Window s ®7 For Seniors - The

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Operating Systems/Windows
• What’s on the taskbar
• Directions for creating and
saving documents
• Steps for installing a printer
and other peripherals
®
You don’t need a grandchild to teach you Windows 7 —
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Windows 7 For Seniors
You can learn to use Windows,
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Making Everythin
• How to connect to the Internet
anywhere
• Tour the desktop — learn to use menus, the Start menu
button, files, and folders
• Backgammon and other games
you can play online
• Do it — create notes and letters, connect a printer, download
photos from your digital camera, and put music on a CD
• Guidance on protecting your
computer from viruses
• Have some fun — discover Solitaire and other built-in
games, listen to music, and watch a movie
• How to send e-mail
attachments
• Use the accessories — display Gadgets on your desktop,
draw with Paint, and use the Calculator
• Advice on backing up
documents and photos
• To keep or not — install additional programs you want and
remove those you don’t need
• Protect your Windows — learn to use the Action Center,
download and install virus protection software, and keep it
up to date
• Have it your way — make your screen easier to see, open
files with a single click, and even have your computer read
to you
7
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For S
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Learn to:
• Use the Windows 7 desktop and
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Go to Dummies.com®
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how-to articles, or to shop!
• Connect to the Internet and
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• The wide, wide Web — shop and explore online and learn to
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• View, edit, and print photos
• Keep in touch by e-mail and play
games online
$24.99 US / $29.99 CN / £17.99 UK
Mark Justice Hinton teaches all kinds of technology from
digital photography to HTML. He maintains a blog at
www.mjhinton.com/help where he answers questions from
his readers, and he is also the author of Digital Photography
For Seniors For Dummies.
™
ISBN 978-0-470-50946-3
Mark Justice Hinton
Hinton
Author of Digital Photography
For Seniors For Dummies
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Windows 7
For Seniors
®
FOR
DUMmIES
‰
by Mark Justice Hinton
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Windows® 7 For Seniors For Dummies®
Published by
Wiley Publishing, Inc.
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Copyright © 2009 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana
Published by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana
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About the Author
A computerist for more than 30 years, Mark Justice Hinton has written
two books on digital photography, one on Microsoft Windows Vista,
and this new book on Windows 7: www.mjhinton.com/author/.
He has taught computer classes since 1988 for the University of New
Mexico Division of Continuing Education. Mark lives — in the best
sense of the word — in front of a computer. He writes a blog on
computer topics: www.mjhinton.com/help. He posts favorite
photos, as well: www.flickr.com/photos/mjhinton/.
Dedication
To Lucky Dog, our handsome, gentle, old friend — a true gift from the
Universe.
Author’s Acknowledgments
It takes a lot of people to put this book into your hands. The author
gets the fame, the fans, and the fat check, but he couldn’t do it without
so many other people, too many of whom go unnamed here. Thanks
to everyone at Wiley for their part in producing this book. Special
thanks to editorial manager Jodi Jensen, my acquisitions editor Amy
Fandrei, project editors Leah Cameron and Jean Nelson, copy editor
Virginia Sanders, technical editor Russ Mullen, and senior editorial
assistant Cherie Case. My deepest thanks, again, to Merri Rudd,
long-time senior advocate, photographer, writer, and editor, as well as
mi corazón.
Peace,
mjh
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Publisher’s Acknowledgments
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other comments, please contact our Customer Care Department within the U.S. at 877-762-2974, outside the U.S. at 317-572-3993, or fax 317-572-4002.
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Contents at a Glance
Introduction ............................................................................. 1
Part I: Getting to Know Windows 7 ........................................... 7
1: Getting Comfortable with the Windows 7 Desktop ..........................................9
2: Examining the Anatomy of a Window ..............................................................29
3: Creating Your First Documents .........................................................................45
4: Organizing Your Documents .............................................................................69
Part II: Getting Things Done in Windows 7 .............................. 93
5: Taking Advantage of the Windows Accessories ................................................95
6: Installing and Removing Programs ................................................................ 115
7: Working with Printers and Other Add-On Devices ...................................... 127
Part III: Discovering the Internet .......................................... 141
8: Connecting to the Internet.............................................................................. 143
9: Finding What You Need on the Web ............................................................. 153
10: Sending and Receiving E-Mail ...................................................................... 179
Part IV: Having Fun with Windows 7 .................................... 201
11: Playing Games ............................................................................................... 203
12: Enjoying Photos in Windows 7 .................................................................... 213
13: Listening to Music and Watching DVDs ...................................................... 235
Part V: Having It Your Way with Windows 7 ......................... 259
14: Making Windows 7 More Fun to Use .......................................................... 261
15: Using the Taskbar and Start Menu Smartly ................................................. 285
16: Making Windows 7 Easier to Use ................................................................. 303
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Part VI: Staying Safe and Keeping Windows 7 Healthy .......... 323
17: Updating Windows 7 .................................................................................... 325
18: Protecting Your Computer ............................................................................ 341
19: Keeping Your Data Safe................................................................................. 359
Index ................................................................................... 377
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Table of Contents
Introduction ............................................................................. 1
About This Book ........................................................................................2
Foolish Assumptions .................................................................................2
Why You Need This Book .........................................................................3
Conventions Used in This Book ...............................................................3
How This Book Is Organized ....................................................................4
Time to Get Started! ...................................................................................6
Part I: Getting to Know Windows 7 ........................................... 7
Chapter 1: Getting Comfortable with the
Windows 7 Desktop ....................................................... 9
Get a New Computer with Windows 7 ..................................................10
Turn On Your Computer .........................................................................12
Check Out the Windows 7 Desktop .......................................................15
Try Out the Mouse ...................................................................................17
Go with the Start Button .........................................................................20
Get Familiar with the Taskbar .................................................................22
Get Help When You Need It ...................................................................24
Close Windows 7 .....................................................................................26
Chapter 2: Examining the Anatomy of a Window ............ 29
Explore the Parts of a Window................................................................30
Resize a Window ......................................................................................33
Arrange Windows .....................................................................................35
Snap Windows..........................................................................................37
Stack Windows .........................................................................................39
Flip between Windows ............................................................................40
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Windows 7 For Seniors For Dummies
Chapter 3: Creating Your First Documents ........................ 45
Start WordPad and Type Some Text .......................................................46
Save a Document .....................................................................................48
Add, Delete, Select, and Move Text.........................................................51
Format Text with Bold, Italics, and More ...............................................54
Print a Document.....................................................................................56
Quit WordPad ..........................................................................................60
Open a Document ...................................................................................61
Discover How a Dialog Box Works.........................................................64
Chapter 4: Organizing Your Documents ........................... 69
See All Your Documents As Files on a Disk ...........................................70
Find a Misplaced File ...............................................................................75
Create a Folder to Organize Your Files ...................................................77
Rename a File or a Folder ........................................................................78
Move a File from One Folder to Another ...............................................80
Delete a File or Folder .............................................................................82
Get Back a File or Folder You Deleted ....................................................83
Select Multiple Files and Folders ............................................................85
Copy Files and Folders to a Flash Drive or Memory Card ....................86
Copy Files and Folders from a Flash Drive or Memory Card ...............90
Part II: Getting Things Done in Windows 7 .............................. 93
Chapter 5: Taking Advantage of the
Windows Accessories .................................................... 95
Display Gadgets on Your Desktop ..........................................................96
Keep Time with the Clock Gadget ..........................................................97
Check the Weather with the Weather Gadget ..................................... 100
Use the Calculator ................................................................................. 102
Capture the Screen with the Snipping Tool ........................................ 104
Draw with Paint .................................................................................... 107
Talk to Sound Recorder ........................................................................ 112
Take Sticky Notes .................................................................................. 113
➟
viii
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Table of Contents
Chapter 6: Installing and Removing Programs ............... 115
Determine Which Programs Are on Your Computer ......................... 116
Install a New Program from a CD or DVD ......................................... 118
Install a New Program That You Downloaded from the Internet ..... 121
Remove Programs You Don’t Use........................................................ 124
Chapter 7: Working with Printers and
Other Add-On Devices ................................................ 127
Trust USB Plug and Play for Add-Ons ................................................. 128
View the Printer and Other Devices on Your Computer.................... 130
Connect a Printer to Your Computer .................................................. 132
Add an External DVD or Hard Drive ................................................... 134
Add a Second Display for Twice the Fun ............................................ 135
Part III: Discovering the Internet .......................................... 141
Chapter 8: Connecting to the Internet ............................ 143
Connect to the Internet Anywhere....................................................... 144
Bring the Internet Home ...................................................................... 149
Chapter 9: Finding What You Need on the Web ............ 153
Get Familiar with Microsoft Internet Explorer .................................... 154
Browse for News.................................................................................... 157
Use Tabs to Browse Multiple Web Pages at Once............................... 161
Change Your Browser’s Home Page..................................................... 163
Mark Your Favorite Places on the Favorites Bar .................................. 164
Add More Favorites ............................................................................... 165
Search for Anything .............................................................................. 167
Shop Online Using Amazon ................................................................ 168
Close Internet Explorer ......................................................................... 177
Chapter 10: Sending and Receiving E-Mail ..................... 179
Set Up an E-Mail Account .................................................................... 180
Check Your Inbox for New E-Mail....................................................... 184
Reply to E-Mail ...................................................................................... 188
➟
ix
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Windows 7 For Seniors For Dummies
Create a New E-Mail ............................................................................. 190
Attach a Document or Photo to E-Mail ............................................... 193
View or Open Attachments .................................................................. 195
Keep an Electronic Address Book......................................................... 197
Avoid Spam and Other Junk Messages ................................................ 199
Part IV: Having Fun with Windows 7 .................................... 201
Chapter 11: Playing Games ........................................... 203
Use the Games Explorer ....................................................................... 204
Play Solitaire .......................................................................................... 206
Show Your Grandkids Purble Place ..................................................... 208
Play Internet Backgammon .................................................................. 209
Get More Games from Microsoft and Others ..................................... 211
Chapter 12: Enjoying Photos in Windows 7 ................... 213
View Photos in Windows 7 .................................................................. 214
See Photos in a Slideshow .................................................................... 218
Display a Photo on Your Desktop ....................................................... 220
Edit Photos Using Paint........................................................................ 222
Print Your Photos.................................................................................. 226
Copy Photos from Your Digital Camera to Your Computer ............. 230
Control How Windows 7 Names and Organizes Photos .................. 233
Chapter 13: Listening to Music and Watching DVDs ....... 235
Play Music with Windows Media Player ............................................. 236
Select Music to Play .............................................................................. 239
Play a CD on Your Computer .............................................................. 241
Copy Music from a CD to Your Computer ......................................... 243
Create a Playlist ..................................................................................... 247
Create Your Own CD ............................................................................ 249
Copy Music to an MP3 Player .............................................................. 253
View Pictures in Media Player .............................................................. 255
Watch a DVD ......................................................................................... 256
➟
x
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Table of Contents
Part V: Having It Your Way with Windows 7 ......................... 259
Chapter 14: Making Windows 7 More Fun to Use ......... 261
Personalize Windows 7 with a Theme ................................................ 262
Choose a Desktop Background ............................................................ 264
Color Your Windows ............................................................................ 267
Change the Sounds Your Computer Makes ........................................ 270
Set Up a Screen Saver ............................................................................ 272
Save Your Theme ................................................................................... 275
Change Desktop Icons .......................................................................... 275
Pick Your Mouse Pointers..................................................................... 278
Change Your Account Picture .............................................................. 283
Chapter 15: Using the Taskbar and
Start Menu Smartly ..................................................... 285
Tune Up Your Taskbar .......................................................................... 286
Control System Notification Messages ................................................ 288
Pin Icons to the Taskbar ....................................................................... 291
Use Taskbar Jump Lists ......................................................................... 293
Customize Your Start Menu ................................................................. 295
Pin Icons to the Start Menu.................................................................. 300
Chapter 16: Making Windows 7 Easier to Use ............... 303
Make Your Screen Easier to See............................................................ 304
Change Screen Font Size....................................................................... 307
Turn On ClearType Text ....................................................................... 309
Stop Double-Clicking for Good ........................................................... 311
Check to Select ...................................................................................... 312
Get Recommendations for Specific Needs .......................................... 314
Start Magnifier ....................................................................................... 316
Use the On-Screen Keyboard ............................................................... 317
Let Narrator Read to You ...................................................................... 319
Explore All Access Settings.................................................................... 321
➟
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Windows 7 For Seniors For Dummies
Part VI: Staying Safe and Keeping Windows 7 Healthy .......... 323
Chapter 17: Updating Windows 7 ................................. 325
Activate Windows Now ........................................................................ 326
Perform a Windows Update ................................................................. 328
Change the Time When Windows Update Runs ................................ 332
Get Updates for Other Microsoft Products ......................................... 333
Discontinue Additional Updates ......................................................... 335
Upgrade Windows Anytime ................................................................. 337
Chapter 18: Protecting Your Computer .......................... 341
Check the Action Center ....................................................................... 342
Install Antivirus Software ..................................................................... 346
Register Your Antivirus Software .......................................................... 350
Scan a Folder or Disk for Viruses ......................................................... 353
Schedule a Disk Check.......................................................................... 355
Chapter 19: Keeping Your Data Safe ............................. 359
Back Up Your Documents and Photos ................................................ 360
Restore Files from Backup .................................................................... 367
Create a System Repair Disc ................................................................. 371
Use the System Repair Disc .................................................................. 374
Index ................................................................................... 377
➟
xii
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W
indows 7 is the latest generation of
Microsoft’s operating system, the master
program that makes a computer useful and
provides support to other programs, including
word processors, photo viewers, and Internet
browsers. Much as an education equips you to
read a novel or play a game, Windows 7 equips
your computer to perform a wide range of
activities. You can use Windows 7 and other
software (programs) to read or write a novel,
play games or music, and stay in touch with
friends and family around the world.
➟
Introduction
As Windows has evolved over the last 30 years,
so have computers — the hardware. Today, you
can buy a computer as small as a paperback
book, and even such a little computer is
unimaginably more powerful than computers
were just 10 years ago, and at a fraction of the
price. The hardware provides the mechanisms —
the display, the keyboard, the mouse, and
more — you use to work with Windows 7.
It doesn’t take much time with a computer to
conclude there has to be an easier way to do
things. At times, computers seem overly complex
and inscrutable. Have you used a cellphone
lately? Or a TV remote control? Why are the
controls on every microwave oven different?
Why does every new tool offer countless
options you don’t want that hide the ones you
do? Well, I don’t have the answers to those
questions, but I do have step-by-step instructions
for many tasks you want to perform using
Windows 7, which isn’t as dry as that sounds,
but which is quite practical.
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Windows 7 For Seniors For Dummies
After 30 years working with computers, I find computers reward
patience, curiosity, and a little methodical exploration. In this book,
you find the instructions for doing practical activities, such as creating
a letter or sending e-mail. In addition to the steps that are necessary,
you see what’s possible and what’s consistent (and inconsistent)
between different programs.
Seniors, in particular, know that learning never really stops and that
new things keep one young, at least figuratively. The computer is a
unique tool. Tomorrow, your TV won’t do something new, but with
your computer, you’ll do things you don’t yet imagine.
By the end of this book, you may be a multitasking computerist
performing virtual gymnastics with Windows 7. On the other hand,
if the computer does only one thing for you — whether it’s e-mail,
browsing the Web, enjoying photos, music, or DVDs — that one
useful thing may be all you need.
About This Book
Age is just a number. This book is intended for anyone getting started
with Windows 7 who wants step-by-step instructions without a lot
of discussion. The Get ready to . . . bullets at the beginning of each
chapter lead you to the practical tasks that you want to find out
about. Numerous figures with notes show you the computer screen as
you progress through the steps. Reading this book is like having an
experienced friend stand behind you as you use Windows 7 . . .
someone who never takes the keyboard away from you.
Foolish Assumptions
➟
I assume that you have a computer and want clear, brief, step-by-step
instruction on getting things done with Windows 7. I also assume you
want to know just what you need to know, just when you need to
know it. This isn’t Computers 101. This is Practical Windows 7. As an
old friend of mine says, “I don’t want to make a watch; I just want to
know what time it is.”
2
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Introduction
Why You Need This Book
Technology always comes with its own terms and concepts, but you
don’t need to learn another language to use a computer. You don’t
need any prior experience with computers or Windows. Step-by-step
instructions guide you through specific tasks, such as starting a
program and saving your documents. These steps provide just the
information you need for the task at hand.
You can work through this book from beginning to end or simply
look at the table of contents and find the content you need to solve a
problem or help you learn a new skill whenever you need it. The steps
in each task get you where you want to go quickly without a lot of
technical explanation. In no time, you’ll start picking up the skills you
need to become a confident Windows 7 user.
Conventions Used in This Book
This book uses certain conventions to highlight important
information and help you find your way around, including these:
➟
Tip icons: Point out helpful suggestions related to
tasks in the steps lists.
➟
Bold: I use bold on the important, find-it-now stuff:
• When you have to type something onscreen using
the keyboard
• Figure references
Many illustrations and figures have notes or other
markings to draw your attention to a specific part
of the figure. The text tells you what to look for;
the figure notes help you find it.
➟
Web site addresses: They look like this:
www.website.com. See Chapter 9 for information
on browsing the Web.
➟
3
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Windows 7 For Seniors For Dummies
➟
Menu choices: Look for this arrow symbol: ➪. This
shows a sequence of steps a computer menu. For
example, Start➪All Programs➪Accessories means to
click the Start button, click All Programs, and then
click Accessories.
➟
Options and buttons: Although Windows 7 often
uses lowercase in options and on buttons, I capitalize the text for emphasis. That way you can find a
button labeled Save Now, even though onscreen it
appears as Save now.
On the computer, you single-click the left mouse button to select an option or object. A single click of the
right mouse button always produces a special context,
or shortcut, menu with commands tailored to the situation. When appropriate, I tell you to click the right
mouse button as right-click. All other times when I
tell you to click the mouse, you can assume that I
mean the left button. See Chapter 1 for more on
using the mouse.
When you’re to use the keyboard, I tell you to press a
particular key, such as press the Enter key. Later in the
book, after you get comfortable with the steps, you
may see shorthand for keyboard shortcuts. For
example, Q+E means press and hold the Windows
logo key (with the flag icon on it, between Ctrl and
Alt on most keyboards), press the E key, and then
release both. Knowing a few keyboard shortcuts can
be very handy.
How This Book Is Organized
➟
This book is divided into six parts to help you find what you need.
You can read from cover to cover or just jump to the page that
interests you first.
4
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Introduction
➟
Part I: Getting to Know Windows 7. In Chapter 1,
turn the computer on and get comfortable with
essential parts of Windows 7, such as the desktop
and Start menu. In Chapter 2, explore the parts of a
window (an area of the screen). In Chapter 3, use
WordPad to create a note or letter. In Chapter 4,
discover the organization Windows 7 creates for you
and make it your own.
➟
Part II: Getting Things Done in Windows 7. In
Chapter 5, use programs for displaying the time and
weather, performing calculations, and taking notes.
In Chapter 6, install additional programs or remove
programs you don’t need. In Chapter 7, set up a
printer or other device, such as an external hard
drive.
➟
Part III: Discovering the Internet. In Chapter 8,
connect to the Internet at home or on the road. (You
may want to do this sooner, rather than later.) In
Chapter 9, browse the World Wide Web, which can be
your international library and marketplace. In Chapter
10, create an e-mail account and then send and
receive e-mail.
➟
Part IV: Having Fun with Windows 7. If you haven’t
been having any fun until now, I’ve failed you. In
Chapter 11, play the games Windows 7 includes,
such as Solitaire. In Chapter 12, enjoy photos on
Windows 7 and put your own photos on the computer
if you have a digital camera. In Chapter 13, listen to
music or watch a DVD movie.
➟
Part V: Having It Your Way with Windows 7. Hint:
If something about Windows 7 bothers you or is
hard to use — for example, things on the screen are
too small — turn to this section now. In Chapter 14,
➟
5
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Windows 7 For Seniors For Dummies
make changes to the look of Windows 7. In Chapter
15, adjust the taskbar and Start menu to work better
for you. In Chapter 16, change the size of objects on
the screen and turn on features intended to make
Windows 7 easier to use.
➟
Part VI: Staying Safe and Keeping Windows 7
Healthy. In Chapter 17, keep Windows 7 up-to-date.
In Chapter 18, protect your computer against bad
software (called malware), such as viruses. (Another
thing you should do sooner, rather than later.) In
Chapter 19, back up the documents and photos
you’d hate to lose.
Time to Get Started!
Scan the table of contents or the index for a topic that interests you
most. Or, just turn the page and start at the beginning. It’s your book.
Comments and suggestions are welcome. Write me at mark@
mjhinton.com. Visit the book’s Web site for supplemental material:
www.mjhinton.com/w7fs.
➟
6
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Part I
Getting to Know
Windows 7
04_509463-pp01.indd 7
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04_509463-pp01.indd 8
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Getting
Comfortable with
the Windows 7
Desktop
➟
Chapter
1
Get ready to . . .
➟ Get a New Computer with
M
icrosoft Windows 7 is a special type of
program or software — tools for getting
things done with a computer — called an
operating system, which is the master control of
a computer. Windows 7 gives a computer
essential functions that enable you to run other
programs and work with documents, photos,
and music.
Whether you already have a computer or you
intend to buy a new computer with Windows 7
installed, this chapter takes you into Windows 7
for the first time, from turning the computer
on, looking around, to turning it off again.
Get familiar with common terms and concepts,
such as the desktop, which you see soon after
you start. Use the Start menu to start programs.
Take advantage of the taskbar to see what’s
going on. You work with these parts of
Windows 7 every time you use your computer.
05_509463-ch01.indd 9
Windows 7 ........................ 10
➟ Turn On Your Computer ...... 12
➟ Check Out the Windows 7
Desktop ............................. 15
➟ Try Out the Mouse .............. 17
➟ Go with the Start Button ....... 20
➟ Get Familiar with the
Taskbar ............................. 22
➟ Get Help When You
Need It .............................. 24
➟ Close Windows 7 ............... 26
8/10/09 9:48 PM
Part I: Getting to Know Windows 7
In the process of exploring the major features of Windows 7 for the first
time, come to grips with the mouse, your pet for prodding Windows 7
into action. The mouse and its buttons enable you to point and click
your way to happiness. From time to time, I emphasize when the keyboard provides a good alternative to the using the mouse.
Get a New Computer with Windows 7
Although this is not the book to tell you everything there is to know
about buying a new computer, I do have a few suggestions for you as
you shop. The first consideration is what style or size of computer do
you want? Choose from these types of computers (see Figure 1-1):
~
!
`
@
1
#
2
$
3
W
A
Q
Tab
Caps
Lock
%
4
Ctrl
Desktop
Figure 1-1
➟
^
5
E
S
Z
Shift
PgUp
Insert Home
PgDn
Pause
Break
ScrLk
Delete End
NumLk
PrtScr
e
F12
SysRq
Backspac
F11
+
F10
_
F9
|
=
)
}
F8
F7
F6
F5
F4
F3
F2
F1
Esc
*
&
7
6
R
D
X
T
F
C
7
(
8
Y
G
V
8
9
U 4
H
B
0
9
I
J
5
1
N
/
-
O 6
K 2
M
{
P
L
<
0
3
]
[
*
,
:
“
;
>
,
‘
?
-
.
.
\
Enter
Shift
/ +
Ctrl
Alt
Alt
Fn
Laptop
Netbook
➟
A desktop computer is usually shoebox sized or
larger. Often, a desktop computer is a vertical tower
that sits under a desk or table. This desktop box
usually accepts numerous hardware upgrades
internally, but not everyone wants to open the box
and insert new hardware. A desktop has a separate
screen (also called a display or monitor) that displays
what the computer is doing, a keyboard for typing,
plus a mouse for doing things onscreen. (More on
these components shortly.)
➟
A laptop computer is not only smaller than most
desktop computers, it is portable. Even if you never
intend to leave the house with your computer, you
may enjoy taking the computer from one room to
another. A desktop computer requires you to connect
10
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Chapter 1: Getting Comfortable with the Windows 7 Desktop
a few different parts during setup. A laptop computer
is ready to go when you get it.
➟
A netbook is a small laptop computer that may
be less powerful than a more expensive laptop. A
netbook is a great beginner’s computer because
netbooks are much cheaper than other machines
($250 to $400). The small size of a netbook may
suit you perfectly, but look closely at the size of any
laptop or netbook. Is the computer too big to carry
comfortably? Will your hands fit the keyboard?
In the rest of the book, when I use the words computer or machine, I
mean any style of computer. I use the words desktop or laptop
(including netbook) to emphasize differences between those
machines, as needed.
For more information on buying a computer, see
Computer For Seniors For Dummies, by Nancy C. Muir.
When you buy a new computer, check the ad or the box or talk with a
salesperson to find out whether that computer comes with Microsoft
Windows 7 installed. Ask which edition you’re buying. The various
editions of Windows 7 have different features and capabilities. You
are most likely to see one of these editions:
➟
Starter Edition: Many of the Windows 7 visual
effects are missing from the Starter Edition, and so
are some of the useful accessories discussed in
Chapter 5. This edition may be too stripped down to
give you the real benefits of using Windows 7.
➟
Home Premium Edition: This is a good choice for
most computer users and is likely to be the version
already installed if you are buying a new PC. It has
media options, such as music and video. Home
Premium supports all the slick visual effects of
Windows 7. Some people dismiss these visual effects
as eye-candy, but these effects, such as semi-transparent
➟
11
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Part I: Getting to Know Windows 7
objects onscreen and rich colors, are part of the fun
of using Windows 7.
➟
Ultimate Edition: This version has everything
Windows 7 can provide. (The name says as much.)
Ultimate may include some advanced features —
including options for backing up your files — that
you won’t immediately need. This is the Edition that
may impress your teen-aged kids or grandkids, if
anything does.
Through a program called Windows Anytime
Upgrade, you can upgrade from Starter to Home
Premium or Ultimate. See Chapter 17 for more
information.
You can buy a DVD with Windows 7 and use that to
install Windows 7 on an older computer that currently
uses Windows XP or Vista. Sometimes, upgrades
work flawlessly; but the older the computer, the
greater the odds that some hardware or software
won’t work with the brand new Windows 7. It is
often more reliable to get a new version of Windows
on a new computer. (At least, that’s what the marketing department says.)
Turn On Your Computer
1. If your computer is a laptop, find the latch on the front
edge of the computer that releases the screen from the
keyboard. You may need to push the latch in or slide it
to the right to open the laptop. Raise the lid so you can
see the screen and the keyboard.
2. Locate the power switch. On most laptops, the switch is
➟
located near one of the hinges of the lid. On a desktop
computer, the power switch is usually on the front of the
computer box or tower (see Figure 1-2). Push in or slide
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Chapter 1: Getting Comfortable with the Windows 7 Desktop
the power switch from left to right; then release the
switch to turn on the computer. You should hear some
noise from the fan or see lights on the keyboard or screen
soon after you turn it on.
Power button
Laptop/netbook
Desktop
Figure 1-2
3. The very first time you turn on a computer running
Windows 7, you may have to create a user account with
the following information:
• User name and computer name: Your user name
appears throughout the system, from the log-in
screen to the Start menu to the folder containing
all your documents. Use a simple, clear name.
Your first name is just fine. Your computer needs a
name, as well. Windows 7 suggests your user name
plus -PC, but you can change that, if you wish.
(See Figure 1-3.) Click Next.
➟
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Part I: Getting to Know Windows 7
Enter a user name and computer name...
...And then click Next.
Figure 1-3
• Password: A password is an optional security
measure. If you enter a password when you create
your user account, that password is required each
time you start the computer. If someone other
than you tries to start your computer, he or she
will have to know (or guess) the password to get
into your files. (Don’t put your password on a
note stuck to the computer or nearby.) Click Next.
➟
For home computers, passwords may be unnecessary
unless you need to keep someone else in the
house out of your business. Laptop users should
always create a password, however, because it is
easy to lose a laptop. Don’t make it easy for a
thief to use your computer.
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Chapter 1: Getting Comfortable with the Windows 7 Desktop
• Use Recommended Settings: After the password
screen, you select settings for updating and securing
Windows 7. Click Use Recommended Settings.
• Date and Time Settings: Select your time zone.
Check or uncheck Automatically Adjust for
Daylight Saving Time, as appropriate. Confirm the
current time. Click Next.
• Select Your Computer’s Current Location: Your
computer may detect an Internet connection
automatically. If you are at home, click Home
Network. Otherwise, click Public Network. See
Chapter 8 for more information about network
connections.
After the initial setup, every time you turn on the
computer, you may be asked to log in under the user
account you created in Step 3, including a password
if you created one. If you are the only user of the
computer and did not create a password, Windows 7
logs you in automatically.
Check Out the Windows 7 Desktop
1. After you turn on the computer and log in with your user
name and (if necessary) password, you see a screen
indicating that Windows is starting. Then you see the
Windows desktop. Figure 1-4 shows a common desktop
setup, although yours may be different.
Often, an interesting picture or photo is displayed on
the desktop. You see how to change this picture in
Chapter 14.
➟
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Part I: Getting to Know Windows 7
Icon
Icons
Figure 1-4
Desktop
2. Examine your desktop for icons — small pictures that
represent programs, which perform functions, or
documents such as letters and photos. Icons provide
a way to run a program or open a document. The
Windows 7 desktop displays an icon for the Recycle
Bin, where deleted documents go. The Recycle Bin may
be the only icon on your desktop, or you may see others.
3. Finally, the desktop displays gadgets, which are usually
➟
larger than icons. Gadgets display information, such as
the time (in a clock) or the current weather report. See
Chapter 5 for more about using gadgets.
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Chapter 1: Getting Comfortable with the Windows 7 Desktop
Try Out the Mouse
1. If your computer came with a mouse pad, which is a
thin, flexible rectangle with a very smooth surface, place
the mouse pad under the mouse.
2. Move the mouse, which is typically about the size of a
bar of soap and has two buttons at one end. Your mouse
may have a wheel between the buttons. Use the wheel in
long documents or on Web pages (see Chapter 9) to
scroll to areas below or above the area displayed on your
screen.
Hold the mouse gently so that you can click either
button easily without having to reposition your
hand.
Instead of a mouse, a laptop usually has a touchpad — a
small rectangle below the keys on the keyboard with
buttons below it that do the same things as the mouse
buttons. Drag your index finger over the touchpad to
move the mouse pointer (see Step 3) over the screen.
You can use more than one mouse or other pointing
device with any computer. If your current mouse is
too small or big or hard to use, buy a wireless mouse.
In addition to mice, other pointing devices include
trackballs, which you roll to move the mouse
pointer, and pens that you use on a separate tablet or
directly on the screen.
3. As you move the mouse, an arrow called the mouse
pointer moves on your computer screen (see Figure 1-5).
Try moving that pointer over the screen. With experience,
you’ll become very comfortable using the mouse. For
practice, pat your head while rubbing your stomach.
➟
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Part I: Getting to Know Windows 7
Icon
Mouse pointer
Figure 1-5
4. Try out the mouse or touchpad buttons in the following
ways:
• Move the mouse pointer on top of an icon or gadget
on the desktop, such as the Recycle Bin. Let the
mouse pointer sit there for a moment — this is
hovering — you may see a pop-up message (called
a tooltip) with information about the icon you
hover over. Press and release (click) the left mouse
button. This action highlights, or selects, that icon
or gadget. As you work with menus, which are lists
of items (see Chapter 3), you put the mouse
pointer on the menu item you intend to use and
then click the left mouse button to select the item.
In this book, when you see the words point or
hover, they mean move the mouse pointer to the
specified location but don’t click. The word click
means a single, quick press and release of the left
mouse button. A double-click is two rapid clicks of
the left mouse button. A right-click is a single
press and release of the right mouse button.
➟
• Place the mouse pointer on an icon and then
double-click the left mouse button to open the
object associated with that icon, such as an e-mail
program or a document that you want to read,
edit, or print.
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Chapter 1: Getting Comfortable with the Windows 7 Desktop
Sometimes you don’t know for sure whether you
need to click or double-click. One way to tell is to
hover over the icon you want to use. Often, a little bit of help info pops up, telling you what the
icon is for (see “Get Help When You Need It,”
later in this chapter). Then click the left mouse
button to see whether anything happens. If nothing does, double-click the icon. In other words,
you may not always have to double-click to open
a document or run a program, so don’t assume
that you have to until you get more familiar with
when one click is sufficient.
• Place your mouse pointer over any object on the
screen and right-click (click the right mouse button
one time). You see a menu of options, related to
the item your mouse pointer is over. This menu is
called a context menu because it changes with the
context or the position of the mouse pointer and
is different for different items. Right-clicking a
photograph’s icon, for example, displays a menu
of options for viewing that photo, and right-clicking
a music file’s icon displays a menu of options for
playing the music. A few options, such as Open
and Properties, appear in most context menus, but
others change depending on the context (what the
mouse pointer is pointing at).
The right mouse button is the key to the kingdom
because of context menus. Try right-clicking various
areas of the screen. You almost never double-click the
right mouse button, though.
5. With the mouse pointer over an icon, such as the Recycle
Bin, click and hold down the left mouse button; then
move the mouse to the right or down the screen. As you
move the mouse, the icon moves in the same direction
on the screen. This process is called click and drag. When
you release the left mouse button, the icon stays where
➟
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Part I: Getting to Know Windows 7
you moved it. Click and drag the Recycle Bin or any
other icons you see on the desktop to some other places
on the desktop. Fun, huh?
6. You can also click and drag with the right mouse button.
Hover the mouse pointer over an icon, such as the
Recycle Bin or any other icon or gadget on the desktop;
click and hold down the right mouse button; and move
the mouse. When you release the right mouse button, a
small context menu pops up. You use this menu to copy
or move documents in Chapter 4.
If you have a laptop, you can click, double-click, and
click and drag by using your finger on a touchpad
and the buttons near it. Keep in mind, too, that you
can use a mouse with a laptop (though it’s not easy if
you have the laptop on your lap!).
Go with the Start Button
1. The Start button, located in the bottom-left corner of the
screen, provides easy access to all the programs you use.
This circular button displays the Windows logo — a
four-colored flag. Click the Start button to display the
Start menu, which is a list of options (see Figure 1-6).
2. Move your mouse pointer slowly over each item on the
left side of the menu. As you hover, some menu items
display a tooltip. A menu item with a triangle to the right
displays a pop-out list called a jump list. See Chapter 15
for more information about using jump lists.
3. Click the All Programs item to display a menu of all the
available programs on your computer.
4. On the All Programs menu, find a yellow icon for
➟
Games or Accessories, and click that icon to display more
programs. (Later, to play a game or open an accessory,
you click its name.)
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Chapter 1: Getting Comfortable with the Windows 7 Desktop
Click an item to start that program.
Start typing to find the program you want.
Start button
Figure 1-6
5. Click Back near the bottom of the All Programs menu to
return to the first Start menu. You can also press the Esc
(Escape) key to back up through the menus.
6. You don’t have to dig through menus by clicking as you
did in the preceding steps. Instead, you can type part of
the name of the program you want to run. When the
Start menu opens, the cursor, which is a vertical or
horizontal line indicating where words you type will
appear, is automatically in the box labeled Search
Programs and Files. Start typing solitaire, and you see
several programs listed, including the game Solitaire.
Note that the game appears in the list as soon as you
➟
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Part I: Getting to Know Windows 7
type the letter s. By the time you type sol, Solitaire is at
the top of the list. Click the Solitaire item to start the
game. See Chapter 11 for information about Solitaire and
other games.
You can perform most actions with the mouse, the
keyboard, or a combination of the two. Another way
to display the Start menu, for example, is to press the
Windows logo key, which is located between the keys
labeled Ctrl (Control) and Alt (Alternate) near the
spacebar — the largest key on the keyboard. The
Windows logo key has the same four-part flag icon as
the Start menu (although not in color). From here
on, I’ll refer to this key as the Win key.
7. Tap and release the Win key to display the Start menu;
tap the Win key a second time to remove the Start menu
from the screen. If you want to run something else, you
can type the name of the program you want and press
Enter or click the program name. This is the easiest way
to start any program you know the name of. You may
need to type only a few letters to run a program.
See Chapter 15 for information on customizing the
items that appear on the Start menu.
Learning keystroke shortcuts is especially valuable if
you don’t like using the mouse or other pointing
device, which is a common complaint laptop users
have about the touchpad.
Get Familiar with the Taskbar
1. The area at the bottom of the screen and to the right of
➟
the Start button is the taskbar, where you see icons for
some programs. Figure 1-7 shows four icons in the
taskbar. The first three icons are for programs that aren’t
running (Microsoft Internet Explorer, Windows Explorer,
22
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Chapter 1: Getting Comfortable with the Windows 7 Desktop
Media Player); the fourth icon is for Solitaire, which you
started in the preceding task. The mouse hovers over
Solitaire to display the thumbnail or the program name.
Taskbar
Thumbnail
Notification area
Figure 1-7
Use the taskbar as another way to run programs, in
addition to the Start menu. You can use the taskbar to
switch between programs by clicking the icon for the
program you want to use.
2. Hover the mouse pointer over icons in the taskbar. For
programs that are running, you may see a preview or
thumbnail (small picture) of that program (refer to
Figure 1-7).
Whether your computer has this capability depends,
in part, on your edition of Windows 7. The Starter
edition, for example, does not show thumbnails in
the taskbar. This function also depends on your
computer’s graphics hardware, so you may not see
taskbar thumbnails if you don’t have the necessary
hardware.
3. The right end of the taskbar is an area called the
Notification area or icon tray (refer to Figure 1-7), which
displays the current date and time, as well as icons for
➟
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Part I: Getting to Know Windows 7
other programs that run automatically when your
computer starts. Messages called notifications pop up here
from time to time. Get information about these icons by
hovering the mouse pointer over them. Click any icon in
the icon tray to open the associated program, and rightclick an icon to see a menu of available options, such as
those to change settings or exit the program.
Before too long, you see a pop-up notification in the
icon tray to Activate Windows Now. Windows 7
needs to phone home to Microsoft to check in —
that’s activation. Ignore this message until you have
an Internet connection. See Chapter 8 for information on connecting to the Internet and Chapter 17
for steps to activation.
To recap: Start a program by using the Start menu,
icons on the desktop, or icons in the taskbar. Switch
between programs you have started by clicking their
icons in the taskbar.
Get Help When You Need It
1. Hover the mouse pointer over anything on the screen to
see a pop-up box, or tooltip, with a brief explanation of
the item.
2. Look for information on the screen. A How to Play box
appears briefly when you start Solitaire, for example. The
bottom edge of the screen, called the status bar, may display help text that changes as you highlight different
items on the screen. Some screens display blue links you
can click for more information.
3. Many programs, including the one shown in Figure 1-8,
➟
have a Help menu. Click the Help menu to see a list of
help options. You can also press the F1 key near the top
of your keyboard to see help information.
24
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Chapter 1: Getting Comfortable with the Windows 7 Desktop
Click Help.
Figure 1-8
In most programs, choose Help➪About (this
program) to find out the name and version number
of the program. You may need the version number as
you seek help elsewhere.
4. Choose Start➪Help and Support to start the Windows 7
Help program. Click blue links to see more information.
Type a term you want help with in the Search Help box
at the top of the Help window, and press the Enter key
to search for that term. Try this by typing taskbar or
start menu, for example. Search the Help and Support
program for what’s new if you have used Windows Vista
or Windows XP (see Figure 1-9).
➟
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Part I: Getting to Know Windows 7
Type a term you want to find more about and press Enter.
Figure 1-9
Close Windows 7
1. Although you can let Windows 7 run indefinitely, you
probably want to turn your computer off if you aren’t
going to use it for a few hours. To see your options for
turning the computer off, click the Start button to open
the Start menu (refer to “Go with the Start Button,”
earlier in this chapter).
2. At the bottom of the Start menu, to the right of the box
➟
labeled Search Programs and Files, you see a button with
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Chapter 1: Getting Comfortable with the Windows 7 Desktop
a triangle at its right end. This button usually displays
Shut Down, although the button may be programmed to
display another option.
3. The Shut Down button has other options, as shown in
Figure 1-10. Click the triangle to the right of the button
for these options. For now, these three options matter
most (you may not have all of these):
• Shut Down: This option exits Windows 7 and saves
power by turning the computer off. In exiting
Windows 7, Shut Down closes any programs that are
currently running.
Click the triangle for more options.
Figure 1-10
➟
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Part I: Getting to Know Windows 7
• Sleep: This option reduces the computer’s power
consumption without exiting Windows 7 or closing
programs. As a result, when you wake the computer
by moving the mouse or touching the keyboard,
everything is exactly as you left it: programs and
documents are open, if they were before Sleep.
• Hibernate: This option combines Sleep and Shut
Down. Hibernate records which programs are
running but completely shuts down the computer.
When you start the computer, Windows 7 opens
all programs you were using, just like Sleep.
Hibernate or Shut Down are equally green options —
they save the same amount of power. Sleep is a little
less green, but saves time in returning to a task you’re
in the middle of.
