Scanner 3100 Web Interface Manual

Table of Contents
Important Manual Viewing Information
Section 1—Getting Started
Section 2—Monitoring Status
Section 3—Setting Up the Scanner
3100
Scanner 3100 Web Interface
User Manual
Important Manual Viewing Information
This document is designed to be viewed simultaneously with the web
interface. The following computer settings will position the manual alongside the web interface on your computer screen for easy reference.
Section 4—Setting Up
Communications
When you log into the Scanner* 3100 web interface, this manual .pdf may appear in a new tab at the
top of your screen or in a separate window. To view the manual and the Scanner 3100 interface sideby-side, change the following settings on your computer.
Section 5—Configuring Inputs and
Outputs
1.
Section 6—Calibrating, Zeroing and
Verifying Inputs
If your manual already appears in a separate window, proceed to step 2.
2.
Click on the web interface window to select it.
Section 7—Flowrun Configuration
3.
To reposition the web interface window in the LEFT half of the screen, press and hold the
WINDOWS LOGO key while pressing the LEFT arrow key, as shown below.
4.
Click on the manual .pdf window to select it.
5.
To reposition the manual window in the RIGHT half of the screen, press and hold the
WINDOWS LOGO key while pressing the RIGHT arrow key, as shown below.
6.
Drag the interior edge of the windows to shrink or expand the width for optimal viewing.
If the manual appears as a tab at the bottom of your screen, configure your web browser to
open links in a new window. For instructions, search the Internet for “open links in a new window
in [browser name]”.
Section 8—Using the Scanner Logic
Controller Features
Section 9—Creating Custom
Calculations
Section 10—Configuring Device
Alarms
Section 11—Configuring Archives
Section 12—Accessing Archive Data
Appendix A—Device Administration
Appendix B—Gas Chromatograph
Inputs
Appendix C—Maintaining a Scanner
Slave Device
Appendix D—Creating a Virtual Serial
Port for TCP-to-Serial Passthrough
Communications
Appendix E—Web Interface
Troubleshooting
TECHNICAL SUPPORT
Phone:+1.844.226.6327
Email:
ms-services@cameron.slb.com
Website:products.slb.com
*Mark of Schlumberger.
Other company, product, and service
names are the property of their respective
owners.
Copyright © 2017 Schlumberger Limited.
All rights reserved.
Manual No. 50264388, Rev. 03
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Section 1—Getting Started
NAVIGATING THE WEB INTERFACE
To familiarize yourself with the Scanner 3100 web interface in less than five minutes, read this section
and explore four basic navigational features (Figure 1.1).
Figure 1.1—The four basic navigational features of the Scanner 3100 web interface
Menu Bar
A gray menu bar near the top of the screen contains a series of tabbed menus (“Device,” “Local I/O,”
“Slave Devices,” etc.). Selecting a menu from this bar is the first step in performing many tasks within
the interface. If an arrow appears next to a menu name, a dropdown list with more selections is provided. Place your cursor over the bar to view these added selections.
Note When a Scanner 3100 is configured as a master of one or more Scanner 2x00 devices and
you navigate to a Slave Device screen, a second menu bar appears just below the gray
menu bar, providing access to slave device status and configuration settings. See Appendix C—Maintaining a Scanner Slave Device, page 101 for details.
Screen Links
Once a menu is selected from the menu bar, status information for the selected menu will appear in
the large interface window and the STATUS screen link at the left will be white, indicating the Status
screen is in view. When other viewing and configuration functions are available, additional screen link
buttons will appear below the STATUS link. Click on a screen link button to change the content displayed in the interface window. Screen links vary based on the menu bar selection.
Modify Button
Screens used for configuring the Scanner 3100 contain a MODIFY button (highlighted in Figure 1.1)
in the upper left corner. Clicking the MODIFY button provides access to editable fields.
During input calibration and configuration, it is necessary to enter Maintenance Mode, which freezes
sensor input values to preserve data integrity. When a task requires this action, a notification appears
to the right of the MODIFY button, as shown in Figure 1.2, page 3.
2
Figure 1.2—Maintenance Mode notification
Upon clicking the MODIFY button, the Enter Maintenance Mode dialog (Figure 1.3) will appear. Click
OK to enter Maintenance Mode. The device will automatically freeze input values, and you can safely
continue with changing input settings.
Maintenance Mode Timeout
If you fail to exit Maintenance Mode, it
will expire automatically after 60 minutes,
assuming no activity is detected on the
web interface. All inputs will return to
regular operation.
Figure 1.3—Enter Maintenance Mode dialog
When new settings are saved, a bar prompting you to exit Maintenance Mode and restore inputs to
live values (Figure 1.4) will appear at the top of the screen. Input values will remain frozen until you
click the Exit Maintenance hyperlink.
Figure 1.4—Exit Maintenance Mode notification bar
Download Button
Expanding Archive Folders
To view the archives under a particular
folder on the All Archives Download
screen, click the double chevron
icon
to the far right of the folder. To expand all
archive folders, click the Show All Details
hyperlink in the upper right corner.
The red DOWNLOAD button in the upper left corner of the screen (Figure 1.1, page 2) can be
used to download Scanner 3100 archives (and Scanner 2x00 slave device archives, where applicable) on demand. Archive data is packaged in a variety of ways to facilitate various needs. To download a file, click the DOWNLOAD button, then right-click on the desired archive file (blue hyperlink)
and select “Save As...” to move a copy of the file to the user-selected directory.
All archive data is stored in a proprietary .sdf file that can be opened with the Scanner Data Manager
software (downloadable from http://www.cameron.slb.com/flowcomputers).
A “Complete” archive contains all Scanner 3100 device and slave device records (when applicable).
For information about other archive packages, see Section 12—Accessing Archive Data, page 92.
Navigational Paths
Throughout this manual, users will find menu paths formatted in purple text set in all caps. These
menu paths provide an easy-to-follow guide to the sequence of clicks required to navigate to a
screen, starting at the gray menu bar. See Figure 1.1, page 2, for help in locating these elements
on the screen.
MENU BAR (1)>
DROPDOWN LIST (WHERE APPLICABLE)>
SCREEN LINK (2)>
MODIFY BUTTON (3) WHERE APPLICABLE)>
3
Example: To access the configuration settings for the device display, click DEVICE>DISPLAY>
MODIFY (Figure 1.5).
Figure 1.5—Common navigation sequence
CONFIGURATION TIPS
Common Icons
The Scanner 3100 web interface commonly uses three icons in conjunction with configurable settings:
•
The Pencil icon
displays the available options for a configurable field and has the same
effect as clicking inside the field.
•
The Delete icon
•
The Information icon
provides additional information about settings. If the information is not
displayed to the right of the icon, click on the icon to display it.
deletes the selection.
Save Button
Important
To avoid losing settings on a configurable screen, always click SAVE before
exiting. Also click SAVE before clicking on any blue hyperlink embedded in the
screen. These links typically open a new screen, resulting in the loss of any
changes entered on the previous screen since the last save.
Shortcut for Configuring Multiple Instances of a Parameter
When more than one instance of a configurable parameter is required (two flowruns, two or more
gas streams, communication ports, or digital inputs/outputs, for example), it is not necessary to exit
the parameter menu screen to configure each one. From the Status screen for the parameter being
configured, simply look at the selection options bar in the upper right corner of the screen to quickly
select the next instance in the series to configure. For example, in Figure 1.6, all six Digital Ins/Outs
can be configured without returning to the LOCAL I/O menu.
Figure 1.6—Selection options bar for configuring multiple instances of a parameter without leaving
the parameter menu
4
VALIDATION ERRORS
Validation errors appear when a required field is left blank or the value in a field is invalid. A validation error message will appear on the screen or in a popup window, and red messages identifying the
error(s) will appear next to the field(s) containing an unresolved entry, as shown in Figure 1.7.
Figure 1.7—Validation errors identified with red text
Important
Name fields throughout the device are generally limited to 15 characters and
do not allow the following characters: & < > , ! . ‘ “ ` * + / : ; = ? \ [ ] | (space) { }
If an invalid character is entered, a validation error will appear on screen.
Section 2—Monitoring Status
OVERVIEW
Every menu selectable from the gray menu bar opens to a Status screen. Status screens are typically read-only screens that provide information on the current status of the parameters or processes
associated with the menu selection.
The web interface displays status information two ways:
1.
Hover the cursor over a menu bar to reveal a dropdown list of selections, and choose the All
[Parameter Type] selection to collectively view the status of all configured parameters for that
type in one screen. (All menus except for DEVICE and ADMINISTRATION feature this view.)
Note
2.
The following Status screens also include action links: Device, All Local Input/Output, Flow
Run, All Archives and Triggered Archive. For more information, see the parameter-specific
Status screen information on page 8 through page 14.
Select a single parameter from menu bar selection to view a detailed status breakdown for the
selected parameter. Embedded links in the All [Parameter Type] screens also allow users quick
access to the individual parameter status screens.
Colored Status Indicators
Status screens typically contain green, red, orange, or gray rectangular glyphs that indicate the status
of various parameters, as shown in Table 2.1—Status Indicators, page 6.
•
Green is used to convey a status or non-critical information that may not require further action.
•
Orange indicates a warning that the device is in a temporary holding state that is expected to
change soon and is not available for use.
•
Red is used to communicate critical events, including failure, that typically requires a response
from you.
•
Gray indicates a “disabled” or “not used” status.
5
TABLE 2.1—STATUS INDICATORS
GLYPH
SCREEN
Alarms Status
DESCRIPTION
OK
Calculator Status
Device Status - Alarms
Device System Status
Input Status
Flow Run Status
Analog Output Status
PID Controller Status
Digital In/Out Status
Gas Stream Status
Gas Chromatograph Status
Scanner 2x00 Flow Run/Input Status
Port Status
Enabled
Network Connection Status
Connected
Wireless Mesh Network Status
Operational
Wireless Mesh Node Status
Wired Slave Node Status
Slave Device Status
Wireless Mesh Network Status
Synchronizing
Wireless Mesh Node Status
Wired Slave Node Status
Input Status
Value in Stacked Input Range
Input Status
Maintenance Mode,
User Override
Flow Run Status
PID Controller Status
Manual Override
Analog Output Status
Calibration Mode
Digital In/Out Status
Gas Stream Status
User Override
Slave Device Status
Calculator Status
Operation Contains Integer Value
Flow Run Status
Input is an Integer Value
Analog Output Status
PID Controller Status
Digital In/Out Status
Scanner 2x00 Flow Run/Input Status
Calculation Warning, MVT Error
Alarms Status
No Current Alarm (alarms have occurred
that have not been acknowledged)
Gas Stream Status
In Alarm Hold-off
(Data Test Fail or Stale Input Data)
Wireless Mesh Network Status
Radio Test
Wireless Mesh Node Status
Negotiating
Wired Slave Node Status
Alarms Status
High and Low Alarm
Device Status
Alarm
Gas Stream Status
Gas Chromatograph Status
Scanner 2x00 Flow Run/Input Status
Flow Run/Input Fail
Wireless Mesh Network Status
Error: Startup, Config, or License
Wireless Mesh Node Status
Lost
Wired Slave Node Status
Slave Device Status
6
GLYPH
SCREEN
Input Status
DESCRIPTION
Maintenance Mode, User Override
Flow Run Status
Analog Output Status
Maintenance Mode
Digital In/Out Status
Gas Stream Status
User Override
Scanner 2x00 Flow Run/Input Status
Flow Run Fail, User Override
Calculator Status
Fail, Calculation Error in Operation
Device System Status
Fail
Input Status
Flow Run Status
PID Controller Status
Fail, Calculation Error
Gas Stream Status
Gas Chromatograph Alarm
Alarms Status
Invalid Register Tag (reconfigure alarm)
Calculator Status
Operation Contains Integer Value
Input Status
Invalid Input, Data Type/Input Category
Mismatch
Flow Run Status
Analog Output Status
Invalid Input, Data Type Mismatch,
Calculation Error
PID Controller Status
Invalid Input, Data Type/Input Category
Mismatch
Digital In/Out Status
Invalid Input, Data Type Mismatch,
Gas Stream Status
Data Test Failure, Stale Input Data (when
stale alarm is enabled)
Scanner 2x00 Flow Run Status
Fail
Alarms Status
High Alarm
Device System Status
Above Range High
Input Status
High-High Alarm
Flow Run Status
Analog Output Status
Output Clipped High
Scanner 2x00 Flow Run/Input Status
Flow Run/Input Fail, High
Alarms Status
Low Alarm
Device System Status
Below Range Low
Input Status
Low-Low Alarm
Flow Run Status
Analog Output Status
Output Clipped Low
Scanner 2x00 Flow Run/Input Status
Flow Run Fail, Low
Device System Status
Above Normal Range
Input Status
High Alarm
Flow Run Status
Scanner 2x00 Flow Run/Input Status
Flow Run High, Input High
Input Status
Low Alarm
Flow Run Status
Scanner 2x00 Flow Run/Input Status
Flow Run Low, Input Low
Alarms Status
Disabled
Calculator Status
Device System Status
Input Status
Flow Run Status
Analog Output Status
PID Controller Status
Port Status
Gas Chromatograph Status
Unassigned
Network Connection Status
Not Connected
Wireless Mesh Network Status
Network Not Running
Slave Device Status
Not Used
7
To obtain a more detailed, context-specific definition of an indicator, hover your cursor over the
glyph,as shown in Figure 2.1. The definition of an indicator can vary within the web interface, depending upon the parameter or function being supported.
Figure 2.1—Indicator definition
See Table 2.2—Input Alarm Criteria, page 11 and Table 2.3—Input Fail Conditions, page 11 for
more information about the criteria used to determine low/high input conditions and fail conditions.
DEVICE STATUS
Upon logging in to the web interface, the Device Status screen will appear, providing
•
Status indications for flowruns, inputs/outputs, and alarms
•
Device date and time
•
Current flow rates for volume, mass, and energy
•
Current day and previous day flowrun totals
•
Instantaneous, current day, and previous day input averages
•
Current flow rates for pulse inputs
•
Current mode and state of digital inputs/outputs
•
Current mode and output level of analog outputs
•
Instantaneous, current day, and previous day device alarms
The following actions can also be performed from the Device Status screen:
•
Generate a snapshot report (Snapshot Report, page 14)
•
Clear latched digital outputs
ALARM STATUS
VIEWING SLAVE DEVICE ALARMS
The Alarms Status page does not display
alarms that are configured for a Scanner
2000 Series slave device using ModWorX
Pro software. To view the status of these
alarms, view SLAVE DEVICES>ALL
SLAVE DEVICES. If a configured slave
has an active alarm condition, “Fail” will
appear in the Alarms column of the All
Slave Devices - Status page. Log into
the slave device using ModWorX Pro to
manage specific alarms.
Alternatively, device alarms can be
configured to follow slave device alarms
using the DEVICE>ALARMS menu. When
the alarm is created in this way, the status
of the alarm can be monitored from the
Alarms Status screen.
The Scanner 3100 can be configured to alarm on up to 32 parameters. See Section 10—Configuring
Device Alarms, page 83 for information about configuring alarms. To view alarm status information,
navigate to one of the two screens in the web interface, as described below.
Click the DEVICE tab on the menu bar and scroll to the bottom of the Device Status screen to view
the current status of configured alarms including the collective number of instantaneous, current day,
and previous day alarms triggered, and (when the “Show Details” view is enabled) the current status
of each individual configured alarm.
Click DEVICE>ALARM STATUS for a detailed view of alarm status, including configured setpoints
and live alarm parameter values.
Beside each configured alarm description is a colored status indicator box that dynamically changes
between green, red, and orange to communicate changes in alarm status.
•
A green-filled box indicates the variable is operating within configured parameters with no active alarm conditions. Live values and setpoints appear in black text on the screen.
•
A red-filled box indicates the variable is in an active alarm state. Live values and the setpoints
violated by the alarm condition appear in red text on the screen. When applicable, an arrow appears inside the colored box to indicate whether an alarm is a high alarm (upward arrow) or a
low alarm (downward arrow).
•
An orange-filled box indicates the variable experienced an alarm state that has not been acknowledged and that the variable is no longer in an active alarm state. Live values and setpoints
appear in black text on the screen. The box will remain orange until a user acknowledges the
alarm (see Acknowledging Alarms, page 9).
For details about the history of a single alarm condition, click on the blue double chevron icon to the
far right of an alarm entry. For a detailed view of all configured alarms, click the Show All Details link
in the upper right corner of the screen. To collapse the detailed view, select Hide All Details.
The “All Details” view provides additional details to determine when the alarm condition occurred.
Instantaneous, daily, previous day, interval, and previous interval alarm status is easily identified with
an “OK” (no alarm condition) or “Alarm” (an alarm condition has occurred within the designated time
frame). For example, when the daily alarm status is “OK” and the previous day status is “Alarm,” a
8
user can be assured that the alarm occurred prior to the current daily contract period. The instantaneous alarm status is displayed as “OK,” “Low,” or “High” to indicate the type of alarm triggered.
Acknowledging Alarms
In addition to the alarm status indicators described above, a “Has Alarmed” indicator appears in the
far right of a row of the “All Details” view. The “Has Alarmed” indicator can only be cleared manually,
thereby ensuring that past alarm conditions are acknowledged by a user. If an alarm occurs, the “Has
Alarmed” status is automatically displayed as “Yes” in red text. Even after the alarm condition is no
longer active, the “Has Alarmed” status will remain onscreen until it is manually acknowledged. To
acknowledge past alarms and clear the “Has Alarmed” status, click the Acknowledge Alarmed link
near the top of the Alarms Status page, and click YES on the Confirm dialog. The red “Yes” will be
replaced by a black “No” for all alarm parameters that are not actively in alarm.
Important Latched DIO outputs configured to track alarms will not be unlatched by this
action.
Clearing the “Has Alarmed” status automatically clears the color-filled box indicator. It will not clear
the red text status descriptions displayed in the “Show All Details” view if an alarm condition persists.
If a variable has experienced an alarm state but is no longer in an active alarm state, the orangecolored box and red text status indicators will remain until a user acknowledges the alarm.
SYSTEM STATUS
The Device System Status screen (DEVICE>SYSTEM) provides important system information, such
as the current firmware version, the device’s IP address, etc. Data from the integral MVT sensor,
such as static pressure range and differential pressure range, also appear on this screen, as do device temperature, system voltage, system current, system power, external voltage, etc.
Verifying Firmware Versions
Firmware versions are updated from time to time and users are encouraged to verify the firmware
version of their device before installation and before contacting technical support. Figure 2.2 shows
the location of firmware version information for both the Scanner 3100 device and for connected
Scanner 2x00 slave devices.
Figure 2.2—Firmware version location on Device System Status and Slave Device # System
Information screens
The Slave Device System Information screen (SLAVE DEVICES>SLAVE DEVICE #>SYSTEM)
provides general information about the slave device, including the slave device’s product type, serial
number, firmware version, and register table version.
LEP and UIC Firmware
In addition to identifying the version of firmware used to control the computing functions of the Scanner 3100, the Device System Status screen also contains firmware versions for two processors that
control communications functions, pulse inputs, and keypad inputs.
9
When the system boots properly, the LEP and UIC firmware version should appear as a non-zero
value. An LEP or UIC firmware value of 0.000 may be an indicator of a boot failure. Other indicators
of a failure include four filled keys in the keypad glyph at the top of the Scanner 3100 display (see the
Scanner 3100 Hardware Manual for additional information) and malfunctioning communication ports,
pulse inputs, and keypad inputs.
To rule out a hardware failure,
1.
Remove all power sources and unplug power at the terminal block.
2.
Let the device sit idle for at least 10 seconds.
3.
Check the power supply to ensure it complies with the 9 to 30 VDC, 150 mA external power supply rating specified for use with the Scanner 3100.
4.
Restore power and check the keypad glyph. If the four quadrants are still illuminated, contact
technical support for assistance.
LOCAL INPUT/OUTPUT STATUS
When LOCAL I/O>ALL LOCAL INPUT/OUTPUT (Figure 2.3) is selected, all supported input/output
parameters are displayed on the All Local Input/Output Status screen.
Figure 2.3—Local I/O dropdown list
The All Local Input/Output Status screen provides:
•
Status indications for inputs and outputs
•
Instantaneous, current day and previous day input averages
•
Current flow rates for pulse inputs
•
Current mode and state of digital inputs/outputs
•
Current mode and output level of analog outputs
Additionally, users can clear latched digital outputs from the All Local Input/Output Status screen by
clicking the Clear All DIO Latches hyperlink to the right of the “Digital Inputs/Outputs” heading and
clicking OK when the Confirm dialog appears.
Each input/output parameter has its own Status screen accessed by clicking on a parameter in the
dropdown selections of the LOCAL I/O menu or by clicking on any hyperlink listed on the All Local
Input/Output Status screen.
Available inputs and outputs are:
•
Differential Pressure (DP)
•
Static Pressure (SP)
•
RTD (1 and 2)
•
Analog Input (1 through 4)
•
Pulse Input (1 through 3)
•
Digital Input/Output (1 through 6)
•
Analog Output (1 and 2)
Input Data
The status indicators displayed on Local Input/Output Status screens turn from green to red when
communication to an input device is lost or when the input value goes outside its user-configured
range. When an override value is set for an input parameter, a lock symbol appears in combination
10
with the colored status indicator. See Table 2.1—Status Indicators, page 6, for a complete list of
indicators and their definitions.
Generally, the Scanner 3100 low, high, low-low, and high-high input conditions are defined in Table
2.2—Input Alarm Criteria:
TABLE 2.2—INPUT ALARM CRITERIA
Alarm Status
Description
Low
Below transducer range by 0.5% of span
Low-Low
Below transducer range by 20% of span
High
Above transducer range by any amount
High-High
Above transducer range by 20% of span
Alarm records are created when the device enters and exits an alarm condition.
Example:
––
An alarm is created when a damped input is greater than the upper end of the transducer
range.
––
The alarm will not clear until the damped value is less than 0.5% of span below the upper
limit of the transducer range.
––
A damped value is altered by field calibration but not by the low input cutoff value.
A “fail” status is triggered when any of the fail conditions shown in Table 2.3—Input Fail Conditions
exist:
TABLE 2.3—INPUT FAIL CONDITIONS
Input
Fail Condition
RTD
Open circuit or short circuit is detected
1 to 5 VDC
Input < 125 mV
4 to 20 mA
Input < 0.5 mA
MVT
Serial number is not read at boot-up
TSEN: < –100°C or > 200°C
SP: < –10 PSI or > 10000 PSI
DP: < –2000 inH2O or > 2000 inH2O
In the event that an MVT is over-ranged (the applied pressure exceeds the MVT upper-range limit)
and the high-high alarm is activated, the Scanner 3100 will continue to use the live pressure reading
for flow calculations until the input reaches the fail state. The fail condition (symbolized by a red X
status indicator in the interface) will be declared only if the MVT cable is damaged or the cell is unreadable (typically, when the ADC < –2000 inH2O or > 2000 inH2O). At that point, the input will revert
to the configured fail value.
SLAVE DEVICE STATUS
The Scanner 3100 supports up to 20 Scanner 2x00 slave devices. For an overview of the slave
devices, select SLAVE DEVICES>ALL SLAVE DEVICES. The All Slave Devices Status screen will
display the status of all slave devices.
To view the status of a single slave device, choose SLAVE DEVICES>DEVICE # or click on the
linked slave device name in the All Slave Devices Status screen. The Status screen for the selected
slave device will be displayed.
Slave Device Flowruns Status
To view a summary of the flowrun details (current day, previous day and rate information) for all connected slave devices, select SLAVE DEVICES>ALL SLAVE DEVICES>FLOW RUNS STATUS.
Real-time data for volume, mass and energy are displayed.
Click the Show All Details hyperlink in the upper right corner to display additional information, such as
the communications port, slave address, product model, calculation period and flow rate/fluid property configuration.
Slave Device Archive Sync Status
To view slave device synchronization status, select SLAVE DEVICES>ALL SLAVE DEVICES>
ARCHIVE SYNC STATUS. A red status indicator will alert you to a synchronization issue. With a
healthy connection, the “Pending Records” values are typically low (often 0 or 1).
11
In the event a communication failure has occurred and been resolved, a large number of records
could be transmitted at once, causing the “Pending Records” value to be quite large. Recovering recent daily and interval records from slave devices can also result in a large “Pending Records” value.
To access the RECOVER RECENT button, select ALL SLAVE DEVICES>ADMINISTRATION (for
recovering archives from multiple slave devices or SLAVE DEVICES>SLAVE DEVICE #>ADMINISTRATION for recovering archives from a single slave device.
Click the Show All Details hyperlink in the upper right corner of the Archive Synchronization Status
screen to display additional information, such as the product type and the configured archive interval
of each connected slave device.
GAS STREAM STATUS
The Scanner 3100 supports eight gas streams. Choose GAS STREAMS>ALL GAS STREAMS to
view the All Gas Streams Status screen, which displays a status indication for each gas stream and
its configured gas composition data source.
To view the status of a single gas stream, choose GAS STREAMS>GAS# or click on the linked gas
stream name from the All Gas Streams Status screen. The Status screen for the selected gas stream
will be displayed, providing a list of currently selected gas constituents. If a gas chromatograph is selected as the gas composition data source, additional information, such as chromatograph identification information, molecule validation and sum test status, last good readings and active gas mixture
values, will also be displayed.
FLOWRUN STATUS
Clearing Grand Totals
You can clear grand totals at any time.
Following are some examples of when
you might want to do so:
To view status information for the two integral Scanner 3100 flowruns, choose FLOW RUNS>ALL
FLOW RUNS. The All Flow Runs Status screen displays a status indication, liquid or gas flow rates
and grand totals for each configured flowrun.
To view the status of a single flowrun, choose FLOW RUNS>FLOW RUN # or click on the linked
flowrun name. The Status screen for the selected flowrun will appear, displaying a status indication
for the flowrun, rate calculation and fluid property selections, the last calculation date and time, live
flow rates and grand totals, current and previous daily and interval totals and current and previous
calculation period totals.
•
After switching from gas measurement to liquid measurement or vice
versa
•
After changing the fluid properties
calculation method
•
After correcting a monthly record
•
After calibrating/performing maintenance on the device
•
Clear grand totals for either flowrun by clicking the Clear Grand Totals hyperlink to the right of
the “Flow Run # Status” heading
•
After downloading or clearing the
archive
•
Create a Snapshot Report by clicking the Generate Snapshot Report hyperlink in the upper right
corner. For more information about the Snapshot Report, see Snapshot Report, page 14.
•
After relocating a device
From this screen, users can also
ARCHIVE STATUS
The Scanner 3100 creates archives for daily and interval records for each flowrun, for events and
for user-configured triggered logging. Choose ARCHIVES>ALL ARCHIVES to view the number of
records in each archive and the total number of records available based on the current configuration. The time and date of the oldest and newest record in each archive is also displayed on the All
Archives Status screen.
Typical Uses for Triggered
Archives
The triggered archive is useful for
applications such as well testing, where
test data is collected and downloaded
and archives are cleared in a repetitive
sequence of steps: clear archives, capture
test, download archive, and repeat.
The triggered archive reset function is
commonly performed
•
To clear the archive as part of the
everyday work flow (as described
above)
•
Before starting a new well test
•
After downloading trigger archives
The Flow Archive # Daily and Interval (Hourly) # Record hyperlinks display the daily and interval logs
within the web interface. These hyperlinks are also available on the flowrun-specific archive pages
accessed by choosing ARCHIVES>FLOW ARCHIVE #. See Flow Archive Status, page 13 for details.
Create a partial record from the All Archives Status screen by clicking Create Partial Records in the
upper right corner of the screen. See Enabling/Disabling and Creating Partial Records, page 87,
for details.
Triggered Archive Status
To view the status of the triggered archive, choose ARCHIVES>TRIGGERED ARCHIVE. In addition
to showing usage, total available records and date/time stamps for oldest and newest records, the
Triggered Archive Status screen displays the current and previous trigger state of the archive (triggered or not triggered), as well as the state of the triggered archive with respect to the current/previous hour and current/previous day.
Resetting Triggered Archive
A reset of the triggered archive instantly sets the triggered archive pointers to zero.
12
Note: Before resetting triggered archives, download any archive data you want to keep. See
Downloading Archive Files, page 92, for details.
To reset the archive,
1.
Click the Reset Triggered Archive hyperlink in the upper right corner of the screen.
2.
Click OK on the Confirm dialog.
3.
Perform a soft reset of the device using the procedure described in Remotely Reset the Scanner
3100, page 96.
Event Archive Status
To view the status of the event archive, choose ARCHIVES>EVENT ARCHIVE. The number of
records used and the total number available, as well as the time and date of the oldest and newest
record, is displayed on the Event Archive Status screen.
Printing Legally Relevant Logs (Measurement Canada)
The Scanner 3100 complies with Measurement Canada Specification S-EG-06 (Category 3) for configurable metering devices with exportable event logs. All configuration to legally-relevant parameters
(those subject to verification under the Electricity and Gas Inspection Act) are recorded in the User
Change log.
When the User Change log is nearly full, further configuration changes are prevented until the log has
been exported by a user with sufficient security permissions.
To export the User Change log,
1.
Choose ARCHIVES>EVENT ARCHIVE>CHANGE LOG EXPORT.
2.
Under the “User Change Log Data File,” locate the user change log records file.
3.
Right-click on the User Change log file name and select Save As... from the dropdown menu.
4.
Browse to the location where the file should be saved.
5.
Name the data file a unique name, if desired.
6.
Click SAVE to download the data file to the selected location.
Flow Archive Status
Daily and interval logs for the two integral flowruns can be viewed in the web interface. To view the
device’s flowrun archive data one flowrun at a time,
1.
Choose ARCHIVES>FLOW ARCHIVE #. The Flow Archive # Status screen showing selections
for Daily Logs and Interval Logs will appear.
2.
Click the appropriate hyperlink to view the Flow Archive # Daily Log Records or Flow Archive
# Interval Log Records screen. By default, the current month, date (interval logs only) and year
are selected in the “Custom Search” section of the screen.
3.
Click RETRIEVE LOGS to view records for current month, date (interval logs only) and year or
select the month, date (interval logs only) and year from the Date fields and then click RETRIEVE LOGS.
To navigate to other months, select Prev Month, Current Device Month or Next Month from the
top right corner of the screen, then click the RETRIEVE LOGS button.
For all other logs, download the archives and use Scanner Data Manager software to view them. See
Downloading Archive Files, page 92, and the Scanner Data Manager User Manual for details.
COMMUNICATION STATUS
The Scanner 3100 supports communication ports for a wireless mesh network, three serial ports, and
two TCP ports. To view the status for all communication ports, choose COMMUNICATIONS>ALL
COMMUNICATION PORTS. The All Communication Ports Status screen will display a port status
indication, port configuration and the assigned protocol for each port.
To view the status of an individual port, choose COMMUNICATIONS>[COMM PORT] or click on the
linked port name in the All Communications Ports Status screen. The Status screen for the selected
communications port will appear.
Mesh Network Status
The Wireless Mesh Network Status screen displays a status indication of the network state, the
network ID in use, network health indicators, and an indication of whether the wireless transmitter is
actively transmitting. The screen also identifies any mesh nodes (Scanner 2x00 slave devices) that
are connected.
13
From this screen, you can recalculate node statistics (typically required only with large networks,
which may be capable of transmitting data faster than the interface can update the display). You can
also rebuild the wireless mesh network, which may be necessary over time to maintain strong connections between routing devices.
When a wireless mesh network is configured, click the STATISTICS screen link (below the STATUS
screen link) provides additional status information about the network, such as the number of nodes
configured and how many are connected to the Scanner 3100. The connection status of an individual
wireless unit can also be obtained by monitoring the graphics at the top of the LCD. See the Scanner
3100 Hardware User Manual for more information about wireless status glyphs.
Serial Port Status
Status information on the Serial Port # Status (Scanner Master or Modbus Master) screen will vary
depending on the protocol assigned to it.
When a serial port is configured as a Scanner 2x00 master, the Status screen identifies the polling
status of the port and the port status and shows whether connected nodes are present, configured,
and operational. To view additional details about the port status, click on the Show Details hyperlink
to open the Serial Port # Status Details screen. When one or more slave nodes are connected, this
screen provides a status indication of the connection, identifies the connected node by slave address,
and displays a count of packets received and lost.
Modbus Protocol Manual
Download
To download the Modbus register map
manual, right-click on the hyperlink, select
“Save As...” from the menu, rename the
file, browse to the folder to which you want
to download and click SAVE.
When the port is configured as a Modbus Master, the Status screen identifies if the port is enabled
and provides a count of bytes transmitted and received, as well as a count of errors detected. The
screen also identifies the polling status for data queries and gas stream queries.
When the port is configured as a slave (Enron Modbus, Modbus RTU, or Modbus TCP), the Status
screen shows whether the port is enabled and provides a count of bytes transmitted and received,
as well as a count of errors detected. The screen also displays a count of packets received and lost.
Click the Download Modbus Protocol Manual hyperlink at the right to view a Modbus register map
manual in a new browser tab.
TCP Port Status
The TCP Port Status screen identifies if the TCP port is enabled, and provides a count of bytes
transmitted and received, as well as a count of errors detected. The screen also displays a count of
packets received and lost. Click the Download Modbus Protocol Manual hyperlink at the right to view
a Modbus register map manual in a new browser tab.
User-Defined Register Maps
If a custom slave protocol is in use, you must upload the user-defined register map to the Scanner
3100 in order to view the manual using the web interface link on the Serial Port Status or TCP Port
Status screens. See the ScanMap Software Manual for more information about user-defined register
maps. For information about uploading user-defined register maps via the web interface, see Installing a Custom Modbus Protocol Map File, page 94. For information about uploading user-defined
register maps via the ScanFlash software, see the Scanner 3100 Hardware User Manual.
NETWORK STATUS
Choose ADMINISTRATION>NETWORK to view the status of the network connection and hardware,
and confirm information about the Ethernet configuration. Your active IP address and IP configuration
(static or dynamic IP) can be found on the Network Status screen. Your Scanner 3100 IP address is
also displayed on Scanner’s LCD.
SNAPSHOT REPORT
A Snapshot Report is a compilation of live flowrun, input/output, and system data captured at a single
moment in time. The Snapshot report can be viewed in a web browser window, downloaded as a .csv
file or downloaded with the archive data and viewed with Scanner Data Manager software.
To create a Snapshot Report, choose one of the following options:
•
Choose FLOW RUNS>ALL FLOW RUNS and click on the Generate Snapshot Report hyperlink.
•
Choose DEVICE>STATUS, then click on the Generate Snapshot Report hyperlink.
Snapshot Report Viewing Options
To view the snapshot report in a web browser, click OK when the Confirm dialog appears. The report
will appear in a new window, as shown in Figure 2.4:
14
Figure 2.4—Snapshot report viewed in a separate window
•
To download the snapshot report as a .csv file, right-click on the hyperlink in the report and
specify the directory path and filename when prompted.
•
To download and view the snapshot report in Scanner Data Manager, download the archive
data as described in Downloading Archive Files, page 92. Scanner Data Manager software
is available for download from our website at http://www.cameron.slb.com/flowcomputers. The
Snapshot report is included in every archive file type supported.
Section 3—Setting Up the Scanner 3100
BASIC COMMISSIONING PROCESS
While the sequence of steps in commissioning a Scanner 3100 can vary, the following checklist offers
a recommended sequence of steps for new users. The path specified in parentheses relates to the
menus in the interface where the settings will be found. See also Section 1—Getting Started, page
2, for a tour of the interface and helpful navigating tips.
These instructions assume that power is supplied to the device, communications are established, and
you have successfully connected to the Scanner 3100 via the web interface. If necessary, see the
Scanner 3100 User Manual for instructions on installation and wireless router setup.
1.
Complete basic setup tasks.
a.
Verify the firmware version (DEVICE>SYSTEM).
b.
Enter information by which the device can be identified (DEVICE>IDENTIFICATION).
c.
Select a units system and unit preferences (DEVICE>UNITS).
d.
Select logging, calculation, and input sampling periods (DEVICE>DATA ACQUISITION).
e.
Select display preferences and parameters (DEVICE>DISPLAY).
f.
Confirm the device time (DEVICE/STATUS and ADMIN>GENERAL>DEVICE TIME).
2.
Configure communications for any external devices in use (COMMUNICATIONS).
3.
Configure inputs (LOCAL I/O).
4.
Configure gas constituents (GAS STREAMS).
5.
Set up a flowrun (FLOW RUNS).
6.
Set up alarms (DEVICE>ALARMS).
7.
Set up logging parameters (ARCHIVES).
8.
If applicable, configure communications for the slave device(s) (COMMUNICATIONS).
9.
If applicable, configure slave device settings (SLAVE DEVICES).
10. Clear archive space if desired to clear any information logged during setup (ADMINISTRATION
>GENERAL>MANAGEMENT).
11. Change the administrator password and add all required user accounts (ADMINISTRATION
>GENERAL>SECURITY).
15
VERIFY THE FIRMWARE
To view the firmware version installed on the Scanner 3100, choose DEVICE>SYSTEM. To access
the latest firmware, download the ScanFlash software utility from the our website at http://www.cameron.slb.com/flowcomputers. See also Load New Firmware, page 96.
For information detailing changes between firmware versions, contact Cameron.
ENTER DEVICE INFORMATION
The Device Identification screen allows users to distinguish one device from other devices in a network and to uniquely identify archive records created by the device.
To configure device identification parameters,
1.
Choose DEVICE>IDENTIFICATION>MODIFY.
2.
Enter values in the fields provided, and click SAVE.
Configurable identification parameters include:
•
Device name
•
Company name
•
Site/well name
•
Field/lease name
•
Location name
•
Legal description
By default, “S3100” appears as the device name, which will appear as a prefix in all .sdf archive filenames.
A device name change will not appear in archive filenames until the next archive log is created (the
time period will vary depending on the archive interval configured).
Device identification information appears in the configuration log portion of all archive file types except for “recent” archives which contain only interval history logs.
CHOOSE UNITS
Device units are displayed in two different views. The basic view allows only the selection of a unit
system. A second view provides additional options for customizing the unit and display format for any
specified measurement category.
Changing the Unit System
Basic View
The default units system for the Scanner 3100 is “SI Units.” To change the units system to U.S. Customary Units,
1.
Choose DEVICE>UNITS>MODIFY. The Modify Device Units Configuration screen will appear.
2.
Select the desired units system from the “Units System” field.
Viewing Additional Options
3.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
To switch to the “Additional Options” view,
click on the Click Here hyperlink located
just below the SAVE button at the top of
the white screen.
Additional Options View
To change the units system from the additional options view,
1.
Choose DEVICE>UNITS>MODIFY. The Modify Device Units Configuration screen will appear.
2.
Click on the appropriate hyperlink (Load Default SI Units or Load Default US Customary Units)
located to the right of the “Measurement Units” heading.
3.
Click OK when the Confirm dialog appears. The measurement system selected is saved automatically.
Customizing the Unit Display of a Measurement Category
To change the way the Scanner 3100 displays values for a specific measurement category (such as
temperature or gas volume),
1.
If you are in the basic view, click on the Click Here hyperlink (located underneath the SAVE button) to access the additional options view.
2.
From the Device Units Configuration screen, click the MODIFY button.
16
3.
Make changes to the “Units,” “Scalar,” “Decimals” and/or “Format” values, as desired.
4.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
CHOOSE LOGGING, CALCULATION, AND INPUT SAMPLING
PERIODS
To set the time periods for data acquisition, choose DEVICE>DATA ACQUISITION>MODIFY. From
the Modify Device Data Acquisition Configuration screen, you can
•
Choose the interval period for flow archives
•
Choose a flowrun calculation period
•
Choose an input sampling period for MVT, RTD and analog inputs
•
Enable a transducer warm-up period for MVT and/or RTD inputs
•
Enable the Scanner 3100 to power an external transmitter
Interval Archive Logging Period
By default, interval archives are created every hour. To change the interval period, click in the “Interval Period” field and select the desired interval period. Selections range from one second to 12 hours.
Calculation Period
Calculation Period Selections
Calculation period selections vary with the
logging period selected. Periods displayed
in red are not available for selection.
By default, flowrun calculations are performed once per minute. To change the frequency of calculations, click in the “Calculation Period” field and select the desired period. Selections range from one
second to 12 hours.
Based on the calculation period entered, the Scanner will automatically compute and display the
number of calculations to be performed within each logging interval.
Note The calculation period must equal or exceed the input sampling periods. If an input sampling period exceeds the calculation period, the settings will change to red to prompt you to
modify the selections.
Input Sampling Period
Input Sampling Period Selections
Input sampling period selections vary with
the calculation period selected. Periods
displayed in red are not available for
selection.
By default, analog, MVT, RTD and pulse inputs are sampled once per second in accordance with API
recommendations. To change the input sampling frequency, click in the “Sampling Period” field, and
select the desired sampling period. Selections range from 0.1 seconds to 12 hours.
Based on the period entered, the Scanner will automatically compute and display the number of
samples to be collected within each calculation period.
Note
The sampling rate for pulse inputs is fixed at once per second. Pulse Inputs 1 and 2 are
always enabled. Pulse Input 3 is disabled by default.
Click the Enabled checkbox next to each input to begin logging the selected input. To delay logging
until Scanner configuration is complete, leave the checkbox unchecked and return to the screen after
the flowruns are configured to enable input sampling.
Integrated MVT and RTD Power Control
For reducing power consumption, a transducer warm-up period of up to 10 minutes can be configured in the Scanner 3100, when desired. The transducer warm-up period defines the minimum “on”
time of the transducer prior to its measurement. If the sampling period is greater than the warm-up
time, the transducer will be unpowered while it is waiting to take its next sample, which reduces
power consumption. Setting a warm-up period that is greater than the sampling period is equivalent
to choosing “always on” as the transducer excitation setting.
To enable a warm-up period,
1.
Choose DEVICE>DATA ACQUISITION>MODIFY. The Modify Device Data Acquisition Configuration screen will appear.
2.
In the “Integrated Transducers Excitation Control” section, select Transducer Warm-up from the
“Transducer Excitation” field and enter a time period in the “Warm-up Time” field. Warm-up time
selections range from 0.1 seconds to 10 minutes.
3.
Click SAVE.
If a warm-up period is not desired, click in the “Transducer Excitation” field, choose Always On and
click SAVE.
17
External Transmitter Power Control
The Scanner 3100 can be used to power up to three pulse input devices and up to four analog input
devices. From the web interface, a user can disable power to all devices, enable power to select
transmitters and manage the supply of power to each one.
To shut off power to all external transmitters,
1.
Choose DEVICE>DATA ACQUISITION>MODIFY. The Modify Device Data Acquisition Configuration screen will appear.
2.
In the “External Transmitter Power Control” section, set the Transmitter Power Mode to Disabled. All individual input settings on the screen will default to disabled.
3.
Click SAVE.
Input Power Control Parameters
To enable the supply of power to external transmitters under user-specified conditions,
1.
In the “External Transmitter Power Control” section, set the Transmitter Power Mode to Enabled
If Required.
2.
Under the “Input Power Control Parameters” heading, click the “Power Setting” field for each
input to control whether power is to be supplied (select Always Off, Always On, or Transducer
Warm-up). If Transducer Warm-up is selected, enter the warm-up time in the adjacent field.
Selections range from 0.1 seconds to 10 minutes.
3.
Under the “Input Power Control Parameters” heading, click the “Power Setting” field for each
pulse input to control whether power is to be supplied (select Always Off or Always On).
4.
Click SAVE.
CONFIGURE THE DISPLAY
The Scanner 3100 can display a sequence of up to 32 user-selected parameters on the local LCD
display. There are three message display modes for controlling how these parameters are displayed
in a graphical configuration which contains 5 display positions (see below). By default, the Scanner
3100 will sequentially display all user-selected parameters. Alternatively, additional message display
modes allow the user to customize parameter positions and the parameter groupings.
Figure 3.1—Parameter positions
To configure the display, choose DEVICE>DISPLAY>MODIFY. From the Modify Device Display
Configuration screen, a user can:
•
Change the orientation of the display
•
Change the background color of the display (light gray or dark gray)
•
Change the amount of time to display parameters between scrolls
•
Add, change, or delete parameters from the display sequence
Change Display Orientation
The Scanner 3100 is designed to accommodate installation in the conventional upright position or in
an inverted position. By default, the Scanner automatically detects the device orientation and adjusts
the display orientation accordingly.
To manually control the orientation, click in the “Display Orientation” field and select MVT Port is
downward or MVT Port is upward from the dropdown list, and click SAVE.
Change Background Color
By default, the display has a black background with white characters. To change the background to a
white background with black characters, click in the “Display Color Scheme” field, select Light Background from the dropdown list, and click SAVE.
