Zerto Virtual Manager Administration Guide: Microsoft

Zerto Virtual
Manager
Administration
Guide
Microsoft Hyper-V Environment
Version 5.0 Update 4
ZVR-ADVH-5.0U4-July2017
Copyright © 2017, Zerto Ltd. All rights reserved.
Information in this document is subject to change without notice and does not represent a commitment on the part of Zerto Ltd. Zerto Ltd. does not assume
responsibility for any printing errors that may appear in this document. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any
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personal use, without the prior written permission of Zerto Ltd.
All other marks and names mentioned herein may be trademarks of their respective companies.
ZVR-ADVH-5.0U4 Rev01 July2017
2
TABLE OF CONTENTS
About This Guide. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
Intended Audience. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Overview of Content in This Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Support and Feedback. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION TO ZERTO VIRTUAL REPLICATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
What is Zerto Virtual Replication?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Zerto Virtual Replication Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
How Zerto Virtual Replication Recovery Works. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Benefits of Using Zerto Virtual Replication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
CHAPTER 2: ACCESSING THE ZERTO USER INTERFACE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Using the Zerto Virtual Manager Web Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a Security Certificate for the Zerto User Interface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working With the Zerto User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Subtabs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Views. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16
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CHAPTER 3: INITIAL SITE CONFIGURATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Enabling Replication to the Same Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
WAN Sizing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Collecting Data Characteristics for VMs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Calculating the Estimated Bandwidth Requirement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Setting Up Offsite Backups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Creating an Offsite Backup Repository . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Editing an Offsite Backup Repository . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
CHAPTER 4: OVERVIEW OF RECOVERY FLOWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Flow for a Disaster Recovery Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Flow for a Test Failover Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Flow for a File or Folder Level Restore Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Flow for an Offsite Backup and Restore Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
CHAPTER 5: INTRODUCTION TO PROTECTING VIRTUAL MACHINES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Configuring Virtual Protection Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
The Role of the Journal During Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
What happens After the VPG is Defined . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
File and Folder Recovery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Offsite Backups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
CHAPTER 6: PROTECTING VIRTUAL MACHINES FROM HYPER-V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Protecting Virtual Machines to Hyper-V Hosts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Protecting Virtual Machines to the Same Site. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
When to Replicate to the Same Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Protecting Virtual Machines to a Recovery Site VMware vCenter Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Protecting Virtual Machines to a Recovery Site VMware vCloud Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
3
Protecting Virtual Machines from Hyper-V Hosts to AWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Protecting Virtual Machines from Hyper-V Hosts to Azure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Azure Limitations Which Affect Installation and Recoverability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
CHAPTER 7: MONITORING ZERTO VIRTUAL REPLICATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
The DASHBOARD Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Monitoring VPGs – The VPGs Tab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
List View - GENERAL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
List View - PERFORMANCE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
List View - BACKUP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Additional Fields and Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Grid View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Monitoring a Single VPG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Monitoring Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Monitoring Protected Virtual Machines – The VMs Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Monitoring Peer Sites - The SITES Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Monitoring Virtual Replication Appliances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Monitoring VRAs – The SETUP Tab – VRAs Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Monitoring a Single VRA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Monitoring Storage – The SETUP Tab – The STORAGE Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Monitoring Repositories – The SETUP Tab – The REPOSITORIES Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Monitoring Offsite Backups – The OFFSITE BACKUP Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
VPGs Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
VMs Tab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110
Zerto Performance Counters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
CHAPTER 8: MANAGING VPGS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Editing a VPG. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114
Modifying the Journal Size Hard Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
Modifying the Retention Period for Offsite Backups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
Adding Virtual Machines to a VPG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
Azure Limitations Which Affect Installation and Recoverability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
Deleting Virtual Machines in a VPG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Modifying Protected Virtual Machine Volumes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Changing the Recovery Storage for a Protected Virtual Machine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
Pausing the Protection of a VPG. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
Forcing the Synchronization of a VPG. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
Handling a VPG with in an Error State. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Deleting a VPG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Deleting a VPG When the Status is Deleting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Running an Unscheduled Offsite Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Ensuring Application Consistency – Checkpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Adding a Checkpoint to Identify a Key Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Ensuring Transaction Consistency in Microsoft Windows Server Environments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Running Scripts Before or After Recovering a VPG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Creating a Script . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Example Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Exporting and Importing VPG Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
VPG Statuses and Synchronization Triggers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
VPG Statuses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
VPG Synchronization Triggers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
CHAPTER 9: MANAGING VRAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Installing a VRA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
4
Upgrading VRAs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Editing VRA Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
Changing a Recovery VRA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
Uninstalling VRAs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Handling a VRA in an Error State (Ghost VRA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Managing Protection When Moving a Host to a Different Cluster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
CHAPTER 10: MANAGING A ZERTO VIRTUAL MANAGER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .151
Checking Connectivity Between Zerto Virtual Replication Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .151
Reconfiguring the Zerto Virtual Manager Setup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
Reconfiguring the Microsoft SQL Server Database Used by the Zerto Virtual Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Replacing the SSL Certificate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Pairing to Another Site and Unpairing Sites. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Pair to Another Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Unpairing Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
CHAPTER 11: ADVANCED SITE CONFIGURATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Site Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Editing Information About a Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Defining Performance and Throttling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Defining Site Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Configuring Email Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .161
Defining Resource Report Sampling Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
Reviewing Supported Host Versions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Seeing What is Licensed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Submitting a Support Ticket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
About Zerto Virtual Replication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
CHAPTER 12: OVERVIEW OF DISASTER RECOVERY OPERATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
The Failover Test Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
The Move Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
The Failover Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
The Restore File Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
The Clone Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
CHAPTER 13: TESTING RECOVERY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .171
The Test Failover Process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .171
Starting and Stopping Failover Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
After Starting a Test, What Happens? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Viewing Test Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Live Disaster Recovery Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Basic Verification – User Traffic Is Not Run against the Recovered VMs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Run User Traffic Against the Recovered VMs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
CHAPTER 14: MIGRATING A VPG TO THE RECOVERY SITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
The Move Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Moving Protected Virtual Machines to a Remote Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Reverse Protection For a Moved VPG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
5
CHAPTER 15: MIGRATING ZERTO VIRTUAL REPLICATION TO A NEW VIRTUAL MACHINE . . . . . . 190
CHAPTER 16: MANAGING FAILOVER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
The Failover Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Initiating a Failover. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
Reverse Protection for a Failed Over VPG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
What Happens When the Protected Site is Down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .200
Initiating a Failover During a Test. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .200
CHAPTER 17: CLONING A VPG TO THE RECOVERY SITE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
The Clone Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Cloning Protected Virtual Machines to the Remote Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
CHAPTER 18: RECOVERING FILES AND FOLDERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .204
The File and Folder Recovery Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .204
Recovering Files and Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .205
CHAPTER 19: RESTORING AN OFFSITE BACKUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211
The Restore Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211
Restoring Virtual Machines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
CHAPTER 20: ZERTO VIRTUAL REPLICATION REPORTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Outbound Protection Over Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Protection Over Time by Site. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Recovery Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Resources Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .220
Using a REST API to Generate a Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .220
Details Tab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .220
Monthly Usage Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
VPG Performance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
Backup Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
CHAPTER 21: TROUBLESHOOTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226
Ensuring the Zerto Virtual Manager is Running . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226
Troubleshooting Needs Configuration Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
Troubleshooting GUI Problems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
Troubleshooting VRA Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
Handling Lack of Storage Space for Recovered Virtual Machines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228
Zerto Virtual Replication Diagnostics Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228
Collecting Zerto Virtual Replication Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229
Using Remote Log Collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229
Using the Zerto Diagnostics application. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230
Understanding the Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234
CHAPTER 22: ZERTO VIRTUAL REPLICATION AND MICROSOFT HYPER-V FEATURES. . . . . . . . . . . 236
Stopping and Restarting the SCVMM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236
Dynamic Disks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236
Hyper-V High Availability (HA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236
Clusters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
Failover Clustering and Fault Tolerance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
Pass-through Disks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
6
Performance and Resource Optimization or Dynamic Optimization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
Multi-Pathing and Storage Failures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
Availability Sets and Anti-Affinity Rules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
Live Migration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
Quick Storage Migration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
SCVMM and Host Maintenance Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
User Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
Hyper-V Replica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
Restart Zerto Virtual Manager After SCVMM Upgrade. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
CHAPTER 23: THE ZERTO VIRTUAL MANAGER USER INTERFACE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .240
Add Checkpoint Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241
Add Site Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241
Advanced Journal Settings Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242
Advanced VM Replication Settings Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243
Advanced VM Settings for Cloud Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243
ALERTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .244
Boot Order Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .244
Browse for File Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
Change VM Recovery VRA Dialog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
Checkpoints Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .246
Configure and Install VRA Dialog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247
Configure Paired Site Routing Dialog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .248
Configure VM Settings Dialog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .249
Edit NIC Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .249
Edit Repository Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .250
Edit Selected Volumes Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
Edit VM Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
Edit VM Settings (AWS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252
Edit VM Settings (Azure) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252
Edit vNIC Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
Edit Volumes Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254
Edit VRA Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254
New Repository Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255
NICs Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256
Offsite Clone Dialog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256
Open Support Ticket Dialog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257
Remote Support Dialog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257
Restore from Zerto Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258
Restore Volumes Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .260
Site Settings Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261
Site Information Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261
Performance and Throttling Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
Policies Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263
Email Settings Dialog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .264
Reports Dialog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265
Compatibility Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265
License Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266
About Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
Stop Failover Test Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
TASKS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268
Volumes Dialog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268
CHAPTER 24: GLOSSARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269
7
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
Zerto Virtual Replication provides a business continuity (BC) and disaster recovery (DR) solution in a virtual environment,
providing near real-time replication, with write-order fidelity, with minimal impact on product workloads. Fully automated
orchestration delivers failover and failback in one click. Non-disruptive disaster recovery testing gives you confidence that your
DR solution will work predictably and consistently. Protection groups ensure that all virtual machines that comprise an
application are protected in the exact same manner no matter where they are in the environment.
With support for different hypervisors, such as vSphere or Hyper-V, workloads can be protected, migrated, and recovered,
either within the same hypervisor environment or across hypervisor environments.
This guide describes how to configure and manage Zerto Virtual Replication to implement business continuity and disaster
recovery (DR) solutions in a VMware, Hyper-V, AWS, or mixed environments.
Intended Audience
This guide is for the use of experienced Hyper-V administrators.
Overview of Content in This Guide
This guide contains the following chapters:
CHAPTER TITLE
DESCRIPTION
1
Introduction to Zerto Virtual Replication Describes the underlying concepts and architecture of Zerto Virtual
Replication.
2
Accessing the Zerto User Interface
Describes how to access the Zerto User Interface.
3
Initial Site Configuration
Describes the initial site configuration before protecting virtual
machines.
4
Overview of Recovery Flows
Describes disaster recovery and offsite backup flows from the initial
protection to the recovery of virtual machines. It also describes, at a
high level, the file level recovery process.
5
Introduction to Protecting Virtual
Machines
Describes how to set up protection for virtual machines.
6
Protecting Virtual Machines from
Hyper-V
Describes how to protect virtual machines on a Hyper-V host.
7
Monitoring Zerto Virtual Replication
Describes the different ways of monitoring the protected virtual
machines and the protection and recovery sites.
8
Managing VPGs
Describes the processes available to manage VPGs using Zerto Virtual
Replication.
9
Managing VRAs
Describes the processes available to manage VRAs using Zerto Virtual
Replication.
10
Managing a Zerto Virtual Manager
Describes the processes available to manage the Zerto Virtual Manager
using Zerto Virtual Replication.
11
Advanced Site Configuration
Describes site configuration not crucial to the protection of virtual
machines.
Zerto Virtual Manager Administration Guide for Microsoft Hyper-V Environments - Version 5.0 Update 4
About This Guide
8
Zerto Virtual Manager Administration Guide for Microsoft Hyper-V Environments - Version 5.0 Update 4
About This Guide
CHAPTER TITLE
DESCRIPTION
12
Overview of Disaster Recovery
Operations
Describes the available recovery procedures and when they are used.
13
Testing Recovery
Describes how to test recovery to ensure the results you want.
14
Migrating a VPG to the Recovery Site
Describes the process of migrating protected virtual machines from the
protected site to the recovery site.
16
Managing Failover
Describes the process of recovery from the protected site to the
recovery site.
17
Cloning a VPG to the Recovery Site
Describes the process of cloning protected virtual machines from the
protected site to the recovery site.
18
Recovering Files and Folders
Describes the process of restoring files and folders from the recovery
site.
19
Restoring an Offsite Backup
Describes the process of restoring an offsite backup from a repository.
20
Zerto Virtual Replication Reports
Describes the reporting and monitoring capabilities available with Zerto
Virtual Replication.
21
Troubleshooting
Describes how to resolve problems, including generating logs.
22
Zerto Virtual Replication and Microsoft Describes the interaction between Zerto Virtual Replication and
Hyper-V Features
commonly used Hyper-V features such as Live Migration.
23
The Zerto Virtual Manager User
Interface
Describes the Zerto User Interface.
24
Glossary
A glossary of terms used throughout Zerto Virtual Replication.
Support and Feedback
Please send suggestions to improve the documentation to Zerto support.
Support and Feedback
9
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION TO
ZERTO VIRTUAL REPLICATION
Disaster recovery is the process of preparing for recovery or continuation of IT processing tasks that support critical business
processes in the event of a threat to the IT infrastructure. Zerto Offsite Backup is the additional process of enabling recovery of
IT processing tasks after an extended period. This chapter describes Zerto Virtual Replication general concepts to enable
replication and recovery in a virtual environment.
The following topics are described in this chapter:
■
■
■
■
“What is Zerto Virtual Replication?”, below
“Zerto Virtual Replication Architecture”, on page 11
“How Zerto Virtual Replication Recovery Works”, on page 12
“Benefits of Using Zerto Virtual Replication”, on page 12
What is Zerto Virtual Replication?
Zerto Virtual Replication provides a business continuity (BC) and disaster recovery (DR) solution in a virtual environment,
providing near real-time replication, with write-order fidelity, with minimal impact on product workloads. Fully automated
orchestration delivers failover, failback, and reverse protection in one click. Non-disruptive disaster recovery testing gives you
confidence that your DR solution will work predictably and consistently. Consistency groups ensure all virtual machines that
comprise an application are protected in the exact same manner no matter where they are in the environment.
With support for different hypervisors, such as vSphere or Hyper-V, workloads can be protected, migrated, and recovered,
either within the same hypervisor environment or across hypervisor environments.
Zerto Virtual Replication is installed in both the protected and the recovery sites. The disaster recovery across these sites is
managed by a browser-based user interface. Managing Zerto Virtual Replication is also possible programmatically, either via a
set of RESTful APIs or PowerShell cmdlets.
Recovery that does rely on native replication functionality, such as recovery available with Microsoft Active Directory or SQL
Server, can also be replicated using Zerto Virtual Replication, and whether the native replication functionality is used or not is
determined by site considerations, such as increased complexity of having multiple points of control and possible additional
costs incurred when using vendor native replication.
You configure replication by first pairing the site with virtual machines to be protected with a recovery site. You then define
what virtual machines you want replicated in consistency groups, where the virtual machines in a group comprise the
application and data you want to protect. You can group different virtual machines together or keep them separate. By creating
different replication groups, you can customize the replication requirements for each group to better optimize the recovery
plan.
Disaster recovery is based on the premise that you will want to recover with a minimum RPO. However, to enable full recovery
in cases such as virus attacks, Zerto Virtual Replication provides the ability to recover to a point in time up to 30 days prior to
the disaster. When recovery longer than 30days is required, Zerto Virtual Replication provides an extended recovery, using an
offsite backup mechanism that enables you to recover to a recovery site based on a daily or weekly backup going as far back as
a year. The majority of the processing for both disaster recovery and extended recovery is done at the recovery site, minimizing
the impact on the production site.
Zerto Virtual Manager Administration Guide for Microsoft Hyper-V Environments - Version 5.0 Update 4
Introduction to Zerto Virtual Replication
10
Zerto Virtual Manager Administration Guide for Microsoft Hyper-V Environments - Version 5.0 Update 4
Introduction to Zerto Virtual Replication
Zerto Virtual Replication Architecture
Zerto Virtual Replication provides disaster recovery between hypervisors such as VMware ESX/ESXi hosts managed by
vCenter Servers and Microsoft Hyper-V hosts managed by SCVMM. In addition, you can protect virtual machines in these
environments to a public cloud, such as Amazon Web Services.
When Zerto Virtual Replication is installed to work with a hypervisor it comprises the following components:
Zerto Virtual Manager (ZVM) – A Windows service that manages everything required for the replication between the
protection and recovery sites, except for the actual replication of data. The ZVM interacts with the hypervisor management
user interface, such as vCenter Server or Microsoft SCVMM, to get the inventory of VMs, disks, networks, hosts, etc. and then
the Zerto User Interface manages this protection. The ZVM also monitors changes in the hypervisor environment and
responds accordingly. For example, a VMware vMotion operation, or Microsoft Live Migration of a protected VM from one
host to another is intercepted by the ZVM and the Zerto User Interface is updated accordingly.
A Zerto Virtual Manager can manage up to 5000 virtual machines, either being protected by, or recovered to, the Zerto Virtual
Manager.
Virtual Replication Appliance (VRA) – A virtual machine installed on each hypervisor hosting virtual machines to be protected
or recovered, to manage the replication of data from protected virtual machines to the recovery site.
A VRA can manage a maximum of 1500 volumes, whether these are volumes being protected or recovered.
Virtual Backup Appliance (VBA) – A VBA is a Windows service, which manages back-ups within Zerto Virtual Replication. The
VBA service runs on the same machine as the Zerto Virtual Manager service and is responsible for the repositories where
offsite backups are stored. These repositories can be local or on a shared network.
Zerto User Interface – Recovery using Zerto Virtual Replication is managed in a browser.
The following diagram shows how the main Zerto Virtual Replication components are deployed across hypervisor-based
enterprise sites to provide disaster recovery across these sites.1
When you plan to recover the enterprise site to a public cloud, Zerto Virtual Replication is installed in the cloud environment.
Zerto Virtual Replication comprises the same components but the VRA runs as a service, so that the ZVM, VRA, and VBA all
run as services on a single virtual machine instance in the public cloud.
1. For the architecture diagrams when one of the sites is a cloud service provider, see Zerto Cloud Manager Administration Guide.
Zerto Virtual Replication Architecture
11
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Introduction to Zerto Virtual Replication
How Zerto Virtual Replication Recovery Works
Installing Zerto Virtual Replication installs the Zerto Virtual Manager, which sits in the hypervisor layer on the enterprise site.
You manage the Zerto Virtual Manager, one on each of the protected and recovery sites, using the Zerto User Interface.
Zerto also provides a set of RESTful APIs and PowerShell cmdlets to enable incorporating some of the disaster recovery
functionality within scripts or programs.
In the protected site you define the virtual machines that you want to replicate, either individually or together, as a virtual
protection group (VPG). The virtual machines that you include in the VPG can come from one or more hypervisor hosts. In this
way, you can protect applications that run on multiple virtual machines and disks as a single unit – a VPG. An example of an
application that runs on multiple virtual machines includes software that requires a web server and database, both of which run
on virtual machines different than the virtual machine where the application software runs.
A virtual machine can be included in several VPGs so that you can recover it to several sites, depending on the needs of the
organization. For example the same workload can be protected to a local or a remote location as well as to the cloud. Using
several recovery sites also enables migrating disaster recovery datacenters from one location to another.
Every write is copied by Zerto Virtual Replication and sent, asynchronously, to the recovery site, while the write continues to be
processed on the protected site. For greater efficiency and performance, the write can be compressed before being sent to the
recovery site with throttling techniques being used to prioritize network traffic.
On the recovery site the write is written to a journal managed by a Virtual Replication Appliance (VRA). Each protected virtual
machine has its own journal. Every few seconds, a checkpoint is also written to each journal. These checkpoints ensure write
order fidelity and crash-consistency to each checkpoint. During recovery you pick one of these crash-consistent checkpoints
and recover to this point. Additionally, checkpoints can be manually added by the administrator, with a description of the
checkpoint. For example, when an event is going to take place that might result in the need to perform a recovery, you can
pinpoint when this event occurs as a checkpoint written to each journal.
The VRA manages the journals for every virtual machine that will be recovered to the hypervisor hosting that VRA. It also
manages images of the protected volumes for these virtual machines. During a failover, you can specify that you want to
recover the virtual machines in the VPG using the last checkpoint or you can specify an earlier checkpoint, in which case the
recovery of the mirror images under the VRA are synchronized to this checkpoint. Thus, you can recover the environment to
the point before any corruption and ignore later writes in the journal that were corrupted, regardless of the cause of the
corruption, such as a crash in the protected site or a virus attack.
To improve the RTO during recovery, the user is able to start working even before the virtual machine volumes on the recovery
site have been fully synchronized. Every request is analyzed and the response returned either from the virtual machine directly
or from the journal if the information in the journal is more up-to-date. This continues until the recovery site virtual
environment is fully synchronized, up until the last checkpoint or an earlier checkpoint, when the integrity of the protected site
was assured.
When recovery to a point is required that is further in the past than the time saved in the journal, an offsite backup can be
restored. Offsite backups are an extension of disaster recovery, with the virtual machine files, such as the configuration and
virtual disk files, saved to a repository for up to one year. These files are then used to restore the virtual machines to the point
of the stored offsite backup at the recovery site.
Benefits of Using Zerto Virtual Replication
Datacenter optimization and virtualization technologies have matured and are now commonly used in IT infrastructure. As
more applications are deployed in a virtualized infrastructure, there is a growing need for recovery mechanisms that support
mission critical application deployments while providing complete BC and DR.
Traditional replication and disaster recovery solutions were not conceived to deal with the demands created by the
virtualization paradigm. For example, most replication solutions are not managed in the hypervisor layer, considering the
virtual machines and disks, but at the physical disk level. Hence they are not truly virtualization aware.
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Introduction to Zerto Virtual Replication
The lack of virtualization awareness creates a huge operational and administrative burden. It also results in operational
inflexibility. Zerto Virtual Replication has been designed to resolve these issues by being fully virtualization aware.
Fully Virtual – Sits in the Hypervisor or Cloud
Zerto Virtual Replication software sits in the hypervisor level. Protection groups are configured with virtual machines and
virtual disks, without the need to consider the physical disks.
Hypervisor Agnostic
Zerto Virtual Replication runs both in VMware vCenter Server and Microsoft SCVMM. It is compatible with VMware
hypervisor management features, such as vMotion and Microsoft hypervisor management features, such as Live Migration.
Hardware Agnostic
Because Zerto Virtual Replication software manages recovery of virtual machines and virtual disks only, it does not matter
what hardware is used in either the protected or recovery sites; it can be from the same vendor or different vendors. With Zerto
Virtual Replication the logical storage is separated from the physical storage so that the vendor and actual type of storage
hardware do not need to be considered.
Zerto Virtual Replication provides a workload mobility and protection layer providing seamless connectivity, portability,
protection, orchestration, and application encapsulation of workloads across clouds without vendor lock-in. High scale, mission
critical applications, and data are encapsulated, as well as features, specifications, and configurations, and can be seamlessly
migrated across different servers, storage, hypervisors, and clouds without any disruption to business services.
With Zerto Virtual Replication, IT managers can choose the right infrastructure for the right use case for the right price. One
application can leverage several different environments for disaster recovery, bursting, production, backup, testing, and
development. With Zerto Virtual Replication there is no vendor lock-in to a cloud, technology, or vendor. Any choice, any cloud,
any technology, any price, any service level is available in minutes for any workload.
Focus is on the Application, Not the Physical Storage
By considering the physical disk level and not the virtual disk level, traditional replication is not truly application aware. Even
virtual replication recovers block writes at the SCSI level and not at the application level. Zerto Virtual Replication is truly
application focused, replicating the writes from the application in a consistent manner.
Compatibility Across Virtual Environments – Cross-Hypervisor Platform and Version Agnostic
Zerto Virtual Replication enables replication across multiple hypervisor managers, such as VMware vCenter Server and
Microsoft SCVMM, and to public clouds such as Amazon Web Services (AWS) or Microsoft Azure. You can protect virtual
machines in one hypervisor platform and recover to a different hypervisor platform. This feature can also be used to migrate
virtual machines to a different hypervisor platform.
Also, virtual machines running in one version a hypervisor can be recovered in a different version of the same type of
hypervisor, as long as Zerto Virtual Replication supports the hypervisor versions, virtual machines can be protected across
versions.
Fully Scalable
Zerto Virtual Replication enables defining software-only Virtual Replication Appliances (VRAs) on each hypervisor host to
manage the replication of virtual machines on that host. Increasing the number of hypervisor hosts is handled by defining a new
VRA on each new host. There is no need to install additional software to the hypervisor management tool, such as VMware
vCenter Server or Microsoft SCVMM, to handle additional hosts or virtual machines and no need to consider additional
hardware acquisitions.
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Efficient Asynchronous Replication
Writes are captured by the Zerto Virtual Replication software in the hypervisor level, before they are written to the physical
disk at the protected site. These writes are sent to the recovery site asynchronously, thus avoiding long distance replication
latency for the production applications.
Also, because these writes are captured and sent to the recovery site, it is only the delta changes and not the whole file or disk
that is sent to the recovery site, reducing the amount of network traffic, which reduces WAN requirements and significantly
improves the ability to meet both RPO and RTO targets.
One-Click Failover and Control of the Recovery Process
When recovery is required, the administrator clicks on a button in the Zerto User Interface to initiate failover. This means that
controlling the start of a recovery remains in the hands of the administrator, who can decide when to initiate the recovery and,
by selecting a checkpoint, to what point-in-time to recover to.
One-Click Migration
Application migrations can be resource intensive projects that take weeks of planning, execution, and downtime. With Zerto
Virtual Replication migrations are greatly simplified and can be completed without extended outages or maintenance windows
and across different types of hardware and even different hypervisors, such as VMware ESXi or Microsoft Hyper-V. Migrations
across different versions within a type of hypervisor, such as from a VMware vCenter environment to a vCloud environment or
even cross hypervisor migration, such as migration from a vCenter environment to a Hyper-V environment is as easy as a
migration from one site to another using the same hypervisor infrastructure.
Efficient Asynchronous Replication
Writes are captured by the Zerto Virtual Replication software in the hypervisor level, before they are written to the physical
disk at the protected site. These writes are sent to the recovery site asynchronously, thus avoiding long distance replication
latency for the production applications.
Also, because these writes are captured and sent to the recovery site, it is only the delta changes and not the whole file or disk
that is sent to the recovery site, reducing the amount of network traffic, which reduces WAN requirements and significantly
improves the ability to meet both RPO and RTO targets.
One-Click Failover and Control of the Recovery Process
When recovery is required, the administrator clicks on a button in the Zerto User Interface to initiate failover. This means that
controlling the start of a recovery remains in the hands of the administrator, who can decide when to initiate the recovery and,
by selecting a checkpoint, to what point-in-time to recover to.
File and Folder Recovery
You can recover specific files and folders from the recovery site for virtual machines that are being protected by Zerto Virtual
Replication and running Windows operating systems. You can recover the files and folders from a specific point-in-time.
You can choose to recover one or several files or folders from the recovery site.
Offsite Backup
Zerto Virtual Replication provides an offsite back up option that enables saving the protected virtual machines offsite for up to
one year in a state where they can be easily deployed. Because the backups use the same mechanism used for disaster
recovery, the performance impact on the production site is minimal, since the processing is performed on the recovery site. The
offsite backups are fixed points saved either weekly or monthly.
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Policy-based
In the protected site you define the virtual machines that you want to recover, either individually or as groups, as a virtual
protection group (VPG). The virtual machines that you include in the VPG can come from one or more hypervisor hosts. In this
way, you can protect applications that run on multiple virtual machines and disks as a single unit, in a single VPG.
Minimal RPO
Zerto Virtual Replication utilizes continuous data protection, sending a record of every write in the virtual protection group to
the recovery site. The transfer of this information is done over an optimized WAN asynchronously. If recovery is required, all
the data that was transferred to the recovery site is available resulting in recovery within the requested RPO.
Policy-based
In the protected site you define the virtual machines that you want to recover, either individually or as groups, as a virtual
protection group (VPG). The virtual machines that you include in the VPG can come from one or more hypervisor hosts. In this
way, you can protect applications that run on multiple virtual machines and disks as a single unit, in a single VPG.
Minimal RPO
Zerto Virtual Replication utilizes continuous data protection, sending a record of every write in the virtual protection group to
the recovery site. The transfer of this information is done over an optimized WAN asynchronously. If recovery is required, all
the data that was transferred to the recovery site is available resulting in recovery within the requested RPO.
WAN Optimization Between Protected and Recovery Sites
Using compression to minimize bandwidth and other techniques such as throttling to prioritize network traffic to reduce the
impact on day-to-day operations, you can make sure that the communication between the protected and recovery sites is fully
optimized.
Zerto Virtual Replication also uses signature matching to reduce the amount of data sent across the WAN. During
synchronization of the protected site and recovery site for every virtual machine in a VPG, Zerto Virtual Replication maintains a
map of disk sectors so that if there is a need to resynchronize sites, the map signatures can be used to ensure that only data
where changes occurred are passed over the WAN.
WAN Resilience on Both the Protected and Recovery Sites
Zerto Virtual Replication is highly resilient to WAN interruptions. In order to reduce storage overhead used for replication
purposes, on WAN failure or when the load over the WAN is too great for the WAN to handle, Zerto Virtual Replication starts
to maintain a smart bitmap in memory, in which it tracks and records the storage areas that changed. Since the bitmap is kept
in memory, Zerto Virtual Replication does not require any LUN or volume per VPG at the protected side. The bitmap is small
and scales dynamically, but does not contain any actual IO data, just references to the areas of the protected disk that have
changed. The bitmap is stored locally on the VRA within the available resources. Once the WAN connection resumes or the
load returns to normal traffic, Zerto Virtual Replication uses this bitmap to check whether there were updates to the protected
disks and if there were updates to the disks, these updates are sent to the recovery site.
DR Management Anywhere
With Zerto Virtual Replication everything is managed from a standalone browser-base user interface, enabling disaster
recovery management from anywhere using any device.
Benefits of Using Zerto Virtual Replication
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CHAPTER 2: ACCESSING THE ZERTO
USER INTERFACE
You manage the protection and replication of virtual machines in Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager
(SCVMM), between the protected and recovery sites, using the Zerto User Interface. On first access to the user interface, you
might have to add a security certificate to set up secure communication. Zerto also provides a set of RESTful APIs and
PowerShell cmdlets to enable incorporating some of the disaster recovery functionality within scripts or programs.
You manage the protection and replication of virtual machines between the protected and recovery sites using Zerto Virtual
Manager Web Client.
Note: Microsoft Windows Explorer 9 is not supported and version 10 does not work well with the user interface. Zerto
recommends using Chrome, Firefox, or later versions of Internet Explorer.
Note: It is required to exclude the Zerto Virtual Replication folder from antivirus scanning. Failure to do so may lead to the ZVR
folder being incorrectly identified as a threat and in some circumstances corrupt the ZVR folder.
The following topics are described in this chapter:
■
■
■
“Using the Zerto Virtual Manager Web Client”, below
“Adding a Security Certificate for the Zerto User Interface”, on page 16
“Working With the Zerto User Interface”, on page 18
Using the Zerto Virtual Manager Web Client
1.
In a browser, enter the following URL:
https://zvm_IP:9669
where zvm_IP is the IP address of the Zerto Virtual Manager for the site you want to manage.
2.
Login using the user name and password for the machine where you installed Zerto Virtual Replication.
Username – The user name for the user for the machine where the Zerto Virtual Manager is installed. If the user is part of
a domain, you must also specify the domain, with the following format:
domain\username
Password – A valid password for the given user name.
Adding a Security Certificate for the Zerto User Interface
Communication between the Zerto Virtual Manager and the user interface uses HTTPS. On the first login to the Zerto User
Interface, you must install a security certificate in order to be able to continue working without each login requiring acceptance
of the security.
To install a security certificate for the Zerto User Interface:
On first access to the Zerto User Interface, if you haven’t installed the security certificate, a security alert is issued.
Note the following:
■
■
1.
To run this procedure run Microsoft Internet Explorer as administrator. The procedure is similar for Google Chrome and for
Mozilla Firefox.
Access the Zerto User Interface using the IP and not the name of the machine where Zerto Virtual Replication is installed.
Click View Certificate.
The Certificate dialog is displayed.
2.
Click Install Certificate.
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The Certificate Import wizard dialog is displayed.
3.
Follow the wizard: Place all the certificates in the Trusted Root Certification Authorities store: Select the Place
all certificates in the following store option and browse to select the Trusted Root Certification
Authorities store.
4. Continue to the end of the wizard. Click Yes when the Security Warning is displayed.
5.
Click OK that the installation was successful.
6.
Click OK when prompted and then Yes in the Security Alert dialog to continue.
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Working With the Zerto User Interface
After logging on to the Zerto User Interface for the first time, the dashboard is displayed. The dashboard provides summary
information about the status of the site, as shown in the following diagram:
Use the tabs to access the specific information you want:
DASHBOARD – General information about the site, including the status of the VPGs being protected or recovered to the site.
VPGs – All the VPGs from both the local and remote sites and provides summary details of each VPG.
VMs – All the protected virtual machines from both the local and remote sites and provides summary details of each virtual
machine.
SITES – Details of the paired sites. This tab lists all the paired sites to the local site and provides summary details of each paired
site.
SETUP – Details about VRAs, storage and repositories.
OFFSITE BACKUP – Details of the offsite backup jobs either by VPG or virtual machine. This tab lists all the defined offsite
backups and their statuses.
MONITORING – Details about the alerts, events and tasks for the site.
REPORTS – General reports.
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Subtabs
The SETUP, OFFSITE BACKUP and MONITORING tabs and details of a specific VPG and VRA can be viewed from different
perspectives via subtabs. For example, under SETUP you can manage VRAs, storage and repositories via subtabs.
Views
Lists can be displayed with different views. For each view you can filter the information in columns via the filter icon next to
each column title. Clicking the column title enables sorting the column in ascending to descending order.
You can customize the default views or add a new view by clicking the view configuration button.
Customize a default view by selecting Show/Hide Columns and then checking the columns you want displayed. Create a new
view by selecting Create View.
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CHAPTER 3: INITIAL SITE
CONFIGURATION
There are a number of configuration tasks that you should do as part of the initial site configuration.
The following configuration topics are described in this chapter:
■
■
■
“Enabling Replication to the Same Site”, below
“WAN Sizing”, on page 21
“Setting Up Offsite Backups”, on page 23
Enabling Replication to the Same Site
When a single SCVMM is used, for example with remote branch offices, when replicating from one datacenter to another
datacenter, both managed by the same SCVMM, you must enable replication to the same SCVMM and pairing is not required.
In this case, replication to the same SCVMM must be set in the Site Settings dialog.
To enable replication to the same SCVMM:
1.
In the Zerto User Interface, click SETTING (
) in the top right of the header and select Site Settings.
The Site Settings dialog is displayed.
2.
Click Policies.
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3.
Check the Enable Replication to Self checkbox.
4. Click APPLY or SAVE.
The Zerto Virtual Manager when used to protect to itself can manage the protection of up to 5000 virtual machines.
WAN Sizing
When preparing your deployment, you need to verify that the connectivity between the two sites has bandwidth capacity that
can handle the data to be replicated between the sites.
You must use a minimum dedicated bandwidth of at least 5 Mb/sec.
Zerto Virtual Replication employs sophisticated compression algorithms to reduce the bandwidth required between the sites.
While compression can be very effective in reducing the bandwidth requirements, its efficiency is dependent on data
characteristics.
Note: Zerto Virtual Replication can also work with third-party WAN optimization and acceleration technologies, such as those
supplied by Riverbed Technologies and Silver Peak.
Estimating the bandwidth requirements between the protected and recovery sites involves the following:
1.
Collect data characteristics for protected VMs.
2.
Calculate the estimated bandwidth requirements.
Note: When the recovery site is Amazon Web Services (AWS), you estimate the required bandwidth for the protected
machines as described below.
Collecting Data Characteristics for VMs
You can collect data characteristics for the virtual machines in a VPG in one of the following ways:
■
■
By using operating system performance monitors, such as the Windows Performance Monitor utility or the iostat
command for Linux operating systems.
By using Windows PowerShell in Windows Server 2012 to collect network utilization (and other information). When using
metering ACLs, you can measure the total network traffic sent and received by a virtual machine. To collect performance
characteristics for the virtual machines in a VPG, using PowerShell, do the following:
■
Turn on resource metering for the relevant virtual machines, if it is not already enabled.
■
Adjust the collection frequency, if necessary.
■
Collect the relevant statistics.
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Zerto recommends that you collect data for a minimum of one day. When you have enough statistics, you may want to turn off
resource metering since data collection can impact performance.
Turning on Resource Metering
By default, resource metering is not enabled. To turn on resource metering for one virtual machine, enter the following
PowerShell command:
Get-VM <VM-name> | Enable-VMResourceMetering
To turn on monitoring for all virtual machines on a server at one time, enter the following PowerShell command:
Get-VM | Enable-VMResourceMetering
Once you enable resource metering, Hyper-V begins to collect data. You can reset metering at any time, which discards the
data that has been collected up to that point.
If resource metering is enabled but no NetworkAdapterAcls are configured, Hyper-V configures them to measure total network
traffic. To measure network traffic through an IP range, configure the NetworkAdapterAcls for the IP range before running
Enable-VMResourceMetering.
Adjusting the Collection Frequency
By default, the collection frequency is once every hour. You can change the collection frequency, but understand that data
collection can impact performance. To change the collection frequency, enter the following command:
Set-VMHost –ComputerName <host-server-name> -ResourceMeteringSaveInterval <HH:MM:SS>
The collection frequency is always set at the host server level. You cannot adjust the collection frequency per virtual machine.
For example, if you enter 01:30:00, resource consumption will be collected every hour and a half.
Collecting and Viewing the Relevant Statistics
To view resource usage for one virtual machine, enter the following command:
Get-VM <VM-name> | Measure-VM
Resource metering data can be displayed for all of the virtual machines that are running on a host. To see data for all of the
virtual machines on a host, enter the following command:
Get_VM | Measure-VM
You can configure PowerShell to display only certain statistics. To do this, you must know the object names that PowerShell
assigns to each statistic. You can see the object names by entering the following command:
Get-VM | Measure-VM | Select-Object *
For example, when working with Zerto Virtual Replication, you are interested in network traffic. To list the network traffic for
each virtual machine, enter the following command:
Get-VM | Measure-VM | Select-Object VMName, NetworkMeteredTrafficReport
You can use VM Network Adapter ACLs to measure network activity to and from a specific network. For example, to meter
network traffic for a special subnet or IP address:
Add-VMNetworkAdapterAcl -VMName <VM-name> -Action Meter -RemoteIPAddress 10.10.0.0/16 Direction Outbound
Turning off Resource Metering
To disable the collection of performance statistics, enter the following PowerShell command:
Disable-VMResourceMetering -VMName <VM-name>
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Calculating the Estimated Bandwidth Requirement
Use the average write rate for the virtual machines in a VPG in the Zerto WAN Sizing Estimator to estimate the minimum
bandwidth required.
For each VM you also must decide whether compression will be enabled for the VM, based on the data characteristics.
To estimate sizing using the Zerto WAN Sizing Estimator:
1.
Open the Zerto WAN Sizing Estimator.
2.
Enter the following information in the VM data sheet:
■
The VM name.
■
The Write KB/s data, based on the statistics gathered in the previous task. Use a period for the decimal mark.
■
Define whether compression is enabled for this VM: Select Yes or No.
■
The application data characteristics: Select Compressed or Compressible.
Note: The Zerto WAN Sizing Estimator colors the cell red if you decide to employ compression on compressible data and
orange if you decide to avoid compression for compressible data.
The Zerto WAN Sizing Estimator estimates the total bandwidth needed for your deployment, using a minimum value of 5 Mb/
sec. The estimation is displayed on the top of each page of the Zerto WAN Sizing Estimator.
Note: The Zerto WAN Sizing Estimator also includes an Initial Sync Calculator sheet which you can use to estimate the initial
synchronization time given the disk sizes or the virtual machines in a VPG, the available bandwidth and whether or not
preseeding is used. The result is an estimate and could be increased by extensive write I/O activity and/or storage latency. The
Initial Sync Calculator takes into account the actual ongoing change rate data from the VM data sheet as well as automatically
using the compression parameter from the VM data sheet.
You can estimate the WAN sizing required without using the Zerto WAN Sizing Estimator using the following procedure.
To estimate sizing without using the Zerto WAN Sizing Estimator:
1.
For each virtual machine in the VPG multiply the KB/sec, based on the statistics gathered, by 8 and divide the result by
1024 to provide an answer in Mb/sec. Divide this result by 2 if compression is enabled for the VM and the data is
compressible.
2.
Sum the results of step 1.
WAN Mb/sec = SUM(KB/sec * (8/1024/(1 or 2 if compressible data that will be compressed)))
The result is an estimate of the required Mb/sec for the WAN.
Note: If the result is less than 5 Mb/sec, you must use a minimum dedicated bandwidth of at least 5 Mb/sec.
Setting Up Offsite Backups
Disaster recovery using Zerto Virtual Replication enables recovering from a disaster to any point between the moment just
before the disaster and a specified amount of time in the past up to 30 days. The recovery is done in real time at the recovery
site with a minimal RTO.
If there is an additional requirement to extend the recovery ability to more than 30 days, Zerto Virtual Replication provides an
offsite back up option that enables saving the protected virtual machines offsite for up to one year in a state where they can be
easily deployed.
The virtual machine files are saved in a repository for the required period. Each virtual machine can have multiple offsite
backups created according to a fixed schedule.
The offsite backups are managed by a Windows service, the Virtual Backup Appliance (VBA). The VBA is installed as part of
the Zerto Virtual Replication installation. During an offsite backup, the VBA communicates with the VRAs on the recovery site
to create the virtual machine files, such as the configuration and virtual disk files in a repository. The offsite backups are fixed
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points saved either weekly or monthly in the repository. Before you can create an offsite backup for virtual machines, you must
first create one or more repositories for the offsite backup jobs.
The following offsite backup set up options are described in this section:
■
■
“Creating an Offsite Backup Repository”, below
“Editing an Offsite Backup Repository”, on page 25
Creating an Offsite Backup Repository
You define the repositories where offsite backups are defined on the recovery site and can be stored, either locally at the
recovery site, or on a network share that uses the SMB, Server Message Block, protocol. The repository where you want this
offsite backup stored is specified when an offsite backup is defined.
To create an offsite backup repository:
1.
2.
In the Zerto User Interface, click SETUP > REPOSITORIES.
Click NEW REPOSITORY.
The New Repository dialog is displayed.
3.
Specify the following settings:
Repository Name – Specify a unique name for the repository.
Repository Type – Specify the type of repository. The options are Local or Network Share (SMB). If Local is specified,
backups are stored on the local machine where the Zerto Virtual Manager is installed. If SMB is specified, the network
share drive must be an SMB drive and if specified the username and password to access the drive must be provided. If the
repository location is a network drive, this drive can be mounted to third party storage, such as Amazon Web Services
(AWS). Using TntDrive, from Amazon, enables you to save your offsite backups to a cloud repository mounted disk as if
you are using a LAN or locally mounted drive. You can mount one or more Amazon S3 buckets as network drives or as
removable local drives, and to use them exactly as you would use any other drive folder on your computer.
Username – Username to access the Network Share drive. The name can be entered using either of the following formats:
■
■
username
domain\username
This field is not displayed when the type is Local.
Password – Password to access the Network Share drive. This field is not displayed when the type is Local.
Path – The path where the repository will reside. The path must be accessible from the Zerto Virtual Manager, so if the
repository is on a different domain to the Zerto Virtual Manager, the domain must be included in the path.
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Enable Compression – Check this option to compress backups stored in the repository. Compression is done using zip
compression, set to level six. If you want better compression, which requires more CPU, or less compression to reduce the
CPU overhead, contact Zerto support.
Note: Compression usually reduces the effectiveness of deduplication on stored data. If the backup repository resides on a
deduplication-enabled storage appliance, it is recommended that the data be stored uncompressed.
Note: Backup to TntDrive with compression enabled is not supported.
Set as Default Repository– Check if you want the repository to be used as the default when specifying extended recovery
in a VPG.
4. Click VALIDATE.You must validate the path specified. If the folder does not exist, you are asked if you want to create it.
5.
Click SAVE.
The repository is created.
Editing an Offsite Backup Repository
You edit the repositories from the Repositories tab.
To edit an offsite backup repository:
1.
2.
In the Zerto User Interface, click SETUP > REPOSITORIES.
Select the repository to edit and click the edit, pencil, icon.
The Edit Repository dialog is displayed.
Edit any of the following settings:
Repository Name – Specify a unique name for the repository.
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Repository Type – Either specify that the repository resides on a local or shared network disk, using the SMB protocol,
accessible from the recovery site. If the repository location is a network drive, this drive can be mounted to third party
storage, such as Amazon Web Services, AWS, or Microsoft Azure.
Username – Username to access the Network Share drive. The name can be entered using either of the following formats:
■
■
username
domain\username
This field is not displayed when the type is Local.
Password – Password to access the Network Share drive. This field is not displayed when the type is Local.
Path – The path from the recovery site where the repository will reside. The path must be accessible from the Zerto Virtual
Manager, so if the repository is on a different domain to the Zerto Virtual Manager, the domain must be included in the
path.
Enable compression – Check this option to compress backups stored in the repository. Compression is done using zip
compression, set to level six. If you want better compression, which requires more CPU, or less compression to reduce the
CPU overhead, contact Zerto support.
Note: Compression usually reduces the effectiveness of deduplication on stored data. If the backup repository resides on a
deduplication-enabled storage appliance, it is recommended that the data be stored uncompressed.
Note: Backup to TntDrive with compression enabled is not supported.
Set as default repository– Check if you want the repository to be used as the default when specifying extended recovery in
a VPG.
3.
Click VALIDATE.You must validate the path specified. If the folder does not exist, you are asked if you want to create it.
4. Click SAVE.
The updated definition of the repository is saved.
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CHAPTER 4: OVERVIEW OF
RECOVERY FLOWS
Zerto Virtual Replication enables protecting virtual machines, for both disaster recovery or for extended, longer term recovery
from an offsite backup, by protecting the relevant virtual machines in virtual protection groups. A virtual protection group
(VPG) is a group comprised of virtual machines that are grouped together for recovery purposes. For example, the virtual
machines that comprise an application like Microsoft Exchange, where one virtual machine is used for the software, one for the
database, and a third for the Web Server require that all three virtual machines be replicated to maintain data integrity.
The following topics are described in this chapter:
■
■
■
“Flow for a Disaster Recovery Operation”, below
“Flow for a File or Folder Level Restore Operation”, on page 28
“Flow for an Offsite Backup and Restore Operation”, on page 28
Once a VPG has been created, each virtual machine in the VPG can be replicated on the recovery site under the VRA on the
host specified in the VPG definition as the host for the recovery of the virtual machine.
Every write to the protected virtual machine in a VPG is copied by the VRA on the same host as the protected machine and
passed to the VRA on the host in the recovery site specified in the VPG definition as the host for the recovery of the virtual
machine. These writes first are saved in a journal for a specified period and then moved to replica virtual disks managed by the
VRA, which mirror the protected virtual machine disks.
Flow for a Disaster Recovery Operation
Disaster recovery using Zerto Virtual Replication enables recovering from a disaster to any point between the moment just
before the disaster and a specified amount of time in the past up to 30 days. The recovery is done in real time at the recovery
site with a minimal RTO.
A recovery operation is one of the following:
■
■
A failover.
A planned move of the protected virtual machines from the protected site to the recovery site.
A clone of the protected virtual machine to the recovery site.
Virtual machines are protected in VPGs. Once a VPG is created, Zerto Virtual Replication creates a copy under the
management of a Virtual Replication Appliance, VRA, on the recovery site, of the protected virtual machine files, such as the
configuration and data files. A VRA is installed on every host where the machines are to be recovered.
When a recovery operation is performed, the VRA creates the virtual machines defined in the VPG and attaches the virtual
disks to these machines. It then promotes the data from the journal to the virtual machine disks.
The following references the appropriate procedure to protect virtual machines:
■
■
■
■
■
“Protecting Virtual Machines to Hyper-V Hosts”, on page 35
“Protecting Virtual Machines to the Same Site”, on page 45
“Protecting Virtual Machines to a Recovery Site VMware vCenter Server”, on page 46
“Protecting Virtual Machines to a Recovery Site VMware vCloud Director”, on page 59
“Protecting Virtual Machines from Hyper-V Hosts to AWS”, on page 69
After initializing the VPG, all writes to the protected virtual machines are sent by the VRA on the relevant host for each virtual
machine on the protected site to the VRA on the recovery site specified as the recovery host for the virtual machine. The
information is saved in the journal for the virtual machine with a timestamp, ensuring write-fidelity. Every few seconds the
Zerto Virtual Manager causes a checkpoint to be written to every journal on the recovery site for every virtual machine in the
VPG, ensuring crash-consistency.
The data remains in the journal until the time specified for the journal when it is moved to the relevant mirror disks, also
managed by the VRA for the virtual machine. In this way, you can recover the virtual machines using the mirror disks and then
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promoting the data from the journal to include the final few hours of data for each virtual machine. Refer to “The Role of the
Journal During Protection”, on page 30 for more details about the journal.
The following references the procedures to recover virtual machines protected in a VPG:
■
■
■
■
“Overview of Disaster Recovery Operations”, on page 167
“Managing Failover”, on page 192
“Migrating a VPG to the Recovery Site”, on page 182
“Cloning a VPG to the Recovery Site”, on page 201
Flow for a Test Failover Operation
When testing that the recovery works as planned, the VRA creates the virtual machines defined in the VPG and uses scratch
disks to simulate the virtual machine disks for the duration of the test. This enables the ongoing protection of the virtual
machines and the possibility of a live failover if required during the test.
The following references the procedure to recover virtual machines:
■
■
“Overview of Disaster Recovery Operations”, on page 167
“Testing Recovery”, on page 171
Flow for a File or Folder Level Restore Operation
You can recover specific files and folders from the recovery site for virtual machines that are being protected by Zerto Virtual
Replication and running Windows operating systems. You can recover the files and folders from a specific point-in-time.
To recover files and folders, see “Recovering Files and Folders”, on page 204.
Flow for an Offsite Backup and Restore Operation
If there is a requirement to extend the recovery ability to more than the 30 days that are available with disaster recovery, Zerto
Virtual Replication provides an offsite backup option that enables saving the protected virtual machines offsite for up to one
year in a state where they can easily be deployed. The recovery virtual machines are saved in a repository of offsite backups
that can extend as far back as a year. These offsite backups are fixed points saved either daily or weekly. To save space the
offsite backups can be compressed before they are stored in the repository.
When an offsite backup job starts, the Virtual Backup Appliance (VBA) on the recovery site communicates with the VRA on
the recovery site to create the backup files of the virtual machines in the VPG, including the data in the journal and saves these
files in the repository.
To set up repositories to protect virtual machines in a VPG with offsite backup, see “Setting Up Offsite Backups”, on page 23.
Setting up offsite backups is part of defining a VPG.
After initializing the VPG, Zerto Virtual Replication periodically checks that the time to run an offsite backup has not passed. At
the scheduled backup time, the offsite backup is run and the offsite backup file stored in the specified repository.
Offsite backups are kept for the retention period specified in the VPG. Over time the number of stored offsite backups is
reduced to save space.
To restore virtual machines to the recovery site, see “Restoring an Offsite Backup”, on page 211.
Flow for a File or Folder Level Restore Operation
28
CHAPTER 5: INTRODUCTION TO
PROTECTING VIRTUAL MACHINES
Virtual machines are protected in virtual protection groups. A virtual protection group (VPG) is a group of virtual machines that
you group together for recovery purposes. For example, the virtual machines that comprise an application like Microsoft
Exchange, where one virtual machine is used for the software, one for the database, and a third for the Web Server require that
all three virtual machines be replicated to maintain data integrity.
Any virtual machine whose operating system is supported in both the protected site and recovery site can be protected in a
VPG.
Once a virtual machine is protected, all changes made on the machine are replicated in the remote site. The replicated virtual
machines in the remote site can be recovered to any point in time defined for the VPG or if a period further in the past is
required, an offsite backup can be restored.
When a VPG is created, a replica of each virtual machine disk in the VPG is created under a VRA on the recovery site. These
replica virtual disks must be populated with the data in the protected virtual machines, which is done by synchronizing the
protected virtual machines with the recovery site replicas. This synchronization between the protected site and remote site
takes time, depending on the size of the virtual machines.
After the initial synchronization completes, only the writes to disk from the virtual machines in the protected site are sent to
the remote site. These writes are stored by the VRA in the remote site in journals for a specified period, after which they are
promoted to the replica virtual disks managed by the VRA.
The number of VPGs that can be defined on a site is limited only by the number of virtual machines that can be protected. Each
site can manage a maximum of 5000 virtual machines.
Note: If the total number of protected virtual machines on the paired sites is 5000, then any additional machines are not
protected.
Any virtual machine that is supported by the hypervisor can be protected. When recovering to a different hypervisor, the
protected virtual machines must also be supported by the recovery hypervisors.
The following topics are described in this chapter:
■
■
■
“Configuring Virtual Protection Groups”, below
“The Role of the Journal During Protection”, on page 30
“What happens After the VPG is Defined”, on page 32
Configuring Virtual Protection Groups
Use the following guidelines:
■ You protect one or more virtual machines in a VPG.
■ The VPG must include at least one virtual machine.
■ After creating a VPG, you can add or remove virtual machines as required.
■ You can only protect a virtual machine in a VPG when the virtual machine has no more than 60 disks.
■ The 60 disks can be a combination of IDE and SCSI disks where:
■
Each virtual machine can have up to 2 IDE controllers and up to 4 SCSI controllers
■
Each IDE controller can have a maximum of 4 IDE disks
■
Each SCSI controller can have a maximum of 15 disks
■
The total of IDE and SCSI disks must not exceed 60 disks
■ When the recovery site is VMware vSphere, any IDE disks are converted to SCSI disks.
■ When the recovery site is Amazon Web Services (AWS), you can only protect virtual machines in the protected site that
are supported by AWS in the recovery site and the maximum number of supported disks is 12 for virtual machines running
a Windows operating system and 1 for virtual machines running a Linux operating system.
■ You can protect a virtual machine in several VPGs.
■ A virtual machine can be in a maximum of three VPGs.
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■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Note: Protecting virtual machines in several VPGs is enabled only if both the protected site and the recovery site, as well as
the VRAs installed on these sites, are of version 5.0 and higher.
VPGs that contain the same virtual machine cannot be recovered to the same site.
The virtual machines can be defined under a single hypervisor host or under multiple hosts.
The recovery can also be to a single host or multiple hosts.
The virtual machines are recovered with the same configuration as the protected machines.
For example, if a virtual machine in the protected site is configured so that space is allocated on demand and this machine
is protected in a VPG, then during recovery the machine is defined in the recovery site with the same space allocation
configuration.
You protect virtual machines by creating the VPG on the site hosting these virtual machines.
After the VPG is created, you can add or remove virtual machines from the VPG by editing the VPG in the Zerto User
Interface running on either the protected or recovery site.
To create a VPG you must have a recovery site available with a host with a VRA installed.
■
The recovery site can either be a remote site, paired with the protected site, or the protected site itself, where both
protection and recovery are to the same Zerto Virtual Manager site.
The VPG definition consists of the following:
■ General: A name to identify the VPG and the priority to assign to the VPG.
■ Virtual machines: The list of virtual machines being protected as well as the boot order and boot delay to apply to the
virtual protection groups during recovery.
■ Replication Settings: VPG replication settings, such as the recovery site, host and storage and the VPG SLA. SLA
information includes the default journal history settings and how often tests should be performed on the VPG. The defaults
are applied to every virtual machine in the VPG but can be overridden per virtual machine, as required.
■
■
■
■
Cloud service providers can group the VPG SLA properties together in a service profile. When a service profile is used, the
VPG SLA settings cannot be modified unless a Custom service profile is available.
Storage Settings: By default the storage used for the virtual machine definition is also used for the virtual machine data.
This storage can be overridden per virtual machine, as required.
Recovery Settings: Recovery details include the networks to use for recovered virtual machines and scripts that should be
run either at the start or end of a recovery operation.
NIC Settings: Specify the network details to use for the recovered virtual machines after a live or test failover or migration.
Backup Settings: Specify the backup properties that govern the VPG backup, including the repository where the backups
are saved.
The Role of the Journal During Protection
After defining a VPG, the protected virtual machine disks are synced with the recovery site. After initial synchronization, every
write to a protected virtual machine is copied by Zerto Virtual Replication to the recovery site. The write continues to be
processed normally on the protected site and the copy is sent asynchronously to the recovery site and written to a journal
managed by a Virtual Replication Appliance (VRA). Each protected virtual machine has its own journal.
In addition to the writes, every few seconds all journals are updated with a checkpoint time-stamp. Checkpoints are used to
ensure write order fidelity and crash-consistency. A recovery can be done to the last checkpoint or to a user-selected, crashconsistent, checkpoint. This enables recovering the virtual machines, either to the last crash-consistent point-in-time or, for
example, when the virtual machine is attacked by a virus, to a point-in-time before the virus attack.
Data and checkpoints are written to the journal until the specified journal history size is reached, which is the optimum
situation. At this point, as new writes and checkpoints are written to a journal, the older writes are written to the virtual
machine recovery virtual disks. When specifying a checkpoint to recover to, the checkpoint must still be in the journal. For
example, if the value specified is 24 hours then recovery can be specified to any checkpoint up to 24 hours. After the time
specified, the mirror virtual disk volumes maintained by the VRA are updated.
During recovery, the virtual machines at the recovery site are created and the recovery disks for each virtual machine, managed
by the VRA, are attached to the recovered virtual machines. Information in the journal is promoted to the virtual machines to
bring them up to the date and time of the selected checkpoint. To improve the RTO during recovery, the virtual machine can be
used even before the journal data has been fully promoted. Every request is analyzed and the response is returned from the
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virtual machine directly or, if the information in the journal is more up-to-date, it comes from the journal. This continues until
the recovery site’s virtual environment is fully restored to the selected checkpoint.
Each protected virtual machine has its own dedicated journal, consisting of one or more volumes. A dedicated journal enables
journal data to be maintained, even when changing the host for the recovery. The default storage used for a journal is the
storage used for recovery of each virtual machine. Thus for example, if protected virtual machines in a VPG are configured with
different recovery storage, the journal data is by default stored for each virtual machine on that virtual machine recovery
storage.
The journals for the protected virtual machines are defined as part of the VPG definition and by default are defined to reside on
the same storage as the virtual machine. This can be overridden at the virtual machine and VPG levels as follows.
ALLOWS STORAGE NOTES
TIERING
Default Journal
No
The journal is located on the virtual machine recovery storage.
By default, the recovery storage for each virtual machine journal is the same as the
virtual machine recovery storage.
Journal storage
No
separate from VM
storage for each
VM
Specify a journal storage for each virtual machine. All journals for the virtual machine
are stored in this storage.
Journal storage for Yes
each VPG
Specify a journal storage for each VPG. All journals for the virtual machines in the
VPG are stored in this storage.
