EZbus Quickstart + Tutorial Manual V. 1.1
The EZbus operating sytem is regularly enhanced and updated.
As such, the information contained in this manual is subject to change.
Please check the Event Electronics Web site, www.event1.com, for the most
up-to-date EZbus documentation.
To receive a printed copy of this Quickstart + Tutorials Manual, please fill out
and mail the coupon that came packaged with your EZbus. If you prefer, you
can submit your request via the Web at www.event1.com/support/manual.html.
Installation and Quickstart Guides
Operational Tutorials
®
2
EZbus Installation and QuickStart Guides/Operational Tutorials
©2001 Event Electronics LLC
P.O. Box 4189
Santa Barbara, CA 93140-4189
Manual Version 1.00
Event Electronics® is a registered trademark of Event Electronics LLC.
EZbus™ is a trademark of Event Electronics LLC.
Windows®, Windows® 98 SE, Windows® ME, and Windows® 2000 are
registered trademarks of Microsoft, Inc.
Macintosh® is a registered trademark of Apple Corp.
ADAT® is a registered trademark of Alesis Corp.
3
Disclaimer of All Warranties and Liability
Event Electronics LLC makes no warranties, either express or implied,
except as explicitly set forth in the Limited Warranty (below) with respect
to this manual or with respect to the product described in this manual, its
quality, performance, merchantability, or fitness for any particular purpose.
This product is sold “as is.” The entire risk as to its quality and performance
is with the buyer. Should the product prove to be defective following its
purchase, the buyer (not Event Electronics LLC, their distributors, or
retailers) assumes the entire cost of all necessary servicing, repair, or
correction and any incidental or consequential damages. In no event will
Event Electronics LLC be liable for any direct, indirect, incidental, or
consequential damages resulting from any defect in the product, even if
Event Electronics LLC has been advised of the possibility of such damages.
Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of implied warranties
or liability for incidental or consequential damages, so the above limitation
or exclusion may not apply to you.
Limited Warranty
The Event Electronics EZbus is fully tested and quality checked before
shipment, and is warranted to be free from defects in materials and
workmanship for a period of 90 days (ninety days) from the date of
purchase. During that time period, Event Electronics, LLC will, at no
charge, repair or replace, at Event Electronics’ sole option, any defective
unit returned to its service department. Event Electronics LLC will
accept for servicing only those units that are accompanied by a Return
Authorization number obtained from the Event Electronics LLC Customer
Service department. Units shipped without a Return Authorization number
will be refused.
Event Electronics LLC disclaims any liability to users of its products for
consequential damage of any kind arising from or connected with the use
of their products.
This warranty is void in cases of misuse, abuse, abnormal conditions of
operation, or attempts to alter or modify the function of a part or assembly.
This limited warranty is in lieu of all other warranties expressed or implied
and no representative or other person is authorized to represent or assume
for Event Electronics LLC any warranty liability beyond that set forth
herein. This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may have
additional rights, which vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.
Notice of Copyright
This manual is copyrighted. All rights reserved. This document may not,
in whole or in part, be copied, photocopied, reproduced, translated, or
reduced to any electronic medium or machine-readable form without
prior consent in writing from Event Electronics LLC.
4
Important Safety Instructions
• Please read all safety and operating instructions
before using this product.
• Please note and follow all warnings printed on the EZbus
and in the EZbus Owner’s Manual.
• Keep all liquids away from this product. Do not operate this
product in environments where it may be subjected to moisture.
• Do not operate this product in environments where it may be
subjected to excessive heat.
• This product is designed to be operated only at the voltage
specified on the individual unit (100V, 110V, or 240V). Failure to
operate the unit at the specified voltage may result in severe
damage to the unit, and risk of fire or electrical shock. Operating
the unit at the improper voltage will void the factory warranty.
• This unit is equipped with a grounding connector and a power
cord with grounding plug. Always make sure the unit is plugged
into an electrical outlet that is properly installed and grounded.
Never purposely defeat the grounding properties of the unit by
modifying the power cable or using a “ground lift” device.
Operating the unit without proper grounding could result
in electric shock, severe injury, or death.
• Use care in routing the power cord so as to make it unlikely to be
stepped upon, pinched, or bent.
• This unit contains no user-serviceable parts. Refer all servicing to
qualified personnel. Do not attempt to service this unit yourself.
Opening the case of this unit will expose you to dangerous
voltages that could result in electric shock, injury, or death.
• Refer this unit for servicing to qualified personnel if:
• Liquid has spilled into the unit, or the unit has been exposed
to excessive moisture
• The unit has been dropped or physically damaged
• A marked change in performance is noticed
5
Contents
Getting Started ..................................................................................... 9
Contents of the EZbus Box ............................................................................... 9
Using the EZbus with a Computer ................................................... 10
Computer System Requirements .................................................................... 10
For use with an IBM-PC/Compatible ............................................................. 10
For use with an Apple Macintosh ................................................................... 11
Installing the EZbus Software Drivers ........................................ 12
IBM-PC/Compatible ........................................................................................ 12
Apple Macintosh ............................................................................................... 13
EZbus QuickStart Guide 1 .................................................. 14
Using the EZbus as a Computer Audio Recording Interface ....................... 14
EZbus QuickStart Guide 2 .................................................. 17
Using the EZbus as a Software Control Surface ............................................17
EZbus QuickStart Guide 3 .................................................. 20
Part I. Using the EZbus as a Stand-Alone Digital Mixer—Live Performance ... 20
Part II. Using the EZbus as a Stand-Alone Digital Mixer—Recording ........ 23
6
EZbus Overview....................................................................................... 25
EZbus System Architecture ........................................................................ 25
Control Nomenclature and Conventions .................................................. 27
Operating Conventions Used in Audio Control Mode .................................. 28
Operating Conventions Used in Virtual Control Mode ................................ 29
EZbus Front Panel ........................................................................................... 30
EZbus Rear Panel ............................................................................................ 32
Ezbus Signal Flow ........................................................................................... 34
EZbus Operational Tutorials
.................................................... 37
Tutorial 1:
Using the EZbus as a Computer Audio Recording Interface .......... 38
What this Tutorial Covers ............................................................................... 39
What You’ll Need for this Tutorial .................................................................. 39
Step 1: Connecting the EZbus to a Computer Via USB ................................ 40
Step 2: Connecting the EZbus to Your Audio Playback System .................. 41
Step 3: Connecting an Analog Audio Source to the EZbus .......................... 42
Step 4: Selecting the EZbus as the Audio Input/Output Device
in Your Recording Software ............................................................................. 43
Step 5: Recalling an EZbus Mix and Making it the “Active” Mix ................ 44
Step 6: Assigning an Audio Input Source to a Primary Audio Channel ...... 46
Step 7: Assigning a Primary Audio Channel to the Main Mix Bus ............. 47
Step 8: Routing the Audio to the Computer via USB .....................................48
Step 9: Assigning the Computer’s Audio Playback to an EZbus Return .....49
Step 10: Adjusting Audio Levels: The Main Mix and
Primary Audio Channel Faders ...................................................................... 50
Step 11: Adjusting Audio Levels: The Line Input trim Control .................... 51
Step 12: Recording an Audio Track via USB ..................................................52
Step 13: Monitoring Your Recorded Tracks: Return 3/4 ..............................52
7
Step 14: Simultaneously Monitoring the Source Audio Signal and the
Playback from the Computer .......................................................................... 53
Step 15: Naming and Saving a Mix ................................................................. 54
Advanced Concept: Using Sends to Route Audio to the Computer ... 56
Tutorial 2:
Using the EZbus as a Software Control Surface ................................. 58
What this Tutorial Covers: ............................................................................... 59
What You’ll Need for this Tutorial: ................................................................. 59
Introduction: About V Groups ......................................................................... 59
Step 1: Connecting the EZbus to a Computer Via USB ................................ 60
Step 2: Entering Virtual Control Mode
(a.k.a. Software Control Surface Mode) ........................................................ 60
Step 3: Loading V Groups from Your Computer Via USB ............................ 61
Step 4: Selecting a V Group ............................................................................. 63
Step 5: Accessing Additional V Groups ......................................................... 64
Step 6: Using the EZbus Virtual Controls ...................................................... 65
Step 7: Using the Virtual Control shift Buttons ............................................. 66
Step 8: About Fader Modes: Nulling and Relative..........................................67
Tutorial 3:
Using the EZbus as a Stand-Alone Digital Mixer ................................ 68
What this Tutorial Covers: ............................................................................... 69
What You’ll Need for this Tutorial: ................................................................. 69
Part I ................................................................................................................ 69
Part II ............................................................................................................... 69
Step 1: Connecting the EZbus to Your Audio Playback System .................. 70
Step 2: Connecting an Analog Audio Source to the EZbus .......................... 71
Step 3: Connecting a Digital Audio Source to the EZbus ............................. 71
Step 4: Recalling an EZbus Mix and Making it the “Active” Mix ................ 72
Step 5: Assigning an Audio Input Source to a Primary Audio Channel ...... 74
8
Step 6: Assigning a Primary Audio Channel to the
Main and Alt Mix Buses .................................................................................. 76
Step 7: Assigning the Main and Alt Mix Buses to the
Analog and Digital Outputs ............................................................................. 79
Step 8: Adjusting Audio Levels:
The Main Mix and Primary Audio Channel Faders ..................................... 80
Step 9: Adjusting Audio Levels: The Line Input TRIM Control ...................... 81
Step 10: Adjusting Audio Levels: The Alternate Mix Master Level ............... 82
Step 11: Adjusting the EQ of a Primary Audio Channel ............................... 83
Step 12: Adjusting the Dynamics Processor of a Primary Audio Channel ... 85
Step 13: Using Sends ........................................................................................ 91
Step 14: Usings Returns ................................................................................... 92
Step 15: Naming and Saving a Mix ................................................................. 94
Contacting Customer Service ....................................... 96
9
Getting Started
Congratulations on your purchase of
In a truly innovative, next-generation
piece of audio equipment. Though simple in appearance, the EZbus is an
extraordinarily powerful device, combining three essential functions—a
In Software Control Surface, and
Computer Audio Recording Interface,
Stand-Alone Digital Mixer—into one convenient, low cost package.
Whether you’re adding the EZbus to your existing rig or making it the
centerpiece of a new setup, we’re sure you’ll find it a remarkably flexible
and highly versatile tool, perfectly suited to a wide variety of music
recording, editing, mixing, and live performance applications.
Contents of the EZbus Box
When you open the EZbus box you should find the following:
• The EZbus unit wrapped in a protective plastic cover
• A compact disc containing the EZbus Windows USB audio/MIDI
drivers; a Microsoft Windows system executable file; control surface
Profiles for a variety of software-based audio/MIDI recording
programs, plug-ins, and virtual instruments; demo versions of digital
audio recording, editing, and processing software and virtual
synthesizers from a variety of manufacturers; a PDF version of this
manual; a PDF version of the EZbus Reference Manual; hyperlinks to
our Warranty Registration and Technical Support Web pages
• An EZbus USB cable
• An IEC grounded power cable
• This EZbus Owner’s Manual
10
Using the EZbus with a
Computer
Computer System Requirements
The EZbus functions as a stand-alone digital mixer right
out of the box, with no special setup or connection to a
computer required. However, to use the EZbus as an audio
recording interface for your computer and/or as a software
control surface for your recording software, plug-ins, and
virtual instruments, you’ll need the following:
For use with an IBM-PC/Compatible
• An IBM-PC or compatible computer with at least one built-in USB
port, a genuine Intel-brand Pentium microprocessor (Pentium II 300
or better highly recommended) and Intel brand USB Chipset, or a
genuine AMD microprocessor and a motherboard with the AMD 760
or AMD 760 MP chipsets, and minimum 64Mb RAM (128Mb or
more highly recommended) running Windows 98 SE/ME or newer.
Windows ME, along with the supplied Windows system file (on the
EZbus installation CD) or newer is required if you wish to have both
audio and MIDI data transmitted and received over USB. You can
use Windows 98 SE, but the EZbus will not transmit or receive MIDI
data over USB. (MIDI via a PCI-based MIDI interface, however, is
supported.) Please consult the EZbus technical support pages on the
Event Web site, www.event1.com, for the latest information on
Windows system compatibility.
• A fast, high-capacity IDE or SCSI hard disk drive for storing audio files
• Peripheral audio equipment, such as a monitor speakers, Alesis
ADAT® digital tape recorder, MIDI keyboard, microphone, etc.
IMPORTANT NOTE: Event Electronics makes no claims as to the suitability
for use with EZbus computer systems that do not conform to the requirements
listed above. Non-conforming systems include those systems based on
11
non-Intel- or AMD- brand processors and USB chipsets, even when such
systems claim performance specifications that equal or exceed those of
Intel- or AMD- brand chipsets. Furthermore, Event Electronics cannot
provide customer support to end users that are having difficulty making
the EZbus work reliably with non-conforming systems. Support for the
EZbus in stand-alone mode is available to all users, regardless of their
computer system configuration.
For use with an Apple Macintosh
• A Macintosh computer, iMac or newer, with at least one built-in USB
port, and minimum 64MB RAM running Mac OS 9.04 or newer.