Change Message Display Mode
The Scanner 3100 has three message display modes to enable users to customize parameter positions and the parameter groupings. To change how the user-selected display parameters are se18
quenced on the local LCD, click the Message Display Mode selection and select from the following
modes:
Arranging Display Sections in
Groups
Each display group can display up to five
parameter selections (A to E). To make
one parameter selection appear as the
topmost parameter on every group (1 to
32) display screen, select the parameter
to appear in the same position (A to E) on
each screen.
Note that this only applies to “Grouped
Display Selections” and “Controlled by
Scanner Logic Script Program” modes.
•
Sequential Display Selections. Display selections are shown in sequential order, filling as
many display positions (A to E) as available. When the display group is advanced after the
Message Delay, the next parameter selections are used to fill positions A to E. In this mode, a
parameter selection can be given a priority of “Normal” or “Topmost.” If any selections are set to
topmost priority, then they will only be shown in position A.
•
Grouped Display Selections. Display parameter selections are organized into groups, with
each parameter selection assigned to a display position. Groups are numbered 1 to 32 and are
shown in numerical order, advancing after the message delay. Customize a display group by assigning the same group number to up to 5 of the parameter selections you wish to be displayed
together and give each a unique position (A to E).
•
Controlled by Scanner Logic Script Program. Display selections are organized as described
in “Grouped Display Selections” above. However, the active group is controlled by the Scanner
Logic Script program. Within the Scanner Logic Script program, the user can write commands to
specify what display group number is shown (1 to 32) at different stages of the program execution.
Change Message Delay
By default, display parameters remain displayed for 10 seconds before display group advances. To
change the period, enter a new value (in seconds) in the “Message Delay” field and click SAVE. Select a period of “0” to set the display cycling to advance when manually triggered. The display group
can be advanced by pressing the <LEFT> arrow on the keypad, setting up the Digital I/O Special
Function Input (see Configuring a Special Function Input, page 40), or via the Cover Left/Cover
Right feature (see the Scanner 3100 Hardware EFM Hardware Manual for more information).
Add or Change Parameters Displayed
To add or change display parameters,
Display Group Design
1.
Displaying 9 parameter selections
together requires the creation of 2
consecutive groups.
If desired, all current parameter selections can be removed from the list by clicking the “Clear All
Selections” link on the Display Selections header.
2.
Note that many operations find it favorable
to always have the same parameter
selection in the same position on the
screen.
In the “Display Selections” section of the screen, click in a “Register” field. In the Edit Display
Selection dialog, review the available register categories. Click a tab (Local, Modbus Master, or
Slave Device) to view the contents of a specific register category. Click ALL SELECTIONS to
view all available registers in one list. Choose the register you want to add and click OK.
3.
In Sequential Display Selections mode, new parameters will be added to the normal scroll sequence. To force new parameters to appear only in display position A, click in the “Priority” field
and select Topmost.
4.
In the Grouped Display Selections mode and the Controlled by Scanner Logic Script Program
mode, each parameter should be assigned a “Group” and a “Position.” Customize a display
group by assigning the same group number (1 to 32) to up to 5 of the parameter selections to be
displayed together and give each a unique position (A to E).
5.
By default, the parameters display the decimal format configured for the device units (see
Choose Units, page 16 for more information). Changing the decimal position on the Modify
Device Display Configuration screen will only affect how the units appear on the device display.
To change the display units, click in the “Decimals” field and select the desired decimal option
from the dropdown list. The Scanner 3100 LCD can display up to six decimal places per parameter.
To change the decimal format for all uses (LCD display, archive, real-time value display in the
interface), change the device units decimal configuration on the Modify Device Units Configuration screen. See Customizing the Unit Display of a Measurement Category, page 16 for more
information.
6.
By default, the user-defined display parameter selections have a checkmark in the “Enabled”
field. A parameter selection can be disabled (meaning it will not show on the local LCD) without
being deleted by deselecting the parameter selection in the “Enabled” field.
7.
Click SAVE.
VERIFY DEVICE TIME
The device time is displayed at the top of the Device Status screen, accessed by clicking the DEVICE menu. To change the time, click ADMINISTRATION>GENERAL>DEVICE TIME>MODIFY. See
Appendix A—Device Administration, page 94 for more information.
19
Section 4—Setting Up Communications
NETWORK IP CONFIGURATION
Important
By default, the Scanner 3100 has a dynamic IP address, which is displayed at
the top of the LCD when an Ethernet cable is connected to the RJ-45 connector on the Scanner 3100 terminal board. Dynamic IP addresses are subject
to change over time (the frequency of such changes is controlled by LAN
configuration settings).
If IP address changes are problematic, the IP address configuration of the
Scanner 3100 can be changed to a static IP address as described below.
Replacing the Dynamic IP Address with a Static IP Address
ImportantUsers who are bound by corporate policy should discuss IP options with their
IT department before attempting to change the IP address. For remote installations, keep in mind that while firmware upgrades are not intended to change the IP
configuration, it is possible that some firmware upgrades could cause the device
to revert to a Dynamic IP address. Should this occur, the dynamic IP address must
be retrieved from the Scanner 3100 to secure the connection necessary to reset
the Scanner 3100 to a static IP address using the interface.
To assign a static IP address to the Scanner 3100, perform the following steps:
1.
Click ADMINISTRATION>NETWORK>CONFIGURATION>MODIFY. The Modify Network
Configuration screen will appear.
2.
In the “Enable DHCP” field, select No. “Use Static IP Parameters” will appear to the right of the
field.
3.
Enter the static IP address in the “IP Address” field as follows:
Important
Do not change any settings other than the IP address in the “Static IP Parameters” section unless directed to do so. Changing these parameters may result
in the inability to communicate with the Scanner 3100.
a.
If you are connecting the Scanner 3100 to a corporate network or other existing network,
change the Scanner 3100’s IP address to the IP address supplied by your network
administrator or IP coordinator.
b.
If you have the administrative control to change the IP address of your network, as when
the Scanner 3100 is directly connected to the Ethernet port of your PC or connected to a
PC or laptop via a personal/portable router, you can choose the IP address for the Scanner
3100.
The first three sets of numbers in the network/router IP address must match the first three
sets of numbers in the Scanner 3100 IP address. For example, if the Scanner 3100 IP
address is 123.456.789.101, the network/router IP address must be 123.456.789 plus a
unique three-digit string (not 101). (The IP address of the laptop can remain dynamic.)
4.
Click SAVE.
5.
Close the browser window, reopen the browser, and log back in to the web interface by entering
the new static IP address in your browser’s address bar.
MASTERING A WIRELESS SCANNER 2100 DEVICE
As a SmartMesh network manager, the Scanner 3100 can communicate with multiple Scanner 2100
devices via wireless mesh communications. Each wireless device within the network is identified by
two identities: a network ID and a slave ID. Both must be established before wireless communications can be configured in the Scanner 3100. It is recommended that the network ID be established
first so that it can be entered in each wireless slave device along with a slave ID.
What is a Network ID?
A network ID is a value between 1 and 65535 that uniquely identifies the Scanner 3100 wireless network. The network ID is shared by every device in the wireless network. The network ID is entered
in the Scanner 3100 interface. It is also entered in each wireless slave device using the slave device
keypad.
20
What is a Slave ID?
A slave ID is a value between 1 and 65535 that uniquely identifies each wireless Scanner 2100 slave
device in a given Scanner network, just as a slave address uniquely identifies a slave device in a serial network. The slave ID is entered into each Scanner 2100 device using the device keypad.
Assigning the Network ID and Slave ID to a Scanner 2100 Slave Device
To verify the network ID and slave ID of a Scanner 2100 slave device or change the network ID or
slave ID:
1.
Using the device keypad, press the UP ARROW and ENTER keys simultaneously to access
the Configuration menu.
2.
Press ENTER repeatedly to advance the menu to the Network ID selection. The default network
ID will appear.
3.
To change the network ID, enter a value between 1 and 65535, entering digits from right to left.
a.
Press UP ARROW until correct digit is displayed.
b.
Press LEFT ARROW to select the next digit to the left.
c.
Repeat using UP and LEFT arrows to enter all remaining digits.
d.
Press ENTER to advance the menu to the Slave ID selection. The default Slave ID will
appear.
Important
4.
If multiple wireless Scanner 2100 devices are to be networked to a Scanner
3100 master, the same network ID MUST be used for all of them.
To change the Slave ID, enter a value that is larger than 1 and less than 65535, entering digits
from right to left.
a.
Press UP ARROW until the correct digit is displayed.
b.
Press LEFT ARROW to select the next digit to the left.
c.
Repeat using UP and LEFT arrows to enter all remaining digits.
d.
Press ENTER.
Important
If multiple wireless Scanner 2100 devices are networked to the Scanner 3100,
each MUST have a unique slave ID to eliminate communications conflicts.
Configuring the Wireless Network
To configure the wireless network via the web interface,
1.
Select COMMUNICATIONS>WIRELESS MESH NETWORK>CONFIGURATION>MODIFY to
configure the wireless network. The Modify Wireless Mesh Network Configuration screen will
appear.
2.
In the “Wireless Mesh Network Settings” field,
a.
Click in the “Enable Wireless Transmitter” field and select Yes.
b.
In the “Network ID” field, enter the appropriate Network ID value established for the
network.
c.
Change the number of parents allocated per node only if necessary. By default, two
parents are allocated per node, and this value is adequate for most networks. The number
can be increased for deep and wide networks.
Changing the Routing Mode
Changing the routing mode of an
operational Scanner 2x00 Series slave
device will cause the device to disconnect
from and reconnect to the wireless
network.
Non-Routing Mode
The non-routing mode transmits only
data originating from itself and does not
forward traffic from other nodes. Choosing
a non-routing mode may cause portions
of the network to become isolated from
the rest of the network and should be
used sparingly as a solution to bandwidth
problems or to conserve battery power in
certain situations.
3.
Set up a wireless Scanner 2100 slave device in the “Slave Device Slot Assignments” grid as
follows:
a.
Click in the first “Unused Master Selection” field and click OK when the Set Master
Selection message appears. The name “Wireless Master” is automatically assigned as the
master selection (non-editable) and “Routing” appears as the operating mode. The routing
mode (default setting) routes wireless traffic from other nodes and should not be changed
in most cases.
b.
Enter the Slave ID value that is assigned to the Scanner 2100 being added to the network.
If multiple wireless Scanner 2100 devices are networked to the Scanner 3100 master, each
will require a unique slave ID.
Important Once a slave ID has been assigned to a Master Selection slot, it cannot be
changed by entering a new value in the “Slave ID” field. To correct a slave ID entered by mistake, click the red “minus” glyph to release the wireless master slot,
click OK at the prompt, and click SAVE to clear the slot. Then click MODIFY and
enter a new master selection with the appropriate slave ID value.
21
4.
If required, repeat Steps 3a and 3b to add other wireless Scanner 2100 slave devices to the
network.
5.
Click SAVE. The Scanner 3100 will attempt a connection with the Scanner 2100 devices in the
slot assignments. Allow 2 to 5 minutes for the connection to be acknowledged as operational.
See Verifying Communications with the Wireless Network below for more details.
Editing/Deleting a Slave Device from the Network
The “Slave Device Slot Assignments” grid displays all mastered slave devices, including devices
mastered by other communication ports. Only slave devices configured as a wireless Scanner 3100
slave will be editable from the Wireless Mesh Network Configuration screen. If the slave device you
want to remove is not selectable in the “Slave Device Slot Assignments” grid, select the port mastering the slave device from the COMMUNICATIONS menu.
Verifying Communications with the Wireless Network
To verify the connection(s), select the STATUS screen link at the left of the screen and click REFRESH. The “Connected Mesh Nodes” section of the screen will display the connection status as
“Lost,” “Negotiating,” or “Synchronizing” as connection is attempted. If communications are successful, the network state will change to “Operational” (allow 2 to 5 minutes). Once a connection is
achieved, the statistics at the bottom of the screen will update approximately once per minute (Figure
4.1). To view the updates as they occur, enable the Auto Refresh checkbox at the left side of the
screen.
Restarting the Connection
To force an evaluation of a Scanner 2100 device’s connection state, press ENTER on the device keypad (or press the button of an optional Cameron momentary switch, if installed). If the device is not
connected or in the process of connecting to the network, the connection process will automatically
restart. This can speed up slave device connections when the Scanner 3100 is first powered up and
when a Scanner 2100 is not joining the network for an unknown reason.
Recalculating Node Statistics
During periods of high activity due to multiple units being polled and/or high polling frequency rates,
the mesh node statistics displayed at the bottom of the Wireless Mesh Network Status screen may
appear slow to update. If quicker updates are desired, click the Recalculate Node Stats hyperlink
near the bottom of the screen to force a statistics update.
Rebuilding the Wireless Network
Healthy Network Indicators
•
All nodes are operational.
•
Network Reliability = 100% means
that all unique packets sent were
received.
•
Path stability > 80% means that
the Scanner 3100 is only adjusting
minimal paths for optimization (lower
stability means that the Scanner
3100 is constantly trying to improve a
system that keeps changing).
•
All nodes have all other nodes as
neighbors.
•
All nodes report that all neighbors are
good neighbors.
•
All nodes have requested low bandwidth (one packet every 10,000 ms).
•
The assigned bandwidth to all nodes
is ≤ the needed bandwidth.
Over time, many factors can affect the quality of the wireless network. Typically, the Scanner 3100
network manager automatically optimizes the network. However, you can manually optimize communications when transmitting issues are suspected or when adding a new slave device to the network.
To manually force a network rebuild, click the Rebuild Wireless Mesh Network hyperlink near the bottom of the Wireless Mesh Network Status screen. The network rebuild may take up to 2 minutes to
complete, during which time data from the slave devices may be unavailable.
Figure 4.1— Indicators of a healthy wireless network including eight Scanner 2x00 slave devices
22
Serial Port Capacity
If a large number of slave devices are to
be connected to a Scanner 3100 network
via a serial port, more than one communication port may be required, depending on
archive periods and baud rates desired.
See the Scanner 3100 Hardware Manual
for details.
Slave Device Firmware
A wired Scanner 2x00 slave device must
have firmware version 4.26 or later to
communicate with a Scanner 3100.
MASTERING A WIRED SCANNER 2X00 SLAVE DEVICE
As a network manager, the Scanner 3100 can communicate with multiple Scanner 2x00 slave devices via serial communications.
To configure communications, first assign a unique slave ID to each Scanner 2x00 slave device using the Scanner’s keypad. This information will be required for mastering the slave device in the web
interface. By factory default, all Scanner 2x00 slave devices are shipped with a slave address of “1.”
The slave address can be changed using the device keypad (consult the device manual for details) or
via the ModWorX* Pro software.
Assigning a Slave Address to a Wired Scanner 2x00 Slave Device
To verify and/or change the slave address of a wired Scanner 2x00 slave device,
1.
Using the device keypad, press the UP ARROW and ENTER keys simultaneously to access
the Configuration menu.
2.
Press ENTER repeatedly to advance the menu to the slave address selection. The slave address will appear.
3.
To change the slave address, enter a value between 1 and 65535 (excluding 252 through 255
and 64764), entering digits from right to left.
a.
Press UP ARROW until the correct digit is displayed.
b.
Press LEFT ARROW to select the next digit to the left.
c.
Repeat using UP and LEFT arrows to enter all remaining digits.
d.
Press ENTER.
Configuring the Wired Network
Serial Ports
Ports 1 and 2 are low-power ports and
are always enabled. Port 3 is disabled by
default to conserve power when it is not
in use. Enable it by clicking in the “Enable
Port” field and selecting Yes. The Serial
Port Type is automatically detected. Port
3 is the only serial port that supports both
RS-485 and RS-232 communications.
To configure the wired network via the web interface,
1.
Select COMMUNICATIONS>SERIAL PORT 1 or 2 (RS-485) or SERIAL PORT 3 (RS-485/232)
and click PORT CONFIGURATION>MODIFY to configure the port. The Modify Serial Port #
Configuration screen will appear.
2.
Click in the “Communication Protocol” field, select Scanner Master from the Change Communication Protocol dialog, and click OK to return to the previous screen.
3.
Click SAVE.
4.
Click SCANNER MASTER>MODIFY. The Modify Serial Port # Protocol (Scanner Master)
screen will appear.
5.
In the “Wired Network Settings” section of the screen, select Enabled. This setting is required to
initiate polling of the slave device.
6.
Review the remaining settings and change them as follows, if desired:
•
Enable Polling. Enabling polling means that the Scanner 3100 device will poll each of the
Scanner 2x00 devices configured as the Scanner 3100’s slave devices.
•
Bus Delay. The bus delay is the amount of time the Scanner 3100 will wait before transmitting a message to a Modbus slave device. The default value of “10 ms” is the minimum
value allowed. Increase the bus delay value only if a significant number of data packets are
being missed.
•
Bus Timeout. The bus timeout is the amount of time the Scanner 3100 will wait to receive
a response from a Scanner 2x00 slave device before resending the query. Change this
value when slower baud rates are used or if a large number of data packets are being lost.
•
Internal Termination Resistor. The internal termination resistor is disabled by default. If
noise is a problem within the network as a result of long lengths of cable between devices,
enabling this internal resistor in the end devices of a daisy chain installation can improve
communications. Enable the internal termination resistor only when required to minimize
the number of lost data packets.
•
Modbus Inter-Packet Delay. The inter-packet delay value specifies how long between
serial requests the Scanner 3100 should wait. The default value of “10 ms” is sufficient for
use with baud rates of 4800 and above. With slower baud rates, it may be necessary to
increase this value.
•
Retry Count. This value is the number of times the master will attempt to send a message
to the Scanner slave device before reporting a failed communication.
Internal Termination Resistor
Enabling the internal termination resistor
will increase the Scanner’s power
consumption. Do not enable the resistor
for devices that are not on the ends of
a daisy chain installation. Enabling the
resistor for a large number of devices on
a single serial port can limit the output
capability of the port.
Modbus Inter-Packet Delay
Modbus protocol requires that the delay
be a minimum of the time required to
transmit a message 3.5 characters in
length. As a worst-case example, a
device configured for 300 baud and 11-bit
characters could require a delay of up to
130 ms.
7.
Set up a wired Scanner 2x00 slave device in the “Slave Device Slot Assignments” grid as follows,
a.
Click in the first “Unused” Master Selection” field and click OK when the Set Master
Selection message appears. The name “Serial Port #” is automatically assigned as the
master selection and is not editable.
23
b.
Enter the slave address assigned to the Scanner 2x00 device being added to the network.
If multiple wired Scanner 2x00 slave devices are networked to the Scanner 3100 master,
each will require a unique slave address.
Important Once a slave address has been assigned to a Master Selection slot, it cannot be
changed by entering a new value in the “Slave Address” field. To correct a slave
address entered by mistake, click the red “minus” glyph to release the master
slot, click OK at the prompt, and click SAVE to clear the slot. Then click MODIFY
and enter a new master selection with the appropriate slave address.
c.
Click in the “Communication” field to select the baud rate of the slave device from the
Change Node Communication Settings dialog. A selection of 9600 baud or higher is
recommended. Acceptable baud rates for a Scanner 2x00 device range from 300 to 38.4K.
Important
d.
The settings for data bits, parity, and stop bits on the Change Node Communication Settings screen are predefined to match the settings of Scanner 2x00
slave devices and cannot be changed.
Click OK to return to the Modify Serial Port # Protocol (Scanner Master) screen.
8.
Repeat Step 7 to add other wired Scanner 2x00 slave devices to the network.
9.
Click SAVE. The Scanner 3100 master will attempt to connect with the configured Scanner 2x00
slave devices.
Editing/Deleting a Slave Device from the Network
The “Slave Device Slot Assignments” grid displays all mastered slave devices, including devices
mastered by other communication ports. Only slave devices configured for the selected port will be
editable from the Serial Port # Configuration screen. If the slave device you want to remove is not
selectable in the “Slave Device Slot Assignments” grid, check the port selection in the upper right
corner of the screen.
Verifying Communications with the Wired Scanner 2x00 Slave Device
To verify the connection, select the STATUS screen link and click REFRESH as the Scanner 3100 attempts to connect to the Scanner 2x00 slave device. If communications are successful, the “Connected Wired Slave Nodes” section of the screen will display an “Operational” status. The “Wired Network
Status” section of the screen provides details about the configuration and health of the wired network.
MASTERING A MODBUS DEVICE (MODBUS MASTER)
Using Modbus Master protocol, the Scanner 3100 can network with any Modbus-compatible device
and establish connections with up to 128 data points per serial port. Those inputs can be selected for
display, archive logging, configuring alarms, etc.
Configuring Protocol Settings
To set up the Scanner 3100 for use with Modbus Master protocol,
Serial Ports
Ports 1 and 2 are low-power ports and
are always enabled. Port 3 is disabled by
default to conserve power when it is not
in use. Enable it by clicking in the “Enable
Port” field and selecting Yes. The Serial
Port Type is automatically detected. Port
3 is the only serial port that supports both
RS-485 and RS-232 communications.
1.
Select COMMUNICATIONS>SERIAL PORT [1, 2 or 3]>PORT CONFIGURATION>MODIFY.
The Modify Serial Port # Configuration (Modbus Master) screen will appear.
2.
In the “Communication Protocol” field, select Modbus Master.
3.
Enter port settings in the “Default Port Settings for Data Queries” section of the screen to match
the settings of the Modbus slave device to be mastered. These settings should be specified in
the manufacturer literature for the Modbus slave device.
•
Baud rate. The baud rate is the speed at which data is transmitted or received via the serial port. The default setting is “9600.”
•
Enable flow control. The default setting is “No.” This setting should not be changed for
most RS-485 communications. However, some devices (specifically RS-232 devices that
have more than three connecting wires) require flow control to establish the point of communication initiation. If you are unsure if your device requires this setting to be enabled,
check your product literature or attempt communications with the setting disabled. If communications fail, enable the setting and try connecting again.
Internal Termination Resistor
•
Enabling the internal termination resistor
will increase the Scanner’s power
consumption. Do not enable the resistor
for devices that are not on the ends of
a daisy chain installation. Enabling the
resistor for a large number of devices on
a single serial port can limit the output
capability of the port.
Internal termination resistor. The internal termination resistor is disabled by default. If
noise is a problem within the network as a result of long lengths of cable between devices,
enabling this internal resistor in the end devices of a daisy chain installation can improve
communications. Enable the internal termination resistor only when required to minimize
the number of lost data packets.
•
Data bits. The number of data bits transmitted by the slave device. The setting for Ports 1
and 2 is fixed at “8 bits.” When using Port 3, the bit value is selectable (5, 6, 7, or 8 bits).
•
Parity. A parity bit is a binary digit (bit) added to the end of a binary code for detecting errors in transmission. The default setting is “None.” The Scanner 3100 interface supports
24
the following parity selections:
•
4.
––
None. No parity bits are assigned (default).
––
Even. The parity bit “1” will be added to the end of the binary code if it represents an
even number.
––
Odd. The parity bit “0” will be added to the end of the binary code if it represents an
odd number.
––
Always One. This selection is available only when Port 3 is selected and is also know
as a “Mark Parity”. The parity bit “1” will be added to the end of each binary code.
––
Always Zero. This selection is available only when Port 3 is selected and is also know
as a “Space Parity”. The parity bit “0” will be added to the end of each binary code.
Stop bits. A stop bit tells the computer how long to wait between receiving data packets
and alerts the transmitting device that the connection is still active. The stop bit is added
after the binary code and parity bit. The default stop bit value is “1.”
Click SAVE.
Setting Up a Modbus Data Query
Up to 128 data points from Modbus devices can be added to each port. To configure the Scanner
3100 to poll the desired data points from a configured Modbus slave device,
Suspending Device Polling
1.
Select MODBUS MASTER>MODIFY. The Modify Serial Port # Protocol (Modbus Master)
screen will appear.
2.
In the “Protocol Settings” section of the screen, enter the following:
To temporarily suspend device polling
(such as when using the same wires to
configure another device), set the “Enable
Modbus Polling” setting to No.
Suspending device polling is also a
convenient method for performing shortterm maintenance (calibration, etc.) on a
Modbus slave device.
a.
Enable Data Query Polling. Select Yes from the dropdown list. Enabling this setting
allows the Scanner 3100 to poll the Modbus devices in the network for new data.
b.
Bus Delay. The bus delay is the amount of time the Scanner 3100 will wait before
transmitting a message to a Modbus slave device. The default value of “10 ms” is the
minimum value allowed. Increase the bus delay value only if a significant number of data
packets are being missed.
c.
Bus Timeout. The bus timeout is the amount of time the Scanner 3100 will wait to receive
a response from a Modbus slave device before resending the query. Change this value
when slower baud rates are used or if a large number of packets are being lost.
Important
Before entering data queries, consider whether you will want to establish a
device alarm based on any of the queries. If so, the order in which you enter
the queries can improve your ability to diagnose the cause of an alarm.
Data queries cannot be easily reordered once they are entered. Also, be aware
that data queries are not required to be entered in one continuous list. Unused
slots between entries are acceptable, and there may be value in categorizing
the queries so that some slots remain unused, as discussed in Using Modbus
Query Groupings to Identify the Source of an Alarm, page 85.
Unused Rows
d.
An “Unused” row will contain placeholder
settings and display a polling period of 0
seconds and a slave address of 0.
To enter the first data point, click in the first “Unused” row in the table. The Change Modbus
Master Data Query # Settings screen will appear.
e.
Review the settings on each of the dialog’s three tabs (Polling, Communications and Data
Format) and configure as described below. The following are descriptions of each tab’s
selections:
––
Polling tab. Enable the data query and specify the slave and register addresses,
polling period, and stale alarm holdoff for the data point, as well as enter a custom
register name.
––
Communications tab. Specify serial communication settings, if desired.
––
Data Format tab. Specify the remote data format settings and the remote units conversion settings, including remote measurement category, units, rate scalar, etc.
Important To use a Modbus data point as the flowrun input source for static pressure, differential pressure, or temperature, you MUST categorize the data point on the “Data
Format” tab. Failure to do so will prevent the Modbus input from being selectable
when specifying Input Assignments from the Modify Flow Run Rate Calculation
screen.
Polling Tab Selections
1.
Enable Data Query Polling. Select Yes to allow the Scanner 3100 to query the Modbus device.
This setting must be enabled to receive data from the Modbus device.
2.
Slave Address. Enter the slave address of the device to be polled.
3.
Register Address. Enter the Modbus register to be polled.
25
4.
Register Name. Enter a register name, if desired. This name will appear in selection lists within
the web interface, allowing you to create an alarm or output based on the Modbus register. The
prefix “MD” for “Modbus Device” and the serial port number will be inserted before the userspecified register name. For example, MD_1_P2_001, where “1” is the serial port number and
“P2_001” is the register name.
5.
Data Direction. Indicate whether the Scanner 3100 master will Read from Slave Device or
Write to Slave Device. Only data query items 1 through 32 support the writing of data to a slave
device.
If writing to a slave device, click the “Publishing Register” field and select the register to be
written from the dialog provided. The Select Publishing Register dialog will appear with all
available register types displayed (note the highlighted ALL SELECTIONS button). You can filter
the selections by clicking on other buttons in the “Local” tab ( System, Rates/Totals, etc.) or by
selecting one of the other tabs.
6.
Polling Period. Click in the “Polling Period” field, select the desired polling period from the Edit
Polling Period dialog and click OK. The standard polling period is “1 second.”
7.
Data Frame Type. Select the data frame type used by the Modbus device (standard Modbus or
Modbus TCP). Check the device manual if you are unsure which data frame type is supported.
8.
Modbus Function Codes. Select the function codes supported by the Modbus device. Check
the device manual if you are unsure which codes it supports.
9.
Stale Alarm Holdoff. Select the number of polling periods the Scanner 3100 should wait before
returning a Stale Value alarm. Enter a low value for data points that require constant monitoring
to ensure prompt detection of stale data.
10. Continue to the next tab.
Communications Tab Selections
The COMMUNICATIONS tab allows you to specify communication settings for a Modbus device. By
default, the device uses the communication settings used to configure the selected serial port, as
indicated by the checked box labeled Use Communications Settings from Port Configuration.
1.
If the Modbus device requires alternate settings, uncheck the Use Communications Settings
from Port Configuration box and enter device-specific settings in the fields provided.
2.
Click in the “Reply Timeout Period” field and enter the number of system ticks the Scanner 3100
should wait before considering the connection with the Modbus device lost. If the default value
“0” is retained, the Scanner 3100 will use the bus timeout established in the protocol settings.
3.
Continue to the next tab.
Data Format Tab Selections
The DATA FORMAT tab allows you to define the rules used by the Modbus device to package data
so that it is read correctly by the Scanner 3100. The data type, register size, byte order, and word
order settings must match the settings defined by the Modbus device manufacturer.
The Scanner 3100 interface supports the following data formats:
1.
Remote Data Type. Select the data type used by the slave device. Selections include 32-bit
floating point, 32-bit unsigned integer, 32-bit signed integer, 16-bit unsigned integer, and 16-bit
signed integer.
2.
Remote Register Size. Select 16-bit or 32-bit.
3.
Byte Order. Select High Byte Sent First or Low Byte Sent First.
4.
Word Order. Select High Word Sent First or Low Word Sent First.
The “Remote Units Conversion Settings” section allows you to define the rules for converting the default units of the Modbus slave device to the units desired when polling the device. If no conversions
are required, accept the default settings and skip this section.
Configuring Conversion Settings
To configure conversion settings for the slave device or register polled,
Remote Measurement Category
If you fail to select a remote measurement
category from the “Data Format” tab, you
will be unable to select that data source as
a flow run input from the Modify Flow Run
Rate Calculation screen.
1.
Remote Measurement Category. Enter the appropriate measurement category from the
dropdown list.
2.
Remote Units. Select the appropriate unit from the dropdown list (contents will vary depending
upon the measurement category selected).
If the output of the Modbus device is not a typical unit of measure but an integer that can be
used to define a standard unit of measure (for example, a device that outputs 1 to 10,000 counts
to represent 0 to 50 psi), select the unit to which the integer will be converted for use in the
Scanner 3100. Configure the scale to be applied in Steps 3 through 5.
3.
Rate Scalar. If the data point being polled is a rate, enter the appropriate rate scalar from the
dropdown list.
26
4.
Enable Value Scaling. If the data point will be scaled, select Yes in the “Enable Value Scaling”
field. The data value result is the read value from the device times the Scale Factor plus the
Offset.
Data Query Value = (Read Value * Scale Factor) + Offset
Reading Scaled Integer Values
A Modbus slave device may contain an
integer value that is scaled. For example,
if a 16-bit integer register represents a
temperature where each bit equals 0.01
degC (i.e. 2,456 = 24.56 degC), enable
scaling with a Scale Factor of 0.01 and an
offset of 0.0.
5.
Scale Factor. If the “Enable Value Scaling” setting is “Yes,” enter the appropriate scale factor.
6.
Offset. If an offset will be applied, enter the offset value.
7.
Click OK to save the settings and exit the dialog.
8.
Click in the next available “Unused” row in the table and repeat the procedure for each Modbus
data point desired. To duplicate the settings used to configure the first data point, click the COPY
SETTINGS FROM DATA QUERY # button in the bottom left corner of the Change Modbus
Master Data Query # Settings dialog.
Verifying Communications (Modbus Master)
Click the DATA QUERY STATUS screen link and click REFRESH intermittently. If the Scanner is
communicating with the Modbus device, the “Age” value in the “Query Status” table will change with
every click of the REFRESH button, but should not exceed the polling period during normal operation, and the “DataStale” reading will be “N.”
Following a change to the polling period or “Stale Alarm Holdoff” settings, the update of “Age” values
may be delayed for a short period. The delay should not exceed twice the polling period value. (For
example, when the polling period is set at 20 seconds, the “Age” value of the reading should not
exceed 40 seconds. If the “Stale Alarm Holdoff” setting is “2 polling periods” and the “Age” value exceeds 40 seconds, the “DataStale” setting will be activated. If this happens repeatedly, it is an indication of a communications issue.)
Uses for Modbus Master Registers
Modbus master registers can be added to the display, connected to an alarm, and/or logged. See the
hyperlinks below for more information:
•
Add a parameter from an external device to the Scanner 3100 display. (Add or Change Parameters Displayed, page 19)
•
Add a static pressure, differential pressure, or process temperature input from an external device to the list of selectable inputs for flowrun configuration. (Configuring Conversion Settings,
page 26)
•
Add a parameter from an external device to the list of selectable alarms. (Section 10—Configuring Device Alarms, page 83)
•
Add a Modbus Master register to the archive log. (Section 11—Configuring Archives, page 86)
•
Add a Modbus Master register to a digital output. (Digital Output, page 41)
CONFIGURING THE SCANNER 3100 AS A SLAVE DEVICE VIA
SERIAL PORT
Scanner 3100 Software Downloads
The following software programs
are available for download from our
website at http://www.cameron.slb.com/
flowcomputers:
•
Scanner Data Manager
•
ScanMap
•
ScanFlash
Navigate to the website, select SCANNER
MODEL 3100 FLOW COMPUTER and
click the desired software download link.
As a slave device, the Scanner 3100 can be configured to communicate serially with Enron Modbus,
Modbus RTU, or Modbus TCP protocol. Any of these protocols can be used with an internal Modbus
map, or with a user-defined register map created with ScanMap software. You must decide which
type of map you will use before selecting the serial port protocol.
User-defined register maps are created with ScanMap software, and uploaded to the Scanner
3100 via the web interface (Installing a Custom Modbus Protocol Map File, page 94) or via the
ScanFlash software utility. See the ScanMap User Manual and the Scanner 3100 Hardware Manual
for more information.
Important
If using a custom Modbus map, you MUST upload the custom Modbus map
BEFORE you begin configuring the Scanner 3100 as a slave device via serial
port. Failure to do so will result in the Scanner 3100 slave device being tied to
a blank protocol map.
Choosing a Protocol/Register Map
Enron Modbus
The internal Enron Modbus map includes 32-bit registers for the Scanner 3100 and up to 20 Scanner
2x00 slave devices, and includes Enron extensions for flow history and events retrieval.
Modbus RTU
The RTU Modbus map includes 16-bit registers for the Scanner 3100 and up to 20 Scanner 2x00
slave devices. It does not support Enron extensions for flow history and events retrieval.
27
Modbus TCP Server/Slave
The Modbus TCP Server/Slave protocol selection allows you to communicate with the Scanner 3100
via Modbus TCP protocol over a serial connection. This protocol uses the same internal map as the
Modbus RTU protocol and contains only 16-bit registers. Enron extensions for flow history and events
retrieval are not supported.
Downloading a Modbus Protocol Manual
Each pre-configured Modbus protocol manual can be downloaded and viewed within the web browser as follows:
1.
Configure a serial port as a Modbus slave using one of the protocols listed above OR select the
serial port you have already configured.
2.
From the Serial Port # Status (...Modbus...Slave) screen, click the Download Modbus Protocol
Manual hyperlink to the right of the “Protocol Status” heading. Depending on your browser settings, the manual will open in another tab or another window.
Alternatively, to download the manual to your computer, right-click on the Download Modbus
Protocol Map hyperlink, select Save As..., browse to the folder to which you want to save the
protocol manual, enter a name for the protocol manual (if desired), and click SAVE.
To view the manual, navigate to the folder where the file was saved and click to open it.
Configuring Communications (Slave Device Over Serial Port)
To set up the Scanner 3100 as a slave device over a serial connection, perform the following steps.
Serial Ports
Ports 1 and 2 are low-power ports and
are always enabled. Port 3 is disabled by
default to conserve power when it is not
in use. Enable it by clicking in the “Enable
Port” field and selecting Yes. The Serial
Port Type is automatically detected. Port
3 is the only serial port that supports both
RS-485 and RS-232 communications.
1.
Select COMMUNICATIONS>SERIAL PORT 1 or 2 (RS-485) or SERIAL PORT 3 (RS-485/232).
2.
Click PORT CONFIGURATION>MODIFY. The Modify Serial Port # Configuration [Selected
Protocol Name] screen will appear.
3.
Click the “Communication Protocol” field, and select Enron Modbus Slave, Modbus RTU Slave,
Modbus TCP Server/Slave, Custom Modbus Slave, or Custom Modbus TCP Server/Slave from
the Change Communication Protocol dialog and click OK to return to the previous screen.
Important
4.
Internal Termination Resistor
Enabling the internal termination resistor
will increase the Scanner’s power
consumption. Do not enable the resistor
for devices that are not on the ends of
a daisy chain installation. Enabling the
resistor for a large number of devices on
a single serial port can limit the output
capability of the port.
Enter port settings in the bottom half of the screen to ensure compatibility with the Modbus master device or other existing devices on the network.
•
Baud rate. The baud rate is the speed at which data is transmitted or received via the serial port. The default setting is “9600.”
•
Enable flow control. The default setting is “No.”
•
Internal termination resistor. The internal termination resistor is disabled by default. If
noise is a problem within the network as a result of long lengths of cable between devices,
enabling this internal resistor in the end devices of a daisy chain installation can improve
communications. Enable the internal termination resistor only when required to minimize
the number of lost data packets.
•
Data bits. The number of data bits transmitted by the Scanner 3100. The default setting
is “8 bits,” and is fixed for serial ports 1 and 2. For serial port 3, you can select 5, 6, 7, or 8
bits.
•
Parity. A parity bit is a binary digit (bit) added to the end of a binary code to detect errors in
transmission. The default setting is “None.” The Scanner 3100 interface supports the following parity selections:
•
5.
If you will use a custom user-defined map, you must select Custom Modbus
Slave or Custom Modbus TCP Server/Slave under “Slave Protocols (User-Defined Register Map).”
––
None. No parity bits are assigned (default).
––
Even. The parity bit “1” will be added to the end of the binary code if it represents an
even number.
––
Odd. The parity bit “0” will be added to the end of the binary code if it represents an
odd number.
––
Always One. This selection is available only when Port 3 is selected and is also know
as a “Mark Parity”. The parity bit “1” will be added to the end of each binary code.
––
Always Zero. This selection is available only when Port 3 is selected and is also know
as a “Space Parity”. The parity bit “0” will be added to the end of each binary code.
Stop bits. A stop bit tells the computer how long to wait between receiving data packets
and alerts the transmitting device that the connection is still active. The stop bit is added
after the binary code and parity bit. The default stop bit value is “1”.
Click SAVE.
28
6.
Select ENRON MODBUS SLAVE>MODIFY or CUSTOM MODBUS SLAVE>MODIFY. The
Modify Serial Port # Protocol screen will appear.
7.
In the “Protocol Settings” section of the screen, enter the following settings:
8.
a.
Slave Address (or Unit ID). Enter the slave address assigned to the Scanner 3100.
b.
Bus Delay. The bus delay is the amount of time the Scanner 3100 will wait before
transmitting a message to a Modbus master device. The default value of “10 ms” is the
minimum value allowed. Increase the bus delay value only if a significant number of data
packets are being missed.
c.
Bus Timeout. The bus timeout is a “character” timeout period during which the Scanner
3100 will wait before aborting the message. If this period elapses between receiving
characters, the Scanner 3100 considers the message as lost and prepares for the next
one. Use a larger value for low baud rates and situations such as serial radio or modem
links where gaps between characters may be relatively long.
Modify the following settings as required if they appear on the screen. These fields appear
only when the Modbus protocol map includes Enron registers. Modbus RTU and Modbus TCP
Server/Slave protocol do not support flow history, and this field will be absent from the screen
when either is selected as the active protocol.
a.
History Record Size. Enter the number of parameters to be returned with each record
polling of the device (4 bytes per parameter). This includes any required user-configured
parameters plus three fixed parameters (record date, record time, and status). The “History
Record Size” setting applies to all history records for the communication channel, which
could come from Scanner 3100 archives of varying sizes. The “History Record Size” setting
can be larger or smaller than the number of fields selected for Scanner 3100 archives (if
larger, additional parameters are returned as an invalid value).
Example 1:
Include only the first 10 user parameters from a 16-field Scanner 3100 archive.
Solution:
Enter 13 (10 user parameters +3 fixed parameters = 13 parameters total).
Example 2:
FlowRun 1 archive size is 16 fields.
FlowRun 2 archive size is 31 fields.
The host requires 20 user parameters.
Solution:
Enter 23 (20 user parameters + 3 fixed parameters = 23 parameters total). The four
unused parameters for FlowRun 1 archive will appear as an invalid value. FlowRun 2
archive will return only the first 20 parameters.
b.
Enron Event Reporting. The “Enron Event Reporting” section of the screen allows you to
specify the following settings based on the host you are using:
––
Retrieval Mode Notes
Retrieval Mode. This selection allows you to choose the amount of data reported.
Select Host Will Stop When Response Event Packet Is Not Full to send the minimum
number of event records by eliminating records not relevant to the Modbus map
registers or by omitting System Command Change records (when System Command
Support is set to Host Cannot Process System Command Changes). The number of
events sent will be smaller than the event counter.
Selecting Host Will Stop When Response
Event Packet Is Not Full filters results
and may require long response times that
cause the host to time out.
Selecting Host Requires the Number
of Events Available to Equal the Event
Counter does not filter results and may
produce very large event logs that may
include unused data, but may be required
to match the number of events recorded to
the event counter.
Select Host Requires the Number of Events Available to Equal the Event Counter to
ensure that the number of downloadable event records is exactly equal to the number
of records reported. Records containing events irrelevant to the Modbus map registers
or unsupported System Command Change events will be transmitted as zero-value
records.
––
System Command Support. Scanner 3100 system-generated events and alarms
are encoded as Enron System Command Changes (Bit 7 of the Operator Change Bit
Map). The address field in the Enron System Command Change record contains the
System Command Code to indicate what event occurred and provides the proper decoding of new and old values.
The default setting is Host Can Process System Command Changes. When Host
Cannot Process System Command Changes is selected, the system command
events are zeroed and will not be sent if “Event Retrieval Mode” is set to Host Will
Stop When Response Event Packet Is Not Full.
––
9.
Year Offset. This setting allows the user to specify whether an event-date offset will
be used. Choose Standard to use the current year if the host does not require an offset. Choose Alternate if the host requires the event date to be offset by -80 years.
Click SAVE.
29
Verifying Communications (Slave Device over Serial Port)
Click the STATUS screen link and click REFRESH to confirm port status and determine whether errors exist that could indicate a problem with communications. Check the Auto checkbox for automatic
screen refresh.
CONFIGURING THE SCANNER 3100 AS A SLAVE DEVICE VIA A TCP
(ETHERNET) PORT
As a slave device, the Scanner 3100 can be configured to accept connections from a Modbus device
using TCP/IP communications. The RJ-45 connector on the Scanner 3100 terminal board supports
two TCP communication ports in addition to the web interface connection.
You can configure the port to use one of three protocols: Enron Modbus Slave, Modbus RTU Slave,
or Modbus TCP Server/Slave.
Enron Modbus Slave and Modbus RTU Slave protocols are essentially Modbus serial messages with
a TCP protocol wrapper. If you are unfamiliar with TCP protocol wrapping of serial messages, the
Modbus TCP protocol is recommended.
Scanner 3100 Software Downloads
The following software programs
are available for download from our
website at http://www.cameron.slb.com/
flowcomputers:
•
Scanner Data Manager
•
ScanMap
•
ScanFlash
Navigate to the website, select SCANNER
MODEL 3100 FLOW COMPUTER and
click the desired software download link.
Register maps for Enron Modbus Slave and Modbus RTU Slave protocols are stored in the Scanner
3100, ready for use. The Modbus TCP Server/Slave register map is stored on your PC hard drive
when ScanMap software is installed, and is easily uploaded to the Scanner 3100 via the web interface upload function or via the ScanFlash utility.
Additionally, you can modify an existing register map or create a new register map from scratch using ScanMap software, and upload it using the web interface upload function or ScanFlash software.
These maps are then selectable as “user-defined” register maps in the Change Communication
Protocol dialog used to configure a TCP port. You must decide which type of map you will use before
selecting the port protocol.
For more information on uploading register maps via the web interface, see Installing a Custom
Modbus Protocol Map File, page 94. For information about customizing a register map and uploading it via ScanFlash software, see the ScanMap User Manual and the Scanner 3100 Hardware
Manual.
Configuring Communications (Slave Device Over TCP Port)
To set up the Scanner 3100 as a slave device over an Ethernet connection,
1.
Select COMMUNICATIONS>TCP PORT 1 or TCP PORT 2.
2.
Click PORT CONFIGURATION>MODIFY. The Modify TCP Port # Configuration [Selected
Protocol Name] screen will appear.
3.
Click the “Communication Protocol” field, and select a protocol from the dialog provided in the
Change Communication Protocol dialog and click OK to return to the previous screen. Selectable protocols include Enron Modbus Slave, Modbus RTU Slave, Modbus TCP Server/Slave,
Custom Modbus Slave, or Custom Modbus TCP Server/Slave protocols.
