r
/
J
Computers
HiFi, Radii'
0
1
0
//
JULY, 1980
ST $1.60*
NZ $1.70
----.
_'t%
oJ
WHY THE
PACE SHUTTLE
WILL COST
$8.7 BILLION
A
o
Rack Mounting 300 Watt Amplifier
Rumble Filter
Electronic Tuning Standard
EPROM Programmer for TRS-80, Sorcerer
Dick proves
you don't have
to pay through the
nose to get
good tape
f1
.
Consider the evidence:
- Our tape comes from
a substantial manufacturer of bulk magnetic
tape. This manufacturer is virtually unknown (compared to the big
guys) but he turns out a tape of great quality and consistency. The
tape is sold to companies all around the world.
- We take this tape on 'webs' (large rolls) to our overseas factory.
There it is tested, slit and assembled into cassette shells manufactured
to our exact specifications. The product is tested again, packaged,
sealed against dust and moisture and sent to us in Australia
- But the crazy thing is, despite the similar quality, we land the tape
here for less than we can buy the big name tapes -either here or in
Japan!
- After much head scratching we figured it out. The glossy colour ads
(like this one -our first and only one) that use expensive models with
big boobs in expensive magazines.An excercise revealed that the
marketing costs for the big guys tape were staggering!
- At last we had it. But do we have to do the same thing before you
believe us!
Do you want us to waste your money like that?
When you buy 10 or more Dick Smith cassette
tapes you will receive FREE a copy of Dick's
"The Inside Story on Cassettes" - normally priced at 50¢. This
booklet is very informative and will give newcomers and the old
FREE*
hands a new insight into cassettes.
.7)h
fore .i2s ,.
j@
es
CIO
.
C01-911
further evidence
The Dick Smith cassette tape is available as a high quality low noise tape
for all audio purposes and the fantastic Extended Dynamic Range (EDR)
cassette tape for top quality hi fi recordings.
Dick Smith
DR
a
Pay only
10 or more
C90EDR
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15
L5
Volume 42 No.
0
Australia's largest selling electronics magazine
Tuning Standard for
musical instruments
°
Y,/YC4
01 NYtUtdl
FEATURES
SHUTTLE SETBACKS Unexpected problems increase costs and delay the launch
SIROTEM An award winning prospecting instrument from the CSIRO
COMPUTER CONTROLLED BUS SERVICE In Wunstorf the bus is never late...
ANTENNAS Care and feeding of TV/FM antennas
WHAT'S INSIDE A HANDHELD HAIRDRYER? Basic electronics
N("j
O
July, 1980
3
10
18
24
74
83
'lb M,
º *NI
TI
Our crystal -locked
musical
HIFI TOPICS AND REVIEWS
tone
generator has a built-in audio amplifier
and frequency comparator and is
suitable for tuning both electronic and
acoustic instruments. See p42 for details.
EPROM Programmer
AUDIO ELECTRONICS Technics responds to loudspeaker problems
NEW PRODUCTS FROM M.R. ACOUSTICS
HIFI REVIEW: TECHNICS SL -10 TURNTABLE
32
37
38
PROJECTS AND CIRCUITS
MUSICAL TONE GENERATOR Crystal-locked tuning standard
PLAYMASTER 300W AMPLIFIER PART 3 Case, power supply, and cooling
INFRASONIC RUMBLE FILTER Low cost filter improves record reproduction
EPROM PROGRAMMER For use with popular microcomputers
42
52
58
62
MICROCOMPUTERS
EPR-M PRpRAMMEA
.
ra
._-----:
r.
Write your own software into EPROMs
with our versatile progammer. This
month we give full details of a version
for use with the TRS-80, and next month,
a version for the Exidy Sorcerer. See p62.
On the cover
An artist's impression of the Space Shuttle launch. Boosters supply the initial
thrust, after which the Shuttle will orbit
and land under pilot control, trip after
trip.
(Cover by Garry Lightfoot.)
SIGMA DATA Showing the way to the electronic office
MICROCOMPUTER NEWS & PRODUCTS New developments
DATA 80 Exhibition and seminars
in computing
112
115
121
AMATEUR RADIO, CB SCENE, DX
AMATEUR RADIO Royal Navy radio society, AMSAT launch failure
CB SCENE Submission to the Minister by the NCRA
SHORTWAVE SCENE Reception from Bhutan
87
90
92
COLUMNS
FORUM Fires in TV receivers - what about lightning strikes?
THE SERVICEMAN There's a signal somewhere in them thar ills
RECORD REVIEWS Classical, popular and special interest
DEPARTMENTS
-
- -
26
76
102
-
-
NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 4
EDITORIAL 3
CIRCUIT & DESIGN IDEAS 80
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 84
NEW PRODUCTS 94
BOOKS &
INFORMATION CENTRE 130
LITERATURE 100
MARKETPLACE 134
NOTES AND ERRATA 100
-
-
-
ELECTRONICS Australia, July 1980
1
TOMORROW'S TECHNOLOGY
IS IN OUR HANDS.
-
ONE PHONE CALL PUTS
Whatever you want in the field of electronics, no doubt
you want it to happen fast.
That, quite simply, is what GES isallabout. We have
11"
the range. And we have the names.
No problem is too large or too small. (And
the same applies to orders).
We have world wide technical
back-up, on-line stock control,
an in-house engineer who is only too
happy to offer technical advice and
fast service on indent orders.
Team this with large stocks on major lines and twenty
years of business experience and you have
a.... ,....:..k...... ....,....,a efficient dealer in
tomorrow's technology. GES.
f
Components Usting
Microprocessors, Integrated Circuits
I.C. Sockets - Production - MIL -SPEC Gold & Tin
Ribbon Cable and Cable Connectors, Edge Connectors
Kyna/Tefzel Wire 30 AWG, 26 AWG, 24 AWG, - 10 colours
D.I.L. Switches colour coded. Keys ritches and Keyboards
IN YOURS.
Spacers, Terminals -feedthrough-stand-offs
Heatsinks PCB type and extrusion
Capacitors - solid tantalum - tag tants .
ceramic and film
E-Z Hooks and Test Leads, Circuit Hardware
Fuses and Fuse Holders
Crystal Oscillators, Crystal Ovens, Crystals, Monolithic
Crystal Filters L.E.D. Displays
Antennas - Microwave
Amplifiers, Attenuafors, Oscillators, Transistors
Double Balance Mixers, Power Splitter Combines
Frequency Doublers, R/F Transformers, Coxial
Microwave Switches and
Waveguide Switches
EMI-RFI Shielding material,
L.C.D. Connectors
1
Prime Agencies
Robinson Nugent Union Carbide 11_ `tirC
?t
- Kemet Capacitors Rockwell
- Microprocessors E.F. Johnson
Avantek Redpoint
Masterlte Industries Harwin Engineers
Berk-Tek Continental Specialties Electrolube
E -Z Hook
Mini -Circuits
Erg Lee Green Precision Instruments
Plezo Technology Tecknit Transco Products Elu Elektro Union GMBH Compas Microsystems OPCOA
IT
,
-
439 2488
C
General Electronic Services Pty. Ltd.
99 Alexander Street, Crows Nest. NSW. 2065.
GES/001/CWA
2
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
ditorial Viewpoint
Hit drink/driving at its source
EDITOR -IN -CHIEF
Neville Williams
M.I.R.E.E. (Aust.) (VK2XV)
TECHNICAL EDITOR
Leo Simpson
ASSISTANT EDITOR
Greg Swain, B.Sc. (Hons, Sydney)
TECHNICAL PROJECTS
Ron de Jong, B.E. (Hons, NSW), B.Sc.
John Clarke, B.E. (Elect., NSWIT)
Ian Pogson (VK2AZN/T)
Peter Vernon, B.A. L.L.B. (NSW)
Gerald Cohn
GRAPHICS
Robert Flynn
PRODUCTION
Danny Hooper
ADVERTISING MANAGER
Selwyn Sayers
CIRCULATION MANAGER
Alan Parker
COVER PRICE
We're sorry that we've had to add another
10c to our cover price. We tried to keep it
down to $1.50 but rising costs, right
across the board, have dictated otherwise.
Registered for posting as
a
publication
-
Category B.
Printed by Magazine Printers Pty Ltd, of Regent
Street, Sydney and Masterprint Pty Ltd of Dubbo,
NSW. for Sungravure Pty Ltd, of Regent St,
Sydney.
Editorial Office
57 Regent St, Sydney 2008.
Phone (02) 699 3622 Telex 25027
Postal Address: PO Box 163. Beaconsfield 2014.
-
Advertising Offices
57 Regent St. Sydney 2008.
Sydney
Phone (02) 699 3622 Telex 25027
Representative: Narciso Pimentel.
392 Little Collins St, Melbourne
Melbourne
3000. Phone (03) 602 3033
Representative: Janice Wallace
-
Recently, there has been discussion in the media about the desirability of an electronic device to prevent people affected by alcohol from driving. The idea involves
the fitting of an ignition disabling circuit which would prevent starting of the car until
the driver blew into a sensor. If the driver was sober, the car could be started. If the
driver was not sober, he/she would turn the key in vain.
The device would not be installed in all vehicles, so the argument goes, but would
be fitted, by court order, to vehicles belonging to drivers convicted of drink -driving
offences.
The concept has apparently been supported in a recent confidential report by the
NSW Traffic Accident Research Unit.
Personally, am far from convinced. Anybody who is handy with a soldering iron
and screwdriver could disable or bypass such an installation without too much hassle. Most such devices can be circumvented by one means or another, given the will
I
to do so.
Anyone who thinks otherwise is surely just whistling in the wind. In saying this, find
ample precedent in the widespread tampering with anti -pollution devices on latemodel cars. And the chances of being caught are fairly remote.
Even if it was not possible to physically disable such a device easily, what is to stop
a "drunken" driver from asking a sober mate to blow into the sensor and then drive
away, however erratically? Or, more simply, what is to stop the potentially drunken
driver from obtaining a hand -operated "puffer" from a child's toy horn to do the job?
Or, as an even more direct solution, what is to stop the potentially drunken driver
from using a vehicle other than his own?
In my opinion the idea just won't work. Nor will some of these more exotic
systems using a keyboard on the dash. These ideas are yet another example of the
belief that technology will solve all social problems. And this is a social problem!
If we as a society are really concerned about the problem of drunken driving and
the deaths and untold misery it causes, we would pressure our politicians for the immediate introduction of random breathalyser tests. Of course, to be really effective,
"random" breath tests would have to be performed outside licensed clubs,
I
restaurants and hotels.
Furthermore, penalties for these offences should be made much stiffer and be
more rigidly enforced by the courts.
Finally, we must knock alcohol off its pedestal. It is a dangerous drug and, as with
other dangerous drugs, we must learn to regulate its use.
Technology will not and cannot solve the problem!
Leo Simpson
-
Adelaide
Charles F. Brown & Associates Ltd,
254 Melbourne St, North Adelaide 5006
Representativé'Sandy Shaw, (08) 267 4433.
454 Murray Street, Perth 6000
Perth
Representative: Ashley Croft. (09) 21 8217.
Subscriptions
Subscription Dept, John Fairfax 8 Sons Ltd, GPO
Box 506, Sydney 2001.
Enquiries: Phone (02) 20944. ext 2589.
Circulation Office
21 Morley Ave, Rosebery, Sydney 2018
-
Phone (02) 663 3911.
Distribution
Distributed in NSW by Sungravure Pty Ltd, 57
Regent St. Sydney; in Victoria by Sungravure Pty
Ltd, 392 Little Collins Street, Melbourne; in South
Australia by Sungravure Pty Ltd, 101-105
Weymouth St, Adelaide; in Western Australia by
Sungravure Pty Ltd, 454 Murray Street, Perth; in
Queensland by Gordon and Gotch (A'asia) Ltd; In
Tasmania by Ingle Distributors, 93 Macquarie St,
Hobart; in New Zealand by Gordon and Gotch (NZ)
Ltd, Adelaide Rd, Wellington.
Copyright. All rights reserved
Devices or arrangements shown or described
herein may embody patents. Information is furnished without responsibility for its use and
without prejudice for patent rights. All
manuscripts, photographs and other material submitted to Electronics Australia for publication must
be accompanied by a stamped, addressed
envelope. Contributions are submitted at the
sender's risk, and responsibility for loss cannot be
accepted by Electronics Australia.
'Recommended and maximum price only.
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
3
News Highlights
it
.r
.
..r.
-a
promising
OTEC
renewable energy resource
engineers working on one of the
most promising renewable energy
sources
ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) are expecting two major developments this year. The first will
be in July when a 1MW experimental rig
called OTEC-1 is floated out of a shipyard in Washington state to Hawaii for
operational trials. Secondly, the US
government budget for the technology is
to be doubled this year, to $80 million,
paving the way for a 40MW demonstration plant in 1984.
The OTEC technique uses the temperature differences between the ocean
surface and depths of 1000m or more to
extract energy. Cold water is drawn up a
massive pipe and used to condense a
working fluid (ammonia is the current
favourite). Warm water at the surface is
used to evaporate the fluid. By pumping
the ammonia around a closed circuit the
latent heat given off from the change
from gas to liquid can be extracted
through heat exchangers and used to
produce steam to drive electric
generators.
Even at low levels of efficiency (5% is
the best so far achieved) the costs of
OTEC generating stations will be in the
region of $2000-$2500 per kilowatt
US
-
-
-
about the same as present nuclear
power stations, and the ocean power
plants have other advantages such as a
long operating life and absence of
dangerous waste products. It has been
predicted that efficiencies of 10% will be
possible by the year 2000, by which time
the US could have 10,000MW plants in
operation.
However, significant problems must be
overcome. The ocean generating plants
a 400MW
are very large structures
plant could displace 75,000 tonnes
and they must be moored in depths of
well over 1000m, requiring new types of
mooring cables and anchors and new
ways of using them.
In addition, the most crucial component of the system, the cold water
pipe, poses engineering problems that
have yet to be solved. In OTEC-1 cold
water is drawn up through a cluster of
three pipes, 670m long and 1.3m in
diameter. The cold water pipe for a
400MW plant would be' 1000m long
and 30m in diameter, and would pump
water at a rate of four million litres per
second. The pipes must be strong
enough to support their own weight and
to withstand the massive pumping
-
The development of a particle
beam weapon
a device which
would project extremely high-energy
beams of atomic particles could run
into insurmountable problems, according to a team of researchers at the
Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
The MIT team examined the
-
-
beams of
energetic particles, either fired from
the ground or from orbiting satellites,
to shoot down ICBMs or military
satellites, and concluded that no
presently available machine has all
the attributes needed for such a
weapon.
The heart of the weapon would be
its particle accelerator, and existing
4
of using
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
-
how close?
accelerators used in high energy
physics provide a guide to what is required. Working backwards from the
known amount of energy necessary
to damage a missile, the MIT researchers calculated that a particle beam
weapon would require an accelerator
operating at 1000MeV which is well
within the
range
-
of existing
accelerators.
However, existing accelerators provide this energy at low current. They
produce a beam of particles with a
measure of the number of
current
particles within the beam of around
.025A, which is far short of the 1000A
required for a weapon. Other shortcomings of present accelerators are
the low amount of energy in each
-a
-
Pod
,`
-
pressures.
Particle beam weapons
possibility
.,
-
OTEC uses warm water to vaporise li-
quid ammonia, which drives the turbine
generators. The ammonia is then condensed back to a liquid by cold water
and so the cycle continues.
OTEC is considered a form of solar
power, but has important advantages
over other solar energy processes in that
it continues to work after the Sun goes
down.
instead of 100
million); the time each pulse lasts
(1.5us instead of 100us); and the rate
at which they can produce pulses (50
per second instead of 100).
Even if it does prove possible to
develop a satisfactory accelerator
there are still problems to be overcome in operation. For example, if
the weapon was placed in orbit
around Earth, interference with the
pulse (56 jourles
communications between the
satellite and the controlling ground
station could prevent its use. In addition, if the particles in the beam were
energetic neutral hydrogen atoms, a
thin later of air would be a good
shield. The air would strip the electrons from the hydrogen atoms, leaving a beam of protons, which would
break up as the protons repel each
other.
JVC readies
VHD videodisc
JVC's VHD (Video High Density)
videodisc system was demonstrated in
production prototype form at a Tokyo
press conference recently. The system
uses a grooveless, capacitive pickup, and
each 30cm disc contains two hours of
colour programs with sound. With the
addition of a PCM (Pulse Code Modulation) decoder the system can also play
high fidelity stereo sound recordings.
The videodisc player provides a variety
of special effects such as still, slowmotion and fast -motion, forward and
reverse operation and a fast search
mode. In addition there is a random access capability, so that a pre -selected
single "track" can be located and played
back automatically.
Picture and sound information are
recorded as pits on the disc surface
without grooves to guide the pickup
stylus. Video information and tracking
signals are simultaneously picked up as
capacitive variations between the disc
surface and an electrode on the stylus.
The discs are made of conductive PVC
material and rotate at 900rpm (twice the
speed of the RCA disc and half the speed
of the Philips/MCA disc). Disp life is
approximately 10,000 replays, and the
stylus is made from sapphire and has a
life of around 2000 hours. JVC plans to
commence production next year, and
the system is expected to sell for about
$500.
Russia closing
the "technology gap"
The American government is afraid
that the Soviet Union is closing the
"technology gap" by clandestinely obtaining high-technology products such as
computers, laser components and
equipment for manufacturing electronic
components, in spite of President
Carter's ban on the export of such equipment to Russia.
A US Senate subcommittee has been
investigating reports that powerful computers have reached Russia after they
had been sold to another country.
Although the United States is still about
five years ahead of the Soviet Union in
microelectronics, the gap is narrowing.
Part of the problem is that a computer
is a general purpose machine. For example, a computer sold with a package of
programs for developing, say, synthetic
fibres, can be later re -programmed to do
stress calculations for the design of a
supersonic bomber. While a computer
might be sold with a package of innocuous software, there is nothing to
prevent the purchaser from reselling the
computer with software that can be applied to military uses.
Electronic speedometer has memory & LCD
Liquid crystal
displays and a
non-volatile
memory system
combine to give
this new electronic
speedometer from
National
Semiconductor.
J
1
.a
National Semiconductor Corporation
generated by a speed sensor and programs one bit of the PROM for each increment of the mileage total. The controller can also use the pulses to determine the speed of the vehicle. Either
total mileage or the distance covered on
a particular trip can be displayed at the
user's option, and odometer and
speedometer information can be
displayed in either Imperial or metric
units.
has developed an electronic
odometer
with a non-volatile memory that can retain a vehicle's total mileage under all
conditions, including loss of power in the
vehicle. The system is designed into National's intelligent instrument panel, and
uses a fusible link bipolar PROM for
mileage storage and a low-cost COP420L
four -bit microcontroller.
The microcontroller counts pulses
Britain expands nuclear power program
Confirmation of Britain's decision to go
ahead with the building of two more advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR) nuclear
power stations was given on April 14 by
Energy Secretary Mr David Howell. The
two 1320 megawatt stations, which are
likely to cost more than $4000 million,
were originally given the go-ahead by
the previous government in 1978, and
work on preparing the sites has already
started.
Since the current AGR program was announced in 1964, two stations have
been brought into service and three
more are now under construction. The
new AGR reactors are expected to be a
modified version of those already
operating, with a bigger pressure vessel
to allow greater access for inspection
and repair and a bigger core to ensure
that power is maintained without corrosion problems.
Approval has also been given for the
design and manufacture of equipment
for a third new nuclear power plant.
Unlike the other two, this will use a
pressurised water reactor (PWR) built
under licence from American Westinghouse.
Although the new station will use
technology incorporated in the PWR station involved in the accident at Three
Mile Island, it is believed that strict safeguards will prevent a similar incident in
Britain. Construction is planned to start
in 1982.
Huge impact seen for cable television
Technological developments in the
television industry in the 1980s will bring
about major changes to current programming and regulatory practices, according to Mr Bruce Gyngell, the former
chairman of the Australian Broadcasting
Tribunal.
Speaking at a television seminar
organised by the Australian Association
of National Advertisers, Mr Gyngell said
that the effect of cable television, in particular, will be shattering.
Cable television is at present serving 16
million households in the United States,
and was first introduced there 20 years
ago as a means of relaying normal channels to areas of poor reception. Programs are transmitted to the television
receiver by underground cable from a
central point, and subscribers pay to join
the network and for the programs they
watch. Current US prices are $15 for the
initial connection and $8 a month on
average, with a new movie costing $2 to
$3.
Some industry sources believe that
(continued on p7)
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
5
he '
y
.
ta++o'
`"
-
,
.,
__ce ma
use...
I of Test Equiptwl«
'.
-yineerTng at
£7
!
,,,,,,.,..a.
0
51c
1
A.M.
,...:
...
John Shillabeer's department is involved in the maintenance,
calibration and servicing of all test equipment used within
S.T.C. We asked him why S.T.C. used Trio CS1560A scopes.
"My department gets involved with all test gear purchases.
As a general purpose scope we've found that the Trio provides
sxcellent performance for its price. Being easy to trigger we
Find staff can readily get it up and going. On the production
15MHz Trio CS1560AI I Dual Trace
-t
a
i
4.°""'
'
line, the bright clear trace makes it an easy scope for operators
to use.
"Over the past three or four years, S. T.C. has bought 8 Trio
1560s and we've had virtually no trouble from them. Any
minor services have been easy to carry out. As you can see we
even use one in our department in the development of our
own digital test equipment."
30MHz Trio CS1577 Dual Trace
...
..-,
.
ito
PARAMETERS
%
"Perfection in Measurement"
Melbourne 90 7444
Available from selected dealers
Sydney 439 3288
N.S.W. Sydney Dick Smith Stores 888 3200; George Brown & Co 519 5855; Radio Despatch Service 211 0191. Newcastle D.G.E. Systems 69 1625;
Elektron 2000 26 2644. Wollongong Hundell Engineering 74 0278; Macelec 29 1455; A.C.T. Canberra Electronic Components 80 4654.
QII D Brisbane Audiotronics 44 7566; L.E. Boughen 36 1277; N.S. Electronics 36 5061. VIC Melbourne Browntronics 419 3986; Douglas Radio
211 1698; J.H. Magrath 663 3731; Radio Parts 329 7888; Tech Rentals 267 5877; G.B. Telespares 328 4301. Geelong Teleparts 21 7288. S.A. Adelaide
K.D. Fisher & Co 269 2544; Gerard & Goodman 223 2222; Trio Electrix 516718. W.A. Perth Hinco Engineering 381 4477; W.J. Montcrieff 325 5722;
Rablec Engineering 381 2866. TAS Hobart Imbros Surpat h Systems 23 2892. Launceston W & G Genders 31 2511.
6
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
Dishwasher cleans
circuit boards
NEWS HIGHLIGHTS
1111KOS,
BPO aims for Prestel expansion
The British Post Office is planning a major marketing campaign to increase the
number of subscribers to its Prestel services. Although at present the system
has only 2400 subscribers, the Post Office hopes to boost this by "tens of
thousands" in 1980, and manufacturers
producing the television sets that receive
Prestel say that by the end of April, 1980
they will be producing hundreds of sets
each week.
Prestel is a system which links a television set to an ordinary domestic phone
telephone line to bring information from
a central computer bank direct to the
television screen. More than 150,000
"pages" of information are now on call in
...
Britain, providing facts and services ranging from accounting, agriculture and air
travel to wines and yoga lessons. In addition, an international Prestel service is
now undergoing tests.
New development will allow full colour photographs to be included on
Prestel pages. The new feature will have
obvious advantages for mail order
businesses, who already use Prestel extensively and for customers placing
advertisements. Picture Prestel, as it is
called, is scheduled to be in use by the
late 1980s, but this addition to existing
facilities will require adaptation or
replacement of the present generation
of receiving sets.
but consumers offer resistance
A recently published book on teletext
and viewdata systems says that "the
established habit of watching TV as a
pastime, for entertainment only", is a
major obstacle to the growth of videotext services. These systems will need to
overcome serious user resistance to new
ways of using the television set if they
are to succeed on a large scale, the book
states.
The book, "Videotext: the Coming
Revolution in Home/Office Information
Retrieval" is edited by Efram Sigel, of
Knowledge Industry Publications in New
York, and contains first hand accounts
on the BBC's Ceefax service, the British
Post Office's Prestel project, and various
tests of these systems made in the US.
Among the author's conclusions are
that the initial market for viewdata
Cable television
cable television will be introduced to
Australia in as little as five years, initially
with a 30 channel system. Competition
for access is likely to be fierce, given the
profitability of the system in the United
States.
One change predicted by Mr Gyngell is
that cable television will remove the
pressure from all stations to present programs of particular social value, such as
children's programs or Australian -made
programs, which he sees as being best
provided by cable services. Whéther
they will in fact be provided remains to
be seen.
Cable television will also cause
changes in the approach of advertisers.
Cable TV does not normally carry advertising, as the cost of the service is paid
directly by the subscribers. Mr Gyngell
expects advertisers and agencies to over-
systems will be among business and professional users, who are accustomed to
paying a premium for information
delivered quickly.
The book describes the notion of a
home information/entertainment centre
containing a large variety of entertainment and information retrieval facilities
as a "science fiction concept". In reality
consumers will be selective, the author
asserts, buying one type of device, eg a
video recorder, rather than another,
such as a teletext decoder.
The book notes that in the first two
years of Ceefax service by the BBC in
London, only 15,000 sets equipped to
receive the transmissions were sold. It
may take many years before a substantial number of people are ready to accept videotext services.
... ctd from p5
come the problem, but predicts that the
short style of commercial used today will
not exist in 1990. One of the alternatives
open to advertisers could be to package
programs which feature the advertiser's
products as an integral part of the plot,
as has already been done overseas.
The Australian Broadcasting Tribunal
will conduct an inquiry into the issues involved in cable television in July, after
the Tribunal's new chairman, Mr David
Jones, takes office. Two of the major
issues scheduled for discussion are
whether Australia can afford cable television (the cost of supplying Sydney alone
with cable TV would be in the vicinity of
$200 million), and whether overseas
capital investment would be allowed
and if so how much. The demand for the
system by Australian television viewers
will also have to be determined.
:
-I
--
.
! hit.
'p1::t
1i
=.--,
]
When engineers at Lockheed Missiles
and Space Corporation discovered that
the solvents used in customary cleaning
processes were harmful to new materials
used in electronic circuit boards, they
had a problem. A thorough search was
made for industrial cleaning equipment
using a water-detergent process, but
none of the available devices were
suitable.
Then someone realised that what the
Corporation was actually looking for was
a dishwasher with special controls. It
didn't take long before engineers
developed a programmable control unit
and attached it to a commercial
dishwasher, creating a simple circuit
board cleaning unit, and ' the most
sophisticated dishwasher in the world.
Historic film
found in America
A print of the only silent motion picture "epic" made in Australia the 1927
production of "For the Term of His
Natural Life"
has been found in the
United States and given to the National
Library of Australia. At the time it was
made, the film was the longest, most expensive, and one of the most successful
products of Australia's young film
-
-
industry.
The print was found by the American
Film Institute in Washington. Although it
is of a shortened version made for the
American market, it will enable the
Library to reconstruct an almost complete copy of the full-length work, using
an incomplete print that the Library has
been holding for 15 years.
Based on Marcus Clark's novel about
an Englishman wrongly convicted of
murder and transported to the Tasmanian penal colony of Port Arthur, "For
the Term of His Natural Life" was made
by Australasian Films Ltd. It cost £60,000,
took six months to produce, and was
filmed in Sydney and Newcastle and at
Port Arthur and other locations in
Tasmania.
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
7
NEWS HIGHLIGHTS
TI, IBM ready
"sighted" robots
At least two major electronics comTexas Instruments and IBM
panies
are on the verge of producing industrial
robots. Declining productivity has
vision systems for robots, and Unimation
robot firm, which
- - the world's biggest
World market -
-
stimulated interest in robots among US
manufacturers, and industry sources say
that major efforts will be made in the
1980s to put robot manufacture on a
commercial basis.
Robots currently under development
by IBM and Texas Instruments mark a
new stage in robot design because they
are equipped with TV cameras which
enable them to see and operate on objects in their vicinity. Imaging processing
the conversion of camera images into
codes which can be used to control a
is a very complex aspect
manipulator
of computer programming, but it seems
that considerable progress is being
made.
Texas Instruments has built sighted
robots to help make calculators at its
Lubbock, Texas, production plant, and
IBM makes similar robots that help in
making printed circuit boards for IBM
computers, in heat -treating components,
and in testing. These developments have
been shrouded in secrecy, but sources in
the US expect that both firms will announce plans later this year to sell the
type of robots that they have so far
manufactured for their own use.
TI and IBM are not the only companies
trying to produce robots that can "see".
Brown Boveri of Switzerland and Philips
of Holland are also experimenting with
-
-
claims 70% of the
working on the problem.
is
also
Unimation recently announced an important development in the robot field.
A small, lightweight robot called Puma,
developed by Unimation in conjunction
with General Motors, is expected to start
work in one of General Motors' factories
soon. Until recently, most robots, as well
as being blind, were big and clumsy
machines that did ' fairly rudimentary
Alcohol fuels
-
-
Business Briefs:
Western Australian based electronics components distributor and
wholesaler Reserve Electronics Pty Ltd has been appointed Fairchild
distributor for Western Australia. The agreement became effective
on February 1 1980, and initial orders for over 200,000 devices have
been placed. Reserve Electronics is located at 5 Bookham St,
Morley, WA 6002.
A Melbourne based Australian company, Antenna Engineering
Australia Pty Ltd, has been awarded a $2.3 million contract for the
design, manufacture, supply, and commission of a high frequency
antenna network for the Royal Australian Navy at Humpty Doo in the
Northern Territory. The contract is believed to be the largest order for
antennas ever placed with an Australian company.
Vicom's New Zealand operation has moved to larger and better
positioned premises. The new address is 84 Whites Line East, Lower
Hutt, NZ.
OTC recently announced the opening of a Brisbane bureau for
service providing fast transmission of facsimiles of
Overseasfax
documents and other printed information between Australia and
overseas.
The new bureau ís located in OTC's Brisbane office, 380 Queen St,
Brisbane.
8
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
adopted computerised information processing. The social changes needed to
accommodate a robot -based economy
are vast, but it appears that investigation
of the technological aspects of robotics
are proceeding at a much faster pace
than enquiry into the human factors
involved.
counting the cost
The fact that modern farming methods
consume very large amounts of energy
makes it difficult to see how agriculture
can contribute much to the energy
needs of industrialised countries by producing alcohol. Researchers at the Louisiana State University have just completed a "net energy analysis" of alcohol
production from sugar cane, and their
findings indicate that the process may be
unprofitable.
C. S. Hopkins and J. W. Day, of the
University's Coastal Ecology Laboratory,
calculated how much energy is consumed in the fuel and chemicals needed to
grow surgar cane and added this to
estimates of the amount of energy needed to turn the cane into alcohol. They
found that the net energy balance the
-a
jobs, using relatively old-fashioned computer techniques. They were also expensive, costing up to $80,000 each.
Unimation's Puma is the first commercial robot that can carry out intricate
jobs with the precision of a human
worker. The Puma is also relatively
cheap, costing from $30,000 to $40,000.
Regardless of the problems posed by
large-scale automation, it seems that
market forces will demand that manufacturing industries turn to robots in the
same way that other businesses have
ratio of the energy output to the energy
input depends on what fuel is used in
the conversion plant.
If the conversion plant is powered by
fossil fuels, the net energy balance is 0.9,
which means that more energy goes into
the plant than comes out of it as alcohol
fuel. If, however, waste from the cane
fields, known as bagasse, is used as fúel
to raise steam the system can produce
1.8 times as much energy as it consumes, although some of it is in the form
of steam.
-
However the US does not appear to be
taking this more economical route. According to Hopkins and Day, plants currently under design will use a 50/50 mixture of fossil fuels and bagasse to power
the conversion process. The resulting net
energy balance would be 1.2, indicating
that alcohol production from crops will
not make a significant contribution to
the country's energy needs.
Lester Brown, president of the World watch Institute, points out further problems of power alcohol production in
his paper "Food or Fuel: New Competition for the World's Cropland" (Worldwatch Paper 35). He states that the
developed nations' hunt for new spurces
of fuel, including alcohol production
from crops, is a serious threat to food
production which may drive apart the
rich and poor as nothing else before has
done. The price of oil may soon set the
price of food, he writes.
In January of this year President Carter
announced that the US would aim to
produce 2275 million litres of fuel
ethanol by 1981 and 910 thousancj
million litres by the mid -1980s. Brown
points out that the goal of 2275 million
litres would require the output of almost
a million hectares of farmland, or five
million tonnes of maize, which represents approximately 5% of projected
US maize exports in 1980.
JOHN F. ROSE
COMPUTER SERVICES PTY. LTD
33-35 ATCHISON STREET, ST. LEONARDS, N.S.W., 2065, AUSTRALIA.
TELEPHONE: (02) 439 1220
TELEX: AA 27901
STOCK CLEARANCE SALE
S-2000 serial or parallel printer, full 15" paper capacity, 1701chrs/sec bi-directional 5/10/16.5 CPI, stand and
tractor included, 6 months warranty
$2565.00
S-4000 parallel dot-matrix (16 x 16) wordprocessing quality printer (see our other ads)
3105.00
Imsai 22 slot S -I00 mainframe with operating front panel and 240V power supply. Supplied with documentation and Cromemco ZPU board (USED)
1300.00
Micromation Doubler Disk controller for 8" Single/Double density operation supplied with CPIM 1.4 (fully
documented BIOS and COPY programs etc)
447.00
North Star S-100 CPU Board (Z80)
200.00
CROMEMCO
ZPU 5-100 Z80a card
Bytesaver
16k Bytesaver
32k Bytesaver
System Z2H with 10 Megabyte hard disk and lots of software
Seattle Computer products '8086 S-100 CPU board with S-100 support board, full description and 8086
cross assembler and Microsoft Basic 86
8k
VECTOR GRAPHICS
Z80a CPU S-100
48k RAM Board (4Mhz)
8k Static Ram Board
Bitstreamer II (2 x RS232c ports 3x Parallel ports)
12k Prom/Ram board
Siemens 8" Double Density disk drive with options and just serviced
Microworks Digisector DS-80 board with instruction manual, capable of digitising to 256 x 256 with grey
scales (USED)
MATROX ALT256** (S-100 PAL compat, 256 x 256 x 16 grey levels can be chained together to 3 board
256 x 256 x 8 colours. xy addressable) Supplied with graphics software
TV camera with 6 to I zoom lens and tripod and some cable (USED)
Durst RCP -20 gear driven processor
Hitachi
high resolution RGB/PAL 17" (cross diagonals) shadow mask monitor
8275 complete terminal on a chip plus data/design book
8251 UART $4.00. 20 key hex pad + steel frame (unen) each
2 x unused video tubes with one set drivers of unknown quality
I x Video tube mounted in frame with doubtful driver
Honeywell Microswitch keyboard with user definable keys, editing and numeric keypad
DM -20 terminal with function keys and detachable keyboard
Imsai S-I00 2S10 board (2 serial RS232c ports) with documentation (USED)
ONTEL wordprocessing 48k computer with twin 8 inch disks and full docum & software (USED)
Acoustic Screens by Co-Ordinated design (USED) each
-
BOOKS
Computer Graphics
-
Techniques and Applications
Advanced Basic
Singer: Programming in Basic with Applications
Understanding Microprocessors
An Introduction to Database System by C. J. Date
Osbourne
General Ledger
Accounts Payable
James Martin Principles of Database Management
Security, Privacy and Accuracy in computer systems
Computer Database Organisation 2 ED
Design of Man -Computer Dialogues
Systems Analysis for data trans
15% discount for purchase of 3 or more of set.
350.00
150.00
185.00
270.00
8970.00
1300.00
200.00
600.00
200.00
250.00
217.00
475.00
300.00
400.00
800.00
658.00
1600.00
55.00
17.00
65.00
40.00
250.00
1600.00
200.00
7000.00
120.00
20.00
6.00
11.00
3.00
50.00
10.00
10.00
50.00
50.00
50.00
50.00
50.00
All new stock prices exclude sales tax. USED goods include sales tax. Prices valid for this month only or while stock lasts.
Send $1.00 to be included in our Mailing List Club and receive our latest catalogue. All goods to be prepaid. No deposits.
Money refunded in full if items out of stock. Postage/handling $3.00 for orders up to $40.00. Contact us to arrange details
for shipment.
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
9
challenge engineers' ingenuity
sion to Jupiter and is rescheduling launch
timing of communications and other
satellites.
What's wrong?
To find out, spent more than a month
digging into the Space Shuttle Orbiter
and its problems. I visited aerospace
plants where the Orbiter, or parts of it,
was designed and built, and NASA centres where its troubles are being analysed. I talked with a score of experts who
by' JIM SCHEFTER
I
The behemoth in black and white, a
brickyard with wings, stands pointed at
the Florida sky. Workers throng in and
around it, checking its tiled surface,
testing its extraordinarily complex
systems, fixing this and adjusting that as
they attempt to make every doubt
disappear.
But some doubts remain.
This is the Space Shuttle, already
several years behind schedule, more
than $3 billion over budget, 4100kg
overweight, and still tied to Earth.
Its problems have now spread
throughout the aerospace industry, sending payload planners scrambling to
revise their launch schedules or find
other ways to get satellites into space.
NASA itself has delayed its Galileo mis-
r
generally agreed on what is troubling the
Shuttle and what is necessary to fix it.
One conclusion quickly became obvious: The Orbiter is the most cantankerously advanced machine ever conceived. It makes flying to the Moon seem
easy.
On close examination, it has to be that
way. The Space Shuttle is a three -in -one
transportation system. It takes off as a
rocket, performs its mission as a manned
spacecraft, then becomes an airplane for
landing back on Earth. With a minimum
r
I.
_
,:L,y...'
l
of repair and refurbishment, it has to be
ready to do it all over again one hundred
times.
No blank cheque
No one expected to design and build a
Shuttle without running into difficult and
surprising problems. NASA's whole
philosophy of space flight assumes that
problems will sprout where least
expected.
It also assumes that enough money will
be available for fixes. But that hasn't
always been true for the Shuttle
NASA's budget has been sharply
restricted during the past few years.
The Shuttle originally was scheduled
for launch in 1978. When even 1979
became impossible, concern surfaced
rapidly. When the delays affected launch
-
schedules
for
military surveillance
getting more
money.
Now it's beginning to pay off. Most
satellites,
NASA began
....
905
nmire rr.
w4~74l04, ©.
Riding piggyback aboard a 747 jet transport, the Shuttle Orbiter "Columbia" journeyed last March from Edwards Air Force
Base, California, to Kennedy Space Flight Center, Florida. The
10
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
seemingly uneventful trip did appalling damage. Flight-caused
vibrations loosened the tiles that compose the Shuttle re-entry
heat shield. Thousands of tiles had to be tested and replaced.
N
'N
Unexpected setbacks in the
US Space Shuttle program
are challenging the
ingenuity of NASA
engineers. Some vexing
problems have had to be
solved so that the world's
first spaceship, already two
years behind schedule, can
get off the ground.
Shuttle problems have been resolved.
But four of them, selected by the experts
I interviewed, were real demons
to fix:
The Thermal Protection System, a
state-of-the-art advance to allow an
airplane to survive reentry heating, turned into a bricklayer's nightmare.
The main rocket engines repeatedly
failed during testing.
Onboard computer software became
so complicated that it strained the industry to find enough qualified programmers to do the job.
The Orbiter's internal structure was
too weak. It could have broken in half
during normal reentry!
In each case, NASA and its aerospace
contractors tackled the troubles with innovation and hard work. The result now
is a Space Shuttle that could reach orbit
later this year or early next year. Is it
safe?
"I'd fly it," said Rockwell engineer Bob
Olsen, who spent more than a year on
the Thermal Protection System's
problems.
He probably won't get the chance. But
astronauts John Young and Bob Crippen,
tabbed to be first to fly the Shuttle, will
have their lives on the line when the
thermal system faces its ultimate test.
The system is composed of more than
31,000 fragile,. ceramic-like tiles bonded
to the Orbiter's belly, nose, wings, and
control surfaces. And the slightest failure
could mean disaster.
"The system doesn't have much margin
designed in," NASA engineer Tom Moser
admitted. "In fact, it's designed not to
lose one tile."
What would happen if one small tile
ripped off during the intense heating and
turbulence of reentry? Temperatures up
to 1260°C would eat into the Orbiter's
aluminium skin. Other ,tiles would be
weakened as well, Moser said, and
would begin peeling away. Total
destruction would follow.
These vital tiles are made of a
.0.
.5z\
/1
A worker carefully applies white tiles to the fuselage of the Shuttle Orbiter "Columbia". The Orbiter underwent a successful mock flight last December in which ground based computers tested the responses of the on -board computers.
fascinating material developed by
Lockheed. Nearly pure silica fibres, the
tiles start out as a soft white cube that is
97% air and weighs just .14g per cubic
céntimetre. A heavier version for surfaces that will be subjected to the worst
temperatures weighs 0.35g per cubic
centimetre and was developed at
NASA's Ames Research Centre.
The material can't be handled roughly.
Without a surface glaze, it could be
pulverized in the fist of a child. And the
tiles can't be installed as you'd tile a
patio or shower stall.
"It's not like going down to the hardware store for a box of tiles," Rockwell's
Olsen told me. "Every tile is different."
Each tile must adhere snugly and
smoothly. But some Orbiter surfaces are
smooth and flat, while others are curved
and bent, even in S -type sweeps. So all
31,000 tiles had to be cut to individual
specifications. After being cut and
shaped into sections, many no bigger
than your hand, each tile had to be glazed for stiffness. Black glaze was used for
high -temperature areas such as the belly,
while white glaze protects less exposed
surfaces.
Painstaking work
The glaze was applied on five sides,
leaving the bottom soft and powdery.
Then arrays of tiles, ranging from two or
three to enough to cover a desk top,
were glued to a felt "strain isolation pad"
that would be glued
by hand
to exactly the right place on Orbiter's thin
-
-
aluminium skin.
The glue used is nothing unusual. It's a
silicone-type sealant, not too different
from the stuff you can buy for household
use. (Incidentally, the household -type
silicone sealants originally were
developed for the space program.)
The real nightmare began with installation. Every tile had to be aligned perfectly on all sides, with gaps held to
.05-.075mm. And the final surface had to
be so smooth that no aerodynamic turbulence would be generated.
But instead of starting from a central
point and working outward, the
NASA/Rockwell plan called for spotting
arrays around the fuselage,
checkerboard-fashion, then coming back
to fill in the gaps. That only made things
worse as installers struggled to insert
close-out tiles while perfectly joining
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
11
JUST WRAP'"WIRE WRAPPIRG
TOOL
JW-1-B
JW-1-W
JW-1-Y
JW-1-R
JUST
JUST
PRB-I DIGITAL LOGIC PROBE
WHY CUT? WHY STRIP? WHY SLIT?
WHY NOT JUST WRAP?
DC to> 50 MHZ
10 X0.0. putt., ...Poo.*
t20 R lI knpdnce
Automatic pule., elntc Nng
BLUE WIRE
WHITE WIRE
to so
RED WIRE
LIMP
R-JW-B
R-JW-W
R-JW-Y
R-JW-R
BLUE WIRE
WHITE WIRE
YELLOW WIRE
RED WIRE
50 ft. Roll
50 ft. Roll
,3 3
50 ft. Roll
50 ft. Roll
URWRAP TO01 FOR JUST WRAP
JUW-1
UNWRAPPING TOOL
JUST WRAP HIT
JUST WRAP KIT
JWK-6
I
PRB-1
REPLACERIEnT ROLLS
W
'.
4-15 VDC
Range extended
optiona
adapter
Supply O.V.P. to _ 70 VDC
No
1A-1
*witches/no calibration
DIGITAL LOGIC PROBE
I
I
TERMINALS: 1,020 TEST POINTS. 188 separate 5
point terminals. plus 2 horizontal bus lines of 40 common test points each.
SIZE: 6t/a- Wide, 5- Long.
CM-100IMODULAR PROTOTYPE BOARD
uA
I
PROTOTYPE BOARD CRC- 200
TERMINALS: 630 TEST POINTS. 94 separate 5 point
terminals. plus 4 bus lines of 40 common test points
each.
SIZE: 6" Wide, 3Yo- Long.
«1MIt10z.lÍ
-
CM -2001 MODULAR PROTOTYPE BOARD'
I
TOOL BATTERY POWERED
FOR AWG 26-30
BW-26301
Use "C" size NICAD Batteries, not included. Bits
not included.
PROTOTYPE BOARD Cn1.300,CRI-400
two separated rows of five
interconnected contacts each. Each pin of a DIP inserted in the strip will have four additional tie-points
per pin to insert connecting wires. They accept leads
and components up to .032 in. diameter. Interconnections are readily made with RW-50 Jumper Wire.
All contact sockets are on a .100 In. square grid
(1%. in. wide).
CM -300 and CM -400 have
BIT FOR AWG 30
BIT FOR AWG 26-28
BT -2828
lamllla
PROTOTYPE BOARD C11I-100
ann444.4
"HOBBY" WIRE WRAPVIIIG
BT -30
reselling
Compatible with all logic
MaMae,ith
Automatic reselling memory
Open Circuit detection
YELLOW WIRE
Automatic threshold
CM -400
HOBBY WRAP TOOLS
CM -300 MODULAR PROTOTYPE BOARD
CM -a00 MODULAR PROTOTYPE BOARD
REGULAR WRAP
MODIFIED WRAP
WSU-30
WSU-30M
STRIP
-
WRAP
-
MODULAR BUS STRIP
CM -500 is a bus strip to be used In conjunction with
CM -300 and CM -400 for distribution of power and
UNWRAP
common signed lines. Two separate rows of common
terminals, grouped into clusters of five. All contact
sockets are on a .100 in. square grid.
-
CORP.
CM -500 I
CM-300
MODULAR BUS STRIP
It IRSERTIOR TOOLS
WITH Pin STRAIGHTRER
DIP
Cutters have a new patented
shearing action
Narrow profile. Pin straightener
Very thin profile
Low operator fatigue
Low cost
Long life
built into tool. Automatic ejector.
INS-1416
SIRAICHIEN PINS
RELEASE
PICK
MO5,1111OS-SAFE
INSERT
UP
14-16 PIN
DIP/IC INSERTER
GROUND STRAP NOT INCLUDED
14-16 PIN, MOS
CMOS SAFE INSERTER
PIN MOS
24-28
MOS-2428
CMOS SAFE INSERTER I
MOS-1416
3B-40 PM
TRI-COLOR DISPERSER
WD-30-TRt I
R-30-TRI
I
TRI-COLOR DISPENSER
It
I
REPLACEMENT ROLLS
WIRE DISPERSER
WO -30-B
WD -30-Y
WD -30-W
WD -30-R
Aligns bent out pins. Includes terminal lug for attachment of ground strap.
BLUE WIRE
YELLOW WIRE
WHITE WIRE
GROUND STRAP NOT INCLUDED
REO WIRE
-30B-0050
-30Y-0050
R -30W-0050
R -30R-0050
R
30-AWG
30-AWG
30-AWG
30-AWG
BLUE 50 FT. ROLL
18 AWG 25 FT.
20 AWG 25 FT
HK -22 22 AWG 50 FT.
HK -24 24 AWG SO FT.
HK -26 26 AWG 50 FT
SHK-1818 AWG 25 FT.
SHK-2020 AWG 25 FT
SHK-2222 AWG SOFT.
SHK -24 24 AWG 50 FT.
SHK-2626 AWG 50 FT.
DIP IC EXTRACTOR TOOL
YELLOW50FT.ROLL
WHITE 50 FT. ROLL
RED 50 FT. ROLL
Extracts all LSI, MSI and SSI devices of from
24 pins.
C
EX -1
I
HOOHUP WIRE
HK -18
HK -20
36-40 PIN CMOS SAFE
INSERTION TOOL
MOS-40
DISPERSER REPLACERIERT ROLLS
R
CBIOS -SAFE
IRSERTIOn TOOL
SOLID CONDUCTOR
SOUD CONDUCTOR
SOLID CONDUCTOR
SOLID CONDUCTOR
SOLID CONDUCTOR
STRANDED CONDUCTOR
STRANDED CONDUCTOR
STRANDED CONDUCTOR
STRANDED CONDUCTOR
STRANDED CONDUCTOR
I,
24-40
8
to
EXTRACTOR TOOL
CMOS-SAFE EXTRACTOR TOOL
Removes 24-40 pin IC's, .600" centers. C-MOS safe.
Includes terminal lug for attachment of ground strap.
GROUND STRAP NOT INCLUDED
I
EX -2
I
CMOS SAFE EXTRACTOR TOOL
AMPEC ENGINEERING CO. PTY. LTD. Wellington Street. Rozel e, 2039. Tel. (02)818-1166. Available from: NSW David Reid Electronics, 29-6601. Radio
Despatch Service, 211-0191. Electronics (Distributors). 636-6052. Martin De Launay, 29-5834. Applied Technology. 487-271.1. Vic. Radio Parts. 329-7888.
Stewart Electronics, 534-3733. Arlin Instruments. 569-6984. Ellistronics, 602-3282. S. Aust. Protronics. 212-3111. W. Aust. Reserve Electronics, 328-3116.
Old. Wilber Sales. 391-5136.
1
Shuttle setbacks: $3 billion over budget
5
Smoke billows from Shuttle main engines after a premature
shutdown during tests. Scheduled to fire for 510 seconds, the
three -engine cluster lasted only nine seconds before a
arrays.
It was
slow going and added
significantly to the time it takes to build
an Orbiter. In a good week, only about
600 tiles could be installed. Most weeks
weren't good.
"We were kind of naive," said Don
Whitman of Rockwell's Space Division in
Downey, Calif. "It seemed like a simple
thing to do, but it was a tough learning
curve."
Then tiles began falling off.
When NASA ferried the Orbiter Columbia from California to Florida atop its
Boeing 747 transport, the little deflections and vibrations in the Shuttle's skin
loosened the bonding. Dozens of tiles
popped loose.
So, in late 1979, Rockwell faced the
enormous task of pull -testing every tile
already installed, more than 20,000 at
that point. An easy, 14kPa pull test had
been planned anyway. But now, each
tile was pulled to at least 42kPa, some to
more, while being monitored with sensitive acoustical.devices.
"We were listening for the failing of
fibres between the tile and strain isolation pad," Olsen explained.
If a tile flunked the test, it was removed. Its soft bottom was densified with a
-
malfunction cut it off causing a damaging fire (see text). By
late 1979, the same engines had successfully fired for 540
more than enough to get the Shuttle into orbit.
seconds
-
liquid silica that soaks in about 2.5mm.
Then it was rebonded to the felt pad. It
all took time.
"We'd have come on this problem a lot
earlier if we'd planned our program a little better," Ron Kubicki, former Orbiter
engineering manager at Johnson Space
Centre, said, "If you leave any chance for
error, you'll get it."
Tougher files
But the innovative work that went into
perfecting the tiles has led to even more
advanced materials that will be used on
later Orbiters now being built. With
weight a strong consideration (the current "lightweight" tiles still account for
about 9100kg), Dr Howard Goldstein
and his co-workers at Ames have come
up with a lighter, much stronger material
needing no glazing. Called Fibrous
Refractory Composite Insulation, the
stuff is a mixture of two recently
developed materials. It's 20% Nextel, an
alumino-borosilicate fibre from the 3M
Company, and 80% Microquartz, a nearly pure silicate produced by Johns Manville.
Goldstein and the other materials experts at Ames have perfected ways to
blend the mixtures to produce high -
strength tiles with none of the current
fragility problems. The version likely to
be used on the Shuttle weighs 0.19g per
cubic centimetre, but is 50% stronger
than the strongest tiles now used. The
material can be machined easily, and will
even hold screws. It also sticks tight with
silicone -based glue.
"And it's totally thermal -shock resistant," Goldstein said. "You can take it out
of a 1260°C oven and drop it in water
with no effect."
Some of the new tiles will be on the second Orbiter to reach space. By the third
Orbiter, all high -temperature black tiles
will be replaced by the new tiles. The
low -temperature white tiles also may be
replaced, but by a blanket of quartz
cloth also developed at Ames. This flexible blanket, now getting intense testing,
eliminates virtually all of the installation
problems caused by the current tiles. It's
also cheaper: $1000 per square metre of
blanket versus $40,000 per square metre
of tile.
Reluctant rockets
If thermal protection has been the
Shuttle's worst problem, its main rocket
engines, using hydrogen and oxygen for
fuel, have been the most visible. They've
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
13
Shuttle
Setbacks
blown apart during tests, shut down
prematurely, suffered bearing failures
and destructive internal combustion, had
.
a
.
welds break, and lost critical components in dramatic incidents.
One explosion and fire, in July 1979, so
badly damaged the rocket stand at the
National Space Technology Laboratories
that testing was delayed nearly four
months. When it resumed in November,
a three -engine cluster fired only nine
seconds before a turbopump problem
triggered a shutdown.That, in turn, ruptured hydrogen lines and started another
fire.
r
ELECTRONICS Australia, July. 1980
r.
'1
=-
r
Workers apply and test heat -resistant black -tiles to Shuttle's underbelly. No two tiles
in the more than 31,000 set are exactly the same!
overheated and shattered. Since the
bearing was cooled by a flow of liquid
hydrogen, a real mystery developed.
Then engineers discovered the culprit,
Johnson said. The supercold liquid
hydrogen was spinning into a vortex,
leaving the bearing to overheat in the
whirlpool's central hole. A small paddle
inserted into the feed line broke up the
vortex and put the cooling back where it
belonged.
Another bearing failed when highpressure hydrogen, used as fuel, began
ed use.
spinning through the piping instead of
flowing smoothly. The erratic sloshing
Power pumps
caused high -frequency vibrations that
Prime elements in the Shuttle engine's destroyed the bearing. Rocketdyne
performance, and source of major remedied that problem by stiffening the
headaches, are the high-pressure fuel
bearing to make it more resistant to
turbopumps. These pumps are smaller vibrations.
than, but four times as powerful as,
And there were literally dozens of
Apollo rocket pumps.
other problems, both with the tur"You get that power by concentrating bopumps and with other parts of the
on precision," Johnson said. "Everything engine. Some of the trouble goes back
has to be perfect."
to money. NASA opted for a less When it isn't, there are failures.
expensive program of testing whole
So far, Rocketdyne has redesigned
engines rather than individual comvalves and seals, strengthened internal ponents. The result was too often extencomponents, even added parts not in sive damage when something failed.
the original design. With all this effort, it
That's what happened last November.
was still a turbopump problem that led The original failure was traced to a
to last November's damaging fire.
secondary seal in the oxygen -fuel turSeveral problems centred on bearing
bopump. The seal allowed oxygen into
failures. In one case, an engine was an internal cavity where it couldn't
damaged when a turbopump bearing escape. Pressure soared and the
14
.
-
¡...svr?.. .^
le
"The sudden shock of engine
shutdown was too much for the
cooling system. A weld broke,
pure hydrogen spilled out, and
an intense fire engulfed the
engine".
At that point, with the Shuttle already
about 20 months late, preliminary flight
certification on the Space Shuttle Maín
Engine was less than 80% complete.
"This engine is pushing the state of the
art," Rocketdyne's Jerry Johnson told me
at the Canoga Park, Calif, plant where it
is built. "When you want high thrust in a
small package, you add complexity."
For instance, to get its 1.7 million
Newtons of thrust, the engine has a
higher chamber pressure (20,680kPa)
and higher expansion ratio (77) than any
rocket engine ever built. The big J-2
engine used in the Saturn Booster's upper stages had a chamber pressure of
just 4826kPa and its ratio between
combustion -chamber opening and nozzle was 27. And the J-2 didn't have to survive for mission after mission of prolong-
,,
.
automatic monitoring system shut down
the engine and its two mates almost
instantly.
"There was little or no damage from
the seal failure," Johnson said.
But one engine was damaged beyond
immediate repair by what happened
next. The inner lining of the Shuttle
engine's bell -shape lower unit, or nozzle,
is cooled by liquid hydrogen flowing
down through scores of small pipes. The
sudden shock of engine shutdown was
too much for the cooling system. A weld
broke (see photo), pure hydrogen spewed out, and an intense fire engulfed the
engine. It was put out very quickly, but
not before the engine had suffered major damage.
Rocketdyne already had planned a
modification to forestall exactly that sort
of thing. But it came too late to salvage
the November trial and added another
five-week delay to engine testing.
Command computer
Virtually every Shuttle problem, every
new test result, and every design change
feeds back into the Orbiters incredible
software package, the central program
that directs the craft's five onboard computers. The system is so advanced that
the astronauts have direct control over
only two functions
lowering the landing gear and stepping on the brakes
after touchdown!
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ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
15
1
Shuttle setbacks: two years behind schedule
....ti,
-
=--
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-_..
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-
Broken pipe is part of collection system for Shuttle engine's
hydrogen coolant. The T-shape pipe funnels used coolant to
the combustion chamber where it aids firing. When welds
bordering the T broke, the engine didn't get enough
Everything else can be done by
computer.
But that means that the programming
must take into account every factor,
even the most insignificant, that can affect Orbiter operations. It means
reprogramming pieces of the software
every time a test result comes in that's
different from the original specifications.
And that happens constantly.
One of the latest revisions came only
after combined testing of all three main
engines began. In the original plan, the
computers started the three engines
simultaneously for lift-off from the
launch pad. When they did, bulkhead
pressures soared dangerously.
"It was like exploding three stacks of
dynamite under there," said Bill Madden
of IBM's Federal System Division in
Houston, "We had to rewrite the pro-
gram
to start the engines at
40 -millisecond intervals."
That kind of precision timing is typical
of what it takes to program the Orbiter's
computers. It takes more computer instructions to get the Orbiter safely
through reentry than it took to get
Apollo home from the Moon.
More than 600,000 lines of computer
code have been written and are stored
on tapes carried aboard the Orbiter.
Most of the work was done by IBM,
which at one time had more than 400
16
hydrogen, and so ran oxygen -rich during shutdown. Result: a
serious fire. Weld failures have been traced to use of wrong
welding rod.
highly skilled programmers on the job.
This massive computer program literally runs everything aboard the Orbiter. It
handles guidance and navigation, propulsion, attitude control, lift-off, landing,
and on through a seemingly endless list.
"The software is the nervous system of
the thing," Dr Ken Cox, who manages
software development at Johnson Space
Centre, told me. "That's what makes it
work."
And that's why the computer program
never quite ready.
"We're continually finding out things
about the hardware that hadn't been
considered before," Madden said.
For instance, testing of the small
reaction -control jets that shift the Or biter's attitude in space turned up the
fact that a minimum blip of the thruster
lasts about 160 milliseconds. It doesn't
sound important, except that the programming called for even quicker blips.
A rewrite became necessary.
Just the simple act of firing one of those
thrusters requires major computer intervention. Here's a vastly simplified version of what happens when an astronaut
wants to change which way the Orbiter's
nose is pointing.
A digital signal from the astronaut's
rotational hand controller actuates the
computer, which then checks back with
three transducers in the hand controller.
is
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
the signal is verified (still "on"), the
middle -value transducer signal becomes
a command to the computer to pitch,
roll, or yaw the ship.
Now the program races through a
series of questions. Which reaction control pod should be fired? (Any one of
four could do the job.) Which pod was
fired last? (Select them in order to help
spread around the wear -and -tear.) Now
which jet in that pod is needed? (Pick the
proper one for the movement required.)
Finally, the best jet is selected and a firing command goes out from the computer. The whole sequence takes 16
hundredths of a second.
Now the program asks whether or not
the thruster actually fired. If it didn't, a
new 0.16 -second sequence to fire
another thruster begins. The computer
makes a note of thruster failure and
If
eliminates that jet from
future
consideration.
That's just one small activity. There are
thousands like it that keep an Orbiter
working.
"The program is so extensive that
nobody can know every detail," said
Rockwell's Dr John Peller, "No computer
program ever had to work for a rocket, a
spacecraft, an entry vehicle, and an
airplane."
By mid -winter of 1979-80, program -
mers still struggled with rewrites to get
the Shuttle flying.
"When the aerodynamics change, we
go back and rewrite software specifications to make it right," Cox said. "When
the structure guys have a problem, they
strengthen a strut. But it adds weight and
it ripples in to our stuff."
Hazardous weight
Weight gain affects more than the
computer program, Shuttle engineers
discovered. Using the latest data, including every design change so far performed, they unearthed a frightening
t->
rs'
0
fact.
"We have an understrength condition,"
of Rockwell said. "Our new
Jim Johnson
flight -load data, combined
y
with
temperature data, show that at some trajectories, this overloads the airplane.
"It would break."
The news sent tremors through the
astronaut office in Houston and had
NASA and Rockwell teams scampering
to find a way to fix their weakened ship.
The problem, Johnson said, developed
slowly throughout the past few years.
The Orbiter was designed to perform a
2.5-G manoeuvre during landing. But
then it put on weight. That added stress.
Heat loads went up a little. That reduced
body strength.
Most of the problem was in the Or biter's mid-fuselage, just where it's
hardest to reach. That area already was
filled with wire bundles, black boxes,
pipes, tubes, and insulation. And the required fix called for installing clips and
stiffeners on a large number of T -shape
struts that give strength to the ship's skin.
It would be at least a month's work,
maybe more. And of course, it would all
ripple back into the computer program.
Similar stiffening was needed on a
number of wing struts. But since workers
could simply walk inside the empty wing
and do the modification quickly, there
was little impact on the schedule.
But instead of building the Orbiter's
strength back up to a 2.5-G tolerance,
the added fortifications will give the present craft a tolerance of only 2.0-2.2-G,
Johnson said.
"It's a classic problem in airplane
design," Johnson explained. "We designed for a set of loads generated four years
ago and now we've learned more about
3
1?
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The new data already are being applied to other Orbiters being built. Their
T -struts are being machined a little
thicker to bring the G -loading back up to
2.5 G. But in the meantime, it's just one
more problem that helps drive up costs
and further delay schedules.
For this first of a new breed of
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Until the Orbiter flies, that part of the
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ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
17
The microprocessor
goce pro pecting
CSIRO's Sirotem wins international award
Last September in Chicago, the Mineral Physics division of the
CSIRO won a prestigious IR100 award for its mineral prospecting
instrument, SIROTEM. The award was one of a hundred made by
by PETER VERNON
the American technical magazine "Industrial Research/
Development" for the most significant new technical products of
the year.
Sirotem is a microprocessor based
geological prospecting instrument,
developed over a period of seven years
by CSIRO scientists Brien O'Neill and
Dr Jock Buselli. It uses a prospecting
technique known as Transient Electro
which is
Magnetics (TEM, for short
where Sirotem gets its name).
-
Transient
Electromagnetic
prospecting relies on detecting and
measuring the very small currents
induced in an orebody by a transmitted
current pulse. By studying how this
signal changes as the receiver is moved
over the ground, the mineral explorer
can find the shape, position, and depth
of an orebody.
i
.
TEM works in the following way:
Current pulses are passed through a
large transmitting loop (up to 100
metres square) laid out on the ground.
The current creates a magnetic field
which extends into the ground below.
Each time the transmitter current is
changed, the magnetic field collapses
and induces eddy currents in the
ground. These currents in turn produce
their own magnetic field, known as the
secondary field. The strength of these
induced fields depends on the
electrical conductivity ,of the ground
beneath the transmitter loop (see Fig.
1).
*11
Mineral deposits are usually highly
yfv
conductive compared to the
surrounding earth, so they produce a
strong magnetic field. This magnetic
field induces a current in a second loop
of wire which is attached to a sensitive
receiver. By measuring this current a
mineral deposit may be detected above
the response produced by the
surrounding earth.
Instruments using the TEM principle
were first developed in the United
States in the late 40s. They were further
developed in Russia, where a
reasonably compact instrument was
produced which has been used
successfully in most countries of the
world.
However, when these instruments
were used in Australia the results were
disappointing. As anyone who has used
a metal detector will know, Australia is
heavily mineralised country. The
a
great age of the continent means that
extensive weathering has distributed
deep layers of diffuse mineralisation
(particularly iron oxides) over much of
the surface. These mineralised layers,
or conductive overburden, as they are
called, produce a signal which can
completely mask the signal produced
by an orebody.
TEM instruments produced overseas
were not able to discriminate between
the signal produced by an orebody and
the signal from the overburden. In
addition, the Russian instruments,
designed for Russian conditions, were
severely affected by the extreme
temperatures of the Aústralian
outback.
This was the state of affairs when the
CSIRO's division of Mineral Physics
began to look for ways of improving
the TEM technique for use in Australia.
In 1972 they began work on a method
of using the relative decay times to
reliably distinguish between an'
Sirotem consists of two units; a transmitter/ receiver and a battery pack.
18
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
orebody signal and the signal from the
overburden.
:
:.
yD,fy.,
/-l.I:/_,
.
a-te,
i
-
oQ
'G'li?1,yw` `y
i;T_'
'_ ¡IC.
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RECEIVED MAGNETIC
FIELD
?:;:
12'rii
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TRANSMITTED
MAGNETIC
FIELD
-Z
is
,
"1",...,,_SL:F
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...
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PRINT OUT FROM 5IROTEM
IMMEDIATELY CAN INDICATE A FIND.
THE OPERATOR CAN THEN PROVE THE
EXTENT OF THE ORFBODY. THE DATA
f5 PLOTTED BACK IN TWE LAB. AND
BECOMES KNOWN AS A PROFILE.
Current
!
.I;: i
'C±
pulsed through the transmitter loop and the magnetic field induced in the orebody
"Decay time" is a measure of how
long a signal takes to go from its
maximum strength to zero. Mineral
deposits produce a magnetic field
which decays relatively slowly (about
150ms) while signals from the
conductive overburden decay more
quickly (in about 10ms) because of the
higher electrical' resistance of the
overburden. Thus the response from
the orebody can be distinguished from
the overburden signal if the response is
measured at late time delays.
The outcome of this development
work, Sirotem, is able to sample the
response signal a maximum of 32 times,
in "time windows" ranging in length
from 400 microseconds to 25.6ms (see
Fig. 2). Transient pulses can thus be
measured over a time interval of
165ms. To reduce the data to
manageable proportions, wider time
windows are used at later time delays,
when the signal is changing more
slowly.
The problem is that after the signal
from the overburden dies away the
decaying signal from the orebody is
extremely small, only fractions of a
microvolt. Special signal measuring
techniques had to be developed to
converted into digital form and stored
in the computer's memory. From this
stored data the average value of the
transient signals can be calculated.
Noise cancellation is effected as
follows: Transient pulses contribute a
fixed positive voltage to each received
signal, while the contribution due to
noise is quite random
sometimes
-
CURRENT
TIME
CURRENT IN TRANSMITTER LOOP
VOLTAGE
detected by the receiver.
positive and sometimes negative. By
adding up a number of samples for
each time window, the voltage induced
by noise can be averaged almost to
zero. The orebody signals reinforce.
each other in the averaging process,
while the noise signals cancel each
other out.
Although the use of a minicomputer
enabled the CSIRO to demonstrate the
feasibility of the refined TEM method,
the equipment was hardly portable.
The computer alone weighed 20kg.
Then in 1974 microprocessors became
generally available in Australia and the
minicomputer could be replaced by a
microprocessor board weighing a mere
200g.
-ME
TIME
TRANSIENT VOLTAGE INDUCED IN RECEIVER
FIG.
1
The first prototype to use a
microprocessor was completed in 1975
and tested in extensive field trials. It
was found to be at least 50 times more
TRANSMITTER
TURNS OFF
VOLTAGE
TRANSMITTER
TURNS OFF
12345678 9101112
interference at these low signal levels.
In 1973 the CSIRO began to use a
minicomputer to "average" the signal
readings from thousands of scans to
overcome the noise problem. For each
position of the transmitter loop the
current is switched on and off several
is
100m.
f
overcome spurious noise and
thousand times. The received signal
looms
is
234
5 6 7
8 9
10
1112
TIME
TIME WINDOW NUMBER
FIG.
A pulse is
2
:
SAMPLING THE TRANSIENT DECAY SIGNAL
induced when the magnetic field of thé transmitter changes suddenly.
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
19
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EA
15.00
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2.80
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2.75
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10.90
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COOLING FANS
mount components on
14 pin $0.60
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IA
(s,
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-ra
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o0M
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I
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<
Spectrol model 63P
ACTUAL SIZE
$22.50
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Muffin fan 4%" square
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$26.50
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$24.50
Sprite fan 3'4" square
$26.50
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524.50
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Range of larger fans available. Send for
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Good regulation electrostatic shield
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in scotchca/ from July 79.
Phone for details.
'
his
7:
3
STOCK VALUES.
10R. 20R. 50R. 100R. 200R. 500R, 1K,
2K, 5K, 10K. 20K, 50K. 200K. 500K,
1M. 2M.
1-9
$1.00
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Values may be mixed.
(
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OR. 20R. 50R, 100R, 200R, 600R. 1K,
2K. 5K. 10K. 20K. 50K. 100K. 200K.
500K. 1M, 2M,
$1.30
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1
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Values may be mixed.
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KIT
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KIT FORM
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DREAM
ELECTRONIC AUSTRALIA
MICROCOMPUTER PROJECT
Kit for main board (including programme
$115.00
2708)
Also available re -designed 6802 PCB
Ideal for dream
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PCB (fibre glass) only
511.90
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10
$10.90
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50R. 100R. 200R.
500R. 1K. 2K. 5K.
10K. 20K. 50K,
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,
Test these new parts for yourself with in
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532.50
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523.50/each
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SPECIAL 4116 RAM OFFER
8 OFF PRIME SPEC 4116 I/Cs $79.00
16 4116s for $155.00
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ACTUAL SIZE
$3.70
$1.10
54.50
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WHEN ORDERING FRONT PANELS.
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Ideal for use with flat
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KITS & CIRCUIT BOARDS
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2.50
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99
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Dials to suit 10 T Pots
Model 21 1.8" dia
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Price 1-9
$6.50
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HEAVIER ITEMS ADD ADDITIONAL POSTAGE EXTRA HEAVY ITEMS SENT COMET FREIGHT ON
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'
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
sensitive than the Russian TEM
instruments. Sirotem can detect a field
change of one billionth of the Earth's
magnetic field, in one thousandth of a
second, and is capable of averaging up
to 4096 pulses in any one reading to
improve the signal to noise ratio of the
received signal.
However, this extreme sensitivity
created problems of its own. Not all
noise can be removed by the averaging
process. Distant power lines, VLF radio
Modelling assists the interpretation of results
di1011111.4.--_
transmitters, and even tropical
thunderstorms on the other side of the
world can cause interference which is a
hundred to a thousand times stronger
than the signal which must be
measured.
To counter interference from VLF
radio stations, Sirotem uses a low pass
filter which allows selected stations to
be "tuned out" if they are known to be
troublesome in a particular area. If
necessary Sirotem can be used within a
few kilometres of
transmitter.
Specially
designed
a
broadcast
atmospherics
rejection circuitry detects noise
generated by electrical disturbances in
the atmosphere and causes the
microprocessor to disregard the digital
conversion which includes large noise
pulses. The noisy conversion is
replaced in the data store by the last
noise -free conversion to take place.
While this introduces a slight time error
in the data, this error is much smaller
than that caused by a conversion which
is distorted by noise.
Sirotem uses a bipolar transmitter,
which means that the current pulses
fed to the transmitting loop are
alternately positive going and negative
going, ás shown in Fig. 1. The
microprocessor controls the turn off of
the transmitter, so that the repetition
rate of the transmitted pulses can be
varied to give better mains -frequency
interference rejection.
The repetition rate is chosen so that
the phase angle of the mains frequency
interference is identical on both
positive and negative going transmitter
pulses. By reversing the sign of the
signal received from the negative pulse,
and adding it in the data store to the
signal received from the positive pulse,
mains frequency interference
is
cancelled out.