Journal storage for Yes
multiple VPGs
Enables the use of advanced settings such as storage IO controls etc., to provide
individualized service to customers by grouping VPGs by customer and assigning
each group to a specific storage.
This option is recommended for cloud service providers.
Journal Sizing
The journal space is always allocated on demand. The provisioned journal size initially allocated for a journal is 16GB. The
provisioned journal size is the current size of all the journal volumes.
If the journal grows to approximately 80% of the provisioned journal size or less than 6GB remains free, a new volume is added
to increase the journal size. Each new journal volume added is bigger than the previous volume. The journal size can increase
up until a specified hard limit. If the size of the journal is reduced in the VPG definition after new volumes have been added,
these volumes are not reduced and continue to be used if required. In this case, the journal size can be bigger than the set size
and the reduced journal size definition is not applied, except to ensure that no new volumes are created if the new journal size
is reached or exceeded.
The provisioned journal size reported in the Resources report can fluctuate considerably when new volumes are added or
removed.
When the amount of the journal used is approximately 50% of the provisioned journal size, the biggest unused journal volume
from the added volumes is marked for removal. This volume is then removed after the time equivalent to three times the
amount specified for the journal history, or twenty-four hours, whichever is more if it is still not used.
Reclaiming space on a volume does not change the provisioned journal size, which is the current size of all the journal volumes.
When a virtual machine journal comes close to a specified hard limit, Zerto Virtual Replication starts to move data to the target
disks. Once this begins, the maintained history begins to decrease. If the journal history falls below 75% of the value specified
for the journal history, a warning alert is issued in the GUI. If the history falls below one hour, an error is issued. However, if the
amount of history defined is only one hour, an error is issued if it is less than 45 minutes.
The size of the datastore where the journal resides must have at least 30GB free, or have 15% free space, relative to the total
datastore space, whichever number of GBs is smaller.
If the available storage of the journal datastore falls below 30GB or 15% of the total datastore size:
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■
■
■
■
The datastore itself is considered full.
An error alert is issued and all writes to the journal volumes that datastore storage are blocked.
Replication is halted, but history is not lost.
The RPO begins to steadily increase until additional datastore space is made available.
Examples:
■
For a large (2TB) datastore: 15% free space remaining = 307GB.
The ZVM would not consider the datastore full if 307GB of free space were remaining. 30GB free space remaining would
trigger an alert, as it is the smaller figure.
■
For a small (100GB) datastore: 15% free space free space remaining = 15GB.
The ZVM would not consider the datastore full if 30GB of free space were remaining. 15GB free space remaining would
trigger an alert, as it is the smaller figure.
Testing Considerations When Determining Journal Size
When a VPG is tested, either during a failover test or before committing a Move or Failover operation, a scratch volume is
created for each virtual machine being tested. The scratch volume created uses the same size limit defined for the virtual
machine journal.
The size limit of the scratch volume determines the length of time that you can test for. Larger limits enable longer testing
times if the constant rate of change is constant. If a small hard limit size is set for this amount of history, for example 2–3 hours,
the scratch volume created for testing will also be small, thus limiting the time available for testing.
What happens After the VPG is Defined
After defining a VPG, the VPG is created. For the creation to be successful, the storage used for the recovery must have either
30GB free space or 15% of the size free. This requirement ensures that during protection the VRA, which manages the virtual
machine journal and data, cannot completely fill the storage, which would result in the VRA freezing and stopping to protect all
virtual machines using that VRA.
The VRA in the remote site is updated with information about the VPG and then the data on the protected virtual machines are
synchronized with the replication virtual machines managed by the VRA on the recovery site. This process can take some time,
depending on the size of the VMs and the bandwidth between the sites.
During this synchronization, you cannot perform any replication task, such as adding a checkpoint.
For synchronization to work, the protected virtual machines must be powered on. The VRA requires an active IO stack to
access the virtual machine data to be synchronized across the sites. If the virtual machine is not powered on, there is no IO
stack to use to access the protected data to replicate to the target recovery disks and an alert is issued.
Once synchronized, the VRA on the recovery site includes a complete copy of every virtual machine in the VPG. After
synchronization the virtual machines in the VPG are fully protected, meeting their SLA, and the delta changes to these virtual
machines are sent to the recovery site.
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For details of the screen, see “Monitoring a Single VPG”, on page 91.
Recovery
After initializing the VPG, all writes to the protected virtual machines are sent by the VRA on the relevant host for each virtual
machine on the protected site to the VRA on the recovery site specified as the recovery host for the virtual machine. The
information is saved in the journal for the virtual machine with a timestamp, ensuring write-fidelity. Every few seconds the
Zerto Virtual Manager writes a checkpoint to every journal on the recovery site for every virtual machine in the VPG, ensuring
crash-consistency.
The data remains in the journal for the time defined by the journal history configuration, after which it is moved to the relevant
mirror disks for each virtual machine. Both the journal and the mirror disks are managed by the VRA.
When recovering, either a failover or move, or testing failover or cloning protected virtual machines in the recovery site, you
specify the checkpoint at which you want the recovered virtual machines to be recovered. The mirror disks and journal are used
to recover the virtual machines to this point-in-time.
File and Folder Recovery
After initializing the VPG, instead of recovering a virtual machine, you can recover specific files and folders in the protected
virtual machines from a checkpoint.
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Offsite Backups
After initializing the VPG, Zerto Virtual Replication periodically checks that the schedule to run an offsite backup has not been
passed, either a daily offsite backup or a weekly offsite backup. At the scheduled backup time, the offsite backup is run and the
offsite backup file stored in the specified repository.
Offsite backups are kept on the recovery site for the retention period specified in the VPG. However, over time the number of
stored offsite backups is reduced to save space.
The number of stored offsite backups for daily backups is as follows:
RETENTION PERIOD DAILY
WEEKLY
MONTHLY NUMBER OF MAXIMUM NUMBER OF
BACKUPS
DAYS TO OLDEST BACKUP
1 week
7
0
0
7
7
1 month
7
4
0
11
35
3 months
7
4
2
13
91
6 months
7
4
5
16
175
9 months
7
4
8
19
259
12 months
7
4
11
22
343
That is, an offsite backup is kept for each day for the current week and then the oldest offsite backup for the previous week is
kept for the previous four weeks and then the oldest monthly backup is kept for the rest of the retention period.
The number of stored offsite backups for weekly backups is as follows:
RETENTION PERIOD
WEEKLY
MONTHLY NUMBER OF MAXIMUM NUMBER OF
BACKUPS
DAYS TO OLDEST BACKUP
1 week
1
0
1
7
1 month
4
1
5
58
3 months
4
3
7
121
6 months
4
6
10
205
9 months
4
9
13
289
12 months
4
12
16
373
That is, an offsite backup is kept for each week for the current month and then the oldest backup for the month is kept and then
the oldest monthly backup is kept for the rest of the retention period.
What happens After the VPG is Defined
34
CHAPTER 6: PROTECTING VIRTUAL
MACHINES FROM HYPER-V
When the protected site is SCVMM, the following protection is available:
■
■
■
■
■
■
“Protecting Virtual Machines to Hyper-V Hosts”, below
“Protecting Virtual Machines to the Same Site”, on page 45
“Protecting Virtual Machines to a Recovery Site VMware vCenter Server”, on page 46
“Protecting Virtual Machines to a Recovery Site VMware vCloud Director”, on page 59
“Protecting Virtual Machines from Hyper-V Hosts to AWS”, on page 69
“Protecting Virtual Machines from Hyper-V Hosts to Azure”, on page 76
Protection can be set up to cope with the following situations:
■
■
A disaster, enabling recovery to a point in time in the 30 days prior to the disaster.
The need to back up to files saved either daily or weekly for a period of up to one year. The same dialog is used to set up
both disaster recovery and backup.
Virtual machines with pass-through disks and shared disks cannot be protected. Also, a Hyper-V host with a pass-through disk
is ignored by the Zerto Virtual Manager.
Any virtual machine that is supported by the hypervisor can be protected. When recovering to a different hypervisor, the
protected virtual machines must also be supported by the recovery hypervisor.
Protecting Virtual Machines to Hyper-V Hosts
You can protect virtual machines to Hyper-V. The procedure is the same whether you intend to protect one virtual machine or
multiple virtual machines.
To create a virtual protection group (VPG):
1.
In the Zerto User Interface, select ACTIONS > CREATE VPG.
The NEW VPG step of the Create VPG wizard is displayed.
2.
Specify the name of the VPG and the priority of the VPG.
VPG Name – The VPG name must be unique. The name cannot be more than 80 characters.
Priority – Determine the priority for transferring data from the protected site to the recovery site when there is limited
bandwidth and more than one VPG is defined on the protected site. When there are updates to virtual machines protected
in VPGs with different priorities, first the updates from the VPG with the highest priority are passed over the WAN.
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Medium priority VPGs will only be able to use whatever bandwidth is left after the high priority VPGs have used it. This is
also true between medium and low priorities. Note that updates to the protected virtual machines are always sent across
the WAN before synchronization data, such as during a bitmap or delta sync. During a synchronization, only after updates
to the virtual machines are sent over the WAN, based on the VPG priority, is synchronization data from the VPG sent, and
the synchronization data from the VPG with the highest priority is passed over the WAN before data from medium and
low priority VPGs.
3.
Click NEXT.
The VMs step is displayed.
4. Select the VMs that will be part of this VPG and click the arrow pointing right to include these VMs in the VPG.
Virtual machines that are not yet protected are displayed in the list. A VPG can include virtual machines that are not yet
protected and virtual machines that are already protected. You can view protected virtual machines by clicking Select VMs
in the Advanced (One-to-Many) section.
The Select VMs dialog is displayed.
Note: Virtual machines can be protected in a maximum of three VPGs. These VPGs cannot be recovered to the same site.
Virtual machines protected in the maximum number of VPGs are not displayed in the Select VMs dialog.
Protecting virtual machines in several VPGs is enabled only if both the protected site and the recovery site, as well as the
VRAs installed on these sites, are of version 5.0 and higher.
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5.
If you want to define the boot order of the virtual machines in the VPG, click DEFINE BOOT ORDER, otherwise go to the next
step.
When virtual machines in a VPG are started in the recovery site, by default these machines are not started up in a
particular order. If you want specific virtual machines to start before other machines, you can specify a boot order. The
virtual machines are defined in groups and the boot order applies to the groups and not to individual virtual machines in the
groups. You can specify a delay between groups during startup.
Note: Up to five virtual machines may boot on a host simultaneously. Following the boot, a 300 second delay occurs until
the next boot batch.
Initially, virtual machines in the VPG are displayed together under the Default group. If you want specific machines to start
before other virtual machines, define new groups with one or more virtual machines in each group.
a) Click ADD to add a new group.
b) To change the name of a group, click the Pencil icon next to the group. To delete a group, click the delete icon on the
right side. You cannot delete the Default group nor a group that contains a virtual machine.
c) Drag virtual machines to move them from one group to another.
d) Drag groups to change the order the groups are started.
e) Optionally, in Boot Delay, specify a time delay between starting up the virtual machines in the group and starting up
the virtual machines in the next group. For example, assume three groups, Default, Server, and Client, defined in this
order. The boot delay defined for the Default group is 10, for the Server group is 100, and for the Client group 0. The
virtual machines in the Default group are started together and after 10 seconds the virtual machines in the Server group
are started. After 100 seconds the virtual machines in the Client group are started.
f) Click OK to save the boot order.
Click NEXT.
The REPLICATION step is displayed.
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Note: If the protected site is paired with only one recovery site, the recovery step is displayed with the Recovery Site
field automatically filled in and defaults set for the SLA and Advanced settings, as shown below.
6.
Specify the recovery site.
Recovery Site – The site to which you want to recover the virtual machines. After specifying the recovery site, the host and
storage on the site to use for the replication can be specified.
Host – The default cluster or host, in the recovery site that handles the replicated data.
Storage – The default storage volume to use for the recovered virtual machine files and for their data volumes. Every
storage for the recovery host is included in the drop-down list. If a cluster is selected for the host, only storage accessible
by every host in the cluster are displayed.
7.
Optionally, change the SLA settings, which apply to every virtual machine in the group.
Journal History – The time that all write commands are saved in the journal. The longer the information is saved in the
journal, the more space is required for each journal in the VPG. You can select the number of hours from 1 to 24 or the
number of days from 2 to 30.
For additional journal-related fields, click ADVANCED.
The Advanced Journal Settings dialog is displayed.
Select the journal settings.
Default Journal Storage – The storage used for the journal data for each virtual machine in the VPG. Select storage
accessible to the host. When you select a specific journal storage, the journals for each virtual machine in the VPG are
stored in this storage, regardless of where the recovery storage is for each virtual machine. In this case, all protected virtual
machines must be recovered to the hosts that can access the specified journal storage.
Journal Size Hard Limit – The maximum size that the journal can grow, either as a percentage or a fixed amount. The
minimum journal size, set by Zerto Virtual Replication, is 8GB.
Unlimited – The size of the journal is unlimited and it can grow to the size of the recovery storage.
Size (GB) – The maximum journal size in GB.
Percentage – The percentage of the virtual machine volume size the journal can grow to.
Journal Size Warning Threshold – The size of the journal that triggers a warning that the journal is nearing its hard limit.
Unlimited – The size of the journal is unlimited and it can grow to the size of the recovery storage.
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Size (GB) – The size in GB that will generate a warning.
Percentage – The percentage of the virtual machine volume size that will generate a warning.
Both the value of Size and Percentage must be less than the configured hard limit so that the warning will be generated
when needed. In addition to the warning threshold, Zerto Virtual Replication will issue a message when the free space
available for the journal is almost full.
Target RPO Alert – The maximum desired time between each automatic checkpoint write to the journal before an alert is
issued. To increase the value, move the slider right; to decrease the value, move the slider left.
Test Reminder – The time recommended between testing the integrity of the VPG. A warning is issued if a test is not done
within this time frame.
8.
Optionally, change the Advanced value.
Enable WAN Traffic Compression – Whether or not data is compressed before being transferred to the recovery site.
Compressing the data is more efficient but results in a small performance degradation. Enable WAN traffic compression if
network considerations are more critical than CPU usage considerations. When WAN compression is enabled, the
compressed data is written in compressed format to the recovery site journal. Even if WAN compression is selected, Zerto
Virtual Replication decreases the level of compression if it takes too many resources. The VRA automatically adjusts the
compression level according to CPU usage, including totally disabling it if needed. Zerto recommends enabling WAN
compression. Zerto Virtual Replication can also work with third-party WAN optimization and acceleration technologies,
such as those supplied by Riverbed Technologies and Silver Peak. When third-party WAN optimization is implemented,
Zerto recommends disabling VPG WAN compression.
9.
If you want to change the replication settings per virtual machine, click VM SETTINGS.
The Advanced VM Replication Settings dialog is displayed.
In this dialog, you can edit the values of one or more of the virtual machines in the VPG.
10. If you want to edit information in one field, click the field and update the information. If you want to edit information for
several virtual machines at the same time, select the virtual machines and click EDIT SELECTED.
The Edit VM dialog is displayed.
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Recovery Host – The cluster or host that will host the recovered virtual machine.
Recovery Storage – The location where the metadata files for the virtual machine are stored, such as the vhdx file. If a
cluster is selected for the host, only storage that are accessible by every host in the cluster are displayed.
Journal Size Hard Limit – The maximum size that the journal can grow, either as a percentage or a fixed amount. The
minimum journal size, set by Zerto Virtual Replication, is 8GB.
Unlimited – The size of the journal is unlimited and it can grow to the size of the recovery storage.
Size (GB) – The maximum journal size in GB.
Percentage – The percentage of the virtual machine volume size the journal can grow to.
Journal Size Warning Threshold – The size of the journal that triggers a warning that the journal is nearing its hard limit.
Unlimited – The size of the journal is unlimited and it can grow to the size of the recovery storage.
Size (GB) – The size in GB that will generate a warning.
Percentage – The percentage of the virtual machine volume size that will generate a warning.
Both the value of Size and Percentage must be less than the configured hard limit so that the warning will be generated
when needed. In addition to the warning threshold, Zerto Virtual Replication will issue a message when the free space
available for the journal is almost full.
Journal Storage – The storage used for the journal data for each virtual machine in the VPG. To change the default, specify
a host and then select the storage location accessible by this host to be used as the journal storage. When you select
specific journal storage, the journals for each virtual machine in the VPG are stored in this storage, regardless of where the
recovery storage is for each virtual machine. In this case, all the protected virtual machines must be recovered to hosts that
can access the specified journal storage.
Click OK.
11. In the Advanced VM Replication Settings dialog, click OK.
12. Click NEXT.
The STORAGE step is displayed. By default the storage used for the virtual machine definition is also used for the virtual
machine data. For each virtual machine in the VPG, Zerto Virtual Replication displays its storage-related information.
Note: Steps that do not require input are marked with a check mark. You can jump directly to a step that has been marked
with a check mark to edit the values for that step. Every step must be marked with a check mark before you can click DONE
to create the VPG.
Temp Data – If the virtual machine to be replicated includes a temp data disk as part of its configuration, mark the recovery
disk for this disk as a temp data disk. In this case, data is not replicated to the temp data disk after initial synchronization.
13. If you want to edit information in one field, click the field and update the information. If you want to edit information for
several virtual machines at the same time, select the virtual machines and click EDIT SELECTED.
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The Edit Volumes dialog is displayed.
14. Specify the volume source for recovery from one of the options.
Storage – A new volume is used for replicated data. Specify the storage to use to create disks for the replicated data.
The storage specified for the replication must have at least the same amount of space as the protected volume and then an
additional amount for the journal. The amount of additional space needed for the journal can be fixed by specifying a
maximum size for the journal, or can be calculated as the average change rate for the virtual machines in the VPG,
multiplied by the length of time specified for the journal history.
Preseeded volume – Whether to copy the protected data to a virtual disk in the recovery site. Zerto recommends using this
option particularly for large disks so that the initial synchronization will be faster since a Delta Sync can be used to
synchronize any changes written to the recovery site after the creation of the preseeded disk. When not using a preseeded
disk, the initial synchronization phase must copy the whole disk over the WAN. When using a preseeded virtual disk, you
select the storage and exact location, folder, and name of the preseeded disk. Zerto Virtual Replication takes ownership of
the preseeded disk, moving it from its source folder to the folder used by the VRA. Only disks with the same size as the
protected disk can be selected when browsing for a preseeded disk. The storage where the preseeded disk is placed is also
used as the recovery storage for the replicated data.
15. Specify the other volume options.
Temp Data disk – If the virtual machine to be replicated includes a temp data disk as part of its configuration, specify a
mirror disk for replication that is marked as a temp data disk. In this case, data is not replicated to the temp data disk after
initial synchronization.
16. Click OK.
17. Click NEXT.
The RECOVERY step is displayed. Recovery details include the networks to use for failover, move, and for testing failover,
and whether scripts should run as part of the recovery operation.
18. Select the default recovery settings. These are applied to every virtual machine in the VPG.
Failover/Move Network – The network to use during a failover or move operation in which the recovered virtual machines
will run.
Failover Test Network – The network to use when testing the failover of virtual machines in the recovery site. Zerto
recommends using a fenced-out network so as not to impact the production network at this site.
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19. Enter the name of the script to run in the Command to run text box. You can then enter details about the script.
Pre-recovery Script – The information about a script that should run at the beginning of the recovery process.
Post-recovery Script – The information about a script that should run at the end of the recovery process.
For both types of scripts, enter the following information:
TEXT BOX
DESCRIPTION
Command to run
The full path of the script. The script must be located on the same machine as the Zerto Virtual
Manager for the recovery site.
Params
The parameters to pass to the script. Separate parameters with a space.
Timeout
The time-out, in seconds, for the script to run. If the script runs before executing a failover, move,
or test failover, and the script fails or the timeout value is reached, an alert is generated and the
failover, move, or test failover is not performed. If the script runs after executing a failover, move,
or test failover, and the timeout value is reached, an alert is generated. The default time-out value
is specified in Performance and Throttling tab in the Site Settings dialog.
20. Click NEXT.
The NICs step is displayed. In this step, you can specify the NIC details to use for the recovered virtual machines after a
failover, a test failover, or migration.
21. If you want to edit information in one field, click the field and update the information. If you want to edit information for
several virtual machines at the same time, select the virtual machines and click EDIT SELECTED. Otherwise, go to step 24.
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The Edit VNIC dialog is displayed.
22. Specify the network details to use for the recovered virtual machines after a failover or move operation, in the Failover/
Move column, and for the recovered virtual machines when testing replication, in the Test column.
In each column, specify the following:
Network: The network to use for this virtual machine.
Create New MAC Address: Whether the Media Access Control address (MAC address) used on the protected site should
be replicated on the recovery site. The default is to use the same MAC address on both sites. Note that if you check this
option, to create a new MAC address, and the current IP address is not specified, the protected virtual machine static IP
address might not be used for the recovered virtual machine.
Change vNIC IP Configuration: Whether or not to keep the default virtual NIC (vNIC) IP configuration. Configuration is
possible only when the guest operating system is defined in the hypervisor manager and Integration Services are detected.
The vNIC IP address is only changed after recovery for virtual machines with Microsoft Integration Services running.
To change the vNIC IP configuration, select Yes in the Failover/Move or Test column. If you select to use a staticallyassigned IP address, set the IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway. Optionally, change the preferred and alternate
DNS server IP addresses and the DNS suffix. If you leave the DNS server and suffix entries empty, or select to use DHCP,
the IP address and DNS server configurations are assigned automatically, to match the protected virtual machine. You can
change the DNS suffix.
If the virtual machine has multiple NICs but is configured to only have a single default gateway, fill in a 0 for each octet in
the Default gateway field for the NICs with no default gateway.
Note: During a failover, move, or test failover, if the recovered virtual machine is assigned a different IP address than the
original IP address, after the virtual machine has started it is injected with the correct IP address. If the same network is
used for both production and test failovers, Zerto recommends changing the IP address for the virtual machines started for
the test, so that there is no IP address clash between the test machines and the production machines.
Copy to failover test – Copies the settings in the Failover/Move column to the Test column.
Copy to failover/move – Copies the settings in the Test column to the Failover/Move column.
23. Click OK.
24. Click NEXT.
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The BACKUP step is displayed. Backup properties govern the VPG backup, including the repository where the backups are
saved. Backup extends the ability to recover virtual machines in a VPG going back one year.
25. By default, backup is off. If you do not want to change this value, go to step 26. Otherwise, toggle OFF to ON and enter the
following information:
Target Repository – The name of the repository where the offsite backups are written. Repositories are configured via the
SETUP tab as described in “Setting Up Offsite Backups”, on page 23.
Retention Period – The length of time to keep offsite backups, up to a maximum of one year. For details of how this affects
the number of backups saved, see “Offsite Backups”, on page 34.
Run Job Every – The day and time to start the backup.
Retries – Whether to rerun the backup job automatically if the job fails. If you select this option, you must also define the
number of retries that will be attempted and the time to wait after a job fails before running the backup job again.
Post-Backup Script – The information about a script that should run at the end of the recovery process. Enter the following
information:
TEXT BOX
DESCRIPTION
Command to run
The full path of the script. The script must be located on the same machine as the Zerto Virtual
Manager for the recovery site.
Parameters
The values of parameters to pass to the script. Separate parameters with a space.
Timeout
The time-out, in seconds, for the script to run. If the timeout value is reached, an alert is generated.
The default time-out value is specified in the Performance and Throttling tab of the Site Settings
dialog.
26. Click NEXT.
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The SUMMARY step is displayed. It shows the VPG configuration that you defined in previous tabs.
27. Click DONE.
The VPG is created.
For details of what happens after saving the VPG, see “What happens After the VPG is Defined”, on page 32.
Protecting Virtual Machines to the Same Site
The same site can be used as both the protected and recovery sites. Even if the site is not paired with another site, VPGs can be
created.
When to Replicate to the Same Site
The following scenarios show when replicating to the same site can be beneficial. The list is not inclusive.
■
■
■
■
Where the same SCVMM manages different datacenters in different geographical locations. The main datacenter can be
used as the recovery site. This scenario describes situations where there are remote offices or branch offices (ROBOs).
In an organization that does not have a recovery site but wants to protect its virtual machines that use one storage by
creating recovery on a second storage. this protects against a disaster happening to the primary storage.
Between hosts in different clusters.
Protection against viruses, even in a single cluster: A different host within the cluster can serve as the recovery host for a
host with an internal problem with a virtual machine, such as a virus.
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To enable replication to the same site:
1.
Select Site Settings. In the Site Settings dialog, select Policies.
2.
Check the Enable replication to self option in the Replication section. Click SAVE or APPLY.
To define a VPG to recover to the protection site:
■ In the Zerto User Interface, select ACTIONS > CREATE VPG.
The NEW VPG step of the Create VPG wizard is displayed.
The procedure is the same as when protecting virtual machines, described in “Protecting Virtual Machines to Hyper-V
Hosts”, on page 35.
Protecting Virtual Machines to a Recovery Site VMware vCenter Server
You can protect virtual machines to a recovery site VMware vCenter Server. The procedure is the same whether you intend to
protect one virtual machine or multiple virtual machines.
When creating a VPG from Hyper-V to a VMware vCenter Server, all recovery operations bring up the recovered machines on
VMware vCenter Server hosts.
Zerto Virtual Replication uses SCSI for vCenter Server virtual machine disks. Any Hyper-V virtual machines with IDE disks will
be recovered with SCSI disks.
When protecting virtual machines from Hyper-V to vCenter Server, the operating systems of the protected machines must be
supported by vCenter Server. Refer to VMware documentation for the list of supported operating systems.
The following conversions are done to a protected virtual machine when it is recovered in vCenter Server:
■
■
■
■
■
Virtual machines are recovered in vCenter Server with the highest hardware version supported by the vCenter Server host
version under which the virtual machine is recovered.
A Generation 1 virtual machine is recovered in vCenter Server with BIOS with the highest supported hardware version.
A Generation 2 virtual machine is recovered in vCenter Server with EUFI. The host in vCenter must support hardware
version 8 or higher. Also the following restrictions apply for Generation 2 virtual machines:
■
The secure boot option for the machine in Hyper-V must be disabled.
■
The boot disk must be less than 2TB if the recovery host version is lower than ESXi 5.5.
All IDE disks are converted to SCSI disks. The boot disk is ported to a disk on a SCSI controller with location 0:0.
Recovered virtual machines use the VMware Virtual E1000 network adapter.
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To create a virtual protection group to recover to VMware vCenter Server:
1.
In the Zerto User Interface, select ACTIONS > CREATE VPG.
The NEW VPG step of the Create VPG wizard is displayed.
2.
Specify the name of the VPG and the priority of the VPG.
VPG Name – The VPG name must be unique. The name cannot be more than 80 characters.
Priority – Determine the priority for transferring data from the protected site to the recovery site when there is limited
bandwidth and more than one VPG is defined on the protected site. When there are updates to virtual machines protected
in VPGs with different priorities, first the updates from the VPG with the highest priority are passed over the WAN.
Medium priority VPGs will only be able to use whatever bandwidth is left after the high priority VPGs have used it. This is
also true between medium and low priorities. Note that updates to the protected virtual machines are always sent across
the WAN before synchronization data, such as during a bitmap or delta sync. During a synchronization, only after updates
to the virtual machines are sent over the WAN, based on the VPG priority, is synchronization data from the VPG sent, and
the synchronization data from the VPG with the highest priority is passed over the WAN before data from medium and
low priority VPGs.
3.
Click NEXT.
The VMs step is displayed.
4. Select the VMs that will be part of this VPG and click the arrow pointing right to include these VMs in the VPG.
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Virtual machines that are not yet protected are displayed in the list. A VPG can include virtual machines that are not yet
protected and virtual machines that are already protected. You can view protected virtual machines by clicking Select VMs
in the Advanced (One-to-Many) section.
The Select VMs dialog is displayed.
Note: Virtual machines can be protected in a maximum of three VPGs. These VPGs cannot be recovered to the same site.
Virtual machines protected in the maximum number of VPGs are not displayed in the Select VMs dialog.
Protecting virtual machines in several VPGs is enabled only if both the protected site and the recovery site, as well as the
VRAs installed on these sites, are of version 5.0 and higher.
5.
If you want to define the boot order of the virtual machines in the VPG, click DEFINE BOOT ORDER, otherwise go to the next
step.
When virtual machines in a VPG are started in the recovery site, by default these machines are not started up in a
particular order. If you want specific virtual machines to start before other machines, you can specify a boot order. The
virtual machines are defined in groups and the boot order applies to the groups and not to individual virtual machines in the
groups. You can specify a delay between groups during startup.
Note: Up to five virtual machines may boot on a host simultaneously. Following the boot, a 300 second delay occurs until
the next boot batch.
Initially, virtual machines in the VPG are displayed together under the Default group. If you want specific machines to start
before other virtual machines, define new groups with one or more virtual machines in each group.
a) Click ADD to add a new group.
b) To change the name of a group, click the Pencil icon next to the group. To delete a group, click the delete icon on the
right side. You cannot delete the Default group nor a group that contains a virtual machine.
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c) Drag virtual machines to move them from one group to another.
d) Drag groups to change the order the groups are started.
e) Optionally, in Boot Delay, specify a time delay between starting up the virtual machines in the group and starting up
the virtual machines in the next group. For example, assume three groups, Default, Server, and Client, defined in this
order. The boot delay defined for the Default group is 10, for the Server group is 100, and for the Client group 0. The
virtual machines in the Default group are started together and after 10 seconds the virtual machines in the Server group
are started. After 100 seconds the virtual machines in the Client group are started.
f) Click OK to save the boot order.
Click NEXT.
The REPLICATION step is displayed.
Note: If the protected site is paired with only one recovery site, the recovery step is displayed with the Recovery Site
field automatically filled in and defaults set for the SLA and Advanced settings, as shown below.
6.
Specify the recovery site and default values to use for the replication to this site.
Recovery Site – The site to which you want to recover the virtual machines. After specifying the recovery site, other fields
are displayed including the host and datastore to use for replication.
ZORG – If the site is defined in Zerto Cloud Manager, you specify the name used by the cloud service provider to identify
you as a Zerto Organization, ZORG. For details about Zerto Cloud Manager, refer to Zerto Cloud Manager Administration
Guide
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Host – The default cluster, resource pool or host in the recovery site that handles the replicated data. If the site is defined in
Zerto Cloud Manager, only a resource pool can be specified and the resource pool must also have been specified as a
resource in Zerto Cloud Manager1. For details about Zerto Cloud Manager, refer to Zerto Cloud Manager Administration
Guide.
When a resource pool is specified, Zerto Virtual Replication checks that the resource pool capacity is enough for any
virtual machines specified in the VPG.
All resource pool checks are made at the level of the VPG and do not take into account multiple VPGs using the same
resource pool. If the resource pool CPU resources are specified as unlimited, the actual limit is inherited from the parent
but if this inherited value is too small, failover, move, and failover test operations can fail, even without a warning alert
being issued by Zerto Virtual Manager.
Note: If a resource pool is specified and DRS is disabled for the site later on, all the resource pools are removed by VMware
and recovery will be to any one of the hosts in the recovery site with a VRA installed on it.
Datastore – The default datastore to use for recovered virtual machine files and for their data volumes. Every datastore for
the selected recovery host is included in the drop-down list. If a cluster or resource pool is selected for the host, only
datastores that are accessible by every host in the cluster or resource pool are displayed.
7.
When the Zerto Cloud Manager is used select the service profile.
Service Profile – The name of the service profile to use which determines the VPG SLA settings for the group, which apply
to every virtual machine in the group. To change the VPG SLA settings, select the Custom Service Profile.
8.
If the VPG SLA settings are editable, when the Zerto Cloud Manager is not used or when a Custom service profile is
available, specify these settings for the group, which apply to every virtual machine in the group.
Journal History – The time that all write commands are saved in the journal. The longer the information is saved in the
journal, the more space is required for each journal in the VPG. You can select the number of hours from 1 to 24 or the
number of days from 2 to 30.
For additional journal-related fields, click ADVANCED.
The Advanced Journal Settings dialog is displayed.
9.
Set the following fields:
Default Journal Datastore – The datastore used for the journal data for each virtual machine in the VPG. Select a datastore
accessible to the host. When you select a specific journal datastore, the journals for each virtual machine in the VPG are
stored in this datastore, regardless of where the recovery datastores are for each virtual machine. In this case, all protected
virtual machines must be recovered to the hosts that can access the specified journal datastore.
Journal Size Hard Limit – The maximum size that the journal can grow, either as a percentage or a fixed amount. The
minimum journal size, set by Zerto Virtual Replication, is 8GB. The journal is always thin-provisioned.
Unlimited – The size of the journal is unlimited and it can grow to the size of the recovery datastore.
Size (GB) – The maximum journal size in GB.
Percentage – The percentage of the virtual machine volume size the journal can grow to.
Journal Size Warning Threshold – The size of the journal that triggers a warning that the journal is nearing its hard limit.
Unlimited – The size of the journal is unlimited and it can grow to the size of the recovery datastore.
Size (GB) – The size in GB that will generate a warning.
Percentage – The percentage of the virtual machine volume size that will generate a warning.
1. If Zerto Cloud Manager is used, vSphere Standard edition cannot be used.
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Both the value of Size and Percentage must be less than the configured hard limit so that the warning will be generated
when needed. In addition to the warning threshold, Zerto Virtual Replication will issue a message when the free space
available for the journal is almost full.
Target RPO Alert – The maximum desired time between each automatic checkpoint write to the journal before an alert is
issued. To increase the value, move the slider right; to decrease the value, move the slider left.
Test Reminder – The time recommended between testing the integrity of the VPG. A warning is issued if a test is not done
within this time frame.
10. Click OK.
11. Optionally, change the Advanced value.
Enable WAN Traffic Compression – Whether or not data is compressed before being transferred to the recovery site.
Compressing the data is more efficient but results in a small performance degradation. Enable WAN traffic compression if
network considerations are more critical than CPU usage considerations. When WAN compression is enabled, the
compressed data is written in compressed format to the recovery site journal. Even if WAN compression is selected, Zerto
Virtual Replication decreases the level of compression if it takes too many resources. The VRA automatically adjusts the
compression level according to CPU usage, including totally disabling it if needed. Zerto recommends enabling WAN
compression. Zerto Virtual Replication can also work with third-party WAN optimization and acceleration technologies,
such as those supplied by Riverbed Technologies and Silver Peak. When third-party WAN optimization is implemented,
Zerto recommends disabling VPG WAN compression.
12. If you want to change the replication settings per virtual machine, click VM SETTINGS.
The Advanced VM Replication Settings dialog is displayed.
In this dialog, you can edit the values of one or more of the virtual machines in the VPG.
13. If you want to edit information in one field, click the field and update the information. If you want to edit information for
several virtual machines at the same time, select the virtual machines and click EDIT SELECTED.
The Edit VM dialog is displayed.
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Recovery Host – The cluster, resource pool, or host that will host the recovered virtual machine. If the site is defined in
Zerto Cloud Manager, only a resource pool can be specified and the resource pool must also have been defined in Zerto
Cloud Manager. For details about Zerto Cloud Manager, see Zerto Cloud Manager Administration Guide.
When a resource pool is specified, Zerto Virtual Replication checks that the resource pool capacity is enough for all the
virtual machines specified in the VPG.
If a resource pool is specified and DRS is disabled for the site later on, all the resource pools are removed by VMware and
recovery is to any one of the hosts in the recovery site with a VRA installed on it.
All resource pool checks are made at the level of the VPG and do not take into account multiple VPGs using the same
resource pool. If the resource pool CPU resources are defined as unlimited, the actual limit is inherited from the parent but
if this inherited value is too small, failover, move, and failover test operations can fail, even without a warning alert being
issued by Zerto Virtual Manager.
Recovery Datastore – The datastore where the VMware metadata files for the virtual machine are stored, such as the vmx
file. If a cluster or resource pool is selected for the host, only datastores that are accessible by every ESX/ESXi host in the
cluster or resource pool are displayed. This is also the datastore where RDM backing files for recovery volumes are
located.
Journal Size Hard Limit – The maximum size that the journal can grow, either as a percentage or a fixed amount. The
minimum journal size, set by Zerto Virtual Replication, is 8GB. The journal is always thin-provisioned.
Unlimited – The size of the journal is unlimited and it can grow to the size of the recovery datastore.
Size (GB) – The maximum journal size in GB.
Percentage – The percentage of the virtual machine volume size the journal can grow to.
Journal Size Warning Threshold – The size of the journal that triggers a warning that the journal is nearing its hard limit.
Unlimited – The size of the journal is unlimited and it can grow to the size of the recovery datastore.
Size (GB) – The size in GB that will generate a warning.
Percentage – The percentage of the virtual machine volume size that will generate a warning.
Both the value of Size and Percentage must be less than the configured hard limit so that the warning will be generated
when needed. In addition to the warning threshold, Zerto Virtual Replication will issue a message when the free space
available for the journal is almost full.
Journal Datastore – The datastore used for the journal data for each virtual machine in the VPG. To change the default,
specify a host and then select one of the datastores accessible by this host to be used as the journal datastore. When you
select specific journal datastore, the journals for each virtual machine in the VPG are stored in this datastore, regardless of
where the recovery datastores are for each virtual machine. In this case, all the protected virtual machines must be
recovered to hosts that can access the specified journal datastore.
14. Click OK.
15. In the Advanced VM Replication Settings dialog, click OK.
16. Click NEXT.
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The STORAGE step is displayed. By default the storage used for the virtual machine definition is also used for the virtual
machine data. For each virtual machine in the VPG, Zerto Virtual Replication displays its storage-related information.
Note: Steps that do not require input are marked with a check mark. You can jump directly to a step that has been marked
with a check mark to edit the values for that step. Every step must be marked with a check mark before you can click DONE
to create the VPG.
Thin – If the recovery volumes are thin-provisioned or not.
IMPORTANT: Changing the VPG recovery volume from thin-provisioned to thick-provisioned or vice versa, results in
volume initial synchronization.
Temp Data – If the virtual machine to be replicated includes a temp data disk as part of its configuration, mark the recovery
disk for this disk as a temp data disk. In this case, data is not replicated to the temp data disk after initial synchronization.
The STORAGE step is displayed. By default the storage used for the virtual machine definition is also used for the virtual
machine data. For each virtual machine in the VPG, Zerto Virtual Replication displays its storage-related information.
17. If you want to edit information in one field, click the field and update the information. If you want to edit information for
several virtual machines at the same time, select the virtual machines and click EDIT SELECTED.
The Edit Volumes dialog is displayed.
18. Specify the volume source for recovery from one of the following options.
Datastore – A new volume is used for replicated data. Specify the datastore to use to create disks for the replicated data. If
the source disk is thin provisioned, the default for the recovery volume is that it is also thin provisioned.
The datastore specified for replication must have at least the same amount of space as the protected volume and an
additional amount for the journal. The amount of additional space needed for the journal can be fixed by specifying a
maximum size for the journal, or can be calculated as the average change rate for the virtual machines in the VPG,
multiplied by the length of time specified for the journal history.
Zerto Virtual Replication supports the SCSI protocol. Only disks that support this protocol can be specified.
Raw Disk – The VMware RDM (Raw Device Mapping) to use for the replication: By default, RDM is recovered as thinprovisioned VMDK in the datastore specified in the VM Recovery Datastore field in the Edit VM dialog, and not to RDM.
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Only a raw disk with the same size as the protected disk can be selected from the list of available raw disks. Other raw
disks with different sizes are not available for selection. The RDM is always stored in the recovery datastore used for the
virtual machine. The following limitations apply to protecting RDM disks:
■
RDM disks with an even number of blocks can replicate to RDM disks of the same size with an even number of blocks
and to VMDKs.
■
RDM disks with an odd number of blocks can only replicate to RDM disks of the same size with an odd number of
blocks and not to VMDKs.
You cannot define an RDM disk to be protected to a cloud service provider via a Zerto Cloud Connector nor if the virtual
machine uses a BusLogic SCSI controller, nor when protecting or recovering virtual machines in an environment running
vCenter Server 5.x with ESX/ESXi version 4.1 hosts.
Preseeded volume – Whether to copy the protected data to a virtual disk in the recovery site. Zerto recommends using this
option particularly for large disks so that the initial synchronization will be faster since a Delta Sync can be used to
synchronize any changes written to the recovery site after the creation of the preseeded disk. When not using a preseeded
disk, the initial synchronization phase must copy the whole disk over the WAN. When using a preseeded virtual disk, you
select the datastore and exact location, folder, and name of the preseeded disk, which cannot be an IDE disk. Zerto Virtual
Replication takes ownership of the preseeded disk, moving it from its source folder to the folder used by the VRA. Only
disks with the same size as the protected disk can be selected when browsing for a preseeded disk. The datastore where
the preseeded disk is placed is also used as the recovery datastore for the replicated data.
If the preseeded disk is greater than 1TB on NFS storage, the VPG creation might fail. This is a known VMware problem
when the NFS client does not wait for sufficient time for the NFS storage array to initialize the virtual disk after the RPC
parameter of the NFS client times out. The timeout default value is 10 seconds. See the VMware documentation, http://
kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=1027919, which
describes the configuration option to tune the RPC timeout parameter using the esxcfg-advcfg -s <Timeout> /NFS/
SetAttrRPCTimeout command.
Datastore – The datastore where the preseeded disk is located.
Path – The full path to the preseeded disk.
Note the following conditions:
■
If the protected disks are non-default geometry, configure the VPG using preseeded volumes.
■
If the protected disk is an RDM disk, it can be used to preseed to a recovery VMDK disk. Zerto Virtual Replication
makes sure that the VMDK disk size is a correct match for the RDM disk.
■
If the VPG is being defined for a Zerto Organization, ZORG, the location of the preseeded disk must be defined in the
Zerto Cloud Manager. For details, see Zerto Cloud Manager Administration Guide.
Temp Data disk – If the virtual machine to be replicated includes a temp data disk as part of its configuration, mark the
recovery disk for this disk as a temp data disk. In this case, data is not replicated to the temp data disk after initial
synchronization.
Thin provisioning – If the recovery volumes are thin-provisioned or not. If the source disk is thin provisioned, the default for
the recovery volume is that it is also thin provisioned.
19. Click OK.
20. Click NEXT.
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The RECOVERY step is displayed. Recovery details include the networks to use for failover, move, and for testing failover,
and whether scripts should run as part of the recovery operation.
21. Select the default recovery settings.
Failover/Move Network – The network to use during a failover or move operation in which the recovered virtual machines
will run.
Failover Test Network – The network to use when testing the failover of virtual machines in the recovery site. Zerto
recommends using a fenced-out network so as not to impact the production network at this site.
Recovery Folder – The folder to which the virtual machines are recovered.
22. To specify a recovery folder for each virtual machine in the VPG, click VM SETTINGS.
The Advanced VM Recovery Settings dialog is displayed.
In this dialog, you can edit the values of one or more of the virtual machines in the VPG.
23. If you want to edit information in a field, click the field and update the information. If you want to edit information for
several virtual machines at the same time, select the virtual machines and click EDIT SELECTED.
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The Edit VM dialog is displayed.
Recovery Folder – The folder to which the virtual machine is recovered.
24. Click SAVE.
25. In the Advanced VM Recovery Settings dialog, click OK.
26. Enter the name of the script to run in the Command to run text box. You can then enter details about the script.
Pre-recovery Script – The information about a script that should run at the beginning of the recovery process.
Post-recovery Script – The information about a script that should run at the end of the recovery process.
For both types of scripts, enter the following information:
TEXT BOX
DESCRIPTION
Command to run
The full path of the script. The script must be located on the same machine as the Zerto Virtual
Manager for the recovery site.
Params
The parameters to pass to the script. Separate parameters with a space.
Timeout
The time-out, in seconds, for the script to run. If the script runs before executing a failover, move,
or test failover, and the script fails or the timeout value is reached, an alert is generated and the
failover, move, or test failover is not performed. If the script runs after executing a failover, move,
or test failover, and the timeout value is reached, an alert is generated. The default time-out value
is specified in Performance and Throttling tab in the Site Settings dialog.
27. Click NEXT.
The NICs step is displayed. In this step, you can specify the NIC details to use for the recovered virtual machines after a
failover, a test failover, or migration.
28. If you want to edit information in one field, click the field and update the information. If you want to edit information for
several virtual machines at the same time, select the virtual machines and click EDIT SELECTED. Otherwise, go to step 31.
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The Edit VNIC dialog is displayed.
29. Specify the network details to use for the recovered virtual machines after a failover or move operation, in the Failover/
Move column, and for the recovered virtual machines when testing replication, in the Test column.
In each column, specify the following:
Network: The network to use for this virtual machine.
Create New MAC Address: Whether the Media Access Control address (MAC address) used on the protected site should
be replicated on the recovery site. The default is to use the same MAC address on both sites. Note that if you check this
option, to create a new MAC address, and the current IP address is not specified, the protected virtual machine static IP
address might not be used for the recovered virtual machine.
Change vNIC IP Configuration: Whether or not to keep the default virtual NIC (vNIC) IP configuration. Configuration is
possible only when the guest operating system is defined in the hypervisor manager and Integration Services or VMWare
Tools are detected. The vNIC IP address is only changed after recovery for virtual machines with VMware Tools and
Microsoft Integration Services running.
Refer to the Zerto Virtual Replication Interoperability Matrix for the list of operating systems for which Zerto supports ReIPing.
To change the vNIC IP configuration, select Yes in the Failover/Move or Test column. If you select to use a staticallyassigned IP address, set the IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway. Optionally, change the preferred and alternate
DNS server IP addresses and the DNS suffix. If you leave the DNS server and suffix entries empty, or select to use DHCP,
the IP address and DNS server configurations are assigned automatically, to match the protected virtual machine. You can
change the DNS suffix.
If the virtual machine has multiple NICs but is configured to only have a single default gateway, fill in a 0 for each octet in
the Default gateway field for the NICs with no default gateway.
Note: During a failover, move, or test failover, if the recovered virtual machine is assigned a different IP than the original IP,
after the virtual machine has started it is automatically rebooted so that it starts up with the correct IP. If the same network
is used for both production and test failovers, Zerto recommends changing the IP address for the virtual machines started
for the test, so that there is no IP clash between the test machines and the production machines.
Copy to failover test – Copies the settings in the Failover/Move column to the Test column.
Copy to failover/move – Copies the settings in the Test column to the Failover/Move column.
30. Click OK.
31. Click NEXT.
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The BACKUP step is displayed. Backup properties govern the VPG backup, including the repository where the backups are
saved. Backup extends the ability to recover virtual machines in a VPG going back one year.
32. By default, backup is off. If you do not want to change this value, go to step 21. Otherwise, toggle OFF to ON and enter the
following information:
Target Repository – The name of the repository where the offsite backups are written. Repositories are configured via the
SETUP tab as described in “Setting Up Offsite Backups”, on page 23.
Retention Period – The length of time to keep offsite backups, up to a maximum of one year. For details of how this affects
the number of backups saved, see “Offsite Backups”, on page 34.
Run Job Every – The day and time to start the backup.
Retries – Whether to rerun the backup job automatically if the job fails. If you select this option, you must also define the
number of retries that will be attempted and the time to wait after a job fails before running the backup job again.
Post-Backup Script – The information about a script that should run at the end of the recovery process. Enter the following
information:
TEXT BOX
DESCRIPTION
Command to run
The full path of the script. The script must be located on the same machine as the Zerto Virtual
Manager for the recovery site.
Parameters
The values of parameters to pass to the script. Separate parameters with a space.
Timeout
The time-out, in seconds, for the script to run. If the timeout value is reached, an alert is generated.
The default time-out value is specified in the Performance and Throttling tab of the Site Settings
dialog.
33. Click NEXT.
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The SUMMARY step is displayed. It shows the VPG configuration that you defined in previous tabs.
34. Click DONE.
The VPG is created.
For details of what happens after saving the VPG, see “What happens After the VPG is Defined”, on page 32.
Protecting Virtual Machines to a Recovery Site VMware vCloud Director
You can protect virtual machines to a recovery site VMware vCloud Director (vCD). The procedure is the same whether you
intend to protect one virtual machine or multiple virtual machines.
When creating a VPG from Hyper-V to a VMware vCD, all recovery operations bring up the recovered machines as vCD
vApps.
Zerto Virtual Replication uses SCSI for recovered virtual machine disks. Any Hyper-V virtual machines with IDE disks will be
recovered with SCSI disks.
When protecting virtual machines from Hyper-V to vCD, the operating systems of the protected machines must be supported
by vCD. Refer to VMware documentation for the list of supported operating systems.
The following conversions are done to a protected virtual machine when it is recovered in vCD:
■
■
■
■
■
Virtual machines are recovered in vCenter Server with the highest hardware version supported by the vCenter Server host
version under which the virtual machine is recovered.
A Generation 1 virtual machine is recovered in vCenter Server with BIOS with the highest supported hardware version.
A Generation 2 virtual machine is recovered in vCenter Server with EUFI. The host in vCenter must support hardware
version 8 or higher. Also the following restrictions apply for Generation 2 virtual machines:
■
The secure boot option for the machine in Hyper-V must be disabled.
■
The boot disk must be less than 2TB if the recovery host version is lower than ESXi 5.5.
All IDE disks are converted to SCSI disks. The boot disk is ported to a disk on a SCSI controller with location 0:0.
Recovered virtual machines use the VMware Virtual E1000 network adapter.
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To create a virtual protection group to recover to VMware vCloud Director:
1.
In the Zerto User Interface, select ACTIONS > CREATE VPG.
The NEW VPG step of the Create VPG wizard is displayed.
2.
Specify the name of the VPG and the priority of the VPG.
VPG Name – The VPG name must be unique. The name cannot be more than 80 characters.
Priority – Determine the priority for transferring data from the protected site to the recovery site when there is limited
bandwidth and more than one VPG is defined on the protected site. When there are updates to virtual machines protected
in VPGs with different priorities, first the updates from the VPG with the highest priority are passed over the WAN.
Medium priority VPGs will only be able to use whatever bandwidth is left after the high priority VPGs have used it. This is
also true between medium and low priorities. Note that updates to the protected virtual machines are always sent across
the WAN before synchronization data, such as during a bitmap or delta sync. During a synchronization, only after updates
to the virtual machines are sent over the WAN, based on the VPG priority, is synchronization data from the VPG sent, and
the synchronization data from the VPG with the highest priority is passed over the WAN before data from medium and
low priority VPGs.
3.
Click NEXT.
The VMs step is displayed.
4. Select the VMs that will be part of this VPG and click the arrow pointing right to include these VMs in the VPG.
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Virtual machines that are not yet protected are displayed in the list. A VPG can include virtual machines that are not yet
protected and virtual machines that are already protected. You can view protected virtual machines by clicking Select VMs
in the Advanced (One-to-Many) section.
The Select VMs dialog is displayed.
Note: Virtual machines can be protected in a maximum of three VPGs. These VPGs cannot be recovered to the same site.
Virtual machines protected in the maximum number of VPGs are not displayed in the Select VMs dialog.
Protecting virtual machines in several VPGs is enabled only if both the protected site and the recovery site, as well as the
VRAs installed on these sites, are of version 5.0 and higher.
Note: A boot order for virtual machines recovered in a vCloud Director vApp is defined in the vCloud Director console.
5.
Click NEXT.
The REPLICATION step is displayed.
6.
Specify the recovery site and default values to use for the replication to this site.
Recovery Site – The site to which you want to recover the virtual machines. If the site is a site running vCloud Director, the
option to select either VC or vCD is presented.
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If the site is defined in Zerto Cloud Manager, you specify the name the cloud service provider uses to identify you as a
Zerto Organization, ZORG. For details about Zerto Cloud Manager, refer to Zerto Cloud Manager Administration Guide.
If VC is selected, the procedure is the same as described in “Protecting Virtual Machines to a Recovery Site VMware
vCenter Server”, on page 46.
If vCD is selected, specify the Recovery Org vDC to use in the recovery site.
7.
When the Zerto Cloud Manager is used select the service profile.
Service Profile – The name of the service profile to use which determines the VPG SLA settings for the group, which apply
to every virtual machine in the group. To change the VPG SLA settings, select the Custom Service Profile.
8.
If the VPG SLA settings are editable, when the Zerto Cloud Manager is not used or when a Custom service profile is
available, specify these settings for the group, which apply to every virtual machine in the group.
Journal History – The time that all write commands are saved in the journal. The longer the information is saved in the
journal, the more space is required for each journal in the VPG. You can select the number of hours from 1 to 24 or the
number of days from 2 to 30.
For additional journal-related fields, click ADVANCED.
The Advanced Journal Settings dialog is displayed.
Journal Size Hard Limit – The maximum size that the journal can grow, either as a percentage or a fixed amount. The
minimum journal size, set by Zerto Virtual Replication, is 8GB. The journal is always thin-provisioned.
Unlimited – The size of the journal is unlimited and it can grow to the size of the recovery datastore.
Size (GB) – The maximum journal size in GB.
Percentage – The percentage of the virtual machine volume size the journal can grow to.
Journal Size Warning Threshold – The size of the journal that triggers a warning that the journal is nearing its hard limit.
Unlimited – The size of the journal is unlimited and it can grow to the size of the recovery datastore.
Size (GB) – The size in GB that will generate a warning.
Percentage – The percentage of the virtual machine volume size that will generate a warning.
Both the value of Size and Percentage must be less than the configured hard limit so that the warning will be generated
when needed. In addition to the warning threshold, Zerto Virtual Replication will issue a message when the free space
available for the journal is almost full.
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Target RPO Alert – The maximum desired time between each automatic checkpoint write to the journal before an alert is
issued. To increase the value, move the slider right; to decrease the value, move the slider left.
Test Reminder – The time recommended between testing the integrity of the VPG. A warning is issued if a test is not done
within this time frame.
9.
Optionally, change the Advanced value.
Enable WAN Traffic Compression – Whether or not data is compressed before being transferred to the recovery site.
Compressing the data is more efficient but results in a small performance degradation. Enable WAN traffic compression if
network considerations are more critical than CPU usage considerations. When WAN compression is enabled, the
compressed data is written in compressed format to the recovery site journal. Even if WAN compression is selected, Zerto
Virtual Replication decreases the level of compression if it takes too many resources. The VRA automatically adjusts the
compression level according to CPU usage, including totally disabling it if needed. Zerto recommends enabling WAN
compression. Zerto Virtual Replication can also work with third-party WAN optimization and acceleration technologies,
such as those supplied by Riverbed Technologies and Silver Peak. When third-party WAN optimization is implemented,
Zerto recommends disabling VPG WAN compression.
10. If you want to change the replication settings per virtual machine, click VM SETTINGS.
The Advanced VM Replication Settings dialog is displayed.
In this dialog, you can edit the values of one or more of the virtual machines in the VPG.
11. If you want to edit information in one field, click the field and update the information. If you want to edit information for
several virtual machines at the same time, select the virtual machines and click EDIT SELECTED.
The Edit VM dialog is displayed.
Storage Profile – Storage profiles enable mapping virtual machines to storage levels according to predefined service levels,
storage availability, performance requirements or cost. You can define and label storage tiers and then specify the tier to
use as a storage profile, for each virtual machine in the VPG. The default storage profile is the default for the Recovery Org
vDC.
Zerto will place all the volumes of each virtual machine in a datastore, according to the following considerations:
■
The datastore is part of the selected storage profile.
■
The datastore is configured as recovery datastore target in the Configure PVDC dialog.
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■
The datastore has enough space to contain all of the virtual machine volumes.
If Zerto Virtual Replication cannot find a storage profile that can be used as target storage, the value is set to Zerto_Any.
In this case, any of the datastores configured in the Configure Provider vDCs dialog can be selected as recovery datastores,
provided they are exposed to the relevant recovery hosts. Upon recovery, Zerto Virtual Replication chooses a storage
profile available to the Org vDC, for the recovered vApp, that contains all of the datastores on which recovery volumes of
the VPG reside. If there is no such storage profile, the recovery operation cannot start. The storage profile can be set to
Zerto_Any for a number of reasons, such as adding a virtual machine to the VPG which does not have a storage profile
that can be used as the target.
Journal Size Hard Limit – The maximum size that the journal can grow, either as a percentage or a fixed amount. The
minimum journal size, set by Zerto Virtual Replication, is 8GB. The journal is always thin-provisioned.
Unlimited – The size of the journal is unlimited and it can grow to the size of the recovery datastore.
Size (GB) – The maximum journal size in GB.
Percentage – The percentage of the virtual machine volume size the journal can grow to.
Journal Size Warning Threshold – The size of the journal that triggers a warning that the journal is nearing its hard limit.
Unlimited – The size of the journal is unlimited and it can grow to the size of the recovery datastore.
Size (GB) – The size in GB that will generate a warning.
Percentage – The percentage of the virtual machine volume size that will generate a warning.
Both the value of Size and Percentage must be less than the configured hard limit so that the warning will be generated
when needed. In addition to the warning threshold, Zerto Virtual Replication will issue a message when the free space
available for the journal is almost full.
12. Click OK.
13. In the Advanced VM Replication Settings dialog, click OK.
14. Click NEXT.
The STORAGE step is displayed. By default the storage used for the virtual machine definition is also used for the virtual
machine data. For each virtual machine in the VPG, Zerto Virtual Replication displays its storage-related information.
Note: Steps that do not require input are marked with a check mark. You can jump directly to a step that has been marked
with a check mark to edit the values for that step. Every step must be marked with a check mark before you can click DONE
to create the VPG.
Thin – If the recovery volumes are thin-provisioned or not.
IMPORTANT: Changing the VPG recovery volume from thin-provisioned to thick-provisioned or vice versa, results in
volume initial synchronization.
Temp Data – If the virtual machine to be replicated includes a temp data disk as part of its configuration, mark the recovery
disk for this disk as a temp data disk. In this case, data is not replicated to the temp data disk after initial synchronization.
15. If you want to edit storage information for one of the virtual machines, select the machine and click EDIT SELECTED.
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The Edit Volumes dialog is displayed.
16. Specify the volume source for recovery from one of the options.
vCD managed storage profile – The datastore is allocated based on the available free space. You can specify whether the
recovery volume is thin-provisioned or not. If the Org vDC only supports thin-provisioned volumes, you cannot change the
setting.
Preseeded volume – A virtual disk (the VMDK flat file and descriptor) in the recovery site that has been prepared with a
copy of the protected data. Zerto recommends using this option particularly for large disks so that the initial
synchronization is much faster since a Delta Sync is used to synchronize any changes written to the recovery site after the
creation of the preseeded disk. When not using a preseeded disk the initial synchronization phase has to copy the whole
disk over the WAN. Browse to the preseed folder configured for the customer and the disk name, of the preseeded disk. In
order to use a preseeded VMDK, do the following:
■
Create a folder in vCD to use for the preseeded disks in the datastore you want to use for the customer.
■
Specify this datastore as a provider datastore for preseeded disks in the Configure Provider vDCs dialog, from the
Advanced Settings dialog, as described in Zerto Cloud Manager Administration Guide.
■
In the Zerto Cloud Manager specify the Preseed Folder Name for the ZORG, in the Manage ZORG tab.
Zerto Virtual Replication searches for the preseeded folder in the available datastores in the Org vDCs specified in the vCD
Cloud Resources for the ZORG in the Zerto Cloud Manager and takes ownership of the preseeded disk, moving it from its
source folder to the folder used by the VRA. Note that if the virtual machine has more than one preseeded disk, these disks
must reside on the same datastore. If the preseeded disk is greater than 1TB on NFS storage, the VPG creation might fail.
