GV-Storage System
User’s Manual
© 2008 GeoVision, Inc. All rights reserved.
Under the copyright laws, this manual may not be copied, in whole or in part, without
the written consent of GeoVision.
Every effort has been made to ensure that the information in this manual is accurate.
GeoVision is not responsible for printing or clerical errors.
GeoVision, Inc.
9F, No. 246, Sec. 1, Neihu Rd.,
Neihu District, Taipei, Taiwan
Tel: +886-2-8797-8377
Fax: +886-2-8797-8335
http://www.geovision.com.tw
Trademarks used in this manual: GeoVision, the GeoVision logo and GV series
products are trademarks of GeoVision, Inc. Windows and Windows XP are registered
trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
March 2008
Contents
Regulatory Notice ..................................................................................................... 3
Usage Notice ............................................................................................................. 4
Chapter 1
Introduction........................................................................................... 5
1.1
Key Features..............................................................................................................6
1.2
iSCSI introduction ......................................................................................................6
1.3
Terminology................................................................................................................8
1.4
RAID levels ..............................................................................................................10
Chapter 2
Identifying Parts of Storage System ..................................................11
2.1
Front View ................................................................................................................ 11
2.2
Rear View ................................................................................................................12
2.3
Redundant Power Supply ........................................................................................12
2.4
Enclosure .................................................................................................................13
Chapter 3
Getting Started.................................................................................... 16
3.1
Unpacking ................................................................................................................16
3.2
Before You Begin .....................................................................................................16
3.3
Installing on a Network.............................................................................................17
3.4
Turning on the Power...............................................................................................18
3.5
Installing Hard Drives ...............................................................................................19
Chapter 4
Web GUI Guideline ............................................................................. 21
4.1
Login ........................................................................................................................21
4.2
Quick Install .............................................................................................................24
4.3
System Configuration...............................................................................................26
4.4
iSCSI Config ............................................................................................................32
4.5
Volume Configuration...............................................................................................36
4.6
Enclosure Management ...........................................................................................46
4.7
System Maintenance ...............................................................................................49
4.8
Logout ......................................................................................................................52
Chapter 5
Examples of Creating Volumes ......................................................... 53
5.1
Example 1 ................................................................................................................53
5.2
Example 2 ................................................................................................................58
1
Chapter 6
Advanced operation ........................................................................... 63
6.1
Rebuild.....................................................................................................................63
6.2
VG Migration and Extension ....................................................................................65
6.3
UDV Extension.........................................................................................................67
6.4
Disk Roaming...........................................................................................................68
Chapter 7
About iSCSI Initiator........................................................................... 69
7.1
Microsoft iSCSI Initiator ...........................................................................................69
7.2
Support Microsoft MPIO and MC/S..........................................................................76
Chapter 8
Troubleshooting ................................................................................. 77
Specifications ......................................................................................................... 80
Appendix
2
............................................................................................................. 81
A.
Certification List .......................................................................................................81
B.
Event Notifications ...................................................................................................82
C.
Performance Test Results ........................................................................................87
Regulatory Notice
FCC Notice
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device,
pursuant to part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable
protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial
environment.
Class A
This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed
and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio
communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful
interference in which case the user will be required to correct the interference at their own
expense.
CE Notice
This is a Class A product. In a domestic environment, this product may cause radio
interference in which case the user may be required to take adequate measures.
RoHS Compliance
The Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) Directive is to forbid the use of hazardous
materials of production. To meet the RoHS Directive requirements, this product is made to be
RoHS compliant.
WEEE Compliance
This product is subject to the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Directive
and made compliant with the WEEE requirements.
3
Usage Notice
Please pay attention to the following usage notice when you use the storage system.
•
Recommended Hard Drive
To avoid compatibility issues between the storage system and hard drives, we strongly
suggest you use Seagate Barracuda ES series drives. For details on drive models, see
Certification list in Appendix A.
•
Order of Hard Drive Slots
Remember the order of hard drive slots on the storage system (see Figure 2-1). When you
see the warning message “Error: Disk, <slot> is failed”, remove the failed hard drive in the
correct slot. If you remove the hard drive in the wrong slot, you could suffer data loss.
•
Replacing Hard Drives
Don’t turn off the power of the drive bay when replacing the hard dive, otherwise RAID
failure could occur. For the location of Power Switch buttons, see 2.1 Front View.
•
Before power off
It is better to execute “Shutdown” through LCD panel menu to flush the data from cache to
physical disks before power off. See 2.4.1 LCD Panel Menu.
•
UDV (User Data Volume) Restriction
Don’t assign the same UDV to more than one DVR host for recording usage; otherwise
you may suffer data lost or corrupt. See 4.5.4 User Data Volume and 4.5.6 Logical Unit.
•
Initiator Node Name Restriction
The Initiator node name only accepts lower-case letters. Use lower-case letters for Host
name in the storage system, otherwise you cannot establish the connection between the
storage system and DVR. See 4.5.6 Logical Unit.
4
1
Chapter 1
Introduction
Introduction
GV-Storage System is a high-performance RAID storage system based on the latest iSCSI
technology for users looking for a cost-effective and shared storage solution over the network.
Users can use their existing Ethernet infrastructure to implement the GV-Storage System. No
specialized adaptors, switches and cables are required for DVR servers. And there are no
limitations on the number of GV-Storage Systems implemented in a single application.
GV-Storage System can work in conjunction with these GV products to save data: GV-System
version 8.2, GV-Video Server version 1.4, GV-Compact DVR and GV-NVR.
Figure 1-1
iSCSI Storage Area Networks
Note: GV-System version 8.2 and GV-NVR provides Backup Server and Backup Viewer
functions. Backup Server allows you to back up recording data to GV-Storage System
automatically, while Backup Viewer allows you to access the data from any computer. For
details see Surveillance System User’s Manual.
5
1.1 Key Features
•
Up to 8 hot-swappable SATA II hard drives
•
RAID 0 / 1 / 5 / 6 / 10 / 50 / 60, JBOD
•
Dual Gigabit iSCSI ports
•
Online volume expansion and RAID level migration
•
Global/dedicated cache configuration by volume
•
S.M.A.R.T enabled
•
Support for SES (SCSI Enclosure Services)
•
Disk roaming
•
MPIO and MC/S ready (Initiator drive support needed)
•
Data structure and power failure alert buzzer
•
Redundant power supplies with load balance sharing
•
CHAP Encryption
•
Integrating with GV products: GV-System V8.2, GV-Video Server V1.4, GV-Compact DVR
and GV-NVR.
1.2 iSCSI introduction
iSCSI (Internet SCSI) is a protocol which encapsulates SCSI (Small Computer System
Interface) commands and data in TCP/IP packets for linking storage devices with servers over
common IP infrastructures. iSCSI provides high performance SANs over standard IP networks
like LAN, WAN or the Internet.
IP SANs are true SANs (Storage Area Networks) which allow a few of servers to attach to an
infinite number of storage volumes by using iSCSI over TCP/IP networks. IP SANs also
include mechanisms for security, data replication, multi-path and high availability.
Storage protocol, such as iSCSI, has “two ends” in the connection. These ends are the
initiator and the target. In iSCSI we call them iSCSI initiator and iSCSI target. The iSCSI
initiator requests or initiates any iSCSI communication. It requests all SCSI operations like
read or write. An initiator is usually located on the host side, such as DVR.
6
1
Introduction
The iSCSI target is the storage device itself or an appliance, which controls and serves
volumes or virtual volumes. The target is the device that performs SCSI commands or bridges
it to an attached storage device. Here, iSCSI targets are GV-Storage Systems with RAID
arrays.
Figure 1-2
The host side needs an iSCSI initiator. The initiator is a driver, which handles the SCSI traffic
over iSCSI. For details, see Chapter 6 About iSCSI Initiator.
7
1.3 Terminology
The document uses the following terms:
RAID
RAID is the abbreviation of “Redundant Array of Independent Disks”.
There are different RAID levels with different degree of the data
protection, data availability, and performance to host environment.
PD
The Physical Disk belongs to the member disk of one specific
volume group.
VG
Volume Group. A collection of removable media. One VG consists of
a set of UDVs and owns one RAID level attribute.
UDV
User Data Volume. Each VG could be divided into several UDVs.
The UDVs from one VG share the same RAID level, but may have
different volume capacity.
CV
Cache Volume. The system uses the on board memory as cache. All
RAM (except for the part which is occupied by the controller) can be
used as cache. Users can divide the cache for one UDV or sharing
among all UDVs. Each UDV will be associated with one CV for data
transaction. Each CV could be assigned different cache memory
size.
LUN
Logical Unit Number. LUN is the logical volume, which users could
assign by using the SCSI commands.
GUI
Graphic User Interface.
WT
Write-Through cache write policy. A caching technique in which the
completion of a write request is not signaled until data is safely
stored on non-volatile media. Each data is synchronized in both data
cache and the accessed physical disks.
WB
Write-Back cache write policy. A caching technique in which the
completion of a write request is signaled as soon as the data is in
cache and actual writing to non-volatile media occurs at a later time.
It speeds up system write performance but needs to bear the risk
where data may be inconsistent between data cache and the
physical disks in one short time interval.
RO
8
Set the volume to be Read-Only.
1
DS
Introduction
Dedicated Spare disks. The spare disks are only used by one
specific VG. Others could not use these dedicated spare disks for
any rebuilding purpose.
GS
Global Spare disks. GS is shared for rebuilding purpose. If some
VGs need to use the global spare disks for rebuilding, they could get
the spare disks out from the common spare disks pool for such
requirement.
DC
Dedicated Cache.
GC
Global Cache.
DG
Degraded mode. Not all of the array’s member disks are functioning,
but the array is able to respond to application read and write
requests to its virtual disks.
S.M.A.R.T.
Self-Monitoring Analysis and Reporting Technology.
WWN
World Wide Name.
S.E.S
SCSI Enclosure Services.
NIC
Network Interface Card.
iSCSI
Internet Small Computer Systems Interface.
MTU
Maximum Transmission Unit.
