On
160,
ARRL 10 Meter Contest
2011 Results
By Scott Tuthill, K7ZO
"Hey , look, it's a DX Contest again!" -- WQ5L
The 39th annual ARRL 10 Meter Contest was held on
December 10-11, 2011. After tantalizing us in 2010 with
what might be, the band broke wide open for deserving
operators worldwide. Conditions were the best since just
after the peak of the last solar cycle in 2002. What an onthe-air party was celebrated by all!
Activity
Nothing attracts operators of all interests like a wide
open 10 meter band. Low power and small antennas
generate contacts far and wide. Whether operating for
competition or fun, when open, 10 meters is a great place
to hang out. As a picture of how open the band was
check out EA6VQ's DXSherlock map from 16:45 UTC
Saturday below. That solid mass of long red and green
lines means operators were really enjoying themselves by
making QSOs all over the world.
DX Sherlock 28 MHz real time QSO map at 16:45 UTC Saturday.
(www.dxsherlock.info) Map courtesy of Gabriel EA6VQ.
The 2011 contest attracted operators like no other 10
Meter Contest in history. An absolutely unbelievable
5,361 logs were entered this year! This count more than
2011 ARRL 10 Meter Contest Results
doubled last year's total of 2,474 and was 70% higher
than the previous record in 2002.
For further
comparison, the 2011 ARRL DX Phone contest set an
all-time mark with 3,343 logs submitted. The 10 Meter
Contest exceeded that by more than 2,000! Continuing
the comparison, all the logs submitted for the 2011
ARRL DX Phone contest contained 1.49 million QSOs
across all six bands. Submitted 10 Meter Contest logs
contained 1.95 million QSOs as a single-band contest. Of
course the 10 Meter Contest has an advantage in that you
can make contacts on both CW and phone but still, a lot
of people had a lot of fun over the weekend. The average
log contained 363 QSOs this year compared to 153 in
2010.
Another notable milestone was achieved with the 2011
edition. For the first time ever the 2,692 DX logs
submitted exceeded the 2,669 from W/VE/XE! DX logs
more than tripled from 2010 driven by a genuine
explosion from Europe where logs entered jumped from
380 in 2010 to 1,763 in 2011. Solid growth continues
from Asia as well where logs entered increased from 191
to 550.
As far as operating categories goes, the Single-Operator,
Low Power (SOLP) categories continue to be the most
popular, making up just over half of all log submissions.
For DX operators the CW-Only categories were most
popular while for W/VE/XE the Phone-Only categories
were most popular. Overall, Phone-Only entrants
exceeded CW-Only entrants in 2011, capturing the top
spot back after CW-Only moved into first for the first
time ever in 2010. For 2011 the big category news was
the creation of the Multioperator, Low Power (MOLP)
category. Filling the role of both a true Multioperator
category as well as a Single-Operator Mixed-Mode
Assisted category it proved to be quite popular with 512
logs submitted worldwide. From first impressions it
looks like we have a real winner here. When combined
with the Multioperator, High Power (MOHP) category it
propelled total Multioperator entries ahead of total
Single-Operator, Mixed Mode entries. During the
previous 38 runnings of this contest the Multioperator
category was always a distant last place to the other
three.
Extended Version 1.2
Page 1 of 22
Top Ten, USA
Mixed Mode, QRP
K9OM
490,732
W7YAQ
310,232
WA6FGV
298,016
W7IV
263,700
W2MF
253,572
W6AQ
192,780
K7XC
163,184
N6WG
145,140
KS4X
119,574
WB2AMU
107,670
Mixed Mode, Low Power
N8OO
1,719,968
N8II
1,368,380
N1UR
1,255,872
KU2M
1,121,328
K2PS
914,746
N5DO
885,204
N7ZG
824,724
N6ZFO
781,776
KØTT
767,980
K7SS
714,776
Mixed Mode, High Power
KM3T
3,018,720
N2NT
2,737,742
NQ4I (VE7ZO, op) 1,920,036
K6LL
1,702,350
WØAIH (NE9U, op) 1,696,320
K3ZO
1,657,136
K1UO
1,606,500
KF6T
1,501,464
WB9Z
1,443,204
WC6H
1,375,776
Phone Only, QRP
KE2OI
142,296
NØNI
127,676
K6OO
84,390
K6MI
80,408
KB5KYJ
66,000
N8XA/P
63,896
W8QZA
61,824
WA7PVE
44,160
WWØWB
36,696
WB7OCV
33,200
Phone Only, Low Power
K7ULS
321,624
KTØDX
294,128
N7FLT
278,576
AC5O
271,880
W1TJL
224,640
N7XS
218,622
N9ISN
215,320
KC6AWX
200,376
N9TGR
199,836
W3PAW
193,980
Phone Only, High Power
KK1KW (WW1WW, op)
771,426
W5PR
690,018
K5TR (WM5R, op) 649,428
NA3D
600,372
W6YI
573,540
W1SJ
564,062
WO4DX
529,104
K4NV
520,880
K8CC (N8NX, op) 456,030
KQØC
445,516
CW Only, QRP
KR2Q
333,792
W6JTI
265,024
KØLUZ
252,720
NØUR
249,260
AA1CA
231,648
W7FB
175,740
KE5AKL
169,988
K4LTA
161,600
K3TW
161,092
K2SM
150,800
CW Only, Low Power
WA1Z
812,000
W3BGN
799,488
KH6ZM
749,320
W2ID
597,104
N4WW (N4KM, op) 550,400
WD4AHZ
516,880
NA8V
495,040
WQ5L
493,120
K9WZB
491,616
N4ZI
491,040
CW Only, High Power
K1TO
1,409,952
NN1N
1,347,720
N2IC
1,322,980
W1WEF
1,307,496
K8AZ (K8NZ, op) 1,262,400
K1RM
1,256,736
W5KFT (K5PI, op) 1,253,904
KD4D
1,248,000
K5NA
1,202,624
NY3A
1,197,364
2011 ARRL 10 Meter Contest Results
Multioperator, High Power
K1LZ
3,635,992
NR5M
3,000,024
W2RE
2,865,160
K1WHS
2,734,200
NX5M
2,512,200
K9CT
2,483,824
K3WW
2,169,680
WX3B
2,143,854
W6YX
2,087,120
KØDU
2,084,064
Multioperator, Low Power
KD2RD
1,326,080
W7TVC
733,176
W1WBB
585,752
KO3T
574,864
N4CJ
568,920
K4MM
489,632
KA2D
396,312
K4ABB
372,292
K2DFC
363,636
KØRC
353,212
Extended Version 1.2
Top Ten, Canada
Mixed Mode, QRP
VE6BIR
59,128
VE3XTI
39,840
Mixed Mode, Low Power
VE3CX
257,174
VE4YU
234,472
VE3IAE
221,078
VE7WO
203,294
VX2AWR (VE2AWR, op)
189,810
VE5UO
186,456
VE9ML
182,972
VE5SF
159,160
VE1ZA
122,472
VE1JS
115,920
Mixed Mode, High Power
VY2TT (K6LA, op) 2,392,420
VX6WQ
1,817,202
VA2EW
1,513,920
VE3KZ
1,161,072
VE3MMQ
929,106
VE3FGU
738,344
VE6TL
317,408
VE4EAR
246,344
VE2FXL
19,716
VE2DC
12,596
Phone Only, QRP
VX4MM
93,956
VA7IR
75,844
VE3HG
13,300
VE3FCT
7,896
VE6SKY
5,304
Phone Only, Low Power
VA3YP
264,186
VE4TV
190,512
VE8GER
108,758
VA3PC
99,990
VE3VE
70,512
VE3TU
57,428
VE1SQ
41,412
VE3JOC
23,246
VA3GD
21,700
VE7WWW
20,634
Phone Only, High Power
VO1KVT
403,182
VA6UK
143,528
VE3CR
125,240
VA3ZDX
108,192
VE2JM
89,792
VE3KPP
67,404
VE2/K1ZM
2
Page 2 of 22
CW Only, QRP
VY2OX
74,456
VA3RJ
18,096
VE6EX
15,504
VA3RKM
9,324
VE2KOT
7,424
VE3MO
4,428
VE3WZ
2,280
VA3WR
1,872
VE3IGJ
640
CW Only, Low Power
VA2WA (VA2WDQ, op)
772,680
VE3DZ
681,408
VO1TA
515,280
VE3KI
400,384
VE3ZT
320,032
VE1RGB
230,520
VA3EC
227,772
VE7JKZ
192,192
VA7RN
171,976
VA7DZ
160,704
CW Only, High Power
VY2ZM
1,638,972
VE9AA
1,062,560
VE5UF
865,032
VE3EY
813,852
VE3EK
768,600
VE7XF
593,400
VY2SS
558,240
VE6WP
369,228
VA7ST
348,288
VE2SG
313,200
Multioperator, High Power
VE5MX
1,717,056
VE1OP
1,231,808
VE3EJ
715,350
VA3DX
628,002
VE6AO
607,260
VE3RZ
420,966
VE3MM
309,684
VE7AX
174,150
VE9HF
74,592
VE3MV
56,358
Multioperator, Low Power
VA7BEC
591,840
VE6FI
217,516
VE3XAT
167,272
VE4EA
134,160
VE3AD
107,748
VE7IO
94,612
VE3CWU
77,376
VE2EBK
74,688
VA3DF
65,730
VO1HP
35,984
Top Ten, Mexico
Mixed Mode, QRP
No Entries
Mixed Mode, Low Power
XE1L
122,944
XE2GG
109,968
XE2YWH
84,224
XE1SVT
63,744
XE1FZE
42,624
XE2HWB
26,480
XE1RZL
21,888
XE3DX
480
Mixed Mode, High Power
XE2K
740,520
XE1GRR
36,448
Phone Only, QRP
XE2JA
95,892
XE1RCS (XE1ODG, op)
34,128
XE1AKM
992
Phone Only, Low Power
XE1B
518,256
XE3N
279,628
XE2O
150,660
XE1ZTW
69,168
XE1AO
61,992
XE1J
43,540
XE1GZU
20,488
XE3OAC
8,282
XE1AJ
6,640
XE2PXT
420
Phone Only, High Power
XE1CWJ
321,216
XE2HUQ
175,120
XE1EE
132,430
XE1R
82,056
XE1MW
76,800
XE1OGG
55,176
CW Only, QRP
XE3WMA
2,944
CW Only, Low Power
XE1AY
134,048
XE1CT
82,896
XE2MX
30,444
CW Only, High Power
XE1MM
525,600
XE2S
279,444
Multioperator, High Power
XE2X
392,524
XE2B
93,744
Multioperator, Low Power
XE2AU
163,200
XE2FGC
39,312
XE2CRH
39,308
XE2VHF
38,482
XE2WK
960
XE2MVs
416
XE1BRX
220
Top Ten, DX
Mixed Mode, QRP
ON6AB
261,416
EA1GT
130,626
CT2IOV
123,970
UX1UX
116,340
UX8ZA
84,660
SP3PL
73,632
4M2L (YV5YMA, op)
69,388
RT4W
65,846
JM2RUV
61,200
9A2EY
55,610
Mixed Mode, Low Power
PY2EX
1,578,528
EA8OM
835,176
C4Z (5B4AIZ, op) 826,084
DL4MCF
581,240
RL6M
579,006
7Z1SJ
564,596
JA6WFM
562,536
CR5A (CT1FFU, op)
537,358
RA1AL
480,110
OR2F
479,520
Mixed Mode, High Power
ZM2V (AI6V, op)
1,735,344
VP5CW (W5CW, op)
1,661,868
NH2DX (KG6DX, op)
1,640,640
ZF2AH
1,506,816
EA6SX
1,474,908
VK4CT (VK4EMM, op)
1,470,016
UW1M (UR5MW, op)
1,331,652
3G3FZ (CE3FZ, op) 1,240,492
OE8Q (OE8SKQ, op)
1,159,380
JT5DX (JT1CO, op) 1,016,024
Phone Only, QRP
KP4KE
282,274
TG9ANF
266,304
R7NA
100,416
LU1VK
34,768
R2AD
29,952
I5KAP
25,792
CT2JBG
22,512
SN5R (SP5XMU, op)
22,080
JR6HMJ
21,616
VK4ATH
21,080
2011 ARRL 10 Meter Contest Results
Extended Version 1.2
Phone Only, Low Power
HI3TEJ
790,152
EA8MT
610,450
PU2LEP
449,334
CO6LC
324,104
IQ9BT (IT9SPB, op) 317,966
CM8AKD
284,160
VK4LAT
261,632
LW7DUC
249,776
CA3SOC
238,290
LU6FOV
232,078
Phone Only, High Power
KP2A (KW8N, op) 1,131,248
LP1H (LU5HM, op) 1,192,794
CE3CT
1,133,508
V25R (K6IF, op)
1,127,232
GW9T (MWØZZK, op)
884,722
CT3FQ
835,536
PQ5B (PP5JD, op) 792,582
GM5X
750,708
ZX2B (PY2MNL, op)
718,740
TMØT
709,770
CW Only, QRP
EU1AA
181,280
JA1YNE (JR1NKN, op)
170,016
AY9F (LU5FZ, op) 149,380
RU7A
126,080
US5VX
104,580
PY4ZO
100,584
UA6LCJ
85,008
YO8DDP
79,800
DF1DX
73,272
UA9AB
67,584
CW Only, Low Power
CE2/VE7SV
1,328,000
KP2MM (N2TTA, op)
730,592
GIØRQK
678,368
YT9A
662,088
EA8CN
618,552
ZL1GO
502,500
9A3VM
491,064
HGØR (HAØNAR, op)
460,256
XR3A (CE3DNP, op)
434,436
RW9QA
415,800
Page 3 of 22
CW Only, High Power
LU1HF
2,001,136
CE1/K7CA
1,597,280
ZM1A (ZL3CW, op) 1,428,336
EF5Y (EA5GTQ, op)
1,130,112
PY2ZEA (OH2MM, op)
1,057,536
G3TXF
1,046,900
ZC4LI
968,772
HA1AG
943,020
EI7KD
917,280
JF1SQC
870,756
Multioperator, High Power
D4C
4,351,000
CW5W
3,615,656
EF8R
3,565,078
PY2NDX
3,420,348
HK1NA
3,306,360
LS1D
3,235,680
CX5BW
3,123,778
EI7M
2,859,864
PJ2T
2,758,288
CR6K
2,717,242
Multioperator, Low Power
TI5N
2,565,348
PY1GQ
1,676,196
ZY2C
1,292,830
4Z5MU
1,092,180
LU5DX
1,040,160
EA6BF
783,272
YT2F
764,568
LU2EE
641,240
EF1D
615,660
V63QQ
590,006
Version 1.2 of this article corrects
the Phone Only, High Power Top
Ten table. KP2A (KW8N, op) was
the World High score and
mistakenly omitted from the Top
Ten, DX tables, although correctly
shown in the Continental Leaders
table. We regret the omission.