This is a known VMware problem when the NFS client does not wait for sufficient time for the NFS storage array to
initialize the virtual disk after the RPC parameter of the NFS client times out. The timeout default value is 10 seconds. Refer
to the VMware documentation, http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/
search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=1027919, which describes the configuration option to tune the
RPC timeout parameter using the esxcfg-advcfg -s <Timeout> /NFS/SetAttrRPCTimeout command.
If the VPG is being defined for a Zerto Organization, ZORG, the location of the preseeded disk must be defined in the Zerto
Cloud Manager. For details, refer to Zerto Cloud Manager Administration Guide.
Zerto Virtual Replication supports the SCSI protocol. Only disks that support this protocol can be specified. Virtual
machine RDMs in a vCenter Server are replicated as VMDKs in a vCD environment.
17. Specify the other volume options.
18. Temp Data disk – If the virtual machine to be replicated includes a temp data disk as part of its configuration, mark the
recovery disk for this disk as a temp data disk. In this case, data is not replicated to the temp data disk after initial
synchronization.
Thin provisioning – If the recovery volumes are thin-provisioned or not.
19. Click OK.
20. Click NEXT.
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The RECOVERY step is displayed. Recovery details include the scripts that should be run either at the start or end of a
recovery operation.
21. Select the default recovery settings.
vCD Guest Customization – When checked, VMware Guest OS Customization is enabled for the virtual machine in vCloud
Director. Enabling guest customization means that the computer name and network settings configured for this virtual
machine are applied to its Guest OS when the virtual machine is powered on. vCD Guest Customization must be checked to
enable re-IPing the recovered virtual machines.
vApp Network Mapping – The networks to use for failover and move operations, for failover test operations, and for test
failover operations after a failover or move when reverse protection is configured. The list of current Org Networks is
displayed and you can specify what network to use in each of the situations. <Isolated> means that the network is an
internal only vApp network.
22. Enter the name of the script to run in the Command to run text box. You can then enter details about the script.
Pre-recovery Script – The information about a script that should run at the beginning of the recovery process.
Post-recovery Script – The information about a script that should run at the end of the recovery process.
For both types of scripts, enter the following information:
TEXT BOX
DESCRIPTION
Command to run
The full path of the script. The script must be located on the same machine as the Zerto Virtual
Manager for the recovery site.
Params
The parameters to pass to the script. Separate parameters with a space.
Timeout
The time-out, in seconds, for the script to run. If the script runs before executing a failover, move,
or test failover, and the script fails or the timeout value is reached, an alert is generated and the
failover, move, or test failover is not performed. If the script runs after executing a failover, move,
or test failover, and the timeout value is reached, an alert is generated. The default time-out value
is specified in Performance and Throttling tab in the Site Settings dialog.
23. Click NEXT.
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The NICs step is displayed. In this step, you can specify the NIC details to use for the recovered virtual machines after a
failover, a test failover, or migration.
24. If you want to edit information in one field, click the field and update the information. If you want to edit information for
several virtual machines at the same time, select the virtual machines and click EDIT SELECTED. Otherwise, go to step 27.
The Edit VNIC dialog is displayed.
25. Specify the network details to use for the recovered virtual machines after a failover or move operation, in the Failover/
Move column, and for the recovered virtual machines when testing replication, in the Test column.
In each column, specify the following:
Network: The network to use for this virtual machine.
New MAC Address: Whether the Media Access Control address (MAC address) used on the protected site should be
replicated on the recovery site. The default is to use the same MAC address on both sites.
vNIC IP Mode: Which IP mode to use. Specify the IP address if you choose static IP pool.
Refer to the Zerto Virtual Replication Interoperability Matrix for the list of operating systems for which Zerto supports ReIPing.
Note: During a failover, move, or test failover, if the recovered virtual machine is assigned a different IP than the original IP,
after the virtual machine has started it is automatically rebooted so that it starts up with the correct IP. If the same network
is used for both production and test failovers, Zerto recommends changing the IP address for the virtual machines started
for the test, so that there is no IP clash between the test machines and the production machines.
Copy to failover test – Copies the settings in the Failover/Move column to the Test column.
Copy to failover/move – Copies the settings in the Test column to the Failover/Move column.
26. Click OK.
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27. Click NEXT.
The BACKUP step is displayed. Backup properties govern the VPG backup, including the repository where the backups are
saved. Backup extends the ability to recover virtual machines in a VPG going back one year.
28. By default, backup is off. If you do not want to change this value, go to step 29. Otherwise, toggle OFF to ON and enter the
following information:
Target Repository – The name of the repository where the offsite backups are written. Repositories are configured via the
SETUP tab as described in “Setting Up Offsite Backups”, on page 23.
Retention Period – The length of time to keep offsite backups, up to a maximum of one year. For details of how this affects
the number of backups saved, see “Offsite Backups”, on page 34.
Run Job Every – The day and time to start the backup.
Retries – Whether to rerun the backup job automatically if the job fails. If you select this option, you must also define the
number of retries that will be attempted and the time to wait after a job fails before running the backup job again.
Post-Backup Script – The information about a script that should run at the end of the recovery process. Enter the following
information:
TEXT BOX
DESCRIPTION
Command to run
The full path of the script. The script must be located on the same machine as the Zerto Virtual
Manager for the recovery site.
Parameters
The values of parameters to pass to the script. Separate parameters with a space.
Timeout
The time-out, in seconds, for the script to run. If the timeout value is reached, an alert is generated.
The default time-out value is specified in the Performance and Throttling tab of the Site Settings
dialog.
29. Click NEXT.
The SUMMARY step is displayed. It shows the VPG configuration that you defined in previous steps.
30. Click DONE.
The VPG is created.
For details of what happens after saving the VPG, see “What happens After the VPG is Defined”, on page 32.
The virtual machines in the VPG are protected as a vCD vApp in the recovery site.
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Protecting Virtual Machines from Hyper-V Hosts to AWS
You can protect virtual machines to Amazon Web Services (AWS). The procedure is the same whether you intend to protect
one virtual machine or multiple virtual machines.
When creating a VPG from Hyper-V to AWS the data is stored in S3 and all replicated data from protected virtual machines to
AWS is encrypted in S3. all recovery operations bring up the recovered machines in EC2 in AWS.
■
Only virtual machines that are supported by AWS can be protected by Zerto Virtual Replication. Refer to AWS
documentation for the supported operating systems.
■
Each machine that you intend to protect must have at least 250MB free space This is because AWS adds files to the
recovered machines during failover, move, test failover, and clone operations.
■
Protected volumes are recovered in EC2 as EBS disks with magnetic disk type. Virtual machines with disks that are less
than 1GB are recovered with disks of 1GB. Additional volumes might be created in the recovered instance, dependent on
the instance type used for the recovery. These volumes can be ignored.
Note: By default, every m3.xlarge instance is created with two SSD disks. These disks are in addition to the disks
associated with each protected virtual machine.
■
A VPC must exist, and a security group and subnet must be assigned to it and to all other VPCs you want to use for
recovered virtual machines.
■
The following limitations apply when protecting to AWS:
■
You cannot protect machines that have a disk larger than 1TB.
■
AWS supports virtual machines with up to 12 volumes, including the boot disk.
■
You cannot protect virtual machines that are GPT partitioned.
To create a virtual protection group (VPG):
1.
In the Zerto User Interface, select ACTIONS > CREATE VPG.
The NEW VPG step of the Create VPG wizard is displayed.
2.
Specify the name of the VPG and the priority of the VPG.
VPG Name – The VPG name must be unique. The name cannot be more than 80 characters.
Priority – Determine the priority for transferring data from the protected site to the recovery site when there is limited
bandwidth and more than one VPG is defined on the protected site. When there are updates to virtual machines protected
in VPGs with different priorities, first the updates from the VPG with the highest priority are passed over the WAN.
Medium priority VPGs will only be able to use whatever bandwidth is left after the high priority VPGs have used it. This is
also true between medium and low priorities. Note that updates to the protected virtual machines are always sent across
the WAN before synchronization data, such as during a bitmap or delta sync. During a synchronization, only after updates
to the virtual machines are sent over the WAN, based on the VPG priority, is synchronization data from the VPG sent, and
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the synchronization data from the VPG with the highest priority is passed over the WAN before data from medium and
low priority VPGs.
3.
Click NEXT.
The VMs step is displayed.
4. Select the VMs that will be part of this VPG and click the arrow pointing right to include these VMs in the VPG.
Virtual machines that are not yet protected are displayed in the list. A VPG can include virtual machines that are not yet
protected and virtual machines that are already protected. You can view protected virtual machines by clicking Select VMs
in the Advanced (One-to-Many) section.
The Select VMs dialog is displayed.
Note: Virtual machines can be protected in a maximum of three VPGs. These VPGs cannot be recovered to the same site.
Virtual machines protected in the maximum number of VPGs are not displayed in the Select VMs dialog.
Protecting virtual machines in several VPGs is enabled only if both the protected site and the recovery site, as well as the
VRAs installed on these sites, are of version 5.0 and higher.
5.
If you want to define the boot order of the virtual machines in the VPG, click DEFINE BOOT ORDER, otherwise go to the next
step.
When virtual machines in a VPG are started in the recovery site, by default these machines are not started up in a
particular order. If you want specific virtual machines to start before other machines, you can specify a boot order. The
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virtual machines are defined in groups and the boot order applies to the groups and not to individual virtual machines in the
groups. You can specify a delay between groups during startup.
Note: Up to five virtual machines may boot on a host simultaneously. Following the boot, a 300 second delay occurs until
the next boot batch.
CInitially, virtual machines in the VPG are displayed together under the Default group. If you want specific machines to
start before other virtual machines, define new groups with one or more virtual machines in each group.
a) Click ADD to add a new group.
b) To change the name of a group, click the Pencil icon next to the group. To delete a group, click the delete icon on the
right side. You cannot delete the Default group nor a group that contains a virtual machine.
c) Drag virtual machines to move them from one group to another.
d) Drag groups to change the order the groups are started.
e) Optionally, in Boot Delay, specify a time delay between starting up the virtual machines in the group and starting up
the virtual machines in the next group. For example, assume three groups, Default, Server, and Client, defined in this
order. The boot delay defined for the Default group is 10, for the Server group is 100, and for the Client group 0. The
virtual machines in the Default group are started together and after 10 seconds the virtual machines in the Server group
are started. After 100 seconds the virtual machines in the Client group are started.
f) Click OK to save the boot order.
6.
7.
When configuring boot order settings, define the boot disk to be first in the boot sequence in order to avoid boot failure.
Click NEXT.
The REPLICATION step is displayed.
Note: If the protected site is paired with only one recovery site, the recovery step is displayed with the Recovery Site
field automatically filled in and defaults set, as shown below.
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8.
Specify the recovery site.
Recovery Site – The site to which you want to recover the virtual machines. After specifying the recovery site, other fields
are displayed.
Note: Steps that do not require input are marked with a check mark. You can jump directly to a step that has been marked
with a check mark to edit the values for that step. Every step must be marked with a check mark before you can click DONE
to create the VPG.
9.
Optionally, change the default SLA values:
Journal History – The time that all write commands are saved in the journal. The longer the information is saved in the
journal, the more space is required for each journal in the VPG. You can select the number of hours from 1 to 24 or the
number of days from 2 to 30.
Target RPO Alert – The maximum desired time between each automatic checkpoint write to the journal before an alert is
issued. To increase the value, move the slider right; to decrease the value, move the slider left.
Test Reminder – The time recommended between testing the integrity of the VPG. A warning is issued if a test is not done
within this time frame.
10. Click NEXT.
The STORAGE step is displayed. By default the storage used for the virtual machine definition is also used for the virtual
machine data. For each virtual machine in the VPG, Zerto Virtual Replication displays its storage-related information.
11. Specify whether the protected volume is a temp data disk.
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Temp Data – If the virtual machine to be replicated includes a temp data disk as part of its configuration, mark the recovery
disk for this disk as a temp data disk. In this case, data is not replicated to the temp data disk after initial synchronization.
12. Click NEXT.
The RECOVERY step is displayed. Recovery details include the networks, security group, instance family, and instance type
to use for failover, move, and testing failover, and whether scripts should run as part of the recovery process.
Note: Steps that do not require input are marked with a check mark. You can jump directly to a step that has been marked
with a check mark to edit the values for that step. Every step must be marked with a check mark before you can click DONE
to create the VPG.
13. Select recovery settings for failover/move and failover testing.
VPC Network – The virtual network dedicated to your AWS account. A security group and subnet must be assigned to this
VPC.
Subnet – The subnet mask for the VPC network.
Security Group – The AWS security to be associated with the virtual machines in this VPG.
Instance Family – The instance family from which to select the type. AWS instance families are optimized for different
types of applications. Choose the instance family appropriate for the application being protected in the VPG.
Instance Type – The instance type, within the instance family, to assign to recovered instances. Different types within an
instance family vary, for example in vCPU, RAM, and local storage size. Choose the instance type appropriate for the
application being protected in the VPG. The price per instance is related to the instance configuration.
14. For additional settings, click ADVANCED VM SETTINGS.
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The Advanced VM Settings dialog is displayed, which shows the recovery network settings for failover and move for virtual
machines in the VPG. You can see the recovery network settings for failover tests by clicking TEST.
15. If you want to edit information in one field, click the field and update the information. If you want to edit information for
several virtual machines at the same time, select the virtual machines and click EDIT SELECTED.
The Edit VM Settings dialog is displayed.
16. Update the values for VPC network, subnet, security group, instance family, instance type, and private IP as necessary.
Only private IPs specified for Windows machines are assigned during a recovery operation. For Linux machines, the IP is
assigned from the specified subnet range.
Clearing the values in the Private IP field results in an IP being automatically assigned from the subnet range during a
recovery operation.
Refer to the Zerto Virtual Replication Interoperability Matrix for the list of operating systems for which Zerto supports ReIPing.
17. Click OK twice to return to the main page of the RECOVERY step.
18. Enter the name of the script to run in the Command to run text box. You can then enter details about the script.
Pre-recovery Script – The information about a script that should run at the beginning of the recovery process.
Post-recovery Script – The information about a script that should run at the end of the recovery process.
For both types of scripts, enter the following information:
TEXT BOX
DESCRIPTION
Command to run
The full path of the script. The script must be located on the same machine as the Zerto Virtual
Manager for the recovery site.
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TEXT BOX
DESCRIPTION
Params
The parameters to pass to the script. Separate parameters with a space.
Timeout
The time-out, in seconds, for the script to run. If the script runs before executing a failover, move,
or test failover, and the script fails or the timeout value is reached, an alert is generated and the
failover, move, or test failover is not performed. If the script runs after executing a failover, move,
or test failover, and the timeout value is reached, an alert is generated. The default time-out value
is specified in Performance and Throttling tab in the Site Settings dialog.
19. Click NEXT.
The BACKUP step is displayed. Backup properties govern the VPG backup, including the repository where the backups are
saved. Backup extends the ability to recover virtual machines in a VPG for up to one year.
20. By default, backup is off. If you do not want to change this value, go to step 21. Otherwise, toggle OFF to ON and enter the
following information:
Target Repository – The name of the repository where the offsite backups are written. Repositories are configured via the
SETUP tab as described in “Setting Up Offsite Backups”, on page 23.
Retention Period – The length of time to keep offsite backups, up to a maximum of one year. For details of how this affects
the number of backups saved, see “Offsite Backups”, on page 34.
Run Job Every – The day and time to start the backup.
Retries – Whether to rerun the backup job automatically if the job fails. If you select this option, you must also define the
number of retries that will be attempted and the time to wait after a job fails before running the backup job again.
Post-Backup Script – The information about a script that should run at the end of the recovery process. Enter the following
information:
TEXT BOX
DESCRIPTION
Command to run
The full path of the script. The script must be located on the same machine as the Zerto Virtual
Manager for the recovery site.
Parameters
The values of parameters to pass to the script. Separate parameters with a space.
Timeout
The time-out, in seconds, for the script to run. If the timeout value is reached, an alert is generated.
The default time-out value is specified in the Performance and Throttling tab of the Site Settings
dialog.
Note: You cannot restore a backup in AWS.
21. Click NEXT.
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The SUMMARY step is displayed. It shows the VPG configuration that you defined in the previous steps.
22. Click DONE.
The VPG is created.
For details of what happens after creating the VPG, see “What happens After the VPG is Defined”, on page 32.
Protecting Virtual Machines from Hyper-V Hosts to Azure
You can protect virtual machines to Microsoft Azure. The procedure is the same whether you intend to protect one virtual
machine or multiple virtual machines.
When creating a VPG from Hyper-V to Azure the data is stored in a storage account and all replicated data from protected
virtual machines to Azure is encrypted in the storage account. All recovery operations bring up the recovered machines in
resource groups in Azure.
■
Only virtual machines that are supported by Azure can be protected by Zerto Virtual Replication. All Windows operating
systems are supported.
Note: Microsoft does not support operating systems that are past the End of Support date, without a Custom Support
Agreement (CSA). For more information about Microsoft operating systems support for Microsoft Azure, refer to https://
support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/2721672.
■
For Linux distribution, refer to Azure documentation:
■
Linux on Azure-endorsed distributions: https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/virtualmachines-linux-endorsed-distributions/
■
Information for non-endorsed distributions: https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/virtualmachines-linux-create-upload-vhd-generic/
■
Protected volumes are recovered in Azure as VHD disks in a page blob. Virtual machines with disks that are less than 1GB
are recovered with disks of 1GB.
Note: For some instance size, the Azure virtual machine is created with a Local SSD disk which is a temporary disk. This
disk is in addition to the disks associated with each protected virtual machine.
■
The following limitations apply when protecting to Azure
■
Virtual machines with UEFI Firmware cannot be protected.
■
You cannot protect machines that have a disk larger than 1TB.
■
The protected virtual machines needs to have at least one NIC.
■
The supported number of data disks and NICS per virtual machine is dependent on the selected instance size. For
example, instance size D3_v2 allows up to eight data disks per virtual machine.
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■
To create a VPG that will be recovered to Azure, you must have a virtual machine in Azure with a Zerto Cloud Appliance
installed on it. This ZCA must be paired with the protected site.
For additional considerations, see Azure subscription and service limits, quotas and constraints: https://docs.microsoft.com/
en-us/azure/azure-subscription-service-limits.
For example, see the following default values:
■
20 cores per subscription
■
200 Storage accounts per subscription
■
20 VMs per region per subscription
■
VM per series (Dv2, F, etc.) cores per subscription201 per Region
Additionally, see the following example for maximum values:
■
A standard storage account has a maximum total request rate of 20,000 IOPS. The total IOPS across all of your virtual
machine disks in a standard storage account should not exceed this limit.
VM TIER
BASIC TIER VM
STANDARD TIER VM
Disk size
1023 GB
1023 GB
Max 8 KB IOPS per persistent disk
300
500
Max number of disks performing max IOPS
66
50
Azure Limitations Which Affect Installation and Recoverability
Below are the default Azure limitations which affect installation and recovery.
Default Azure limitations which Affect Installation
■
Storage Limitations:
■
Number of storage accounts: 200 per subscription (note: max is 250)
Default Azure limitations which Affect Recovery
■
■
■
Virtual Machines Limitations:
■
VMs per subscription per region: 20 (max: 10K)
■
VM total cores per subscription per region: 20
■
Instance sizes are also limited per region. Many of them are 20 cores per region per subscription
■
Resource groups per subscription: 800
Networking:
■
Network interfaces per region: 350
■
NICs per instance: depends on instance size
■
Windows: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/virtual-machines/virtual-machines-windows-sizes
■
Linux: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/virtual-machines/virtual-machines-linuxsizes?toc=%2fazure%2fvirtual-machines%2flinux%2ftoc.json
■
Private IP Addresses per VNET per subscription per region: 4096
Storage:
■
Storage Account total size limitation: 500 TB (# of entities (blobs, containers etc) within a storage account:
unlimited).
■
Max size of a page blob (vhd): 1 TB
■
Min size of a page blob (vhd): 20 MB
■
Max number of data disks: depends on instance size
■
Windows: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/virtual-machines/virtual-machines-windows-sizes
■
Linux: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/virtual-machines/virtual-machines-linuxsizes?toc=%2fazure%2fvirtual-machines%2flinux%2ftoc.json
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To create a virtual protection group (VPG):
1.
In the Zerto User Interface, select ACTIONS > CREATE VPG.
The NEW VPG step of the Create VPG wizard is displayed.
2.
Specify the name of the VPG and the priority of the VPG.
VPG Name – The VPG name must be unique. The name cannot be more than 80 characters.
Priority – Determine the priority for transferring data from the protected site to the recovery site when there is limited
bandwidth and more than one VPG is defined on the protected site. When there are updates to virtual machines protected
in VPGs with different priorities, first the updates from the VPG with the highest priority are passed over the WAN.
Medium priority VPGs will only be able to use whatever bandwidth is left after the high priority VPGs have used it. This is
also true between medium and low priorities. Note that updates to the protected virtual machines are always sent across
the WAN before synchronization data, such as during a bitmap or delta sync. During a synchronization, only after updates
to the virtual machines are sent over the WAN, based on the VPG priority, is synchronization data from the VPG sent, and
the synchronization data from the VPG with the highest priority is passed over the WAN before data from medium and
low priority VPGs.
3.
Click NEXT.
The VMs step is displayed.
4. Select the VMs that will be part of this VPG and click the arrow pointing right to include these VMs in the VPG.
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Virtual machines that are not yet protected are displayed in the list. A VPG can include virtual machines that are not yet
protected and virtual machines that are already protected. You can view protected virtual machines by clicking Select VMs
in the Advanced (One-to-Many) section.
The Select VMs dialog is displayed.
Note: Virtual machines can be protected in a maximum of three VPGs. These VPGs cannot be recovered to the same site.
Virtual machines protected in the maximum number of VPGs are not displayed in the Select VMs dialog.
Protecting virtual machines in several VPGs is enabled only if both the protected site and the recovery site, as well as the
VRAs installed on these sites, are of version 5.0 and higher.
5.
If you want to define the boot order of the virtual machines in the VPG, click DEFINE BOOT ORDER, otherwise go to the next
step.
When virtual machines in a VPG are started in the recovery site, by default these machines are not started up in a
particular order. If you want specific virtual machines to start before other machines, you can specify a boot order. The
virtual machines are defined in groups and the boot order applies to the groups and not to individual virtual machines in the
groups. You can specify a delay between groups during startup.
Note: Up to five virtual machines may boot on a host simultaneously. Following the boot, a 300 second delay occurs until
the next boot batch.
Initially, virtual machines in the VPG are displayed together under the Default group. If you want specific machines to start
before other virtual machines, define new groups with one or more virtual machines in each group.
a) Click ADD to add a new group.
b) To change the name of a group, click the Pencil icon next to the group. To delete a group, click the delete icon on the
right side. You cannot delete the Default group nor a group that contains a virtual machine.
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c) Drag virtual machines to move them from one group to another.
d) Drag groups to change the order the groups are started.
e) Optionally, in Boot Delay, specify a time delay between starting up the virtual machines in the group and starting up
the virtual machines in the next group. For example, assume three groups, Default, Server, and Client, defined in this
order. The boot delay defined for the Default group is 10, for the Server group is 100, and for the Client group 0. The
virtual machines in the Default group are started together and after 10 seconds the virtual machines in the Server group
are started. After 100 seconds the virtual machines in the Client group are started.
f) Click OK to save the boot order.
Click NEXT.
The REPLICATION step is displayed.
Note: If the protected site is paired with only one recovery site, the recovery step is displayed with the Recovery Site
field automatically filled in and defaults set, as shown below.
6.
Specify the recovery site.
Recovery Site – The site to which you want to recover the virtual machines. After specifying the recovery site, other fields
are displayed.
Note: Steps that do not require input are marked with a check mark. You can jump directly to a step that has been marked
with a check mark to edit the values for that step. Every step must be marked with a check mark before you can click DONE
to create the VPG.
7.
Optionally, change the default SLA values:
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Journal History – The time that all write commands are saved in the journal. The longer the information is saved in the
journal, the more space is required for each journal in the VPG. You can select the number of hours from 1 to 24 or the
number of days from 2 to 30.
Target RPO Alert – The maximum desired time between each automatic checkpoint write to the journal before an alert is
issued. To increase the value, move the slider right; to decrease the value, move the slider left.
Test Reminder – The time recommended between testing the integrity of the VPG. A warning is issued if a test is not done
within this time frame.
8.
Click NEXT.
The STORAGE step is displayed. By default the storage used for the virtual machine definition is also used for the virtual
machine data. For each virtual machine in the VPG, Zerto Virtual Replication displays its storage-related information.
9.
Specify whether the protected volume is a temp data disk.
Temp Data – If the virtual machine to be replicated includes a temp data disk as part of its configuration, mark the recovery
disk for this disk as a temp data disk. In this case, data is not replicated to the temp data disk after initial synchronization.
10. Click NEXT.
The RECOVERY step is displayed. Recovery details include the networks, network security group, instance family, and
instance size to use for failover, move, and testing failover, and whether scripts should run as part of the recovery process.
Note: Steps that do not require input are marked with a check mark. You can jump directly to a step that has been marked
with a check mark to edit the values for that step. Every step must be marked with a check mark before you can click DONE
to create the VPG.
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11. Select recovery settings for failover/move and failover testing.
VNet – The virtual network dedicated to your Azure subscription.
Subnet – The subnet or the VNet network.
Network Security Group – The Azure network security to be associated with the virtual machines in this VPG. You can
associate one network security group with the virtual machines. The NIC will be associated with the network security
group defined at the virtual machine level.
Instance Family – The instance family from which to select the size. Azure instance families are optimized for different
types of applications. Choose the instance family appropriate for the application being protected in the VPG.
Instance Size– The instance size, within the instance family, to assign to recovered instances. Different sizes within an
instance family vary, for example in a number of cores, RAM, and local storage size. Choose the instance size appropriate
for the application being protected in the VPG. The price per instance is related to the instance configuration.
12. For additional settings, click ADVANCED VM SETTINGS.
The Advanced VM Settings dialog is displayed, which shows the recovery network settings for failover and move for virtual
machines in the VPG. You can see the recovery network settings for failover tests by clicking TEST.
13. If you want to edit information in one field, click the field and update the information. If you want to edit information for
several virtual machines at the same time, select the virtual machines and click EDIT SELECTED.
The Edit VM Settings dialog is displayed.
14. Update the values for VNet, subnet, security group, instance family, instance size, and private IP as necessary.
Only private IPs specified for Windows machines are assigned during a recovery operation. For Linux machines, the IP is
assigned from the specified subnet range.
Clearing the values in the Private IP field results in an IP being automatically assigned from the subnet range during a
recovery operation.
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Refer to the Zerto Virtual Replication Interoperability Matrix for the list of operating systems for which Zerto supports ReIPing.
15. Click OK twice to return to the main page of the RECOVERY step.
16. Enter the name of the script to run in the Command to run text box. You can then enter details about the script.
Pre-recovery Script – The information about a script that should run at the beginning of the recovery process.
Post-recovery Script – The information about a script that should run at the end of the recovery process.
For both types of scripts, enter the following information:
TEXT BOX
DESCRIPTION
Command to run
The full path of the script. The script must be located on the same machine as the Zerto Virtual
Manager for the recovery site.
Params
The parameters to pass to the script. Separate parameters with a space.
Timeout
The time-out, in seconds, for the script to run. If the script runs before executing a failover, move,
or test failover, and the script fails or the timeout value is reached, an alert is generated and the
failover, move, or test failover is not performed. If the script runs after executing a failover, move,
or test failover, and the timeout value is reached, an alert is generated. The default time-out value
is specified in Performance and Throttling tab in the Site Settings dialog.
17. Click NEXT.
The BACKUP step is displayed. Backup properties govern the VPG backup, including the repository where the backups are
saved. Backup extends the ability to recover virtual machines in a VPG for up to one year.
18. By default, backup is off. If you do not want to change this value, go to step 21. Otherwise, toggle OFF to ON and enter the
following information:
Target Repository – The name of the repository where the offsite backups are written. Repositories are configured via the
SETUP tab as described in “Setting Up Offsite Backups”, on page 23.
Retention Period – The length of time to keep offsite backups, up to a maximum of one year. For details of how this affects
the number of backups saved, see “Offsite Backups”, on page 34.
Run Job Every – The day and time to start the backup.
Retries – Whether to rerun the backup job automatically if the job fails. If you select this option, you must also define the
number of retries that will be attempted and the time to wait after a job fails before running the backup job again.
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Post-Backup Script – The information about a script that should run at the end of the recovery process. Enter the following
information:
TEXT BOX
DESCRIPTION
Command to run
The full path of the script. The script must be located on the same machine as the Zerto Virtual
Manager for the recovery site.
Parameters
The values of parameters to pass to the script. Separate parameters with a space.
Timeout
The time-out, in seconds, for the script to run. If the timeout value is reached, an alert is generated.
The default time-out value is specified in the Performance and Throttling tab of the Site Settings
dialog.
Note: You cannot restore a backup in Azure.
19. Click NEXT.
The SUMMARY step is displayed. It shows the VPG configuration that you defined in the previous steps.
20. Click DONE.
The VPG is created.
For details of what happens after creating the VPG, see “What happens After the VPG is Defined”, on page 32.
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CHAPTER 7: MONITORING ZERTO
VIRTUAL REPLICATION
You can monitor information about all the VPGs either protected at the local site or recovered to the local site in the VPGs tab.
You can also drill-down to monitor information about a specific VPG displayed in the VPGs tab or about the virtual machines
being protected by VPGs. You can also view summary details of the protected and recovery sites in either the protected or
recovery site as well as monitor the status of each virtual protection group and any of the virtual machines being protected in
either site.
The following general monitoring options are described in this chapter:
■
■
■
■
■
“The DASHBOARD Tab”, below
“Monitoring VPGs – The VPGs Tab”, on page 88
“Monitoring a Single VPG”, on page 91
“Monitoring Tasks”, on page 95
“Monitoring Protected Virtual Machines – The VMs Tab”, on page 96
The following site monitoring option is described in this chapter:
■
“Monitoring Peer Sites - The SITES Tab”, on page 99
The following VRA monitoring option is described in this chapter:
■
“Monitoring Virtual Replication Appliances”, on page 100
The following storage monitoring option is described in this chapter:
■
“Monitoring Storage – The SETUP Tab – The STORAGE Tab”, on page 106
The following offsite backup monitoring options are described in this chapter:
■
■
“Monitoring Repositories – The SETUP Tab – The REPOSITORIES Tab”, on page 108
“Monitoring Offsite Backups – The OFFSITE BACKUP Tab”, on page 109
The following performance counters are described in this chapter:
■
“Zerto Performance Counters”, on page 111
For details about monitoring Zerto Virtual Manager alerts and events, refer to Zerto Virtual Replication Guide to Alarms, Alerts
and Events.
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The DASHBOARD Tab
The DASHBOARD provides an overview of the sites and VPGs being protected at the site or recovered to the site.
The following information is displayed:
VPG HEALTH
The VPGs being recovered to AWS with the health of each VPG, represented by a colored block, where the color represents the
following:
Green – The VPG is being replicated, including syncing the VPG between the sites.
Orange – The VPG is being replicated but there are problems, such as an RPO value larger than the target RPO value
specified for the VPG.
Red – The VPG is not being replicated, for example because communication with AWS is down.
Positioning the mouse over a block displays the VPG name as a tooltip. Clicking the block opens the details tab for the VPG.
STATUS
The status of the site, including the following:
■
■
■
■
The number of VPGs and virtual machines being protected or recovered.
The amount of storage being protected.
The average RPO.
The percentage compression of data passed between the site and peer sites.
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Performance Graphs
The current site performance, which includes the following information:
IOPS – The IO per second between all the applications running on the virtual machines being protected and the VRA that sends
a copy to the remote site for replication.
Throughput (MB/sec) – The MBs for all the applications running on the virtual machines being protected. There can be a high
IO rate with lots of small writes resulting in a small throughput as well as a small IO with a large throughput. Thus, both the
IOPS and Throughput values together provide a more accurate indication of performance.
WAN Traffic (MB/sec) – The VPG related outgoing traffic between the sites.
VPG STATUS
The status of the VPGs displayed as a pie chart. The legend describes what the pie chart colors represent.
SITE TOPOLOGY
A graphical display of the sites including the number of VPGs.
ACTIVE ALERTS, RUNNING TASKS, and EVENTS
A listing of the currently active alerts and running tasks, and the events run during the last few hours.
User input, for example, stopping a failover test or committing or rolling back a Move or Failover operation, can be initiated
from the relevant task displayed in the RUNNING TASKS section.
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Monitoring VPGs – The VPGs Tab
View details of all VPGs in the VPGs tab. This tab lists all the VPGs from both the local and remote sites and provides summary
details of each VPG.
You can create a query using the view buttons (
)to display VPG information in a list or as a grid. In both list and grid
views you can filter the VPGs that will be displayed according to their status by checking the checkboxes alongside the VPG
status icons (
). The query can be customized by adding and removing filters.
The QUERY option allows you to save or run a personal query, or set the VPG tab back to its default view.
List View - GENERAL
The following information is displayed in the GENERAL view:
Alert status indicator – The color indicates the status of the VPG. Hovering over the alert displays a popup of all active alerts
with descriptions:
Green – The VPG is being replicated, including syncing the VPG between the sites.
Orange – The VPG is being replicated but there are problems, such as an RPO value larger than the Target RPO Alert
value specified for the VPG.
Red – The VPG is not being replicated, for example, because communication with the remote site is down.
Move the cursor over the Alert status indicator to display details of the alert.
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VPG Name (#VMs) – The name of the VPG. The name is a link: Click the VPG name to drill-down to more specific details
about the VPG that are displayed in a dynamic tab. The number of VMs protected in the VPG is displayed in parentheses.
Direction – The direction of the replication, from this site to the remote site or from the remote site to this site.
Peer Site – The name of the site with which this site is paired: the site where the VPG is protected or will be recovered to.
Priority – The priority of the VPG.
Protection Status – The current status of the VPG, such as Meeting SLA. Where appropriate, the percentage of the operation
completed, such as syncing, is displayed.
State – The current substatus of the VPG, such as Delta syncing. Where appropriate, the percentage of the operation
completed, such as syncing, is displayed.
Actual RPO – The time since the last checkpoint was written to the journal. This should be less than the Target RPO Alert
value specified for the VPG.
Operation – The operation, such as Move, that is currently being performed.
List View - PERFORMANCE
The following information is displayed in the PERFORMANCE view:
IO – The IO per second between all the applications running on the virtual machines in the VPG and the VRA that sends a copy
to the remote site for replication.
Throughput – The MB per second for all the applications running on the virtual machines being protected. There can be a high
IO rate with lots of small writes resulting in a small throughput as well as a small IO with a large throughput. Thus, both the
IOPS and Throughput values together provide a more accurate indication of performance.
Network – The amount of WAN traffic.
Provisioned Storage (not shown by default) – The provisioned storage for all the virtual machines in the VPG. This value is the
sum of the values that are used in the vSphere Client console per virtual machine in the Virtual Machines tab for the root
vCenter Server node. Each value is the sum of both the hard disk and memory. Thus, a virtual machine with 1GB hard disk and
4GB memory will show 5GB provisioned storage.
Used Storage – The storage used by all of the virtual machines in the VPG. This value is the sum of the values that are used in
the vSphere Client console per virtual machine in the Virtual Machines tab for the root vCenter Server node.
List View - BACKUP
The following information is displayed in the BACKUP view:
Alert status indicator – The color indicates the status of the VPG. Hovering over the alert displays a popup of all active alerts
with descriptions:
Green – The VPG is being replicated, including syncing the VPG between the sites.
Orange – The VPG is being replicated but there are problems, such as an RPO value larger than the Target RPO Alert
value specified for the VPG.
Red – The VPG is not being replicated, for example, because communication with the remote site is down.
Move the cursor over the Alert status indicator to display details of the alert.
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VPG Name (#VMs) – The name of the VPG. The name is a link: Click the VPG name to drill-down to more specific details
about the VPG that are displayed in a dynamic tab.
Retention Policy – Whether the VPG is protected against a disaster only with the ability to recover to a point in time up to 30
days before the disaster, or protection is extended to include offsite backups of the virtual machines, going back for a maximum
of one year.
Backup Status – The status of the backup.
Backup Repository – The name of the repository where the jobs are stored.
Restore Point Range – The restore points for the backup jobs out of the total backup jobs run for the VPG.
Backup Scheduling – The schedule for offsite backups.
Additional Fields and Options
In the GENERAL, PERFORMANCE, and BACKUP views you can:
■
■
■
Show/Hide Columns, Create View and Reset Columns using the settings ( ) menu.
Sort the list by a column by clicking in the column title.
Filter information in the columns by clicking the filter button ( ) that is displayed when the mouse cursor is moved into
the column title. Active filters are displayed with a yellow background.
Grid View
In the grid view each VPG is displayed as a card.
The default view is of all the VPG cards, un-grouped and sorted by VPG name.
The cards displayed can be filtered by clicking the filter button( ). The default filters are Direction and Protection Status. You
can click the ADD button to open the filters drop-down, and select additional filters. Active filters are displayed with a yellow
background.
Each card contains the following:
Alert status indicator – The color indicates the status of the VPG. Hovering over the alert displays a popup of all active alerts
with descriptions:
Green – The VPG is being replicated, including syncing the VPG between the sites.
Orange – The VPG is being replicated but there are problems, such as an RPO value larger than the Target RPO Alert
value specified for the VPG.
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Red – The VPG is not being replicated, for example, because communication with the remote site is down.
Move the cursor over the Alert status indicator to display details of the alert.
VPG Name (#VMs) – The name of the VPG. The name is a link: Click the VPG name to drill-down to more specific details
about the VPG that are displayed in a dynamic tab. The number of VMs protected in the VPG is displayed in parentheses.
Direction – The direction of the replication, from this site to the remote site or from the remote site to this site.
Peer Site – The name of the site with which this site is paired: the site where the VPG is protected or will be recovered to.
State – The current substatus of the VPG, such as Delta syncing. Where appropriate, the percentage of the operation
completed, such as syncing, is displayed.
Actual RPO – The time since the last checkpoint was written to the journal. This should be less than the Target RPO Alert
value specified for the VPG.
Operation – The operation, such as Move, that is currently being performed.
Saving Details of Virtual Protection Groups to File
You can save details of every VPG displayed in the VPGs tab to a CSV file, which can be opened using programs such as
Microsoft Excel.
In the VPGs tab, click EXPORT and specify where to save the VPG details.
Monitoring a Single VPG
You can monitor the status of a specific VPG by clicking the VPG name in the VPGs tab or clicking the VPG name in the VMs
tab. The VPG details are displayed in a dynamic tab.
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General Tab
The tab on the left side shows the status of the VPG. The following information is displayed in this tab:
Performance Graphs
The current VPG performance, which includes the following information:
RPO (sec) – The time since the last checkpoint was written to the journal. This should be less than the Target RPO Alert
value specified for the VPG.
IOPS – The IO per second between all the applications running on the virtual machines in the VPG and the VRA that sends a
copy to the remote site for replication.
Throughput (MB/sec) – The MB per second for all the applications running on the virtual machines being protected. There can
be a high IO rate with lots of small writes resulting in a small throughput as well as a small IO with a large throughput. Thus,
both the IOPS and Throughput values together provide a more accurate indication of performance.
WAN TRAFFIC (MB/sec) – The outgoing traffic between the sites.
JOURNAL HISTORY
The journal history shows:
■
■
■
The SLA defined for the VPG.
The amount of time currently covered by information in the journal.
The earliest—oldest—checkpoint currently in the journal that can be used for a recovery operation.
OFFSITE BACKUP
If backup is enabled, the following backup details are displayed:
Retention Policy – Whether the VPG is protected against a disaster only with the ability to recover to a point in time up to 30
days before the disaster, or protection is extended to include offsite backups of the virtual machines, going back for a maximum
of one year.
Backup Status – The status of the backup.
Backup Repository – The name of the repository where the jobs are stored.
Restore Point Range – The restore points for the backup jobs out of the total backup jobs run for the VPG.
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Backup Scheduling – The schedule for offsite backups.
ACTIVE ALERTS, RUNNING TASKS, and EVENTS
A listing of the currently active alerts and running tasks, and the events run during the last few hours.
User input, for example, stopping a failover test or committing or rolling back a Move or Failover operation, can be initiated
from the relevant task displayed in the RUNNING TASKS section.
PROTECTED VMs Tab
The PROTECTED VMs tab shows details about the protected virtual machines:
Name – The name of the virtual machine.
Group – The boot order group to which the virtual machine belongs.
Protection Host – The protected virtual machine host.
Storage Protected – The name of the protected storage.
Provisioned – The protected virtual machine provisioned storage.
Used – The amount of data used on the recovery site for this virtual machine.
Recovery Data Size – The total size of the data on the recovery site.
Failover Network – The failover network used when recovering this virtual machine.
Test Network – The test network used when testing the recovery of this virtual machine.
The following details are displayed with a vSphere recovery site:
Recovery Host – The host to use for recovery.
VM Recovery Datastore – The name of the recovery datastore.
Folder – The folder where the virtual machine is recovered to.
The following details are displayed with a Hyper-V recovery site:
Recovery Host – The host to use for recovery.
VM Recovery Storage – The name of the recovery storage.
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The following details are displayed with an AWS recovery site:
Failover/Move VPC – The virtual network dedicated to your AWS account during a failover or move operation. A security
group and subnet must be assigned to this VPC.
Failover/Move Subnet – The subnet mask for the VPC network during a failover or move operation.
Failover/Move Security Groups – The AWS security to be associated with the virtual machines in this VPG during a
failover or move operation.
Test VPC – The virtual network dedicated to your AWS account during a failover test operation. A security group and
subnet must be assigned to this VPC.
Test Subnet – The subnet mask for the VPC network during a failover test operation.
Test Security Groups – The AWS security to be associated with the virtual machines in this VPG. during a failover test
operation.
Folder – The folder where the virtual machine is recovered to.
SITES Tab
The SITES tab shows the topology of the VPG, including both the protected and recovery sites.
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SETTINGS Tab
The SETTINGS tab shows details about the VPG settings, divided into general, replication, recovery, and backup categories.
Monitoring Tasks
Recent tasks can also be reviewed for a site by clicking the TASKS area in the status bar at the bottom of the user interface.
The following information is displayed for each task:
Status – The task status.
Name – The name of the task.
Description – A description of the task.
Action – The ability to perform an action directly. For example, stop a failover test, or commit or rollback a move or failover
operation.
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The full details of the tasks can be monitored in the TASKS subtab under the MONITORING tab.
The following information is displayed for each task:
Task status indicator – The color indicates the status of the task. The following statuses exist for each task:
Green – The task was completed successfully.
Red – The task failed.
Task – The task name.
Status – The task status.
Related Entities – The sites which were effected by the task.
User – The user who initiated the task.
Started – The date and time the task started.
Completed – The date and time the task completed.
Notes – Notes added at the completion of a failover test.
Monitoring Protected Virtual Machines – The VMs Tab
View details of the protected VMs in the VMs tab. This tab lists all the protected virtual machines from both the local and
remote sites and provides summary details of each virtual machine.
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You can filter information in columns via the filter icon next to each column title. You can also sort the list by each column.
GENERAL View
The following information is displayed in the GENERAL view:
Alert status indicator – The color indicates the status of the VPG:
Green – The VPG is being replicated, including syncing the VPG between the sites.
Orange – The VPG is being replicated but there are problems, such as an RPO value larger than the Target RPO Alert
value specified for the VPG.
Red – The VPG is not being replicated, for example, because communication with the remote site is down.
VM Name – The name of the virtual machine. The name is a link.
VPG Name – The name of the VPG. The name is a link: Click the VPG name to drill-down to more specific details about the VPG
that are displayed in a dynamic tab.
Direction – The direction of the replication, from this site to the remote site or from the remote site to this site.
Peer Site – The name of the site with which this site is paired: the site where the VPG is protected or will be recovered to.
Priority – The priority of the VPG.
Protection Status – The current status of the virtual machine, such as Meeting SLA. Where appropriate, the percentage of the
operation completed, such as syncing, is displayed.
State – The current substatus of the VPG, such as Delta syncing. Where appropriate, the percentage of the operation
completed, such as syncing, is displayed.
Actual RPO – The time since the last checkpoint was written to the journal. This should be less than the Target RPO Alert
value specified for the VPG.
Operation – The operation, such as Move, that is currently being performed.
PERFORMANCE View
The following information is displayed in the PERFORMANCE view:
IO – The IO per second between all the applications running on the virtual machine and the VRA that sends a copy to the
remote site for replication.
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Throughput – The MB per second for all the applications running on the virtual machines being protected. There can be a high
IO rate with lots of small writes resulting in a small throughput as well as a small IO with a large throughput. Thus, both the
IOPS and Throughput values together provide a more accurate indication of performance.
Network – The amount of WAN traffic.
Provisioned Storage – The provisioned storage for the virtual machine in the recovery site.
Used Storage – The storage used by the virtual machine in the recovery site.
BACKUP View
The following information is displayed in the BACKUP view:
Alert status indicator – The color indicates the status of the VPG. Hovering over the alert displays a popup of all active alerts
with descriptions:
Green – The VPG is being replicated, including syncing the VPG between the sites.
Orange – The VPG is being replicated but there are problems, such as an RPO value larger than the Target RPO Alert
value specified for the VPG.
Red – The VPG is not being replicated, for example, because communication with the remote site is down.
Move the cursor over the Alert status indicator to display details of the alert.
VPG Name (#VMs) – The name of the VPG. The name is a link: Click the VPG name to drill-down to more specific details
about the VPG that are displayed in a dynamic tab.
Retention Policy – Whether the VPG is protected against a disaster only with the ability to recover to a point in time up to 30
days before the disaster, or protection is extended to include offsite backups of the virtual machines, going back for a maximum
of one year.
Backup Status – The status of the backup.
Backup Repository – The name of the repository where the jobs are stored.
Restore Point Range – The restore points for the backup jobs out of the total backup jobs run for the VPG.
Backup Scheduling – The schedule for offsite backups.
Additional Fields
There are additional fields that you can display that are listed when you select Show/Hide Columns from the dropdown list
shown by clicking the configuration icon ( ):
Protected Site – The name of the protected site.
Recovery Site – The name of the recovery site.
ZORG – A name given to an organization by a cloud service provider. For details refer to Zerto Cloud Manager Administration
Guide.
Last Test – The time and date of the last backup performed by Zerto Virtual Manager.
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Monitoring Peer Sites - The SITES Tab
View details of the paired sites in the SITES tab. This tab lists all the sites paired to the local site and provides summary details
of each paired site.
You can filter information in columns via the filter icon next to each column title. You can also sort the list by each column.
GENERAL View
The following information is displayed in the GENERAL view:
Alert status indicator – The color indicates the alert status of the site:
Green – The Zerto Virtual Manager for the site is running without problems.
Orange – The Zerto Virtual Manager for the site has a problem that does not stop the protection of virtual machines, such
as an RPO value larger than the Target RPO Alert value for a VPG.
Red – The Zerto Virtual Manager for the site is not running correctly, for example, because communication with the site is
down.
Site Name – The name specified for the paired site during installation or in the Site Settings dialog.
Location – The location specified for the paired site during installation or in the Site Settings dialog.
Site IP – The IP of the peer site.
Network – The amount of WAN traffic.
IOPS – The IO per second between all the applications running on the virtual machine in the VPG and the VRA that sends a
copy to the remote site for replication.
Incoming Throughput – The MBs for all the applications running on the virtual machine being protected. There can be a high IO
rate with lots of small writes resulting in a small throughput as well as a small IO with a large throughput. Thus, both the IO and
Incoming Throughput values together provide a more accurate indication of performance.
Provisioned Storage (GB) – The maximum storage that can be protected.
# VPGs – The total number of VPGs being protected by the site and replicated to the site.
# VMs – The total number of virtual machines being protected by the site and replicated to the site.
Additional Fields
There are additional fields that you can display that are listed when you select Show/Hide Columns from the dropdown list
shown by clicking the configuration icon ( ):
Used Storage (GB) – The name of the protected site.
ZORG Name – A name given to the organization by a cloud service provider. For details refer to Zerto Cloud Manager
Administration Guide.
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Version – The Zerto Virtual Replication version installed at this site.
Monitoring Virtual Replication Appliances
You can monitor information about all the VRAs for the local site in the VRAs tab. You can also drill-down to monitor
information about a specific VRA displayed in the VRAs tab:
■
■
“Monitoring VRAs – The SETUP Tab – VRAs Tab”, below.
“Monitoring a Single VRA”, on page 102.
Monitoring VRAs – The SETUP Tab – VRAs Tab
View details of the VRAs in the VRAs subtab, under the SETUP tab. All the hosts in the SCVMM are listed, and details of VRAs
for each host, when installed, are also shown.
You can filter information in columns via the filter icon next to each column title. You can also sort the list by each column.
GENERAL View
In this view, the number of installed VRAs is displayed in the VRAs tab. The following information is displayed in this view:
Cluster – The cluster name, if relevant.
Host Address – The host IP address for the VRA. If the host is part of a cluster, the cluster name is displayed with the hosts
under the cluster.
Host Version – The host version.
Alert Status – The alerts status of the VRA virtual machine.
VRA Name – The name of the VRA virtual machine.
VRA Status – The VRA status. For example, Installed, Ghost VRA.
VRA Version – Either Latest if the version installed is the most current version or Outdated if it can be upgraded. A tooltip
displays the actual version.
VRA Address – The IP address of the VRA virtual machine.
# VPGs – The number of VPGs with a virtual machine for which the VRA either manages the protection or the recovery of the
data.
# VMs – The number of virtual machines for which the VRA either manages the protection or the recovery of the data.
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SETTINGS View
The following information is displayed in the SETTINGS view:
VRA Group – The group of VRAs to which this VRA belongs. When VRAs use different networks, they can be grouped by
network.
VRA RAM – The amount of memory allocated to the VRA to buffer data before it is sent to the recovery site or at the recovery
site before it is written to the journal.
Storage – The storage used by the VRA.
Storage Cluster – The storage cluster used by the VRA.
WORKLOAD PROTECTION View
The following information is displayed in the WORKLOAD PROTECTION view:
# VPGs – The number of VPGs with a virtual machine for which the VRA is used either for protection or recovery.
# VMs – The number of virtual machines for which the VRA is used either for protection or recovery.
# of Protected VPGs – The number of VPGs with a virtual machine for which the VRA manages the protection of their data.
# of Protected VMs – The number of virtual machines for which the VRA manages the protection of their data.
# of Protected Volumes – The number of volumes for which the VRA manages the protection of their data.
# of Recovery VPGs – The number of VPGs with a virtual machine for which the VRA manages the recovery of the data.
# of Recovery VMs – The number of virtual machines for which the VRA manages the recovery of the data.
# of Recovery Volumes – The number of volumes for which the VRA manages the recovery of the data.
Additional Fields
There are additional fields that you can display that are listed when you select Show/Hide Columns from the dropdown list
shown by clicking the configuration icon ( ):
Cluster – The cluster with the host used by the VRA.
VC Network– The network used by the VRA.
# Volumes – The number of volumes for which the VRA manages the protection or recovery of data.
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Monitoring a Single VRA
You monitor the status of a single VRA by clicking the VRA name in the VRAs tab. The VRA details are displayed in a dynamic
tab.
You can filter information in columns via the filter icon next to each column title. You can also sort the list by each column.
Installed Tab
The tab on the left side shows the status of the VRA. The following information is displayed when this tab is selected:
Performance Graphs
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CPU Usage – The percentage of CPU usage by the VRA.
Local Memory – The percentage of the VRA memory used by protected volumes managed by the VRA. If the memory
consumption is high you can consider vMotioning some of the virtual machines to a different host.
Remote Memory – The percentage of the VRA memory used by recovery volumes managed by the VRA. If the memory
consumption is high you can consider changing the target host for some of the virtual machines to a different host.
ACTIVE ALERTS, RUNNING TASKS, and EVENTS
A listing of the currently active alerts, running tasks, and events run over the last few hours.
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VPGs Tab
Information about the VPGs with virtual machines that are on the host with the VRA is displayed in the VPGs tab.
GENERAL View
The following information is displayed in the GENERAL view:
Alert status indicator – The color indicates the status of the VPG:
Green – The VPG is being replicated, including syncing the VPG between the sites.
Orange – The VPG is being replicated but there are problems, such as an RPO value larger than the Target RPO Alert
value specified for the VPG.
Red – The VPG is not being replicated, for example, because communication with the remote site is down.
Direction – The direction of the replication, from this site to the remote site or from the remote site to this site.
Protected Site – The name of the protected site.
Recovery Site – The name of the recovery site.
Name – The name of the VPG.
Protection Status – The current status of the VPG, such as Meeting SLA. Where appropriate, the percentage of the operation
completed, such as syncing, is displayed.
State – The current substatus of the VPG, such as Delta syncing. Where appropriate, the percentage of the operation
completed, such as syncing, is displayed.
PERFORMANCE View
The following information is displayed in the PERFORMANCE view:
# VMs on VRA/#VMs in VPG – The number of virtual machines on the VRA and the number of virtual machines in the VPG.
Provisioned – The provisioned storage for all the virtual machines in the VPG. Each value is the sum of both the hard disk and
memory. Thus, a virtual machine with 1GB hard disk and 4GB memory will show 5GB provisioned storage.
Used – The storage used by all virtual machines in the VPG.
IOPS – The IO per second between all the applications running on the virtual machines in the VPG and the VRA that sends a
copy to the remote site for replication.
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Throughput – The MB per second for all the applications running on the virtual machines being protected. There can be a high
IO rate with lots of small writes resulting in a small throughput as well as a small IO with a large throughput. Thus, both the
IOPS and Throughput values together provide a more accurate indication of performance.
BACKUP View
The following information is displayed in the BACKUP view:
Alert status indicator – The color indicates the status of the VPG. Hovering over the alert displays a popup of all active alerts
with descriptions:
Green – The VPG is being replicated, including syncing the VPG between the sites.
Orange – The VPG is being replicated but there are problems, such as an RPO value larger than the Target RPO Alert
value specified for the VPG.
Red – The VPG is not being replicated, for example, because communication with the remote site is down.
Move the cursor over the Alert status indicator to display details of the alert.
VPG Name (#VMs) – The name of the VPG. The name is a link: Click the VPG name to drill-down to more specific details
about the VPG that are displayed in a dynamic tab.
Retention Policy – Whether the VPG is protected against a disaster only with the ability to recover to a point in time up to 30
days before the disaster, or protection is extended to include offsite backups of the virtual machines, going back for a maximum
of one year.
Backup Status – The status of the backup.
Backup Repository – The name of the repository where the jobs are stored.
Restore Point Range – The restore points for the backup jobs out of the total backup jobs run for the VPG.
Backup Scheduling – The schedule for offsite backups.
Additional Fields
There is an additional field that you can display. This field is listed when you select Show/Hide Columns from the dropdown list
shown by clicking the configuration icon ( ):
ZORG – A name given to an organization by a cloud service provider. For details refer to Zerto Cloud Manager Administration
Guide.
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VMs Tab
Information about the virtual machines that are on the host with the VRA is displayed in the VMs tab.
GENERAL View
The following information is displayed in the GENERAL view:
Alert status indicator – The color indicates the status of the VPG:
Green – The VPG is being replicated, including syncing the VPG between the sites.
Orange – The VPG is being replicated but there are problems, such as an RPO value larger than the Target RPO Alert
value specified for the VPG.
Red – The VPG is not being replicated, for example, because communication with the remote site is down.
Direction – The direction of the replication, from this site to the remote site or from the remote site to this site.
Protected Site – The name of the protected site.
Recovery Site – The name of the recovery site.
VM Name – The name of the virtual machine.
VPG Name – The name of the VPG with which this virtual machine is associated.
Protection Status – The current status of the virtual machine, such as Meeting SLA. Where appropriate, the percentage of the
operation completed, such as syncing, is displayed.
State – The current substatus of the virtual machine, such as Delta syncing. Where appropriate, the percentage of the
operation completed, such as syncing, is displayed.
PERFORMANCE View
The following information is displayed in the PERFORMANCE view:
Provisioned on Host – The provisioned storage for the virtual machine on the host.
Used on Host – The storage used by the virtual machine in the VPG.
IO – The IO per second between all the applications running on the virtual machines in the VPG and the VRA that sends a copy
to the remote site for replication.
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Throughput – The MB per second for all the applications running on the virtual machine. There can be a high IO rate with lots
of small writes resulting in a small throughput as well as a small IO with a large throughput. Thus, both the IOPS and
Throughput values together provide a more accurate indication of performance.
Additional Fields
There is an additional field that you can display. This field is listed when you select Show/Hide Columns from the dropdown list
shown by clicking the configuration icon ( ):
ZORG – A name given to an organization by a cloud service provider. For details refer to Zerto Cloud Manager Administration
Guide.
SETTINGS Tab
Information about the VRA is displayed in the SETTINGS tab. This includes its version, the host on which it is located, its
definition, the networks it uses, and its replication and recovery settings.
Monitoring Storage – The SETUP Tab – The STORAGE Tab
View details of the storage used by Zerto Virtual Replication in the STORAGE subtab, under the SETUP tab. This tab lists all the
storage used by Zerto Virtual Replication with an option to show all the storage per cluster or for the hosts, whether used by
Zerto Virtual Replication or not.
You can filter information in columns via the filter icon next to each column title. You can also sort the list by each column.
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GENERAL View
In this view, the number of available storage is displayed in the STORAGE subtab. The following information is displayed in the
GENERAL view:
Storage – The name of the datastore or cluster.
Alert status indicator – The color indicates the alert status of the storage:
Green – The storage is functioning as required.
Orange – The storage is functioning, but there are problems, such as not enough free space.
Red – There is a problem with the storage.
Status – The status of the storage:
Device – The storage device identifier.
Cluster – The cluster that the storage is associated with.
Total Usage (GB) – The amount of GB used in relation to the total amount available.
DR Usage (GB) – The amount of GB used by Zerto Virtual Replication in relation to the total amount available.
# VRAs – The number of VRAs using the storage.
WORKLOAD PROTECTION View
The following information is displayed in the WORKLOAD PROTECTION view:
Storage – The name of the storage or cluster.
Alert status indicator – The color indicates the alert status of the storage:
Green – The storage is functioning as required.
Orange – The storage is functioning, but there are problems, such as not enough free space.
Red – There is a problem with the storage.
Total Usage (GB) – The amount of space, in GB, used in relation to the total amount available.
Type – The type of storage.
Recovery Size – The amount space used for recovery.
Journal Size – The amount of space used by the journals.
# Protected VMs – The number of protected virtual machines using the storage.
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# Incoming VMs – The number of virtual machines are specified to be recovered using the storage.
Additional Fields
There are no additional fields that you can display. However, you can display all the fields shown in these views when you
select Show/Hide Columns from the dropdown list shown by clicking the configuration icon ( ).
Monitoring Repositories – The SETUP Tab – The REPOSITORIES Tab
View details of the repositories that can be used for offsite backup jobs in the REPOSITORIES subtab, under the SETUP tab. This
tab lists all the repositories created for the site.
You can filter information in columns via the filter icon next to each column title. You can also sort the list by each column.
GENERAL View
In this view, the available repositories are displayed. The following information is displayed:
Star – A colored star indicates that this is the default repository.