CHAP
Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol. An optional security
mechanism to control access to an iSCSI storage system over the
iSCSI data ports.
iSNS
Internet Storage Name Service.
9
1.4 RAID levels
RAID 0
Disk striping. RAID 0 needs at least one hard drive.
RAID 1
Disk mirroring over two disks. RAID 1 needs at least two hard drives.
RAID 3
Striping with parity on the dedicated disk. RAID 3 needs at least
three hard drives.
RAID 5
Striping with interspersed parity over the member disks. RAID 3
needs at least three hard drives.
RAID 6
2-dimensional parity protection over the member disks. RAID 6
needs at least four hard drives.
RAID 0+1
Mirroring of the member RAID 0 volumes. RAID 0+1 needs at least
four hard drives.
RAID 10
Striping over the member RAID 1 volumes. RAID 10 needs at least
four hard drives.
RAID 30
Striping over the member RAID 3 volumes. RAID 30 needs at least
six hard drives.
RAID 50
Striping over the member RAID 5 volumes. RAID 50 needs at least
six hard drives.
RAID 60
Striping over the member RAID 6 volumes. RAID 60 needs at least
eight hard drives.
JBOD
The abbreviation of “Just a Bunch Of Disks”. JBOD needs at least
one hard drive.
10
2
Chapter 2
Identifying Parts of Storage System
Identifying Parts of Storage System
The illustrations in this section identify the various features of the storage system. Get
yourself familiar with these terms, as it will help you when you read further in the following
sections.
2.1 Front View
iSCSI 1 GigaLAN Detect LED
iSCSI 1 Transmit LED
iSCSI 2 GigaLAN Detect LED
iSCSI 2 Transmit LED
Power Supply Fault LED
System Status LEDs
Figure 2-1
1
SATA Backplane Reset Switch
8
Fan Sensor LED
2
HDD 1 (Power Switch)
9
System Status LEDs
3
HDD 2 (Power Switch)
10
LCD Display
4
HDD 3 (Power Switch)
11
HDD 7 (Power Switch)
5
HDD 4 (Power Switch)
12
HDD 8 (Power Switch)
6
HDD 5 (Power Switch)
13
Power Switch
7
HDD 6 (Power Switch)
14
Safety Lock
11
2.2 Rear View
1
2
3
Figure 2-2
1
Redundant Power Supply (Full Range)
2
Management Port (10/100 Mbps)
3
iSCSI Data Port (10/100/1000 Mbps)
2.3 Redundant Power Supply
5
4
3
2
1
Figure 2-3
1
AC Power Input (Full Range)
4
Power Switch
2
Screw hole to lock with the chassis
5
Power Supply LED
3
Handle
12
2
Identifying Parts of Storage System
2.4 Enclosure
1
2
3
Figure 2-4
1
LED Indicators
2
LCD Panel
2.4.1
3
Control Panel
LCD Panel Menu
There are four buttons to configure the LCD panel menu, including: c (up), d (down), ESC
(Escape), and ENT (Enter).
After booting up the system, you will see the following screen:
192.168.000.200
GeoVision Inc. GV-Storage System←
Press ENT. The LCD functions Alarm Mute, Reset/Shutdown, Quick Install, View IP
Setting, Change IP Config and Reset to Default. These functions will rotate by pressing c
(up) and d (down).
When there is WARNING or ERROR level of event happening, the LCD panel shows the
event log to give users more details from front panel too.
13
The following table is function description.
Alarm Mute
Mute alarm when an error occurs.
Reset/Shutdown
Reset or shutdown the storage system.
Quick Install
Quick three steps to create a volume. Please refer to Chapter 4 for
operation in web UI.
View IP Setting
Display current IP address, subnet mask, and gateway.
Change IP Config
Set IP address, subnet mask, and gateway. There are 2 selections,
DHCP (Get IP address from DHCP server) or set static IP.
Reset to Default
Reset the password to default: Admin, and set IP address to default:
Default IP address: 192.168.0.200
Default subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
Default gateway: 192.168.0.254
The following is the LCD Panel menu hierarchy.
[Alarm Mute]
[Reset/Shutdown]
[Quick Install]
[cYes
Nod]
[Reset]
[cYes
Nod]
[Shutdown]
[cYes
Nod]
RAID 0
Volume Size
(RAID 1/RAID 3/
(xxxxxx G)
RAID 5/RAID 6)
xxxxxx GB
Apply The Config
Adjust Volume Size
[cYes Nod]
[IP Config]
[Static IP]
GV-Storage
[IP Address]
System
cd
[View IP Setting]
[192.168.000.200]
[IP Subnet Mask]
[255.255.255.000]
[IP Gateway]
[192.168.000.254]
[DHCP]
[cYes
[Change IP Config]
[Static IP]
[Reset to Default]
[cYes
Nod]
[IP Address]
Adjust IP address
[IP Subnet Mask]
Adjust Submask IP
[IP Gateway]
Adjust Gateway IP
[Apply IP Setting]
[cYes Nod]
Nod]
Caution: Before power off, it is better to execute “Shutdown” to flush the data from
cache to physical disks.
14
2
2.4.2
Identifying Parts of Storage System
Enclosure LED
The features of Enclosure LED are described as follows:
Status LED
Used to reflect the system status by turn on the LED when an error occurs or
RAID malfunctioning happens.
Busy LED
Hardware activated LED when RAID operation is busy.
Power LED
Hardware activated LED when the system is powered on.
2.4.3
System Buzzer
The system buzzer features are described as follows:
•
The system buzzer alarms 1 second when the system boots up successfully.
•
The system buzzer alarms continuously when there is an error-level event happened. The
alarm will be stopped after mute.
•
The alarm will be muted automatically when the error situation is resolved. E.g., when
RAID 5 is degraded and alarm rings immediately, after you changes/adds one physical
disk for rebuilding, and when the rebuilding is done, the alarm will be muted automatically.
15
Chapter 3
Getting Started
3.1 Unpacking
The package includes the following items:
•
GV-Storage System
•
AC Power Cord x 2
•
Lock Key x 2
•
Self-Stick Rubber Pad x 4
•
GV-Storage System User’s Manual
•
GV-Storage System Quick Start Guide
3.2 Before You Begin
Before starting, prepare the following items:
•
Check Certification List in Appendix to confirm the hardware setting is fully supported
•
A DVR server of GV-System version 8.2 with a network interface card (NIC)
•
CAT 5e or CAT 6 LAN cables for one management port and two iSCSI data ports (CAT 6
cable is recommended for best performance)
•
Prepare storage system configuration plan
•
Network information of management and iSCSI data ports, including static IP addresses,
subnet mask, and default gateway
•
A Gigabit Layer 2 or Layer 3 managed stackable switch (see Certification List in Appendix)
•
CHAP security information, including CHAP username and secret (Optional)
16
3
3.3
Getting Started
Installing on a Network
1. Connect the unit’s management port to the network on which you will manage the storage
system.
2. Using LAN cables, connect the unit’s iSCSI data ports to a Gigabit switch.
3. Installing hard drives. For details, see 3.4 Installing Hard Drives.
4. Using the two provided power cords, connect the unit’s two power supplies to a different
power source/circuit.
Blue color line=Fast Ethernet ; Purple color line=Gigabit Ethernet
Figure 3-1
Note:
•
You cannot manage the storage system from the two iSCSI data ports.
•
GV-Storage System has a default address of 192.168.0.200. The server used for
managing the system must be on the same IP and subnet sequence assigned to the unit.
•
Currently the storage system doesn’t support DDNS (Dynamic Domain Name
System).
17
3.4 Turning on the Power
1. Turn on the two power switches located on the rear panel. See No. 4, Figure 2-3.
2. Turn on the main power switch on the front panel. See No. 13, Figure 2-1.
3. Check status of powering on to ensure that everything is running smoothly.
•
Power Supply LED: The two LEDs on the rear panel should turn green. See No. 5,
Figure 2-3.
•
GigaLAN Detect LED: The two LEDs on the front panel should turn green. See Figure
2-1
•
Drive Tray LED: Power LEDs for all drive trays containing hard drives should light up,
e.g. No. 2, Figure 2-1.
Before using the storage system, configure RAID at first. Without this step, there is no hard
drive available for storage. See Chapter 4 for Web GUI Guideline.
Note: Although the power supply units are redundant and a single power supply can provide
sufficient power to the system, it is advisable to turn both of the power switches on. If only
one power supply unit is operating and fails, the system operation will be terminated.
18
3
Getting Started
3.5 Installing Hard Drives
The storage system supports hot-swapping allowing you to install and replace a hard drive
while the system is running.
1. If the system is running, do not turn off the power of the drive bay.
2. Turn the safety lock to the OPEN position.
3. Push the safety lock. The drawer handle pops up.
4. Pull out the drive drawer.
2
Safety Lock
3
4
Drive
Drawer
Front panel of SATA backplane
for HDD 1 to 6.
Drawer
Handle
1
Front panel of SATA backplane
for HDD 7 and 8.
Power Button
and LED
Power
Button
Power
LED
HDD
Activity LED
Figure 3-2
19
5. Remove the lid of the drawer.
Figure 3-3
6. Place the hard drive in the drawer and slide the lid back on.
Figure 3-4
7. Turn over the drawer and secure the hard drive with the 4 supplied screws.
Figure 3-5
8. Put the drawer back in the drive bay of the storage system.
9. Push the drawer handle back and turn the safety lock to the LOCK position.
20
4
Chapter 4
Web GUI Guideline
Web GUI Guideline
4.1 Login
GV-Storage System supports graphic user interface (GUI) to operate the system. Be sure to
connect the LAN cable to the management port. Open the browser and enter the default IP:
http://192.168.0.200 The following screen will be displayed.
Figure 4-1
Click any function at the first time; it will pop up a dialog box for authentication.
Login name: admin
Default password: admin
After login, you can choose the functions on the left side of window to do configuration.
There are three indicators at the top-right corner.
Green is normal. Red represents abnormal voltage status.
Voltage light
Green is normal. Red represents abnormal temperature.
