Baron 58 POH - CSOBeech.com

BARON 58 AND S8A
(TH-773 THRU TH-1395, EXCEPT TH-1389)
PILOT'S OPERATING HANDBOOK
AND
FAA APPROVED AIRPLANE FLIGHT MANUAL
A13 Revision
July, 1994
LOG OF REVISIONS
Page
Description
Title Page
Updated
Page A (A13)
New
10-1 thru
Revised Section X, Safety
Information (May, 1994)
10-64
r;;
PAGE A
BARON 58 AND 58A
(TH·773 THRU TH·1395 EXCEPT TH·1389)
PILOT'S OPERATING HANDBOOK
AND
FAA APPROVED AIRPLANE FLIGHT MANUAL
A12 Revision
October 1990
I
LOG OF REVISIONS
Page
Description
Title Page
Updated
Page A
(A12)
New
10-1 thru
10-68
Revised Section X,
Safety Information (October, 1990)
~
PAGE A
Baron S8/S8A
(TH-773 thru TH...1395, except TH ...1389)
Pilot's Operating Handbook
and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
Log of Revisions
PIN 58-590000-21A11
A 11
March, 1988
Page
Description
Title Page
Updated
Page A (A11)
2-10
New
Revised: "KINDS OF OPERATION" and
"WARNING"
Revised: "ICE PROTECTION SYSTEMS"
4-21
8-48
Revised: "OVERHAUL OR
REPLACEMENT SCHEDULE"
F
Page A
Baron S8/S8A
(TH- 773 thru TH-1395, except TH-1389)
Pilot's Operating Handbook
and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
Log of Revisions
A10
August. 1984
Page
Title Page
Page A(A10)
Page B (A10)
1·4A and 1-48
1-10
2-2
2·6
2-10 and 2-11
2-12 thru 2-23
2-24 thru 2-30
2-31 and 2-32
3-1
3-6 and 3-7
3-11
3·12, 3-12A,
and 3-128
4-1
4-4, 4-4A. 4-4B,
4-5, and 4-6
4-9 and 4-10
4-15
7-2 and 7-3
7-10 and 7-11
7-28
7-30 and 7-31
Description
Update
Added
Added
Revised: "Important Notice"
Revised: "Propellers"
Revised: "Table of Contents"
Revised: "Propellers"
Shifted Material; Relocated Page 2-20 to Pages
2-10 and 2-11, and Revised: "Oxygen Requirements"
Relocated: "Placards" from Pages 2-21 thru 2-32
to Pages 2-12 thru 2-23
Revised: "Required Equipment for Various Conditions of Flight" title to "Kinds of Operations
Equipment list"; Revised: System and/or Component List of Same; Relocated: Same from
Pages 2-10 thru 2-19 to Pages 2-24 thru 2-30.
Deleted
Revised: "Table of Contents"
Revised: "Air Start", and Shifted Material
Added: Serialization to "Illumination of Alternator-Out Light"
Added: "Illumination of Alternator-Out light (TH1377 and after, and Airplanes Equipped With
Kit No. 55-3024)"; Shifted Material; and Added:
"Intentionally Left Blank Page"
Revised: "Table of Contents"
Revised: "Preflight Inspection"; Shifted Material;
Added "Intentionally Left Blank Page"
Revised: "Before Takeoff"
Revised: "Oxygen Duration Graph"
Revised: "Table of Contents"
Revised: "Control Switch"; Shifted Material
Added: Serialization to "Alternators"
Added: "Alternators (TH-1377 and after, and
Airplanes Equipped With Kit No. 55-3024)";
Revised: "External Power";
Shifted Material
I
A10
Page A
LOG OF REVISIONS
Page
7-43 and 7-44
8-1 and 8-2
8-6. 8-6A, and
8-68
8-7
8-13 and 8-14
8-16 thru 8-18
Page B
Description
Revised: "Engine Break-In Information"; Shifted
Material
Revised: "Table of Contents"
Revised: "Publlcancns" and Shifted Material
Revised: "Alterations to Airplane"
Deleted: "Recharging the Battery" and Shifted
Material
Revised: "Oil System", "Battery", and "Tires";
Shifted Material
I
Al0
Baron 58J58AI{TH-773 Through TH-1395,
Except TH-1389)
Pilot's Operating Handbook
and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
A9
April, 1984
LOG OF REVISIONS
Page
Title Page
Page A (A9)
Description
Update
New
r;;
Page A
Baron 58 (TH-773 and After)
Pilot's Operating Handbook
and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
A8
March 1983
LOG OF REVISIONS
PAGES
Title Page
Page A (A8)
a&b
1-4, 1-4A, 1-4B,
1-5 & 1-6
2-27 & 2-28
3-1 & 3-2
3-3 & 3-4
3-9
3-16 & 3-17
4-'
4-3
4-8A & 4-88
4-13
5-27
7-2
7-17 & 7-18
7-18A
8-2
8-23
8-25,8-26,
8-26A & 8-26B
8-31
8-36
8-41, 8-42. 8-42A,
DESCRIPTION
Update
New
Revise "Introduction" and Add "Warning"
Revise "NOTE" and Shfit Material
Revise "Placards"
Update Table of Contents
Revise" Emergency Airspeeds", Add Stall
Warning Horn Advisory and Shift Material
Revise "One Engine Inoperative Landing"
Revise "Emergency Exits"
Update Table of Contents
Revise "Airspeeds For Safe Operation"
Revise "Starting" and" After Starting
and Taxi" and Shift Material
Revise "Balked Landing"
Revise "Climb-Two Engine (3-Blade Propalter}" Graph
Update Table of Contents
Revise "Openable Cabin Windows"
Add "Emergency Exits"
Update Table of Contents
Revise" Heating and Ventilating System"
Revise "Cleaning - Exterior Painted Surfaces"
and Shift Material
Revise" Lubrication Points"
Revise "Recommended Servicing Schedule"
Revise "Consumable Materials"
8-428 & 8·43
I
AS
Page A
Baron 58 (TH773 and After)
Pilot's Operating Handbook
and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
September, 1981
A7
LOG OF REVISIONS
..
Page
Title Page
Page A (A7)
Description
Added Revision Date
New
7-2
Revised "Table of Contents"
7-3
Revised "Table of Contents"
7-28
Revised "Alternators"
7·31
Shifted Material
7·32
Revised "Interior Lighting"
7-32A
Added Page, Revised "Exterior Lighting"
7-328
Added Page
7-33
Shifted Material
r;Page A
Baron 58 (TH-773 and After)
Pilot's Operating Handbook
and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
A6
February, 1981
LOG OF REVISIONS
Page
Description
Title Page
Logo Page
Added Revision Date
Added
A Page (A6)
Update
7-32
7·33
7-34
7-35
7-36
Revised
Revised
Revised
Revised
Revised
"Cabln Heating"
"Environmental Schematic"
"Heater Operation"
"Heat Regulation"
"Cabin Ventilation"
10·1 Thru 10-67
Revised Safety Section
Dated March 1981.
"'o"
C't')
eo
0'1
C't')
..........
. . ._
..
a:,
Page A
BARON 58 (TH-n3 and After)
Pilot's Operating Handbook
and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
September, 1980
AS
LOG OF REVISIONS
Page
Description
Title Page
Page A (AS)
1-5
1-6
1-9
1·12
1-16
2-1
2-5
2-7
2·8
2-11
Add Revision Date
Update
Revised "Use of Handbook"
Shifted Material
Revised "Engines"
Revised "Airspeed Terminology"
Revised "Power Terminology"
Revised "Table of Contents"
Revised "Engines"
Revised "Power Plant Instrument Markings"
Shifted Material
Revised "Required Equipment for
Various Conditions of Flight"
Revised "Electrical Power"
Revised "Placards"
Revised "Table of Contents"
Added "Starter Energized Warning
light Illuminated"
Shifted Material
Revised "Before Starting"
Revised "Starting"
Revised "Before Take-Off"
Revised "Maximum Normal Operating Power"
Revised "Ice Protection System"
Revised "Noise Characteristics"
Revised "Time, Fuel and Distance
to Climb" Graph
Revised "Fuel Flow" vs "Horsepower"
Revised "Seating. Baggage and Equipment
Arrangement' ,
2-12
2-30 and 2-31
3-1
3-11
3-12 and 3-13
4-7
4-8 and 4-8A
4-9 and 4-10
4-10A
4-21
4-27
5-29
5-33
6-9
1 of 2
r:-
Page A
LOG OF REVISIONS
Page
7-2
7-13
7-17
7-21 and 7-22
7-22A
7-228
7-23
7-27
7-28
7-29
7-30
7-31
7-32
Description
Revised "Table of Contents"
Revised "Aft Baggage/Cargo Compartment"
Revised "Utility Door"
Shifted Material
Revised "Fuel Flow and Pressure Indicator"
Revised "Fuel Flow and Pressure Indicator"
and Added "Fuel Flow Indicator"
Added "Fuel Flow Indicator"
Shifted Material
Revised "Battery" and "Alternator"
Revised "Power Distribution Schematic"
Revised "Alternator" and "Starters"
Revised "Starters"
Shifted Material
)
)
l
)
I ..
1
2 of 2
...
. . ._ - . .
Page A
Baron 58 I 58A
PILOT'S OPERATING HANDBOOK
and
FAA APPROVED AIRPLANE FLIGHT MANUAL
LOG OF REVISIONS
A4
September, 1979
Page
Description
Title Page
Page A (A4)
Page B (A4)
Add Revision Date and Letter
Update
Update
a
Revise '" ntraduction"
Revise "Table of Contents"
Revise "Important Notice"
Revise "Use of the Handbook"
Revise "Supplements Revision Record"
and Add "Vendor-Issued STC Supplements"
Revise "Engines"
Revise "Propellers" and "Fuel"
Revise "Power Terminology"
Shifted Material
Revise "Table of Contents"
Revise "Airspeed Limitations"
Revise "Airspeed Indicator Markings"
Revise "Engines" and "Fuel"
Revise "Propellers"
Revise "Tachometer"
Revise "Flight Load Factors" and "Required
Equipment for Various Conditions of Flight"
Revise" Electrical Power"
Revise "Lights"
Revise "Engine Indicating Instruments"
Revise "Placards" and Shifted Material
Revise "Table of Contents"
Revise "Speeds for Safe Operation"
Revise "Preflight Inspection"
Revise "Before Starting"
Revise "Starting" and Shifted Material
Revise "Max imum Performance Climb"
Add "Normal Operating Power Climb"
Shifted Material
Shifted Material
Add "Windshield Anti-ice System (Electrothermal)"
Shifted Material
Add "Noise Characteristics"
Revise "Table of Contents"
1-1
1-4
1-5
1·6
1-9
1-10
1-16
1-17 thru 1-20
2-1 and 2-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
2-6
2-7
2-10
2-12
2-16
2-18
2-21 thru 2-32
4·1 and 4-2
4-3
4-5 and 4-6
4-7
4-8 and 4-8A
4-10
4-10A
4-11 and 4-1 2
4-22A
4-23
4-24 and 4·25
4-26 and 4-27
5-1 and 5-2
F
Page A
lOG OF REVISIONS
Page
5-13
5-26A
5-26B
5-27
7-1 thru 7-3
7-5
7-6 and 7-7
7-10 and 7-11
7·12
7-23
7-27
7·30
7-31
7-32
7-34
7-35
7-39
7-40A
7-41
8-1 thru 8-3
8-5
8-6
8·8
8-9
8-12
8-15
8-16
8-l8A
8-19
8-23
8-24
8-25
8-30 thru 8-33
8-36 th ru 8-39
8-41 thru 8-44
8-45
8-50
"
o
('/')
co
M
co
m
Page B
Description
Revise "Comments Pertinent to the Use of
Performance Graphs"
Revise "Climb-Two Engine (TH-773 thru
TH-1089)"
Add "Climb-Two Engine (TH·1090and After)
(2-blade propeller installed)"
Add "Climb-Two Engine (TH-l 090 and After)
(3-blade propeller installed)"
Revise "Table of Contents"
Revise "Control Column"
Shifted Material
Shifted Material
Revise "Brakes"
Revise "Fuel Flow Indicator"
Revise "Fuel Off-loading"
Revise" Alternators"
Shifted Material
Revise" Exterior Lighting"
Revise "Heater Operation"
Revise "Heat Regulation"
Revise "Stall Warning"
Add "Windshield Anti-ice (Electrothermal)"
and Shifted Material
Shifted Material
Revise "Table of Contents"
Revise "Introduction"
Revise "Publications" and "Airplane Inspection
Periods"
Shifted Material
Revise "Parking"
Revise "Preparation for Service"
Revise "Fuel Drains"
Revise "0 iI System"
Shifted Material
Add "Shock Strut Sh irnrnv Damper"
Revise "Oxygen Cylinder Retesting"
Revise "Magentos"
Revise "Exterior Painted Surfaces"
Revise "Lubrication Points"
Revise "Recommended Servicing Schedule"
Revise "Consumable Materials" and" Approved
Engine Oils"
Revise "Bulb Replacement Guide"
Revise "Overhaul or Replacement Schedule"
F
BARON 58 (TH-773 and After)
PILOT'S OPERATING HANDBOOK
AND
FAA APPROVED AIRPLANE FLIGHT MANUAL
A3
July 1979
LOG OF REVISIONS
Page
Title Page
Page
2-26
2-28
2-30
2 -31
3 -16
3-1 7
3-18
7-17
A (A3)
and 2-27
and 2-29
and 3-19
and 7-18
7-18A
7-18 B
Description
Add Revision Date and
Letter
Up date
Revise Placards
Shifted Material
Revise Placards
Shifted Material
Shifted Material
Revise Emergency E x it
Sh ifted Material
Revise Openable Cabin
Windows
Revise Openable Cabin
Windows
Shifted Material
F
Page A
BARON 58 (TH-773 and after)
PILOT'S OPERATING HANDBOOK
AND
FAA APPROVED AIRPLANE FLIGHT MANUAL
A2 ••••••••••.•••.•••••••••. 0ctober,1978
LOG OF REVISIONS
Page
Description
Title
1-9
1-12
1-13
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
2-9
2-23
2-26
2-29
3-2
3-3
3-18
Revision Date and Letter
eVa "ENGINES"
eVa "Vmea" Definition
eVe "Vsse" Definition
eVe Table of Contents
eVe "AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS"
eVe "AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS"
eVa "OIL"
ev , "MANEUVERS"
hifted Data
dd Placard
eVa Placard
eVe Table of Contents
eVa "EMERGENCY AIRSPEEDS"
elete "PRACTICE DEMONSTRATION OF Vmea"
eVe Table of Contents
eVa "SPEEDS FOR SAFE
OPERATION
dd "PRACTICE DEMONSTRATION
of Vmca"
dd "PRACTICE DEMONSTRATION
of Vmca"
eVa "POWER PLANTS"
eVa "SAFETY SECTION"
4-2
4-3
4-25
4-26
7-18
10-1 thru
10-37
r--
ort'l
co
A2
rt'l
cO
0'1. .
....
..........
Page A
Baron 58 Pilot's Operating
Handbook and FAA Approved
Airplane Flight Manual
A1
.. ....................................................... October, 1977
LOG OF REVISIONS
P8.
Deacrlptlon
Title Page
Update
Page A (A1)
Update
a and b
Renumbered Pages
1-5 and 1-6
Revise "General" Information
2-27
Revise "Placards"
2-29
Revise "Placards"
5-36
Revise "Performance"
7-16
Rearrange Material
7-17
Add "NOTE"
7-43 and 7-44
Revise "Engine Break-
8-16
Revise "Oil System"
8-36
Revise "Recommended Servicing Schedule"
in Information
8-41
Revise "Consumable Materials"
8-45
Revise "Bulb Replacement Guide"
p;Page A
Baron 58 Pilot's Operating
Handbook and FAA Approved
Airplane Flight Manual
Original
October 1976
lOG OF REVISIONS EFFECTIVE PAGE
Date
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
1976
1976
1976
1976
1976
1976
1976
1976
1976
1976
October 1976
Page
Title Page
a thru c
1-1 thru 1·20
2-1 thru 2-30
3-1 thru 3-20
4-1 thru 4-26
5-1 thru 5-48
6-1 thru 6- 22
7-1 thru 7-44
8-1 thru 8-52
Section 9
10-1 thru 10-34
Descri ption
of Revision
Original
Original
Original
Original
Original
Original
Original
Original
Original
Original
See Log of
Supplements
Original
I Original
Page A
A
October 1 976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
SECTION I
GENERAL
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SUBJECT
Important Notice
Use of the Handbook
Revising the Handbook
Supplements Revision Record
Vendor-Issued STC Supplements
Airplane Three View
Ground Turning Clearance
Descriptive Data
Engines
Propellers
,
Fuel
Oil Capacity
Weights
Cabin Dimensions
Baggage
Specific Loadings
Symbols, Abbreviations and Terminology
Airspeed Terminology and Symbols
Meteorological Terminology
Power Terminology
Engine Controls and Instruments
Airplane Pertormance and Flight
Planning Terminology
Weight and Balance Terminology
September, 1979
PAGE
1-3
1-4
1-5
1 ~6
1-6
1-7
1·8
1-9
1~9
1-9
1~1 0
1~ 11
1-11
1~ 11
1-11
1-11
1-12
1-12
1-14
1-15
1-16
1-17
1-18
1-1
Section I
General
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
1-2
October 1976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section I
General
THANK YOU . . . for displaying confidence in us by
selecting a BEECHCRAFT airplane. Our design engineers,
assemblers and inspectors have utilized their skills and
years of experience to ensure that the BEECHCRAFT Baron
meets the high standards of quality and performance for
which BEECHCRAFT airplanes have become famous
throug hout the world.
IMPORTANT NOTICE
This handbook must be read carefully by the owner and
operator in order to become familiar with the operation of
the BEECHCRAFT Baron. The handbook presents suggestions and recommendations to help obtain safe and maximum performance without sacrificing economy. The
BEECHCRAFT Baron must be operated according to the
Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane
Flight ·Manual, and/or placards located in the airplane.
As a further reminder, the owner and operator of this
airplane should also be familiar with the applicable Federal
Aviation Regulations concerning operation and
maintenance of the airplane and FAR Part 91 General
Operating and Flight Rules. Likewise this airplane must be
operated and maintained in accordance with FAA
Airworthiness Directives which may be issued against it.
The Federal Aviation Regulations place the responsibility
for the maintenance of this airplane on the owner and the
operator who must ensure that all maintenance is done by
qualified mechanics in conformity with all airworthiness
requirements established for this airplane.
All limits, procedures, safety practices, time limits,
servicing, and maintenance requirements contained in this
handbook are considered mandatory for the continued
airworthiness of this airplane, in a condition equal to that of
its origi~al manufacture.
October 1 976
1-3
Section I
General
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Authorized BEECHCRAFT Aero or Aviation Centers or
International Distributors or Dealers can provide
recommended modification, service, and operating
procedures issued by both the FAA and Beech Aircraft
Corporation, which are designed to get maximum utility and
safety from the airplane.
USE OF THE HANDBOOK
The Pilot's Operating Handbook is designed to maintain
documents necessary for the safe and efficient operation of
the Baron. The handbook has been prepared in loose leaf
form for ease in maintenance and in a convenient size for
storage. The handbook has been arranged with quick
reference tabs imprinted with the title of each section and
contains ten basic divisions:
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
1-4
General
Limitations
Emergency Procedures
Normal Procedures
Performance
6 Weight and Balance/Equipment List
7 Systems Description
8 Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
9 Supplements
10 Safety Information
1
2
3
4
5
Revised: March 1983
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section I
General
NOTE
Except as noted, all airspeeds quoted in this
handbook are Indicated Airspeeds (lAS) and assume zero instrument error.
In an effort to provide as complete coverage as
possible, applicable to any configuration of the
airplane, some optional equipment has been
included in the scope of the handbook. However, due to the variety of airplane appointments and arrangements available, optional
equipment described and depicted herein may
not be designated as such in every case.
The following information may be provided to
the holder of this manual automatically:
I
1. Original issues and revisions of Beechcraft
Service Bulletins
2. Original issues and revisions of FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual Supplements
3. Reissues and revisions of FAA Approved
Airplane Flight Manuals, Flight Handbooks,
Owner's Manuals, Pilot's Operating Manuals, and Pilot's Operating Handbooks
This service is free and will be provided only to
holders of this handbook who are listed on the
FAA Aircraft Registration Branch List or the
BEECHCRAFT International Owners Notification Service List, and then only if listed by airplane serial number for the model for which
this handbook is applicable. For detailed information on how to obtain "Revision Service"
August, 1984
1-4A
Section I
General
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
applicable to this handbook or other BEECHCRAFT Service Publications, consult a BEECHCRAFT Aero or Aviation Center, International
Distributor or Dealer, or refer to the latest
revision of BEECHCRAFT Service Instructions
No. 2001.
I
Beech Aircraft Corporation expressly reserves
the right to supersede, cancel, and/or declare
obsolete. without prior notice, any part, part
number, kit, or publication referenced in this
manual.
The owner/operator should always refer to all
supplements, whether STC Supplements or
Beech Supplements, for possible placards,
limitations, normal, emergency and other
operational procedures for proper operation of
the airplane with optional equipment installed.
1-48
August, 1984
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section I
General
REVISING THE HANDBOOK
Immediately following the Title Page is the "Log of Revisions" page(s). The Log of Revisions pages are used for
maintaining a listing of all effective pages in the handbook
(except the SUPPLEMENTS section), and as a record of
revisions to these pages. In the lower right corner of the
outlined portion of the Log of Revisions is a box containing a
capital letter which denotes the issue or reissue of the handbook. This letter may be suffixed by a number which indicates the numerical revision. When a revision to any information in the handbook is made, a new Log of Revisions will be
issued. All Logs of Revisions must be retained in the handbook to provide a current record of material status until a
reissue is made.
WARNING
When this handbook is used for airplane
operational purposes it is the pi lot's
responsibility to maintain it in current status.
Revised: March 1983
1-5
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section I
General
SUPPLEMENTS REVISION RECORD
Section IX contains the FAA Approved Airplane Flight Man~
ual Supplements headed by a Log of Supplements page. On
the "Log" page is a listing of the FAA Approved Supplemental Equipment available for installation on the BEECHCRAFT
Baron 58. When new supplements are received or existing
supplements are revised, a new "Log" page will replace the
previous one, since it contains a listing of all previous approvals, plus the new approval. The supplemental material will be
added to the grouping in accordance with the descriptive
listing.
NOTE
Upon receipt of a new or revised supplement,
compare the "Log" page you have just received
with the "Log" page in the manual. Retain the
"Log" page with the latest date on the bottom of
the page and discard the other log.
VENDOR-ISSUED STC SUPPLEMENTS
When a new airplane is delivered from the factory, the handbook will contain either an STC (Supplemental Type Certificate) Supplement or a Beech Flight Manual Supplement for
all items requiring a supplement. If a new handbook is purchased at a later date for operation of the airplane, it is the
responsibility of the owner/operator to see that all required
STC Supplements (as well as weight and balance and other
pertinent data) are retained for use in the new handbook.
Revis.ad: March 1983
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
f---------~37'1
Section I
General
0"
~~+.
1----
L-j-99"
8'11 " -
I
I- - - - - - 29'10"---------o-j·
October 1 976
1-7
Section I
General
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
GROUND TURNING CLEARANCE
A
A
B
C
D
Radius
Radius
Radius
Radius
for
for
for
for
Wing Tip. . . . . . . . . . . . ..
Nose Wheel
~ ..
Inside Gear
Outside Gear
31 feet 6
15 feet 6
7 feet 11
17 feet 6
inches
inches
inches
inches
TURNING RADII ARE PREDICATED ON THE USE OF PARTIAL BRAKING ACTION AND DIFFERENTIAL POWER.
1-8
October 1976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section I
General
DESCRIPTIVE DATA
ENGINES
Two Continental IO-520-C or IO-520-CB fuel-injected, aircooled six-cylinder, horizontally opposed engines each
rated at 285 horsepower at 2700 rpm
Take-off and Maximum
Continuous Power..
Full Throttle and 2700 rpm
Maximum Normal Operating Power (TH-1090 and After)
With 2-blade propellers
· Full Throttle and 2550 rpm
installed
.
With 3-blade propellers
· Full Throttle and 2650 rpm
installed
.
Maximum One-Engine
Full Throttle and 2700 rpm
Inoperative Power .
. 25.0 in. Hg at 2500 rpm
Cruise Climb Power .
·
24 5 in Hg at 2500 rpm
Maximum Cruise Power ..
PROPELLERS
HARTZELL
2 Blade Hubs: BHC-J2YF-2CUF
Blades: FC8475-6
Spinner: C-2285-6P
Pitch Setting at 30 inch Station: Low 14.5°; Feathered
80,0°
Diameter: 78 inches maximum, 76 inches minimum
3 Blade Hubs: PHC-J3YF-2UF
Blades: FC7663-2R
Spinner: C-3567-1 P
Pitch Setting at 30 inch Station: Low 13.0°; Feathered
82.0°
Diameter: 76 inches maximum, 74 inches minimum
September, 1980
1-9
I
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section I
General
McCAULEY (TH-773 thru TH-l089)
2 Blade Hubs: D2AF34C30
Blades: 78FF-0
Spinner: 0-3953 or 0-4046
Pitch Setting at 30 inch Station: Low 15.00 ; Feathered
79.0°
Diameter: 78 inches maximum, 76 inches minimum
I
3 Blade Hubs: D3AF32C35
Blades: 82NB-6
Spinner: PD-4068 or PD-4069
Pitch Setting at 30 inch Station: Low 14.0 0 ± .2°; Feathered
81.2° + .3°
Diameter: 76 inches, no cut-off permitted
FUEL
Aviation Gasoline 100LL (blue) or 100 (green) minimum
grade; 115/145 (purple) Aviation Gasoline alternate grade.
STANDARD SYSTEM:
Total Capacity
Total Usable
142 Gallons
136 Gallons
OPTIONAL SYSTEMS:
Total Capacity
Total Usable
172 Gallons
166 Gallons
or
Total Capacity
Total Usable
1·10
200 Gallons
194 Gallons
August, 1984
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section I
General
OIL
The oil capacity is 12 quarts for each engine.
WEIGHTS
58
Maximum Ramp Weight
Maximum Take-Off Weight
Maximum Landing Weight.
58A
Maximum Ramp Weight
Maximum Take-Off Weight
Maximum Landing Weight
. .. . .
54241bs
5400 Ibs
5400lbs
50141bs
4990 Ibs
, 4990 Ibs
CABIN DIMENSIONS
Length
Height (Max.)
Width (Max.)
Entrance Door
Utility Door Opening
12 ft 7
4 ft 2
3 ft 6
37 in. x 36
45 in. x 35
in.
in.
in.
in.
in.
BAGGAGE
Aft cabin compartment
Extended rear compartment
Nose compartment
37 cu ft
10 cu ft
, 18 cu ft
SPECIFIC LOADINGS
Wi ng Loadi ng
Power Loading
October 1976
27.1 lbs/sq ft
9.47 Ibsjhp
1-11
Section I
General
BEECH CRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
SYMBOLS, ABBREVIATIONS AND
TERMINOLOGY
The following Abbreviations and Terminologies have been
listed for convenience and ready interpretation where used
within this handbook. Whenever possible, they have been
categorized for ready reference.
AIRSPEED TERMINOLOGY AND SYMBOLS
CAS
Calibrated Airspeed is the indicated speed
of an airplane, corrected for position and
instrument error. Calibrated airspeed is equal
to true airspeed in standard atmosphere at
sea level.
GS
Ground Speed is the speed of an airplane
relative to the ground.
lAS
Indicated Airspeed is the speed of an
airplane as shown on the airspeed
indicator. lAS values pubfished in this
handbook assume zero instrument
error.
I
TAS
True Airspeed is the airspeed of an airplane
relative to undisturbed air which is the CAS
corrected for altitude, temperature, and
compressibility.
YMCA Air Minimum Control Speed is the minimum flight
speed at which the airplane is directionally
controllable as determined in accordance with
Federal Aviation Regulations. The airplane
certification conditions include one engine
becoming inoperative and windmilling, a 5degree bank towards the operative engine, takeoff power on operative engine, landing gear up,
flaps in take-off position, and most rearward e.G.
For some conditions of weight and altitude. stall
1-12
September, 1980
BEECHCRAFT Baron 68
Serial TH 773 and After
Section I
General
can be encountered at speeds above V MeA as
established by the Certification procedure
described above, in which event stall speed must
be regarded as the \imit of effective directional
control.
VSSE The Intentional One-Engine-Inoperative
Speed is a speed above both VMCA and stall
speed, selected to provide a margin of lateral
and directional control when one engine is
suddenly rendered inoperative. Intentional failing
of one engine below this speed is not
recommended.
VA
Maneuvering Speed is the maximum speed
at which application of full available aerodynamic control will not overstress the airplane.
VF
Design flap speed is the highest speed permissible
at which wing flaps may be actuated.
VFE
Maximum Flap Extended Speed is the highest
speed permissible with wing flaps in a prescribed extended position.
VLE
Maximum Landing Gear Extended Speed is
the maximum speed at which an airplane
can be safely flown with the landing gear
extended.
VNE
Never Exceed Speed is the speed limit that
may not be exceeded at any time.
VLO
Maximum Landing Gear Operating Speed is
the maximum speed at which the landing
gear can be safely extended or retracted.
VNQ
or
Maximum Structural Cruising Speed is the
speed that should not be exceeded except
.in smooth air and then only with caution.
vc
October 1978
1-13
Section I
General
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Vs
Stalling Speed or the minimum steady flight
speed at which the airplane is controllable.
VSO
Stalling Speed or the minimum steady flight
speed at which the airplane is controllable
in the landing configuration.
Vx
Best Angle-of-Climb Speed is the airspeed
which delivers the greatest gain of altitude
in the shortest possible horizontal distance.
Vy
Best Rate-of-Climb Speed is the airspeed
which delivers the greatest gain in altitude
in the shortest possible time.
METEOROLOGICAL TERMINOLOGY
ISA
International Standard Atmosphere in which
(1) The air is a dry perfect gas;
(2) The temperature at sea level is 15 0
Celsi us (59 0 Fahrenheit);
(3) The pressure at sea level is 29.92
inches Hg. (1013.2 millibars);
(4) The temperature gradient from sea
level to the altitude at which the
temperature is -56.5° C (-69.7° F)
is -0.00198° C (-0.003566° F)
per foot and zero above that altitude.
OAT
Outside Air Temperature is the free air
static temperature, obtained either from
inflight temperature indications adjusted
for instrument error and compressibility
effects, or ground'meteorological sources.
Indicated
Pressure
Altitude
1-14
The number actually read from an
altimeter when the barometric subscale has been set to 29.92 inches of
mercury (1013.2 millibars).
October 1976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section I
General
Pressure
Altitude
Altitude measured from standard
sea-level pressure (29.92 in. Hg) by
a pressure or barometric altimeter.
It is the indicated pressure altitude
corrected for position and instrument
error. In this Handbook, altimeter
instrument errors are assumed to be
zero. Position errors may be
obtained from the Altimeter
Correction Chart.
Station
Pressure
Actual atmospheric pressure at field
elevation.
Wind
The wind velocities recorded as
variables on the charts of this handbook are to be understood as the headwind or tailwind components of the
reported winds.
POWER TERMINOLOGY
Take-off and
Maximum
Continuous
The highest power rating not limited by
time.
Cruise
Climb
Power recommended for cruise climb.
Maximum
Cruise
The highest power settings recommended for cruise.
Recommended
Cruise
Intermediate power settings
for which cruise power settings are
presented.
Economy
Cruise
The lowest power setting for which
cruise power settings are presented.
October 1976
1-15
Section I
General
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
IMaximum
Normal
Operating
Power
I(MNOP)
Highest power rating within the normal
operating range. Noise characteristics
requirements of FAR 36 have been
demonstrated at this power rating.
ENGINE CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS
TERMINOLOGY
Throttle
Controls
The lever used to control the introduction of a fuel-air mixture into the intake
passages of an engine.
Propeller
Controls
This lever requests the governor to
maintain rpm at a selected value and, in
the maximum decrease rpm position,
feathers the propellers.
Mixture
Controls
This lever, in the idle cut-off position,
stops the flow of fuel at the injectors and
in the intermediate thru the full rich
positions, regulates the fuel air mixture.
Propeller
Governors
The governors maintain the selected
rpm requested by the propeller
control levers.
Manifold
Pressure
Gage
An instrument that measures the absolute pressure in the intake manifold
of an engine, expressed in inches of
mercury (in. Hg).
1-16
September, 1980
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Tachometer
Section I
General
An instrument that indicates the rotational speed of the propeller (and engine) in revolutions per minute (rpm).
AIRPLANE PERFORMANCE AND
FLIGHT PLANNING TERMINOLOGY
Climb
Gradient
The ratio of the change
in height during a portion of a climb,
to the horizontal distance traversed
in the same time interval.
Demonstrated
Crosswind
Velocity
The demonstrated crosswind velocity
is the velocity of the crosswind component for which adequate control of
the airplane during take-off and landing was actually demonstrated during
certification tests.
AccelerateStop Distance
The distance required to accelerate to
a specified speed and, assuming
failure of an engine at the instant that
speed is attained, to bring the airplane
to a stop.
AccelerateGo Distance
The distance required to accelerate to
a specified speed and, assuming
failure of an engine at the instant that
speed is attained, feather inoperative
propeller and continue takeoff on the
remaining engine to a height of 50 feet.
MEA
Minimum enroute IFR altitude.
September, 1979
1-17
Section I
General
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Route
Segment
A part of a route. Each end of that
part is identified by: (1) a geographical location; or (2) a point at which
a definite radio fix can be established.
GPH
U.S. Gallons per hour.
WEIGHT AND BALANCE TERMINOLOGY
Reference
Datum
An imaginary vertical plane from
which all horizontal distances are
measured for balance purposes.
Station
A location along the airplane fuselage
usually given in terms of distance
from the reference datum.
Arm
The horizontal distance from the reference datum to the center of gravity
(C.G.) of an item.
Moment
The product of the weight of an item
multiplied by its arm. (Moment divided
by a constant is used to simplify balance calculations by reducing the
number of digits.)
Airplane
Center of
Gravity
(C.G.)
The point at which an airplane would
balance if suspended. Its distance
from the reference datum is found
by dividing the total moment by the
total weight of the airplane.
1-18
September. 1979
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section I
General
e.G. Arm
The arm obtained by adding the airplane's individual moments and
dividing the sum by the total weight.
e.G. Limits
The extreme center of gravity locations within which the airplane must
be operated at a given weight.
Usable Fuel
Fuel available for flight planning.
Unusable
Fuel
Fuel remaining after a runout test
has been completed in accordance
with governmental regulations.
Standard
Empty
Weight
Weight of a standard airplane
including unusable fuel, full
operating fluids and full oil.
Basic
Empty
Weight
Standard empty weight plus
optional equipment.
Payload
Weight of occupants, cargo and
baggage.
Useful
Load
Difference between ramp weight
and basic empty weight.
Maximum
Ramp
Weight
Maximum weight approved for ground
maneuvering. (It includes weight of
start, taxi, and run up fuel).
Maximum
Take-off
Weight
Maximum weight approved for the
start of the take off run.
September, 1979
1-19
Section I
General
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Maximum
Landing
Weight
Maximum weight approved for the
landing touchdown.
Zero Fuel
Weight
Weight exclusive of usable fuel.
1·20
September, 1979
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
SECTION II
LIMITATIONS
TABLE OF CONTENTS
PAGE
SUBJECT
Airspeed Limitations
Airspeed Indicator Markings
Power Plant Limitations
Engines..
Fuel
Oil
Propellers
Starters - Time for Cranking
Power Plant Instrument Markings
Oil Temperature
Oil Pressure
Fuel Flow and Pressure
Fuel Flow
Manifold Pressure
Tachometer
Cylinder Head Temperature
Miscellaneous Instrument Markings
Instrument Pressure
Propeller Deice Ammeter
Fuel Quantity
Weights
CG Limits
Maneuvers
Flight Load Factors (5400 Pounds)
September. 1980
..
2-3
2-4
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-6
2-6
2-7
2-7
2-7
2-7
2-7
2-7
2-7
2-8
2-8
2-8
2-8
2-8
2-8
2-9
2-9
2-10
2-1
Section II
Limitations
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
serial TH 773 and After
TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)
SUBJECT
Minimum Flight Crew
Kinds of Operation
Fuel.
Oxygen Requirements
Maximum Passenger Seating
Configuration
Seating
Placards
Kinds of Operations
Equipment List
2-2
PAGE
2-10
2-10
2·10
2-11
2-11
2-11
2-12
2-24
AugU8t, 1984
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section II
Limitations
The limitations included in this section have been approved
by the Federal Aviation Administration and must be
observed in the operation of this airplane.
I
AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS
CAS
KNOTS
lAS
KNOTS
Never Exceed
VNE
223
223
Do not exceed this
speed in any operation
Maximum
Structural
Cruising
VNO or Vc
195
195
Do not exceed this
speed except in smooth
air and then only
with caution
Maneuvering
VA
156
156
Do not make full or
abrupt control movements above this speed
SPEED
Maximum Flap
Extension/
Extended VF~
(Approach 15
(Full Down 30°)
REMARKS
Do not extend flaps or
operate with flaps extended above this
speed
152
122
152
122
Maximum
Landing Gear
Operating/
Extended
VLO and VLE
152
152
Do not extend,
retract or operate
with gear extended above
this speed
Air
Minimum
Control
Speed VMCA
81
81
Minimum speed for
directional controllability
after sudden loss
of engine
Maximum With
Utility Doors
Removed
174
174
Utility door removal
kit must be installed
September, 1979
2-3
•
BEECHCRAFTBaron58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section II
Umitations
*AIRSPEED INDICATOR MARKINGS
I
I
MARKING
CAS
KNOTS
lAS
KNOTS
White Arc
72-122
74-122 Full Flap Operating
Range
White
Trianqle'"
152
152
Maximum Flap
Approach Position 15°
Blue Radial
100
100
Single-Engine Best
Rate-ot-Climb Speed
Red Radial
81
81
Minimum SingleEngine Control
(VMCA)
Green Arc
83-195
84-195 Normal Operating
Range
Yellow Arc
195-223
195-223 Operate with caution,
only in smooth air
Red Radial
223
223
SIGNIFICANCE
Maximum speed tor
ALL operations
-The Airspeed Indicator is marked in lAS values
--Series TH-1080 and After
2-4
September, 1979
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section II
Limitations
POWER PLANT LIMITATIONS
ENGINES
Two Continental IO-520-C (Prior to TH-973) or IO-520-CB
(TH-973 and after) fuel-injected. air-cooled, six-cylinder,
horizontally opposed engines each rated at 285 horsepower
at 2700 rpm.
Take-off and Maximum
Continuous Power......
..... Full Throttle and 2700 rpm
Maximum Normal Operating Power (TH-1090 and After)
With 2-blade propellers
installed
Full Throttle and 2550 rpm
With 3-blade propellers
installed
Full Throttle and 2650 rpm
Maximum Cylinder Head Temperature....
460
Maximum Oil Temperature
...240
Minimum Take-off Oil Temperature......
...... 75
Minimum Oil Pressure (idle).......................
..30 psi
Maximum Oil Pressure........
. 100 psi
I
GF
GF
GF
FUEL
Aviation Gasoline 100LL (blue) preferred, 100 (green)
minimum grade.
OIL
Ashless dispersant oils must meet Continental Motors
Corporation Specification MHS-24B. Refer to APPROVED
ENGINE OILS, Servicing Section.
September, 1980
2-5
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section II
Limitations
PROPELLERS
HARTZELL
2 Blade Hubs: BHC-J2YF-2CUF
Blades: FC8475-6
Spinner: C-2285-6P
Pitch Setting at 30 inch Station: Low 14.5°; Feathered
80.0°
Diameter: 78 inches maximum, 76 inches minimum
3 Blade Hubs: PHC-J3YF-2UF
Blades: FC7663-2R
Spinner: C-3567-1 P
Pitch Setting at 30 inch Station: Low 13.0°; Feathered
82.0°
Diameter: 76 inches maximum, 74 inches minimum
McCAULEY (TH-773 thru TH-1089)
2 Blade Hubs: D2AF34C30
Blades: 78FF-0
Spinner: D-3953 or D-4046
Pitch Setting at 30 inch Station: Low 15.0°; Feathered
79.0°
Diameter: 78 inches maximum, 76 inches minimum
3 Blade Hubs: D3AF32C35
Blades: 82NB-6
Spinner: PD-4068 or PD-4069
Pitch Setting at 30 inch Station: Low 14.0°±,.2°; Feathered
181.2 0 ± .3 0
Diameter: 76 inches, no cut-off permitted
STARTERS - TIME FOR CRANKING
Do not operate starter continuously for more than 30 seconds. Allow starter to cool again before cranking.
2-6
August, 1984
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section II
Limitations
POWER PLANT INSTRUMENT MARKINGS
OIL TEMPERATURE
Caution (Yellow Radial) ....
Operating Range (Green Arc) . .
Maximum (Red Radial).
.... 75°F
75 to 240"F
240"F
OIL PRESSURE
Minimum Pressure (Red Radial)
Operating Range (Green Arc)
Maximum Pressure (Red Radial)
FUEL FLOW AND PRESSURE
Serials TH-773 thru TH-1193:
Minimum (Red Radial) .....
Operating Range (Green Arc) . .
Cruise Power (Green Arc)
.
Take-off and Climb Power
(Wide Green Arc).
Maximum (Red Radial) ...
..
. 30 psi
.... 30 to 60 psi
.. 100 psi
I
.
15psi
15 psi to 243 gph
. .. 9.7 gph to 17.0 gph
... 178 gph to 243 gph
.175 psi
FUEL FLOW
Serials TH-1194 and after:
Operating Range (Green Arc) . .........
Take-off and Climb Power
(White Radials) ..
.
Maximum (Red Radial)
17.8 to 24.3 gph
.243 gph
MANIFOLD PRESSURE
Operating Range (Green Arc)
Maximum (Red Radial) ...
15t0296in Hg
296in. Hg
69 to 243 gph
TACHOMETER
Operating Range (Green Arc)
(Serials TH-773 thru TH-1089) .
..2000 to 2700 rpm
Operating Range (Green Arc) (Serials TH -1090 and
after)
With 2-blade propellers installed
2000 to 2550 rpm
With 3-blade propellers installed... . 2000 to 2650 rpm
Maximum (Red Radial). .
. .... 2700 rpm
September, 1980
2-7
section II
Limitations
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH n3 and After
CYLINDER HEAD TEMPERATURE
Operating Range (Green Arc)
Maximum Temperature (Red Radial)
200° to 460°F
.
460°F
MISCELLANEOUS INSTRUMENT MARKINGS
INSTRUMENT PRESSURE
Normal (Green Arc)
Red Button Source Failure
Indicators
PROPELLER DEICE AMMETER
Normal Operating Range
(Green Arc)
Normal Operating Range
(Green Arc)
FUEL QUANTITY
Yellow Arc
4.3 to 59 in. Hg
7 to 12 amps (2 blade)
14 to 18 amps (3 blade)
E to 1/8 Full
WEIGHTS
58
Maximum Ramp Weight
Maximum Take-Off Weigh!...
Maximum Landing Weight
5424 Ibs
5400 Ibs
5400 Ibs
58A
Maximum Ramp Weight
Maximum Take-Off Weight
Maximum Landing Weight
50141bs
4990 Ibs
4990 Ibs
Maximum Baggage/Cargo Compartment Weights:
Aft Cabin compartment
(less occupants and equipment)
400 Ibs
Extended Rear Compartment...
120 Ibs
Nose Compartment (baggage less
equipment)
300 Ibs
Refer to Weight and Balance section for additional
information.
2-8
september, 1980
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section II
Limitations
CG LIMITS
Baron 58
Forward Limits: 74 inches aft of datum at 4200 Ibs and
under, then straight line variation to 78.0 inches aft of
datum at gross weight of 5400 Ibs.
Aft Limits: 86 inches aft of datum at all weights.
Baron 58A
Forward Limits: 74 inches aft of datum at 4200 Ibs and
under, then straight line variation to 76.6 inches aft of
datum at gross weight of 4990 Ibs.
Aft Limits: 86 inches aft of datum at all weights.
Datum is 83.1 inches forward of center line through
forward jack points.
MAC leading edge is 67.2 inches aft of datum.
MAC length is 63.1 inches.
MANEUVERS
This is a normal category airplane. Acrobatic maneuvers,
including spins. are prohibited.