Important
4.
If you will use a custom user-defined map, you must select Custom Modbus
Slave or Custom Modbus TCP Server/Slave under “Slave Protocols (User-Defined Register Map).”
Enter TCP port settings in the bottom half of the screen to be compatible with the TCP master
device or existing devices on the network.
•
TCP port number. The port number uniquely identifies the connection between the Scanner 3100 and its master. The default value is “502” for TCP Port 1 and “503” for TCP Port
2. An alternate port number (between 1024 and 65535) can be used to eliminate conflicts
between multiple networked devices.
•
Socket timeout. Socket timeout is the amount of time from when the socket connects until
the connection breaks. The Scanner 3100 slave device will close the connection if there is
no communication from the client during this period. The Modbus client can reopen it after
that time.
5.
Click SAVE.
6.
Select the screen link under “Protocol Setup” at the left of the screen (the name of the link will
vary depending on the protocol selected):
––
If “Enron Modbus” protocol is selected, the screen link will be labeled ENRON MODBUS
SLAVE.
––
If “Modbus RTU Slave” protocol is selected, the screen link will be labeled MODBUS RTU
SLAVE.
30
––
If “Modbus TCP Server/Slave” protocol is selected, the screen link will be labeled
MODBUS TCP SERVER.
––
If “Custom Modbus Slave” protocol is selected, the screen link will be labeled CUSTOM
MODBUS SLAVE.
––
If “Custom Modbus TCP Server/Slave” protocol is selected, the screen link will be labeled
CUSTOM MODBUS TCP.
7.
Click the MODIFY button. The Modify TCP Port # Protocol screen will appear.
8.
In the “Protocol Settings” section of the screen, enter the Slave Address or Unit ID, depending
on the protocol selected. In either case, enter the slave address assigned to the Scanner 3100.
9.
Enter the following settings if they appear on the screen. All protocol selections except for
Modbus RTU Slave and Modbus TCP Server/Slave, and Custom Modbus TCP Server/Slave
support the following:
a.
History Record Size (if applicable). Where the “History Record Size” field appears, enter
the number of parameters to be returned with each poll of the device. This number can
vary depending on company requirements. As a standard, this number includes all userconfigured parameters plus three fixed parameters (record date, record time, and status)
that are automatically included in the every archive file. However, the “History Record Size”
setting applies to all history records for the communication channel, which could come from
Scanner 3100 archives of varying sizes. The “History Record Size” setting can be larger or
smaller than the number of fields selected for Scanner 3100 archives.
Example 1:
Include only the first 10 user parameters from a 16-field Scanner 3100 archive.
Solution:
Enter 13 (10 user parameters +3 fixed parameters = 13 parameters total).
Example 2:
Flow Run 1 archive size is 16 fields.
Flow Run 2 archive size is 31 fields.
The host requires 20 user parameters.
Solution:
Enter 23 (20 user parameters + 3 fixed parameters = 23 parameters total). The four
unused fields in the Flow Run 1 archive will appear as a zero value. A poll of the Flow
Run 2 archive will return only the first 20 parameters.
b.
Retrieval Mode Notes
Enron Event Reporting. The “Enron Event Reporting” section of the screen allows you to
specify the following settings based on the host you are using:
––
Select Host Will Stop When Response Event Packet Is Not Full to allow the host to
send the minimum number of event records by eliminating records not relevant to the
Modbus map in use or by omitting System Command Change records (when the host
cannot accept System Command Changes).
Selecting Host Will Stop When Response
Event Packet Is Not Full filters results
and may require long response times that
cause the host to time out.
Selecting Host Requires the Number
of Events Available to Equal the Event
Counter does not filter results and may
produce very large event logs that may
include unused data, but may be required
to match the number of events recorded to
the event counter.
Retrieval Mode. This selection allows you to choose the amount of data reported.
Select Host Requires the Number of Events Available to Equal the Event Counter to
ensure that the number of downloadable event records is exactly equal to the number
of records reported. Records containing events irrelevant to the Modbus map registers
or unsupported System Command Change events will be transmitted as zero-value
records.
––
System Command Support. Scanner 3100 system-generated events and alarms
are encoded as Enron System Command Changes (Bit 7 of the Operator Change Bit
Map). The address field in the Enron System Command Change record contains the
System Command Code to indicate what event occurred and provides the proper decoding of new and old values.
The default setting is Host Can Process System Command Changes. When Host
Cannot Process System Command Changes is selected, the system command
events are zeroed and will not be sent if “Event Retrieval Mode” is set to Host Will
Stop When Response Event Packet Is Not Full.
––
Year Offset. This setting allows the user to specify whether an event-date offset will
be used. Choose Standard to use the current year if the host does not require an offset. Choose Alternate if the host requires the event date to be offset by -80 years.
10. Click SAVE.
Verifying Communications (Slave Device Over TCP Port)
Click the STATUS screen link and click REFRESH to confirm port status and determine whether errors exist that could indicate a problem with communications. Check the Auto checkbox for automatic
screen refresh.
31
Did You Know?
A Port Passthrough connection can be
used to configure a wired Scanner 2x00
slave device using ModWorX Pro over
an Ethernet connection. See Configuring
a Scanner 2x00 via a Serial-to-TCP
Passthrough Connection, page 34 for
details.
PORT PASSTHROUGH COMMUNICATIONS
The Port Passthrough feature allows a user to bridge two communication ports to remotely interact
with devices that are connected to one of the Scanner 3100 ports. By linking two Scanner 3100 ports
with Port Passthrough, data can be transmitted directly to the destination port and received from the
destination port without wiring changes. Each of the Scanner 3100’s five communication ports can be
bridged to another port using this feature:
•
Serial Port 1 (RS-485)
•
Serial Port 2 (RS-485)
•
Serial Port 3 (configurable as RS-485 or RS-232)
•
TCP Port 1
•
TCP Port 2
Two pairs of connections can be bridged concurrently (a serial-to-serial connection and a serial-toTCP connection, for example), as long as no single port is used in more than one bridge. In configuring a Port Passthrough connection, a user bypasses the existing protocol settings for the bridged
ports, and assigns override protocol settings for use with the Port Passthrough connections.
There are two types of Port Passthrough connections. Before configuring a passthrough connection,
consider which type is most appropriate for your needs:
Scanner Master Temporary
Connection Application
If a Scanner 3100 is configured to poll a
Scanner slave device, you can temporarily
bypass the protocol and download from
the slave device using a temporary Port
Passthrough connection. ModWorX
Pro software can be used to download
archives from the slave device. When
the Port Passthrough connection expires
or is manually terminated, the Scanner
Master protocol settings are automatically
restored, allowing the Scanner 3100 to
resume polling the slave device.
•
Persistent Connection. Ports remain bridged until the connection is manually terminated. During a loss of power to the Scanner 3100, the persistent connection remains configured and will
be automatically restored once power is regained. The original protocol selections will be restored only when the port passthrough connection is manually terminated.
•
Temporary Connection. Ports are bridged for a user-selected period of time (up to 1 day). If
the Scanner 3100 loses power, the temporary connection is terminated, even if the configured
time period has not expired. When the time period expires or the connection is otherwise terminated, the original protocol selections are automatically restored.
Creating a Port Passthrough Connection
To configure a Port Passthrough connection,
1.
Select COMMUNICATIONS>ALL COMMUNICATIONS PORTS>PORT PASSTHROUGH.
2.
Click PORT PASSTHROUGH>MODIFY. The Modify Port Passthrough Configuration screen
will appear.
3.
Click in the first available field in the left column. Unallocated fields are marked “Not In Use.”
The Change Port Passthrough Connection dialog will appear.
4.
Under “Port Selections,” click in the “Port A” field and select one of the two ports to be bridged.
5.
Under Port Selections,” click in the “Port B” field and select the port to be bridged with the Port A
selection.
6.
Under “Passthrough Connection Type,” select Persistent or Temporary.
If Temporary is the selected connection type, enter a time of expiration (up to 1 day or the
equivalent of 1 day in hours, minutes, or seconds).
7.
Click OK to save the configuration settings and exit the dialog. The two ports selected for bridging will appear on the Modify Port Passthrough Configuration screen under Port A or Port B.
8.
Each port description contains a string of characters in parentheses. These characters identify
the default communication settings applied to each port. For example, “Serial Port 1 (9600 baud,
8N1),” where 8 is the number of data bits, N equals no parity, and 1 is the number of stop bits. If
these settings are appropriate for the bridge without modification, proceed to step 9.
9.
To modify the communications settings for the Port Passthrough connection,
Viewing Port Passthrough Status
When two ports are actively bridged
using a Port Passthrough connection,
a message at the top of each port’s
Status screen will identify the port is in
passthrough mode. A link to the Port
Passthrough Configuration will appear to
the right of the message.
a.
Click in the field of the port to be changed (Port A or Port B). The Change Passthrough
Settings dialog will appear.
b.
Change the drop-down menu selections as required.
c.
Click OK to save the changes and return to the Modify Port Passthrough Configuration
screen.
10. Click SAVE to create the Port Passthrough connection and apply the passthrough protocol settings to the affected ports. The Port A and Port B selections are automatically converted to live
links that connect the user to port status screens.
Terminating a Port Passthrough Connection
To terminate a Port Passthrough connection,
1.
Select COMMUNICATIONS>ALL COMMUNICATIONS PORTS.
32
2.
Click PORT PASSTHROUGH>MODIFY. The Modify Port Passthrough Configuration screen
will appear.
3.
Terminate passthrough connections either of two ways:
a.
b.
To terminate all passthrough connections simultaneously,
i.
Click Clear All Passthrough Connections in the upper right corner of the screen.
ii.
Click OK when the Confirm dialog appears.
iii.
Click SAVE on the Modify Port Passthrough Configuration screen.
To terminate a single passthrough connection,
i.
Click on the red circle next to the connection to be terminated.
ii.
Click OK when the Confirm dialog box appears.
iii.
Click SAVE on the Modify Port Passthrough Configuration screen.
Configuring a Scanner 2x00 via a Serial-to-Serial Passthrough Connection
Without the Port Passthrough feature, a Scanner 3100 user can poll data from a Scanner 2x00 remotely, but can make only limited changes to the Scanner’s configuration settings. For complete configuration access, the user must physically connect a PC to the Scanner 2x00 and use ModWorX Pro
software to configure the device.
Using a serial-to-serial Port Passthrough connection, a Scanner 3100 user can remotely configure a
Scanner 2x00 by bridging serial ports used to connect the Scanner 3100 to the Scanner 2x00 and the
serial port of a PC running ModWorX Pro configuration software. Since the Scanner 2x00 requires an
RS-485 connection, an RS-485-to-USB adapter and a USB cable are required on the PC end of the
connection. Both ends of the port passthrough connection must have the same serial port configuration settings (baud rate, no parity, 1 stop bit) for successful communication.
Note Record the slave address and baud rate assigned to the Scanner 2x00 device. These settings will be needed to connect to the Scanner 2x00 using port passthrough communications.
To configure this connection,
1.
Select COMMUNICATIONS>ALL COMMUNICATIONS PORTS.
2.
Click PORT PASSTHROUGH>MODIFY. The Modify Port Passthrough Configuration screen
will appear.
3.
Click in the first available field in the left column. Unallocated fields are marked “Not in Use.” The
Change Port Passthrough Connection dialog will appear.
4.
Under the “Port Selections” header, click in the “Port A” field and select from the dropdown menu
the Scanner 3100 serial port connecting the Scanner 3100 to the Scanner 2x00 slave device.
5.
Under the “Ports Selections” header, click in the “Port B” field and select from the dropdown
menu the Scanner 3100 serial port connecting the Scanner 3100 to the PC running ModWorX
Pro software.
6.
Under the “Passthrough Connection Type” header, select Persistent Connection. This will allow
the connection to ModWorX Pro to be retained until the user manually terminates it.
7.
Click OK to exit the dialog. The two ports selected for bridging will appear on the Modify Port
Passthrough Configuration screen under the Port A and Port B columns.
8.
Click on the Scanner 2x00 serial connection. From the Change Passthrough Port X Settings
dialog, change the baud rate to match the baud rate of the connected Scanner 2x00.
9.
Click on the PC/ModWorX Pro serial connection. From the Change Passthrough Port X
Settings dialog, change the baud rate to match the baud rate specified in the ModWorX Pro
“Specify Parameters” connection settings.
10. Click OK to save the changes and return to the Modify Port Passthrough Configuration screen.
11. Click SAVE to create the Port Passthrough connection.
Important
Do not be alarmed if the serial port designated as a Port A selection appears
in the Port B column, and vice versa. The ordering of serial ports in the Port A
and Port B slots is automated by the Scanner 3100 and has no impact on the
function of the ports or the viability of the passthrough communications.
Connecting to a Scanner Slave Device from ModWorX Pro
Log into ModWorX Pro software from the PC and change communications settings as follows to connect to a Scanner 2x00:
1.
Select Specify Parameters connection method in ModWorX Pro.
33
2.
Enter the slave address and baud rate of the Scanner 2x00.
Note
3.
Port Passthrough connections do not support the ModWorX Pro “Express Connect” and
“Discover Devices” connection methods.
Change the ModWorX Pro download settings as follows:
a.
Click TOOLS>OPTIONS…>DOWNLOAD.
b.
Under the “Download Streaming” header, set the “Download Baud Rate” to the baud rate of
the Scanner 2x00.
c.
Click OK.
Important
Do not check the “Same as comm. baud rate” checkbox.
Configuring a Scanner 2x00 via a Serial-to-TCP Passthrough Connection
The procedure for connecting a Scanner 2x00 to ModWorX Pro via a serial-to-TCP connection is almost identical to the serial-to–serial connection procedure described above. However, a virtual serial
port is needed to provide the TCP wrapper that will allow Modbus messages to travel via the Ethernet
between Scanner 3100 and PC serial ports.
To configure this connection,
Clearing Grand Totals
You can clear grand totals at any time.
Following are some examples of when
you might want to do so:
•
After switching from gas measurement to liquid measurement or vice
versa
•
After changing the fluid properties
calculation method
•
After correcting the monthly record
•
After calibrating/performing maintenance on the device
•
•
1.
Install a serial-to-TCP redirecting software on the PC with the ModWorX Pro software and configure a virtual serial port on the PC using the IP address and TCP Port number assigned to the
Scanner 3100. See Appendix D—Creating a Virtual Serial Port for
TCP-to-Serial Passthrough Communications, page 106 for an example. Open ModWorX Pro
and configure communications to use the virtual serial port.
2.
In the Scanner 3100 web interface, select COMMUNICATIONS>ALL COMMUNICATIONS
PORTS.
3.
Click PORT PASSTHROUGH>MODIFY. The Modify Port Passthrough Configuration screen
will appear.
4.
Click in the first available field in the left column. Unallocated fields are marked “Not in Use.” The
Change Port Passthrough Connection dialog will appear.
5.
Under the “Ports Selection” header, click in the “Port A” field and select one of the three serial
ports. Wire the Scanner 2x00 device to the selected Scanner 3100 port.
Important
The selected serial port must be configured as an RS-485 connection. If serial
port 3 is used, it cannot be configured with a RS-232 connection.
6.
Under the “Ports Selection” header, click in the “Port B” field and select one of the two TCP
ports. The selected port will provide the connection to the virtual serial port on the PC, which in
turn, provides access to ModWorX Pro software.
After downloading or clearing the
archive
7.
Under the “Passthrough Connection Type” header, select Persistent Connection. This will allow
the connection to ModWorX Pro to be retained until the user manually terminates it.
After relocating the device
8.
Click OK to exit the dialog. The two ports selected for bridging will appear on the Modify Port
Passthrough Configuration screen under the Port A and Port B columns.
9.
Click on the PORT A configuration. From the Change Passthrough Port A Settings dialog,
change the baud rate to match the baud rate of the connected Scanner 2x00. No further setting
changes are required for Port B.
To clear a grand total from the Pulse Input
# Status screen, click the Clear Grand
Total hyperlink to the right of the “Grand
Total” field.
10. Click OK to save the changes and return to the Modify Port Passthrough Configuration screen.
11. Click SAVE to create the Port Passthrough connection.
12. Connect to the Scanner slave device through ModWorX Pro using the procedure described in
Connecting to a Scanner Slave Device from ModWorX Pro, page 33.
Section 5—Configuring Inputs and Outputs
This section will guide users in performing the following tasks:
•
Configure a differential pressure input
•
Configure a static pressure input
•
Configure process temperature (RTD) inputs
•
Configure analog inputs
•
Configure pulse inputs
34
•
Configure digital inputs
•
Configure digital outputs
•
Configure analog outputs
DIFFERENTIAL PRESSURE
To configure a differential pressure input, choose LOCAL I/O>DIFFERENTIAL PRESSURE>
CONFIGURATION>MODIFY. From the Modify Differential Pressure Configuration screen, a user
can:
•
Change the input configuration
•
Enable input stacking
Configuring a Differential Pressure Input
1.
Click in the “Input Name” field and type a unique input name, if desired,.
2.
To change the damping factor, click the -/+ buttons. In the Scanner 3100, the value entered for
the damping factor is also the settling time.
3.
To change the low input cutoff, click in the “Low Input Cutoff” field and enter the desired cutoff
pressure. This setting helps prevent inaccuracies in daily and interval records caused by periods
of very low flow by establishing the minimum pressure that will be applied as an input.
4.
To override the live input, choose Yes from the “Enable Override” dropdown list, then enter the
override value desired in the “Override Value” field. The Scanner 3100 will use this value in
place of the live input.
5.
Enter the appropriate fail value. In the event of an input failure, this value will be applied as the
input.
6.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
Stacking Differential Pressure Inputs
Measurement uncertainty increases as pressure approaches zero. To limit this uncertainty, transmitters with a small pressure range may be combined or stacked with a transmitter having a broader
pressure range. By switching between the two transmitters as pressure rises and falls, the measurement uncertainty is significantly reduced. The Scanner 3100 supports up to five stacked inputs.
Important
Before configuring input stacking, consider the number of transmitters to be
stacked and the progression of ranges. This will determine the stacking order
to be configured. Failure to link the transmitters in the correct order will prevent the transfer from one transmitter to another from working as intended.
When the Scanner 3100 is purchased with an MVT, one differential pressure source exists internally.
External transmitters can be added by configuring an analog input as a differential pressure input
or by configuring a serial port connection using Modbus Master protocol. For more information, see
Analog Input, page 37, or Mastering a Modbus Device (Modbus Master), page 24, for more information.
Important When connecting an external transmitter using a serial port connection, the
external transmitter MUST be the largest pressure range in the series of transmitters to be stacked. You can link a transmitter with a smaller pressure range
to a Modbus Master input device, but you cannot link from a Modbus Master
input device to another transmitter with a higher pressure range.
For example, to stack an external transmitter connected via serial port
(Modbus Master) and the internal MVT differential pressure, the external
transmitter range MUST exceed the MVT differential pressure range and the
external transmitter should be configured first. Then the MVT can be linked to
the external transmitter to create the stacked input.
Configure transmitters in the order of the largest to smallest pressure range as follows:
1.
Configure the transmitter with the largest pressure range.
2.
Configure the transmitter with the next highest pressure range and link it to the first transmitter
configured in Step 1 as follows:
a.
Locate the “Input Stacking” selections on your configuration screen. If the internal MVT
is your second highest pressure range, these selections may be on the Modify Static
Pressure Configuration screen. If your second highest pressure range is an external
transmitter connected to the Scanner 3100 via an analog input, these selections will be on
the Modify Analog Input # Configuration screen.
b.
Choose Yes from the “Enable Stacking” dropdown list.
35
c.
Click in the “Linked Input” field to select the transmitter with the highest pressure range.
d.
Enter the desired deadband to determine the point at which the input will switch from a
broader pressure range transmitter to a smaller pressure range transmitter as pressure
drops. The point of input switching as pressure drops from high to low is determined by
subtracting the deadband value from the full-scale value of the lower-range transmitter.
Example:
Transmitter A range: 0 to 50 inH2O (deadband is 5)
Transmitter B range: 0 to 100 inH2O
Transmitter A will provide the differential pressure input until pressure reaches 50 inH2O,
then Transmitter B will provide the input. When pressure drops to 50 inH2O again,
Transmitter B will still be the active input because the pressure has not surpassed the
deadband.
When the pressure reaches 45 inH2O (Transmitter A’s 50 inH2O maximum range minus
the deadband), the input source will switch back to Transmitter A.
3.
Repeat Steps 2a through 2d to stack up to five transmitters. Remember that stacking order is
important. Each additional stacked input must be linked to the transmitter with the next highest
pressure range in the series.
STATIC PRESSURE
To configure a static pressure input, choose LOCAL I/O>STATIC PRESSURE>CONFIGURATION>
MODIFY. From the Modify Static Pressure Configuration screen, a user can:
•
Change the input configuration
•
Enable input stacking
Configuring a Static Pressure Input
1.
Type a unique input name in the “Input Name” field or skip this item to leave the default input
name.
2.
Click the -/+ buttons to change the damping factor. To change the damping factor, click the -/+
buttons. In the Scanner 3100, the value entered for the damping factor is also the settling time.
3.
To change the low input cutoff, click in the “Low Input Cutoff” field and enter the desired cutoff
pressure. This setting helps prevent inaccuracies in daily and interval records caused by periods
of very low flow by establishing the minimum pressure that will be applied as an input.
4.
To override the live input, choose Yes from the “Enable Override” dropdown list, then enter the
override value desired in the “Override Value” field. The Scanner 3100 will use this value in
place of the live input.
5.
Enter the appropriate fail value. In the event of an input failure, this value will be applied as the
input.
6.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
Stacking Static Pressure Inputs
Measurement uncertainty increases as pressure approaches zero. To limit this uncertainty, transmitters with a small pressure range may be combined or stacked with a transmitter having a broader
pressure range. By switching between the two transmitters as pressure rises and falls, the risk for
measurement uncertainty is significantly reduced. The Scanner 3100 supports up to five stacked
inputs.
Important
Before configuring input stacking, consider the number of transmitters to be
stacked and the progression of ranges. This will determine the stacking order
to be configured. Failure to link the transmitters in the correct order will prevent the transfer from one to another from working as intended.
When the Scanner 3100 is purchased with an MVT, one static pressure source exists internally.
External transmitters can be added by configuring an analog input as a static pressure input or by
configuring a serial port connection using Modbus Master protocol. For more information, see Analog
Input, page 37, or Mastering a Modbus Device (Modbus Master), page 24, for more information.
36
Important When connecting an external transmitter using a serial port connection, the
external transmitter MUST be the largest pressure range in the series of transmitters to be stacked. You can link a transmitter with a smaller pressure range
to a Modbus Master input device, but you cannot link from a Modbus Master
input device to another transmitter with a higher pressure range.
For example, to stack an external transmitter connected via serial port
(Modbus Master) and the internal MVT static pressure, the external transmitter
range MUST exceed the MVT static pressure range and the external transmitter
should be configured first. Then the MVT can be linked to the external transmitter to create the stacked input.
Configure transmitters in the order of the largest to smallest pressure range as follows:
1.
Configure the transmitter with the largest pressure range.
2.
Configure the transmitter with the next highest pressure range and link it to the first transmitter
configured in Step 1 as follows:
a.
Locate the “Input Stacking” selections on your configuration screen. If the internal MVT
is your second highest pressure range, these selections may be on the Modify Static
Pressure Configuration screen. If your second highest pressure range is an external
transmitter connected to the Scanner 3100 via an analog input, these selections will be on
the Modify Analog Input Configuration screen.
b.
Choose Yes from the “Enable Stacking” field.
c.
Click in the “Linked Input” field and select the transmitter with the highest pressure range.
d.
Enter the desired deadband to determine the point at which the input will switch from a
broader pressure range transmitter to a smaller pressure range transmitter as pressure
drops. The point of input switching as pressure drops from high to low is determined by
subtracting the deadband value from the full scale value of the lower-range transmitter.
Example:
Transmitter A range: 0 to 50 psi (deadband is 5)
Transmitter B range: 0 to 100 psi
Transmitter A will provide the differential pressure input until pressure reaches 50 psi, then
Transmitter B will provide the input. When pressure drops to 50 psi again, Transmitter B will
still be the active input because the pressure has not surpassed the deadband.
When the pressure reaches 45 psi (Transmitter A’s 50-psi maximum range minus the
deadband), the input source will switch back to Transmitter A.
3.
Repeat Steps 2a through 2d to stack up to five transmitters. Remember that stacking order is
important. Each additional stacked input must be linked to the transmitter with the next highest
pressure range in the series.
PROCESS TEMPERATURE
The Scanner 3100 supports up to two RTD inputs. To configure an RTD input, choose LOCAL I/O>
RTD #>CONFIGURATION>MODIFY. The Modify RTD Input Configuration screen will appear.
Shortcut
You can configure multiple inputs of the
same type without exiting the Modify
[Input Type] Configuration screen. Simply
click the number of the desired input
in the upper right corner of the Modify
Configuration screen, or use the PREV
and NEXT buttons to select the input to be
configured.
BS&W Volume Correction
When using an analog input to transmit
a BS&W percentage, you can apply the
same input as a volume correction to a
flow run volume. See Configuring Liquid
Properties, page 70.
Configuring a Process Temperature (RTD) Input
To configure the RTD,
1.
Type a unique input name in the “Input Name” field, if desired.
2.
Click the -/+ buttons to change the damping factor. To change the damping factor, click the -/+
buttons. In the Scanner 3100, the value entered for the damping factor is also the settling time.
3.
To override the live input, choose Yes from the “Enable Override” dropdown list, then enter the
override value desired in the “Override Value” field. The Scanner 3100 will use this value in
place of the live input.
4.
Enter the appropriate fail value. In the event of an input failure, this value will be applied as the
input.
5.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
ANALOG INPUT
The Scanner 3100 supports up to four analog inputs. An analog input can be used to provide a static
pressure (absolute or gauge), differential pressure, temperature, length, current, voltage, viscosity,
fraction, or Base Sediment and Water (BS&W) input.
37
To configure an analog input, choose LOCAL I/O>ANALOG #>CONFIGURATION>MODIFY. The
Modify Analog Input Configuration screen will appear.
Configuring an Analog Input
To configure the transducer parameters,
Transducer Units
Selection of the transducer units when
configuring an analog input provides a
simple mechanism for converting the
manufacturer’s published transducer
units to the selected device units. This
mechanism prevents the need to manually
convert the high and low ranges during
configuration.
Analog input calibrations and data will be
in the selected device units.
Pulse Input Source Configuration
When configuring a flow run with a pulse
input source (such as an AGA-7 volume
pulse input), configure the pulse input
source before configuring the flow run.
Otherwise, the pulse input source will
appear as “Invalid Source” and will not be
selectable when you configure your input
assignments on the Modify Flow Run Rate
Calculations screen.
If your fluid property is gas, configure
your pulse input accumulation type as
“uncorrected gas volume.” If your fluid
property is hydrocarbon liquid, choose
“uncorrected liquid volume.” If your fluid
property is mass, choose “mass.”
1.
Click in the “Transducer Type” field, select the type of input required from the Change Transducer Type dialog, and click OK.
2.
Select the desired input type (0–5 Volt, 1–5 Volt, 0–20 mA, or 4–20 mA) from the “Transducer
Input Type” list.
3.
Select the desired unit type from the “Transducer Units” dropdown list.
4.
Enter the desired transducer range “Low” value in the field provided. The low range setting is
the output value that will represent the low end of the sensor’s range. For example, a low setting of 10 psig for a 1–5 volt pressure transmitter would cause the Scanner to record a 10-psig
measurement when it receives a 1-volt input.
5.
Enter the desired transducer range “High” value in the field provided. The high range setting
is the output value that will represent the high end of the sensor’s range. For example, a high
setting of 200 psig for a 1–5 volt pressure transmitter would cause the Scanner to record a 200psig measurement when it receives a 5-volt input.
6.
Enter the transducer model number in the “Transducer Model Number” field, if desired. This field
is blank by default.
7.
Enter the transducer serial number in the “Transducer Serial Number” field, if desired. This field
is blank by default.
8.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
To configure the analog input parameters,
1.
Type a unique input name in the “Input Name” field, if desired.
2.
Click the -/+ buttons to change the damping factor. To change the damping factor, click the -/+
buttons. In the Scanner 3100, the value entered for the damping factor is also the settling time.
3.
To change the low input cutoff, click in the “Low Input Cutoff” field and enter the desired cutoff
(pressure, temperature, etc.), depending on transducer type selected. This setting helps prevent
inaccuracies in daily and interval records analog input records caused by periods of very low
activity by establishing the minimum output at which a signal will be recorded.
4.
To override the live input, choose Yes from the “Enable Override” field, then enter the override
value desired in the “Override Value” dropdown list. The Scanner 3100 will use this value in
place of the live input.
5.
Enter the appropriate fail value. In the event of an input failure, this value will be applied as the
input.
6.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
PULSE INPUT
The Scanner 3100 supports up to three pulse inputs, which can be used to measure uncorrected
volumes of gas and liquid as well as mass using a turbine magnetic pickup, a device with a closed
contact or open collector output, or a device with a DC pulse output.
Pulse Inputs 1 and 2 are always enabled. Pulse Input 3 is disabled by default.
Configuring a Pulse Input
To configure a pulse input, choose LOCAL I/O>PULSEIN #>CONFIGURATION>MODIFY. The Modify Pulse Input Configuration screen will appear.
1.
Click in the “Accumulation Type” field, select the accumulation type from the Change Accumulation Type dialog that matches the flow rate calculation method selected for the flowrun to be
used with the input and click OK. Failure to match the accumulation type to the flow rate calculation method will result in an “invalid source” error on the Flow Run Status screen.
2.
Click in the “Pulse Input Type” field, select the type of pulse-generating device to be used from
the Change Pulse Input Type dialog and click OK.
The default setting for pulse input
accumulation type is “uncorrected liquid
volume.”
––
3.
If Turbine Magnetic Pickup is selected, click on the “Input Threshold” dropdown list and
choose the desired sensitivity level for minimizing noise interference in the signal reception.
There are three sensitivity levels; ~20 mV, ~50 mV and ~100 mV. The “low” threshold value
will allow the Scanner to detect a signal of approximately 20 mV peak-to-peak, while the
“high” threshold value will detect only signals that exceed approximately 100 mV peak-topeak.
Click in the “Meter Model Number” field and enter the transducer model number, if desired. This
field is blank by default.
38
4.
Click in the “Meter Serial Number” field and enter the transducer serial number, if desired. This
field is blank by default.
5.
Click SAVE to save and exit or continue to the next configuration category on the screen.
Maintenance Mode Timeout
To configure the pulse input parameters,
If you fail to exit Maintenance Mode, it
will expire automatically after 60 minutes,
assuming no activity is detected on the
web interface. All inputs will return to
regular operation.
1.
Type a unique input name in the “Input Name” field or skip this item to leave the default input
name.
2.
Click the -/+ buttons to change the damping factor. To change the damping factor, click the -/+
buttons. In the Scanner 3100, the value entered for the damping factor is also the settling time.
3.
To change the low input cutoff, enter the desired cutoff frequency in the “Low Input Cutoff” field.
This setting is reserved for turbine input only. The Scanner will ignore inputs below this value.
4.
To override the live input reading (when applicable), choose Yes from the “Enable Override”
dropdown list and enter the desired override value in the “Override Value” field.
5.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
Changing the K-Factor or Meter Factor
The K-Factor provides an electronic indication of volumetric throughput. To change the K-Factor or
meter factor, choose LOCAL I/O>PULSEIN #>K-FACTOR>MODIFY from the Pulse Input Status
screen. You will be prompted to enter Maintenance Mode. Click OK to proceed. All sensor inputs will
be locked at current values until calibration is complete and you exit Maintenance Mode.
1.
Click in the “Calibration Type” field, select the desired calibration type from the Change Calibration Type dialog and click OK. Selections include:
––
Linear (Nominal) Factor
Restoring to Factory Calibration
––
Multipoint
To restore the factory calibration, click the
Restore Factory Calibration hyperlink to
the right of the “Calibration Parameters”
heading.
––
Multipoint Meter Factor
2.
Enter a reference number for the K-Factor calibration in the “Reference Number” field, if desired.
3.
Enter calibration notes in the “Calibration Note” field, if desired.
4.
Enter the K-Factor value appropriate for your selected calibration type, as described below:
Calibration History
Linear (Nominal) Factor
The four most recent calibrations are
stored in the Scanner 3100 and may
be restored as the current calibration.
Calibrations that are compatible with the
existing transducer are identified by a
green checkmark icon (see below) to the
left of the calibration entry.
Select from one of the following options:
––
Enter a new value in the “Linear K-Factor” field.
––
Use an historical list entry by clicking on the desired history in the “Calibration History” section of the screen and clicking OK when the Confirm dialog appears.
Multipoint
Select from one of the following options:
Sort Points/Clear All Points
The Sort Points hyperlink is located to the
right of “New Calibration Data” heading.
Clicking this link before saving will sort the
calibration points from lowest to highest
frequency. Clicking the SAVE button will
also automatically sort the calibration
points.
––
In the “New Calibration Data” field, enter a new frequency and K-Factor for each calibration
point desired. At least two calibration points are required and up to 16 calibration points are
supported.
––
Copy the current calibration to the new calibration by clicking the Copy to New hyperlink to
the right of the “Current Calibration Data” heading.
––
Use an historical list entry by clicking on the desired history in the “Calibration History” section of the screen and clicking OK when the Confirm dialog appears.
Multipoint Meter Factor
Select from one of the following options:
––
To clear all new calibration data points
from the “New Calibration Data” grid, click
the Clear all Points hyperlink.
In the “New Calibration Data” field, enter the nominal K-Factor in the field provided and
enter a new frequency and meter factor for each calibration point desired. At least two calibration points are required and up to 16 calibration points are supported.
If frequency data is not supplied by the meter manufacturer, calculate it using the formula
KF×FR/60 = Frequency, where KF = K-Factor in pulses per gallon and FR = flow rate in
gallons per minute.
5.
––
Copy the current calibration to the new calibration by clicking the Copy to New hyperlink to
the right of the “Current Calibration Data” heading.
––
Use an historical list entry by clicking on the desired history in the “Calibration History” section of the screen and clicking OK when the Confirm dialog appears.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit. If an historical calibration is restored, the screen will be
automatically saved.
39
DIGITAL INPUT
Shortcut
You can configure multiple inputs of the
same type without exiting the Modify
[Input Type] Configuration screen. Simply
click the number of the desired input
in the upper right corner of the Modify
Configuration screen, or use the PREV
and NEXT buttons to select the input to be
configured.
The Scanner 3100 supports up to six digital inputs/outputs, four of which are optically isolated (DIOs
1 through 4) and two of which are non-isolated (DIOs 5 and 6). Digital inputs can be configured from
a variety of devices including an installed control switch, and devices with either a pulse output, an
open collector output or a contact closure output. DIOs 5 and 6 can be configured for an open collector output using an internal pull-up resistor or a customer-supplied resistor.
In addition to a standard digital input, the Scanner 3100 interface provides a “special function” menu
containing some common functions that can be activated by changing the state of the input for userspecified periods of time (momentarily, 5 seconds, or 15 seconds). Special function selections include
pacing the display, resetting grand totals for an integral flowrun or pulse input, unlatching a digital
input/output alarm or resetting the state of a triggered archive.
Configuring a Digital Input
To configure a standard digital input,
1.
Choose LOCAL I/O>DIO #>CONFIGURATION>MODIFY. The Modify Digital In/Out # Configuration screen will appear.
2.
Click in the “Digital I/O Mode” field, select Input Mode from the Change Digital IO Mode dialog,
and click OK.
3.
In the “Input Settings” section of the screen, click the “Input Type” field, select a digital input type
from the Change Digital I/O Input Type dialog, and click OK. Available digital input types are
Installed Control Switch, Pulse, Open Collector, and Closed Contact.
Note
4.
Choose the input trigger state (high or low) where applicable.
Note
5.
Disabling Wireless in the Interface
Wireless communications can
also be disabled by changing a
setting in the web interface. Select
COMMUNICATIONS>WIRELESS MESH
NETWORK>CONFIGURATION>MODIFY
and select “No” from the Enable Wireless
Transmitter dropdown menu.
Installed Control Switch
The digital input “Installed Control
Switch” input type is intended for use with
Cameron’s momentary or toggle control
switches. Either switch can be ordered
with a mechanical lockout device to keep
unauthorized personnel from changing the
switch position during critical operations.
The momentary switch is recommended
for use with special functions where
the signal duration determines the
function activated. See the Scanner
3100 Hardware User Manual for more
information on Cameron control switches.
When configuring DIOs 5 and 6 for connecting to an Open Collector output, you must
specify whether your are using an internal pull-up resistor or a customer-supplied resistor. When an internal pull-up resistor is selected, signals can be transmitted over short
distances without the use of an external power supply.
When the digital input type is Installed Control Switch, the “Trigger State” field is not
editable because the action is always triggered by the High state when a momentary control switch is used.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
Configuring a Special Function Input
The Special Function Input mode allows you to perform two types of special functions:
•
Configure a digital input for remotely disabling wireless communications
•
Configure a digital input for remotely performing common functions using a momentary switch or
other device in which you can configure a signal duration
Special functions that can be configured via a digital input include advancing the display, toggling a wireless device on and off, resetting the grand total of a flowrun or pulse input, unlatching
a digital input/output, and releasing a triggered archive latch.
Disable Wireless Communications
1.
Choose LOCAL I/O>DIO #>CONFIGURATION>MODIFY. The Modify Digital In/Out # Configuration screen will appear
2.
Click in the “Digital I/O Mode” field, select Special Function Input Mode from the Change Digital
IO Mode dialog and click OK.
3.
In the “Input Settings” section of the screen, click the “Input Type” field, select a digital input type
from the Change Digital I/O Input Type dialog, and click OK. Available digital input types are
Installed Control Switch, Pulse, Open Collector, and Closed Contact.
4.
Choose the input trigger state (high or low) when applicable.
Note
5.
When the digital input type is Installed Control Switch, the “Trigger State” field is fixed in the
“High” state because the action is always triggered by the High state when a momentary
control switch is used.
Select Yes in the “Disable Wireless while Input Is Active” field.
Configure a Digital Input for Remotely Performing a Function
1.
Repeat Steps 1 through 4 of Disable Wireless Communications above. (Skip Step 5.)
2.
Select the function required from the “Special Function Selections” grid and click in the appropriate checkbox to select the signal duration desired for actuating the switch. For example, choos40
ing a tap duration for the Advance to Next Display Message selection with an installed control
switch as the input type will allow you to advance the display with each tap of the switch.
3.
Repeat Step 2 to add additional functions. Up to three functions can be selected for each input
by selecting different signal durations. (A tap can actuate one function, a 5-second press and
hold can actuate a different function, and a 15-second press and hold can actuate a third function.)
4.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
The following special functions can be performed:
Shortcut
You can configure multiple outputs of
the same type without exiting the Modify
[Output Type] Configuration screen.
Simply click the number of the desired
output in the upper right corner of the
Modify Configuration screen, or use the
PREV and NEXT buttons to select the
output to be configured.
•
Advance Display. Use this selection to cause the LCD display to advance.
•
Reset Flow Run Grand Totals. Reset Flow Run 1 and/or Flow Run 2 grand totals.
•
Reset Pulse Input Grand Totals. Reset Pulse Inputs 1 through 3 grand totals.
•
Unlatch DIO. Select Unlatch Digital Input/Output 1 through 6 to release a latched digital input/
output.
•
Release Triggered Archive Latch. Use this selection to release triggered archive latches.
•
Publish Triggered Archive Record. Use this selection to publish a triggered archive record to
the Triggered Archive file.
•
Create Partial Archive Records. Use this selection to record a partial archive.
•
Acknowledge Device Alarms. Use this selection the Acknowledge Device Alarms hyperlink on
the DEVICE>ALARMS STATUS page.
•
Abort Program. Select this option to force any executing Scanner Logic program into the Abort
State.
•
Reset Program. Select this option to restart any executing Scanner Logic program at the initial
state for all tasks. Any program in Abort State or Fail State will also be restarted.
DIGITAL OUTPUT
To configure a digital output, choose LOCAL I/O>DIO #>CONFIGURATION>MODIFY. The Modify
Digital In/Out Configuration screen will appear, from which a user can configure the digital output to
represent any of the following:
•
A pulse output representing the accumulated pulse count in proportion to a selected register
•
A pulse output based on time
•
A response to a value that triggers an alarm
•
A response to a value that goes above a user-defined setpoint, below a user-defined setpoint, or
out of the range of user-defined setpoints
•
A programmable time-of-day output control
•
A programmable controlled output state (via serial protocol)
Configuring an Accumulated Pulse Count Pulse Output
To configure an accumulated pulse count pulse output,
1.
Click on the “Digital I/O Mode” dropdown list, select Accumulated Pulse Count under the “Pulse
Output” header, and click OK.
2.
Click on the “Selected Register” field and select the register for which the accumulated pulse
count will be output.
3.
Enter the volume that each pulse will represent per unit in the “Output Scaling” field.
4.
Enter the pulse duration in milliseconds.
5.
Select Normally Open or Normally Closed from the “Output State” field.
6.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
Configuring a Periodic (Time-Based) Pulse Output
To configure a periodic pulse output,
1.
Click on the “Digital I/O Mode” dropdown list, select Periodic under the “Pulse Output” header
and click OK.
2.
Enter the output period in milliseconds.
3.
Enter the pulse duration in milliseconds.
4.
Select Normally Open or Normally Closed from the “Output State” field.
5.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
41
Configuring a Device Alarm Output
A device alarm output generates a digital output when one or more selected alarms are activated.
The Scanner 3100 supports up to 32 alarm selections for each alarm output. For more information
about establishing alarms, see Section 10—Configuring Device Alarms, page 83. To configure a
selected device alarm,
Clearing Alarm Selections
To clear alarm selections, uncheck the
Selected checkbox or click the CLEAR
ALL SELECTIONS link to the right of the
“Alarm Selections” heading.
1.
Make sure the device alarms to be used as a digital output trigger in the Scanner 3100 are configured. If they are not, configure the alarm(s) using the procedures in Section 10—Configuring
Device Alarms, page 83.
2.
Click in the “Digital I/O Mode” field. The Change Digital I/O Mode dialog will appear. Select
Selected Device Alarms and click OK.
3.
Select Normally Open or Normally Closed from the “Output State” field.
4.
Click on the “Enable Output Latching” field and select Yes, if a latched state is desired. If the
alarm is latched (enabled), it will remain active once it is activated, even if the assigned parameter value returns to a normal range, and the alarm must be manually cleared by the operator.
See Clearing an Output Latch below for details. If the alarm is unlatched (disabled), the alarm
will clear without intervention from the operator when the assigned parameter value returns to a
normal range.
5.
Click in the “Output Turns ON When” field and select whether the output will be activated when
ANY selected alarm is triggered or when ALL selected alarms are triggered.
6.
If you want to delay the output until a selected alarm has been active for a specified time period
(i.e. alarm hold-off), click in the “Alarm Hold-Off” field, enter the appropriate time period in the
Edit Alarm Hold-Off dialog, and click OK.
7.
Select the alarm(s) from the “Alarms Selections” grid as described below. If no alarms are displayed in the grid (i.e. all alarms appear as “Unused”), device alarms have not been configured.
8.
––
To select specific alarms, check the Selected checkbox next to the desired alarms.
––
To select all alarms, click SET ALL SELECTIONS to the right of the “Alarm Selections”
heading.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
Clearing an Output Latch
If output latching is enabled for a device alarm output, the state of the latch will be displayed on the
Digital In/Out Status screen for the respective DIO, along with a hyperlink for clearing a latch.
To clear the latch on an individual device alarm output, click LOCAL I/O>DIO #>STATUS and click
the Clear Output Latch hyperlink.
To clear all DIO latches, click DEVICE>STATUS, scroll down to the DIO section of the Status screen,
and click the Clear All DIO Latches hyperlink.
Configuring a Conditional Output
A conditional output is triggered in response to a tracked register value that goes above or below a
specified setpoint or outside a specified setpoint range.
To configure a conditional output,
1.
Output State
The Output State of a digital output is
reported as Active or Not Active. When
not active, the output switch is in the
user-configured normal position (Normally
Open or Normally Closed). When an
output is active, the output switch is in the
non-normal state.
Click in the “Digital I/O Mode” field, select one of the following conditions from the Change Digital I/O Mode dialog and click OK.
––
Value Below Setpoint. The alarm is activated when the value of the selected register is
below the designated threshold.
––
Value Above Setpoint. The alarm is activated when the value of the selected register is
above the designated threshold.