Division Winners
Mixed Mode
Atlantic
Central
Dakota
Delta
Great Lakes
Hudson
Midwest
New England
Northwestern
Pacific
Roanoke
Rocky Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
West Gulf
Canada
Mexico
W2MF
AF9J
no entry
KS4X
N8HP
WB2AMU
WØMRZ
W1AN
W7YAQ
K7XC
K4KSR
NS7K
K9OM
WA6FGV
AA5CK
VE6BIR
no entry
Atlantic
Central
Dakota
Delta
Great Lakes
Hudson
Midwest
New England
Northwestern
Pacific
Roanoke
Rocky Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
West Gulf
Canada
Mexico
K2PS
W9AV
KØTT
N8OO
K8BL
KU2M
KTØK
N1UR
N7ZG
N6ZFO
N8II
WØETT
N4OX
W7ZR
N5DO
VE3CX
XE2GG
Atlantic
Central
Dakota
Delta
Great Lakes
Hudson
Midwest
New England
Northwestern
Pacific
Roanoke
Rocky Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
West Gulf
Canada
Mexico
K3ZO
WØAIH (NE9U, op)
WAØMHJ
N4ZZ
N8LJ
N2NT
KØDEQ
KM3T
K7ABV
KF6T
K4EU
KO7X
NQ4I (VE7ZO, op)
K6LL
N5NA
VY2TT (K6LA, op)
XE2K
Phone Only
253,572
40,992
CW Only
Multioperator, High Power
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Atlantic
Central
Dakota
Delta
Great Lakes
Hudson
Midwest
New England
Northwestern
Pacific
Roanoke
Rocky Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
West Gulf
Canada
Mexico
KE2OI
WB9FOL
NDØC
N3AWS
N8XA/P
AA2VK
NØNI
WA1JG
WA7PVE
K6OO
NO4FX
WWØWB
KS4GW
W8QZA
KB5KYJ
VX4MM
XE2JA
142,296
30,806
25,160
20,776
63,896
17,160
127,676
1,302
44,160
84,390
18,172
36,696
12,540
61,824
66,000
93,956
95,892
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Atlantic
Central
Dakota
Delta
Great Lakes
Hudson
Midwest
New England
Northwestern
Pacific
Roanoke
Rocky Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
West Gulf
Canada
Mexico
K2SM
AI9K
NØUR
K4LTA
N8AP
KR2Q
W7FB
AA1CA
K5UJU
W6JTI
KI4FW
KE5AKL
KØLUZ
N7IR
K2DG
VY2OX
XE3WMA
150,800
39,104
249,260
161,600
83,296
333,792
175,740
231,648
54,752
265,024
65,056
169,988
252,720
99,856
47,280
74,456
2,944
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
Atlantic
Central
Dakota
Delta
Great Lakes
Hudson
Midwest
New England
Northwestern
Pacific
Roanoke
Rocky Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
West Gulf
Canada
Mexico
914,746
198,852
767,980
1,719,968
583,232
1,121,328
612,750
1,255,872
824,724
781,776
1,368,380
543,536
551,200
493,652
885,204
257,174
109,968
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
Atlantic
Central
Dakota
Delta
Great Lakes
Hudson
Midwest
New England
Northwestern
Pacific
Roanoke
Rocky Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
West Gulf
Canada
Mexico
W3PAW
N9ISN
WBØTSR
AC5O
NF8J
KS2G
KAØFSP
W1TJL
N7FLT
KC6AWX
AD4L
K7ULS
WB4JFS
NF7E
W5TMC
VA3YP
XE3N
193,980
215,320
78,606
271,880
124,938
106,680
93,480
224,640
278,576
200,376
103,032
321,624
114,608
149,240
123,420
264,186
279,628
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
Atlantic
Central
Dakota
Delta
Great Lakes
Hudson
Midwest
New England
Northwestern
Pacific
Roanoke
Rocky Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
West Gulf
Canada
Mexico
W3BGN
W9PN
K7RE
WQ5L
NA8V
W2ID
KU1CW
WA1Z
AB7R
KH6ZM
K4ORD
W2UP
N4WW (N4KM, op)
K9WZB
W5MT
VA2WA (VA2WDQ, op)
XE1AY
799,488
288,932
345,420
493,120
495,040
597,104
273,000
812,000
420,648
749,320
226,432
394,128
550,400
491,616
325,728
772,680
134,048
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
Multioperator, Low Power
Atlantic
KO3T
574,864
Central
KF9US
90,948
Dakota
KØRC
353,212
Delta
NO4Q
159,120
Great Lakes
AA8IA
132,300
Hudson
KD2RD
1,326,080
Midwest
WØIW
105,450
New England
W1WBB
585,752
Northwestern
W7TVC
733,176
Pacific
K6EI
178,064
Roanoke
K4FPF
161,024
Rocky Mountain
K5WO
289,280
Southeastern
N4CJ
568,920
Southwestern
N6MA
66,368
West Gulf
WDØGTY
57,456
Canada
VA7BEC
591,840
Mexico
XE2AU
163,200
1,657,136
1,696,320
1,185,664
1,135,304
116,644
2,737,742
425,862
3,018,720
415,488
1,501,464
1,071,968
427,330
1,920,036
1,702,350
609,120
2,392,420
740,520
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
Atlantic
Central
Dakota
Delta
Great Lakes
Hudson
Midwest
New England
Northwestern
Pacific
Roanoke
Rocky Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
West Gulf
Canada
Mexico
NA3D
N7US
NXØX
N4QWZ
K8CC (N8NX, op)
WU2X
NØUU
KK1KW (WW1WW, op)
W7ZB
K6HNZ
NN4F
KQØC
WO4DX
W6YI
W5PR
VO1KVT
XE1CWJ
600,372
358,316
423,660
212,772
456,030
111,890
141,180
771,426
361,120
348,480
306,592
445,516
529,104
573,540
690,018
403,182
321,216
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
Atlantic
Central
Dakota
Delta
Great Lakes
Hudson
Midwest
New England
Northwestern
Pacific
Roanoke
Rocky Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
West Gulf
Canada
Mexico
KD4D
K9BGL
NEØU
KN5O
K8AZ (K8NZ,op)
N2UN
KV1E
NN1N
N9RV
KH7Y
K4VV (K4ZA, op)
N2IC
K1TO
AA7A
W5KFT (K5PI, op)
VY2ZM
XE1MM
1,248,000
846,144
809,904
921,728
1,262,400
512,960
208,896
1,347,720
988,344
1,159,968
951,600
1,322,980
1,409,952
772,200
1,253,904
1,638,972
525,600
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
119,574
100,576
107,670
55,444
83,224
310,232
163,184
1,224
76,140
490,732
298,016
13,776
59,128
2011 ARRL 10 Meter Contest Results
Extended Version 1.2
Page 4 of 22
W2RE
K9CT
KDØS
WO4O
W8MJ
N1EU
NØMA
K1LZ
NK7U
W6YX
K4FJ
KØDU
W4UH
N7DD
NR5M
VE5MX
XE2X
2,865,160
2,483,824
1,643,600
927,360
1,870,506
615,480
614,978
3,635,992
1,475,760
2,087,120
1,864,506
2,084,064
1,843,968
1,753,224
3,000,024
1,717,056
392,524
Regional Leaders
Category: A = Mixed Mode, B = Phone only, C = CW only, D = Multioperator
Northeast Region
Southeast Region
Central Region
Midwest Region
West Coast Region
New England, Hudson and
Atlantic Divisions; Maritime
and Quebec Sections
Delta, Roanoke and
Southeastern Divisions
Central and Great Lakes
Divisions; Ontario Section
Dakota, Midwest, Rocky
Mountain and West Gulf
Divisions; Manitoba and
Saskatchewan Sections
Pacific, Northwestern
and Southwestern
Divisions; Alberta,
British Columbia and
NWT Sections
W2MF
WB2AMU
N2XP
W1AN
W1VT
N1UR
KU2M
K2PS
N1IX
W6AAN
KM3T
N2NT
VY2TT (K6LA, op)
K3ZO
K1UO
KE2OI
WB7OCV
AA2VK
W2WGK
W3EK
W1TJL
W3PAW
W2TF
N1IXF
KX1X
KK1KW (WW1WW, op)
NA3D
W1SJ
N8RA
N3HBX
KR2Q
AA1CA
K2SM
K3RR
WO2N
WA1Z
W3BGN
VA2WA (VA2WDQ, op)
W2ID
VO1TA
VY2ZM
NN1N
W1WEF
K1RM
KD4D
253,572
107,670
94,080
83,224
75,088
1,255,872
1,121,328
914,746
664,104
553,316
3,018,720
2,737,742
2,392,420
1,657,136
1,606,500
142,296
33,200
17,160
16,680
9,408
224,640
193,980
188,232
172,928
114,048
771,426
600,372
564,062
425,664
407,970
333,792
231,648
150,800
132,916
132,800
812,000
799,488
772,680
597,104
515,280
1,638,972
1,347,720
1,307,496
1,256,736
1,248,000
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
K1LZ
W2RE
K1WHS
K3WW
WX3B
3,635,992
2,865,160
2,734,200
2,169,680
2,143,854
KD2RD
W1WBB
KO3T
KA2D
K2DFC
1,326,080
585,752
574,864
396,312
363,636
2011 ARRL 10 Meter Contest Results
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
K9OM
KS4X
K9TM
WI4R
NT4TS
N8OO
N8II
K1HTV
N4YDU
N4OX
NQ4I (VE7ZO, op)
N4ZZ
K4EU
K4BAI
K5RQ
N3AWS
NO4FX
KC5WA
WC4J
KS4GW
AC5O
WB4JFS
WA8QYJ
AD4L
K4PZC
WO4DX
K4NV
W4SVO
NN4F
AG4W
KØLUZ
K4LTA
K3TW
KI4FW
N4AU
N4WW (N4KM, op)
WD4AHZ
WQ5L
N4ZI
WB4TDH
K1TO
K4TD
N4BP
K4VV (K4ZA, op)
KN5O
490,732
119,574
91,616
54,498
28,644
1,719,968
1,368,380
606,424
581,380
551,200
1,920,036
1,135,304
1,071,968
1,024,832
1,017,648
20,776
18,172
15,456
15,048
12,540
271,880
114,608
105,776
103,032
94,794
529,104
520,880
400,722
306,592
221,308
252,720
161,600
161,092
65,056
59,616
550,400
516,880
493,120
491,040
487,760
1,409,952
994,788
971,040
951,600
921,728
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