4. Choose Shutdown to turn off the computer.
On most computers, pressing the power switch also
shuts down the computer. On a laptop, closing the
lid may shut down the laptop or put it into Sleep or
Hibernation mode.
For a desktop computer, consider using a power strip
to plug in the computer, the monitor, and the printer.
After you shut down or hibernate the computer, turn
the power strip off. This saves the most power.
➟
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Examining the
Anatomy of a
Window
A
t the dawn of the personal computer in
the 1980s, computers and their users ran
one program at a time. Although you can use
Windows to run one program at a time, that’s
so last-century. Windows is a multitasking
system that enables you to run many programs
at once. You can listen to music, browse the
Web, write e-mail, and play a game — all at
the same time.
Windows, with a capital W, gets its name from
its main feature: windows, with a lowercase w.
These windows contain activities. Each program
you run occupies its own window. One window
may contain your word processing program,
such as WordPad or Microsoft Word; another
may contain your Web browser; and another
may contain a game.
➟
Chapter
2
Get ready to . . .
➟ Explore the Parts of
a Window ......................... 30
➟ Resize a Window ............... 33
➟ Arrange Windows .............. 35
➟ Snap Windows................... 37
➟ Stack Windows .................. 39
➟ Flip between Windows ........ 40
A window can occupy part of the computer’s
screen or fill the entire screen. Individual
windows have some common features, which
you explore in this chapter. Many windows
also have features that are unique to the
particular program, such as a slideshow option
in a photo program or a play option in a game.
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Part I: Getting to Know Windows 7
Getting comfortable with capital-W Windows means learning to open,
close, resize, move, and switch between lowercase-w windows, which is
the key to juggling multiple activities successfully.
Explore the Parts of a Window
1. To see a window on your screen, click the Start button
and type sol in the Search Programs and Files box to display the Solitaire game. (See Chapter 1 for information
on using the Start button.) Figure 2-1 shows the window
that Solitaire runs in.
Menu bar
Program name
Maximize
Title bar
Minimize Close
Status bar
Figure 2-1
➟
30
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Chapter 2: Examining the Anatomy of a Window
2. Explore this example of a window, starting at the top:
• Title bar: The title bar is the top line of the window, containing the title of the program you’re
using. When you use a program to create a document, the name of the document also appears in
the title bar.
• View and close buttons: In the top-right corner of
the window are three little buttons with big functions. (One of these buttons changes as you use
it.) From left to right, these buttons are:
Minimize: The Minimize button shrinks or hides
the window contents. The program that the window contains is still running and open, but the
window is out of sight. You’ll still see the program’s icon in the taskbar. (I cover the taskbar in
Chapter 1.) Click the Minimize button when you
want to ignore a particular window but aren’t actually done with it. To restore the window, click its
icon in the taskbar (see Chapter 1).
Maximize/Restore: The Maximize button (the button with a single square) fills the screen with the
contents of this window. Click the Maximize button to hide the desktop and other open windows,
to concentrate on this one window, and to see as
much of the window’s contents as you can. Restore
(the button with two squares) is the name of the
button that appears after you click the Maximize
button; it replaces the Maximize button. Click the
Restore button to return the window to its previous size, which is in between maximized and
minimized.
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Close: Close is the red button with the X in the
top-right corner of the window. Click the Close
button when you are done with the window. Close
is also called Quit and Exit.
• Menu bar: Below the title bar, starting at the left
edge of the window, you see the menu bar, which
is a horizontal strip containing various menus.
Solitaire’s menu bar has two menus: Game and
Help. Many other programs’ menu bars have File,
Edit, and View as the first three menus. To use a
menu, click its name and a vertical list of related
items drops down. Then click the item you want
to use.
• Toolbar: Below the menu bar, some programs display a toolbar of icons that you can click to perform various functions. Solitaire doesn’t have a
toolbar. You see a toolbar later in this chapter.
• Program: The bulk of the window contains the
reason you have this particular window open: the
program or document you’re using.
• Status bar: Along the bottom edge of the window,
some programs display information about the
window or its contents in a status bar. Solitaire displays the elapsed time of play and your score in
the status bar.
Scan the edges of windows. Often, important information and functions are pushed to these edges
around the main content area.
3. Click the Close button (the red X) to close Solitaire.
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Chapter 2: Examining the Anatomy of a Window
Resize a Window
1. To see how to resize a window, open Notepad, a simple
program for typing small amounts of text. Click the Start
button and type Notepad. Notice that Notepad’s title bar
displays Untitled because you’re starting a new document.
2. If the Notepad window is maximized (fills the screen),
click the Restore button to the left of the Close button to
make it smaller.
3. Move the mouse pointer to the right edge of the window.
When you have the pointer just over the outside edge of
the window, the mouse pointer changes to a doubleheaded arrow called the resize pointer, shown in Figure 2-2.
Resize pointer
Figure 2-2
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4. Click and drag the edge of the window, using the resize
pointer. (To drag, click and hold down the mouse button
while you move the mouse.) Drag left to shrink the window and right to expand it.
5. Put the mouse pointer over any other edge of the window and then click and drag on the resize pointer to
shrink or expand the window.
6. Put the mouse pointer on the bottom-right corner of the
window. If your pointer is in the corner over the small
triangle of dots, the resize pointer arrows point top-left to
bottom-right. Click and drag to resize the window’s
width and height at the same time (see Figure 2-3).
Click and drag to resize both height and width.
Figure 2-3
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Chapter 2: Examining the Anatomy of a Window
7. Resize the window by clicking and dragging the resize
pointer in any of the other corners (even though you
don’t see dots in those corners). If you want to see
whether you’re a mouse master, try resizing the top-right
corner without accidentally clicking the Close button.
8. Leave Notepad open as you go on to the next task.
You may want to resize a window to show just what
you want to see, nothing more. Practice resizing from
any side or corner.
Arrange Windows
1. Start the WordPad program by clicking the Start button
and typing wordpad. You may not need to type the whole
word before it opens. WordPad is suitable for documents
such as letters and journals. (See Chapter 3 for more
information about using WordPad.) Notice that WordPad’s
title bar displays Document as the title of this new document. WordPad has a very large tool bar called a ribbon.
2. If Notepad isn’t still running from the preceding task,
start it by clicking the Start button and typing notepad.
You now see two overlapping windows, as shown in
Figure 2-4.
The window in front of others is called the active
window. All other windows are inactive. Notice the
title bar of the active window is a different color
from the title bar in an inactive window. Clicking
anywhere in an inactive window makes it active and
moves that window to the front.
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Ribbon toolbar
Inactive window
WordPad icon
Active window
Notepad icon
Figure 2-4
3. Click anywhere in the WordPad title bar (avoiding the
buttons on the left and right ends), hold down the
mouse button, and drag the mouse to move the window
a little.
4. Click anywhere in the Notepad title bar (again, avoiding
the buttons on both ends), and drag the window.
5. Practice moving both windows a few times. Arranging
➟
windows helps you see and do more than one thing at a
time.
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Chapter 2: Examining the Anatomy of a Window
If you can’t see the title bar of the window you want
to move, move the other window to uncover the
hidden title bar.
6. Leave Notepad and WordPad open for the following task.
Snap Windows
1. Drag the Notepad window to the left edge of your screen.
When the mouse pointer touches the left edge of the screen,
you’ll see a new outline on the screen (see Figure 2-5).
Figure 2-5
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2. Release the mouse button. The window should resize
automatically to fill the left half of the screen
(see Figure 2-6). This operation is called snap.
Figure 2-6
3. Drag the WordPad window to the right edge of the
screen. When the mouse pointer touches the right edge,
you’ll see a new outline on the screen.
4. Release the mouse button. The WordPad window resizes
automatically to fill the right half of the screen.
Two or more windows displayed side by side like this
are called tiled.
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Chapter 2: Examining the Anatomy of a Window
5. Drag either window by the title bar away from the edge
of the screen. The window returns to its previous size.
6. Drag either window to the top edge of the screen. This
action maximizes that window, just as though you
clicked the Maximize button (refer to “Explore the Parts
of a Window,” earlier in this chapter).
7. Drag the title bar of the maximized window away from
the top to restore it to its previous size, just as though
you clicked the Restore button (refer to “Explore the Parts
of a Window,” earlier in this chapter).
8. Leave Notepad and WordPad open for the following task.
Stack Windows
1. On your desktop, place the mouse pointer on an empty
area of the taskbar and right-click to display the context
menu shown in Figure 2-7.
More ways to arrange windows
Figure 2-7
2. On that menu, click Show Windows Stacked. All the
windows open on your desktop are arranged, one above
the other.
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3. With the mouse pointer on an empty area of the taskbar,
right-click to display the context menu again and choose
Undo Show Stacked to put the windows back the way
they were.
4. Right-click an empty area of the taskbar and choose
Show Windows Side by Side from the context menu
(refer to Figure 2-7). The windows are arranged side
by side.
When you snapped the windows in Steps 1–4 of
“Snap Windows,” earlier in this chapter, you had to
drag each window to the edge of the screen. The
Show Windows Side by Side option performs this
operation in one step.
5. Undo the tiling operation by right-clicking an empty area
of the taskbar and choosing Undo Show Side by Side
from the context menu.
Often, you can undo your most recent action by
right-clicking to display the context menu and
looking for an undo option.
6. Leave Notepad and WordPad open for the next task.
Flip between Windows
1. Notepad and WordPad should be open. Start Solitaire, so
that you have all three programs running. Now, you’re
juggling. To display previews of all open windows using
a function called Flip, hold down one of the Alt keys (on
either side of the spacebar, typically) and tap and release
the Tab key. Don’t let go of the Alt key yet. You’ll see one
of two forms of preview of your open windows:
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Chapter 2: Examining the Anatomy of a Window
• Windows 7’s Aero Peek feature provides actual
thumbnail previews of the content of each
window, as in Figure 2-8. The Solitaire thumbnail
preview is easiest to recognize in the figure. In
addition, the window matching the selected preview
appears behind the thumbnail previews.
Switch to the selected window.
Figure 2-8
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• If you have the Starter Edition of Windows 7, Aero
Peek is unavailable. In other editions, you may not
have thumbnail previews because your graphics card
doesn’t support it or preview may be turned off using
themes discussed in Chapter 14. In this case, you see
generic icons in Flip. See Figure 2-9. In addition, the
window matching the selected preview doesn’t appear
behind the thumbnail previews.
Switch to the selected window.
Figure 2-9
2. Still holding down the Alt key, tap the Tab key as many
times as necessary to move the highlight to the window
you want to switch to.
3. Release the Alt key. The highlighted window appears in
front of the others.
4. For a different — and cooler — preview of all open windows, hold down one of the Win keys that is beside one
of the Alt keys, and repeatedly tap the Tab key to bring
the window you want to the front. This action produces
the effect called Flip 3D, shown in Figure 2-10.
5. Release the Win key. The selected window appears in
front of the others.
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Chapter 2: Examining the Anatomy of a Window
Switch to the window in front.
Figure 2-10
If nothing happens when you hold down the Win
key and press Tab, you may have the Starter Edition
of Windows 7, which doesn’t have this feature; your
computer’s graphics hardware may not have the
necessary capability; or the feature may have been
turned off. See Chapter 14 for information about
Aero themes, which enable Flip and Flip 3D.
Flip and Flip 3D have an option to show the
desktop, which minimizes all open windows. That
option is the last icon on the right of Flip or in back
of Flip 3D.
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Creating Your
First Documents
Y
ou use programs — or software, if you
prefer that term — to do anything on a
computer, including creating documents such
as letters, memos, and diaries. That rather dry
word document includes drawings and other
works you create and save on your computer.
You tell a program what you want to do.
Often, you have more than one way to
command the program to do something.
You may see a menu below the title bar of the
window. You may find a button in a toolbar
below the menu. Or clicking the right mouse
button displays a context menu that may
contain just the option you are looking for
(see Chapter 1 for a refresher on context
menus).
Often, you can use keystrokes to perform the
most common commands. You don’t need (or
want, I’ll bet) three or four ways to do something, but you have to determine which way is
best for you. If the mouse is a problem for you,
you may like keystrokes. Buttons in toolbars
are often the most obvious choices, but they
can be tricky to locate, recognize, or click. In
this chapter, I introduce one method for each
function and suggest some alternatives to try.
07_509463-ch03.indd 45
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Chapter
3
Get ready to . . .
➟ Start WordPad and Type
Some Text .......................... 46
➟ Save a Document ................ 48
➟ Add, Delete, Select, and
Move Text .......................... 51
➟ Format Text with Bold,
Italics, and More................. 54
➟ Print a Document ................ 56
➟ Quit WordPad.................... 60
➟ Open a Document .............. 61
➟ Discover How a Dialog
Box Works ......................... 64
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Part I: Getting to Know Windows 7
A dialog box is a special window that requires input from you. You
interact with a dialog box, choosing groups of related options, such as
for printing a document. In this chapter, you use dialog boxes and
discover more about common features of a dialog box.
For this chapter, you create a letter or similar text using WordPad, one
of the programs included with Windows 7. You can create similar
documents with Microsoft Word and other programs. Each program
you work with has some unique aspects, but try to generalize your
experience with WordPad to see how it applies to other programs.
Start WordPad and Type Some Text
1. Start WordPad, and maximize the WordPad window to
fill the screen. (See Chapter 2 for information about
starting WordPad and working with individual program
windows.) Figure 3-1 shows the WordPad window.
The cursor shows where text will appear when you type.
➟
Figure 3-1
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Chapter 3: Creating Your First Documents
2. Start typing any text at all. The cursor — the blinking
vertical line that shows where the next character you type
will appear — moves as you type. Don’t worry too much
about what you’re typing; no one is looking over your
shoulder. (You can check to make sure, if you want.)
Relax.
Don’t press the Enter key at the end of every line. Just
keep typing; your text automatically wraps (moves
down) to the next line.
3. At the end of a paragraph, press the Enter key. WordPad
puts a blank line after each paragraph. A few paragraphs
are all you need right now. See Figure 3-2.
Press Enter at the end of a paragraph.
Figure 3-2
4. If you need to move the cursor before you type more text,
click the place in the document where you want to move
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the cursor, or press the arrow keys that point up, left,
down, and right. These keys are between the letters and
numbers on a standard keyboard.
You can’t click or move the cursor beyond the last
line of the document. To make a document longer,
click at the end of the last character and start typing
new text, or press Enter to create a new paragraph
before typing.
5. Leave your document open for the next task.
Save a Document
1. To save your document, press the Ctrl key and the letter S
at the same time, and then release them. This action, or
key combination, is called Ctrl+S. When you do, the Save
As dialog box appears (see Figure 3-3). See “Discover
How a Dialog Box Works,” later in this chapter. The Save
As dialog box needs one piece of information from you:
What do you want to call this document? Right now, the
File Name text box displays the word Document, which is
highlighted and ready to be replaced as soon as you start
typing.
2. In the File Name text box, type a name that you’ll
recognize as being the name of this particular document,
because you’ll use it later to open the document again
(see “Open a Document,” later in this chapter). You
could type My First WordPad Document, as shown in
Figure 3-4, or something else.
➟
The name can be more than 200 characters long,
which may be more characters than you have in the
document! A few characters or words may suffice for a
name. You can use uppercase and lowercase characters,
spaces, dashes, and a few other symbols, including
underscore (_), parentheses (()), and brackets ([]).
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Chapter 3: Creating Your First Documents
You can’t use slashes (/ or \) or a few other symbols
that Windows 7 reserves for other functions, including
the asterisk (*) and question mark (?).
Type a new file name.
Figure 3-3
3. Click the Save button in the dialog box to save your
document. When you do, the Save As dialog box closes,
and you return to your document. Notice that your
document name appears in the title bar to the left of the
program name (WordPad).
Saving a document stores it on your computer’s disk
as a file that you can open later. (See Chapter 4 for
information on files and disks.) The saved document
remains open so you can continue to work on it.
Many programs, including WordPad, also have a toolbar button for saving a document. In the WordPad
title bar, you see a small icon with a white square on
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a larger purple square (refer to Figure 3-1). This icon,
which represents a disk, is the Save button. You can
click this button instead of pressing Ctrl+S, if you prefer; it executes the same Save command and opens
the same Save As dialog box. Another way to save
your document and open the Save As dialog box is to
choose File➪Save As.
Click the Save button.
Figure 3-4
4. Type some more text in your document.
5. Save your document again, just as you did in the preceding
steps. This time, you don’t see the Save As dialog box.
Why? WordPad knows the name of this file from the first
time you saved it, so you don’t have to name it again.
➟
Don’t wait until you’re done with a document to
save it. Every time you make significant changes in a
document, save it. Every time you’re about to do
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Chapter 3: Creating Your First Documents
something in a document that you’ve never tried
before, save it. If you’re not sure whether you’ve
already saved a document, save it. Save frequently to
reduce the odds of losing everything if the power
goes off or you accidentally delete all your text. You
can’t save too many times, so save early and often.
Each time you do, the older version of the file
without your latest changes is replaced by the newest
version of your file.
See Chapter 4 for information on where your saved
document is and how to find, move, and rename
that document.
Add, Delete, Select, and Move Text
1. Add text to the document you created in earlier tasks or
any document with text already in it. Click the place in the
document where you want to begin typing, or press the
arrow keys to move the cursor to that point (refer to “Start
WordPad and Type Some Text,” earlier in this chapter).
2. Click between two words and type something. The
existing text moves to the right and down automatically
to make room for the new text.
3. Press the Backspace key. Each time you do so, a character
to the left of the cursor is erased. Any text to the right of
the cursor moves left.
4. To undo what you just did, press Ctrl+Z (press the Ctrl key
and the letter Z at the same time, and then let go of both
keys at the same time). You can repeat Ctrl+Z to undo
previous steps. To redo a step — or undo an undo — press
Ctrl+Y. Feel free to undo any steps you wish to repeat.
5. With the cursor under some text, press the Delete key.
Each time you do so, the character directly above the cursor is erased. Any text to the right of the cursor moves left.
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Delete and Backspace both erase text, but Delete
erases the text to the right of the cursor and
Backspace erases the text to the left of the cursor.
6. Double-click a word to select the entire word and then
press Backspace or Delete to erase it.
When you select text, it’s highlighted on your screen
(see Figure 3-5). You select text when you want to do
something to it, such as delete it or format it (see
“Format Text with Bold, Italics, and More,” later in
this chapter).
Selected text
Figure 3-5
7. To select more than a single word, click at the beginning
of the text that you intend to select; hold down the Shift
key; and press the right-arrow key to highlight the text
you want to select. Don’t let go of the Shift key until
you’ve selected all the text you want. As you hold down
Shift, you can also press the down-arrow key to select an
entire line of text.
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The mouse method for selecting text is clicking and
dragging over the text to highlight it (see Chapter 2).
Another way to select text with the mouse is to click
at the beginning of the text you want to select, hold
down the Shift key, and click at the end of the text
you want to select. The entire section is highlighted.
8. Select any text and then press Ctrl+X to cut it. That text
disappears from the screen but is not erased from the
document, as it is when you press the Backspace or
Delete key (refer to Step 3 and Step 5). Text that you cut
is moved to an invisible feature of Windows 7 called the
Clipboard, which temporarily holds text and graphics that
you cut or copy.
Anything that you cut stays on the Clipboard until
you cut or copy something else, which replaces it, or
until you turn off your computer.
9. Move the cursor somewhere else in your document, and
press Ctrl+V to paste. Windows 7 takes the text you just
cut from the Clipboard and puts it in the document at
the location of your cursor.
10. To copy text instead of cutting it, select that text and
press Ctrl+C to copy; move the cursor to a new location;
and press Ctrl+V to paste. Like cut text, copied text
goes to the Clipboard and stays there until you copy
something else to replace it or turn off your computer.
Most programs use the same key combinations for
the Copy (Ctrl+C), Cut (Ctrl+X), and Paste (Ctrl+V)
commands. Many programs also have an Edit menu
that contains these commands. (WordPad doesn’t.) If
you right-click selected text, these same commands
appear in a context menu. Also, many programs have
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Cut, Copy, and Paste buttons in the toolbar. Why do
programs give you so many options? To let you find
out which one works best for you. Try each method
to see what you find.
Format Text with Bold, Italics, and More
1. In any document, select some text (refer to “Add, Delete,
Select, and Move Text,” earlier in this chapter), and press
Ctrl+B to make that text bold (dark and thick). You see
the text become thicker onscreen.
2. With the text still selected, press Ctrl+B again to remove
the bold formatting.
3. Select some text, and press Ctrl+I to make the text italic
(slightly slanted to the right).
4. With the text still selected, press Ctrl+I a second time to
remove the italic formatting.
5. Use WordPad’s Ribbon — the toolbar at the top of the
window — to add more text effects (see Figure 3-6). In
each case, first select the text you want to format; then
click one of the following formatting buttons in the Font
panel of the Ribbon:
WordPad Ribbon toolbar
The Home tab
The Font panel
Figure 3-6
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• B is bold.
• I is italic.
• U is underline.
• abc is strikethrough.
• X2 is subscript (like the number in H2O).
• X2 is superscript (like the number in E = mc2).
• The highlighter icon to the right of the Superscript
button (X2) highlights the selected text. Click the
triangle (down arrow) to the right of the button to
select a highlighter color. To use that same color
the next time, just click the Highlight button, not
the arrow.
• The A with a heavy bar under it applies a color
to the text itself. Click the triangle (down arrow)
to the right of the button to select a text color. To
use that same color the next time, just click the
Font Color button, not the arrow.
6. Use the buttons in the top row of the Font panel in
WordPad’s Ribbon (see Figure 3-7) to make these
changes to selected text:
Font family
Increase Font size
Font size Decrease Font size
Figure 3-7
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• The Font drop-down list shows options that let
you change the font, or typeface, in which the text
is displayed. Some fonts are easier to read than
others; some fonts are prettier than others.
• The Size drop-down list allows you to change the
selected text to a specific size measured in points —
a traditional unit of measure for fonts. Text that is
72 points, for example, is about an inch tall. Most
newspapers and books use text between 10 and 12
points. (This text is 12.5 points.)
• The A with a triangle pointing up allows you to
increase the font size without using the Size list.
• The A with a triangle pointing down allows you to
decrease the font size without using the Size list.
Programs reward patience and curiosity. Don’t be
afraid to experiment with formatting in a document
that isn’t precious to you, so that you can see what
works and how. Remember: The Undo command is
Ctrl+Z.
Print a Document
1. You can print your document at any time. With the
printer connected and the power on, click the WordPad
button — the button with the little box and downpointing triangle on it — to the left of the Home tab in
the Ribbon. (You can see this tab in Figure 3-1, earlier in
this chapter.) Figure 3-8 shows the WordPad menu that
drops down from this button.
If you haven’t attached your printer to the computer
yet, see Chapter 7.
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Click Print.
The WordPad button
Figure 3-8
In most programs, the File menu appears in place of
the WordPad button. The File menu displays options
similar to those on the WordPad button.
2. Hover over the Print button, halfway down the menu.
(Flip to Chapter 1 for a refresher on hovering.) A second
menu pops out to the right, listing three printing commands (see Figure 3-9).
3. Click the Print Preview item to see what your document
will look like on paper (see Figure 3-10).
When you’re creating a document, you can’t always
tell how much of the page the text uses or how
many sheets of paper you’ll need to print the whole
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document. Print Preview shows you exactly what will
come out of your printer. It may also help you avoid
wasting paper if you see a change that you need to
make before printing.
Click Print Preview to see how your document will look when you print it.
Figure 3-9
4. If you’re ready to print from Print Preview, click the Print
button in the Ribbon (refer to Figure 3-10). If you’re not
using Print Preview, repeat Steps 1 and 2, then click Print
in the pop-out menu. The Print dialog box appears, as
shown in Figure 3-11.
Ninety-nine percent of the time, you don’t need to
set any of the options in the Print dialog box.
➟
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Click to print the document.
Click to return to editing the document.
Figure 3-10
5. Click the Print button to print (or, if you don’t want to
print, click the Cancel button).
To skip the Print dialog box, choose File➪Print➪
Quick Print.
➟
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Click to print.
Figure 3-11
Quit WordPad
1. When you’re done with WordPad, click the Close box —
the red box with the X on it in the top-right corner of the
program window — to quit the program. Quit is also
called exit or close. (See Chapter 2 for details on closing.)
If you haven’t saved your document since making
changes or printing it, WordPad displays the dialog box
shown in Figure 3-12.
2. Click one of the three buttons in the dialog box:
• Click the Save button to save your document
before quitting WordPad (your most likely
choice).
➟
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Save and close the document.
Return to the document
and close the dialog box.
Close without saving the document.
Figure 3-12
• Click the Don’t Save button to throw away your
most recent changes. Whatever you did up to the
last time you saved the document is still saved, but
any changes you made after the save are discarded.
• Click Cancel to dismiss the dialog box and return
to WordPad and your document. (Clicking the
Close button in the dialog box does the same
thing.)
Open a Document
1. To open an existing document to read, change, or print
it, click the Start button (see Chapter 1), and start to type
the name of the document you intend to open. If you
named the document My First WordPad Document, for
example (refer to “Save a Document,” earlier in this
chapter), you could start to type any of the four words in
the document name. The Start menu automatically lists
matching documents and programs, as you see in
Figure 3-13.
➟
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Type text that matches your document’s name.
Figure 3-13
2. Click the document name or, if the name is already
highlighted, press the Enter key. The document opens in
WordPad (or whichever program you used to create the
document).
3. Searching for your document from the Start menu, as you
just did, is great, but now try this method: Click Start. If
you see WordPad in the Start menu, hover over
WordPad. A list of recent documents pops out to the
right. This list is called a jump list (see Figure 3-14). Click
the document you intend to open. See Chapter 15 for
more about using jump lists.
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Hover over a program for a jump
list of recent documents.
Figure 3-14
4. Yet another way to open a document: Start WordPad,
and click the WordPad button next to the Home tab in
the Ribbon (refer to Figure 3-9). Your document may be
listed in the menu that drops down. Click the document’s
name to open it. If it isn’t, choose File➪Open. Doubleclick your document in the dialog box (see Figure 3-15).
See Chapter 4 for information on searching for misplaced documents and opening documents from
Windows Explorer.
➟
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Double-click a document to open it.
Figure 3-15
Discover How a Dialog Box Works
Dialog boxes provide multiple options related to a specific action. In
the task “Save a Document,” the Save As dialog box provides a text box
for you to enter the name of the document. You didn’t need the
options that determine where the document is saved and what kind of
file it is. Often, you can accept the default options already set in a dialog box. The following features are common to many dialog boxes,
though no dialog box contains every one of these. (For that reason,
there isn’t an ideal figure to display them all.)
➟
➟
The OK button: When you are done with the
dialog box — even if you haven’t actually changed
anything — click OK to accept the options in the
dialog box and to continue. In some dialog boxes,
the label on this button is for the action to be
performed, instead of OK. For example, the button
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displays Print in the Print dialog box (Figure 3-16).
To see this dialog box on your screen, click the
WordPad button, and then click Print.
Tab
Radio buttons
Text box
Figure 3-16
Panels or sections
Check box
➟
The Cancel button: This button stops any further
action and undoes selections you made prior to canceling. Use it when you open a dialog box you don’t
want to continue with.
➟
The Apply button: This button preserves changes
you make in the dialog box, unlike Cancel. Also
unlike OK, this leaves the dialog box open for further options. Apply is useful in a dialog box with
many options, because you can apply the choices
you’ve made before you go on to explore others.
➟
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➟
➟
Tabs: Some dialog boxes have so many options,
those options are grouped into tabs arranged across
the top of the dialog box. The Print dialog box (see
Figure 3-16) only has one tab, labeled General.
➟
Panels or sections: Within a dialog box, related
options may be grouped into panels or sections. In
Figure 3-16, three panels appear. Select Printer and
Page Range are labeled. The third panel, containing
Number of Copies, is not labeled.
➟
Text boxes: You can click in a text box and type.
Figure 3-17 shows four text boxes for the margins of
the printed page — the area of blank space around
the outside of the text. Click in the text box next to
Left, backspace to erase the current number, and type
a different number. You can change any of the four
margins in the same way. To see this dialog box on
your screen, cancel the Print dialog box, if it is open.
Click the WordPad button, and then click Page
Setup.
➟
Menus or lists: You pick some options from a list or
menu, which often drops down or pops up when
you click on the current selection. In Figure 3-17,
Size and Source both use drop-down lists.
➟
Radio buttons: Radio buttons are small circles. If
there is a dot in the center of the circle, the option
is selected. Deselected radio buttons are empty or
hollow. With radio buttons, you can select only one
of the available choices. In Figure 3-17, Portrait is
selected, which is standard page orientation, taller
than it is wide. If you click on Landscape anywhere
from the button through the end of the word, you
select Landscape (the page is sideways, wider than
it is tall) and Portrait automatically becomes
deselected. You can’t choose both options.
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Radio buttons
Check box
Figure 3-17
➟
Drop-down lists
Text boxes
Check boxes: Check boxes are small squares. If a
check box is selected, it contains a check mark, an X,
or it is filled in solid. In Figure 3-17, Print Page
Numbers is checked and every page will have a
number on it. If you click anywhere from the check
box through the end of the word Numbers, you
uncheck this option and page numbers will not
print. Unlike radio buttons, multiple check boxes
can all be checked or unchecked in any
combination.
➟
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If you want to use the keyboard instead of the mouse
in a dialog box, Ctrl+Tab moves from one dialog box
tab to the next. The Tab key moves the selection from
one panel to another. The down and up arrow keys
move radio button selection. The spacebar selects
and deselects check boxes. The Enter key chooses the
default button — often OK — which appears highlighted differently from Cancel or Apply.
➟
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Organizing Your
Documents
E
verything inside your computer is stored on
a disk. Your computer has a primary disk,
formally called the internal hard drive. (Drive
and disk are interchangeable words.) You may
see this disk referred to as the C: drive.
➟
Chapter
4
Get ready to . . .
➟ See All Your Documents
As Files on a Disk ............... 70
The content of a disk is organized into
individual files. When you save a document
(see Chapter 3), you create a file on a disk.
Many other files on the disk belong to the
programs you use, including the thousands of
files that make up Windows 7.
➟ Find a Misplaced File .......... 75
➟ Create a Folder to
Disks also are divided into folders, which are
containers for files. Windows 7 has a folder
for its own files and dozens of other folders
inside that one (called subfolders). One extraimportant folder has the same name as your
user name, which you created the first time
you turned on the computer (see Chapter 1).
Inside or below that user account folder,
Windows 7 creates more folders to help you
organize your files by type. All your photos go
into the Pictures folder, all your documents go
into the Documents folder, and so on.
Folder to Another ................ 80
Organize Your Files ............ 77
➟ Rename a File or a Folder.... 78
➟ Move a File from One
➟ Delete a File or Folder ......... 82
➟ Get Back a File or Folder
You Deleted ....................... 83
➟ Select Multiple Files
and Folders ........................ 85
➟ Copy Files and Folders
to a Flash Drive or
Memory Card ..................... 86
➟ Copy Files and Folders
from a Flash Drive or
Memory Card ..................... 90
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In this chapter, you explore your disk, folders, and documents. You
create new folders to organize documents and move files from one
folder to another. You also copy files from your hard disk to other
disks to take with you or give to other people. It’s all much more
exciting than it may sound so far.
See All Your Documents As Files on a Disk
1. Click the Start button to open the Start menu.
2. In the folders list on the right side of the Start menu,
click your user folder, which is named with your user
name. (Mine appears in Figure 4-1.) Your user folder
opens in Windows Explorer, the program you use to . . .
well, explore your computer and to work with files and
folders outside the programs you use to create files.
Windows Explorer is your file manager, as you see in
Figure 4-2.
Note the following areas in Windows Explorer:
• The address bar is at the top of Windows Explorer.
If you completed Steps 1 and 2, it currently displays
your user name. As you move around in Windows
Explorer, the address bar shows where you are in
your computer system.
• The command bar, which starts with the Organize
button, is a toolbar below the address bar. (So
many bars!) The buttons in the command bar
change depending on where you are in the folders
and what you select, if anything.
➟
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Click your username.
Figure 4-1
• The navigation pane runs down the left edge of
the screen and has five sections: Favorites, which
are folders that you need one-click access to;
Libraries, which are groups of folders; Homegroup,
which is a network option if you have two or more
Windows 7 computers; Computer, which represents
your entire computer; and Network, which displays
your computer and others on your network, if any,
including non-Windows 7 computers, such as
those running Windows XP.
➟
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Command bar
Navigation pane
Address bar
Details pane
Figure 4-2
Folders for holding your files
Your username
View Options
Content area
• The content area displays icons for folders in your
user account. Windows 7 creates these folders
automatically to help you organize your files by
type.
• The details pane stretches across the bottom of the
window. The information in this pane depends on
what you select in the content area, if anything.
➟
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3. Change the display of the icons in the content area by
clicking the small four-part View Options button at the
right end of the command bar. Each time you click the
button, the display of the icons changes, as well as the
information you see about each icon. Click the triangle
to the right of the View Options button to see a list of
view options (see Figure 4-3). Click the Extra Large Icons
option, which is very useful, especially in a folder full of
pictures, although you can’t see many icons at one time
in this view. In each folder you view, use the View
Options button to choose the best view for that moment.
View options list
Extra Large Icons
Figure 4-3
➟
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4. Double-click the My Documents folder in the content
area. You see any files saved in that folder, including (if
you’re reading this book in chapter order) the one you
created in Chapter 3.
Somewhat confusingly, Windows 7 has a Documents
library and a My Documents folder. Just keep in
mind that a library is a collection of folders and that
a folder is a collection of files. The Documents library
contains lots of files created by Windows 7 and other
programs, and some that you create, but the My
Documents folder contains only files that you create.
5. Click a file name in the My Documents folder, and look
in the details pane for some technical information, such
as file size in bytes (characters, roughly), date created,
and date modified.
6. Click the Preview Pane button at the right end of the
command bar. The Preview pane appears on the right
side of the window, displaying the contents of the
selected file (see Figure 4-4), and the Preview Pane
button changes to the Hide Preview Pane button.
7. Return to the contents of your user folder (refer to Figure
4-2) by clicking the Back button to the left of the address
bar or pressing the Backspace key.
If you see the folder you want in the address bar or
the navigation pane, you can click the folder name
anywhere you see it to open that folder.
You can go directly to the Documents, Pictures, and
Music libraries, which are groups of folders, from the
top-right side of the Start menu (refer to Figure 4-1).
➟
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Display or hide the preview pane.
Select a document...see its contents here.
Figure 4-4
Find a Misplaced File
1. To search for a misplaced file, click the Start button and
then click your user name to open Windows Explorer
with all your folders.
2. In the top-right corner of Windows Explorer, click inside
the Search text box (in which the word Search is followed
by your user name or the folder you are exploring), and
type part of the name of the file you’re looking for.
Windows Explorer displays any matching files, highlighting
the text that matches. The search results include extra
information that may help you identify the file, including
the date it was modified (last changed). Figure 4-5 shows
the results of a search for My First WordPad Document.
➟
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Search results with matching text highlighted
Type in the Search box.
Figure 4-5
3. If the search results include too many files, making it
hard to see the one you want, type more of the file name
in the Search box. The number of matching files should
decrease as you type more text in the box.
You can find all the documents you changed on a
particular date. In the Add a Search Filter pane below
the Search box, click Date Modified; then click a date
on the calendar that appears. All files modified on
that date appear in the search results.
4. If you don’t see the file you’re looking for, type a
different part of the file name in the Search box.
5. If you still don’t find your file, click Computer in the
➟
navigation pane (refer to Figure 4-2), and repeat Step 2.
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This action searches the entire computer, which takes
longer and turns up some irrelevant files along with the
missing one (you hope!).
Create a Folder to Organize Your Files
1. To create a new folder, start by going to the folder or
library that you want your new folder to be part of. For
this exercise, you create a new folder in the Documents
library, so choose Start➪Documents to open the
Documents library.
2. Click the New Folder button in the command bar. An
icon for the new folder appears in the content area, with
the name New folder next to it, already selected (see
Figure 4-6).
Type a name for the new folder.
Click new folder.
Figure 4-6
➟
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3. Type the name you intend to give to the new folder.
Don’t move the cursor or mouse before you start typing.
Your new text will replace the highlighted text
automatically.
4. Press the Enter key to make the new name stick.
5. Open your new folder by double-clicking its icon.
6. To return to the Documents folder, click Documents in
the address bar, or press the Backspace key.
7. If you want, create more new folders by repeating
Steps 2–4.
Don’t worry too much about creating folders as you
start out. The folders Windows 7 provides may be all
you ever need. As you accumulate more and more
files, however, organizing them into folders may help
you keep up with them. In the Documents library,
for example, you might create a folder called
Finances for files related to income, expenses, and
investments, and another folder called Family for
family-related documents. Which folders to create
and how to name them depend entirely on your own
sense of order.
Rename a File or a Folder
1. You can change the name of any file or folder you create.
With the mouse pointer over the file or folder you intend
to rename, click the right mouse button (right-click that
file or folder). A context menu appears. Figure 4-7 shows
the context menu for a folder.
For more information on right-clicking and context
menus, see Chapter 1.
➟
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2. Choose Rename from the context menu. The file’s or
folder’s current name is selected. If you type anything,
you erase the current name. If you want to keep most of
the current name and edit it, click inside the name or
press the left- or right-arrow key to move to the place in
the name where you want to type new text.
Right-click a folder...
...And click Rename.
Figure 4-7
3. Type the new name, which can be more than 200
characters long (although a dozen characters may be
more than enough). You can capitalize letters and use
spaces and dashes; you can’t use slashes or asterisks,
which Windows 7 reserves for other purposes.
4. When you’ve typed the new name, press the Enter key to
finish.
➟
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You can undo the renaming and get the old name
back, but you have to act now. With the mouse
pointer over an empty area of Windows Explorer —
not over the renamed folder or file — right-click and
then choose Undo Rename from the context menu.
Move a File from One Folder to Another
1. To move a file to a new folder, right-click the file’s name
or icon in Windows Explorer to open the context menu.
To move more than one file at a time, see “Select
Multiple Files and Folders.”
2. Choose Cut from the context menu to remove the file
from its current location and place it on the Clipboard
(see Figure 4-8). The file’s icon fades, although the file
remains in its original location.
3. Right-click the folder to which you want to move the file,
and choose Paste from the context menu to move the
file (see Figure 4-9). The file’s icon disappears from its
previous location.
For details on cutting, copying, and pasting in a
document, see Chapter 3.
4. Open the folder you selected in Step 3 to see your file.
You can move a file in a single step. Click the file’s
icon and hold down the right mouse button as you
drag the file to the folder you want to move it to.
➟
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When the mouse pointer is over the folder, release
the right mouse button. From the context menu that
pops up, choose Move Here.
Use these same steps to move a subfolder from one
folder to another. Don’t move the folders Windows 7
creates.
Right-click a file...
...And click Cut.
Figure 4-8
➟
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Right-click a folder...
...And click Paste.
Figure 4-9
Delete a File or Folder
1. To delete a file or folder, right-click it and then choose
Delete from the context menu. Windows 7 displays a
confirmation dialog box as a safety measure (see
Figure 4-10).
2. Choose Yes unless you’ve changed your mind about
deleting this file or folder; in that case, choose No.
➟
The context-menu commands that you’ve used for
the tasks in this chapter also appear on the Organize
menu in Windows Explorer.
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Click Yes to delete the file.
Click No to keep the file.
Figure 4-10
Get Back a File or Folder You Deleted
1. If you delete a file or folder and want it back, look for it
in the Recycle Bin, which is a special folder to which
Windows 7 moves items that you delete (see Chapter 1).
To open the Recycle Bin, double-click its icon — which
looks like a trash can — on the desktop.
If you don’t see the desktop, you may have to
minimize open windows (see Chapter 2) or click the
Show Desktop button to the right of the time in the
taskbar.
To open the Recycle Bin from Windows Explorer,
click Desktop in the Favorites list in the navigation
pane; then double-click Recycle Bin in the list that
appears to the right of the navigation pane.
2. If many files or folders are listed in the Recycle Bin
window, type the name of the item you want in the
Search box in the top-right corner of the window. Files
matching what you type, if any, will appear in the
content area.
➟
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3. To restore a file or folder to its original location,
right-click it in the Recycle Bin window and then
choose Restore from the context menu (see Figure 4-11).
The selected file or folder returns to where it was before
you deleted it.
4. Files stay in the Recycle Bin indefinitely, so that you can
undelete files even months later. If Windows 7 needs
room, it will clear out the oldest files first. If you want to
get rid of everything in the Recycle Bin, click Empty the
Recycle Bin in the command bar.
Double-click the Recycle Bin icon.
Right-click the file and click Restore.
Figure 4-11
➟
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After you empty the Recycle Bin, you can’t undo your
action and undelete any of these files or folder.
Don’t click Restore All Items in the command bar,
because it puts every single item in the Recycle Bin
back in its original location. Choosing this command
would be like dumping the trash can on your livingroom floor to find a penny you threw away.