––
Value Out of Setpoint Range. The alarm is activated when the value of the selected register goes above or below the designated thresholds.
2.
Click in the “Selected Register” field, select the desired register from the Select Register for
Digital Output dialog, and click OK.
3.
Enter the low setpoint, high setpoint or setpoint range values as applicable in the fields provided.
4.
Select Normally Open or Normally Closed from the “Output State” dropdown list.
5.
If a latched output is desired, click the “Enable Output Latching” dropdown list and select Yes.
If the alarm is latched (enabled), it will remain active once it is activated, even if the assigned
parameter value returns to a normal range, and the alarm must be manually cleared by the
operator. See Clearing an Output Latch above for details. If the alarm is unlatched (disabled),
the alarm will clear without intervention from the operator when the assigned parameter value
returns to a normal range.
6.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
42
If output latching is enabled for a conditional output, the state of the latch will be displayed on the
Digital In/Out Status screen for the respective DIO, along with a hyperlink for clearing a latch. For
instructions on clearing a latch, see Clearing an Output Latch, page 42.
Configuring a Time of Day Output Control
To configure an output that will be activated for a specified period at the same time every day,
1.
Click in the “Digital I/O Mode” field, select Time of Day Output Control from the Change Digital
I/O Mode dialog and click OK.
2.
Enter the desired “on” and “off” times and select AM or PM in the appropriate fields.
3.
Select Normally Open or Normally Closed from the “Output State” field.
4.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
Configuring a Programmable Controlled Output State
When the Scanner 3100 is serially connected to an external Modbus device, a digital output can be
enabled or disabled by writing a value of 1 or 0 to the appropriate DIO holding register. Register numbers are published in all Modbus protocol manuals supplied for use with the Scanner 3100.
To configure a programmable controlled output state,
1.
Click in the “Digital I/O Mode” field, select Controlled Output State from the Change Digital I/O
Mode dialog and click OK.
2.
Select Normally Open or Normally Closed from the “Output State” field.
3.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
ANALOG OUTPUT
Shortcut
You can configure a second analog
output without exiting the Modify Analog
Output Configuration screen. Simply
click the number of the desired output
in the upper right corner of the Modify
Configuration screen, or use the PREV
and NEXT buttons to select the output to
be configured.
The Scanner 3100 supports two analog outputs. To configure an analog output, choose
LOCAL I/O>ANALOG OUTPUT#>CONFIGURATION>MODIFY. The Modify Analog Output # Configuration screen will appear. By default, the output mode is set to “Disabled.” An analog output can
be configured to track a selected register or to control a process variable via a controller (analog)
output.
Configuring an Analog Output to Track a Selected Register
To configure the analog output to track a selected register,
1.
Click in the “Analog Output Mode” field, select TRACK SELECTED REGISTER from the
Change Analog Output Mode dialog and click OK.
2.
Click in the “Selected Register” field and select the register to be tracked from the Select Register for Analog Output dialog.
Note the three tabs in this dialog. Registers for the local Scanner 3100 appear in the LOCAL
tab. If a Scanner slave device or other Modbus device is connected to the Scanner 3100, the
MODBUS MASTER and SCANNER SLAVE tabs will contain additional registers for those
devices.
Data Options for Triggering an
Analog Output
Registers for local device inputs and
totals, Modbus Master inputs, and
Scanner slave device inputs and values
can be used to trigger an analog output.
Modbus Master inputs and Scanner 2x00
slave device inputs are not selectable
unless Modbus Master or Scanner
slave communications are properly
configured. See Section 4—Setting Up
Communications, page 20 for more
information.
3.
Click OK to exit the dialog.
4.
In the “Low Setpoint (4 mA)” field, enter the parameter value that the 4 mA output signal will
represent.
5.
In the “High Setpoint (20 mA)” field, enter the parameter value that the 20 mA output signal will
represent.
The output is proportional to the parameter value between the low and high setpoints.
6.
Click in the “Stale Data Alarm Timeout” field and select the amount of time the Scanner 3100
should wait for new data before outputting a fixed “stale data” value. The timeout value must
be between 2 seconds and 2 hours. If the data is safety critical, or requires frequent polling for
other reasons, a low value may be desired.
7.
Click in the “Stale Data Alarm Value” field and enter the value (in mA) to be output in the event
of a stale data alarm. The value must be between 3 mA and 24 mA. If the “Stale Data Alarm”
value is displayed in the readout of the signal-receiving device for an extended period, check to
see if external power to the Scanner 3100 has been lost.
8.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
9.
Click the STATUS button on the left side of the screen to view the current output level based
on the selected register value. If this value differs significantly from the value displayed on the
readout, the analog output may require calibration.
43
Configuring an Analog Output as a Simple PID Controller
Each of the Scanner 3100 analog outputs can be used as a PID control output to manage a single
process variable or a combination of a process variable and a pressure variable.
To configure a Simple PID controller to regulate valve position to control one process variable,
1.
Under the “Mode” header, click in the “Analog Output Mode” field, select Simple PID Controller
from the Change Analog Output Mode dialog, and click OK.
2.
Under the “Mode” header,
3.
a.
Click in the “Stale Data Alarm Timeout” field and select the amount of time the Scanner
3100 should wait for new data before outputting a fixed “stale data” value. The timeout
value must be between 2 seconds and 2 hours. If the data is safety critical or requires
frequent polling for other reasons, a low value may be desired.
b.
Click in the “Stale Data Alarm Value” field and enter the value (in mA) that you want to
output in the event of a stale data alarm. The value must be between 3 mA and 24 mA. If
the “Stale Data Alarm” value is displayed in the readout of the device receiving the output
for an extended period, check to see if external power to the Scanner 3100 has been lost.
Under the “PID Controller Parameters” header,
a.
Click the “Action” field and choose either Reverse or Direct. Reverse causes the PID
controller output to decrease as the process variable increases. Direct causes the PID
controller output to increase as the process variable increases.
b.
Click the “Process Variable” field to select the process variable monitored by the PID
controller. This value will act as the input for the PID controller. Note the three tabs in
this dialog. Process variables for the local Scanner 3100 appear in the LOCAL tab. If
a Scanner slave device or other Modbus device is connected to the Scanner 3100, the
MODBUS MASTER and SCANNER SLAVE tabs will contain additional process variables
for those devices.
Caution
c.
Note When using a variable from a Modbus Master or Scanner Slave device as a control
parameter, there is the potential for a time delay in obtaining the variable values.
If using the Scanner 3100 controller as a safety/time critical operation, Cameron
recommends using only variables local to the Scanner 3100 to avoid unexpected
operations, such as reaching a pressure that exceeds the maximum rating for
valve.
Note the “Execution Period” value. This value is the period during which the PID controller
acts on the selected process variable.
If the process variable tracked by the PID controller is local to the Scanner 3100, the “Execution Period” will be automatically controlled by the variable’s preconfigured sampling or
calculation period (manually changing the period on the Modify Analog Output Configuration screen will have no effect). The active PID execution period is available on the Analog
Output Status page.
If the process variable is being accessed from another Modbus device or from a Scanner
2x00 slave device, change the “Execution Period” to match the update period of the data
source in the “PID Controller Parameters” section of the Modify Analog Output Configuration screen.
d.
In the “Range Low (0%)” field, enter the enter the low control range value of the process
variable.
e.
In the “Range High (100%)” field, enter the enter the high control range value of the
process variable.
f.
In the “Setpoint” field, enter a value between the “Range High (100%)” and “Range Low
(0%).” The PID controller will act upon the process variable to reach and maintain this
value.
g.
In the “Enable Setpoint Tolerance and Dead Band” field, select Yes to freeze the PID
Output control when the process variable is within a tolerance zone around the setpoint in
between (Setpoint – Tolerance) and (Setpoint + Tolerance).
The PID Output will remain frozen until the process value moves outside of the dead
band zone, which is between (Setpoint - Dead Band) and (Setpoint + Dead Band). At this
point, the PID output value will be actively adjusted until the process value falls within the
tolerance zone again.
h.
In the “Setpoint Tolerance” field, enter the tolerance zone value.
i.
In the “Sepoint Dead Band” field, enter a dead band for the Setpoint Tolerance function.
44
4.
Under the “PID Control Loop Settings” header,
a.
b.
Review the default settings and modify them if desired. For information on tuning these
parameters for a specific application, see PID Tuning, page 48.
––
The Gain (Proportional) parameter produces an output value proportional to the current error in the process variable. Typical values range from 0.1 to 1.
––
The Integral (Ki) parameter produces an output value proportional to the accumulated errors in the process variable. Typical values range from 0.01 to 0.5.
––
The Derivative (Kd) parameter produces an output value proportional to the instantaneous change in error of the process variable. Typical values range from 0.01 to 0.10.
In the “Output Mode” field, select Auto to activate the PID control algorithm to regulate a
valve position automatically. Select Manual to retain a fixed output value.
If a “Manual” output mode is selected, enter the corresponding output value in the “Manual
Value Override” field. By default, this setting is a unitless fraction and values between 0 (fully
closed) and 1 (fully open) can be entered However, the fraction unit category can also be
configured as a percentage, in which case the entered values will range from 0% to 100%.
c.
In the “Fail Value” field, enter the output value to be used to control valve position in the
event the PID controller fails. As described in step 4b, the fail value can be a unitless
fraction or a percentage.
5.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
6.
To check the calibration of the output, configure the output to use a manual output mode
(described in step 4b), and click STATUS on the left side of the screen to view the current
output level based on the selected register value. If this value differs significantly from the value
displayed on the readout, the analog output may require calibration. See Calibrating an Analog
Output, page 47 for analog output calibration instructions.
Configuring an Analog Output as a PID Controller with Pressure Override
The Scanner 3100 PID Controller with Pressure Override is implemented with two PID controllers.
One controls valve position based on a process variable and the other controls valve position based
on a pressure variable. When the Static Pressure Source exceeds the Pressure Override Setpoint,
the primary controller begins tracking the secondary pressure controller output. The Pressure Override Setpoint is the setpoint of the secondary controller. By default, the secondary controller has a
high proportional gain (5.0), which causes it to react abruptly to over pressure and will likely cause
full closure until the pressure drops. If this gain is reduced such that the secondary controller has
a dampened response, the secondary controller will try to maintain the target pressure (rather than
over-compensating and closing the valve).
Each of the Scanner 3100 analog outputs can be used as a PID control output to manage a single
process variable or a combination of a process variable and a pressure variable. To configure a PID
Controller that regulates valve position to control a process variable and a pressure variable,
1.
Under the “Mode” header, click in the “Analog Output Mode” field, select PID Controller with
Pressure Override from the Change Analog Output Mode dialog, and click OK.
2.
Under the “Mode” header,
3.
a.
Click in the “Stale Data Alarm Timeout” field and select the length of time the Scanner 3100
should wait for new data before outputting a fixed “stale data” value. The timeout value
must be between 2 seconds and 2 hours. If the data is safety critical, or requires frequent
polling for other reasons, a low value may be desired.
b.
Click in the “Stale Data Alarm Value” field and enter the value (in mA) that you want to
output in the event of a stale data alarm. The value MUST be between 3 mA and 24 mA. If
the “Stale Data Alarm” value is displayed in the readout of the device receiving the output
for an extended period, check to see if external power to the Scanner 3100 has been lost.
Under the “PID Controller Parameters” header,
a.
Click the “Action” field and choose Reverse or Direct. Reverse causes the PID controller
output to decrease as the process variable increases. Direct causes the PID controller
output to increase as the process variable increases.
b.
Click the “Process Variable” field and select the process variable monitored by the PID
controller. This value will act as the input for the PID controller. Note the three tabs in
this dialog. Process variables for the local Scanner 3100 appear in the LOCAL tab. If
a Scanner slave device or other Modbus device is connected to the Scanner 3100, the
MODBUS MASTER and SCANNER SLAVE tabs will contain additional process variables
for those devices.
Caution
When using a variable from a Modbus Master or Scanner Slave device as a control
parameter, there is the potential for a time delay in obtaining the variable values.
If using the Scanner 3100 controller as a safety/time critical operation, Cameron
recommends using only variables local to the Scanner 3100 to avoid unexpected
operations, such as reaching a pressure that exceeds the maximum rating for
valve.
45
c.
Note Note the Execution Period value shown. This value is the period for which the PID
controller acts on the selected process variable.
If the process variable tracked by the PID controller is local to the Scanner 3100, the Execution Period will be automatically controlled by the variable’s preconfigured sampling or
calculation period (manually changing the period on the Modify Analog Output Configuration screen will have no effect).
If the process variable is being accessed from another Modbus device or from a Scanner
2x00 slave device, change the Execution Period to match the update period of the data
source in the “PID Controller Parameters” section of the Modify Analog Output Configuration screen.
d.
In the “Range Low (0%)” field, enter the low control range value of the process variable.
e.
In the “Range High (100%)” field, enter the high control range value of the process variable.
f.
In the “Setpoint (within range)” field, enter a value between the “Range High (100%)” and
“Range Low (0%)”. The PID controller will act upon the process variable to reach and
maintain this value.
g.
In the “Enable Setpoint Tolerance and Dead Band” field, select Yes to freeze the PID
Output control when the process variable is within a tolerance zone around the setpoint in
between (Setpoint – Tolerance) and (Setpoint + Tolerance).
The PID Output will remain frozen until the process value moves outside of the dead
band zone, which is between (Setpoint - Dead Band) and (Setpoint + Dead Band). At this
point, the PID output value will be actively adjusted until the process value falls within the
tolerance zone again.
4.
h.
In the “Setpoint Tolerance” field, enter the tolerance zone value.
i.
In the “Sepoint Dead Band” field, enter a dead band for the Setpoint Tolerance function.
Under the “PID Control Loop Settings” header,
a.
Review the default settings and modify them if desired. For information on tuning these
parameters for a specific application, see PID Tuning, page 48.
The Gain (Proportional) parameter produces an output value proportional to the current
error in the process variable. Typical values range from 0.1 to 1.
The Integral (Ki) parameter produces an output value proportional to the accumulated
errors in the process variable. Typical values range from 0.01 to 0.5.
The Derivative (Kd) parameter produces an output value proportional to the instantaneous
change in error of the process variable. Typical values range from 0.01 to 0.10.
b.
In the “Output Mode” field, select Auto to activate the PID control algorithm to regulate a
valve position automatically. Select Manual to retain a fixed output value.
If a “Manual” output mode is selected, enter the corresponding output value in the “Manual
Value Override” field. By default, this setting is a unitless fraction and values between 0
(fully closed) and 1 (fully open). However, the fraction unit category can also be configured
as a percentage, in which case the entered values will range from 0% to 100%.
5.
c.
In the “Fail Value” field, enter the output value to be used to control valve position in the
event the PID controller fails. As described in step 4b, the fail value can be a unitless
fraction (enter values between 0 and 1) or a percentage (enter values of 0% to 100%).
d.
In the “Maintenance Mode Action” field, select the action should be taken when the device
enters Maintenance Mode.
Under the “Pressure Override Settings” header,
a.
Click the “Static Pressure Source” field and select a static pressure source.
b.
Click in the “Pressure Sampling Period” field to change the period for which the PID
controller acts on the selected process variable.
c.
In the “Range Low (0%)” field, enter the low control range value of the static pressure
source.
d.
In the “Range High (100%)” field, enter the high control range value of the static pressure
source.
e.
In the “Pressure Override Setpoint” field, enter the maximum allowed static pressure value
for the PID controller. If the Static Pressure Source reaches this value, the PID controller
will begin controlling the Static Pressure Source instead of the Process Variable, causing
the valve to change its position to release static pressure. When the switch over from
process variable to a pressure override occurs, the PID Controller Status will display
“Signal Select” as confirmation that PID pressure control is being used to control valve
position.
To eliminate erratic switching between PID pressure and PID process variable control
targets, a deadband may be applied to the output configuration. The deadband is a
46
threshold in which a declining pressure value is unable to trigger a switch back to the
control of the process variable. The use of a deadband ensures a smoother transition
between the two control modes as live (declining) pressure values approach the pressure
override (setpoint) value. To apply a deadband, select Yes in the “Enable Pressure
Threshold Dead Band” field, and enter a deadband value in the field below it.
6.
•
Scanner Data Manager
•
ScanMap
•
ScanFlash
Navigate to the website, select SCANNER
MODEL 3100 FLOW COMPUTER and
click the desired software download link.
If desired, adjust the “Gain” value, for the secondary controller monitoring the Static
Pressure Source. In the case of a static pressure spike, the default gain value of 5 will
likely cause an immediate and dramatic response, whereas a lower gain value will cause
the PID controller to respond with a slower change in valve position.
g.
Enter an “Integral” gain value, if desired. The default value is 0.
h.
Enter a “Derivative” gain value, if desired. The default value is 0.
i.
Click in the “Action” field and select the desired action for the PID controller output.
Reverse causes the PID controller output to decrease as the process variable increases.
Direct causes the PID controller output to increase as the process variable increases.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
To check the calibration of the output, configure the output mode as Manual (described in step
4b), and click STATUS to view the current output level based on the selected register value. If
this value differs significantly from the value displayed on the readout, the analog output may
require calibration. See analog output calibration instructions below.
Scanner 3100 Software Downloads
The following software programs
are available for download from our
website at http://www.cameron.slb.com/
flowcomputers:
f.
Calibrating an Analog Output
Before attempting to calibrate an analog output, make sure the calibration readout device is properly
connected to the Scanner.
Note A one-hour timeout is built into the analog output calibration process. If an analog output
calibration is initiated but not completed within that period, the Scanner 3100 will return to
the last-saved analog output configuration settings and calibration values.
To calibrate the analog output,
1.
Choose LOCAL I/O>ANALOG OUTPUT#>CALIBRATION>MODIFY.
2.
Enter a reference number in the “Reference Number” field, if desired.
3.
Enter a calibration note in the “Calibration Note” field, if desired.
4.
To adjust the low output level, click the “Low Output” field under “New Calibration Offsets.” The
Adjust Analog Output dialog will appear.
5.
If a calibration readout device is connected, the Scanner 3100 will automatically calculate the
required offset adjustment. See Method A for details. If a calibration readout device is not available but you know the appropriate offset required, see Method B for instructions to manually
enter an offset.
Method A: Calculate Offset Adjustment Automatically
a.
Enter the output value displayed on the calibration readout device in the “Observed Output
Value” field, and click CALCULATE. The calculated adjustment will appear in the “Adjust
Output Value By” field near the middle of the screen.
b.
Click OK to close the dialog and return to the Configuration screen. The calculated
adjustment will appear under “New Calibration Offsets” and the “Calibration Output” section
of the screen will display the output mode that is active.
Method B: Modify Offset Adjustment Manually
a.
Click on any of the six buttons in the bottom left corner of the shaded grid to specify the
desired adjustment. The changes will be evident in the “Adjust Output Value By” field near
the middle of the screen.
The order of magnitude of adjustments associated with each button increases from right
to left, with the “fine” button being the most precise and the left-most button providing
the largest incremental adjustments. The arrows on the buttons indicate the direction of
each adjustment (the top row of buttons increase the value, and the bottom row of buttons
decrease the value).
b.
Note
Click OK to close the dialog and return to the Configuration screen. The manual
adjustment will appear under “New Calibration Offsets” and the “Calibration Output” section
of the screen will display the output mode that is active.
To restore the factory calibration, click the Restore Factory Calibration hyperlink to the
right of the “New Calibration Record” heading. Click OK in the popup dialog to confirm the
restoration and to return to the Status screen.
47
PID Tuning
When an analog output is configured for PID control, tuning assistance is provided within the web
interface. The PID tuning is implemented as a triggered archive function.
WARNING
When PID tuning is enabled via the triggered archive configuration, archive
selections are changed to a pre-set configuration. Archive parameters and
archive selections are not user-configurable in the PID Tuning mode and previously logged data will become inaccessible. To preserve previously logged
data, download the records before enabling PID tuning.
To tune a PID controller,
1.
Enable PID tuning as follows:
a.
Click ARCHIVES>TRIGGERED ARCHIVE>CONFIGURATION>MODIFY.
b.
Select PID Tuning Mode (Analog Output #) from the Archiving Mode dropdown menu.
c.
Click SAVE.
d.
Click OK to bypass the warning described above.
The Triggered Archive Configuration screen displays the archive parameters associated with
the PID tuning configuration and the PID archive selections that will be logged in the triggered
archive and made available for download.
Additionally, a PID Tuning screen will be added to the Analog Output screens.
2.
Return to the Analog Output Status screen and click PID TUNING.
3.
Review the PID controller configuration and control loop settings. If changes are required, click
MODIFY and adjust settings as needed. Click SAVE to apply the settings to the controller.
4.
When the settings are confirmed, click START LOGGING to initiate the capture of 1-second logs
in the triggered archive.
5.
Confirm that the triggered archive count in the “Triggered Archive Usage” section of the screen
is incrementing. Enable Auto Refresh, if desired, to increase the frequency of these updates.
6.
Monitor the live process value on the Analog Output>PID Tuning screen to view the response
as the controller attempts to bring the process variable to the new setpoint. Alternatively, you
can view the live process value and the setpoint value on the Analog Output Status, where they
appear side by side.
7.
When the live process value becomes stable near the setpoint or sufficient time lapses to indicate a persistent lack of stability, stop logging.
8.
Adjust control loop settings as required and repeat steps 4 through 7 until the controller is properly tuned.
9.
Download triggered archive records to view a historical trend of the log values, if desired. If
Scanner Data Manager software is installed on the computer used to download the files, the .sdf
log will automatically open, allowing you to view the process variable, setpoint, and controller
output in a graphical trend view. See the Scanner Data Manager User Manual for details.
Important Proceed with caution when making changes to PID control loop settings.
Changes to proportional gain, integral gain, and derivative values can cause
abrupt changes in flow behavior, potentially resulting in excess equipment
wear and/or equipment failure.
Change control loop settings on the fly from the Analog Output>PID Tuning screen by clicking MODIFY and entering new control loop setting values. Use the shortcut link Click to write PID Settings to
device now immediately below this group of settings to apply new values. This has the same effect
as clicking SAVE, but allows you to remain on the Modify screen and make repeated adjustments if
necessary without changing web pages.
Note Enabling Auto Refresh on the Modify Analog Output>PID Tuning screen locks the PID
Control Loop settings. Turn off Auto Refresh to return these setting fields to an editable
state.
DIGITAL VALVE CONTROLLER
The Digital Valve Controller enables the Scanner 3100 to act as a digital controller interfacing with the
motorized valve actuator. The Scanner 3100 manages the digital valve position using PID algorithms,
a single process variable, or a combination of a process variable and a pressure override variable.
Unlike the analog PID controller, digital PID controls are more immune to line noise and use intermittent signaling to control valve position. Digital control methods are based on either time (continuous
48
motor valve; 100 sec = 100%, for example) or count (stepper motor valve; 200 pulses = 100%, for
example).
Important
The valve type must be identified before configuring the Digital Valve Controller. If the valve type is unknown, read the valve’s Quick Start guide or manual.
To access the Digital Valve Controller screen, choose LOCAL I/O>DIGITAL VALVE CONTROLLER>
CONFIGURATION>MODIFY. The Modify Digital Valve Controller Configuration screen will appear.
By default, the output mode is set to “Disabled.” A minimum of two digital outputs must be configured
to control the motorized valve actuator via the controller output.
Configuring the Digital Valve Controller as a Simple PID Controller
To configure the Digital Valve Controller to regulate valve position to control one process variable,
Note
The following procedure describes setting up a continuous motor control for a motorized
valve actuator with two digital inputs. All valve control types are configured similarly when
the Digital Valve Controller mode is a simple PID controller.
1.
Under the “Mode” header, click in the “Digital Valve Controller Mode” field, select Simple PID
Controller from the Change Digital Valve Controller Mode dialog, and click OK.
2.
Under the “Controller Settings” header,
a.
Click in the “Valve Control Type” field and select the appropriate control type for the valve
being controlled.
b.
Click in the “Digital Output - Open Run Signal” field and select the DIO# configured as the
Digital Valve Controller output for the open digital signal.
c.
Click in the “Digital Output - Close Run Signal” field and select the DIO# configured as the
Digital Valve Controller output for the close digital signal.
d.
Click in the “Digital Input - Full Open Detect” field and select the DIO# configured as the
digital input used to detect the fully-opened valve position.
e.
Click in the “Digital Input - Full Close Detect” field and select the DIO# configured as the
digital input used to detect the fully-closed valve position.
Note
Although Steps 2d and 2e are optional, Cameron highly recommends configuring them to
improve the accuracy of the estimated valve position.
f.
Click in the “Valve Full Travel Time” field and enter the time (in seconds) required for the
valve to move from the fully-opened position to the fully-closed position.
g.
Click in the “Valve Movement Dead Band” field and enter the percentage of the full travel
time at which the movement signals should be activated. The valve movement dead band
entry is designed to avoid excessive valve movement.
For example, if the Valve Full Travel Time is set to 100 seconds and the Valve Movement
Dead Band is 0.500%, the Scanner 3100 will not activate the signal until the required
corrective valve movement is greater than 0.5 seconds.
3.
Under the “PID Controller Parameters” header,
a.
Click in the “Action” field and choose Reverse or Direct. Reverse causes the PID controller
output to decrease as the process variable increases. Direct causes the PID controller
output to increase as the process variable increases.
b.
Click the “Process Variable” field to select the process variable monitored by the PID
controller. This value will act as the input for the PID controller. Note the three tabs in
this dialog. Process variables for the local Scanner 3100 appear in the LOCAL tab. If
a Scanner slave device or other Modbus device is connected to the Scanner 3100, the
MODBUS MASTER and SCANNER SLAVE tabs will contain additional process variables
for those devices.
Caution
c.
When using a variable from a Modbus Master or Scanner Slave device as a control
parameter, there is the potential for a time delay in obtaining the variable values.
If using the Scanner 3100 controller as a safety/time critical operation, Cameron
recommends using only variables local to the Scanner 3100 to avoid unexpected
operations, such as reaching a pressure that exceeds the maximum rating for
valve.
Note the “Execution Period” value. This value is the period during which the PID controller
acts on the selected process variable.
49
Note If the process variable tracked by the PID controller is local to the Scanner 3100, the
“Execution Period” will be automatically controlled by the variable’s preconfigured sampling
or calculation period (manually changing the valve position on the Modify Digital Valve
Controller Configuration screen will have no effect). The active PID execution period is
available on the Digital Valve Controller Status page.
If the process variable is being accessed from another Modbus device or from a Scanner
2x00 slave device, change the “Execution Period” to match the update period of the data
source in the “PID Controller Parameters” section of the Modify Digital Valve Controller
Configuration screen.
d.
In the “Range Low (0%)” field, enter the low control range value of the process variable.
e.
In the “Range High (100%)” field, enter the high control range value of the process variable.
f.
In the “Setpoint (within range)” field, enter a value between the “Range High (100%)” and
“Range Low (0%).” The PID controller will act upon the process variable to reach and
maintain this value.
g.
In the “Enable Setpoint Tolerance and Dead Band” field, select Yes to freeze the PID
Output control when the process variable is within a tolerance zone around the setpoint in
between (Setpoint – Tolerance) and (Setpoint + Tolerance).
The PID Output will remain frozen until the process value moves outside of the dead
band zone, which is between (Setpoint - Dead Band) and (Setpoint + Dead Band). At this
point, the PID output value will be actively adjusted until the process value falls within the
tolerance zone again.
4.
h.
In the “Setpoint Tolerance” field, enter the tolerance zone value.
i.
In the “Setpoint Dead Band” field, enter a dead band for the Setpoint Tolerance function.
j.
The PID Output will remain frozen until the Process Value moves outside of the dead
band zone, which is between (Setpoint - Dead Band) and (Setpoint + Dead Band). At this
point, the PID Output value will be actively adjusted until the Process Value falls within the
tolerance zone again.
Under the “PID Control Loop Settings” header,
a.
b.
Review the default settings and modify them if desired.
––
The Gain (Proportional) parameter produces an output value proportional to the current error in the process variable. Typical values range from 0.1 to 1.
––
The Integral (Ki) parameter produces an output value proportional to the accumulated errors in the process variable. Typical values range from 0.01 to 0.5.
––
The Derivative (Kd) parameter produces an output value proportional to the instantaneous change in error of the process variable. Typical values range from 0.01 to 0.10.
In the “Output Mode” field, select Auto to activate the PID control algorithm to regulate a
valve position automatically. Select Manual to establish the valve position in the manual
override state.
If a “Manual” output mode is selected, choose the valve position override in the “Manual
Value Override” field. By default, this setting is “Full Close.”
Maintenance Mode Timeout
If you fail to exit Maintenance Mode, it
will expire automatically after 60 minutes,
assuming no activity is detected on the
web interface. All inputs will return to
regular operation.
5.
c.
In the “Fail Value” field, enter the output value to be used to control valve position in the
event the PID controller fails. By default, this setting is “Full Open.”
d.
In the “Maintenance Mode Action” field, choose what the valve position should be when
Maintenance Mode is entered. The available selections are Lock valve position, which
causes the valve to remain in the same position it was in when Maintenance Mode was
entered, or Move valve to Fail Position, which causes the valve to move to the fail position
when Maintenance Mode is entered.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
Configuring the Digital Valve Controller as a PID Controller with Pressure
Override
The Scanner 3100 PID Controller with Pressure Override is implemented with two digital PID controllers. One controls valve position based on a process variable and the other controls valve position
based on a pressure override variable. When the Static Pressure Source exceeds the Pressure
Override Setpoint, the primary controller begins tracking the secondary pressure controller output.
The Pressure Override Setpoint is the setpoint of the secondary controller. By default, the secondary
controller has a high proportional gain (5.0), which causes it to react abruptly to over pressure and
will likely cause full closure until the pressure drops. If this gain is reduced such that the secondary
controller has a dampened response, the secondary controller will try to maintain the target pressure
(rather than over-compensating and closing the valve).
To configure a digital PID controller that regulates valve position to control a process variable and a
pressure variable,
50
1.
Under the “Mode” header, click in the “Digital Valve Controller Mode” field, select PID Controller
with Pressure Override from the Change Digital Valve Controller Mode dialog, and click OK.
1.
Under the “Mode” header, click in the “Digital Valve Controller Mode” field, select Simple PID
Controller from the Change Digital Valve Controller Mode dialog, and click OK.
2.
Under the “Controller Settings” header,
a.
Click in the “Valve Control Type” field and select the appropriate control type for the valve
being controlled.
b.
Click in the “Digital Output - Open Run Signal” field and select the DIO# configured as the
Digital Valve Controller output for the open digital signal.
c.
Click in the “Digital Output - Close Run Signal” field and select the DIO# configured as the
Digital Valve Controller output for the close digital signal.
d.
Click in the “Digital Input - Full Open Detect” field and select the DIO# configured as the
digital input used to detect the fully-opened valve position.
e.
Click in the “Digital Input - Full Close Detect” field and select the DIO# configured as the
digital input used to detect the fully-closed valve position.
Note
Although Steps 2d and 2e are optional, Cameron highly recommends configuring them to
improve the accuracy of the estimated valve position.
f.
Click in the “Valve Full Travel Time” field and enter the time (in seconds) required for the
valve to move from the fully-opened position to the fully-closed position.
g.
Click in the “Valve Movement Dead Band” field and enter the percentage of the full travel
time at which the movement signals should be activated. The valve movement dead band
entry is designed to avoid excessive valve movement.
For example, if the Valve Full Travel Time is set to 100 seconds and the Valve Movement
Dead Band is 0.500%, the Scanner 3100 will not activate the signal until the required
corrective value movement time is greater than 0.5 seconds.
3.
Under the “PID Controller Parameters” header,
a.
Click in the “Action” field and choose Reverse or Direct. Reverse causes the PID controller
output to decrease as the process variable increases. Direct causes the PID controller
output to increase as the process variable increases.
b.
Click the “Process Variable” field to select the process variable monitored by the PID
controller. This value will act as the input for the PID controller. Note the three tabs in
this dialog. Process variables for the local Scanner 3100 appear in the LOCAL tab. If
a Scanner slave device or other Modbus device is connected to the Scanner 3100, the
MODBUS MASTER and SCANNER SLAVE tabs will contain additional process variables
for those devices.
Caution
c.
Note When using a variable from a Modbus Master or Scanner Slave device as a control
parameter, there is the potential for a time delay in obtaining the variable values.
If using the Scanner 3100 controller as a safety/time critical operation, Cameron
recommends using only variables local to the Scanner 3100 to avoid unexpected
operations, such as reaching a pressure that exceeds the maximum rating for
valve.
Note the “Execution Period” value. This value is the period during which the PID controller
acts on the selected process variable.
If the process variable tracked by the PID controller is local to the Scanner 3100, the
“Execution Period” will be automatically controlled by the variable’s preconfigured sampling
or calculation period (manually changing the Manual Value Override setting on the Modify
Digital Valve Controller Configuration screen will have no effect). The active PID execution
period is available on the Digital Valve Controller Status page.
If the process variable is being accessed from another Modbus device or from a Scanner
2x00 slave device, change the “Execution Period” to match the update period of the data
source in the “PID Controller Parameters” section of the Modify Digital Valve Controller
Configuration screen.
4.
d.
In the “Range Low (0%)” field, enter the low control range value of the process variable.
e.
In the “Range High (100%)” field, enter the high control range value of the process variable.
In the “Setpoint (within range)” field, enter a value between the “Range High (100%)” and
“Range Low (0%).” The PID controller will act upon the process variable to reach and maintain
this value.
51
5.
In the “Enable Setpoint Tolerance and Dead Band” field, select Yes to freeze the PID Output
control when the process variable is within a tolerance zone around the setpoint in between
(Setpoint – Tolerance) and (Setpoint + Tolerance).
The PID Output will remain frozen until the process value moves outside of the dead band zone,
which is between (Setpoint - Dead Band) and (Setpoint + Dead Band). At this point, the PID output value will be actively adjusted until the process value falls within the tolerance zone again.
6.
a.
In the “Setpoint Tolerance” field, enter the tolerance zone value.
b.
In the “Setpoint Dead Band” field, enter a dead band for the Setpoint Tolerance function.
Under the “PID Control Loop Settings” header,
a.
b.
Review the default settings and modify them if desired.
––
The Gain (Proportional) parameter produces an output value proportional to the current error in the process variable. Typical values range from 0.1 to 1.
––
The Integral (Ki) parameter produces an output value proportional to the accumulated errors in the process variable. Typical values range from 0.01 to 0.5.
––
The Derivative (Kd) parameter produces an output value proportional to the instantaneous change in error of the process variable. Typical values range from 0.01 to 0.10.
In the “Output Mode” field, select Auto to activate the PID control algorithm to regulate a
valve position automatically. Select Manual to establish the valve position in the manual
override state.
If a “Manual” output mode is selected, choose the valve position override in the “Manual
Value Override” field. By default, this setting is “Full Close.”
Maintenance Mode Timeout
If you fail to exit Maintenance Mode, it
will expire automatically after 60 minutes,
assuming no activity is detected on the
web interface. All inputs will return to
regular operation.
7.
c.
In the “Fail Value” field, enter the output value to be used to control valve position in the
event the PID controller fails. By default, this setting is “Full Open.”
d.
In the “Maintenance Mode Action” field, choose what the valve position should be when
Maintenance Mode is entered. The available selections are Lock valve position, which
causes the valve to remain in the same position it was in when Maintenance Mode was
entered, or Move valve to Fail Position, which causes the valve to move to the fail position
when Maintenance Mode is entered.
Under the “Pressure Override Settings” header,
a.
Click the “Static Pressure Source” field and select a static pressure source.
b.
Click in the “Pressure Sampling Period” field to change the period for which the PID
controller acts on the selected process variable. The sample period is only required if the
static pressure source is not a local register. If the sources is a local selection, the period
will be known by the system. If the source is remote (i.e. Modbus master, slave device,
etc.), then the period must be entered.
c.
In the “Range Low (0%)” field, enter the low control range value of the static pressure
source.
d.
In the “Range High (100%)” field, enter the high control range value of the static pressure
source.
e.
In the “Pressure Override Setpoint” field, enter the static pressure value at which the
digital controller should switch from controlling the process variable to controlling the static
pressure source. If the Static Pressure Source reaches this value, the Digital Controller will
begin controlling the Static Pressure Source instead of the Process Variable, causing the
valve to change its position to release static pressure. When the switch over from process
variable to a pressure override occurs, the PID Controller Status will display “Signal
Select” as confirmation that PID pressure control is being used to control valve position.
To eliminate erratic switching between the process variable-based PID control and the
pressure-based PID control, a deadband may be applied to the output configuration. The
deadband is a threshold in which a declining pressure value is unable to trigger a switch
back to the control of the process variable. The use of a deadband ensures a smoother
transition between the two control modes as live (declining) pressure values approach
the pressure override (setpoint) value. To apply a deadband, select Yes in the “Enable
Pressure Threshold Dead Band” field, and enter a deadband value in the field below it.
8.
f.
Adjust the “Gain” value, if desired, for the secondary controller monitoring the Static
Pressure Source. In the case of a static pressure spike, the default gain value of 5 will
likely cause an immediate and dramatic response, whereas a lower gain value will cause
the PID controller to respond with a slower change in valve position.
g.
Enter an “Integral” gain value, if desired. The default value is 0.
h.
Enter a “Derivative” gain value, if desired. The default value is 0.
i.
Click in the “Action” field and select the desired action for the PID controller output.
Reverse causes the PID controller output to decrease as the process variable increases.
Direct causes the PID controller output to increase as the process variable increases.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
52
Section 6—Calibrating, Zeroing and Verifying Inputs
This section will guide users in performing the following tasks:
•
Calibrating an input
•
Zeroing an input
•
Verifying an input
Before attempting to calibrate an input, make sure the calibration test device is securely connected to
the Scanner. See the Scanner 3100 Hardware User Manual for more information.
Disabled Inputs
If an input is disabled, it cannot be
calibrated and only the current calibration
information will be displayed on the Modify
Calibration screen.
CALIBRATING AN INPUT
Calibration minimizes error in recorded measurements.
Note
The procedure described below can be used to calibrate differential pressure, static pressure, process temperature, and analog inputs.
For information about calibrating a pulse input, see Meter Calibration, page 65.
Maintenance Mode Timeout
If you fail to exit Maintenance Mode, it
will expire automatically after 60 minutes,
assuming no activity is detected on the
web interface. All inputs will return to
regular operation.
Note
You must enter the Maintenance Mode to perform calibration functions. The software will
remain in Maintenance Mode until you click the Exit Maintenance Mode hyperlink in the far
right of the gold bar.
To calibrate an input,
1.
Choose LOCAL I/O>[INPUT]>CALIBRATION>MODIFY.
2.
Click OK on the Enter Maintenance Mode dialog to continue calibration. The Modify [Input]
Calibration screen will appear.
3.
Enter a reference number in the “Reference Number” field, if desired.
4.
Enter a calibration note in the “Calibration Note” field, if desired.
From this point, you may
•
Enter new calibration points
•
Load the current calibration settings for making minor modifications or additions
•
Restore a historical calibration
•
Restore the factory calibration
Entering New Calibration Points
1.
Under “New Calibration Points” in the middle of the screen, click in the first empty “Applied/As
Left” cell or use the Add New Point hyperlink to the right of “New Calibration Points.”
2.
The Edit Calibration Point dialog will appear. Enter the desired value in the field and click OK.
3.
The Acquire Data Point screen will appear. Once the Stability of Reading has reached 100%
and the Status is “Reading Acquired”, click the ACCEPT button. The Acquire Data Point dialog
will close, the acquired reading is displayed as the “As Found” reading on the Modify [Input]
Calibration screen, and the calculated percentage of error is displayed.
If the device reading fails to stabilize after several seconds, the Force Acquire Reading button
will become selectable (it is grayed out typically). Press it to force the current reading to be
saved. The Acquire Data Point dialog will close, the acquired reading is displayed as the “As
Found” reading on the Modify [Input] Calibration screen, and the calculated percentage of error
is displayed.
4.
Repeat Steps 1 through 3 until all desired calibration points are established.
To remove a calibration point, click the Delete icon
next to the polnt to be removed. To
remove the new calibration points, click the Clear All Points hyperlink to the right of “New Calibration Points.”
5.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
6.
Click the Exit Maintenance Mode hyperlink in the gold bar to unfreeze input values.
Making Minor Changes to a Calibration
The currently applied calibration points are displayed on the right side of the screen. To use these
points as the basis for a new calibration:
53
1.
From the Modify [Input] Calibration screen, click the Copy to New hyperlink located to the right
of the “Current Calibration Points” heading.
2.
Click OK in the Confirm dialog to copy the calibration points into the “New Calibration Points”
grid.
3.
Recalibrate select points, or add new calibration points as required using the calibration steps
described above.
4.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
5.
Click the Exit Maintenance Mode hyperlink in the gold bar to unfreeze input values.
Restoring to Historical Calibration Settings
To calibrate using previously-established calibration settings:
1.
From the Modify [Input] Calibration screen, scroll to the “Calibration History” section at the bottom of the calibration screen and select the historical calibration desired. The four most recent
calibrations are saved, in addition to the current calibration, which is displayed in bold at the top
of the list.
2.
Click OK from the Confirm dialog to apply the previous data to the input.
3.
Click the Exit Maintenance Mode hyperlink in the gold bar to unfreeze input values.
Note If the transducer has been modified since a historical calibration was performed, the calibration will be incompatible with the transducer. A green checkmark to the left of a historical
calibration hyperlink indicates that it is compatible with the existing transducer.
Restoring to Factory Calibration
To restore the factory calibration settings:
Maintenance Mode Timeout
If you fail to exit Maintenance Mode, it
will expire automatically after 60 minutes,
assuming no activity is detected on the
web interface. All inputs will return to
regular operation.
1.
From the Modify [Input] Calibration screen, click the Restore Factory Calibration hyperlink
located in the upper right section of the screen.
2.
When the Confirm dialog appears, click OK to restore the factory calibration settings.
3.
Click the Exit Maintenance Mode hyperlink in the gold bar to unfreeze input values.
After the factory calibration has been restored, the calibration date will change to the current date.
ZEROING AN INPUT
The zero offset is the value that is added to the instrument’s reading to obtain the desired (applied)
value. If the sensor is reading high, the zero offset will be a negative value.
To zero an input:
1.
Choose LOCAL I/O>[INPUT]>ZERO OFFSET>MODIFY.
2.
From the [Input] Zero Offset screen, click OK on the Enter Maintenance Mode dialog to continue calibration. The Modify [Input] Zero Offset screen will appear.
3.
Enter the desired value in the “Zero Offset” field and enter the desired value on the Edit Zero
Offset dialog, then click OK.
4.
The Acquire Data Point screen will appear. Once the Stability of Reading has reached 100%
and the Status is “Reading Acquired”, click the ACCEPT button.
5.
Click SAVE to save and exit.
6.
Click the Exit Maintenance Mode hyperlink in the gold bar to unfreeze input values.
Important
Calibrations performed after a zero offset is completed will clear the zero
offset adjustment.
VERIFYING AN INPUT
1.
Choose LOCAL I/O>[INPUT]>VERIFICATION>MODIFY.
2.
From the [Input] Verification screen, click OK on the Enter Maintenance Mode dialog to continue calibration. The Modify [Input] Verification screen will appear.
3.
Enter a verification note in the “Verification Note” field if desired.
Entering New Verification Points
1.
Under “New Verification Points” in the middle of the screen, click in the first empty “As Left” cell
or use the Add New Point hyperlink to the right of “New Verification Points.”
54
2.
The Edit Verification Point # dialog will appear. Enter the desired value in the field and click OK.
3.
The Acquire Data Point # screen will appear. Once the Stability of Reading has reached 100%
and the Status is “Reading Acquired”, click the ACCEPT button. The Acquire Data Point dialog
will close, the acquired reading is displayed as the “As Found” reading on the Modify [Input]
Calibration screen, and the calculated percentage of error is displayed.
If the device reading fails to stabilize after several seconds, the Force Acquire Reading button
will become selectable (it is grayed out typically). Press it to force the existing reading to be
saved. The Acquire Data Point dialog will close, the acquired reading is displayed as the “As
Found” reading on the Modify [Input] Calibration screen, and the calculated percentage of error
is displayed.
4.
Repeat Steps 1 through 3 until all desired verification points are established.
5.
If you wish to remove the new verification points, click the Clear All Points hyperlink to the right
of “New Verification Points.”
6.
Click SAVE to save and exit the screen when you have completed verifying the input.
7.
Click the Exit Maintenance Mode hyperlink in the gold bar to unfreeze input values.