D
D
D
D
D
K4FJ
W4UH
N4PN
K5KG
W4MLB
1,864,506
1,843,968
1,426,992
1,373,700
1,112,436
E
E
E
E
E
N4CJ
K4MM
K4ABB
K4FPF
NO4Q
568,920
489,632
372,292
161,024
159,120
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
N8HP
KU4A
AF9J
VE3XTI
K8BL
N8VV
VE3CX
VE3IAE
W9AV
WØAIH (NE9U, op)
WB9Z
VE3KZ
W9XT
VE3MMQ
N8XA/P
WB9FOL
WD9FTZ
VE3HG
VE3FCT
VA3YP
N9ISN
N9TGR
NF8J
WB9PUB
K8CC (N8NX, op)
W8JUZ
N7US
W9NY
WD8EOL
100,576
97,970
40,992
39,840
583,232
262,800
257,174
221,078
198,852
1,696,320
1,443,204
1,161,072
1,139,496
929,106
63,896
30,806
14,592
13,300
7,896
264,186
215,320
199,836
124,938
116,800
456,030
366,080
358,316
287,280
138,762
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
Q
Q
Q
Q
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
N8AP
K2YAZ
WA8REI
WA8RJF
AI9K
VE3DZ
NA8V
K8AJS
VE3KI
VE3ZT
K8AZ (K8NZ, op)
W5MX
K9BGL
NE8P
VE3EY
83,296
44,604
42,560
39,104
39,104
681,408
495,040
416,256
400,384
320,032
1,262,400
1,054,488
846,144
830,560
813,852
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
D
D
D
D
D
K9CT
W8MJ
W9IU
N2BJ
W8TA
2,483,824
1,870,506
1,136,432
877,824
784,520
E
E
E
E
E
VE3XAT
AA8IA
K8GT
VE3AD
KF9US
167,272
132,300
122.08
107,748
90,948
Extended Version 1.2
NS7K
WØMRZ
WØPWE
KØOU
KB7QOS
N5DO
KØTT
W5GAI
KTØK
WØETT
WAØMHJ
KBØEO
N5NA
KO7X
KØDEQ
NØNI
VX4MM
KB5KYJ
WWØWB
NDØC
K7ULS
KTØDX
VE4TV
WØLSD
W5TMC
W5PR
K5TR (WM5R, op)
KQØC
NXØX
WA5ZUP
NØUR
W7FB
KE5AKL
KØPK
NØAX
W2UP
K7RE
K7VU
W5MT
K9BWI
N2IC
W5KFT (K5PI, op)
K5NA
VE5UF
NEØU
76,140
55,444
45,500
18,124
15,984
885,204
767,980
660,300
612,750
543,536
1,185,664
961,590
609,120
427,330
425,862
127,676
93,956
66,000
36,696
25,160
321,624
294,128
190,512
154,294
123,420
690,018
649,428
445,516
423,660
365,932
249,260
175,740
169,988
105,576
50,264
394,128
345,420
327,488
325,728
310,608
1,322,980
1,253,904
1,202,624
865,032
809,904
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
D
D
D
D
D
NR5M
NX5M
KØDU
VE5MX
KDØS
3,000,024
2,512,200
2,084,064
1,717,056
1,643,600
E
E
E
E
E
KØRC
K5WO
KØRI
NØJHZ
KØPC
353,212
289,280
260,604
215,930
149,760
W7YAQ
WA6FGV
W7IV
W6AQ
K7XC
N7ZG
N6ZFO
K7SS
N7LOX
W7ZRC
VX6WQ
K6LL
KF6T
WC6H
K9YC
K6OO
K6MI
VA7IR
W8QZA
WA7PVE
N7FLT
N7XS
KC6AWX
NF7E
KH6CJJ
W6YI
W7ZB
K6HNZ
N7UQ
W7LEA
W6JTI
N7IR
AE9F
K5UJU
WA6L
KH6ZM
K9WZB
AB7R
K7HP
AB7E
KH7Y
N9RV
K7BG
K7NV
KB7Q
310,232
298,016
263,700
192,780
163,184
824,724
781,776
714,776
685,102
536,576
1,817,202
1,702,350
1,501,464
1,375,776
996,410
84,390
80,408
75,844
61,824
44,160
278,576
218,622
200,376
149,240
147,420
573,540
361,120
348,480
322,420
275,412
265,024
99,856
75,600
54,752
34,692
749,320
491,616
420,648
379,200
378,576
1,159,968
988,344
873,252
853,120
829,668
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
D
D
D
D
D
W6YX
N7DD
K6EZ
W7RN
NK7U
2,087,120
1,753,224
1,720,680
1,653,460
1,475,760
D
D
D
D
D
E
E
E
E
E
W7TVC
VA7BEC
N7XU
VE6FI
K6EI
733,176
591,840
237,956
217,516
178,064
E
E
E
E
E
Page 5 of 22
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
Continental Leaders
Category: A = Mixed Mode, B = Phone only, C = CW only, D = Multioperator
Africa
CT9/DL2TM
Asia
17,760
A
QRP
EA8OM
835,176
A
EA8BQM
Europe
North America
Oceania
South America
JM2RUV
61,200
A
QRP
ON6AB
261,416
A
QRP
J68UN
267,120
A
LP
ZL3NB
24,640
A
LP
4M2L (YV5YMA, op)
69,388
A
QRP
LP
RA0AY
37,288
A
QRP
EA1GT
130,626
A
QRP
NP3CW
95,550
A
LP
ZL4NR
19,760
A
LP
PU5ATX
46,784
A
QRP
2,736
A
LP
PY2EX
1,578,528
A
LP
154
A
LP
PY1NB
166,160
A
LP
326,700
A
LP
R9DX
22,260
A
QRP
CT2IOV
123,970
A
QRP
HP3FTD
8,120
A
LP
DU7HF
CT3KN
85,746
A
LP
7K1CPT
12,464
A
QRP
UX1UX
116,340
A
QRP
FG1PP
7,400
A
LP
YC1BJX
EA8CQW
77,066
A
LP
BD4WM
10,730
A
QRP
UX8ZA
84,660
A
QRP
VP5CW (W5CW, op)
1,661,868
A
HP
ZM2V (AI6V, op)
1,735,344
A
HP
PU5AAD
142,272
A
LP
ZS2NF
73,656
A
LP
C4Z (5B4AIZ, op)
826,084
A
LP
DL4MCF
581,240
A
LP
ZF2AH
1,506,816
A
HP
NH2DX (KG6DX, op)
1,640,640
A
HP
PY6KY
120,650
A
LP
5Z4EE
51,336
A
HP
7Z1SJ
564,596
A
LP
RL6M
579,006
A
LP
FM5CD
9,408
A
HP
VK4CT (VK4EMM, op)
1,470,016
A
HP
YW5T (YV5JBI, op)
98,724
A
LP
CT3HF
14,792
A
HP
JA6WFM
562,536
A
LP
CR5A (CT1FFU, op)
537,358
A
LP
KP4KE
282,274
B
QRP
ZK2V (GM3WOJ, op)
808,080
A
HP
3G3FZ (CE3FZ, op)
1,240,492
A
HP
392
B
QRP
JG1AVO
454,272
A
LP
RA1AL
480,110
A
LP
TG9ANF
266,304
B
QRP
ZM4M
296,400
A
HP
PY7ZY
52,256
A
HP
EA8MT
610,450
B
LP
UN6P
HP
EC8CQ
99,540
B
LP
JT5DX (JT1CO, op)
EA8/RW3DO
83,160
B
LP
23,296
B
EA8BUE
CN8VO
447,580
A
LP
OR2F
479,520
A
LP
HI3TEJ
790,152
B
LP
VK4ATH
21,080
B
QRP
PP5JY
42,600
A
1,016,024
A
HP
EA6SX
1,474,908
A
HP
CO6LC
324,104
B
LP
YBØNSI
9,620
B
QRP
PY2WAS
18,720
A
HP
JS6RGY
757,080
A
HP
UW1M (UR5MW, op)
1,331,652
A
HP
CM8AKD
284,160
B
LP
YCØOHG
2,744
B
QRP
LU1VK
34,768
B
QRP
100,200
B
LP
JR1AIB (JH5GHM, op)
725,088
A
HP
OE8Q (OE8SKQ, op)
1,159,380
A
HP
FG4NO
LP
VK4LAT
261,632
B
LP
CE3WYZ
5,070
B
QRP
22,594
B
LP
RT9T
724,160
A
HP
DK6XZ (E77XZ, op)
977,076
A
HP
KP4RV
42,336
B
LP
DU1IVT
108,080
B
LP
PU2LEP
449,334
B
LP
CT3FQ
835,536
B
HP
RG9A
681,910
A
HP
UW5Q (UR3QCW, op)
959,500
A
HP
KP2A (KW8N, op)
1,341,248
B
HP
YB1AR
87,660
B
LP
LW7DUC
249,776
B
LP
EA9IE
604,810
B
HP
JR6HMJ
21,616
B
QRP
R7NA
100,416
B
QRP
V25R (K6IF, op)
1,127,232
B
HP
DU1LC
30,702
B
LP
CA3SOC
238,290
B
LP
CT3DZ
275,058
B
HP
BD4AAS
9,240
B
QRP
R2AD
29,952
B
QRP
CO8ZZ
391,288
B
HP
VK4NDX
25,668
B
LP
LU6FOV
232,078
B
EF8F (EA8CER, op)
58,560
B
HP
JA2MWV
7,920
B
QRP
I5KAP
25,792
B
QRP
FM5AN
85,478
B
HP
KH2JU
210,420
B
HP
YV5KG
218,880
B
LP
ZS5NK
10,450
B
HP
JR2EKD
6,474
B
QRP
CT2JBG
22,512
B
QRP
KP4JRS
36,994
B
HP
9M6DXX
63,656
B
HP
LP1H (LU5HM, op)
1,192,794
B
HP
EA8CN
618,552
C
LP
BD4HY
440
B
QRP
SN5R (SP5XMU, op)
22,080
B
QRP
KP2MM (N2TTA, op)
730,592
C
LP
VK3AVV
37,556
B
HP
CE3CT
1,133,508
B
HP
5C5W (CN8KD, op)
375,664
C
LP
HZ1BW
157,776
B
LP
IQ9BT (IT9SPB, op)
317,966
B
LP
FM/F6AUS
380,600
C
LP
VK3GK
36,656
B
HP
PQ5B (PP5JD, op)
792,582
B
HP
5X1NH
369,528
C
LP
JH7RTQ
104,346
B
LP
F5OWT
221,136
B
LP
J39BS
286,760
C
LP
T88WJ
26,400
B
HP
ZX2B (PY2MNL, op)
718,740
B
V51YJ
361,128
C
LP
JA7BEW
97,440
B
LP
HA4XH
189,500
B
LP
KP2/K9MA
153,216
C
LP
ZL1GO
502,500
C
LP
AY8A (LU8ADX, op)
572,160
B
HP
V5/DJ4SO
299,172
C
LP
JH0JDV
58,950
B
LP
CU2AF
175,760
B
LP
NP4Z
1,996,400
D
HP
YB1ALL
277,248
C
LP
AY9F (LU5FZ, op)
149,380
C
QRP
ZS6A
144,352
C
HP
R9UAG
46,764
B
LP
GØAEV
171,864
B
LP
TI5N
2,565,348
D
LP
ZL1TM
255,360
C
LP
PY4ZO
100,584
C
QRP
D4C
4,351,000
D
HP
B7P
624,660
B
HP
GW9T (MWØZZK, op)
884,722
B
HP
CO2CW
567,580
D
LP
DV1/JO7KMB
137,632
C
LP
LU1WI
18,228
C
QRP
EF8R
3,565,078
D
HP
JA7OWD
333,248
B
HP
GM5X
750,708
B
HP
CO8CY
376,992
D
LP
VK2PN
90,000
C
LP
PP5BZ
17,712
C
QRP
91,640
D
HP
BX5AA
312,394
B
HP
TMØT
709,770
B
HP
KP2B
297,850
D
LP
ZM1A (ZL3CW, op)
1,428,336
C
HP
PP5VX
A61BK
277,016
B
HP
PI4DX (PD2R, op)
575,248
B
HP
YS1GR
62,400
D
LP
ZL3TE (W3SE, op)
543,360
C
HP
CE2/VE7SV
UP2L (UN9LG, op)
251,560
B
HP
EA1DR
551,936
B
HP
NH2T (N2NL, op)
502,680
C
HP
JA1YNE (JR1NKN, op)
170,016
C
QRP
EU1AA
181,280
C
QRP
VK4IU
32,648
C
UA9AB
67,584
C
QRP
RU7A
126,080
C
QRP
ZL3PAH
14,432
RU9UN
43,616
C
QRP
US5VX
104,580
C
QRP
VK4WIL
JH3DMQ
38,076
C
QRP
UA6LCJ
85,008
C
QRP
ZL5ØGH
JH8FAJ
38,060
C
QRP
YO8DDP
79,800
C
QRP
VK2GGC
RW9QA
415,800
C
LP
GIØRQK
678,368
C
LP
5B/RN3QO
396,180
C
LP
YT9A
662,088
C
LP
JA7IC
385,840
C
LP
9A3VM
491,064
C
LP
VU2BGS
338,252
C
LP
HGØR (HAØNAR, op)
460,256
C
LP
RT9S
295,200
C
LP
SP1NY
386,888
C
LP
ZC4LI
968,772
C
HP
EF5Y (EA5GTQ, op)
1,130,112
C
JF1SQC
870,756
C
HP
G3TXF
1,046,900
JG1ILF
764,920
C
HP
HA1AG
JE1CKA
659,964
C
HP
EI7KD
JA5FBZ
