ICM Administration Guide for Cisco ICM Enterprise

ICM Administration Guide for Cisco ICM Enterprise
ICM Administration Guide for Cisco
ICM/IPCC Enterprise & Hosted Editions
Cisco ICM/IPCC Enterprise & Hosted Editions Release 7.0(0)
July 2007
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ICM Administration Guide for Cisco ICM/IPCC Enterprise & Hosted Editions, Release 7.0(0)
© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
CONTENTS
About This Guide
Purpose
vii
vii
Audience
vii
Organization
vii
Conventions
viii
Other Publications
ix
Obtaining Documentation ix
Cisco.com ix
Product Documentation DVD
Ordering Documentation ix
Documentation Feedback
ix
x
Cisco Product Security Overview x
Reporting Security Problems in Cisco Products
Product Alerts and Field Notices
xi
Obtaining Technical Assistance xi
Cisco Support Website xi
Submitting a Service Request xii
Definitions of Service Request Severity
xii
Obtaining Additional Publications and Information
CHAPTER
1
Administration Overview
CHAPTER
2
Fault Tolerance
x
xiii
1-1
2-1
Architecture 2-1
Approaches to Fault Tolerance 2-2
Duplicated Communication Paths 2-3
Node Manager 2-3
Central Controller 2-3
Two Sides 2-4
Geographic Distribution 2-6
Role of the Synchronizers 2-6
Synchronization and State Transfer
CallRouter Recovery 2-8
2-8
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Logger and Database Manager Recovery
2-8
Database Fault Tolerance 2-9
ICM Database Recovery 2-10
System Failure 2-10
Disk Failure 2-10
Software Failure 2-11
Network Interface Controllers
Peripheral Gateways
2-12
Real-Time Distributors
2-13
Historical Data Servers
2-13
Simplexed Operation
2-11
2-14
Fault Tolerance in Integrated Deployments
CHAPTER
3
The ICM Databases
Overview
2-14
3-1
3-1
Types of Data 3-2
Configuration and Script Data
Historical and Real-time Data
3-3
3-3
Central Database 3-3
Database Sizing and Creation 3-4
Optimization tips for SQL Server 2000.
Database Updates and Changes 3-4
Distributor AW Local Database 3-5
Database Creation and Initialization
Real-Time Data 3-5
3-5
Configuration Management Service (CMS)
Temporary Database
Historical Data Server
Locks
CHAPTER
4
3-4
3-5
3-6
3-6
3-7
Database Administration
Overview
4-1
4-1
Retaining Historical Data
4-2
Database Administration Tool 4-2
Starting ICMDBA 4-3
Estimating the Size of a Database
Creating a Database 4-5
4-4
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Contents
Deleting a Database 4-7
Expanding a Database 4-7
Recreating a Database 4-8
Viewing Database Properties 4-9
Viewing Table Properties 4-10
Importing/Exporting Data 4-11
Synchronizing Database Data 4-11
Configuring the Server 4-12
Historical Data Server
4-14
When a Database Nears Capacity
Monitoring the Database Size
Allocating Additional Space
Initializing the Local Database
Troubleshooting
CHAPTER
5
4-14
4-15
4-15
4-16
4-16
General Administration
Built-In Administration
5-1
5-1
Optional Administration 5-2
Checking Data Integrity in the Local Database
Viewing Logger Events 5-4
Database Networking Support 5-4
5-2
Performance Monitoring 5-4
ICM Router 5-5
ICM QoS PerfMon Objects and Counters 5-6
Registry Settings and Risks 5-6
Charting QoS Values 5-7
ICM Message Delivery Service (MDS) Performance Meters
Charting MDS Values 5-10
Backup and Restore 5-14
Database 5-15
Best practices for performing a backup
Comparing Databases
5-9
5-15
5-15
Resynchronizing Databases 5-16
Synchronizing Databases from the Command Window
Synchronizing Databases with ICMDBA 5-17
ICM Time Synchronization
MDS 5-17
VRU PIM 5-18
5-16
5-17
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NAM/Customer ICM
CIC 5-19
Router 5-19
Logger 5-19
CHAPTER
6
Event Management
5-18
6-1
Overview 6-1
Event Data Storage 6-3
Event Viewing Tools 6-4
When to View Events and Log Files
6-4
Windows Event Logs 6-4
Event Log Settings 6-4
Viewing the Event Logs 6-5
Windows Logs and Event Types 6-5
Viewing Event Data from Other Systems
Per-Process Log Files 6-6
Naming Conventions 6-7
Sample File 6-11
Viewing Per-Process Log Files
CHAPTER
7
Support Facilities
The DDSN
7-1
File Transfer
7-2
7-2
Support Processing
Serial Alarm Feed
7-2
7-3
Syslog Compatible Feed
Cisco Support Tools
8
6-11
7-1
Error Reporting
CHAPTER
6-6
ICM Partitioning
7-4
7-5
8-1
ICM Partitioning Overview 8-1
Why Use ICM Partitioning? 8-1
Classes and Objects 8-2
Mapping Objects 8-2
Business Entities 8-3
Access Privilege Levels 8-4
ICM Partitioning Security 8-5
User Privileges 8-5
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User Groups 8-5
How Partitioning Works
Getting Started 8-7
8-5
Class and Object Security 8-8
Class and Object Security Overview
Class Security 8-9
Object Security 8-10
8-8
Installing and Configuring ICM Partitioning 8-22
Installing ICM Partitioning 8-23
ICM Security Tools 8-23
Defining User Groups 8-23
Defining Users 8-24
Defining Business Entities Security 8-26
Defining Class Security Access 8-27
Defining Object Security Access 8-28
Defining Security for One or More Records at a Time
Defining Script Security 8-30
Partitioning and Database Access
Problems with Partitioning
8-29
8-30
8-47
Best Practices 8-48
Only enable partitioning if it is really needed 8-48
Hardware can help the problem 8-48
Do changes in small batches 8-49
Ensure the logger system is idle during changes 8-49
Minimize the number of objects in the system 8-49
Minimize the number of users in the system 8-50
Partitioning Tips
8-50
INDEX
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Contents
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vi
About This Guide
Purpose
This manual describes how to administer and manage Intelligent Contact Management (ICM) software.
It includes information about database administration, event management, support services, and ICM
software’s fault tolerant architecture.
This manual includes some discussions of how ICM software functions in integrated environments with
the Cisco E-Mail Manager (Cisco E-Mail Manager Option) and Cisco Collaboration Server (Cisco Web
Collaboration Option) components, but it does not provide administration information for the E-Mail
Manager and Collaboration Server components. Please refer to the approriate E-Mail Manager and
Collaboration Server documents for instructions on how to administer these components.
Audience
This manual is intended for personnel responsible for administering ICM software. As an ICM
administrator, you should be familiar with Microsoft SQL Server database administration and Windows
2003. This manual also assumes that you have a general understanding of the ICM system components
and how they work together as a complete call routing system. Administrators who are responsible for
an ICM system that is part of an integrated environment should also have a general understanding of
Cisco Collaboration Server and Cisco E-Mail Manager system components.
Organization
The manual is divided into the following chapters.
Chapter
Description
Chapter 1,
“Administration
Overview”
Describes aspects of the system that are of interest
to the administrator.
Chapter 2, “Fault
Tolerance”
Describes the main features of the ICM fault
tolerant architecture, with special emphasis on
how fault tolerance affects the administration of
the system.
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About This Guide
Chapter
Description
Chapter 3, “The ICM
Databases”
Introduces the local and central ICM databases
and explains how they are used.
Chapter 4, “Database
Administration”
Describes the ICMDBA tool, used for various
database administration tasks.
Chapter 5, “General
Administration”
Describes the administration that ICM software
performs automatically. This chapter also includes
several optional administration features that you
can use.
Chapter 6, “Event
Management”
Describes how ICM software reports events from
components and processes throughout the system.
This chapter also describes the different tools that
you can use to view event data.
Chapter 7, “Support
Facilities”
Explains the ICM Distributed Diagnostics and
Services Network (DDSN) and several other
support provider services.
Chapter 8, “ICM
Partitioning Overview”
Discusses the ICM)\ Partitioning feature, which
controls what data individuals are allowed to
access within an ICM database.
Conventions
This manual uses the following conventions.
Format
Example
Boldface type is used for user
entries, keys, buttons, and folder
and submenu names.
Choose Edit > Find from the ICM
Configure menu bar.
Italic type indicates one of the
following:
•
A newly introduced term
•
For emphasis
•
A generic syntax item that
you must replace with a
specific value
•
A title of a publication
An arrow (>) indicates an item
from a pull-down menu.
•
A skill group is a collection of agents
who share similar skills.
•
Do not use the numerical naming
convention that is used in the
predefined templates (for example,
persvc01).
•
IF (condition, true-value, false-value)
•
For more information, see the Cisco
ICM Enterprise Edition Database
Schema Handbook.
The Save command from the File menu is
referenced as File > Save.
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About This Guide
Other Publications
For additional information about Cisco Intelligent Contact Management (ICM) software, see the Cisco
web site listing ICM documentation.
Obtaining Documentation
Cisco documentation and additional literature are available on Cisco.com. This section explains the
product documentation resources that Cisco offers.
Cisco.com
You can access the most current Cisco documentation at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/techsupport
You can access the Cisco website at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com
You can access international Cisco websites at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/public/countries_languages.shtml
Product Documentation DVD
The Product Documentation DVD is a library of technical product documentation on a portable medium.
The DVD enables you to access installation, configuration, and command guides for Cisco hardware and
software products. With the DVD, you have access to the HTML documentation and some of the
PDF files found on the Cisco website at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/univercd/home/home.htm
The Product Documentation DVD is created and released regularly. DVDs are available singly or by
subscription. Registered Cisco.com users can order a Product Documentation DVD (product number
DOC-DOCDVD= or DOC-DOCDVD=SUB) from Cisco Marketplace at the Product Documentation
Store at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/go/marketplace/docstore
Ordering Documentation
You must be a registered Cisco.com user to access Cisco Marketplace. Registered users may order Cisco
documentation at the Product Documentation Store at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/go/marketplace/docstore
If you do not have a user ID or password, you can register at this URL:
http://tools.cisco.com/RPF/register/register.do
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About This Guide
Documentation Feedback
You can provide feedback about Cisco technical documentation on the Cisco Support site area by
entering your comments in the feedback form available in every online document.
Cisco Product Security Overview
Cisco provides a free online Security Vulnerability Policy portal at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/products_security_vulnerability_policy.html
From this site, you will find information about how to do the following:
•
Report security vulnerabilities in Cisco products
•
Obtain assistance with security incidents that involve Cisco products
•
Register to receive security information from Cisco
A current list of security advisories, security notices, and security responses for Cisco products is
available at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/go/psirt
To see security advisories, security notices, and security responses as they are updated in real time, you
can subscribe to the Product Security Incident Response Team Really Simple Syndication (PSIRT RSS)
feed. Information about how to subscribe to the PSIRT RSS feed is found at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/products_psirt_rss_feed.html
Reporting Security Problems in Cisco Products
Cisco is committed to delivering secure products. We test our products internally before we release them,
and we strive to correct all vulnerabilities quickly. If you think that you have identified a vulnerability
in a Cisco product, contact PSIRT:
•
For emergencies only — [email protected]
An emergency is either a condition in which a system is under active attack or a condition for which
a severe and urgent security vulnerability should be reported. All other conditions are considered
nonemergencies.
•
For nonemergencies — [email protected]
In an emergency, you can also reach PSIRT by telephone:
Tip
•
1 877 228-7302
•
1 408 525-6532
We encourage you to use Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) or a compatible product (for example, GnuPG) to
encrypt any sensitive information that you send to Cisco. PSIRT can work with information that has been
encrypted with PGP versions 2.x through 9.x.
Never use a revoked encryption key or an expired encryption key. The correct public key to use in your
correspondence with PSIRT is the one linked in the Contact Summary section of the Security
Vulnerability Policy page at this URL:
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About This Guide
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/products_security_vulnerability_policy.html
The link on this page has the current PGP key ID in use.
If you do not have or use PGP, contact PSIRT to find other means of encrypting the data before sending
any sensitive material.
Product Alerts and Field Notices
Modifications to or updates about Cisco products are announced in Cisco Product Alerts and Cisco Field
Notices. You can receive these announcements by using the Product Alert Tool on Cisco.com. This tool
enables you to create a profile and choose those products for which you want to receive information.
To access the Product Alert Tool, you must be a registered Cisco.com user. Registered users can access
the tool at this URL:
http://tools.cisco.com/Support/PAT/do/ViewMyProfiles.do?local=en
To register as a Cisco.com user, go to this URL:
http://tools.cisco.com/RPF/register/register.do
Obtaining Technical Assistance
Cisco Technical Support provides 24-hour-a-day award-winning technical assistance. The
Cisco Support website on Cisco.com features extensive online support resources. In addition, if you
have a valid Cisco service contract, Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC) engineers provide
telephone support. If you do not have a valid Cisco service contract, contact your reseller.
Cisco Support Website
The Cisco Support website provides online documents and tools for troubleshooting and resolving
technical issues with Cisco products and technologies. The website is available 24 hours a day at
this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/support/index.html
Access to all tools on the Cisco Support website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password. If you have
a valid service contract but do not have a user ID or password, you can register at this URL:
http://tools.cisco.com/RPF/register/register.do
Note
Before you submit a request for service online or by phone, use the Cisco Product Identification Tool
to locate your product serial number. You can access this tool from the Cisco Support website
by clicking the Get Tools & Resources link, clicking the All Tools (A-Z) tab, and then choosing
Cisco Product Identification Tool from the alphabetical list. This tool offers three search options:
by product ID or model name; by tree view; or, for certain products, by copying and pasting show
command output. Search results show an illustration of your product with the serial number label
location highlighted. Locate the serial number label on your product and record the information
before placing a service call.
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About This Guide
Tip
Displaying and Searching on Cisco.com
If you suspect that the browser is not refreshing a web page, force the browser to update the web page
by holding down the Ctrl key while pressing F5.
To find technical information, narrow your search to look in technical documentation, not the
entire Cisco.com website. After using the Search box on the Cisco.com home page, click the
Advanced Search link next to the Search box on the resulting page and then click the
Technical Support & Documentation radio button.
To provide feedback about the Cisco.com website or a particular technical document, click
Contacts & Feedback at the top of any Cisco.com web page.
Submitting a Service Request
Using the online TAC Service Request Tool is the fastest way to open S3 and S4 service requests. (S3 and
S4 service requests are those in which your network is minimally impaired or for which you require
product information.) After you describe your situation, the TAC Service Request Tool provides
recommended solutions. If your issue is not resolved using the recommended resources, your service
request is assigned to a Cisco engineer. The TAC Service Request Tool is located at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/techsupport/servicerequest
For S1 or S2 service requests, or if you do not have Internet access, contact the Cisco TAC by telephone.
(S1 or S2 service requests are those in which your production network is down or severely degraded.)
Cisco engineers are assigned immediately to S1 and S2 service requests to help keep your business
operations running smoothly.
To open a service request by telephone, use one of the following numbers:
Asia-Pacific: +61 2 8446 7411
Australia: 1 800 805 227
EMEA: +32 2 704 55 55
USA: 1 800 553 2447
For a complete list of Cisco TAC contacts, go to this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/techsupport/contacts
Definitions of Service Request Severity
To ensure that all service requests are reported in a standard format, Cisco has established severity
definitions.
Severity 1 (S1)—An existing network is “down” or there is a critical impact to your business operations.
You and Cisco will commit all necessary resources around the clock to resolve the situation.
Severity 2 (S2)—Operation of an existing network is severely degraded, or significant aspects of your
business operations are negatively affected by inadequate performance of Cisco products. You and Cisco
will commit full-time resources during normal business hours to resolve the situation.
Severity 3 (S3)—Operational performance of the network is impaired while most business operations
remain functional. You and Cisco will commit resources during normal business hours to restore service
to satisfactory levels.
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About This Guide
Severity 4 (S4)—You require information or assistance with Cisco product capabilities, installation, or
configuration. There is little or no effect on your business operations.
Obtaining Additional Publications and Information
Information about Cisco products, technologies, and network solutions is available from various online
and printed sources.
•
The Cisco Online Subscription Center is the website where you can sign up for a variety of Cisco
e-mail newsletters and other communications. Create a profile and then select the subscriptions that
you would like to receive. To visit the Cisco Online Subscription Center, go to this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/offer/subscribe
•
The Cisco Product Quick Reference Guide is a handy, compact reference tool that includes brief
product overviews, key features, sample part numbers, and abbreviated technical specifications for
many Cisco products that are sold through channel partners. It is updated twice a year and includes
the latest Cisco channel product offerings. To order and find out more about the Cisco Product Quick
Reference Guide, go to this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/go/guide
•
Cisco Marketplace provides a variety of Cisco books, reference guides, documentation, and logo
merchandise. Visit Cisco Marketplace, the company store, at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/go/marketplace/
•
Cisco Press publishes a wide range of general networking, training, and certification titles. Both new
and experienced users will benefit from these publications. For current Cisco Press titles and other
information, go to Cisco Press at this URL:
http://www.ciscopress.com
•
Internet Protocol Journal is a quarterly journal published by Cisco for engineering professionals
involved in designing, developing, and operating public and private internets and intranets. You can
access the Internet Protocol Journal at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/ipj
•
Networking products offered by Cisco, as well as customer support services, can be obtained at
this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/index.html
•
Networking Professionals Connection is an interactive website where networking professionals
share questions, suggestions, and information about networking products and technologies with
Cisco experts and other networking professionals. Join a discussion at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/discuss/networking
•
“What’s New in Cisco Documentation” is an online publication that provides information about the
latest documentation releases for Cisco products. Updated monthly, this online publication is
organized by product category to direct you quickly to the documentation for your products. You
can view the latest release of “What’s New in Cisco Documentation” at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/abtunicd/136957.htm
•
World-class networking training is available from Cisco. You can view current offerings at
this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/learning/index.html
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C H A P T E R
1
Administration Overview
Because of its fault tolerant design, ICM software requires little ongoing administration. However, there
are some aspects of the ICM system that you should understand:
•
Fault Tolerant Architecture. The fault tolerant architecture of the ICM system ensures continuous
operation in the event of hardware or software failures. Certain system administration tasks may not
be necessary depending on the level of fault tolerance present in your ICM system. You should
review the ICM’s fault tolerant features in order to gain a better understanding of overall system
administration.
•
ICM Databases. The central database resides on the Central Controller and is used for persistent
storage of data. In addition, each Distributor Admin Workstation has its own local database. The
local database is used for real-time reporting and storing configuration data and scripts. You should
understand how these databases are used in the system. You should also become familiar with the
tools that manage the data in these databases.
•
Database Storage. The ICM databases are sized and set up at installation to suit your particular
contact center enterprise requirements. However, you may want to become familiar with the aspects
of system usage that affect database storage capacity. You might also want to review the criteria for
sizing the ICM central database.
•
General Administration. Although most administration is taken care of automatically by the
system, there are several optional administration features you should be aware of (especially if
configuration uses a simplexed Central Controller). These include backing up the central database,
performing manual integrity checks on the Distributor AW local database, and examining the
Logger’s event log files.
•
Event Management. You may want to become familiar with the ICM’s event management system.
ICM software provides several tools for reviewing event data in the system. Event data can aid you
in identifying potential system performance problems.
•
Support Facilities. ICM software includes several support provider and remote maintenance
facilities. You might want to know more about the Distributed Diagnostic and Services Network
(DDSN), which is a facility that allows your ICM support provider to remotely diagnose and fix
problems in an ICM system. You might also be interested in the DDSN’s optional serial alarm and
SNMP feeds. For more information on SNMP Feeds see the SNMP Guide for Cisco ICM/IPCC
Enterprise & Hosted Editions.
•
Partitioning. ICM Partitioning provides a mechanism for controlling what data individuals are
allowed to access within an ICM database.
The following chapters describe these topics in more detail.
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Chapter 1
Administration Overview
For information on registering users and setting up security for the ICM system, see the ICM Installation
Guide for Cisco Enterprise Edition. The installation guide also contains information on networking
requirements and configuration options for the ICM system components.
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C H A P T E R
2
Fault Tolerance
Intelligent Contact Management (ICM) software is a fault tolerant call routing system that continues to
operate without interruption in the case of hardware, software, or communications failures. The main
goals of the ICM’s fault tolerant architecture are to:
•
Minimize time periods during which the system is non-responsive to call routing requests (for
example, while the system is being reconfigured due to a component failure or recovery).
•
Eliminate all single points of failure that would cause the system to stop.
•
Provide disaster protection by allowing the major system components to be geographically
separated.
The ICM’s fault tolerant mechanisms operate in the background and are not visible from within ICM
applications. However, it is still important that you have a general understanding of the fault tolerant
architecture and the implications it has for system administration.
In some cases, the level of fault tolerance in the ICM system can affect which administration tasks you
need to perform. For example, in duplexed database configurations many typical database administration
tasks such as database backups become unnecessary because exact copies of the central database are kept
on each side of the system on separate computers.
This chapter provides an overview of ICM fault tolerance with a special emphasis on the fault tolerance
of the Central Controller and the central database.
Architecture
The architecture of ICM software allows the system to continue to function if one component fails. This
ability is called fault tolerance. To ensure that ICM software continues to operate in the case of a
computer failure, all critical parts of the system can be physically duplicated. There can be two or more
physical Network Interface Controllers (NICs), two physical Peripheral Gateways (PGs) at each call
center, and two Central Controllers. The communication paths between critical components can also be
duplicated.
The critical components of ICM software include the Central Controller (CallRouter and Logger), PGs,
and NICs. Normal Admin Workstations (AWs) are not considered to be critical to the operation of the
system since they play no active role in routing calls or storing historical data.
When both instances of a component are available to the system, that component is said to be duplexed;
when only one of the pair is available, the component is running simplexed. You might have some
components in your ICM system that are duplexed and others that are simplexed. For example, you might
have a duplexed Central Controller (two CallRouters and two Loggers) and simplexed Peripheral
Gateways at call center sites.
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It takes more than duplicate hardware to achieve fault tolerance. The ICM system can quickly detect that
a component has failed, bypass that component, and use its duplicate instead. ICM software can also
initiate diagnostics and service so that the failed component can be fixed or replaced and the system
returned to duplexed operation.
Approaches to Fault Tolerance
ICM software uses two approaches to fault tolerance: hot standby and synchronized execution. In the hot
standby approach, one set of processes is called the primary, and the other is called the backup. In this
model, the primary process performs the work at hand while the backup process is idle. In the event of
a primary process failure, the backup process is activated and takes over. Peripheral Gateways optionally
use the hot standby approach to fault tolerance.
ICM software uses synchronized execution in the Central Controller. In the synchronized execution
approach, all critical processes (CallRouter, Logger, and Database Manager) are duplicated on separate
computers. There is no concept of primary or backup. Both process sets run in a synchronized fashion,
processing duplicate input and producing duplicate output. Each synchronized system is an equal peer.
Each set of peers is a synchronized process pair.
In the event that one of the synchronized processes fails (for example, a CallRouter goes off-line), its
peer continues to run. There is no loss of data and calls continue to be routed. When the failed member
of the pair returns to operation, it is resynchronized with its peer and begins to run again as a
synchronized process. Figure 2-1 shows how synchronized execution and hot standby are applied in ICM
software.