Section 7—Flowrun Configuration
The Scanner 3100 is compatible with a broad range of meter types including orifice, cone, Venturi,
and turbine meters. For compensated flow measurement, pressures and temperatures can be supplied through a variety of inputs, including local MVT and RTD inputs, analog inputs using external
pressure and temperature transmitters, inputs from a Scanner 2x00 slave device and inputs from an
external Modbus transmitter.
The following procedures provide step-by-step instructions on configuring a flowrun for use with various metering methods.
ORIFICE METER
The Scanner 3100 supports AGA-3 (1992 and 2012), ISO 5167, and small bore (ASME MFC-14M)
orifice plate input devices.
Note Gas Measurement: AGA-3 (1992 or 2012), ISO-5167 (2003, part 2) Orifice, or Small Bore
Orifice (based on ASME MFC-14M)
For gas measurement, ISO-5167 is applicable only to flow that remains subsonic throughout the measuring section and where the fluid can be considered single-phase. It is not applicable to the measurement of pulsating flow. It does not cover the use of orifice plates in
pipe sizes less than 50 mm or more than 1000 mm or pipe Reynolds numbers below 5000.
Liquid Measurement: Liquid Orifice AGA-3 (1992 or 2012), Liquid Orifice (based on ISO5167), or Small Bore Orifice (based on ASME MFC-14M).
For liquid measurement, the Small Bore Orifice flow rate calculation method is appropriate
for 1/2-in. to 1-1/2-in. meter sizes with a beta ratio between 0.1 and 0.75. The ASME small
bore orifice plate can be used to measure natural gas, steam, and liquids.
Setting Up an Orifice Flowrun
To set up an orifice flowrun,
1.
Choose FLOW RUN>FLOW RUN #>FLOW RUN SETUP>MODIFY. The Modify Flow Run #
Setup screen will appear.
2.
Enter a unique flowrun name, if desired.
3.
Under the “Flow Rate Calculation Method” heading, click in the “Rate Calculation” field and
select the appropriate orifice meter type from the Change Flow Rate Calculation Method dialog,
then click OK.
4.
Under the “Fluid Properties Standard” heading, select the appropriate fluid type/standard from
the Change Fluid Properties Standard dialog, then click OK.
5.
By default, the Scanner 3100 accumulates flow when positive differential pressure conditions
exist. To accumulate flow only when negative differential pressure conditions exist, select Negative in the Flow direction field. Using a Positive flow direction for Flow Run 1 and a Negative
flow direction for Flow Run 2 allows you to separately accumulate the negative and positive
flow totals for a single fluid. See Bidirectional Measurement via Integral MVT, page 57 and
Bidirectional Measurement via User-Supplied Bidirectional Differential Pressure Sensor, page
58 for more information.
55
Rate Calculation Period
The “Rate Calculation” field is populated
with the rate calculation method selected
during the flow run setup.
The Calculation Period is established
on the Device Data Acquisition
Configuration screen. See Choose
Logging, Calculation, and Input Sampling
Periods, page 17, for more details.
6.
Set the Accumulation Control Mode to Always Accumulate (default setting).
7.
Click SAVE.
Configuring Orifice Flow Rate Calculation Parameters
To configure flow rate parameters, choose RATE CALCULATION>MODIFY from the flowrun screen.
There are two views of this screen:
•
Basic Options—the standard settings required for configuring the flowrun
•
Additional Options—Basic Options view plus advanced settings for maximum configurability
To change the view from basic to additional options, select the Click Here hyperlink in the upper left
corner of the white screen.
ImportantSome values displayed on the Modify Flow Run Rate Calculation screen can be
modified on other screens, and hyperlinks to those screens are provided for quick
access. To avoid losing the settings selected on the Modify Flow Run Rate Calculation screen, click SAVE before clicking on a hyperlink.
To modify flow rate calculations,
1.
Change the rate damping factor if required, by clicking the –/+ buttons. The rate damping factor
value will also be the “settling time”.
2.
If the Additional Options view is selected, you can select the desired expansion coefficient
source and the desired extended temperature range. Neither of these settings is required for
most flowrun measurements.
3.
Modify the “Input Assignments” section, as necessary, for static pressure, temperature, and differential pressure sources. Click the shaded field of the source to be changed, choose a source
from the Select Input Source dialog and click OK.
Important
4.
An input source can be an integral pressure or RTD input, or an input from a
slave device or external device configured via Modbus Master. If using an input from an external Modbus device, make sure that communications with the
device are properly configured before configuring the flowrun. If communications are not established, these inputs will not appear in the list of selectable
inputs in the Select Input Source dialog. See Section 4—Setting Up Communications, page 20, for details about establishing communications with these
devices so that they are selectable from the Select Input Source dialog.
Enter the following pipe parameters, if required:
––
Pipe size
––
Pipe material (select from the dropdown list)
If the Additional Options view is selected, you can enter the following pipe settings using the Set
alpha manual entry hyperlink:
5.
––
Custom expansion coefficient (recommended when the pipe material required is not included in the dropdown list)
––
Tap type (select from the dropdown list)
––
Tap location (select from the dropdown list)
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
Configuring Orifice Plate Parameters
To configure orifice plate parameters, choose PLATE CONFIGURATION>MODIFY from the flowrun
screen, and click OK on the Enter Maintenance Mode dialog. The Modify Flow Run Plate Configuration screen will appear. There are two views of this screen:
•
Basic Options—the standard settings required for configuring the flowrun
•
Additional Options—Basic Options view+advanced settings for maximum configurability
To change the view from basic to additional options, select the Click Here hyperlink in the upper left
corner of the white screen.
To configure plate parameters:
1.
Enter the plate reference diameter in the field provided.
If the Additional Options view is selected, enter the plate reference temperature, if desired.
2.
Select the appropriate plate material from the “Plate Material” dropdown list.
56
If the Additional Options view is selected, use Set alpha manual entry hyperlink to the right of
plate material to enter a custom expansion coefficient. This option is recommended when the
meter material is not included in the standard dropdown list.
Maintenance Mode Timeout
If you fail to exit Maintenance Mode, it
will expire automatically after 60 minutes,
assuming no activity is detected on the
web interface. All inputs will return to
regular operation.
3.
Enter the plate model number, if desired.
4.
Enter the plate serial number, if desired.
5.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
6.
Click the Exit Maintenance Mode hyperlink in the gold bar to unfreeze input values.
Configuring Fluid Properties for the Orifice Meter
To configure fluid properties for an orifice meter run, choose FLUID PROPERTIES>MODIFY from
the flowrun screen, the click OK on the Enter Maintenance Mode dialog. The Modify Flow Run Fluid
Properties screen will appear. There are two views of this screen:
•
Basic Options—the standard settings required for configuring the flowrun
•
Additional Options—Basic Options view+advanced settings for maximum configurability
To change the view from basic to additional options, select the Click Here hyperlink in the upper left
corner of the white screen.
The contents of this screen will vary, depending upon the fluid property standard selected when setting up the flowrun. See Fluid Property Configuration, page 67, for details.
Configuring Liquid Properties for the Orifice Meter
When Hydrocarbon Liquids is selected as the flowrun’s Fluid Properties Standard, a LIQUID PROPERTIES button appears at the left of the screen, just beneath the FLUID PROPERTIES button.
By clicking LIQUID PROPERTIES to access the Flow Run # Liquid Properties screen, you can specify the density and viscosity of a fluid, and apply a correction to the oil volume to account for shrinkage or BS&W content. For details, see Hydrocarbon Liquids, page 68.
Configuring Steam Properties for the Orifice Meter
Steam Analysis Reference Number
The Steam Analysis Reference Number
field is an optional alphanumeric field.
If no formal steam analysis has been
performed, you can enter the date of the
last steam quality calculation/test or simply
leave the field blank.
When Saturated Steam (Quality Corrected) or Water-Steam (Auto-selected Region, the region for
liquid water, super-heated/dry steam, and the critical region) is selected as the flowrun’s Fluid Properties Standard, a STEAM PROPERTIES button appears at the left of the screen, just beneath the
FLUID PROPERTIES button.
By clicking STEAM PROPERTIES to access the Flow Run # Steam Properties screen, you can enter the steam analysis reference number, if applicable. If Saturated Steam is selected, you can also
enter the saturated steam quality/dryness. For details, see Steam, page 71.
Bidirectional Measurement via Integral MVT
The Scanner 3100 supports bidirectional flow measurement using the differential pressure input from
the Scanner’s integral MVT.
When the Scanner 3100‘s two integral flowruns are configured to separately accumulate positive
and negative flow, the accumulation totals and a complete set of archive data can be logged for each
direction. You can record totals of fluid injected into and extracted from a storage device or record
totals of fluid traveling through two different flow paths, as directed by changing the position of a
valve. Bidirectional totals can also be used to compute instantaneous, hourly, daily net, or grand total
volumes using Scanner 3100 calculators. See Section 9—Creating Custom Calculations, page 79.
The Scanner 3100 supports the integral MVT’s pressure range in both the positive and negative direction. For example, a 200 inH2O sensor can sense pressures from -200 to +200 inH2O.
To achieve the measurement of both flow directions in a bidirectional flow measurement application,
1.
Configure one flowrun to record flow when the differential pressure output is positive.
2.
Configure the other flowrun to record flow when the differential pressure output is negative.
As the differential pressure output changes from positive to negative, the Scanner 3100 will record
the flow total in the appropriate flowrun, switching between flowruns as required.
When setting up the flowruns, consider the following:
•
Bidirectional Input Calibration. To calibrate the MVT for bidirectional measurement, create
a set of calibration points that spans the full positive and negative ranges of the DP sensor. To
calibrate for positive flow, apply positive pressure to the “high” side of the MVT and add calibration points using the web interface calibration tool. To calibrate for reverse (negative) flow, apply
positive pressure to the “low” side of the MVT and add calibration points using the web interface.
The “high” side and “low” side calibration points combine to form a single calibration over a posi57
tive and negative range.
Tap Location Setting
•
Flow Run Name. Choose a name for the flowrun that identifies flow by direction (injection or
extraction, for example) to provide a clear record of positive and negative flow totals when viewing data in the web interface or viewing flow archives.
•
Accumulation Settings. Configure one flowrun for positive flow direction, and configure the
other for negative flow direction. The accumulation control mode should be “Always Accumulate”
for both flowruns.
•
Tap Location Settings. The tap location for each flowrun must be configured correctly to enable the Scanner 3100 to accurately compute the bidirectional totals. Per industry standards,
flow calculations are based upon upstream pressure inputs. By default, the Scanner 3100 static
pressure tap location is upstream, which is appropriate for recording positive (forward) flow.
However, for the flowrun configured to record negative (reverse) flow, the same tap must be
downstream of the primary metering device (orifice plate, for example). An extra calculation is
required to compensate for the pressure drop across the orifice plate when computing negative
(reverse) flow.
To access the tap location setting, choose
the Additional Options view of the Flow
Run Rate Calculation page (note the
hyperlink near the MODIFY button at the
top of the screen) and scroll to the “Pipe”
section at the bottom of the page.
Consider an installation in which a “positive” flowrun is configured to measure flow traveling
downstream past the static pressure tap and through the primary metering device and
“negative” flowrun is configured to measure flow traveling in the opposite direction:
––
To accumulate flow in the positive direction, choose Upstream from the “Tap Location”
dropdown.
––
To accumulate flow in the negative direction, choose Downstream from the “Tap Location”
dropdown. This signals the Scanner to calculate the required upstream static pressure using the downstream tap static pressure reading and the measured differential pressure.
Bidirectional Measurement via User-Supplied Bidirectional Differential
Pressure Sensor
The configuration of flowruns for bidirectional flow using a remote bidirectional sensor is very similar
to the MVT configuration described above, except an analog input is used to supply the differential
pressure input from the remote sensor.
When configuring the analog input, consider the following:
•
Transducer Input Range. Enter low and high range values that are equal and opposite to allow the Scanner 3100 to identify the input as bidirectional. For example, to configure the analog
input for a 200 inH2O sensor, enter a low range of -200 inH2O and a high range of 200 inH2O.
If the range endpoints are not equal and opposite—for example, -50 and 200 inH2O—the Scanner will fail to recognize the calibration as bidirectional.
•
Low Input Cutoff. For bidirectional flow, the input cutoff is read as a +/- value centered around
the range midpoint. For example, entering a cutoff value of 0.1 inches will result in positive flow
accumulation being cutoff at 0.1 inches and negative flow accumulation being cutoff at -0.1
inH2O.
•
Bidirectional DP Input Calibration. When equal and opposite low and high transducer ranges
are selected, the midpoint of the analog input signal used to represent differential pressure will
be zero. The midpoint signal level will correspond to 12mA for a 4-20mA input; it will correspond
to 3V for a 1-5V input.
To calibrate the positive differential pressure range (for measuring flow in the forward direction),
apply pressure to the “high” side pressure port of the sensor. Alternatively, if using an analog
calibration tool, apply an electrical signal greater than the midpoint signal. Using the web interface calibration tool, enter calibration pressures as positive values.
To calibrate the negative differential pressure range (for measuring flow in the reverse direction),
apply pressure to the “low” side pressure port of the sensor. Alternatively, if using an analog
calibration tool, apply an electrical signal less than the midpoint signal. Using the web interface
calibration tool, enter calibration pressures as negative values.
For best results, enter calibration pressures that span the sensor’s positive and negative pressure range.
•
Flow Run Name. Choose a name for the flowrun that identifies flow by direction (injection or
extraction, for example) to provide a clear record of positive and negative flow totals when viewing data in the web interface or viewing flow archives.
•
Accumulation Settings. Configure one flowrun for Positive flow direction, and configure the
other for Negative flow direction. The accumulation control mode should be “Always Accumulate” for both flowruns.
•
Tap Location Settings. The tap location for each flowrun must be configured correctly to enable the Scanner 3100 to accurately compute the bidirectional totals. Per industry standards,
flow calculations are based upon upstream pressure inputs. By default, the Scanner 3100 static
pressure tap location is upstream, which is appropriate for recording positive (forward) flow.
However, for the flowrun configured to record negative (reverse) flow, the same tap must be
downstream of the primary metering device (orifice plate, for example). An extra calculation is
Tap Location Setting
To access the tap location setting, choose
the Additional Options view of the Flow
Run Rate Calculation page (note the
hyperlink near the MODIFY button at the
top of the screen) and scroll to the “Pipe”
section at the bottom of the page.
58
required to compensate for the pressure drop across the orifice plate when computing negative
(reverse) flow.
Consider an installation in which a “positive” flowrun is configured to measure flow traveling
downstream past the static pressure tap and through the primary metering device and
“negative” flowrun is configured to measure flow traveling in the opposite direction:
––
To accumulate flow in the positive direction, choose Upstream from the “Tap Location”
dropdown.
––
To accumulate flow in the negative direction, choose Downstream from the “Tap Location”
dropdown. This signals the Scanner to calculate the required upstream static pressure using the downstream tap static pressure reading and the measured differential pressure.
CONE METER
The Scanner 3100 supports spoolpiece and wafer cone meter input devices.
Setting Up a Cone Meter Flowrun
To set up a cone meter input flowrun,
1.
Choose FLOW RUN>FLOW RUN #>FLOW RUN SETUP>MODIFY. The Modify Flow Run #
Setup screen will appear.
2.
Enter a unique flowrun name, if desired.
3.
Under the “Flow Rate Calculation Method” heading, click in the “Rate Calculation” field, select
the appropriate cone meter type from the Flow Rate Calculation Method dialog, then click OK.
4.
Under the “Fluid Properties Standard” heading, select the appropriate fluid type/standard from
the Change Fluid Properties Standard dialog , then click OK.
5.
By default, the Scanner 3100 accumulates flow when positive differential pressure conditions
exist. It is not possible to separately accumulate positive and negative flow with a single cone
meter input and a single DP sensor. Therefore, the “Flow Direction” setting should remain in the
default Positive setting for cone meter configurations.
6.
Change the “Accumulation Control Mode” settings if necessary. By default, the Accumulation
Control Mode is set to Always Accumulate. Do not change this setting unless you intend to
control flow accumulation with a digital input signal. See Flow Accumulation Control by Digital IO
State (Cone Meters) below for details.
7.
Click SAVE.
Flow Accumulation Control by Digital IO State (Cone Meters)
The Accumulation Control Mode defines when flow accumulation stops and starts and provides an
innovative solution for separating flow totals based on the type of fluid flowing through a single pipe.
By default, the Accumulation Control Mode is set to Always Accumulate. However, additional selections allow a user to control when a flowrun is calculating accumulation via a DIO configured as a
digital input. For example, consider a valve that is used to change the source of fluid passing through
the meter. In one position, the valve allows fluid “A” to flow through the meter; in the opposite position, the valve stops the flow of fluid “A” through the meter and allows fluid “B” to flow through. The
accumulated total for each respective fluid can be measured using a digital input signal configured to
indicate the valve position.
By configuring Flow Run 1 to accumulate only when the digital input valve position signal is in the
high position, for example, the first fluid is measured. By configuring Flow Run 2 to accumulate only
when the digital input valve position signal is in the low position, the second fluid is measured. This
feature is available only for DIOs configured as digital inputs (see Digital Input, page 40, for additional information).
Cone Meter Flow Rate Calculation
Rate Calculation Period
The “Rate Calculation” field is populated
with the rate calculation method selected
during the flow run setup.
The Calculation Period is established
on the Device Data Acquisition
Configuration page. See Choose Logging,
Calculation, and Input Sampling
Periods, page 17, for more details.
To configure flow rate parameters, choose RATE CALCULATION>MODIFY from the flowrun screen.
There are two views of this screen:
•
Basic Options—the standard settings required for configuring the flowrun
•
Additional Options—Basic Options view+advanced settings for maximum configurability
To change the view from basic to additional options, select the Click Here hyperlink in the upper left
corner of the white screen.
ImportantSome values displayed on the Modify Flow Run Rate Calculation screen can be
modified on other screens, and hyperlinks to those screens are provided for quick
access. To avoid losing the settings selected on the Modify Flow Run Rate Calculation screen, click SAVE before clicking on a hyperlink.
59
To modify flow rate calculations,
1.
Change the rate damping factor, if required, by clicking on the –/+ buttons. The rate damping
factor will also be the “settling time”.
If the Additional View option is selected, you can select the desired expansion coefficient source
and the desired extended temperature range, if desired. Neither of these settings is required for
proper flowrun measurements.
2.
Modify the “Input Assignments” section, as necessary, for static pressure, temperature and
differential pressure sources. Click in the shaded field of the source to be changed, choose a
source from the Select Input Source dialog and click OK.
If the Additional View option is selected, you can select the desired expansion coefficient source
and the desired extended temperature range. Neither of these settings is required for proper
flowrun measurements.
Important
3.
An input source can be an integral pressure or RTD input, or an input from a
slave device or external device configured via Modbus Master. If using an input from an external Modbus device, make sure that communications with the
device are properly configured before configuring the flowrun. If communications are not established, these inputs will not appear in the list of selectable
inputs in the Select Input Source dialog. See Section 4—Setting Up Communications, page 20 for details about establishing communications with these
devices so that they are selectable from the Select Input Source dialog.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
Configuring Cone Meter Parameters
To configure cone meter parameters, choose CONE CONFIGURATION>MODIFY from the flowrun
screen and click OK on the Enter Maintenance Mode dialog. The Modify Flow Run # Cone Configuration screen will appear. There are two views of this screen:
•
Basic Options—the standard settings required for configuring the flowrun
•
Additional Options—Basic Options view+advanced settings for maximum configurability
To change the view from basic to additional options, select the Click Here hyperlink in the upper left
corner of the white screen.
To configure cone meter parameters,
1.
Enter the beta ratio (typically recorded on the nameplate of the cone meter and/or recorded in
the calibration data supplied with the cone meter).
2.
Enter the meter size (ID) (typically recorded on the nameplate of the cone meter).
3.
If the Additional Options view is selected, you can enter the following information as well,
––
If a single reference temperature (typically included in a test report issued by the laboratory that calibrated the meter) is provided, enter the reference temperature in the “Cone
Reference Temperature” field and the “Meter Reference Temperature” field. If the reference
temperature is not known, enter 68ºF (US Customary units) or 20ºC (SI units).
––
The Set alpha manual entry hyperlink to the right of cone material and plate material allows
you to enter a custom alpha for the cone and the meter. This option is recommended when
the cone and meter materials are not included in the standard dropdown list.
4.
Enter the cone material and meter material in the fields provided.
5.
If desired, enter the cone model and serial numbers in the fields provided. Neither of these settings is required for proper flowrun measurements.
6.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
7.
Click the Exit Maintenance Mode hyperlink in the gold bar to unfreeze input values.
Calibrating the Cone Meter
To calibrate a cone meter, choose FLOW RUN>FLOW RUN #>CONE CALIBRATION>MODIFY and
follow the instructions provided in Meter Calibration, page 65.
Configuring Fluid Properties for the Cone Meter
To configure fluid properties for a cone meter run, choose FLUID PROPERTIES>MODIFY from the
flowrun screen, the click OK on the Enter Maintenance Mode dialog. The Modify Flow Run Fluid
Properties screen will appear. There are two views of this screen:
•
Basic Options—the standard settings required for configuring the flowrun
•
Additional Options—Basic Options view+advanced settings for maximum configurability
60
To change the view from basic to additional options, select the Click Here hyperlink in the upper left
corner of the white screen.
The contents of this screen will vary, depending upon the fluid property standard selected when setting up the flowrun. See Fluid Property Configuration, page 67, for details.
Configuring Liquid Properties for the Cone Meter
When Hydrocarbon Liquids is selected as the flowrun’s Fluid Properties Standard, a LIQUID PROPERTIES button appears at the left of the screen, just beneath the FLUID PROPERTIES button.
By clicking LIQUID PROPERTIES to access the Flow Run # Liquid Properties screen, you can not
only specify the density and viscosity of a fluid, but you can also apply a correction to the oil volume
to account for shrinkage or BS&W content. For details, see Hydrocarbon Liquids, page 68.
Configuring Steam Properties for the Orifice Meter
Steam Analysis Reference Number
The Steam Analysis Reference Number
field is an optional alphanumeric field.
If no formal steam analysis has been
performed, you can enter the date of the
last steam quality calculation/test or simply
leave the field blank.
When Saturated Steam (Quality Corrected) or Water-Steam (Auto-selected Region) is selected as
the flowrun’s Fluid Properties Standard, a STEAM PROPERTIES button appears at the left of the
screen, just beneath the FLUID PROPERTIES button.
By clicking STEAM PROPERTIES to access the Flow Run # Steam Properties screen, you can enter the steam analysis reference number, if applicable. If Saturated Steam is selected, you can also
enter the saturated steam quality/dryness. For details, see Steam, page 71.
VENTURI METER
The Scanner 3100 supports ISO 5167-4:2003 Venturi meter inputs.
Setting Up a Venturi Meter Flowrun
To set up a Venturi meter input flowrun,
1.
Choose FLOW RUN>FLOW RUN #>FLOW RUN SETUP>MODIFY. The Modify Flow Run #
Setup screen will appear.
2.
Enter a unique flowrun name, if desired.
3.
Under the “Flow Rate Calculation Method” heading, click in the “Rate Calculation” field, select
Classical Venturi Meter from the Change Flow Rate Calculation Method dialog and click OK.
4.
Under the “Fluid Properties Standard” heading, select the appropriate fluid type/standard from
the Change Fluid Properties Standard dialog and click OK.
5.
By default, the Scanner 3100 accumulates flow when positive differential pressure conditions
exist. It is not possible to separately accumulate positive and negative flow with a single Venturi
meter input and a single DP sensor. Therefore, the “Flow Direction” setting should remain in the
default Positive setting for cone meter configurations.
6.
Change the “Accumulation Control Mode” settings if necessary. By default, the Accumulation
Control Mode is set to Always Accumulate. Do not change this setting unless you intend to
control flow accumulation with a digital input signal. See Flow Accumulation Control by Digital IO
State (Venturi Meters) below for details.
7.
Click SAVE.
Flow Accumulation Control by Digital IO State (Venturi Meters)
The Accumulation Control Mode defines when flow accumulation stops and starts and provides an
innovative solution for separating flow totals based on the type of fluid flowing through a single pipe.
By default, the Accumulation Control Mode is set to Always Accumulate. However, additional selections allow a user to control when a flowrun is calculating accumulation via a DIO configured as a
digital input. For example, consider a valve that is used to change the source of fluid passing through
the meter. In one position, the valve allows fluid “A” to flow through the meter; in the opposite position, the valve stops the flow of fluid “A” through the meter and allows fluid “B” to flow through. The
accumulated total for each respective fluid can be measured using a digital input signal configured to
indicate the valve position.
Rate Calculation Period
The “Rate Calculation” field is populated
with the rate calculation method selected
during the flow run setup.
The Calculation Period is established
on the Device Data Acquisition
Configuration page. See Choose Logging,
Calculation, and Input Sampling
Periods, page 17, for more details.
By configuring Flow Run 1 to accumulate only when the digital input valve position signal is in the
high position, for example, the first fluid is measured. By configuring Flow Run 2 to accumulate only
when the digital input valve position signal is in the low position, the second fluid is measured. This
feature is available only for DIOs configured as digital inputs (see Digital Input, page 40, for additional information).
Venturi Meter Flow Rate Calculation
To configure flow rate parameters, choose RATE CALCULATION>MODIFY from the flowrun screen.
To modify flow rate calculations,
61
1.
Change the rate damping factor, if required, by clicking on the –/+ buttons. The rate damping
factor will also be the “settling time”.
2.
Select an Expansion Coefficient Source from the dropdown list.
3.
Select an Extended Temperature Range from the dropdown list.
4.
Modify the “Input Assignments” section, as necessary, for static pressure, temperature and
differential pressure sources. Click in the shaded field of the source to be changed, choose a
source from the Select Input Source dialog and click OK.
Important
5.
An input source can be an integral pressure or RTD input, or an input from a
slave device or external device configured via Modbus Master. If using an input from an external Modbus device, make sure that communications with the
device are properly configured before configuring the flowrun. If communications are not established, these inputs will not appear in the list of selectable
inputs in the Select Input Source dialog. See Section 4—Setting Up Communications, page 20 for details about establishing communications with these
devices so that they are selectable from the Select Input Source dialog.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
Configuring Venturi Meter Parameters
To configure Venturi meter parameters, choose VENTURI CONFIGURATION>MODIFY from the
flowrun screen and click OK on the Enter Maintenance Mode dialog. The Modify Flow Run # Venturi
Meter Configuration screen will appear.
To configure the Venturi meter,
1.
Click in the “Meter Specifications Type” field and select the appropriate meter specifications type
from the dropdown list.
a.
If you select Inlet Diameter and Throat Diameter, enter the meter inlet diameter and
the reference throat diameter (typically recorded on the nameplate of the meter and/or
recorded in the calibration data supplied with the meter) in the fields provided.
b.
If you select Inlet Diameter and Beta Ratio, enter the meter inlet diameter and the beta
ratio (typically recorded on the nameplate of the meter and/or recorded in the calibration
data supplied with the meter) in the fields provided.
2.
Enter the reference temperature (typically provided on a test report issued by the laboratory that
calibrated the Venturi meter) in the field provided. If the reference temperature is not known,
enter 68ºF (US customary units) or 20ºC (SI units).
3.
Click in the “Meter Material” field and select the appropriate meter material from the dropdown
list.
The Set alpha manual entry hyperlink to the right of meter material allows you to enter a custom
expansion coefficient. This option is recommended when the meter material is not included in
the standard dropdown list.
4.
If desired, enter the model and serial numbers in the fields provided. Neither of these settings is
required for proper flowrun measurements.
5.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
6.
Click the Exit Maintenance Mode hyperlink in the gold bar to unfreeze input values.
Calibrating the Venturi Meter
To calibrate a Venturi meter, choose FLOW RUN>FLOW RUN #>VENTURI CALIBRATION>MODIFY
and follow the instructions provided in Meter Calibration, page 65.
Configuring Fluid Properties for the Venturi Meter
To configure fluid properties for a cone meter run, choose FLUID PROPERTIES>MODIFY from the
flowrun screen, the click OK on the Enter Maintenance Mode dialog. The Modify Flow Run Fluid
Properties screen will appear. There are two views of this screen:
•
Basic Options—the standard settings required for configuring the flowrun
•
Additional Options—Basic Options view+advanced settings for maximum configurability
To change the view from basic to additional options, select the Click Here hyperlink in the upper left
corner of the white screen.
The contents of this screen will vary, depending upon the fluid property standard selected when setting up the flowrun. See Fluid Property Configuration, page 67, for details.
62
Configuring Liquid Properties for the Venturi Meter
When Hydrocarbon Liquids is selected as the flowrun’s Fluid Properties Standard, a LIQUID PROPERTIES button appears at the left of the screen, just beneath the FLUID PROPERTIES button.
By clicking LIQUID PROPERTIES to access the Flow Run # Liquid Properties screen, you can
specify the density and viscosity of a fluid and also apply a correction to the oil volume to account for
shrinkage or BS&W content. For details, see Hydrocarbon Liquids, page 68.
TURBINE METER/PULSE INPUT
The Scanner 3100 supports volume pulse accumulation [AGA-7 (2006), gas fluid types] and mass
pulse accumulation inputs.
Setting Up a Turbine Meter/Pulse Input Flowrun
To set up a turbine meter/pulse input flowrun:
1.
Choose FLOW RUN>FLOW RUN #>FLOW RUN SETUP>MODIFY. The Modify Flow Run #
Setup screen will appear.
2.
Enter a unique flowrun name, if desired.
3.
Under the “Flow Rate Calculation Method” heading, click in the “Rate Calculation” field, select
the appropriate pulse input type from the Change Flow Rate Calculation Method dialog and
click OK.
4.
Under the “Fluid Properties Standard” heading, select the appropriate fluid type/standard from
the Change Fluid Properties Standard dialog and click OK.
5.
The default flow direction setting (Positive) should always be used for turbine/pulse input applications. For applications involving bidirectional measurement, flow can be accumulated with
a turbine/pulse input meter using an additional digital input signal to indicate flow direction. See
Bidirectional Measurement Using Flow Direction Control (for Turbine, Coriolis, and Ultrasonic
Meters), page 63 below for details. The Scanner 3100 does not support bidirectional dualpulse turbine signals.
6.
By default, the “Accumulation Control Mode” is set to Always Accumulate. Do not change this
setting unless you intend to control bidirectional flow accumulation as described in step 5. See
Bidirectional Measurement Using Flow Direction Control (for Turbine, Coriolis, and Ultrasonic
Meters), page 63 below for details.
Bidirectional Measurement Using Flow Direction Control (for Turbine, Coriolis, and
Ultrasonic Meters)
For installations where flow measurement is based on a pulse input source, a digital input can be
used to control when flow accumulation starts and stops. The use of a digital signal to indicate flow
direction allows the Scanner’s two integral flowruns to separately accumulate forward and reverse
flow.
For example, consider a Scanner 3100 connected to a Coriolis meter or ultrasonic meter. The meter
produces two signals. Signal A is the pulse indication of mass or volume and is connected to a Scanner 3100 pulse input (pulse input 1, 2, or 3). Signal B indicates direction of flow (high = positive flow;
low = negative flow) and is connected to a digital I/O that is configured as an input. To accumulate
flow in both directions, configure both Scanner 3100 flowruns to use the pulse input connected to
Signal A as the accumulation source. Then, configure Flow Run 1 to accumulate flow when Signal B
is high, and configure Flow Run 2 to accumulate flow when Signal B is low.
This feature is available only for DIOs configured as digital inputs (see Digital Input, page 40, for
additional information).
Important
For best accuracy, this technique should be used for flow that travels in one
direction for a period of time. If flow is changing direction rapidly, configure
the calculation period to be less than 60 seconds. When the DIO state (i.e.
flow direction) changes in the middle of a calculation period, all flow collected
since the last calculation period will be logged to the flowrun targeted by the
new DIO state.
When setting up the flowruns, consider the following settings:
From the Modify Flow Run 1 Setup screen, configure Flow Run 1 for a positive flow direction as follows:
1.
Under “Flow Run Properties,” enter a flowrun name that uniquely identifies flow direction or fluid
type to provide a clear record of both sets of flow totals when viewing data in the web interface
or viewing flow archives.
2.
Under “Accumulation Mode,” configure flow direction to be positive.
63
a.
Click in the “Accumulation Control Mode” field. From the Change Accumulation Control
Mode dialog that appears:
i.
Choose the mode (Digital I/O state) that will trigger flow accumulation for a specific
flow direction (Accumulate when selected digital I/O state is High Input, for example).
ii.
Select the Digital I/O port configured to indicate the flow direction.
iii.
Click OK to save the settings and exit the dialog.
From the Modify Flow Run 2 Setup screen, configure Flow Run 2 for a negative flow direction as
follows:
3.
Under “Flow Run Properties,” enter a flowrun name that uniquely identifies flow direction or fluid
type to provide a clear record of both sets of flow totals when viewing data in the web interface
or viewing flow archives.
4.
Under “Accumulation Mode,” configure flow direction to be positive.
a.
Click in the “Accumulation Control Mode” field. From the Change Accumulation Control
Mode dialog that appears:
i.
Choose the mode (Digital I/O state) that will trigger flow accumulation for the opposite
flow direction (Accumulate when selected digital I/O state is Low Input, for example).
ii.
Select the Digital I/O port configured to indicate the flow direction.
iii.
Click OK to save the settings and exit the dialog.
Assuming the digital input state for flowrun 1 is “high,” flow accumulation will be displayed on the
Flow Run 1 Status screen. When the DIO status changes to “low,” flow will stop accumulating as
Flow Run 1 volume, and begin accumulating as Flow Run 2 volume. The uncorrected volume (or
mass) totals produced by the Pulse Input will be the total sum of uncorrected accumulations sent to
Flow Run 1 and Flow Run 2.
Configuring Turbine Meter/Pulse Input Flow Rate Calculation Parameters
Rate Calculation Period
The “Rate Calculation” field is populated
with the rate calculation method selected
during the flow run setup.
The Calculation Period is established on
the Device Data Acquisition Configuration
page. See Choose Logging, Calculation,
and Input Sampling
Periods, page 17, for more details.
To configure flow rate parameters, choose RATE CALCULATION>MODIFY from the flowrun screen.
There are two views of this screen:
•
Basic Options—the standard settings required for configuring the flowrun
•
Additional Options—Basic Options view+advanced settings for maximum configurability
To change the view from basic to additional options, select the Click Here hyperlink in the upper left
corner of the white screen.
ImportantSome values displayed on the Modify Flow Run Rate Calculation screen can be
modified on other screens, and hyperlinks to those screens are provided for quick
access. To avoid losing the settings selected on the Modify Flow Run Rate Calculation screen, click SAVE before clicking on a hyperlink.
To modify flow rate calculations,
Pulse Input Source Configuration
When configuring a flow run with a pulse
input source (such as an AGA-7 volume
pulse input), configure the pulse input
source before configuring the flow run.
Otherwise, the pulse input source will
appear as “Invalid Source” and will not be
selectable when you configure your input
assignments on the Modify Flow Run Rate
Calculations screen.
If your fluid property is gas, configure
your pulse input accumulation type as
“uncorrected gas volume.” If your fluid
property is hydrocarbon liquid, choose
“uncorrected liquid volume.” If your fluid
property is mass, choose mass.
The default setting for pulse input
accumulation type is “uncorrected liquid
volume.”
1.
Change the rate damping factor, if required, by clicking on the –/+ buttons. The rate damping
factor will also be the “settling time”.
2.
Select an Expansion Coefficient Source from the dropdown list.
3.
Select an Extended Temperature Range from the dropdown list.
4.
Modify the “Input Assignments” section, as necessary, for static pressure, temperature, and
pulse input sources. Click in the shaded field of the source to be changed, choose a source from
the Select Input Source dialog and click OK.
Important
Verify that the pulse input source is configured to match the fluid being measured. If it is not, the pulse input source will not be selectable when configuring a flowrun. By default, the pulse input source setting is configured for
uncorrected liquid volume.
Important
An input source can be an integral pressure or RTD input, or an input from a
slave device or external device configured via Modbus Master. If using an input from an external Modbus device, make sure that communications with the
device are properly configured before configuring the flowrun. If communications are not established, these inputs will not appear in the list of selectable
inputs in the Select Input Source dialog. See Section 4—Setting Up Communications, page 20 for details about establishing communications with these
devices so that they are selectable from the Select Input Source dialog.
64
5.
If the “additional options” view is selected, complete the following selections under the “Meter
Body Parameters” heading:
a.
Click in the “Meter Body Size” field and enter the appropriate meter body size.
b.
Click in the “Meter Body Reference Temperature” field and enter the reference temperature
(typically provided on a test report issued by the laboratory that calibrated the meter) in the
field. If the reference temperature is not known, enter 68ºF (US customary units) or 20ºC
(SI units).
c.
Click in the “Meter Body Material” field and select the appropriate meter body material from
the dropdown list.
NoteThe Set alpha manual entry hyperlink to the right of meter material allows you to enter a
custom expansion coefficient. This option is recommended when the meter material is not
included in the standard dropdown list.
6.
Verify the pulse input configuration settings under the “Meter Parameters - Pulse Input X”
heading. The accumulation type must match the flow method selected in Step 3 of Setting Up a
Turbine Meter/Pulse Input Flowrun, page 63.
7.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
Configuring Turbine Meter/Pulse Input Meter Parameters
See Pulse Input, page 38, for complete instructions about configuring pulse inputs.
Calibrating a Turbine Meter/Pulse Input Meter
To calibrate a turbine meter or pulse input meter, choose LOCAL I/O>PI#: PULSEIN#>K-FACTOR>
MODIFY and follow the instructions provided in Changing the K-Factor or Meter Factor, page 39.
Configuring Fluid Properties for a Turbine Meter/Pulse Input Flowrun
To configure fluid properties for a turbine meter or pulse input meter flowrun, choose FLUID
PROPERTIES>MODIFY from the flowrun screen, the click OK on the Enter Maintenance Mode dialog. The Modify Flow Run Fluid Properties screen will appear. There are two views of this screen:
•
Basic Options—the standard settings required for configuring the flowrun
•
Additional Options—Basic Options view+advanced settings for maximum configurability
To change the view from basic to additional options, select the Click Here hyperlink in the upper left
corner of the white screen.
The contents of this screen will vary, depending upon the fluid property standard selected when setting up the flowrun. See Fluid Property Configuration, page 67, for details.
Configuring Liquid Properties for a Turbine Meter/Pulse Input Flowrun
When Hydrocarbon Liquids is selected as the flowrun’s Fluid Properties Standard, a LIQUID PROPERTIES button appears at the left of the screen, just beneath the FLUID PROPERTIES button.
By clicking LIQUID PROPERTIES to access the Flow Run # Liquid Properties screen, you can specify the density and viscosity of a fluid, and apply a correction to the oil volume to account for shrinkage or BS&W content. For details, see Hydrocarbon Liquids, page 68.
METER CALIBRATION
Calibration for cone meters and Venturi meters can be performed by choosing FLOW RUN>FLOW
RUN #>[METER TYPE] CALIBRATION>MODIFY. The Flow Run # Modify... Calibration screen will
appear.
Calibration for turbine meter/pulse input meters can be performed by clicking PULSE INPUT # KFACTOR>MODIFY. The Modify Pulse Input # K-Factor screen will appear. For detailed instructions,
see Changing the K-Factor or Meter Factor, page 39.
Calibration Types
To calibrate the meter, select one of the three calibration types from the dropdown list:
•
Linear (Nominal) Factor
•
Multipoint
•
Multipoint Meter Factor
65
Restoring to Factory Calibration
To restore the factory calibration, click the
Restore Factory Calibration hyperlink to
the right of the “Calibration Parameters”
heading.
Calibration History
The four most recent calibrations are
stored in the Scanner 3100 and may
be restored as the current calibration.
Calibrations that are compatible with the
existing transducer are identified by a
green checkmark icon (see below) to the
left of the calibration entry.
Calibrating Methods
If there are current calibration data available, the data will appear in the “Current...” sections of the
screen. Regardless of calibration type, there are three methods available for entering calibration
data:
•
Enter all new calibration data
•
Use current calibration data—click the Copy to New hyperlink to the right of the “Current Calibration Data” heading.
•
Use historical calibration data—click on the desired historical calibration in the “Calibration
History” section to revert to the selected calibration. You can choose the current calibration or
select one of the four recent calibrations.
The selections available for edit depend on the calibration type selected. See below for instructions
for each calibration type.
Linear (Nominal) Factor Calibration
To calibrate using a linear (nominal) factor,
1.
Select Linear (Nominal) Factor from the “Calibration Type” dropdown list.
2.
Enter a reference number and calibration note in the fields provided, if desired.
3.
Modify the linear discharge coefficient using one of the following methods:
4.
––
Type the new linear discharge coefficient in the field provided.
––
Click the Copy to New hyperlink to the right of “Current Calibration Data” to use current
calibration data.
––
Click on one of the available historical entries to use historical calibration data.
Click SAVE to update the calibration data and exit the screen.
Multipoint Calibration
To calibrate using a multipoint factor,
1.
Select Multipoint from the “Calibration Type” dropdown box.
2.
Enter a reference number and calibration note in the fields provided, if desired.
3.
Modify the Reynolds number and the discharge coefficient by performing one of the following
tasks:
––
Note
Type the new data in the fields provided. (To remove existing calibration data points, click
CLEAR ALL POINTS to the right of the “New Calibration Data” section of the screen.)
Calibration data points may be sorted by clicking the Sort Points hyperlink to the right of
the “New Calibration Data” section of the screen.
––
Click the Copy to New hyperlink to the right of “Current Calibration Data” to use current
calibration data.
––
Click on one of the available historical entries to use historical calibration data.
4.
Repeat Step 3 as necessary to enter up to 16 calibration points.
5.
Click SAVE to update the calibration data and exit.
Multipoint Meter Factor Calibration
The multipoint meter factor calibration method allows you to compensate for variations between calibrations without changing the meter K-Factor from the value stamped on the meter at the factory.
Meter factors are typically determined through calibrations performed by third-party test laboratories.
This method allows you to enter the appropriate factor during calibration to account for any variation
in the calibration curve over Reynolds numbers.
To calibrate using a multipoint meter factor,
1.
Select Multipoint Meter Factors from the “Calibration Type” dropdown box.
2.
Enter a reference number and calibration note in the fields provided, if desired.
3.
Modify the nominal discharge coefficient by performing one of the following tasks:
4.
––
Type the new nominal discharge coefficient in the field provided.
––
Click the Copy to New hyperlink to the right of “Current Calibration Data” to use current
calibration data.
––
Click on one of the available historical entries to use historical calibration data.
Modify the Reynolds number and the meter factor by performing one of the following tasks:
66
––
Note
Type the new data in the fields provided. (To remove existing calibration data points, click
Clear All Points below the “Nominal Discharge Coefficient” field of the screen.)
Calibration data points may be sorted by clicking the Sort Points hyperlink below the
“Nominal Discharge Coefficient” field of the screen.
––
Click Copy to New to the right of the “Current Calibration Data” to use current calibration
points.
––
Click on one of the available historical entries to use historical calibration data.
5.
Repeat Step 4 as necessary to enter up to 16 calibration points.
6.
Click SAVE to update the calibration data and exit.
FLUID PROPERTY CONFIGURATION
The fluid properties parameters selected when setting up the flowrun can be further configured by
choosing FLUID PROPERTIES>MODIFY from the flowrun screen.
Detailed Composition Natural Gas Fluid Properties (AGA-8 Part 1 Detailed,
AGA 8 Part 2, or GERG 2012)
If you selected natural gas fluid properties with detailed composition (AGA-8, Part 1 Detailed; AGA 8,
Part 2, or GERG 2012), there are two views of the Modify Flow Run # Fluid Properties (Natural Gas,
Detailed) screen:
•
Basic Options—the minimum number of configurable items that might require additional configuration to ensure the most accurate flow calculations possible
•
Additional Options—Basic Options view+other configurable items that might require additional
configuration to ensure the most accurate flow calculations possible
1.
Click on the –/+ buttons to change the calculation interval. This interval determines the time
between calculations in a flowrun interval.
Note
The units of measure used on this screen were established on the DEVICE>UNITS screen.
For more information about setting default units, see Choose Units, page 16.
2.
Complete the “Base Conditions” section of the screen.
3.
Click in the “Gas Stream Input” field and select one of the eight gas streams available from the
dropdown list. By default gas streams will use a static composition as the data source. If a gas
chromatograph will be used instead, see Appendix B—Gas Chromatograph Inputs, page 97.
Gas Stream Inputs
Gas stream inputs are only required for
AGA-8 Detailed and GERG-08 Detailed
natural gas fluid property calculations.
They are not required for use with flow
runs using AGA-8 Gross or Hydrocarbon
Liquids fluid property calculations.