A Mac OS newer than OS X 10.1 is required if you wish to have both
audio and MIDI data transmitted and received over USB. You can use
Mac OS OS 9.04 through OS X 10.1, but the EZbus will not transmit or
receive MIDI data over USB. MIDI via a Macintosh-compatible MIDI
interface, however, is supported.
• A fast, high-capacity IDE or SCSI hard disk drive for storing audio files
• Peripheral audio equipment, such as a monitor speakers, Alesis
ADAT® digital tape recorder, MIDI keyboard, microphone, etc.
12
Installing the EZbus Software
Drivers and Applications
IBM-PC/Compatible
If your computer system meets the hardware requirements
listed on Page 10, the next step is to install the Windows ME
update file and USB Audio and MIDI drivers that are included
on the EZbus Installation CD.
IMPORTANT
Windows® ME users must update their operating systems
as detailed below before connecting the EZbus to a
computer via USB. Please follow these instructions
precisely to avoid problems with your computer operating
system configuration.
• Prior to installing the Windows ME update, be certain that the EZbus
is NOT CONNECTED to your computer via USB.
• Insert the EZbus Installation CD into your computer’s CD-ROM drive.
• Locate the Microsoft Windows ME update file named
280127USAM.exe on the CD-ROM. Double-click on the file to
install it. When the installation is complete, reboot your computer.
• Locate the Setup.exe file on the EZbus Installation CD. Double-click
on the file to initiate the setup routine. Follow the on-screen prompts
in the Setup Wizard, then click FINISH to reboot your computer when
the setup routine is complete.
• Connect the EZbus to your computer using the supplied USB cable,
and apply power to the EZbus.
• When the “Add New Hardware” Wizard appears, click NEXT to have
Windows automatically search for the EZbus driver.
• In the next window, click FINISH. This completes the EZbus
installation.
13
Apple Macintosh
According to the operating system in use, one of the two
following conditions will apply:
• With any Mac OS from OS 9.04 up to and including OS X 10.1, the
EZbus will automatically be recognized as a USB audio device, with
no additional drivers required. Note: You must have the USB
Configuration mode in the EZbus System menu set to Audio Only.
To use MIDI, connect MIDI 2 Out on the EZbus rear panel to your
Macintosh-compatible MIDI interface and follow the instructions
included with your interface.
• With a Mac OS newer than OS X 10.1, the EZbus will automatically
be recognized as a USB audio and MIDI device, with no additional
drivers required. Note: You must have the USB Configuration mode
in the EZbus System menu set to Audio+MIDI.
QUICKSTART GUIDE 1: EZBUS AS A COMPUTER AUDIO RECORDING INTERFACE
14
EZbus QuickStart Guide 1:
Using the EZbus as a
Computer Audio Recording
Interface
After installing the EZbus drivers and Windows system
software as detailed in the preceding Installation Guide,
follow these EZ steps to begin recording using the
EZbus and your computer:
1. Connect the rear-panel USB port on the EZbus
to the USB port on your computer using the enclosed USB cable.
COAXIAL S/PDIF
USB
WITCH
IN
OUT 1
TO L/R INPUTS OF
AUDIO PLAYBACK
SYSTEM
OUT 2
OPTICAL
IN
O
2. Make the
audio connections to your
playback system using the
EZbus Main Out L and R
jacks. The jacks accept
balanced (TRS) or
unbalanced (TS) 1/4" phone
connectors. If you prefer,
you can plug headphones
into the PHONES jack.
QUICKSTART GUIDE 1: EZBUS AS A COMPUTER AUDIO RECORDING INTERFACE
15
3. Connect an audio source, such as a microphone or keyboard, into
one of the input channels labeled CH1 – CH8.
4. Plug the EZbus into a grounded AC outlet and turn on the
power switch (located on the rear panel).
5. If any Mix other than Mix 00
is showing in the LCD, turn
the VALUE wheel until Mix 00
appears, then double-click
the MIX button to recall Mix 00.
6. Raise the Main fader and the
input channel fader to their
±U(unity gain) marks.
continued on next page
16
QUICKSTART GUIDE 1: EZBUS AS A COMPUTER AUDIO RECORDING INTERFACE
7. Adjust the input channel’s TRIM control until your audio source
signal registers just below MAX on the EZbus LCD.
8. Launch your recording software and select the EZbus as its
audio input. (See the owner’s manual of your recording
software for details.)
9. Make music!
QUICKSTART GUIDE 2: EZBUS AS A SOFTWARE CONTROL SURFACE
17
EZbus QuickStart Guide 2:
Using the EZbus as a
Software Control Surface
After installing the EZbus drivers and Windows system
software as detailed in the Installation Guide on page 12, follow
these EZ steps to start operating your software with the EZbus
faders, switches, VALUE wheel, and transport controls.
1. Connect the rear-panel USB port on the
EZbus to the USB port on your computer
using the enclosed USB cable.
C
USB
OTSWITCH
2. Plug the EZbus
into a grounded
AC outlet and
turn on the power
switch (located on
the rear panel).
ON/OFF
IN
3. Launch your audio/MIDI
software and select the
EZbus as its MIDI input
device.
continued on next page
QUICKSTART GUIDE 2: EZBUS AS A SOFTWARE CONTROL SURFACE
18
4. Press the AUDIO/VIRTUAL
button in the Master
Control section to enter
Virtual Control mode.
The LED next to the
button will turn off.
5. The EZbus comes filled with
V Groups (control surface
configurations)for a number of
popular music applications.
Press the “V” (virtual)button in
the Master Control section to
select the V Group for your software program. Each V button has
four pages associated with it (P1, P2, P3, P4). Use the NEXT and
PREVIOUS buttons to step through the pages.
6. In DAW applications, these EZbus V Groups contain setups for
controlling the software’s faders, pan, mute, solo, and transport
functions. In the virtual instrument V Groups, the EZbus controls a
variety of instrument parameters. The first page under button V1
contains a setup for Cubase VST.
Faders: VST Volume
Wheel: Ch 01 Pan
7. Enjoy!
QUICKSTART GUIDE 2: EZBUS AS A SOFTWARE CONTROL SURFACE
19
EZtip
You can play the virtual
instruments via MIDI
as you control them
by plugging your MIDI
keyboard into either of
the EZbus’s rear-panel
MIDI ports.
MIC 1
MIC 2
1 AUX OUT 2
CH 5C
CH 6C
CH 7C
CH 8C
1
CH 5B
CH 6B
CH 7B
CH 8B
SENDS
2
MAIN OUT
L
WORD CLOCK
DIG IN/OUT OPTICAL
MIDI I/O 3
MIDI I/O 2
DIG IN/OUT COAXIAL
USB
FOOTSWITCH
POWER
COMPUTER AUDIO RECORDING INTERFACE • SOFTWARE CONTROL SURFACE • STAND-ALONE DIGITAL MIXER
R
+48V
CH 1
CH 2
CH 3
CH 4
CH 5A
CH 6A
CH 7A
CH 8A
PHONES
-48
-36
-24
-18
-15
-12 -9 -6 -3-2-1 MAX
MUTE
SOLO
MIC/LINE
MIC/LINE
INST/LINE
INST/LINE
LINE
LINE
LINE
LINE
TRIM
TRIM
TRIM
TRIM
TRIM
TRIM
TRIM
TRIM
SELECT
SELECT
1
SELECT
SELECT
SELECT
SELECT
3
4
5
6
7
8
LEVEL
MUTE
SELECT
2
SYSTEM
INPUTS
V1
V2
V3
V4
AUDIO
OUTPUTS
RETURNS
DYNAMICS
PAN/ASSIGN
V5
V6
V7
V8
ALT/SENDS
EQ
MIX
SELECT
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
LOC 1
LOC 2
LOC 3
LOC 4
LOC 5
LOC 6
LOC 7
LOC 8
M
+12
+12
+12
+12
+12
+12
+12
+12
+12
+6
+6
+6
+6
+6
+6
+6
+6
+6
±U
±U
±U
±U
±U
±U
±U
±U
±U
-6
-6
-6
-6
-6
-6
-6
-6
-6
-12
-12
-12
-12
-12
-12
-12
-12
-12
-18
-18
-18
-18
-18
-18
-18
-18
-18
-24
-24
-24
-24
-24
-24
-24
-24
-24
-36
-36
-36
-36
-36
-36
-36
-36
-36
-∞
-∞
-∞
-∞
-∞
-∞
-∞
-∞
-∞
SHIFT A
SOLO
SHIFT B
VIRTUAL
NEXT
VALUE
SHIFT C
PREVIOUS
REWIND
FFWD
CURSOR
STOP
PLAY
LOCATE
SET LOCATE
RECORD
20
QUICKSTART GUIDE 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
EZbus QuickStart Guide 3:
Part I.
Using the EZbus as a
Stand-Alone Digital Mixer—
Live Performance
Follow these EZ steps to make the EZbus
the center of your live performance rig:
1. Make the audio
connections to your
playback system
using the EZbus Main
Out L and R jacks.
The jacks accept
balanced (TRS) or
unbalanced (TS) 1/4"
phone connectors. If
you prefer, you can
plug headphones into
the PHONES jack.
Both of these outputs
carry the signal of the
stereo Main Mix bus.
TO L/R INPUTS OF
AUDIO PLAYBACK
SYSTEM
QUICKSTART GUIDE 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
21
2. Connect an analog audio source, such as a microphone or keyboard,
into one of the input channels labeled CH1 – CH8.
ON/OFF
3. Plug the EZbus into a grounded AC outlet and turn on the
power switch (located on the rear panel).
4. If any Mix other than Mix 00
is showing in the LCD, turn
the VALUE wheel until Mix 00
appears, then double-click
the MIX button to recall Mix 00.
5. Raise the Main fader and the
input channel fader to their
±U (unity gain) marks.
continued on next page
QUICKSTART GUIDE 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
22
6. Adjust the input channel’s TRIM control until your audio source
signal registers just below MAX on the EZbus LCD.
7. Start playing!
QUICKSTART GUIDE 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
Part II.
Using the EZbus as a
Stand-Alone Digital Mixer—
Recording
Follow these EZ steps to use the EZbus in a recording setup:
Begin by following steps 1–7 of Part I (Page 20). Next:
OPTICAL
IN
OUT
8. Make the analog audio
connections to your recording
system using the EZbus Aux 1
and 2 jacks. (These jacks will
carry the signals you are
going to record.) Multichannel connections can be
made via the ADAT Optical
output, located on the EZbus
rear panel. The optical jack
can carry a variety of signals,
including the direct outputs of
Channels 1–8.
23
QUICKSTART GUIDE 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
24
9. Press OUTPUTS in the Master Control
Section, followed by the NEXT button
repeatedly until the display shows:
Auxiliary Out Jacks
Source: Off
Turn the
VALUE wheel
to select the
input of
your source
signals, in this
example, Line
inputs 7 and 8.
The display now reads:
Auxiliary Out Jacks
Source: Line 7&8
10. Make music!
OVERVIEW: SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
EZbus Overview
EZbus System Architecture
To help you get the most out of your EZbus audio capabilities,
both as a Computer Audio Interface and as a Stand-Alone
Digital Mixer, we suggest you take a few moments to
familiarize yourself with its internal architecture.
About the EZbus Digital Mixer Engine
At the core of the EZbus is a powerful DSP-based “mix engine”
that takes audio from the analog and digital inputs, (optionally)
routes it through EQ and dynamics processors, then sends the
audio to the various analog and digital outputs, either directly,
or via the Mix and Send buses.
The mix engine features eight discrete audio paths (the
Primary Audio Channels), each of which offers a variety of
traditional mixer functions, including input trim, volume, pan,
bus assign, mute and solo, and selectable pre-and post-fader
sends, as well as sophisticated EQ and dynamics processing.
The Primary Audio Channels can then be routed to multiple
destinations, including directly to analog and digital hardware
outputs, the stereo Main Mix, the stereo Alternate (Alt) Mix,
and Sends 1, 2, 3, and 4. The Mix/Send buses can also be
routed to multiple analog and digital hardware outputs.
The layout of the EZbus front panel makes it appear as though
the rows of analog inputs located at the top left of the front
panel are directly associated with the rows of channel/fader
strips located immediately below the inputs. But, in fact, audio
from any of the inputs—analog or digital—can be assigned to
any of the Primary Audio Channels (using the INPUTS
function—see The EZbus as Digital Mixer, Master Control
Section, INPUTS, in the Reference Manual, for further details).
25
26
OVERVIEW: SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
This flexible input/output assignment architecture forms the
heart of the EZbus’s powerful AudioMatrix™ signal routing.
The EZbus also features three discrete Returns (two mono and
one stereo) that feed directly to the stereo Main Mix bus. These
Returns are ideal for bringing signals from effects devices into
the EZbus without using up Primary Audio Channels. The
Return paths are much the same as the Primary Audio
Channels, except without EQ and dynamics processing, and
they don’t offer digital Trim and Phase controls. As such, they
also provide a convenient way of bringing additional audio
signals into the EZbus, including ADAT tracks, MIDI
instruments, signals from external mixers, and the like.
In short, the EZbus is designed to provide maximum flexibility
with respect to the number of audio signals it can handle
simultaneously, the sophistication with which it can process
audio and, thanks to the AudioMatrix™ signal routing
architecture, be at home in a wide variety of audio applications,
from live performance to post-production to home and project
studio recording (and everything in-between).