638,448
C
HP
EA4TX
RU0FM
983,876
D
HP
JA6WIF
964,656
D
UA9CDV
886,894
JS3CTQ
791,040
RL9AA
4Z5MU
ZS6GRL
CT3BD
HP
16,544
C
QRP
1,328,000
C
LP
XR3A (CE3DNP, op)
434,436
C
LP
HP
LU8QT
383,264
C
LP
C
HP
LW5HR
240,680
C
1,321,672
D
HP
LU5FR
235,840
C
LP
355,950
D
HP
LU1HF
2,001,136
C
HP
156,468
D
HP
CE1/K7CA
1,597,280
C
HP
YB2DX
94,628
D
HP
PY2ZEA (OH2MM, op)
1,057,536
C
HP
DU1/JJ5GMJ
68,970
D
HP
PJ4LS
653,796
C
HP
V63QQ
590,006
D
LP
LU3DAT
496,848
C
HP
ZL3GA
75,200
D
LP
CW5W
3,615,656
D
HP
VK4IZ
72,590
D
LP
PY2NDX
3,420,348
D
HP
HP
HK1NA
3,306,360
D
HP
C
HP
LS1D
3,235,680
D
HP
943,020
C
HP
CX5BW
3,123,778
D
HP
917,280
C
HP
PY1GQ
1,676,196
D
LP
862,224
C
HP
ZY2C
1,292,830
D
LP
EI7M
2,859,864
D
HP
LU5DX
1,040,160
D
LP
HP
CR6K
2,717,242
D
HP
LU2EE
641,240
D
LP
D
HP
TM6M
2,419,054
D
HP
PY3YD
374,400
D
LP
D
HP
4O3A
2,065,338
D
HP
783,692
D
HP
ED1R
2,023,988
D
HP
1,092,180
D
LP
EA6BF
783,272
D
LP
VR2ZQZ
408,842
D
LP
YT2F
764,568
D
LP
RM9RZ
321,832
D
LP
EF1D
615,660
D
LP
JA7YCQ
305,748
D
LP
OK2PAY
473,680
D
LP
E21EIC
286,936
D
LP
YTØA
377,060
D
LP
Version 1.1 of the extended writeup corrects the Continental Leaders table that contained mis-sorted data in version 1.0. The text of the writeup is not affected.
2011 ARRL 10 Meter Contest Results
LP
Extended Version 1.2
Page 6 of 22
LP
Looking around the world, logs were received from more
than 230 different DXCC entities and W/VE/XE
sections. This is truly a global contest. More logs than
from any other area were received from those
quintessential contesters in Japan with 267. They were
closely followed by Germany‟s 242 logs and European
Russia„s 239 logs. Looking for the most active W/VE/XE
sections, honors goes to Virginia with 106 logs received
followed by Minnesota with 92. If you live in Minnesota
and it's the second weekend in December it must be a
good time to be on the radio! Minnesota only has about
two-thirds the ham population Virginia does so they were
out in force. Of particular interest in Asia were the 50
logs received from China -- up from 5 in 2009 and 8 in
2010. Their activity now exceeds that from many
stalwart European countries such as Portugal, Hungary,
Switzerland, Norway, and Finland. With 1.3+ billion
citizens, might China someday become the #1 contesting
country? Since the ban on Amateur Radio in China was
lifted in 1992 the number of licensed operators climbed
to 500 in the year 2000, 3,500 in the year 2003 and shot
up to 20,000 in 2010. Though they still only have as
many hams as Ontario or North Carolina, the trend is
strong.
Who were the most energetic and active contesters?
Which operators sit down, keep their butts in the chair,
and make a large number of contacts? Looking at those
entities from which five or more logs were received the
honors go to none other than Cuba. The five logs
submitted from Cuba averaged 1,272 QSOs each – a
great effort from CM8AKD, CO2CW, CO6LC, CO8CY,
and CO8ZZ. If you wanted to work Cuba and you were
within propagation range I bet they were in your log. In
second place were the 11 stations from Ireland that
averaged 894 QSOs each followed by a tie for third place
between 6 stations from Saskatchewan and 11 from
Alberta who averaged 847 QSOs each. Like Minnesota,
if you live in Saskatchewan or Alberta and it is the
second weekend in December it is probably not a bad day
to spend some time on the radio!
All in all, the 2011 edition of the contest was a whole
bunch of fun. For the more competitive of you, those
aiming to set records and or winning your category, it
was a pretty good contest for you as well.
Records, Records and more Records
Not only did operators have fun in 2011 but they set
records all over the place. Wow, were there records set!
Driven by the triple factors of more sunspots, the new
MOLP category, and the continuing benefit of 32 new
XE multipliers, a total of 432 new all-time records were
set at the DXCC entity and W/VE/XE section level.
Looking at it another way, almost 1 in every 12 logs
2011 ARRL 10 Meter Contest Results
contained a record score and 1 in every 5 DXCC and
W/VE/XE section records was set in 2011!
Comparatively only 34 such records were set in 2010.
(Thanks to the efforts of Ken, WM5R a full set of contest
records are available at www.arrl.org/contests.) Of these
432 records, 226 were DX entity records and 206 were
W/VE/XE section records. There were 149 High Power
records, 221 Low Power records (117 of these being
initial records in the MOLP category), and 63 QRP
records set. Mexican operators continue to participate in
increasing numbers with 40 new XE records in 2011.
There are now records in 68 of the 352 possible entry
categories in XE, up from 28 last year.
New W/VE/XE Division Records
Division
Atlantic
Atlantic
Atlantic
Canada
Canada
Canada
Canada
Canada
Canada
Central
Central
Dakota
Delta
Delta
Delta
Delta
Great Lakes
Hudson
Hudson
Hudson
Mexico
Mexico
Mexico
Mexico
Mexico
Mexico
Mexico
Mexico
Mexico
Mexico
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
New England
New England
New England
Northwestern
Northwestern
Pacific
Pacific
Pacific
Roanoke
Roanoke
Rocky Mountain
Rocky Mountain
Southeastern
Southeastern
Southwestern
West Gulf
West Gulf
Extended Version 1.2
Category
MO LP
SO CW HP
SO PH QRP
MO HP
MO LP
SO CW HP
SO CW LP
SO MX HP
SO PH QRP
MO LP
SO PH QRP
MO LP
MO LP
SO CW QRP
SO MX LP
SO MX QRP
MO LP
MO LP
SO CW LP
SO MX HP
MO HP
MO LP
SO CW HP
SO CW LP
SO CW QRP
SO MX HP
SO MX LP
SO PH HP
SO PH LP
SO PH QRP
MO LP
SO CW QRP
SO PH QRP
MO HP
MO LP
SO MX HP
MO LP
SO MX QRP
MO LP
SO CW LP
SO PH QRP
MO LP
SO MX LP
MO LP
SO CW HP
MO LP
SO CW HP
MO LP
MO HP
MO LP
Call
New Record
KO3T
574,864
KD4D
1,248,000
KE2OI
142,296
VE5MX
1,717,056
VA7BEC
591,840
VY2ZM
1,638,972
VA2WA (VA2WDQ, op.)
772,680
VY2TT (K6LA, op.)
2,392,420
VX4MM
93,956
KF9US
90,948
WB9FOL
30,806
KØRC
353,212
NO4Q
159,120
K4LTA
161,600
N8OO
1,719,968
KS4X
119,574
AA8IA
132,300
KD2RD
1,326,080
W2ID
597,104
N2NT
2,737,742
XE2X
392,524
XE2AU
163,200
XE1MM
525,600
XE1AY
134,048
XE3WMA
2,944
XE2K
740,520
XE1L
122,944
XE1CWJ
321,216
XE1B
518,256
XE2JA
95,892
WØIW
105,450
W7FB
175,740
NØNI
127,676
K1LZ
3,635,992
W1WBB
585,752
KM3T (@ KC1XX)
3,018,720
W7TVC
733,176
W7YAQ
310,232
K6EI
178,064
KH6ZM
749,320
K6OO
84,390
K4FPF
161,024
N8II
1,368,380
K5WO
289,280
N2IC
1,322,980
N4CJ
568,920
K1TO
1,409,952
N6MA
66,368
NR5M
3,000,024
WDØGTY
57,456
Page 7 of 22
Within W/VE/XE a total of 50 division records were set.
Seventeen of these were the initial records in the new
MOLP category and 10 were from Mexico where
operators set new records in every category except
Single-Op, Mixed Mode, QRP. What a great effort from
XE in the second year of the contest with the new rules!
(See the section “Mexican Activity Update.”) Division
records were sprinkled across all the operating categories
though no new records were set in the Phone-Only Low
or High Power categories outside of Mexico.
Even with this big batch of new records there are still
some old ones out there to aim at. Three records still
remain from 1988, now the oldest ones on the books in
W/VE/XE. Who will take the challenge next year and set
new records for: Atlantic Division Single-Op, PhoneOnly, High Power held by W3LPL (WA8MAZ, op),
Hudson Division Single-Op, Phone-Only, Low Power
held by N2BJ, and Northwestern Division Single-Op,
Mixed-Mode, High Power held by NL7GP?
In addition to the 50 division records there were 4 new
W/VE/XE category records set, the first since 2002.