Duplexed ICM Fault Tolerance
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Figure 2-1
PGs and NICs use the hot standby approach to fault tolerance. Note that the duplexed NIC in Figure 2-1
is implemented on two separate computers. Each computer has active and idle connections to the sides
of the Central Controller. NIC fault tolerance is described in more detail later in this chapter.
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Duplicated Communication Paths
Each NIC, Peripheral Gateway, and Admin Workstation has two communication paths to the Central
Controller (see Figure 2-1). The two paths connect the device (for example, a PG) to a Central Controller
Agent process on each side of the Central Controller. The Central Controller Agent is a software process
that manages communications between the Central Controller and nodes in the ICM system.
At any one time, one of the two communications paths is active and the other is idle. All communication
traffic between the Central Controller and the device is sent on the active path. If the active path fails for
any reason, the second path is activated and all traffic is switched to the newly active path. The
previously active path becomes the idle path.
The communication protocols use buffering and acknowledgments to ensure that no messages are lost
during the path failure and switch-over. After a communication path failure, the device periodically
attempts to re-establish communication along the failed path.
A different mechanism is used for the real-time data feed to Admin Workstations. See Real-Time
Distributors, page 2-13, later in this chapter, for more information.
Node Manager
Each ICM component (except the client-only Admin Workstation) includes a Node Manager process.
The Node Manager is in charge of restarting Intelligent Contact Management processes that have failed.
For example, each Logger and each CallRouter has its own Node Manager. If a Logger and CallRouter
are installed on the same machine, two separate Node Managers run on that machine. If Loggers for
multiple customers run on a single machine, a separate Node Manager runs for each customer.
When a failure occurs in a single-customer ICM system, the Node Manager may shut down the machine
to initiate a reboot. However, in a network service provider (NSP) environment when a Logger or
CallRouter fails, components for other customers might still be active on the machine. In such a case,
the Node Manager for an NSP component does not shut down and reboot the machine, and manual
intervention is required to restore the failed component.
If the Node Manager does initiate a reboot, the Node Manager itself restarts when the machine reboots.
The Node Manager then starts the other processes for the component. On a Distributor Admin
Workstation, you can choose whether to have the Node Manager automatically restart when the
computer reboots.
For more information on Node Manager start-up options, see the ICM Installation Guide for Cisco
Enterprise Edition.
Central Controller
The Central Controller includes the CallRouter, Logger, and the Database Manager. The CallRouter and
Logger processes are typically on separate computers. However, in smaller call center configurations the
CallRouter and Logger processes can be on the same computer. The Database Manager works very
closely with the Logger. The Logger and Database Manager processes are always on the same computer.
Note
Beginning with ICM 7.0(0), the Logger is changing from a single process to a double process—one
process handling configuration data and the other handling historical data. This allows parallel
processing of the two kinds of data and, thus, a more efficient Logger. However, these two processes are
still part of a single Logger node; that is, the functionality of the Logger remains essentially unchanged.
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Therefore, throughout this manual, reference will generally continue to be made to the Logger, without
distinguishing between the separate processes.
However, you should be aware that the new split in the Logger does affect failure and failover behavior.
For example, if the historical Logger on side A fails, the system fails over to the historical Logger on
side B; however, the still functioning configuration Logger on side A continues to be used.
A duplexed Central Controller uses the synchronized execution approach to fault tolerance. The Central
Controller processes are duplicated and run as synchronized process pairs. In synchronized execution, if
one component fails its peer continues running and the system runs without interruption. The Database
Manager is also duplicated, but technically it does not run synchronized. Since all modifications to the
database come through the Logger, the databases automatically remain synchronized.
Two Sides
All components of the Central Controller, with their duplicates, form one logical duplexed system. The
system can be divided into two sides, each of which contains one instance of a component. Each side of
the Central Controller has a Database Manager, Logger, CallRouter, Synchronizer, and an Agent. By
convention, the two sides are referred to as Side A and Side B.
All components within a side are collocated; that is, located on the same local area network (LAN).
However, Side A might be geographically separated from Side B. Figure 2-2 shows the two sides of a
duplexed Central Controller.
Duplexed Central Controller
Central Controller
Side A
Central Controller
Side B
Database
Manager
Database
Manager
Logger
Logger
Call Router
Call Router
Synchronizer
Synchronizer
Agent
Agent
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Figure 2-2
During normal operation, the two sides run in parallel. For example, information about each incoming
call is processed by both CallRouters. Both CallRouters, using the same call routing scripts and identical
information about the call centers, determine the same destination for the call. Both sides of the Central
Controller receive the same information from the Peripheral Gateways and Admin Workstations.
A duplexed Central Controller can tolerate a single device or system failure (for example, the loss of one
CallRouter) without losing functions. A double failure, while extremely rare, typically results in some
loss of functions. An example of a double failure would be if both CallRouters in a duplexed system were
to go off-line.
Single failures are typically caused by system crashes, operating system failures, or disk failures.
However, LAN outages and IP router failures can also cause single failures. Figure 2-3 shows five
possible Central Controller failure scenarios.
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Figure 2-3
Central Controller Failure Scenarios
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Each of these failures affects system functions differently:
•
Single Logger. If a single Logger (whether historical or configuration Logger) goes off-line, ICM
software runs without interruption. All call routing and reporting functions remain available. The
CallRouters continue to operate as a synchronized pair. The remaining Logger runs simplexed.
When the failed Logger returns to service, the Loggers return to synchronized execution.
•
Single CallRouter. When a CallRouter on one side of the Central Controller fails, that entire side
of the Central Controller is removed from service. This is because the CallRouter plays an integral
part in forwarding historical data to the historical Logger on its side of the system. The on-line side
of the Central Controller runs as a simplexed system. Call processing continues uninterrupted and
reporting functions are still available. When the failed CallRouter returns to service, both
CallRouters and both Loggers return to synchronized execution.
•
Logger and CallRouter (opposite sides). In this failure scenario, side B of the Central Controller
is removed from service due to the CallRouter failure. Call routing continues uninterrupted with the
remaining Side A CallRouter; however, because neither Logger is available, data in both databases
slowly becomes out of date. Some reporting functions are not available until the nodes are returned
to service and synchronized execution is restored.
•
Both Loggers. In a double Logger failure, call routing continues uninterrupted. If it is the historical
Loggers that failed, all reporting functions are lost until at least one of the historical Loggers returns.
If it is the configuration Loggers that failed, you cannot make any configuration changes until at
least one configuration Logger is operational. Such a double failure is extremely rare. The
CallRouter continues to route calls because it has a copy of the call center enterprise configuration
data in its program memory. (The CallRouter loads the configuration data into memory when it is
started and keeps it up-to-date as configuration changes occur.)
•
One Side. If one side of the Central Controller goes off-line, processing continues uninterrupted.
ICM software continues to function as a simplexed system until the failed side of the Central
Controller returns to service. All functions remain, but the system is running simplexed (without
protection against an additional failure). When the off-line side of the Central Controller returns,
normal duplexed operation is restored.
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A double CallRouter failure would temporarily disrupt call routing and reporting functions. This type of
failure is extremely rare (especially in geographically distributed Central Controller configurations).
Geographic Distribution
To provide maximum protection against disasters such as fires, floods, and earthquakes, the two sides of
the Central Controller can be in separate locations—even in separate cities. The two Synchronizers
communicate with each other via a private wide area network (WAN) to ensure that they remain
synchronized. This WAN, called the private WAN, is used for no other purpose than to ensure
synchronization between the sides of the Central Controller.
For details on collocated and distributed Central Controller configurations, see the Cisco ICM Enterprise
Edition Installation Guide.
Role of the Synchronizers
The Synchronizers play the key role in maintaining synchronized execution across the two sides of the
Central Controller. All input for the CallRouter and any changes to the Logger must pass through the
Synchronizers.
Each time a Synchronizer receives input, it passes that input to its duplicate on the other side. The two
Synchronizers cooperate to ensure that they are both sending the same input to the Central Controllers
on both sides of the system.
Figure 2-4 shows how the Synchronizers combine input messages and send the messages in the same
order to each side of the Central Controller.
Figure 2-4
Role of the Synchronizers
Central Controller
Side A
Central Controller
Side B
CallRouter
CallRouter
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
1
2
4
3
Synchronizer
Synchronizer
5
1
2
4
3
PGs
Input Messages
NICs
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Both CallRouters receive the same input and generate the same output. The Synchronizers ensure that
both sides of the Central Controller return identical destinations for the same call and write identical data
to the databases.
Figure 2-5 further illustrates the Central Controller and its device connections.
Figure 2-5
ICM Fault-Tolerant Architecture
Central Controller
Side A
Side B
DBM
DBM
Synchronized Zone
Logger
Logger
CallRouter
CallRouter
Synchronizer
Synchronizer
Unsynchronized Zone
Agent
Agent
PG1
PGn
NIC1
NIC2
AW1
AWn
Active Path
Idle Path
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Each PG, NIC, and Admin Workstation has duplicate communication paths to the Central Controller. If
there is a failure on one side of the Central Controller, the PGs, NICs, and Admin Workstations can
switch their communication paths to the active side of the Central Controller. As shown in Figure 2-5,
only one communication path is active at a time. The other communication path is idle (indicated by a
dotted line). ICM software sends heartbeats (brief periodic messages) over the idle path to ensure that it
can still be used in the event that the active path fails.
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Synchronization and State Transfer
In synchronized execution, duplicated processes are always processing identical input and generating
identical output. If one process fails, the other continues to operate without interrupting system
operation. Once the failed process returns, it is immediately updated with the current state of ICM
processes running on its peer.
In order to synchronize one peer with another after a failure, the system performs a state transfer. The
state transfer facility allows a synchronized process (for example, a CallRouter) to copy the variables in
its memory to its peer. The recovering system receives the variables from the currently executing system
and is able to restart with a copy of the current state of ICM processes. For example, as soon as a failure
is detected on the Side A CallRouter, ICM software uses only Side B. When the Side A CallRouter is
restarted, ICM software invokes a state transfer to immediately update the Central Controller Side A
components with the current state of their counterparts on Side B.
In order to better understand synchronization and state transfer, it might help to take a closer look at
CallRouter and Logger recovery.
CallRouter Recovery
When a single CallRouter process fails for any reason, ICM software continues to operate without any
loss of functions by using the other side of the Central Controller. All attached devices (PGs, NICs, and
Admin Workstations) switch their active communications paths to the remaining side. This ensures that
devices such as PGs continue to receive CallRouter output through the active CallRouter on the other
side of the system.
As a consequence of the CallRouter failure, the entire side of the Central Controller is removed from
service. The Logger and Database Manager associated with the failed CallRouter see no further inputs
(and will not until the failed CallRouter is restored to full operation). All components on the failed side
of the Central Controller lose synchronization with the other side. The CallRouter, Logger, and Database
Manager must all be resynchronized before normal duplexed operation can resume.
For a single-customer ICM, the recovery process begins when the Node Manager notices the failure of
a CallRouter process and automatically restarts it. Other processes are not impacted. In a network service
provider (NSP) environment, if several ICM instances are running on the same machine, the Node
Manager cannot restart the machine. In such NSP environments, manual intervention is required to
restart the failed CallRouter process.
The restarted CallRouter immediately initiates a state transfer from its currently executing peer. Each
CallRouter sends a message to its Logger. The Loggers then perform their own state transfer.
When the state transfer is completed, all processes are now synchronized. The newly on-line Central
Controller sends an in-service status to all local Agents. It then begins processing input messages. After
the state transfer, both sides of the Central Controller see exactly the same sequence of input messages.
At this point the ICM system is returned to full duplexed operation.
Logger and Database Manager Recovery
Logger recovery is closely linked with central database recovery. In central database recovery, the SQL
Server component of the central database is accessed directly through its client interface rather than
through proprietary ICM interfaces. Therefore, in addition to synchronization and state transfer, the
following database recovery procedures must be performed before the Logger can return to full duplexed
operation:
•
The Database Manager must run SQL Server automatic recovery.
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•
The state transfer process may need to update configuration data in the central database (if it was
the configuration Logger that failed).
•
The Database Manager may need to run historical recovery to recover historical data gathered during
the off-line period (if it was the historical Logger that failed).
When a single Logger process fails, ICM software continues to operate with the Logger on the other side.
The remaining Logger ensures that output messages continue to reach PGs and Admin Workstations. The
ICM’s Message Delivery Service detects the failure of the Logger and notifies the PGs and Admin
Workstations, which switch their active communication paths to the on-line Logger. At this point, both
CallRouters are in service, but only one Logger is available.
For a single-customer ICM, when the Node Manager detects that the Logger has gone off-line, it initiates
a shutdown and reboot of the machine. In an NSP environment, the Node Manager does not restart the
machine. In this case, manual intervention is needed to restart the failed Logger.
The Logger’s Node Manager automatically restarts when the machine reboots. Next, the SQL Server
service starts automatically as part of the reboot. SQL Server automatic recovery runs to ensure that the
returning database is consistent and that all transactions committed before the failure are recorded on
disk. Once automatic recovery is completed, the Logger can then go through the application
synchronization and state transfer process. If configuration data in the on-line database has changed, the
state transfer also updates the configuration data in the returning database. However, in most cases
configuration data will not have changed during the failure.
Once the two Loggers are returned to synchronized execution, ICM software may need to recover
historical data that was accumulated during the off-line period. This process, referred to as Recovery, is
described in the next section, “Database Fault Tolerance”.
In a double Logger failure (both Loggers are off-line), the CallRouter continues to route calls. This is
possible, even if it is the configuration Loggers that have failed, because the CallRouter loads
configuration data in its program memory at system initialization. In a double Logger failure scenario,
all messages and data that the CallRouter sends to an off-line Logger are discarded until a Logger is
completely recovered.
Database Fault Tolerance
The Central Controller database provides two major ICM functions:
•
Permanent storage of the data that describes a call routing configuration.
•
Permanent storage for the historical data that is gathered by the ICM system.
Each time a CallRouter starts, it loads configuration data from the central database into its program
memory. Once the configuration data is loaded, the CallRouter can begin to route calls (even when the
central database is not available). Therefore, when a CallRouter fails and restarts, at least one
configuration Logger and central database must be available so that the CallRouter can load the
configuration data into memory.
In addition to configuration data, Peripheral Gateways, NICs, and the CallRouter itself all produce
historical data. The system components gather historical data and pass it to the CallRouter, which then
delivers it to the historical Logger and the central database. The historical Logger passes the historical
data on to an Historical Data Server (HDS) facility on a Distributor Admin Workstation.
The ability of the CallRouter to deliver data to the historical Logger and the central database is not
necessary for call routing. However, the ICM’s monitoring and reporting facilities require both real-time
data and historical data from the central database. Database fault tolerance and data recovery, therefore,
are extremely important to the reporting functions of ICM software.
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ICM Database Recovery
Database recovery is the process of bringing an off-line database up to the same state as an on-line
database. In a database device failure (for example, in a disk failure), some manual intervention is
required to restore duplexed operation and bring the off-line database up to date. The following scenarios
describe what happens in a system failure, a disk failure, and a software failure.
System Failure
When a single Logger, CallRouter, or Database Manager fails (for example, due to a power outage), the
associated central database will go off-line. The process of bringing the off-line database back to full
synchronization is completely automatic. If the Logger machine reboots, SQL Server automatic recovery
runs to ensure that the database is consistent and that all transactions committed before the failure are
recorded on disk.
Note
If the Logger machine does not reboot, SQL Server automatic recovery is not required.
After SQL Server automatic recovery is completed, the off-line Logger synchronizes its state with the
state of the on-line Logger. After the state transfer process takes place, both members of the Logger pair
can execute as a synchronized process pair.
During the time that one database is off-line, configuration data may have been added to the contents of
the on-line database. If any configuration data changed while one database was off-line, the
configuration changes are applied to the database as part of the configuration Logger’s state transfer
process. This configuration update happens as part of the state transfer before synchronized execution
begins.
Any historical data that accumulated in the on-line database is recovered after synchronized execution
begins. Rather than attempting to recover the historical data immediately, ICM software first restores
system fault tolerance (that is, duplexed database capability and synchronized execution).
ICM software recovers historical data from the on-line database using a special process called Recovery.
In Recovery, the historical Logger communicates with its counterpart on the other side of the Central
Controller and requests any historical data that was inserted during the off-line period. The counterpart
delivers the data over the private network that connects both sides of a duplexed Central Controller.
Disk Failure
A disk failure requires additional steps. If a disk failure disables one side of the Central Controller
database, the disk must be repaired or replaced.
Note
Contact your ICM support provider if a disk failure occurs.
Your support provider may repair or replace the disk and perform the following steps:
Step 1
Rebuild the database structure from scratch on the new disks.
Step 2
Restore the configuration data, either from:
•
A snapshot of the on-line database.
•
The most recent backup tape.
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•
A backup tape taken from the on-line side of the Central Controller database.
At the time of the state transfer, any missing configuration data will be restored. Historical data is
restored by the Recovery process, which is run automatically each time the Node Manager process starts
on the Logger, or by loading the data from a backup tape.
Software Failure
Cases of software failure that leave a Central Controller database unavailable are handled in the same
way as a disk failure (if the failure cannot be repaired by existing software tools). Contact your ICM
support provider if such a failure occurs.
Network Interface Controllers
The NIC has four physical controllers on each side of the Central Controller. Each of these controllers
can simultaneously handle calls from the signaling network. Typically, each physical NIC handles part
of the total call routing load for ICM software.
The NIC processes are implemented as non-synchronized process pairs (one process on each side of the
Central Controller). The NIC runs as a process on the CallRouter machine.
As a non-synchronized process pair, the NICs operate without knowledge of each other. They are
managed by the Node Manager and communicate with other CallRouter processes via the Message
Delivery Service (MDS). Figure 2-6 shows how fault tolerance is implemented for various NICs.
NIC Fault Tolerance
Central Controller
Side A
ICRP, MCI, Nortel,
or Sprint NIC
Load Balanced
Portion of
Route Requests
Central Controller
Side B
CallRouter
CallRouter
Synchronizer
Synchronizer
Agent
Agent
AT&T
NIC A
AT&T
NIC B
ICRP, MCI, Nortel,
or Sprint NIC
Load Balanced
Portion of
Route Requests
Line Sharing
Unit
Idle path
A-Links
Active path
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Figure 2-6
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Peripheral Gateways
In a duplexed environment, two NICs are on-line and handling routing requests simultaneously.
Typically, each NIC handles part of the total call routing load for ICM software. The Synchronizers
combine the two input streams to ensure that both sides of the Central Controller receive the same
routing requests. If one of the NIC processes fails, or one side of the Central Controller is removed from
service, the signaling network detects that communication is no longer possible to that NIC and
automatically sends all routing requests to the remaining NIC process.
Peripheral Gateways
Peripheral Gateways use a combination of the synchronization and hot standby approaches to fault
tolerance. The Open Peripheral Controller (OPC) operates as a synchronized process pair on a duplexed
PG system. The Peripheral Interface Managers (PIMs) typically use the hot standby approach.
Figure 2-7 shows how synchronization and hot standby are employed in a duplexed Peripheral Gateway
(PG).
Figure 2-7
PG Fault Tolerance
Central Controller
Side A
Central Controller
Side B
PG Side A
To Side A
CC Agent
PG Side B
To Side B
CC Agent
To Side A
CC Agent
To Side B
CC Agent
PG Agent
PG Agent
Synchronized Processes
OPC
OPC
PIM 1
PIM 2
PIM 1
PIM 3
PIM 2
PIM 3
ACD1
ACD2
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CTI Links
ACD3
Idle path
Active path
The OPC processes communicate with each other via a private network connection and the Message
Delivery Service (MDS). The MDS provides a synchronizer service which combines the input streams
from the PIMs and PG Agents on both sides of the PG to ensure that both OPC processes see exactly the
same input.
The OPC process is responsible for activating PIMs and PG Agents on each side of the duplexed PG.
The OPC process also supplies uniform message sets from various PG types to the Central Controller.
The PIMs manage the interface between different types of ACDs and the OPC. PIMs are duplicated on
each side of the system and operate in hot standby mode. A PIM can be active on either side of the
duplexed PG, but not on both sides at the same time. For example, in Figure 2-7 PIMs 1 and 2 are active
on Side A; PIM 3 is active on Side B. The duplexed OPCs communicate with each other through the
MDS to ensure that a PIM is active only on one side at a time.
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Real-Time Distributors
The duplexed PG architecture protects against a failure on one side of the PG. For example, if an adapter
card controlling access to an ACD fails, a hot standby PIM can use the alternate PIM activation path. As
shown in Figure 2-7, PIM3 has been activated from Side B of the PG. This might be in response to an
adapter failure between the Side A PIM3 and ACD3. In this type of failure scenario, the PG is able to
maintain communication with the attached ACD.
Only one PG Agent actively communicates with a side of the Central Controller. When messages arrive
at the Central Controller, they are delivered to both sides by the Central Controller Synchronizer process.
The PG maintains idle communication paths to both sides of the Central Controller in case a switch-over
to the other side of the Central Controller or PG is necessary.
Real-Time Distributors
To allow users to monitor current call center activity, ICM software must send up-to-date data to the
Distributor Admin Workstation in a reliable and timely manner. The real-time data arrives at the Central
Controller from the Peripheral Gateways, which are monitoring activity at each call center. The
CallRouter acts as the real-time server. The CallRouter for the other side of the Central Controller is the
back-up real-time server.
Admin Workstations can be located with one or both sides of the Central Controller, at a call center, or
at another site. Any site that contains AWs is referred to as an admin site.
The CallRouter is responsible for providing real-time data to a Distributor AW at each admin site. Each
site has at least one, and usually two, Distributor AWs that serve as real-time data distributors for the
site. The primary Distributor AW maintains an active connection to the real-time server through which
it receives real-time data.
Client AWs at the site receive their real-time data through a connection to a Distributor AW. These AWs
are called Client AWs because they do not have the local database and distributor processes required to
receive real-time data directly from the Central Controller real-time server.
If the site has two Distributor AWs, Client AWs are configured to automatically switch to a secondary
Distributor AW if the first distributor becomes non-functional for any reason. The secondary Distributor
AW also maintains connections to the real-time server; however, these connections remain idle until
needed.
You specify whether to install Distributor or Client AWs through the ICM Setup tool.
Historical Data Servers
Historical data is forwarded to the Distributor AW where they are stored in a special database. The
distributor then acts as an Historical Data Server (HDS) for the admin site. Admin Workstations at the
site query historical data from the HDS rather than directly from the historical Logger.
Two Distributor AWs at a site are set up as HDS machines. Each has its own HDS database. The same
fault-tolerant strategy that applies to the real-time Distributor AW also applies to the HDS. That is, when
the primary HDS fails, other Admin Workstations at the site automatically switch over to use the backup
HDS.
The “Historical Data Server” section in Chapter 4, “Database Administration” provides more
information on setting up an HDS AW.
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Simplexed Operation
Simplexed Operation
If you have a simplexed Central Controller configuration, you are vulnerable to a single device failure
(for example, a system failure, process failure, or a disk crash). Have a strategy in place for keeping daily
backups of the central database. Your backup strategy might involve regularly scheduled backups,
mirrored disk configurations, or Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disk (RAID) configurations. Always
have the central database backed up on removable media.