By default, volumetric heating value, viscosity, and isentropic exponent values are calculated by
the Scanner 3100. To manually enter these values, change to the Additional Options view and
click the Set manual entry hyperlink next to each selection under “Gas Properties.” To clear a
manual entry retained from a previous fluid property configuration, click the Clear manual entry
hyperlink to enable the Scanner 3100 to calculate the values.
4.
Click SAVE to save all changes.
ImportantLeaving the Modify Flow Run Fluid Properties screen without saving will result in
the loss of fluid properties configuration settings.
Configuring a Static Composition Gas Stream
The Scanner 3100 can accept inputs from up to eight gas streams. The composition of each gas
stream can be either static composition (user-specified) or supplied from a gas chromatograph input.
This section addresses only static composition inputs. For information about configuring and assigning gas chromatograph inputs to a flowrun, follow the instructions in Appendix B—Gas Chromatograph Inputs, page 97.
1.
Choose GAS STREAM>GAS STREAM #. The Gas Stream Configuration screen will appear.
2.
Click CONFIGURATION>MODIFY.
3.
Click in the “Gas Stream Name” field and assign a unique name.
4.
Click in the “Gas Composition Data Source” field and select Static Composition from the
dropdown list.
5.
Enter the analysis reference number for the gas stream composition.
6.
If required by your company, enter your name or initials in the “Last Changed By” field, and
enter the current date in the “Last Changed On” field.
67
Default Static Composition Values
If no static composition constituents or
values are entered, the values will remain
at their default settings, which represent
typical components of a Gulf Coast region
gas stream.
7.
Enter the gas constituents in the “Composition” section of the screen. To zero all values on the
screen before entering new constituents, click the Clear Composition hyperlink to the right of the
“Composition” heading.
8.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
Gross Characterization Natural Gas Fluid Properties (AGA 8, Part 1 Gross
or SGerg-88)
If you selected the gross characterization natural gas fluid standard (AGA 9, Part 1 Gross or
SGerg-88), you must set up fluid properties and gas properties.
Configuring Fluid Properties
To configure fluid properties,
1.
Choose FLUID PROPERTIES>MODIFY. The Modify Flow Run # Fluid Properties (Natural
Gas, Gross) screen will appear.
2.
Click on the –/+ buttons to change the calculation interval. This interval determines the time
between calculations in a flowrun interval.
Note
The units of measure used on this screen were established on the DEVICE>UNITS screen.
For more information about setting default units, see Choose Units, page 16.
3.
Complete the “Base Conditions” section of the screen.
4.
Click SAVE.
Configuring Gas Properties
To configure gas properties,
Maintenance Mode
In Maintenance Mode, all sensor inputs
are locked at their current values. The
sensor inputs will remain frozen until
Maintenance Mode is exited.
1.
Choose GAS PROPERTIES>MODIFY from the Flow Run # Setup screen. If you are not already
in Maintenance Mode, you will be prompted to enter this mode to configure gas properties.
2.
In the “Analysis Reference No.” field, enter a reference number from the gas analysis report.
3.
Update the “Reference Conditions” field, if necessary. This selection sets the reference temperature and pressure for air density, which is used in converting the user-supplied heating value
into the heating value mass basis required for energy calculations.
4.
By default, the volumetric heating value is “calculated.” To manually enter the volumetric heating
value of the measured fluid, click Set/Clear Manual Entry hyperlink and enter the desired value.
5.
Enter the specific gravity of the measured fluid in the field provided.
6.
Enter the viscosity of the measured fluid in the field provided. If you are unsure of the value, enter 10.268 cP or 0.00010268 P if you are using SI units. If you are using U.S. Customary units,
enter 0.0000068998 lbm/ft∙sec or 0.000010268 kg/m∙sec.
7.
Enter the isentropic exponent of the measured fluid in the field provided. If you are unsure of the
value, enter 1.300.
8.
Enter the carbon dioxide content as a mole fraction in the field provided.
9.
Enter the nitrogen content as a mole fraction in the field provided.
10. Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
Hydrocarbon Liquids
If you selected hydrocarbon liquids as the flowrun fluid properties, you must set up fluid properties
and liquid properties.
Configuring Fluid Properties
To configure fluid properties,
1.
Click in the “Hydrocarbon Liquid Type” field and select the type of hydrocarbon liquid from the
dialog. Click OK to save the selection and return to the Modify Flow Run # Fluid Properties
(Hydrocarbon Liquids) screen.
2.
Click on the –/+ buttons to change the calculation interval. This interval determines the time
between calculations in a flowrun interval.
3.
Complete the Base Conditions fields as necessary.
4.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
Liquid Properties Overview
Scanner 3100 users have the option of using an input to capture a live flowing density from a densitometer or manually entering water and oil densities to compute liquid hydrocarbon volumes. By receiving a live density measurement, the Scanner 3100 properly computes the standard liquid volume
of a liquid hydrocarbon whose composition changes. This feature makes the Scanner 3100 suitable
68
Hydrocarbon
Available DataLiquid Types
Hydrocarbon
selections
include
Live
oil, water,liquids
and net
volume grand
crude
oil, refined
oil, and
totals and
period product,
totals arelube
displayed
special
products.
Special
products
are
in the Flow
Run Status
screen
in the
generally
relatively
pure liquid
products
web
interface
for routine
monitoring.
In
that
are derived
(such
addition,
base oilfrom
and petroleum
water densities,
as Gasohol)
and have
been tested
to
calculated
flowing
densities,
live input
establish
product-specific
thermal
densities a
and
manual/live BS&W
expansion
correctionsfactor.
can all be logged by the
Scanner 3100 and archived for operations
maintenance and auditing purposes. See
Section 10—Configuring Device Alarms,
page 83 for details.
to more pipeline, LACT and other applications. The Density Application Mode selection described in
Table 7.1—Density Application Modes determines the available input source options for densities and
correction factors as well as which parameters must be computed by the Scanner for the final determination of volume. When crude is being measured, this selection will also determine the options
available for applying base sediment and water (BS&W) correction.
Crude oil generally contains some water. Therefore, to totalize the crude only, it is necessary to apply
a BS&W correction factor to discount the water content. The correction can be provided by a userentered value (assumed to be constant) or by a live measurement from a water-cut monitor/BS&W
monitor. This live measurement enters the Scanner 3100 via an analog Input or as data read from a
Modbus Master register.
Net Oil Measurement (Crude)
In applications where a live density reading is available from a Coriolis meter or densitometer and the
base density of the crude is known, the Scanner can derive the water-cut factor directly from the live
flowing composite density. This Net Oil Computer density application mode eliminates the need for
separate BS&W measurement. In this configuration, the Scanner calculates flowing densities of the
crude and water portions of the fluid using user-entered base densities and the computed pressure/
temperature compensation factors. The Scanner then interpolates the flowing water-cut using the live
composite and calculated flowing densities and corrects the flowing water-cut back to base conditions.
Density Mode Availability
Density Mode Selections
All four density application modes are
available for crude measurement, whereas
only two modes (Manual and Densitometer) are available for measurement of
non-crude products. To quickly assess
the differences between the modes and
determine the best method for measuring
watercut based on available equipment
and data, see the following tables. Descriptions of each method are also provided in the web interface (Change Density
Application Mode dialog). See Configuring
Liquid Properties, page 70.
The Scanner 3100 supports four different density application modes: Manual Entry, BS&W Probe,
Densitometer Input, and Net Oil Computer.
TABLE 7.1—DENSITY APPLICATION MODES
DENSITY APPLICATION MODES FOR CRUDE
BS&W Probe
Base Oil Density
User-Entered
User-Entered
Calculated
User Entered
Base Water Density
User-Entered
User-Entered
User-Entered
User-Entered
Flowing Oil or
Composite Density
Calculated
Calculated
Live Input*
Live Input*
User-Entered
Live Input*
User-Entered
or Live Input*
Calculated
BS&W
Densitometer
Net Oil
Computer
Manual
* Live input requires an analog input or a Modbus Master input
DENSITY APPLICATION MODES FOR NON-CRUDE
Manual
Densitometer
Base Oil Density
User-Entered
Calculated
Base Water Density
User-Entered
User-Entered
Flowing Oil or
Composite Density
Calculated
Live Input*
User-Entered
User-Entered
or Live Input*
BS&W
* Live input requires an analog input or a Modbus Master input.
Configuring a Live Input
If you plan to use a live input for the density or BS&W correction factor, configure the input before
you configure the liquid properties for your flowrun. If the source device is not configured in advance, it will not be selectable when you are asked to identify it during the configuration process.
•
To measure an analog BS&W signal, configure an Analog Input for a “Base Sediment and
Water (BS&W) Correction” transducer and provide all of the transducer parameters. See Configuring an Analog Input, page 38.
•
To create a BS&W data value using the Modbus Master, configure a Modbus Master data query to read a value with a Remote Measurement Category of “BS&W Correction”. See Setting
Up a Modbus Data Query, page 25 for more information about the Remote Measurement
Category selection on the Data Format tab in the web interface.
Assign a descriptive name to the Analog Input or Modbus Master Data Query to make it easy to recognize the density or BS&W source (for example, FlowingDensity or FlowingBSW).
69
Configuring Liquid Properties
To configure liquid properties,
Maintenance Mode
In Maintenance Mode, all sensor inputs
are locked at their current values. The
sensor inputs will remain frozen until
Maintenance Mode is exited.
1.
Choose LIQUID PROPERTIES>MODIFY. If you are not already in Maintenance Mode, you will
be prompted to enter this mode to configure liquid properties.
2.
Click in the “Density Application Mode” field and select the desired method for providing density
from the Change Density Application Mode dialog. Selections will vary, depending on the hydrocarbon liquid type selected. See also Density Mode Selections, page 69.
3.
In the “Analysis Reference Information” field, enter a reference number from the liquid analysis
report.
4.
Select a base oil density specification type and enter a density value if applicable. Users that
require highest accuracy should use a live densitometer input where available.
Oil and Water Density Units
Base oil (absolute) and base water density
units will vary, depending on the unit
system in use (kg/m3 for SI units, lbm/ft3
for US Customary units). Specific gravity
and API gravity are unitless values.
a.
If the base oil density is to be manually entered, select (Absolute, Specific Gravity or
API Gravity) from the dropdown list. Enter the base density value of the liquid in the field
provided. Density is assumed to be at base temperature.
b.
If a flowing oil density is provided by a live input, click in the Flowing Oil Density Source
field and select the densitometer from the list of available input sources. If the densitometer
is not present in the input source list, it has not been properly configured in the web
interface. Check your analog input configurations. Once the densitometer is configured, it
will appear as a selection in the Flowing Oil Density Source dialog.
5.
Enter the viscosity of the liquid at flowing temperature. If the viscosity is unknown, use the recommended default value for the liquid type selected.
6.
If Special Products is selected as the fluid type, enter the fluid’s coefficient of thermal expansion in accordance with MPMS Chapter 11.1. If the coefficient is unknown, click the hyperlink
“Select coefficient from presets list” to view industry-recommended presets for some common
fluids. Special products are hydrocarbons that are outside the classifications of crude oil, refined
products, and lube oil, such as Gasohol.
7.
If Crude Oil is selected, you have the additional option of configuring a volume correction based
on base sediment and water (BS&W) content or volume shrinkage. See Configuring Oil Volume
Correction (Crude) below, and configure the Oil Volume Correction settings as required.
Configuring Oil Volume Correction (Crude)
When measuring crude, a base sediment and water (BS&W) correction factor is often applied to
discount the water content.
BS&W Units
•
BS&W device units can be configured as
either a percentage (default) or a fraction
(no units). See Choose Units, page 16.
BS&W Correction Factor. The selections vary, depending on the density application mode
selected.
––
When the Manual Density mode is selected, the BS&W correction mode defaults to User
Entry (Base Conditions). Enter a known percentage of correction in the BS&W Amount
(Base Conditions) field. If no BS&W correction is desired, enter zero in the BS&W Correction field.
––
When the BS&W Probe density mode is selected, the BS&W correction mode defaults to
Live Input Source. Select the BS&W correction input from the “BS&W Probe Source” field.
If the watercut monitor/BS&W monitor is not present in the input source list, it has not been
configured in the web interface. See Configuring an Analog Input, page 38.
––
When the Densitometer density mode is selected, the BS&W correction mode can be
configured to accept No Correction, a user-entered correction under flowing conditions,
or a live input correction. To apply a user-entered correction, select User Entry (Flowing Conditions) and enter a known percentage of correction in the BS&W Amount (Base
Conditions) field. To apply a live input source, select the BS&W correction input from the
“BS&W Probe Source” field.
––
When the “Net Oil Computer” mode is selected, the BS&W correction is interpolated using
a live flowing composite density. Instead of selecting a BS&W source under the Oil Volume
Correction header, you will select a densitometer input in the “Flowing Composite Density
Source” field. If the densitometer is not present in the input source list, it has not been
properly configured in the web interface. See Configuring an Analog Input, page 38.
Shrinkage Correction
When the oil is discharged from a
pipeline to a stock tank at atmospheric
conditions, the volatile components in
the oil evaporate, causing a reduction in
liquid volume. When live oils are metered
(e.g., test separators), a shrinkage factor
must be applied to correct the measured
liquid volume from the metering pressure
and temperature to stock tank conditions
unless the meter is proved to stock
tank conditions. Shrinkage volumes
are typically obtained with a shrinkage
tester. This correction method will correct
the meter reading for both dissolved
gas and for oil volume reduction. It will
not compensate for the effects of fluid
viscosity changes. Shrinkage volumes or
factors are often used to mitigate safety
and environmental concerns when live oil
volumes are measured at high pressures
or when the live oil contains hydrogen
sulfide (H2S).
•
Base Water Density. Manually enter the base water density, if applicable. By default, the water
density is 999.016 kg/m3 (62.367 lbm/ft3). This is the density of pure, air-free water as defined
by API Ch 11.1, Appendix D. If the water density for a specific application is unknown, retain this
default value. If no BS&W correction is entered, the “Base Water Density” field will be omitted
from the screen.
•
Shrinkage Factor. This correction factor automatically corrects liquid volume measurements for
the effects of gas content in crude oil. If no shrinkage factor correction is desired, simply leave
the shrinkage factor value at the default setting of 1.
8.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
70
Steam
Meter Types Supported for Steam
Steam may only be selected as the fluid
properties standard for orifice and cone
meter types.
Steam Regions
The Scanner 3100 fully implements IF-97 steam regions as defined below:
Steam Regions
When measuring steam while operating
in Regions 1 through 3, select the
Water-Steam (Auto-selected Region)
fluid property calculation. To make
measurement in these regions, pressure
and temperature inputs are required.
When measuring water while operating on
the saturation line, select the Saturated
Steam (Quality Corrected) fluid property
calculation. Once in Region 4, only a
pressure input is required and a steam
quality factor is added.
Figure 7.2—IF-97 steam regions
•
Region 1 (Water/Compressed Water) lies between the saturation line and maximum pressure
limit, as well as between 0° F and 662 °F (0° C and 350° C).
•
Region 2 (100% Vapor/Superheated Vapor/Dry Steam/Superheated Steam) lies below and
to the right of the saturation line up to a maximum temperature of 1472° F (800° C).
•
Region 3 (Critical Region) surrounds the Critical Point and extends upward to the maximum
pressure limit. In flow measurement, Region 3 is considered “incompressible liquid.”
•
Region 4 (Saturated Steam) lies on the saturation line and separates Regions 1 and 2. The
user determines when Region 4 is entered, and only pressure OR temperature is measured and
a steam quality factor is added to the measured value.
Per the Lockhart-Martinelli parameter, a wet gas flow has a value between 0.0 and 0.3. Values
in excess of 0.3 are usually defined as multiphase flow. When the Lockhart-Martinelli parameter
exceeds 0.4, a warning that the multiphase flow is becoming dual flow will appear.
Definition of Superheated
Scanner 3100 Steam Calculations
Scanner 3100 steam calculations
are based on the Lockhart-Martinelli
parameter (χ). Wet correction for orifice
and cone meters is applied using the
Steven’s method.
“Superheated” is defined as any temperature in excess of the boiling temperature at a given pressure. For example, if water is heated to 100% vapor and heat continues to be added, the vapor
temperature will rise. This “extra” temperature above the boiling point is “superheated,” which is expressed as degrees.
Because the superheated value is a temperature difference, it does not correspond to a point on the
temperature scale. Steam that has 30 degF (–1.11 degC) of superheat also has 30 Rankine degrees
of superheat. For example, steam at 300 degF (148.89 degC) and 20 psia (137.9 kPa) has 72.1
degF (22.28 degC) of superheat because the saturation temperature of 20 psia steam is 227.9 degF
(108.83 degC).
Configuring Fluid Properties
To configure fluid properties,
1.
Choose FLUID PROPERTIES>MODIFY. The Modify Flow Run # Fluid Properties (Steam)
screen will appear.
2.
Click on the –/+ buttons to change the calculation interval. This interval determines the time
between calculations in a flowrun interval.
Note
The units of measure used on this screen were established on the DEVICE>UNITS screen.
For more information about setting default units, see Choose Units, page 16.
3.
Complete the “Base Conditions” section of the screen.
4.
Click SAVE.
Configuring Steam Properties
To configure steam properties,
71
Steam Analysis Reference Number
The Steam Analysis Reference Number
field
is an optional
alphanumeric field.
Maintenance
Mode
If no formal steam analysis has been
In
Maintenance
Mode,
all the
sensor
performed,
you can
enter
dateinputs
of the
are locked
at their calculation/test
current values. or
The
last
steam quality
simply
sensor
inputs
remain frozen until
leave the
field will
blank.
Maintenance Mode is exited.
1.
Choose STEAM PROPERTIES>MODIFY from the Flow Run # Setup screen. If you are not
already in Maintenance Mode, you will be prompted to enter this mode to configure steam
properties.
2.
If applicable, enter an analysis reference number in the field provided.
3.
By default, the enthalpy, specific gravity, viscosity, and isentropic exponent are “calculated” and
cannot be manually entered.
4.
If “Saturated Steam” was selected as the fluid type, enter the saturated steam quality/dryness in
the field provided. Entering “100.000%” indicates that the saturated steam is completely dry and
entering “0.000%” indicates that it is completely wet.
5.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
Section 8—Using the Scanner Logic Controller Features
The Scanner Logic Controller turns the Scanner 3100 into an advanced programmable logic and
timer control system. Using the Scanner Logic Integrated Development Environment (IDE) program,
the user can configure the Scanner 3100 for a variety of automation functions.
Before a script can be uploaded to the Scanner 3100, it must be created using the Scanner Logic
IDE, a custom program for programmable logic. For information about creating a program, see the
Scanner Logic Programmer Manual and the Scanner Logic IDE User Manual. Both manuals are
available from the Scanner Logic IDE program and from the website at http://www.cameron.slb.com/
flowcomputers, navigate to Scanner 3100 Flow Computer and select the manual(s) you want to
download.
INSTALLING A SCANNER LOGIC FILE
To install a custom programmable logic file the Scanner 3100 via the web interface,
Note
Skip steps 1 and 2 if the SLBIN file has been created from the IDE program and is saved
for upload to the Scanner 3100 web interface.
1.
From the IDE program, select the file you want to upload to the Scanner.
2.
Connect the IDE to the desired Scanner using the procedure described in the Scanner Logic
IDE User Manual.
3.
Open the Scanner 3100 web interface and log into the same Scanner selected in step 1.
4.
Select ADMINISTRATION>GENERAL>INSTALLED FILES to access the Scanner Logic Binary
File webpage, as shown below.
Figure 8.1—Install Scanner Logic File location
5.
Locate the “Install Scanner Logic Script File” section of the webpage and click BROWSE.
6.
Navigate to the folder where the SLBIN file is stored, select the desired file, and click OK.
72
Figure 8.2—SLBIN upload confirmation
7.
Click SUBMIT in the web interface.
8.
When the Confirm dialog appears, click OK. The SLBIN File Status should say “Valid,” as
shown below.
Figure 8.3—SLBIN File Status location
Note
Some other SLBIN file statuses that may appear are “Erased,” “State Unknown,” “Not
Valid,” or “Validated.”
DOWNLOADING A PROGRAM FILE FROM A SCANNER TO THE
SCANNER LOGIC IDE
To download an SLBIN program file from the Scanner web interface,
1.
Open the web browser and log into the selected Scanner.
2.
Select ADMINISTRATION>GENERAL>INSTALLED FILES.
3.
From the Scanner Logic Script Binary File page, locate the “Installed SLBIN Binary File” field.
Figure 8.4—Installed SLBIN Binary File location
73
4.
Right-click on the SLBIN file name and select Save [Link] As… from the popup menu.
5.
Browse to the location where the file will be saved.
6.
Rename the file to one that accurately reflects the file contents.
7.
Click SAVE.
UNINSTALLING A PROGRAM FILE FROM THE SCANNER
To uninstall an SLBIN file from a Scanner,
1.
Open the web browser and log into the selected Scanner.
2.
Select ADMINISTRATION>GENERAL>INSTALLED FILES.
3.
From the Scanner Logic Script Binary File page, locate the “Uninstall Scanner Logic Script
Binary File” section shown below.
Figure 8.5—Uninstall Scanner Logic Binary File location
4.
Click UNINSTALL SLBIN FILE.
5.
Click OK when the Confirm dialog appears.
MONITORING LOGIC CONTROLLER EXECUTION
When a Scanner Logic program is successfully installed, it starts executing immediately. The complete status of the executing program can be viewed within the web interface (see the Scanner 3100
Web Interface User Manual for more information). If the program has entered the a Fail State, a red
banner will appear and indicate the failure. The Logic Controller Status screen will contain details
about the source of the failure.
Viewing Logic Controller Status
To view the status of the Scanner Logic Controller and the executing program,
1.
Open the web browser and log into the selected Scanner.
2.
Select SCANNER LOGIC CONTROLLER>STATUS. From the Logic Controller Status screen,
you can view:
a.
Program Information. Includes program name, program version, program reference
report, and program source code.
b.
Script Program Status. Includes the following:
i.
Execution Time. Displays how long the script has been running in seconds.
ii.
Image Status. Possible image statuses include “Unknown,” “Erased,” “Valid,”
“JustNotValidated,” “Not Valid,” “Just Validated.”
iii.
Program State. Possible program statuses include “Idle,” “Initialization,” “Running,”
“Break,” Fail,” “FailBreak,” “Abort,” and “AbortBreak.”
iv.
Line Number. The current line number the program is running.
c.
Alarms. Displays status of Logic Controller alarms. If alarms are not configured, the status
for Instantaneous, Current Day and Previous Day will read “OK.” Click on the Logic Status
Controller Alarms item to view the alarms configured for the script.
d.
Task Status (1 through 4). Displays the item status, current state, and line number on
which the task appears.
74
Resource Validation Errors
As a Scanner Logic program is executing, the Scanner 3100 reviews the program requirements,
first ensuring that the system is providing the Logic Controller with the required system control. If the
program requires the use of any of the Scanner outputs, they must be configured to accept the Scanner Logic control. Secondly, the Scanner 3100 reviews all inputs to ensure the values provided are
healthy and that the input is operational. If any resource validation errors are detected, the Scanner
3100 will place the program in the “Fail State.” The Logic Controller Status screen will display a banner detailing the error source(s).
Figure 8.6—Scanner Logic Program Errors
Validation error(s) sources can be:
Flow Run Accumulation Control Is Not Configured for Scanner Logic Control
This error indicates that the installed program requires control over the accumulation of one or more
of the Flow Runs but control has not been granted. To resolve this error:
1.
Navigate to FLOW RUNS>[FLOW RUN #N]>FLOW RUN SETUP>MODIFY.
2.
Edit the “Accumulation Control Mode” and select Controlled by Scanner Logic Script program.
3.
Click OK and then SAVE.
Flow Run Is Disabled or in Fail State
This error indicates that the installed program requires control over the accumulation of one or more
of the flow runs; however, the flow run is reporting that it is disabled or in a Fail State. See Section
7—Flowrun Configuration, page 55 to properly configure a flow run.
Triggered Archive Mode Is Not Configured for Scanner Logic Control
This error indicates that the installed program requires control over the triggered archive; however,
control has not been granted. To resolve this error:
1.
Navigate to ARCHIVES>TRIGGERED ARCHIVES>CONFIGURATION>MODIFY.
2.
Edit the “Archiving Mode” and select Log Manually (via serial protocol, web page, or Scanner
Logic Script program).
3.
Click OK and then SAVE.
Creation of Partial Archive Records Is Disabled and Will Prevent Scanner Logic
Function
This error indicates that the installed program requires the ability to create partial archive records;
however, the Scanner is not permitting partial record creation. To resolve this error:
1.
Navigate to ARCHIVES>FLOW ARCHIVES 1>CONFIGURATION>MODIFY.
2.
Edit “Enable Partial Records” and select Yes.
3.
Click OK and then SAVE.
Analog Output Is Not Configured for Scanner Logic Control
This error indicates that the installed program requires control over an analog output; however, control has not been granted. To resolve this error:
1.
Navigate to LOCAL I/O>[ANALOG OUTPUT #N]>CONFIGURATION>MODIFY.
2.
Edit “Analog Output Mode” and select Track Scanner Logic Controller.
3.
Click OK and then SAVE.
Digital Valve Is Not Configured for Scanner Logic Control
This error indicates that the installed program requires control over the digital valve controller; however, control has not been granted. To resolve this error:
1.
Navigate to LOCAL I/O>DIGITAL VALVE CONTROLLER>CONFIGURATION>MODIFY.
75
2.
Edit “Analog Output Mode” and select Track Scanner Logic Controller.
3.
Click OK and then SAVE.
Digital Output Is Not Configured for Scanner Logic Control
This error indicates that the installed program requires control over a digital output; however, control
has not been granted. To resolve this error:
1.
Navigate to LOCAL I/O>[DIO #]>CONFIGURATION>MODIFY.
2.
Edit “Digital I/O Mode” and select Track Scanner Logic Controller.
3.
Click OK and then SAVE.
Digital Input Is Not Enabled and Is Required by Installed Scanner Logic Program
This error indicates that the installed program requires the reading of a digital input; however, the DIO
is not configured as an input. To resolve this error:
1.
Navigate to LOCAL I/O>[DIO #]>CONFIGURATION>MODIFY.
2.
Edit “Digital I/O Mode” and select Input Mode.
3.
Click OK and then SAVE.
Local LCD Display Mode Is Not Configured for Scanner Logic Control
This error indicates that the installed program requires control over the display group presented on
the local LCD; however, control has not been granted. To resolve this error:
1.
Navigate to DEVICE>DISPLAY> MODIFY.
2.
Edit “Message Display Mode” and select Controlled by Scanner Logic Script program.
3.
Click OK and then SAVE.
Register Input Does Not Match the Configured Measurement Category
This error indicates that the installed program requires the reading of an Scanner input; however, the
input is not configured to produce the required measurement category type. This error can occur with
the following input types:
•
Analog Input. See Analog Input, page 37 to properly configure an analog input as the required category type.
•
Modbus Master Data. See Mastering a Modbus Device (Modbus Master), page 24 to properly configure a Modbus master data query as the required category type.
•
Slave Device Data. See Section 4—Setting Up Communications, page 20 to properly configure and connect to a slave device.
Register Input Is in Disabled or Fail State
This error indicates that the installed program requires the reading of an Scanner input; however, the
input is not enabled or is in Fail State. This error can occur with the following input types:
•
Analog Input. See Analog Input, page 37 to properly configure an analog input as the required category type.
•
Modbus Master Data. See Mastering a Modbus Device (Modbus Master), page 24 to properly configure a Modbus master data query as the required category type.
•
Slave Device Data. See Section 4—Setting Up Communications, page 20 to properly configure and connect to a slave device.
Program Control
Users with the required security permissions level (defined by the script author) can halt or restart the
execution of the installed Scanner Logic program. This permission level is viewable on the SCANNER LOGIC CONTROLLER>PROGRAM INFO page as “Online Controls Access Level.” To control
the execution of the installed program:
1.
Open the web browser and log into the selected Scanner with the required access permissions.
2.
Select SCANNER LOGIC CONTROLLER>PROGRAM CONTROL.
3.
Click EMERGENCY STOP. This control stops executing code in all Scanner Logic tasks and
causes the program to enter the user Abort State.
4.
Click RESTART PROGRAM to restart the Scanner Logic program and enter the initial state of
each task. Configuration and Maintenance parameter values are preserved.
Note
A Scanner Logic program will enter the Fail State if a resource validation error is detected.
Once all resource validation errors are resolved, click RESTART PROGRAM to exit the
Fail State.
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Program Information
All program information entered by the program author is viewable on the web interface. This information, which can contain program version information and a user description, allows the user to
monitor and maintain a Scanner Logic Controller application. To view the program information of the
installed Scanner Logic program:
1.
Open the web browser and log into the selected Scanner.
2.
Select SCANNER LOGIC CONTROLLER>STATUS. From the Logic Controller Status screen,
you can view
––
Program Name. User-declared application name.
––
Program Author. Authorship information could be used to include contact information.
––
Program Owner. User-declared program owner.
––
Program Version. User-declared version number, an important indicator that should be
incremented by the author on all revisions.
––
Program Creation Date. This date is automatically updated when a program is compiled
by the Scanner Logic IDE.
––
Online Source Access Level. User-declared access level required to view or download
the program source code on the web interface.
––
Online Controls Access Level. User-declared access level required operate the execution controls on the Program Controls page.
––
HMI Write Access Level. User-declared access level required to change values on the
User HMI page.
––
Program Description. User-declared application description that can also be used to communicate modification notes.
Tip
The program author should take the time to communicate the purpose and strategy of
your program in the “Program Description” field. The program description contains enough
space to give an overview of the program’s function and store revision notes as the program evolves.
USER HMI
When creating a Scanner Logic program using the Scanner Logic IDE, the user has the option of defining a custom User HMI (human to machine interface) page. The page is designed by selecting up
to 64 program values which can be grouped into sections. Each section is labeled with user-defined
header text. The program values can be selected from the properties of any object declared within
the user program.
When a Scanner Logic program is loaded onto a Scanner, the web interface will automatically create
the User HMI page if the program contains HMI Field objects. For more information about HMI fields,
see the Scanner Logic IDE User Manual.
1.
Open the web browser and log into the selected Scanner.
2.
Select SCANNER LOGIC CONTROLLER>HMI FIELDS. This page will only appear if the executing Scanner Logic program contains declared HMI fields.
3.
Choose whether to display the HMI fields by Name or by Description. The order of the fields
can be changed by clicking the “Name Column First” or the Description Column First” links.
The web interface will remember this setting and display all other register pages in the selected
fashion.
4.
Choose HMI FIELDS >MODIFY to change the values displayed in the HMI fields. Only some
“User HMI” fields can be modified via the web interface if the following permissions are met:
5.
Tip
––
The web user must meet the security permissions level requirement defined by the script
author. To view permission level, choose SCANNER LOGIC CONTROLLER>PROGRAM
INFO page using the “HMI Write Access Level.”
––
The property must be a Read/Write property.
––
The script author has enabled the property’s Webmodify flag, thereby granting write permission to the web user.
Click SAVE when the desired changes are made.
A custom HMI page can consolidate all of the information and settings for the system
operator onto one landing page of the Scanner 3100 web interface.
77
VIEWING LOGIC CONTROLLER REGISTERS
Registers are places in the program code where a float value is stored. The Scanner Logic IDE allows the user to define registers with custom names and descriptions. When a Scanner Logic program is loaded onto a Scanner, the web interface automatically displays all registers declared within
the loaded program. Each register type appears in its own page. There are five available register
types in the IDE: Configuration, Maintenance, Holding, Accumulation, and Working. The working
registers are private internal registers and will not appear in the web interface. For more information
about registers, see the Scanner Logic IDE User Manual.
Within a Register Type page, registers can be grouped under custom header text, which provides
ease of locating and viewing specific registers based on the group. To view a page for a register type:
1.
Open the web browser and log into the selected Scanner.
2.
Select SCANNER LOGIC CONTROLLER>[REGISTER TYPE]. In the examples below, the
Configuration registers are grouped into four groups.
Figure 8.7—Logic Controller Configuration Registers, first three groups shown
Note To view the register group, scroll down the page or click on the quick links under “Register
Groups” at the top of the screen.
3.
Choose whether to display the registers by Name or by Description. The order of the fields can
be changed by clicking the “Name Column First” or the Description Column First” links. The web
interface will remember this setting and display all other register pages in the selected fashion.
4.
Choose [REGISTER TYPE]>MODIFY to change the values in the displayed registers. Only
some registers can be modified on the web interface:
––
Configuration Registers. These registers can be changed if the web user have Configuration Access permission or higher.
––
Maintenance Registers. These registers can be changed if the web user have Maintenance Access permission or higher.
––
Holding Registers. These registers are for the Scanner Logic program to report values
and cannot be modified.
––
Accumulation Registers. These registers are for the Scanner Logic program to report
accumulation values and cannot be modified.
SCANNER LOGIC PID CONTROLLERS
The Scanner Logic Controller can control Analog Output 1, Analog Output 2, and the Digital Valve
Controller 1 with PID Control. If the installed program uses any of the PID controllers, the PID Controllers page will appear on the web interface. For each active PID controller, all the operating properties will appear on this page. For more information about PID controllers, see the Scanner Logic IDE
User Manual.
To view the Scanner Logic PID controllers:
78
1.
Open the web browser and log into the selected Scanner.
2.
Select SCANNER LOGIC CONTROLLER>PID CONTROLLERS. The PID Controllers page will
only appear if the current Scanner Logic program contains declared PID controllers.
3.
Choose whether to display the PID controller by Name or by Description. The order of the fields
can be changed by clicking the “Name Column First” or the Description Column First” links.
The web interface will remember this setting and display all other register pages in the selected
fashion.
4.
All relevant properties for active PID controllers will appear on this page. Scroll down to view all
controllers.
5.
Click MODIFY to change the operating parameters for a PID controller. Only some properties
can be modified on the web interface. if the following permissions are met:
6.
––
The web user must meet the security permissions level requirement defined by the script
author.
––
The property must be a Read/Write property.
––
The script author has enabled the property’s Webcontrolflags flag, thereby granting write
permission to the web user.
Click SAVE when completed making all changes.
Section 9—Creating Custom Calculations
In addition to the industry-standard flow calculations supported by the Scanner 3100, the web interface gives users a built-in calculator for performing a wide range of user-specified calculations, such
as net volumes, applying a correction factor to a flowrun accumulation, or creating a custom flow rate
accumulation. Calculator results are stored in Scanner 3100 memory as calculator registers, allowing
users to log calculator results, add them to the Scanner 3100 display, or apply them in configuring
flowruns, device alarms, analog outputs, digital outputs, and other calculators.
The Scanner 3100 offers 8 calculators and each calculator can include up to 16 user-entered operations. Operations can be constructed using register values (such as a volume, flow rate or even an
existing calculator register) or user-entered constants. If Scanner slave devices or other Modbus devices are networked to the Scanner 3100, measurements from those devices can also be integrated
into calculations.
Many calculator results can be archived in Scanner 3100 memory for reporting and logging, triggering an alarm, or customizing flow calculations. For example, users can create different flow parameters in addition to the parameters provided in the flowrun holding registers or compare total volumes
for a period from a user-specified flow rate calculation. Creating a custom calculator is a convenient
way to create, archive, and display parameters to simplify a user’s work flow and archive record processing.
CALCULATION MODES
Two calculation modes are available.
Calculator Display Units
To change the unit used to display
calculator results, select DEVICE>UNITS
and change the device unit selection for
the appropriate unit category.
•
Choose Summation Mode to add or subtract values associated with a single measurement type
or “unit category” (grand totals, gas volume, differential pressure, etc.). The output will be displayed in the device unit that is configured for the selected category.
•
Choose Formula Mode to perform more complex calculations involving
––
Loading a register or constant value
––
Adding, subtracting, multiplying, or dividing values
––
Calculating the square root of a value
––
Raising a value to a user-defined power
––
Handling complex orders of operation using memory functions to store intermediate calculations to memory and recall them for use in final calculations
In Formula mode, operations may combine two or more measurement types or “unit categories” to
produce an end result in a different measurement type (ie: a mass divided by a volume to create a
density). To properly configure a calculator in Formula mode, you must identify both the unit category
and the unit in which the result will be calculated. Do not be concerned if the “end result” unit is different than the “device” unit used to display the result values throughout the interface. The Scanner
3100 automatically converts the end result value to the device unit you have selected for the applicable unit category. The Calculator Status screen displays the end result in both the calculated unit
and the configured device unit.
79
CALCULATOR RESULT DATA TYPES
Calculator results are stored in registers that can be used to configure many other functions. The type
of result data available for any given calculator depends on the type of calculation performed and the
nature of the values used in its operations. In some calculations, the result will be an instantaneous
value; in others, the result will be period data only or period data and instantaneous values.
Instantaneous values are made available in calculations where period data would be illogical. For
example, when calculating a net grand total (Flow Run 1 Grand Total - Flow Run 2 Grand Total), the
difference is presented as an instantaneous value. Period data serves no purpose in this instance,
because accumulating or averaging incremental results over time would produce a number that has
no real-world application.
Where period data exists, the result is averaged or accumulated. For example, when computing a net
gas volume from two flowrun volumes, the period result is incrementally accumulated. When computing differential pressure by subtracting two static pressures, the values collected within a period are
averaged to produce the result.
Consider the following three basic types of values used in operations for a closer look at how these
results are handled by the Scanner 3100:
•
Volume, mass, or energy results from a flowrun or pulse input (excluding grand totals) are incremental accumulations produced by the Scanner. If these registers are exclusively used in a calculator configuration, the end result will be accumulated and only period data will be available.
•
Grand totals are handled as a single-point reading that cannot be accumulated. The end result
is an instantaneous value only. Period data is not calculated.
•
Other registers (including all Flow Run Fluid Info and Flow Info registers) exist as instantaneous
values that produce both instantaneous data and period data when they are operated upon. The
period data results will be the average of all instantaneous data results.
For any given calculator, the Calculator Status page identifies the data types that are available for
use in configuring other functions (“Calculator Data Values Available”) and, where applicable, the
means used to compute the end result for period data (“Period Data Collection Mode”).
In Formula mode calculations that yield period data, the user chooses the collection mode to be used
in presenting the results (“End Result is Accumulated” or “End Result is Averaged”). See step 3d in
Configuring a Calculator, page 81. This setting is automatically determined for Summation mode
calculations.
Calculator Register Naming Conventions
The default names applied to calculator registers makes it easy to identify the data type when selecting a calculator register as an input to a configuration.
•
Registers containing instantaneous data will appear in configuration dialogs as “<Calculator
Name>_InstValue.”
•
Registers containing period data will appear as “<Calculator Name>_DailyValue,” “<Calculator
Name>_IntervalValue,” “<Calculator Name_PreviousDailyValue,” or “<Calculator Name>_PreviousIntervalValue.”
•
In archive selections, the Calculator register will appear simply as the calculator name without a
suffix. Grand total results cannot be added to an archive.
CALCULATOR APPLICATIONS
Because the data types produced by a calculator vary with the calculator configuration, the applicable
uses for these results vary also. The number of possible configurations for the Scanner 3100 calculator function is too great to describe in this manual. However, Table 8.1—Example Calculator Result
Applications compares the functions supported for three basic calculations.
Note Net Grand Totals cannot be archived. They can be displayed, used to trigger a device
alarm, digital output, or analog output, added to a calculator operation, or written to another
Modbus device.
80
TABLE 8.1—EXAMPLE CALCULATOR RESULT APPLICATIONS
SCANNER
FUNCTION
NET
GRAND TOTAL
(EXAMPLE:
FR1_GRANDTOTAL
MINUS
FR2_GRANDTOTAL)
NET VOLUME
ACCUMULATION
(EXAMPLE:
FR1 VOLUME
MINUS
FR2 VOLUME)
DIFFERENTIAL
PRESSURE
(EXAMPLE:
STATIC PRESSURE
MINUS
ANALOG PRESSURE*)
ARCHIVE
None
Period Accumulation Value
Period Average Value
DISPLAY
Instantaneous Value
Daily Value
Daily Value
—
Interval Value
Interval Value
—
Previous Daily Value
Previous Daily Value
—
Previous Interval Value
Previous Interval Value
—
—
Instantaneous Value
Instantaneous Value
Daily Value
Instantaneous Value
DEVICE ALARMS
—
—
Daily Value
DIGITAL OUTPUT
CONDITIONAL
Instantaneous Value
—
Instantaneous Value
—
Daily Value
Daily Value
ANALOG OUTPUT
(PID)
Instantaneous Value
—
Instantaneous Value
FLOWRUN INPUT
None
None
Period Average Value
CALCULATORS
Instantaneous Value
Instantaneous Value
Instantaneous Value
MODBUS MASTER
WRITE QUERY
Instantaneous Value
Daily Value
Daily Value
—
Interval Value
Interval Value
—
Previous Daily Value
Previous Daily Value
—
Previous Interval Value
Previous Interval Value
—
—
Instantaneous Value
* Where Analog Input is configured as a static pressure input
VIEWING CALCULATOR STATUS
To collectively view the current values of all configured calculators, select FLOW RUNS>ALL CALCULATORS. From this view, you can also click on a Calculator name (hyperlink) to access the Calculator Status screen for the selected calculator.
Each Calculator Status screen displays valuable information including:
•
Calculator Name. A unique, user-specified name is recommended.
•
Calculator Mode. Summation mode, Formula mode, or Disabled
•
Status Indicator. Indicates if there is an error in any of the registers used within an operation or
if an error is caused by an operation (ie: divide by 0)
•
Calculator Data Values Available. Identifies whether instantaneous values, period data, or
both are available as a calculator result
•
Period Data Collection Mode. Identifies whether the end result is an average of the data collected over a period (interval or day) or the sum of collected data
For more information on calculator data values and period data collection modes, see Calculator Result Data Types, page 80.
If the Calculator Status screen indicates that an operation has produced an error, review the Calculator Configuration page to determine the cause of the error. The status information about each calculation operation can be useful in troubleshooting the error.
CONFIGURING A CALCULATOR
To create a calculator,
1.
Select FLOW RUNS>CALCULATOR # (1 to 8). Calculators available for use (not configured)
are displayed as “disabled.”
2.
Click CONFIGURATION>MODIFY. The Modify Calculator # Configuration screen appears.
3.
From the Modify Calculator # Configuration screen, complete the following calculator settings:
a.
Name the calculator. Because the calculator value will be among the register selections
available for other calculations, archive selection, etc., create a name that describes the
purpose of the result and identifies its unit category.
81
b.
c.
Note
d.
End Result Unit
Consider the unit associated with each
operation (displayed next to the operation
on the Modify Calculator Configuration
page) when determining the end result
unit for a calculation. The End Result Unit
Category is the type of measurement
represented by the calculator output.
The End Result Unit is the unit in which
the end result is calculated. The End
Result Units available for selection
are determined by the End Result Unit
Category selected.
Note
Select a calculation mode:
––
Summation Mode for simple addition/subtraction of values in a single unit category.
––
Formula Mode for all other operations (values may be associated with dissimilar unit
categories); see Calculation Modes, page 79 for details.
Click in the “End Result Unit Category” field and select the unit category that corresponds
with the result (gas volume, differential pressure, etc.).
If “Summation Mode” is in use, skip step 3d. The end result unit will default to the unit that
is configured for the selected End Result Unit Category, and the Period Data Collection
Mode will be automatically determined based on the End Result Unit Category. If the End
Result Unit Category is related to volume, mass, or energy, the end result (period data)
is accumulated. Otherwise, the end result is averaged. Grand total results are presented
as instantaneous values only and are therefore unaffected by the Period Data Collection
Mode.
If the Formula Mode is selected,
i.
Click the ”End Result Unit Category” field and choose the unit of measurement
in which the result will be calculated. Only units associated with the unit category
selected in step 3c will be available for selection. This unit may be different than the
device unit used to display the result. The result will be displayed in terms of the
device unit configured in the DEVICE>UNITS menu.
ii.
In the “Period Data Collection Mode” field, indicate whether the end result is to be
averaged or accumulated. For more information, see Calculator Result Data Types,
page 80.
The calculation period for calculator operations is fixed at 1 second.
4.
Enter up to 16 operations as described below.
5.
Click SAVE to store the settings in memory.
Entering Operations for a Summation Calculation
Operations are applied sequentially, top to bottom. To confirm the value of the calculator at any step
within the calculation, save your operation settings and click the STATUS tab at the left side of the
screen.
1.
To enter an operation, click in the first “Operation” field under the “Calculator Operations” section
of the screen.
2.
In the Edit Calculator Operation dialog, choose Add or Subtract and select the desired register
from the field provided. Registers may be selected from any of three tabs (Local, Modbus Master, and Scanner Slave).