Select Multiple Files and Folders
1. You can work with groups of files or folders at the same
time, but first, you have to select them. Try one of these
methods for selecting multiple files or folders in
Windows Explorer:
• Click the first file or folder you want to select,
hold down the Ctrl key, and then click each
additional file or folder you want. The selected
files are highlighted, and the details pane (refer to
Figure 4-2) displays the number of selected items.
To unselect one of the selected files, click that file
a second time. After selecting all your files, release
the Ctrl key.
• Click an empty part of the content area in
Windows Explorer, hold down the left mouse
button, and drag the mouse pointer towards the
files you want to select. A selection box appears
on-screen (see Figure 4-12). Any file or folder that
you touch with that selection box becomes
selected. You don’t have to surround a file with
the box — just touch it.
• To select all files inside a folder, open that folder
by double-clicking its icon and then press Ctrl+A
or choose Organize➪Select All.
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Click and drag diagonally to select multiple files.
Figure 4-12
2. After selecting multiple files or folders by any method,
right-click any of the selected items to display a context
menu.
3. Choose a command to apply to all the selected files or
folders. For example, Cut to begin a move, or Copy,
Delete, or Rename.
Copy Files and Folders to a Flash Drive or Memory Card
1. You can carry your files around with you when you’re
➟
away from your computer by storing them on portable
storage devices. For example, you can store files on a USB
flash drive (also called a thumb drive), which is about the
size of a disposable cigarette lighter, and a memory card,
which is the size of a postage stamp and is most often
used in laptop computers and digital cameras.
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• To copy files or folders to a flash drive, start by inserting the flash drive into one of your computer’s USB
ports (see Figure 4-13). A USB port is a small rectangular slot in the front or back of a desktop or tower
computer or on either side of a laptop, marked with a
symbol that looks like a trident.
• To copy files or folders to a memory card, start by
inserting the card into a slot along the edge of your
laptop computer. (Desktop computers rarely have
memory-card slots.)
You can buy these portable storage devices at most officesupply and computer stores. They come in various capacities but are large enough to hold many files.
USB symbol
USB flash drive
Figure 4-13
USB port
2. If Windows 7 displays a pop-up message when you insert
the flash drive or memory card, close it by clicking the
Close box (the red box with the X) in the top-right corner
of the message.
➟
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3. In Windows Explorer, select the files or folders you
intend to copy (refer to “Select Multiple Files and
Folders,” earlier in this chapter).
4. Right-click one of the selected items, and choose Send
To from the context menu. Your flash drive or memory
card is probably one of the last items in the submenu of
locations that appears (see Figure 4-14). The name and
letter for your flash drive or memory card will be different
from those in Figure 4-14.
5. Choose the flash drive or memory card from this
submenu. Your files or folders are copied to the portable
storage device.
Right-click a file or folder.
➟
Click Send To and then click your flash drive.
Figure 4-14
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6. To see the files or folders on the flash drive or memory
card, click Computer in the navigation pane; then
double-click the flash drive’s or memory card’s icon in
the content area.
7. To remove a flash drive or memory card, click Computer
in the navigation pane. Right-click over the card or drive
(Figure 4-15). Click Eject. This closes the device.
Windows 7 pops up a notification message it is Safe To
Remove Hardware (Figure 4-16). Gently pull the flash
drive out of the USB port. To remove a memory card,
press the eject button by the card or push the card in
farther and release to cause it to pop up.
Right-click the flash drive or memory card, and then click Eject.
Figure 4-15
➟
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Figure 4-16
If you have files or folders that you’d be devastated
to lose, follow the steps in this task to create backup
copies of those items on a portable storage device,
and keep that device in a safe place.
Copy Files and Folders from a
Flash Drive or Memory Card
1. If you want to copy the files or folders stored on a flash
drive or memory card back to your computer’s hard
drive, insert the flash drive or memory card into the
appropriate slot on your computer (refer to “Copy Files
and Folders to a Flash Drive or Memory Card,” earlier in
this chapter). Windows 7 displays the AutoPlay dialog
box shown in Figure 4-17.
2. Click Open Folder to View Files in the AutoPlay
dialog box.
3. Select the files or folders you intend to copy.
4. Right-click one of the selected items, and choose Copy
from the context menu.
5. Open the folder on your computer where you want to
copy the files.
6. Right-click an empty area of the folder, and choose Paste
from the context menu. You should see your copied files.
➟
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Click to see the folders
and files on the flash drive.
Figure 4-17
7. To remove a flash drive or memory card, click Computer
in the navigation pane. Right-click over the card or drive
(refer to Figure 4-15). Click Eject. This closes the device.
Windows 7 pops up a notification message it is Safe To
Remove Hardware (refer to Figure 4-16). Gently pull the
flash drive out of the USB port. To remove a memory
card, press the eject button by the card or push the card
in farther and release to cause it to pop up.
See Chapter 12 for information on copying photos to
or from a camera or memory card. For information
on copying music to or from a CD or MP3 player, see
Chapter 13.
➟
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Getting Things
Done in Windows 7
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Taking Advantage
of the Windows
Accessories
W
indows 7 includes a few programs called
accessories. One such accessory is
WordPad, which you use in Chapter 3. In this
chapter, you add a couple of gadgets — small
tools for displaying bits of information on your
desktop — to display the time and weather. You
also work with a simple calculator, a tool that
lets you take a snapshot of what’s on your computer screen, a drawing program, a sound
recorder, and two programs for taking notes.
You may not use the accessories regularly. In
some cases, you may replace these programs
with others that have even more features. The
accessories are, however, a good introduction
to what you can use programs for.
You can start any program from the Start
menu. If the program already appears on the
Start menu, as it will after you run it once, just
click the program name. If the program name
doesn’t appear on the Start menu, simply type
enough of the program name to make it appear,
then click it. You can also find most of these
programs by choosing Start➪All Programs➪
Accessories, where you see all of the accessories.
You use a few accessories in this chapter, a few
others in later chapters, and there are a few you
may never use.
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➟
Chapter
5
Get ready to . . .
➟ Display Gadgets on
Your Desktop ..................... 96
➟ Keep Time with the
Clock Gadget ..................... 97
➟ Check the Weather with
the Weather Gadget ......... 100
➟ Use the Calculator............. 102
➟ Capture the Screen with
the Snipping Tool .............. 104
➟ Draw with Paint ................ 107
➟ Talk to Sound Recorder...... 111
➟ Take Sticky Notes ............. 112
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As you use these accessory programs, look for features that you may
see again in other programs, such as buttons, tools, and menus.
Most Windows 7 programs allow you to undo
(Ctrl+Z), cut (Ctrl+X), copy (Ctrl+C), and paste
(Ctrl+V). See Chapter 3 for details.
Display Gadgets on Your Desktop
1. Gadgets display bits of information on the desktop. Your
desktop may already show one or more gadgets from
Windows 7 or from the computer manufacturer. To see
all of the available gadgets, right-click the desktop and
click Gadgets (see Figure 5-1). The Desktop Gadget
Gallery appears in Figure 5-2.
Right-click the desktop
and then click Gadgets.
Figure 5-1
2. Double-click a gadget’s icon. You see that gadget on the
➟
desktop.
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3. Repeat Steps 1 and 2 for any other gadgets you want to
add. The two you may use most often — as I do — are
the Clock and Weather gadgets, so I discuss them in the
following sections.
Double-click a gadget to display it on the desktop.
Figure 5-2
Keep Time with the Clock Gadget
1. If you don’t already see the Clock gadget on your desktop, follow Steps 1 and 2 of “Display Gadgets on Your
Desktop,” earlier in this chapter, to put it there. Hover
the mouse over the clock to see the toolbar in Figure 5-3.
Close
Settings
Handle
Figure 5-3
➟
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2. You can change the way the clock looks and works, if
you want. To do so, click the Options tool, which looks
like a wrench, or right-click that gadget on your desktop,
and choose Options from the context menu. The Options
dialog box for the Clock gadget opens (see Figure 5-4).
(For more information on working with dialog boxes, see
Chapter 3.)
Type a name.
Change the time zone (optional).
Click arrows to see other clock faces.
Select to see the second hand.
Figure 5-4
➟
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3. Experiment with these options:
• View different clock styles by clicking the arrow
button to the right of 1 of 8. Each time you click it,
a preview of a new clock face appears above the
arrow buttons (see Figure 5-4). Click the left-arrow
button to move backward through the clock faces.
• Give the clock a name if you’re going to have more
than one on the desktop. Just type the name in the
Clock Name text box.
Each time you double-click the Clock gadget in
the gallery, you add another clock to the desktop.
Why would you want more than one clock? Each
clock can display the time in a different time
zone. You can create your own wall of clocks, as
in a movie newsroom or to track time zones
where friends and family live.
• Choose a different time zone from the Time Zone
drop-down list. To do this, click the triangle at the
right end of the Time Zone box to display the
menu; then, on that menu, click the time zone you
want to use.
• Check the Show the Second Hand check box, if
you want to see one. (Time flies when you have a
second hand.) For more information on check
boxes, see Chapter 3.
4. Click the OK button to save your changes. You may
see that the Clock gadget has changed on the desktop
(see Figure 5-5).
➟
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Clock name (Hawaii)
Figure 5-5
Check the Weather with the Weather Gadget
1. Double-click the Weather gadget in the Desktop Gadget
Gallery to display it on the desktop (refer to “Display
Gadgets on Your Desktop,” earlier in this chapter). If
you have an Internet connection, this gadget gets weather
information through the Internet. If you don’t have an
Internet connection, the gadget displays “Cannot
connect to service.” (See Chapter 8 for information
about connecting to the Internet.) Windows 7 guesses
your location based on your Internet connection.
2. To change the city in the weather forecast, hover over the
gadget and click the wrench icon or right-click and
choose Options from the context menu. The Options
dialog box for the Weather gadget opens (see Figure 5-6).
3. Click inside the Select Current Location text box, type
your zip code or city name, and press the Enter key to
search for your location. If your location appears, click
OK. If your location isn’t found, search for a larger city
nearby.
You can add more than one Weather gadget and
choose different locations for each gadget — a great
idea if you have a bunch of clocks. (Refer to “Keep
Time with the Clock Gadget,” earlier in this chapter.)
➟
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Type your zip code or city’s name,
and click the magnifying glass.
Figure 5-6
4. To expand the gadget to show more information, place
your mouse pointer over the gadget on the desktop; a
tiny arrow in a box appears to the right of the gadget.
Click that arrow. The gadget shows a three-day forecast
(see Figure 5-7).
Click this button to switch between
smaller and larger sizes for the gadget.
Figure 5-7
➟
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5. Click the same arrow-in-a-box button to collapse the
gadget into its smaller format.
You can also expand the Calendar gadget, if you have
it on your desktop, to show both the month at a
glance and the day. Not all gadgets have the same
tools or options.
Use the Calculator
1. To use the Windows 7 Calculator accessory, click the
Start button, type calc, and click Calculator in the search
results. The Calculator appears on your desktop (see
Figure 5-8), looking much like the standard pocket
calculators that you’re probably familiar with.
Entry or result appears here.
Click the equal-sign button or
press Enter to see the result.
Click the buttons or type numbers.
Figure 5-8
2. To perform a simple calculation, use the keyboard to type
➟
the first number or click the number buttons with the
mouse; type or click the appropriate math-symbol button;
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enter the second number; then press the Enter key or
click the equal-sign button to see the results.
Along with the plus (+) and minus (–) buttons, use
the asterisk key or button (*) for multiplication and
the slash key or button (/) for division. Click the CE
button or press the Esc key to clear your most recent
entry or click the C button to clear all calculations.
3. After you perform at least one calculation, choose
View➪History. The calculator expands to display your
recent calculations, as shown in Figure 5-9. Choose
View➪History again to hide the history.
Choose ViewHistory to
see recent calculations.
Figure 5-9
4. If you want to, copy or cut results from the Calculator
and paste them into another program. Choose Edit➪
Copy, or Edit➪History➪Copy History (only available if
History is displayed). (See Chapter 3 for details on copying, cutting, and pasting.)
➟
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Capture the Screen with the Snipping Tool
1. The Snipping Tool captures all or part of the computer
display screen as a picture. You can save the picture and
attach it to an e-mail or paste the picture into a document.
(See Chapter 10 for information on e-mail.) Click the
Start button, type snip, and click the Snipping Tool from
the search results. The screen fades slightly and the
Snipping Tool toolbar appears (see Figure 5-10).
Click and drag over the area
you want to capture.
Figure 5-10
Use the Snipping Tool to capture screens, if you have
questions or problems. Send the captures to your
own computer expert. Or explain steps to someone
using screen captures.
2. Click and drag over the area of the screen you want to
➟
capture as a picture. Any area at all will do for this step.
Figure 5-11 shows the area to be captured.
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3. After you select an area, release the left mouse button.
Figure 5-12 shows the result of the capture in the
Snipping Tool editor, which appears as soon as you
complete the capture.
The area inside the box you
create by dragging is captured.
Figure 5-11
4. (Optional) Change the shape of the area you want to
select by clicking the down arrow on the New button
(see Figure 5-12) in the editor or the original capture
toolbar. The options on the menu that appears include
the following:
• Free-form Snip: Lets you draw any shape,
including a rough circle.
➟
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• Rectangular Snip: Allows you to click and drag a
box around the area you want to capture. This is
the default option if you don’t select one of the
other options.
Save
New
Highlighter
Pen
Eraser
The screen capture
Figure 5-12
• Window Snip: Grabs an entire window automatically, which may be less than the entire screen. Move
the mouse pointer over the window you intend to
capture and click anywhere in that window.
➟
• Full-screen Snip: Grabs the entire screen at once.
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5. Choose one of these options. A new snip begins. Select an
area of the screen, unless you chose Full-screen. After you
complete the screen capture, the Snipping Tool editor
appears with the area of the screen you selected (refer to
Figure 5-12).
6. (Optional) You can highlight or annotate your snip with
tools in the toolbar (refer to Figure 5-12). Click the Pen
tool and draw or write on the picture; click the Highlighter tool and drag a highlight over any area; erase your
changes with the Eraser tool.
7. After making all necessary edits, click the Save button or
press Ctrl+S to save your snip. Type a filename for your
picture when prompted.
Whether or not you save your snip, you can copy it
to the Clipboard to paste into other programs. With
your snip still onscreen, press Ctrl+C to copy the
snip. Open the other program (such as Paint,
described in the next task), and choose Ctrl+V to
paste it.
Draw with Paint
1. To use Microsoft Paint — an accessory that provides
virtual pens and brushes for use in play, serious art, or art
therapy — click the Start button, type paint, and click
Paint in the search results. The Paint window opens (see
Figure 5-13). Maximize the window, if it isn’t already.
(See Chapter 2 for information on working with
windows.)
2. The canvas is the area you draw on, below the Ribbon
(refer to Figure 5-13). To see what Paint is capable of,
click and drag your mouse over the white canvas to draw
a black squiggle using the default brush and color; then
release the mouse button.
➟
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If your computer uses a pen or has a touchscreen,
you may be able to draw directly on your screen.
3. Move the mouse pointer to a different spot on the
canvas, and click and drag to create another black
squiggle or line.
Ribbon
Paint button
Home and View tabs Brushes
Tools panel
➟
Shapes
Color palette
Canvas (drawing area)
Figure 5-13
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4. Click the down arrow on the Brushes button in the
Ribbon to see a panel of brushes (see Figure 5-14).
Hover your mouse pointer over each brush to see a
tooltip that describes it. (See Chapter 1 for information
on hovering and tooltips.)
Choose a brush.
Figure 5-14
5. Click one of the brushes in this panel to select it.
6. Click one of the small color boxes at the right end of the
Ribbon (refer to Figure 5-13) to select that color.
7. Click and drag your mouse over the canvas again. The
new line looks different from the first two lines you
drew, because you’re using a different brush and a
different color.
8. To add text to your drawing, click the A button on the
Tools panel (refer to Figure 5-13); then click the canvas
and start typing in the text box that appears. When you
do, a new Text tab opens above the Ribbon.
9. Select the text you just typed, and choose options in the
Text tab to size and format your text. You may need to
resize the text box as you change or add text. Your
drawing may (or may not) look something like the
example in Figure 5-15. (For details on text formatting,
see Chapter 3.)
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10. Save your drawing by pressing Ctrl+S or by clicking the
Save button — the tiny disk icon in the Paint title bar
(refer to Figure 5-15).
Size
The text tab contains formatting tools.
Font
Drag a handle to resize the text.
Selected text
Figure 5-15
➟
Paint is capable of doing more — more than I am.
(You can tell that I’m an art-school dropout.) To use
premade shapes, for example, click the Shapes button
on the Ribbon; click a shape on the panel that drops
down; and click and drag in the canvas to draw that
shape. Then click the paint-bucket icon on the Tools
panel to change the inside (or fill color) of the shape.
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Copy what’s on your screen by using the Snipping
Tool, and then paste it into Paint to draw or add text
to something displayed on your screen. You can also
open a photo in Paint and use Paint’s tools to add
drawings and text to your photo. Keep in mind that
you are changing your original photo unless you
make a copy first. See Chapter 12 for information
about photos.
Talk to Sound Recorder
1. You can record audio notes or reminders to yourself with
the Sound Recorder accessory, if your computer has a
microphone.
If you don’t have an obvious external microphone
or headset, you may have a built-in microphone,
especially with a laptop.
2. To open this accessory, click the Start button, type sound,
and click Sound Recorder in the search results. Sound
Recorder opens (see Figure 5-16).
Elapsed time
Volume indicator
Click to start recording.
Figure 5-16
3. To start recording, click the Start Recording button (and
people say computers are hard to figure out!); face the
computer; and talk for more than a few seconds.
When you click the Start Recording button, it changes
to the Stop Recording button.
➟
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4. To stop recording, click the Stop Recording button.
Sound Recorder automatically opens the Save As dialog
box (see Chapter 3). There are no options to pause and
resume.
5. In the File Name text box, type a name you’ll recognize
later for the recording.
6. Click the Save button. Windows 7 saves your recording
as a sound file on your computer’s hard drive (see
Chapter 4).
7. To listen to your recording, choose Start➪Documents,
find your sound file in Windows Explorer, and doubleclick the file to open it. The sound file opens in Windows
Media Player, which I cover in Chapter 13. (For details
on navigating Windows Explorer, see Chapter 4.)
If you try to play back a recording, but hear nothing,
make sure your speakers are on and turned up a
little. Check that the speaker icon in the taskbar isn’t
muted (no red slash across the speaker). Right-click
the speaker icon and choose Recording Devices. Is a
microphone listed with a green checkmark?
Take Sticky Notes
1. To use Sticky Notes — an accessory that puts those
ubiquitous yellow notes directly on your computer’s
desktop — click the Start button, type sticky, and click
Sticky Notes in the search results. Sticky Notes opens, as
you see in Figure 5-17. (Looks just like the real thing,
doesn’t it?)
2. Start typing. Your text appears where the cursor is on the
note.
➟
To add text to an existing note later, click the end of
the text that’s already there and type the new text.
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Add another note.
Delete
Click and drag to resize note.
Start typing your note.
Figure 5-17
3. To make the note larger, drag the bottom-right corner
down and to the right (refer to Figure 5-17).
4. To move the note to another place on your desktop, click
the top area of the note between the plus sign and the X,
and drag the note to a new location.
5. To add a new note, click the plus sign (+) in the top-left
corner of any existing note. A new, blank note appears
near the existing note.
6. To delete a note, click the X in the top-right corner. A
confirmation dialog box pops up.
7. Click the Yes button to delete the note or No to keep it.
Sticky Notes doesn’t have a Save command, so your
notes are saved automatically unless you delete an
individual note by clicking the X.
The next time you start Windows 7, you may not see
any of your notes. Start Sticky Notes to display your
existing notes.
➟
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Installing and
Removing
Programs
Y
our toaster oven isn’t getting any smarter.
Your computer is different from other
machines, in that it can be programmed to do
something it’s never done before. You expand
your computer’s capabilities by installing new
programs. Programs, software, and applications
are all terms for the tools you use to do things.
You don’t install new programs because you
want your computer to live up to its potential,
however. You install new programs so that you
can do new things by using those programs —
things you can’t do with the programs you
already have. You can install a program to
add new capabilities to your computer, such
as creating greeting cards or drafting legal
documents. Some programs are free; others
cost money. Programs designed for professional
work may cost hundreds of dollars. In this
chapter, you install programs from DVD and
from the Internet.
➟
Chapter
6
Get ready to . . .
➟ Determine Which Programs
Are on Your Computer ...... 116
➟ Install a New Program
from a CD or DVD ............ 118
➟ Install a New Program
That You Downloaded
from the Internet ................ 121
➟ Remove Programs You
Don’t Use ......................... 124
On the other hand, your computer may
already have programs that you haven’t begun
to explore. The company that sold your computer or the person who set it up for you may
have installed extra software.
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Your computer may have some programs that you’ll never use and
wouldn’t miss. You don’t have to get rid of them, but doing so is easy
enough and frees a little space on your computer. In this chapter, you
have the option to uninstall a program you are absolutely sure you
don’t need.
Determine Which Programs Are on Your Computer
1. To take stock and see what’s on your computer, click the
Start button, and examine the programs listed on the left
side of the Start menu, which may look something like
Figure 6-1. The programs you see include any that you
have run recently. Other programs may be recommended
by Microsoft or your computer maker.
Click a program to run it.
➟
Click to see all the programs on your computer.
Figure 6-1
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2. Click All Programs at the bottom of the menu. Windows 7
displays the All Programs menu — an alphabetical list of
programs followed by a second list of yellow folder icons
representing program groups (see Figure 6-2).
All programs
Click folders to see groups of programs.
Figure 6-2
3. Click one of the folder icons, such as Accessories or
Games, to see a submenu of all the programs in the
group. Some program groups have other program groups
inside them.
4. Click the folder icon again to hide the group submenu.
5. To start any program listed in any of these menus, click
its name.
➟
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Starting a program by clicking through menus seems
slower to me than typing part of the program name
in the Start search box, especially if you don’t know
which program group a program is in or if it’s several
folders deep. However, sometimes you need to see
what programs are available by digging a little.
Install a New Program from a CD or DVD
1. To install a program that comes on a CD or DVD, insert
the program disc into your computer’s disc drive or tray,
label side up (or, if your computer has a vertical disc slot
instead, insert the disc with the label side facing left). The
AutoPlay dialog box appears (see Figure 6-3). Click the
option to run Install or Setup. User Account Control may
ask if you really want to run this program. (Windows 7
tries to keep you from installing software unintentionally
by asking for confirmation.)
Click to install the new program.
Figure 6-3
➟
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If nothing happens when you insert the disc, choose
Start➪Computer to open the Computer window;
double-click the icon for your DVD or CD drive; and
then double-click a program named Setup or Install.
2. If the installer offers a language selection, choose yours.
3. Many installers require you to accept an end-user license
agreement (EULA). You can read the EULA or not, but
you can’t install without agreeing to its terms.
4. If the installer offers Express or Custom installation options,
choose the Express option to let the installer set up the program without further input from you. The Custom option
or Advanced Settings allows you to specify where to install
the program and, perhaps, which parts of the program to
install. Some installers provide other options, such as the
one shown in Figure 6-4, to install documentation, other
programs, or to register the program.
5. As the installer program continues to run and display
dialog boxes, click the Next or Continue button in each
dialog box to proceed to the next step.
6. Click the Finish or Close button in the last step of the
installer program to complete the process. In a few cases,
the setup program may ask you to restart Windows 7. In
this case, you don’t have to restart immediately, but you
won’t be able to use the new program until you do
restart.
➟
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Click to...Install the program.
...Read the user guide.
...Register the program.
Figure 6-4
7. The new program may appear automatically at the bottom of the first screen of the Start menu, as shown in
Figure 6-5. Look under All Programs, as well. Newly
installed programs are highlighted in color. Some installers add a program icon to the desktop.
Many programs try to connect to the Internet for
updates during installation or when you run the
installed program. The first time you run a program,
you may be asked if you want to register the program
or configure some aspect of the program. Go with
default (assumed) responses, if you’re not sure.
➟
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Newly installed programs are highlighted.
Figure 6-5
Install a New Program That You
Downloaded from the Internet
You may want to read Chapter 8, about connecting
to the Internet, and Chapter 9, about using Internet
Explorer, before you try this task. You need to
download a program to perform these steps.
➟
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1. To install a program that you’ve downloaded from the
Internet, choose Start➪Computer to open the Computer
window; then click Downloads on the left side of the
window. The contents of the Downloads folder appear
under your user name. See Figure 6-6 (your folder surely
has different contents).
Downloads folder
Double-click to install.
Figure 6-6
2. Double-click the downloaded program to start the
installer. User Account Control may ask if you really
want to run this program. (Windows 7 tries to keep you
from installing software unintentionally by asking for
confirmation.)
➟
3. If the installer offers a language selection, choose yours.
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4. Many installers require you to accept an end-user license
agreement (EULA). You can read the EULA or not, but
you can’t install without agreeing to its terms.
5. If the installer offers Express or Custom installation
options, choose the Express option to let the installer set
up the program without further input from you. The
Custom or Advanced Settings option allows you to
specify where to install the program and, perhaps, which
parts of the program to install.
6. As the installer program continues to run and display
dialog boxes, click the Next or Continue button in each
dialog box to proceed to the next step.
7. Click the Finish or Close button in the last step of the
installer program to complete the process. In a few cases,
the setup program may ask you to restart Windows 7. In
this case, you don’t have to restart immediately, but you
won’t be able to use the new program until you do
restart.
8. The new program may appear automatically at the
bottom of the first screen of the Start menu (refer to
Figure 6-5). Look under All Programs, as well. Newly
installed programs are highlight in color. Some installers
add a program icon to the desktop.
Many programs try to connect to the Internet for
updates during installation or when you run the
installed program. The first time you run a program,
you may be asked if you want to register the program
or configure some aspect of the program. Go with
default (assumed) responses, if you’re not sure.
This tip is a warning, really: Although you can
download many good programs from the Internet,
you can also download dangerous ones. Never install
➟
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a program that you get in an e-mail message, for
example, no matter who sent it. See Chapter 18 for
more information about protecting your computer.
Remove Programs You Don’t Use
1. If you don’t want a particular program on your computer,
you can uninstall it. Begin by clicking the Start button,
typing programs, and then clicking Programs and Features
(not Default Programs). The Programs and Features window opens, listing all the programs that you can uninstall
(see Figure 6-7).
Programs that you can double-click to uninstall (optional).
Date the program was installed.
Figure 6-7
➟
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Just because you can uninstall a program doesn’t
mean you should. You can ignore programs you don’t
use. Look at program names, publisher, and date
installed to determine whether you actually use a
program.
2. Double-click the program you want to remove. A confirmation dialog box appears (see Figure 6-8).
Change or repair options
Click Yes to uninstall the program.
Figure 6-8
Some confirmation dialog boxes are larger than the
one shown in Figure 6-8 and may have other
options, such as Repair or Change. Choose one of
➟
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those options if you decide that you want to keep the
program but are having a problem with it. A series of
dialog boxes will lead you through the repair or
change process.
3. Click Yes to remove the program. Uninstallation may
take anywhere from a few seconds to several minutes.
When the process is complete, the program no longer
appears in the All Programs menu (refer to “Determine
Which Programs Are on Your Computer,” earlier in this
chapter).
4. If Windows 7 tells you to restart the computer after it
uninstalls a program, you can restart now or later, at your
convenience.
Before you uninstall a program that you may want
to reinstall later, make sure that you have a copy of
it on a CD or DVD (or that you know where to
download it from the Internet again). You have no
undo option when you uninstall a program.
➟
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Working with
Printers and
Other Add-On
Devices
➟
Chapter
7
Get ready to . . .
➟ Trust USB Plug and Play
E
very computer has a screen, a keyboard,
and a mouse or other pointing device.
Computers accept add-on devices for additional
functionality — devices such as printers. You
can also add a second display, a mouse, or
another hard drive. Specifically, you may want
to add a mouse or replace the one that came
with your computer. Other devices you may add
to your computer include an external hard drive
that you can use to back up precious files.
Perhaps the idea of using two displays intrigues
you. Laptops have built-in support for two displays — an external display in addition to the
laptop screen — and Windows 7 makes it very
easy to use a second display. Most desktop computers also support a second display, although
there is a little more setup than with laptops.
for Add-Ons ..................... 128
➟ View the Printer and
Other Devices on Your
Computer ......................... 130
➟ Connect a Printer to
Your Computer ................. 132
➟ Add an External DVD
or Hard Drive ................... 134
➟ Add a Second Display
for Twice the Fun .............. 135
For any add-ons — which tech-folk call
peripherals — Windows 7 has a trick up its
sleeve to help you. Thanks to Plug and Play
technology, which automatically identifies
add-on devices, connecting new devices to
your computer can be quite easy.
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Trust USB Plug and Play for Add-Ons
There are many kinds of add-on devices you may find useful:
➟
A printer lets you, well, print documents or photos.
Your choices for printers include black and white
versus color, and ink jet versus laser printer.
Consider a multifunction printer that includes a
copier, scanner, and fax machine.
➟
A scanner enables you to make digital images of old
photos or documents so that you can view them
onscreen.
➟
An external hard drive stores backup copies of your
most precious files.
➟
An additional or replacement pointing device (your
mouse is a pointing device), including a trackball or
a pen with a tablet, may be more comfortable to use
than what came with your computer. Switching
between pointing devices helps you avoid repetitive
stress.
➟
A microphone is crucial for communicating by voice
with your computer, through speech recognition, or
with your friends over the Internet. A combination
headset with microphone may sound the best.
➟
A video camera (or webcam) is essential for video
phone calls a la the Jetsons.
The majority of these devices connect using USB (Universal Serial Bus)
technology. When you connect a device to your computer using a USB
cable to the USB port (see Figure 7-1), the device identifies itself to
the computer. This identification process is called Plug and Play.
Ideally, you connect your device, and it simply works.
➟
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USB port
USB cable
Figure 7-1
Windows 7 uses a device driver to communicate with an add-on device.
The driver is really a program that tells Windows 7 how to run the
device. When you connect a device, such as a printer, Windows 7
looks for a driver (specifically, a printer driver, in this case). That
driver may be built into Windows 7, or it may come on a disc that’s
packaged with the device. Or, the driver may need to be downloaded
from the Internet, either automatically by Windows 7 or manually
by you.
Every computer has at least a couple of USB ports.
Some are harder to reach in the back of the computer, and some are in front. If your computer
doesn’t have enough ports, you can buy a USB hub,
which is a small box with two to four USB ports, to
add more ports. If a port is hard to reach with a
device’s cable, you can buy a USB extension cable.
➟
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Bluetooth is a wireless technology for adding devices
to your computer. If your computer has Bluetooth,
you can use Bluetooth in addition to USB, to add
some devices, especially a microphone or headset.
The process differs from connecting a USB device;
you pair the device and computer via a dialog box.
View the Printer and Other Devices on Your Computer
1. Maybe you’re curious and just want to see all the devices
that are attached to your computer. Luckily, you can see
most of them from one screen, the Devices and Printers
window (also called the Device Stage). And to get there,
choose Start➪Devices and Printers.
2. The Device and Printers window appears (see Figure 7-2)
and shows you all the devices attached to your computer,
including the computer itself, the display (or monitor),
external add-on devices, such as a hard drive, flash drive,
or memory card, and the mouse. Your screen will look
different.
Windows 7 automatically installs the Microsoft XPS
Document Writer, which doesn’t print, but creates
printable files, as your default printer. When you
connect a real printer, the new printer becomes your
default printer automatically. See the next section,
“Connect a Printer to Your Computer.”
3. Double-click the device you want to examine. This action
➟
opens the device’s properties either in a full-screen dialog
box with options or in a smaller dialog box with limited
information and options. (Older devices have more
limited information.) When you’re finished reviewing the
information, if a small dialog box popped open, close it.
If a full-screen dialog box opened, use the Backspace key
or click Devices and Printers in the address bar of the
window to return to the previous screen.
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Click, double-click, or right-click icons
to see information and options.
Figure 7-2
4. Right-click any device to open a context menu of other
options, including access to settings, options, or properties
for that device. For example, your printer options include
seeing what’s printing, which is especially useful if nothing
comes out of your printer. If you’re having problems with
a device, click the Troubleshoot option on the context
menu to open a guided troubleshooting program to walk
you through options for resolving problems with the
device.
Although you see buttons to Add a Printer or Add
Device in the command bar of the Device and
Printers window, you need to use those buttons only
➟
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if Windows 7 doesn’t automatically detect and install
your device. With USB and Plug and Play, most
devices install automatically.
Connect a Printer to Your Computer
1. Take your printer out of the box. Keep all the packing
material together until you know you won’t need to
return the printer. Arrange all the components for easy
access. In addition to the printer, you’ll probably find ink
cartridges or a toner cartridge, a power cable, and a CD
with printer software. Read the setup instructions that
come with your printer.
2. Remove all tape from the printer. Most printers ship with
the print mechanism locked in place to prevent it from
moving during shipping. Look for brightly colored tape,
paper, or plastic indicating what you need to move or
remove to release the print mechanism.
3. Put the printer within cable length of your computer.
Insert the ink or toner cartridge before you turn on the
printer for the first time. Place some paper in the paper
drawer or tray. Connect the printer to the power supply.
Plug the printer cable into the printer and into the
computer.
Your printer may have come with a disc with a
printer driver and other software. You don’t need to
use that disc unless Windows 7 fails to correctly
install a driver automatically.
4. Turn on the printer. You may see some informational
dialog boxes or pop-up messages as Windows 7 handles
the configuration.
5. To confirm that your printer is installed properly, choose
➟
Start➪Devices and Printers. You should see an icon for
your new printer onscreen in the Devices and Printers
window (refer to Figure 7-2).
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6. Double-click your printer icon to see information about
your printer. Click on Customize Your Printer to open a
separate Properties dialog box, as shown in Figure 7-3. At
the bottom of the General tab, click the Print Test Page
button.
If a test page doesn’t print, check that both ends of
the cable are plugged in properly and make sure the
printer is turned on. Double-check all the preceding
steps and try to print a test page again. Contact the
printer manufacturer, the location you bought the
printer from, or the Web for more help.
Click to return to the Devices and Printers window.
Click OK to close the dialog box.
Print out a test page.
Figure 7-3
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➟
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7. After you successfully print your test page, click the Back
button or close the dialog box showing the properties.
Confirm that your new printer is identified as the default
printer, which is the one Windows 7 assumes you intend
to use whenever you print something. In the Devices and
Printers window, right-click over the printer. If there isn’t
a check mark next to Set as Default Printer, click that
option.
8. Start a program and create or open a document. (See
Chapter 3.) Print from any program by choosing File➪
Print, clicking a Print button (usually a printer icon), or
pressing Ctrl+P.
When you print from a program, a Print dialog box
appears and gives you options for changing how your
printer prints any specific document. In most cases,
you can just click the Print button without changes.
Add an External DVD or Hard Drive
1. Your computer has a built-in hard drive storing Windows 7,
all of your programs, and the files you create — your data.
There’s always a possibility that you’ll lose your data
through accident or theft. To make an extra copy, or back
up a large amount of data (or all of your computer files and
programs), attach an external USB hard drive. Although
you can also back up files to an external DVD drive, you’re
more likely to want one to record and play DVDs for
entertainment.
2. Plug the external drive into a power source and into a USB
port. Turn on the drive. Windows 7 installs a device driver
automatically. You may see pop-up notifications near the
clock in the taskbar as the driver is installed and when the
device is ready for use. Windows 7 may automatically
open the AutoPlay dialog box shown in Figure 7-4.
➟
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An external device brings up the AutoPlay dialog box.
Close
Click to view files on the device
Figure 7-4
Choose Start➪Computer (or press the Windows key
and E) to explore your new hard drive or disc drive.
See Chapter 19 for information on backing up your
data. Also, Chapters 12 and 13 tell you what you
need to know about copying your photos and music
to disc.
Add a Second Display for Twice the Fun
1. Before you buy a second display (also called a screen or
monitor), you should find out whether your computer is
ready for a second display. Right-click the desktop and
then choose Screen Resolution from the pop-up menu.
You arrive at the Screen Resolution window, as shown in
Figure 7-5.
➟
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Using two computer displays at once may sound
excessive, but in fact, two displays give you twice as
much space to see everything you want to see and
work with at one time. For example, you can position
your e-mail program on one display while you use
the other for games or real work. Your e-mail will
always be visible as you go about doing other things.
Trust me: Once you try this, you’ll see that two
displays are twice the fun.
2. Click the Detect button and then click the drop-down list
next to Display. On the first line, you see 1. followed by
the name of the computer’s default display (such as 1.
Mobile PC Display in Figure 7-5). If you see a second
line in the menu (possibly worded Available Display
Output), your computer is ready for a second display;
you may also see an icon representing a second display.
If only one display is listed, you can’t add a second display
without replacing the graphics card, which is more work
and expense than you may want to get into now.
3. When you’re ready, if you don’t have a display leftover
from another computer, buy an LCD display at an office
supply or discount electronics supply store.
4. To add a second display, shut down Windows 7. With
the computer off, plug your second display into the wall
or power strip and connect the display cable to your
computer. See Figure 7-6 for an example of a typical
display cable and plug (this is not USB). On a desktop
computer, the plug is behind the computer. Your first
display will be plugged in near the plug for the second.
On a laptop computer, the plug is probably located along
the back edge, near the hinge.
➟
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Windows shows all connected displays here.
Click Detect to find a second display.
Figure 7-5
5. Turn the new display on and turn the computer on. If
you’re using a laptop computer, press the Win key (see
the Introduction) and the X key simultaneously to open
the Windows Mobility Center, shown in Figure 7-7. (The
Mobility Center is not available on desktop computers.)
Click the Connect Display button. In the next dialog box,
click Extend, which allows you to use the two displays
separately. If both displays show the desktop, skip to
Step 9.
➟
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Display port
Display plug
Figure 7-6
Click to connect the display.
Figure 7-7
6. To activate the second display on a desktop computer,
right-click on the desktop and then choose Screen
Resolution from the pop-up menu. Once again, you arrive
at the Screen Resolution window (refer to Figure 7-5).
➟
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7. Open the Multiple Displays drop-down list and choose
Extend These Displays to enable the new display. Click
Apply. Click Identify; each display should briefly show a
huge number 1 or 2.
8. If both screens display the desktop, close the Screen
Resolution dialog box.
If the second display still isn’t working, check all the
cable connections and the display power switch.
Repeat Step 7. Confirm that two lines appear in the
Display drop-down list and two numbered icons
appear near the top of the dialog box.
9. If both displays work, you can drag a window that is
neither maximized nor minimized from one display to
the other, where you can maximize it or size and place it,
as you wish. The taskbar and Start menu appear only on
the original display. Now you have some room to work
with.
➟
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➟
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Part III
Discovering the
Internet
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Connecting to
the Internet
T
he Internet is a global network of computers. Any computer can connect to any other
computer through the Internet. Your Internet
connection is the gateway to communication
via e-mail and to browsing the World Wide
Web for information and entertainment.
Windows 7 makes connecting to the Internet
easy. At its easiest, you turn on the computer
and you’re connected. Because there may be
more to connecting than that, you work with
two different types of connections in this chapter: wireless and wired.
➟
Chapter
8
Get ready to . . .
➟ Connect to the Internet
Anywhere ........................ 144
➟ Bring the Internet Home ..... 149
A wireless connection has the benefit of providing you with mobility and no cables to get
tangled. Furthermore, Windows 7 is designed
to find wireless connections and simplify connecting. Public connections — such as those
you can find in hotels, coffee shops, fast food
joints, public libraries, and airports — will
surely be wireless, but you may find wireless
best for home, as well, especially with a laptop.
A wired connection involves more setup steps
than wireless, not to mention wires. A desktop
computer running at home may use a wired
connection, especially if your desk is conveniently located next to the connection — either
your cable service access or phone line. Wired
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connections are often referred to as Ethernet connections, which use a
cable-like thick phone cord.
There are three components to an Internet connection:
➟
Hardware in the form of a wireless or a wired
adapter built into every new computer
➟
Software in the form of Windows 7
➟
Access provided by an Internet service provider
(ISP), such as your phone company, cable TV
provider, or a public connection in a coffee shop or
library
Connect to the Internet Anywhere
1. If you have a laptop computer and carry it with you, you
can connect to the Internet in many public locations.
Many of these locations provide free, easily accessed
connections, commonly called hotspots. To follow these
steps, take your laptop to a library or coffee shop that
offers a hotspot.
Most free, public connections don’t require
passwords or special permission to connect. If
you have trouble connecting to a hotspot, it may be
part of a private network or require a password to
connect. Ask for the log-in requirements at the front
desk or counter.
2. Turn on your laptop. After the Windows 7 desktop
➟
appears, wait a moment while Windows 7 searches
automatically for available wireless connections, including
private ones. You may see a notification in the taskbar
for available connections or an icon with five vertical
bars. Click the message or the icon for a list of available
connections (see Figure 8-1). If you see a list, skip to
Step 5.