If the central database becomes unavailable due to disk failure, contact your ICM support provider. A
support representative can assist you in replacing the disk, rebuilding the database, and restoring the
configuration and historical data.
For more information on database backup and restore procedures for simplexed Central Controllers, see
Chapter 5, “General Administration.”
Fault Tolerance in Integrated Deployments
Some components in the ICM implement synchronized fault-tolerance, meaning that communication
paths to redundant components are utilized simultaneously. This reduces the probability of message loss
during transition periods to a very low rate. Cisco Collaboration Server (CS) and Cisco Media Blender
(MB) nodes do not implement synchronized fault-tolerance; however, duplexed implementations of
these nodes provides a vast improvement over a single path setup. Table 2-1 describes general recovery
behavior and its effects when a single node failure occurs in an integrated deployment. Although
multiple failures are not considered, an instance of multiple node failure will manifest itself as a
superposition of single failure cases. However, a catastrophic failure can occur if all redundant
components in an array fail (for example, if all routing CSs fail).
Table 2-1
Integrated Deployment Failure Recovery
State Lost
Routing CS
Node
LocalDirector routes to
other CS
Current routing
sessions
None
Routing MB
Node
CSs activate gateway
connections to other
MBs
None
Current routing Time delay
sessions
requeued by CS
Web PG Node
MBs await connection
from other PG web side
which becomes active
None
Current routing Time delay
sessions
requeued by CS
An Agent CS
ICM software routes
around this site to
another agent site
Current agent
sessions at this site,
some new sessions
may be lost
Other sites not
affected
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Effect on Web
State Recovered Caller
Point of Failure Recovery Action
Connection
fails, must
reestablish
Connection
fails, must
reestablish CS
sessions
Chapter 2
Fault Tolerance
Fault Tolerance in Integrated Deployments
Table 2-1
Integrated Deployment Failure Recovery (continued)
Point of Failure Recovery Action
State Lost
Effect on Web
State Recovered Caller
An Agent
CMS1
ICM software routes
around this site to
another agent site
CTI blending and
agent reporting at
this site
Current sessions None
continue,
unblended
An Agent CTI
Server
MB connects to the other
CTI Server side, if
duplexed. Site routing
disabled during
transition.
Some loss of CTI
blending and
reporting during
transition
Current sessions Possible loss of
continue, some web callback.
loss of blending
1. CMS is discussed in Configuration Management Service (CMS), page 3-5.
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3
The ICM Databases
ICM software stores configuration information and call routing scripts in a central database that is part
of the Central Controller. You cannot directly alter data in the central database. Instead, you work with
a copy of the configuration and script data that resides in the local database of the Distributor AW. When
you make changes to these data, (for example, by using the ICM Configuration Manager or Script Editor
tools,) the changes are applied to the Distributor AW’s local database and automatically to the central
database on the Logger.
In addition to safeguarding the integrity of data in the central database, the Distributor AW’s local
database stores real-time performance statistics. For example, it stores data such as the current Average
Delay in Queue, Longest Call in Queue, and the number of Available Agents for each service. This
information is updated approximately every ten seconds.
ICM software stores historical performance data in the central database and in a special Historical Data
Server (HDS) database on the Distributor AW.
This chapter provides an overview of the ICM databases. In particular, it focuses on the types of data
contained in each database and how these data are kept current.
Overview
Figure 3-1 shows the ICM databases and how changes made to the Distributor AW local data are
automatically applied to the central database.
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Types of Data
The ICM Databases
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Figure 3-1
The Initialize Local Database tool copies data from the central database to the local database on the
Distributor AW. This tool is used to update the local database on the Distributor AW when the AW is
first installed. Optionally, you can use this tool to update the local database at any time.
Note
Until the Initialize Local Database tool operation is completed, configuration changes cannot be made.
Subsequently, the Update AW process forwards to the local database any changes made to the central
database. Changes made to configuration data and scripts are automatically copied from the central
database back to the local database.
To make access to the real-time data as efficient as possible, the data are stored in memory in temporary
tables. These temporary tables actually reside in the TEMPDB database; however, you can access them
as if they were tables within the AWDB database.
A Distributor AW that serves as an Historical Database Server (HDS) has a special database to store
historical data it receives from the central database. Client AWs can then access historical data from the
HDS rather than from the central database.
See “Historical Data Server,” later in this chapter, for more information on the HDS option.
In a network service provider (NSP) environment, a single machine might serve multiple customers. In
this case, each customer has its own database. For example, if a Logger machine runs separate instances
for each of 10 customers, then it contains 10 central databases. If a Distributor AW needs access to those
10 customers, it needs 10 local databases.
Regardless of the number of databases, only one instance of SQL Server runs on each machine. One set
of SQL Server processes maintain all the databases on the machine.
The Cisco Network Applications Manager Product Description and the Cisco Network Applications
Manager User Guide provide more information on multiple customer environments.
Types of Data
ICM software handles three types of data:
•
Configuration data is stored in the central, HDS, and local databases.
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Central Database
•
Historical data is stored in the central database and the HDS database.
•
Real-time data is stored in the local database.
Configuration and Script Data
Configuration data describe your call center enterprise. For example, all of your peripherals, services,
dialed numbers, routes, and peripheral targets are part of the configuration data. Configuration data can
also include data that has been imported from other systems, such as workforce scheduling data.
In duplexed Central Controller systems, configuration data is kept duplexed on both Loggers. It is always
resynchronized when a Logger is restarted.
Script data is also kept on both Loggers. Script data include all call routing and administrative scripts
that ICM software uses in call routing (both current and previous versions).
Historical and Real-time Data
Historical data and Real-time data provide information about certain objects in the system such as
service, skill groups, and routes.
Real-time data provide current information on these objects.
Historical data fall into four categories: five-minute snapshots, half-hour summaries, call detail records,
and events.
The five-minute tables contain snapshot data, which are values that are derived from real-time data.
Snapshot data provides a view of contact center activity at a particular instant. Since the five-minute
values change frequently, they are not synchronized across the central databases of a duplexed Central
Controller.
For the tables in which the Historical data and Real-time data are stored, see the Database Schema
Handbook for Cisco ICM /IPCC Enterprise & Hosted Editions.
Central Database
The central database on the Logger contains the following types of data:
•
Full configuration information for the enterprise
•
All routing scripts—current and, if you choose to save them, past versions
•
Event data
•
Call detail data
•
Five-minute summary data
•
Half-hour historical data
The ICM central database maintains 5-minute summary and half-hour historical data for each:
•
Route
•
Service
•
Skill group
•
Trunk group
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It also maintains five-minute summary data for Routing Clients and Scripts and half-hour data for
Application Gateways and Network Trunk Groups. Although you can view these data in reports, you
cannot modify them directly or indirectly.
For specific information on the tables of the ICM databases, see the Database Schema Handbook for
Cisco ICM Enterprise & Hosted Editions or the on-line ICM Schema Help.
The central ICM database resides with the Logger itself. If the Logger is duplexed, each physical Logger
has its own copy of the database. If the Logger services multiple customers, each machine has a separate
database for each customer.
The name of the central database has the form inst_sideX, where inst is an up-to-five-character instance
name and X indicates the side of the central controller (A or B). For example, the central database for
cus01 on the Side A Logger is named cus01_sideA.
Database Sizing and Creation
When you first install the Logger software on a machine, you must also create the central database. If
you install multiple instances of the Logger software (for multiple customers), you must create a central
database for each instance.
Before creating the database, you must determine how much space it requires. The size of the database
depends on a number of factors, including the size of your configuration, the expected call load, and how
long you want to retain historical data.
To prevent the database from growing indefinitely, old records are automatically purged from the
historical tables on a regular basis. You can work with your ICM support provider to decide how long
you want to retain historical data in the central database.
For specific information on sizing and creating the database, see Chapter 4, “Database Administration.”
Optimization tips for SQL Server 2000.
SQL Server database files can be configured to grow automatically, using the Autogrow feature. This
eliminates many problems that occur when logs or databases run out of space.
In the event that the ICM database in undersized or there is an unplanned increase in the data stored in
the database and the ICM processes cannot purge the data to maintain the maximum database size, the
autogrow option automatically expands the database when additional space is required.
For more information about autogrow, see the Microsoft SQL Server System Administrator’s Guide.
Database Updates and Changes
Each Distributor AW has a copy of the central database configuration data and scripts in its local
database. All AWs use the Distributor AW’s local database copy to make changes to configuration and
script data. When you change the ICM configuration by using the Configuration Manager, or you create
scripts with the Script Editor, you are actually modifying the data in the Distributor AW’s local database.
Any changes you make are then automatically applied to the central database.
In the Configuration Manager tool and in the Script Editor, the central database is updated when you
perform a Save or Save All operation. Every time you perform a Save or Save All operation, those
changes are applied immediately to the central database. Changes to call organization data (call types
and schedules) are applied to the central database only when you perform a Save All operation.
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Distributor AW Local Database
As changes are made to the data in the central database, the UpdateAW process copies the changes to all
Distributor AWs. This ensures that the local database copy is up-to-date with the central database. The
Logger forwards any changes in historical data to the HDS machine.
Distributor AW Local Database
The Distributor AW local database contains the following information:
•
Configuration information (copied from the central database)
•
Scripts (copied from the central database)
•
Real-time data
For specific information on the tables of the ICM databases, see the Database Schema Handbook for
Cisco ICM Enterprise & Hosted Editions or the on-line ICM Schema Help.
Database Creation and Initialization
The local database is created automatically and initialized when you install the Distributor AW software.
Its name has the form inst_awdb, where inst is an up to five-character instance name. For example, the
local database for instance ins01 is named ins01_awdb.
Real-Time Data
The real-time client process on the Distributor AW keeps the real-time data in the local database
up-to-date. It receives real-time data from the real-time server approximately every ten seconds. Old
real-time data is constantly overwritten by new real-time data.
For information on how real-time data is delivered, see Chapter 2, “Fault Tolerance.”
Configuration Management Service (CMS)
In integrated environments, the Configuration Management Service (CMS) coordinates the
configuration of objects common to both ICM software and to application instances such as Cisco
E-Mail Manager and Cisco Collaboration Server. CMS also authenticates agents when they log in.
Common objects are stored both in the application instance local database and the ICM central database.
The copy of the data in the ICM central database is used for integrated reporting and for authentication
of agents. The copies of the data in the application instance databases is used for application specific
reporting and for application operation.
CMS includes the following components:
•
A set of client libraries that reside on the application instance system and are called by the
application.
•
A service process that runs on an ICM Distributor.
The server process reads configuration data from the Distributor database and writes configuration data
to the ICM via the Central Controller API (CCAPI).
The CMS client library communicates with the CMS server process using a message bus. Figure 3-2
shows the CMS integrated architecture.
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Temporary Database
Figure 3-2
CMS Integrated Architecture
CEM or CCS Server
ICM Distributor
ICM Central Controller
Distributor
DB
CEM or CCS
CMS Client
Library
Message
Bus
CMS Server
Process
CCAPI
ICM Central
Controller
There may be multiple CMS services in a global ICM system, just as there may be multiple Distributors
in an ICM system.
Note
See the Cisco Collaboration Server Administration Guide for Cisco ICM/IPCC Enterprise & Hosted
Editions, for information about Cisco Collaboration Server databases. See the Cisco E-Mail Manager
Administration Guide for Cisco ICM/IPCC Enterprise & Hosted Editions, for information about Cisco
E-Mail Manager databases.
Temporary Database
Because real-time data are written and read frequently, the real-time tables are stored in memory as
temporary tables. Although these tables physically reside in the temporary database, TEMPDB, you can
access them as if they were in AWDB.
Historical Data Server
Admin Workstations need to access historical data (half hour data, call detail, etc.). ICM software
normally stores historical data in the central database on the Logger, as well as on the Distributor Admin
Workstation that acts as the Historical Data Server (HDS).
One Distributor AW at each admin site is an HDS machine. The Central Controller forwards historical
records to the HDS machine for storage in a special local database. Other Admin Workstations at the
local site can retrieve historical data from the HDS machine without having to access the central site (see
Figure 3-3).
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Locks
Figure 3-3
Historical Data Server Architecture
Central Controller
Logger with Historical
Data Replication enabled
Admin Site
Historical
Data Server
Distributor
AW 1
AW 4
AW 5
37350
AW 3
AW 2
To set up an Historical Data Server, you must configure the Logger to perform historical data replication.
You must also configure a Distributor Admin Workstation to be an Historical Data Server. You can use
the ICM Setup tool to create an HDS database on a real-time distributor.
For specific information about setting up an HDS database, see Chapter 4, “Database Administration.”
Locks
To prevent users from changing the same data simultaneously, ICM configuration data records contain
a ChangeStamp field. The ChangeStamp field is incremented when the record is changed in the central
database. When an administrator makes changes to configuration data and sends the changed data to the
Logger, the value of the ChangeStamp field is compared to the value in the Logger’s copy. If the values
differ, this means that another administrator has changed the data in the interim. The Logger rejects the
change, and the administrator is notified to refresh the data view and try again.
ICM software also provides the Master lock, solely for compatibility with previous ICM releases. The
Master lock provides exclusive access to all configuration data and scripts. If a user holds the Master
lock, no one can acquire any other locks. You must explicitly acquire and release the Master lock through
Lock Admin.Use one of the more specific lock types instead.
The Lock Admin tool (accessible through the Admin Workstations) displays the status of all locks:
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To release a lock:
Step 1
Select the lock by clicking on its name in the Type column.
Step 2
To release the lock, click the Release button.
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Database Administration
When you install a new Logger, you must create its central database. When you create a database, you
must specify the size of its data or log file (or files). The data file (or files) size should be sufficient for
all the data you expect the database to hold.
The size of the central database depends on the size of your call center enterprise, your expected call
load, and your specific data retention requirements. Based on your expectations and requirements, you
can create a central database of the appropriate size.
You must create an HDS database on a real-time Distributor Admin Workstation. The same
considerations that affect the size of the central database also affect the size of the HDS database.
Over time, the size of your enterprise or your call volumes may change significantly. Therefore, you may
need to resize the central and HDS databases to meet new requirements.
This chapter presents the ICM Database Administration (ICMDBA) tool, that gives you the capability
to manage your Logger and Distributor databases.
Overview
When you install a Distributor Admin Workstation, ICM Setup automatically sizes and creates a local
database on the machine. Because the real-time data in the local database are constantly overwritten by
new data, the database size remains fairly constant. You normally do not need to resize the Distributor
AW real-time database. If you do need to resize the Distributor AW database, you can do so using the
ICM Database Administration (ICMDBA) tool. The procedures for using the ICMDBA tool are
described later in this chapter.
The data in the central database and HDS database grow as they accumulate historical data and call detail
records. The growth is directly related to the following factors:
•
Size of the ICM configuration; for example, how many services, skill groups, routes, and trunk
groups are configured.
•
Call rate; that is, how many calls per day ICM software is handling.
•
How long historical data is kept in the database.
The amount of configuration data directly affects the amount of historical data generated. ICM software
generates a new historical record every half hour for each service, skill group, route, trunk group, etc.,
configured in the ICM system.
You must size and create the central and HDS databases after installing the ICM software. Use the ICM
Database Administration (ICMDBA) tool for estimating the size of these databases, based on the
expected usage.
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Retaining Historical Data
The database size remains adequate as long as your usage is consistent with the values used to size the
database. If your configuration expands significantly or if you change the retention times for historical
data, you may have to increase the size of the database. This may involve adding additional disks to the
system.
Normally, the central database transaction logs are sized to handle the processing of historical data at a
call rate of 35 calls per second.
Retaining Historical Data
ICM software initiates a purge process on the Logger and on each HDS AW machine once every day. By
default, the purge process runs each night at 12:30 A.M. The purge process deletes records that are older
than a specified number of days. When you configure the ICM databases you can specify the number of
days to keep data for each historical table.
Table 4-1 lists the default settings for retaining historical data.
Table 4-1
Historical Tables
Historical Tables
Default Retention Time
Application_Event, Config_Message_Log, Event
14 days
Logger_Admin, Recovery
30 days
All other historical tables
14 days in Logger, 1095
days in HDS
Database Administration Tool
The ICMDBA tool (icmdba.exe) is included with the ICM software and is located in the \icm\bin
directory. This tool provides a central utility that allows you to manage ICM database administration.
Use this tool to:
•
Estimate size requirements for databases
•
Create, edit and delete central databases, local databases, and historical database for installed ICM
customers
•
Resize database files
•
Recreate a database
•
Import/export ICM configuration data to/from databases
•
View database properties
In addition to these tasks, you can use the ICMDBA tool to start or stop a server, and to do some limited
SQL Server configuration.
Note
Before using the ICMDBA tool, the ICM software for a customer must be installed. See the ICM
Installation Guide for Cisco ICM Enterprise Edition, for information on the ICM installation.
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Note
The ICMDBA Import/Export feature pertians to ICM configuration data only. To import or export ICM
historical data, us Microsoft’s SQL Server Database Backup and Database Restore utilities.
Starting ICMDBA
Start the ICMDBA by entering the following command in the Windows Run dialog box or command
window:
ICMDBA
The ICMDBA main window appears.
The main window is a tree hierarchy displaying the ICM database servers in the current domain.
Note
If you cannot find the server you want in the main window, you can select any computer on your local
network by choosing File > Add Computer from the menu bar.
You can expand the sever by clicking on the plus sign (+) next to its name. This displays the ICM
instances that have databases on the server. Expanding the ICM instance displays a specific ICM node
or nodes (Distributor and Logger) on machines that have databases for that instance. Expanding the node
displays the databases associated with the node. Expanding the node database displays a list of the
individual tables in the node database. Under databases are the table groups, and the final level lists the
tables in the group.
To view the properties of a table, right-click on the desired table in the list and select Properties from the
pop-up menu, or double-click on the table in the list.
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There are two ways to access the ICMDBA tool functions. From the main window, choose a node or
database from the tree and then select a function from the menu bar menu, or right-click a node or
database to display a pop-up menu.
Estimating the Size of a Database
Use the Estimate Database function for the following
•
Estimate required database size
•
Control the amount of time that data is retained
•
Save a database estimate to a file
•
Open a previously saved database estimate file
To estimate a database:
Step 1
For the server, instance, and node (Distributor or Logger), select the database that you want to estimate.
Step 2
Choose Database > Estimate from the menu bar (or click the right mouse button and choose Estimate).
The Estimate window displays.
Step 3
Use this window to estimate the size of the database. Use the tabbed sections of the window to configure
ICM settings that control the amount of time that data is retained in the database. Use the Save button
to save the estimate to a file, or the Open button to open a previously saved estimate file.
Enter the following information to estimate the size of the database:
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Configuration. Use this section of the screen to estimate the ICM variables. Enter your best estimate
for each of the fields. The ICMDBA uses these values to estimate the size of the database.
Data. Use the tabbed sections to configure the ICM settings that control the amount of time that data is
retained in the database. Changes that you make in this section are applied to the Registry and affect data
purging in the database.
•
Click on the Call and Event Data tab to configure call and event data.
•
Click on the Half Hour tab to configure half hour data.
•
Click on the Five Minute tab to configure five minute data.
•
Click on the Outbound Option (Blended Agent) tab to configure the Outbound Option data, if you
are using Outbound Option.
•
Click on the Advanced tab to configure the Overhead Factor, Average Events Per Day, and Variable
Percent Used. By default, Overhead Factor is 2, Average Events Per Day is 10000, and Variable
Percent Used is 25.
Overhead Factor. Enter a Value. The value entered in this field affects the database size. This Value is
used as a mulitplier for the sum of table sizes. The result is the required database size. Incase the values
provided for other fields are not accurate, the Overhead Factor provides the margins.
Variable Percent Used. Use this filed to specify the percentage of maximum length to be used while
estimating the required database size.
Database Size. This section displays the actual database size and the required database size, based on
the current values entered on the screen.
Step 4
Warning
Click the OK button to save setting changes to the Registry and exit the screen. A message displays
indicating the action was successful.
The database size estimation algorithm does not factor in customer defined fields in the ECC tables.
Creating a Database
Use the Create function to create a database for an Admin Workstation or Logger. You can only create
one Logger database per side.
To create a new ICM database:
Step 1
With the ICM software running, for the server and instance, select the node (Distributor or Logger)
where you want to create the database
Step 2
Choose Database > Create from the menu bar (or click the right mouse button and choose Create). The
Create Database window displays.
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Figure 4-1
Step 3
Create Database Window
Enter the following information for the database:
Database Type. Specify the type of database: HDS (Historical Data Server) for distributor machines,
AW for an Admin Workstation local database. For a Logger device, the default database type displays.
ICM Type. Specify whether this is a Standard, NAM, or CICM (Customer ICM) system.
Region. Specify regional information where applicable.
Partitions. If partitioning is enabled, check this box and specify the maximum number of partitions
allowed for the customer (1 through 5).
Step 4
Click on the Add button. This button invokes the Add Device window.
Use this window to create a new data file and a new log file for the selected database. Specify the disk
drive letter and size in megabytes for each new file.
When finished adding the file, click the OK button to return to the Create Database screen.
Note
By default, the newly created data file will be set to “Automatically Grow”, should it exceed the initially
specified size. This setting, as well as the maximum file size, can be modified using SQL Server
Enterprise Manager.
Step 5
When you have completed entering information in the Create Database window, click the Create button
to close the window and create the database.
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Note
Partitioning is only supported for customers using ICM Enterprise Edition. It is not supported in ICM
Hosted Edition, IPCC Enterprise Edition, or IPCC Hosted Edition.
Deleting a Database
Use the Delete function to delete a Distributor or Logger database.
To delete a database:
Step 1
With ICM software running, for the server, instance, and node (Distributor or Logger), select the
database that you want to delete.
Step 2
Choose Database > Delete from the menu bar.
Step 3
The Delete Database prompt displays. Select Yes to delete the database (or No to return to the main
window). Another message displays to verify that you want to delete the database. Indicate whether or
not to delete the database.
Step 4
Click the Close button to exit. Check the main window to verify that the database was deleted.
Expanding a Database
Use this function to add a new storage file.
Note
ICMDBA allows a database to be expanded a maximum of 49 times (resulting in 50 segments). In the
event that you reach this limit, you must either recreate the database or use SQL Enterprise Manager to
modify the database.
To expand database storage on a storage device:
Step 1
For the server, instance, and node (Distributor or Logger), select the database that you want to expand.
Step 2
Choose Database > Expand from the menu bar (or click the right mouse button and choose Expand).
Step 3
The Expand Database screen displays.
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Use the screen to adjust the size allocation on the database's storage device, by completing the following
fields:
Component. Specifies whether the file is a data file or log file. Each database must have a file for each
type of service.
Available Drives. Specify the drive on which to create the database.
Size. Specifies the size (in MB) of the storage. Field displays a default size. This field may be edited to
adjust size as necessary.
Step 4
Click the OK button to expand the file and exit the screen.
Recreating a Database
Use this function to recreate a database. The procedure for recreating a database is the same as when you
create a database.
Note
When you recreate a database, the information currently stored in the database is deleted.
To recreate a database:
Step 1
For the server, instance, and node (Distributor or Logger), select the database that you want to recreate.
Step 2
Choose Database > Recreate from the menu. The Recreate Database window displays.