Summation Mode
In Summation Mode, changing the End
Result Unit Category of a configured
calculator will clear all existing Calculator
Options.
3.
a.
Only registers associated with the selected End Result Unit Category are available for
selection.
b.
Existing calculator results may be among the list of available selections under the Local
tab. Only calculator results associated with the End Result Unit Category used by the new
calculation will be selectable.
Click in the next available “Operation” field and repeat step 2 to create as many operators as
needed, up to a total capacity of 16.
Entering Operations for a Formula Calculation
Operations are applied sequentially, top to bottom. To confirm the value of the calculator at any step
within the calculation, save your operation settings and click STATUS at the left side of the screen.
1.
To enter an operation, click in the first “Operation” field under the “Calculator Operations” section
of the screen.
2.
In the Edit Calculator Operation dialog, choose an operator from the dropdown list provided.
Load and Add both supply a starting value for an operation.
3.
Select the type of entry (register selection or constant value) in the “Parameter Type” field.
4.
If entering a register, select the register from the field provided. Registers may be selected from
any of three tabs in the dialog (Local, Modbus Master, and Scanner Slave). The unit for the
register will appear alongside the operation description.
5.
If entering a constant value, enter the desired constant in the field provided.
6.
Repeat steps 1 through 5 to create as many operators as needed, up to a total capacity of 16.
––
Select Load from the Operator dropdown menu to replace the current result of the calculator with a new value.
82
––
Use memory functions to achieve the required order of operations by storing values and
performing operations on the memory. After all operations are complete, recall the memory
to make it the active end result. Memory functions emulate the memory functions of a
simple Windows calculator.
•
MC clears the memory
•
M+ adds the current result of the calculator to the value stored in memory
•
M– subtracts the current result of the calculator from the value stored in memory
•
M* multiplies the current result of the calculator by the value stored in memory
•
M/ divides the value stored in memory by the current result of the calculator
•
MR recalls the value stored in memory
Section 10—Configuring Device Alarms
You can configure a Scanner 3100 alarm for up to 32 data points, including system parameters, flow
rates and totals, and input values. In addition to alarming on real-time values, you can also configure a device alarm to activate when a device status, such as an Scanner 3100 gas stream status or
alarm status, changes. You can also alarm on status changes for networked Modbus devices and
Scanner 2x00 slave devices.
A device alarm is typically configured for the purpose of generating an output, such as a sound or a
light, to alert a technician to investigate a potentially critical event. A secondary benefit is the ability to
capture an alarm condition in an alarm log.
ALARMS BASED ON REAL-TIME VALUES
To configure an alarm that will trigger when a real-time value goes outside one or a pair of userspecified setpoints,
1.
Choose DEVICE>ALARMS>MODIFY.
2.
Click an “Unused” slot and select an alarm register from any of three tabs in the Edit Alarm
Selection dialog. The dialog will open with the LOCAL tab displayed and all selections for the
local Scanner 3100 device in view (note the ALL SELECTIONS button at the left of the dialog
is highlighted). Users can filter the selections by clicking on other buttons in the LOCAL tab
(System, Rates/Totals, etc.) or by selecting one of the other tabs for Modbus Master or Scanner
2x00 slave device selections.
•
The Local tab allows the selection of Scanner 3100 registers and features the ALL SELECTIONS button for accessing all registers from one list.
•
The Modbus Master Data tab displays only registers for networked Modbus slave devices
and Modbus slave data values. Click the ALL SELECTIONS button to view all registers in
one list.
•
The Scanner Slave tab displays registers for networked Scanner 2x00 slave devices. Filter the selections using the buttons in the left column.
3.
Click the desired register and click OK to return to the Alarms Configuration page. The selection
will appear in the “Register” column of the “Alarm Selections” table and the Enable checkbox
next to it will be checked to indicate the alarm is enabled.
4.
Set low and high setpoints as required.
5.
a.
If a low setpoint is desired, click the Low Setpoint checkbox and enter the desired value. If
the value of the selected parameter drops below the setpoint, an alarm will be triggered.
b.
If a high setpoint is desired, click the High Setpoint checkbox and enter the desired value.
If the value of the selected parameter rises above the setpoint, an alarm will be triggered.
c.
To disable a Low or High Setpoint, uncheck the box next to the setpoint field you want to
disable. The setpoint value will be cleared when you uncheck the box, indicating that the
setpoint is disabled.
Enter a deadband value in the field provided, if desired. The deadband prevents oscillation or
repeated activation-deactivation cycles when a measurement hovers close to a setpoint. The
deadband value determines how far the measured value must come into the user-specified
setpoint range for an alarm to clear. For example, an alarm is set with a low setpoint of 50 mA
and a deadband of 5. When the register value drops below 50 mA, the alarm will activate. When
the value rises past 50 again, it must reach 55 mA (low setpoint plus deadband) to clear the
alarm.
ALARMS BASED ON STATUS (INTEGER VALUES)
The following Scanner 3100 status registers may be useful for establishing device alarms.
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•
DataStale. Triggers an alarm when a data query is not updated due to an unresponsive Modbus
Device. This alarm will monitor only Modbus Master data queries in which a stale alarm holdoff
period has been configured. See Setting Up a Modbus Data Query, page 25, for details.
•
GasStreamAlarm. Triggers an alarm when any gas stream is in alarm condition, which may
indicate a loss of communication with a gas chromatograph or gas stream data that does not
pass the validation tests.
•
ConfiguredSlavesLost. Triggers when a configured Scanner 2x00 slave device is lost or a new
slave device being added to the network fails to connect to the network.
•
SlavesReportingUserAlarms. Triggers when any connected Scanner 2x00 slave device reports that a user-configured alarm is in alarm condition.
•
SlavesReportingErrors. Triggers when any connected Scanner 2x00 device reports an input
alarm, calculation error or memory error.
•
SD_#_Alarms. Triggers when a specific Scanner 2x00 slave device user-configured alarm is in
alarm condition.
•
SD_#_InputStatus. Triggers when a specific Scanner 2x00 device reports an input alarm.
Important When the selected device alarm register is a status, integers define the
parameter state using either a “1” (active) or a “0” (inactive or off). For bit
definitions, see the Scanner 3100 Modbus Protocol Manual (for local device
registers) or the appropriate Scanner 2x00 protocol manual (for slave device
registers).
To configure an alarm that will trigger when a parameter status changes,
1.
Choose DEVICE>ALARMS>MODIFY.
2.
Click an “Unused” slot and select an alarm register from any of three tabs in the Edit Alarm
Selection dialog. The dialog will open with the LOCAL tab displayed and all selections for the
local Scanner 3100 device in view (note the ALL SELECTIONS button at the left of the dialog
is highlighted). Users can filter the selections by clicking on other buttons in the LOCAL tab
(System, Rates/Totals, etc.) or by selecting one of the other tabs for Modbus Master or Scanner
2x00 slave device selections.
•
The Local tab allows the selection of Scanner 3100 registers and features the ALL SELECTIONS button for accessing all registers from one list.
•
The Modbus Master Data tab displays only registers for networked Modbus slave devices
and Modbus slave data values. Click the ALL SELECTIONS button to view all registers in
one list.
•
The Scanner Slave tab displays registers for networked Scanner 2x00 slave devices. Filter the selections using the buttons in the left column.
3.
Click the desired register and click OK to return to the Alarms Configuration page. The selection
will appear in the “Register” column of the “Alarm Selections” table and the Enable checkbox
next to it will be checked to indicate the alarm is enabled.
4.
Assuming that an active alarm condition will be read as a bit value of “1,” leave the “Low
Setpoint” field blank and enter a “1” in the “High Setpoint” field. Accidentally entering “0” in the
“Low Setpoint” field will result in the alarm condition being active continuously.
5.
Enter “0” in the deadband field.
6.
Repeat Steps 2 through 5 to configure additional device alarms or click SAVE to save changes
and exit.
To configure a digital output based on this device alarm, see Configuring a Device Alarm Output,
page 42.
Examples
The following examples illustrate how a status alarm can be used to provide an alert to a condition
that is not possible using real-time values alone.
Example 1—Alarm on the Loss of Communication to Modbus Device
A user has set up multiple alarms for flow rates, totals, and other real-time values to help detect the
presence of leaks in his pipeline. However, he also wants to alarm on the loss of communication
to an external Modbus transmitter, since that can prevent him from detecting whether a leak exists. When communication is lost and the device value ceases to update in the Scanner 3100, the
DataStale register associated with the Modbus device in use will change from a value of “0” (inactive)
to a value of “1” or greater (active). Therefore the user needs to create an alarm that will trigger when
the DataStale register is equal to or greater than “1.
Solution
1.
Configure one of the Scanner 3100 serial ports using Modbus Master protocol and connect that
port to the external transmitter to be monitored.
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2.
Choose DEVICE>ALARMS>MODIFY to configure a device alarm.
3.
Click an “Unused” slot and select the Modbus Master Data tab from the Edit Alarm Selection
dialog.
4.
To configure the alarm that will trigger when communication is lost, click the appropriate
“Modbus Master...DataStale...” register and click OK to return to the Alarms Configuration page.
The selection will appear in the “Register” column of the “Alarm Selections” table and the Enable
checkbox next to it will be checked. The “DataStale” register containing the flags for the function
you want to monitor will depend upon how the data query table was set up. See Using Modbus
Query Groupings to Identify the Source of an Alarm, page 85 for more information about the
four DataStale registers available for selection.
5.
Leave the “Low Setpoint” field blank (very important) and enter a “1” in the “High Setpoint” field.
Accidentally entering “0” in the “Low Setpoint” field will result in the alarm condition being active
continuously.
6.
Enter “0” in the deadband field.
7.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
Example 2—Alarm on the Loss of a Scanner Slave Device from a Scanner 3100
Network
A user is troubleshooting issues with a slave device connection that becomes “lost” periodically for
unknown reasons. To ensure that he is immediately alerted each time this occurs, he wants to configure a device alarm that triggers each time the slave device connection is lost. When communication
is lost, the ConfiguredSlaveLost register will change from a value of “0” (all configured slaves are
connected to the network) to a value of “1” (one or more configured slave devices is lost from the
network). Therefore the user needs to create an alarm that will trigger when the ConfiguredSlaveLost
register equals 1.
Solution
1.
Configure one of the Scanner 3100 serial ports using Modbus Master protocol and connect that
port to the external transmitter to be monitored for loss of communication.
2.
Choose DEVICE>ALARMS>MODIFY to configure a device alarm.
3.
Click an “Unused” slot and select the Modbus Master Data tab from the Edit Alarm Selection
dialog.
4.
To configure the alarm that will trigger when communication is lost, click the “ConfiguredSlaveLost” register and click OK to return to the Alarms Configuration page. The selection will
appear in the “Register” column of the “Alarm Selections” table and the Enable checkbox next
to it will be checked. See “Using Modbus Query Groupings to Identify the Source of an Alarm”
below for more information about Modbus Master alarms.
5.
Leave the “Low Setpoint” field blank (very important) and enter a “1” in the “High Setpoint” field.
Accidentally entering “0” in the “Low Setpoint” field will result in the alarm condition being active
continuously.
6.
Enter “0” in the deadband field.
7.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
Using Modbus Query Groupings to Identify the Source of an Alarm
When you plan to alarm on the status of an external Modbus device, preplanning the arrangement of
data queries among the 128 available slots in the Modbus Master Data Queries grid can significantly
increase the amount of information you have to troubleshoot an active alarm.
Setting Up Modbus Master Queries
Any of the three serial ports in the
Scanner 3100 can be configured for use
with Modbus Master protocol, and each
port can support up to 128 data points.
See Setting Up a Modbus Data Query,
page 25, for detailed instructions about
configuring each data point as a query.
Each Scanner 3100 serial port supports up to 128 Modbus Master data points and each data point
query has a “DataStale” flag. The Scanner 3100 interface divides these flags into four “DataStale”
registers, any one of which can be selected as a device alarm register to be monitored for change:
DataStale1 = flags for data queries 1 through 32
DataStale2 = flags for data queries 33 through 64
DataStale3 = flags for data queries 65 through 96
DataStale4 = flags for data queries 97 through 128
Knowing this is powerful because, depending upon how you allocate your data point assignments
among the 128 slots in the query table, you can logically create up to four of data query categories so
that when a data point goes into an alarm state, you can identify the category and thereby identify the
source of the alarm more quickly.
Example 1
An operator has four Modbus devices daisy-chained to a Scanner 3100 master device. If he assigns
each device’s data points to a separate 32-query category, he can quickly determine the device from
which a DataStale alarm condition originates.
Data Queries 1–32 = Modbus Device 1
Data Queries 33–64 = Modbus Device 2
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Data Queries 65–96 = Modbus Device 3
Data Queries 97–128 = Modbus Device 4
For example, to create a device alarm to signal the loss of communications to Modbus Device 2, the
operator selects “DataStale2” as the alarm register. When this alarm is triggered, the operator instantly knows that the problem is with Modbus Device 2. Had he configured all four Modbus devices
within the same data query category, he would know only that he had a communications failure; he
would not know which device was affected without further investigation.
Example 2
An operator is polling one Modbus device for 16 data points: 6 flow rates and 10 flow totals. By assigning flow rates to slots within the first query category (1 through 32) and assigning flow totals to
slots within the second query category (33 through 64), he can quickly determine the type of input affected when a “DataStale” alarm is triggered. Note that Data Query 1 (data points 1 through 32) does
not use all the available slots in the category.
Data Queries 1-6 = Flow Rates
Data Queries 33–42 = Flow Totals
For example, if device alarms are set up for both “DataStale1” and “DataStale2” registers and
“DataStale1” is triggered, the operator instantly knows that the problem is with a flow rate.
DISABLING ALARM SELECTION(S)
To disable an alarm selection,
1.
Choose DEVICE>ALARMS>MODIFY. The Modify Device Alarms Configuration screen will
appear.
2.
In the Alarm Selections grid, click in the “Enable” checkbox to remove the checkmark for each
alarm to be disabled.
3.
Repeat Step 2 for each alarm to be disabled.
4.
When desired alarm selections are disabled, click SAVE.
CLEARING ALARM SELECTION(S)
To clear one or more alarm selections,
a.
Choose DEVICE>ALARMS>MODIFY. The Modify Device Alarms Configuration screen
will appear.
To clear a single alarm, click the delete icon
to the right of the alarm
register to be cleared. Repeat for each alarm register to be cleared.
b.
5.
To clear all alarm selections, click on the CLEAR ALL SELECTIONS to the right of the
“Alarm Selections” heading.
Click SAVE.
Section 11—Configuring Archives
Archive settings control which parameters are logged by the Scanner and how frequently they are
logged.
Daily archives are recorded at the time of day designated by the user-specified contract hour. Once
an archive is filled, oldest records will be overwritten by new records.
CAUTION Before configuring archive parameters, download all existing log data. For
detailed instructions on downloading data, see Section 12—Accessing Archive
Data, page 92.
CONFIGURING FLOW ARCHIVES
To configure the flow archive settings, choose ARCHIVES>FLOW ARCHIVE #>
CONFIGURATION>MODIFY. From the Modify Flow Archive # Configuration screen, a user can:
•
Change the contract hour
•
Enable the creation of a partial record
•
Change the log record size
•
Select or change the parameters to be logged
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Changing Contract Hour
To change the contract hour start time, click in the Contract Hour dropdown list and select the desired
time from the dropdown list.
Enabling/Disabling and Creating Partial Records
As the name “partial” suggests, a partial record is a set of values from an incomplete daily or interval
archive period. The “Partial Records” setting provides a means of segregating the flow records recorded before and after a calibration or configuration change that affects the way flow is calculated.
When the “Partial Records” setting is disabled and a calibration or configuration change is made that
affects flow calculations, the daily log values recorded for that period will reflect a combination of calculations performed with the previous settings and calculations performed with modified settings.
The configuration of partial records (enabled/disabled) affects both Flow Archive 1 and Flow Archive
2 and is editable from the Flow Archive # Configuration screens in the web interface. A change made
to the setting on Flow Archive 1 Configuration screen will change the setting on the Flow Archive 2
Configuration screen and vice versa.
The “Partial Records” setting is enabled by default. When it is enabled, a calibration or configuration
change will typically involve the creation of three partial records (see Partials 1, 2, and 3 below).
When the “Partial Records” setting is enabled and a change is made to calibration or configuration
settings (a change that causes the device to go into Maintenance Mode), the current archive record
is terminated (Partial 1) and a new record is initiated, based on the input values that existed when the
device entered Maintenance Mode.
When the calibration or configuration change is complete and the user exits Maintenance Mode, the
current record is again terminated (Partial 2), and a new record is initiated using the newly configured/calibrated input values. This record will continue until the contract hour of the next day (Partial
3).
Flow recorded prior to the setting change will be displayed as “Previous Interval” and “Previous Day”
totals, and flow recorded after the setting change will be added to the “Current Interval” and “Current
Day” totals.
Example: The contract hour is 8 a.m. “Partial Records” is enabled. A calibration or configuration
change is made at 10 a.m. A partial log is created for flow between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. A new log is
created at 10 a.m. and records flow until the configuration change is complete at 10:10 a.m. A new
log is created at 10:10 a.m. and continues until the contract hour of the next day. This record will be
displayed as the Current Day total.
Disabling Partial Records
Note If the Scanner is to be used with a third-party flow analysis system such as Flow-Cal® or
PGAS®, confirm that the system will support partial records. Some systems will not process
partial records as intended.
To disable partial records, select No in the “Enable Partial Records” field on the Modify Flow Archive
# Configuration screen.
Manual Creation of Partial Record
When the “Partial Records” setting is enabled, you can manually create a partial record on demand.
This is often used to mark the starting point for flow measurement after a setup period in which the
archive has collected unwanted data that doesn’t correspond to a valid configuration.
To manually create a partial record for a flowrun:
Scanner 3100 Software Downloads
The following software programs
are available for download from our
website at http://www.cameron.slb.com/
flowcomputers:
•
Scanner Data Manager
•
ScanMap
•
ScanFlash
Navigate to the website, select
PRODUCTION>MEASUREMENT>FLOW
COMPUTERS>SCANNER MODEL 3100
FLOW COMPUTER and click the desired
software download link.
1.
Confirm that the “Enable Partial Records” field on the Modify Flow Archive # Configuration
screen is set to “Yes”.
2.
Choose ARCHIVES>ALL ARCHIVES. The All Archives Status screen will appear. Select the
Create Partial Record hyperlink in the upper right corner of the screen, then click OK on the
Confirm dialog.
3.
Download the archive files for the device.
Partial Records for Slave Devices
Scanner 2x00 slave devices can also be configured to create partial flowrun records using ModWorX
Pro Software. See the ModWorX Pro User Manual for details.
Changing the Log Record Size
Log record size is the number of archivable values included in each record. To change the log record
size, click in the “Log Record Size” field on the Modify Flow Archive # Configuration screen. Choose
87
from four record sizes: 61, 31, 21, or 16 fields. In each case, the field count includes three predefined
values (Record Date, Record Time and Status). For example, if you select a log record size of 16
fields, 3 are predefined (uneditable) and 13 are user-selectable.
Keep in mind that the larger the record size, the faster the Scanner 3100 interval archive storage will
fill up and the fewer interval records can be stored. If the record size is set at 61 parameters, the interval log capacity is 6,144 records. If the record size is set at 16 parameters, the interval log capacity
is 24,576 records.
Selecting Data to Be Archived
Archiving a Volume Grand Total
To archive a grand total, select the “Grand
Total” register of interest from the Edit
Archive Selections dialog (Rates/Totals
tab). Then, in the Functions column, select
“Maximum” from the dropdown menu.
The Scanner can log up to 58 user-defined archive parameters. Users can select from a list of more
than 350 parameters from the local device, Modbus slave device or Scanner 2x00 slave device. Selectable categories include System, Rates/Totals, Fluid Info, Flow Info, Gas Streams, Inputs, etc. The
Scanner 3100 screen displays up to five parameters at a time and will scroll through all the selected
parameters, displaying them in the order selected.
To add and configure an archive parameter:
1.
Flow Weighting Selections
To restrict the archive calculation
(average, maximum or minimum) to the
period of flow within the interval, choose
“Flow Weighted” in the archive selections
grid and specify which flow run is to be
tracked. When the default setting “Not
Flow Weighted” is selected, the calculation
will be based on the entire interval
regardless of the presence of flow.
Click in the “Register” field. The Edit Archive Selection # dialog will appear. Click on the appropriate tabs:
•
Local. All parameters related to the Scanner 3100 and its two integral flowruns
•
Modbus Master. All data received from Modbus slave devices
•
Slave Device. All data received from Scanner slave devices
Note
Archive parameters will appear in the order selected on screen. If an archive parameter
field is skipped, that field will be ignored and will not be included in the archive log.
2.
Select the archive parameter to be assigned to the selected register field number, then click OK.
3.
If the selected archive parameter’s function is not a device-defined function, click in the “Function” field, then select Average, Maximum or Minimum from the dropdown list.
4.
The default value for flow weighting is Not Flow Weighted. If the archive parameter is flowweighted, click in the “Flow Weighting” field and select Flow Weighted on Flow Run 1 or 2.
5.
Repeat Steps 1 through 4 for each parameter to be included in the archive.
6.
Click SAVE.
Device-Defined Functions
Clearing Archive Selections
The most commonly archived registers
are preconfigured within the Scanner 3100
archive space and identified as “devicedefined” functions. For all other userspecified registers, you must select the
desired function as “average, maximum,
or minimum.” Flow weighting is an optional
selection for many registers.
1.
To delete a single archive parameter from the list, click on
deleted.
2.
To clear all archive parameters, click the Clear All Selections hyperlink located to the right of the
“Archive Selections” section of the screen.
next to the parameter to be
TRIGGERED ARCHIVES
A triggered archive differs from a flow archive in that it allows you to capture an additional record of
up to 19 registers under specific user-defined conditions. A triggered archive can log data as quickly
as once per second, and can hold between 135,000 and 1.35 million log records, depending upon
the number of registers included in each log. You can configure the logging to begin when an event is
detected, and you can control the frequency of logs and the point at which logging stops by the configuration settings selected. This configurability makes triggered archives a valuable diagnostic tool
for investigating an unexpected change in flow or input/output behavior of the Scanner 3100.
To configure triggered archives, choose ARCHIVES>TRIGGERED ARCHIVE>CONFIGURATION
>MODIFY. From the Modify Triggered Archive Configuration screen, triggered archives can be configured to log data
•
In accordance with a selected real-time period
•
Periodically, based on user-defined intervals
•
When one or more specified device alarms are active
•
When one or more digital inputs are active
•
Instantaneously when a user remotely activates the archive via a web interface or serial protocol
command
•
For PID tuning when an analog output is configured for PID control
Configuring Triggered Archive to Log on a Real Time Period
To create a log on a schedule that is synchronized with a selected real-time period,
88
1.
Click in the “Archiving Mode” field and select Log on Real Time Period.
2.
Click OK to select and return to the Modify Triggered Archive Configuration screen.
3.
Click in the “Real Time Period” field and select the real time interval or contract period that will
be used to trigger the logs.
4.
––
Archive Interval Period. Creates a log at the end of each archive interval as defined in the
DEVICE>DATA ACQUISITION menu.
––
Minute. Creates a log with each minute registered by the device real time clock.
––
Hour. Creates a log with each hour registered by the device real time clock.
––
Contract Day. Creates a log when a contract day ends and another begins.
––
Contract Week. Creates a log when a contract week ends and another begins.
––
Contract Month. Creates a log when a contract month ends and another begins.
––
Contract Year. Creates a log when a contract year ends and another begins.
Click on the “Action at End of Log Space” dropdown list and select the way to handle the logs
when the log space is full:
––
Wrap Around. Return to the beginning of the log and overwrite the data.
––
Stop Logging. End the log and do not record further data.
5.
Click in the “Log Record Size” field and choose the number of parameters to include in the triggered log. The more parameters chosen, the smaller the log capacity becomes.
6.
Add parameters to the archive selection by clicking in the “Register” field in the Archive Selections table and selecting the parameter to be logged from the available selections.
7.
If the selected archive parameter’s function is not a device-defined function, click in the “Function” field, then select Average, Maximum or Minimum from the dropdown list.
8.
The default value for flow weighting is Not Flow Weighted. If the archive parameter is flowweighted, click in the “Flow Weighting” field and select Flow Weighted on Flow Run 1 or 2.
9.
Repeat Steps 6 through 8 for all archive selections.
10. Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
Configuring Triggered Archive to Log Periodically (Interval)
To create a periodic (interval) triggered archive,
1.
Click in the “Archiving Mode” field and select Log Periodically.
2.
Click OK to select and return to the Modify Triggered Archive Configuration screen.
3.
Click in the “Logging Interval” field and select the number of logs per second, minute, hour or
day.
4.
Click on the “Action at End of Log Space” dropdown list and select the way to handle the logs
when the log space is full:
––
Wrap Around. Return to the beginning of the log and overwrite the data.
––
Stop Logging. End the log and do not record further data.
5.
Click in the “Log Record Size” field and choose how many parameters to include in the triggered
log. The more parameters chosen, the smaller the log capacity becomes.
6.
Add parameters to the archive selection by clicking in the “Register” field in the Archive Selections table and selecting the parameter to be logged from the available selections.
7.
If the selected archive parameter’s function is not a device-defined function, click in the “Function” field, then select Average, Maximum or Minimum from the dropdown list.
8.
The default value for flow weighting is Not Flow Weighted. If the archive parameter is flowweighted, click in the “Flow Weighting” field and select Flow Weighted on Flow Run 1 or 2.
9.
Repeat Steps 6 through 8 for all archive selections.
10. Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
Removing Triggered Archive Selections
Configuring a Device Alarm
See Section 10—Configuring Device
Alarms, page 83 for information about
configuring device alarms.
1.
To delete a single archive parameter from the list, click on
deleted.
next to the parameter to be
2.
To remove all archive parameters, click the Clear All Selections hyperlink located to the right of
the “Archive Selections” section of the screen.
Configuring a Trigger on Device Alarm Archive
The Scanner 3100 allows you to select up to 32 alarms to be configured as log triggers. To configure
an archive triggered by a device alarm,
89
1.
Click in the “Archiving Mode” field and select Trigger on Device Alarm.
2.
Click in the “Trigger Condition” field and select the device alarm(s) to be monitored. A log will
trigger if any of the selected alarms become active.
3.
Click in the “Logging Mode” field and select from the following options:
4.
––
Event Triggered. Log once each time the event occurs.
––
Event Triggered with Duration. Log periodically for a duration after the event occurs.
––
Level Triggered. Log periodically for as long as the condition is active.
––
Latched Trigger. Log continuously after the event occurs.
Click on the “Action at End of Log Space” dropdown list and select the way to handle the logs
when the log space is full:
––
Wrap Around. Return to the beginning of the log and overwrite the data.
––
Stop Logging. End the log and do not record further data.
5.
Click in the “Log Record Size” field and choose how many parameters to include in the triggered
log. The more parameters chosen, the smaller the log capacity becomes.
6.
Add parameters to the archive selection by clicking in the “Register” field in the “Archive Selections” area of the screen and selecting the parameter to be logged from the available selections.
7.
Delete parameters from the archive by clicking
next to the parameter name or by clicking
CLEAR ALL SELECTIONS to the right of the “Archive Selections” heading.
8.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
Configuring Triggered Archive on Digital Input
The Scanner 3100 allows you to select up to six digital inputs to be configured as log triggers. To
configure an archive triggered by a digital input,
1.
Click in the “Archiving Mode” field and select Trigger on Digital Input.
2.
Click in the “Trigger Condition” field and select the digital input(s) to be monitored from the
Change Trigger Condition dialog. If multiple digital inputs are checked, the log will trigger if any
of them are in the high state.
3.
Click in the “Logging Mode” field and select how you want the triggered archive to be logged:
4.
––
Event Triggered. Log once whenever the event occurs.
––
Event Triggered with Duration. Log periodically for a specified time after the event occurs.
––
Level Triggered. Log periodically for as long as the event condition is active.
––
Latched Trigger. Log periodically after the event occurs until latch reset.
Click on the “Action at End of Log Space” dropdown list and select the way to handle the logs
when the log space is full:
––
Wrap Around. Return to the beginning of the log and overwrite the data.
––
Stop Logging. End the log and do not record further data.
5.
Click in the “Log Record Size” field and choose how many parameters to include in the triggered
log. The more parameters chosen, the smaller the log capacity becomes.
6.
Add parameters to the archive selection by clicking in the “Register” field in the “Archive Selections” area of the screen and selecting the parameter to be logged from the available selections.
7.
Delete parameters from the archive by clicking
8.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
next to the parameter name.
Configuring a Manual Archive Trigger
To configure an archive triggered remotely by a user,
1.
Click in the “Archiving Mode” field and select Log Manually.
2.
Click on the “Action at End of Log Space” dropdown list and select the way to handle the logs
when the log space is full:
––
Wrap Around. Return to the beginning of the log and overwrite the data.
––
Stop Logging. End the log and do not record further data.
3.
Click in the “Log Record Size” field and choose how many parameters to include in the triggered
log (between 1 and 19 selections).
4.
Add parameters to the archive selection by clicking in the “Register” field in the “Archive Selections” area of the screen and selecting the parameter to be logged from the available selections.
90
Maintenance Mode Timeout
If you fail to exit Maintenance Mode, it
will expire automatically after 60 minutes,
assuming no activity is detected on the
web interface. All inputs will return to
regular operation.
5.
Delete parameters from the archive by clicking
next to the parameter name or by clicking
CLEAR ALL SELECTIONS to the right of the “Archive Selections” heading.
6.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
Once the archive selections are made, logging can be initiated from the web interface or by writing a
value to a Modbus command register.
Initiating Logging from the Web Interface
To access the logging controls built into the web interface, click the MANUAL CONTROL button to
the left of the screen. Locate the selections under Manual Archive Logging at the bottom of the Triggered Archive Manual Control screen.
To log a single record on demand, choose Single Logging Event from the Logging Type dropdown
menu. Then click the hyperlink Log Single Record Now in the Logging Control field.
To log for a period on demand, choose Start/Stop Logging from the Logging Type dropdown menu.
Then click the Start Logging hyperlink to initiate logging. After the desired logging period has lapsed,
click the Stop Logging hyperlink to stop logging.
Initiating Logging with a Modbus Command
To log a single record on demand, write code 500001 to the appropriate Command Register. For 32bit protocol, write to Register 5124. For 16-bit protocol, write to Register 79.
To log for a period on demand, you can stop and start logging by writing a prescribed value to a block
of five registers as shown in the table below:
ACTION
32-BIT PROTOCOL
16-BIT PROTOCOL
Start Logging
Write 1000500000 to registers 5120
through 5124
Write 1000500000 to registers 71 to 79
Stop Logging
Write 0000500000 to registers 5120
through 5124
Write 0000500000 to registers 71 to 79
For more information, see the Scanner 3100 Modbus Protocol Manual.
Configuring Triggered Archive for PID Tuning Mode
When an analog output is configured for PID control, tuning assistance is provided within the web
interface. The PID tuning is implemented as a triggered archive function.
WARNING
When PID tuning is enabled via the triggered archive configuration, archive
selections are changed to a pre-set configuration. Archive parameters and
archive selections are not user-configurable in the PID Tuning mode and previously logged data will become inaccessible. To preserve previously logged
data, download the records before enabling PID tuning.
Enable PID tuning as follows:
1.
Click ARCHIVES>TRIGGERED ARCHIVE>CONFIGURATION>MODIFY.
2.
Select PID Tuning Mode (Analog Output #) from the Archiving Mode dropdown menu.
3.
Click SAVE.
4.
Click OK to bypass the warning described above.
The Triggered Archive Configuration screen displays the archive parameters associated with the PID
tuning configuration and the PID archive selections that will be logged in the triggered archive and
made available for download. Additionally, a PID Tuning screen will be added to the Analog Output
screens. For more information, see PID Tuning, page 48.
Terminating a Triggered Archive
If a triggered archive is configured as a latched trigger or an event trigger without a specified duration, selected parameters will be logged indefinitely once a trigger event occurs. If desired, logging
can be terminated using one of three methods:
•
Terminate logging from the web interface. Choose ARCHIVES>TRIGGERED ARCHIVE>
CONFIGURATION>MODIFY and change the Archive Mode to “Disabled.”
•
Terminate logging using a Modbus command. For 32-bit protocol, write 500002 to Register
5124. For 16-bit protocol write 500002 to Register 79.
•
Terminate logging with a switch using a digital input and the Special Functions selections from
the Digital In/Out Configuration screen. See Configuring a Special Function Input, page 40,
for details).
91
Resetting Archives
When the triggered archive is full and the log records are downloaded, it may be necessary to reset
the archive to allow the accumulation of more log records. To reset the archive, click on the Reset
Triggered Archive hyperlink to the right of the “Manual Archive Logging” header.
Important
Resetting the triggered archive simply resets the archive pointer to zero. It
does not release a latched trigger or terminate logging. If a latched trigger is
configured, logging will continue after the reset has occurred. To release a
latched trigger, see Terminating a Triggered Archive above.
EVENT ARCHIVES
Event archives record a single action, such as a login, a parameter change, user change, system
event, etc. Choosing ARCHIVES>EVENT ARCHIVE opens the Event Archive Log Records screen,
where you can view the number of event records archived and the date and time of the oldest and
newest event records. The maximum available event records in the event archive is 98,304.
To view the event archive, download the event archive file and open it using Scanner Data Manager.
For more information about downloading files, see Section 11—Configuring Archives, page 86.
MANUALLY CLEARING ARCHIVES (FORMATTING ARCHIVE SPACE)
Resetting Triggered Archives
Triggered archives may be reset by any
user with download access-level security
access. Resetting archives sets the
archive pointers to zero and is intended
for applications such as well testing, that
require a repetitive work flow.
The Scanner 3100 begins logging as soon as power is supplied and an archive parameter is configured and stops logging only when power is removed. Clearing an archive stops all device functions
and calculations to completely eliminate archive data from the device. Archives should be cleared
when moving a device to a new location, changing device ownership or immediately after configuring a new device. Clearing an archive and formatting the archive space requires configuration-level
security access.
Note
Only triggered archives can be disabled and enabled at the user’s discretion.
Important Clearing archive space stops all device functions and calculations, performs a
soft reset of the device, and executes a low-level format of the archive space. It
can take 1 minute or longer to complete.
To clear archive space,
1.
Click on ADMINISTRATION>GENERAL>MANAGEMENT.
2.
Under the Archive Management heading, select the archives to be cleared:
3.
•
All Archive Space. Clears all record storage space on the device.
•
Triggered Archive Space. Clears the record storage space for triggered archives.
•
Flow Archive Space. Clears the record storage space for flow archives.
•
Event Archive Space. Clears the record storage space for event archives.
•
Clear Slave Device Archive Space. Clears the record storage space for slave device
archives.
When the Confirm dialog appears, click OK. You will automatically be logged out of the web
interface. Wait approximately 2 minutes to allow the archive clearing process to complete before
logging back into the web interface.
Section 12—Accessing Archive Data
DOWNLOADING ARCHIVE FILES
Archive files can be downloaded via the web interface two ways:
Download Button
•
Click the red DOWNLOAD button in the upper left corner of the web interface screen.
•
Choose ARCHIVES>ALL ARCHIVES>DOWNLOAD.
Either method opens the All Archive Downloads screen, displaying the latest archives available for
download. Archive data is collectively stored in a single Scanner Data File (.sdf). This proprietary file
can be viewed using Scanner Data Manager software, which can be downloaded from the website at
http://www.cameron.slb.com/flowcomputers.
Archive data is prepackaged in four downloadable file types—Complete, Local, Triggered, and
Event—as shown at the top of the All Archive Downloads screen. In addition, archive data for a
92
single flowrun or slave device can be downloaded. Click on one of the Local Flow Run or Slave Device folders to view contents, or click on the Show All Details hyperlink to expand all folders to view
contents. For a detailed description of the various file types, see Archive File Types below.
Default Filepath
Clicking the filename (as opposed to rightclicking the filename) will save the file to
a default location on the computer’s hard
drive (such as a Downloads directory) in
many web browsers. If you cannot find
your file, check the computer’s default
directory.
To download a file:
1.
Right-click on the filename.
2.
Select Save As...
3.
Browse to the folder where you want the file saved.
4.
Rename the file, if desired.
5.
Click SAVE.
Viewing an SDF File
If the file is downloaded to a computer that has Scanner Data Manager software installed, doubleclicking the file will automatically open the software program. See the Scanner Data Manager User
Manual for complete instructions on navigating the software.
Archive File Types
Archive data is prepackaged in four downloadable file types:
•
Complete Archive Data. [Filename: S3100_Complete.sdf] Contains all device and slave device
records (when applicable) including:
––
Daily logs—up to 61 parameters (local and slave device data)
––
Interval logs—up to 61 parameters (local and slave device data) with intervals ranging from
1 second to 12 hours
––
Configuration settings (local and slave device data)
––
Calibration settings (local and slave device data)
––
Snapshot report
––
Events and alarms for local flowruns
Important“Complete” archive files may be too large for emailing. “Recent” archive files provide
access to smaller packages of data with an email-friendly file size. If Scanner 2x00 slave
devices are not in use, the “Local” archive files will also be small enough for email.
•
If “Partial Records” Is Enabled...
The Recent interval archive files will
include the 7 most recent archives, which
may not be equal to 7 days. See Enabling/
Disabling and Creating Partial Records,
page 87, for more information about
partial records.
Local Archive Data. [Filename: 3100_Local.sdf] Contains all records for integral flowruns (no
slave device data) including:
––
Daily logs—up to 61 parameters (local data)
––
Interval logs—up to 61 parameters (local data) with intervals ranging from 1 second to 12
hours
––
Configuration settings (local and slave device data)
––
Calibration settings (local data)
––
Snapshot report
––
Events and alarms
•
Triggered Logs. [Filename: S3100_TR_Full.sdf] Contains triggered events for up to 19 parameters as well as configuration, snapshot, and calibration records.
•
Event/Alarm Logs. [Filename: S3100_EA_Full.sdf] Contains up to 98,304 event/alarm records
as well as configuration, snapshot, and calibration records.
•
Recent Logs. Contains interval archives for the past 7 days in a small compact file ideal for
emailing. These log records are included in the Complete Archive Data file, but the individual
archives have a smaller file size and can be easily emailed, which is useful for diagnosing a
suspected problem with a flowrun or slave device.
To view recent logs, choose ARCHIVES>ALL ARCHIVES and click Show All Details in the
upper right corner of the All Archive Downloads screen. The recent interval archives will be displayed under each flowrun and slave devices (Figure 10.1). They are downloaded the same way
as other individual files. See Downloading Archive Files, page 92, for details.
Note
Recent archives for slave devices present data for the day it was downloaded from the
slave, not the day in which the archive log was created in the slave device.
93
Figure 10.1—Location of Recent archive files
Important
Recent Interval Archive data for local flowruns are included in the interval logs
of the Complete and Local data downloads. Recent Interval Archive data for
slave devices are included in the interval logs of the Slave Device and Complete data downloads.
VIEWING DATA FROM THE WEB INTERFACE
For detailed data analysis, it is recommended that archive data be viewed from Scanner Data Manager. However, small portions of data can be viewed directly in the web interface using any standard
web browser device, such as a tablet or smartphone. Choose ARCHIVES>FLOW ARCHIVE # and
click DAILY LOGS or INTERVAL LOGS to view desired log records. You can view a month of daily
logs or a day of interval logs at one time.
The screen displays the current day or month by default. To view data for additional days or months,
simply enter the day or month in the “Custom Search” section at the top of the screen and click
RETRIEVE LOGS. Alternatively, you can select the Previous Day/Month and Next Day/Month hyperlinks in the upper right corner of the screen to select a new view.
Appendix A—Device Administration
Some tasks, such as restoring firmware, resetting the device and synchronizing device time to the
connected computer, are device administrative tasks that usually require a specific user permission
level to perform. To perform these tasks, refer to the following procedures.
RESTORING FACTORY CONFIGURATION DEFAULTS
Before restoring factory configuration default settings, consider the need for retaining the current configuration settings and save the current configuration file if desired. The current configuration will be
overwritten when factory default settings are applied.
To restore the configuration factory defaults,
1.
Choose ADMINISTRATION>GENERAL>MANAGEMENT to access the Device Management
screen.
2.
Click LOAD CONFIGURATION DEFAULTS.
3.
Click OK when the Confirm dialog appears.
INSTALLING A CUSTOM MODBUS PROTOCOL MAP FILE
Users can upload a custom Modbus protocol map file (.pmap file created using ScanMap software) to
the Scanner 3100, where the file can be downloaded to Scanner and Modbus slave devices or used
by the Scanner 3100 itself. To install the protocol map file,
1.
Choose ADMINISTRATION>GENERAL>INSTALLED FILES to access the Installed User Files
screen.
2.
Type a protocol map file name or click BROWSE... in the “Install Protocol Map File” field at the
bottom of the page and navigate you the custom map you want to upload.
3.
Click SUBMIT to install the selected pmap file.
94
4.
The status of the upload appears to the right of “Protocol Map File Status” at the top of the white
screen. If the protocol map did not upload correctly, view the map file by clicking View Protocol
Map File to verify that the uploaded map file is the correct one. If not, uninstall the file as follows.
5.
To uninstall the current protocol map file, click UNINSTALL PMAP FILE.
Note
Only one custom Modbus protocol map can be installed on the Scanner 3100. The pmap
file can be sent to up to 20 Scanner or Modbus slave devices.
SAVING A DEVICE CONFIGURATION IN AN UPLOADABLE FILE
Users can save a configuration file from a successfully configured device for use in configuring multiple devices with the same settings, or for safekeeping as a backup should a configuration be lost or
inadvertently changed. To save the existing configuration settings in an uploadable file,
SCANFLASH UPLOAD UTILITY
The ScanFlash software utility can be
used to upload a custom Modbus protocol
map file or a configuration file to a
Scanner 3100.
To download ScanFlash software, visit our
website at
http://www.cameron.slb.
com/flowcomputers, choose
PRODUCTION>MEASUREMENT>FLOW
COMPUTERS>SCANNER MODEL 3100
FLOW COMPUTER, and click the link for
the ScanFlash software install.
To upload configuration files or custom
Modbus register maps, you must have
Configuration Editor-level or Administratorlevel user access.
Unlike the web interface upload functions,
ScanFlash uses FTP to upload files to the
Scanner 3100. To access the Scanner
3100 FTP server remotely, the proper
port-forwarding rules must be set up on
your computer.
1.
Choose ADMINISTRATION>GENERAL>MANAGEMENT to access the Device Management
screen.
2.
Right click the SCANNER 3100 CONFIGURATION FILE hyperlink and select Save As... from
the popup menu. Select the file location and name the configuration file.
3.
Click SAVE to save the file to your computer or external storage device.
UPLOADING A DEVICE CONFIGURATION FILE
Configuration files that are stored on your computer or on an external storage device that can be
accessed via your computer can be uploaded to the Scanner 3100 using the web interface upload
function or using the ScanFlash software utility. In either case, the configuration file must have been
created using the firmware version that is currently installed on the Scanner 3100 to which you are
uploading the configuration.
To upload a configuration file using the web interface,
1.
Choose ADMINISTRATION>GENERAL>MANAGEMENT to access the Device Management
screen.
2.
Under the “Configuration Management” heading, click BROWSE next to “Load Configuration
File,” select the desired configuration file to upload, and click OPEN in the browser window.
3.
In the interface screen, click SUBMIT. An Upload Succeeded dialog will appear if the upload
file is determined to be valid. You can choose to activate the configuration settings and reset the
device immediately or to retain the existing configuration and activate the uploaded configuration file at a later time (see Activating a Configuration File below).
4.
To activate the configuration settings immediately, click OK at the bottom of the Upload Succeeded dialog. The device will reset and you will be returned to the Login page of the web interface. When you login, the device will be operating with the new configuration settings applied.
Cameron’s ScanFlash software can also be used to upload a configuration file to a Scanner 3100.
For instructions, see the ScanFlash upload procedure in the Scanner 3100 Hardware User Manual.
Activating a Configuration File
Using the configuration file upload feature, you can create a custom default configuration file and
upload it as a reserve in the event you need to restore a set of known configuration settings. This
configuration upload will only be accepted by the Scanner 3100 if the configuration file being uploaded was created with the same firmware version that is loaded in the Scanner 3100 at the time of
activation.
To apply the configuration settings from the uploaded file to the Scanner 3100,
1.
Choose ADMINISTRATION>GENERAL>MANAGEMENT to access the Device Management
screen.
2.
Under the “Configuration Management” heading, click ACTIVATE CONFIGURATION FILE.
3.