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Click a network to select it.
Click the Connections icon to see
a list of available connections.
Figure 8-1
3. If you don’t see a list of available connections, press Q+X
for the Windows Mobility Center, as shown in Figure 8-2.
(The Windows Mobility Center is not available on desktop
computers.)
4. In the section — or tile — labeled Wireless Network, if
the button says Turn Wireless On, click it. (If the button
says Turn Wireless Off, don’t click — it’s on already.)
Above the button, if you see the word Connected, you’re
done and ready to use the Internet. If you don’t see
Connected, click the button with five gray bars to open
the Available Networks dialog box shown in Figure 8-1.
➟
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Click icon to see a list of connections.
Wireless Network panel
Figure 8-2
If wireless is off but you can’t click the button, you
may have a separate switch on the laptop that turns
wireless on and off. Turn that wireless switch on;
then repeat Step 4.
5. The Available Networks dialog box lists all networks in
range of your computer, including private networks you
can’t access. Network names are often technical or
whimsical. Look for the name of the establishment
you’re in. If more than one network looks promising,
choose the one with the most green bars, indicating the
best connection.
Stay away from networks with weird names like
DeathTrap or Warez. (A network named FluffyBunny
could be just as dangerous, of course.) A network
connection is a two-way street. Be careful who you
connect to.
6. Click the name of the network you intend to connect to
➟
(see Figure 8-3). If you plan on connecting to this network
again in the future, you can select the Connect
Automatically check box to make reconnection easier. If
this is a one-time connection, deselect the Connect
Automatically check box. Click the Connect button.
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Click a network to select it.
Refresh the list.
Click Connect to use this network now.
Check here to automatically connect.
Figure 8-3
7. If the network you’re connecting to requires a security
key or passphrase (password), you see the dialog box
shown in Figure 8-4. Hotels often require this information,
even on an account that’s free to guests. If you know
the required information, enter it here and click OK
to connect. Otherwise, ask someone for help or try a
different network.
8. If the network connection doesn’t require a password or
you’ve entered one, Windows 7 prompts you to identify
the type of network connection you want. Your choice
here sets security for the connection.
➟
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Type the key, passphrase, or password.
Click ok to connect.
Figure 8-4
• Home: You may connect wirelessly to your own
home network, in which case, identifying that
connection as Home makes it easy for other
computers you have at home to share documents
and resources, such as a printer.
• Work: You may connect to an office network with
this option.
• Public: Use this option for all other connections
or when in doubt. Identifying this as a public
network automatically sets many security options
to be more secure.
Speaking of security, you need it when accessing
the Internet. Windows 7 does many things
automatically to secure your machine,
protecting you from intruders and other trouble.
See Chapter 18 for information about what steps
you need to take to stay secure.
➟
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9. The Wireless Network tile of the Windows Mobility
Center (get there by pressing Q+X) indicates Connected,
as shown in Figure 8-5. If not, start over and select a
different network. Repeat as many times as necessary or
read the next section for some trouble-shooting tips.
You’re connected.
Figure 8-5
10. Test your Internet connection: Start Microsoft Internet
Explorer. (See Chapter 9 for information on using
Internet Explorer, or IE.) Click in the address bar at the
top of IE and type www.google.com; then press Enter. If
a screen appears with the Google logo and a search box,
you’re connected to the Internet. If you still don’t have a
connection, repeat these steps using a different wireless
network.
Bring the Internet Home
If you have a laptop that you use at home, try the steps in the previous
section first. You may already have a wireless connection available at
home if your Internet service provider provided you with a wireless
router (look for antennas), or you live in a facility with wireless
provided to residents.
➟
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1. To bring the Internet home, you need an account with
an Internet service provider (ISP), such as your local
telephone company or cable TV service. An ISP provides
you with the hardware for a physical (wired) connection
to the Internet, as well as an account for access. Your ISP
may send you the hardware or deliver and install it. The
hardware consists of a box (sometimes called a modem)
that connects to your phone line or TV cable. In turn,
your computer connects to this box with a wire or
wirelessly.
If you have a laptop, you can’t beat wireless for ease
of connection and mobility. If you see an antenna on
the ISP box, it supports a wireless connection. If your
ISP box doesn’t have built-in wireless support, you
can add it using a device called a wireless router.
Details are beyond the scope of this book. See Using
the Internet Safely For Seniors For Dummies, by Linda
Criddle and Nancy Muir (Wiley Publishing, Inc.), for
more on wireless network security.
2. With the Windows 7 desktop onscreen, insert the disc
that comes with your hardware. (If you don’t have such a
disc, skip to Step 5.) If the setup program doesn’t start
automatically, choose Start➪Computer. Double-click the
disc icon. Double-click on Setup or Install. Follow the
instruction screens, which tell you how to connect the
hardware and set up your Internet access. At some point
during this process, you’ll enter the username and
password the ISP provides.
3. When you’re done with the setup program, test your
➟
Internet connection: Start Microsoft Internet Explorer.
(See Chapter 9 for information on using Internet
Explorer, or IE.) Click in the address bar at the top of IE
and type www.google.com; then press Enter. If a screen
appears with the Google logo and a search box, you’re
connected to the Internet. Skip the remaining steps.
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4. If you don’t have a disc from your ISP or you don’t have
an Internet connection at this point, proceed with the
following steps.
5. Connect your computer to the ISP box using an Ethernet
cable (which looks like a thick phone wire) if you
haven’t already done so. Plug the Ethernet cable into
your computer’s Ethernet port and into a port on the
ISP box. See Figure 8-6. Turn on the box’s power. Lights
blink on the box.
Ethernet port (with the cable plugged in)
Ethernet cable
Modem
Figure 8-6
6. Test your Internet connection: Click in the address bar at
the top of IE and type www.google.com; then press Enter.
If a screen appears with the Google logo and a search box,
you are connected to the Internet. If you receive any error
messages, click in the address bar at the top of IE. Type the
address for your connection; your ISP provides this
numeric address, and 192.168.0.1 is very common. The
configuration screen for your ISP connection appears, as
shown in Figure 8-7. (Your screen may look different.)
➟
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Numeric address for Internet connection.
Click for a step-by-step setup.
Figure 8-7
7. Click the option for setup or configuration. You proceed
through a series of screens with instructions. At some
point, you enter the username and password provided by
your ISP.
8. When you’re done with the setup steps, test your Internet
connection: Click in the address bar at the top of IE and
type www.google.com; then press Enter. If a screen
appears with the Google logo and a search box, you’re
connected to the Internet. If you still don’t have an
Internet connection, turn the ISP box on and off, and
restart your computer. Test your connection again and, if
you still aren’t connected, call your ISP for assistance.
➟
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Finding What
You Need on
the Web
T
he World Wide Web (simply, the Web,
from here on) provides quick access to
information and entertainment worldwide.
One part library, one part marketplace, and
one part soapbox, the Web makes everything
equidistant: From down the block to halfway
around the world — even out into space —
everything is one click away. News, shopping,
and the electronic equivalent of the town
square await you.
You explore the Web using a Web browser, a
program designed to make browsing the Web
easy, enjoyable, and safe. In this chapter, I
show how you can use Microsoft Internet
Explorer to step beyond your computer into
the global village.
You browse Web pages, which are published by
governments, businesses, and individuals —
anyone can learn to create Web pages. Each
Web page can consist of a few words or
thousands of words and pictures. A Web page
is part of a larger collection called a Web site,
which consists of a group of related Web pages
published on a topic by an organization or
individual. Companies and individuals create
Web sites to organize their related pages.
15_509463-ch09.indd 153
➟
Chapter
9
Get ready to . . .
➟ Get Familiar with Microsoft
Internet Explorer................ 154
➟ Browse for News .............. 157
➟ Use Tabs to Browse Multiple
Web Pages at Once ......... 161
➟ Change Your Browser’s
Home Page ...................... 163
➟ Mark Your Favorite Places
on the Favorites Bar .......... 164
➟ Add More Favorites .......... 165
➟ Search for Anything .......... 167
➟ Shop Online Using
Amazon ........................... 168
➟ Close Internet Explorer....... 177
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Regardless of topic, pages and sites on the Web have some common
characteristics:
➟
Unique addresses, which are formally called URLs
(URL stands for Uniform Resource Locator, in case
you’re ever on Jeopardy!). The address of each Web
page appears in the browser’s address bar at the top
of the screen.
➟
Connecting links that move you from page to
page when you click them. These links (also called
hypertext links or hyperlinks) often appear underlined
and blue. Pictures and other graphic images can also
be links to other pages.
Get Familiar with Microsoft Internet Explorer
1. Start Microsoft Internet Explorer (IE) by clicking on the
blue e icon in the taskbar. The first time you run IE, one
of the following will happen:
• The default Web page, known as the browser’s
home page, appears. The manufacturer of your
computer may have chosen this page as your
default. (Don’t worry, you can change it later.)
• The Set Up Windows Internet Explorer dialog box
may appear. On that screen, click the Ask Me Later
button.
• An error message may appear if you don’t
have access to the Internet. See Chapter 8 for
information about getting connected to the
Internet.
2. Examine IE. Locate each of the following (see Figure 9-1):
➟
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Favorites Bar
Command Bar
Title
Address bar
Status bar
Figure 9-1
Tabs
Search box
Protected mode is on.
Zoom
• The title of the current Web page appears in the
title bar and on a tab a few lines lower. Tabs allow
you to open more than one Web page at a time.
• The address bar displays the Web page address for
the page currently shown in the browser. As you
follow links, the address changes. If you know the
Web address of a page you want to visit, you can
type it here and then press Enter to get there.
➟
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For a Web address that begins with www. and
ends with .com, such as www.amazon.com, you
can type the middle part of the address — for this
example, amazon — and then press Ctrl+Enter to
have the browser add the beginning and the end
of the address: amazon with Ctrl+Enter becomes
www.amazon.com.
• The search box allows you to type in topics or
search terms for which you want to find matching
Web pages. See the section “Search for Anything,”
later in this chapter.
You can also find new Web pages and sites by
following links from other sites. When you
discover sites that you intend to visit again, you
can find your way back by marking those sites as
favorites.
• The Favorites Bar displays links to frequently
visited sites. See “Mark Your Favorite Places on the
Favorites Bar.”
• The Command Bar appears below the address bar
and to the right of the tabs.
• The Web page appears in the main part of the IE
window. If the page is longer than one screen, you
can scroll down the page by clicking in the scroll
bar area on the right edge of the window.
➟
• The status bar displays information about the
page, including Done, if the page is complete.
Look in the status bar for the message Protected
Mode: On, which indicates that IE is protecting
your computer from some hazards. At the right
end of the status bar, zoom in and out by clicking
on 100% or using the down arrow for a dropdown menu of zoom levels.
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Scroll down a page by pressing Page Down or the
spacebar. Scroll back up by pressing Page Up or
Shift+spacebar. Use the up and down arrows to scroll
up or down one line at a time.
Browse for News
1. You have to start browsing for something, so why not the
news? There’s no need to delete whatever is currently in
the address bar if you click once in the address bar and
see everything there is highlighted. Type www.newseum.
org in your browser’s address bar and press Enter. IE
automatically adds http:// to the front of whatever
you type — you never have to type that part of a Web
address. Your browser has a home page — the first page
you see when you start the browser. Each Web site you
visit also has a home page, the first page you see at that
site. The home page for the Newseum, an online
collection of newspapers, appears in Figure 9-2.
See “Install an Add-On in Internet Explorer,” later in
this chapter, if you see a message about installing
Flash.
2. Click the button for Today’s Front Pages, which is
possibly on the right side of the screen. It can be tricky to
find the link or button you want on a Web page, but
links are usually underlined or a different color from
regular text. The mouse pointer turns into a hand with a
pointing index finger when you hover over something
you can click. Most Web sites arrange major links
horizontally near the top and vertically along either side
of the page. Keep in mind that Web pages are subject
to change any time, so what you see onscreen may be
different from the pages you see in this chapter.
➟
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Click Today’s Front Pages.
Figure 9-2
Some Web pages are wider than the browser window,
in which case you have to scroll right and left by
clicking in the horizontal scroll bar or by pressing the
right- or left-arrow keys.
3. On Today’s Front Pages (see Figure 9-3), scroll down the
page and up again. Look at the thumbnails of front pages
from newspapers around the world. Use any of the blue,
underlined links:
• Next: This link shows you more front page
thumbnails.
➟
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• Previous: After you click Next one or more times,
this link returns you to pages you’ve already seen.
• Show 40 80 100 All per page: Use one of these
numbers or All to change the number of thumbnails that appear on one Web page.
• Sort Papers by Region: This link displays thumbnails grouped by international region, such as U.S.,
Europe, or Africa. The current display (See All
Papers) is alphabetical by newspaper name.
Click to sort by area.
Choose how many front pages to see at once.
Click to see more front pages.
Click a front page.
Figure 9-3
➟
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4. To see one newspaper, click the thumbnail of the front
page or the underlined text (the link) beneath that
thumbnail.
5. The next page (see Figure 9-4) displays the front page of
the paper you just selected. Scroll down the page to look
at the front page and then scroll up again. Click one of
these links above the front page:
• BACK returns you to the previous page of
thumbnails.
• Web Site takes you from the Newseum site to the
Web site for that particular newspaper.
Click Back to return to the list of front pages.
➟
Click Web Site to see this newspaper’s Web site.
Figure 9-4
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6. Click in the address bar. Type news.google.com (no
www) and press Enter. Google News displays headlines
as links to news stories from around the world. Click
any link to go to the story, as reported by any one of
thousands of sources. Click the Back button or press
Backspace to return to news.google.com.
Use Tabs to Browse Multiple Web Pages at Once
1. IE provides tabs to open more than one Web page at the
same time. Click the narrow New Tab button to the right
of your current tab, below the address bar. (As an alternative to clicking the New Tab button, you can press
Ctrl+T.) A new tab appears (see Figure 9-5) next to the
tab you were using.
Previous tab
The New Tab button.
A new tab is open for a new address.
Figure 9-5
2. Type www.newseum.org in the address bar, replacing
about:Tabs. As you type, IE displays matching addresses
you can pick with the mouse or with the down arrow
and Enter (see Figure 9-6).
3. Click the tab to the left of the new one to return to your
previous tab — it’s still open and available. Return to the
newest tab by clicking it.
➟
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As you type, IE looks for matches.
Figure 9-6
Another way to open a Web page in a new tab is to
right-click over a link on a page. Click Open in New
Tab. You can open as many tabs as you need. I use
multiple tabs so that I don’t lose my place on one
page as I move on to the next.
4. Click the Quick Tabs (or press Ctrl+Q) button to the left
of your first tab to display thumbnails for all open tabs
(see Figure 9-7). Click on a thumbnail to switch to that
tab. Click the down arrow to the right of Quick Tabs for
a list of open tabs.
Click the Quick Tabs button or arrow.
Click the X button to close the tab.
➟
Click a thumbnail to switch to that tab.
Figure 9-7
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5. Close an open tab by clicking the X to the right of that
particular tab (or press Ctrl+W).
Change Your Browser’s Home Page
1. When you start your Web browser, the browser’s default
Web page — its home page — appears. You can make the
browser’s home page one you want to see every time you
start the browser. A news Web site or any other might be
a better home page for the browser than the default page
the browser chooses.
Whenever you’re wandering the Internet, you can
quickly return to your browser’s home page without
restarting IE. To the right of the browser tabs, on the
same bar, click the Home Page button. It’s an icon
that looks like a house with a chimney. The browser’s
home page appears.
2. To change your browser’s home page, browse to the page
you want to use as home. Click the down arrow next to
the Home Page button. Click Add or Change Home Page,
and the corresponding dialog box appears (see Figure
9-8) with two options:
• Use This Webpage as Your Only Home Page
replaces the previous home page with the current
page.
• Add This Webpage to Your Home Page Tabs
creates a group of home page tabs, all of which
open when IE starts.
3. Make your choice and click Yes. After you do, clicking the
Home Page button opens your choice (or choices). Each
time you start IE, this page opens, as well.
➟
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Select this option to make the page
your home page, and then click Yes.
Figure 9-8
Mark Your Favorite Places on the Favorites Bar
1. In IE, the Favorites Bar appears directly below the address
bar. You can add links here to take you back to pages you
want to return to, such as your favorite news site or your
bank’s Web site. Browse the Web page for this book:
Type www.mjhinton.com/w7fs/ in the address bar and
press Enter.
2. On the Favorites Bar, click the Add to Favorites Bar
button, which has a green arrow over a gold star.
Without any fanfare, the title of the current Web page
appears to the right of the Add to Favorites Bar button
(see Figure 9-9).
Click a favorite to see that page.
Click to add the current page to the Favorites Bar.
Figure 9-9
➟
3. To return to a site using the Favorites Bar, click on the
link.
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4. Rename a Favorites Bar link by right-clicking over that
link. Choose Rename. For this book, you could type
Windows 7 book. Then click OK. Shorter names allow
you to fit more links on the Favorites Bar and make those
links easier to recognize.
5. Delete a link from the Favorites Bar by right-clicking over
that link and choosing Delete from the resulting menu. A
dialog box asks whether you’re sure. Click Yes (if you are).
Use the Favorites Bar for the Web sites you visit most
often, and delete links you don’t often use.
Add More Favorites
1. You can bookmark any Web page as a favorite place to
make it easy to return to that page later. Browse to a site
you like to visit (for example, the Web page for this
book): Type www.mjhinton.com/w7fs/ in the address
bar and press Enter.
2. To mark the Web page that appears as a favorite, click the
Favorites button below the address bar. See Figure 9-10.
The Favorites panel displays any page titles already
marked as favorites, as well as folders used to organize
favorites into groups.
3. Click the Add to Favorites button. The Add a Favorite
dialog box appears with the title of the current Web page
showing in the Name box. You can change that name, if
you want. See Figure 9-11. Favorites is the name of the
main folder for these links. You can select a different
folder or create a new folder. Don’t feel you have to be so
organized. Click the Add button.
Pressing Ctrl+D opens the Add a Favorite dialog box
directly. You can press Ctrl+D to get the Add a
Favorite dialog box at any time, even if the Favorites
panel isn’t open.
➟
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Click to add the current page to the Favorites panel.
Click Favorites to see the Favorites panel.
Figure 9-10
Place the favorite in a different folder (optional).
Change the name of the favorite (optional).
Figure 9-11
4. To return to a Web page you previously marked as a
favorite, click the Favorites button. Click on the title of
the page you previously marked. If you put the favorite
in a folder, click on the folder and then on the title.
You can also return to a previously viewed Web page
by typing the address or the title in the address bar
for a list of matching pages. Or, choose Favorites➪
History and click on the heading for the date you
visited the Web page.
➟
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Search for Anything
1. With IE open, click in the Search box to the right of the
Address bar (or press Ctrl+E). Type travel. As you type, a
list of suggested search terms appears. You can continue
to type your search terms or choose from this list, as
shown in Figure 9-12. A search results page appears after
you choose from the list or press Enter after your text.
The results come from www.bing.com, the default
search engine for IE. A search engine is simply a Web site
that allows you to find other Web sites. A search engine
provides links to Web pages that match your search. That
definition ignores the complex process going on behind
the scenes.
Use another search provider.
Type search items.
Click a suggestion or press Enter.
Figure 9-12
2. Scroll down the page of search results. Click on any link
you want to follow. Click Next at the bottom of the page
for more search results.
➟
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Browsing your search results is often a good time to
use multiple tabs for browsing. (See the section “Use
Tabs to Browse Multiple Web Pages at Once,” earlier
in this chapter.) Simply right-click a search result’s
link and choose Open in a New Tab. Doing this
several times enables you to pursue several results at
once in different tabs.
3. If the search results aren’t what you’re looking for, you
can refine your search. Just add to or change your search
terms in the search box near the top of the results page.
Press Enter to perform the refined search.
Different search engines may turn up different results
even if you use the same search terms. Two other
popular search engines are Google (www.google.
com) and Yahoo! (www.yahoo.com). By entering
those addresses in the address bar, you can use either
search engine for exploring the Web. You can also
change the default search engine IE uses by clicking
the down arrow at the end of the Search box (refer to
Figure 9-12) and choosing Find More Providers
(other search engines).
Shop Online Using Amazon
1. You can shop, pay bills, do your banking, and even
invest your money online. Your bank and brokerage firm
have Web sites, as do many companies that sell almost
anything you may want to buy. So first, how about
shopping? Enter www.amazon.com in the address bar.
Amazon is the largest online retailer in the world.
2. You can use the menu under Shop All Departments to
➟
look for specific categories of products, or you can use
the Search box at the top of Amazon’s home page. Click
in the Search box and type bird watching. As you type,
Amazon automatically suggests potential matches. You
can select from the suggestions or continue typing and
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click the Go button. Search results appear along with
links to Related Searches (in this case, those related to
bird watching), specific departments within Amazon, and
brand names. See Figure 9-13.
Click any related searches that interest you.
Explore or refine results.
Figure 9-13
3. Click on the link or picture of one of the items listed to
see its product page, similar to the one shown in Figure
9-14. Amazon’s product pages are chock-full of information and links to more information. Scroll down the
product page and look at price, description, and ratings
and reviews from buyers.
➟
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Note the star rating.
Click to add the item to your shopping cart.
Scroll down for more information.
Figure 9-14
4. Repeat the preceding steps a few times to look at
products that interest you. Before you continue, you
can pick a product you actually want to buy.
5. To purchase a product, click the Add to Shopping Cart
➟
button on the right side of a product page. A new page
appears, offering other products (see Figure 9-15). You
can continue shopping for more products, but when
you’re ready, click Proceed to Checkout. (You may want
to select the check box next to Show Gift Options During
Checkout.)
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Click when you’re done shopping.
Figure 9-15
6. The Amazon sign-in screen appears with options for new
or returning customers. Enter your e-mail address (see
Figure 9-16). See Chapter 10 for information on setting
up an e-mail account and getting an address. Click the
Sign In Using Our Secure Server button.
Security in the browser comes in many forms. In this
case, the Web address now begins with https; the s
indicates a secure connection, as does the presence of
a padlock icon next to the address. You want a secure
connection like this for all online financial
transactions.
➟
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Type your e-mail address.
Click to sign in.
Figure 9-16
7. On the next screen (see Figure 9-17), enter your full
name. Reenter the e-mail address in the space provided.
Type a new password into the two boxes provided. Your
password should be easy for you to remember but hard
for someone else to guess. Amazon requires at least six
characters in a password. Click the Create a New Account
button.
When you create a password, don’t use the words
password or secret and avoid using the names of your
spouse, children, close friends, or even your pets.
Start with a memorable phrase, such as, “I like
shopping on Amazon.” Reduce that to initials: ilsoa.
Add punctuation: ilsoa! To make a better password,
capitalize some letters: iLsoA! Turn letters into
numbers: 1Ls0A! No one will guess that password,
but it’s relatively easy to remember. If you choose to
write down passwords, hide your notes well.
➟
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Type your information.
Click to continue.
Figure 9-17
8. The next screen (see Figure 9-18) provides a form for
your address, even if you are purchasing a gift. Fill in the
form appropriately, select Yes as the answer to the billing
address question, and click Continue. If any of the information you enter is incomplete, you may see this page
again with a message describing the problem, such as a
missing zip code.
Don’t click the Back button on any of these screens;
the process requires you to move forward, except
where you see a link or button on the screen itself
that indicates you can go back to change something.
You’ll have an opportunity later to review and revise
information or cancel your order or account.
9. On the next screen, choose a shipping speed. Standard
shipping usually takes four business days. Select the
check box for gift option if this is a gift; you’ll enter a gift
address, later. Click Continue.
➟
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Fill in your information.
Click Continue.
Make sure Yes is selected if you’re using your home address.
Figure 9-18
10. If you did not selected the gift option in the previous
step, skip to Step 11. The Add Gift-Wrap and Write a Free
Gift Message screen appears. Select gift wrap for a fee, if
you choose. Type a short message in the gift note box, if
you want. Prices for gift items will not appear on the
packing slip sent with the gift unless you uncheck the
check box next to Don’t Print Prices. You’ll still get prices
on your receipt, regardless.
11. On the Payment page, to use a credit card, click the Add
a New Card button. A form appears below that button.
Enter your card number (with or without dashes) and
your name as it appears on the card. Use the drop-down
➟
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lists to pick the month and year your card expires. Click
Select Card Type to choose your card. With all fields
complete, click the Add Your Card button. Your credit
card information now appears on this same screen. Click
Continue.
12. You may see a screen to Choose a Billing Address. If the
correct address appears onscreen, click the Use This
Address button just above that address. If the address displayed is not the correct billing address, enter the correct
information on this screen and click the Continue
button.
13. The review screen (see Figure 9-19) displays your shipping
address, shipping speed, purchase details, and an Order
Summary with any shipping, handling, and tax. Review
your order. To ship a gift to a different address, click the
Change button next to Shipping To. Select a different
shipping speed, if you want. Click buttons to Change
Quantities or Delete part of the order, to Change Gift
Options, to Change Payment Method, or to Change
Billing Address. To proceed with the order, click Place
Your Order.
If you don’t want to continue with an order, at this
point, click the Change Quantities or Delete button.
On the next screen, set quantities to zero and click
the Continue button. The next screen indicates you
have nothing in your shopping cart.
14. A thank you screen appears with links to track or cancel
the order. If you’re done, you can close this browser tab.
➟
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Click to complete your order.
If needed, click a Change button to change information.
Figure 9-19
15. Amazon, like most online retailers, sends e-mail with
➟
your order information and again when your product
ships. The shipping e-mail includes a tracking number,
or you can find shipping information by typing www.
amazon.com in your browser’s address bar and clicking
Your Account. Click the View Recent and Open Orders
button. Type or confirm your e-mail address and type
your password. Click the Sign In Using Our Secure Server
button. The Order History screen displays sections for
Open Orders and Completed Orders, if any. For open
orders — those that haven’t shipped — click the View or
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Change Order button. You can change or cancel an order
on the next screen. For completed orders, click the View
Order button to see details of your order or click the
Track Your Package button, if your order hasn’t been
delivered yet.
When you enter a password on a Web page, the
AutoCompete Passwords dialog box appears. If you
click Yes, IE will save your password for this site and
enter the password automatically when you return to
this site. If you click No, IE will not save the password
for this site. The Yes option is convenient, although it
means anyone with access to your computer can log
in to those sites for which IE has saved passwords.
Don’t select Don’t Offer to Remember Any More
Passwords — you may want IE to remember passwords in the future.
Close Internet Explorer
1. When you’re done browsing the Web with IE, close it like
you do any other program: Click the X in the upper-right
corner of the window. If you have more than one tab
open, IE displays a message with buttons to Close All
Tabs, which closes IE completely, or to Close Current
Tab. If you don’t intend to close IE or the current tab,
click the X in the dialog box.
2. This dialog box protects you from accidentally closing
tabs you don’t intend to close. However, you can check
Always Close All Tabs to prevent this dialog box from
appearing again in the future.
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Receiving E-Mail
E
-mail has largely replaced notes and letters
of previous centuries. Every day, billions of
e-mail messages circle the globe, conveying
greetings, news, jokes, even condolences.
To send and receive e-mail, you need an
account with an e-mail service. Your Internet
service provider (ISP) probably gave you an
e-mail account and address when you signed
up for Internet access. You can use the account
provided by your ISP with any number of
e-mail programs you can install on your
computer.
But my suggestion — for convenience and ease
of use — is that you sign up for a Web-based
e-mail account. After you do, you can access
your Web-based e-mail from anywhere in the
world using any computer connected to the
Internet. New e-mail pops into your inbox 24
hours a day. With a bit of typing and a click,
you can send your reply. Who needs postage
stamps?
➟
Chapter
10
Get ready to . . .
➟ Set Up an E-Mail
Account ........................... 180
➟ Check Your Inbox for
New E-Mail ...................... 184
➟ Reply to E-Mail ................. 188
➟ Create a New E-Mail ........ 190
➟ Attach a Document or
Photo to E-Mail ................. 193
➟ View or Open
Attachments...................... 195
➟ Keep an Electronic
Address Book ................... 197
➟ Avoid Spam and Other
Junk Messages.................. 199
E-mail also provides a way to send and receive
attachments, such as documents or photos.
Who needs faxes or postcards?
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With the good comes the bad, including unsolicited junk e-mail,
referred to as spam. These messages may be only a distraction, or they
may include efforts to trick you into trouble. Stay clear and stay safe.
In this chapter, I show you how to set up an e-mail account with
Google Gmail, a shining example of e-mail service. You also find out
how to send and receive e-mail, send attachments or handle ones
you’ve received, organize your contacts, and dispatch the junk.
Gmail places advertisements to the side of each
screen. That’s what pays for your account.
Set Up an E-Mail Account
1. To create a free e-mail account with Google’s e-mail service, known as Gmail (Google Mail, in Europe), start
Internet Explorer (IE) and type mail.google.com (no
www) in the address bar at the top. The Welcome to
Gmail page appears.
As an alternative to Gmail, you can create a free
e-mail account with another Web-based service,
such as AOL (www.aol.com), MSN Hotmail (www.
hotmail.com), or Yahoo! (www.yahoo.com). The
steps for creating accounts with those services should
be fairly similar to creating an account for Gmail.
2. On the Welcome page, click Create an Account. The
Create a Google Account page appears, as shown in
Figure 10-1.
3. Fill in the boxes (called fields) for your first and last
➟
name. In the Desired Login Name field, type the e-mail
username you want. Your e-mail address will be this
name followed by @gmail.com, such as mhinton47@
gmail.com. (Typically, the login name is some variation
on your first and last name.) Click the Check Availability
button to see whether your desired name is available. If it
isn’t, try another name.
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Fill in each field.
Enter your password twice.
Enter the login name you want, and click Check Availability.
Figure 10-1
Adding numbers to your desired name increases your
chance of finding an available name.
4. In the Choose a Password field, type a password of eight
characters or more. Your password should be easy for
you to remember but hard for others to guess. As you
type the password, the Password Strength meter to the
right displays a rating of your password from fair to
strong. Reenter your password in the next field.
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When you create a password, don’t use the word
password or secret or the names of people or pets. Start
with a memorable phrase, such as “I use Gmail for
e-mail.” Reduce that to initials: iugfe. If a longer
password is required, add punctuation and numbers:
iugfe99! To make a better password, capitalize some
letters: iUgFe99! Turn letters into numbers or numbers
into letters: 1U9Fegg! No one will guess that password,
but it’s relatively easy to remember. If you choose to
write down passwords, hide your notes well.
5. Leave these check boxes selected:
• Remember Me on This Computer: When a check
mark appears next to this box, the Gmail program
will automatically remember you (and you don’t
have to type your username and password) whenever you use this same computer to access your
e-mail account.
Don’t use Remember Me on This Computer if
you’re not using your own computer, but instead
a friend’s or a public computer.
• Enable Web History: When this box is checked,
Google tracks information about your activity,
including searches you perform.
6. Scroll down the Create Account page a bit to see the
bottom half of the page, as shown in Figure 10-2.
7. Select a Security Question from the drop-down list and
then enter an answer to the question in the Answer field.
If you ever forget your password, Google will use this
question and the answer you provide in the next field to
verify that you are who you say you are.
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Select a security question and type the answer.
Type the letters you see above the field.
Figure 10-2
8. If you already use another e-mail address, enter it in the
Secondary E-Mail field. This provides Gmail with an
alternative for contacting you. You may leave this field
blank.
9. Select your country from the Location drop-down list.
➟
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10. In the Word Verification field, type the letters you see
displayed above the field. This is a test to separate
humans from programs designed to create e-mail
addresses. (Seriously, it is.) If you can’t read the letters,
click the wheelchair icon to have Gmail read the letters
out loud.
11. Be the first person ever to read the Terms of Service,
which describes the relationship you and Google are
entering into. Google promises very little and requires
little of you.
12. Click the “I Accept. Create My Account.” button (refer to
Figure 10-2). The Congratulations screen appears. Click
on Show Me My Account.
If you decide to use Gmail for your e-mail, the
account is Web-based — meaning you access it
through any browser from any computer connected
to the Internet. Although there are e-mail programs
you can install on your computer (for example,
Thunderbird), you don’t have to bother with such a
program if you’re happy with access through the
browser.
Check Your Inbox for New E-Mail
1. In Internet Explorer, go to http://mail.google.com.
➟
You may need to sign in with your username (e-mail
address) and password. If Google remembers you from a
previous sign-in, you go straight to your Inbox (see
Figure 10-3). E-mail sent by others appears automatically
in your Inbox, which is the first screen you see after
signing in. The Inbox displays the sender’s name, the
subject line of the message, and the date or time the
message was received. E-mail you haven’t read yet
appears in bold.
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The links show different screens.
Messages you haven’t read are in bold. Click a message to read it.
Figure 10-3
2. Click any message in your Inbox. The message appears
onscreen (see Figure 10-4). Scroll, if necessary, to read
the entire message.
If the incoming e-mail contains any photos or other
graphics, Gmail doesn’t automatically display them.
If you trust the sender of the e-mail, click the Display
Images Below link near the top of the message.
➟
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The description of the buttons and the links below is
based on looking at a single message — I assume
you’re not in the Inbox in this section. If you are in
the Inbox, most of these buttons require that you
select messages beforehand by clicking on the check
box left of each message.
Click to reply to the message.
Figure 10-4
3. Use the buttons above the message (refer to Figure 10-4)
to accomplish various tasks:
➟
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• Archive: Moves the selected message out of the
Inbox. Use this if you want to keep this message
but move it out of the Inbox. Click All Mail on the
left to see archived and sent e-mail.
• Report Spam: Moves the selected message to the
Spam folder for junk e-mail. See “Avoid Spam and
Other Junk Messages,” later in this chapter.
• Delete: Moves the selected message to the Trash
folder.
• Move To: You can use labels to categorize your
e-mail. (For example, you can label all financial
e-mail as investments.) The Move To button
archives the selected message and labels it using
the label that you select from the drop-down list
or one you create using this button.
• Labels: Use this button’s drop-down list to add
labels to e-mail without moving it out of the
Inbox.
Don’t worry about labels, but they can be very
valuable for finding messages later. The labels
you use appear on the left side of the screen.
When you click on a label on the left, all the
e-mail you labeled that way appears in a list.
• More Actions: You can do much more with any
e-mail message. Mark a message as unread so that
it appears new and boldfaced in the Inbox. Add a
star to a message to emphasize it. Create a task
based on the message using Gmail’s Tasks function. Create an event using Google Calendar.
Create a filter to automatically label, archive, or
delete incoming e-mail.
➟
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4. Click the links on either side of the buttons above the
message to navigate through your mail:
• Back to Inbox (logically) takes you back to the
full view of the Inbox with all your most recent
messages showing.
• Newer or Older links take you to another message, if you are still viewing one message. On the
other hand, if you’re looking at the Inbox, these
links page through groups of messages. After you
get too many messages, you can’t see them all
together on one page. And so Gmail orders your
messages by date and gives you these links to
move through them.
Gmail’s fast search function — it’s Google, the king
of search engines — makes it a great choice for
e-mail. Click in the search box on any screen to type
text that is in any message you want to open. A list of
messages containing that text appears. Click any message to open it.
Reply to E-Mail
1. Click any message in your Inbox. The message appears
onscreen (refer to Figure 10-4). After you read the
message, click the Reply button in the upper-right corner
of the message or the Reply link at the bottom of the
message.
If the message you’re replying to went to more than
one person and you want everyone to see your reply,
click the down arrow next to the Reply button and
then select the Reply to All option. You can select
Forward from this same menu to send this message
to someone who did not receive it already.
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2. A new compose mail box appears below the message you
have open, as shown in Figure 10-5. The address of the
sender of the message appears in the To field. You can
add to that or change it. The cursor appears in the message box. The entire message you received appears below
the cursor.
Click Reply and type your message in the compose box.
Click Discard to not save or send.
Click Save Now to save but not send.
Click Send when you’re done.
Figure 10-5
➟
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To send the same e-mail to more than one person at
a time, you can add a comma after the first e-mail
address and type another. Click Add Cc (for courtesy
copy) for another way to send this message to other
recipients. Click Add Bcc (for blind courtesy copy) to
add a recipient address other recipients won’t see.
3. (Optional) The subject line doesn’t appear — replies
usually keep the same subject. However, you can click
the Edit Subject link if you want to change the subject
line. When you’ve edited your subject, click in the blank
area at the top of the big box below.
Gmail creates conversations out of e-mail message
exchanges with the same subject line. This makes it
easy to read all of the messages exchanged on that
subject, by clicking on any message listed in the
conversation. A reply to your e-mail will automatically
link to all the other related messages, unless you
change the subject line of a reply.
4. Type your response. Use the Save Now button if you
don’t want to send it immediately. Clicking the Save
Now button creates a draft message you can revise and
send later. (Click Drafts on the left, to see draft messages.) Click the Send button if your message is ready to
go. After your reply is sent, click the Archive button to
remove this message from your Inbox. (Click All Mail on
the left to see mail you have archived or sent, including
this message.) Return to your Inbox.
Create a New E-Mail
1. Click Compose Mail in the upper-left area of the Gmail
page. The Compose Mail form appears. The From field
displays your Gmail address.
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To move from one field to the next on any Web
form, such as the Compose Mail form, press the Tab
key or click in the field.
2. In the To field, type an e-mail address you intend to write
to. (You can use your own address for practice.) Don’t
type the person’s name here, just the e-mail address. If
you’ve written other e-mail, Gmail may display e-mail
addresses for you to use along with that person’s name
(see Figure 10-6).
Type address.
Add a subject.
Figure 10-6
➟
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To send the same e-mail to more than one person at
a time, you can add a comma after the first e-mail
address and type another. Click Add Cc (for courtesy
copy) for another way to send this message to other
recipients. Click Add Bcc (for blind courtesy copy) to
add a recipient address other recipients won’t see.
3. In the Subject field, type a subject line (something short
but descriptive).
4. In the message area, type your e-mail. A salutation, such
as Hi, Mark, is optional, but common. Avoid using all
capital letters, which some people interpret as yelling.
You don’t need to press Enter at the end of lines within a
paragraph — as your words reach the end of a line, the
cursor automatically goes to the next line of the
paragraph.
5. (Optional) If you want to change the look of the text,
select the text you want to modify and click any of these
tools in the toolbar above the message area:
• B turns text bold (darker). Click the B icon a
second time to remove bold from selected text, if
necessary.
• I turns text italics. A second click removes italics.
• U underlines text.
• F allows you to select a specific font (a style of text
or typeface) from a drop-down list.
• TT allows you to increase or decrease the size of
the selected text from a drop-down list.
See Chapter 3 for information on formatting text.
➟
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The easiest way to include a clickable link in e-mail is
to copy that link from the browser address bar and
paste it into your e-mail. You can also type in a Web
address, with or without http:// at the beginning,
such as www.google.com.
6. End your message with your name or initials as a
signature.
7. Click the Send button when you’re ready to e-mail your
message.
8. Click the Sent Mail link on the left to see the e-mail
you’ve sent or click the All Mail link for e-mail sent or
received.
You can compose e-mail to send later. As you write,
Gmail automatically saves your e-mail in the Drafts
folder. You can also click the Save Now button to
create a draft. Later, click on the Drafts link on the
left and click on the e-mail you started earlier.
Discard drafts you don’t intend to send.
Attach a Document or Photo to E-Mail
1. Send a photo or any file to family and friends. On the
Compose Mail form (explained in the preceding section),
click the Attach a File link below the Subject line. The
Choose a File to Upload dialog box appears.
2. Locate the file you intend to send with the e-mail and
click it. (See Chapter 4 for information on using
Windows Explorer to locate files.) The filename appears
below the Subject field (as shown in Figure 10-7). You
can remove this attachment with the Remove link, if you
change your mind.
➟
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Attached file
Figure 10-7
Click if you want to attach another file.
3. Gmail begins to upload the file before you click the Send
button. For large files, you see a progress bar indicating
how much more time is required to complete the upload.
Be patient when attaching files.
4. Click the Attach Another File link and repeat Steps 2 and 3
for any other files you want to send.
5. To remove an attachment, click the Remove link next to
that attachment’s filename.
6. Complete your message and click the Send button when
you’re ready. Your message and the attachment(s) will be
delivered to the recipient.
Although you can attach any type of document to an
e-mail message, avoid sending video files, because
they are so large and take too long to send and
receive. Gmail refuses to send or receive program files
(executables) because such files are commonly used to
attack a computer.
➟
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View or Open Attachments
1. If incoming e-mail includes an attachment, Gmail displays the attachment’s filename and links for handling
the attachment. See Figure 10-8. (If the attachment is a
picture, you get to see a preview of the image.)
Photos show previews.
Click View to see this photo in a new browser tab.
Different types of files have different links.
Figure 10-8
➟
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Ignore attachments from unknown senders. Never
download or open these. Even if an attachment
comes from a trusted source, be aware that attachments may contain content that can infect your computer with viruses, worms, or other rotten stuff. See
Chapter 19 for information on keeping your computer safe.