Congratulation to KM3T at KC1XX on setting a new
Single-Op, Mixed-Mode, High Power record, VY2ZM
on setting a new Single-Op, CW-Only, High Power
record, and K1LZ for setting a new Multioperator, High
Power record. KD2RD came out on top of all entrants in
the new MOLP category and now holds that record.
New Continent Records
Continent
Africa
Africa
Africa
Asia
Asia
Europe
Europe
Europe
N. America
Oceania
Oceania
Oceania
S. America
S. America
S. America
Category
SO PH LP
SO CW LP
MO HP
SO PH HP
MO LP
SO CW HP
MO LP
MO HP
MO LP
SO PH QRP
SO CW HP
MO LP
SO CW LP
MO LP
MO HP
Single-Op, Phone-Only, Low Power held by OT4AAQ
(ON4AAQ, op), North America Single-Op, Phone-Only,
Low Power held by VP2EXX, and Oceania Single-Op,
Mixed-Mode, High Power held by AH3C. Finally, there
were three new all-time category world records set, the
first since 2002. You will hear about two of these next.
Extraordinary people doing extraordinary
things
In most events there are always a small number of
participants who stand above others by their will and
determination to excel. With the good conditions for the
2011 contest these efforts resulted in new all-time
category records. Let's take a look at two of operations
that led to new all-time world records and one that led to
a W/VE/XE record.
The D4C story -- Fabio I4UFH thought 2011 would be a
good opportunity to go after the world Multioperator,
High Power record set by VP5K in 2000. As he said "I
love the ARRL 10 Meter Contest for more than 20 years
and already hold many records. There is no contest as the
ARRL 10m Contest !!" Fabio is a proven 10 meter
operator. He holds the current Single-Op, Phone-Only,
High Power world record as D44TD from 2002. In that
contest he also made the all-time record number of QSOs
for any operation in any category at 5,085. So this year
he invited some friends; Giorgio, I2VXJ, Donato,
IK2EGL, and Max, IZ4DPV to the D4C station at Monte
Verde in the Cape Verde Islands.
Call
New Record
EA8MT
610,450
EA8CN
618,552
D4C
4,351,000
B7P
624,660
4Z5MU
1,092,180
EF5Y (EA5GTQ, op.)
1,130,112
EA6BF
783,272
EI7M
2,859,864
TI5N
2,565,348
VK4ATH
21,080
ZM1A (ZL3CW, op.)
1,428,336
V63QQ
590,006
CE2/VE7SV (VE7SV, op.) 1,328,000
PY1GQ
1,676,196
CW5W
3,615,656
On the DX front 15 new continent records were set, the
first since 2007. Five of these were the initial records in
the new MOLP category. There are still a few old
continental records out there to aim at if that is your goal.
The oldest is a 1975 record held by KC4AAC (WB6KLI,
op) from Antarctica in the Single-Op, Mixed-Mode, High
Power category. If you are interested in setting a new
continental record, head to Antarctica as there are no
records at all in ten of the eleven operating categories.
Remember it is summer time there during the contest!
Beyond that record there are a few left from 1990: Asia
Single-Op, Phone-Only, QRP held by JA1DXA, Europe
2011 ARRL 10 Meter Contest Results
The record breaking D4C team. From left to right: Max IZ4DPV, Fabio
I4UFH, Donato IK2EGL, and Giorgio I2VXJ. (Photo - I4UFH)
To say that the D4C station is ideal for a 10 meter contest
is a vast understatement. Monte Verde is the highest
point on the island of São Vicente. The station rests on
the top of this 750-meter mountain with clear shots in all
directions. Effectively, their antennas are in "free space"
with takeoff angles as low as they can be.
Extended Version 1.2
Page 8 of 22
KØMD did Dale get the parts needed to fix his 3-element
SteppIR Yagi.
These are the 10 meter antennas at D4C. They can beam into any
combinations of these antennas they want, up to and including all four
for 360 degree coverage! (Photo - I4UFH)
As Fabio remembered: "Our 4 antenna system beamed
over 360 degrees worked like a charm, two interlocked
radios have done the job! We started slowly Saturday
morning at our sunset, we opted to left all the first night
of QRX, allowing us a long second night, and it paid off
a lot, 100 JAs long path during the dark hours until
0300Z, it was very thrilling !! Everything was as
expected, great sunshine days, no Murphy visit, a short
Friday / Monday trip." When the contest was over they
racked up a post log-checking score of 4,351,000,
beating the previous VP5K record by a healthy 260,000
points or 6%.
Here is Dale VE7SV working the pileups as CE2/VE7SV and setting a
new world record in the process. (Photo - VE7SV)
What Dale did have going for him was that his antenna
was located 250 feet above the ground on the top of a 20story apartment building in Renaca, Vina del Mar, Chile.
This building was located in turn near the beach and well
above it so that his antenna was 600 feet above sea level.
This is the view from the top of the apartment building where the
CE2/VE7SV antenna system is. Twenty stories up and 600 feet above
the nearby ocean. (Photo - VE7SV)
The D4C QTH is conveniently located on top of 750 meter tall Monte
Verde. Nice view and even better takeoff angles. (Photo - I4UFH)
The CE2/VE7SV story – Well-known contester and
DXpedition participant Dale, VE7SV may or may not
have had in mind setting an all-time world record in the
Single-Op, CW-Only, Low Power category. As the
contest date approached he didn't even have a working
antenna. Only through the efforts of delivery boy Scott,
2011 ARRL 10 Meter Contest Results
As at D4C there is something magical about 10 meter
antennas high above the ground. As Dale described it:
"The pile-ups to Europe were crazy…many times I had
to QSY and often ran with the attenuator on trying to
copy anything from the mess calling....but what a rush.
Working pals from the Pacific Northwest from the Bluff
(W7RM) days was fun and a big thrill to hear friends
Rebecca and Koji (VA7BEC) crash the pile-up." When
the final bell rung Dale had made over 2,100 QSOs with
low power and a 3-element antenna! His post logchecking score of 1,328,000 beat the previous record
held by K1TO by 110,000 points or about 9%.
Extended Version 1.2
Page 9 of 22
Russian stations and some goodies like 4K4K and 9K,
4X4, etc.
Part of the team that is behind the surge in contest activity from Chile.
From left to right: VE7SV, CE3CT, VE7AG, and CE3FZ. (Photo VE7SV)
The KM3T story – Dave, KM3T had an opportunity to
operate from KC1XX for the contest and knew he was
going to go full-bore in the Single-Op, Mixed-Mode,
High Power category. KC1XX may not be on a mountain
like D4C nor on top of apartment near a beach like
CE2/VE7SV but whatever disadvantage that may be is
made up by throwing aluminum at the problem. Dave
had at his selection seven different 7-element beams
including a rotating 4-stack as well as a few other
antennas here and there.
A portion of the KC1XX 10 meter antenna system. This is the 7/7/7/7
rotary stack. (Photo - KM3T)
A happy Dave KM3T in front of the operator console at KC1XX. (Photo
- KM3T)
As Dave related: "It was great to hear the massive
amount of activity this weekend from Europe, USA, and
South America. Europe starting coming in via a southerly
scatter path Saturday morning between about 1120Z and
1140Z, then the path went direct. The EU opening
seemed better and deeper on Sunday with many more
2011 ARRL 10 Meter Contest Results
The KC1XX station is on a good hilltop in southern NH
near the MA border. When the band is closed it is
possible to work ground-wave QSOs up and down the
East Coast and out toward Buffalo/Rochester, NY and
into VE3 – the only way besides backscatter to get into
these high population density areas from up here. Much
like a VHF contest on 6 meters. My many years of VHF
contesting experience came in handy. :-) Tried to balance
CW and SSB the best I could. I think I gave slight
preference to SSB on Saturday - then applying what I
learned Saturday I hit CW much harder on Sunday
morning, especially to Europe, where CW activity seems
stronger." When the contest was over Dave suspected if
his log survived log checking it would be a new record.
Well it did survive and it was a new record. His post log
checking score of 3,018,720 beat the prior record held by
KQ2M by 271,000 points or almost 10%.
Extended Version 1.2
Page 10 of 22
from my car. I use a Kenwood TS-590S. My antenna is
simply a mobile whip antenna. I powered the radio with a
deep cycle 12V battery. I also hooked up the battery to
solar panels. Actually, most of the solar panels were used
for another battery that I used to power my laptop
computer. I operated from various places within the city
of San Marcos, CA. Sometimes I operated right in front
of my Mom's house. Sometimes I operated from the local
Target parking lot. Finally, sometimes I went to a local
park that is on top of a hill." I would be tired as well,
contesting in my car for almost five hours.
Finally there was the fantastic statement from Mike,
AB1OD who was operating in the contest near the first
anniversary of getting his ticket. As he said: "If you had
told me this time last year that I'd be having this much
fun sitting at a computer and a radio, I would have
questioned your sanity. My, how things change."
Another portion of the KC1XX 10 meter antenna system. These are
dedicated to the second radio. (Photo - KM3T)
Here is Mike AB1OD doing what he enjoys, contesting! (Photo AB1OD)
Hams just want to have fun
There are also participants who just do it for the fun. That
is one of the great things about contesting – you can
choose your own level of participation and commitment.
Try that playing doubles tennis someday – it does not
work quite as well! Several great examples of the spirit
and fun of contesting from the 2011 contest were:
And how they did change! Many regular contesters
probably recognize Mike's call. A graduate of the ARRL
Rookie Roundup, since the 2011 ARRL 10 Meter
Contest through mid-April 2012 he has participated in no
fewer than 21 other contests by a count of his 3830 score
postings. Mike is having some fun!
Operating as the GM3W team, Ian, GM3SEK and his
wife Nadine, MMØMNW invented a "Mr. & Mrs."
section to the Multioperator, High Power category. Ian
did the CW operating and Nadine did the Phone
operating. They ended up with 1,205 QSOs and 196
multipliers and had enough fun that they are planning on
the same format in 2012.
For Larry, KD6SXF the 2011 ARRL 10 Meter Contest
was his first contest ever! As he described it: "I only
operated about 4.75 hours, but I was exhausted! I wonder
how so many hams are able to stay on the air hour after
hour. I imagine that one builds stamina over time." I
asked Larry for a little more detail on his operating
conditions and discovered the special effort he made to
get on the air -- definitely not what most of us are
accustomed to. As he described it: "I basically operate
2011 ARRL 10 Meter Contest Results
This is a close-up of Mike AB1OD's station. Very well appointed! Looks
like he has one of everything.(Photo AB1OD)
Extended Version 1.2
Page 11 of 22
Medium Category
Club Competition
Club competition continues to be a popular and fun
aspect of this contest. It is like a wide-area Multioperator
effort where you can operate from your home QTH but
be part of a larger team competing with others. Seventy
clubs submitted logs for the 2011 10 Meter Contest, way
up from the 55 last year. These 70 clubs represented a
combined 1,217 entries meaning almost half of W/VE
operators were also part of a club entry!
In the Local Club category the Central Virginia Contest
Club took top honors among the 26 clubs. Their 10
members combined for more than 4 million points and
ended the streak of the Midland Amateur Radio Club of
Midland, Texas who won the category in three of the last
four years.
Local Category
Score
Central Virginia Contest Club
4,359,656
Midland ARC
1,255,800
Kansas City DX Club
1,176,590
Hilltop Transmitting Assn
1,145,576
599 DX Association
1,141,616
Delara Contest Team
939,460
Lincoln ARC
764,918
Bergen ARA
753,702
Northeast Wisconsin DX Assn
684,290
Iowa DX and Contest Club
575,440
New Mexico Big River Contesters
455,756
Metro DX Club
394,192
Meriden ARC
358,964
Sterling Park ARC
333,944
West Park Radiops
282,488
Badger Contesters
268,626
Gloucester Co ARC
216,488
Granite State ARA
205,664
Low Country Contest Club
172,588
Murgas ARC
152,960
Portage County Amateur Radio Service 104,884
Heartland DX Association
92,520
Southern Berkshire ARC
62,770
Raritan Bay Radio Amateurs
44,878
Pueblo West Amateur Radio Club
34,904
Hays-Caldwell ARC
6,504
Entries
10
4
9
5
6
7
5
8
3
3
3
3
4
9
7
7
5
6
4
3
7
6
5
5
4
3
In the popular Medium Club category 38 clubs fought a
hard-pitched battle with one of the closer finishes in any
contest category. In the end, the 31 members of the
Frankford Radio Club bested the 44 members of the
Arizona Outlaws Contest club by less than 2%! This was
a great rebound from the Frankford club as they placed
8th last year and another heartbreaker for the Arizona
club who also finished second in 2010. As they say,
"There is always next year."