Temperature light
Green means RAID works well. Red represents RAID
RAID light
failure happened.
21
The below table is the hierarchy of Web GUI.
Æ Step 1 / Step 2 / Step 3 / Confirm
Quick Install
System Config
System name Æ System name
IP address Æ DHCP / Static / HTTP port / HTTPS port / SSH port
Language Æ Language
Login config Æ Auto logout / Login lock
Password Æ Old password / Password / Confirm
Date Æ Date / Time / Time zone / Daylight saving / NTP
Mail Æ Mail-from address / Mail-to address / SMTP relay /
Authentication / Send test mail / Send events
SNMP Æ SNMP trap address / Community
Messenger Æ Messenger IP/hostname / Send events
System log Æ Server IP/hostname / Port / Facility / Event level
server
Event log Æ Filter / Download / Mute / Clear
iSCSI config
Entity Property Æ Entity name / iSNS
NIC Æ IP settings / Default gateway / Set MTU / MAC address
Node Æ Node name / CHAP Authentication
Session Æ iSCSI sessions and connections
CHAP account Æ Create / Delete CHAP account
Volume config
Physical disk Æ Free disc / Global spares / Dedicated spares / More
information / Auto Spindown
Volume group Æ Create / Delete / More information / Rename / Migrate
/ Expand
User data Volume Æ Create / Delete / Attach LUN / More information /
Rename / Extend / Set read/write mode / Set priority
Cache volume Æ Create / Delete / More information / Resize / Dedicated
cache
Logical unit Æ Attach / Detach
Enclosure management
SES config Æ Enable / Disable
Hardware monitor Æ Status / Auto shutdown
S.M.A.R.T. Æ S.M.A.R.T. for physical disks
Maintenance
22
4
Web GUI Guideline
Upgrade Æ Browse the firmware to upgrade / Export config
Info Æ System information
Reset to default Æ Reset to factory default
Config import & export Æ Controller configuration import and export function
Shutdown Æ Reboot / Shutdown
Logout
23
4.2 Quick Install
It is easy to use the Quick install function to create a volume. Depend on how many physical
disks or how many residual spaces on created VGs are free, the system will calculate
maximum spaces on RAID levels 0 / 1 / 3 / 5 / 6. Quick install function will occupy all residual
VG space for one UDV, and it has no space and spare.
Quick Install function has a smarter policy. When the system is full inserted with 8 HDD, and
all HDD are in the same size, Quick Install function lists all possibilities and sizes among
different RAID levels. Quick Install will use all available HDD for the RAID level that you
decide. But, when the system is inserted with different sizes of HDD, e.g., 8 x 200G HDD and
8 x 80G, Quick Install also lists all possibilities and combinations of different RAID levels and
different sizes. After you choose the RAID level, you may find there are still some HDD are
not used (Free Status). The result is from the smarter policy on Quick Install that gives you:
1. Biggest capacity of RAID level which you choose and,
2. The fewest disk number for the RAID level/volume size.
E.g., you choose RAID 5 and the system has 6 x 200G HDD + 2 x 80G HDD inserted. If all 8
HDD are used for a RAID 5, the volume max size is 560G (80G x 7). But in Quick Install, we
do smarter check and find out the most efficient use of HDD, which results the system only
use the 200G HDD (volume size is 200G x 5=1000G). Then, the volume size is bigger, and
full use of HDD capacity.
Three steps for a quick install:
1. Select Quick install, and choose RAID Level from the drop-down list. Click Next.
Figure 4-2
24
4
Web GUI Guideline
2. Type Volume size and select a LUN number. By default, the maximum volume size is
shown. To re-enter the size be sure it has to be less or equal to the maximum volume size.
Then click Next.
Figure 4-3
(Figure 4-3: The maximum volume size is 222GB and 1 LUN (No. 0) is attached.)
3. Click Confirm if all setups are correct. Then a page with the “User data volume” will be
shown as below. You can start to use the system now.
Figure 4-4
(Figure 4-4: A RAID 5 user data volume with the UDV name “QUICK40547”, named by the
system itself, with the total available volume size 222GB and attached with 1 LUN.)
Note: The UDV created by Quick Install is accessible by every host. Access control of
host would show as a wildcard “*”. For recording storage, you must create an independent
UDV for a specific host. For details on UDV, see 4.5.4 User Data Volume.
25
4.3 System Configuration
System config selection is for the setup of System name, IP address, Language, Login
config, Password, Date, Mail, SNMP, Messenger, System log server and Event log.
4.3.1
System Name
Select System name to change the system name. Default system name composed by model
name and serial number of this system, ex: GV-StorageSystem-A4A04D.
Figure 4-5
4.3.2
IP Address
Select IP address to change IP address for remote administration usage. There are 2
selections, DHCP or static IP. The default setting is Static enabled. You can change the HTTP,
HTTPS and SSH port number when the default port number is not allowed on the DVR host.
Figure 4-6
4.3.3
Language
Select Language to set the language shown in Web UI. The option Auto Detect will be
detected by browser language setting.
Figure 4-7
26
4
4.3.4
Web GUI Guideline
Login Config
Select Login config to set only one admin and set the auto logout timing. The only one
admin can prevent multiple users access the system at the same time.
1
Auto logout: Options are (1) Disable (2) 5 mins (3) 30 mins (4) 1 hour. When the user is
no response for a period of time, the system will logout automatically to allow another
user to login.
2
Login block: Disable/Enable. When the login lock is enabled, the system allows only
one user to login/modify the system settings.
Figure 4-8
4.3.5
Password
Select Password to change administrator password. The maximum length of admin
password is 12 characters.
Figure 4-9
27
4.3.6
Date
Select Date to set up the current date, time, time zone and NTP server before using.
Figure 4-10
4.3.7
Mail
Select Mail to enter at most 3 mail addresses for receiving the event notification. Some mail
servers would check Mail-from address and need authentication for anti-spam. Please fill
the necessary fields and select Send test mail to check whether the email works fine. You
can also select which levels of event logs are necessary to be sent out by Mail. Default
setting is only ERROR and WARNING event logs enabled.
Figure 4-11
28
4
4.3.8
Web GUI Guideline
SNMP
Select SNMP to set up SNMP trap for alert via SNMP. It allows up to 3 SNMP trap addresses.
Default community setting is “public”. You can choose the event log type, and the default
value of SNMP is the INFO event log enabled only.
Figure 4-12
4.3.9
Messenger
Select Messenger to set up pop-up message alert via Windows messenger (not MSN). You
must enable the service “Messenger” in Windows (Start Æ Control Panel Æ Administrative
Tools Æ Services Æ Messenger), and then event logs can be received. It allows up to 3
messenger addresses. You can choose the event log levels and the default values are
WARNING and ERROR event logs enabled only.
Figure 4-13
29
4.3.10
System log server
Select System log server to set up alert via syslog protocol. The default port of syslog is 514.
You can choose the facility and the event log level. The default values of event level are INFO,
WARNING and ERROR event logs enabled.
Figure 4-14
30
4
Web GUI Guideline
4.3.11 Event log
Select Event log to view the event messages.
•
The Filter button: Choose the display.
•
The Download button: Save the whole event log as text file with file name
“log-ModelName-SerialNumber-Date-Time.txt” (E.g., log-GV-Storage
System-A4A05D-20061011-114718.txt).
•
The Clear button: Clear event log.
•
The Mute button: Stop alarm if system alerts.
Figure 4-15
To customize your own display of event logs, there are total three display methods, on Web
UI event log page (Show events), popup windows on Web UI (Pop up events), and on LCD
panel menu (Show on LCM). The default setting is WARNING and ERROR event logs
enabled on Web UI and LCD panel menu. The popup window is disabled by default.
Figure 4-16
The event log is displayed in reverse order which means the latest event log is on the first
page. The event log is actually saved in the first fourth hard drives, each hard drive has one
copy of event log. For one system, there are four copies of event logs to guarantee the user
can check event log most of the time when there is/are failed disk(s).
31
4.4 iSCSI Config
iSCSI config selection is for the setup of Entity Property, NIC, Node, Session, and CHAP
account.
4.4.1
Entity Property
Select Entity property to view the entity name of the system, and set up iSNS IP for iSNS
service. iSNS is the abbreviation of Internet Storage Name Service. Add an iSNS server IP
address to the iSNS server list which the iSCSI initiator service can send queries.
For details on iSNS server, please check Microsoft website.
Figure 4-17
32
4
4.4.2
Web GUI Guideline
NIC
Select NIC to change IP addresses of iSCSI data ports. There are two gigabit LAN ports to
transmit data. Each of them must be assigned to one IP address in multihomed mode. The
default IP address for data port 1 is 192.168.1.1 and for data port 2 is 192.168.2.1.
Figure 4-18
(Figure 4-18: Each of iSCSI data ports is set to static IP. MTU is 1500.)
You can change IP address by clicking the blue square button in the DHCP column. There
are 2 selections, DHCP (Get IP address from DHCP server) or static IP.
Figure 4-19
Default gateway can be changed by clicking the blue square button in the Gateway column.
There is only one default gateway. The row of No. 1 would be the default gateway.
MTU (Maximum Transmission Unit) size can be changed by clicking the blue square button in
the MTU column.
Figure 4-20
The range of MTU size is between 1500 and 3900. Default MTU size is 1500. If it is changed,
the setting of MTU size on switching hub and LAN card should be set to the same size.
Otherwise, the LAN cannot work properly.
33
4.4.3
Node
Select Node to view the target name for iSCSI initiator. Press Auth to enable CHAP
authentication. CHAP is the abbreviation of Challenge Handshake Authorization Protocol.
CHAP is a strong authentication method used with point-to-point for user login. It’s a type of
authentication in which the authentication server sends the client a key to be used for
encrypting the username and password. CHAP enables the username and password to
transmit in an encrypted form for protection.
Figure 4-21
To use CHAP authentication, please follow these steps:
Figure 4-22
1.
Click the blue square button in the Auth column.
2.
Select CHAP.
3.
Go to \ iSCSI config\ CHAP account to create account and password.