I
October 1978
2-9
BEECHCRAFT Baron 5B
Serial TH 773 and After
Section II
limitations
FLIGHT LOAD FACTORS (5400 POUNDS)
Positive maneuvering load factors:
Flaps Up
Flaps Down
MINIMUM FLIGHT CREW
4.2 G
2.0 G
One Pilot
KINDS OF OPERATION
This airplane is approved for the following type operations
when the required equipment is installed and operational
as defined herein:
1. VFR day and night
2. IF R day and night
WARNING
Ice protection equipment which may be installed on this airplane has not been demonstrated to meet requirements for flight into
known icing conditions.
FUEL
TOTAL FUEL with left and right wing fuel systems full:
Standard Fuel System
Capacity
Usable
142 Gallons
136 Gallons
2·10
March,1988
BEECHCRAFT Baron58
Serial TH 773 andAfter
Section II
Limitations
Optional Fuel System
Capacity
Usable
172 Gallons
166 Gallons
or
Capacity
Usable
200 Gallons
194 Gallons
Do not take off if Fuel Quantity Gages indicate in Yellow Arc
or with less than 13 gallons in each wing fuel system.
The fuel crossfeed system to be used during emergency
conditions in level flight only.
Maximum slip duration: 30 seconds
OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS
One mask for minimum crew and one mask per passenger with
an adequate supply of oxygen when operating above 12,500
feet (MSL). Refer to FAR 91 for variations concerning supplemental oxygen requirements for a particular flight.
MAXIMUM PASSENGER SEATING
CONFIGURATION
Five (5) passengers and one (1) pilot
SEATING
All occupied seats must be in the upright position for takeoff and landing.
August, 1984
2-11
I
I
Section II
Limitations
BEECHCRAFTBaron58
Serial TH 773 and After
PLACARDS
On Left Side Panel:
TURN STROBE LIGHTS OFF WHEN TAXIING IN
VICINITY OF OTHER AIRCRAFT OR WHEN
FLYING IN FOG OR CLOUDS STANDARD POSITION LIGHTS
TO BE USED FOR ALL NIGHT OPERAliONS
o
o
On Pilot's Left Sidewall Panel (58) (Serials TH-773 Thru
TH-1079, Except TH-1027, TH-1062 and TH-1067):
o
o
THIS AIRPLANE MUST BE OPERATED AS A NORMAL CATEGORY
AIRPLANE IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE OPERATING LIMITATIONS
STATED IN THE FORM OF PLACARDS, MARKINGS, AND MANUALS.
(PILOT'S CHECK LIST)
OCCUPIED SEATS MUST BE IN UPRIGHT POSITION DURING
TAKE-OFF AND LANDING
MAXIMUM WEIGHT 5400 LBS
NO ACROBATIC MANEUVERS INCLUDING SPINS APPROVED
AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS
MAX. SPEED WITH LDG GEAR EXTENDED (NORMAL) 152 KTS
MAX. SPEED WITH FLAPS EXTENDED (15' DOWN) 152 KTS
MAX. SPEED WITH FLAPS EXTENDED (NORMAL) 122 KTS
MAX. DESIGN MANEUVER SPEED 156 KTS
MIN CONTROL SPEED SINGLE ENGINE 81 KTS
NEVER EXCEED SPEED 223 KTS
MAX. STRUCTURAL CRUISE SPEED 195 KTS
0
0
On Pilot's Left Sidewall Panel (58A) (Serials TH·773 Thru
TH-1079, Except TH-1027, TH-1062 and TH-1067):
o
o
THIS AIRPLANE MUST BE OPERATED AS A NORMAL CATEGORY
AIRPLANE IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE OPERATING LIMITATIONS
STATED IN THE FORM OF PLACARDS, MARKINGS, AND MANUALS.
(PILOT'S CHECK LIST)
OCCUPIED SEATS MUST BE IN UPRIGHT POSITION DURING
TAKE-OFF AND LANDING
MAXIMUM WEIGHT 4990 LBS
NO ACROBATIC MANEUVERS INCLUDING SPINS APPROVED
AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS
MAX. SPEED WITH LDG GEAR EXTENDED (NORMAL) 152 KTS
MAX. SPEED WITH FLAPS EXTENDED (15' DOWN) 152 KTS
MAX. SPEED WITH FLAPS EXTENDED (NORMAL) 122 KTS
MAX. DESIGN MANEUVER SPEED 156 KTS
MIN CONTROL SPEED SINGLE ENGINE 81 KTS
NEVER EXCEED SPEED 223 KTS
MAX. STRUCTURAL CRUISE SPEED 195 KTS
2·12
0
0
August, 1984
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section II
Limitations
On Left Sidewall (58 & 58A) (Serials TH-1027, TH-1062,
TH-1067, TH-1080 and after):
- - - - AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS - - - MAX. LOG GEAR EXTENDED (NORMAL)
----------152 KTs
MAX. FLAPS EXTENDED (15° DOWN)
--------152 KTs
MAX. flAPS EXTENDED (NORMAL)
---------122 KTs
MAX. DESIGN MANEUVER SPEED ---156 KTs
MIN. CONTROL SPEED SINGLE ENGINE---81 KTs
NEVER EXCEED SPEED ----------223 KTs
MAX. STRUCTURAL CRUISE SPEED ---195 KTs
On Upper Left Hand Side Panel (58) (Serials TH-1027, TH1062, TH-1067, TH-1080 and after):
--------OPERATION LIMITATIONS
,
THIS AIRPLANE MUST BE OPERATED AS A NORMAL CATEGORY AIRPLANE IN
~ COMPLIANCE WITH THE OPERATING LIMITATIONS STATED IN THE FORM OF ~
PLACARDS. MARKINGS, AND MANUALS. MAXIMUM WEIGHT IS 5400 LBS.
W
II
L!=:
W
(PILOrS CHECK L1STI
OCCUPIED SEATS MUST BE IN UPRIGHT POSITION FOR TAKEOFF AND LANDING.
NO ACROBATIC MANEUVERS INCLUDING SPINS APPROVED.
d
II
On Upper Left Hand Side Panel (58A) (Serials TH-1027,
TH-1062, TH-1067, TH-1080 and after):
rr=
W
OPERATION LIMITATIONS
THIS AIRPLANE MUST BE OPERATED AS A NORMAL CATEGORY AIRPLANE IN
WITH THE OPERATING LIMITATIONS STATED IN THE FORM OF
PLACARDS, MARKINGS, AND MANUALS. MAXIMUM WEIGHT IS 4990 LBS.
II
L!=:
(PILOT'S CHECK LIST)
OCCUPIED SEATS MUST BE IN UPRIGHT POSITION FOR TAKEOFF AND LANDING.
NO ACROBATIC MANEUVERS INCLUDING SPINS APPROVED.
~ COMPLIANCE
AugU8t, 1984
,
~
W
d
II
2-13
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section II
Limitations
Between Fuel Selector Handles:
Standard 136 Gallon System
0
FUEL SELECTOR
LEFTWING
68 GAL
ON
USE CROSS FEED
IN LEVEL FLIGHT ONLY
"
/
0
RIGHT WING
68 GAL
ON
CROSS FEED
JL
I
a
F
F
0
I
a
F
F
00 NOT TAKE OFF IF FUEL QUANTITY GAGES
INDICATE IN YELLOW ARC OR WITH LESS
THAN 13 GAllONS IN EACH WING SYSTEM
0
Optional 166 Gallon System
0
FUEL SELECTOR
LEFT WING
83 GAL
ON
USE CROSS FEED
IN LEVEL FLIGHT ONLY
"-
/
0
RIGHT WING
83 GAL
ON
r:ROSS FFFD
JL
I
0
F
F
0
2-14
00 NOT TAKE OFF IF FUEL QUANTITY GAGES
INDICATE IN YEllOW ARC OR WITH LESS
THAN 13 GALLONS IN EACH WING SYSTEM
I
a
F
F
0
August, 1984
_,-ean Aircraft
BIron 58 and 58A
Temporary Change
to the
Pilot'. Operating Handbook
and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
PIN 58-590000-21 TC1
PublicatIon
Affected
58 and 58A Pilot's Operating Handbook
and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual (PIN 58-590000-21, Issued October, 1976 or Subsequent)
AIrplane 88rlal
Numbers Affected
TH·773 thru TH-1395, except TH·1389
DescrIptIon of
Change
The addition of a placard to the fuel
selectors to warn of the no-flow condition that exists between the fuel selector detents.
Filing InstructIons
Insert this temporary change Into the 58
and 58A Pilot's Operating Handbook
and FAA Approved AIrplane Flight Manual Immediately follOWing page 2·14
(Section II, LIMITATIONS) and retain
until rescinded or replaced.
PIN 58-590000·21TC1
10/21/87
1of2
___eM Aircraft
Baron 58 and 5eA
LIMITATIONS
PLACARDS
Located On The Face Of The Fuel Selector Valves, For Those
Airplanes In Compliance With S.8. 2670:
WARNING - POSITION SELECTORS IN DETENTS ONLY NO FUEL FLOW TO ENGINES BETWEEN DETENT~
Approved:
. Jackson
Raytheon Aircraft Co
DOACE·2
PIN ":580000-21TC1
2012
10/21/97
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section II
Limitations
Between Fuel Selector Handles Con't.
Optional 194 Gallon System
FUEL SELECTOR
0
LEFT WING
97 GAL
ON
USE CROSS FEED
IN LEVEL FLIGHT ONLY
/
"CROSS FEED
0
RIGHT WING
97 GAL
ON
JL
I
,
()
I
0
r
F
F
0
00 NOT TAKE OFF If fUEl QUANTITY GAGES
INDICATE IN YELLOW ARC OR WITH LESS
THAN 13 GALLONS IN EACH WING SYSTEM
0
On Inboard Side Of Seat Backs For 3rd And 4th Seats:
o
TURN
RED
HANDLE
TO
UNLOCK
SEAT
BACK
o
August, 1984
2·1&
Section II
Umitations
BEECH CRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
On Top of Front Spar Carry-Thru Structure Between Front
Seats:
EMERGENCY
LANDING GEAR
INSTRUCTIONS
TO EXTEND
ENGAGE HANDLE IN REAR
OF FRONT SEAT AND TURN
COUNTERCLOCKWISE AS FAR
AS POSSIBLE (50 TURNS)
On Emergency Crank Access Cover:
LANDING GEAR
EMERGENCY CRANK
PULL OUT
LIFT UP
On Instrument Panel When Anti-Collision Lights Are Not
Installed:
THIS AIRCRAFT NOT FULLY
EQUIPPED FOR NIGHT FLIGHT
2-16
August, 1984
section II
Limitations
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
On Lower Sidewall Adjacent to Pilot:
o
WARNING
0
EMERGENCY AIRSPEED STATIC SOURCE
ON
EMERGENCY
SEE PILOTS CHECK LIST
OR FLIGHT MANUAL
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
FOR AIRSPEED & ALTIMETER
CALIBRATION ERROR
OFF
0
NORMAL
o
OR
o
WARNING
STATIC AIR DRAIN
VALVE TO BE CLOSED
BEFORE FLIGHT
o
o
OPEN
. ~_R:I N
~
\
:::SE
DRAIN
o
Adjacent To Cabin Door Handle:
ROTATE HANDLE TO
FULL LOCKED POSITION
August, 1984
2-17
Section II
limitations
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Below Left and Right Openable Windows After Compliance
with BEECHCRAFT Service Instructions 1241:
(Serials TH-773 thru TH-1079, Except TH-1027, TH-1062
and TH-1 067):
EMERGENCY EXIT
LIFT LATCH - PULL PIN
PUSH WINDOW OUT
On Face of Emergency Exit Latch Cover (Serials TH-1027,
TH-1062, TH-1067. TH-10BOandAfter):
EMERGENCY EXIT
PULL COVER
ROTATE HANDLE UP
BREAKING SAFETY WIRE
PUSH WINDOW OUT
2-18
August, 1984
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
SerialTH 773 and After
section II
Limitations
On Emergency Exit Handle (TH-1027, TH-1062, TH-1067,
TH-1080 and After):
uP!
!"ROTATE HANDLE
BREAKING SAFETY
WIRE
~USH WINDOW OU~
On Openable Cabin Windows:
DO NOT OPEN
LATCH WINDOW
IN FLIGHT
BEFORE TAKE-OFF
Adjacent to Openeble Cabin Window Handles (Serials TH1316 and after):
~
UNLOCKED
LOCKED
On Oxygen Console:
r--
OXYGEN
NO SMOKING WHEN IN USE
L!!0SE PLUG MUST BE PULLED OUT TO STOP OXYGEN
On Each Oxygen Mask Stowage Container:
I OXYGEN
August, 1984
MASK I
I
FLO~
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
section II
Limitations
On Each Passenger Outlet (Serials TH-773 Thru TH-1079,
Except TH-1027, TH-1062 and TH-1067) and On All Pilot
and Copilot Outlets (All Serials):
On Oxygen Manifold (Serials TH-1027, TH-1062, TH-1067
and TH-10BO and after):
r--I
OXYGEN - NO SMOKING WHILE IN USE
PULL PLUG TO STOP FLOW
~
+-++++
L
ssn
MOH d01S 01 orna una
NI 311HM ~Nl)tOWS ON - NWAXO
I
I
~
Adjacent to Oxygen Outlet when 5th & 6th Seats Are
Installed:
MASK STOWED UNDER
2·20
August, 1984
Section II
Limitations
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
On Windows Adjacent to Pilot's and Copilot's Seat:
,
-t
I
I
L
SHOULDER HARNESS
MUST BE WORN AT
ALL TIMES WHILE AT
PILOT POSITIONS
On Windows Adjacent to 5th & 6th Seats And 3rd & 4th
Forward Facing Seats:
r
-------,
I
SHOULDER HARNESS
MUST BE WORN DURING
TAKE-OFF AND LANDING
IL -WITH SEAT BACK UPRIGHT c
On Windows Adjacent to 3rd & 4th Aft Facing Club Seats:
SHOULDER HARNESS
MUST BE WORN DURING
TAKE-OFF AND LANDING
WITH SEAT BACK UPRIGHT
AND AFT FACING SEATS
MUST HAVE HEADREST
FULLY EXTENDED
On Inside of Utility Door, on Left Sidewall of UfJlity
Compartment, or on Aft Bulkhead:
BAGGAGE COMPARTMENTS
o
LOAD IN ACCORDANCE WITH
WEIGHT AND BALANCE DATA
- MAXIMUM STRUCTURAL CAPACITY
MAIN COMPARTMENT - 400 POUNDS
AFT COMPARTMENT - '20 POUNDS
August, 1984
o
2·21
Section II
Limitations
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
On Left Sidewall of Utility Compartment or Aft Bulkhead
(with utility door removal kit):
BAGGAGE COMPARTMENTS
LOAD IN ACCORDANCE WITH
WEIGHT AND BALANCE DATA
o
MAXIMUM STRUCTURAL CAPACITY
MAIN COMPARTMENT· 400 POUNDS
AFT COMPARTMENT· 120 POUNDS
o
WHEN' UTILITY DOORS ARE REMOVED THE FOLLOWING
RESTRICTIONS APPLY TO CABIN AREA:
1. NO SMOKING
2. ALL LOOSE OBJECTS MUST BE SECURED
3. PERSONNEL NOT SECURED IN SEATS BY SAFETY
BELTS MUST WEAR PARACHUTES
On Floating Panel when Utility Doors are Removed:
WHEN UTILITY DOORS ARE
REMOVED AIR SPEED IS NOT TO
EXCEED 174 KNOTS
In Plain View When Nose Baggage Compartment Door Is
Open:
BAGGAGE COMPARTMENT
o
LOAD IN ACCORDANCE WITH
AIRPLANE FLIGHT MANUAL
MAXIMUM STRUCTURAL CAPACITY -
2-22
o
300 POUNDS
August, 1984
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section II
Limitations
On Control Lock
INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS
INSTALL OTHER SIDE FACING PILOT
1.CLOSE THROTTLES, INSTALL PIN
BETWEEN LEVERS, THROUGH
COLLAR LOCK & CONTROL
COLUMN. (ROTATE CONTROL
WHEEL APPROX 12° TO THE
RIGHT)
2. ROUTE CABLE & RUDDER LOCK
AROUND RIGHT SIDE OF
CONTROL COLUMN, POSITION
PEDALS IN AFT POSITION &
INSTALL LOCK IN RUDDER PEDALS.
CONTROLS LOCKED
REMOVE BEFORE
FLIGHT
August, 1984
2-23
Section II
Limitations
BEECHCRAFTBaron58
Serial TH 773 and After
KINDS OF OPERATIONS EQUIPMENT LIST
This airplane may be operated in day or night VFR, day or
night IFR when the appropriate equipment is installed and
operable.
The following equipment list identifies the systems and equipment upon which type certification for each kind of operation
was predicated. The following systems and items of equipment must be installed and operable for the particular kind of
operation indicated unless:
1. The airplane is operated in accordance with a current
Minimum Equipment List (MEL) issued by the FAA.
Or:
2. An alternate procedure is provided in the Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
for the inoperative state of the listed equipment.
Numbers on the Kinds of Operations Equipment List refer to
quantities required to be operative for a specified condition.
NOTE
The following Kinds of Operations Equipment List
does not include all specific flight instruments and
communications/navigation equipment required
by the FAR Part 91 and 135 Operating Requirements. It also does not include components obviously required for the airplane to be airworthy
such as wings, empennage, engines, etc.
2-24
August, 1984
~
I
....
~
I
Engine Tachometer (Dual Indicating)
Manifold Pressure
Indicator (Dual Indicating)
Cvlinder Head Temo Gaae
Battery
DC Alternator
DC Loadmeter
Alternator-Out Light
Starter Energized
Warning Light
(TH-1194 and after)
ENGINE INDICATING
INSTRUMENTS
ELECTRICAL POWER
SYSTEM
and/or
COMPONENT
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
VFR DAY
VFR NIGHT
IFR DAY
IFR NIGHT
...3_....~_.
0
m
!!!.:x:
"'en
~ co
»0
.... :1
III OJ
:I III
0. ...
W-4
...... "ft
... »
-4(')
:X:::EI
::!.(')
OJ
fnm
CD
In
o:I --
!:t. :I
III
I:':fn
N
I
-
~
a
r
N
m
Trim Tab Indicators
(Rudder, Aileron, and
Elevator)
Flap System
Flap Position Indicator
Stall Warning System
FLIGHT CONTROLS
Oil Pressure Indicator
Oil Temperature Indicator
ENGINE OIL
COMPONENT
and/or
SYSTEM
1
1
1
3
2
2
1
1
1
3
2
2
1
1
1
3
2
2
1
1
1
3
2
2
VFR DAY
VFR NIGHT
IFR DAY
IFR N/GH7
-
Cff
_.-
.. CII
CDCIl
~~
e.g
~ III
llIaJ
(;1:!1
....,~
%:D
-10
!!.%
::!'o
aJ
cnm
CDm
fn
~
0_
:::.~
-
III 0
3 n
~II
...,
~I
Emergency Static Air System
(If Installed)
Pilot Heater
Heated Fuel Vent
ICE AND RAIN PROTECTION
Engine Driven Fuel Pump
Electrically Driven Aux Fuel Pump
Fuel Quantity Indicator
Fuel Flow Indicator
Fuel selector Valve
FUEL EQUIPMENT
Altimeter
Airspeed Indicator
Magnetic Compass
Attitude Indicator
Turn and Slip Indicator
Directional Gyro
Clock
Outside Air Temperature Indicator
FUGHTINSTRUMENTS
0
0
0
0
0
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
2
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
UI
CD
o :I
;l=
"
0
III ..
..
3·_.111en
_.
-·0
r-
!t
» ..
;:tg
Q.III
III
-I
:1m
w."
..... »
..... ::u
-I:::t
:::to
!!?O
::l·m
enm
111m
I
....
~
Ic:
~
Cockpit and Instrument
Ught System
Landing Ught
Landing Ught (With Opt Wing
Tip Fuel Tanks TH-773
thru TH-873)
Landing Ught (With Opt Wing
Tip Fuel Tanks TH-874
and after)
Rotating Beacon
Navigation Ught
LIGHTS
SYSTEM
and/or
COMPONENT
0
0
0
2
0
1
3
0
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
3
2
2
1
1
VFR DAY
VFR NIGHT
IFR DAY
IFR NIGHT
0
~
co
"en
»0
.... ::J
::J III
III
D:l
11 ..
~::!I
"»
::I::Jl
~C')
~::I:
D:l
fnm
CD m
:::!. C')
III
o::J --
:to ::J
III
3
!::~
n
.._...-.
t&
N
I
~
II
i• I
~
Pilot's Operating Handbook
and FAA Approved Airplane
Flight Manual
PUBLICATIONS
Instrument Air System
Pressure Gage
PNEUMATIC SYSTEM
Landing Gear Motor and
Gearbox
Landing Gear Position
Indicating Lights
Landing Gear Aural
Warning Horn
Emergency Landing Gear
Extension System
LANDING GEAR
I
1
I
1
1
1
1
12
1
1
0
0
4
1
4
1
I
1
1
I
1
1
I
I
..
1
~. g.
~ ;
IH
r-
~
i g
=
! ~
;;
I
...... :D
~~
1
4
1
I 2 12
1
1
4
1
~.~n~
:i! 5
0~
...
I
~
I
~
Seat Belts (Per Seat)
Shoulder Harness (Per Seat)
RESTRAINT SYSTEM
COMPONENT
and/or
SYSTEM
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
VFR DAY
VFR NIGHT
IFR DAY
IFR NIGHT
n
lJ3
o
m
~ClO
"0'1
»0
~.::J
c. ..
Dl lJ3
::J Dl
W-t
........ . »
"T!
::I:::D
-t(")
!!.::I:
::!.
CD
cnm
III
::J -
o -
Dl 0
d'. ::J
3
-..._.
..!:':f
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
serial TH T73 and After
SECTION III
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SUBJECT
Emergency Airspeeds (5400 lBS)
One Engine Operation
Determining Inoperative Engine
One-Engine Inoperative P~ures
Engine Failure During Take-Qff
Engine Failure After Uft-off and
In Right
Air Start
Engine Fire (Ground)
Engine Fire In Flight...
Emergency Descent
Glide
Landing Emergencies
Gear Up Landing
One-Engine Inoperative Landing
One-Engine Inoperative Go-Around
Systems Emergencies
One-Engine Inoperative Operation on
Crossfeed
Electrical Smoke or Fire
Starter Energized Warning Ught Illuminated
Illumination of Alternator-Out Ught
(TH-773 thru TH-1376)
Illumination of A1ternator-out Ught
(TH-1377 and After, and Airplanes Equipped
With Kit No. 55-3024)
Unscheduled Electric Elevator Trim
Landing Gear Manual Extension
Auguat, 1184
PAGE
3-3
3-3
3-4
3-4
3-4
3-5
3-6
3-7
3-7
3-7
3-8
3-8
3-8
3-9
3-9
3-10
3-10
3-10
3-11
3-11
3-12
3-12A
3-13
3-1
Section III
Emergency Procedures
BEECHCRAFTBaron58
Serial TH 773 and After
TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)
SUBJECT
Landing Gear Retraction After
Practice Manual Extension
Ice Protection
Surface Deice System
Electrothermal Propeller Deice
System
Emergency Static Air Source
Emergency Exits
Unlatched Door in Flight
Simulated One-Engine Inoperative
Spins
3-2
PAGE
3-13
3-14
3-14
3-14
3-15
3-16
3-17
3-17
3-18
Revised: March 1983
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section III
Emergency Procedures
All airspeeds quoted in this section are indicated airspeeds
(lAS) and assume zero instrument error.
EMERGENCY AIRSPEEDS (5400 LBS)
One-Engine-Inoperative Best
Angle-ot-Climb (Vx) .......................• 96 kts
One-Engine-Inoperative Best
100 kts
Rate-of-Climb (Vy)
Air Minimum Control Speed (VMCA) _...•.•...•• 81 kts
100 kts
One-Engine-Inoperative Enroute Climb
Emergency Descent .••••...... _• . . . . . . . . . . . •. 152 kts
One-Engine-Inoperative landing:
Maneuvering to Final Approach . _. . . . . . . . .. 100 kts
100 kts
Final Approach (Flaps Down)
Intentional One-Engine-Inoperative
Speed (VSSE) .•••••••................ - • • .. 86 kts
Maximum Glide Range ...........•••......... 120 kts
On Serials TH-973 and After, the stall warning horn is
inoperative when the banery and ahernator switches are
turned off.
The following information is presented to enable the pilot to
form, in advance, a definite plan at action for coping with
the most probable emergency situations which could occur
in the operation of the airplane. Where practicable, the
emergencies requiring immediate corrective action are
treated in check list form for easy reference and familiarization. Other situations, in which more time is usually permitted to decide on and execute a plan of action, are
discussed at some length. In order to supply one safe speed
for each type of emergency situation, the airspeeds presented were derived at 5400 Ibs.
ONE ENGINE OPERATION
Two major factors govern one engine operations; airspeed
and directional control. The airplane can be safely maneu-
Revised: March 1983
3-3
Section III
Emergency Proced ures
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
vered or trimmed for normal hands-off operation and
sustained in this configuration by the operative engine AS
LONG AS SUFFICIENT AIRSPEED IS MAINTAINED.
DETERMINING INOPERATIVE ENGINE
The following checks will help determine which engine has
failed.
1. DEAD FOOT· DEAD ENGINE. The rudder pressure re~
quired to maintain directional control will be on the side
of the good engine.
2. THROTILE. Partially retard the throttle for the engine
that is believed to be inoperative; there should be no
change in control pressures or in the sound of the engine if the correct throttle has been selected. AT LOW
ALTITUDE AND AIRSPEED THIS CHECK MUST BE AC~
COMPLISHED WITH EXTREME CAUTION.
Do not attempt to determine the inoperative engine by
means of the tachometers or the manifold pressure gages.
These instruments often indicate near normal readings.
ONEMENGINE INOPERATIVE PROCEDURES
ENGINE FAILURE DURING TAKE-OFF
1. Throttles - CLOSED
2. Braking - MAXIMUM
If insufficient runway remains for stopping:
3. Fuel Selector Valves - OFF
4. Battery, Alternator, and Magnetq.Start Switches - OFF
3-4
Revised: March 1983
Section III
Emergency Procedures
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
ENGINE FAILURE AFTER LIFT-OFF
AND IN FLIGHT
NOTE
The most important aspect of engine failure is
the necessity to maintain lateral and directional control. If airspeed is below 81 kts, reduce power on the operative engine as required to maintain control.
An immediate landing is advisable regardless of take-off
weight. Continued flight cannot be assured if take-off
weight exceeds the weight determined from the TAKE-OFF
WEIGHT graph. Higher take-off weights will result in a loss
of altitude while retracting the landing gear and feathering
the propeller. Continued flight requires immediate pilot response to the following procedures.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
landing Gear and Flaps - UP
Throttle (inoperative engine) - CLOSED
Propeller (inoperative engine) - FEATHER
Power (operative engine) - AS REQUIRED
Airspeed-MAINTAINSPEEDATENGINEFAILURE(l00
KTS MAX.) UNTIL OBSTACLES ARE CLEARED.
After positive control of the airplane is established"
6. Secure inoperative engine:
a. Mixture Control - IDLE CUT-OFF
b. Fuel Selector - OFF
c. Auxiliary Fuel Pump - OFF
d. Magneto/Start Switch - OFF
e. Alternator Switch - OFF
f. Cowl Flap - CLOSED
7. Electrical Load - MONITOR (Maximum load of 1.0 on remaining engine)
October 1976
3-5
Section III
Emergency Procedures
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
AIR START
CAUTION
The pilot should determine the reason for engine failure before attempting an air start.
1. Fuel Selector Valve - ON
2. Throttle - SET approximately 1/4 travel
3. Mixture Control - FULL RICH, below 5000 ft (1;2 travel
above 5,000 ft)
4. Aux Fuel Pump - LOW
5. Magnetos - CHECK ON
6. Propeller:
WITH UNFEATHERING ACCUMULATORS:
a.
b.
Move propeller control full forward to accomplish
unfeathering. Use starter momentarily if necessary.
Return control to high pitch (low rpm) position, when
wind milling starts, to avoid overspeed.
If propeller does not unfeather or engine does not turn, proceed
to WITHOUT UNFEATHERING ACCUMULATORS procedure.
WITHOUT UNFEATHERING ACCUMULATORS;
a.
b.
c.
Move propeller control forward of the feathering
detent to midrange.
Engage Starter to accomplish unfeathering.
If engine fails to run. clear engine by allowing it to
windmill with mixture in IDLE CUT-OFF. When
engine fires, advance mixture to FULL RICH.
7. When Engine Starts - ADJUST THROTILE, PROPELLER and MIXTURE CONTROLS
8. Aux Fuel Pump - OFF (when reliable power has been
regained)
3-6
August, 1984
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section III
Emergency Procedures
9. Alternator Switch - ON
10. Oil Pressure - CHECK
11. Warm Up Engine (approximately 2000 rpm and 15 in.
Hg)
12. Set power as required and trim
ENGINE FIRE (GROUND)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Mixture Controls - IDLE CUT-OFF
Continue to crank affected engine
Fuel Selector Valves - OFF
Battery and Alternator Switches - OFF
Extinguish with Fire Extinguisher
ENGINE FIRE IN FLIGHT
Shut down the affected engine according to the following
procedure and land immediately. Follow the applicable
single-engine procedures in this section.
1. Fuel Selector Valve - OFF
2. Mixture Control - IDLE CUT-OFF
3. Propeller - FEATHERED
4. Aux Fuel Pump - OFF
5. MagnetojStart Switch - OFF
6. Alternator Switch - OFF
EMERGENCY DESCENT
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Propellers - 2700 RPM
Throttles - CLOSED
Airspeed - 152 kts
Landing Gear - DOWN
Flaps - APPROACH (15°)
August, 1984
3-7
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section III
Emergency Procedures
GLIDE
1.
2.
3.
4.
Propellers - FEATHER
Flaps - UP
Landing Gear - UP
Cowl Flaps - CLOSED
The glide ratio in this configuration is approximately 2
nautical miles of gliding distance for each 1000 feet of
altitude above the terrain at an airspeed of 120 kts.
LANDING EMERGENCIES
GEAR-UP LANDING
If possible, choose firm sod or foamed runway. When
assured of reaching landing site:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Cowl Flaps - CLOSE0
Wi ng Flaps - AS DESIRED
Throttles - CLOSED
Fuel Selectors - OFF
Mixture Controls - IDLE CUT-OFF
Battery, Alternator and Magnetq.-5tart Switches - OFF
Keep wings level during touchdown.
Get clear of the airplane as soon as possible after it
stops.
NOTE
The gear up landing procedures are based on
the best available information and no actual
tests have been conducted.
3-8
October 1 976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section III
Emergency Procedures
ONE-ENGINE-INOPERATIVE LANDING
On final approach and when it is certain that the field can be
reached:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Landing Gear - DOWN
Flaps - APPROACH (15°)
Airspeed - 100 kts
Power - AS REQUIRED to maintain 800 ft/min rate of
descent
When it is certain there is no possibility of go-around:
5. Flaps - DOWN (30°)
6. Execute normal landing
ONE-ENGiNE-INOPERATIVE GO-AROUND
WARNING
Level flight might not be possible for certain
combinations of weight, temperature and altitude. In any event, DO NOT attempt a one
engine inoperative go-around after flaps have
been fully extended.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Power - MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE
Landing Gear - UP
Flaps - UP (0°)
Airspeed - MAINTAIN 100 KTS
Revised: March 1983
I
Section III
Emergency Proced ures
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
SYSTEMS EMERGENCIES
ONE-ENGINE INOPERATIVE OPERATION
ON CROSSFEED
NOTE
The fuel crossfeed system is to be used only
duri ng emergency conditions in level flight only.
Left engine inoperative:
1. Right Aux Fuel Pump - LOW
2. Left Fuel Selector Valve - OFF
3. Right Fuel Selector Valve - CROSSFEED
4. Right Aux Fuel Pump - LOW or OFF as required
Right engine inoperative:
1. Left Aux Fuel Pump - LOW
2. Right Fuel Selector Valve - OFF
3. Left Fuel Selector Valve - CROSSFEED
4. Left Aux Fuel Pump - LOW or OFF as required
ELECTRICAL SMOKE OR FIRE
Action to be taken must consider existing conditions and
equipment installed:
1. Battery and Alternator Switches - OFF
WARNING
Electrically driven flight
become inoperative.
instruments
will
2. Oxygen - AS REQUIRED
3. All Electrical Switches - OFF
4. Battery and Alternator Switches - ON
3-10
October 1976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section III
Emergency Procedures
5. Essential Electrical Equipment - ON (Isolate defective
equipment)
NOTE
Ensure fire is out and will not be aggravated by
draft. Turn off CABIN HEAT switch and push in
the CABIN AIR control. Open pilot's storm
window, if required.
STARTER ENERGIZED WARNING LIGHT ILLUMINATED
(If installed)
After engine start, should the starter relay remain engaged,
the starter will remain energized and the starter energized
warning light will remain illuminated. Continuing to supply
power to the starter will result in eventual loss of electrical
power.
ON THE GROUND:
1. Battery Master and both Alternator Switches . OFF.
2. Do not take off.
IN FLIGHT AFTER AIR START
1. Battery Master and both Alternator Switches - OFF.
2. Land as soon as practical.
ILLUMINATION OF ALTERNATOR OUT LIGHT (TH-773I
thru TH-1376)
In the event of the illumination of a single AL TERNA TOR
OUT light:
1. Check the respective loadmeter for load indication
a. No Load - Turn off affected alternator
b. Regulate load
In the event of the illumination of both AL TERNA TOR OUT
lights:
1. Check loadmeters for load indication
a. No load indicates failure of regulator
(1 ) Switch regulators
(2) System should indicate normal
August, 1984
3-11
Section III
Emergency Procedures
b.
c.
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
If condition recurs
(1) Switch to original regulator
(2) System returns to normal, indicates
overload condition causing malfunction
(3) Reduce load
If condition indicates malfunction of both
alternator circuits
(1) Both ALT Switches - OFF
(2) Minimize electrical load since only battery
power will be available
ILLUMINATION OF ALTERNATOR - OUT LIGHT (TH-1377
AND AFTER, AND AIRPLANES EQUIPPED WITH KIT NO.
55-3024)
In the event of the illumination of
OUT light:
a single ALTERNATOR -
1. Check the respective loadmeter for load indication.
a.
b.
c.
d.
No Load - Turn off affected alternator.
Regulate load to less than 100 % of remaining
alternator.
Affected Alternator - ON. Check load indication.
No Load - Turn affected alternator off and leave
off.
In the event of the illumination of both ALTERNATOR - OUT
lights:
1. Check loadmeters for load indication.
a.
b.
c.
3-12
No Load - Turn both alternator switches off.
Reduce load to minimum (must be less than the
rating of one alternator).
Left Alternator - ON. If no indication on loadmeter,
turn off and leave off.
August, 1984
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
d.
e.
2.
Section III
Emergency Procedures
Right Alternator - ON. If no indication on
loadmeter, turn off and leave off.
Adjust electrical load.
If condition indicates malfunction of both alternator
circuits:
a.
b.
Both ALT switches - OFF.
Minimize electrical load since only battery power
will be available.
UNSCHEDULED ELECTRIC ELEVATOR TRIM
Incorporated in the system is an emergency release button
located on the left handle grip of the pilot's control wheel.
This button can be depressed to deactivate the system
quickly in case of a malfunction in the system. The system
will remain deactivated only while the release button is
being held in the depressed position.
1. Airplane Attitude - MAINTAIN using elevator control
2. Trim Release (under pilot's thumb adjacent to control
wheel trim switch) - HOLD IN DEPRESSED
POSITION
3. Trim - MANUALLY RE-TRIM AIRPLANE
4. Electric Trim - OFF
5. Trim Release . RELEASE
6. Circuit Breaker - PULL
NOTE
Do not attempt to operate the electric trim
system until the cause of the malfunction has
been determined and corrected.
August, 1984
3-12A
Section III
Emergency Procedures
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
3..128
AUgU8t, 1984
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section III
Emergency Procedures
LANDING GEAR MANUAL EXTENSION
Reduce airspeed before attempting manual extension of
the land;ng gear.
1. LOG GR MOTOR Circuit Breaker - PULL
2. Landing Gear Handle - DOWN
3. Remove cover from handcrank at rear of front seats.
Engage handcrank and turn counterclockwise as far
as possible (approximately 50 turns). Stow handcrank.
4. If electrical system is operative. check landing gear
position lights and warning horn (check LOG GR
RELAY circuit breaker engaged.)
CAUTION
The manual extension system is designed only
to lower the landing gear; do not attempt to
retract the gear manually.
WARNING
Do not operate the landing gear electrically
with the hand crank engaged. as damage to the
mechanism could occur.
After emergency landing gear extension do not
move any landing gear controls or reset any
switches or circuit breakers until airplane is on
jacks, as failure may have been in the gear-up
circuit and gear might retract with the airplane
on the ground.
I
LANDING GEAR RETRACTION AFTER PRACTICE
MANUAL EXTENSION
After practice manual extension of the landing gear, the
gear may be retracted electrically, as follows:
1.
2.
3.
Handcrank - CHECK, STOWED
Landing Gear Motor Circuit Breaker - IN
Landing Gear Handle - UP
September, 1980
3-13
Section III
Emergency Procedures
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
ICE PROTECTION
SURFACE DEICE SYSTEM
a.
Failure of AUTO Operation
(1) Surface Deice Switch - MANUAL (Do not hold
more than 8 seconds)
CAUTION
The boots will inflate only as long as the switch
is held in the MANUAL position. When the
switch is released the boots will deflate.
b.
Failure of boots to deflate
(1) Pull circuit breaker on pi lot's side panel.
ELECTROTHERMAL PROPELLER DEICE
SYSTEM
1. Loss of one alternator; turn off unnecessary electrical
equipment. Turn the prop deice system off while
operating the cabin heater blower or the landing gear
motor. Monitor electrical loads so as not to exceed
alternator capacity of 1.0 on the loadmeter.
An abnormal reading on the Propeller Deice Ammeter indicates need for the following action:
a.
Zero Amps:
Check prop deice circuit breaker. If the circuit
breaker has tripped,- a wait of approximately 30
seconds is necessary before resetting. If ammeter
reads 0 and the circuit breaker has not tripped or if
the ammeter still reads 0 after the circuit breaker
has been reset, turn the switch off and consider the
prop deice system inoperative.
3-14
October 1976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
b.
Section III
Emergency Procedures
Zero to 7 Amps, 2 Blade Propeller; Zero to 14Amps,
3 Blade Propeller:
If the prop deice system ammeter occasionally or
regularly indicates less than 7 amps for 2 blade, (or
14 amps for 3 blade), operation of the prop deice
system can continue unless serious propeller imbalance results from irregular ice throw-ofts.
c.
12 to 15 Amps, 2 Blade Propeller; 18 to 23 Amps, 3
Blade Propeller:
If the prop deicing system ammeter occasionally or
regularly indicates 12 to 15 amps for 2 blade (or 18
to 23 amps for 3 blade), operation of the prop deice
system can continue unless serious propeller imbalance results from irregular ice throw-offs.
d.
More than 15 Amps, 2 Blade Propeller, More than
23 amps, 3 Blade Propeller:
If the prop deice system ammeter occasionally or
regularly indicates more than 15 amps for 2 blade,
or more than 23 amps for 3 blade, the system
should not be operated unless the need for prop
deicing is urgent.
EMERGENCY STATIC AIR SOURCE SYSTEM
THE EMERGENCY STATIC AIR SOURCE SHOULD BE USED
FOR CONDITIONS WHERE THE NORMAL STATIC SOURCE
HAS BEEN OBSTRUCTED. When the airplane has been
exposed to moisture and/or icing conditions (especially on
the ground), the possibility of obstructed static ports should
be considered. Partial obstructions will result in the rate of
climb indication being sluggish during a climb or descent.
October 1976
3-15
Section III
Emergency Procedures
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Verification of suspected obstruction is possible by
switching to the emergency system and noting a sudden
sustained change in rate of climb. This may be accompanied
by abnormal indicated airspeed and altitude changes
beyond normal calibration differences.
Whenever any obstruction exists in the Normal Static Air
System or the Emergency Static Air System is desired for
use:
1. Emergency Static Air Source - Switch to
EMERGENCY. (lower sidewall adjacent to pilot)
ON
2. For Airspeed Calibration and Altimeter Corrections,
refer to the PERFORMANCE section.
CAUTION
The emergency static air valve should remain in
the OFF NORMAL position when system is not
needed.
EMERGENCY EXITS
Emergency exits, provided by the openable window on each
side of the cabin, may be used for egress in addition to the
cabin door and the utility door.
NOTE
For access past the 3rd and/or 4th seats, rotate
the red handle, located on the lower inboard
side of the seat back. and fold the seat back
over.
3-16
Revised: March 1983
BEECHCRAFTBaron58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section III
Emergency Procedures
To Open Each Emergency Exit:
Serials TH-773 thru TH-1079, Except TH -1027, TH-1062,
and TH-l 067:
An emergency exit placard is installed below the left and
right openable windows.
1. Lift the latch.
2. Pullout the emergency release pin and push the
window out.
Serials TH-1027, TH-1062, TH-1067, TH-l080 and After:
1. Remove cover as indicated by placard in the center of
the Ventilation/Emergency Exit latch.
2. Rotate handle up as indicated by placard, breaking
safety wire, and push window out.
NOTE
Anytime the window has been opened by
breaking the safety wire on the red emergency
latch, the window must be reattached and
wired by a qualified mechanic using OQ-W343, Type S, .020 diameter copper wire prior to
further airplane operation.
UNLATCHED DOOR IN FLIGHT
If the cabin door is not locked it may come unlatched in
flight. This may occur during or just after take-off. The door
will trail in a position approximately 3 to 4 inches open.
Flight characteristics of the airplane will not be affected
Revised: March 1983
3-17
Section III
Emergency Procedures
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
except for a reduction in performance. Return to the field in
a normal manner. If practicable, during the landing flareout have a passenger hold the door to prevent it from
swinging open.
SIMULATED ONE ENGINE INOPERATIVE
ZERO THRUST (Simulated Feather)
Use the following power setting (only on one engine at a
time) to establish zero thrust. Use of this power setting
avoids the difficulties of restarting an engine and preserves the availability of engine power.
The following procedure should be accomplished by alternating small reductions of propeller and then throttle,
until the desired setting has been reached.
1. Propeller Lever - RETARD TO FEATHER DETENT
2. Throttle Lever - SeT 12 in. Hg MANIFOLD PRESSURE
NOTE
This setting will approximate Zero Thrust using
recommended One-Engine Inoperative Climb
speeds.
SPINS
If a spin is entered inadvertently:
Immediately move the control column full forward, apply
full rudder opposite to the direction of the spin and reduce
power on both engines to idle. These three actions should
3-18
JUly 1979
Section III
Emergency Procedures
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
be done as near simultaneously as possible; then continue
to hold this control position until rotation stops and then
neutralize all controls and execute a smooth pullout.
Ailerons should be neutral during recovery.
NOTE
Federal Aviation Administration Regulations do
not require spin demonstration of airplanes of
this weight; therefore, no spin tests have been
conducted. The recovery technique is based on
the best available information.
July 1979
3·19
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
SECTION IV
NORMAL PROCEDURES
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SUBJECT
PAGE
Airspeeds for Safe Operation (5400 L8S)
Preflight Inspection
Before Starting
Starting
After Starting and Taxi
Before Takeoff
Takeoff
Maximum Performance Climb
Cruise Climb
Normal Operating Power Climb
Cruise
Leaning Using the Exhaust Gas
Temperature Indicator
Descent
,
Before Landing
Balked Landing
After Landing
Shutdown
Oxygen System
Electric Elevator Trim
Cold Weather Operation
Preflight Inspection
Engines
External Power
Starting Engines Using
Auxiliary Power Unit..
Taxiing
4-3
4-4
4-6
4-7
4-88
4-9
4-10
4-10
4-10
4-1 OA
4-1 OA
August, 1984
4-1 OA
4-12
4-12
4-13
4-13
4-13
4-14
4-16
4·17
4-17
4-17
4-1 9
4-20
4-20
4-1
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)
SUBJECT
PAGE
Ice Protection Systems
4
Emergency Static Air Source
4-21
Surface Deice System
.4-22
Electrothermal Propeller Deice
4 2 2A
Windshield Anti-ice System
(Electrothermal)
4-23
Propeller and Windshield Anti-ice System
(Fluid Flow).
.4-24
Pitot Heat and Heated Stall Warning
4-24
Fuel Vent Heat
4-25
Windshield Defogging
.4-25
,4-25
Engine Break-In Information
Practice Demonstration of VMCA . . . . . . . . . . . • . . .4-25
4-26
Noise Characteristics
w21
w
4-2
September, 1979
BEECHCRAFTBaron58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section IV
Normal Procedures
All airspeeds quoted in this section are indicated airspeeds
(lAS) and assume zero instrument error.