2011 ARRL 10 Meter Contest Results
Score
Frankford Radio Club
13,258,284
Arizona Outlaws Contest Club
13,048,014
Central Texas DX and Contest Club 11,199,744
Contest Club Ontario
10,612,610
Southern California Contest Club
7,472,480
Grand Mesa Contesters of Colorado 7,439,444
Alabama Contest Group
7,227,460
Tennessee Contest Group
6,984,066
Hudson Valley Contesters and DXers 5,550,942
Mad River Radio Club
5,350,674
Western Washington DX Club
5,096,476
Maritime Contest Club
4,800,072
South East Contest Club
4,521,596
Carolina DX Association
4,457,550
Willamette Valley DX Club
4,454,032
Mother Lode DX/Contest Club
4,242,378
ORCA DX And Contest Club
3,380,924
Order of Boiled Owls of New York
3,046,704
Saskatchewan Contest Club
2,741,248
Contest Group Du Quebec
2,627,380
CTRI Contest Group
2,566,664
North Coast Contesters
2,477,072
Northern Rockies DX Association
2,277,084
Spokane DX Association
2,220,038
Western New York DX Assn
1,850,700
Lone Star DX Assn
1,609,164
Hampden County Radio Assn
1,546,158
Rochester (NY) DX Assn
1,437,270
North Texas Contest Club
1,436,724
Kentucky Contest Group
1,264,876
Louisiana Contest Club
1,142,182
Utah DX Assn
1,140,548
Allegheny Valley Radio Association 1,048,578
Bristol (TN) ARC
451,102
West Allis RAC
443,982
Mississippi Valley DX/Contest Club
309,088
Six Meter Club of Chicago
86,688
Pacific Northwest VHF Society
55,724
Entries
31
44
21
43
30
19
29
41
23
15
22
12
24
20
20
12
14
9
3
13
15
5
3
11
8
7
18
9
5
4
5
7
4
11
11
5
6
3
In the Unlimited Club category six entries were received
in 2011, up from three in 2010. Coming out on top were
the 130 members of the Potomac Valley Radio Club who
bested second-place Yankee Clipper Contest Club by a
wide margin. The PVRC's success formula looks like just
overwhelming their competition with the sheer number
of members. Their average score per member was the
lowest among the top four clubs in this category but by
being the only club with more than 100 members they
easily took top honors. Congratulations to all the clubs
and their organizers.
Unlimited Category
Potomac Valley Radio Club
Yankee Clipper Contest Club
Florida Contest Group
Northern California Contest Club
Minnesota Wireless Assn
Society of Midwest Contesters
Extended Version 1.2
Score
33,186,960
28,654,372
24,608,646
20,299,126
14,453,608
13,038,478
Entries
130
78
83
66
83
54
Page 12 of 22
distributed around the world. But, for its faults the data is
incredibly valuable and we can learn a lot from it.
A Skimmer View of the Contest
Among the more competitive contesters a common
During the 48 hours of the 2011 ARRL 10 Meter Contest
conversation topic is the length and quality of your band
the network captured over 500,000 spots, 551,186 to be
openings relative to others. More often than not it we use
exact. This data is easily downloaded from the web site,
it as an excuse -- "I just could not overcome the better
imported into Excel, crunched for analysis and charted
opening the other operator had!" Of course it never has to
for visual insight.
do
with
your
Skimmer
Spots
From
Continents
So, to the question
operating skills or
of the length and
Europe
station capabilities.
Asia
S. America
quality of band
It is just that
openings
one
uncontrollable
measure
of
that
is
propagation. One of
the
sum
total
of
the more popular
stations heard at
complaints for 2011
each skimmer site.
was the relatively
Let's take a look
weak
opening
using two maps.
between the Pacific
Northwest area of
The US map shows
the United States
the skimmer spot
and Europe. Guy
count of stations
N7ZG summarized
heard across the US
it well: "The band
skimmer network,
opened up at about
breaking the spots
7 AM to the east
down
by continent of the
coast and was expecting
received
station. The
EU to open. Never really
Skimmer Spots
height
of
the bar
did. Worked a few
from North America corresponds to the sum
western Europeans and
of spots received from
then started running the
each continent. If there
east coast."
were multiple skimmers
in a state the chart
With technology it is
presents the skimmer
now possible to gain
with the highest count.
some unbiased and
quantitative insight into
What does this map
actual band openings.
seem to say? With
That technology is the
respect to Europe the
network of Skimmers
openings seemed pretty
around the world and the
uniform
from
the
Reverse
Beacon
Maryland/Pennsylvania
Network
web
site.
area
up
into
the
(www.reversebeacon.net
Northeast
US.
Stations
) The 10 Meter Contest,
in the Ohio, West
being a single band
Virginia, and Georgia
contest, is also a bit
areas did not have as good an opening. And, yes, for
easier to study with skimmer data than an all band
stations in the western US and in the Pacific Northwest
contest like ARRL DX.
in particular, the opening to Europe was fleeting. The
skimmer in the state of Washington recorded a total of 31
Skimmers of course are an imperfect technology for
skimmer spots from Europe for the whole weekend.
comparison. It is CW only and the 10 Meter Contest is
Compare this to well over 6,000 spots for skimmers in
both Phone and CW. Different skimmers have different
the Northeast US, a ratio of almost 200 to 1. Definitely -antennas. Different skimmers use different receivers.
Advantage East Coast!
Different skimmers may be on the air for different
lengths of time. The skimmer network is not uniformly
Washington
Maine
Montana
North Dakota
Minnesota
Oregon
New Hampshire
Idaho
Vermont
New York
Wisconsin
Massachusetts
South Dakota
Wyoming
Rhode Island
Connecticut
Michigan
Iowa
Nebraska
Pennsylvania
Ohio
Delaware
Nevada
Utah
California
Illinois
New Jersey
District of Columbia
Indiana
Colorado
West Virginia
Kansas
Virginia
Missouri
Kentucky
Maryland
Tennessee
Arizona
North Carolina
Oklahoma
New Mexico
Arkansas
South Carolina
Georgia
Mississippi
Texas
Alabama
Louisiana
Florida
Iceland
Sweden
Finland
Norway
Estonia
Latvia
Denmark
Lithuania
Ireland
United Kingdom
Poland
Netherlands
Belgium
Luxembourg
Germany
Czech
Slovakia
Austria
France
Hungary
Switzerland
Romania
Slovenia
Croatia
Serbia
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bulgaria
Andorra
Spain
Portugal
Montenegro
Macedonia
Albania
Greece
Italy
Malta
2011 ARRL 10 Meter Contest Results
Extended Version 1.2
Page 13 of 22
In return though how about the openings to Asia? Does
the western US have an advantage here? Looking at the
map again shows that yes states from the Rocky
Mountains west had a much better opening to Asia than
stations on the east coast. The skimmer in Utah recorded
2,410 spots from Asia whereas stations in the Northeast
recorded between 50 and 100 spots, giving the west
stations a 25 to 50 to 1 advantage over the east. The west
did have a relative propagation advantage over the east to
Asia but the activity level appears to be less than half the
activity the east coast saw from Europe.
As a last insight from this map how did things behave
with respect to South America? Geography would seem
to project uniform openings across the US. And, the map
does seem to show a pretty uniform pattern of South
America openings across the US.
This type of analysis and insight can be repeated for
other geographies. With 500,000+ data points to use,
time is the limit on the study, not the data. A similar map
looks at the skimmers in Europe and how many spots
they captured from North American stations.
Conclusions are a bit harder to draw from this map. The
central part of Europe and the UK seemed to have a
better openings than Scandinavia and the south east area
such as Greece and Italy. But, the differences are not
nearly as great as seen across the US.
Spots and Predicting Scoring
Another interesting use of the data is using spot counts as
The top four scoring stations also were the top four in
a predictor of scoring. Logic would say that the operators
number of skimmer spots. But, there are also several
that are heard the most by the skimmers might be the
negative correlated data points in the DX results as well.
high scorers. For this contest this approach works best
So, in the end I just have to leave this investigation in the
for the CW Only category. The following chart
"Well that's interesting but it really does not tell us
compares the total number of skimmer spots versus score
anything." category.
for the Top 10 stations in the CW-Only High-Power
category in the
US and DX.
ARRL 10 Meter Contest -- Skimmer Spots vs Score
Top 10 High Power CW Only Scores
Did
having
more
skimmer spots for you
turn into a higher
score?
W/VE/XE
DX
2,250,000
2,000,000
Score
The chart seems
to
tell
two
1,750,000
different stories.
For
W/VE/XE
1,500,000
there is almost no
correlation.
In
1,250,000
fact the highest
score by VY2ZM
1,000,000
had the third
lowest skimmer
750,000
count in the Top
10. Most of the
scores
are
500,000
0
500
1,000
1,500
2,000
clustered in a
Number of Skimmer Spots During Contest
fairly tight band
from 1.2-1.4 million points, but within that skimmer
counts vary by a factor of two. The station with the most
skimmer spots, K8AZ placed 6th. For DX stations there
seems to more of a positive correlation with a general
"Up and to the Right" progression of the data points. The
highest scoring station, LU1HF, had the highest number
of skimmer spots.
2011 ARRL 10 Meter Contest Results
Extended Version 1.2
2,500
3,000
Page 14 of 22
submission with expanding internet connectivity and
stability and adoption of the Cabrillo file format. A
higher percentage of contesters are submitting logs.
In mid November 2011 I authored a "Pre-Contest" article
However, it also has to be caused as well by growth in
that was posted on the ARRL web site. In that article I
contesting as a part
made
several
of the amateur radio
ARRL 10 Meter Contest Participation -- By Year
predictions for the
hobby. There are just
W/VE/XE
DX
Total
6,000
then upcoming 10
more
people
Meter Contest based
contesting!
All Time Record!
on past year's records
5,000
High-Power
and
looking
at
Category Scoring
potential
solar
4,000
and Top 10s
conditions. When I
wrote that article the
I also made some
3,000
Space
Weather
predictions
for
Prediction Center was
scoring
in
the
Highforecasting a solar
2,000
Power categories in
flux in the 130 range.
the W/VE/XE and
Actual flux levels
1,000
DX
super-regions.
were in the 135-140
The
first
set was with
range for contest
respect
to
the average
0
weekend with K1973
1976
1979
1982
1985
1988
1991
1994
1997
2000
2003
2006
2009
2012
scores
of
the Top 5
indices
bouncing
Year
finishers
in
the four
around between 1 and
different categories.
2 with a A of 6-7. So,
ARRL 10 Meter Contest Participation - By Solar Flux Level
My predictions were
overall, pretty good
1995-2007 Cycle
2007-2011 Cycle
a bit less precise here
6,000
conditions. The best
than
with
Participation is
All Time Record!
since 2002 for sure
participation.
Boldly
much higher this
and
a
huge
5,000
solar cycle than the
I stated "Top stations
improvement over the
last!
should see scores
2010 edition when
double or triple over
4,000
flux was in the 87-89
2010". Again, I
2011
range.
Forecast
managed
to
3,000
understate
what
top
The question at hand
operators
and
is: "How well did my
2,000
stations were able to
predictions hold up?"
accomplish.
In
Let's look at each of
W/VE/XE the four
1,000
them.