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Database Administration Tool
Step 3
Enter the database information. Refer to the Creating a Database section of this document for a
description of the fields.
Step 4
Click the Create button to continue. A message displays asking if you are sure you want to recreate the
database. Click Yes to continue the operation.
Step 5
The next Recreate Database window displays. Click the Start button to recreate the database. When the
process is completed, a message displays indicating the action was successful. Click OK and then click
the Close button to exit.
Viewing Database Properties
The ICMDBA tool allows you to view the properties of specified databases.
To view the properties of a database:
Step 1
For the server, instance, and node (Distributor or Logger), select the database that you want to view.
Step 2
Choose Database > Properties from the menu bar (or click the right mouse button and choose
Properties). The Properties window displays.
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The screen display includes the following information:
Step 3
•
Customer and database name
•
The database configuration
•
The size of the data and log files
•
The size and percentage full of the combined files
When you are finished viewing the database properties, click the Close button to exit the screen.
Viewing Table Properties
ICMDBA also allows you to view the properties of each table in the database.
To view the properties of a table:
Step 1
Select and expand the database to display the tables of a database.
Step 2
Double-click on the table you want to view. The properties screen for the table displays.
Step 3
When you are finished viewing the table properties, click on the Close button to exit the screen.
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Importing/Exporting Data
You can use Import/Export functions to import/export ICM configuation data from one database to
another.
Note
The ICMDBA Import/Export feature pertians to ICM configuration data only. To import or export ICM
historical data, us Microsoft’s SQL Server Database Backup and Database Restore utilities.
To import/export data:
Step 1
For the server, instance, and node (Distributor or Logger), select the database from which you want to
import/export data.
Step 2
Choose Data > Import (or Export) from the menu bar. The Import (or Export) window displays.
Step 3
Check the Lockout Changes box if you want to ensure that changes cannot be made to the database
during the import or export operation.
Step 4
Check the Truncate Config Message Log box if you want to truncate the Config_Message_Log table
in the Logger database.
Step 5
Indicate the path for the source/destination of the data.
Step 6
Click the Import/Export button to display the next Import/Export screen.
Step 7
Click the Start button to import/export the data. When the process is completed, a message displays
indicating the action was successful. Click OK and then click the Close button to exit. You can click the
Cancel button at any time to end the process.
Synchronizing Database Data
Use the Synchronize function to synchronize the data of two Logger databases.
Note
Whenever an ICM database is restored from a previous backup or the Logger databases are synchronized
using ICM config tools, the Verify Sync utility must be run on all connected Cisco E-Mail Manager (EM)
and Cisco Collaboration Server (CS) instances prior to performing any configuration via any of the EM
or CS instances. Failure to do so may result in an unrecoverable condition for EM and CS instances that
may require complete reinstall of EM/CS instances. The Sync utility may not be able to fix any errors
but at least manual recovery may be attempted.
To synchronize databases:
Step 1
For the server and instance, select the Logger database to synchronize.
Step 2
Choose Data > Synchronize from the menu bar. The Synchronize window displays.
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Step 3
Check the Lockout Changes box if you want to ensure that changes cannot be made to the database
during the synchronize operation.
Step 4
Check the Truncate Config Message Log box if you want to truncate the Config_Message_Log table
in the Logger database.
Step 5
Select the server name and database for both source and target from the drop down lists. To select a
server that is not on the drop down list, click the Add button and enter the server name in the Add Server
box.
Step 6
Click the Synchronize button.
Step 7
A message box appears asking for confirmation. Click OK to continue.
Step 8
The next Synchronize window displays. Click the Start button to import/export the data. When the
process is completed, a message displays indicating the action was successful. Click OK and then click
the Close button to exit. You can click the Cancel button at any time to end the process.
Configuring the Server
ICMDBA allows you to start or stop a server and to do some limited server configuration.
To start or stop a server select the node from the list and choose Server > Start/Stop from the menu bar.
To configure a server:
Step 1
Select the server and choose Server > Configure from the menu bar. The Configure window displays.
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Step 2
Use this window to modify the following SQL Server parameters:
User Connections. Indicate the maximum number of users that may connect to SQL Server at one
time.
Locks. Indicate the maximum number of available locks.
Open Objects. Indicate the maximum number of available open objects.
Note
User Connections, Locks, and Open Objects are “dynamically allocated” by SQL Server.
ICM does not allow you to change these options, so they are grayed out.
Open Databases. Indicate the maximum number of available open databases.
Note
Open Databases is not available in SQL 7.0 or SQL 2000.
Memory. Indicates the amount of memory (in megabytes) allocated to SQL Server processing.
Note
Memory can be configured to be a specific value instead of the SQL Server default of
“Dynamic”. Specifying a value of 0 can set the Memory setting to “Dynamic”.
Recovery Interval. This setting controls checkpoint frequency.
Max Async ID. Indicates the maximum number of outstanding asynchronous disk input/output
(I/O) requests that the entire server can issue against a file.
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Historical Data Server
Note
Step 3
Note
Max Async ID is not available in SQL 2000.
When you are finished configuring the server, click on the OK button to complete the operation or click
on Cancel to end the operation without making any changes.
When you use the Configure option, the SQL Server, Distributor and Logger restart automatically.
However, when you use the Stop option from the Server menu, the Logger and Distributor must be
manually restarted from ICM Service Control.
Historical Data Server
To set up an Historical Data Server machine:
Step 1
Run ICM Setup and install the standard Admin Workstation software on the machine. Select the
Historical Data Server option.
Step 2
Create the HDS database on the machine.
Note
For information about running Setup for an Admin Workstation, see the Cisco ICM Enterprise Edition
Installation Guide.
Use the ICMDBA tool to determine the size of the database and to create the database. (See “Estimating
the Size of a Database” and “Creating a Database” earlier in this chapter.)
When a Database Nears Capacity
ICM software has automatic checks to prevent the central database from becoming full:
Warning message. When the central database begins to approach its capacity, ICM software issues a
warning message. By default this occurs when the database is 85% full, but this value can be configured.
Automatic purge. If you select the Automatic Purge option when you install the Logger software, the
ICM software automatically deletes the oldest historical data, if it exceeds the retention period, when the
central or HDS database nears its capacity. If the data has not exceeded the retention period, it does not
get deleted. By default, automatic purge occurs when the database is 90% full, but you can set the
percentage when you set up the Logger. You can also set the retention period for data when you set up
the Logger.
Note
Refer to the Cisco ICM Installation Guide for Cisco Enterprise Edition for more on purging information
from databases.
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Monitoring the Database Size
The automatic purge ensures that the database can never become completely full. The worst that can
happen is you begin to lose older historical data.
Monitoring the Database Size
You should regularly monitor the space used by the central database and transaction logs. You can
monitor database size by viewing the Logger’s per-process log files. The per-process log files contain
specific information on Logger and database activity. The following example shows a per-process event
log file for a side A Logger.
The Logger logs events and trace messages that show the percentage of space used in the database. These
files are stored in a \logfiles subdirectory in the Logger’s directory (la or lb). You can view the Logger’s
per-process log files by using the ICM dumplog utility.
When the database becomes 85 percent full, the Logger logs an EMS warning message to the central
database. The “85 percent full” warning message might also immediately be sent to your ICM support
provider where the appropriate customer support engineer would be notified.
Note
For more information on using the dumplog utility, see Viewing Per-Process Log Files, page 6-11.
If you decide that you need additional database space, contact your ICM support provider.
Allocating Additional Space
If the central database is growing too large, you might have to allocate additional space. Your ICM
support provider may have options for allocating more space, including:
•
Remotely adding database space (if current disk space allows).
•
Installing “hot-plugable” disk drives and configuring the disks while the system is running.
If you require additional space in the central database, you must back up the master database before more
space is added.
Note
For more information on backing up the database, see Chapter 5, “General Administration.”
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Initializing the Local Database
Initializing the Local Database
It should not be necessary to initialize the local database, since it is done automatically when the AWDB
is created. However, if you should ever need to initialize it again after it is first installed, you can do so.
To initialize the local database:
Step 1
Double-click on the Initialize Local Database icon within the Admin Workstation program group of the
Program Manager. The Initialize Local Database main window appears.
Step 2
Click the Start button to transfer the data. As data are copied, the screen displays the number of rows
processed for each table.
Step 3
When the transfer is completed, click the Close button to exit.
Troubleshooting
Problem:
Viewing historical data from an AW database does not return the expected data.
Possible Causes:
1.
The AW distributor was installed with the HDS option enabled, and the HDS database was then
created. This ends up creating historical data views without including the HDS database name.
2.
The Logger is partitioned and the AW is not partitioned, or vice versa.
Possible Solutions:
1.
In the first case: Delete the AW database. Run the local AW distributor setup.
2.
In the second case: Make the Logger and the AW both either partitioned or not partitioned.
Problem:
The "Select into/bulkcopy" option is missing on the AW or Logger database.
Possible Cause:
The database was dropped at some point and not recreated properly. (The proper method would have
been to use ICMDBA, which would have set the following default database options during the database
creation: Trunc. log on chkpt.; Select into/bulkcopy.)
Possible Solutions:
•
In either case, you could recreate this database option — on the AW or the Logger, as appropriate.
or
•
If this database option is missing on the AW database:
a. Delete the AW database.
b. Run the AW local setup (which recreates the AW database).
or
•
If this database option is missing on the Logger database:
Recreate the database using the "sp_db option" in order to add the "Select into/bulkcopy" option.
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C H A P T E R
5
General Administration
Because Intelligent Contact Management is a mission-critical application that runs 24 hours a day, ICM
software takes care of many routine administration tasks automatically. In general, the ICM software
retains control of most of the database administration functions in order to keep external interference to
a minimum.
This chapter describes the data integrity checks that ICM software performs on configuration data. It also
describes the scheduled database maintenance jobs that run on automatically.
As the ICM administrator, you might be responsible for performing several optional ICM administration
tasks:
•
Setting networking options
•
Monitoring Logger activity
•
Backing up the central database
•
Restoring the central database from backup
•
Comparing databases
•
Resynchronizing databases
This chapter describes each of these administration tasks.
Note
In order to conserve system resources, minimize all ICM process windows prior to configuring your
system.
Built-In Administration
ICM software maintains a database on each side of the Central Controller and a local database on each
Distributor Admin Workstation. Each database consists of a group of interrelated tables. As you add or
update data in the database, you must ensure that logical relationships are maintained. For example, if
you delete a trunk group, you must not leave trunks in the database that reference that trunk group. If
you do, the integrity of the database is broken.
Configuration Manager prevents you from making certain changes that disrupt the integrity of the data
in the database. However, it cannot prevent all such changes. Usually, if data integrity in the local
database is temporarily disrupted, no major problems occur. However, integrity problems in the central
ICM database could cause errors in system processing.
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Optional Administration
Note
To protect the integrity of the ICM databases, do not use third-party tools to modify them. These tools
do not protect against disruptions of database integrity. (You may use third-party tools to view ICM
data.)
When your ICM support provider installs the ICM system, they perform integrity checks to make sure
that the database is configured correctly. After that, the integrity of the central database is maintained by
the ICM software. You do not need to manually check the integrity of the ICM central database. If you
ever have a problem with data integrity in the central database, the problem is most likely a software
problem that needs to be addressed by your ICM support provider.
Caution
Any manual integrity checks of the central database must involve your ICM support provider. Do not run
the DBCC CHECKDB procedure on the central database while the ICM system is running. This
procedure will stop the Logger.
Optional Administration
You can perform optional administration functions for ICM software such as manually checking data
integrity in the local database, monitoring central database space, and viewing a Logger’s event logs.
These tasks are not required, but you may find them useful in situations when you need to check the
system immediately.
Checking Data Integrity in the Local Database
You can manually check the integrity of data in the local database. Configuration Manager provides a
Check Integrity option under the Administer menu. Configuration Manager allows you to choose which
checks you want to execute.
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To check data integrity at any time:
Step 1
Invoke Configuration Manager by clicking on its icon in the Admin Workstation program group.
Step 2
Choose Configure ICM> Administration > Integrity Check from the menu bar. The following dialog
box appears:
Step 3
Choose specific checks to execute, or choose All to perform all the checks.
Step 4
Click the Start button to perform the checks. If any integrity problems are found, Configuration
Manager displays a message describing the problems.
Step 5
When you have performed all the checks you want, click the Done button to dismiss the Integrity Check
dialog box.
The specific data integrity check procedures are listed in Table 5-1.
Table 5-1
Local Database Data Integrity Check Procedures
Procedure
Description
Nulls
Checks for the value NULL in specific fields in the
database that must not be null. It also checks that the
value of the RoutingClient.PeripheralID is NULL for
routing clients associated with a NIC.
Targets
Checks for appropriate relationships among peripherals,
targets at peripherals (services, skill groups, agents, and
translation routes), trunk groups, network targets,
announcements and peripheral targets.
Routes and Numbers Checks that ID fields cross-referenced from several
tables correspond to existing records.
Scripts
Checks for valid cross-references among scripts, call
types, and dialed numbers.
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Table 5-1
Local Database Data Integrity Check Procedures
Enterprise
Checks for valid cross-references among enterprise
services and services, and between enterprise skill
groups and skill groups. Also performs several other
checks on skill groups, trunks, etc.
Domain Adherence
Checks for valid relationships between agents and skill
groups, between skill groups and services, between
labels and routing clients, between dialed numbers and
routes, and between peripherals and routing clients.
Names
Checks for invalid characters in enterprise names
(EnterpriseName field) in various database tables.
Enterprise names provide unique character-string
names for objects in the ICM configuration.
Miscelleaneuos
Checks rules for Outbound Option Configuration.
For more information on the specific fields checked by these procedures, see the on-line help for the
Configuration Manager tool.
Viewing Logger Events
You can view recent Logger activity by viewing the Logger’s per-process log files. Per-process log files
document events for the specific processes running on a computer. These files are useful in diagnosing
problems with processes on the Logger (and on other nodes in the ICM system).
You can also view Logger event data in the central database. The Event Management System (EMS) logs
events to the central database. You should be especially aware of Error and Warning events generated by
the Logger. For example, ICM software logs a Warning event when the central database becomes 85
percent full.
For more information on viewing the per-process log files and central database event data, see Chapter 6,
“Event Management.”
Database Networking Support
You can use the SQL Server Setup program to specify which network protocols the database manager
supports. Named pipes are the default for Windows; you need not change this default.
For more information about database networking, see the Microsoft SQL Server System Administrator’s
Guide.
Performance Monitoring
When you install ICM software, ICM Setup installs a DLL and sets registry values that enable you to
monitor ICM software through the Performance Monitor (perfmon.exe) utility. You can use this tool to
monitor ICM software from the local machine or from a remote computer.
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The Performance Monitor utility is a standard Windows administrative tool. It graphically tracks one or
more variables that you select. You can track variables related to the processor, memory, or various
processes and services running on a machine. You can monitor the local machine or choose a remote
machine to monitor.
Start the Performance Monitor by choosing Programs > Administrative Tools > Performance from the
Windows Start menu. A blank performance chart appears.
Click the Add button (“plus sign” icon) above the blank chart. The Add Counters dialog box appears:
If running from a remote computer, choose the ICM machine in the Computer field.
ICM Router
To chart Cisco router values, choose Cisco Router from the Performance Object drop-down list. The
Instance field then lists all the instances running on the machine.
The Counter field displays the values that you can track:
•
Agents Logged On. This represents the number of agents currently logged on.
•
Calls In Progress. This represents the number of active calls in progress.
•
Calls/sec. This represents the number of calls per second.
Choose the instance and value to track and click the Add button to add it to the current chart.
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ICM QoS PerfMon Objects and Counters
The following is an example Performance Monitor Add ICM QoS Counter window on a router machine.
The following is an example Performance Monitor Add ICM QoS Counter window on a PG machine.
In both windows there is a single performance object, Cisco ICM QoS, which contains all ICM QoS
performance counters defined. Copies of the same objects are differentiated in the Instance list. Since
performance data is centralized to the Router, PG instances are visible in the Instance list of the Router's
Add Counter window. Notice that the Instance list includes a pseudo-instance called _Total. If _Total is
selected, each selected counter will contain the sum of the values for all the instances.
Registry Settings and Risks
There are overheads in maintaining ICM QoS counters. The application needs to have a block of memory
that stores current counter data, and periodically it must update these values. Furthermore, synchronizing
access to the counter values adds serious burdens to the system. For these reasons, the performance
monitoring feature is turned off by default. To turn on the feature, change the following registry key
value to 1 and cycle the application process.
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Cisco Systems, Inc.\ICM\<instance>\<node>\DMP\
CurrentVersion\EnablePerformanceMonitor
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System Performance Monitor introduces overheads itself and the overheads depend on the periodic
update interval, which is set as the minimum 1 second by default. This interval should be set reasonably
high to minimize the impact on the system.
Charting QoS Values
To chart performance values associated with links between the Peripheral Gateway Agent (PG Agent)
and the Central Controller Agent (CC Agent), perform the following steps from the Add Counters dialog
box:
1.
From the Performance Object drop-down list, select Cisco ICM QoS.
2.
From the Instance list, select the link that you want to chart.
On the PG agent side, instance names are listed in the following format:
<from node name> PGAgent to CCAgent <A or B>
On the Central Controller side, instance names are listed in the following format:
<from node name> CCAgent to Dev <device id>
Table 5-2
3.
From the Counter list, select the counter values that you wish to chart (Table 5-2).
4.
Click the Add button to add the instances and values that you selected to the current chart.
Cisco ICM QoS Counters
Counter
Description
High BytesSent/sec
The number of bytes per second sent to the other side over high priority
connection.
High MsgsSent/sec
The number of messages per second sent to the other side over high
priority connection.
High BytesRcvd/sec
The number of bytes received from the other side over high priority
connection.
High MsgsRcvd/sec
The number of messages received from the other side over high
priority connection.
High LocalRttMean
The mean round trip time in milliseconds of high priority messages as
measured by local node.
High LocalRttStdDev
The standard deviation of round trip time of high priority messages as
measured by local node.
High RemoteRttMean
The mean round trip time in milliseconds of high priority messages as
measured by remote node.
High RemoteRttStdDev
The standard deviation of round trip time of high priority messages as
measured by remote node.
High Xmit NowQueueDepth
The current number of messages in the transmit queue for high priority
traffic.
High Xmit MaxQueueDepth
The maximum number of messages observed in the transmit queue for
high priority traffic.
High Xmit NowBytesQueued The current number of bytes in the retransmit queue for high priority
traffic.
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Table 5-2
Cisco ICM QoS Counters (continued)
Counter
Description
High Xmit MaxBytesQueued
The maximum number of bytes observed in the retransmit queue for
high priority traffic.
High TotalQoSReallocations
The total number of times QoS resources had to be reallocated for high
priority connection because actual usage has exceeded previous
allocation over defined threshold levels.
Med BytesSent/sec
The number of bytes per second sent to the other side over medium
priority connection.
Med MsgsSent/sec
The number of messages sent to the other side over medium priority
connection.
Med BytesRcvd/sec
The number of bytes received from the other side over medium priority
connection.
Med MsgsRcvd/sec
The number of messages received from the other side over medium
priority connection.
Med LocalRttMean
The mean round trip time in milliseconds of medium priority messages
as measured by local node.
Med LocalRttStdDev
The standard deviation of round trip time of medium priority messages
as measured by local node.
Med RemoteRttMean
The mean round trip time in milliseconds of medium priority messages
as measured by remote node.
Med RemoteRttStdDev
The standard deviation of round trip time of medium priority messages
as measured by remote node.
Med Xmit NowQueueDepth
The current number of messages in the transmit queue for medium
priority traffic.
Med Xmit MaxQueueDepth
The maximum number of messages observed in the transmit queue for
medium priority traffic.
Med Xmit NowBytesQueued
The current number of bytes in the retransmit queue for medium
priority traffic.
Med Xmit MaxBytesQueued
The maximum number of bytes observed in the retransmit queue for
medium priority traffic.
Med TotalQoSReallocations
The total number of times QoS resources had to be reallocated for
medium priority connection because actual usage has exceeded
previous allocation over defined threshold levels.
Low BytesSent/sec
The number of bytes per second sent to the other side over low priority
connection.
Low MsgsSent/sec
The number of messages sent to the other side over low priority
connection.
Low BytesRcvd/sec
The number of bytes received from the other side over low priority
connection.
Low MsgsRcvd/sec
The number of messages received from the other side over low priority
connection.
Low LocalRttMean
The mean round trip time in milliseconds of low priority messages as
measured by local node.
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Table 5-2
Cisco ICM QoS Counters (continued)
Counter
Description
Low LocalRttStdDev
The standard deviation of round trip time of low priority messages as
measured by local node.
Low RemoteRttMean
The mean round trip time in milliseconds of low priority messages as
measured by remote node.
Low RemoteRttStdDev
The standard deviation of round trip time of low priority messages as
measured by remote node.
Low Xmit NowQueueDepth
The current number of messages in the transmit queue for low priority
traffic.
Low Xmit MaxQueueDepth
The maximum number of messages observed in the transmit queue for
low priority traffic.
Low Xmit NowBytesQueued
The current number of bytes in the retransmit queue for low priority
traffic.
Low Xmit MaxBytesQueued
The maximum number of bytes observed in the retransmit queue for
low priority traffic.
Low TotalQoSReallocations
The total number of times QoS resources had to be reallocated for low
priority connection because actual usage has exceeded previous
allocation over defined threshold levels.
ICM Message Delivery Service (MDS) Performance Meters
There are overheads in maintaining MDS meters. The application needs to have a block of memory that
stores current counter data, and periodically it must update these values. Furthermore, synchronizing
access to the counter values adds serious burdens to the system. For these reasons, the performance
monitoring feature is turned off by default. To turn on the feature, change one or both of the following
registry key values to 1.
•
For the MDS process (required for the Cisco ICM MDSPROC and Cisco ICM
MDSPROCCLIENT performance objects mentioned below):
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Cisco Systems, Inc.\ICM\<instance>\<node>\MDS\
CurrentVersion\Process\EnablePerformanceMonitor
•
For the MDS client (required for the Cisco ICM MDSCLIENT performance object mentioned
below):
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Cisco Systems, Inc.\\ICM\<instance>\<node>\MDS\
CurrentVersion\Clients\<client>\EnablePerformanceMonitor
where rtr (router) is an example of a <client>.
System Performance Monitor introduces overheads itself and the overheads depend on the periodic
update interval, which is set as the minimum 1 second by default. This interval should be set reasonably
high to minimize the impact on the system.
The assumption is that extensive metering will not be performed while the system is performing as
expected. Only in exceptional cases would close monitoring of the system be desirable.
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Charting MDS Values
To chart MDS, perform the following steps from the Add Counters dialog box:
1.
Click the radio button: Select counters from computer.
2.
From the Performance object drop-down list, select Cisco ICM MDSCLIENT, Cisco ICM
MDSPROC, or Cisco ICM MDSPROCCLIENT.
3.
From the Instance list, select that instances that you want to chart:
<cust>, <nodes>, <process>
(_Total is not actually an instance of the object, but a pseudo-instance. If _Total is selected, each
selected counter will contain the sum of the values for all the instances.)
4.
Click the radio button: Select counters from list, and then select the counter values that you wish
to chart; or click the radio button: All counters, to select all the counter values for charting.
5.
