the flag
label and may be different than the actual waypoint
identifier.
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FMS Pages
INFO TAB
The INFO tab of the FMS page provides additional information
about airports, navaids, and waypoints.
Info Tab
The facility (airport, navaid, waypoint) to which the information
applies will stay locked to the top of the page; the identifier field is
an editable field. To edit the identifier, either use the bottom right
IFD knob (inner ring or outer ring) as required to highlight the
identifier field and push in to get into edit mode and present a
virtual keyboard, or, touch the field to present a virtual keyboard.
There is also a Paste LSK along the left edge of the IFD that will
nominate the currently active leg of the flight plan or the flight plan
leg that is highlighted by a wrap-around edit cursor or any
selected item from the Nearest lists. A search function, accessible
via the Search LSK is also available to help find the name of the
facility for which more information is desired.
If a nav frequency is associated with the facility displayed, then it
will be displayed in that same top block with the facility identifier
and can be nominated into the #1 standby nav slot by either
touching the frequency or by using the bottom right IFD knob to
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FMS Pages
highlight the frequency field and push the knob to nominate it into
the standby slot.
Depending on the type of facility being displayed, there are up to
7 category fields of information associated with the facility that
can be expanded (via the + symbol) or compacted (via the –
symbol) for additional details:
2-37
•
General – describes the facility (e.g. “Public
Towered Airport”), provides a thumbnail map of
the facility (the orientation and range of the
thumbnail map cannot be adjusted), provides
coordinates, elevation and magnetic variation
data, provides sunrise/sunset, provides density
altitude or access to a calculator to compute it,
provides fuel information, if applicable;
•
Communications – provides a list of frequencies
associated with the facility. Any one on the list can
be nominated into the #1 standby slot by either
touching it (first touch will highlight the field if
necessary, second touch nominates it into the #1
standby) or by using the bottom right IFD knob to
highlight the desired frequency and then push the
knob to nominate it into the #1 standby slot;
•
Runways – identifies the known runways at the
airport to include orientation, length and width, and
a thumbnail map of the runways. When an
individual runway row has been selected via touch
or the bottom right IFD knob, it can further expand
to provide surface type, coordinates of the
endpoints, runway bearing and elevation and the
graphical depiction will show lighting;
•
Nearby Navaids – when the info page fix is an
airport, this panel is present and contains navaids
within 40nm of the airport, up to a maximum of 10
navaids. Each navaid row displays the navaid
identifier, distance from the Info fix, cardinal
direction from the Info fix, and navaid frequency.
Possible navaids are VOR, VORTAC, TACAN,
VOR/DME, DME and NDBs that are not marker
beacons. If the navaid has a VHF frequency, the
cursor will go to that field and the nav radio can be
FMS Pages
tuned by touch or using the bottom right knob.
The navaid identifier is a field and if selected with
the cursor, changes the Info page data to show
data for that navaid.
•
Departures – identifies the published departures
associated with the airport and when an individual
row has been selected via touch or the bottom
right IFD knob, it can further expand to provide a
thumbnail map depiction of the departure;
•
Arrivals - identifies the published arrivals
associated with the airport and when an individual
row has been selected via touch or the bottom
right IFD knob, it can further expand to provide a
thumbnail map depiction of the arrival;
•
Approaches - identifies the published approaches
associated with the airport including any identifier
and nav frequency, and when an individual row
has been selected via touch or the bottom right
IFD knob, it can further expand to provide a
thumbnail map depiction of the approach. If the
nav frequency is selected by touch or by using the
bottom right IFD knob, it can be nominated
(copied) into the #1 standby slot;
•
Weather – provides four additional rows of data if
known: METAR, TAF, Winds Aloft, and Temps
Aloft. Selecting any of the additional rows via
touch or the bottom right IFD knob will display
additional sub-category data. Wind and temp data
will represent data from the nearest known point
within approximately 30nm.
NOTE
Map Switches
Switching between the thumbnail map on the INFO
tab and the main map on the MAP tab may result in
a 1-2 second delay as the new map re-sizes.
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FMS Pages
Four Additional Rows of Weather Data on Info Tab
Info Tab Nearby Navaids
2-39
FMS Pages
ROUTE TAB
The ROUTE tab is where flight plans or routes are stored within
the system. Up to 100 routes can be stored for later use, which is
useful for frequently traveled routes. A stored route must first be
“activated” via the “Activate Route” LSK, which makes it the
active flight plan and displays the flight plan (FPL) tab.
Routes Tab
As indicated in the above image, each stored route will have its
own row with the route name on the left and the origin and
destination waypoints identified on the right side of the row.
The Route tab has provisions to:
2-40
•
Create a new route;
•
Name a route;
•
Copy a route;
•
Invert a route;
•
Activate a route;
•
Delete a route.
FMS Pages
CREATING A NEW ROUTE
In addition to using the FPL tab, a new flight plan route can be
created via the ROUTE tab. Use the bottom right IFD knob to
highlight the “New Route” row and then press the knob or touch
nd
the “New Route” row to highlight, it then touch a 2 time to start
creating a new route.
The route name field will be highlighted and a route name can be
created by either pushing in the bottom right IFD knob or by
touching the route name field to generate a keyboard. The
keyboard can be used or twist the bottom right IFD knob to start
creating a new route name. When the naming is complete, press
the “Enter” button on the keyboard or push the bottom right IFD
knob again to accept the new route name.
As soon as the route name is completed, an insert cursor will be
presented and any of the previously described methods for
creating a flight plan can be used.
After a flight plan is entered, use the “Back to Route List” LSK to
return to the directory of stored routes or press any other Page
Function key to move on to other tasks.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Route Previewing
Experimentation with routes without altering the
active route (e.g. setting up multiple arrival
scenarios when still far from destination) can be
accomplished by copying the active route on the
Route tab, renaming it for clarity, and editing as
desired. When ready, activate that newly edited
route. In dual IFD installations, use one IFD to view
potential changes without affecting the active route.
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FMS Pages
NAMING A ROUTE
An existing stored route can be renamed (or a new route named
for the first time) by highlighting the desired route from the
ROUTE tab, either by touching it twice or by using the bottom
right IFD knob to select it (twist the knob as required to highlight
the row and push the knob to put into edit mode).
Once the route is selected, the route name field will be displayed
with reverse video highlighting. Touching that highlighted route
name field or pushing in the bottom right IFD knob will begin the
route name editing. The desired route name can either be typed
into the virtual keyboard or entered by twisting and pushing the
bottom right IFD knob. When the desired name is complete,
press the “Enter” button on the keyboard or press in the IFD knob
to exit the naming edit mode.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Saving Altitude Constraints
Prior to Release 10.2.0.0, no manually entered
altitude constraints were saved. The database
contains altitude constraints for SIDs, STARs, and
approaches, and those have always been retrieved
from the database when a stored route is loaded.
Starting with Release 10.2.0.0, the system will save
manually entered altitude constraints, but only for
direct legs. If you’ve manually entered or changed
an altitude constraint on a leg within a published
procedure (SID, STAR, Approach, or Airway), those
changes will not be saved.
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FMS Pages
COPYING A ROUTE
To copy an existing route for later use or modification, highlight
the desired route from the ROUTE tab by either touching the row
or using the bottom right IFD knob. Once the desired route to be
copied is highlighted, press the “Copy” LSK along the left edge of
the display.
Copy Route LSK
This will present a copy of the original route that can then be
edited as required.
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FMS Pages
INVERTING A ROUTE
To invert an existing route for later use or modification, highlight
the desired route from the ROUTE tab by either touching the row
or using the bottom right IFD knob. Once the desired route to be
copied is highlighted, press the “Invert” LSK along the left edge of
the display.
Invert Route LSK
This will create an inverted copy of the original route that can then
be edited as required.
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FMS Pages
ACTIVATING A ROUTE
To activate an existing route from the stored routes list, highlight
the desired route from the ROUTE tab by either touching the row
or using the bottom right IFD knob. Once the desired route to be
activated is highlighted, press the “Activate Route” LSK along the
left edge of the display.
Activate Route LSK
This will display the now active route in the FPL tab.
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FMS Pages
DELETING A ROUTE
To delete an existing route from the stored routes list, highlight
the desired route from the ROUTE tab by either touching the row
or using the bottom right IFD knob. Once the desired route to be
deleted is highlighted, press the “CLR” function key along the
right edge of the display. A confirmation dialog box will then be
displayed (“Delete <name of flight plan>”) that can be confirmed
by either touching the dialog box or pressing the “ENTR” function
key along the right edge of the display.
Deleting a Route from ROUTE tab
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Current Route is the Active Flight Plan
The current route in the ROUTE tab is the active
flight plan on the FMS – FPL tab. Clearing the
Current Route on the ROUTE tab will clear the
active flight plan but not any saved route in the
ROUTE tab.
2-46
FMS Pages
WPT (USER WAYPOINTS) TAB
The WPT tab will list all user waypoints in the IFD. Up to 500
user waypoints can be stored and accessed on this page.
User Waypoints Tab
CREATING A USER WAYPOINT
There are 4 methods of creating a user waypoint from the “WPT”
tab of the FMS page:
2-47
•
Present Position – Press the “PPOS” LSK to
create a waypoint with your current position. No
further action is required.
•
Enter Lat/Lon – Press the “New” LSK then press
the “Format” LSK until the “Lat/Lon” option
appears and enter in your desired coordinates
either by touching the coordinate field and then
using the virtual keyboard or by using a
combination of twists and pushes of the bottom
FMS Pages
right IFD knob to enter the coordinates. Press the
“Enter” LSK to save that new waypoint.
•
Enter Radial/Radial (an intersection of two
radials) – Press the “New” LSK then press the
“Format” LSK as required to select the “Rad/Rad”
option and enter in your desired navaids and
radials either by touching the target field and then
using the virtual keyboard or by using a
combination of twists and pushes of the bottom
right IFD knob to enter the data. Press the “Enter”
LSK to save that new waypoint.
•
Enter Place/Bearing/Distance – Press the “New”
LSK then press the “Format” LSK as required to
select the “Rad/Dist” option and enter in your
desired place/bearing/distance either by touching
the target field and then using the virtual keyboard
or by using a combination of twists and pushes of
the bottom right IFD knob to enter the data. Press
the “Enter” LSK to create and save that new
waypoint.
Some external EFIS systems (e.g. Bendix King EFS 40/50,
Collins Pro Line 21, etc) can also create and send user waypoints
to the IFD. When the waypoint data is received from the external
EFIS, the IFD will automatically switch to the WPT tab if not
already there.
NAMING A USER WAYPOINT
Each user waypoint can be assigned a 5 character identifier that
can be used in the FMS anywhere a nav database waypoint can
be used. You can elect to use the automatically assigned 5
character identifier (format is “WP###”) or re-name that as
desired. A longer description can also be attached to each user
waypoint using the “Name” field. In each case, those names can
be entered by either touching the specific field and using the
virtual keyboard or by using a combination of twists and pushes
of the bottom right IFD knob.
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FMS Pages
DELETING A USER WAYPOINT
There are two methods to delete an existing user waypoint.
Either highlight the waypoint to be deleted and press the “CLR”
button on the bezel, and then the “ENTR” button when the green
confirm dialog box is displayed, or, use the “Delete Waypoint”
LSK along the left edge of the display and then use the “ENTR”
button when the green confirm dialog box is displayed (or touch
the green box).
DESIGNATING A USER WAYPOINT AS AN AIRFIELD
To designate a user waypoint as an airfield, the waypoint must be
manually named using the following format
“AIRPORT XXXXXFT” where XXXX is the field’s elevation and
note that the space is critical in naming the point.
User Waypoint Airfield Naming Example
When used in a flight plan, the user-defined airport will display as
a no-known-runway-orientation type of an airfield on the map.
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FMS Pages
User Waypoint Airfield Depiction on Map
2-50
FMS Pages
NRST (NEAREST) TAB
The Nearest page has two display formats – full page Nearest
and a split Map-Nearest combination. Switching between the two
formats is accomplished by “opening” or “closing” the side tab
when on the Nearest page.
Full Nearest Tab
Split Nearest Tab
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FMS Pages
The “Nearest” LSK along the left edge can be used to cycle
through the various nearest types. Choices include:
•
Nearest Airports
•
Nearest Airports to Destination
•
Nearest VORs
•
Nearest NDBs
•
Nearest Intersections
•
Nearest ARTCCs (out to 200nm from ownship)
•
Nearest FSS
•
Nearest Airspace
•
Nearest User Waypoints
When using the split Map-Nearest view, the row that is
highlighted in the Nearest list will also be highlighted in cyan on
the map.
For those rows that contain a frequency, touching the frequency,
or using the bottom right IFD knob to highlight it and then pushing
the knob will nominate the frequency into the #1 standby slot.
For those rows that contain a lower case blue info “i” symbol in
the middle of the row, touching the info “i” or using the bottom
right IFD knob to highlight it and then pushing the knob will jump
the page to the INFO tab with that facility information displayed.
For those rows that contain a chart icon on the right side,
touching the chart icon or using the bottom right IFD knob to
highlight it and then pushing the knob will jump the page to the
CHART tab on the MAP page with the Chart directory for that
airfield displayed.
For airports that have a METAR associated with them, a colored
METAR flag will be displayed on the right side.
Each Nearest type list can be scrolled either via touch (use a
vertical swipe of the finger) or via the bottom right IFD knob.
If the highlighted item is an airport, pressing the Direct-To
function key on the bezel will display the Direct-To green dialog
box with the highlighted airport pre-populated as the Direct-To
location.
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FMS Pages
As described in Section 1 of the manual, pressing the NRST
function key will bring up the Nearest tab in the split Map-Nearest
view. Each subsequent push of the “NRST” function key will step
to the next nearest data type.
If the Nearest page is left for 60 seconds or more and then is
returned to, the Nearest Airports selection will be the active
nearest data type no matter what the last nearest data type may
have been. For example, if the Nearest VORs selection was the
most recent display of nearest data, and then the pilot selects a
map page for more than 60 seconds, when the Nearest tab is
next selected, Nearest Airports data is now displayed and not
Nearest VORs.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Emergency Return to Departure Airfield
If on departure leg and an emergency return to the
departure airfield is deemed necessary, the
recommended technique is to press the –D-> button
on the bezel, twist the bottom right IFD knob
counter-clockwise to pre-fill the departure airfield
and press ENTR, ENTR to make that the active
waypoint. Then press the PROC key to produce a
dropdown list of approaches and select the desired
one. To quickly get the tower frequency of that
airfield, press the NRST button on the bezel,
confirm the departure airfield is the highlighted row
and press the bottom right IFD knob to nominate
that frequency into the #1 standby slot for swapping.
NOTE
Nearest Lists Capped at 100nm
Most Nearest lists will only display entries that are
within 100nm of the current aircraft position.
ARTCCs use 200nm.
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FMS Pages
3
Map Pages
This section covers the Map page tabs including the map and
chart display modes and controls, terrain awareness and alerting,
weather datalink, weather radar, SVS view and video input.
MAP TAB
The map has several formats and views. There is both a full map
depiction as well as a datablock map depiction. In both cases,
you have the ability to control the map feature density as well as
the various overlays, all via the LSKs along the left edge of the
display.
The active FMS flight plan is always overlaid on the map as are
any traffic depictions.
COOL FEATURE
Next Leg Depiction on Map
While the current leg of the active flight plan is
always depicted in magenta on all moving maps,
we’ve added an indication of the next leg using
alternating magenta and white stripes. This “candy
cane” indication can come in handy during such
circumstances as teardrop entries into a hold
pattern. It gives you a clear indication of what the
system will do next. All future legs beyond the next
leg will be depicted in white.
MAP CONTROLS
Turning the bottom right IFD knob (inner or outer ring) or using
“pinch zoom” touch gestures will result in a map range change.
Map Pages
3-1
Map range choices extend from 2 nm up to 1000 nm. Current
map range is indicated on the outer map range ring at
approximately the 1:30 position and as noted above, the map
range can be adjusted by either twisting the bottom right IFD
knob or by using a two-fingered pinching gesture on the touch
screen. The depicted current range numeric is replaced by “Min”
and “Max” for two seconds before timing back out to the actual
range number when at the two range extremes.
Pressing the knob cycles through the various map views. The
map view selected is indicated at the top of the map next to the
heading box. No indication means Heading Up. All other options
are labeled next to that heading box. Depending on the
installation, map view options can be:
•
Heading Up or Track Up (360°)
•
Heading Up or Track Up (240° arc view)
•
North Up (360°)
Heading vs. Track selection is made from the “Map Orientation”
selection on the User Options – SETUP tab of the AUX page.
North-Up, 360 View Example
3-2
Map Pages
North Up can be either Magnetic North or True North depending
on the “Bearing Reference” selection on the User Options –
SETUP tab of the AUX page.
Track-Up, Arc View Example
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Map Content Control
Map features displayed are highly dependent on a
combination of the map view, map range, map
declutter settings, and user setup choices. For
example, if the flight plan concludes at an airfield,
the airfield identifier may be automatically
decluttered in favor of the waypoint identifier that
represents the airfield from the flight plan. In this
example, both identifiers can be made visible by
ranging in the map to under 4nm.
Map Pages
3-3
NOTE
Heading vs. Track Depictions
In configurations in which aircraft heading
information is unavailable, the map display will
orient the aircraft ownship symbol and other map
data to the aircraft ground track and continue to
display intruder aircraft oriented to heading.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Heading/Track Digital Display Can Be Removed
A map setup choice provides a means to remove
the heading/track digital readout box from the top of
the map. This is intended to provide a method to
increase usable map space, especially on dual IFD
installations where cleaner maps are desired.
NOTE
Map Orientation Without GPS
The map orientation will auto-switch from track-up
orientation to north-up orientation when GPS is lost.
Pilots who leave the map orientation in track-up
during shutdown may notice the map will start up in
north-up until a GPS position fix is available, at
which time the map will auto-switch to track-up.
NOTE
Terrain Resolution
The map uses 9 arc-sec terrain data globally. There
are however, some locations where the terrain
database fills in missing terrain cell data and the
map terrain will visually appear to be a lower
resolution background in those locales.
3-4
Map Pages
OTHER MAP FEATURES
The table below defines other map features.
Map Symbol
Map Pages
3-5
Item
Description
Desired Track
Solid magenta triangle
on inside edge of map
compass rose
Heading Select
(“Heading Bug”)
For those installations
where the IFD is
receiving heading select
(aka heading “bug”) data,
a hollow magenta
heading bug is displayed
for reference on the
inside edge of the map
compass rose
Projected track
line
Dashed white line
indicating actual track.
Connects ownship
symbol with compass
rose.
Single Low
Obstacle
200’ AGL up to 1000’
AGL (blue)
Grouping of low
obstacles
2 or more low obstacles
(200’ AGL up to 1000’
AGL) within 1 nm of each
other (blue)
Map Symbol
Item
Description
Single high
obstacle
1000’ AGL or higher
(blue)
Grouping of high
obstacles
2 or more high obstacles
(1000’ AGL or higher)
within 1 nm of each other
(blue)
Towered airport,
hard
If runway orientation
known, they are also
depicted on the airfield
symbol (blue with white
runway)
Towered airport,
soft
Towered airport,
water
Non-towered
airport, hard
Non-towered
airport, soft
If runway orientation
known, they are also
depicted on the airfield
symbol (magenta)
Non-towered
airport, water
3-6
Map Pages
NDB
All NDBs in nav database
(magenta diamond)
VOR
All VORs in nav
database (blue)
Intersection
All intersections in nav
database (gray)
Map Symbol
Map Pages
3-7
Item
Description
Flight plan, course
waypoints
Each waypoint in flight
plan (white)
Interstate highway
All interstate highways in
the database (solid
brown)
Class A
Each boundary of Class
A airspace (solid red line)
Class B
Each boundary of Class
B airspace (solid blue)
Class C
Each boundary of Class
C airspace (solid
magenta)
Tower Zone
(estimated Class
D)
Tower zone (dashed
blue)
Victor or Jet
Airways
All Victor and/or Jet
airways (solid blue-gray)
Map Symbol
Item
Description
Terrain scale
Indicates highest and
lowest limits of the terrain
in displayed area.
Legend colors in
between these numerics
represent terrain
elevations. Blue
obstacle clearance
number shows the top of
the highest obstacle,
when greater than the
highest displayed terrain.
Ownship symbol
Representation of
present position. Uses
fixed wing aircraft icon or
rotary wing helicopter
icon depending on
selection made in
Maintenance Mode.
Selecting the helicopter
icon changes the fuel
ring reserve from 45
minutes to 20 minutes.
or
COOL FEATURE
Fuel Range Ring
The green fuel range ring depicted on the map
provides a visual indication of the max range of the
aircraft, allowing a 45-minute reserve (helicopter
reserves are set at 20 minutes). Winds are
indirectly taken into account. The calculation uses
groundspeed to compute the size of the circle and is
based on the value of the fuel totalizer. The dashed
green circle indicates the total maximum range
without using the reserve. A wider solid green circle
3-8
Map Pages
indicates the extra range the reserve fuel should
provide. The circle turns yellow indicating that only
reserve fuel remains. The rings are always
displayed and cannot be turned off.
The indications depicted are for a maximum fuel
range, calculated with reference to the current
groundspeed and the remaining fuel as indicated by
the fuel totalizer. Changes in power settings or
winds aloft or inaccurate fuel totalizer data will alter
your range and endurance depiction. There will be
no fuel range rings depicted if the IFD is not
connected to a fuel flow system. An inaccurate
manual entry of initial fuel will result in an inaccurate
fuel range ring depiction.
Map Pages
3-9
COOL FEATURE
Optional Airspace Aural Alerting
If selected on the User Options page, an aural alert
“Airspace Ahead” will be issued when an imminent
airspace penetration is anticipated. This is
designed to happen approximately 5 minutes (± 30
sec) prior to the projected airspace penetration.
The aural alert will repeat every 10 seconds until the
condition is removed or the associated CAS
message is acknowledged.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Scenarios for Airspace Aural Alerting
A technique for the use of aural airspace alerting is
to turn it on via the Users Options page when flying
in non-familiar areas, especially when operating
under VFR. Experience has shown that local area
flights in familiar airspace or when operating under
IFR can result in what may be considered nuisance
calls.
DECLUTTERING THE MAP
Two LSKs along the left edge of the display allow for separate
control of the information density of the land-based (“Land”) map
features (e.g. terrain, political boundaries, rivers, lakes, oceans,
roads, etc.) and the navigational-based (“Nav”) map features (e.g.
airspace, Victor and Jet airways, airports, obstacles, navaids,
etc.).
Use the “Land” and/or “Nav” LSK to select the preferred level of
feature density. The level specified remains consistent across all
map pages on the display on which it was set.
3-10
Map Pages
Map Declutter Controls
MAP PANNING
Panning the map is accomplished by dragging a finger along the
display in the direction of desired panning. When panning away
from the ownship depiction, a cross-hair cursor is displayed and a
readout of the bearing and distance from present position to the
cross-hair cursor position is displayed next to the cross-hair
cursor.
The map will snap back to being centered on the present-position
ownship depiction after 20 seconds of panning inactivity or if a
quick double-tap on the touch-screen is made.
NOTE
Map Panning Limited Geographic Boundaries
Due to map projection limitations, map panning is
limited to +/- 45 degrees of longitude and +/- 30
degrees of latitude from present position.
NOTE
Map Panning Only Via Touch
Map panning can only be accomplished via touch
screen use. There is no physical bezel control to
support map panning.
Map Pages
3-11
GRAPHICAL FLIGHT PLANNING (“RUBBER BANDING”)
A flight plan can be altered graphically by touching the desired leg
or the desired waypoint on the map depiction, placing your finger
on the leg for approximately 2 seconds until the leg turns cyan,
and then, without lifting your finger off the display, dragging your
finger to the desired location. When you lift your finger off the
display, a dialog box is presented on the display for you to
choose/confirm the new waypoint being created.
If the new fix is in close proximity to a facility or facilities in the onboard navigation database, then both the fix and the nearby
facility or facilities will appear in the dialog box list.
Rubber Banding Dialog Box
If the intended new waypoint is not listed in the dialog box to your
satisfaction, press the bezel “CLR” button to clear and restart as
required.
As soon as a fix from the presented list is selected, a new
waypoint is inserted in the FPL flight plan list and uses a default
waypoint naming mechanism (“RBxxx” where “RB” stands for
3-12
Map Pages
Rubber Banding). This can easily be seen if the IFD were on the
FPL tab of the FMS page and using the split Map-FPL view.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Optimal Rubber Banding
If you don’t see the desired leg turn cyan within 2
seconds of placement of your finger on the location,
try slightly adjusting the placement of the finger that
is being used to designate a leg for rubber banding.
Move your finger slightly in a direction perpendicular
to the leg. Note that any leg can be rubber-banded
including the active leg (the magenta one) unless
the leg is part of a published instrument procedure.
Rubber banding is a handy feature to quickly alter a flight plan
around airspace or a weather buildup while staying on the map.
NOTE
Rubber Banding Only Via Touch
Rubber banding can only be accomplished via touch
screen controls. There is no physical bezel control
to support the feature.
NOTE
Rubber Banding Not Functional in SVS View
Rubber banding is not supported in the exocentric
synthetic vision view of the flight plan on the SVS
tab of the MAP page.
Map Pages
3-13
ALTITUDE CONSTRAINTS ON MAP
Any waypoint that has an altitude constraint defined for it in the
flight plan, including all published procedures, will display a
graphical indication of the altitude constraint on the map. The
three types of altitude constraints are:
• At or Below (horizontal line above altitude);
• At (horizontal lines above and below altitude);
• At or Above (horizontal line below altitude)
Example Depictions of Altitude Constraints
The altitude constraint depiction will also appear at the proper
geographic position. For example, if an altitude constraint were
defined to be 5nm prior to a waypoint like it is for KGDM in the
image above, the graphical representation of the altitude
constraint on the map will be positioned 5nm prior to the
waypoint, instead of at the actual waypoint.
3-14
Map Pages
MAP INFORMATION POP-UP BOXES
There are “hot spots” all over the map and include every depicted
navaid, airport and airspace including TFRs. Touching one of
these “hot spots” will generate an informational pop-up box that
contains relevant information about that hot spot. These boxes
will time out in 20 seconds and can also be dismissed by tapping
somewhere else on the display. A few examples are depicted in
the images below. Note that in every case, there is a page count
in the bottom right corner of each pop-up box. For those boxes
that indicate more than one page (e.g. VOR co-located with an
airfield), touching the pop-up box switches between the various
pages of the pop-up box.
Map Popup Info Boxes
Map Pages
3-15
For those hotspots that are an airport and typically have METAR
data associated with them, a METAR page can be appended to
the map info popup boxes as shown in the middle example image
above.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
METAR page on Map Popup Pages Delayed
If the airfield being touched to generate the map info
popup box is not in your active flight plan or nearest
list, there will be approximately a 1 second delay
before the METAR page will created. This can be
avoided by dwelling your finger on the airfield of
interest for approximately 1 second or touch the
airfield a second time to give the system time to
generate the METAR map info popup page.
NOTE
Map Pop-Up Boxes Only Via Touch
Map pop-up boxes can only be accomplished via
touch screen use. There is no physical bezel
control to support the feature.
3-16
Map Pages
DATALINK WEATHER OVERLAYS AND OPERATIONS
The optional broadcast weather datalink is a transmission to your
aircraft via one of a number of possible weather datalink systems.
Some datalink systems require a fixed monthly subscription (e.g.
MLB700, GDL-69, etc) and some datalink systems have no
subscription fees (e.g. MLB100) but in both cases, the receiver
receives weather data continuously. You can control display of
the received data on the various moving map pages.
The datalink systems provide US, Canadian, Mexican, and
Caribbean METARS and TAFs and US, Canadian and Puerto
Rican RADAR as well as other information such as winds aloft,
TFRs, lightning, etc. Product availability depends on the product
and/or level of subscription chosen. See the IFD product details
page on http://www.avidyne.com/products/ifd540/ifd-weather.asp
for a complete list of supported weather products and expected
product refresh rates.
NOTE
Datalink Data Accuracy
Avidyne does not control, review, or edit the
information made available by the datalink products,
and is therefore not responsible for the accuracy or
timeliness of that information.
NOTE
Datalink Data Intended to Aid Decision Making
Weather Datalink information is meant to aid pilot
planning and near-term decisions focused on
avoiding areas of inclement weather that are
beyond visual range or where poor visibility
precludes visual acquisition of inclement weather.
The system is not designed for use for weather
penetration and storm cell circumvention. The
system lacks sufficient resolution and updating
necessary for tactical maneuvering.
Map Pages
3-17
DATALINK RADAR
The Datalink radar is a composite image depicting precipitation
as seen by multiple ground-based weather radar sites. The
image is color-coded to FAA definitions to show intensity levels
and precipitation types and is overlaid on top of any other map
features, including terrain alerting.
Datalink Precipitation Example
Weather Data Legend
3-18
Map Pages
At large map ranges beyond 250nm from the aircraft, small areas
of high-intensity RADAR returns may not be displayed; instead,
larger areas of surrounding lower-intensity RADAR returns will be
shown.