High-Power
Participation
categories had their
0
Top 5 scores increase
0
25
50
75
100
125
150
175
200
225
250
History demonstrates
Solar Flux
by an average of
that ARRL 10 Meter
311%, so a bit more
Contest participation is heavily dependent on
than triple. The Mixed-Mode categories saw the biggest
propagation. That makes all the sense in the world. With
increases both almost quadrupling their 2010 scores. The
the projected conditions I guessed that 3,200 or so
single mode categories saw their top scores increase by a
operators would submit logs. This turned out to be
little more than 200%. DX stations did even better. The
among my worst predictions as an amazing 5,361
four High-Power categories had their Top 5 scores
operators worldwide submitted logs, more than double
increase by an average of 360%, well more than triple.
the number submitted in 2010 and 70% greater than the
Almost quadruple!. The Phone-Only folks really raised
previous all-time record from 2002.
their game though. The Top 5 increased their scored by
over 500% from 2010. Well done! Though you messed
Also, for the first time ever the number of logs from
up my predictions.
outside W/VE/XE exceed those in that region. For sure
some of this is driven by the increasing ease of log
Total number of logs submitted
Total Number of Logs submitted this year
My Contest Predictions -- How Accurate
were They?
2011 ARRL 10 Meter Contest Results
Extended Version 1.2
Page 15 of 22
The other set of scoring predictions I made were "What
score might be needed to get into the Top 10 box?" When
I made these predictions I felt these were the wildest of
my guesses. Yet, they turned out to be the most accurate
of them all.
Looking at the W/VE/XE High-Power Top 10 table
shows three of the four predictions were pretty close and
my CW-Only prediction was almost exact! For some
reason I really missed on the Phone-Only category.
W/VE/XE High-Power Top 10
What minimum score did it take to get into the Top 10?
Category
Pre-contest Prediction
Single-Op Mixed-Mode
1,600,000
Phone-Only
800,000
CW-Only
1,200,000
Multioperator
1,800,000
Actual
1,513,000
445,000
1,202,000
2,084,000
What about where the W/VE/XE Top 10's were located?
Historically South Texas has turned in the most Top 10s
in High-Power. The Florida sections do well as does the
Atlantic coast from North Carolina up to Massachusetts.
This historic pattern was followed in one way during
2011. South Texas hosted six of the 40 High Power Top
10's this year and on a percentage basis this was well
above average. The Florida sections however had an off
year turning in only one Top 10 when historic averages
would predict six Top 10s. The area with a strong
showing this year was the Northeast US and eastern
Canada. In a normal year the W1 US call area would
have four Top 10's. This year they more than doubled
that with nine! Throw in two Top 10s in the Canada
Maritimes section and you have an outstanding year for
that part of the continent. And, congratulations to team
W2RE for turning in the first ever Top 10 from Northern
New York and VA2EW for the first ever Top 10 from
Quebec. Special mention also goes out to W6YI for a
Top 10 from San Diego. The last Top 10 from that
section was more than a decade ago. Great job!
Looking at the DX High-Power Top 10 table three of the
four predictions were pretty close as well. To balance
out my miss in W/VE/XE I pretty well nailed the PhoneOnly category. The big miss for my DX predictions was
in the Multioperator category where it took a score
almost 60% higher than I predicted to crack the Top 10.
Actual
1,016,000
709,000
870,000
2,717,000
What about where the DX Top 10s were located?
Historically Argentina is the single best spot. However,
Japan, Brazil, France, and Germany are not bad either.
2011 ARRL 10 Meter Contest Results
All-time Records
As discussed in the pre-contest article, prior to the 2011
contest, the last time a new all-time High-Power record
for W/VE was set was in 2005 and then it was only one.
2004 also only had one set and 2003 had two. DX
operators have been a bit more successful during that
period, but still, it has been really hard to set an all-time
High-Power record during the 2003 to 2010 period. I did
predict though with improved propagation in 2011 plus
the new XE multipliers that records would fall. So did
they? They sure did! In W/VE/XE 61 new High Power
records were set in 2011. Eleven of those were in XE
states and 50 in W/VE. This was more than were set in
the good old days of the 2002 contest. DX stations set an
amazing 88 new High-Power records this year which was
also well exceeded the number of records set in 2002. So,
yes, 2011 was a year for the record books.
Phone vs CW Mix -- A magic formula?
For Single-Op Mixed-Mode and Multioperator stations
one of the most important decisions made during the
contest is the mix of time and effort in CW versus Phone
modes. Of course many advanced stations have found
ways to operate both modes at the same time. But the
general decision still exists. How much CW? How much
Phone? Is there a magic mix that the top scoring stations
have found?
If you don't want to read all the way to the end of this
section here are the findings:
DX High-Power Top 10
What minimum score did it take to get it into the Top 10?
Category
Pre-contest Prediction
Single-Op Mixed-Mode
1,150,000
Phone-Only
600,000
CW-Only
750,000
Multioperator
1,700,000
And, actually all of South America, Europe, and the
Caribbean can host Top 10 operations. Argentina had a
bit off an off year. In a normal year they would turn in
five Top 10s but only managed three this year. However,
the rest of the southern part of South America picked up
the slack with strong showings by stations in Chile and
Uruguay. These three countries turned in nine Top 10s
versus a historic average of around six and a half. Brazil
also had a strong year with four Top 10's compared to a
historic average of two or so. South America was the
place to be this year. On the other hand continental
Europe had an off year compared to long term averages.
Finally congratulations to JT5DX for the first ever Top
10 from Mongolia and both EI7KD and the EI7M team
for the first ever Top 10's from Ireland.
There is no magic mix. You can get into a Top 10 or Top
3 position over a very wide range of CW to Phone QSO
mix ratios. (There is however a different magic ratio this
analysis found. You will have to keep reading to find out
what it is.)
However, if your ratio drops into the less CW QSOs than
Phone range it becomes harder to get into a Top 10 box.
Extended Version 1.2
Page 16 of 22
% of Stations in this Bin
% of Stations in this Bin
It can and has been done, KM3T placed 1st in US &
average. [It is also interesting that the 30 stations that
World Mixed-Mode High-Power with essentially a 1:1
made up the Top 10 in each of the three power categories
CW to Phone ratio, and D4C placed 1st in DX & World
made 21% of the reported QSOs overall. So 6% of the
Multioperator Highstations made 21% of
US Single-Operator Mixed-Mode CW/Phone Ratios
Power and set a world
the QSOs. Remember
All Entrants
Top 10 Scores
20%
record with a 0.85:1
this ratio. It is going to
ratio, but it gets
show up again.]
18%
harder. You usually
16%
The overall average
need more CW QSOs
14%
view does not show
than Phone QSOs to
12%
the whole story. More
get into the Top 10.
insightful is looking at
10%
The lower power you
histogram
of
the
8%
run, the higher the
different CW to Phone
6%
ratio of CW to Phone
QSO ratios for the
4%
QSOs you need in
overall population and
order to make it into
then again the Top 10
2%
the Top 10. This
stations.
0%
makes sense if you
Reading these charts
think of the efficiency
Ratio of CW to Phone QSOs in Log
Top 3 QRP (Average = 1.75)
can be a bit tricky,
and punch of a CW
Top 3 Low Power (Average = 1.49)
especially the X-axis.
versus Phone signal. If
Top 3 High Power (Average = 1.30)
you are running QRP
The X-axis is the ratio
US Multioperator CW/Phone Ratios
and Low Power you
of CW to Phone
All Entrants
Top 10 Scores
need to make every
25%
QSOs in a station's
watt count. If you are
log. It is broken up
going
to
operate
into bins. The leftmost
20%
Mixed-Mode
QRP
bins are for all
you should consider a
stations with a CW to
15%
ratio of 1.5-2.0 to 1
Phone ratio of zero -(CW to Phone), or
meaning they were in
even higher. On the
10%
fact SSB only. The
other hand Top 10 DX
next bin going to the
Multioperator Highright, labeled "0-0.2",
5%
Power
stations
are for stations with a
averaged just 1.11
CW to Phone ratio of
CW QSOs for every
0%
greater than zero up to
Phone QSO and four
and equal to 0.2. The
of the Top 10 had
Ratio of CW to Phone QSOs in Log
next bin to the right of
Top 3 Low Power (Average = 2.46)
ratios well under 1:1.
Top 3 High Power (Average = 1.45)
that, labeled "0.2-0.4",
The data to look into
this is a bit hard to manage so following detailed
investigations are into just US and DX stations.
Looking first at US Single-Op Mixed-Mode stations
there were 485 entries that made both CW and Phone
QSOs during the contest. [Interestingly there were 56
entrants in this category who actually operated PhoneOnly and another 18 who operated CW-Only] Looking at
these 485 entrants in aggregate they reported making
111,821 CW QSOs and 102,651 Phone QSOs. So, the
overall average mix was 1.09 CW QSOs for every Phone
QSO. Looking next just at the Top 10 stations in each
power category their overall average was 1.11 CQ QSOs
for every Phone QSO. Essentially the same as the overall
2011 ARRL 10 Meter Contest Results
are for stations with a
CW to Phone ratio of greater than 0.2 up to and equal
0.4. And so on across the X-axis until the last bin is for
stations with a ratio greater than 4. The Y-axis indicates
the percentage of all logs that fell into that bin.
One set of bars looks at the CW to Phone ratios of all
stations and the other looks at just the Top 10 stations.
One thing that is very clear right away is that you can
make it into the Top 10 with a very wide range of CW to
Phone operating strategies. Stations made it into the Top
10 with a ratio as low as 0.31 and as high as 2.22. There
is no magic mix that will propel you above your
competition. There are some general trends though. Top
10 QRP and Low-Power stations had a higher CW mix
Extended Version 1.2
Page 17 of 22
Repeating
this
analysis
for
US
Multioperator stations
shows
the
same
general trends though
even more strongly in
favor of the CW
mode.
% of Stations in this Bin
than High-Power stations do. Top 10 QRP and LowPower stations both averaged in the 1.27 to 1.28 CW
QSOs per Phone QSO range while High Power stations
had a 1 to 1 mix. Examining the Top 10 even closer,
what about the Top 3 in each category? Their ratios are
shown separately under the X-axis on the chart.
placed 2nd in the High-Power category for a noticeable
exception.
Moving on, let's look at DX stations operating in the
Mixed-Mode category.
There were 475 entries overall and 426 that made both
CW
and
Phone
DX Single-Op Mixed-Mode CW/Phone Ratios
QSOs. These 426
All Entrants
Top 10
entrants
reported
30%
making 90,580 CW
QSOs and 64,789
25%
Phone QSOs for an
overall ratio of 1.40
20%
CW QSOs for every
Phone QSO. This is
15%
well above the 1.09
ratio reported by US
10%
Mixed-Mode stations.
5%
DX
stations
on
average are more
0%
active on CW than
US. However, similar
Ratio
of
CW
to
Phone
QSOs
in
Log
to the US the Top 10
Top 3 QRP (Average = 1.07)
DX stations had an
Top 3 Low Power (Average = 2.10)
average
essentially
Top 3 High Power (Average = 1.62)
% of Stations in this Bin
There were 387 US
stations entering the
Multioperator class.
Of these 294 made
both CW and SSB
QSOs. [The rest were
effectively operating
as a single mode
assisted though the 10
Meter
Contest
operating
the same as the
DX Multioperator CW/Phone Ratios
classifications don't
overall average at
All Entrants Top 10
recognize
these.]
1.44. [And once again
30%
These 294 stations
these 30 Top 10
reported 100,954 CW
stations
which
25%
and 85,021 Phone
represented just 7%
QSOs for a ratio of
of
all
entrants
20%
1.19 CW QSOs for
reported 22% of all
every Phone QSO.
QSOs in this class.
15%
Multioperator stations
This is turning into a
make an even higher
trend!] Did the same
10%
percentage of their
pattern also show up
QSOs in CW than
with respect to QRP,
5%
Mixed-Mode
Low-Power,
and
operators did. Top 10
High-Power
0%
stations drive this
categories as seen in
ratio even higher,
the US? Sort of. The
making an average of
Ratio of CW to Phone QSOs in Log
QRP
results
are
1.37 CW QSOs for
skewed by third place
Top 3 Low Power (Average = 1.25)
every Phone QSO.