2. The links Gmail displays for attachments vary depending
on the type of attachment. Links include
• View: This link displays the contents in a new tab
in the browser. Use this to view attached photos.
• View as HTML: This link displays the document’s
contents as a Web page in a new tab in the browser.
This display may not look exactly like the original
document — some formatting may not show.
• Open As a Google Document: This link opens
the attachment as a new document in Google
Documents, an online version of word processing,
spreadsheets, and more. Use this option if you
want to be able to edit the document without
downloading it.
• Download: This option downloads the attachment
to the Downloads folder under your username.
Choose the Start➪Computer command and select
the Downloads folder to see this file. If you can’t
open a downloaded attachment, you may not have
the necessary software. If the content is important
to you, inform the sender and ask her to send the
attachment in a different format, such as rich text
format (RTF) or plain text (TXT).
➟
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Gmail stores all of your sent and received e-mail
online. There’s no option to save a message to your
computer. If you want to save a copy of e-mail, click
the down arrow next to the Reply button and choose
Print. In the Print dialog box that appears, select
Microsoft XPS Document Writer to create a file you
can save to your computer. When you click the Print
button, a Save As dialog box appears for you to enter
the name and location to save this e-mail.
Keep an Electronic Address Book
1. Gmail automatically remembers e-mail address as you
send or reply. As you type in the To, Cc, or Bcc fields,
Gmail displays matching addresses, if any. To keep track
of e-mail address and other information, click the
Contacts link on the left. Figure 10-9 shows the resulting
Contacts screen.
2. Under My Contacts on the right, click the View
Suggestions button. Gmail displays addresses you’ve used
but not added to My Contacts. To add any of these to
your contacts address book, click the check box next to
each address you want and then click the Move to My
Contacts button.
3. To add a new address, click the New Contact button. A
new form appears on the right, as shown in Figure
10-10. Fill in the Name field — first name and last name.
Title and Company are optional fields. Enter the e-mail
address for this contact. For a contact with more than
one e-mail address, enter the primary address first and
then click the Add link next to Email for another e-mail
field. There’s a drop-down list on the right of the Email
field for Home, Work, or Other so that you can categorize the e-mail address, but you don’t have to use it. All
other fields are optional and are included for your
convenience.
➟
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New Contact
Click Contacts to view and add contacts.
Figure 10-9
4. Click the Save button to save this contact.
5. You can create optional groups in Gmail, if you want to
organize contacts. To get you started, Gmail has groups
for Friends, Family, and Coworkers. Click the New Group
button next to the New Contact button (refer to Figure
10-9). Enter the name of the group, such as teammates
or classmates.
6. To add contacts to any group, select the contact’s check box
➟
and click the Groups button for a list of groups. One contact can be in as many groups as you want or in no groups.
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Fill out the Name and Email fields.
New Contact
Click Save when you’re done.
Figure 10-10
You can send e-mail to everyone in a group. In the
Compose Mail form, type the name of the group in
the To, Cc, or Bcc fields.
Avoid Spam and Other Junk Messages
When you get e-mail from a source you don’t recognize, don’t open it.
In your Inbox, click the check box next to the e-mail and then do one
of the following:
➟
Click the Delete button to move the e-mail into the
Trash. Eventually, Gmail will delete that e-mail.
➟
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➟
Click the Report Spam button for unsolicited junk
mail, including advertising and solicitations. By
using the Report Spam button, you help Gmail
recognize spam automatically for all of its customers,
not just for you. The spam you report or Gmail recognizes goes into your Spam folder.
If someone sends you e-mail you never get, that
e-mail may be in the Trash or Spam folder. You can
check these folders, although you have no obligation
to do so. Open e-mail in the Trash or Spam folder
only if you’re sure it’s legitimate.
Avoid junk e-mail in the first place. Keep these practices in mind:
➟
Don’t give Web sites, businesses, or groups your real
e-mail address if you don’t have to.
➟
On forms that require an e-mail address, look for
options to opt-out of receiving e-mail.
➟
Don’t respond to unsolicited e-mail. Don’t even
open it, because that may be all the sender needs in
order to know the address works.
➟
Don’t click on links in e-mail unless you’re 100 percent confident about the person who sent the e-mail.
Links may look like they take you to a legitimate site
but, in fact, switch you to a fake site.
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Having Fun with
Windows 7
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Playing Games
I
f you’re like me, everything you do on the
computer is a game — for me at times, a
frustrating game I can’t seem to win. But you
may find that you enjoy the diversion of playing the real games included in Windows 7.
Windows 7 groups games under the Game
Explorer on the Start menu.
Most of the games included with Windows 7
are based on widely familiar, traditional
games. These fall into three categories:
➟
The card games: FreeCell, Hearts,
Solitaire, and Spider Solitaire.
➟
The board games: Chess Titans, Mahjong
Titans, and Minesweeper.
➟
The Internet games: Backgammon,
Checkers, and Spades. These are board
or card games you play online against
opponents around the globe. Internet
games require an Internet connection.
See Chapter 8 about connecting to the
Internet.
➟
Chapter
11
Get ready to . . .
➟ Use the Games Explorer .... 204
➟ Play Solitaire .................... 206
➟ Show Your Grandkids
Purble Place ..................... 208
➟ Play Internet
Backgammon ................... 209
➟ Get More Games from
Microsoft and Others......... 211
With a little searching, you can find other games
to play online or to install on your computer.
Along with tradition-based games, such as those
in this chapter, all manner of new games exist
to place you in a virtual world. Have fun, but
don’t forget to come back to this world for a
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Each game in this chapter has a Help option in the
top menu. Unfortunately, the help information tells
about options in each game program and doesn’t
include help with rules, play, or strategy. Start with a
game you already know how to play.
Use the Games Explorer
1. To play the games included with Windows 7, choose
Start➪Games to open the Games Explorer. The first time
you do this, the Set Up Games dialog box appears. Click
the option labeled Yes, Use Recommended Settings. The
Games Explorer appears (see Figure 11-1).
In the Preview pane on the right of the Games
Explorer, you may see a note indicating that this
computer’s performance information has not been
created. Although you can click the link to Rate This
Computer to begin that process, I suggest that you
ignore this option for now. The performance
information — also called the Windows Experience
Index — helps Windows 7 determine whether you can
play certain games, but it isn’t crucial at this time.
2. Click a game to find out more about it. The Details pane
at the bottom of the Games Explorer displays some
information about the selected game, including the date
and time you last played the game (if ever). The Preview
pane to the right displays tabs for the game, including
rating, performance requirements, and statistics, if any.
As with Windows Explorer, you can hide or display
the Preview pane by clicking the button near the farright side of the Command bar. You can also change
the look of the icons for the games with the View
button just left of the Preview pane button.
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When you start a game, you may receive a warning
about slow game performance. Don’t be alarmed.
Click OK to start the game.
Click to hide the Preview pane.
Preview pane
Double-click a game to play.
Figure 11-1
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Play Solitaire
1. In the Games Explorer window, double-click Solitaire.
The Solitaire window opens, as shown in Figure 11-2.
For the record, the gist of solitaire is to drag cards into
stacks of alternating red and black, placing lower-value
cards on higher-value cards sequentially — for example,
by dragging the eight of spades onto the nine of
diamonds.
Click to turn over a card.
Click and drag to stack cards.
Figure 11-2
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2. You can place a king in an empty column. Click facedown cards in the stacked columns to turn them over;
click the face-down card pile in the upper-left corner to
access cards in the deck. Double-click cards to send them
to the top-right row (the home row), beginning with aces,
then two, three, and so on. Proceed through the game
until all cards are stacked by suit in the home row or
you’re unable to move remaining cards.
3. Click Game. The menu allows you to start a new game,
undo a move (you can also press Ctrl+Z to undo), and
get a hint (during play, press the letter H). Choose
Options to open the Options dialog box, shown in
Figure 11-3, where you can change how cards are drawn
(draw one card from the deck or three) or scored (no
scoring, standard, or Vegas scoring). Click OK after setting your options.
Select options and click OK.
Figure 11-3
4. Choose Game➪Change Appearance to select a different
style of cards or background. In the Change Appearance
window, select a style for your deck and background, and
then click OK.
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5. If you close the Solitaire window before completing the
game, click Save if you want to resume the game next
time. Click Don’t Save if you want a new game next time.
Show Your Grandkids Purble Place
1. Purble Place (see Figure 11-4) is designed for young
children. In the Games Explorer window, double-click
Purble Place to start the game. There are three games
within Purble Place:
• Purble Pairs: Click two tiles to reveal pictures. If
two pictures match, you have a pair. You have to
remember which pictures you’ve already seen to
find matches. A gold symbol marks special tiles,
including a joker for a free match or a bonus tile.
At the end of the game, your final score appears.
Click Play Again, Main Menu, or Exit.
• Comfy Cakes: Match an order for a cake by choosing
pan, batter, frosting, and decoration. Move the
cake down the assembly line with the right arrow.
• Purble Shop: Click to add eyes, nose, and mouth
to a figure.
2. When you choose one of the games, the Select Difficulty
dialog box appears. Choose from Beginner, Intermediate,
or Advanced.
3. At any time, choose Game➪New Game to start over.
Choose Game➪Main Menu if you want to switch from
one of the three types of games to another.
4. Click the big red X in the lower-left corner to exit the
➟
main menu or the usual X in the upper-right corner of
any window. You can exit Purble Place anytime. Your
game is automatically remembered for the next time.
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Click here for Purble Pairs...
...here for Comfy Cakes...
...and here for Purble Shop.
Figure 11-4
Play Internet Backgammon
1. In the Games Explorer Window, double-click Internet
Backgammon. A dialog box informs you that you’ll be
matched with players online. Click Play. A dialog box
displays Looking for Other Players and then
Starting Game. The game board appears, as shown in
Figure 11-5. The computer assigns you the white or
brown pieces (the message at the bottom of the board
tells which color you are playing). White gets to click
Roll first.
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Brown starts here and moves left.
White clicks Roll first.
Figure 11-5
2. Internet games include options for chat or instant
messaging. Internet Backgammon doesn’t allow free-form
chat. Instead, you can select from a list of available
messages by clicking Select a Message to Send. Select Off
(under Chat) if you don’t want to exchange messages
with your opponent.
3. Your goal is to move all your markers from your end of
➟
the board around to the other end in a sideways U.
When you click Roll, use the numbers on the dice to
determine how far you can move one (combined dice)
or two of your pieces (one die per piece).
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4. You can’t land where your opponent has two or more
markers. If one player lands on another player’s single
marker, that single marker goes in the middle, and the
player whose marker is in the middle must roll to move
the marker back to his starting area at one end of the
board. For example, if white lands on a brown marker,
the brown marker moves to the middle, and the brown
player must roll to move the marker back to his starting
area. You cannot move your other pieces until you move
your pieces that are in the middle back onto the board.
Roll, move, and chat.
5. If you don’t want to continue play, click the Resign
button in the right pane. The loss counts against your
statistics.
You start play as a beginner. Choose Game➪Skill
Level to select Intermediate or Expert from the
submenu. The next time you start a game, you will
be matched with an opponent with a matching skill
level.
Get More Games from Microsoft and Others
If you like computer games, you’re not alone. Use any of these
methods to find more games:
➟
In the Games Explorer window, click More Games
from Microsoft (refer to Figure 11-1). In the Preview
pane, click any of the links under Microsoft games.
These links start Internet Explorer and display different Web pages at zone.msn.com, the Microsoft
online game Web site. You can find free and paid
games to play online or download to your computer.
➟
Your computer’s manufacturer may have placed
other links under Games or Game Providers. Use
those links to look for more games.
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➟
Facebook has games you can play against friends or
strangers. From your Facebook page (if you have one),
choose Applications➪Browse More Applications➪
Games (see Figure 11-6). Click an application, such
as Scrabble. On that application’s page, click the Go
to Application button. Finally, if you want to play the
game, click the Allow button to allow the game access
to your profile. (Some people have concerns about
giving applications access to the information in their
profiles, but millions of Facebook users do it.)
Click here and then click a game to play.
Figure 11-6
➟
Use a search engine, such as www.google.com, to
search for games.
My Scrabble-expert wife recommends the Internet
Scrabble Club (www.isc.ro) for an internationally
popular online version of the game.
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Enjoying Photos
in Windows 7
W
indows 7 makes enjoying digital photos
easy. You can pick and choose photos to
look at or display a group of photos in a slide
show. Make a favorite photo your desktop
background so you see it every time you start
Windows 7. In this chapter, you do all these
things using the photos Windows 7 includes as
samples.
The Paint accessory enables you to resize a
photo for e-mail or inclusion in a document.
Use Paint to crop a photo to remove unwanted
parts of the photo and draw attention to the
subject.
If you have a printer, you can print photos for
yourself or to send to someone. Even blackand-white prints of color photos may be nice.
Of course, if you want to take your own photos, nothing beats having a digital camera.
Connect your camera to your computer to
copy photos to the Pictures library for viewing
and printing.
19_509463-ch12.indd 213
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Chapter
12
Get ready to . . .
➟ View Photos in
Windows 7 ...................... 214
➟ See Photos in a
Slideshow ........................ 218
➟ Display a Photo on
Your Desktop .................... 220
➟ Edit Photos Using Paint ...... 222
➟ Print Your Photos ............... 226
➟ Copy Photos from Your
Digital Camera to
Your Computer ................. 230
➟ Control How Windows 7
Names and Organizes
Photos ............................. 233
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Part IV: Having Fun with Windows 7
In this chapter, you use the tools built into Windows 7 for working
with photos. You may want the additional features of a digital photo
organizer and editing program. See my other book, Digital Photography
For Seniors For Dummies (Wiley Publishing, Inc.). That book has
detailed steps on organizing, editing, printing, and sharing photos, as
well as on using a digital camera.
View Photos in Windows 7
1. Choose Start➪Pictures. This opens the Pictures library,
which contains photos you copy from a digital camera
and the Sample Pictures folder, included with Windows 7.
(Figure 12-1 shows the Pictures library.)
Double-click Sample Pictures.
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Figure 12-1
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2. Double-click Sample Pictures to see the pictures
Microsoft includes with Windows 7, shown in Figure
12-2. Click the triangle next to the Views button on the
Command Bar and choose Extra Large Icons for the largest thumbnails of these photos.
Click the triangle next to View and select Extra Large Icons.
Figure 12-2
3. Double-click the first photo to preview it. The photo
opens in one of these programs:
• Windows Photo Viewer is the standard viewer for
Windows 7. See Figure 12-3.
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• Windows Live Photo Gallery is a free photo
program from Microsoft. You can download
Windows Live Photo Gallery from http://
download.live.com/photogallery.
• Picasa is a free photo program from Google. You
can download Picasa from http://picasa.
google.com.
• Another program installed by the company that
sold your computer, by the person who set it up,
or by your digital camera.
If the photo didn’t open in Windows Photo Viewer,
close the program that opened. In the Sample
Pictures library, click a photo. Click the triangle to
the right of Preview and choose Windows Photo
Viewer.
4. In Windows Photo Viewer, these tools appear across the
bottom of the window from left to right (see Figure 12-3):
• Change the display size (Zoom): Click the
magnifying glass for a pop-up slider to zoom in
and out of the photo.
• Actual Size and Fit to Window: These two tools
alternate in the second position of the toolbar.
Most photos are larger than computer screens.
Actual Size shows the true size of the photo, but
you can’t see all of it at once. You can click and
drag the photo to move it. This is called panning
the photo. Use Actual Size to see details in a
photo. Fit to Window allows you to see the entire
photo at once.
• Previous: Click this tool to see the photo before
the current one, depending on how the photos are
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sorted. You can also press the left-arrow key to see
the previous photo.
• Play Slide Show: This button displays each photo
in the folder at full screen for a few seconds before
moving on to the next. See the task “See Photos in
a Slideshow.”
• Next: Click this tool to see the photo after the
current one, depending on how the photos are
sorted. Alternatively, press the right-arrow key to
see the next photo.
Zoom
Delete
Actual Size/Fit to Window
Previous photo
Rotate the photo
Next photo
Play Slide Show
Figure 12-3
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• Rotate Counterclockwise: Each click of this
button turns the photo 90 degrees to the left. Use
this to fix photos that are turned sideways. See
“Copy Photos from Your Digital Camera to Your
Computer.”
• Rotate Clockwise: Each click of this button turns
the photo 90 degrees to the right. Use this button
to fix photos that are turned sideways. See “Copy
Photos from Your Digital Camera to Your
Computer.”
• Delete: Stop! Later, click this button to delete the
current photo. However, you don’t have many
sample photos to work with, so don’t test this button yet.
A warning, really: The two Rotate buttons and the
Delete button actually change the photo — the other
tools don’t make changes. These changes are saved
automatically. It’s easy to fix a Rotate problem by
clicking the button repeatedly to get back to the
original look. Delete is a little harder to undo. If you
delete a photo and want it back, turn to Chapter 4
for the section on getting back a file you deleted.
5. Click Next to see each of the sample photos in Windows
Photo Viewer. Close Windows Photo Viewer.
See Photos in a Slideshow
1. In the Sample Picture folder, click the Slide Show button
on the Command Bar. A full-screen slideshow of all the
photos in the Sample Pictures folder begins.
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You can start a slide show from Windows Photo
Viewer by clicking the Slide Show button or pressing
F11. (Think Fu11.)
2. During a slideshow, each picture appears briefly before
changing to the next picture. The slideshow repeats
(loops) indefinitely.
3. During the slideshow, press the left arrow to see the
previous photo and the right arrow for the next photo.
4. To pause the slideshow, press the spacebar once. Press
the spacebar again to resume the slideshow.
5. During the slideshow, click the right mouse button for a
context menu. The display of this menu depends on your
computer. The menu you see may not exactly match
Figure 12-4, but similar options appear on all menus:
• Play, Pause, Next, Back (Previous) work as
described with the keystrokes mentioned in Steps 3
and 4.
• Click Shuffle to mix the order in which the photos
appear. Initially, photos appear in the order they
appear in the folder.
• Click Loop to turn off the endless repeating of the
slide show.
• Vary the speed — the time each photo remains on
screen — from among Slow, Medium, and Fast.
• Click Exit to close the slideshow. You can also
press Esc.
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Selected options
Figure 12-4
Your computer can automatically start a slideshow
when you aren’t using it. See Chapter 14 for
information on setting up a screen saver.
Display a Photo on Your Desktop
1. In the Sample Pictures folder, click a photo to select it.
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2. Click the right mouse button over that photo to open the
context menu and choose Set as Desktop Background
(see Figure 12-5).
Click here to make the photo appear on your desktop.
Figure 12-5
3. Click the Show Desktop button to the right of the time in
the taskbar (or press Q+D). The photo appears as your
desktop background, as shown in Figure 12-6.
4. Click the Show Desktop button again to see the Sample
Pictures folder. These steps work with any picture or
photo.
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Figure 12-6
Edit Photos Using Paint
1. You can use the Paint accessory to make changes to a
photo, including making a picture smaller. In the Pictures
library, click a photo to select it. Click the triangle next to
Preview and choose Paint from the menu. The selected
photo opens in Paint, as shown in Figure 12-7.
In Windows Photo Viewer, choose Open➪Paint to
open the photo you’re previewing.
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File menu button
Image panel
Figure 12-7
2. Before you make any changes to this photo, consider
saving a copy so you have the original and the changed
version. You may not need to do this for every photo,
but this gives you some insurance against edits you can’t
fix. Click the File menu button to the left of Home. Click
Save As. You can ignore the menu of file types that pops
out to the side when you hover over Save As, unless you
know you want a particular file type. The Save As dialog
box opens (see Figure 12-8).
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Change the file’s name.
Figure 12-8
Click Save.
3. Change the name in the File Name field to create a new
copy of this picture. Click Save. You’re now editing the
new copy, so the original file still exists under the original name and will remain unaltered.
4. Click Resize in the Image panel. In the Resize and Skew
dialog box (see Figure 12-9), enter a percentage less than
100 (without the percent sign) in the Horizontal field.
The value in the Vertical field changes automatically to
the same number that you type. You’re shrinking the
width and height of the photo to this size. You can resize
photos before inserting them into documents, such as in
WordPad, or before attaching photos to e-mail. Click OK.
The photo has been resized.
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Enter less than 100 to make the photo smaller.
Figure 12-9
You can undo each step by clicking the Undo button
above the Home tab (or by pressing Ctrl+Z).
5. Many photos can be improved by cutting out distracting
elements and keeping just part of the photo. This is
called cropping. Crop photos to concentrate on the most
important part of the photo. To crop, click Select in the
Image panel above the photo. In the photo, click and
drag a box over the area you want to keep — everything
outside this box will be deleted. Click Crop. The selected
area is all that remains, as shown in Figure 12-10.
6. If you want to save the changed photo, click the Save
button. Close Paint.
See Chapter 5 for information on Paint’s drawing and text tools,
which you can use on photos.
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Figure 12-10
Print Your Photos
1. In the Sample Pictures folder, click a photo to select it.
Click the Print button on the Command Bar. The Print
Pictures dialog box appears (see Figure 12-11).
To print more than one photo at once, before you
click Print, select additional photos by holding down
the Ctrl key as you click on each photo.
2. You can simply click the Print button for prints of your
photos filling one full-size page each. However, you can
also use the options along the right side of the dialog box
to specify the size of each print. The number of prints
that can fit on one page appears in parentheses next to
each size. (Your choice here doesn’t change the photo
files.) Select from these sizes:
• Full Page Photo: This option prints one photo per
page. The photo fills most of the page.
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Set printer options.
Choose print size.
Choose how many copies here.
Figure 12-11
• 4 x 6 in. (2): Use this to print two photos per page
(if you select more than one photo or more than
one copy). This is a standard print size for photos.
• 5 x 7 in. (2): Prints two photos per page (if you
select more than one photo or more than one
copy). These prints are larger than those from the
4 x 6 in. option.
• 8 x 10 in. (1): This option is the same as Full Page
Photo, unless you’ve changed paper size in the
printer options. (See Step 5 for more on this.)
• 3.5 x 5 in. (4): This option prints four smaller
photos per page (if you select more than one
photo or more than one copy).
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• Wallet (9): Use this option to print up to nine
small photos per page (if you select more than one
photo or more than one copy). Each print is 3 x
21⁄4 inches.
• Contact Sheet (35): Use this option to print up to
35 very small photos per page (if you select more
than one photo or more than one copy). Each
print is 11⁄2 x 1 inches. The filename of each photo
appears below the photo. This is a quick way to
evaluate the print-worthiness of a large number of
photos at once.
3. If you want more than one copy of each photo, enter a
number or click the up and down arrows on the box
beside the Copies of Each Picture option at the bottom
of the dialog box. If you select more than one photo in
Step 1, you print this number of copies of each photo.
Two copies of three photos equal six prints, of course.
That requires six sheets of paper for full-size prints but
only one for wallet-size — with space for three more
prints. Check page count under the preview to see how
many pages this printing requires.
If you intend to print on specialty paper, such as
preprinted stationery or photo paper, print a test on
regular paper, first. That way, you don’t waste special
paper as you get the options set the way you want
them.
4. Deselect and re-select the Fit Picture to Frame option,
watching how that changes the print preview. If selected,
this option expands the shorter of width or height of the
photo to fill the available space and eliminate any white
space around the photo. As a result, the longer of width
or height may extend beyond the edges of the print
frame, and if so, will be cut off when printed. When you
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deselected this option, the entire photo fits within the
available space, but you may have blank space above and
below or to both sides of the photo. (This space is shown
as off-white around the photo in the dialog box.)
5. You may not need to change any of the printer options
that appear across the top of the dialog box. These
options are available:
• Printer: Your current default printer (possibly your
only printer) is listed automatically. If you have
another printer, you can choose it here.
• Paper size: Letter size is a standard 81⁄2 x 11 inch
piece of paper. If you’re printing on other sizes,
you may need to choose a different paper size
from this list.
• Quality: For the best prints, use the highest available
quality (marked HQ in the drop-down menu). The
numbers here refer to dots per inch — more dots
make smoother images. You may be able to switch
to a lower quality for drafts and quick prints.
6. When you’re ready to print, click the Print button. The
dialog box indicates a wait. Your prints should come out
of the printer soon after. The more photos you select to
print at once and the more copies you specify, the longer
this step takes, as the Photo Gallery formats each print.
If nothing prints a few minutes after the dialog box
disappears, check to make sure that the printer is on and
its cable is connected. See Chapter 7 for information on
setting up and troubleshooting your printer.
You can order high-quality prints at low cost from an
online photo service or by taking photos to a local
printing service. For specific steps, see my other
book, Digital Photography For Seniors For Dummies.
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Copy Photos from Your Digital
Camera to Your Computer
1. Copying photos from your camera to your computer —
also called downloading or importing — begins with one of
two methods:
• Connect a cable from the camera to a USB port on
the computer. Turn on the camera. Look for a
menu on the camera’s LCD screen. Choose the
option to connect to or copy to a PC.
• Remove the memory card from your camera and
insert it into a matching slot in the computer or
separate card reader. Many laptops accept several
different kinds of memory cards.
The first time you connect your camera to your
computer or insert the memory card, you may see a
pop-up tip indicating that a driver is being installed
to allow Windows 7 to access the device.
2. The AutoPlay dialog box appears the first time you copy
photos (see Figure 12-12). Select the Always Do This for
Pictures check box. Then click the Import Pictures and
Videos Using Windows button unless you see a different
program under AutoPlay you intend to use for pictures.
3. The first Import Pictures and Videos dialog box appears
briefly as Windows 7 searches the device for photos.
The more photos on the device, the longer this box
displays, but the dialog box is replaced automatically by
the next one.
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Check this option.
Click to import your photos.
Figure 12-12
4. The next dialog box appears with a thumbnail of the first
picture found, as shown on the left in Figure 12-13. Use
the Tag These Pictures field to add tags, which are labels
or categories, to all of the photos you import at this time.
If all the photos have something in common — for
example, all are from a vacation or celebration — enter a
tag such as vacation, graduation, or birthday. You can
separate multiple tags with semicolons: vacation; New
Mexico, for example. Later, you can use tags to search for
photos and group photos by tag instead of by location or
date taken. If these photos have nothing in common,
don’t enter a tag. Click the Import button to continue.
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Add an optional tag here.
Click to import photos.
See thumbnail here.
Click to erase after importing.
Figure 12-13
5. A thumbnail of each photo appears briefly as photos are
copied, as on the right in Figure 12-13. If you have time,
select the Erase After Importing check box. If Erase After
Importing is checked, Windows 7 verifies each photo was
copied successfully and then deletes those photos from
your camera’s memory card. Otherwise, you have to
manually erase photos from your camera as a separate
step using your camera’s controls.
6. After the importing process completes, Windows 7 opens
the Imported Pictures and Videos window to display
your recently imported photos (see Figure 12-14).
Double-click one of your newly copied photos to
preview it.
7. Preview each photo you copied using Windows Photo
Viewer (refer to Figure 12-3). If you want to delete a
photo, click the red X in the toolbar. If a photo isn’t
upright, click one of the two Rotate buttons to reorient
that photo. Use the Next button (right arrow) to step
through all of the photos you just copied. When you’re
done, close Windows Photo Viewer.
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Imported photos
Figure 12-14
Control How Windows 7 Names and Organizes Photos
1. Your photos are automatically copied into the My
Pictures folder in the Pictures library. Each time you
import pictures, Windows 7 creates a new folder under
My Pictures and names the folder and pictures according
to the Import Settings. You don’t have to change these
settings, but you may want to.
2. To access these settings, begin the steps to copy photos
from your camera, as explained in the preceeding task.
When you see the Import Pictures and Videos dialog box,
click Import Settings (refer to Figure 12-13). This opens
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the Import Settings dialog box, which offers you many
options, including where you import your files, how you
name the folders and files, whether you automatically
rotate pictures, and so on.
Feel free to change your picture and video import settings to your heart’s content. You can always restore
the original import settings by clicking Restore
Defaults. This button puts all options back the way
they were when you installed the program.
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Listening to
Music and
Watching DVDs
W
indows Media Player plays media, as you
would guess from the name. The term
media on computers refers to something other
than text: Audio and video are examples of
media. Audio is a catchall term for music and
other sound files, such as books on CD.
The delivery of music has come a long way
from Edison’s wax cylinder or even vinyl LPs.
Nowadays, music is often entirely digital. Use
Media Player to play the sample music
included with Windows 7. If you have an
audio CD handy, you can play it on your
computer using Media Player. To make playing
that CD even more convenient, you can copy
the audio files to your computer.
With a library of music copied from your CD
collection, you can create your own CDs,
combining tracks (songs) at your whim. You
can also copy your audio to an MP3 player.
➟
Chapter
13
Get ready to . . .
➟ Play Music with Windows
Media Player ................... 236
➟ Select Music to Play .......... 239
➟ Play a CD on Your
Computer ......................... 241
➟ Copy Music from a CD
to Your Computer ............. 243
➟ Create a Playlist ............... 247
➟ Create Your Own CD ........ 249
➟ Copy Music to an
MP3 Player ...................... 253
➟ View Pictures in Media
Player .............................. 255
➟ Watch a DVD................... 256
When you’re ready for a break from all the
music, pop a DVD into your computer and
enjoy the show. In this chapter, you do all of
these things using Windows Media Player.
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Play Music with Windows Media Player
1. To start Windows Media Player, click its icon (a white
triangle on an orange circle on a blue square) in the
taskbar. The first time you start Media Player, the initial
settings screen appears, as shown in Figure 13-1. Click
Recommended Settings and Finish.
Select Recommended Settings.
Figure 13-1
2. After a brief delay, the Media Player Library displays
music that comes with Windows 7, shown in Figure
13-2, and any music already copied to your computer.
The toolbar at the bottom of Media Player’s window
provides the following controls:
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• Shuffle: Click this button to turn on shuffle, which
randomly mixes the tracks you play. A second click
turns off shuffle, and the tracks play in the order
in which they appear onscreen.
• Loop: Click this button to turn on loop (repeat),
which continuously plays all the tracks again after
all have played.
• Stop: Click to stop a track.
• Previous: This button skips to the previous track.
• Play/Pause: Click the button with two vertical
lines to pause play mid-track. Click the same
button (now with a triangle pointing to the right)
to resume playing from the point you paused.
• Next: This button skips to the next track.
• Mute/Unmute: Click this button to silence the
player. Although the track continues to play, you
won’t hear it. When mute is on, a red circle and
slash appear next to the speaker icon. Click the
button again to hear the track.
• Volume: Click or drag the slider to decrease (to
the left) or increase (to the right) the volume of
the track. Your speakers may also have manual
volume control. Windows 7 has a separate volume
control in the taskbar, as well.
• Now Playing: Located far to the right of the toolbar, click this button to reduce the player to a
small size.
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Shuffle
Loop
Mute
Next track
Stop Play/Pause
Volume control
Previous track
Figure 13-2
3. Using these controls, click Play to play the music. Adjust
the volume with the slider. Mute and unmute the music.
Pause the music and resume playing. Stop the music.
Play any music.
4. Click the Switch to Now Playing button to the right of
the toolbar to shrink Media Player to a smaller window,
as shown in Figure 13-3. To return to the larger window,
click the Switch to Library button.
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Switch to Library
Mute
Stop
Previous track
Next track
Volume
Play/Pause
Figure 13-3
You can buy music online and download the tracks
directly to your computer.
Select Music to Play
Initially, Media Player plays all the music in your Music library, which
consists of the My Music and the Sample Music folders. There are
many ways to select music to play:
➟
Click Music in the Navigation pane on the left to
display all music. Click Artist, Album, or Genre to
display the music by these categories. With the small
collection of music Windows 7 includes for free, the
difference in these selections may not be obvious.
With a large library of music, you can play everything
by one artist, one selected album, or all music in a
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particular genre. Or, use these categories to find the
one album or song you want to hear.
➟
Type the name of an artist, song, album, or genre
in the Search box (click in the Search box in the
upper-right or press Ctrl+E). Media Player instantly
displays matching items, if any. To test this with the
sample files, type jazz or tuna in the Search box.
Clear the search results by clicking Music in the
Navigation pane.
➟
Choose Start➪Music to open the Music library in
Windows Explorer. Double-click Sample Music. Click
the Play All button on the Command Bar (see Figure
13-4) or double-click one track to play just that track
in Media Player.
Click to play all tracks.
➟
Music library
Figure 13-4
Double-click a track to play just one.
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➟
In the Music library in Windows Explorer, click one
track and hold down the Ctrl key as you click
another. Keep holding down the Ctrl key as you
select all the music you intend to play. Click the Play
Selection button on the Command Bar to play just
the selected tracks in Media Player.
When you play music from Windows Explorer,
Media Player starts in Now Playing mode (refer to
Figure 13-3), which provides a smaller toolbar to
stop, play/pause, skip, and mute/unmute. Click the
Switch to Library button if you want to see the
full-size Media Player (refer to Figure 13-2).
Play a CD on Your Computer
1. Your computer has a disc drive capable of playing CDs.
On the front of a desktop computer or tower, look for a
narrow door or cover. On a laptop, the CD tray may be
on either side or in front. A button on or near the CD
door opens the CD tray. Open the tray and position a
music CD label-side up in the tray, which may have a
spindle the CD snaps onto. With the CD in place, gently
push the CD tray. If the tray doesn’t close automatically,
gently push it completely closed. Do not force the drive
closed.
Some computers have a narrow CD-sized slot, instead of
a door or tray. Insert a CD into the slot with the label up
or facing left.
You hear the disc spin as the computer reads it.
In case you were wondering, the word disc, with a C,
is the preferred spelling for so-called optical media,
such as CDs and DVDs, which use lasers. Disk, with
a K, usually refers to magnetic media, such as hard
disks and flash drives.
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2. Windows 7 decides what to do based on the content
of the disc you inserted. In the case of a music or audio
disc, Windows 7 starts Media Player’s small Now Playing
window. If your computer is connected to the Internet,
Media Player displays the name of the track, artist, and
album title, as well as the album cover. If you don’t have
Internet access or the CD is unrecognized, you see Track 1
as the title and a generic music note icon. See Chapter 8
for information on connecting to the Internet.
3. Use the Now Playing toolbar to stop, skip to the previous
track, pause or play, skip to the next track, mute/unmute,
and adjust volume. (For details, see the earlier task “Play
Music with Windows Media Player.”)
4. You don’t just have to sit there and listen to the CD. You
can play a game, browse the Internet, whatever. Media
Player plays in the background as you go about your
business. Enjoy, and “let your laughter fill the room.”
5. If you want the larger window of Media Player, click the
Switch to Library button.
6. You can minimize the Now Playing window or the
Library window. Hover over the Media Player icon in the
taskbar for an even smaller toolbar with Previous, Pause/
Play, and Next, plus a brief pop-up note of the track
currently playing.
7. To remove the CD from the computer, press the button
on the computer that opens the disc tray or right-click
the CD title in Media Player Library and click Eject
(see Figure 13-5).
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Right-click CD title.
Click Eject.
Figure 13-5
Copy Music from a CD to Your Computer
1. You can copy music from a CD to your computer, both
technically and legally (if you own the CD). Doing so
allows you to play the music from the CD anytime
without needing the disc. Copy all of your music CDs to
the computer to create your own 21st century jukebox.
(Be sure to refer to this as ripping a CD around your
younger friends. But not the youngest, because they think
CDs are way passé.)
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2. Insert the CD you intend to copy. If Now Playing
appears, click the Switch to Library button. The Rip CD
screen appears automatically (see Figure 13-6). If you
don’t see this screen, click on the CD title in the
Navigation bar on the left.
Click to see Rip settings.
CD title
Rip CD
Check the tracks to copy.
Figure 13-6
3. Check marks appear next to every track. Deselect tracks
you don’t want to copy, if any.
4. Before you start copying your first CD, select a few options
under the Rip Settings button on the Command Bar:
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• Audio Quality➪192Kpbs (Best Quality) for the
best possible recording quality
• Rip CD Automatically, if you want this process to
be automatic for additional CDs
• Eject CD After Ripping, so the CD ejects
automatically
This is a one-time step.
If you have an MP3 player, determine whether it can
play Windows Media Audio (WMA) files before you
copy from a CD. To find this out, consult the MP3
player manufacturer’s Web site or your manual. If the
MP3 player can’t play WMA or you’re not sure it can,
choose Rip Settings➪Format➪MP3 to create files you
can copy to your MP3 player. See “Copy Music to an
MP3 Player,” later in this chapter.
5. When you’re ready, click the Rip CD button on the
Command Bar. If you’re playing a track when you click
the button, that track starts over. You can play the CD as
you rip it or you can stop playing. To stop the copying —
which you don’t have to do — click the Stop Rip button.
6. In the Rip Status column, Media Player displays a
Pending message next to tracks not yet ripped. A
progress bar appears beside each track as that track is
copied. Ripped to Library appears next to each
track that is completed. See Figure 13-7.
7. You can finish listening to the disc, if you want. If the
disc doesn’t automatically eject, push the button on the
tray or right-click the CD title in the Navigation bar on
the left and click Eject.
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Rip status
Figure 13-7
8. To see your newly ripped CD, click Music. The album
you just copied appears in the library. (You may have to
scroll down to see it.)
Delete tracks from your library by right-clicking and
choosing Delete. In the dialog box, select the Delete
from Library Only option to keep the music file on
your computer or the Delete from Library and My
Computer option to remove those tracks completely.
If you have vinyl LPs or 45s, you can digitize them
using a USB turntable, though this takes some work.
The details are beyond the scope of this book. Options
include hardware from www.ionaudio.com and
software from audacity.sourceforge.net.
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Create a Playlist
1. Without any additional effort, you can play your music
library in its entirety, by artist, by album, or by genre. If
you want to play a mix of tunes from various CDs, create
a playlist, a list of tracks to play together. In the Library,
click the music category that shows the tracks you want
to play.
2. Click the Play tab in the upper-right corner of Media
Player to open the Play pane (see Figure 13-8).
Click to save your playlist.
Play tab
Playlist
Number of tracks and play time
Figure 13-8
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3. To add a track to the playlist, drag and drop that track
into the Play pane. Drag tracks up and down to rearrange
the list order.
4. To remove a track from the playlist, right-click the
unwanted track and choose Remove from List. To start
over from scratch, click Clear List.
5. The total number of items (tracks) and total minutes of
play appear at the bottom of the Play pane.
6. Click the Save List button to save this playlist for future
play. The Unsaved list text above the tracks changes
to Untitled playlist (see Figure 13-9). Type a
name for your playlist and press Enter. The playlist title
appears in the Play pane and in the Navigation pane
under Playlists.
7. If you change the list by adding, moving, or removing
tracks, click the Save List button again to preserve your
changes.
8. When you’re done creating the playlist, click the Play tab
to close the Play pane.
9. To play the tracks on a playlist, double-click the playlist
name under Playlists in the Navigation pane. Furthermore,
you can right-click a playlist name and choose whether to
Play, Rename, or Delete that playlist. Deleting a playlist
doesn’t delete any tracks.
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Type for a name for your playlist.
Click Save List.
Figure 13-9
Create Your Own CD
1. Creating your own CD with your favorite tracks is rather
like creating the mixed tape of a generation ago. These
days, you burn a CD, which means that you copy files to
the CD. (As if the laser burns the disc, which it doesn’t
really do.) Click the Burn tab in Media Player to display
the pane on the right side of Media Player, in which you
can create a list of tracks to burn (your burn list). (See
Figure 13-10.)
➟
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Drag tracks to the list.
Burn tab
Figure 13-10
2. Insert a blank recordable CD into the CD drive.
Buy blank CDs at an office supply or electronics
store. CD-Rs are good for music.
3. Click a playlist or music category to show the tracks you
intend to copy to a CD.
4. Drag and drop a track, an album, or a playlist into the
burn list. Drag tracks up and down in the burn list to
rearrange them.
5. To remove a track from the burn list, right-click and
choose Remove from List. To start over from scratch,
click Clear List.
➟
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6. The number of minutes in the selected tracks appears in
the burn list next to Disc 1 (see Figure 13-11). A CD
holds about 75 minutes of audio. A bar graph and numbers indicate how many minutes are free of the total
available. You don’t have to fill a CD, although you may
want to.
Click to start burning your CD.
Minutes free on the CD
Figure 13-11
If you choose more tracks than will fit on one CD,
Media Player starts a list for a second disc below the
first. If you want to burn only one disc, remove one
or more tracks from the list.
7. When you’re ready to create a CD, click the Start Burn
button on the Command Bar.
➟
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8. The burn progress bar appears near the top of the Burn
list (see Figure 13-12). Let the burn complete before you
go on to other tasks. If the disc doesn’t automatically
eject, push the button on the tray or right-click over the
CD title and click Eject. Click the Burn tab to close the
Burn pane.
Percent completed
Figure 13-12
Although you can click the Cancel Burn button to
stop mid-burn, odds are good that the disc will be
unusable if you don’t let the burn complete.
➟
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Copy Music to an MP3 Player
1. An MP3 is a music file. An MP3 player is a portable music
player. You can copy tracks from your library to an MP3
player. That process is called syncing. In the Media Player
Library, click the Sync tab to open the Sync pane on the
right, in which you create the list of tracks to sync to your
MP3 player (your sync list). (See Figure 13-13.)