Repository Name – The name of the repository. This field contains icons that you can click to edit or delete the repository.
Repository Type – The type of repository. The options are Local or Network Share (SMB).
Connectivity – Whether the repository is connected or not.
Path – The path to the repository.
Capacity – The overall capacity of the repository.
Free Space – The amount of free space currently available on the repository.
Active Backups – The number of backup jobs currently active that are stored in the repository.
Restore Points – The restore points for the backup jobs out of the total backup jobs saved to the repository.
Compression – A check in this field means that the backups stored in the repository are compressed.
Click NEW REPOSITORY to display the New Repository dialog that you can use to create a new repository.
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Monitoring Offsite Backups – The OFFSITE BACKUP Tab
View details of the offsite backup jobs in the OFFSITE BACKUP tab either by VPG or virtual machine. This tab lists all the defined
offsite backups and their statuses.
VPGs Tab
View details of the offsite backup jobs by VPG.
You can filter information in columns via the filter icon next to each column title. You can also sort the list by each column.
GENERAL View
The following information is displayed in the GENERAL view:
VPG Name – The name of the VPG.
Backup Site – The site where the VPG is backed up. The backup jobs are stored either locally at this site or on a network shared
drive which is accessible from this site.
Status – The status of the job: Running or Scheduled.
Repository Name – The name of the repository where the job is stored.
VPG Size – The size of the VPG in the last run stored on disk.
Result of Last Run – The result of the last run: Full success, Partial success, or Failed.
Restore Points – The restore points for the backup jobs out of the total backup jobs run for the VPG.
RUN DETAILS View
The following information is displayed in the RUN DETAILS view:
VPG Name – The name of the VPG.
Result of Last Run – The result of the last run: Full success, Partial success, or Failed. If a backup job has not yet run
on this VPG, the field is empty.
Time of Last Run – The time of the last run. If a backup job has not yet run on this VPG, the field is empty.
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Next Scheduled Run – The time of the next scheduled run.
Last Full Backup – The date and time of the last full backup.
Additional Fields
There are additional fields that you can display that are listed when you select Show/Hide Columns from the dropdown list
shown by clicking the configuration icon ( ):
Protected Site – The name of the site.
Last Backup Size – The size of the last backup performed by Zerto Virtual Manager.
ZORG – A name given to an organization by a cloud service provider. For details refer to Zerto Cloud Manager Administration
Guide.
# VMs – The total number of virtual machines protected by the VPG.
# of Volumes – The number of volumes protected by the VPG.
VMs Tab
View details of the offsite backup jobs by virtual machine.
You can filter information in columns via the filter icon next to each column title. You can also sort the list by each column.
GENERAL View
The following information is displayed in the GENERAL view:
VM Name – The name of the virtual machine.
VPG Name – The name of the VPG.
Protected Site – The name of the site where the VPG is protected.
Backup Site – The site where the virtual machines are backed up. The backup jobs are stored either locally at this site or on a
network shared drive which is accessible from this site.
Status – The status of the job.
Repository Name – The name of the repository where the job is stored.
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VM Size – The size of the VMs stored on disk.
Result of Last Run – The result of the last run: Full success, Partial success, or Failed.
Restore Points – The restore points for the backup jobs out of the total backup jobs run for the VPG.
RUN DETAILS View
The following information is displayed in the RUN DETAILS view:
VM Name – The name of the Virtual machine.
VPG Name – The name of the VPG.
Result of Last Run – The result of the last run: Full success, Partial success, or Failed.
Time of Last Run – The time of the last run.
Next Scheduled Run – The time of the next scheduled run.
Last Full Backup – The date and time of the last full backup.
MORE Options
Click MORE > Edit to edit the backup parameters of the VPG.
Click MORE > Abort Backup to abort a running job. Any virtual machine volumes already stored in the repository are not
removed and the job status is partial if there are any stored volumes.
Click MORE > Run Backup to start a job for a selected VPG, outside of the schedule for that VPG.
Click EXPORT to export the backup list as a Microsoft Excel worksheet.
Additional Fields
There are additional fields that you can display that are listed when you select Show/Hide Columns from the dropdown list
shown by clicking the configuration icon ( ):
Last Backup Size – The size of the last backup performed by Zerto Virtual Manager.
ZORG – A name given to an organization by a cloud service provider. For details refer to Zerto Cloud Manager Administration
Guide.
# of Volumes – The number of volumes associated with the VM.
Zerto Performance Counters
During installation of Zerto Virtual Replication, Zerto-related performance counters are added to the Windows Performance
Monitor on the machine where the Zerto Virtual Manager runs.
Uninstalling Zerto Virtual Replication, uninstalls the Zerto-related performance counters. Upgrading Zerto Virtual Replication
updates any changes to the Zerto-related performance counters.
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The Zerto-related performance counters are collected on the protected site only. These counters are described as follows.
Category
Name
Description
Zerto Checkpoints
Checkpoint failures in last 10 minutes
Number of checkpoints that failed to be inserted in last 10
minutes.
Checkpoint insertions in last 10 minutes
Number of checkpoints inserted in last 10 minutes.
The maximum is 120; normal performance is 90–115; less
than 40 indicates a problem.
Time to insert last checkpoint
Time in milliseconds needed to insert the last checkpoint;
normal is less than 5 seconds.
# of connected VRAs
Number of VRAs connected to the local Zerto Virtual
Manager.
Zerto Connectivity
# of peer Zerto Virtual Managers (ZVMs) Number of Zerto Virtual Managers connected to the local
Zerto Virtual Manager.
Zerto GUI
Concurrent GUI calls to the ZVM
Number of concurrent GUI calls to the local Zerto Virtual
Manager.
Zerto Reflections
AWS reflection collection time
Time in milliseconds needed to collect AWS environment
data.
Hypervisor reflection collection time
Time in milliseconds needed to collect vCenter Server or
SCVMM environment data.
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vCenter Server collection time should be less than 10
minutes.
SCVMM collection time should be less than 25
minutes.
Reflection data pushed in last 10 minutes
Size in bytes of environment data pushed in last 10
minutes to Zerto Virtual Managers connected to this site.
Reflection data pushed to peer ZVMs
Size in bytes of last pushed environment data.
Reflection data received from peer ZVMs
Size in bytes of last received environment data.
Reflection data received in last 10 minutes Size in bytes of environment data received in last 10
minutes from Zerto Virtual Managers connected to the
local Zerto Virtual Manager.
Reflections pushed to peer ZVMs in last 10 Number of times environment data was pushed to peer
minutes
Zerto Virtual Managers in the last 10 minutes.
Zerto Remote Calls
Zerto RPO
Reflections received from peer ZVMs in
last 10 minutes
Number of times environment data was received from
peer Zerto Virtual Managers in the last 10 minutes.
Retained data
Size in bytes of total retained pushed or received data.
vCD reflection collection time
Time in milliseconds needed to collect vCD environment
data.
Active incoming remote calls
Current number of active incoming calls being processed.
Active outgoing remote calls
Current number of calls sent to WCF services for which
the Zerto Virtual Manager is still waiting for a response.
Incoming remote calls in last minute
Number of incoming remote calls received in last minute.
Outgoing remote calls in last minute
Number of outgoing remote calls executed in last minute.
Average RPO
Average RPO in seconds for all VPGs, displayed in the
Dashboard.
Current maximum RPO
Current maximum RPO in seconds for all VPGs in this
site.
Current minimum RPO
Current minimum RPO in seconds for all VPGs in this site.
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Category
Name
Description
Zerto System State
Number of alerts
Current number of active alerts.
System state loop length
Execution time of one system state loop.
This should be less than 40 milliseconds.
Time to calculate statistics
Time in milliseconds needed to calculate statistics during
a system state loop.
Time to retrieve active alerts
Time in milliseconds needed to collect local Zerto Virtual
Manager active alerts during a system state loop.
Time to save VRA performance counters
Time in milliseconds needed to save VRA performance
information to a file.
Time to execute a VQ build loop
Time in milliseconds needed to execute a single VQ build
loop. This should be less than 25 milliseconds.
Time to retrieve hypervisor information
(reflection)
Time in milliseconds to execute a remote query on peer
Zerto Virtual Managers to retrieve hypervisor
information from remote sites.
Time to retrieve local VM list
Time in milliseconds needed to retrieve the list of virtual
machines from the local hypervisor.
Time to retrieve local VPG data
Time in milliseconds needed to retrieve VPG data from
the local Zerto Virtual Manager.
Time to retrieve VPG list
Time in milliseconds to execute a remote query on peer
Zerto Virtual Managers to build a list of VPGs on remote
sites.
Zerto Visual Query
Zerto VRA Counters # of VRAs not updated
Should be zero or close to zero.
# of VRAs updated
Should be near or equal to the number of active VRAs.
Average time of 5 most time-consuming
VRA updates
Should be close to the median VRA update time.
Median VRA update time
Median time in milliseconds of last 100 VRA updates.
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CHAPTER 8: MANAGING VPGS
After defining virtual protection groups (VPGs) the virtual machines specified as part of each VPG are protected. There are a
number of ongoing management tasks that you can perform on a VPG, such as specifying a checkpoint to enable recovery to
that specific point or you can modify the configurations of existing VPGs.
The following VPG management options are described in this chapter:
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“Editing a VPG”, below
“Adding Virtual Machines to a VPG”, on page 115
“Deleting Virtual Machines in a VPG”, on page 120
“Modifying Protected Virtual Machine Volumes”, on page 120
“Pausing the Protection of a VPG”, on page 121
“Forcing the Synchronization of a VPG”, on page 121
“Handling a VPG with in an Error State”, on page 122
“Deleting a VPG”, on page 122
“Running an Unscheduled Offsite Backup”, on page 123
“Ensuring Application Consistency – Checkpoints”, on page 123
“Running Scripts Before or After Recovering a VPG”, on page 133
“Exporting and Importing VPG Definitions”, on page 135
“VPG Statuses and Synchronization Triggers”, on page 137
Monitoring VPGs and the VMs that are protected is described in “Monitoring Zerto Virtual Replication”, on page 85.
Editing a VPG
You can edit a VPG definition, including adding virtual machines to the VPG, as described in “Adding Virtual Machines to a
VPG”, on page 115, deleting virtual machines from the VPG, or changing the information about how virtual machines are
recovered, such as adding or removing volumes from the virtual machine.
Note: You cannot edit the VPG while a backup job is running.
After modifying the VPG, the definition is updated. While the VPG definition is being updated, you cannot perform any
operations on the VPG, such as adding a checkpoint, editing the VPG properties, or failing the VPG. After the definition is
updated, the VPG is synchronized with the recovery site.
To modify a VPG:
1.
In the VPGs tab in the Zerto User Interface, select the VPG to be edited and click MORE > Edit VPG. You can also select the
VPG, display the VPG details, and click EDIT VPG.
The Edit VPG wizard is displayed, enabling editing the VPG, including adding and removing virtual machines from the VPG.
Note: If the VPG was previously viewed, and the tab for this VPG is still displayed, you can access the details by selecting
the tab.
2.
Make any required changes to the VPG definition, as described in “To create a virtual protection group (VPG):”, on
page 35. You can jump directly to a step to make a change in that step, for example, the REPLICATION step or the
RECOVERY step, by clicking the step. Steps that have been completed are marked with a check.
Note: If the Journal Size Hard Limit or Journal Size Warning Threshold in the advanced journal settings for
the VPG SLA settings, or the default values are changed, the changed values are not applied to existing virtual machines
but only to new virtual machines added to the VPG.
3.
Click DONE.
When a virtual machine is removed from a VPG, a warning is displayed. Another message is displayed when trying to save
the VPG, asking whether or not to save the recovery volumes. These recovery volumes can be used for preseeding if the
virtual machine is added back to the VPG.Is this true for vCD vApps as well?
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The VPG is updated and then synchronized with the recovery site, if required, for example when the host was changed.
Note: Synchronization after deleting a virtual machine from a VPG results in all checkpoints being removed and the checkpoint
mechanism restarts after synchronization completes.
Modifying the Journal Size Hard Limit
If the journal size hard limit is reduced, and if the current size is greater than the newly defined size, the journal remains at the
current size. When the amount of the journal used falls below the hard limit value it will not grow greater than the new hard
limit. Unused journal volumes from the added volumes are marked for removal and removed after the time equivalent to three
times the amount specified for the journal history, or twenty-four hours, whichever is more.
Note: If the Journal Size Hard Limit or Journal Size Warning Threshold in the VPG SLA settings are changed, the
changed values are not applied to existing virtual machines but only to new virtual machines added to the VPG.
Modifying the Retention Period for Offsite Backups
If the retention period was shortened, the number of backup jobs older than the new retention period are deleted from the
repository.
Adding Virtual Machines to a VPG
You can add virtual machines that are not already included in a VPG, to an existing VPG. A virtual machine can be protected in
a maximum of three existing VPGs, provided that the VPGs are recovered to different sites.
Protecting virtual machines in several VPGs is enabled only if both the protected site and the recovery site, as well as the VRAs
installed on these sites, are of version 5.0 and higher.
Note: You cannot edit the VPG to add a virtual machine while a backup job is running.
Only virtual machines with a maximum of 60 disks can be protected.
60 disks can be a combination of IDE and SCSI disks, where each virtual machine can have up to 2 IDE controllers each with a
maximum of 4 IDE disks and up to 4 SCSI controllers each with a maximum of 15 disks, so that the total of IDE and SCSI disks
does not exceed 60 disks. When the recovery site is VMware vSphere, any IDE disks are converted to SCSI disks.
When the recovery site is AWS
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Only virtual machines that are supported by AWS can be protected by Zerto Virtual Replication. Refer to AWS
documentation for the supported operating systems.
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Each machine that you intend to protect must have at least 250MB free space This is because AWS adds files to the
recovered machines during failover, move, test failover, and clone operations.
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Protected volumes are recovered in EC2 as EBS disks with magnetic disk type. Virtual machines with disks that are less
than 1GB are recovered with disks of 1GB. Additional volumes might be created in the recovered instance, dependent on
the instance type used for the recovery. These volumes can be ignored.
Note: By default, every m3.xlarge instance is created with two SSD disks. These disks are in addition to the disks
associated with each protected virtual machine.
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A VPC must exist, and a security group and subnet must be assigned to it and to all other VPCs you want to use for
recovered virtual machines.
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The following limitations apply when protecting to AWS:
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You cannot protect machines that have a disk larger than 1TB.
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AWS supports virtual machines with up to 12 volumes, including the boot disk.
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You cannot protect virtual machines that are GPT partitioned.
To add a virtual machine to a VPG:
1.
In the VPGs tab in the Zerto User Interface, select the VPG and click MORE > Edit VPG. You can also select the VPG to
display the VPG details and click EDIT VPG.
The Edit VPG wizard is displayed, enabling you to edit the VPG, including adding and removing virtual machines from the
VPG.
In the VMs step, select the virtual machines to add and click the arrow pointing right to include these machines in the VPG.
A VPG can include virtual machines that are not yet protected and virtual machines that are already protected. You can
view protected virtual machines by clicking Select VMs in the Advanced (Multi Target) section.
Virtual machines protected in the maximum number of VPGs are not displayed in the Select VMs dialog.
Protecting virtual machines in several VPGs is enabled only if both the protected site and the recovery site, as well as the
VRAs installed on these sites, are of version 5.0 and higher.
If you want to define the boot order of the VPGs, click DEFINE BOOT ORDER.
2.
Configure the settings for the new virtual machines in the same way that you configured the other virtual machines in the
VPG, when you created the VPG.
3.
Click DONE.
The virtual machines are added to the VPG. This process may take a few minutes. While the VPG definition is being updated,
you cannot perform any operation on the VPG, such as adding a checkpoint, editing its properties, or recovering it.
After the VPG definition has been updated, the protected and recovery sites are then synchronized. During the synchronization
period, the Protection Status displayed in the VPGs tab of the Zerto User Interface is: Meeting SLA n/m VMs
where n is the number of virtual machines that were originally in the VPG, and m is the total number of virtual machines in the
VPG, including the virtual machines that are currently being synced. While the virtual machines that were added are being
synced, the VPG can be failed over but the failover only includes the original virtual machines in the VPG.
For example, in the following screen shot, two virtual machines were added to the VPG, Operations, that originally contained 2
other virtual machines.
When the sync process for a virtual machine is complete, Zerto Virtual Manager tags the first checkpoint that includes a new
virtual machine with: VM ’XXX’ is fully synced
where XXX is the name of the virtual machine that was synced.
When you perform a recovery operation using one of these checkpoints, or any later checkpoint, all the virtual machines that
have completed syncing will be recovered.
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For example, in the following screen shot, two virtual machines were added to the VPG Operations. When the sync process for
each machine completed, a checkpoint was added to show this. If you use the checkpoint written on Dec 20, 2015 at 15:39:48,
the recovery will include the virtual machine Clients but not FX history. If you select the checkpoint at 15:40:03 or a later
checkpoint, a recovery operation will also include the virtual machine FX history.
If the virtual machines are added to a VPG replicating to a resource pool in VMware vSphere environments, Zerto Virtual
Replication checks that the additional virtual machines do not exceed the resource pool capacity, such that the sum of the
virtual machine reservation is less than or equal to the resource pool CPU and storage settings.
When the recovery site is Azure
■
Only virtual machines that are supported by Azure can be protected by Zerto Virtual Replication. All Windows operating
systems are supported.
Note: Microsoft does not support operating systems that are past the End of Support date, without a Custom Support
Agreement (CSA). For more information about Microsoft operating systems support for Microsoft Azure, refer to https://
support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/2721672.
■
For Linux distribution, refer to Azure documentation:
■
Linux on Azure-endorsed distributions: https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/virtualmachines-linux-endorsed-distributions/
■
Information for non-endorsed distributions: https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/virtualmachines-linux-create-upload-vhd-generic/
■
Protected volumes are recovered in Azure as VHD disks in a page blob. Virtual machines with disks that are less than 1GB
are recovered with disks of 1GB.
Note: For some instance size, the Azure virtual machine is created with a Local SSD disk which is a temporary disk. This
disk is in addition to the disks associated with each protected virtual machine.
■
The following limitations apply when protecting to Azure
■
Virtual machines with UEFI Firmware cannot be protected.
■
You cannot protect machines that have a disk larger than 1TB.
■
The protected virtual machines needs to have at least one NIC.
■
The supported number of data disks and NICS per virtual machine is dependent on the selected instance size. For
example, instance size D3_v2 allows up to eight data disks per virtual machine.
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■
To create a VPG that will be recovered to Azure, you must have a virtual machine in Azure with a Zerto Cloud Appliance
installed on it. This ZCA must be paired with the protected site.
For additional considerations, see Azure subscription and service limits, quotas and constraints: https://docs.microsoft.com/
en-us/azure/azure-subscription-service-limits.
For example, see the following default values:
■
20 cores per subscription
■
200 Storage accounts per subscription
■
20 VMs per region per subscription
■
VM per series (Dv2, F, etc.) cores per subscription201 per Region
Additionally, see the following example for maximum values:
■
A standard storage account has a maximum total request rate of 20,000 IOPS. The total IOPS across all of your virtual
machine disks in a standard storage account should not exceed this limit.
VM TIER
BASIC TIER VM
STANDARD TIER VM
Disk size
1023 GB
1023 GB
Max 8 KB IOPS per persistent disk
300
500
Max number of disks performing max IOPS
66
50
Azure Limitations Which Affect Installation and Recoverability
Below are the default Azure limitations which affect installation and recovery.
Default Azure limitations which Affect Installation
■
Storage Limitations:
■
Number of storage accounts: 200 per subscription (note: max is 250)
Default Azure limitations which Affect Recovery
■
■
■
Virtual Machines Limitations:
■
VMs per subscription per region: 20 (max: 10K)
■
VM total cores per subscription per region: 20
■
Instance sizes are also limited per region. Many of them are 20 cores per region per subscription
■
Resource groups per subscription: 800
Networking:
■
Network interfaces per region: 350
■
NICs per instance: depends on instance size
■
Windows: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/virtual-machines/virtual-machines-windows-sizes
■
Linux: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/virtual-machines/virtual-machines-linuxsizes?toc=%2fazure%2fvirtual-machines%2flinux%2ftoc.json
■
Private IP Addresses per VNET per subscription per region: 4096
Storage:
■
Storage Account total size limitation: 500 TB (# of entities (blobs, containers etc) within a storage account:
unlimited).
■
Max size of a page blob (vhd): 1 TB
■
Min size of a page blob (vhd): 20 MB
■
Max number of data disks: depends on instance size
■
Windows: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/virtual-machines/virtual-machines-windows-sizes
■
Linux: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/virtual-machines/virtual-machines-linuxsizes?toc=%2fazure%2fvirtual-machines%2flinux%2ftoc.json
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To add a virtual machine to a VPG:
1.
In the VPGs tab in the Zerto User Interface, select the VPG and click MORE > Edit VPG. You can also select the VPG to
display the VPG details and click EDIT VPG.
The Edit VPG wizard is displayed, enabling you to edit the VPG, including adding and removing virtual machines from the
VPG.
In the VMs step, select the virtual machines to add and click the arrow pointing right to include these machines in the VPG.
A VPG can include virtual machines that are not yet protected and virtual machines that are already protected. You can
view protected virtual machines by clicking Select VMs in the Advanced (Multi Target) section.
Virtual machines protected in the maximum number of VPGs are not displayed in the Select VMs dialog.
Protecting virtual machines in several VPGs is enabled only if both the protected site and the recovery site, as well as the
VRAs installed on these sites, are of version 5.0 and higher.
If you want to define the boot order of the VPGs, click DEFINE BOOT ORDER.
2.
Configure the settings for the new virtual machines in the same way that you configured the other virtual machines in the
VPG, when you created the VPG.
3.
Click DONE.
The virtual machines are added to the VPG. This process may take a few minutes. While the VPG definition is being updated,
you cannot perform any operation on the VPG, such as adding a checkpoint, editing its properties, or recovering it.
After the VPG definition has been updated, the protected and recovery sites are then synchronized. During the synchronization
period, the Protection Status displayed in the VPGs tab of the Zerto User Interface is: Meeting SLA n/m VMs
where n is the number of virtual machines that were originally in the VPG, and m is the total number of virtual machines in the
VPG, including the virtual machines that are currently being synced. While the virtual machines that were added are being
synced, the VPG can be failed over but the failover only includes the original virtual machines in the VPG.
For example, in the following screen shot, two virtual machines were added to the VPG, Operations, that originally contained 2
other virtual machines.
When the sync process for a virtual machine is complete, Zerto Virtual Manager tags the first checkpoint that includes a new
virtual machine with: VM ’XXX’ is fully synced
where XXX is the name of the virtual machine that was synced.
When you perform a recovery operation using one of these checkpoints, or any later checkpoint, all the virtual machines that
have completed syncing will be recovered.
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For example, in the following screen shot, two virtual machines were added to the VPG Operations. When the sync process for
each machine completed, a checkpoint was added to show this. If you use the checkpoint written on Dec 20, 2015 at 15:39:48,
the recovery will include the virtual machine Clients but not FX history. If you select the checkpoint at 15:40:03 or a later
checkpoint, a recovery operation will also include the virtual machine FX history.
If the virtual machines are added to a VPG replicating to a resource pool in VMware vSphere environments, Zerto Virtual
Replication checks that the additional virtual machines do not exceed the resource pool capacity, such that the sum of the
virtual machine reservation is less than or equal to the resource pool CPU and storage settings.
Deleting Virtual Machines in a VPG
Deleting a virtual machine protected in a VPG, causes the journal to be reset as all the checkpoints in the journal are removed.
Modifying Protected Virtual Machine Volumes
Adding or deleting volumes for a virtual machine protected in a VPG, are automatically reflected in the volumes used for the
mirror virtual machine, managed by the VRA in the recovery site.
Adding or deleting a volume in any virtual machine protected in a VPG, causes the journal to be reset as all the checkpoints in
the journal are removed.
If you add a volume to the virtual machine the total number of disks cannot exceed 60 disks, which can be a combination of IDE
and SCSI disks, where each virtual machine can have up to 2 IDE controllers each with a maximum of 4 IDE disks and up to 4
SCSI controllers each with a maximum of 15 disks, so that the total of IDE and SCSI disks does not exceed 60 disks.
Changing the defined size of a journal of a virtual machine in a VPG is automatically reflected in the VRA in the recovery site.
When protecting to AWS, if you add a volume to the virtual machine the total number of disks cannot exceed 12, including the
boot disk.
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Changing the Recovery Storage for a Protected Virtual Machine
To change the recovery storage for a virtual machine volume, the new storage must have 45GB or 25% of the storage size for
the change to be performed.
Pausing the Protection of a VPG
During periods when the WAN bandwidth is utilized to its maximum, you can pause the protection of a VPG, to free up some of
this bandwidth. After pausing the protection, the VPG can still be recovered to the last checkpoint written to the journal before
the pause operation.
Note:
■
■
Zerto recommends adding a checkpoint to the VPG immediately before pausing protection, if you might want to recover
the VPG to the latest point in time before the pause.
You cannot pause a VPG while a backup job is running.
To pause the protection of VPGs:
1.
In the Zerto User Interface, click the VPGs or VMs tab and select one or more VPGs to pause protection.
2.
Click MORE > PAUSE.
A warning is displayed. If you click PROCEED in this warning, the VPG protection is paused.
Note: If the VPG was previously viewed, and the tab for this VPG is still displayed, you can access the details by selecting
the tab.
The VPG protection is paused until you click Resume VPGs.
To resume the protection of VPGs:
1.
In the Zerto User Interface, click the VPGs or VMs tab and select one or more VPGs to resume protection.
2.
Click MORE > Resume.
After resuming protection, a Bitmap Sync will most probably be performed to synchronize the protection and recovery
sites.
1.
Forcing the Synchronization of a VPG
If the protected virtual machines are updated such that they are no longer synchronized with their mirror machines in the
recovery site, you can force the resynchronization of the machines. An example of when the machines can be out-of-sync is
when there is a rollback of a virtual machine to a snapshot. In this case, the recovery virtual machine will include changes that
have been rolled back in the protected machine, so that they are no longer synchronized.
You can force the synchronization of the machines in a VPG to remedy this type of situation.
Note: You cannot force the synchronization of a VPG while a backup job is running.
To forcibly synchronize a VPG:
1.
In the Zerto User Interface, select the VPGs or VMs tab and click the VPG to display the VPG details.
2.
Click MORE > Force Sync.
Note: If the VPG was previously viewed, and the tab for this VPG is still displayed, you can access the details by selecting
the tab.
The VPG starts to synchronize with the recovery site. As the journal fills up during the synchronization, older checkpoints are
deleted from the journal to make room for the new data and the data prior to these checkpoints are promoted to the virtual
machine virtual disks. Thus, during the synchronization, you can recover the virtual machine to any checkpoint still in the
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journal, but as time progresses the list of checkpoints available can lessen. If the journal is not big enough to complete the
synchronization without leaving at least ten minutes worth of checkpoints, the synchronization pauses for the time specified in
the Replication Pause Time value for the VPG, to enable intervention to ensure recovery to a checkpoint remains available.
The intervention can be, for example, increasing the size of the journal, or cloning the journal as described in “Deleting a VPG”,
on page 122.
Handling a VPG with in an Error State
When a volume connected to a virtual machine in a VPG is deleted, the VPG and all the virtual machines in that VPG enter an
error state and an alert is issued.
Note: When a VPG is in an error state, recovery operations cannot be performed.
Edit the VPG definition to resolve the error in one of the following ways.
■
■
Remove the virtual machine that was connected to the deleted volume from the VPG: In the VPGs tab in the Zerto User
Interface, select the VPG to be edited and click MORE > Edit VPG. In the Edit VPG wizard, go to the VMs step. Select the
virtual machine to be removed and click the arrow pointing left.
Replace the volume that was deleted: In the VPGs tab in the Zerto User Interface, select the VPG to be edited and click
MORE > Edit VPG. In the Edit VPG wizard, go to the STORAGE step and click the empty Recovery Volume Location field or
select that row and click EDIT SELECTED. In the Edit Volumes dialog that is displayed, choose the volume source: Storage or
Preseeded volume, specify other volume options and click OK.
Note:
■
■
If you choose a new volume, a volume initial sync is performed. During this period, new checkpoints are not added to the
journal and recovery operations cannot be performed on the VPG.
If you choose a preseeded volume, a delta sync is performed. During this period, new checkpoints are not added to the
journal but recovery operations are possible. During a delta sync, you can recover to the last checkpoint in the journal.
As soon as the VPG is updated, the VPG and all virtual machines in the VPG return to normal, and recovery operations can be
performed on the VPG.
Deleting a VPG
You can delete a VPG and either keep the target disks to use later for preseeding if you want to reprotect any of the virtual
machines in the deleted VPG or delete these disks. Any offsite backups stored for the VPG are not deleted and the virtual
machines that were backed up can be restored.
Note: You cannot delete a VPG while a backup job is running.
To delete a VPG:
1.
In the Zerto User Interface, click the VPGs or VMs tab and select one or more VPGs to delete.
2.
Click MORE > Delete.
3.
Check Keep the recovery disks at the peer site if you might reprotect the virtual machines. Checking this
option means that the target replica disks for the virtual machines are saved so that they can be used as preseeded disks if
the virtual machines are re-protected.
The Delete VPG dialog is displayed.
4. Click APPLY to delete the VPG.
The VPG configuration is deleted. The VRA on the recovery site that handles the replication for the VPG is updated
including keeping or removing the replicated data for the deleted VPG, dependent on the Keep the recovery disks at
the peer site setting during the deletion.
The locations of the saved target disks are specified in the description of the event for the virtual machines being removed,
event EV0040, displayed in MONITORING > EVENTS.
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Deleting a VPG When the Status is Deleting
If, for some reason, the VPG cannot be deleted, the VPG status changes to Deleting and the substatus is VPG waiting to
be removed. Attempting to delete the VPG a second time causes the following to be displayed:
Retry – Retry deleting the VPG.
Force Delete – Forcibly delete the VPG.
Cancel – Cancel the delete operation.
Running an Unscheduled Offsite Backup
After initializing the VPG, Zerto Virtual Replication periodically checks that the schedule to run an offsite backup - either daily
or weekly - has not passed. At the scheduled backup time, the offsite backup is run and the offsite backup file stored in the
specified repository.
To run an unscheduled offsite backup:
1.
In the Zerto User Interface, click the VPGs or VMs tabs and select one or more VPGs to be backed up.
2.
Click MORE > Run Backup.
Note: You can also start from the OFFSITE BACKUP tab.
Note: If the VPG was previously viewed, and the tab for this VPG is still displayed, you can access the details by selecting
the tab.
3.
Click OK.
The offsite backup starts. You can monitor the progress in the Offsite Backup tab and the tasks pane. During the backup job
you cannot perform any other operation on the VPG without first aborting the job. You can start a live failover and you are then
prompted to abort the job.
Scheduled backup runs for the VPG are skipped until the unscheduled run ends.
If the job runs out of the configured backup window, the virtual machines that are already stored in the repository are kept but
remaining virtual machines in the VPG are not backed up. The job is reported as a partial backup.
Ensuring Application Consistency – Checkpoints
Checkpoints are recorded automatically every few seconds in the journal. These checkpoints ensure crash-consistency and are
written to the virtual machines journals by the Zerto Virtual Manager and each checkpoint has the same timestamp set by the
Zerto Virtual Manager. During recovery you pick a checkpoint in the journal and recover to this point.
The crash-consistent checkpoints guarantee write order fidelity. For example, if write A on a virtual machine in the VPG
occurred before write B on a virtual machine in the VPG, then when a checkpoint is written, the journal will contain:
■
■
■
Neither of the writes
Both writes, and if they overlap the B data takes precedence
Only A – indicating the checkpoint occurred between A and B
The coordination is done by the Zerto Virtual Manager.
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You can also integrate Microsoft Volume Shadow Copy Service (VSS) with Zerto Virtual Replication to ensure transaction
consistency in a Microsoft Windows server environment.
You can also use a script to place the application in a quiesced mode, such as Oracle Hot Backup mode, and execute the Zerto
Virtual Replication PowerShell cmdlet Set-Checkpoint, then release the quiesced mode. For more information about Zerto
Virtual Replication PowerShell cmdlets, refer to Zerto Virtual Replication Cmdlets.
Note: To write application-consistent checkpoints, there is a performance impact on the virtual machine running the
application as a result of the application-consistent mechanism used, such as VSS, since the guest operating system and any
integrated applications will be quiesced. This impact on performance may be negligible and does not always happen since not
all applications require these checkpoints in order to achieve successful application recovery. Also, Zerto Virtual Replication
only requires the guest and application to quiesce for a brief moment, just long enough to add a checkpoint.
Checkpoints are recorded every few seconds in the journal. After a short time, the number of checkpoints available from which
to choose a recovery point can be in excess of 2000. When this threshold is reached, in order to enable efficient management
and use of the checkpoints, the number of checkpoints is diluted with respect to time as follows:
■ Selected checkpoints are removed while ensuring that remaining checkpoints are diluted across the entire journal.
■ The dilution method ensures that the frequency of the most recent checkpoints is still in seconds while the frequency of
older checkpoints can be reduced to minutes, and eventually to hours. The longer the journal history, the lower the
frequency of the older checkpoints.
Checkpoints added either manually or via the ZertoVssAgent are not diluted.
This section describes the different options available to ensure application consistency:
■
■
“Adding a Checkpoint to Identify a Key Point”, below.
“Ensuring Transaction Consistency in Microsoft Windows Server Environments”, on page 126.
Adding a Checkpoint to Identify a Key Point
In addition to the automatically generated checkpoints, you can add checkpoints manually to ensure application consistency
and to identify events that might influence recovery, such as a planned switch-over to a secondary generator. You can recover
the machines in a VPG to any checkpoint in the journal, to one added automatically or to one added manually. Thus, recovery is
done to a point-in-time when the data integrity of the protected virtual machines is ensured.
Note:
■ Adding a checkpoint manually does not guarantee transaction consistency.
■ Changes to a VPG that result in re-synchronization of the VPG results in all checkpoints being removed. Adding
checkpoints to the journal is resumed after synchronization completes. A forced synchronization of the VPG only removes
checkpoints if the journal fills up during the synchronization.
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To add a checkpoint to a VPG:
1.
In the Zerto User Interface select ACTIONS > ADD CHECKPOINT.
The Add Checkpoint dialog is displayed.
A list of VPGs is displayed with the requested VPG selected. You can select more VPGs to add the same checkpoint to, for
example, when something is happening at your site that affects multiple VPGs.
Note: Crash-consistency is per VPG and not across VPGs, even if a checkpoint was added to multiple VPGs.
2.
Enter a name for the checkpoint.
3.
Click SAVE.
When testing a failover, as described in “Testing Recovery”, on page 171, or actually performing a failover, as described in
“Managing Failover”, on page 192, you can choose the checkpoint as the point to recover to.
The checkpoints listed include checkpoints added via the ZertoVssAgent, as described in “Ensuring Transaction Consistency in
Microsoft Windows Server Environments”, below.
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Ensuring Transaction Consistency in Microsoft Windows Server Environments
The Microsoft Volume Shadow Copy Service (VSS) enables taking manual or automatic offsite backup copies or snapshots of
data, even if it has a lock, on a specific volume at a specific point-in-time over regular intervals. This ensures not just that the
data is crash consistent but also transaction consistent if recovery is needed.
Zerto Virtual Replication enables adding checkpoints to the journal that are synchronized with VSS snapshots.
The Microsoft Volume Shadow Copy Service (VSS) enables taking manual or automatic offsite backup copies or snapshots of
data, even if it has a lock, on a specific volume at a specific point-in-time over regular intervals. This ensures not just that the
data is crash consistent but also transaction consistent if recovery is needed.
Zerto Virtual Replication enables adding checkpoints to the journal that are synchronized with VSS snapshots.
To use Zerto Virtual Replication with VSS to ensure application consistency you must install the ZertoVssAgent on every virtual
machine that uses VSS and that you want to protect with Zerto Virtual Replication.
You can install the ZertoVssAgent on the following supported Windows operating systems:
OPERATING SYSTEMS
Windows Server 2008, all versions (SPs and R2)
Windows Server 2012, all versions (SPs and R2)
To install the ZertoVssAgent:
1.
2.
Download the ZertoVssAgent, ZertoVss64Agent.msi, from the Zerto Support Portal downloads page, on the virtual
machines that use VSS and that you want to protect with Zerto Virtual Replication.
Run the ZertoVssAgent on the virtual machines that use VSS and that you want to protect.
Note: Only a single virtual machine in a VPG can have application consistent checkpoints and the VSS checkpoint is only
applied to the virtual machine where the ZertoVssAgent is installed. Thus, even if more than one virtual machine runs VSS,
you only install the Zerto VssAgent on one of the virtual machines in the VPG. Also, the virtual machine where the
ZertoVssAgent is installed must have network connectivity to the local Zerto Virtual Manager in order to be able to add
VSS checkpoints successfully.
3.
Enter the license key and click Validate.
4. Follow the wizard through the installation.
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The Zerto Virtual Manager Connections Settings dialog is displayed.
5.
Specify the IP address and HTTP port number for the Zerto Virtual Managers managing the protection of the virtual
machines, both for the local site and optionally, for the paired, remote site. If the same hypervisor manager is used both for
protecting and recovering virtual machines, specify the IP address and HTTP port number for the single Zerto Virtual
Manager installed.
Note: The default HTTP port number when Zerto Virtual Replication is installed is 9080.
If you enter a wrong IP address or port you can correct the address or port after the installation completes by editing the
ZertoVssAgentGUI.exe.conf file in the ZertoVssAgent folder under the folder where the ZertoVssAgent is installed,
for example, C:\Program Files\Zerto.
6.
Click OK.
The ZertoVssAgent is installed and the Add VSS Checkpoint is placed on the desktop. The agent runs as a Windows service,
ZertoVssprovider.
You can add a checkpoint to the Zerto Virtual Replication via the Add VSS Checkpoint dialog, via the command line or as a
scheduled task. The ZertoVssAgent ensures that the virtual machine is in an application consistent state and then sends the
checkpoint to the Zerto Virtual Manager, which then adds the checkpoint to the journals for the VPG containing that virtual
machine.
The checkpoint is logged for the entire VPG, however any other virtual machine in the VPG will have a crash-consistent
checkpoint.
To add a checkpoint while ensuring application consistency via the Add VSS Checkpoint dialog:
1.
On a virtual machine where the ZertoVssAgent has been installed, click Start > Programs > Zerto Virtual Replication > Add
VSS Checkpoint or double-click the Add VSS Checkpoint icon on the desktop.
The Add VSS Checkpoint dialog is displayed.
2.
Enter a name for the checkpoint.
3.
Click OK.
Note: A message that the process was completed is displayed on the machine where the ZertoVssAgent has been installed. The
handling of the checkpoint by the Zerto Virtual Manager is done asynchronously and you can check via the recent tasks list in
the Zerto User Interface that the checkpoint is added in the VPG.
To add a checkpoint while ensuring application consistency via the command line:
1.
2.
Open the command line dialog as an administrator.
Navigate to the directory where the ZertoVssAgent is installed. The default location is
C:\Program Files\Zerto\ZertoVssAgent\
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3.
In the command line, run the following:
ZertoVssAgent.exe <localURL> <localPort> <remoteURL> <remotePort> <checkpoint>
where:
localURL – The URL for the Zerto Virtual Manager that manages the protected site.
localPort – The HTTP port for the Zerto Virtual Manager that manages the protected site.
remoteURL – The URL for the Zerto Virtual Manager that manages the recovery site.
remotePort – The HTTP port for the Zerto Virtual Manager that manages the recovery site.
checkpoint – The name of the checkpoint.
Note: A message that the process was completed is displayed on the machine where the ZertoVssAgent is installed. The
handling of the checkpoint by the Zerto Virtual Manager is done asynchronously and you can check via the recent tasks list in
the Zerto User Interface that the checkpoint is added in the VPG.
To schedule checkpoints:
1.
Open the Task Scheduler.
2.
Under the Actions menu item, select Create Task.
The Create Task dialog is displayed.
3.
Enter the following:
Name – A name for the task.
Run whether the user is logged on or not – Make sure that this is checked.
Run with highest privileges – Make sure that this is checked.
The Windows Scheduled Task will be created and run by the currently logged in user. After the task is created, Zerto
recommends changing this to NT AUTHORITY\Network Service permissions and follow the steps to allow the correct
permissions as described in “To set COM permissions for VSS when “Access Denied” errors are received:”, on page 132.
4. Select the Triggers tab and configure a new trigger.
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The New Trigger dialog is displayed.
5.
Select the Actions tab and create a new action to start the ZertoVssAgent with the IP address and port of the Zerto Virtual
Manager and the checkpoint to use. For example:
C:\Program Files\Zerto\ZertoVssAgent\ZertoVssAgent.exe and
106.18.206.10 9080 106.18.206.10 9080 "VSSTaskCP"
That is, with the format: <protecting_ZVM_IP> 9080 <recovery_ZVM_IP> 9080 "<CP_name>"
6.
Click OK.
7.
Select the Settings tab and make changes as required. Make sure Stop the task if it runs longer than is not
selected.
8.
Click OK.
There are certain permissions required for the Windows scheduled task to execute successfully. For example, you may see the
following in the event logs:
Volume Shadow Copy Service error: Unexpected error querying for the IVssWriterCallback
interface. hr = 0x80070005
This is often caused by incorrect security settings in either the writer or requestor process.
If this is the case, the service which runs the Windows Scheduled Task must have NT AUTHORITY\Network Service
permissions or be using the SYSTEM account to run the task. VSS operations are performed as NT AUTHORITY\Network
Service which is not granted COM access by default on the service assigned to Windows Scheduled Tasks.
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The following procedure is only required if the windows scheduled task is using the Network Services account.
The correct permissions can be assigned by using the Component Services application, accessed by running
dcomcnfg.exe, in the windows guest.
To set COM permissions for VSS when “Access Denied” errors are received:
1.
Run dcomcnfg.exe.
The Component Services dialog is displayed.
2.
Expand the Component Services node to My Computer and right-click to access the Properties menu.
The My Computer Properties dialog is displayed.
3.
Select the COM Security tab and click Edit Limits under Access Permissions.
4. Add the NETWORK SERVICE local access.
5.
Click OK and verify that the user is now in the Access Permission list.
6.
Click OK to commit these changes.
Access Denied messages should no longer be written in the event viewer for VSS. Additionally, you can grant Network
Service full control over HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\VSS\Diag. You can also check this key
HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\VSS\VssAccessControl which should at least contain the DWORD NT
Authority\NetworkService set to value 1.
You may also add a new DWORD like DOMAIN\MyZertoServiceUserAccount and set its value to 1.
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The Windows Scheduled Task will be created and run by the currently logged in user. After the task is created, Zerto
recommends changing this to NT AUTHORITY\Network Service permissions and follow the steps to allow the correct
permissions as described in “To set COM permissions for VSS when “Access Denied” errors are received:”, on page 132.
7.
Select the Triggers tab and configure a new trigger.
The New Trigger dialog is displayed.
8.
Select the Actions tab and create a new action to start the ZertoVssAgent with the IP address and port of the Zerto Virtual
Manager and the checkpoint to use. For example:
C:\Program Files\Zerto\ZertoVssAgent\ZertoVssAgent.exe and
106.18.206.10 9080 106.18.206.10 9080 "VSSTaskCP"
That is, with the format: <protecting_ZVM_IP> 9080 <recovery_ZVM_IP> 9080 "<CP_name>"
9.
Click OK.
10. Select the Settings tab and make changes as required. Make sure Stop the task if it runs longer than is not
selected.
11. Click OK.
There are certain permissions required for the Windows scheduled task to execute successfully. For example, you may see the
following in the event logs:
Volume Shadow Copy Service error: Unexpected error querying for the IVssWriterCallback
interface. hr = 0x80070005
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This is often caused by incorrect security settings in either the writer or requestor process.
If this is the case, the service which runs the Windows Scheduled Task must have NT AUTHORITY\Network Service
permissions or be using the SYSTEM account to run the task. VSS operations are performed as NT AUTHORITY\Network
Service which is not granted COM access by default on the service assigned to Windows Scheduled Tasks.
The correct permissions can be assigned by using the Component Services application, accessed by running
dcomcnfg.exe, in the windows guest.
To set COM permissions for VSS when “Access Denied” errors are received:
1.
Run dcomcnfg.exe.
The Component Services dialog is displayed.
2.
Expand the Component Services node to My Computer and right-click to access the Properties menu.
The My Computer Properties dialog is displayed.
3.
Select the COM Security tab and click Edit Limits under Access Permissions.
4. Add the NETWORK SERVICE local access.
5.
Click OK and verify that the user is now in the Access Permission list.
6.
Click OK to commit these changes.
Access Denied messages should no longer be written in the event viewer for VSS. Additionally, you can grant Network
Service full control over HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\VSS\Diag. You can also check this key
HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\VSS\VssAccessControl which should at least contain the DWORD NT
Authority\NetworkService set to value 1.
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You may also add a new DWORD like DOMAIN\MyZertoServiceUserAccount and set its value to 1.
During recovery you can recover to the VSS checkpoint, ensuring both application consistency and that the data is
crash-consistent for this virtual machine. For details, refer to “Latest VSS – When VSS is used, testing is to the latest VSS
snapshot, ensuring that the data is both crash-consistent and application consistent to this point. The frequency of VSS
snapshots determines how much data can be recovered. For details about VSS checkpoints, see “Ensuring Transaction
Consistency in Microsoft Windows Server Environments”, on page 126.”, on page 174 and “To initiate a failover:”, on page 194.
Changing the Zerto Virtual Manager Used by the ZertoVssAgent
When you install the ZertoVssAgent, you specify the Zerto Virtual Manager to use to manage the addition of checkpoints for
the virtual machines that uses VSS and that you want to protect in VPGs. You can change the IP and port of the VPG that you
specified during the installation either by rerunning the installation and selecting the Repair ZertoVssAgent option or by
editing IP and port values in the ZertoVssAgentGUI.exe.conf file in the folder where the ZertoVssAgent is installed.
Running Scripts Before or After Recovering a VPG
Before and after executing a failover, move, or test failover, you can run executable scripts, such as Windows .bat files or
PowerShell scripts. A pre-recovery script is always run at the beginning of the recovery operation. A post-recovery script is run
after all the virtual machines are powered on at the recovery site.
The scripts must be saved to the machine where the remote Zerto Virtual Manager (ZVM) is installed.
Both pre-recovery and post-recovery scripts are run by the ZVM service on the ZVM machine. The account running the ZVM
service is the account that will run the scripts when they are executed.
Note: Zerto recommends duplicating scripts on the Zerto Virtual Managers for both the protected and recovery sites, so that if
reverse replication is required, the scripts are available. The location of the script for reverse replication, on the machine where
the Zerto Virtual Manager that manages the protected site is installed, must be to the same path as in the remote Zerto Virtual
Manager machine. For example, if the scripts are saved to C:\ZertScripts on the remote Zerto Virtual Manager machine,
they must be saved to C:\ZertScripts on the local Zerto Virtual Manager machine.
The scripts can include environment variables that can be included as part of the script itself, or passed to the script as
parameters. When the script is passed an environment variable as a parameter, the variable is evaluated before executing the
script. The following environment variables are available:
%ZertoVPGName% – The name of the VPG. If the name includes a space, enclose the variable in double quotes (”). For example,
the VPG MyVPG uses the format %ZertoVPGName% but the VPG My VPG uses the format “%ZertoVPGName%”.
%ZertoOperation% – The operation being run: FailoverBeforeCommit, FailoverRollback, Test, MoveBeforeCommit,
MoveRollback. Use the result returned for this variable to limit when the script runs, dependent on the operation. The scripts
are run after all the virtual machines are powered on at the recovery site and the variable is set to FailoverBeforeCommit or
MoveBeforeCommit. Use FailoverRollback or MoveRollback when rolling back the Failover or Move operation, to undo
whatever changes a previous script has done (such as updating the DNS records).
%ZertoForce% – A Boolean value, Yes/No, that dictates whether to abort the recovery operation if the script fails. For
example, whether to rollback a Move operation when the script fails and returns a non-zero value.
For example, if a specific VPG should not be migrated, the pre-recovery script can determine whether to continue based on the
values of the %ZertoOperation% and %ZertoVPGName%.
When specifying scripts in the definition of a VPG, enter values for the Pre-recovery Script and Post-recovery Script:
Command to run – The full path of the script to run. The script must be located on the same machine as the Zerto Virtual
Manager for the recovery site.
Params – The values of any parameters to pass to the script. Separate parameters with a space.
Timeout (sec) – The time-out in seconds for the script to run. If the script runs before executing a failover, move, or test
failover and the script fails or a timeout value is reached, an alert is generated and the failover, move, or test failover is not
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performed. If the script runs after executing a failover, move, or test failover and the timeout value is reached, an alert is
generated. The default timeout value is specified in the Site Configuration Advanced Settings dialog.
Creating a Script
There are many ways to create scripts to run before or after recovering a VPG. The following procedure uses a Windows
PowerShell file (.ps1) or a batch (.bat) file.
To create a script:
1.
Create a file on the machine where the Zerto Virtual Manager that manages the recovery is installed.
2.
Enter the script that you want to run in the file.
3.
Save the file as a Windows PowerShell file (.ps1) or batch (.bat) file.
When writing a PowerShell script, you can include the environment variables in the script. For example, the following code
snippet shows the use of the %ZertoOperation% and %ZertoVPGName% environment variables:
$Operation = $env:ZertoOperation
$VPG = $env:ZertoVPGName
$time = Get-Date
if ($Operation -eq "Test") {
"$time VPG: $VPG was tested." >> "C:\ZertoScripts\VPG_DR.txt"
}
if ($Operation -eq "FailoverBeforeCommit") {
"$time Failover before commit was performed. VPG: $VPG" >> "C:\ZertoScripts\VPG_DR.txt"
}
if ($Operation -eq "MoveBeforeCommit"){
"$time Move before commit was performed. VPG: $VPG" >> "C:\ZertoScripts\VPG_DR.txt"
}
Pre-recovery scripts must be saved on the protected site Zerto Virtual Manager machine. Post-recovery scripts must be
saved on the recovery site Zerto Virtual Manager machine.
Note: Zerto recommends having both pre- and post-recovery scripts, available on both the protected and recovery Zerto
Virtual Manager machines, so that they will work from the protected site and after reverse protection from the recovery
site.
4. Update Command to run and Params fields for all the VPG definitions that you want to run the script.
Passing parameters is implemented differently for the two script types. For information about passing command line
parameters, refer to the relevant PowerShell or batch file documentation.
Using a BAT File
Windows Batch (.bat) is an executable file that does not require anything in order to run. Update Command to run and
Params fields for all the VPG definitions that you want to run the script.
Command to run – <script_including_path>
C:\ZertoScripts\PostScript.bat
Use quotes (“) around the path if it includes spaces. The bat file is an executable file and is therefore included in the
Command to run field.
Params – <Zerto_Params>, for example:
%ZertoOperation% %ZertoVPGName%
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Using a PowerShell Script
Windows PowerShell scripts require Windows PowerShell (.exe) to execute. To specify a PowerShell script, update
Command to run and Params fields for all the VPG definitions that you want to run the script.
Command to run – powershell.exe
Params – <script_including_path> <Zerto_Params>, for example:
C:\ZertoScripts\PostScript.ps1 %ZertoOperation% %ZertoVPGName%
Use quotes (“) around the path if it includes spaces.
Note: You might have to set the remote signed execution policy. For example, using the following:
##PowerCLI requires remote signed execution policy - if this is not enabled,
##it may be enabled here by uncommenting the line below.
##Set-ExecutionPolicy -ExecutionPolicy RemoteSigned -Force
Note: Zerto recommends testing both PowerShell and batch scripts by running them from the command line, to ensure that
they run correctly.
Example Scripts
The following script is an example of how to track failover tests.
The following script, c:\ZertoScripts\TestedVPGs.bat, writes the VPG name and date to the
ListOfTestedVPGs.txt file every time a failover test is run:
SET isodt=%date:~10,4%-%date:~7,2%-%date:~4,2% %time:~0,2%-%time:~3,2%-%time:~6,2%
IF %1==Test ECHO %2 %isodt% >> c:\ZertoScripts\Results\TestedVPGs.txt
Where %1 is the first parameter in the list of parameters, %ZertoOperation%, and %2 is the second parameter in the list of
parameters, %ZertoVPGName%.
Note: If the file TestedVPGs.txt does not exist it is created, as long as the folder, c:\ZertoScripts\Results, exists.
Exporting and Importing VPG Definitions
You can save VPG definitions to an external file and import these definitions back to Zerto Virtual Replication, for example,
exporting the settings before uninstalling a version of Zerto Virtual Replication and importing the settings after reinstalling
Zerto Virtual Replication.
Note: Zerto Virtual Replication regularly exports settings to the Zerto_Installation_Folder\Zerto Virtual
Replication\ExportedSettings folder. You can use one of these exported files instead of creating a new export file. The
default location of Zerto_Installation_Folder is C:\Program Files\Zerto.
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To export VPG settings:
1.
Open the Zerto Diagnostics application. For example, via Start > Programs > Zerto Virtual Replication > Zerto Diagnostics.
The Zerto Virtual Replication Diagnostics menu dialog is displayed.
2.
Select the Export Protection Group Settings option and click Next.
3.
Select the destination for the file to contain exported settings and specify the Zerto Virtual Manager IP address and port
where the VPGs are protecting virtual machines.
4. Click Next.
The list of exported VPGs is displayed.
5.
Click Done.
Note: If you are uninstalling Zerto Virtual Replication, the VPGs are deleted.To prevent having to perform a full synchronization
when the VPG definitions are imported, Zerto recommends deleting the VPGs in the Zerto User Interface, keeping their target
disks.
To import VPG settings:
1.
Click Start > Programs > Zerto Virtual Replication > Zerto Diagnostics.
The Zerto Virtual Replication Diagnostics menu dialog is displayed.
2.
Select the Import Protection Group Settings option.
3.
Click Next.
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4. Select the file previously exported and enter the Zerto Virtual Manager IP address and port specified when exporting the
VPGs.
5.
Click Next.
The list of exported VPGs is displayed.
6.
7.
Select the VPGs to import. Only VPGs with names that are not already defined can be imported. VPGs in the import files
with the same name as an existing VPG are disabled.
Click Next.
The list of imported VPGs is displayed. If the VPG could not be imported, the reason for the failure is specified.
Note: If a host was removed from and then re-added to the environment it is advisable to wait approximately 5 minutes
from when the host was re-added before performing the import of the VPGs.
8.
Click Done.
VPG Statuses and Synchronization Triggers
During normal operations the VPG status can change. For example, a change can be made to the VPG definition, or an
operation such as move or failover is performed on the VPG, or an external event impacts the system such as the WAN going
down. When the status changes, resulting in the VPG being synchronized, for example with a Delta Sync, the estimated time
to complete the synchronization is displayed under the VPG status, and if relevant, the synchronization trigger, such as
Network Congestion.
VPG Statuses
The following statuses are displayed:
STATUS
SUBSTATUS
Deleting
Deleting the VPG
COMMENT
VPG waiting to be removed
Failing Over
Committing Failover
The VPG is being failed over.
Failing over – Before commit
A VPG being failed over is in the initial stage, before
committing the failover.
Promoting
The failover has completed and the data from the journal
is being promoted to the failed over virtual machine disk.
Rolling back Failover
The failover is being rolled back to prior to the failover.
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STATUS
SUBSTATUS
COMMENT
History Not Meeting SLA
See Not Meeting SLA, below.
The VPG is meeting the RPO SLA setting but not the
journal history.
Volume Initial Sync
After adding a virtual machine to an existing VPG not
meeting the journal history SLA.
Initializing
Creating VPG
Initial Sync
Syncing
Volume Initial Sync
Meeting SLA
—
Bitmap Syncing
Delta Syncing (When Force Sync is
applied)
Moving
Recovery is Possible
After a rollback.
Volume Initial Sync
After adding a virtual machine to an existing VPG
meeting SLA.
Committing Move
Moving – Before commit
Promoting
Rolling back Move
Not Meeting SLA
Delta Sync (when Force Sync is not
applied)
The VPG is not meeting the journal history nor RPO SLA
settings.
Delta Syncing a volume
Error
Needs configuration
Site disconnection
Site disconnection. No checkpoints
VM not protected
Volume Initial Sync
After adding a virtual machine to an existing VPG not
meeting the SLA.
VPG has no VMs
Recovered
—
The VPG has been recovered.
RPO Not Meeting SLA
See Not Meeting SLA, above.
The VPG is meeting the journal history SLA setting but
not the RPO.
Volume Initial Sync
After adding a virtual machine to an existing VPG not
meeting the RPO SLA.
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The following provides full description of the substatuses:
SUBSTATUS
DESCRIPTION
Backing Up
An offsite backup is running.
Bitmap Syncing1
A change tracking mechanism of the protected machines during a disconnected state or when a
VRA buffer is full. In these situations, Zerto Virtual Replication starts to maintain a smart bitmap
in memory, in which it tracks and records the storage areas that changed. Since the bitmap is kept
in memory, Zerto Virtual Replication does not require any LUN or volume per VPG at the
protected side.
Note: The VRA buffer is set via the Amount of VRA RAM value, specified when the VRA is
installed
The bitmap is small and scales dynamically, containing references to the areas of the protected
disk that have changed but not the actual I/O. The bitmap is stored locally on the VRA within the
available resources. For example, when a VRA goes down and is then rebooted.
When required, Zerto Virtual Replication starts to maintain a smart bitmap in memory, to track
and record storage areas that change. When the issue that caused the bitmap sync is resolved,
the bitmap is used to check updates to the protected disks and send any updates to the recovery
site. A bitmap sync occurs when any of the following conditions occur:
■
■
■
Synchronization after WAN failure or when the load over the WAN is too great for the WAN
to handle, in which case the VPGs with the lower priorities will be the first to enter a bitmap
sync.
When there is storage congestion at the recovery site, for example when the VRA at the
recovery site cannot handle all the writes received from the protected site in a timely fashion.
When the VRA at the recovery site goes down and is then rebooted, for example during a
Zerto Virtual Replication upgrade.
During the synchronization, new checkpoints are not added to the journal but recovery
operations are still possible, assuming there are valid checkpoints in the journal. If a disaster
occurs requiring a failover during a bitmap synchronization, the VPG status changes to Recovery
Possible and you can recover to the last checkpoint written to the journal.
For synchronization to work, the protected virtual machines must be powered on so that the VRA
has an active IO stack, which is only available when the virtual machine is powered on.
Note: If the synchronization takes longer than the configured history, all the checkpoints in the
journal can be lost, preventing a failover from being performed. For the resolution of this
situation, see “To configure disaster recovery policies:”, on page 160.
Committing Failover
Failing over the VPG.
Committing Move
Completing the move, including removing the protected virtual machines.
Creating VPG
The VPG is being created based on the saved definition.
Deleting the VPG
Deleting the VPG.
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SUBSTATUS
DESCRIPTION
Delta Syncing1
The Delta Sync uses a checksum comparison to minimize the use of network resources. A Delta
Sync is used when the protected virtual machine disks and the recovery disks should already be
synchronized, except for a possible few changes to the protected disks, for example:
■
■
■
■
■
When a virtual machine was added to the VPG and the target recovery disk is defined as a
preseeded disk.