Tips: The initiator in the DVR host should have the same CHAP settings, otherwise you
cannot log in the storage system.
34
4
4.4.4
Web GUI Guideline
Session
Select Session to view iSCSI session and connection information, which includes the
following items:
1. Host (Initiator Name)
2. Security Protocol
3. TCP Port Number
4. Error Recovery Level
5. Error Recovery Count
6. Detail of Authentication status and Source IP: port number.
Figure 4-23
4.4.5
CHAP Account
Select CHAP account to create a CHAP account for authentication.
Figure 4-24
35
4.5 Volume Configuration
Volume config selection is for the setup of volume configurations including Physical disk,
Volume group, User data volume, Cache volume, and Logical unit functions.
4.5.1
Volume Relationship Diagram
The below diagram describes the relationship of RAID components. One VG (Volume Group)
consists of a set of UDVs (User Data Volume) and owns one RAID level attribute. Each VG
can be divided into several UDVs. The UDVs from one VG share the same RAID level, but
may have different volume capacity. Each UDV will be associated with one specific CV
(Cache Volume) to execute the data transaction. Each CV could have different cache
memory size from the user’s modification/setting. LUN is the logical volume/unit, which the
user could access through SCSI commands.
LUN 1
UDV 1
LUN 2
LUN 3
UDV 2
UDV3
+
+
+
VG
Dedicated
Global CV
CV
PD 1
PD 2
PD 3
DS
Figure 4-25
36
RAM
4
4.5.2
Web GUI Guideline
Physical Disk
Select Physical disk to view the status of hard drives inserted in the system. The following
are operation tips:
1.
Multiple select. Select one or more checkboxes in front of the slot number. Or select the
checkbox at the top left corner will select all. Check again will select none.
2.
The list box will disappear if there is no VG or only VG of RAID 0, JBOD. Because these
RAID levels cannot be set as dedicated spare disk.
3.
These three functions Free disc, Global spares, Dedicated spares can do multiple
selections, too.
4.
The operations of the other web pages (e.g.: volume config of VG, UDV, CV, LUN pages)
are similar to previous steps.
Figure 4-26
(Figure 4-26: Physical disks of slot 1 and 5 are created for a VG named “QUICK43975”. Slot 6 is
reserved for use.)
•
PD column description:
Slot
The position of hard drives. The blue square button below
the number of slot is the More Information indication. It
shows the details of the hard drive.
WWN
World Wide Name.
Size (GB)
Capacity of hard drive.
VG Name
Related volume group name.
37
Status
The status of hard drive.
•
Good: the hard drive is good.
•
Defect: the hard drive has the bad blocks.
•
Fail: the hard drive cannot work in the respective
volume.
Status 1
•
RD: RAID Disk. This hard drive has been set to
RAID.
•
FR: Free disk. This hard drive is free for use.
•
DS: Dedicated Spare. This hard drive has been set to
the dedicated spare of the VG.
•
GS: Global Spare. This hard drive has been set to
a global spare of all VGs.
•
RS: Reserve. The hard drive contains the VG
information but cannot be used. It may be caused by an
uncompleted VG set, or hot-plug of this disk in the
running time. In order to protect the data in the disk, the
status changes to reserve. It can be reused after setting
it to “FR” manually.
Status 2
Speed
•
R: Rebuild. The hard drive is doing rebuilding.
•
M: Migration. The hard drive is doing migration.
•
3.0G: From SATA ATAPI standard, if the disk can
support ATAPI IDENTIFY PACKET DEVICE command,
and the speed can achieve Serial ATA Gen-2 signaling
speed (3.0Gbps).
•
1.5G: From SATA ATAPI standard, if the disk can
support ATAPI IDENTIFY PACKET DEVICE command,
and the speed can achieve Serial ATA Gen-1 signaling
speed (1.5Gbps).
•
Unknown: The disk doesn’t support above command,
so the speed is defined as unknown.
•
38
PD operations description:
Free Disc
Make the selected hard drive to be free for use.
Global Spares
Set hard drive(s) to be global spare of all VGs.
Dedicated Spares
Set hard drive(s) to be dedicated spare of selected VGs.
4
•
Web GUI Guideline
Auto spindown:
In the page of Physical disk, the system also provides the HDD auto spindown function to
save power. The default value is disabled.
Click Disable in the Auto spindown field. Then set the inactive time after which the HDD will
spin down.
Figure 4-27
4.5.3
Volume Group
Select Volume group to view the status of each volume group.
•
VG column description:
Figure 4-28
(Figure 4-28: There is a RAID 5 with 3 physical disks, named “VG-1”, total size is 148GB, free
size is 0GB, related to 2 UDV.)
39
No.
Number of volume group. The blue square button below the
No. is the More Information indication. It shows the details
of the volume group.
Name
Volume group name. The blue square button under the
Name is the Rename function.
Total (GB)
Total capacity of this volume group.
Free (GB)
Free capacity of this volume group.
#PD
The number of physical disks of the volume group.
#UDV
The number of user data volumes related to the volume
group.
Status
Status 1
The status of volume group.
•
Online: volume group is online.
•
Fail: volume group fails.
DG: Degraded mode. This volume group is not completed.
The reason could be lack of one disk or failure of disk.
Status 2
R: Rebuild. This volume group is doing rebuilding.
Status 3
M: Migration. This volume group is doing migration.
RAID
The RAID level of the volume group. The blue square button
below the RAID level is the Migrate function. Clicking
Migrate can add disk(s) to do expansion or change the
RAID level of the volume group.
•
40
VG operations description:
Create
Create a volume group.
Delete
Delete a volume group.
4
4.5.4
Web GUI Guideline
User Data Volume
Select User data volume to view the status of each user data volume.
Figure 4-29
(Figure 4-29: Create a UDV which name is “UDV-1”; related to “VG-1”; size is 100GB; status is
online, write back and high priority; related to 1 LUN; with cache volume 300MB. The other UDV
is named “UDV-2”, initializing to 2%)
•
UDV column description:
No.
Number of this user data volume. The blue square button
below the UDV No. is the More Information indication. It
shows the details of the User data volume.
Name
Name of this user data volume. The blue square button
below the UDV Name is the Rename function.
Size (GB)
Total capacity of this user data volume. The blue square
button below the size is the Extend function.
Status
Status 1
The status of this user data volume.
•
Online: user data volume is online.
•
Fail: user data volume fails.
•
WT: Write Through.
•
WB: Write Back.
The blue square button below the status1 is the Set
read/write mode function.
Status 2
•
HI: High priority.
•
MD: Mid priority.
•
LO: Low priority.
41
The blue square button below the status2 is the Set Priority
function.
Status 3
•
42
•
I: user data volume is doing initializing.
•
R: user data volume is doing rebuilding.
•
M: user data volume is doing migration.
R%
Ratio of initializing or rebuilding.
RAID
The RAID level that user data volume is using.
#LUN
Number of LUN(s) that data volume is attaching.
VG name
The VG name of the user data volume.
CV (MB)
The cache volume of the user data volume.
UDV operations description:
Attach LUN
Attach to a LUN.
Create
Create a user data volume function.
Delete
Delete a user data volume function.
4
4.5.5
Web GUI Guideline
Cache Volume
Select Cache volume to view the status of cache volume.
The global cache volume is the default cache volume, which is created after power on
automatically, and cannot be deleted. The size of global cache is based on the RAM size. It is
total memory size minus the system usage.
Figure 4-30
•
CV column description:
No.
Number of the Cache volume. The blue square button below
the CV No. is the More Information indication. It shows the
details of the cache volume.
Size (MB)
Total capacity of the cache volume. The blue square button
below the CV size is the Resize function. The CV size can
be adjusted.
UDV Name
•
Name of the UDV.
CV operations description:
Create
Create a cache volume function.
Delete
Delete a cache volume function.
43
4.5.6
Logical Unit
Select Logical unit to view the status of attached logical unit number of each UDV.
You can attach LUN by clicking the Attach button. In the Host field, you must enter an initiator
node name for access control, or type wildcard “*”, which means every host can access the
volume. Select LUN and Permission, and then click Confirm.
Figure 4-31
You can assign up to 256 LUNs per system. For the host connection, the host number
limitation is 32 per system at the same time, and 8 for single user data volume (UDV) which
means 8 hosts can access the same UDV at the same time.
The matching rules of access control are from top to down by sequence. For example, there
are 2 rules for the same UDV, one is “*”, LUN 0; the other is “iqn.host1”, LUN 1. The host
“iqn.host2” can login because it matches the rule 1. The access will be denied when there is
no matching rule.
Figure 4-32
(Figure 4-32: UDV-1 is attached to LUN 0 which every host can access. UDV-2 is attached to
LUN 1 which only initiator node name “test-1” can access.)
44
4
•
Web GUI Guideline
LUN operations description:
Attach
Attach a logical unit number to a user data volume.
Detach
Detach a logical unit number from a user data volume.
Note:
•
Only lower-case letters are allowed for Host name/imitator node name.
•
If the Host is created for recording storage, do not assign the same UDV to other hosts
again; otherwise you may suffer data lost or corrupt.
•
If the Host is created for Backup Viewer, it is strongly recommended to select Read-only
permission. For Backup Viewer function, see Surveillance System User’s Manual.
45
4.6 Enclosure Management
The Enclosure management function allows managing enclosure information including SES
config, Hardware monitor and S.M.A.R.T. functions. For the enclosure management, there
are many sensors for different purposes, such as temperature sensors, voltage sensors and
hard disks. And due to the hardware characteristics are different among these sensors, for
different sensors, they have different polling intervals. Below are the polling time intervals:
1. Temperature sensors: 1 minute.
2. Voltage sensors: 1 minute.
3. Hard disk sensors: 10 minutes.
4.6.1
SES Configuration
SES represents SCSI Enclosure Services, one of the enclosure management standards. The
initiator can communicate with the enclosure using a specialized set of SCSI commands to
access power, cooling and other non-data characteristics.
The SES client software is available at the following web site: http://www.santools.com/
Figure 4-33
(Figure 4-33: LUN 0 is enabled for SES, and can be accessed from every host.)