CONTROL NOMENCLATURE AND CONVENTIONS
Figure 1. Functions associated with Audio Control mode are printed in
white lettering, whereas Virtual Control functions are indicated by light gray.
Control Nomenclature
and Conventions
The EZbus derives its name from the fact that it’s very simple (“EZ”) to
operate. All you need to know are a few basic operational rules that
apply throughout the system.
The EZbus operates in two basic modes, Audio Control mode, in which
you’re controlling audio signals going into and out of the EZbus via its
various analog and digital inputs and outputs, and Virtual Control
mode, in which the EZbus is controlling your software applications and
external MIDI devices.
Access to these modes is via the front-panel AUDIO/VIRTUAL button. When
the LED next to the word AUDIO is lit, the EZbus is in Audio Control mode.
When the LED is not lit, the EZbus is in Virtual Control mode.
In general, functions associated with Audio Control mode are printed in
white lettering on the EZbus front panel (e.g., EQ, DYNAMICS, SELECT,
MUTE, SOLO). Functions associated with Virtual Control mode are
printed in light gray (e.g., V1, SHIFT A, SET LOCATE, LOC, as shown in
Figure 1, above.
NOTE: For clarity, all dedicated EZbus function buttons
are denoted in this manual by SMALL CAPS typeface.
27
28
AUDIO CONTROL: OPERATING CONVENTIONS
Operating Conventions Used in Audio Control Mode
• The EZbus is in Audio Control mode when the LED next to the
AUDIO/VIRTUAL button is “On” (lit).
• The Master Control function buttons and the Primary Audio Channel
SELECT buttons are activated when they are pressed. The green LED
located to the upper left of each button indicates its active status (LED
lit = On). A button remains active until another button is pressed. The
exception to this is the AUDIO/VIRTUAL button, which toggles the
EZbus between Audio Control and Virtual Control modes.
• Whenever any of the Master Control function buttons are pressed, the
NEXT and PREVIOUS buttons will page you through the various
parameter options that are available. The pages listed under each
button are accessed in rotation; that is, you can access all pages
regardless of whether you begin by going forward (NEXT) or
backward (PREVIOUS) through the list of available pages. When you
enter a Master Control function, the page you last accessed in that
function is displayed.
• Each page listed under a Master Control function contains a single
parameter. The value of that parameter is entered using the VALUE
wheel. The number of pages associated with each Master Control
function varies according to the function selected.
• When a Primary Audio Channel SELECT button is lit, that channel is
active and can be edited according to the function selected in the
Master Control section. So, for example, you could select Primary
Audio Channel 5, then edit its INPUT audio source, PAN position, EQ
settings, and OUTPUT assignment by accessing the appropriate
button(s) in the Master Control section and entering parameter
values. Similarly, you could select EQ in the Master Control Section,
then edit each individual channel’s EQ settings in turn by pressing the
appropriate channel SELECT buttons.
VIRTUAL CONTROL: OPERATING CONVENTIONS
Operating Conventions Used in Virtual Control Mode
• The EZbus is in Virtual Control mode when the LED next to the
AUDIO/VIRTUAL button is “Off” (unlit).
• Eight of the buttons in the Master Control section have a small “V”
label located at the lower left-hand corner of each button (V1 - V8).
This “V” stands for VIRTUAL, and refers to the fact that the button has
a different set of functions associated with it when the EZbus is in
Virtual Control mode.
• Unlike the preset functions in Audio Control mode, the functions of
the V buttons are fully user-programmable. From the factory, the
EZbus comes loaded with a number of presets (called “V Groups”)
designed for controlling a wide variety of software programs,
including MIDI/audio sequencers and virtual instruments. Generic
setups for General MIDI devices and software-based MIDI mixers are
also included. (See the README document on the EZbus Installation
CD for a list of included factory-programmed V Groups.) The control
functions for each V Group are documented in the V Group’s Help file.
An up-to-date list of V Groups can be found on the EZbus technical
support pages at www.event1.com.
• To access a V Group, press the AUDIO/VIRTUAL button until its LED
turns off, then press one of the V buttons. The name of the V Group
and its associated function(s) will appear in the LCD. Additional pages
for each V Group can be accessed via the NEXT and PREVIOUS buttons.
In the case of larger V Groups, such as those designed for controlling
MIDI/audio sequencers, multiple V buttons, each with multiple pages,
can be part of the V Group.
• The following controllers can generate MIDI data when the EZbus is
in Virtual Control mode:
• Faders 1–8
• “M” Select Button
• Main Mix Fader
• Select Buttons 1–8
• Value Wheel
• Select Buttons with Shift A, B, and C
• Transport Controls (also active in Audio Control mode)
29
FRONT PANEL DIAGRAM
30
EZbus Front Panel
6 7 8
MIC 1
1
Primary Audio Channel
SELECT Buttons
Used to select a Primary Audio
Channel in Audio Control
mode. Used to generate userprogrammable MIDI commands
in Virtual Control mode.
MIC 2
5
9
10 11
1 AUX OUT 2
CH 5C
CH 6C
CH 7C
CH 8C
1
CH 5B
CH 6B
CH 7B
CH 8B
SENDS
2
MAIN OUT
L
R
4
3
+48V
CH 1
CH 2
MIC/LINE
2
CH 3
CH 4
CH 5A
CH 6A
CH 7A
CH 8A
MIC/LINE
INST/LINE
INST/LINE
LINE
LINE
LINE
LINE
TRIM
TRIM
TRIM
TRIM
TRIM
TRIM
TRIM
TRIM
PHONES
LEVEL
2
Channels 1–8
TRIM Controls
Analog trim (level) control with
40dB gain range for controlling
the level of the signal at the
analog input jacks.
WORD CLOCK
DIG IN/OUT OPTIC
MUTE
1
3
Channels 1 and 2
Line Inputs
Line level inputs with balanced
1
/4" TRS input jacks.
SELECT
SELECT
SELECT
SELECT
SELECT
1
2
3
SELECT
4
5
6
7
8
LOC 1
LOC 2
LOC 3
LOC 4
LOC 5
LOC 6
LOC 7
LOC 8
SELECT
SELECT
M
+12
+12
+12
+12
+12
+12
+12
+12
+12
+6
+6
+6
+6
+6
+6
+6
+6
+6
±U
±U
±U
±U
±U
±U
±U
±U
±U
-6
-6
-6
-6
-6
-6
-6
-6
-6
-12
-12
-12
-12
-12
-12
-12
-12
-12
-18
-18
-18
-18
-18
-18
-18
-18
-18
-24
-24
-24
-24
-24
-24
-24
-24
-24
-36
-36
-36
-36
-36
-36
-36
-36
-36
-∞
-∞
-∞
-∞
-∞
-∞
-∞
-∞
-∞
SHIFT A
SOLO
SHIFT B
SHIFT C
4
+48V Phantom Power Switch
When depressed, supplies
+48V phantom power to microphones plugged into the Mic 1
and Mic 2 inputs.
Channels 1 and 2
Microphone Inputs
XLR microphone inputs with
precision low noise microphone
preamplifiers and +48V phantom power.
20 19
21
5
6
8
9
Aux Out 1 and 2
Balanced 1/4" TRS outputs for
carrying the signals from the
Alternate (Alt) Mix bus, Sends
3 and 4, and the various
analog and digital inputs.
Channels 3 and 4
Instrument/Line Inputs
High impedance instrument
inputs with balanced 1/4" TRS
jacks, suitable for accepting
the direct signal from an
electric guitar or bass or other
electronic instrument. Can also
be used for line level sources.
Channels 5, 6, 7, and 8
Line Inputs A, B, and C
Balanced 1/4" TRS line inputs,
designed for use with line level
sources. Inputs A, B, and C are
summed, making each channel
ideal for use as an input for
multiple keyboard instruments,
effects devices, and the like.
7
Sends 1 and 2
Balanced 1/4" TRS outputs dedicated to the signals generated
by Sends 1, 2, 3, and 4.
CAL
FRONT PANEL DIAGRAM
31
12 13
MIDI I/O 3
MIDI I/O 2
DIG IN/OUT COAXIAL
USB
FOOTSWITCH
POWER
12
17
Level Control
Used to adjust the volume
level of the signal appearing
at the PHONES output jack.
Please use care when adjusting the headphone level control; excessive volume levels
can damage your hearing.
Transport Controls
Used to control sequencer
playback and set/locate
functions. REWIND and FFWD
buttons also control LCD
cursor movement.
COMPUTER AUDIO RECORDING INTERFACE • SOFTWARE CONTROL SURFACE • STAND-ALONE DIGITAL MIXER
-48
-36
-24
-18
-15
-12 -9 -6 -3-2-1 MAX
MUTE
SOLO
1
SYSTEM
AUDIO
VIRTUAL
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
INPUTS
ALT/SENDS
EQ
MIX
V1
V2
V3
V4
OUTPUTS
RETURNS
DYNAMICS
PAN/ASSIGN
V5
V6
V7
V8
NEXT
VALUE
15
16
PREVIOUS
REWIND
FFWD
CURSOR
14
STOP
PLAY
LOCATE
SET LOCATE
RECORD
17
13
LCD (Liquid Crystal Display)
Shows a variety of system information, including the Active Mix,
audio levels, parameter values,
MUTE/SOLO status, and more.
14
Master Control
Function Buttons
Provide access to the Audio
Control mode menus (SYSTEM,
AUDIO/VIRTUAL, INPUTS, OUTPUTS,
SENDS, RETURNS, EQ, DYNAMICS, MIX,
PAN/ASSIGN) and Virtual Control
mode menus (V1, V2, V3, V4, V5,
V6, V7, V8).
15
18
10
11
Main Out
Left and Right
Balanced 1/ 4" TRS outputs
dedicated to the signal from
the Main Mix bus. In most
applications these outputs
are used to feed your control
room monitors.
Phones
(Headphones)
Unbalanced 1/4" TRS stereo
output jack for carrying the
signals from the Main Mix
bus, Alt Mix bus, Sends 1, 2,
3, and 4, or the various analog and digital inputs.
Value Wheel
Used to adjust parameter values in Audio Control mode and
to generate MIDI commands in
Virtual Control mode.
16
NEXT and PREVIOUS
In Audio Control mode, used to
navigate among menu options
in the Master Control functions.
In Virtual Control mode, used
to access the pages associated
with each V button.
18
AUDIO/VIRTUAL Button
Used to toggle between Audio
Control mode and Virtual Control mode.
19
MUTE and SOLO/SHIFT A, B,
and C Buttons
Used to mute and solo the
Primary Audio channels in
Audio control mode. Used as
function shift keys in Virtual
Control mode.
20
Main Mix Audio Fader
Used to control the level of the
stereo Main Mix bus signal in
Audio Control mode, and to
generate various types of MIDI
data in Virtual Control mode.
21
Primary Audio Channel/
Virtual Control Faders (1–8)
Used to control the level of
Primary Audio channels 1–8
in Audio Control Mode, and to
generate various types of MIDI
data in Virtual Control Mode.
REAR PANEL DIAGRAM
32
EZbus
Rear
Panel
USB Interface
Accepts a standard USB
cable to connect directly
to the USB port on a
computer. Provides two
channels of simultaneous audio input and
output plus 16 channels
of MIDI communication.
Footswitch Jack
For use with 1/4” TS (Tip/Sleeve)
momentary-action footswitch to perform a variety of functions, including
Mix Advance, AUDIO/VIRTUAL Select,
and Sequencer Start/Stop.
Coaxial S/PDIF
In
Accepts a stereo S/PDIF
signal with any bit-resolution up to 24-bits and at
44.1kHz, 48kHz, 88.2kHz,
and 96kHz sample rates.
For reliable operation, the
connection to this jack
should be made using a
75ohm coaxial video cable.
Out 1 and Out 2
Each output transmits a
stereo S/PDIF signal with
any bit-resolution up to
24-bits and at 44.1kHz,
48kHz, 88.2kHz, and 96kHz
sample rates.
Digital Optical Input
This dual-purpose jack
can accept up to eight
channels of digital audio from an ADAT or
other ADAT Opticalequipped device, or a
stereo S/PDIF signal.
Digital Optical Output
This jack can transmit
up to eight channels of
digital audio to an
ADAT or ADAT Opticalequipped device. The
jack can carry the direct
signals from the Primary
Audio Channels, the line
inputs, or the Main and Alt
Mixes and Sends 1–4.
COAXIAL S/PDIF
OPTICAL
AC Power
ON/OFF Switch
USB
POWER
FOOTSWITCH
IN
ON/OFF
IN
OUT
MIDI 2
AC Power Connector Jack
This standard IEC jack accepts a
grounded three prong AC connector.
Never purposely defeat the grounding
properties of the unit by modifying the
power cable or using a “ground lift”
device. Operate the product only at the
voltage specified on the individual unit
(100V, 110V, or 240V).
OUT 1
OUT 2
IN
IN
OUT
OUT
WORD CLOCK OUT
MIDI 3
MIDI Port 2/MIDI Port 3
Two independent MIDI ports featuring
standard five-pin MIDI input and output
jacks. Supports all MIDI data types.
Word Clock Output
Standard BNC-type connector. Output sample
rate is determined by
the EZbus internal
sample rate being used
(44.1kHz, 48kHz, 88.2kHz,
or 96kHz).