AIRSPEEDS FOR SAFE OPERATION (5400 LBS)
Maximum Demonstrated Crosswind
Component
Takeoff:
Lift -off
50-ft Speed
Two-Engine Best Angle-of-Climb (Vx)
Two-Engine Best Rate-of-Climb (Vy)
Cruise Climb
Turbulent Air Penetration
Landing Approach:
Flaps ON
Balked Landing Climb. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
Intentional One-Engine-Inoperative
Speed (VSSE)
Air Minimum Control Speed (VMCA)
Revised: March 1983
22 kts
86 kts
94 kts
86 kts
104 kts
139 kts
156 kts
96 kts
96 kts
86 kts
81 kts
4-3
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section IV
Normal Procedures
NOTE
I
Refer to all applicable Beech Supplements and
STC Supplements for flight phase procedures for
optional equipment installed in the airplane.
PREFLIGHT INSPECTIO"N
1. COCKPIT:
a. Control Lock - REMOVE AN D STOW
b. Parking Brake - SET
c. All Switches - OFF
d. Trim Tabs - SET TO ZERO
2. RIGHT FUSELAGE:
a. Load Distribution - CHECK AND SECURED
b. Utility Door - SECURE
c. Static Port - UNOBSTRUCTED
d. Emergency Locator Transmitter - ARMED
3. EMPENNAGE:
a. Control Surfaces, Tabs and Deice Boots - CHECK
CONDITION, SECURITY, AND ATTACHMENT
b. Tail Cone, Tail Light, and Rudder Beacon - CHECK
c. Tie Down - REMOVE
d. Cabin Air Inlet - CHECK
4-4
August, 1984
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH-773 and After
Section IV
Normal Procedures
4. LEFT FUSELAGE:
a. Cabin Air Outlet - CHECK
b. Static Port - UNOBSTRUCTED
c. All Antennas and Lower Beacon - CHECK
5. LEFT WING TRAILING EDGE:
a. Fuel Sump Aft of Wheel Well - DRAIN
b. Fuel Vents CHECK
c. Flaps - CHECK GENERAL CONDITION
d. Aileron - CHECK CO~DITION AND FREEDOM OF
MOVEMENT, TAB NEUTRAL WHEN AILERON
NEUTRAL
w
6. LEFT WING LEADING EDGE
a. Lights and Deice Boot - CHECK FOR CONDITION
b. Stall Warning Vane - CHECK FREEDOM OF
MOVEMENT
c. Fuel - CHECK QUANTITY AND CAP(S) SECURE. ALWAYS CHECK WING TIP TANK FIRST (IF INSTALLED); DO NOT REMOVE INBOARD CAP IF
FUEL IS VISIBLE IN TIP TANK.
d. Wing Tip Tank (if installed) Sump - DRAIN
e. Fuel Sight Gage - CHECK
f. Tie Down, Chocks - REMOVE
g. Engine ou . CHECK QUANTITY, CAP AND DOOR
SECURE
h. Engine Cowling and Doors - CHECK CONDITION
AND SECURITY
i. Landing Light (if installed) - CHECK
j. Engine Air Intake - REMOVE COVER AND EXAMINE FOR OBSTRUCTIONS
August, 1984
4-4A
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH-773 and After
INTENTIONALLV LEFT BLANK
4..4 8
August, 1984
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH-773 and After
k.
I.
m.
n.
o.
Section IV
Normal Procedures
Propeller - EXAMINE FOR NICKS, SECURITY
AND OIL LEAKS
Cowl Flap - CHECK
Wheel Well Doors, Tire, Brake Line and Shock
Strut - CHECK
Landing Gear Uplock Roller - CHECK
Fuel Drains - DRAIN
7. NOSE SECTION
a. Wheel Well Doors, Tire and Shock Strut - CHECK
b. Pitot(s) - REMOVE COVER, EXAMINE FOR
OBSTRUCTIONS
c. Taxi Light - CHECK (if installed)
d. Heater Air Inlets - CLEAR
e. Oxygen - CHECK
f.
Baggage Door - SECURE
8. RIGHT WING LEADING EDGE
a. Wheel Well Doors, Tire, Brake Line, and Shock
Strut - CHECK
b. Landing Gear Uplock Roller - CHECK
c. Cowl Flap - CHECK
d. Fuel Drains - DRAIN
e. Engine Oil - CHECK QUANTITY, CAP AND DOOR
SECURE
f. Engine Cowling and Doors - CHECK CONDITION
AND SECURITY
g. Landing Ught (if installed) - CHECK
h. Propeller - EXAMINE FOR NICKS, SECURITY,
AND OIL LEAKS
i.
Engine Air Intake - REMOVE COVER AND
EXAMINE FOR OBSTRUCTIONS
j.
Fuel Sight Gage - CHECK
k. Fuel· CHECK QUANTITY AND CAP(S)
SECURE. ALWAYS CHECK WING TIP TANK
FIRST (IF INSTALLED); DO NOT REMOVE
INBOARD CAP IF FUEL IS VISIBLE IN TIP
TANK.
August, 1984
4-5
Section IV
Normal Procedures
I.
m.
n.
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH-773 and After
Wing Tip Tank (if installed) Sump - DRAIN
Tie Down and Chocks - REMOVE
Lights and Deice Boot ~ CHECK FOR
CONDITION
9. RIGHT WING TRAILING EDGE
a. Aileron - CHECK CONDITION AND FREEDOM
OF MOVEMENT
b. Fuel Vents - CHECK
c. Fuel Sump Aft of Wheel Well - DRAIN
d. Flaps - CHECK GENERAL CONDITION
NOTE
Check operation of lights if night flight is
anticipated.
CAUTION
DO NOT TAXI WITH A FLAT SHOCK STRUT,
BEFORE STARTING
1. Seats - POSITION AND LOCK SEAT BACKS
UPRIGHT
2. Seat Belts and Shoulder Harnesses· FASTEN
3. Parking Brakes - SET
4. All Avionics· OFF
5. Oxygen· CHECK QUANTITY AND OPERATION
6. Landing Gear Handle - DOWN
7. Cowl Flaps - CHECK. OPEN
8. Fuel Selector Valves . CHECK OPERATION THEN
ON
4~6
AugU8t, 1984
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section IV
Normal Procedures
9. All Circuit Breakers, Switches and Equipment Controls
- CHECK
10. Battery and Alternator Switches - ON (if external power
is to be used, Alternator Switches - OFF)
11. Fuel Quantity Indicators - CHECK QUANTITY (See
LIMITATIONS for take-off fuel)
12. Landing Gear Position Lights - CHECK
STARTING
1. Throttle Position - APPROXIMATELY 1 2 IN. OPEN
2. Propeller Control - LOW PITCH (high rpm)
3. Mixture Control - FULL RICH
NOTE
If the engine is hot. and the ambient temperature is 90°F or above, place mixture control in
IDLE CUT-OFF, switch aux fuel pump to HIGH
for 30 to 60 seconds, then OFF. Return mixture
control to FULL RICH.
September, 1980
Section IV
Normal Procedures
1
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
4. Aux Fuel Pump - HIGH (until fuel flow stabilizes then OFF)
5. Magneto/Start Switch
w
START (Observe Starter
Limits)
CAUTION
Do not engage starter for more than 30 seconds
in any 4-minute time period.
NOTE
In the event of a balked start (or overprime condition) place mixture control in IDLE CUT-OFF
and open the throttle; operate the starter to
remove excess fuel. As engine starts, reduce
the throttle to idle rpm and place the mixture
control in FULL RICH.
6. Warm-up - 1000 to 1200 RPM
7. Oi I Pressure - 25 PSI WITHIN 30 SECONDS
8. External Power (if used) - DISCONNECT
WARNING
When using external power, start the right engi ne fi rst, si nce the externa I power receptacle is
on the left nacelle. Disconnect external power
before starting left engine.
4..8
September, 1980
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
9. Alternator Switch - ON
10. All Engine Indicators - CHECK
11. Starter Energized Warning Light (if installed) ~ CHECK
for illumination during initial start. Should not be
illuminated after starting.
CAUTION
If the starter energized warning light is not
installed, or is inoperative and the total of both
loadmeters exceeds .2 after two minutes at
1OOO~ 1200 rpm, with no additional electrical
equipment on, and the indication shows no
signs of decreasing, an electrical malfunction is
indicated. The battery master and both alternator switches should be placed in the OFF
position. Do not take off.
I
CAUTION
Low voltage, high ammeter or loadmeter
readings, dimming of lights, or excessive noise
in radio receivers could be indications that
problems are developing in the starter system.
A noted change in such normal conditions
could indicate prolonged starter motor running
and the engine should be shut down. No further
flight operations should be attempted until the
cause is determined and repaired.
12. Using the same procedure, start other engine.
Revised: March 1983
4-8A
section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
serial TH 773 and After
AFTER STARTING AND TAXI
I
CAUTION
Do not operate engine above 1200 RPM until oil
temperature reaches 75°F.
1. Brakes - RELEASE AND CHECK
2. Avionics - ON, AS REQUIRED
3. Exterior Lights - AS REQUIRED
Revised: March 1983
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEFORE TAKEOFF
1. Parking Brake - SET
2. Seat Belts and Shoulder Harnesses - CHECK
3. Aux Fuel Pumps - OFF (If ambient temperature is gooF or
above, use LOW pressure boost)
4. All Instruments - CHECKED
5. Fuel Indicators - CHECK QUANTITY
6. Mixture - FULL RICH (or as required by field elevation)
7. Propellers - EXERCISE AT 2200 RPM
I
CAunON
When exercising propellers in their governing
range. do not move the control lever aft past the
detent. Todo so will allow the propeller to change
rapidly to the full feathered position. imposing
high stresses on the blade shank and engine.
8. Starter Energized Warning Light (if installed) - CHECK;
should be illuminated during start and extinguished after
start. If light is not installed or is inoperative, check
loadmeters for proper indication.
9. Throttles - 1700 RPM
10. Magnetos - CHECK (Variance between individual
magnetos should not exceed 50 rpm. max. drop 150 rpm)
11. Throttles - 1500 RPM
12. Propellers - FEATHERING CHECK (Do not allow an rpm
drop of more than 500 rpm)
13. Throttles - IDLE
14. Electric Trim - CHECK OPERATION
August, 1984
I
4..9
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section IV
Normal Procedures
15. Trim· AS REQUIRED FOR TAKEOFF
16. Flaps - CHECK AND SET FOR TAKEOFF
17. Flight Controls - CHECK PROPER DIRECTION, AND
FREEDOM OF MOVEMENT
18. Doors and Windows - LOCKED
19. Parking Brake - OFF
1
TAKEOFF
Take-Off Power
Full throttle. 2700 rpm
Minimum Take-Off Oil Temperature
75°F
1. Power - SET TAKE-OFF POWER (MIXTURE - SET FUEL
FLOW TO ALTITUDE) BEFORE BRAKE RELEASE
2. Airspeed - ACCELERATE TO AND MAINTAIN RECOMMENDED SPEED
3. Landing Gear - RETRACT (when positive rate of climb is
established)
4. Airspeed . ESTABLISH DESIRED CLIMB SPEED (when
clear of obstacles)
MAXIMUM PERFORMANCE CLIMB (TH-773thru TH-1089)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Power - SET MAXIMUM CONTINUOUS POWER
Mixtures - LEAN TO APPROPRIATE FUEL FLOW
Cowl Flaps - OPEN
Airspeed· ESTABLISH 104 KTS
CRUISE CLIMB
1.
2.
3.
4.
Power - SET (25.0 in. Hg or Full Throttle - 2500 RPM)
Mixture - LEAN TO APPROPRIATE FUEL FLOW
Airspeed - 139 KTS
Cowl Flaps - AS REQUIRED
NOTE
In high ambient temperatures. low pressure
boost may be required to prevent excessive fuel
flow fluctuations.
4·10
August, 1984
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section IV
Normal Procedures
MAXIMUM NORMAL OPERATING POWER CLIMB (TH1090 and After)
1. Power - SET:
a. With z-btace propellers installed
2550 RPM
b.
With 3-blade propellers installed
2650 RPM
2. Mixtures - LEAN TO APPROPRIATE FUEL FLOW
3. Cowl Flaps - AS REQUIRED
4. Airspeed - 104 KTS
CRUISE
Maximum Cruise Power
24.5 in.
Recommended Cruise Power .. 24.0 in.
Recommended Cruise Power .. 21.0 in.
Economy Cruise Power
20.5 in.
Hg
Hg
Hg
Hg
at
at
at
at
2500
2300
2300
2100
rpm
rpm
rpm
rpm
1. Power - SET AS DESIRED (Use Tables in PERFORMANCE section)
2. Fuel Flow - LEAN AS REQUIRED
3. Cowl Flaps - AS REQUIRED
LEANING USING THE EXHAUST GAS TEMPERATURE
INDICATOR (EGT)
The system consists of a thermocouple type exhaust gas
temperature (EGT) probe mounted in the right side of each
exhaust system. This probe is connected to an indicator on
the right side of the instrument panel. The indicator is calibrated in degrees Fahrenheit. Use EGT system to lean the
fuel/air mixture when cruising at maximum cruise power or
less.
September, 1980
4-10A
I
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
4-108
September, 1979
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section IV
Normal Procedures
1. Lean the mixture and note the point on the indicator
that the temperature peaks and starts to fall.
a.
CRUISE (LEAN) MIXTURE - Increase the mixture
until the EGT shows a drop of 25°F below peak on
the rich side of peak.
b.
BEST POWER MIXTURE - Increase the mixture
until the EGT shows a drop of 100°F below peak on
the rich side of peak.
CAUTION
Do not continue to lean mixture beyond that
necessary to establish peak temperature.
2. Continuous operation is recommended at 25°F or more
below peak EGT only on the rich side of peak.
3. Changes in altitude and power settings require the peak
EGT to be rechecked and the mixture reset.
September, 1979
4-11
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
DESCENT
1. Altimeter - SET
2. Cowl Flaps - CLOSED
3. Windshield Defroster - AS REQUIRED
4. Power - AS REQUIRED (avoid prolonged idle settings
and low cyli nder head temperatures)
Recommended descent speeds:
Smooth air
Rough air
175 kts
(Max.) 156 kts
BEFORE LANDING
1. Seat Belts and Shoulder Harnesses - FASTENED, SEAT
BACKS UPRIGHT
2. Fuel Selector Valves - CHECK ON
3. Aux. Fuel Pumps - OFF, OR LOW AS PER AMBIENT
TEMPERATURE
4. Cowl Flaps - AS REQUIRED
5. Mixture Controls - FULL RICH (or as required by field
elevation)
6. Flaps - APPROACH 15° POSITION (Maximum
extension speed 152 kts)
7. Landing Gear - DOWN (Gear extension speed 152 kts)
8. Flaps - FULL DOWN (30°) (Maximum extension speed,
122 kts.)
9. Airspeed - ESTABLISH NORMAL LANDING
APPROACH SPEED.
10. Propellers - LOW PITCH (high rpm)
4·12
September, 1979
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFTBaron58
Serial TH 773 and After
BALKED LANDING
1. Propellers - LOW PITCH (high rpm)
Power - MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE
Airspeed - BALKED LANDING CLIMB SPEED (96 KTS)
Flaps - UP (0°)
Landing Gear - UP
Cowl Flaps - AS REQUIRED
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
I
AFTER LANDING
1. Landing and Taxi Lights - AS REQUIRED
2. Flaps - UP
3. Trim Tabs - SET TO ZERO.
4. Cowl Flaps - OPEN
5. Aux Fuel Pumps - AS REQUIRED
SHUT DOWN
1. Parking Brake - SET
2. Propellers - HIGH RPM
3. Throttles - 1000 RPM
4. Aux Fuel Pumps - OFF
5. Electrical and Avionics Equipment - OFF
6. Mixture Controls - IDLE CUT-OFF
7. Magneto;Start Switches - OFF, AFTER ENGINES STOP
8. Battery and Alternator Switches - OFF
9. Controls - LOCKED
10. If airplane is to be parked for an extended period of time,
install wheel chocks and release the parking brake as
greatly varying ambient temperatures may build excessive pressures on the hydraulic system.
NOTE
Induction air scoop covers, included in the loose
tools and accessories, are to prevent foreign
matter from entering the air scoops while the
aircraft is parked.
Revised: March 1983
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
OXYGEN SYSTEM
WARNING
NO SMOKING permitted when using oxygen.
PREFLIGHT
1. Check Oxygen Pressure Gage for pressure reading.
2. Determine percent of full system.
3. Multiply oxygen duration in minutes by percent of full
system.
EXAMPLE:
People
5
Gage Pressure
1500 psi
Percent Capacity (from chart)
80%
Cyli nder Capacity (full)
49 cu ft
Altitude (planned flight)
15,000 feet
Duration (full cylinder)
149 minutes
Duration (80% full)
119 minutes
OXYGEN DURA TION
Oxygen duration is computed for a Scott Altitude Compensated System assuming 90% of cylinder volume usable
and using Scott oxygen masks rated at 3.0 Standard Liters
Per Minute (SLPM). These masks are identified by a green
color coded plug-in.
4-14
October 1 976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section IV
Normal Procedures
OXYGEN AVAILABLE WITH
PARTIALLY FULL BOTTLE
2500
C!)
~
2000
I
w
gj
1500
en
en
w
g:
1000
w
(!)
~
500
o
25
50
75
100
PERCENT OF USABLE CAPACITY
Duration in minutes at the following altitudes:
Persons
Using
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
::J
U
CD
CD
3
4
5
6
August, 1984
12,500
15,000
20,000
1014
507
338
253
202
169
746
373
248
186
149
124
507
1344
672
448
988
494
329
247
197
164
336
268
224
253
169
126
101
84
672
336
224
168
134
112
4-15
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
IN FLIGHT
The use of oxygen is recommended to be in accordance with
current FAR operating rules.
1. Oxygen Control Valve - OPEN SLOWLY
2. Mask - INSERT FITTING, DON MASK (adjust mask for
proper fit)
3. Oxygen Flow Indicator - CHECK (red plunger lifts from
its seat when the hose is inserted into the oxygen
coupling)
AFTER USING
1. Discontinue use by unplugging mask from outlet.
NOTE
Closing the control valve while in flight is not
necessary due to automatic sealing of the outlet when the mask is unplugged.
2. Oxygen Control Valve - CLOSE (may be accomplished
during shut-down).
ELECTRIC ELEVATOR TRIM
1. ON-OFF switch - ON
2. Control Wheel Trim Switch - Forward for nose down, aft
for nose up, (when released the switch retu rns to the
center - OFF position)
Malfunction procedures are given in the EMERGENCY
PROCEDURES section.
4-16
October 1976
BEECHCRAFTBaron58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section IV
Normal Procedures
COLD WEATHER OPERATION
PREFLIGHT INSPECTION
In addition to the normal preflight exterior inspection,
remove ice, snow and frost from the wings, tail, control
surfaces and hinges, propellers, windshield, fuel cell filler
caps and fuel vents. If you have no way of removing these
formations of ice, snow, and frost leave the airplane on the
ground, as these deposits will not blow off. The wing
contour may be changed by these formations sufficiently
that its lift qualities are considerably disturbed and
sometimes completely destroyed. Complete your normal
preflight procedures. Check the flight controls for complete
freedom of movement.
Conditions for accumulating moisture in the fuel tanks are
most favorable at low temperatures due to the condensation increase and the moisture that enters as the system
is serviced. Therefore, close attention to draining the fuel
system will assume particular importance during cold
weather.
ENGINES
Use engine oil in accordance with Consumable Materials in
the SERVICING section. Always pull the propeller through
by hand several times to clear the engine and "limber up"
the cold, heavy oil before using the starter. This will also
lessen the load on the battery if an auxiliary power unit is
not used.
Under very cold conditions, it may be necessary to preheat
the engine prior to a start. Particular attention should be
applied to the oil cooler, and engine sump to insure proper
preheat. A start with congealed oil in the system may
produce an indication of normal pressure immediately after
October 1976
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
the start, but then the oil pressure may decrease when
residual oil in the engine is pumped back with the
congealed oil in the sump. If an engine heater capable of
heating both the engine sump, and cooler is not available,
the oil should be drained while the engines are hot and
stored in a warm area until the next flight.
If there is no oil pressure within the first 30 seconds of running, or if oil pressure drops after a few minutes of ground
operation, shut down and check for broken oil lines, oil
cooler leaks or the possibility of congealed oil.
NOTE
It is advisable to use external power for starting
in cold weather.
During warm-up, watch engine temperatures closely, since
it is quite possible to exceed the cylinder head temperature
limit in trying to bring up the oil temperature. Exercise the
propellers several times to remove cold oil from the pitch
change mechanisms. The propellers should also be cycled
occasionally in flight.
During letdown and landing, give special attention to engine temperatures, since the engines will have a tendency
toward overcooling.
4-18
October 1976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 68
Serial TH 773 and After
Section IV
Normal Procedures
EXTERNAL POWER
It is very important that the following precautions be observed while using external power.
1. The airplane has a negative ground system. Be sure to
connect the positive lead of the auxiliary power unit to
the positive terminal of the airplane's external power
receptacle and the negative lead of the auxiliary power
unit to the negative terminal of the external power receptacle. A positive voltage must also be applied to the
small guide pin.
2. To prevent arcing, make certain no power is being supplied when the connection is made.
3. Make certain that the battery switch is ON, all avionics
and electrical switches OFF, and a battery is in the system before connecting an external power unit. This protects the voltage regulators and associated electrical
equipment from voltage transients (power fluctuations).
October 1 976
4-19
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
STARTING ENGINES USING AUXILIARY POWER UNIT
1. Battery switch - ON
2. Alternators, Electrical, and Avionics Equipment - OFF
3. Auxiliary Power Unit - CONNECT
4. Auxi liary Power Unit - SET OUTPUT (27.0 to 28.5 volts)
5. Auxiliary Power Unit - ON
6. Right Engine - START (use normal start procedures)
7. Auxiliary Power Unit - OFF (after engine has been
started)
8. Auxiliary Power Unit - DISCONNECT (before starting
left engine)
9. Alternator Switches - ON
TAXIING
Avoid taxiing through water, slush or muddy surfaces if
possible. In cold weather, water, slush or mud, when
splashed onto landing gear mechanisms or control surface
hinges may freeze, preventing free movement and resulting in structural damage.
October 1976
Section IV
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Normal Procedures
ICE PROTECTION SYSTEMS
The following equipment, when installed and operable, will
provide a degree of protection when icing conditions are inadvertently encountered. Since this equipment has not
been demonstrated to meet current requirements for flight
into known icing conditions, the pilot must exit such conditions as soon as possible if ice accumulates on the airplane.
1. Equipment required for IFR flight
2. Beech approved emergency static air source
3. Beech approved surface deice system
4. Beech approved propeller deice or anti-ice system
5. Beech approved pitot heat
6. Beech approved heated stall warning
7. Beech approved heated fuel vents
8. Beech approved windshield defogging and openable
storm window
9. Beech approved alternate induction air
10. Beech approved external antenna masts (capable of
withstanding ice loads)
WARNING
Stalling airspeeds should be expected to
increase due to the distortion of the wing airfoil
when ice has accumulated on the airplane. For
the same reason, stall warning devices are not
accurate and should not be relied upon. With
ice on the airplane, maintain a comfortable
margin of airspeed above the normal stall
airspeed.
1.
EMERGENCY STATIC AIR SOURCE
If the Emergency Static Air Source is desired for use:
a. Emergency Static Air Source - ON EMERGENCY
(lower sidewall adjacent to pilot)
b. For Airspeed Calibration and Altimeter
Corrections, refer to PERFORMANCE section
CAUTION
The emergency static air valve should be in the
OFF NORMAL position when the system is not
needed.
March, 1988
4-21
Section IV
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Normal Procedures
2. SURFACE DEICE SYSTEM
a.
BEFORE TAKE·OFF
(1) Throttles - 2000 RPM
(2) Surface Deice Switch ~ AUTO (UP)
(3) Deice Pressure - 9 to 20 PSI (while boots are inflating)
(4) Wing Boots - CHECK VISUALLY FOR INFLATION AND HOLD DOWN
b.
IN FLIGHT
When ice accumulates 1/2 to 1 inch
(1) Surface Deice Switch - AUTO (UP)
(2) Deice Pressure - 9 to 20 PSI (while boots are inflating)
(3) Repeat - AS REQUIRED
CAUTION
Rapid cycles in succession or cycling before at
least 1/2 inch of ice has accumulated may cause
the ice to grow outside the contour of the inflated boots and prevent ice removal.
Stall speeds are increased 4 kts in all configurations with surface deice system operating.
NOTE
Either engine will supply sufficient vacuum and
pressure for deice operation.
c.
For Emergency Operation refer to the EMERGENCY PROCEDURES section.
4-22
October 1976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section IV
Normal Procedures
3. ELECTROTHERMAL PROPELLER DEICE
CAUTION
Do not operate the propeller deice when propellers are static.
a.
BEFORE TAKEOFF
(1) Propeller Deice Switch - ON
(2) Propeller Deice Am meter - CHECK, 7 to '2
amps (2 Blade), 14 to 18 amps (3 Blade)
b.
IN FLIGHT
(1) Propeller Deice Switch - ON. The system may
be operated continuously in flight and will function automatically until the switch is turned
OFF.
(2) Relieve propeller imbalance due to ice by increasing rpm briefly and returning to the
desired setting. Repeat as necessary.
CAUTION
If the propeller deice ammeter indicates abnormal reading, refer to the Emergency Procedures section.
September 1979
4-22A
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
4-228
September 1979
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section IV
Normal Procedures
4. WINDSHIELD ANTI-ICE SYSTEM
(ELECTROTHERMAL)
8.
BEFORE TAKEOFF
(1)
(2)
WSHLD Heat Switch - ON (Note deflection
on loadmeter)
Windshield - CHECK (feel for warming)
CAUTION
Ground operation is limited to 10 minutes.
b.
IN FLIGHT
NOTE
Continuous operation is permitted.
(1)
WSHLD Heat Switch - AS REQUIRED
(Heat should be applied before ice forms)
NOTE
If directional gyro is to be reset, turn off the
electrothermal windshield heat for 15 seconds
to allow a stable reading of the standby
compass.
September 1979
4-23
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
5. PROPELLER AND WINDSHIELD ANTI-ICE SYSTEM
. (FLUID FLOW)
CAUTION
This anti-ice system is designed to PREVENT
the formation of ice. Always turn the system ON
before entering icing conditions.
a.
PREFLIGHT
(1) Check the quantity in reservoir
(2) Check slinger ring and lines for obstructions
(3) Check propeller boots for damage
b.
IN FLIGHT
(1) Prop Anti-ice Switch - ON
(2) Windshield Anti-ice Switch - CYCLE AS RE-
QUIRED
(3) Anti-ice Quantity Indicator - MONITOR
NOTE
See SYSTEM description for endurance.
6. PilOT HEAT AND HEATED STALL WARNING
a.
Pitot Heat Switch(es) - ON (Note deflection on Loadmeter) Heated Stall Warning is activated by the left
pitot heat switch.
NOTE
Switches may be left on throughout flight. Prolonged operation on the ground could damage
the Pitot Heat System.
4-24
September 1979
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section IV
Normal Procedures
7. FUEL VENT HEAT
a.
Fuel Vent Switch - ON (If ice is encountered)
8. WINDSHIELD DEFOGGING
a.
Defrost Control - PUSH ON
b.
Pilot's Storm Window - OPEN, AS REQUIRED
ENGINE BREAK-IN INFORMATION
Refer to Systems section.
PRACTICE DEMONSTRATION OF VMCA
VMCA demonstration may be required for multi-engine pilot
certification. The following procedure shall be used at a safe
altitude of at least 5000 feet above the ground in clear air
only.
WARNING
Inflight engine cuts below Vsse speed of 86
kts/99 mph are prohibited.
1. Landing Gear - UP
2. Flaps - UP
3. Airspeed - ABOVE 86 KNOTS/ 99 MPH (Vsse)
4. Propeller Levers - HIGH RPM
September 1979
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section IV
Normal Procedures
5. Throttle (Simulated inoperative engine) - IDLE
6. Throttle (Other engine) - Maximum Manifold Pressure
7. Airspeed - REDUCE approximately 1 knot per second
until either YMCA or stall warning is obtained.
CAUTION
Use rudder to maintain directional control
(heading) and ailerons to maintain 5° bank
towards the operative engine (lateral attitude).
At the first sign of either VMCA or stall warning (which may be evidenced by: inability to
maintain heading or lateral attitude, aerodynamic stall buffet, or stall warning horn
sound) immediately initiate recovery: reduce
power to idle on the operative engine and
immediately lower the nose to regain VSSE'
NOISE CHARACTERISTICS
Approach to and departure from an airport should be made
so as to avoid prolonged flight at low altitude near noisesensitive areas. Avoidance of noise-sensitive areas, if
practical, is preferable to overflight at relatively low altitudes.
For VFR operations over outdoor assemblies of persons,
recreational and park areas, and other noise-sensitive
areas, pilots should make every effort to fly not less than
2000 feet above the surface, weather permitting, even
though flight at a lower level may be consistent with the
provisions of government regulations.
4-26
September, 1979
Section IV
Normal Procedu res
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
NOTE
The preceding recommended procedures do
not apply where they would conflict with Air
Traffic Control clearances or instructions, or
where, in the pilot's judgement, an altitude of
less than 2000 feet is necessary to adequately
exercise his duty to see and avoid other
airplanes.
Flyover noise levels established in compliance with FAR 36
are:
For Serials TH-1090 and After:
I
2-Blade Propeller Using MNOP 78.9 dB(A)
3-Blade Propeller Using MNOP 78.8 dB(A)
NOTE
Flyover noise levels given are not applicable for
Serials TH-773 thru TH-10a9.
No determination has been made by the Federal Aviation
Administration that the noise level of this airplane is or
should be acceptable or unacceptable for operation at.
into, or out of any airport.
September, 1980
4-27
BEECHCRAFT Baron 5B
Serial TH 773 and After
Section V
Performance
SECTION V
PERFORMANCE
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SUBJECT
Introduction to Performance and
Flight Planning
Conditions
Comments Pertinent to the Use of
Performance Graphs
Performance Graphs
Airspeed Calibration - Normal System
Altimeter Correction - Normal System
Airspeed Calibration - Alternate System
Altimeter Correction - Alternate System
Fahrenheit to Celsius
ISA Conversion
Manifold Pressure vs RPM
Take-Off Weight.
Stall Speeds - Power Idle
Wind Components
Take-Off Distance
Accelerate - Stop
Accelerate - Go
Climb - Two Engine (TH-773 thru TH-1 089)
Climb - Two Engine (TH-1090 and After)
2-blade Propellers Installed
3-blade Propellers Installed
Take-Off Climb Gradient, One
Engine Inoperative
September, 1979
PAGE
5-3
5-3 - 5-13
5-13
5-14 - 5-47
5-14
5-15
5-16
5-17
5-18
5-19
5-20
5-21
5-22
5-23
5-24
5-25
5-26
5-26A
5-268
5-27
5-28
5-1
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)
SUBJECT
Time, Fuel, Distance to Climb
Climb - One Engine Inoperative
Service Ceiling - One Engine Inoperative
Cruise Speeds
Fuel Flow vs Brake Horsepower
Cruise Power Settings
Maximum Cruise Power
Recommended Cruise Power
Recommended Cruise Power
Economy Cruise Power
Range Profile - 136 Gallons
Endurance Profile - 136 Gallons
Range Profile - 166 Gallons
Endurance Profile - 166 Gallons
Range Profile - 194 Gallons
Endurance Profile - 194 Gallons
Holding Time
Time, Fuel and Distance to Descend
Climb - Balked Landing
Landing Distance
5-2
PAGE
5-29
5-30
5-31
5-32
5-33
5-34 - 5-37
5-34
5-35
5-36
5-37
5-38
5-39
5-40
5-41
5-42
5-43
5-44
5·45
5-46
5-47
September, 1979
BEECHCRAFT Baron 5B
Serial TH 773 and After
Section V
Performance
INTRODUCTION TO PERFORMANCE
AND FLIGHT PLANNING
All airspeeds quoted in this section are indicated airspeeds
(lAS) except as noted and assume zero instrument error.
The graphs and tables in this section present performance
information for takeoff, climb, landing and flight planning at
various parameters of weight. power, altitude, and
temperature. FAA approved performance information is
included in this section. Examples are presented on all
performance graphs. In addition, the calculations for flight
time, block speed, and fuel required are presented using the
conditions listed.
Performance with a gross weight of 4990 Ibs (Baron 58A)
will be equal to or betterthan that of the higher gross weight
Baron 58.
CONDITIONS
At Denver:
Outside Air Temperature
Field Elevation
Altimeter Setting
Wind
Runway 26L length
15°C (59°F)
5330 ft
29.60 in. Hg
270° at 10 kts
10,010 ft
Route of Trip
*DEN-V81-AMA
For VFR Cruise at 11,500 feet
October 1976
5-3
BEECHCRAFTBaron58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section V
Performance
WIND
OAT
11500
11500
MAGNETIC OIST
FEET
ROUTE
NM OIR/KTS
SEGMENT COURSE
FEET
°C
AlT
SETTING
IN.HG
DEN-COS
161 0
55
010;30
-5
29.60
COS-PUB
153
0
40
010;30
-5
29.60
PUB-TBE
1340
74
100/20
0
29.56
TBE-DHT
132
0
87
200/20
9
29.56
DHT-AMA
125 0
65
200/20
10
29.56
'REFERENCE: Enroute Low Altitude Chart L-6
At Amarillo:
Outside Air Temperature
Field Elevation
Altimeter Setting
Wi nd
Runway 21 Length
25°C (77°F)
3605 ft
29.56 in. Hg
180° at 1a kts
10,000 ft
To determine pressure altitude at origin and destination
airports, add 100 feet to field elevation for each .1 in. Hg
below 29.92, and subtract 100 feet from field elevation for
each .1 in. Hg above 29.92.
Pressure Altitude at DEN:
29.92 - 29.60
= .32
in. Hg
The pressure altitude at DEN is 320 feet above the field
elevation.
5330 + 320 = 5650 ft
5-4
October 1976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section V
Performance
Pressure Altitude at AMA:
29.92
~
29.56
= .36
in. Hg
The pressure altitude at AMA is 360 feet above the field
elevation.
3605 + 360 = 3965 ft
NOTE
For flight planning, the difference between
cruise altitude and cruise pressure altitude has
been ignored.
Maximum Allowable Take-off Weight
Ramp Weight
=5400 Ibs
= 5400 + 24 = 5424 Ibs
NOTE
Fuel for start, taxi and take-off is normally 24
pounds.
Enter the Take-Off Weight graph at 5650 feet pressure
altitude and 15°C.
The take-off weight to achieve a positive rate-of-c1imb at
lift-off for one engine inoperative is:
Take-off Weight
=4850 pounds
Enter the Take-Off Distance graph at 15°C, 5650 feet pressure altitude, 5400 pounds, and 9.5 knots headwind
component.
Ground Roll
1900 ft
Total Distance over 50 ft Obstacle
3090 ft
Lift-off Speed
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 86 kts
50 foot Speed
94 kts
October 1 976
5-5
Section V
BEECHCRAFTBaron58
Serial TH 773 and After
Performance
Enter the Accelerate-Stop graph at 15°C, 5650 feet pressure altitude, 5400 pounds, and 9.5 knots headwind
component:
Accelerate-Stop Distance
Engine Failure Speed
3960 ft
86 kts
NOTE
Since 3960 feet is less than the available field
length (10,010 ft), the accelerate-stop procedure can be performed at any weight.
Take-off at 5400lbs can be accomplished. However, if an engine failure occurs before becoming airborne, the accelerate-stop procedure must be performed.
The following example assumes the airplane is loaded so
that the take-off weight is 4850 pounds.
Although not required by regulations, information has been
presented to determine the take-off weight, field requirements and take-off flight path assuming an engine failure
occurs during the take-off procedure. The following
illustrates the use of these charts.
Enter the Accelerate-Go graph at 15°C, 5650 feet pressure
altitude, 4850 pounds, and 9.5 knots headwind component:
Ground Roll
Total Distance Over 50 ft Obstacle
Lift-off Speed
50 Foot Speed
5-6
1775 ft
8071 ft
86 kts
94 kts
October 1976
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Enter the graph for Take-off Climb Gradient - One Engine
Inoperative at 15°C, 5650 feet pressure altitude, and 4850
pounds.
2.1 %
94 kts
Climb Gradient
Climb Speed
A 2.1 % climb gradient is 21 feet of vertical height per 1000
feet of horizontal distance.
NOTE
The Climb Gradient - One Engine Inoperative
graph assumes zero wind conditions. Climbing
into a headwind will result in higher angles of
climb, and hence, better obstacle clearance
capabilities.
Calculation of horizontal distance to clear an obstacle 90
feet above the runway surface:
Horizontal distance used to climb from 50 feet to 90 feet
= (90-50) (1000.;. 21) = 1905 feet
Total Distance
=8071
+ 1905
=9976 feet
The above results are illustrated below:
October 1976
5-7
Section V
Performance
BEECH CRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
G)ACCELERATE - GO TAKE-OFF DISTANCE = 8071 FT
CD DISTANCE TO CLIMB FROM 50 FT TO 90 FT ABOVE
RUNWAY = 1905 FT
G)ACCELERATE - STOP DISTANCE FOR 5400 LBS
TAKE-OFF WEIGHT = 3960 FT
The following calculations provide information for the flight
planning procedure. All examples are presented on the
performance graphs. A take-off weight of 5400 pounds has
been assumed.
Enter the Time, Fuel, and Distance to Climb graph at 15°C to
5650 feet and to 5400 pounds. Also enter at -5°C to 11,500
feet and to 5400 pounds. Read:
Time to Climb = (22 -7) = 15 min
Fuel Used to Climb =(12.7 -4.7) =8 gal
Distance Traveled =(55 -17) =38 NM
5-8
October 1976
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
The temperatures for cruise are presented for a standard
day (ISA); 20°C (36°F) above a standard day (ISA + 20°C);
and 20°C (36°F) below a standard day (ISA - 20°C). These
should be used for flight planning. The IOATvalues are true
temperature values which have been adjusted for the
compressibility effects. IOAT should be used for setting
cruise power while enroute.
Enter the graph for ISA conversion at 11,500 feet and the
temperature for the route segment:
DEN-PUB
OAT
ISA Condition
-5°C
ISA + 3°C
PUB-TBE
OAT
ISA Condition
O°C
ISA + 8°C
TBE-DHT
OAT
ISA Condition
goC
ISA + 17°C
DHT-AMA
OAT
ISA Condition
1QoC
ISA + 18°C
=
Enter the table for recommended cruise power - 24 in. Hg,
2300 rpm at 10,000 ft. 12,000 ft. ISA and ISA + 20°C.
TEMPERATURE
ISA + 20 0 e
ISA
ALTI- MAN.
TUDE PRESS.
FEET IN. HG
FUEL
FLOW
GPH/
ENG
MAN.
TAS PRESS.
KNOTS IN. HG
FUEL
FLOW
GPH/
ENG
TAS
KNOTS
10000
20.1
12.3
187
20.1
11.8
187
12000
18.5
11.6
184
18.5
11.2
185
October 1976
5-9
Section V
Performa nce
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Interpolate for 11,500 feet and the temperature for the
appropriate route segment. Results of the interpolations
are:
ROUTE
SEGMENT
MAN.
PRESS.
IN. HG
DEN-PUB
18.9
11.7
186
PUB-TBE
18.9
11.6
186
TBE-DHT
18.9
11.5
185
DHT-AMA
189
11.4
185
FUEL
FLOW
GPH/ENG
TAS
KNOTS
NOTE
The preceding are exact values forthe assumed
conditions.
Enter the graph for Descent at 11,500 feet to the descent
line, and enter again at 3965 feet to the descent line, and
read:
Time to Descend = (23-8) = 15 min
Fuel Used to Descend =(9.7 -3.3) =6.4 gal
Descent Distance = (72-25) = 47 NM
Time and fuel used were calculated at Recommended
Cruise Power - 24 in. Hg. 2300 RPM as follows:
Time
=
Distance
Ground Speed
Fuel Used
5-10
=(Time) (Total
Fuel Flow)
October 1976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section V
Performance
Results are:
TIME AT
CRUISE
ALTITUDE
HRS: MIN
FUEL
USED
FOR
CRUISE
GAL
ROUTE
SEGMENT
DISTANCE
NM
EST
GROUND
SPEED
KNOTS
DEN-COS
*17
215
: 05
1.9
COS-PUB
40
213
: 11
4.4
PUB-TBE
74
171
: 26
10.0
TBE-DHT
87
173
: 30
11.6
*18
176
: 06
2.3
DHT-AMA
"Distance required to climb or descend has been subtracted from segment distance.
TIME - FUEL· DISTANCE
FUEL
GAL
DISTANCE
NM
ITEM
TIME
HRS: MINS
Start, Runup,
Taxi and Takeoff
0:00
4.0
0
Climb
0:15
8.0
38
Cruise
1:18
30.2
236
Descent
0:15
6.4
47
Total
1:48
48.6
321
October 1976
5-11
Section V
Performance
BEECH CRAFT Baron 5B
Serial TH 773 and After
Total Flight Time: 1 hour, 48 minutes
Block Speed: 321 NM .;. 1 hour, 48 minutes = 178 knots
Reserve Fuel: (45 minutes at Economy Cruise Power):
Enter the cruise power settings table for Economy
Cruise Power at 11,500 feet for ISA (assume ISA Fuel
Flow Rate).
Fuel Flow Per Engine = 10.3 gal;hr
Total Fuel Flow = 20.6 gal;hr (124 Ib;hr)
Reserve Fuel
Total Fuel
=(45 min) (124 Ib;hr) =93
=48.6 + 15.5 =64.1
Ibs (15.5 gal)
gallons
The estimated landing weight is determined by subtracting
the fuel required for the flight from the ramp weight
Assumed ramp weight = 5424 Ibs
Estimated fuel from DEN to AMA = 64.1 gal (385 Ibs)
Estimated landing weight
=5424 -385 =5039 Ibs
Examples have been provided on the performance graphs.
The above conditions have been used throughout. Rate of
climb was determined for the initial cruise altitude
conditions.
5-12
October 1976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
SectionV
Performance
Enter the graph for Landing Distance - Flaps 30 degrees at
25°C, 3965 feet pressure altitude, 5039 pounds and 9.5
kts headwind component:
Ground Roll
Total Distance over 50 ft Obstacle
Approach Speed
1450 ft
2500 ft
91 kts
Enter the graph for Climb-Balked Landing at 25°C, 3965
feet pressure altitude and 5039 pounds:
Rate-of-Climb
Climb Gradient
640 ft/min
6.5%
COMMENTS PERTtNENT TO THE USE OF
PERFORMANCE GRAPHS
1. The example, in addition to presenting an answer for a
particular set of conditions, also presents the order in
which the graphs should normally be used, i.e., if the
first item in the example is OAT, then enter the graph at
the known OAT.
2. The reference lines indicate where to begin following
guide tines. Always project to the reference line first,
then follow the guide lines to the next known item.
3. Indicated airspeeds (lAS) were obtained by using the
Airspeed Calibration-Normal System.
4. The associated conditions define the specific conditions
from which performance parameters have been determined. They are not intended to be used as instructions;
however, performance values determined from charts
can only be achieved if specific conditions exist.
5. The full amount of usable fuel is available for all approved flight conditions.
September, 1979
5-13
I
en
......
CD
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...
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CD
...
0
0
n
oIlo
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,
70
80
90
100 110 120 130 140
150 160 170 180 190 200
170
85 140
120
60
60
lAS· INOICATED AIRSPEED~ KNDTS
70
70
90
80
80
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180
180
(f)
EXAMPLE
CAS
FLAPS
lAS
89 KNOTS
70
80
90
lAS· INDICATED
60
110 120 130
AIRSPEED~KNOTS
100
DOWN
91 KNOTS
2 0 0 _
190
~ 160
f-
(f)
FLAPS UP
INDICATED AIRSPEED ASSUMES ZERO INSTRUMENT ERROR
170
190
200
NOTE
AIRSPEED CALIBRATION - NORMAL SYSTEM
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-40
-30
70
80
90
lAS - INDICATED AIRSPEED ~KNOTS
100 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 180 190 200
FLAPS UP
...
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O~
5
~~
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m«
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~ t; -c
... «0
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10
20
30
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I
I
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.... 0
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-60
60
70
80
90
100 110 120
lAS - INDICATED AIRSPEED~KNOTS
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o~ 0CD
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I
3944 FT
-50
+
:::l·m
-l:%:
:%:0
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I
·21 FT
(3965-21)
91 KTS
DOWN
3965 FT
cnaJ
(!l m
-41
-20
-10'
----0
o ~~
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o
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>= 8
u «
z
u.