The operation of Sirotem is
completely under the control of the
microprocessor. Thumbwheel switches
on the front panel set the number of
pulses which will be transmitted for
each reading and the number of time
channels which will be sampled. The
microprocessor stores the settings of
these switches and turns on the
transmitter. The received signal is
sampled in the required number of
time channels and the signal level
converted into digital form and
averaged over the selected number of
transmitter pulses.
The output of TEM receiver is of no use unless it can be interpreted. A common /y used aid is a set of plots of the response obtained over a mineral deposit which
has been extensively drilled. TEM responses can be compared to other results of
the drilling and an interpretation curve calculated. Drilling is an expensive business
however, and the types of geological formations which can be studied in this way
are limited.
Interpretation curves can also be prepared in the laboratory by calculations
made with a small scale model of the technique. The CSIRO maintains a modelling facility in Sydney which can simulate surface or airborne traverses over 1km in
length on a scale of 300:1. The geological structure of a particular area can be
deduced from the model which produces a TEM response most closely matching
the plot obtained in the field.
The model consists of a large fibreglass tank which contains a conducting salt
solution which simulates the electrical properties of the rock in which the mineral
deposits occur. A slab of graphite which simulates the electrical properties of the
mineral deposit is immersed in the solution. Conductive foam is used to simulate
the effect of the overburden.
A small sensor coil is moved over the graphite slab and the surrounding solution
under the control of a computer. The computer is also used to process the signals
from the sensor and produce plots of the sensor response as a function of the coil
position over the graphite slab.
To prevent electromagnetic interference distorting the measurements, the room
containing the model must be extensively shielded. For the same reason no metal
is used in the construction of the facility. All supporting beams are wood, and
nylon ropes are used to suspend the graphite in the tank.
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
21
SIROTEM: the microprocessor goes prospecting
.....
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The use
-`~
of
a
microprocessor
allows a very
compact instrument
which is exceedingly
powerful and
v.4f
.t'1 M -t" c.n
'
...s
versatile.
M
r'
.
IS
BELOW: The averaged
values for each
channel are printed
out as a series of
numbers.
The use of a microprocessor provides
Sirotem with great versatility. The
stored data can be mathematically
analysed in a number of ways,
depending on the operating program,
and the results printed out by the
instrument's own printer. The raw data
can also be transferred to a cassette, at
3000 characters per second, and
calculations done at another location.
The operating program for the
microprocessor is stored in a set of
PROMs, which can be easily changed if
is
a different mode of operation
required. Test and diagnostic programs
are also available on PROMs which can
be plugged into the microprocessor
board to assist maintenance.
The usé of a microprocessor also
makes the instrument extremely
compact. The transmitter and receiver,
microprocessor and printer are all
contained in one unit which weighs
8kg, and can be carried by one man.
The separate, rechargeable battery
pack weighs another 8kg, and provides
10 hours of operation on a single
charge.
To reduce the weight of the batteries
required and increase operating time,
Sirotem has been designed for the
lowest possible power consumption.
An IM6100 CMOS microprocessor is
used together with CMOS RAMs,
which draw very little power. The
printer is a special low power device,
designed for battery operation.
The PROMs used are bipolar fusible
link devices, consuming over 100mA
each. The full program memory would
normally consume over 2A. This is
reduced to around 50mA by controlling
the power supply to all PROMs. Each
set of three is switched on for about
one microsecond when that particular
set of instructions is required by the
22
microprocessor.
Even the specification of the battery
charging circuitry has been tailored for
trouble free operation in the field.
The disadvantage of the normal
method of charging NiCad batteries is
that repeated over -charging can cause
a reduction of battery life. When
Sirotem is in the field it is often
necessary to recharge the batteries to
full capacity in as little as 10 hours.
Simple constant current charging at this
rate could cause substantial overcharging.
The CSIRO devised a method of
sensing the completion "of battery
charging, taking advantage of the fact
that the temperature rise which occurs
at the completion of charging causes a
slight drop in the output voltage of the
battery.
When Sirotem's battery pack is
connected to the mains, the battery
charging circuit delivers current for a
set period and then turns off. The open
circuit voltage of the battery is then
converted to a digital value and
compared with earlier values, and a
drop of greater than 25mV per cell
(corresponding to a temperature rise of
5°C after charging has been completed)
causes the charging cycle to cease.
As can be seen from this article every
aspect of Sirotem has been designed
for accuracy, reliability, and ease of
operation. It is the most advanced
electromagnetic prospecting
instrument in the world, as recognised
by the IR100 award, and at the same
time it is particularly adapted to
Australian conditions. It represents a
triumph for the CSIRO and for the
Australian manufacturer, Geoex Pty Ltd
of South Australia. So far 15 of the
instruments have been sold, and
substantial export orders are expected.
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
Normalised
Voltage
Channel
Number
nV/A
o
o
0
6
/
o
0
5
7
0
0
7
0
0 1
4
0
0 1
S
0
07
6
0
0
7
0
8
0
9
0
/
0/
0/
0
0
00
00
/ /
0
0 0
7
o
0
1
0
4
0
/
1
0
7
0
18
0
00
00
00
00
00
00
/
/
/
/
/
/
5
0
6
0
1
1
i
7 o
79/1
5487
9107
19K7
7117
9 7
4
8
8
1
7
0
1
S
7 0
I
1
0 8
1
9
0
7 8
S
9
6
5
/
7 9
4
7718
1
/
4
4
0
4
7
0
/
7
0
0
S
0
0
7 7
7
0
0
/
1
6
6
8
6
4
08/0
4
7
7
0
7 9
9
0
0
0 0
0 0
70
0
0
0
0
0 0
7/
0
0
0
0
/
? T
0
0
0 0
7 7
8
1
0
00
00
00
0
0 0
1
74
0
0
0
0
0
0
7
1
o
0 0
7
9
0
0 0
1
0 0
0
0
0
0
l7
1
0
0
0
0
0 0
7
7
8
0
0
0
0
0
0
/
7 9
0
0
0
0
0 0
0
1 0
0
0 0
0
0 0
0 S
1/
0
0
0
0
0
0
S
l6
0
S
o
A blueprint
for your sccess.
6
7
$
9
10
11'
12
13
14
17
15
16
26
25
24
AnA'rFo ce
Opportunities no shop floor
Apprenticeship can offer.
Right now, you can take an Air Force
Apprenticeship and become a specialist in
Airframes, Armaments, Rádar,
Communications, Propulsion Systems, Flight
Systems or Motor Transport.
Understandably, when you have completed
your initial training we expect you to spend
another 61/2 years working for us. On full adult
pay of course.
It's not easy!
Success demands application. And a
disciplined approach to work. As an Air Force
Apprentice you'll be required to study in your
own time. And regularly sit for exams. The
rewards are there. Many Apprentices go on to
become Officers.
with
You will have stacks of time to relax provided
you're on top of your studies. At both training
bases (Wagga Wagga and Laverton) excellent
sports facilities abound. Gyms, football
is in the phone book and there's no obligation.
now!
Air Force Apprenticeships are very
popular. So the sooner you have a chat
You're somebody
in T : it's Air Force
Authorised by
Drrector.General Recruiting Dept. Defence
Townsville:
71 3191
Wagga:
21 1100
Adelaide:
223 2891
Sydney
212 1011
Canberra:
82 2333
Perth:
325 6222
Newcastle:
2 5476
Melbourne:
61 3731
* llth
year will be required for 1982 entry for
Certificate of Technology Scheme.
00 II. MI tee
To;
enormous'
On completion of your Apprenticeship, you'll
be part of a team servicing, repairing and
testing some of the most advanced and
sophisticated aircraft and equipment in the
country. The technology of the future will
be in your everyday working life.
Careers Officer the better. The address
Brisbane
226 2626
Wollongong:
28 6492
Hobart:
34 7077
You need to be 15 and under 17 years at time
of entry, an Australian citizen or able to meet
our nationality requirements. We also expect
you to have passed (or be in the process of
passing) your * 10th year of formal schooling
with above -average marks in maths and science
with a physics content. And be reasonably fit.
The scope for the future is
a
Alternatively send or phone for the facts:
What about entry qualifications?
under the expert guidance of professional
instructors. In modem laboratories, classrooms
and workshops.
It's not all work.
grounds, golf courses, swimming pools, tennis
courts and many clubs.
Full time training recognised and
respected by Australian employers.
For the first 21/2 years, you will be taught on
some of the most up-to-the-minute equipment
ticesM
,
AIR FORCE CAREERS
OFFJCER; G.P.O. Box XYZ
to the capital city nearest you
'
%
Yes! I atii"interested in an Air Force
Apprenticeship. Please send me full details.'
1Name:
°Mr:
1
'
1
Address
%
11Apply
State*
ost code.
Dateof Birth.
1
AlAP23D.FP-30
,
-
110
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
23
Computer-controlled
urban bus service
Computer control of bus routes and timetables in a West German town has actually attracted people back to public transport.
The new system provides a "personalised" bus service that
and conserves petrol.
saves time, eases traffic congestion
-
by DAVID SCOTT
city. There are 24 bus stops spaced a few
but with no fixed routes
streets apart
between them. On demand, a bus
comes to your stop and takes you directly to your destination.
"Average waiting time at a stop is six
minutes, said Gert von Lieres of
Messerschmitt-Bolkow-Blohm in Munich,
designer of the system. "In 12 minutes,
95% of requests are met." The speedy
transportation has caught on quickly.
"The buses handle three times more
passengers than when they were on fixed schedules," says von Lieres. "And
there are now fewer cars on the road."
At the bus stop, there is a calling terminal, which has a town map, pusbutton
keyboard, and digital -display panels. You
pick your destination number from the
-
With their gasoline at $2 a gallon and
urban traffic jams and parking a growing
headache, the Germans are taking a
fresh look at public transportation. One
exciting taxilike scheme is a computer controlled local bus service that can save
time, money, and frayed nerves. It's a
personalised people mover with almost
the point-to-point convenience of
private cars. But it practically eliminates
the congestion and environmental pollution created by large numbers of cars.
Fuel conservation is another plus.
A pilot scheme began a year ago in
Wunstorf, a commuter-belt town of
37,000 near Hanover, a major German
Dashboard
terminal shows
driver requests for
stops. Driver
registers location
at each stop with
a pushbutton on
the readout panel.
1
; "
map and punch it out on the keyboard.
As a check, in case you made a mistake,
the number is displayed.
Now
you
insert
your
personal
magnetic -code card into the machine. In
a few seconds, the arrival time of your
bus
determined by a central computer, which also alerts the driver that
is calculated and
you're waiting
displayed in a window on the machine.
A slip of paper printed with the time
identifies you as the passenger.
You pay a small flat fare on entering
the bus. If you watch the electronic
panel over the driver's head, you can see
the name and number of up -coming
stops. Since there may be intermediate
pickups along a changing and perhaps
unfamiliar route, the panel indicates
where you are and when to get off.
The central computer keeps track of all
buses as they move about. The location
of each is signalled over a two-way radio
by the driver at each stop. A button on
the dashboard terminal registers the
name and number of a stop, and the
computer then designates the next stop
for that bus, flashing it onto the
dashboard terminal as a new display.
The computer optimises pickups in accordance with requests and shortest
travel distances.
So far, only five minibuses are in use.
But already they're carrying some 1200
people every weekday. With a full fleet
of 30, waiting times should be cut, and
buses can be used according to demand.
-
-
Reprinted from "Popular Science" with
permission. Copyright° 1980 Times Mirror
Magazines Inc.
r
111'1
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(1
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RS* \ fYV
k
f
oimiemema
Mt
Stop number of destination is entered at calling terminal (left).
Computer-guided bus (right) reaches request stop in minutes.
24
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
Electronic sign on board flashes each stop number along varying route. VW minibus seats eight people.
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The Sanwa name has long been associated with high quality reliable test instruments
and has trained wide acceptance in many areas including Telecom, military
establishments, research, educational, trade and hobbyists. The above represents a
selection of sume of the more popular instruments front the comprehensise Sanwa
power line up.
The
^'.( /SWEAT- Insulation and Loo ft
Meter
TH-510
PDM 500c
no handle to
One man operation
crank.
No searing parts solid state for lung
urouhle-free Itfe
I.argeeasrls read scale
Semple push-button operation
High Performance-Rueeed Construction
460 ED
~men! in a heal
lllp A
12A A
Maintenance simplified
indicator Mock
Pollan resersal
sss
limo( the lane -for
N501
V f4
-Juts case.
s
(' /t).(- measurcmentcapandrts
ss
ith detachable
itch
Lah and Bench
performance ss Ith constant I \1<L
Impedance on A ('.V ranges.
2pA taut hand suspension motemcnt.
IIigh resolution off1H5uA/ImV
I use and diode protection.
At
Simultaneous measurement of A.C. and
Hot Favourite for'remperature 'Measurement
I
Thermometer measuring 50° 31X)°(
In dual ranks.
N -I tsNa:eompan,ese pointed tip
probe. S.? brie a flat tip probe for
surface temperature.
Constant soilage I(' circuit
Minimal Current consumption (3mA)
increases sett ice life of hatters
I50 -hour continuous use.
ns. Cost 3 -in -1 f otic Pulse Scale
YX-380TR
Instant 1..1..1). indication
Ii_h sensitis lh
U -60D
r,Is\ 111 read
o Ide scale.
44µ,A diode protected mosement.
Optional temperature probe for 30° to
150-0
Plug in shunt adaptor optional for IA.
(
BX808M
I
A.C. signals mas he measured esen
ss hen fAlsed ss Ith 1) C.
Pros ides logic pulse analysis facilities
range.
ss lth pulse and DC
Instant 1.11.D. indication of pulses
exceeding() 5 R MS 0-30 MHz.
Popular Choice of 'lobbyists & Sett icemen
of pulses in
of (1.5 VR MS.O-30MH/ using
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I)(' and ACslmululneousls
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Versatility Plus Sensitisits
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t).( signals
3(1µA
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AUCKLAND N 2 77.0924 WELLINGTON N Z 698-272
Conducted by Neville Williams
FIRES IN TV RECEIVERS
WHAT ABOUT LIGHTNING STRIKES?
"Forum" for May, which sought to debunk exaggerated stories
about exploding TV sets, certainly gained its share of attention
from the press and radio stations. One point which came out of
the subsequent discussion had to do with thunderstorms: is the
family TV set at risk from a possible lightning strike?
u
Lightning was not mentioned in the
May "Forum", mainly because it had
nothing to
contention.
do
with
the
original
In March, newspaper articles had warned readers of the danger of TV sets exploding spontaneously and setting fire to
homes especially if left plugged into a
live power point. Our object was to
debunk what we felt was a scare story
and to relieve the public of a lot of unnecessary worry and hassle. We were
-
particularly concerned at reports of
older people nervously groping around
at floor level trying to cope with power
plugs and switches.
What we said appears generally to
have been accepted but a number of
readers did raise the question: "What
about lightning?" J.P. of Lesmurdie, WA
can act as their spokesman:
find very few people aware of this
possibility or even ready to believe it.
I.P. (Lesmurdie, WA)
P.S. There is an article in today's "West
Australian", page 5, reporting a house in
Callangiri gutted by fire "caused by the
antenna of the TV set being struck by
lightning, and causing the set to explode
and catch fire" ..
The report continues: "The local SEC
spokesman said yesterday that lightning
would blow up any electrical appliance,
even if turned off, that was left plugged
into the power point."
So what about the article in "Electronics Australia" debunking this statement? Whom do we believe?
-
ELECTRONICS Australia, July. 1980
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First, J.P.: let's get one point straight:
we did not "debunk" any statement
about lightning strikes. As we noted
earlier, the subject under discussion was
Dear Sir,
a possible explosion and fire caused by
I refer to the article in
today's "West an internal fault. The subject of lightning
Australian" entitled "Theories on TV sets was never mentioned.
debunked" (p23).
What's more, far from any inclination
While I have never had any experience to "debunk" lightning, we have a very
of power trouble, I was certainly very healthy respect for it, dating from
glad that I took the advice of the TV sup- childhood.
plier who installed a colour TV set for
In those far-off days, I lived on a counme some years ago. He strongly advised try farmlet, devoid of
power lines,
me to remove the antenna plug from the telephone lines or anything else
manset in the event of a severe made to be the focus for a lightning
thunderstorm, as the antenna could act strike. Tall gum trees provided the most
as a lightning conductor into the set.
obvious path to earth and, on several ocDuring a recent heavy storm, with casions, I heard or saw them literally
lightning overhead, I duly pulled out the blown into pieces by a direct hit. When it
antenna plug and draped it over the arm happens 20 or 30 metres
from the
of the nearest chair. Subsequently, a jet house, you know about itl
of flame shot out of the plug, which
Not surprisingly, when family fortunes
would certainly have gone into the set,
permitted the purchase of a Colmovox-4
I rang up the supplier next day and he
wireless, and necessitated the erection
told me that his shop had received 19 of a large antenna, an automatic
inclucalls for repairs by customers whose sets sion was an aerial
knife switch with
had been damaged during the storm. I lightning spark gap, and
a thorough earth
26
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This century -old
woodcut caught our
eye. In 1880, they were worried about
the risk of lightning striking gas lamps!
system. On many an occasion, that spark
gap would crackle like a broken ignition
lead, before someone thought it wise to
earth the aerial directly.
When I later came to live in the City
and, in due course, erected an array of
amateur band antennas, I could never
quite get over their apparent passiveness
in terms of static electricity, or the
disinclination of fellow amateurs to
worry about lightning strikes. Maybe it's
because, in the suburbs, one is living
within a huge network of elevated
power and telephone lines.
a
Why, amongst all that, would lightning
single
out somebody's
backyard
antenna?
must admit that the TV antennas
I
which sprout above the roofline of
countless homes around Australia look
like tempting targets for a lightning strike
but, in practice, and on a statistical basis,
the worst seems to happen but rarely.
In making this remark, I'm happy to
have the moral support of Reg Home of
Electrocraft Manufacturing Pty Ltd (Artarmon, NSVV) who have been installing TV
antennas around Australia since the early
days of TV. At one stage Electrocraft
were installing domestic antennas at the
rate of several hundred a week and
they've lost count of how many
thousands they would have erected over
the years. But Reg Horne says that he
could count on the fingers of one hand
the number of instances they've heard
about, where domestic TV antennas
have been the target for a direct lightning strike.
Even in blocks of home units, where
the antenna is usually large and exposed,
he can recall only a couple of installations where they have had to cope with
mechanical damage to the structure.
Where there has been trouble at all, it
has normally required internal service
only to the distribution amplifier. He
'could not remember any damage to an
individual receiver further down the
distribution line.
Reg Horne agreed that: "The chance of
a lightning strike to a TV antenna is
rather like your chance of winning the
big lottery!"
For sure, every now and again,
somebody carries off the big prize and
gets their name in the paper.
Likewise, every now and again,
somebody's TV antenna cops a bolt for
the blue, necessitating a call to the
friendly local TV insurer!
Curiously it was in the May issue
where the TV set fires were discussed
that our "Serviceman" contributor quite
independently told the story of two
lightning strikes on amateur radio antennas, one prior to May '80 and the other
prior to June '78. Both were direct
strikes, both did some damage to electrical equipment but there was no structural damage to the house in either case.
The house fire at Callangiri, mentioned
earlier by J.P., would have to be a particularly unfortunate occurrence.
-
But what precautions do I take personally, when the storm clouds gather?
Plenty, some, or none? Well ...
a couple of amateur band antenboth higher than the TV antenna.
Both are of a type such that the structure
can be earthed and both are, in fact, earthed to a water pipe driven well into the
ground. What's more, the coax leads are
never left plugged into the equipment.
Aside from a direct strike, it is always
possible that a heavy discharge nearby
could take out a front-end transistor.
I
have
nas,
don't mind removing the antenna
from the amateur gear because I'm the
only one who uses it and do so fitfully.
The TV set is quite another proposition.
It would be a bore to fiddle with the
antenna plug every time the set was usbesides which TV antenna plugs
ed
and sockets don't have the appearance
of being proof against excessive
handling.
But I/we do disconnect the antenna if a
storm threatens. don't relish replacing
front-end transistors in TV tuners either!
So my advice follows on naturally: íf
you have an outdoor TV antenna, in the
interest of a good picture, make sure
that the structure is grounded by means
of a stout earth wire and a metal pipe
driven into moist soil. Furthermore, if
lightning starts to flash around your
suburb, and you can exist for a few
minutes without TV, disconnect the
antenna lead from the set. It might just
of a
and nuisance
save you the cost
service call.
What about disconnecting the set from
the power point, as mentioned in the
newspaper article?
don't bother because I
Personally,
regard lightning damage via the antenna
as the greater risk and this can happen
whether or not the set is operating, and
whether or not it is plugged into the
power socket.
I
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The idea of unplugging the receiver is
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Merely switching the set off should be a
reasonable precaution during a violent
local thunderstorm but guess that there
is always the possibility of a massive
voltage surge breaching the switch.
But, to be consistent, one should also
switch off and/or unplug all the other appliances around the home, in case they
should suffer the same fate. But here we
are in the realms of chance. Given the
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---
I
staff?
Assistant Editor Greg Swain lives in a
home unit with communal antenna and
leaves everything as is, storm or no
storm. He has that phlegmatic kind of
disposition.
Leo Simpson, on the other hand,
would much rather unplug things than
run any risk at all of having to repair
them later. He's a very canny, careful
man ... wears belt and braces with
elastic-topped slacks!
Getting back to the subject of fires in
TV sets, the report of a receiver and
house fire, due to a lightning strike, does
invoke some of the questions raised last
month. Did the fire start inside the
receiver, which then set fire to the
-
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72 3450
Martin De Launay 29 1066
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Telephone 72 0133
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
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ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
FORU r--
-
continued
house? If so, what substances were there
in the receiver to support active conflagration? Was it perchance an older
type set, or a later model from which
combustible materials had allegedly
been eliminated? Or did the flash fuse
the antenna or mains leads and start off a
fire simultaneously outside the set?
don't know.
At the time of writing, have received
two first-hand reports of fires in TV sets
due to spontaneous internal failure
nothing to do with lightning. In both
cases, the owners had a technical
background.
F.G. of Bondi, NSW, told me that his set
had only been on for a couple of
minutes one morning, when his son called out to say that it was smoking. By the
time his wife got to the lounge room,
flames were visible but she was able to
drag it into the centre of the room away
from the curtains.
He raced for a blanket to smother the
flames but, no sooner had the blanket
dropped into place, than the set "explodpresumably due to the tube coled"
lapsing. He said that there was never any
risk of them being trapped but, by the
time things were under control, a fair
amount of damage had been done, particularly by fumes and smoke, to fabrics,
furnishings and paintwork.
He mentioned that the set was of European design and manufacture "with a fair
amount of plastic inside" over and above
the usual PC boards and hardware.
I
I
-
-
Whether it was flammable or not, he
had no idea.
That might have remained just another
unexplained incident had it not been for
a letter to hand from Michael Sheriff,
Director of "the colour box", 457 Sydney
Rd; Balgowlah, NSW. What appears in
the accompanying panel is a paraphrase
of that letter, amended to include
aspects which emerged from a direct
telephone discussion.
suggest you read it at this point.
Mr Sheriff told me that a fire in hís own
workshop had alerted him to the problem and that he had seen enough
evidence since then to know that the
failure was not an isolated one. He was
at pains to stress that European receivers
generally were of good quality and those
which had been modified for Australian
conditions posed no special problems.
Where the difficulty arose was with
sets designed for 220V AC, which had
been fed straight on to the Australian
market for use on our local mains
240V in most of Australia but somewhat
higher in WA. Allow for some voltage
rise when the load on the lines is light
eg summer mornings and the sets had
to cope with high temperatures and (for
them) gross over-voltage:
According to Mr Sheriff, there aren't
too many such sets around, compared
with the total number in use, but he is
anxious that his fellow servicemen
should be alerted to the potential
problem.
I
I'
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BUYERS
Are you tired of paying too much
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i
A problem in some European sets:
Dear Sir,
expressWe agree wholeheartedly and congratulate you on the sentiments
and whether it
ed, relative to newspaper articles on colour television receivers
at last, someone has
is safe to leave them on standby, etc. We are pleased that,
saying all along.
been
have
trade
the
of
members
repeated publicly what
have been imBut, having said that, we would point out that a few receivers
Africa) where the
South
and
Germany
World
(eg
the
parts
of
from
other
ported
give
normal mains potential is 220V AC. If not modified, these receivers can
real trouble when plugged straight into Australian 240V mains.
picture and
In most cases, the over -voltage results only in an over-scanned
unmodified
the
of
some
However,
premature breakdown of components.
capacitor,
receivers are still fitted with a YELLOW ITT 1uF 220V AC RF filter
fuses. Alterthe
blow
merely
may
it
down,
if
it
breaks
mains.
across
the
directly
natively, it can emit acrid smoke and it can spontaneously ignite and continue
to burn, even after the power is switched off. What happens after that depends
on the vulnerability of adjacent components.
imported 220V
Owners of TV receivers which could be suspected of being
ITT 220V AC
types would be wise to have them checked. The YELLOW
a GREY or BLUE 250V type,
with
replaced
be
MUST
mains
the
across
capacitor
which is available from Lawrence and Hanson.
fitted with a
For my own company, we recommend that 220V receivers be
Better
rectification.
-wave
full
and
resistors
with
or
auto
transformer,
240/220V
rectifica-wave
half
for
(1KVA
be
provided
still, an isolating transformer should
Stantion, less for full-wave), in accordance with manufacturers' and Australian
recommendations.
and
dards specifications
the
Provided they have been (or are) adapted for our local mains voltage,
Sheriff.
receivers I have in mind reflect quality design and manufacture. -, M. F.
To: DINDY MARKETING
15 BOUNDARY STREET
P.O. BOX 55, RUSHCUTTERS
BAY, SYDNEY 2011
20,000 people have bought over
1,000,000 cassettes from us. They
all can't be wrong. $1 spent could
save you hundreds.
/
1
1
1
Mr/MrslMíss
Address
//i
1
P/code
1111PP6004/EA01
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
1111
29
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lee set Sfr nemmIN.
BUYING BY
MAIL?
0-1020
Cal
munimeta. II kw 20
meet ohs dB wale
....pernerote,
EES
Old. nail 258)
Ir.
and
$1 595
FM
veer
deal
holdwin Compare tbe
X-11384
LOOK MUM: NO WIRES!
dips
SOUND COMPONENTS
78 Brisbane Street Unearth NSW. 061 363)
SUMNER ELECTRONICS
95 Mitchell Steed Bendese Vic. (431 9771
Iwemes once
21.000 ohm, per
borne handyman
use!
IN
a
auper0 meter lor the
Dick Smith and Staff
P.J. O'BRIEN ELECTRONICS
62 We W.. Street Walg.n. NSW. (243)
PURELYSt.RC
ELECTRONICS
01010
$1250
Herís
Dear Customers ...
pat
DC
ohm, Gm
Cal
g ait often. products we adveren, are
completely sold out within few does. Or
problems may hold up delivery of promised
goods so they are not in the atom when
the mitten appears. Please don't blame
the store ms eager ow stale: they me.
pomade.. to do anything above it!
What we are trying 10 say is that it you are
about to drive soles town to pick up
particular Inns, gtv the store a ring first:
VALUE!
1000V
8-100m4
one for the home
popular 3 -way torch is
salet1. Comes complete oath
Mndr Cary strap
yourself
ranges
DC.
S-lsok
one for the olmyetros and
Femme legs mein lobe for
gw.rsl bony Ow spot
and awning enbe. light for
a
a
and
bnght
L
mane,
OM
near
MEASURE IT
DICK...
now buck in stock a you
missed ow bet lime hurry in
TROPICAL
POWER N'SOUNO
15 funklen Street. Trerebeon
went.-
Neer
ECONOMY MULTIMETERS FROM
incldelr wA/ »we
NUMERIC KEYPAD TO BUILD:
IA huge number of interning
±.4,4> a]
project. can be made wen
2 Jack Street.
(454 7641
1C
Are
due
BASIC
INTRO. TO PASCAL
Cal
SYST. 80
& TRS-80
OWNERS:
Oue
NAMBOUR ELECTRONIC SHOP
Shop 4. Iowan Roue, Ann SI. Renshaw. Old. (411 604)
Mn Si
dad
.. $15.95
Ca 82335
BACK IN STOCK!
manulactan
W..
TABLELAND RADIO SERVICE
S
h
masterpiece
neta you ALL
$35.00
the price of
walls a
ned
Cat A 8500
dc
LYREBIRD ELECTRONICS
Fenian
S13.95
.
REFERENCE DATA
FOR RADIO ENG.
eralay usq .3.0.01 I.wuc
w ore, alba 5 cerda Mullet
STEVENS ELECTRONICS
Shop 2.
.
$3950
Owed
$2560
KB ELECTRONICS 8 MARINE
361 Main home. Getaldton. WA (212 176)
KENT ELECTRONICS
42 Stun Highway, Darwi, NT- (ltd 149)
50 Berry
.
The BASIC H'book
By D Dead Ira A moo-
Pea%
lo yea
ADVANCED ELECTRONICS
the
ledwl
Cal A 5530
Listed below are re -sellers who stock a large range of our
products. However, we cannot guarantee that they will have all
Hems in stock or at the prices we advertise.
MAJOR DICK SMITH RESELLERS
and
lien naole be
wenkan 8 b 80
Ca 83806 ..
S4.95
-sy
then dayt rou 00441
$3250
Cat 0-2000
Cat K-3035
a
It yourself and save!
Eft
X-1110
Cat
This mutt be the ultimate In comfort Imagine
the coldest seat In the house becoming a
beautifully warm place to relax your cares
away! Seriously, you owe 1t to yourself and
your family: the soothing comfort of a Dick
Smith warmed toilet seal It's heavenly!
$2950
e
INDY IGNITION:
AND FOR THOSE COLD,
COLD WINTER MORNINGS:
Cd K-3444
r.
Bawse prim behabA
motors up to 1000 wane (meat
less than Ib.1. Rugged and releabl.. loo
lemon *nth gold plated comm. Fun gamy moulding
Cat 61160 supplied Value
63 et ASCII clamant.
MIXER/PREAMP
'afoot
b
ON
computer anentd projects/
You'll need keyboard seen., or later,
Thu Muse k.yboerd twines edewd
wally swnchd key will removable
tope (comes in standard 'OWFRTT
I
Thus
$15
Budding
$690°
lanldy
M-015
83250
(IT- ruck ems). Cm 5.2480 P 4550
Cal
DICK'S FUN WAT
REFERENCE
DATA FOR
$3950
law
GI 8-2400
INTO ELECTRONICS
lOtNo-
ARLEC
SPEED RIGHT:
tap.s
roII
neme 300W RMS Budd ran mplie nadie end
dew sere 6 a gira endSo eAkc ediles wad.
and d w. boat mnaaam
pew borlan..
v.-
to sinning
or TV.
leaded
ncm9 6S NOW
wit
'mimed typo
grade
, 0?
eat or
re
te war
got to be
wed.
about Ica
GIB -2218..,$15.95
Ns. you haven't seen
ay. a h..
r
Ives
nao
teen
-
SACepttH
arc The lo corlee dim la.0ac pok
low
Semple to use just plug into power point and
plug droll. mi..,. etc into
Sortable for all
ved also
-
01501
cram Used
NEW"
Cu
of happy
welt be deseo rr
300W AMPLIFIER
Yak meta wad e
o
Ileerre the eel who ve
mid Oú Seem Casette
SAVE OVER
$2995
professional job Sorb
Hard plug table nbbon to tuner
unman net le raven
63 KEY KEYBOARD
K-3080
SEE EA MAY ISSUE
lots
13.90
Tepee Try same you
WI)RIC
SOri
the before! Its on the
same package as the Drenthe and Super
mach. but Iii, oni . motor sped controller.
hlew TV h erring wound doing nothing Aso
meals Mt Iron
a CRO Why not we your
This
IM: C-3350 SISO .a (S100 ID
hod hiohlr+ C60
Electronic. Australia tuns yea TV set Lets en mho CRO which
C901R C-3752 52.00 ea (51.20 10
uselul The Lit comae complete with instructions. Comae our once with otberelrr
C90 EDR: C -3l54 52.15 ea 1190 10
Car
el
-A
Put -WTI
750,75CI
PLÜÓ
DICK SMITH TAPES
BARGAIN!
NEW
ADAPTOR
TV CRO
el
rete
TO
pas
94010
nbbon or co as awry from neat
Ca. 14512
Easy te h
sucas
Alas Avd.blw headed modal for set ~one rolo
300 each (228 ere 10
wood Cat L-4510
doe. Campine web
Cal L-4153
version (-4152
They.
thousands
895
Kas
en
$495
/1
cal dada
uddls clamp 69cm long
ELECT. VEHICLES:
Err
eeN'yamNbkmab
ENGINEERS
l!111111
Us. with r
1980ARRLHB00K
Re Armen s 9eN
ep, ~array
r to chasm,double ma oath
single amp Complete assembly. Cat 44154
Sle
$550
GOOD ENOUGH TO
GO TO BED WITH!
Is
d¢óon b deseadse
a
hornn a vertical
ho
Mounts .
surf.ce such e' abargebard 3Am
keno
Let L-4150
$89.00
57.50
$5.00
S5,00
Z-5417 $1.48
2.6145 S0.34
Tr
BOOKS
CHIMNEY
MOUNT
Gres for mounting antenna just .bare the roof
moues below. Gab/wised.
line Use
Buy ten or more
If
Irks many people the
you've probably always mated
(Noe
5495
MAST SECTION
Thorbads
NE555
Cat 11-4444
these!
versa
$2.50
TV & FM ANTENNA ACCESSORIES
ANALOGUE FREQUENCY METER (See ETI December)
Cat 1.1-8642 51.95
Pnnted Circuit Board
Cat
Car
O. At aa
L-4451.
$3950
man
INCLUDES
POWER SUPPLY!
GUITAR PRACTICE AMPLIFIER (See ETI Jan)
Peered Circuit Board
Cat 14-8825 54.60
(All other components are normal stock lines)
IC
Cat
7n
anade e' dada Cond.
orm ro 75
W-2080
It
PLAVMASTER AUDIO ANALYSER (See EA Feb)
Cat K-3510 $99.50
Complete kit
Cat H-8373 58.50
Printed Circuit Board v
4136 IC
Cat 2-6105 $1.88
CA3140
Use warh
.y.
BALUN
-
59,95
Cat L
(1'
areas
lot 300 ohms
ecr
t
snatch another few 'mums .hut
1 you went M Power brill, mdecelre
just in ease. We're sold thousands of
sieral for reliable FM recd... .MY
not try one of Ihee. TV masthead amplifiers, TMs, work b.aurilully
n PM wends
ht one el these and It could be the ddlerencs
between plewant hewing end .0101'
Thu mestheed .moldier is easy to hl (lull Instructions suppn.d!
A severe.
end 1. NOT a
t
plug pack mains adspror is included in
Me price all you hen. lo do is boob
up and mire sway.
You'll be so amazed M the improvem.nt in your FM signal. you'll
one lot
a. well,
OVER -REV ALARM (See ETI March)
LM291 7 IC
Cat Z-6112 $2.95
(This protect Is easily built on Matrix board or ºimilar all
other components are normal stock Iinesl.
ETI 466 300W AMPLIFIER
problem
Mr
Ila
d rgAiMe l clock
huge bnght floors
Melon with auto brightness control
Se.,,e sense. lets you
at night
moire
II you cen'l guile get enough
CONTROL TIMER (See EA April)
Cat H-8374 $2.50
Printed Circuit Board
Cat X-1050 $17.50
Temer Module
Pnnted Circuit Board
Use
For
lSc/mStrallDc/m100mup)
eimoebcnq
149°
"IF!
woken
be
station, Thu modern
elements
3
to
ar
east to
NOT ENOUGH SIGNAL IN YOUR AREA
FOR GOOD FM RECEPTION? CHEAT.. .
USE A TV MASTHEAD AMPLIFIER!
TV CRO ADAPTOR (See EA May)
Complete Kit
Cat K-3060 $29.95
Printed Circuit Board
Cat H-8375 $3.75
Complete kit
loft
Very
with saddle clamp
Comes complete
Outside 4uakh nbbm. sets FM
Mew
er.
Cat W-2070
GUITAR/PA PREAMP (See ETI July)
Short form kit (PCB 6 components, no transCat K-3035 $29.50
former or case)
300 WATT AMPLIFIER (See EA June)
Cat H-8376
(Most other components are normal stock lines)
...
Irk
Mow do you
and you llbe able to
300/75 ohm
war te ktiM is ea Met Ike pans Maybe enana ~rem.
As Old SasA Citrina et osa te yew n..eet Dcl Seers mere
Printed Circuit Board Only
antenawait break de bank
ra blest stators on the dial
114
Cal L-4064
75 OHM COAXIAL COOLS
300 OMw rLAT ele nos
s len yea
MUSIC HATH CHARMS TO SOOTHE
THE SAVAGE BEAST
Is,t tbor¡.
refecdmn el ºWiens an Cha FM
bands. Most people have a tuner capable of receiving FM:
all you need is an TM antenna to pick them upr
At
Ths FM
NEW KITS
Ctaaá
HAS ARRIVED!!!
eeet
any 88-/
52750
ORDER VALUE:
$5 (mm) to $9 99
510 00 to 524 99
$25 00 to 549.99
$50.00 to $99.99
5100 or more
-'8P
00
52 00
$3 00
54 00
S1
SS 50
drupes apply to goods sent AY
post in Austnba only. lags and bully hem,
C111101 be sent by post
II you prefer. we mil despatch your order be
NOTE: These
Red Freight to enrwMt.
b packing (charges
post
"ply t0 toter order value
s per table al nghn.
Comet
Then watch your letler10.'
by Com unless you speedy cliff ee.eely (ea
by rail sr err
you Pei hnght oe ddwoy.)
-
ie
Australia
tot only 56.00
mar, below what it costs
usl Larg. and bulky items e. normally sent
-
SAVE OVER 20% ON FAMOUS
CRO!
HOBBYIST
TRIO bandwidth,
10mV
YES! WE HAVE THE
COnMPUTd
Byte.
Ek
OS:
o
MAg.
I
80.
Full 5MHz
per division sensitivity and
a sweep frequency range from
10Hz to 100kHz in four ranges
make this the ideal CRO for
hobbyist use.
But be quick, because we've
only got a few of these left so
ring your nearest store to check
Cat, Q-1230
stocks.
Australian
etc (plus many of the overseas
electronic. maps which have computer sectional
AND THE NEW::
AUSTRALIAN
PERSONAL
CHIPUTER
NOW wet
Gen
me
.br
~We
cum.
n
1KOW
$220
Cat
B
5059
h.d.re »Are
m.ta
people
dams
wloe.ncuel.e.n
IT'S JUST ARRIVED!
19900
owe.. pamines
really pas d.we to
imddq
Oro
the Speak h belle neatest«, ..d
give it wore enmeshes rrlabone
twee (u pee
me
Ube how to turn on
M
caroms -ban..
X y.: n bnma
throb.. Jew on.-rhi. boh le ter
yea while wens with the Semen
84103
$905
INTERCOM
TELEPHONE
PICKUP
Computer le mind e's applicable to
pay computer vein, BASIC language
EXCLUSIVE TO DICK
16K UPGRADE
$30!
KIT: SAVE
SUITABLE FOR ALL COMPUTERSI
Incredible barge. from NW: Sava e
maser. 530.50 on this peck of 8
10 RAs for upgrading
computer memory. rESI Than e
top quality 25005 type. which
suitable for ALL microcomputer.
Win buying so many of lb... the
wn gar huge bulk bay recount..
INCLUDES
an mimed on to you.
Youving.
reap the ~ern. x-1186
INSTRUCTIONS
Sto40
ALSO AVAILABLE: Inderrdrlal 250.5 0116 W^e
.
bear swing Buy at nick's low bulk
and urel
Cat 2 9310
RAMS also el
it....
a
S99D
E.e. hb tu roes huta,, dora
d o by a sunsuit pd Inerw pd u) Wan .rttMcaon wade,
eh Compete wolf, I nee sed .d
we Cat 41300
$150
$695
t
Cr Ns
142153
$2.50
53.75
$1.95
142,55
$150
19.2151
142752
115s54,28
1.1
00
1.60
Conde. ate hilly padded phew. et. Imo
Adptabl, headband end
budget
PC6A You .aove
Se par W arise
A MUST
l
nom. to wear, the
embossed
numeric Westerlies, when
M,h
processor.
m
word
peer
ram p
wen
net
ro,
hairdo»
1
n.esorcrar n
SET OF
remembering the
so much
II
COMPUTER MAINS FILTER
Dart
lo O brio..
the
d Derr
ilTAts
FOR
ALL CHANNELS
IN STOCK
plrin 61e cons darn
Pe pomp cod
A
beep ew
need. to ram
wKtlt
cornea ben'
Co 8.9850
$75
%
arte
ea. a Iwds
Tna
-M*.d
VERNIER DIAL High qu.hty lot pr.ci.ton tuning ... N-3900
H-3º45
PLANETARY MECHANISM 8:1 Ratio
N-3954
DIAL DRIVE SPINDLE Iles B.3mm then
II -3950
to
Stmm
6.3mm
SHAFTS
EXTENSION
N-3926
DIAL DRUM 51nm aren mound dial dora
8-3922
BRASS DIAL PULLEYS 9.6mm e... 3wm
8-3934
matra.
DIAL CORD Spool appro.. 28
N-3940
DIAL SPRINGS ROS unrs.rsal
note
pot me
;
34535
S5.D0'
EACH!
20.71«
26.375
T6.3e5
.yeti
1. e. tew 27MNa
(t
(U
17940
9
27.095
acernon.r'tn pin
u ION)
27I60
[funnel,
dug
SOW/
71961Ca D.e09e
in
nytam rob
earn
mount h xm
RSE?-2GUTTER MOUM7...
RSEdA
ar
nub ern yarn m
e.w
2m item.
r.0
bard rnoeatr/
but
ail
n
54.90
$4.50
51.50
S1.30
*no
IA
If
and yew
n
on NP
9DC
WA
190
52.30
Anton'na
RSL-x56 e0m Antenna
ps11 40m Antenna..
651-14
20. Anson.
651.36
to..
/T
tCN
shads.
pr.
Ilse
a
AnOenn,
'
sus
build yourself yes InaaldA
ee.put lira* watch technology caree
s da hobbyist its e prat gel. .1.a tO
unow amt
N-3922
e
.rlrped lord,
heno, compre
AP1
$
N-3926
WWI
DICK SMITH ELECTRO
125 York Street.
147 Hume Highway.
162 Pacific Highway.
30 Grose Street,
SYDNEY.
CHULLORA.
GORE
HILL
PARRAMATTA
613 Princes Highway, BLAKEHURST
WOLLONGONG.
Ph
Ph
Ph
Ph
Ph
290
642
479
683
546
Ph 28 3800
CD
MAIL ORDER CENTRE:
PO Boo
3377
8922
5311
1133
7144
1980
VIC
399 Lansdale Street. MELBOURNE.
RICHMOND.
656 Bridge Road,
QLD166
Logan Road,
842 Gympie Road.
96 Gladstone Street,
ACT
SA 60 Wright Street
WA 414 William Streets,
321,
©9NORTH RYDE NSW 2113.
r
..:
.nd
O. n.w, imp atoe t.rai.n +.0 +
dr7W eas.n.hidrr rrroasp AM.of ears..
Oath' memo when.. pang yea p«erw.,rch
r.r.,eh nwd orb' w e«t ban ro
sly
.rd
ni..eparhthe
duel in
ca A -95o0
ark earth
(
QS
.sea ryetse we ben
Y h ware
soma 1.
TO FINISH YOUR SYSTEM
D[
s
CQ ` SPEAKERS
ms.
0-4110
9-4113
0-4114
D4118
0-411e
nU
tic suahtr aim ~noon
an May
won
so
1
Dash Smrin,
26 ko. 3 -wry wed B each base
was sperm
year room
.m
Crouse rho
um
rd
foot
stew p evw
531n. 3 -wry wren 10
roe pet par
roar
thesuperb 15 9a. 3 -con
art mown 12 inch
14.8 your warmer.
nines Mt con As n
neon Tuna srnthng
BUILD THEW
YOURSELF
AND SAVE!
re
ear
enamor
r
D
111
8" system: 5159.50 pair
10" system. 5248 DO pair
12' system S298 00 pair
pee 53
pad 75
ht..stems
p
pad
.....
COO-IOu
net)
tot
welcome here
Ph 67 9834
Ph 428 1614
FYSHWICK.
ADELAIDE.
PERTH.
Ph
;
ecototturYt Became IOU
In ecoupeof
step -by. dapentnfon. prowled Violate proud to
b.. tram.
Wain ery/es/r.rU.«erd, a,p.y.
uwea lonpoe k .5555 ban. ee.. eo'
Compete with emestn. btet*a .nap
6233
6255
Ph 80 4944
Ph 212 1962
MIRANDA.
CHERMSIDE.
%Mimic, Tela, weal.
ised,. calor sr moon
watt. wanlr
bet tse, myself
you bipdn
r
lo-,
;
This waded
won Pl.ym.ssn ape.. M, nom
Cowan we prod Ihiammewta *oh
/Jam
0513
wee 051300
has coo let W
v.nlr .pd h pap
(bl Corse) et. stn
K-3457
by
=
rod
le
10.95 0.1102
K/ -
. Wed owe ewer were
Asti
"'" g
worry the labor., And putteeroamtogether a Mt. play
32.50 o-4iW
$20 95
5 20.95
520.95
520.95
.,b
Ennime-area yea- can OW
u'parb R.ymastr sp.ras Why
523.95 9-4104
S 2 1. 95
9
.ailing lot
Wes
.
tend'
:e...
SUPER CNRONO WATCH!
LCD WATCH
200
'i
RSL-21 IBm Antenna.
lrnradeW wake horn gams,
3945
263 Kefre Street.
1
OW(
NEW MARINE XTALS
rn
2..eb
gRSE-145
/w/2w
fir r
11-3940-
NSW
950
RECEIVE 00811 011101
0-0120 2724
D-6123 27800
D-61 t4 17.69
D-0126 27.90
0-8120 z7.91
'
OF 6 VHF ANTENAS SY VAESU
buy the
In
Waretaros hash
tHI Now lick!
Ce A-1500
Bestia
tumida
wow lull.
-
1
1
unit{ SIC.
`
1
Cet D
NeNs inn
whirs «ce,.r.
Renewed
Image' Intent Anota on mrif.
1dl
I s In roed .. 'en
.' Ellmmatll
roquenc e. ram CB radiosp
1
$15
.
;AND A DOLBY DECK:
,ONLY
`
-,k
give
511900
HI SIDE ITNUs FOR
127MEIz TRANSCEIVEFRS
I¡- f '
I
1
Fr1e yore the choice o1 We old AM
aural Am. FM esta.,.' Notch.,
a re err ras .
pedacn week the coro ~Mho
wawa Wars hard Is heat larw deweeatn
FM
p
HOBBYISTS...Did you know?
N
es e
nerd lelds
S
$995°
-1t2
NOWT
WE STOCK A WIDE RANOX OF PARTS TO HELP YOU COPE
WITH A VARIETY OF CONSTRUCTION PROBLEMS.
N-3900
This
high power unit le
fishermen.
nnnel.Mor,e titled with
vrovie
.+hikers.
emergency 27.880MHz). Maaimum
plenty
ry of power for
ge
p
legal
pea le 6 wane
long distance eommantcetionel Come.
earphone and
strap.
,plot, with cafe.
inatrucuons,
.de' ha m.
revash
wows
Wiwi
Webs
here
Ilia tuner
Winn.
ira
epa, -05.13
Cy T-S,gO
compact
Cat X 3006
...ier'
tilt
(}4100
an
get
495
A
hrirnndew
/
POWER HANDHELD.
HI
41141
KEYS FOR SORCERER Don't caught in emergency!
$
ideal for
Cat 451300
:TUNER'
á
for every
hobbyist!
WORD PROCESSOR
l
$9900
41991"
99:
M
79'
mned
HEADPHONES
p 120
Item
Wee mama
Watery eland hr a.d prow.ton for external horn
L-5108
$975
00
.
of
thb
Compton.
lead and plug
OW
15060450
195a11360
13068.41
Ow. y. o
wooled web
ea.
mar,
ahh corMne bubne.
enema. blhbae
owl
heal. pmt«ion those M+ Tb , owl..
rn
,f bah, beet ryM: linty sal coeW
tern, tar,
lightweight mimes hours of setae
t anniae Peen.
err mount.) OW.
5123:
1
pip
. M.
Ike ins
at
A5A sun .bate
newt on
bare
ne
bhs a email
e
out
reflected bark and deterred a, as
«fiord SOT
business you mein
YS STERFO
melt
to
the, elan,
It
nn
yea /Mormance et
end 30
yb
:FM IS HERE! HOW:
ABOUT AN AM/FM
Sydney (02)888 3200.
and
F.atunna
charmed .unput.
S249 00 back ia
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PROFESSIONAL AUDIO
ENTERTAINMENT
LOUDSPEAKERS: Technics' response to a
longstanding problem
For decades, loudspeaker manufacturers have been wrestling
with the problem of producing loudspeaker cones that are, at the
one time, durable and consistent, rigid, resonance -free and light
in weight. Technics engineers claim that they have edged closer
to the ideal with their new "honeycomb" cones, due to be released in Australia later
this month.
by NEVILLE WILLIAMS
Virtually from the day they first made
their appearance, moving -coil "dynamic"
loudspeakers
have
been
At the other extreme, high frequency
need to have small,
lightweight cones if they are to operate
efficiently up to at least 15kHz.
Mid -range drivers fall midway between
these two extremes and, if you examine
typical three-way loudspeaker systems,
the basic and differing needs will be seen
to have been met.
Not surprisingly, so-called "full -range"
fitted
predominantly with cones made from
paper. Traditionally, they have been
dyed black, as the appropriate thing to
do, although AWA/MSP sought at one
time to give their product eye appeal (?)
with cones of bright yellow or bright
green!
Somehow, they didn't look right.
The word "cone" is no accident: paper
can offer a reasonable combination of
rigidity and lightness only if it is formed
into an appropriate shape. So that part of
the loudspeaker which moves to agitate
the air, and which might otherwise have
been called the diaphragm, is more commonly referred to as the cone
a term
that dates back to the pioneers Rice and
Kellogg in 1925.
The manufacture of paper cones has
been characterised by endless debate, as
well as by "secret" processes, but certain
things are self-evident.
If a driver is to perform well in the bass
region, its cone has to "pump" a lot of
air. It needs either to be of large
diameter or else of smaller' diameter but
capable of moving freely to and fro
typically up to 3 to 4mm either side of its
rest position.
Accordingly, the cones in bass drivers
(or "woofers") tend to be thicker than
normal and capable of acting as a pump
or "piston" over the bass range and up to
at least a few hundred Hertz. The central
"spider" and outer surround have to
cope with the substantial movement but
fortunately, at these lower frequencies, a
bit of extra weight does not matter too
much.
-
-
32
F
"tweeters"
loudspeakers pose a real headache for
designers, the first problem being obvious: somehow, they have to contrive a
cone voice coil suspension system which
is rugged enough to handle low frequency energy and yet light enough to
reproduce very high frequency signals.
A further problem is more subtle: at
drive frequencies approaching (and
beyond) 1000Hz, where the wavelength
diminishes towards (and below) the
cone dimensions, it (the cone) begins to
buckle and vibrate in various modes
across its surface. This can cause peaks
and troughs in the response, increased
waveform distortion, and even audible
buzzes extraneous to the program.
In an attempt to forestall this kind of
cone "break-up" even in limited range
drivers, designers often mould annular
grooves into the cone, which decouple
sections of the cone from each other. At
the higher frequencies, only the central
segment of the cone may vibrate. At
progressively lower frequencies, a
greater cone area is driven by the voice
coil.
And here we move into the area of
argument, debate and dark secrets: The
number and detail of the decoupling
rings; the possible use of radial stiffeners;
the texture of the cone material; its
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
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[IIThis very light aluminium core is the
heart of Technics' new honeycomb disc
flat diaphragm. The nominally hexagonal
cells compress towards the centre to
provide effective axial symmetry.
weight and stiffness; its surface hardness;
the enclosed angle of the cone; the
possible resort to "curvilinear" shape ...
And so on, ad tedium!
Perhaps it is sufficient to say that, over
the years, we have seen just about every
conceivable kind of paper cone, from
one extreme to the other: what look like
"cheapie" cones folded from flat, likely looking paper and glued, seam and all,
to a voice coil former and an outer support ring. But there have been others
lovingly (and expensively) moulded from
selected fibres in a process reminiscent
of a fine felt hat! In many such cases the
description "paper" may do the product
less than justice.
There have also been notable efforts to
escape the "paper" syndrome altogether
although the very persistence of conventional cones must be some tribute to
-
their practicality.
In
the 1930s,
if memory serves me cor-
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amplifier sections mark a straight
line toward that ideal of amplification:
a straight wire with gain. And now,
drawing on its priceless experience
as a hi-fi specialist, Sansui presents
its R-70 stereo receiver and A-80
integrated amplifier.
DC (direct coupling) circuitry is
closest to our ideal of pure amplification. DC power amplifier stages
are directly coupled and all capacitors
'_
'th gain.
are eliminated. And Sansui's DC Servo configuration prevents sub-
The design of all Sansui power
t
sonic signals from reaching your
speakers so the music you hear is
purer and free from coloration.
Both power amplifier sections
feature Sansui's original DC -Servo
amplification. When you hear how
accurately recorded music is
reproduced, you may well wonder
how Sansui achieved such an
audible miracle.
Advanced technology includes
the special microelectronic devices
in the FM/AM tuner section of the
R-70 and the OCL output of the A-80.
Advanced features include LED
peak power level displays for both
units and a built-in MCtpre-preamplifier for the A-80.
But the real secret is that Sansui
does not make a fetish of advanced
technology. Instead, it is the applica-
tion of that technology continuously
-
ht
-
monitored by that sensitive instruthat
the human ear
ment
receives the highest priority. Our
dedication, in the final analysis, is
to faithful reproduction of the
actual musical performance.
R-70 DC -Servo Receiver:
65 RMS watts x 2. THD: 0.08%
A-80 DC -Servo Integrated Amplifier:
65 RMS watts x 2. THD: 0.05%
SANSUI
R-70/A-80
SANSUI ELECTRIC CO., LTD.
14-1 Izumi 2-chome, Suginami-ku, Tokyo 168, Japan
VANFI (AUST.) PTY. LTD.
297, City Road, South Melbourne, Victoria 3205,
Australia Tel: 690-6200
283 Alfred Street, North Sydney, N.S.W. 2060,
Australia Tel: 929-0293
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It's only natural that the Bee Geés - the world's
most popular recording group - master their hit
albums on the world's most popular professional
recording tape - Ampex Grand Master. In fact,
more hit albums, by more top stars, are mastered
on Ampex tape than on all others combined.
Now there's a home version of Ampex Gránd
Master. So you can get the same star quality at
home that top stars like the Bee Gees insist on in
the studio.
You'll get the incredible signal-to-noise ratio
and low distortion the Bees Gees get. And whether
you choose normal or high bias cassette, you'll be
recording on the one component that never needs
upgrading. Ampex Grand Master tape.
-
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The sound-ófthe stars: .
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RARE ADDITIONS FROM
ING ABOUT. AND LISTENING TO.
WORTH '
. Á
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á
A
Rage: very valuable.
Additions: the things added.
a range of ultra -high
Mara
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performance sophisticated components
blending state-of-the-art engineering
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Marantz rare additions will add a
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so hook up with your local
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Marantz dealer and listen to your
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outperform anything you've heard to date.
i
-
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ST-500 AM/FM STEREO
COMPUTUNER
features state-of-the-art electronic
quartz-locked synthesized tuning with
14 station (7 AM, 7 FM) memory presets.
AM tuning is particularly sensitive and,
with more FM stations due in 1980, the
i
tuner is a sound investment
for the future.
PM 700 INTEGRATED AMPLIFIER
ST -500
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NIIGRAE5).prQDSSy.
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.
d
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01444 F.
when recording time
is a factor. Also: Dolby
Noise Reduction; digital display
including clock and LED meters.
Your Marantz stockist will
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Marantz components. If you demand
critical performance standards
hear Marantz.
maranf,
Now you're listening.
Distributed by: MARANTZ (AUST.) PTY. LTD.
32 Cross Street. Brookvale. N.S W. 2100
Telephone: (02)939 1900 Telex AA 24121
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high-fidelity recording
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features Dual 5 -band Graphic Equalizers
and delivers 70 watts True Power per
channel into 8 ohms.
The current interest in
high -definition moving coil cartridges
makes the built-in moving coil
head -amp on the PM 700 a particular
plus. This model offers the most
demanding audiophile a new concept in
power, price and performance.
SD 8000 2 -SPEED CASSETTE DECK
takes your system beyond the traditional
limits of cassette deck technology. The
Compudeck Feather -Touch control
centre (inset left) offers superior
programming capability, e.g. up to 19
selections in whatever order you wish.
Two speeds give you
1
.Ye
the flexibility of true
,.
fl
(
When the TV action's
too good to miss,
tape it.
It always happens. You're going out and
there's a great sporting programme, movie or special
on TV. Next time, instead of hearing how good it was,
tape it with a National VHS Video Cassette Recorder.
Simply set the date and time on the 7-day timer,
select the desired station and the National NV-8610A
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Even recording full length movies up to 3 -hours.
1
*Caution: Unauthorised recording of TV programmes and
other materials may infringe the rights of others.
Because time doesn't stand still...
1
IT
ational
Instant Home Video
D624
u
u
rectly,
late
the
Fritz
Langford -Smith
(editor "Radiotron Designers Handbook)
imported a then new (I think) Hartley Turner full -range driver. Unlike other hifi
loud speakers of the day, it had a hard,
brown bakelised cone and unusually soft.
suspension. On sinewave input, it sounded uncannily clean but it seemed to
"muddy up" badly on complex musical
passages.
Unfortunately, before we had the
chance to work out what might be
wrong, someone got the leads confused
and plugged it into 240V AC. And that
was that!
In Britain, GEC produced an eight-inch
bass driver with a cone of shim brass.
This seemed to make quite a name for
itself, particularly in association with its
companion tweeter.
Philips experimented with cones
("pistons"?) made of thick polystyrene
foam and one 12 -inch woofer at least
received a good deal of attention at the
time.
The Leak "Sandwich" driver also used a
polystyrene cone but was faced with
aluminium foil.
Currently and for the past 10 years or
more KEF drivers have also used multi layer cones, referred to in their literature
as "Bextrene". Their highly regarded
B-139 bass driver, and its closely related
passive radiator, both use a wedgeshaped flat -faced diaphragm moulded
from polystyrene foam and surfaced
with blackened aluminium foil.
As a manufacturer of loudspeakers on
a very large scale, the Matsushita group
(Technics/National/Panasonic) have probably looked at cones as closely as
anybody. They have certainly been well
aware of cone "break-up" (or standing wave) problems, as revealed originally
by rather primitive methods and, more
recently, by strobe and laser technology,
or by computer simulation.
Two other problems have been looked
at
amongst others:
(1) The interaction between pressure
waves radiated from the inward sloping
surfaces. Cancellation and summing produces minor peaks and troughs across
the upper end of the spectrum. Technics
refer to the behaviour as "front cavity
effect".
(2) The need to determine the "acoustic
centre" of woofer, squawker and
tweeter cones and to stagger the drivers
-
The thinkiñg behind
the honeycomb disc
loudspeaker
With flat drivers (far right) the acoustic centres (dot) can be aligned by mounting the
drivers flush with the baffle. Conventional
drivers have to be staggered for a linear
phase relationship, necessitating a stepped
enclosure.
fl
Four of at least 10 significant vibration modes for a centre -driven square plate, as
revealed by. computer simulation. The modes (1 to r) are at about 2.7, 2.8, 3.0 and
3.4kHz.
-
Above: Three of about eight significant vibration modes for
round cones and, below, typical node lines involved. The frequencies (I to r) approximate 0.76, 1.3, 1.7kHz.
Node
Center Drive
T
-
~
Honeycomb Onc deovpm
ri1
-
Node
Nodal Drive
Vibration modes in diaphragms can be minimised by applying drive across the whole
surface but this is really not practical in a heavy duty dynamic driver. Technics say
that, by applying drive at a' selected node region, one major vibration mode can be
eliminated and others significantly reduced in amplitude.
Game
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A cross-sectional diagram of the new Technics SB-10 system
woofer, which uses a 32cm dia honeycomb disc diaphragm,
directly driven by a 16cm dia voice coil. The SB-10 is said to
work comfortably to 3300Hz but it would normally be rolled
off above about 400Hz in a typical, high quality three-way
system.
Pule
Cult Poe
Voce cod
the 58-7 system woofer, a 5cm honeycomb disc is
driven via a specially rigid cone cemented at the nodal
diameter.
In
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
33
Hear a MILLION Dollars worth
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FULL GUIDE
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34
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
accordingly, ín order to achieve linear
phase characteristics. This can add to
enclosure cost and increase the number
of corners and edges, with possible
undesirable diffraction effects.
Motivated by such considerations,
Technics engineers turned their attention
to the possibility of producing a line of
flat diaphragm drivers. These could
hopefully exhibit a flatter frequency
response and, as well, offer linear phase
characteristics when mounted directly
on the front of a normal rectangular
enclosure.
In a classical example of "sideways
thinking", Technics turned away from
traditional materials like paper and foam
derivatives and turned instead to the aircraft industry. Here the need for light,
rigid, relatively plane surfaces is commonly met by a honeycomb structure
a sandwich of (typically) hexagonal cells
between two plane surfaces.
With loudspeaker diaphragms in possible view, Technics research showed that,
weight for weight, an ultra -light
aluminium honeycomb sandwich offered an inherent bending stiffness 700
times that of plane aluminium sheet and
1000 times that of Kraft paper. Its potential for use as a flat diaphragm seemed
obvious.
However, it became apparent that a
honeycomb sandwich did not necessari-
Wall mounting for speakers
Pivotelli multi -directional audio-visual wall brackets can provide a new and practical answer to a familiar furnishing problem in small rooms: hifi speakers or TV receivers can be
suspended unobtrusively from walls and angled to suit listening or viewing needs.
-
needs
either clamp types or screw
types.
In terms of utility, the distributors
say that,
-
The distributors, Associated Steel
Equipment Pty Ltd, say that Pivotelli
brackets can be obtained to fit
equipment from about 18cm to
125cm in width and will support
weights up to 110kg. They are
available with multiple horizontal
pivots and vertical tilt and are made
of high grade solid 'steel, nylon
coated in either black matte or gloss
white. The brackets are the subject
of a London Design award.
Two kinds of base plate are
available, to suit differing equipment
ly exhibit even stiffness along all stress
seemed to be an
undesirable characteristic in something
that was to be used as a loudspeaker
diaphragm.
Further study was made also of possible diaphragm shapes and' this involved
a re-examination of vibration modes in
square diaphragm, as originally set down
in 1909 by the German physicist Walter
lines
and
this
Ritz.
Technics choice ultimately reverted to
flat, circular diaphragm, of diameter
appropriate to the role of the driver, and
using what they describe¡ as an "axial
symmetry" core. As will be apparent
from the photograph, the,"core is made
up from concentric rings of "hexagons"
which are progressively flattened as the
diameter diminishes towards the centre.
The choice of a round cone was conditional, so they say, on theirlability to apply drive in such a way that it would tend
to minimise, rather than to excite vibration modes which would be evident to
some extent, even in a disc of
a
The Technics 58-10 system uses a 32cm
honeycomb disc woofer, an 8cm
honeycomb disc mid -range and a "leaf"
tweeter with crossovers at 400Hz and
4000Hz. Power rating is 100W DIN or
150W music, and response 28Hz to
125 k Hz!
honeycomb structure.
Drive applied across the whole surface
would have been ideal but it would not
have been a practical method for a complete range of drivers. By 'contrast, cen-
not only can the
loudspeakers, TV, etc be angled for
best results, but that the need for
stands trolley or shelves is
eliminated, leaving the floor space
uncluttered and simplifying cleaning. With proper planning, trailing
leads can also be hidden.
The set-up illustrated is just one of
a number depicted in a brochure
available from the distributors, some
being smaller and simpler, others
larger and more complex.
It is evident also that they have a
wide-ranging potential for use in
commercial, industrial, educational
even medical situations. Applications which have already emerged
from their relatively short exposure
in Australia incude hifi and sound
equipment, TV and other audio
-
visual
units,
video recorders,
microwave ovens and heart
monitors.
For further information, price lists,
etc, contact Associated Steel Equipment Pty Ltd, 11 Hornscroft Place,
Moorabbin, Vic 3189. Telephone (03)
95 9355, 95 9921.
tre drive to a disc diaphragm is the least
desirable mode, because the entire surface is available to accommodate the
maximum number of modes.
What Technics engineers did was to
study the significant vibration modes for
the various sizes of diaphragm and identify the nodes
those areas which tend
to remain stationary while the rest of the
panel is vibrating. By applying drive in a
selected nodal region, they claim that
vibration modes (or "break-up") is
substantially inhibited. Further that the
range over which the diaphragm will act
as a piston can be extended by a couple
of octaves.
In the case of the new 32cm woofer,
this meant fitting it with a voice coil of no
less than 16cm to secure the desired
"Nodal" drive. A voice coil, so large in
relation to the diaphragm, poses special
problems in relation to the coil itself, to
the magnet structure and, indeed, to the
whole configuration of the driver.
However, Technics are confident that
consumer reaction will prove that their
pioneering has all been very worthwhile.
Four of the systems in the new
Technics "Honeycomb" range are due to
be released in Australia around the end
of this month.
-
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
35
AUDIO ELECTRONICS
The SB-3 is a two-way system combining a 22cm honeycomb woofer and a
2.8cm honeycomb tweeter, with attenuator control. Dimensions are 27 x 44
x 23.7cm (WxHxD) and power rating
75W music, 50W DIN. Response is
quoted as 45Hz to 35kHz (-10dB).
The SB-5 is a larger system (31.5 x 58 x
31.8cm) with an 8cm honeycomb disc
mid -range driver added, also with its
own level control. Crossover frequencies are at 800Hz and 4500Hz and
response 38Hz to 35kHz (-10dB). Power
rating is 110W music and 75W DIN.
In the SB-7 a 25cm honeycomb disc
woofer is used, plus an 8cm honeycomb
disc mid -range driver, and the Technics
"Leaf" tweeter. This last has a flat ultra-
Magnification of Cutting the Groove
Stanton-The
Professional
inthe
Reco
lightweight diaphragm with overall drive,
rather like a super -power "ribbon" configuration, and with a claimed response
to 125kHz! As before level controls are
provided. Dimensions are 36 x 63 x
31.8cm, response 34Hz to 125kHz, and
power rating 130W music and 90W DIN.
Big boy of the present range is the
SB-10 with the same mid-range driver
and leaf tweeter (and level controls) but
with a 32cm honeycomb disc woofer.
Dimensions are 40.2 x 71.1 x 31.8cm,
response 28Hz to 125kHz, and power
rating 150W music and 100W DIN.
In all cases, the drivers are mounted on
the front face of a stoutly built rectangular enclosure and line up to provide a linear phase relationship.
Ind
Application- Cutting the
master- Stanton plays
it back
Record manufacturing starts with
the simultaneous cutting and
playback of the lacquer original.
Recording engineers rely on the
Stanton 881S Professional
Calibration Standard Cartridge at
this crucial point to monitor the
performance of the cutting system
and the entire sound transfer
process.
The Stanton 881S is perfect for the
playback of the master because it
assures minimum wear of the
lacquer groove through the patented
StereohedronTM stylus tip. The
Stereohedron has exceptionally
wide contact area for reduced
pressureon the groove wall. And the
881S tracks superbly because of its
low dynamic tip mass.
aww.-
- continued
PEERLESS
OF DENMARK have released
two horn -loaded tweeters intended for
use in high quality sound reinforcement
systems. The LK1OHT has a sensitivity of
95dB for one watt at one metre. For the
the figure is 99dB. Both can be
used with 50W systems when crossed
over at 1500Hz, 12dB/octave. They can
be used in 100W systems with a 4000Hz
crossover. The manufacturers claim that
KO1OHT
their "soft dome" design ensures smooth
response, low distortion and low colouration. For information on these and
other Peerless drivers, contact G.R.D.
Group Pty Ltd, 698 Burke Rd,
Camberwell 3124. Tel: (03) 82 1256.
4111111111~
6
i
40
L
IN
11111111
Pictured above is a new Krohn -Hite ultra
low distortion audio oscillator. Listed as
model 4400, it covers the range from
1Hz to 110kHz with sinewave output
having a distortion level of less than
.001%. Output is level at 7V RMS to
within .05dB and attenuation is available
to 90dB. Details from any Warburton
Franki office.
MAGNAVOX (AUST) PTY LTD have just
celebrated 50 years of manufacturing
loudspeakers in Australia. Plans are in
hand to upgrade marketing activities,
with new models for high-performance
car stereo and for do-it-yourself hifi enthusiasts. A catalogue is in preparation,
together with distinctive merchandising
packs. For information: G. K. Barter,
Magnavox (Aust) Pty Ltd, 6-12 O'Riordan
St, Alexandria, NSW. Phone (02)
699 4506.
French speakers from L.S.T. Electronics
r
>
.
I
1
n
C 1979 STANTON
MAGNE TICS
Sole Australian Distributors:
LEROYA INDUSTRIES rró
aw
STNTOfl
THE
CHOICE OF THE PROFESSIONALS
noteworthy move, a company in Tam worth, NSW is importing a range
of STARE
loudspeakers and ancillary components from France. The range
some of which are
pictured above includes 310mm and 244mm sub woofers,
244mm and
woofer/mid-range drivers, various full-range and mid -range drivers and 204mm
tweeters.
Crossover networks are available to suit recommended
combinations, plus appropriate enclosure details. For information on the SIARE range
of loudspeaker products, contact L.S.T. Electronics, 374-378 Peel Street,
"Centrepoint Tamworth, NSW
2340. Telephone
In a
Head Office: 156 Railway Pde,
Leederville, Western Australia, 6007
Phone 81 2930
NSW Office: 7 Jordan Rd., Wahroonga,
2076. Phone 487-2543
-
-
.
(067) 66 2525.
,
NEW LINES FROM M. R. ACOUSTICS
The letters QED once appeared at the foot of geometry
theorems; nowadays, they are more likely to be associated
with a range of hifi supportive products, exported from Britain
and sold in Australia through M.R. Acoustics of PO Box 165,
Annerley, Old 4103.
Price of the renovator kít is quoted as
$13, for which outlay it should be possible to refurbish several dust covers.
The second item pictured is a five -
One such product ís aimed at the enthusiast who watches despairingly as the
acrylic cover of his prized phono deck
becomes scratched and dull. It tends to
take the shine off his whole system!
The QED Dust Cover Renovator Kit
contains a tube of white paste
and
presumably a very fine abrasive
two applicator cloths, which can be used
to polish out the scratches. Instructions
on the box warn that the operation
might have to be repeated several times
in the area of deep scratches. We imagine that that would be putting it mildly
the lesson being that carelessness with
-
metre length of very heavy gauge twin
flex, which QED (and M.R. Acoustics)
recommend as low -loss loudspeaker
cable. Appropriately, they make no fancy claims about it being a "super" cable,
but they do point out that it has 79
strands, giving a 20 -amp rating, with a
DC resistance of 0.0076 ohms/metre and
a capacitance of 90pF/metre. As such, it
would introduce negligible loss in any
likely domestic installation, while the
-
n
-
CHEAP
TAPES!
BULK TAPES
DISCOUNTED
mexell.