After a source VRA upgrade: Depending on the nature of the upgrade, a VRA upgrade on the
protected side may trigger either a Delta Sync or a Bitmap Sync. See the version release
notes to determine if a sync will be triggered with a source VRA upgrade.
For reverse protection after a move or failover.
A Force Sync operation was manually initiated on the VPG.
A host protecting virtual machines was restarted and the protected virtual machines on the
host had not been Live Migrated to other hosts in the cluster or a protected virtual machine
was Live Migrated to another host without a VRA, and then Live Migrated back to the
original host.
For synchronization to work, the protected virtual machines must be powered on so that the VRA
has an active IO stack, which is only available when the virtual machine is powered on.
During the synchronization, new checkpoints are not added to the journal but recovery
operations are still possible, assuming there are valid checkpoints in the journal. If a disaster
occurs requiring a failover during a delta synchronization, you can recover to the last checkpoint
written to the journal.
Delta syncing a volume1
Synchronization when only delta changes for a volume needs synchronizing, for example, when a
volume is added to a protected virtual machine in a VPG, and a preseeded disk is used.
For synchronization to work, the protected virtual machines must be powered on so that the VRA
has an active IO stack, which is only available when the virtual machine is powered on.
During the synchronization, new checkpoints are not added to the journal but recovery
operations are still possible, assuming there are valid checkpoints in the journal. If a disaster
occurs requiring a failover during a delta volume synchronization, you can recover to the last
checkpoint written to the journal.
Error
Problem situation, for example, when a ZVM is disconnected from a VRA used to protect virtual
machines. The VPG cannot be recovered until the problem is resolved,
Failing over - Before
commit
Preparing and checking the VPG virtual machines in the recovery site.
Full Syncing1
Full synchronization to ensure that the protected disks and recovery disks are the same after
some change to the system. This type of sync is the same as an Initial Sync but occurs after
protection started. In general, this type of sync should not happen.
For synchronization to work, the protected virtual machines must be powered on so that the VRA
has an active IO stack, which is only available when the virtual machine is powered on.
During the synchronization, new checkpoints are not added to the journal. Also, recovery
operations are not possible.
Full syncing a volume1
Synchronization when a full synchronization is required on a single volume.
For synchronization to work, the protected virtual machines must be powered on so that the VRA
has an active IO stack, which is only available when the virtual machine is powered on.
During the synchronization, new checkpoints are not added to the journal. Also, recovery
operations are not possible.
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SUBSTATUS
DESCRIPTION
Initial Sync1
Synchronization performed after creating the VPG to ensure that the protected disks and
recovery disks are the same. Recovery operations cannot occur until after the initial
synchronization has completed.
For synchronization to work, the protected virtual machines must be powered on so that the VRA
has an active IO stack, which is only available when the virtual machine is powered on.
Adding a virtual machine to a VPG is similar to creating a new VPG, a volume initial sync is
performed for the new virtual machine. For more information, see Volume Initial Sync1.
Journal storage error
There was an I/O error to the journal. For example, if the journal was full and the size was
increased. Once the problem is resolved a synchronization is required.
Moving - Before commit
Preparing and checking the VPG virtual machines in the recovery site.
Needs Configuration
One or more configuration settings are missing, for example, when reverse protection is not
specified or a virtual machine is added to a vApp.
Promoting
Updating recovered virtual machines in the VPG with data from the journal.
Recovery is possible
Communication with the Zerto Virtual Manager at the protected site is down so continuing
protection is halted, but recovery on the remote site is available (compare with Site
disconnection).
Recovery storage error
There was an I/O error to the recovery storage. For example, the storage is almost full or the
virtual machines are turned off and the recovery disks are inaccessible.
Recovery storage profile
error
The storage profile in the recovery site specified to be used by the VPG cannot be found.
Rolling back
Rolling back to an initial status, for example, after canceling a cloning operation on the VPG.
Rolling back Failover
Rolling back a Failover operation before committing it.
Rolling back Move
Rolling back a Move operation before committing it.
Site disconnection
Communication with the Zerto Virtual Manager at the remote, recovery, site is down so
continuing protection is halted (compare with Recovery is possible).
Site disconnection. No
checkpoints
Communication with the Zerto Virtual Manager at the remote, recovery, site is down and there
are no checkpoints to use to recover the VPG at the recovery site.
Syncing
Status while type of synchronization is being evaluated.
User paused protection
Protection is paused to enable solving a Journal disk space problem, for example, by increasing
the disk size or cloning the VPG.
VM not protected
A virtual machine in the VPG is no longer being protected. For example, when the virtual machine
was moved to another host without a VRA.
Volume Initial Sync1
Synchronization when a full synchronization is required on a single volume, for example, when
changing the target storage or adding a virtual machine to the VPG without using a preseeded
disk.
For synchronization to work, the protected virtual machines must be powered on so that the VRA
has an active IO stack, which is only available when the virtual machine is powered on.
Recovery can be performed on a VPG while a Volume Initial Sync is being performed for virtual
machines added to an existing VPG. However, only the virtual machines that were already in the
VPG can be recovered. The new virtual machines can only be recovered after the volume initial
sync for them is complete.
VPG has no VMs
A configured VPG where the virtual machines have been removed from it, for example when
changing both the storage and host for the virtual machines in the VPG, causes the VPG to be
recreated.
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SUBSTATUS
DESCRIPTION
VPG waiting to be
removed
An attempt to remove the VPG failed and it must be forcibly removed. For details, see “Deleting a
VPG When the Status is Deleting”, on page 123.
Zerto Virtual Manager
paused protection
Protection is paused to enable solving a Journal disk space problem, for example, by increasing
the disk size or cloning the VPG.
1. Synchronization after a recovery starts after the promotion of data from the journal to the virtual machine disks ends. Thus, synchronization of virtual machines can start at different times, dependent on when the promotion for the virtual machine ends. All synchronizations are done in parallel, whether a delta
sync or full sync, etc.
VPG Synchronization Triggers
The following synchronization triggers can be applied:
TRIGGER
DESCRIPTION
Force Sync
The user requested to synchronize the VPG, as described in “Forcing the Synchronization of a
VPG”, on page 121.
Network Congestion
The network bandwidth is not wide enough to handle all the data, causing some of the data to be
backed up.
Protected Storage Error
An I/O error occurred to a protected virtual machine, after the data was sent to the recovery
side.
Protected VRA
Congestion
The host where the VRA is installed is highly loaded: many updates are made to the protected
machines at the same time, causing a time lapse before the updates are passed to the recovery
site.
Recovery or Journal
Storage Error
There was an I/O error either to the recovery storage or journal, for example if the journal was
full and the size was increased. Once the problem is resolved a synchronization is required.
Recovery Storage
Congestion
The recovery storage is being written to a lot, causing a delay for some of the data passed from
the protected site to be written to disk.
Recovery VRA
Communication Problem
A network error, such as the network being down for a period, requires a synchronization of the
VPG between the two sites, for example a bitmap sync.
VPG Configuration
Changed
The configuration of the VPG changed resulting in a synchronization being required. For example,
the size of the journal was changed.
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CHAPTER 9: MANAGING VRAS
A VRA is a Zerto Virtual Replication virtual machine that manages the replication of virtual machines across sites. A VRA must
be installed on every hypervisor that hosts virtual machines that require protecting in the protected site and on every
hypervisor that will host the replicated virtual machines in the recovery site. The VRA compresses the data that is passed
across the WAN from the protected site to the recovery site. The VRA automatically adjusts the compression level according
to CPU usage, including totally disabling it if needed.
The VRA is a custom, very thin, Linux-based virtual machine with a small footprint, disk – memory and CPU – and increased
security since there are a minimum number of services installed.
Zerto recommends installing a VRA on every host so that if protected virtual machines are moved from one host in the cluster
to another host in the cluster there is always a VRA to protect the moved virtual machines.
A VRA can manage a maximum of 1500 volumes, whether these are volumes being protected or recovered.
Note: VRAs and shadow VRAs are configured and managed by the Zerto Virtual Manager. You cannot take snapshots of VRAs
as snapshots cause operational problems for the VRAs.
The priority assigned to a VPG dictates the bandwidth used. The Zerto Virtual Manager distributes bandwidth among the
VRAs based on this priority and the VPGs with higher priorities are handled before writes from VPGs with lower priorities.
There are a number of tasks that you might need to perform on VRAs, including installing a new VRA on a host added to the
hypervisor management tool or uninstalling VRAs and moving the data maintained by a VRA to another VRA when a host
requires maintenance.
During normal operation, a VRA might require more disks than a single virtual machine can support. If this situation arises, the
VRA creates new shadow VRA virtual machines, used by the VRA to maintain additional disks (a diskbox). A shadow VRA
does not have an operating system and therefore does not have an IP address, or use Integration Services. A shadow VRA is
created pro-actively at the recovery site. Similar to a VRA, a shadow VRA must be left to Zerto Virtual Replication to manage,
and must not be modified or removed for any reason.
The following VRA management options are described in this chapter:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
“Installing a VRA”, below
“Upgrading VRAs”, on page 146
“Editing VRA Settings”, on page 148
“Changing a Recovery VRA”, on page 148
“Uninstalling VRAs”, on page 149
“Handling a VRA in an Error State (Ghost VRA)”, on page 150
“Managing Protection When Moving a Host to a Different Cluster”, on page 150
Monitoring VRAs is described in “Monitoring Virtual Replication Appliances”, on page 100.
Installing a VRA
It is recommended to install a VRA on every host in every site so that if protected virtual machines are moved from one host in
the cluster to another host in the cluster there is always a VRA to protect the moved virtual machines.
VRA Installation Requirements
To install a VRA you require the following on the Hyper-V host:
■
■
■
■
12.5GB storage space
At least 1GB of reserved memory.
Port 8100 must be enabled on SCVMM.
The following PowerShell cmdlet has been run:
Install-WindowsFeature –Name Hyper-V -IncludeManagementTools -Restart
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You must also know the following information to install a VRA:
■
■
■
The storage the VRA will use and the local network used by the host.
The network settings to access the peer site; either the default gateway or the IP address, subnet mask and gateway.
If a static IP is used, which is the Zerto recommendation1, instead of DHCP, the IP address, subnet mask and default
gateway to be used by the VRA.
If the peer site VRAs are not on the default gateway, you must set up routing to enable the VRAs on this site to communicate
with the peer site VRAs before defining the VRAs. Setting up routing after defining VRAs only applies to VRAs installed after
the routing is set. Any existing VRA is not affected and access to these VRAs continues via the default gateway. If the default
gateway stops being used, you must reinstall the VRAs that were installed before setting up paired site routing.
To set up routing:
1.
In the SETUP > VRAs tab, select MORE > Paired Site Routing.
The Configure Paired Site Routing dialog is displayed.
2.
Click Enable Paired Site Routing.
3.
Specify the following and then click SAVE:
Address – The IP address of the next hop at the local site, the router or gateway address, that is used to access the peer site
network.
Subnet Mask – The subnet mask for the peer site network.
Gateway – The gateway for the peer site network.
These access details are used to access all VRAs installed on the peer site after the information is saved.
To install a Zerto Virtual Replication Appliance (VRA) on a host:
1.
In the Zerto User Interface, click SETUP > VRAs.
2.
Select a host which requires a VRA and click NEW VRA.
1. In a non-production environment it is often convenient to use DHCP to allocate an IP to the VRA. In a production environment this is not recommended. For
example, if the DHCP server changes the IP allocation on a reboot, the VRA does not handle the change.
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The Configure and Install VRA dialog is displayed.
Note: If you selected a cluster or multiple hosts, the VRA is installed on the first host in the displayed list.
3.
Specify the following Host Details:
Host – The host under which the VRA is installed. The drop-down displays the hosts which do not have a VRA installed,
with the selected host displayed by default.
Host Root Password – For future use.
Storage – The storage that the VRA will use for mirror virtual machines and for its journal. You can install more than one
VRA on the same storage.
Network – The network used to access the VRA.
VRA RAM – The amount of memory to allocate to the VRA. The amount determines the maximum buffer size for the VRA
for buffering IOs written by the protected virtual machines, before the writes are sent over the network to the recovery
VRA. The recovery VRA also buffers the incoming IOs until they are written to the journal. If a buffer becomes full, a
Bitmap Sync is performed after space is freed up in the buffer.
AMOUNT OF VRA RAM
Installing a VRA
VRA BUFFER POOL SIZE
1GB
450MB
2GB
1450MB
3GB
2300MB
4GB
3,300MB
5GB
4,300MB
6GB
5,300MB
7GB
6,300MB
8GB
7,300MB
9GB
8,300MB
10GB
9,300MB
11GB
10,300MB
12GB
11,300MB
13GB
12,300MB
14GB
13,300MB
15GB
14,300MB
16GB
15,300MB
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The protecting VRA can use 90% of the buffer for IOs to send over the network and the recovery VRA can use 75% of the
buffer. That is, for example, a protecting VRA defined with 2GB of RAM can buffer approximately 1305MB before the
buffer is full and a Bitmap Sync is required.
Note: The number of virtual machines that a VRA can support is not dependent on the amount of VRA RAM.
VRA Group – Choose the VRA Group from the dropdown list. If you want to create a new VRA group, type in the name of
the new group and click CREATE. You can then choose the new group from the dropdown list.
You group VRAs together when VRAs use different networks so they can be grouped by network, for example when the
protected and recovery sites are managed by the same SCVMM and you want to replicate from the branch site to the main
site. Within a group the priority assigned to a VPG dictates the bandwidth used and is applicable within a group and not
between groups. Thus, a VPG with a high priority is allocated bandwidth before VPGs with lower priorities. VPGs that are
on VRAs with different VRA groups, for example, VPG1 on VRA1 in group1 and VPG2 on VRA2 in group2, do not affect
each other, as the priority is relevant only within each group.
4. Specify the following VRA Network Details:
Configuration – Either have the IP address allocated via a static IP address or a DHCP server. If you select the Static
option, which is the recommended option, enter the following:
Address – The IP address for the VRA.
Subnet Mask – The subnet mask for the network. The default value is 255.255.255.0.
Default Gateway – The default gateway for the network.
5.
Click INSTALL.
The VRA installation starts and the status is displayed in the TASKS popup dialog in the status bar and under
MONITORING > TASKS.
The VRA displayed name and DNS name is Z-VRA-hostname. If a virtual machine with this name exists, for example
when a previous VRA was not deleted, the VRA name has a number appended to it.
Upgrading VRAs
When upgrading Zerto Virtual Replication, the VRAs that were installed in the previous version are not upgraded
automatically. Zerto Virtual Replication enables VRAs installed with the previous version of Zerto Virtual Replication to work
with VRAs installed with the current version of Zerto Virtual Replication in any combination of VRAs (all from one version or a
mix of VRA versions) as long as the VRAs are only one update higher or lower than the version of Zerto Virtual Replication
installed on this site. Zerto recommends upgrading the VRAs to be consistent with the latest version and this can be done by
selecting SETUP > VRAs.
After upgrading Zerto Virtual Replication, the VRAs might also require an upgrade. You can see if an upgrade is available in the
VRAs tab.
Note: An alert is also issued that there are VRAs that can be upgraded. Move the mouse over the Outdated value to display
the VRA version as a tooltip.
Considerations when upgrading VRAs:
■
■
VRAs managing protected virtual machines: Either live migrate the protected virtual machines and storage managed by
the VRA to another host with a VRA, or upgrade the VRA without migrating the virtual machines and a Delta Sync will be
performed following the upgrade.
Upgrading a VRA that manages the recovery of virtual machines results in a bitmap sync being performed after the
upgrade. Note that the time to upgrade a VRA is short so the bitmap sync should also be quick.
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To upgrade VRAs:
1.
For a VRA protecting virtual machines, if live migrating the protected virtual machines, remove affinity rules for protected
virtual machines on the host with the VRA to be upgraded and migrate these protected machines from the host to another
host with a VRA.
2.
In the Zerto User Interface, click SETUP > VRAs.
3.
Select the VRAs to upgrade and click MORE > Upgrade.
The Upgrade VRAs dialog is displayed, listing the selected VRAs and whether an upgrade is available.
4. Review the list for the VRAs that you want to upgrade.
5.
Click UPGRADE SELECTED VRAs.
The upgrade progress is displayed in the VRAs tab.
A Delta Sync, for VRAs protecting virtual machines, or a Bitmap Sync, for VRAs managing recovery, is performed following
the upgrade.
Note: The VRA name does not change, even if the naming convention in the latest version is different.
You do not need to upgrade Integration Services on a VRA.
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Editing VRA Settings
If you need to change the host password, VRA Group or network settings for a VRA, for example when the gateway to the VRA
is changed, you can do this by editing the VRA.
To edit the VRA:
1.
In the Zerto User Interface, click SETUP > VRAs, select the VRAs to edit, and click MORE > Edit.
The Edit VRA dialog is displayed.
2.
Edit the host root password if the password for the host has changed. To display the password in plain text, click in the
checkbox next to the field.
3.
Edit the group if required.
VRA Group – You can change the free text to change the group that a VRA belongs. If you create a group and then change
the name when editing the VRA so that there is no VRA in the site that belongs to the originally specified group, the group
is automatically deleted from the system.
To create a new group, enter the new group name over the text New group and click CREATE.
4. Edit the VRA network settings as follows:
Configuration – Either have the IP address allocated via a static IP address or a DHCP server. If the VRA was originally
installed with a static IP, you cannot change this to DHCP. If the VRA was originally installed to use a DHCP server, you can
change this to use a static IP. Zerto always recommends using a static IP.
Address – The static IP address for the VRA to communicate with the Zerto Virtual Manager.
Subnet Mask – The subnet mask for the network. The default value is 255.255.255.0.
Default Gateway – The default mask for the network.
5.
Click SAVE.
The following folder is created as part of the VRA installation and must not be removed:
C:\zerto-temp-<storage_name> – VRA installation files. <storage_name> signifies the target host. When a VRA is installed
using the local storage (c:\), there is only one folder with this name. When a VRA is installed on remote storage, a second
folders with the same name is also created where the VRA is installed
Changing a Recovery VRA
When a VPG is defined, the recovery host to use for each virtual machine in the VPG is specified. If required, you can change
the recovery host for a protected virtual machine.
Note: The storage used by the original VRA and the changed VRA must be accessible by both the original target host and by
the changed target host.
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To change a host VRA:
1.
In the Zerto User Interface, select the VRA to change in the VRAs subtab under the SETUP tab.
2.
Click MORE > Change VM Recovery VRA.
The Change VM Recovery VRA dialog is displayed, listing all the virtual machines that require a change to the recovery host.
3.
Review the list and select the virtual machines to change the target host to another specified target host.
4. Select the target host for these virtual machines in the Select the replacement host drop-down list. You can move
some virtual machines to one replacement target host and by repeating the operation, move other virtual machines to a
different target host.
Validation is performed to make sure the selected target host can be used, for example the storage used by both the VRAs
are accessible from both hosts.
Any implications of the change, such as whether synchronization might be required after the change is also displayed.
5.
Click SAVE.
The VPG target host definitions are changed and the affected target data, including the journals, storage live migrated to
the VRA under the replacement host. During this procedure you cannot edit the affected VPGs nor attempt a failover,
move, failover test or clone operation. At the end of the procedure a Delta Sync might be required to resynchronize the
protected machines with the recovery VRAs.
In order not to affect the recoverability of other VPGs replicating to the VRA, a new virtual machine is created to handle
moving the disks. This virtual machine is named Z-VRAH-hostname, where hostname is the name or IP of the host where
the original VRA is installed.
6.
Repeat this procedure from step 3 for all the virtual machines.
Uninstalling VRAs
VRAs are uninstalled via the Zerto User Interface and not via SCVMM. You cannot uninstall a VRA which is used to protect or
recover virtual machines.
For a VRA protecting virtual machines – Before uninstallng the VRA, remove affinity rules for protected virtual machines on
the host and live migrate these protected virtual machines to another host in the cluster with a VRA installed.
For a VRA recovering virtual machines – Before uninstallng the VRA, change the host for all virtual machines in VPGs
recovering to this VRA to another host as described in “Changing a Recovery VRA”, on page 148. A bitmap sync occurs to
synchronize the VPGs with the new host.
Note: If the VRA has crashed, or was accidentally deleted, it must be forcibly uninstalled, as described in “Handling a VRA in an
Error State (Ghost VRA)”, on page 150.
For a VRA in a cluster, you can remove it and then install a new VRA. However, to ensure that virtual machines in the cluster
are not moved to the host without a VRA from the time the VRA is removed to the time a new VRA is installed, it is
recommended to perform the following procedure.
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To uninstall a VRA with virtual machines being recovered to it:
1.
When the VRA to be removed is in a cluster, make sure that virtual machines in the cluster are not moved to the host
without a VRA from the time the VRA is removed to the time a new VRA is installed.
2.
Remove affinity rules for protected virtual machines on the host and live migrate any protected virtual machines to another
host with a VRA installed.
3.
Change the host for all virtual machines in VPGs recovering to this VRA to another host as described in “Changing a
Recovery VRA”, on page 148.
4. Wait for any synchronization to complete.
5.
Either select the VRAs to uninstall in the VRAs tab or for a single VRA display the VRA details by clicking the VRA Name link
in the VRAs tab, and click Actions > Uninstall.
6.
Once the VRAs are completely removed, install a new VRA on the host.
After the VRA is uninstalled, connectivity from that VRA to any Zerto Cloud Connector is lost. After a VRA is reinstalled on the
host, the ports that were used for the connection to the Zerto Cloud Connector are not reused and new ports must be opened
in the firewall for the cloud site. For details about Zerto Cloud Connectors, refer to Zerto Cloud Manager Administration Guide.
Handling a VRA in an Error State (Ghost VRA)
When an event occurs that causes a VRA to enter an error state, for example the host machine crashes or the VRA or a shadow
VRA is accidentally deleted, if the VRA has shared storage disks that are accessible by other hosts in the site, you can copy
these disks to another VRA in the site.
To recover VRA disks from a ghost VRA:
1.
Remove the VPGs, keeping the recovery disks when removing to use as preseeded disks.
2.
Uninstall the VRA.
3.
Reinstall the VRA, as described in “Installing a VRA”, on page 143.
4. Recreate the VPGs using the preseeded disks.
Managing Protection When Moving a Host to a Different Cluster
When a host machine has to be moved to another cluster:
For a host machine on the protected site – Remove affinity rules for protected virtual machines on the host that is going to be
moved and live migrate these machines to any other host in the cluster with a VRA installed. Shut down the VRA before moving
the host.
For a host machine on the recovery site – Shut down the VRA. After shutting down the VRA VPGs with virtual machines being
recovered to the VRA will enter an error state. Move the host to the new cluster and power on the VRA. The VPGs in an error
state will enter a bitmap sync and then resume a Meeting SLA status.
Note: Any VPGs that were defined with a recovery resource pool in the original cluster must be edited to change the default
and virtual machine specific target host settings for the new cluster, even when the new cluster has a resource pool that is
displayed in the VPG definitions.
Handling a VRA in an Error State (Ghost VRA)
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CHAPTER 10: MANAGING A ZERTO
VIRTUAL MANAGER
The Zerto Virtual Manager runs as a Windows service and connects to Zerto Virtual Replication components, such as VRAs, as
well as hypervisor management tools, such as VMware vCenter Server and Microsoft SCVMM.
A Zerto Virtual Manager can manage up to 5000 virtual machines, either being protected by, or recovered to, the Zerto Virtual
Manager.
The following topics are described in this chapter:
■
■
■
■
■
“Checking Connectivity Between Zerto Virtual Replication Components”, below
“Reconfiguring the Zerto Virtual Manager Setup”, on page 152
“Reconfiguring the Microsoft SQL Server Database Used by the Zerto Virtual Manager”, on page 154
“Replacing the SSL Certificate”, on page 155
“Pairing to Another Site and Unpairing Sites”, on page 155
Checking Connectivity Between Zerto Virtual Replication Components
If you think that there are connectivity problems to or from a Zerto Virtual Manager, you can use the Zerto diagnostics utility to
check the connectivity.
To check connectivity between Zerto Virtual Manager components:
1.
Open the Zerto Diagnostics application. For example, via Start > Programs > Zerto Virtual Replication > Zerto Diagnostics.
The Zerto Virtual Replication Diagnostics menu dialog is displayed.
2.
Select the Test Connectivity to Zerto Virtual Replication components option and click Next.
The IP Connectivity dialog is displayed.
You can use this dialog to check the following:
TCP communication between the Zerto Virtual Managers (ZVMs) on the protected and recovery sites. The default
port, specified during installation, is 9081.
■
Communication between VRAs on the protected and recovery sites, via the control port and the data port.
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3.
Select the connectivity you want to test and in the case of the Zerto Virtual Manager (ZVM), specify the TCP
communication port specified during the installation, if the default port, 9081, was changed.
4. Specify the type of test to perform:
Server – Test for incoming communication.
Client – Test for outgoing communication. Specify the IP address of the receiving Zerto Virtual Manager.
5.
Click Next to test the specified connectivity.
The Server option listens for communication from a paired VRA. Stop listening by clicking Stop.
The Client options tests the client; on completion a result dialog is displayed.
6.
Click Stop (server test) or OK (client test) to return to the Zerto Virtual Replication Diagnostics dialog.
1.
Reconfiguring the Zerto Virtual Manager Setup
When installing Zerto Virtual Replication, you provide the IP address of SCVMM to connect the Zerto Virtual Manager with,
and the IP address of the machine where the Zerto Virtual Manager runs to enable running the Zerto User Interface.
You can change these IP addresses if necessary, using the Zerto Virtual Replication Diagnostics utility.
To reconfigure the Zerto Virtual Manager:
1.
Click Start > Programs > Zerto Virtual Replication > Zerto Diagnostics.
The Zerto Virtual Replication Diagnostics menu dialog is displayed.
2.
Select the Reconfigure Zerto Virtual Manager option and click Next.
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The installation settings for the connection to the SCVMM are displayed.
3.
Change the IP and username and password if necessary.
IP / Host Name – The IP address or host name of the machine where SCVMM runs.
Domain\User Name – The user name for an administrator to SCVMM. The name can be entered using either of the
following formats:
username
domain\username
Password – A valid password for the given user name.
4. Click Next.
The dialog for Zerto Virtual Manager setup is displayed:
ZVM VM IP to be used by SCVMM – The IP to access the Zerto Virtual Manager from the Zerto User Interface. If the
machine has more than one NIC, select the appropriate IP from the list, otherwise the IP that is displayed is the only option.
HTTP Port (ZVMApi) – The port used for inbound communication between the Zerto Virtual Manager and Zerto RESTful
APIS, PowerShell Cmdlets and a VSS Agent.
TCP Port (ZVM<->ZVMs on other sites) – The port used for communication between Zerto Virtual Managers.
Both the protected and recovery sites belong to the same enterprise – If you change the value, when pairing sites, use
the TCP port value you specify here.
An enterprise using a cloud service provider to supply disaster recovery services – You must not change this value.
TCP Port (ZVM->VBA) – The port used for communication between the Zerto Virtual Manager and the Virtual Backup
Appliance.
HTTP Certificate – Check Replace SSL Certificate and browse for a certificate, if you change the certificate you have
been using.
5.
Click Next.
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The connectivity is checked.
Note: If one of the tasks fails, click the link for information about why it failed. Usually it is a mistake when entering an IP
address.
6.
Click Next.
The Zerto Virtual Manager is reconfigured.
7.
Click Finish.
If you changed the IP address of the Zerto Virtual Manager or the TCP port it uses to communicate with paired Zerto Virtual
Managers on other sites, you must unpair these sites, both from this site and from the remote sites and then pair the sites
again.
Reconfiguring the Microsoft SQL Server Database Used by the Zerto Virtual Manager
1.
Click Start > Programs > Zerto Virtual Replication > Zerto Diagnostics.
The Zerto Virtual Replication Diagnostics menu dialog is displayed.
2.
Select the Change SQL Server Credentials option and click Next.
The installation settings for the SQL Server are displayed. Change the IP and username and password if necessary.
Reconfiguring the Microsoft SQL Server Database Used by the Zerto Virtual Manager
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Server Name – The domain name and server instance to connect to, with the format <server_name>\<instance_name>
or <Server_IP>\<instance_name>.
Specify either of the following authentication options:
Windows Authentication – Use Windows authentication. This option is only enabled if a specific service user account was
specified in the previous Service User dialog, in which case the service account name and password are used.
SQL Server Authentication – Use SQL Server authentication.
User Name – The user name for SQL Server database.
Password – A valid password for the given user name.
3.
Click Next to the end of the wizard and then click Finish.
4. The Zerto Virtual Manager service is restarted using the new credentials.
Replacing the SSL Certificate
The communication between the Zerto Virtual Manager and the user interface uses HTTPS. On the first login to the Zerto User
Interface you must install a security certificate in order to be able to continue working without each login requiring acceptance
of the security.
If you want to replace the SSL certificate, perform the procedure described in “To reconfigure the Zerto Virtual Manager:”, on
page 152 and select a new SSL certificate when the dialog for Zerto Virtual Manager setup is displayed:
HTTP Certificate – Check Replace SSL Certificate and browse for a replacement certificate.
Pairing to Another Site and Unpairing Sites
See the following sections:
■
■
“Pair to Another Site”, below
“Unpairing Sites”, on page 156
Pair to Another Site
You can pair to any site where Zerto Virtual Replication is installed.
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To pair to a site:
1.
In the Zerto User Interface, in the SITES tab click PAIR.
The Add Site dialog is displayed.
2.
Specify the following:
Remote Site ZVM IP Address – IP address or host name of the remote site Zerto Virtual Manager to pair to.
Port – The TCP port communication between the sites. Enter the port that was specified during the installation. The default
port during the installation was 9081.
3.
Click PAIR.
The sites are paired, meaning that the Zerto Virtual Manager for the local hypervisor site is connected to the Zerto Virtual
Manager at the remote hypervisor site.
Unpairing Sites
You can unpair any two sites that are paired to each other.
IMPORTANT: if there is a VPG on either of the sites you are unpairing, the VPGs will be deleted.
To unpair two sites:
1.
In the Zerto User Interface, in the SITES tab, select the site which you want to unpair
2.
Click UNPAIR.
A message appears warning the user that the sites are about to unpair.
If there are either protected or recovered VPGs on the paired sites, a message appears warning the user that the VPGs will
be deleted.
3.
To unpair, click CONTINUE.
The sites are no longer paired. If there are VPGs on either site, they are deleted.
Pairing to Another Site and Unpairing Sites
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CHAPTER 11: ADVANCED SITE
CONFIGURATION
There are a number of configuration tasks that you can perform, some of which should be done as part of the initial site
configuration.
The following topics are described in this chapter:
■
■
■
■
■
“Site Settings”, below
“Editing Information About a Site”, on page 158
“Seeing What is Licensed”, on page 163
“Submitting a Support Ticket”, on page 164
“About Zerto Virtual Replication”, on page 165.
Site Settings
The Site Settings dialog enables configuring various site settings. These include the maximum bandwidth that Zerto Virtual
Replication uses between the protected and recovery sites, default script timeout, and protection policies such as the commit
policy for a failover or move operation.
To specify site settings:
1.
In the Zerto User Interface, in the top right of the header click SETTING (
) and select Site Settings.
The Site Settings dialog is displayed.
2.
Make any required changes to the settings, click SAVE and then APPLY. The following settings can be defined:
“Editing Information About a Site”, below
■
“Defining Performance and Throttling”, on page 158
■
“Defining Site Policies”, on page 160
■
“Configuring Email Settings”, on page 161
■
“Defining Resource Report Sampling Period”, on page 162
■
“Reviewing Supported Host Versions”, on page 163
■
Licensing is described in “Seeing What is Licensed”, on page 163.
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Editing Information About a Site
You provide information about the site during installation, to make it easier to identify the site in the in the user interface and to
identify the contact person at the site. After installation you can updated these settings.
In the Zerto User Interface, site information is displayed at the top of the display.
To update information about the local site:
1.
In the Zerto User Interface, click SETTING (
) in the top right of the header and select Site Settings.
The Site Settings dialog is displayed.
2.
Define general information about the site.
Site Name – The name used to identify the site. Mandatory.
Site Location – Information such as the address of the site or a significant name to identify it. Mandatory.
Contact Name – The name of the person to contact if a need arises. Mandatory.
Contact Email – An email address to use if a need arises.
Contact Phone – A phone number to use if a need arises.
3.
If the credentials to access SCVMM from the Zerto Virtual Manager change, specify the new credentials:
User Name – The administrator name used to access SCVMM. The name can be entered using either of the following
formats:
■
■
username
domain\username
Password – The password used to access SCVMM for the given user name. To ensure security, after saving the settings,
the password field is cleared.
4. Click APPLY or SAVE.
Defining Performance and Throttling
Performance and throttling settings include bandwidth settings and the maximum time a script can run before timing out.
You can specify bandwidth throttling, which is the maximum bandwidth that Zerto Virtual Replication uses from this site to
recovery sites. The default value is for Zerto Virtual Replication to automatically assign the bandwidth used per VPG, based on
using the maximum available and then prioritizing the usage according to priority set for the VPGs sending data over the WAN.
Note: The minimum supported bandwidth is 5 Mb/sec.
For details about estimating the bandwidth, see “WAN Sizing”, on page 21.
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Time-based Bandwidth Throttling – If you know that the bandwidth needs specific throttling during a certain period, for
example, during the daily peak transaction period you can override the general throttling of the bandwidth for these specific
times.
To configure bandwidth:
1.
Click Performance and Throttling.
2.
Specify the bandwidth throttling you want. You can use the slider to set the Mb/sec. If you are going to protect virtual
machines on this site as well as recover virtual machines to this site, for example via failback, you must also set the
bandwidth on the peer site out to this site.
A value of 0 Mb/sec means that the bandwidth used is determined automatically by Zerto Virtual Replication.
3.
To specify time-based throttling, check the Time-based Throttling checkbox.
4. Specify the maximum bandwidth for the period.
If the Unlimited checkbox is checked, the bandwidth is always unlimited.
A value of 0 Mb/sec means that the bandwidth used is determined automatically by Zerto Virtual Replication.
You can use the slider to set the Mb/sec.
a) In the From fields, select the start time for throttling.
b) In the To fields, select the end time for throttling.
5.
Click APPLY or SAVE.
IO Throttling values should be changed only in coordination with Zerto support.
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Defining Site Policies
You can set default recovery and replication policies.
Configuring Disaster Recovery Policies
To configure disaster recovery policies:
1.
Click Policies.
2.
Choose the Failover/Move Commit Policy to use during a failover or move operation, described in “Initiating a
Failover”, on page 193 and “Moving Protected Virtual Machines to a Remote Site”, on page 184 respectively. The following
options are available:
None – The failover or move operation must be manually committed or rolled back by the user.
Commit – After the time specified in the Default Timeout field the failover or move operation is committed, unless
manually committed or rolled back by the user before the time-out value is reached. During the specified time you can
check the recovered VPG virtual machines.
Rollback – After the time specified in the Default Timeout field the failover or move operation is rolled back, unless
manually committed or rolled back by the user before the time-out value is reached. During the specified time you can
check the recovered VPG virtual machines.
The value set here applies as the default for all failover or move operations from this point on but can be changed when
defining a failover or move operation.
3.
Specify the Default Timeout after which a Commit or Rollback commit policy is performed. A value of zero indicates
that the system will automatically perform the commit policy, without waiting for any user interaction.
4. Specify the timeout in seconds for a script to run before or after a failover, move, or test failover in the Default Script
Execution Timeout field.
For information about scripts, see “Running Scripts Before or After Recovering a VPG”, on page 133.
5.
If the same site is to be used as both the protected and recovery site, select Enable Replication to Self.
For more details, see “Enabling Replication to the Same Site”, on page 20.
6.
Choose the Replication Pause Time, which is the time to pause when the journal might have problems, resulting in the
loss of all checkpoints, for example, when the datastore for the journal is near to being full.
The replication pause time is the amount of time that the transfer of data from the protected site to the journal on the
recovery site is paused. This time can then be used by the administrator to resolve the issue, for example by cloning the
virtual machines in the VPG, described in “Cloning Protected Virtual Machines to the Remote Site”, on page 201. The value
set here is applied to existing and new VPGs.
Note: The setting is applied to the site only. If you want the ability to pause the protection in both directions, for example to
cover reverse protection back to the original site after a move operation, set the replication Pause Time on both sites.
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7.
Click APPLY or SAVE.
Configuring Email Settings
You can configure Zerto Virtual Replication alerts to be sent to an email address, so as to be better informed when an alert
occurs and backups are run.
Email Settings
To configure email settings:
1.
Click Email Settings.
2.
Specify the SMTP server Address. The Zerto Virtual Manager must be able to reach this address.
3.
If the SMTP Server Port was changed from the default, 25, specify the port number.
4. Specify a valid email address for the email sender name in the Sender Account field.
5.
Specify a valid email address where you want to send the email in the To field.
You can test that the email notification is set up correctly by clicking SEND TEST EMAIL. A test email is sent to the email
address specified in the To field.
6.
Click APPLY or SAVE.
Alerts and Reports
You can configure when to send alerts and backup reports.
To configure when to send emails about alerts and backups:
1.
To send an email when an alert is issued, check Enable sending alerts.
2.
To send an email with a backup report, check Enable backup reports.
3.
Specify whether you want a backup report sent daily or weekly.
Daily – Send a daily backup report
Weekly – Send a weekly backup report. Select the day of the week from the dropdown list.
4. Specify day of the week and the time of day to send the backup report.
5.
Click APPLY or SAVE.
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Defining Resource Report Sampling Period
Specify when you want to take resource samples to identify resource usage, either daily at a specific hour and minute or hourly
at a specific minute within each hour.
1.
Click Reports.
2.
Choose the Sampling Rate.
3.
Choose the Sampling Time.
If you set the daily time to be 12:00, you will get a sample taken at noon every day. Collecting a sample hourly provides a
higher resolution picture of replication traffic than if collected daily.
4. Click APPLY or SAVE.
Information is saved for 90 days when the sampling period is hourly and for one year when the sampling period is daily.
These samples are used to generate resource reports as described in “Zerto Virtual Replication Reports”, on page 217.
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Reviewing Supported Host Versions
Zerto Virtual Replication works with Microsoft hypervisor hosts. For a list of supported hosts, click Compatibility.
Seeing What is Licensed
The Zerto license includes information such as the number of virtual machines that can be protected and the license expiry
date. You can see these details in the Site Settings > License dialog.
The Zerto license includes the following details:
License – The license key itself.
License ID – An identifier for the license.
License Type – What is licensed: whether the license restricts the number of virtual machines that can be protected or the
number of sockets used.
Expiry Date – The license expiry date.
Quantity – The maximum amount licensed, either virtual machines or sockets, based on the license type. If blank, the quantity
is unlimited.
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Maximum Sites – The maximum number of sites allowed.
Usage – The sites using the license and the number of protected virtual machines in each site.
A warning is generated when either the license expires or more than the licensed number of virtual machines are being
protected. Protection continues but the license should be updated. After getting a new license key you can update Zerto Virtual
Replication with this key.
To update a license key:
1.
In the Zerto User Interface, in the top right of the header click SETTING (
) and select Site Settings.
The Site Settings dialog is displayed.
2.
Click License.
3.
Enter a valid license key and click APPLY or SAVE.
The license is updated on the local site and the paired remote sites.
1.
Submitting a Support Ticket
You can open a ticket to Zerto support directly from Zerto Virtual Replication.
Note: The clocks on the machines where Zerto Virtual Replication is installed must be synchronized with UTC and with each
other (the timezones can be different). Zerto recommends synchronizing the clocks using NTP. If the clocks are not
synchronized with UTC, submitting a support ticket can fail.
To open a support ticket:
1.
In the Zerto User Interface, click SETTING (
) in the top right of the header and select Submit Support Ticket.
The Open Support Ticket dialog for the site is displayed.
2.
Specify the ticket details:
Subject – The subject of the support ticket.
Type – The type of ticket being opened.
Description – A description of the ticket in addition to the information supplied in the subject.
SSP Email Address – A valid email address registered with Zerto, with permission to open tickets.
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3.
Click SUBMIT.
The ticket is processed and its progress is displayed. If the email address is not valid, the ticket is rejected. Once the ticket
submission starts, it cannot be canceled.
About Zerto Virtual Replication
You can see details about the version of Zerto Virtual Replication being run and specify whether the version can be
automatically updated when new VMware vSphere versions are released, without the need to upgrade to a later version of
Zerto Virtual Replication. This functionality is the Zerto CALLHOME feature. You can also enable or disable the Zerto Virtual
Manager to send data to the SaaS platform for monitoring purposes.
Enable Support notification and analytics – When selected, the CALLHOME feature is enabled, whereby analytics that are
sent to Zerto that are used to improve Zerto Virtual Replication. The CALLHOME also enables to automatically update Zerto
Virtual Replication when a new version of a hypervisor is released that is supported by Zerto.
Enable Online Services and Zerto Mobile – Allows licensed Zerto Virtual Manager users to enable or disable data being sent
from the Zerto Virtual Manager to the SaaS platform thereby enabling site monitoring using the Zerto Mobile App.
To see version information, prepare to send analytics to Zerto, or send data to the Cloud:
1.
In the Zerto User Interface, in the top right of the header click SETTING (
) and select Site Settings.
The Site Settings dialog is displayed.
2.
Click About.
The version and build of Zerto Virtual Replication that are installed in the site are displayed.
3.
If you want to send analytics to Zerto automatically, check Enable Support notification and analytics. This initiates the
CALLHOME feature. This information is used solely to improve Zerto Virtual Replication and to automatically update
Zerto Virtual Replication when a new version of a hypervisor is released that is supported by Zerto.
4. If you want Zerto Virtual Replication to send information to our Online Services and Zerto Mobile App, check Enable
Online Services and Zerto Mobile. This allows licensed Zerto Virtual Manager users to enable or disable data being sent
from the Zerto Virtual Manager to the SaaS platform, thereby enabling site monitoring using the Zerto Mobile App.
Note: The Enable Online Services and Zerto Mobile option is enabled by default.
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If the Enable Online Services and Zerto Mobile option is enabled and the user un-checks the checkbox, the
following warning is displayed.
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CHAPTER 12: OVERVIEW OF
DISASTER RECOVERY OPERATIONS
Zerto Virtual Replication provides a number of operations to recover virtual machines at the remote site. This chapter
describes these operations. The following topics are described in this chapter:
■
■
■
■
■
“The Failover Test Operation”, on page 167
“The Move Operation”, below
“The Failover Operation”, on page 168
“The Restore File Operation”, on page 169
“The Clone Operation”, on page 169
In addition, when extended recovery is defined, an offsite backup can be restored as described in “Restoring an Offsite Backup”,
on page 211.
The Failover Test Operation
Use the Failover Test operation to test that during recovery the virtual machines are correctly replicated at the recovery site.
The Failover Test operation creates test virtual machines in a sandbox, using the test network specified in the VPG definition as
opposed to a production network, to a specified point-in-time, using the virtual disks managed by the VRA. All testing is written
to scratch volumes. The longer the test period the more scratch volumes are used, until the maximum size is reached, at which
point no more testing can be done. The maximum size of all the scratch volumes is determined by the journal size hard limit
and cannot be changed. The scratch volumes reside on the storage defined for the journal. Using scratch volumes makes
cleaning up the test failover more efficient. For details, see “Testing Recovery”, on page 171.
During the test, any changes to the protected virtual machines at the protected site are sent to the recovery site and new
checkpoints continue to be generated, since replication of the protected machines continues throughout the test. You can also
add your own checkpoints during the test period.
The following diagram shows the positioning of the virtual machines before and during a Failover test operation.
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The Move Operation
Use the Move operation to transfer protected virtual machines from the protected site to the recovery site in a planned
migration.
When you perform a planned migration of the virtual machines to the recovery site, Zerto Virtual Replication assumes that
both sites are healthy and that you planned to relocate the virtual machines in an orderly fashion. For details, see “Migrating a
VPG to the Recovery Site”, on page 182.
The following diagram shows the positioning of the virtual machines before and after the completion of a Move operation.
Note: The Move operation without reverse protection does not remove the VPG definition but leaves it in a Needs Configuration
state.
The Failover Operation
Following a disaster, use the Failover operation to recover protected virtual machines to the recovery site. A failover assumes
that connectivity between the sites might be down, and thus the protected virtual machines and disks are not removed, as they
are in a planned Move operation.
When you set up a failover you always specify a checkpoint to which you want to recover the virtual machines. When you
select a checkpoint – either the last automatically generated checkpoint, an earlier checkpoint, or a tagged checkpoint – Zerto
Virtual Replication makes sure that virtual machines at the remote site are recovered to this specified point-in-time. For details,
see “Managing Failover”, on page 192.
Note: To identify the checkpoint to use, you can perform a number of test failovers, each to a different checkpoint.
Failback after the Original Site is Operational
After completing a failover, when the original site is back up and running you can move the recovered virtual machines back
again using the Move operation. The VPG that is now protecting the virtual machines on the recovery site has to be configured
and then a Delta Sync is performed with the disks in the original protected site. Once the VPG is in a protecting state the virtual
machines can be moved back to the original site. For details, see “Migrating a VPG to the Recovery Site”, on page 182.
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The following diagram shows the positioning of the virtual machines before and after the completion of a Failover operation.
Note: The Failover operation without reverse protection does not remove the VPG definition but leaves it in a Needs
Configuration state.
The Restore File Operation
Use the Restore File operation to recover individual files and folders from the recovery site.
You can recover specific files and folders from the recovery site for virtual machines that are being protected by Zerto Virtual
Replication and running Windows operating systems. You can recover the files and folders from a specific point-in-time. For
details, see “Recovering Files and Folders”, on page 204.
The Clone Operation
Use the Clone operation to create a copy of the VPG virtual machines on the recovery site in the production network. The virtual
machines on the protected site remain protected and live.
Note: When the recovery site is VMware vCloud Director, the clone is created in vCenter Server and the virtual machines have
to be manually imported into vCD.
You might want to create a clone if you need to have a copy of the virtual machines saved to a specific point-in-time, for
example, when the VPG enters a Replication Paused state, or when testing the VPG in a live DR test. For details, see “Cloning a
VPG to the Recovery Site”, on page 201.
The cloned machines are named the after the protected virtual machine name along with the timestamp of the checkpoint used
for the clone. The cloned virtual machines are not powered on.
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The following diagram shows the positioning of the virtual machines before and after the completion of a Clone operation.
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CHAPTER 13: TESTING RECOVERY
In order to verify that the disaster recovery that you have planned is the one that will be implemented, Zerto recommends
testing the recovery of the VPGs defined in the protected site to the recovery site. This chapter describes how to test VPG
recovery.
The following topics are described in this chapter:
■
■
■
■
“The Test Failover Process”, below
“Starting and Stopping Failover Tests”, on page 172
“Viewing Test Results”, on page 176
“Live Disaster Recovery Testing”, on page 177
Note: You cannot perform a failover test while a backup job is running.
The Test Failover Process
Use the Failover Test operation to test that during recovery the virtual machines are correctly replicated at the recovery site.
The Failover Test operation creates test virtual machines in a sandbox, using the test network specified in the VPG definition,
as opposed to creating virtual machines in a production network, to a specified point-in-time, using the virtual disks managed
by the VRA. All testing is written to scratch volumes. The longer the test period the more scratch volumes are used, until the
maximum size is reached, at which point no more testing can be done. The maximum size of all the scratch volumes is
determined by the journal size hard limit and cannot be changed. The scratch volumes reside on the storage defined for the
journal.
During the test, any changes to the protected virtual machines at the protected site are sent to the recovery site and new
checkpoints continue to be generated, since replication of the protected machines continues throughout the test. You can also
add your own checkpoints during the test period. You can initiate a failover during a test, as described in “Initiating a Failover
During a Test”, on page 200.
The Failover Test operation has the following basic steps:
1.
Starting the test.
a) The test virtual machines are created at the remote site using the network specified for testing in the VPG settings and
configured to the checkpoint specified for the recovery.
The test virtual machines are created without CD-ROM drives, even if the protected virtual machines have CD-ROM
drives.
b) The virtual machines are powered on, making them available to the user. If applicable, the boot order defined in the
VPG settings is used to power on the machines.
2.
Testing. The virtual machines in the VPG are created as test machines in a sandbox and powered on for testing using the
test network specified in the VPG definition and using the virtual disks managed by the VRA. All testing is written to
scratch volumes. The longer the test period the more scratch volumes are used, until the maximum size is reached, at
which point no more testing can be done. The maximum size of all the scratch volumes is determined by the journal size
hard limit and cannot be changed. The scratch volumes reside on the storage defined for the journal. Using scratch
volumes makes cleaning up the test failover more efficient.
Note: You must not delete, clone, migrate to another host or change the disk properties of any of the test virtual machines.
3.
Stopping the test.
a) The test virtual machines are powered off and removed from the inventory.
b) The following tag is added to the checkpoint specified for the test: Tested at startDateAndTimeOfTest
The tagged checkpoint can be used to identify the point-in-time to restore the virtual machines in the VPG during a
failover.
Testing that recovery is accomplished successfully should be done periodically so that you can verify that a failover will work.
Zerto also recommends testing all the VPGs being recovered to the same cluster together. For example, in a cluster, if the HA
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configuration in a cluster includes admission control to prevent virtual machines being started if they violate availability
constraints, testing the failover of every VPG configured for recovery to this cluster, at the same time, will show whether the
constraints are violated or not.
When configuring a VPG, specify the period between tests for that VPG in the Test Reminder field in the REPLICATION step
of the Create VPG wizard.
Starting and Stopping Failover Tests
You can test a single VPG or multiple VPGs to make sure that if an actual failover is needed, the failover will perform as
expected.
By default, test virtual machines are started with the same IPs as the protected machines in the protected site. This can create
clashes so Zerto recommends ensuring that different IPs are assigned to the virtual machines when they start, by configuring
virtual machine NIC properties in the VPG. For details, refer to “To create a virtual protection group (VPG):”, on page 35. If you
have defined the new virtual machines so that they are assigned different IPs, Zerto Virtual Replication changes the machine
IPs.
Note: You can initiate the failover test from either the protected site or recovery site.
To test failover:
1.
In the Zerto User Interface set the operation to TEST and click FAILOVER.
The Failover Test wizard is displayed.
2.
Select the VPGs to test. By default, all VPGs are listed.
At the bottom, the selection details show the amount of data and the total number of virtual machines selected.
The Direction arrow shows the direction of the process: from the protected site to the peer, recovery, site.
3.
Click NEXT.
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The EXECUTION PARAMETERS step is displayed.
You can select the checkpoint to use for the recovery and see if a boot order and scripts are defined for the VPG.
4. By default, the last checkpoint added to the journal is displayed. If you want to use this checkpoint, go to the next step. If
you want to change the checkpoint, click the checkpoint.
The {VPG-Name}: Checkpoints dialog is displayed.
5.
Select the checkpoint to use. Click the refresh button to refresh the list. You can choose from one of the following
checkpoints:
Latest – Recovery is to the latest checkpoint. This ensures that the data is crash-consistent for the recovery. When
selecting the latest checkpoint, the checkpoint used is the latest at this point. If a checkpoint is added between this point
and starting the failover, this later checkpoint is not used.
Latest Tagged Checkpoint – The recovery operation is to the latest checkpoint added in one of the following situations:
By a user.
■
When a failover test was previously performed on the VPG that includes the virtual machine.
■
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■
When the virtual machine was added to an existing VPG after the added virtual machine was synchronized.
Latest VSS – When VSS is used, testing is to the latest VSS snapshot, ensuring that the data is both crash-consistent and
application consistent to this point. The frequency of VSS snapshots determines how much data can be recovered. For
details about VSS checkpoints, see “Ensuring Transaction Consistency in Microsoft Windows Server Environments”, on
page 126.
If you do not want to use the latest checkpoint, latest tagged checkpoint, or latest VSS checkpoint, choose Select from
all available checkpoints. By default, this option displays all checkpoints in the system. You can choose to display
only automatic, VSS, or tagged checkpoints, or any combination of these types.
6.
Click OK.
7.
Click NEXT.
The FAILOVER TEST step is displayed. The topology shows the number of VPGs and virtual machines being tested to
failover to each recovery site. In the following example, 2 VPGs will be failed over to Site6-Ent2-R2, and they contain 5
virtual machines; and 1 VPG will be failed over to Site5-Ent2-P2-R2 and it contains 2 virtual machines.
8.
To start the test, click START FAILOVER TEST.
The test starts for the selected VPGs. The test begins with an initialization period during which the virtual machines are created
in the recovery site.
After Starting a Test, What Happens?
The virtual machines in the virtual protection group are created at the recovery site with the suffix testing recovery.
Note: The following conversions are done to a protected virtual machine when it is recovered in vCenter Server:
■ Virtual machines are recovered in vCenter Server with the highest hardware version supported by the vCenter Server host
version under which the virtual machine is recovered.
■ A Generation 1 virtual machine is recovered in vCenter Server with BIOS with the highest supported hardware version.
■ A Generation 2 virtual machine is recovered in vCenter Server with EUFI. The host in vCenter must support hardware
version 8 or higher.
■ Recovered virtual machines use the VMware Virtual E1000 network adapter.
All testing is written to scratch volumes. The longer the test period the more scratch volumes are used, until the maximum size
is reached, at which point no more testing can be done. The maximum size of all the scratch volumes is determined by the
journal size hard limit and cannot be changed. The scratch volumes reside on the storage defined for the journal. Using these
test scratch volumes makes cleaning up the test failover more efficient.
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While a test is running:
■
■
■
■
■
The virtual machines in the VPGs continue to be protected throughout the test.
You can add checkpoints to the VPGs, and if necessary fail over the VPGs, as described in “Initiating a Failover During a
Test”, on page 200.
You cannot take a snapshot of a test machine, since the virtual machine volumes are still managed by the VRA and not by
the virtual machine. Using a snapshot of a test machine will create a corrupted virtual machine.
You cannot delete, clone, migrate to another host or change the disk properties of any of the test virtual machines.
You cannot initiate a failover while a test is being initialized or closed.
Monitor the status of a failover test by doing the following:
■
In the Zerto User Interface, click the VPGs tab. The Operation field in the GENERAL view displays Testing Failover
when a failover test is being performed.
■
In the Zerto User Interface, click the VPGs tab, and then click the name of a VPG you are testing. A dynamic tab is created
displaying the specific VPG details including the status of the failover test.
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ITo stop a failover test:
1.
Click the Stop icon, in either the Dashboard or the dynamic tab, to stop the test in the specific VPG tab.
You can also stop the test via the TASKS popup dialog in the status bar, or by selecting MONITORING > TASKS.
The Stop Test dialog is displayed.
2.
In the Result field specify whether the test succeeded or failed.
3.
Optionally, in the Notes field, add a description of the test. For example, specify where external files that describe the tests
performed are saved. Notes are limited to 255 characters.
4. Click STOP.
After stopping a test, the following occurs:
■
■
■
Virtual machines in the recovery site are powered off and removed.
The resource group created for the operation is deleted.
The checkpoint that was used for the test has the following tag added to identify the test:
Tested at startDateAndTimeOfTest.
This checkpoint can be used to identify the point-in-time to use to restore the virtual machines in the VPG during a failover.
\
Viewing Test Results
After stopping a test, you can see the test results as part of Zerto Virtual Replication reports. Refer to “Recovery Reports”, on
page 219.
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Live Disaster Recovery Testing
This section describes how to use the basic Zerto Virtual Replication recovery operations to perform live disaster recovery
tests, in different situations.
When performing a live DR test you need to consider the following:
■
■
■
■
■
The purpose of the live DR test:
■
Do you only want to verify that the VMs can recover properly?
- Or ■
Do you want to conduct a full DR test that will include running user traffic against the recovered VMs?
The length of time you want to test the recovery, a few hours or several days.
Whether the changes to the recovered machine need to be retained after the test or can they be discarded?
Whether you are willing to accept temporary downtime of the application.
Whether you want to simulate an actual disaster at the protected site, for example by simulating a network outage or
bringing down the protected site.
The following flowchart shows the testing decision flow:
During any live test, Zerto recommends that you only maintain one working version of the same virtual machine.
As such, the first step in any test, except for a Failover Test or Clone, is to make sure that the protected virtual machines are
shut down before starting to test recovered machines.
During a Zerto Virtual Replication Move operation the first step Zerto Virtual Replication performs is to shut down the
protected machines, to ensure data integrity.
However, a Zerto Virtual Replication Failover operation assumes that the protected virtual machines are no longer accessible
(the total site disaster scenario) and does not attempt to shut them down at the beginning of the operation.
In a live test using a Failover operation you have to manually shut down the virtual machines to be tested at the beginning of
the test in order to prevent potential split-brain situations where two instances of the same applications are live at the same
time.
If you want to perform a live DR test that includes a simulated disaster you can simulate the disaster, for example, by
disconnecting the network between the two sites. In this type of test, once the disaster is simulated a Move operation cannot
be used, since it requires both sites to be healthy, while a Failover operation can be used.
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Basic Verification – User Traffic Is Not Run against the Recovered VMs
Basic testing that the virtual machines can recover is done using either a Failover Test operation or an uncommitted Move
operation, using the Rollback setting.
Using a Failover Test Operation
You use a Failover Test operation if recovering the virtual machines in a sandbox, using the test network specified in the VPG
definition for network isolation, is sufficient for a test. The Failover Test operation is described in “The Failover Test Operation”,
on page 167 and in “Starting and Stopping Failover Tests”, on page 172.
Using a Failover Test Operation: Recommended Procedure for a Live DR Test
1.
Change the VPG Failover Test Network to the production network used at the recovery site.
2.
Manually shut down the virtual machines in the VPG.
3.
Insert a new checkpoint. This avoids potential data loss since the virtual machines are shut down and the new checkpoint
is added after all I/Os have been written to disk.
4. Optionally simulate a disaster, for example by disconnecting the two sites.
5.
Perform a test failover on the VPG, choosing the checkpoint you added in step 3.
6.
Verify that the test machines are recovered as expected.
7.
Run user traffic against the virtual machines.
8.
Stop the failover test.
9.
Reconnect the sites.
Using a Failover Test Operation: Failover Test Considerations
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You do not have to shut down the protected virtual machines, and changes from the test phase are not kept or applied to
the protected applications.
You can recover to a specific point-in-time.
You can use an isolated network to enable testing in a sandbox environment and not a live DR environment. This is the
recommended practice.
During the testing period, every change is recorded in a scratch volume.
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Therefore, since both the scratch volume and virtual machines tested are on the same site, performance can be
impacted by the increased IOs during the failover test.
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In addition, the longer the test period the more scratch volumes are used, until the maximum size is reached, at
which point no more testing can be done.
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The maximum size of all the scratch volumes is determined by the journal size hard limit and cannot be changed.
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The scratch volumes reside on the storage defined for the journal.
At the end of the test, if you powered off the virtual machines in the protected site, you can power them back on and
continue to work without the need to save or replicate back any data changed during the test.
You can also use a Failover Test operation if you want to simulate an actual disaster for around an hour or less and do not
want to save any changes on the recovery site.
Using an Uncommitted Move Operation
Use a Move operation with the commit/rollback policy set to rollback after the test period, if you need to test the recovery of
virtual machines in the recovery site production environment. The Move operation is described in “The Move Operation”, on
page 168 and in “Migrating a VPG to the Recovery Site”, on page 182
Note: Committing the Move operation requires failing the migrated virtual machines back to the production site after a Delta
Sync has been performed on the committed machines in the recovery site.