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W
o
ALTIMETER CORRECTION
ACTUAL PRESSURE
ALTITUDE
lAS
FLAPS
INDICATED PRESSURE
ALTITUDE
EXAMPLE
ALTIMETER CORRECTION - NORMAL SYSTEM
NOTE
INDICATED ALTITUDE AND INDiCATED
AIRSPEED ASSUME ZERO INSTRUMENT ERROR
m
~
CD
CD
0
tT
...
.....
0
n
...enm,
200
190
in
«
80
90
~ 100
s
~ 110
....w
120
130
....~
(/)
140
~
<J
150
90
100 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 180 190 200
NORMAL SYSTEM INDICATED
AIRSPEEO~KNOTS
140
150
160
120
«
':J
a::
w
«
z
....
w
(/)
>-
(/)
....~
<':
70
80
90
100
AIRSPEED~KNOTS
110 120 130 140 150
FLAPS DOWN
NORMAL SYSTEM INDICATED
70
80
90
100
Ci 110
<J
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....
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~ 130
(/)
~
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~
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80
FLAPS UP
0
(/)
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w
0
I 180
><
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(/)
210
AIRSPEED CALIBRATION - ALTERNATE SYSTEM
CD
al
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-200
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0
w
a0
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80
100 110
120 130 140
150 160
I
170 18D 190 200
ALTERNATE SYSTEM INDICATED AIRSPEED"-'KNOTS
90
II! II T
llililllliillillIElill
950
,,~;
WINDOW OPEN:
S(t=::;::::w~OOO
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WINDOW CLOSED
PRESSURE ALTItUDE;;'FEETj
FLAPS UP
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AIRSPEED~KNOTS
100 "0 120 130 140
ALTERNATE SYSTEM INDICATED
~500
-400
·300
~ ~ ~200
I
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qqoo
~5~100~
~..
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ALTIMETER CORRECTION - ALTERNATE SYSTEM
.....
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-60
-50
l:r
g
n
-40
-30
-20
-10
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10
20
30
40
50
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60
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70
80
90
100
110
120
':;::.ffii ; Illrl>1~j~;
r "!.l!l:t-.f; ,rr~·~~-::.
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TEMPERATURE CONVERSION-oC vs of
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a. ..
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BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section V
Performance
; I.
R
+
i-++++t++Jf-4-H+++l-+tf-tt++t+t-JH+tH-t+1-+tf-tt++t++-H+t+ f
fi!
I
+
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o
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al:
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o
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a:
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....
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o
.L3H - 30n.LI.L'... 3llnSS311d
October 1976
5-19
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
0
0
<0
N
0
0
I!l
N
0
0
:E
a.
"'"
N
a:
0
0
III
>
M
N
W
~
a.
0:
a:
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(I)
(I)
0
0
N
N
W
a:
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0
0
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0
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a.
en
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az
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80
N
8
~
0
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'DH 'NI'" 3HnSS3Hd OlO:lINVVII
5-20
October 1976
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT Baron 5B
Serial TH 773 and After
TAKE-OFF WEIGHT
TO ACHIEVE POSITIVE SINGLE ENGINE
RATE-OF-CUMB AT LlFT·OFF
EXAMPLE
ASSOCIATED CONDITIONS
AIRPLANE
POWER
FLAPS
LANDING GEAR
INOPERATIVE PROPELLER
AIRBORNE
TAKE-OFF
UP
DOWN
PRESSURE ALTITUDE
OAT
5650 FEET
TAKE-OFF WEIGHT
4850
15°C
FEATHERED
13000
12000
11000
10000
I-
w
~
~
9000
~ 8000
::J
!::
~
«
7000
~ 6000
::J
(J)
ffla:
5000
Q.
4000
3000
2000
1000
SL
3000
3500
4000
4500
5000
5500
WEIGHT rv POUNDS
October 1976
5-21
.
en
en
~
CD
~
...
CD
a-
....o
o
e
N
N
5000
4000
WEIGHT", POUNDS
4500
3500
•
3000
I
0
I
I
20
I
30
I
40
I
50
I
60
ANGLE OF BANKtv DEGREES
10
STAll SPEEDS - POWER IDLE
~~~
•
WITH CAM 3120 WAS 350 FT.
2 A NORMAL STALL RECOVERY TECHNIQUE
MAY BE USED
WHILE CONDUCTING STALLS IN ACCORDANCE
1. THE MAXIMUM ALTITUDE LOSS EXPERIENCED
NOTES
sz
50
60
70
80
~
~
~
.,
o
90 .,
"(
100.,
110
120
4850 lBS
UP
20"
82 KIAS
BO KCAS
WEIGHT
FLAPS
ANGLE OF BANK
STALL SPEED
EXAMPLE
j
0
a!
<
j
III
~Q)
;:en
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ilia!
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n
j
III
3
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o :to
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CD CD
"'Urn
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section V
Performance
WIND COMPONENTS
Demonstrated Crosswind Component is 22 kts
EXAMPLE:
WIND SPEED
ANGLE BETWEEN WIND DIRECTION AND FLIGHT PATH
20KTs
500
HEADWIND COMPONENT
CROSSWIND COMPONENT
13KTs
15 KTs
FLIGHT PATH
30
~
~ 10
e:!1
8
Q
Z
i
~
w
0
:I:
·10
·20
o
10
20
40
CROSSWIND COMPONENTS
October 1976
5-23
~
c»
.....
<0
Gl
17
....
...o
on
~
N
~
il"
COWL FLAPS
FLAPS
LANOING GEAR
-40
-30
·10
6
10
20
.......r
30
40
50
4500
WEIGHT "'POUNDS
5000
TAKE-OFF SPEEDS (ALL WEIGHTS)
LIFT-OFF B6 KNOTS
50 FEET 94 KNOTS
TAKE-OFF DISTANCE
OUTSIDE AIRTEMPERATURE ",oc
-zo
TAKE-OFF POWER
LEAN TO APPROPRIATE
FUEL FLOW
uP
RETRACT AFTER POSITIVE
CLIMB ESTABLISHEO
OPEN
ASSOCIATED CONDITION
POWER
MIXTURE
0
'" FEET
30
'" KNOTS
20
OBSTACLE HEIGHT
'0
GROUND ROLL
TOTAL OISTANCE OVER
50 FT OBSTACLE
TAKE-OFF SPEED AT
LIFT-OFF
50 FT
HEAD WIND COMPONENT
TAKE -OFF WEIGHT
WIND COMPONENT
4ObO 0
EXAMPLE:
OAT
PRESSURE ALTITUDE
~
t;
1000
2000
0
~
3000 ~
4000
5000
6000
B6 KTS
94 KTS
3090 FEET
'900 FEET
is-c (59°FI
5650 FEET
5400 LBS
9.5 KNOTS
::I
CJl
<
CJl
~CXl
"'01
»0
.... ::1
::I III
c.
..
III
(0)-1
.....
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3
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... 0
..
0'1
I
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0'1
(I)
"
CO
~
...
<D
cr
o
o
n
..
FLAPS
COWL FLAPS
POWER
-40
0
10
20
30
OUTSIDE AIR TEMPERATURE'" °C
-30 -20 -10
40
50
4500
WEIGHT'" POUNDS
5000
DECISION SPEED 'ALL WEIGHTS'
86 KNOTS
ACCELERATE - STOP DISTANCE
1. TAKE-OFF POWER
2. ENGINE IDLE AT DECISION SPEED
UP
OPEN
ASSOCIATED CONDITIONS:
-
4000
I
10
I
20
I
30
~KNOTS
WIND COMPONENT
0
Eff±l±±!!!fillIlll~UlUB
2000
3000
5000
6000
7000
ACCELERATE - STOP DiSTANCE
DECISION SPEED liAS}
OAT
PRESSURE ALTITUDE
TAKE·OFF WEIGHT
HEADWIND
EXAMPLE
9.5 KTS
3960 FT
B6 KTS
15
~
Z
U
w
~
~
U
W
..J
w
a:
!;t
w
~
in
U
w
o
o
Z
Ul
Q.
W
w
o
«
z
o
t;;
~
t:
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Performance
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
SERVICE CEILING - ONE ENGINE INOPERATIVE
EXAMPLE,
ASSOCIATED CONDITIONS,
POWER
LANDING GEAR
INOPERATIVE PROPELLER
FLAPS
MAXIMUM CONTINUOUS
UP
FEATHERED
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NOK
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OUTSIDE AIR TEMPERATURE
October 1976
30
40
50
60
"'oc
5-31
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section V
Performance
CRUISE SPEEDS
EXAMPLE,
ASSOCIATED CONDITIONS,
AVERAGE CRUISE WEIGHT
TEMPERATURE
5000 LBS
STANDARD DAY (ISA)
PRESSURE ALTITUDE
POWER SETIING
11500 FEET
FULL THROTILE
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TRUE AIRSPEED
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150
160
170
180
190
200
210
TRUE AIRSPEED ~ KNOTS
5-32
October 1976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section V
Performance
FUEL FLOW vs BRAKE HORSEPOWER
EXAMPLE
FUEL FLOW/ENGINE
CONDITIONS
11.7 GALJHR
LEVEL FLIGHT
CRUISE LEAN
BRAKE HORSEPOWER 160 HP
PER ENGINE
25
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ENDURANCE INCLUDES START. TAXI. CLIMB AND DESCENT
WITH 45 MINUTES RESERVEFUEL AT ECONOMY CRUiSE
NOTE:
STANDARD DAY (lSA)
a-CT
ASSOCIATED CONDITIONS:
ENDURANCE PROFILE - 166 GALLONS
(')
o
7.5
8:0
6.0 HRS
ENDURANCE
8:5
~
ill
~
11500 FEET
FULL THROTTLE
2300 RPM
PRESSUREALTITUDE
POWER SETTING
EXAMPLE:
ID
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AVIATION GASOLINE
500D LBS
RANGE INCLUDES START. TAXI, CLIMB AND DESCENT
WITH 45 MINUTES RESERVE FUEL AT ECONOMY CRUiSE
NOTE'
STANDARD DAY IISAI
RANGE PROFILE - 194 GALLONS
RANGE
PRESSURE ALTITUDE
POWER SETTING
EXAMPLE-
900
950
,600
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0.
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,,'50
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'200
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1100
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194 U.S GALS (1164 LBSI
FUEL
6.0
7.0
8.0
(ZEROWIND)
7.5
ENDURANCE~HOURS
6.5
8.5
NOTE
ENDURANCE INCLUDES START. TAXI. CLIMB AND DESCENT
WITH 45 MINUTES RESERVE FUEL AT ECONOMY CRUISE
STANDARD DAY (ISA)
ENDURANCE PROFILE - 194 GALLONS
FUEL DENSITY
INITIAL FUEL LOADING
WEIGHT
ASSOCIATED CONDITIONS:
9.0
9.5
ENDURANCE
POWER SETTING
PRESSURE AtTITUDE
EXAMPLE
10.0
7.15 HRS
(7 HRS. 9 MIN)
11500 FEET
FULL THROITLE
2300 RPM
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Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
TIME. FUEL AND DISTANCE TO DESCEND
ASSOCIATED CONDITIONS:
EXAMPLE
POWER
INITIAL ALTITUDE
FINAL ALTITUDE
"500FT
3965 FT
TIME TO DEScENO
FUEL TO DESCEND
DISTANCE TO DESCEND
123-8) : , 5 MIN
19.7-3.31: 6.4 GAL
172-25) : 47 NM
LANDING GEAR
FLAPS
AS REQUIREDTO
MAINTAIN 500 FT,MIN
RATE-OF-DESCENT
UP
UP
DESCENT SPEEO
175 KNOTS
16000
15000
,4000
13000
12000
"000
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w
9000
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8000
7000
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6000
5000
4000
3000
2000
1000
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0
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0
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to
I
20
October 1976
I
15
20
25
TIME TO DESCEND tv MINUTES
30
35
40
t
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-1000
-500
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16000
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30
50
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CUMB SPEED 96 KNOTS (ALL WEIGHTS)
OUTSIDE AIR TEMPERATURErvoC
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18.4
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ALTITUDE
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15.4
14.5
1
'12000
, .8
-70
o
500
1000
1500
2000
DOWN
DOWN
LEAN TO APPROPRIATE
FUEL FLOW
TAKE· OFF
ASSOCIATED CONDITIONS
4500
wEIGHT rvPOUNDS
5000
CLIMB-BALKED LANDING
I
4000
~
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-500
o
500
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15
20
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RATE OF CLIMB
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PRESSURE ALTITUDE
WEIGHT
OAT
EXAMPLE
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4500
WEIGHT rv POUNDS
5000
B7
B1
96
91
KNOTS
SPEED AT 50 FT
LANDING DISTANCE
OUTSIDE AIR TEMPERATURE"'oC
-20
PAVED. LEVEL, DRY SURFACE
RUNWAY
BRAKING
lAS AS TABULATED
MAXIMUM
DOWN
DOWN
APPROACH SPEED
FLAPS
LANDING GEAR
ON FINAL APPROACH
RETARDED TO MAINTAIN 800 FT,lMIN
ASSOCIATED CONDITIONS:
POWER
10
rv
20
KNOTS
30
0
rv
FEET
50
WIND COMPONENT OBSTACLE HEIGHT
4600 0
_ _ 500
1000
1500
2000
2500
3000
3500
GROUND ROLL
TOTAL OVER 50 FT
OBSTACLE
APPROACH SPEED
WIND COMPONENT
OAT
PRESSURE ALTITUDE
WEIGHT
EXAMPLE'
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Cl)1D
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
5-48
October 1976
BEECHCRAFT·Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VI
Wt and Bal;Equip List
SECTION VI
WEIGHT AND BALANCE/
EQUIPMENT LIST
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SUBJECT
PAGE
Weighing Instructions
Basic Empty Weight and Balance Form
. . . . . ..
Weight and Balance Record
Seating, Baggage and Equipment
Arrangements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
Loadi ng Instructions
Moment Limits vs Weight Table
6-11 Moment Limits vs Weight Graph
Computing Procedure
Sample Weight and Balance Loading Form
Weight and Balance Loading Form
Useful Load Weights and Moments
6-18 Occupants
Baggage
Cargo
Usable Fuel
Airplane Papers (furnished with individual airplane)
October 1976
6-3
6-5
6-7
6-9
6-10
6-13
6-14
6-15
6-16
6-17
6-21
6-18
6-19
6-20
6-21
6-1
Section VI
Wt and BaljEquip list
BEECHCRAFTBaron58
Serial TH 773 and After
INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
6-2
October 1 976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VI
Wt and BaljEquip list
WEIGHING INSTRUCTIONS
Periodic weighi ng of the airplane may be requ ired to keep
the Basic Empty Weight current. All changes to the airplane
affecting weight and balance are the responsibility of the
airplane's operator.
1. Three jack points are provided for weighing: two on the
wi ng front spar at Fuselage Station 83.1 and one on the
aft fuselage at Fuselage Station 271.0.
2. Fuel should be drained preparatory to weighing. Tanks
are drained from the regular drain ports with the
airplane in static ground attitude. When tanks are
drained, 5.7 pounds of undrainable fuel remain in the
airplane at Fuselage Station 81.6. The remainder ofthe
unusable fuel to be added to a drained system is 30.3
pounds at Fuselage Station 78.5
3. Engine oil must be at the full level or completely
drained. Total engine oil when full is 45 pounds at
Fuselage Station 43.
4. To determine airplane configuration at time of
weighing, installed equipment is checked against the
airplane equipment list or superseding forms. All
installed equipment must be in its proper place during
weighing.
5. The airplane must be longitudinally and laterally level
with the landi ng gear fully extended at the time of
weighing. Leveli ng screws are located on the left side of
the fuselage at Fuselage Station 152.25 (approximately). Longitudinally level attitude is determined
with a plumb bob. Laterally level attitude is accomplished by having the vertical distance, from the left and
right wingtips to the floor, equal.
October 1976
6-3
Section VI
Wt and Bal;Equip list
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
6. Measurement of the reaction arms for a wheel
weighing is made using a steel measuring tape.
Measurements are taken, with the airplane level on the
scales, from the reference (a plumb bob dropped from
the center of either main jack point) to the axle center
li ne of the rna in gear and then to the nose wheel axle
center line. The main wheel axle center line is best
located by stretchi ng a string across from one main
wheel to the other. All measurements are to be taken
with the tape level with the hangar floor and parallel to
the fuselage center line. The locations of the wheel
reactions will be approximately at Fuselage Station
96.7 for rna; n wheels and Fuselage Station -10.3 for the
nose wheel.
7. Jack point weighings are accomplished by placing
scales at the jack points specified in step 1 above. Since
the center of gravity of the airplane is forward of
Fuselage Station 83.1, the tail reaction of the airplane
will be in an up direction. This can be measured on
regular scales by placing ballast of approximately 200
pounds on the scales and attached to the aft weighing
point by cable of adjustable length. The up reaction will
then be total ballast weight minus the scale reading and
is entered in the weighing form as a negative quantity.
8. Weighing should always be made in an enclosed area
which is free from air currents. The scales used should
be properly calibrated and certified.
LEVELING POINTS
_~biD~:m
~~
FRONT JACK POINTS
F.S. 83.1
6-4
REAR JACK POINT
F.S. 271.0
October 1976
o
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CD
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~
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CT
....
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SCALE
READING
MAIN
96
97
TARE
NET
WEIGHT
ARM
EMPTY WEIGHT (DRY)
ENGINE OIL
UNUSABLE FUEL
BASIC EMPTY WEIGHT
-
79
45
36
__
_
1935
2844
MOMENT
REG. NO.
DATE
JACK POINT LOCATION
PREPARED BY
FORWARD
83.1 Company
AFT
271.0 Signature
Space below provided for additions and subtractions to as weighed condition
LEFT MAIN
RIGHT MAIN
NOSE OR TAIL
TOTAL (AS WEIGHED)
REACTION
WHEEL - JACK POINTS
STRUT POSITION - NOSE
EXTENDED
-11.6
COMPRESSED
-9.8
BARON~SER. NO.
BASIC EMPTY WEIGHT AND BALANCE
m
0
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(J)aJ
Section VI
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Wt and BaljEquip list
NOTE
Each new airplane is delivered with a
completed sample loading, empty weight and
center of gravity, and equipment list, all
pertinent to that specific airplane. It is the
owner's responsibility to ensure that changes
in equipment are reflected in a new weight and
balance and in an addendum to the equipment
list. There are many ways of doing this; it is
suggested that a running tally of equ ipment
changes and their effect on empty weight and
e.g. is a suitable means for meeting both
requirements.
The current equipment list and empty weight
and e.g. information must be retained with the
airplane when it changes ownership. Beech
Aircraft Corporation cannot maintain this
information; the current status is known only to
the owner. If these papers become lost, the FAA
will require that the airplane be re-weighed to
establish the empty weight and e.g. and that an
inventory of installed equipment be conducted
to create a new equipment list.
October 1976
-...I
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DATE
IN
OUT
ITEM NO.
SERIAL NO
WT
(lBS)
1'00
MOM
RUNNING BASIC
EMPTY WEIGHT
PAGE NO
WEIGHT CHANGE
DESCRIPTION OF ARTICLE ADDED (+) OR REMOVED (-)
OR CHANGE
WT
ARM
MOM
(lBS)
(IN.)
1150
REGISTRATION NO
WEIGHT AND BALANCE RECORD
-4
iii'
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DATE
IN
OUT
ITEM NO.
SERIAL NO
2
WT
(LBS)
100
MOM
RUNNING BASIC
EMPTY WEIGHT
PAGE NO.
WEIGHT CHANGE
DESCRIPTION OF ARTICLE ADDED (+) OR REMOVED H
OR CHANGE
WT
MOM
ARM
(LBS)
100
liN.)
REGISTRATION NO.
WEIGHT AND BALANCE RECORD
<
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BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VI
Wtand BaljEquip list
SEATING, BAGGAGE AND EQUIPMENT
ARRANGEMENTS
nn
bJbd
CREW
't;;;;;;;J gFS 75 TO 82
PASS
[db:J TO
FS 115
120
I
8> F~
150
FS 170
QuI
nn
PASS
~ ~ FS 152
8> FS 190
HH
LJLJ
~6J
PASS
FS 111
TO 115
(3)
NOTE
The floor structure load limit is 100 pounds per
square foot, except for the area between the front
and rear spars, where the floor structure load limit is
50 pounds per square foot.
I
[!> MAXIMUM WEIGHT 300 POUNDS INCLUDING EQUIPMENT AND BAGGAGE.
[3> MAXIMUM WEIGHT 120 POUNDS INCLUDING EQUIP-
8>
l3>
(Y
MENT AND BAGGAGE.
MAXIMUM WEIGHT 400 POUNDS INCLUDING
EQUIPMENT AND BAGGAGE.
MAXIMUM WEIGHT 200 POUNDS FORWARD OF
REAR SPAR INCLUDING EQUIPMENT AND
CARGO WITH 3rd and 4th SEATS REMOVED. ALL
CARGO MUST BE SECURED WITH APPROVED
CARGO RETENTION NETS
MAXIMUM WEIGHT 400 POUNDS AFT OF REAR SPAR
INCLUDING EQUIPMENT AND CARGO WITH 3rd, 4th,
5th and 6th SEATS REMOVED.
September I 1980
6-9
I
Section VI
Wt and BaljEquip list
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
LOADING INSTRUCTIONS
It is the responsibility of the airplane operator to ensure that
the airplane is properly loaded. At the time of delivery,
Beech Aircraft Corporation provides the necessary weight
and balance data to compute individual loadings. All
subsequent changes in airplane weight and balance are the
responsibility of the airplane owner and/or operator.
The empty weight and moment of the airplane at the time of
delivery are shown on the airplane Empty Weight and
Balance form. Useful load items which may be loaded into
the airplane are shown on the Useful Load Weight and
Moment tables. The minimum and maximum moments are
indicated on the Moment Limits vs Weight table. These
moments correspond to the forward and aft center of gravity
flight limits for a particular weight. All moments are divided
by 100 to simplify computations.
MOMENT LIMITS vs WEIGHT
Moment limits are based on the following weight and
center of gravity limit data (landing gear down).
WEIGHT
CONDITION
5400 lb. (58
max. take-off
or landing)
4990 lb. (58A
max. take-off
or landing)
4200 lb. or less
6~10
FORWARD
CG LIMIT
AFT CG LIMIT
78.0
86.0
76.6
86.0
74.0
86.0
October 1 976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VI
Wt and BaljEquip List
Minimum
Moment
Maximum
Moment
100
100
3400
3425
3450
3475
2516
2535
2553
2572
2924
2946
2967
2989
3500
3525
3550
3575
2590
2609
2627
2646
3010
3032
3053
3075
3600
3625
3650
3675
2664
2683
2701
2720
3096
3118
3139
3161
3700
3725
3750
3775
2738
2757
2775
2794
3182
3204
3225
3247
3800
3825
3850
3875
2812
2831
2849
2868
3268
3290
3311
3333
3900
3925
3950
3975
2886
2905
2923
2942
3354
3376
3397
3419
4000
4025
4050
4075
2960
2979
2997
3016
3440
3462
3483
3505
Weight
f---
October 1 976
6-11
Section VI
Wt and BaljEquip list
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
MOMENT LIMITS vs WEIGHT (Continued)
Minimum
Moment
100
Maximum
Moment
100
4100
4125
4150
4175
3034
3053
3071
3090
3526
3548
3569
3591
4200
4225
4250
4275
4300
4325
4350
4375
3108
3130
3152
3174
3196
3218
3240
3263
3612
3634
3655
3677
4400
4425
4450
4475
3285
3784
3806
3827
3849
4500
4525
4550
4575
3374
3398
3420
3442
3935
4600
4625
4650
4675
3465
3488
3510
3534
3956
3978
3999
4021
4700
4725
4750
4775
3556
3579
3602
3625
4042
4064
4085
4107
Weight
6-12
3308
3330
3352
3698
3720
3741
3763
3870
3892
3913
October 1976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VI
Wt and BaljEquip list
MOMENT LIMITS vs WEIGHT (Continued)
Minimum
Moment
Maximum
Moment
100
100
4800
4825
4850
4875
3648
3671
3694
3717
4128
4150
4171
4193
4900
4925
4950
4975
4990
3740
3764
3786
3810
3824
4214
4236
4257
4279
4291
5000
5025
5050
5075
3833
3856
3880
3904
4300
4322
4343
4365
5100
5125
5150
5175
3926
3950
3974
3998
4386
4408
4429
4451
5200
5225
5250
5275
4021
4045
4068
4092
4472
4494
4515
4537
5300
5325
5350
5375
4116
4140
4164
4188
4558
4580
4601
4622
5400
4212
4644
Weight
October 1976
6-13
Section VI
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Wt and BaljEquip List
MOMENT LIMITS
V$
WEIGHT
~400
50000
"--- '19~.l(.J~I)hh,
°SOo
42110
:moo
J)OO
JGIJO
3,00
76
ctr,TER OF GRAVITY - INCHES AFT O~ DATUM
ENVELOPE BASED ON THE FOLLOWING WEIGHT I\ND
ctNTE R OF GRAVITY LIMI r DATA ILANDING GEAR DOWNI
WEIGH1 CONDITION
FOAWARo C G LIMIT
860
5400 LBs IMAXIMUM TAKE OFF
OR LANDING I
8ARON 5SA
WEIGHT CONDITION
FORWARD CG. LIMIT
4990 LBS (MAXIMUM TAKE OFF
OR LANDINGl
4200LBS
6-14
October 1 976
BeeCHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VI
Wt and BaljEquip List
COMPUTING PROCEDURE
1. Record the Basic Empty Weight and Moment from the
Basic Empty Weight and Balance form (or from the
latest superseding form) under the Basic Empty
Condition block. The moment must be divided by 100 to
correspond to Useful Load Weights and Moments
tables.
2. Record the weight and corresponding moment from the
appropriate table of each of the useful load items
(except fuel) to be carried in the airplane.
3. Total the weight column and moment column. The
SUB-TOTAL is the Zero Fuel Condition.
4. Determine the weight and corresponding moment for
the fuel loading to be used. This fuel loading includes
fuel for the flight, plus that required for start, taxi, and
take-off. Add the Fuel to Zero Fuel Condition to obtain
the SUB-TOTAL Ramp Condition.
5. Subtract the fuel to be used for start and taxi to arrive at
the SUB-TOTAL Take-off Condition.
6. Subtract the weight and moment of the fuel to be used
from the take-off weight and moment. (Determine the
weight and moment of this fuel by subtracting the
amount on board on landing from the amount on board
on take-off.) The Zero Fuel Condition, the Take-Off Condition, and the Landing Condition moment must be
within the minimum and maximum moments shown on
the Moment Limit vs Weight table for that weight. If the
total moment is less than the minimum moment allowed, useful load items must be shifted aft or forward
load items reduced. If the total moment is greater than
the maximum moment allowed, useful load items must
be shifted forward or aft load items reduced. If the
quantity or location of load items is changed, the calculations must be revised and the moments rechecked.
October 1976
6-15
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VI
Wt and Bal;Equip List
The following Sample Loading chart is presented to depict the
sample method of computing a load. Weights used DO NOT reflect
an actual airplane loading.
WEIGHT AND BALANCE LOADING FORM
BARON_---=...;""-58
DATE
_
SERIAL NO.
REG N O. --=N...:.:X:..=;X:..=;X~
_
TH-XXXX
ITEM
WEIGHT
MOM/100
1. BASIC EMPTY CONDITION
3517
2763
2. FRONT SEAT OCCUPANTS
340
256
4. 3rd and 4th SEAT
OCCUPANTS AFT FACING
340
378
5. 5th and 6th SEAT
OCCUPANTS
170
258
3. 3rd and 4th SEAT
OCCUPANTS FWD FACING
6. NOSE BAGGAGE
~
7. AFT BAGGAGE
S~~
8. CARGO
9. SUB TOTAL
ZERO FUEL CONDITION
10. FUEL LOADING (166 GAL)
11. SUB TOTAL
RAMP CONDITION
12. *LESS FUEL FOR START,
TAXI, AND TAKE-OFF
9
61
-
-
-
-
4428
3664
996
824
5424
4488
-24
-20
13. SUB TOTAL
TAKE-OFF CONDITION
5400
4468
14. LESS FUEL TO
DESTINATION (142 GAL)
-852
-712
4548
3756
15. LANDING CONDITION
*Fuel for start, taxi and take-off is norrnallv 24 lbs at an average
mom/100 of 20.
6-16
October 1 976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VI
Wt and BaljEquip List
WEIGHT AND BALANCE LOADING FORM
BARON
DATE
_
SERIAL NO.
REG NO,
_
ITEM
WEIGHT
MOM/100
1. BASIC EMPTY CONDITION
2. FRONT SEAT OCCUPANTS
3. 3rd and 4th SEAT
OCCUPANTS FWD FACING
4. 3rd and 4th SEAT
OCCUPANTS AFT FACING
5. 5th and 6th SEAT
OCCUPANTS
6. NOSE BAGGAGE
7. AFT BAGGAGE
8. CARGO
9. SUB TOTAL
ZERO FUEL CONDITION
10. FUEL LOADING
11. SUB TOTAL
RAMP CONDITION
12. *LESS FUEL FOR START,
TAXI, AND TAKE-OFF
13. SUB TOTAL
TAKE-OFF CONDITION
14. LESS FUEL TO
DESTINATION
15. LANDING CONDITION
"Fuel for start, taxi and take-off is normally 24 Ibs at an average
mom/l00 of 20.
October 1976
6-17
...
.....
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CD
CD
0-
.....
o
o
n
..
00
~
Aft
Position
75
82
90
98
105
112
120
128
135
142
150
82
90
98
106
114
123
131
139
148
156
164
Aft
Position
115
126
138
150
161
172
184
196
207
218
230
120
132
144
156
168
180
192
204
216
228
240
Aft
Position
111
122
133
144
155
166
178
188
200
210
222
115
126
138
150
161
172
184
196
207
218
230
ARM 111 ARM 115
Fwd
Position
MOM/100
ARM 115 ARM 120
Fwd
Position
152
167
182
198
212
228
243
258
274
288
304
ARM 152
Standard or
Club Seating
NOTE: OCCUPANT POSITIONS SHOWN ARE FOR THE SEATS ADJUSTED THE MAXIMUM
RANGE. INTERMEDIATE POSITIONSWILL REQUIRE INTERPOLATION OFTHEMOMj1 00 VALUES.
100
110
120
130
140
150
160
170
180
190
200
WEIGHT ARM 75 ARM 82
Fwd
Position
Front Seats
Standard Seating
Club Seating
5th and 6th
Seats
3rd and 4th Fwd Facing 3rd and 4th Aft Facing
USEFUL LOAD WEIGHTS AND MOMENTS
OCCUPANTS
!:!"
00
"c.n
!!l 00
.... :::1
~o
Q, ..
III 00
:::I III
w-t
::I::u
..... ~
..... ."
-to
!.::I:
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cnm
CD m
[
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c
'S'
<
~-
00:::1
III
Q,O
~f
n
III
:::I
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VI
Wt and BaljEquip List
BAGGAGE
Weight
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
110
120
130
140
150
160
170
180
190
200
220
240
260
280
300
320
340
360
380
400
NOSE
REAR
AFT
COMPT
FS 131 TO 170
FS 170 TO 190
ARM 15
ARM 150
ARM 180
Mom/100
Mom/100
Mom/100
15
30
45
60
75
90
105
120
135
150
18
36
54
72
90
108
126
144
162
180
165
180
195
210
225
240
255
270
285
300
198
216
2
3
5
6
8
9
11
12
14
15
17
18
20
21
23
24
26
27
29
30
33
37
39
42
45
October 1 976
330
360
390
420
450
480
510
540
570
600
6-19
Section VI
Wt and Bal;Equip list
G
ght
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
9a
100
I
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
CARGO
FWD OF SPAR
(CENTER SEATS REMOVED)
ARM 108
Moment
Weight
100
11
22
32
43
54
65
76
86
97
108
110
120
130
140
150
160
170
180
190
200
Moment
100
119
130
140
151
162
173
184
194
205
216
CARGO
AFT OF SPAR
(CENTER &. AFT SEATS REMOVED)
ARM 145
Moment
Moment
Weight
100
100
Weight
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
110
120
130
140
6-20
15
29
44
58
73
87
102
116
131
145
160
174
189
203
150
160
170
180
190
200
210
220
230
240
250
260
270
280
218
232
247
261
276
290
305
319
334
348
363
377
392
406
October 1 976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VI
Wt and BaljEquip list
Moment
Moment
100
Weight
100
421
435
450
464
479
493
350
360
370
380
390
400
508
522
537
551
566
580
~
290
300
310
320
330
340
USABLE FUEL
I
Gallons
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
110
120
130
136
140
150
160
166
170
180
190
194
136
GAL
Weight
60
120
180
240
300
360
420
480
540
600
660
720
780
816
840
900
960
996
1020
1080
1140
1164
166
GAL
194
GAL
Mom/100
46
92
140
189
238
288
338
388
439
489
539
590
641
671
46
92
140
189
238
288
338
388
439
489
539
590
641
46
92
140
189
238
288
338
388
439
489
539
590
641
692
743
793
824
692
743
793
845
899
953
974
I------------.-
October 1976
6-21
Section VI
Wt and Bal;Equip List
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
6-22
October 1976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VII
Systems Description
SECTION VII
SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SUBJECT
Airframe
Flight Controls
Control Surfaces
Control Column
Rudder Pedals
Trim Controls
Electric Elevator Trim
Instrument Panel
Flight Instruments
Power Plant Instruments
Ground Control.
Wing Flaps
Panel Illustration
Landing Gear System
Control Switch
Position Indicators
Safety Switch
Warning Horn
Manual Extension
Brakes
Baggage/Cargo Compartments
Aft Baggage/Cargo Compartment
NoseBaggage/Cargo Compartment
Seating
SeatBelts andShoulder Harnesses
september, 1979
PAGE
7-5
7-5
7-5
7-5
7-5
7-6
7-6
7-6
7-6
7-7
7-7
7-7
7-8,7-9
7-10
7-10
7-10
7-11
7-11
7-11
7-12
7-13
7-13
7-13
7-14
7-14
7-1
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)
SUBJECT
PAGE
Doors, Windows, and Exits
7-15
Cabin Door
7-15
Utility Door
7-16
Open able Cabin Windows
7-17
Emergency Exits
7-18A
Control Locks
7-18A
Power Plants
7-188
Power Plant Controls
7-188
Propeller, Throttle and Mixture
7-188
Induction Air
7-188
Engine Ice Protection
7-188
Lubrication System
7-19
Cowl Flaps
7-19
Propellers
7-19
Hartzell Air-Charged Propeller Domes
7-20
Propeller Synchronizer
7-20
Propeller Synchroscope
7-21
Fuel System
7-21
Fuel Flow and Pressure Indicator
7-22A
Fuel Flow Indicator
7-228
Illustrations
7-22A, 7-23
Fuel Crossfeed
,
,
7-27
"
7-27
Auxiliary Fuel Pumps
Fuel Off-loading
7-27
Fuel Required for Flight.
7-27
Electrical System
7-28
Battery
7-28
Schematic
7-29
Alternators (TH-773 thru TH-1376)
7-28
Alternators (TH-1377 and After. and Airplanes
Equipped With Kit No. 55-3024)
7-30
Starters
_
7-31
External Power
_
7-31
7-2
August, 1984
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VII
Systems Description
TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)
SUBJECT
PAGE
Lighting Systems
7-32
Interior Lighting
7-32
Exterior Lighting
7-32A
Heating and Ventilation System
7-33
Cabin Heating
7-33
Environmental Schematic
7-33
Heater Operation
7-34
Heat Regulation
7-35
Heater Blower
7-35
Cabin Ventilation
7·35
Individual Fresh Air Outlets
7·36
Oxygen System
7-36
Pitot and Static System
7-37
Pitot System
7-37
Static System
7-37
Pressu re System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-38
7-39
Stall Warning
Ice Protection Systems
7-40
Surface Deice System
7·40
Windshield Anti-ice (Electrothermal).
7-40A
Propeller and Windshield
7-41
Anti-ice System (Fluid Flow).
Electrothermal Propeller De ice
7-42
Pitot Heat
7-42
Stall Warning Anti-ice
7-42
Heated Fuel Vents
7A3
Engine Break-In Information
7-43
August, 1984
7-3
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
7-4
October 1976
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
AIRFRAME
The BEECHCRAFT BARON 58 is a four to six place all-metal.
low-wi ng, twin-engi ne airplane with retractable tricycle
landing gear, and a conventional horizontal and vertical
stabilizer.
FLIGHT CONTROLS
CONTROL SURFACES
Control surfaces are bearing supported and operated
through push-pull rods and conventional cable systems
terminating in bellcranks.
CONTROL COLUMN
The throw-over type control column for elevator and aileron
control ca n be placed in front of either front seat. Pu 11 the T ~
handle latch at the back of the control arm and position the
control wheel as desired. Check for full freedom of movement after repositioning the control.
NOTE
If a reduced power throttle position exists when
throwing over the control column, it will be
necessary to momentarily move the throttle
levers forward for passage of the control
column.
The optional dual control column is required for flight instruction.
RUDDER PEDALS
To adjust the rudder pedals, press the spring-loaded lever
on the side of each pedal arm and move the pedal to its
forward or aft position. The adjustment lever can also be
used to place the right set of rudder pedals against the floor,
(when the copilot brakes are not installed) when not in use.
September, 1979
7-5
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
TRIM CONTROLS
Trim tabs on the rudder, left aileron, and elevator are adjustable with the controls mounted on the center console
through closed cable systems. Mechanical position indicators for each of the trim tabs are integrated with their respective controls. The left aileron tab incorporates servo
action in addition to its trimming purpose. Elevator trim is
accomplished through either the electric or the manual
pitch trim system.
ELECTRIC ELEVATOR TRIM
The electric elevator trim system is controlled by the ONOFF switch located on the instrument panel, a thumb
switch on the control wheel and a circuit breaker on the left
sidewall. The ON-OFF switch must be in the ON position to
operate the system. The thumb switch is moved forward for
nose down, aft for nose up and when released returns to the
center OFF position. When the system is not being
electrically actuated, the manual trim control wheel may be
used.
Incorporated in the system is an emergency release button
located on the left handle grip of the pilot's control wheel.
This button can be depressed to deactivate the system
quickly in case of a malfunction in the system. The system
will remain deactivated only while the release button is
being held in the depressed position.
INSTRUMENT PANEL
FLIGHT INSTRUMENTS
The flight instruments are located on a floating panel directly in front of the pilot's seat. Standard flight instrumentation includes attitude and directional gyros, air-
7-6
September, 1979
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VII
Systems Description
speed, altimeter, vertical speed, turn coordinator, and a
clock. A magnetic compass is mounted above the instrument panel and an outside air temperature indicator is
located on the left side panel. Located on the right side of
the instrument panel is the standard pressure gage for the
instrument air system.
POWER PLANT INSTRUMENTS
Most of the engine instruments are located in the upper
center of the instrument panel. The standard indicators for
each engine are as follows: tachometers, manifold pressure, fuel flow, fuel quantity, and loadmeters. Other indicators such as the exhaust. gas temperature system, the
propeller deice ammeter (or propeller alcohol quantity and
deice pressure) are usually installed on the right side of the
instrument panel. Two multi-purpose instruments, one for
each engine, indicate cylinder head temperature, oil pressure, and oil temperature.
GROUND CONTROL
Spring-loaded linkage from the nose gear to the adjustable
rudder pedals allows for nose wheel steering. Smooth
turning is accomplished by allowing the airplane to roll
while depressing the appropriate rudder pedal. The minimum wing tip turni ng radius, using partial braking action
and differential power, is 31 feet 6 inches.
WING FLAPS
The wing flaps have three positions; UP, 15° (approach),
and DOWN (30°), with no intermediate positions. A flap
position indicator and a control switch are located on the
left side of the control console. The switch must be pulled
out of a detent to change the flap position. The flaps will
move to either position selected from any previously
selected position.
September. 1979
7-7
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
.-I
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Q.
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a::
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z
October 1976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 68
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VII
Systems Description
...w
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October 1976
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7-9
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VII
Systems Description
LANDING GEAR SYSTEM
CAUTION
Never taxi with a flat strut.
The landing gear is operated through adjustable linkage
connected to an actuator assembly mounted beneath the
front seats. The actuator assembly is driven by an electric
motor. The landing gear may be electrically retracted and
extended, and may be extended manually.
CONTROL SWITCH
The landing gear is controlled by a two-position switch on
the right side of the control console. The switch handle
must be pulled out of the safety detent before it can be
moved to the opposite position. Never operate the landing
gear electrically with the handcrank engaged.
I
CAUTION
Do not change the position of the control switch to
reverse the direction of the landing gear while the
gear is in transit, as this could cause damage to
the retract mechanism.
POSITION INDICATORS
Landing gear position lights are located above the control
switch. Three green lights, one for each gear, are illuminated whenever the landing gears are down and locked.
The red light illuminates anytime one or all of the landing
gears are in transit or in any intermediate position. All of the
lights will be extinguished when the landing gear is up and
locked.
The switch placarded TEST-BRT-DIM-WARN LIGHTS, located on the pilot's floating instrument panel, controls the
illumination intensity and testing of the lamps. When the
switch is held to the TEST position, the warning lights and
the landing gear position indicator lights are energized in
7-10
August, 1984
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VII
Systems Description
orderto verifythatthey illuminate. The switch returns tothe
BRT position. The pilot may select BRT or DIM lights by
moving the switch to the proper position.
SAFETY SWITCH
To prevent inadvertent retraction of the landing gear on the
ground, a main strut safety switch opens the control circuit
when the strut is compressed.
CAUTION
Never rely on the safety switch to keep the gear
down during taxi or on takeoff, landing roll, or
in a static position. Always make certain that
the landing gear switch is in the down position
during these operations.
WARNING HORN
If either or both throttles are retarded below an engine
setting sufficient to sustain two engine flight with the landing gear retracted, a warning horn will sound intermittently. During one engine operation, the horn can be
silenced by advancing the throttle of the inoperative engine
until the throttle warning horn switch opens the circuit.
MANUAL EXTENSION
The landing gear can be manually extended, but not retracted, by operating the handcrank on the rear ofthe pilot's
seat. The landing gear handle must be in the down position
and the landing gear MOTOR circuit breaker must be pulled
before manually extending the gear. When the electrical
system is operative, the landing gear may be checked for full
down with the gear position lights, provided the landing
gear RELAY circuit breaker is engaged. After the landing
gear is down, disengage the handcrank. For electrical
retraction of the landing gear after a practice manual extension use procedures outlined in the EMERGENCY
PROCEDURES section.
AUgU8t, 1984
7-11
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VII
Systems Description
If the la nding gear was extended for emergency reasons, do
'not move any la ndi ng gear controls or reset any switches or
circuit breakers until the aircraft is on jacks, to prevent a
gear retraction on the ground. These procedures are outlined in the EMERGENCY PROCEDURES section.
BRAKES
The brakes on the main landing gear wheels are operated
by applying toe pressure to the top of the rudder pedals.
The parking brake T-handle control is located just left of the
elevator tab wheelan the pilot's subpanel. To set the
parking brakes, pull the control out and depress each toe
pedal until firm. Push the control in to release the brakes.
NOTE
I
The parking brake should remain off and wheel
chocks installed if the airplane is to remain
unattended. Changes in ambient temperature
can cause the brakes to release or to exert
excessive pressu re.
I
On Serials TH-773 thru TH-1005 with shuttle
valves installed, only the pilot's brake pedals
can be used in coniunction with the parking
brake system to set the parking brake.
CAUTION
On Serials TH-773 thru TH-1005 with shuttle
valve brake systems installed, continuous brake
application of either the pilot's or copilot's brake
pedals, in conjunction with an overriding
pumping action from the opposite brake pedals,
could result in the loss of braking action on the
s ide which continuous pressure is being
applied.
September, 1979
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VII
Systems Description
The brakes hydraulic fluid reservoir is accessible through
the nose baggage door, Fluid level is checked with the dipstick attached to the reservoir cap. The brakes require no
adjustments, since the pistons move outward to compensate for lining wear.
BAGGAGE/CARGO COMPARTMENTS
AFT BAGGAGE/CARGO COMPARTMENT
The aft baggage/cargo compartment is accessible through
the utility door on the right side of the fuselage. This area
extends aft of the pilot's seats to the rear bulkhead.
Because of structural limitations, this area is divided into
three sections, each having a different weight limitation.