Top 3 High Power (Average = 1.13)
CT2IOV
who
[An also interesting
reported 517 Phone
note is that the Top 10 stations which make up 7% of the
QSOs to just 16 CW QSOs. Putting this in perspective he
entrants made 19% QSOs in this class -- almost the same
had a higher Phone QSO count than any DX Top 10
as for Mixed-Mode. A coincidence?] Repeating the
Mixed-Mode Low-Power station and it even beat one
observation from Mixed-Mode, Low-Power stations had
DX Top 10 High-Power Mixed-Mode station. Taking
a higher CW ratio at 1.95 than High-Power at 1.24. Only
CT2IOV's results out of the calculations shows the same
three of the 20 Top 10 stations in Multioperator made
general trend as in the US. QRP and Low-Power stations
materially more Phone QSOs than CW and the best any
made a higher portion of their QSOs in CW than the
of them placed was 8th. NR5M did have a 1:1 ratio and
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High-Power stations. The respective ratios for QRP,
Low-Power, and High-Power were: 1.79, 1.92, and 1.29.
Finally, what about DX stations operating in the
Multioperator category?
There were 375 entries overall and 295 made both CW
and Phone QSOs. These 295 entrants reported making
123,004 CW QSOs and 102,463 Phone QSOs for an
overall ratio of 1.20 CW QSOs for every Phone QSO -effectively the same ratio as US Multioperator stations.
[As a final note, these 20 Top 10 Stations represented 7%
of the stations in the class and made 21% of the reported
QSOs. This ratio is "The Magic Ratio" mentioned earlier.
Consistently, the top 6-7% of stations in each general
category report making 19-22% of the total QSOs in that
category.] The Top 10 stations had the same overall ratio
at 1.22, unlike in the US where the Top 10 stations had a
more heavily weighted CW mix. What was similar was
that the Low Power stations had a higher CW ratio at
1.59:1 than the High Power stations did at 1.10:1. Both
of these ratios are below that of US Multioperator
stations suggesting that DX stations can make it into the
Top 10 with a lower CW to Phone QSO ratio than the
US. This could be explained by the general greater
prevalence of Phone operations in the US and DX
Multioperator stations who want to work the US will
need to operate in Phone to a higher extent.
A 3,000 kilometer long mic cable!
Hams have long been known for their ingenuity and
creative exploits in pushing technology limits. One
innovation over the last several years has to do with
remote operating over the internet. In this way operators
can be located just about anywhere on the planet with
respect to their transceiver and antennas. Though not a
ultra rare mode any more it is still unique enough to draw
attention and discussion. Kevin K7ZS is one of the latest
to venture into this realm and he put it to great use in the
2011 10 Meter Contest.
Many of us would like to be sitting in the warmth and
sun of Baja California Sur on the second weekend of
December. In Kevin's case he did that while his
transceiver, amp and antennas were on a snowy hilltop in
Oregon! Kevin's story and photos:
"Here are a few shots of WHERE I remoted from, with a
picture of essentially the whole remote end: Kenwood
TS-480SAT head, RemoteRig MKII box, microphone
and laptop (not really necessary for operation, but for
contest logging).
You get an idea of WHERE I was - about 30 miles off
the grid, totally solar powered with the 5.7 GHz
Motorola Canopy system providing the internet
backbone to the home station in Oregon, via a relay
tower which is near where the last photo was, looking
down over Cabo Pulmo, Baja California Sur.
“On the Oregon side it was connected to the other
RemoteRig, the rest of the TS-480SAT, and routed
through a SPE 1K-FA solid state linear amplifier, finally
2011 ARRL 10 Meter Contest Results
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into the 4 element SteppIR @ 90 feet. It was pretty
amazing to be sitting there, running stations from such a
remote place. Is this microwave DXing? "And, not only
is this setup creative it is also very effective. Kevin
placed second in the Oregon section in the Single-Op
Phone-Only High-Power category in the process. And
which weather would you rather enjoy?
After the good experience with the 2010 test, this year
we used the same bulletins, Internet Social networks and
the radio promotion of the event to pressure the few
active XE to participate in the “Big event the ARRL 10
Meter Contest where Mexican states are needed.”
The pressure works fine to make a few to be on the air
and work a few stations, giving that rare or semi-rare
state. As a Mexican I know that many XEs just make a
few short CQ‟s and do not stay CQing when there are
few callers, making it hard to find them.
The improvement this year was clear, more QSOs from
more stations. Not all the states participated and a few
with stations making a handful of contacts from rare
states like SIN, MIC, DGO, COA, HGO, and NAY to
mention a few. The most active states were DF, EMX,
BAC, QUI, GTO, and SON.
Mexican Activity Update
The 2011 running of the 10 Meter Contest was the
second under the new rules that made the 32 Mexican
states multipliers. This 2010 rules innovation met with
enthusiastic response from XE operators and over 100
unique XEs were active with 26 states on the air. Fifty
logs were submitted up from just six in 2009. Through
the tireless efforts and promotion of Hector XE2K,
Joaquin XE1R and his XE1RCS bulletin as well as
Grupo DXXE, XE participation continued to grow in
2011. More than 110 unique XEs were active in the
contest and from 30 of the 32 states. Without a doubt
these operators were a major factor in the many new
records set in 2011. Comments by several operators
setting new records commented on the impact the XE
multipliers are having. They really changed the dynamics
of this contest. It's always fun to be "the new kid on the
block"!
Most of the stations were not active all weekend, some
just a few minutes others a few moments during the
contest at least losing the fear to be in a contest. A big
problem for several is the “fear” in his English fluency,
not really a language barrier, just the fear of the big pile
up and freeze.
Another fact, just a few logs were received from those
stations with small participation. The reasons are
unknown and that is part of the work to do in the next
years.
Comments from several of the most active Mexican
stations…
XE3N – Zalo (below) report from his Caribbean location,
during the 21 hours he participated, 3 hours of 130 +
QSOs. It was hard to pass the multiplier QUI which was
difficult to understand for a big number of callers but in
general for him the propagation was better than past year
with his limited working conditions of an A-99 vertical
and 100 watts to make the 1,350 QSOs.
A contest summary from Mexico by Hector XE2K
As we see for second year, having a few more multipliers
with the XE states give more fun all weekend long with
the improvement of the conditions.
As we know this contest opens the door to make more
points with good or not so good propagation, what is
always welcome, more stations to log with the double
value. Talking from the XE perspective there is another
very important fact, the opportunity to promote more
Mexican non-contesters to be active and give their state,
with the chance they get the Contesting Bug. There still
is more work to do but it is a good start.
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XE2S -- Marco, The propagation for him was not the
best for the time he participated compared to a few weeks
before. Sometimes no stations at all were answering his
CQ so he focused providing the multiplier and he kept
CQing as a main technique for this contest, finishing
with over 800 Q‟s in his log, with not a single XE.
XE2X – Jorge (antenna system shown below) with his
new call he planned a big effort to make a good score. It
was a great start for him at his new station from rural
TAM with zero noise but some problems made him stop
and lose a lot of time. With a lower interest after the
problems and the heavy rain during the weekend he made
800 QSOs.
XE1CWJ -- Javier, One of the most active stations from
GTO reports that some family activities take him away
from the radio but the time was good to make over 1600
QSOs with very rare conditions. It was difficult to almost
impossible to work XE was his experience.
XE1MW -- Carlos, with technical problems at the station
and some family activities his effort was limited to 6
hours but his example is good. It was not the best hours
of propagation but it worked for him to make over 500
QSOs, putting MOR in many logs.
XE2K – Hector (10 meter antenna shown below from the
viewpoint of ground crew photographer N6AN) Starting
the contest 2 hours late the first day he found a solid S-7
line noise made it hard to make contacts the first hours.
The noise dropped to S4-S5 the rest of the weekend
making it possible to run stations, looking for his
personal goal to double the number of QSOs from 2010
and looking to be again the station with most QSOs from
XE. The personal goal was reached with over 2,000
QSOs using a single 5L OWA Yagi.
A Bit of Contest History
As this is my first time authoring the 10 Meter Contest
write-up I was naturally a bit inquisitive -- "What is the
history of this contest anyway?" Through the hard work
of Ken, WM5R and others, score records exist back to
that first contest in 1973. But, how did the contest come
about in the first place? In the post contest score postings
I noticed a reference to those early days from Larry
WØPAN. He related:
"Vic Clark, W4KFC (SK) would have been proud of this
one. Back in the early 70s, during an ARRL Board
meeting, we 'contesters' on the Board kicked around the
idea of a 10 meter contest. After discussion, it went to the
Contest Advisory Committee for their input. Bob, K8IA
was one of them that I recall pushed for approval. My
recollection is that this one has to be the most successful
one (from a participation standpoint) since it started in
the 70s."
I followed up with Larry and he provided some
additional background: "The first 10 Meter Contest was
reported in the November 1973 issue of QST on page 58.
After reading the article, some of the fuzzy memory
came back. Back in those days we were concerned that if
we didn't use a particular spectrum we would lose it. That
was a constant concern of the ARRL Board of Directors
as there was much pressure by commercial interests to
take over some of our spectrum. After the early
discussion of several of us at the January 1973 Board of
Directors meeting, it was brought up for some more
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discussion at either an ARRL Forum or ARRL Contest
Advisory Committee forum at quite probably the Dayton
Hamfest or ARRL National Convention in 1973. Much
of the discussion centered on the occupancy of 10 meters
during the ups and downs of the sunspot cycle. The
thought was how about a 10 meter contest to whip up
some interest on the 10 meter band. In the ARRL Forum,
the consensus of those present was: 'let's give it a try for
1973'. The Contest Advisory Committee, after receiving
the task from the ARRL Board, made the
recommendation to proceed. I didn't take long from idea
to implementation - probably one of the fastest in Ham
Radio history of contesting.
“The first contest ran for 36 hours beginning at 1200Z,
December 15, 1973. The results of the first contest were
reported in July 1974 QST beginning on page 56. The
article, authored by Rick Niswander, WA1PID reported
720 logs from 65 sections and 29 foreign countries on 6
continents which was phenomenal in participation. With
the passage of time, this contest has survived and as you
will report in the results with the latest one, an amazing
following in our modern day of spotting and automated
logging.
Of course I also followed up with Bob, K8IA to add his
part of the story. His reply was: "I doubt I'll be much
help to you, but here goes. 40+ yrs has way of clouding
my memory cells. ;-) I was the 8th Area rep (K8HLR
then) on the Contest Advisory Committee back then, as I
served two terms in the 70s. At that time, the CAC was
not a rep from each ARRL Division, like now, but rather
one rep from each call area and a VE rep. So, it was a
smaller committee and, I recall, closer to the League
officials. Larry, WØPAN, who you mention and an
active Arizona Outlaw too, was the Controller for ARRL
sometime back then and a multi-term Dakota Div
Director as well. I recall the “10 Meter Contest" as
something on our plate back then, but there were a lot of
other things too. I know that we, simply, wanted to
increase 10 meter activity with something intelligently
sponsored and supported. I don't recall any power
struggle with the League guys over this at all. It was
something they wanted as much as we did. In fact, the
original direction to look into the 10 Meter Contest may
have actually come from ARRL down to us. No pics of
much of anything here from those days. All my pics and
logs and everything else memorabilia were destroyed in a
rare Michigan flood I experienced in about 1981."
“My first 10 meter experience was in 1954 with a newly
issued General Class license (WNØPAN in July 1953)
and another cycle was experienced in the AM days
before SSB was even heard or thought about by most of
us." 2011 proved how successful this contest has been.
So that is how we got from a great idea in 1973 to an
event extraordinaire with 5,000+ entrants 39 years later.
If you ever run into WØPAN or K8IA thank them for
their efforts. And, remember they both were on the air in
2011. They know a good thing when they see it!
Summary
The 2012 ARRL 10 Meter Contest will be held on Dec
8th and 9th. As this article is written, solar flux has been
varying between 100 and 150 with the band wide open
on some days and closed on others. Which will it be?
We‟ll see you on the band in December!
Larry, WØPAN was one of the original promoters of the 10 Meter
Contest. (Photo by WØPAN)
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