Diagonal stripes show the Datalink radar data no coverage area.
In normal operation the boundary follows the outline of the
Continental United States (CONUS). If, however, Datalink radar is
unavailable in a particular area for any reason, hatched lines
appear in that area. In the mountains and off the coast, hatched
lines may represent no coverage below 10,000 feet. If there are
radar returns in that region above 10,000 feet, the returns will be
displayed as “islands of precipitation” surrounded by the hatched
lines.
ADS-B (“FIS-B”) radar data coverage areas can be very irregular
shaped areas – the geometry is dependent on how many
transmission sites are in view and how much data has been
received by the on-board receiver.
No Datalink Coverage Area Hatched Lines
Map Pages
3-19
WEATHER OVERLAYS ON MAP
The “Wx Overlay” LSK on the map page brings up a control page
on which the layer combinations can be turned on or off.
Wx Overlay Selection
The options vary with the installed datalink device and
subscription level.
The Wx Overlay page is segmented into groupings of products.
One selection per grouping can be made and products selected
are indicated by a green lamp. The table below represents the
possible set of products available. Products that are not available
due to the device type or subscription level will not be displayed
as selectable choices.
NOTE
ADS-B (FIS-B) US Weather Radar Data is Coarse
When compared to subscription Datalink service
data and even ADS-B Regional data, the CONUS
weather radar data appears as a noticeably coarser
depiction – this is a function of the supplied data.
3-20
Map Pages
NOTE
Weather Source Selection
An individual IFD can only display ADS-B (e.g.
“MLB100”) or Sirius/XM (e.g. “GDL-69”, “MLB700”,
etc) weather at any given time. The choice to select
the source is made at time of installation in the
setup pages.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Weather Overlays in Dual IFD Operations
For those installations with dual IFDs and more than
one type of weather source (e.g. GDL-69 and a
MLB100) in the aircraft, Avidyne recommends wiring
one weather source to one IFD and the other
weather source to the second IFD.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Weather Overlays in Single IFD Operations
For those installations with a single IFD and more
than one type of weather source (e.g. GDL-69 and a
MLB100) in the aircraft, Avidyne recommends wiring
both weather sources to the IFD so that the higher
priority weather overlay can display on the IFD and
the lower priority weather data can be streamed out
of the IFD via WiFi for display on a compatible
tablet/wireless device application.
The current display priority is GDL-69, MLB700,
AV300/350, MLB100.
Map Pages
3-21
Weather Product Grouping
Title/Category
Weather Layers
Possible Selections Within
the Grouping
Rgnl Wx Rdr (ADS-B only)
US Wx Radar (All systems)
PR Wx Radar (Puerto Rico) (nonADS-B)
CN Wx Radar (Canada) (non-ADS-B)
Other Wx Rdr (ADS-B only)
Storm Cells*
Icing*
Winds Aloft
Onboard Radar (optional)
Airport Reports
METARs
Weather Reports
AIR/SIGMETs
Lightning
Datalink*
Sensor – Strike
Sensor – Cell
Sensor – Clear Strikes
*Product not yet displayed if the source is a MLB100
3-22
Map Pages
IMPORTANT NOTE
When connected to an ADS-B Receiver, Winds
and Temperature Aloft Winds and temperatures
aloft depicted are only displayed as a 6 hour
forecast. It is strongly recommended for the pilot to
obtain the latest information through other approved
sources for their operation. The 12 and 24 winds
aloft forecast will need to be obtained via other
approved sources.
Selections can be made by either touching the desired product or
by using the bottom right IFD knob.
Note that when there is an on-board lightning sensor selected
(Avidyne TWX670 Tactical Weather System or L3 WX500
Stormscope), the “Lightning” grouping will also include a “Clear
Strikes” function key. A WX-500 Lightning sensor test is only
available in maintenance mode.
Use the bottom right IFD knob to adjust altitude slices for icing
and wind products. Note that the IFD knob will only adjust the
weather product slice if the product is being displayed and is
valid; otherwise it still controls the map range and view.
Choices may include “METARS”, “AIR/SIGMETS”:
•
METARs – These are available in both text and
graphical formats and represent recent surface
weather observations. Text METARs are
presented on the “Info” tab of the “FMS” page. The
graphical METARs are color-coded flag symbols
that summarize a recent surface weather
observation and can appear as overlays on the
Map and embedded in the flight plan on the Flight
Plan tabs and Nearest tabs. These flags allow an
overview of general weather conditions in an area.
Graphical METAR Legend
Map Pages
3-23
•
AIRMETs and SIGMETs (US only) – These are
areas where the National Weather Service has
issued advisories for various types of hazardous
weather. They are depicted on the Map page
along with an abbreviated description of the
hazard, such as “ICE” (icing), “MTN” (mountain
obscuration),
or
“IFR”
(instrument
flight
conditions).
AIRMETs and SIGMETs Detail MAP Page
3-24
Map Pages
COOL FEATURE
METAR Flags in Flight Plan The right edge of
each leg in a flight plan presents a METAR flag for
the closest reporting station, if the station is different
from the previous leg’s station. The station for which
the METAR flag applies is decoded immediately
beneath the flag and may not be exactly the same
location as the leg itself.
Map Pages
3-25
TFRS
Active and Pending TFRs
TFR data is also transmitted via
Broadcast Datalink. Two types of
TFRs are depicted – active and
pending. Active TFRs are depicted
as solid red lines and Pending
TFRs are depicted as dashed red
lines, which become solid when
the TFR transition time rolls from
pending to active. TFR data
cannot be turned off.
INDICATIONS OF DATA AGE
The multiple products transmitted
as part of the Broadcast Datalink service can arrive at different
intervals. Two indicators at the bottom corners of each map
provide an easy-to-use indication of data age. If a Datalink Icing
product was selected for display via the “Wx Overlay” key, the
RADAR age is replaced by the age of the icing altitude data
currently being displayed; the icing altitude slice currently
displayed is shown in the bottom right corner.
NOTE
Datalink Data Position
The in-cockpit RADAR display depicts where the
weather WAS, not where it IS. The age indicator
does not show the age of the actual weather
conditions but rather the age of the mosaic image.
The actual weather conditions could be up to 15 to
20 minutes OLDER than the age indicated on the
display. Pilots should consider this potential delay
when using in-cockpit RADAR capabilities, as the
movement and/or intensification of weather could
adversely affect safety of flight.
3-26
Map Pages
Data Age: RADAR and Icing
WEATHER RADAR SELECTION FOR MAP OVERLAY
Support for digital weather radar is an optional capability for the
IFD. When this option has been activated on an IFD, and if the
IFD has access to heading data, radar data can also be a
selectable overlay on the moving map.
Onboard Radar Selection on Wx Overlay
Map Pages
3-27
Onboard Weather Radar Overlay on Map
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Onboard Weather Radar Overlay Usage
There are no controls of the onboard weather radar
from the map page – it is simply an on/off layer. The
map can be decluttered to remove non-essential
map content but still provide map and flight plan
graphical situational awareness and a more typical
weather radar depiction at the same time.
Radar contol is only available on the dedicated
RADAR tab.
3-28
Map Pages
Decluttered Map with Onboard Weather Radar Overlay
TERRAIN
Both Terrain Awareness (TA) and Forward Looking Terrain
Alerting (FLTA) are meant to serve as an aid to situational
awareness. They are intended to provide terrain and obstacle
awareness in the proximity of your aircraft. They are not meant to
be the sole means of terrain or obstacle avoidance.
Both TA and FLTA use a GPS-based MSL altitude and a 9 arcsec terrain database (WGS-84) to display a two dimensional
scene representing an “exocentric” look-down-from-above view.
The database is loaded on the IFD prior to shipping from the
factory, and is capable of being updated in the same manner as
other onboard databases, if necessary.
Both TA and FLTA compute height above terrain via GPS inputs
and are not a radio altimeter (RADALT).
TERRAIN AWARENESS (TA)
TA is for general situational awareness purposes and consists of
hatched terrain on any map page. TA will not generate a CAS
message or aural alert.
Map Pages
3-29
Terrain Awareness (TA)
TA can be triggered by either terrain or database obstacles (e.g.
towers > 200’ AGL tall buildings, etc). Any terrain that is within a
10nm radius of aircraft position and between 100’ (100’ for
helicopters) below aircraft altitude and 1000’ (500’ for helicopters)
below aircraft altitude will generate yellow hatched indications on
the map pages. Any terrain that is within a 10nm radius of the
aircraft position and is 100’ (50’ for helicopters) below aircraft to
anything above aircraft altitude will generate red hatched
indications on the map pages. TA is automatically turned off
when well clear of terrain which is 3000’ (1500’ for helicopters).
Any obstacle in the database within a 5nm radius of the aircraft
position and whose top is within 2000’ vertically (above or below)
of the aircraft altitude will generate a cyan (blue) threat bubble
over the obstacle on the map pages. Obstacles inside a 3nm
radius of the aircraft position and whose top is between 100’
below aircraft altitude and 1000’ below aircraft altitude will
generate a yellow threat bubble over the obstacle. Obstacles
inside a 1.5nm radius of the aircraft position and whose top is
between 100’ below aircraft to anything above aircraft altitude will
generate a red threat bubble over the obstacle.
TA can be turned off via the “User Options” LSK of the SETUP
3-30
Map Pages
tab on the AUX page. When turned off, there is no terrain TA
display on the map pages for the individual IFD.
A rectangular suppression area exists for all runways in the FMS
database and user waypoints that have been designated to be an
airfield (see User Waypoints section earlier in this manual).
Terrain inside this suppression area will not generate any TA
indication. Dimensions of the TA runway suppression area are
0.25 nm laterally and 0.5 nm off each runway end. Airports with
no known runway orientation use a 1nm circular suppression
area. Obstacle threat bubbles can still appear inside the
suppression area.
Runway Suppression Area Depiction
FORWARD LOOKING TERRAIN ALERTING (FLTA)
The FLTA function looks ahead of the airplane projecting the
airplane’s lateral and vertical flight path and provides suitable
alerts if a potential terrain or obstacle threat exists. FLTA alerting
is triggered by either a projected imminent impact with terrain or
obstacle or reduced terrain and obstacle clearance. Projected
imminent impact with terrain occurs when the aircraft flight path is
projected to intersect with terrain up to 3.0nm (1.2nm for
helicopters) for a yellow caution or up to 1.5nm (0.6nm for
helicopters) for a red warning in front of the aircraft flight path. By
way of reference, this means an aircraft traveling at 180 knots of
ground speed will have 60 seconds of notice for a caution and 30
seconds for a warning. Reduced terrain or obstacle clearance
occurs when the aircraft flight path is not projected to impact the
terrain but the projected clearance between the aircraft flight path
and nearby terrain or obstacles falls below a designated safe
vertical distance. The reduced terrain and obstacle clearance
distance varies with phase of flight and aircraft dynamics per
TAWS TSO C-151c (TSO C-194 for helicopters) but generally
ranges from 300’ to 1000’ (100’ to 150’ for helicopters).
Map Pages
3-31
Either terrain or obstacles can trigger FLTA alerts and they are
distinguished via the CAS messaging and aural alerting. The
difference between FLTA warnings and cautions is exclusively
based on distance-to-go to projected impact points or reduced
clearance areas.
Each unique FLTA alert will generate a new Master Caution lamp
illumination (flashing yellow or red “AUX” Page Function key), a
new CAS message, a new aural alert, and display the elliptical
solid yellow/red coloration on the maps.
Each unique FLTA alert can be acknowledged by touching the
CAS message or pressing the “CLR” function key on the right
edge of the IFD which turns off the Master Caution lamp flashing,
the CAS message and the aural alert. The FLTA
acknowledgment does not turn off the solid red or yellow
coloration on the maps.
The projected imminent impact location or the projected reduced
terrain and obstacle clearance area is depicted on the maps with
a solid yellow (caution) or red (warning) “flashlight” elliptical
depiction. Depending on aircraft dynamics, it may be possible
for a solid red FLTA “flashlight” projected terrain impact point to
appear on top of a larger hatched yellow TA depiction.
3-32
Map Pages
FLTA Depiction (solid red and solid yellow)
It is possible to have multiple terrain and obstacle FLTA caution
and warning conditions at the same time. However, the CAS
visual alerts and associated aural alerting will only honor the
highest priority alert. The priority order is Terrain Warning,
Obstacle Warning, Terrain Caution, Obstacle Caution.
FLTA aural alerts repeat every 6 seconds for the duration of the
alert condition or until acknowledged/muted by the pilot.
There is a rectangular suppression area for all runways in the
FMS database. Terrain and obstacles inside this suppression
area will not generate any FLTA alerts. Dimensions of the FLTA
runway suppression area are 2.0 nm laterally and 4.0 nm off each
runway end when runway orientations are known or a circle with
a radius of 1 nm centered on the Airfield Reference Point (ARP)
when the on-board databases do not know the runway
orientations. Note that for airfields with multiple runways, this may
have the effect of looking like several irregular shapes around the
airfield. If the aircraft position or the aircraft flight path projected
impact point is anywhere within that runway suppression area, no
FLTA alert will be generated. Obstacle threat bubbles can still
appear inside the suppression area.
Map Pages
3-33
FLTA alerts are inhibited if any of the following conditions are
met:
•
FLTA is manually turned off via the pilot-accessible “User
Options” LSK on the “SETUP” tab of the AUX page
(generates a “FLTA OFF” CAS Advisory message);
•
The ownship position is inside the rectangular (or circular,
in the case of no known runway orientation) FLTA Inhibit
zone depicted on the 2D map (generates a “FLTA
INHIBITED” CAS Advisory message);
•
The projected ground impact point along the current
ground track intersects the terrain inside that FLTA Inhibit
rectangle/circle (generates a “FLTA INHIBITED” CAS
Advisory message);
•
The Reduced Terrain Clearance (RTC) violation is
projected to happen inside that FLTA Inhibit
rectangle/circle (generates a “FLTA INHIBITED” CAS
Advisory message).
FLTA Inhibited and Off Messages
NOTE
FLTA Disabled in External TAWS Equipped
Aircraft
In order to prevent possibly conflicting alerting
3-34
Map Pages
information, when an external TAWS/EGPWS
system in installed in the airplane as determined by
the “External TAWS” field selection on the “Main
System Config” page at time of installation, all FLTA
functionality is turned off, including the “FLTA Off”
and “FLTA Inhibited” CAS messages in Release
10.1.1.0 or later.
Should a FLTA alert be generated, there are several courses of
action that can be taken and the specific scenario will dictate the
optimum avoidance maneuver. For example, sometimes the best
course of action is to immediately add power and climb, yet
sometimes the best course of action may be a small heading
change, especially in the case of a single obstacle off the nose.
The pilot in command must assess the specific circumstances
presented and take action to avoid flight into terrain.
500’ CALLOUT
A 500’ aural alert is played anytime the aircraft descends through
500’ AGL as calculated by comparing GPS MSL altitude with
terrain database elevation data immediately below the aircraft.
This feature is primarily intended to provide situational awareness
to the pilot when the airplane is being operated properly per
normal procedures. Therefore, it is not suppressed in FLTA
exclusion areas, however, it will not play while there is an active
FLTA caution or warning.
In aircraft that have this feature enabled, it can be optionally
turned on/off via the User Options page.
In IFD540 TAWS equipped aircraft, this feature is not deselectable.
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TERRAIN ALERTING WARNING SYSTEM (TAWS)
NOTE
IFD TAWS Does Not Hold TSO C-151c
TSO C-151c functionality is all present in the IFD
however the IFD does not hold the TSO C-151c
approval and therefore may not take credit in aircraft
where TSO C-151c compliance is required.
The optional TAWS-B functionality does not require any external
equipment. For those aircraft equipped with TAWS-B, the
function is always running in the background and does not have a
dedicated display page. TAWS-B contains the following subfunctions:
• Forward Looking Terrain Alerting (FLTA) – includes
Reduced Required Terrain Clearance and Imminent
Terrain Impact alerts exactly as described above;
• 500’ Callout – exactly as described above;
• Premature Descent Alert (PDA) – the PDA function uses the
aircraft’s current position and flight path information as
determined from the FMS/GPS and airport database to
determine if the airplane is hazardously below the normal
(typically 3 degree) approach path for the nearest
runway;
• Excessive Rates of Descent (EDR) – this function is
designed to alert when excessive rates of descent are
being experienced during any phase of flight;
• Negative Climb Rate (NCR) or Altitude Loss After
Takeoff/Go-Around – this function is designed to alert
when the aircraft develops a negative climb rate
immediately after takeoff or go-around or when an
altitude loss is detected in that phase.
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Map Pages
The aural alerts for the TAWS functions are listed below
prioritized from highest to lowest:
Alert Function
Aural Alert
Excessive Rate of Descent
Warning
Sink Rate, Pull Up
FLTA Terrain Warning
Terrain, Pull-Up, Terrain, PullUp
Or
Terrain, Terrain, Pull-Up, PullUp
FLTA Obstacle Warning
Warning, Obstacle
FLTA Terrain Caution
Caution, Terrain, Caution,
Terrain
Or
Terrain Ahead, Terrain Ahead
FLTA Obstacle Caution
Caution, Obstacle
Premature Descent Alert
Too Low Terrain
500’ Altitude Callout
500
Excessive Rate of Descent
Caution
Sink Rate
Negative Climb Rate or Altitude
Loss After Takeoff
Don’t Sink
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NOTE
Terrain Alert Caution Manuever
When a terrain alert caution occurs, verify the
aircraft flight path and correct it, if required. If in
doubt, perform a climb until the caution alert ceases.
NOTE
Terrain Alert Warning Manuever
When a terrain alert warning occurs, immediately
initiate and continue a climb that will provide
maximum terrain clearance, or any similar approved
vertical terrain escape maneuver, until all alerts
cease. Only vertical maneuvers are recommended,
unless operating in visual meterorogical conditions
(VMC) and/or the pilot determines, based on all
available information, that turning in addition to the
vertical escape maneuver is the safest course of
action.
NOTE
Do Not Use TAWS For Navigation
The TAWS terrain display is intended to serve as a
situational awareness tool only. It may not provide
the accuracy and/or fidelity on which to solely base
decisions and plan maneuvers to avoid terrain or
obstacles.
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Map Pages
PREMATURE DESCENT ALERT (PDA)
The PDA function is available for all types of instrument
approaches, including those approaches that are not aligned
within 30 degrees of the runway heading as well as circling
approaches and straight-in approaches.
The PDA function uses the aircraft’s current position and flight
path information as determined from the FMS/GPS and airport
database to determine if the airplane is hazardously below the
normal (typically 3 degree) approach path for the nearest runway.
PDA is inhibited when inside an FLTA exclusion area and only
runs between 2NM and 15NM from the nearest runway or ARP
and requires the nav mode to be in Approach mode.
PDA is suppressed during normal VFR operations in the airport
area and will only generate alerts in the following range and
altitude categories:
Range from nearest
runway or ARP
AGL Altitude Range in Which a
PDA Caution Alert is Generated
2 – 5 NM
200’ to 400’
5 – 10 NM
400’ to 500’
10 – 15 NM
500’ – 750’
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Height Above Terrain (FT)
Premature Descent Alerting
800
600
400
200
"Too Low, Terrain"
0
2
5
10
15
Distance From Destination Airport (NM)
If a PDA alert has been triggered, a CAS message and aural alert
“Too Low Terrain” will be issued and repeat every 6 seconds until
it is acknowledged or the condition is no longer true. For the
condition to no longer be true, the aircraft must clear the alerting
altitude by 100’. So, for example, if the aircraft is 10 NM away
from the airport and descended to 500’ AGL, a climb to 600’ AGL
must be completed to clear the condition.
EXCESSIVE DESCENT RATE (EDR)
The excessive rate of descent alerts are intended to be always
active, even in the vicinity of an airport. There is a caution area
for high rates of descent and a warning area for even higher rates
of descent. The figure below depicts the yellow caution area in
which a “Sink Rate” aural alert and associated yellow caution
CAS message is issued and then a red warning area in which a
“Pull Up” aural alert and associated red warning CAS message is
issued.
The excessive rate of descent aurals will continuously repeat
every 6 seconds until either the message is acknowledged or the
condition is no longer valid.
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Map Pages
The “Pull Up” warning will provide between 0 and 30 seconds of
warning depending on aircraft altitude at the time. “Sink Rate”
cautions add approximately 25% to those numbers. Aircraft
vertical speed and current terrain elevation below the aircraft are
used to compute the alerting altitude thresholds.
The Excessive Descent Rate (EDR) alert is triggered at -1600
fpm. “Pull Up” EDR warnings are the most serious/highest
priority of all TAWS alerts, even higher than FLTA warnings.
NEGATIVE CLIMB RATE / ALTITUDE LOST AFTER TAKEOFF
The final function of the TAWS system is the alert for a negative
climb rate (NCR) or excessive altitude lost after takeoff/goaround. Takeoff/Go-around state is defined as a 100’ climb
inside the FLTA Exclusion area (i.e. “airport environment”) when
between 100’ AGL and 700’ AGL.
This function has two algorithms that run whenever the aircraft is
in that takeoff/go-around state. The first one is a Negative Climb
Rate calculation that alerts if the vertical speed as derived by the
FMS/GPS becomes a negative value between -100 fpm and -500
fpm after takeoff/go-around, depending on aircraft altitude. The
second algorithm is an Accumulated Altitude Loss calculation that
alerts if GPS-derived AGL altitude decreases by 10% after
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takeoff/go-around (e.g. if the aircraft is at 600’ AGL, it can lose 60’
down to 540’ AGL before an alert is triggered).
The alerts will clear if the CAS message is acknowledged or the
aircraft AGL altitude increases past the previous highest value.
This function will generate a “Don’t Sink” aural alert and
associated yellow caution CAS message. NCR is disabled for
helicopters.
Height Above Terrain (FT)
Negative Climb Rate - Sink Rate Alert Criteria
600
500
400
300
200
100
"Don't Sink"
0
10
20
30
40
50
Sink Rate (FPM)
Height Above Terrain (FT)
Negative Climb Rate - Accumulated Altitude Loss
Alert Criteria
3-42
800
600
400
200
"Don't Sink"
0
10
20
30
40
50
Altitude Loss (FT)
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70
TAWS INHIBIT CONTROL
The FLTA and PDA functions of TAWS (visual and aural) can be
inhibited via pilot control. This comes in handy in some
scenarios like VFR flight in an area of significant terrain, VFR low
altitude flight and airfields that are not in the on-board database
or designated as a user waypoint airport.
The manual inhibit control is the FLTA On/Off selection in the
User Options page. This on/off control applies to FLTA and PDA
simultaneously.
An alternative means to inhibit the TAWS FLTA and PDA
functions is via an external switch that can be optionally installed
somewhere in the cockpit.
TAWS SELF-TEST
TAWS Self-test is conducted automatically at power up. A
passing self-test will produce the aural “TAWS System Test, Ok”
and a failed self-test will play “TAWS System Failure.”
DEGRADED OR NO TAWS CONDITIONS
TAWS is degraded or not available under the following
conditions:
•
GPS is unavailable or in Dead Reckoning mode;
•
GPS position accuracy is excessively low;
•
Terrain database is invalid or not available;
•
Obstacle database is invalid or not available;
•
Nav database is invalid or not available;
•
Aircraft is on the ground;
•
The system was configured to think an external TAWS
system is present;
•
The option was not enabled.
If TAWS had passed self-test and then fails at some point later in
the power cycle, a “bing-bong” chime is issued along with a CAS
message.
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TRAFFIC DISPLAY
When integrated with an optional traffic system (e.g. TAS, TIS,
TIS-B, TCAS), the IFD will display traffic information for sensed
aircraft and provide aural and visual alerting for traffic considered
a threat.
Traffic data will always be displayed as an overlay on the map
and can also be selected as a datablock option on the left or right
side of the display. The center of the traffic symbology represents
the horizontal position reference point of the traffic.
The following symbols for traffic systems are displayed both on
the map (all views) and in the traffic thumbnail:
Traffic Symbol
Definition
TAS Traffic Alert (TA)
Traffic that is within the alert zone defined by the traffic sensor.
(yellow circle)
TAS Proximate Traffic
Traffic that is not within an alert zone, but is close to your position.
(blue solid diamond)
TAS Other Traffic
Traffic that is detected by the traffic sensor, but determined not to be
a current threat. (hollow blue diamond)
TIS Traffic Alert (TA)
Traffic radiated by a TIS ground station and includes 45° cardinal
track pointers when available. (solid blue diamond with blue pointer
barb)
TIS-B (ADS-B, ADS-R) Traffic Alert (TA)
Traffic that is within the alert zone defined by the TIS-B traffic receiver
and includes an arrow shaped symbol that indicate the target’s track.
(yellow arrow head inside a yellow circle with a 1 minute pointer barb)
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Map Pages
TIS-B (ADS-B, ADS-R) Proximate Traffic
Traffic that is not within an alert zone, but is close to your position.
(blue solid arrow head with a 1 minute pointer barb)
TIS-B (ADS-B, ADS-R) Other Traffic
Traffic that is detected by the TIS-B traffic receiver, but determined
not to be a current threat. (blue hollow arrow head with a 1 minute
pointer barb)
Additional information is displayed adjacent to the traffic symbol
to indicate relative altitude and vertical trend.
Additional Traffic Information
Traffic Thumbnail datablock data is a subset of the map overlay
traffic. Trend vector, tail number and TIS track pointers are not
displayed in the traffic thumbnail datablock for space reasons.
While on the ground, TIS-B equipped aircraft can also display a
brown colored vehicle symbol.
TAS Traffic
TIS-B Traffic
TIS Traffic Thumbnails
For Mode-S equipped aircraft, the aircraft ID (e.g. tail number, call
sign, etc) may also be displayed adjacent to the traffic symbol.
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Traffic Advisories (TA) will also generate a CAS message and
depending on the type of traffic system installed, some type of
aural alert.
Most installations will ensure the traffic system is in Standby or
Ground mode on the ground and will automatically toggle to one
of the enroute altitude modes per the table below.
Traffic Altitude Mode
Relative Altitude Window
Below
-9900’ to 2700’
Normal
-2700’ to 2700’
Above
-2700’ to 9900’
Unrestricted
All known traffic
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Map Pages
NOTE
Traffic Mode and Range Changes
The traffic sensor mode changes are automatic
based on phase of flight. If however, a manual
mode change is desired, it can only be
accomplished when the traffic thumbnail is
displayed and is accomplished by either pressing
the L1 LSK or touching the lower 1/3 of the traffic
thumbnail. The only means to change the traffic
thumbnail display range is accomplished by
touching the upper 2/3 of the traffic thumbnail.
TIS capable transponders are supported by the IFD including
map depictions of the TIS track lines. These track “barbs” are
only reported and indicated to 45° cardinal increments (e.g. 0°,
45°, 90°, 135°, etc) and roughly point in the direction of sensed
traffic direction.
TIS Track Pointer
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Since TIS traffic data is re-radiated data from FAA ground
stations, thre are a few additional possible states of the data
beyond normal operating state. The non-normal TIS status
states will be displayed in the traffic thumbnail and as CAS
messages and include:
TIS Traffic
Thumbnail
Status
Definition
"Coasting"
TIS traffic communications have ceased
for >6 seconds but <12 seconds
"Removed"
TIS traffic communications have ceased
for >12 seconds
"Unavailable"
No TIS ground station is available or
communications have ceased for >60
seconds
TIS Coasting Indication
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Several Types of TIS-B Traffic
TIS-B traffic can come from several sources
depending on ownship equipment type, target
equipment type and proximity to TIS-B ground
stations. ADS-B, ADS-R and TIS traffic can all coexist within the TIS-B data stream.
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Map Pages
TIS-B Traffic
Thumbnail
Status
"Track
Degraded"
"Pos
Degraded"
"ADS-B
Degraded"
“Maint
Required”
“No TIS-B”
Definition
The angular placement of intruders in the
traffic thumbnail is not necessarily within 5
degrees of the nose. This indication is
normal on the ground in aircraft without a
heading source.
The ownship GPS position accuracy
(HFOM, VFOM) is worse than the normal
limits for accurate placement of intruders.
This indication is normal on the ground
until a good GPS signal is acquired.
Indicates the receiver has not yet gotten a
good enough GPS lock to update its
internal clock or there is a problem with
the ADS-B receiver’s GPS position.
This message is sent by the ADS-B
receiver. If displayed, consult the ADS-B
receiver manual.
Indicates the ground is not providing TISB or ADS-R services to your aircraft. The
primary causes of this are: you are not in
range of a ground station, OR, your
aircraft is not providing qualifying ADS-B
Out information, OR, your ADS-B In
device is not configured for the correct tail
number. If you never get TIS-B service
while in a known service area, it likely
means there is a misconfiguration of your
ADS-B Out or ADS-B In device.
If an individual intruder displays “DGRD” in yellow in the traffic
thumbnail, then that intruder is reporting its own GPS position
accuracy (HFOM, VFOM) as outside normal operating limits.