Loading within the baggage/cargo compartment must be in
accordance with the data in the WEIGHT AND BALANCE
section. All cargo must be secured with approved cargo
retention nets.
WARNING
Do not carry hazardous material anywhere in
the airplane.
NOSE BAGGAGE/CARGO COMPARTMENT
The forward baggage/cargo compartment is easily accessible through a large door on the right side of the nose.
The door, hinged at the top, swings upward, clear of the
loading area. Loading within this area must be within the
limitations according to the WEIGHT AND BALANCE
section. The nose baggage/cargo compartment incorporates the full width of the fuselage as usable space. This
compartment also affords accessibility to the oxygen cylinder and to some of the airplane's avionics. Straps are provided and should be used to secure any baggage or cargo
loaded into the nose baggage/cargo compartment.
September, 1980
7·13
I
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
SEATING
To adjust any of the four standard seats forward or aft, pull
up on the release bar below the seat and slide the seat to the
desired position. The seat backs of all standard seats can be
placed in any of four positions by operating a release lever
on the inboard side of each seat. An option is available that
provides for the seat backs on all seats (except the pilot's) to
be placed in any position from vertical tofully reclined. Outboard armrests for all standard seats are built into the cabin
sidewalls. Center armrests can be elevated or positioned
flush with the seat cushions. The 3rd and 4th place chairs
are equipped with a locking back to accomodate the
shoulder harness, and the seat back can be folded over for
access by rotating the red handle located on the lower inboard side of the seat back. The optional fifth and sixth seats
can be folded up to provide additional floor space, or folded
down to provide access to the extended baggage/cargo
compartment.
Club seating is available. When occupied, aft facing chairs
in the club seating arrangement must havethe headrests in
the fully raised position during takeoff and landing. If de~
sired, these seats can be arranged to face forward. To convert aft facing club seats to forward facing, move seat stops
on center tracks to the two forward existing holes. Move
stops on outboard and inboard tracks to the existing aft
holes.
SEAT BELTS AND SHOULDER HARNESSES
The shoulder harness is a standard installation for all seats
and must be used with the seats in the upright position. The
spri ng loadi ng at the inertia reel keeps the harness snug but
will allow normal movement during flight operations. The
inertia reel is designed with a locking device that will secure
the harness in the event of sudden forward movement or an
impact action.
7-14
October 1976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VII
Systems Description
The strap is worn over the shou Ider and down across the
body, where it is fastened by a metal loop into the seat belt
buckle. For the pilot seats, the harness strap is contained in
an inertia reel attached to the side canopy structure of the
cockpit The inertia reel is covered with an escutcheon and
the strap runs upfrom the reel location to a looped fitting attached to the window frame just aft of the pilot seats. For
the third and fourth passenger seats, the inertia reel is attached into the seat back structure and is covered with the
seat back upholstery. The strap runs up the seat back and
over the outboard corner of the seat back. For the fifth and
sixth passenger seats, the strap is contained in an inertia
reel attached to the upper fuselage side structure, just aft of
the seat back and is covered with an escutcheon.
NOTE
The seat belt is independent of the shoulder
harness, but the outboard seat belt and the
shoulder harness must be connected for
stowage when the seat is not occupied.
DOORS, WINDOWS AND EXITS
CABIN DOOR
The airplane has a conventional cabin door on the forward
right side of the fuselage and when closed,the outside cabin
door handle is spring loaded to fit into a recess in the door to
create a flat aerodynamically clean surface. The door may
be locked with a key. To open the door from the outside, lift
the handle from its recess and pull until the door opens.
To close the cabin door from the inside, observe that the
door handle is in the unlocked position. In this position, the
latch handle is free to move approximately one inch in
either direction before engagement of the locking
October 1 976
7-15
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
mechanism. Then grasp the door and firmly pull the door
closed. Rotate the door handle fully counterclockwise into
the locked position. When the door is properly locked, the
door latch handle is free to move approximately one inch in
either direction.
NOTE
When checking the door latch handle, do not
move it far enough to engage the door latch
release mechanism.
Press firmly outward at the top rear corner of the door. If any
movement of the door is detected, completely open the door
and close again following the above instructions.
To open the door from the inside, depress the lock button
and rotate the handle clockwise.
UTILITY DOOR
A utility door aft of the cabin door is provided for loading
bulky cargo or to accommodate passengers. The utility door
is a double door with each half hinged at the forward and aft
edge of the door opening. The rear half of the door must be
closed first. A latch on the forward edge of the door moves
downward to a locked position to secure the hooks atthe top
and bottom of the door to the door frame. The front half of
the door cannot be fully closed until the latch of the aft door
is latched and flush with the edge of the door. After the forward half of the door is closed, it can be latched from the
outside by rotating the half-moon shaped handle to the
CLOSED position. A conventional handle on the inside of
this door provides for opening or closing from the inside.
A BEECH approved kit is available to provide for operation
with the cargo doors removed. A baffle is to be installed on
the forward edge of the door and placards installed in the
airplane. With the doors removed, assure that all regis-
7-16
October, 1977
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VII
Systems Description
tration numbers are visible on the side of the airplane. With
doors removed, all occupants not wearing parachutes must
wear restraining belts.
The utility door ajar warning light is tested by the
TEST-BRT-DIM-WARN LIGHTS switch, located on the
pilot's floating instrument panel. The switch controls the
intensity and testing of the lamps. When the switch is held
in the TEST position, the light is energized in order to
verify that it illuminates. The switch, when released, returns
to the BRT position. The pilot may select either BRT or
DIM lights by moving the switch to the desired position.
OPENABLE CABIN WINDOWS
NOTE
I
Windows are to be closed before and during
flight.
Serials TH-773 thru TH-1 079, Except TH-1 027, TH-1 062
and TH-1 067:
To Open Window For Ventilation (Only On Ground):
Release latch front of bar, pull bar at the bottom of the
window out and upward. Window will open approximately
two inches.
I
To Close Window:
Pull inward and down on the bar at the bottom of the
window. Resistance will be felt as the bar moves downward.
Continue moving bar downward to its lowest position.
Check that bar is locked by the latch.
NOTE
I
While closing window, ascertain that the emergency release pin (which allows the window to
open fully for emergency exit) is securely in
place.
Revised: March 1983
7-17
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
serial TH n3 and After
I
Serials TH- 10 27 , TH- 1062, TH- 1067 and TH- 1080 thru
TH-1315:
A plastic covered multi-purpose latch on each openable
window is used to provide partial opening of the window for
ventilation during ground operations, and also quick unlatching for emergency egress.
I To Open Window For Ventilation (Only On Ground):
NOTE
Red handle for emergency exit only.
1. Lift thumb catch (window will release).
2. Push up and outward until mechanism clicks into
detent.
To Close Window:
-
Pull inward and down until locked. (Listen for detent.)
Serials THA 1316 and after:
To Open Window For Ventilation (Only On Ground):
NOTE
Red handle for emergency exit only.
1. Rotate lock handle to UNLOCKED position.
2. Lift thumb catch (window will release).
3. Push latch up and outward to over-center position.
To Close Window:
1. Pull latch inward and push down until locked. (Listen for
detent.)
2. Rotate lock handle to LOCKED position.
7·18
Revised: March 1983
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VII
Systems Description
EMERGENCY EXITS
To open the emergency exit provided by the openable
window on each side of the cabin:
Serials TH-773 thru TH-l 079, Except TH-l 027, TH-l 062
and TH-l 067:
1. Lift the latch.
2. Pullout the emergency release pin and push the
window out.
The above procedure is described on a placard installed
below the left and right openable windows.
Serials TH-l027, TH-l062, TH-l067, TH-1080 and after:
1. Remove cover as indicated by placard in the center of
the Ventilation/Emergency Exit latch.
2. Rotate handle up as indicated by placard, breaking
safety wire, and push window out.
NOTE
Anytime the window has been opened by
breaking the safety wire on the red emergency
latch, the window must be reattached and
wired by a qualified mechanic using QQ-W343, Type S, .020 diameter copper wire prior to
further airplane operation.
CONTROL LOCKS
The control column pin assembly is placarded with the
installation instructions. Install the assembly with the instructions facing the instrument panel. Placard reading
CONTROLS LOCKED, REMOVE BEFORE FLIGHT will be
facing pilot if properly installed.
Revised: March 1983
7-18A
Section VII
Systems Description
aEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
POWER PLANTS
The BEECHCRAFT BARON 58 is powered by two
ContinentaIIO-520-C or IO-520-CB six-cylinder. horizontally
opposed. fuel-injected engines rated at 285 hp at 2700 rpm.
POWER PLANT CONTROLS
PROPELLER, THROTTLE, AND MIXTURE
The control levers are grouped along the upper face of the
control console. Their knobs are shaped so they can be identified by touch. A single controllable friction knob below and
to the left of the control levers prevents creeping.
INDUCTION AIR
Induction air is available from filtered ram air or alternate
air. Filtered ram air enters from the intake air scoop on top of
the cowling. Should the filter become obstructed, a springloaded door on the alternate air intake will open automatically and the induction system will operate on alternate air taken from the engine accessory section.
ENGINE ICE PROTECTION
Engi ne ice protection consists of electrothermal fuel vent
heaters controlled by a switch on the left panel, and an
automatic alternate air induction system.
The only significant ice accumulation is impact ice on the
inlet scoop and filter. Should the induction air scoop or filter
become clogged with ice, a spring-loaded door on the firewall will open automatically, and the induction system will
operate on alternate air.
7-188
JUly 1979
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VII
Systems Description
LUBRICATION SYSTEM
The engine oil system for each engine is the full pressure,
wet sump type, with a full flow, integrally mounted oil filter
and has a 12-quart capacity. Oil operating temperatures are
controlled by an automatic thermostat bypass control. The
bypass control will limit oil flowthrough the oil cooler when
operating temperatures are below normal and will permit
the oil to bypass the cooler if it should become blocked.
The oil system may be checked through access doors in the
engine cowling. A calibrated dip stick attached to the filler
cap indicates the oil level. Due to the canted position of the
engines, the dip sticks are calibrated for either right or left
engines and are not interchangeable.
The oil grades listed in the Approved Engine Oils in the SERVICING section are general recommendations only, and will
vary with individual circumstances. The determining factor
for choosing the correct grade of oil is the average ambient
temperature.
COWL FLAPS
The cowl flap for each engine is controlled by a manual controllever located on the lower center console. The cowl flap
is closed when the lever is in the up position and open when
the lever is down.
PROPELLERS
The engines are equipped with either two or three blade,
full featheri ng, constant speed, propellers. Springs aided by
counterweights move the blades to high pitch. Engine oil
under governor-boosted pressure moves the blades to low
pitch.
October 1 976
7-19
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT Baron 68
Serial TH 773 and After
The propellers should be cycled occasionally during cold
weather operation. This will help maintain warm oil in the
propeller hubs so that the oil will not congeal.
HARTZELL AIR-CHARGED PROPELLER DOMES
If propeller air dome pressure is lost during flight, the
following symptoms may be noticed: sluggish propeller rpm
reduction; overspeed and poor synchronization during
higher rpm operation; and propeller overspeed upon the instant opening of the throttle, followed by poor rpm recovery.
NOTE
In the event of pressure loss, feathering capability is lost, but flight can be continued by
reducing air speed to regain rpm control. The
malfunction should be corrected by an authorized service center before further flight.
PROPELLER SYNCHRONIZER
The propeller synchronizer automatically matches the rpm
of both propellers. The system's range of authority is limited
to approximately 25 rpm. Normal governor operation is unchanged but the synchronizer will continuously monitor
propeller rpm and adjust one governor as required.
A magnetic pickup mounted in each propeller governor
transmits electric pulses to a transistorized control box installed behind the pedestal. The control box converts any
pulse rate differences into correction commands, which are
transmitted to the appropriate governor.
A toggle switch installed on the pedestal turns the system
on. To operate the system, synchronize the propellers in the
normal manner and turn the synchronizer on. To change
7·20
October 1 976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VII
Systems Description
rpm, adjust both propeller controls at the same time. This
will keep the setting within the limiting range ofthe system.
If the synchronzer is on but unable to adjust the propeller
rpm, the system has reached its range limit. Turn the synchronizer switch off, synchronize the propellers manually,
and turn the synchronizer switch on.
PROPELLER SYNCHROSCOPE
A propeller svnchroscope. located in the tachometer case,
operates to give an indication of synchronization of propellers. If the right propeller is operating at a higher rpm than
the left, the face of the synchroscope, a black and white
cross pattern, spins in a clockwise rotation. Counterclockwise rotation indicates a higher rpm of the left propeller.
This instrument aids the pilot in accomplishing manual synchronization of the propellers.
FUEL SYSTEM
The fuel system is an OFF-ON-CROSSFEED arrangement.
The fuel selector panel, located on the floor forward of the
front seats, contains the fuel selector for each engine and a
schematic diagram of fuel flow.
The standard wing fuel system has a tota I capacity of 142
gallons. Two optional systems are available. The first has a
total capacity of 172 gallons; the second, comprising the
172 gallon system plus wet wing tip tanks, provides a total
capacity of 200 gallons. The fuel value placarded adjacent
to each filler cap indicates fuel capacity and usable fuel
September, 1980
7-21
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT Baron 68
Serial TH 773 and After
when that wing fuel system is full. Refer to the LIMITATIONS section for usable fuel in each system.
A vapor return Iine returns excess fuel from the engine to its
respective wing system. All of the fuel cells, standard or
optional, in each wing are interconnected in order to make
all the usable fuel in each wing available to its engine
when the fuel selector valve is turned to ON. The standard
142 gallon and optional 172 gallon fuel systems are filled
through a single filler located in each wing. When the wet
wing tip option is installed (200 gallons total), there are two
additional filler caps, one per wing. Refer to the
SERVICING section for additional information.
CAUTION
When the wet wing tip tanks are filled with fuel,
DO NOT open the outboard wing leading edge
filler caps, as fuel will exit from those openings.
The standard 142 gallon fuel system and the optional 172
gallon fuel system have six drain locations. There are two
additional drain locations when the wet wing tip tanks are
installed.
Fuel quantity is measured by float type transmitter units
which transmit the common level indication to a single
indicator for each respective wing system.
When the wet wing tip fuel system is installed, the fuel
quantity indicators will read FULL until the fuel quantity
remaining is less than 75 gallons. When this occurs, the
quantity indicated is coordinated to the total usable fuel
supply.
7·22
September, 1980
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
section VII
Systems Description
FUEL FLOW AND PRESSURE INDICATOR
Serials TH-773 thru TH-1193
The dual fuel flow indicator on the instrument panel senses
fuel pressure at the fuel distributor and is calibrated to
indicate fuel flow to each engine in gallons per hour. The
green arc indicates the normal fuel flow operating range
while the red radials indicate the minimum and maximum
allowable fuel pressures.
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~75%
I
FUEL FLOW AND PRESSURE INDICATOR
(Serials TH-773 thru TH-1193)
September, 1980
7-22A
section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH n3 and After
The higher end of the green arc includes a sawtooth
segment labeled "TAKE-OFF AND CLIMB" and indicates
the approximate fuel flow required for takeoff and climb at
sea level, 3000, 5000, and 7000 feet. The pilot should use
these markings as a guide only and refer to the
performance charts for the exact fuel flow requirements for
takeoff, climb at maximum continuous power, or climb at
maximum normal operating power.
The lower end of the green arc includes a sawtooth
segment labeled "% CRUISE POWER" which indicates the
approximate fuel flows for powers ranging from 45% to
75% of maximum continuous power. The lower fuel flow of
each sawtooth corresponds to the cruise-lean fuel flow
while the higher fuel flow of each sawtooth corresponds to
the best power fuel flow. When power is set in accordance
with the cruise power setting tables in the
PERFORMANCE Section. these sawtooth marks provide
approximate percent power information.
FUEL FLOW INDICATOR
Serials TH-1194 and after
The dual fuel flow indicator on the instrument panel is
controlled electrically and indicates fuel flow to each engine
in gallons per hour. A turbine meter installed in the fuel line
rotates in proportion to the fuel flow The speed of rotation
7·22B
september, 1980
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Seriai TH 773 and After
Section VII
Systems Description
FUEL FLOW INDICATOR
(Serials TH-1194 and after)
is converted to an electrical signal which is then interpreted
by the fuel flow indicator The green arc indicates the
normal operating range while the red radial indicates the
maximum allowable fuel flow
A segment of fuel flows at the higher end of the green arc
is labeled "TAKEOFF AND CLIMB" and indicates the
approximate fuel flow required for takeoff and climb at sea
level, 3000, 5000, and 7000 feet. The pilot should use
these markings as a guide only and refer to the tables in
the PERFORMANCE Section for takeoff, climb at
maximum continuous power, or climb at maximum normal
operating power.
September, 1980
7-23
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BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VII
Systems Description
FUEL CROSSFEED (One Engine Inoperative Only)
The fuel lines for the engines are interconnected by crossfeed lines. During normal operation each engine uses its
own fuel pumps to draw fuel from- its respective wing fuel
system. However, on emergency crossfeed operations
either engine can consume the available fuel from the opposite side.
The fuel crossfeed system is provided for use during emergency conditions. The system cannot be used to transfer
fuel from one wing system to the other. The procedure for
using the crossfeed system is described in the EMERGENCY PROCEDURES section.
AUXILIARY FUEL PUMPS
An individual two-speed electric auxiliary fuel pump is provided for each engine. HIGH pressure, OFF or LOW pressure is selected with each auxiliary fuel pump switch on the
pilot's subpanel. High pressure is used for providing fuel
pressure before starting, and provides near maximum engine performance, should the engine-driven pumpfail. Low
pressure may be used in any operating mode to eliminate
pressure fluctuations resulting from high ambient temperatures and/or high altitudes. The high pressure position
should not be selected while the engine is operating except
in the event of engine-driven pump failure since the high
pressure mode supplies a greater pressure than can be accepted by the injection system during normal operation.
FUEL OFF-LOADING
When installed, a visual fuel level sight gage in each wing
leading edge, outboard of the engine nacelle, can be used
for partial fill ing or off-loading of fuel. Th is gage is to
be used only when it reads within the calibrated area.
FUEL REQUIRED FOR FLIGHT
Flight planning and fuel loading is facilitated by the use of
fuel quantity indicators that have been coordinated with the
September, 1980
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
usable fuel supply. It is the pilot's responsibilityto ascertain
that the fuel quantity indicators are functioning and maintaining a reasonable degree of accuracy, and be certain of
ample fuel for a flight. A minimum of 13 gallons offuel is required in each wing system before takeoff. An inaccurate
indicator could give an erroneous indication of fuel
quantity. If the pilot is not sure that at least 13 gallons are in
each wing system, add necessary fuel so that the amount of
fuel will not be less than 13 gallons perwing system at takeoff. Plan for an ample margin of fuel for any flight.
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
In general, the airplane's circuitry is the single-wire, ground
return type. The battery, magneto-starter, and alternator
switches are located on the left subpanel. This panel contains most ofthe electrical system switches and switch type
circuit breakers. Each is placarded as to its function. The remainder of the electrical equipment circuit breakers are located on the pilot's side panel. Avionics circuit breakers are
located on the right subpanel.
BATIERY
One 15.5-ampere-hour, 24-volt lead acid battery is
standard. Two 25 ampere-hour, 12-volt lead acid batteries,
connected in series, are offered as options. The battery
installation is located beneath the floor of the nose
baggage compartment. Battery servicing procedures are
described in the SERVICING section. The battery switch
can be turned off in flight and the alternator will remain on
the line.
I
ALTERNATORS (TH-773 thru TH-1376)
Two standard 50- or SO-ampere, or optional 85-or 100ampere, 28-volt, gear driven alternators are controlled by
two transistorized electronic voltage regulators. Only one
regulator is operable in the system at anyone time. The
remaining regulator is used as an alternate or standby unit.
7·28
August, 1984
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
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Section VII
Systems Description
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September, 1980
7·29
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
When switched into the circuit, either regulator will adjust
alternator output to the required electrical load, including
battery recharging. Selection of the regulators is provided
by a two-position selector switch on the pilot's subpanel.
The alternators are protected by current limiters.
ALTERNATORS (TH-1377 AND AFTER, AND AIRPLANES
EQUIPPED WITH KIT NO. 55-3024)
Two standard 50-ampere, or optional 100-ampere, 28-volt,
gear-driven alternators are individually controlled by alternator
control units which, regulate the voltage, balance the load and
provide overvoltage protection. Each alternator system is
controlled by a switch located on the subpanel.
I
(TH-773 AND AFTER)
Individual alternator output is indicated by two loadmeters
on the instrument panel. The loadmeters give a percentage
reading of the load on the system.
Two warning lights, placarded ALTERNATOR-L-R, located
in the floating instrument panel, will illuminate whenever
the respective alternator is disconnected from the bus by
low voltage or an over-voltage condition or with the switch
in the OFF position. On serials TH-1194 and after, the
lights will illuminate jf the fuse on the AUX terminal of the
alternator is blown. Any time a failure is detected, the
appropriate alternator should be turned OFF. The
AL TERNATOR-L-R lights are tested by the
TEST-BRT-DIM-WARN LIGHTS switch, located on the
pilot's floating instrument panel.
7·30
August, 1984
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
SectionVlt
Systems Description
STARTERS
The starters are relay-controlled and are actuated by rotary
type, momentary-on switches incorporated in the
magneto/start switches located on the pilot's subpanel. To
energize the starter circuit, hold the magneto/start switch in
the START position. After starting, release the switch to
the BOTH position.
The warning light placarded STARTER ENERGIZED
(serials TH-1194 and after) will illuminate whenever
electrical power is being supplied to either the left or right
starter. If the light remains illuminated after starting, the
starter relay has remained engaged and loss of electrical
power may result. The battery master and both alternator
switches should be placed in the OFF position if the light
remains illuminated after starting. If the light does not
illuminate during starting, the indicator system is
inoperative and the loadmeters should be monitored to
ensure that the starters do not remain energized after
starting. This light can be tested by the TEST-WARN
LIGHT switch, located on the floating instrument panel.
EXTERNAL POWER
The external power receptacle is located in the outboard
side of the left nacelle and accepts a standard AN type plug.
The power unit should be capable of delivering at least 300
amperes for starting. Before connecting an external power
unit, turn the electrical systems and avionics off to avoid
damage due to electrical surges. When external power is
connected, the battery switch should be turned on. If polarity
is reversed, a diode in the coil circuit will prevent contactor
operation.
August, 1984
7-31
I
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECH CRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
LIGHTING SYSTEM
INTERIOR LIGHTING
The courtesy light, located in the forward cabin door, will
illuminate any time the cabin door is open. On airplanes TH1298 and after, the courtesy light is connected to a timer
which will extinguish the light approximately 15 minutes
after the door is opened.
The cabin dome light is operated by an ON-OFF switch
located just forward of the light.
Individual reading lights located above the standard third
and fourth or optional fifth and sixth seats are operated by
switches adjacent to the lights.
There are four rheostat dimmer control knobs located on the
lower level of the circuit breaker panel: the individual
instrument lights located above the pilot's subpanel are
controlled by the knob placarded INCREASE - OFF SUBPANEL LIGHTING; the avionics panel and trim tab
indicator lights are controlled by the knob placarded
INCREASE - OFF - INST FLOOD; the instrument lights in
the glareshield are controlled by the knob placarded
INCREASE - OFF - FLIGHT INST; and the
electroluminesent lighting in the pilot's subpanel is
controlled by the knob placarded INCREASE - OFF - ENG
INST AVIONICS CONSOLE.
The magnetic compass light, outside air temperature
indicator light, and map light are operated by a switch on the
pilot's control wheel.
7-32
September, 1981
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH..n 3 and After
Section VII
Systems Description
I
The light located in the nose baggage/cargo compartment
automatically illuminates when the compartment door is
opened. A manual switch located in the compartment may
be used to manually extinguish the light.
EXTERIOR LIGHTING
The switches for the navigation lights. landing light(s),
rotating beacons, nose gear taxi light (if installed), and wing
ice light(s) are at the top of the pilot's subpaneL The two
wing leading edge landing lights are operated by separate
switches. With optional wing tip fuel tanks (TH-773 thru TH873), a single nose gear landing light replaces the two.
leading edge landing lights and the optional nose gear taxi
light. With optional wing tip fuel tanks (TH-874 and after),.
the landing lights are located on the front lower section of
each engine cowling. For longer battery and lamp service
life, use the landing Iight(s) only when necessary. Avoid
prolonged operation, during ground maneuvering, which
could cause overheating. The optional taxi light (if installed)
is offered for use during ground operations. At night,
reflections from rotating anti-collision lights on clouds, dense
haze, or dust can produce optical illusions and vertigo. The
use of these lights is not advisable under instrument or
limited VFR conditions.
september, 1981
7..32A
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT BARON 58
Serial TH773 and After
INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
7-32B
september, 1981
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VII
Systems Description
HEATING AND VENTILATION SYSTEM
CABIN HEATING
A combustion heater in the nose cone supplies heated air
to the cabin. Outlets are located forward of the pilot and
copilot seats, at the rear of the copilot's seat, and at the
HEATER--+-J'-liiW!!
5
D:~::TST\AIR
GLASS
SERVICE
VALVES
FRESH AIR
CONTROL
AIR CONDITIONER
OUTLETS /4 PLACES)
_ H E A T E R AlA
c==J
AIR CONDITIONER
_
VENTILATION AIR
~
EXHAUST AIR
~
---------J
ill CABIN AIR CONTROL
® CABIN HEAT CONTROL
CD DEFROST CONTROL
@) PILOT
AIR CONTROL
® COPILOT
AIR CONTROL
AFT BULKKEAD
AFT EVAPORATOR/OR OPTIONAL
FRESH AIR BLOWER
CABIN AIR EXHAUST
ENVIRONMENTAL SCHEMATIC
September, 1981
7-33
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
rear of the right passenger seat. The fifth outlet provides
heated air for windshield defrosting.
In flight, fresh ram air enters an intake on each side of the
nose cone, passes through the heater, and is distributed to
the cabin outlets. For ground operation, a blower maintains
airflow through the system.
If a malfunction resulting in dangerously high temperatures
should occur, a heat actuated circuit breaker, located on
the heater, will render the heater system, except the
blower, inoperative. MAKE CERTAIN ANY MALFUNCTION
CAUSING THE OVERHEAT CIRCUIT BREAKER TO POP
IS CORRECTED BEFORE ATIEMPTING TO OPERATE
THE HEATER AGAIN.
HEATER OPERA nON
I
1. A three-position switch, placarded BLOWER, OFF,
and HEATER, is located on the pilot's subpanel. To
place the heating system in operation, move the
switch to the HEATER position.
2. The CABIN AIR T-handle, which regulates the amount
of intake air, is below the left side of the pilot's
subpanel. On TH-873, TH-895 and after, it is below
the circuit breaker panel on the left sidewall. Push the
CABIN AIR control full forward to the full open
position.
3. Pull out the CABIN HEAT control located below the
left side of the pilot's subpanel, to raise the
temperature of the heated air. Push the CABIN HEAT
control in to decrease temperature.
4. For windshield defrosting, push in the DEFROST
control located to the right of the CABIN HEAT
control.
5. To direct heated air onto the pilot's feet, pullout the
PILOT AIR control to the right of the DEFROST
control.
7-34
February, 1981
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VII
Systems Description
6. The COPILOT AIR control, identical to the PILOT AIR
control, is located below the right side of the
instrument panel.
HEAT REGULATION
For maximum heat, the CABIN AIR control can be pulled
aft to reduce the volume of incoming cold air and permit
the heater to raise the temperature of the admitted air.
However, if the CABtN AIR control is pulled aft more than
halfway the heater will not operate.
I
The volume of air available for the pilot outlet and the
copilot outlet can be divided between the two outlets as
desired by adjusting· each control individually.
More heated air will be available for defrosting by reducing
the flow of air from the pilot outlet, copilot outlet, or both.
The PILOT AIR and COPILOT AIR controls can be used to
regulate the volume of air distributed to the rear outlets.
HEATER BLOWER
When the three-position switch on the pilot's subpanel is
placed in either the HEATER position or the BLOWER
position, the blower will operate if the landing gear is in the
extended position and the CABIN AIR control is more than
ha\fway in. The blower win automatically shut off if the
landing gear is retracted or the CABIN AIR control is pulled
out approximately halfway.
CABIN VENTILATION
In flight, to provide unheated air for the same cabin outlets
used for heating, push the CABIN AIR and CABIN HEAT
controls forward.
February, 1981
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECH CRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
For ventilation during ground operation, push the CABIN
AIR control forward and place the three-position switch on
the pilot's subpanel in the BLOWER position. An optional
fresh air blower (Serials TH-1225 and after) located in the
aft fuselage provides additional ventilation through the
overhead outlets during ground operations, and
automatically shuts off in flight.
I
INDIVIDUAL FRESH AIR OUTLETS
Fresh ram air from the intake on the left side of the dorsal
fairing is ducted to individual outlets above each seat,
including the optional fifth and sixth seats. A master control
in the overhead panel just aft of the front air outlets
enables the pilot to adjust the amount of ram air available
to all outlets. The volume of air at each outlet can be
regulated by rotating the outlet. Each outlet can be
positioned to direct the flow of air as desired.
OXYGEN SYSTEM
WARNING
Proper safety measures must be employed
when using oxygen, or a serious fire hazard
will be created. NO SMOKING PERMITIED.
DESCRIPTION
The recommended masks are provided with the system.
The masks are designed to be adjustable to fit the average
person.
The oxygen cylinder is located at the aft end of the forward
baggage compartment. The system is available with either
four, five, or six outlets and with a 49.8 or 66 cu ft oxygen
bottle. Supply of oxygen to the system is controlled by a
push-pull control on the pilot's subpanel. The pressure
indicator shows the supply of oxygen available (1850 psi is
nominal pressure for a full supply in the cylinder).
7-36
February, 1981
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VII
Systems Description
The system regulator is altitude compensated to provide a
varying flow of oxygen with altitude. Flow is varied automatically from 0.5 liters per minute at 5/000 feet to 3.5 liters
per minute at 30,000 feet. The use of oxygen is recommended to be in accordance with current FAR operating
rules.
PITOT AND STATIC SYSTEM
The pitot and static system provides a source of impact and
static air for the operation of flight instruments.
PITOT SYSTEM
A standard pitot tube for the pilot's flight instruments is located immediately to the left of the nose gear doors. The
optional pitot tube for the copilot's instrument is located to
the right of the nose gear doors.
Left and right pitot heat switches, located on the pilot's left
subpa nel, supply heat to the left and right pitot masts
respectively.
The pitot system needs no drain because of the location of
the components.
STATIC SYSTEM
Static air is taken from a flush static port located on each
side of the aft fuselage. The static air is routed to the rate-ofclimb indicator, altimeter and airspeed indicator.
The static air line is drained at the emergency static air
source by raising the lever to the emergency static air
source position. Return the lever to normal position after
the line is completely drained.
October 1976
7-37
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
The emergency static air source is designed to provide a
source of static pressure to the instruments from inside the
fuselage should the outside static air ports become blocked.
An abnormal reading of the instruments supplied with
static air could indicate a restriction in the outside static air
ports. A lever on the lower sidewall adjacent to the pilot, is
placarded OFF NORMAL, ON EMERGENCY. When it is
desired or required to use this alternate source of static air,
select the ON EMERGENCY position. To recognize the need
and procedures for the use of emergency static air, refer to
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES. Airspeed Calibrations and AI~
timeter Corrections charts are in the PERFORMANCE section.
PRESSURE SYSTEM
Pressure for the flight instruments, deice boots, and autopilot (if installed) is supplied by two, engine-driven, dry,
pressure pumps interconnected to form a single system. If
either pump fails, check valves automatically close and the
remaining pump continues to operate all gyro instruments.
A pressure gage on the instrument panel indicates pressure in inches of mercury. Two red buttons on the pressure
gage serve as source failure indicators, each for its respective side of the system. The .pressure system incorporates
two filters per engine. One is located on the rear baffle of
the engine to filter intake air to the pressure pump. The
other is down stream of the pump and is located aft of the
firewall in the upper nacelle. This filter protects the instruments.
7-38
October 1 976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VII
Systems Description
STAll WARNING
A stall warning horn on the cabin forward bulkhead sounds
a warning signal while there is time for the pilot to correct
the attitude. The horn is triggered by a sensing vane on the
leading edge of the left wing and is effective in all flight
attitudes and at all weights and airspeeds. Irregular and
intermittent at first, the warning signal will become steady
as the airplane approaches a complete stall.
Electrical power is supplied to the stall warning horn directly
from the battery (TH-733 through TH-972) or from the main
electrical bus (TH-973 and after).
WARNING
The stall warning horn (TH-973 and after) is
inoperative when the battery and alternator
switches are OFF while in flight.
In icing conditions, stalling airspeeds should be expected to
increase due to the distortion of the wing airfoil when ice
has accumulated on the airplane. For the same reason, stall
warning devices tend to lose their accuracy. The sensing
vane is installed on a plate that can be electrically heated,
preventing ice from forming on the vane of the transducer.
A switch on the pilot's subpanel, placarded PITOT HEAT,
supplies power to the heated pitot mast and to the heating
plate at the stall warning transducer. However, any accumulation of ice in the proximity of the stall warning vane
reduces the probability of accuracy in the stall warning system whether or not the vane itself is clear of ice. For this
reason, it is advisable to maintain an extra margin of airspeed above the stall speed.
September, 1979
7-39
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
ICE PROTECTION SYSTEMS
SURFACE DEICE SYSTEM
Deice boots bonded to the leading edges of the wings and
the tail surfaces are operated by engine-driven pump pressure. Compressed air, after passing through the pressure
regulator, goes to the distributor valve. When the deice system is not in operation, the distributor va Ive appl ies vacu um
to the boots to deflate and hold the boots flat against the
surface. Then, when the deice system is operated, the distributor valve changes from vacuum to pressure and the
boots inflate. After the cycle is completed, the valve returns
to vacuum hold down.
A three-position, spring loaded switch, with a center OFF
position, a MAN (manual) down position, and an up AUTO
(automatic) position, controls the system. When the switch
is in the AUTO position, the deice boots inflate for a period of
five to six seconds, then deflate automatically and return to
the vacuum hold down position. The switch must be tripped
for each complete cycle. In the MAN position the deice boots
inflate as long as the switch is held in this position. When
the switch is released, the boots deflate and go to the
vacuum hold down condition.
Deice boots are designed to remove ice after it has accumulated, rather than prevent its formation. If the rate of ice
accumulation is slow, best results are obtained by leaving
the deice system off until 1/2 to 1 inch of ice accumulates.
Bridging can occur if boots are actuated too early or too
frequently.
7-40
October 1976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VII
Systems Description
The wing ice light(s), used to check for ice accumulation
during night operation, illuminates the wing leading edge.
The light switch is on the pilot's subpanel.
WINDSHlELD ANTI·ICE (ELECTROTHERMAL)
The pilot's electrically heated windshield segment is
controlled by a switch located on the left subpanel.
Windshield heat is designed for continuous in-flight use and
should be applied prior to, or upon first encountering, icing
conditions. This system is also beneficial as an aid in
preventing frost and fogging due to rapid descents from
higher altitudes into warm, moist air.
Operation of the windshield heat will cause the standby
compass to become erratic; therefore, windshield heat
should be turned off for a period of 15 seconds to allow a
stable reading of the standby compass.
CAUTION
Ground use of windshield heat is limited to 10
minutes.
September 1979
7-40A
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
7-408
september 1979
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VII
Systems Description
PROPELLER AND WINDSHIELD ANTI-ICE SYSTEM (FLUID
FLOW)
The system is designed to prevent the formation of ice. Always place the system in operation before encountering
ici ng conditions.
Ice is prevented from forming on the propeller blades by
wetting the blade anti-ice boots with anti-icing fluid. The
anti-ice pump delivers a constant flow of fluid from the
supply tank to the blade boots. The pump is controlled by an
ON-OFF switch located on the pilot's subpanel.
Wi ndshield anti-ice (when installed) receives anti-ice fluid
from the same source as the propeller anti-ice system. Ice is
prevented from forming on the windshield by wetting the
windshield surface with anti-ice fluid. This combined system is controlled by a three position switch, MOM ON-OFFON, located on the pilot's subpanel. The system will not
function unless the propeller anti-ice pump switch is turned
ON. For windshield system only, the flow is controlled by an
ON-OFF switch. An indicator on the right side of the instrument panel indicates the amount of fluid in the supply tank.
With a full reservoir, system endurance is:
Left Windshield Only
Left & Right Windshield
Prop Anti-ice Only
Prop & Left Windshield
Prop, Left & Right Windshield
September 1979
approx. 36
approx. 18
approx. 120
approx. 28
approx. 16
min.
min.
min.
min.
min.
7-41
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VII
Systems Description
ELECTROTHERMAL PROPELLER DEICE (2 and 3 BLADES)
Propeller ice removal is accomplished by the electrically
heated deice boots bonded to each propeller blade. The system uses the aircraft electrical power to heat portions of the
deice boots in a sequence controlled by a timer. The system
is controlled by an ON-OFF switch on the pilot's subpanel.
When the system is turned on the ammeter will register 7 to
12 amperes on the 2 blade propeller, or 14 to 18 amperes on
the 3 blade propeller. The system can be operated continuously in flight; it will function automatically until the
switch is turned off. Propeller imbalance can be relieved by
varying rpm. Increase rpm briefly, then return to the desired setting. Repeat if necessary.
CAUTION
Do not operate the system with the engines inoperatve.
,PITOT HEAT
Heating elements are installed in the pitot mast(s). Each
heating element is controlled by an individual switch located on the pilot's subpanel. The switches are placarded
PITOT HEAT - LT - RT, and should remain off during ground
operations, except for testing or for short intervals of time to
remove ice or snow from the mast(s).
STALL WARNING ANTI-ICE
The mounting pad and the stall warning vane are equipped
with a heati ng element that is activated any time the switch
placarded PITOT HEAT - LT, is on.
7-42
October 1976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VII
Systems Description
HEATED FUEL VENTS
The fuel system vents, one located on the underside of each
wing outboard of the nacelle, are provided with heating
elements controlled by the FUEL VENT switch on the pilot's
subpanel.
ENGINE BREAK-IN INFORMATION
MIL-C-6529 Type II Multiviscosity 20W-50 CorrosionPreventative Oil is installed in the engine at the factory. It is
recommended that this oil be removed and the oil filter changed
at 20 hours of engine operation or no later than 25 hours. If oil
consumption has not stabilized by this time, the engine should
be drained and refilled with MIL-L-6082 Mineral Oil. This oil
should be used until oil consumption stabilizes; usually a total of
approximately 50 hours. After oil consumption has stabilized,
MIL-L-22851 Ashless Dispersant Oil should be used.
Drain and replace the engine oil as recommended in HANDLlNG, SERVICING AND MAINTENANCE. If operating conditions are unusually dusty or dirty, more frequent oil changes
may be necessary. Oil changes are more critical during the
break-in period than at any other time.
Use full throttle at recommended rpm for every takeoff and
maintain until at least 400 feet AGL, then reduce as necessary for cruise climb or cruise. Maintain the highest power
recommended for cruise operations during the break-in
period, avoiding altitudes above 8000 feet. Interrupt cruise
power every 30 minutes or so by smoothly advancing to
take-off power settings for about 30 seconds, then returning
to cruise power settings.
August, 1984
7..43
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Avoid long power-off descents especially during the break-in
period. Maintain sufficient power during descent to permit
cylinder head temperatures to remain in the green arc.
Minimize ground operation time, especially during warm
weather. During the break-in period. avoid engine idling in
excess of 15 minutes. especially in high ambient temperatures.
7·44
AugU8t, 1984
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
SECTION VIII
HANDLING, SERVICING AND
MAINTENANCE
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SUBJECT
Introduction
Publications
Airplane Inspection Periods
Preventative Maintenance That May Be
Accomplished By A Certificated Pilot.
Alterations or Repairs to Airplane
Ground Handling
Towing
Parking
Tie-Down
Main Wheel Jacking
Prolonged Out of Service Care
Storage
Flyable Storage -7 to 30 Days
Mooring
Engine Preparation For Storage
During Flyable Storage
Fuel Cells
Flight Control Surfaces
Grounding
Engines/Pitot Tube
Windshield and Windows
Preparation For Service
August, 1984
PAGE
8-5
8-6
8-6A
8-6A
8-68
8-8
8-8
8-8
8-9
8-10
8-10
8-10
8-10
8-10
8-11
8-11
8-11
8-11
8-11
8-12
8-12
8-12
8-1
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)
SUBJECT
External Power
Recharging the Battery (Using
Auxiliary Power)
Checking Electrical Equipment..
Servicing
Fuel System
Fuel Cells
Fuel Drains
Fuel Strainers
Oil System
Battery
Tires
Shock Struts
Shock Strut Shimmy Damper
Brakes
Induction Air Filter
To Remove and Clean the Filter
Propellers
Propeller Blade Bearing lubrication
Propeller and Windshield Anti-ice
Tank (Fluid)
Oxygen System
Oxygen Cylinder Retesting
Minor Maintenance
Rubber Seals
Heating and Ventilating System
Alternators
Magnetos
,
Cleaning
Exterior Painted Surfaces
Windshield and Windows
Surface Deice Boots
Engine
8-2
PAGE
8-12
8-13
8-13
8-1 3
8-13
8-13
8-15
8-15
8-16
8-17
8-17
8-18
8-19
8-20
8-20
8-20
8-20
8-21
8-21
8-22
8-23
8-23
8-23
8-23
8-24
8-24
8-25
8-25
8-268
8-268
8-27
August, 1984
BEECHCRAFTBaron58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)
SUBJECT
Interior
Lubrication Points
Recommended Servicing Schedule
Consumable Materials
Approved Engine Oils
Bulb Replacement Guide
Overhaul or Replacement Schedule
Special Conditions Cautionary Notice
landing Gear
Power Plant
Fuel System
Instruments
Electrical System
Utility Systems
Flaps and Flight Controls
Miscellaneous
September, 1979
PAGE
8-27
8-28
8-35
8-41
8-43
8-45
8-46
8-46
8-47
8-47
8-48
8~49
8-49
8·50
8-50
8-51
8-3
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
8-4
October 1 976
BEECHCRAFT8aron68
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
INTRODUCTION
The purpose of this section is to outline the requirements for
maintaining the airplane in a condition equal to that of its
original manufacture. This information sets the time
frequency intervals at which the airplane should be taken to
a BEECHCRAFT Aero or Aviation Center or International
Distributor or Dealer for periodic servicing or preventive
maintenance.
I
The Federal Aviation Regulations place the responsibility
for the maintenance of this airplane on the owner and
operator of the airplane who must ensure that all
maintenance is done by qualified mechanics in conformity
with all airworthi ness requirements established for this
airplane.
All limits, procedures, safety practices, time limits,
servicing and maintenance requirements contained in this
handbook are considered mandatory.
Authorized BEECHCRAFT Aero or Aviation Centers orl
International Distributors or Dealers can provide
recommended modification, service, and oper ati n9
procedures issued by both the FAA and Beech Aircraft
Corporation, which are designed to get maximum utility and
safety from the airplane.
If there is a question concerning the care of the airplane, it is
important to include the airplane serial number in any
correspondence. The serial number appears on the model
designation placard attached to the right side of the
fuselage at the inboard end of the flap.
September, 1979
8-5
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
PUBLICATIONS
The following publications are available through
BEECHCRAFT Aero or Aviation Centers or International
Distributors or Dealers:
1. Shop Manual
2. Parts Catalog
3. Service Instructions
4. Various Inspection Forms
5. Wiring Diagram Manual
NOTICE
The following information may be provided to the holder of this
manual automatically:
1. Original issues and revisions of BEECHCRAFT Service
Bulletins
2. Original issues and revisions of FAA Approved Airplane
Flight Manual Supplements
3. Reissues and revisions of FAA Approved Airplane Flight
Manuals, Flight Handbooks, Owner's Manuals, Pilot's
Operating Manuals, and Pilot's Operating Handbooks
This service is free and will be provided only to holders of this
handbook who are listed on the FAA Aircraft Registration
Branch List or the BEECHCRAFT International Owners
Notification Service List, and then only if listed by airplane
August, 1984
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH773 and After
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
serial number for the model for which this handbook is
applicable. For detailed information on how to obtain
"Revision Service" applicable to this handbook or other
BEECHCRAFT
Service
Publications,
consult
a
BEECHCRAFT Aero or Aviation Center, International
Distributor or Dealer, or refer to the latest revision of
BEECHCRAFT Service Bulletin No. 2001.
AIRPLANE INSPECTION PERIODS
1.
2.
3.
4.
FAA-required 1DO-hour and/or Annual Inspections.
BEECHCRAFT Approved Inspection Guide.
Continuing Care Inspection Guide.