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Procedure
The Move operation is described in detail in “The Move Process”, on page 182. The following procedure highlights specific
steps to enable using the Move functionality for a DR test.
1.
In the Move wizard, in the EXECUTION PARAMETERS tab, for commit policy, select None.
2.
Either power off the relevant virtual machines or check the Force Shutdown checkbox, in the EXECUTION PARAMETERS
tab, to make sure that the virtual machines are shut down, if they cannot be powered off using Microsoft Integration
Services.
3.
After testing the machines in the recovery site you can roll back the Move operation, which will return the virtual machines
to their pre-test state.
Using an Uncommitted Move Operation: Move Considerations
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Changes from the pre-commit phase are not kept or applied to the protected applications.
The virtual machines are allocated disks and connected to the network for a full test of the environment.
The protected machines are turned off until the end of the test, ensuring that there are no conflicts between the protected
site and recovery site.
During the testing period, every change is recorded in a scratch volume to enable rolling back.
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Therefore, since both the scratch volume and virtual machines being moved are on the same site, performance can be
impacted by the increased IOs during the testing period.
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In addition, the longer the test period the more scratch volumes are used, until the maximum size is reached, at
which point no more testing can be done.
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The maximum size of all the scratch volumes is determined by the journal size hard limit and cannot be changed.
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The scratch volumes reside on the storage defined for the journal.
You can only recover to the last checkpoint written to the journal, at the start of the Move operation.
Run User Traffic Against the Recovered VMs
Testing actual user traffic against recovered virtual machines can be done using a Clone, Move, or Failover operation, as
follows:
Move operation – When you can shut down the protected virtual machines but you do not want or need to simulate an actual
disaster.
Failover operation – When you want to simulate an actual disaster.
Clone operation – When the protected application has to run throughout the test.
Using a Move Operation
Use a Move operation when you can shut down the protected virtual machines but you do not want to simulate an actual
disaster. After the virtual machines have been recovered in the target site, they are used as the protected machines for as long
as the test lasts. The Move operation is described in “The Move Operation”, on page 168 and in “Moving Protected Virtual
Machines to a Remote Site”, on page 184.
Using a Move Operation - Recommended Procedure for a Live DR Test
1.
To enable using the Move functionality for a DR test, in the Move wizard, in the EXECUTION PARAMETERS tab, for
commit policy, select None.
2.
Move the VPG back to the original protected site. A Delta Sync is performed to copy the new transactions performed on the
virtual machines in the recovery site back to the original protected site.
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Using a Move Operation - Move Considerations
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You can test the moved machines before they are committed.
You can test for as long as you want.
The virtual machines are allocated disks and connected to the network for a full test of the environment.
The originally protected disks are maintained for a faster failback when reverse replication is specified.
The protected machines are turned off until the move is committed and then they are removed from the protected site.
This ensures that there are no conflicts between the protected site and recovery site.
You must test to the last checkpoint, taken after the protected virtual machines are shut down.
An actual disaster is not simulated.
During the testing period, if reverse replication is not specified, there is no protection for the recovered machines.
Using a Failover Operation
Use a Failover operation when you can shut down the protected virtual machines and you want to simulate an actual disaster.
After the virtual machines have been recovered in the target site they are used as the protected machines for as long as the test
lasts.
Using a Failover operation to test DR requires specific steps to ensure that the virtual machines are gracefully migrated to the
target site, similar to a Move operation and that, like a Move operation, they can be verified prior to committing the failover.
The Failover operation is described in “The Failover Operation”, on page 168 and in “Initiating a Failover”, on page 193.
Using a Failover Operation - Recommended Procedure for a Live DR Test
1.
Manually shut down the virtual machines.
2.
Insert a new checkpoint. This avoids potential data loss since the virtual machines are shut down and the new checkpoint
is added after all I/Os have been written to disk.
3.
Optionally simulate a disaster, for example by disconnecting the two sites.
4. Perform a live failover on the VPG, specifying the commit policy and choosing the checkpoint you added in step 2. Choose
a commit policy that will give you the necessary time to check that the failed over virtual machines have been successfully
recovered to the correct point-in-time and if they are not, you are able to roll back the failover.
5.
Continue to use the recovered virtual machines.
6.
The VPG is in a Needs configuration state, because there is no access to the protected site.
After testing the recovered virtual machine you can finalize the live DR test and fail the virtual machines back to the original
protected site:
1.
Reconnect the sites.
2.
Enable protection for the virtual machines by editing the VPG and clicking DONE.
3.
Zerto Virtual Replication uses the original disks to preseed the volumes and expedite the synchronization between the
two sites, using a Delta Sync.
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The time it will take for the Delta Sync to complete is based on total size of the disks and storage performance at both
sites.
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After the synchronization completes, the VPG enters the Meeting SLA state.
4. Perform a Move operation to fail back the virtual machines to the original protected site.
5.
In the Move wizard, in the EXECUTION PARAMETERS tab, for commit policy, set the commit policy to enable basic testing
before the move is committed.
The virtual machines are recovered at the original protected site, and the VPG enters a Delta Sync phase before it enters a
Meeting SLA state.
Using a Failover Operation - Failover Considerations
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The originally protected disks are maintained for a faster failback.
Using the Failover operation for testing is non-intuitive.
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Testing by using the Failover operation requires performing manual procedures, such as shutting down the protected
virtual machines.
During the testing period, there is no protection for the recovered machines.
Using a Clone Operation
Use the Clone operation when the protected application must continue to run throughout the test. Create a clone of the virtual
machines in a VPG on the recovery site to a specific point-in-time. The clone is a copy of the protected virtual machines on the
recovery site, while the virtual machines on the protected site remain protected and live. The Clone operation is described in
“The Clone Operation”, on page 169 and in “Cloning a VPG to the Recovery Site”, on page 201.
The cloned virtual machines are independent of Zerto Virtual Replication. At the end of the test you can remove these
machines or leave them.
Run User Traffic against the Recovered VMs - Using a Clone Operation
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You use the Clone operation when the source application has to continue throughout the test.
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You can create a clone of the virtual machines in a VPG on the peer site to a specific point-in-time.
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The clone is a copy of the protected virtual machines on the recovery site, while the virtual machines on the protected site
remain protected and live.
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The Clone operation is described above, and in the in the Zerto Virtual Manager Administration Guide for the Microsoft HyperV Environment.
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The cloned virtual machines are independent of Zerto Virtual Replication. At the end of the test you can remove these
machines or leave them.
Using a Clone Operation - Clone Considerations
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You can clone to a specific point-in-time.
There is no protection for the cloned machines.
After use of the clone ends, no changes made to the cloned virtual machines are applied to the protected virtual machines.
The original virtual machines on the source site are live and online throughout the test.
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CHAPTER 14: MIGRATING A VPG TO
THE RECOVERY SITE
This chapter describes a planned migration of a VPG to a remote site. The following topics are described in this chapter:
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“The Move Process”, below
“Moving Protected Virtual Machines to a Remote Site”, on page 184
“Reverse Protection For a Moved VPG”, on page 188
Note: You cannot perform a move while a backup job is running.
The Move Process
Use the Move operation to move groups of protected virtual machines from a protected site to a recovery site in a planned
migration.
When you perform a planned migration of virtual machines to a recovery site, Zerto Virtual Replication assumes that both sites
are healthy and that you plan to relocate the virtual machines in an orderly fashion without loss of data.
Note: To recover virtual machines on the recovery site during disaster recovery, see “Managing Failover”, on page 192.
The Move operation has the following basic steps:
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Shutting down the protected virtual machines gracefully. This ensures data integrity.
If the machines cannot be gracefully shut down, for example, when VMware Tools or Microsoft Integration Services is not
available, you must manually shut down the machines before starting the Move operation or forcibly power off the virtual
machines as part of the Move operation. If the machines cannot be gracefully shut down automatically and are not shut
down manually and the Move operation does not forcibly power them off, the Move operation stops and Zerto Virtual
Replication rolls back the virtual machines to their original status.
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Inserting a clean checkpoint. This avoids potential data loss since the virtual machines are not on and the new checkpoint
is created after all I/Os have been written to disk.
Transferring all the latest changes that are still in the queue to the recovery site, including the new checkpoint.
Creating the virtual machines in the recovery site and attaching each virtual machine to its relevant virtual disks, based on
the last checkpoint.
Note: The virtual machines are created without CD-ROM drives, even if the protected virtual machines had CD-ROM
drives. Also, as long as the virtual machines are created, the operation is considered successful, even if the virtual
machines are not created with their complete definition, for example re-IP cannot be performed.
VHDX disks are always recovered in the recovery site with dynamic disks. VHD disks are recovered in the recovery site by
default with the same configuration as in the protected site.
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Preventing automatically moving virtual machines to other hosts: Setting failover clustering to prevent Dynamic
Optimization. This prevents automatic Live Migration of the affected virtual machines during the Move operation.
Powering on the virtual machines making them available to the user. If applicable, the boot order defined in the VPG
settings is used to power on the machines.
Note: If the virtual machines do not power on, the process continues and the virtual machines must be powered on
manually. The virtual machines cannot be powered on automatically in a number of situations, such as when there are not
enough resources in the resource pool, or the required MAC address is part of a reserved range, or there is a MAC address
conflict or IP conflict, for example, if a clone was previously created with the MAC or IP address.
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Committing the Move operation. The default is to automatically commit the Move operation without testing. However,
you can also run basic tests on the machines to ensure their validity to the clean checkpoint. Depending on the commit/
rollback policy that you specified for the operation, the operation is committed, finalizing the move, or rolled back, aborting
the operation.
If Keep Source VMs is not selected, the protected virtual machines are removed from the inventory.
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Note: If Keep Source VMs is not selected, and the virtual machines are already protected in other VPGs, continuing with the
operation will cause the virtual machines to be deleted from other VPGs that are protecting them and to the journals of
these VPGs to be reset. If no other virtual machines are left to protect, the entire VPG will be removed.
Promoting the data from the journal to the machines. The machines can be used during the promotion and Zerto Virtual
Replication ensures that the user sees the latest image, even if this image, in part, includes data from the journal.
Note: Virtual machines cannot be moved to another host during promotion. If the host is rebooted during promotion, make
sure that the VRA on the host is running and communicating with the Zerto Virtual Manager before starting up the
recovered virtual machines.
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If reverse replication is specified, the virtual disks used by the virtual machines in the protected site are used for the
reverse protection. A Delta Sync is performed to make sure that the two copies, the new recovery site disks and the
original protected site disks, are consistent. A Delta Sync is required since the recovered machines can be updated while
data is being promoted.
If reverse replication is not specified, the VPG definition is saved but the state is Needs configuration and the virtual disks
used by the virtual machines in the protected site are deleted. Thus, in the future if reverse protection is required, the
original virtual disks are not available and a full synchronization is required.
Note: If reverse protection is specified, the Keep Source VMs option is grayed out because the virtual disks of the VMs
are used for replication and cannot have VMs attached. If Keep Source VMs is selected before reverse protection is
specified, the Keep Source VMs selection is canceled.
A move differs from a failover in that with a move you cannot select a checkpoint to restore the virtual machine to. Also, to
ensure data integrity, the protected virtual machines are powered off completely and a final checkpoint created so that there is
no data loss before the move is implemented.
You can initiate the Move operation from either the protected site or recovery site.
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Moving Protected Virtual Machines to a Remote Site
You can move the virtual machines in a virtual protection group (VPG) to a remote site, where the virtual machines are
replicated. As part of the process you can also set up reverse protection, where you create a VPG on the remote site for the
virtual machines being moved, pointing back to the original site. This is commonly used, for example, when the protected site
has planned downtime.
To initiate a move:
1.
In the Zerto User Interface select ACTIONS > MOVE VPG.
The Move wizard is displayed.
2.
Select the VPGs to move.
At the bottom, the selection details show the amount of data and the total number of virtual machines selected.
The Direction arrow shows the direction of the process: from the protected site to the peer, recovery, site.
3.
Click NEXT.
The EXECUTION PARAMETERS step is displayed.
You can change the following values to use for the recovery:
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Commit Policy
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Force Shutdown policy
Reverse Protection settings
Keep Source VMs settings
You can also see if a boot order and scripts are defined for the VPG.
4. To change the commit policy, click on the field or select the VPG and click EDIT SELECTED.
a) To commit the recovery operation automatically, without any checking, select Auto-Commit and 0 minutes.
b) If you do not want an automatic commit or rollback, select None. You must manually commit or roll back.
To allow checking before committing or rolling back, specify an amount of time to check the recovered machines, in
minutes, before the automatic commit or rollback action is performed. During this time period, check that the new virtual
machines are OK and then commit the operation or roll it back. The maximum amount of time you can delay the commit or
rollback operation is 1440 minutes, which is 24 hours.
Checking that involves I/O is done on scratch volumes. The longer this period the more scratch volumes are used, until the
maximum size is reached, at which point no more checking can be done. The maximum size of all the scratch volumes is
determined by the journal size hard limit and cannot be changed. The scratch volumes reside on the storage defined for the
journal.
5.
To specify the shutdown policy, double-click the Force Shutdown field. If the virtual machines cannot be gracefully shut
down, for example if Microsoft Integration Services is not installed on one of the virtual machines in the VPG, the Move
operation fails unless you specify that you want to force the shutdown. If a utility is installed on the protected virtual
machines, the procedure waits five minutes for the virtual machines to be gracefully shut down before forcibly powering
them off.
6.
To specify reverse protection, where the virtual machines in the VPG are moved to the recovery site and then protected in
the recovery site, back to the original site, double-click the Reverse Protection field and click the REVERSE link.
The Edit Reverse VPG wizard is displayed.
You can edit the reverse protection configuration. The parameters are the same as described when you create a VPG,
described in “To create a virtual protection group (VPG):”, on page 35, with the following differences:
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You cannot add or remove virtual machines to the reverse protection VPG.
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By default, reverse replication is to the original protected disks. You can specify a different storage to be used for the
reverse replication.
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If Microsoft Integration Services is available, for each virtual machine in the VPG, the IP address of the originally
protected virtual machine is used. Thus, during failback the original IP address of the virtual machine on the site where
the machine was originally protected is reused. However, if the machine does not contain the utility, DHCP is used.
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When reverse protection is specified for a VPG residing on a vCD site that is replicating to either a vSphere or HyperV site, the boot order settings will not reserve the start delay vApp settings for virtual machines with the same order
number.
7.
To prevent the protected virtual machines from being deleted in the protected site, click the Keep source VMs checkbox.
IMPORTANT:
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The virtual machines will be removed from the other VPGs that are protecting them if the following conditions apply:
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The virtual machines are already protected in other VPGs
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Reverse protection is specified
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Keep Source VMs is not checked
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If there are no other virtual machines left to protect, the entire VPG will be removed.
Protecting virtual machines or vCD vApps in several VPGs is enabled only if both the protected site and the recovery site, as
well as the VRAs installed on these sites, are of version 5.0 and higher.
8.
Click NEXT.
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When reverse protection is specified for a VPG residing on a vCD site that is replicating to either a vSphere or HyperV site, the boot order settings will not reserve the start delay vCD vApp settings for virtual machines with the same
order number.
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The MOVE step is displayed. The topology shows the number of VPGs and virtual machines being moved to each peer site.
In the following example, 2 VPGs will be moved to Site6-Ent2-R2, and they contain 5 virtual machines; and 1 VPG will be
moved to Site5-Ent2-P2-R2 and it contains 2 virtual machines.
9.
Click START MOVE to start the migration.
10. If a commit policy was set with a timeout greater than zero, as described in step 4, you can check the moved virtual
machines on the recovery site before they are removed from the protected site.
Note: If a virtual machine exists on the recovery site with the same name as a virtual machine being migrated, the machine
is moved and named in the peer site with a number added as a suffix to the name, starting with the number 1
The status icon changes to orange and an alert is issued, to warn you that the procedure is waiting for either a commit or
rollback.
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All testing done during this period, before committing or rolling back the Move operation, is written to thin-provisioned
virtual disks, one per virtual machine in the VPG. These virtual disks are automatically defined when the machines are
created on the recovery site for testing. The longer the test period the more scratch volumes are used, until the maximum
size is reached, at which point no more testing can be done. The maximum size of all the scratch volumes is determined by
the journal size hard limit and cannot be changed. The scratch volumes reside on the storage defined for the journal. Using
these scratch volumes makes committing or rolling back the Move operation more efficient.
Note: You cannot take a snapshot of a virtual machine before the Move operation is committed and the data from the
journal promoted to the moved virtual machine disks, since the virtual machine volumes are still managed by the VRA and
not directly by the virtual machine. Using a snapshot of a moved machine before the Move operation has completed will
result in the creation of a corrupted virtual machine.
11. After checking the virtual machines on the recovery site, choose one of the following:
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Wait for the specified Commit Policy time to elapse, and the specified operation, either Commit or Rollback, is
performed automatically.
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Click the Commit or Rollback icon (
) in the specific VPG tab.
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Click Commit to confirm the commit and, if necessary set, or reset, the reverse protection configuration. If the
protected site is still up and you can set up reverse protection, you can reconfigure reverse protection by checking
the Reverse Protection checkbox and then click the Reverse link. Configuring reverse protection here
overwrites any of settings defined when initially configuring the failover.
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Click Rollback to roll back the operation, removing the virtual machines that were created on the recovery site and
rebooting the machines on the protected site. The Rollback dialog is displayed to confirm the rollback.
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You can also commit or roll back the operation in the TASKS popup dialog in the status bar or under
MONITORING > TASKS.
After the virtual machines are up and running and committed in the recovery site, the powered off virtual machines in the
protected site are removed from the protected site. Finally, data is promoted from the journal to the moved virtual machines.
Note: If virtual machines are protected in several VPGs, reverse protection is selected and Keep source VMs is not checked, the
virtual machines are deleted from the protected site. This will result in the removal of these virtual machines from other VPGs
that are protecting them and to the journals of these VPGs to be reset. If no other virtual machines are left to protect, the entire
VPG will be removed.
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Protecting virtual machines in several VPGs is enabled only if both the protected site and the recovery site, as well as the VRAs
installed on these sites, are of version 5.0 and higher.
During promotion of data, you cannot move a host on the moved virtual machines.If the host is rebooted during promotion,
make sure that the VRA on the host is running and communicating with the Zerto Virtual Manager before starting up the
recovered virtual machines.
Note: If the virtual machines do not power on, the process continues and the virtual machines must be manually powered on.
The virtual machines cannot be powered on automatically in a number of situations, such as when there are not enough
resources in the resource pool or the required MAC address is part of a reserved range or there is a MAC address conflict or IP
conflict, for example, if a clone was previously created with the MAC or IP address.
The following conversions are done to a protected virtual machine when it is recovered in vCenter Server:
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Virtual machines are recovered in vCenter Server with the highest hardware version supported by the vCenter Server host
version under which the virtual machine is recovered.
A Generation 1 virtual machine is recovered in vCenter Server with BIOS with the highest supported hardware version.
A Generation 2 virtual machine is recovered in vCenter Server with EUFI. The host in vCenter must support hardware
version 8 or higher. Also the following restrictions apply for Generation 2 virtual machines:
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The secure boot option for the machine in Hyper-V must be disabled.
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The boot disk must be less than 2TB if the recovery host version is lower than ESXi 5.5.
All IDE disks are converted to SCSI disks. The boot disk is ported to a disk on a SCSI controller with location 0:0.
Recovered virtual machines use the VMware Virtual E1000 network adapter.
Reverse Protection For a Moved VPG
When moving the virtual machines in a VPG you specify whether you want reverse protection from the recovery site back to
the original protected site.
Reverse Protection Specified
When you specify reverse protection, the virtual machines are moved to the recovery site and then protected using the values
specified during the move. Data is promoted from the journal to the moved virtual machines and then synchronization with the
original site is performed so that the VPG is fully protected. The synchronization performed uses the original protected disks
and is either a Delta Sync or, if there is only one volume to synchronize, a Volume Delta Sync. A sync is required since the
recovered machines can be updated while data is being promoted.
Reverse Protection Not Specified
If you do not specify reverse protection, the protected disks are removed along with the protected virtual machines at the end
of the procedure. In this case, if you want to move the virtual machines back again to the original site, you will not be able to use
the original disks and an initial synchronization will have to be performed. The VPG definition is kept with the status Needs
Configuration and the reverse settings in the VPG definition are not set.
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Clicking EDIT VPG displays the Edit VPG wizard with the settings filled in, using the original settings for the virtual machines in
the VPG from the original protected site, except for the volumes, since the last step of the Move operation is to delete the
virtual machines from the original protected site inventory, including the disks. To start replicating the virtual machines in the
VPG, specify the disks to use for replication and optionally, make any other changes to the original settings and click DONE. An
initial synchronization is performed.
Notes:
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If virtual machines are protected in several VPGs, reverse protection is selected and Keep source VMs is not checked, the
virtual machines are deleted from the protected site. This will result in the removal of these virtual machines from other
VPGs that are protecting them and to the journals of these VPGs to be reset. If no other virtual machines are left to protect,
the entire VPG will be removed
Protecting virtual machines in several VPGs is enabled only if both the protected site and the recovery site, as well as the
VRAs installed on these sites, are of version 5.0 and higher.
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You can edit the VPG definition from either of the sites, the site where the VPG virtual machines were initially protected or
the site they were moved to.
When reverse protection is specified for a VPG residing on a vCD site that is replicating to either a vSphere or Hyper-V
site, the boot order settings will not reserve the start delay vApp settings for virtual machines with the same order number.
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CHAPTER 15: MIGRATING ZERTO
VIRTUAL REPLICATION TO A NEW
VIRTUAL MACHINE
This chapter describes how to migrate the Zerto Virtual Replication (ZVR) application to a new Virtual Machine.
When ZVR is installed, the installation includes the following:
■
■
■
■
Zerto Virtual Manager (ZVM): A Windows service, Zerto Virtual Manager service, that manages the replication at the
site level.
Virtual Replication Appliance (VRA): A virtual machine installed on each Hyper-V hosting virtual machines to be
protected or recovered, to manage the replication of data from protected virtual machines to the recovery site.
Virtual Backup Appliance (VBA): A Windows service that manages back-ups within Zerto Virtual Replication. The VBA
service runs on the same machine as the Zerto Virtual Manager service and manages the repositories where offsite
backups are stored. These repositories can be local or on a shared network.
Zerto User Interface: Recovery using Zerto Virtual Replication is managed in a browser.
Before you Begin
From the Source VM, make a note of the following information which you will need later:
■
Make a note of the exact Zerto Virtual Replication installation configuration settings.
■
Navigate to Control Panel > Network and Internet, and make a note of the IP address
■
If a DNS name was used instead of an IP address, make a note of the DNS name
IMPORTANT:
■
The Optional steps that are included in the procedure below are highly recommended.
■
Perform them before connecting the new ZVM to peer ZVM sites, in order to verify that the ZVM on the target VM is
working correctly, and with the correct configurations.
■
If the ZVM on the target VM is not working correctly with the correct configurations, VPGs could be automatically
deleted.
To migrate ZVR to a target VM:
1. Prepare the target VM for the ZVR. To do this, review the machine requirements to install ZVR, and make sure that the
target VM complies with these minimum requirements. For these details, see Zerto Virtual Replication Installation Guide for
your environment, in the section Installing Zerto Virtual Replication.
2.
On the source VM, verify which version of the Zerto Virtual Replication Installer file is currently installed, and then copy
and paste that same version to the target VM.
3.
On the source VM, stop all Zerto related services:
■
Zerto Virtual Manager Service
■
Zerto Virtual Backup Appliance Service
■
Zerto Remote Log Collection Service
4. On the source VM, navigate to the Zerto installation folder and copy the entire folder, including all its contents. By default,
this folder is named Zerto Virtual Replication.
TIP: To save space, you can leave out, or delete old log files which are no longer relevant. Navigate to the path: ..\Zerto
Virtual Replication\logs\
5.
On the target VM, create a temp folder, and into this folder paste the entire Zerto installation folder, including all its
contents, which you copied in Step 4.
6.
(Optional) If Backup was configured and used with local repository, do the following:
a) On the source VM, copy the entire Backup folder, including contents and sub folders.
b) On the target VM, navigate to the relevant path, and paste the Backup folder.
c) Repeat for each Backup folder that you need to manually back up.
d) Do not proceed to Step 7 until you have copied all the relevant Backup folders.
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Note: Previous Backups can also be manually copied to the target VM, but this must be done before Step 7.
7.
On the source VM, first change the IP address to a different IP address, then disconnect the source VM network
connection.
8.
On the target VM, run the ZVM Installer and complete the installation with the same settings and configurations as the
ZVM that was installed on the source VM.
■
If the ZVM on the source VM was configured to use VCD, and in addition the amqp service was installed, then on the
target VM, the same amqp services must be reinstalled. These are the following:
■
amqp_installer
■
Erlang
■
RabbitMQ
9.
On the target VM, stop all Zerto related services:
Zerto Virtual Manager Service
■
Zerto Virtual Backup Appliance Service
■
Zerto Remote Log Collection Service
■
10. (Optional) On the target VM, open the Windows Firewall and configure a new rule to block all outgoing TCP traffic on
ports 9080 and 9081.
11. On the target VM, navigate to the temp folder which you created in Step 5 and copy the entire Zerto installation folder,
then navigate to the Zerto installation folder which was created when you ran the ZVM installer, and paste and overwrite
all files.
12. On the target VM, navigate to Control Panel > Network and Internet, and set the target VM’s IP address the same IP
address as original IP address of the source VM.
■
If a DNS name was used instead of the IP address, set the target VM’s DNS name the same DNS name as the source
VM.
13. (Optional) If the Log Archiver functionality was configured and in use on the source VM, make sure to create a folder on
the target VM to which the logs are archived.
14. On the target VM, start all Zerto related services:
■
Zerto Virtual Manager Service
■
Zerto Virtual Backup Appliance Service
■
Zerto Remote Log Collection Service
15. (Optional) On the target VM, perform the following optional validations:
a) Open an Internet browser, enter the URL https://localhost:9669, and log into the ZVM.
b) If you blocked all outgoing TCP traffic on ports 9080 and 9081 as described in Step 10, make sure all the VPGs are
present. Their state should be Error or Site disconnection, as there should be no connection to the peer ZVM sites.
c) Make sure that the VRA status is Installed.
d) Open the Windows Firewall and re-enable traffic for ports 9080 and 9081.
16. From anywhere in the network, log into the ZVM GUI and verify that the status of the VPGs and VRAs is OK.
■
If a DNS name was used instead of an IP address, it might take a while for the correct routing to occur. The sites will
remain with the status disconnected until the correct routing occurs.
17. If the status of all the VPGs and VRAs is OK, first power off and then delete the source VM as it is no longer in use.
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CHAPTER 16: MANAGING FAILOVER
This section describes how to perform a failover to the recovery site after an unforeseen disaster. The following topics are
described in this section:
■
■
■
■
“The Failover Process”, below
“Initiating a Failover”, on page 193
“Reverse Protection for a Failed Over VPG”, on page 199
“Initiating a Failover During a Test”, on page 200
Note: If you need to perform a failover while a backup job is running, the backup job is aborted to enable the failover to run.
The Failover Process
Use the Failover operation following a disaster to recover protected virtual machines to the recovery site.
Note: You can also move virtual machines from the protected site to the recovery site in a planned migration. For details, see
“Migrating a VPG to the Recovery Site”, on page 182.
When you set up a failover you always specify a checkpoint to which you want to recover the virtual machines. When you
select a checkpoint – either the last automatically generated checkpoint, an earlier checkpoint, or a tagged checkpoint – Zerto
Virtual Replication makes sure that the virtual machines at the remote site are recovered to this specified point-in-time. By
setting a commit policy that enables checking the recovered machines before committing the failover, you can check the
integrity of the recovered machines. If the machines are OK, you can commit the failover. Otherwise, you can roll back the
operation and then repeat the procedure using a different checkpoint.
The Failover operation has the following basic steps:
■
If the protected site or Zerto Virtual Manager is down, the process continues with the next step.
If the protected site or Zerto Virtual Manager is still running, the failover requirements are determined:
If the default is requested, doing nothing to the protected virtual machines, the Failover operation continues with the
next step.
■
If shutting down the protected virtual machines is requested and the protected virtual machines do not have Microsoft
Integration Services available, the Failover operation fails.
■
If forcibly shutting down the protected virtual machines is requested, the protected virtual machines are shut down
and the Failover operation continues.
■
■
Creating the virtual machines at the remote site in the production network and attaching each virtual machine to its
relevant virtual disks, configured to the checkpoint specified for the recovery. The virtual machines are created without
CD-ROM drives, even if the protected virtual machines had CD-ROM drives. Also, as long as the virtual machines are
created, the operation is considered successful, even if the virtual machines are not created with their complete definition,
for example re-IP cannot be performed.
Note: The original protected virtual machines are not touched since the assumption is that the original protected site is
down.
VHDX disks are always recovered in the recovery site with dynamic disks. VHD disks are recovered in the recovery site by
default with the same configuration as in the protected site.
■
■
Preventing automatically moving virtual machines to other hosts: Setting failover clustering to prevent Dynamic
Optimization. This prevents automatic live migration of the affected virtual machines during the Failover operation.
Powering on the virtual machines making them available to the user. If applicable, the boot order defined in the VPG
settings is used to power on the machines.
Note: If the virtual machines do not power on, the process continues and the virtual machines must be manually powered
on. The virtual machines cannot be powered on automatically in a number of situations, such as when there are not enough
resources in the resource pool or the required MAC address is part of a reserved range or there is a MAC address conflict
or IP conflict, for example, if a clone was previously created with the MAC or IP address.
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■
The default is to automatically commit the Failover operation without testing. However, you can also run basic tests on the
machines to ensure their validity to the specified checkpoint. Depending on the commit/rollback policy that you specified
for the operation after testing either the operation is committed, finalizing the failover, or rolled back, aborting the
operation.
If the protected site is still available, for example, after a partial disaster, and reverse protection is possible and specified
for the Failover operation, the protected virtual machines are powered off and removed from the inventory. The virtual
disks used by the virtual machines in the protected site are used for the reverse protection. A Delta Sync is performed to
make sure that the two copies, the new target site disks and the original site disks, are consistent. A Delta Sync is
required since the recovered machines can be updated while data is being promoted.
If reverse protection is selected, and the virtual machines are already protected in other VPGs, continuing with the
operation will cause the virtual machines to be deleted from other VPGs that are protecting them and to the journals of
these VPGs to be reset. If no other virtual machines are left to protect, the entire VPG will be removed
Protecting virtual machines or a vCD vApp in several VPGs is enabled only if both the protected site and the recovery site,
as well as the VRAs installed on these sites, are of version 5.0 and higher.
Note: If reverse protection is not possible, the original protected site virtual machines are not powered off and removed.
■
The data from the journal is promoted to the machines. The machines can be used during the promotion and Zerto Virtual
Replication ensures that the user sees the latest image, even if this image, in part, includes data from the journal.
Note: Virtual machines cannot be moved to another host during promotion. If the host is rebooted during promotion, make
sure that the VRA on the host is running and communicating with the Zerto Virtual Manager before starting up the
recovered virtual machines.
Failback After the Original Site is Operational
To fail back to the original protected site, the VPG that is now protecting the virtual machines on the recovery site has to be
configured and then a Delta Sync is performed with the disks in the original protected site. Once the VPG is in a protecting
state the virtual machines can be moved back to the original protected site, as described in “Migrating a VPG to the Recovery
Site”, on page 182.
Initiating a Failover
You can initiate a failover, whereby the virtual machines in the virtual protection group are replicated to a set checkpoint in the
recovery site. As part of the process you can also set up reverse replication, whereby you create a virtual protection group on
the recovery machine for the virtual machines being replicated, pointing back to the protected site.
You can initiate a failover to the last checkpoint recorded in the journal, even if the protected site is no longer up. You can
initiate a failover during a test, as described in “Initiating a Failover During a Test”, on page 200.
If you have time to initiate the failover from the protected site you can. However, if the protected site is down, you initiate the
failover from the recovery site.
Note: Any VPGs that are in the process of being synchronized, cannot be recovered, unless the synchronization is a bitmap
synchronization.
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To initiate a failover:
1.
In the Zerto User Interface set the operation to LIVE and click FAILOVER.
The Failover wizard is displayed.
2.
Select the VPGs to failover. By default, all VPGs are listed.
At the bottom, the selection details show the amount of data and the total number of virtual machines selected.
The Direction arrow shows the direction of the process: from the protected site to the peer, recovery, site.
3.
Click NEXT.
The EXECUTION PARAMETERS step is displayed.
You can change the following values to use for the recovery:
■
Commit Policy
■
Checkpoint to use
■
Force Shutdown
■
Reverse Protection settings
You can also see if a boot order and scripts are defined for the VPG.
4. By default, the last checkpoint added to the journal is displayed. If you want to use this checkpoint, go to the next step. If
you want to change the checkpoint, click the checkpoint.
The {VPG-Name}: Checkpoints dialog is displayed.
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5.
Select the checkpoint to use. Click the refresh button to refresh the list. You can choose from one of the following
checkpoints:
Latest – Recovery is to the latest checkpoint. This ensures that the data is crash-consistent for the recovery. When
selecting the latest checkpoint, the checkpoint used is the latest at this point. If a checkpoint is added between this point
and starting the failover, this later checkpoint is not used.
Latest Tagged Checkpoint – The recovery operation is to the latest checkpoint added in one of the following situations:
By a user.
■
When a failover test was previously performed on the VPG that includes the virtual machine.
■
When the virtual machine was added to an existing VPG after the added virtual machine was synchronized.
■
Latest VSS – When VSS is used, recovery is to the latest VSS snapshot, ensuring that the data is both crash-consistent and
application consistent to this point. The frequency of VSS snapshots determines how much data can be recovered. For
details about VSS checkpoints, see “Ensuring Transaction Consistency in Microsoft Windows Server Environments”, on
page 126.
If you do not want to use the latest checkpoint, latest tagged checkpoint, or latest VSS checkpoint, choose Select from
all available checkpoints. By default, this option displays all checkpoints in the system. You can choose to display
only automatic, VSS, or tagged checkpoints, or any combination of these types.
6.
Click OK.
7.
To change the commit policy, click on the field or select the VPG and click EDIT SELECTED.
a) To commit the recovery operation automatically, without any checking, select Auto-Commit and 0 minutes.
b) If you do not want an automatic commit or rollback, select None. You must manually commit or roll back.
To allow checking before committing or rolling back, specify an amount of time to check the recovered machines, in
minutes, before the automatic commit or rollback action is performed. During this time period, check that the new virtual
machines are OK and then commit the operation or roll it back. The maximum amount of time you can delay the commit or
rollback operation is 1440 minutes, which is 24 hours.
Checking that involves I/O is done on scratch volumes. The longer this period the more scratch volumes are used, until the
maximum size is reached, at which point no more checking can be done. The maximum size of all the scratch volumes is
determined by the journal size hard limit and cannot be changed. The scratch volumes reside on the storage defined for the
journal.
To specify the shutdown policy, double-click the VM Shutdown field and select the shutdown policy:
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No (default) – The protected virtual machines are not touched before starting the failover. This assumes that you do not
know the state of the protected machines, or you know that they are not serviceable.
Yes – If the protected virtual machines have Microsoft Integration Services available, the virtual machines are gracefully
shut down, otherwise the Failover operation fails. This is similar to performing a Move operation to a specified checkpoint.
Force Shutdown – The protected virtual machines are forcibly shut down before starting the failover. This is similar to
performing a Move operation to a specified checkpoint. If the protected virtual machines have Microsoft Integration
Services available, the procedure waits five minutes for the virtual machines to be gracefully shut down before forcibly
powering them off.
8.
To specify reverse protection, where the virtual machines in the VPG are moved to the recovery site and then protected in
the recovery site, back to the original site, double-click the Reverse Protection field and click the REVERSE link.
The Edit Reverse VPG wizard is displayed.
You can edit the reverse protection configuration. The parameters are the same as described when you create a VPG,
described in “To create a virtual protection group (VPG):”, on page 35, with the following differences:
■
You cannot add or remove virtual machines to the reverse protection VPG.
■
By default, reverse replication is to the original protected disks. You can specify a different storage to be used for the
reverse replication.
■
If Microsoft Integration Services is available, for each virtual machine in the VPG, the IP address of the originally
protected virtual machine is used. Thus, during failback the original IP address of the virtual machine on the site where
the machine was originally protected is reused. However, if the machine does not contain the utility, DHCP is used.
■
When committing the failover, you can reconfigure reverse protection, regardless of the reverse protection settings
specified here.
■
When reverse protection is specified for a VPG residing on a vCD site that is replicating to either a vSphere or HyperV site, the boot order settings will not reserve the start delay vApp settings for virtual machines with the same order
number.
IMPORTANT:
The virtual machines will be removed from the other VPGs that are protecting them if the following conditions apply:
■
The virtual machines are already protected in other VPGs
■
Reverse protection is specified
■
If there are no other virtual machines left to protect, the entire VPG will be removed.
■
Protecting virtual machines or vCD vApps in several VPGs is enabled only if both the protected site and the recovery site,
as well as the VRAs installed on these sites, are of version 5.0 and higher.
9.
Click NEXT.
10. Click OK. If a virtual machine is deleted from other VPGs, the journals of these VPGs are reset.
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The FAILOVER step is displayed. The topology shows the number of VPGs and virtual machines being failed over to each
recovery site. In the following example, 2 VPGs will be failed over to Site6-Ent2-R2, and they contain 5 virtual machines;
and 1 VPG will be failed over to Site5-Ent2-P2-R2 and it contains 2 virtual machines.
11. Click START FAILOVER to start the failover.
If a commit policy was set with a timeout greater than zero, you can check the failed over virtual machines on the recovery
site before committing the failover operation.
The failover starts, by creating the virtual machines in the recovery site to the point-in-time specified: either the last data
transferred from the protected site or to one of the checkpoints written in the journal.
Note: If a virtual machine exists on the recovery site with the same name as a virtual machine being failed over, the
machine is created and named in the peer site with a number added as a suffix to the name, starting with the number 1.
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If the original protected site is still up and reverse replication configured to use the protected virtual machines virtual disks,
these virtual machines are powered off.
The status icon changes to orange and an alert is issued, to warn you that the procedure is waiting for either a commit or
rollback.
All testing done during this period, before committing or rolling back the failover operation, is written to thin-provisioned
scratch virtual disks. These virtual disks are automatically defined when the machines are created on the recovery site for
testing. The longer the test period the more scratch volumes are used, until the maximum size is reached, at which point no
more testing can be done. The maximum size of all the scratch volumes is determined by the journal size hard limit and
cannot be changed. The scratch volumes reside on the storage defined for the journal. Using these scratch volumes makes
committing or rolling back the failover operation more efficient.
Note: You cannot take a snapshot of a virtual machine before the failover operation is committed and the data from the
journal promoted to the moved virtual machine disks, since the virtual machine volumes are still managed by the VRA and
not directly by the virtual machine. Using a snapshot of a recovered machine before the failover operation has completed
will result in a corrupted virtual machine being created.
12. After checking the virtual machines on the recovery site, choose one of the following:
■
Wait for the specified Commit Policy time to elapse, and the specified operation, either Commit or Rollback, is
performed automatically.
■
Click the Commit or Rollback icon (
) in the specific VPG tab.
■
.Click Commit. The Commit dialog is displayed to confirm the commit and, if necessary set, or reset, the reverse
protection configuration. If the protected site is still up and you can set up reverse protection, you can reconfigure
reverse protection by checking the Reverse Protection checkbox and then click the Reverse link. Configuring
reverse protection here overwrites any of settings defined when initially configuring the move.
■
Click Rollback to roll back the operation, removing the virtual machines that were created on the recovery site and
rebooting the machines on the protected site. The Rollback dialog is displayed to confirm the rollback.
■
You can also commit or roll back the operation via the TASKS popup dialog in the status bar, or by selecting
MONITORING > TASKS.
If the original protected site is still up and reverse replication is configured to use the virtual disks of the protected virtual
machines, these virtual machines are removed from this site, unless the original protected site does not have enough storage
available to fail back the failed over virtual machines. Finally, data is promoted from the journal to the recovered virtual
machines.
Note: If Reverse Protection is selected and the virtual machines are already protected in other VPGs, the virtual machines are
deleted from the protected site and the journals of these VPGs are reset. This will result in the removal of these virtual
machines from other VPGs that are protecting them, or the removal of the entire VPG, if no other virtual machines are left to
protect.
Note: Protecting virtual machines in several VPGs is enabled only if both the protected site and the recovery site, as well as the
VRAs installed on these sites, are of version 5.0 and higher.
During promotion of data, you cannot move a host on the recovered virtual machines. If the host is rebooted during promotion,
make sure that the VRA on the host is running and communicating with the Zerto Virtual Manager before starting up the
recovered virtual machines.
By default the virtual machines are started with the same IPs as the protected machines in the protected site. If you do not
specify reverse protection, the original machines still exist in the protected site and this can create clashes. In this case, Zerto
recommends ensuring that a different IP is assigned to the virtual machines when they start, when configuring each virtual
machine NIC properties in the VPG, during the definition of the VPG. For details, refer to “To create a virtual protection group
(VPG):”, on page 35. f you have defined the new virtual machines so that they will be assigned different IPs, Zerto Virtual
Replication changes the machine IPs. Changing IPs can take several seconds.
Note: If the virtual machines do not power on, the process continues and the virtual machines must be manually powered on.
The virtual machines cannot be powered on automatically in a number of situations, such as when there is not enough
resources in the resource pool or the required MAC address is part of a reserved range or there is a MAC address conflict or IP
conflict, for example, if a clone was previously created with the MAC or IP address.
The following conversions are done to a protected virtual machine when it is recovered in vCenter Server:
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■
■
■
■
■
Virtual machines are recovered in vCenter Server with the highest hardware version supported by the vCenter Server host
version under which the virtual machine is recovered.
A Generation 1 virtual machine is recovered in vCenter Server with BIOS with the highest supported hardware version.
A Generation 2 virtual machine is recovered in vCenter Server with EUFI. The host in vCenter must support hardware
version 8 or higher. Also the following restrictions apply for Generation 2 virtual machines:
■
The secure boot option for the machine in Hyper-V must be disabled.
■
The boot disk must be less than 2TB if the recovery host version is lower than ESXi 5.5.
All IDE disks are converted to SCSI disks. The boot disk is ported to a disk on a SCSI controller with location 0:0.
Recovered virtual machines use the VMware Virtual E1000 network adapter.
Reverse Protection for a Failed Over VPG
When you specify reverse protection, the virtual machines are recovered on the recovery site and then protected using the
values specified during the failover. The original virtual machines are removed from the original protected site and then on the
target site the data is promoted from the journal to the recovered virtual machines and then synchronization with the original
site is performed so that the VPG is fully protected. The synchronization used is either a Delta Sync or if there is only one
volume to synchronize, a Volume Delta Sync is performed. A sync is required since the recovered machines can be updated
while data is being promoted.
Notes:
■
■
■
If Reverse Protection is selected and the virtual machines are already protected in other VPGs, the virtual machines are
deleted from the protected site and the journals of these VPGs are reset. This will result in the removal of these virtual
machines from other VPGs that are protecting them, or the removal of the entire VPG, if no other virtual machines are left
to protect
Protecting virtual machines or a vCD vApp in several VPGs is enabled only if both the protected site and the recovery site,
as well as the VRAs installed on these sites, are of version 5.0 and higher
For the Failover operation to complete successfully, when reverse protection is specified, the original protected site must
have enough storage available to fail back the failed over virtual machines.
If you do not specify reverse protection, the VPG definition is kept with the status Needs Configuration and the reverse
settings in the VPG definition are not set.
Clicking EDIT VPG displays the Edit VPG wizard with the settings filled in, using the original settings for the virtual machines in
the VPG from the original protected site, except for the volumes. To start replicating the virtual machines in the VPG, specify
the disks to use for replication and optionally, make any other changes to the original settings and click DONE.
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Note: When reverse protection is specified for a VPG residing on a vCD site that is replicating to either a vSphere or Hyper-V
site, the boot order settings will not reserve the start delay vApp settings for virtual machines with the same order number.
What Happens When the Protected Site is Down
If the protected site is down, you can initiate the failover from the recovery site, as described above in “To initiate a failover:”,
on page 194.
The tab for a specific VPG tab for a VPG shows that recovery is possible.
If the Zerto Virtual Manager service is down the actual machines that are being protected can still be up, but they are only
recoverable to the last checkpoint written before the Zerto Virtual Manager service went down.
When there is no connection with the protected site, the status for recovered VPGs is red with an Error status and green while
recovery is being performed. If the protected site restarts so that reverse replication is possible, the status changes to orange.
Initiating a Failover During a Test
Replication continues during a test. If you need to initiate a failover during a test, you initiate the failover. The test stops to
enable the failover and then a normal failover is performed, as described in “Initiating a Failover”, on page 193. Any changes
made to test the failover are not replicated, as only changes to the protected machines in the VPG are replicated.
Note: You cannot initiate a failover while a test is being initialized or closed.
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CHAPTER 17: CLONING A VPG TO
THE RECOVERY SITE
You can create a clone of each virtual machine in a VPG. The clone is a copy of the protected virtual machine, located on the
recovery site, while the virtual machine on the protected site remains protected and live.
The following topics are described in this chapter:
■
■
“The Clone Process”, below
“Cloning Protected Virtual Machines to the Remote Site”, on page 201
Note: You cannot clone virtual machines in a VPG test while a backup job is running. When the recovery site is VMware vCloud
Director, the clone is created in vCenter Server and the virtual machines have to be manually moved into vCD.
The Clone Process
Use the Clone operation to create a copy of the VPG virtual machines on the recovery site. The virtual machines on the
protected site remain protected and live.
The Clone operation has the following basic steps:
■
■
Creating the cloned disks at the recovery site with the data from the journal to the specified checkpoint.
Creating the virtual machines at the recovery site in the move/failover network and attach each virtual machine to its
relevant cloned disks, configured to the checkpoint specified for the clone.
Note: The virtual machines are created without CD-ROM drives, even if the protected virtual machines have CD-ROM
drives.
The cloned machines are named with the names of the protected machines, with the timestamp of the checkpoint used to
create the clone. The cloned virtual machines are not powered on and are not protected by Zerto Virtual Replication.
Use the Clone operation to create a copy of the VPG virtual machines on the recovery site. The virtual machines on the
protected site remain protected and live.
The Clone operation has the following basic steps:
■
■
Creating the cloned disks at the recovery site with the data from the journal to the specified checkpoint.
Creating the virtual machines at the recovery site in the move/failover network and attach each virtual machine to its
relevant cloned disks, configured to the checkpoint specified for the clone.
Note: The virtual machines are created without CD-ROM drives, even if the protected virtual machines have CD-ROM
drives.
The cloned machines are named with the names of the protected machines, with the timestamp of the checkpoint used to
create the clone. The cloned virtual machines are not powered on and are not protected by Zerto Virtual Replication.
VHDX disks are always cloned in the recovery site with dynamic disks. VHD disks are cloned in the recovery site by default
with the same configuration as in the protected site.
Cloning Protected Virtual Machines to the Remote Site
You might want to create a clone if you need to have a copy of the virtual machines saved to a specific point-in-time, for
example, when a VPG enters a Replication Paused state, or when testing a VPG in a live DR test.
To clone a VPG:
1.
In the Zerto User Interface, in the VPGs tab click the name of the VPG to be cloned.
A new tab is added to the Zerto User Interface, with the name of the VPG that you clicked. The tab displays data about the
VPG.
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Note: If the VPG was previously viewed, and the tab for this VPG is still displayed, you can access the details by selecting
the tab.
2.
Select the new tab and click MORE > Offsite Clone.
The {VPG-Name}: Offsite Clone dialog is displayed.
3.
If you intend to use the last checkpoint, which is displayed in the dialog, go to step 6.
To select the checkpoint, click SELECT A CHECKPOINT.
The {VPG-Name}: Checkpoints dialog is displayed.
4. Select the checkpoint to use. Click the refresh button to refresh the list. You can choose from one of the following
checkpoints:
Latest – Recovery is to the latest checkpoint. This ensures that the data is crash-consistent for the recovery. When
selecting the latest checkpoint, the checkpoint used is the latest at this point. If a checkpoint is added between this point
and starting the failover, this later checkpoint is not used.
Latest Tagged Checkpoint – The recovery operation is to the latest checkpoint added in one of the following situations:
By a user.
■
When a failover test was previously performed on the VPG that includes the virtual machine.
■
When the virtual machine was added to an existing VPG after the added virtual machine was synchronized.
■
Latest VSS – When VSS is used, the clone is to the latest VSS snapshot, ensuring that the data is both crash-consistent and
application consistent to this point. The frequency of VSS snapshots determines how much data can be recovered. For
details about VSS checkpoints, see “Ensuring Transaction Consistency in Microsoft Windows Server Environments”, on
page 103.
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If you do not want to use the latest checkpoint, latest tagged checkpoint, or latest VSS checkpoint, choose Select from
all available checkpoints. By default, this option displays all checkpoints in the system. You can choose to display
only automatic, VSS, or tagged checkpoints, or any combination of these types.
5.
Click OK.
6.
Select the recovery storage to use for the cloned virtual machines.
Note: All the cloned virtual machines use a single storage, that is accessible by all the recovery site VRAs used by the VPG.
7.
Click CLONE.
The cloning starts and the status is displayed in the VPG details tab.
The cloned machines are assigned the names of the protected machines with the addition of the timestamp of the checkpoint
used for the clone. The cloned virtual machines are not powered on.
When cloning to VMware vSphere environments:
■
■
■
■
■
The cloned virtual machines are created in the ZertoRecoveryFolder folder, and not the recovery folder defined in the
VPG.
The cloned virtual machines use a single datastore.
The VMDKs are renamed (1).vmdk, (2).vmdk, etc.
When the recovery site is VMware vCloud Director, the clone is created in vCenter Server and the virtual machines have to
be manually imported into vCD.
If the protected virtual machine has RDMs attached, these disks are always cloned as thin-provisioned VMDKs to the
datastore specified in the Recovery Datastore field in the Edit VM dialog in the REPLICATION step in the Edit VPG
wizard.
When cloning to Microsoft Hyper-V environments:
■
■
The cloned virtual machines use a single storage.
The VHDs are renamed (1).vhdx, (2).vhdx, etc.
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CHAPTER 18: RECOVERING FILES
AND FOLDERS
You can recover specific files and folders from the recovery site for virtual machines that are being protected by Zerto Virtual
Replication and running Windows operating systems. You can recover the files and folders from a specific point-in-time. Thus,
you can recover files and folders for a virtual machine for as far back as the journal history is configured.
This chapter describes how to recover files and folders. The following topics are described in this chapter:
■
■
“The File and Folder Recovery Process”, below
“Recovering Files and Folders”, on page 205
The File and Folder Recovery Process
Use the RESTORE FILE operation to recover specific files and folders from the recovery site.
When you set up file and folder recovery, you always specify a checkpoint to which you want to recover the files and folders.
When you select a checkpoint – either the last automatically generated checkpoint, an earlier automatically generated
checkpoint, or a tagged checkpoint – Zerto Virtual Replication makes sure that the files and folders replicated at the remote site
are recovered to this specified point-in-time.
The file and folder operation has the following basic steps:
■
■
■
Selecting the virtual machine that is protected on which the files or folders to recover are located.
Selecting the checkpoint at which the files and folders will be recovered.
Selecting the disk which contains the files and folders to recover.
Note: You can only recover files and folders from one disk at a time.
■
■
■
■
Mounting the selected disk.
Selecting the files and folders on the disk to recover.
Downloading the selected files and folders. The files are downloaded to the machine where you run the Zerto User
Interface. Make sure that this machine has enough space for the recovered files.
Unmounting the selected disk.
You can only recover files and folders from one disk at a time. After the required disk is mounted, if you want to recover files or
folders from another disk, you can begin the mount process for the second disk. Zerto Virtual Replication does not support
mounting the same volume twice, for example if you want a file from two different checkpoints.
The operating system of the machine on which the recovery site Zerto Virtual Manager is installed determines the types of file
systems from which files and folders can be recovered. When the operating system supports a file system, files and folders can
be recovered from it. For example, if a protected virtual machine running Windows 2012 has files using the ReFS file system
and requires one or more of these files to be recovered and the recovery site Zerto Virtual Manager is on a machine with
Windows 2008, which does not support ReFS, the protected virtual machine files and folders cannot be recovered.
Note the following:
■
■
■
■
You cannot recover files or folders from Linux machines.
You cannot recover files or folders from a virtual machine when a test failover, live failover, move, clone, or backup is being
performed on a VPG that contains the virtual machine.
Zerto Virtual Replication does not support disks larger than 2TB.
You cannot recover files or folders from the Zerto plugin.
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Recovering Files and Folders
The procedure to recover files and folders involves the following steps:
■
■
Mounting the disk that contains the required files and folders.
Downloading the files and folders from the disk.
To mount a disk that includes files and folders to restore:
1.
From either the protected or recovery site, select ACTIONS > RESTORE FILE.
The File and Folder Restore wizard is displayed.
The list of all protected virtual machines is displayed. You can only recover files or folders from one virtual machine at a
time.
2.
Select the virtual machine on which the file or folder is located and click NEXT.
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The CHECKPOINT step is displayed. By default, all checkpoints are displayed.
3.
Select the checkpoint from which to recover the file or folder.
Auto – Checkpoints generated by the Zerto Virtual Manager are displayed.
VSS – Checkpoints that were synchronized with VSS snapshots are displayed. When VSS is used, recovery to the latest
VSS snapshot ensures that the data is both crash-consistent and application consistent to this point. The frequency of VSS
snapshots determines how much data can be recovered.
Tagged – Checkpoints that were added by a user, or were added by the Zerto Virtual Manager when a failover test was
performed on the VPG that included the virtual machine, or when the virtual machine was added to an existing VPG after
the virtual machine was synchronized.
4. Click NEXT.
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The DISK step is displayed. All disks associated with the selected virtual machine are displayed.
o
5.
Select a disk to mount and click NEXT.
The MOUNT step is displayed. The settings you selected are displayed.
6.
Click START MOUNT to mount the disk.
Mounting the disk may take some time, depending on the selected checkpoint and the number of files and folders on the
disk.
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When the first part of the restore process is done, icons appear next to the completed task. Click the folder icon ( ) to browse
the folders and files on the disk. Click the unmount icon ( ) to unmount the disk without restoring any files or folders.
To download folders or files:
1.
Click the folder icon.
The File and Folder Restore dialog is displayed.
2.
Click NEXT.
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The FILE/FOLDER step is displayed.
3.
Select the files and folders you want to download.
The selected files or folders are displayed in the right pane of the dialog. The number of items selected is displayed and the
size of the selected files is also displayed.
4. Click NEXT.
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The DOWNLOAD step is displayed. It shows the files and folders you selected for downloading. By default, when you select
multiple files or one or more folders, the data is compressed before it is downloaded. If you select only one file, for
download, you can choose whether or not the file is compressed.
5.
Click START DOWNLOAD.
The files and folders are downloaded by default to the downloads folder on the computer where you run the Zerto User
Interface.
Note: Saving the files and folders to a network share is dependent on the browser used to display the Zerto User Interface
and the settings for this browser.
When you select one file to download, and do not compress the file, the name of the downloaded file is the name of the file. For
example, if you download a file called Important-file.docx, the name of the file on your computer will be
Important-file.docx. When you choose one file and choose to compress it, or you select multiple files, the files are zipped
into a file called ZertoDownloads.zip.
Zerto recommends that you unmount the disk after the files or folders are downloaded. While the disk is mounted:
■
■
■
■
If you start a live failover or move, Zerto Virtual Manager forcibly unmounts the disk so the live failover or move can be
performed.
Scheduled backups do not start.
Manual backups fail.
You can perform a test failover or clone.
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CHAPTER 19: RESTORING AN
OFFSITE BACKUP
Zerto Virtual Replication enables recovering the virtual machines in a VPG from an offsite backup, up to one year back, to the
recovery site.
The following topics are described in this chapter:
■
■
“The Restore Process”, below
“Restoring Virtual Machines”, on page 212
The Restore Process
Use the Restore operation to recover the VPG virtual machines on the recovery site from a backup job. The virtual machines on
the protected site remain protected and live.
The Restore operation has the following basic steps:
1.
2.
The VBA accesses a specified backup, either by identifying the specific VPG that was backed up or by scanning a specified
repository for offsite backups.
The VBA passes the offsite backup to the VRA.
Note: If backed up volumes were deleted after the backup was created, as long as there are still volumes to restore, the
backup can continue, restoring the remaining volumes.
3.
The VRA creates the virtual machines under the designated host and storage on the recovery site. The host and storage
can be the same as the recovery host and storage specified in the VPG or any other host and associated storage in the site.
4. If requested, the restored virtual machines are powered on.
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Restoring Virtual Machines
You can restore an offsite backup to the recovery site, either by specifying the VPG that has offsite backups or the repository
where the backup was saved.
To restore a backup:
1.
In the Zerto User Interface select ACTIONS > RESTORE BACKUP.
The Restore from Zerto Backup wizard is displayed.
2.
Select the VPG to restore from the backup list or the repository where the offsite backup was saved. If the VPG backups
were saved to more than one repository, selecting the VPG collects all the offsite backups for the VPG from all the
available repositories.
Note: When restoring via the VPG backup option, the VPG must still be available. If the VPG was deleted, the restore must
be performed from a repository.
3.
Click NEXT.
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The RESTORE POINT step is displayed, showing all the available offsite backups.
where:
Point in Time – The date and time the offsite backup was performed.
Restore Site – The recovery site for the VPG.
Backup Status – Whether the offsite backup of the virtual machines was fully completed or only partially completed, in
which case only some of the virtual machine were fully backed up.
VMs – The number of backed up virtual machines out of the total number of virtual machines.
Volumes – The number of backed up volumes out of the total number of volumes for the virtual machines.
Repository – The name of the repository where the offsite backup is stored.
Compression – A value in this field denotes that the backups stored in the repository are compressed.
ZORG – The Zerto organization for which the offsite backup was created. This field only has a value if the Zerto Cloud
Manager is connected to the site. For details, refer to Zerto Cloud Manager Administration Guide.
4. Select the offsite backup to restore.
Selecting an offsite backup displays the list of virtual machines in the backup, including the following information:
VM Name – The name of the virtual machine in the package.
VM Backup Status – Whether the offsite backup of the virtual machine is complete or only partial, in which case only some
of the volumes of the virtual machine were backed up.
Backed Up Volumes – The number of backed up volumes out of the total number of volumes for the virtual machine.
Note: The number of offsite backups available depends on the frequency — daily or weekly — specified and the length of
the retention period for the VPG. The exact number of offsite backups over time is described in “Offsite Backups”, on
page 34.
5.
Click NEXT.
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The VM SETTINGS step is displayed.
The list of virtual machines in the selected offsite backup is displayed.
6.
You can specify the following default values, which are then applied to all the virtual machines to be restored:
Restore on Host – The IP address of the host where you want the virtual machine restored. After selecting a host the
Restore on Storage field is displayed.
Restore on Storage – The storage to use for the restored virtual machine files.