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NOTE
Traffic Source Selection
An individual IFD can only display TIS-B (e.g.
“MLB100”) or sensor traffic (e.g. “TAS600”,
“Skywatch”, etc) traffic at any given time. The choice
to select the source is made at time of installation in
the setup pages.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Traffic Overlays in Dual IFD Operations
For those installations with dual IFDs and more than
one type of traffic source (e.g. “TAS600” and an
TIS-B “MLB100”) in the aircraft, Avidyne
recommends wiring one traffic source to one IFD
and the other traffic source to the second IFD.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Traffic Overlays in Single IFD Operations
For those installations with a single IFD and more
than one type of traffic source (e.g. “TAS600” and
an TIS-B “MLB100”) in the aircraft, Avidyne
recommends wiring both traffic sources to the IFD
so that the higher priority traffic overlay can display
on the IFD and the lower priority traffic data can be
streamed out of the IFD via WiFi for display on a
compatible tablet/wireless device application.
The current display priority is TAS6XX/TCAD,
Skywatch, Other ARINC429 Traffic sensor,
MLB100.
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Map Pages
SYNTHETIC VISION (SVS) TAB
The SVS tab on the MAP page provides a hybrid view of your
aircraft and flight plan from a virtual wingman who is flying above
and behind your present position. This is an “exocentric” view.
The aircraft ownship symbol is displayed just like the 2D map as
well as the shadow it casts on the ground. The ground shadow
represents your aircraft position over the ground.
The viewing position of that virtual wingman is directly above and
behind the displayed ownship symbol. Twisting either ring of the
bottom right knob (outer ring for coarse control, inner ring for fine
control) or pinch zooming the display will adjust the perceived
distance above and behind the ownship symbol and pushing the
knob restores the default zoom value.
If a flight plan is active in the FMS and is within the current field of
view, it will be displayed floating over the map at a point
approximately 300 meters below ownship altitude. This flight plan
will also cast a conformal shadow across the terrain immediately
below the flight plan.
Zoomed out with Active Flight Plan and Waypoint
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Any traffic in the scene will cast a shadow on the ground to help
with judging distance and relative closure rate.
Subtle grid lines are drawn on the terrain for additional speed,
distance and depth cues. Each grid line is a 1NM x 1NM block.
Zoomed In Map SVSView
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Map Pages
Just like in the 2D map, the hatched red and yellow Terrain
Awareness can be displayed in the view (controllable via the
same on/off control in User Options) and for those units with the
FLTA active, the solid red warning and yellow caution areas are
drawn in real-time on the map.
Terrain Awareness and FLTA in Map SVS View
Also like on the 2D map view, the active leg is depicted in solid
magenta, the next leg is a candy-striped magenta/white depiction
and downstream legs are depicted in whilte.
The active flight plan waypoint will be displayed as a magenta
flag pole and downstream waypoints are not depicted for map
clutter reasons. Fly-over waypoints typically depict the flight plan
flying right through/over the waypoint whereas Fly-by waypoints
can turn inside the waypoint.
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Curved Flight Path with Next Leg Depiction
Fly By Waypoint Depiction
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Map Pages
Not yet activated missed approach procedures are depicted as
dashed lines, just line on the 2D map and go solid when/if the
missed approach procedure has been activated.
Missed Approach (Not Activated) in Map SVS View
Landing airfields are drawn on the map as are any known
obstacle database obstructions.
Close in of Landing Runway in Map SVS View
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Missed Approach Enabled in Map SVS View
NOTE
Flight Plan Depictions
The depiction of the flight plan in any SynVis display
is placed 1000’ feet below aircraft altitude. This
means that it will not be visible when flying under
1000’ AGL during takeoff, enroute and approach
phases, nor will it be visible during ground
operations and it may appear to go underground
when descending or over variable terrain.
NOTE
SynVis Depiction Unavailable In GPS Alignment
SynVis depictions will not be available until the GPS
has reached SBAS state (SBAS/WAAS
configurations), or FDE state (non-SBAS/WAAS
configurations).
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Map Pages
CHART TAB
The CHART tab on the MAP page is capable of displaying georeferenced Jeppesen departure/arrival/approach charts and
airfield diagrams. Geo-referenced charts refers to the ability to
overlay an ownship symbol representing aircraft present position
in the correct orientation and position on the chart diagrams as
well as overlaying the active FMS flight plan on the chart.
Geo-referenced Charts with Flight Plan and Ownship Overlay
Global coverage is provided but the exact set of charts supported
on any individual IFD is dependent on the level of subscription
held by the aircraft owner/operator.
Directory List
Press the “Select Chart” LSK to start searching for a specific
airfield and chart. If an airfield is in the active flight plan, then a
“Paste <airfield name> LSK will be presented along with a “Select
Airport” LSK option. Pressing the “Select Airport” LSK will put a
cursor in the airport edit field that can then be altered using the
bottom right IFD knob or by touch on a virtual keyboard.
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The Charts Selection page presents a list of available charts.
Use the right-hand knob on the IFD to select the desired
approach from the presented list and push the knob in, or touch
the desired approach in the list, to select and display the chart.
NOTE
Inclusion of RNP Approach Choices
RNP AR (authorization required) approaches may
be included in the list of available charts and can be
selected for viewing but they cannot be selected in
the FMS, and the IFD system is not authorized for
RNP AR operations.
European Visual Approach, Landing and Area Charts
European VFR charts (formerly referred to as “Bottlang Charts”)
are also available as an optional JSUM/JDM download package
(requires Release 10.2.0.0 or later). If they are part of your Chart
subscription package, then they will appear in the directory list
with the term “VFR” in the chart title.
Sample VFR Area Chart
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Map Pages
Chart Extent Box
A green chart extent box is drawn separately on the map and
represents the geographic boundaries of an instrument approach
plate associated with a FMS destination. When the ownship
symbol crosses the boundary of the chart extent box, this is a
good time to switch over to the CHART tab.
Close Up of Chart Extent Box
Hot Links to Charts
Hot links to the charts directory or individual charts exist in
several locations throughout the IFD including the FPL tab, INFO
tab and NRST tab of the FMS page.
COOL FEATURE
Hot Links to Charts in Flight Plan Whenever a
flight plan leg (blue airfield legs) has at least one
published approach associated with it, a chart icon
is presented on the right edge of the flight plan leg.
By using touch or the bottom right IFD knob, scroll
through the flight plan elements until the chart icon
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is highlighted in reverse video. If, at that time, the
knob is pushed in, the IFD will display either the
specific chart for that associated procedure or the
directory of possible procedures for that airfield.
Hot Links to Charts
Chart Views
If the currently displayed chart is not the desired one, use the
“Select Chart” LSK to jump back to the Directory List where the
desired airport/chart can be selected.
Once a chart is displayed, the left-hand LSKs provide means to
alter the view or presentation of the chart. A “Chart” LSK is
provided to select Airport or Procedure type charts. The “View”
LSK provides a set of views to choose from based on which
option was selected in the “Chart” LSK. For example, if Procedure
was picked, then one of five chart views can be selected (Plan,
Header, Profile, Minimums, All). If Airport was picked, then a
slightly different set of chart views could be selected (Plan,
Header, Runways, Departure, All) The chart can be zoomed
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Map Pages
in/out as desired by using the right-hand knob on the IFD or via a
pinch-zoom touch method.
Taxi Charts/Airport Diagrams
If a published procedure was used via the Charts tab for the
landing airport, the display chart will automatically switch over to
the airfield diagram during post-landing roll out. Your ownship
position on the airfield diagram chart will be displayed as an aid in
surface navigation.
Airport Diagram
The charts can be pinch-zoomed and panned or knob zoomed to
see close ups of the airfield diagram.
If you did not select or use a published approach via Charts, the
local airfield diagram can still be accessed. Select “CHART” tab
of the MAP page and then use the left-hand LSKs to select the
desired airfield diagram.
Lighting
Some pilots prefer to use the Charts pages in the daytime lighting
scheme at all times and some prefer the nighttime lighting
scheme. In order to provide that flexibility, a separate “Chart
Day/Night Mode” option (Auto, Day, Night) has been provided on
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the User Options LSK of the Setup tab on the AUX page. “Day”
will always provide a bright white background for readability.
“Night” will always turn the bright white backlighting off. “Auto”
will use the additional “Chart Auto Mode” selection (Sensor,
DimBus) on the User Options LSK of the Setup tab on the AUX
page to control the definition of Auto.
Water Marking/Expired Data
Charts that have been expired for 60 or more days will still be
displayed and readable indefinitely but a watermark “Not for
Navigation” will be depicted on each chart. Expired charts will not
display the flight plan overlay.
Updating Charts
Procedures for updating Charts are described in Section 6 of this
manual.
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Map Pages
RADAR TAB
Support for digital weather radars is an optional capability for the
IFD. When this option has been activated on an IFD, a dedicated
“RADAR” tab is present on the MAP page, and if the IFD has
access to heading data, radar data can also be a selectable
overlay on the moving map. The RADAR tab is designed to
replace an existing radar indicator.
NOTE
Use of Radar Requires Familiarity
Actual operation of the radar function depends on
the particular make and model of the installed radar.
Make sure you are familiar with the functionality and
operation of the radar system installed on your
aircraft. See the user’s guide for your radar for
details.
NOTE
On-Board Radar For Avoidance Only
Radar is intended to serve as a severe weather
avoidance tool only. Do not use the IFD radar
depiction to penetrate severe weather,
thunderstorms, cells, or lines of cells.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Pre-Takeoff Check
As part of your pre-takeoff check, check for proper
operation of your installed radar. While at a safe
distance from ground personnel and other aircraft,
briefly turn the radar on and tilt the antenna below
zero degrees. If the radar is working properly this
will produce ground reflections and verify the correct
operation of the transmitter/receiver and antenna tilt
functions.
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The radar mode is controlled by a line select key along the left
side labeled “Radar”. Pressing the LSK or touching the label will
generate a drop down list of the available modes. Twist the
bottom right knob to scroll through the list or touch the desired
mode in the list to select it.
Radar Mode Control
The possible modes are:
• Test – when selected, initiates a radar self-test function that
is monitored by the IFD. The test function is confirmed
by the presence of the test annunciation and test pattern
display. During self-test, all of the circuitry and functions
of the R/T are exercised with the exception of the
magnetron tube. No microwave energy is emitted in the
test function. The display will have a test pattern with the
following colors: green, yellow, red, and magenta.
• Standby – the system will always power up in this mode.
Standby places the radar circuitry in an energized but
inactive state. In Standby, the moving scan indicator and
radar echo returns are not present and the antenna is
placed in the desired park position.
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Map Pages
• On – turns the radar on in normal operation. When On, the
moving scan indicator and radar echos are visible and
the system is radiating microwave energy.
• Gnd Map – when selected, the system will orient the radar
to ground features.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Auto Standby Feature
The IFD will automatically switch the radar to
Standby when the groundspeed falls below 20
knots.
The current position of the scan is shown by a gray radial arc,
representing the width of the radar beam.
The beam altitude numbers display the relative altitude in
thousands of feet (“Kft”) of the center of the radar beam
compared to the aircraft’s altitude at the distance shown on the
range rings.
Radar in Operation
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The “Stabilization” LSK is an on/off toggle of the radar’s gyro
stabilization.
When Radar is “On”, the controllable parameters are:
• Range – Use the outer ring of the bottom right knob to
control the displayed range scale.
• Tilt – Use the inner ring of the bottom right knob to control
the tilt angle and direction of the radar antenna: U for up
via right twists, D for down via left twists with the amount
of antenna tilt in 0.25° degrees increments, using decimal
notation.
• Azimuth – Push the bottom right knob to toggle between Tilt
and Azimuth control and then twist that knob to adjust the
azimuth or bearing line. The azimuth/bearing line is
controlled in increments of 1° and the relative bearing is
displayed in degrees relative to aircraft heading (if
known) where left has a “-“ indicator in front of the relative
azimuth. It will also control the radar’s “yaw” or lateral
position of the dish, when in vertical profile mode.
WARNING
Radar Energy is Potentially Hazardous
Aircraft weather radar is specifically designed to
emit a concentrated beam of microwave energy at
potentially hazardous power levels. These hazards
include the possibility of injury to ground personnel,
ignition of flammable materials, including fuel, and
damage to sensitive electronic devices. The pilot in
command is responsible for management of the
radar system.
The FAA has published an Advisory Circular, AC
20-68B, Recommended Radiation Safety
Precautions for Airborne Weather Radar, with basic
guidelines for safe radar operation.
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Map Pages
U.S. Government standards for human exposure to
microwave radiation permit a maximum level of
10mW per square centimeter. When the radar is
operating, this level may be exceeded within the
area indicated in the figure below. According to
information published by the radar manufacturer,
strict observance of this boundary whenever the
radar is operating should provide adequate
protection.
Exposure of ground personnel or other aircraft
occupants to microwave energy emitted at positions
within the MPEL boundary depicted below may be
hazardous. Be aware that the MPEL boundary is
determined with respect to the antenna, not the
radome or any other aircraft structure. The MPEL
boundary shown below applies only to units
specifically approved for use with the IFD. The
MPEL boundary shown below does not guarantee
protection against ignition of flammable materials or
damage to sensitive electronic equipment exposed
to microwave energy from your radar.
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3-67
Vertical Profile mode allows you to view approaching weather as
a slice of the vertical plane instead of the conventional horizontal
forward view.
Switching between horizontal forward view and vertical profile
view is accomplished by toggling the “Vert Profile” LSK on/off.
Vertical profile display contains the same functions and modes as
shown on the horizontal forward view. Dual IFDs stay synched in
radar view – if one is changed to vertical, the other will follow.
Vertical Profile Radar View
NOTE
Dual IFD Range Changes
If radar is an overlay currently displayed on one IFD
map and the RADAR tab is displayed on the second
IFD, if the map range on the overlay page is
changed, the radar page range will change on the
second IFD. Conversely, if the radar range is
changed on the second IFD, the map range will
NOT change on the first IFD.
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Map Pages
Some radar systems (e.g. RDR 2000) can be configured at
installation to include the Target Alert feature. The purpose of the
feature is to alert the pilot to the presence of a significant weather
cell that exists beyond the currently selected range. For this mode
to be active, “On” mode must be selected and Vertical Profile
must not be selected. The criteria for a Target Alert is for the cell
to be at least red intensity, within ±10° of aircraft heading, a
minimum size of 2 NM in range and 2 degrees in azimuth, and
within the range of 80 to 240 NM. When a Target Alert is issued,
two red arcs, separated by a black arc will be displayed at the top
of the display centered on the aircraft heading (see the following
figure). Target Alert is applied to each scan independent of the
other when the radar is alternating scans.
Target Alert Depiction on Radar Tab
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3-69
VIDEO TAB
Support for 4x3 aspect ratio RS-170 formatted video display is an
optional capability for the IFD. When this option has been
activated on an IFD, a dedicated “VIDEO” tab is present on the
MAP page.
Most Enhanced Vision System (EVS) devices supply an infrared
RS-170 signal and and RS-170 electro-optical signal can also be
displayed in gray scale or color on the IFD.
Video Display on the IFD
The video image can be pinch zoomed using two-finger touch
pinching gestures on the glass and finger panned. The pinch
zooming range is 1x to 5x magnification.
Video brightness can be adjusted by twisting the outer ring of the
bottom right knob.
Video contrast can be adjusted by twisting the inner ring of the
bottom right knob.
Pressing the bottom right knob restores default values for
contrast, brightness, zoom and positioning.
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Map Pages
4
Aux Pages
This section covers the system pages including audio controls,
various utilities, setup options, system status and the alert
message center.
AUDIO TAB
The AUDIO tab provides control and display of all system audiorelated features such as radio volume, squelch settings, satellite
radio channel tuning and com presets.
Audio Tab Controls
VOLUME CONTROL
Each subsystem for which the IFD has an ability to control
volume (and squelch and ID on/off) is displayed as a separate
line item when the “Volume Control” LSK is active.
The bottom right IFD knob controls row selection, volume adjust,
and squelch or ID on/off control or in some cases (e.g. Satellite
audio) mute on/off. Twisting the outer ring will highlight an
individual row. Twisting the inner ring will adjust the volume as
indicated by the green volume bar. Pushing that knob will toggle
squelch on/off if applicable or ID on/off if applicable or mute on/off
if applicable (1-2 second delay possible).
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4-1
Volume Control
Touch control can also be used to make all those adjustments
(e.g. selecting a row by touching, changing a volume level by
touch dragging the bar, turning squelch on/off by tapping the
correct area on the display, etc).
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Adjusting Volume Plays Audio Test Aural
As the volume bar for the traffic alerts is adjusted,
the IFD will play a double chime that represents the
new volume level selected. As the volume bar for
the other aural alerts is adjusted, the IFD will play
an aural that represents the new volume level also.
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AUX Pages
SATELLITE RADIO TUNING
When a compatible audio-capable satellite radio system (i.e.
currently MLB700 and AV350 are not supported but the XM
version of GDL69A is) is installed, a “Satellite Radio” LSK is
displayed along the left edge of the display.
Satellite Radio Selection and Favorites
The page is divided into three parts. The left side of the page is a
full channel list of all available satellite radio channels. The right
side of the page is a numbered list titled “Favorites” and
represents the satellite radio channels that have been
programmed into a preset list for faster access. The bottom of
the page contains a datablock indicating the artist, song, channel
name and number, audio signal strength and a Quick Go To link
to enter in a desired satellite audio channel.
To load a channel into the Favorites list, scroll the available
channel list in the left column either via touch scroll or twisting the
bottom right IFD knob counter-clockwise (either ring) until the
desired channel is highlighted and press the “ENTR” key on the
bezel to push that channel into the next available Favorites list
slot.
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4-3
To delete a channel from a Favorites slot, highlight the desired
Favorites slot to remove the channel via touch or using the
bottom right IFD knob. Then, with the Favorites slot highlighted,
press the “CLR” button on the bezel.
To use the Favorites preset list, double tap the desired preset slot
or push the bottom right IFD knob to highlight the desired row and
push the knob to select it or press the “ENTR” bezel key to select
it. This will immediately make that channel the active satellite
radio channel.
In lieu of using the Favorites preset list, just scroll the full channel
list in the left column either using touch or the bottom right IFD
knob (either ring) to highlight the desired channel and then touch
nd
a 2 time (double tap) or push in the bottom right IFD knob to
immediately make that channel the active satellite radio channel.
Finally, the “Go To” field in the bottom right corner of the page
can be used to select a satellite radio channel as the active
channel. Highlight the field by touching it or using the bottom
right IFD knob to highlight and then activate the button by
touching it a second time. Another way to accomplish this is to
push in the bottom right IFD knob to bring up a key pad and type
or knob in the desired channel number.
All of these controls/edits can also be done via touch.
NOTE
Competing Control of Audio Channel Tuning
In aircraft with multiple dissimilar devices capable of
tuning satellite radio stations and adjusting volumes
(e.g. G500 & IFD), a condition can occur where
commands are ignored if they are made on both
devices. Avidyne strongly recommends making
satellite radio channel selections and volume
adjustment on one device and do not mix it up
between devices.
4-4
AUX Pages
COM PRESETS
The “Com Preset List” LSK can be used to nominate one of up to
16 selected preset frequencies into the #1 Standby com radio
slot. If the aircraft has been wired to provide a cockpit control
(e.g. dedicated com preset button on the yoke), then loading the
preset frequencies into the #1 Standby can be done from any
page by using that cockpit control.
Com Presets Page
To load a com frequency into a com preset slot, first put the page
into edit mode by selecting the “Edit” box in the top right corner by
either touching it or using the bottom right IFD knob to highlight
and push the knob in. The box will turn dark blue to indicate the
page is in edit mode.
Once in edit mode, select the desired slot for the preset
frequency by either touching it or by using the bottom right IFD
nd
knob. Once that slot has been highlighted, either touch it a 2
time to generate a numeric keypad and type in the desired
frequency (must type in full frequency including the decimal point,
“121.7”) or use a combination of twists and pushes of the bottom
right IFD knob to enter the desired frequency.
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4-5
When you have finished loading frequencies into the preset slots,
exit the edit mode by either touching the “Edit” box again or using
the bottom right IFD knob to highlight it then push the knob in.
To nominate a frequency from the com preset list into the #1
Standby slot, make sure it is highlighted by either touching it or
using the bottom right IFD knob. Then either touch it a second
time or push in the IFD knob.
For aircraft with the cockpit control installed (e.g. dedicated com
preset button on the yoke), any time it is activated, it will briefly
display a small dialog box next to the #1 Standby slot indicating
which preset slot is used.
#1 Standby Slot
If the com preset page happened to be displayed at the time the
cockpit control was activated, a small arrow will indicate which
preset is used.
Com Preset Arrow
Each subsequent actuation of the cockpit control will step to the
next non-blank entry in the com preset list.
4-6
AUX Pages
UTILITIES TAB
TIMERS
For those timers that can expire, a cyan advisory Caution
Advisory System message will be displayed and will stay active
even across power cycles until the timer is manually reset.
Standard Timers
Generic Timer
The “Generic Timer” can be used for a variety of purposes.
Controls exist for count-up and count-down versions of timers
(the active selection will be displayed in a blue background) along
with a Start/Stop and Reset. When the count-down option has
been selected, then the clock value can also be set by using the
bottom right IFD knob to select the clock field and edit the starting
value or by touching the desired location on the display.
The generic timer values will reset after a power cycle (the timer
is not continued from the previous power cycle).
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4-7
Trip Timer
The “Trip Timer” provides an option to start from either IFD power
on or from take-off (the active selection will be displayed in a blue
background), along with a Reset capability.
This timer will automatically reset with each power cycle or takeoff, depending on which selection was made.
Event Timer
The “Event Times” timer provides an option to start from either
IFD power on or from take-off (the active selection will be
displayed in a blue background) and indicates the clock time
(Zulu or Local) associated with the active blue selection.
The selection of Zulu or Local is automatic and dependent on the
“Time Format” choice made on the “User Options” LSK of the
SETUP tab on the AUX page.
Custom Timer
Up to 10 custom timers can be created by inserting a new timer
below the Departure Time slot.
Twist the bottom right IFD knob to create an insert cursor at the
bottom of the current timers list and push in the knob to create the
new custom timer.
Typical uses include creating timers for 50hr and 100hr
inspections, Annual inspections, Bi-annual air data system
checks, BFRs, etc.
The user may choose from three types: an event-based timer, a
1-time event timer, or a periodic timer. Depending on which type
was selected (indicated by a blue background), different types of
date and time entries can be made and for the periodic selection,
a count-down of remaining time is also displayed.
The custom timer can be named by selecting the title field using
the bottom right IFD knob and pushing it in to get into edit mode.
Then twist the inner and outer rings as required to create a
custom name for the timer. When finished naming the timer,
push the IFD knob to exit the edit mode.
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AUX Pages
2 Custom Timer Examples
Custom timers have a default name of “Event” with an
accompanying “Event” CAS message at expiration. If the custom
timer name were manually set to a blank, then the CAS message
will be “Timer”.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Separate “Switch Tank” Alert
A specific Switch Tanks alert can be created via the
“User Options” LSK on the SETUP tab as described
later in this manual.
Acknowledging the custom timer expired CAS message (via
touch or pressing the CLR button) will only clear the alert
message. Resetting of the timer must be done on the Timers
page.
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4-9
CALCULATORS
Several calculators are included in the system and all can be
accessed via the “Calculators” LSK on the UTIL tab of the AUX
page.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Pre-Populated Data Fields
Many data fields in the various IFD calculators will
be populated automatically with sensor data in
green if it is available, or can be manually
edited/entered by the pilot. The DEST field will be
populated with the last airport in the active flight
plan, not necessarily the last waypoint in that flight
plan. Non-airport waypoints are not permitted in the
DEST field.
If a pre-populated field had been manually altered,
the sensor supplied data can be restored by
pressing the CLR button on the bezel.
Air Data Calculator
The air data calculator includes data fields for altitude, calibrated
air speed, heading, total air temperature and barometric setting
and will produce a wind computation.
Air Data Calculator
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AUX Pages
Fuel Planner
The fuel planner includes fields for the type, origin (if type is Point
to Point), destination, ground speed, fuel on board, and fuel flow,
and will produce a computed fuel at destination value (straight
line distance between the two points) and other fuel related data.
The “Type” field choices are “Present Pos” or “Point-to-Point”.
Fuel Planning Calculator
Trip Planner
The trip planner includes fields for type, destination, ground
speed, departure time (departure time will track current time until
takeoff) and departure date and will produce values (straight line
connecting start/end) for desired track, distance, ETE, ETA,
sunrise and sunset., and enroute safe altitude (ESA) - defined as
1000’ above the maximum elevation of displayed terrain
(including obstacles) within a rectangular grid that measures 10
miles on each side of the centerline of the active leg or portion of
the active leg that is currently displayed on the Map page.
The “Type” field choices are “Present Position” or “Point-to-Point”.
If Point-to-Point was selected, then there is also a field for origin.
Trip Planner Calculator
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4-11
RAIM Prediction
The GPS RAIM (Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring)
Prediction calculator includes fields for destination, arrival time
and arrival date and will produce a RAIM status value for the
destination location.
RAIM Prediction Calculator
Trip Statistics
The trip statistics calculator computes an odometer setting,
maximum ground speed and average ground speed value,
providing options to reset each computation individually or a
master reset to reset all.
The trip statistics will continue to compute each data field across
power cycles and until manually reset. The “Reset All” selection
will prompt a confirm dialog box that must be used to reset all.
Trip Statistics Calculator
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AUX Pages
ELECTRONIC CHECKLIST
If enabled in Maintenance Mode, up to 9 custom checklists can
be created and stored in the IFD via the “Checklist” LSK of the
UTIL tab, each with up 50 steps. Each step can be up to 30
characters long.
Creating a Checklist
The first step is to create a checklist directory (list of named
checklists to be created). From the “Checklist” LSK, put the
system into checklist edit mode by highlighting the “Edit” box in
the top right corner of the page, either by touching it or using the
bottom right IFD knob to highlight the box. The edit box will be
displayed with a blue background and presents a numbered blank
row when it is in edit mode.
When the system is put into checklist edit mode, the light blue
wraparound cursor needs to be manually placed on the next
available line in the checklist directory by touching the line or
using the bottom right IFD knob. Then touch the row in the
directory list a second time or push the bottom right IFD knob to
generate a keypad for checklist naming.
Creating a Checklist Directory
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4-13
When you have finished naming the new checklist, press the
“Enter” button on the keypad or push the right IFD knob. Repeat
this process for naming new checklists until all desired checklist
names are created.
When all done naming checklists, press the “Edit” box again to
get out of Edit mode (background of Edit box should now be
gray).
The second step is to create the checklist content. To create the
checklist content, select the checklist title that is to be filled out
from the directory list. First put the system back into checklist edit
mode by touching the “Edit” box again or using the bottom right
IFD knob to select it and then pushing the knob. This will
produce an empty grey checklist step item.
Touch or use the bottom right IFD knob to select the step to be
created or edited and this will put a bright blue outline around the
step. Touch the highlighted row a second time or push in the
bottom right IFD knob to generate a keypad. Type the desired
text (Note: there is no ability to manually generate upper case
characters) and then press the “Enter” button to accept. This will
generate another empty grey checklist step item below and
repeat the process as required. When done creating all the
desired checklist steps, press the “Edit” button in the top right
corner again to exit edit mode.
Creating/Editing a Checklist
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AUX Pages
Editing a Checklist
To edit an existing checklist, touch or use the bottom right IFD
knob to select the “Edit” button, then touch again or push the
knob putting the system in edit mode. This automatically creates
a new step at the end of the checklist – if that’s what you want,
then just start typing on the keyboard. If instead, an existing step
is to be edited, then select the checklist step to be edited by
touching it or using the inner ring of the IFD knob. Touch the step
a second time or push the IFD knob to generate a keyboard,
press the CLR button (keyboard or bezel) as required to clear
characters and then re-type as required. To insert a
missing/extra step, type the step as desired as the last step of an
existing checklist and then twist the outer ring of the bottom right
IFD knob to insert the step in the desired location. When done
with editing the existing checklist, touch/select the “Edit” button
again to exit edit mode.
Press the “CLR” button on the bezel to return to the checklist
directory.
Selecting a Checklist
From the checklist directory, highlight the desired checklist by
either touching it or using the bottom right IFD knob and then
either touch the checklist title a second time or push in the IFD
knob to select it.
The selected checklist will then be displayed with the checklist
title along the top strip.
Using a Checklist
When a checklist is selected for use, the first step will be
highlighted by a bright blue wrap-around highlight. Either
touching a highlighted step or pushing in the IFD knob will toggle
that step to bright green and a green checkmark will appear along
the right edge, indicating that checklist step has been
accomplished.
Until all steps have been designated as accomplished, the bottom
left edge of the checklist box will display “Checklist Not
Completed”. As soon as all steps have been designated as
accomplished, that text strip along the bottom edge will change to
“Checklist Complete”.