Drag tracks to list.
Connect an MP3 player.
Figure 13-13
➟
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2. Connect your MP3 player to your computer by using a
cable (usually USB). Some MP3 players connect to a
separate dock that’s connected to your computer. Some
MP3 players connect wirelessly. You may see two brief
pop-ups the first time you connect a device as Windows 7
installs a driver for the device. After a few moments, the
MP3 player appears at the top of the Sync pane. If the
MP3 player already has tracks on it, those tracks are listed
in the Sync pane.
3. Add tracks, albums, artists, genres, or playlists by
dragging and dropping the items into the Sync pane’s
sync list. Drag tracks up and down in the sync list to
rearrange them.
4. To remove a track from the sync list, right-click it and
choose Remove from List. To start over from scratch,
click the Clear List button at the top of the Sync pane.
5. A bar graph and numbers indicate the amount of
space used and the free space left on your MP3 player
(see Figure 13-14).
6. When you’re ready to copy tracks to the MP3 player,
click the Start Sync button. A progress bar and
percentage indicate how much of the sync is done.
(see Figure 13-15).
7. When the sync is done, a Sync completed message
appears in the Sync pane. You can then disconnect your
MP3 player.
➟
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Click to sync your MP3 player.
Free space
Figure 13-14
View Pictures in Media Player
Media Player shows more types of media than just music. In the
Navigation pane on the left, click Pictures. (You may prefer viewing
photos with the functions covered in Chapter 12.)
Using Media Player, you can
➟
Listen to music and look at pictures at the same
time.
➟
Create playlists of pictures with or without music.
➟
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➟
Burn pictures to CD.
➟
Sync pictures to a media player, an MP3 player that
also has a screen for pictures, such as a Microsoft
Zune.
Click to stop sync.
Percent complete
Figure 13-15
Watch a DVD
1. You can play DVDs on your computer. On the front of a
desktop computer or tower, look for a narrow door or
cover. On a laptop, the DVD tray may be on either side
or in front. A button on or near the DVD door opens the
DVD tray. Open the tray and position a music DVD
label-side up in the tray, which may have a spindle the
DVD snaps onto. With the DVD in place, gently push
➟
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the DVD tray. If the tray doesn’t close automatically,
gently push it completely closed. Do not force the drive
closed.
Some computers have a narrow DVD-sized slot instead of
a door or tray. Insert a DVD into the slot with the label
up or facing left.
You hear the disc spin as the computer reads it.
DVD drives play both DVDs and CDs.
2. Windows 7 decides what to do based on the content of a
disc. In the case of a movie, Windows 7 starts Media
Player full screen. The opening screens of the movie
appear automatically.
3. Move the mouse to display the Media Player toolbar at
the bottom of the screen. The following buttons — many
of which you also see in Figure 13-2 — are available
(from left to right):
• DVD: This button displays the DVD menu with
options to play the DVD or access special features,
such as commentary.
• Stop: Click the Stop button to stop playing the
DVD. A menu appears with options to Play DVD,
Go to Library, or Play Previous List, which resumes
playing the playlist prior to the DVD.
• Previous: This button skips to the previous
chapter, as defined by the DVD. Click and hold
this button to rewind.
• Play/Pause: Click the button with two vertical
lines to pause play midstream. Click the same
button (now with a triangle pointing to the right)
to resume playing from the point you paused.
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• Next: This button skips to the next chapter. Click
and hold this button to fast-forward.
• Mute/Unmute: Click this button to silence the
player, although the movie continues to play (you
won’t hear it). When mute is on, a red circle and
slash appear next to the speaker icon. Click the
button again to hear the movie.
• Volume: Click or drag the slider to decrease (to
the left) or increase (to the right) the volume of
the movie. Your speakers may also have manual
volume control.
• Exit Full-Screen Mode/View Full Screen: Located
far to the right of the toolbar, click this button to
switch out of or into full-screen mode (alternatively, press F11). You can watch a DVD in a
smaller window.
Move the mouse away from the bottom of the screen.
The toolbar disappears.
4. Play the DVD. You deserve a break, don’t you think?
5. To remove the DVD from the computer, press the button
on the computer that opens the disc tray or click the Go
to Library button in the top-right corner, right-click the
DVD title in Media Player Library, and click Eject.
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Having It Your Way
with Windows 7
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Making Windows 7
More Fun to Use
T
he nesting instinct is strong in human
kind. We mark our territories in various
ways (for example, with paint and decals).
From refrigerator magnets to tattoos, we personalize things to make them our own. Why
should Windows 7 be any different? The
Personalization window gives you one-stop
access to all the functions for changing the
look of Windows 7.
➟
You see the Windows 7 desktop every
time you start your computer. Put a
photo — perhaps one of your own —
on the desktop.
➟
Choose a favorite color for window title
bars and borders. A different color
scheme may be more soothing or easier
to see.
➟
Change the sounds Windows 7 makes as
you use it. Some of the Windows 7 sounds
are nerve-wracking. Choose something
more pleasant or eliminate a sound
altogether.
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➟
Chapter
14
Get ready to . . .
➟ Personalize Windows 7
with a Theme.................... 262
➟ Choose a Desktop
Background ...................... 264
➟ Color Your Windows ........ 267
➟ Change the Sounds Your
Computer Makes .............. 270
➟ Set Up a Screen Saver ...... 272
➟ Save Your Theme .............. 275
➟ Change Desktop Icons ....... 275
➟ Pick Your Mouse Pointers ... 278
➟ Change Your Account
Picture ............................. 283
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➟
Set up a screen saver to display photos as a
slideshow while Windows 7 is otherwise idle.
➟
Pick a mouse pointer that’s easier to see.
Some people will dismiss personalization as cosmetic, ignoring the
huge cosmetics industry. Make Windows 7 yours and, in the process,
make Windows 7 more fun to use.
In this chapter, begin with a theme, which is a collection of all of
these personalization options. You may be content with one of the
choices Windows 7 provides. You can change the look and feel of
Windows 7 as much or as little as you wish.
Personalize Windows 7 with a Theme
1. Right-click on the desktop. Choose Personalize from the
shortcut menu. The Personalization window appears
(see Figure 14-1).
You return to the Personalization window often in
this chapter. In many cases, the window stays open
as you make choices. If you need to open this
window again, repeat Step 1.
2. Scroll down through the themes displayed in the window.
Themes are collections of Windows 7 settings, such as
desktop background, color, sounds, and more. Explore
the themes under these headings:
• My Themes: These are themes you customized and
saved. If you haven’t saved a theme (covered later
in the “Save Your Theme” task), you see Unsaved
Theme, which is your current setup.
➟
• Aero Themes: These slick themes display beautiful
photos as a changing desktop background and set
transparent colors for windows. The Landscapes
and Nature themes are particularly lovely. The
Characters theme is whimsical.
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Themes
Scroll for more themes.
Personalization options
Figure 14-1
• Basic and High Contrast Themes: These are simpler, plainer themes, most with solid-color desktop backgrounds. High contrast may be useful for
someone with a vision disability or for use in low
light.
3. Click the Landscapes theme. You may not notice a
change; if you can’t see the desktop, click the Minimize
button (or press Q+D) to see the new desktop background. See Figure 14-2. Other Personalization settings
changed with this theme, as well.
4. Return to the Personalization window by clicking its icon
on the taskbar. Try a different theme by clicking on it. To
restore your original settings, click the Unsaved Theme
under My Themes.
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Personalization icon
Figure 14-2
Desktop background
Choose a Desktop Background
1. In the Personalization window, click the Desktop
Background option near the bottom. The Desktop
Background window appears, as shown in Figure 14-3.
The current background is part of the theme you
previously chose. If you chose the Landscapes theme
as I described in the preceding task, then under the
Landscapes heading in the list box of themes, photos are
marked with check marks. Each selected photo appears
one at a time as the desktop background.
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Choose how often the background photo changes.
Checked photos appear as the background.
Figure 14-3
2. Click on any photo to make that photo the only desktop
background. Alternatively, select the small check box in
the upper-left corner of a photo to add a photo to the
photos that will appear, one at a time. Deselect a photo’s
check box to prevent it from displaying on the desktop.
You don’t have to select photos by theme — you can pick
any photos.
Click on a heading, such as Nature, to select all the
pictures under that heading.
3. The Picture Position option is set to Fill, which fills the
screen. Don’t change this unless you want to display
pictures that are much smaller than screen size.
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4. Click the Change Picture Every drop-down list to change
the amount of time that passes before the next picture
displays. Intervals range from every 10 seconds to once
per day. For a quick test of this feature, choose 10
seconds.
5. Select the Shuffle check box to mix the order in which
photos appear.
6. Minimize the Desktop Background window. The desktop
background changes every 10 seconds (unless you choose
a different frequency or choose only one photo). Restore
the Desktop Background window by clicking its icon on
the taskbar.
Pressing Alt+Tab allows you to cycle through open
windows and the desktop. Keep holding down the
Alt key and press the Tab key repeatedly until you see
the window you want or the desktop. Release both
keys to switch to the selected window.
7. In the Desktop Background window, click the Picture
Location drop-down list and select the Pictures Library
option. You see the pictures in the Pictures library, as
shown in Figure 14-4. (These are the pictures discussed
in Chapter 12, including your own photos if you copied
some to the computer.) Deselect photos you don’t want to
see. Change the time each picture displays (as described
earlier in Step 4). Minimize the window if you want to test
your selections.
8. To keep the selections you make in the Desktop
Background window, click the Save Changes button. To
undo those selections, click Cancel. In either case, you
return to the Personalization window.
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Choose Pictures Library.
Click Save Changes to keep your choices.
Figure 14-4
Color Your Windows
1. You can change the color of the window title bar and
border. In the Personalization window, click the Window
Color option near the bottom. The next window or
dialog box you see depends on your computer and on
the theme you’ve chosen.
2. The Window Color and Appearance window in Figure
14-5 appears if you select one of the Aero themes and
your computer’s graphics card supports transparency,
which allows the background to show through the edges
of a window. If you select a non-Aero theme or your
computer doesn’t support transparency, you see Figure
14-6, in which case, skip to Step 3.
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Choose one of the color schemes. The color of the
taskbar, title bar, and border changes immediately. If you
want, you can adjust the Color Intensity slider to lighten
(left) or darken (right) the selected color scheme. The
inveterate tinkerer may choose Show Color Mixer for
even more sliders to find just the right color and level of
transparency. To keep your changes, click the Save
Changes button. To discard your changes, click the
Cancel button. Either choice returns you to the
Personalization window.
Choose a window color.
Click for advanced custom settings.
Figure 14-5
3. The Window Color and Appearance dialog box (see
➟
Figure 14-6) appears if your computer doesn’t support
transparency, if transparency is off, or if you click the
Advanced Appearance Settings link shown in Figure 14-5.
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Choose ToolTip...
Figure 14-6
...Then select a larger size.
This dialog box allows you to adjust the appearance of
over a dozen parts of a window. These options are for the
compulsive tweaker (no offense intended). However,
there’s one option in Advanced Settings that anyone may
appreciate: It’s the tooltip option, which determines the
appearance of text in some of the pop-up boxes you see.
Hover the mouse pointer over the Close button of this
dialog box (don’t click). That pop-up message Close is a
tooltip. Follow these steps to make the tooltip text easier
to read:
a. Click the Item drop-down list and select the ToolTip
option.
b. In the Size drop-down list, select 14. This will increase
the font size from 9 points to 14 points. (For reference,
72 points is about an inch tall.)
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c. Change the background color (labeled Color 1) or the
font color. Click the Color drop-down button (on the
second line) and choose the blue square from the
color picker that appears. Click the Apply button. A
Please Wait message appears briefly, asking you to
please wait.
d. Hover the mouse pointer over the Close button again
long enough to see the changed tooltip, which should
be larger and a different color. You may want to select
different items from the background color (Color 1),
Font, Size, and (Font) Color drop-down lists, as well
as clicking the Bold button (but not Italics). Make any
adjustments. Click Apply. Test again by hovering your
mouse pointer over Close.
e. Feel free to look at the other options in the Item list.
When you finish making adjustments, click OK to
return to the Personalization window.
If you want to return all of the Advanced Settings to
their original settings, simply click any of the themes
in the Personalization window (other than Unsaved
Theme).
Change the Sounds Your Computer Makes
1. Windows 7 plays sounds in response to actions and
events, including starting and exiting Windows 7. You
can choose what sounds play or even to play no sounds.
In the Personalization window, click the Sounds option
near the bottom. The Sounds dialog box appears, as
shown in Figure 14-7.
2. The current option showing in the Sound Scheme
drop-down list is determined by the theme you choose.
However, you can choose any sound scheme. Click the
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Sound Scheme drop-down list and select one of the
schemes, noting the current scheme before you do. In the
Program Events list box, click Asterisk. When Windows 7
displays an alert, the sound associated with Asterisk
plays. Click the Test button. Make sure your speakers are
on, not muted, and the volume is high enough to hear.
Select a scheme.
Click an event.
Figure 14-7
Test the sound.
You can silence Windows 7 without silencing other
programs, such as Media Player or IE. Choose No
Sounds from the Sound Scheme drop-down list.
Adjust all sounds by clicking the Windows 7 speaker
icon in the taskbar. Click and drag the slider to adjust
volume or click the pop-up speaker icon to mute or
unmute Windows 7.
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3. Select a different scheme from the Sound Scheme
drop-down list. Click Asterisk in the Program Events list
box and then click the Test button. Do you like this
sound more or less?
4. Click Default Beep in the Program Events list box and
then click the Test button. This is another sound you
hear often.
5. Click the Sounds drop-down list to open it. The first
option is (None). If you choose (None), any event that
triggers the selected sound (Default Beep), won’t make
any sound, but other events will continue to produce
sounds. You can pick any of the sounds listed as the
sound you want to hear for the selected event. Test your
selection by clicking the Test button.
6. If you want to keep the choices you made, click OK.
Otherwise, in the Sound Scheme drop-down list, select
the original scheme or Windows Default, and then
click OK.
Set Up a Screen Saver
1. After a set period of time without mouse or keyboard
activity, a screen saver displays changing images on your
screen. You can choose which images appear and how
much of a delay occurs before they appear. In the
Personalization window, click the Screen Saver option.
The Screen Saver Settings dialog box appears, as shown in
Figure 14-8.
2. Click the Screen Saver drop-down list and select the
➟
Photos option. In the top half of the dialog box, you see
what this screen saver looks like. The Photos screen saver
plays a slideshow of photos in the Pictures library. For a
full-screen preview, click the Preview button and then
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avoid moving the mouse or touching the keyboard for a
few seconds. When you’re done with the preview, press
any key or move the mouse to return to the dialog box.
Select a screen saver.
Click to preview.
Click settings to adjust the screen saver.
Figure 14-8
The Photos screen saver is my favorite. You can try
any of the other screen savers — Bubbles is great
fun — but many screen savers don’t run if the
graphics card in your computer doesn’t support
them. A warning appears in the dialog box if you
choose a screen saver you can’t run, in which case
you need to choose a different screen saver.
3. With Photos selected as the screen saver, click the Settings
button. The Photos Screen Saver Settings dialog box
appears (see Figure 14-9).
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• If you want to see some pictures but not all — for
example, just your recent vacation photos — click
the Browse button and find the folder that contains those photos.
• Click the Slide Show Speed drop-down list to
choose how frequently the photos change on
screen (Slow, Medium, or Fast).
• Select the Shuffle Pictures check box to display
photos randomly.
If you make changes here you want to keep, click Save.
Otherwise, click Cancel. You’re returned to the Screen
Saver Settings dialog box.
4. Click the Preview button again to make sure you like
your choices.
Select to show the pictures in random order.
Select the speed.
Figure 14-9
5. The Wait option displays the number of minutes of key-
➟
board and mouse inactivity that must pass before the
screen saver appears. You can change this number if you
want more or less inactive time to pass before the screen
saver starts.
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6. Don’t select the On Resume, Display Logon Screen check
box, unless your account has a password and you want to
require entering a password after the screen saver clears.
7. Click OK to keep your changes or Cancel to clear
unapplied changes.
Save Your Theme
1. After you make various changes in the previous tasks,
click the Save Theme link in the Personalization window.
The Save Theme As dialog box appears.
2. Enter a name for your theme in the text box. Click Save.
3. Saving your current settings as a theme allows you to
return to these settings. If you try other themes or settings
and you want to go back to this theme, open the
Personalization window and, in the large list box, click
the name of the theme you saved under the My Themes
heading. All settings are restored to their condition at the
time you saved your theme.
Change Desktop Icons
1. Icons on the desktop provide easy access to certain files
or programs. By default, the Recycle Bin is the only icon
on the Windows 7 desktop. The manufacturer of your
computer may add other icons. When you install programs,
that process may also add icons to the desktop. You can
choose a few Windows 7 icons to display on the desktop.
In the Personalization window, click the Change Desktop
Icons link in the Navigation pane on the left. The
Desktop Icon Settings dialog box appears, as shown in
Figure 14-10.
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2. Select the check boxes next to the icons you want to add
or deselect icons you want to remove. Click OK to keep
your changes or Cancel to discard changes.
Select icons to display on the desktop.
Click to change an icon’s look.
Figure 14-10
Leave the Recycle Bin check box selected to make it
easy to find when you need to undelete files. All of
the other icons already appear on the Start menu and
in Windows Explorer, so you may not need them on
the desktop.
3. Minimize the Personalization window. To change the
➟
size of icons on the desktop, right-click the desktop.
Choose View➪Large Icons (see Figure 14-11). Repeat for
Medium or Small Icons, whichever you prefer.
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Some people consider desktop icons to be clutter that
obscures the desktop background. You can hide all
desktop icons by right-clicking the desktop and
choosing View➪Show Desktop Icons, which deselects
and hides those icons. Repeat to bring the icons
back.
Choose Large Icons.
Click to hide desktop icons.
Figure 14-11
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Pick Your Mouse Pointers
1. Changing the size, color, or shape of the mouse pointer
may make it easier to see. In the Personalization window,
click the Change Mouse Pointers link in the Navigation
pane on the left. The Mouse Properties dialog box opens
with the Pointers tab selected (see Figure 14-12).
Click the tabs for more options.
Choose a scheme.
Figure 14-12
2. In the Scheme drop-down list note the current selection
and then click it to see what options it has to offer.
Each scheme provides different mouse pointers. Mouse
pointers differ in size, color, and style:
• Colors include white, black, and inverted, which is
transparent with an outline.
➟
• Sizes are standard, large, and extra large.
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• Styles include the modern-looking Aero,
black-outlined Magnified, and the rest, which
are variations on the standard.
You may find additional styles installed by the
computer manufacturer. You can also download
mouse pointers from the Web.
3. Select Windows Black (Extra Large) from the Scheme
drop-down list. In the preview to the right, the cursor
appears black and larger. Click the Apply button to see
this pointer size in action. Move the mouse around.
4. Select Windows Aero (Extra Large) from the Scheme
drop-down list. This is the larger version of the default
pointer scheme. Click the Apply button. Do you prefer
one of these schemes?
The rest of this section contains options you may
find valuable, but it’s okay if you skim to the next
section.
5. Click the Buttons tab at the top of the dialog box.
Consider these options (see Figure 14-13):
• Button Configuration: This option is intended
for left-handers. Select the Switch Primary and
Secondary Buttons check box to switch the functions of the left and right buttons. With this
option selected, you single-click the right mouse
button to select, double-click the right button to
open, and left-click for the shortcut menu.
• Double-Click Speed: If you have trouble
double-clicking, dragging this slider left or right
may fix that. Double-click the yellow folder icon
repeatedly. That icon should open or close each
time you double-click. Adjust the slider slightly
and repeat your test.
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• ClickLock: Select the Turn On ClickLock check
box to change click and drag. With this option
selected, you don’t have to hold the mouse button
down as you drag. Click and drag becomes click,
release, drag, click, release.
To keep your changes, click the Apply button.
Double-click here to test the speed.
Figure 14-13
6. Click the Pointer Options tab (see Figure 14-14).
• Motion: If the mouse pointer seems to move
onscreen too quickly or slowly for your tastes, try
dragging the slider a little toward Slow or Fast to
see if that helps.
➟
• Snap To: If you select the Automatically Move
Pointer to the Default Button in a Dialog Box
check box, Windows 7 positions the mouse
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pointer over OK or Cancel, whichever is the
expected option. This saves you from moving the
mouse before you click.
• Visibility: Three options here to help you see the
mouse pointer:
Display Pointer Trails: Select this check box to exaggerate mouse pointer movements with a kind of
slow-motion effect.
Hide Pointer While Typing: Leave this check box
selected so the pointer won’t obscure the cursor
position where you can type.
Show Location of Pointer When I Press the Ctrl Key: If
you select this check box, you can press the Ctrl
key to create a radar or target effect around the
pointer to help you locate it onscreen.
To keep your changes, click the Apply button.
Figure 14-14
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7. If your mouse has a wheel between the mouse buttons,
you can use that wheel to scroll in longer windows, such
as in IE. Click the Wheel tab (see Figure 14-15) to access
these two options:
• Vertical Scrolling: By default, each time you turn
the wheel slightly, the screen moves three lines up
or down. To scroll down an entire screen requires
turning the wheel about six times. Select the One
Screen at a Time option to change that to one
screen with each slight wheel turn.
• Horizontal Scrolling: Not all mouse wheels tilt
left or right. If yours does, you can change how
much the window scrolls horizontally as you press
the wheel from either side to tilt it slightly.
Click Apply.
Increase the number to scroll faster.
➟
Figure 14-15
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8. When you’re done with the Mouse Properties, click OK.
See Chapter 16 for instructions on making singleclick the way to open items and to add check boxes
to Windows Explorer to select items.
Change Your Account Picture
1. Your account has a picture or an icon associated with it.
This icon appears on the Welcome screen (if you see that
screen to log in) and on the Start menu. In the Personalization window (refer to Figure 14-1), click the Change
Your Account Picture link in the Navigation pane on the
left. The pictures that Windows 7 provides appear in
Figure 14-16.
Current user account picture
Click to select your own photo.
Figure 14-16
Choose a different picture.
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2. Click one of the pictures and then click the Change
Picture button. When you click the Start button, the
new picture you chose appears at the top-right of the
Start menu.
3. Back in the Personalization window, click the Change
Your Account Picture link again. Click the Browse for
More Pictures link below the pictures. In the Pictures
library that appears, double-click a picture you want as
your account picture. (You may have to open Sample
Pictures, first.) Click the Start button. That picture
appears on the Start menu. Repeat Step 1 if you want a
different picture.
Oddly, if you use the Browse option in Step 3,
Windows 7 opens the User Accounts window instead
of the Personalization window after you select a
picture. Close the User Accounts window if it opens.
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Using the
Taskbar and
Start Menu
Smartly
L
ooking at the taskbar, you see icons (buttons) for open windows. The taskbar also
contains icons that are pinned to the taskbar, so
that you can open those windows with just a
click. The taskbar provides one way to switch
between open windows as your attention
shifts.
You can customize the location and appearance of the taskbar. Pin icons for programs you
need immediate access to and unpin those you
never use.
➟
Chapter
15
Get ready to . . .
➟ Tune Up Your Taskbar ....... 286
➟ Control System
Notification Messages ....... 288
➟ Pin Icons to the Taskbar ..... 291
➟ Use Taskbar Jump Lists ...... 293
➟ Customize Your Start
Menu............................... 295
➟ Pin Icons to the Start
Menu............................... 300
Throughout this book, you use the Start menu
to run programs. You can determine just what
appears on the Start menu to reduce clutter
from icons you seldom use. As with the taskbar, you can pin or unpin programs depending
on their value to you.
Both the taskbar and the Start menu provide a
feature that is unique to Windows 7: Jump Lists.
Jump Lists display recent and frequently used
documents and options belonging to a specific
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In this chapter, you customize the taskbar and the Start menu. You
also take advantage of Jump Lists for quick access to important
documents.
Tune Up Your Taskbar
1. Change the way the taskbar looks and acts. Right-click
the taskbar and choose Properties. The Taskbar tab of the
Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog box appears
(see Figure 15-1).
The Taskbar tab
Pinned icons
Figure 15-1
Active icon
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These properties are not all equally important, so I
skip a few.
2. Click the Taskbar Location on Screen drop-down list.
Select the Top option and then click the Apply button.
This moves the taskbar to the top of the screen. With the
taskbar at the top, menus drop down instead of popping
up. Because most windows have toolbars near the top of
the window, you don’t have to move the mouse as far
between taskbar and toolbar. It’s a small change you may
have to use for a while to appreciate.
On laptops and touchscreens, you may have an easier
time using the taskbar at the top of the screen.
For the rest of this chapter, figures show the taskbar
at the top of the screen — if the world seems upsidedown, that’s why.
3. In the Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog box,
click the Taskbar Buttons drop-down list. Select the
Combine When Taskbar Is Full option and then click the
Apply button. On the taskbar, the button for Taskbar and
Start Menu Properties includes some text (see Figure
15-2), as in the previous version of Windows. With this
option, you trade more information on the button for
fewer buttons on the taskbar.
4. Under Preview Desktop with Aero Peek, the Use Aero
Peek check box is unavailable if your graphics card
doesn’t support this feature. Aero Peek automatically
turns all windows transparent when you hover over the
Show Desktop button to the right of the clock on the
taskbar — it’s a narrow space that doesn’t really look like
a button. Aero Peek allows you to see the desktop
background, icons, and gadgets without having to
minimize windows. If this feature is grayed out or
deselected, you have to click the Show Desktop button
(or press Q+D) to see the desktop.
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Places taskbar at top of screen
Expands the label on active icons
Figure 15-2
Control System Notification Messages
1. The notification area appears at the right end of the
taskbar, to the left of the clock. This area displays icons
for programs running in the background, for which
there is no other icon on the taskbar. An example is the
speaker icon. Use these icons to see the status of a
program — through changes in the icon or pop-up
notifications (messages) — or to access that program. The
icons showing in the notification area in Figure 15-3
indicate that
➟
• I have an Action Center alert.
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• The laptop battery is nearly fully charged.
• A wireless network connection is established.
• The speakers are muted. (The red slash over that
fourth icon disappears when mute is off.)
2. If other icons are hidden from view in the notification
area, as in this case, click the down arrow for a small
window displaying those hidden icons.
Click to see hidden icons.
Figure 15-3
See Chapter 18 for information about using the
Action Center to tend to your computer.
3. Hover your mouse pointer over icons in the notification
area to display tooltips (text). Click an icon to access a
default option (or double-click, if needed). Right-click an
icon for additional options.
4. You have some control over which icons appear in this
area. In the Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog box
(refer to Figure 15-1), click the Customize button in the
Notification Area section. The Notification Area Icons
window appears (see Figure 15-4). The icons that appear
here are currently in the notification area or were recently.
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Choose behaviors for each icon.
Figure 15-4
5. Icons take up space on the taskbar and can be distracting.
On the other hand, you may need to know what an icon
is trying to tell you. For each icon, you can choose a
behavior for that icon from the Behaviors drop-down
lists:
• Show Icon and Notification: With this choice,
both the icon and associated pop-up messages
appear. Select this if the icon itself displays useful
information by changing under different conditions,
such as the speaker icon with or without a red
slash to indicate the mute condition. Some icons
change and some don’t.
• Hide Icon and Notifications: With this choice, the
icon doesn’t appear directly in the notification
area. You won’t receive messages from this icon,
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either. Select this option if an icon just seems to
take up space or its messages distract you. (Ignore
messages at your own peril. Some are irksome;
some are vital.)
• Only Show Notifications: This choice hides the
icon but lets messages pop up. This is a good
choice if the icon itself never changes.
6. If you use the second or third behavior options, you can
display the hidden icons by clicking the triangle to the
left of the notification area. All of the hidden icons
appear in one little window (refer to Figure 15-3). As
with the other icons, you can hover, click, double-click,
or right-click to access different functions related to each
icon. Click outside the pop-up to hide it again.
Pin Icons to the Taskbar
1. Two kinds of icons appear in the main part of the taskbar.
If a window is open, its icon is there. Other icons are
pinned to the taskbar so that they’re always there and can
be used to open a window or start a program. In Figure
15-1, shown earlier, the first three icons in the taskbar are
pinned and can be used to start IE, Windows Explorer,
and Media Player, respectively. The fourth icon is for the
active window, Taskbar and Start Menu Properties.
2. For these steps, you practice by pinning an icon for
Solitaire to the taskbar. Choose Start➪Solitaire. (Click
OK if Solitaire displays a hardware message.) Right-click
the Solitaire icon in the taskbar. Choose Pin This
Program to Taskbar from the drop-down list shown in
Figure 15-5.
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Right-click the icon on the taskbar.
Figure 15-5
3. Close Solitaire. The icon is still on the taskbar because
you pinned it there. If you want fast access to Solitaire,
this is hard to beat. Consider pinning any program you
use often.
4. Right-click Solitaire in the taskbar. Click Unpin This
Program from Taskbar. The icon disappears unless
Solitaire is running, in which case, the icon stays there
until you close the program. Consider unpinning icons
in the taskbar that you never use.
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Use Taskbar Jump Lists
1. Jump Lists are shortcuts to documents or functions associated with a program. Display a Jump List in the taskbar
by clicking an icon and dragging down (or up, if your
taskbar is at the bottom). Click and drag down from the
Media Player icon on the taskbar. Figure 15-6 shows the
Media Player Jump List. (Keep in mind that yours will
show some different options based on what you’ve
played recently in Windows Media Player.)
Click and drag from a taskbar icon to see its Jump List.
Figure 15-6
2. The Media Player Jump List displays frequently played
tracks or playlists, as well as tasks, such as Resume
Previous List (where List refers to playlist). This Jump List
provides an easy way to play these tracks without having
to start Media Player first, before choosing what to play.
Click an option to play music.
➟
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3. On the taskbar, click and drag down or up from the
Windows Explorer icon (the yellow folder). Figure 15-7
shows the Windows Explorer Jump List. (Yours will be
different based on what you’ve explored recently.)
Folders you have frequently accessed appear on the Jump
List. When you hover your mouse pointer over one of the
items, such as Pictures, a pushpin appears to the right.
Click on the pushpin to pin that selection to the Jump
List. That pinned selection appears in the Pinned section
at the top of the Jump List. Pinned items are always
accessible in the Jump List. Click on the pin to unpin this
from the Jump List. The item still appears, but it may be
replaced by other items as you use Windows Explorer.
The Windows Explorer Jump List
Figure 15-7
4. Click and drag down (or up) from any other icons in the
taskbar. The options available may be different for other
icons. Use Jump Lists to quickly jump to a file or option.
Pin the most useful files.
➟
Let me stress the combined value of Jump Lists with
the taskbar at the top of the screen. You can click and
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drag down and select a pinned item with much less
movement of the mouse than if the taskbar is at the
bottom, where you click and drag up the full length
of the Jump List to reach pinned items. The difference is more significant than may be apparent now.
On the Start menu, programs with Jump Lists, such
as Paint and WordPad, display a triangle (arrow) to
the right of the menu item. The Jump List for such
menu items appears when you hover your mouse
pointer over the program name. You don’t need to
click and drag to display Start menu Jump Lists.
Customize Your Start Menu
1. Throughout this book, you use the Start menu to start
programs, such as Solitaire or WordPad, and to access
files, folders, and libraries, such as Documents or
Pictures. As you’ve seen, the Start menu’s Search box is
often the most direct way to run a program. (Pinned
taskbar icons are even more direct.) Still, you can customize the Start menu to make it more useful. Right-click
the Start button and choose Properties. The Start Menu
tab of the Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog box
appears (see Figure 15-8).
2. Click the drop-down list next to Power Button Action.
This determines the behavior of the Power button that
appears at the bottom of the Start menu. Choose the
option you’ll use most often: Sleep, Hibernate, or Shut
Down. Both Sleep and Hibernate return you to the programs and documents you had open when you chose
that option. Shut Down closes programs and documents.
For a laptop, choose Hibernate to save the most power
while still being able to quickly return to the programs
you were running. For a desktop, you may prefer the
quicker resumption from Sleep.
➟
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Start Menu tab
Power button
What the Power button does
Figure 15-8
3. Under Privacy, the two check boxes enable you to easily
rerun programs and reopen documents through the Start
menu. In an environment where other people see the
Start menu, some users prefer that this information not
appear and would deselect both of these check boxes. I
recommend you leave the options selected.
4. Click the Customize button on the Start Menu tab. The
Customize Start Menu dialog box appears (see Figure
15-9). There are many ways to customize the Start menu.
In general, use the check boxes to determine which
features appear on the Start menu. Deselect features you
never use to reduce clutter.
➟
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Display Computer as a link.
Checked items appear in the Start menu.
Figure 15-9
Many of the options in the Customize Start Menu dialog
box give you a choice of three settings:
• Display as a Link: This setting makes the item a
link you click to open a separate window. Initially,
all the items on the right side of the Start menu
(in the black area) have this effect (see Figure
15-9), including Computer.
• Display as a Menu: This setting causes a menu to
pop out when you hover your mouse pointer over
or click this item. Figure 15-10 shows Computer
with Display as a Menu selected. The drives appear
to the right of Computer for easy access.
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Display Computer as a menu.
Figure 15-10
• Don’t Display This Item: Of course, this setting
removes the item from the Start menu. Reduce
Start menu clutter: Don’t display items you don’t
ever use. Windows Explorer is pinned to the
taskbar and pressing Q+E opens Computer, so you
may prefer to use the Don’t Display This Item
option for Computer. (However, I like having
more than one way to get to everything
important.)
Here are a few changes for you to consider:
• If you’ll be traveling with a laptop, select the
Connect To check box to provide a way to connect
to wireless networks. See Chapter 8 for information
on connecting to a wireless Internet connection.
➟
• Deselect the Default Programs check box — you
won’t use it.
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• Under the Downloads check box, choose Display
as a Link.
• If you don’t play games, choose Don’t Display This
Item under the Games check box.
• If you use a network, select the Network check box.
• Select the Recent Items check box. This provides
another way to reopen documents.
In the Start Menu Size, you find these options:
• Number of Recent Programs to Display: This
option determines how many programs appear in
the Start menu. The default value of 10 is probably
fine.
• Number of Recent Items to Display in Jump
Lists: This option determines how many
documents or other items appear in Start menu
Jump Lists (coming up). The default value of 10 is
probably fine.
Figure 15-11 shows seven recent programs on the left,
with room for three more before older items drop off to
make room for newer ones. On the right, the Jump List
for Getting Started displays nine items with room for one
more before older items drop off to make room for
newer ones. No items are deleted or lost; these two
options just determine how many items you can see at
one time.
5. When you’re done making changes, click OK to close the
Customize Start Menu dialog box. (Refer to Figure 15-9.)
Then click OK to close the Taskbar and Start Menu
Properties dialog box.
➟
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Recently used programs
Jump List items
Figure 15-11
Pin Icons to the Start Menu
1. The programs that appear on the Start menu are recently
➟
used or recommended by Windows 7. As you use more
programs, this initial list on the Start menu changes to
show only your most recently used programs. Pin the
programs to the Start menu that you want always available, as other items come and go. Right-click any item on
the Start menu, including those listed under All Programs.
Choose Pin to Start Menu. Figure 15-12 shows Solitaire
pinned to the Start menu. Note that a line separates
pinned programs (above) from those Windows 7 lists
(below).
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A pinned program
Figure 15-12
I’m not really obsessed with Solitaire — it’s just a
convenient example.
2. To remove a program you pinned to the Start menu,
right-click that program and choose Unpin from Start
Menu.
➟
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➟
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Making Windows 7
Easier to Use
Y
➟
Chapter
16
ou can change Windows 7 in many ways
that may make using your computer easier
and more comfortable. In this chapter, you
choose adjustments that may make all the
difference to you.
Get ready to . . .
If you strain and squint to make things
out onscreen, change your screen to make
everything larger. Increase the size of the
screen font and adjust the sharpness of text.
➟ Change Screen Font Size... 307
➟ Turn On ClearType Text ..... 309
➟ Stop Double-Clicking
Go from double-clicking to single-clicking to
open programs and documents.
Add a new method for selecting files: check
boxes. With check boxes, you don’t need any
keystrokes as you make selections and those
selections are very obviously marked.
Windows 7 provides a magnifier for zooming
into an area of the screen. An onscreen
keyboard can substitute for a mechanical
keyboard. And Windows 7 can read screen
content to you.
➟ Make Your Screen
Easier to See .................... 304
for Good ......................... 311
➟ Check to Select ................. 312
➟ Get Recommendations
for Specific Needs ............ 314
➟ Start Magnifier ................. 316
➟ Use the On-Screen
Keyboard ......................... 317
➟ Let Narrator Read
to You ............................. 319
➟ Explore All Access
Settings ............................ 321
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Make Your Screen Easier to See
1. Two factors work together in determining the appearance
of a computer screen:
• The display — the TV-like device sometimes called
a monitor or an LCD — has a width and height
you can’t change. Displays are measured diagonally.
Sizes range from 17 to 25 inches for desktops and
8 to 17 inches on laptops.
• Screen resolution determines how much content
fits on the screen.
To change your screen resolution, right-click the desktop.
Choose Screen Resolution. The Screen Resolution dialog
box appears, as shown in Figure 16-1.
Choose a screen resolution.
➟
Figure 16-1
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If your desktop display is too small, consider buying
a new one to replace it. See Chapter 7 for information
on adding a second display before you give the old
one away.
2. Click the Resolution drop-down list. Available
resolutions appear with width and height measured in
pixels (dots). The slider marks the current resolution. In
Figure 16-2, the current resolution is 1024 x 768, a very
common resolution ideal for displays around 16 inches.
Choose a lower resolution to make the items onscreen larger.
Figure 16-2
3. The choices available to you in the dialog box may be
different from those in the figure. If you have 800 x 600
as an option, select that. Otherwise, click the next resolution
lower than the current resolution (down the menu).
Click the Apply button to see this resolution.
➟
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4. A dialog box appears to ask Do You Want to Keep These
Display Settings? If you want to try this resolution for a
while, click the Keep Changes button. If you don’t want
this resolution, click the Revert button to return to the
previous resolution. This dialog box has a 15-second
timer. If you don’t respond, it reverts automatically.
That’s a safety measure. If you choose a resolution
that prevents you from seeing the dialog box — that’s
possible — don’t panic; just count to 15 and let
Windows 7 fix the problem. For the purposes of these
steps, click the Keep Changes button if you can read the
dialog box comfortably.
5. Here’s the catch about screen resolution: Lower resolution
makes everything onscreen bigger but shows less. Higher
resolution shows more onscreen but smaller, which may
be harder to read. You may need to use a particular
resolution for a while to judge the effect. Look at how
your desktop, taskbar, and Start menu change with the
resolution. Start IE and browse a familiar Web site. Play a
game you’ve played before.
6. In the Screen Resolution dialog box, choose 1280 x 1024
or the next resolution higher than the current one (up
the menu). Click Apply. If you can read the dialog box,
click the Keep Changes button. Check out this resolution
by looking at familiar screens.
7. In the Screen Resolution dialog box, return to your
original screen resolution.
8. Feel free to try other resolutions to find the one that
works best for you. You may need to return to this
section after you use a resolution for a while.
➟
If you use a high screen resolution, you may want
to increase screen font size. See the following task,
“Change Screen Font Size,” for steps to increase
font size.
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Change Screen Font Size
1. You can increase the size of text on the screen by 25 or
50 percent. Right-click the desktop and choose Screen
Resolution. The Screen Resolution dialog box appears
(refer to Figure 16-1). Click the Make Text and Other
Items Larger or Smaller link. The Display window
appears (see Figure 16-3).
Increase the screen font size.
Figure 16-3
2. Increase the screen font size by choosing Medium
(125%) or Larger (150%) and clicking Apply. Be aware
that you may see consequences from choosing this
increase, including
• A warning that some items may not fit on your
screen with the current screen resolution
➟
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• Some dialog boxes that are too large for a screen
resolution of 1024 x 768 or lower
3. If you encounter a problem seeing an entire dialog box,
you may be able to move it to see the missing areas, or
you may have to reset the screen font size to 100 percent.
Click Apply.
4. To complete the change, click the Log Off Now button,
as shown in Figure 16-4.
Log off to apply the change.
Figure 16-4
5. Log in by choosing your user icon and, if necessary,
entering your password. Figure 16-5 shows the Start
menu with each option selected.
As you increase screen resolution, consider increasing
screen font size to keep the text legible.
➟
Some programs may have their own options for
adjusting text size onscreen. In IE and some other
programs, press Ctrl+= (the Ctrl key and the equal
sign key, which also has a plus sign on it) to increase
text size. Or press Ctrl+- (the Ctrl key and the minus
key) to decrease text size. Press Ctrl+0 (the zero key
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above the letters) to return to 100 percent. If your
mouse has a wheel, hold down the Ctrl key and roll
the wheel away from you to increase or towards you
to decrease text size.