The uploaded configuration file will be validated and activated. If the file is validated successfully, you will be returned to the login screen. The activation process can take up to a minute,
during which you will not be able to log in. The device will reboot itself during the sequence.
When the restore is complete, you will be able to log in again. When you login, the device will be
operating with the new configuration settings applied.
Important
Only one configuration file upload is stored in the Scanner 3100 at a time.
However, the current upload can be reactivated as many times as necessary. Once a new configuration file is uploaded, any previous upload is no longer
available for activation.
95
RESTORE FIRMWARE TO FACTORY SETTINGS
If the current firmware becomes unusable or the Scanner 3100 becomes unrecoverable, consider
restoring the firmware to the factory default version. Administrator-level permission is required to perform this task.
Important Before restoring firmware to factory settings and reconnecting to your Scanner
3100, close your browser window and clear your browser’s cache to ensure that
the correct web content is displayed.
To restore the Scanner 3100 device’s firmware to the factory default,
1.
Choose ADMINISTRATION>GENERAL>MANAGEMENT to access the Device Management
screen.
2.
Scroll down to the “Firmware Management” section and click the RESTORE FIRMWARE button.
3.
Cycle power to the Scanner 3100.
Important
After restoring to the factory default firmware, update your Scanner 3100 firmware to the current version as soon as possible.
LOAD NEW FIRMWARE
SCANFLASH DOWNLOAD
To download ScanFlash software,
visit our website at http://www.cameron.
slb.com/flowcomputers, choose
PRODUCTION>MEASUREMENT>FLOW
COMPUTERS>SCANNER MODEL 3100
FLOW COMPUTER, and click the link for
the ScanFlash software install.
To upload firmware to the Scanner 3100,
you must have Administrator-level user
access.
When new firmware is made available for the Scanner 3100, the ScanFlash software utility can be
used to upgrade a Scanner 3100’s firmware.
For instructions, see the ScanFlash upload procedure in the Scanner 3100 Hardware User Manual.
The manual and the ScanFlash utility can be downloaded from http://www.cameron.slb.com/
flowcomputers.
SECURITY CONFIGURATION (DIP SWITCH AND USER AUTHORITY)
The configuration lock is a physical dip switch located inside the Scanner 3100. The lock can be
enabled to prevent unauthorized individuals for changing the Scanner 3100’s configuration. After the
device is fully configured, the lock can be enabled using the dip switch and the web interface.
To activate the switch, change the mechanical switch to the active position (pushed in the direction
of the display face) and enable the switch in the web interface security settings using the following
procedure:
Configuration Lock (Dip Switch)
When the dip switch is activated, the
Scanner 3100 terminates the active
session in the web interface and treats
all user permission levels as if they were
“Download access.” Log into the web
interface again to see current settings.
1.
Select ADMINISTRATION>GENERAL>SECURITY>MODIFY to access the Security Configuration screen.
2.
Click in the “Configuration Lock Mode” field, select Configuration Seal (Category 2) from the
menu to prevent further changes while the configuration seal or physical switch is engaged, and
click OK.
3.
Click SAVE to activate the configuration lock.
Important
If the lock is removed while a user is logged in, the device will terminate the
active web interface session. To reconfigure the device, disengage the lock by
switching the lock to the “off” position (away from the device face). Then have
an administrator-level user to log into the device from the web interface.
REMOTELY RESET THE SCANNER 3100
When an unexpected problem with the Scanner 3100 occurs, such as an input/output ceasing to
function as expected, and the cause of malfunction is unclear, restart the device by using the “reset”
control within the Scanner 3100 web interface.
To reboot the Scanner 3100 device remotely via the web interface,
Web Interface Login Screen
When the Remember me on this computer
checkbox on the login screen is checked,
the computer remembers the user name.
Only the password is required to regain
access the web interface.
1.
Choose ADMINISTRATION>GENERAL>MANAGEMENT to access the Device Management
screen.
2.
Scroll down to the “Firmware Management” section and click the RESET DEVICE button.
3.
Click OK in the Confirm popup to proceed with the soft reset.
4.
When the device has been reset, the web interface login screen will appear. Enter the user
name and password to access the web interface again.
96
Note: During a soft reset, any data in RAM (random access memory) will be cleared. Unsaved
data in current use may be lost but data and configuration settings stored in the device are
not affected.
SYNCHRONIZE DEVICE TIME TO A COMPUTER
The date and time read by the device may vary slightly with the date and time read by the computer
used to access the web interface.
To synchronize the device time to the computer time,
Daylight Savings Time Setting
This setting must be set in advance of
the time change. Setting it after Daylight
Savings Time is in effect will have no
effect on the device time. Alternatively,
you can use the SYNC TO COMPUTER
TIME link to force the device time to reflect
the Daylight Savings Time schedule,
assuming your computer is configured to
automatically update in accordance with
Daylight Savings Time.
1.
Choose ADMINISTRATION>GENERAL>DEVICE TIME>MODIFY.
2.
Click the Sync to Computer Time hyperlink to the far right of the “Time Settings” header.
3.
Click OK in the popup box to confirm the synchronization.
ENABLE DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME
To enable Daylight Savings Time,
1.
Choose ADMINISTRATION>GENERAL>DEVICE TIME>MODIFY.
2.
Under the “Daylight Savings Time” section, click in the “Enable DST Value” dropdown list and
select Yes.
3.
Click SAVE to save changes and exit.
Appendix B—Gas Chromatograph Inputs
This appendix provides instructions for configuring the Scanner 3100 to use the live gas readings
from a gas chromatograph in flow calculations, rather than a user-entered static composition. The
Scanner 3100 supports gas chromatograph inputs from a Daniel/Rosemount gas chromatograph or a
gas chromatograph that emulates 2251 communications protocol.
Static Composition Mirrored Gas
Stream(s)
Consider configuring a static composition
for each gas stream to mirror the gas
chromatograph input. In the event of gas
chromatograph failure, switching to the
comparable static composition can help
maintain data integrity.
Multiple Gas Stream Queries
Multiple gas stream queries may be
configured for use with a single gas
chromatograph, or with different gas
chromatographs. If using the same gas
chromatograph for multiple queries,
the Scanner 3100 will poll the gas
chromatograph at the lowest polling period
specified in any of the queries for that
chromatograph.
CONFIGURING A GAS CHROMATOGRAPH INPUT
There are two basic steps involved in configuring a gas chromatograph input:
•
Set up one or more gas stream queries via a serial port (protocol setup)
•
Configure the gas stream(s)
Setting Up a Gas Stream Query (Protocol Setup)
To set up a gas stream query
1.
Make sure the gas chromatograph is wired to the Scanner 3100.
2.
Select COMMUNICATIONS>SERIAL PORT>PORT CONFIGURATION>MODIFY to access the
Modify Serial Port Configuration screen and configure the serial port to use Modbus Master
protocol. For more information about setting up a Modbus Master, see Mastering a Modbus
Device (Modbus Master), page 24.
3.
Verify that settings in the “Default Port Settings for Data Queries” section are properly configured for the gas chromatograph being configured.
4.
Click SAVE to return to the Serial Port Configuration screen.
5.
Under the Protocol Setup heading to the left of the screen, click GAS STREAM QUERIES>
MODIFY. On the Modify Serial Port Gas Stream Queries Configuration screen, note that there
is a separate configuration section for each of the eight available gas streams.
6.
Click in the “Enable Gas Stream Polling” field and select Yes.
7.
Choose the query you wish to configure (Gas Chromatograph Stream Query 1, for example)
and complete the selections for that query as follows:
a.
Select Yes from the Enable Query dropdown list.
b.
Enter a polling period value greater than “0.”
c.
Click in the “GC Communications Settings” field and select the communications settings
used by the connected gas chromatograph device. Verify that the Slave Address value
matches the slave address assigned to the gas chromatograph. By default, the Scanner
3100 will use the communication settings established on the Port Configuration screen. To
change the settings, uncheck the Use Communications Settings from Port Configuration
checkbox on the Change GC Query Communication dialog.
97
d.
Enter the gas chromatograph stream number in the field provided. Enter “0” if the gas
chromatograph in use has only one stream.
e.
Change the data frame type from the dropdown list, if necessary. When using serial
communications, the data frame type should be “Modbus data frame.”
f.
If the gas chromatograph is slow to respond to polling, change the reply time-out period.
Otherwise, leave the default value of “0”.
Note
The “Stream Component Usage List” field will not be completed at this time. The gas
stream must be configured and associated with the serial port used for the chromatograph
connection before stream components will appear in the Change Stream Component Usage List dialog.
8.
Repeat Steps 7a through 7f to set up the remaining gas streams using the same gas chromatograph, if necessary.
9.
Click SAVE to return to the Serial Port Gas Stream Queries Configuration screen.
10. Proceed with configuring the gas stream(s).
Configuring a Gas Stream
To set up a gas stream to use a gas chromatograph input as its data source, the Scanner 3100
MUST be connected to a gas chromatograph. To configure the gas stream,
1.
Select GAS STREAMS>GAS#>CONFIGURATION>MODIFY. The Modify Gas Stream # Configuration screen will appear.
2.
Change the gas stream name, if desired.
3.
Click in the “Gas Composition Data Source” field, select Gas Chromatograph Input from the
Change Gas Composition Data Source dialog, and click OK to save the selection.
4.
From the “Gas Chromatograph Input Settings” section of the screen, click in the “Gas Chromatograph Input Source” field, select the appropriate gas chromatograph from the Select Input
Source dialog, and click OK to save the selection and return to the previous screen.
Note
When the gas stream query settings are configured properly, the Gas Chromatograph
Input Source dialog will contain a selection for each serial port/query configured as a
Modbus Master input as described in Setting Up a Gas Stream Query (Protocol Setup),
page 97.
5.
If company policy dictates that you use the specific gravity, molar mass, volumetric heating
value and/or mass heating value from the gas chromatograph, select Yes in the appropriate
dropdown lists.
6.
If validation tests, sum tests, or alarm holdoffs for stale data or failure conditions are desired,
see Configuring Gas Chromatograph Tests and Alarms, page 99.
Modifying the Gas Stream Component Usage List
Heavy-Gas Split Code
If the gas chromatograph you are using
reports heavy gas constituents using
a non-standard component code, see
Creating a User-Defined Component
Split Code to create the split code before
modifying the gas stream component
usage list.
By default, all of the gas stream components transmitted by the gas chromatograph will be included
in the “Gas Stream Component Usage List.” You can modify the usage list as follows:
1.
Select COMMUNICATIONS>SERIAL PORT (MODBUS MASTER)>GAS STREAM QUERIES>
MODIFY to access the Modify Serial Port Gas Stream Queries Configuration screen.
2.
Scroll to the gas chromatograph stream query to be modified.
3.
Click in the “Stream Component Usage List” field and select the gas stream components that
you wish to log and monitor. If duplicate entries appear, uncheck them to remove them from the
list of components tracked. Only gas stream components that have been identified by the gas
chromatograph will appear on this list.
4.
Click OK to save changes and exit the dialog.
5.
Click SAVE to return to the Serial Port Gas Stream Queries Configuration screen. To view the
status of all configured gas chromatograph queries for the selected serial port, click GC QUERY
STATUS.
6.
Click GAS STREAM>GAS# to view the status of the configured gas stream(s). The total of the
Active Gas Mixture displayed at the bottom of the screen should be 1.000.
Creating a User-Defined Component Split Code
For gas chromatographs using non-standard heavy gas component codes, create a user-defined split
code as follows:
1.
Click COMMUNICATIONS>SERIAL PORT for the serial port configured as the Modbus master.
The Serial Port Configuration screen will appear.
98
2.
Click USER SPLIT CODE>MODIFY to access the Modify Serial Port User Component Split
Code Configuration screen.
3.
Select Yes from the “Enable User Defined Split Code” dropdown list.
4.
Enter a new component code* in the “Replaced Component Code” field, if desired. This code
will be decoded in all GC stream queries configured on the designated serial port.
Note
Clearing All Molecule Values
5.
Clear all existing values by clicking the
CLEAR ALL MOLECULES link to the
right of the Split Code Composition
heading.
*Component code 50 is typically the user-defined split code for gas chromatographs using
the Daniel 2251 protocol, although any standard component code can be replaced.
In the “Split Code Composition” section of the screen,
a.
Click in the “Molecule” field and select the appropriate gas constituent from the Change
Component Molecule # dialog.
b.
Click OK to return to the previous screen.
c.
Enter the desired split value as a decimal in the “Split” field.
d.
Repeat Steps 5a through 5c until the desired composition is defined.
e.
Verify that the composition split total is 1.000.
f.
Click SAVE.
6.
Select GAS STREAM QUERIES>MODIFY and click in the “Stream Component Usage List” for
the first query linked to the designated serial port.
7.
Select the user-defined split code to be used for decoding components.
8.
To avoid duplication of components, deselect all molecules contained within the selected split
code from the gas stream component usage list. Typically, these will include hexane, heptane,
and octane (component codes 39, 45 and 20, respectively). If multiple queries are configured
for a single chromatograph, repeat this step for each query’s component usage list. To view the
status of all configured gas chromatograph queries for the selected serial port, click GC QUERY
STATUS.
ImportantFailure to deselect the heavy gas molecules used in the split code from the
“Stream Component Usage List” will result in an active gas mixture total exceeding 1.000.
9.
Click GAS STREAM>GAS# to view the status of the configured gas stream(s). The total of the
Active Gas Mixture displayed at the bottom of the screen should be 1.000.
Identifying Component Errors
To verify that no errors exist in the Stream Component Usage List, click the GC QUERY STATUS
screen link to open the Serial Port # Gas Chromatograph Query Status screen. Locate the “Component Errors” row for the gas stream(s) with user-defined split codes, which will contain one of the
following statuses:
•
Okay. There are no duplicate components in the gas stream component usage list.
•
Duplicate Component. One or more components is duplicated in the gas stream component
usage list. Review the list and deselect the duplicate component(s).
•
Unknown Component. One or more of the components in the gas stream component usage
list has an unknown component code. Either remove the component code in the component usage list or add the component to the user-defined split code.
CONFIGURING GAS CHROMATOGRAPH TESTS AND ALARMS
While data validation and sum tests are optional, they can provide very useful data for monitoring
changes in gas components. The Scanner 3100 allows you to create up to 16 data validation tests
and up to four sum tests for each chromatograph input. In addition, each of the components tracked
for data validation can be configured to alarm on stale data conditions, and you can establish alarm
holdoffs to control the effects of a stale data alarm or gas stream fail condition.
To configure these tests and controls, click GAS STREAMS>GAS#>CONFIGURATION>MODIFY
and follow the instructions below as applicable for completing the settings on the Modify Gas Stream
Configuration screen.
Molecule Data Validation Tests
To establish molecule data validation tests for select molecules, perform the following from the Molecule Data Validation Tests table:
1.
Click in the first “Not Used” Molecule field and select the desired gas component from the
dropdown list.
99
2.
To create an alarm if the molecule data is low or high in relation to expected values, enter the
low or high setpoint value in the appropriate field. Check the box to the left of the field to enable
the alarm. These alarms may be used with or without molar fraction sum tests.
3.
Click SAVE to save the settings and exit the screen, or continue to configure additional tests or
controls.
Molar Fraction Sum Tests
Molar fraction sum tests allow you to alarm on a condition in which the sum of two or more molecule
values is low or high in relation to expected values.
To configure a sum test,
1.
Select the molecules to be included in the summation by checking the Sum 1, 2, 3 or 4 boxes to
the right of each desired molecule in the “Molecule Data Validation Tests” grid.
2.
Enter the low or high setpoint value for the sum alarm in the “Molar Fraction Sum Tests” section
of the screen.
3.
Check the Enable box to enable the alarm.
Stale Data Test
To configure a stale data test,
1.
Scroll to the bottom of the Modify Gas Stream Configuration screen to view the Stale Data Test
section.
2.
Enter the number of seconds you want the Scanner 3100 to wait before creating an alarm after
a stale data condition is detected.
3.
Check the Enable box to enable the alarm holdoff setting.
Gas Stream Fail Condition
Whenever a gas stream fail condition is detected, a fail alarm will be generated. To change the Scanner 3100’s immediate response to this alarm condition, change the Alarm Holdoff and/or the Action
on Alarm settings.
1.
Alarm Hold-Off. To delay the logging of an alarm condition, enter the number of seconds that
the Scanner 3100 is to wait after detecting a gas stream fail condition before it logs the alarm as
an event. As a starting point, consider a hold-off value that is two or three times the length of the
configured polling period.
2.
Action On Alarm. By default, the Scanner 3100 will use the last good reading (without any
failed test results) for calculations in the event of a gas stream fail condition. To use a static
composition instead, click the Action On Alarm dropdown list and select Override with Static
Composition.
3.
If enabling a static composition override in Step 2, click STATIC COMPOSITION>MODIFY to
verify that the static composition values established for the designated gas stream are acceptable, or change them to match the gas composition ratios being read from the gas chromatograph. The factory default static composition values are recommended as typical for Gulf Coast
gas streams. Make sure the mixture total equals 1.000.
4.
Click SAVE to save the static composition values and exit the screen. Note that saving these
values does not enable the static composition as the gas composition data source for the gas
stream. This setting can only be changed on the Modify Gas Stream Configuration screen.
ASSIGNING A GAS CHROMATOGRAPH INPUT GAS STREAM TO A
FLOWRUN
After configuring a gas stream, you can assign it to a flowrun as follows:
1.
Select FLOW RUN>FLOW RUN #.
2.
Click FLOW RUN SETUP>MODIFY.
3.
From the Fluid Properties Standard dropdown list, select a fluid property standard that requires
a detailed gas mixture.
4.
Click SAVE to return to the Flow Run Setup screen.
5.
Click FLUID PROPERTIES>MODIFY. The Modify Flow Run Fluid Properties screen will appear.
6.
Click in the Gas Stream Input dropdown list and select the desired GC Input gas stream.
7.
Click SAVE.
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Appendix C—Maintaining a Scanner Slave Device
Scanner 2x00 slave devices are configured using ModWorX Pro software. However, the web interface allows you to view device status and configurations and perform limited flowrun maintenance
and administrative tasks.
To access the status and management screens for any Scanner 2x00 slave device, choose SLAVE
DEVICES>[SLAVE DEVICE NAME]. The Slave Device # Flow Run Status screen will appear. The
Slave Device Menu Bar will also appear underneath the Main Menu Bar, as shown below. Use the
Slave Device Menu Bar to navigate through slave device information.
For an overview of all slave devices, select SLAVE DEVICES>ALL SLAVE DEVICES.
Note
Clicking on a slave device entry (even an unused slave slot, as if to configure a slave
device) will add a secondary menu taskbar (as shown below) to the top of the screen with
more screen links that are specific to the selected slave device.
Figure C.1—Slave Device menu bar
VIEWING SLAVE DEVICE STATUS/CONFIGURATION INFORMATION
For assistance locating Scanner 2x00 slave device information (general, inputs, flowrun, and archives), refer to the following table:
Slave Device Input Types
File Path
(After Slave Devices>[Slave Device Name]
is selected)
•
Static Pressure
Status/Configuration Information
•
Differential Pressure
GENERAL>STATUS
•
Temperature
Status summary (flowrun, inputs),
instantaneous and daily average input
values
•
Analog Inputs 1 & 2
Turbine Inputs 1 & 2
Product type, serial number, firmware
versions, etc.
GENERAL>SYSTEM
•
Slave device name
GENERAL>IDENTIFICATION
Input status
INPUTS>[INPUT TYPE]>STATUS
Input configuration
INPUTS>[INPUT TYPE]>CONFIGURATION
Input calibration
INPUTS>[INPUT TYPE]>CALIBRATION
Turbine input K-Factor
INPUTS>TURBINE INPUT #>K-FACTOR
Flowrun status
FLOW RUN>STATUS
Flow archives and events
ARCHIVE>STATUS
Archive Usage
The Slave Device Archive Status screen
displays an estimate of the number
of daily, interval, and event records
contained in the slave archive, based on
the device storage space used by data
records. For a more precise measure of
the number of records stored, download
the archive data and view with Scanner
Data Manager software.
SLAVE DEVICE FLOWRUN MAINTENANCE
Flow rate calculation methods are typically configured and maintained using ModWorX Pro software.
The configured flow rate calculation method and fluid property is displayed within the web interface,
but configuration changes to these settings are not supported within the web interface with two exceptions:
•
A slave device can be configured within the web interface to use the AGA-3 (1992) rate calculation method.
•
A slave device can be configured within the web interface to use the AGA-8 Detailed fluid
property (gas measurement only). In this instance, orifice plate changes and gas composition
changes are also supported.
For all other flowrun maintenance, use ModWorX Pro software.
AGA-3 RATE CALCULATION CONFIGURATION
Configuring an AGA-3 Rate Calculation
To change the flow rate calculation method of a slave device to AGA-3, click FLOW RUN SETUP>
MODIFY, click in the “Flow Rate Calculation Method” field, and select AGA-3 (1992) or Liquid Orifice,
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AGA-3 (1992) from the Change Calculation Method dialog. All other calculation methods (grayed out
in the dialog) must be configured using the ModWorX Pro software supplied with the slave devices.
Changing Rate Calculation Parameters
To access additional rate calculation settings for an AGA-3 flowrun, choose SLAVE DEVICES>
[SLAVE DEVICE NAME]>FLOW RUN>RATE CALCULATION.
Note If the flowrun is configured for a flow rate calculation method other than AGA-3, the RATE
CALCULATION button will not be selectable. Use ModWorX Pro software to make flow
rate calculation changes.
The Slave Device # Flow Run Rate Calculation screen allows you to view current settings and
modify the following:
Calculation Period
By default, flowrun calculations are performed once every 60 seconds. To change the frequency of
calculations, click in the “Calculation Period” field and enter the appropriate calculation period. The
calculation period must be equal to or less than the archive period and it must be a divisor of the
archive period. (For example, if the archive period is 60 minutes, the calculation period should be a
factor of 60. If a period is entered that cannot be divided evenly into 60, such as 25, a validation error
will prompt you to change the value.)
Note
Decreasing the calculation period to less than 60 seconds (and thereby increasing the
calculation frequency) will not increase measurement accuracy and may result in slow
communications between the slave device(s) and the Scanner 3100.
Rate Damping Factor
Click on the –/+ buttons to change the rate damping factor. The resulting “settling time” will always be
a multiple of the sampling period. For example, when the sampling period is 4 seconds, entering a
damping factor of 2 will result in a settling time of 8 seconds.
Low Pressure Cutoff
Enter the desired cutoff pressure in the “Low Pressure Cutoff” field if desired. The low input cutoff
setting establishes the minimum pressure at which flow will be recorded.
Base Conditions
Click in the fields for various base conditions to change base temperature, base pressure, or atmospheric pressure for the installation location.
Pipe Parameters
Click in the fields for pipe parameters to change the pipe size, select a new pipe material, or select a
new tap type from the dropdown menus provided.
Changing an Orifice Plate for an AGA-3 Flowrun
To change an orifice plate in an AGA-3 flowrun, choose SLAVE DEVICES>[SLAVE DEVICE
NAME]>FLOW RUN>PLATE CONFIGURATION.
From the Slave Device # Flow Run Plate Configuration screen:
1.
Enter the size of the new orifice plate.
2.
Enter the reference temperature for the new plate.
3.
Select the orifice plate material from the dropdown list.
AGA-8 FLUID PROPERTY CONFIGURATION
Configuring a Slave Device for AGA-8 Fluid Property
To change the fluid property type of a slave device to AGA-8 Detailed, click FLOW RUN SETUP
>MODIFY, click in the “Fluid Properties Type” field, and select AGA-8 Detailed from the Change Fluid
Properties dialog. All other fluid property types (grayed out in the dialog) must be configured using
the ModWorX Pro software supplied with the slave devices.
Changing Fluid Property Parameters
To access the Slave Device # Flow Run Fluid Properties screen, choose SLAVE DEVICES>
[SLAVE DEVICE NAME]>FLOW RUN>FLUID PROPERTIES. This screen allows you to view current
fluid property settings and to modify the following:
102
Calculation Interval
Click on the –/+ buttons to change the calculation interval. The calculation interval determines the
time between calculations in a flowrun interval. The default value is “1” (60 seconds).
Reference Conditions
Choose the desired reference conditions from the dropdown list. The “Reference Conditions” selection identifies the ideal mass heating value table for use in calculating the heating value of the gas
composition and sets the reference temperature and pressure used in converting the user-supplied
heating value into the heating value mass basis required for energy calculations.
Heating Value
The “Heating Value” default setting is Calculated. To specify a manually-entered value, click on the
Set Manual Entry hyperlink and enter the desired heating value in the field provided, then click OK to
save and return to the Modify screen.
Specific Gravity
The “Specific Gravity” default setting is Calculated. To specify a manually-entered value, click the Set
Manual Entry hyperlink and enter the desired specific gravity value in the field provided, then click
OK to save and return to the Modify screen.
Viscosity
Enter a new viscosity in the “Viscosity” field if desired.
Isentropic Exponent
Enter a new isentropic exponent of the measured fluid in the “Isentropic Exponent” field if desired.
Changing the Gas Composition
Slave Configuration Units
Slave parameter values will be displayed
in the units assigned to measurement
categories in the Scanner 3100, which
may be different from the units used
to enter the values in ModWorX Pro
software. For example, a viscosity value
entered as 0.010268 cP in ModWorX Pro
may appear as 0.0000069 lbm/ft·s if U.S.
Customary units system is in use by the
Scanner 3100.
To change the units system, see Choose
Units, page 16.
Mole Fraction Units
Gas composition values for Scanner 2000
Series slave devices are always presented
in mole fraction units in the web interface.
They are unaffected by unit selections in
the DEVICE>UNITS menu.
To change the gas constituents or the gas composition update mode for an AGA-3 flowrun, choose
SLAVE DEVICES>SLAVE DEVICE #>FLOW RUN>GAS COMPOSITION. The Slave Device # Gas
Composition screen allows you to view current gas composition settings and to select the source
of gas constituents for use in flow calculations as well as the mode by which the constituents will be
obtained.
Automatic Update of Gas Composition
ModWorX Pro supports only manual entry of gas compositions and the loading of a current or previous gas composition. When a Scanner 2x00 slave device is connected to a Scanner 3100 device,
however, the Scanner 3100 web interface allows you to convert the slave device flowrun to use composition values that are automatically updated from a selected gas composition data source such as
a gas chromatograph.
To use the live readings from a gas stream in flowrun calculations, click the “Composition Update
Mode” field, select Automatic Update from the Change Gas Composition Update Mode dialog, and
click OK. In this mode, the gas composition values are updated by the device using the gas stream
selected in the “Gas Composition Data Source” field.
Manual Entry of Gas Composition
To use manually entered gas composition values, click in the field and select Manual Entry. The gas
constituents can be updated as required within the web interface by clicking in the field displaying the
value field of the constituent to be changed and entering a new value. Following a change to constituent values, click the RECALC button near the “Mixture Total” field to ensure that the sum of all constituents equals 1.0 following the change. Then click SAVE.
SLAVE DEVICE ADMINISTRATION
From the web interface, you can perform limited slave device administrative tasks for all configured
Scanner 2x00 slave devices or for an individual device.
Administrative Functions for All Slave Devices
To perform administrative tasks for all configured Scanner 2x00 slave devices, choose SLAVE
DEVICES>ALL SLAVE DEVICES>ADMINISTRATION. The All Slave Devices - Administration
screen will appear, from which you can perform the following tasks for all slave devices:
•
Clear device values. Clear grand totals for flowrun or turbine flow or clear flowrun alarms. See
Clearing Flow Totals and Clearing Flowrun Alarms for details.
•
Manage slave archives. See Managing Slave Archives, page 105, for details.
•
Synchronize the remote time to a local device. See Synchronizing Slave Device Time, page
105 for details.
103
Administrative Functions for an Individual Slave Device
To perform administrative tasks for an individual configured Scanner 2x00 slave device, choose
SLAVE DEVICES>SLAVE DEVICE #>ADMINISTRATION. The Slave Device # Administration
screen will appear. Administering an individual slave device allows you to perform the following tasks:
•
Clear device values. Clear grand totals for flowrun or turbine flow or clear flowrun alarms. See
Clearing Flow Totals, page 104, and Clearing Flowrun Alarms, page 104, for details.
•
Load defaults. Load default values in the slave device to restore to factory configuration. See
Configuration Management, page 104, for details.
•
Re-read Config. Force a re-read of the slave device configuration data to refresh the local copy.
See Configuration Management, page 104, for details.
•
Maintenance Mode. Enter and exit Maintenance Mode as described in Slave Device Maintenance Mode, page 104.
•
Manage slave archives. See Managing Slave Archives, page 105, for details.
•
Synchronize the remote time to a local device. See Synchronizing Slave Device Time, page
105 for details.
•
Reset Device. Perform a soft reset of the slave device as described in Resetting Slave Device,
page 106.
Clearing Flow Totals
To clear device flowrun or turbine flow totals,
1.
Choose SLAVE DEVICES>SLAVE DEVICE #>ADMINISTRATION.
Shortcut
2.
Click CLEAR FLOW TOTALS.
To select or deselect all items on the Clear
Slave Device # Flow Totals dialog or the
Clear Slave Device # Alarms dialog, click
the Select All hyperlink to select all items
on the dialog.
3.
From the Clear Slave Device # Alarms dialog, check the box next to the flow totals (Flow Run,
Turbine 1 or Turbine 2) you wish to clear.
4.
Click OK in the Confirm dialog. The selected flow total archive(s) will be zeroed and the archive
space will be reformatted.
If all items have been selected, click
Deselect All to deselect all items on the
dialog.
Clearing Flowrun Alarms
To clear all user-configured flowrun alarms,
1.
Choose SLAVE DEVICES>SLAVE DEVICE #>ADMINISTRATION.
2.
Click CLEAR ALARMS and click OK in the Confirm dialog.
Configuration Management
Most slave device configuration tasks are accomplished using ModWorX Pro software. However,
the web interface allows you to load slave device default values, restore factory default settings, and
force a re-read of the slave device configuration data.
Loading Factory Defaults
To load factory default values in the slave device,
1.
From the Slave Device # Administration screen, click LOAD DEFAULTS.
2.
Click OK in the Confirm dialog. A command to load all slave device defaults (except for serial
port settings) will be sent to the slave device.
Forcing Configuration Data Re-read
To force a re-read of the local slave device configuration data,
1.
From the Slave Device # Administration screen, click RE-READ CONFIG.
2.
Click OK from the Confirm dialog. A command to force the slave device configuration data to be
read again by the local device will be sent and the local copy of the slave device configuration
data will be refreshed.
Slave Device Maintenance Mode
Entering Maintenance Mode freezes all inputs at the current process values while changes to the
flowrun or device settings are being made. To enter Maintenance Mode for a selected slave device,
click ENTER MAINT MODE from the Slave Device # Administration screen,.
After all changes requiring Maintenance Mode are made, click EXIT MAINT MODE to release the
slave device inputs and resume reading process values.
104
Managing Slave Archives
Stopping the Download of All Existing Slave Device Archive Records
When the Scanner 3100 detects a Scanner 2x00 slave device connected to the network, it reads the
slave device archives and stores a copy within the Scanner 3100 that can then be downloaded for
viewing. When the slave device archive space is quite full, or the slave has not been synchronized
with the network for quite some time, this process can take a long time to complete. If you are not
interested in synchronizing all slave archive records and are interested only in retrieving the current
and future slave archive records, the web interface Slave Device Administration settings allow you
to stop the downloading of existing records by forcing the archive pointers to be marked as synchronized.
To mark all slave device archive files as synchronized,
1.
From the Slave Device # Administration screen, scroll down to the “Slave Archives” heading
and click MARK AS READ.
2.
Click OK from the Confirm dialog.
Recovering Recent Archive Records from a Slave Device
Consider recovering recent slave device archive records if you suspect that slave records are missing from the slave archive records stored on the local Scanner 3100 device. This can occur when a
slave device has been collecting data for some time before the slave device is added to the Scanner
3100 network.
Note
This function will recover up to 400 recent daily records and up to 1680 interval records
from a slave device (approximately 70 days’ worth of 1-hour interval archives).
Important
Recovering recent slave device archive records may result in duplication of
archive records in the slave device archives. The process may take a long
time, consume a great deal of network bandwidth, and increase slave device
power consumption, resulting in slowed communications with other nodes in
the network.
To recover recent archive records from a single slave device,
1.
From the Slave Device # Administration screen, scroll down to the “Slave Archives” heading
and click RECOVER RECENT.
2.
Click OK from the Confirm dialog.
To recover recent archive records from all slave devices,
1.
Choose SLAVE DEVICES>ALL SLAVE DEVICES>ADMINISTRATION.
2.
From the All Slave Devices Administration screen, click RECOVER RECENT under the “Slave
Archives” heading.
3.
Click OK from the Confirm dialog.
Synchronizing Slave Device Time
The device time of a Scanner 2x00 device can vary with the device time of the Scanner 3100 over
time. The Scanner 3100 periodically checks the device time of the slave devices and compares it
with the device time recorded by the Scanner 3100 real time clock. If the time difference exceeds 60
seconds, the Scanner 3100 will automatically synchronize the time to the local device time.
Important Time synchronization may cause the slave device archive log to appear as if
a record has been lost. To verify if an unexpected change in archive log time
stamps is due to a synchronization event, check the Scanner 3100 event log for a synchronization record. The synchronization event will also be recorded
in the slave device event logs, viewable by downloading events with ModWorX
Pro software.
If you desire an immediate time synchronization of slave device time,
1.
From the Slave Device # Administration screen, scroll down to the “Slave Archives” heading
and click SYNC TIME.
2.
Click OK from the Confirm dialog.
105
Resetting Slave Device
When an unexpected slave device problem occurs, such as an input/output ceasing to function as
expected, and the cause of malfunction is unclear, reset the device by using the “reset” control within
the Scanner 3100 web interface. To remotely reset the slave device,
1.
From the Slave Device # Administration screen, scroll down to the “Slave Archives” heading
and click RESET DEVICE.
2.
Click OK from the Confirm dialog.
Appendix D—Creating a Virtual Serial Port for
TCP-to-Serial Passthrough Communications
A Port Passthrough connection can be used to remotely configure a Scanner 2x00 slave device over
an Ethernet connection when a virtual serial port with serial-to-TCP redirecting capabilities is established on the PC running the ModWorX Pro configuration software. Unlike a standard serial port, the
virtual port automatically makes a TCP/IP connection to the Scanner 3100 and relays data to and
from the slave device over the Internet.
The following procedure describes the steps for installing and configuring a virtual serial port using
HW VSP, a free virtual serial port software product produced by www.HW-group.com.
HW VSP Version
To install and configure HW VSP for use with the Scanner 3100, perform the following steps.
While a number of serial-to-TCP
redirecting software utilities are available
for sending and receiving serial messages
over an internet (TCP) connection,
HW VSP has been tested and proven
effective for use with Scanner 3100
Port Passthrough communications. For
more information on port passthrough
communications, see Creating a Port
Passthrough Connection, page 32.
1.
Download the HW VSP setup file from the developer’s website: http://www.hw-group.com
Choose the product labeled “Serial port I/O over IP” to access the IP serial products page.
Select the HWVSP Single/Multiport hyperlink and look for the Singleport download link.
2.
Double-click the installation file (hw-vsp3-single_3-1-2.exe) to execute the installation and follow
the onscreen prompts to create a virtual serial port.
a.
When the “Select Components” dialog appears, select the “Standalone Installation” option
from the dropdown menu, and click “Next.”
At the time of this manual’s release,
the current version was
HW VSP Singleport 3.1.2.
Figure D.1—Select Components dialog
b.
When the Ready to Install screen appears, click INSTALL, wait for the “Confirmation”
prompt to appear, and select Yes to add the application to the list of firewall exceptions.
106
Figure D.2—Ready to Install dialog
Figure D.3—Firewall Exceptions confirmation
To establish a connection to the Scanner 3100,
1.
Double-click the HW VIRTUAL SERIAL PORT desktop icon to launch the program. If you opted
not to install a desktop icon, click the HW_VSP3s_client.exe file from the installation directory
created on your PC.
2.
Click the “Settings” tab and edit the selections to match the selections in the following screen.
3.
Click “Save Settings to INI file” near the bottom of the dialog.
Figure D.4—“Settings” tab
4.
Click the “Virtual Serial Port” tab and complete the following settings in the “General” section of
the screen.
107
a.
In the “Port Name” field, enter a serial port number that is not currently in use by other
serial ports installed on the computer (typically Port 20 or above is a good choice).
b.
Enter the IP Address assigned to the Scanner 3100.
c.
Enter the TCP port number assigned to the Scanner 3100. If the default TCP port
configurations have not been changed, enter “502” for TCP Port 1 and enter “503” for TCP
Port 2.
Figure D.5—”Virtual Serial Port” tab
5.
Click CREATE COM to add the virtual serial port to your computer. If the connection is successful, the VSP section of the screen will display a “Created” status, and the LAN section will
display a “Connected” status.
Figure D.6—Virtual serial port successfully connected
If you are having difficulty connecting through the virtual serial port, check the counters shown
on the Virtual Serial Port tab above.
––
If the Tx messages are not transferred from QUEUE to LAN, a network failure is likely
causing the problem. For a corporate network, the port that a user is trying to access could
be closed by the IT department. Consult your IT department if you suspect this may be the
problem.
––
If the Tx messages are not transferred to QUEUE, check the serial COM port settings in
your PC.
––
If the Tx messages are transferred to LAN but no response is generated, check the wiring
108
of Scanner 3100 and Scanner 2x00 serial port connections and communications settings
such as baud rate, slave address, and parity.
––
Additionally, if the VSP Status is “Created” but the LAN Status is “Error,” the IP address
may have been entered incorrectly.
Appendix E—Web Interface Troubleshooting
WEB BROWSER COMPATIBILITY
Internet Explorer browsers, versions 9 and higher, and Chrome browsers are recommended for use
with the Scanner 3100 web interface.
If you experience difficulty viewing the interface using Internet Explorer, check to see if the browser is
configured to view the website in “compatibility view.” Remove the Scanner 3100 website from the list
of websites with compatibility view enabled.
WEB BROWSER CACHE
When it loads for the first time, a copy of the web interface is saved in a folder, or cache, on your
computer. Over time, this cache can become outdated. Most unexpected web interface behavior is a
result of outdated files in your browser’s cache. As a rule of thumb, clear your browser cache before
accessing a Scanner 3100 for the first time after a firmware update has been applied, and whenever
the following symptoms are observed:
Common Symptoms of an Outdated Browser Cache
•
Device Login page hangs after the Login button is pressed.
•
The progress bar stops while loading a page.
•
Various error messages appear while loading a page.
•
The page loading hangs, displaying “Loading” wait dialog.
•
The page loads a header, footer, and sidebar, but the page content is only a “Loading …” label.
•
Status glyphs and images do not load properly. Broken image icons displayed by browser may
vary by browser and browser versions.
Clearing the Browser Cache
1.
Close all browser tabs containing the Scanner 3100 web interface before clearing the cache.
2.
Press CTRL+SHIFT+DEL to open a dialog with options for clearing browsing history (works in
most modern browsers). Options may vary by browser and browser version. Some examples
are provided below:
3.
•
Chrome (41.0.2272.89 m). Select options such that all “Browsing History”, “Cookies”,
“Cached images and files,” and “Hosted app data” are removed from “the beginning of
time,” then click “Clear browsing data”.
•
Internet Explorer (11.0.9600.17358). Check boxes for “Temporary Internet files and
website files” and “Cookies and website data.” Uncheck the box for “Preserve Favorites
website data.” Click “Delete.” Wait for a popup at the bottom of the browser to indicate that
“Internet Explorer has finished deleting the selected browsing history.”
Open a new browser tab and log into the interface again.
OTHER KNOWN ISSUES
The issues listed in Table D.1 are known to produce unexpected behavior in the web interface at
times. Please read the instructions below for a description of possible sources of a problem and tips
for responding to an issue and preventing future occurrences where possible.
TABLE E.1—KNOWN INTERFACE ISSUES
Issue
1
Page hangs during load, or only
loads part of the pages content
(missing values, glyphs and
images may show as a white box
with a small “x”).
Solution
Close the browser tab, open a new browser tab and log into the
interface again. This issue may occur as a result of a slow or remote
network connection.
109
Issue
Solution
2
Slave devices are shown as
“Operational” on the Scanner
Master (or Wireless Master)
page, but appear as “-NOT
USED-“ in the “Slave Devices”
dropdown list.
Navigate to the All Slave Devices...Status screen, then reopen the
“Slave Devices” dropdown list.
3
When you navigate away from a
page with Auto-refresh enabled,
you are redirected to the Login
Expired screen.
Close the browser tab, open a new browser tab and log into the
interface again. If this issue recurs due to a slow or remote connection,
avoid the use of the “Auto-refresh” feature in the interface and do not
use the browser’s built-in Refresh button.
4
You cannot access the
web interface after recently
configuring a Static IP address in
“Network Configuration” settings.
(This frequently results from two
devices on the network having
the same IP address. The IP
address in use in the Scanner
3100 appears in the top left
corner of the LCD.)
Temporarily remove one of the devices with conflicting IP addresses
from the network using either of the following methods:
5
You cannot access the
web interface after recently
configuring IP Address Exclusion
Filters in Security Configuration.
Perform the troubleshooting steps described in Item 4. If you are
unsuccessful in reestablishing a connection to the interface, the IP
Address Exclusion Filters may be preventing access. The IP Address
Exclusion Filters are a network security feature. Please contact
Cameron for assistance.
6
A web browser that was recently
working suddenly has problems
when displaying the web
interface.
A browser update may have changed some aspect of how the Scanner
web interface JavaScript is executed in that browser. Use a different
browser for accessing the web interface until a later browser or Scanner
firmware update resolves the issue.
•
Method 1: Temporarily disconnect the network cable from the
device with the same IP address as the Scanner 3100. Retry
accessing the Scanner through the IP displayed on the LCD.
•
Method 2: Set up a direct (1-to-1) connection to a laptop
according to the instructions in Section 4 of the Scanner 3100
Hardware Manual.
Once you have access to the web interface, edit the Network
Configuration to use either DHCP or a static IP address that is not used
by any other device on the network.
Alternatively, you can roll back to a known working version of the
browser. Disable automatic updates for your browser (see steps for
Chrome and Internet Explorer below). Locate an installer of the known
working browser and version. Uninstall your current browser and
reinstall the known working version.
Update Disabling Instructions
Chrome: Open a new tab and type: chrome://plugins into the URL
address bar and press “Enter.” From the plugins listed, find “Google
Update” and select the “Disable” option.
Internet Explorer 11: In the “Options” dropdown list, select “About
Internet Explorer.” Uncheck the box for “Install new version
automatically.”
Note: These options may be restricted by some company
IT policies. Internet Explorer 11 may also update as part of
Windows 7 automatic updates. In the Start menu search bar,
type Turn automatic updating on or off. In the dialog, configure
important updates to “Check for updates but let me choose
whether to download and install them.”
7
A “Session Terminated” page
is displayed instead of the
expected page.
The web interface only supports a single user session at a time. Another
user has attempted to log in to the Scanner web interface and has
chosen to disconnect the existing session.
8
The web interface has been
open in a browser for days and
is no longer responsive.
Close unnecessary browser tabs. Close and reopen the browser. Open
a new browser tab and log into the interface again.
9
Clicking “Help” glyph downloads
the Scanner 3100 Web Interface
User Manual instead of opening
it.
Web browsers have different default behaviors when downloading files.
Consult your browser’s documentation for help in configuring these
behaviors. For Chrome, click the down arrow on the downloaded .pdf
file and select “Always open in Adobe Reader” menu item.
110
WARRANTY - LIMITATION OF LIABILITY: Seller warrants only title to the products, software, supplies
and materials and that, except as to software, the same are free from defects in workmanship and
materials for a period of one (1) year from the date of delivery. Seller does not warranty that software
is free from error or that software will run in an uninterrupted fashion. Seller provides all software “as
is”. THERE ARE NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS
OR OTHERWISE WHICH EXTEND BEYOND THOSE STATED IN THE IMMEDIATELY PRECEDING
SENTENCE. Seller’s liability and Buyer’s exclusive remedy in any case of action (whether in contract,
tort, breach of warranty or otherwise) arising out of the sale or use of any products, software, supplies,
or materials is expressly limited to the replacement of such products, software, supplies, or materials on
their return to Seller or, at Seller’s option, to the allowance to the customer of credit for the cost of such
items. In no event shall Seller be liable for special, incidental, indirect, punitive or consequential damages. Seller does not warrant in any way products, software, supplies and materials not manufactured
by Seller, and such will be sold only with the warranties that are given by the manufacturer thereof.
Seller will pass only through to its purchaser of such items the warranty granted to it by the manufacturer.
111
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