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4-15
Completed Checklist
If a step inadvertently has been checked off as accomplished, it
can be unchecked by selecting the step (touch it or use the
bottom right IFD knob) and then touching it a second time or
pushing the IFD knob to remove the checkmark. This will also
toggle the “Checklist Complete” text back to “Checklist Not
Completed”.
Resetting Checklists
To quickly reset a completed or partially completed checklist,
press and hold the bottom right IFD knob while that checklist is
open. All green completed checkmarks will be removed for that
open checklist.
To quickly reset all completed or partially completed checklists,
ensure the checklist directory (list of all checklists) is displayed
and then press and hold the bottom right IFD knob to reset the
checklist and remove the grey or green checkmarks for that
checklist and jump the cursor down to the next partial or fully
completed checklist. At that point, press the knob again to clear
the next checklist and jump the cursor to the next one. Repeat
the process as needed until all checklists are reset.
4-16
AUX Pages
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Backup Your Checklists
For a variety of reasons including copying onto
other IFDs, restoring post-service events, etc.,
Avidyne highly recommends backing up and storing
electronic checklists by downloading checklists onto
USB fobs. Procedures are supplied later in this
manual.
AUX Pages
4-17
SETUP TAB
DATABLOCK SETUP
Setting up datablocks can be done by either selecting some
preset configurations, individually customizing the slots (except
for the two dedicated COM slots in the top left corner) or a
combination of both.
Selecting preset datablock configurations is accomplished using
the “Datablock” LSK on the SETUP tab of the AUX page and
selecting “Presets” as the option. This produces a page with a
choice of several presets.
Datablock Presets
Use either the outer or the inner ring (both work) of the bottom
right IFD knob to select the desired choice from the options list.
4-18
AUX Pages
Datablock Preset
Selection
Factory Default
Content
Displays two COM frequencies
above two NAV frequencies above
the Decoded VLOC IDENT block
above the Nav Mode along the left
side.
Displays GPS AGL Altitude along
the top strip.
Displays To Waypoint Information
above Nearest Airport above
Destination Direct Information
above Minimum Safe Altitude
above Ground Speed above GPS
CDI along the right side.
Left Block Default
Displays two COM frequencies
above two NAV frequencies above
the Decoded VLOC IDENT block
above the Nav Mode along the left
side.
Top strip and right side datablocks
are fully customizable.
Traffic (if installed)
Displays the traffic thumbnail
adjacent to the top LSK along the
left side and provides a datablock
slot above the traffic thumbnail to
be configured as the user wishes.
Transponder (if installed)
Displays the transponder
mode/code datablock adjacent to
the top LSK along the left side and
provides a datablock slot above
the transponder box to be
configured as the user wishes.
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4-19
Datablock Preset
Selection
Custom
Content
Permits all datablock slots except
the top left two dedicated COM
slots to be configured as desired.
Setting up customizable datablocks is accomplished using the
“Datablock” LSK on the SETUP tab of the AUX page and
selecting “Setup” as the option.
Once on the Datablock Setup page, use the bottom right IFD
knob in the following manner:
Outer Ring
Selects the desired page location (middle of top
strip in the example below)
Inner Ring
Selects the data item from the list (GPS AGL
Altitude in the example below)
Datablock Setup
4-20
AUX Pages
Any change made on this page is immediately accepted with no
special “save” step required. Datablocks can be inserted along
the upper left edge of the display, along the top edge of the
display and along the entire right edge of the display.
As you twist the outer ring of the bottom right IFD knob while on
the Datablock Setup page, you will notice a blue filled box that will
jump from one datablock slot to the next.
The center of the page will display the datablock options list for
that given slot. Those items that are displayed in bright green
text can be selected for the given slot. Those items that are
displayed in subdued grey text are not selectable for that slot –
the typical reason is that there is not enough space for the item
given the content above and/or below the slot.
As an alternative to using the bottom right IFD knob to select the
slot and the item to go into the slot, the page is touch capable as
well. Touching the desired datablock slot will highlight it as it
does via the knob method and then touching the item in the
center options list will place the touched item in the selected slot.
The datablocks on the right edge of the display are touch
scrollable as well meaning many more datablocks can be setup
than can be viewed at any given time. Panning your finger up or
down the right side datablock list will scroll the list bringing other
datablock selections into view.
COOL FEATURE
Scroll Your Datablocks
Since many more datablocks can be selected on the
right side than can be viewed at any time, you can
set up all possible datablocks you’d like and pan as
desired. This can be organized in any fashion
including optimizing the displayed datablock
groupings by phase of flight and repeating options.
Restoring factory defaults is accomplished by pressing the bottom
right IFD knob and then accepting the Confirm dialog box.
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4-21
Potential datablock selections are listed below (factory defaults
identified by asterisks). The format of many of the blocks
changes if they are selected to be displayed along the top
datastrip.
Datablock Item Title
and Image
Content
Primary Com/VLOC
(Note: This selection is
permanently greyed out
and is not actually
selectable)
Defines the position of the top two
datablocks along the left side. These
are permanently dedicated to
Com/VLOC control and display.
VLOC Radio
Provides a means to display the Active
and #1 Standby Nav frequencies in
slots 3 and 4 (2 lines)
Com/Nav Standby #2
Provides a means to display a 3rd com
or nav frequency (2nd standby slot) (2
lines)
Only available on left side datablocks
Note: If this field is currently in
datablock edit mode as indicated by a
blue background, then com/nav tuning
is disabled
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AUX Pages
Datablock Item Title
and Image
Com/Nav Standby #3
Content
th
Provides a means to display a 4 com
or nav frequency (3rd standby slot) (2
lines)
Only available on left side datablocks
Note: If this field is currently in
datablock edit mode as indicated by a
blue background, then com/nav tuning
is disabled
Com/Nav Standby #4
th
Provides a means to display a 5 com
th
or nav frequency (4 standby slot) (2
lines)
Only available on left side datablocks
Note: If this field is currently in
datablock edit mode as indicated by a
blue background, then com/nav tuning
is disabled
Traffic Thumbnail
A thumbnail depiction of the traffic
sensor output. The range rings can be
adjusted by touching the upper 2/3 of
the block and the mode (e.g. Normal,
Above, Below, etc) can be toggled by
either using the adjacent bezel LSK (if
on the left side of the IFD) or by
touching the lower 1/3 of the block. If
selected for display on the left edge of
the IFD, it is in a fixed location aligned
with the top line select key.
It can be placed wherever desired on
the right edge of the IFD.
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4-23
Datablock Item Title
and Image
Transponder Status
Content
Provides a means to display and
control the remote transponder mode
and code as well as a Reply lamp.
The Ident function will be performed by
touching the Ident soft key. Touching
the mode or code will produce the
transponder specific keyboard for data
entry.
Can be displayed on the left or right
sides of the IFD and in an abbreviated
form along the top strip.
To Waypoint
Information*
To waypoint identifier, desired track to
current waypoint along flight plan
route, distance to current waypoint
along the track**, estimated remaining
fuel at the current waypoint (if a fuel
flow system is connected), and
estimated time enroute to the current
waypoint in HH:MM. The data will be
displayed in magenta. (4 or 5 lines
depending on whether a fuel flow
system is connected)
** Depending upon the relative
geometry of the To waypoint and the
aircraft position/direction of flight at the
time of waypoint activation, track may
not necessarily be a straight line but
include a button hook at the beginning.
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AUX Pages
Datablock Item Title
and Image
Next Waypoint
Information
Content
Next waypoint identifier (the next leg of
the flight plan, not the current leg),
desired track to next waypoint along
flight plan route, flight plan leg distance
for the next waypoint, estimated
remaining fuel at the next waypoint (if
a fuel flow system is connected), and
estimated time enroute of the next leg
in HH:MM. (4 or 5 lines depending on
whether a fuel flow system is
connected)
Note: The data fields will be dashed if
there is no flight plan, the active leg is
the last leg of the flight plan or when
performing a Direct-To, since there is
no next waypoint in those cases.
Designated Waypoint
Designated waypoint identifier, bearing
from present position to the designated
waypoint, radial from the designated
waypoint to present position, straight
line distance from present position to
the designated waypoint, and
estimated time enroute from present
position to the designated waypoint. (5
lines)
Note: to change the designated
waypoint, touch the datablock which
generates a keyboard. Type in the
designated waypoint identifier and
press Enter. The designated waypoint
will persist across power cycles.
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4-25
Datablock Item Title
and Image
Content
Dest. Along Track Info.
Destination identifier, total distance to
destination along the remaining flight
plan legs, estimated fuel at destination
(if fuel flow installed) and estimated
time enroute to the destination in
HH:MM format (Z or LCL units
dependent on User Options page
selection).(3 or 4 lines)
Destination Direct Info.*
Destination identifier, bearing to
destination from present position and
distance (in NM) to destination from
present position. (3 lines)
Destination Waypoint
Title and destination identifier. (1 line)
Direct Distance to Dest.
Destination identifier and straight line
distance in NM to the destination from
present position. (2 lines)
4-26
AUX Pages
Datablock Item Title
and Image
Content
To Waypoint Direct Info
Active (To) waypoint identifier, bearing
from present position to active
waypoint, straight line distance from
present position direct to the active
waypoint with no button hook. (3 lines)
To Waypoint Direct Dist
Active (To) waypoint identifier and
straight line distance from present
position direct to the waypoint with no
button hook. (2 lines)
ETA at Destination
Title and estimated time of arrival at
the “Destination” waypoint in HH:MM
format. Units (Z or LCL) dependent on
format selection in User Options page.
(2 lines if on side, 1 line if on top strip)
ETA at To Waypoint
Title and estimated time of arrival at
the “To” waypoint in HH:MM format.
Units (Z or LCL) dependent on format
selection in User Options page. (2
lines if on side, 1 line if on top strip)
Destination ETE
Title and estimated time enroute (along
flight planned route) to the
“Destination” waypoint in HH:MM
format. (2 lines if on side, 1 line if on
top strip)
To Waypoint ETE
Title and estimated time enroute to the
“To” waypoint in HH:MM format. (2
AUX Pages
4-27
Datablock Item Title
and Image
Content
lines if on side, 1 line if on top strip)
GPS CDI**
Current track, desired track for active
flight plan leg and visual depiction of
deviation. (3 lines)
Track Angle Error
(TKE)
Title and track angle error (error in
degrees between desired track and
actual track) and an arrow indicating
direction to fly to correct the error. (2
lines)
Desired Track
Title and desired track for active flight
plan leg. (1 line)
Cross Track Distance
Title and cross track deviation in NM
from current flight plan leg. (2 lines, 1
line if on top strip)
Next Desired Track
Title and desired track for the next
flight plan leg (not the active flight plan
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AUX Pages
Datablock Item Title
and Image
Content
leg). (1 line)
Vertical Speed
Required
Title and vertical speed required (units
dependent on selection in User
Options page) to make next down-path
altitude constraint. (1 line)
Navigation Mode*
Title and IFD navigation mode (e.g.
OCN, ENRT, TERM, APPR) including
the GPS Nav mode (e.g. LPV,
LNAV/VNAV, LNAV+V, LNAV, LP). (2
lines)
Active GPS Approach
Title, approach identifier, airfield. (3
lines)
Decoded VLOC IDENT*
For VORs:
Navaid identifier, navaid radial
currently on, distance to navaid. (3
AUX Pages
4-29
Datablock Item Title
and Image
Content
lines)
For ILS/Localizers:
Localizer identifier, airport, runway. (3
lines)
Nearest Airport*
Nearest airport identifier, bearing to
airport from ownship, distance to
airport from ownship. (3 lines)
Aircraft Position
Latitude and Longitude (format is
dependent on selection in User
Options page). (2 lines)
GPS AGL Altitude*
Title and computed GPS-based AGL
altitude. (2 lines if on side, 1 line if on
top strip)
Minimum Safe Altitude*
Title and Min Safe Altitude (defined as
1000’ above the highest terrain or
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AUX Pages
Datablock Item Title
and Image
Content
obstacle in a 10nm rectangle around
ownship position). (2 lines if on side, 1
line if on top strip)
Ground Speed**
Title and Ground speed. (1 line)
Ground Track
Title and Ground Track. (1 line)
Wind Vector
Title, wind speed and direction, and an
arrow indicating direction of the wind
relative to the nose of the airplane.
Populates in air. Displays as “Calm”
when 5 knots or less. (3 lines)
Note: Requires TAS and Heading
from an external device like an EFIS.
OAT
Title and OAT. (1 line)
Note: Requires OAT input from an
external device like an EFIS or
appropriate fuel flow system. It
prioritizes Static Air Temperature
(SAT) over Total Air Temperature
(TAT) input.
Local Time
AUX Pages
Title and HH:MM:SS format. (2 lines if
on side, 1 line if on top strip)
4-31
Datablock Item Title
and Image
Content
UTC Time*
Zulu Time HH:MM:SS format. (1 line)
Flight Timer
Title and HH:MM format flight timer. (2
lines, 1 line if on top strip).
This automatically starts and is based
on the system in-air determination.
Number of Alerts
Title and # of active red warnings,
yellow cautions and cyan advisories
that the IFD is aware of. (2 lines)
User Profile
Displays the currently selected User
Profile. (1 line)
Fuel Amount
Title and total fuel remaining (units
dependent on unit type selection made
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AUX Pages
Datablock Item Title
and Image
Remaining*
Content
in User Options list) as sent by the
aircraft fuel flow system, if available.
(2 lines)
It is not presented as an option if the
IFD isn’t configured to communicate
with an external fuel flow system.
Fuel Time Remaining*
Title and estimated fuel time remaining
in HH:MM based on input from the
aircraft fuel flow system. (2 lines)
This item will not be presented as an
option if the IFD is not configured to
communicate with an external fuel flow
system.
Fuel Flow
Title and fuel flow (units dependent on
unit type selection made in User
Options list) as sent by the aircraft fuel
flow system. For twin engine aircraft,
this is the summed total. (2 lines)
This item will not be presented as an
option if the IFD is not configured to
communicate with an external fuel flow
system.
Fuel Used
Title and estimated fuel used (units
dependent on unit type selection made
in User Options list) as sent by the
aircraft fuel flow system, if available.
For twin engine aircraft, this is the
summed total. (2 lines)
This item will not be presented as an
option if the IFD is not configured to
communicate with an external fuel flow
system.
AUX Pages
4-33
Datablock Item Title
and Image
Fuel Economy
Content
Title and estimated fuel economy (e.g.
nm/gal) based on input from the onboard fuel flow system. (2 lines)
This item will not be presented as an
option if the IFD is not configured to
communicate with an external fuel flow
system.
*** Blank ***
Single blank line. (1 line)
Items that are factory defaults are identified in the table above
with an asterisk. If no fuel flow system is connected to the IFD,
the two fuel-related factory default elements are replaced by the
double asterisked items. To restore factory defaults to the
datablock selections, press the bottom right IFD knob while on
the Datablock Setup page and then accept the green Confirm
dialog box that gets displayed or use the Presets selection in the
“Datablock” LSK.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Selecting Desired Datablocks
If a desired datablock selection is greyed out in the
selection box, that means there isn’t currently
enough room to put it in the desired location. One
technique is to delete datablocks below the desired
location in order to make room. Each new
datablock selection will push older ones below it
“down the stack”.
MAP SETUP
4-34
AUX Pages
The level of detail and the choice of displaying elements on the
map may be controlled from the AUX page by choosing the
SETUP tab and the “Setup Map” LSK.
Map Setup
The Airport Filters section provides a location to specify the
runway length, runway surface, airport tower status, and type of
fuel available. Airports that meet these various filter definitions
will be displayed on the moving map.
The Map General section provides a means to turn the map
compass rose on/off and to command the map declutter algorithm
as to whether to use the altitude filter, as well as a means to turn
the heading/track digital readout box on the map on/off. This is
also the place to select one of the pre-defined map detail defaults
(VFR, IFR, Factory, Custom). Restoring factory defaults is
accomplished by pressing the bottom right IFD knob and then
accepting the Confirm dialog box.
The Map Detail section provides a location to define the level of
map detail. Options include element labels on the map, selecting
a range and an altitude beyond which the element is no longer
displayed, and defining the declutter priority levels.
FMS SETUP
AUX Pages
4-35
This is a page where some of the calculations of the FMS can be
altered for aircraft or operational tailoring. Access this page by
pressing the “Setup” LSK until “FMS” is shown. Options include:
•
Descent rate editing - keep these the same in dual IFD installations
•
Transition Altitude and Level editing
•
Controlled airspace alerts
•
TFRs alerts and Special Use Airspace (SUA) alerts
•
Modifying list of selectable procedures for the FMS drop down boxes
•
Airways
•
Arrivals
•
Departures
•
Approaches
•
Enabling Search Patterns/Circular Holds
•
WAAS display channel #
•
Flight Plan format (single row format vs. multi-row format)
Restoring factory defaults is accomplished by pressing the bottom
right IFD knob and then accepting the Confirm dialog box.
FMS Setup
4-36
AUX Pages
USER OPTIONS
A number of user options are available for setup on the “User
Options” LSK of the SETUP tab on the AUX page.
The outer ring of the bottom right IFD knob is used to select a
given row and twisting the inner ring of that knob will cycle
through the options.
User Options
Restoring factory defaults is accomplished by pressing the bottom
right IFD knob and then accepting the Confirm dialog box. This
will reset all the options (except the name) for that user profile
only to factory defaults.
The user options are (default selection indicated by * asterisk):
User Option Item Title
User Profile
Description
User-1* – custom settings for
User Options, Map, FMS and
Datablock;
User-2 – custom settings for User
AUX Pages
4-37
User Option Item Title
Description
Options, Map, FMS and
Datablock;
User-3 – custom settings for User
Options, Map, FMS and
Datablock;
User-4 – custom settings for User
Options, Map, FMS and
Datablock;
User-5 – custom settings for User
Options, Map, FMS and
Datablock.
Touch Screen
On* - all touch screen controls are
enabled;
Off – all touch screen controls are
disabled.
Bezel Mode
Auto* - the bezel backlighting will
rely on the ambient light sensor in
the bezel until a low threshold is
reached, at which time it uses the
dimming bus;
DimBus – the bezel backlighting
will only be responsive to the
cockpit dimming bus control;
User Control – the bezel
backlighting is completely
controlled by you using the
bottom right IFD knob.
Bezel Backlight
4-38
AUX Pages
A brightness bar that represents
the bezel brightness setting when
User Control is selected. This
item has no default value.
User Option Item Title
Display Mode
Description
Auto* - the LCD display
backlighting will rely on the
ambient light sensor in the bezel
until a low threshold is reached, at
which time it uses the dimming
bus;
DimBus – the LCD display
backlighting will only be
responsive to the cockpit dimming
bus control;
User Control – the LCD display
backlighting is completely
controlled by you using the
bottom right IFD knob.
Display Backlight
A brightness bar that represents
the LCD display brightness
setting when User Control is
selected. This item has no
default value.
Chart Day/Night Mode
Day - Charts are displayed with a
bright white background;
Night – Charts are displayed with
the bright white background
turned off;
Auto* – Uses the selection in the
Chart Auto Mode field to
automatically determine whether
the system is using Day mode or
Night mode for chart depiction.
Chart Auto Mode
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4-39
Sensor* - uses the ambient light
sensor embedded in the bezel to
determine if the Chart page will
use day or night lighting schemes
User Option Item Title
Description
when the “Auto” selection was
made on the Chart Day/Night
Mode user option;
DimBus – uses only the cockpit
dimming bus setting to determine
if the Chart page will use day or
night lighting schemes when the
“Auto” selection was made on the
Chart Day/Night Mode user
option.
Switch Tanks Alert
Never* – No “Switch Tanks” CAS
message will be issued;
15 min – “Switch Tanks” CAS
message issued every 15 min;
30 min - ”Switch Tanks” CAS
message issued every 30 min;
45 min – “Switch Tanks” CAS
message issued every 45 min;
60 min – “Switch Tanks” CAS
message issued every 60 min.
Time Format
UTC – displays all times in the
system in zulu time format;
12 Hr* - displays all times in the
system in am/pm time format;
24 Hr – displays all times in the
system in “military” 24 hour time
format.
Note: The 12 Hr and 24 Hr
selections are intended to be
used if local time is the overall
desired time format.
4-40
AUX Pages
User Option Item Title
Description
UTC
Just a display of current UTC for
reference
Local Time Offset
HH:MM – push in bottom right
IFD knob to put into edit mode
then twist the inner ring to change
in 15 minute increments and then
push knob again to exit edit
mode.
Note: Local time is a user
specified offset from UTC rather
than an automatically calculated
offset based on current location.
This should be manually
readjusted if crossing time zones.
Current Time
Just a display of current local time
for reference.
Keyboard Convenience
On – When dual IFD equipped,
the other IFD will present a
keyboard on which edits can be
made to the original IFD;
Off* - The other IFD will not
present a keyboard when an edit
is attempted on the original IFD.
Bluetooth Ψ
On – When enabled in
Maintenance Mode, turns on the
Bluetooth transceiver in the IFD.
Off* - turns off the Bluetooth
transceiver in the IFD.
AUX Pages
4-41
User Option Item Title
Network (WiFi) Ψ
Description
On – When enabled in
Maintenance Mode, turns on the
WiFi transceiver in the IFD.
Off* - turns off the WiFi
transceiver in the IFD.
Aircraft Flight ID
Provides a means to enter in the
optional aircraft flight ID for Mode
S transponder operations.
Push the bottom right IFD knob to
put the field into edit mode and
twist the inner ring to change the
value and twist the outer ring to
move to the next digit. Put the
cursor on any value (e.g. trailing
zeros) you wish to delete and
press the bezel CLR button.
Push the bottom right knob again
to exit edit mode.
Note: This selection is only
available if the system is
configured to communicate with a
remote mount Mode S
transponder.
4-42
AUX Pages
User Option Item Title
Transponder Default Code
Description
Provides a means to enter in a
regional default “VFR”
transponder code.
Push the bottom right IFD knob to
put the field into edit mode and
twist the inner ring to change the
value and twist the outer ring to
move to the next digit. Push the
bottom right knob again to exit
edit mode.
Note: This selection is only
available if the system is
configured to communicate with a
remote mount Mode S
transponder.
Map Orientation
Heading-Up* - the map will be
displayed in heading up
orientation if heading is available;
Track-Up – the map will be
displayed in track up orientation
Note: Even though Heading-Up
is the default selection, if there is
no heading source, then the
default reverts to Track-Up.
Potential heading sources include
digital heading from an
ARINC429 source (e.g. EFIS),
WX500, serial 232 heading
source and, analog synchro
heading input.
AUX Pages
4-43
User Option Item Title
Com Frequencies Spacing
Description
25 kHz* - Com tuning will use 25
kHz spacing;
8.33 kHz – Com tuning will use
8.33 kHz channel spacing.
Advisory Glideslope
On* - Will transmit a glideslope
deviation signal for display on
external indicators (e.g. HSI,
EFIS) for approaches that don’t
have a published glideslope
associated with them. Advisory
glideslope will be displayed for
RNAV approaches, GPS
approaches, and approaches that
are authorized for a GPS overlay
regardless of SBAS. In a nonSBAS environment, if one of
those kinds of approaches is
selected and it has a published
flight path angle in the database,
then expect LNAV+V;
Off – Will not transmit glideslope
deviation data for approaches
that don’t have a published
glideslope associated with them.
4-44
AUX Pages
User Option Item Title
Auto-VLOC Tuning
Description
On* - Enables the automatic
tuning of the active nav frequency
slot to follow the governing navaid
in the flight plan. For example, if
the next FMS flight plan leg is a
VOR, this will automatically tune
the VOR frequency into the active
nav slot;
Off – Disables the automatic
tuning of the active nav frequency
into the active nav slot.
GPS  VLOC Capture
Auto* - Allows the GPS  VLOC
state for nav source and an
automatic transition to VLOC if
the capture criteria are met;
Manual – Never displays the GPS
 VLOC nav source option and
no automatic nav source
switching will occur.
Auto Enable Missed
On* – Automatically activates the
published missed approach when
crossing the Missed Approach
Point (MAP);
Off - Will not automatically
activate the published missed
approach and requires manual
activation of the L4 LSK on the
FPL tab when inside the FAF.
AUX Pages
4-45
User Option Item Title
FLTA Ψ
Description
On* - Forward Looking Terrain
Alerting (and Premature Descent
Alert, if TAWS equipped) function
enabled;
Off – Forward Looking Terrain
Alerting (and Premature Descent
Alert, if TAWS equipped) function
disabled.
Note that in dual IFD installations,
both units will need to be set to
Off to disable the function.
Terrain Awareness (TA)
On* - Terrain Awareness function
enabled;
Off – Terrain Awareness function
disabled.
Terrain Caution Aural Ψ
Caution, Terrain; Caution,
Terrain* - When selected, that is
the aural alert issued during FLTA
caution conditions;
Terrain Ahead; Terrain Ahead When selected, that is the aural
alert issued during FLTA caution
conditions.
Terrain Warning Aural Ψ
Terrain, Pull Up; Terrain, Pull Up*
- When selected, that is the aural
alert issued during FLTA warning
conditions;
Terrain, Terrain; Pull Up, Pull Up When selected, that is the aural
alert issued during FLTA warning
conditions.
4-46
AUX Pages
User Option Item Title
FLTA Exclusion Areas Ψ
Description
On* - Turns the FLTA Exclusion
area on resulting in hatched white
polygons around airfields and no
FLTA alerts when inside the
exclusion areas;
Off – Turns the FLTA Exclusion
area off resulting FLTA alerts
even in the proximity of airfields.
Top of Descent (TOD) Aural
On* - Enables TOD aural chime;
Off – Disables TOD aural chime.
Airspace Aural
On* - Enables aural alerting of
impending airspace (correlates
with presence of the Airspace
Ahead CAS message);
Off – Disables aural alerting of
airspace.
500ft Callout Aural Ψ
On* - Enables 500’ AGL (based
on GPS altitude) aural callout
when descending through 500’
AGL;
Off – Disables 500’ AGL callout.
Bearing Reference
Magnetic* - Sets map orientation
and all datablock information to
magnetic reference;
True – Sets map orientation and
all datablock information to true
reference. By selecting True, the
map orientation will display in
True North when “North Up” view
selected on the map page.
AUX Pages
4-47
User Option Item Title
Distance/Speed Units
Description
nm/knots* - distance units will be
displayed in nautical miles and
speed units will be displayed in
knots;
km/kph – distance units will be
displayed in kilometers and speed
units will be displayed in
kilometers/hour;
sm/mph – distance units will be
displayed in statute miles and
speed units will be displayed in
miles/hour.
Altitude/Vert. Speed Units
ft/fpm* - altitude units will be
displayed in feet and vertical
speed units will be displayed in
feet/min;
m/mpm – altitude units will be
displayed in meters and vertical
speed units will be displayed in
meters/min;
m/mps – altitude units will be
displayed in meters and vertical
speed units will be displayed in
meters/sec.
Pressure Units
InHg* - pressure units will be
displayed in Inches Mercury;
mbar – pressure units will be
displayed in millibars;
hPa – pressure units will be
displayed in hectopascals.
4-48
AUX Pages
User Option Item Title
Temperature Units
Description
Fahrenheit* - temperature units
will be displayed in degrees F;
Celsius – temperature units will
be displayed in degrees C.
Fuel Units
Gal* - fuel units will be displayed
in gallons;
Lit – fuel units will be displayed in
liters;
Imp Gal – fuel units will be
displayed in Imperial Gallons.
Position Units
ddd°mm’ss’’* - position units will
be displayed in degrees-minutesseconds;
ddd°mm.mm – position units will
be displayed in degrees-minuteshundredths of minutes;
UTM – position units will be
displayed in Universal Transverse
Mercator;
MGRS – position units will be
displayed in Military Grid
Reference System.
Hide Page Tabs
Never* - The page tabs will
always be present;
After 2s – the page tabs “sink”
down out of view 2 seconds after
they were last used;
After <x>s where x choices are 5,
AUX Pages
4-49
User Option Item Title
Description
10 or 15 seconds – the page tabs
“sink” down out of view x seconds
after they were last used.
Ψ - not available if the option is not enabled in the IFD.
CUSTOM USER SETTINGS
5 different custom user definitions can be created which are
saved across power cycles. Each custom user definition consists
of:
• User Option page selections;
• Map settings;
• FMS settings;
• Datablock selections.
To select the desired User ID, use the outer ring of the bottom
right IFD knob to select the “User ID” row on the User Options
page from the AUX-Setup tab and then twist the inner ring of that
knob to cycle through the 5 different user ID definition sets. No
further action is required to select the desired user ID.
Setting/Selecting User ID
Each user ID can be uniquely named, if desired, with a maximum
of 11 characters. To create a custom name for a user ID, use the
outer and inner ring to select the User ID row and the specific ID
that is desired to be renamed. Then push the bottom right IFD
knob in to generate a keyboard. Type in the desired name (do
not use any spaces) and press the ENTER key on the keyboard
or the ENTR button on the bezel.