46
4
4.6.2
Web GUI Guideline
Hardware Monitor
Select Hardware monitor to view the information of current voltage and temperature.
Figure 4-34
If Auto shutdown has been checked, the system will shutdown automatically when voltage
or temperature is out of the normal range. For better data protection, please check Auto
Shutdown.
For better protection and to avoid single short period of high temperature triggering auto
shutdown, the system uses multiple condition judgments for auto shutdown. Below is the
detail of when the auto shutdown will be triggered.
1
There are 3 sensors placed on the enclosure for temperature checking: on core
processor, on PCI-X bridge (location 1), and on daughter board (location 2). The
system will check each sensor every 30 seconds. When one of these sensors is over
the high temperature value for continuous 3 minutes, the auto shutdown will be
triggered immediately.
2
The “Temperature light” indicator on the window will turn red when one of 3 sensors
reaches the abnormal temperature: the core processor temperature reaches 65℃,
PCI-X bridge (location 1) temperature reaches 60 ℃ and daughter board (location 2)
temperature reaches 60 ℃.
3
The system buzzer will alarm and the system will shut down automatically when
one of 3 sensors reaches the temperature limit for continuous 3 minutes: the
temperature limit of core processor is 70℃, PCI-X bridge (location 1) is 65 ℃ and
daughter board (location 2) is 65 ℃.
4
If the high temperature situation doesn’t last for 3 minutes, the system will not do auto
shutdown.
47
4.6.3
Hard Drive S.M.A.R.T. Function Support
S.M.A.R.T. (Self-Monitoring Analysis and Reporting Technology) is a diagnostic tool for hard
drives to give advanced warning of drive failures. S.M.A.R.T. provides you chances to take
actions before possible drive failure.
S.M.A.R.T. measures many attributes of the hard drive all the time and decides the hard
drives which are close to out of tolerance. The advanced notice of possible hard drive failure
can allow you to back up hard drive or replace the hard drive. This is much better than hard
drive crash when it is writing data or rebuilding a failed hard drive.
Select S.M.A.R.T. to display S.M.A.R.T. information of hard drives. The number is the current
value; the number in parenthesis is the threshold value. The threshold values of hard drive
vendors are different; please refer to vendors’ specification for details.
Figure 4-35
48
4
Web GUI Guideline
4.7 System Maintenance
The Maintenance function allows operation of the system functions including Upgrade to the
latest firmware, Info to show the system version, Reset to default to reset all configuration
values to origin settings, Config import & export to export and import all configurations
except for VG/UDV setting and LUN setting, and Shutdown to either reboot or shutdown the
system.
4.7.1
Upgrade
Select Upgrade to upgrade firmware. Please prepare the new firmware file named xxxx.bin
in local hard drive, and then press Browse to select the file. Click Confirm, and it will pop up
a message “Upgrade system now? If you want to downgrade to the previous FW later, please
export your system config first”. Click Cancel to export system config first, and then click OK
to start to upgrade firmware.
After finished upgrading, the system must reboot manually.
Figure 4-36
Note: Please contact with dvrsysstem@geovision.com.tw for latest firmware.
4.7.2
Info
Select Info to display system type, FW number, CPU type, RAM size, and serial number.
Figure 4-37
49
4.7.3
Reset to Default
The Reset to default function allows you to reset the system to factory default settings.
Figure 4-38
4.7.4
Config Import & Export
The Config import & export function allows you to save configurable values, and to apply all
configurations to the current or another system. For the volume config setting, the values are
available in the export function and not available in the import function which can avoid
confliction/date-deleting between two systems. That says if one system already has valuable
data on the disks and you may forget it and use the import function. If the volume setting was
also imported, your current data will be cleared. Below is the table of available configurations
in import & export functions.
Figure 4-39
System name
System name
IP address
Web UI IP address with (1) DHCP enabled, (2) IP, (3) Subnet
mask, (4) Gateway, (5) DNS
iSCSI
iSCSI data port address with (1) iSNS, (2) CHAP, (3) LAN 1
and LAN 2 IP, Subnet mask, Gateway, MTU
Login config
Admin account login config with (1) Auto logout setting, (2)
Admin login lock
Password
Admin password value with (1) Current password, (2) Old
password
Date
50
Time Zone setting
4
Mail
Web GUI Guideline
Event log mail setting with (1) Mail_from address, (2) SMTP
server, (3) Authentication, (4) Mail account ID, (5) Mail
password, (6) Mail_To_1 address, (7) Mail_To_2 address, (8)
Mailt_To_3 address, (9) Event log filter setting
SNMP
SNMP setting with (1) SNMP trap address 1, (2) SNMP trap
address 2, (3) SNMP trap address 3, (4) Community setting,
(5) Event log filter function
Event log
Event log filter setting with (1) Web UI setting, (2) LCM
setting, (3) Web UI pop up event setting
SES config
SES management setting
vol_temp
Auto shutdown setting
Physical disk
Not available in the import function.
Current hard disk status with (1) size, (2) block size, (3) VG,
(4) hard status
Physical disk
Not available in the import function.
spindown
Hard disk auto spindown setting
Volume group
Not available in the import function.
VG setting with (1) VG name, (2) size, (3) number of physical
disks, (4) number of UDVs, (5) RAID level
Cache volume
Not available in the import function.
Cache volume setting with (1) size, (2) percentage
User data volume
Not available in the import function.
UDV setting with (1) UDV name, (2) size, (3) VG name, (4)
cache volume, (5) stripe height, (6) block size, (7) write
through or write back, (8) priority
Logical unit
Not available in the import function.
LUN setting with (1) host name, (2) target name, (3) UDV
name, (4) LUN number, (5) permission
4.7.5
Shutdown
Select Shutdown to display the Reboot and Shutdown buttons. Before power off, it’s better
to press Shutdown to flush the data from cache to physical disks. The step is better for the
data protection.
Figure 4-40
51
4.8 Logout
For security reason, the Logout function will allow logout while no user is operating the
system. To re-login the system, please enter username and password again.
52
5
Chapter 5
Examples of Creating Volumes
Examples of Creating Volumes
The followings are examples for creating volumes. Example 1 is to create two UDVs sharing
the same CV (global cache volume) and set a global spare disk. Example 2 is to create two
UDVs. One shares global cache volume; the other uses dedicated cache volume. Then, set a
dedicated spare disk.
5.1 Example 1
Example 1 is to create two UDVs in one VG, each UDV uses global cache volume. Global
cache volume is created after system boots up automatically. So, no action is needed to set
CV. Then set a global spare disk. The last, delete all of them.
Step 1: Create VG (Volume Group).
Figure 5-1
a.
Select / Volume config / Volume group.
b.
Click Create.
c.
Type a VG Name, select a RAID level, press Select PD to choose the RAID PD
slot(s), and then press Next.
d.
Check the outcome. Press Confirm if all setups are correct.
e.
A VG has been created.
53
Figure 5-2
(Figure 5-2: Creating a RAID 5 with 3 physical disks, named “VG-1”. The total size is 148GB.
Because of no related UDV there, free size still remains 148GB.)
Step 2: Create UDV (User Data Volume).
Figure 5-3
a.
Select / Volume config / User data volume.
b.
Click Create.
c.
Type a UDV name, choose a VG Name and enter a size to the UDV. Decide the
stripe height, block size, read/write mode and set priority. Finally click Confirm.
54
d.
A UDV has been created.
e.
Do one more time to create another UDV.
5
Examples of Creating Volumes
Figure 5-4
(Figure 5-4: Create UDVs named “UDV-1” and “UDV-2”, related to “VG-1”. The size of “UDV-1” is
100GB, and the size of “UDV-2” is 48GB. The status of these UDVs are online, write back, high
priority with cache volume 383MB. “UDV-2” is initialing about 32%. There is no LUN attached.)
Step 3: Attach LUN to UDV.
There are 2 methods to attach LUN to UDV.
1.
In / Volume config / User data volume, press Attach.
2.
In / Volume config / Logical unit, press Attach.
The procedures are as follows:
Figure 5-5
a.
In / Volume config / User data volume, select a UDV and press Attach.
b.
Enter Host, which is an initiator node name for access control, or type wildcard “*”,
which means every host can access this volume. Choose LUN and permission, and
then click Confirm.
55
Figure 5-6
(Figure 5-6: UDV-1 is attached to LUN 0 which any host can access. UDV-2 is attached to LUN 1
which only initiator node named “test-1” can access.)
Step 4: Set global spare disk.
a.
Select / Volume config / Physical disk.
b.
Select the free disk(s) by clicking the checkbox of the row, and then click Global
Spare to set as global spares.
c.
There is a GS icon shown up at Status 1 column.
Figure 5-7
(Figure 5-7: Slot 6 is set as global spare disk.)
Step 5: Done. They can be used as iSCSI disks.
56
5
Examples of Creating Volumes
To delete UDVs and VG, please follow the steps below.
Note: If the storage system is connecting to any DVR host, please log off the iSCSI device
from the host before deleting any volumes.
Step 6: Detach LUN from UDV.
a.
In / Volume config / Logical unit, select LUNs by clicking the checkbox of the row,
then click Detach. There will pop up a confirm page.
b.
Choose OK.
Step 7: Delete UDV (User Data Volume).
a.
Select / Volume config / User data volume.
b.
Select UDVs by clicking the checkbox of the row.
c.
Click Delete. There will pop up a confirm page.
d.
Choose OK. The UDVs have been deleted.
Note: When you delete UDV, the attached LUN(s) related to this UDV will be detached
automatically, too.
Step 8: Delete VG (Volume Group).
a.
Select / Volume config / Volume group.
b.
Select a VG by clicking the checkbox of the row. Make sure that there is no UDV on
this VG, or the UDV(s) on this VG must be deleted first.
c.
Click Delete. There will pop up a confirmation page.
d.
Choose OK. The VG has been deleted.
Note: The action of deleting one VG will succeed only when all of the related UDV(s) are
deleted in this VG. Otherwise, it will have an error when deleting this VG.