See "Recommended Servicing Schedule" and
"Overhaul or Replacement Schedule" for further
inspection schedules.
NOTE
Check the wing bolts for proper torque at
the first 1 DO-hour inspection and at the first
100-hour inspection after each reinstallation
of the wing attach bolts.
PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE THAT MAY
BE ACCOMPLISHED BY A CERTIFICATED PILOT
1. A certificated pilot may perform limited maintenance.
Refer to FAR Part 43 for the items which may be
accomplished.
August, 1984
8-6A
SectionVIII
Handling,Serv • Maint
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
SerialTH773 and After
To ensure proper procedures are followed, obtain a
BEECHCRAFT Shop Manual for performing
preventative maintenance.
2. All other maintenance must be performed by licensed
personnel.
NOTE
Pilots operating airplanes of other than U. S.
registry should refer to the regulations of the
country of certification for information on preventative maintenance that may be performed
by pilots.
ALTERATIONS OR REPAIRS TO AIRPLANE
The FAA should be contacted prior to any alterations on the
airplane to ensure the airworthiness of the airplane is not
violated.
NOTE
Alterations or repairs to the airplane must be
accomplished by licensed personnel.
8-68
August, 1984
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VIII
Handling, Serv ~ Maint
WARNING
Use only genuine BEECHCRAFT or BEECHCRAFT approved
parts obtained from BEECHCRAFT approved sources, in
connection with the maintenance and repair of Beech
airplanes.
Genuine BEECHCRAFT parts are produced and inspected
under rigorous procedures to ensure airworthiness and
suitability for use in Beech airplane applications. Parts
purchased from sources other than BEECHCRAFT, even
though outwardly identical in appearance, may not have had
the required tests and inspections performed, may be
different in fabrication techniques and materials, and may be
dangerous when installed in an airplane.
Salvaged airplane parts, reworked parts obtained from nonBEECHCRAFT approved sources, or parts, components, or
structural assemblies, the service history of which is unknown
or cannot be authenticated, may have been subjected to
unacceptable stresses or temperatures or have other hidden
damage, not discernible through routine visual or usual
nondestructive testing techniques. This may render the part,
component or structural assembly, even though originally
manufactured by BEECHCRAFT, unsuitable and unsafe for
airplane use.
BEECHCRAFT expressly disclaims any responsibility for
malfunctions, failures, damage or injury caused by use of nonBEECHCRAFTapproved parts.
August, 1984
8~7
Section VIII
Handling, Serv . Maint
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
GROUND HANDLING
The three-view drawing in Section 1 shows the minimum
hangar clearances for a standard airplane. Allowances
must be made for any special radio antennas.
CAUTION
To insure adequate propeller clearance, always observe recommended shock strut servicing procedures and tire inflation pressures.
TOWING
Attach the tow bar to the tow pin on the nose gear lower
torque knee. It is recommended to have someone in the airplane to operate the brakes.
CAUTION
Do not exert force on the propellers, control
surfaces, or horizontal stabilizer. When towing
with a tug, Ii mit turns to prevent damage to the
nose gear. Do nottowwhen the main gear is obstructed by mud or snow. Also ensure the
rudder lock is removed.
Care should be used when removing the tow bar to prevent
damage to the lubrication fittings on the landing gear.
PARKING
The parking brake T-handle control is located just left of the
elevator tab wheel on the pilot's subpanel. To set the parking brakes, pull control out and depress each toe pedal until
firm. Push the control in to release the brakes.
8-8
September, 1979
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
NOTE
Excessive pedal pressure may prevent releasing of the parking brake.
On Serials TH-773 thru TH~1 005 with shuttle
valves installed, only the pilot's brake pedals
can be used in conjunction with the parking
brake system to set the parking brake.
I
The parking brake should be left off and wheel
chocks installed if the airnlar.e is to be left
unattended. Changes in ambient temperature
can cause the brakes to release or to exert
excessive pressures.
TIE-DOWN
It is advisable to nose the airplane into the wind. Three tiedown lugs are provided:one on the lower side of each wing
and a third at the rear of the fuselage.
1. Install the control locks.
2. Chock the main wheels, fore and aft.
3. Using nylon line or chain of sufficient strength, secure
the airplane at the three points provided. DO NOT OVER
TIGHTEN; if the line at the rear of the fuselage is
excessively tight, the nose may rise and produce lift due
to the angle of attack of the wings.
4. Release the parking brake.
If high winds are anticipated, a vertical tail post should be
installed at the rear tie-down lug. and a tie-dow,", Iii Ie
attached to the nose gear.
September, 1979
8-9
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
SerialTH 773 and After
MAIN WHEEL JACKING
1. Check the shock strut for proper inflation to prevent
damage to the la nding gear door by the jack adapter and
to facilitate installation of the adapter.
2. Insert the main wheel jack adapter into the main wheel
axle.
3. A scissors-type jack is recommended for raising and
loweri n9 the wheel.
4. When lowering the wheel, exercise care to prevent
compression of the shock strut, wh ich wou ld force the
landing gear door against the jack adapter.
NOTE
Persons should not be in or on the airplane
while it is on a main wheel jack.
PROLONGED OUT OF SERVICE CARE
STORAGE
Storage procedures are intended to protect the airplane
from deterioration while it is not in use. The primary
objectives of these measures are to prevent corrosion and
damage from exposure to the elements.
Flyable Storage (7-30 days) has been considered here. For
more extended storage periods, consult the Beech Airplane
Shop Manual and Continental Service Bulletin M 74-9 or
later issue.
FLYABLE STORAGE - 7 TO 30 DAYS
MOORING
If airplane cannot be placed in a hangar, tie down securely
at the three points provided, Do not use hemp or manila
rope. It is recommended a tail support be used to compress
the nose strut and reduce the angle of attack of the wings.
Attach a line to the nose gear.
8-10
October 1 976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
ENGINE PREPARATION FOR STORAGE
Engi nes in airplanes that are flown only occasionally tend to
exhibit cylinder wall corrosion much more than engines
that are flown frequently.
Run engine at least five minutes at 1200 to 1500 rpm with
oil and cylinder head temperatures in the normal operating
range.
Check for correct oil level and add oil if necessary to bring
level to full mark.
DURING FLYABLE STORAGE
Each seven days during flyable storage, the propellers shall
be rotated by hand. After rotating each engine six
revolutions, stop the propellers 60 0 or 1200 from the
position they were in.
WARNING
Before rotation of propeller blades, ascertain
magneto/start switches are OFF, throttles are in
the CLOSED position, and mixture controls are
in the IDLE CUT-OFF position. Always stand in
the clear while turning propellers.
If at the end of 30 days, airplane will not be removed from
storage, the engine shall be started and run. The preferred
method will be to fly the airplane for 30 minutes, and up to,
but not exceeding normal oil and cylinder temperatures.
FUEL CELLS
Fill to capacity to minimize fuel vapor and protect cell inner
liners.
FLIGHT CONTROL SURFACES
Lock with internal and external locks.
GROUNDING
Static ground airplane securely and effectively.
October 1976
8-11
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
ENGINES / PITOT TUBE(S)
Install cover(s).
WINDSHIELD AND WINDOWS
Close all windows and window vents. It is recommended
that covers be installed over windshield and windows.
PREPARATION FOR SERVICE
Remove all covers, clean the airplane. and give it a
thorough inspection, particularly landing gear, wheel wells,
flaps, control surfaces, and pitot and static pressure
openings.
Preflight the airplane.
EXTERNAL POWER
When using external power, it is very important that the following precautions be observed:
1. The airplane has a negative ground system. Exercise
care to avoid reversed polarity. Be sure to connect the
positive lead of the auxiliary power unit to the positive
terminal of the airplane's external power receptacle
and the negative lead to the negative terminal of the
external power receptacle. A positive voltage must also
be applied to the small guide pin.
2. To prevent arcing, make certain no power is being supplied vvhen the connection is made.
September, 1979
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
3. Make certain that the battery switch is ON, all avionics
and electrical switches OFF, and a battery is in the system before connecting an external power unit. This protects the electronic voltage regulators and associated
electrical equipment from voltage transients (power
fl uctuations).
I
CHECKING ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT
Connect an auxiliary power unit as outlined in Starting Procedures. Ensure that the current is stabilized prior to making any electrical equipment or avionics check.
NOTE
If the external power :unit has poor voltage regu1ation or produces voltage transients, the aircraft electrical equipment connected to the unit
may be damaged.
SERVICING
FUEL SYSTEM
FUEL CELLS
See Consumable Materials for recommended fuel grades.
The standard 142 gallon capacity fuel system has a fuel
filler cap in each wing box section. The optional 172 gallon
capacity system has a filler cap in each outboard wing
leading edge. The optional 200 gallon capacity system has a
filler cap in each wet wing tip and in each outboard wing
leading edge.
August, 1984
8-13
Section VIII
Handling, Serv ~ Maint
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
NOTE
To obtain the maximum capacity of the fuel
system when the wet wing tips are installed, fill
the fuel system from the wet wing tip tank filler
caps to the bottom of the tab marked FULL.
Refer to the LIMITATIONS section for the usable fuel in
each system.
CAUTION
Caution must be taken when the wet wing tip
tanks are filled with fuel. DO NOT open the outboard wing leading edge filler cap, as fuel will
exit from that opening. If this occurs, wash the
fuel from the wing surface to prevent possible
pai nt damage.
Ground the aircraft with a static line before refueling and
secure the filler caps immediately after filling. Before letting the airplane stand for several days, it is a good practice
to fill the wing fuel system to ensure that the cell inner
Iiners do not dry out and crack, allowing fuel to diffuse
through the cell walls. Also, less moisture condensation
will occur when fuel cells are full. If the cells are to be
drained before storage, a coating of light engine oil should
be sprayed or flushed onto the inner liners of the cells as a
preservative.
8~14
August, 1984
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VIII
Handling, Serv ~ Maint
NOTE,
The optional 200 gallon fuel system should be
filled from the wing leading edge filler cap when
airplane must stand for several days. Check and
fill to capacity at wet wing tip filler cap before
flight if required for the mission.
FUEL DRAINS
Open each of the snap-type or flush-type fuel drains daily to
purge any water from the system. The two sump drains
extend through the bottom of each wing. The fuel strainer in
each wheel well is provided with a drain extending through
the wheel well skin. Two additional flush-type fuel drains are
located at the midpoint. inboard lower surface of the wet
wing tip fuel tanks (if installed). When the flush type drains
are installed. a drain wrench is provided in the loose tools
and accessories.
FUEL STRAINERS
To preclude the possibility of contaminated fuel, always cap
any disconnected fuel tines or fittinqs The fue! strainer in
each wheel well should be inspected and cleaned with solvent at regular intervals. The frequency of inspection and
cleaning will depend upon service conditions, fuel handling
cleanliness, and local sand and dust conditions. At each
1aO-hour inspection the strainer plug should be removed
from the fuel injection control valve and the fuel injection
control valve screen washed in fresh cleaning solvent. After
the strainer plug has been reinstalled and safetied, the installation should be checked for leakage. A leading edge
sump strainer, accessible through an access door on the
bottom of the wing, should be cleaned periodically.
September, 1979
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
OIL SYSTEM
The engines are equipped with a wet sump, pressure type
oil system. Each engine sump has a capacity of 12 quarts.
The oil system may be checked through access doors in the
engine cowling. A calibrated dipstick attached to the filler
cap indicates the oil level. Due to the canted position of the
engines, the dipsticks are calibrated for either right or left
engines and are not interchangeable.
The oil and oil filter should be changed every 100 hours
under normal operating conditions. The oil drain is accessible
through the cowl flap opening. The engines should be
warmed to operating temperature to assure complete draining of the oil.
1. Remove the cowling plug button below the aft inboard
corner of the oil sump.
2. Open the oil drain valve
3. Remove the oil filter and replace with a new unit. A
torque of 18 to 20 foot-pounds should be applied to the
nut of the oil filter.
4. Close oil drain valve and fill with oil.
Moisture that may have condensed and settled in the oil
sump should be drained occasionally by opening the oil
drain plug and allowing a small amount of oil to escape. This
;s particularly important in winter, when the moisture will
collect rapidly and may freeze.
The engine manufacturer specifies ashless dispersant oils
only. However, for the first 20 hours, MIL-C-6529 Type II
Multiviscosity 2QW-50 Corrosion-Preventive Oil is used. It is
recommended that this oil be removed and the oil filter
changed at 20 hours of engine operation (not to exceed 25
hours). If oil consumption has not stabilized at this point,
MIL-L-6082 Mineral Oil may be used. After the break-in period,
when oil consumption has stabilized, MIL-L-22851 Ashless
8-16
August, 1984
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
Dispersant Oil should be used. Oils must meet the latest
revision of Teledyne Continental Motors Corporation
Specification MHS-24 or the most current applicable Teledyne
Continental Service Bulletin. Refer to APPROVED ENGINE
OILS.
Aviation Grade
Oil
Average Ambient
Air Temperature
SAE 50
Above 5°C (40°F)
SAE 30
Below 5°C (40°F)
I
BATIERY
The battery is accessible by opening the forward baggage
compartment door and removing the battery box cover from
the floor of "the compartment. Check the electrolyte level
after each 25 hours of operation and add distilled water as
necessary. Avoid filling over the baffles and never fill more
than one-quarter inch over the separator tops. Excessive
water consumption may be an indication that the voltage
regulators require resetting.
The battery box is vented overboard to dispose of electrolyte
and hydrogen gas fumes discharged during the normal
charging operation. To ensure disposal of these fumes the
vent hose connections at the battery box should be checked
frequently for obstructions.
TIRES
An inflation pressure of 52 to 56 psi should be maintained
on the 6.50 x 8 main wheel tires. The 5.00 x 5 nose wheel
tire should be inflated to 55-60 psi. Maintaining recommended tire inflation will minimize tread wear and aid in
August, 1984
I
Section VIII
Handling, Serv . Maint
BEECH CRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
preventing tire failure caused from running over sharp
stones and ruts. When inflating tires, visually inspect them
for cracks, breaks, or evidence of internal damage.
CAUTION
I
Beech Aircraft Corporation cannot recommend
the use of recapped tires. Recapped tires have a
tendency to swell as a result of the increased
temperature generated during takeoff. Increased tire size can jeopardize proper function
of the landing gear retract system, with the
possibility of damage to the landing gear doors
and retract mechanism.
SHOCK STRUTS
CAUTION
DO NOT taxi with a flat shock strut.
The shock struts are filled with compressed air and
hydraulic fluid. The same procedure is used for servicing
both the main and the nose gear shock struts. To service a
strut, proceed as follows:
1. Jack the airplane, remove the air valve cap, depress the
valve core, and allow the strut to fully deflate.
WARNING
Do not unscrew the valve body assembly until
all air pressure has been released or it may be
blown off with considerable force, causing
injury to personnel or damage to equipment.
2. Carefully remove the valve body assembly.
3. Compress the strut and fill through the air valve assembly hole with hydraulic fluid (approximately one
pi nt) until the fluid overflows.
8-18
August, 1984
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
Serial TH 773 and After
4. Cycle the strut from full extension to compressed and
refill. Repeat until no more fluid can be added to the
strut in the compressed position.
NOTE
Cycling of the shock strut is necessary to expel
any trapped air within the strut housing.
5. Install the air valve assembly.
6. With the airplane resting on the ground and the fuel
cells full, inflate the nose gear strut until 3-1/2 to 3-3/4
inches of the piston are exposed and inflate the main
gear struts until 3 inches of the piston are exposed.
Rock the airplane gently to prevent possible binding of
the piston in the barrel while inflating.
NOTE
It is recommended that the nose strut inflation
di mension and the tire inflation pressures be
carefully adhered to. Properly inflated tires and
struts reduce the possibility of ground damage
occuring to the propellers. Exercise caution
when taxiing over rough surfaces.
7. Remove all foreign material from the exposed piston
with a soft cloth moistened with hydraulic fluid.
CAUTION
If a compressed air bottle containing air under
extremely high pressure is used, exercise care
to avoid over-inflating the shock strut.
WARNING
NEVER FILL SHOCK STRUTS WITH OXYGEN.
September, 1979
8·18A
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
8-18B
September, 1979
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
SHOCK STRUT SHIMMY DAMPER
The shimmy damper has a reservoir of fluid carried in the
piston rod. Two coil springs installed in the piston rod keep
the fluid in shimmy damper under pressure. As fluid is lost
through leakage it is automatically replenished from the
reservoir until the reservoir supply is exhausted.
To check the fluid level in the shimmy damper, insert a wire,
approximately 1/32 inch in diameter, through the hole in the
disc at the aft end of the piston rod until it touches the bottom
of the hole in the floating piston. Mark the wire, remove it, and
measure the depth of the insertion. When the shimmy
damper is full, insertion depth is 2-3/16 inches, when empty,
3-1/16 inches.
NOTE
The measuring wire should be inserted in the
hole in the floating piston rather than against the
piston face to give a more accurate reading. To
determine if the wire is inserted in the hole in the
floating piston, insert the wire several times,
noting insertion depth each time. When the wire
is inserted in the hole, the depth will be about 1/4
inch greater than when it rests against the piston
face.
When the shimmy damper is found empty or nearly empty, it
should be refilled. See Shop Manual.
September, 1979
8-19
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
BRAKES
The brake hydraulic fluid reservoir is accessible through the
nose baggage compartment. A dipstick is attached to the
reservoir cap. Refer to Consumable Materials for hydraulic
fluid specification.
The brakes require no adjustments since the pistons move
to compensate for lining wear. The brake linings should be
replaced before the metal back plate is exposed through the
abrasive surface. The minimum allowable thickness forthe
abrasive surface is .010 inch. The brake disc should be replaced when its thickness measures .330 inch.
INDUCTION AIR FILTERS
The filters should be inspected for foreign matter at least
once during each 50-hour operating period. In adverse
climatic conditions, or if the airplane is stored, preflight
inspection is recommended.
TO REMOVE AND CLEAN THE FILTER:
1. Remove the access plate in the top of the engine
cowling.
2. Remove the filter and clean as noted by the manufacturer's instructions.
3. Reinstall the filter and the plate.
PROPELLERS
The daily preflight inspection should include a careful
examination of the propeller blades for nicks and scratches.
Propeller operation, servicing, and maintenance instructions are contai ned in the propeller owner's manual
furnished with the airplane.
8-20
October .1976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
WARNING
When servicing a propeller, always make
certain that the ignition switch is off and that
the engine has cooled completely. WHEN
MOVING A PROPELLER, STAND IN THE
CLEAR; THERE IS ALWAYS SOME DANGER OF
A CYLINDER FIRING WHEN A PROPELLER IS
MOVED.
Air pressure settings (HARTZELL):
70° to 100°F
40° to 70°F
0° to 40°F
-30° to O°F
41 psi
38 psi
36 psi
33 psi
PROPELLER BLADE BEARING LUBRICATION
1. Remove the propeller spinner.
2. Remove the safety wire and covers from grease zerks.
3. Remove one zerk from each blade.
4. Lubricate by placing the grease gun fitting on one zerk
of each blade and filling until the grease is visible from
the zerk openi ng on the opposite side of the blade.
5. Clean the excess grease from the propeller, reinstall the
grease zerks, covers, and safety wire on each blade.
6. Reinstall the spinner.
PROPELLER AND WINDSHIELD ANTI-ICE TANK (FLUID)
The tank is located beneath the floor on the left side of the
forward baggage compartment. The filler cap is accessible
through an access door in the floor of the compartment. Capacity is 3 U.S. gallons of anti-ice fluid (see Consumable
Materials). The tank should be drained and flushed twice a
year.
October 1976
8-21
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
OXYGEN SYSTEM
WARNING
Keep hands, tools, clothing, and oxygen equipment clean and free from grease and oil. KEEP
FIRE AWAY FROM OXYGEN.
1. Read the pressure indicator on the oxygen console. (The
shutoff valve on the oxygen cylinder must be open.) If
the oxygen cylinder is equipped with a gage, system
pressure may be checked at the cylinder.
CAUTION
Always open the cylinder shutoff valve slowly to
prevent damage to the system.
2. Make certain that the oxygen control valve is closed
(PUSH IN).
3. Close the cylinder shutoff valve, remove the cap from
the filler va1ve, and attach the recharging outlet. Open
valve on supply bottle.
4. Open the cylinder shutoff valve and fill the cylinder to
1800 + 50 psi (add 3.5 psi per degree above 70°F; subtract 3.5 psi per degree below 70°F).
5. Close the cylinder shutoff valve, close valve on the supply bottle, remove the recharging outlet, and replace the
filler valve cap.
6. Reopen the cylinder shutoff valve to prepare system for
use.
8-22
October 1976
BEEC~~CRI.FT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VIII
Handling, Serv ~ Maint
OXYGEN CYLINDER RETESTING
Oxygen cylinders used in the airplane are of two types.
Light weight cylinders, stamped "3HT" on the plate on the
side, must be hydrostatically tested every three years and
the test date stamped on the cylinder. This bottle has a
service life of 4,380 pressurizations or twenty-four years,
whichever occurs first, and then must be discarded. Regular
weight cylinders, stamped "3A", or "3AA", must be hydrostatically tested every five years and stamped with the
retest date. Service life on these cylinders is not limited.
MINOR MAINTENANCE
RUBBER SEALS
To prevent sticking of the rubber seals around the windows,
doors, and engine cowling, the seals should be coated with
Oakite 6 compound. The compound is noninjurious to paint
and can be removed by employing normal cleaning
methods.
HEATING AND VENTILATING SYSTEM
The heater fuel pump filter in the nose wheel well should be
removed and cleaned after each 100 hours of airplane
operation. Remove the filter by turning the base of the pump
counterclockwise. Wash the filter in fresh cleaning solvent
(see Consumable Materials) and dry with compressed air.
The iris valve at the heater blower inlet should be lubricated occasionally with molybdenum disulfide (see Consumable Materials). The valve should never be lubricated
with oil or any liquid lubricant which would collect dust.
Do not reset the overheat circuit breaker until a thorough inspection of the system has determined the cause and the
malfunction has been corrected.
Revised: March 1983
8-23
I
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
ALTERNATORS
Since the alternator and electronic voltage regulator are designed for use on only one polarity system, the following
precautionary measures must be observed when working on
the charging circuit, or serious damage to the electrical
equipment will result:
1. When installing a battery, make certain that the ground
polarity of the battery and the ground polarity of the
alternator are the same.
2. When connecting a booster battery, be sure to connect
the negative battery terminals together and the positive
battery terminals together.
3. When using a battery charger, connect the positive lead
of the charger to the positive battery terminal and the
negative lead of the charger to the negative battery
terminal.
4. Do not operate an alternator on open circuit. Be sure all
circuit connections are secure.
5. Do not short across or ground any of the terminals on
the alternator or electronic voltage regulator.
6. Do not attempt to polarize an alternator.
MAGNETOS
Ordinarily, the magnetos will require only occasional
adjustment, lubrication, and breaker point replacement. This
work should be done by a BEECHCRAFT Aero or Aviation
Center or International Distributor or Dealer.
WARNING
To be safe, treat the magnetos as hotwhenever
a switch lead is disconnected at any point; they
do not have an internal automatic grounding
device. Otherwise, all spark plug leads should
be disconnected or the cable outlet plate on the
rear of the magneto should be removed.
8-24
September, 1979
BEECHCRAFT Baron 68
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
CLEANING
EXTERIOR PAINTED SURFACES
WARNING
Do not expose control surface trim tab hinge
lines and their pushrod systems to the direct
stream or spray of high-pressure, soap-andwater washing equipment. Fluid dispensed at
high pressure could remove the protective lubricant, allowing moisture from heavy or prolonged rain to collect at hinge lines, and then to
freeze at low temperatures. After highpressure or hand washing, and at each periodic
inspection, lubricate trim tab hinge lines and
trim tab pushrod end fittings (Brayco 300 per
Federal Specification VV-L-800 preferred). See
Consumable Materials.
CAUTION
When cleaning landing gear areas with solvent,
especially if high-pressure equipment is used,
exercise care to avoid washing away grease
from landing gear components. After washing
the landing gear areas with solvent, lubricate
all lubrication points, or premature wear may
result.
Do not apply wax, polish, rubbing compound, or
abrasive cleaner to any uncured painted
surface. Use of such items can permanently
damage the surface finish. Also, waxes and
polishes seal the paint from the air and prevent
curing.
Alkyd enamel (sometimes called "automotive
enamel"), acrylic enamel, lacquer, and dope
Revised: March 1983
8-25
Section VIII
Handling Serv - Maint
6
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
CAUTION
finishes require a curing period of approximately 90 days; Acrylic urethane, polyester
urethane, and epoxy finishes undergo a curing
process for a period of 30 days after application.
Wash uncured painted surfaces with a mild
non-detergent soap (MILD detergents can be
used on urethane finishes) and cold or lukewarm water only. Use soft cloths, keeping them
free of dirt and grime. Any rubbing of the
surface should be done gently and held to a
minimum to avoid damaging the paint film.
Rinse thoroughly with clear water. Stubborn oil
or soot deposits may be removed with automotive tar removers.
Prior to cleaning, cover the wheels, making certain the
brake discs are covered. Attach the pitot cover securely, and
plug or mask offal! other openings. Be particularly careful
to mask off all static air buttons before washing or waxing.
Use special care to avoid removing lubricant from lubricated areas.
When using high-pressure washing equipment, keep the
spray or stream clear of wheel bearings, propeller hub
bearings, etc.. and openings such as pitot tubes, static air
buttons, and battery and avionics equipment cooling ducts,
which should be securely covered or masked off. Avoid
directing high-pressure sprays toward the fuselage, wings,
and empennage from the rear, where moisture and
chemicals might more easily enter the structure, causing
corrosion damage to structural members and moving parts.
Hand washing may be accomplished byflushing away loose
dirt with clean water, then washing with a mild soap and
water, using soft cleaning cloths or a chamois. Avoid harsh,
abrasive, or alkaline soaps or detergents which could cause
8-26
Revised: March 1983
BEECH CRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
corrosion or scratches. Thorough clear-water rinsing prevents buildup of cleaning agent residue, which can dull the
paint's appearance. To remove oily residue or exhaust soot.
use a cloth dampened with an automotive tar remover. Wax
or polish the affected area, if necessary.
There is some variation in the procedures required for
proper care of the several types of exterior paint. During the
curing period. do not make prolonged flights in heavy rain or
sleet. and avoid all operating conditions which might cause
abrasion or premature finish deterioration. Alkyd enamel,
lacquer, and dope finishes must be polished and waxed
periodically to maintain luster, and to assure protection
from the weather. Acrylic enamel should be waxed, and
may be polished, if desired. Acrylic urethane may be waxed
for protection from the elements, but should not be polished
unless polishing or buffing is required to restore a damaged
area. Waxing of polyester urethane finishes, although not
required, is permitted; however, never use abrasive cleaner
type waxes, polishes, or rubbing compounds, as these
products cause eventual deterioration of the characteristic
urethane gloss. Epoxy finishes should be waxed on a
regular basis, and may be polished and buffed to restore
appearance should "chalking" occur. For waxing, select a
high quality automotive or aircraft waxing product. Do not
use a wax containing silicones, as silicone polishes are
difficult to remove from surfaces. A buildup of wax on any
exterior paint finish will yellow with age; therefore, wax
should be removed periodically. Generally, alphatic naptha
(see Consumable Materials) is adequate and safe for this
purpose.
NOTE
Before returning the airplane to service,
remove all maskings and coverings, and relubricate as necessary.
Revised: March 1983
8-26A
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
WINDSHIELD AND WINDOWS
The windshield and plastic windows should be kept clean
and waxed at all times. To prevent scratches wash the
windows carefully with plenty of soap and water, using the
palm of the hand to feel and dislodge dirt and mud. A soft
cloth, chamois or sponge may be used, but only to carry
water to the surface. Rinse thoroughly, then dry with a
clean, moist chamois. Rubbing the surface of the plastic
with a dry cloth builds up an electrostatic charge which
attracts dust particles in the air.
Remove oil and grease with a cloth moistened with isopropyl alcohol. Never use gasoline, benzine, alcohol, acetone, carbon tetrachloride, fire extinguisher fluid, anti-ice
fluid, lacquer thinner or glass cleaner. These materials will
soften plastic and may cause it to craze.
After thoroughly cleaning, the surface should be waxed
with a good grade of commercial wax. The wax will fill in the
minor scratches and help prevent further scratching. Apply
a thin, even coat of wax and bring it to a high polish by
rubbing lightly with a clean, dry, soft flannel cloth. Do not
use a power buffer; the heat generated by the buffing pad
may soften the plastic.
SURFACE DEICE BOOTS
The surfaces of the deice boots should be checked for indication of engine oil after servicing and at the end of each
flight. Any oil spots that are found should be removed with a
non-detergent soap and water solution. Care should be
exercised during cleaning. Avoid scrubbing the surface of
the boots as this will tend to remove the special graphite
surfacing. The deice boots are made of soft, flexible stock
which may be damaged if qasoline hoses are dragged over
the surface of the boots or if ladders and platforms are
rested against them.
8-268
Revised: March 1983
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
ENGINE
Clean the engine with neutral solvent. Spray or brush the
fluid over the engine, then wash off with water and allowto
dry. Solutions which may attack rubber or plastics should
not be used.
INTERIOR
To remove dust and loose dirt from the upholstery, headliner, and carpet, clean the interior regularly with a vacuum
cleaner.
Blot up any spilled liquid promptly wth cleansing tissue or
rags. Do not pat the spot; press the blotting material firmly
and hold it for several seconds. Continue blotting until no
more liquid is taken up. Scrape off sticky materials with a
dull knife; then spot-clean the area.
Oily spots may be cleaned with household spot removers,
used sparingly. Before using any solvent, read the instructions on the container and test it on an obscure place on the
fabric to be clea ned. Never saturate the fabric with a volatile
solvent; it may damage the padding and backing materials.
Soiled upholstery and carpet may be cleaned with foamtype detergent used according to the manufacturer's instructions. To minimize wetting the fabric, keep the foam as
dryas possible and remove it with a vacuum cleaner.
The plastic trim, instrument panel, and control knobs need
only be wiped with a damp cloth. Oil and grease on the
control wheel and control knobs can be removed with a
cloth moistened with isopropyl alcohol. Volatile solvent,
such as mentioned in the article on care of plastic windows
should never be used since they often craze the plastic.
October 1976
8-27
Section VIII
Handling, Serv- Maint
t/)
tZ
0D.
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
~
~
Z
0
t=
«(J
a:m
2
-i>
::J
....I
\\------2
'\.Il""+-'!---~-O
-----0.
"-:1-----0
8-28
October 1976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
A
CONTROL COLUMN LINKAGE
B
CABIN DOOR
c
RUDDER PEDALS
October 1 976
8-29
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
D
LANDING GEAR BOX
58-604-45
MAIN LANDING GEAR DOOR HINGES
58-604-46
F
5
5 r-::::-i----.hL.,...::x
UTILITY DOOR
58-604-47
8-30
September, 1979
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
G
RUDDER TAB
58-604-48
H
I
ELEVATOR TAB
AILERON TAB
58-604-50
Revised: March 1983
8-31
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
J
AILERON BELL CRANKS
58·604-51
K
FLAP ACTUATOR
58-604-52
L
MAIN GEAR RETRACT
58-604-53
September, 1979
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VIII
Handling, Serv ~ Maint
M
N
o
NOSE WHEEL DOOR HINGES
58-604-55
58-604-56
September, 1979
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
p
NOSE WHEEL STEERING
Q
HEATER IRIS VALVE
•I
HAND OR PACK
ZERK
FLUID CONT AINER
SQUIRT CAN
FITTING
NOTE: Letters are keyed to the Service Schedule; Numbers
refer to items in the Consumable Materials Chart.
8-34
October 1 976
INTERVAL
ITEM
(Number refers
to item on
Consumable Materials)
CO
(JI
W
co
0)
......
25 Hrs.
Preflight
Check battery electrolyte
Drai n box section cell
Service fuel cells
Drain fuel strainer drains
Drain main fuel cell drains
Check engine oil level
Fwd baggage compartment
under floor
Access door on upper
cowling
Lower wing surface
(leading edge)
Wing surface fwd of main
wheel well
Aft bottom wing surface
Top of wings, leading edge
I
See Shop Manual
7
-
-
6
~
m
0'1
:x:
,..='
-=
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I
o'
!. <
en(/)
CD CD
:2 ~
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5'
='
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CD
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-f:t
::J:(')
~
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r:r
LOCATION
(Letters refer to Lubrication
Points Diagram)
RECOMMENDED SERVICING SCHEDULE
"'"
o
on
,..
•
co
W
W
Q)
CD
...a.
::T
o
...
3:
I»
II
en
*
Through cowl opening
Access plate on left
cowling door
In wheel wells
Access door on side of
nacelle
Nose wheel well
Change enqine oil
Replace engine
oil filter
Clean fuel strainers
Clean fuel injection
control valve screen
Clean heater fuel pump
filter
Lubricate trim tab
hinges and push rods
100 Hrs
Clean with solvent and blow dry with compressed air.
Empennage (G, H)
Aileron (I)
Access plate, induction scoop
Clean induction air filter
ITEM
50 Hrs.
INTERVAL
19
*9
Hastings oil
filter P-128
*9
*9
6
(Number refers
LOCATION
to item on
(Letters refer to Lubrication
Points Diagram)
Consumable Materials)
RECOMMENDED SERVICING SCHEDULE
~ to
;:ten
Q.a
:I>::::J
DIm
::::J DI
W-I
...... ~
...... l>
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100 Hrs.
(Cont.)
.
~ II
to
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e.g
......
-
C'O
tT
3
<D
r+
en
~
I
Lubricate landing gear
uplock rollers
Clean and check spark
plugs
Check magneto timing
Lubricate landing gear
door hinges
Lubricate nose wheel
steering mechanism
I Lubricate landing gear
retract mechanism
Lubricate wheel bearings
Lubricate cabin door
mechanism
Lubricate aileron bell
cranks
Lubricate control column
linkage
Lubricate rudder pedals
Drain static air lines
Utility door latch
and hinges
Access panel underside
wings (J)
Forward of instrument
panel (A)
Cockpit (C)
Left forward cabin sidewall
Cabin, right side (F)
Nose wheel and main gear
wheel wells (0) (L)
Landinq gear (0) (L)
Cabin door latch (B)
Under cowl, both sides
engine
Engine compartment
Land i ng gea r wheel wells
(E) (N)
Nose wheel well (P)
Main landing gear (L)
4, 5
5
5
5
5
1
3
3
5
13
CD
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r+ _
<
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I
I
!
ITEM
--
Service landing gear
motor-reduction gears
600 Hrs
900 Hrs
Lubricate flap actuators
and flexible drive shafts
Replace pressure system
filters
Replace pressure system
inlet filter
Service landing gear
actuator gear box
Rod end bearings
._--
~
Forward of flap(K)
Underside of wing (M)
Under front seats (0)
13
12
3
~CX)
;::CJ1
l>g
C»
Q.~
C»
= to
.....
W-4
..... ."
»
-40
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Airborne D9-14-1
Rear engine baffle
to
m
:!. 0
enm
CD
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Airborne IJ4-7
Oil or grease
as required
11
CD
=0
:s
Q.
=:t.n
::I:CIJ
m
Aft of engine firewall
Control system and
landing gear
Under front seats (0)
(Number refers
LOCATION
(letters refer to Lubrication
to item on
Points Diagram)
Consumable Materials)
RECOMMENDED SERVICING SCHEDULE
500 Hrs.
300 Hrs.
--
•
INTERVAL
~I
CD
tJ)
to
W
to
~
to
W
co
to
.....
CD
As Req.
Service wing fuel system
Service propeller/windshield anti-ice
reservoir
Service oxygen cylinder
Service brake fluid
reservoir
Drain moisture from
engine oil sump
Service main gear struts
Service nose gear strut
Service shimmy damper
Check brake lining wear
Lubricate heater iris
Lubricate aileron trim
tab actuators
1000 Hrs.!l.Ubricale rudder and
elevator trim tab
actuators
JI
(f.I
13
Aileron (I)
2
2
2
2
Through cowl flap opening
Top of each strut (L)
Top of strut (0)
Nose landing gear (0)
Main landing gear wheels
Forward nose cornpartment (Q)
4
-
18
8
At wing fillers
Under left floorboard,
forward baggage
compartment
Nose baggage compartment
Nose baggage compartment
7
13
1
Empennage (G H)
~
(X)
;.... ~-
I
3:~
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(1) (1)
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On right side of aft
fuselage access through
left side access panel
-
ED
m
CJ)
CD
......
~
~
(I)
o
~CD
;:0'1
l>g
:s Al
a. ..
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.... 0
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.
(I)
tr
Rechargeable Batteries: Recharge after one cumulative hour of use or after 50% of
the useful charge life.
Non-Rechargeable Batteries: Replace after one cumulative hour or after 50% of
the useful life.
Battery for emergency
locator transmitter
(Replace)
ITEM
en:
~<
::0
:s n
a. :t.
:s :;,
:ten
m CD
........ . ."
»
t
t
INTERVAL
(Number refers
LOCATION
(Letters refer to lubrication
to item on
Points Diagram)
Consumable Materials)
RECOMMENDED SERVICING SCHEDULE
oo
,..
o
~
,
CX)
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
CONSUMABLE MATERIALS
Only the basic number of each Military Specification is
included in the Consumable Materials Chart. No attempt
has been made to update the basic number with the letter
suffix that designates the current issues of the various
spec ifi cat ions.
Vendors listed as meeting Federal and Military Specifications are provided as reference only and are not specifically recommended by Beech Aircraft Corporation; consequently, any product conforming to the specification
listed may be used. The products listed below have been
tested and approved for aviation usage by Beech Aircraft
Corporation, by the vendor, or by compliance with the applicable specifications. Other products that are locally
procurable which conform to the requirements of the applicable Military Specification may be used even though not
specifically included herein.
It is the responsibility of the operatorluser to determine the
current revision of the applicable Military Specification
prior to usage of that item. This determination may be made
by contacting the vendor of a specific item.
CONSUMABLE MATERIALS
ITEM
MATERIAL
SPECIFICATION
1. Lubricating Grease
Wheel Bearing
Aeroshell No.5 or
MIL-G-81322
CAUTION
Do not mix Aeroshell No.5 with MIL-G-81322.
Thoroughly clean grease from bearings and
bearing area before changing grease.
Revised: March 1983
8-41
Section VIII
Handling, Serv· Maint
ITEM
MATERIAL
2. Hydraulic Fluid
*3.
I
Lubricating Grease,
General Purpose,
Wide Temperature
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
SPEC/FICA TION
MIL-H-5606
MIL-G-81322
4. Molybdenum Disulfide MIL-M-7866
5. Lubricating Oil
**6. Engine Oil
I
***7. Engine Fuel
I
SAE No. 20 or
SAE 1OW-3D
SAE 30 (Below 40°F)
SAE 50 (Above 40°F)
Approved Multiviscosity Oils
Grade 1DOLL (Blue)
preferred, 100
(Green)
8. Anti-Ice Fluid
MIL-F-5566
9. Solvent
Federal Specification,
PD6S0
10. Lubricant
Scintilla 10-86527
I
11. Lubricant
Mobil Compound GG
or Mobil 636
I
12. Lubricating Oil, Gear
MIL-L-1 0324, or
MIL-L-2105C,
Grade 75W
8-42
Revised: March 1983
BEECHCRAFTBaron58
Serial TH 773 and After
ITEM
13.
t14.
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
MATERIAL
SPECIFICA TION
Grease, Aircraft
and Instrument
MIL-G-23827
Lubricant, Rubber
Seal
Oakite 6 Compound
15.
Naphtha, Aliphatic
tt16.
Tape, Antiseize
Tetrafluorethylene
Federal Specification,
TI-N-95
MIL-T-27730
17.
Leak Test Compound,
Oxygen Systems
MIL-L-25567
18.
Oxygen, Aviator's
Breathing
19.
Lubricating Oil,
General Purpose,
Preservative (WaterDisplacing, Low
Temperature)
MIL-O-27210
.Brayco 300 per
Federal Specification VV-L-BOO
(Preferred)
Alternates for Brayco 300:
Lubricant
••CRe 3-36
•••LPS No.1
••••WD-40
Revised: March 1983
8-42A
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
* In extremely cold climates use MIL-G-23827 grease in
place of MIL-G-81322. (These greases harmful to
paint.)
I
** Ashless dispersant oil (latest revision of Teledyne Continental Motors Corp. Spec. MHS-24) recommended;
straight mineral oils recommended during break-in
period. See servicing data.
I
If 1DOLL grade fuel (blue) is not available, use 100
(green) as minimum grade. See Engine Manufacturer's
Service Letter for recommended maintenance and
servicing techniques.
• Product of Bray Oil Co.,
1925 North Marianna
Los Angeles, Calif. 90032
•• Product of CRe Chemicals, Inc.,
Warminster, Pa. 18974
••• Product of LPS Research Laboratories, Inc.,
2050 Cotner Ave,
W. Los Angeles, Calif. 90025
•••• Product of WD-40 Company,
1061 Cudahy Place,
San Diego, Calif. 92110
t
Product of Oakite Products, lnc., 50 Valley Road,
Berkley Heights, N.J. 07922.
8-428
Revised: March 1983
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
tt For
sealing tapered pipe threads on high pressure
oxygen lines.
I
APPROVED ENGINE OILS
COMPANY
BRAND AND WEIGHT
BP Oil Corporation
SIP Aero Oil 065/80
Castrol limited
(Australia)
Grade 40, Castrolaero AD, .
Type Iff
Grade 50, Castrolaero AD
Type II
1
Continental Oil Co.
Conoco Aero S (SAE 10W30)
Delta Petroleum Co.
Delta Avail - Grades 30, 40 - 50
Gulf Oil Corporation
Gulfpride Aviation AD
Humble Ojl &
Refining Company
Esso Aviation Oil
Enco Aviation Oil
Pennzoil Company
Pennzoil Aircraft Engine Oil,
Heavy Duty Dispersant,
Grades 30,40,50
Phillips Petroleum Co.
Phillips 66 Aviation Oil Type A
(Replaced HD Aviation Oil)
Quaker State Oil
Reiining Corp.
Quaker State AD Aviation
Engine Oil Grades 20W/30,
40 - 50
Revised: March 1983
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
COMPANY
BRAND AND WEIGHT
Shell Oil Company
Aeroshell Oil W (in 4 grades)
Grade 120 (Nominal SAE 60) •
Military Grade 1120
Grade 100 (Nominal SAE 50) ~
Military Grade 1100
Grade 80 (Nominal SAE 40) ~
Military Grade 1080
Grade 65 (Nominal SAE 20
or 30) - Military Grade
1065
Sinclair Refining Co.
Sinclair Avoil 20W-40
Socony-Mobil
Mobil
Mobil
Mobil
Mobil
Texaco, Inc.
Texaco Aircraft Engine Oil Premium AD, Grades 65,
80, 100
Union Oil Co. of
California
Union Aircraft Engine Oil HD
Grades 80 - 100
Aero
Aero
Aero
Aero
Oil
Oil
Oil
Oil
65
80
100
120
Ashless
Dispersant
Aviation
Engine Oil
NOTE
This chart lists all oils which were certified as
meeting the requirements of Teledyne
Continental Motors Corporation Specification
M HS-24B at the time this handbook was
published. Any other oil which conforms to this
specification may be used.
•
8~44
September, 1979
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
BULB REPLACEMENT GUIDE
NUMBER
LOCATION
Compass light
327
Dome light. cabin
1864
Electrical panel light
327
Flap position indicator light
356
Ice light
A-7079B-24
Instrument light, flood
313
Instrument light, post
327
Landing gear position light
327
Landing light
4596
Map light
1495
Navigation light, tail
93
Navigation light. tail w/strobe
701557-6-801, or
30-0815-5 Grimes
Navigation light, wing
A7512-24 Grimes
Alternator out light
327
Reading light
303
Rotating beacon
A-7079B-24 Grimes
Tab position indicator light
1819
Taxi light (if installed)
4596
September, 1979
8-45
I
Section VIII
Handling. Serv - Maint
BEECH CRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
OVERHAUL OR REPLACEMENT SCHEDULE
The first overhaul or replacement should be performed not
later than the required period. The condition of the item at
the end of the first period can be used as a criterion for
determining subsequent periods applicable to the
individual airplane or fleet operation, providing the operator
has an approved monitoring system.
The time periods for inspection noted in this handbook are
based on average usage and average environmental
conditions.
SPECIAL CONDITIONS CAUTIONARY NOTICE
Airplanes operated for Air Taxi or other than normal
operation and airplanes operated in humid tropics or cold
and damp climates. etc.. may need more frequent
inspections for wear, corrosion and/or lack of lubrication. In
these areas periodic inspections should be performed until
the operator ca n set his own inspection periods based on
experience.