Click the Add button to add the values that you selected to the current chart.
Table 5-3 and Table 5-4 list the meters that are provided if you select Cisco ICM MDSPROC.
Table 5-5 lists the meters that are provided if you select Cisco ICM MDSPROCCLIENT.
Table 5-6 lists the meters that are provided if you select Cisco ICM MDSCLIENT.
MDS maintains a number of different queues, among which are:
Local Incoming Queue
Remote Output Queue
Local Ordering Queue
Remote Ordering Queue
Timed Delivery Queue
A high, medium, and low priority counter is provided for each of the above queues.
Table 5-3 below is presented in a condensed form to reduce repetition. For the string QQQ you can
substitute any of the following values:
LocalHighInQ
LocalMedInQ
LocalLowInQ
RemoteHighOutQ
RemoteMedOutQ
RemoteLowOutQ
LocalHighOrderQ
LocalMedOrderQ
LocalLowOrderQ
RemoteHighOrderQ
RemoteMedOrderQ
RemoteLowOrderQ
TDHighQ
TDMedQ
TDLowQ
where:
High stands for "high priority"
Med stands for "medium priority"
Low stands for "low priority"
In stands for "incoming"
Out stands for "output"
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Order stands for "ordering"
Q stands for "queue"
TD stands for "timed delivery"
Table 5-3
Cisco ICM MDS Meters
Counter
Description
QQQ Current Depth
Current number of messages in the queue.
QQQ Now Messages In/sec
Total number of messages added to the queue during
last second.
QQQ Now Messages Out/sec
Total number of messages removed from the queue during last second.
QQQ Now Bytes In/sec
Total number of bytes added for all the messages to the
queue during last second.
QQQ Now Bytes Out/sec
Total number of bytes removed for all the messages
from the queue during last second.
QQQ Now Traffic Intensity
Ratio (x 100) of the number of messages added to the
number of messages removed from the queue during
last second.
QQQ Avg. Queue Response Time [ms]
Average time in milliseconds a message waits in the
queue.
QQQ 90% Queue Response Time [ms]
The response time in milliseconds that 90% of all messages passing through the queue will experience.
The following meters are also provided for the MDS process.
Table 5-4
Additional Cisco ICM MDS Meters
Counter
Description
Current Buffers Memory Allocated
Total number of bytes used by all currently allocated
buffers.
Current Buffers Allocated
Total number of buffers currently allocated from buffer
pool.
Buffers Allocation Requests/sec
Number of buffers allocated during last second.
Buffers Free Requests/sec
Number of buffers freed during last second.
Current Buffers Memory Limit
Maximum amount of memory (in bytes) allowed to be
allocated for buffers for this process.
Initial Buffers Memory Limit
Amount of memory limit (in bytes) reserved for buffers
for this process.
Synch Messages Ordered/sec
Number of messages ordered by the MDS synchronizer
during last second.
Synch MDS Duplicates/sec
Number of duplicate MDS messages detected by the
synchronizer during last second.
Synch DMP Duplicates/sec
Number of duplicate DMP messages detected by the
synchronizer during last second.
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Table 5-4
Additional Cisco ICM MDS Meters (continued)
Counter
Description
Output Waits/sec
Number of times output from critical client (Route or
OPC) waited for ACK from MDS peer during last second.
Average Output Wait Time
Average number of milliseconds MDS output waits to
receive an ACK message from MDS peer.
Private Net Min RTT
Minimum time (in milliseconds) it took MDS to send a
message over the private network and receive an ACK
response from MDS peer.
Private Net Avg RTT
Average time (in milliseconds) it took MDS to send a
message over the private network and receive an ACK
response from MDS peer.
Private Net Max RTT
Maximum time (in milliseconds) it took MDS to send a
message over the private network and receive an ACK
response from MDS peer.
The following meters are provided by the MDS process for each MDS client (statistics as seen by the
MDS process, not by the MDS client itself).
Table 5-5
Cisco ICM MDS Meters - client statistics as seen by process
Counter
Description
Client Handle ID
Handle for this MDS client. It is used to uniquely identify the MDS client connected to the MDS process.
Total MDS Client Connects
Total number of times the MDS client has connected to
the MDS process
Total MDS Client Disconnects
Total number of times the MDS client has disconnected
from the MDS process.
Now Message Received from Client
Number of messages received from the MDS client
during last second.
Now Message Sent to Client
Number of messages sent to the MDS client during last
second.
Now Bytes Received from Client
Number of bytes received from the MDS client during
last second.
Now Bytes Sent to Client
Number of messages sent to the MDS client during last
second.
ToClientQ Current Depth
Current number of messages in the Send to MDS Client
Queue.
ToClientQ Now Messages In/sec
Total number of messages added to the Send to MDS
Client Queue during last second.
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Table 5-5
Cisco ICM MDS Meters - client statistics as seen by process (continued)
Counter
Description
ToClientQ Now Messages Out/sec
Total number of messages removed from the Send to
MDS Client Queue during last second.
ToClientQ Now Bytes In/sec
Total number of bytes added for all the messages to the
Send to MDS Client Queue during last second.
ToClientQ Now Bytes Out/sec
Total number of bytes removed for all the messages
from the Send to MDS Client Queue during last second.
ToClientQ Now Traffic Intensity
Ratio (x 100) of the number of messages added to the
number of messages removed from the Send to MDS
Client Queue during last second.
ToClientQ Avg. Queue Response Time
[ms]
Average time in milliseconds a message waits in the
Send to MDS Client Queue.
ToClientQ 90% Queue Response Time
[ms]
The response time in milliseconds that 90% of all messages passing through the Send to MDS Client Queue
will experience.
The following meters are provided for each MDS client (statistics as seen by the MDS client itself, not
by the MDS process).
Table 5-6
Cisco ICM MDS Meters - client statistics as seen by client
Counter
Description
Client Handle ID
Handle for this MDS client. It is used to uniquely identify the MDS client connected to the MDS process.
Now Message Received
Number of messages received by the MDS client during last second.
Now Message Sent
Number of messages sent by the MDS client during
last second.
Now Bytes Received
Number of bytes received by the MDS client during
last second.
Now Bytes Sent
Number of bytes sent by the MDS client during last
second.
Current Buffers Memory Allocated
Total number of bytes used by all currently allocated
buffers.
Current Buffers Allocated
Total number of buffers currently allocated from buffer
pool.
Buffers Allocation Requests/sec
Number of buffers allocated during last second.
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Backup and Restore
Table 5-6
Cisco ICM MDS Meters - client statistics as seen by client (continued)
Counter
Description
Buffers Free Requests/sec
Number of buffers freed during last second.
Current Buffers Memory Limit
Maximum amount of memory (in bytes) allowed to be
allocated for buffers for this process.
Initial Buffers Memory Limit
Amount of memory limit (in bytes) reserved for buffers for this process.
SendClientQ Current Depth
Current number of messages in the Send by MDS Client Queue.
SendClientQ Now Messages In/sec
Total number of messages added to the Send by MDS
Client Queue during last second.
SendClientQ Now Messages Out/sec
Total number of messages removed from the Send by
MDS Client Queue during last second.
SendClientQ Now Bytes In/sec
Total number of bytes added for all the messages to the
Send by MDS Client Queue during last second.
SendClientQ Now Bytes Out/sec
Total number of bytes removed for all the messages
from the Send by MDS Client Queue during last second.
SendClientQ Now Traffic Intensity
Ratio (x 100) of the number of messages added to the
number of messages removed from the Send by
MDS Client Queue during last second.
SendClientQ Avg. Queue Response
Time [ms]
Average time in milliseconds a message waits in the
Send by MDS Client Queue.
SendClientQ 90% Queue Response
Time [ms]
The response time in milliseconds that 90% of all messages passing through the Send by MDS Client Queue
will experience.
Backup and Restore
A database can be lost or corrupted for several reasons, such as:
•
Disk drive failure
•
Bad media
•
Software error (in the Database Manager or elsewhere in the system)
Because you cannot protect against all these conditions, you must have a backup strategy in place. This
is especially important if you have a simplexed central database configuration. However, even for a
duplexed system, you still need to perform backups to protect against software problems that corrupt
both sides of the system.
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Comparing Databases
Database
The following database backup strategies are commonly used:
•
Regularly scheduled database backups
•
Mirrored disk configurations
•
Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks (RAID) configurations
Although the last two strategies might decrease system performance, they have the advantage of not
requiring manual intervention. However, while these configurations protect against disk drive failure and
bad media, they might not protect against some software errors.
In a simplexed database configuration, you need to ensure protection against all types of errors. To
protect your data, regularly back up the central database to Digital Audio Tape (DAT).
To perform a database backup, use the SQL Administrator tool provided with SQL Server.
Note
The SQL Monitor service must be running during a backup. If SQL Server is not configured to start SQL
Monitor automatically, you must start the service manually before beginning the backup.
When you restore a database, you can only restore up to the last backup. Any transactions after that
backup are lost. Therefore daily backups are recommended for simplexed systems.
Note
You must backup the entire database at each backup interval. ICM software does not support the use of
transaction log dumps as incremental backups.
For general information about developing a backup strategy, including the use of mirrored disks, see
Microsoft’s SQL Server System Administrator’s Guide.
For specific information about backing up a database using SQL Administrator, see Microsoft’s SQL
Administrator User’s Guide.
Best practices for performing a backup
To backup an ICM database:
Note
•
Stop ICM services for the processes that are using the database being backed up.
•
Run the backup.
•
Restart ICM services after the backup completes.
On a duplexed system, calls will continue to be processed if sideA is backed up at a different time than
sideB.
Comparing Databases
For diagnostic purposes, you might want to check that two databases have the same data in a specific
table. For example, you might want to check that the ICM_Locks table contains the same data on both
sides of a Central Controller. The tool dbdiff.exe performs this type of check. Its syntax is as follows:
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dbdiff [email protected] [email protected]
For example:
dbdiff [email protected] [email protected]
The batch script diffconfig.bat invokes dbdiff for various tables to automatically compare two ICM
databases. Its syntax is as follows:
diffconfig database1 host1 database2 host2
For example:
diffconfig cust1_sideA geoxyzlgra cust1_sideB geoxyzlgrb
Resynchronizing Databases
It may occasionally be necessary to repair a corrupt Logger database on one side of a duplexed ICM by
copying the Logger database from the other side. You can synchronize the databases using either the
DOS Command window or the ICM Database Administration (ICMDBA) tool.
Synchronizing Databases from the Command Window
The following directions explain how to perform this copy from side A to side B for a customer named
CustX.
To copy CustX database from Side A to Side B:
Step 1
Stop the Side B Logger, if it is running.
Step 2
In a DOS Command window on the Side B Logger, change to the \icm directory.
Step 3
Run the following command:
install\syncloggers geoCustXlgrA CustX_SideA geoCustlgrB CustX_SideB
Step 4
When prompted, verify that the configuration will be deleted from the correct database and type Y to
continue.
When the command completes, you can restart the side B Logger.
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Synchronizing Databases with ICMDBA
To synchronize the data of two Logger databases:
Step 1
Start the ICMDBA tool from the Admin Workstation program group.
Step 2
Select a database from the main window and choose Synchronize from the Data menu. The Synchronize
window appears:
Step 3
Enter the server name and database for both source and target and click the Synchronize button.
Note
The ICMDBA synchronize process involves dropping the targeted side data and copying the data from
the source. For example, if you are synchronizing side B data to side A data, the side B data will be
replaced with the data stored in side A.
ICM Time Synchronization
This section describes the components that are involved in to keeping the time-of-day clocks
synchronized across all machines that comprise an ICM system.
MDS
The Message Delivery Service (MDS) Synchronizer attempts to keep the system clocks of both sides of
a duplexed system synchronized. The enabled Synchronizer is the time master, and the disabled
Synchronizer is the time slave. The enabled Synchronizer supplies time messages every half-second to
the synchronized application processes as well as to the disabled Synchronizer. To insulate applications
against time discontinuities, the time supplied by the enabled Synchronizer is smoothed. If the system
clock on the enabled side is changed, the enabled Synchronizer will supply time messages that appear
to run 10% faster or slower (as needed) until the MDS time has converged with the system time.
The disabled Synchronizer receives time messages from the enabled Synchronizer every half second, and
periodically compares the received time to the system time. In the event of a discrepancy greater than
100 milliseconds, the disabled Synchronizer uses system calls to run the system clock 10% faster or
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slower (as needed) until the discrepancy falls within tolerance. The net effect is that the systems clock
on the disabled side smoothly tracks the MDS time, which in turn smoothly tracks the system clock on
the enabled side.
MDS provides a “Set System Time” message API for setting the time. When MDS receives this message,
the enabled Synchronizer sets the system time and the disabled Synchronizer does nothing (since it will
track the clock of the enabled side). The “Set System Time” message should be sent by a synchronous
process (on both sides of the system), since it cannot be determined which Synchronizer is the enabled
one.
VRU PIM
The VRU PIM supports a mechanism for keeping the VRU time synchronized with ICM time. The PIM
periodically compares the time reported by the VRU to its own time, and sends a time adjustment
message to the VRU if the times differ by more than about 15 seconds.
NAM/Customer ICM
In a Service Bureau installation, there can be multiple INCRP NICs running on the same machine (one
per Customer ICM instance). However, only one of these NICs will be running on the ICM instance that
is in control of the system clock, and only this NIC is able to affect the time on the CICM machine. This
NIC will participate in time synchronization with the Network Applications Managers (NAMs).
While initializing, each INCRP NIC will query MDS to determine whether it can control the clock. Only
one NIC on each machine will receive a positive response. This NIC will then periodically (every few
hours) send an unsolicited “Time Indication” message to one member of each duplexed CIC pair. The
time indication will include the NIC’s machine name and current time.
Each duplexed CIC pair may be configured to be a “Time Server”, a “Time Client”, or “Passive”. A CIC
that is passive with regard to time synchronization forwards all received time indications to the Routers
for reporting purposes. A “Time Server” CIC additionally responds to each “Time Indication” message
from an INCRP NIC with a “Set Time Request” message containing its own (MDS) time. (If the NIC
and CIC reside on the same machine, as determined by the machine name in the “Time Indication”
message, the CIC will not send a “Set Time Request” – this prevents the NAM and CICM from
conflicting over control over the system clock.)
A “Time Client” CIC receives “Time Indication” messages and forwards them to the Routers for
reporting purposes. In addition, a time client CIC may also receive “Set Time Request” messages. Upon
receipt of a “Set Time Request” message, the CIC sends a “Set System Time” message to the Routers,
which in turn send a “Set System Time” message to MDS. Participation of the Routers is required to
ensure that the “Set System Time” message is delivered to MDS on both sides of the system.
Similar processing occurs when an INCRP NIC receives a “Set Time Indication” from a (time server)
CIC: the NIC sends a “Set System Time” message to the Routers, and the Routers in turn send a “Set
System Time” message to MDS on both sides of the system. In addition, the INCRP NIC forwards the
“Set Time Indication” message to one member of each duplexed CIC pair other than the one from which
the original message was received. This serves to keep multiple duplexed NAM pairs synchronized with
each other.
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CIC
The CIC can be configured with respect to time synchronization. A CIC configured to be a “Time
Server” responds to a “Time Indication” message from an INCRP NIC with a “Set Time Request”
message. A CIC configured to be a “Time Client” accepts “Set Time Request” messages from INCRP
NICs and sends a “Set System Time” message to the Router. All CICs forward CICM time indications
to the Routers for reporting.
The CIC Time Manager Type key in the registry is:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Cisco Systems, Inc.\ICM\
instanceName\RouterA(B)\CIC\CurrentVersion\Configuration\CIC Time Manager Type
To configure a CIC to be a Time Server, set the type to 2. To configure a CIC to be a Time Client, set the
type to 1. Setting the Type to 0 will only forward Time Indications to the Router.
Router
The Router attempts to keep the clocks of all controllers (NICs and PGs) synchronized with its own MDS
time. It periodically queries each controller for its time. If the time discrepancy between the Router and
controller is sufficiently large (15 seconds or more), the Router sends a time adjustment message to the
controller instructing it to adjust its time by a delta value. The Router uses the round-trip delay of the
query-response to account for transmission delay when computing the time adjustment.
Different controllers handle the time adjustment message in different ways. On a PG, OPC uses the MDS
API to adjust the time of the (possibly duplexed) PG. A NIC ignores the time adjustment message, since
adjusting the time on the Router machine could have unwanted feedback effects.
The Router records the time skew of all controllers and peripherals and can report these statistics via
rttest.
In addition, the Router can optionally be configured via the Registry to designate one peripheral (usually
an ACD) as a reference time source. When the Router receives a time update from the named peripheral,
it invokes the MDS “Set System Time” API to set the Router time. This effectively synchronizes the
Routers and all controllers to the reference time provided by the ACD.
Logger
The Router attempts to keep Loggers synchronized with its own Message Deliver Service (MDS) time.
It periodically queries each Logger for its time. If the time discrepancy between the Router and Logger
is 15 seconds or more, the Router sends a time adjustment message to the Logger instructing it to adjust
its time by a delta value. The Logger then uses this delta value to adjust its time. The Router uses the
round-trip delay of the query-response to account for transmission delay when computing the time
adjustment.
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C H A P T E R
6
Event Management
Intelligent Contact Management software tracks events for processes and applications running in the
system. An event is any significant occurrence within the ICM system that you might want to know
about. Events are recorded on a local and system-wide basis to aid you in maintaining the ICM system.
This chapter provides an overview of event logging and management in the ICM system. It also describes
how to use the ICM’s event viewing tool.
Overview
Intelligent Contact Management software is a distributed call routing system with components that span
several networks. The major components of ICM software generate event data that can be useful in
troubleshooting and maintaining the system.
The ICM Event Management System (EMS) logs events from processes throughout the system and
stores the event data in the central database. For example, a typical EMS event might record that a system
component has been disconnected.
The EMS also saves events from individual processes in per-process log files on the local computer.
These files document events for a specific process running on a specific computer.
Several components and processes log events through the EMS:
•
Peripheral Gateways
•
Network Interface Controllers
•
CallRouters
•
Loggers
These ICM components are critical to the effective routing of calls in the ICM system. As a system
administrator, you need to be informed almost immediately when significant events occur on these
components. Admin Workstations also log EMS events, but only to the Application event log. This is
because Admin Workstations are not as critical to call routing as the other components of ICM software.
Figure 6-1 summarizes how EMS logs events.
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Overview
Figure 6-1
Event Logging Overview
As show in Figure 6-1, event logging in the ICM system involves central and remote system components.
The Event Management System (EMS) enables ICM components and the processes that run on them to
report events back to the Central Controller. The Central Controller then forwards the events to the
Logger for storage in the central database. Events are also forwarded to the HDS database on the
Distributor AW. Some of these EMS events may also be forwarded to your ICM support provider’s
Listener process by the Distributed Diagnostic and Services Network (DDSN).
The DDSN and Listener are described in Chapter 7, “Support Facilities.”
ICM software classifies events based on their severity. Table 6-1 lists the severity levels for ICM events.
Table 6-1
Event Severity
Severity
Description
Error
Indicates a significant problem such as a loss of data,
incorrect configuration data, or a loss of function. For
example, an error would be logged if a Peripheral Gateway
were to become disconnected.
Warning
Indicates a potential problem in the ICM system. For
example, a warning event might be logged if a user
attempted to add a duplicate record to the configuration.
Although an event such as this does not cause a loss of
function, it is something that you should note.
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Overview
Table 6-1
Event Severity
Severity
Description
Informational
Documents a successful operation for a major process or
application in the system. For example, an informational
event might indicate that the peripheral data service was
activated on a specific Peripheral Gateway in the system.
Trace
Used for internal testing and diagnostics only.
Trace events are stored in log files, but not in the ICM database.
Event Data Storage
Table 6-2 summarizes the types of events stored in different locations.
Table 6-2
Event Logging Locations
Location
Events
Viewer
Windows event logs Event data from the local computer. Windows Event
This event data includes EMS
Viewer
Warning and Error events that were
generated by ICM processes on the
computer.
ICM per-process
log files (.ems)
All EMS events and trace messages ICM Dumplog
logged by processes on the
utility
individual computer. The log files
are saved in the ICM component
\logfiles directory on each
computer. For example, on an
Admin Workstation the log files are
stored in the aw\logfiles directory.
ICM command
log files (.log)
Status information reported by
Notepad or
scheduled jobs. These files are
WordPad
saved in the \logfiles directory along
with the per-process log files.
All computers that have SQL Server also contain SQL Server transaction log files. These files are found
under the SQL installation directory on individual computers. You can examine the transaction logs
using a standard text editing tool such as Notepad.
For more information on SQL Server log files, see the Microsoft SQL Server System Administrator’s
Guide.
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Windows Event Logs
Event Viewing Tools
Viewing event data in the ICM system requires that you use different tools to view the event data that
reside in different parts of the system.
You can use the following tools to view event data:
•
Windows Event Viewer. This tool is part of Windows. Use the Windows Event Viewer to manage
event logs for Windows systems.
•
Dumplog.exe utility. This is a utility for displaying per-process log files at individual ICM
computers. You can view the log files on the screen or export them to text files.
•
Notepad or WordPad. These Microsoft tools can be used to view command log files and any other
event log files that have been saved in a text file format.
When to View Events and Log Files
The following guidelines apply to examining the different types of event data collected by the ICM
system:
•
Component check. Use the Windows Event Viewer as needed to examine the Application and
System event logs on systems you have identified as having problems. For example, if you notice
EMS error events being generated by the CallRouter, you can use the Windows Event Viewer on an
Admin Workstation to examine the event data on the CallRouter computer.
•
Process check. Use the per-process log files as needed to evaluate the specific processes that may
be responsible for generating errors. To view these logs, use the Dumplog utility provided with ICM
software.
Windows Event Logs
Each Windows computer logs events to its own local System, Application, and Security event logs. You
can view event data through the Windows Event Viewer (on the local computer or from a remote
computer). Windows computers include CallRouters, Loggers, PGs, and Admin Workstations.
All EMS events that are logged to the central database with an Error or Warning severity level are also
logged to the local computer’s Windows Application Event Log. This ensures that ICM events are logged
at the source and can be viewed locally through the Event Viewer.
Event Log Settings
ICM software requires the Event Log settings shown in Table 6-3.
Table 6-3
Event Log Settings
Log
Size
Wrapping
Application
16384K
Overwrite as Needed
System
16384K
Overwrite Events Older than 7 days
Security
81920K
Overwrite Events Older than 7 days
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Windows Event Logs
These values ensure that none of the logs become full. The 1024K setting ensures that large log files can
be accommodated in any of the logs. The Application log must overwrite events as needed because it
logs EMS Errors and Warnings, application events, and SQL Server events. If it could not overwrite
events, the Application log could quickly become full.
Viewing the Event Logs
The Microsoft Windows Event Viewer allows you to view and manage events on a system-by-system
basis. You can use the Event Viewer to isolate problems on specific computers. Once you identify an
individual computer as generating errors, you can use the Windows Event Viewer to view the computer’s
local event data. All EMS-generated Error and Warning events are logged to the local computer’s
Windows Application Event Log.
The Windows event logging process starts automatically each time a Windows system is started. At an
Admin Workstation, you can use the Event Viewer to view event data for that computer or for other
locally connected computers. For example, you might select a PG or a Logger and view the event data
for those computers.