LN C60 ULTRA LOW NOISE Box of 12
LN C90 ULTRA LOW NOISE Box of 12
LN C120 ULTRA LOW NOISE Box of 12
UD 060 ULTRA DYNAMIC Box of 12
UD C90 ULTRA DYNAMIC Box of 12
UDXLI
UDXLI
C60
C90
EPITAXIAL Box of
EPITAXIAL Box of
12
12
UDXL II C60 EPITAXIAL Box of
UDXL II C90 EPITAXIAL Box of
12
12
&TDK
DYNAMIC Box of IO
D -C90 DYNAMIC Box of 10
AD -C60 ACOUSTIC DYNAMIC Box of
AD -C90 ACOUSTIC DYNAMIC Box of
SA -C60 SUPER AVILYN Box of 10
SA -C90 SUPER AVILYN Box of 10
D -C60
T COVER RENOVATO
The QED Dust Cover
Renovator kit (right) is
supplied in a polystyrene
pack
and
INCORRNIATING ACRYLIC SCRATCH REMOVER
.L
connections.
lti.,,.,n,
.
l,rr.s. Lase, le.tmq Sneer.
Ca.ynlrte Y..,,, Cb+,i..g CMnhx
M.nl.p Vn. G.,., Caw. Lw,M lile New
ugly scratch or a lot of work to get rid of
it!
Whether or not the scratch is removed
completely, a container of liquid polish
and a lint -free cloth should make the
cover glisten anew. The polish is also
said to render the acrylic less liable to
pick up electrostatic surface charges.
As a matter of interest, the instructions
suggest that the treatment can be used
on things like watch "glasses". We took
them at their word and, within a couple
of minutes, the much abused glass of the
transparent again!
CHF
CHF
BHF
BHF
AHF
AHF
.-,e.
-
watch
became
19
S18.00
S23.00
128.00
$33.00
534.00
S43.00
514.00
S11.00
SONY,
an acrylic dust cover will bring its own
dubious reward, either in the form of an
writer's
_. -
cardboard
loudspeaker
,.r
.
10
MAR -C60 METAL (METAL CASE) Each
MA -C60 METAL Each
sleeve. Pictured below is
a Sm length of heavy duty cable well suited for
'I
ANTI -STATIC POLISH
........_.,..
&
118.00
S25.00
537.00
129.00
535.00
S38.00
$48.00
$40.00
$50.00
positively
modest capacitance should not upset
any ordinary amplifier.
A slight ridge down one side of the
cable allows the conductors to be identified without electrical measurement.
The cable is priced at i'$10 per five metre length or $185 per 100 -metre roll.
Other lines mentioned in recent
literature from M. R. Acoustics include:
BERKSHIRE AUDIO: Equipment devised
by this American company, and stocked
by M. R. Acoustics, can' measure the
capacitance of phono arm/cable combinations and ensure that an optimum
R/C match is obtained with a given
cartridge.
WESTRAK CARTRIDGE: Model 501 is a
moving coil type manufactured in Japan
for Howland West of the UK. It weighs a
modest five grams and offers a nominal
sufficient to drive a
output of 3.5mV
normal amplifier directly. Price is $280.
TURNTABLES & ARMS: The JH turntable
combines economy and simplicity with
good performance at $48,,l plus $24 for a
perspex cover. Build your own plynth.
The JH arm sells for $98 and SONUS cartridges from $65 up.
Inquiries may be directed to M. R.
Acoustics at the addressi given above.
They are accessible byi phone: (07)
48 7598 or (07) 284 6764.1(WNW)
-
C60
Box of
C90
Box of 10
Box of 10
Box of 10
Box of 10
Box of 10
C60
C90
C60
C90
518.00
524.00
S24.00
528.00
S29.00
10
FL C60 SUPER LOW NOISE
FL C90 SUPER LOW NOISE
FXI C60 PURE FERRIX Box
FBI C90 PURE FERRIX Box
FXII C60 PURE FERRIX Box
FXII C90 PURE FERRIX Box
MC 60 METAL Each
MC 90 METAL Each
$39.00
Box of 10
Box of 10
517.00
S23.00
of 10
S26.00
S31.00
532.00
541.00
S11.00
514.50
of 10
of
10
of
10
OPUS
UDC 90 EXTENDED RESPONSE Box of 12 525.00
$19.00
G -C90 G -TAPE LOW NOISE Box of 20
FURTHER DISCOUNTS
AVAILABLE ON
PURCHASES OF 10
BOXES OR MORE
ADD: PACK 8 POST
5+
boxes
$2,00
$1.00
3-4 boxes
SI.SO
$2.00
53.00
54.00
53.00
53.50
$5.00
1-2 boxes
Within Vic
NSW/SA/TAS
All other places
within
list
To:
MAIL ORDER CENTRE,
A.M.S. SYSTEMS,
HAWTHORN ROAD,
CAULFIELD. VICTORIA 3162_
PHONE: (03) 523 7145
135
Stock at prices shown available at
time of going to press.
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
37
O
0 0
2121
O
0
..
..
...e
0
KIFI REVIEW
0
Technics SL-10 phono player
Technics has taken a most unusual approach with this new
SL -10 turntable. It has a linear tracking tonearm built into.the lid
which must be closed for normal operation. The tonearm is
dynamically balanced and can play in any attitude, even vertically. But perhaps the most dramatic and most noticeable feature
of the Technics SL -10 is its small size
it is not much larger, in
plan, than an LP record sleeve.
-
While there is a vast range of turntables on the Australian market, most
conform to fairly conventional design
principles. As a result, there are a great
many look -alike turntables with little to
separate them in terms of styling or performance. This can certainly not be said
of the Technics SL -10. It is easily the most
radical development in turntable design
that we have seen for many years.
In some ways, the SL -10 can be regarded as the disc answer to the cassette
deck. For example, once the record is
placed on the turntable and the lid closed, the user has no contact, at all, with
the disc. The user plays the disc by
remote control using the deck controls.
We accept this as normal for playing
cassettes but it is little short of revolu-
tionary for discs.
This isolation of the record has a
number of worthwhile advantages. First,
the record is less likely to be exposed to
dirt; the user cannot cough, sneeze or
blow cigarette smoke over it. Second,
the cartridge cannot be damaged by
clumsy handling and third, because the
record is played in what is virtually a
sealed chamber, there is less likelihood
of direct acoustic feedback from the
loudspeakers.
As shown by the photograph on the second page of this review, the compact
SL -10 player opens into two halves. The
lower half naturally contains the turntable platter and its direct-drive motor
and accompanying circuitry. The upper
half, the lid, contains a motor-driven
lihear tracking tonearm plus its control
circuitry plus, on the top surface, the
user controls.
When the record is placed on the platter and the lid closed, the disc is
clamped in place by a rotor section attached to the lid. Pressing the "start" button on top of the lid will then initiate
play. The miniature tonearm leaves its
rest, moves over to the lead-in groove of
the record and gently lowers the car38
tridge to the record surface. What is so
different about this mode of operation
from that of a conventional automatic
turntable? Read on.
Whereas most automatic players do
not sense the record size (the user does
it instead), the Technics SL -10 senses the
disc diameter by means of three radial
groups of three infra -red LEDs (at least,
we assume they are infra -red). Corresponding to these LEDs is a diagonal
row of three photo transistors which, by
a simple logic system, are able to deter-
magnitude less than the maximum tracking error of good quality conventional
tonearms which is typically 2°, this is not
the major advantage of a linear tracking
arm. In truth, the distortion due to lateral
tracking error is far less than the distortion inherent in typical cartridges.
No, the major advantage of a linear
tracking arm is that it does away with the
need for anti -skating compensation and
its attendant compromises. Because the
linear tracking arm produces no skating
forces, the cartridge should have better
tracking performance which should, in
turn, translate to lower distortion.
Technics claini another advantage for
their tonearm in stating that the player
may be used horizontally, vertically or
even upside down. This is true because
the very short arm is dynamically balanced and has the stylus tracking torce applied by a spring mechanism rather than
a slightly out -of-balance counterweight.
But while it is true that the SL -10 will
play in any attitude, it is not practical to
I
ov>
1
%SY
mine the size of the record on the platter, ie, whether the disc is nominally 175,
250 or 300mm in diameter.
An optoelectronic system is also used
to detect the deflection of the linear
tracking tonearm so that tracking error is
reduced to within ±0.1°. While this
figure is very small, and is an order of
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
ti
use it in any but the hórizontal mode.
For a start, the SL -10 will not stand on
edge in a stable manner and even íf it
was fixed in a vertical position it would
not be practical. The not inconsiderable
spring tension on the lid means that it
flies open with such alacrity that the
record is likely to end up on the carpet.
Rovbar d5anAra were
-feeliry.down.
lhey wanted_a
: ound 59síerm ,ut
t',
:Ro» Worked out how
until they visited their ¡!nearest
DICK SMITH STORE
.
.
'much they would save
and Mcide4 ?lay casters
.
were for
them.
thought -they ooulQn t"
afford one
.
.
t3
saw the fabulous
PLAYMASTER SPEAKERS
next saturday morning they
collected their
,
assembly was a
cinch.
PLAYMASTERS
Eft
.//
PLAYMASTERS
ARE RIGHT
FOR YOU!
Saturday evening, Sally f3 George called
Gook
ar those
Speakers .
8" SYSTEM
26 litre infinite baffle system with 8 ohms
impedance and 40 watts max power handling
SAVE $101*.
$159.50
paid
10" SYSTEM
53 litre infinite baffle system with b uhms
impedance and 60 watts max power handling
SAVE s101*.
12" SYSTEM
$248.00
pair
infinite baffle system with 8 ohms
impedance and 80 watts max power handling
Also has mtdrange and tweeter control'
75 litre
YE5,
we
networks
built them
oGIYSeI Ve`i
s
áci
"e-)1F-)
'
$298.00
I/
pair
*Saving based on the same speakers in made
up form (also available from Dick Smith)
DICK SMITH ELECTRONºCS
AND RESELLERS
SEE OUR OTHER ADVERTS IN THIS MAGAZINE FOR OUR STORE ADDRESSES
°
VIDEO BUFFS TAKE NOTE
This is
money.
of 'interest to you, and could win you some
The Paul Raymond Organisation, of London runs such
well known London Theatres as the Whitehall, Windmill
and Regency, and also the World Famous Raymond
Revue Bar, together with the magazines ... MEN ONLY
& CLUB INTERNATIONAL
This is only part of the Interests of this large organisation, in the entertainment world.
tape, which is a collectors item, is now available in
Australia and you are invited to purchase it in either
Betamax or VHS, for S64.95, from
This
ELECTRIC BLUE (A'SIA),
P.O. Box
.Cut out and send to
I
A moving centrefold, an amateur section where Video
Buffs are asked to send in Buff Video for prizes, and
other excellent articles, which you will want to view
again and again.
DISCO LIGHTING PRODUCTS
wish to purchase/hire Electric Blue 001. Please send
copies.
Name
The magazine pulses with excitement in the visual
electromagnetic spectrum. Every effort and considerable cost has been expended to make it as eyecatching as possible.
Video Magazine Is definitely not for the prurient.
There is quite a large proportion of Buff Video for the
Video buff.
A scenario on the worst Indianopolis crashes, a brilliant
Snow White cartoon, which extracts the Michael from
Fairy Tales, and takes half a dozen screenings to fully
understand.
320, Toorak, 3142. Vic.
ELECTRIC BLUE (AUSTRALASIA)
P.O. Box 320, Toorak, Victoria, 3142
Keeping abreast of the newest forms of entertainment, a quarterly magazine, in audio video form has
been produced, in full colour of high quality.
This
...
Address
I
declare I am over
18
purchase/
years old and enclose o cheque for S
days hire or charge to:
for
BANKCARD No.
DOD DODDOODOODDODD
I
use
a
V.H.S.
Betocord
Phillips System
Signature
L_
Registered Office:
644 Victoria Street,
North Melbourne, 3051
welcome here
PRISM ELECTRONICS
50 Lynch St.,
Hawthorn, VIC. 818 0206
Australia's most advanced design and manufacturing company.
4 CHANNEL ZONED CHASERS
$595
4ZZ.
Electronic touch controls
Auto zone change
Auto reverse
Designed for starbursts, pinspots etc.
4ZM
Full & kill override
Strobe flash override
AGC audio input
$395
Sixteen programs stored
in ROM
Auto program change
Auto zone change
,
Auto reverse
Full & kill override
AGC audio input
All our chasers are OPTO-ISOLATED from the mains,
ZERO CROSSING switched, each output rated 10A/250VAC,
and are ideal for INDUCTIVE & INCANDESCENT LOADS.
PINSPOTS
Fully fused primary
2000 hour globe life
Compact size
Adjustable mounting
Low cost
FLOWLITE
.
100,000 hour globe life
Round or square
Clear or coloured Lexan tubing
Custom made to any length
Low cost
PRISM ELECTRONICS has supplied Australia's most expensive
discos with custom designed SOUND SYSTEMS, LIGHTING CONTROL,
5 WATT LASER, STROBES, FLOWLITE, PINSPOTS, HELICOPTER SPOTS,
all backed by a total concept and design service.
,
PRISM ELECTRONICS PTY. LTD., 50 Lynch St., Hawthorn, VIC. 818 0206
40
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
lcalibrated in millimetres), the scale is of
ittle use when trying to line up the stylus
Technics SL -10
by eye with the run-in groove for a particular track. To help this task, the
perspex cover should have less tinting or
the lighting of the record surface should
So we'll just quietly forget about playing
be improved.
it vertically.
The SL -10 is supplied with a moving
Perhaps the most elegant feature of the
coil cartridge which is fixed directly to
SL -10 player is the cueing system. This is
controlled by three buttons on the lid. the tonearm. There is no separate head For example, if you are playing the outer- shell as such and the cartridge is not inmost track and wish to play a selection terchangeable with other models or
further down the groove, pushing the brands. You can have any ,cartridge you
want, as long as it is the Technics
Start button will raise the cartridge and
cause it to traverse towards the centre of 310M0 This has a claimed frequency
the record. At the same time, a red LED response of 10 to 60kHz or more
arrow lights up to show the direction of realistically, within ±0.5dB1from 10Hz to
travel (just in case you cannot see the 10kHz. Channel separation is claimed to
±0.25 grams. At the force set by the
1.5g, the cartridge would not track
the +12dB drum test track of the W&G
25/2434 disc and it was similarly below
par on the CBS STR-110 disc.
Separation between channels of the
cartridge was within the specification
above. Frequency response was within
±0.5dB up to 10kHz as specified, using
the internal preamplifier of the SL -10, but
above 10kHz the response rises by 9dB
to the resonance at 18kHz.
Waveform of the cartridge was also
not up to the standard set by moving magnet models. Whereas the latter
types tend to show a slew -rate limiting
phenomenon at the high frequencies (ie,
the waveform becomes a sawtooth), the
SL -10,
------
r
f
Above is a close-up view of the very
short tone arm assembly. The cartridge
is fixed to the arm with a screw and is
not
interchangeable
with
other
cartridges.
arm itself moving across in poor lighting).
Press the Start button just a little harder
and the arm traverses more rapidly and
two LED arrows light up. It happens very
smoothly and very quietly. The same
mode of operation applies for the other
direction of traverse, by pressing the
Stop button. Then, with the cartridge in
the exact position desired, you can
lower (or raised it) by pressing the Cue
button.
Finding the exact spot on the record to
cue the cartridge is not so easy. While
there is an accurately marked scale
which shows the precise position of the
stylus with respect to the record centre
be more than 25dB at 1kHz and more
than 20dB at 10kHz.
The performance results of the
Technics SL -10 can be summarised by
saying that the turntable itself performs
very well but is let down by the cartridge. We found the turntable to
operate flawlessly at all times. Rumble is
very low and so is wow and flutter,
which we measured at 0.02% DIN
weighted.
As with most moving coil cartridges,
the tracking performance of the 310MC
cartridge is not up to the standard of
good quality moving magnet cartridges.
Tracking force of the cartridge is 1.25
moving -coil 310MC waveform above
5kHz had high frequency ripples
superimposed. Similarly, on square
waves there was undamped ringing
although at a relatively low level.
As is often the case with cartridges
which do not turn in a good test result,
the sound is quite passable although a little more strident than we would expect
from a player in this price range.
In short, the Technics SL -10 represents
a new standard in turntable design but it
would serve better with an improved
cartridge.
Recommended retail price of the
Technics SL -10 is $669 including sales
tax. Further information can be obtained
from hifi retailers or from the Australian
distributors, National Panasonic (Aust)
Pty Ltd, 95-99 Epping Road, North Ryde,
NSW 2113, (LDS & JC).
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
41
Musical Tone Generator
Crystal locked with beat frequency indicator
octave synthesiser. This divides the input
13 ways and by whole numbers to. give
the top notes required. These include
two
MUSICAL TONE GENERATOR
c-
e
O
E
b
o
o0o0
aooo
C.)c)
i-
CS
440Hz
vaturlie
fib
There are still large numbers of electronic organs with free running oscillators and which need tuning from time to time. This updated version of a crystal locked musical tone generator has a
built-in beat indicator, thus avoiding the need for a CRO. The
design may also form the basis for a synthesiser and for the
generator for an electronic organ. With a built-in speaker, it may
also be used to tune acoustically other musical instruments.
By IAN POGSON & GERALD COHN
As far back as July 1965 we described
an Electronic Tuning Standard. By virtue
of progress, this unit has long since been
superseded. In August 1974 we described a Crystal Locked Musical Tone
Generator. This was a giant step forward
and indeed, it is still in current use.
However, we felt that the time had
come to present an updated version of
the latter unit. In retrospect, we considered that the latter unit had a couple
of deficiencies which should be avoided
if possible. For the normal tuning process, it was necessary to feed the outputs of the tuning device into a CRO, using the well known Lissajous pattern
method. Also, when any acoustic tuning
was undertaken, some difficulty was experienced due to the fact that the audio
tones from the built-in speaker were
substantially square waves.
Our new tuner was therefore to have
some sort of built-in indicator and so
avoid the need for an external CRO.
Also, the tones should be filtered so as
to approximate a sine wave, thereby
42
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
making
acoustic
tuning adjustments
easier.
A rather more important problem than
those just mentioned, was the question
of a suitable top -octave synthesiser IC
consistent with a reliable source of supply. After giving this question careful consideration, we found' that a suitable IC
was available through the Tandy
organisation. The IC is type 50240 and is
available in a 16 -pin DIL package.
A desirable feature of the 50240 is that
it requires only a single polarity power
supply, compared with the AY-1-0212 as
used in our design of August 1974. The
latter device requires -15V DC in addi-
tion to the +12V.
And so we had established the basis for
our new version of the musical tone
generator. All other components at the
time of writing are readily available.
More will be said about components and
places of availability. later on.
A look at the block diagram will show
the general principle of operation. A
2MHz crystal oscillator drives the top -
Cs, C8 and
C9. Because whole
numbers are used to divide the clock frequency, the resultant outputs are not
necessarily precise but very closely approximate those laid down for the equal
tempered scale.
51, a single-pole 12 -position switch,
selects the required synthesiser output
to be fed into a seven -stage binary
counter/divider from which any one of
eight octaves are available. C8 and C9,
are selected by 53. The divider outputs are fed via eight low-pass filters to
52 which feeds the LED beat frequency
indicator and the audio amplifier.
So far, we have referred to the crystal
oscillator as being on 2MHz. This is a
nominal frequency and much has been
said about precisely what frequency
should be used.
In addition to the tempered scale concept, we also have the matter of pitch to
consider. This has been more or less
universally accepted as fixing A above
middle C on a frequency of 440Hz. The
divisor of A on our top octave synthesiser is 284. Now if we divided 2MHz
by 284, we get 7042.2535Hz. This is the
frequency of the top available A for the
instrument. Now if we divide this frequency down by octaves, we find that A
is equal to 440.14082Hz, which is very
close.
If we reverse the process, starting with
440Hz precisely, instead of 2MHz we get
1999.36kHz and this is the frequency required for the crystal for an exact A440.
If we adopt an exact A440, this will be
coincident with the tempered scale requirement but it will be achieved at the
expense of other notes being further
removed from the tempered scale
figures. Another school of thought
seems to be that if a particular crystal frequency is adopted, giving a sort of
"middle-of-the-road" for all notes of the
scale, that this would be the best compromise. This crystal frequency works
out to 2000.24kHz and when compared
with the tempered scale figures, the
maximum error is plus or minus .069%.
For the prototype, we fitted a 2MHz
crystal and provided an adjustable trimmer in the oscillator circuit so that
readers may make precise adjustments
against a frequency counter or some
other reference. We set our oscillator to
2000.24kHz. However, for average use
the trimmer could be dispensed with
and a 33pF NPO ceramic capacitor
subsituted.
1
Eme
/7777
CHASSIS
TO CRO
IF USED
SIGNAL
INPUT
=. 3-30pF
2851
6.3V
12161_I0
74C04
10M
bl
2MH
9
+129
t12V
27pF
2200
25VW
_
2 loin
a
0.1
3
50240
ONO
LM340T 12
0
2
3
4
I
1
0.1=
UT
MUSICAL TONE GENERATOR
51::::>06
Vs
+12V
53
I
E
11,12,13
/
4
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VOLUME
470k
LOG
1
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11
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9
4024
RST Vss
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470
2
07
06
05
04
03
2
2
3
A
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9
11
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112
.'TANTALUM
8 OHM
SPEAKER
'SPEAKER
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R1
F2
F3
F4
F5
F6
F8
1F1/
25VW
14
+12V
C2
S2
IN
F8
F7
F6
F5
F4
F3
OUT
GND
O
F2
F1
.001
022
039
.082
0.18
IIEMI-
100k
10k
10k
10k
10k
10k
10k
12k
0.68
0.33
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TABLE
C1,C2
FILTER
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HF325-2 QUALITY FM TUNER-MODULE
The HF325 Is a complete high quality FM tuner or
professional standing The tuner unit is ready-made
and pretrimmed, making it child's play to assemble
-
Tuning range 88-108 MHz, operating voltage 12.55
ac. Kit HF325
$79.00
Stereo decoder HF 310
FM
HF310
RECEIVER
The HF310 is a very reasonable priced HF FM tuner.
Fully trimmed, the sensitivity according to IMF
standards is better than 10uV. Features 60 dB S/N
,radio and low harmonic distortion
Kit HF310
$49.00
HF330 STEREO DECODER
Gives 40-45 dB channel separation just add to a
good quality FM receiver. Kit HF330
$24.00
-
-
HF395 RF PREAMPLIFIER
Gain 30dB to 20 MHz, 10 dB to 100 MHz and 5 dB
to 226 MHz Ideal to boost reception on short-wave
receivers. Kit HF 395
$6.00
HF385 VHF/UHF ANTENNA PREAMP
Superb quality with two aerial inputs and one down
lead which simultaneously supplies current from the
power supply. Frequency range 40-250 MHz and
400-820 MHz Gain 9-18 dB, depending on
frequency. Kit 385
$30.00. Box 8850
$6.00.
-
-
F
pRF
ny q Mp
PRF
11,7p
.
Light Shows
-
-
'`
Ph 211 0816
Customs Communications,
Parramatta, Ph 635 6399
Adelaide: Hamtronics,
Goodwood Rd, Kingspark
GENERAL PURPOSE AMP 0.5w $18.00
MICROPHONE AMPLIFIER
$18.00
SiNE WAVE GENERATOR
JKO1
20-20,000 Hz
FM TUNER 88-108 MHz
27 MHz RECEIVER
27 MHz TRANSMITTER
JKO4
$25.00
- -
FM
-
NT300 LABORATORY POWER SUPPLY
2-30V High quality supply, regulated
2-3UV dc at 2 amps with overload
protection Complete with box and
transformer. Kit NT300
$110.00
Quick assembly kits
JKO2
JKO3
AT468 4 CHANNEL LIGHT SHOW
This superb kit drives 4 lights (400w per channel)
from the audio amplifier output Kit AT468
$75.00. Attractive box and knobs B3265
$48.00
AT365 LIGHT SHOW
This quality kit uses microphone input instead of
connection to the audio output 1599w max
Kit AT365
$69.00
Box and knobs 83265
$48.00
-
Power Supplies
NT415 LAB POWER SUPPLY
0-3Uv 1 amp well -regulated
supply for professional use.
Complete with box and transformer.
Kit NT415
$128.00
-
AT465 LIGHT SHOW
Turn your music into light
Simply connect this 3
channel light show to the audio
terminals of your amplifier and this
quality kit does the rest for you!
Kit AT465
$64.00
Attractive box and knobs B6065
-
Transmitter
HF65 FM TRANSMITTER 60-148 Mt1Z
Will run 5w output with heat sink Ideal for signal
testing of for a miniature transmitter which could be
received on a standard FM receiver. Kit HF65
$9.00.
-
JKO5
JKO6
JKO7
$30.00
$30.00
$33.00
$29.00
DUAL TONE DECODER FOR
R/C MODELS
JKO8 33UVac LIGHT OPERATED RELAY
JKO9 SIREN KIT inc. SPEAKEH
JK10 PHOTOGRAPHIC TIMER 240 Vac
JK101 CAR BURGLAR ALARM KIT
$43.00
$19.00
$19.00
$23.00
$55.00
New Kits
AT347
AT350
,T357
AT356
MI -360
Electronic Roulette
2 amp triac light controller
Touch -control light dimmer
6 amp AC regulator
Multivibrator, sq wave to 10MHz
SY-31015w stereo amplifier kit
SY-34037W stereo amplifier kit
$54.00
$12.00
$33.00
$27.00
$6.00
$230.00
$289.00
rAix ,74
JostyKits are now available from:
Sy
e: Vicom
339 Pacific Hwy, Crows Nest
Ph 436 2766
Radio Despatch Service,
869 George SC Sydney.
F¡V
AM Receiver
HF61 MEDIUM WAVE
RECEIVER 540-1600 KHz
receiver complete with ferrite
coil antenna Kit HF61 - $19.00
V
Hp
-
-
-
FM1
FM Tuners
(R9
HF305 VHF CONVERTER
Converts FM 105-148 MHz to
105 MHz
Kit HF305
$28.00
Box B3405 attractive
chassis kit
524.00
.
-
Pre-amps
Receiver Converter
most
tot the
enough..
specification parameters
Kit AF300
$25.00
AF340 40 WATT AUDIO AMPLIFIER
MODULE
High quality 20-20,000 Hz, 37w
HMS witn low distortion
Kit AG340
$35.00
44
loch comes
Scandinideavia
engineers,age technology
electronic
AF300 AUDIO AMPLIFIEI#
A real work -horse, this
solid-state
universal power amp has
affianced
a wide range of applications
such as car radio, record
players and small receivers.
Due to its well designed electronic circuit,
the AF300 can be used over wide wltage
ranges without deterioration of the
Ph
blinder.
Mall Orders: Direct to VICOM, 68 Eastern Hd.,
Sits Melbourne, vie 3205. Endo:. SI extra for handling and postage costs.
uric: Eastern
Communications,
898 Riversdale Rd,
Brisbane: Delsound,
Wickham Tce,
Ph 229 6155.
Camberwell. Ph 836 8635
Tasman Electronics,
12 Victoria St, Coburg.
CW Electronics,
Marshall Rd, Tarrgindt
Melba
Ph 354
5062
Magraths, 208 Lt Lonsdale St,
Melbourne. Ph 663 3736.
272 8417
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
1
Ph
48 6601.
Perth: Willis Electronics.
993 Hay SL,
Ph 321 7609
Adelaide 43 7981
Gold Coast 32 2644
Launceston 31 7075
Launceston 31 5815
Geelong 78 9660
Brisbane 38 4480
Wellington (NZ) 28 7946
Rockhampton 28 2843
Wagea 21 2125
Hobart 436337
Cairns 54 1035'
Launceston 44 3882
Now let us look at the circuit and
describe each section in detail. The
crystal oscillator uses three inverters in a
standard configuration which, by virtue
of the propagation delay around the
loop, prevents operation of the crystal in
a spurious overtone mode. An additional
inverter in the same 4069/74C4
package is used to buffer the oscillator
output as it feeds into the 50240 top octave synthesiser.
No buffering is required for the outputs
of the 50240 as they are compatible with
C@4
the following 4024 CMOS
o
counter/divider.
Eight passive low-pass filters are used
to change the square wave outputs from
the 4024 to a rough approximation of
sine waves. To save space, the component values for the filters are tabulated
exclusive -OR gate which frequency doubles both signals. The two output
signals from the XOR gate are then fed to
a 74C193 up/down counter. The processed external input signal is fed to the
count-down input while the processed
internal signal is fed to the count -up
input.
The output of the up -down counter
drives half of a 4556 two -to -four-line
figured as an inverting amplifier with a
nominal gain of 100. Following that is
another op amp which is ,a comparator.
The result of the gain of; these two op
amps is that the previously rounded
signal from the output of'S2 is amplified
and squared up again. All identical pair
of op amps similarly treats the external
input signal. These squared -up signals
are then fed to a 4070/4030 quad
o
TOP
2MH,
OCTAVE
CRYSTAL
OSCILLATOR
SYNO THESISER
o
OCTAVE
DIVIDERS
0rl10
FILTERS
o
BEAT
FREQUENCY
INDICATOR
---o
o
on the circuit diagram. Each of the filter
-0
-0
o
o
outputs is selected by switch 52 and then
o
o
fed to the audio amplifier and the beat
EXTERNAL
SIGNAL
frequency indicator.
The audio amplifier is simple enough.
Output from switch S2 is coupled to the
470k volume control via a 0.1uF
AUDIO
capacitor and thence to the LM380
AMPLIFIER
14 -pin amplifier IC. This drives a
SPEAKER
miniature loudspeaker or an external
FIG.
loudspeaker via a jack socket on the rear
panel. Power output is about two watts
maximum.
which uses 13 ICs.
This diagram shows the major features of the complete circuit
The beat frequency indicator employs
four ICs and is based on a TTL circuit
featured in our "Circuit and Design
Ideas" pages from the January 1975
issue. What the circuit does is to give a
revolving display of four LEDs. If the frequency being compared is higher than
the standard generator frequency, then
the LEDs will appear to rotate in one
direction. If the frequency being checked
is lower, the LEDs rotate in the other
direction.
Finally, if the two frequencies are exactly the same the LEDs will stop rotating
1
and extinguish.
This method of indication is very good
in its own right but it does take time to
make a precise adjustment, particularly
at low frequencies. As there is a varying
DC condition in the supply to the LEDs, a
small meter has been added which
follows the slow current changes which
still exist at near to zero beat. Precise
zero beat can be achieved very quickly
by adjusting for a stationary meter
needle.
Although we have provided an effective zero beat indicating system, some
readers may have access to a CRO and
may prefer to use it as the zero beat indicator. We have provided for this in that
there are outlet sockets on the back of
the case so that a pair of patch cords
may be connected across to a CRO.
A 4136 quad operational amplifier IC is
used to amplify the signals to a sufficient level to operate the following
CMOS circuitry. All four op amps are
referenced to +6V via a voltage divider
comprising two 10k resistors. The output
signal from S2 is fed to an op amp con-
L
4.
.0-a
--^Wrr--
r <.
4
rZ!
a
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
45
All New Realistic TIC -II
Marine 2 -Way Radio
Complete With New
Frequency Crystals
TRC-II Marine
Solid State
1
Transceiver
n 95
-FZF4 L /St
-
--7:e£4tis17C_ ANL
s
OUT
VOLUME
OF
--
--
o
C_
TRC-11 MARINE
,,R
----
Specifications
This transceiver is designed for marine use. For example. the TRC-II is
ideal for fishing/trawling vessels. motor cruisers. speedboats
and
houseboats. Mounting bracket can be secured to a horizontal shelf. the
overhead or to a bulkhead. Features variable SQUELCH control to
eliminate background noise. Automatic Noise Limiting Circuit (switch able), to reduce or eliminate impulse or static noise. Automatic gain
control, to provide constant sound level. Push-pull Audio Amplifier to
provide the highest quality sound reproduction. Modulation Indicator
to let you know when you're transmitting. External SPK jack
allows
you to use an external speaker (8 ohms). The TRC-I1 is a reliable
transceiver. with a great range in good conditions. 21'1141
TANDM`
TRANSMITTER: Power Output 4 watts: Modulation 90100%: Emission Type A3: Frequency Tolerance
± 0.005%: Antenna Impedance 50 ohms (SO -239
receptacle).
RECEIVER: Sensitivity 0.7 uV for 10dB(S+N)/N:
Selectivity 6 kHz
-6 dB: Adjacent Channel Rejection
36 dB: Audio Distortion at 100) Hz 0.8 W 10% THD:
Signal -to -Noise Ratio 40 dB: I.F. Frequency 455 kHz:
Squelch-Adjustable from 50 uV to 3.000 uV.
GENERAL: Channels
Supplied with A: 27.860 MHz
B: 27.880 MHz C:27.900 MHz D:27.910 MHz
E:27.940
MHz F:27.960 MHz:
Power
Requirements:
12.5-15VDC. negative ground only: Current Drain RX
0.3 A (full volume). TX1.2A (with modulation): Microphone-Dynamic with push -to -talk switch and coiled
cahle,
-
14
transistors. 9 diodes and 2 thermistors.
Available at all Tandy Stores and Participating Dealers Around
Australia or
Mail Order Department, P.O. Box 229, Rydalmere, N.S.W.
2116
MUSICAL TONE GENERATOR
- continued
SIGNAL INPUT
1-11.
apbx
LMNOT42
12.6V
AC
MEOTER
<.LEO.
a
8
OHM SPEAKER
Use ribbon cable
to the switches to
keep the wiring
TO
TO SI
WIPER
S
tidy.
PARTS LIST
1
Norwood instruments case, 204
x
100x210mm(WxHxID)
Front panel overlay, 204 x 90mm
4 rubber feet
2 single-pole, 12 -position rotary switches (see text)
1 SPOT miniature toggle switch
1 edge-reading meter scaled 0-10
3 knobs
SEMICONDUCTORS
4 1N4002 rectifier diodes
4 red LEDs with bezels
1 LM340T-12, uA7812 12V 3 -terminal
6 0.1 uF greencap
2 .082uF greencap
2 .039uF greencap
regulator
50240 top -octave synthesizer
4069, 74C04 unbuffered hex
inverter
4030, 4070 quad exclusive-OR gate
40193, 74C193 up -down binary
counter
4556 dual 2 -to -4 -line decoder
4024 7-stage ripple counter
uÁ4136 quad op amp
LM380 14 -pin power amplifier
2 .015uF greencap
1 .01 uF greencap
2 .001uF greencap
1
1
2
1
1
1
3
1
1
miniature 8 ohm loudspeaker
metres of 3 -core mains cord and
3 -pin plug
mains cord clamp and grommet
three-way insulated terminal block
6.5mm jack socket
RCA sockets, single -hole mounting
PCB, 177. x 110mm, code 80g6
transformer, 12.6V secondary,
Ferguson 2851, A&R 6474,
2851 or equivalent
1
4
2MHz
crystal,
20pF
DSE
ambient
HC-33/U (see text)
PCB spacers
decoder. This has four mutually exclusive outputs which drive the four
LEDs. Even though the outputs are
mutually exclusive, there is still a fluctuation in the LED current through the common 1k resistor. This fluctuation is
monitored by the meter to give a better
indication of very low frequency beats.
Power supply requirements are quite
modest. All the CMOS circuitry runs
from +12V provided by a three-terminal
regulator, LM340T-12 or uA7812. The
TO POT
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
CAPACITORS
1
22000F or
electrolytic
2500uF/25VW PC
470uF/16VW PC electrolytic
1
10uF/16VW PC electrolytic
1 4.7uF/16VW tantalum electrolytic
4 1 uF/35VW tantalum electrolytic
2 0.68uF/35VW tantalum electrolytic
2 0.33uF/35VW tantalum electrolytic
1
2
TO 52
WIPER
TO SI
TO 52
0.18uF/100VW metallised
polyester (greencap)
LM380 amplifier IC runs directly from the
unregulated DC of approximately 18
volts provided by the bridge rectifier,
2200uF/25VW capacitor and 12.6V
2 .022uF greencap
1
1
or polystyrene
27pF polystyrene or NPO ceramic
3-30PF Cermet or Philips trimmer
RESISTORS
(5% tolerance, Y4 or MW rating)
1 x 10M, 2 x 1M, 2 x 100k, 1x47k, 16
x 10k, 2x 12k, 2x2.2k, 1 x 1k, 1 x2.7
ohms
1
470k (log)
switch
potentiometer
with
MISCELLANEOUS
Solder, solder lug, hookup wire
(various colours), screws, nuts.
NOTE: Ratings are those used on the
prototype. Components with higher
ratings may generally be used providing they are physically compatible.
Components with lower ratings may
also be used in some cases provided
the ratings are not exceeded.
time this appears in print. The box which
houses the instrument is made by Horwood and should be available from most
stores.
The Scotchcal label for the front panel
is obtainable also from Radio Despatch
CONSTRUCTION
Services, as is the Norwood box.
All the circuitry, with the exception of
The meter is also a common type and
the switches and other hardware is
no trouble should be experienced here.
mounted on a PCB measuring 177 x
The LEDs which we used on the pro110mm and coded 80g6.
totype have chrome plated bezels and
are rather expensive. However, other
The printed circuit board should be
types may be used.
available from the usual outlets by the
47
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
transformer.
MUSICAL GENERATOR
- continued
This is the full size PCB artwork.
Construction should begin with the
assembly of the PCB. In carrying out this
task, the usual precautions should be
taken. A good soldering iron with a bit
suited to small work is a must and care
should be taken not to overheat components during soldering. Also, care
should be taken to be sure that every
soldered joint is a good one and that the
solder has flowed properly. Resin
cored solder ONLY should be used. It
has come to our notice recently that
some builders in their keenness to do a
"good" job have used corrosive fluxes.
This practice should be strictly avoided.
The use of sockets is optional. We used
a socket for the most expensive chip but
soldered the rest directly into circuit. If
you elect to solder the ICs directly to the
board, the barrel of the soldering iron
should be connected with a clip lead to
the "earthy" copper of the board. In any
case, MOS ICs should only be removed
,.from their packing immediately prior to
fitting them to the board.
It is generally convenient to start the
board assembly by fixing the smallest
components first. There are seven
jumpers on the board and they should
be fitted first, using some 22 gauge tinn48
We estimate that the current
cost of parts for this project is
approximately
$85
This includes sales tax.
ed copper wire. These may be followed
by the resistors, small capacitors, diodes,
or sockets, checking carefully for dry
joints. Care should be taken to observe
the polarity of components where this
applies. At this stage, the PCB may be
put aside until later on.
Fitting the Scotchcal overlay to the
front panel is a tricky job and calls for
some care. This done, all the holes
should be drilled, taking care not to
damage the panel. All components may
then be fitted to the panel. Provided a
very neat fitting hole is cut for the meter,
it may be made a push fit, without any
ICs
other fixing.
Alternatively,
some
judicious use of a suitable adhesive
could suffice.
There is no direct means of fitting the
miniature loudspeakers to the panel. We
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
solved the problem by fixing it with four
spots of Araldite epoxy adhesive, allowing it to set overnight.
Two one-pole, 12 -position rotary switches will be required. If C&K Lorlin switches are purchased, one may be
modified to operate as an eight-position
switch for the octave selector. Otherwise, just ignore the unused four positions. The two switches should be
oriented so that their knobs point to the
correct markings on the panel. The stop
for the note selector is between B and C.
The back panel of the box requires five
holes, three for the RCA sockets, one for
the external speaker jack and one for the
mains lead rubber grommet. The bottom
of the box requires four holes for mounting the PCB, four for fixing the mains
lead terminal strip and transformer, and
one for the mains lead clamp. The PCB
should be located so that there is about
equal space between the board edges
and the front and back panels.
Before fitting the PCB to the box, there
are some preparatory matters to be
dealt with. The sockets and rubber
grommet are now fixed to the back
panel. The mains cord may also be fitted
and terminated and clamped. The green
or earth lead should be terminated on a
ROD IRVING ELECIRONICS
499 HIGH STREET, NORTHCOTE 3070, MELBOURNE VICTORIA. Ph (03) 489-8131.
-
S100 COMPUTER PRODUCTS
16K EPROM CARD -S 100 BUSS
lid
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Ir
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8K LOW POWER RAM KIT -S 100 BUSS
:
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;r-,
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C11T
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RAM board. Designed for error -free, NO HASSLE, systems use.
Blank PC Board w/Documentation
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BUILT & TESTED $80.00 inc. tax.
RITRON COMPUTER GRADE POWER SUPPLY: +5V Reg, 10A,
+ 16V Unreg. Kit of parts $79.95 inc. tax. A&T $99.95 inc. tax.
Write for list of other power supplies. Tax free prices also available.
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da11Qi@QZEICEQEE®8E1
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Perfect for
OEM's
a
KIT FEATURES:
1
Addressable on 16K Boundaries
2 Uses 2114 Static Ram
3 Runs at Full Speed
4. Double sided PC Board. Solder mask
and silk screened layout Gold fingers
5 Art Parts and Sockets included
6 Low Power: Under 1.5 Amps Typical
BLANK PC BOARD- $39 COMPLETE SOCKET
SUPPORT IC'S AND CAPS- $39
ITOH Model 8300 PRINTER. $770 plus 15% sales tax.
This 80 -column printer provides quiet operation, making it suitable for
use in offices, classrooms and homes. Specifications include 125
cps, 60 lines per minute, paper loading from bottom or rear and
Centronics -compatible, parallel interface.
A bidirectional, dot matrix impact printer with a print head designed
for 100 percent duty operation, assuring a print life that exceeds 100
million characters -The precision sprocket-feed mechanism permits
printing forms from 41/2 to 91/2 inches wide. A 96 ASCII character set
prints in upper and lowercase with the added Capability of producing
double-width fonts in boldface. The vertical format unit provides
preprogrammed/ programmable tab positions,,top of form and
bottom of form for complete formatting capabilities:
JUST WRAP KIT - JWK-6 $39.50
50ft ea. blue, white, red, yellow wire Just Wrap Tool
EMMIQQQEUZIE21£
FULLY STATIC
AT DYNAMIC
KIT FEATURES:
1. Addressable as four separate 4K Blocks.
2. ON BOARD BANK SELECT circuitry. (Croe
BLANK PC BOARD W/DATA $45
memco Standard!). Allows up to 512K on gnat
3. Uses 2114 (450NS) 4K Static Rams.
LOW PROFILE SOCKET SET $15
4.- ON BOARD SELECTABLE WAIT STATES.
5. Double sided PC Board, with solder mask and
SUPPORT IC'S & CAPS- $25
silk screened layout. Gold plated contact fingers
6. All addiess and data lines fully buffered.
ASSEMBLED & TESTED-ADD $30
7. Kit Includes ALL parts and sockets.
8. PHANTOM is iumpered to PIN 67.
9. LOW POWER: under 1.5 amps TYPICAL from
#1
the .8 Volt Buss
10. Blank PC Board can be populated as any
multiple of 4K.
.a
$269
I
1u
$13
Bypass CAP's (Disc 8 Tantalums)
S7
',,®Ii,n.i,iIIIIEI.iEfli
i
-_.t
i'
Low Profile Socket Set...13.50
Support IC's (TTL & Regulators)
ALL ASSEMBLED BOARDS
ARE TESTED AT 4MHZ.
iiii.ziwtiazi
rI.I
$39
ASSEMBLED AND FULLY
BURNED IN ADDI$45
16K STATIC RAM KIT -S 100 BUSS
1
$139.50
e
USES 2708's!
Thousands of personal and business systems around the world
use this board with complete satisfaction. Puts 16K of software
on line at ALL TIMES! Kit features a top quality soldermasked and
silk-screened PC board and first run parts and sockets. Any
number of EPROM locations may be disabled to avoid any
memory conflicts. Fully buffered and has WAIT STATE
capabilities.
ASSEMBLED
OUR 450 NS 2708'S
AND FULLY TESTED
ARE 58.95 EA. WITH
ADD $36
PURCHASE OF KIT
KIT $239
A&T $269
paICE
$79.50
SET- $15
S-100 Z80 CPU CARD
$189.00
Wired &
Tested
4
MHZ
==1711r1
VIM ,' '
tI'll .l
I
ASSEMBLED AND TESTED! READY TO USEI Over 3 years of design
efforts were required to produce a TRUE S-100 Z80 CPU at a genuinely
bargain price!
FEATURES:
*
BRAND NEW!
* Generates MWRITE. so no front panel required.
* 8080 Signals emulated for S-100 compatability.
Jump on reset capability.
Top Quality PCB. Silk Screened. Solder Masked. Gold Plated Contact Fingers
*
*
2 or 4 MHZ Operation.
SHUGART 5" MINI FLOPPY DRIVE: $379.50 inc. tax.
$330.00 ex tax.
Verbatim Products available. Please write for price lists.
.Prices currena till 7th lime 1980. Heavier items arid additional postage. Extra heavy items
sent Comet freight on. Prices subieca to change without'notice. Send 60c and SAE for
free catalogues. MAIL ORDERS PO Box 135, Morthcote, Vic 3070. Minimum pack and
post $1.25. Phone (03) 489,-8131.
,
,
::
FOR ALL THE BEST BUYS IN
SEMICONDUC _SRS &PASSIVES
SAM I{µA
ELECTROLYTICS
FILM CAPACITOR!
IAI !C
FrTROMICS CO LTD.
EL
RESISTORS
air. TELEDYNE
SEMICONDUCTOR
1
5
I
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS
Neivi,9apan/Ic
U
SEMICONDUCTORS
RC
.tckronic
Components
DIODES !nd
Materials
CERAMIC DISC
CAPACITORS
SAMHWA
CELLE
POTENTIOMETERS
MOTOROLA
CAPACITOR CO., LTD.
seal
POWER RESISTORS
RAYTHEON
SEMICONDUCTORS
SEM.CON0toC,OR DIVISION
F.NISSEI
ThermaI1Y
sr
CA
+ITORS
_
SEMICONC
)`
CCESSORIES
MIS
THE POWER DISTRIBUTOR
Comprehensive Stocks readily
available inall Statesthroughout Australia
r
r
SOANAR ELECTRONICS PTY. LTD.
A MEMBER OF THE A+R-SOANAR ELECTRONICS GROUP
30 Lexton Road,Box HiII,Vic.,3128,Australia.
50
ELECTRONICS Australia. July, 1980
890661
VICTORIA: 890661
N.SW: 7896733
STH. AUST.: 516981
QUEENSLAND: 525421
WEST. AUST :
3819522
MUSICAL TONE GENERATOR
11'.
YWICI
TOM Gfllall°iDn
<°'
.
.
.
.
CNti
.
solder lug held with one of the back
panel fixing screws.
Before the PCB is fitted, all leads destined for external points must be added.
Those leads to the two rotary switches
should best be made with rainbow cable
to help with identification. In the prototype, we used shielded audio leads
from the input to the LM380 and from
the volume control to the RCA socket on
the back panel.
With the PCB fully prepared, mount it
in the box, using four tapped spacers and
suitable screws. Do not attempt to wire
the rotary switches at this stage. Rather,
push the relevant cables out of the way
so that the rest of the wiring may be
done. Wire the volume control first, terminating the shield leads 'on the appropriate lug. This lug is also connected
back to the board via an earth lead. The
other ends of the shielded leads have
the shields cut off. The switch on the
volume control may now be wired.
When you are satisfied that all the wiring is complete it should be thoroughly
checked to make sure that there are no
errors. This check should include the
PCB as well. Components should be
checked for correct placement and
value, as well as correct polarity.
Satisfied that all is well, it is ready to be
given its initial tests.
If you have .a frequency counter and
you intend to set the crystal to the frequency of your choice, then now would
be a good time to do it. The crystal signal
may be taken off between a ground
point and pin 6 of the 74C04. Switch on
and if all is well the crystal frequency
should appear on the counter. Set to the
wanted frequency with the trimmer
capacitor.
AUDIBLE CHECKS
It should now be possible to make
some audible checks. A good place to
start would be with A440. Set the two
switches to this position and advance the
volume control. The 440Hztone should
be heard from the speaker. Now rotate
the upper switch right across the scale
from C to B and all notes should be
heard and in their right order. If the
order is not right, there is a switching
problem to be corrected. Now rotate
-
continued
AN
RPG
i
the octave selector and the various octaves of the note selected should be
heard, again in their respective order.
The toggle switch selects C9, top C
available.
Due to the inability of the small
speaker to reproduce the lower frequencies, it may not be possible to hear
anything in the lower couple of octaves
or so. This may be remedied by plugging
in a larger enclosed speaker into the
jack provided.
During these tests, the four LEDs
should appear to be on and the meter
should read about half scale. With C
selected on the upper switch, C8 on the
toggle switch and the lowest octave on
the lower switch, the LEDs will appear to
be flickering. Actually, the LEDs are not
all on at the one time but they are
rotating, at a low speed for the low frequencies, increasing as the frequency is
PRODUCT
051\
DOMINION
MUSICOLORS
L03000 OR/
L03000S '
increased.
If you have observed all the above, it is
a good bet that your Musical Tone
Generator is working properly and ready
for service.
CREATE EXCITING LIGHT EFFECTS
THAT RESPOND DIRECTLY TO THE
MOOD OF THE MUSIC WITH
..
.
Dominion Musicolors
HOW TO USE IT
The method of using the generator for
tuning a musical instrument will depend
largely on the type of instrument being
tuned. If it is an acoustic instrument such
as a piano, then the sound from the
speaker will be used to bring the corresponding tone of the instrument to
zero beat. An external speaker will of
course be necessary for a job such as this
one. The LEDs and the meter will be ignored for this type of operation. Another
method of tuning an acoustic instrument
would involve the use of a microphone
so that the LED beat indicator could be
employed. This would require a suitable
microphone preamplifier.
If you wish to tune an electronic organ,
the output from an appropriate speaker
on the organ.will be patched to the input
of the generator. A stop will be chosen
which is not too loaded with harmonics,
such as a flute or tibia and the volume
set at a low level so as not to be annoying in its own right. The input
preamplifier of -the generator will perform satisfactorily with levels ranging
from about 50mV to 10V rms.
The note to be adjusted is selected on
the keyboard and the corresponding
note and octave is also selected on the
generator. The LEDs will appear to be
rotating if the organ note is off tune, the
rotation direction will depend on
whether the note is higher or lower than
the generator. The note is adjusted so
that the LED rotation stops and then the
needle of the meter may still be moving
slowly and adjustment is then made until
the needle remains stationary.
.
The musicolor is an electronic light switching Instrument that
separates musical sounds into three (3) channel light display.
An internal three (3) way electronic crossover, accurately performs this task, separating F. channelling bass, mid range 8
treble frequencies to their respective outlets.
$95.28
L03000
This model receives the sound via a lead simpy connected to the output terminals of the amplifier.
$99.36
L03000S
Picks up sound through an inbuilt microphone
RADIO
562
PARTS GROUP
3003
SPENCER ST,
WEST MELBOURNE
ORDER COUPON
PLEASE SEND ME 1.03000
0
O
L03000S
Name
Address
Add $4 for post/packing per unit
Method of payment
Cheque O Money Order O or Bankcard
(If Bankcard) No
Signature
Expiry Date
RADIO
RPG PARTS
GROUP
Head Office:
562 Spencer Street,
West Melbourne
Vic. 3003
Ph
(03) 329 7888
Southern Depot:
1103 Dandenong Rd,
East Malvern
Ph
Vic, 3145
(03) 211 8122
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
51
Rack mounting
300
att Amplifier
has load -line & loudspeaker protection
Our new Playmaster 300W Amplifer has already
created a great
deal of interest. This month, we tell you how to fit
the completed
amplifier module into a 483mm (19 -inch) rack mounting
together with a power supply, fan cooling and loudspeakercase
pro-
tection circuitry.
by JOHN CLARKE and GREG SWAIN
Last month, we published full constructional details for a rugged, high -power
amplifier module capable of delivering
300W RMS into a 4 ohm load. By following this article, readers should have little
difficulty putting the module to work in a
practical amplifier suitable for stage
work or wherever high -power amplification is required.
We also have no doubt that some
readers will be power-hungry enough to
build a stereo version of this amplifier for
use in a home hifi system. Matched with
suitable loudspeakers, the noise that
such a system could produce would be
devasting!
Constructors should note that a 10
ohm/1 W resistor should be used in place
of one of the wire links if two modules
are to be used in a stereo system. This
0
IN
measure is to avoid possible hum problems due to earth loops and was shown
on the component overlay diagram on
page 59 of the June issue.
SPEAKER PROTECTOR
Apart from the power supply, the only
extra circuitry required for the complete
amplifier is the loudspeaker protection
circuit. This feature is mandatory for any
amplifier of this power. Without protection, the loudspeaker could be driven by
the full supply rails in the event of a fault
and be destroyed.
The circuit published here is a slight
modification of the Loudspeaker Protector published in November, 1975 (File
No. 1/MS/13). Basically, it consists Of a
relay which normally connects the
loudspeaker to the amplifier a few
seconds after switch -on, thus eliminating
switch -on transients. If a fault subsequently occurs within the amplifier such
that the DC offset voltage rises above
±2V, the relay trips and disconnects the
loudspeaker from the amplifier.
Five general purpose transistors are
employed in the circuit. Q5 drives the
relay direct and is controlled by Q4 via
the 10k resistor. When Q4 conducts, so
does Q5. A diode in the collector circuit
of Q5 protects the transistor against inductive kick -back from the relay when it
is de -energised.
Base bias for Q4 is provided by a network consisting of two 56k resistors, one
270k resistor and a 100uF capacitor. At
initial switch -on of the amplifier the
100uF capacitor has zero charge, so no
forward bias is applied to Q4 and the
relay is off. After about three seconds,
the capacitor is charged sufficiently to
cause Q4 and then Q5 to conduct and
energise the relay. This connects the
loudspeaker to the amplifier after the required delay.
Q1, Q2 and Q3 form an odd -looking
triple which monitors the amplifier output for DC fault conditions. They function as follows:
1
o
270k
56k
22k
56k
100uFI
10k
25vwT
05
O
1
IE
I
N4002
22k
B
o
470uF
25VW+
r
50VW
o
1N4002
150(1
47uF
47uF
SOVW
22k
\ I
1
I
.
1
BIPOLAR
V
COIL
B
01 03 04: BC547, BC549 etc
A
SEE TEXT
02 05: BC557. BC559 etc
OUT
52
15V AC
LOUDSPEAKER PROTECTOR (WITH SWITCH ON MUTE)
Five transistors, a relay and a few other components make up the loudspeaker protector
circuit.
ELECTRONICS Australia, July. 1980
T
u
r
--4
R
ñ
-
IR
!I
tr
s
0.
NN.
J
Note how the cooling fan
is
positioned directly behind the heatsink. Be sure to keep all mains wiring neat and tidy.
The output of the amplifier is
monitored via a low pass filter consisting
of three 22k resistors and two non polarised 47uF capacitors. If the amplifier
output goes positive by more than 2V,
Q3 is forward biased and it conducts to
remove the base bias from Q4. Hence
Q4 and Q5 turn off and the relay disconnects the loudspeaker.
Similarly, if the amplifier output
becomes negative by more than 2V, the
emitter of Q1 is made negative with
respect, to its base. Q1 is thus forced to
conduct as is Q2, thus removing the bias
from Q4 and turning óff Q4 and Q5 as
before.
So all the transistors function as simple
switches which are only controlled by
the presence of DC voltages at the
amplifier outputs. AC signals have
negligible effect due to the input lowpass filter.
Power for the loudspeaker protector is
derived from a 15V winding on the
transformer, giving a supply rail of about
20V DC after half -wave rectification and
filtering. A 150 ohm/1 W resistor is used
in series with the relay to limit the
voltage across it to 12V.
There are two different relays that can
be used with the loudspeaker protector.
We used a "power relay" with double
changeover 10A contacts from Dick
Smith Electronics. This relay is physically
larger than the 5A relay used in the
original circuit, and must be mounted off
the board as shown in the wiring
diagram. Note that only one set of
changeover contacts is used.
Alternatively, a much smaller relay
distributed by Associated Controls (55
Fairford Rd, Padstow 2211) can be used.
Designated VS 12TAN, this is a single pole relay with 10A contacts that, unlike
the Dick Smith relay, can be mounted
directly on the PC board. It will be
necessary to bend the pins slightly to
make the relay fit.
We expect that the VS 12TAN relay will
be available through components suppliers by the time this article appears.
Assembly of the loudspeaker protector
PC board is straightforward. Just follow
the accompanying overlay diagram
closely, making sure that the transistors
and diodes are correctly oriented. The
non -polarised capacitors can be
soldered in either way, with no regard
for polarity.
The use of PC stakes is recommended
to facilitate external connections to the
PC board.
FAN COOLING
As mentioned in last month's article,
the heatsink on the amplifier module is
quite adequate for typical program
material peaking at full power. However,
for those who intend to use the amplifier
for stage work, we have made provision
for fan cooling. The fan is mounted on
RELAY
COIL
1
RIGHT: The PC board
layout for the
loudspeaker
protector. Additional
connections will have
to be made to the
board if the VS
12TAN relay
is used.
._
0aC
E 018C
COMMON
E
8
028
C
IN
038
1
2`
1N400
SE
E C
Ñ
t5V AC
T T 1 0uF
56k 14
E05 C
8
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
53
Rack mounting 300 watt amplifier
//W/.0/./ZAI///
111111{aaaaa...
/rrrt4Í%r%1lÍtÍ/r1-1I1
//rr/rtit//r11r1/1II\laltaaaa14%a\
Playmaster 300W
II
The only components on the
1
front panel are the on/off switch and the
the rear panel of the chassis and blows
cool air across the heatsink.
Our prototype used a Mulfingen Type
7119 fan which has a nominal diameter
of 80mm and is designed to run from
220V AC. A 680 ohm/5W resistor is included in series with the fan to ensure
that it does not suffer premature failure'
when connected to the Australian 240V
mains. With this resistor, the voltage
across the fan will be slightly less than
220V AC. This fan is available from
.Stewart Electronics, 33 Sunhill Road, Mt
Waverley, Victoria.
Other fan types should also be suitable
and include the "Sprite" sold by Radio
LED
indicator. At right is the wiring diagram.
Despatch Service (869 George St,
Sydney), and the Yaesu D-2865 as sold
by Dick Smith Electronics. Like the Mulfingen fan, the Sprite is some 80mm in
diameter but has the advantage that it
can be run directly from the mains
without a dropping resistor. The Yaesu
D-2865 is somewhat smaller at 70mm
diameter. It is rated at 120V AC and can
be run directly from the 94V AC (47V +
47V) transformer secondary. Paris Radio,
of 7a Burton St, Darlinghurst, NSW, also
have suitable fans.
The power supply circuitry was
featured last month and has been kept
as simple as possible. A centre -tapped
PARTS LIST
LOUDSPEAKER PROTECTOR
1 PC board code 75L11, 102 x 51 mm
3 BC547 NPN transistors
2 BC557 PNP transistors
2
1
1
2
1
1 N4002 silicon diodes
470uF/25VW PC electrolytic
100uF/25VW PC electrolytic
47uF/50VW non -polarised
electrolytics
12V DC relay, 10A contacts (see
text)
(
6 PC stakes
RESISTORS
1
1
or
Y2W, 5%)
270k, 2 x 56k, 3 x 22k,
x 150 ohm/1 W
x
1
x 10k,
Scotchcal front panel label
SPDT 240V AC miniature toggle
switch
1 5mm red LED and mounting bezel
2 14mm speaker terminal binding
posts
1 RCA panel mounting socket
6 6mm brass spacers
1
22cm length shielded cable
1 8.2k resistor (Y or %W, 5%)
1 680 ohm/5 W resistor (see text)
1 .01 uF polyester capacitor
1 mains cord clamp
1
four-way insulated terminal block
1
1
MISCELLANEOUS
CHASSIS & HARDWARE
1 power amplifier module (see last
month)
1 power supply (see last month)
1 483mm rack mounting case,'425 x
140x250mm(WxHxD)
1
1
54
80mm cooling fan (optional), see
text
ELECTRONICS Australia, July,
bridge rectifier circuit produces the
positive and negative 70V rails for the
power amplifier. These are bypassed
with large value (4000uF) electrolytic
capacitors to ensure low supply ripple.
As can be seen from the wiring
diagram, the OV output from the power
supply is connected to chassis earth, providing the reference level for the supply
rails. The input earth for the amplifier is
decoupled from the chassis earth via a
.01 uF capacitor connected from the input lead shield to chassis.
Before proceeding further, we will
repeat the warning given last month concerning the power supply voltages. In
addition to the normal hazard from the
mains, the power supply produces a
total of 140V DC. This voltage is present
on the PC board and is dangerous. Do
the wrong thing and it could prove fatal!
Hook-up wire, 24 x 0.2mm core
heavy duty hook-up wire, machine
screws and nuts, solder, insulation
tape etc.
NOTE: Ratings are those used for the
prototype. Components with higher
ratings may be used provided they
are physically compatible.
CONSTRUCTION
Start the mechanical construction by
temporarily bolting the case together.
The case we used (from Dick Smith Electronics) measured 425 x 140 x 250mm
(W x H x D inside box) and featured
generous ventilation slots on the top and
bottom panels. These ventilation slots
We estimate that the current
cost of parts for this project is
approximately
$220
This
includes the amplifier
module, power supply,
loudspeaker protector, case and
fan.
quasi -complementary
connection.
SPECIAL NOTE:
See page 100 regarding
AMPLIFIER
MODULE
FAN
l
SPEAKER
POSITIVE
OV
1
W
CAPACITOR
4000uF
10k
CAPACITOR
4000uF
K
LED
SWITCH
BRIDGE
RECIFIER
CONTACTS
NIO
SPEAKER RED
TERMINALS
COIL
RELAY
BLK
CT
94V
AC
TERMINAL
STRIP
B
LOUDSPEAKER
PROTECTOR
TRANSFORMER
CLAMP
CORD
CORD
MAINS
(
240V
AC
1SV
EARTH
LUG
A LABORATORY
QUALITYCROATA
6.5MHz
Il':
srl
LI'
HOBBYIST PRICE!
,'
; ,;..f..
`s
:';,..
: 44<<<é
-.::''
.
Here's what 'Electronics
Australia' had to say:
.. this neatly styled little oscilloscope should
..
Sí
<
be
just the shot for the hobbyist who cannot afford an
expensive CRO
now a CRO has been placed
within the financial reach of most hobbyists
...
4 1,
sweep
van
laboratory
oscilloscope
.
Cat
our overall impression of the 0-1280 oscilloscope
is that it represents good value for money.'
41-poslt7on-,
0-1280
swe
ran
(ht
sync
This is it! The new Dick Smith
Q-1280 laboratory
oscilloscope. With a useable
bandwidth to beyond 6.5MHz,
it's the ideal budget cro for
everyone!
7n
,,rtrr. ai
vertical
gam
11.1111
DICK
SMITH
DESIGNED FOR
on__Í 10+1
groun
/1»
put
CHULLORA,
Ph 290 3377
Ph 642 8922
ENENSI
USER'S
MANUAL
Pacific Highway. GORE HILL
Ph 439 5311
Grose Streit
PARRAMATTA Ph 683 1133
613 Princes Highway, BLAKEHURST
Ph 546 7744
263 Asir. Street.
WOLLONGONG. Ph 28 3800
MAIL ORDER CENTRE:
PO Box
399 Lonsdale Street.
656 Bridge Road.
OLD166 Logan Road,
842 Gympis Road.
96 Gladstone Street,
60 Wright Street,
414 William Street
ACT
SA
WA
_
10
.
E
S
1
e
e
00
Cat. Q-1280
$6.00 Freight anywhere in Australia
THAT'S BELOW COST!
MELBOURNE.
Ph 67 9834
RICHMOND.
BURANDA.
CHERMSIDE.
Ph 428 1614
Ph 391 6233
PERTH.
Tt
bonkcord
welcome here
SHOPS OPEN 9AM to 5.30PM
(Saturday: 9am till 12 noon)
Ph 212 1962
BRISBANE: Hall hour earlier.
ANY TERMS OFFERED ARE TO
APPROVED APPLICANTS ONLY
Ph 328 6944
RE -SELLERS OF
Ph 59 6255
Ph 80 4944
FYSHWICK
ADELAIDE.
321, NORTH RYOE NSW 2113. Ph 888 3200. PACK
7
e
vert input
DICK SMITH ELECTRONICS
Inc
SYDNEY.
100
ALL THIS FOR
ONLY
CO
ES
COMPLETE
Vertical Deflection Sensitivity: 10mV/DIV
Horizontal Deflection Sensitivity: 500mV/DIV
Time base - Sweep Frequency: 10Hz to 100KHz in 4 ranges
Synchronising: Internal and external.
Power Requirements: 100/234V, 50/60Hz, approximately 10W
Dimensions: 202(w) x 160(h) x 306(d)mm. Weight: Approximately 3.8kg.
York Street.
Hume Highway,
-1
\-
power
SPECIFICATIONS:
125
147
162
30
"-ground
.III
AUSTRALIA
HOBBYISTS
AMATEURS
SCHOOLS
UNIVERSITIES
SERVICEMEN
NSW
eat
POST EXTRA.
DICK SMITH
PRODUCTS IN MOST AREAS OF AUSTRALIA.
D5[772
Rack mounting 300 watt amplifier
must if fan cooling is to be
effective.
Once the case is assembled, the two
rYY/M///!7/N/br//lt11rlI1 H IitfÍlt71111t1t111111111V
/~~/ii/i .iiii..lJIufrIfIIlirtR1111111ta000.114VONVl`t
PC boards and the power supply compJ
ponents can be positioned on the base
of the chassis and positions for the
mounting holes marked. Use the accomF
panying wiring diagram and the interior
This
photograph to guide your layout.
done, the case can be quickly
disassembled to make drilling easier.
The two PC boards can now be
mounted in place on the chassis using
6mm brass spacers. In the prototype, the
amplifier module was supported at the
four corners of the heatsink only, as this
was considered to give sufficient
mechanical strength. Some constructors
may prefer to also use the four extra
mounting holes at the corners of the Rear view of the completed amplifier chassis. The large hole at right allows direct air
module for additional support, par- entry to the cooling fan.
ticularly if the amplifier is to be used for
stage work.
Make sure that the amplifier module is
mounted well forward to provide sufficient clearance for the cooling fan.
The power transformer should be
oriented with its 47V + 47V secondary
leads facing the PC board. It is bolted to
the base of the chassis, with one side
butted directly against the front panel.
Mounted in this fashion, the transformer
can also be bolted to the front panel if
additional chassis strength is required.
The two 4000uF filter capacitors are
mounted in an upright position with
clamp brackets, while the bridge rectifier
is bolted to the chassis between them.
Before mounting the rectifier, smear its Above: Full size artwork for the loudspeaker protector PC board.
underside with heatsink compound to
improve heat transfer. There is no need
to electrically isolate the rectifier from
for the relay after switch-off is less than a
The mains cord should be passed
the chassis.
second. The relay will close in less than
rear
in
of
hole
the
Note that the relay used in our pro- through a grommeted
two seconds if the Protector is switched
and anchored with a cord
the
chassis
totype is mounted on a socket and raisthe mains active and on immediately after it is switched off.
Terminate
clamp.
ed bracket. If difficulty is experienced in
Fault conditions at the input can now
neutral to the terminal block and solder
obtaining a socket, then the relay can be
wire
a solder lug adjacent to
be simulated with the aid of a (suitably
to
the
earth
glued upside down to the chassis base
the cord clamp. Additional wires are run insulated) jumper lead. Simply connect
so that its pins are upright. The leads can
from the terminal block to the mains the active side of the loudspeaker input
then be soldered direct to the relay pins.
to the positive +70V rail and then to the
switch and to the cooling fan.
Once work on the chassis base has
-70V raíl. In both cases, the relay should
Use heavy duty (24 x 0.2mm core)
been completed, the case can be
open almost immediately and then close
hook-up wire for the power supply wirreassembled and the hole positions for
again after the simulated fault has been
ing and check that the voltages delivered
the front and rear panel components
removed.
by the supply are correct before making
marked and drilled. These components
Satisfied that all is well, the
the connections to the amplifier module.
include the mains switch and the LED inloudspeaker protector can be connected
It is a good idea to wrap the terminals of
dicator on the front panel, and the coolinto circuit such that the active
the mains switch in plastic insulation
ing fan, RCA input socket and
loudspeaker line is switched by the relay.
tape to avoid the possibility of an electric
loudspeaker terminals on the rear panel.
The final job of assembly is to carry out
shock.
the setting up procedure for the
A large hole will also have to be cut in
Note that a short length of shielded
amplifier as described in the June issue.
the rear panel to allow direct air entry to cable (about 22cm) is required to conScrew the lid to the case and you will
the cooling fan. The fan should be posi- nect the amplifier input to the RCA input
have a rugged, reliable, high-power
tioned directly behind the heatsink, and socket.
amplifier costing much less than an
must be oriented so that it blows air into
The loudspeaker protector should be
equivalent commercial model. But do
before
the chassis.
operation
correct
for
checked
think of the neighbours, and remember
With all components now mounted in connecting it to the amplifier output.
the noise -pollution laws for your state.
position, the chassis wiring can be com- Switch on and check that the relay closes
Happy listening!
-out
time
Drop
seconds.
after about two
pleted according to the wiring diagram.
are a
e
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
57
Clean up the bass in your system with an
...
Infrasonic Rumble Filter
Even though modern turntables have
very low rumble output;
rumble can still be a problem when listening
records; particularly with amplifiers having response down to
to
DC. This low
cost
infrasonic rumble filter effectively removes all
rumble
noises below 20Hz and can give a substantial
improvement
to
record reproduction in some circumstances.
by RON DE JONG
There are two types of rumble: that
which you can hear and that which you
can't. The latter is infrasonic rumble; involving frequencies below 20Hz. Rumble
which you can hear, broadly involving
the audio spectrum between 20Hz and
250Hz, is difficult to remove from any
hifi system. You can minimise rumble in
your system by employing a good quality turntable and by not unduly boosting
the bass response.
But if there is rumble present on the
record, then you are stuck with it.
Infrasonic rumble is quite another matter. While you may not be able to hear it
directly because it lies below 20Hz, it
can certainly be the cause of problems in
your system. You can quickly gain an
idea of whether infrasonic rumble is a
problem in your system by removing the
grilles from your loudspeakers and then
playing a record.
It is possible that you will see the
speaker cones wobbling at a low rate. If
the record has any ripples in it or you are
using bass boost,'you may find that the
cones wobble quite alarmingly, particularly if you have bass reflex
enclosures. Now while you may not
regard this as a problem, these very low
frequency signals can be the cause of
considerable intermodulation of the
audible bass region. This intermodulation may take place in the amplifier as
well as in the speakers themselves.
Problems with infrasonic rumble can
be worse in DC coupled amplifiers, ie,
those that have flat response right down
to DC. And while most DC amplifiers
have a low frequency filter, it generally
offers only a modest rate of attenuation,
typically 6dB/octave with a 3dB corner
frequency of 20Hz. This means that the
attenuation is likely to be about 8dB or
less at 10Hz which is hardly adequate.
What is needed is a steep cut-off filter
which means a rate of attenuation of
18dB/octave or more. With a 3dB point
i.
at 20Hz, as before, this will provide a
really worthwhile attenuation of low frequencies to eliminate intermodulation.
Our filter circuit does just that.
The filter is mounted on a small PC
board which can be installed in a
separate metal box or inside the
amplifier or perhaps even another piece
of equipment such as a graphic
equaliser. Connections to the rumble
filter could be made in the tape loop as
with most other add on equipment.
Alternatively some amplifiers provide
pre -amp out and main amplifier in connections and the filter could be connected between these points. This can
also be done with systems in which a
separate preamplifier and power
amplifier are used.
The performance of the filter circuit is
shown in an accompanying panel.
Notice that the signal-to-noise ratio is
quite high and a good match for even
the best preamplifiers and power
amplifiers.
Frequency response of the rumble
filter is shown in art accompanying
graph. The rate of attenuation is
18dB/octave below the 3dB corner frequency of 20Hz. This means that the
response at 5Hz is 36dB below
reference. In short, infrasonic rumble is
eliminated.
Just one integrated circuit provides all
the active circuitry for the two channels
of the rumble filter. A low cost and low.
We estimate that the current
cost of parts for this project is
approximately
$10
This includes sales tax.
y
noise uÁ4136 quad operational amplifier
does the job, as shown in the circuit
diagram which shows both channels.