Step 9: Free global spare disk.
a.
Select / Volume config / Physical disk.
b.
Select the global spare disk by clicking the checkbox of the row, then click Free
Disks to free disk.
Step 10: All volumes have been deleted.
57
5.2 Example 2
Example 2 is to create two UDVs in one VG. One UDV shares the global cache volume, and
the other uses the dedicated cache volume. First, the dedicated cache volume should be
created; it can be used in creating UDV. The last, delete them.
Each UDV is associated with one specific CV (cache volume) to execute the data transaction.
Each CV could have different cache memory size. If there is no special request in UDVs, it
uses global cache volume. Or you can create a dedicated cache for indivifual UDV manually.
Using dedicated cache volume, the performance would not be affected by the other UDV’s
data access.
The total cache size depends on the RAM size and set all to global cache automatically. To
create a dedicated cache volume, first step is to cut down global cache size for the dedicated
cache volume. Please follow the procedures.
Note: If there is no special requirement, it is strongly recommended not to modify global catch
volume and create dedicated cache volume, but keep default settings.
Step 1: Create dedicated cache volume.
Figure 5-8
a.
Select / Volume config / Cache volume.
b.
If there is no free space for creating a new dedicated cache volume, cut down the
global cache size first by clicking the blue square button in the Size column. After
resizing the global cache volume, click Confirm to return to the cache volume page.
c.
58
Click Create to enter the setup page.
5
d.
Examples of Creating Volumes
Fill in the size and click Confirm. A new dedicated cache volume has been set.
Note: The minimum size of dedicated cache volume is 20MB.
Step 2: Create VG (Volume Group).
Please refer to Step 1 of Example 1 to create VG.
Step 3: Create UDV (User Data Volume).
Please refer to Step 2 of Example 1 to create UDV. To create a data user volume with
dedicated cache volume, please follow the below procedures.
Figure 5-9
a.
Select / Volume config / User data volume.
b.
Click Create.
c.
Type a UDV name, choose a VG Name, and select Dedicated cache which is
created at Step 1. Enter the size for the UDV, decide the stripe height, block size,
read/write mode and set priority. Finally click Confirm.
d.
A UDV using dedicated cache has been created.
59
Figure 5-10
(Figure 5-10: UDV named “UDV-1” uses global cache volume 300MB, and “UDV-2” uses
dedicated cache volume 83MB. “UDV-2” is initialing about 2%.)
Figure 5-11
(Figure 5-11: In / Volume config / Cache volume, UDV named “UDV-2” uses dedicated cache
volume 83MB.)
Step 4: Attach LUN to UDV.
Please refer to Step 3 of Example 1 to attach LUN.
60
5
Examples of Creating Volumes
Step 5: Set dedicated spare disk.
a.
Select / Volume config / Physical disk.
b.
Select a VG from the list box, then select the free disk(s), and click Dedicated
spares to set as dedicated spare for the selected VG.
c.
There is a DS icon shown up at the Status 1 column.
Figure 5-12
(Figure 5-12: Slot 6 has been set as dedicated spare disk of VG named “VG-1”.)
Step 6: Done. The PDs can be used as iSCSI disks.
To delete UDVs and VG, please follow the steps.
Step 7: Detach LUN from UDV.
Please refer to Step 6 of Example 1 to detach LUN.
Step 8: Delete UDV (User Data Volume).
Please refer to Step 7 of Example 1 to delete UDV.
Step 9: Delete VG (User Data Volume).
Please refer to Step 8 of Example 1 to delete VG.
61
Step 10: Free dedicated spare disk.
a.
Select / Volume config / Physical disk.
b.
Select the dedicated spare disk by clicking the checkbox of the row, then click Free
Disks to free disk.
Step 11: Delete dedicated cache volume.
a.
Select / Volume config / Cache volume.
b.
Select a CV by clicking the checkbox of the row.
c.
Click Delete. There will pop up a confirmation page.
d.
Choose OK. The CV has been deleted.
Caution: Global cache volume cannot be deleted.
Step 12: Done. All volumes have been deleted.
62
6
Chapter 6
Advanced Operation
Advanced operation
6.1 Rebuild
If one physical disk of the VG which is set as protected RAID level (e.g.: RAID 3, RAID 5, or
RAID 6) failed or has been unplugged/removed, then, the VG status is changed to degraded
mode. The system will search/detect spare disk to rebuild the degraded VG to a complete
one. It will detect the dedicated spare disk as rebuild disk first, and then global spare disk.
The system supports the Auto-Rebuild function. When the RAID level allows disk failures
which the VG is protected, such as RAID 3, RAID 5, RAID 6, and etc, the system starts
Auto-Rebuild as below scenario:
Take RAID 6 for example:
1.
When there is no global spare disk or dedicated spare disk on the system, the system
will be in degraded mode and wait until (A) there is one disk assigned as spare disk, or
(B) the failed disk is removed and replaced with new clean disk. Then the auto-rebuild
starts. The new disk will be a spare disk to the original VG automatically.
a. If the new added disk is not clean (with other VG information), it would be marked as
RS (reserved) and the system will not start the auto-rebuild.
b. If this disk is not belonging to any existing VG, it would be FR (Free) disk and the
system will start the auto-rebuild.
c. If you only removes the failed disk and plugs the same failed disk in the same slot
again, the auto-rebuild will start by this case. But rebuilding in the same failed disk
may impact customer data later from the unstable disk status. We suggest all
customers not to rebuild in the same failed disk for better data protection.
2.
When there is enough global spare disk(s) or dedicated spare disk(s) for the degraded
array, the system starts the auto-rebuild immediately. And in RAID 6, if there is another
disk failure happening during the time of rebuilding, the system will start the above
auto-rebuild scenario as well. And the auto-rebuild feature only works at "RUNTIME". It
will not work at the downtime. Thus, it will not conflict with the “Roaming” function.
In degraded mode, the status of VG is “DG”.
63
When rebuilding, the status of PD/VG/UDV is “R”; and “R%” in UDV will display the ratio in
percentage. After rebuilding is complete, “R” and “DG” will disappear. VG will become
complete one.
Note: The list box doesn’t exist if there is no VG or only VG of RAID 0, JBOD, because you
cannot set dedicated spare disk for these RAID levels.
Sometimes, rebuild is called recover; these two have the same meaning. The following table
is the relationship between RAID levels and rebuild.
RAID 0
Disk striping. No protection of data. VG fails if any hard drive fails or
unplugs.
RAID 1
Disk mirroring over 2 disks. RAID 1 allows one hard drive fail or
unplugging. Need one new hard drive to insert to the system and
rebuild to be completed.
RAID 3
Striping with parity on the dedicated disk. RAID 3 allows one hard
drive fail or unplugging.
RAID 5
Striping with interspersed parity over the member disks. RAID 5
allows one hard drive fail or unplugging.
RAID 6
2-dimensional parity protection over the member disks. RAID 6
allows two hard drives fail or unplugging. If it needs to rebuild two
hard drives at the same time, it will rebuild the first one, then the
other by sequence.
RAID 0+1
Mirroring of the member RAID 0 volumes. RAID 0+1 allows two hard
drives fail or unplugging, but at the same array.
RAID 10
Striping over the member RAID 1 volumes. RAID 10 allows two hard
drives fail or unplugging, but at different arrays.
RAID 30
Striping over the member RAID 3 volumes. RAID 30 allows two hard
drives fail or unplugging, but at different arrays.
RAID 50
Striping over the member RAID 5 volumes. RAID 50 allows two hard
drives fail or unplugging, but at different arrays.
RAID 60
Striping over the member RAID 6 volumes. RAID 40 allows four hard
drives fail or unplugging, but each two at different arrays.
JBOD
The abbreviation of “Just a Bunch Of Disks”. No protection of data.
VG fails if any hard drive fails or unplugs.
64
6
6.2
Advanced Operation
VG Migration and Extension
To migrate the RAID level, please follow the below procedures. If the VG migrates to the same
RAID level of the original VG, it is extension.
1. Select / Volume config / Volume group.
2. Decide which VG to be migrated, click the blue square button in the RAID column.
3. Change the RAID level by clicking the drop-down list of RAID Level. There will be a
pup-up which shows if the HDD is not enough to support the new RAID level. Click Select
PD to increase hard drives, and then click Confirm to go back to the setup page. When
doing migration to lower RAID level, such as the original RAID level is RAID 6 and you
want to migrate to RAID 0, the controller will evaluate this operation is safe or not, and
display "Sure to migrate to a lower protection array?” to give user warning.
4. Double check the settings of RAID level and RAID PD slot. If no problem, click Next.
5. A confirmation page shows the detailed RAID info. If no problem, click Confirm to start
migration. The system also pops up a message of “Warning: power lost during
migration may cause damage of data!” to give you warning. When the power is
abnormally off during migration, the data is in high risk.
6. Migration starts and it can be seen from the “Status 3” of a VG with a running square and
an “M”. In / Volume config / User data volume, it displays an “M” in “Status 3” and
complete percentage of migration in “R%”.
Figure 6-1
Figure 6-2
(Figure 6-2: A RAID 5 with 3 physical disks migrates to RAID 6 with 4 physical disks.)
65
Figure 6-3
(Figure 6-3: A RAID 5 migrates to RAID 6. The complete percentage of two related UDVs is 1%
and 0%.)
Note: To do migration/extension, the total size of VG must be larger or equal to the original
VG. It does not allow expanding the same RAID level with the same hard disks of original
VG. During setting migration, if you do not setup properly, the system will pop up warning
messages. Below is the detail of messages:
•
"Invalid VG ID": Source VG is invalid.
•
"Degrade VG not allowed": Source VG is degraded.
•
"Initializing/rebuilding operation's going": Source VG is initializing or rebuilding.
•
"Migration operation's going": Source VG is already in migration.
•
"Invalid VG raidcell parameter": Invalid configuration. E.g., New VG's capacity < Old
VG's capacity, New VG's stripe size < Old VG's stripe size. Or New VG's configuration
== Old VG's configuration.