NOTE
The required periods do not constitute a
guarantee that the item will reach the period
without malfunction, as the aforementioned
factors cannot be controlled by the
manufacturer.
8-46
October 1976
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
COMPONENT
Section VIII
Handling. Serv - Maint
OVERHAUL OR REPLACE
LANDING GEAR
Main gear assembly
Nose gear assembly
Actuator assembly
Retract motor
Retract motor brushes
Shimmy damper
Wheels and tires
Brake assembly
Brake lining
Master cylinder
Shuttle valve assembly
Parking brake valve
All hose
Every 2000 hours
Every 2000 hours
Every 4000 hours
Every 2000 hours
Every 500 hours or on
condition
Every 1000 hours
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
POWER PLANT
NOTE
When an engine has been overhauled, or a new
engine installed, it is recommended that low
power settings not be used until oil consumption has stabilized. The average time for piston
ring seating is approximately 50 hours,
Engine
Engine controls
Engine vibration isolator
mounts
Exhaust system
Engi ne driven fuel pump
October 1976
*Every 1500 hours
On condition
Engine change or on condition
On condition
1500
8-47
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
COMPONENT
OVERHAUL OR REPLACE
Oil cooler
On condition (replace when
contaminated)
1500 hours or 4 years.
Reduce to 1000 hours or 3
years if airplane is stored
out in the weather.
1500 hours or 3 years
On condition
At engine overhaul but not
to exceed 1500 hours or 3
years
Every 600 hou rs
Hose carrying flammable
liquids at engine overhaul
or every 5 years.
All other hose on condition.
Propeller (Hartzell)
Propeller (McCauley)
Propeller controls
Propeller governor
I
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Dry air pressure pumps
All hose
FUEL SYSTEM
Fuel cells
Wing fuel quantity
tra nsmitters
Fuel cell drain valve
Fuel system check valves
Fuel selector valves
Aux fuel pump
All hose
Vent line check valve
8-48
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
Inspect every 500 hours
Overhaul every 1200 hours
Every 1200 hours
Hose carrying flammable
liquids at engine overhaul
or every 5 years.
All other hose on condition.
On condition
March, 1988
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
Section VIII
Handling, Serv ~ Maint
OVERHAUL OR REPLACE
COMPONENT
INSTRUMENTS
Turn coordi nator
Altimeter
Directional gyro
Gyro horizon
Gyro pressure
Engine indicator units
Airspeed indicator
Rate-of-c1imb
Fuel flow gage
Manifold pressure indicator
Tachometer
Free air temperature
indicator
Deice pressure gage
All hose
On condition
Every 24 months per FAA
Directive (Inspect
and Calibrate)
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
Dynamic brake relay
Battery master relay
All other relays
Voltage regulator
Starter
Starter relay
Alternator
Landing gear
selector switch
October 1976
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
At engine overhaul or replace
on condition
On condition
On condition
1200 hours - replace
8-49
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
OVERHAUL OR REPLACE
COMPONENT
UTILITY SYSTEMS
Cabi n heater
Heater ig nit ion assembly
Heater spark plug
Heater fuel pump
Heater fuel spray nozzle
Heater fuel shut-off valve
Combustion blower
Combustion blower brushes
Heater vent blower
Heater vent blower brushes
Oxygen regulator
Oxygen cylinder (3HT)
I
Oxygen cylinder (3A or
3AA)
All Hose
Every 500 hou rs of
operation with
periodic inspections
Replace every 500 hours
of heater operation
On condition
On condition
Replace at heater overhaul
On condition
On condition
Every 500 hou rs
On condition
Every 500 hours
Every 2000 hours or
48 months
Hydrostatically test every
3 years, replace every
24 years or 4,380 refills
(ICC Regulation)
Hydrostatically test every
5 years; no replacement
duration
On Condition
FLAPS AND FLIGHT CONTROLS
Flight controls
Aileron tab actuator
Elevator tab actuator
Rudder tab actuator
.Flap track rollers
Flap motor and drives
I
Flap actuators
Flap flexible shaft
8-50
On condition
On condition
On condition
. On condition
On condition
Every 2000 hou rs
Every 2000 hours
Every 2000 hours
September, 1979
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
COMPONENT
Section VIII
Handling, Serv • Maint
OVERHAUL OR REPLACE
NOTE
Any time the control surfaces are altered, repaired. or repainted, they must be rebalanced
per Shop Manual.
MISCELLANEOUS
Seat belts or Shoulder
Harnesses
Hand fire extinguisher
Inspect every 12 months,
replace on condition
Inspect every 12 months,
recharge as necessary
*Refer to Continental Service Bulletin M74-20, Rev. 1 or
later issue, for detailed overhaul period instructions.
With particular attention to throttle response, smooth
power and oil consumption, a qualified certificated
mechanic must determine that the engine is operating
normally at the time of each periodic inspection.
October 1976
8-51
Section VIII
Handling, Serv - Maint
BEECHCRAFT Baron 58
Serial TH 773 and After
INTENTIONAllY LEFT BLANK
8-62
October 1976
RAYTHEON AIRCRAFT
BEECH(ij) BARON 58/58A
PILOT'S OPERATING HANDBOOK
and
FAA APPROVED AIRPLANE FLIGHT MANUAL
PIN 58-590000-21
LOG OF SUPPLEMENTS
FAA Supplements must be in the airplane for flight
operation when subject equipment is installed.
Part Number
Subject
96-590010-19
King KN-74 Area Navigation System
96-590010-21
Nickel·Cadmium Battery and Charge
Current Detector
Rev
No.
1
Date
2fl9
10176
3
3/25f76
SA773CE
Hartzell Propellers
96-590010-23
1CO-Amp.Alternator
96-590011·21
Bendix Np·2041A NAV Computer
Programmer
1
58-590000-23
Air Conditioning System
3
58-590000-25
AirData AD611/D Area Navigation
6/21m
106-590000-15
Collins ANS-351 Area Navigation
System
11/16f77
58-590000-27
AirData AD-511 AD·511 G Area
Navigation System
1006
1
1/80
10/83
7/79
102-590000-45
KNC-610 Area Navigation System
11/78
58-590000-29
King KNS-80 Integrated Navigation
System
1f79
96-590010-27
Narco RNAV 161 Multi-Waypoint Area
Navigation System
1/79
102-590000-53
King KNS-81 Integrated Navigation
System
58-590000-37
Dual Voltage Regulators
(Kit No. 55-3024)
58-590000-33
Flight In Icing Conditions (Furnished
Only When Kit No. 58-5012 Installed)
58-590000-49
Inside Cabin Door Handle With
Open/Closed Placard
12190
36-590002-47
Full Flap Warning Horn System
12190
36-590002-49
Landina Gear Warnina Liaht Svstem
12190
9/98
1
10/83
5/84
2
9/98
1 of 2
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SECTION X
SAFETY INFORMATION
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SUBJECT
PAGE
Introduction
.
3
General
.
5.
5
Do's
Don'ts
.
.
6
Sources of Information
..
Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA Approved
Airplane Flight Manual
.
7
BEECHCRAFTService Publications
.
7
Federal Aviation Regulations
..
9
10
10
11
11
15
15
16
Airworthiness Directives
Airman's Information Manual
Advisory Information
FAA Advisory Circulars
FAA General Aviation News
FAA Accident Prevention Program
Additional Information
General Information on Specific Topics
Maintenance
Hazards of Unapproved Modifications
Flight Planning
Passenger Information Cards
Stowage of Articles
Flight Operations
General
Preflight Inspection
Weight and Balance
Autopilots and Electric Trim Systems
Flutter
Turbulent Weather
Wind Shear
Flight in Icing Conditions
Weather Radar
Mountain Flying
VFR - Low Ceilings
May, 1994
.
..
..
..
..
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
..
.
.
..
..
.
.
..
.
.
..
.
.
7
17
17
19
20
20
21
21
21
21
22
23
26
28
30
31
36
39
39
10 -1
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SECTiON X
SAFETY INFORMATION
TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)
SUBJECT
PAGE
VFR at Night
~.......
Vertigo - Disorientation
Flight of Multi-Engine Airplanes With One'
Engine Inoperative
Air Minimum Control Speed (VMCA) ...•.•.••..•....•.
Intentional One-Engine Inoperative Speed
g'~;~ngi~e~i~~p~.i~ii.~~..B~~i.R.ai~~~i~c.lir;;b.......
Speed (VYSE)
One-Engine-Inoperative Best Angle-at-Climb
Speed (VXSE)
.
Single Engine Service Ceiling
.
Basic Single' Engine Procedures
.
Engine Failure on Takeoff
.
When to Fly Vx, Vy, VXSE and VYSE .....•.•.•..•..•
Stalls, Slow Flight and Training
.
Spins
.
Descent
.
Vortices - Wake Turbulence
.
Takeoff and Landing Conditions
.
.
Medical Facts for Pilots
General
.
Fatigue
.
Hypoxia
.
Hyperventilation
.
Alcohol
.
~~~~~ ·Di~i·~·g··::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
Carbon Monoxide and Night Vision
Decompression Sickness
A Final Word
10 ·2
40
40
42
44
45
45
46
46
46
47
48
48
51
53
54
55
55
55
56
56
58
59
60
..
.
61
61
61
.
63
May, 1994
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Section X
Safety Information
INTRODUCTION
Beech Aircraft Corporation has developed this special summary publication of safety information to refresh pilots' and
owners' knowledge of safety related subjects. Topics in this
publication are dealt with in more detail in FAA Advisory Circulars and other publications pertaining to the subject of
safe flying.
The skilled pilot recognizes that safety consciousness is an
integral - and never-ending - part of his or her job. Be thoroughly familiar with your airplane. Know its limitations and
your own. Maintain your currency, or fly with a qualified
instructor until you are current and proficient. Practice emergency procedures at safe altitudes and airspeeds, preferably with a qualified instructor pilot, until the required action
can be accomplished without reference to the manual. Periodically review this Safety Information as part of your recurrency training regimen.
BEECHCRAFT airplanes are designed and built to provide
you with many years of safe and efficient transportation. By
maintaining your BEECHCRAFT properly and flying it prudently you will realize its full potential.
............ Beech Aircraft Corporation
May, 1994
10-3
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Section X
Safety Information
Twin Engine (Piston)
WARNING
I
Because your airplane is a high performance, high speed transportation vehicle,
designed for operation in a three-dimensional
environment, special safety precautions must
be observed to reduce the risk of fatal or serious injuries to the pilot(s) and occupant(s).
It is mandatory that you fully understand the contents of this
publication and the other operating and maintenance manuals which accompany the airplane; that FAA requirements
for ratings, certifications and review be scrupulously complied with; and that you allow only persons who are properly
licensed and rated, and thoroughly familiar with the contents
of the Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual to operate the airplane.
IMPROPER OPERATION OR MAINTENANCE OF AN AIRPLANE, NO MAnER HOW WELL BUILT INITIALLY, CAN
RESULT IN CONSIDERABLE DAMAGE OR TOTAL
DESTRUCTION OF THE AIRPLANF, ALONG WITH SERIOUS OR FATAL INJURIES TO ALL OCCUPANTS.
10004
May, 1994
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Section X
Safety Information
GENERAL
As a pilot, you are responsible to yourself and to those who
fly with you, to other pilots and their passengers and to
people on the ground, to fly wisely and safely.
The following material in this Safety Information publication
covers several subjects in limited detail. Here are some condensed Do's and Don'ts.
DO'S
Be thoroughly familiar with your airplane, know its limitations
and your own.
Be current in your airplane, or fly with a qualified instructor
until you are current. Practice until you are proficient.
Preplan all aspects of your flight - including a proper
weather briefing and adequate fuel reserves.
Use services available - weather briefing, inflight weather
and Flight Service Station.
Carefully preflight your airplane.
Use the approved checklist.
Have more than enough fuel for takeoff, plus the trip, and an
adequate reserve.
Be sure your weight loading and C.G. are within limits.
Use seatbelts and shoulder harnesses at all times.
Be sure all loose articles and baggage are secured.
Check freedom and proper direction of operation of all controls during preflight.
Maintain the prescribed airspeeds in takeoff, climb, descent,
and landing.
May. 1994
10-5
Section X
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Twin Engine (Piston)
Avoid wake turbulence (Vortices).
Preplan fuel and fuel tank management before the actual
flight. Utilize auxiliary tanks only in level cruise flight. Take
off and land on the fullest main tank, NEVER use auxiliary
fuel tanks for take off or landing.
Practice emergency procedures at safe altitudes and airspeeds, preferably with a qualified instructor pilot, until the
required action is instinctive.
Keep your airplane in good mechanical condition.
Stay informed and alert; fly in a sensible manner.
DON'TS
Don't take off with frost, ice or snow on the airplane.
Don't take off with less than minimum recommended fuel,
plus adequate reserves, and don't run the tank dry before
switching.
Don't fly in a reckless, show-off, or careless manner.
Don't fly into thunderstorms or severe weather.
Don't fly in possible icing conditions unless the airplane is
approved, properly equipped, and all required equipment is
operational for flight in icing conditions.
Don't fly close to mountainous terrain.
Don't apply controls abruptly or with high forces that could
exceed design loads of the airplane.
Don't fly into weather conditions that are beyond your ratings or current proficiency.
Don't fly when physically or mentally exhausted or below
par.
10-6
May, 1994
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Section X
Safety Information
Don't trust to luck.
SOURCES OF INFORMATION
There is a wealth of information available to the pilot created
for th~ sale purpose of making your flying safer, easier and
more efficient. Take advantage of this knowledge and be
prepared for an emergency in the event that one should
occur.
PILOT'S OPERATING HANDBOOK AND
FAA APPROVED AIRPLANE FLIGHT
MANUAL
You must be thoroughly familiar with the contents of your
operating manuals, placards, and check lists to ensure safe
utilization of your airplane. When the airplane was manufactured, it was equipped with one or more of the following:
placards, Owner's Manual, FAA Flight Manual, Approved
Airplane Flight Manual Supplements, Pilot's Operating
Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual.
Beech has revised and reissued many of the early manuals
for certain models of airplanes in GAMA Standard Format as
Pilot's Operating Handbooks and FAA Approved Airplane
Flight Manuals. For simplicity and convenience, all official
manuals in various models are referred to as the Pilot's
Operating Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight
Manual. If the airplane has changed ownership, the Pilot's
Operating Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight
Manual may have been misplaced or may not be current.
Replacement handbooks may be obtained from any
BEECHCRAFT Authorized Outlet.
BEECHCRAFT SERVICE PUBLICATIONS
Beech Aircraft Corporation publishes a wide variety of
manuals. service letters, service instructions. service bulletins, safety communiques and other publications for the various models of BEECHCRAFT airplanes. Information on how
May, 1994
10·7
Section X
Safety Information
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Twin Engine (Piston)
to obtain publications relating to your airplane is contained in
BEECHCRAFT Service Bulletin number 2001 entitled
"General - BEECHCRAFT Service Publications .. What is
Available and How to Obtain It."
t
Beech Aircraft Corporation automatically mails original
issues and revisions of BEECHCRAFT Service Bulletins
(Mandatory, Recommended and Optional), FAA Approved
Airplane Flight Manual Supplements, reissues and revisions
of FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manuals, Flight Handbooks, Owners Manuals, Pilot's Operating Manuals and
Pilot's Operating Handbooks, and original issues and revisions of BEECHCRAFT Safety Communiques to BEECHCRAFT Owner addresses as listed by the FAA Aircraft Registration Branch List and the BEECHCRAFT International
Owner Notification Service List. While this information i's distributed by Beech Aircraft Corporation, Beech can not make
changes in the name or address furnished by the FAA. The
owner must contact the FAA regarding any changes to
name or address. Their address is: FAA Aircraft Registration
Branch (AAC250) P.O. Box 25082, Oklahoma City, OK
73125, Phone (405) 680-2131.
It is the responsibility of the FAA owner of record to ensure
that any mailings from Beech are forwarded to the proper
persons. Often the FAA registered owner is a bank or
financing company or an individual not in possession of the
airplane. Also, when an airplane is sold, there is a lag in
processing the change in registration with the FAA. If you
are a new owner, contact your BEECHCRAFT Authorized
Outlet and ensure your manuals are up to date.
Beech Aircraft Corporation provides a subscription service
which provides for direct factory mailing of BEECHCRAFT
publications applicable to a specific serial number airplane.
Details concerning the fees and ordering information for this
owner subscription service are contained in Service Bulletin
number 2001.
For owners who choose not to apply for a Publications Revision Subscription service, Beech provides a free Owner
10-8
May, 1994
COeechcmft
Twin Engine (Piston)
Section X
Safety Information
Notification Service by which owners are notified by post
card of BEECHCRAFT manual reissues, revisions and
supplements which are being issued applicable to the airplane owned. On receipt of such notification, the owner may
obtain the publication through a BEECHCRAFT Authorized
Outlet. This notification service is available when requested
by the owner. This request may be made by using the owner
notification request card furnished with the loose equipment
of each airplane at the time of delivery, or by a letter
requesting this service, referencing the specific airplane
serial number owned. Write to :
Supervisor, Special Services
Dept. 52
Beech Aircraft Corporation
P.O. Box 85
Wichita, Kansas 67201-0085
From time to time Beech Aircraft Corporation issues
BEECHCRAFT Safety Communiques dealing with the safe
operation of a specific series of airplanes, or airplanes in
general. It is recommended that each owner/operator maintain a current file of these publications. Back issues of
BEECHCRAFT Safety Communiques may be obtained without charge by sending a request, including airplane model
and serial number, to the Supervisor, Special Services, at
the address listed above.
Airworthiness Directives (AD's) are not issued by the manufacturer. They are issued and available from the FAA.
FEDERAL AVIATION REGULATIONS
FAR Part 91, General Operating and Flight Rules, is a document of law governing operation of airplanes and the owner's and pilot's responsibilities. Some of the subjects covered are:
Responsibilities and authority of the pilot-in-command
May, 1994
10·9
Section X
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'Oeechcmft
Twin Engine (Piston)
Certificates required
Liquor and Drugs
Flight plans
Preflight action
Fuel requirements
Flight Rules
Maintenance, preventive maintenance, alterations, inspection and maintenance records
You, as a pilot, have responsibilities under government
regulations. The regulations are designed for your protection
and the protection of your passengers and the public. Compliance is mandatory.
AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES
FAR Part 39 specifies that no person may operate a product
to which an Airworthiness Directive issued by the FAA
applies, except in accordance with the requirements of that
Airworthiness Directive.
AIRMAN'S INFORMATION MANUAL
The Airman's Information Manual (AIM) is designed to provide airmen with basic flight information and ATC procedures for use in the national airspace system of the United
States. It also contains items of interest to pilots concerning
health and medical facts, factors affecting flight safety, a
pilot/controller glossary of terms in the Air Traffic Control
system, information on safety, and accidenVhazard reporting. It is revised at six-month intervals and can be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402.
This document contains a wealth of pilot information. Among
the subjects are:
Controlled Airspace
1D-10
May, 1994
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Twin Engine (Piston)
Section X
Safety Information
Emergency Procedures
Services Available to Pilots
Weather and Icing
Radio Phraseology and Technique
Moun1ain Flying
Airport Operations
Wake Turbulence - Vortices
Clearances and Separations
Medical Facts for Pilots
Preflight
Bird Hazards
Departures - IFR
Good Operating Practices
Enroute - IFR
Airport Location Directory
Arrival - IFR
All pilots must be thoroughly familiar with and use the information in the AIM.
ADVISORY INFORMATION
NOTAMS (Notices to Airmen) are documents that have
information of a time-critical nature that would affect a pilot's
decision to make a flight; for example, an airport closed, terminal radar out of service, or enroute navigational aids out
of service.
FAA ADVISORY CIRCULARS
The FAA issues Advisory Circulars to inform the aviation
public in a systematic way of nonregulatory material of interest. Advisory Circulars contain a wealth of information with
which the prudent pilot should be familiar. A complete list of
current FAA Advisory Circulars is published in AC 00-2,
which lists Advisory Circulars that are for sale, as well as
those distributed free of charge by the FAA, and provides
May, 1994
10-11
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Section X
Safety Information
Twin Engine (Piston)
ordering information. Many Advisory Circulars which are for
sale can be purchased locally in aviation bookstores or at
FBOts. These documents are subject to periodic revision.
Be certain the Advisory Circular you are using is the latest
revision available. Some of the Advisory Circulars of interest
to pilots are:
*00..6
Aviation Weather
00..24
Thunderstorms
00-30
Rules of Thumb for Avoiding or Minimizing Encounters with Clear Air Turbulence
*00-45
Aviation Weather Services
00-46
Aviation Safety Reporting Program
20-5
Plane Sense
20-32
Carbon Monoxide (CO) Contamination
in Aircraft - Detection and Prevention
20-35
Tie-Down Sense
20-43
Aircraft Fuel Control
20-105
Engine-Power Loss Accident Prevention
20-113
Pilot Precautions and Procedures to
be Taken in Preventing Aircraft Reciprocating Engine Induction System and
Fuel System Icing Problems
20-125
Water in Aviation Fuels
21-4
Special Flight Permits for Operation of
Overweight Aircraft
43..9
Maintenance Records: General Aviation Aircraft
10-12
May, 1994
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Twin Engine (Piston)
Section X
Safety Information
43-12
Preventive Maintenance
60-4
Pilot's Spatial Disorientation
60·6
Airplane Flight Manuals (AFM),
Approved Manual Materials, Markings
and Placards - Airplanes
60-12
Availability of Industry-Developed"
Guidelines for the Conduct of the Biennial Flight Review
60-13
The Accident Prevention Counselor
Program
*61-9
Pilot Transition Courses for Complex
Single-Engine and Light Twin-Engine
Airplanes
*61-21
Flight Training Handbook
*61-23
Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical
Knowledge
*61-27
Instrument Flying Handbook
61-67
Hazards Associated with Spins in Airplanes Prohibited from Intentional
Spinning.
61-84
Role of Preflight Preparation
*67-2
Medical Handbook for Pilots
90-23
Aircraft Wake Turbulence
90-42
Traffic Advisory Practices at Nontower
Airports
90-48
Pilot's Role in Collision Avoidance
90-66
Recommended Standard Traffic Patterns for Airplane Operations at
Uncontrolled Airports
May, 1994
10·13
Section X
Safety Information
Oeechcmft
Twin Engine (Piston)
90-85
Severe Weather Avoidance Plan
(SWAP)
91-6
Water, Slush and Snow on the Runway
91-13
Cold Weather Operation of Aircraft
*91-23
Pilot's Weight and Balance Handbook
91-26
Maintenance and Handling of Air
Driven Gyroscopic Instruments
91-33
Use of Alternate Grades of Aviation
Gasoline for Grade 80/.87
91-35
Noise, Hearing Damage, and Fatigue
in General Aviation Pilots
91-43
Unreliable Airspeed Indications
91-44
Operational and Maintenance Practices for Emergency Locator Transmitters and Receivers
91-46
Gyroscopic Instruments - Good Operating Practices
91-50
Importance of Transponder Operations
and Altitude Reporting
91-51
Airplane Deice and Anti-ice Systems
91-59
Inspection and Care of General Aviation Aircraft Exhaust Systems
91-65
Use of Shoulder Harness in Passenger
Seats
103-4
Hazards Associated with Sublimation
of Solid Carbon Dioxide (Dry Ice)
Aboard Aircraft
135-9
FAR Part 135 Icing Limitations
10-14
May, 1994
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Section X
Twin Engine (Piston)
210-5A
Safety Information
Military Flying Activities
* For Sale
FAA. GENERAL AVIATION NEWS
FAA General Aviation News is published by the FAA in the
interest of flight safety. The magazine is designed to promote safety in the air by calling the attention of general
aviation airmen to current technical, regulatory and procedural matters affecting the safe operation of airplanes. FAA
General Aviation News is sold on subscription by the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington D.C., 20402.
FAA ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROGRAM
The FAA assigns accident prevention specialists to each
Flight Standards and General Aviation District Office to
organize accident prevention program activities. In addition,
there are over 3,000 volunteer airmen serving as accident
prevention counselors, sharing their technical expertise and
professional knowledge with the general aviation community. The FAA conducts seminars and workshops, and distributes invaluable safety information under this program.
Usually the airport manager, the FAA Flight Service Station
(FSS), or Fixed Base Operator (FBO), will have a list of
accident prevention counselors and their phone numbers
available. All Flight Standards and General Aviation District
Offices have a list of the counselors serving the District.
Before flying over unfamiliar territory, such as mountainous
terrain or desert areas, it is advisable for transient pilots to
consult with local counselors. They will be familiar with the
more desirable routes, the wind and weather conditions, and
the service and emergency landing areas that are available
along the way. They can also offer advice on the type of
emergency equipment you should be carrying.
May, 1994
10-15
Section X
Safety Information
COeechcmft
Twin Engine (Piston)
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal
Aviation Administration periodically issue, in greater detail,
general aviation pamphlets concerning aviation safety. FAA
Regional Offices also publish material under the FAA General Aviation Accident Prevention Program. These can be
obtained at FAA Offices, Weather Stations, Flight Service
Stations or Airport Facilities. Some of these are titled:
12 Golden Rules for Pilots
Weather or Not
Disorientation
Plane Sense
Weather Info Guide for Pilots
Wake Turbulence
Don't Trust to Luck, Trust to Safety
Rain, Fog, Snow
Thunderstorm - TRW
Icing
Pilot's Weather Briefing Guide
Thunderstorms Don't Flirt ... Skirt 'em
IFR-VFR - Either Way Disorientation Can Be Fatal
IFR Pilot Exam-O-Grams
VFR Pilot Exam-O-Grams
Flying Light Twins Safely
Tips on Engine Operation in Small General Aviation Aircraft
Estimating Inflight Visibility
Is the Aircraft Ready for Flight
Tips on Mountain Flying
Tips on Desert Flying
Always Leave Yourself An Out
Safety Guide for Private Aircraft Owners
Tips on How to Use the Flight Planner
Tips on the Use of Ailerons and Rudder
Some Hard Facts About Soft Landings
10-16
May, 1994
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Twin Engine (Piston)
Section X
Safety Information
Propeller Operation and Care
Torque 'What it Means to the Pilot"
Weight and Balance. An Important Safety Consideration for
Pilots
GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPECIFIC
TOPICS
MAINTENANCE
Safety of flight begins with a well maintained airplane. Make
it a habit to keep your airplane and all of its equipment in
airworthy condition. Keep a "squawk list" on board, and see
that all discrepancies, however minor, are noted and
promptly corrected.
Schedule your maintenance regularly, and have your airplane serviced by a reputable organization. Be suspicious of
bargain prices for maintenance, repair and inspections.
It is the responsibility of the owner and the operator to
assure that the airplane is maintained in an airworthy condition and that proper maintenance records are kept.
Use only genuine BEECHCRAFT or BEECHCRAFT
approved parts obtained from BEECHCRAFT approved
sources, in connection with the maintenance and repair of
Beech airplanes.
Genuine BEECHCRAFT parts are produced and inspected
under rigorous procedures to insure airworthiness and suitability for use in Beech airplane applications. Parts purchased from sources other than BEECHCRAFT, even
though outwardly identical in appearance, may not have had
the required tests and inspections performed, may be different in fabrication techniques and materials, and may be dangerous when installed in an airplane.
May, 1994
10-17
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Section X
Safety Information
Twin Engine (Piston)
Salvaged airplane parts, reworked parts obtained from nonBEECHCRAFT approved sources or parts, components, or
structural assemblies, the service history of which is
unknown or cannot be authenticated, may have been subjected to unacceptable stresses or temperatures or have
other hidden damage not discernible through routine visual
or usual nondestructive testing techniques. This may render
the part, component or structural assembly even though
originally manufactured by BEECHCRAFT, unsuitable and
unsafe for airplane use.
I
BEECHCRAFT expressly disclaims any responsibility for
malfunctions, failures, damage or injury caused by use of
non-BEECHCRAFT parts.
Airplanes operated for Air Taxi or other than normal operation, and airplanes operated in humid tropics, or cold and
damp climates, etc., may need more frequent inspections for
wear, corrosion and/or lack of lubrication. In these areas,
periodic inspections should be performed until the operator
can set his own inspection periods based on experience.
NOTE
The required periods do not constitute a
guarantee that the item will' reach the period
without malfunction, as the aforementioned
factors cannot be controlled by the manufacturer.
Corrosion and its effects must be treated at the earliest possible opportunity. A clean, dry surface is virtually immune to
corrosion. Make sure that all drain holes remain unobstructed. Protective films and sealants help to keep corrosive agents from contacting metallic surfaces. Corrosion
inspections should be made most frequently under highcorrosion-risk operating conditions, such as in areas of
10-18
May, 1994
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Twin Engine (Piston)
Section X
Safety Information
excessive airborne salt concentrations (e.g., near the sea)
and in high-humidity areas (e.g., tropical regions).
If you have purchased a used airplane, have your mechanic
inspect the airplane registration records, logbooks and
maintenance records carefully. An unexplained period of
time for which the airplane has been out of service, or unexplained significant repairs may well indicate the airplane has
been seriously damaged in a prior accident. Have your
mechanics inspect a used airplane carefully. Take the time
to ensure that you really know w~at you are buying when
you buy a used airplane.
HAZARDS OF UNAPPROVED MODIFICATIONS
Many airplane modifications are approved under Supplemental Type Certificates (STC's). Before installing an STC
on your airplane, check to make sure that the STC does not
conflict with other STC's that have already been installed.
Because approval of an STC is obtained by the individual
STC holder based upon modification of the original type
design, it is possible for STC's to interfere with each other
when both are installed. Never install an unapproved modification of any type, however innocent the apparent modification may seem. Always obtain proper FAA approval.
Airplane owners and maintenance personnel are particularly
cautioned not to make attachments to, or otherwise modify,
seats from original certification without approval from the
FAA Engineering and Manufacturing District Office having
original certification responsibility for that make and model.
Any unapproved attachment or modification to seat structure
may increase load factors and metal stress which could
cause failure of seat structure at a lesser "G" force than
exhibited for original certification.
May, 1994
10·19
Section X
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Twin Engine (Piston)
Examples of unauthorized attachments found are drilling
holes in seat tubing to attach fire extinguishers and drilling
holes to attach approach plate book bins to seats.
FLIGHT PLANNING
FAR Part 91 requires that each pilot in command, before
beginning a flight, familiarize himself with all available information concerning that flight.
Obtain a current and complete preflight briefing. This should
consist of local, enroute and destination weather and
enroute navaid information. Enroute terrain and obstructions, alternate airports, airport runways active, length of
runways, and takeoff and landing distances for the airplane
for conditions expected should be known.
The prudent pilot will review his planned enroute track and
stations and make a list for quick reference. It is strongly
recommended a flight plan be filed with Flight Service Stations, even though the flight may be VFR. Also, advise Flight
Service Stations of changes or delays of one hour or more
and remember to close the flight plan at destination.
The pilot must be completely familiar with the performance
of the airplane and performance data in the Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual.
The resultant effect of temperature and pressure altitude
must be taken into account in performance if not accounted
for on the charts. An applicable FAA Approved Airplane
Flight Manual must be aboard the airplane at all times and
include the weight and balance forms and equipment list.
PASSENGER INFORMATION CARDS
Beech has available, for most current production airplanes,
passenger information cards which contain important information on the proper use of restraint systems, oxygen
10-20
May, 1994
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Twin Engine (Piston)
Section X
Safety Information
masks, emergency exits and emergency bracing procedures. Passenger information cards may be obtained at any
BEECHCRAFT Authorized Outlet. A pilot should not only be
familiar with the information contained in the cards, but
should always, prior to flight, inform the passengers of the
information contained in the information cards. The pilot
should orally brief the passengers on the proper use of
restraint systems, doors and emergency exits, and other
emergency procedures, as required by Part 91 of the FAR's.
STOWAGE OF ARTICLES
The space between the seat pan and the floor is utilized to
provide space for seat displacement. If hard, solid objects
are stored beneath seats, the energy absorbing feature is
lost and severe spinal injuries can occur to occupants.
Prior to flight, pilots should insure that articles are not
stowed beneath seats that would restrict seat pan energy
absorption or penetrate the seat in event of a high vertical
velocity accident.
FLIGHT OPERATIONS
GENERAL
The pilot MUST be thoroughly familiar with ALL INFORMATION published by the manufacturer concerning the airplane, and is required by law to operate the airplane in
accordance with the FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
and placards installed.
PREFLIGHT INSPECTION
In addition to maintenance inspections and preflight information required by FAR Part 91, a complete, careful preflight
inspection is imperative.
May, 1994
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Each airplane has a checklist for the preflight inspection
which must be followed. USE THE CHECKLIST.
WEIGHT AND BALANCE
Maintaining center of gravity within the approved envelope
throughout the planned flight is an important safety consideration.
The airplane must be loaded so as not to exceed the weight
and center of gravity (C.G.) limitations. Airplanes that are
loaded above the maximum takeoff or landing weight limitations will have an overall lower level of performance compared to that shown in the Performance section of the Pilot's
Operating Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight
Manual. If loaded above maximum takeoff weight, takeoff
distance and .the,landing distance will be longer than that
shown in the Performance section; the stalling speed will be
higher, rate of climb, the cruising speed, and the range of
the airplane at any level of fuel will all be lower than shown
in the Performance section.
If an airplane is loaded so that the C.G. is forward of the forward limit it will require additional control movements for
maneuvering the airplane with correspondingly higher control forces. The pilot may have difficulty during takeoff and
landing because of the elevator control limits.
>
If an airplane is loaded aft of the aft C.G. limitation, the pilot
will experience a lower level of stability. Airplane characteristics that indicate a lower stability level are; lower control
forces, difficulty in trimming the airplane, lower control forces
for maneuvering with attendant danger of structural overload, decayed stall characteristics, and a lower level of
lateral-directional damping.
Ensure that all cargo and baggage is properly secured
before takeoff. A sudden shift in balance at rotation can
cause controllability problems.
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AUTOPILOTS AND ELECTRIC TRIM SYSTEMS
Because there are several different models of autopilots and
electric trim systems installed in Beech airplanes and different installations and switch positions are possible from airplane to airplane, it is essential that every owner/operator
review his Airplane Flight Manual (AFM) Supplements and
ensure that the supplements properly describe the autopilot
and trim installations on his specific airplane. Each pilot,
prior to flight, must be fully aware of the proper procedures
for operation, and particularly disengagement, for the system as installed.
In addition to ensuring compliance with the autopilot manufacturer's maintenance requirements, all owners/operators
should thoroughly familiarize themselves with the operation,
function and procedures described in the Airplane Flight
Manual Supplements. Ensure a full understanding of the
methods of engagement and disengagement of the autopilot and trim systems.
Compare the descriptions and procedures contained in the
Supplements to the actual installation in the airplane to
ensure that the supplement accurately describes your installation. Test-that all buttons, switches and circuit breakers
function as described in the Supplements. If they do not
function as described, have the system repaired by a qualified service agency. If field service advice or assistance is
necessary, contact Beech Aircraft Corporation, Customer
Support Department.
As stated in all AFM Supplements for autopilot systems and
trim systems installed on Beech airplanes, the preflight
check must be conducted before every flight. The preflight
check assures not only that the systems and all of their features are operating properly, but also that the pilot, before
flight, is familiar with the proper means of engagement and
disengagement of the autopilot and trim system.
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Autopilot Airplane Flight Manual Supplements caution
against trying to override the autopilot system during flight
without disengaging the autopilot because the autopilot will
continue to trim the airplane and oppose the pilot's actions.
This could result in a severely out of trim condition. This is a
basic feature of all autopilots with electric trim follow-up.
Do not try to manually override the-autopilot during flight.
IN CASE OF EMERGENCY, YOU CAN OVERPOWER THE
AUTOPILOT TO CORRECT THE ATTITUDE, BUT THE
AUTOPILOT AND ELECTRIC TRIM MUST THEN IMMEDI·
ATELY BE DISENGAGED.
It is often difficult to distinguish an autopilot malfunction from
an electric trim system malfunction. The safest course is to
deactivate both. Do not re-engage either system until after
you have safely landed. Then have the systems checked by
a qualified service facility prior to further flight.
Depending upon the installation on your airplane, the foltowing additional methods may be available to disengage the
autopilot or electric trim in the event that the autopilot or
electric trim does not disengage utilizing the disengage
methods specified in the Supplements.
Transient control forces may occur when the
autopilot is disengaged.
1. Turn off the autopilot master switch, if installed.
2. Pull the autopilot and trim circuit breaker(s) or turn off
the autopilot switch breaker, if installed.
3. Turn off the RADIO MASTER SWITCH, if installed, and
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Section X
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if the autopilot system and the trim system are wired
through this switch.
Radios, including VHF COMM are also disconnected when the radio master switch is
off.
4. Turn off the ELECTRIC MASTER SWITCH.
I
WARNING
I
Most electrically powered systems will be
inoperative. Consult the AFM for further information.
5. Push the GA switch on throttle grip, if installed (depending upon the autopilot system).
6. Push TEST EACH FLT switch on the autopilot controller, if installed.
NOTE
After the autopilot is positively disengaged, it
may be necessary to restore other electrical
functions. Be sure when the master switches
are turned on that the autopilot does not
re-engage.
The above ways mayor may not be available on your autopilot. It is essential that you read your airplane's AFM
May, 1994
10-25
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Twin Engine (Piston)
SUPPLEMENT for your autopilot system and check each
function and operation on your system.
The engagement of the autopilot must be done in accordance with the instructions and procedures contained in the
AFM SUPPLEMENT.
Particular attention must be paid to the autopilot settings
prior to engagement. If you attempt to engage the autopilot
when the airplane is out of trim, a large attitude change may
occur.
IT IS ESSENTIAL THAT THE PROCEDURES SET FORTH
IN THE APPROVED AFM SUPPLEMENTS FOR YOUR
SPECIFIC INSTALLATION BE FOLLOWED BEFORE
ENGAGING THE AUTOPILOT.
FLUTTER
Flutter is a phenomenon that can occur when an aerodynamic surface begins vibrating. The energy to sustain the
vibration is derived from airflow over the surface. The amplitude of the vibration can (1) decrease. if airspeed is
reduced; (2) remain constant. if airspeed is held constant
and no failures occur; or (3) increase to the point of selfdestruction, especially if airspeed is high and/or is allowed to
increase. Flutter can lead to an in-flight break up of the airplane. Airplanes are designed so that flutter will not occur in
the normal operating envelope of the airplane as long as the
airplane is properly maintained. In the case of any airplane.
decreasing the damping and stiffness of the structure or
increasing the trailing edge weight of control surfaces will
tend to cause flutter. If a combination of those factors is sufficient. flutter can occur within the normal operating envelope.
Owners and operators of airplanes have the primary responsibility for maintaining their airplanes. To fulfill that responsibility. it is imperative that all airplanes receive a thorough
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preflight inspection. Improper tension on the control cables
or any other loose condition in the flight control system can
also cause or contribute to flutter. Pilots should pay particular attention to control surface attachment hardware including tab pushrod attachment during preflight inspection.
Looseness of fixed surfaces or movement of control surfaces other than in the normal direction of travel should be
rectified before flight. Further, owners should take their air..
planes to mechanics who have access to current technical
publications and prior experience in properly maintaining
that make and model of airplane. The owner should make
certain that control cable tension inspections are performed
as outlined in the applicable Beech Inspection Guide. Worn
control surface attachment hardware must be replaced. Any
repainting or repair of a moveable control surface will
require a verification of the control surface balance before
the airplane is returned to service. Control surface drain
holes must be open to prevent freezing of accumulated
moisture, which could create an increased trailing-edge..
heavy control surface and flutter.
If an excessive vibration, particularly in the control column
and rudder pedals, is encountered in flight, this may be the
onset of flutter and the procedure to follow is:
1. IMMEDIATELY REDUCE AIRSPEED (lower the landing gear, if necessary).
2. RESTRAIN THE CONTROLS OF THE AIRPLANE
UNTIL THE VIBRATION CEASES.
3. FLY AT THE REDUCED AIRSPEED AND LAND AT
THE NEAREST SUITABLE AIRPORT.
4. HAVE THE AIRPLANE INSPECTED FOR AIRFRAME
DAMAGE, CONTROL SURFACE ATTACHING HARDWARE CONDITION/SECURITY, TRIM TAB FREE
PLAY, PROPER CONTROL CABLE TENSION, AND
CONTROL SURFACE BALANCE BY ANOTHER
MECHANIC WHO IS FULLY QUALIFIED.
May, 1994
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TURBULENT WEATHER
A complete and current weather briefing is a requirement for
a safe trip.
Updating of weather information en route is also essential.
The wise pilot knows that weather conditions can change
quickly r and treats weather forecasting as professional
advice, rather than an absolute fact. He obtains all the
advice he can! but stays alert to any sign or report of changing conditions.
Plan the flight to avoid areas of reported severe turbulence.
It is not always possible to detect individual storm areas or
find the in-between clear areas.
The National Weather Service classifies turbulence as follows:
Class of
Turbulence
Effect
Extreme
Airplane is violently tossed about and
is practically impossible to control. May
cause structural damage.
Severe
Airplane may be momentarily out of
control. Occupants are thrown violently
against the belts and back into the
seat. Unsecured objects are tossed
about.
Moderate
Occupants require seat belts and
occasionally are thrown against the
belt. Unsecured objects move about.
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Section X
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Occupants may be required to use
seat belts, but objects in the airplane
remain at rest.
Thunderstorms, squall lines and violent turbulence should
be regarded as extremely dangerous and must be avoided.
Hail and tornadic wind velocities can be encountered in
thunderstorms that can destroy any airplane, just as tornadoes destroy nearly everything in their path on the ground.
Thunderstorms also pose the possibility of a lightning strike
on an airplane. Any structure or equipment which shows
evidence of a lightning strike, or of being subjected to a high
current flow due to a strike, or is a suspected part of a lightning strike path through the airplane should be thoroughly
inspected and any damage repaired prior to additional flight.
A roll cloud ahead of a squall line or thunderstorm is visible
evidence of extreme turbulence; however, the absence of a
roll cloud should not be interpreted as denoting that severe
turbulence is not present.
Even though flight in severe turbulence must be avoided,
flight in turbulent air may be encountered unexpectedly
under certain conditions.
The following recommendations should be observed for airplane operation in turbulent air:
Flying through turbulent air presents two basic problems, the
answer to both of which is proper airspeed. On one hand, if
you maintain an excessive airspeed, you run the risk of
structural damage or failure; on the other hand, if your airspeed is too low, you may stall.
If turbulence is encountered, reduce speed to the turbulent
air penetration speed, if given, or to the maneuvering speed,
which is listed in the Limitations section of the Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual.
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Twin Engine (Piston)
These speeds give the best assurance of avoiding excessive stress loads, and at the same time provide the proper
margin against inadvertent stalls due to gusts.
Beware of overcontrolling in an attempt to correct for
changes in attitude; applying control pressure abruptly will
build up G-forces rapidly and could cause structural damage
or even failure. You should watch particularly your angle of
bank, making turns as wide and shallow as possible. Be
equally cautious in applying forward or back pressure to
keep the airplane level. Maintain straight and level attitude in
either up or down drafts. Use trim sparingly to avoid being
grossly out of trim as the vertical air columns change velocity and direction. If necessary to avoid excessive airspeeds,
lower the landing gear.
WIND SHEAR
Wind shears are rapid, localized changes in wind direction,
which can occur vertically as well as horizontally. Wind
shear can be very dangerous to all airplanes, large and
small, particularly on approach to landing when airspeeds
are slow.
A horizontal wind shear is a sudden change in wind direction
or speed that can, for example. transform a headwind into a
tailwind, producing a sudden decrease in indicated airspeed
because of the inertia of the airplane. A vertical wind shear,
is a sudden updraft or downdraft. Microbursts are intense,
highly localized severe downdrafts.
The prediction of wind shears is far from an exact science.
Monitor your airspeed carefully when flying near storms,
particularly on approach. Be mentally prepared to add power
and go around at the first indication that a wind shear is
being encountered.
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FLIGHT IN ICING CONDITIONS
Every pilot should be intimately acquainted with the FAA
Approved National Weather Service definitions for ice intensity and accumulation which we have reprinted below:
Intensity
Ice Accumulation
Trace
Ice becomes perceptible. Rate of
accumulation slightly greater than rate
of sublimation. It is not hazardous
even though deicing/anti-icing equipment is not utilized, unless encountered for an extended period of time
(over 1 hour).
Light
The rate of accumulation may create a
problem if flight is prolonged in this
environment (over 1 hour). Occasional
use of deicing/anti-icing equipment
removes/prevents accumulation. It
does not present a problem if the
deicing/anti-icing equipment is used.