Two op amps are used as unity -gain inverting buffers to provide a low source
impedance for the active filters, which
are third -order Butterworth. The Butterworth configuration is used here as it has
a maximally flat response within the
pass-band (ie, above the rolloff point of
20Hz) and minimal phase distortion.
Operation of the filter can be
116,
Hti
RMyVTi
L
4
4111-.11111k
This PCB should be housed in a small metal box
58
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
or installed in the amplifier chassis.
understood by regarding the circuit in
the following way. For high frequencies,
say above 1kHz, the capacitors can be
regarded as having low impedance and
so the filter circuit works as a unity-gain
inverter. At low frequencies the impedance of each of the relevant
capacitors (0.1uF, .047uF) becomes appreciable and introduces losses into the
signal path.
(A complete derivation of the filter
design is given in the National Semiconductor Audio Handbook, in the chapter
on "Floobydust".)
Power for the filter unit can be obtained in two ways as shown in the circuit
diagram. Either a half -wave rectifier can
be used with the power obtained from a
9V transformer winding or a obtained
from the split supply of the preamplifier
or amplifier. Provision has been made on
the board for both configurations.
DECIBELS
+10
2',
- 0.5dB
AT 20kHz
-3
-10
Typically the power supply - of an
amplifier will range between ±30 and
±60 volts so we have not specified a particular value for the resistors in the zener
regulated supply. The value can be
worked out using the formula shown on
the circuit diagram, eg if the amplifier
power supply was +40V then R =
(40-12)1.015 = 1.8k. The resistor should
also have an appropriate power rating,
in the example above the power
dissipated by the resistor is (40-12) x .15
= .42W so a 1W resistor would be used
for a reasonable safety margin.
All the circuit components are accoi'nmodate on a small PCB measuring 63 x
97mm and coded 80rf5.
-18
20
30
20
10
HERTZ
100
2k
1k
FREOUENCY RESPONSE OF RUMBLE FILTER
PERFORMANCE OF PROTOTYPE
Maximum Input voltage:
Input impedance:
Output Impedance:
Signal-to-noise ratio:
Distortion at 1V RMS:
Gain:
Frequency response:
LOW COST
TEKA
5V RMS
100k
less than 1k
96db with respect to 1V RMS
.0025% at 1kHz
.012% at 10kHz
.02% at 20kHz
-0.5dB at 1kHz
see graph
S 100 and Motorola
Bus Connectors
Ex Stock
P rinted circuit
connectors...
new series of
edgeboard connectors
utilising the most
advanced materials and
finishes to furnish
extremely high
performance at low
a
cost.
C&K Electronics (Rust.) Pty Limited
COMPONENTS
Office 2/6 McFarlane Street Merrylands NSW 2160
Telephone 682 3144 Telex AA23404
PO Box 101 Merrylands 2160
Agents Melb. 598 2333/Adel. 269 2544/Bris. 36 1277/Perth 458 7111
Obligation free and
Comprehensive data
yours for the asking.
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
is
59
II
47pF
RUMBLE 'FILTER
fE
.047
IIF
100k
390k
Construction of the unit should present
few difficulties. The only points to note
are that the orientation of the uA4136 IC
electrolytic capacitors and the diodes
should be correct according to the wiring diagram, and that shielded audio
cable must be used for the connections
to the inputs and outputs of the filter.
For best signal-to-noise ratio the filter
PCB should be installed in a separate
metal box or within the confines of an
amplifier, stereo receiver or graphic
equaliser chassis and well away from
transformer hum fields.
In conclusion, we should note that
4.7
INEUT,
\\ i
pA4136
25VW 100k
LEFT
4.7
250W
'iF
13
100k
INPUT
RIGHT
.1H
~1,7 1-
4.7
390k
.047
47pF
1N4001
code 80rf5
+12V
uA4136 op amp
2 BZX79 C12 zener diodes (see text)
2 1N4001 diodes (see text)
+V
+12V
1
9V
AC
82%79C12
CAPACITORS
16VW
12V
greencap (metallised
12V
1N4001
polyester)
V
=
2 0.047uF greencap
2 47pF polystyrene
RESISTORS (all 1/+ watt 5%):
2 x 390k, 6 x 100k, 2 x 39k, 2 x 33k
1000
82%79C12
2 1000uF 16VW PC electrolytics
4 4.7uF 25 VW PC electrolytics
8 0.1 uF
OUTPUT
RIGHT
250W
2OVW
PARTS LIST
PCB, 63 x 97mm,
LEFT
100k
0.1
100k
1
-0
OUTPUT
071152
OHMS
INFRASONIC RUMBLE FILTER
See the end
1/F/ -
of this article for modifications to the filter corner frequency.
OUTPUT
LEFT
'i
.7pf
:34
4.7pF
(;)
7pF
T
LEFT
INPUT
I
0.1
.047
100k}
+
'o
T T
6
-1-100k1 s-f
4,..(47pF
0.1
O s- 1-
A--r390k ñ Y
14
INPUT
RIGHT
Y
+
).
©tSa
3901714,
.04
4.70F
¿,
TT
k..1)
0.1
1
1.7pF
n,c)-E(.
OUTPUT
RIGHT
At left is the actual
size artowrk for the
PCB.
o g:14QTgó
9V FROM
TRANSFORMER
some readers may wish to raise the corner frequency of this filter to increase the
attenuation of lower frequencies and
thus bring about a reduction of audible
rumble. For example, the corner frequency may be changed to 60Hz by
merely scaling the capacitor values, ie,
those marked 0.1uF are changed to
.033uF and those marked .047uF
are
changed to .015uF.'
With these changes, the response is
-18dB at 30Hz, -30dB at 20Hz, -48dB
60
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
at 10Hz and -56dB at 5Hz.
<--1* HEATHKIT=
{
Microprocessor
Course and
Computer
Trainer
T Microprocessor trainer for experimentation
and design
.**
jk,..0001.
ts-
Uses 6800 Microprocessor
Built in 1k ROM
monitor program
256 bytes of RAM
' ,
.,
I.
Breadboarding
socket for prototyping
Use with Course EE-3407 for an up-to-date computer education
Functioning as a miniature digital computer, the ET3400
Microprocessor Trainer has been designed to compliment your EE platform upon
3401 Microprocessor Course and provide an ideal
pursuits,
If you are involved in scientific, electronic or business
factor in
microprocessors are becoming a way of life and a dominant
is a
trainer
The EE34011ET-3400 course and
your success or failure.
learn microlow cost and effective key with which you can easily
programmed
processor theory and techniques. EE -3401 uses proven
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learning techniques to teach programming, interfacing and
for exmore. The ET -3400 Trainer provides the ideal platformThis is a
perimentation and later, your own prototyping and design.
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which you may easily and enjoyably expand your knowledge of
O Learn Microprocessor Operation,
Application and Interfacing
Covers microprocessor basics, computer arithmetic,
programming, interfacing and much more
EE -3401 adopts a
Using Heath's proven self -instruction techniques,
through the comstep-by-step,
you,
to
guide
approach
three phase
hardware I/O
plexities and power of machine language programming,
interfacing and microprocessor theory and design applications.
-study texts to
Element I, presented in 8 lessons, utilizes concise self basics, comcover: Number systems and codes, microcomputer
the 6800 microputer arithmetic, introduction to programming,
the
processor (part I), the 6800 microprocessor (part II), interfacing
(part II).
microprocessor, (part I), and interfacing the microprocessor
in element II's
Colourful audio and visual presentations are combined
of such subjects as
six lessons to further enhance your knowledge
semiconductor
programming, designing with microprocessors and
experiments
memories. Phase Ill of EE -3401 provides 19 Informative
is gained. The ET
through which valuable "hands-on" experience
programinto
divided
3400 Trainer is utilized and experiments are
program branming and interfacing applications. Experiments cover
instructions and much
ches. address decoding, arithmetic and logic
more.
components including
EE -3401 comes complete with 62 electronic
oriented
IC& RAMs, op -amps and a variety of other microprocessor
to carry out the exdevices. No additional components are necessary
periments provided with this program.
$155.00
Course EE -3401
microprocessor programming and Interfacing techniques. In addition, the ET -3400 provides you with plenty of breadboarding
capability for experimentation, prototyping and system design.
and key
The ET -3400 Is based on the popular 6800 microprocessor
features include: 1. A built-in 1k ROM monitor program for controlling
unit operation. 2. Six digit hexadecimal 7-segment LED display for address and data readout. 3. 17 -key hexadecimal keyboard for entering
programs, data and control of the unit. 4. 256 bytes of random access
memory (RAM), expandable to 512 bytes. 5. Breadboarding socket for
prototyping, interlacing and memory circuits. 6. Eight buffered binary
LEDs for display of breadboard logic states. 7. Eight SPST DIP switches for binary input to breadboarded circuits. 8. +5, +12 and -12 VDC
conpower supply outputs. 9. All microprocessor address, data, and
trol busses buffered and terminated on the front panel for ease of
connection to prototyped circuits. 10. Provision for a 40 -pin external
connector for extending memory and I/O capability.
$347.00
Trainer ET-3400.
MI MI MI all MI
I
INN
Ell
MI
NMI
all
ORDER BY COUPON NOW OR COME TO OUR SHOWROOM
Please rush me the
for $
ape! post.
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-
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is enclosed plus $7.00
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ELECTRONICS Australia, July. 1980
61
Program a 2708 in two minutes flat!
EPROM_ Programmer
suits the TRS-80, Sorcerer, &c.
If you have ever wanted to rewrite or extend the
operating
system of your microcomputer or if you're interested in
dedicated microprocessor applications then this EPROM programmer is just the thing. It is an inexpensive unit that uses
readily available ICs, interfaces directly to the expansion bus on
the back of all the popular 8080/Z80 microcomputers and programs 2708s, 2716s, 2758s and 2732s.
check that it has been erased prior to
programming and check that the EPROM
does in fact contain the correct data
after programming. Using the machine
language driver shown elsewhere in this
article programming time is about two
minutes for a 2708.
Before discussing the operation of the
EPROM programmer, in detail, let's look
at the operation and programming requirement of the 2708 and 2716.
The popular 2708 EPROM uses
floating-gate avalanche mode MOS transistors as the storage cells. Stored
charges on the floating gates are used to
control the conduction of the MOS transistors, to determine whether they effectively store a "I" or a "0".
The floating gate's charge is produced
by inducing a non -damaging avalanche
breakdown in the drain -channel junction
of the cell. High energy electrons from
the avalanche breakdown are then injected into the floating gate, charging it
negatively. Since the floating gate is surrounded by an extremely effective insulator, this charge will remain practically indefinitely, and hence the stored pattern will also remain.
To erase a programmed EPROM, the
chip is irradiated with ultra -violet light.
The resulting photons impart enough
energy to the trapped electrons to allow
by RON DE JONG
The ready availability of inexpensive
simple matter to prototype these sort of
devices by first running the operating
programs on such systems as the 6800
02 kit, or by using the numerous
assembler editor programs available
with most computers.
The problem up until now though has
been the lack of EPROM programmers
suited for use with personal computers.
With this in mind, we decided to design
an EPROM programmer suitable for
direct connection to the bus expansion
ports of personal computers, in particular, the 8080 and Z80-based
machines such as the Exidy Scorcerer
and Tandy TRS-80.
Our EPROM programmer programs the
popular 2708 as well as the more recent
EPROMs particularly the 2708 and 2716,
now presents a vast number of pos-
sibilities for the computer enthusiast.
Since EPROMs can be conveniently erased and reprogrammed, the operating
system of a microcomputer could be
modified or extended to include such
features as renumbering routines in
BASIC. The Compucolor microcomputer
for example provides for 8k of additional
ROM while the ROM-PACs used .on the
Sorcerers have provision for the use of
EPROMs rather than ROMs.
Some more exciting possibilities are in
the area of dedicated microprocessor
applications. Just to mention a few
-
robots, intelligent video terminals, music
synthesisers, train controllers, speech
recognisers, and burglar alarms. It is a
2716, 2758 and 2732 EPROMs. It can
read the contents of the EPROM to
'Lea-
1.9
`.....
.
ROGRAMME R
EPR^-
I..
P
27082
r.
OFF
ON
62
?716/2 759
\
READ
`
pROGaAM
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
ptN
732
While the programmer will accept four
EPROM types, the
software featured in
this article is
specifically written
to program the
2708. Small
modifications to the
program are required for the other
EPROM types.
them to escape from the floating gate,
leaving it uncharged.
An erased EPROM has all memory cells
effectively containing l's, so programming consists of inducing avalanche
mode breakdowns in the appropriate
cells to produce the required zeros. In
principle, one programming pulse is required for each memory location. The
appropriate address and data information must be applied to the address and data pins of the EPROM.
In practice, due to power dissipation
limits, it is necessary to apply a short programming pulse between .1 and 1ms
long to each memory location in sequence. Each complete sequence is called a program loop and N such loops are
required, such that the total programming time for each location (N x pulse
width) is at least 100ms.
Programming pulses are +26V in
amplitude and during programming the
CS/WE or chip-select pin must be at
+12V. In addition three supplies are required to operate the 2708 during both
programming and reading, namely
+12V, +5 and -5V. In comparison the
2716 EPROM is considerably easier to
program and it requires only the standard +5V supply. It is a 2k x 8 EPROM in
which each location only has to be programmed once by a single 50ms TTLlevel programming pulse with the chip
'select high and the Vpp supply at +25V.
The 2758 is a 1k version of the 2716
chip but with one half of the memory
defective. Rather than throw these
devices away, manufacturers have labelled them 2758A or 2758B depending on
which half of the die is defective. These
chips still have the advantage over 2708s
however since they are single supply
EPROMs, like the 2716 itself. Programming requirements are also the same except that the software has to "know"
which half of the chip to program.
To see how we have satisfied all these
requirements, refer now to the block
diagram, Fig. 1 and Fig. 2 which shows
the waveforms involved. The programmer occupies 4 consecutive address
locations in I/O space: Depending on
which of those four addresses is accessed by the microprocessor and whether a'
read or write operation is performed,
one.of the six outputs of the address decoder will briefly go low.
Two of the address decoder outputs
go to the reset and clock inputs of a
12 -bit binary counter. The counter outputs are connected to the address inputs
of the EPROM, so that by simply accessing the appropriate addresses the
counter can be made to reset or increment. Hence any of the 1024 locations in the 2708 EPROM can be accessed by appropriate reset and increment
operations. This actually saves a lot of
time because the memory locations of
the EPROM will always be accessed in
sequence during programming or
reading.
Another two outputs from the address
decoder
drive
the
program-pulse
TRI-STATE
LATCH
EPROM
DATA BUS
COUNTER
SOCKET
RESET
CK
TRI-STATE
BUFFER
FROM
MICROCOMPUTER
PROGRAM
PULSE
FLIP FLOP
RESET
SET
ADDRESS BUS
ADDRESS
DECODING
CONTROL SIGNALS
FIG.
1
EPROM
DATA
ADDRESS COUNTER
INCREMENTED
DATA FOR NEXT
LOCATION LOADED
DATA FOR NEXT
LOCATION
EPROM
ADDRESS
26V
PROGRAM
PULSES
FLIP FLOP
SET
FIG.2
NEXT PULSE
0.5ms
l
FLIP
FLOP,
RESET
SEQUENCE OF PROGRAMMING SIGNALS FOR 2708 EPROM
flipflop. One of the lines sets the flipflop
and the other resets it. The two remaining lines from the decoder enable the
Tristate latch and the Tristate buffer.
When the microprocessor reads from a
particular address location the Tristate
buffer will be enabled and the data present at the output will be read, and when
the micro writes to that same location
the Tristate latch is enabled instead, latching the data.
Fig. 2 shows how these signals are used
to program the 2708 EPROM. Firstly the
EPROM programmer must be switched
to the program mode so that the Tristate
outputs of the EPROM are turned off and
the Tristate outputs of latch are turned
on. This means that any data written into
the Tristate latch by the microprocessor
will be present at the data inputs of the
EPROM.
Each program loop starts with the address counter being cleared by accessing
the appropriate address for each cycle in
the loop and then the data for the par-
is loaded. A
later the program -pulse
flipflop is set and +26V is then applied to
the program pin. After waiting 0.5ms,
the microprocessor resets the .flipflop
which removes the +26V program pulse.
The address counter is then incremented
and new data loaded for the next location and then the cycle repeats itself.
To satisfy the requirement that the
total program time for each location be
at least 100ms, 200 program loops are
required (200 x 0.5 = 100ms).
Using the software driver shown
elsewhere in this article programming
time for a 2708 is about two minutes.
In the case of the 2716 or 2758 only
one program loop is required but each
levels
program pulse is at normal
and the pulse width for each location is
50ms, giving a total programming time
titular memory location
short time
rn
of 100 seconds.
Looking now at the circuit diagram, we
can see the various functional blocks in
Fig. 1. The data bus, DO to D7 and the
63
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
EPROM PROGRAMMER
address bus AO to A7 can be seen on the
left of the diagram. Note that only
address lines AO to A7 are used
because
the EPROM programmer is connected as
an I/O port.
The control signals provided for on the
circuit are IN, OUT, RD, WR, IOREQ,
DBUSEN, and BDUSDIR. The first two, IN
and OUT, are all that is required for
use
with the TRS-80. The other controls
are
required when interfacing to the Exidy
Sorcerer.
The purpose of these various signals is
as follows: WR will go low
during either
a memory or I/O write
operation by the
microprocessor and RD will go low during a memory or I/O read operation.
The
IOREQ signal goes low when an I/O
operation rather than a memory operation is performed. The TANDY TRS-80
combines the RD and IOREQ and WR
and IOREQ signals internally to
generate
the IN and OUT signals respectively.
Hence if the TANDY is used, the IOREQ
line on the programmer would simply be
earthed.
The Sorcerer's signal DBUSEN is the
Tristate enable for the data bus provided
by the expansion port and it should be
low if the data bus is to be enabled.
DBUSDIR is the signal to the Sorcerer indicating the direction of the data bus,
low for a read and high for write.
The first two address lines AO and Al
plus the IN and OUT signals go to IC4
which is a dual 2 -to-4 line decoder. The
remaining six address lines are decoded
by IC6 which is a triple 3 -input NOR gate.
The outputs of IC6a and IC6b will
go
high only when their inputs are all low.
These two outputs are combined by
IC7d which then generates a low enable
for the rest of the address decoding
64
a write to location 0 is
performed,
output 1Y0 of IC4 will go low, and when
a read to location 2, for example, is
performed then output 2Y2 will go low
briefly. Two of the enable lines go to the
Tristate latch and the buffer for reading
and programming data. All the other de-
coded outputs, however, are used as
signals themselves and nothing is actual1(:yread from or written to the
computer's
ata bus.
The Tristate latch used in the circuit is
IC1, a 7415374. The latch signal is
derived from output 1Y0 of the decoder, so
when the microprocessor performs an
I/O write to location 0
the brief enable
signal from the decoder will latch the
data present on the data bus into the
latch. If the microprocessor performs an
I/O read from the same location the 2Y0
output of the decoder would go low instead, enabling the Tristate outputs of
IC2 which is an 811595 tristate buffer.
We estimate that the current
cost of parts for this project is
approximately
$75
including sales tax. This includes the cost of the flat cable
and connectors.
circuit.
As a result, if all the address lines are
connected directly to the inputs of IC6a
and IC6b the EPROM programmer will
be located at 00 in I/O space. Two inverters, IC5b and IC5c, can be used
however to invert any of the six address
lines so the EPROM programmer can be
relocated quite easily. As it turns out
neither the Sorcerer, Compucolor or
Tandy machines has anything at 00 location, so you are quite free to locate the
programmer there.
Now, the enable signal from IC6c is used to gate the IN and OUT signals via
two NAND gates, IC7a and IC7b. These
signals then enable either one of the two
2-to -4 decoders. Hence when
the correct address is present and an I/O read or
write operation is performed, one of the
two decoders will be enabled, and
depending on the lower two address
bits, one of the four outputs of that particular decoder will go low.
To simplify our discussion of the
circuit
we will assume that the I/O address
of
the EPROM programmer starts at 0.
So
when
The remaining outputs of the decoder
drive the program -pulse flipflop and the
address counter. The program pulse flipflop consists of IC8d, IC8c and IC7c
which are 2-output NAND gates and IC5f
which is an inverter. IC8d and IC8c are
connected together as an RS flipflop,
with pin 9 of IC8c as the R input and pin
12 of IC8d as the S input. When a
brief
low pulse is applied to the S input the
output of IC8d will go high and the output of IC8c will go low. Similarly when a
low pulse is applied to the R input, the
output of IC8d will go low and IC8c will
go high.
The SET input of the program pulse flipflop is obtained from output 2Y2 of the
decoder so the program is initiated
when the microprocessor writes to I/O
location 2. The Reset input is obtained
from output 2Y1 of the decoder via IC7c
and IC5f which together function as a
"power-on reset" for the flipflop. This to
prevent the flipflop from being set when
power is first applied
situation which
could damage the EPROM should the
programmer be in the program mode.
Power on reset works as follows.
When the power is first applied pin 10 of
IC7c will be held low by the 10uF
capacitor. The output of IC7c will then
be high and the output of IC5f low causing the flipflop to be reset. The capacitor
is charged up via a 2.2k resistor so
that
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
-a
about 20ms later, pin 10 will be high and
the combination of IC7c and IC5f merely
pass the signal from the decoder,
uninverted to the flipflop and normal
operation can follow.
Outputs from the program -pulse flipflop drive a simple class-B output stage
which generates the +26V programming
pulses. When the flipflop is set the output of IC8d will be high and IC8c low.
This causes transistor Q2 to be off
and
Q1 to be turned on which then turns
Q3
on and pulls the output up to the +26V
supply line. If the flipflop is reset though,
Q1 and Q3 will be off while Q2 will
be
on.
Rise and fall times for the
programming
pulses must be within certain limits to
ensure reliable programming. This is accomplished by using a .01uF capacitor
on the output of the stage along with
a
100 ohm resistor in series with the
collector of Q3 and a 39 ohm resistor in
series with the collector of Q2.
The address counter is IC3 which is a
4040 12 -bit CMOS counter. Reset
and
clock inputs for the counter are obtained
from the decoder outputs 1Y1 and 1Y2,
respectively. Hence to reset the counter
the micro would perform an I/O read
from address 1, and to increment the address it would perform an I/O read from
location 2. Note that IC8b inverts the
signal to the rest input of the counter
because the outputs of the decoder are
active low while the counter resets on a
high.
That completes our description of the
basic data, address and programming circuitry. Data and address lines for the
various EPROMs are in fact the same except for pins 18, 19, 20, 21. Depending
on the type of EPROM being programmed, these pins will be switched to various
supplies or signals by switch Si. This
switch is a 4 -pole 3 -position rotary
switch with each pole corresponding to
one of the pins 18, 19, 20, 21. The three
positions on the switch correspond to
the three basic types of EPROM, viz
2708, 2716/2758 and 2732.
The only other switch to affect these
four pins is 52. This is a DPDT toggle
switch which sets the EPROM programmer into either the read or program
modes. Without going into too much
detail we will discuss only pins 18 and
20. Switch S2b switches pin 18 which is
the program -pulse pin of the EPROM. In
the read mode it switches pin 18 to
ground, while in the program mode it
switches pin 18 to Sic which then connects it either to the +26V or directly to
the TTL level program pulses from the
flipflop itself.
Pin 20 is the chip -select pin, CS/WE of
the EPROM. In the read mode it will be
low for all the EPROM types while in the
program mode it should be at +12V for
the 2708 and +5V for the 2716, 2758
The complete circuit, at right, can be
built for around $75, including all
hardware.
4
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TCOMPUCOLOR BUS SIGNALS
*SORCERER BUS SIGNALS
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EPROM PROGRAMMER
18140D2 02
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74LS00 VCC = PIN 14 GND = PIN 7
741SO4 VCC
PIN 14 ONO
PIN 7
741527 VCC = PIN 14 GNO = PIN 7
7415374 VCC = PIN 20 GND = PIN 10
811595 VCC = PIN 20 ONO = PIN 10
CD4040 VCC
PIN 16 GND = PIN 8
74L5139 VCC = PIN 16 ONO = PIN 8
2708 VCC = PIN 24 GND = PIN 12
VBB = PIN 21 VDD < PIN 19
1210+
0
I
SWITCH POSITIONS
SI I : 2708
2 : 271612758
3 : 2732
Std
+12V
II..
+25V
21CCI-
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+250
Diao nostics
Sofieday your computer is going to break; even the most
reliable
computer systems "go down". Often, finding exactly
what is
wrong can account for the most time consuming
part of repairing
the system, and the longer the system is
down, the more
money you lose.
DIAGNOSTICS I is a complete program package
designed to check
every major area of your computer,
detect errors, and find the
cause of most common computer malfunctions,
often before they
become serious. For years, large installations have
run daily
or weekly diagnostic routines as a part of
normal system
maintenance and check-out procedures.
DIAGNOSTICS I is designed to provide that kind of
performance
testing for 8080/Z80 micro computers.
I
for CP/M* & TRSDOS"
Requires: 24K CP/M; 16K disc for TRS-80
formats: CP/M 8" SOFT SECTORED, NORTHSTAR
CP/M
AND TRS-80 DOS
INSTANT
SOFTWARE
Postal Address: P.O. Box 420,
Hawthorn, 3122
Cable: RODCAM Australia. Phone
819 2411
j
FREE CATALOGUE
Give your computer a "physical" today!
DIAGNOSTICS I will really put your system'through its
paces. Each
test is exhaustive and thorough. The tests
include:
Memory Test
Disk Test
CPU Test í;8080/8085/Z80,)
Printer Test
-CRT Test
brinkcard
welcome here
To our knowledge,
this is the first CPU test available for 8080/Z80
Many times transient problems, usually
blamed on bad
memory, are really CPU errors.
CPU's.
A good set of
diagnostics is an indispensable addition to your
program library even if your system is working
fine. Hours have been
wasted trying to track down a "program bug" when
actually
hardware was to blame!
DIAGNOSTICS I also allows you to be confident of
your system.
This can be critical when file merges or sorts
and backups
are involved. You want to be as sure of your
computer as possible
during these critical times. Running DIAGNOSTICS I
prior to
these and other important functions helps to
insure that your
system is operating at peak performance.
r
/
DIAGNOSTICS I is supplied on discette with a complete
users manual.
DIAGNOSTICS
1$ 7
.
$21
Manual:
R
r
...
J
1
1.
1
SuperSa t
First in Software Technology
'CP/M REGISTERED TRADEMARK DIGITAL RESEARCH
t1I$S00S, TRS 80 TRADEMARKS TANDY CORP
Why not put all your frequently used routines in an EPROM for real convenience?
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ONIOFF
OPTIONAL WIRING
MAINS CORD
Note that
TO RELOCATE ADDRESS
tSORCERER BUS SIGNALS
a
heatsink
is
required for the three -terminal regulator.
and 2732 EPROMs. This switching is accomplished by 51a and S2a. In the read
mode, 52a is switched to ground. Hence
for the 2716, 2758 and 2732 pin 20
will be low. S2a is also connected to the
input of IC8a which inverts this signal,
turning transistor Q4 on and hence also
sending pin 18 to low for the 2708.
for 2650s and SC/MPs published
In the write mode the 1k resistor connected to S2a pulls pin 20 high (+5V) for
the 2716, 2758, 2732 and at the same
time pulling the input of IC8a high, which
turns Q4 off. This results in +12V being
applied to pin 20 if it is a 2708, which is
precisely what is required. In addition a
green LED is connected to the output of
IC8d so that it turns on when the programmer is set to the program mode.
To prevent the Tristate latch IC1 from
having its outputs enabled at the same
time as the EPROM is enabled, the output of IC8a is connected to the outputcontrol line of the latch, pin 1. Hence as
soon as the programmer is switched to
read, IC1 will be disabled and the
EPROM enabled, while during programming the outputs IC1 are enabled
and the ROMs disabled.
The power supply for the programmer
is virtually the same as that used in a
previous EPROM programmer project
A full -wave rectifier consisting of
diodes D2 and D3 and a 1000uF filter
capacitor C3, supplies an LM340T-5
three -terminal regulator. The regulator
delivers a constant 5V supply with low
ripple and excellent line and load
regulation. The output of the regulator is
decoupled by two 10uF tantalum
capacitors and three 0.1uF capacitors.
These are distributed around the board
to reduce the effects of supply line inductance, which can be a problem due
to the -fast risetimes encountered with
February 1979 (File No. 2/CC/35). The
transformer is an'A&R2155 and it drives
three seperate power supplies for -5V,
+5V and +26V. The -5V supply is a simple half wave rectifier consisting of diode
D1 and capacitor filter followed by a
zener regulator using a 5.1V 1W zener.
TTL.
About 30VDC is generated by a tripler
circuit consisting of diodes D4, D5 and
1000uF capacitors Cl, C2 together with
the full -wave rectifier already described.
The operation of the circuit can be
understood by noting that when the 1 SV
tap swings negative (about -10V) then
the 1000uF capacitor is charged up to
20V by D4 which effectively clamps the
positive side of Cl at +10V. Now when
the 15V tap swings up to +10V D4 is
reverse-biased and D5 is forward biased
and Cl's charge is dumped into C2.
The tripler ,is followed by a zener
regulator consisting of a 68 ohm resistor,
two 12V 2.5W zeners and .a diode in
series. Theoretically this would give a
nominal output voltage of 24.6 but due
to the positive thermal coefficient of the
zeners this nominal voltage will exceed
25V. The voltage tolerance of the zeners
also means that the actual output
voltage can vary as much as ±1.4V
hence this voltage should actually be
checked and if it is not +26±1V then a
higher or lower voltage zener should be
substituted for D7.
The specified programming voltage for
the 2716 and 2758 EPROMs is 25±1 V
which is 1V below the specified voltage
range for the 2708s, viz 26±1 V. Hence to
keep this voltage well within specifications we have tapped off a seperate
+25V supply via diode D6. The voltage
at this point is 0.6V below the nominal
+26V. A 22 -ohm resistor has also been
included in series with the +25V supply
to limit the current should the EPROM
selector be accidentally set to the 2716/
2758 position when a 2708 is in the
socket.
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
67
e
Break a ay from
the past.
a
Motorola's MC68000 sets new MPU system
performance standards for the '80s. ow.
Motorola announces a new microprocessor so
advanced in concept it offers the designer
virtually unlimited freedom of system design.
Advanced technologies provide it with a
speed/power product four times that of standard
NMOS. Break away from the past and step into
the new era of microprocessors.
Everything you need for system design is
available now-a Design Module for evaluating
the MC68000, development hardware and
software, full documentation and training. In
addition, the MC68000 interfaces directly and
easily with existing M6800 Family peripherals,
MPUs, and MCUs.
The MC68000 is, by design, perfect for an
easy -to-handle, block -structured, high-level
language like PASCAL. It simplifies modern
programming techniques like modular
programming.
Complete M68000 design support available now.
Concurrent with introduction of the MC68000, the
design tools to help you break away from the past
are now available.
A major commitment to development of timely
and effective M68000 hardware and software has
been part of the program from the beginning. The
results, part innovation and part evolution, give
you a choice among Motorola's EXORciser®, the
IBM 370 and the PDP°-11 for system hardware
and software development.
Motorola offers the total range of
microcomponents for your advanced systems.
Motorola's original M6800 Family pioneered the
concept of the fully-compatible, matched set
microprocessor plus I/O, peripheral controller
and memory family, complete with support
hardware, software and training.
The MC68000 springs from a rich tradition in
both microcomponents and MOS technology and
is designed to develop in the same total family
way as the M6800 Family.
Pace -setting products like the MCM6664 64K
dynamic RAM, the MC6809 super 8 -bit
microprocessor, and the definitive MC6801 and
M6805 Family one-chip MCUs have firmly
established Motorola's capability.
For further details and application form please
contact:
RANK
ELECTRONICS
PTY LIMITED
INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS
12 Barcoo Street, East Roseville NSW 2069. Phone: 406
5666
60 Rosebank Avenue, Clayton South Vic 3169. Phone:
541 8444
299 Montague Road, West End, Brisbane 4101. Phone 44
2851
101-105 Mooringe Avenue, Camden Park SA 5038. Phone 294 6555
430 Newcastle Street, Perth WA 6000. Phone: 328
3933
120 Parry Street, Newcastle NSW 2300. Phone: 26 2466
'Trademark of Digital Equipment Corporation.
68
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
.
MAS5694
PARTS LIST
Norwood Instrument Case, 228 x
x 203mm or Pactec instrument
housing Model CH325 234 x 93 x
1
.12
76
261mm(DxHx
-"ti/
W)
Altronics 2155 or
1
A&R2155,
1
DSE2155 mains transformer
PC board coded 8Opp7a, 140 x
t
127mm
PC board coded 8Opp7b,
1
48
x
69mm
1
1
1
1
TO-220 heatsink
mains cable clamp and
1
1
=',--
I
i
i
with solder lugs
SPST miniature toggle switch
DPDT miniature toggle switch
3-position 4 -pole rotary switch
mains cord and plug
1
=1*asn
tYlt
t
suitable length of flat cable
20/40 way card edge connector
1
---------.
I
IJI.11*11'
m
24 -pin zero -insertion force socket
25 -pin panel -mounting male D connector and 25 -pin female D connector mass terminated with a
1
-
-"
--
'
A
{
g`
/11
rubber
grommet
Y2 metre of rainbow cable
2 large LED bezels
1 large knob
---.,
SEMICONDUCTORS:
1 74LS374 octal Tristate latch
1 81LS95 octal Tristate buffer
1
74LS139 dual 2 -to -4 decoder
1 741327
triple three -input NOR
gates
1 4040 12 -stage counter
2 74LS00 quad NAND gates
1 74LSO4 hex buffer/inverter
1 LM340T-5 three terminal regulator
3 BC547 NPN transistors
1 BC557 PNP transistor
2 BZX70C12 zener diode
1
BZX70C13 zener diode
1 BZX70C5V1 zener diode
6 1N4002 diodes
1 large red LED
1 large green LED
CAPACITORS:
1000uF/35VW PC electrolytic
1000uF/25VW PC electrolytic
2 1000uF/16VW PC electrolytics
2 10uF/35VW tantalum electrolytics
3 10uF/25VW tantalum electrolytics
1 10uF/6.3VW PC electrolytic
1
1
greencap (metallised
4
0.1uF
1
polyester)
0.01 uF greencap
RESISTORS (all 14 W 5%):
1 x 33k, 2 x 10k, 2 x 4.7k, 1 x 2.2k, 1
x 1k, 2 x 470 ohm, 1 x 100 ohm,
68 ohm %,W, 1 x 39 ohm, 1 x 22
2x
ohm.
NOTE: Resistor wattage and capacitor
voltage ratings are those used in our
prototype. Components with higher
ratings may be used provided they
are physically compatible.
°
1
Terminate suitable lengths of rainbow cable to the PCB before installation in the
case.
The +12V supply required by the 2708
also tapped off the regulator by taking
the voltage across zener diode D8, This
is why two zener diodes were used in
series rather than one single 24V zener,
but it has the further advantage of reducing the dissipation by distributing the
power dissipation in two 2.5W zeners
rather than a larger and more expensive
24V zener.
is
CONSTRUCTION
That completes our discussion of the
circuit. We can now discuss the construction of the programmer. The unit is
assembled on two PC boards, 8Opp7,
measuring 140 x 127mm and 8Opp7b,
measuring 48 x 69mm. Most of the components are mounted on the larger PCB
while the EPROM socket is mounted on
the small PCB which is soldered at right angles to the larger PCB.
Mount the links, ICs and other components on the main board first paying
particular attention to the orientation of
the ICs diodes and electrolytics. Next
mount the EPROM socket on the socket
PCB.
The EPROM socket should be a 24 -pin
zero -insertion force socket so as to avoid
damage to the IC pins and ensure a long
life for the socket. Two types of zero insertion force sockets are available so
the front panel artwork has been designed to accommodate either type. We
understand that these sockets as well as
most of the other parts for the programmer can be obtained from CQ Electronics, 95 Regent St, Sydney (or 30
Campbell St, Blacktown) and Radio
Despatch Service, 869 George St,
Sydney.
We housed our unit in a Horwood Instrument case measuring 228 x 76 x
230mm (D x H x W). The case has black
Marviplate top, bottom and sides with
aluminium front and back panels. Alternatively you can use a Pactec Instrument
Housing model CH325 which is a particularly attractive unit though it is more
expensive than the Norwood case.
Drill mounting holes for the major
components and make a cutout in the
back panel for a 25 pin male Dconnector with solder lugs. This Dconnector is required for the cable connection to the bus -expansion port on the
back of the computer and it mates with a
female D-connector which has been
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
69
Here is the full Software listing for the EPROM Programmer
mass -terminated with a length
It
t
of rainbow cable. On the other end of the
cable the individual wires have to be
soldered to a card edge connector
which then mates with the expansion
port of the computer.
The connections which have to be
made to the card edge connector will
depend on which computer you are using. In the case of the Compucolor,
Sorcerer and Tandy computers this information is given in the owner's
manuals so we will not list them here.
The only point to note is that a different
size edge connector is required for each
of them. The Compucolor and the
Sorcerer both require 25/50 way edge
connectors while the Tandy requires a
20/40 way edge connector.
Mass terminated 25-pin D-connectors
are available from Radio Despatch Service, 869 George St, Sydney as well as
the card edge connectors.
Now drill the holes in the front panel
for the switches and LED bezels and
make a cutout for the EPROM socket.
Use the actual size artwork shown else
where in this article to obtain drill centres etc. The artwork can also be used to
make up a front panel from Scotchcal
photosensitive aluminium or alternatively front panels can be purchased
from Rod Irving Electronics or Radio
10 REM
20 ?"
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= E _TC= NI_r
:TtiHL IÑ 270 j EPROM PROGRAMMER
30 REM WRITTEN BY RON DE JOt1
22/5/80
-,
44J h=,t 1=,r: THE Tr,_
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WHICH
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.3=1
REhi SEPA^cTLEY Ir REQUIRED. THE
ROUTIt;ES PRE
SO REM LISTED G-L0W:
r-ts
"-L,_tLJ
;-.,-.n
^ :,.
-,
14J:
CHECKS
SEE 1{"IÑr THE EPROM
QGE
_f-Rri'i
.10 REM
HÑ'_ SEENPROPERLYERASED..
131_E"
n
+,T2
122 R=Í
RE Ary Da Ñ
MEMORY STARTING
..,
_1
130
r',E,
-PT LCCAT I r'i 30001 FOR SUBSEQUENT LCÑD I NL
140 REM
INTO THE EPROM
150 REM 3. ,to-.
_,_1_,'1
r' ,0..
_
Ñ ,n
HEX I_'
LISTING
1_,
160 REM
+:F PREI:IIWSLY ENTERED_ OÑTA.
1
"
r111
170 REMi
:nG_1a=,
RRi II;r,ÑIL,',
l_'
+r~ i, IN MEMORY
El'IGr. T
INTU
100 REM
THE EPROM IISING Ñ r1ÑCHINE LÑt";i;CtÑGE DF,Il1ER.
152,-L,1
REM 5. "E000" IS A ROUTINE FOR LOÑDINC' DÑ
TM
DATA
REM
_t',
FROM r;.-rhJt
=
INTO J^ 1T -- nJL_E OJ E T
2:C REM
PR^GRAMtINE, INTO Ñ BLÑNK EPROM. HENCE IF Ñ
i r -:.J
-,r. ,
rROUTINES
CHECK VOLTAGES!
,
1
.
T
.
t".r'.'.
i
,
11
I
I
;ti
I
I
1
J
'7..a.71:J
r
ROM IS HATER INSERTED "Ñ RUNf 4000
EXECUTED THE FIRST EPRGM WILL SE DUPLICATED
"2000" 1S AN EDITING ROUTINE WHICH
ACCEPTS Ñ Ht;t ÑDDRESS FOLLOWED S'T' Ñ
HEX D TiÑ BYTE TO BE ^LÑ3ED PT THAT LOCATIO`.
:BLANK
l,'
REM
243 REM; S.
REM
260 REM
*7-'7n
,
Despatch.
The PCB can now be installed in the
case using 10mm tapped spacers to support the board. Temporarily install the
socket board with the zero insertion
force socket into the front panel cutout
and butt the main board against it. Then
using a pencil, mark a line across the
socket board, remove the two boards
and using the line as a guide, solder the
two boards together. Be careful to line
up the connector strips on the boards
and carefully solder two of the connector strips together. Check first to see that
the boards will mount properly in the
case then solder the remaining connector strips together.
With the main components mounted
in the case, complete the wiring using
the diagram shown elsewhere in this article. For a neat appearance use rainbow
cable for the connections to the D connector and the front panel switches.
,',
^E'!
ri-_
1000
.J_:=li'T
1010
_2?2
1070
;;i_'r _'L
2000
I,ri:jli3
77.0:3i3
C r='I_ t
.,
_rr._i
..
1jO'=d-:71
:_i:34;CS
I,
i43? j
1.:140
1177v1
10Sr'
_1 -'r 1
2e131
20,-,0
`_
17
GOSUG 4000
5232
END
INPUT "SWITCH
:TTCH
J=1d^(1):L_-0
O
READ i37r" ,
-.;.
1=1 TO 1024
FU-:
POKE 0000i-1,255
IF IMP(0)<>255 THEN
CF,=1
.117-.12)
_
r
n_
_..--
"r,-,.. '1
r
THEN
1_I', PRINT
r:.,.t;
=r,i,:'f (,3T L..RH__I ",
''L=' -RIrT "EPROM ERASED"
2090 RETURN
3020 FOR i=1 _T¡O 1024
301c-, _I_
1 ,+J'JIJL' 7052
3320 PRINT ''0"}P$i
3072 P...17="":IMPUT A;'
304G_1 IF LEN'; A$ i=C1 THEN
GOTO 3053
3030 IJl_+:;U3 7000
30s0 K -J GCISI8 7200
_
i
4'
'
,
I
.
:
t,
lita
,l_i
:
POKE 32020+I,16+k::+.J
Rather then blow up an otherwise 3080 NEXT I
working EPROM your first check, after 7,2503_ nn: hT "DATA ENTRY COMPLETED"
turning the programmer on, is to test 7100 r',ETUr,:`";
that all the voltages on the power supply 4024: It';PLIT "'_;G'aITC:-i
TO PROGRAM t"{+JDE";Ñs`'
pins of the EPROM are okay. Some
401I=1 DÑTÑ
points to note when using the program?_6,22E1.D3,43.117,1,0.4.2i_i,1,12'6,211
mer is that the EPROMs should only be 4020 DATA :i,211,2,F2.,54.ó1,32,253,c11.1..35
inserted
into
the
programming 4030 DRIP 219,2,11,120,1'i',72,2?E,29,32,225,?ti11
socket when the power is off and the 4240 FOR I=0 TO 72,3
programmer has been switched to read 4050 REPO A: POKE I+3.2062,1
mode.. it is also good practice to check 44_IRE3 NEXT I
7.27.0
-i
70
0.
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
ARE YOU READY TO OWN A
THEN TALK
TO US!
INTERFACE
'a
r
V.el
Y
C
4
6809
Convenient serial or parallel I/O cards have DB-25
connectors mounted directly on the circuit
board. Up to 16 interface devices may
be installed on the address decoded
I/O bus. Programming strips are
.
provided for input and output baud rate selection
on each port. All
outputs are
fully buffered.
N
I«
CABINET
Rugged 1/8 inch alloy aluminum
PROCESSOR
with a solid 1/8
inch alloy aluminum cover for unsurpassed
protection. All interior metal is conversion
coated. The cover is fiñished with a super tough textured epoxy.
base plate combined
rr
kim
The world's most powerful
eight-bit processor, the Motorola
MC6809, plus 2K byte monitor ROM
that is 2716 EPROM compatible and full
buffering on all output lines. Built-in multiuser capability, just add I/O cards to operate
a
multi -terminal system.
MEMORY-
You can purchase the computer with either 8K bytes of RAM memory (expandable to 56K), or with
the full
56K. The efficient, cool running dynamic memory used in this system is designed and manufactured for
us by "Motorola
Memory Systems Inc."
PERIPHERALS-The wide range of peripheral hardware that is supported by the 6809 includes: dot matrix printers (both
80 and 132 column), IBM Electronic 50 typewriter, daisy wheel printers, 5 -inch floppy disk
system, 8 -inch floppy disk
systems and a 16 megabyte hard disk.
SOFTWARE-
The amount of software support available for the 6809 is incredible when you consider that it was first
introduced in June, 1979. In addition to the FLEX9 operating system, we have a Text Editor, Mnemonic
Assembler, Debug,
Sort -Merge, BASIC, Extended BASIC, MultiUser BASIC, PASCAL and PILOT.
69/K Computer Kit with 8K bytes of memory
69/A Assembled Computer with 8K bytes of memory
69/56 Assembled Computer with 56K bytes of memory
Prices + Sales Tax
rialrd
if Applicable
$ 560
$ 660
$1660
Prices Subject to Change Without Prior Notice.
SOUTH WEST TECHNICAL PRODUCT CORPORATION
(COVERING AUSTRALASIA)
7a BURTON STREET, DARLINGHURST, N.S.W. 2010.
P.O. BOX 380 DARLINGHURST N.S.W. 2010. PHONE (02) 31 3273
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
71
EPROM Programmer listing contd:
SOFTWARE DESCRIPTION
+070 POKE 15526,2:FOr r 1R527,125
42$0
4090
.J=LIS,F,(
0
)
PRINT "EPROM
4100 RETURN
51300
PR17üF:HMM
I
NG COMPLETED"
l'iFUT"SN I TivH TO REPO NODE" ; A$
I=INF{ i ): I=1
I
5010
.
FOR l.1.=1 TO 3
5030PS=RÍGHTt1::PS,2;1
30411 Fl] ti R=1 T! 15
5053 J1-í GOSUE 7050
50 rJ PRINT "0"+10$+"
507Gt FOR T=1 TO c:
5080 IF Z=1 THEN J=P EEH::i: 1131_j1=t+ I;1: EL:iE J= I NPC 0)
705G
51_t:_i0 C7OSUE:
5100 P1=RICHTS( P$ r'2 ): c:=PEEK( 31jt_11=11_1+1 ): PRINT P$';
5110 IF J=E THEN PRINT"
";:ELSE PñINT"
";
5120 J=1!'iN 2 ): I=I+1
5130
13J Y (+
r140
51_120
:
PRINT
5150 IF .' 0LY THEN
f_i h-_U_t
518G NEXT F:
5170 I`.,PJ- PS
5180 NUT I?
5130 RETURN
60110 ,J=INP1. 1 ): INPUT "SNITCH 70 REPD Í'iO,_1C";i-1$
6010 FOR I=1 TO 1024: POKE 3E1000+I , it'iP( E: )
80 15 .J- I NF'12 ? `irWT I
6020 =1: GUS:ÜE 5010
r -T ^,t
81330 Itic
Ir51i
:
1
7000
0i0
7020
7052
7060
7070
7080
7090
,,
r'1G:,_
TH^N J= =S0 8
-tin(ES)-M`C{"P"l+l%
1F8.4:,:"P"
s'
i
-A=CC" 3"
):
RrTJ RN
R_TUriN
I NTI; .J:
L5F.
r
M=J-k::+2.18
L=IP,T1'H/1E:;1
M=M -L+16
N=K:
1jl-iS,l.lEt
7140
^
riS:iJ=L:GO:_IJB 7140
PS=PS+N.17: N=fi: GOSUE 7143
`
1-.=---
7110
7120 PfS=P-47+f'+:£
7130 RETURN
7140 IF `{>:3 THEN N$I.HRVtf-10+AS1,( "A11 )?:RETURN
7150 N.'=Ci-IRE N+ASC1' ":I" ;
71613 RETURN
gE100 ?=1: GOSL IE 5E110
8010 RETURN
:32=0 PRINT "ECIITItJ13 INPUT FORMAT PAPA DD"
9010 INPUT h+'
:31=20 IF LEN( A$ ?=43 THEN RETIIRi',
3E+10 GOS, e 7030
3040 K=J :1;1]:;Uó 70n0
9050 iC=18*K+ J: rOS;UE 7000
:,
:11=t61_í
i,=16yFF::,+.J:133S;iJE
?Tina
9070 K=1h*fi+J: uOSUE 7000
9080 Ai'=F:IGHTS( A$, 2): G1]SUE: 7000
SOSCI L=J I,OL E, 7000
:3100 POKE .^I31_1n1+K, i6*L+J
9110 GOTO 9010
:
RIAD'r
that the right EPROM type has been
selected before using the programmer.
Well that completes the hardware.
Now all that remains before we can
start programming EPROMs is suitable
software for the microcomputer. To this
end we have provided a listing of a program (for 2708 EPROMs only) written in
Tandy Level II BASIC. The timing for the
program routine assumes a 2MHz CPU
clock. It is possible to adapt this program
for other microcomputers and different
clock speeds. Also by changing the
various constants in the program and adding extra routines, 2716/2758 and 2732
EPROMs can be programmed.
There are six separate routines which
are called up in sequence by the main
program during normal execution. These
routines are as follows: "200(Y' checks
that the EPROM has been erased; "3000"
reads the data to be stored in the
EPROM by first prompting with the hexadecimal address and then reading the
hex data to be stored there
note that
this data is stored in the computer's
memory at this stage; "8000" lists the
data which has been entered in the form
of a hex dump with a hex address then
eight hex data bytes per line. The listing
is page by page so that each page of data
can be individually studied and any errors noted.
-
UTILITY ROUTINES
If there are any errors these can be corrected in the next routine. This is an
editing routine starting at "9000" which
accepts input in the form of a four-digit
hex address followed by a two -digit hex
data byte which is to be stored at that
location. Routine "4000" is then called
and this loads and jumps to a machine
language program that takes the data
stored in the computer's memory and
programs it into the EPROM. This routine
is quite fast and as we have mentioned,
programming time is about two minutes
or less.
The programming routine is followed
by a verification routine which provides
a hex dump of the data contained in the
EPROM and marks any data bytes which
do not match the data stored in the computer's memory with an asterisk. (If there
are any bad locations then the EPROM
may be faulty.)
In addition to these, we have provided
another routine at line 6000 which may
be called up to read the data from an
EPROM into the computer's memory
and list it in the form of a hex dump. This
is useful for duplication of EPROMs since
if routine "4000" is then called this data
can be programmed into any number of
blank EPROMs which are subsequently
loaded into the programmer.
Next month we shall feature a listing of
this program for the Exidy Sorcerer.
(To be continued)
72
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
Hewlett-Packard You'll never know how
trr
're u
N EW!
'
,e.
,e
esre
pea
210 steps $184.50 ($165.50)
.A
HP33C Scientific Programmable,
49 steps $148 ($133)
The 41C has 4 interlace ports for:
Card Reader $237 ($213)
HP38C Financial Programmable,
Printer/Plotter $425 ($382)
99 steps $184.50 ($165.50)
Extra memory modules each with capacity of
basic 41C $56.40 ($49.10)
Plus 16 application pacs (plug-in modules)
$56.40 ($49.10) ea
And 24 solution books $15.70 ($13.60)
Also HP67/97 software compatible
(Prices in brackets exclude sales tax)
HP29C Scientific Programmable,
98 steps, continuous $202.50 ($182)
HP19C same as 29C but with
Printer $51.50 ($225)
HP97 Card Programmable, printing,
224 steps $913 ($820)
HP37E Business $93.50 ($84)
HP38E Financial $148 ($133)
HP92A "The Investor"
HP's ONLY POST FREE!
PLUS ALL ACCESSORIES
HP41C
All LCD models $1.50
Pack and Post
anywhere in Australia. Otherwise $2.50 for
COMPUTERS!!
$35 (S31)
$39.50 ($35)
it
mem.... 565.90 ($58.501
*
*
Ti58C, 480 steps, 60 mem
$149 (5132)
Ti59, 960 steps, 100 mem
$299 ($265)
PC1000 Printer
$237 ($210)
Module for 58C/59
$34.50 ($30.50)
Pakettes for 58C/59
$9 (58)
Thermal Paper PC100C...,...$12 ($10.50)
40 Mag cards 59
$15 ($13.50)
Package Deal T159/PC100C
5510 ($450)
it
- -
NEW INTERTEC BUSINESS SYSTEM
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ASK OUR SPECIAL DEAL
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-
fs ALCULATOR
and
OMPUTER DISTRIBUTORS
PHONE
(02) 624 8849
(Prices In brackets exclude sales tax)
INCORPORATING ELECTRONIC CALCULATOR DISCOUNTS
r
$87 ($78)
HP33E Advanced Scientific
Programmable, 49 steps $111 ($99.75)
-
TI25 LCD Scientific
1155, 32 steps, 10
HP31E Scientific $63 ($56.50)
HP32E Advanced Scientific Statistical
Financial Printing $530 ($476)
ea
TEXAS
Ti50 LCD
ALL WITH
HP34C Scientific Programmable,
Ira
el.
-
NE1
,C
CONTINUOUS MEMORY
FANTASTIC SYSTEM
LCD ALPHA -NUMERIC
over 400 steps, up to 64 data
registers (continuous) $359.90 ($323)
HP41C
good HP's are till you own one
NSW, elsewhere $3.50 per ordeÁ. (Extra
S1.50 for registered). Sales Tax Forms
must be duly signed and stamped (Forms
available).
LEASING
ARRANGED
W
Fre
Copy and complete.
Please debit my Bankcard $
Expiry
No
Date
Signature
Name 8 Address
MAIL ORDER:
P.O. BOX 106
BAULKHAM HILLS,
N.S.W. 2153.
DON'T MISS OUT
27 DO-IT-YOURSELF PROJECTS
FROM ELECTRONICS AUSTRALIA
HHTINNIN3
If you like building electronic projects in your spare time, this exciting new
book of popular projects is a must. There's a tácho, a dwell meter and a COI
unit for your car; a Doppler burglar alarm; a digital clock; a loudspeaker
protector; a variable power supply: plus much more. Order your copy nowt
¡RDSiRRM
ww-a
Use this handy order form
$
ONLY
$3.00*
+ 60c pack
&
poet
1111To:
Electronics Australia, PO Box 163, Beaconsfield 2014.
Please send me
copies of "PROJECTS & CIRCUITS
NO. 2" at $3.60 each. (Price includes packing and postage.)
NAME
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ADDRESS
ftMt uweTnumoMt r>rwu
Of TWIT/ SEVEN MoaECiS,
HUS INCUR 011110 eE81C41
STATE
10.1
I
L
L
enclose
a
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ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
J
73
It cost you money, so..
Take care of our
TV/FM antenna
In the
interest of signal pickup, a television antenna should be
mounted well out in the clear. But, in such a position, it is exposed to wind, salt spray perhaps, and large birds. The
Author, an
expert in the field, talks about possible deterioration, and
damage to TV antennas.
by W. J. (Bill) McMANUS*
Corrosion, or oxidisation, is one of the
main enemies of a TV/FM antenna installation but it is one that depends a
great deal on the particular location.
In the dry Australian interior, a piece of
steel without special protective coating
may last for years without showing signs
of destructive corrosion. On the other
hand, corrosion is a very real problem in
coastal regions, such that all hardware
that is used to support the antenna
should be hot-dipped galvanised.
Nuts and bolts need to be zinc or cadmium plated
a treatment that offers
protection without affecting the thread.
They could be galvanised but a die nut
would have to be run over the thread
and this would cut the coating off and
leave bare metal again.
Brass bolts are out of the question
because of the electrolysis effect that
would set up immediately with the
-
IN
galvanising,
leading
to chemical
corrosion.
Aluminium nuts and bolts are less
prone to electrolysis but they lack the
strength of the harder metals.
Stainless steel hardware is both strong
and virtually corrosion -free but the cost
will deter most ordinary consumers.
Fortunately, the life of antenna support
hardware can be prolonged in badly affected salt areas by first treating it with a
metal primer and then coating it with a
good quality weather -resistant paint.
The antenna itself is normally less of a
problem. Being constructed mainly or
wholly of aluminium, there is no spon-
*Bill McManus is Managing Director of
Television Services Pty Ltd, 69
Maitland Rd, Islington, NSW 2296. The article is adapted from his book "TV & FM
Aerial Installations for Australian Conditions", as reviewed on page 102 of our
May 1980 issue. Price of the book is $4.50
plus postage.
taneous galvanic action between the
various components. Other reasons for
using aluminium include:
Its light weight, especially when large
arrays have to be installed at a considerable height in fringe areas. Apart
from problems of handling, weight imposes demands on the supporting
structure.
The electrical conducting properties
of aluminium are good.
Aluminium has good anti-corrosion
properties, even in
a
coastal
environment.
After aluminium has been exposed to
the weather for some time, its skin
hardens to produce a coating not unlike
anodising, thus acting as a form of selfprotection. However, when subjected to
direct salt-spray (eg within 100 metres or
so of the water's edge) severe deterioration can still occur.
Coating the antenna with protective
lacquers etc, can slow down this action a
little but it has to be done correctly. Ordinary metal primers do not take well to
aluminium. It has to be etch -primed,
IN
74
ELECTRONICS Australia July, 1980
high.
As distinct from corrosion problems,
medium to large birds can pose a constant hazard both inland and on the
coast. Cockatoos and galahs have been
known to chew the insulators away on
an antenna in inland situations and, on
the coast, large water birds such as
pelicans have used television antennas
as a spotting position for fish, if situated
close to an estuary.
Unfortunately, an antenna constructed
strongly enough to withstand the stress
of a pelican landing and taking off again
would be just too heavy and too costly
to market. However, an idea that offers
some protection is to provide the birds
with an alternate perch, which can be in
the form of a 'T" bar arrangement that
projects above the antenna (at least a
half wavelength so it won't interfere with
the electrical performance). With a
stronger and larger horizontal section on
top, the larger birds favour sitting there
rather than on the thinner elements.
Probably the worst enemy of a large
TV/FM antenna installation is gale-force
wind. In theory, an antenna could be
constructed that would withstand
anything that the elements might throw
at it but, as mentioned earlier, it gets
down to matters of weight and cost.
Even so, given sufficient thought and
care, a normal system can be installed so
as to stand up to anything short of a
typhoon!
The main reasons why antennas blow
Hi -Q
II
undercoated, and a special aluminium
paint applied.
Care has to be taken not to paint the
insulators and connections. These are
best treated with a rubberised compound laid on liberally to keep the salt
water etc away from the connections by
sealing them over.
All stainless steel antennas can be used
in coastal situations but, again, the
cost is
down are
"And that guy wire thing just happened
to get caught in the bumper bar!"
as
follows:
The guying angle is too acute to give
proper support to the mast. There are
calculations that can be carried out for
wind loading on the antenna and sup porting mast etc. but it is outside the
1.
scope of this article to go into them. A
good rule of thumb is never to install the
guying points closer than a third of the
height of the masts. If you are going up
15 metres your guying points should be
five metres or more from the foot of the
mast; the wider the better, within
reason.
Another Red Hot Idea
From Cambion .. .
o
e
2. Improperly placed guys. Aim to install
four sets of guys, arranged 90° apart.
¡:'
An unsupported top section carrying
the antenna itself. A special collar on all
High -Q masts allow an extra set of guys
to be installed right up underneath the
antenna.
-7.41%4,
3.
!!Í
... Electronic Refrigeration
4. Insecure
anchor points. Use eye bolts
wherever possible, locked in position
with a washer and nut. Failing eye bolts,
and the need to use a guying cleat, use
coach screws. Above all, don't count on
the fascia board of an old dwelling; it
may be quite insecure.
Corroded and weakened guy wires,
eye bolts, turnbuckles, etc. They should
be checked every two or three years.
As there is such a wide variety of situations encountered when installing television antennas, there is no set rule of how
each one should be approached. A lot of
initiative and common sense, has to be
5.
used.
One only has to glance at some installations to get the impression that
they are not safe. Examples are on the
roof of a gunbarrell type house; or on
the ground with the fence too close to
the dwelling. In both cases the guying
angle is such as to impose too much
down -thrust on the mast. This may cause
it to buckle, usually between the upper
guy rings.
Standards have been published concerning such matters but, if these are not to
hand, let common sense be your guide.
Don't go for greater antenna height, in
search of a better picture, if you can't
provide adequate guying. And don't
forget that wind gusts can be stronger in
some situations than others.
CLIMBING THE MAST?
One final point: to save time and expense a professional antenna man may
opt to climb an existing installation to
check for a broken lead or install a
masthead amplifier. He has experience
and maybe equipment on his side, so
don't be temptéd to follow suit out of
sheer bravado.
But, if you're determined to copy the
expert, first carefully check all guy wires
and all anchor points; and make sure
that there is enough of them to cope
with the extra stress.
Check the mast sections carefully as
you progress. They tend to rust from the
inside, leaving only the galvanised shell.
Believe it or not, have known an installer to poke a screwdriver: straight
through an apparently solid looking
metal mast. That would be one case, for
certain, where care paid dividends)
I
Electronic refrigeration, i.e. a thermoelectric
module plus a heat sink, can maintain cool
temperatures in a variety of electronic
packages. Call or write today for
Catalog 300.
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TELEPHONE: 438 2500
TELEX: AA25963
VIDEO TECHNICS
THE CAROUSEL CENTER. SHOP 17 & 18. 530 OXFORD ST.. BONDI JUNCTION
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BRISBANE 4064. PH. 36 1257
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3
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II
Starting time
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$195 +
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FRANCHISEES REQUIRED FOR S.A, W.A., VICTORIA AND TASMANIA
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
75
The Serviceman
..o
0000
oI
There's a signal somewhere - in them thar 'ills!
As a change from intermittents and similar horrible beasties,
this month have a story about a different type of serviceman
I
activity; the installation of a complex antenna system in a
difficult fringe area. There is also some insight into customer
attitudes and psychology.
We sat down to discuss the problem
over a very welcome cup of tea, and
outlined some of the possibilities, their
likely cost, and probable order of improvement. was surprised to find that
he now seemed prepared to spend
almost any reasonable amount of
money if could promise a worthwhile
improvement.
But now was trying to decide whether
to "go for broke". had always envisaged
the ultimate installation for this site; an
aerial on top of the hill which shielded
the house, a masthead amplifier, and
open wire feeder to the house. was
hesitated to
sure it would work, but
suggest anything so costly.
So decided to try a little psychology. If
could make the customer believe he
thought of the idea, then he might well
buy it. So, while we discussed the piojokingly pointed out that his
blem,
house was really in the wrong place; that
if it had been up on the hill he would
have no problems.
He took the bait. "Could we put the
antenna up on the hill?" he asked innocently. Inwardly delighted,
agreed
that he had made a very good point
(thus giving him the credit) and that it
would be well worthwhile surveying this
area and working out installation details.
resolved to strike while the iron was
hot.
had brought antennas, portable
masting, field strength meter, etc with
me, and. decided to survey the area
right away. So set off up the hill, hoping
could find a spot which was a
reasonable compromise between the
view towards the transmitters and the
distance to the house.
As it turned out, found a very likely
looking spot. Setting up the field strength
meter fitted a four element aerial to a
5 -metre length of masting and made
some measurements. The results were
excellent; over 2mV on channel 4 and
about 1.2mV on 5A.
Back at the house told the customer
what had found; a really first class signal
which should give him a perfect picture.
By now he was almost as excited as
was, but wasn't prepared for his next
suggestion. "Would it be possible to
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The story comes from a colleague in him to think in terms of a better antenna
the channel 4/5A region south of Sydney, but he finally decided that the
where long distances and undulating ter- monochrome set was good enough.
rain make reception difficult or impossiIt was nearly two years before I saw
ble for many outlying properties. will him again, and found that there had
present it more or less in his own words, been a change in the domestic scene.
as he told it to me.
His wife had passed away a few months
The customer and his wife lived on a
earlier, and a married daughter, with two
cattle stud property a few miles out of small children, had moved in to keep
town and first met them several years house for him.
ago when I was called to service a
have no doubt that the presence of a
monochrome TV set. The fault was a younger woman, and the two children in
routine one which was quickly fixed, but particular, in the isolated environment,
was rather shocked
though not sur- was responsible for my being called in
prised
at the quality of the picture. As and the changed attitude which found.
well as severe snow, it displayed several For one thing, the daughter had brought
prominent ghosts.
her own colour TV set with her and
The reason was fairly obvious. The found, to her dismay, that it was quite
antenna was a very simple one supuseless.
My next surprise was the farmer's atported by a short mast on the
bargeboard. That was bad enough con- titude. He came straight to the point with
sidering the distance involved, but the the question, "What can you do about
it?" Remembering his previous reaction, I
real problem was the location. The
hesitated to make any drastic suggeshouse was situated hard in under a steep
hill, directly between it and the tions. felt that if I could persuade him to
install a reasonable mast and high gain
transmitters.
antenna it would be about as much as
It was so bad, in fact, that I was surpriscould expect.
ed that they received any picture at all,
but even more surprised that they could
bear to watch it. commented on the
picture quality, feeling that a higher mast
might be worth trying, but they seemed
quite content with things as they were;
so I didn't press the point.
visited the property several times
over the next couple of years, mainly to
fix routine faults. On one occasion
found that the reflector and one director
had fallen off the antenna, making the
picture even more atrocious than
before. Even so, it took some effort to
persuade the customer to let me fix it.
More recently he asked me to bring
out a colour set for a trial, which I did,
but the result was a foregone conclusion "To get the picture really clear, l'll need a
hopeless. In vain tried to persuade pair of scissors!"
76
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
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operate more than one set from such
a
system?"
I assured him that it was possible, little
realising how the situation was about to
mushroom. He then reminded me that
he still had the monochrome set, and
went on to explain that his daughter had
also brought a monochrome set with her
So now he wanted three outlets; one
for the colour set in the lounge room,
one for a mono set in his office, and one
for the other mono set in the children's
POSTAL & TELECOMMUNICATIONS DEPT.
room!
More determined than ever to follow
through, set to on the spot and worked
out the kind of amplifier would need,
the amount of cable, the splitters, anten-
1
low
>)»>RAMA
1CKC«<<
I
I
na and mast.
It wasn't cheap by any means, but he
didn't fall down in a dead faint. Rather he
suggested we discuss it over another
"cuppa". Then he explained that he had
remembered that he had yet another
monochrome set; again faulty, but which
he felt confident could repair.
It was a much older set and had been
relegated to an outbuilding; an ex -army
hut used as a residence for casual
workers. It had never performed well on
its simple antenna and, when it broke
down, it was not regarded as worth fixing. But now
could put a fourth outlet
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in the army hut?
The hut was some distance away from
the house, but right on the line where
planned to run the feeder. told the
customer that it should not cost a great
deal more to do this.
Then, to clinch the deal, I explained
that with installations of this kind, offer
the customer complete satisfaction or
no charge. It is not an offer one can afford to make lightly, but have never
had an installation backfire. The result
was a firm order for the full installation.
On the way back to the shop I could
not help but reflect on the customer's
changed attitude; from an unwillingness
to spend even a few dollars on a better
antenna, to an almost carte blanche approach.
At the shop I went over the technical
had selected a
specifications again.
masthead amplifier, marketed by Standard Components, having a gain of
20dB. From this figure subtracted the
two main losses in the system; that of
the open wire line and the splits to the
various outlets.
had added up a feeder length of
210m. Open wire feeder loss at 200MHz
is about 0.5dB per 30m when dry, and
1.5dB when wet. This worked out at
3.5dB when dry, and a little over 10dB
when wet.
This would leave a gain of 10dB at the
end of the run, before splitting. A twoway splitter will introduce nearly 4dB
loss in practice, and a three-way type
over 5dB. It is sometimes more convenient, and cheaper, to use two 2 -way
splitters in cascade to provide three
outlets, particularly if it is desired to
favour one outlet.
Even allowing for this, the maximum
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CB RADIO
WHAT CHANNELS?
PUBLIC COMMENT WANTED
Radio frequency arrangements and regulations for CB radio
are to be reviewed.
The Postal and Telecommunications Department is conducting a public inquiry with the following terms of reference.
To report to the Minister for Post and Telecommunications as soon as possible on whether the present
18 channel 27 MHz Citizens Band Radio Service,
which was established on 2 June 1977, should be
retained after June 1982.
In considering this issue regard should be had to:
technical operating
conditions, regulations, frequencies, channel
allocations and procedures governing the Citizens
Band Radio Service in both the HF (27 MHz) and
(1) all matters associated with the
UHF (477 MHz) bands;
(2) the need to utilise and manage the radio frequency
spectrum for the maximum overall benefit to the
Australian community;
.(3) Australia's international obligations in radio
frequency management; and
(4) the need to minimise interference to otherservices.
I
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The Department is seeking written submissions on these
issues from interested individuals and organisations.
Submissions should be sent to:
First Assistant Secretary
Radio Frequency Management Division
Postal and Telecommunications Department
PO Box 5412CC
MELBOURNE VIC. 3001
CLOSING DATE FOR SUBMISSIONS:
TELEPHONE INQUIRIES:
15 AUGUST 1980
MR. 1. KENNEDY (03)
6091512
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
77
ATTENTION
MICRO BUFFS!
Now is your opportunity to procure hardware at a
bargain basement price. We have a large number of
computer terminal units (Incomplete), which would
enable you to mount your micro and peripherals in a professional manner for
$150 F.O.T.
our premises
te
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trm`tlóttXs N pr tawt` ttOn<
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Caber attGo°od9tn tOp.
d
h
deep
Pack
siOts'
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p
tyP
totta
t<e1
e
ir
Get both price
and performance
Make a detailed price/performance
comparison and you'll find that these DMMs
come out on top.
Only these models give you bench -top
features like four digits and autoranging
plus the kind of price and compact, rugged
construction that used to be reserved for
field service.
The Philips DMMs also feature a choice
of LED and LCD readouts, a time saving
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ofnse
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ts 11(5.9\e
Cat`t
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other svndcv
Note:
1. These
units are incomplete and circuit detail is not available. Any person wanting a working processor system need not apply, this is an opportunity
for the system builder.
2.
Some of the component types on the boards are: 7400,
74H00, 7402, 7403, 7408, 7409, 7420, 7426, 7438, 7474,
74H106, 74154, 74193, 7511, 7540, 7552, MC1488,
MC1489, MOSTEK 2407, 2496, IM5603, TR1420A, 2N2905,
555, 8-pole Dip switches, tubular tantalum, 1/2W
resistors. 4.9meg and 19.7meg crystals plus many other
bits.
3. All equipment is virtually new and would have a conservative value of $1000 at new prices.
Fall 4 -digit displays: for higher resolution. We
also give you a parameter readout.
Autoranging: for quicker, more convenient
readings. Manual too, of course.
True RMS: the only true way to measure AC
signals other than sine-waves.
Currents to 10 A: a standard feature.
Overload protection: it's comprehensive.
Data Hold: a big Philips plus. Allows measurement data to be "frozen" until you can read it.
This option is a must for tricky service situations.
Now get the full facts on the PM 2517.
For more details contact:
-
Philips Electronic Systems
Scientific & Industrial Equipment,
P.O. Box 119, North Ryde,
NSW 2113 or phone Sydney 888 8222
Melbourne 699 0300 Adelaide 223 4022
Perth 277 4199 Brisbane 44 0191
Wellington NZ 859 859
This equipment can be inspected on our premises at
SHARON YOUTH CAMP,
Dandenong Hastings Road, Pearcedale, Victoria 3912.
We suggest you ring (059) 78 6278 for
appointment.
mums
Test& Measuring
Instruments
PHILIPS
AHEARN.S112
78
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
THE SERVICEMAN
- continued
loss would be 8dB, leaving a gain of 2dB
over the signal at the aerial. Since this
was already above lmV (which regard
as a conservative minimum) this provided a useful safety margin.
There was only one snag; the branch
feed to the army hut. had overlooked
the fact that could not fit a conventional
splitter at this point because of the need
to feed DC power to the masthead
amplifier. (I understand that splitters
suitable for this application are now
available, but
knew of none at the
time.)
considered locating the power supply
in the hut, or running another feeder
back from the house, but either would
have been inconvenient and costly
decided to get the main section working
first, then try some fiddling.