To start the Windows Event Viewer:
In the Administrative Tools group in the Windows Program Manager, double-click the Event Viewer
icon. The Event Viewer window is displayed:
You can change to different logs (for example, the Application, System, or Security logs) by choosing
Options from the Log menu.
Windows Logs and Event Types
You can choose between three different logs, depending on the type of event data you want to view. You
can view these log files for any Windows computer. The Application log is typically the most useful log
since it contains ICM-related events.
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Per-Process Log Files
•
Application log. Records events logged by Windows applications (including all ICM applications
and processes running on the local computer). For example, when the Node Manager restarts on the
local computer, an informational event is entered in the Application log.
•
System log. Records events logged by the Windows local computer system components (for
example, disk drives, network drivers, event log services). For example, the failure of a driver or
other local component to load during startup is recorded in the System log.
•
Security log. Records security events. This log keeps track of changes to system security. For
example, attempts to log on might be recorded in the security log.
The event types in the Windows Event Viewer (Error, Warning, and Informational) have similar
meanings to those listed earlier in Table 6-1. The Event Viewer provides two additional event types
related to system security:
•
Success Audit. Audited security access attempts that were successful. For example, a user’s
successful attempt to log onto the system might be logged as a Success Audit event.
•
Failure Audit. Audited security access attempts that failed. For example, if a user tried to access a
network drive and failed, the attempt might be logged as a Failure Audit event.
Viewing Event Data from Other Systems
When you first start the Windows Event Viewer, event data for the local computer is displayed. However,
you can connect to another computer in the local network (for example, a Peripheral Gateway) in order
to examine its event data.
Note
To view events for other computers, you must be logged in as an Administrator.
To connect to another computer:
Step 1
From the Log menu of the Event Viewer, choose Select Computer.
Step 2
In the Computer field, type the computer name of the computer to view. You can also select a Computer
name from the Select Computer list.
Step 3
Click the OK button. The Event Viewer displays event data for the selected computer.
Per-Process Log Files
The per-process EMS log files are stored in the ICM component \logfiles directory on the local computer
as well as forwarded to the central database. For example, per-process log files on Admin Workstations
are stored in the aw\logfiles directory. EMS log files have the suffix .ems.
The \logfiles directory also contains the command log file purgeold.log. Unlike the per-process log files,
you can view purgeold.log directly with a text editor such as Notepad or WordPad.
ICM automatically schedules the command purgeold to run nightly. This command removes records
over 30 days old from ICM per-process (.ems) log files. Typical purgeold.log entries include how many
.ems files were found and how many were deleted. purgeold.log is updated each time that purgeold is
run.
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Per-Process Log Files
Naming Conventions
Each per-process log file has a prefix that indicates the process within ICM that generated the event.
Each file name includes the date and time the log was created. All log files end with an .ems file
extension.
Table 6-4 lists the process names and prefixes and provides brief descriptions of each process. The
following example shows the format of a log file name:
PPP_YYMMDD_HHMMSS.ems
The PPP is a prefix that indicates the process. For example, the following log file is for the real-time
distributor process. It was created on February 8, 1996 at 9:48:39 A.M.
rtd_960208_094839.ems
The timestamp on a log file is in 24-hour format. For example, 3:00 P.M. is indicated as 15:00; 9:00 A.M
is indicated as 09:00.
Table 6-4
Process Prefixes and Descriptions
Prefix
Process
Description
Node(s)
acdsim
ACDSIM
An ICM software process AW, Logger,
that simulates the functions CallRouter, PG
of an ACD. Used for testing
purposes.
agi
APPGW
The Application Gateway CallRouter
process, which allows ICM
software to interact with
external host applications.
ccag
CCAGENT
Central Controller DMP
CallRouter
Agent. Device
Management Protocol
Agent that manages session
layer communications with
ICM nodes.
cic
CIC
The Customer Interface
Controller. A process that
maintains communication
between the NAM, on
which it runs, and one or
more CICMs.
clgr
CONFIGLOGGER Configuration Database
Logger
Logger. Process that stores
configuration data in the
central database.
CallRouter
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Table 6-4
Process Prefixes and Descriptions (continued)
Prefix
Process
Description
csfs
CSFS
Customer Support
Logger
Forwarding Service.
Receives, filters, and saves
appropriate events for
delivery to your ICM
support provider.
ctisvr
CTILINK
Computer Telephony
Integration server. A PG
process that serves as an
interface between ICM
software and client CTI
applications.
PG
dba
DBAGENT
Central Controller
Database Agent.
Communications process
that validates access to the
central database.
CallRouter
dbw
DBWORKER
Host Database Lookup.
CallRouter
Process that queries
external databases and uses
that data in call routing.
dcserver
DCSERVER
Rockwell Demand
Admin
Command Server. Admin
Workstation
Workstation process that
provides access to Demand
Commands on attached
Galaxy ACDs.
dtp
DTP
Customer Support Data
Logger
Transfer Process. Transfers
events from the Logger to
your ICM support provider.
edt
SCRIPTED
ICM Script Editor. Tool
Admin
used to create and schedule Workstation
call routing scripts.
ftp
FTPPROC
File Transfer Protocol.
Transfers Rockwell
Resource Management
Center (RMC) reports to
the Admin Workstation.
hlgr
HISTLOGGER
Historical Database
Logger
Logger. Process that stores
historical data in the central
database.
hsl
HSLTRACE
Northern Telecom
High-Speed Link
diagnostic tool.
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PG
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Table 6-4
Process Prefixes and Descriptions (continued)
Prefix
Process
Description
Node(s)
hsltomei
HSLtoMEI
Northern Telecom
High-Speed Link and
Meridian Event Interface
diagnostic tool.
PG
mci
MCI
NIC for ICM
communication with the
MCI signaling network.
CallRouter
mds
MDS
Message Delivery Service. CallRouter, PG
Process that provides
reliable message delivery
between ICM processes.
nm
NODEMAN
Node Manager. Process
that manages, restarts, and
initializes processes on
ICM nodes.
Dist. AW,
CallRouter,
Logger, PG
nmm
NMM
Node Manager Manager.
Process that manages,
restarts, and initializes the
Node Manager process on
each ICM node.
Dist. AW,
CallRouter,
Logger, PG
nic
nic
A special Generic Network CallRouter
Interface Controller (NIC)
used in testing. The
Generic NIC receives route
requests from the ICM’s
call generator (CallGen).
nortelnic
NTNIC
NIC for ICM
communication with the
Nortel signaling network.
opc
OPC
Open Peripheral
PG
Controller. Interface
between the PIM and the
CallRouter. Supplies the
CallRouter with uniform
message sets from different
PG types.
pgag
PGAGENT
Peripheral Gateway DMP PG
Agent. The Device
Management Protocol
Agent that manages session
layer communications
between the PG and
CallRouter.
CallRouter
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Table 6-4
Process Prefixes and Descriptions (continued)
Prefix
Process
Description
Node(s)
pim1,
pim2,
pim3, etc.
varies
Peripheral Interface
Manager. The proprietary
interface between a
peripheral and the PG.
PG
rcv
RECOVERY
Central Database
Logger
Recovery. Recovers central
database historical data.
rmc
RMCPROC
Rockwell Resource
Logger
Management Center
process. Periodically
generates a Rockwell RMC
report and places it in a file.
rtc
RTCLIENT
Real Time Feed Client. A Distributor AW
Distributor AW process
that receives real-time data
from the Real-Time
Distributor.
rtd
RTDIST
Real Time Feed
Distributor AW
Distributor. A Distributor
AW process that distributes
real-time data to
client-only Admin
Workstations.
rtr
ROUTER
CallRouter. Process that
receives call routing
requests, determines call
destinations, and collects
information about the
entire system.
CallRouter
rts
RTSERVER
Real Time Server. Process
that takes real-time data
retrieved from PGs and
forwards it to Admin
Workstations.
CallRouter
sef
SERIALFD
Serial Event Feed. Provides Logger
an alarm feed to an external
management station.
spr
SPR
NIC for ICM
communication with the
Sprint signaling network.
CallRouter
stentornic
STENTORNIC
NIC for ICM
communication with the
Stentor signaling network.
CallRouter
tsyp
TESTSYNC
Diagnostic tool.
PG
tsyl
TESTSYNC
Diagnostic tool.
Logger
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Table 6-4
Process Prefixes and Descriptions (continued)
Prefix
Process
Description
Node(s)
tsyr
TESTSYNC
Diagnostic tool.
CallRouter
upcc
UPDATECC
Update ICM Central
Database tool. Copies data
from the local database to
the central database.
Admin
Workstation
Sample File
The EMS creates a new log file each time a process initializes. This means that messages documenting
the end of a process can always be found at the end of a log file; messages documenting the initialization
of a process can always be found at the beginning of the log file.
The following is an example of a typical per-process log file:
Viewing Per-Process Log Files
You can view per-process log files by using the dumplog.exe command. The dumplog.exe command
reads the file, formats the event data, and writes the formatted data to the workstation screen. You can
also redirect output to a file using either the /o or /of arguments.
To view per-process log files:
Step 1
Open a DOS Command Prompt window.
Step 2
Change to the \logfiles directory. For example, at an Admin Workstation the directory is
icm\instance\aw\logfiles.
You have several options for viewing log files. The most common option is to display the most recent
events for a process on the screen.
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To display today’s events on the screen, type:
dumplog rtr
This command displays all of today’s CallRouter (rtr) events. You can specify any process prefix. You
can build on this basic dumplog command by adding date and time arguments.
To dump events for a specific day:
dumplog rtr /bd 1/15/97
This command displays all rtr information that was logged on January 15, 1997 (the begin date, /bd). To
see more than one day’s log, use the end date (/ed) argument.
The complete syntax for the dumplog command is as follows:
dumplog [ProcessName(s)] [/dir Dirs] [/if InputFile] [/o] [/of OutputFile] [/c]
[/bd BeginDate(mm/dd/yyyy)] [/bt BeginTime(hh:mm:ss)] [/ed EndDate(mm/dd/yyyy)]
[/et EndTime(hh:mm:ss)] [/hr HoursBack] [/all] [/last] [/prev] [/bin] [/m MatchString]
[/x ExcludeString] [/ms] [/mc] [/debug] [/help] [/?]
The specific parameters are shown in Table 6-5.
Table 6-5
Dumplog Parameters
Parameter
Description
ProcessName(s)
Specifies a process prefix from Table 6-4. The
command dumps the current day’s log for that
process, unless you specify different dates or times
with other arguments.
/dir Dirs
Specifies the location (directory) of the log files for
any processes listed on the command line after the
/dir switch. If no /dir switch is used, the current
directory is used by default.
/if InputFile
Specifies a specific .ems file to dump. The /if token
is optional. If you specify an input file, the /bd, /bt,
/ed, /et, /hr, and /all arguments are ignored.
/o
Writes output to a text file in the \logfiles directory.
The filename is formed by adding the .txt suffix to
the specified process prefix or input file name
(without the .ems suffix). The file is written to the
current directory.
/of OutputFile
Specifies an output text file; for example,
c:\temp\mylog.txt.
/c
Specifies continuous output. The command does not
exit after reaching the end of the log. Instead, it
waits and writes any further entries that appear in
the log.
/bd
Specifies the begin date. If specified with /bt, this
BeginDate(mm/dd/yyyy) specifies a range of dates. Otherwise, dumplog
dumps events for only the specified date.
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Table 6-5
Dumplog Parameters (continued)
Parameter
Description
/bt
BeginTime(hh:mm:ss)
Specifies the begin time. Use with /et to specify a
range of time.
/ed
EndDate(mm/dd/yyyy)
Specifies the end date. Use with /bd to specify a
range of days.
/et EndTime(hh:mm:ss)
Specifies the end time. Use with /bt to specify a
range of time.
/hr HoursBack
Specifies a number of hours back from the current
time.
/all
Displays all information from the specified
process’s log files.
/last
Displays information from the most recent log file
for the process.
/prev
Displays information from the next to last log file
for the process.
/m MatchString
Displays only events that contain a match for the
specified string.
/x ExcludeString
Displays only events that do not contain a match for
the specified string.
[/ms]
Displays milliseconds in time stamps.
[/mc]
Use multiple colors when dumping merged logs.
Each process is given a different color.
You must specify either a ProcessPrefix or an InputFile. If you give only a ProcessPrefix value (for
example: rtr, nm), dumplog displays the current day’s log for that process by default.
To view redirected log files through Notepad:
If you save the log file to a text file (using the dumplog /of argument), you can open the text file from
the command prompt by typing:
notepad filename
You can also print the file or include it in an e-mail message. To deliver a log file to the your ICM support
provider, it may be sufficient to save it as a text file and place it in the Logger’s export directory. If used,
the Distributed Diagnostic and Service Network (DDSN) would automatically deliver the file to your
ICM support provider.
For more information on the DDSN, see Chapter 7, “Support Facilities”.
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7
Support Facilities
The ICM’s Logger collects events and messages from all components of the system. The Logger can pass
this information to a process called the Listener, which can reside at your ICM support provider’s
facility. Depending on the installation, the Logger may connect to the Listener via a dial-up connection
or via a normal network connection.
The facilities that allow the Logger to transfer events and messages to the Listener are collectively called
the Distributed Diagnostics and Services Network (DDSN). The DDSN allows Support representatives
to remotely diagnose, and in some cases remotely fix, problems in your system.
This chapter also provides an overview of the DDSN and Cisco Support Tools.
The DDSN
For customer sites not connected to the monitoring site via a VPN / LAN or WAN, each computer
running the ICM Logger at a customer site is equipped with a modem in order to support the DDSN. The
Logger sends data to the Listener through a dial-up connection using the Windows Remote Access
Service (RAS) or through a direct network connection. Loggers located at customer premises also allow
dial-in or direct network connections. Figure 7-1 shows the basic parts of the DDSN.
Figure 7-1
DDSN Overview
ICM Central Controller
Local and Remote
PGs and NICs
Call Router
Logger
Customer Support
Forwarding Service
(CSFS)
EMS Event Data
Real-Time
Event Feed
DDSN Transfer
Process (DTP)
Serial Feed
SNMP Feed
Remote Access
Service (RAS)
Dialup or Direct
Network Connection
Admin Workstation
37153
Support
Listener
Send Home
Messages
The DDSN Transfer Process (DTP) keeps EMS events in memory until delivering them to the Listener.
To minimize the traffic to the Listener (and particularly the number of dial-up connections that may
needed over time), messages are batched and sent periodically. However, if the DTP receives a high
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Error Reporting
priority event, it immediately sends the event to the Listener. If an attempt to establish a RAS connection
fails because of a busy phone or no answer, the DTP process periodically tries to re-establish the RAS
connection.
You can place exported log files (for example, .txt files) in the export directory on the local machine.
Every 30 minutes, the DTP checks to see if there are EMS events in memory or any new files in the
Logger’s export directory. When there are new events and files, the DTP sends the events and files to the
Listener, establishing a RAS connection, if necessary. Any files sent to the Listener are then deleted from
the Logger’s export directory.
Error Reporting
The ICM Logger immediately informs the Listener of any significant errors or unexpected conditions it
encounters. Error reporting is handled by two processes on the Logger:
•
Customer Support Forwarding Service (CSFS). Receives events, filters them, and holds then in
memory.
•
DDSN Transfer Process (DTP). Transfers the events and export files to the machine running the
Listener. It uses either a dial-up connection and the Remote Access Service (RAS) or a direct
network connection. The Listener stores the events in a customer-specific directory on its machine.
ICM software sends two types of data to the Listener:
•
Event information generated by any process within ICM software.
•
Export files placed in the Logger’s export directory.
The event messages received by the Listener include information about when and where the error
occurred and the full message as reported on the event feed.
File Transfer
You can transfer any file to the Listener by copying it to the Logger’s export directory. For example, you
might transfer a per-process log file that you exported to a text file (.txt). DTP automatically transfers
the file to the Listener during the next transfer cycle. At the Listener machine, the file is held in a
customer-specific directory.
Support Processing
When your messages arrive at the Listener, they are stored in a customer-specific directory. For error
messages, appropriate Support representatives receive automatic and immediate notification.
Representatives assigned to a specific customer are notified of all error messages from that customer.
Representatives assigned to specific areas of the ICM product are notified of all error messages related
to their areas.
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Serial Alarm Feed
Serial Alarm Feed
ICM software provides an optional serial alarm feed that allows you to establish your own alarm/event
links to the DDSN. The Serial Alarm Feed process (SERIALFD) uses the Customer Support Forwarding
Service (CSFS) to communicate alarm information to an external system. The Serial Alarm Feed process
receives events and sends alarms in ASCII format to a communications port on the Logger. Once the
SERIALFD process is started, alarm messages are sent to the communications port as they occur.
The Serial Alarm Feed consists of a series of alarm messages that are sent out over a 9600 baud serial
connection. The Alarm Messages are formatted as shown in Table 7-1.
Table 7-1
Alarm Message Format
Meaning
Example
Trap Number
6
System Name
CSOXYZRTRB
System Type
2
Process Name
rtr
Trap Severity
6
Date (format: YYYYMMDD)
19961219
Time (format: hh:mm:ss)
16:08:51
Number of Optional Arguments
Following
1
1st Optional Argument
pim1
Description
Restarting process pim1 after having
delayed restart for 60 seconds
End of message sequence (0xD, 0xA)
[CR][LF]
Note that all the fields in Table 7-1 are delimited by a single SPACE character. All fields are variable
length.
You can find information about specific traps in the ICM Management Information Base (MIB). The
MIB correlates to the driving table used by the Customer Support Forwarding Service (CSFS). You can
look up each trap number in the MIB to see the descriptions and appropriate ASN.1 syntax used to
generate the SNMP traps.
Note
For more information on SNMP Feeds and ICM MIB, see the SNMP Guide for Cisco ICM/IPCC
Enterprise & Hosted Editions.
You typically see alarms from the following sources:
•
Nodes
•
Processes
•
Connections
•
Peripherals
•
Sessions/Links
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Syslog Compatible Feed
Since the Serial Alarm Feed is an alarm process, only events that have triggered a state change in an
object are forwarded to the communications port. All other events are discarded. For example, if a
process stops, an alarm is generated and forwarded to the communications port. All subsequent alarms
indicating that the process has stopped are discarded. When the process restarts, another alarm is
generated. The latest alarm indicates a state change, so it is forwarded to the communications port.
Syslog Compatible Feed
The ICM system supports the Syslog event reporting mechanism for CiscoWorks 2000. If you are using
CiscoWorks 2000 for monitoring other Cisco products, you can optionally add the ICM system by
configuring the ICM Logger for CiscoWorks 2000 support. Please refer to the CiscoWorks 2000
documentation for details on how to add the ICM system as a managed device.
Figure 7-2 shows an example CiscoWorks 2000 Syslog ICM report.
CiscoWorks 2000 Syslog event reports show the EMS event data in a web browser.
Figure 7-2
CiscoWorks 2000 Syslog Display for ICM
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Cisco Support Tools
Cisco Support Tools
The Support Tools suite includes the full set of standard diagnostic tools delivered with earlier ICM
versions. It also provides key new functionality including:
•
The ability to interrogate individual Support Tools nodes for their hardware/OS, Cisco component,
and third party product information.
•
The ability to view, stop, and start services running on Support Tools nodes.
•
The ability to view and terminate processes running on Support Tools nodes.
•
The ability to compare and synchronize registry settings from different Support Tools nodes.
•
The ability to pull logs from most Support Tools nodes including ICM CallRouters, Loggers,
Peripheral Gateways (PGs), Admin Workstations (AWs), CTI Object Server (CTI OS), Cisco
Collaboration Server, Cisco E-Mail Manager, and Cisco Media Blender, as well as from Cisco
CallManager.
•
The ability to create enhanced time-synchronized merged logs across servers.
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C H A P T E R
8
ICM Partitioning
This chapter discusses the Intelligent Contact Management (ICM) Partitioning feature, which controls
what data individuals are allowed to access within an ICM database.
Note
Partitioning is only supported for customers using ICM Enterprise Edition. It is not supported in ICM
Hosted Edition, IPCC Enterprise Edition, or IPCC Hosted Edition.
Note
Partitioning has some limitations. Read the section on Problems with Partitioning, page 8-47,- before
you enable partitioning.
ICM Partitioning Overview
People often equate the word Partitioning with the computer management utility that logically divides
a hard drive into sections to improve data storage. The ICM Partition feature does not split the database
into sections; it only controls access to the ICM database.
The ICM Partitioning feature is used to control the data that individual ICM administrative users are
allowed to see within the ICM database. This control is enforced in the standard ICM Administrative
Workstation tools, as well as WebView and Script Editor.
Other methods of protecting data—such as through firewalls, encryption, and so on—are not described
in this chapter.
Why Use ICM Partitioning?
The data stored in the ICM database describes the ICM enterprise. In the simplest case, all users of ICM
software have access to all the data in the enterprise. However, there are several reasons why you might
want to restrict access to specific data:
•
To limit the users who can make changes that affect call handling or monitoring.
•
To restrict the users who can see sensitive data.
•
To allow separate divisions to act independently without interference.
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Depending on the data, you might want to limit a user’s access to scripts, routes, peripherals, services,
enterprise services, skill groups, and so on. For example, one administrator might have access to only
the sales services while another administrator might have access to only scripts. You may also need one
or more business entities, depending on what data you need to segregate.
The optional ICM Partition feature allows you to apply these types of security measures to ICM
software.
Classes and Objects
You can grant access to broad classes of data or to specific objects within the ICM enterprise. A class
represents a group of objects; an object represents a specific element and its related data.
An object might control other objects. In turn, each object and controlled object has a group of ICM
database configuration tables it is associated with. Figure 8-1 illustrates this hierarchy.
Figure 8-1
Class and Object Hierarchy
For example, if you grant a user access to the Peripheral class, that user can access the configuration data
for all peripherals and all the data associated with each of those peripherals in the enterprise. On the
other hand, if you grant a user access to a peripheral object—the Scranton ACD, for example—that user
can access only the configuration data for that specific peripheral and its related data (trunks, services,
skill groups, agents, etc.).
By selectively granting access to specific classes and objects, you can ensure that each user has the full
access he or she needs without allowing unnecessary or unwanted access to other data.
Mapping Objects
Most objects have a direct mapping between the database security object and a configuration item. For
example, the Agent database security object directly maps to Agents created through the Agent Explorer
or the Agent Bulk Configuration Tool. However, some objects do not have a configuration object, but
rather, serve only as a mapping device between the Class and Object levels.
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Note
This mapping is required because Classes do not have a direct association with tables.
Table 8-1 lists these mapping objects:
Table 8-1
Special Mapping Objects
Class
Objects
Call
Call
Network Interface
Network Interface, Network/Peripheral
Peripheral
Peripheral Global, Network/Peripheral
System
System
Some objects intersect the Network Interface Class and the Peripheral Class, where access levels can be
assigned to the object either through the Network Interface class or the Peripheral Class. The
Network/Peripheral object exists for such objects.
For example, a Dialed Number object requires an association to a Routing Client. If the Routing Client
is associated with:
•
A Network Interface Controller, then access to that the Dialed Number comes from the Network
Interface Class.
•
A Peripheral, then access to the Dialed Number comes from the Peripheral class.
For specific information about the classes and objects recognized by ICM software, see Class and Object
Security, page 8-8.