Alternatively, you can use the recovery host and storage specified for each virtual machine in the VPG definition by clicking
APPLY VPG CONFIGURATION.
Note: The VPG must still be available to use APPLY VPG CONFIGURATION.
If you want to change the information in one field, click the field and update the information. If you want to change the host
or datastore information for several virtual machines at the same time, select the virtual machines and click EDIT
SELECTED.
The Configure VM Settings dialog is displayed.
Note: If one or more of the backed up volumes was deleted after the backup was created, as long as there are still volumes
to restore the backup can continue, restoring the remaining volumes.
You can specify the following values, which are then applied to all the selected virtual machines:
Restore on Host – The IP address of the host where you want the virtual machines restored.
Restore on Storage – The storage to use for the restored virtual machine files.
Power On – Check this if you want the restored virtual machines to be powered on.
Alternatively, you can use the recovery host and storage specified for each virtual machine in the VPG definition by clicking
APPLY VPG CONFIGURATION.
7.
For each virtual machine, specify the volume information by clicking Volumes under Actions.
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The Volumes dialog is displayed:
8.
If you want to edit information in a field, click the field and update the information. If you want to edit information for
several datastores at the same time, select the datastores and click EDIT SELECTED.
The Edit Selected Volumes dialog is displayed.
Note: If more than one storage is selected, the path is not displayed.
9.
Specify the storage settings.
Storage – The storage where the virtual machine files will be restored.
Thin – Whether the virtual machine disks will be dynamic disks or not.
10. Click SAVE.
11. Click DONE.
12. For each virtual machine, specify the NIC information by clicking NICs under Actions.
The NICs dialog is displayed:
13. If you want to edit information in one field, click the field and update the information. If you want to edit information for
several virtual NICs at the same time, select the NICs and click EDIT SELECTED.
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The Edit NIC dialog is displayed.
14. Specify the NIC settings.
NIC Name – The name of the selected NIC.
Network – The network to use for the restored virtual machine.
Create new MAC address? – The Media Access Control address (MAC address) to use. The default is to use the same
MAC address for the restored virtual machine that was used in the protected site. Check the box to create a new MAC
address on the restore site.
IP Address – The IP for the restored virtual machine. This can be the same IP as the original protected virtual machine.
Subnet Mask – The subnet mask for the network. The default value is 255.255.255.0.
Default Gateway – The default mask for the network.
Preferred DNS Server– The IP address of the primary DNS server to handle Internet protocol mapping.
Alternate DNS Server – The IP address of the alternate DNS server.
DNS Suffix – The DNS name excluding the host.
15. Click OK.
16. Click DONE.
17. Click NEXT.
The SUMMARY step is displayed. Check the details of the restore.
18. If this is the offsite backup you want to restore, click RESTORE.
The virtual machines are created from the repository at the recovery site.
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CHAPTER 20: ZERTO VIRTUAL
REPLICATION REPORTS
Zerto Virtual Replication includes reporting for the following:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
“Outbound Protection Over Time”, below
“Protection Over Time by Site”, on page 218
“Recovery Reports”, on page 219
“Resources Report”, on page 220
“Monthly Usage Report”, on page 223
“VPG Performance”, on page 224
“Backup Report”, on page 224
Outbound Protection Over Time
Information about how much data is actually being protected against the amount configured for any of the sites can be
displayed in the Outbound Protection Over Time report under the REPORTS tab.
The data displayed can be up to 30 minutes old, since the Zerto Virtual Manager collects the relevant data every 30 minutes.
You can filter the information by the following:
From and To – The dates for which you want information.
Recovery Site – Select the site for which you want information or select all sites. If all sites are selected, All is displayed. The
dropdown list displays all sites paired with the local site.
Click APPLY to apply the selected filtering and produce the report.
Click RESET to reset the display to the default values.
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Protection Over Time by Site
Information about the virtual machines and the amount of data on the recovery site can be displayed in the Protection Over Time
by Site report under the REPORTS tab. When the report is displayed for the first time, information is shown per 30 minute
intervals.
The data displayed can be up to 30 minutes old, since the Zerto Virtual Manager collects the relevant data every 30 minutes.
You can filter the information by the following:
From and To – Select the dates for which you want information.
Protected Site – Select the sites for which you want information. The list displays all sites paired with the local site.
Resolution – Select the resolution for the report: daily, weekly, monthly, or All.
Click APPLY to apply the selected filtering and produce the report.
Click RESET to reset the display to the default values.
Note: By default, the Protection Over Time By Site report is only available for the last 90 days.
Differences might occur between the value displayed in the Used Journal column in this report and the value displayed in the
Recovery Journal Used Storage column retrieved from vCenter or Hyper-V in the Resources report.
The Used Journal value displayed here is calculated by the VRA, based on internal journal allocations for each recovery volume.
vCenter and Hyper-V Resources reports are expected to display a larger size than in this report, and may reach up to 500MB
per virtual machine higher than reported in this report.
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Recovery Reports
Information about recovery operations — failover tests, moves, and failovers — can be displayed in Recovery Reports under the
REPORTS tab. The information includes the name of the user who initiated the report, which recovery operation, the point in
time , protected and the recovery sites involved, when the recovery operation was started, when it ended, the time it took to
bring up the machines in the recovery site, the RTO, whether the operation succeeded or not, the VPG recovery settings, the
virtual machine recovery settings, and detailed recovery steps, and any notes added during a failover test
You can filter the tests by the following:
Dates – The dates for which you want information. Only operations performed between these dates are displayed.
VPG – Select the VPGs for which you want information. The number of VPGs you selected is displayed. If you select All, the
total number of VPGs is shown.
Type – Select the recovery operations for which you want information: Failover, Move, Failover Test. If more than one
operation is selected, the number of recovery operations you selected is displayed.
Status – Select the statuses for which you want information: Success, Failed. If more than one status is selected, the number
of statuses you selected is displayed.
Click APPLY to apply the selected filtering.
Click RESET to reset the display to the default values.
Click EXPORT and choose PDF or ZIP to generate a report.
The report displays information by VPG and then by virtual machine within the VPG. The VPG information includes the type of
operation, the start time of the operation, the recovery host, storage, network, any boot order information, etc. The information
for each machine includes the steps taken during the operation, such as creating a machine and scratch volumes for testing,
when each process began and ended, and whether the operation succeeded or not.
Note: When FOT is in still in progress, the end time in the Recovery Report appears as NA.
The Recovery operation start time and Recovery operation end time values are shown in UTC according to the Zerto Virtual
Manager clock in the recovery site. The Point in time value takes the checkpoint UTC time, which was created in protected site,
and converts it to the recovery site time zone.
Branding the Recovery Report
A branded logo can be placed in the report in the top left corner by adding the logo as a .png file to the
<ZertoInstallFldr>\Zerto\Zerto Virtual Replication\gui\ folder with the name provider_logo.png.
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The folder ZertoInstallFldr is the root folder where Zerto Virtual Replication in the recovery site is installed. For
example, C:\Program Files\Zerto.
Resources Report
Information about the resources used by the virtual machines being recovered to a particular site is displayed in the Resources
report under the REPORTS tab. The information is collected at fixed times that are defined in the Reports tab of the Site Settings
dialog in the recovery site. Information for the report is saved for 90 days when the sampling period is hourly and for one year
when the sampling period is daily.
The report collects the resource information for the virtual machines being recovered to the site where the report is run.
If no virtual machines are recovered to the site where the report is run, the report is empty.
You can filter the information by the following:
From and To – The dates for which you want information.
Click EXPORT to generate the report, which is produced as an Excel file.
The information presented in this report is divided into three tabs:
Details Tab – Shows information for each protected virtual machine.
Performance Tab – Shows bandwidth and throughput information for each virtual machine in a table and in a graph.
Target Host Tab – Shows information per host in the recovery site.
Using a REST API to Generate a Report
Zerto Virtual Replication exposes a REST API to produce resource data. The report is generated by passing a URL. For details
about the ResourcesReport API (and all other Zerto Virtual Replication REST APIs), see the Zerto Virtual Replication RESTful API
Reference Guide.
Details Tab
The Details tab includes the names and IDs of the virtual machines being protected and, for each virtual machine, the
timestamp for the information, where it is protected, the CPU used, the memory used by the host and the guest, the storage
used, and other information.
Interpreting the Details Tab
The Details tab provides a breakdown of every protected virtual machine, identified by its internal identifier and name in the
hypervisor manager. The report also includes the name of the VPG that is protecting the virtual machine and information such
as the protected and recovery sites, the protected and recovery vCD Org, cluster, etc.
The Timestamp column displays the time when the last sample, as defined in the Reports tab of the Site Settings dialog, was
taken.
The VPG Type column is one of:
VC2VC – vCenter to vCenter replication
VC2VCD – vCenter to vCloud Director replication
VCD2VCD – vCloud Director to vCloud Director replication
VCD2VC – vCloud Director to vCenter replication
The ZORG column defines organizations set up in the Zerto Cloud Manager that use a cloud service provider for recovery.
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The Bandwidth (Bps) and Throughput (Bps) columns display the average between two consecutive samples. With daily
samples, these figures represent the average daily bandwidth and throughput. For hourly samples, the timestamp represents
an average between the sample at the timestamp and the previous sample. A value of -1 means that the system failed to
calculate the value, which can happen for several reasons, for example:
■
■
■
Sites were disconnected when the sample was collected. Although the protected site measures the throughput and
bandwidth, the recovery site logs the results.
The bandwidth or throughput values at the time of the sample was lower than the bandwidth or throughput value in the
previous sample. This can happen, for example, if the protected site VRA is rebooted since the sample values are not
stored persistently by the VRA.
If valueInLastSample does not exist, since currentValue is the first sample for the virtual machine, the data is not
calculated.
Bandwidth is calculated as: (currentValue – valueInLastSample)/elapsedTtime
For example:
TIME
ACTION/DESCRIPTION
2:29:59.999
A virtual machine is placed in a VPG
2:30
A sample is generated. The total transmitted bytes is zero since the virtual machine was just placed in the
VPG
2:30-2:59.999
The VM is writing data at 1MB/minute
3:00
The virtual machine lowers its write rate to 0.5MB/minute
3:30
A new sample is calculated. Current value of total data transmitted is 45MB:
1MB/minute)*(30 minutes) + (0.5MB/minute)*(30 minutes)
Last value of total data transmitted is 0, from the 2:30 sample.
Bandwidth = (45MB-0)/(60 minutes) = 0.75MB/minute = 13107Bps
Report output fields
The following describes the fields in the Details, Performance and Target Host tabs.
PARAMETER
DESCRIPTION
Details
Active Guest Memory (MB)
The active memory of the virtual machine.
Bandwidth (Bps)
The average bandwidth used between two consecutive samples, in bytes per second.
Consumed Host Memory (MB)
The amount of host memory consumed by the virtual machine.
CPU Limit (MHz)
The maximum MHz available for the CPUs in the virtual machine.
CPU Reserved (MHz)
The MHz reserved for use by the CPUs in the virtual machine.
CPU Used (MHz)
The MHz used by the CPUs in the virtual machine.
CrmId
The CRM identifier specified in Zerto Cloud Manager for an organization that uses a
cloud service provider for recovery.
Memory (MB)
The virtual machine defined memory.
Memory Limit (MB)
The upper limit for this virtual machine’s memory allocation.
Memory Reserved (MB)
The guaranteed memory allocation for this virtual machine.
Number Of vCPUs
The number of CPUs for the virtual machine.
Number Of Volumes
The number of volumes attached to the virtual machine.
Recovery Journal Provisioned Storage The amount of provisioned journal storage for the virtual machine. The provisioned
(GB)
journal size reported can fluctuate considerably when new volumes are added or
removed.
Recovery Journal Used Storage (GB)
Resources Report
The amount of journal storage used by the virtual machine.
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PARAMETER
DESCRIPTION
Recovery Volumes Provisioned
Storage (GB)
The amount of provisioned storage for the virtual machine in the target site. This
value is the sum of volumes’ provisioned size.
Recovery Volumes Used Storage (GB) The amount of storage used by the virtual machine in the target site.
Service Profile
The service profile used by the VPG.
Source Cluster
The source cluster name hosting the virtual machine.
Source Host
The source host name hosting the virtual machine.
Source Organization VDC
The name of the source vDC organization.
Source Resource Pool
The source resource pool name hosting the virtual machine.
Source Site
The source protected site name, defined in the Zerto User Interface.
Source vCD Organization
The name of the source vCD organization.
Source Volumes Provisioned Storage The amount of provisioned storage for the virtual machine in the source site. This
(GB)
value is the sum of volumes’ provisioned size.
Source Volumes Used Storage (GB)
The amount of storage used by the virtual machine in the source site. This value is the
sum of the volumes’ used size.
Source VRA Name
The name of the source VRA used to send data to the recovery site.
Target Cluster
The target cluster name hosting the virtual machine.
Target Datastores
The target storage used by the virtual machine if it is recovered.
Target Host
The target host name hosting the virtual machine when it is recovered.
Target Organization vDC
The name of the target vDC organization.
Target Resource Pool
The target resource pool name where the virtual machine will be recovered.
Target Site
The target site name, defined in the Zerto User Interface.
Target Storage Profile
The target vCD storage profile used.
Target vCD Organization
The name of the target vCD organization.
Target VRA Name
The name of the VRA managing the recovery.
Throughput (Bps)
The average throughput used between two consecutive samples, in bytes per second.
Timestamp
The date and time the resource information was collected. The value can be
converted to an understandable date using code similar to the following:
var date = new Date(jsonDate);
or code similar to the Perl code example, jsonDateToString($), described in Zerto
Virtual Replication RESTful API Reference Guide.
VM Hardware Version
The VMware hardware version.
VM Id
The internal virtual machine identifier.
VM Name
The name of the virtual machine.
VPG Name
The name of the VPG.
VPG Type
The VPG type:
VCVpg – VMware vCenter Server
VCvApp – Deprecated
VCDvApp – VMware vCloud Director vApp
PublicCloud – Amazon WebServices or Microsoft Azure
HyperV – Microsoft SCVMM
ZORG
Resources Report
The name assigned to an organization using a cloud service provider for recovery. The
name is created in the Zerto Cloud Manager. For details, see the Zerto Cloud Manager
Administration Guide.
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PARAMETER
DESCRIPTION
Performance
AppServer Bandwidth (Bps)
The varying maximum data transfer capacity allocated to the AppServer during the
measured period in bytes per second.
AppServer Throughput (Bps)
The varying number of bytes of data, for all the applications running on the
AppServer, transfered per second, during the measured period.
Target Host
Active Guest Memory (MB)
The active memory of the virtual machine.
CPU Used (MHz)
The MHz used by the CPUs in the virtual machine.
Host
The Target Host's IP address.
Total Bandwidth
The total number of bytes of data transfer capacity available to the Target Host
during the measured period.
Total Throughput
The total number of bytes of data the Target Host transferred during the measured
period.
vCPUs
The number of CPUs for the virtual machine.
VMs
The number of VMs protected.
Volumes
The number of volumes attached to the virtual machine.
Performance Tab
The Performance tab shows bandwidth and throughput information for each virtual machine in a table and in a graph. For full
explanation of the bandwidth and throughput information, refer to the “Details Tab”, on page 220.
You can filter information by date, bandwidth and throughput.
The following describes the fields in the Performance tab:
PARAMETERS
DESCRIPTION
Time Stamp
Monthly Usage Report
Information about usage can be displayed in the Monthly Usage report under the REPORTS tab. The Monthly Usage Report can
only be viewed with a cloud license.
The information is organized by organization and within each organization by site, then virtual protection group (VPG) and
then by the virtual machines in each VPG.
This report is mostly used by cloud service providers.
You can filter the information by the following:
Year – The year of interest.
Month – Select the month to review.
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For each month, the usage report displays the number of virtual machines protected during the month and the average number
per day in the month. For example, if fifteen virtual machines are protected in a few VPGs starting on the 28th of the month in a
thirty day month, the total days will be 30 (two days multiplied by fifteen machines) and the VM Count will be 1 (Total days
divided by the number of days in the month).
Click EXPORT to a CSV or ZIP file to generate the report.
The ZIP file option saves the report as a zipped CSV file in a zipped file called UsageReport.zip.
VPG Performance
Performance graphs for all VPGs or for an individual VPG can be seen in the VPG Performance report under the REPORTS tab.
These graphs show more detailed resolution than the corresponding graphs in the DASHBOARD tab.
You can specify the VPGs whose performance should be displayed. When you request information about multiple VPGs, each
VPG is shown in a different color, with a key at the top of the report that maps each color to the VPG it represents.
Position the cursor on a graph line to see exact information about that point.
Click APPLY to apply the selected filtering and produce the report.
Click RESET to reset the display to the default values.
Backup Report
Information about offsite backups can be sent as a report every day or weekly on a specified day. To set up the report, select
Site Settings > Email Settings.
Enter an email address to receive Zerto Virtual Replication backup reports.
SMTP Server Address – The SMTP server address of the hypervisor manager. The Zerto Virtual Manager must be able to
reach this address.
SMTP Server Port – The SMTP server port, if it was changed from the default, 25.
Sender Account– A valid email address for the email sender name.
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To – A valid email address where that will receive the email containing the backup reports.
SEND TEST EMAIL button – Tests that the email notification is set up correctly. A test email is sent to the email address
specified in the To field.
To configure backup reports:
1.
Select Enable backup reports.
2.
Specify whether you want a backup report sent daily or weekly.
Daily – Sends a daily backup report.
Weekly – Sends a weekly backup report. Select the day of the week from the dropdown list.
3.
Specify the time of day to send the backup report.
The backup report is sent as HTML with the following information:
■
A summary listing every VPG for which an offsite backup job has run. The summary information includes the following:
■
An entry for each backup job that was run.
■
The result of the job: successful, partial successful, or failed.
A partially successful job means that some, but not all, of the virtual machines were successfully backed up.
■
The time the job started.
■
The time the job completed.
■
The duration of the job.
■
The size of the backup that was stored in the repository.
■
The type of the job: automatic, meaning a scheduled run, or manually initiated.
■
Summary details of the run.
■
Specific details about the job, including:
■
The name of the ZORG of the VPG.
■
The protected site.
■
The backup site where offsite backup can be restored.
■
The number of virtual machines backed up from the totally number in the VPG.
■
The number of virtual machines only partially backed up.
■
The start and end times of the run and the run duration.
■
The backup size.
■
Whether the backup was scheduled or initiated manually.
■
The repository name.
■
The next time a backup of the VPG is scheduled.
■
The previous run time.
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CHAPTER 21: TROUBLESHOOTING
You can handle problems related to the WAN connecting the protecting or recovery sites, or other problems using a variety of
diagnostic and troubleshooting tools.
The following topics are described in this chapter:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
“Ensuring the Zerto Virtual Manager is Running”, below
“Troubleshooting Needs Configuration Problems”, on page 227
“Troubleshooting GUI Problems”, on page 227
“Troubleshooting VRA Problems”, on page 227
“Handling Lack of Storage Space for Recovered Virtual Machines”, on page 228
“Zerto Virtual Replication Diagnostics Utility”, on page 228
“Collecting Zerto Virtual Replication Logs”, on page 229
For details about Zerto Virtual Manager alarms, alerts, and events, refer to Zerto Virtual Replication Guide to Alerts and Events.
Ensuring the Zerto Virtual Manager is Running
If you have problems accessing the Zerto User Interface, check under Windows Services, on the machine where Zerto Virtual
Replication is installed, that the Zerto Virtual Manager Windows service is started.
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Troubleshooting Needs Configuration Problems
When the VPG status changes to Needs Configuration, the settings in the VPG need to be checked and, when necessary,
updated.
The following scenarios result in the VPG status changing to Needs Configuration:
■
■
■
■
■
A protected disk resize operation fails, for example when there is not enough disk space.
Shrinking a protected disk.
When a volume is added to a protected virtual machine and the added volume has no matching storage or not enough
room on the recovery storage.
When a volume is added to a protected virtual machine and the VPG settings are not updated because of a site
disconnection or a SCVMM error. In some situations, after the sites reconnect, the state corrects itself automatically.
When performing a Failover or Move operation, if you do not specify reverse protection.
Troubleshooting GUI Problems
Host is Not Displayed in List of Hosts in the Manage VPG Dialog
If the installation of a VRA completes successfully, but the allocation of the IP takes too long, when attempting to specify the
host to recover a VPG, the host where the VRA is installed does not appear in the list, you must uninstall and then re-install the
VRA.
Troubleshooting VRA Problems
VPG Syncing Takes a Long Time – Network Problems
Check the network. If the firewall configuration is modified, the VRA TCP connections must be reset. After a VRA disconnect
and reconnect the system can wait for up to fifteen minutes before syncing the sites after the reconnection.
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Host is Not Displayed in List of Hosts in the Manage VPG Dialog
If the installation of a VRA completes successfully, but the allocation of the IP takes too long, when attempting to specify the
host to recover a VPG, the host where the VRA is installed does not appear in the list, you must uninstall and then re-install the
VRA.
VRA Crashes During Promotion
If a VRA is promoting data to a recovery virtual machine and the VRA fails, the VRA starts up automatically but you might have
to restart the virtual machine manually and then the promotion will continue.
Cannot Install a VRA After Uninstalling a VRA on the Host
Uninstalling a VRA sometimes leaves a zagentid folder and you cannot install a new VRA, because of an old, unused, zagentid
folder. Delete the zagentid folder manually.
Note: This only happens if a file was manually added to the zagentid folder.
Handling Lack of Storage Space for Recovered Virtual Machines
If a recovery virtual machine does not have enough space on the recovery site, the promotion of data to the recovered virtual
machine hangs. If this occurs you should add more space to the machine and then start the machine. The promotion will then
continue.
Zerto Virtual Replication Diagnostics Utility
Zerto Virtual Replication includes a diagnostics utility to help resolve actual and potential problems. Using the diagnostics tool,
you can do the following:
■
■
■
■
■
■
Collect logs to help Zerto support resolve problems. The Zerto Virtual Manager must be running on each site for which you
want logs. See “To collect logs for Zerto support to use when troubleshooting:”, below.
Collect local Zerto Virtual Manager logs. Use this option if the Zerto Virtual Manager is not running. See “To collect local
Zerto Virtual Manager logs when the Zerto Virtual Manager is not running:”, on page 233.
Check the connectivity between Zerto Virtual Replication components. See “To check connectivity between Zerto Virtual
Manager components:”, on page 151.
Reconfigure the Zerto Virtual Manager, including the IP addresses of the vCenter Server and of the machine running the
Zerto Virtual Manager, and the SSL certificate used when accessing the Zerto User Interface. See “Reconfiguring the Zerto
Virtual Manager Setup”, on page 152.
Export VPG settings to an external file and import these settings.
Reconfigure access to the Microsoft SQL Server that is used by the Zerto Virtual Manager. This database was specified
during the installation of Zerto Virtual Replication. See “Reconfiguring the Microsoft SQL Server Database Used by the
Zerto Virtual Manager”, on page 154.
Note: A separate installation kit is available for download from the Zerto Support Portal downloads page that installs the Zerto
Virtual Replication Diagnostics utility as a standalone utility on any Windows machine that has Microsoft .NET Framework 4
installed.
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Collecting Zerto Virtual Replication Logs
Virtual replication logs can be collected to help Zerto support resolve problems related to Zerto Virtual Replication. Virtual
replication logs can be collected in the following ways:
“Using Remote Log Collection”, below
“Using the Zerto Diagnostics application”, on page 230
Using Remote Log Collection
Remote Log Collection allows customers to authorize Zerto support engineers to collect logs from their environment. By using
remote log collection customers can avoid having to use the Diagnostic Tool on their ZVM server in order to collect logs for
analysis, a potentially complex and time-consuming procedure.
To enable Remote Log Collection:
1.
In the Zerto User Interface, click SETTING (
) in the top right of the header and select Remote Support.
The Remote Support dialog is displayed.
2.
3.
Click the drop down menu to display the remote log collection options.
Select the remote log collection option you wish to allow:
Never – Remote log collection is not allowed (default). If remote log collection is currently is allowed, it will be terminated
if you select this option.
For the next 30 days -Remote log collection is allowed. This permission will automatically terminate in 30 days unless
terminated by selecting the Never option.
■
Only for a specific case - You will be prompted to enter the Case number opened via the Salesforce Self-service Portal.
Remote log collection will be allowed for as long as the case is active or until remote log collection is terminated by
selecting the Never option.
Click Save.
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Using the Zerto Diagnostics application
You can collect logs using the diagnostics tool to help Zerto support resolve problems when the Zerto Virtual Manager is
running or when the Zerto Virtual Manager is not running.
■
■
When the Zerto Virtual Manager is running, see “To collect logs for Zerto support to use when troubleshooting:”, below.
This option enables you to specify the logs that you want to collect, generated by Zerto Virtual Replication, for example
VRA logs, as well as logs generated by VMware, for example, vCenter Server logs or host logs. The Zerto Virtual
Replication generated logs can be filtered by any alerts issued and by the VPGs that require analysis to identify problems.
When the Zerto Virtual Manager is not running, see “To collect local Zerto Virtual Manager logs when the Zerto Virtual
Manager is not running:”, on page 233.
To collect logs for Zerto support to use when troubleshooting:
1.
Open the Zerto Diagnostics application. For example, via Start > Programs > Zerto Virtual Replication > Zerto Diagnostics.
The Zerto Virtual Replication Diagnostics menu dialog is displayed.
2.
3.
Select the Collect the Zerto Virtual Replication logs for use by Zerto support option.
Click Next.
The Initialize dialog is displayed.
4. Specify the following and click Next.
IP / Host Name – The IP of the Zerto Virtual Manager where the log collection runs from. Logs are collected from this site
and from the paired site.
Port – The port used for inbound communication with the Zerto Virtual Manager.
Your Company Name – A name to identify the log collection for the customer. This information is used by Zerto support.
An account name must be entered. After this information is added, it is displayed in subsequent uses of the diagnostics
utility.
Email – An email address for use by Zerto support when analyzing the logs. An email address must be entered. After this
information is added, it is displayed in subsequent uses of the diagnostics utility.
Timeframe – The amount of time you want to collect logs for. The more time, the bigger the collection package.
Case Number – The case number assigned by Zerto support, if one already exists. Optional.
Description – An optional free text description of the reason for collecting the logs.
After clicking Next the utility connects to the Zerto Virtual Replication and if any alerts have been issued, they are
displayed in the Select Alerts dialog.
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If there are no alerts, this dialog is skipped.
5.
Select any alerts that need analyzing from the list and click Next.
The Select VPGs dialog is displayed.
6.
Select the VPGs that you want analyzed and click Next.
The Customize dialogs are displayed. These dialogs can generally be left with their default values.
The following Customize dialogs are displayed:
■
The Select Sites dialog
■
The Select VRA Hosts dialog
■
The Select vSphere Logs dialog (not applicable when all the sites are SCVMM sites)
■
The Select vCloud Director Logs dialog (not applicable when all the sites are SCVMM sites)
The Select Sites dialog is displayed, with the list local site and all the sites paired to it listed.
Those sites that are either protecting or used for recovery for any of the selected VPGs from the previous dialog are
automatically selected.
Note: Zerto Virtual Manager logs from both sites are collected when both sites are trusted sites otherwise only logs from
the local site are collected.
7.
Verify that the sites that need analyzing are selected and click Next.
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The Select VRA Hosts dialog is displayed.
Those hosts with VRAs that are used to protect or recover any of the selected VPGs are automatically selected.
You can change the collection criteria using the plus and minus buttons. The expected size of the collection package is
updated dependent on the selected VRAs.
8.
Verify that the host with VRAs that need analyzing are selected and click Next until the Save Log Destinations dialog is
displayed.
9.
Specify destination for the files that you want collected.
Destination – The name and location where the log collection will be saved.
Automatically upload files to Zerto FTP Server – When this option is checked, the log collection is automatically uploaded
to a specified FTP site.
If you choose to upload the log collection to a site that you specify, make sure that the site is up.
10. Specify the FTP site to send the collection and the protocol to use, either FTP or HTTP.
11. Click Next.
The Review dialog is displayed.
Check that you have specified everything you want to collect and if you want to make changes, click Back to change the
selection.
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12. Click Start.
The data is collected and stored in the destination file which, by default, is timestamped. If specified, the collection is also
sent to an FTP site.
Note: The log collection is performed on the server. Canceling the collection in the GUI does not stop the collection from
continuing on the server and a new log collection cannot be run until the running collection finishes.
When the log collection has completed the result is displayed. For example:
13. Click Done to return to the Zerto Virtual Replication Diagnostics menu dialog.
14. Send the log to Zerto support, unless the Automatically upload files to Zerto FTP Server option was specified,
in which case it is automatically sent to Zerto.
To collect local Zerto Virtual Manager logs when the Zerto Virtual Manager is not running:
1.
Open the Zerto Diagnostics application. For example, via Start > Programs > Zerto Virtual Replication > Zerto Diagnostics.
The Zerto Virtual Replication Diagnostics menu dialog is displayed.
2.
Select the Local Zerto Virtual Manager diagnostics option and click Next.
You are prompted to use the first option to collect more comprehensive diagnostics. If you continue, the Initialize dialog is
displayed.
3.
Specify the details that you want collected.
IP / Host Name – The IP of the Zerto Virtual Manager where the log collection runs from. Logs are collected from this site
and from the paired site.
Port – The port used for inbound communication with the Zerto Virtual Manager.
Your Company Name – A name to identify the log collection for the customer account. This information is used by Zerto
support. An account name must be entered.
Email – An email address for use by Zerto support when analyzing the logs. An email address must be entered.
Timeframe – The amount of time you want to collect logs for. The more time, the bigger the collection package.
Case Number – An optional field for the case number assigned to the issue by Zerto.
Description – An optional free text description of the reason for collecting the logs.
4. Click Next.
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The Save Log Destinations dialog is displayed.
5.
Specify the details that you want collected.
Destination – The name and location where the log collection will be saved.
Automatically upload files to Zerto FTP Server – When this option is checked, the log collection is automatically uploaded
to a specified FTP site.
If you choose to upload the log collection to a site that you specify, make sure that the site is up before clicking Finish.
The data is collected and stored in the destination file which, by default, is timestamped. If specified, the collection is also
sent to an FTP site.
6.
Click Next.
The collection progress is displayed. When the log collection has completed the result is displayed.
7.
Click Done to return to the Zerto Virtual Replication Diagnostics menu dialog.
8.
Send the log to Zerto support, unless the Automatically upload files to Zerto FTP Server option was specified,
in which case it is automatically sent to Zerto.
1.
Understanding the Logs
If problems arise with Zerto Virtual Manager, you can view the Zerto Virtual Manager logs to see what is happening.
The current log is called logfile.csv and resides in the <Zerto_Install_Dir>\Zerto Virtual Replication\logs folder,
where Zerto_Install_Dir is the folder specified during the installation.
When the log reaches 10MB its name is changed to log.nnnn.csv, where nnnn is a number incremented by one each time
logfile.csv reaches 10MB. Up to 100 log files are kept.
The log file has the following format:
FFFF, yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss, ####, LVL, Component, API, Message
where:
FFFF – A HEX code. For internal use.
yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss – Timestamp for the message.
#### – Number for internal use.
LVL – Severity level of the message. The more messages written to the log the bigger the impact on performance. The number
of messages written to the log decreases from Debug to Error. The level can be one of the following:
Debug – All messages are written to the log. This level should only be specified during testing.
Info – Information messages.
Warn – Warning messages such as a reconnect ion occurred.
Error – Error messages that need handling to find the problem.
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Component – The specific part in the Zerto Virtual Manager that issued the message.
API – The specific API that issued the message.
Message – The message written in the log.
The following is a sample from a log:
07f4c878,2010-12-01 19:54:41.4237,Debug,5,
Zerto.Zvm.RemoteZvmConnector.ResyncingRemoteZvmConnector,
TestConnectivity,TestConnectivity returning true,
07f4c878,2010-12-01 19:54:41.7362,Info,11,
Zerto.Zvm.ZvmServices.Protection.PromotionMonitor,
PromotionMonitoringThreadFunc,Promoting protection groups: ,
07f4c878,2010-12-01 19:54:42.7987,Info,9,
Zerto.Infra.ZvmReaderWriterLock,LogLock,Synchronizer: Enter Writer,
07f4c878,2010-12-01 19:54:42.7987,Info,9,
Zerto.Zvm.ZvmServices.ReconnectingConnectorProxy,
GetConnector,"Connecting IP=106.16.223.86, PORT=4005, attempt (1/3)",
07f4c878,2010-12-01 19:54:42.7987,Debug,9,
Zerto.Zvm.VraConnector.VraNetworkConnector,
Connect,try to connect 106.16.223.86:4005 ...,
07f4c878,2010-12-01 19:54:43.0643,Debug,17,
Zerto.Zvm.ZvmServices.CrossSiteService,Ping,Ping,
07f4c878,2010-12-01 19:54:43.0643,Debug,17,
Zerto.Zvm.ZvmServices.PingService,Ping,Ping called,
07f4c878,2010-12-01 19:54:43.8612,Error,9,
Zerto.Zvm.VraConnector.VraNetworkConnector,
ClearAndThrow,connection is closed: No connection could be made because the target
machine actively refused it 106.16.223.86:4005,
07f4c878,2010-12-01 19:54:43.8612,Warn,9,
Zerto.Zvm.ZvmServices.ReconnectingConnectorProxy,GetConnector,failed,
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CHAPTER 22: ZERTO VIRTUAL
REPLICATION AND MICROSOFT
HYPER-V FEATURES
This chapter describes the interaction between Zerto Virtual Replication and commonly used Microsoft Hyper-V features such
as live migration, dynamic optimization, and failover clustering.
The following topics are described in this chapter:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
“Stopping and Restarting the SCVMM”, below
“Dynamic Disks”, on page 236
“Hyper-V High Availability (HA)”, on page 236
“Clusters”, on page 237
“Failover Clustering and Fault Tolerance”, on page 237
“Pass-through Disks”, on page 237
“Performance and Resource Optimization or Dynamic Optimization”, on page 237
“Multi-Pathing and Storage Failures”, on page 237
“Availability Sets and Anti-Affinity Rules”, on page 238
“Live Migration”, on page 238
“Quick Storage Migration”, on page 238
“SCVMM and Host Maintenance Mode”, on page 238
“User Management”, on page 238
“Hyper-V Replica”, on page 239
“Restart Zerto Virtual Manager After SCVMM Upgrade”, on page 239
Stopping and Restarting the SCVMM
If a host on which Hyper-V is running is restarted, a Zerto Virtual Replication Delta Sync is performed on all protected virtual
machines on that host.
Dynamic Disks
Microsoft dynamic disks use multiple hard disks, which can contain many dynamic volumes, to manage data. They enable you
to create volumes that span multiple disks and to create fault-tolerant volumes. All volumes on dynamic disks are known as
dynamic volumes. Dynamic disks offer greater flexibility for volume management because they use a database to track
information about dynamic volumes on the disk. Dynamic disks and volumes rely on the Logical Disk Manager (LDM) and
Virtual Disk Service (VDS) for management.
When recovering virtual machines in a VPG, VHDX disks are always recovered in the recovery site with dynamic disks. VHD
disks are recovered in the recovery site by default with the same configuration as in the protected site.
Hyper-V High Availability (HA)
Highly available virtual machines in Hyper-V reside on highly available storage such as a cluster shared volume (CSV) and can
only handle disks residing on this type of storage. Therefore, when Zerto replicates a virtual machine, the type of virtual
machine created on the recovery site is determined by the type of storage designated for it.
When high availability is enabled, a copy of each cached object or region is maintained on a separate cache host. The cache
cluster manages these copies and supplies them to the application if the primary copies are not available.
High availability is automatically disabled by Zerto Virtual Replication while updating recovered virtual machines in the
recovery site from the VRA journal. After promotion of data from the journal to the recovered virtual machine completes, high
availability is automatically re-enabled.
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Clusters
A cluster is a group of tightly coupled hosts, called nodes, that work closely together so that in many respects they can be
viewed as though they are a single computer. With a cluster, you define two or more physical machines that provide resources
for the hosts that are assigned to that cluster. By using clusters, you can achieve high availability and load balancing of virtual
machines.
When protecting a virtual machine on a host that is part of a cluster, Zerto recommends that you install a VRA on each host in
the cluster, to ensure coverage if the virtual machine is migrated with Live Migration.
Failover Clustering and Fault Tolerance
Setting up a failover cluster for Hyper-V hosts makes the virtual machines fault tolerant. The Failover Clustering feature
requires you to manually specify the virtual machines that you wish to make fault tolerant. Fault tolerant virtual machines are
treated as clustered roles. Virtual machines automatically restart when a node in a cluster unexpectedly failed.
Pass-through Disks
Storage on pass-through disks provides the following:
■
■
■
■
■
Very fast performance.
A very simple storage path because the file system on the host is not involved.
Better alignment under SAN.
Lower CPU utilization.
Support for very large disks.
Zerto Virtual Replication cannot protect virtual machines with pass-through disks. Also, a Hyper-V host with a pass-through
disk is ignored by the Zerto Virtual Manager.
Performance and Resource Optimization or Dynamic Optimization
Performance and Resource Optimization (PRO) ensures that virtual machine hosts and virtual machines are operating in the
most efficient possible manner. PRO generates recommendations for remedial actions based on alerts that the Operations
Manager generates. You can configure PRO to implement the pre-defined corrective actions automatically or you can choose
to perform these actions manually. During Dynamic Optimization, SCVMM migrates virtual machines within a host cluster to
improve load balancing among hosts.
PRO is ignored by Zerto Virtual Replication. Dynamic Optimization is automatically disabled by Zerto Virtual Replication when
updating recovered virtual machines in the recovery site from their journals. After promotion of data from the journal to the
recovered virtual machine completes, Dynamic Optimization is automatically re-enabled.
Multi-Pathing and Storage Failures
Hyper-V can use multiple paths to a storage array, which is called multi-pathing. If all paths from a Hyper-V node to the
storage array fail, an alternative route using the network LAN can be used to reach the storage. This is called Redirected IO.
Zerto Virtual Replication does not support multi-pathing.
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Availability Sets and Anti-Affinity Rules
Availability sets keep virtual machines separate from each other so they do not run on the same host whenever possible. If you
create an availability set in SCVMM for two different virtual machines, SCVMM attempts to keep those virtual machines on
separate hosts and avoids placing them on the same host. Availability sets implement this by defining anti-affinity rules within
a Hyper-V host cluster or in standalone hosts.
VRAs are defined with affinity rules to prevent their migration. Do not change these affinity rules.
During a recovery operation, when new virtual machines are created in the recovery site, migration of these virtual machines is
prevented by Zerto-defined affinity rules. Once the recovery process is complete, the affinity rules are deleted and these virtual
machines can be migrated.
Live Migration
If you use live migration to migrate a virtual machine, which is part of a VPG, from one host to another host, before moving the
virtual machine make sure that:
■
■
The host to which you are moving the virtual machine has a Virtual Replication Appliance (VRA) installed on it, as
described in the Zerto Virtual Replication Installation Guide.
The virtual machine is not a test virtual machine running on the recovery site during the performance of a failover test, as
described in “Testing Recovery”, on page 171.
Do not migrate a Virtual Replication Appliance (VRA) from one host to another. Also, do not migrate a virtual machine on the
recovery site that is being updated from the VRA journal until promotion of data to the virtual machine completes.
Quick Storage Migration
Microsoft quick storage migration enables you to move virtual machine storage from one location to another. The virtual disks
of a running virtual machine can be migrated independently of their storage protocols or storage types. Downtime is minimal
because quick storage migration takes a snapshot of the virtual machine and transfers data without requiring the virtual
machine to be turned off.
Zerto Virtual Replication supports quick storage migration for protected virtual machine volumes and for journal volumes in
the recovery site, but not for machine volumes in a VPG being promoted.
SCVMM and Host Maintenance Mode
In SCVMM, you can configure maintenance mode for a virtual machine host anytime that you need to perform maintenance
tasks on the physical host, such as applying security updates or replacing hardware on the physical host computer.
Before maintaining a host that is being used for recovery, edit VPGs that contain virtual machines that are replicating to this
host and change their recovery host. Assuming that you only change the recovery host, the resulting update uses live migration
and should be very quick.
User Management
Hyper-V Manager allows users designated as administrators of the management operating system to manage virtual machines
on a host. Authorized users can perform management tasks on the host, such as starting and stopping VMs, importing and
deploying VMs, and managing snapshots. By default, anyone who is a local administrator of the management operating system
can use Hyper-V Manager on the host. In addition, a user can also use Hyper-V Manager to remotely manage Hyper-V on
other servers in a domain to which the user has administrative access.
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SCVMM may use run-as-account to perform operations on the Hyper-V host. Zerto Virtual Manager also uses the default
run-as-account to perform operations on this host.
Hyper-V Replica
Hyper-V Replica asynchronously replicates Hyper-V virtual machines in a primary site to replica virtual machines in a
secondary site.
Zerto Virtual Replication cannot protect virtual machines that are protected using Hyper-V Replica.
Restart Zerto Virtual Manager After SCVMM Upgrade
Zerto Virtual Manager must be restarted after SCVMM is upgraded.
Hyper-V Replica
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CHAPTER 23: THE ZERTO VIRTUAL
MANAGER USER INTERFACE
Configuration and management of the disaster recovery for a site is performed in the Zerto User Interface.
The following dialogs and tabs are described in this chapter:
■ “Add Checkpoint Dialog”, below
■ “Add Site Dialog”, on page 241
■ “Advanced Journal Settings Dialog”, on page 242
■ “Advanced VM Replication Settings Dialog”, on page 243
■ “Advanced VM Settings for Cloud Dialog”, on page 243
■ “ALERTS”, on page 244
■ “Boot Order Dialog” on page 244
■ “Browse for File Dialog”, on page 245
■ “Change VM Recovery VRA Dialog”, on page 245
■ “Checkpoints Dialog”, on page 246
■ “Configure and Install VRA Dialog”, on page 247
■ “Configure Paired Site Routing Dialog”, on page 248
■ “Configure VM Settings Dialog”, on page 249
■ “Edit NIC Dialog”, on page 249
■ “Edit Repository Dialog”, on page 250
■ “Edit Selected Volumes Dialog”, on page 251
■ “Edit VM Dialog” on page 251
■ “Edit VM Settings (AWS)” on page 252
■ “Edit VM Settings (Azure)”, on page 252
■ “Edit vNIC Dialog”, on page 253
■ “Edit Volumes Dialog”, on page 254
■ “Edit VRA Dialog”, on page 254
■ “New Repository Dialog”, on page 255
■ “NICs Dialog”, on page 256
■ “Offsite Clone Dialog”, on page 256
■ “Open Support Ticket Dialog”, on page 257
■ “Remote Support Dialog”, on page 257
■ “Restore Volumes Dialog”, on page 260
■ “Site Settings Dialog”, on page 261
■ “Stop Failover Test Dialog”, on page 267
■ “TASKS”, on page 268
■ “Volumes Dialog”, on page 268
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Add Checkpoint Dialog
Checkpoints are recorded automatically every few seconds in the journal. These checkpoints ensure crash-consistency and are
written to the virtual machine journals by the Zerto Virtual Manager. Each checkpoint has a timestamp set by the Zerto Virtual
Manager. In addition to the automatically generated checkpoints, you can manually add checkpoints to identify events that
might influence the recovery, such as a planned switch over to a secondary generator.
The list of VPGs is displayed. You can select more VPGs to add the same checkpoint.
Enter a name for the checkpoint – The name to assign to the checkpoint.
Dir – The direction of the protection.
VPG Name – The name of the VPG.
Protected Site Name – The name of the site where virtual machines are protected.
Recovery Site Name – The name of the site where protected virtual machines are recovered.
You can filter columns in the list via the filter icon next to each column title. You can also sort the list by each column. Clicking
the cog on the right side of the table enables you to change the columns that are displayed and to create a permanent view of
the columns you want displayed.
Add Site Dialog
Pair sites.
Remote Site ZVM IP Address – IP address or fully qualified DNS host name of the remote site Zerto Virtual Manager to pair to.
Port – The TCP port communication between the sites. Enter the port that was specified during installation. The default port
during the installation is 9081.
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Advanced Journal Settings Dialog
Manage the journal used for recovery.
Journal History – The time that all write commands are saved in the journal. The longer the information is saved, the more
space is required for each journal in the VPG to store the saved information. You can select the number of hours from 1 to 23 or
the number of days from 1 to 30.
Default Journal Storage – The storage used for the journal data for each virtual machine in the VPG. Select storage accessible
to the host. When you select a specific journal storage, the journals for each virtual machine in the VPG are stored in this
storage, regardless of where the recovery storage are for each virtual machine. In this case, all protected virtual machines must
be recovered to the hosts that can access the specified journal storage.
Journal Size Hard Limit – The maximum size that the journal can grow, either as a percentage or a fixed amount. The minimum
journal size, set by Zerto Virtual Replication, is 8GB. The journal is always thin-provisioned.
Unlimited – The size of the journal is unlimited and it can grow to the size of the recovery storage.
Size (GB) – The maximum journal size in GB.
Percentage – The percentage of the virtual machine volume size the journal can grow to.
If unlimited is chosen, the Size and Percentage options are not displayed.
Journal Size Warning Threshold – The size of the journal that triggers a warning that the journal is nearing its hard limit.
Unlimited – The size of the journal is unlimited and it can grow to the size of the recovery storage.
Size (GB) – The size in GB that will generate a warning.
Percentage – The percentage of the virtual machine volume size that will generate a warning.
If unlimited is chosen, the Size and Percentage options are not displayed.
Both the value of Size and Percentage must be less than the configured hard limit so that the warning will be generated when
needed. In addition to the warning threshold, Zerto Virtual Replication will issue a message when the free space available for
the journal is almost full.
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Advanced VM Replication Settings Dialog
Displays the replication settings for the virtual machines in the VPG. You can choose to edit information in one field by clicking
the field and updating the information. You can choose to edit information for several virtual machines at the same time by
selecting the virtual machines and clicking EDIT SELECTED.
Advanced VM Settings for Cloud Dialog
Displays the recovery settings for the virtual machines in the VPG. You can choose to edit information in one field by clicking
the field and updating the information. You can choose to edit information for several virtual machines at the same time by
selecting the virtual machines and clicking EDIT SELECTED.
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ALERTS
Monitor the recent alerts by clicking the ALERTS area in the status bar at the bottom of the Zerto User Interface. The following
information is displayed for the most recent alerts:
■
■
■
The alert status.
The site where the alert is issued.
A description of the alert.
Click See All Alerts to access MONITORING > ALERTS.
Boot Order Dialog
To specify the boot order of virtual machines in a VPG. When machines are started up on recovery, for example, after a move
operation, the virtual machines in the VPG are not started up in a particular order. If you want specific virtual machines to start
before other machines, you can specify a boot order. The virtual machines are defined in groups and the boot order applies to
the groups and not to individual virtual machines in the groups. You can specify a delay between groups during startup.
Initially, virtual machines in the VPG are displayed together under the default group. If you want specific machines to start
before other virtual machines, define new groups with one or more virtual machines in each group.
There is no boot order for virtual machines within a group, only between groups.
ADD GROUP button – Adds a group. After adding a group you can edit the group name by clicking the Edit icon at the right of
the group name and remove the group via the delete icon at the right of the group. You cannot remove the Default group nor
a group that contains a virtual machine.
Boot Delay – Specifies a time delay between starting up the virtual machines in the group and starting up the virtual machines
in the next group. For example, assume three groups, Default, Server, and Client defined in this order. The Start-up delay defined
ALERTS
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for the Default group is 10, for the Server group is 100 and for the Client group 0. The virtual machines in the Default group are
started together and after 10 seconds the virtual machines in the Server group are started. After 100 seconds the virtual
machines in the Client group are started up.
Browse for File Dialog
To select the folder with the preseeded disk to use. Drill-down to select the disk.
Note: Disks that are not viable for preseeding are grayed out.
Change VM Recovery VRA Dialog
To change the recovery host required by the VRA to access the host.
Alert icon status indicator – The color indicates the status of the alert:
■
Green icon – The virtual machine can be moved to the replacement host.
■
Red icon – The virtual machine cannot be moved to the replacement host.
Direction – The direction of the replication, from this site to the remote site or from the remote site to this site.
VM Name – The name of the virtual machine.
VPG Name – The name of the VPG.
ZORG – The Zerto name given to the organization, the ZORG, by a cloud service provider. For details, refer to Zerto Cloud
Manager Administration Guide.
VM Size GB – The virtual machine size in gigabytes.
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# of Volumes – The number of volumes used by the virtual machine.
VM Hardware Version – The hardware version of the virtual machine.
Select the replacement host – The name of the host to move the recovery virtual machines information.
Checkpoints Dialog
The point to recover to.
Latest – Recovery is to the latest checkpoint. This ensures that the data is crash-consistent for the recovery. When selecting
the latest checkpoint, the checkpoint used is the latest at this point. If a checkpoint is added between this point and starting the
failover, the later checkpoint is not used.
Latest Tagged Checkpoint – The recovery operation is to the latest checkpoint added in one of the following situations:
■
■
■
By a user.
When a failover test was previously performed on the VPG which includes the virtual machine.
When the virtual machine was added to an existing VPG after the added virtual machine was synchronized.
Latest VSS – When VSS is used, recovery or clone is to the latest VSS snapshot, ensuring that the data is both crash-consistent
and application consistent to this point. The frequency of VSS snapshots determines how much data can be recovered.
If you do not want to use the latest checkpoint, latest tagged checkpoint, or latest VSS checkpoint, choose Select from all
available checkpoints. By default, this option displays all checkpoints in the system. You can choose to display only
automatic, VSS, or tagged checkpoints, or any combination of these types.
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Configure and Install VRA Dialog
Host – The host under which the VRA is installed. The drop-down displays the hosts managed by the hypervisor manager that
do not have a VRA installed, with the selected host displayed by default.
Host Root Password – For future use.
Storage – The storage that the VRA will use for protected virtual machine data on the recovery site, including the journals. You
can install more than one VRA on the same storage.
Network – The network used to access the VRA.
VRA RAM – The amount of memory to allocate to the VRA. The amount determines the maximum buffer size for the VRA for
buffering IOs written by the protected virtual machines, before the writes are sent over the network to the recovery VRA. The
recovery VRA also buffers the incoming IOs until they are written to the journal. If a buffer becomes full, a Bitmap Sync is
performed after space is freed up in the buffer.
AMOUNT OF VRA RAM
VRA BUFFER POOL SIZE
1GB
450MB
2GB
1450MB
3GB
2300MB
3GB
2300MB
4GB
3,300MB
5GB
4,300MB
6GB
5,300MB
7GB
6,300MB
8GB
7,300MB
9GB
8,300MB
10GB
9,300MB
11GB
10,300MB
12GB
11,300MB
13GB
12,300MB
14GB
13,300MB
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AMOUNT OF VRA RAM
VRA BUFFER POOL SIZE
15GB
14,300MB
16GB
15,300MB
The protecting VRA can use 90% of the buffer for IOs to send over the network and the recovery VRA can use 75% of the
buffer. That is, for example, a protecting VRA defined with 2GB of RAM can buffer approximately 1305MB before the buffer is
full and a Bitmap Sync is required.
VRA Group – Specify the VRA Group as free text to identify the group or select from a previously specified group. You group
VRAs together when VRAs use different networks so they can be grouped by network, for example when the protected and
recovery sites are the same site and you want to replicate to different storage in the site. The group name is free text you use to
identify the group.
The priority assigned to a VPG dictates the bandwidth used. The Zerto Virtual Manager distributes bandwidth among the
VRAs based on this priority and the VPGs with higher priorities are handled before writes from VPGs with lower priorities.
To create a new group, enter the new group name over the text New group and click CREATE.
Configuration – Either have the IP address allocated via a static IP address or a DHCP server. The Static option is the
recommended option.
Address – The IP address for the VRA.
Subnet Mask – The subnet mask for the network. The default value is 255.255.255.0.
Default Gateway – The default mask for the network.
Configure Paired Site Routing Dialog
The IP address, subnet mask, and gateway to access the peer site VRAs when access to the peer site VRAs is not via the
default gateway.
Enable Paired Site Routing – When checked, enables paired site routing.
Address – The IP address of the next hop at the local site, the router, or gateway address that is used to access the peer site
network.
Subnet Mask – The subnet mask for the peer site network.
Gateway – The gateway for the peer site network.
These access details are used to access the VRAs on the peer site.
The settings in the Configure Paired Site Routing dialog apply to all VRAs installed after the information is saved. Any existing
VRA is not affected and access to these VRAs continues via the default gateway. If the default gateway stops being used, you
must reinstall the VRAs that were installed before setting up paired site routing.
Configure Paired Site Routing Dialog
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Configure VM Settings Dialog
Specifies the values to use when restoring the selected virtual machines.
Restore on Host – The IP address of the host where you want the virtual machine restored.
Restore on Datastore – The datastore to use for the restored virtual machine files.
Power On – Check this if you want the restored virtual machine to be powered on.
Edit NIC Dialog
Specify the NIC settings when restoring an offsite backup to the recovery site.
NIC Name – The name of the selected NIC.
Network – The network to use for the restored virtual machine.
Create new MAC address – The Media Access Control address (MAC address) to use. The default is to use the same MAC
address for the restored virtual machine that was used in the protected site. Check the box to create a new MAC address on
the restore site.
Change vNIC IP Configuration – Whether or not to keep the default virtual NIC (vNIC) IP configuration. The vNIC IP is changed
after the restore has completed when Integration Services are installed. If Static is selected, the IP address, subnet mask, and
default gateway must be set. If DHCP is selected, the IP configuration and DNS server configurations are assigned
automatically, to match the protected virtual machine.
IP Address – The IP for the restored virtual machine. This can be the same IP as the original protected virtual machine.
Subnet Mask – The subnet mask for the network. The default value is 255.255.255.0.
Default Gateway – The default mask for the network.
Preferred DNS Server– The IP address of the primary DNS server to handle Internet protocol mapping.
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Alternate DNS Server – The IP address of the alternate DNS server.
DNS Suffix – The DNS name excluding the host.
Edit Repository Dialog
Edits a repository used for backups.
Repository Name – The name of the repository.
Repository Type – The type of repository. The options are Local or Network Share (SMB). If Local is specified, backups are stored
on the local machine where the Zerto Virtual Manager is installed. If Network Share (SMB) is specified, the network share drive
must be an SMB drive and if specified the username and password to access the drive must be provided.
Username – The username to access the Network Share drive. The name can be entered using either of the following formats:
■ username
■ domain\username
This field is not displayed when the type is Local.
Password – The password to access the Network Share drive. This field is not displayed when the type is Local.
Path – The path where the repository resides. The path must be accessible from the Zerto Virtual Manager, so if the repository
is on a different domain than the Zerto Virtual Manager, the domain must be included in the path.
Free Space – The amount of free space currently available for the repository.
Used Space – The amount of space currently used in the repository.
Capacity – The overall capacity of the repository.
VALIDATE – Click to validate the path. The path must be valid in order to save the information.
Enable compression – Check this option to compress backups stored in the repository. Compression is done using zip
compression, set to level six. If you want better compression, which requires more CPU, or less compression to reduce the CPU
overhead, contact Zerto support.
Set as default repository – Check this option to make the repository the default repository.
Edit Repository Dialog
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Edit Selected Volumes Dialog
If more than one storage is selected, the path is not displayed.
Storage – The storage where the virtual machine files will be restored.
Thin – Whether the virtual machine disks will be dynamic disks or not.
Edit VM Dialog
Edit the replication settings for a particular virtual machine in a VPG.
Recovery Host – The cluster, resource pool, or host that will host the recovered virtual machine. If the site is defined in Zerto
Cloud Manager, only a resource pool can be specified and the resource pool must also have been defined in Zerto Cloud
Manager. For details about Zerto Cloud Manager, see Zerto Cloud Manager Administration Guide.
When a resource pool is specified, Zerto Virtual Replication checks that the resource pool capacity is enough for the specified
virtual machine.
Recovery Storage – The location where the metadata files for the virtual machine are stored. If a cluster or resource pool is
selected for the host, only storage that is accessible by every host in the cluster or resource pool is displayed. When specifying
the recovery storage for a virtual machine with a storage cluster, specify storage in the cluster.
Journal Size Hard Limit – The maximum size that the journal can grow, either as a percentage or a fixed amount. The minimum
journal size, set by Zerto Virtual Replication, is 8GB. The journal is always thin-provisioned.
Unlimited – The size of the journal is unlimited and it can grow to the size of the recovery storage.
Size (GB) – The maximum journal size in GB.
Percentage – The percentage of the virtual machine volume size the journal can grow to.
Journal Size Warning Threshold – The size of the journal that triggers a warning that the journal is nearing its hard limit.
Unlimited – The size of the journal is unlimited and it can grow to the size of the recovery storage.
Size (GB) - The size in GB that will generate a warning.
Percentage - The percentage of the virtual machine volume size that will generate a warning.
Both the value of Size and Percentage must be less than the configured hard limit so that the warning will be generated when
needed. In addition to the warning threshold, Zerto Virtual Replication will issue a message when the free space available for
the journal is almost full.
Journal Storage – The storage used for the journal data for each virtual machine in the VPG. To change the default, specify a
host and then select a storage location accessible by this host to be used as the journal storage. When you select specific
Edit Selected Volumes Dialog
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journal storage, the journals for each virtual machine in the VPG are stored in it, regardless of where recovery storage is for
each virtual machine. In this case, all the protected virtual machines must be recovered to hosts that can access the specified
journal storage.
Edit VM Settings (AWS)
Edit the network settings for one or more virtual machines in a VPG that will be recovered to AWS. There are recovery settings
for failovers and moves, and for failover tests.
VPC Network – A virtual network dedicated to your AWS account.
Subnet – A range of IP addresses in your VPC.
Security Group – The AWS security to be associated with the virtual machines in this VPG. You can associate one or more
security groups with the virtual machines.
Instance Family – The instance family from which to select the type. AWS instance families are optimized for different types of
applications. Choose the instance family appropriate for the application in the virtual machine protected in the VPG.
Instance Type – The instance type, within the instance family, to assign to recovered instances. Different types within an
instance family vary primarily in vCPU, ECU, RAM, and local storage size. The price per instance is directly related to the
instance size.
Private IP – The private IP of an instance from the selected subnet. If you do not set the private IP, during recovery, AWS sets
the private IP from the defined subnet range.
Edit VM Settings (Azure)
Edit the network settings for one or more virtual machines in a VPG that will be recovered to AWS. There are recovery settings
for failovers and moves, and for failover tests.
VNet – A The virtual network dedicated to your Azure subscription.
Subnet – A range of IP addresses in your VPC.
Network Security Group – The Azure network security to be associated with the virtual machines in this VPG. You can
associate one or more network security groups with the virtual machines.
Instance Family – The instance family from which to select the type. Azure instance families are optimized for different types of
applications. Choose the instance family appropriate for the application in the virtual machine protected in the VPG.
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Instance Type – The instance size, within the instance family, to assign to recovered instances. Different sizes within an
instance family vary primarily in vCPU, ECU, RAM, and local storage size. The price per instance is directly related to the
instance size.
Private IP – The private IP of an instance from the selected subnet. If you do not set the private IP, during recovery, Azure sets
the private IP from the defined subnet range.
Edit vNIC Dialog
To configure the NIC used for the replicated VM disks. You can configure a maximum of four NICs.