Medium font size
Larger font size
Figure 16-5
Turn On ClearType Text
1. ClearType improves legibility of text on an LCD display.
On the Start menu, type clear and click Adjust ClearType
Text. (There is also a link from the Display window
where you adjust screen font size.) Figure 16-6 shows the
first screen of the ClearType Text Tuner, a series of dialog
boxes that help you fine-tune text sharpness.
➟
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Select to use ClearType.
Figure 16-6
2. Select the Turn On ClearType check box if it isn’t already
selected. You may notice an immediate improvement in
text legibility in the box. Click Next.
3. In each of the next four dialog boxes, click the box
containing the sharpest text. This is like a visit to the eye
doctor — better or worse? One or two? Don’t fret; just go
with what looks sharpest. Click Next on each screen.
4. The last screen indicates you’ve finished tuning the text
on your monitor (screen). Click Finish.
As you use your computer, if you notice text isn’t as
sharp as you want, repeat these steps.
➟
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Stop Double-Clicking for Good
1. For icons on the desktop or in Windows Explorer, you
click once to select the icon, and you double-click to
open that item. You can reduce the double-click to a
single-click — which may not seem like much of a
change — but consider the following:
• You already single-click items on the Start menu
and taskbar, as well as most buttons and menu
items.
• Even links on Web pages involve a single-click to
open or browse that link.
• Double-clicking to open an icon, such as the
Recycle Bin on the desktop, seems an odd
exception.
2. You can make icons behave more consistently with the
rest of Windows 7. Open the Start menu and type folder
in the Search text box. In the list of search results, click
Folder Options. On the General tab (see Figure 16-7),
under Click Items as Follows, select the option called
Single-Click to Open an Item (Point to Select). Click OK.
3. Hover your mouse pointer over the Recycle Bin icon (or
any other icon) on the desktop to select it. Click the icon
to open it. You won’t double-click much anymore (once
you break that habit).
4. This change requires an adjustment if you’ve used
Windows before. You may open things you only
intended to select. You’ll get used to this and love it if
you give it some time.
➟
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Choose Single-click.
Figure 16-7
Check to Select
1. In Windows Explorer, if you want to select more than
one file at a time, you can use the Ctrl key to select additional files. For an alternative method, have Windows 7
add a check box to each file. Use the check box to select
each file. On the Start menu, type folder in the Search
box and then, in the list of search results, click Folder
Options. On the View tab (see Figure 16-8), under
Advanced Settings, scroll down to the Use Check Boxes
to Select Items check box and select it. Click OK.
➟
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2. Choose Start➪Pictures. Open the Sample Pictures folder.
As you move the mouse pointer over each picture, a
small check box appears in the upper-left corner of the
icon (see Figure 16-9) or left of the filename in Details
view. Click in that check box to select that photo. Repeat
to select additional photos. If a photo is selected, click in
the check box to deselect that photo. Close the window
after you’ve seen how these check boxes work.
Select Use Check Boxes to Select Items.
Figure 16-8
This change works especially well with the change in
the earlier task “Stop Double-Clicking for Good.”
With both changes, click anywhere on the icon to
open it or click on the check box to select it.
➟
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Selecting files is just a step before copy, move,
rename, delete, and more. See Chapter 4 for information on working with files.
Hover over an item to see the check box.
Figure 16-9
Get Recommendations for Specific Needs
1. In the Start search box, type access. In the search results
list that appears, click Ease of Access Center. Maximize
the window by clicking the middle of the three buttons
in the upper-right corner of the window, just left of the
Close button (the X). The Ease of Access Center, shown
in Figure 16-10, provides even more ways to adjust the
usability of Windows 7.
Pressing Q+U also displays the Ease of Access Center.
➟
2. Click the link to Get Recommendation to Make Your
Computer Easier to Use. In a series of five screens, select
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all statements that apply to you. Click Next on
each screen.
Click to take a survey and get recommended settings.
Figure 16-10
3. On the fifth screen, click Done. The Recommended
Settings appear based on your responses, as shown in
Figure 16-11. Turn on features you wish to use, such as
Narrator. Adjust settings on this screen or follow links to
set up appropriate functions.
Although this survey and the resulting recommendations are a good place to start, the following sections
provide information on separate functions the
Recommended Settings combines into one page.
➟
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Check settings to use.
Adjust settings and features.
Figure 16-11
Start Magnifier
1. The Magnifier places (or, in techy terms, docks) a panel
across the top of your screen. As you move the mouse,
the area around the mouse appears magnified in this
panel. In the Ease of Access Center, click the Start
Magnifier button (refer to Figure 16-10).
2. Click the magnifying glass to display the Magnifier tool-
➟
bar (see Figure 16-12). With these tools, you can increase
(click the Plus button) or decrease (click the Minus button) magnification. Click the Views drop-down list to
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switch the magnification panel from docked to full
screen. Click the gear icon for Magnifier Options; for
instance, you can
• Adjust the percentage change of zoom.
• Turn color inversion on or off.
• Change the tracking from following the mouse
(default) to following keyboard focus or the text
insertion point.
• Click the link to Control Whether Magnifier Starts
When I Log On.
Click OK to keep changes to these options or Cancel to
discard changes.
Click to control magnification.
Magnifier toolbar
Figure 16-12
3. To turn off the Magnifier, click the X in the Magnifier
toolbar.
Use the On-Screen Keyboard
1. Using the On-Screen Keyboard, you can type with the
mouse or other pointing device, such as a joystick, pen,
➟
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or mouth-stick. In the Ease of Access Center, click Start
On-Screen Keyboard.
2. Using your mouse or other pointing device and the
On-Screen Keyboard, click the Windows logo key, Q (it’s
between Ctrl and Alt). The Start menu appears. Click the
letters k-e-y (see Figure 16-13). As you select letters with
the On-Screen Keyboard, words matching what you’ve
typed appear across the top of the keyboard. You can
click the correct word (keyboard, for example). The
word keyboard is inserted into the Start search box, and
matching items appear.
Matching words appear here.
Text appears at cursor.
Figure 16-13
Click keys here.
3. You can drag the On-Screen Keyboard by the title bar to
➟
reposition it. Minimize by clicking the first of the three
buttons in the upper-right corner of the keyboard if you
need it later.
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4. On the On-Screen Keyboard, click the Options button.
You can turn off the audible click that accompanies
clicking the keys. You can turn on the display of the
numeric keypad. Consider the option to Hover Over
Keys, which enables you to select a key by hovering over
it instead of clicking it, if clicking the keys isn’t practical.
Windows 7 has another On-Screen Keyboard called
the Tablet PC Input Panel. Search for tablet on the
Start menu. You may prefer either of these virtual
keyboards.
Let Narrator Read to You
1. Narrator is a screen reader, which is software that reads
screen text aloud. Press the Q key. Type narrator (narr is
enough) in the Start menu search box. Press Enter to start
Narrator.
2. The Narrator Settings dialog box opens (see Figure
16-14). This window stays on top of other windows,
unless you minimize it. Narrator reads aloud the
contents of any window you click in. Initially, Narrator
reads its own window’s content. If you click in IE,
Narrator begins reading the contents of the Web page
you are browsing. You may want to adjust speaker
volume or volume control in the taskbar.
3. Narrator reads the content based on focus, which is the
currently selected item. Onscreen, the item with focus is
highlighted by a box of dots.
4. Press Tab to move the focus in the window from one
item to the next. Each time you press Tab, you move the
focus to the next item, and Narrator reads the text of that
item and its tooltip, if any. Pressing Shift+Tab moves the
focus to the previous item.
➟
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Figure 16-14
5. Press the Tab key to move the focus to the Quick Help
button. Narrator reads just the button text and tooltip.
Press Enter to listen to Quick Help, which announces
these keystrokes, among others:
• Press the Ctrl key to stop Narrator from reading
the current content.
• Press Ctrl+Shift+Enter to make Narrator read
information about the current item. Use this to
repeat text Narrator reads.
• Press Ctrl+Shift+spacebar to make Narrator read
the entire active window, top to bottom.
6. Press the Q key. The Narrator reads the Start menu
search box. Type help to select Help and Support under
Programs. Press Enter.
On the Start menu, if you need to move between
selections, press the down- or up-arrow keys.
7. In Windows Help and Support, type narrator and press
➟
Enter. Press Tab to move among search results. Listen for
Hear Text Read Aloud with Narrator. Press Enter. This
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Help page includes a list of keyboard shortcuts. Press
Ctrl+Shift+spacebar to hear the whole page.
8. Switch back to Narrator using Alt+Tab. (Hold down Alt
and tap Tab repeatedly until Narrator is selected.) In the
Narrator window, press Tab until Exit is selected and
then press Enter. Press Enter again to select Yes. Narrator
closes.
Explore All Access Settings
Although there are many other options you may appreciate in the
Ease of Access Center (Q+U), I want to highlight a few (refer to
Figure 16-11). Some of these options appear in more than one place,
including the recommendations discussed in the task “Get
Recommendations for a Specific Need.”
➟
Click the Use the Computer without a Display
link. You can then change how long pop-up notifications display from the default 5.0 seconds to up to
5 minutes. These pop-ups don’t stick around long
enough, it seems to me. If you use Narrator, select
the Turn On Narrator check box to turn it on automatically when Windows 7 starts and select the Turn
On Audio Descriptions check box. Click OK to
return to the Ease of Access Center.
➟
Click the Make the Computer Easier to See link
and then select the Make the Focus Rectangle Thicker
check box. This option puts a thicker box around
selections in dialog boxes. Change the Set the
Thickness of the Blinking Cursor setting from the
default of 1 to 3 or more (note the Preview). If you
use the Magnifier, select the Turn On Magnifier check
box to turn it on automatically when Windows 7
starts. Click OK to return to the Ease of Access
Center.
➟
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➟
Click the Make the Mouse Easier to Use link and
then select the Activate a Window by Hovering Over
It with the Mouse check box. This option makes it
unnecessary to click in a window to make it active —
hovering your mouse pointer makes it active. If you
have trouble with windows rearranging automatically as you drag them, select the Prevent Windows
from Being Automatically Arranged When Moved to
the Edge of the Screen check box. See Chapter 14 for
information on modifying the mouse pointer.
➟
Click the Make the Keyboard Easier to Use link
and then choose these options:
• Select the Underline Keyboard Shortcut and Access
Keys check box to add an underline to menu items
below the letter you use with the Ctrl key, such as
Ctrl+S for Save.
• If you have trouble pressing combinations of
keystrokes, such as Ctrl+S, select the Turn on
Sticky Keys check box to turn combinations into
sequences: press Ctrl and release, press S and
release.
• If you sometimes accidentally press Caps Lock,
Num Lock, or Scroll Lock, select the Turn On
Toggle Keys check box to hear a tone when you
press one of these keys.
➟
Click the Use Text or Visual Alternatives for Sounds
link and then select the Turn On Visual Notifications
for Sounds check box if you have trouble hearing the
Windows 7 alert and error sounds. See Chapter 14 for
information on changing the sounds in Windows 7.
➟
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Keeping Windows 7
Healthy
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Updating
Windows 7
T
hings change. As millions of people put
Windows 7 to the test every single hour,
Microsoft discovers glitches with how
Windows 7 works. Especially important are
any weaknesses in security that turn up only
when software is under fire in the real world.
Windows Update is the process for installing
patches (updates) to plug these holes in
Windows 7.
If you have an always-on Internet connection,
such as DSL or cable, Windows Update automatically downloads and installs the most
important updates as they become available
(usually, once a month). Security patches are
among the most important, so they’re among
those updates downloaded automatically.
➟
Chapter
17
Get ready to . . .
➟ Activate Windows Now .... 326
➟ Perform a Windows
Update ............................ 328
➟ Change the Time When
Windows Update Runs ...... 332
➟ Get Updates for Other
Microsoft Products ............. 333
➟ Discontinue Additional
Updates ........................... 335
➟ Upgrade Windows
Anytime ........................... 337
Less important, optional updates include
updates to device drivers, the programs that
make Windows 7 work with specific hardware,
such as your display and printer. Windows
Update keeps track of optional updates but
leaves the decision of whether to install — and
the installation — up to you. For this reason,
you need to run Windows Update and check
out the optional updates, at least occasionally,
perhaps once every month or two.
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In this chapter, I show you how to work with the ever-changing world
of Windows. You can start by activating Windows 7, a one-time process
for validating your computer. And for the ever-changing part, you see
how to work with Windows Update. Finally, you explore the option of
upgrading from your current edition of Windows 7 to another in order
to acquire additional features, such as more backup options.
If you have a laptop but no Internet connection, take
your computer to someplace with a free public wireless connection, such as a coffee shop or library. See
Chapter 8 for information on connecting to the
Internet before trying to activate or upgrade
Windows 7 or trying to use Windows Update.
Activate Windows Now
1. You have to activate Windows 7 within 30 days of your
first use. During activation, your computer contacts
Microsoft over the Internet to confirm you have a
legitimate copy of Windows 7. (If you aren’t currently
connected to the Internet, you need to connect before
you can activate Windows 7.) To activate Windows 7,
click Start and type activate in the Search Programs and
Files text box. Click Activate Windows in the resulting list
of matching programs.
You can also activate Windows 7 by clicking on the
pop-up notification that appears daily until you
activate.
2. Click the words Activate Windows Online Now (as
shown in Figure 17-1). After about a minute, you may
see a message indicating activation was successful, and
you’ll know that you’re done.
➟
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3. If you see the dialog box labeled Type Your Product Key,
you need to enter the 25-character product key that
appears on the Windows 7 Installation disc or on a
sticker attached to your computer. Type the 25 characters
(dashes are added automatically) in the text box. Click
Next. If you get an error message, double-check the
product key you entered against the copy on the
computer or disc.
Click to activate Windows.
Figure 17-1
➟
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Perform a Windows Update
1. To run Windows Update, click Start and type update in the
Search Programs and Files text box. Click Windows Update
in the resulting list of matching programs. Figure 17-2
shows the Windows Update screen that appears next.
Click to check for updates.
Updates are available.
Your most recent check
Figure 17-2
2. Windows Update indicates the following:
• Important Updates Available: Microsoft recommends you install important updates as soon as
possible. (Critical updates are automatically
installed.) Important updates include noncritical
security updates.
➟
• Optional Updates Available: Optional updates are
just that — optional — and include device drivers.
However, you should consider making these
updates carefully. If a device is working well, an
update may not improve the situation.
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• Most Recent Check for Updates: The date and
time when Windows 7 checked for updates, which
should be the current day or very recent. If the
most recent check is a week old or older, click the
Check for Updates link in the Navigation pane on
the left.
• Updates Were Installed: The date and time when
Windows 7 was last updated. If you want to know
what update was performed, click View Update
History.
• You Receive Updates: Initially, Windows Update
is for Windows 7 only. See “Get Updates for Other
Microsoft Products,” later in this chapter.
3. Click the link for Important Update (if there is one).
Figure 17-3 shows one example of the resulting screen.
Check updates you want to install.
Click the update theme.
See update info here.
Figure 17-3
4. Click the link for Optional Updates (if there is one) on
the Select Updates to Install screen or from the initial
Windows Update screen.
➟
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5. To learn more about an update, click the name of the
update. The area to the right then shows you some
information for the selected update. Click the More
Information link if you want to know even more.
Notice whether the update description includes a
warning (marked by an exclamation point in a circle)
that you may need to restart your computer after
installing this update. You won’t have to restart
immediately, in most cases. You can shut down at
the end of the day and start normally the next day,
instead, although both shutdown and start-up may
take a few minutes longer than usual.
Even with a description, you can’t always determine
how important an update is for your computer.
Sometimes you have to guess. In general, I suggest
installing important updates and not installing the
updates labeled optional, especially if you don’t know
the updates will benefit your computer. You can opt
to install an update later.
6. To select an update for installation, click the check box
next to its name. Click OK to continue or Cancel if you
don’t want to perform an update. When I selected both
updates available and clicked OK, I saw the screen shown
in Figure 17-4.
7. To complete the update, click Install Updates. After you
start the update, you shouldn’t cancel or stop the update
or close this window. You can minimize the window, if
you want to do other things.
➟
When the download and installation of the update are
completed, the Windows Update screen reports The
Updates Were Successfully Installed. If a
restart isn’t required, click OK to close Windows Update.
If Windows Update seems to think it’s best to restart your
computer (and you agree), click the Restart Now button.
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Remember that you should close other open programs
and save open documents before you click the Restart
Now button. If you want to wait to restart, just close the
Windows Update window.
Click here to install selected updates.
Figure 17-4
8. Take note of the messages that the update process has for
you.
• During restart or shut down, you may see a message
that updates are being installed. If you’re shutting
down, don’t turn off your computer until this process
finishes.
• When the computer starts, you may see messages
about installing and configuring updates.
• Windows Update may display a notification in the
taskbar concerning recent updates.
9. If you wish to confirm that the update was completed,
start Windows Update (as you did in Step 1) and check
for yourself. You should see a message similar to the one
in Figure 17-5.
➟
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Click here to change update time.
Your computer is up to date!
Figure 17-5
Change the Time When Windows Update Runs
1. For some reason, Microsoft schedules Windows Update
to run at 3 AM every day. If necessary, Windows 7 will
turn on your computer automatically so that Windows
Update can run. If your computer is in the guest room,
avoid waking guests by clicking Change Settings in the
Navigation pane on the left of the Windows Update
window.
2. You see the Choose How Windows Can Install Updates
window, as shown in Figure 17-6. Click the down arrow
next to Install New Updates At and select a time from
the drop-down list. Change the time to one when the
computer is likely to be on, such as 12 PM.
3. Click OK to save your change.
➟
The only way to guarantee the computer won’t turn
on in the middle of the night is to plug your computer
into a power strip and turn that off after you shut
down. For laptops, remove the battery if you intend to
prevent Windows 7 from starting on its own.
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Change the time for updates here.
Figure 17-6
Get Updates for Other Microsoft Products
1. Windows Update automatically installs important
updates for Windows 7. If you use other Microsoft
software — in particular, Microsoft Office for word
processing (Word) or spreadsheets (Excel) — you can
have Windows Update check for additional updates, as
well. In Windows Update, click the Find Out More link,
if the screen displays that option next to Get Updates for
Other Microsoft Products (refer to Figure 17-2). If you
don’t have this option, the choice to check for additional
updates may already be selected (see Step 5).
➟
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2. Internet Explorer launches and automatically browses the
Microsoft Update site shown in Figure 17-7. Select the
check box to agree to the Terms of Use. (What choice do
you have, really?) Then click Install.
Accept terms and click Install.
Figure 17-7
3. User Account Control may display a dialog box to
confirm running Windows Update. Click Yes.
4. The next Web page indicates Microsoft Update was
successfully installed. Click the X in the upper-right
corner to close the browser window.
5. Windows Update automatically starts and searches for
➟
updates. If Windows Update doesn’t start, see “Perform a
Windows Update,” earlier in this chapter, to start it. The
You Receive Updates option now states For Windows
and Other Products from Microsoft Update,
as shown in Figure 17-8.
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Your chosen updates are here.
Figure 17-8
6. If updates are found and you want to install them,
continue with the steps (starting with Step 4) in the
“Perform a Windows Update” section, earlier in this
chapter.
Discontinue Additional Updates
1. You may change your mind and decide you don’t want
updates for Microsoft products or notification of new
software. No problem! Run Windows Update by clicking
Start and typing update in the Search Programs and Files
text box. Then click Windows Update in the resulting list
of matching programs.
➟
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2. Click Change Settings in the left pane of the Windows
Update window that appears. In the resulting dialog box,
you should see the options you want to discontinue in
the Microsoft Update and Software Notifications sections,
as shown in Figure 17-9. (These options don’t appear in
the Choose How Windows Can Install Updates dialog
box unless you’ve completed the steps in the preceding
section.)
Uncheck updates you don’t want.
Figure 17-9
3. Each update option has a separate check box. Deselect
the check box next to the options you want to discontinue.
Then Click OK.
➟
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Upgrade Windows Anytime
1. Windows 7 has several editions with different features.
See URL for details comparing editions. For a fee, you
can upgrade to another edition. If you decide to upgrade
to a version with more features or want to know more
about your options, click Start, type anytime in the
Search Programs and Files text box, and click Windows
Anytime Upgrade in the resulting list of matching
programs.
2. The Windows Anytime Upgrade screen displays your
current edition in the upper-right corner. Figure 17-10
shows that I’m running Windows 7 Home Premium. If
you have Windows 7 Ultimate, you’re done (since there’s
nothing to upgrade to from Ultimate).
If you have Windows 7 Starter, you may want the
multimedia options in Home Premium. The
Ultimate edition is less compelling.
3. Click the link labeled Go Online to See If Your Computer
Is Ready to Upgrade to Another Edition of Windows 7.
Click Download the Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor. On
the next screen, click Download.
4. In the File Download Security Warning dialog box,
click Save. In the Save As dialog box, click Save. After
download completes, click Run. If the dialog box doesn’t
stay open after downloading, choose Start➪Computer
and click Downloads on the left. Double-click the
Upgrade Advisor installer. Click Next and OK as needed.
➟
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Your Windows 7 Version shows up here.
Figure 17-10
5. After the installer finishes, click Start. Click Windows 7
Upgrade Advisor on the Start menu. If the User Account
Control dialog box prompts you for confirmation,
click Yes.
6. On the first Advisor screen, click Start Check. The process
takes a few minutes to run. Read the resulting Report
screen. If you want to refer to the report later, click Save
Report. Click Close.
7. Click Go Online to Choose the Edition of Windows 7
➟
That’s Best for You. Click Compare the Editions of
Windows 7. Find your current edition in the columns of
the chart. Look at editions to the right of your current
edition. Do you see any features you want? If you don’t
see a feature you want, then you don’t need to continue;
close the window. If you see a feature you want, consider
the following tip before proceeding to the next step.
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If your edition of Windows 7 lacks a feature you
want or need, you may be able to find other
programs with the missing feature. There are
many good — even free — programs available for
download from the Web. Take the time to research a
program before you download and install it, to avoid
unreliable or dangerous software. Two good sources
for software reviews are www.downloadsquad.com
and www.howtogeek.com.
8. Click the button to upgrade from your current edition to
the edition you intend to buy. Confirm your selection.
On the payment screen, fill in the required information.
Click Checkout.
9. After a few minutes, Windows 7 completes downloading
the missing features and upgrading the edition. Click
Restart Now. When Windows 7 restarts, the Congratulations screen indicates your new edition.
➟
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➟
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Protecting Your
Computer
W
indows 7 uses the Action Center to keep
you informed of security and maintenance issues that need attention, such as antivirus protection and file backup. The Action
Center alerts you to issues you should investigate by displaying a flag with an X over a red
circle in the notification area of the taskbar.
The Action Center divides issues into Security
and Maintenance sections. As far as maintenance goes, Windows 7 automatically performs
certain functions to protect your computer. But
in the last section of this chapter, I do show
you how to check your hard drive for file system errors. Your hard drive’s well-being is
essential for your computer’s overall
well-being.
➟
Chapter
18
Get ready to . . .
➟ Check the Action Center .... 342
➟ Install Antivirus Software .... 346
➟ Register Your Antivirus
Software .......................... 350
➟ Scan a Folder or Disk
for Viruses ........................ 353
➟ Schedule a Disk Check ...... 355
Then you have security issues. For most new
computers running Windows 7, the pressing
security issue is protection against viruses.
Viruses are programs designed to work undetected against your interests, and they can
employ a variety of tactics. A virus may
➟
Search your system for information
that’s useful for identity theft, such as
your Social Security number (which
should not be anywhere on your computer), credit card numbers, or bank and
investment account numbers.
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➟
Install spyware, such as a keystroke logger, a program
that records every keystroke you type, as a way to
snag passwords as you enter them into a program or
on a Web site.
➟
Spread to other systems through e-mail, over a
network connection, or by way of flash drives.
Given the severity of risk viruses pose to your security, you’ll be
surprised that Windows 7 doesn’t include antivirus software, although
the company that sold your computer may have added some. In this
chapter, you find out how to download, install, and run this vital
software.
Check the Action Center
1. If you see the Action Center icon (the image of a flag) in
the taskbar’s notification area, hover your mouse pointer
over that icon for a summary tooltip. When the icon also
has an X over the flag image, you know that the Action
Center has a message for you. Click the icon to see a list
of the Action Center messages. In Figure 18-1, the Action
Center notification pop-up indicates one important
message (finding an antivirus program) and a second,
presumably less-important issue (setting up a backup).
Summary of messages
➟
Specific messages
Figure 18-1
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2. You can click a specific message within the pop-up
notification to see related details, and you can also
click Open Action Center for access to all messages.
Figure 18-2 shows the result when you choose to open
the Action Center.
If you don’t see the Action Center icon in the taskbar, click
Start and type action in the Search Programs and Files text
box; then click Action Center from the resulting list.
Security and Maintenance section headers
Figure 18-2
Most Action Center issues have an option to Turn Off
Messages about the particular issue. Don’t turn off a
message until you determine that it’s truly irrelevant
to you. On the other hand, the X — indicating a
problem to resolve — appears over the Action Center
icon until you address it or turn off the messages (for
an issue you can safely ignore).
➟
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3. Click anywhere on the Security heading to expand that
section of the Action Center, as shown in Figure 18-3.
Most of the items in this area are marked On or OK.
Here’s a brief description of each item under Security:
• Network Firewall: The firewall scans Internet traffic
and blocks activity from programs that don’t have
explicit permission to use Internet access. When
you install a program that uses the Internet, you
may be asked to approve the connection the first
time. The safest practice is to reject online
connections that you don’t initiate or recognize.
• Windows Update: See Chapter 17 for information
on Windows Update.
• Virus Protection: Having virus protection for your
computer is essential. See the task “Install
Antivirus Software,” later in this chapter, for
instructions on making it so.
• Spyware and Unwanted Software Protection: If this
service is on, you have basic protection from
malicious software.
• Internet Security Settings: These settings pertain
to your browser. The default settings may be
adequate. To learn more, see the following tip.
I recommend Using the Internet Safely For Seniors
For Dummies (Wiley Publishing, Inc.), by Nancy
Muir and Linda Criddle, as a guide for helping
you deal with online security confidently.
➟
• User Account Control (UAC): This function notifies
you of programs that try to make changes to your
system and requires that you confirm any such
changes. In particular, UAC lets you know when a
program tries to run or install software that may
be malicious.
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• Network Access Protection (NAP): If this service is
off, that isn’t a problem, unless this computer
connects to a business network that requires NAP
to protect the business network from machines
that aren’t properly protected.
Click to expand Security section.
Click to find antivirus software online.
Figure 18-3
4. Click the Security heading to collapse that section. Then
click the Maintenance heading to see what that section
includes. Among other options, setting up backups is an
item that Windows 7 likes to remind you of. (See
Chapter 19 for information on backing up your data.)
You can click the Maintenance heading to collapse that
section.
➟
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Check the Action Center weekly or monthly to see
whether any new messages have appeared. This is
Windows 7’s primary means of alerting you to
potential problems.
Install Antivirus Software
1. In the Action Center, if Windows didn’t find antivirus
software on your computer, it prompts you to get cracking and get some. You’ll need an Internet connection and
Internet Explorer (IE) for this task. See Chapter 8 for
information about connecting to the Internet and
Chapter 9 for information on using IE.
2. In the Action Center, click the button to Find a Program
Online (refer to Figure 18-3) under the Security heading.
A Web page of Microsoft security software providers
appears in your browser. Each company listed provides
antivirus software. Some of these programs are free; some
operate as an annual subscription. You may click on the
company logo of any of these companies.
For these steps, I lead you through the process of
downloading and installing free avast! antivirus
software, an antivirus product that I recommend
and have used for years.
3. In the IE address bar, type avast and press Ctrl+Enter,
➟
which automatically adds www. and .com to the address.
The Web page shown in Figure 18-4 appears. On the
avast! home page, click the Free Software tab and then
click the Download button under Home Edition. (If
these options don’t appear on the home page, click the
Download navigation button at the top, then Programs,
then Home Edition. Click the Download button.) A
second download page may appear, in which case, click
the Download Now button. Note: Watch out for ads
on these pages that also say download — those other
products are not what you’re after.
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Click to download. Click for free software.
Figure 18-4
4. The IE Information Bar appears below the tab to indicate
IE has blocked the download, as shown in Figure 18-5.
(Don’t worry; this is the normal, precautionary reaction
that you want to happen with IE.) Click the Information
Bar and then click Download File. The File Download
Security Warning appears. Click Save.
Click to continue the download.
Figure 18-5
➟
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5. The Save As dialog box appears. Without changing
anything, click the Save button.
6. After a few seconds, the Download Complete dialog box
appears. Click the Run button. (If this dialog box doesn’t
appear, click the Start button and click Downloads or
type down in the Start menu’s search box and click
Downloads. Double-click avast_home_setup.) The User
Account Control dialog box appears to confirm your
intent to run the setup. Click Yes.
7. In the first avast! Antivirus Setup dialog box (shown in
Figure 18-6), choose your language and click Next. avast!
downloads additional files and shows you another dialog
box. If you’re running any other programs, such as
WordPad or Solitaire, close those programs to reduce
interference with the setup. Click Next.
Choose your language here.
➟
Figure 18-6
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8. The avast! setup continues with a series of dialog boxes.
Your part is simple — see the following table.
This Dialog Box Appears
You Do This
Read Me
Click Next.
License Agreement
Click I Agree, then Next.
Destination
Click Next.
Configuration
Click Next.
Installation Information
Click Next.
The Installation Progress
Nothing.
A pop-up asking if you want to schedule
a boot-time antivirus scan
Click Yes.
Setup Finished
Click Restart and Finish.
9. Windows 7 exits and restarts. Before Windows 7 loads
again — because you clicked Yes to schedule a boot-time
antivirus scan — avast! scans your system for viruses.
Don’t be concerned as filenames flash on the screen
during this process. This could take up to half an hour.
If your antivirus software finds a virus, it may ask you
what to do. The best option is to delete a virus when
it is found. However, some viruses infect documents.
In such a case, you can choose the Quarantine option
if you don’t have a backup copy of the infected
document. Quarantine moves the infected document
to a safe area. You’ll need to search the Web and
download a program that can extract the virus from
the document. It is better to have a backup of your
documents — see Chapter 19 to create a backup
before trouble comes.
➟
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Register Your Antivirus Software
1. After you install antivirus software, the company
providing the software usually offers you the opportunity
to register your software. Registering gives you access to
updates. Antivirus software changes almost daily in the
fight against virus developments.
2. If you followed the steps in the preceding section and
installed avast!, you can proceed with these steps to register it. When avast! finishes the initial scan, Windows 7
starts again. The Welcome to avast! Home Edition dialog
box appears, as shown in Figure 18-7. This dialog box
informs you that you have 60 days to obtain a free registration key. avast! requires a new, free registration key
every 14 months. To obtain the key immediately, click
the link labeled avast! Home Registration Page.
Otherwise, click OK to close the dialog box.
Click this link to register.
Figure 18-7
➟
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3. On the avast! Registration page, click the I’m a New User
link. The next page prompts you for some information.
Enter your e-mail address twice, your name, and your
country. Click the check box to confirm you’ll use the
program at home. Enter the Control Letters that appear
onscreen. Click Register. A confirmation message appears
onscreen, saying that an e-mail message has been sent to
your address. This message contains your license key.
4. Open your e-mail program and look in your inbox for a
message from avast! with your license key. Refer to
Chapter 10 for information on using e-mail.
5. To enter your license key, click the left arrow in the
notification area on the taskbar. Right-click over the
avast! icon. (It’s a white a on a blue circle.) Click
About avast! and click the License Key button in
the About avast! dialog box.
6. If the User Account Control dialog box appears, click
Yes. Then, in the Registration dialog box, enter your
registration key. The easiest and most accurate way to
enter the registration key is to select the key in the
e-mail you received, press Ctrl+C to copy, click in the
Registration text box (shown in Figure 18-8), and press
Ctrl+V to paste. If you can’t copy the key, enter the key as
it appears in the e-mail. Click OK. avast! thanks you;
click OK again.
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Paste your registration key here.
Figure 18-8
7. Return to the Action Center (see the task “Check the
Action Center” for steps). If there are no current issues, the
Security section is collapsed; you can assume all is well.
8. If Virus Protection (under Security) is highlighted, avast!
may need permission to update. Click the Update Now
button. The Action Center may ask “Do You Want to Run
This Program?” as in Figure 18-9. Click the Don’t Show
Me This Again check box and click Yes, I Trust the
Publisher and Want to Run This Program. avast!
downloads and installs updates. From this point on,
avast! automatically installs updates and protects your
computer from virus threats.
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Check here to avoid this message.
Figure 18-9
Scan a Folder or Disk for Viruses
1. Although avast! — or any other antivirus program —
automatically scans for viruses, you may want to
manually scan certain disks or folders, including the
following:
• Flash drive: Always scan a USB flash drive that has
been used with another computer, because flash
drives can carry viruses from one computer to
another.
• Downloads folder: Files in the Downloads folder
have come from the Internet via the browser or
e-mail. Scan this folder before opening downloaded
files or moving files to other folders.
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• Network folder: Although every computer on your
network should be equally protected, you never
know what someone else is doing with his or her
computer, so scan a network folder before opening
or copying files from that folder.
2. To scan a disk for viruses, choose Start➪Computer
(Q+E). Right-click over the disk or flash drive. Choose
Scan. (The avast! icon appears next to this option.) To
scan a folder, right-click over the folder and choose
Scan Folder Name from the shortcut menu, as shown in
Figure 18-10.
Right-click folder or disk.
Click Scan.
Figure 18-10
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3. As the scan begins, the avast! Quick Scanner dialog box
appears. A folder or disk with few files takes just seconds
to scan. A large number of files may take several minutes
to scan. The dialog box disappears automatically, unless
a virus is found. If a virus is found and avast! asks what
to do, choose to delete or quarantine the virus. In most
cases, delete the virus. If you got this infected file from a
friend, warn her to update her antivirus software and run
a scan.
Schedule a Disk Check
1. Hard disks store information in magnetically charged
bits. Over time, hard disks can lose their ability to record
information in random areas. Windows 7 can scan your
hard disk for potential problems. If problems are found,
Windows 7 tries to move data out of the affected area
and marks that area to be avoided for data storage in the
future. To run the error-checking function, choose
Start➪Computer (or press Q+E). Right-click over the
Local Disk (C:) and choose Properties. The General tab
of the Properties dialog box appears, as shown in
Figure 18-11.
If you want to give your hard disk a more interesting
name than Local Disk, type a name in the text box
above Local Disk on the General tab. Click Apply.
The new name appears in Windows Explorer, instead
of Local Disk.
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Give your hard drive a name here.
Figure 18-11
2. Click the Tools tab; then click the Check Now button
in the Error-Checking panel. Figure 18-12 shows the
resulting Check Disk Local Disk (C:) dialog box.
3. The Automatically Fix File System Errors check box
should already be selected. Select the check box called
Scan for and Attempt Recover of Bad Sectors. (The bad
sectors are those weakened or corrupted areas of the disk’s
surface.) Click the Start button.
4. Windows 7 reports that it can’t check the disk while it’s
in use (see Figure 18-13). Click the Schedule Disk Check
button.
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Choose options for your disk check.
Click Start.
Figure 18-12
Click to schedule disk check.
Figure 18-13
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5. The next time you start your computer, the error-checking
function will start before Windows 7 loads. You may see
a message giving you 9 seconds to press any key to
bypass the check. Let the check run without interruption.
A simple text screen of white text on a black background
will indicate progress. The scan could take up to an hour
or so. After the scan is complete, Windows 7 loads normally. You won’t receive any reports, but you can assume
the error-checking function has done its job. Run this test
every couple of months or anytime your computer acts
weird.
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Keeping Your
Data Safe
I
f your computer is stolen, lost, or destroyed,
you can replace it — at a price. But, the
documents and photos you create — your data —
are irreplaceable. Consider how miserable you
might be if you lost a favorite photo or precious document forever.
As you work with your computer, any number
of things can go wrong. Everyone loses something on the computer eventually. This is no
reason to fear, but it is good reason to create
backups, which are duplicates of your data that
you keep in separate storage. You can back up
just your most precious files, all of your files,
or even the entire computer if you have the
space for a very large backup.
➟
Chapter
19
Get ready to . . .
➟ Back Up Your Documents
and Photos ....................... 360
➟ Restore Files from
Backup ............................ 367
➟ Create a System Repair
Disc ................................. 371
➟ Use the System Repair
Disc ................................. 374
In this chapter, you find out how to use
Windows 7’s tools to back up selected data or
everything on your computer. I also show you
how to restore files (put them back on the
computer) and urge you to practice with at
least one file so that you’re ready for the real
drill. You can also follow the steps in this
chapter to create an emergency disc for starting
the computer and repairing problems with
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If you just have a few precious photos or documents,
you can copy those files to a flash drive. See Chapter 4
for those simple steps.
Back Up Your Documents and Photos
1. Open the Start menu and type backup in the Search
Programs and Files text box. Choose Backup and Restore
from the list of matching results. The Backup and Restore
window opens, as shown in Figure 19-1.
Click to set up backup.
Figure 19-1
2. Click the Set Up Backup link. A dialog box shows up and
displays the message Starting Windows Backup.
Wait for this process to finish. The next dialog box allows
you to select where you want to save your backup. If the
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Save Backup On list box is empty, you don’t have a
device to back up to. Suitable backup media, as shown in
Figure 19-2, includes:
• Recordable DVD or CD: This is the option of last
resort, assuming you have no other options. Discs
are less convenient to handle, carry, and store than
other options.
• Memory card: This option uses the same kind of
memory card as digital cameras. If you have a
spare card and a card slot or reader, this may
suffice.
• Flash drive: This option may be better than the
previous options for ease of use and capacity.
• External hard drive: This is the best option. An
external hard drive allows you to back up much
more than any other option, creating a more
complete backup.
If necessary, attach or insert the backup media you intend
to use and click the Refresh button. If [Recommended]
appears next to one of the choices, that’s the one you
should use. If none is recommended, choose the media
with the most free space. Click Next.
Removable media (such as discs, memory cards, and
flash drives) are marked as unsuitable for a system
image. A system image is the most complete backup,
which can be used to restore your entire disk,
including all changes to Windows 7 and all installed
programs, as well as your data. You may be able to
back up your own files — all your documents,
photos, music, and so on — to media that doesn’t
have sufficient room for an entire system image.
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Choose the recommended media option.
Figure 19-2
You can move backward through the Set Up Backup
dialog boxes by clicking the Back button (an arrow
on a blue circle) in the upper-left corner. Use it if you
need to review or change an earlier step.
3. The What Do You Want to Back Up? dialog box appears.
Only one of the two following options may be available,
depending on the backup media you chose earlier:
• Let Windows Choose: Windows 7 backs up all
data files that are in standard libraries and folders
for all users. If the backup media has sufficient
space, a system image is created. Choose this
option if you have an external hard drive attached.
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• Let Me Choose: You select the folders to back up
on the next screen. Only data files are backed up;
files belonging to programs or Windows 7 are not
backed up. This option requires less free space on
the backup media and less time to perform the
backup. However, you risk missing something in
the backup.
Click an option button and then click Next.
4. If you selected Let Windows Choose in the previous step,
skip to the next step.
If you selected Let Me Choose in the previous step, the
What Do You Want to Back Up? dialog box enables you
to select folders to back up, as shown in Figure 19-3. The
data files for your username should remain selected. You
need to select other folders only if you store files outside
the standard Windows 7 user folders. See Chapter 4 for
information on using these standard folders. Click Next.
5. In the next dialog box, review your backup settings. Click
the Change Schedule link, and the How Often Do You
Want to Back Up? dialog box appears, as shown in
Figure 19-4. If you don’t want the backup to run automatically, deselect the Run Backup On a Schedule check
box. If you do want an automatic backup, how often do
you want to do it? Schedule a backup when the computer
is likely to be on but not in heavy use; if you use removable media, such as a flash drive, you need to leave it in
place when the backup is scheduled or be present to
insert the media when it’s needed.
• How Often: A daily backup provides the greatest
insurance against data loss. A weekly backup may
suffice, although you put six days of document
changes at risk if something goes wrong before the
next backup. A monthly backup may not be frequent enough to keep your data safe.
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Select folders to include in the backup.
Figure 19-3
• What Day: If you select Weekly in the previous
option, choose a day of the week. If you select
Monthly, choose a day of the month.
• What Time: What time of day is the computer on
but not in heavy use? For me, that’s lunch- or
dinnertime.
Click OK to close the dialog box.
6. In the Review Your Backup Setting dialog box
(see Figure 19-5), click the Save Settings and Run Backup
button to begin the backup.
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Select to run automatically.
Choose the schedule here.
Figure 19-4
7. The original Backup and Restore window appears with an
indication that the backup is in progress. Click the View
Details button if you want the nitty-gritty; click Close on
the View Details screen to return to this dialog box.
Although you can use the computer during backup,
the process may be faster if you don’t run other programs at the same time. Also, don’t shut down or
turn off the computer until the backup is complete.
Leave your computer on overnight, if necessary.