4-50
AUX Pages
SYSTEM TAB
The “SYS” (System) tab provides access to various system status
pages, a means to enter initial fuel (if configured with a
recognized fuel flow system) and a means to access IFD data
logs, update IFD software and update IFD databases.
FUEL MANAGEMENT
The “Fuel Mgmt” LSK will be displayed if the IFD has been
configured to communicate with an installed aircraft fuel flow
system.
Fuel Management Dialog Box
When properly configured and selected via the LSK, a fuel dialog
box will be displayed, on which the current fuel value can be
entered. In addition, the various fuel related datablock selections
will be available as described earlier in this section.
Depending on the capability of the fuel sensor installed, some
fields may be editable (e.g. initial fuel setting, fuel added, etc).
When this “Fuel Mgmt” LSK selection is available, the FMS will
also populate its data fields with projected fuel states at all
downpath flight plan legs, as appropriate.
AUX Pages
4-51
SYSTEM STATUS
The “Status” LSK is a multiple state LSK that provides access to
software status page, weather datalink status page (if datalink is
installed and properly configured), GPS status page, and the IFD
databases status page. Pushing the adjacent bezel key or
touching the label soft key will cycle through the various status
pages.
Software Status Page
The “Software” selection will present the top level software part
number information and some system-level parameters which
can be useful during service calls and IFD feature descriptions.
Software Status Page
When the “Software” selection is made on the “Status” LSK of the
SYS tab, a “Download Logs” LSK is also displayed. Pressing
that LSK will put the IFD into Maintenance Mode where the
datalogs can be downloaded (see Datalogs Download section
later in this manual for instructions).
4-52
AUX Pages
NOTE
Data Downloads and Updates
Procedures for downloading IFD data logs and for
updating IFD databases and software are covered
later in this manual.
Database Status Page
The “Databases” selection on the “Status” LSK of the SYS tab will
display the currently loaded version of the Nav data, Obstacles
data, Terrain data and Charts data and will indicate valid date
ranges or if/when a given data base is expired.
Database Status Page
AUX Pages
4-53
NOTE
Database Currency
It is critical that you update the data regularly and
that you ensure the databases are current prior to
conducting flight operations.
Pressing the “Update Databases” LSK will put the IFD into
Maintenance Mode where the databases can be uploaded to the
IFD (see Data Updates section later in this manual for
instructions).
4-54
AUX Pages
GPS Status Page
The “GPS” selection will provide a number of GPS status
parameters, including the GPS navigation state and GPS derived
current altitude as well as the active GPS approach (if
appropriate), and a graphical depiction of the satellite vehicles
(SV) being tracked by the IFD GPS receiver.
GPS Status Page
NOTE
Global SBAS Support
Wide area/regional satellite based augmentation
system (SBAS) support provided by the IFD include
WAAS (Continental US, Alaska, Canada and most
of Central America), EGNOS (most of Europe and
North Africa), MSAS (Japan) and GAGNAN (India).
These are regional augmentations of the GPS
satellite constellation and should not be interpreted
as meaning the IFD is compatible with other GNSS
constellation systems such as Galileo (Europe),
GLONASS (Russia), or Compass (China).
AUX Pages
4-55
The GPS navigation states possible are:
GPS Navigation State
Operational Meaning
Self Test
System performing self test. This is
the initial state value but happens so
quickly it is rarely observed.
Init
System is initializing – this state is
also very quick and is rarely
observed.
Search
Satellite acquisition mode.
Basic Nav
System has acquired enough
satellites to conduct basic navigation
but without integrity.
FDE Nav
System has acquired enough
satellites to conduct navigation with
fault detection and exclusion integrity.
SBAS Nav
System is capable of navigation with
satellite-based augmentation (e.g. the
WAAS platform in the US).
Fault
System has detected an internal fault
and does not have a satellite
navigation solution.
This may require a manual power
cycle of the IFD to restore a GPS
lock.
The graphical bars represent the relative signal strength of each
individual SV as well as the SV identification number. SV
numbers above 100 represent the WAAS satellites. It typically
requires three WAAS satellites before full WAAS functionality can
be realized.
4-56
AUX Pages
The internal GPS receiver will automatically de-select satellite
vehicles from inclusion in the position fix if poor satellite health or
maintenance information is available in the satellite data stream.
However, there may be times, or geographic locations in the
world, where it is desirable to manually de-select a satellite
vehicle or series of satellite vehicles from the GPS solution. For
example, most locations in Australia can see a US WAAS satellite
and a Japanese MSAS satellite, neither of which are used for
Australian precision approach flying. In that case, it may be
desirable to de-select those specific satellite vehicles from the
GPS position fix algorithm.
Satellite vehicles (SVs) can be manually de-selected via the
Maintenance Mode pages. The de-selected SVs persist across
power cycles.
AUX Pages
4-57
Datalink Status Page
The “Datalink” selection will be available if the IFD has been
properly configured to integrate with a compatible on-board
satellite weather/audio system (see the IFD product page on
www.avidyne.com (http://www.avidyne.com/products/ifd540/ifdweather.asp) for a list of currently supported systems).
This page has two distinct sections – the upper part displays the
various weather products supported by the datalink system and
subscription level with their age and receipt status; the lower part
is a legend that defines the various symbols used in the datalink
data depictions on the maps. Note that forecast products (e.g.
winds aloft) display the forecast time, not the data receipt age.
Dashed data is not authorized for that subscription level and “Not
Rcvd” data has not been received.
Datalink Status Page
4-58
AUX Pages
5
Navigation
GENERAL
The IFD is an IFR certified FMS-GPS-Nav-Com that has been
specifically designed to support single-pilot IFR operations.
NOTE
CDI is GPS-based CDI
The CDI datablock that can be optionally displayed
on the IFD is a GPS-based CDI and never a VHFbased CDI.
LEVELS OF INTEGRATION
The IFD is designed for both retrofit and clean installations,
meaning that it can have different capabilities depending on the
nature of the aircraft integration as described in the table below.
Integration
Category
No external nav
indicator
5-1
Navigation
Description
There is no form of
external CDI, HSI,
or EFIS in the
airplane and
therefore, no
external course
input available to
the IFD.
IFD Functionality
VFR operations
only.
No way to
externally set
course.
All course setting is
conducted on the
IFD (e.g. –D->,
push OBS and twist
nav source knob,
auto-nominate a
course by selecting
Integration
Category
Description
IFD Functionality
a procedure, etc).
Nav source modes
available:
GPS,
VLOC,
GPS  VLOC,
OBS,
OBS  VLOC.
Basic electromechanical nav
indicator
There is at least
one external CDI or
HSI in the airplane
and the IFD has
access to the
course data from it.
Set the course on
the external unit
and the IFD will
display that value.
No auto-slew
capability of the
course on the IFD.
The nav source
knob is basically
just a toggle button
to toggle between
the available states.
Nav source modes
available:
GPS,
VLOC,
GPS  VLOC,
OBS,
OBS  VLOC.
“Non-cooperative”
electronics (e.g.
G500/600, Aspen
EFD1000, Avidyne
EXP5000, Dynon
Skyview, EFIS
5-2
Navigation
The IFD can
receive course input
from this external
device(s).
The IFD can send
The nav source
knob is basically
just a mode change
knob to toggle
between the
Integration
Category
40/50, etc.)
Description
commands to set
course (e.g. “autoslew”) on those
external device(s).
IFD Functionality
available states.
Nav source modes
available:
GPS,
VLOC,
GPS  VLOC,
OBS,
OBS  VLOC.
“Cooperative”
electronics
The “cooperative”
system is even
more capable than
the IFD and
therefore is the
primary navigation
control device.
Course values will
display on the IFD
but are set on the
external device(s).
All nav source
selection and
course setting is
performed on the
external device.
None (the nav
source knob will
appear to be nonfunctional).
The IFD becomes a
“slave” to the
external device.
5-3
Navigation
Nav source modes
available:
NOTE
Manual Sequencing May Be Required
In Electro-mechanical installations where the IFD
does not have an altitude input, a CAS message
(“Manual Sequence Req’d”) prompting the pilot to
manually sequence legs of the flight plan will be
presented on Heading-to-Altitude leg types (e.g.
some missed approach legs). Since the IFD does
not know altitude in this case, it does not know
when to sequence to the next leg. Failure to
manually sequence to the next leg will result in the
IFD maintaining the leg heading indefinitely.
NAV SOURCE KNOB
The top right IFD knob is the dedicated IFD Navigation (Nav)
Source knob. Think of the nav source knob as a channel selector
to choose which Nav source the pilot wants depicted on the
moving map. The chosen source will also be sent to other onboard systems like an EFIS (e.g. Aspen PFD) and in-turn, the
autopilot, as well as driving any conventional CDI or RMI or HSI
indicator. VLOC and GPS course and deviation data may all be
coming into the IFD continuously but the channel selector acts as
a filter to determine which one gets used in the nav solution and
displayed on the IFD. The nav source knob must typically be
twisted to select the desired state. The selected nav mode
indication will flash for several seconds before taking effect;
thereby giving you time to visually confirm the desired state.
Nav Source Knob State Indication
As described earlier in this section, multiple levels of aircraft
system integration are possible, and will affect the possible states
of the Nav Source knob. The table below describes all possible
nav source states:
5-4
Navigation
Nav Source
State
GPS
(or LPV,
LNAV/VNAV,
LP+V, LP,
LNAV, LNAV+V
if on a RNAV
approach)
Description
GPS is the active state (green), and all external
deviation data being transmitted by the IFD is in
reference to the active GPS leg. Note that if no
GPS leg is active or if no GPS lock, the nav
mode will be displayed in yellow. If performing a
RNAV approach, “GPS” gets replaced with the
approach type when the leg to the FAF
becomes active and either the approach is VTF
or the course to the FAF is within 45° of the final
approach course.
GPS  LPV (or
LNAV/VNAV,
LP+V, LP,
LNAV, LNAV+V)
Basic GPS is the active state (green), and the
approach type is armed (blue).
GPS  VLOC
GPS is the active state (green), and VLOC is
armed (blue). If the GPS flight plan contains a
VHF-based procedure or leg (e.g. localizer
final), then the nav mode will automatically
transition from GPS to VLOC when the capture
criteria have been met. While GPS is active, all
external deviation data being transmitted by the
IFD is in reference to the active GPS leg. That
transitions to VHF deviation data when the
switch to VLOC is made.
VLOC
VLOC is the active state (green), and all
external deviation data being transmitted by the
IFD is in reference to the active VHF-based leg
(e.g. Inbound VOR course, localizer deviation,
etc). Note that if no VHF data is being received
(e.g. out of range, improperly tuned nav radio,
etc), the nav mode will be displayed in yellow. It
will also stay yellow until the nav channel is fully
decoded as an indication to manually tuneidentify-monitor.
5-5
Navigation
Nav Source
State
Description
OBS becomes the active state (green) and
deviation data being transmitted by the IFD is
reactive to the external course setting knob (or
the Nav Source knob if no external course
control is present or when a KI-208A or KI-209A
is present) for the inbound/outbound course.
OBS
Note that this state is accessed by pushing in
the Nav Source knob, and then it takes the
place of pure GPS mode as described earlier in
this table.
OBS  VLOC
OBS becomes the active state (green) and
VLOC is the armed state (blue). Deviation data
being transmitted by the IFD is reactive to the
external course setting knob (or the Nav Source
knob if no external course control is present or
when a KI-208A or KI-209A is present) for the
inbound/outbound course.
Note that this state is accessed by pushing in
the Nav Source knob and then it takes the place
of GPS  VLOC mode as described earlier in
this table.
NOTE
Aircraft Integration
The Nav Source modes available in your airplane
will be dependent on the level of integration with
other on-board systems. Avidyne strongly
recommends practice operations in VMC conditions
before any use in IMC, to understand the level of
integration between the IFD and the other on-board
systems and therefore the Nav Source modes
available.
5-6
Navigation
The nav source knob is labeled “CDI” above the knob and is
designed to allow you to toggle the CDI and system nav source
between the active and armed states defined above.
OBS MODE
“PUSH OBS” is the label underneath the knob and is active when
you can put the system in To/From course setting mode for a
waypoint. There is no need for “suspend” functionality in the IFD
paradigm – the IFD will continue sequencing to the next waypoint
and exit OBS mode at that time.
NOTE
GPS and OBS
If GPS or OBS are not the active Nav state
(annunciated in green), then pushing the Nav
Source knob will have no effect. When one of them
is the active Nav state, pushing the Nav Source
knob will toggle between the two states.
NOTE
OBS Can Not Be Activated Inside the FAF
OBS is prevented from being selected on a
published approach when inside the Final Approach
Fix (FAF).
The depiction on the map when in OBS mode depends on
whether the system determines if the airplane is in TO or FROM
orientation.
In OBS TO (defined as when the difference between the selected
OBS course and the aircraft course to the fix is < 90°), the map
will display only the magenta leg to be flown to the fix. There is
no white leg depiction for the outbound leg because the assumed
intent is to fly to the fix and automatically sequence legs as
normal from there.
5-7
Navigation
OBS TO Depiction
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Sharp Intercepts To Final
Lateral and vertical guidance is provided even for
non-conventional sharp angle intercepts to final for
precision GPS-based approaches (LP, LPV, some
LNAV/VNAV). In these cases, SBAS (e.g. WAAS)
deviation data is available whenever the aircraft is
inside a 35° cone around the runway centerline.
In OBS FROM (defined as when the difference between the
selected OBS course and the aircraft course to the fix is ≥ 90°),
the system will activate the reciprocal course away from the
station with guidance away FROM the fix. The previously active
TO leg will change to white and remain in pivot. The assumption
here is that you will want to fly the leg on the 180° plane between
the aircraft and the fix. If the TO leg is within this plane, you will
fly to the station. If you swing the TO leg to the opposite plane,
5-8
Navigation
the FROM leg would now be in the 180° plane between you and
the fix, and that is the leg to fly – away from the station.
OBS FROM Depiction
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
OBS “Final”
OBS mode can be used to create a user-defined
course into a waypoint/fix or an airfield. Once in
OBS mode, use the external course knob to set the
desired inbound course to the fix or airfield. All
guidance, including that sent to an autopilot, will
now be with respect to that user-defined course.
5-9
Navigation
NOTE
OBS Leg Depiction on External Moving Maps
The depiction of the OBS course line on external
moving map displays may vary by device. Some
external displays may depict the OBS leg and some
may not. For example, in IFD software releases
prior to Release 10.1.1.0, the Avidyne EX5000,
EX500, and EX600 MFDs would not depict the OBS
course line/leg but do depict a 200nm OBS course
line/leg in Release 10.1.1.0 and later. Changes can
take up to 7 seconds to display on the map and
east-west legs may show some curvature.
NOTE
OBS Behavior in Dual IFD Operations
For those installations that include dual IFDs that
are separately wired to two different nav indicators,
the #2 IFD will automatically switch into OBS mode
when #1 IFD Nav Source has been put into OBS
and the #2 nav indicator will flag invalid. This is
because the FMS stays sync’d between the two
IFDs. The #2 IFD will display the selected course
as set by the #1 nav indicator on the map page.
5-10
Navigation
VOR COURSE DEPICTION
When the Nav Source on the IFD is VLOC and the IFD is tuned to
a VOR station, the IFD will display the in-bound and out-bound
radials as dialed in by the OBS/Course knob on the external
indicator, if that external device is capable of transmitting course
(see the IFD product details page on
http://www.avidyne.com/products/ifd/vor-course-depictiondevices.html ). The radial lines will be displayed once the VOR
station is decoded and will be 50 nm long.
The line will be green for the in-bound course/radial to the VOR
when the aircraft position is on the near side of the perpendicular
course (“To” geometry) and the out-bound course/radial will be
white.
The line will be green for the out-bound course/radial to the VOR
when the aircraft position is on the far side of the perpendicular
course (“From” geometry) and the in-bound course/radial will be
white.
VOR Course Depiction
5-11
Navigation
ARMED VS ENGAGED/ACTIVE INDICATIONS
The active IFD nav mode is displayed to the left of the arrow in
green along the right edge of the top data strip. The armed IFD
nav mode, if there is one, is displayed to the right of the arrow in
blue along that same top strip. When there is an armed state, the
nav source is depicted per the image below.
Nav Source Mode Armed and Engaged Depiction
As the armed mode is captured, the previously active nav mode
lamp will extinguish and the previously armed state will turn green
and begin to flash. The flashing should last approximately 5
seconds and the nav mode will not actually change until the
flashing stops and the indication becomes a solid lamp.
To trigger the transition from armed VLOC to active VLOC, all of
the following capture criteria must be met:
5-12
•
The tuned frequency in the nav radio matches that
of the approach navaid;
•
The Morse code decoded by the tuned nav radio
matches the identifier of the approach navaid;
•
The aircraft track is within 15 degrees of the final
approach course;
•
The course to the active waypoint is within 45
degrees of the final approach course;
•
The radio deviations are at most 50% of full scale
for 5 consecutive seconds;
•
The active leg is part of the approach up to and
including the final approach fix.
Navigation
FMS HOOKS
There are shortcuts to accomplish typical FMS actions on the
FPL tab of the FMS page. The L4 LSK will present the most
appropriate selection from the table below based on the flight
state or scenario at the moment. Pressing the LSK or the soft key
label adjacent to the LSK will accomplish the action.
L4 LSK Label
Comments
Activate
Approach
Displayed if either the next downpath approach in the flight
plan is preceded by a discontinuity (gap in flight plan) and
the aircraft is within 40 nm of the FAF OR the next leg of
the flight plan is the first leg of a published approach and
there is a discontinuity or a Vectors-To-Final arrival
selected.
Retry
Approach
Displayed when the active leg of the flight plan is part of a
published missed approach and you were conducting a
Vectors-To-Final approach. Selecting this option will
activate the first leg of the VTF approach (i.e. the leg into
the FAF). This option will not be displayed if you were
conducting a full published approach.
Enable
/Activate
Missed
Displayed when the next leg of the flight plan is the first leg
of a published missed approach. Typically this occurs
immediately after the FAF. Pressing the LSK will activate
the published missed approach for that approach if it is in
the flight plan. Not pressing the button prior to reaching the
MAP results in guidance outbound from the MAP using the
same course as the final approach course. The message
automatically toggles to Activate Missed when crossing the
MAP.
Displayed when the active leg of the flight plan is a hold
and is not the last leg of the route. Pressing the LSK will
either command the FMS to continue the hold or exit it.
Continue/Exit
Hold
Skip Hold
Displayed when the aircraft is within 5 nm of the FAF and
the next leg is a database procedure hold. Pressing the
LSK will sequence the active leg past the hold without
entering it when the aircraft reaches the FAF. The leg after
the hold will become active.
Sequence
Leg
Displayed when there is no altitude source and the active
leg terminates at an altitude. Pressing the LSK upon
reaching the altitude is required to sequence to the next
leg.
5-13
Navigation
Enable A/P
Approach
Displayed for specific autopilots (e.g. KAP140, KFC225)
when the FMS determines it is time for the autopilot to be
in Approach mode but does not have any control or
knowledge of the actual autopilot state. This case is just a
prompt, and no pilot action must be taken on the IFD.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
FMS Philosophy
The FMS treats the flight plan as a continuous
sequence of legs, regardless of whether they are
part of a terminal area procedure or are in the
enroute structure. If you had chosen an IAF and the
last waypoint before the approach was the same as
the IAF, then the flight plan would naturally
sequence right into the approach with no further
pilot action required. If the last waypoint before the
approach were not the same as the IAF, then a
discontinuity would precede the approach. The
typical course of action, in that case, is to close the
gap and then, again, the flight plan would sequence
right onto the approach.
The operation with VTF is slightly different,
however. In that case, you really have no choice
but to intervene when it's time to start the approach.
There are several options, including activating the
leg to the FAF, direct-to the leg to the FAF, or the
convenient FMS hook L4 LSK that says "Activate
Approach". That FMS hook is just a shortcut for
activating the leg to the FAF.
5-14
Navigation
COURSE CHANGES AND HOLDS
If the course change at a waypoint is more than 120°, the IFD will
issue an alert approximately 30 seconds prior to the turn. For
course changes less than 120°, the alert will be issued
approximately 10 seconds prior to the turn.
For normal leg transitions, the alert text will be “Next Leg xxx° in x
seconds” where xxx is the course and x is the number of seconds
left until the turn. When the next leg is a hold, however, the alert
text shows the entry type. It will be “Teardrop Entry”, or “Parallel
Entry” or “Hold Course xxx°” where xxx is the inbound course of
the hold, representing a direct entry.
If the course change at a waypoint is greater than 135°, then the
FMS will treat the waypoint as a “fly-over” waypoint. If the course
change at a waypoint is less than or equal to 135°, then the FMS
will treat the waypoint as a “fly-by” waypoint meaning lead turns
beginning up to a maximum of 2.5nm can be expected.
AUTO VLOC TUNING
Auto-VLOC tuning is a user option which enables the automatic
tuning of the active nav frequency slot to follow the governing
navaid in the flight plan.
If the active leg is part of a VHF-based approach, the FMS will
auto-tune the navaid that defines the final approach.
If the active leg is not part of a VHF-based approach, and if the
active leg has a recommended navaid in the database, the FMS
will auto-tune that navaid. Otherwise, from the active leg, the
FMS will look backward through the route and forward through
the route for legs with a recommended navaid or that are defined
by a navaid, in which case, the FMS auto-tunes the one of those
two navaids that is closer to the aircraft.
5-15
Navigation
TRANSITION ALTITUDES/LEVELS
Advisory alerts can be optionally turned on via the FMS Setup
page. When set to On, an advisory CAS message will be
displayed as the transition altitude/level is being approached from
below or above.
If the origin airport has a published transition altitude in the nav
database, AND the transition altitude has not been manually set,
the system will automatically set the transition altitude.
If the destination airport has a published transition level in the
nav database, AND the transition level has not been manually
set, the system will automatically set the transition level.
The transition altitude can be manually set on the FMS Setup
page by twisting the inner ring of the bottom right knob or by
typing in a value in the virtual keyboard. Each click of the inner
ring adjusts the value by 100 feet and manual entries can be
made down to the foot. The allowable range is from 1,000 feet to
60,000 feet.
Simiarly, the transition level can be manually set on the FMS
Setup page by twisting the inner ring of the bottom right knob or
by typing in a value in the virtual keyboard. Each click of the
inner ring adjusts the value by one flight level (i.e. 100 feet). The
alloable range is from FL010 to FL600.
When the transition altitude/level has been automatically set by
the system, it is displayed in green. If the transition altitude/level
has been manually entered, it is displayed in white. When the
transition altitude/level has been manually set, pressing the bezel
“CLR” button will allow the value to be set by the system, turning
it from white to green.
5-16
Navigation
Transition Altitude and Level Setting
The advisory CAS message is displayed when the aircraft climbs
to an altitude 250 feet below the transition altitude. Once issued,
the alert will not be eligible to be issued again unless the aircraft
has descended more than 500 feet below the transition altitude.
Likewise, the advisory CAS message is displayed when the
aircraft descends to an altitude 250 feet above the transition level.
Once issued, the alert will not be eligible to be issued again
unless the aircraft has climbed more than 500 feet above the
transition level.
5-17
Navigation
NAVIGATION MODE/CDI SCALE CHANGING
Each navigation mode has an associated CDI scaling associated
with it per the table below:
Navigation Mode
CDI Full Scale Value
Enroute
2.0 NM (5.0 NM for non-WAAS)
Terminal
1.0 NM
Approach
0.3 NM or 2°, whichever is less
at the FAF
In order to prevent abrupt changes to CDI deflection (especially
important during autopilot-coupled operation), the mode changes
and CDI full scale deflection changes are gradual.
Automatic transitioning between the navigation modes occurs in
accordance with the following diagram:
5-18
Navigation
APPROACH PROCEDURES
Ensure the approach has been entered into the FMS flight plan,
and that it is currently active in the IFD.
Automatic mode switching to VLOC (e.g. GPS  VLOC
transition) including automatically setting the inbound course, will
occur if the capture criteria defined above are met and the
primary nav frequency can be auto-identified. If auto tuning has
not been enabled on the setup pages, or a station cannot be
identified, automatic mode switching will not occur.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Exception to Automatic Nav Mode Switching
If VLOC mode had been previously manually
selected to be the nav mode (e.g. cross-tuning a
VOR) and then an approach is activated in the flight
plan that would have normally resulted in a GPS 
VLOC nav mode indication, the nav mode will NOT
toggle to GPS  VLOC. Instead, it will stay at
VLOC since it is assumed the pilot intended to keep
using the previous function. Likewise, the
approach nav frequency will be inserted into the #1
standby nav frequency slot but not the active nav
frequency position. Both the nav mode transition
and the swapping of the nav frequencies will have to
be manually performed by the pilot.
With the proper inbound course set, including on localizer or ILS
approaches where the course pointer is just for reference, the
course and glide slope deviation data will be transmitted as
appropriate from the IFD for display on compatible cockpit thirdparty devices such as CDIs, HSIs, EFISs, etc. In the
ILS/Localizer case, the CDI deflection will be driven by the
localizer signal itself, regardless of the course setting.
An approach can be selected and flown as a full published
procedure or as a Vectors-to-Final – the choice is made on the
5-19
Navigation
Transitions dropdown menu in the FMS. When an approach is
selected from the FMS drop down list, the Transition dropdown
st
menu is presented. “Vectors” is the 1 choice in the list and if it is
selected, an “Activate Approach” button is presented in the LSK
L4 along the left side of the page. Until the “Activate Approach”
button is pressed, the FMS state right above the FMS leg into the
FAF displays “/ Vectors to Final – Inactive /”. As soon as the
Activate Approach button is pressed, the leg into FAF becomes
active (magenta) and the FMS state right above that leg displays
“/ Vectors to Final /”
NOTE
Displayed Inbound Course
Due to mathematical rounding, it is possible that
course being sent to an EFIS for digital display may
be 1 degree off from the published approach chart.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Discontinuities During Approaches
Before you insert an approach at an airport, the
FMS is being told to fly a leg directly to the airport
(i.e. the reference point) and the legs on the map
reflect that. However, when you insert an approach,
the FMS is being told to fly the legs of the approach
to the airport (actually to the runway) and not fly a
leg to the airport reference point. After the
approach has been entered, you'll notice a
"discontinuity" before the first leg of the approach.
A discontinuity is an indication that the FMS doesn't
know how to get from the leg before the
discontinuity to the leg after. In other words, there's
a gap in the flight plan.The gap can be closed via a
number of means to include using the L4 LSK hook,
activating a leg of the approach, or Direct-To the leg
to the FAF. Verify the system will do as you expect
by examining the depiction on the map.
5-20
Navigation
PRECISION APPROACHES
On ILS/LOC approaches (Vectors-to-Final transition or the full
published procedure), the IFD will automatically toggle the nav
mode to VLOC when the following conditions have been met for 5
consecutive seconds:
• The next leg or the active leg terminates at the FAF;
• The aircraft is on the front side of the approach;
• The aircraft course is within 15 degrees of the final
approach course;
• Cross track deviation is less than half a dot; and
• The correct station is tuned and identified.
Lateral and vertical deviation data will be transmitted by the IFD
for use by any integrated autopilot and external indicators.
Conversely, the IFD will toggle the nav source from VLOC back to
GPS when going missed at the Missed Approach Point.
Precision WAAS approaches are flown with the nav source knob
set to GPS (which will automatically change to the GPS approach
type).
5-21
Navigation
NON-PRECISION APPROACHES
As with the case in precision approaches, as long as the
published approach is entered into the FMS as part of the active
flight plan, the inbound course and all switching between GPS
and VLOC (if appropriate) is done automatically.
DME arc legs and approaches are supported by the system.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
CDI Deflection During VOR Approaches
When VOR and GPS inbound courses are not coaligned, a large CDI deflection may occur when the
Nav Source transitions from GPS to VLOC.
BACK COURSE APPROACHES
This system is designed to fully support flying back course
localizer approaches.
If the published back course approach is entered into the FMS,
the IFD nav source will automatically toggle from “GPS  VLOC”
to “VLOC” when all transition criteria have been met outside the
FAF and it will automatically tune the localizer frequency into the
active nav channel. The Nav Mode datablock should display the
localizer ID, landing airfield ID and the front course runway ID.
When integrated with an EFIS (e.g. Avidyne PFD, Aspen PFD,
etc), the front course may need to be manually entered and then
“Back Course” should be displayed on the EFIS.
PROCEDURE TURNS AND HOLDS IN LIEU OF PROCEDURE
TURNS
Both of these maneuvers, when part of a published procedure,
appear as normal legs in the flight plan and therefore have no
special or different procedures – just fly them as part of the flight
plan.
5-22
Navigation
WAAS APPROACHES
LPV (RNAV) approaches are the preferred approach for the IFD,
if available. The IFD is configured at the time of installation for
whether it is a WAAS-capable unit or a non-WAAS-capable unit.
If non-WAAS, the following procedures do not apply.