Note: You can only change the vNIC IP for virtual machines with Microsoft Integration Services running.
Specify the network details to use for the recovered virtual machines after a live recovery or migration, in the Failover/Move
column, and for the recovered virtual machines when testing the replication, in the Test column.
Network – The recovery site network to use. For testing, this network can be a fenced-out network to avoid impacting the
production network.
Create New MAC Address – Whether the Media Access Control address (MAC address) used on the protected site should be
replicated on the recovery site. The default is to use the same MAC address on both sites.
Change vNIC IP Configuration – Whether or not to keep the default virtual NIC (vNIC) IP configuration. You can only change
the vNIC IP after recovery has completed by installing Integration Services.
To change the vNIC IP, select Yes in the Failover/Move or Test column. If you select a static IP connection, set the IP address,
subnet mask, and default gateway. Optionally, change the preferred and alternate DNS server IPs and the DNS suffix. If you
select DHCP, the IP configuration and DNS server configurations are assigned automatically, to match the protected virtual
machine. You can change the DNS suffix.
If the virtual machine has multiple NICs but is configured to only have a single default gateway, fill in a 0 for each octet in the
Default gateway field for the NICs with no default gateway.
Note: During a failover, move, or test failover, if the recovered virtual machine is assigned a different IP than the original IP,
after the virtual machine has started it is automatically rebooted so that it starts up with the correct IP. If the same network is
used for both production and test failovers, Zerto recommends changing the IP address for the virtual machines started for the
test, so that there is no IP clash between the test machines and the production machines.
Copy to failover test – When clicked, copies the settings in the Failover/Move column to the Test column.
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Copy to failover/move – When clicked, copies the settings in the Test column to the Failover/Move column.
Edit Volumes Dialog
To edit recovery storage information for a protected virtual machine.
Volume Source – The source on the recovery site for the replicated data.
Storage – A new volume is used for replicated data.
Preseed – Whether to copy the protected data to a virtual disk in the recovery site. Zerto recommends using this option
particularly for large disks so that the initial synchronization will be faster since a Delta Sync can be used to synchronize
any changes written to the recovery site after the creation of the preseeded disk. When not using a preseeded disk, the
initial synchronization phase must copy the whole disk over the WAN. When using a preseeded virtual disk, you select the
storage and exact location, folder, and name of the preseeded disk. Zerto Virtual Replication takes ownership of the
preseeded disk, moving it from its source folder to the folder used by the VRA. Only disks with the same size as the
protected disk can be selected when browsing for a preseeded disk. The storage where the preseeded disk is placed is also
used as the recovery storage for the replicated data.
Temp Data disk – If the virtual machine to be replicated includes a temp data disk as part of its configuration, specify a mirror
disk for replication that is marked as a temp data disk. In this case, data is not replicated to the temp data disk after initial
synchronization.
Storage – The storage to use to create disks for the replicated data.
The storage specified for the replication must have at least the same amount of space as the protected volume and then an
additional amount for the journal. The amount of additional space needed for the journal can be fixed by specifying a maximum
size for the journal, or can be calculated as the average change rate for the virtual machines in the VPG, multiplied by the length
of time specified for the journal history.
Edit VRA Dialog
To change the network settings for a VRA, for example when the gateway to the VRA is changed.
Host – The IP of the host on which the VRA is installed.
Edit Volumes Dialog
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Host Root Password – The password required by the VRA to access the host.
VRA Group – The free text to identify the group to which a VRA belongs. If you create a group and then change the name when
editing the VRA so that there is no VRA in the site that belongs to the originally specified group, the group is automatically
deleted from the system.
To create a new group, enter the new group name over the text New group and click CREATE.
Configuration – Either have the IP address allocated via a static IP address or a DHCP server. If the VRA was originally installed
with a static IP, you cannot change this to DHCP. If the VRA was originally installed to use a DHCP server, you can change this
to use a static IP. Zerto always recommends using a static IP.
Address – The static IP address for the VRA to communicate with the Zerto Virtual Manager.
Subnet Mask – The subnet mask for the network. The default value is 255.255.255.0.
Default Gateway – The default mask for the network.
New Repository Dialog
To create a new repository for backups.
Repository Name – The name of the repository.
Repository Type – The type of repository. The options are Local or Network Share (SMB). If Local is specified, backups are stored
on the local machine where the Zerto Virtual Manager is installed. If Network Share (SMB) is specified, the network share drive
must be an SMB drive and if specified the username and password to access the drive must be provided.
Username – Username to access the Network Share drive. The name can be entered using either of the following formats:
■ username
■ domain\username
This field is not displayed when the type is Local.
Password – Password to access the Network Share drive. This field is not displayed when the type is Local.
Path – The path where the repository will reside. The path must be accessible from the Zerto Virtual Manager, so if the
repository is on a different domain to the Zerto Virtual Manager, the domain must be included in the path.
Free Space – The amount of free space currently available for the repository.
Used Space – The amount of space currently used in the repository.
New Repository Dialog
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Capacity – The overall capacity of the repository.
VALIDATE – Click to validate the path. The path must be valid in order to save the information.
Enable compression – Check this option to compress backups stored in the repository. Compression is done using zip
compression, set to level six. If you want better compression, which requires more CPU, or less compression to reduce the CPU
overhead, contact Zerto support.
Note: Compression usually reduces the effectiveness of deduplication on stored data. If the backup repository resides on a
deduplication-enabled storage appliance, it is recommended that the data be stored uncompressed.
Set as default repository – Check this option to make the repository the default repository.
NICs Dialog
When restoring an offsite backup to the recovery site, this dialog shows the NIC settings for the virtual machines in the VPG.
You can choose to edit information in one field by clicking the field and updating the information. You can choose to edit the
NIC settings for several virtual machines at the same time by selecting the NICs and clicking EDIT SELECTED.
For more details, see “Restore Volumes Dialog”, on page 260.
Offsite Clone Dialog
To create a clone of each virtual machine in a VPG on the recovery site in the production network. The clone is a copy of the
protected virtual machines on the recovery site, while the virtual machines on the protected site remain protected and live.
SELECT A CHECKPOINT button – Opens the Checkpoints Dialog to select the checkpoint to use to make the clone.
Recovery Storage – Select the storage to use for the recovery virtual machines.
NICs Dialog
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Open Support Ticket Dialog
To open a support ticket directly from the user interface.
The clocks on the machines where Zerto Virtual Replication is installed must be synchronized with UTC and with each other
(the timezones can be different). Zerto recommends synchronizing the clocks using NTP. If the clocks are not synchronized
with UTC, submitting a support ticket can fail.
Subject – The subject of the support ticket.
Type – The type of ticket being opened.
Description – A description of the ticket in addition to the information supplied in the subject.
SSP Email Address – A valid email address registered with Zerto, with permission to open tickets.
After a support ticket is submitted, its progress is displayed. If the email address is not valid, the ticket is rejected. Once ticket
submission starts, it cannot be canceled.
Remote Support Dialog
Remote Log Collection allows customers to authorize Zerto support engineers to collect logs from their environment. By using
remote log collection customers can avoid having to use the Diagnostic Tool on their ZVM server in order to collect logs for
analysis, a potentially complex and time-consuming procedure.
Never – Remote log collection is not allowed (default). If remote log collection is currently is allowed, it will be terminated if you
select this option.
Open Support Ticket Dialog
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For the next 30 days -Remote log collection is allowed. This permission will automatically terminate in 30 days unless
terminated by selecting the Never option.
Only for a specific case - You will be prompted to enter the Case number opened via the Salesforce Self-service Portal. Remote
log collection will be allowed for as long as the case is active or until remote log collection is terminated by selecting the Never
option.
Restore from Zerto Backup
To restore the virtual machines in a VPG from the backup list or the repository where the offsite backup was saved.
If the VPG backups were saved to more than one repository, selecting the VPG collects all the offsite backups for the VPG from
all the available repositories.
When restoring via the VPG option, the VPG must still be available. If the VPG was deleted, the restore must be performed
from a repository.
After clicking NEXT, the RESTORE POINT step displays all available offsite backups.
Restore from Zerto Backup
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Point in Time – The date and time the offsite backup was performed.
Restore Site – The recovery site for the VPG.
Backup Status – Whether the offsite backup of the virtual machines was fully completed or only partially completed, in which
case only some of the virtual machine were fully backed up.
VMs – The number of backed up virtual machines out of the total number of virtual machines.
Volumes – The number of backed up volumes out of the total number of volumes for the virtual machines.
Repository – The name of the repository where the offsite backup is stored.
Compression – A value in this field denotes that the backups stored in the repository are compressed.
ZORG – The Zerto organization for which the offsite backup was created. For details, refer to Zerto Cloud Manager
Administration Guide.
Selecting an offsite backup displays the list of virtual machines in the backup, including the following information:
VM Name – The name of the virtual machine in the package.
Backup Status – Whether the offsite backup of the virtual machine was fully completed or only partially completed, in which
case only some of the volumes for the virtual machine were backed up.
# Volumes Backed Up – The number of backed up volumes out of the total number of volumes for the virtual machine.
Note: The list of offsite backups is dependent of the whether a daily or weekly backup was specified in the VPG and the
retention period.
After clicking NEXT the list of virtual machines that can be restored from the selected offsite backup are displayed.
Restore from Zerto Backup
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For each machine you specify the host and storage to use to restore the virtual machine. The following values are applied to all
the virtual machines to be restored:
Restore on Host – The IP address of the host where you want the virtual machine restored.
Restore on Storage – The storage to use for the restored virtual machine files.
Alternatively, you can use the recovery host and storage specified for each virtual machine in the VPG definition by clicking
APPLY VPG CONFIGURATION. The VPG must still be available to use APPLY VPG CONFIGURATION.
You can choose to edit information in one field by clicking the field and updating the information. You can choose to edit host
and storage information of several virtual machines at the same time by selecting the virtual machines and clicking EDIT
SELECTED.
Restore Volumes Dialog
The volumes to be restored for the selected virtual machine. You can choose to edit information in a field by clicking the field
and updating the information. You can choose to edit information for several storage volumes at the same time by selecting the
volumes and clicking EDIT SELECTED.
Restore Volumes Dialog
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Site Settings Dialog
Contains site-wide settings:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
“Site Information Dialog”, below
“Performance and Throttling Dialog”, on page 262
“Policies Dialog”, on page 263
“Email Settings Dialog”, on page 264
“Reports Dialog”, on page 265
“Compatibility Dialog”, on page 265
“License Dialog”, on page 266
“About Dialog”, on page 267
Site Information Dialog
During installation, information about the site is entered to identify the site in the user interface and to identify the contact
person at the site. After installation you can update this information.
Site Name – The name used to identify the site.
Site Location – Information such as the address of the site or a significant name to identify it.
Contact Name – The name of the person to contact if a need arises.
Contact Email – An email address to use if a need arises.
Contact Phone – A phone number to use if a need arises.
User Name – The administrator name used to access the hypervisor management tool. The name can be entered using either
of the following formats:
■
■
username
domain\username
Password – The password used to access the hypervisor management tool for the given user name. If the password changes,
specify the new password. To ensure security, after saving the settings, the password field is cleared.
Site Settings Dialog
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Performance and Throttling Dialog
Bandwidth Throttling – The maximum bandwidth that Zerto Virtual Replication uses from this site to recovery sites. The
default value is for Zerto Virtual Replication to automatically assign the bandwidth used per VPG, based on using the maximum
available and then prioritizing the usage according to the priority set for the VPGs sending data over the WAN. The minimum
supported bandwidth is 5 Mb/sec.
Unlimited – The bandwidth is unlimited. This is the default value.
Slider – Set the Mb/sec. The valid range is from 0 to 100 Mb/sec. With 0 Mb/Sec, Zerto Virtual Replication automatically
assigns the bandwidth used per VPG, based on using the maximum available and then prioritizing the usage according to
the priority set for the VPGs sending data over the WAN.
Text box – Mb/sec. when the value required is 100 Mb/sec. or more.
Time-based Throttling – To throttle the bandwidth during specific times. For example, during the daily peak transaction period
you can change the bandwidth throttling, to override the general setting.
Unlimited – The bandwidth is always unlimited.
From – The hour and the minute to start the throttling, using a 24-hour clock.
To – The hour and the minute to end the throttling, using a 24-hour clock.
Advanced Settings should only be changed in coordination with Zerto support:
Enable Bandwidth Regulation– To enable regulating the bandwidth to troubleshoot problems.
Enable IO throttling – If a host is handling too many IOs, then the IOs begin to get high latencies. To offset this the VRA sends
fewer concurrent IOs. The latency is measured by taking the average latency for all IOs over a set period of time. For example,
when the period is 5000 milliseconds and the bad IO latency is 40, the average latency is calculated every 5 seconds, and if the
average latency exceeds 40, the VRA sends fewer concurrent IOs.
Bad IO Latency VM – The threshold above which the latency is considered high, and therefore bad.
Requested Duration (ms) – The period of time used to measure the average latency.
Site Settings Dialog
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Policies Dialog
Failover/Move Commit Policy – The commit policy to use during a failover or move operation. The value set here is the default
for all failover or move operations from this point on but can be changed when defining a failover or move operation. The
following options are available:
■
■
■
None – The failover or move operation must be manually committed or rolled back by the user.
Commit – After the time specified in the Default Timeout field, the failover or move operation is committed. During the
specified time you can check the recovered VPG virtual machines, and you can manually commit or roll back.
Rollback – After the time specified in the Default Timeout field the failover or move operation is rolled back, unless you
manually commit it or roll it back before the time out value is reached. During the specified time you can check the
recovered VPG virtual machines.
Default Timeout – The time-out in minutes after which a Commit or Rollback is performed. A value of zero indicates that the
system automatically performs the commit policy, without waiting for any user interaction.
Default Script Execution Timeout – The length of time in seconds after which a script times out.
Enable Replication to Self – Enable the same site to be used as both the protected and recovery site.
Replication Pause Time – The time to pause when synchronizing a VPG if continuing the synchronization will cause all the
checkpoints in the journal to be removed.
Site Settings Dialog
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Email Settings Dialog
Define an email address to receive Zerto Virtual Replication alerts and backup reports.
SMTP Server Address – The SMTP server address. The Zerto Virtual Manager must be able to reach this address.
SMTP Server Port – The SMTP server port, if it was changed from the default, 25.
Sender Account– A valid email address for the email sender name.
To – A valid email address where you want to send the email.
SEND TEST EMAIL button – Tests that the email notification is set up correctly. A test email is sent to the email address
specified in the To field.
Enable sending alerts – Check to be notified by email about any Zerto Virtual Replication alerts issued. An email is sent when
the alert is issued, and after it has been successfully handled and the alert is no longer valid.
Enable backup reports – Defines when backup reports will be emailed.
Site Settings Dialog
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Reports Dialog
Configures the Resource Report.
Sampling Rate – When to take resource samples to identify resource usage, either daily at a specific hour and minute or hourly
at a specific minute within each hour. Note that collecting a sample hourly provides a higher resolution picture of replication
traffic than if samples are only collected once a day.
Sampling Time – The time that the sample is taken.
Compatibility Dialog
Lists supported host versions.
Site Settings Dialog
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License Dialog
The Zerto license includes the following details:
License – The license key itself.
License ID – An identifier for the license.
License Type – What is licensed: whether the license restricts the number of virtual machines that can be protected or the
number of sockets used.
Expiry Date – The license expiry date.
Quantity – The maximum amount licensed, either virtual machines or sockets, based on the license type. If blank, the quantity
is unlimited.
Maximum Sites – The maximum number of sites allowed.
Usage – The sites using the license and number of protected virtual machines in each site.
Site Settings Dialog
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About Dialog
The About dialog includes the Zerto Virtual Replication version number and whether to allow analytics to be sent to the
ZertoCall Home server to help improve Zerto Virtual Replication. You can also enable or disable the Zerto Virtual Manager to
send data to the SaaS platform for monitoring purposes.
Send analytics to Zerto – When selected, analytics are sent to Zerto that are used to improve Zerto Virtual Replication and to
automatically update Zerto Virtual Replication when a new version of a hypervisor is released that is supported by Zerto.
Send Data to Cloud – Allows licensed Zerto Virtual Manager users to enable or disable data being sent from the Zerto Virtual
Manager to the SaaS platform thereby enabling site monitoring using the Zerto Mobile App.
Note: The Enable Online Services and Zerto Mobile option is enabled by default.
Stop Failover Test Dialog
Enables stopping the testing of the selected VPG.
Result – Whether the test passed or failed.
Notes – A description of the test. For example, defines where external files that describe the tests are saved. Notes are limited
to 255 characters.
Stop Failover Test Dialog
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Stop button – Stops the testing. After stopping a test, the virtual machines in the recovery site are powered off and then
removed, and the checkpoint that was used for the test has the following tag added to identify the test:
Tested at startDateAndTimeOfTest.
TASKS
Monitor the recent tasks by clicking the TASKS area in the status bar at the bottom of the Zerto User Interface. The following
information is displayed for the most recent tasks:
■
■
■
The task status.
The name of the task.
A description of the task.
Also, actions, such as stopping a failover test, can be performed from this dialog.
Click See All Tasks to access MONITORING > TASKS.
Volumes Dialog
When restoring an offsite backup to the recovery site, this dialog shows the storage for a selected virtual machine in the VPG.
You can choose to edit information in a field by clicking the field and updating the information. You can choose to edit several
storage settings at the same time by selecting the volumes and clicking EDIT SELECTED.
For more details, see “Edit VM Dialog”, on page 251.
TASKS
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CHAPTER 24: GLOSSARY
Access Key (AWS)
An alphanumeric text string that uniquely identifies the AWS account owner. No two accounts can
have the same AWS Access Key.
Amazon Web Services A collection of remote computing services, also called web services, that make up a cloud computing
(AWS)
platform by Amazon.com. The most central and well-known of these services are Amazon EC2 and
Amazon S3. The service is advertised as providing a large computing capacity (potentially many
servers) much faster and cheaper than building a physical server farm.
Asynch Replication
See Replication, Asynchronous.
Backup
See Extended Recovery.
Bare Metal
A computer system or network in which a virtual machine is installed directly on hardware rather than
within the host operating system (OS).
Bitmap Sync1
A change tracking mechanism of the protected machines during a disconnected state when Zerto
Virtual Replication starts to maintain a smart bitmap in memory to track and record changed storage
areas. Since the bitmap is kept in memory, Zerto Virtual Replication does not require any LUN or
volume per VPG at the source side.
The bitmap is small and scales dynamically, containing references to the areas of the source disk that
have changed but not the actual I/O. The bitmap is stored locally on the VRA within the available
resources. For example, when a VRA goes down and is then rebooted.
When required, Zerto Virtual Replication starts to maintain a smart bitmap in memory, to track and
record storage areas that change. When the issue that caused the bitmap sync is resolved, the bitmap
is used to check updates to the source disks and send any updates to the recovery site. A bitmap sync
occurs during the following conditions:
■
■
■
Synchronization after WAN failure or when the load over the WAN is too great for the WAN to
handle, in which case the VPGs with the lower priorities will be the first to enter a Bitmap Sync.
When there is storage congestion at the recovery site, for example when the VRA at the recovery
site cannot handle all the writes received from the protected site in a timely fashion.
When the VRA at the recovery site goes down and is then rebooted.
During the synchronization, new checkpoints are not added to the journal but recovery operations are
still possible. If a disaster occurs requiring a failover during a bitmap synchronization, you can recover
to the last checkpoint written to the journal.
Note: For the synchronization to work, the protected virtual machines must be powered on. The VRA
requires an active IO stack to access the virtual machine data to be synchronized across the sites. If
the virtual machine is not powered on, there is no IO stack to use to access the source data to
replicate to the target recovery disks.
Bucket (AWS)
Amazon buckets are like a container for your files. You can name your buckets the way you like but it
should be unique across the Amazon system.
Business Continuity & An organization’s ability to recover from a disaster and/or unexpected event and resume or continue
Disaster Recovery
operations. A disaster recovery, DR, plan is a subset of a Business Continuity plan. Organizations
(BC/DR)
should have a business continuity, BC, plan in place that outlines the logistics and business operations.
The key metrics to be measured in a disaster recovery environment are the Recovery Point Objective
(RPO) and Recovery Time Objective (RTO).
Business Continuity
Management (BCM)
Holistic management process that identifies potential threats to an organization and the impacts to
business operations that those threats, if realized, might cause, and which provides a framework for
building organizational resilience with the capability for an effective response that safeguards the
interests of its key stakeholders, reputation, brand and value-creating activities. (ISO 22313, formerly
BS 25999-1).
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Business Continuity
Plan
Contains the instructions, procedures and guidelines that are developed and maintained in readiness
for use during and after any potentially disruptive event in order to enable the organization to continue
to deliver its critical activities at an acceptable, predefined level.
Business Impact
Analysis (BIA)
The process of analyzing business functions and processes and the effects that a business disruption
might have upon them.
Checkpoint
Zerto Virtual Replication ensures crash consistency by writing checkpoints to the journal every few
seconds. These checkpoints ensure write order fidelity and crash-consistency to each checkpoint.
During recovery you pick one of these crash-consistent checkpoints and recover to this point.
Additionally, checkpoints can be manually added by the administrator, with a description of the
checkpoint. For example, when an event is going to take place that might result in the need to perform
a recovery, you can pinpoint when this event occurs as a checkpoint in each journal.
Cloud Service Provider A service provider that offers customers storage or software services available via a private (private
(CSP)
cloud) or public network (cloud). Usually, it means the storage and software is available for access via
the Internet. Typically Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), Software as a Service (SaaS), or Platform as a
Service (PaaS) – are offered to their customers. Zerto enables them to offer Disaster Recovery As A
Service (DRaaS) and In-Cloud DR (ICDR), too.
Crisis Management
Plan
Provides the overall coordination of the organization’s response to a crisis (which is a critical event
that needs to be handled appropriately to prevent a damaging impact to the organization’s
profitability, reputation or ability to operate).
Data Deduplication
A specialized data compression technique for eliminating duplicate copies of repeating data.
Delta Sync
1
The Delta Sync uses a checksum comparison to minimize the use of network resources. A Delta Sync
is used when the protected virtual machine disks and the recovery disks should already be
synchronized, except for a possible few changes to the protected disks, for example, when the target
recovery disk is defined as a preseeded (not available in the cloud) disk or after a VRA upgrade, or for
reverse protection after a move or failover.
During the synchronization, new checkpoints are not added to the journal but recovery operations are
still possible. If a disaster occurs requiring a failover during a delta synchronization, you can recover to
the last checkpoint written to the journal.
Note: For the synchronization to work, the protected virtual machines must be powered on. The VRA
requires an active IO stack to access the virtual machine data to be synchronized across the sites. If
the virtual machine is not powered on, there is no IO stack to use to access the source data to
replicate to the target recovery disks.
Disaster
The occurrence of one or more events which, either separately or cumulatively, activate disaster
recovery.
Disaster Recovery
The ability to restart operations after an interruption to the business according to a plan that ensures
an orderly and timely restoration.
Disaster Recovery Plan The disaster recovery, DR, plan is a component of the Business Continuity plan that details the
process and procedures to recover the organization’s resources to continue business operations. The
Technology DR plan focuses on the IT disaster recovery. Also see Business Continuity Plan.
Disaster Recovery As
A Service (DRaaS)
A disaster recovery solution that incorporates a service provider to replace or augment the
organization’s data protection implementation. In a DRaaS scenario, the customer may manage and
have complete control over the production data. The Cloud Service Provider (CSP) may provide a
partial or completely managed service. In either case, the CSP must ensure the availability of the data
and adapt as the customers infrastructure changes. An advantage of this model is the CSP has
dedicated resources skilled in DR operations.
DRS (vSphere)
Enables balancing computing workloads with available resources in a VMware vCenter cluster.
Emergency
Management
Covers the immediate response to a situation or set of circumstances that present a clear and present
threat to the safety of personnel or other assets of the organization.
Estimated Recovery
Time (ERT)
This is the estimated timings based on full resource provision available during a live invocation. This
time typically sits between the Net Recovery Time and the Recovery Time Achieved (RTA) time.
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ESX/ESXi (vSphere)
Bare-metal hypervisor from VMware, meaning it installs directly on top of the physical server and
partitions it into multiple virtual machines that can run simultaneously, sharing the physical resources
of the underlying server. ESXi is the most recent version.
Extended Recovery
Extended DR includes the ability to configure both disaster recovery and offsite backups for the
protected virtual machines in the VPG, according to a user-defined data retention policy.
High Availability
(VMHA)
VMware high availability decreases downtime and improves reliability with business continuity by
enabling another ESX/ESXi host to start up virtual machines that were running on another ESX/ESXi
host that went down. High availability is automatically disabled by Zerto Virtual Replication while
updating recovered virtual machines in the recovery site from the VRA journal. After the promotion of
the data from the journal to the virtual machine completes, high availability is automatically reenabled. The HA configuration can include admission control to prevent virtual machines being
started if they violate availability constraints. If this is the case, then a failover, test failover or
migration of the virtual machines in a VPG to the cluster with this configuration will fail, if the
availability constraints are violated when the virtual machines are recovered.
Hyper-V
A hybrid hypervisor, which is installed in the operating system. However, during installation it
redesigns the operating system architecture and becomes just like a next layer on the physical
hardware.
Hypervisor
The host for multiple VMs in a virtualized environment. vSphere, ESX/ESXi, is the VMware brand
hypervisor. The hypervisor is the virtualization architecture layer that allows multiple operating
systems, termed guests, to run concurrently on a host computer.
Hypervisor Manager
The tool used to manage the host. For example VMware vCenter Server and Microsoft SCVMM.
I/O (Input/Output)
Describes any operation, program, or device that transfers data to or from a computer. Typical I/O
devices are printers, hard disks, keyboards, and mouses. In fact, some devices are basically input-only
devices (keyboards and mouses); others are primarily output-only devices (printers); and others
provide both input and output of data (hard disks, diskettes, writable CD-ROMs). In computer
architecture, the combination of the CPU and main memory (memory that the CPU can read and write
to directly, with individual instructions) is considered the brain of a computer, and from that point of
view any transfer of information from or to that combination, for example to or from a disk drive, is
considered I/O.
In-Cloud DR (ICDR)
A disaster recovery solution that incorporates a service provider to replace or augment the
organization’s data protection implementation. When customers leverage an ICDR service, the CSP
hosts the production and DR sites. The virtual machines (VMs) are typically replicated from one CSP
datacenter to another CSP datacenter as a managed service or as managed co-located datacenters.
The customers have the ability to interact with their applications as if they were locally hosted.
Initial Sync1
Synchronization performed after creating the VPG to ensure that the protected disks and recovery
disks are the same. Recovery operations cannot occur until after the initial synchronization has
completed.
Adding a virtual machine to a VPG is equivalent to creating a new VPG and an initial synchronization
is performed. In this case, any checkpoints in the journal become unusable and only new checkpoints
added after the initial synchronization completes can be used in a recovery. The data in the journal
however remains and is promoted to the recovered virtual machine as part of a recovery procedure.
Note: For the synchronization to work, the protected virtual machines must be powered on. The VRA
requires an active IO stack to access the virtual machine data to be synchronized across the sites. If
the virtual machine is not powered on, there is no IO stack to use to access the source data to
replicate to the target recovery disks.
iSCSI
An Internet Protocol (IP)-based storage networking standard for linking data storage facilities. By
carrying SCSI commands over IP networks, iSCSI is used to facilitate data transfers over intranets and
to manage storage over long distances.
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Journal
Every write to a protected virtual machine is intercepted by Zerto Virtual Replication and a copy of the
write is sent, asynchronously, to the recovery site, while the write continues to be processed on the
protected site. On the recovery site the write is written to a journal managed by the Virtual Replication
Appliance. Each protected virtual machine has its own journal.
Each journal can expand to a size specified in the VPG definition and automatically shrinks when the
expanded size is not needed.
LUN
Disk drives are the foundation of data storage, but operating systems cannot use physical disk storage
directly. The platters, heads, tracks and sectors of a physical disk drive must be translated into a
logical space, which an OS sees as a linear address space comprised of fixed-size blocks. This
translation creates a logical entity that allows operating systems to read/write files. Storage networks
must also partition their physical disks into logical entities so that host servers can access storage
area network (SAN) storage. Each logical portion is called a logical unit number (LUN). A LUN is a
logical entity that converts raw physical disk space into logical storage space, which a host server's OS
can access and use. Any computer user recognizes the logical drive letter that has been carved out of
their disk drive. For example, a computer may boot from the C: drive and access file data from a
different D: drive. LUNs do the same basic job.
Level of Business
Continuity
The reduced level of service that has been agreed if there is an interruption to business operations.
Managed Service
Provider (MSP)
See Cloud Service Provider (CSP).
Maximum Tolerable
Data Loss
The maximum tolerable data loss an organization can endure without compromising its business
objectives.
Maximum Tolerable
Outage (MTO)
The maximum time after which an outage will compromise the ability of the organization to achieve
its business objectives.
Maximum Tolerable
Period of Disruption
The duration after which an organization's viability will be irrevocably threatened if product and
service delivery cannot be resumed.
NAS
A network-attached storage (NAS) device is a server that is dedicated to nothing more than file
sharing. NAS does not provide any of the activities that a server in a server-centric system typically
provides, such as e-mail, authentication or file management. NAS allows more hard disk storage
space to be added to a network that already utilizes servers without shutting them down for
maintenance and upgrades. With a NAS device, storage is not an integral part of the server. Instead, in
this storage-centric design, the server still handles all of the processing of data but a NAS device
delivers the data to the user. A NAS device does not need to be located within the server but can exist
anywhere in a LAN and can be made up of multiple networked NAS devices.
Net Recovery Time
The net time achieved in recovering one or more VPGs after a disaster.
Offsite Backup
See Extended Recovery.
Operational Level
Agreement (OLA)
The agreement between the service management and the Service Provision Partners. It defines the
responsibilities for support and delivery of the services provided.
Pair
Zerto Virtual Replication can be installed at one or more sites and each of these sites can connect to
any of the other sites enabling enterprises to protect virtual machines across multiple vCenters or
within the same vCenter. Two sites connected to each other are considered paired. Also see
Replication to Self.
Preseed
A virtual disk (a. vmdk flat file and descriptor or a .vhdx file) in the recovery site that has been
prepared with a copy of the protected data. Using this option is recommended particularly for large
disks so that the initial synchronization is much faster. When not using a preseeded disk the initial
synchronization phase has to copy the whole disk over the WAN. Zerto Virtual Replication takes
ownership of the preseeded disk, moving it from its source folder to the folder used by the VRA.
Note that preseeding is not available in the cloud.
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Quiesce
Pausing or altering the state of running processes on a computer, particularly those that might modify
information stored on disk during a backup, in order to guarantee a consistent and usable backup.
Critical applications, such as databases have quiescent mechanisms that Zerto Virtual Replication can
use to get application consistent checkpoints.
RBAC
Role-based Access control, available in the Zerto Cloud Manager via the Permissions tab.
RDM (vSphere)
RDM is a mapping file in a separate VMFS volume that acts as a proxy for a raw physical storage
device. The RDM allows a virtual machine to directly access and use the storage device. The RDM
contains metadata for managing and redirecting disk access to the physical device.
The file gives you some of the advantages of direct access to a physical device while keeping some
advantages of a virtual disk in VMFS. As a result, it merges VMFS manageability with raw device
access.
Zerto Virtual Replication supports both physical and virtual mode RDMs.
Recovery Point
Objective (RPO)
The maximum amount of data that may be lost when the activity or service is restored after an
interruption. Expressed as a length of time before the interruption.
Recovery Time
Achieved (RTA)
The actual times achieved during a DR test.
Recovery Time
Objective (RTO)
Related to downtime. The metric refers to the amount of time it takes to recover from a data loss
event and how long it takes to return to service. The metric is an indication of the amount of time the
system's data is unavailable or inaccessible, thus preventing normal service.
Replication,
Asynchronous
Technique for replicating data between databases or file systems where the system being replicated
does not wait for the data to have been recorded on the duplicate system before proceeding.
Asynchronous Replication has the advantage of speed, at the increased risk of data loss during due to
communication or duplicate system failure.
Replication to Self
When a single vCenter is used, for example with remote branch offices, when replicating from one
datacenter to another datacenter, both managed by the same vCenter Server, you have to enable
replication to the same vCenter Server and pairing is not required.
Resource
The elements (such as staff, site, data, IT systems) that are required to deliver an activity or service.
Resource Recovery
Plan
Contains the instructions, procedures and guidelines to recover one or more resources and return
conditions to a level of operation that is acceptable to the organization. Recovery Plans include
detailed recovery procedures for IT equipment and infrastructure.
Rolling Back
Rolling back to an initial status, for example, after canceling a cloning operation on the VPG.
RPO
See Recovery Point Objective (RPO).
RTO
See Recovery Time Objective (RTO).
SAN
A storage area network (SAN) is any high-performance network whose primary purpose is to enable
storage devices to communicate with computer systems and with each other. A storage device is a
machine that contains nothing but a disk or disks for storing data. A SAN's architecture works in a way
that makes all storage devices available to all servers on a LAN or WAN. As more storage devices are
added to a SAN, they too will be accessible from any server in the larger network. In this case, the
server merely acts as a pathway between the end user and the stored data. Because stored data does
not reside directly on any of a network's servers, server power is utilized for business applications, and
network capacity is released to the end user.
SCSI
Acronym for Small Computer System Interface. SCSI is a parallel interface standard used by many
servers for attaching peripheral devices to computers. SCSI interfaces provide for faster data
transmission rates (up to 80 megabytes per second) than standard serial and parallel ports. In
addition, you can attach many devices to a single SCSI port, so that SCSI is really an I/O bus rather
than simply an interface.
SCVMM
A Microsoft management solution for the virtualized datacenter, enabling you to configure and
manage your virtualization host, networking, and storage resources in order to create and deploy
virtual machines and services to private clouds that you have created.
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Secret Access Key
(AWS)
A password. The Secret Access Key with the Access Key forms a secure information set that confirms
the user's identity.
Security Group
A virtual firewall that controls the traffic for one or more instances.
Service Continuity
Plan
The continuity plan that acts as an umbrella document for a service, referencing other plans as
required and providing service-specific emergency management and recovery plans.
Service Level
Agreement (SLA)
The agreement between the customer and service provider which defines the service that is to be
delivered to the customer.
Service Profile
A predefined set of default properties to use when VPGs are defined or edited. Zerto provides a
default service profile and the option for the organization to specify their own requirements. The cloud
service provider can define service profiles to manage specific service level agreements (SLAs) with
its customers.
Service Test Plan
Detailed plan defining the activities required to test the recovery of an individual IT service to meet
business requirements documented in the RTO and RPO.
Shadow VRA
During normal operation, a VRA might require more disks than a single virtual machine can support. If
this situation arises, the VRA creates new shadow VRA virtual machines, used by the VRA to maintain
additional disks. These virtual machines must not be removed. A VRA can manage a maximum of
1500 volumes, whether these are volumes being protected or recovered.
Snapshots
A snapshot is a block device which presents an exact copy of a logical volume, frozen at some point in
time. Typically this would be used when some batch processing, a backup for instance, needs to be
performed on the logical volume, but you don't want to halt a live system that is changing the data.
Zerto does NOT use a snapshot mechanism, but is constantly replicating data writes.
Storage Account
(Azure)
Storage accounts re like a container for your files. You can name your storage account the way you
like but it should be unique across the Azure system.
Subnet
A logical, visible subdivision of an IP network.[1] The practice of dividing a network into two or more
networks is called subnetting.
Subscription (Azure)
The description uses information derived from the following site:
https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/arunrakwal/2012/04/09/create-windows-azure-subscription/
An Azure subscription grants access to Azure services and Platform Management Portal. A
subscription has two aspects:
■
■
The Windows Azure account, through which resource usage is reported and services are billed.
The subscription itself, which governs access to and use of the Azure services that are subscribed
to.
System Center Virtual See SCVMM.
Machine Manager
Virtual Machine (VM) A virtual machine (VM) is an environment, usually a program or operating system, which does not
physically exist but is created within another environment. In this context, a VM is called a guest while
the environment it runs within is called a host.
Virtual Network
(VNet) (Azure)
A virtual network dedicated to an Azure subscription.
Virtual Private Cloud
(VPC) (AWS)
An on demand configurable pool of shared computing resources allocated within a public cloud
environment, providing a certain level of isolation between the different organizations (denoted as
users hereafter) using the resources. The isolation between one VPC user and all other users of the
same cloud (other VPC users as well as other public cloud users) is achieved normally through
allocation of a Private IP Subnet and a virtual communication construct (such as a VLAN or a set of
encrypted communication channels) per user.
Virtual Protection
Group
See VPG.
Virtual Replication
Appliance
See VRA.
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VMDK, Virtual
Machine Disk
Virtual Machines created with VMware products typically use virtual disks. The virtual disks, stored
as files on the host computer or remote storage device, appear to the guest operating systems as
standard disk drives.
Volume Delta Sync1
Synchronization when only delta changes for a volume needs synchronizing, for example, when a
virtual machine is added to a VPG using a preseeded disk.
During the synchronization, new checkpoints are not added to the journal. Also, recovery operations
are not possible during a Volume Delta Sync.
For the synchronization to work, the protected virtual machines must be powered on. The VRA
requires an active IO stack to access the virtual machine data to be synchronized across the sites. If
the virtual machine is not powered on, there is no IO stack to use to access the source data to
replicate to the target recovery disks.
Preseeding is not available in the cloud.
Volume Full Sync1
Synchronization when a full synchronization is required on a single volume.
During the synchronization, new checkpoints are not added to the journal. Also, recovery operations
are not possible during a Volume Full Sync.
Note: For the synchronization to work, the protected virtual machines must be powered on. The VRA
requires an active IO stack to access the virtual machine data to be synchronized across the sites. If
the virtual machine is not powered on, there is no IO stack to use to access the source data to
replicate to the target recovery disks.
Volume Initial Sync1
Synchronization when a full synchronization is required on a single volume, for example, when
changing the target datastore or adding a virtual machine to the VPG without using a preseeded (not
available in the cloud) disk.
During the synchronization, new checkpoints are not added to the journal. Also, recovery operations
are not possible during a Volume Initial Sync.
For the synchronization to work, the protected virtual machines must be powered on. The VRA
requires an active IO stack to access the virtual machine data to be synchronized across the sites. If
the virtual machine is not powered on, there is no IO stack to use to access the source data to
replicate to the target recovery disks.
VPG
Virtual machines are protected in virtual protection groups. A virtual protection groups (VPG) is a
group of virtual machines that you want to group together for replication purposes. For example, the
virtual machines that comprise an application like Microsoft Exchange, where one virtual machine is
used for the software, one for the database and a third for the Web Server, require that all three virtual
machines are replicated to maintain data integrity.
VRA
A virtual machine installed on each hypervisor hosting virtual machines to be protected or recovered,
that manages the replication of protected virtual machine writes across sites. A VRA must be installed
on every hypervisor that hosts virtual machines that require protecting in the protected site and on
every hypervisor that will host the replicated virtual machines in the recovery site.
vSphere
VMware’s server virtualization platform for building a cloud infrastructure.
Zerto Cloud Connector A virtual machine installed on the cloud side, one for each customer organization replication network.
(ZCC)
The Zerto Cloud Connector requires both cloud-facing and customer-facing static IP addresses. The
ZCC routes traffic between the customer network and the cloud replication network, in a secure
manner ensuring complete separation between the customer network and the cloud service provider
network. The ZCC has two Ethernet interfaces, one to the customer’s network and one to the cloud
service provider's network. Within the cloud connector a bidirectional connection is created between
the customer and cloud service provider networks. Thus, all network traffic passes through the ZCC,
where the incoming traffic on the customer network is automatically configured to IP addresses of the
cloud service provider network.
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Zerto Cloud Manager A Windows service, which enables managing all the cloud sites offering disaster recovery using a
(ZCM)
single interface. The ZCM manages the DR either as a service (DRaaS) or completely within the cloud
environment, protecting on one cloud site and recovering to a second site (ICDR).
Zerto User Interface
Recovery using Zerto Virtual Replication is managed via a user interface: in a browser via the Zerto
Virtual Manager Web Client, or in either the vSphere Web Client or vSphere Client console in the
Zerto tab.
Zerto Self-service
Portal (ZSSP)
An out-of-the-box DR portal solution with a fully functioning browser-based service portal to enable
cloud service providers to quickly introduce disaster recovery as part of their portal offering.
Zerto Virtual Backup
Appliance (VBA)
A Zerto Virtual Replication service that manages the offsite backup.
Zerto Virtual Manager A Windows service, which manages everything required for the replication between the protection
(ZVM)
and recovery sites, except for the actual replication of data. The ZVM interacts with the vCenter
Server to get the inventory of VMs, disks, networks, hosts, etc. The ZVM also monitors changes in the
VMware environment and responds accordingly. For example, a vMotion operation of a protected VM
from one host to another is intercepted by the ZVM so the Zerto User Interface is updated
accordingly.
ZORG, Zerto
Organization
Cloud customers are defined to Zerto Cloud Manager as Zerto organizations, ZORGs. A ZORG is
defined with the cloud resources it can use, the permissions that it has to perform operations, such as
testing a failover or defining a VPG.
1. Synchronization after a recovery starts after the promotion of data from the journal to the virtual machine disks ends. Thus, synchronization of virtual machines can start at different times, dependent on when the promotion for the virtual machine ends. All synchronizations are done in parallel, whether a delta
sync or full sync, etc.
276
INDEX
A
affinity rules ...............................................................149, 150, 238
anti-affinity rules .................................................................238
alerts .......................................................................................93, 244
caused by timeout ............................................................... 134
email settings ........................................................................ 161
in Dashboard .......................................................................... 87
in single VRA tab ................................................................. 102
analytics, sending to Zerto ...............................................165, 267
application-consistent checkpoints ........................................ 124
architecture ....................................................................................... 11
availability sets .............................................................................238
AWS
defining offsite backup ..................................................75, 83
editing VPG settings ...........................................................252
limitations .......................................................................69, 116
re-IP process ................................................................... 74, 82
Azure
limitations ....................................................................... 76, 117
B
backups, see offsite backup
bandwidth ................................................................... 158, 159, 262
calculating size ....................................................................... 23
freeing up ................................................................................121
in resources report ...............................................................221
site settings ........................................................ 158, 159, 262
bitmap sync ................................................................149, 150, 269
definition .................................................................................139
boot order
configuring .............................................. 37, 48, 71, 79, 244
configuring for vCD ............................................................... 61
branding the Recovery report ...................................................219
C
CALLHOME ...................................................................................165
change rate
estimating .............................................................. 41, 53, 254
checkpoint .................................................................. 123, 241, 246
adding manually ......................................................... 124, 125
adding via Add VSS Checkpoint dialog ..........................127
adding via command line ...................................................127
application-consistent ....................................................... 124
choosing ............................................................. 173, 195, 202
purpose .................................................................................... 30
renaming after testing failover .........................................176
scheduling ..............................................................................128
Chrome ............................................................................................. 16
clock synchronization with NTP .................................... 164, 257
cloning ............................................................................................256
description ................................................................... 169, 201
to Hyper-V ............................................................................203
to VMware vSphere ...........................................................203
cluster ............................................................................................ 237
for failover ............................................................................. 237
COM permissions, setting for VSS .................................130, 132
commit policy
changing .................................................................................195
choosing .................................................................................185
configuring for failover and move ....................................160
for failover and move ......................................................... 263
site setting ............................................................................ 263
compression
to minimize bandwidth ......................................................... 15
compression for offsite backup, enabling ............................. 256
connecting sites, see pairing
connectivity, checking .................................................................151
crash consistency, VSS ...............................................................126
D
Dashboard ................................................................................18, 86
alerts, events, and running tasks ............................... 87, 93
performance graphs ..............................................................87
site topology ............................................................................87
stopping a failover test .......................................................176
data compression ............................................................ 39, 51, 63
data promotion .......................................................... 188, 193, 198
when VRA fails .................................................................... 228
default gateway, configuring ............................................... 43, 57
delta sync ............................................................... 41, 65, 122, 199
definition ............................................................................... 140
when restarting a host ....................................................... 236
diagnostics utility .................................................................151, 152
checking connectivity ..........................................................151
diagnostics utility, functions .................................................... 228
disaster recovery
description .............................................................................192
during a test ........................................................................ 200
initiating ..................................................................................194
types ..........................................................................................27
disk
IDE ............................................................................................ 46
pass-through and shared .....................................................35
RDM ........................................................................53, 54, 203
SCSI .......................................................................................... 46
swap .......................................................................................... 41
disk size
estimating ...............................................................41, 53, 254
277
disk space, insufficient ...............................................................228
disk types, IDE or SCSI ................................................................. 29
diskbox, see shadow VRA
dynamic disk .................................................................................236
Dynamic Optimization ...............................................................237
preventing ..............................................................................182
force delete of VPG ..................................................................... 123
E
H
EBS disks (AWS) ...................................................................69, 115
EC2 (AWS) .............................................................................69, 115
email settings ................................................................................ 161
configure ................................................................................. 161
for alerts and backup reports ............................................ 161
enable replication to self
site setting .....................................................................46, 263
environment variable ...................................................................133
ZertoForce ..............................................................................133
ZertoOperation .....................................................................133
ZertoVCenterPort ................................................................133
ZertoVPGName ....................................................................133
events ............................................................................................... 93
in Dashboard .......................................................................... 87
in single VPG tab ............................................................87, 93
in single VRA tab ................................................................. 102
export to CSV, VPG details .......................................................... 91
F
failback
enable after move ...................................................... 185, 196
introduction .......................................................................... 168
failover ..................................................................................192–200
commit policy .......................................................................263
configuring commit policy ................................................ 160
description .............................................................................192
during a test ......................................................................... 200
initiating ................................................................................. 194
introduction .......................................................................... 168
report .......................................................................................219
scratch volume ..................................................................... 198
stopping a test ......................................................................176
testing ......................................................................................171
topology ..................................................................................197
failover cluster ..............................................................................237
failover test report ........................................................................219
file recovery ................................................................................. 204
Linux machines ................................................................... 204
Firefox ................................................................................................ 16
folder recovery ............................................................................ 204
Linux machines ................................................................... 204
G
geometry, non-default ................................................................. 54
ghost VRA ......................................................................................150
glossary ................................................................................269–276
HA, see high availability
high availability ............................................................................ 236
host maintenance mode ............................................................ 238
host not displayed in Manage VPG dialog ................. 227, 228
HTTPS ............................................................................................. 155
Hyper-V Replica .......................................................................... 239
I
IDE disks ........................................................................... 29, 46, 59
initial synchronization ......................................................... 30, 122
definition .................................................................................141
Internet Explorer, supported versions ...................................... 16
J
journal ...............................................................30, 38, 72, 81, 242
adding a checkpoint ............................................................124
defining its storage ............................................................... 40
defining save time ............................................................... 242
history in VPG tab ..................................................................92
location ......................................................................................31
sizing ..........................................................................................31
storage ......................................................................................38
journal size hard limit ........... 114, 167, 171, 174, 187, 198, 242
journal size warning threshold ........................................ 114, 242
K
Keep Source VMs ........................................................................182
L
license .............................................................................................163
updating .................................................................................164
Linux machines
file and folder recovery ......................................................204
live migration ................................................................................ 238
preventing ..............................................................................182
logs
collecting .................................................... 229–??, 230–234
description ............................................................................ 234
M
m3.xlarge (AWS) .................................................................. 69, 115
MAC address ............................................................. 188, 192, 198
creating new ............................................................... 249, 253
278
maintenance mode in SCVMM ...............................................238
migration, see move
monitor
alerts, events, and running tasks ................................87, 93
recent tasks ..........................................................................268
site ............................................................................................. 99
virtual machines .................................................................... 96
VPG .................................................................................... 88, 91
VRA ......................................................................................... 102
move
commit policy .......................................................................263
configuring commit policy ................................................ 160
description .............................................................................182
failing back ................................................................... 185, 196
initiating ................................................................................. 184
introduction .......................................................................... 168
recovery report .....................................................................219
reverse replication ..................................................... 185, 196
using a scratch volume .......................................................187
multi-pathing ................................................................................237
N
needs configuration ...................................................141, 188, 199
troubleshooting ...................................................................227
network
for failing over or moving ............................................. 41, 55
for testing ......................................................................... 41, 55
NIC
defining network details ......................................... 249, 256
NTP clock synchronization ............................................. 164, 257
O
offsite backup ...................................................................12, 28, 34
changing repository ........................................................... 250
enabling compression ........................................................256
flow ........................................................................................... 28
number saved ......................................................................... 34
repository .........................................................................24, 25
restoring ..........................................................................28, 211
retention period ..................................................... 28, 34, 115
running unscheduled ...........................................................123
setting up ................................................................................. 23
status in Dashboard ............................................89, 98, 104
status in single VPG tab ...................................................... 92
status in VPGs tab ........................................................ 89, 90
offsite backup repository
creating .................................................................................... 24
editing ...................................................................................... 25
Offsite Backups report ............................................................... 224
offsite clone, see cloning
Outbound Protection Over Time report ................................. 217
P
pairing ..........................................................77, 118, 155, 241, 248
pass-through disks ..............................................................35, 237
pause protection ...........................................................................121
Performance and Resource Optimization ............................. 237
performance graphs
for a single VPG ......................................................................92
for single VRA .......................................................................102
for site .......................................................................................87
permissions in Hyper-V ............................................................ 238
PowerShell cmdlet
Set-Checkpoint .....................................................................124
preseed ........................................................................... 41, 54, 254
recovery volume .....................................................................65
promotion of data ..................................................... 188, 193, 198
hangs ...................................................................................... 228
when VRA fails .................................................................... 228
protected site, pairing ................................................................. 155
Protection Over Time by Site report .......................................218
provisioned storage ............................................................. 89, 103
Q
quick storage migration ............................................................. 238
R
raw disk (RDM) ..............................................................................53
recovery
during a test ........................................................................ 200
initiating ..................................................................................194
report ......................................................................................219
to AWS .............................................................................29, 69
to Azure ....................................................................................76
to Hyper-V ...............................................................................35
to same site ............................................................................ 45
to VMware vCenter Server ................................................ 46
to VMware vCloud Director ...............................................59
types ..........................................................................................27
recovery flows .................................................................................27
recovery host, changing ............................................................ 245
Recovery report ............................................................................219
branding .................................................................................219
recovery site
choosing ................................................................................... 61
pairing ..................................................................................... 155
recovery volume
preseeding ...............................................................................65
swap ..........................................................................................65
re-IP ................................................................................... 43, 57, 67
in AWS .............................................................................74, 82
279
Replication Pause Time ...............................................................122
replication to self ................................................................... 20, 45
configuring ..............................................................................46
reports
Offsite Backups ....................................................................224
Outbound Protection Over Time .....................................217
Protection Over Time by Site ............................................218
Recovery .................................................................................219
Resources ............................................................................. 220
Usage ......................................................................................223
VPG Performance ...............................................................224
repository
defining new .........................................................................255
offsite backup ..................................................................24, 25
resize volumes ............................................................................. 120
resource pool, choosing for recovery ......................................251
Resources report ........................................................................ 220
configuring ............................................................................265
generating with REST API ................................................ 220
output ......................................................................................221
restore
description ..............................................................................211
offsite backup ......................................................................... 28
retention period
offsite backup ..................................................................28, 34
reverse protection
when failing over ................................................................. 199
when moving ........................................................................ 188
reverse protection, see failback
reverse replication
move .............................................................................. 185, 196
rollback ............................................................................................178
failover ....................................................................................193
setting for failover or move .............................................. 160
running tasks, see tasks
S
same site replication .................................................................... 45
sandbox, using ................................................................................171
scheduling checkpoints ..............................................................128
scratch volume .................................................................... 187, 198
for testing failover ....................................................... 171, 174
scripts
creating .................................................................................. 134
execution timeout ..................................................... 160, 263
running ....................................................................................133
ZertoForce environment variable ....................................133
ZertoOperation environment variable ............................133
ZertoVCenterPort environment variable .......................133
ZertoVPGName environment variable ...........................133
SCSI disks .........................................................................29, 46, 59
security certificate
adding ........................................................................................ 16
replacing .................................................................................155
security group ........................................................................ 69, 116
service profile ................................................................................. 30
Set-Checkpoint cmdlet ...............................................................124
settings
importing VPG ......................................................................136
shadow VRA ........................................................................143, 274
shared disks .....................................................................................35
signature matching, WAN optimization .................................. 15
site details ......................................................................................158
monitoring .............................................................................. 86
site settings ...................................................................................261
bandwidth ..............................................................................159
commit policy .............................................................160, 263
configuring ....................................................................157–163
defining ................................................................................... 157
email .........................................................................................161
enabling replication to self ................................20, 46, 160
performance and throttling ...............................................158
script execution timeout ..........................................160, 263
site details ..............................................................................158
site status ........................................................................................ 86
SITES tab ......................................................................................... 99
sizing
volumes ...................................................................41, 53, 254
WAN ......................................................................................... 21
SSL certificate, see security certificate
storage
for replicated data ................................................................. 41
pass-through disks ............................................................. 237
provisioned .................................................................... 89, 103
sizing ......................................................................................... 41
storage profile .......................................................................63, 222
for vCD .....................................................................................65
missing .....................................................................................141
stored offsite backups ................................................................. 34
subnet ...................................................................................... 69, 116
support ticket, opening .............................................................. 257
swap disk .......................................................................................... 41
recovery volume .....................................................................65
synchronization
delta .........................................................................41, 122, 188
forcing ......................................................................................121
initial ................................................................. 30, 32, 65, 122
triggers .................................................................................... 137
triggers for VPG ...................................................................142
volume delta ..........................................................................188
VPGs ........................................................................................121
T
tasks .......................................................................................... 93, 95
in single VRA tab .................................................................102
monitoring ............................................................................268
test failover
stopping ..................................................................................176
testing failover ...............................................................28, 171–181
basic verification ..................................................................178
280
initiating a failover ............................................................. 200
introduction ...........................................................................167
process .....................................................................................171
running traffic against recovered VMs ...........................179
using a scratch volume .............................................. 171, 174
thin provisioning .................................................................... 54, 65
throttling ........................................................................................... 15
site settings ........................................................ 158, 159, 262
ticket, see support ticket
time-based bandwidth throttling
site settings ..................................................................159, 262
topology
for failover ..............................................................................197
for move ................................................................................. 186
for testing failover ............................................................... 174
in Dashboard .......................................................................... 87
in Sites tab ...............................................................................94
transaction consistency
VSS ...........................................................................................126
triggers
for synchronization ..............................................................137
VPG synchronization .......................................................... 142
troubleshooting
host not displayed in Manage VPG dialog .........227, 228
insufficient disk space ........................................................228
VRA crashes during data promotion ..............................228
Zerto Virtual Manager service ........................................226
U
uninstalling VRAs ........................................................................ 149
Usage report .................................................................................223
V
vApp network mapping ............................................................... 66
VBA ................................................................................................... 23
offsite backup ......................................................................... 28
vCD guest customizing ................................................................ 66
Virtual Backup Appliance, see VBA
virtual machine
adding or deleting volumes .............................................. 120
changing its VRA ........................................................148–149
modifying replication settings ..........................................251
monitoring ............................................................................... 96
restoring ............................................................................... 249
virtual protection group, see VPG
Virtual Replication Appliance, see VRA
VM in Several VPGs 12, 29, 36, 48, 61, 70, 79, 115, 116, 183,
.................................................................................................. 193, 198
VMware vCenter Server
cloning to it ...........................................................................203
recovering to it .................................................... 46, 188, 198
VMware vCloud Director
collecting logs .......................................................................231
recovering to it ....................................................................... 59
VMware vSphere Server
selecting preseeded disk ................................................... 245
vNIC
configuring ...............................................................................67
configuring re-IP ............................................................. 43, 57
modifying .............................................................................. 253
volume
choosing for recovery ........................................................260
estimating size .......................................................41, 53, 254
preseed .....................................................................................65
volume delta sync .............................................................. 188, 199
Volume Shadow Copy Service, see VSS
VPC (AWS) ............................................................................ 69, 116
VPG
adding a machine ................................................. 115, 116, 119
creating to recover to AWS ........................ 69–76, 78–84
creating to recover to Hyper-V .................................. 35–45
creating to recover to VMware vCD ........................ 60–68
creating to recover to VMware vCenter Server .....47–59
definition .......................................................................... 27, 29
deleting ................................................................................... 122
editing ............................................................................114, 252
forcing delete ........................................................................ 123
handling error ....................................................................... 122
importing settings ................................................................136
monitoring ........................................................................86, 91
pausing protection ................................................................121
saving details to file ............................................................... 91
statuses .................................................................................. 137
substatuses ...........................................................................139
synchronization triggers ...........................................137, 142
synchronizing .........................................................................121
waiting to be removed ........................................................ 123
VPG Performance report ........................................................... 224
VPGs tab ......................................................................................... 88
VRA ......................................................................................... 12, 274
changing recovery host ..................................................... 245
crashing during data promotion ...................................... 228
editing .....................................................................................148
editing network settings ....................................................148
ghost ........................................................................................150
monitoring .............................................................................102
shadow VRA .........................................................................143
uninstalling ............................................................................149
upgrading ..................................................................... 146–147
VSS ......................................................................124, 126, 174, 206
crash consistency ................................................................126
setting COM permissions .........................................130, 132
transaction consistency .....................................................126
W
WAN
compressing traffic ................................................. 39, 51, 63
signature matching ................................................................ 15
sizing ......................................................................................... 21
281
Zerto Virtual Manager Administration Guide for Microsoft Hyper-V Environments - Version 5.0 Update 4
WAN bandwidth, freeing up ......................................................121
WAN optimization ......................................................................... 15
Windows service
Zerto Virtual Manager .......................................................226
ZertoVssprovider .................................................................127
Z
ZCA, see Zerto Cloud Appliance
Zerto User Interface
configuration ........................................................................... 18
customizing ............................................................................. 19
Zerto Virtual Manager ................................................................... 11
checking component connectivity ....................................151
reconfiguring .........................................................................152
Windows service .................................................................226
Zerto Virtual Manager Web Client ............................................ 16
Zerto Virtual Replication
architecture .............................................................................. 11
benefits ..................................................................................... 12
description ...............................................................................10
how it works ............................................................................ 12
logs ..........................................................................................234
monitoring ............................................................................... 85
version information ..............................................................165
ZertoForce script ..........................................................................133
ZertoOperation script .................................................................133
ZertoVCenterPort script .............................................................133
ZertoVPGName script ................................................................133
ZertoVssAgent
installing .................................................................................126
ZertoVssAgent.exe ......................................................................128
ZertoVssAgentGUI.exe.conf ............................................127, 133
ZertoVssprovider
Windows service ..................................................................127
ZORG
preseeding ............................................................................... 65
specifying ................................................................................ 62
ZVM, see Zerto Virtual Manager
ABOUT ZERTO
www.zerto.com
Zerto is committed to keeping enterprise and cloud IT running 24/7 by providing scalable business continuity
software solutions. Through the Zerto Cloud Continuity Platform, organizations seamlessly move and protect
virtualized workloads between public, private and hybrid clouds. The company’s flagship product, Zerto Virtual
Replication, is the standard for protection of applications in cloud and virtualized datacenters.
For further assistance
using Zerto Virtual
Replication, contact
@Zerto Support.
Copyright © 2017, Zerto Ltd. All rights reserved.
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