8. When the backup is complete, the Backup and Restore
window displays the time of the next backup and the
last (previous) backup, which just completed (see
Figure 19-6). At any time after setting up backup, you
can do the following from this window:
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What, when, and where for your backup.
Click here if you’re happy with the settings.
Figure 19-5
• Change Settings: Clicking this link takes you
through all of the preceding steps in this list so
you can adjust when, where, and what you’re
backing up.
• Manage Space: Click this link only if your backup
media is 80 percent full. You can delete older
backups to make room for newer backups.
• Back Up Now: Click this button to run an
unscheduled backup.
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If you don’t want a scheduled backup to run,
click the Turn Off Schedule link on the left side
of the screen. You can still run a backup manually
whenever you like or click the Turn On Schedule
link.
Manage your backups from this window.
Figure 19-6
Restore Files from Backup
1. If you’re lucky, you’ll never need your backup. However,
if you lose a file (or more), you can restore the missing
files from your backup. Consider restoring a file for
practice, just so you have some experience before you
really need to restore a file (under the pressure of loss).
Open the Start menu and type backup in the Search text
box. Choose Backup and Restore from the resulting list.
The Backup and Restore window opens (refer to Figure
19-6). Click the Restore My Files button.
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2. In the Restore Files dialog box (see Figure 19-7), use any
of three ways to locate files or folders you intend to
restore:
• Search: Click this button if you know the filename
but not the location of the original. In the search
dialog box, type part of the name of the file you
intend to restore. Click the found file to select it to
restore. Click Select All if you intend to restore all
the found files. Click OK.
• Browse for Files: Click this button to open a
dialog box of folders. Click the backup name and
then open the folder that contained the original
file. Click the found file to select it to restore. Click
Add Files.
• Browse for Folders: Click this button to open a
dialog box of folders. Click a folder to restore all
the files in that folder. Click Add Folder.
The files you select with the preceding methods appear in
the dialog box. Repeat these steps if you need to select
additional files or folders to restore.
If you can’t find a backup of the file you want to
restore and you made more than one backup, in the
first Restore Files dialog box, click the Choose a
Different Date link. Choose All from the Show
Backups From drop-down list. Pick a backup that is
likely to have the file you intend to restore. You may
have to repeat this process for more than one
backup.
3. After you’ve selected one or more files or folders in the
preceding step, click Next in the original Restore Files
dialog box (shown in Figure 19-7).
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Files you find here...
...appear here.
Figure 19-7
4. The next dialog box (see Figure 19-8) asks for the
location to which you want these files restored:
• In the Original Location: Puts the file back where
it was originally. This is the more likely choice.
• In the Following Location: Allows you to specify
a different location from the original. Use this if
you want the restored file in a different location
from the original. If you choose this option, you
have to specify the new location and indicate
whether you want subfolders to be restored with
the restored files.
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Choose this option, in most cases.
Figure 19-8
5. If you restore a file to a location that already contains a
file of the same name, such as restoring a backup when
the original is still in the folder, you see the dialog box
shown in Figure 19-9. Consider these choices:
• Copy and Replace: The file in the original location will be replaced by the file restored from
backup. Choose this option if the current file is
wrong and the backup is a better file.
• Don’t Copy: The backed-up version isn’t restored.
Nothing changes.
➟
• Copy, But Keep Both Files: The original file
and the restored file will both be in the original
location. The restored file will include (2) in the
filename.
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• Do This for All Conflicts: Select this check box if
you’re restoring multiple files and intend one of
the preceding choices to apply to every file with a
duplicate filename.
Choose what to do with duplicate files.
Select to apply your choice to all duplicates.
Figure 19-9
6. The final dialog box appears. Your files have been
restored. You can click the View Restored Files link,
which opens the folder you restored these files to. Click
Finish to close the dialog box.
Create a System Repair Disc
1. If your computer came with a Windows 7 DVD, you can
use that DVD to start the computer and effect some
repairs, including restoring a system image created in
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Backup and Restore. Restoring a system image resets
everything to the conditions at the time the image was
created, and of course, having a recently created system
image is best. See the earlier task “Back Up Your
Documents and Photos” for instructions on the type of
backup media and choices to make. If you don’t have a
Windows 7 DVD, you need to create a Repair Disc for
this purpose. Open the Start menu and type backup.
Choose Backup and Restore. The Backup and Restore
window opens, as shown in Figure 19-10.
Click here to create your own repair disc.
Figure 19-10
2. Click the Create a System Repair Disc link. The dialog
box shown in Figure 19-11 appears.
3. Insert a blank DVD into your DVD drive. (Look for a
button to open the DVD tray on the front of a desktop or
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around the edge of a laptop. Some computers have a
DVD slot into which you insert the DVD.) Click the
Create Disc button.
Figure 19-11
4. Windows 7 prepares the System Repair Disc. When the
process is done, an informational dialog box pops up,
indicating you should label the disc. Close the message
dialog box. Click OK to close the Create dialog box. Eject
the disc by pressing the button on the computer. Put the
disc in a safe place, where you can find it in an
emergency.
When the disc is done, Windows 7 may start the
AutoPlay dialog box. Close AutoPlay, if it opens.
Many computers come with a Restore Disc from the
computer manufacturer. That disc restores your computer to the exact condition it was in when you
received it (using a restore hard disk partition you
may notice in Windows Explorer). A Restore Disc
isn’t the same as a Windows 7 Repair Disc. You may
want both.
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Use the System Repair Disc
1. If Windows 7 won’t start or starts with significant problems, you may need to use the System Repair Disc to fix
problems. (See the preceding section for instructions to
create a System Repair Disc.) Insert the System Repair
Disc in the DVD drive and restart the computer. If necessary, turn off the power, count to ten, and turn the power
back on.
2. For just a few seconds, the screen displays Press any
key to boot from CD or DVD. Press any key. If
you aren’t quick enough, you’ll have to start the computer again.
3. The screen displays white text on a black background:
Windows is loading files. The first System Recover
Options dialog box appears. Change the keyboard input
method if US isn’t correct. Click Next.
4. The next dialog box indicates System Recover is searching
for Windows installations. Click Next.
5. The next screen offers these choices:
• Use Recovery Tools That Can Help Fix Problems
Starting Windows. Choose this option.
• Restore Your Computer Using a System Image
That You Created Earlier. Choose the other
option unless you’re certain this is the one you
want. (You have a second chance to take this
option after choosing the other.)
6. Click Next.
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7. Choose a Recovery Tool:
• Startup Repair: Automatically fix problems that
are preventing Windows from starting. Choose this
option if Windows 7 won’t start. This option isn’t
likely to do any harm.
• System Restore: Restore Windows to an earlier
time. Choose this option if Windows 7 starts but
you think something significant about how it runs
has changed. This might happen after you install a
new program or update a program. You’ll pick
from a list the most recent restore point based on
date and time. Because this option rolls back
Windows 7 settings, you may lose recent changes
you made to Windows 7 or other programs, but
not your data.
• System Image Recovery: Recover your computer
using a system image you created earlier. Choose
this option if the first two don’t fix a problem and
you have a relatively recent system image. Attach
the backup media you used to create the system
image. (See the earlier task “Back Up Your
Documents and Photos.”) Because this option
rolls back the entire computer to the date and
time the image was created, you’ll lose data created or changed since the image was created,
unless you have that data on a separate device,
such as a flash drive.
• Windows Memory Diagnostic: Check your
computer for memory hardware errors. Choose
this harmless diagnostic if your computer
mysteriously hangs, freezes, or crashes. See
Chapter 18 for information on scheduling a disk
check as a separate measure.
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• Command Prompt: Open a command prompt
window. Use this if you’re familiar with typing
commands at a prompt.
Use the first three options in the order listed, restarting
after each one.
8. After using any of these tools, click Restart. Click Shut
Down if you’ve had enough for now.
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➟
Index
•A•
accessibility
check boxes, selecting with,
312–314
ClearType Text, 309–310
double-clicking, 311–312
Ease of Access Center, 314–316
font size, 307–309
Magnifier, 316–317
miscellaneous settings, 321–322
Narrator, 319–321
On-Screen Keyboard, 317–319
overview, 303
screen visibility, 304–306
accessories
Calculator, 102–103
Clock gadget, 97–100
overview, 95–97
Paint, 107–111
Snipping Tool, 104–107
Sound Recorder, 111–112
Sticky Notes, 112–113
Weather gadget, 100–102
accounts
Amazon, 172
Gmail, 180–184
user, 13–15, 283–284
Action Center, 341–346, 352
activating Windows 7, 24, 326–327
29_509463-bindex.indd 377
active windows, 35–36
Actual Size tool, Photo Viewer,
216–217
Add Gift-Wrap and Write a Free Gift
Message screen, Amazon, 174
Add to Favorites dialog box, 164–166
Add to Shopping Cart button,
Amazon, 170
address bars
Internet Explorer, 155–156,
161–162
Windows Explorer, 70, 72
address book, Gmail, 197–199
Aero Peek feature, 41–42, 287
Aero Themes, 262, 267
All Programs menu, 20–21
Amazon, 168–177
antivirus software, 346–355
Anytime Upgrade program, 12, 337
Archive button, Gmail, 187, 190
arranging windows, 35–37
arrow keys, 219
Attach a File link, Gmail, 193
attachments, e-mail
adding, 193–194
opening, 195–197
viewing, 195–197
AutoComplete Passwords dialog
box, 177
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Windows 7 For Seniors For Dummies
AutoPlay dialog box, 90–91, 118,
134–135, 230
Available Networks dialog box,
145–147
avast! antivirus software,
346–351, 355
•B•
Back to Inbox link, Gmail, 188
Backgammon, 209–211
backing up data
documents, 360–367
on external USB hard drives, 134
overview, 359–360
photos, 360–367
on portable storage devices, 90
restoring files, 367–371
Backspace key, 51–52
bad sectors, 356
Bcc (blind courtesy copy), Gmail,
190, 192
Behaviors drop-down lists,
290–291
Bluetooth, 130
bold text, 54–56
Brushes button, Paint, 109
burn progress bar, Media
Player, 252
Burn tab, Media Player, 249–252
burning CDs, 249–252
Button Configuration option, 279
buttons
dialog box, 64–66
window, 31–32
buying computers, 10–12
➟
•C•
cable
display, 136, 138
Ethernet, 151
Calculator, 102–103
Calendar gadget, 102
cameras, copying photos from,
230–233
Cancel Burn button, Media
Player, 252
canvas, Paint, 107–108
Cc (courtesy copy), Gmail, 190, 192
CDs (compact discs)
burning, 249–252
copying, 243–246
creating, 249–252
ejecting, 242–243
installing programs from, 118–121
playing, 241–243
recordable, 361
ripping, 243–245
check boxes, 67, 312–314
Choose a Billing Address screen,
Amazon, 175
Choose a File to Upload dialog box,
Gmail, 193
Choose a Password field, Gmail, 181
ClearType Text, 309–310
ClickLock option, 280
clicks, mouse. See mouse
Clipboard, 53, 80, 107
Clock gadget, 97–100
Close All Tabs dialog box, 177
Close button, 32, 177
closing Windows 7, 26–28
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Index
colors
mouse pointer, 278
Paint, 109
personalizing, 267–270
Comfy Cakes game, 208–209
Command Prompt, 376
compact discs (CDs)
burning, 249–252
copying, 243–246
creating, 249–252
ejecting, 242–243
installing programs from, 118–121
playing, 241–243
recordable, 361
ripping, 243–245
Compose Mail form, Gmail,
190–191
Computer window
disk checks, 355–356
external devices, 135
installing downloads, 122
opening discs from, 119
removing devices, 89, 91
computers
buying, 10–12
naming, 13–14
protecting, 341–358
turning on, 12–15
confirmation dialog box, 82–83,
125–126
connecting to Internet
anywhere, 144–149
at home, 149–152
overview, 143–144
contacts, Gmail, 197–199
context menus, 4, 19
conversations, Gmail, 190
copying
CDs, 243–246
files/folders, 86–91
folders, 86–91
music to MP3 players, 253–255
photos, 223–224, 230–233
snips, 107
text, 53
courtesy copy (Cc), Gmail, 190, 192
Create a Google Account page,
Gmail, 180–184
Create a New Account button,
Amazon, 172
cropping photos, 225–226
Ctrl key
increasing text size with, 308–309
Narrator controls, 320
selecting multiple items with,
85, 226, 241
cursors, 47–48
Custom installation option, 119, 123
customizing Windows 7
account pictures, 283–284
backgrounds, 264–267
colors, 267–270
icons, 275–277
mouse pointers, 278–283
overview, 261–262
screen savers, 272–275
sounds, 270–272
themes, 262–264, 275
cutting
files from folders, 80–81
text, 53
➟
379
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Windows 7 For Seniors For Dummies
•D•
Date and Time Settings, 15
Delete button
Gmail, 187, 199
Photo Viewer, 218
Delete key, 51–52
deleting
files/ folders, 82–83
links from Favorites Bar, 165
Sticky Notes, 113
text, 51–54
tracks from Media Player
library, 246
Desired Login Name field, Gmail,
180–181
desktop
backgrounds, 264–267
closing Windows 7, 26–28
help, 24–26
icons, 275–277
overview, 9–10, 15–16
photos, displaying, 220–222
Start button, 20–22
taskbar, 22–24
Desktop Background window,
264–267
desktop computers
DVD drive, 256–257
overview, 10
power strips, 28
turning on, 12–13
Desktop Gadget Gallery, 96–97
Desktop Icon Settings dialog box,
275–277
➟
Detect button, 136
device driver, 129, 134, 230, 325
Devices and Printers window,
130–134
dialog boxes, 46, 64–68
discontinuing updates, 336–337
disk checks, scheduling, 355–358
displays
adding second, 135–139
font size, 307–310
overview, 10
screen visibility, 304–306
documents. See also text
backing up, 360–367
copying, 86–91
deleting, 82–83
finding, 75–77
moving, 80–82
opening, 61–64
overview, 45–48
printing, 56–60
recovering, 83–85
renaming, 78–80
saving, 48–51
selecting multiple, 85–86
Documents library, 74, 77–78
double-clicking, 18–19, 279,
311–312
Download link, Gmail, 196
downloading
avast! antivirus, 346–348
photos from cameras, 230–233
Windows upgrades, 337–339
Downloads folder, 122, 196, 353
Drafts folder, Gmail, 193
drop-down lists, 66–67
380
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8/10/09 10:04 PM
Index
duplicate files, 370–371
DVD button, Media Player, 257
DVD drives, adding external,
134–135
DVDs
installing programs from,
118–121
recordable, 361
system repair discs, 371–374
watching, 256–258
Windows 7, 12
EULA (end-user license agreement),
119, 123
executables, 194
Exit Full-Screen Mode button, Media
Player, 258
Express installation option, 119, 123
external DVD drives, 134–135
external hard drives, 128,
134–135, 361
•E•
F1 key, 24
F11 key, 219
Facebook, 212
Favorites Bar, 156, 164–165
Favorites button, 165–166
File menus, 57
files
copying, 86–91
deleting, 82–83
finding, 75–77
moving, 80–82
naming, 48–49
overview, 69, 70–75
recovering, 83–85
renaming, 78–80
selecting multiple, 85–86
fill color, 110
finding files, 75–77
firewalls, 344
Fit to Window tool, Photo Viewer,
216–217
flash drives, 86–91, 353, 361
flipping between windows, 40–43
Folder Options dialog box, 311–313
Ease of Access Center, 314–319,
321–322
editing photos, 222–226
ejecting
CDs, 242–243
DVDs, 258
flash drives, 89–91
memory cards, 89–91
e-mail
accounts, setting up, 180–184
address book, 197–199
from Amazon, 176
attachments, 193–197
creating, 190–193
Inbox, 184–188
junk, 199–200
overview, 179–180
replying, 188–190
spam, 180, 187, 199–200
Enable Web History check box,
Gmail, 182
error-checking function, 355–358
Ethernet, 151
•F•
➟
381
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Windows 7 For Seniors For Dummies
folders
copying, 86–91
deleting, 82–83
overview, 69, 77–78
recovering, 83–85
renaming, 78–80
selecting multiple, 85–86
Font Color button, WordPad, 55
Font drop-down list, WordPad, 56
Font panel, WordPad, 54–56
fonts, 54–56, 307–309
formatting text, 54–56
Free-form Snip, 105
•G•
gadgets
Clock, 97–100
overview, 16, 95–97
Weather, 100–102
games
Games Explorer, 204–205
getting more, 211–212
Internet Backgammon, 209–211
overview, 203–204
Purble Place, 208–209
Solitaire, 21–25, 30–32, 40–41,
206–208, 291–292
Gmail
accounts, setting up, 180–184
address book, 197–199
attachments, 193–197
creating messages, 190–193
Inbox, 184–188
junk e-mail, 199–200
overview, 179–180
➟
replying to messages, 188–190
spam, 180, 187, 199–200
Google News, 161
groups, Gmail, 198–199
•H•
hard disks, 355–356
hard drives, 69, 128, 134–135, 361
help resources, 24–26
Hibernate option, 28, 295
Hide Icon and Notifications option,
290–291
Highlight button, WordPad, 55
History option, Calculator, 103
home networks, 148
home page, 154, 163
Home Premium Edition, Windows,
11–12
Horizontal Scrolling option, 282
hotspots, 144
hovering, 18
hyperlinks (hypertext links)
in e-mails, 193, 200
locating, 157–161
opening in new tabs, 162
overview, 154
•I•
icon tray, 23–24
icons, desktop, 16
IE (Internet Explorer)
closing, 177
favorites, 164–166
home page, 163–164
news, 157–161
382
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Index
overview, 154–157
searching, 167–168
shopping, 168–177
tabs, 161–163
Image panel, Paint, 224
images
backgrounds, 264–267
backing up, 360–367
copying from digital cameras,
230–233
desktop display, 220–222
editing, 222–226
naming, 233–234
organizing, 233–234
overview, 213–214
Paint, 111, 222–226
printing, 226–229
rotating, 218
screen saver, 272–274
slideshows, 218–220
viewing, 214–218
importing pictures from cameras,
230–234
inactive windows, 35–36
Inbox, Gmail, 184–188
installing
antivirus software, 346–349
ISP hardware, 150–152
printers, 132
programs, 118–124
updates, 329–330
Internet. See also Web
connecting to, 15, 143–152
installing programs from,
121–124
Internet Backgammon, 209–211
Internet Explorer (IE)
closing, 177
favorites, 164–166
home page, 163–164
news, 157–161
overview, 154–157
searching, 167–168
shopping, 168–177
tabs, 161–163
Internet Security Settings, 344
Internet service provider (ISP), 150
italic text, 54–56
•J•
Jump Lists, 20, 62–63, 293–295
junk e-mail, 199–200
•K•
keyboard
Backspace key, 51–52
Delete key, 51–52
dialog boxes, navigating via, 68
Ease of Access Center options
for, 322
F1 key, 24
F11 key, 219
keystrokes, 45
Shift key, 52
shortcuts, 4, 22
slideshow controls, 219
Windows logo key, 22
keystroke logger, 342
•L•
Labels button, Gmail, 187
Landscapes theme, 263
➟
383
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Windows 7 For Seniors For Dummies
laptop computers
CD drive, 241
DVD drive, 256–257
Internet connections, 144–145
overview, 10
second display, adding, 136–137
shutting down, 28
touchpads, 17, 20
turning on, 12–13
wireless Internet connections, 150
libraries
Documents library, 74, 77–78
Music library, 293–241
overview, 74
Pictures library, 214, 284
links
in e-mails, 193, 200
locating, 157–161
opening in new tabs, 162
overview, 154
lists, dialog box, 66
login name, Gmail, 180–181
Loop button, Media Player,
237–238
•M•
Magnifier, 316–317, 321
Maximize button, 31
Media Player
copying CDs, 243–246
copying music to MP3 players,
253–255
creating CDs, 249–252
DVDs, 256–258
overview, 235
pictures, 255–256
➟
playing CDs, 241–243
playing music, 236–239
playlists, 247–249
selecting music, 239–241
memory cards, 86–91, 230, 361
Memory Diagnostic tool, 375
menu bar, 32
menus
context, 4, 19
dialog box, 66
selecting options from, 18
mice. See mouse
microphone, 111, 128
Microsoft Update site, 334–335
Microsoft XPS Document Writer,
130, 197
Minimize button, 31
Mobility Center, 137–138,
145–146, 149
modems, 150–151
monitors
adding second, 135–139
font size, 307–310
overview, 10
screen visibility, 304–306
More Actions button, Gmail, 187
mouse
click and drag process, 19–20,
80–81, 85–86, 107–108
double-clicking, 18–19, 311–312
modifying behavior of, 322
overview, 4, 17–20
pointers, 17–19, 278–283
selecting text, 53
mouse pads, 17
Move To button, Gmail, 187
384
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Index
moving
e-mail, 187
files, 80–82
text, 51–54
MP3 players
copying music to, 253–255
creating files for, 245
music
copying to MP3 players, 253–255
playing, 236–239
selecting, 239–241
Music library, 239–241
Mute/Unmute button, Media Player,
237–238, 258
muting sound, 237–238, 258, 271
My Contacts, Gmail, 197
My Documents folder, 74
My Pictures folder, 233
My Themes heading, 262
•N•
naming
computers, 13–14
favorite links, 165
files, 78–80
folders, 78–80
hard disks, 355
photos, 233–234
user names, 13–14
wireless networks, 146
NAP (Network Access
Protection), 345
Narrator, 319–321
Navigation pane
Media Player, 239
Windows Explorer, 71–72
netbooks, 11, 12–13
Network Access Protection
(NAP), 345
Network Firewall item, 344
Network folder, 354
network security keys, 147–148
networks. See Internet
New Contact button, Gmail, 197
New Folder button, 77
New Tab button, 161
Newer link, Gmail, 188
Newseum Web site, 157–160
Next button
Media Player, 237–238, 258
Photo Viewer, 217
Notepad program, 33–35
Notification area, 23–24
Notification Area Icons window,
289–291
Now Playing mode, Media Player,
237–238, 241–242
•O•
office networks, 148
OK button, 64–65
Older link, Gmail, 188
On-Screen Keyboard, 317–319
Open As a Google Document link,
Gmail, 196
Open dialog box, WordPad, 63–64
operating systems, defined, 9
•P•
Page Setup dialog box, WordPad,
66–67
Paint, 107–111, 213, 222–226
panning photos, 216
➟
385
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Windows 7 For Seniors For Dummies
paper for printing, 228–229
passwords
Amazon, 172
AutoComplete Passwords dialog
box, 177
Gmail, 181–182
Internet connections, 144,
147–148
user accounts, 14–15
pasting
files into folders, 80, 82
text, 53
patches, security, 325
Payment page, Amazon, 174–175
peripherals, 127
personalizing Windows 7
account pictures, 283–284
backgrounds, 264–267
colors, 267–270
icons, 275–277
mouse pointers, 278–283
overview, 261–262
screen savers, 272–275
sounds, 270–272
themes, 262–264, 275
Photo Gallery, 216, 229
Photo Viewer, 215–218, 232–233
photos
backgrounds, 264–267
backing up, 360–367
copying from digital cameras,
230–233
desktop display, 220–222
editing, 222–226
naming, 233–234
organizing, 233–234
overview, 213–214
➟
Paint, 111, 222–226
printing, 226–229
rotating, 218
screen saver, 272–274
slideshows, 218–220
viewing, 214–218
Picasa, 216
Pictures library, 214, 284
pinning icons
to Start menu, 300–301
to taskbar, 291–292
Play pane, Media Player, 247–249
Play Slide Show button, Photo
Viewer, 217
playing
CDs, 241–243
DVDs, 256–258
music, 236–239
playlists, 247–249
Play/Pause button, Media Player,
237–238, 257
Pointer Options tab, 280–281
pointing device, 17, 128
pop-up notifications, 321
Power Button Action options, 295
power strips, 28
power switches, 12–13, 28
Previous button
Media Player, 237–238, 257
Photo Viewer, 216–217
Print dialog box, 58–60,
65–66, 134
Print Pictures dialog box, 226–229
Print Preview option, WordPad,
57–58
printers, connecting, 132–134
386
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Index
printing
documents, 56–60
photos, 213, 226–229
Privacy options, 296
Proceed to Checkout button,
Amazon, 170–171
product key, 327
programs
Help menus, 24–25
installing, 118–124
inventory, 116–118
overview, 115–116
removing, 124–126
Start menu, 20–22
starting, 95
taskbar, 22–23
protecting computers
Action Center, 342–346
antivirus software, 346–355
disk checks, 355–358
overview, 341–342
public networks, 144, 148
Purble Place, 208–209
purchasing computers, 10–12
•Q•
Quarantine option, 349
Quick Tabs button, 162
•R•
radio buttons, 66–67
recordable DVDs/CDs, 361
recovering files/folders, 83–85
Recovery Tools, 374–376
Rectangular Snip, 106
Recycle Bin, 16, 83–85, 276
redo actions, 51
registering programs, 120, 123,
350–353
Remember Me on This Computer
check box, Gmail, 182
removing programs, 124–126
Rename option, 79
Reply button, Gmail, 188
Reply to All option, Gmail, 188
Report Spam button, Gmail,
187, 200
Resign button, Internet
Backgammon, 211
Resize and Skew dialog box, Paint,
224–225
resize pointer, 33–35
Resolution drop-down list, 305
Restore button, 31
Restore Discs, 373
restoring files, 83–85, 367–372
ribbon toolbar, 35–36, 54–57
Rip CD screen, Media Player,
244–245
Rip Settings button, Media Player,
244–245
Rip Status column, Media Player,
245–246
ripping CDs, 243–246
rotating photos, 218
routers, wireless, 150
•S•
Safe To Remove Hardware message,
89–91
Sample Pictures folder, 214–215,
220–221, 226
➟
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Save As dialog box, 48–50, 112,
223–224
Save Changes button, 266–267
Save List button, Media Player,
248–249
Save Now button, Gmail, 190
Save Theme As dialog box, 275
saving
documents, 48–51
themes, 275
scanners, 128
scheduling
backups, 363–367
disk checks, 355–358
Scheme drop-down list, 278–279
Scrabble, 212
screen reader, 319
screen resolution, 135–139,
304–308
screen savers, 272–275
screens
adding second, 135–139
font size, 307–310
overview, 10
visibility, 304–306
scrolling, 17, 157–158, 282
search engines, 167–168
Search Help box, 25–26
Search Programs and Files box,
21–22, 61–62, 118
security
Action Center, 342–346
antivirus software, 346–355
disk checks, 355–358
financial transactions online, 171
installing downloads, 123–124
junk mail, 200
opening e-mail attachments, 196
overview, 341–342
passwords, 14–15, 172, 177
public networks, 148
wireless Internet connections, 146
Security heading, 344–345, 352
security patches, 325
Security Question list, Gmail, 182
Select tool, Paint, 225–226
selecting
with check boxes, 312–314
multiple files/folders, 85–86
music, 239–241
text, 51–54
Send button, Gmail, 190
Send To option, 88
Set as Desktop Background
option, 221
Set Up Backup link, 360
Set Up Games dialog box, 204
Set Up Windows Internet Explorer
dialog box, 154
Shapes button, Paint, 110
Shift key, 52
shipping information, Amazon,
172–173
shopping via Web, 168–177
Show Color Mixer option, 268
Show Desktop button, 221
Show Icon and Notification
option, 290
Show Only Notifications option, 291
Show Windows Side by Side
option, 40
➟
388
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Index
Show Windows Stacked option,
39–40
Shuffle button, Media Player,
237–238
Shut Down button, 26–28, 295
Sign In Using Our Secure Server
button, Amazon, 171–172
Size drop-down list, WordPad, 56
sizing
icons, 276
mouse pointers, 278
photo prints, 226–228
Sticky Notes, 113
windows, 33–35
Sleep option, 28, 295
slideshows, 217–220, 274
Snap To option, 280–281
snapping windows, 37–39
Snipping Tool, 104–107
Solitaire, 21–25, 30–32, 40–41,
206–208, 291–292
Sound Recorder, 111–112
sounds
personalizing, 270–272
visual notifications for, 322
spacebar, 219
spam, 180, 187, 199–200
speaker icon, 271
spyware, 342, 344
stacking windows, 39–40
Start Burn button, Media Player, 251
Start button, 20–22
Start menu
customizing, 295–300
overview, 285–286
pinning icons to, 300–301
Start Sync button, Media Player,
254–255
Starter Edition, Windows, 11, 23, 43
Startup Repair tool, 375
status bar, 24, 32, 156
Sticky Notes, 112–113
Stop button, Media Player,
237–238, 257
Stop Recording button, 111–112
strikethrough text, 54–56
subfolders, 69
subscripts, 54–56
superscripts, 54–56
Sync pane, Media Player, 253–255
synchronizing music to MP3 players,
253–255
system image, 361, 371–372,
374–375
system notification messages,
288–291
System Repair Disc, 371–376
System Restore tool, 375
•T•
Tablet PC Input Panel, 319
tabs
dialog box, 66
Internet Explorer, 161–163
tags, photo, 231
taskbar
changing, 286–288
Jump Lists, 293–295
overview, 22–24, 285–286
pinning icons to, 291–292
system notification messages,
288–291
➟
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Windows 7 For Seniors For Dummies
Terms of Service, Gmail, 184
text
adding, 51–54
bold, 54–55
deleting, 51–54
formatting, 54–56
Gmail, 192
italics, 54–55
moving, 51–54
Paint, 109
selecting, 51–54
sizing, 308
Sticky Notes, 112–113
strikethrough, 55
subscript, 55
superscript, 55
underline, 55
text boxes, 66–67
themes
overview, 262–264
saving, 275
thumb drives (flash drives), 86–91,
353, 361
thumbnails, 23
tiling windows, 38–40
Time Zone box, 98–99
Tip icons, 3
title bar, 31, 36–39
To field, Gmail, 191
toolbar, 32
tooltips, 18, 24, 269
touchpads, 17, 20
trackballs, 17
transparency, 267
Trash folder, Gmail, 199–200
triangle button, 26–28, 295
➟
turning on computers, 12–15
turntable, USB, 246
typeface. See fonts
•U•
UAC (User Account Control), 344
Ultimate Edition, Windows, 12
underlined text, 54–56
undo actions, 51, 80
Uniform Resource Locator
(URL), 154
uninstalling programs, 124–125
updating Windows 7
overview, 325–326
Windows Anytime Upgrade,
337–339
Windows Update, 328–332,
336–337
upgrading to Windows 7, 12
URL (Uniform Resource
Locator), 154
USB devices, 87, 128–130, 246
User Account Control (UAC), 344
user accounts
creating, 13–14
passwords, 14–15
pictures for, 283–284
user folder, 70–71
user names, 13–14
•V•
Vertical Scrolling option, 282
video cameras, 128
video files, 194
View as HTML link, Gmail, 196
390
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Index
View Full Screen button, Media
Player, 258
View link, Gmail, 196
Virus Protection item, 344
viruses, 341–342, 349, 353–355
Visibility options, 281
visual notifications for sounds, 322
Volume button, Media Player,
237–238, 258
volume controls, 237–238, 258, 271
•W•
Weather gadget, 100–102
Web
Amazon, 168–177
favorites, 164–166
home page, 163–164
Internet Explorer, 154–157, 177
news, 157–161
overview, 153–154
searching, 167–168
shopping, 168–177
tabs, 161–163
Web browser
closing, 177
favorites, 164–166
home page, 163–164
news, 157–161
overview, 153–157
searching, 167–168
shopping, 168–177
tabs, 161–163
Web-based e-mail, 179
webcams, 128
wheels, mouse, 17, 282
Win key (Windows logo key), 22
Window Color and Appearance
window, 267–270
windows
arranging, 35–37
flipping between, 40–43
overview, 29–43
parts of, 30–32
resizing, 33–35
snapping, 37–39
stacking, 39–40
tiling, 39–40
Windows Anytime Upgrade,
12, 337–339
Windows Explorer, 70–76
Windows Live Photo Gallery,
216, 229
Windows logo key (Win key), 22
Windows Media Audio (WMA)
files, 245
Windows Media Player
copying CDs, 243–246
copying music to MP3 players,
253–255
creating CDs, 249–252
DVDs, 256–258
overview, 235
pictures, 255–256
playing CDs, 241–243
playing music, 236–239
playlists, 247–249
selecting music, 239–241
Windows Memory Diagnostic
tool, 375
Windows Mobility Center, 137–138,
145–146, 149
Windows Photo Viewer, 215–218,
232–233
➟
391
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Windows 7 For Seniors For Dummies
Windows Update, 328–332,
336–337, 344
wired Internet connections, 150
wireless Internet connections,
144–149
wireless mouse, 17
wireless router, 150
WMA (Windows Media Audio)
files, 245
Word Verification field, Gmail, 184
WordPad. See also text
closing, 60–61
dialog boxes, 64–68
opening documents, 61–64
overview, 46–48
printing documents, 56–60
saving documents, 48–51
wrapped text, 47
•X•
X button, 32, 177
XPS Document Writer, 130, 197
•Z•
Zoom button, Photo Viewer,
216–217
➟
392
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8/10/09 10:04 PM
Business/Accounting
& Bookkeeping
Bookkeeping For Dummies
978-0-7645-9848-7
eBay Business
All-in-One For Dummies,
2nd Edition
978-0-470-38536-4
Job Interviews
For Dummies,
3rd Edition
978-0-470-17748-8
Resumes For Dummies,
5th Edition
978-0-470-08037-5
Stock Investing
For Dummies,
3rd Edition
978-0-470-40114-9
Successful Time
Management
For Dummies
978-0-470-29034-7
Computer Hardware
BlackBerry For Dummies,
3rd Edition
978-0-470-45762-7
Computers For Seniors
For Dummies
978-0-470-24055-7
iPhone For Dummies,
2nd Edition
978-0-470-42342-4
Laptops For Dummies,
3rd Edition
978-0-470-27759-1
Macs For Dummies,
10th Edition
978-0-470-27817-8
Cooking & Entertaining
Cooking Basics
For Dummies,
3rd Edition
978-0-7645-7206-7
Wine For Dummies,
4th Edition
978-0-470-04579-4
Diet & Nutrition
Dieting For Dummies,
2nd Edition
978-0-7645-4149-0
Nutrition For Dummies,
4th Edition
978-0-471-79868-2
Weight Training
For Dummies,
3rd Edition
978-0-471-76845-6
Digital Photography
Digital Photography
For Dummies,
6th Edition
978-0-470-25074-7
Gardening
Gardening Basics
For Dummies
978-0-470-03749-2
Hobbies/General
Chess For Dummies,
2nd Edition
978-0-7645-8404-6
Organic Gardening
For Dummies,
2nd Edition
978-0-470-43067-5
Drawing For Dummies
978-0-7645-5476-6
Green/Sustainable
Green Building
& Remodeling
For Dummies
978-0-4710-17559-0
Green Cleaning
For Dummies
978-0-470-39106-8
Green IT For Dummies
978-0-470-38688-0
Health
Diabetes For Dummies,
3rd Edition
978-0-470-27086-8
Food Allergies
For Dummies
978-0-470-09584-3
Living Gluten-Free
For Dummies
978-0-471-77383-2
Knitting For Dummies,
2nd Edition
978-0-470-28747-7
Organizing For Dummies
978-0-7645-5300-4
SuDoku For Dummies
978-0-470-01892-7
Home Improvement
Energy Efficient Homes
For Dummies
978-0-470-37602-7
Home Theater
For Dummies,
3rd Edition
978-0-470-41189-6
Living the Country Lifestyle
All-in-One For Dummies
978-0-470-43061-3
Solar Power Your Home
For Dummies
978-0-470-17569-9
Photoshop Elements 7
For Dummies
978-0-470-39700-8
Available wherever books are sold. For more information or to order direct: U.S. customers visit www.dummies.com or call 1-877-762-2974.
U.K. customers visit www.wileyeurope.com or call (0) 1243 843291. Canadian customers visit www.wiley.ca or call 1-800-567-4797.
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Internet
Blogging For Dummies,
2nd Edition
978-0-470-23017-6
eBay For Dummies,
6th Edition
978-0-470-49741-8
Facebook For Dummies
978-0-470-26273-3
Google Blogger
For Dummies
978-0-470-40742-4
Web Marketing
For Dummies,
2nd Edition
978-0-470-37181-7
WordPress For Dummies,
2nd Edition
978-0-470-40296-2
Language & Foreign
Language
French For Dummies
978-0-7645-5193-2
Italian Phrases
For Dummies
978-0-7645-7203-6
Spanish For Dummies
978-0-7645-5194-9
Spanish For Dummies,
Audio Set
978-0-470-09585-0
Macintosh
Mac OS X Snow Leopard
For Dummies
978-0-470-43543-4
Parenting & Education
Parenting For Dummies,
2nd Edition
978-0-7645-5418-6
Self-Help & Relationship
Anger Management
For Dummies
978-0-470-03715-7
Type 1 Diabetes
For Dummies
978-0-470-17811-9
Overcoming Anxiety
For Dummies
978-0-7645-5447-6
Pets
Cats For Dummies,
2nd Edition
978-0-7645-5275-5
Sports
Baseball For Dummies,
3rd Edition
978-0-7645-7537-2
Chemistry For Dummies
978-0-7645-5430-8
Dog Training For Dummies,
2nd Edition
978-0-7645-8418-3
Basketball For Dummies,
2nd Edition
978-0-7645-5248-9
Microsoft Office
Excel 2007 For Dummies
978-0-470-03737-9
Puppies For Dummies,
2nd Edition
978-0-470-03717-1
Golf For Dummies,
3rd Edition
978-0-471-76871-5
Office 2007 All-in-One
Desk Reference
For Dummies
978-0-471-78279-7
Religion & Inspiration
The Bible For Dummies
978-0-7645-5296-0
Web Development
Web Design All-in-One
For Dummies
978-0-470-41796-6
Math & Science
Algebra I For Dummies
978-0-7645-5325-7
Biology For Dummies
978-0-7645-5326-4
Calculus For Dummies
978-0-7645-2498-1
Music
Guitar For Dummies,
2nd Edition
978-0-7645-9904-0
Catholicism For Dummies
978-0-7645-5391-2
Women in the Bible
For Dummies
978-0-7645-8475-6
Windows Vista
Windows Vista
For Dummies
978-0-471-75421-3
iPod & iTunes
For Dummies,
6th Edition
978-0-470-39062-7
Piano Exercises
For Dummies
978-0-470-38765-8
Available wherever books are sold. For more information or to order direct: U.S. customers visit www.dummies.com or call 1-877-762-2974.
U.K. customers visit www.wileyeurope.com or call (0) 1243 843291. Canadian customers visit www.wiley.ca or call 1-800-567-4797.
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How-to?
How Easy.
Go to www.Dummies.com
From hooking up a modem to cooking up a
casserole, knitting a scarf to navigating an iPod,
you can trust Dummies.com to show you how
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spine=.8160”
Operating Systems/Windows
• What’s on the taskbar
• Directions for creating and
saving documents
• Steps for installing a printer
and other peripherals
®
You don’t need a grandchild to teach you Windows 7 —
with this friendly guide, you’ll be using the mouse,
working with folders, hooking up a printer, and
cruising the Internet in nothing flat. Learn to use all the
gizmos that come with Windows 7, shop online, view
a slideshow of your favorite photos, send e-mail to a
friend, enjoy music, and more!
Open the book and find:
Windows 7 For Seniors
You can learn to use Windows,
get online, and start
doing things today!
g Easier!
Making Everythin
• How to connect to the Internet
anywhere
• Tour the desktop — learn to use menus, the Start menu
button, files, and folders
• Backgammon and other games
you can play online
• Do it — create notes and letters, connect a printer, download
photos from your digital camera, and put music on a CD
• Guidance on protecting your
computer from viruses
• Have some fun — discover Solitaire and other built-in
games, listen to music, and watch a movie
• How to send e-mail
attachments
• Use the accessories — display Gadgets on your desktop,
draw with Paint, and use the Calculator
• Advice on backing up
documents and photos
• To keep or not — install additional programs you want and
remove those you don’t need
• Protect your Windows — learn to use the Action Center,
download and install virus protection software, and keep it
up to date
• Have it your way — make your screen easier to see, open
files with a single click, and even have your computer read
to you
7
s
w
o
Wind
s
r
o
i
n
e
For S
®
Learn to:
• Use the Windows 7 desktop and
create your first documents
Go to Dummies.com®
for videos, step-by-step examples,
how-to articles, or to shop!
• Connect to the Internet and
browse the Web
• The wide, wide Web — shop and explore online and learn to
stay safe
• View, edit, and print photos
• Keep in touch by e-mail and play
games online
$24.99 US / $29.99 CN / £17.99 UK
Mark Justice Hinton teaches all kinds of technology from
digital photography to HTML. He maintains a blog at
www.mjhinton.com/help where he answers questions from
his readers, and he is also the author of Digital Photography
For Seniors For Dummies.
™
ISBN 978-0-470-50946-3
Mark Justice Hinton
Hinton
Author of Digital Photography
For Seniors For Dummies
Download PDF

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