Moderate
The rate of accumulation is such that
even short encounters become potentially hazardous and use of deicing/
anti-icing equipment or diversion is
necessary.
Severe
The rate of accumulation is such that
deicing/anti-icing equipment fails to
reduce or control the hazard. Immediate diversion is necessary.
It is no longer unusual to find deicing and anti-icing equipment on a wide range of airplane sizes and types. Since the
capability of this equipment varies, it becomes the pilot's primary responsibility to understand limitations which restrict
the use of his airplane in icing conditions and the conditions
which may exceed the systems capacity.
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Pilots and airplane owners must carefully review the Pilot's
Operating Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight
Manual in order to ascertain the required operable equipment needed for flight in icing conditions. In addition, they
must ascertain from the same source the limits of approval
or certification of their airplane for flight in icing conditions,
and plan the flight accordingly, if icing conditions are known
or forecast along the route.
Every owner and pilot of an airplane should understand that
it is not uncommon to find airplanes equipped with less than
the full complement of available systems and equipment.
For example, propellers and pitot tube may be protected, but
the airplane may not have wing boots or tail boots. The
reverse might be true. Windshield, pitot and airfoil surfaces
might be protected, but the propellers might not be. Before
undertaking any flight into areas where icing conditions
might be expected, inspect the airplane and review the
Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane
Flight Manual to be certain that you are supported by the full
complement of required IFR and deicing/anti-icing equipment.
Remember that regardless of its combination of deicinglantiicing equipment, any airplane not fully equipped and functional for IFR flight is not properly equipped for flight in icing
conditions. An airplane which is not approved or certificated
for flight in icing conditions, or which does not have all critical areas protected in the required manner by fully operational anti-icing equipment must not be exposed to icing
encounters of any intensity. When icing is detected, the pilot
of such an airplane must make an immediate diversion by
flying out of the area of visible moisture or going to an altitude where icing is not encountered.
Some models of Beech airplanes were approved for flight in
certain limited icing conditions under the FAA's Bureau of
Flight Standards Release No. 434. Under this release, properly equipped airplanes are approved for flight in light to
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Section X
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moderate icing conditions only. Refer to Sections 2 and 4 of
the above document for icing limitations. These airplanes
are not approved for extended flight in moderate icing conditions or flights in any severe icing conditions. Flight in
these conditions must be avoided.
Even airplanes fully equipped and certified for flight in the
icing conditions described in Appendix C to FAR Part 25
must avoid flights into those conditions defined by the
National Weather Service as "Severe". The National
Weather Service definition of "Severe Icing" describes that
conditions as: "the rate of accumulation is such that deicing/
anti-icing equipment fails to reduce or control the hazard."
No airplane equipped with any combination of deicing/antiicing equipment can be expected to cope with such conditions. As competent pilots know, there appears to be no
predictable limits for the severest weather conditions. For
essentially the same reasons that airplanes, however
designed or equipped for IFR flight, cannot be flown safely
into conditions such as thunderstorms, tornadoes, hurricanes or other phenomena likely to produce severe turbulence, airplanes equipped for flight in icing conditions cannot
be expected to cope with "Severe" icing conditions as
defined by the National Weather Service. The prudent pilot
must remain alert to the possibility that icing conditions may
become "severe" and that his equipment will not cope with
them. At the first indication that such condition may have
been encountered or may lie ahead, he should immediately
react by selecting the most expeditious and safe course for
diversion.
Every pilot of a properly fully-equipped Beech airplane who
ventures into icing conditions must maintain the minimum
speed (KIAS) for operation in icing conditions, which is set
forth in the Normal Procedures section, and in the Limitations section, of his Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA
Approved Airplane Flight Manual. If a minimum speed for
flight in icing conditions is not specified in the manual, the
following minimum indicated airspeeds must be maintained:
May, 1994
10·33
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All Baron and Travel Air Models - 130 KIAS
All other BEECHCRAFT twin-engine models - 140 KIAS
The pilot must remain aware of the fact that if he allows his
airspeed to deteriorate below this minimum speed, he will
increase the angle of attack of his airplane to the point
where ice may build up on the under side of the wings aft of
the area protected by the boots.
The fact or extent of ice build-up in unprotected areas will
not be directly observable from the cockpit. Due to distortion
of the wing airfoil, increased drag and reduced lift, stalling
speeds will increase as ice accumulates on the airplane. For
the same reasons, stall warning devices are not accurate
and cannot be relied upon in icing conditions.
Even though the pilot maintains the prescribed minimum
speeds for operating in icing conditions, ice is still likely to
build up on the unprotected areas (the fuselage and unprotected wing leading edge inboard of the engine nacelle).
Under some atmospheric conditions, it may even build up aft
of the boots despite the maintenance of the prescribed rnlnlmum speed. The effect of ice accumulation on any unprotected surface is aggravated by length of exposure to the
icing conditions. Ice buildup on unprotected surfaces will
increase drag, add weight, reduce lift, and generally,
adversely affect the aerodynamic characteristics and performance of the airplane. It can progress to the point where the
airplane is no longer capable of flying. Therefore, the pilot
operating even a fUlly-equipped airplane in sustained icing
conditions must remain sensitive to any indication, such as
observed ice accumulation, loss of airspeed, the need for
increased power, reduced rate of climb, or sluggish
response, that ice is accumulating on unprotected surfaces
and that continued flight in these conditions is extremely
hazardous, regardless of the performance of the deicing!
anti-icing equipment.
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May, 1994
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Since flight in icing conditions is not an everyday occurrenee, it is important that pilots maintain a proper proficiency
and awareness of the operating procedures necessary for
safe operation of the airplane and that the airplane is in a
condition for safe operation.
Ensure moisture drains in the airplane structure are maintained open as specified in the Aircraft Maintenance Manual,
so that moisture will not collect and cause freezing in the
control cable area. Also, control surface tab hinges should
be maintained and lubricated as specified in the Aircraft
Maintenance Manual.
In icing conditions the autopilot should be disengaged at an
altitude sufficient to permit the pilot to gain the feel of the
airplane prior to landing. In no case should this be less than
the minimum altitude specified in the Autopilot Airplane
Flight Manual Supplement.
Observe the procedures set forth in your Pilot's Operating
Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual during
operation in icing conditions.
Activate your deice and anti-icing systems before entering
an area of moisture where you are likely to go through a
freezing level, to make sure all necessary equipment is
operative.
Rapid cycling of deice boots or cycling before at least onehalf inch (1/2") of ice has accumulated (measured in the
chordwise direction or forward from the leading edge), may
cause the ice to grow outside the contour of the inflated
boots and prevent ice removal.
For any owner or pilot whose use pattern for an airplane
exposes it to icing encounters, the following references are
required reading for safe flying:
• The airplane's Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA
May, 1994
10-35
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Approved Airplane Flight Manual, especially the sections on Normal Procedures, Emergency Procedures,
Abnormal Procedures, Systems, and Safety Information.
• FAA Advisory Circulars 91-51 Airplane Deice and Antiice Systems
• FAA Advisory Circulars 135-9 :- Icing Limitations
• Weather Flying by Robert N. Buck.
Finally, the most important ingredients to safe flight in icing
conditions - regardless of the airplane or the combination of
deicing/anti-icing equipment - are a complete and current
weather briefing, sound pilot judgement, close attention to
the rate and type of ice accumulations, and the knowledge
that "severe icing" as defined by the National Weather Service is beyond the capability of modern airplanes and immediate diversion must be made. It is the inexperienced or
uneducated pilot who presses on "regardless", hoping that
steadily worsening conditions will improve, only to find himself flying an airplane which has become so loaded with ice
that he can no longer maintain altitude. At this point he has
lost most, if not all, of his safety options, including perhaps a
180 degree turn to return along the course already traveled.
The responsible and well-informed pilot recognizes the limitations of weather conditions, his airplane and its systems,
and reacts promptly.
WEATHER RADAR
Airborne weather avoidance radar is, as its name implies,
for avoiding severe weather--not for penetrating it. Whether
to fly into an area of radar echoes depends on echo intensity and shape, spacing between the echoes, and the capabilities of you and your airplane. Remember that weather
radar detects only precipitation drops. Therefore, the radar
scope provides no assurance of avoiding turbulence. The
radar scope also does not provide assurance of avoiding
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instrument weather from clouds and fog. Your scope may be
clear between intense echoes; this clear area does not necessarily mean you can fly between the storms and maintain
visual sighting of them.
Thunderstorms build and dissipate rapidly. Therefore, do not
attempt to plan a course between echoes using ground
based radar. The best use of ground radar information is to
isolate general areas and coverage of echoes. You must
avoid individual storms from in-flight observations either by
visual sighting or by airborne radar. It is better to avoid the
whole thunderstorm area than to detour around individual
storms unless they are scattered.
Remember that while hail always gives a radar echo, it may
fall several miles from the nearest visible cloud and hazardous turbulence may extend to as much as 20 miles from the
echo edge. The intensity of the radar echo from hail varies
with the size and nature of the hailstone. A hailstone with a
wet surface gives a strong radar return while a dry hailstone
gives a relatively weak return. Avoid intense or extreme
level echoes by at least 20 miles; that is, such echoes
should be separated by at least 40 miles before you fly
between them. With weaker echoes you can reduce the distance by which you avoid them.
Above all, remember this: never regard any thunderstorm
lightly. Even when radar observers report the echoes are of
light intensity, avoiding thunderstorms is the best policy. The
following are some do's and don'ts of thunderstorm avoidance:
1. Don't land or take off in the face of an approaching
thunderstorm. A sudden gust front of low level turbulence could cause loss of control.
2. Don't attempt to fly under a thunderstorm even if you
can see through to the other side. Turbulence and wind
shear under the storm could be disastrous.
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3. Don't fly without airborne radar into a cloud mass containing scattered embedded thunderstorms. Embedded
thunderstorms usually can not be visually circumnavigated.
4. Don't trust visual appearance to be a reliable indicator
of the turbulence inside a thunderstorm.
5. Do avoid by at least 20 miles any thunderstorm identified as severe or giving an intense radar echo. This is
especially true under the anvil of a large cumulonimbus.
6. Do circumnavigate the entire area if the area has 6/10
or greater thunderstorm coverage.
7. Do remember that vivid and frequent lightning indicates
the probability of a severe thunderstorm.
8. Do regard as extremely hazardous any thunderstorm
with tops 35,000 feet or higher, whether the top is visually sighted or determined by radar.
If you cannot avoid penetrating a thunderstorm, the following are some do's BEFORE entering the storm:
9. Tighten your safety belt, put on your shoulder harness,
and secure all loose objects.
10. Plan and hold your course to take you through the
storm in minimum time.
11. To avoid the most critical icing, establish a penetration
altitude below the freezing level or above the level of
-15°C.
12. Verify that pitot heat is on and turn on carburetor heat
or engine anti-ice. Icing can be rapid at any altitude and
cause almost instantaneous power failure and/or loss of
airspeed indication.
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MOUNTAIN FL YING
Pilots flying in mountainous areas should inform themselves
of all aspects of mountain flying, including the effects of topographic features on weather conditions. Many good articles
have been published, and a synopsis of mountain flying
operations is included in the FAA Airman's Information Manual, Part 1.
Avoid flight at low altitudes over mountainous terrain, particularly near the lee slopes. If the wind velocity near the
level of the ridge is in excess of 25 knots and approximately
perpendicular to the ridge, mountain wave conditions are
likely over and near the lee slopes. If the wind velocity at the
level of the ridge exceeds 50 knots, a strong mountain wave
is probable with extreme up and down drafts and severe turbulence. The worst turbulence will be encountered in and
below the rotor zone, which is usually 8 to 10 miles downwind from the ridge. This zone is sometimes characterized
by the presence of "roll clouds" if sufficient moisture is
present; altocumulus standing lenticular clouds are also visible signs that a mountain wave exists, but their presence is
likewise dependent on moisture. Mountain wave turbulence
can, of course, occur in dry air and the absence of such
clouds should not be taken as assurance that mountain
wave turbulence will not be encountered. A mountain wave
downdraft may exceed the climb capability of your airplane.
Avoid mountain wave downdrafts.
VFR - LOW CEILINGS
If you are not instrument rated, do not attempt "VFR on Top"
or "Special VFR" flight or clearances. Being caught above a
solid cloud layer when an emergency descent is required (or
at destination) is an extremely hazardous position for the
VFR pilot. Accepting a clearance out of airport control zones
with no minimum ceiling and one-mile visibility as permitted
with "Special VFR" is a foolish practice for the VFR pilot.
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Avoid areas of low ceilings and restricted visibility unless
you are instrument rated and proficient and have an instrument equipped airplane. Then proceed with caution and with
planned alternates.
VFR AT NIGHT
When flying VFR at night, in addition to the altitude appropriate for the direction of flight, pilots should maintain a safe
minimum altitude as dictated by terrain, obstacles such as
TV towers, or communities in the area flown. This is especially true in mountainous terrain, where there is usually very
little ground reference. Minimum clearance is 2,000 feet
above the highest obstacle en route. Do not depend on your
ability to see obstacles in time to miss them. Flight on dark
nights over sparsely populated country can be the same as
IFR, and must be avoided by inexperienced or non-IFR
rated pilots.
VERTIGO - DISORIENTATION
Disorientation can occur in a variety of ways. During flight,
inner ear balancing mechanisms are subjected to varied
forces not normally experienced on the ground. This, combined with loss of outside visual reference, can cause vertigo. False interpretations (illusions) result, and may confuse
the pilot's conception of the attitude and position of his airplane.
Under VFR conditions, the visual sense, using the horizon
as a reference, can override the illusions. Under low visibility conditions (night, fog, clouds, haze, etc.) the illusions predominate. Only through awareness of these illusions, and
proficiency in instrument flight procedures, can an airplane
be operated safely in a low visibility environment.
Flying in fog, dense haze or dust, cloud banks, or very low
visibility, with strobe lights or rotating beacons turned on can
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Section X
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contribute to vertigo. They should be turned off in these
conditions, particularly at night.
All pilot's should check the weather and use good judgment
in planning flights. The VFR pilot should use extra caution in
avoiding low visibility conditions.
Motion sickness often precedes or accompanies disorientation and may further jeopardize the flight.
Disorientation in low visibility conditions is not limited to VFR
pilots. Although IFR pilots are trained to look at their instruments to gain an artificial visual reference as a replacement
for the loss of a visual horizon, they do not always do so.
This can happen when the pilot's physical condition will not
permit him to concentrate on his instruments; when the pilot
is not proficient in flying instrument conditions in the airplane
he is flying; or, when the pilot's work load of flying by reference to his instruments is augmented by such factors as
turbulence. Even an instrument rated pilot encountering
instrument conditions, intentional or unintentional, should
ask himself whether or not he is sufficiently alert and proficient in the airplane he is flying, to fly under low visibility
conditions and in the turbulence anticipated or encountered.
If any doubt exists, the flight should not be made or it should
be discontinued as soon as possible.
The result of vertigo is loss of control of the airplane. If the
loss of control is sustained, it will result in an excessive
speed accident. Excessive speed accidents occur in one of
two manners, either as an inflight airframe separation or as
a high speed ground impact; and they are fatal accidents in
either case. All airplanes are subject to this form of accident.
For years, Beech Pilot's Operating Handbooks and FAA
Approved Airplane Flight Manuals have contained instructions that the landing gear should be extended in any circumstance in which the pilot encounters IFR conditions
May, 1994
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Twin Engine (Piston)
which approach the limits of his capability or his ratings.
Lowering the gear in IFR conditions or flight into heavy or
severe turbulence, tends to stabilize the airplane, assists in
maintaining proper airspeed, and will substantially reduce
the possibility of reaching excessive airspeeds with catastrophic consequences, even where loss of control is experienced.
Excessive speed accidents occur at airspeeds greatly in
excess of two operating limitations which are specified in the
manuals: Maximum maneuvering speed and the "red line"
or maximum operating speed. Such speed limits are set to
protect the structure of an airplane. For example, flight controls are designed to be used to their fullest extent only
below the airplane's maximum maneuvering speed. As a
result, the control surfaces should never be suddenly or fully
deflected above maximum maneuvering speed. Turbulence
penetration should not be performed above that speed. The
accidents we are discussing here occur at airspeeds greatly
in excess of these limitations. No airplane should ever be
flown beyond its FAA approved operating limitations.
FLIGHT OF MUL TI-ENGINE AIRPLANES WITH
ONE ENGINE INOPERATIVE
The major difference between flying a twin-engine and
single-engine airplane is knowing how to manage the flight
if one engine loses power for any reason. Safe flight with
one engine inoperative requires an understanding of the
basic aerodynamics involved - as well as proficiency in engine out procedures.
Loss of power from one engine affects both climb performance and controllability of twin-engine airplanes. Climb
performance depends on an excess of power over that
required for level flight. Loss of power from one engine obviously represents a 50% loss of horsepower but, in virtually
all twin-engine airplanes, climb performance is reduced by
at least 80%. A study of the charts in your Pilot's Operating
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Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual will
confirm this fact. Single-engine climb performance depends
on four factors:
Airspeed
too little, or too much, will decrease
climb performance
Drag
gear, flaps, cowl flaps, prop, and
speed
Power
amount available in excess of that
needed for level flight
Weight
passengers, baggage, and fuel load
greatly affect climb performance
Loss of power on one engine creates yaw due to asymmetric thrust. Yaw forces must be balanced with the rudder.
Loss of power on one engine also reduces airflow over the
wing causing a roll toward the "dead" engine which must be
balanced with the aileron. The net result of these forces
cause the airplane to sideslip slightly toward the dead engine. This sideslip may be balanced by banking slightly (up to
5°) into the operating engine.
In the event of an engine failure with the
main tanks less than one-quarter full, corrective action must be taken immediately to prevent large yaw angles from developing and
causing stoppage of the remaining engine.
Airspeed is the key to safe single engine operations. For
most twin-engine airplanes there is:
May, 1994
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Twin Engine (Piston)
Symbol
Description
VMCA
Airspeed below which directional control cannot be maintained
VSSE
Airspeed below which an intentional
engine cut should never be made
VYSE
Airspeed that will give the best single
engine rate-of-climb (or the slowest
loss of altitude)
VXSE
Airspeed that will give the steepest
angle-of-climb with one engine out
AIR MINIMUM CONTROL SPEED (VMCA)
VMCA is designated by the red radial on the airspeed indicator and indicates the minimum control speed, airborne at
sea level. YMCA is determined by FAA regulations as the
minimum airspeed at which it is possible to recover directional control of the airplane within 20 degrees heading
change, and thereafter maintain straight flight, with not more
than 5 degrees of bank if one engine fails suddenly with:
• Takeoff power on both engines
• Rearmost allowable center of gravity
• Flaps in takeoff position
• Propeller windmilling in takeoff pitch configuration
However, sudden engine failures rarely occur with all factors
listed above, and therefore, the actual VMCA in any particular situation may be a little slower than the red radial on the
airspeed indicator. Most airplanes with an inoperative engine will not maintain level flight at maximum power at speeds
at or near YMCA. Consequently, it is not advisable to fly at
speeds approaching VMCA, except in training situations or
during flight tests. Adhering to the practice of never flying at
or below the published VMCA speed for your airplane does
not eliminate loss of directional control as a problem in the
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event of an engine failure. The pilot must be prepared to use
assertive control input to maintain airplane control following
an engine failure.
INTENTiONAL ONE-ENGiNE INOPERATIVE
SPEED (VSSE)
is specified by the airplane manufacturer and is the
minimum speed at which to perform intentional engine cuts.
Use of VSSE is intended to reduce the accident potential
from loss of control after engine cuts at or near minimum
control speed. VMCA demonstrations are necessary in training but should only be made at safe altitude above the terrain and with power reduction on one engine made at or
above VSSE.
VSSE
ONE-ENGiNE-INOPERATIVE BEST
RATE-OF-CLIMB SPEED (VYSE)
VYSE is designated by the blue radial on the airspeed indicator. VYSE delivers the greatest gain in altitude in the shortest possible time, and is based on the following criteria:
• Critical engine inoperative, and its propeller in the minimum drag position.
• Operating engine set at not more than the maximum
continuous power.
• Landing gear retracted.
• Wing flaps up.
• Cowl flaps as required for engine cooling.
.• Airplanes flown at recommended bank angle (up to 50
into operating engine).
Drag caused by a windmilling propeller, extending landing
gear, or flaps in the landing position, will severely degrade
or destroy single engine climb performance. Since climb
MaYJ 1994
10-45
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Cikechcmft
Twin Engine (Piston)
performance varies widely with type of airplane, weight, temperature, altitude, and airplane configuration, the climb gradient (altitude gain or loss per mile) may be marginal - or
even negative - under some conditions. Study the Pilot's
Operating Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight
Manual for your airplane and know what performance to
expect with one engine out.
ONE-ENGINE-INOPERA TIVE BEST
ANGLE-OF-CLIMB SPEED (VXSE)
VXSE is used only to clear obstructions during initial climbout as it ,gives the greatest altitude gain per unit of horizontal distance. It provides less engine cooling and requires
more rudder control input than VYSE.
SINGLE ENGINE SERVICE CEILING
The single engine service ceiling is the maximum altitude at
which an airplane will climb at a rate of at least 50 feet per
minute in smooth air, with one engine inoperative.
The single engine service ceiling chart should be used during flight planning to determine whether the airplane, as
loaded, can maintain the Minimum En Route Altitude (MEA)
if IFR, or terrain clearance if VFR, following an engine failure.
BASIC SINGLE ENGINE PROCEDURES
Know and follow, to the letter, the single-engine emergency
procedures specified in your Pilot's Operating Handbook
and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual for your specific
make and model airplane. However, the basic fundamentals
of all the procedures are as follows:
1. Maintain airplane control and airspeed at all times.
THIS IS CARDINAL RULE NUMBER ONE.
2. Usually, apply maximum power to the operating engine.
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However, if the engine failure occurs at a speed below
VMCA, during cruise or in a steep turn, you may elect to
use only enough power to maintain a safe speed and
altitude. If the failure occurs on final approach, use
power only as necessary to complete the landing.
3. Reduce drag to an absolute minimum.
4. Secure the failed engine and related sub-systems.
The first three steps should be done promptly and from
memory. The check list should then be consulted to be sure
that the inoperative engine is secured properly and that the
appropriate switches are placed in the correct position. The
airplane must be banked about 5° into the operating engine,
with the "slip/skid" ball slightly out of center toward the operating engine, to achieve rated performance.
Another note of caution: Be sure to identify the dead engine, positively, before securing it. Remember: First identify
the suspected engine (Le., "Dead foot means dead engine"), second, verify with cautious throttle movement, then
secure.
ENGINE FAILURE ON TAKEOFF
If an engine fails before attaining lift-off speed or below
the only proper action is to discontinue the takeoff. If
the engine fails after lift-off with the landing gear still down,
the takeoff should still be discontinued if touchdown and
roll-out on the remaining runway is still possible.
YMCA,
If you do find yourself in a position of not being able to climb,
it is much better to reduce the power on the good engine
and land straight ahead than try to force a climb and lose
control.
Your Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual contains charts that are used in calculating the runway length required to stop if the engine fails
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before reaching lift-off speed and also has charts showing
the singleaengine performance after lift-off.
Study your charts carefully. No airplane is capable of climbing out on one engine under all weight, pressure altitude,
and temperature conditions. Know, before you take the
actual runway, whether you can maintain control and climb
out if you lose an engine while the gear is still down. It may
be necessary to off-load some weight, or wait for more
favorable temperatures.
WHEN TO FLY Vx, Vy, VXSE AND VYSE
During normal two-engine operations, always fly Vy (Vx if
necessary for obstacle clearance) on initial climb out. Then,
accelerate to your cruise climb airspeed, which may be Vy
plus 10 or 15 knots after you have obtained a safe altitude.
Use of cruise climb airspeed will give you better engine cooling, increased inflight visibility and better fuel economy.
However, at first indication of an engine failure during climb
out, or while on approach, establish VYSE or VXSE, whichever is appropriate. (Consult your Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual for speciflcs.)
STALLS, SLOW FLIGHT AND TRAINING
The stall warning system must be kept operational at all
times and must not be deactivated by interruption of circuits,
circuit breakers, or fuses. Compliance with this requirement
is especially important in all high performance multi-engine
airplanes during engine-out practice or stall demonstrations,
because the stall speed is critical in all low speed operations
of high-performance airplanes.
Training should be accomplished under the supervision of a
qualified instructor-pilot, with careful reference to the applicable sections of the FAA Practical Test Standards and FAA
Pilot Transition Courses for Complex Single Engine and
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Light Twin Engine Airplanes (AC61-9B). In particular,
observe carefully the warnings in the Practical Test Standards.
The single-engine stall speed of a twin-engine airplane is
generally slightly below the power off (engines idle) stall
speed, for a given weight condition. Single-engine stalls
should not be conducted in multi-engine airplanes by other
than qualified engineering test pilots.
Ymca
~
STALL
FIRST
SPEED
w
o
~
rH
t-
-.J
«
W
0:::
~
(fJ
(fJ
W
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0..
INDICATED AIRSPEED
RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN STALL SPEED AND
Ymca FOR AIRCRAFT WITH NORMALLY
ASPIRATED ENGINES.
C93THOOCOl04
Engine-out minimum control speed generally decreases with
altitude, while the single engine stall speed remains approximately constant for normally aspirated engines. No such
demonstration should be attempted when the altitude and
temperature are such that the engine-out minimum control
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speed is known, or discovered to be, close to the stalling
speed. Loss of directional or lateral control, just as a stall
occurs, is potentially hazardous.
the airspeed below which an engine should not be
intentionally rendered inoperative for practice purposes, was
established because of the apparent practice of some pilots,
instructors, and examiners, of irrtentionally rendering an
engine inoperative at a time when the airplane is being operated at a speed close to, or below the power-idle stall
speed. Unless the pilot takes immediate and proper corrective action under such circumstances, it is possible to enter
an inadvertent spin.
VSSE,
It is recognized that flight below VSSE with one engine inoperative, or simulated inoperative, may be required for conditions such as practice demonstration of YMCA for multiengine pilot certification. Refer to the procedure set forth in
the Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane
Flight Manual for your airplane. This procedure calls for
simulating one engine inoperative by reducing the power
level (throttle) on one engine to idle while operating at an
airspeed above VSSE. Power on the other engine is set at
maximum, then airspeed is reduced at approximately one
knot per second until either YMCA or stall warning is
obtained. During this transition, rudder should be used to
maintain directional control, and ailerons should be used to
maintain a 5° bank toward the operative engine. At the first
sign of either YMCA or stall warning (which may be evidenced by inability to maintain longitudinal, lateral or dlrectional control, aerodynamic stall buffet, or stall warning horn
sound), recovery must be initiated immediately by reducing
power to idle on operative engine and lowering the nose to
regain VSSE. Resume normal flight. This entire procedure
should be used at a safe altitude of at least 5,000 feet above
the ground in clear air only.
If stall warning is detected prior to the first sign of VMCA, an
enqine-out minimum control speed demonstration cannot be
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accomplished under the existing gross weight conditions
and should not be attempted.
SPINS
A major cause of fatal accidents in general aviation airplanes is a spin. Stall demonstrations and practice are a
means for a pilot to acquire the skills to recognize when a
stall is about to occur and to recover as soon as the first
signs of a stall are evident.
If a stall does not occur A spin cannot occur. It is
important to remember however, that a stall can occur in
any flight attitude, at any airspeed, if controls are misused.
>
Unless your airplane has been specifically certificated in the
aerobatic category and specifically tested for spin recovery
characteristics, it is placarded against intentional spins. The
pilot of an airplane placarded against intentional spins
should assume that the airplane may become uncontrollable
in a spin, since its performance characteristics beyond certain limits specified in the FAA regulations may not have
been tested and are unknown. This is why airplanes are
placarded against intentional spins, and this is why stall
avoidance is your protection against an inadvertent spin.
Pilots are taught that intentional spins are entered by deliberately inducing a yawing moment with the controls as the
airplane is stalled. Inadvertent spins result from the same
combination - stall plus yaw. That is why it is important to
use coordinated controls and to recover at the first indication
of a stall when practicing stalls.
In any twin engine airplane, fundamental aerodynamics dictate that if the airplane is allowed to become fully stalled
while one engine is providing litt-producing thrust, the yawing moment which can induce a spin will be present. Consequently, it is important to immediately reduce power on the
operating engine, lower the nose to reduce the angle of
attack, and increase the airspeed to recover from the stall.
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In any twin engine airplane, if application of stall recovery
controls is delayed, a rapid rolling and yawing motion may
develop, even against full aileron and rudder, resulting in the
airplane becoming inverted during the onset of a spinning
motion. Once the airplane has been permitted to progress
beyond the stall and is allowed to reach the rapid rolling and
yawing condition, the pilot must then immediately initiate the
generally accepted spin recovery procedure for mUlti-engine
airplanes, which is as follows:
Immediately move the control column full forward, apply full
rudder opposite to the direction of the spin and reduce
power on both engines to idle. These three actions should
be done as near simultaneously as possible; then continue
to hold this control position until rotation stops, then neutralize all controls and execute a smooth pullout. Ailerons
should be neutral during recovery. THE LONGER THE
PILOT DELAYS BEFORE TAKING CORRECTIVE ACTION,
THE MORE DIFFICULT RECOVERY WILL BECOME.
Always remember that extra alertness and pilot techniques
are required for slow flight maneuvers, including the practice
or demonstration of stalls or YMCA. In addition to the foregoing mandatory procedure, always:
• Be certain that the center of gravity of the airplane is as
far forward as possible. Forward C.G. aids stall recovery, spin avoidance and spin recovery. An aft e.G. can
create a tendency for a spin to stabilize, which delays
recovery.
• Whenever a student pilot will be required to practice
slow flight or single-engine maneuvers, be certain that
the qualified instructor pilot has a full set of operable
controls available. FAA regulations prohibit flight
instruction without full dual controls.
• Conduct any maneuvers which could possibly result in
a spin at altitudes in excess of five thousand (5,000)
feet above ground level in clear air only.
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• Remember that an airplane, at or near traffic pattern
and approach altitudes, cannot recover from a spin, or
perhaps even a stall, before impact with the ground. For
twin engine airplanes, when descending to traffic altitude and during pattern entry and all other flight operations, maintain speed no lower than VSSE. On final final
approach maintain at least the airspeed shown in the
flight manual. Should a go-around be required, do not
apply more power than necessary until the airplane has
accelerated to VSSE. Recognize that under some conditions of weight, density altitude, and airplane configuration, a twin engine airplane cannot climb or accelerate
on a single engine. Hence a single engine go-around is
impossible and the airplane is committed to a landing.
Plan your approach accordingly.
• Remember that if an airplane flown under instrument
conditions is permitted to stall or enter a spin, the pilot,
without reference to the horizon, is certain to become
disoriented. He may be unable to recognize a stall, spin
entry, or the spin condition and he may be unable to
determine even the direction of the rotation.
• Finally, never forget that stall avoidance is your best
protection against an inadvertent spin. MAINTAIN
YOUR AIRSPEED.
DESCENT
In twin engine piston-powered airplanes, supercharged or
normally aspirated, it is necessary to avoid prolonged
descents with low power, as this produces two problems: (1)
excessively cool cylinder head temperatures which cause
premature engine wear, and (2) excessively rich mixtures
due to idle enrichment (and altitude) which causes soot and
lead deposits on the spark plugs (fouling). The second of
these is the more serious consideration; the engine may not
respond to the throttle when it is desired to discontinue the
descent. Both problems are amenable to one solution: maintain adequate power to keep cylinder head temperatures in
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Twin Engine (Piston)
the "green" range during descent, and lean to best power
mixture (that is, progressively enrich the mixture from cruise
only slightly as altitude decreases). This procedure will
lengthen the descent, of course, and requires some
advance planning. If it is necessary to make a prolonged
descent at or near idle, as in practicing forced landings, at
least avoid the problem of fouled spark plugs by frequently
advancing the throttle until the engine runs smoothly, and
maintain an appropriate mixture setting with altitude. (Refer
to pre-landing check list.)
VORTICES - WAKE TURBULENCE
Every airplane generates wakes of turbulence while in flight.
Part of this is from the propeller or jet engine, and part from
the wing tip vortices. The larger and heavier the airplane,
the more pronoun.ced and turbulent the wakes will be. Wing
tip vortices from large, heavy airplanes are very severe at
close range, degenerating with time, wind and distance.
These are rolling in nature, from each wing tip. In tests, vortex velocities of 133 knots have been recorded. Encountering the rolling effect of wing tip vortices within two minutes
after passage of large airplanes is most hazardous to light
airplanes. This roll effect can exceed the maximum counterroll obtainable in a light airplane. The turbulent areas may
remain for as long as three minutes or more, depending on
wind conditions, and may extend several miles behind the
airplane. Plan to fly slightly above and to the windward side
of other airplanes. Because of the wide variety of conditions
that can be encountered, there is no set rule to follow to
avoid wake turbulence in all situations. However, the Airman's Information Manual, and to a greater extent Advisory
Circular 90-23, Aircraft Wake Turbulence, provide a thorough discussion of the factors you should be aware of when
wake turbulence may be encountered.
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TAKEOFF AND LANDING CONDITIONS
When taking off on runways covered with water or freezing
slush, the landing gear should remain extended for approximately ten seconds longer than normal, allowing the wheels
to sp.in and dissipate the freezing moisture. The landing gear
should then be cycled up, then down, wait approximately
five seconds and then retracted again. Caution must be
exercised to insure that the entire operation is performed
below Maximum Landing Gear Operating Airspeed.
Use caution when landing on runways that are covered by
water or slush which cause hydroplaning (aquaplaning), a
phenomenon that renders braking and steering ineffective
because of the lack of sufficient surface friction. Snow and
ice covered runways are also hazardous. The pilot should
also be alert to the possibility of the brakes freezing.
Use caution when taking off or landing during gusty wind
conditions. Also be aware of the special wind conditions
caused by buildings or other obstructions located near the
runway.
MEDICAL FACTS FOR PILOTS
GENERAL
When the pilot enters the airplane, he becomes an integral
part of the man-machine system. He is just as essential to a
successful flight as the control surfaces. To ignore the pilot
in preflight planning would be as senseless as failing to
inspect the integrity of the control surfaces or any other vital
part of the machine. The pilot has the responsibility for
determining his reliability prior to entering the airplane for
flight. When piloting an airplane, an individual should be free
of conditions which are harmful to alertness, ability to make
correct decisions, and rapid reaction time.
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FATIGUE
Fatigue generally slows reaction time and causes errors due
to inattention. In addition to the most common cause of
fatigue; insufficient rest and loss of sleep, the pressures of
business, financial worries, and family problems can be
important contributing factors. If you are tired, don't fly.
HYPOXIA
Hypoxia, in simple terms, is a lack of sufficient oxygen to
keep the brain and other body tissues functioning properly.
There is a wide individual variation in susceptibility to hypoxia. In addition to progressively insufficient oxygen at
higher altitudes, anything interfering with the blood's ability
to carry oxygen can contribute to hypoxia (anemias, carbon
monoxide, and certain drugs). Also, alcohol and various
drugs decrease the brain's tolerance to hypoxia.
Your body has no built-in alarm system to let you know
when you are not getting enough oxygen. It is impossible to
predict when or where hypoxia will occur during a given
flight, or how it will manifest itself. Some of the common
symptoms of hypoxia are increased breathing rate, a Iightheaded or dizzy sensation, tingling or warm sensation,
sweating, reduced visual field, sleepiness, blue coloring of
skin, fingernails, and lips, and behavior changes. A particularly dangerous feature of hypoxia is an increased sense of
well-being, called euphoria. It obscures a person's ability
and desire to be critical of himself, slows reaction time, and
impairs thinking ability. Consequently, a hypoxic individual
commonly believes things are getting progressively better
while he nears total collapse.
The symptoms are slow but progressive, insidious in onset,
and are most marked at altitudes starting above ten thousand feet. Night vision, however, can be impaired starting at
an altitude of 5,000 feet. Persons who have recently overindulged in alcohol, who are moderate to heavy smokers, or
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who take certain drugs, may be more susceptible to hypoxia. Susceptibility may also vary in the same individual
from day to day or even morning to evening. Use oxygen on
flights above 10,000 feet and at any time when symptoms
appear.
Depending upon altitude, a hypoxic individual has a limited
time to make decisions and perform useful acts, even
though he may remain conscious for a longer period. If pressurization equipment fails at certain altitudes the pilot and
passengers have only a certain amount of time to get an
oxygen mask on before they exceed their time of useful
consciousness. The time of useful consciousness is
approximately 3-5 rnlnutes at 25,000 feet of altitude for the
average individual and diminishes markedly as altitude
increases. At 30,000 feet altitude, for example, the time of
useful consciousness is approximately 1-2 minutes. Therefore. in the event of depressurization, oxygen masks should
be used immediately.
Should symptoms occur that cannot definitely be identified
as either hypoxia or hyperventilation, try three or four deep
breaths of oxygen. The symptoms should improve markedly
if the condition was hypoxia (recovery from hypoxia is rapid).
Pilots who fly to altitudes that require or may require the use
of supplemental oxygen should be thoroughly familiar with
the operation of the airplane oxygen systems. A preflight
inspection of the system should be performed, including
proper fit of the mask. The passengers should be briefed on
the proper use of their oxygen system before flight.
Pilots who wear beards should be careful to ensure that
their beard is carefully trimmed so that it will not interfere
with proper sealing of the oxygen masks. If you wear a
beard or moustache, test the fit of your oxygen mask on the
ground for proper sealing. Studies conducted by the military
and oxygen equipment manufacturers conclude that oxygen
masks do not seal over beards or heavy facial hair.
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Federal Aviation Regulations related to the use of supplemental oxygen by flight crew and passengers must be
adhered to if flight to higher altitudes is to be accomplished
safely. Passengers with significant circulatory or lung disease may need to use supplemental oxygen at lower altitudes than specified by these regulations.
Pilots of pressurized airplanes should receive physiological
training with emphasis on hypoxia and the use of oxygen
and oxygen systems. Pilots of airplanes with pressure
demand oxygen systems should undergo training, experience altitude chamber decompression, and be familiar with
pressure breathing before flying at high altitude. This training is available throughout the United States at nominal
cost. Information regarding this training may be obtained by
request from the Chief, Civil Aeromedical Institute, Attention:
Aeromedical Education Branch, AAC-140, Mike Monroney
Aeronautical Center, P. O. Box 25082, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73125
HYPERVENTILA TION
Hyperventilation, or overbreathing, is a disturbance of respiration that may occur in individuals as a result of emotional
tension or anxiety. Under conditions of emotional stress,
fright, or pain, breathing rate may increase, causing
increased lung ventilation, although the carbon dioxide output of the body cells does not increase. As a result, carbon
dioxide is "washed out" of the blood. The most common
symptoms of hyperventilation are: dizziness, nausea, sleepiness, and finally, unconsciousness. If the symptoms persist
discontinue use of oxygen and consciously slow your
breathing rate until symptoms clear, and then resume normal breathing rate. Normal breathing can be aided by talking aloud.
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ALCOHOL
Common sense and scientific evidence dictate that you
must not fly as a crew member while under the influence of
alcohol. Alcohol, even in small amounts, produces (among
other things):
• A dulling of critical judgement.
• A decreased sense of responsibility.
• Diminished skill reactions and coordination.
• Decreased speed and strength of muscular reflexes
(even after one ounce of alcohol).
• Decreases \in efficiency of eye movements during reading (after one ounce of alcohol).
• Increased frequency of errors (after one ounce of alcohol).
• Constriction of visual fields.
• Decreased ability to see under dim illuminations.
• Loss of efficiency of sense of touch.
• Decrease of memory and reasoning ability.
• Increased susceptibility to fatigue and decreased attention span.
• Decreased relevance of response.
• Increased self confidence with decreased insight into
immediate capabilities.
Tests have shown that pilots commit major errors of judgment and procedure at blood alcohol levels substantially
less than the minimum legal levels of intoxication for most
states. These tests further show a continuation of impairment from alcohol up to as many as 14 hours after consumption, with no appreciable diminution of impairment. The
body metabolizes ingested alcohol at a rate of about onethird of an ounce per hour. Even after the body completely
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destroys a moderate amount of alcohol, a pilot can still be
severely impaired for many hours by hangover. The effects
of alcohol on the body are magnified at altitudes, as 2 oz. of
alcohol at 18,000 feet produce the same adverse effects as
6 oz. at sea level.
Federal Aviation Regulations have been amended to reflect
the FAA's growing concern with the effects of alcohol impairment. FAR 91 states:
"Alcohol or drugs.
(a) No person may act or attempt to act as a crewmember of a civil aircraft •
(1) Within 8 hours after the consumption of any
alcoholic beverage;
(2) While under the influence of alcohol;
(3) While using any drug that affects the person's faculties in any way contrary to safety; or
(4) While having .04 percent by weight or more
alcohol in the blood.
(b) Except in an emergency, no pilot of a civil aircraft may allow a person who appears to be intoxicated or who demonstrates by manner or physical
indications that the individual is under the influence
of drugs (except a medical patient under proper
care) to be carried in that aircraft."
Because of the slow destruction of alcohol by the body, a
pilot may still be under influence eight hours after drinking a
moderate amount of alcohol. Therefore, an excellent rule is
to allow at least 12 to 24 hours between "bottle and throttle,"
depending on the amount of alcoholic beverage consumed.
DRUGS
Self-medication or taking medicine in any form when you are
flying can be extremely hazardous. Even simple home or
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over-the-counter remedies and drugs such as aspirin, antihistamines, cold tablets, cough mixtures, laxatives, tranquilizers, and appetite suppressors, may seriously impair the
judgment and coordination needed while flying. The safest
rule is to take no medicine before or while flying, except
after consultation with your Aviation Medical Examiner.
SCUBA DIVING
Flying shortly after any prolonged scuba diving could be
dangerous. Under the increased pressure of the water,
excess nitrogen is absorbed into your system. If sufficient
time has not elapsed prior to takeoff for your system to rid
itself of this excess gas, you may experience the bends at
altitudes even under 10,000 feet, where most light planes
fly.
CARBON MONOXIDE AND NIGHT VISION
The presence of carbon monoxide results in hypoxia which
will affect night vision in the same manner and extent as
hypoxia from high altitudes. Even small levels of carbon
monoxide have the same effect as an altitude increase of
8,000 to 10,000 feet. Smoking several cigarettes can result
in a carbon monoxide saturation sufficient to affect visual
sensitivity equal to an increase of 8,000 feet altitude.
DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS
Pilots flying unpressurized airplanes at altitudes in excess of
10,000 feet should be alert for the symptoms of'decompression sickness'. This phenomenon, while rare, can impair the
pilot's ability to perform and in extreme cases, can result in
the victim being rendered unconscious. Decompression
sickness, also known as dysbarism and aviator's "bends", is
caused by nitrogen bubble formation in body tissue as the
ambient air pressure is reduced by climbing to higher altitudes. The symptoms are pain in the joints, abdominal
cramps, burning sensations in the skin, visual impairment
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and numbness. Some of these symptoms are similar to hypoxia. The only known remedy for decompression sickness is
recompression, which can only be accomplished in an
unpressurized airplane by descending. The pilot should
immediately descend if it is suspected that this condition
exists, since the effects will only worsen with continued
exposure to the reduced pressure environment at altitude
and could result, if uncorrected, iii complete incapacitation.
The possibility of decompression sickness can be greatly
reduced by pre-breathing oxygen prior to flight and by commencing oxygen breathing well below the altitudes where it
is legally mandatory.
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A FINAL WORD
Airplanes are truly remarkable machines. They enable us to
shrink distance and time, and to expand our business and
personal horizons in ways that, not too many years ago,
were' virtually inconceivable. For many businesses, the general aviation airplane has become the indispensable tool of
efficiency.
Advances in the mechanical reliability of the airplanes we fly
have been equally impressive, as attested by the steadily
declining statistics of accidents attributed to mechanical
causes, at a time when the airframe, systems and power
plants have grown infinitely more complex. The explosion in
capability of avionics systems is even more remarkable.
Radar, RNAV, LORAN, sophisticated autopilots and other
devices which, just a few years ago, were too large and prohibitively expensive for general aviation size airplanes, are
becoming increasingly commonplace in even the smallest
airplanes.
It is thus that this Safety Information is directed to the pilot,
for it is in the area of the skill and proficiency of you, the
pilot, that the greatest gains in safe flying are to be made
over the years to come. Intimate knowledge of your airplane,
its capabilities and its limitations, and disciplined adherence
to the procedures for your airplane's operation, will enable
you to transform potential tragedy into an interesting hangar
story when - as it inevitably will - the abnormal situation is
presented.
Know your airplane's limitations, and your own. Never
exceed either.
Safe flying,
BEECH AIRCRAFT CORPORATION
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