REAR PANEL DIAGRAM
E V E N T
E L E C T R O N I C S
33
EZBUS SIGNAL FLOW
34
EZbus Signal Flow
Follow the diagram from left to right to see how audio signals flow
through the EZbus. Note that you can “tap” into the signal at multiple
points along the path, allowing you to route any input to any output.
DIGITAL
INPUTS
ANALOG MIC &
LINE INPUTS
ADAT OPTICAL,
S/PDIF 1&2,
USB, AUX 1&2,
HEADPHONES
ADAT OPTICAL,
S/PDIF 1&2,
USB, AUX 1&2,
HEADPHONES
CHANNEL
DIRECT
OUT
ADAT OPTICAL, USB,
S/PDIF 1&2, AUX 1&2,
HEADPHONES
SEND 1 SEND 2
SEND 1
MASTER
LEVEL
SEND 2
MASTER
LEVEL
TRIM
POT
SEND 1 SEND 2
LEVEL LEVEL
LINE
OUT
DIGITAL TRIM
& PHASE
DYNAMICS
PROCESSOR
EQ
The EZbus input/output design provides for a great deal of routing
flexibility, but the basic signal flow is actually very simple, and follows
traditional audio mixer conventions.
As shown in the diagram, the signal path begins with any of the 21
audio sources (the analog and digital inputs) being brought into any of
the eight Primary Audio Channels. The signal is digitized (in the case
of an analog input), then sent first to the dynamics and then the EQ
portions of the circuit. Each of those circuits can be bypassed if desired.
Immediately past the EQ lies the channel’s direct output, which can
appear at the ADAT Optical jack, the USB port, S/PDIF transmitters 1
and 2, Aux Out 1 and 2, and the headphone jack.
The signal then continues to the fader control, where the volume level
can be adjusted by the user. Notice that the diagram shows channel
Sends 1 and 2 patched into the signal before the fader (pre-fader
mode) and Sends 3 and 4 patched in after the fader (post-fader mode).
Each Send is individually adjustable pre- or post-fader; the illustration is
EZBUS SIGNAL FLOW
ADAT OPTICAL, USB,
S/PDIF 1&2,
HEADPHONES
SEND 3
MASTER
LEVEL
MAIN OUT L/R
ADAT OPTICAL, USB,
S/PDIF 1&2,
HEADPHONES
ANALOG
& DIGITAL
INPUTS
PAN
PAN
R
L
MAIN
ON/OFF
SEND 3 SEND 4
LEVEL LEVEL
SEND PRE/POST
SELECT
RETURNS
1, 2, 3/4
SEND 4
MASTER
LEVEL
MAIN
MIX
BUS
FADER
35
ALT
ON/OFF
SOLO
MUTE
R
L
R
L
MAIN OUT 1/2
USB,
ADAT OPTICAL,
S/PDIF 1/2,
HEADPHONES
AUX OUT 1/2
USB,
ADAT OPTICAL,
S/PDIF 1/2,
HEADPHONES
just one example of how the sends can be programmed. (For more on
using the Sends see The Master Control Section, SENDS, in the EZbus
Reference Manual PDF.)
Next come the Mute and Solo functions, followed by the channel’s
Pan control. From here the signal is routed to the stereo Main Mix or
Alternate Mix buses (or both).
As you can see in the diagram, the Pan control functions as a bus
assign control, much the same as on a traditional analog mixer. Once
the channel signal is assigned to either or both of the stereo buses,
the pan control determines to which side(s) of the bus the signal is
fed. In this way you can set up two independent stereo mixes, four
discrete signal paths, or a combination of the two.
The EZbus Returns patch directly into the Main Mix bus, offering an
easy way to bring additional signals into the EZbus without using up
Primary Audio Channels.
EZbus
Operational
Tutorials
38
TUTORIAL 1: EZBUS AS A COMPUTER AUDIO RECORDING INTERFACE
Tutorial 1:
Using the EZbus as a Computer
Audio Recording Interface
In this Tutorial we’ll start by making basic computer
and audio connections, then take you through a series of
EZbus functions: making channel and bus assignments,
setting levels, monitoring Returns, and finally
saving the audio signal routing and
system parameter values
as a complete Mix.
TUTORIAL 1: EZBUS AS A COMPUTER AUDIO RECORDING INTERFACE
What this Tutorial Covers:
• Connecting the EZbus to a computer via USB
• Connecting the EZbus to your audio playback system
• Connecting an analog audio source to the EZbus
• Selecting the EZbus as the audio input/output device in your
recording software
• Recalling an EZbus Mix and making it the “Active” Mix
• Assigning an audio input source to a Primary Audio Channel
• Assigning a Primary Audio Channel to the Main Mix bus
• Assigning the computer’s audio playback to an EZbus Return
• Adjusting audio levels: the Main Mix fader
• Adjusting audio levels: the Primary Audio Channel fader and TRIM control
• Adjusting audio levels: Return 3/4
• Recording an audio track via USB
• Simultaneously monitoring the source audio and the playback from
the computer
• Naming and saving a Mix
• Advanced Concept: Using Sends to Route Audio to the Computer
Note to PC users: This Tutorial presumes you have previously installed the EZbus
driver and Windows system file in your computer as per the instructions on Page 12.
What You’ll Need for this Tutorial:
• The EZbus
• A USB-equipped computer
• Audio recording software (Cakewalk, Cubase VST, etc.)
• The included USB cable
• A sound source (musical instrument, microphone, etc.)
• A sound system (power amp and speakers, headphones, etc.)
• Assorted audio cables
39
TUTORIAL 1: EZBUS AS A COMPUTER AUDIO RECORDING INTERFACE
40
Step 1: Connecting the EZbus to a Computer Via USB
Unpack the USB cable that was enclosed with the EZbus. Plug one end
of the cable into the USB jack located on the rear panel of the EZbus and
the other end into your computer’s USB port. You’re done!
All of the audio communication between the EZbus and the computer
will take place via USB. You’ll be able to record two channels of audio
into your computer while listening back to two channels of audio from
your computer. Remember that the two channels you’re recording can
be two independent instruments, one stereo instrument, or a stereo mix
of many instruments. Similarly, the audio you’re monitoring from your
computer can be two individual instrument
tracks or a stereo mix of multiple tracks.
COAXIAL S/PDIF
USB
WITCH
IN
OUT 1
OUT 2
OPTICAL
IN
O
Figure 1. All communication between the EZbus and
the computer is via single USB cable.
TUTORIAL 1: EZBUS AS A COMPUTER AUDIO RECORDING INTERFACE
Step 2: Connecting the EZbus to Your Audio Playback System
The two jacks labeled Main Out L and R located at the center top of the
EZbus front panel always carry the signal from the EZbus Main Mix
bus, and are ideally suited for use as the “control room” monitor outputs.
Through them you’ll be able to simultaneously listen to the tracks you’re
recording and the tracks that are playing back from your computer.
Plug one end of an audio cable with standard 1/4" phone plug connectors
into the Main Out L jack, and the other end of the cable into the Left
Channel input of your monitoring system. (If you’re using powered
monitors, plug the cable directly into the Left monitor.) Now plug a
second cable into the Main Out R jack and your monitor system’s Right
Input Channel.
NOTE: The EZbus Main Outs also accept balanced 1/4" TRS (Tip/Ring/Sleeve)
connectors, allowing you to set up a balanced audio system. Consult your audio
system’s owner’s manual to see if this feature is supported.
If you’re using headphones rather than a monitor system (i.e., an amp
and speakers), plug the headphones into the jack labeled PHONES at the
center top of the EZbus front panel. The volume control for the phones
is the knob labeled LEVEL immediately below the PHONES jack.
As with the Main Outs, the PHONES output can also be used to monitor
the Main Mix bus (as well as a variety of other sources).
Figure 2.
Main Outs 1
and 2 function
as control room
monitor outputs
for the EZbus
Main Mix bus.
The Main Mix
bus signal can
appear at the
PHONES output
as well.
41
42
TUTORIAL 1: EZBUS AS A COMPUTER AUDIO RECORDING INTERFACE
Step 3: Connecting an Analog Audio Source to the EZbus
Now we’ll plug in the analog audio signal we plan to record. Each of the
EZbus’s analog input jacks is designed for a particular type of signal:
microphone, instrument, or line. If you’re using a microphone, plug it
into the Mic 1 or the Mic 2 jack. If the microphone is a condenser type
and requires phantom power, press the +48V switch located by the Mic 1
and 2 inputs. When the LED next to the switch is lit, phantom power is
being supplied to the microphone(s).
NOTE: If you are using a microphone, you should monitor your audio using
headphones rather than with a monitor system. This will allow you to avoid
feedback and/or introducing unwanted leakage into the recorded signal.
If your source is an unamplified electric guitar, bass, or other instrument
that requires an instrument level input, plug it into either the Channel 3
input or the Channel 4 input.
All other line level sources—keyboards, drum machines, CD players,
and the like—should be plugged into Channels 5, 6, 7, and 8. It doesn’t
matter whether you use the A, B, or C inputs on these channels, as they
are identical. For more information on using the multiple inputs on these
channels, see The Analog Input/Output Section: INPUTS, in the EZbus
Reference Manual PDF. For information on using the digital inputs, see
Tutorial 3, Using the EZbus as a Digital Mixer, beginning on page 68 of
this Tutorial Manual.
TUTORIAL 1: EZBUS AS A COMPUTER AUDIO RECORDING INTERFACE
Figure 3. The EZbus is selected as the Audio Input and Output devices in
Cubase VST, allowing recording and playback to be performed via USB.
Step 4: Selecting the EZbus as the Audio Input/Output Device
in Your Recording Software
Now it’s time to boot your computer, turn on the EZbus, and launch your
audio recording software. The EZbus is automatically recognized by
your computer over USB, providing you have followed the installation
steps detailed on page 12. If you have not yet installed the EZbus (and
Windows) software, do so now before proceeding.
Now your audio software needs to be told that the EZbus is going to be
used for audio input and output. The following example uses Steinberg’s
Cubase VST™. Most audio recording applications make their audio
input/output device assignments in a similar manner. Please consult the
owner’s manual of your audio software for specific details on making the
audio input/output device assignments.
In Cubase VST, go to the Options menu and select Audio –> System.
Select the ASIO Multimedia driver. Hit OK.
43
44
TUTORIAL 1: EZBUS AS A COMPUTER AUDIO RECORDING INTERFACE
Step 5: Recalling an EZbus Mix and Making it the “Active” Mix
The EZbus comes from the factory pre-programmed with a number of
Mix configurations. Mix 30, Tutorial 1, is designed to make you familiar
with the EZbus Mix architecture. The Mix contains no parameter
assignments; rather, you’ll be making all the assignments as we work
our way through this Tutorial. At the end, you’ll have a Mix designed for
recording and monitoring via USB, which we’ll then save for use in
future recording sessions.
First we need to Recall Mix 30 to make it the “Active” Mix, that is, the
Mix currently loaded into memory. This is done in the MIX menu,
located in the Master Control section.
Press the MIX button; the LED next to the button will light, indicating
that it is the active Master Control function.
The display will show:
Select Mix: 00
"Welcome to EZbus"
TUTORIAL 1: EZBUS AS A COMPUTER AUDIO RECORDING INTERFACE
Note that if you have recalled Mixes prior to following this Tutorial, the
name and number of the Mix shown in the EZbus display may be
different from this example.
The MIX LED will begin to flash.
Turn the VALUE wheel until Mix 30, Tutorial 1, appears in the display as
shown below:
Select Mix: 30?
"Tutorial 1
"
Double-click the MIX button to recall Mix 30 and make it the current
Active Mix. The MIX LED will flash more quickly for a few moments
while the new Mix is being loaded. The display will show:
Recalling Mix: 30
The MIX LED will remain solidly lit once the loading is complete. The
display will then show:
Select Mix: 30
"Tutorial 1
"
45
46
TUTORIAL 1: EZBUS AS A COMPUTER AUDIO RECORDING INTERFACE
Step 6: Assigning an Audio Input Source to a Primary Audio Channel
Let’s begin by choosing which of the eight EZbus Primary Audio
Channels we’re going to use to record. Remember, any input, analog or
digital, can be assigned to any of the Primary Audio Channels, so just
because you have something plugged into the Channel 4 input jack
doesn’t mean that you have to use Primary Audio Channel 4 for that
signal. For this Tutorial, we’ll assign our input signal to Primary Audio
Channel 1. The analog input we assign to that channel will depend on
your source audio (line level, instrument, or microphone).
Let’s presume you’re using a line level source such as a
keyboard or MIDI sound module plugged into the Line 5 A jack.
(For this Tutorial we’ll use only a mono source.) In the Master
Control Section, press INPUTS, followed by the SELECT button
of the Primary Audio Channel you wish to assign, in this case
Channel 1. Notice that the LED next to the Channel 1 SELECT
button is lit, indicating that Channel 1 has been selected.
Press NEXT repeatedly until the display shows:
Channel 1
Source: Off
TUTORIAL 1: EZBUS AS A COMPUTER AUDIO RECORDING INTERFACE
The following hardware inputs are
available as sources for Primary
Audio Channel 1. Turn the VALUE
wheel to select Line 5 (ABC).