When GPS has been selected as the nav source, and one of the
RNAV/GPS approach types with vertical guidance (LPV, L/VNAV,
LNAV+V, LP+V) is selected in the FMS, the IFD will transmit
horizontal and vertical deviation for use by any integrated external
display device.
There are several types of WAAS approaches. The FMS will
automatically select the best available approach based on current
GPS integrity and will indicate the selection in the Nav Mode
datablock field.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Nav Mode Datablock
The Nav Mode datablock as defined in the
Datablock definitions table in Section 4 of this
manual will indicate the current navigation mode
(e.g. OCN, ENRT, TERM, APPR, LPV,
LNAV/VNAV, LNAV+V, LNAV, etc). It is a default
datablock and is an excellent means to know GPS
integrity and mode.
The pilot must monitor the IFD throughout the approach and use
charted minimums appropriate to the approach type. If an
approach type is not indicated by the time the final approach fix
(FAF) is reached, do not descend – the conditions required to fly
the approach have not been met and you must fly the missed
approach procedure.
5-23
Navigation
WAAS approach types in the Nav Mode datablock and the nav
source indication in the top right corner of the display include:
LNAV (Lateral Navigation)
Provides lateral (horizontal) guidance only, with standard GPS
precision of 0.3 NM full-scale deflection. This is essentially the
same as a non-WAAS GPS approach. It is flown as any other
non-precision approach – observing step down restrictions,
descend to MDA, fly at MDA altitude to the MAP; and execute the
missed approach procedure if appropriate. Since there is no
vertical guidance associated with this type of approach, the IFD
will not transmit any vertical deviation information. The Nav Mode
datablock will display “LNAV” for the approach type.
LNAV + V (Lateral Navigation with Vertical Information)
This mode provides the same lateral navigation as LNAV, but
also typically presents an ILS GS-like presentation on the
external deviation indicator. The GPS draws a 3-D picture of the
approach based on crossing the FAF at the depicted altitude.
Then it follows a glidepath from the published approach, which is
typically a 3 degree angle to the touchdown zone. This type of
approach remains a non-precision approach and does not
consider any step-down limitations. The Nav Mode datablock will
display “LNAV+V” for the approach type.
LNAV/VNAV (Lateral Navigation with Vertical Navigation)
In this mode, the GPS provides lateral navigation, providing more
accurate guidance than regular LNAV but easier to follow
indications than a localizer. The vertical navigation is driven by
GPS signals. LNAV/VNAV approaches are operationally different
from LNAV+V in that the glide path is protected from obstructions
but attention still must be applied to step down fixes. Also, the
minimum altitude presented is a decision altitude/height (DA/DH)
– DA being what is on the altimeter, and DH being the height of
the DA above the touchdown zone elevation. This is not a MDA,
thus, fly it just as though it were an ILS approach: follow the glide
slope all the way to the DA before initiating a missed approach, if
appropriate. The Nav Mode datablock will display “LNAV/VNAV”
5-24
Navigation
for the approach type.
LPV (Localizer Precision with Vertical Guidance)
The lateral guidance is significantly more precise than LNAV, and
equivalent to that of a localizer. Vertical guidance is provided to
minimums as low as 200’ AGL above the touchdown zone.
Lateral tolerance starts out at 0.3 NM full-scale (slightly tighter
than a localizer at the FAF), transitioning to 350 feet either side at
the runway threshold. The steering remains linear all the way
without the difficult to follow swings of a VHF localizer. The
vertical guidance is precise and has a DA/DH (shown as “DA(H)”
on approach charts) rather than a MDA. The Nav Mode datablock
will display “LPV” for the approach type.
LP (Localizer Performance)
These approaches have localizer performance but no vertical
guidance associated with them. Use the published “LP”
minimums. The Nav Mode datablock will display “LP” for the
approach type.
LP+V (Localizer Performance with Advisory Vertical Guidance)
This mode provides the same lateral navigation as LP, but also
presents an advisory glideslope deviation for display on the
external deviation indicator. The GPS draws a 3-D picture of the
approach based on crossing the FAF at the depicted altitude,
which is typically a 3 degree angle to the touchdown zone. This
type of approach remains a non-precision approach and does not
consider any step-down limitations. Use the published “LP”
minimums. The Nav Mode datablock will display “LP+V” for the
approach type.
5-25
Navigation
COOL FEATURE
FPL L4 LSK Think of the L4 LSK on the IFD as your
“hook” into the FMS. The button changes
functionality based on the phase of flight or
instrument procedure you are on. This is described
in more detail in the FMS Hooks subsection of the
Navigation section of this manual.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
VTF Transitions
VTF transitions in the IFD provide guidance to the
extended centerline of the selected runway.
When assigned a VTF clearance on a SBAS
approach (WAAS- or EGNOS-based LPV, LP and
LNAV/VNAV) with an offset leg into the Final
Approach Fix (FAF) where the leg to the FAF is not
aligned with the final approach course (i.e. an
angled entry to the FAF), the pilot should ask the
ATC controller to clarify if those vectors are to
extended final or the published offset inbound leg to
the FAF.
In the case where ATC responds with the extended
final scenario, Avidyne recommends the pilot select
the “VTF” transition option in the FMS approach
dropdown list. In the case where ATC responds
with the published offset leg scenario, Avidyne
recommends the pilot activate the inbound leg to the
FAF from the FMS FPL tab to ensure the offset leg
is accounted for.
5-26
Navigation
MISSED APPROACH
The simplest and safest way to properly fly a published missed
approach is to ensure it is part of the active flight plan. It can be
activated anytime inside the FAF by pressing the L4 LSK on IFD
FPL tab that is labeled “Enable Missed”. This label changes to
“Activate Missed” when crossing the Missed Approach Point
(MAP) if it hadn’t been pressed prior to the MAP.
Alternatively, the system can be configured to automatically
enable the published missed approach for an active procedure by
selecting the Auto Enable Missed selection in the User Options
page. When this is selected, the system will automatically
sequence to the published missed approach when crossing the
MAP.
The following sequence of images show the map depiction of the
published missed approach procedure before it has been
enabled, followed by an image showing the “Enable Missed” LSK
on the FPL tab, and then finally the map depiction of the now
enabled published missed approach procedure.
Depiction of Published Missed Approach Procedure
5-27
Navigation
Enable Missed LSK
Flight Plan Depiction of an Enabled Missed Approach
Enabled Published Missed Approach Procedure
5-28
Navigation
Prior to going missed approach, apply go-around power, ensure
the aircraft is trimmed for the power setting, establish a climb
attitude and consider using the autopilot to smoothly execute the
assigned climb-out or published missed approach procedures.
The Nav Source will automatically toggle back to “GPS” shortly
after crossing the MAP, if it weren’t already set to “GPS” unless
you had manually switched the Nav Source to “VLOC” prior to
being established on final with the localizer tuned and identified –
in that case, it will stay in “VLOC” until you manually change it.
RETRY APPROACH
If you had been flying a Vectors-To-Final (VTF) approach, and
the active leg of the flight plan is part of a published missed
approach, the L2 LSK displays “Retry Approach”. Pressing the
L2 LSK will put the same VTF approach in the FMS flight plan
with the inbound leg to the FAF active.
NOTE
Activating Missed Approach Past MAP
If the missed approach was activated after the
Missed Approach Point (MAP), the first non-altitude
terminated leg of the published missed approach
procedure will become the active leg, regardless of
where the airplane is geographically.
NOTE
Autopilot Integration
Autopilot integration and capability can vary widely.
Avidyne strongly recommends flying practice
approaches in VMC conditions to understand the
level of integration between the IFD and the
autopilot before any flight in IMC conditions. For
example, many roll-steering capable autopilots will
terminate the roll steering capability when approach
5-29
Navigation
mode is selected on the autopilot. As another
example, some autopilots such as the KAP-140 and
the KFC 225 do not support automatic switching to
VLOC; switching the nav mode and entering the inbound course must be manual operations with those
autopilots.
In the case of KFC-225 and KAP-140 autopilots,
depending on how the IFD was configured, a
prompt is provided when GPS is the nav source to
enable the approach (“Enable A/P Approach” CAS
message displayed which directs a pilot selection
along the left side of the FPL tab). At that point,
APPR mode can then be selected on the autopilot.
This setting will also ignore the GPS  VLOC
Capture option on the User Options part of the
Setup tab on the AUX page.
RNP/RNAV OPERATIONS
The IFD540 complies with the equipment requirements of AC 90105 and meets the equipment performance and functional
requirements to conduct RNP terminal departure and arrival
procedures and RNP approach procedures without RF (radius to
fix) legs. Part 91 subpart K, 121, 125, 129, and 135 operators
require operational approval.
The IFD540 installed with an SBAS approved antenna, provides
pilot and automatic flight control guidance for the following
operations conducted under instrument flight rules (IFR):
•
•
5-30
VOR, LOC, ILS instrument approach procedures
(procedures using VHF radio guidance)
RNP instrument approach procedures using the
following lines of minima:
o LNAV minima (including when using advisory
vertical guidance from the system);
o LNAV/VNAV minima;
o LPV minima; and
o LP minima.
Navigation
The IFD540 when installed with a non-SBAS antenna, provides
pilot and automatic flight control guidance for the following
operations conducted under instrument flight rules (IFR):
•
•
VOR, LOC, ILS procedures (procedures using VHF radio
guidance);
RNP instrument approach procedures using LNAV lines
of minima only.
The IFD540 complies with requirements of AC 90-100A for
RNAV1 and RNAV2 operations. In accordance with AC 90-100A,
Part 91 (except subpart K) are authorized to fly RNAV1 and
RNAV2 procedures.
The IFD540 complies with the requirements for GPS Class II
oceanic and remote navigation (RNP-10) and (RNP-4) without
time limitations. A second navigation source may be required for
these operations to meet availability requirements.
5-31
Navigation
RECOMMENDED ICAO EQUIPMENT CODES
Avidyne recommends the following set of ICAO codes when filing
for aircraft equipped with at least one IFD:
B – LPV
G - GPS
R – PBN Approved
S – VHF, VOR, ILS
Y – VHF w/8.33 kHz spacing
With a PBN string of:
A1 – RNP10 (Oceanic) (may require a LOA)
B2 – RNAV-5 (Enroute)
C2 – RNAV-2 (RNAV Q-Routes and T-Routes over land)
D2 – RNAV-1 (Terminal)
L1 – RNP4 (Oceanic) (may require a LOA)
O2 – RNP1 (Terminal)
S1 – RNP APCH (RNAV and/or GPS Approaches without RF
legs)
And if combined with an AXP340 or AXP322 transponder, the
surveillance codes are:
E – Mode S, including aircraft ID, pressure altitude, extended
squitter
B1 – ADS-B with dedicated 1090 MHz ADS-B Out capability
And if a MLB100 or SkyTrax100 receiver is installed,
U2 – 978 (UAT) In receiver
5-32
Navigation
6
General
CAUTION ADVISORY SYSTEM (CAS) / ALERTS
See the individual aircraft Pilot Operating Handbook (POH)
Supplement for any limitations with respect to IFD operations.
A caution-warning alerting system (CAS) has been included in
this system. There are three levels of message alerting:
•
Warnings
performed
•
Cautions – Immediate attention should be applied
•
Advisories – A change in system state that you
should be aware of
–
Immediate
action
should
be
MASTER CAUTION LAMPS
A “Master Caution” system has been created where any active
Warnings will trigger a red “AUX” lamp along the bottom edge of
the bezel and any active Cautions will trigger an amber (yellow)
“AUX” lamp along the bottom edge of the bezel. Likewise, any
active Advisories will trigger a cyan (blue) “AUX” lamp along the
bottom edge of the bezel. Each time a new Warning or Caution or
Advisory condition exists, the AUX lamp will flash the appropriate
color until either it is acknowledged by the pilot or the condition
goes away. The AUX lamp will stay lit with the color that
represents the highest level of alert for Warnings and Cautions. If
the AUX page is already the current page, then the AUX lamp
stays green and the ALERT tab will follow the coloring behavior
just described. Note that if there is an active alert in the system
and a new one of a lower color priority level also becomes active,
the AUX/ALERT tab color will not change (e.g. a new cyan
advisory will not cause the tab color to change from yellow to
cyan).
For those aircraft that have a remote annunciator panel installed,
the IFD will trigger a “MSG” lamp or its equivalent on the remote
annunciator unit for each new CAS alert.
In all cases, basic airmanship should be exercised and
fundamentals utilized such as maintain aircraft control, analyze
the situation, and take proper action.
6-1
General
WARNING-CAUTION-ADVISORY MESSAGE BAR
A message bar is provided on every IFD to alert the pilot to what
the CAS message is/are. Advisories are displayed on a cyan
(blue) background in the lower right corner of each IFD. Warnings
are displayed on red background in the lower right corner of each
IFD. Likewise, Cautions are displayed on an amber background
in the lower right corner of each IFD. Red warnings will always
display on top of amber cautions and amber cautions will always
display on top of cyan advisories.
Warning Message
Pressing the “CLR” bezel key or touching the message bar on the
display will acknowledge the message but will not do anything
else.
After all active messages have been acknowledged, a reminder in
the form of the colored “AUX” lamp is left lit.
In dual IFD installations, there is a concept of global vs. local CAS
messages. Global messages stay synched across all IFDs and
will be displayed on all IFDs and can be acknowledged on any
IFD to dismiss the message on all IFDs. Local messages only
apply to the IFD on which it is displayed and can only be
acknowledged on the individual IFD. The table of system CAS
messages that appears later in this section indicates global
messages via an asterisk.
6-2
General
ALERTS TAB
The ALERTS tab keeps a running tally of all active alerts,
grouping them by level. This tab can also be manually selected at
any time via the page and tab structure along the bottom edge of
each IFD.
Systems Alerts Tab
Entries in the tables below that are global alerts in dual IFD
installations are indicated by an asterisk in the Short Text column.
Entries in the tables below that are deleted on acknowledgement
are indicated by a “Ψ“ symbol in the Short Text column.
6-3
General
EXCEEDANCES | WARNINGS RED
Short Text
Long Text
Comments
Terrain Pull-Up*
Terrain Pull-Up
The FLTA algorithm has
detected an imminent
ground collision - Initiate an
immediate recovery
maneuver.
Warning Obstacle*
Warning Obstacle
The FLTA algorithm has
detected an imminent
obstacle collision - Initiate
an immediate recovery
maneuver.
Unit Overtemp –
Unit Unreliable
Unit Overtemp: <internal
component name> Unit reliability
in question – Get IFD serviced
One or more of the internal
components has exceeded
its maximum design
temperature and reliability
cannot be ensured until the
unit is tested by the Avidyne
Service Center. Contact
the Avidyne Service Center
or a local dealer for service.
This message will be
present on every
subsequent power cycle
until reset by the Avidyne
Service Center.
Low Volts – off in
<countdown from
60> sec
Low Volts – IFD powers down in
<countdown from 60> sec
Main supply voltage has
fallen below 9 VDC.
Contact a local dealer for
service.
Pull Up
Excessive Descent Rate
The TAWS Excessive
Descent Rate algorithm has
detected a CFIT potential –
initiate an immediate
recovery maneuver.
6-4
General
EXCEEDANCES | CAUTIONS YELLOW
Short Text
Long Text
Comments
Caution Terrain*
Caution Terrain
The FLTA algorithm is
predicting a likely ground
collision within
approximately 60 seconds
– initiate a proper
recovery maneuver.
Caution Obstacle*
Caution Obstacle
The FLTA algorithm is
predicting a likely obstacle
collision with
approximately 60 seconds
– initiate a proper
recovery maneuver.
GPS Integrity Lost
GPS Integrity Lost – Crosscheck
Nav
This is alerting about
imminent exceedence of
horizontal fault detection
limits or protection levels.
Crosscheck the nav
solution and determine the
best course of action but if
on an approach, a Missed
Approach is
recommended.
GPS Fault Dead
Reckoning
Position updated via dead
reckoning
The system will use the
last known position and
groundspeed (and
heading if available) to
estimate the aircraft
position following loss of
GPS for up to 5 minutes.
Since Dead Reckoning
assumes no directional or
groundspeed change, it
will not be reliable even
during those first 5
minutes if either or both of
these factors have
changed.
6-5
General
Short Text
Long Text
Comments
GPS Fault No
Position
No position available
The navigation solution
cannot compute a
position, typically after
dead reckoning has
expired. Transition to
alternative navigation
sources.
Configuration Error
Configuration Error – IFD
Requires Service
The configuration of the
IFD or the devices to
which it is communicating
with has changed or
experienced an error.
Contact the Avidyne
Service Center or a local
dealer for service.
LPV Unavailable Use
L/VNAV DA
GPS integrity is insufficient for
LPV Approach
Transition to a non-LPV
approach and the
appropriate minima.
LPV Unavailable Use
LNAV MDA
GPS integrity is insufficient for
LPV Approach
Transition to a non-LPV
approach and the
appropriate minima.
LP Unavailable Use
LNAV MDA
GPS integrity is insufficient for
LP Approach
Transition to a non-LP
approach and the
appropriate minima.
L/VNAV Unavail. Use
LNAV MDA
GPS integrity is insufficient for
L/VNAV Approach
Transition to a nonL/VNAV approach and the
appropriate minima.
VNAV Lost Use
LNAV MDA
Excessive XTK or Low GPS
Integrity for Vertical Guidance
Transition to LNAV
minima.
6-6
General
Short Text
Long Text
Comments
Check Altitude Too
Low
Aircraft is below the glide slope
altitude at FAF
Correct aircraft altitude as
required to safely conduct
the approach or initiate a
climb to a published safe
altitude and abort the
approach.
Traffic Sensor Fault*
No communication with traffic
sensor (local) OR
Traffic sensor has failed (global)
Contact a local dealer for
service.
Traffic <Low | High>
<Bearing in clock
direction> <Distance
in NM>*
Traffic [Brg (e.g. 1:00)] [dist (e.g.
2 NM)] [alt (e.g. 200 ft)]
Traffic advisories –
establish visual contact
with conflicting traffic in
order to facilitate
avoidance maneuvers as
necessary.
Traffic <Low | High>
<Distance in NM>*
Traffic <Distance in NM>
<Signed relative altitude in feet>
FT
Traffic advisories with no
bearing information –
establish visual contact
with conflicting traffic in
order to facilitate
avoidance maneuvers as
necessary.
Traffic <Bearing in
clock direction>
<distance in NM>*
Traffic <bearing in clock
direction> <distance in NM>
Traffic advisories with no
relative altitude
information establish
visual contact with
conflicting traffic in order
to facilitate avoidance
maneuvers as necessary.
Traffic <distance in
NM>*
Traffic <distance in NM>
Traffic advisories with no
relative altitude
information and no
bearing – establish visual
contact with conflicting
traffic in order to facilitate
avoidance maneuvers as
necessary.
6-7
General
Short Text
Long Text
Comments
COM TX Fault
Transmitter Fault, No TX Ability
Transition to a backup
VHF com radio (if
available) or initiate lost
communication
procedures. Contact the
Avidyne Service Center or
a dealer for service.
COM Stuck TX
Stuck Mic Timeout, Transmitter
Disabled
Requires 35 seconds of
continuous transmission.
Verify the PTT is stuck
and contact a dealer for
service as required.
No Comm with VHF
No communication with the VHF
radio
Transition to a backup
VHF com radio (if
available) or initiate lost
communication
procedures. Contact the
Avidyne Service Center or
a dealer for service.
Unit Overtemp –
Check cooling
Unit Overtemp: <internal
component identification>
One or more of the
internal components has
exceeded 80°C. Contact
the Avidyne Service
Center or a dealer for
service – consider adding
a source of cooling and/or
improving air flow
in/around the IFD.
Low Volts
Backlight reduced to 25%
Main supply voltage has
fallen to approximately
11VDC.
Check the aircraft
alternators are on and
functional.
Consider load shedding
the power bus that is
powering the IFD.
6-8
General
Short Text
Long Text
Comments
Manual Sequence
Req’d
Altitude invalid – leg will not auto
sequence
In basic E-M aircraft
where the IFD does not
have altitude input, this
message will appear when
the FMS active leg is a
HeadingAltitude leg. In
this case, the FMS flight
plan will need to be
manually sequenced to
the next leg. Failure to do
so will keep the FMS
flying the heading
indefinitely.
No ADS-B Position
AXP322 Lost GPS Position Data
ADS-B position data had
previously been valid and
then transitions to invalid.
Check the ADS-B position
source device.
Xpndr Fault
AXP322 Transponder Fault
Any fault other than loss
of ADS-B GPS position.
Contact the Avidyne
Service Center if this
persists across power
cycles.
No Comm With Xpdr
No Communication with Remote
Transponder
No data has been
received from the remote
transponder for greater
than 2 seconds. Contact
the Avidyne Service
Center if this persists
across power cycles.
Radar: Echos Ahead
Radar: Heavy Echos Ahead
Radar: Target Alert
Radar: Target Alert Detected
Generated when a
number of red and/or
magenta echos are
present within the area
±22° off the nose of the
aircraft at the current
displayed radar range.
Alerts the pilot to the
presence of a significant
weather cell that exists
beyond the currently
selected display range.
6-9
General
Short Text
Long Text
Comments
Radar Sensor Fault
No Communication with Radar
Sensor, or;
No data is received from
the sensor for at least 2
seconds, or;
The data stream from the
radar contains information
that the data stream
should not be used, or;
If the requested mode and
the reported mode do not
match, or;
Any specific fault code is
active from the sensor.
TIS traffic communications
have ceased for >12
seconds
No TIS ground station is
available or
communications have
ceased for >60 seconds
TAWS PDA algorithm has
determined the aircraft is
below glide path.
TAWS EDR algorithm has
determined a potential
CFIT scenario is
developing – recover the
aircraft
TAWS NCR algorithm
has determined corrective
action should be t aken
immediately.
The GPS solution is lost
or the GPS velocity quality
parameters drop below
required accuracy limits. A
“bing-bong” chime is
played if this condition
occurs. Contact the
Avidyne Service Center if
this persists across power
cycles.
TAWS failed self-test for
the reason provided and
TAWS will be degraded or
not available for the power
cycle. Contact the
Avidyne Service Center if
this persists across power
cycles.
Radar Data is Invalid, or;
Sensor mode is [selected]
Selected mode is [reported], or;
Radar fault code: any active
fault codes.
TIS Removed
TIS Traffic Removed
TIS Unavailable
TIS Traffic Unavailable
Too Low, Terrain
Premature Descent, below glide
path
Sink Rate
Excessive Descent Rate
Don’t Sink
Negative climb rate or altitude
loss
TAWS Fail
Invalid GPS Positon/Velocity
TAWS System
Failure
TAWS Failed Self-Test [reason
why]
6-10
General
EXCEEDANCES | ADVISORIES CYAN
Short Text
Long Text
Comments
Switch Tanks* Ψ
Switch Tanks
The time between the
advisory is set on the
User Options page.
Datalink Receiver
Fault*
Broadcast Datalink receiver failure
Weather Datalink will be
unavailable.
Datalink [Product
Name] Stale*
Broadcast [Product Name] age is
greater than [x] minutes
“Stale” periods vary
with weather product.
See the IFD product
page on
www.avidyne.com for
detailed Datalink
product information.
Datalink Data Not
Recvd*
No: [Product Names]
Timeout periods vary
with weather product.
See the IFD product
page on
www.avidyne.com for
detailed Datalink
product information.
TFR Ahead*
TFR Ahead
When enabled on the
FMS setup page and
the aircraft current
position, altitude,
ground speed, ground
track and vertical speed
will intercept a TFR
within 5 minutes (+/- 30
seconds).
Set course to xxx°
Selected course / DTK mismatch
Displayed when the
selected course on the
external course pointer
is more than 10 degrees
off of desired track and
the aircraft course is
within 3 degrees of
desired track. Adjust
the course knob as
directed. Only displayed
in GPS mode.
6-11
General
Short Text
Long Text
Comments
Route Not Loaded Ψ
Route Not Loaded
Displayed when the
selected route could not
be loaded because it is
corrupted or there is an
internal error. If the
problem persists across
a power cycle of the
IFD, contact the
Avidyne Service Center
for service.
Route Not Stored Ψ
Route Not Stored
Displayed if the route
cannot be internally
stored due to an internal
error. If the problem
persists across a power
cycle of the IFD, contact
the Avidyne Service
Center for service.
Intercept Too Sharp*
Must Intercept Within 45° of Final
Approach Course
Displayed when a
Direct-To is initiated to
the FAF and the
resulting intercept angle
at the FAF is greater
than 45 degrees.
Gap in Route
Ahead*Ψ
Gap in Route Ahead
Displayed when the
ETA to a flight plan
discontinuity is 3
minutes.
Lateral Offset End
Ahead* Ψ
Approaching End of Flight Plan
Lateral Offset
Displayed when the
ETA to the end of a
lateral offset is 60
seconds.
Exiting Hold At Fix*Ψ
Exiting Hold At Fix
Displayed when the
hold is armed for exit
and hold is set to
sequence at the hold
fix.
Exiting Hold At
Intercept* Ψ
Exiting Hold At Intercept
Displayed when an
active HF leg (an
automatically
terminating hold at the
first pass of the hold fix)
is armed for exit and set
to sequence at the
completion of the
inbound turn.
6-12
General
Short Text
Long Text
Comments
Next Leg [Leg
Course] In <xx> s* Ψ
Next Leg [Leg Course]
Displayed when there is
10 +/- 1 seconds until
the start of a turn up to
120 degrees OR 30 +/seconds until the start
of a turn of more than
120 degrees.
Begin Descent in
[Time to Top of
descent in seconds]
seconds*
Approaching Top Of Descent
Displayed when there is
10 +/- 1 seconds until
the crossing of the top
of descent point. This
message is
accompanied by an
aural TOD chime.
Begin Descent Now*
Sequenced Top of Descent
Displayed when the
time to reach the top of
descent point is zero.
Check Navaid
Identifier
Decoded navaid Identifier did not
match approach navaid
Displayed when the
active approach is
based on a localizer or
a VOR and that
approach is not
authorized for GPS
overlay, the aircraft
course is within 45
degrees of the final
approach course, the
course to the active
waypoint is within 45
degrees of the final
approach course, the
distance to the final
approach fix (FAF) from
the current position is
less than 4 NM, the
frequency tuned by the
nav radio matches the
frequency of the
approach navaid and
the identifier decoded
by the nav radio does
not match the identifier
of the approach navaid.
This can also be
triggered if the
frequency currently in
the active nav
frequency slot does
NOT match the
expected frequency
from the flight plan.
6-13
General
Short Text
Long Text
Comments
Lightning Sensor
Error*
Lightning sensor recoverable fault:
[fault codes]
An internal warning
condition within the
lightning sensor has
occurred and it may
clear itself or clear after
a power cycle of the
lightning sensor.
Lightning Sensor
Fault*
No communication with lightning
sensor (local) OR
Lightning sensor fatal fault: [fault
codes]. Try cycling lightning sensor
power (global) OR
No lightning sensor data: [Heading
fault | GPS fault] (global)
Recommend cycling
power to the lightning
sensor. If the problem
persists, contact a local
dealer for service.
Lightning Sensor
Fault*
No communication with lightning
sensor (local) OR
No lightning sensor data: [Horz
antenna | Vert antenna | Sense
antenna | Sensor fault | Stuck mic |
Antenna config | Heading Fault |
GPS Fault] (global) OR
Lightning sensor recoverable fault:
[codes] (global)
If the problem persists,
contact a local dealer
for service.
Traffic Sensor
Fault*Ψ
Traffic sensor failed to start self test
OR
Traffic sensor altitude unavailable
If the problem persists,
contact a local dealer
for service.
COM Stuck Mic
Stuck mic timeout, Release PTT
Displayed after
approximately 25
seconds of continuous
transmission.
<Application>
Function Lost
<Application> function is not
responding
Displayed if an
application (e.g.
Datalink, lightning
sensor, traffic, etc)
monitored by the IFD
stops reporting a status
message. If the
problem persists,
contact a local dealer
for service.
6-14
General
Short Text
Long Text
Comments
CrossSync Fault Ψ
Attempting to re-establish
CrossSync
Displayed when dual
IFDs have been
installed and
configured to share data
between the units but
there is no
communication between
the IFDs, or one IFD is
turned off. Contact the
Avidyne Service Center
or a local dealer for
service.
Timer Expired Ψ
Timer Expired
Displayed when the
generic countdown
timer has expired.
<Title of Expired
Timer> Ψ
<Title of Expired Timer> Expired
Displayed when one of
the custom
scheduler/timers has
expired. The message
will persist until the
scheduler/timer has
been manually reset.
IFD Fan Failure
IFD Requires Service
Contact a local dealer
for service.
Config Modified
Configuration modified, please
restart IFD when possible
Displayed when
CrossSync is enabled in
dual IFD installations
and a configuration with
external devices has
changed on one of the
IFDs since the last
power cycle. This
prompts a restart to
allow automatic
reconfiguration of the
IFDs so that sensor
information can be
shared.