Business Entities
A business entity is a subset of the ICM software enterprise and is an object in the ICM database. Once
you create business entities, then you can define your own set of objects that belong to the business entity
objects, such as:
•
Routing and administrative scripts
•
Enterprise services
•
Enterprise skill groups
•
Enterprise agent groups
•
Enterprise routes
By default, the ICM software enterprise consists of only one business entity. However, if the ICM
Partition feature is enabled, you have the option to logically divide the ICM enterprise into several
business entities. For example, in a large corporation, you might create business entities to represent
specific divisions.
Note
The number of business entities on an ICM system must be less-than-or-equal-to the maximum number
of Partitions (five). The number of Partitions is defined using the ICM Database Administration
(ICMDBA) tool. For more information, see Creating a Database, page 4-5.
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You can limit the access of individual users and user groups to specific business entities. For example,
you might grant a system manager within one business entity the privileges to create and modify routing
and administrative scripts for that business entity. However, this same manager might not have any
access to the scripts of another business entity
For more information about setting the security access for business entities, see Installing and
Configuring ICM Partitioning, page 8-22.
Access Privilege Levels
For each class and object in the ICM software database, you can grant users or groups a specific access
privilege level. The access level determines what rights the user has to the associated data, as described
in Table 8-2.
Table 8-2
Access Levels
Access Level
Description
Example: Peripheral Access
Maintenance
Permits the User or Group to read, update, and Allows the user to create, modify,
delete the object.
or delete the services, skill groups,
etc., for a peripheral.
Reference
Permits the User or Group to read the object
and use it in a script.
Allows the user to reference
peripheral-level variables in a
script.
Read
Permits the User or Group to see the object,
but not change it or use it in a script.
Allows the user to see the
peripheral and the associated
peripheral real-time and historical
data
No access
Restricts access to the object. (This is the
default if a User or Group is not explicitly
assigned an access level.)
Allows no access.
Not all access levels can be applied to all classes and objects. For example, a user can only have Read
or Reference access to call detail data; ICM software does not permit Maintenance access to call detail
data.
You can intermix different levels of security. For example, you might choose to give some users Read
access to a wide range of data, but grant them Maintenance access to only a subset of that data.
Note
The highest—that is, the most permissive—access level to a particular piece of data “wins.”
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ICM Partitioning Security
The security provided by Partitioning involves checking the user’s access privileges.
User Privileges
Security settings can be assigned directly to a user. A user account is created on the Windows
domain.The system administrator then defines the access rights of the user to different objects in the
ICM database tables.
Note
Non-system administrators can assign security settings if they have maintenance access to the ICM
system class and maintenance access to the object for which they wish to assign access.
Users can be granted access to data by their access level to the:
•
Class to which the data belongs.
•
Data object
A user’s access level to data is determined both by the user’s access privileges and the access privileges
of the group(s) to which the user belongs.
User Groups
To simplify security administration, you can define user groups and assign users to these groups. A user
group is a collection of ICM users that exists only in ICM, not in the domain. You can grant to each group
the appropriate set of rights within the system for the tasks that they will need to perform.
For example, you might want to create groups for the following:
•
Users who can make changes to the carrier interfaces
•
Users who can add and remove peripherals
•
For each peripheral, users who can change the configuration within that specific peripheral
You can define any number of groups with broader or narrower rights than in these examples. In addition
to granting rights to user groups, you can also grant specific rights to individual users. However, it is
usually simpler and easier to use groups as much as possible.
For more information about defining the security access for user groups, see Installing and Configuring
ICM Partitioning, page 8-22.
How Partitioning Works
The ICM Partitioning feature restricts access to objects in the ICM system by restricting users from
directly accessing the raw data in the ICM system. Instead, users are granted access to database defined
views. These views are defined by SQL queries which only select the data to which the given user is
granted access.
In order to populate these views from the raw data in the database tables, the ICM must keep track of
which users are granted access to which data, and make the data easily accessible from a SQL query.
This is done by generating a table (User_Security_Control) from the security definitions that has a single
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row (on the order of 100 bytes) for each object to which each user has access. The data in this table is
then joined with the raw data in the database tables to generate views that are specific to each user and
only contain the data that user is permitted to see.
The User_Security_Control table could get very large. If a given database has 20 users and 10,000
objects the resulting User_Secuirty_Control table could contain as many as 200,000 rows. If a given
user does not have access to a given object, no row appears in the table, therefore ( Number of Users *
Number of Objects ) is an upper bound on the table size. Rows in most (but not all) ICM configuration
tables count as objects. See Table 8-6 for a comprehensive list of configuration object types.
It is important to note that the number of objects to which a given user has access is not just the number
of objects to which they are granted explicit access; this number also includes those objects to which the
user implicitly has access. In other words, if a user is granted access to an entire Business Entity object,
that user will not only have a single row in the User_Security_Control table for the Business Entity
object, but will also have one row for each object that falls under that Business Entity (each Enterprise
Service, Enterprise Skill Group, Schedule, Schedule Report, Schedule Source and Script).
The User_Security_Control table is kept up to date through the use of triggers which execute stored
procedures. The tables are updated when database object changes affect object access. The triggers
attempt only to regenerate sections of the User_Security_Control table instead of the entire table when
they can do so. Table 8-3 shows a list of conditions that lead to partial updates, and the updates that
occur:
Table 8-3
User_Secuirty_Control table partial recalculation conditions
What Changed
Modified Records
Object Added
Create all records for the object
Object Deleted
Delete all records for the object
User added to group
Recreate all records for the user
User deleted from group
Recreate all records for the user
New group or user given access to object
Recreate all records for the object
Group or user access to object deleted
Recreate all records for the object
Group or user access to object changed
Recreate all records for the object
New group or user given access to class
Recreate all records for the class
Group or user access to class deleted
Recreate all records for the class
Group or user access to class changed
Recreate all records for the class
New group or user given access to global
Recreate all records for all members of
the group or user
Group or user access to global changed
Recreate all records for all members of
the group or user
Group or user access to global deleted
Recreate all records for all members of
the group or user
Even though these are partial updates, they still have the potential of generating large numbers of
records. For example, adding a user to a group (that may only give access to a few objects) not only
causes new records to be created for that user to grant access to the new object(s), but also recreates all
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existing records for objects the user had previously been granted access to. These records include both
objects on which rights are explicitly granted (such as a Peripheral) as well as those for which rights are
implicitly granted (such as Agents, Skill Groups, Labels, etc).
Getting Started
Before you begin setting up ICM Partitioning, take some time to plan the process. Designing your
Partitioning system carefully before beginning to implement it ultimately makes the task easier and less
error-prone. In particular, you should:
•
Determine tasks that need to be performed.
•
Create a group for each task.
•
Add users to groups representing the tasks the user needs to perform.
For example, one task might be to add Peripherals. To accommodate this task, you would take the
following steps:
1.
Create a group name, for instance, AddPeripherals.
2.
Grant the group maintenance Peripheral Class Access.
3.
Assign users to the group.
See Class and Object Security, page 8-8to work out which specific access rights you need to assign to
each group. See Installing and Configuring ICM Partitioning, page 8-22for instructions on setting up
Partitioning.
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Class and Object Security
This section provides information about ICM class and object security.
Class and Object Security Overview
Class security defines access to a group of ICM configuration objects. Object security sets access
privileges for specific records within a table or a group of tables.
Note
For details regarding the classes and objects that affect the security for a specific database table, see the
Cisco ICM Schema On-Line Help.
Class and object security settings determine a User or Group’s access level to ICM data. Certain access
levels are valid for each class and each object and can be any combination of the levels described in
Table 8-2:
Table 8-4
Access Levels
Access Level
Description
Maintenance
Permits the User or Group to read, update, and delete
the object.
Reference
Permits the User or Group to read the object and use
it in a script.
Read
Permits the User or Group to see the object, but not
change it or use it in a script.
No access
Restricts access to the object. (This is the default if a
User or Group is not explicitly assigned an access
level.)
Note
The highest—that is, the most permissive—access level to a particular
piece of data “wins.”
A user can belong to multiple groups or be assigned settings at the class
level that conflict with settings at the object level.
For example: UserX might have been assigned only read access to
PeripheralZ. However, UserX might also belong to Group1 and Group2.
Group1 might have reference access to PeripheralZ and Group2 might
have maintenance access to PeripheralZ. Consequently, even though
UserX as an individual has only read access to PeripheralZ, since he
belongs to Group2, he has maintenance access to PeripheralZ.
Another example:UserA might have read-only access to the global class
but maintenance access to the peripheral object. Because the peripheral
object controls the skill group object, UserA has maintenance access to
the skill group object even though his global access gives him only read
access.
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You assign class security to a User or Group using the Class Security List. You assign object security
using the Security Dialog or tab on the Explorer, List, or Bulk Configuration tool.
Class Security
Database class security defines access to a group of ICM configuration objects.Table 8-5 describes the
classes the ICM software supports.
Table 8-5
Security Classes (Sheet 1 of 2)
Class Name
Description
Access Levels
Objects
Call
Provides security for viewing
routing and call history tables.
Reference
Read
Call
Global
Provides security to all objects and Read, Reference,
tables.
Maintenance
Note
Network
Interface
All
A user with Maintenance
access to the Global class
has full access to all ICM
software data.
Administrative users
automatically have this
level of access.
Provides security for setting up the Read, Maintenance
ICM network interface.
Announcement
Call Type
Device Target
Dialed Number
Label
Network Interface
Network Trunk Group
Network VRU
Network Vru Script
Network/Peripheral
Scheduled Target
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Table 8-5
Security Classes (Sheet 2 of 2)
Class Name
Description
Access Levels
Objects
Peripheral
Provides security for configuring
ICM peripherals.
Read, Maintenance
Agent
Agent Team
Call Type
DialedNumber
Dialer
Label
Network TrunkGroup
Network/Peripheral
Peripheral
Peripheral global
Route
Service
Service Array
Skill Group
Translation Route
Trunk Group
System
Provides security for ICM security Read, Maintenance
and configuration objects and
tables.
Agent Desk Settings
Application Gateway
Business Entity
Campaign
Database Lookup
Enterprise Route
Enterprise Service
Enterprise Skill
Group
Expanded Call Variable
Import RuleQuery Rule
Schedule
Schedule Report
Script
System
User Formula
User Variable
Object Security
Object security sets access privileges for specific records within a table or a group of tables. There are
two types of security objects:
•
A controlling object sets security on the object itself and a set of other objects. For example, the
Peripheral object is a controlling object that groups Agents on a particular peripheral.
•
A controlled object derives its security from a controlling object. For example, Agent is controlled
by the Peripheral object.
Table 8-6 lists ICM objects and describes which database table each controls.
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Note
For complete details on each of the tables listed inTable 8-6, see the Database Schema Handbook for
Cisco ICM/IPCC Enterprise and Hosted Editions..
Table 8-6
Security Objects (Sheet 1 of 12)
Object
Description
Agent
Provides
security on
an Agent
Access
Levels
Controlling
Object
Classes
ICM Database
Tables
Reference
Read
Peripheral
Agent
Global
Peripheral
Objects
Controlled
Agent_Half_
Hour
Agent_Logout
Agent_Real
Time
Agent_State_
Trace
Agent Desk
Settings
Provides
security to
use a set of
Agent Desk
Settings
Reference
Read
System
Global
System
Agent_Desk_
Settings
Application_
Event
ICR_View
Agent Team
Provides
Reference
security to
Read
use an Agent
Team
Peripheral
Global
Peripheral
Agent_Team
Agent_Team_
Member
Agent_Team_
Supervisor
Announcement Provides
security to
use an
announcement
Reference
Read
Network
Interface
Global
Network
Interface
Announcement
Application
Gateway
Reference
Read
System
Global
System
Application_
Gateway
Provides
security to
use an
Application
Gateway
Application_
Gateway_
Half_Hour
Application_
Gateway_
Connection
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Table 8-6
Object
Security Objects (Sheet 2 of 12)
Description
Business Entity Provides
security to
create
objects
within the
Business
Entity
Access
Levels
Controlling
Object
Classes
Maintenance System
Reference
Read
Global
System
ICM Database
Tables
Objects
Controlled
Business_
Entity
Enterprise
Route
Enterprise
Service
Enterprise
Skill
Group
Schedule
Schedule
Report
Schedule
Source
Script
Call
Provides
security to
read the call
related tables
Call
Global
Route_Call
Detail
Route_Call
Variable
Termination_
Call_Detail
Termination_
Call_Variable
Call Type
Provides
Reference
security on a Read
call type
Network/
Peripheral
Global
Network
Interface
Peripheral
Call_Type
Call_Type_
Half_Hour
Call_Type_
Map
Call_Type_
Real_Time
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Table 8-6
Security Objects (Sheet 3 of 12)
Object
Description
Campaign
Provides
security to
use a
Campaign
Access
Levels
Controlling
Object
Classes
Maintenance System
Reference
Read
Global
System
ICM Database
Tables
Objects
Controlled
Campaign
Campaign_
Query_Rule
Campaign_
Query_Rule_
Half_Hour
Campaign_
Query_Rule
Real_Time
Campaign_
Skill_Group
Campaign_
Target_
Sequence
Database
Lookup
Provides
security to
use a
Database
Lookup
Reference
Read
System
Device Target
Provides
security to
use a Device
Target
Reference
Read
Dialed Number Provides
Reference
security on a Read
dialed
number
Global
System
Script_Table
Network
Interface
Global
Network
Interface
Device_Target
Network/
Peripheral
Global
Network
Interface
Peripheral
Dialed_
Number
Script_Table_
Column
Dialed_
Number_
Label
Dialed_
Number_Map
Dialer
Provides
security to
use a Dialer
Maintenance Peripheral
global
Reference
Read
Global
Peripheral
Dialer
Dialer_Half_
Hour
Dialer_Port
_Map
Dialer_Port
_Real_Time
Enterprise
Agent Group
Provides
Reference
security to
Read
use an
Enterprise
Agent Group
Global
Enterprise_
Agent_Group
Enterprise_
Agent_Group
_Member
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Table 8-6
Security Objects (Sheet 4 of 12)
Access
Levels
Controlling
Object
Classes
ICM Database
Tables
Provides
security to
use an
Enterprise
Route
Reference
Read
Business
Entity
Enterprise_
Route
Provides
security to
use an
Enterprise
Service
Reference
Read
Object
Description
Enterprise
Route
Enterprise
Service
Enterprise Skill Provides
Group
security to
use an
Enterprise
Skill Group
Global
System
Objects
Controlled
Enterprise_
Route_
Member
Business
Entity
Global
System
Enterprise_
Service
Enterprise_
Service_
Member
Reference
Read
Business
Entity
Global
System
Enterprise_
Skill_Group
Enterprise_
Skill_Group_
Member
Expanded Call
Variable
Provides
Maintenance System
security to
Reference
use an
Read
Expanded
Call Variable
Global
System
Expanded_Call
_Variable
Import Rule
Provides
security to
maintain a
Import Rule
Global
System
Import_Rule
Maintenance System
Reference
Read
Import_Rule_
Clause
Import_Rule_
History
Import_Rule_
Real_Time
Label
Provides
security to
use a Label
Reference
Read
Network
Interface
Provides
security to
use the
network
interface
tables
Reference
Read
Network
Interface
Peripheral
Global
Network
Interface
Peripheral
Label
Global
Network
Interface
Network_
Event_Detail
Announcement
Network_
Target
Device
Target
Network
Vru Script
Scheduled
Target
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Table 8-6
Object
Security Objects (Sheet 5 of 12)
Description
Access
Levels
Network Trunk Provides
Reference
Group
security to
Read
use a
Network
Trunk Group
Controlling
Object
Classes
ICM Database
Tables
Peripheral
global
Network_
Trunk_Group
Global
Network
Interface
Peripheral
Objects
Controlled
Network_
Trunk_Group
Half_Hour
Network_
Trunk_Group
Real_Time
Peripheral_
Target
Network VRU
Provides
security to
use a
Network
VRU
Maintenance Network/
Reference
Peripheral
Read
Global
Network
Interface
Network_Vru
Network Vru
Script
Provides
security to
use a
Network
VRU Script
Maintenance Network
Interface
Reference
Read
Global
Network
Interface
Network_Vru_
Script
Network/
Peripheral
Provides
security to
read the
tables that
are used for
both the
Peripheral
and the
Network
Interface
Global
Network
Interface
Peripheral
Logical_
Interface_
Controller
Physical_
Interface_
Controller
Physical_
Controller_
Half_Hour
Routing_Client
Routing_Client
Five_Minute
Call Type
Dialed_
Number
Label
Network_Vru
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Table 8-6
Security Objects (Sheet 6 of 12)
Access
Levels
Controlling
Object
Classes
Object
Description
Peripheral
Provides
Maintenance Peripheral
security on a Reference
global
peripheral
Read
and the
services,
skill groups,
etc. on it
Global
Peripheral
ICM Database
Tables
Objects
Controlled
Agent_Team_
Service
Agent
Peripheral
Peripheral_
Default_
Route
Peripheral_
Half_Hour
Peripheral
Monitor
Peripheral_
Real_Time
Service_Level
_Threshold
Galaxy_Agent
_Call_Count
Galaxy_Agent
_Igroup
Galaxy_Agent
_Performance
Galaxy_Alarm
Galaxy_DNIS
Galaxy_PBX
Galaxy_
Transaction_
Code
Peripheral
Gateway
Provides
security to
use a
Peripheral
Gateway
Maintenance Network/
Peripheral
Global
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Type
Dial_Number_
Plan
Skill
Group
Trunk
Group
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Table 8-6
Security Objects (Sheet 7 of 12)
Object
Description
Peripheral
global
Provides
security to
use the
peripheral
related tables
Access
Levels
Controlling
Object
Classes
ICM Database
Tables
Global
Peripheral
Objects
Controlled
Dialer
Network
Trunk
Group
Peripheral
Person
Route
Service
Array
Translation Route
Person
Provides
security to
use a Person
Reference
Read
Query Rule
Provides
security to
use a Query
Rule
Provides
security to
use a Route
Route
Peripheral
global
Global
Peripheral
Person
Maintenance System
Reference
Read
Global
Query_Rule
System
Query_Rule_
Clause
Reference
Read
Global
Peripheral
Route
Peripheral
global
Route_Half_
Hour
Route_Five_
Minute
Route_Real_
Time
Schedule
Provides
security to
use a
Schedule
Reference
Read
Business
Entity
Global
System
Import_Log
Import_
Schedule
Recurring_
Schedule_
Map
Schedule
Schedule_Map
Schedule_
Import
Schedule_
Import_Real_
Time
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Table 8-6
Security Objects (Sheet 8 of 12)
Access
Levels
Controlling
Object
Classes
ICM Database
Tables
Object
Description
Schedule
Report
Provides
security to
maintain a
Schedule
Report
Maintenance Business
Entity
Reference
Read
Global
System
Schedule
Source
Provides
security to
use a
Schedule
Source
Reference
Read
Global
Schedule_
Source
Scheduled
Target
Provides
security to
maintain a
Scheduled
Target
Maintenance Network
Interface
Reference
Read
Global
Network
Interface
Scheduled_
Target
Global
System
Admin_Script_
Schedule_
Map
Script
Provides
Reference
security on a Read
script and the
associated
real-time and
historical
tables
Business
Entity
Business
Entity
Schedule_
Report
Schedule_
Report_Input
Scheduled_
Target_Real_
Time
Master_Script
Script
Script_Cross_
Reference
Script_Data
Script_Five_
Minute
Script_Print_
Control
Script_Real_
Time
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Table 8-6
Security Objects (Sheet 9 of 12)
Access
Levels
Object
Description
Service
Provides
Reference
security on a Read
Service and
the
associated
real-time and
historical
tables
Controlling
Object
Classes
ICM Database
Tables
Peripheral
Service
Global
Peripheral
Objects
Controlled
Service_
Member
Service_Five_
Minute
Service_Half_
Hour
Service_Real_
Time
Galaxy_Gate
Galaxy_Gate_
Delayed_Call
Galaxy_
Overflow
Service Array
Skill Group
Provides
Reference
security to
Read
use a Service
Array
Peripheral
global
Global
Peripheral
Service_Array
Provides
Reference
security on a Read
Skill Group
and the
associated
real-time and
historical
tables
Peripheral
Global
Peripheral
Agent_Skill_
Group_Half_
Hour
Service_Array
_Member
Agent_Skill_
Group_
Logout
Agent_Skill_
Group_Real_
Time
Skill_Group
Skill_Group_
Member
Skill_Group_
Five_Minute
Skill_Group_
Half_Hour
Skill_Group_
Real_Time
Skill_Target
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Table 8-6
Security Objects (Sheet 10 of 12)
Object
Description
System
Provides
security to
read the ICM
security and
configuration tables
Access
Levels
Controlling
Object
Classes
ICM Database
Tables
Objects
Controlled
Global
System
Agent_
Distribution
Agent
Desk
Settings
Application
Application_
Gateway_
Globals
Application_
Instance
Application_
Path
Application
Gateway
Business
Entity
Campaign
Database
Lookup
Application_
Path_Member Expanded
Call VariApplication_
able
Path_Real_
Time
Blended_
Agent_
Options
ClassID_To_
ObjectType
Import
Rule
Query
Rule
User
Formula
Class_Access_ User
Xref
Variable
Class_List
Class_Security
Customer_
Definition
Customer_
Options
ICR_Instance
ICR_Node
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Table 8-6
Object
Security Objects (Sheet 11 of 12)
Description
Access
Levels
Controlling
Object
Classes
System
(continued)
ICM Database
Tables
Objects
Controlled
Feature_
Control_Set
Media_Class
Media_Routing_Domain
Object_Access
_Xref
Object_List
Object_
Security
Region
Region_
Member
Region_Prefix
Region_View
Region_View_
Member
User_Group
User_Group_
Member
User_Supervisor_Map
VRU
_Currency
VRU_Defaults
VRU_Locale
Translation
Route
Provides
security to
use a
Translation
Route
Reference
Read
Peripheral
global
Global
Peripheral
Translation_
Route
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Table 8-6
Security Objects (Sheet 12 of 12)
Access
Levels
Object
Description
Trunk Group
Provides
Reference
security on a Read
Trunk Group
and the
associated
real-time and
historical
tables
Controlling
Object
Classes
ICM Database
Tables
Peripheral
Trunk
Global
Peripheral
Trunk_Group
Trunk_Group_
Five_Minute
Trunk_Group_
Half_Hour
Trunk_Group_
Real_Time
Vru_Port_Map
Galaxy_Single
_Trunk
Galaxy_Trunk
_Call_Count
Galaxy_Trunk
_IGroup
User Formula
User Variable
Provides
security to
maintain a
User
Formula
Maintenance System
Reference
Read
Global
System
User_Formula
Provides
security to
maintain a
User
Variable
Maintenance System
Reference
Read
Global
System
Persistent_
Variable
Installing and Configuring ICM Partitioning
This section lists tips for using and installing Partitioning and describes:
•
How to install ICM Partitioning
•
The tools used to configure Partitioning
•
How to configure Partitioning by:
– Creating and maintaining user groups
– Granting groups and individual users access to classes
– Creating and administering individual user accounts
– Setting access for individual ICM database objects and scripts
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_Equation
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Installing ICM Partitioning
You enable the ICM Partition feature during the Admin Workstation Setup phase of the ICM software
installation process. To install the ICM Partition feature:
Step 1
When creating the Logger database, using the ICMDBA tool, enable Partitioning and set the maximum
number of Partitions. The maximum number of Partitions equals the maximum number of business
entities.