Off
Inst/Line 3
Line 6(ABC)
Optical 1
Optical 4
Optical 7
S/PDIF Right
Mic/Line 1
Inst/Line 4
Line 7(ABC)
Optical 2
Optical 5
Optical 8
USB Left
Mic/Line 2
Line 5 (ABC)
Line 8(ABC)
Optical 3
Optical 6
S/PDIF Left
USB Right
If you’re using another audio source, such as the direct signal
from an electric bass, select its associated input (Inst/Line 3,
for example), as the audio Source for Primary Audio Channel 1.
Step 7: Assigning a Primary Audio Channel to the Main Mix Bus
Now we need to route Primary Audio Channel 1 to the Main Mix
bus so that we can monitor its signal.
In the Master Control section, Press PAN/ASSIGN, followed by the
SELECT button of Primary Audio Channel 1. Then press the NEXT
button repeatedly until the display shows:
47
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TUTORIAL 1: EZBUS AS A COMPUTER AUDIO RECORDING INTERFACE
Channel 1
Main Mix: Off
Two options are available, as shown below.
On
Off
Turn the VALUE wheel to select “On.”
The display will show:
Channel 1
Main Mix: On
Step 8: Routing the Audio to the Computer via USB
At this point we have the audio that’s coming into the EZbus routed to a
Primary Audio Channel and from there to the Main Mix bus, where we
can monitor it. Now we need to get the channel’s signal to the computer.
Since we’re using a line input for our source signal, we’ll simply assign
that input directly to USB. Press OUTPUTS followed by the NEXT button
repeatedly until the display shows:
USB Audio (to PC)
Source: Off
TUTORIAL 1: EZBUS AS A COMPUTER AUDIO RECORDING INTERFACE
Use the VALUE wheel to select your source
input, e.g., Line 5 & 6, from the following available options:
Off
Sends 3&4
Dir Out 1&2
Dir Out 7&8
Line 5&6
Optical 3&4
Main Mix
S/PDIF L&R
Dir Out 3&4
Line 1&2
Line 7&8
Optical 5&6
Altrnate Mix
USB L&R
Dir Out 5&6
Line 3&4
Optical 1&2
Optical 7&8
The display will show:
USB Audio (to PC)
Source: Line 5&6
Step 9: Assigning the Computer’s Audio Playback to an EZbus Return
The final step in our audio routing setup is assigning the computer’s
audio playback (coming in via USB) to the Main Mix bus so that we can
monitor it. We’ll do that using the Returns, which are hard-wired to the
Main Mix bus. We could easily bring the audio into two Primary Audio
Channels, but we want to save those channels for instrument inputs, so
the Returns provide a convenient alternative. Return 3/4 is a stereo
return, ideally suited for this application (Returns 1 and 2 are mono), so
we’ll select it.
In the Master Control Section press RETURNS,
followed by NEXT repeatedly until the display shows:
Return 3/4 (stereo)
Source: Off
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TUTORIAL 1: EZBUS AS A COMPUTER AUDIO RECORDING INTERFACE
Turn the VALUE wheel to select USB L & R
as the audio Source from the following
available options:
Off
Line 5 & 6
Optical 3 & 4
S/PDIF L & R
Line 1 & 2
Line 7 & 8
Optical 5 & 6
USB L & R
Line 3 & 4
Optical 1 & 2
Optical 7 & 8
The display will show:
Return 3/4 (stereo)
Source: USB L & R
Step 10: Adjusting Audio Levels: The Main Mix and
Primary Audio Channel Faders
The last thing we need to do before recording is adjust our audio levels,
starting with the Main Mix fader.
The Main Mix fader, distinguished from the Primary
Audio Channel faders by its blue “M” SELECT button,
controls the volume of the Main Mix bus signal.
We’re using the Main Mix bus strictly for monitoring,
so the position of the fader isn’t critical at this point
(i.e., the level of the signal being recorded isn’t
affected by this fader, since it’s the Line input signal
that’s going to the computer.) As a rule, however,
the fader should be set at its ±U (unity gain) mark.
So for now, set it there; if your playback level turns
out to be too soft or too loud, you can adjust it later.
TUTORIAL 1: EZBUS AS A COMPUTER AUDIO RECORDING INTERFACE
Now set the Channel 1 fader to its ±U (unity gain) position. As
with the Main Mix fader, the position of the channel fader will
only affect playback volume, not the level of the signal going to
the computer. This allows you to easily create a monitor mix
without adversely affecting your record levels.
Step 11: Adjusting Audio Levels: The Line Input TRIM Control
The goal here is to set this control so that noise is minimized, dynamic
range is maximized, and a reasonable amount of headroom is
maintained. When the control is properly set, the level of the source
signal will be optimized for both the EZbus and the computer input,
since we’re routing the signal directly to the computer via USB.
We’ve assigned the Line input to Primary Audio Channel 1,
so first press the Channel 1 Select button; this will place the
LCD meter into pre-fader mode, allowing you to visually
monitor the level at the Channel’s input.
Next we”ll set the Line Input’s TRIM control, which is used to adjust
the gain of the analog signal that appears at the Channel input.
Important: Even though the Line Input is assigned to Channel 1, the
TRIM control that you’ll be adjusting is the one directly associated with
the Line Input being used. So, for example, if your signal is plugged into
Line Input 5C, you’ll be adjusting the Channel 5 TRIM control.
Begin by playing your audio source—playing the keyboard, singing into
the microphone, and so on. Then, starting with the control rotated fully
counter-clockwise, gradually increase the gain by turning the knob
clockwise. As you turn the knob, keep an eye on the level meter in the
EZbus LCD. The TRIM is at the correct setting when the loudest part of
your signal registers just below the MAX indicator on the LCD. At this
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TUTORIAL 1: EZBUS AS A COMPUTER AUDIO RECORDING INTERFACE
point you’ll have a nice, hot signal going to the channel (without
overloading it), thereby maximizing signal-to-noise and dynamic range.
If you think you’ll exceed this level when actually doing your take (we all
get excited when the record light comes on!), set the level so that the
loudest peaks read at around –2dB on the LCD. This will give you a bit of
headroom for transients and louder passages.
Step 12: Recording an Audio Track via USB
Now that you’ve completed the audio setup, all that’s left is to start
making music! Simply initiate recording in your software and start
playing (or singing)—the signal from your EZbus will be recorded on
the track. If you need to adjust the record level, you can do so using the
Line input’s TRIM control, as this will only affect the signal going to the
computer, not your monitoring level.
Step 13: Monitoring Your Recorded Tracks: Return 3/4
Return 3/4 (stereo) provides an easy and convenient way to monitor
playback of the audio tracks recorded on your computer.
Once you’ve recorded a track, set that track’s
on-screen fader to its normal operating position
(as recommended in your software’s owner’s
manual), usually around 3/4 of the way up.
Initiate playback of the track. Then, in the
Master Control Section, press RETURNS,
followed by the NEXT button repeatedly until
the display shows:
Return 3/4 (stereo)
Level: Off
TUTORIAL 1: EZBUS AS A COMPUTER AUDIO RECORDING INTERFACE
Gradually turn the VALUE wheel clockwise to increase the Return 3/4
level. There is no “correct” setting. Simply adjust the level to provide
reasonable volume for playback and overdubbing. Note that a setting of
±00dB provides unity gain.
Step 14: Simultaneously Monitoring the Source Audio Signal and the
Playback from the Computer
When monitoring your source signal, its volume level is controlled by
the Primary Audio Channel fader. You can freely adjust this fader
without affecting the level of the signal that’s being recorded by the
computer. Similarly, the Return 3/4 Level can be adjusted to taste, as
described in Step 13. Use the two controls to balance the levels of the
source signal and the audio from the computer.
Monitoring Variation: For more immediate access to the volume of the
audio signals returning from the computer, try assigning USB Left and
USB Right as the audio sources of two Primary Audio Channels, and
those Primary Audio Channels to the Main Mix bus. That way, you can
control the monitor levels using faders, rather than the “soft” level
control used by Return 3/4. Instructions for making these assignments
can be found in Steps 6 and 7.
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TUTORIAL 1: EZBUS AS A COMPUTER AUDIO RECORDING INTERFACE
Step 15: Naming and Saving a Mix
Congratulations . . . you’ve just created your first EZbus Mix! Needless
to say, you don’t want to have to create a brand new Mix every time
you begin a session, so for our final step we’ll name and save the Mix
created in this Tutorial. The EZbus provides 32 locations for storing
Mixes, and Mixes can be recalled, edited, and resaved. You can create
recording Mixes, live performance Mixes, song-specific Mixes,
mixdown Mixes, whatever!
In the Master Control section, press MIX, followed by NEXT. The display
will show:
Store as Mix 30?
"Tutorial 1
"
The MIX LED will begin to flash.
Press the FFWD button in the transport controls; the cursor in the LCD
will move to under the “T” in Tutorial. Use the VALUE wheel to select one
of the following alphanumeric characters:
0...9
:
Y
A...Z
#
*
+
;
?
%
,
<
a...z
&
-
=
_
'
.
>
!
(
/
?
"
)
TUTORIAL 1: EZBUS AS A COMPUTER AUDIO RECORDING INTERFACE
Use the FFWD button to advance the cursor to the next character space.
Use the REWIND button to move the cursor to the previous character space.
Names can be up to 16 characters long.
When the name is complete, double-click the MIX button to store the
name and all the Mix settings to memory location 30.
Or, you can use the VALUE wheel to select a new location (00–31)
prior to double-clicking MIX.
When you double-click the MIX button, its LED will flash more
quickly for a few moments while the new name and Mix are being
stored. The display will show:
Storing Mix 30!
The MIX LED will remain solidly lit once the
Mix has been stored. The display will then show:
Select Mix: 30
"My New Mix Name "
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TUTORIAL 1: EZBUS AS A COMPUTER AUDIO RECORDING INTERFACE
Advanced Concept: Using Sends to
Route Audio to the Computer
When recording multiple instruments, or when you wish to add EQ or
dynamics to the signal(s) being recorded, you can route the signals to
the computer using the Sends, rather than going directly from the Line
Inputs. As with taking the signal directly from the Line Inputs, using
Sends allows you to control the level of the signal going to the computer
independently of your monitoring level. And since the Sends can be
configured to operate pre-fader, you'll be able to adjust your monitor mix
without disturbing the record level.
Four Sends are available, each of which can accept signals from multiple
Channels. For this exercise, we’ll use Send 1.
First we’ll check the Master Output
Level of Send 1. We’ll set the level
feeding Send 1 from Primary Audio
Channel 1 in a later step after we’ve
got our recording software up
and running.
Press SENDS in the Master Control
Section, followed by NEXT repeatedly
until the display shows:
Send 1
Master Level: +00dB
A ±00dB Level represents full digital output from the Send 1 Master
Output, the recommended (default) setting for the Output Level. When
recording multiple tracks, it may be necessary to reduce the level to
avoid overloading the Master Output.
TUTORIAL 1: EZBUS AS A COMPUTER AUDIO RECORDING INTERFACE
Now it’s time to set the Pre/Post fader mode of Send 1. In the Master
Control section, press NEXT repeatedly until the display shows:
Send 1
Mode: Pre Fader
Use the VALUE wheel to select Pre Fader.
Now it’s time to set the Send level coming from Primary Audio
Channel 1. This adjustment is somewhat critical, as it directly affects the
level of the signal going to the computer.
Begin by record-enabling a track in your
software so that you can view its input level
meter. Next, in the Master Control section
press SENDS, followed by the NEXT
button repeatedly until the display shows:
Channel 1 Send 1
Level: Off
Now, while playing your audio source,
turn the VALUE wheel clockwise to slowly
bring up the Channel 1 to Send 1 level.
As you do so, watch the level meters in
your audio recording software. Continue to increase the level until your
recorder’s meters are reading at the recommended level (generally at or
near 0dB full scale). On the EZbus, a Level setting of ±0dB provides
unity gain, the recommended setting for a single source. When
recording multiple sources, the Level setting must be lower to avoid
overloading the Send 1 Master Output.
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TUTORIAL 2: EZBUS AS A SOFTWARE CONTROL SURFACE
58
Tutorial 2:
Using the EZbus as a
Software Control Surface
In this Tutorial we’ll start by making basic computer
connections, then take you through a series of EZbus
Virtual Control functions, including loading and
selecting Virtual Control configurations, operating
the EZbus controls, and using fader nulling.