The actual installation, while simple
enough in theory, presented some practical complications. The antenna proper
presented no problems.
used a four
element type similar to the survey model
which, together with the amplifier, was
mounted on a 5m length of masting. The
latter was securely bolted to a stout
fence post which just happened to be in
a suitable spot.
From here planned to run the feeder
to a large tree, about 30m away, and
right on the edge of a very steep drop
down the side of the hill. The feeder
would then run some 65m to a disused
power pole alongside the army hut, and
then via a couple more existing poles to
the house.
Getting the feeder down the hillside
was the major problem. The entire
hillside was covered with a huge patch
of blackberry bushes, over 3m high in
most places. It reminded me of the berry
picking expeditions of my youth, when
we used to collect the luscious fruit by
the kerosene tin full
despite the
hazards of thorns and snakes!
While was able to reach the top of the
hill by a much longer path around the
blackberry bush, this path was out of the
question for the feeder. tackled the job
with a stout pair of boots, a boiler suit,
and two ladders
another legacy from
my berry picking days.
Starting from the top, used the ladders to smash the bushes down and
clear a path. pulled a light rope behind
me and, with the path cleared, set up a
drum of feeder cable on the hill and used thr rope to pull the cable down to the
first power pole. The far end was then
connected to the antenna and anchored
on the tree as planned.
From the pole to the house was a fairly
simple run and soon had the feeder anchored on the house. Inside the ceiling
connected it to the existing 300 ohm
feeder, which ran to an outlet in the
lounge room. This was a convenient
place to put the power supply, to feed
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printed circuit/
power up the line to the masthead
amplifier.
This particular power supply offers a
choice of either two 300 ohm outlets r.1
one 72 ohm outlet, and selected the latprefer to use co -ax for multiple
ter.
runs, since it minimises the risk of local
oscillator radiation from one set being
coupled into another run.
The 72 ohm output from the power
supply was taken to a two-way splitter,
one split going to the children's room at
the rear of the house, and involving quite
a long run. The other split went to a second splitter, one split from which fed
the colour TV set in the same room, and
the other the second monochrome set in
the office, only a short distance away.
On test, all three outlets provided a
nice clean signal with level to spare,
making it three down and one to go
the army hut. The signal was quite strong
at this point, being only half way along
the feeder, and not having suffered any
splitter losses. was hoping that a very
light coupling would provide enough
signal, without robbing the other sets, or
creating standing waves.
had terminated the feeder at a terminal block inside a weatherproof housing on the nearby pole, with the house
feeder connected directly to it. The
feeder to the hut was terminated at an
adjacent pair of terminals and, as a first
attempt, bridged it across to the main
feeder via a pair of SpF capacitors.
Unfortunately, my worst fears were
realised. There was far more signal being
directed into the hut than was needed,
the signal to the house was seriously attenuated, and there were clear indications of standing waves.
It was the amount of signal reaching
the hut which suggested the next idea. If
there was all that much signal available,
did need any coupling devices at all?
Would there be sufficient random coupling?
took only a few moments to
remove the capacitors and try again.
And it worked. There was more than
enough signal reaching the hut, and
without any of the adverse loading effects on the main feeder.
So there it was. Not very scientific
perhaps, but eminently satisfactory.
Naturally, the customer was delighted,
and even smiled as he wrote the cheque.
But couldn't help wondering whether
he regretted all the years he watched
those atrocious pictures.
Well, that's my colleague's story, and
feel that it gives a good insight into the
practical problems associated with such
a project. Obviously, one needs to be a
technician, mathematician, psychologist,
mountain climber, and blackberry bush
trampler, all rolled into one.
No wonder such installations are
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Accurately machine printed etched
Phenolic & fibreglass -gold tin plated
EA R & H ET Philips Mullard available
Specials to your drawing
POSTAGE small 80c large $1.10.
S
S
S
325
80141015
2.50
3.00
3.00
801V8
2.50
3.30
80B83
153
562
3.30
566A
80AW4
80C14
4.00
80GPS3
2
2.80
496
5.00
466
6.00
496G
6.50
726
8.00
8011U3
3.00
80CM3A
3.20
80CM3B
264
150
561
2.80
455
2.80
3.00
322
2.80
800838
3.20
800838
5.00
80S1
2.50
795810
2.80
2.80
ET452
2.80
4.50
ET474
ET560
ET321
4.50
19FE11
2.80
2.80
2.50
79PC12
3.50
2.80
2.50
?.50
2.50
2.00
3.00
3.50
2.80
4.20
2.80
2.80
2.80
2.50
2.80
80583
79E812
797111
2.80
ET270
ET262
2.50
ET261
ETI50
2.80
ETI46
79PG9
79M09
ET573
3.00
2.80
2.50
2.80
790M9
79998
3.00
4.20
ET5T7
79PS10
2.80
2.80
79SF10
2.50
79819
2.60
79117
798C9
3.50
4.20
795F9
2.60
1.60
2.80
3.50
ET814
79SR8
79WF8
79PS6
ET451
6,800
79U PS6
ET574
3.00
3.20 791178
2.80 79FR6
2.50 ET472
8.50 79CL7
1.50' 19SA5
ETI44
3.50
79905
3.00 79E02C
77E02A
3.50'E1249
ET320
ET249
2.20 ET253
ET595
2.80
ET254
-
491
79PS3
4.50
2.60
79P18
79CIA
280
566B
80F3
80
E1151
ET730
ET252
/51
2.50
79010
ET576
80PC1
2.80
3.00
3.50
3.00
4.80
8.00
2.50
2.50
-
7905
559
785E3
79P10
3.00
2.80
2.80
.E1152
2.80
ET263
ET260
79PS1I
ET606
ET473
79918
79AL9abc
79W9
ET731
ET575
ET725
79TRF5
79M8
ET148
ET724
79187
ET651
ET471
2.50
721
2.80
78CI8
79PB2
558
2.50
557
1410
8.00
79UP1
4.50
79W3
785812
2.60
3.00
3.00
3.10
2.80
2.80
79CLI
785128
ET813
ET812
ET556
788Bd9
6508
718
5908
78E09
ET391A
ET59IC
781119
18UM8
E16388
78IM12
18C11
78011013
ET143
ET593
780811
555
650A
553
590A
ET605
E7551
ET550
78M09
78C1.8
ET591
4.00
7875C7
E13378
2.50
ET248
ET810
78PT7
2.80
E113711
ET717
3.50
3.50
4.00
2.60
5.00
5.50
750
4.00
3.00
2.80
3.20
3.00
2.60
3.00
3.80
ET587
78N
78F6B
246
18604
78UP5
ET1140P
E14878
78UT4
7882
E14508
ET486
78AF2
77C812
ET135
775C11
4898
18P55
ETI40D
ETI36
ET588 20
18E8(3
78182
ET716
ET245
1853
17P1112
ET586
17P511
78UPIO
7801100
1807100
3.20
2.80
ET141
ET490
78UP9
4.00
650C
4.00
3.00
8.00
138
7.00
3.00
2.80
3.30
3.00
2.30
2.80
2.50
3.50
7.00
1.80
2.50
2.50
4.00
2.50
10.00
3.30
2.60
4.00
2.50
2.60
2.60
2.80
2.50
2.20
2.80
4.50
4.00
2.50
3.00
4.00
780110C
2.50
ET594
ET470
7983
7951
5.00
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2.60
2.50
3.50
2.80
6.00
3.50
2.60
2.60
8.00
2.50
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16.00
2.60
4.00
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1428
79172
785128
78N10
3.00
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79E028
3.80
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'
811
78MCIO
E13918
ET641
ET592
7819
E16388
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187M8
781111G7
ETI39
E1640
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4898
18C5
E11408
ET4878
78NG4
7873
ET4508
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ON AP
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16.50
2.80
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3.00
3.60
77MXII
2.60
3.00
3.00
2.80
3.50
2.50
71UP6A
3.00
18C1
78CFI
77PM12
ALL SILICON 30/60w PA PORT AMP
-
16V. two Inputs 5&
61/2'w x 81/2"D x 31/4'H 12
100mV. 125. 250. 500 ohm output only. No. 763A
570 ea. 240V operation 533 extra. Freight collect.
COILS and IF's All 52.50 ea plus post 60d
1'."W x 9'4"D a 2"H
I
expensive!
MAIL cheque or money order
(add postage) direct to.
-
RCS radio ptg ltd
651 FOREST RD BEXLEY
NSW 2207 587 3491
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
79
CIRCUIT & DESIGN IDE S
Interesting circuit ideas and design notes selected from technical literature, reader contributions and staff
jottings. As they have not necessarily been tested in our laboratory, responsibility cannot be
accepted. Contributions to this section are always welcome, and will be paid for If used.
Conducted by Ian Pogson
Simple modification to wiper delay unit
This simple and inexpensive modification may be added readily to the Wiper
Delay Unit described in September,
+12V
1979.
With the original circuit, the first delay
time after switch on was longer than the
selected time interval. This meant that
the wipers had to be manually switched
to clear the screen. The addition of a
series RC network and a transistor
charge the timing capacitor immediately
power is applied, thus giving two or
three wipes to clear the windscreen. For
the first 15 seconds the delay period is
slightly shorter than usual as the timing
capacitor is charging both through the
timing resistors and the partially conducting transistor.
The 4.7uF capacitor should be a tan -
ov
-
talum type to ensure low leakage. The
number of initial wipes can easily be
changed by altering the values of the 68k
resistor and 4.7 capacitor.
(By Mr C. Hall, 2/60 Lang Road, Centennial Park, NSW 2021.)
Temperature control for heaters
This circuit will switch any 240V heater
on when the temperature drops below a
preset level and switch it off again when
the room warms up. The NTC thermistor
has a resistance of about 10k at 20°C.
Other thermistors may be used provided
that the value of the variable resistor is
twice the value of the termistor at 20°C.
This will allow a broad range of
temperatures at which the heater may
be operated.
The 741 op amp is used as a com-
MAINS SOCKET
The relay contacts must be rated for
240V AC and at 10A, or for whatever the
particular application may require.
NTC
THERMISTOR
(By Mr J, Petroulias, 30 Whitehorse
Road, Blackburn, Victoria.
Ato
A
simple LED flasher
If a flashing LED is required this circuit is
simple and effective. A Schmitt trigger
provides regenerative switching and R1
gives the necessary charge/discharge bistable action as Q1 is switched on and
off. Resistors R3 and R4 set the on and
off times respectively and the best ratio
seems to be 2:1. The values shown give
'an oscillator frequency of about 1.5Hz.
Brightness of the LED is set by R1 and R2.
(By W. C. Peaston, in "Wireless
World".)
80
parator. The two 10k resistors form a
voltage divider to supply six volts at the
non -inverting input of the 741. As the
temperature drops, the resistance of the
thermistor rises and the voltage across it
increases. When the voltage goes above
six volts, the output of the comparator
will saturate and go to 12V. This will
forward -bias the transistor and cause the
relay to become energised. The heater is
turned on via the relay contacts.
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
AN INTRODUCTION TO
DIGITAL ELECTRONICS
You don't need any previous
knowledge of digital electronics
the book starts you right from
scratch, and covers all of the basic
concepts you need.
-
Available from "Electronics Australia,"
57 Regent St, Sydney. PRICE 53.50.
OR by mail order from "Electronics
Australia", PO Box 163, Beaconsfield
2014. PRICE S4.10.
ROD IRVING ELECTRONICS AND STAFF WIEN
TO APOLOGISE FOR THE INCONVENIENCE
CAUSED TO ITS MANY CUSTOMERS WHO ARE
CONTINUALLY FORCED TO TRIP OVER EACH
OTHER DUE TO OUR CRAMPED SHOP CONDITIONS
WE ARE PROUD TO ANOUNCE THAT FROM THE
1ST OF JULY WE HAVE MOVED TO LARGER
PREMISES AT 425 HIGH ST NORTHCOTE
JUST 2 BLOCKS TOWARDS THE CITY.
TO CELEBRATE: THE FIRST 200 HOBBYISTS
TO PRESENT THIS AD WILL RECEIVE A
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PHONE
HIGH Si., NORTHCOTE
(03) 489 8131
(03) 481 1436
(03) 489 7099
General
Enquiries
Order Enquiries
Ritronics Wholesale
Mail
MAIL ADDRESS P.O. BOX 235, NORTHCOTE VIC.
3070.
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
81
The smart counters
High resolution and easy operation
6867120
for a low price
PM
Tnese new counters get it all together.
The one -chip microcomputer design gives
you high resolution and accuracy plus easy
operation and compact construction... all
for a low price.
The high resolution comes from the use
of reciprocal frequency counting, which
gives an intrinsically higher resolution
without the traditional ± 1 cycle error. For
example, a full 7-digit resolution is obtained
in only one second. It therefore avoids the
need for long gate times, period measurements or the limitations of phase -locked
frequency multipliers.
Other big benefits that the microcomputer design brings are easy operation
and minimal controls, since the built-in
intelligence gives automatic triggering and
range switdhing
Dimensions
160x77x180mm
MHz
Mr/úúúú
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r
Auto -triggering on all ac<
waveforms
High -contrast liquid/g` 9\021
crystal display
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e`Qe``re
MOS FET AMPLIFIER MODULE
watt Fully Symmetrical
Design utilizing Low Feedback whilst
still giving Low Distortion.
The module also features a very
wide band width and is capable of
driving highly reactive loads safely.
Compatible heat sinks, pre -amps,
electronic crossovers, regulator and
speaker delay modules as well as
a 40 watt Bipolar module will
be available shortly.
A 100
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ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
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Instruments
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119
THE RIGHI HEIDELBERG VIC 3084
ANEAFN.S110
Inside a
handheld ha'rdryer
most expensive and heaviest
on the user's head.
Larger hairdryers, such as the bonnet
type, generally use a shaded -pole AC
motor, while the older "heat -gun" type
of hand-held dryer often use a "universal", or series wound AC/DC motor.
Both sorts of motors are quite difficult
to manufacture below a certain size,
and they lack sufficient power.
The "slim line" style of hand-held
hairdryer, illustrated here, gets around
this problem by using a small
permanent -magnet DC motor. These
motors combine small size with the
power required to drive an efficient
tangential blower fan.
This DC motor is powered directly
from the mains via a bridge rectifier.
The heating element itself is used as a
series limiting resistor to drop the
mains voltage for use by the motor. The
circuit diagram illustrates the concept.
Power is applied to the dryer through
a three -position switch. The heating
element is actually tapped, and the
bridge rectifier fed from the tap to
produce approximately 15V DC (unfiltered) for the fan motor.
That compact DC
Speed and temperature selection are
provided for the dryer by a simple
method. When the three position
switch is in the "dry" position, the full
mains voltage is applied to the heating
element, to produce
a
-
-
by PETER VERNON
The
-
is reduced by a proportionate amount,
causing it to run at a slower speed.
Great attention has also been paid to
safety in the design of hand-held
dryers. They are double insulated
even the switch is operated by a sliding
plastic cover plate. A thermal cut-out is
provided in the form of a bi-metallic
strip mounted near the heater coil, and
there is a fusible link in the power
Have you ever wondered how they fit a powerful motorised fan, a
heater and control circuits inside the compact case of a modern
handheld hairdryer. A look inside shows that they are an interesting application of basic electronics principles.
component of larger hairdryers is the
motor to drive the fan. The fan motor
needs to be reasonably powerful in
order to deliver a concentrated blast of
air right to the roots of the hirsute mass
Basic
Electronics
supply wiring.
All told, these new lightweight hairdryers are an ingenious application of
simple electronics circuitry to produce
a highly effective product.
And just before we conclude, here is
an interesting idea. That fan and motor
high
temperature and a high fan speed.
When the switch is in the "style"
STYLE
O
OOFF
POWER
DIODE
DRY
The fan
motor
is
run from a bridge
rectifier connected to a tap on
the heating element.
HEATER
ELEMENT
BRIDGE
240V
RECTIFIER
FAN MOTOR
APPROX. 15V,
IA
THERMAL
CUT-OUT
N
FUSIBLE
LINK
00
could be very useful for forced air cooling in a high power amplifier or computer power supply. When run from
12VDC or less it should be reasonably
quiet but still deliver a copious quantity
of air. Think of that possibility if ever
you come across a discarded unit. 21
position the mains voltage is half -wave
rectified by a power diode before it is
applied to the heating -element. This
half -wave rectification cuts the mains
voltage to approximately 170V RMS,
reducing the power to the heating element by half. The voltage to the motor
motor in the dryer below delivers
a
really copious flow of air from the efficient blower.
«....
1.111.11111110_
"I/'
.
QM!~ .
1
3
ú--i.n-imr ru u
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
83
Letters to
the editor
Error on
May front cover
I
agree with Mr Hartkoprs comment
is easier to amend a program than
to write one, and I apologise to him, Mr
Reid, and other offended readers for the
arrogant manner in which I expressed
my 'objections.
With regard to the Reaction Timer
program:
The 300 baud modification that Mr
Hartkopf criticises has appeared twice in
EA: see Feb '79 p69 and Aug '79 p89.
The other confusion is regarding outI
that it
would like to draw your attention to
an obvious error on the front cover of
the May 1980 issue of "Electronics
Australia".
You say pn Page 1 under the heading
"On the Cover" that well known organist
Klaus Wunderlich appears with the
Wersi "Galaxy W45KT" kit organ.
I have been
a very keen collector of
the recordings of master organist Klaus
Wunderlich for some years now and I
have a special half-hour weekly program
on our local FM community radio station
2NCR-FM each Friday night from 7.00pm
to 7.30pm, called "The Sound of Klaus
Wunderlich" and I consider myself a bit
of an expert on this artist.
The picture on the cover is NOT Klaus
Wunderlich. There is absolutely no
resemblance to Klaus what -so-ever. The
picture is more like another very popular
German organist, Franz Lambert.
am enclosing a picture of Klaus
Wunderlich for your perusal and comparison. I feel sure that you will agree
with me that the caption for your cover
is incorrect.
Bruce A. Greig,
Lismore, NSW.
put procedures. Without the modification, the program requires serial output
routines COUT, CRLF and BOUT changed to another suitable output routine at
300 baud. The addresses to be changed
are 055F, 052A, and 0552. (I neglected to
mention this second change in the
original article
sorry). The better alternative offered was to use output port C
instead of the serial output (much faster),
which requires changing 0527 onwards
as detailed.
And the moral of the story is: "Do not
judge, or you too will be judged"
(Mathew 7:1)
-
I
I
COMMENT: You are quite right. On
checking back with Peter Hadrian of Defi
Agency, we find that the organist is indeed Franz Lambert. The confusion
arose because Klaus Wunderlich was
featured in the demonstration record
mentioned.
Judge not,
or you too....
In view of the criticism of me levelled
by Mr Hartkopf (Letters, May 1980), I feel
some need to make restitution.
It must be said that was not criticising
Mr Reid (notice I did not mention his
name), but merely asking why the program was published. Needless to say, my
earlier programs would be laughable
I
when compared with the programming
abilities of, for example, Jamieson Rowe
or Ian Binnie. I do not "despise" beginners; rather, in several ways, am involved with coaching them in 2650
programming.
I
84
David Fulcher,
Strathfield, NSW.
Three cheers to Leo Simpson for his inaugural editorial
"Technology isn't
everything" (EA March 1980, p3). Such
sentiments remind me of my years in
university when loathed having to do
"General Studies" subjects (eg Political
Science, Economics) to complete the
science course requirements. But now, it
is those subjects which have proved to
be the most useful in providing, as Leo
says, a perspective on living in Australia,
and the role that technological advance
should and should not play in our
society.
I would like to encourage "Electronics
Australia" to pay more attention in its
pages to the social questions raised by
ever more sophisticated technology.
Surely this can be done without becoming embroiled in the politics of it all. It is
significant that two governments of opposite political persuasion both have enquiries or ministries dealing with these
-'uestions (eg The Technological Information and Research Unit in NSW). Even
if attention was simply drawn to significant publications and articles appearing
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
preciated.
To change the subject completely
would like to make a suggestion for a
constructional project: a tuning standard
for guitars etc. have seen them in shops
selling for around $100-5150. am not
exactly sure how they work, but it appears you can switch them to the
desired note, then tune the music instrument while watching a meter which
somehow tells you when the correct frequency is achieved.
So then, keep up the good work; really look forward to that first Monday of
every month.
Robert J. Morsillo, B.Sc (NSW) B.D.
(Melbourne), Pascoe Vale 5th, Vic.
I
I
I
I
Technology &
social impact
-
I
from time to time; symposia; lectures
etc, I feel this would be a good thing.
Too often (I feel) the magazine, in its
outlook, particularly as seen in the
"News Highlights", promotes the wrong
sort of fascination with scientific achievement: namely a "golly -gee -whiz" attitude
which views the implementation and use
of all new products and technologies as
an accepted and good thing. An "I can't
wait to get my hands on one of those"
type of attitude.
Perhaps it would feel a little strange for
a magazine which depends for its very
existence on technology and its advancement, to be concerned with issues
which may finally give a negative judgement on some technology and/or its introduction. But then it is "Electronics
Australia," and a concern for Australia
and Australian people in the light of the
new technologies is surely in order. You
have already shown this concern with articles on conservation and alternative
energy sources: eg wind power, solar
energy. Also articles and reports on the
use of electronics in helping handicapped people have been much ap-
COMMENT: Our February editorial was
also branded "a little strange". A tuning
standard for musical instruments appears
in this issue.
More on
cigarette adverts
John Jacobs' letter (EA March) jogged
my memory to write to you about
cigarette advertising in EA.
I didn't see the February issue
but your
"comment" to the above letter refers to
something not raised in Mr Jacobs' letter
legality.
Those of us concerned enough to raise
objections to cigarette advertising in
publications such as EA are not convinced by such weak "justifications". One
would have to be senseless to eschew
the common sense and scientific findings
linking smoking and clinical disease.
You have the right of choice to allow
cigarette advertising or not. In my opinion you have not made the right
choice.
-
John Reid,
Wyoming, NSW.
WE'LL GET YOU
INTO ELEC . F-_1ICS.
ONE AY
OR ANOTHER.
At International Correspondence Schools, we have at least 16
career courses you can take in electronics and other inter -related fields,
like computers and television. These
are the fields of the future that you
should progress in now: And they are
all ideally suited to home study. And
ICS, being the largest ínstítution of its
kind in the world, has access to the
latest world-wide developments and its
teachers are amongst the best in Aus-
tralia. So, if you're interested in one or
more of the courses below, mail the
coupon to ICS, and we'll send back
everything you need to begin a more
successful career.
ing of the applications of integrated
circuits in electronic equipment.
9 Data Processing. Various courses including Electronic Computer Servicing.
10 TV Servicing courses, in black and
white, and PAL colour. Approved by
Basic Electronics course for a sound
knowledge of radio theory and the in1
dustrial applications of electronics.
2 Electronics Technician course, with
specialist courses in Audio, Radio and Hi
Fi; Communications/Broadcasting;
Electronic Computer Servicing; Industrial
Electronics. Approved by TETIA.
3 Electronic Instrumentation and Control Systems course for electronics technicians interested in industrial instrumentation and control.
4 Electronic Technology, a program that
will fit the ambitioustechnician for a wide
variety of jobs.
5 Electronics Maintenance for basic
principles and electronic theory, followed
by a practical section of maintenance
procedures and techniques.
6 Radio -Electronic Telemetry covers
electrical and electronic aspects of
telemetering. Employment opportunities
abound in this very modern field.
Amateur Radio Operator's Certificate
of Proficiency prepares you for the examination leading to the Certificate of
Proficiency issued by' the Postal and
Telecommunications Department.
8 Digital Electronics course, as new as
today, gives you a thorough understand7
Please send me,
TETIA.
11 TV Principles course for basic television technology. And TV engineering
course for complete practical coverage of
,"
television engineering.
12
broad technical knowledge.
13 Electrical and Electronic Drafting
J
r
is
designed for experienced draftsmen
wishing to enter this specialised field.
14 Automobile Electrician gives you the
basics of servicing the automobile's
electrical system.
15 Industrial Electrician course gives
comprehensive training on all aspects of
the electrician's work.
16 Electrical Mechanic course prepares
you for external examinations.
_
International Correspondence Schools
(A'asia) Pty. Ltd., 4u0 Pacific Highway.
Crows Nest, N.S.W. 2065.Tel: (02)43 2121.
without cost or obligation, information about the ICS courses in Electronics.
course.
or,,l am interested in a(Please specify)
Mr/Mrs/Miss
Electrical Engineering Technician
course, is especially for those who want to
make a start in the industry or want a
(Please Print
Postcode
Address
Occupation
Tick here if currently full time student.
Write to your nearest ICS city: International Correspondence Schools.
Sydney: 400 Pacific Highway. Crows Nest. NSW. 2065. Tel: (02) 43 2121.
Melbourne: 18-20 Collins Street. Melbourne. V IC. 3000. Tel: (03) 63 7327.
Brisbane: 131 Elizabeth Street. Brisbane. OLD. 4000. Tel: (07) 221 0178.
Adelaide: 28 Grenfell Street, Adelaide. S.A. 5000. Tel: (08) 51 2834.
Perth: P.O. Box DI57. Perth. W.A. 6001. Tel: (09) 321 8530.
New Zealand: 182 Wakefield Street. Wellington. C.I. N.Z.
Age
Phone
l
224 174
J
Bankcard
ICS 017
ELECTRONICS Australia. July, 1980
85
WOULD YOU BUY A TRL\NSCEI VER
THAT IS ALREADY OBSOLETE?
,
^,,.,,
t-
/
"es
ILytes
=~se,
Yr.
1
,
«.,
A
Let's face it: a modem transceiver is quite an investment. Are you prepared to buy a
transceiver which
would let you down in years to come?
The new Yaesu FT-707 HF transceiver is, as far as we know, the only transceiver on the
market with
the new HF amateur bands already included. Its modern circuitry represents the
`state-of-the-art' in
communications technology. And the really good news: the FT-707 actually costs LESS than many
of the superseded transceivers it is replacing. Shouldn't your next transceiver be a
Yaesu FT -707?
c._
t\ :v -2e151299
a
CE$S01oaZeeeSPp\V
An
4600
10 00
k0-1.1595A
o
'__`_- vsstg
''-r;t_
...
F
.191 885 e ?Octet
FC .191
_
,._
1
c.:2
f
¡ ,j
-
1.
_
-
Here's some more of what they said:
Zi
rT7/f1>
'
Amateur Radio Action's
introduction (review in June
issue).
;
.
Í
03'3l
...o©oaooo
'
w.swct
`PLANNING AHEAD' was
....
.. physically very attractive ... one of the finest
velvet smooth tuning arrangements on any transceiver in the world ... VFO stability is superb ...
receiver performance is excellent ... sensitivity is
very good . .
audio output is clean
.
.
performance (of the noise blanker rated 'great' on
the FT101 Z) if anything is better... the transceiver
is well laid out and simple to operate ... makes an
ideal mobile rig
expected to retail for around
`"""sa-w.,
....
.
1980
Cat O-2869
Q
-
COHi PARE OUR
FREIGHT: $6.00 ANYWHERE
in Australia (that's below cost!)
You can
use
on
the Novice bands - then when you get
your full ticket, it's ready for you!
Why buy
a
'Novice Only' rig now and
be disappointed later???
...
$850 and therefore on present standards represents
PRICE:
NOVICES:
legally
this transceiver
$735
good value
York Street.
Hume Highway,
SYDNEY.
CHULLORA.
162 Pacific Highway, GORE HILL.
30 Grose Street.
PARRAMATTA
613 Princes Highway, BLAKEHURST
263 Keira Street.
WOLLONGONG.
MAIL ORDER CENTRE:
PO Box
Ph 290 3377
Ph 642 8922
Ph 439 5311
Ph 683 1133
Ph 546 7744
Ph 28 3800
399 Lonsdale Street,
656 Bridge Road.
Logan Road.
OLD166
842 Gympie Road.
96 Gladstone Street,
60 Wright Street,
414 William Street
VIC
ACT
SA
WA
.
.
One minor discrepancy: our price for the FT -707 is
Over $100 less than the price quoted above.
This must mean it is far and away the best value
transceiver on the market in Australia!!!
inx
EASY TERMS AVAILABLE TO APPROVED APPLICANTS!
DICK SMITH ELECTRONICS
NSW 125
147
.
9834
MELBOURNE.
RICHMOND.
BURANDA.
CHERMSIOE.
FYSHWICK.
Ph 67
ADELAIDE.
Ph 212 1962
PERTH.
Ph 328 6944
Ph 428 1614
Ph 391
6233
Ph 59 6255
Ph 80 4944
321. NORTH RYDE NSW 2113. Ph 888 3200. PACK 6 POST EXTRA.
welcome here
SHOPS OPEN 9AM to 5.30PM
(Saturday: Sam till 12 noon)
BRISBANE: Halt hour earlier.
ANY TERMS OFFERED ARE TO
APPROVED APPLICANTS ONLY
RE -SELLERS OF
0
DICK SMITH
PRODUCTS IN MOST AREAS OF AUSTRALIA
...,..
1
.
.
by Pierce Healy, VK2APQ
Royal Naval Amateur Radio Society
has official blessing of British Admiralty
a common background of
It is not unusual for amateurs with
groups within the
employment or other interests to form special
these is Royal
of
active
amateur fraternity. One of the mostwhile
in Great Briit
started
Naval Amateur Radio Society which,
and
countries,
Commonwealth
the
tain, has now spread through
beyond.
G3BZU at HMS Mercury uses GB3RN on
open days at Portsmouth Naval
Dockyard. The third, GB2FAA has been
allocated to the RNARS station at Yeovil)
Naval Air Station.
Because of the experience of the
RNARS in the restoration of the bridge
wireless office of HMS Belfast, the
Maritime Trust of Australia gladly accepted the offer of the Australian Branch
on
RNARS to carry out a similar project
Castlemaine.
the HMAS
On Friday, February 1, 1980, a meeting
of Victorian members was held on the
ship and a committee known as the
RNARS HMAS Castlemaine Group was
amateurs and shortwave listeners.
The Royal Naval Amateur Radio SocieGrowth in Australia was slow.
amateurs
ty was formed in 1960 by radio
in December 1978, Australian
However,
who were serving members of the Royal
members arranged to hold a net every
in
Navy. Many were Chief Petty` -Officer
Monday night on 3613kHz to keep
took
Telegraphists and the first meeting
other. As the result of
each
with
touch
signal
naval
place at HMS Mercury, the RN
publicity in amateur radio and
1980
April
in
school near Portsmouth, England.
magazines, membership
be
In order that the society could
114, with more applicato
grown
has
established as a "Naval" society their
tions being processed.
lordships at the Admirality stipulated
RNARS has approximately 1000
that all members and former members
the largest group outside the
members,
of the Royal Navy should be eligible,
Australia, followed by USA
being
UK
from
or
in
even though they were not
28, New
38, Canada
65, Europe
-16.
the communications branch.
Africa
South
23,
Zealand
all
Hence membership was open to
located in Japan, Hong
also
are
Members
RN
the
former and serving members of
Kong, Solomon Islands, Ocean Island
who had an interest in amateur radio or and Falkland Islands.
listening to shortwave broadcasts.
In October 1979, because of the growMembers of the Royal Marines, ing membership in Australia, the
Women's Royal Naval Service, Royal
Australian branch was formed. This exbut
Fleet Auxiliaries, Royal Naval Wireless
ists within the world-wide society,
for
Auxiliary, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve
feeling
national
of
form
a
give
does
also
and Royal Naval Reserve were
-under".
members "down
eligible.
The world wide society publishes a
merBritish
the
of
members
on,
Later
quarterly newsletter and the Australian
had
chant navy, as well as civilians who
branch publishes its own newsletter
as
such
been employed by the navy,
"Australian Signal". The editor is Mike
civilian instructors and naval dockyard Thorne, VK2BKK, and it deals solely with
personnel, were admitted as associate
branch activities within Australia.
members.
When the cruiser HMS Belfast was
a
Until the late 1960's it was solely
presented to the British nation for use as
British organisation. Then a decision was
naval museum the Belfast Trust was apa
Comthe
of
made to admit members
and the RNARS was given the
proached
furmonwealth and merchant navies. A
office and has restored
wireless
bridge
ther broadening took place in the early the naval equipment and established a
navies
bloc
1970's when all western
permanent exhibition amateur radio stawere encouraged to join. Membership tion, the call sign being G4HMS.
and
classifications were revised, British
Recently the British Home Office
were
Commonwealth members and
three special call signs for use
allocated
all
classified as corporate members
occasions. The HMS Belfast
special
on
associate
other nationalities asthere
whenever the ship is open
GB2RN
uses
difany
members. At no time was
The headquarters station
public.
the
to
licensed
to
-
ferent treatment shown
-
-
-
formed under the chairmanship of Mike
Thorne, VK3BKK. The project comprises
two overlapping tasks. The restoration of
the WIT office ís being handled by John
Powell, VK3CIE and the installation of
the amateur radio station by Jeff Fletcher, VK3NLG.
When the Navy handed over the HMS
Castlemaine to the Maritime Trust in
1974 all radio equipment had been
removed but most of the original equipment has been located and is currently
being restored before re -installation. The
the
call sign VK3BZU originally issued to
has
station
amateur
Castlemaine
HMAS
permaa
as
VK3RAN
been replaced by
nent call sign which, although in the
repeater "R" series, is not in that
category. Regular schedules are kept
between the two ships HMAS Castlemaine and HMS Belfast.
VK3RAN will be operated whenever
HMAS Castlemaine is open to the public,
which is every weekend, public holidays,
and Navy Days. RNARS members will be
in attendance to explain naval communications and various items of equipment in the W/T office.
In the future HMAS Diamantina will be
a
going to Brisbane to be operated as
Queensland
the
by
naval museum
Maritime Museum Association. RNARS
members will be restoring and operating
from the W/T office of the HMAS
VK4RAN.
Diamantina, hopefully under
the RNARS
on
information
further
For
July, 1980
ELECTRONICS Australia,
87
launch vehicle
AMATEUR_AMSAT-OSCAR
RADIO fails on take -off
activities write to Terry
Clark, VK2ALG,
Australian Branch Manager
RNARS, PO
Box 537, Albury, NSW
2640, or to
RNARS Headquarters, HMS
Mercury,
Leydene, Portsmouth,
England UK.
The Australian Branch
nets are on Mondays at 1030GMT on
3613kHz SSB and
on Tuesdays at 1030GMT
on 3527kHz
CW.
WIRELESS INSTITUTE COUNCIL
BALLOT RESULTS
The ballot for election of the
NSW Division Council for 1980-81 was
conducted
at the adjourned annual general
at Wireless Institute Centre; 14 meeting
Atchison
Street, Crows Nest on Sunday May
18,
1980. In alphabetical order, the
following members were
elected:- S. Brown
VK2BSB; H. Lundell VK2ZHE;
T. Mills
VK2ZTM; S. Pall VK2VHP; D.
Thompson
VK2BDT; A. Tilley VK2BAD; E. Van
de
Weyer VK2ZUR.
At the initial meeting of the
council the
following officers were elected: President A. Tiley VK2BAD;
-
Brown VK2BSB; Treasurer
son VK2BDT.
-
Secretary S.
D. Thomp-
-
After years of planning and
several countries, the first of work by dedicated amateurs in
the AMSAT - OSCAR Phase
amateur communication
III
satellites
was launched aboard a European Space Agency vehicle
"ARIANE" at 1429UTC on May 23,
1980.
Unfortunately,
immediately after
launching from Kourou, French
Guiana,
South America, one of the four
rocket
engines of the space vehicle
reduced thrust. One minute aftersuffered
the guidance system could no launch
longer
compensate fór the vehicle's
to veer off course and thetendency
vehicle
entered a wild tumbling spin.
Two minutes after launch ground
control began losing telemetry
and the
range safety officer destroyed
the vehicle and with it the A -O Phase Ill
satellite.
Throughout the project the AMSAT
organisation met all schedules on time
and the spacecraft worked
flawlessly until the mission was terminated.
AMSAT
has proved again that radio
amateurs are
capable of working in
state-of-the-art
space technology. The Phase Ill
satellite
was in no way responsible for
the failure.
AMSAT reported "What was
lost was
hardware and, although that
hurt deeply, the design and obviously
ment skills and knowledge, thedevelopsystem
software, and the many
hardworking
-
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1980
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counter and the probe is
held near the oscillator
whose frequency is to be
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then read on the
counter. With no actual connection
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under test there is no loading on
the circuit, and very
low level oscillator
frequencies can be measured with
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Electronic Components
A Accessories
Áik
WICEN in the southern area of Sydney
given time
those amateurs who have
will be assisting the State Emergency Serto
additional
and effort to the project,
to point comtwo or three vice' in providing point Sutherland to
future".
the work carried out by the
the
links
during
11th
munication
the
AMSAT.
for
This would have been
technicians employed by
out Surf race. The SES will be responsible
I flew ín 1961);
insurance, if any, was taken
duramateur satellite (OSCAR
What
control
in
traffic
amateur service. to cover the cost of the spacecraft has assisting the poiice
a proud record for the
ing the event.
not been stated.
National amateur radio societies have
maDuring the City to Surf race in Sydney,
several
that
known
is
perforHowever, it
congratulated AMSAT on their
(Hyde Park to Bondi Beach) on SunNSW
were
systems
on jor components and
mance and extend their sympathies
10, WICEN will provide the
August
day
during the design and
the
the unfortunate loss of the newest duplicated
official communication facility for
building of the flight unit. It is, therefore,
will handle comember of the amateur satellite family.
exercise
The
organisers.
took
AMSAT
to assume that
progress information,
(Acknowledgement to W1AW ARRL reasonable
contingency factors, ordination links,
consideration
into
on
repeated
was
traffic during the
which
aid
news broadcast
emergency
would
and
that
such as last minute problems,
and
ANARTS RTTY and WIA news require immediate replacement of units
race. VHF and HF links will be used
inare
to
participate
wishing
broadcasts).
and that any redundant or backup units amateurs contact WICEN co-ordinator
to
a
now
vited
but
The A - O Phase Ill project had several
could be used in a second,
Mike Richter, VK2BMM, on telephone
facets. On May 5, 1978, the National replacement launch.
AH (02)
Administration
(02) 233 5330 (business), or
III
spacecraft
Aeronautical Space
Phase
second
Just when a
CorSatellite
Amateur
3861.
Radio
476
and
outside
(NASA)
can be launched is somewhat
From Friday October 17 to Tuesday
poration (AMSAT) signed a contract to the planning scope of AMSAT, and
would
allow
21, 1980, WICEN have undera
October
jointly pursue a project that
providing
agency
depends on a space
public
the
to
communications for the
provide
to
demonstrate
vehicle.
taken
to
AMSAT
place aboard a suitable launch
rally in the Port Macspacecraft
build
car
Southern Cross
how amateurs
Some of the features of the satellite
north coast of NSW.
the
on
area
quarie
(specificially Phase Ill). Under the terms
make interesting reading, and illustrate
jointly
NASA
be established and
and
will
AMSAT
links
HF
and
VHF
contract,
of the
the work that went into the design and amateurs wishing to take part should
funded a facility at the Goddard Space
its
into
insight
an
construction as well as
contact WICEN organisers as soon as
Flight Center, to be used by AMSAT to
It was intended not only as an
use.
return
In
Ill
satellites.
Phase
possible.
construct the
amateur communication medium, but as
AMSAT demonstrated to NASA visitors
educational
provide
to
unit
access
free
a
RADIO CLUB NEWS
the amateur approach to low-cost and emergency communication facilities
BRISBANE VHF GROUP: Amateurs with
aerospace construction.
scale.
on a truly international
a special interest in the world above
The concept of the Phase Ill series
previous OSCARS used
the
Whereas
tentative
a
50MHz is how the members describe the
new
dates back to 1975, when
near polar orbits, at low level, the
group. Meetings are held on the fourth
program schedule was drawn up.
was to be roughly midway betorbit
in
made
were
Wednesday of each month at the
reviews
Preliminary design
ween a polar orbit and an equatorial orNewmarket High School. A welcome is
mid -1976.
more precisely at 57 degrees inclina- extended to new members and visitors.
bit,
orbit,
In 1977 the hardware cost for a Phase
tion. It was also to be an elliptical
The group owns and maintains the
of
an
order
ín
with
the
estimated
duration,
was
hours
Ill satellite
about 11
of
two -metre channel 7000 repeater
as
$US200,000. Individual items such
apogee of about 36,000km above the
VK4RBN, the 70cm repeater in Brisbane,
onapogee rocket motor $US10,000,
hemisphere, and a perigee of the two -metre beacon VK4RTT at Mt
northern
and
board microcomputer $US8000,
1500km.
Mowbullan, and the 70cm beacon
transponder $US5000, were listed in the
Such an orbit would have meant that
VK4RBB ín Brisbane.
estimates.
any station in the northern hemisphere
Members have combined their
While the final cost of the ill-fated would have been able to communicate
and technical expertise to
knowledge
satellite is not known, it was met by with any other station in the northern
various projects such as VHF develop
in
have
for up to 15 hours a day,
subscriptions from AMSAT members
UHF aerials, RF amplifiers etc, and
the hemisphere,
southern
projects
throughout
the
of
service
parts
other
in
of
amateur
stations
the
and with
information available
world, together with substantial dona- hemisphere for much of the same time.
for clubs and individuals.
if, and when, AM tions of components from commercial
All membership enquiries for the
hoped
that
It
is
to
be
It was
satellite, that it group or its activities should be addressand space research organisations.
another
build
can
SAT
Secretary, Brisbane VHF
estimated that a government or comwill have the opportunity to put it into a ed to the
perforsimilar
providing
911, Fortitude Valley,
Box
satellite
PO
mercial
Group,
similar orbit.
mance would cost about $US10 million.
Brisbane, QId 4006.
The materials, components, construcWICEN NEWS
in the
tion and systems incorporated
NSW Wireless Institute Civil
The
and
amateur satellite were subjected to, re- Emergency Network Committee will
SO YOU WANT TO BEA
Tueson
session
passed, all the stringent tests and
training
a
commence
RADIO AMATEUR?
quirements applying to government or day, July 1, 1980, at Wireless Institute
undertake
To achieve this aim, why not
Nest.
Crows
Street,
commercial satellites.
Centre, 14 Atchison
Courses conducted by the
the
of
one
made
7.00pm
EstablishBy mid 1978 plans were being
The sessions will commence at
Wireless Institute of Australia?
of
for a complex of ground control stations, each Tuesday evening for six to eight
interests
the
further
to
ed in 1910
two
weeks, will last for approximately
completed in March 1979.
Institute. is well
the
Radio,
'
Amateur
initial
of hours, and will concentrate in the
your goal.
Another facet was the preparation
qualified to assist you to
a
on message handling and proof
at
stage
formulation
available
are
the
and
data
Courses
orbital
Correspondence
on cedure. Interested amateurs are invited
in
commence
classes
users' band plan for the transponder
Personal
on
time.
any
to telephone David Mackie
year.
board the satellite.
February each
(02) 269 1616.
to
For further information write
of
It would not be possible to readily
members
1980,
13,
July
Sunday
On
by
spent
hours
man
SUPERVISOR,
total
assess the
THE COURSE
W.I.A.
cordialare
operators,
amateur
as well a Individual
P.O. BOX 123,
columns.
in
these
Radio clubs and other organisations,
inclusion
notes of their activities for
ST. LEONARDS. NSW 2066
ly Invited to submit news and when of sufficient general interest, and where space perBankstown.
Photographs will be published
89
sent to Pierce Healy at 69 Taylor Street,
July, 1980
mits. All material should be
ELECTRONICS Australia,
volunteers, remain as resources
for the
-
The Australian
11
SUBMISSION TO THE MINISTER BY THE
NCRA
The
Federal Government is to review
rangements and regulations governing the the frequéncy arCitizens Band Radio
Service. In announcing this
recently, the Minister for Post and
Telecommunications, Mr Tony Staley, called for
submissions
from all sectors of the community.
Mr Staley rang,the National
Director óf
the NCRA (Terry Watkin) and- myself
(I
am still the National Liaison
Officer)
before he made the release, and advised
us of its contents. We spoke
with him at
length and, during the discussion,
he
mentioned that he was coming to
Brisbane and asked if the members
of
the National Executive here ín
Brisbane
would be available for talks. There
was
no question as to what the
answer
would bet
The NCRA held a. National
Executive
meeting here in Brisbane on
the
weekend of March 1 and 2 last, so that
we cold draw up the NCRA
submission
in response to the Minister's
request.
Copies will by now have been circulated
around the State Divisions for
comment.
The main points of the submission
are:
(1) Retention of the 27MHz
band.
(2) Expansion of the 27MHz
band to an
immediate 40 channels with another 40
to follow as soon as possible.
(3) Expansion of the UHF
band to include a further 40 channels.
(4) Point of sale licencing
for all
CB MAILBAG
have had some outstanding
letters
which I would like to tell you
about.
One was from Malcolm Lowe,
the
Central -Northern Regional Director
of
90
Groups?
*
*
*
Another letter comes from Max Morris,
President of the Victorian UHF Club. It
was like a breath of fresh air to hear
from
UHF organisation. There are too
few of
them. Max tells us that the club is
extremely active,and has members in most
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
parts of Australia, including many
who
are
I
the Queensland section of
CREST
Australia Inc. From his home in
Mackay,
Malcolm writes of the
tremendous
assistance which CREST was able to
to the SES during cyclone "Amy"give
in
Western Australia. Mackay CREST
worked as a link between SES
Control and its
personnel in the field during "Amy" and
subsequent cyclones, and 'also relayed
messages via both the telephone
and CB
to and from relatives. Thé
Australian
Broadcasting Commission was also in
there pitching by advising CB
operators
in the stricken areas that
Mackay CREST
was getting into the area.
The Tropical
Cyclone Warning Centre in Brisbane also
made use of Mackay CREST by
them all the updated informationgiving
that
came in so that CREST could
retransmit
the information into. WA.
The marvels of "skip"! A special
transceivers.
bouquet to Mackay CREST for a job well
(5) Licence itself to be
free, but a done. It
takes
'a
special
registration fee of $5.00 be placed
kind of person to
on
monitor the emergency channels. They
each set put on the licence.
have to put up with quite a lot ...
(6) licence renewals to
interbe made at ference
(both natural and manmade),
post offices as well as radio
branches.
idiots,
and
at times apalling operating
(7) Multi -year licences.
conditions.
(8) Permission for gain and
directional
antennas on a non-interference basis.
Now how about the other Regions
of
(9) Emergency frequencies
to be plac- CREST? What have you been up to? And
ed in RB14 then into Wireless
Telegraphy the other Emergency Monitoring
Act.
(10) Overseas
communications with
reciprocal agreements.
(11) Business
communications to be
prohibited from the CBRS.
(12) Introduction of a
separate General
Business Radio Service (GBRS) on
UHF.
There were other minor
submissions.
We keep trying!
by JAN CHRISTENSEN
amateur and/or
commercial
operators. They have a repeater going in
Melbourne, which is working very well.
Max sent me a copy of the
club's fine
newsletter which is used to keep in
touch with the members in the rural
areas and interstate. On top of this,
the
club also puts out a newstape.
Max is receiving no news
whatsoever
from the UHF operators in WA and
suggest that you can swap tapes
on a
"round robin" basis. He would
be
delighted to hear from you. The address
is: The Victorian UHF
Club, PO Box 160,
Sorrento, Victoria, 3043.
*
*
*
Now on to a curly matter. Mr
Don
McMillan of Cairns has written to
me
regarding an article of mine "27MHz
..
Who Else Really Needs The
Band?" (EA
April 1980).
Apparently Don is an avid aeromodeller and is upset that CB was introduced onto the 27MHz band,
causing
problems for model aircraft. I know
people who had the same
problem with
model cars!
Now Don, I can sympathise with
you
up to a point. However, if we
are
face the facts, it must be realised to
that
27MHz was never an exclusive
for model control. It was and allocation
still is the
industrial, scientific and medical
"dumping ground".
I
have had talks with the Brisbane
Radio Branch and a
manufacturer,
distributor and retailer of model aircraft.
I also
obtained a copy of the RB 195, entitled "Conditions Governing the
Use of
Radio Apparatus for the
Control of
Models".
RB 195 tells us that an
operator of such
equipment can use 26.957 - 27.282MHz,
29.72 - 30.00MHz and 40.66 so really can't see that you 40.70MHz,
have that
.
I
much to complain about, Don. The
manufacturer that I spoke to said "Any
aero-modeller who uses the frequencies
around the CB band was asking for trouble". RB 195 also reads as follows: "Permits may be granted to persons over the
age of 16 years to cover the use of approved types of radio apparatus for the
control of models". seriously wonder
how many modellers are aware that
they need these permits. Are all
modellers in possession of them? doubt
I
I
it.
Since legislation, CB operators have
paid in excess of $6,000,000 in licence
fees alone, not to mention import and
sales taxes.
*
*
*
Thanks must surely go to the Long
Distance Transport Association of Aust
who wrote to me after reading one of
my early articles and offered to circulate
my views via their news -sheet. I can only
say "Thanks, fellas".
How about other trucking organisations getting in touch with me and letting
us all know what you are doing? I'm sure
readers would be interested.
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The response to my articles has given
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point of view would be accepted. You
could say that I took it on as a challenge,
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I
in."
The CB scene, in general, is once again
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are once more being heard around the
channels. For the DXers, the skip is
phenomenal at the moment. Though I
don't DX myself, I say "Hello" to someone in just about every State each
day and always get a greeting in reply.
This is great, and I also get a lot of enjoyment out of "sandbagging" on some of
the long distance conversations. People
are once again starting to use CB as it
was intended for, after all, communication is the name of the game. Keep it up.
If anyone would like to write to me
about any subject that may be of interest
to readers, my address is: PO Box 406,
Fortitude Valley, Queensland, 4006. I'll
look forward to hearing from you.
Jan Christensen.
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SPEAKER SYSTEMS
NEW CAR CASSETTE CONVERTERS
BICOH MODEL NA100/CC-007A AT
APPROX 1/2 LIST PRICE
By connecting this model with your existing
AM car radio you can enjoy the music of any
cassette that has been pre-recorded.
Connection requires no alteration to the car
radio. Plug your car aerial into the cassette
recorder and using the patch cord supplied,
connect the recorder to the aerial connection
of your car radio. By following the instructions, Installation is a simple procedure. Alt
cords & brackets are supplied. Can be used in
any car with a 12 -volt neg. earth system can
also be used with any AM radio by using a 12V
supply.
Dimensions: 150 x 110 x 53mm.
(SEE REVIEW EA FEB 1980)
CLASSIC RADIO
245 PARRAMATTA RD
.
HABERFIELD 2045
PHQÑES 198-7145. 798-6507
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
91
SHORT
by Arthur Cushen, MBE
WAU
CENE
-a
Bhutan
small country, an even
smaller radio service
Bhutan, a tiny country in the Himalayas, is transmitting on
4690kHz using only 300W. Reception is reported by readers in
Australia and New Zealand when conditions are favourable.
Broadcasts from Bhutan have been
received on 4690kHz. Bhutan is a small
state in the east of the Himalayas bordering Tibet and broadcasting was commenced on November 11, 1973 by a
group of young people who were
members of the National Youth Association of Bhutan. The station started with
one tape recorder and a mixer made in a
biscuit tin. The equipment had to be used inside a tin trunk to shield it from the
transmitter.
Since then the station has progressed
to using two cassette players with a mixer and the original equipment is kept as a
museum piece. The staff are mostly
amateurs and volunteers and the station
broadcasts news of international and
local interest, listeners' choice of music,
announcements by various government
departments and messages on health
etc.
The broadcasting schedule is Sunday
NYAB (Broadcasting System of the National Youth Association of Bhutan). The
station address is PO Box 1, Thimphu,
Bhutan.
NEW BBC TRANSMITTING SITE
The BBC has announced that a new
transmitting site is to be built in southern
England to house eight 500kW transmitters, the first high powered units to be installed by the BBC in the United
Kingdom. The first BBC shortwave
broadcasts were on a transmitter rented
from Marconi, on November 11, 1927.
The station used the call sign G5SW and
power was limited to less than 20kW.
Since then there has been a rapid expansion ín shortwave broadcasting, first-
ly at
0600-0900GMT
on 7040kHz and
Wednesday and Friday on 4690kHz at
1100-1400GMT. Bhutan time is six hours
ahead of GMT.
The programs are in Dzongkha, which
is the national language, Nepali for the
Southern Bhutanese, and in English. The
English section is the last 30 minutes of
each broadcast. The transmitter power is
300W with an inverted V dipole aerial
and, as is to be expected, the signals are
difficult to receive in Australia and New
Zealand. However, reception has been
possible and the station has verified
those who have heard the broadcasts
with an interesting letter from the
Secretary, Miss Louise Dorji of Radio
Notes from readers should be sent to
Arthur Cushen, 212 Earn Street, Invercargill, NZ. All times are GMT. Add
8 hours for WAST, 10 hours for EAST
and 12 hours for NZT.
92
Daventry and
later at
Crowborough, Rampishar, Skelton and
Wooferton. All of these sites are located
in the north of England and it was felt
that a new location in the south would
give a, better propogation pattern to
some areas of the world.
Four of the new transmitters are being
built by Telefunken and four by Marconi.
The first is due to come into service in
1983 and the whole station should be
completed by 1984. The transmitters will
replace some which were put into service in the late 1940s at Skelton and are
at present used by the BBC for its world
services. These have an output of just
70kW.
NEW STATION IN COSTA RICA
A new signal from Costa Rica has been
heard on 6075kHz where Radio Rumbo
has been observed around 0800GMT.
The station was scheduled to commence
operation this year on 6175kHz with
1kW but has instead begun broadcasting
on this new channel. The call sign TI CM
has been allocated to the station and
reception has been possible from as early as 0600 to past 1100GMT.
According to announcements in
Spanish, the station operates on 525kHz
ELECTRONICS Australia. July, 1980
in the medium wave band and also on
FM. Radio Rumbo is located in Cartago
and broadcasts on all three frequencies
24 hours a day. The mailing address is
Apartado 140, Cartago, Costa Rica.
KTWR DX PROGRAM
A new program from Trans World
Radio station KTWR, Guam, called "DX
listeners Log", is now broadcast each
week in three transmissions. The service
for Australian listeners is every Friday at
0915GMT on 1184kHz. The other two
broadcasts can be heard on Thursday at
0100GMT on 17855kHz and Fridays at
1445GMT on 15365kHz. A special
verification card is being issued to
celebrate the new DX session.
The program is packed full of information for DXers, including interval signal
identification, technical information, propagation data, DX tips and more.
The only other English transmission in
the extensive schedule of KTWR is
1430-1500GMT Wednesday -Thursday
on 11880kHz.
Two transmitters are used by Trans
World Radio, each of 100kW. The address for reception reports is KTWR, Box
CC, Agana, Guam 96910.
VATICAN'S INCREASED MAIL
The increasing mail received by Radio
Vatican has resulted in a new transmission to China from which mail is now be:
ing received after many years. Mail from
other quarters also increased to over
50,000 letters last year and, according to
the BBC Monitoring Service, it is expected that some 70,000 letters will be
received this year. This increase will
come mainly from Eastern Europe and
China. According to the head of Vatican
Radio, some 30-40 letters each month
are being received from China, although
none were received while Mao Tse Tung
was in power.
Vatican Radio has adjusted its frequency to Australia for the daily English
broadcast 2210-2225GMT and is now on
9615, 11830 and 15120kHz. Recently
two other frequencies, 7235 and
9625kHz, were used on an irregular
basis.
SNORTWt1UfscE11E
THREE TIFC FREQUENCIES
Station TIFC, using the slogan "The
Lighthouse of the Caribbean", has been
heard on three frequencies, opening at
1130GMT. Best reception is on 5055kHz,
while 6175 and 9645kHz are also received at fair strength. The opening announcement is in Spanish with details of
the frequencies and the address in San
Jose, Costa Rica.
Our first verification from TIFC was jn
October, 1949 when they used 9645kHz
for their gospel broadcasts. Transmitter
power was 200-350W. Later, in 1954, the
frequency of 6037kHz was used. The
power has since been increased on all
frequencies with 5055kHz now being
5kW, 6175kHz 2.5kW and 9645kHz
1kW. The address is Radio TIFC, Apartado 2710, San Jose, Costa Rica.
BROADCASTS FROM OSLO
Radio Norway has made several frequency changes to its transmissions to
the Pacific area and also to other services
which provide good reception in
Australia.
The
0700-0830GMT is
and 21655kHz.
1100-1230GMT is
first
broadcast at
now on 9590, 15135
The broadcast at
transmitted on 15135
and 21730kHz.
Two transmissions for afternoon reception are broadcast as follows: at
0300-0430GMT on 11860, 11895 and
21730kHz; and at 0500-0630GMT on
11860, 15170 and 21655kHz. English is
broadcast for the last 30 minutes of the
two Sunday transmissions at 0400 and
0600GMT
BUDAPEST'S SCHEDULE CHANGE
When Summer Time was introduced
into Europe in April many stations adjusted their shortwave programs to remain on GMT so that there would be no
disruption to the program time for
listeners outside Europe. Radio Budapest
did not make this change and broadcasts
from Hungary are now received one
hour earlier. The transmission to the
South Pacific is at 0930-1030GMT on
9835, 11910, 15220, 17710, 17785 and
21525kHz. The station has also announced plans to use 25645kHz for this
transmission on a test basis.
RADIO JAPAN RELAY
Radio Japan is continuing to use the
250kW transmitters at Sines in Portugal
to improve their reception in the Middle
East and Europe. Two new frequencies
have been scheduled for these broadcasts which are now on 15435kHz at
0700-0730GMT and 15180kHz at
2200-2230GMT. Both of these transmissions are a relay of the General Service.
The first 15 minutes consists of news and
commentary in English, while the
balance of the program is in Japanese.
The program is linked from the Tokyo
studios of Radio Japan to the transmitting site in Portugal by satellite and, in
'addition, there is secondary coverage
with broadcasts direct from Japan. Radio
Japan continues to be heard in Australia
with the special transmission to this area
at 0930-1030GMT on 11875 and
15235kHz.
ELECTRONIC
ORGANS
Quality Wersi Organ Kits from Germany
Technical knowledge not required
Comprehensive instruction books to last
detail (also available in German)
7 full organ models
_
Extensive voicing 16ft to beyond Ift
14 rhythm unit using 16 instruments
Auto features:- reverb, sustain, percussion, wahwah, transposer, piano, string orchestra, plus others.
Electronic (remelts 70 watts RMS output per
channel.
Approx. half cost of equal shop models.
Catalogue 53.00, 104 pages in colour.
(Refundable on 550 order).
Klaus Wunderlich demo record. Music only with
VOICE OF KAMPUCHEA
Signals from The Voice of the People of
Kampuchea continue to be received on
9695kHz at 1200GMT when a news
bulletin in English is presented. Two
other frequencies carry this transmission:
1360kHz mediumwave and 11938kHz.
At 1215GMT there is a broadcast in
French and at 1230GMT a program in
Thai.
These transmissions come from the
studios in Phnom -Penh and due to the
difficulty of mail service in Kampuchea
few verifications have been received.
The "NZ DX Times" reports that a letter
in English has been received by Dene
Lynneberg of Wellington which confirmed his report after nine months. The reply was sent via Hanoi and had no
postage stamps attached when eceived.
jacket notes 56.50 incl. postage.
Arriving shortly
Mini organ, The Entertainer". low cost. 240V or
12V DC. suit caravan.
-
WER51
electronics
:-rw'-.
1
FUTURE OF MONTE CARLO
The future of Radio Monte Carlo, one
of Europe's best known commercial
radio stations, seems to be in doubt according to information published in the
BBC Monitoring Service Bulletin. The National Assembly Deputy for Paris is proposing that the Radio Monte Carlo
transmitter be handed over to Telediffusion de France and has drafted a bill to
this effect. Radio Monte Carlo has been
broadcasting since 1945 from a site on
French territory and the State owns 83%
of the station's capital.
Radio Monte Carlo is often heard on its
mediumwave frequency of 1467kHz
around dawn and, as it has an output of
400kW, reception in the South Pacific is
best around March and September.
Monte Carlo is also the site of Trans
World Radio which uses the medium wave transmitter and also many shortwave transmitters for its gospel
programs.
All inquiries direct
CLEFTRONICS PTY LTD
9 Florence Street, Burwood, Vic. 3125.
Phone (03) 288 7899
AUTOMATIC
TELEPHONE
DIALER PROM
dialling
32
numbers
plus other options
.
SI80.00
PRESETABLE
COUNTER S digits
suitable Ior counting,
batching and
numerical control .
3150.00
s
STEPPING
MOTORS wide
v'
range for N.C. Conrad, Plotters.
Violable speed. Servo
Control Servo DC
Motors, Tacho
Generators. From
"VOICES"
Following the success of Glen Hauser's
Review of International Broadcasting,
which looks at the program content of
shortwave transmissions and is not concerned with reception details, Patrick
Humphreys, formerly of Radio Finland,
has announced a similar publication based on the programs of stations in
Europe. This new magazine, "Voices", is
to:-
.
HAND HELD
TACHOMETER
sigo
549.50
STEPPING MOTOR DRIVING CIRCUITS for 3 or
4 phase in Mode 1 phase 2 phase 1-2 phase excite
lion. From
PROXIMITY TRANSDUCERS
-
512.00
515.00ea.
THUMB WHEEL SWITCHES
1-4 S2.20ea
5-24 $2.00ea
25-100 $1.90ea
END PLATE
a monthly publication with over 50
pages reviewing and commenting on
shortwave radio, including a unique
Feature Program Guide, previewing
special programs scheduled for the
month ahead.
To introduce the magazine a free copy
is available to readers by writing to
"Voices", Box 226, Helsinki 17, Finland.,,.
- $1.00pr
TACHO GENERATORS
From S30
Mail orders add $3.50 for
postage and packaging
G.C.S.
67 Blackshaw Avenue.
MORTDALE 2223.
Telephone: 570 1225
(Trade enquiries invited)
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
93
flEW PRODUCTS
A CB transceiver for NZ standards
If a New Zealand citizen happens to be visiting Australia
and happens to want a CB
transceiver for use in his own
country, he can buy one in an
i
--
Australian Dick Smith store
according to Dick
Smith
save a fistful of
dollars in the process.
and
The transceiver being offered is of the
well known Midland brand and is identified as type 77A-882NZ; it appears in
the Dick Smith catalog as Cat No. D-1435
and carries an NZ Post Office type approval sticker.
The 77A-882NZ has the usual black
panel and chrome plated controls, with
removeable black; wrinkle-finished halflids giving access to the PC board and
wiring. In fact, access appears to be excellent, although the PC board is tightly
packed with diminutive components
typical of recent model transceivers.
Dimensions are quoted as 162(w) x
200(d) x 57(h)mm, and weight as 1730
-
grams.
No copy of the circuit was available but
we understand that it uses a phaselocked loop system, which has been set
up to cover the 11 channels available to
New Zealand CBers. These lie between
26.425MHz and 26.675MHz and are
therefore below the Australian channels,
in terms of frequency. The transceiver
can be modified to include channels 12,
13 and 14, should these become
available to the buyer. Frequency
tolerance is quoted as plus and minus
.005%.
On the rear panel is the usual 50239
antenna socket, a power socket with
matching 12V power cord and miniature
jacks for external and PA speakers. According to the accompanying leaflet, the
transceiver can be used in a vehicle with
either a positive or negative-earth 12V
system.
Rated audio power into an external 8
ohm speaker is "more than 3 watts".
Because of the discrepancy between
the NZ and Australian CB channels, we
chose not to give the transceiver a full
on -air test. However, on listening
around, it was evident that not all
Australian operators suffered such inhibitions, especially when skip conditions
were such as to carry NZ CB signals
across the Tasman. In these circumstances the receiver performed well
on either strong local or congested
"skip" signals, the automatic noise limiter
lroving particularly effective against
virtually no change in level across the
11
channels. (The NZ regulations make no
provision for SSB CB operation).
In discussing the transceiver with Dick
Smith Electronics, they pointed out that
demand for the Midland unit had been
high and that stocks may be exhausted in
fairly short order. However, they can
continue to meet demand for a.further
period with a virtually identical unit,
from the same factory, but manufactured originally with the "GE" brand name. Specifications and price are the
same.
On the basis that the unit is to be taken
back to New Zealand, the Australian taxfree price is $139.50.
Both the Midland and the GE
transceivers are sold with a 90 -day warranty. The leaflet which comes with the
units contains return freighting instructions in the event that after -sales service
is required. For further information contact any Dick Smith outlet or DSE Pty Ltd,
PO Box 321, North Ryde 2113, Australia.
Phone (02) 888 3200; international
61 2 888 3200. (W.N.W.)
ocal electrical interference.
The receiver is a dual conversion
Operating into a dummy load, the
superhet, with intermediate frequencies transmitter produced the permitted 2
of 10.695MHz and 455kHz.
watts of amplitude-modulated RF, with
Controls on the front panel include a
14 -position switch (stopped at position
Low
11) and a delta -tune switch allowing the
receiver only to be offset by plus and
Facing a world shortage of tantalum materials, and tantalum capacitors in
minus 1kHz. There is a continuously particular, the Elna
Capacitor Co Ltd of Japan have announced a line of elecvariable squelch control, a volume and trolytic capacitors
for their low -leakage, low -noise characteristics.
off/on switch, and an antenna warning The new type RB-LLnotable
capacitors
are similar in construction to the existing RB
indicator which is not mentioned in the range but they are smaller
and
with
improved sealing to cope with the rigours
instruction sheet. Along the top of the of machine insertion.
Additionally, they have more tightly controlled
panel is a signal strength and output temperature
and frequency characteristics. Ratings range from 0.1uF to
meter, a noise blanker switch, an
2200uF. For further information: Soanar Electronics Pty Ltd, 30
Lexton Rd,
automatic noise limiter switch, and Box Hill 3128.
Telephone: (03) 89 0661.
another for external speaker.
94
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
noise, ultra low leakage capacitors
Distribution amplifier for TV & FM
Pictured at right is
a
TV and FM
designed and
manufactured in Australia by Electrocraft
Manufacturing Pty Ltd. It is intended for
use in blocks of flats or home units, or in
large homes, where it is desired to
operate a number of receivers from a
common antenna system.
distribution
amplifier
The antenna would normally be
mounted in a prominent position, with
the distribution amplifier nearby; the
amplifier boosts incoming signals and
feeds them into a coaxial line distribution
system at a level sufficient to overcome
o
Dlt
YHF
The distribution amplifiers are designed to attenuate signals below about
Wide range of
LED assemblies
FM .01)1,1"F
i
1
»DraqrA'd
TY
TJ
system losses.
Electrocraft advise that there are eight
models in the present range, including
medium -gain and high -gain models for
use respectively in average areas and
weak signal areas. They have models
for areas such as Newcastle and
Wollongong (NSW) where local channels 3, 4, 5A require less amplification
than Sydney channels 2, 7, 9, 10. Still
other models have in-built gain controls
to cope better with local requirements.
The manufacturers envisage that their
range may need to be expanded to meet
other regional requirements.
.
d
pow_
2O vet"'
oHz
c
Er'
ANaa3os
10
45MHz, including a variety of amateur,
CB and other HF stations. However, except for deliberate discrimination in certain models, all signals above the low
end cut-off frequency are amplified
uniformly, right through to the topmost
UHF TV channels.
A leaflet with the model 27/100 as pictured, indicates gain figures for the
various types ranging from 16dB to
42dB, noise figures generally around
6dB, a response flat to within 1 or 1.6dB,
and commendable performance in
respect to input and output levels, back
attenuation, etc.
The distribution amplifier is housed in a
steel case, with black vinyl lid, and
measures 23 x 14 x 8cm. It is clearly intended for mounting in a position
sheltered from the weather. It operates
from the 240VAC power mains and is
left permanently switched on. Current
drain is not quoted but, to judge by the
size of the power transformer, it would
be negligible.
For further details, contact Electrocraft
Manufacturing Pty Ltd, at 68 Whiting St,
Artarmon, NSW 2064. Tel (02) 438 3266.
1000-metre fibre-optic transmitter
New HFBR-1002
fibre -optic digital
transmitter from
HP makes 1km
data links possible.
of Australia, in association with
Sloan AG of Switzerland, now offer an
extended range of LED indicator lamp
assemblies. The range covers 24 different types of LED in three colours, and
in-built current -limiting resistors are
available as an option. Three mounting
configurations can be provided: PC
mounting, panel mounting with a rear
fixing nut, and panel mounting with a
front fixing nut.
The entire range has been designed to
match the appearance of C & K switches,
providing a uniform panel presentation.
Additional information from C & K Electronics (Aust) Pty Ltd, Office 2, 6
McFarlane Street, Merrylands, 2160.
C & K
A fibre -optic transmitter which can
transmit data over 1km with guaranteed
performance specifications has been introduced by Hewlett-Packard. To complement the new transmitter, HP is also
making
available
cable/connector
its
fibre -optic
assemblies
in
user -
specified lengths.
A bipolar integrated circuit and a new,
high -efficiency GaAs infrared emitter
convert TTL-level inputs to optical pulses
at data rates up to 10 million baud. The
new HFBR-1002 transmitter is pin -
compatible with the HP HFBR-1001
100 -metre fibre -optic transmitter, which
means that it can directly replace the
HFBR-1001 in existing systems to extend
transmission capability to 1km.
Hewlett-Packard's HFBR-3000 single channel fibre -optic cable/connector
assemblies are now also available in one
metre increments from one to 1000m.
Previously,
the
assemblies were
available in fixed lengths from 10 to
100m. Optimum spectral transmission
on the 100 micrometre core cable octhe wavelength of emiscurs at 820nm
sion from the HFBR-1002 transmitter. At
this wavelength, attenuation is typically
7dB/km.
Further information is available from
Cema Electronics Pty Ltd, 21 Chandos St,
St Leonards, NSW 2065 or 208
Whitehorse Rd, Blackburn, Vic 3130.
-
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
95
OWN A MICROCOMPUTER...
OR THINKING ABOUT ONE?
!s995
Here's a superb new book that will take the mysteries out of
microcomputers. It is:
DICK SMITH'S INTRODUCTION TO
SORCERER BASIC
It's the ideal introduction to computers in general and
BASIC in particular. While written, with the Sorcerer
computer in mind, the contents apply to ANY
microcomputer using the BASIC language-which doesn't
leave out many! Each chapter includes excercises - with
solutions at the back so you can find out where you went
wron
It incgudes:
.
1
introduction
How to turn on a computer
What programming is a!I about
Storing your programes on cassette
Summary of BASIC language & commands
Glossary of computer terms
Error messages: and what to do about them
to
Sorcerer
BASIC
by John & -WY
--Mv
Vy
moo-.
WHERE ELSE BUT
DICK SMITH
.
MAIL ORDER CUSTOMERS:
PACK AND POST FREE!!)
Cat. B-6103
.. .
ELECTRONICS
SEE OUR OTHER ADS FOR STORE AND
RESELLER ADDRESSES
DSE773
RADIO DESPATCH SERVICE
' !TIIIIlIlMí
869 George St, Sydney 2000
Phone 211 0816, 211 0191
`
<fr
All PC Boards for EA & ETI Projects Front panels for some 1979
and 1980 EA and ETI projects.
Black or silver background by the
Scotchcal System.
See us
Hirose and Ansley Ribbon Cable
Connectors fitted same day.
for all types of
valves.
Distributors for
XCELITE TOOLS
CANON AUDIO
CONNECTORS
We are distributors
for Canon plugs and
sockets.
,
R
COMPUTER
Popular Muffin fan.
COOLING FANS 240V $26.95
DC Power
Supplies
240V AC Input
12Vdc 200mA plug pack ...$3.50
13.5Vdc 600mA power
supply
$6.50
96
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
E.A. DEC. 79 TRANSISTOR ASSISTED IGNITION SYSTEM
Complete kits
Drilled Box and heatsink.. $35.00
Undrilled box and heatsink $30.00
LOW PRICE
TRANSFORMERS
HIGH QUALITY
R2150 $2.95 (2851)
Primary
Secondary voltage
Secondary current
Termination
240V AC
12.8V CT
150MA
flying leads
R2155 $4.75
Primary
240V AC
Tapped secondary voltages
6.3, 7.5, 8.5, 9.5, 12.6, 15 volts
Secondary current
1 amp
Termination
solder lugs
R6678 37.25
Primary
240V AC
Tapped secondary voltages
15, 17.5, 20, 24, 27.5, 30 volts
Secondary current
1 amp
Termination
solder lugs
MAIL ORDER CUSTOMERS
$1.00 packing plus 5 per cent of order
value up to $80.00, thence a flat $4.00
for postal items. Carrier
-
freight on.