•
"Invalid PD capacity": New VG's minimum PD capacity < Old VG's minimum PD
capacity.
Caution: VG Migration cannot be executed during rebuild or UDV extension. The
recording performance will be affected during migration.
66
6
Advanced Operation
6.3 UDV Extension
To extend UDV size, please follow the procedures.
1.
Select / Volume config / User data volume.
2.
Decide which UDV to be extended, and click the blue square button in the Size column.
3.
Change the size. The size must be larger than the original. Then click Confirm to start
extension.
4.
Extension starts. If UDV needs initialization, it will display an “I” in “Status 3” and
complete percentage of initialization in “R%”.
Figure 6-4
Figure 6-5
(Figure 6-5: Extend UDV-R1 from 50GB to 108GB.)
Note: If the storage system is connecting to any DVR host, please log off the iSCSI device
from the host before the extension. After the extension, the new iSCSI disk will appear as an
unformatted drive. Format the drive before usage.
Caution: UDV Extension cannot be executed during rebuild or migration.
67
6.4 Disk Roaming
Physical disks can be re-sequenced in the same system or move whole physical disks from
system-1 to system-2. This is called disk roaming. Disk roaming has some constraints as
described in the following:
1.
Check the firmware of two systems first. It’s better that both have the same firmware
version or newer.
2.
Whole physical disks of related VG should be moved from system-1 to system-2 together.
The configuration of both VG and UDV will be kept but LUN configuration will be cleared
to avoid conflict with system-2.
68
7
Chapter 7
About iSCSI Initiator
About iSCSI Initiator
The DVR host needs the iSCSI initiator to request access for storage. The iSCSI initiator is a
driver handling the traffic in an iSCSI SAN.
7.1
Microsoft iSCSI Initiator
The Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator is available as a free download from Microsoft
Download Center.
7.1.1
System Requirements
The DVR host should run on one of these supported operating systems:
•
Windows XP Pro SP1 or later
•
Windows Server 2003 or later
•
Windows 2000 SP3 or later
•
Windows Vista
Caution: The iSCSI initiator is integrated into Windows Vista, therefore there is no
need to install the initiator on Windows Vista.
69
7.1.2
1.
Setting up Windows iSCSI Initiator
Run Microsoft iSCSI Initiator.
Figure 7-1
2.
Click the Discovery tab, and click Add to add target portals.
Figure 7-2
70
7
3.
About iSCSI Initiator
Type the IP of GV-Storage System. Click OK.
Figure 7-3
Note: By default, the IP of iSCSI data port 1 is 192.168.1.1, and iSCSI data port 2 is
192.168.2.1. If both data ports are used for connection to the DVR host, add both data port
IPs respectively. The information of two data ports can be found in / iSCSI config / NIC.
4.
Click the Targets tab, and click Log On.
Figure 7-4
5.
Select Automatically restore this connection when the system boots, and click
Advanced.
Figure 7-5
71
6.
Select Local Adaptor to Microsoft iSCSI Initiator. Select Source IP to the host IP. Select
Target Portal to iSCSI data port 1. If the CHAP authentication is enabled at the storage
system, select CHAP logon information and type a valid username and target secret
(password). Click OK.
Figure 7-6
7.
If the connection with the storage system is established, the status changes into
“Connected”. At this step, you can already use the iSCSI disk by the operation similar to
the case to increase a local disk. When connecting to the iSCSI disk at the first time, it is
necessary to format it as well as a local disk.
Figure 7-7
72
7
About iSCSI Initiator
8.
To add the iSCSI data port 2 for connection, click Details in Figure 7-7.
9.
In the Target Properties dialog box, click Connections.
Figure 7-8
10. In the Session Connections dialog box, click Add.
Figure 7-9
11. In the Add Connection dialog box, click Advanced.
Figure 7-10
73
12. In the Advanced Settings dialog box, select Target Portal to the iSCSI data port 2. Set up
the CHAP authentication if necessary. Click OK.
Figure 7-11
13. Now you can see the status of both Source Portals display “Connected”. Click Apply.
Figure 7-12
74
7
7.1.3
About iSCSI Initiator
Logging off the iSCSI device
1. Click Details in Figure 7-7.
Figure 7-13
2. Select the identifier that will be deleted.
3. Click Log off. The iSCSI device is logged off successfully.
Note: If you cannot log off the iSCSI device, please check if any programs are accessing the
iSCSI drive.
75
7.2
Support Microsoft MPIO and MC/S
Microsoft iSCSI Initiator supports the multi-path function. MPIO (Multi-Path Input/Output) and
MC/S (Multiple Connections per Session) both use multiple physical paths to create logical
"paths" between the DVR host and the storage device. In the case which one or more of these
components fails, causing the path to fail, multi-path logic uses an alternate path for I/O so
that applications can still access their data.
Note: With the MPIO function, one DVR host can connect up to 16 GV-Storage Systems at
the same time; With the MC/S function, one DVR host can connect up to 32 GV-Storage
Systems at the same time.
Figure 7-14
7.2.1
Dual ports with MPIO
System Requrirements
The DVR host needs to run on one of these supported operating systems:
•
Windows Server 2002
•
Windows Server 2003
•
Windows Server 2003 R2
7.2.2
Seting up the MPIO & MC/S
To configure the MPIO and MC/S feature on the DVR host, please see Microsoft iSCSI
Software Initiator 2.x User Guide.
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8
Chapter 8
Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
Why does the connectivity between DVR and GV-Storage System get disrupted?
Follow these steps to check your network connection:
1. Run Windows Command Prompt. Take Classic Windows Start Menu for example, click
Start, select Accessories and click Command Prompt.
2. Type “ping 192.168.0.X”, and press Enter.
Note: The IP you type here is the IP address of GV-Storage System. That may be one or both
of data port IPs. If two data ports are used in connection with GV-Storage System, you need to
ping both data port IPs for testing.
3. If you receive a response as the following sample screen, the connection to GV-Storage
System hasn’t been successfully established. Check the related network settings of the
DVR or contact your network administrator.
Type the data port IP
Connection error
77
783
4. If you receive a response as the following sample screen, the connection to GV-Storage
System is still established. Then it could be the network bandwidth or stability problem. It
is recommended to use gigabit LAN to solve the problem.
Type the data port IP
Connection is successful
Why is DVR restarted by software watchdog during recording?
1. Ensure that each UDV (user data volume) is assigned only to one DVR host for recording
usage. See 4.5.4 User Data Volume and 4.5.6 Logical Unit.
2. Ensure network stability.
3. Check the event log of GV-Storage System for any warning and error messages. See
4.3.11 Event Log.
Why can’t I see the assigned iSCSI drive after logging on GV-Storage System?
1. Ensure that each UDV (user data volume) is assigned only to one DVR host for recording
usage. See 4.5.4 User Data Volume and 4.5.6 Logical Unit.
2. Ensure that the initiator node name entered on the DVR matches the host name assigned
on the storage system. See 4.5.6 Logical Unit.
Why is the volume size displayed on DVR different from the assigned size on
GV-Storage System?
This could be because the iSCSI initiator memorizes the previous partition information even
though the iSCSI drive has been reallocated. To solve the problem, you need to delete the old
partition(s) and format the iSCSI drive again. Please note the settings of the formatted
partition should be Basic disk storage and NTFS file system.
78
8
Troubleshooting
Why has the frame rate of DVR been low?
1. Ensure that the RAID is not initializing or rebuilding.
2. Ensure that no ERROR level of events occurred. To check event log, see 4.3.11 Event
Log.
3. Ensure that the storage system has enough bandwidth to handle the iSCSI
communication. For the recommended network specifications, see 3.2 Before You Begin.
4. The storage system may reach the Read/Write limit of RAID. For the limit on the number
of connected channels, refer to Performance Test Results in Appendix.
Why does my storage system shut down automatically?
This may be that the storage system has reached the temperature or voltage limit. To view the
information of current temperature and voltage, see 4.6.2 Hardware Monitor.
Why can’t I open the folder created on the iSCSI drive?
1. Ensure that each UDV (user data volume) is assigned only to one DVR host for recording
usage. See See 4.5.4 User Data Volume and 4.5.6 Logical Unit.
2. Ensure that the iSCSI drive is formatted and written data by the same DVR host. If you use
one DVR to format the iSCSI drive and use another DVR to write data to the drive, the file
may be missing or corrupt. When this problem occurs, try to use Windows ScanDisk tool
to repair the error.
Why has RAID failure occurred?
Please use the recommended SATA hard drives. See Certification list in Appendix A.
How to stop system buzzer?
1. Select Alarm Mute from LCD panel menu. See 2.4.1 LCD Panel Menu.
2. Click the Mute button in Event Log from Web GUI. See 4.3.11 Event log.
Why can’t I connect to Internet using DDNS?
Currently the storage system doesn’t support DDNS (Dynamic Domain Name System).
VPN (Virtual Private Network) or a static IP is required.
79
Specifications
System
CPU
Intel IOP processor
RAM
512 MB
Power
Two (2) Redundant, hot-swappable 420 W, full-range power
supplies
ISCSI Port
Two (2) 10/100/1000 Mbps Ethernet
Ethernet Port
One (1) 10/100 Mbps Ethernet
Hot Swap Tray
Eight (8) Serial ATA trays
Fan
Two (2) rear fans
Management
Management Method
Web GUI, LCD Panel Menu
Alert
Email, System Buzzer
Temperature Control
Hard Disks, Enclosure
Environmental
Operating Temp.