MIC 1
MIC 2
1 AUX OUT 2
CH 5C
CH 6C
CH 7C
CH 8C
1
CH 5B
CH 6B
CH 7B
CH 8B
SENDS
2
MAIN OUT
L
WORD CLOCK
DIG IN/OUT OPTICAL
MIDI I/O 3
MIDI I/O 2
DIG IN/OUT COAXIAL
USB
FOOTSWITCH
POWER
COMPUTER AUDIO RECORDING INTERFACE • SOFTWARE CONTROL SURFACE • STAND-ALONE DIGITAL MIXER
R
+48V
CH 1
CH 2
CH 3
CH 4
CH 5A
CH 6A
CH 7A
CH 8A
PHONES
-48
-36
-24
-18
-15
-12 -9 -6 -3-2-1 MAX
MUTE
SOLO
MIC/LINE
MIC/LINE
INST/LINE
INST/LINE
LINE
LINE
LINE
LINE
TRIM
TRIM
TRIM
TRIM
TRIM
TRIM
TRIM
TRIM
SELECT
SELECT
1
SELECT
SELECT
SELECT
SELECT
3
4
5
6
7
8
LEVEL
MUTE
SELECT
2
SYSTEM
INPUTS
V1
V2
V3
V4
AUDIO
OUTPUTS
RETURNS
DYNAMICS
PAN/ASSIGN
V5
V6
V7
V8
ALT/SENDS
EQ
MIX
SELECT
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
LOC 1
LOC 2
LOC 3
LOC 4
LOC 5
LOC 6
LOC 7
LOC 8
M
+12
+12
+12
+12
+12
+12
+12
+12
+12
+6
+6
+6
+6
+6
+6
+6
+6
+6
±U
±U
±U
±U
±U
±U
±U
±U
±U
-6
-6
-6
-6
-6
-6
-6
-6
-6
-12
-12
-12
-12
-12
-12
-12
-12
-12
-18
-18
-18
-18
-18
-18
-18
-18
-18
-24
-24
-24
-24
-24
-24
-24
-24
-24
-36
-36
-36
-36
-36
-36
-36
-36
-36
-∞
-∞
-∞
-∞
-∞
-∞
-∞
-∞
-∞
SHIFT A
SOLO
SHIFT B
VIRTUAL
NEXT
VALUE
SHIFT C
PREVIOUS
REWIND
FFWD
CURSOR
STOP
PLAY
LOCATE
SET LOCATE
RECORD
TUTORIAL 2: EZBUS AS A SOFTWARE CONTROL SURFACE
What this Tutorial Covers:
• About V Groups (control surface configurations)
• Connecting the EZbus to a computer via USB
• Entering Virtual Control mode (a.k.a. Software Control Surface mode)
• Loading V Groups from your computer via USB
• Selecting a V Group
• Accessing additional V Groups
• Using the EZbus Virtual controls
• Using the Virtual Control SHIFT buttons
• About fader modes: nulling and relative
Note to PC users: This Tutorial presumes you have previously installed the EZbus
driver and Windows system file in your computer as per the instructions on page 12.
What You’ll Need for this Tutorial:
• The EZbus
• A USB-equipped computer
• Audio recording software (Cakewalk, Cubase VST, etc.)
• The included USB cable
• The EZbus Installation CD
Introduction: About V Groups
From the factory, the EZbus comes loaded with a variety of control
surface configurations, called V Groups, designed for use with a
number of popular software recording/editing applications and
virtual instruments. Altogether there are 32 “pages” of V Groups,
with each page containing unique MIDI controller assignments
for the EZbus faders, switches, and VALUE wheel. All 32 can be
dedicated to controlling a single application, each of the 32 to a
different application, or anything (and everything) in-between.
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TUTORIAL 2: EZBUS AS A SOFTWARE CONTROL SURFACE
Figure 1. All
communication
between the EZbus and
the computer is via a
single USB cable.
USB
ITCH
Step 1: Connecting the EZbus to a Computer Via USB
The EZbus control surface operates by sending MIDI data to the
receiving application or device when an EZbus control is operated. The
control information can be sent via the unit’s rear-panel MIDI ports or
via USB. For this Tutorial, we’ll send it via USB, so the first thing we
need to do is get the EZbus hooked up to the computer. Important:
Windows ME users must install ME update, as detailed in the
Installation Guide on page 12, prior to connecting the EZbus to your
computer via USB.f
Unpack the USB cable that was enclosed with the EZbus. Plug one end
of the cable into the USB jack located on the rear panel of the EZbus and
the other end into your computer’s USB port.
All of the MIDI communication between the EZbus and the computer
will take place via USB, which is considered MIDI port 1 (that’s why the
rear-panel ports are labeled MIDI 2 and MIDI 3).
Step 2: Entering Virtual (Software Control) Mode
The EZbus is designed to make it
extremely easy to switch between
Audio Control and Virtual Control
modes. A single push of the
AUDIO/VIRTUAL button, and you’ve
moved from controlling the on-board
EZbus audio functions to controlling
a host of parameters in your audio
recording software, virtual instruments,
TUTORIAL 2: EZBUS AS A SOFTWARE CONTROL SURFACE
and external MIDI devices. Push the button again, and you’re back
controlling the on-board audio. You can tell that the EZbus is in Audio
Control mode when the LED next to the AUDIO/VIRTUAL button, located
in the Master Control section, is lit.
To enter Virtual Control mode, push the AUDIO/VIRTUAL button once;
the LED next to the button will go out, indicating that the EZbus is now
in VIRTUAL mode. The LCD will show:
Faders: VST Volume
Wheel: Ch 01 Pan
The screen above indicates that the currently selected V Group (see
About V Groups, page 59) is set up to control the Cubase VST audio
mixer, and provides control over fader and pan functions.
Step 3: Loading V Groups from Your Computer Via USB
To get the most from your EZbus, you’ll want
to load a set of V Groups optimized for your
particular software applications. A collection of
V Groups is called a “Profile.” To load new
V Groups into the EZbus, you simply load
a new Profile. Some preset Profiles can be loaded by clicking
on the EZ icon in the Windows menu bar, and selecting
a Profile from the Control Surface Profiles pop-up list. We want to
use a custom Profile containing a set of V Groups designed
specifically for this Tutorial; we’ll do that using the EZbus Control
Surface Editor program. Don’t worr y about over writing the onboard set. You can reload it (or any of the other Profiles on the
EZbus Installation CD or in the Tray Menu pop-up list) at the end of
this Tutorial.
Click on the EZbus tray menu icon, and select Control Surface
Editor; this will cause the editor application to launch. The following
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TUTORIAL 2: EZBUS AS A SOFTWARE CONTROL SURFACE
screen will appear:
Figure 2. The EZbus Control
Surface Editor application lets you
create custom Profiles for your
software applications and MIDI
devices. You can also use it to
create libraries of Profiles.
Place the EZbus installation CD into your computer’s CD-ROM drive,
and in the Control Surface Editor click on File and select Open.
Navigate to the EZbus Installation CD and select the Profile named
Tutorial 2. (Note that Profiles have .ebs extensions.). When that Profile
opens, it will appear like this:
Figure 3. The Tutorial 2 Profile contains V Groups
designed specifically for this Tutorial. You can use the
Control Surface Editor application to create your own
V Groups or modify those supplied with the EZbus.
TUTORIAL 2: EZBUS AS A SOFTWARE CONTROL SURFACE
Located at the top of the screen is a row of menu buttons, with the rightmost button labeled EZ. Click that button; the Tutorial 2 Virtual Control
Profile will download into the EZbus over USB in just a few moments.
When the download is complete, the EZbus LCD will show:
Tutorial 2 - Step 3
Loading a Profile
Step 4: Selecting a V Group
You’ll notice that now that you’re in Virtual Control mode, the LED next
to the INPUTS button is lit. Notice, too, that just below the INPUTS button
is a small V1, written in light gray. The V signifies “virtual,” meaning that
when you’re in Virtual Control mode, the button is associated with its
control surface functions, not with its audio functions. The INPUTS LED
is lit because when you enter Virtual Control mode for the first time
after powering up the EZbus, V1 is automatically selected.
Each of the eight Master Control buttons, labeled V1 – V8, is used to
access a new V Group. To call up a different V Group, simply press one
of the other V buttons. Whenever you return to Virtual Control mode
after working in Audio Control mode, the EZbus will display the last V
Group accessed.
Each factory programmed V Group has a descriptive name that appears
in the LCD when the V Group is accessed, making it easy to keep track
of each V Group’s control functions. Names are created using the EZbus
Control Surface Editor software.
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TUTORIAL 2: EZBUS AS A SOFTWARE CONTROL SURFACE
Step 5: Accessing Additional V Groups
Each of the eight V buttons has four layers, or “pages,” associated with
it, for a total of 32 possible unique V Groups. There can, of course, be
direct associations between the pages and the V button, that is, all four
pages can be dedicated to a single software application. But you can just
as easily use each page as a unique V Group and control 32 different
applications. To access pages:
In Virtual Control mode, press V1 (INPUTS), followed by the NEXT
button. This will bring you to V1, page 2. The display will show:
Tutorial 2 - Step 5
Accessing Pages
To get to the next page, press the NEXT
button again. The display will show:
Tutorial 2 - Step 5
Page 3 of 4
Finally, press NEXT again to access the
fourth page. The display will show:
Tutorial 2 - Step 5
Page 4 You made it!
You can also use the PREVIOUS button to access pages.
So, for example, you can go immediately from page 1
to page 4 by pressing PREVIOUS once.
TUTORIAL 2: EZBUS AS A SOFTWARE CONTROL SURFACE
Step 6: Using the EZbus Virtual Controls
Now that we’ve spent a little time navigating through the Virtual menus,
let’s do some actual software control.
On the EZbus Installation CD you’ll find a folder labeled Native
Instruments Demos. Inside the folder is a demo version of the
company’s B4 virtual instrument. Launch the demo, then set up the
program’s communication with the EZbus by clicking on the System
menu and selecting MIDI Settings. In the box labeled Available
Inputs, double-click on EZbus and hit OK.
Figure 4. The EZbus
appears as three MIDI
devices in the B4’s MIDI
settings screen. The
unnumbered EZbus is the
USB MIDI; EZbus 2 and 3
are the EZbus hardware
MIDI ports.
Now we’ll select the EZbus V Group designed for use with the B4.
The V Group is located on V4, pages 1, 2, and 3.
In Virtual Control mode, press V4. The display will show:
Page 1 B4
Upper Manual
Use the EZbus Channel faders 1 – 8 and the Main Mix fader to move
the B4’s upper manual drawbars. (Note that the B4’s drawbar action is
designed to emulate that of a real Hammond organ, so the drawbars pull
out in steps, rather than smoothly. On mixer faders and the like, the
action is continuous.)
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TUTORIAL 2: EZBUS AS A SOFTWARE CONTROL SURFACE
Now let’s go to page 2. Press the NEXT button. The display will show:
Page 2 B4
Lower Manual
Now you can use the EZbus Channel faders 1–8 and the Main Mix fader
to move the B4’s lower manual drawbars. The SELECT buttons are active
on this page, designed to be used in conjunction with the VALUE wheel.
To see an example of how this works, click on the view menu at the top
of the B4 screen, and select Control. Now press SELECT button 4 to
select the rotary speaker’s treble horn acceleration, then use the VALUE
wheel to adjust the acceleration speed up and down.
Now press the NEXT button on the EZbus. The display will show:
Page 3 B4
Pedal Drawbars
In this V Group, the EZbus Channel faders 1–6 are used to control the
B4’s pedal drawbars.
All of the B4’s parameters are mapped to the EZbus controllers. Many
are accessed by pressing a Primary Audio Channel SELECT button to
select the parameter, followed by turning the VALUE wheel to adjust the
parameter value. Before moving to the next step, take a little time to
familiarize yourself with the assignments, and the various control
techniques used in the three B4 Profiles.
Step 7: Using the Virtual Control SHIFT Buttons
The EZbus SELECT switches can be used in combination with SHIFT A, B,
and C to provide additional functionality, that is, to allow you to control
more parameters with a single V Group.
To use a SELECT switch in SHIFT mode, press and hold the SHIFT key(s)
while operating the switch. For SHIFT A, press and hold the MUTE/SHIFT
TUTORIAL 2: EZBUS AS A SOFTWARE CONTROL SURFACE
A button. For SHIFT B, press and hold the SOLO/SHIFT B button.
For SHIFT C, press and hold the MUTE/SHIFT A and SOLO/SHIFT B
buttons simultaneously.
In the B4 V Groups, the SELECT buttons, when used in combination with
a SHIFT button, toggle various functions on and off. To see an example of
this, press and hold SHIFT A (MUTE), then press SELECT 3, which is
programmed to turn the B4 Percussion off and on. Notice that each time
you press SELECT 3, the Percussion toggles modes, from off to on and
back again. (Note: You must contine to hold the SHIFT A button in order
to toggle the function off and on.)
Step 8: About Fader Modes: Nulling and Relative
As you move back and forth between operating faders in Audio Control
and Virtual Control modes, you’ll undoubtedly encounter situations where
a fader’s physical position doesn’t accurately reflect its actual value,
because the fader was moved from its
position while in another mode.
To help you reconcile between a
fader’s position and its actual value,
the EZbus utilizes a fader nulling mode,
wherein moving a fader will not change
the value of the parameter being controlled
(either a MIDI parameter when in Virtual
mode or the volume of a Primary Audio
Channel when in Audio mode) until the
fader passes the physical position
associated with the current parameter
value. The nulling action is in effect regardless of the direction of
the fader movement.
You can also operate the fader in Relative mode, wherein moving a fader
causes an immediate change in the parameter value relative to the
current value, but without regard for the actual fader position. You can
access Relative mode by pressing and holding a fader’s SELECT switch as
you move the fader.
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TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
Tutorial 3:
Using the EZbus as a
Stand-Alone Digital Mixer
In this Tutorial we’ll start by making basic audio
connections, then take you through a series of EZbus
functions: making channel and bus assignments, adjusting
EQ and dynamics processing, setting levels, using Sends
and Returns, and finally saving the audio signal routing
and system parameter values as a complete Mix.
TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
What this Tutorial Covers:
• Connecting the EZbus to your audio playback system
• Connecting an analog audio source to the EZbus
• Connecting a digital audio source to the EZbus
• Recalling an EZbus Mix and making it the “Active” Mix
• Assigning an audio input source to a Primary Audio Channel
• Assigning a Primary Audio Channel to the Main and Alt Mix buses
• Assigning the Main Mix and Alt Mix buses to the analog and
digital outputs
• Adjusting audio levels: the Main Mix fader
• Adjusting audio levels: the Primary Audio Channel fader and
TRIM control
• Adjusting audio levels: the Alternate Mix master Level
• Adjusting the EQ of a Primary Audio Channel
• Adjusting the dynamics processor of a Primary Audio Channel
• Using Sends and Returns
• Naming and saving a Mix
What You’ll Need for this Tutorial:
Part I
• The EZbus
• A sound source (musical instrument, microphone, etc.)
• A sound system (power amp and speakers, headphones, etc.)
• Assorted audio cables
Part II
All of the above and:
• A recording device (ADAT, DAT recorder, etc.)
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TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
Step 1: Connecting the EZbus to Your Audio Playback System
The two jacks labeled Main Out L and R located at the center top of the
EZbus front panel are dedicated to carrying the signal from the EZbus
Main Mix bus, which is the unit’s main stereo “master” bus. As a rule,
the audio signals from the Primary Audio Channels are routed to the
Main Mix bus, making the Main Out jacks ideally suited for use as the
“control room” monitor outputs.
Plug one end of an audio cable with standard 1/4" phone plug connectors
into the Main Out L jack, and the other end of the cable into the Left
Channel input of your monitoring system. (If you’re using powered
monitors, plug the cable directly into the Left monitor.) Now plug a
second cable into the Main Out R jack and your monitor system’s Right
Channel input.
Note: The EZbus Main Outs also accept balanced 1/4" TRS (Tip/Ring/Sleeve)
connectors, allowing you to set up a balanced audio system. Consult your audio
system’s owner’s manual to see if this feature is supported.
If you’re using headphones rather than a monitor system (i.e., an amp
and speakers), plug the headphones into the jack labeled PHONES
at the center top of the EZbus front panel. The volume control for the
phones is the knob labeled LEVEL immediately below the PHONES jack.
As with the Main Outs, the PHONES output can also be used to monitor
the Main Mix bus (as well as a variety of others sources).
TO L/R INPUTS OF
AUDIO PLAYBACK
SYSTEM
Figure 1. Main Outs 1 and 2
function as control room monitor
outputs for the EZbus Main Mix bus.
The Main Mix bus signal can appear
at the PHONES output as well.
TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
71
Step 2: Connecting an Analog Audio Source to the EZbus
Each of the EZbus’s analog input jacks is designed for a particular type
of signal: microphone, instrument, or line. If you’re using a microphone,
plug it into the Mic 1 or the Mic 2 jack. If the microphone is a condenser
type and requires phantom power, press the +48V switch located by the
Mic 1 and 2 inputs. When the LED next to the switch is lit, phantom
power is being supplied to the microphone(s).
If your source is an
unamplified electric guitar,
bass, or other instrument
that requires an instrument
level input, plug it into
either the Channel 3 input
or the Channel 4 input.
All other line level
sources—keyboards, drum
machines, CD players, and the like—should be plugged into Channels 5,
6, 7, and 8. It doesn’t matter whether you use the A, B, or C inputs on
these channels, as they are identical. (For more information on using the
multiple inputs on these channels, see The Analog Input/Output Section:
Inputs, in the EZbus Reference Manual PDF.)
Step 3: Connecting a Digital Audio Source to the EZbus
The EZbus can accommodate a wide variety of digital audio sources,
including ADATs, DAT machines, effects devices, and CD players.
S/PDIF connections can be made
via the Optical or Coaxial inputs (or
COAXIAL S/PDIF
OPTICAL
both); ADAT connections are made,
IN
OUT 1
OUT 2
IN
OUT
naturally, via the Optical input. For
this Tutorial, you can plug any digital
source into the appropriate input.
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TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
Step 4: Recalling an EZbus Mix and Making it the “Active” Mix
The EZbus comes from the factory pre-programmed with a number of
Mix configurations. Mix 31, Tutorial 2, is designed to familiarize you
with the EZbus Mix architecture. The Mix contains no parameter
assignments; rather, we’ll be making all the assignments as we work our
way through this Tutorial. At the end, we’ll save the Mix so you can
recall it for future use.
First we need to Recall Mix 31 to make it the “Active” Mix, that is, the
Mix currently loaded into memory. This is done in the MIX menu,
located in the Master Control section.
Press the MIX button; the LED next to the button will light, indicating
that it is the active Master Control function. Pressing the NEXT button
advances you through the available menu options. Press NEXT once, and
the display will show:
Select Mix: 00
"Welcome to EZbus"
TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
Note that if you have recalled Mixes prior to following this Tutorial, the
name and number of the Mix shown in the EZbus display may be
different from this example.
The MIX LED will begin to flash.
Turn the VALUE wheel until Mix 31, Tutorial 2, appears in the display as
shown below:
Select Mix: 31?
"Tutorial 2
"
Double-click the MIX button to recall Mix 31 and make it the current
Active Mix. The MIX LED will flash more quickly for a few moments
while the new Mix is being loaded. The display will show:
Recalling Mix: 31
The MIX LED will remain solidly lit once the loading is complete. The
display will show:
Select Mix: 31
"Tutorial 2
"
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TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
74
Step 5: Assigning an Audio Input Source to a Primary Audio Channel
You now have two audio sources, one analog and one digital, plugged
into the EZbus. The next step is to assign these inputs to the EZbus’s
Primary Audio Channels.
Remember that any input, analog or digital, can be assigned to any of the
Primary Audio Channels; just because you have something plugged into
the Channel 4 input jack doesn’t mean that you have to use Primary
Audio Channel 4 for that signal. For this Tutorial, we’ll use Primary
Audio Channel 1 for the analog source, and Primary Audio Channels 2
and 3 for the digital source(s). (We’re presuming that the digital source
is a stereo S/PDIF signal. If your source is an ADAT, with multiple
channels, you can simply assign the appropriate number of Primary
Audio Channels using the methods described below.)
Which analog input gets assigned to Primary Audio Channel 1 depends,
naturally, on your source audio (microphone, instrument, or line level).
Let’s presume you’re using a microphone, plugged into the Mic 1 jack
(press the +48V button if your microphone requires phantom power).
In the Master Control Section, press INPUTS, followed by the SELECT
button of the Primary Audio Channel you wish to assign, in this case
Channel 1. Notice that the LED next to the Channel 1 SELECT button is
lit, indicating that Channel 1 has been selected.
Press NEXT repeatedly until the display shows:
Channel 1
Source: Off
TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
75
The following inputs are available as sources for Primary Audio
Channel 1. Turn the VALUE wheel to select Mic/Line 1.
Off
Inst/Line 3
Line 6(ABC)
Optical 1
Optical 4
Optical 7
S/PDIF Right
Mic/Line 1
Inst/Line 4
Line 7(ABC)
Optical 2
Optical 5
Optical 8
USB Left
Mic/Line 2
Line 5 (ABC)
Line 8(ABC)
Optical 3
Optical 6
S/PDIF Left
USB Right
If you’re using another audio source, such as a keyboard, select its associated
input (Line 7 [ABC], for example), as the audio Source for Channel 1.
For the digital input(s), let’s use Primary Audio Channels 2 and 3. While
in the Channel 1 Source menu (as above) press the Channel 2 SELECT
button. The display will now show:
Channel 2
Source: Off
Turn the VALUE wheel to select your
digital input source, e.g., S/PDIF Left.
To now make the Channel 3 assignment, press the
Channel 3 SELECT button. The display will show:
Channel 3
Source: Off
Turn the VALUE wheel to select your digital
input source, e.g., S/PDIF Right.
TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
76
Step 6: Assigning a Primary Audio Channel to the Main and Alt Mix Buses
At this point we have EZbus analog and digital inputs “talking”
to Primary Audio Channels. Now we need to route the Primary
Audio Channels to the Main Mix bus (which is routed to your audio
monitoring system via Main Outs L and R and/or PHONES), so we
can monitor those signals.
In the Master Control section, Press PAN/ASSIGN, followed by the
SELECT button of Primary Audio Channel 1. Then press the NEXT
button repeatedly until the display shows:
Channel 1
Main Mix: Off
Two options are available, as shown below.
Turn the VALUE wheel to select “On.”
Off
On
The display will now show:
Channel 1
Main Mix: On
Now for Channel 2. Press the Channel 2 SELECT button.
TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
77
The display will show:
Channel 2
Main Mix: Off
Turn the VALUE wheel to select “On.”
Off
On
The display will now show:
Channel 2
Main Mix: On
And lastly, Channel 3.
Press the Channel 3 SELECT button.
The display will show:
Channel 3
Main Mix: Off
Turn the VALUE wheel to select “On.”
Off
The display will now show:
Channel 3
Main Mix: On
On
TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
78
You may also wish to assign one or more of the Primary Audio Channels
to the Alternate (Alt) Mix bus. This second bus can be used for creating
stage monitor or headphone mixes, as a record send, or for any
application where you need a mix bus that’s independent of the Main
Mix bus. The Alt Mix bus signal can be assigned to any of the hardware
outputs listed under OUTPUTS in the Master Control section.
To assign a Primary Audio Channel to the Alt Mix bus, press
PAN/ASSIGN, followed by the SELECT button of the Channel you
wish to assign. Then press the NEXT button repeatedly
until the display shows:
Channel 1
Alternate Mix: Off
Turn the VALUE wheel to select “On.”
Off
On
The display will now show:
Channel 1
Alternate Mix: On
Continue making Channel assignments to the Alt Mix bus as needed,
using the Channels SELECT buttons, as above.
TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
Step 7: Assigning the Main and Alt Mix Buses to the
Analog and Digital Outputs
As mentioned in Step 1, the signal from the Main Mix bus always
appears at the Main Out L and R jacks, so it’s not necessary to make any
output assignments to do simple control room monitoring. For more
complex applications, however, you can route the Main Mix signal to the
AUX 1 & 2, PHONES, S/PDIF 1 and 2, Optical, and USB outputs.
Similarly, the Alt Mix bus signal can be routed to multiple outputs.
In this section, we’ll route the Main Mix
to the S/PDIF 1 output, and the Alt Mix
to the Aux Out 1 and 2 jacks.
In the Master Control section press
OUTPUTS, followed by NEXT repeatedly
until the display shows:
S/PDIF Transmitter 1
Source: Sends 1&2
Use the VALUE wheel to select Main Mix
as the Source for the S/PDIF Out 1 jack:
Main Mix Alt Mix Sends 1&2 Sends 3&4
The display will show:
S/PDIF Transmitter 1
Source: Main Mix
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TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
Now for the Alt Mix assignment.
Press NEXT repeatedly until the display shows:
Auxiliary Out Jacks
Source: Sends 3&4
Use the VALUE wheel to select Altrnate Mix
as the audio source for the AUX OUT 1
and 2 jacks. The display will show:
Auxiliary Out Jacks
Source: Altrnate Mix
Now that the audio signals plugged into the EZbus are routed
to the Primary Audio Channels, and the signals from those
Channels are appearing at one or more hardware outputs,
its time to turn our attention to signal levels.
Step 8: Adjusting Audio Levels: The Main
Mix and Primary Audio Channel Faders
The Main Mix fader, distinguished from
the Primary Audio Channel faders by its
blue “M” SELECT button, controls the
volume of the Main Mix bus signal.
We’re using the Main Mix bus strictly for
control room monitoring, so the position
of the fader isn’t absolutely critical.
As a rule, however, the fader should be
set at its ±U (unity gain) mark. So for
now, set it there; if your playback level
turns out to be too soft or too loud,
you can adjust it later.
TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
Now set the Channel 1 fader to its ±U (unity gain) position. As
with the Main Mix fader, the position of the channel fader will
only affect playback volume, not the level of the signal going to
the computer. This allows you to easily create a monitor mix
without adversely affecting your record levels.
Step 9: Adjusting Audio Levels: The Line Input TRIM Control
The goal here is to set this control so that noise is minimized, dynamic
range is maximized, and a reasonable amount of headroom is maintained.
We’ve assigned the Mic 1 input to Primary Audio Channel 1, so first press
the Channel 1 Select button; this will place the LCD meter into pre-fader
mode, allowing you to visually monitor the level at the Channels input.
Next we’ll set the Mic/Line input’s TRIM control, which is used to adjust
the gain of the analog signal that appears at the Channel input. In this
example, we happen to be assigning an input
to a like-numbered Primary Audio Channel.
However, it’s important to note that when
adjusting the analog TRIM controls, you
should always adjust the control associated
with the input, not the channel to which the
input is assigned. So, for example, if your
signal is plugged into Line Input 5C, you’ll be adjusting
the Channel 5 TRIM control.