OPEN: Mon -Fri 8am to 5.30pm. Thurs-
day night late shopping till 8.30pm.
Saturday 8am to 11.45 am.
Hand-held
printing calculator
New Products
Icom IC-720 HF transceiver
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J]e
,
With shop -lifting accounting for as
much as 3% of the turnover of retail
stores, more and more shops are using
advanced electronic devices to detect
thieves. One such device is the newly
released Senelco Slimline, a microwave based system specifically designed for
small shops.
The Slimline consists of two waist-high
pillars, about 100mm thick and spaced
approximately a metre apart on either
side of the store exit. On the floor between the pillars is a rubber mat which
conceals a wire grid. Each of the pillars
contains a low -powered microwave
transmitter and receiver, while a 100kHz
signal is fed into the grid on the floor.
Special tags which are attached to
goods in the store include a sensor
which detects and mixes the two signals
and reflects the modulated microwave
signal back to the receiver when the tag
is brought within range of the field. The
received microwave signal is filtered and
used to trigger either an audible or visible alarm, so that any attempt to remove
an item from the store with the tag still
,r
attached will be detected.
The tags themselves are available in
various forms to suit any type of mer-
500
National Semiconductor has introduc_
.
ICOM HAS RELEASED a new HF transceiver which covers the new amateur frequencies assigned by WARC 79 (World Administrative Radio Conference) as well as providing general coverage to 30MHz. In common with other Icom transceivers, the
new unit incorporates a microprocessor. Tuning is accomplished by an "optical chopper" VFO which is claimed to give better linearity with no backlash.
Other features include a speech processor, bandpass tuning and an effective noise
blanker. A range of options, including an automatically tuned HF mobile antenna, will
also shortly be released. Enquiries to Vicom International Pty Ltd, 68 Eastern Rd,
South Melbourne, Victoria 3205.
Microwave
security system
NS
chandise, and once attached to the
goods can only be removed by a special
tool at the sales desk.
Further information can be obtained
from Senelco Pty Ltd, 23 Ben Boyd Rd,
Neutral Bay, NSW 2089.
High -power
switching transistors
A new series of NPN high power
bipolar transistors, the HPT540/45 and
HPT440/45 series from International Rectifier, are rated at up to 50A continuous
collector current and 75A peak collector
current. They are available with voltage
ratings up to 450V, and are suitable for
use in high -power off-line inverters and
switching regulators, eliminating the
need for paralleling smaller transistors.
The new IR bipolar devices are housed
in TO -83 stud mount packages of
molybdenum to minimise thermal stress.
With a maximum thermal impedance of
0.5°C/watt, the HPT545 series can
dissipate 300W at 25°C case
temperature or 150W at 100°C case
temperature, and has a maximum
operating and storage temperature
range of -65°C to +200°C.
Further details can be obtained from
Warburton Franki Pty Ltd, 199 Parramatta Rd, Auburn, NSW 2144.
ed a compact, 12 -digit calculator with an
in-built thermal printer. The new
calculator, the NS500, is just 30mm thick,
70mm wide and 140mm long, and
comes complete with rechargeable batteries, charger, five rolls of paper, and a
carrying case. .
For more information 'contact N. S.
Electronics, PO Box 89, Bayswater, Vic
3153.
"GRUNDIG"
-
21 band
SATELLITE 2100
Short wave radio $495.00
-
Reconditioned
dictating machines.
With all accessories $195.00
WORKSHOP
GRUNDIG
VALVES, SPARES,
& CIRCUITS
For most Grundig sets.
We also repair electronic equipment
including Metal Detectors.
GRUNDIG SALES
& SERVICE
490 Queen Street,
brisbane 4000 Q.
(07) 229 5445
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
97
New Próducts
BILL DGI'S
ELECTRONIC
AGENCIES
.
50MHz dual trace oscilloscope
115-117 PARRAMATTA ROAD,
CONCORD 2137
bk.*
(CORNER PARRAMATTA ROAD & LLOYD GEORGE AVE)
?
..
1
,
H'
.
'
a';,
*
fr.
©11
t1
it .4
311P"
TEL: 745 3077 (2 LINES)
t,
*
..
,o
300 WATT AMPLIFIER
(EA JUNE '80)
(Single module including
heatsink, thermal cutout,
nuts, bolts etc.)
... ONLY
. ..
Standard Components Pty Ltd has announced the release of Hitachi Denshi
V550 dual trace oscilloscope.
$75.00
*
POWER SUPPLY for EA
300 WATT AMP
(Includes transformer and' all
The V550 features a delayed sweep
that allows magnification of any desired
portion of the displayed waveform up to,
1000 times, while a third trace on the
screen displays the trigger (either internal or external), allowing timing comparisons to be made.
necessary components.
... ONLY
*
r
4111111111~...
$52.95
CASE FOR 300 WATT
Other features of the V550 are the
EA AMP
New Hitachi VS50
dual trace
oscilloscope
features 50MHz.
bandwidth and
delayed sweep.
1mV sensitivity setting, 50MHz bandwidth, and a single sweep facility which
allows investigation of momentary
events and is essential for explosion,
voice or impact experiments. A 15cm
square CRT developed by Hitachi gives a
brighter than usual display while using
acceleration voltages within the normal
range.
Standard
Components Pty Ltd are
located at 10 Hill St, Leichhardt, NSW
2040.
We have three cases available
for this amp; all unpunched;
ETI4000 amp case (rack
mounted) $55.00; Wooden sid-
Antenna rotators
& tuners
ed ETI4000 amp case $45.00;
Dick Smith
case $49.00
rack mounting
SD
.1..
,,
OTO
TV CRO ADAPTOR KIT:
(EA
-
MAY '80)
Over 200 sold in 1 month
from $29.40 without power
adaptor
-
TWO
1. 240V
2. 240V
POWER ADAPTORS:
AVAILABLE:
to 6/7.5/9V
to 9V
$9.50
$5.95
MAIL ORDER: $1.00 + 5% OF
ORDER VALUE UP TO $80.00.
THENCE A Fl AT, S4.O0
HEAVY ITEMS SENT "FREIGHT ON
CARRIER
98
ífí`:.
T
P.
-`
.
%U
y`:
ADAo:O'
'
rHHOUGM
Daiwa Company of Japan has released
new range of antenna rotators which
incorporate a map of the world
cen.tred on Australia to show the bearing
of the antenna. Two new control boxes
are available for both the heavy and
medium duty rotators. With the "pre -ser
type of controller the antenna direction
is set by turning a knob to the desired
bearing, and the rotator then turns to the
selected heading. The other type of con-,
troller uses the traditional method of
pressing a button until the direction
pointer indicates the desired bearing.
Also from Daiwa is the CNW418, the
first amateur radio antenna tuner designed to incorporate the WARC bands of
10, 18 and 24MHz. The coupler handles
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
a
-
-
500W PEP and includes the popular
direct reading "cross needle" type of
SWR/PWR meter. Output impedances of
10-300 ohms can be handled, and input
impedance is 50 ohms.
The Daiwa range is distributed in
Australia by Vicom International Pty Ltd,
68 Eastern Rd, South Melbourne, Vic
3205, and is available at most amateur
radio dealers.
Moulded plastic
instrument cases
A range of two-tone brown, moulded
instrument cases has recently
been released by Vero Electronics.
Available in three heights, the "Hi Style" range is supplied complete with a
ABS plastic
carrying handle which doubles as a tilt
foot. The angle of tilt is adjustable.
The base section has moulded -in PCB
mounting pillars but, apart from these,
the inside of the case is clear for maximum space utilisation. The flat front and
rear panels are removable for easy
machining and are held in position by
the assembled case.
For further information contact Warburton Franki, 199 Parramatta Rd,
Auburn, NSW 2144.
Smart frequency counters from Philips
Two microprocessor-based, frequency
counters, the PM 6b67 and PM 6668,
have been announced by Philips. The
use of a microprocessor gives the
counters higher resolution and makes
them more convenient to use, as well as
saving on the cost of traditional
components.
The new Philips counters span a frequency range of 10Hz to 120MHz for the
PM 6667 and up to 1GHz for the PM
6668. Automatic triggering, 15mV sensitivity and a six -position input attenuator
allow fast triggering, ensuring a stable
readout on the high-contrast 7 -digit liquid crystal display.
The microprocessor incorporated in
the instruments allows a new approach
to
frequency
measurements
.........
I'.a--
-r
-
ir
+=
`i
14I4
I
4
200ms.
Other benefits from the use of a
microprocessor are the elimination of
manual range sglection
(the
microprocessor takés care of the display
shift and activates the proper Hz, kHz, or
MHz indicator and decimal point
regardless of the input frequency), and
the inclusion of a self-diagnostic test
routine.
For further information, contact Philips
Scientific and Industrial Equipment, 25
Paul St, North Ryde, NSW 2113.
eliminates the normal ±1 cycle error. By
making a multiple period measurement
and computing the reciprocal of the
results, the counters provide high resolution frequency measurement of low frequency signals.
Two measuring speeds may be chosen:
normal, with 7 -digit resolution every se-
Finest in Car Stereo
-~'
cond; or fast, with 6 -digit resolution in
that
:
r......
a3.-3333i-'91"9
New digital storage oscilloscope
411
Nine superb models to choose
from many featuring
AM -FM radio
loudness, bass &
Dolby
-
treble controls
Auto Reverse
Push button tuning
20 watts per channel power
output
Auto seek & auto scan
Hear the new range of VOXSON car
stereo units & high power car stereo
speakers at one of these VOXSON
dealers.
Webster's Electronics - Echuca
- Echuca
Simonis - Shepparton
Auto - Cobram
Chris
Supplies - Deniliquin
Deniliquin
Milner Cliffs
(Merben Appliance Service)
Murtett Whiting - Terang
- -Cobden
Warrnambool
Electronics - Balrnsdale
Balrnsdale Electrics - Bairnsdale
- Warragul
Alecton
Electrics - Traralgon
Teychenne Electronics - Traralgon
- Barham
Foster
Horsham
Electrical
Lakes Entrance
- Orbust
Electronics - Morwell
- Ringwood
Wright
Wonthaggi Radio - Wonthaggi
Whartons Electrical - Swan Hill
Ballarat
John Thomas 8 Co
Foster
Lang & Gleesón
sA.
m
á
M
Tektronix 468
Digital Storage
Oscilloscope has
capabilities of
4658 100MHz
oscilloscope, and
-
-
uses an 8 -bit
digitiser to achieve
10MHz storage
bandwidth.
Murray Roberts
Lou
Berg
Elect
Red
Bryan
G. Beevers
8
H. Errey
A.C. Smith
Odyessey
T.V. Service
J.O.B.
Barham Radio á T.V.
Lang & Gleeson
McRaes
Loukes Radio
Bensi T.V.
Maryvale
Bros
- - Geelong
- Ballarat
- Portland
Malleeler Auto
Kerang
Len Day Car Radio
Fred Eva Car Radio
The new Tektronix 468 Digital Storage
Oscilloscope increases digital storage
bandwidth limits, detects aliased signals,
and corrects envelope error and display
problems which have plagued
jitter
earlier digital storage 'scopes. In the ncnstorage mode the 468 has all the.
capabilitiesof the Tektronix 465B
100MHz oscilloscope, and in the storage
mode continues to "drive" like a non storage oscilloscope. Storage mode is
selected by pushing a button, and
waveforms are stored as easily' as they
are viewed in the non -storage mode.
The 468, which will be available in
August, uses an 8 -bit digitiser and a unique display interpolation technique to
achieve a 10MHz "useful storage bandwidth". "Useful storage bandwidth" is
-
defined by Tektronix to mean a usable
and accurate representation of a
waveform, with less than 5% envelope
error. It indicates the maximum frequency sinewave that can be usefully stored
a single sweep.
The envelope mode uses dual sampling rates and records maximum and
in
minimum values
of
a
waveform
envelope into memory over a selectable
number of sweeps (two to 256 plus continuous setting). It can capture narrow
pulses on long sweeps and is useful for
glitch catching, viewing waveform excursions, and detecting aliasing.
Additional information is available
from Tektronix Australia Pty Ltd, 80
Waterloo Rd, North Ryde, NSW 2113.
A.G. Tulloh
- Casterton
-- -- - Finley - Mornington
Mornington
Anderson's Electrical - Rochester
Gambier
Equip Elliott
--Nyah
West
District
Ballarat
Mansfield
-- Mansfield
T. Wilson
Hamilton & Horsham
Civic Centre
Coleraine
W.G. Benson
Seymour
Harrap Electrics
Lavington
Albury Audio
Wodonga
M
8
Anderson
D
Corowa
G. Poidevin
Yarrawonga
John Barnes Auto
Con Carr
Speed Shop
Mt
Sound
T.V.
Nyah &
Ass
IL
T.V.
Frank Day
Thompson Ford
Martins Garage
TRADE ENQUIRIES
-
RADIO PARTS GROUP
329 7888
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
99
CORRECTION: Playmaster 300W Amplifier
OUTPUT
-70V
014
14514
tan
THERMAL
CUTOUT
O
SW
OUTPUT
*SEE TEXT
OUASI-COMPLEMENTARY SYMMETRY
PLAYMASTER
300 (June
PRODUCTS
1980,
parallel links with a third 0.47
ohm/5W resistor. Delete one 0.1uF
complementary circuit shown on capacitor, cut the copper pattern as
page 57, the 1 ohm/10W resistors
indicated and re -arrange links as
associated with Q22, 23 and 24 do shown. The two links shown dotted
not ensure current sharing. To en- are on the underside of the board
sure current sharing in these tran- and should be made with insulated
sistors the circuit should be wire.
modified as shown in these
Note also that the PCB diagram
diagrams. On the PCB, replace two on page 59 of the June 1980 issue
of the 1 ohm resistors with 0.47 'should show the supply rails as
ohm/5W. units and replace the two
± 70V, not ± 75V.
1/MÁ/55): In the quasi -
-
Continued
A monolithic IC specifically designed to
provide low cost motor speed regulation
of low voltage DC motors is available
from National Semiconductor Corpora,
tion, featuring less than 1% system motor
speed change with respect to voltage,
load and temperature change.
For precision soldering.
Light weight. High power.
ADCOLA
STANDARD
Fitted with
non -seize tips
No frills.
Just high
performance.
3mm S 30
5mm S 50
ADCOLA
DUOTEMP
Temperature
control at your
fingertips.
3mm D 30
5mm D 50
Fully automatic
'THERMATIC'
also available.
FROM YOUR RADIO
PARTS SUPPLIER OR:
02
03
709 5293
543
002) 34
07
44
(08
42
5122
2233
0131
6655
(09) 381 5500
soaa
ADCOLA
100
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
Designated the LM1014, the new IC
remote stop (pause) and output
short circuit protection. Four externally
set temperature coefficients allow the
user to program the IC for variations in
temperature. Primarily designed for
cassette tape recorders, the LM1014 will
also be suitable for other low voltage DC
motors in consumer, industrial,
automotive and telecommunications
applications.
If the output current exceeds a preset
limit,, the base drive to the external PNP
transistor is automatically switched off
and the supply voltage must then be
recommended to start up the motor.
Further information from NS Electronics, PO Box 89, Bayswater, Vic 3253.
has
)Op IRVIL1G ELECTRONICS
499 HIGH STREET, NORTHCOTE 3070 MELBOURNE, VICTORIA. Ph. (03) 489 8131.
10 BU208
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
(write for full product range and price list)
525.00
5200.00
100 BU208
(Till Stocks Last)
2,90
75.00
75.00
3.50
3.50
611126
BDX80
BDX80
8D139
8D140
130mm DUAL -TRACE
15MHz, TRIGGERED
SWEEP OSCILLOSCOPE
Bandwidth
BC547
BC557
BC327
50
47 50
10 2114 (450 ns)
10 2708
10 Red Leds
100 Red Lens
10 Green Leds
10 7447
10 7490
10 7400
10 RL4136
8400
20
00
2 00
6 00
3 50
50
13 00
1
11
1
$4.50
4 50
4 20
3.60
4 50
4.60
5 50
XLP3 13
XLP3. 14
XLP-LNE 31
XLP-LNE-32
LPLNE 12
COMPUTER GRADE ELECTRO.
40V
$6.50
16V
6.40
16V
10 000,41
9.00
.2900uf
6800uí
25V
40V
40V
25V
40V
35V
16V
16V
10V
100.000,41
950
90
00
90
23 00
11
12
12
1-9
.70c
.75c
$1.00
$1.35
$2.70
12 Way
16 Way
20 Way
40 Way
including
10+
.60c
65c
.90c
51.25
$2.50
Scotchcal
range.
blue on white plastic
green on white plastic
red on white plastic
black on transparent plastic
black on yellow plastic
8016
8018
8011
8012
8013
8015 black on white plastic
8009 light blue on aluminium
54.10
$4.10
54.60
54.10
$4.10
54.10
$4.10
$4.10
$4.60
$3.75
8001 red on aluminium
8005 black on aluminium
8007 reversing film
12in
all above sheets 10in
' Note
$4.40
8500 Photosensitive developer
$9.30
3900 clear coating (glossy finish)
3930 clear coating (matte finish) $9.30
ML -3 Applicator block
$3.90
ML -4 developer pads 10 for:$8.90
8002KA evaluation kit
-
DE -9P
DE -9S
DE -9C
SD5
SD6
5
6
30
40
2.50
2 70
3 00
2
2
7
8
9
10
SD9
SD10
60
1.70
1.90
DIP SWITCHES SPST
xtgo
ttCKETS
S
ZIP' DIP il
16 Pin Zip' Dip 11
24 Pin Zip' Dip 11
40 Pin Zip' Dip 11
$11 50
12 50
17 50
'Zero Insertion Pressure
TYPE CONNECTORS
1-9
9 PIN COVER
Li1=1
15 PIN MALE
15 PIN F/MALE
15 PIN COVER
25 PIN MALE
25 PIN
1
pc Grey Hood
2 pc. Black Hood
2 pc. Grey Hood
37 PIN MALE
37 PIN F/MALE
37 PIN COVER
Hardware set (2 Pairs)
DA -15P
DA -15S
DA -15C
DB-25P
DB-25S
DB-25C
DB-25C2B
DB-25C2G
DC -37P
DC -37S
DC -37C
EA
"D"
DESCRIPTION
9 PIN MALE
9 PIN F/MALE
PART NO
2150
20 50
'
rlt,i
4
8.4 kg
DH/S
RIE are now distributors for 3M
products
MHz
51
3
504
S07
S08
Sensitivity
4>#
10mV/cliv
Sweep Time
$555.00 Plus Tax
0.5 ps/div
0.5 s/div
Simplified circuitry improved performance and dependability
have been successfully realized with the use of ICs throughout
A vertical amplifier provides as wide a bandwidth as DC to
15 MHz, as high a sensitivity as 10 mV/div, and a low input
capacitance A sweep rate extends from 0.5 µsec/div to 0.5 sec/
div in 19 ranges. Further, TV vertical and horizontal syncs are
available for measuring video signals and, with its x5 magnified
Very easy
sweep, its range of application is extremely wide
X -Y operation of high input sensitivity for Lissajous measurements
Dimensions: 260(W) x 190(H) x 385(0) mm, Weight:
23 50
23 50
MULTISTRANO RIBBON CABLE
Price Per Meter:
10 Way
-15
RS232 &
CANNON CONNECTORS
XLP-3-11C
XLP-3.12C
10.000uf
15.000uí
22.000uí
22 000íf
27.000uf
33.000uf
68.000uí
DC
Price
No of Switches
P/N
SD3
CS-1560AII
1.00
1.50
1.00
1.50
8C549
BC559
10000,41
DIP SWITCHES SPST
TRIO CROs NOW IN STOCK
EXTRA
SPECIALS
METAL DETECTOR
EA 79md 9
As A Kit (without H/phones)
ET576
Dream 6800
ETI 472
ETI 471
$2.60
19.90
4.90
10.90
2.90
9.90
ETI 470
ETI Series 4000 Kit
ETI 585 Re ultrasonic Re
ETI 585 Tx ultrasonic Tx
2.75
179.00
15.95
8.95
NEW PROJECT BOARDS
ETI
ETI
ETI
ETI
ETI
ETI
ETI
ETI
ETI
ETI
ETI
ETI
ETI
151
$2 20
152
261
5200
50
797111
264
5150
795F9
321
53 90
52 75
79PS11
322
452
466
474
470
471
472
541
51
55 90
5650
52 20
52 70
s9 90
5270
52 60
ETI 549A
52 50
ETI 561
ETI 573
ETI 576
ETI 577
ETI 606
$2 75
52 90
54 50
S2 70
ETI 726
79UPS6
53 30
52 90
52 20
52 60
52 90
$3 90
52 20
52 90
52 40
53 50
79se3
79md9
80au3
80r.m3A
80r m38
DREAM 6800
510 90
DREAM 6802
51190
(Redesigned hoard
with notes to
eliminate 6875
clock rhipl
52 30
Please note all hoards are fibreglass 1oz
copper precision drilled
\
10-25 25+
$3.50 53.50 $3.10
4.20
3.90
4.50
1.90
2.10
2.20
4.20
4.50
3.90
4.70
4.90
5.10
2.10
2.00
2.30
5.10
5.60
5.90
6.10
6.60
6.90
2.00
2.20
2.40
2.50
2.70
2.80
2.50
2.40
2.70
7.10
7.90
7.50
9.10
10.90 9.90
4.10
4.50
4.90
1.80
1.90
2.10
PROJECT BOARDS
(FIBREGLASS)
ETI 043
ETI 044
ETI 047
ETI 061
ETI 062
ETI 063
ETI 064
134
135
136
137A
1.50
1.40
1.80
1.70
1.70
1.70
1.80
1.40
1.40
1.80
1.50
1.80
1.70
1.30
1.90
1.90
1.90
1.80
2.90
1378
2.90
Eli 065
ETI 067
FTI 068
ETI 071
ETI
ETI
ETI
ET!
ETI
ETI
ETI
ETI
ETI
ETI
ETI
ETI
51.40
1.30
072
081
083
084
085
130
139
1.90
1.60
1.80
1.50
1.90
1.50
1.90
1.90
ETI 4506
2.40
ETI 480
ETI 480PS 2.40
245
417
445
ETI 446
ETI 449
ETI 450A
ETI
ETI
ETI
ETI 481M
ETI 481 PS
ETI 483
52.00
3.50
20
3.90
2.90
2.90
2.50
1.99
2.20
2.20
ETI 541
2.20
ETI 547
2.20
ETI 581
ETI 583
2.20
1.60
E71 585R
1.40
ETI 5857
2.30
ETI 586
2.50
ETI 603
1.60
ETI 604
ETI 635
2.90
3.90
ETI 638A
ETI 708
1.90
ETI 713
3.90
1.90
ETI 714
ETI 717
2.90
78406
2.90
EA
EA 78TM8 2.00
EA 78N6
3.20
EA 78NG4 2.50
EA 78UT4 3.90
4.20
EA 7813
EA 78C5
3.90
ETI484
ETI 485
ETI486
ETI489A
ETI499
ETI 528
2
Digital
hand
multimeter
$77
SEND
FOR
FULL
SPECS
IC SOCKETS
(Low Profile)
14 Pin
16 Pin
1.9
.18c
22
.24
18 Pin
40
20 Pin
42
44
8 Pin
22 Pin
24 Pin
10-25
.17c
.20
.22
36
39
40
45
28 Pih
50
40 Pin
58
All Solder Tail
46
.16c
.19
.20
.33
.36
.38
.39
.42
55
51
41
WIRE WRAP 3 -LEVEL
1.9
10.25
8 Pin
14 Pin
16 Pin
18 Pin
20 Pin
22 Pin
24 Pin
28 Pin
36 Pin
40 Pin
.75c
$1.00
20
40
1 60
1 90
2 20
2 60
2 90
1
1
.65c
.85c
.90c
$1.10
30
40
80
1
1
1
2 10
2 40
2
100+
70
100+
50c
80c
.85c
$1.00
1 20
1 30
1.70
2 00
2 30
2 50
Bankcard
bonkcord Mail
Orders
welcome here Welcome
Please debit my Bankcard.
Bankcard No.
Expiry Date
Name
Signature
HEAVIER ITEMS ADD ADDITIONAL POSTAGE. EXTRA HEAVY ITEMS SENT COMET FREIGHT ON.
PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. SEND 60c & SAE FOR FREE CATALOGUE.
MAIL ORDERS: PO BOX 135, NORTHCOTE, VIC 3070
MIN PACK & POST $1.00
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
101
REVIEWS OF RECENT
Records & Tapes
CLASSICAL
POPULAR
SPECIAL INTEREST
SCHUMANN Fantasie: "Outstanding recital"
-
SCHUMANN Fantasie, Op 17. Fantasiestucke, Op 12. Played by Martha
Argerich (piano). CBS Stereo 767913.
tiveness and tenderness in the chordal
passages of the second movement,
which again demonstrate her appreciation of the wide contrasts called for in
the work. Another point to notice is the
way she never allows long passages of
dotted notes to become monotonous.
And when at last you meet the Finale,
the way she caresses the notes is a
delight.
The eight short pieces that make up
the Fantasiestucke are best known to audiences as encore pieces at piano
recitals. Her Chopinesque touch in the
first item, Des Abends, is enchanting. I
liked less her cavalier treatment of the
next, Aufschung, which is somewhat
overdone in speed and loudness. But it is
note -perfect, despite its close approach
to recklessness. In Warum (why?) Ms
Argerich's quiet persistence seems to increase her demand for an answer. Then
comes the compelling rhythm of Grillen
and the restlessness of The Night, which
follows.
The next item, Fabel, is one of the
What appeals most to me in Ms
Argerich's account of the great C Major
Fantasia is her impetuosity
favourite
word of mine when writing about
Schumann's music. (I except the Piano
Concerto.) And I mean the performance
as well as the content. In this instance I
am aware that a case could be made out
against the pianist for a measure of selfindulgence in her reading; her "blowing
up" of unimportant details, for instance.
But to me this treatment is a combination of youthful enthusiasm and a careful
weighing up of contrasts in dynamics
and sonorities.
It must be remembered, too, that the
composer marked the first movement
"fantastic with passion". The significance
of that first word should not be forgotten, especially by the more staid exponents of this composer's work.
Specially notable is her alternate asser-
-a
TCHAIKOVSKY Piano
Concerto: "different
t
..."
-
TCHAIKOVSKY
Piano Concerto No. 2
in G. Philips Stereo Cassette (Sonic
Series) 7317 196. With the Monte
Carlo National Orchestra conducted
by Eliahu Inbal. Soloist: Werner Haas.
Here is another "different" reading
from the usual run of interpretations.
Here the general tendency is to go hell for -leather after the virtuoso features of
the concerto.
Before his death in a car accident, Haas
made complete recordings of all
Tchaikovsky's piano concertos but this is
the only one can trace that has been
issued. It first saw the light under the
Philips label in 1978 and didn't cause
much .of a stir. In my opinion it deserved
better
with one reservation. The
I
-
Monte Carlo Orchestra sounds far from
its best, despite Inbal's manifest effort to
improve it. But here I might be unjust,
because listened to it on a cassette and,
for all I know, the sound might be better
on disc. Certainly, one expects better
sound from Philips than one hears here.
Fortunately, the piano tone is quite
satisfactory. So is Haas' performance,
although it tends to be more lyrical than
you might expect. His main concern
seems to be to avoid hysterical climaxes
that are strewn so temptingly along his
rvar
masterpieces of the recital. It seems
almost "weightless" and its fleetness is
close to the incredible. The other outstanding piece in an outstanding recital is
Traumes-Wirren, the first part of which
passes like a flash; then a few slow bars,
as if to give her time to catch her breath
for the resumption of the first theme. If a
note or two is blurred occasionally, it
doesn't seem to matter. To close, after
the decisive end of The Song, nothing
more remains to be said.
Sound is good average. (J.R.)
path. The key to Haas' attractive lyricism
can be found early in his treatment of
the second subject of the first movement. And indeed you won't find any
harsh thumping anywhere in his
performance.
Allied to his other merits is a technique
that is always completely assured and
that responds effortlessly to any
demands he makes on it. By the way, it
might be worth noting that Tchaikovsky
himself always claimed that the concerto
should be played in a lyrical rather than a
virtuoso style. At any rate, don't dismiss
it on the strength of this review without
hearing it first. (J.R.)
I
Reviews in this section are by Julian Russell (.R.), Paul Frolich
(P.1.), Neville Williams (W.N.W.), Leo Simpson (L.D.S.), Norman Marks (N.J.M.), Greg Swain
(G.S.), and Danny Hooper (D.H.).
102
ELECTRONICS Australia,
July, 1980
91'
-
Octet in F, Op.166 D.803.
Academy of St Martin -in -the-Fields
Chamber Ensemble. Philips de Luxe
Stereo Disc 9500 400.
SCHUBERT
This disc faces formidable competition
from the Melos Ensemble's performance
issúed some 10 years ago. Differences
between the two in the matter of playing
and interpretation are minimal. The
Academy plays the two outer
movements slightly faster and the second movement slightly slower. In the
movement with variations yours will be
choice of which you prefer: the more
leisurely gait of the Academy or the
Melos' tiny advance in tempo.
In both versions the phrasing and inflections are a continuing delight. But if
some persistent reader were to demand
that I make a choice between the two
would have to select the new issue (the
Academy) soley on the matter of the
recording which seems to add a little additional freshness to its older rival. And
there is also the immaculate leadership
of lona Boiwn. (J.R.)
I
*
*
-
*
Sinfonietta with Fanfares.
Metamorphoses on
HINDEMITH
Themes by Weber. London Symphony
Orchestra conducted by Claudio Abbado. World Record Club Stereo Disc
JANACEK
-
R.04247.
Except for some Czech or rather Moravian characteristics, Janacek's music is
like no other in the recognised styles of
Western music. Despite its complexity
and subtlety,. it has all the surface in-
nocence of a child's finger painting.
Much of his brilliant and highly original
orchestral scoring call to mind the vivid
colour contrasts of the German expressionist school of painting.
Made up of short repeated ejaculatory
phrases, there is little resemblance to
Western sonata form; yet everything
seems to work out quite naturally as an
organic whole. He can be both vulgar
and elegant in the space of a bar or two.
There is a simple immediacy about his
drama that is instantly effective. His
energetic music brooks no contradiction.
It is as impossible to imagine before it
was written as it would be to copy, except in parody.
In this little Symphony with fanfares, he
sometimes relents to make small compromises with the West. There is, for instance, a recognisable likeness to Puccini
in the beginning' and end of the third
movement and a deliberately vulgar
dance tune in the middle section. The arresting fanfares which announce the
work are developed, or rather slightly
altered, according to the mood of different parts of the work.
Abbado starts them off almost caressingly, never digging down into the brass
to make it bray. Even the slurring phrased trumpet bars don't go through your
head from one side to the other. His
change of rhythm a few bars on is
brilliant when the music changes to an
atmosphere of pageantry. The beautifully tender theme of the third movement
is coaxed affectionately by Abbado so
that, when the brass enter, they do so
with enforced contrast. All through, the
frequent return to the mood and musical
ideas of the first movement (though
nearly always differently scored) are
always exciting. The conducting, playing
CLASSIC PREVIEW SET
BRAHMS 11{3HJ:i
-
r
i
!
1E
Four Brahms symphonies
BRAHMS: Symphonies (Nos 1-4, com-
plete). Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra,
conducted by Karl Bohm. DGG, box of
four stereo discs, with booklet $19.99.
From Classics Preview Series, 11
Hargrave Street, East Sydney. (Tel
31 0255).
Although one may assume that all
seasoned collectors would own recordings of the Brahams symphonies, as
well as representative examples of the
V.P.O.'s playing and Bohm's conducting,
this set may prove of interest to them as
well as, needless to say, young music lovers who are just starting out to build a
collection. The bargain price, even by
the standards of Clubs, is certainly a major attraction, but there's more to it than
that.
In recent years, a body of criticism has
built up around Bohm, accusing him of
relentlessly slow tempi and a degree of
stodginess; when witnessed him in action in London, just two years ago,
found no trace of these "blemishes". The
Brahms symphonies, recorded by him in
1976 and directing an orchestra whose
members will not tolerate much
divergence from their time-honoured
Brahms tradition, are further proof of
I
I
and sound are beyond praise throughout
the whole five movements and the
work's originality is always unique.
Hindemith's usually machine -made
music is a bit more unbuttoned than
usual in this piece, as if the stiff-shirted
composer has undone his collar for a
change. But it can never match the simple joyousness of Janacek's. Just what is
the difference between a symphonic
metamorphosis and a variation perhaps
only the composer could explain. Some
of the movements have a Hungarian
with a lot of notes added.
flavour
-
Others have
of beery
kind
a
gemuthlichkeit. There is one that
tiresomely repeats such chinoiserie.
The third movement (andantino) has
some pleasant twilight sound as if, for
once, the composer was using his heart
instead of his head. And there is even
some evidence of fun when Hindemith
sends up a mournful funeral march by
Weber. (J.R.)
*
-
*
*
Songs from Des Knaben
Wunderhorn sung by Jessye Norman
(soprano) and John Shirley-Qurk (bass)
with the Concertgebouw Orchestra
conducted by Bernard Haitink. Philips
de Luxe Stereo Disc issued for
members of the World Record Club
MAHLER
9500 316.
Bohm's devotion to what is in the score
neither more or less and of his ability to overcome all noticeable symptoms
of old age. There may be more exciting
performances of each of the four symphonies, but not necessarily better ones,
nor more faithful to the composer's
intentions.
Low-priced as they are, records calling
for a laying out of $20 need to be
carefully considered. In this instance, I
have no misgivings in advising purchase:
Brahms' symphonies are an important
part of our musical heritage and should
be well known to every music -lover; the
Vienna Philharmonic remains an orchestra of high quality, producing a unique sound and Bohm personifies one of
our last musical links with pre-war
Europe. Added to which, the quality of
the records produced by DGG is
outstanding, the recorded sound expoint not to be overlookcellent and
this fine set has not been commered
cially offered in this country. (P.F.)
-
-
-
-a
Here is a chance to compare the very
great talents of two fine singers, Jessye
Norman and Janet Baker, in this suite of
lovely songs. Here prefer ever so slightly Ms baker's "Wo die Schonen
Trompeten Blasen" to Ms Norman's,
although both performances are of quite
extraordinary beauty, each fully realising
the drama and sorrow of the song. Don't
be put off the present disc under review
by a tendency to ordinariness in the first
stanza of the first song, Der Schildwache
Nachlied, sung by Shirley -Quirk for Ms
Norman enters gloriously in the second
verse. Indeed all through this recital
Shirley -Quirk does all the right things for
the right reasons but I still found him
strangely unmoving. Indeed it is Ms Norman who makes this recital so thrilling to
me.
I
She is in glorious voice throughout,
though it is curious, after her light touch
in the French recital, to hear her treating
somewhat more heavily the lighter items
in the Mahler suite. But this is to quibble,
because there is so much to admire and
enjoy in the whole disc that to choose a
detail here and there for pinpricking
criticism seems churlish. And I still
haven't mentioned another great contributor to this splendid issue Bernard
Haitink and the Concertgebouw Orchestra. Haitink is now my favourite
Mahler conductor and he and his superb
-
ELECTRONICS Australia. July, 1980
103
RECORDS & TAPES
- continued
orchestra are in grand form for this performance. His sense of balance between
the composer's wonderful scoring and
the voice is never less than beyond
praise. And Philips' engineering is
another feature added to this disc's
many splendours. Although it has some
formidable competitors, it can hold its
own with the best and surpass many
others. And those Mahlerian enthusiasts
who are hearing the songs in their entire
form for the first time will recognise immediately the origin of so many of the
themes Mahler used later in his symphonies. (J.R.).
James Dunham plays viola and Robert
demonstrated what I regard as THE right
way to play Schubert. Ashkenazy has not
discovered this and may well not wish to
do so; he plays superbly well and with
exquisite good taste.
What regard as a failure may well be
regarded as a great "plus" by many
music -lovers and I cannot but commend
this performance to them. As far as the
Dances are concerned, rightly described
as "Landler", the things that worry me in
the sonata are, of course, even more obvious. Leaving Viennese idiosyncrasies
out of the discussion, this is a very fine
disc, with excellent piano sound, full of
lovely music. (P.F.)
I
*
*
*
SCHUBERT: Piano Sonata No. 17, D ma-
jor, D.850; Four German Dances from
D.366. Vladimir Ashkenazy, piano.
World Record Club stereo disc R
THE SEQUOIA
STRING
QUARTET
05218.
auz,
This is, even now, still one of Schubert's
little -heard piano sonatas; currently, the
only available versions I am aware of are
those played by Brendel and Walter
Klien and, for this reason alone we
should be grateful to have another competitive reading. Alas, things aren't quite
so simple; pianistically, Ashkenazy is at
least the equal of Brendel and decidedly
superior to Klien, but this does not mean
that he is able to give better interpretations of Schubert's music.
Viennese traditions are a peculiar thing
and, it seems, not easily absorbed by
learning. There has to be a modicum of
less than perfect taste, a smidgin of
"schmaltz", a certain blurring of strict
time and rhythm almost indescribable
details that are hard to explain and do
not come easily to outsiders. There have
been exceptions: notably Solomon and,
-
closer to home,
Tessa
Birnie
.
.., ,. o i.
10v4iv
THE
SEQUOIA STRING QUARTET.
Quartet in F -Major (Ravel). Quartet
number three (Bartok). Stereo, digital
master. DELOS DMS-3004. [From P. C.
Stereo, PO Box 272, Mount Gravatt,
QId 4122. Phone (07) 343 16121
Founded in 1972, the Sequoia String
Quartet has won wide recognition and is
currently Quartet -in -Residence at the
California Institute of the Arts. Women
members of the group are both Japanese
born, and both came to America to further their studies of the violin: Yoko Matsuda and Miwako Watanabe. American
OMAR
ELECTRONICSAustralia, July, 1980
-
THE ART OF FUGUE. Johann Sebastian
The Backgammon wizard OMAR
from CALCULATOR SUPERMARKET
435 Bourke St, Melbourne 3000.
104
-
Bach. Arranged by Leonard Isaacs.
Members of the Philomusica of London directed by George Malcolm.
c,..t.iR
World Record Club stereo WRC R
05859/60. Two -record set.
This two -record set is the complete
collection of fugues and canons written
but not completed by Bach shortly
before his death. They were intended by
Bach to fully demonstrate the range and
variety possible within'these two forms.
Leonard Isaacs has put together a
scholarly arrangement of the works
which omits the finishing fugue composed by Sir Donald Francis Tovey.
found the album very satisfying. The
playing of the members of the
Philomusica of London is of a very high
standard which is matched by the recording quality. Recommended (L.D.S.)
I
the electronic
computerized
backgammon
game
MAN AGAINST MACHINE. Are you the worlds greatest backgammon player ... or is Omani You'll have to take him on to find out.
Omar,
the electronic backgammon computer with a mind like a person, is a formidable opponent, because his computer brain remembers every move
and calculates the surest path to victory.
.
HE'S CRAFTY. BUT YOU CAN BEAT HIM. Omar, won't let
you win, but as
you sharpen your skills, you'll find man can outwit machine. Then, just
when you think you've got him outclassed hell beat you again. Omar, the
Backgammon Wizard, will always keep you on your toes, but he won't
win every time. Because even Omar can't beat the random roll of the dice,
and they land in your favour as often as his.
ANYONE CAN BECOME A MASTER BACKGAMMON PLAYER. Omar will
help you hone your game to a fine pitch, no matter how
experienced a
player you are. Champs work with him for hours to stay champs. Novices
play him to become champsi
This is one game you'll play and play and play. Because no
one leaves his
chair, till he's got Omar licked!
IT'S
Martin is cellist for the group.
Numerous recordings of the Ravel
quartet are
or have been
available
but this would appear to be the first to
use the digital mastering process. In fact,
the jacket notes claim that it is the first ever digital recording of any string
quartet.
Combining this with the individual and
collective talents of the Sequoia String
Quartet provides almost a guarantee of
a most enjoyable recording and this is
what it turns out to be. The sound is immediate and intimate, unspoiled by any
hint of noise or distortion. And this, of
course, holds for the shorter Bartok
work, which occupies the latter portion
of side two.
Will you enjoy it? If you know and like
the works, the answer will be a positive
yes. If you don't, Delos do their best to
help with generous notes on the Sequoia
Quartet, on the composers and on the
circumstances surrounding the respective compositions. Another good one
from Delos. (W.N.W.)
ti
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2-1 P
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FOLLOW
ME
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New Mergansers( Story Sones
A
Love Song
p0
Fy.logo ! 0.m., ndn y h,wl., r
When you assemble
New devotional albums
J. THOMAS, You Gave Me Love.
Stereo, Myrrh MSB-6633. (From Word
Records Aust, 18-26 Canterbury Rd,
Heathmont, Vic 3135).
In the jacket notes, well known singer
B. J. Thomas tells how he has embraced
the Christian faith and of its effect on his
life and thinking. The track titles are part
of this theme: Using Things and Loving
People Jesus On My Mind You Gave
Me Love
The Faith Of A Little Child
I'm Gonna See Jesus
Lord I'm Just A
I Need To Be Still
Love Has ArBaby
rived
He's Walking In My Shoes.
While the backing varies from track to
track, B. J. Thomas has plenty of support
available from the Nashville scene
around 26 instrumentalists, eight singers
and a children's group. There are quieter
moments but, by and large, the beat is
rock/up tempo and aimed at those most
likely to know the B. J. Thomas of other
days.
The lyrics are printed in full on the inner sleeve and noticed that all carry a
1979 copyright endorsement. If the style
sounds attractive, you won't have any
problem with the sound; it is very clean.
(W.N.W.)
B.
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
I
*
*
*
FOLLOW ME. A LOVE SONG. John and
Amanda Yivisaker. Two-LP stereo
(Dolby) cassette AVC 111/2. (From
Move Records, Box 266, Carlton Sth,
Vic 3053).
According to the very brief notes on
the folder, these two titles are still
available on separate LP discs, but they
have been married on this long-playing
cassette. Both are scripture -based, with
the lyrics being, for the most part, a
close adaptation of the Bible text.
"Follow Me" is virtually a survey of the
Song Of The
Gospel story: The Birth
John The Baptiser
Stable Boy
Nicodemus Wade In The Water The
Rich Young Ruler ... etc.
On side two "A Love Song", the subjects are a little more diverse: The Old
Moses
She Didn't
And The New
The
Know
The Prophecy
Joseph
Palm Sunday ...
Camel Swallowers
and so on.
One might assume that 12 Bible songs
per side might be a bit much but that
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
does not take into account John and
Amanda Yivisaker's skillful choice of
style (calypso, rock, soft-shoe, etc) and
their accompaniment pattern (six and
12 -string guitar, electric guitar, flute,
organ, piano, celeste, string bass). The
tape could easily qualify for either
deliberate listening or for background.
The technical quality is fine. (W.N.W.)
CORAL
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it may take longer but
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KITS CURRENTLY AVAILABLE ARE
*
MAKE A JOYFUL NOISE. The Fountain
Street Church Choir directed by Mr
Beverly R. Howerton. Allen Computer
Organ played by Donald L. Westfield.
Stereo (no brand), DLW-1015. [From
Allen Organs, 32 Woodhouse Rd,
Doncaster East, Vic 3109. Phone (03)
842 3465].
Recorded in late 1974, this album is still
available and still interesting. It was
issued, apparently, as a local momento
to the opening of the huge Saint Francis
de Sales Catholic Church in Muskegon,
Michigan, USA. Guest musicians for the
occasion included the Fountain Street
(liberal Baptist) Church Choir (Grand
Rapids, Michigan), with choirmaster and
organist. Since Donald Westfield was
also connected with the Allen Organ Co,
he was a logical person to "open" St
Francis de Sales' new Allen electronic
organ. It was also logical for the same
company subsequently to "adopt" the
record for sales promotion.
In the huge auditorium, credited with a
seven second reverberation period, the
organ sounds quite magnificent, with all
the weight and power of a big pipe
instrument.
The choir, too, rises to the occasion
with a varied program: Make A Joyful
Twenty -Third Psalm
Noise (Williams)
(Matthews)
Christmas Day (Hoist)
Lacrymosa, Requiem (Mozart) Jubilate
Grant Me True Courage
Deo (Bales)
Lord; Sinfonia From Cantata 129 (Bach)
Now Sleeps
Winter Comes (Kimmel)
Give Me
The Crimson Petal (Quilter)
Your Tired, Your Poor (Berlin) The Lord
Bless You And Keep You (Lutkin).
The performance makes good listening
in its own right but it carries a bonus if
you are interested in the sound of a big
electronic organ in the kind of situation
normally accorded a large pipe instrument. (W.N.W.)
-
-
-
-
Illustrated 12SA1
30cm (12") 3 -WAY WEAKER
SYSTEM KITS (On pair)
12SA1
Speakers: two 30cm (12") woofers, two
12.5cm (5") cone squawkers, four 63em
Impedance: an
(2-1/2") cone tw
Crossover frequency: 1,000Hz, I0,000Hz
Output sound pressure level: 95dB
Program source Input: 60W
Frequency re
sponse: 30-20,000Hz (55Q Alrtight en.
closure)
(NOTE: Enclosures not included.
Build, or purchase to individual
requirements)
AND WHEN YOU'VE GOT
IT ALL TOGETHER WE
HAVE STEREO CARTRIDGES
TO COMPLEMENT YOUR
HI-FI SYSTEM
CORAL
speaker system
kits
-
-
-
191
Distributed
throughout
Australia by
Hi -Fi Audio Equipment
AMALGAMATED WIRELESS
(AUSTRALASIA) LIMITED
554 Parramatta Road, Ashfield,
NSW 2131 Phone 797 5757
Canberra
80 5915
Melbourne Launceston Hobart
44 5155
72 4366
560 4533
Townsville
79 6155
Brisbane
44 1631
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
105
Adelaide Perth
272 2366 271 0888
RECORDS & TAPES
- continued
"AND VIENNA DANCES" Music by Lehar,
CONNECTORS & ELECTRONIC
COMPONENTS
Superb quality and reliability
from one of the oldest and most
experienced manufacturers in
the U.S.A.
Kalman, Joharín Strauss Jr, and Sieczynski. Carole Farley, soprano; The
Columbia Symphony; conducted by
Andre Kostelanetz. The CBS Stereo
disc SBR 235985 & Cassette RC 985.
To accept this disc as a showcase for
Viennese music would correspond with
equating the Empire State Building and
the Vienna State Opera House
grand
old buildings both, they have very little
else in common. The music as such
could be regarded as reasonably representative: items from "The Merry
Widow", "Countess Maritza", "Guiditta"
and "Fledermaus", plus the "Blue
Danube Waltz", the "Tritsch-Tratsch
Polka", etc. What is not acceptable is the
manner of performance and recording.
To be quite clear on this: the orchestral
playing is absolutely first-class, the
recorded sound likewise -and Miss
Farleys singing is, technically at least, all
one could wish for. But there is no
mistaking the performance as being
100% American; instead of the lilting
rubato that Boskovsky, to name an
outstanding conductor of Viennese
music, can impart to dances and snatches from operettas, we are given the
very latest in strict time and brassy
polish, solidly amplified and over -bright.
know that performances of this type are
tolerated, perhaps even popular, in the
USA, but they should not be regarded as
being "Viennese".
-
I
Digital from
M&K RealTime
TCHAIKOVSKY: The Nutcracker Suite;
Romeo & Juliet Overture
Fantasy.
Zoltan Rozsnyai and the Philharmonia
Hungarica. Stereo, digital master. M&K
RealTime RT-201. [From M. R.
Acoustics, PO Box 165, Annerley, Qld
4103. Phone (07) 48 7598].
-
AUSTRALIAN DISTRIBUTORS
AUDIO TELEX COMMUNICATIONS
PTY. LTD.
SYDNEY
MELBOURNE
Little Street,
Parramatta, 2150
Road,
1
7 Essex
Tel: 633 4344
Mt. Waverley, 3149
Tel: 277 5311
BRISBANE
394 Montague Road,
West End, 4101
Tel: 44 6328
A point of note about this album is that
it signals a move into digital mastering by
M&K RealTime, who have hitherto made
their name with direct cuts. They have
also moved into dbx processed records,
but more of that later. This one is a
straight recording done on a Sony PCM
digital recorder, with disc processing
done by Teldec in Germany.
Expecting top quality, the opening
theme of The Nutcracker set me back
because of the distinctly formant sound
of the brass but there was no hint of it on
the strings. I'm still undecided whether it
had to do with the acoustics or mic
placement, or was simply the effect of
half -muting on the brass, as suggested by
Paul Frolich.
106
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
-
Miss Farley
who is married to conductor Jose Serebrier, recently admired
-
in Sydney
may be visiting Australia
shortly and regret that this is the only
example of her work to come my way
up to now. She is obviously a fine singer,
but the techniques used in producing
this disc do not allow one to arrive at a
measured judgement of her voice or
musicianship. (P.F.)
I
GENTLE NOVEMBER. Kazunori Takeda,
saxophone. Digital mastered stereo,
Frasco FS -730. From M. R. Acoustics,
PO Box 165, Annerley, Qld 4103.
Phone (07) 48 7598, (07) 284 67641
Virtually all the information on this
album, apart from the titles and credits
is printed in Japanese, but we do know
that four players are featured on tenor
sax, piano, drums and bass. The jacket
picture also shows the recording session
in progress, with a multi-mic set up and
acoustic baffles between the players.
Kazunori Takeda has a super -relaxed
style, as if not in the slightest hurry to get
through the 40 minutes on this album.
Just here and there, the group breaks
into a gentle jazz sound, that confirms
their capability as a group.
Just one small credit line in the English
titles indicates that this is from a digitally
(Continued on page 109)
t
t
_
'
ELL
_
,
if
31.ss
r"
:.11
'ill
8
ID
f
14
r'
:
: td1
.
I mention it so that you'll be prepared.
But the fact is that the sound
predominantly is clean and open and
haven't the slightest inclination to debate
digital V direct. There's no noise to compromise the soft passages and no distortion to mar the loud. Mind you, it's difficult to listen to this music without
recalling, once again, the visuals from
Walt Disney's "Fantasia".
The "Romeo and Juliet" music is less
familiar; you'll enjoy that, too. In any
case, there are generous notes on the
jacket covering the composer, the music
and, of course, the conductor and
orchestra.
A good one. (W.N.W.)
I
Enjoy any one of these magnificent album sets for 10 days FREE!
BEETHOVEN
TCHAIKOVSKY
Great Piano Sonatas
played by pianist
Alfred Brendel.
'al I.\
11
This is a quality
Philips edition of
some of the most
popular and moving of
Beethoven's sonatas.
Included are the superb
'Pathetique', the exquisite
'Moonlight', the 'Waldstein', the
beautiful 'Appassionata' and the
mighty and demanding
'Hammerklavier'
a real
I
J,
.-'a
r
'-`-1?
,<
'
II
Each album set contains
STEREO LP's OR
CASSETTES
...
musical feast. Each is played by
Alfred Brendel, one of the finest
concert pianists playing today.
Symphonies 4, 5 and 6
together with the Swan
Lake and Sleeping Beauty
Ballet Suites.
)t;shl
Any one album set can be yours,
ifyou decide to keep it, for just
.9
LISZT
The Complete Hungarian
Rhapsodies plus excerpts
from the remarkable
`Opera Paraphrases'.
Played by pianist
Michele Campanella.
BRAHMS
Symphonies 1,2,3, and
played by the Vienna
Philharmonic Orchestra
under Karl Bohm.
4
(plus SI .6.5 delis ery,
handling and insurance).
Brahms, to a greater extent
than any other composer,
brought classical -romantic
music to its logical
conclusion. The fourth
symphony was responsible
for his last
and greatest
musical triumph in Vienna
in 1897 when it was
performed under Hans
Richter. This, and the three
preceding symphonies, truly
reveal Brahms' might as a
symphonist. Recorded by
Deutsche Grammophon.
The Rhapsodies are a mixture of
gypsy and folk music from the
Balkans, together withLiszt's
original music. As piano works
they reveal his masterly
knowledge of the instrument
and his wonderful feeling for
tonal colour. They are amongst
the most popular works in the
piano repertoire. Recorded by
Philips.
-
As your introduction to Classics Preview Series...
You are invited to preview these brilliant performances, on
four records or cassettes, in any one of four superb album sets.
Listen at home for 10 days free. Then the album set of your choice
can be yours for less than you would pay for a single disc or tape
in a record shop.
To obtain your introductory album set simply fill in and return
the coupon today. Listen to the recordings for 10 days free, then
either keep them for just 57.98 (plus delivery, handling and
insurance) or return them and owe nothing.
You can receive future releases for 10 days Free!
NO OBLIGATION.
The Classics Preview Series brings you a continuing
programme of great classical music in outstanding performances.
Every recording is offered on 10 days free trial. You don't have to
buy a minimum number of recordings and you may cancel any
time you wish.
Here's how it works: About every eight weeks you will receive
a free copy of the Classics Preview Series magazine. Each issue
will feature a Selected Recording, specially chosen for its
it will
outstanding merit. To obtain this recording, do nothing
be sent to you automatically. But if you prefer a different
you simply complete the order
selection
or nothing at all
form supplied and return it by the date shown on it.
will
also
find many alternative selections
you
In each magazine
of both records and cassettes in sets, single recordings at 56.98
each, and bonus recordings for only $4.98 each.
and continue to save
Special bonuses mean you save
For each album set, or any single recording bought for $6.98,
you can choose another recording for just $4.98 (plus a small fee
for delivery, handling and insurance.) All are top-label recordings
worth at least 58.99 retail.
So for fine music, fill in and return the coupon today.
-
-
-
The celebrated Deutsche
Grammophon edition of
Tchaikovsky's three greatest
symphonies played by the
renowned Leningrad
Philharmonic under Yevgeny
Mravinsky. Also included are
the famous recordings of the
Swan Lake and Sleeping
Beauty ballet suites by
Herbert von Karajan and the
Berlin Philharmonic.
-
CLASSICS 1'RFZ9fI<' SERIES
-
NO-MONEY -NOW ORDER FORM
TO: CLASSICS PREVIEW SERIES G.P.O. Box 2057, Sydney, 2001
Please send me the album set I have ticked below for just $7.98 plus 51.65
10 DAYS
1
FREE AUDITION
TM EA 701
need send no money now. You will bill me later.
understand t:tat:
The Classics Preview Series will offer
me a Selected Recording, and alternative
recordings, about every eight weeks.'
Selected Recordings will be described
in magazines sent to me well in advance
of shipping dates. If I want a Selected
Recording I need do nothing and it will
be shipped to me automatically. But if I
or
prefer an alternative selection
I will complete the
nothing at all
order form supplied and return it by the
date shown on it.
The Classics Preview Series current
price for single records and cassettes is
just $6.98. Prices are subject to change at
any time but will always be clearly stated
in the magazine. For every album set I
buy, or any single recording purchased
for $6.98, I may choose another
recording from any single recording
listed in the magazine for just $4.98 plus
a small delivery, handling and insurance
charge.
I may cancel my membership at any
time.
I
-
delivery, handling and insurance.
-
NAME
ADDRESS
POSTCODE
Please enrol me as a member of The
Classics Preview Series, and send me the
introductory album ticked below.
I
prefer records
cassettes
Q
(please tick one)
(please tick one)
E BEETHOVEN 6999083
TCHAIKOVSKY2721085
LISZT8999084
BRAHMS
7740154
SIGNATURE
This coupon must he signed. If you are under
your parent or guardian must sign
This offer does not apply in States where it
18.
X
contravenes the law.
t,
G. P.O. Box 2057. Svdnry, 2001.
11-19 Harrow Street. Eau Sydney. A'.S, Ir, 2010
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
107
RESISTORS
SPEAKER
SYSTEMS
20c
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-
TV TUNER
VALVE TYPE
position slide switch, 50c
Toggle switches, 25c
2 position push button switch, 50c
6 position push button switch, $1
position push button switch, 75c
Transistor ear plugs & leads, 3 for $1
In -line fuse holders, 4 for $1
4 pole 2 position rotary switches, 50c
3
5250
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Inc. two 5 x3 speakers. 5W RMS. $4.75
Car radio suppressors, 3 for $1
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pi
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Top quality, low Impedance microphones, $3.50
6 inch ferrite rods, 75c
Rainbow lead, 5 strand, 20c per metre
Une output transformers, 600 ohm, to 15
ohm, 20 watts; 55
Line output transformers, 1200 to 3/ohm,
5 watt, 51
Power supply units, filtered, 240 to 20
volt, $12
240 to 15 volt transformers, $3.50.
OA 626
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EM 410C
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OA 636
each.
455KC IF Transformers for valve radios, 51
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1
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100 mixed resistors, all useful
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Sets of 3 modules include FM '.uner, decoder and IF detector. Circuit diagram
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device, 4 pole motor, magnetic cartridge,
diamond stylus
$48
Perspex Base, top to suit .
... $22.50
PP NSW $2, Interstate 53,A $4.
HOR Drive 3021 transformers for colour
TV
$2
TV Colour Convergence Units 11270 44 x 6
$3
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108
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FM STEREO
TUNER KITS
Special Amplifier tuner 7 valve stereo
tape in out base treble boost etc
$22
5
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Screw in 6.3V
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ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
10
for $10.50
10
for $1.00
Miniature speaker and drive output
transformers
PHILIPS
S1 pr
TV TUNERS
Special mixed tag strips
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-
Transistor NT3024, NT3030, NT3032, ColP&P $1.
our
24V MOTORS
Reversible
Only $2.50 ea.
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$10 ea.
u
RECORDS & TAPES
- continued
-
admittedly not a vital consideration with its non -demanding
dynamic range. But the sound is certainly
very clean as the group plays: Soul Trane
It's Easy To
Theme For Ernie Aisha
Remember. On side two are four compositions by Kadeka: Once Talked
Gentle
Our Days
Little Dream
November.
"Gentle November" is an apt title.
(W.N.W.)
master
-
-
-
-
I
*
*
-
-
*
THE BEST OF THE BEST OF 101 STRINGS.
Stereo, Alshire (Astor) S-5373. (Also on
cassette).
Despite the double superlative in the title, this new album is best regarded as
just one more in the series by the
popular 101 Strings Orchestra. They
open with the mod sound of "ATaste Of
Soul" but, almost immediately, get back
into character with "I Left My Heart In
San Francisco". The strings are well in
evidence for the remainder of the program: Evergreen
The Way
Stardust
Nancy's
We Were
Lara's Theme
Scarborough Fayre
Song Moon River
Raindrops
Stranger On The Shore
Keep Falling On My Head
Summer of
'42 Theme.
The style is typical middle-of-the-road
101 Strings and the sound quality about
average. (W.N.W.)
-
-
-
-
-
-
*
*
*
EXHIBITION. John Serry. Chrysalis L
36998. Festival release.
This is the debut album for 26 -year -old
American John Serry. Before going solo
he was the keyboardist and spokesperson for the group Auracle, whose 1978
album "Glider" gained international
accolade.
The album style can be summarised
by John Serry: "The jazz of the last 30
years has greatly influenced me, primarily in the area of playing, of improvising
but not especially in my writing. As a
composer, I look into the classics of the
past 400 years."
The seven tracks on the album are:
Acting Up
Nicole
Care To Dance
Exhibition
Just For Kicks
Sabotage
-
-
-
-
-
Mouse March.
He composed all seven tracks, orchestrated and arranged all the material,
played keyboards on all of the cuts,
played percussion on some of them and
also produced the recording.
All in all, a refreshing jazz album. (D.H.)
*
-
-A
-
-
-
FROM THE BEGINNING. FBAB
5327. Astor release.
Local label, Fable, celebrates its first 10
years with this interesting release containing 20 of its popular tracks, including:
Old Man Emu
The Pushbike Song
Let Go
Through The Eyes Of Love
Up There Cazaly
Boom Sha LaLaLo
Knock Knock Who's
Waterloo Road
There
She's My Kind of Woman
Julianna
Curly.
Some of the artists represented include
Johnny Chester, Liv Maessen, The
Hawking Brothers, Matt Flinders and the
late Smacka Fitzgibbon. The quality is
good throughout, making in all an enjoyable showcase of local talent. It gives
you a shock to realise how long ago you
first heard some of these songs! (N.J.M.)
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
only perform as good as your aerial system will allow.
FM AERIALS
-
Brackets, Mast, Screws etc
$12.54
$24.61
$38.90
Many others in stock.
If you have recording bugs our staff have the cure.
Prices subject to alteration without notice.
I
SM81
First of the new
breed of highperformance, studio -quality unidirec-
tional condensers-technically stateof-the-art, exceptionally
rugged and superb
sound.
9
ffo.
SM59
You've seen it on
TV musical shows where sound
quality is a must. Unidirectional,
dynamic with exceptionally flat
response, extremely low handling
noise; mellow, smooth, and accurate
sound.
FABLE,
"BUGS"
-
2EL 300 ohm
3EL 300 ohm
yourself Kit 75 ohm
& equipment...
* *
*
AM or TV). The performance Is largely dependant on the level and
When recording Video or Sound Tapes (FM
quality of the signal being fed into the tuner or video cassette.
You could be plagued with the same bugs (Ghosting -Snow -Poor sound) that you encounter with TV reception.
A good antenna Installation will however rectify these problems and let the tuner or video cassette prove how good
they can be. Regardless of how much you may spend on your video cassette or FM & AM tuner your equipment will
Hills FMI
Hills FM3
Hills Do it
Cable,
.
*
*
NO MORE INTERVIEWS. John Mayall.
DIM Records. L 37163. Festival release.
Mayall, the oldest exponent of the
British blues scene still keeps turning
them out. Ever the perfectionist, Mayall
changes his band line-up although, as in
his previous album, he includes female
back-up vocals. The sound is tight, funky
rhythm and blues; horns complement
normal bass and drums.
The tracks on the album are: Hard Going Up
Bigger Slice Of Pie Falling
Take Me Home;Tonight Sweet Honey
Bee
Consideration
Stars In The Night
Gypsy Lady
Wild New Lover.
A pleasing album which Mayall fans
will doubtless want to snap up. (D.H.)
-
fact:
there's a Shure
microphone
that's right for your
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Channel Master 700 FM 4EL 300 ohm
Matchmaster FMG 300 ohm
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distinctive, crisp
sound.
UNIDYNE' III
The world-famous
UNIDYNE® Ill family
offers top value per
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coloration, background noise, and
feedback
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SM61
Omnidirectional dynamic. Outstanding
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Handsome, smooth
looks with new VERAFLEX® dent -
resistant grille-a favorite on -camera
mic with soundmen and entertainers.
AUDIO ENGINEERS P/L
342 Kent Street.
SYDNEY 2000 N.S.W.
AE
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
I49/TP
109
Books &
Literature
Optics Handbook
ELECTRO -OPTICS HANDS (Electro -Optics
Series, Volume 3). By Glen R. Elion and
camera
Herbert A. Elion. Published by Marcel
Dekker, Inc, 270 Madison Avenue,
New York 10016. 1979. Bound and illustrated, 160 x 235mm, 360 pages.
Price in USA $39.75.
This comprehensive book is the result
of an effort to integrate previously scattered data concerning electro-optics
engineering. In this respect the authors
have achieved their aim. Apart from the
detailed 14 chapters, there are a total of
123 figures and 76 tables.
The first couple of chapters deal with
arrays;
fundamental
definitions,
tubes;
optical formulas,
materials and components; displays and
communication
systems;
specialised electro -optic components
and computer design.
We received our copy direct from the
publishers, but we expect the book to be
available from local technical book
shops in the near future.
Electronic Games
R. A. Penfold.
Published 1980 by Bernard Babani
Publishing Ltd, London. Stiff paper
covers, 91 pages,. 180 x 107mm, illustrated by circuits and diagrams.
Price in Australia $5.25.
As distinct from many recent "theory"
books from Babani, this one is devoted
principally to constructional projects for
the hobbyist.
All told, it contains circuit information
for 19 games of which seven are
classified as "simple". These include
"Heads or tails", "Quiz monitor", "Steady
hand", "Reaction game", and so on.
Among the more complicated games is
a random number selector, a "One Armed Bandit", reaction time, electronic die,
noughts and crosses and a combination
lock game ... plus others, of course.
ELECTRONIC GAMES by
symbols,
designations and conversions, allowing
the reader to understand the remaining
chapters.
The depth of each chapter reveals that
this book is not intended for casual
reading but for use as a source of information that is up to date and comprehensive. A background in Optics and
Physics is necessary to fully understand
the contents and consequently is only
suitable for engineers and physicists who
require the basic data for evaluation,
selection and proper application of
electro -optic devices and materials.
Subjects covered include: sources of
radiation; lasers; detectors; image and
All of. these are self-contained party
games intended for home Construction.
The author is not concerned with the
kind of thing involving a TV set.
Circuits are given and some layouts on
Veroboard, plus an explanation of how
each circuit operates. Other details are
left to the constructor.
In assessing the merit of an array of circuits like this, a certain amount has to be
taken on trust. However, the information
appears to be responsibly presented and
19 fun projects for $5.25 should be sufficient to attract quite a few hobbyists.
Our copy came from Technical Book &
Magazine Co Pty Ltd, 289 Swanston St,
Melbourne 3000. (W.N.W.)
Vertical Antennas
AMATEUR RADIO VERTICAL
ANTENNA HANDBOOK. By Capt P. H.
Lee, USNR, K6TS. "CQ" Technical
series, published 1974 by the Cowan
Publishing Corp, New York. Stiff paper'
covers, 136 pages, 227 x 151 mm, freely illustrated. Price in Australia $7.90.
One tends to expect a book on
amateur band antennas to progress
through the usual basic theory towards a
series of widely accepted designs and
thence on through feed systems and
feedlines. But the title of this one, and
the ranking of its author hints and
something different, and it is.
Capt Paul Lee confesses to having long
been a devotee of vertical antennas and
a convert to the principle that, if you
want good DX, you have to concentrate
all the RF in one major, low-angle lobe.
And the focus is, of course, on HF.
He looks first at optimum antenna
design but progresses to foreshortened
antennas, stacked elements, broadbanding and directional arrays. The earth
and earth mats receive due attention.
This takes him through to chapter 12,
THE
Getting to Grips with Exidy Sorcerer Basic
INTRODUCTION TO SORCERER BASIC,
by John and Judy Deane. Stiff paper
covers, 89 pages plus appendices,
297mm x 212mm, illustrated by
diagrams. Published by Dick Smith
Electronics Pty Ltd. Price $9.95.
The Exidy Sorcerer, distributed in
Australia by Dick Smith Electronics, is a
very good computer for its price.
However, in common with many other
small computers, the documentation
which accompanies it is rather scanty.
To remedy this situation Dick Smith has
published "Introduction to Sorcerer
Basic", a manual designed for the person
who has no previous experience with
computers, and may indeed be a little
over -awed by the mysteries of computer
programming. It must be said that the
authors go out of their way to make the
user feel at home with their computer,
eg, "Look at that! It printed 10 times and
stopped! Wow! That IF/THEN statement
did all the work, and it's a beauty."
110
The book assumes no prior knowledge
of computers, and begins with a chapter
entitled "Can turn it On?" which covers
the interconnection of the components
of the system and basic operation. It
then goes on to discuss each statement
and command provided by Sorcerer
Basic (an 8k version of Microsoft Basic).
Each chapter (there are 28 altogether)
covers two or three Basic statements, explaining clearly what each statement
does and how it is used in a program and
concluding with a summary of the points
covered. Also included are chapters on
program development, debugging, and
cassette operation, a glossary and four
appendices; a summary of Basic, Error
messages, answers to exercises, and
ASCII codes, memory usage and interface connections, etc.
Written in a very readable, friendly
style, the book leads the reader in
gradual steps from the fundamentals of
operation of the Sorcerer to the writing
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
I
of complex programs, providing many
useful examples, and a series of graded
programming exercises.
Also valuable are the three chapters on
using the Sorcerer graphics capabilities,
as this subject was sketchily treated in
thé Exidy manuals.
Altogether the book is well written and
very comprehensive, forming an excellent introduction to the Sorcerer and
to Basic. Experienced users may be put
off slightly at times by the "gee whiz!' approach in places, but if they don't allow
this to deter them they will also find "Introduction to Sorcerer Basic" extremely
useful, as it includes information that
have not seen elsewhere in the literature
on the Sorcerer.
I
Our review copy came direct from
Dick Smith Electronics, and copies
should be available at Dick Smith stores
by the time you read this. (P.V.)
with chapters 13 to 18 inclusive covering
suggested 4 -band designs. Questions
and answers and an index round out a
book that abounds with diagrams, data
and performance curves.
So heave-ho me hearties. Forget the
landlubbers with their pipes and their
plumbing and join the captain in the
rigging)
Our review copy came from McGills
Newsagency, 187 Elizabeth St,
Melbourne 3000. (W.N.W.)
Hifi Systems
CHOOSING AND USING YOUR HIFI by
Maurice L. Jay. Published 1980 by Bernard Babani (Publishing) Ltd, London.
Stiff paper covers, 90 pages, 180 x
108mm, with diagrams. Price in
Australia $4.95.
One avowed intention of this book is
to better equip the reader to select their
own hifi equipment from what is offering. A certain amount of advice is offered
but, overall, one gets the impression that
the author has been content to write in
general terms rather than to really address himself to specifics.
Spot
reading also unearthed
paragraphs that I wasn't happy about.
P14 could be taken to mean that the
relationship of "RMS" power to peak
power is 0.707; it is 0.5. P16 talks about
power bandwidth without mentioning
the vital figure "-3dB". P21 contains an
odd statement about damping factor
and loading. P22 repeats that hoary old
misstatement about the input impedance of the speaker needing to
match the output impedance of the
amplifier. P23 carries the implication that
the volume control has to reconcile the
dissimilar outputs from phono cartridge
and tuner; what happened to the phono
preamplifier?
Frankly,
was not impressed. Our
review copy came from the Technical
Book and Magazine Company Pty Ltd,
289-299 Swanston St, Melbourne 3000.
(W.N.W.)
I
Philips Quarterly
Philips'
quarterly publication "Electronic Components & Applications" is intended for equipment designers,
laboratories, research organisations,
eductional establishments, consultants
and libraries, and is jointly published by
the Electronic Components and
materials Division of Philips Industries,
Eindhoven, the Netherlands, and Mullard
Ltd, London, UK.
"Electronic Components & Applications" derives its content from research,
applications and quality control
laboratories and factories. All aspects of
contemporary electronics will be
covered such as telecommunications,
data processing, industrial control and
automotive, domestic and consumer
electronics. The subscription rate per
volume (four issues) is $14.00 pa.
Just some of the books from the biggest range of
radio and electronics books in Australia.
ff the book you require is not listed below, it can
be ordered from us.
BOOKS
NEW
-
NEW
-
LATEST ADAM OSBORNE
NEW
Latest editions of some of the most popular books
on the
subject:
AARL Handbook 1980 Ed
$14.95
World Radio TV Handbook 1980 Ed
$16.95
Radio Handbook (William Orr) 21st Ed
$27.75
The World In My Ears (A. Cushen)
$15.95
Mechanical World Electrical Year Book 1979/80.
$14.25
From Television to Home Computer
The Future
of Consumer Electronics (Ed. Angus Robertson).