0 ~ 50 °C (32 ~ 104 °F)
Humidity
0 ~ 80% RH (non-condensing)
Physical
IPC Case
4U Rackmount
Color
Silver
Dimensions
483 (W) x 178 (H) x 528 (D) mm (19 x 7 x21 inch)
Weight
18.1 Kg (Net), 22.1 Kg (Gross)
80
Appendix
Appendix
A. Certification List
•
•
•
Network Interface Card
Vendor
Model
Intel
PWLA8490MT (Gigabit, 1 port, TCP/IP offload)
Intel
PWLA8492MT (Gigabit, 2 ports, TCP/IP offload)
Intel
PWLA8494MT (Gigabit, 4 ports, TCP/IP offload)
D-Link
DGE-530T (PCI, Gigabit, 1 port)
HP
NC7170 (PCI-X, Gigabit, 2 ports)
HP
NC360T (PCI-Express, Gigabit, 2 ports, TCP/IP offload)
IBM
NetXtreme 1000 T (73P4201) (PCI-X, Gigabit, 2 ports, TCP/IP offload)
Gigabit Switch
Vendor
Model
ZyXEL
GS-2024 (2 Gigabit, 24 ports, 2 SPF slots)
Dell
PowerConnect 5324
Dell
PowerConnect 2724
Dell
PowerConnect 2708
HP
ProCurve 1800-24G
D-Link
DGS-3024
SATA Hard Drive
Vendor
Model
Seagate
Barracuda ES drives, ST3250620NS, 250GB. 7200RPM, SATA 3.0Gb/s,
16M
Seagate
Barracuda ES drives, ST3320620NS, 320GB. 7200RPM, SATA 3.0Gb/s,
16M
Seagate
Barracuda ES drives, ST3400620NS, 400GB. 7200RPM, SATA 3.0Gb/s,
16M
Seagate
Barracuda ES drives, ST3500630NS, 500GB. 7200RPM, SATA 3.0Gb/s,
16M
Seagate
Barracuda ES drives, ST3750640NS, 750GB. 7200RPM, SATA 3.0Gb/s,
16M
Seagate
Barracuda ES.2, ST31000340NS, 1000G, 7200RPM, SATA 3.0Gb/s,
32M
81
B. Event Notifications
•
PD/S.M.A.R.T. events
Level
Type
Description
Info
Disk inserted
Info: Disk <slot> is inserted.
Info
Disk removed
Info: Disk <slot> is removed.
Warning
S.M.A.R.T. threshold
Warning: Disk <slot> S.M.A.R.T.
exceed condition
threshold exceed condition occurred for
attribute of
Warning
1.
read error rate
2.
spin up time
3.
reallocated sector count
4.
seek error rate
5.
spin up retries
6.
calibration retries
S.M.A.R.T. information Warning: Disk <slot>: Failure to get
S.M.A.R.T information
•
Physical HW events
Level
Warning
Type
ECC error
Description
Warning: Single-bit ECC error is
detected.
•
Error
ECC error
Error: Multi-bit ECC error is detected.
Info
ECC DIMM Installed
Info: ECC Memory is installed.
Info
Non-ECC installed
Info: Non-ECC Memory is installed.
Error
Host chip failure
Error: Host channel chip failed.
Error
Drive chip failure
Error: Drive channel chip failed.
Warning
Ethernet port failure
Warning: GUI Ethernet port failed.
HDD IO events
Level
82
Type
Description
Warning
Disk error
Error: Disk <slot> read block error.
Warning
Disk error
Error: Disk <slot> writes block error.
Warning
HDD failure
Error: Disk <slot> is failed.
Warning
Channel error
Error: Disk <slot> IO incomplete.
Appendix
•
SES events
Level
Info
Type
SES load conf. OK
Description
Info: SES configuration has been
loaded.
SES Load Conf.
Error: Failed to load SES configuration.
Failure
The SES device is disabled.
Info
SES is disabled
Info: The SES device is disabled.
Info
SES is enabled
Info: The SES device is enabled
Warning
•
Environmental events
Level
Info
Type
Admin Login OK
Description
Info: Admin login from <IP or serial
console> via <Web UI or Console UI>.
Info
Admin Logout OK
Info: Admin logout from <IP or serial
console> via <Web UI or Console UI>.
Info
iSCSI data port login
Info: iSCSI login from <IQN>
(<IP:Port
Number>) succeeds.
Warning
iSCSI data port login
Warning: iSCSI login from <IQN>
reject
(<IP:Port Number>) was rejected,
reason of
1.
initiator error
2.
authentication failure
3.
authorization failure
4.
target not found
5.
unsupported version
6.
too many connections
7.
missing parameter
8.
session does not exist
9.
target error
10. out of resources
11. unknown
Error
Thermal critical
Error: System Overheated!!! The
system will do the auto shutdown
immediately.
Warning
Thermal warning
Warning: System temperature is a little
bit higher.
83
Error
Voltage critical
Error: System voltages failed!!! The
system will do the auto shutdown
immediately
Warning
Voltage warning
Warning: System voltage is a little bit
higher/lower.
Info
Mgmt Lan Port Active
Info: Management LAN Port is active.
Warning
Mgmt Lan Port Failed
Warning: Fail to manage the system via
the LAN Port.
Info
RTC Device OK
Info: RTC device is active.
Warning
RTC Access Failed
Warning: Fail to access RTC device
Info
Reset Password
Info: Reset Admin Password to default.
Info
Reset IP
Info: Reset network settings set to
default.
•
System config events
Level
Type
Description
Sys Config. Defaults
Info: Default system configurations
Restored
restored.
Info
Sys NVRAM OK
Info: The system NVRAM is active.
Error
Sys NVRAM IO Failed
Error: Can’t access the system
Info
NVRAM.
Warning
•
Sys NVRAM is full
Warning: The system NVRAM is full.
System maintenance events
Level
Info
Type
Firmware Upgraded
Description
Info: System firmware has been
upgraded
Error
Firmware Upgraded
Error: System firmware upgrade failed.
Failed
Info
System reboot
Info: System has been rebooted
Info
System shutdown
Info: System has been shutdown.
Info
System Init OK
Info: System has been initialized OK.
Error
System Init Failed
Error: System cannot be initialized in
the last boot up.
84
Appendix
•
LVM events
Level
Type
Description
Info
VG Created OK
Info: VG <name> has been created.
Warning
VG Created Fail
Warning: Fail to create VG <name>.
Info
VG Deleted
Info: VG <name> has been deleted.
Info
UDV Created OK
Info: UDV <name> has been created.
Warning
UDV Created Fail
Warning: Fail to create UDV <name>.
Info
UDV Deleted
Info: UDV <name> has been deleted.
Info
UDV Attached OK
Info: UDV <name> has been
LUN-attached.
Warning
UDV Attached Fail
Warning: Fail to attach LUN to UDV
<name>.
Info
UDV Detached OK
Info: UDV <name> has been detached.
Warning
UDV Detached Fail
Warning: Fail to detach LUN from Bus
<number> SCSI_ID <number> LUN
<number>.
Info
UDV_OP Rebuild
Info: UDV <name> starts rebuilding.
Started
Info
Warning
UDV_OP Rebuild
Info: UDV <name> completes
Finished
rebuilding.
UDV_OP Rebuild Fail
Warning: Fail to complete UDV <name>
rebuilding.
Info
UDV_OP Migrate
Info: UDV <name> starts migration.
Started
Info
Warning
Warning
UDV_OP Migrate
Info: UDV <name> completes
Finished
migration.
UDV_OP Migrate
Warning: Fail to complete UDV <name>
Failed
migration.
VG Degraded
Warning: VG <name> is under
degraded mode.
Warning
UDV Degraded
Warning: UDV <name> is under
degraded mode.
Info
UDV Init OK
Info: UDV <name> completes the
initialization.
Warning
Warning
UDV_OP Stop
Warning: Fail to complete UDV <name>
Initialization
initialization.
UDV IO Fault
Error: IO failure for stripe number
<number> in UDV <name>.
85
Warning
VG Failed
Error: Fail to access VG <name>.
Warning
UDV Failed
Error: Fail to access UDV <name>.
Warning
Global CV Adjustment
Error: Fail to adjust the size of the
Failed
global cache.
Info
Global Cache
Info: The global cache is OK.
Error
Global CV Creation
Error: Fail to create the global cache.
Failed
Info
UDV Rename
Info: UDV <name> has been renamed
as <name>.
Info
VG Rename
Info: VG <name> has been renamed as
<name>.
Info
Info
Set VG Dedicated
Info: Assign Disk <slot> to be VG
Spare Disks
<name> dedicated spare disk.
Set Global Disks
Info: Assign Disk <slot> to the Global
Spare Disks.
Info
UDV Read-Only
Info: UDV <name> is a read-only
volume.
Info
WRBK Cache Policy
Info: Use the write-back cache policy for
UDV <name>.
WRTHRU Cache
Info: Use the write-through cache policy
Policy
for UDV <name>.
Info
High priority UDV
Info: UDV <name> is set to high priority.
Info
Mid Priority UDV
Info: UDV <name> is set to mid priority.
Info
Low Priority UDV
Info: UDV <name> is set to low priority.
Error
PD configuration
Error: PD <slot> lba <#> length <#>
read/write error
config <read | write> failed.
PD read/write error
Error: PD <#> lba <#> length <#> <read
Info
Error
| write> error.
Error
UDV recoverable
Error: UDV <name> stripe <#> PD <#>
read/write error
lba <#> length <#> <read | write>
recoverable
Error
UDV unrecoverable
Error: UDV <#> stripe <#> PD <#> lba
read/write error
<#> length <#> <read | write>
unrecoverable
Info
UDV stripe rewrite
Info: UDV <name> stripe <#> rewrite
start/fail/succeed
column bitmap <BITMAP> <started |
failed | finished>.
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Appendix
C. Performance Test Results
DVR
Number of Channel
Resolution
Recording Rate (NTSC/PAL)
GV-1480
128
CIF
30/25 FPS (software compression)
GV-2016
48
Full D1
30/25 FPS (hardware compression)
Above data are two test results of the storage system. The storage system was set to
RAID 5 and installed with 8 physical disks, totaling 2.6 TB.
The first test is that 8 DVRs, installed with GV-1480 cards, totaling 128 channels, are
connected to the storage system. Each DVR can record up 30 (NTSC)/ 25 (PAL) fps with
software compression at CIF resolution.
The second test is that 3 DVRs, installed with GV-2016 cards, totaling 48 channels, are
connected to the storage system. Each DVR can record up to 30 (NTSC)/ 25 (PAL) fps
with hardware compression at Full D1 resolution.
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