Begin by playing your audio source—singing into the microphone,
playing the keyboard, and so on. Then, starting with the control rotated
fully counter-clockwise, gradually increase the gain by turning the knob
clockwise. As you turn the knob, keep an eye on the level meter in the
LCD. The TRIM is in the correct position when the loudest part of your
signal registers just below the MAX
indicator on the LCD. At this point
you’ll have a nice, hot signal going
to the channel (without overloading
it), thereby maximizing signal-tonoise and dynamic range. If you
think you might exceed this level
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TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
when actually performing, set the level so that the loudest peaks read at
around –2dB on the LCD. This will give you a bit of headroom for
transients and louder passages.
Step 10: Adjusting Audio Levels:
The Alternate Mix Master Level
The critical—or non-critical—nature of this level adjustment is
determined by your particular application. For headphone or stage
monitor mixes, the adjustment is to taste. When the Alt Mix bus is used
as a record send, the level adjustment must be made according to the
meter readings on your recorder (e.g., MDM, DAW, etc.), so as to
optimize record levels.
In the Master Control section press MIX, followed by the NEXT button
repeatedly until the display shows:
Alternate Mix
Master Level: Off
Now, while playing your audio source, turn the VALUE wheel clockwise
to slowly bring up the Master level of the Alternate Mix bus.
Adjust the level to taste or, if the
Alt Mix is being used as a record
send, watch the level meters in
your audio recording hardware/
software and continue to increase
the level until the recorder’s
meters are reading at the
recommended level.
TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
Step 11: Adjusting the EQ of a
Primary Audio Channel
The EZbus features sophisticated
three-band EQ, independently
adjustable for each Primary Audio
Channel. The mid band is fully
parametric, providing control over
the frequency setting, the amount of
Cut or Boost, and the Q. Use this
band to precisely fine-tune the
frequency response of a signal. The
other two bands provide Low- and
High-shelving, useful for rolling off
undesirable low frequencies (low
shelving) and adding presence or
“air” (high shelving) to a signal.
In this step we’re going to add a little “fat” to Primary Audio Channel 1
(our analog input signal). For this we’ll use the channel’s parametric EQ,
dialing in 6dB of gain at 250Hz, with a fairly wide Q setting. (Q controls
the width of the frequency band at the cut/boost point. Higher Q settings
limit the cut/boost to a narrow band of frequencies surrounding the
selected frequency. Lower Q settings result in a wider band of
frequencies being cut or boosted).
In its default state, a Primary Audio Channel’s EQ status is Bypassed,
that is, the audio completely bypasses the EQ circuit. So the first thing
we need to do is Enable the EQ so we can hear our parameter changes
acting upon the Primary Audio Channel signal.
In the Master Control section press EQ, followed by the SELECT button
of Primary Audio Channel 1. The display will show:
Channel 1 EQ
Status: Bypassed
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Use the VALUE wheel to enable the EQ.
Bypassed
Enabled
The display will now show:
Channel 1 EQ
Status: Enabled
The EQ is now enabled, so let’s start by adjusting the frequency.
Press the NEXT button repeatedly until the display shows:
Channel 1 Mid-Sweep
Frequency:
1000Hz
The frequency parameter is used to precisely dial in to the target
frequency. We want to select 250Hz, so turn the VALUE wheel until the
display shows:
Channel 1 Mid-Sweep
Frequency:
250Hz
Now we’ll add the 6dB of gain. Press the NEXT button.
The display will show:
Channel 1 Mid-Sweep
Cut/boost: +00dB
TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
Use the VALUE wheel to select +6dB of boost. The display will show:
Channel 1 Mid-Sweep
Cut/boost: +06dB
Lastly, we’ll adjust the Q parameter. Since we’re going for “fat,” as
opposed to cutting or boosting just a very narrow frequency range
around 250Hz, we’ll dial in 04, a fairly wide Q setting.
Press the NEXT button.
The display will show:
Channel 1 Mid-Sweep
Q: 0.0%
Use the VALUE wheel to dial in 04. The display will show:
Channel 1 Mid-Sweep
Q: 0.4%
It’s often useful to use a high Q setting when adjusting the frequency
parameters to help you hone in on the particular frequency you’re
looking to cut or boost. Once you’ve found it, you can back the Q setting
down to where it sounds more natural.
Step 12: Adjusting the Dynamics Processor of a Primary Audio Channel
The EZbus provides dynamics processing, in the form of a compressor
(soft knee type) and a noise gate, on each of the Primary Audio
Channels. All are independently programmable. For this Tutorial we’ll
again do our processing on Primary Audio Channel 1. Let’s start with
the compressor.
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TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
The compressor is useful for taming sounds that have lots of loud peaks,
and thereby run the risk of introducing clipping distortion. It’s also good
for fattening up bass tracks and for adding that polished “edge” to vocals.
Press DYNAMICS, followed by the SELECT button of Primary Audio
Channel 1. The display will show:
Channel 1
Dynamics: Bypassed
Use the VALUE wheel to Enable the compressor. The display will show:
Channel 1
Dynamics: Enabled
Now we’ll set the compressor’s Threshold
level, that is, the volume level that the
signal coming into the compressor must
reach in order for the compressor to start
working. Press the NEXT button repeatedly
until the display shows:
TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
Channel 1 Compressor
Threshold: -48dB
Turn the VALUE wheel until the display reads
Channel 1 Compressor
Threshold: -10dB
With this setting the compressor will “kick in” when a sound is at a
moderate volume level.
Next we’ll adjust the Ratio parameter, which
controls how much compression is applied
to the signal. We’ll dial in a ratio of 4:1—a
“reasonable” ratio, in that neither too little
nor too much compression is applied. Press
the NEXT button. The display will show:
Channel 1 Compressor
Ratio: 1.1->1
Use the VALUE wheel to select 4:1 as the Ratio. The display will show:
Channel 1 Compressor
Ratio: 4.0->1
Next we’ll set the Attack Time parameter, which determines
how quickly the compressor reacts to sound that exceeds
the Threshold level. Press the NEXT button. The display will show:
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TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
Channel 1 Compressor
Attack: 001 msec
We’ll set the Attack Time to be relatively quick (20ms). Turn the VALUE
wheel until the display reads:
Channel 1 Compressor
Attack: 020 msec
Now to the Release Time parameter, which determines how quickly (or
slowly) the compressor stops working when the sound level falls below
the Threshold level. Press the NEXT button. The display will show:
Channel 1 Compressor
Release: 0200msec
Let’s dial in a fairly slow release, around
700ms. Turn the VALUE wheel until the
display reads:
Channel 1 Compressor
Release: 700msec
A natural byproduct of compressing a signal is a reduction in the
signal’s level. To compensate for this reduction, you’ll need to
adjust the channel fader. Higher compression ratios result in
greater gain reduction, so the proper fader setting depends on
TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
how much compression you’re adding and how loud you want the
signal to be. We’ll use the EZbus meters to help set the proper
fader level.
You’ll notice that just to the left of the –48 mark in the EZbus LCD
the two meter graphs are labeled Pre and Post. When you’re in
DYNAMICS mode, the level meters change from displaying the stereo
Main Mix signal level to displaying the Pre (before the compressor)
and the Post (after the compressor) signal levels. This allows you to
monitor how much gain reduction your compression settings
produce. You can then adjust the channel fader to compensate for the
reduction. To see how this works, play your audio source and raise
the channel fader slowly.
As you do so, watch the Post level meter. Continue to increase
the fader level until the Post meter reads at the same level as the
Pre meter. When the two levels match, you’ve compressed the
signal to suppress peaks, even out dynamics, or add texture,
without compromising the overall level of the signal.
Now we’ll turn our attention to the Noise Gate. The gate can be used, as
its name implies, to control noisy signals. It does this by muting the
signal whenever the level falls below the level set by the Threshold
parameter. The gate can also be used to create effects, such as the
classic “gated reverb,” in which the natural decay of the reverb tail is
abruptly cut off by the gate, creating a rhythmic, percussive effect.
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TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
We’ll begin by setting the gate’s Threshold level. From the previous
menu, press NEXT repeatedly until the display shows:
Channel 1 Noise Gate
Threshold: Off
For this Tutorial we’ll assume that we’re
setting the gate to control a noisy source
that has no desirable signal below –45dB, so we want the gate to
mute everything below that level. Use the VALUE wheel to set the
Threshold parameter to –45dB.
Channel 1 Noise Gate
Threshold: -45dB
Now we’ll set the Decay Time parameter, which controls how quickly
the gate closes when the Threshold level reached. Press the NEXT
button. The display will show:
Channel 1 Noise Gate
Decay: 0100 msec
The Decay parameter is adjustable in 100 millisecond increments. Use
the VALUE wheel to set the Decay parameter to a value that is musically
appropriate for your source material.
TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
Step 13: Using Sends
The EZbus has four Sends, independently programmable
pre- or post-fader, which are useful for routing signals to effect devices,
setting up headphone mixes, routing a signal to a recording device,
and the like. In this step, we’ll route Send 1 on Primary Audio Channel 1
to an external effects device, and bring the signal from the device back
into the EZbus via the Returns (in Step 14). The analog output jacks on
the EZbus front panel labeled SENDS 1 and 2 always carry the audio
signals from Sends 1 and 2. So we’ll begin by plugging the output of the
SEND 1 jack into the left channel input of your effects device, and the
output of the SEND 2 jack into your effect device’s right channel input.
Now we’ll set the Master Output Level of Send 1.
Press SENDS, followed by NEXT:
The display will show:
Send 1
Master Level: +00dB
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TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
We’ll assume that the device we’re sending to is a –10dB device.
Turn the VALUE wheel to select –10dB for the Send 1 Master Level.
The display will show:
Send 1
Master Level: -10dB
Press NEXT repeatedly to get to the Send 1 Pre/Post fader mode menu.
The display will show:
Send 1
Mode: Pre Fader
We want to use Pre-fader mode so that our fader movements won’t affect
the Send level. So we’ll leave this parameter as it is and move ahead and
assign the signal from Primary Audio Channel 1 to Send 1. Press NEXT
repeatedly until the display shows:
Channel 1 to Send 1
Level: Off
Use the VALUE wheel to set a Level that registers on your effects device’s
meters at the level recommended in the device’s owner’s manual.
If your effects processor is a stereo device, repeat the above steps with
Send 2. Simply press NEXT repeatedly to get to the Send 2 menus.
Step 14: Usings Returns
The EZbus has three Returns (two mono and one stereo), which can be
used to bring the signals from external effects devices back into the
EZbus, or as general purpose inputs. All of the Returns feed directly to
the Main Mix bus, making it a simple matter to monitor their signals.
TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
Now we’ll bring the audio coming back from the effects processor into
the EZbus using a Return. We’ll use Return 3&4 because it’s stereo
(Returns 1 and 2 are mono). First we need to make our analog audio
connections.
Start by plugging the left and right channel outputs of your effects
device into EZbus analog line inputs 7C and 8C, respectively. Set up
those inputs’ faders and TRIM controls according to the guidelines in
Steps 8 and 9.
Next, in the Master Control Section, press RETURNS, followed by the
NEXT button repeatedly until the display shows:
Return 3&4 (stereo)
Source: Off
Turn the VALUE wheel to select
Line 7&8 (ABC) as the audio Source
for Return 3/4. The display will read:
Return 3&4 (stereo)
Source: Line 7&8 (ABC)
All that’s left to do is set the Return Level control.
Press the NEXT button repeatedly until the display shows:
Return 3&4 <stereo>
Level: Off
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TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
94
Gradually turn the VALUE wheel clockwise to increase
the Return 3/4 level. There is no “correct” setting.
Simply adjust the level to provide the desired volume.
Step 15: Naming and Saving a Mix
For our final step we’ll name and save the Mix we’ve created in this
Tutorial. The EZbus provides 32 locations for storing Mixes, and
Mixes can be recalled, edited, and resaved.
In the Master Control section, press MIX/SYSTEM, followed by NEXT
repeatedly until the display shows:
Store as Mix 31?
"Tutorial 3
"
The MIX/SYSTEM LED will begin to flash.
Press the REWIND button in the transport controls; the cursor in the
LCD will move to under the “T” in Tutorial.
Use the VALUE wheel to select one of the following alphanumeric
characters:
0...9
:
Y
A...Z
#
*
+
;
?
%
,
<
a...z
&
-
=
_
'
.
>
!
(
/
?
"
)
TUTORIAL 3: EZBUS AS A DIGITAL MIXER
Use the FFWD button to advance the cursor to the next character space.
Use the REWIND button to move the cursor to the previous character
space. Names can be up to 16 characters long.
When the name is complete, double-click the MIX/SYSTEM button to
store the name and all the Mix settings to memory location 31. Or, you
can use the VALUE wheel to select a new location (00–31) prior to
double-clicking MIX/SYSTEM.
When you double-click the MIX/SYSTEM button, its LED will flash more
quickly for a few moments while the new name and Mix are being
stored. The display will show:
Storing Mix 31!
The MIX/SYSTEM LED will remain solidly lit once the Mix has been
stored. The display will then show:
Select Mix: 31
"My Other New Mix "
95
Contacting Customer Service
If you experience any trouble with your EZbus, please call
the Event Electronics Customer Service department at
805-566-7777, ext. 5. Before calling, however, we ask that you
please consult the Technical Support section of our Web site,
www.event1.com.
If you believe your EZbus is in need of repair, please contact
the Event Electronics Customer Service department for a
Return Authorization Number (RA#). We can accept for
servicing only those units that are accompanied by an RA#.
Units shipped without an RA# number will be refused.
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