$29.50
Computer Games for Business, Schools and
Homes (Nahigian & Hodges)
$14.75
-
BOOKS:
- Introduction
Microcomputers Microprocessors
Introduction
Microcomputers Support
An Introduction to Microcomputers
The Beginner's Book
An Introduction to Microcomputers
-
Volume 0
$11.50
Volume
1
Basic Concepts
An
to
$13.50
Volume 2
Some Real
An
to
Volume 3
Some Real
Devices
Some Common Basic Programs
Accounts Payable and Accounts receivable
Payroll with Cost Accounting In Basic
6800 Programming for logic Design
8080 Programming for Logic Design
Z80 Programming for Logic Design
Z80 Assembly Language Programming
6800 Assembly Language Programming
8080A/8085 Assembly Language Programming.
$29.00
$19.00
$13.00
$20.80
$18.60
$13.50
$13.50
$13.50
$13.50
$13.50
$13.50
HOWARD SAMS BOOKS:
Audio IC OP -AMP Applications (Walter G. Jung).
Getting Acquainted with the IC (Rufus P. Turner)
FM From Antenna to Audio (Leonard Feldman)..
Stereo High -Fidelity Speaker Systems
(Art Zuckerman)
VHF Radio Propagation (J.D. Stewart)
IC OP -AMP Cookbook (Walter G. Jung)
TTL Cookbook (Lancaster)
IC Converter Cookbook (Jung)
TV Typewriter Cookbook (Lancaster)
The Cheap Video Cookbook (Lancaster)
CMOS Cookbook (Lancaster) 1st Ed. 1977
Active Filter Cookbook (Lancaster)
IC Timer Cookbook (Jung)
$10.75
$6.75
$7.00
$8.50
$6.75
$17.50
$12.95
$18.95
$13.50
$7.95
$14.25
$19.95
$13.50
-
OP AMP
$6.00
$4.99
Z-80 Microprocessor Programming & Interfacing
(Book 1) (Nichols, Nichols & Rony)
7-80 Microprocessor Programming & Interfacing
(Book 2) (Nichols, Nichols & Rosy)
The S-100 Bus Handbook (Dave Bursky)
Z-80 and 8080 Assembly Language Programming
(Kathe Sprackten)
The Z-80 Microcomputer Handbook (William
Barden, Jr)
Microprocessor Interlacing Techniques (Lesea &
Zaks) (Sybex)
Understanding Microcomputers and Small
Computer Systems (Scelbi)
$7.20
$8.80
$6.20
$7.20
$8.80
$7.20
$7.20
$7.20
$12.80
$4.00
$8.00
$6.20
Circuit Design & Applications (Joseph
Carr)
CMOS Databook (National Semiconductor)
.
Cook Book
Reduced to.
The Radio Amateur's VHF Manual
Understanding Amateur Radio
The Radio Amateur's License Manual
A Course In Radio Fundamentals
FM & Repeater for the Radio Amateur
Single Sideband for the Radio Amateur
Ham Radio Operating Guide
Electronic Data book
Solid State Design for the Radio Amateur
Learning to work with Integrated Circuits
The A.R.R.L. Antenna Anthology
Weekend Projects for the Radio Amateur
OTHER TITLES:
MICROCOMPUTERS/
MICROPROCESSORS BOOKS:
Stimulating Simulations
2nd Edition (C. W.
Engel)
Scelbi "8080" Software Gourmet Guide and
AMERICAN RADIO RELAY
LEAGUE PUBLICATIONS:
$14.75
$17.50
$16.50
$10.00
$11.95
$18.40
$15.40
Basic Primer (Waite & Pardee)
$11.95
Programming the 6502 (Zaks) (Sybex)
$17.00
Programming the Z80 (Zaks) (Sybex)
$18.40
6502 Applications Book (Zaks) (Sybex)
$17.80
More Basic Computer Games (Ed. David H. Ahl). $11.75
Basic Computer Games (Ed. David H. AN)
$11.75
$9.90
$8.70
Linear Databook (National Semiconductor)
$11.25
How to Program Your Programmable Calculator
(Stephen L. Snover & Mark A. Spikell)
$10.75
Practical Antennas for the Radio Amateur
$15.40
Practical Solid-state Circuit Design (Jerome E.
Eleksy)
$8.75.
73 Dipole and Long-wire Antennas
(Edward M.
Noll)
$7.50
73 Vertical, beam and Triangle Antennas
(Noll).. $7.50
VHF Handbook for Radio Amateurs (Herbert
S.
Brier & William I. Orr)
$9.40
Building Hi -Fi Speaker Systems (Philips)
$3.95
Beam Antenna Handbook
New 5th Edition
(William I. Orr & Stuart D. Cowan)
$7.80
All About Cubical Quad Antennas
2nd Edition
(William I. Orr)
$7.00
The Radio Amateur Antenna Handbook (William I.
Orr & Stuart D. Cowan)
$11.30
The Basic Book of Ham radio (Editors of
Consumer Guide and A.R.R.L.)
$6.70
The New Penguin Dictionary of Electronics (E. C.
Young)
$5.95
SCR Manual
Including Triacs and other
Thyristors 6th Edition (General Electric)
$6.00
-
-
-
For Mail Orders please add: $1.20 Local; $1.75 Interstate
McGILL'S AUTHORISED NEWSAGENCY PTY. LTD.
187 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne.
Phone: 60-1475-6-7
PRICES SUBJECT TO ALTERATION
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
111
Microcomputer
News& Products
!_,_101
-
Sigma Data set for office revolution
word processors, computers, disc filing systems
collars, high stools and quill .pens that once
characterised the business office have given way gradually to
casual clothes, swivel chairs, electric typewriters and the
copiers that are now part of the everyday scene. But, if Sigma
Data have their way, the next few years will see a further major
revolution in corporate administration: the integrated electronic
office or IEO.
The stiff
by NEVILLE WILLIAMS
The Sigma scenario envisages a much
higher level of automation, with a given
number of people coping with a much
greater volume -of meaningful work.
Machines will take over and streamline many of the time-wasting activities
which
characterise present-day
methods.
The elements for Sigma's electroUtopian revolution already exist in the
inventories of various companies
world processors, computers, magnetic
disc filing systems, electronic message
switching facilities and so on. Sigma is
saying that to equip an office with individual bits of such hardware is doing
only half a job. The hardware should be
planned and blended into one harmonious system, so that each unit complements the other in terms of work
flow; hence their key word "integrated".
Needless to say, the hardware for the
IEO revolution would be as supplied or
endorsed by Sigma!
The Sigma concept was presented to
the Australian technical business press
during May, at a function in the Sydney
Opera House complex. While hosted by
-
Club News:
MELBOURNE MICROCOMPUTER
CLUB
Micom, the Microcomputer Club of
Melbourne, is made up of a number
of user groups, each concentrating on
a particular computer system, with
each group chairman a member of
the Executive Committee.
The club publishes a newsletter
containing information on hardware
and software, plus reviews of new
products and books on microcomputing, and meets on the third
112
Data Chairman and Managing
Director Michael Faktor, the concept
was introduced and explained, for the
most part, by Daniel A. Hosage, Senior
Vice President and General Manager of
Sigma Data's principals: Datapoint Cor-
Sigma
poration, USA.
Daniel Hosage is no stranger to the office computer scene. He spend 15 years
with IBM, ending up as Product Manager
for a major part of the system 360 line.
He then joined Recognition Equipment
Inc, of Dallas, as Vice President of product programs. In 1971 he was a cofounder of Action Communications
Systems, which did pioneering work on
the area of computerised telephone control and accounting systems. He has
been with Datapoint Corporation since
1975 and is now General Manager of its
Office Systems Division and directly
responsible for its Integrated Electronic
Office planning.
In December last, Daniel Hosage had
introduced the Integrated Electronics Office concept to a generally favourable
press ín the USA. The plans in hand for
Australia are necessarily more tentative,
Saturday of each month at 2pm at the
AMRA Hall, Willis St Glen Iris,
Melbourne. They can be contacted
by mail at PO Box 60, Canterbury
3126.
BRISBANE MICROCOMPUTER
GROUP
The Brisbane IREE Microcomputer
Interest Group meets on the second
Friday of each month at the Old
Brisbane Town Hall, on the corner of
Vulture and Graham Streets, South
Brisbane. The doors open at 7pm and
méetings commence at 7.30pm.
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
partly because of the smaller market and
partly because some of the communications aspects in this country (as in the UK)
have to be reconciled with the virtual
communications monopoly exercised by
the respective governments.
Even so, as Datapoint's distributors in
Australia, Sigma are in a sound position
to cope, with eight branches and 270
employees. As Managing Director
Michael Faktor pointed out, Sigma's own
could provide a living
laboratory for the IEO system. For example, with an annual telephone bill edging
towards $500,000, savings through rationalisation of that outlay alone could
be considerable.
In fact, the whole thrust of IEO, he
claimed, was that expenditure on new
system hardware could be recouped by
savings in a relatively short time. Obvious target for initial approaches would
be Sigma Data's existing 800 -odd
customers in Australia.
At the heart of the IEO system is a
resource that was originally developed
to interconnect small Datapoint computers within any one organisation, to increase their total power. Out of this
what Datapoint now
in 1977
came
call their ARC or "Attached Resource
Computer" system architecture. They explain ARC this way, in typical industry
jargon:
"Datapoint's ARC system utilises an interprocessor bus which connects applications and file processors which are
dispersed throughout a company.
"The interprocessor bus permits access
to the common database and acts as a
pathway for the movement of all information contained within the system.
"This architecture places computer
power within the reach of all those
needing it within the corporation."
The step from the ARC system to an integrated electronic office involves the
planning and merging with ARC of other
modern office facilities, such as word
processors and phone message handling
"at small incremental cost".
The word processors, for example,
operate "on line", thereby greatly increasing their potential. They can, if
need be, serve as self-contained "state of
the-art" intelligent typewriters but they
can also access and incorporate informa -
operation
-
-
V
`'\°
v
utt'
1
INDEPENDANT
IMPORTER/
MANUFACTURER.
OHIO SCIENTIFIC COMPUTERS
b
HARDWARE
1. MEMORY EXPANSION BOARD, 8K. The double
sided, printed through board has 8K of wired
sockets with driver and butter I.C.'s 8 R.F. filters.
Add 2114's as you require RAM
KIT $120
Fully assembled and tested, extra $15.
FREE 40 wire lead included (Value $19.95).
2. 4K RAM Memory Expansion Chips, 2114,
ii
r.Y-y-(^Y
('Y'">í
450nS
3. R.F.
$52
Modulator, 5 to 9 Volt, all channels
$19.95
4. SUPERBOARD II Cover/VDU Stand
$18.95
1
a
r
5. SUPERBOARD II COMPUTER 8K ROM, 4K RAM
auelool"
ttr
$389
6. CHALLENGER C1P COMPUTER 8K ROM, 4K
RAM
$489
7. CHALLENGER C4P COMPUTER, Sound/Colour
Mr Daniel A. Hosage, Senior Vice President and General Manager, Datapoint Corporation, USA. In the background is the Datapoint 1500 word processing system.
tion from a common data base.
To quote Harold O'Kelley, President
and Chief Executive Officer of Datapoint:
"Using any of these processors,
employees can create, edit, modify, format, reformat and comprehensively
manipulate documents such as correspondence, technical manuals, price
schedules, internal memos and any
other text required within the business
environment.
"Datapoint's word processing system
also features simplified editing, easy-tolearn -and-easy -use commands, flexible
format elements such as page justification, line spacing and tab settings and
the ability to "scroll" or review stored
text on a processor's screen for the most
convenient editing and correction.
"Datapoint is offering a high quality
45cps printer with word processing and
electronic message systems which provides the finest typewriter -like print for
routine word processing tasks."
As a further function, the information
collated on screen can be transmitted in
message form directly to one or more
other word processors throughout the
organisation. Receipt of such messages
can be instantly acknowledged. Used
properly, this facility can eliminate a
large proportion of the physical memo
traffic between departments, ensuring
delivery within minutes rather than the
more usual "next day" situation.
Extending the acronymns, the system
Associated Index
also offers AIM
Memory. Documents passing through
the system can be stored in a permanent
memory bank and later accessed by
nominating key words or phrases, dates,
or the sender or addressee. Given such
clues, the system will search through and
nominate document(s) which satisfy the
-
$946.20
SOFTWARE
We regret, PRICE RISE, due to shipping costs. All
previous (54) advertised Cassette Software, up to
$2.00. Instructions (14 sets), are still the same
price. 01 is now replaced by an updated, and enlarg-
criteria and allow the operator at the
viewing screen to "thumb through" them
to locate the exact reference required.
The handling of all such traffic and
messages is the responsibility of Data point's "Electronic Message System",
which has the ability to sort the traffic
and to respond to encoded instructions
indicating priorities: immediate, urgent,
regular and overnight. Provision can be
made for security by automatic encryption
or scrambling.
In the area of voice communication,
Sigma are offering automatic call
distribution (ACD) equipment which integrates with the phone system and
allows its operation to be monitored to
any desired level.
Questioned about privacy problems
and possible staff attitudes, a Sigma
spokesman said that ACD equipment
would not typically be adjusted to
record each individual call; it might,
however, be set to indicate phone
usage on a departmental basis and, by
dropping the last couple of digits, provide an indication of the STD zone, duration and cost of such calls. Given this information, planning and rationalisation
would be possible, leading to significant
ed Cl at $2.95.
NEW PROGRAMMES
U.17 Trace
V.18 Packer -(K saver)
U.19 Cursor -C2/4
-
15 Sound-SII/C1P
16 G.T. Conversion. X2
17 Saving Data on Tape
$6.95
$2.95
$6.95
$6.95
$5.95
$6.95
18 C1P Tape Control
19 C1P Beeper
20 C1P/ Base 2 Printer
Morse Code Converter
21
and tape
.22 32X64 Character 100%
Hardware
$16.95
$13.95
BUSINESS:
8.4 Savings 8 Loan Package
$14.95
GAMES:
$11.95
G.26 orbital Lander
G.27 Escape from Mars,
2 tapes
G.28 Death Ship, 2 tapes
G.29 Startrek
G.30 Air
Sea battle
$18.95
$18.95
$7.95
$7.95
-
BOOKS/MAGAZINES/
CATALOGUE
1.1 The First Book of OSI
$19.95
T.2 Aardvark Journal
(6 issues)
T.3 Basic Handbook,
$12.95
$15.95
David Lien
T.4 Personal Computing,
Monthly
$2.20
Postage: (Software)
1
or
$1.00
$1.50
$2.00
$2.50
3-5
6-9
-
property boundaries of a company or
instituation.
But, for the time being, Sigma will probably be content to leave that problem
in the "too hard" basket!
$12.95
$14.95
$13.95
NSTRUCTIONS
-
savings.
As a further potential saving Datapoint
(and Sigma) are in a position to offer an
infra -red system
which can
Lightlink
carry voice and data over optical
distances. While Datapoint in the USA
can say "requires no federal registration
or licensing", the same would not apply
in Australia for paths outside the private
for OHIO -SOFTWARE:
UTILmES:
10
or more
All prices are subject to change without notice.
All prices INCLUDE Sales Tax.
MAIL ORDER: Cheque or Bankcard
Looky Video, P.O. Box 347, Richmond
3121, Victoria.
Shop: 418 Bridge Rd,
Richmond,
'Ph. (03) 429 5674.
J
14lss 30
D 0,0
y1-1
ti'
IVY/.1.0
o'?"'
NM
Wig.
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
A
113
if TRS-80's
were meant to have disks
they'd be built in
soon found out that cassettes were slow and not very
heard
Then
needed disks.
So
thought
reliable.
AND
of
disks
The
reliability
FLOPPY.
about STRINGY
digital
A
miniature
cassette.
14 times faster than
under the control of the
transport completely
tape
"wafer" the size of a
on
a
tape
computer, recording
My TRS-80 performs
much
thicker).
credit card (and not
fraction
at.a
the cost of disks.
real computer
a
like
I
I
I
I
other
ASP's brochure explains it all, and versions for
computers are on the way.
NOTE:
-
TRS-80
is
a
trademark of Tandy
Telephone.
IJA
2118855 2118344
797 DANDENONG ROAD,
i111CR000iT1PUTERS
EAST MALVERN 3145,
VICTORIA AUSTRALIA.
LOVE AT FIRST BYTE
The ONE and ONLY:
COMMODORE PETTM
At a price that won't bleed you dry.
ONLY $999
Including SPACE INVADERS and
many more programs
FREE.
This batty price has been extended till July 31st, 1980.
-
*
-
You can search from Hobart to Transalvanla and won't find better
value for money.
+A
-
The Computer Company you can count on for:
** Hardware Support.
** Software Support.
** Programming Development/Advice.
A full range of software
Games, Educational, Business, Etc.
Consumables
Disks, Cassettes, Paper, Printer Ribbons, Etc.
Come and see our Commodore Range and start your Love Affair
B.S. MICROCOMP
-
-
-
We won't Byte.
B.S. MICROCOMP
4th
Floor, 561 Bourke Street,
MELBOURNE, 3000.
Tel. 614-1433/614-1551
welcome here
114
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
The COMMODORE COMPUTER CENTRE
Microcomputer
News & Products
Datapoint 10 megabyte
cartridge disc drive
Sigma Data Corporation has announced a Datapoint 10 Megabyte removable
disk cartridge system, which will be
ready for delivery later this year. The
new 9320 disk drive is designed to provide extended storage capability for
Datapoint entry-level users with 1500 or
1800 Dispersed Processors. It consists of
a disk drive, controller, and a four terminal serial interface, packaged in a
desk -top unit.
At the same time, Sigma Data Corporation released details of its new direct
data communications link with the central computer system at Datapoint, San
Antonio, Texas. The Datapoint in-house
ARC (Attached Resource Computer)
system consists of more than 200 Datapoint processors and the direct com-
munications
link
will
significantly
enhance Sigma Data's software support
capability, enabling its system engineers
to receive quick solutions to system software problems.
Sigma Data Corporation is at 157
Walker St, North Sydney, 2060.
Compucolor users group
Users of the Compucolor II have formed a users group in Sydney and
Melbourne. Meetings are held on the
first Tuesday of the month, at 6pm at
The Logic Shop, 91 Regent St, Chippendale, and at 7.30pm at The Logic Shop,
212 High St, Windsor, Vic. For further
details, contact The Logic Shop Sydney
on 699 4919 or Melbourne 51 1950.
New Teleray terminal
from ADE
Anderson Digital Equipment has just
released the latest Teleray Terminal, the
Model 12T. The Model 12T is an
"intelligent" terminal, with a 48 line
(3840 character) display memory and a
24 line rolling display window. In addition there is a 7500 character function
memory which can be shared by up to
32 programmable function keys. Text,
forms, and control sequences can be
stored in this memory and accessed by a
single key.
+.
Model 12 can be purchased with a
removable keyboard (Model 12M) or in a
rack mounted model (Model 12R). The
unit price is expected to be approximately $1995, and delivery is currently 90
days from order, although ADE expect to
have a stock of the terminals by August.
For further information contact Anderson Digital Equipment, PO Box 322, Mt
Waverley, Vic 3149, or PO Box 294,
All standard editing features are
available, and can be programmed in
any combination. There is also a "secure"
function should the user need to enter
unseen data such as a password. Switchable baud rates from 50 to 9600bps
and full duplex operation are standard.
The Model 12T derives its name from
the "T" shape of the attached keyboard.
Like all other Teleray terminals, the
Ryde, NSW, 2112.
Sydney Home Computer Show
The Home Computer Show was held in
Sydney on May 22-25, and from all accounts it was a great success, with many
firm orders being received by exhibitors
success
a
represented, with both the PET and the
CBM business sytem on display. The exhibit by The Logic Shop featured the
Compucolour II, along with the Sendata
acoustic modem, one of the few approved for use in this country.
A big display by Tandy demonstrated
the TRS-80 in various versions, and close
by was the Micro -80 stand, offering their
magazine and a selection of software for
the TRS-80, along with the Exatron
Stringy Flopply, a high speed data
recorder which is not yet widely known
in Australia, although very popular in the
United States. Dick Smith Electronics
in addition to the thousands of enquiries.
Ten thousand visitors to the show saw
exhibits by 28 organisations, and the
overall impression was that home computers are no longer a novelty but a
mature concern capable of arousing a
great deal of interest and offering considerable commercial prospects.
From the many displays it is hard to
single out those most worthy of attention. Of course the Apple II was there,
playing Invaders and Space Wars, and
coupled to a video camera and colour
printer to produce computerised por-
MICRONEWS
CONTINUED
traits. Commodore was well
modular micro nocessoI
sP
-/
y1eu
from 6800/6809 Based
*
6800/6809
Disk or
Cassette based systems
*
Expansion cards for EXORcisers * D2 kits, AIM -65, SYM-1 or other
EXORciser compatible microcomputers.
*
Memory IC's.IRAMs, CMOS RAMs, PROMs
,
Pennywise Peripherals
Pennywise Peripherals'
Send
50c
in stamps for latest
SF
EXORciser
is
°
registered Trade Mark of Motorola Inc.
Suemar Street,
Mulgrave, Victoria,
AUSTRALIA, 3170. Phone (03) 546 0308.
catalog & price
list.
Sydney dealer (02) 893145
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
115
IT HAD
TO
AND
327
& FULLY
H UGE
PRICE':
-
8REAI(THROUGH!
oICK SMITHS
RATIO
THIRD
GpTFR
THE caM
SO ALL TANDY PROGRAMS ARE
FULLY USABLE
YOU TO MAKE USE OF THE
LARGEST RANGE OF COMPUTER
SOFTWARE IN THE WORLD!
' $5 95;
(WITH LEVEL
so -
COMPUTER
0F THE flF
COMPLETE
WITH TANDY COMPATIBLE
LEVEL II BASIC
IT ALLOWS
M
ONL
II
BA51G
SYSTEM
I
ff MORE!
ND
MORE.
THE SYSTEM SO EXPANSION UNIT IS
S-100 SUS COMPATIBLE NOW
TANDY SOFTWARE WITH AN S-100
BUS AT A HUGE SAVING.
-
-
WHEN WILL
IT END?
* AND EVEN MORE,
VIDEO MONITOR NOT
NECESSARY!
THIS UNITSIMPLY PLUGS INTO
YOUR STANDARD TV SET (SAVE UP
TO
AN ADDITIONAL $250!)
Yes, we agree, the Tandy TRS-80 HAS BEEN the best
selling microcomputer in the world. The original
TRS-80 design is now over 2 years old, and in the
microcomputer industry 2 years is a long time.
THE DICK SMITH SYSTEM 80 is fresh from the design
OF THE ART" techniques.
and features latest "STATE
llli(
1e
/ !MILT
114NlIlN1uNÍllfull
a
o
CPI
1'1
l
I°I
1
l
1
AND PROVISION
FOR AN
:ADDITIONAL UNIT.
(TANDY ONLY
ALLOWS THE USE
OF ONE!)
'
17
l
PLUMMETED
PRICE
features have been added.
and
In our opinion, the greatest
disadvantage of the TRS-80 is the
fact that it it not S-100 Bus
compatible, meaning that the
fantastic range of S-100 products
(speech synthesizers, disk
controllers etc.) are not readily
usable. This problem has now been
solved with the
.
_.
Over 500 sold'
in 10 days:
SPECS
Z-80 microprocessor
*BASIC
two cassette players
* Takes
one is built in!
Australia's
fastest selling
microcomputer
(12k); Inbuilt recorder;
Demonstration tape;
Inbuilt TV modulator;
4k RAM:
as
¡,,;-.....
* Expansion with S-100 system
described
RAM:
16kAs
s
695
162
30
613
263
SYDNEY.
CHULLORA.
Pacific Highway. GORE HILL
PARRAMATTA
Grose Street,
Princes Highway, BLANEHURST
Noire Street.
WOLLONGONG.
MAIL ORDER CENTRE:
PO Boo
Ph 290 3377
Ph 642 8922
439 5311
683 1133
Ph 546 7144
Ph 28 3800
Ph
Ph
When. comparing Tandy TRS-80
with level II BASIC, 16k RAM and
cassette recorder ($1019.50) with
System 80 16k ($695.00),
YOU .SAVE 32%
Cat. X-4005
Cat. X-4003
DICK SMITH ELECTRONICS
vic
York Street,
NSW 125
147 Hume Highway,
16
x
SYSTEM 80
$
direct to TV set
* (videooutput
well!)
output
Tandy compatible BASIC
** 12klines
of 64 characters.or 32
characters
128 48 graphics matrix
** Dick Smith backup
RF
DICK SMITH
SYSTEM 80
800
SYSTEM
With Level II BASIC
-
'
I
lrl l°.l l
1ll1l1¡1'1I1
l
.64°I'
.1r:311.17'
1,
CASSETTE
...DECK
DECK
sYs71mBO«.ra.~d1.-..
I
laboratory
399 Lonsdele Street.
656 Bridge Road.
166 Logan Road,
QLD642 Gympie Road.
96 Gladstone Street.
60 Wright Street.
414 William Speer
ACT
SA
WA
MELBOURNE.
Ph 67 9834
RICHMOND.
Ph 428 1614
BURANDA.
Ph 391
CHERMSIDE.
FYSHWICK.
6233
Ph 59 6255
Ph 80 4944
ADELAIDE.
Ph
PERTH.
212 1962
Ph 328 6944
321. NORTH RYDE NSW 2113. Ph 888 3200. PACK 8 POST EXTRA.
l bonlicord
welcome here
SHOPS OPEN 9AM to 5.30PM
(Saturday: 9am till 12 noon)
BRISBANE: Half hour earlier.
-ANY TERMS OFFERED ARE TO
APPROVED APPLICANTS ONLY
l7
DICK SMITH
PRODUCTS IN MOST AREAS OF AUSTRALIA.
RE -SELLERS OF
"Where you reap the benefit!"
D5E774
CJ9.D. Model 1000
Intelligent Optical
Mark Sense
Card Reader
%a.
J
t
csd <....
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* DESIGNED FOR EDUCATIONAL USE
y
* CONNECTS DIRECTLY TO APPLE SERIAL INTERFACE
* APPLE BASIC CARDS GIVE EASE OF PROGRAMMING
* NO SOFTWARE REQUIRED
UTILIZES BUILT-IN MICROPROCESSOR & FIRMWARE
* RESIDENT SOFTWARE FOR APPLESOFT COMMANDS, MULTI -CHOICE QUESTIONS &
`
-
"RAW DATA"
* CAN BE LOCATED AWAY FROM APPLE FOR REMOTE JOB ENTRY
* DIRECT CONNECTION TO PRINTER OR OTHER OUTPUT DEVICE
* EXECUTIVE SOFTWARE ON DISK GIVES HARD COPY LISTING & RUN OF PROGRAM
ENTERED
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ATTACHMENT
AUSTRALIAN DISTRIBUTORS FOR CED MODEL 100
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in meubouinc
Grd. Floor, 555 Collins Street, MELBOURNE. VIC. 3000.
Phone (03) 62 6737 (03) 62 5581 Telex AA37007.
118
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
Microcomputer
Nees & Products
displayed the Sorcerer computer and the
long-awaited System 80, which comes
complete with Tandy compatible Level II
Basic and 4K of RAM for around $600,
including a built-in cassette recorder.
Cromenco systems were also exhibited, and the complete range of
TCG/Ohio Scientific systems were on
display. For the newcomer to the field
J.R. Components showed off the DREAM
6800, and on another level altogether
Electron Computer was there with their
wide range of Data General microNova
16 bit machines. Specialised uses of
microprocessors such as the "Sargon 2.5"
chess module and the Compucruise car
computer also attracted many visitors.
Acoustic Electronic Developments, Pty
Ltd a small Sydney -based computer company, presented a good display of S-100
boards from George Morrow, Solid State
Music, Godbout and others. They aim to
combine their own products with im-
ported
equipment,
offering
their
customers the best of both worlds.
Suppliers of software were also very
evident, with everything from games to
complete business packages available
for all the popular small computers on
display. The Technical Bookshop
MICRO -80
MONTHLY MAGAZINE
for
TRS-80
users
Each issue has:
At least 6 Programs
-- Programming
-
Tips
Hardware Articles.
ORDER NOW
TO:
MICRO -80: PO Box 213, Goodwood,
SA 5034
PLEASE SEND ME:
SUBSCRIPTION FOR
$24.00 STARTING FROM
(Dec. 79's issue 1)
CURRENT ISSUE FOR $2.50
12 -MONTH
(MAKE CHEQUE PAYABLE TO MICRO -80)
Name:
Address:
Post Code:
presented an extensive range of
computer -related literature, covering
home computers, business applications,
and student needs. Altogether, there
was something for everyone at the
show.
The Home Computer Show will be
coming to Melbourne, at the Kew Civic
Centre from September 11 -14th and indications are that it will be even bigger
than the Sydney show. Certainly it's an
event not to be missed.
Two heads are
better than one
For printing, two heads may well be
better than one, especially when the
heads are daisy print wheels operating in
parallel, as in the new Qume Twin Track
printer from Anderson Digital Equipment
Pty Ltd. The Twin Track printer has been
specially designed to solve complicated
printing problems by providing two
daisy wheel print heads which operate
independantly, doubling the character
set available for a given task.
The Twin Track allows a new convenience in printing applications which require special characters, symbols, or
alphabets. One print head can type text,
while the other prints the required symbols in the proper place. Any combination of type fonts can be used on-line, to.
a total of 192. It is.possible, for example,
to build a word processing system that
prints text in Swahili while simultaneous-
University of NSW
radio courses
The University of NSW is offering
several courses over Radio University
and Television University in late July
which will be of interest to anyone working with microcomputers or microprocessors.
An introductory course in Basic will
cover programming, flowcharting techniques, and error diagnosis and debugging. Students in the course will be shown
how Basic is run in timesharing and batch
modes on university terminals and will
have a chance to use the terminals
themselves. The five radio lectures will
be broadcast over Radio University's station VL2UV at 7pm Mondays and
repeated at 8pm Fridays, and two
televised lectures will be transmitted on
Tuesday evenings to Television University's four viewing centres in the
metropolitan area.
Two new courses on microprocessors
will also be broadcast by Radio University. The first course, Microprocessor Fundamentals (10 lectures), will assume only
general experience in the area. The second course, of 20 lectures, entitled An
Introduction to Microprocessor Systems,
covers the same ground as the first
course, and proceeds to more advanced
nra
ly typing out an English translation
- side
by side.
Alternatively both print heads can use
the same character set, and printing
speed can be doubled. Letter quality
copy can be made at rates up to 75
characters a second, in parallel columns
or as solid text. Like other Qume
printers, Twin Track print heads operate
bidirectionally, printing left to right, then
right to left.
Current availability of the Twin Track is
90 days from the date of order. Anderson Digital Equipment may be contacted
at PO Box 322, Mt Waverley, 3149, or
PO Box 294, Ryde, NSW 2112.
programming techniques, software, and
peripherals.
Radio University's station VL2UV
broadcasts on 1750kHz, just off the
broadcast band, and can be received in
the Sydney area by á simply -modified
radio. Small transistor radios already
modified can be purchased from Radio
University at a cost of $7.
Further details of the courses can be
obtained from the Division
of
Postgraduate Extension Studies, 16th
Floor, Mathews Building, University of
NSW. Telephone 662 2691.
single -board
computer has BASIC
Z8
A single -board computer based on the
Z8 and featuring a Z8 Basic/Debug interpreter has been introduced by Zilog Inc.
The board is designed for a wide variety
of fast data processing and data acquisition applications, and although only
100m by 158mm, it can accommodate
up to 8K of RAM, ROM, or EPROM in any
combination.
Included on
the
board
are
MICRONEWS
CONTINUED
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
two
law
119
Microcomputer
LNews& Products
counter/timers, five eight -bit parallel I/O
ports, a programmable asynchronous
serial interface, 124 general purpose
registers, and three levels of interrupts.
The board's Basic/Debug interpreter,
specially designed by Zilog, is masked
onto the 2K internal ROM of the Z8, and
is a subset of the original Dartmouth
Basic, simplified and modified to meet
Stud programs for
livestock breeders
A set of computer programs designed
for livestock breeders has recently been
released by Computerland of
Melbourne.
The set of programs, called "Stud
Book", can replace or add to a system of
written records. The programs are written in Basic for use on the Apple II personal computer.
Uses of the "Stud Book" programs are
varied. They can be used, for example,
to:
print family trees;
list all the offspring of any animal;
list animals
with
characteristic;
list animals with
a
a
particular
certain range;
the needs of board level applications.
The Z8-SBC is the first of a family of
compatible microcomputer boards planned by Zilog. Other boards will provide
a floppy disk controller, a terminal interface, expanded memory, and digital and
analog input and output functions. A
96 -pin and socket connection system
will allow each board to interface with a
bus structure specially developed by
Zilog for the board family.
For further information contact -ZAP
Systems Pty Ltd, 51-53 Chandos St, St
Leonards, NSW 2065, who are Zilog
distributors in Australia.
NS VAX -1117
compatible memory
A new high-speed, high -density
memory board that packs 512K bytes on
a single card has been introduced by National Semiconductor Corporation.
Designated the N5780, the memory
board is compatible with DEC's
VAX -11/780 32 -bit minicomputer, and is
direct replacement for DEC's M8210
memory. For further information, write
to NS Electronics, PO Box 89, Bayswater,
Vic 3153.
a
select animals with a combination of
characteristics;
list all information for any animal; and
list animals bought or sold.
The programs can be used for studs of
up to 100 animals, and are available in
two versions. The first version is for
animals identified by tag numbers, eg
sheep, cattle and goats; the second is for
animals identified by names, eg horses,
dogs, cats etc.
"Stud Book" programs are available for
demonstration at all Computerland of
Melbourne stores, and require an Apple
II personal computer with 48K bytes of
memory, a video monitor, and a disk
drive.
Further information is available from
Computerland of Melbourne, 555 Collins St, Melbourne, Vic 3000.
Revised prices
Since authorising the advertisement on p104 of our June issue,
South West Technical Product
Corporation advise that two of
the prices quoted have had to be
revised upwards, as follows:
69/K Computer Kit
$660
69/A
Assembled Computer
Assembled
69/56
$760
Computer
$1660
These prices do not include sales
tax. Enquiries to SWTPC, 7a Burton St, Darlinghurst, NSW 2010.
MICRONEWS
CONTINUED
VIDEO DATA TERMINALS
The EME -30A and EME -30B are low cost, interactive stand-alone video data terminals. THEY ARE PART OF A SERIES OF E & M
Electronics video data computer terminals. The EME-30 series is microprocessor based allowing program and hence functional
operating characteristics to be changed or added to as requirements dictate. All the EME series of terminals require the addition of a
standard video monitor, the output providing a composite video signal suitable for driving monitors directly.
As well as providing all the necessary functions of a teleprinter terminal, extensive editing facilities are included so that data
may be composed off line and transmiied.to the computer when line is established.
GENERAL SPECIFICA TIONS
The EME-30A/B operates on 240V, 50Hz. Communications is performed in a serial asynchronous mode using the
EIA RS232C interface. Data transmission rate, parity selection, stop bit, and full and half duplex transmission modes are user
selectable. At switch -on, default values are preset automatically. Optional values may be factory installed.
PHYSICAL SPECIFICATIONS
Screen Format
Screen capacity
Number of lines
Characters per line
Displayable characters
1920 Characters
24
80 or 64 switch selectable ' ' '
128 (Upper -lower case, numbers
Character generation
Punctuation and controls)
5 x 9
Character matrix
Number of scans
Cursor type
Refresh rate
6 x 10
10 per character
Flashing underscore
50Hz (Non -interlaced)
Mode Selection
Local/Line
Full/Half duplex
Transparent
Editing and Control Facilities
Cursor up, down, left, right, Home (top left)
Character and line Insert and Delete
Erase to end of line
Erase to end of screen
Transmit from home to cursor
Direct x-ray cursor addressing
Direct X -Y
Tabbing facility
Automatic LF after CR selection
Cursor and tab control from computer using
ESCAPE sequences
True underline capability
.
'`
r
Other Features
Allows block transmission of screen data
Since the EME -30 serles are microprocessor based, operating
assembled and edited off-line
characteristics may be added to or modified to suit the user's system
Allows all control characters to be displayed
for program debugging use
ASK ABOUT OUR LOW-COST VIDEO TERMINAL EME -20 AND OUR VIDEO MONITOR SUITABLE FOR 80 CHAR DISPLAYS $165.00
For further Information contact:
E
& M ELECTRONICS PTY LTD
136 Marrickville Road, Marrlckville, NSW 2204
Tel Sydney (02) 51 5880; Melbourne (03) 598 9207
120
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
DATA 80: helping the community to
come to grips with computers
9&
Already held in Melbourne, and coming soon to Sydney and
Adelaide, DATA 80 promises to be the most impresssive computer exhibition so far held in Australia. With over 70 exhibitors
and more than $25 million worth of equipment, and supported by
private and governmental organisations, the series of displays
and seminars will be an opportunity for the businessman and
the community to come to grips with the growing use of
computers.
The last five years have been a time of
spectacular growth in the computer industry, both in Australia and overseas.
Constant development and a growing
perception of the commercial advantages of computerisation have combined
to bring about changes in working conditions that are still not fully understood.
And the wide range of equipment
available has not made the position of
the businessman contemplating the initial step into computers any easier.
In an attempt to monitor and assist
developments in the field, the Australian
Computer Society (NSW), the Productivity Promotion Council of Australia, and
the Federal Department of Productivity
joined forces in 1977 to sponsor "DATA
DAY", a series of exhibitions and
seminars designed to allow both potential and experienced computer users to
become acquainted
with new
developments in the area.
Since 1977, DATA DAY has grown into
Australia's largest annual computer
event, leading to "DATA WEEK '79", held
in Sydney, Melbourne, and Adelaide last
year, and to DATA 80, this year's exhibition. DATA 80 will provide first-time
users and experts with an opportunity to
inspect the great variety of computer
systems on the market, in one place at
one time; and to hear professionals
speak on various aspects of computerisation in manufacturing, in small
businesses, and the environment of the
future.
The Melbourne DATA 80 exhibition
was held on May 28-29 at the Southern
Cross Hotel, and comes to Sydney at
Centrepoint on August 5-7, and to
Adelaide at the Oberoi Hotel on
November 12-13. More than 70 companies have entered DATA 80, presenting over $25 million worth of equipment and services. From the standardised hardware and software available in
1977 the local industry has expanded to
provide a vast range of new and
established systems, together with
specialised peripheral support products
and services. DATA 80 will therefore
provide an excellent forum for the
dissemination for up-to-the-minute information on new technologies, and, it is
hoped, discussion of the vital social
issues presented by computerisation in
all its forms.
For the first time this year DATA 80 will
be open to the general public as well as
to the industry. By publicising the event
to the community at large, the promoters, Graphic Directions Pty Ltd, are
confident that the exhibition will contribute to a wide public understanding of
the róle of computers in small business,
and their impact on society as a whole.
The important educative role of exhibitions such as this cannot be neglected,
for computer technology is not the
esoteric province of a handful of professionals, but a community resource to be
shared by all.
The wide-ranging display of new equipment will be accompanied by a series of
seminars providing expert guidance on
buying and using computer systems. This
year's topics will cover three areas
Choosing the
"Buying your Computer
right system" (Day 1); "Computers in
Now and in the Future"
Manufacturing
(Day 2); and "The Electronic 'Office
Word Processing and Other Realities"
(Day 3).
Seminars held at the Melbourne exhibition on computers in the manufacturing
industry sparked a great deal of debate.
For example, Barry Parsons, managing
director of Godfrey Hirst Australia Pty
Ltd, spoke of the shortage of qualified
technicians, programmers and analysts,
and predicted a deterioration in the
situation in Australia during the next five
years. He reasoned that some form of retraining scheme is an urgent necessity if
the expanding use of computers is to be
successful.
Many of the speakers at the Melbourne
seminars emphasised the importance of
-
-
-
overcoming
the
-
distance between
various specialised disciplines. As Dr
Michael Fagan said, speaking of computers in manufacturing, "Usually people
know about either computers or
manufacturing; there is a lack of
knowledge ín the middle."
Similarly, the combination of the two
technologies of telecommunications and
data processing will be immensely important in the future. The common trend
in word processing systems, for example, is towards the automatic transmis-
MICRONEWS
CONTINUED
,
,3JC.11C?
THE
SHOP PTY. LTD
Discount shopping for your
professional Microcomputer
and terminal requirements
COMPUCOLOR II
from
$1970
(inc tax)
Ex Stock
;n4
features:
Up to 32K User RAM
Eight -colour display
32 lines of 64 char.
5" Mini Disk Drive
40 Tracks. 48 TPI
TELEVIDEO TVI-912
$1256
After
Tax
Ex
'zti
Stock
features:`
14x4
24 lines
80 char. per line
Transmission rates 75-19,200 Bd.
96 char. ASCII Upper & Lower Case
12" Monitor
MICROLINE 80 PRINTER
from
$922
(inc tax)
h
--í
Ex Stock "ti
l
features:
80 char. per sec.
80 and 132 char. per line
9x7 DOT MATRIX character or
graphics printing.
PLUG COMPATIBLE TO TRS-80
(TRS-80 is
a
regd. trade name of
The Tandy Corp.).
SPECIAL
51/4
DISKETTS
$3.95 EACH (INC. TAX)
THE
SHOP PTY. LTD
212
HIGH ST, PRAHRAN Vic
3181. Tel (03) 51 1950
91 REGENT ST, CHIPPENDALE,
NSW 2008. Tel (02) 699 4919
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
121
N
JOHN F . ROSE
D
K
COMPUTER SERVICES PTY .LTD
.
PRINT' SAMPLE SHEET
This is a printing sample by our newly developed matrix
printer which has a 16 wire head designed for producing
wordprocessing quality print at high speed.
17 x 16 matrix at the print speed of 75 cps is available
for good printing quality, and 9 x 7 matri,< at the print
speed of 150 cps is available for high speed printing.
!.
Print speed can be increased by
297.
by using the 12 cpi mode.
?
The printer has 2 sets of dot matrix patterns in the
character generator as standard (including JIS 8 bit -code)
This line is printed at 12 cpi.
!"#$%&'()*+,-./0123956789:;<=>?
@ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZifi^_
'abcdefghijklmnopgrstuvwxyz{1)-
, 3y4.5ZXT23`J-74',I91fA%737Jt'J
919Th?=»Jllt7'Nt7,GJti>13,'J1Lo7:9" °
I
ii#$Y.&+
().t.+;-.f0123x:,:56769: ;<-;k.
6iAE,CDE_FGHI J FiLr1Ni;}-'ORSTUV4-J =;'r 7
`abcde ;rgh i j k. l riinopgrs tuvwy,_ { I
,°i
c rJ
x17:17f 'r1.77?-1
i)h;
;
1a..-il.`frj_
.. c
Other type fonts can be specified by the. user.
An important feature of the printer is the ability
to define special characters under external software
command. For example
.
Various patterns may be printed at rate of 900 dot column per second and resolution of 120 dot per inch.
N QK
Price excluding sales tax $3105.00. Send $1.00 to join our mail list club and
receive our latest catalogue.
Manufactured by: Nikkyo Electric Industry Co, Ltd, 807 Futoo-cho, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama,
222 Japan.
Distributed in Australia by:
JOHN F. ROSE
COMPUTER SERVICES PTY LTD
33-35 Atchison Street, St Leonards, NSW 2065
Telephone: (02) 439 1220 Telex: AA27901.
122
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
Data cassette
Microcomputer News & Products
for the hobbyist
J
Sord Mark VI computer system
,
i
r
.
Jr
'
Development system
from Zilog
.
business application programs, a
relocatable assembler, Cobol, Fortran IV, and several versions of Basic adapted
A complete, single board microcomputer system designed to assist in
development and evaluation of hardware and software for systems based on
the Z8 single-chip microcomputer has
been introduced by Zilog Inc.
The Z8 Development Module uses the
64 -pin version of the Z8 microcomputer
to prototype a Z8 based system. The
code thus developed can later be
transferred to the ROM on the mask programmed 40-pin version of the Z8.
to various special purposes, including
"EBasic", which works with the APU.
Details can be obtained from The Small
Business Computer Company, 200
Pacific Highway,
2065.
how to approach the major decision of
whether or not to use a computer in a
particular application; if so, how to
choose a system that fits the requirements. As the president of the
Society, Ted Wastie, puts it: "The aim is
Crows
Nest,
MICRONEWS
CONTINUED
NSW,
COMP -SOFT
Low-cost Z80
personal computer
MICROCOMPUTER
SERVICES
The Sinclair ZX80 personal computer is
complete small system, with Basic,
which sells in Britain for less than £100,
and is currently creating a lot of interest
in Europe. Now, Consolidated Marketing
Pty Ltd, of Melbourne, has announced
plans to begin importing the ZX80,
and expect to have it on sale by August
of this year. Watch this column for further details.
OHIO SCIENTIFIC
a
DATA 80 computer exhibition
sion of text beween remote machines
using telephone lines, and DATA 80 will
allow visitors to see for themselves the
range of word processing equipment
available and hear experienced consultants and users speak on the subject.
The Australian Computer Society will
also be actively participating in the exhibition, offering professional advice on
3M Australia's Data Recording Products
Division. Available in both 10 minute
and 30 minute lengths, the new 830
cassettes are individually packaged in
plastic album cases. Suggested price for
the 10 minute album is $2.10; for the 30
minute album, $2.33.
Additional information is available
from the Data Recording Products Division, 3M Australia Pty Ltd, PO Box 99,
Pymble, NSW 2073.
;--aY
Mitsui & Co (Australia) Ltd recently
released details of their new Sord Mark
VI computer system, the M200. The
system uses a Z80A (4MHz) CPU, in conjunction with an arithmetic processing
unit (ALU) and an 8M byte disk drive.
Mathematical operations formerly processed by software are now carried out
by a special LSI processing unit, and a
Z80 CPU is also incorporated in the disk
controller, resulting in a processing
speed three to five times faster than
previous Sord models.
The mark VI includes a 350K byte mini floppy disk drive as standard, to provide
back-up support for the Winchester-type
hard disk drive. Extensive software is
available for the system, including
A data cassette designed for personal
microcomputers has been introduced by
... from
(OSI) COMPUTERS
and SOFTWARE
SUPERBOARD
1
4
C
C
C 4PM F
p121
OPENING SALE
to encourage people to have a realistic
approach which correctly identifies the
best areas to tackle first with the computer selected. The wrong step can be
excessively expensive. It can also be
fatal."
The speed of change in the computer
industry tends to surprise even the experts, and perhaps leave the general
public bewildered. The aim of DATA 80
is to try to help the public, and the small
businessman in particular, achieve a
greater understanding of the uses of
computers, and to face the future computer society with confidence.
10%
DISCOUNT ON ALL
COMPUTERS
Tues & Wed
Friday
Sat
9.30am
to 5.30pm
4.30pm
to 8.30pm
9.00am
to 12.30pm
235 Swan St, Richmond
Phone:- (03) 428 5269
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
123
N"12
WRITE FOR FREE CATALOGUE
our
le
oo ie
Sollware for most popular 8080/280 computerdisk systems including NORTH STAR, ICOM, MICROPOLIS, DYNABYTE DB8/2
d 088/4, EXIDY SORCERER, SD SYSTEMS, ALTAIR, VECTOR MZ, MECA, 8" IBM, HEATH H17 8 H89, HELIOS,
IMSAI VDP42 8 44, RE X, NYLAC,INTERTEC SUPER -BRAIN, VISTA V80 and V200, TRS-80 MODEL! and MODEL 11, ALTOS,
OHIO SCIENTIFIC, DIGI-LOG, KONTRON PSI 80, IMS 5000 DISKETTE formals and CSSN BACKUP cartridge tapes.
i
Pe
Nnn:r
V
a
CP/M' VERSION
a
2 FOR
TRS80 MODEL II NOW AVAILABLE
FLOPPYO DISK
OPERATING SYSTEM
operating ssystem
onfigured I
Popular mica -computer. end disk evince,:
Ce/N' F
- Digital
many
System
VerelOn Price
North Star Single Denary
1,4.. .145/25 e
North Star Double Density
14....145/25
North Star Double/ouad
24, .170/25
ICOM Were -Disk 2411
1 4
145/25
ICOM 3712
14, , 170/25 v'
ICOM 3512
1 4
.170/25
Mits 3202/Altair 8600
14
145/25
Heath 119 + H17
i 4 145/25
Heath 1159
1 4
145/28
TR5-80 Model I
1.A... 145/25 Ro
TR3.80 Model II
2.,....170/25
Processor Technology Hellos 11 1.4....545/25
Cromemco System 3
4
145/25
1
Intel MOS Single Density
1.4.,,145/25
Intel MSS Single Density
2.0....170/25
Intel MOS 800 Double Density
2.x... .200/25
Intel MDS 230 Double Density
,2.5..-.200/25
Micropolis Mod I
1.4
..14512S v
Micropolis Mod II
1 4
145/25 v
The IOIIOwinp conNgurMbns are scheduled lot release during
hall of 19801
North Star Double/Quad + Coleus 2.5....250/25
North Star Horizon HD-1
2x....250/25
Ohio SOiePbtic C7
2.11
-.200/25
Oh. Sc,entdic C3-13
2a.... 250/25
Onto Sceltilic 03.0
25
250/25
Micropolis Mod II
U....200/25
fo tek MDX STD Bus System
2......350/25'
1COM 3812
2.5 ..,225/25'
ICOM 45111P.rNC 03000
2x. .37135 +
TRS-SO Model re + Comas .......2.5....250/25
Software consists of the operating system, leaf *dire,. assembler, debugger and other old Oil lot the
management end system meMlenance. Complete set
of Digital Research". 000umenalion and adddbol
implemenradon notes Included. Systems marked
and
Include firmware on 2708 and 7710. Systems
marked
include 5440 m dle charge. Systems
marked ® repotre the special
eetaion. of sonware
In tma catalog. Systems marked r have miner yarienla
evaaable to au" console interlace or system. Call or
lard@ for lull ?Ivor options.
BASICSS°
-
y
-
Mellyle
sglmpeedfrom
P
pbaoaean
edde
®
H
®
0
V
I
úy/
'/.'edit
/^
'
-
-
Inteaetive interpretive system tor teaching
Manual includes
full source linings
4105340
(105 C COMPILER
Supports most
01 IanIncluding Structures,
Printers, recurve function evaluat,
ion overlays. Includes linking
loader, 681,T manager, and library containing gen.
hail purpose, file I/O. end floating point !unctions
Lacks .Mtiluers. statics, floats and longs. Docurvrenlation includes "The C PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE" by Kernghen end Rltehro ...
3125/120
WHITESMITHS C COMPILER The .11105,100,555.®
tams software fools. Produces
code ten a
with
extensive runesonomselullUNIX
C
Versionr 7 C Ian
cribed by Kerngnan and Ritchie, and kesavail.able
over 75 functions for performing UO. string
nanipuaten and storege allocallon Linkable a
Microsoft REL Ides. Requires 60K CP/M
, $630.130
C) tiny C
® shuelured programming techniques.
`uagArese.
As, lees
I
/
1"
®
tea1
- lee
e-U7--Rs-P2
124
supplied
Global and Intro-lone
File cornrows utility Included.
839/515
aten tVe
calls°id MSGMENT°oce
éha
l
convenient string handling
l
with
amiable type WRING. Untyped riles
memory Ima
I/O.
56K CPIU
1
PASCAL2 280 native code PASCAL Compiler. Preduce. optimized, ROMable re-entrant Code. All interlacing to CP/M is through to support library, The
package includes compiler, Microsoft Compatible relocating assembler and linker, and source for all
library modules Variant records strings and direct
I/O are supported. Requires 566 CP/11 and ZOO CPU.
-
5395/025
-
PASCAL/YT
Subset o, standard PASCAL Genes
ales ROl.fahM 8080 machine Code. Symbolic debugper included. Supports interrupt procedures, CP/M
file VO and assembly language Interface. Real en ables can Sc BCD, software lolling point, Or AMD
9511 8.1.171.01.
wa,e floating poinL Verse3 Includes
Enumeration and Record data type. Manual explains
BASIC to PASCAL
Source for the runlone package requires Digital Research's MAC Requires 32K
5250/030
Meuse
block.Siruclurea tangoed* Comeconomical run-time dynamic allots Per
bon o,f memory. Very compact (246 total RAM) Sritem
almost ell Algol 60 report lectures
plus manyony powerful extensions including string hendieq direct Mtk eddies, I/O etc. Requires 280
Q ALGOL-60-Powe
g
rut
Imtng
-
-
without
COmmands
PASCAL/M' -Complier generates P code from e
tended language, Implementation of standard PAS-
It
-
ii2di
-.o - Very list random access tent editor for text
0 EDIT
with or
line numbers,
®
(D0fi00iü0
260 DEVELOPMENT PACKAGE-Consists
(1) disk
frle line editor. with global inter end inns
-line facilities (2) 280 rlocetmg assembler. Zilog/MOstek mnemonics. conditiol assemblyana cross eferenn
acle oapabdites: (3) bnkog loader producing obsO.
lute Intel hex disk file
045/820
U EDT -280 Monitor Debugger rO break rand examine
le registers with standard Zaog/Moslek mnemonic dos
assembly displays 135 when ordered with 280 Deve1.
opment Package
850/510
045MM6a-lion-macro erosi'scembler with nealad
condItronels and lull range of pseudo operations Assembles from standard Motorola MC6800 mnemonics
to Intel Is.
5200/325
e su SS As XASM dB 100 MOD Technology MCS.
5500 seine mnemonics
5200/123
DISTEL
Oink baud des.embler to Intel 8080 or
TDL/Xeran 280 source code, bating end Cross referce Ines, Intel Mr TOL/Xne pseudo one optional
Runs on BOBO ...
$45/110
DISILOG
As DISTE*. lo Znog/Mostek mnemonic
files
Runs On ISO Only
6
845/110
la SMAL/e0 Structured Mauro Assembler Language
BD Package of powerful general
purpose text macro
processor and SMAL structured lenguayye complier.
SMAL fs an assembler language with IF-THEN.ELSE.
LOOP -REPEAT -WHILE. DO -END. BEGIN -END construct,
375/115
101
XYBASIC Interactive Prbteis Control BASIC -Full
disk BASIC features plus unique commands to handle bytes, rotate and shat, and to lest and set b115
Available M Integer, Extended and ROMable verses
Integer Disk or Integer ROMable
1295425
Extended Disk or Extended ROMable
5395/525
-
Minn*,n
CPU
.
QCBA5IC-2 Das Extended BASIC
®
51119/120
-
Non-Intereetive
BASIC en pseudo -cede compiler and run -Ilene InferOrete,. Supports lull rile control, chaining. rottener
and extended precisen variables. etc.... .4120/815
MICRO FOCUS
Q STANDARD CIS COBOL- ANSI '74 COBOL wand® and compile, fully undated by U.S. Navy tests to
ANSI level 1. Supports many Mature. to level 2 including dynamic loading o1 COBOL modules and 4
lull'ISAM tole foolery. Also, program sagmentaten.
Interactive debug end c0or,ol interactive extensions
to support protected and unprotected CRT screen
formatting from COBOL progrems used with any
dumb terminal
88500850
FORMS
2-CRT screen editor. Output
N COBOL dala
descrotions for copying Into CIS COBOL program.
Automalrcelly creates query and
program OI
indexed tiles 000,0 CRT protected and unprotected
screen lormats, No programming experience needed
Output program directly compiled by CIS COBOL
tee
(standard)
..
.......... ....
52001120
-72":04711/41-77~,/
EIDOS SYSTEM!
-
KBASIC Mlcrosolt Disk Extended BASIC with all
KISS laltiti.s, integrated by Implementation of nine
addrilonal command. on language. Package includes
KISS. REL as described above, and
sample mail
list program
SS11S/345
To licensed user. of Microsoft BASIC-80 (MBASICI
$x35/H5
COcorn-
linking
library , with
°table
Ca manager. Also on.
crudes MACRO-80 (see below)
5425/325
COBOL -SO
Level 1 ANSI '74 standard COBOL plus
most d Level 2. Full sequential. realhe, and indexed file support with variable file name*. STRING,
UNSTRING, COMPUTE. VARYING/UNTIL, EXTEND,
CALL COPY, SEARCH. 3-dimenstonel era
osanand
n
conditions need IF, PowerYnd
rn$IOnL Include.
lnteraclloebBAtee handling
Ompallbte assembler, linking leader, end tabcetable library menage, es described under MACRO -80
5700/925
Q MACRO -SO -80110/ZBO Macro Assembler Intel and
abs
mnemonics
ble
output.t. Loaderr, Libray
r
and Cross Refer.
rice L11 ulddres included
5149/115
XMACR0.66 8086 Cross assembler, All Macro end
features
MACRO
® utility
Of
-SO package. Mnemonic.
Intel ASMSB Comptmtylaseee
.....
y°n
®
pile,.piIer,
nae
ICP/M 2.0gm1ualf)
oboe
many extension.- Includes
~lost
cam
- Disk
Extended BASIC, ANSI compatible
with long varleble names, WHILEAVEND, cheining
5325/125
O variable length file records
BASIC COMPILER C Language eOmpetlble with
® BASIC 80 and 3.10 times fester execution. Produce.
® standard Microsoft reloealable binary output. Intrudes MACRO -SO Also linkable to FORTRAN -80 or
COBOL -tic code module.
8350/325
FORTRAN.s0
ANSI 66 (except for COMPLEX) plus
....
O ron ncludes
el:eve
MICROSOFT
tl
5
All Lifeboat Programs
BASIC UTILITY DISK
Genets oft (I) CRUNCH -14
Compacting utility o reduce the
and increase
to speed o1 programs in Microsoft,ice
BASIC and TITS.
80 BASIC. (2) DPFUN
Double precision subroutine.
la cOmpu.ing nineteen Irenscendenial functions in.
eluding square root, natural log, log base 10, sin, arc
sin, hyperbolic sin, nyperbobe arc sin, etc. Furnished
in sourCe on dbskette and aocunentarlon ...550/835
U STRING/40 Cheerer string handling plus routines
Ro for direct CP/M BOOS cells from FORTRAN and other
compatible Mlcrosolt Ianguaget The utility library
contr., routines that enable progrems to cheO, to
COM file. retrieve e°m and lone pa/meters, and
arch lrle directories*Rh lull wild card Iac11Re.
Supplied es linlaBle modules on Microsoft lo,mat.
595/120
STRING/30 source Code available separately s29s/n.a.
(] ONE STRING BIT FORTRAN eharatler string hen Mang. Routines to find, 1111, pack, m
separate.
concatenate and compasscharacter°Wings. This
pac kage
eryninatas
pfohlem9 um>
dated with character /zing handling M FORTRAN.
Supplied with source
565/815
VSORT Vera/Pile end/merge syysSter for Bred length
records with lined or variable Meath IleOOL VSORT
I can be used as a lacé-alone package or loaded and
Called as subroutine from COASIC-2. When used as
subroutine, VSORT melmlces the use of butler
Space by saving
TPA on 0h50 and restoring it on
ompletion of sorting. Record* may be up to 255
bytes ling with
maximum of S field.. Upper/lower
case translation and numeric herds supplied.
3175420
Q CPM/374X Has lull range of functions to create or
re -name an IBM 3741 volume, display directory Information and edit the data set contents. Provides lull
the transfer tacilr es between 3741 volume data sets
end CP/M tile.
5195/110
BSTAM 0111117 to link One computer to another also
egspced with BSTAM Allows Isle transfers at lull
data Speed (no conversion to hex). with CRC block
Mtrl Check lob very reliable error deteclron and
aulomatrc retry. We uSe 111 II's great! Full wddcard
espansion to send ..Cone. etc. 9600 baud worn wore.
300 Dead with phone connection. Both ends need
one. Standard and 47) versions Un talk to one another.
4150/8S
am tam
Q
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
amurnrwri:
1
Oaf
alA1. M
tii ".wire.
aewra;:i e.:ei
e.M.
O
MICRO DATA BASE SYSTEMS
MOBS
Hierarchical Data Base System CODASYL
oriented with FILE., SSTs, RECORD, and ITEM.
-
which are all user defined. ADD, DELETE. UPDATE.
SEARCH, and TRAVERSE commands supported. SET
ordering is sorted, FIFO. LIFO. nest or prior One to
many let reMhonship supported. ReadN.',O, proteelon M Ilse FILE level, Supporu FILE, which extend
over multiple Soppy or hard rink devices.
MOBS
Micro Data Base System Full network data
base with all elutes of HOBS plus multi -bevel Read/
Write Protection for FILE. SET, RECORD and ITEM
Explicit represenabiOR 1 one to one, one to many,
many to many, and many to one SET relationships,
Supports multiple owner and multiple record types
within SET. MOBS IOes are fully compatible
O M085DRS MOBS with Dynamic Restructuring Sys.
tam option Which allows altering MDBS data bases
when new ITEMS. RECORD., or SET. are needed
without Changing existing data.
-
-
-
-
HOBS -230 version
1250/540
MD13S.210 version
5750'540
MDBSDRSZOO union
1450/550
8060 Version evalMOle at 575 extra
When orderings specify one of the
languages listed below.
and MDBS m uals purcriued lone corn.
without sablel language mtetiece manuals Manuals
c 50511.018 lot the 101lowmC Mrc,O,ntl languages
1) MBASIC 4.51. 2) 8451)-80. 50, 3) Compiled
BASIC-e0 or FORTRAN -60, 4) COBOL -80, 5) MACRO-
-
to
l
-
teen.),
to
-
s
ri:vEGi(14¿4-912,9/ /ajecd
-
-
8
eflfl-eeeee
SITV lettered. data-baseirlo
byuslee eslive tags
matone
Hashing and random tccess used for fast response.
Regale CBASIC-2
f175525
SELECTOR 111-C2
Data Base Processor to mute
® and maintain mulrl Kay date bases. Prints lormalted
1 Sorted repent, with numerical
mates Of mailing
labels- Comee worts sample application.. including
I Sale.
Activity. Inventory, Payables. Receivables.
Check Reeler. and Client/Petrent Appointments. etc
Requ,tes CBASIC-2 Supplied in source
.5295120
GLECTOR -General Ledger onte to SELECTOR
Ili -C2. Interactive system provides lo, customised
COA. Unique chart of transaction types Insure p'Oper
donthle entry bookkeeping Generates balance sheets.
PAL statement. and purnals. Two year record allows
for statement of changes on limner position report.
Supplied in source. Requires SELECTOR 111-C2,
CBASIC-2 and 526 system
.,1250/125
Q CBS-Configurable Buuneu System le comers.
M henswe set of programs for defining custom data
Ides end
stem. Without using progamSystems
inq
r s deg,ds sued
BASIC. FORTRAN, hale.
,'ryI
W'
key (ol
loo each dala Ible ara supported, S
pe09ram e slomltes system to user', CRT d
yInler
Provides
and eso
data
and
wmhtransaction processing. Report generator
programdoes
oroal
calculations wall stored
and derived data, recordselection win multiple [Aare, and Custom formatss Sample Inoenrly and mallIng kW systems Included NO support languagerequired ..
...
8294925
W NA
ton
-
~hues
Mul.er-up\aaBpe
s i
Prices end specftice0onssubject to change without notice.
Postal Address, P.O. Box 420, Hawthorn, 3122
Cable' RODCAM Australia. Phone 819 2411
/
(C(.pLpcNS¡,.GL
O SUPER -SORT 1- Sort. merge, extract
MICROPRO
O
Q/u
utility
tee
ebSo
role execulaule program or linkable module in Micros It format Safe fixed or variable records with data
M binary, BCD. Packed Decimal, EBCDIC, ASCII,
floating 5 had point exponential. held justified, MC
Even callable number of fields per record, 5225/125
SUPER -SORT II
Above evallaDt as absolute pro-
to
(O KISS
Keyed Index Sequential Search Oilers Comelete Multi -Keyed Index Sequential and Direct ACS. Irle management. Includes built-in utility lunChons for 16 M 32 bit aohmetic.string/IntegerConverand slug comp.,,. Detoured as
relocalable
linkable module in Microsoft Ipmal for u
win
FORTRAN BO or COBOL -80, etc
1i35/í23
a.s. w
.,
.a
owa ow .mr..<e a. 0555
tans.o iaoal. .n
<annpawcw
require CPIPA, unless otherwise stated.
-
SUPERSORT III
-
As II wbihoul SELECT/EXCLUDE
.
..
.
.. 5125/$25
WORD -STAR Menu driven visual word plotessin5
SWUM for use with .andara terminal Text formal Ong performed on screen Facilities for text paginate,
page number, lustily, center and underscore User
can print one document while timultaneousiy edging
a second Edrt lacalu elude global seen and
replies Read/Write to other lent tiles. block most,
Mc Reduores CRT terminal with addreuable cursor
pOsitloing
5445/$40
Q WORD -STAR Customisation Notes-For sophisticated
who do not havea one of I
many standard
testmmal oe printer
the drslribulen
o1 WORD-STAR
NA/395
WORD -MASTER Text Editor-In one mode has super s of CP/M's ED commands Including global
91
O
search.
Ing and replacing. IOr*erds and backwards in file In
video mode. p,Ovrdes lull screen editor lot Lets with
serial addressable -cursor fennel .
.. 5125/125
®
...... ........ .... ....
-
e
eel.
-
8)
LAI
medi
tech
Registered Air Mail
Handling & Tax
ADD 25 O/o
INSTANT
SOFTWARE
Qy APARTMENT
.
-
permitting recipe documents
to be Created from linked Im0ments on other fibs
Has !acetifies for sorted Index, table of contents and
footnote moorhens Ideal for contracts, menials. etc
Now Compatible with Electric Pencil' prepared ribs
disk hies
or Console.
2r.ow-
PEACHTREE SOFTWAR[
Q GENERAL LEDGER Records details of all Knanclal
-
Q Transactions. Generates
balance sheet and an In.
t cane statement FAHble and adaptable design rot
born small buaimesses and firms perlormeng Client
inup services Produce* reports as follows TrW
Galan e, 7rensactiOn Regrslers, Balance Slleel, Prior
Veer Comparative Balance Sleet. Income Statement,
Prior Year Compagrne Income Statement and De
pertinent Income Statements, Interactive wllh other
PEACHTREE accounting packages
Suppled In
source code for Microsoft BASIC .
.. $990170
ACCOUNTS PAYABLE
Tracks current and aged
check writing feature
Q Pasables end Inc«poeales
Maintains compete sender file with Information On
1
Purchase orders and discount terms as well as ochre
en
account status Produces reports as follows
Voucher Report, Accounts Payable Aging Reportand
Cash Requirements Provides molt to PEACHTREE
General Ledger Supplied in source code for Macro.
.
.
.
... .... ..8100/30
s«I. BASIC
Generates invoice regisACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE
le ter and complete monthly olatemenls Tracks Current
aged
receivables
Heinlein,
customer file Inekedand
f
Ing Credit information and account status The current scales of any Customer account Is rnslanlly WIIable. Produces report. as follows Aged Accounts
Recehabe. Invoice Register, Payment and Adluslmenl Regnler end Customer Account Slalus Report
Provides input to PEACHTREE General Ledger Supplied In source code lo, Mcrosoll BASIC 8990/130
Prepares payroll for hourly. salaried and
PAYROLL
employees Generates monthly, quart
Commissioned
oO
terly
employee W-25
and annual returns. Prepay
/
Includes tables for federal withholding and FICA as
well as withholding for all 50 slal.s plus up to 20
beles from pre-computed or user generated bathes
Wdl print checks, Payroll Register. Monthly Summery
and Unemployment Tao Report Provides Input to
PEACHTREE General Ledger. Supplied In source
599030
code for Mcrosoll BASIC
Maintains detailed information On
Q INVENTORY
@ own inventory item Including part number. descripuno of measure, vendor and molder dala, hem
1
Information se current Cent
WC1vrey and compiele
COWS. pricing and sales. Produces reports as follows,
Physical Inventory Worksheet. Inventory Price List.
Departmental Summary Report, Inventory Status Report The Reorder HepOrl and The Penal-mDale and
Year-M,Dare reports Supplied a source code for
51,190/30
Microsoi BASIC
Q MAILING ADDRESS Keep back of name and addoss Info/m.1mo and allows the selectee ponhng of
y this nit«maliOn el Me form of malting bets Ce address labels. Allows the user to tailor the syaee. to
User -defined 101.
nos own particular requirements
m-oul spawn uses
special lormt fie
mal a ldlqprograms hew la *ml the nano YO 1151 or
address labels Standard formal files are included
with system Automate, scaling of dala uses mdeaed
fib management routines whit,' allow The mama and
eddies. mformaton to be eequenlany teoeved end
primed without fire sorting Suppled In source code
5790/30
1« Mcrotolt BASIC
-
-
e
-A
-
/
-
-
-
-
or Items on hand.
14.I
rem
t
-
********
CONDIMENTS
I,
e CL
FLIPPY
5100
CO'
9M1
6COA5 SO
sect* (Mere
Systems
Dynabytel Old
purchase
Tne bah` or each
WOp,etary sonware
package Cgmr.ys
souse for use on one
system only
bonHcOrd
welcome here
$25
each4651or
7
KIT-Template and lnrlructons to
in single sided drives
512.50
.
mil mylar re.nforcing flogs for 25 diskettes.
7
(5',
tiI/J
5e,
0O
,
KO . ..
Reno, only
.
114.95
57.05
.
511.95
K(
55 95
Rongs only
USER MANUAL AND REPORT-By Jensen
and Wirth The standard textbook on the language
Recommended for sate by Pascell2. PascallM and
310
Pascal/MT users
Q THE C PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE By Kernishn
and Reecho The Standard a,lbOOY on the language.
Recommended for use by BOS C, tiny C. and Wnne
S12
.. ..
amiln, C users .
('1 STRUCTURED MICROPROCESSOR PROGRAMMING
By Idle 0015*, of SMALTO Coser. "sued ire: proing, the 90B0/90e5 Inftecoon del and rte
.30.00
%SHAUN language
Q ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 5 ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE520
...
CBASIC By OabornelMcGraw-Hm
GENERAL LEDGER-CBASIC-By Osborne/MCGraw.
9',
[j PASCAL
-
balance re- Creates trial
ouriLs and rec.
Manual COSI apphCalfe
against pece et
Subse0uene soreware
DISK
O FLOPPY SAYER -Plotectlon for denier holes of $e
and 0' floppy disks Only 1 needed per diskette KO
Dow ns centering post, pressure fool and tough
t
sySeens and formats
g North Sear sang.
double or quad density
IBM shire or 20 256
Alain He.os II
lACMIays Mnd I o II
pentde
month single sided Sera (»hellos for use of second
5Ó
Order, must specify disk
...
Doube speed
-
ls-
absorbs
taIoeMilned
s
-
-
OHkel
that might hinder the performance of the drive
head Lasts al best 3 months with daily use Specify
of a .
520 eaols/$55 for 7
Single sided
5995575
Requires CBASIC-2 Supplied a sour.
Malnleens vendor lest and
L[ ACCOUNTS PAYABLE
(L) cteu register. Performs cash flow analysis Flexible
metes checks to specific vendor for [Neon inall
make partial payments Automaticy
, r
« a as
pmts to GRAHAM-DORIAN General Ledgerru
stand alone »stem Requires CBASIC 2 S uppied in
-
loos
G
le per cles, fingerprints, and other foreign
Entries to other GRAHAM-DORIAN
-
-
........
accounting packages are automatically posted. User
....
01,-
available Rep*rs m-
-
, wlabinnes Customhied C O.A Provides transaction
mottle?, record of journal entries, Cal helancaa and
closingsKeep. /4 month history and p ro reles y
vi
comparison el current year were «e.qus year
Provi,es completesnlo nation 0eleriporosrtnvn
invoices as
ing customer payment aCtiyity, Receipts Can bS
posted to ddlerent ledger a0eoi.els EnlnesMOOmaliully update GRANAMDORIAN General Ledger
Supsans as
eland alone system. Requires CBASIC-2
5995/35
.