Class [A | B | C | D]
Ahead*
[Airspace name][Lower Altitude
Limit] - [Upper Altitude Limit] FT
When enabled on the
FMS Setup page and
the aircraft current
position, altitude,
ground speed, ground
track and vertical speed
will intercept a
controlled airspace
within 5 minutes (+/- 30
seconds).
6-15
General
Short Text
Long Text
Comments
Controlled Airspace
Ahead*
[Airspace name][Lower Altitude
Limit] - [Upper Altitude Limit] FT
When enabled on the
FMS Setup page and
the aircraft current
position, altitude,
ground speed, ground
track and vertical speed
will intercept a
controlled airspace
within 5 minutes (+/- 30
seconds).
[Prohibited |
Restricted | Warning |
Alert | Caution |
Danger] Area Ahead*
[Airspace name][Lower Altitude
Limit] - [Upper Altitude Limit] FT
When enabled on the
FMS Setup page and
the aircraft current
position, altitude,
ground speed, ground
track and vertical speed
will intercept the listed
airspace within 5
minutes (+/- 30
seconds).
[MOA | ADIZ] Ahead*
[Airspace name][Lower Altitude
Limit] - [Upper Altitude Limit] FT
When enabled on the
FMS Setup page and
the aircraft current
position, altitude,
ground speed, ground
track and vertical speed
will intercept the
identified airspace
within 5 minutes (+/- 30
seconds).
Nav Database Invalid
An Error Occurred While Loading
the Nav Database
Consider cycling power
to the IFD and if the
problem persists,
contact the Avidyne
Service Center or a
local dealer for service.
New TFR Data
Ignored*
Datalink TFRs reception failure
This is displayed when
the number of TFR
records exceeds 105.
The most likely potential
for this to occur is
during an excessively
active fire season in the
mountain west of North
America. Refer to nondatalink sources for
TFR data.
6-16
General
Short Text
Long Text
Comments
Service Required Ψ
IFD On-board battery requires
replacement
There is an on-board
battery used for
maintaining system time
during power-off periods
that is designed to last
up to 10 years. When
this message is
displayed, the battery is
no longer maintaining
system time and that
will result in degraded
IFD performance such
as Datalink and GPS
acquisition. Contact the
Avidyne Service Center
for service.
Checklist Error Ψ
IFD Requires Service
Contact an Avidyne
Service Center for
service.
Lightning Sensor
Config Ψ
Lightning sensor antenna config set
to: <Bottom or Top>
This message is
principally for installers
and is only present on
the first power cycle
after configuring the IFD
for a WX500.
GAD 42 Needs
Service
GAD 42 Needs Service
Contact an Avidyne
Service Center for
service.
429 Data Not Rcvd
No 429 from input: < port numbers
as displayed in Mx Mode separated
by commas >
Contact an Avidyne
Service Center for
service.
Enable A/P APR
Use the bottom LSK on the FPL tab
before A/P APR
For some autopilots,
this is the prompt to the
pilot to select Approach
mode on the autopilot –
in these cases, the IFD
cannot control, nor has
knowledge of the
autopilot mode.
Hold Course xxx° Ψ
Hold Course xxx°
Displayed when the
next leg is a hold and
the entry is direct. It
appears 10 seconds
prior to reaching the
hold fix where xxx = the
hold course.
6-17
General
Short Text
Long Text
Comments
Teardrop Entry
Teardrop Entry
Displayed when the
next leg is a hold and
the entry is a teardrop.
It appears 30 seconds
prior to reaching the
hold fix.
Parallel Entry
Parallel Entry
Displayed when the
next leg is a hold and
the entry is a parallel. It
appears 30 seconds
prior to reaching the
hold fix.
FLTA Inhibited Ψ
FLTA Inhibited
Aircraft is currently in, or
projected flight path
takes the aircraft in to
an airport-induced FLTA
inhibit area.
FLTA Off Ψ
FLTA Off
FLTA has been turned
off via the User Options
page or via external
TERR INHB discrete
input.
Check Init Fuel Ψ
Fuel Used reset. Check initial fuel
setting
Fuel used reset has
been detected from the
fuel sensor and the pilot
has not set initial fuel at
startup.
Route Upload Ready
A route has been received
Displayed for 5 seconds
after a new flight
plan/route has been
received from an
external (e.g. WiFi)
source.
Waypoint Upload
Ready
A user waypoint has been received
Displayed for 5 seconds
after a new user
waypoint has been
received from an
external (e.g. WiFi)
source.
Waypoint Upload
Rejected
Waypoint Upload Rejected
Displayed for 5 seconds
after receiving a user
waypoint from an
external source but the
waypoint was rejected
as not valid (e.g.
waypoint not in IFD
database, coordinates
do not match database
coordinates, etc)
6-18
General
Short Text
Long Text
Comments
Trans Alt xxxFT
Trans Alt xxxFT
Presented when
climbing through 250
feet below the transition
altitude as defined in
the FMS Setup page.
Times out after 5
seconds and will not be
enabled for display
again until the aircraft
has descended more
than 500 feet below the
transition altitude.
Trans Level FLxxx
Trans Level FLxxx
Presented when
descending through 250
feet above the transition
leve as defined in the
FMS Setup pagel.
Times out after 5
seconds and will not be
enabled for display
again until the aircraft
has climbed more than
500 feet above the
transition altitude.
TIS Coasting
TIS Traffic Coasting
TIS traffic
communications have
ceased for >6 seconds
but <12 seconds
Unsupported
Bluetooth Input
Unsupported Bluetooth Input <Unsupported button or function
identified here>
Displayed for 5 seconds
after an external
Bluetooth keyboard
input was made that is
not functional with the
type of IFD being used.
Radar Sensor Fault
Radar Sensor Fault Code: (any
active fault code reported by radar
sensor)
Any one of a number of
self-reported radar
sensor fault codes.
ADS-R/TIS-B
Unavailable
Traffic Information Incomplete
Displayed when either
not in view of an ADS-B
ground station for at
least 40 seconds, OR,
an ADS-B ground
station is in view and is
specifically reporting
that your ADS-B Out
signal is non-compliant.
The advisory may be
normal when
descending out of
coverage.
6-19
General
If the advisory never
clears, the most likely
your ADS-B Out device
is misconfigured or your
ADS-B In receiver is
inop/misconfigured.
In addition, the ADSR/TIS-B Unavailable
message is also
displayed on the traffic
thumbnail.
UTC Mismatch
6-20
General
UTC Time Mismatch. Please restart
IFD when possible
If the internal clock does
not match the time
received from the GPS,
power cycling the IFD
will update the time.
NIGHT OPERATIONS
There are several controls to assist selection of the proper and
usable brightness level for night operations.
IFD DISPLAY BRIGHTNESS
Each IFD individually controls its own display brightness through
a set of available options (Manual Control, Dimming Bus Control,
Use Ambient Light Sensor) on the User Options LSK of the
SETUP tab on the AUX page. The choice of which option to use
is one of personal preference and/or optimal choice for the
specific airplane but Avidyne recommends using the dimming bus
control for cockpit lighting consistency. Displays can never be
dimmed to be completely off. The lowest dimmable setting may
appear to be off during daylight conditions but is actually set for a
proper low setting in a dark environment after your eyes have
fully dark adapted.
IFD BEZEL BRIGHTNESS
Each IFD individually controls the bezel brightness (backlighting
of knobs and buttons) through a set of available options (Manual
Control, Dimming Bus Control, Use Ambient Light Sensor) on the
User Options LSK of the SETUP tab on the AUX page. The
choice of which option to use is one of personal preference
and/or optimal choice for the specific airplane but Avidyne
recommends using the dimming bus control for cockpit lighting
consistency. Bezel lighting can never be dimmed to be
completely off. The lowest dimmable setting may appear to be off
during daylight conditions but is actually set for a proper low
setting in a dark environment after your eyes have fully dark
adapted.
CHARTS LIGHTING SCHEME
Some pilots prefer to use the Charts pages in the daytime lighting
scheme at all times and some prefer the nighttime lighting
scheme. In order to provide that flexibility, a separate Chart
Day/Night Mode selection is provided on the User Options LSK of
the SETUP tab on the AUX page. “Day” will always provide a
bright white background for readability. “Night” will always turn the
bright white backlighting off.
6-21
General
DISPLAY OF TERRAIN ON MAP
The display of terrain on the moving maps is not affected by the
Day/Night lighting controls. For those pilots who prefer to remove
the display of terrain from the map during night operations, use
the “Land” part of the map declutter LSK to deselect terrain from
being displayed.
NOTE
Chart Data Reliance
Always refer to current aeronautical charts for
appropriate terrain and obstacle information. Do
not rely on the Avidyne Integrated Flight Display
System as your sole source of obstacle and terrain
avoidance information.
6-22
General
SYSTEM FAILURES
NOTE
Good Airmanship
In all cases, basic airmanship should be exercised
and fundamentals utilized such as: maintain aircraft
control, analyze the situation, and take proper
action.
POWER DISTRIBUTION
Each IFD draws a total of 2 amps in nominal operation and up to
4 amps under peak conditions for 28V aircraft. This rises to 4 and
8 amps respectively for 14V aircraft. The system is designed to
operate without degradation on a single power bus, including
single functioning alternator.
Each IFD is controlled by a pair of circuit breakers which need to
be pulled out to remove power to an IFD, or the top left IFD knob
can be pushed and held to power the unit down (recommended
method).
LOSS OF IFD
Failure Indication:
The simplest method of determining that a loss of an IFD has
occurred is a loss of both the bezel backlighting and the display
going black.
Functionality Lost:
When the failure of an IFD is indicated by loss of both the bezel
backlighting and the display going black, this is a total loss of
function for this unit: There will be no VHF, GPS, ADS-B position
output, deviation output, etc. In a dual IFD system, loss of an IFD
may also result in loss of some sensor data on the remaining IFD
if that sensor data was only wired to the failed IFD and therefore
cannot be shared with the remaining IFD.
6-23
General
Recommended Pilot Actions:
The pilot’s plan of action will vary based on the pilot, aircraft configuration, phase
of flight and other factors. Taking into account those variations, pilots should
consider the following actions:
•
Establish safe separation from terrain, traffic and
hazardous weather, using ATC assistance as necessary;
•
If the affected IFD is in use for primary nav or comm,
transition to secondary GPS or VHF Nav/Com unit(s), if
available;
•
Consider cycling power on the affected IFD via the top
left power knob;
•
After the flight, notify an Avidyne Service Center or
Avidyne Customer Support to coordinate for a repair
action.
LOSS OF DISPLAY
Failure Indication:
The first indication that an IFD has experienced a loss of the
display (LCD) is the appearance of a black display but the bezel
backlighting is still present. Assuming the cockpit dimming
control/rheostat hasn’t been activated to the dimmest setting and
the display has actually failed, the easiest indication that just the
display has failed is a continued backlighting of the bezel keys.
Functionality Lost:
All the basic functionality is intact (e.g. VHF com and nav radios,
FMS navigation and deviation output, etc.) but is not visible.
Recommended Pilot Actions:
6-24
•
Check the cockpit dimming control/rheostat to ensure it is
not in the “night” position;
•
Use other cockpit displays (e.g. CDI, HSI, etc) for
crosschecking deviation and position;
•
Consider cycling power on the affected IFD via the top
left power knob;
General
•
After the flight, notify an Avidyne Service Center or
Avidyne Customer Support to coordinate for a repair
action.
LOSS OF BEZEL CONTROLS
Failure Indication:
All knobs and buttons are non-functional and not respondent to
use.
Functionality Lost:
There will be no ability to change major pages (“FMS”, “MAP”,
“AUX”) nor any ability to change the nav source or swap
frequencies between the active and standby frequencies.
Recommended Pilot Action:
6-25
•
Use touch screen controls to perform all other functions
that are still available;
•
Consider cycling power on the affected IFD via the top
left power knob;
•
After the flight, notify an Avidyne Service Center or
Avidyne Customer Support to coordinate for a
repair action.
General
LOSS OF TOUCHSCREEN CONTROL
Failure Indication:
All touch screen inputs are ignored.
Functionality Lost:
There will be no ability to pan the map, perform graphical flight
planning (“rubber banding”), call up a map popup info box, or
select a #2 or #3 standby frequency for swapping into the active
frequency slot.
Recommended Pilot Action:
6-26
•
Use bezel controls to perform all other functions that are
still available;
•
Verify that touch screen control is not turned off on the
User Options – SETUP tab of the AUX page;
•
Consider cycling power on the affected IFD via the top
left power knob;
•
After the flight, notify an Avidyne Service Center or
Avidyne Customer Support to coordinate for a repair
action.
General
LOSS OF GPS (DEAD RECKONING)
Failure Indication:
A “Dead Reckoning” yellow CAS Caution message is issued and
the map will display “Dead Reckoning” along the top left edge of
the map.
Functionality Lost:
Following loss of GPS navigation, Dead Reckoning (DR) provides
limited navigation capability for up to 5 minutes. The IFD will use
speed and last known position at the time of GPS loss along with
any heading data it may have to provide an estimate of aircraft
position. At the end of that 5 minute period, if GPS lock has not
been reacquired, the system will transition to No GPS and
provide the appropriate CAS message and remove the ownship
symbol from the moving map.
All GPS-based navigation should remain unaffected during DR
mode, albeit with less accuracy and LPV approaches will be
terminated due to loss of integrity so higher minimums for the less
accurate GPS-based approaches will need to be used.
Some safety and alerting functions will be lost if GPS is
unavailable including TAWS, FLTA, and 500’ callouts.
Recommended Pilot Action:
In the event of a GPS position fix loss, the pilot’s plan of action
will vary based on the pilot, aircraft configuration, phase of flight
and other factors. Taking into account those variations, pilots
should consider the following actions:
6-27
•
Establish safe separation from terrain, traffic and
hazardous weather, using ATC assistance as necessary;
•
If the affected IFD is in use for primary nav or comm,
transition to secondary GPS or VHF Nav/Com unit(s), if
available;
•
Transition to VHF guidance or GPS guidance from a
secondary receiver, if available;
•
Plan on higher-minimum GPS RNAV approaches if in the
terminal area;
General
•
If successful with GPS reacquisition, normal use of the
affected IFD may be resumed;
•
After the flight, notify an Avidyne Service Center or
Avidyne Customer Support to coordinate for a repair
action.
OTHER ANOMALIES
Other system anomalies (e.g. loss of VHF, etc) are indicated to
the pilot in the form of a CAS message. In all of those cases, be
cognizant of possible increased workload situations and, if the
condition persists across a power cycle, notify an Avidyne Service
Center or Avidyne Customer Support to coordinate for a repair
action.
FCC RF EXPOSURE REQUIREMENTS
As a transmitting device, the FCC has mandated the following
caution:
CAUTION
FCC RF Exposure Requirements
This transmitter must be restricted to work related
operations in a Controlled RF exposure
environment. All qualified end-users of this device
must have the knowledge to control their exposure
conditions and/or duration, and the exposure
conditions and/or duration of their passengers and
bystanders, to comply with the General Population /
Uncontrolled MPE limit and requirements.
The antenna(s) used for this transmitter must be
installed to provide a separation distance of at least
0.71m (2.33 ft) from all persons.
6-28
General
SUBSCRIPTIONS
Nav, Obstacle and Chart data are supplied by Jeppesen via
JSUM subscriptions. Refer to the Jeppesen product website for
the various geographic and bundling options available.
For those aircraft equipped with external weather and music
satellite radio systems, subscriptions are managed via that data
provider.
DATA UPDATES
Periodic updates to your nav data, charts data, and obstacle data
are all made through the USB port on the front of each IFD.
Updates must be performed in accordance with 14 CFR Part 43,
Appendix A.
NOTE
Updates Only Permitted On Ground
Entry into data update mode is only permitted on the
ground. No means will be provided (e.g. LSK
access) to access this mode if the IFD determines it
is in-air.
NOTE
Database Currency
It is critical that you update the data regularly and
that you ensure the databases are current prior to
conducting flight operations.
6-29
General
NOTE
Heliports and Helicopter Instrument Approaches
Not Available
Published heliport and helicopter instrument
approaches are not part of the IFD navigation and
chart databases.
The table below summarizes the databases update periods:
Database
Update Cycle
Comments & Source
Chart Data
14 days
Expiration watermark displayed
after 14 days indefinitely until
data updated (Jeppesen)
Nav Data
28 days
Airport, airway, navaid, airspace,
and FMS data (Jeppesen)
Obstacle
Data
56 days
Displayed on map and used for
TA and FLTA functions
(Jeppesen)
Terrain
Data
As required
Displayed on map and used for
TA and FLTA functions
(Jeppesen). The IFD is shipped
from the factory with this
database already loaded and
updates are anticipated to be a
rare occurrence.
In the event the terrain data ever needs updating, this is also
performed through the front panel USB port.
6-30
General
Use one of the formatted fobs supplied by Avidyne (marked by
the Avidyne logo printed on one side). In the event you no longer
have those available, either call Avidyne for a replacement fob (a
nominal fee will be charged) or purchase a replacement through
other means. Acceptable alternative USB drives are FAT32
format, between 1-16 GB, and manufactured by WINTEC filemate
(http://www.wintecind.com/filemate.html ).
To perform a data update, ensure the data to be updated is
placed onto one of the acceptable USB fobs. Carefully insert the
USB fob into the IFD USB slot while power is turned off. When
the IFD is powered up, select the “SYS” tab of the AUX page and
then pick the “Update Databases” LSK.
Update Databases LSK
You will be prompted to “Confirm” or “Cancel”. Assuming you
selected “Confirm”, you should see a dialog box presented in the
middle of the screen and all uploadable files on that fob will be
individually listed and check marks may be visible next to each
file name.
6-31
General
Confirm and Cancel LSKs
Use the “Select All”, “Un-select All” LSKs and the IFD knob as
required to ensure check marks are associated with all the
desired files to upload to the IFD. Now press the “Proceed” LSK
to begin the file upload.
LSK Options on System Update Page
6-32
General
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Select Only Desired Files For Upload
If you keep reusing the same fob for database
uploads, be sure to either delete all out-of-date or
non-desired files or, take care in selecting/deselecting files from the IFD display list. Not doing so
may extend data upload times considerably by
uploading unintended files.
NOTE
Do Not Power Off the IFD During Data Update
Cycling power to the IFD during a database update
may result in a corruption of the memory device that
stores the databases. If this happens, a service
action is required to restore the data integrity.
A progress bar will be presented to help provide an idea of how
much longer the upload will take.
Progress Bar
6-33
General
Typical upload times are:
•
Worldwide Obstacles (1.5 MB) – 5 sec
•
Eastern US Charts (100 MB) – 3min
•
US Charts (180 MB) – 5 ½ min
•
Worldwide Charts (430 MB) – 13 min
•
US Nav Data (8 MB) – 20 sec
•
Europe Nav Data (10 MB) – 20-30 sec
•
Australian Nav Data (1.5 MB) – 5 sec
•
Worldwide Nav Data (15 MB) – 40 sec
NOTE
Each IFD Requires Separate Upload
In multiple IFD installations, the database uploads
must be performed individually for each IFD to be
updated.
Due to some of the upload durations, Avidyne recommends
creating a fob for each IFD to be updated so that the updates can
happen in parallel and not stacked serially, thereby extending the
overall time to accomplish a full update.
A clear indication is presented when the data uploads have been
completed. Likewise, if the USB fob was removed prior to
finishing the data upload, an error message will be presented and
the entire process will need to be manually restarted once the fob
is reinserted in the IFD.
6-34
General
Upload Complete Indications
When you are finished press the “Done” LSK, which will restart
the IFD into flight mode. Remove the USB fob and perform a
normal start up. It is highly recommended to verify the data was
updated from the “Status” LSK of the SYS tab on the AUX page.
If an IFD is in normal operating mode (not maintenance mode),
the presence of a USB fob is ignored and these pages cannot be
accessed.
NOTE
Report Observed Discrepancies
Avidyne requests that any observed database
discrepancies get reported. These discrepancies
may be in the form of an incorrect procedure,
incorrectly identified terrain, obstacles, navigation
fixes, or any other displayed item used for
navigation or communication in the air or on the
ground. Use the Service Hotline defined on the
inside back cover.
6-35
General
NOTE
Database Accuracy and Completeness
Avidyne accurately processes and validates the
database data, but cannot guarantee the accuracy
and completeness of the data provided by various
state sources and their suppliers.
NOTE
Consistent Nav Database Required for Sharing
In dual IFD installations, the nav database loaded
on each IFD must be the same in order to allow
flight plan sharing between the IFDs.
6-36
General
DATA TRANSFER TO/FROM EXTERNAL DEVICES
Data can be transferred to and from the IFD and a number of
external devices via several methods (USB, WiFi, Bluetooth).
WiFi is the fastest, most capable and most real-time method. A
list of the applications and devices supported can be viewed at
http://www.avidyne.com/products/ifd/wifi-devices.html
Data that can be transferred is expected to grow over time but the
basic functions are summarized in the table below
Data
Transfer Description
Transmission
Method(s)
Present Position
Ownship position is
streaming out of the IFD for
rd
use by 3 party
device/applications.
WiFi
Outbound from IFD only.
Active Flight Plan
The active flight plan, and
any real-time modifications
to it is streaming out of the
rd
IFD for use by 3 party
device/applications.
WiFi
Outbound from IFD only.
Stored Routes
6-37
General
Stored flight plan routes are
a bi-directional transfer
between the IFD and
rd
approved 3 party
device/applications.
Routes can be created offboard and imported into the
IFD, and/or can be created
on the IFD and transmitted
rd
off-board for 3 party
device/application use.
WiFi
Data
Transfer Description
Transmission
Method(s)
Traffic
Traffic data known by the
IFD (TAS sensor, TIS
receiver, TIS-B receiver,
etc) is streaming out of the
rd
IFD for use by 3 party
device/applications.
WiFi
Outbound from IFD only.
Weather
Weather information known
by the IFD (XM Datalink,
Sirius Datalink, SXM
Datalink, FIS-B receiver,
etc) is streaming out of the
rd
IFD for use by 3 party
device/applications.
WiFi
Outbound from IFD only.
User Waypoints
User waypoints are a bidirectional transfer between
rd
the IFD and approved 3
party device/applications.
User waypoints can be
created off-board and
imported into the IFD,
and/or can be created on
the IFD and transmitted offrd
board for 3 party
device/application use.
WiFi, USB
Instrument
Approach and
Transition
Instrument approach and
selected transition data is
streaming out of the IFD to
facilitate automatic chart
and transition selection and
display (“chart popping”) on
rd
3 party
WiFi
6-38
General
Data
Transfer Description
Transmission
Method(s)
device/applications.
Outbound from IFD.
Fully interactive
IFD
The panel mount IFD has
complete bi-directional
communication with the
IFD100 application hosted
on a mobile tablet.
WiFi
User Data (User
settings, user
checklists, user
waypoints, stored
routes)
User data can be stored on
a USB fob device and
imported for later use on
any IFD.
USB
Data Entry and
IFD manipulation
Data can be entered (e.g.
frequencies, waypoint
names, checklist data, etc)
from a properly paired
external Bluetooth
keyboard. In addition,
bezel controls and other
IFD manipulation can be
accomplished (e.g.
activating function keys,
page keys, changing map
range, volume, etc) via the
paired keyboard.
Bluetooth
Inbound to IFD only.
Data Logs
6-39
General
Datalogs can be
downloaded from an IFD
onto a fob device for
importing and use on
external devices (e.g. PC
USB
Data
Transfer Description
Transmission
Method(s)
download, tech support
evaluation, etc).
Outbound from IFD only.
Database
Updates
On-board databases (e.g.
nav, chart, obstacle, terrain)
can be uploaded to an IFD
from a fob device.
USB
Inbound to IFD only.
Software Updates
IFD software updates can
be uploaded to an IFD from
a fob device.
Inbound to IFD only.
6-40
General
USB
INTEGRATION WITH THE IFD100 MOBILE APP
The Avidyne IFD100 mobile application is designed to fully
interact with the panel-mount IFDs. That is to say, the IFD100
behaves as if it were another panel-mount IFD and all of the data
sharing functionality and rules of two panel mount IFDs are in
practice.
The IFD100 does not have its own GPS or VHF but all other
capabilities and functions of the panel-mount IFD is present. In
fact, the VHF (com and nav) of the panel-mount IFD can be
tuned/changed/edited from the IFD100 mobile app.
More than one IFD100 can be connected to a panel-mount IFD at
a time over WiFi – there is no practical upper limit on the number
of IFD100s that can be connected to a panel-mount unit.
The IFD100 application can be downloaded as a free download
from the Apple Store. It does not provide any usable functionality
without a WiFi connection to an operating panel-mount IFD.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
IFD100 Can Connect to IFD Training App
The IFD training app (separate free download from
the Apple Store) is capable of transmitting data over
WiFi just like the panel-mount IFD units. Therefore
you can use the IFD training app to connect to the
IFD100 mobile app for practice or training activities.
The only real constraint is that each application will
need to be running on separate mobile devices (e.g.
iPads) and connected via the same WiFi network.
6-41
General
USER DATA BACKUP/RESTORATION PROCEDURE
Use the following procedure to store and reload user checklists,
user settings, waypoints, and routes. The original user data must
be generated on an IFD per the instructions described in Section
4 of this manual and then they can be reloaded onto any IFD or
multiple IFDs via this procedure.
User Data Save and Restore Options
SAVING USER DATA
Ensure a properly formatted fob is installed in the IFD.
Enter Maintenance Mode via the data download method
described in the next section.
From the Update tab, ensure the desired “Save <data type>”
option(s) has a checkmark and then press the “Proceed” LSK
option. Data type options include Checklists, User Settings,
Waypoints, and Routes.
6-42
General
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Selecting Desired Items in Mx Mode List
When presented with a list of multiple items when
only some items in the list are desired, press the
“Un-Select All” LSK then use the bottom right IFD
knob to scroll through the list and push the knob in
when the cursor is on the desired row to select the
row and generate a checkmark. When all desired
checkmarks are generated, press the “Proceed”
LSK.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Additional Means of Recording Configurations
Avidyne highly recommends recording your user
preferences and configuration settings (including
Maintenance Mode “Config” pages) in an alternate
form (e.g. smart phone photographs of the page
settings) as an additional precaution.
When the download is complete (should take a matter of
seconds), store the fob and/or the files on the fob somewhere
secure.
It is possible to import user data from IFD simulators but they
must be individually selected for saving onto the fob via the
simulator.
6-43
General
RELOADING PREVIOUSLY STORED USER DATA
Ensure the fob containing the previously stored user data is
installed in the IFD.
Enter Maintenance Mode via the data download method
described in the next section.
From the Update tab, ensure the dated file(s) of interest (“Restore
<data type> YY.MM.DD-##”) has a checkmark and then press the
“Proceed” LSK option.
When the upload is complete (should take a matter of seconds),
exit Maintenance Mode via pressing the “Done” LSK and then
select the appropriate page (e.g. UTIL option of the SYS tab on
the AUX page) to verify the restored data is present.
The possible states that can displayed during user data save and
restore operations are:
Save or Restore State
Not selected
Selected but hasn’t started yet
Save or Restore underway
Save or Restore passed over
Completed with no error
Completed with error
6-44
General
Indication
-XPending …
Active …
Skipped …
OK
ERR
DATALOGS DOWNLOAD
Extensive datalogging is performed automatically on all IFDs.
These datalogs can be accessed post-flight and used for a
number of purposes.
NOTE
Datalogs Usable But Avidyne Property
The contents of the data logs and the storage
devices that record and store data remain the
property of Avidyne. However, you are free to
download and use the data for your own training
and safety improvement purposes.
There are seven types of datalogs employed in the IFDs:
6-45
•
System Log – This log provides a record of the
navigation state. From this log, you can re-create
many aspects of the FMS output and IFD state. It
logs at a rate of approximately 1Hz;
•
Flight Log – This log provides a detailed record of
your aircraft state as measured by the various IFD
sensors. It logs at a rate of approximately 5Hz;
•
Engine Log – This log provides details on fuel
flow system data (if configured). It logs at a rate of
approximately ¼ Hz;
•
Event Log – This log contains miscellaneous data
such as all alerts, keystrokes, system status and
error messages, etc. It is designed to be a
diagnostics log for Avidyne Service Center
technicians and not expected to be used by
owners/operators. It logs at an on-condition rate;
•
Voltage Log – This log contains internal
diagnostic data such as the voltages and currents
on sub-system boards, temperatures and internal
fan status. It logs at a rate of approximately 1Hz;.
•
GPS Log – This log contains extensive internal
state data for the GPS;
General
•
Configuration Log – This set of .txt files contains
various system settings, states, and cals at power
down.
The “Download Logs” LSK is presented when “Software” is
selected on the SYS tab and the system is not in-air. When the
“Download Logs” LSK is pressed, a pair of Confirm/Cancel LSKs
are presented. Selecting Confirm will launch the Maintenance
Mode of the IFD540. From Maintenance Mode, press the right
side of the AUX page function key to select the “Logs” tab.
Ensure a USB fob is inserted in the IFD front bezel USB port and
then use a combination of the left side LSKs and the bottom right
IFD knob to select the desired combination of logs and type of
action to perform.