.
plied in source
PAYROLL SYSTEM Mamrains employee master Ile
7 Computes payroll wlmholding for FICA, Federal and
b Siam saes Monts payroll regnler, Checks. guaneey
t moons and W-2 forms. Can generate eel hoc repores
Cnd employee form tatters rel.)mad label.. Requees
1590435
BASIC-2 Suppled in source
[ INVENTORY SYSTEM Captures stook levels. costa.
mast.. am. Trans repealing
by
101
i
lorenarl
ube
ongr
may
eclered
A action
1
Sesmae. type of sae, dote of sate. ere Reports
elsble born for accounting and decision making
in
5590475
source
Requires CBASIC-2 Supplied
JOB COSTING
Designed for general contractors
To be used interactively wren omen GRAHAM-DORIAN
a.COunlmg package. for Irackigpgit and analysing ex custo rhednes cost caagoras
I penses User esiabb
and lob phases Permits comparison of actual versus
estimeted costs Automaleaely updates GRAHAM.
DORIAN General Ledger or runs as .rand alone
eem, Reourres CBASIC-2 Suppled in tollina 199/S75
Is
play, delete and move teal. with good vlde0 screen
prase/station Designed to integrate with MAO for
form letter mailings Requires CBASIC.2 .1200425
interacWAD Heine and Address selection system
tive mail 11,1 creation and maintenance program with
output es full reports wen elerenpe data or restricted
Inlormaluon for mail label. Tranaler system for »110010n and honorer of selected records lo create
5100/30
w lies Requires CBASIC-2
Fast sort/merge program for files with reed
OSORT
.0010 forgo. vanable field length informalion Up to
rise ascending or de,0ending keys Full back-up or
1100/820
... ..
input files Cheated
Q
GRAHAMDORIAN SOFTWARE SYSTEMS
GENERAL LEDGER - An on -lee system; no belch-
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE
audit trail
COPY
Cu lomued data entry and reporting sys.
User speedfe» up to 75 date items per record.
Interactive dale entry. netreval, and update facility
makes Inlonnatron managernent easy. Sopholuuted
report generator provides customized reports using
selected records wen multiple level break-point. I«
5290/S15
surnmareration Regunes CBASIC-2
LETTERIGHT -Program to Croats. edil and type letter. Or other documents Has feclllties to mister. its.
Q ANALYST
-
(El
hard
on order and back -Ordered
Ceude Master Hem Lull. Slock Actively. Stock Value
hon and Be -«der Lest Requires CBASIC.2 51250/525
1
requ red
-report
Interactive end flexible system
outputs. Custominalion of
t providing proof and
COA created Interactively Multiple blanch accounting center
Eatenslve checking performed al data
entry fir proof, COA correctness. etc Jour al entrees
maYorM batched pion to posting. Closing procedure
icelhy backs up Input files, Now includes
Statement of Changes In Financial Position Requires
51250/525
CBASIC-2 .
with
G ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE Open Item system
t output for Internal aged reports and c stonier Ienled statement and billing purposes. On -Line Enquiry PermiH InlOrmalion for Customer Seel. and
Credit departments Interlace to General Ledger prosided it both eyseems used. Requires CBASIC.2.
.01250/521
.. ....
ACCOUNTS PAYABLE Provides aged statements
t of accounts by vendor wells check kerning f« selected
invokes Can be used alone or wen General Lodger
,51250/525
and'« with NA). Requires CBASIC-2
Flexible payroll system handles weekly.
Ci PAYROLL
t bi-weekly. sememontmy and monthly payroll periods.
Tips bonuses le-Imbursemenls, advan.s, sock pay.
time are all part d
...firm pay and Compenlalion
Ilse payroll records Prints government required peri.
Ode reports and will post ro multiple SSG General
Ledger a0C0unts Roquete. CBASIC-2 and 54K of
51250/125
memory
Performs control
INVENTORY CONTROL SYSTEM
hwrchons of adding and depleing Block Iteme add,ng new deers and deleting Ole Items. Tracks quantity
-
es
1980.
STRUCTURED SYSTEMS GROUP
-
ing
Priced at $1700, the Z8 Development
Module became available from April,
POSTMASTER
Comprehensive package Ice mall
list maintenance that IS completely men u driven.
Features include keyed record extraction end label
production A form biter program s included which
provides net letters onsingle sheet or ConllnuYl[out looms. Compallble with NAD Bea. Requires
5150415
CBASIC.2
e
fiill
Q GENERAL LEDGER
~te,W4-
5415/C
-
o1xj'y'1
TEKTMRETER III
Teal lormalter to lustily and payl.
note beer. and other documents Special features
Include Insertion of bat donne as culion from other
EO
(Microcomputer
News& Products
e.
malic text wrap around for word processing. Operations for manipularing blocks of text. and compre5175/515
nenslve 70 page manual
...
..
POLYTEKT/90-Text lormaeler for word processing
appiloalrons Juslil,es and paginates source teat ribs.
Will general* form letters with Custom fields and
conditional processing. Support I« Daisy Wheel
orters Includes veribie pitch justification and m0
885415
.... .....
bin optimization ..
Q
-
Financial
MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
eafor receipts
management
es dataron
apartment protecmts,
pose revenues.
ele. for annual trend analysis,
t Cancel
Daily repon shows late rents, vacancy notices
undies, income lost lhrougn vauntbs, etc. Requires
5590475
CBASIC.2. Supplied in source
CASH REGISTER Maintains files on daily sabe.
Files dala by sales person and item. Teens sales.
F5
rings, refund.. payguls and total net deposits,
!a
5590/35
I Requires CBASIC-2 Supplied in source
POLYVUE/90-Full screen editor for any CRT with
positioning Includes vertical and h«pon8 talXV curs«
scrolling. enlercrve search and replace. aut0-
/
W
"
-
7C
7C
Hearty
Appetite.
'CP/M and MORA era trademark. of Digital Research
280 he trademark or clog. Inc
UNIX is a trademark of Bell Laboratories
WHATSITs es trademark of Coinputer Headware.
trademark of Michael Shwas,
Electos Pencil Is
Software
TRS-90 rs a trademark of Tandy Corp
PascalIM esa trademark of Sworn
¡Recommended system conliguranon consists of 40K
CP;M 2 lull sue disk dome, 24 e 90 CRT and 132
Column printer
PModdred versbn Wadable for use with CP/ka as ilne'emnnaa on Hearn and T11-90 Model I "ammeters
@User license greemenl for this produce must be
signed and returned to Ldeboal Associates before
may be made
m
Smpom
InOl0des4Kcludes the language manual
recommended in Condiments
I3)This product
Zilog Inc are also offering a cross software package that enables users of
PDP-11 minicomputer systems to
develop code for the 16 -bit Z-8000
microprocessor. The package runs on
Western Electric Company's Seventh Edition of the popular UNIX time-sharing
system, a general-purpose, multi-user, interactive operating system. The UNIX
software runs on DEC PDP-11/45 and
PDP-11/70 systems.
According to Rolando Esteverena,
Zilog Systems Division general manager,
the Z-8000 Cross -Software package will
allow users of PDP-11 systems to take
advantage of the tools of a larger computer system to develop software for
their own Z -8000-based products.
More information can be obtained
from Zap Systems Pty Ltd, 51-53 Chan dos St, St Leonards, NSW 2065.
New Aust distributor
Micro Products has recently been appointed the Australian distributor for the
Dennison Kybe range of "Accutrack"
magnetic media. The product range includes eight inch flexible disks, mini flexible disks, digital cassettes, power typing
cassettes and magnetic cards for virtually
any computer in use today. As an adjunct to this range, Micro Products also
deals in the range of Kybe Magnetic
Tape Cleaners, Testers and Certifiers,
Bulk Tape Erasers and Disk Pack
Cleaners.
Micro Products is a new Australian
company dedicated to the support of
the microcomputer user, either as a
small business user or computer hobbyist. The address is PO Box 8, University
of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351.
Top -loading
disc cartridge
A new top -loading disk cartridge
designed for specific drive applications is
now available from the Data Recording
Products Division of 3M Australia Pty Ltd.
The 933/1-24 cartridge has 24 sectors
and is designed for Data General 6070
drives. Capacity per cartridge is 10
megabytes.
The new single -disk cartridge has 3M's
"Crashguard" protective disk coating,
which greatly reduces the possibility of
damage to the disk surface and to
read/write heads because of headcrash.
Further information may be obtained
by writing to the Data Recording Products Division, 3M Australia Pty Ltd, PO
Box 99, Pymble 2073.
ELECTRONICS Australia. July, 1980
125
Microcomputer
News & Products
HP expands logic development system
ás
<
fsa+
i
f
300 Megabyte
Disc System
Anderson Digital Equipment Pty Ltd has
recently announced the introduction of
80 and 300 megabyte Disk Subsystems
to suit any DEC PDP-11 system as well as
Data General, Nova and Eclipse Mini
Computers.
The models S211/80 and 5211/300 connect to the Unibus of the PDP-11 computers while the models 850/80 and
850/300 connect to the normal I/O ports
of the DG, Nova and Eclipse range.
The 80 megabyte subsystem will sell
for approximately $25,000 while the 300
megabyte subsystem will sell for approximately $40,000.
For further information contact Anderson Digital Equipment Pty Ltd, PO Box
322, Mt Waverley, Victoria 3149.
Pro-Log Systems
for Z80 & 8085
Pro -Log Corp has introduced STD BUS
prototyping systems for the Z80 and
8085 microprocessors. Intended for
design engineers using standard
engineering techniques, the
and
PS -3
PS -1 (8085)
(Z80) prototyping systems in-
clude STD BUS hardware, test equipment, PROM -based applications and
operating software
and
complete
documentation.
Each system includes CPU card with 1K
of RAM and sockets for 8K of 2716
PROM, power supply card, keyboard
°
°
New options
available for HP's
Model 64000 Logic
Development
System include five
relocating macro
assemblers and a
12 megabyte disc
drive.
Five new assemblers and a new disk
drive are now available for HP's Model
6400 Logic Development System. A 12
megabyte disk drive has been added to
the family of hard disks used with the
display card, TTL I/O utility card and utility card extender.
Applications and operating software
are contained in one of three 2716
PROMs provided. Application software
includes keyboard and display control
subroutines, math modules, timing
modules and miscellaneous hardware
control modules. Operating software includes a register dump to display and execute programs from a specified starting
address.
Additional information is available
from AJF Systems and Components, 310
Queen Street, Melbourne, Victoria 3000.
COME TO
COMPUTER COUNTRY
PTY LTD
Computer Country can fulfil all your system needs for education, business and Industrial
computer applications. We stock a number of hardware lines including:
Northstar, Apple, Texas Instruments, NEC and many more. We can supply off the shelf
software packages for business uses (GUAPIAR/INV) and professional uses (word
processing, medical,publishing and associations). Our software development staff can also
customise software to your individual requirements. Our service area supports completely all
items that we sell and also invites inquiries from system owners who have purchased
elsewhere.
Do you already own a computer system or are you Interested in learning about them? Take
advantage of our User Group's seminars' and special offers. Call or write now to become a
member (membership is free).
REMEMBER ONLY A PROFESSIONAL CAN OFFER YOU A REAL SOLUTION TO YOUR
PROBLEMS AND NEEDS
WE ARE THE PROFESSIONALS!
-
COMPUTER COUNTRY PTY. LTD.
338 QUEEN STREET, MELBOURNE, VICTORIA 3000. (03) 329 7533.
NOTE: Computer Country is now expanding. Nationwide franchise opportunities are now available
in NSW. QId. SA and WA. Call now before your State is taken.
126
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
y.
-
development system, and five new
relocating macro assemblers now support program development for the 6809,
8048, 9900, 1802, and F8 microprocessors.
The new disk drive, HP Model 791OH,
is a Winchester technology type fixed
drive with a 12 megabyte capacity. It is a
complete stand-alone unit, including a
self-contained HP-IB (IEEE -488) controller
and power supply in a table-top cabinet.
The new assemblers provide software
support for microprocessors other than
the four (8080, 8085, Z8O, and 6800)
presently supported with hardware
emulation by the 64000 Logic Development System. The assemblers are fast,
operating at 4000 lines per minute
regardless of the size of the source file.
Each can be ordered as a separate unit or
option.
For further information contact
Hewlett-Packard Australia Pty Ltd, 31-41
Joseph Street, Blackburn, Vic 3130.
as an
New products
from Intel Corp
Intel has begun volume production of
an upgraded version of its 8086 16 -bit
microprocessor, and the 2732 32K
EPROM, offering speed improvements in
both products. The 8086-2 runs at a max-
imum speed of 8MHz, compared to the
5MHz of the earlier version, and is priced
at $200 each in 100 quantities.
To support the processor, Intel has improved the speed of its 4SOns 32K
EPROM. The new 3732A 32K EPROM has
an access time of 200 or 25Ons.
Intel are also offering an enhanced
memory expandable version of its 16 -bit
single -board computer, the ISBC 86/12A.
The new version allows the addition of
two new memory modules that expand
the on -board RAM from 32K to 64K, and
the on -board ROM from 16K to 32K. Ad -
APPLE II /APPLE II PLUS COMPUTERS come complete with
1.2K ROM. Cassette Interface. $ port I/O facilities, tutorial
manual, language reference manual, system and hardware
reference manual, introductory software manual. leads.
connectors, games paddles and introductory software.
.
APPLE 11 PLUS 16K RAM
APPLE II PLUS 32K RAM
APPLE II PLUS 48K RAM
... 11366.00
... $1603.00
... 31811.00
There's never
been a better
time to b
an Apple I
0.
apple pascal
The lowest priced, highest powered Pascal system on the market.
Our high-level, full feature Language System consists of a Pascal, programs can be written, debugged and executed in
just one-third the time required for equivalent BASIC
plug-in 16K RAM language card, five diskettes containing
programs. With just one-third the memory.
Pascal as well as Integer BASIC and Applesoft extended
On top of that, Pascal is easy to understand, elegant and
BASIC, plus seven manuals documenting the three
able to handle advanced applications. It allows one
languages.
programmer to pick up where another left off with minimal
The beauty of this Language System is that it speeds up
execution and helps cut unwieldy software development jobs chance of foul up.
Because Apple uses UCSD Pascal,TM you get a complete
down to size. Also, because the languages are on diskette,
software system: Editor, Assembler, Compiler, and File
loaded into RAM, you can quickly and economically take
Handler. And because we adhere to the
advantage of upgrades and new languages as they're
standard, your programs run on any
introduced.
UCSD Pascal system with minimum
Apple's Pascal language takes full advantage of Apple
high resolution and colour graphics, analog input and sound conversion. Which is really
something an enthusiast can A:.::1:{¡::
generation capabilities. It turns the Apple into the lowest
get enthusiastic about.
priced, highest powered Pascal system on the market. With
Apple Language System NOW AVAILABLE
@
ONLY $495.00*
Powerfúl software provides
The GRAPHICS TABLET is an image THE GRAPHIC'S TABLET
set of functions selected
comprehensive
pictorial
GRAPHICS
TABLET
THE
input device to enter
information directly into the Apple II THE GRAPHICS TABLET with stylus from menu. Graphics Tablet
with manual, interface and
Computer. eg from:
THE GRAPHICS TABLET completesoftware ... Only $874.00*
maps and photographs
THE GRAPHICS TABLET
logic diagrams and schematics
THE GRAPHICS 'Tx A' T
histograms
art
fine
- architectural drawings
THE GRAlesifflii
-
THIS MONTH'S SUPER SPECIALS
Apple Graphics Tablets
Tally 1600 Printer Only
Hi -Pad Digitizer
819.00'
$2000.00'
$ 699.00'
$
IP225 Printers
Assortment of S100 Cards Negotiable'
BASF 51/4" H/S Diskettes
$
999.00'
$
4.50'
FOR FURTHER DETAILS AND INFORMATION WRITE OR CALL US
o pulerLond
in meubouine
Grd. Floor, 555 Collins Street, MELBOURNE. VIC. 3000.
Phone (03) 62 6737 (03) 62 5581 Telex AA37007.
This offer applicable only in Victoria.
Prices do not mcluc
c
Sales Tax
Prices are correct asat time orpublication and may he subject to change.
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
127
New computers from D.D. Webster
(Microcomputer
News & Products
ditional multi -bus compatible memory
boards can be used to further increase
memory'size to the full one megabyte
support by the 8086 CPU.
The corporation has also announced
the first in -circuit emulator for
'intelligent" peripheral devices and the
first multiple -emulation support for the
development of multi -processor systems
containing such devices. The new
ICE -41A in-circuit emulator emulates the
8741A and 8041A universal peripheral
interface microcomputers. It will allow
designers to use advanced techniques
such as symbolic debugging of programs
to develop intelligent peripheral controllers and other applications of the
UPI -41A single -chip microcomputers.
Multiprocessor development support
is provided by a new Multi -ICE software
package. An enhancement of the Multi ICE package introduced in 1979, the software enables a single Intellect development system to control and co-ordinate
the operations of the new ICE-41A
emulator and the ICE -85 in -circuit
emulator, which emulates the 8085
microprocessor.
Enquiries to A)F Systems. and Components Pty Ltd, 310 Queen St,
Melbourne, Victoria 3000.
The new hard disc
version of the
Spectrum -II range.
The machine is
available with 10
or 20 megabyte
storage capacity
and is priced from
$16,077.
-
T
i
-
-
D.D. Webster Electronics Pty Ltd,
Bayswater, Victoria, is now making hard disc versions of the Spectrum -11 business
computer with 10 and 20 megabyte
storage capacity.
These new free-standing machines are
available singly or as a hard disc 10 or 20
megabyte unit, or can be produced incorporating any of the Spectrum -11's
single or double drive floppy discs, thus
providing the archival advantages of a
floppy system with the five to 10 times
more filing space offered by cartridge
discs.
Prices for the Spectrum -11 hard disc
models start at $16,077 for a Spectrum -11
Z10 (32K bytes of memdry), a machine
without floppies, and a range through a
variety of combinations to the Spectrum D20 (64K bytes). The latter sells for
$23,195 and incorporates a 20 megabyte
storage disc with a double -sided doubledensity floppy disc Spectrum storing 2.52
11
megabytes on line.
Enquiries to D.D. Webster Electronics
Pty Ltd, 17 Malvern. St, Bayswater, 3153.
The Best Micro Computer
Chess Game!!
SARGON
Available in Book and Computer Tapes
this publication as a real landmark in computer chess literature,
and a must for the library shelf of anyone that is at all interested in
computer chess ... "
Doug Penrod, 'Personal Computing'
"I regard
A COMPUTER
Containing clear, easy -to -follow documentation covering all algorithms,
a Z-80 assembly language listing of the programme, 50 subroutines,
graphics display and how to load and play chess against SARGON.
The book and tapes are a fascinating challenge for chess enthusiasts and
computer programmers alike.
CHESS PROG RAM
DAN arm
KArH[
saa+cKLery
-
ORDER FORM Mail to Butterworths Pty Ltd, 586 Pacific Hwy,
CHATSWOOD NSW 2067 PH: (02) 412 3444
Please supply me
with the following:
-
-A
56771L "SARGON
Computer Chess Program" by
copy/les @ $20.00 per copy (limp only)
TAPES (Prices quoted are per tape)
59064H SARGON TRS-80/2
@
59073H SARGON Apple II
@
21283H SARGON II Pet
@
40547H SARGON II TRS-80/2 @
40789H SARGON II Apple II @
NAME
D & L Spracklen
$25.00
$25.00
$37.50
$37.50
$37.50
Winner-1978 West Coast Computer. Faire!
lI
i
1
11
°
EiE1iDEn
ADDRESS
Postcode
Date
SIGNATURE
Dan and Kathe Spracklen
128
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
HAN
CO
electronics
Coming
Next
Month`
and get your components
ISHOP 9 TOWN CENTRE 95 REGENT STREET
30 CAMPBELL STREET CENTRAL RAILWAY
sydney.
blacktown.
698 8079
621 5809
HARDWARE
12
10
ALLIGAT.CLIP $1.00
bmm BAN.PLUG $1.00
1 DPDT MIN TOG.
$1.00
25 CABLE TIES
$1.00
4 0-9 KNOBS
$1.00
5 T03 COVERS
$1.00
5 T03
INS.KITS
$1.00
2 KNIFE SWITCH
$1.00
20 AUTO CONN.
$1.00
3 CAR
SUPPRESS. $1.00
6 27.5mm SLIDES $1.00
PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD
ALL SINGLE SIDED
EA. AND ETI BOARDS AT
50c PER BOARD PLUS 2c
ALL BOARDS
PER HOLE.
ARE SUPPLIED
DRILLED
AND TINNED ON
FIBREGLASS.
BOARDS TO YOUR OWN
ARTWORK AT $2.50
per
BOARD AND 2. PER HOLE
UNDRILLED BOARDS ARE
NOT
SUPPLIED.
TV PATTERN GENERATOR
Kit of parts as featured in Electronics Australia June, 1980. Dot,
Greyscale, Crosshatch, Raster,
Check.
$49.50
Complete Kit
Kit without case
$37.00
Pack and post
$2.50
EPROM PROGRAMMER KIT
Kit of parts as featured in Electronics Australia July, 1980. Programs 2708, 2716 and 2532. Use
with TRS80, Sorcerer, and Compucolor. Kit does not include connector from the programmer to
computer.
$72.50
Complete Kit
Kit without case
$60.00
Pack and post
$2.50
DIG CAPACITANCE METER
Kit of parts as featured in Elec-
tronics Australia March, 1980.
Four digits. Case supplied in kit is
our instrument case, 228 x 76 x
203mm.
$52.50
Complete Kit
$40.00
Kit without case
Pack and post
$2.50
SEMICONDUCTORS
8
OA90 DIODES
$1.00
OA202 DIODES
$1.00
20 EM4005 1A50V $1.00
8 BA100
$1.00
15 1N914 PRECUT $1.00
6 AA119
$1.00
9 1N4007 1A1kV
$1.00
2
FOR
BF173
$1.00
BF180
2 FOR
$1.00
SE7055(BF336) 3 $1.00
BC637
4 FOR
$1.00
BF 195
3 FOR
$1.00
2N2904 2 FOR
$1.00
8
CAPACITORS ELECTRO.
25 2.2uF25V PC
$1.00
25 3.3uF25V PC
$1.00
25 4.7uF1OV PC
$1.00
15 25uF 50V PC
$1.00
$1.00
10 100uF5OV PC
PC
10 470uF6V
$1.00
4
3
2
2
3
1000uF25V
1000uF35V
1000uF5OV
3300uF16V
2200uF10V
PC
PC
PC
RT
RT
$1.00
$1.00
$1.00
$1.00
$1.00
CAPACITORS AEE-PC
$1.00
10 .047uF 400V
400V $1.00
8
.1uF
7
.22uF 250V $1.00
250V $1.00
6
.27uF
$1.00
7
.33uF
100V
6
.33uF
250V $1.00
'CAPACITORS GREYCAP
20 .082uF 100V
$1.00
250V $1.00
15 .47uF
100V $1.00
12 .47uF
250V $1.00
12 .56uF
MICROPROCESSOR
CPU 4MHz
CTC Timer
$12.00
$7.50
PIO
$9.50
SIO/2
$14.95
8085A CPU
$11.00
8080A CPU
$5.50
8251A UART
$5.00
450nS
EPROM
2708
$8.00
Encoder
HD0165
$3.95
These
are
TMS4116-250nS.
available at this price only while
present stock lasts. 16K Dynamic
Z80
Z80
Z80
Z80
Ram.
TMs4116
$9.00
$69.00
$135.00
$192.00
each
for 8
for 16
for 24
circ.:cs
Capacitors and resistors , integratedfuses
knobs
,
semiconductors
Wires and cables
pluge and sockets pote
Radio and TV valves
light'ng.
and
disco
Manufacturera of PC boards
Prices subject to change without notice
,
,
,
Peek and postage wit hin Australia $1.00
CO ELECTRONICS
30 CAMPBELL ST
WRITE
Power Factor Controller
for Induction Motors
BLACKTOWN 2148
J.
---J
Faced with a worsening world energy shortage we
present our version of a NASA -developed power
controller which is reputed to give worthwhile
power savings with induction motors. Is it worth
building? Find out next month.
Eprom Programmer
This is a modified version of the Eprom
Programmer in this month's issue. It matches the
appearance of the Exidy Sorcerer remarkably well
and has software to suit that particular computer.
Leds &
Ladders
This updated version of
our popular Leds
&
Ladders is sure to be a
hit with young and old
alike. It is an engrossing
game of skill which
applies a number of
interesting circuit
concepts.
48)-
1
,.,»..,
...
..,.
....,
Stereo AM Radio
The American FCC has endorsed the Magnavox
system. We look at the implications for Australia.
'Our planning for this issue is well advanced but
circumstances may change the final content. However,
we will make every attempt to include the articles
mentioned here.
welcome
ELEOTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
129
INFORMATION CENTRE
FREQUENCY REFERENCE: I found the article
by Ian Pogson dealing with the Quartz
Multiple Frequency Reference (July, 1979)
very interesting, enough in fact, to assemble one generally in line with the article,
except that I used a 2270kHz crystal, simply because I had one. Also, I found the instrument a lot more versatile than the article indicated. For example, I found that the
combination of microsecond steps gave no
less than 255 discrete and precise frequency values. These should be useful from the
RF to audio range. The reason is, of course,
the geometric series 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64,
128 can give a continuous series of consecutive numbers from 1 to 255. As these
form the divisor into the crystal frequency,
a corresponding number of discrete frequencies is also available. think that its
range is worthy of some additional comments. Altogether a very versatile instru-
130 feet of coax. ; Channel 9 was
hopeless and at times had Channel 2 fully superimposed (both sets). There
seemed to be herringbone patterns
everywhere. I tried pads up to about
25dB with no effect and even used an
AC filter, still with no effect.
During experiments I noticed that as the
DC voltage decayed after switch off there
was a momentary clear picture. This was
observable because used a much more
sophisticated power supply filter employing two dropping resistors and 3 x 1600uF
electros, to eliminate hum when listening
to FM with headphones. With 2V DC the
unit gives only very slight herringbone
which can be fine-tuned out. There are no
problems with FM and the signal strength
meter reads approximately twice that
without amplification.
wonder whether other readers have
had similar problems and whether a better
solution might have been found. (R. B.,
Blair Athol, SA).
Since the masthead amplifier is a wide band device it will be subject to overload
by strong signals, as you have found. Unfortunately we can offer no simple solution
to the problem. Your solution is interesting
but we wonder if it is repeatable, ie, would
other devices perform in the same way?
I
I
ment
- congratulations.
(R. B.,
I
Turramurra,
NSW).
Thank you R. B., for your kind remarks
and comments.
SQ DECODER: I wish to construct the "Full
Logic SQ Decoder" which was published in
your February 1977 issue. I have had trou-
ble locating the 3 chips, MC1312, 1314 and
1315. Could you tell me the name and address of a supplier. (J. M., Valla, NSW).
DREAM 6800:
would like to know
whether the information regarding the
horizontal sync pulses (4us every 64us) is
correct, because seem to be getting a
4us pulse every 32us exactly. If there is
no mistake in the article, maybe' you
would be so kind as to tell me what
could be wrong with my computer. (G.
K., Chadstone, Vic).
In view of the age of this project and the
very low demand, it is doubtful whether
any retailer would have these chips
available. We suggest you contact
Motorola Semiconductor Products, 37
Alexander Street, Crows Nest, NSW 2065
I
for further information.
HERRINGBONES
AND
MASTHEAD
have built the Masthead
Amplifier for TV and FM (EA, August, 1979)
and erected it on a 12 foot mast above a
galvanised iron roof on a two story
residence. A super Colony Model 3111
faces along the length of the roof to the lee
side of a hill with respect to Adelaide's TV
antennas, with further hills behind. My
antenna is probably 50 feet belów the line
of sight, with the blocking hill 100-150
yards away.
The first point on the coax line is a Rank
AMPLIFIERS:
I
Arena Colour TV which requires no
boost in its own right. However have a
split to an FM set 40 feet away, a further
split to a second FM set 35 feet further,
and a further split to a second TV set 15
feet away. The total is approximately
I
130
I
The horizontal sync pulses of 4us every
64us is correct. If you refer to the circuit
diagram in the May 1979 issue, the 2MHz
clock frequency is divided by 16 at the D
output (pin 11) of IC15. This gives a square
wave with a 4us pulse width. Since you are
obtaining this pulse every 32us instead of
every 64us, then the output of IC16a, pin 6
is driving low at double its correct frequency. The fault possibly lies with the D output
(pin 11) of IC14 always remaining high or
the NAND gate IC16a is faulty.
DREAM 6800: In the article on the DREAM
6800 (May 1979) it is stated that "... In
fact, there are 640 bytes free. That's either
a
damned long machine -code program to
hand assemble, or a 320 statement CHIP -8
program ..." Does this mean that the
DREAM is able to be programmed using
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
normal 6800 instruction set as well as using
CHIP -8 instructions? (J. B., Lakemba, NSW).
Yes, it is possible to program the
DREAM 6800 in the machine language of
the 6800 processor. In fact this is the only
way it can be programmed. CHIP-8, the
DREAM monitor program, is simply a collection of instructions in machine language
(such as input a character from the
keyboard, or output a pattern to the
screen). Any monitor program is meant to
make machine -language programming
easier, not to substitute for it.
CHIPOS contains a Call to machine language subroutine instruction, which
may be used to branch to machinelanguage routines. Each machine -language
routine must end with a 39 code (6800
machine language Return from
Subroutine), which will cause the program
to return to the CHIP -8 instruction immediately following the subroutine call
after the machine language subroutine has
been executed.
Anyone interested in programming the
DREAM 6800 should obtain a copy of
CHIPOS
the software manual for the
DREAM, written by Michael Bauer. It is
available from Dreamware, at PO Box 343,
Belmont, Vic 3216. This manual lists the instructions of the CHIP -8 interpreter and explains what each instruction does, as well
as providing a list of CHIPOS subroutines
and the entry points to them. For machine
language programming the Assembly
Language Programming Manuals for the
-
6800 or the, Motorola M6800
Microprocessor Applications Manual are
good reference books.
NANOFARADS, NANNYFARADS ET ALIA: I
enjoy building electronic circuits. There are
many of yours I would have liked to build
but they 'use capacitors with nanofarad
ratings. These capacitors I cannot seem to
obtain around Canberra. Could you or any
of your staff suggest any stores in Sydney
that stock these capacitors or do I
substitute? (S. T., Queanbeyan, NSW).
By way of explanation, a microfarad is
one millionth of a Farad, the unit of
capacitance, and a nanofarad is one
thousandth of a microfarad. So to convert
a capacitor specified in nanofarads to the
more familiar microfarad value, simply
divide by 1000. For example, to convert
6.8nF to microfarads, divide by 1000 to obtain .0068uF. Similarly, 220nF becomes
0.22uF. Just for the record, we do not
normally specify capacitor values in
nanofarads.
I.
Thirdly, BR/W on board 78up9 is simply a
buffered Read/Write signal which has been
provided for convenience in other interfacing applications. It could be used, for exDecember 1978, to ample, to control a bi-directional I/O port,
the 2650 System
which would be most grateful if you but need not be connected to anything
could supply the answers.
unless you desire.
Firstly, is it possible to add up to 3
In answer to your final question, the conmore 8K RAM Boards onto the previous' trol 1 and control 2 lines shown on the I/O
sockets are selected from the data outputs
board (using only one buffer board), in
the same way that the first one was of another output port, so that if necessary
added?
up to 10 outputs can be taken from the
Secondly, are Page 0. Page 1, Page 2, one output socket. As mentioned on page
Page 3 (2650 expansion board, 78UP9)
76 of the November 1978 article, this may
connected to Page Select (RAM Board be necessary for a particular peripheral
78UP10) at the same time (if so, this device. For example, if data bit,7 from outmeans that they short each other out at put port C was connected to the control 1
Page Select), or are they connected singline of output port D, you could use DB7 to
ly by the use of switches?
control an eight bit latch connected to output port D.
Thirdly, to what is BR/W on 78UP9 connected to, if it is not connected, what is it
PARTS DIFFICULTIES: I have been buying
used for?
"Electronics Australia" for the past five
Finally, where on the board do I get the
Control 1 and Control 2 lines on the I/O years. There are numerous projects that
would like to build, except for the fact
sockets from? (P. R., North Manly, NSW).
that don't understand where to obtain
Firstly, the 2650 Mini Computer system
the printed circuit boards. Could you
can be expanded to 32K, the maximum adplease explain how to identify the make
dressing capability of the 2650 CPU. To do
this you would need to remove the 3K of
RAM originally on the CPU board and add
4 8K boards, which will be pages 0, 1, 2,
and 3. The first 1K of RAM, locations 0000
to 03FF, will need to be left vacant if you
MINI SCAMP:Could you please help me, as
wish to retain Pipbug.
have constructed the Mini -Scamp comThe December, 1978 article on the 2650,
puter
but am at a loss with the sample propages 87 and 88, gives the details of this
gram "Binary Count and Display." In the
page selection. There are practical problems however. You will need to fit the ex- book "Getting into Microprocessors" it
pansion board and four 8K memory boards says "As the LDI 8 instruction is a double
byte instruction the number 08 must be set
into the case, and each memory board will
consume approximately 1.5A, a total for into address 02 followed by 35 into 03,
memory alone of 6A. The four boards will and so on" but the instructions leave me
flat as to the other double byte instruction
dissipate a considerable amount of heat,
0007 C902 and the next 0009 8FFF. What
and you may have to consider forced air
do do with 02? (P. R., Ashcroft, NSW).
cooling (ie, a fan).
2650 EXPANSION: I have four questions
regarding the 2650 Mini Computer System
May 1978, Expansion of the 2650 System
November 1978, and Extra RAM for
-
-
I
I
I
of PCB, and where to purchase them.
(R.P., Anglers Paradise, Qld.)
Printed circuit boards described in
"Electronics Australia" are identified by a
small code number which forms part of
the copper pattern. This code number is
always identified in the parts list, and in
the text describing the project.
There are at least two sources for every
PC board ever published in "Electronic
Australia"; Radio Despatch Service, 869
George St, Sydney, NSW 2000; and RCS
Radio, 651 Forest Rd, Bexley, NSW 2207.
Other components suppliers also sell PC
boards, and their advertisements should
be carefully checked. A complete list of
those companies to which we supply
PCB and front panel artwork will appear
on the last page of the next issue.
DIGITAL THERMOMETER: Having been in
the graphic arts and X-ray industry as a
serviceman for some time. have great
need for a digital hand-held thermometer. Has any thought been given to
the design and construction of such a
I
meter?
Programming in Hexadecimal:
I
I
The buffers of the expansion board, in
conjunction with the buffers on each
memory board, will provide enough drive
capability for four memory boards. Interconnection wiring will have to be kept as
short as possible to avoid stray capacitance
and cross -talk which could degrade the
system performance.
In answer to your second question, only
one of the four page -select signals is connected to each memory board. The page
select signals 0, 1, 2, and 3 from the
7418138 on the expansion board 78up9
control which 8K board will be enabled,
while the 7415138 on each memory board
generate the signals to select blocks of 1K
within each 8K block in response to addresses 10, 11, and 12. The word "page" is
used to refer to 8K blocks (Page 0, 1, 2, and
3 from the 7415138 on the 78up9 board)
and also to 1K pages within each 8K block.
Each 8K page of memory is connected to
one "page select" signal from the expansion board. For full expansion of the
system, the first 8K block is connected to
Page 0, the second 8K block to Page 1 and
so on. Note the comments in the
November 78 article about disabling page
0 when Pipbug is selected in an expanded
system.
The double byte instruction C902 is a
Store instruction indexed on pointer
register 1, followed by a displacement
value (02). In the Binary Count and Display
program C9 is loaded into address 0007,
and 02 is loaded into the next address,
0008. Pointer register 1 is set to 0800 by
the instructions at addresses 0001 to 0006,
and when the indexed Store instruction is
executed the displacement is added to this
value, giving a final value of 0802.
This is the address to which data will be
sent in response to the Store instruction.
Because of the way the address bus is
decoded in the Mini Scamp, address 0802
selects the LEDs on the front panel. This
causes the data in the accumulator to be
displayed on the LEDs when the C902 in-
struction is executed, provided that
pointer register 1 has been previously set
to the base address 0800. The addressing
of the front panel LEDs is discussed on
Page 45 of "Getting into Microprocessors".
8F is the instruction which causes a delay
(DLY) in SC/MP programs, and the length of
the delay is set by the value of the
displacement which follows this instruction. In the sample Binary Count and
Display program the displacement is FF,
giving a delay of approximately 260ms.
Changing this value will give a shorter
delay time. In the sample program 8F is
loaded into address 0009, and FF is loaded
into the next address 000A.
A8 is the Increment and Load instruction
(ILD). It adds 1 to the contents of the address specified by the displacement which
follows it (03 in this case). The displacement is added to the contents of the Program Counter, which at this point is 000C
(This is the address of the instruction currently being executed). This gives a result
of OF (OC+3=OF in hexadecimal
arithmetic). Address OF contains the current value of the binary count, and is set to
00 at first, and incremented each time the
SC/MP loops through the program.
This looping is caused by the Jump instruction (JMP) 90. The next instruction, F8,
is the displacement for the Jump instruction, and causes the program to jump back
to address 0007 and go through the program again, storing the contents of the accumulator to the front panel LEDs, waiting
for a moment, then adding 1 to the total of
the count (held in address OF) and then
jumping back to 000C again and repeating
the sequence.
The counting program is discussed in
the article "Assemble your own Mini
Scamp Programs" in "Getting into
Microprocessors" Page 99. This article also
explains how to calculate address
displacements for Jump instructions.
The solution to your problem is to load
the instructions in the order they are listed.
The first byte of a double byte instruction
is loaded into the address shown in the left
hand column, and the next byte is loaded
into the following address. We hope this
clears up your problem.
ELECTRONICS Australia, July, 1980
131
A.
136 VICTORIA RD, MARRICKVILLE, NSW 2204
ELECTRONICS CENTRE
IFtA II) 1CZ)
BARGAIN PRICES
PERSONAL ATTENTION
SLICK MAIL ORDER SERVICE
PLAYMASTER 300 WATT AMPLIFIER
ABSOLUTE
LATEST MODEL P-200
P&P NSW $3.50
INTERSTATE 54.50
a
N MO
ri
ALSO AVAILABLE WITH WALNUT BA SE AND
a hi
r."
PERSPEX COVER WITH HINGES
COMPLETE MODULE KIT
Pack & Post NSW $2.00. Interstate $3
POWER SUPPLY KIT
573.00
547.50
NSW $2.50, Interstate $3.50.
WIRED -TESTED, Module and power supply
P -P
FULLY CONSTRUCTED
&
$147.50
plug
C -CORE
I
LOW NOISE
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ELECTRONIC
CAR -ALARM
-v.
PACK AND POST
r
-4/:
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AMPS
PRICE
NSW
S. a.
SA.. T.
WA.
JT
JT
JT
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0-18V
26-0-26V
8A
2A
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4A
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55.50
266
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Interstate $3.50
Speaker
Pack
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FIBREGLASS P -C BOARD
Al quality Fraction of normal
1.5mm single sided.
1
0-9.5V
0-18V
2
$2.75
$3.75
Moderate
charges
-
Repairs
guaranteed. Radios, Tape
Recorders, Cassettes, Amps.
ü SUPER SCOOP
IMUNI MOM :1R!'111111N1
1IIP.ai i1/Imi IIII11d111N1U
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Model C300K60 12" Max power 150W cont) 200W peak.
132
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ELECTRONICS Australia, July 1980
5.
$5.50
12.5A
30A PEAK
$5.50
$45.95
$3.50
$5.50
$7.00
PAIR
HITACHI STEREO CASSETTE TAPE DECK
Model D-230. Front Load. Dolby system. 12 mth warranty.
DISCOUNT PRICE $155.00
P&P NSW $3.50
SEND SAE FOR SPECS
INTERSTATE 5.50
MICROWAVE LEAKAGE
DETECTOR
For the detection of radiation
leakage In the ISM band centred
at 2450MHz. Microwave ovens
and industrial heaters. Scientific
and medical equipment.
$13.95. P -P $1.50.
Sound pressure level 101 a 2dB.
Freq response 4500Hz Freq
Reson 40 ± 8Hz Voice coil dia.
80mm
Flux density 10800 gauss
Weight 8.5kg was S125
PHILIPS
FERROXCUBE POT CORES
Brand new spares. Types 3HI. 2 E
cores. Bobbin (winding easily unwound), tuning slug, mounting
hardware. 14 x 14 x 11mm.
10 for 55.95 P -P $1.
HEAVY DUTY
BATTERIES
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FAMOUS BRANDS
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Used by many Govt Depts.
WA. NT. 59.75
PP NSW $2.75; SA O. V. T. S5.50;
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.la'
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1.2v
$95
Sound pressure level 99 x 2dB.
Freq response 5000Hz
Freq reson 60 4: 12Hz Voice coil
dia 65mm
Weight 5.2kg
was $102
r
NI -CAD RECHARGEABLE
PP NSW $3; SA O. V. T. 56.75:
$69.95
10
$3.75
$3.75
P&P NSW 53.00. SA, V, a S4.00
TAS, NT. WA S5.50
Plessey Foster 15"-12" high power speakers. Bassllead guitar
Hifi
PA
Organ
Model C380K60. 15" Max power 180 watts (cont) 240W peak. 8 and 16 ohms.
111111111111111111N11NIi\r.
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ATTRACTIVE WALNUT CABINET:
5211 x 30W x 14$ O cm
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we
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10 WATTS
CSIRO DESIGNED
SERVICE
405 x 310mm.
52.50 ea. P -P 75c.
or 3 for $6.25. P -P NSW $1.50, interstate $2.50.
1A
10A
1A
$42
Interstate
NSW
52.00
$2.75
NT
10A
82x0 -12V
JT 253A
and 15 ohms available
12" Woofer, 30 Watts RMS.
Resonance 65Hz.
Freq response 50-8000Hz. 521 ea
or 2 for 537.95.
12" Twin Cone, 30 Watts RMS.
Resonance 65Hz,
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or 2 for 539.95
PP NSW $2.00
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Exit, re-entry delay.
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Instructions for easy installa-
price
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HIGH EFFICIENCY
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INTERSTATE $7.60
Specs. 240VAC 50Hz. auto or manual operation
Plays 17, 25. 30cm (7.
10. 12in) records
33 and 45 rpm. adjustable counter weight and stylus
pressure
cueing lever
Bias compensator and anti skate control
Diecast platter with mat
RCA audio plugs and cable. 3 -core power cable and
PLAYMASTER STEREO GRAPHIC EQUALIZER
FULLY CONSTRUCTED 5129.95
12 MONTHS PARTS
LABOUR WARRANTY
Send SAE for technical specs of these top quality units.
Add freight. NSW $4.50. Interstate $7.
we're
discounting)
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computer -type module.
Protects your vehicle, contents and accessories.
12VDC positive or neg.
Red LED warning lamp.
5129.95
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TOP VALUE
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STYLISH S SHAPE
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BUILD THIS
300W HIGH -POWER
AMPLIFIER MODULE
NOT
SATISFACTION
BSR BELT -DRIVE RECORD PLAYER
'ea
(Can't mention brand
PHONE 51.3845
SIZE
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D.
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4
1.8
PRICE
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53.75
PP
75c
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4 size D $23
4 size C 514
10 size AA 5AH 514.75
PP NSW $1.50; INTERSTATE $3.
My need is to measure liquid temperatures (eg developer, water) within
the range 10°C -50"C and also surface
temperatures within the range
100"C -200°C, although the latter is not as
important. If possible, an accuracy of
±1°C
is required.
would be very grateful for a project
on a digital thermometer, and I'm sure
that others would find such a device useful. I've been a regular follower of "EA"
for seven years, and have built several of
your projects (P.M., St Marys, NSW.)
Sorry P.M., but we have no plans at
this stage to describe a digital thermometer as we believe that its appeal
would be quite limited. Of course, we
could change our minds if there were
other letters indicating otherwise.
Electronics Australia Reader Services
complete an "Electronics
Australia" project because you missed out on
your regular issue, we can usually provide
emergency assistance on the following basis:
If you are unable to
I
I was very interested in
"Super-Bass Filter" in
February EA, as am in the throes of
building my own stereo system.
However, I am having difficulty in
locating any plans or information on
building a super -woofer enclosure.
Would you either consider publishing a
SUPER -WOOFER:
project
your
I
project
build
to
a
super -woofer
enclosure, or give me a contact where
might be able to locate some plans for
this enclosure. (R.K., Dandenong, Vic.)
PHOTOSTAT COPIES: $2 per project, or $2
per part where a project spreads over multiple
issues. Requests can be handled more speedily if projects are positively identified, and If not
accompanied by technical queries.
METALWORK DYELINES: Available for most
projects at $2 each, showing dimensions,
holes, cutouts, etc., but no wiring details.
PRINTED BOARD PATTERNS: Dyeline
transparencies, actual size but of limited contrast: $2. Specify positive or negative. We do
not sell PC boards.
answers, undertake special research or discuss design changes.
BACK NUMBERS: Available only until our
stocks are exhausted. Within three months of
publication, face value. Four months and older,
if available. $2 (includes storage fee). Post and
packing 60c per issue extra.
OTHER QUERIES: Technical queries outside
the scope of "Replies by Post" may be submitted without fee, for reply in the magazine, at
the discretion of the Editor.
COMMERCIAL, SURPLUS EQUIPMENT: No
information can be supplied.
COMPONENTS: We do not deal In electronic
components. Prices, specifications, etc.,
should be sought from advertisers or agents.
PROJECT QUERIES: Members of our technical
staff are NOT available to discuss Individual
projects, either in person at our office or by
telephone.
REMITTANCES: Must be negotiable in
Australia and made payable to "Electronics
Australia". Where the exact charge may be in
doubt, we recommend submitting an open
cheque endorsed with a suitable limitation.
REPLIES BY POST: Limited to advice concerning projects published within the past two
years. Charge $2. We cannot provide lengthy
ADDRESS: All requests to the Assistant Editor,
"Electronics Australia", Box 163, Beaconsfield,
2014.
I
We are considering publishing details
for
a
super -woofer
loudspeaker
enclosure in a future issue. In the meantime, we had an article on the subject including one suggested design in the May
'75 issue (Project file number 1/SE/39.)
recently had a whirlwind introduction to a Signetics 2650
microprocessor which belonged to a
friend of mine. In a rash moment, purchased the unit and a compatible VDU,
cassette interface and 12k of memory.
My problem is this. None of my acquaintances have any knowledge of programming such a computer
without
using BASIC. feel that unless can communicate with the 2650 in machine
language, cannot get the best out of it.
Since almost all the equipment purchased was from projects in your
magazine, hope you can provide me
with software information or a list of articles published. (C.M., Edwardtown, SA.)
2650 SOFTWARE:
I
I
-
I
I
-
2650 Mini Also in the April issue
assembler, Lunar lander game, and
Micro Basic programs (8/M/37).
August 1979
disassembler program
(for assembly language listings of
machine code programs) (8/M/40).
A random morse
December 1979
code program (8/M/43).
February 1980
Comments on improvements to the line assembler program and in the same issue a trace
routine and two micro basic programs
for the 2650. (8/M/45, 46).
An assembler program allows you to
load programs directly into memory in
mnemonic form (Such as LODI, ZBSR etc)
instead of in machine language, which
makes programming much easier.
We hope you find this information
useful.
-A
-
I
I
I
We have published a considerable
amount of software for the 2650 computer, and photostat copies of articles
and back issues are available through
our Reader Services. Below is a list of articles on the 2650 for your information.
Four programs for the
October 1977
Baby 2650 (also suitable for later 2650)
Music and games
December 1978
programs (File No 8/M/32).
2650 driver routines for
January 1979
the Matsushita printer (2/CC/34).
Utility. programs (5 useful
March 1979
subroutines) and a memory test
program (8/M/34).
April 1979
Program for faster loading
(300 baud, or bits per second). (8/M/36).
-
-
-
-
COMPUTER PROS AND CONS: Can you
tell me the pros and cons of the Dream
6800, 2650 and Miniscamp computers
published in your magazine? What is the
difference between the 6800 and 6802
chips used in the Dream and can it (the
Dream) be programmed in Basic
language. (A.B., Essenden, Vic.)
Most DREAM kits now available use
the 6802 microprocessor which is identical to the 6800 as far as programming
and instruction set are concerned. The
difference between the two is that the
6802 chip contains the clock circuit.
The 2650 computer uses a different
microprocessor, namely the Signetics
2650, which has a different instruction
set. As published, our design for the
2650 is more readily expandable than
the DREAM. Up to 32 kilobytes of RAM
memory may be added, for example.
However the 2650 has some dis-
advantages. Firstly, the basic design is for
a computer only. The user must add a
keyboard and a video terminal before
the 2650 can be used.
On the other hand the DREAM already
has a hexadecimal keyboard for entering
programs, and includes a video display
generator, so all that is necessary is to
connect it to a television set, either by
using an RF modulator such as the one
described in numerous articles on TV
games, or by using a direct video entry
method described in the July 1979
DREAM article.
The Miniscamp computer, although a
good design in its time, has been superseded by later designs. Like the 2650, a
keyboard and terminal must be added to
make a functioning computer system,
but the Miniscamp design is not suited to
later expansion of the memory.
The DREAM was not designed to use
Basic, and Basic instructions can't be run
on it. However, the DREAM uses the
CHIPOS language, which for some purposes is better than Basic. It uses only 1K
of Read Only Memory, instead of the 8K
required by Basic, and since all the commands are in hexadecimal form, only a
small keypad is needed, instead of the
full typewriter keyboards of Basic
systems.
CHIPOS is also specially written for
graphical displays and computer game
programs, and for these purposes it is
much easier to use than Basic. This does
not mean however that it is less powerful. Once you know how to use it, it is
very easy to write a CHIPOS program
which would duplicate the function of
the Basic statements like X=3: X=X+1 IF
... THEN
:
etc.
ELECTRONICS Australia, July 1980
133
MARKETPLACE
DISPLAY ADVERTS IN MARKETPLACE
are available in sizes from a minimum of 2cm
x
col rated at $12 per col cm.
1
Please state classification: For Sale. Wanted.
Reader Service. Position Vacant. Position
Wanted. Business For Sale. etc ...
-
refer ARRL Handbook. Iron
powder and ferrite torolds, ferrite beads and
sleeves for wideband RF amps. Large SASE
for data/price list. R.J. & U.S. Imports, Box 157,
Mortdale, NSW 2223.
AMIDON CORES
FOR SALE
CLASSIFIED RATES $3 per line per insertion payable in advance. Minimum two lines.
CLOSING DATE is six weeks prior to the
on -sale date. Issues are on sale the first Monday of each month.
PRECISION TAPE DECK (only) 1, Y/.,
1/2, Inch adj,
NAB or STND spools up to 14 inch, no
overhang. 16 trk 1 inch, RED/RPL heads (4trk
1/4
inch). Control panel etc complete. All V
Good Cond. Some 1 inch and 1/2 Inch tape,
$375. BOX 437 Gawler SA 5118
... List of bargain electronic components,
Ideal for hobbyists, servicemen, Radio Clubs,
etc. Send 9in x 4in SAE Nowll MICRONICS,
PO Box 175, RANDWICK, NSW 2031.
TRS-80 L.1 powerful monitor + reloc debug aid.
Learn mach code, $10 tape + doc. S. Hood, 72
Marion ST, Unley SA 5061.
ADDRESS all classified orders, copy, enquiries. etc. to: The Advertising Manager.
ELECTRONICS AUSTRALIA, Box 162.
Beaconsfield 2014.
COLLINS KWM-2 TRANSCEIVER with P/S. Clean,
Excellent $850 ONO (066) 86 2718.
FREE
EXCITING RANGE of software for use by all
owners of popular brand computers. Write for
our catalogue to Supersoftware, do Lane
Cove, PO, Lane Cove 2068.
papertape reader
-
COMPUTER TERMINALS ASR.33 TELETYPE
110 baud
20mA loop printer, keyboard,
and punch. Good condition
Swls
& Dxers do you know what the Australian
Radio DX Club is? The largest shortwave club
In Australia with over 15 years of service and a
full range of special publications. Comprehensive new member kit upon joining. Special
membership fee for people under 18.
Australian DX news averages over 23 pages
every month. ADXN contains up to the minute
news on short wave, medium wave and'utllity
Dxing.
a basic library for
electronics enthusiasts
Branches established around
BASIC
ELECTRONICS
Australia. For a sample copy of ADXN send a
22c stamp to ARDXC, PO Box 79, Narrabeen,
NSW 2101, mentioning this ad.
Basic Electronics, is almost certainly the most widely used manual on electronic fundamentals in
Australia. It Is used by radio clubs, In secondary
schools & colleges, and in WIA youth radio clubs.
Begins with the electron, Introduces and explains
components and circuit concepts, and progresses
through radio, audio techniques, servicing, test instruments, etc. If you've alweays wanted to become
Involved in electronics, but have been scared off
by the mysteries involved, let Basic Electronics explain them to you.
$550.
EA (FEB 78) VIDEO TERMINAL 110/300 baud
KBD -5 keyboard, power supply and case.
Assembled
good condition $125. R&M Electronics, 14 Tyers St, Hamilton 3300
(055) 72 3082 A/H.
-
READER SERVICE
friends!
Join the first Australian Tapespondence Club.
SAE, to ATRA, Box 970, GPO, Adelaide 5001.
YOUR CASSETTE RECORDER can make
TRS-80 8 COMMODORE PETICBM programs for
business
& education, also mentally
stimulating games. Send SAE for latest list.
Softronics Micro Systems, Box 238 PO, Lind field, NSW 2070. PET/CBM dealers.
FOR HIRE
COMPUTER RENTAL Rent one of the
FUNDAMENTALS OF
SOLID STATE
popular
makes of microcomputers for hands-on experience or for that special job. Dorf
Microcomputer. Ph (02) 960 1808 Bus & AH.
If you're an
ASSEMBLY
ARTIST
and you're reading this
magazine, WE WANT
Tjr
YOU!
All the advertising you see for Dick Smith
Electronics is done in-house. We have a very
busy advertising department - and we're
looking fora competent advertising assembly
artist to help relieve the pressure.
Check yourself against our requirements:
least 2 years experience.
Ability to type (we'll train you on a
computerised phototypesetter).
working knowledge of electronics.
Most of all, a proven self starter who
doesn't need continual supervision.
Are we describing you? If so, how about
working for us. An attractive salary is offered,
you'll be working in a modern, air conditioned
office at North Ryde with a pool and recreat-
At
Fundamentals of Solid State has been reprinted,
revised and updated showing how popular it has
been. It' provides a wealth of information on
semiconductor theory and operation, delving much
deeper than very elementary works but without the
maths and abstract theory which make many of the
more specialised texts very heavy going. It begins
with atomic theory, diode types, unljunction, field
effect and bipolar transistors, thryister devices,
device fabrication and microcircuits. A glossary of
terms and an index complete the book.
FOR SALE
PDP8-E Computer 8K Core Memory, TU56
DECtape, KP8-E Power fail. Auto Start board,
custom 1/0 brand, blank wire wrap board,
Schlumberger 3325, 100 channel analogue
scanner. $2500 or nearest offer. Individual
unit sales considered.
Contact Mr 6. Henstridge,
La Trobe University. 478 3122 ext 2039
AN INTRODUCTION TO
DIGITAL ELECTRONICS
A
ion facilities, and staff discounts on purchases
will really help you if you're an electronics
hobbyist.
Why not give us a call - as soon as possible.
Call (02) 888 3200 and ask to speak to Mr
Gary Johnston.
-
Japanese Transistors & IC's
Send 40c (Rust) stamp
Catalogue
SOAR DIGITAL Multimeters
ME 501 LCD
$58
ME 502 LED
$45
includes air mail post
DICK SMITH ELECTRONICS
Cnr Lane Cove & Waterloo Rds,
134
Bank cheques, money orders in Australian
Dollars
NORTH RYDE, NSW, 2113.
N. NAKAGAMI
.:..
Kasugai, Aichi-ken JAPAN 487
..
..
.457-22 Hasama-cho
^
770
ELECTRONICS Australia, July 1980
Electronics is going digital. This book can help
YOU go right along with it. Tens of thousands of
people
engineers, technicians, students and hobbyists
have used An Introduction to Digital Electronics to find out what the digital revolution Is all
about. The new edition has been fully rewriten and
updated, to make it of even greater value.
--
Available from "Electronics Australia," 57
Regent St, Sydney. PRICE $3.50 each
OR by mail order from "Electronics
Australia", PO Box 163, Beaconsfield 2014.
PRICE $4.10 each.
1
J
SOLENOIDS
BRASS SHIPS CLOCKS
SMITHS 8 DAY 7 INCH
DIAMETER $110
200 MA 24 volt. in push movement.
52.50 P+P 80c
1
2
volt. fully charged. 4in
AH
GENUINE EX ARMY WRIST
WATCHES
Complete with nylon band $19.50
Post 51.10
x
3in
x
$1.60 each P&P 80c
15/64
15/64
Carbon steel 54.00 doz. Post 60c
e
ARTILLERY DIAL SIGHTS MK2
For perfect holes in metal
Cuts holes %" a/a" %" 1" 11/4"
With tapered reamer size
3-14mm
Can also be adapted as a Dumpy Level
or as base for a telescope has full 3607
+
P
5'2" dram gunmetal rotating circle Adjustable elevation and depression Has
top grade 1." diam object lens F L 10"
with cross hairs. eyepiece. '4" right angle
prism
height 10"
weight 31/2kgs.
With leather carrying case Original cost
C$3.65 D$3.65
$300
suits 210 535.
24 volt Power supply to suit above 515.
Or complete station with Headphones.
Mic
5110.
11
a
P+ P5130
30
10'4" x 2400' S7 95
P + P A.$1 65 8.52.75 C.53.10
microvolt sensitivity.
2.5KHz bandwidth ssb. 6KHz bandwidth
AM 1 RW. PEP max output. Fully
automatic tuning of both transmitter and
receiver from remote control unit.
Complete with automatic aerial coupling
unit. mic. headset. etc. 400Hz supply.
Ideal for amateur use.
PRICE 5750
COLLINS SYNTHESISED
SB RECEIVER
1
TRC/75 receiver section of transceiver
specification as above
PRICE 5400
payable at destination.
20X to 60X
ZOOM TELESCOPE
x
$2 cartage to rail, freight payable at
nearest attended railway station.
ZOOM FOCUSING
MICROSCOPES
Zoom focusing microscopes. 750X
battery and mirror illuminated Zoom
531.75
P&P A $1.65.
B
High grade coated lenses
Ideal for pistol and rifle ranges
WEIGHT P.
S32.50
or general viewing Zooms in
lb
$2.75. CS3.10.
from very low to high powers
Complete with tripods
POST A S1 75. 8 $3.00.
C
Length 16in
Height 10in
Weight
S95
P
SPY TELESCOPES
P+
CONDENSER LENS
a rifle cartridge extends to 8". Only $8.95 each, post 60c.
8 x 17 mag size of
BINOCULARS
PRISMATIC Coated Lenses Brand new
Complete with case
8 x 30
542.00
7 y 50
548.95
P&P
10 x 50 $51.00
A
51.75
12 y 50
$53.00
8
53.00
20 x 50 $65.00
C
53.10
20 x 65 5125.00
SMALL CLIP -ON
POCKET TELESCOPE
.21" diem
2'
F L
51.50 each or 52.50
NIBBLING TOOL
Cuts sheet metal like a punch and
die up to 18 G.A. Cuts Trims
Notches 514.95
P+P $1.45
Directional Gyros
ÁN5735-1 Air Operated
tory complete with magneto calling system.
Set of 2 phones
IMPELLER PUMPS
New gunmetal body. Stainless Steel
Shaft. Neoprene Impeller Up to 15ft
Lift. suitable for almost any type of liquid.
Self priming Ideal boat bilge pump. sullage drains. etc. Approx size 8" x 5"
P
$35.75, 1" $51.00,'4" $56.50.
P+P: A. 51.95. B. $3.50. C. $4.60
AERIAL CAMERAS
Sperry Artificial. Horizon.
AN5736.1 Air Operated.
-
WITH 8" FL 3" DIAM LENS F24 MAAK
IV 2.9 LENS STOPS 11, 8, 5.6. 4. 2.9
240 volts operated complete with
Speaker and Amplifier.
BELL & HOWELL 5195.
Si Cartage to Rail Freight payable at
Liquid filled
r.ompass
nearest attended Railway Station
SELSYN MOTORS
MAGSLIP
TRANSMITTER 3" MK2 $17.50
$2 cartage to rail freight. Payable to
nearest attended railway station.
PENTAC LENSES
3" DIAM. 8" FL WITH DIAPHRAGM
STOPS 11.8. 5.6. 4. 2.9. MOUNTED IN
METAL HOUSING
565
POST: A. $1.85, B. $3.25, C $4.10
-
FACED RIGHT ANGLE
PRISMS TOP QUALITY EX AIR FORCE
OR LENS & PRISM FOR $120.
POST A. S1 75. B $300. C $360
545.
517.60.
P&P
A.
$1.65.
B.
52.75.
MAGNESIUM
C.
53.10
DRY
CELL
BATTERIES. Suits PRC25 and dozens
of other uses 15 volts long life.
Only 51.50 each P & P A 51.35. B
52.75. C 53.60.
ANEROID BAROMETERS
In brass case. made in London. S39.50
P&P A. 51.65
B.
C.
52.75
$3.10
Post Packing A. 51.75.
reader.
Only 57.95 each Post $1 30
B.
53.00.
C.
$3.10
MAGNIFYING GLASSES
POLARITY & CURRENT
CHECKER
4" Magnifier suspends from neck and
rests on chest. leaves hands free ideal for
mum or gran. sewing, etc.
400 volt. Semple leads and
pt48s puiigly determines positive or
negative with illuminated indicators. also
checks AC current and intensity, fully
insulated only 54.95. pp Sl 30
Slip and Turn Indicators
547.50
+ P A 2.25, B 4.00, C $6.00
16MM SOUND PROJECTORS
IN GOOD WORKING ORDER
14"
3 volt to
535
$37.50
$2.15, B $3.85, C $4.85,
D $4.85
PMG type ideal office farm or fac-
Kern Swuisse Switzerland DK2
Two minute can be estimated
down to one minuted. Tested in
good working order. $750.00
AIRCRAFT INSTRUMENTS
P A
TELEPHONE SETS
per pair P&P 80c
THEODOLITE
supply headphone mic. leads etc. S95.
Or 42 set separate 565.
A51.75 B53 C53.60.
Precision calibrations set In solid
gunmetal frame spring ratchet adjustment. Approx size 7" x 6".
Complete In wooden case
25 a 30 513.50
P&P A. 51.30
$49.50
P
CLINOMETER MK6
0° TO 45°
TELESCOPES
21b
+
$3.60
With magnified lens sight and degree
Post A52.25, 854.10, C56.10.
-$66;
$ 39.50.
HEADPHONES
30
C42 set 36 to 60M/Hz with 24 volt power
With Tripod. 5115.50.
4" SQUARE
.
-
15 x 50 Ex RAN
black enamelled
brass. Length 16", weight 5kg. Price
Army No 9 with azimuth horizontal circle and vertical adjustment suits all types of
levelling. In leather case
15X 57.00, P+P 80c
1
mile twin (2 miles) genuine ex -Army
Don. 8 perfect condition $45.00 per
drum. $5.00 cartage to rail freight
PRISMS
.
$1.95
$1.60
STC HIGH IMPEDANCE
10"
TELEPHONE WIRE
$75
.
VR65
LENGTH 121/2". HEIGHT
Fully synthesised transceiver with am.
upper. lower and independent sideband
operation. 1KHz steps from 2MHz to
1
6x4
45x40
COLLINS INDEPENDENT
SIDEBAND TRANSCEIVER
TRC/75
29.999MHz
$1.50 832
P+P 80c
2x2
PRISMATIC
TELESCOPES
DIRECTOR LEVELS
$1.50
52.75
600'
1200'
51.95
51.95
51.50
55.00
1H6
Ex
PROFESSIONAL QUALITY
x
Post $1.30
....51.95
ZOOM SPOTTING
SCOPES
EX ABC
MAGNETIC RECORDING
TAPES '/4"
5"
7"
BRAND NEW
51.95 68M8
6SN7
51.95 6GV8
5U4
EF50
$1.50 6AK5
3400 ohms. brand new, only $5.95 pair.
P&P. A $1.65. B 52.75. C 53.10
Our Special only 527.50
P&P A 52.25 B $4.00 C 56 00
RECEIVER No. 210
2-16 M/cs $75
Transmitter No.
-
-
A$1.95 B53.25
SPECIAL $49.50
VALVES
CENTRE DRILLS
$37.95
Le Coultre ex RAAF rated one of the
world's best in smart chrome case with
black dial Original cost 5250
C: NT,
D: WA
1m 4
CHASSIS PUNCH SET
P
A: NSW
8: Vic. Old. SA Tas
NIFE CELLS
Post A $1.75; 8 53.00; C 53.60.
WRIST WATCHES
SWISS JAEGER
POSTAGE KEY:
a
56.30
4" Hand held
3" Hand held
$5.95
$3.80
$2.65
$4.25
21/2" Hand held
314" Rectangular
4" Magnifier on stand
leaves hands free
Illuminated 10 x power
COLLINS COMMUNICATIONS
RECEIVERS
500Khz to 30Mhz
Type R/391
5500
$10.75
magnifier
Postages $1.30 extra
$6.60
Deitch Bros.
70 OXFORD STREET, SYDNEY 2010
SORRY NO
C
O D
ELECTRONICS Australia, July 1980
135
ADVERTISING INDEX
Don't let your valuable issues
go astray
ELECTRONICS
AUSTRALIA
ADVERTISER
PAGE
50
A & R Soanar
ASP Microcomputers
114
AWA Ltd
105
Ace Radio
132
Adcola Products
100
Agfa Gevaert Ltd
In colour section
Ampec Engineering Co Pty Ltd
12
Ampex Australia Pty Ltd
In colour section
Audio Engineers Ply Ltd
109
Audio Monitor Sound Systems
37
Audio Telex Communications Pty Ltd
106
Australian Hi -Fi Publications Pty Ltd
34
BINDERS
B.S. Micromp
Bootstrap Electronics
Bright Star Crystals
Butterworths Pty Ltd
C & K Electronics (Aust.) Pty Ltd
CBS Record & Cassettte Club
CO Electronics
Cema (Distributors) Pty Ltd
C.
ralrItS:
c
These attractive
Chapman, L. E.
Classic Radio
Coates, H.F. & Co Pty Ltd
Comp -Soft Microcomputer Service
Computer Country Pty Ltd
binders finished
in brown plastic
with gold lettering
will keep your
back issues of
Electronics Australia
neat and tidy.
Computerland Melbourne
Defence Force Recruiting
Defi Agency
Deitch Bros
Dick Smith Electronic Group
114
82
88
128
59
107
129
28
108
91
93
123
126
118,127
23
93
135
30, 31, 39, 56, 86, 96
Dick Smith Electronic Group
116, 117, 134, IFC
Dindy Marketing (Aust.) Pty Ltd
29
Electronics
120
Electrocount Pty Ltd
104
Electrocraft Ply Ltd
109
Electonic Agencies
98
Electronic Calculator Discounts
73
Electronic Development Sales Pty Ltd
75
General Electronic Services Pty Ltd
2
Grundig Sales & Service
97
Hagemeyer (Aust.)
OBC
Instant Software
66, 124, 125
International Correspondence Schools
85
John F. Rose Computer Service
E. & M.
*
12
ei2
HOLDS
ISSUES
Available from
Electronics Australia,
57 Regent St, Sydney. PRICE: $4.50
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Magazines prior to April
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Radio Despatch Service
Radio Parts Group
136
Postcode
Enclosed
is
ELECTRONICS Australia, July 1980
for
119
134
In
colour section
1
-J
Tandy International Electronics
46
Vicom International
44, In colour section
Video Technics
75
Warburton Franki
25, 61
Wireless Institute of Australia
89
Address
L
111
Sharon Youth Camp
Stanton Magentics, Inc.
Stotts Technical College
Superscope (A'asia) Pty Ltd
.
Name
113
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years
78
36
17
In
colour section
Technics SL-10
y-
151
I h
Quartz -Phase -Locked
Control Direct -Drive
Turntable with Linear Tracking
Tonearm
01P,
It
-
1
Marking the 10th
anniversary of the
direct-drive turntable.
It has been 10 years since Technics introduced
the world's first direct -drive turntable, the SP-10.
When it was introduced this turntable had less
wow and flutter and better speed accuracy than
the cutting lathes used to make records. And
because the drive system did not use rubber
parts like belts and idler wheels, it insured that its
excellent specifications would be retained for a
long time.
Six years after the introduction of the SP -10,
Technics brought out an improved version, with
higher torque and quartz control. Today, more
than 1500 of these SP-10MKII's are used by
broadcasters in 27 countries around the world.
In the past two years, Technics has added
quartz synthesizer control to various models,
permitting the precision of quartz to be retained
in speeds above and below the standard 33-1/3,
45 and 78 rpm.
More significant to the consumer, Technics has
also developed direct -drive turntables which
have a very high degree of precision, yet cost
much less than the professional grade models.
It is possible to get numerous Technics direct drive turntables in the popular price range, yet
with specifications that were obtainable only in
very expensive equipment a few years ago.
With the SL -10, Technics continues to lead the
industry in turntable innovation. This new
turntable represents as radical a departure from
conventional design as did the SP -10 ten
years ago.
It has the same width and depth dimensions as
an LP record jacket, yet within the compact
package are an amazingly precise drive system,
a gimbal suspended linear -tracking tonearm, a
high-grade moving coil cartridge, plus extensive
control systems which permit even a complete
hi-fi novice to use the SL -10 without any
problem. Nearly every operation is automated,
with the upper and lower halves of the cabinet
closed during record play. And the tonearm is
designed so that the system can be stood
vertically without any sacrifice in tracking
accuracy. The SL -10 marks as great a step
forward in convenience as did the development
of cassette tapes versus the open -reel format.
Yet there is absolutely no loss in reproduction
quality. On the contrary, numerous factors in the
SL -10's design will significantly enhance the
sound from records.
Technics changes the face of
turntable technology ... again.
.1
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/.
Technics
For further information contact The Technics
Advisory Service,
P.O. Box 319, North Ryde 2113
TT2.80
THE JVC RECEIVER.
Every bit as revolutionary as they look, and then some.
1
Ih our case, looks are never
deceiving. Because all.
our new DC integrated
stereo receivers combine unprecedented,
revolutionary styling
with unique electronic .1
design features that
reflect JVC's more
than 50 years' experience in audio
development and
F
the music spectrum than
conventional tone controls. You can attenuate or
accentuate any of five
Ii separate musical bands,
and as an added feature,
we've incorporated a
special button so that the SE.
,
circuit can be switched to your
tape deck.
Pushbutton Source Selectors
A horizontal panel of pushbuttons
provides total control over all functions.
And brilliantly illuminated LEDs instantly
indicate the program source. Professional" type slider controls set volume and balance.
Combine all these exclusive features with high
sensitivity and tuning precision, thumb control tuning
wheel and accurate dual -metering and you'll see just
how revolutionary the new JVC DC integrated stereo
receivers are. Play one at your JVC dealer soon.
For details on all JVC
Hi -Fi Equipment, write to
JVC Advisory Service,
Box 307, North Ryde,
innovation.
DC Power Amplifier
Design
All four new JVC receivers feature DC amplifier
circuitry. They offer virtually distortion -free performance (0.03% THD) throughout the entire audible
spectrum. As a result, the sound you hear is clearer,
cleaner and crisper. In addition, your speakers are
protected with the Triple Power Protection circuit
and you can monitor
outputwattage with
dual power meters,
Choose from 120,
85, 60 and 35 watts/
channel.*
SEA all the way
All four receivers offer
JVC's exclusive built-in
SEA five -zone graphic
Top JR-S401
equalizer for more
Left JR-S2O1
Right JR-S3O1
complete control of
N.S.W. 2113.
For pure Hi -Fi
entertainment!
o
JR-S 401 (top). JR 9201 (bororn left) 6
JAS 301 (Whom
JVC
nyrM)
the right choice
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@ B Ohms. both channels driven from 20Hz-20 KHz. with no more than 0 03% I HD.
Wí87/78