Datalogs Download Page (Maintenance Mode)
Pressing the “Proceed” LSK will immediately start downloading all
logs listed in the center of the page with green check marks
adjacent to them. If only a subset of the logs are to be
downloaded, use the “Un-Select All” LSK to deselect all logs and
then use the bottom right IFD knob to highlight the desired log
and push in to generate a green check mark.
6-46
General
The “Logs” LSK on that Maintenance Mode page provides two
options for downloading this data via dedicated LSKs. The first
option (“Full”) allows a download of all data logs onto the USB
fob. The second option (“Since Last”) downloads the data logged
since the last time a download was completed. Since the logs
contain a large amount of data, the second option will be a
quicker option in almost every case.
Download times are highly dependent on the number and types
of logs being downloaded and the length of time since the last
download. Times can range from a few seconds to more than 15
minutes. The more often logs are downloaded, the shorter the
download times will be.
In order to provide an indication of download progress, a progress
bar will be presented with both a symbolic aircraft indicating
download in progress and a % complete estimate. The files to be
downloaded can have one of several states – “OK”, “In
progress…”, “Pending”, “Skipped”, “Active”, “Failed”.
When downloaded to the USB fob, the data logs will be saved in
.csv files with a unit number prefix (e.g. “1_” or “2_”). This can be
imported into newer versions of Microsoft Excel in a table format.
The data can then be plotted or analyzed by several third-party
tools. Note that files can easily contain 50MB or more of data.
Data included in the files are as follows:
System Log
Date/Time stamp
GPSS state
Power On
OBS value
OAT, if available
Desired track
Localizer deviation
Nav frequency
Glideslope deviation
Course select value, if known
Ground speed
Nav type
Ground track
VOR course
Crosstrack deviation
GPS altitude
Vertical deviation
Distance to active waypoint
Display mode
FMS course
Nav mode
Active waypoint information
GPS parameters
FLTA Status
Magnetic Variation
6-47
General
Flight Log
Date/Time stamp
Indicated airspeed, if available
Power on
True airspeed, if available
Turn rate, if available
Vertical speed, if available
Pressure altitude, if available
Lat/Lon
Engine Log
Date/Time stamp
Fuel Remaining (gal)
Power on
Fuel Time Remaining (min)
Fuel Flow (gal/hr)
Fuel Economy (nm/gal)
Fuel Used (gal)
Voltage Log
This log contains more than 50 voltages and temperatures of
each individual component. It is designed to be a diagnostics log
for Avidyne Service Center technicians.
Event Log
This log contains miscellaneous data such as all alerts,
keystrokes, system status and error messages, etc. It is a
diagnostics log for Avidyne Service Center technicians.
GPS Log
This log contains miscellaneous internal GPS state data. It is a
diagnostics log for Avidyne Service Center technicians.
Configuration Log (Number of parameters in parenthesis
which are saved in the form of multiple text “.txt” files)
Local Unit Port Configurations (47)
Cross-side Port Configurations (47)
GPS Antenna (x)
System Configuration – SW versions,
part numbers, chassis ID (145)
Dimming Settings (23)
Aircraft Tail Number (1)
Chart State – validity dates, identifier
(6)
Datablock selections (32)
User Options selections (33)
FMS Setup settings (38)
Map Setup settings (80)
Map Declutter selections (58)
6-48
General
System Time Since Power On (1)
Frequency List values (80)
Com Preset values (16)
Com-Nav Audio States (21)
GDL69 Settings (2)
VHF Com Values (5)
VHF Nav Values (5)
Lightning Sensor Configuration (4)
OBS Cal Bias data (2)
Video Settings (16)
Paid Options (11)
Radar Settings (6)
WiFi Settings (5)
Press the “Done” LSK after completing all downloads.
SOFTWARE UPDATES
With very few exceptions, all software inside the IFDs is capable
of being updated via the USB connections as well. This means
the IFD does not need to be returned to the factory for any future
software updates. The Avidyne position is that any shop that
holds a repair station certificate, an A&P, or an Experimental
Aircraft owner with log book signoff authority can perform the
update. The person performing the update must follow the
provided Service Bulletin explicitly and mail/fax/email back in the
completed update sheet that is part of the Service Bulletin but
Avidyne does not restrict this to just Avidyne Service Centers.
HIGH TEMPERATURE OPERATIONS
Like all GPS-NAV-COMs, the IFD tends to generate a lot of heat.
There is extensive internal temperature monitoring on all of the
electrical components, and alerts in the form of CAS messages if
the internal temperature gets too high. Part of the temperature
mitigation design is that the metal bezel is intentionally designed
to radiate heat away from the internal components and out of the
unit. This can have the effect of a bezel that may be warm to the
touch. This is considered normal. Note that the rubber bezel
buttons will not conduct this heat and should not be warm. This
condition will be more noticeable on hot days or during long
ground runs. The IFD does not require external or forced cooling
air but is designed to accept cool air intake in those installations
where excessive heat is generated by surrounding avionics or
there is significant blockage of air flow behind the panel.
6-49
General
COLD TEMPERATURE OPERATIONS
If the IFD had been exposed to extreme cold temperatures,
responsiveness of the display and to touch or bezel input may
take longer than normal until the IFD has warmed up.
LOW POWER OPERATIONS
The following actions are taken as input power is reduced to the
IFD:
Input Voltage
IFD Operation Impact
19.9VDC
16W VHF radio output power reduces to
10W.
18VDC
Lose high power (2.1A) USB charging. USB
charging reduces to 1A.
12.75VDC
Lose all USB charging.
11.5VDC
Bezel lighting and display lighting maximum
values are reduced.
10.9VDC
VHF radio output power reduces to 6W.
10.0VDC
VHF radio output power reduces to 4W.
9VDC
60-second countdown to IFD shutdown
begins (countdown message displayed on
the IFD).
6VDC – 8 VDC
Internal components power down.
Function is restored by rising above those voltage thresholds by
1VDC for more than 1 second. A rapid decay below 10 VDC to 68 VDC will result in a power down prior to the 60-sec countdown
being displayed or completed.
6-50
General
NOTE
16W VHF Transmission Power Requires 28VDC
16W radio transmission power is only available as
an option in 28VDC aircraft.
HIGH POWER OPERATIONS
The following actions are taken as input power is increased to the
IFD:
Input Voltage
32.3VDC
6-51
General
IFD Operation Impact
VHF radio shuts down to protect itself from
over-voltage events. Note that input voltage
up to 33VDC will not damage the VHF but it
will not function above 32.3VDC.
CHARGING FROM THE USB
The USB port on the front of the IFD bezel is a USB v1.1
compatible USB port and can be used as a “high power” charger
as well.
Most devices are “low power” devices and they will fully charge
from the IFD bezel USB port. Some devices are “high power”
devices and need up to 2.1amps of power – these devices can
also be charged from the IFD USB port. The iPad is a good
example of a “high power” device and the IFD supports charging.
COOL FEATURE
Charge Devices From the IFD USB Port
Most USB devices can be charged directly from the
USB port on the front bezel of each IFD while on the
ground or in flight. This can be very handy if using a
tablet or other mobile device in-flight – the device
can continue to be used without excessively
draining the battery and may even have extra
charge added in the process.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Avoid Use of USB Port at Startup
If a device is plugged into the bezel USB port at IFD
startup, the unit will boot into maintenance mode.
Unless you are intentionally trying to enter
maintenance mode at startup, ensure there are no
devices inserted in the bezel USB port at startup.
The USB port can be used immediately after IFD
initialization.
6-52
General
PLUG AND PLAY DETAILS
The IFD is a “plug and play” replacement of the following
equipment:
Garmin Product ID
Plug & Play
Software Baseline
530
4.01 (Main)
530W
530AW
530TAWS
Comments
No HTAWS
enablement. This
corresponds to Rev
C of the 190-0035708 Garmin Install
Manual.
The following table represents the complete list of unsupported
530/530W functionality in the IFD:
Unsupported 530
Functionality
Comments
Manual entry of fuel flow
Fuel totalizer data and
computed fuel at
waypoints/destinations are only
supported in installations that
integrate a fuel flow system. In
no cases can you manually
enter fuel flow in the IFD.
Fixed Wing Terrain Awareness
and Warning System – TAWS
TSO C-151c functionality is all
present in the IFD however the
IFD does not hold the TSO C151c approval and therefore
may not take credit in aircraft
where TSO C-151c compliance
is required.
Helicopter Terrain Awareness
and Warning System) HTAWS
TSO C-194 HTAWS is not
supported on the IFD.
6-53
General
NOTE
TAWS and Other Audio Output Wiring to Audio
Panel
To take full advantage of FLTA and other IFD aural
alerting (e.g. TOD chime), ensure the audio output
signals are wired to the audio panel. For 530
replacement installations, if TAWS audio output was
already wired to the audio panel, then no further
action will be required. If the TAWS audio output
was not already wired to the audio panel, then that
wiring will need to be added during time of IFD
installation.
NOTE
ADS-B and Air/Ground Output Wiring to
Transponder
To take full advantage of the IFD ADS-B compliant
position and automatic air-ground transitions,
ensure the proper IFD output signals are wired to a
compatible transponder.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Multiple Integration Options
Discuss integration options with your installer.
There are several options that can be added to the
system for added capability. There is a dedicated
section in the IFD Installation Manual that identifies
these options.
6-54
General
CLEANING THE DISPLAY
If the IFD screen should become dirty due to fingerprints or dust,
clean the screen using the following materials and methods:
A clean, soft lint-free cloth such as 3M Ultra-Brite Cloth #2011 or
similar;
A cleaning solution composed of de-ionized water or other liquid
solvents such as isopropyl alcohol (IPA). Use caution, as it may
be flammable. Always apply the cleaning solution directly on the
cloth. Never spray cleaner directly on the screen.
In general, isopropyl alcohol is a safe and effective cleaner.
Methanol and most acidic solutions can be toxic or damaging to
glass coatings if misused.
Excessive or unnecessary cleaning should be avoided to prevent
damage to the coated optical filter surfaces. Never allow excess
amounts of cleaning agents to dry if they have formed into pools,
streaks or droplets to help avoid spotting of the glass surface.
The use of any third-party screen protector, especially those that
adhere directly to the IFD display glass, is not endorsed by
Avidyne due to the touch-screen nature of the display and may
void the warranty for any display related issue.
6-55
General
PAIRING A BLUETOOTH® KEYBOARD
NOTE
Dual IFD Installations Should Only Pair 1 IFD
To avoid issues arising from a keyboard only being
able to pair with one device at a time, dual IFD
installations should turn off Bluetooth in the User
Options page on one IFD.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Alternate Method of Entry to Maintenance Mode
Maintenance Mode can be entered without use of a
USB fob, if desired. While on the ground, select the
AUX page, SYS tab and then press the “Select” line
select key until either the “Update Databases” or
“Download Logs” button is presented. Pressing
either of those line select keys will take you into
Maintenance Mode.
1. Ensure the supplied keyboard has adequate charge;turn
it on using the left side switch;
2. Ensure Bluetooth is turned on in the User Options page
of the IFD;
3. Ensure the IFD has been powered on for at least one
minute, and is in Maintenance Mode with the Bluetooth®
Pairing page displayed;
4. Activate the pairing control on the keyboard (make it
“discoverable”) to put the keyboard into pairing mode by
pressing the button on the back of the Avidyne supplied
keyboard;
5. Press the “Start Scan” line select key
6-56
General
6. Press the “Stop Scan” line select key once the keyboard
is discovered.
7. Select the device you want to pair with by using the
bottom right IFD knob to put the cyan wraparound cursor
on the desired device;
8. Press the “Pair Device” line select key and wait for the
PIN code to appear;
6-57
General
9. Enter the PIN code using the external keyboard and
press “ENTER” on the keyboard;
10. The selected device in the list will turn green if pairing
was successful.
6-58
General
11. If the device name does not turn green or disappears,
retry the procedure from step 4;
12. Put the IFD back into flight mode;
13. Touch the standby com frequency display on the IFD to
generate an onscreen keyboard;
14. Using the newly paired Bluetooth keyboard, press any
key;
15. Verify a popup message is displayed on the IFD asking
to confirm your intent to use an external keyboard and
touch “ALLOW” or press the bezel “ENTR” button;
6-59
General
16. On the Bluetooth® keyboard, type in a new com
frequency and verify the value on the IFD updates
accordingly. If it did, pairing was successful and
complete.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Common Mistake with Bluetooth Legend
A common mistake is to interpret the Bluetooth
Setup status legend in the top left corner of the
Bluetooth Setup page as the actual state of
Bluetooth.
NOTE
Acceptable Bluetooth® Keyboards
Due to certification constraints, only Avidyne
supplied Bluetooth® enabled keyboards will be
functional.
6-60
General
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
“Inoperative” Bluetooth® Keyboards
The most likely reasons why a previously paired
keyboard appears non-functional or inoperative is
due to lack of charge or the Bluetooth setting on the
User Options page is set to Off.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Physically Secure the Keyboard
A common and effective technique to physically
secure the keyboard in the cockpit is to apply Velcro
to the back surface and find somewhere accessible
but out-of-the-way for the mating Velcro material.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Connect/Disconnect Keyboard Connection
Pressing the pair key on an already connected
keyboard will disconnect it. If this happens, the
keyboard will need to be power cycled to reconnect.
A paired keyboard normally tries to connect when it
is turned on, but will also retry if any key is pressed.
A paired keyboard should keep its connection up to
30 feet away from the IFD. A keyboard can only be
paired to one device. If it is paired to something
other than an IFD, it will have to be paired again
with the specific IFD.
6-61
General
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Keyboard Status Indications
A solid green LED lamp indicates the keyboard is
connected. A flashing green LED indicates it is
trying to pair. A yellow LED is lit every time a
keystroke is sent to the IFD. While charging, the red
LED turns on and grows dimmer as the charge
increase. When fully charged, the red LED is
extinguished. Leaving the keyboard plugged in after
the charge is complete will decrease the battery life.
6-62
General
SELF TEST OUTPUT
For the duration that the notification of legal rights page is
displayed during normal power up on the ground, all remote
annunciator lamps are lit up and the system generates a specific
set of electrical outputs for the purpose of self-test and
troubleshooting. The table below defines the outputs transmitted
during this time.
Parameter
Course Deviation
Glideslope/Vertical
Deviation
Annunciators
Bearing to Waypoint (RMI)
Selected Course (OBS)
Desired Track
Distance To Go
Time To Go
Active Waypoint
Groundspeed
Present Position
Waypoint Alert
Phase of Flight
Message Alert
GPS Integrity
Roll Steering (if applicable)
6-63
General
Self-test Value
Half-scale left deviation, TO
indication, flag stowed
Half-scale up deviation, flag
stowed
All on
135°
150° when interfaced to an
HSI with course pointer
150°
10.0 NM
4 minutes
“AVDYN”
150 knots
N39°04.05’, W094°53.86’
Active
Enroute
Active
Invalid
Flight Director commands 0°
bank (level flight) for 5
seconds; commands
increasing right bank at
1°/second for 5 seconds;
commands 5° right bank for
5 seconds; commands
decreasing right bank at
1°/second for 5 seconds,
until command is 0° bank
again. This cycle repeats
continuously.
USE OF GLOVES
Many types of gloves can be used with the IFD touch screen
display. The key parameter for the effectiveness of a glove with
touch screen is the distance between the finger and the glass and
to a lesser extent, the type of material separating the skin from
the glass. The thinner the glove or the more compatible the
material (e.g. leather, fine cotton, etc), the greater the likelihood
of success will be. Likewise, the more surface area that comes in
contact with the glass, the greater the success may be. Each
glove must be qualified for compatibility with the display and
those glove calibration procedures (specific to the glove and the
pilot combination) are immediately below. If all test steps are
marked as a “Pass” then the glove/pilot combination is
considered to be a qualified pair.
6-64
General
IFD Glove Qualification Procedure
Pilot Name
Description of Glove
Test Step
Circle
one
Touch the standby frequency window and
verify a virtual keyboard is displayed.
Pass
Fail
Type 121.7, press the "ENTER" button on the
virtual keyboard and confirm 121.700 is the
displayed frequency in the #1 Standby Com
window.
Pass
Fail
Press each of the page tabs displayed on the
present page and verify the IFD changes to the
selected tab.
Pass
Fail
With the FMS FPL tab displayed, use touch to
type in a typical flight plan and verify that all
entries were recognized.
Pass
Fail
With the Map page and tab displayed, attempt
to pan the map.
Pass
Fail
With the Map page and tab displayed, attempt
to pinch zoom (in or out) the map to produce a
range change.
Pass
Fail
With the Map page and tab displayed, attempt
to graphically flight plan ("rubber band") and
verify the intended change was made.
Pass
Fail
Press the "Freq" function key on the bezel and
then double tap a frequency from the list to
place it into the #1 standby slot.
Pass
Fail
6-65
General
DEMO MODE
The IFD can be put into demo mode at any time while on the
ground for familiarization purposes. Entry into demo mode is
accessed via inserting a USB fob with a dummy file called
“DEMO” (no file type suffix and no quotes) prior to power
application. Power up the IFD with that fob inserted and the IFD
will boot to the following screen.
Demo Mode Splash Screen
Pressing the bezel “ENTR” button will proceed into demo mode
while pressing “CLR” and removing the USB fob will exit demo
mode and proceed into normal flight mode.
Demo mode can also be exited by removing the USB fob and
cycling power to the IFD.
While in demo mode, the IFD will “fly” the active flight plan in the
FMS including any altitude constraints that may be part of the
flight plan. The starting point of demo mode is whatever location
is entered in the flight plan origin and changing the origin location
while in demo mode will jump the location to the origin
coordinates.
6-66
General
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Flying Behavior in Demo Mode
Demo mode will fly a straight line if no flight plan is
entered or when reaching the end of the flight plan
unless the last leg of the flight plan or missed
approach is a hold, in which case the aircraft will
stay in the hold indefinitely.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Altitude Constraints Retained
Altitude constraints entered into a flight plan will be
retained across power cycles in stored routes for
direct legs but changes to altitude constraints in
terminal area procedures will not be retained in
stored routes.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Flight Above Terrain in Demo Mode
The only way to ensure flight above the terrain in
demo mode is to enter altitude constraint(s) in the
flight plan that are above the terrain along the flight
plan route of flight.
6-67
General
Once in demo mode, both the Map and Chart will display a “Not
For Navigation” watermark.
Demo Mode Watermark
To return to flight mode, remove the USB fob and cycle power to
the IFD.
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Some Elements Simulated in Demo Mode
Some aspects of IFD behavior are completely
simulated in demo mode. For example, the VHF
radios can be “tuned” in demo mode which will
display the entered frequency and the station
identifier but the radio isn’t actually channelized to
that entered frequency.
6-68
General
A
Abnormal Procedures · 6-23
Acquiring Satellites · 4-56
Activate Route · 2-47
Activating Flight Plan · 2-13
Activating Leg · 2-33
ADS-B Traffic · 3-47
ADS-B Weather · 3-21
Advisories · 6-11
Air Data Calculator · 4-11
AIRMETS · 3-25
Airspace Alert · 3-10
Alerts · 6-3
Altitude Constraints · 2-44
Approach · 2-29
Armed · 5-12
Arrival · 2-29
ARTCC · 1-22
ASOS · 1-22
ATIS · 1-22
Audio Tab · 4-1
Aural Alerts · 3-39, 4-47
Auto Tuning · 2-24, 5-15
Autopilot · 5-30
Aux Pages · 4-1
AWOS · 1-22
B
Backcourse · 5-22
Backlighting · 6-21
Before Takeoff · 1-49
Bezel Layout · 1-7
Bluetooth · 1-8, 1-39, 6-56
Brightness Controls · 1-10
C
Calculators · 4-10
CAS · 6-1
Index
69
Cautions · 6-5
CDI · 5-1
CDI Scale Changing · 5-18
Charging from USB · 6-52
Chart Extent Box · 3-62
Charts · 3-60
Checklist · 4-14
Circular Orbits · 2-20
Cleaning the Display · 6-55
Clear · 1-34
CLR · 1-34
Cold Temperature · 6-50
Color Philosophy · 1-6
Com Presets · 4-5
Com Radio · 1-17
Compacting Flight Plan · 2-7
Copy Route · 2-45
Copying Flight Plan · 2-13
Course Changes · 5-15
Create Flight Plan · 2-4
Create User Waypoint · 2-49
Creating New Route · 2-42
CrossSync · 1-41
Cursor · 2-2
Cursor Centered Mode · 2-8
D
Data Age · 3-27
Data Backup/Restoration · 6-42
Data Transfer To/from External
Devices · 6-37
Data Updates · 6-29
Database · 1-13, 4-54
Datablocks · 4-19
Datalink · 4-59
Datalink Weather · 3-17
Datalogs · 6-45
Dead Reckoning · 6-27
Declutter · 3-10
Delete Flight Plan · 2-18
Delete Route · 2-48
Delete Waypoints · 2-15
Demo Mode · 6-66
Departure · 2-9
Direct To · 1-31
Discontinuity · 2-25
Dual IFD · 1-41
E
Edit Waypoint · 2-15
EGNOS · 4-56
Electronic Checklist · 4-13
Emergency · 1-24
Engaged · 5-12
Enhanced Vision · 3-74
Enroute Descents · 2-26
ENTR · 1-34
European VFR Charts · 3-61
Excessive Descent Rate · 3-42
Exocentric · 3-53
Expanding Flight Plan · 2-7
External Keyboard · 1-39
H
Helicopter Operations · 3-32
Hide Page Tabs · 4-50
High Power Operations · 6-51
High Temperature · 6-49
Hold · 2-18, 5-15
Holds in Lieu of · 5-22
Hooks · 5-13
Hot Links · 2-36
HSI · 5-1
I
F
FIS-B Weather · 3-19
Five Hundred Callout · 3-37
Flight Plan Sequencing · 2-23
FLTA · 3-33
FMS · 2-1
FMS Philosophy · 5-14
FMS Preview · 2-30
FMS Setup · 4-36
Forward Looking Terrain Alerting ·
3-33
FPL · 2-1
Frequency List · 1-22
Fuel Management · 4-52
Fuel Planning · 4-11
Fuel Range Ring · 3-8
Function Keys · 1-33
G
Index
Gap In Route · 2-25
Geofill · 2-5
Gloves · 6-64
GPS Satellites · 4-56
GPS Status · 4-56
Graphical Flight Planning · 2-23, 312
70
ICAO Codes · 5-32
Icing · 3-27
IFD100 Mobile App · 6-41
IFR Procedures · 5-18
ILS · 5-21
Imminent Impact with Terrain · 333
INFO · 2-38
Inserting a Waypoint · 2-14
Intercepting a Radial · 2-17
Inverting a Flight Plan · 2-46
Inverting A Flight Plan · 2-13
K
Keyboard · 1-40
Keyboard Convenience · 1-41
Keypad · 1-37
L
Lateral Offsets · 2-24
Line Select Keys · 1-4
LNAV · 5-24
LNAV + V · 5-24
LNAV/VNAV · 5-24
Local Time Offset · 4-42
Localizer · 5-19
Low Power Operations · 6-50
LP · 5-25
LP+V · 5-25
LPV · 5-25
Nav Source Knob · 5-4
Nearest · 1-33, 2-53
Negative Climb Rate / Altitude
Lost After Takeoff · 3-43
Night Operations · 6-21
Non-Precision Approaches · 5-22
O
OBS · 5-7
Obstacles · 3-33
On/Off Control · 1-7
M
P
Map Controls · 3-1
Map Declutter · 3-10
Map Pages · 3-1
Map Panning · 3-11
Map Range · 3-2
Map Setup · 4-35
Map Symbols · 3-5
Map View · 3-2
Messages · 6-4
Metric Units · 4-49
MGRS · 4-50
Min Safe Altitude (MSA) · 4-31
Missed Approach · 5-27
Modify Flight Plan · 2-14
Monitor · 1-19
Multiple Destinations · 2-29
Multiple Standby Frequencies · 117
Multi-touch · 1-3
Music · 4-3
Page Function Keys · 1-4
Page Layout · 1-15
Pairing a Bluetooth Keyboard · 656
Panning · 3-11
Parallel Track · 2-24
Plug and Play · 6-53
Pop-Up Boxes · 3-15
Power Control · 1-9
Precision Approaches · 5-21
Premature Descent Alert · 3-41
Preset Frequencies · 4-5
Preview Flight Plan · 2-13
PROC · 2-32
Procedure · 1-33
Procedure Turns · 5-22
N
Nav Database · 6-30
Nav Mode · 5-18
Nav Radio · 1-17
Index
71
R
Radar · 3-66
Radials · 2-17
RAIM · 4-12
Remote Frequency Control · 1-24
Remote Transponder · 1-25
Retry Approach · 5-29
RNAV Operations · 5-31
RNP Operations · 5-31
Roll Steering · 5-30
Route Preview · 2-43
Routes · 2-41
Rubber Banding · 3-12
S
Satellite Radio Tuning · 4-3
Saving Flight Plan · 2-12
SBAS · 4-56
Self Test Output · 6-63
Setup Page · 4-18
Shared Data · 1-41
SID · 2-9
SIGMETS · 3-25
Single Row Format · 2-5
Software Updates · 6-49
Software Versions · 4-53
Split Pages · 1-16
Squelch · 1-7
Standby Com · 1-17
Start-Up Sequence · 1-11
Stuck Mic · 1-24
Subscriptions · 6-29
Sunrise/Sunset · 2-39
SVS · 3-53
Synthetic Vision · 3-53
System Failures · 6-23
System Settings · 4-52
System Status · 4-53
TOD · 2-26
Top of Descent · 2-26
Touch screen · 1-35
Traffic · 3-46
Transition Altitudes/Levels · 5-16
Transponder Control and Display ·
1-25
Transponder Wiring · 6-54
Trip Planner · 4-12
Trip Statistics · 4-13
Tuning · 1-19
U
USB · 6-29
User Preferences · 4-38
User Settings · 4-38, 4-51
User Waypoint · 2-49
Utilities · 4-7
UTM · 4-50
V
Vertical Constraints · 2-16
Video · 3-73
Volume · 4-1
VOR · 1-20
VOR Course Depiction · 5-11
VSR · 4-30
VTF · 5-26
T
W
TAWS · 3-38
Terrain · 3-31
Terrain Awareness · 3-31
TFR · 3-27
Timers · 4-7
TIS Traffic · 3-46
TIS-B Traffic · 3-46
WAAS Approaches · 5-23
WAAS Operations · 1-47
Warnings · 6-4
Weather Radar · 3-29
WiFi · 1-45
Winds · 3-23
Index
72
Website There is a dedicated website that provides more
information on this product at http://www.ifd540.com
FAQs http://www.avidyne.com/files/downloads/literature/IFD540FAQ.pdf
Service Hotline A hotline has been established to service
questions or issues regarding Avidyne products. The U.S. Toll
Free number is 1-888-723-7592. International toll free numbers
are listed at http://www.avidyne.com/contact/intphones.html
Email Customer/product support issues can be emailed as well at
techsupp@avidyne.com
When calling or emailing for product-related help, please have the
following information available, if able:
•
Customer Name/Account Information
•
Aircraft tail number, IFD540 serial number, and
software versions.
•
A good description of the problem or question.
•
A copy of your data logs.
SOFTWARE LICENSE: AVIDYNE CORPORATION (“AVIDYNE”) IS WILLING TO LICENSE
THIS SOFTWARE, PILOT’S GUIDE, AND RELATED MATERIALS (THE “SOFTWARE”)
ONLY ON THE CONDITION THAT YOU AGREE TO THE TERMS OF THE PUBLISHED
SOFTWARE LICENSE WHICH CAN BE ACCESSED VIA THIS WEB ADDRESS:
HTTP://WWW.AVIDYNE.COM/SUPPORT/LICENSE.ASP
LIMITATION OF LEGAL RIGHTS: THE USER OF THIS EQUIPMENT AGREES TO THE
TERMS AND CONDITIONS PUBLISHED BY AVIDYNE AT THIS WEB ADDRESS:
HTTP://WWW.AVIDYNE.COM/SUPPORT/LEGAL-RIGHTS.ASP
FCC APPROVAL AND CAUTIONS: THIS DEVICE COMPLIES WITH PART 15 OF THE
FCC RULES. OPERATION IS SUBJECT TO THE CONDITION THAT THIS DEVICE DOES
NOT CAUSE HARMFUL INTERFERENCE. THE MANUFACTURER IS NOT RESPONSIBLE
FOR ANY RADIO OR TV INTERFERENCE CAUSED BY UNAUTHORIZED
MODIFICATIONS TO THIS EQUIPMENT. SUCH MODIFICATIONS COULD VOID THE
USER’S AUTHORITY TO OPERATE THE EQUPMENT.
AVIDYNE CORPORATION
710 North Drive
Melbourne FL 32934
P 321 751 8520
Toll Free 800-AVIDYNE (800 284 3963)
www.avidyne.com
P/N 600-00300-001 Rev 06
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