Step 2
Run ICM Setup for each distributor AW in your system and enable Partitioning on those AWs.
Note
For more information on installing Partitioning, see the ICM Installation Guide for Cisco ICM
Enterprise Edition. For more information on the ICMDBA tool, see Database Administration Tool, page
4-2.
ICM Security Tools
In a system that does not have the ICM Partition feature enabled, the Configuration Manager’s Security
menu contains two options:
•
User List
•
Business Entity List
In a system that does have the ICM Partition feature enabled, the Security menu has two additional
options:
•
User Group List
•
Class List
You use these Configuration Manager list tools to create ICM users and groups of users.
•
Use the Configuration Manager list, explorer, and bulk tools to also set user and group access rights
to classes of ICM objects and individual ICM objects.
•
Use the Configuration Manager’s Bulk Configuration tools to set security access to multiple data
records at a time.
•
Use the Script Editor to set security access to scripts.
Defining User Groups
Begin setting up security by creating a user group for each set of users who will have the same access
rights within the ICM system. For example, you might create separate user groups for:
Note
•
Users who can make changes to the network interface
•
Users who can add new peripherals
•
Users who can change configuration data within each peripheral
By carefully defining the user groups you need and assigning the appropriate users to them, you
ultimately make ICM security administration easier to maintain.
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How to view currently-defined user groups
Step 1
From the Configuration Manager’s Configure ICM menu, choose Security > User Group List. The User
Group List window appears.
Step 2
In the Select filter data box, click Retrieve. The User Group List window lists the existing security
groups.
How to add a new user group and assign members to the group
Step 1
In the User Group List window, click Add. A new user group displays in the Attributes tab.
Step 2
Fill in the Attributes tab fields. See the online help if you have any questions.
Step 3
Click Save. This saves the new group to the database.
Step 4
Optionally, click the User Membership tab and then, in that tab, click Add to assign users to the group.
This displays the Add Users dialog box.
Note
You can perform this step only if user accounts have already been defined. If user accounts have
not been defined, you can assign users to the group later as you set up their accounts.
Step 5
In the Name list, select the user or users you want to add to the group and click OK. The Add Users
dialog box closes.
Step 6
In the User Group List window, click Save to save the data in the database.
Repeat this procedure until all new groups have been added. Click Close in the User Groups List window
to close the window.
How to delete a user group
Step 1
Select a Group Name from the User Groups List window and click Delete. The marked for deletion icon
appears next to the group’s name in the list box.
Step 2
Click Save to delete the security group. The User Groups name disappears from the list box.
Defining Users
After defining the security groups and specifying their levels of access, you can assign ICM users to the
appropriate user groups.
How to see the users who are currently defined
Step 1
From the Configuration Manager’s Configure ICM menu, choose Security > User List. The Users List
window appears.
Step 2
In the Select filter data box, click Retrieve. The Users List window lists all users currently defined for
the ICM system.
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Note
If the ICM Partition feature is enabled, the WebView Script Only and Customer properties are
not visible in the attributes tab of a selected user.
How to add a new ICM user
Step 1
In the User List window, click Add. A new Attributes tab appears for the new user.
Step 2
Select the Domain Name.
•
Domain Name. This is the Windows 2000 domain name, the unique host name on the internet to
which the user belongs. Domain names are always in capital letters.
Note
Step 3
Enter the following information:
•
User Name. Select the name of the windows domain account.
Note
ICM user names must begin with a letter and can contain only letters and numbers. If the
Windows user name contains characters other than the preceding, remove those characters
from the ICM user name. (For example, the pound characters (#) and dollar characters ($)
are not allowed in usernames.) The software appends the user name to the Domain name to
form the User group name
•
Description. Enter additional information about the user, such as the name of the person assigned
to this account.
•
Password. Enter the Windows password for the account. Only asterisks appear in the field as you
type.
•
Change Password. Click to change your password.
Note
•
Clicking this box enables the Password and Confirm password fields.
Confirm Password. Enter the Windows password again to confirm that you have typed it correctly.
Note
Step 4
The domain name must start with a letter and contain only letters and numbers. Domain
refers to a set of servers and workstations grouped together for efficiency and security. A
domain is the basic administrative unit in a server running Windows 2000. A network can
be divided into domains by any convenient method, such as by department, workgroup, or
building floor.
Users created in the NAM domain are, by definition, given access rights to the NAM
configuration database. Users created in the Limited AW (Customer) domain are given
access to only their customer specific configuration data.
•
Read Only. Check this box to give the user read-only access to the ICM.
•
Customer. Not available when the ICM Partition feature is enabled.
•
Feature Control Set. Select the Feature Set for the selected User.
Select the user who is already a member of the following:
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•
Configuration
– Read only. Added when Configuration is checked.
•
Setup
•
Webview
Step 5
Optionally, assign the user to one or more groups. Select the Group membership tab, and in that tab click
Add. Then in the Add Groups dialog box, select the group(s) to which you want to add the user and click
OK. This closes the Add Groups dialog box.
Step 6
In the User List window, click Save to create the user account.
Repeat this procedure until all users are created.
How to delete a user
Step 1
In the User List window, select a User Name from the list box and click Delete. A marked for deletion
icon appears next to the name in the list box.
Step 2
When prompted to confirm the deletion, click OK.
Step 3
Click Save to delete the user. The user’s name disappears from the list box.
Defining Business Entities Security
Each ICM enterprise consists of between one and five business entities. You can change the names and
descriptions of business entities and set the access rights to business entities.
Note
You can only create business entities on Partitioned systems that have more than one Partition.
How to find out how many Partitions are on the system
In the ICM Configuration Manager, open the System Information tools and look at the Max Partitions
field.
How to view the business entities in your enterprise
Step 1
From the Configuration Manager’s Configure ICM menu, choose Security > Business Entity List. The
Business Entity List window appears.
Step 2
In the Select filter data box, click Retrieve. The Business Entity List window lists the defined business
entities.
How to change names and descriptions of a business entity
Step 1
In the Business Entity List window, select the business entity you want to change.
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Step 2
In the Attributes tab of the selected business entity, modify the Entity Name and/or Description.
Step 3
Click Save to submit your changes to the database.
Repeat this procedure to make changes to other business entity names and descriptions.
How to assign business entity security access
Step 1
In the Business Entity List window, select the business entity.
Step 2
Click the Security tab.
Step 3
In the Security tab, click Add. The Add Users and Groups dialog box appears.
Step 4
In the Type box, select User or Group, depending on whether you want to give access rights to a user or
a group of users.
Step 5
In the Names list, select a User Name or Group Name to which you want to assign access to the business
entity.
You can select multiple names if you want to assign access to more than one user or user group.
Step 6
From the Access type drop-down list (directly below the User Name and Group Name lists), choose the
level of access you want to assign: Read or Maintenance.
Step 7
Click OK. The Add Users and Groups dialog box disappears and the user name or group name is
displayed in the Security tab User Access list.
Step 8
Repeat steps 4 through 7 to give other Users/Groups access to the business entity.
Step 9
When you have finished assigning access, click Save to apply the changes.
Repeat this procedure to set the access rights for other business entities.
Defining Class Security Access
After you have created security groups, you can use the Class Security List tool to grant each group a
specific level of access to each ICM security class.
How to assign class security access
Step 1
From the Configuration Manager’s Configure ICM menu, choose Security > Class List. The Class
Security List window appears.
Step 2
In the Select filter data box, click Retrieve. The Class Security List window lists the existing security
classes.
Step 3
Select a class from the list box. (For example, to set access for the Network Interface class, choose
Network Interface. See Table 8-5 on page 8-9 for a definition of each class.)
Step 4
Click the Security tab and then, in the Security tab, click Add. This displays the Add Users and Groups
dialog box.
Step 5
In the Type box, select User or Group, depending on whether you want to give access rights to a user or
a group of users.
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Step 6
In the Names list, select a User Name or Group Name to which you want to assign access to the class.
You can select multiple names if you want to assign access to more than one user or user group.
Step 7
From the Access type drop-down list (directly below the User Name and Group Name lists), choose the
level of access you want to assign: Read, Reference, or Maintenance.
Note
Not all access levels are available to all classes.
Step 8
Click OK. The Add Users and Groups dialog box disappears and the user name or group name is
displayed in the Security tab User Access list.
Step 9
Repeat steps 5through 8 to give other Users/Groups access to the class.
Step 10
When you have finished assigning access for the class, click Save to apply the changes.
Repeat this procedure to assign access for other classes.
Defining Object Security Access
Many of the elements that you define in Configure ICM are considered to be ICM objects. (For a list of
ICM objects, see Class and Object Security, page 8-8.)
If your ICM system has the ICM Partition feature enabled, then whenever you create an ICM object, you
have the option of using the security feature to set access rights to it.
How to define access rights for a new object
Step 1
Within the Configuration Manager, use the appropriate Configuration tool to specify information about
the object.
Step 2
In the configuration tool, click the Security button (explorer and bulk tools) or tab (list tools). A Security
dialog box appears for the object you are creating.
Step 3
Use the Security dialog box to specify which groups and individual users have access to the object.
Step 4
Click OK when done.
How to change the access rights for an existing object
Step 1
Within the Configuration Manager, click Security in the configuration tool window for the object you
want to modify. The Security dialog box appears.
Step 2
Use the Security dialog box to specify which groups and individual users have access to the object.
Step 3
Click OK when done.
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Defining Security for One or More Records at a Time
Step 1
In the Configuration Manager menu, select the Bulk Configuration Tool appropriate for the data type
records for which you want to set access rights (for example, dialed numbers or labels). You can define
security for multiple records in either Edit or Insert mode.
Step 2
In the selected data-type window, select the desired row or rows of records.
Step 3
Click Security. The Security dialog box displays. If there are security settings on the selected records
and they are mixed (different records having different settings), no security data is displayed. Otherwise,
the security settings for the selected record(s) are displayed.
Step 4
If you want to apply one setting to records with mixed settings, select Override existing settings.
Note
Step 5
You can set or change security settings on a group of records only if they have the same security
settings, if they have no security settings, or if you have selected Override existing settings.
Make changes to the security settings:
•
To add access to the selected records:
Click Add and in the Add Users and Groups dialog box, (a) select user or group, (b) select the user
or group name(s), (c) select the Access type (Read, Reference, or Maintenance), and (d) click OK.
Note
•
Not all access levels are available for all objects.
To remove access to the records:
In the User Access display box, select the user or group to remove and click Remove.
•
To edit access to the records:
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In the User Access display box, select the user or group to edit and click Edit or double-click on the
item you want to edit. Then in the Edit Permissions dialog box, select the access type and click OK.
Step 6
When done, click OK.
Defining Script Security
Scripts that you create with the Script Editor are also ICM objects you can specify security for.
How to assign script security access
Step 1
Within the Script Editor, open the script.
Step 2
Right-click in the script to display the pop-up menu.
Step 3
Choose the Security option. The Script Security dialog box appears.
Step 4
Choose a User or Group from the lists at the lower right of the dialog box.
Step 5
From the drop-down list above those lists, choose an access level: Read or Reference.
Step 6
Click Add. The user or group you selected moves to the list on the left side of the dialog box.
Step 7
Repeat steps 4 through 6 to grant access to other users or groups.
Step 8
Click OK to submit your changes. The Script Security dialog box closes.
Repeat this procedure to set the access rights for other scripts.
How to access Script Security from the Script Properties dialog
You can also open the Script Security dialog from the Script Properties dialog box.
Step 1
Chose the Security tab in the Script Properties dialog box.
Step 2
Click Modify Security.
The Script Security dialog box opens. Continue with Step 4 of the preceding procedure.
Partitioning and Database Access
This section describes database access changes that result from partitioning your ICM Enterprise system.
Concepts to understand when reading this section include:
•
Access Level - determines the actions that a user can perform on database objects. Access levels
include Read, Reference, and Maintenance. Maintenance provides permission to create, read,
update, and delete. These access levels are represented numerically as follows:
– 10 = Read
– 20 = Reference
– 30 = Maintenance (create/read/update/delete)
•
Class Security- sets access privileges for a group of objects
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•
Object Security - sets access privileges for a group of tables
•
Controlling Object - sets access privileges for itself and a set of other objects. For example, the
Peripheral object is a controlling object that groups Agents on that particular peripheral.
Database tables not included in the table below have no access controls or restrictions if partitioning is
enabled.
Database
Object Type
Agent
Specific Tables
•
Agent
•
Agent_Half_Hour
•
Agent_Log_Out
•
Agent_Real_Time
•
Agent_State_Trace
Effect of Partitioning
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables has the following access
controls:
•
The Agent object provides Reference
and Read access.
•
The Peripheral object is the
controlling object.
The Agent object is a member of the
Global and Peripheral classes. The
Global class provides Maintenance,
Reference, and Read access to all tables.
Agent Desk
Settings
•
Agent_Desk_Settings
•
Application_Event
•
ICR_View
•
Sec_User
•
Sec_Group
•
User_Security_Control
•
View_Column
If the ICM partitioning feature is
enabled, these tables have the following
access controls:
•
The Agent_Desk_Settings object
provides Reference and Read access.
•
The System object is the controlling
object.
•
The Agent_Desk_Settings object is a
member of the Global and System
classes.
The Global class provides Maintenance,
Reference, and Read access to all tables.
Agent Team
•
Agent_Team
•
Agent_Team_Member
•
Agent_Team_Supervisor
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have the following access
controls:
•
The Agent Team object provides
Reference and Read access.
•
The Peripheral object is the
controlling object.
The Agent Team object is a member of
the Global and Peripheral classes. The
Global class provides Maintenance,
Reference, and Read access to all tables.
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Database
Object Type
Specific Tables
Effect of Partitioning
Announcement
Announcement
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
this table has the following access
controls:
•
The Announcement object provides
Reference and Read access.
•
The Network Interface object is the
controlling object.
The Announcement object is a member of
the Global and Network Interface classes.
The Global class provides Maintenance,
Reference, and Read access to all tables.
Application
Gateway
•
Application_Gateway
•
Application_Gateway_Connection
•
Application_Gateway_Half_Hour
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have the following access
controls:
•
The Application Gateway object
provides Reference and Read access.
•
The System object is the controlling
object.
The Application Gateway object is a
member of the Global and System
classes. The Global class provides
Maintenance, Reference, and Read access
to all tables.
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Database
Object Type
Specific Tables
Effect of Partitioning
Business Entity
Business_Entity
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
this table has the following access
controls:
•
The Business Entity object provides
Maintenance and Read access. It
controls the following objects:
– Enterprise Route
– Enterprise Service
– Enterprise Skill Group
– Schedule
– Schedule Report
– Schedule Source
– Script
•
The System object is the controlling
object.
The Business Entity object is a member
of the Global and System classes. The
Global class provides Maintenance,
Reference, and Read access to all tables.
Call Detail
•
Route_Call_Detail
•
Route_Call_Variable
•
Terminiation_Call_Detail
•
Termination_Call_Variable
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have the following access
controls:
•
The Call object is a special object
that provides a direct mapping
between this table and all call
objects.
The Call object - which provides security
to read all call-related tables - is a
member of the Global and Call classes.
The Global class provides Maintenance,
Reference, and Read access to all tables.
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Database
Object Type
Call Type
Specific Tables
•
Call_Type
•
Call_Type_Half_Hour
•
Call_Type_Map
•
Call_Type_Real_Time
Effect of Partitioning
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have the following access
controls:
•
The Call Type object provides
Reference and Read access.
•
The Network/Peripheral object is the
controlling object.
The Call Type object is a member of the
Global, Network Interface, and
Peripheral classes. The Global class
provides Maintenance, Reference, and
Read access to all tables.
Campaign
•
Campaign
•
Campaign_Query_Rule
•
Campaign_Query_Rule_Half_Hour
•
Campaign_Query_Rule_Real_Time
•
Campaign_Skill_Group
•
Campaign_Target_Sequence
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have the following access
controls:
•
The Campaign object provides
Maintenance, Reference, and Read
access.
•
The System object is controlling
object.
The Campaign object is a member of the
Global and System classes. The Global
class provides Maintenance, Reference,
and Read access to all tables.
Configuration
Manager
Database Lookup
•
Cnfg_Manager_Globals
•
Cnfg_Manager_Snapshot_Stat
•
Cnfg_Manager_User
•
Cnfg_Manager_User_Desktop
•
Cnfg_Manager_User_Settings
•
Cnfg_Manager_View
•
ICR_Locks
•
Script
•
Script_Table_Column
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have no access restrictions.
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have the following access
controls:
•
The Database Lookup object
provides Reference and Read access.
•
The System object is the controlling
object.
The Database Lookup object is a member
of the Global and System classes. The
Global class provides Maintenance,
Reference, and Read access to all tables.
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Database
Object Type
Specific Tables
Effect of Partitioning
Device Target
Device_Target
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
this table has the following access
controls:
•
The Device Target object provides
Reference and Read access.
•
The Network Interface object is the
controlling object.
The Device Target object is a member of
the Global and Network Interface classes.
The Global class provides Maintenance,
Reference, and Read access to all tables.
Dialed Number
•
Dialed_Number
•
Dialed_Number_Label
•
Dialed_Number_Map
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have the following access
controls:
•
The Dialed Number object provides
Reference and Read access.
•
The Network/Peripheral object is the
controlling object.
The Dialed Number object is a member of
the Global, Network Interface, and
Peripheral classes. The Global class
provides Maintenance, Reference, and
Read access to all tables.
Dialer
•
Dialer
•
Dialer_Half_Hour
•
Dialer_Port_Map
•
Dialer_Port_Map_Real_Time
•
Dialer_Real_Time
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have the following access
controls:
•
The Dialer object provides
Maintenance, Reference, and Read
access.
•
The Peripheral Global object is the
controlling object.
The Dialer object is a member of the
Global and Peripheral classes. The
Global class provides Maintenance,
Reference, and Read access to all tables.
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Database
Object Type
Enterprise Route
Specific Tables
•
Enterprise_Route
•
Enterprise_Route_Member
Effect of Partitioning
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have the following access
controls:
•
Enterprise Route object provides
Reference and Read access.
•
The Business Entity object is the
controlling object.
The Enterprise Skill Group object is a
member of the Global and System
classes. The Global class provides
Maintenance, Reference, and Read access
to all tables.
Enterprise
Service
•
Enterprise_Service
•
Enterprise_Service_Member
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have the following access
controls:
•
Enterprise Service object provides
Reference and Read access.
•
The Business Entity object is the
controlling object.
The Enterprise Service object is a
member of the Global and System
classes. The Global class provides
Maintenance, Reference, and Read access
to all tables.
Enterprise Skill
Group
•
Enterprise_Skill_Group
•
Enterprise_Skill_Group_Member
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have the following access
controls:
•
Enterprise Skill Group object
provides Reference and Read access.
•
The Business Entity object is the
controlling object.
The Enterprise Skill Group object is a
member of the Global and System
classes. The Global class provides
Maintenance, Reference, and Read access
to all tables.
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Database
Object Type
Expanded Call
Variables
Specific Tables
Effect of Partitioning
Expanded_Call_Variable
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
this table has the following access
controls:
•
The Expanded Call Variable object
provides Maintenance, Reference,
and Read access.
•
The System object is the controlling
object.
The Expanded Call Variable object is a
member of the Global and System
classes. The Global class provides
Maintenance, Reference, and Read access
to all tables.
Import Rule
•
Import_Rule
•
Import_Rule_Clause
•
Import_Rule_History
•
Import_Rule_Real_Time
If the ICM partitioning feature is
enabled, these tables have the following
access controls:
•
The Import Rule object provides
Reference and Read access.
•
The System object is the controlling
object.
The Import Rule object is a member of
the Global and System classes. The
Global class provides Maintenance,
Reference, and Read access to all tables.
Label
Label
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
this table has the following access
controls:
•
Label object provides Reference and
Read access.
•
The Network/Peripheral object is the
controlling object.
The Label object is a member of the
Global, Network Interface, and
Peripheral classes. The Global class
provides Maintenance, Reference, and
Read access to all tables.
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Database
Object Type
Network /
Peripheral
Specific Tables
•
Logical_Interface_Controller
•
Physical_Controller_Half_Hour
•
Physical_Interface_Controller_Five_
Minute
•
Routing_Client
•
Routing_Client_Five_Minute
Effect of Partitioning
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have the following access
controls:
•
The Network/Peripheral object is a
special object that provides a direct
mapping between this table and other
objects it controls:
– Call Type
– Dialed Number
– Label
– Network VRU
– Peripheral Gateway
The Network/Peripheral object - which
provides security to read the tables that
are used for both the Peripheral and
Network Interface - is a member of the
Global, Network Interface, and
Peripheral classes. The Global class
provides Maintenance, Reference, and
Read access to all tables.
Network
Interface
•
Network_Event_Detail
•
Network_Target
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have the following access
controls:
•
The Network Interface object is a
special object that provides a direct
mapping between this table and the
other objects it controls:
– Announcement
– Device Target
– Network VRU Script
– Scheduled Target
The Network Interface object - which
provides security to read the network
interface tables - is a member of the
Global and Network Interface classes.
The Global class provides Maintenance,
Reference, and Read access to all tables.
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Database
Object Type
Network Trunk
Group
Specific Tables
•
Network_Trunk_Group
•
Network_Trunk_Group_Half_Hour
•
Network_Trunk_Group_Real_time
•
Peripheral_Target
Effect of Partitioning
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have the following access
controls:
•
The Network Trunk Group object
provides Reference and Read access.
•
The Peripheral Global object is the
controlling object.
The Network Trunk Group object is a
member of the Global, Network Interface,
and Peripheral classes. The Global class
provides Maintenance, Reference, and
Read access to all tables.
Network VRU
•
Network_VRU
•
Network_VRU_Bank
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have the following access
controls:
•
The Network VRU object provides
Maintenance, Reference and Read
access.
•
The Network/Peripheral object is the
controlling object.
The Network VRU object is a member of
the Global and Network Interface classes.
The Global class provides Maintenance,
Reference, and Read access to all tables.
Network VRU
Script
Network_VRU_Script
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
this table has the following access
controls:
•
The Network VRU Script object
provides Maintenance, Reference
and Read access.
•
The Network Interface object is the
controlling object.
The Network VRU object is a member of
the Global and Network Interface classes.
The Global class provides Maintenance,
Reference, and Read access to all tables.
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Database
Object Type
Peripheral
Peripheral
Gateway
Specific Tables
Effect of Partitioning
•
Galaxy_Transaction_Code
•
Galaxy_PBX
•
Galaxy_DNIS
•
Galaxy_Alarm
•
Galaxy_Agent_Performance
•
Galaxy_Agent_IGroup
•
Galaxy_Agent_Call_Count
•
Peripheral
•
Peripheral_Default_Route
•
Peripheral_Half_Hour
•
Peripheral_Monitor
•
Peripheral_Real_Time
•
Service_Level_Threshold
The Peripheral object - which provides
security on a peripheral and the servcies,
skill group, etc. on it - is a member of the
Global and Peripheral classes. The
Global class provides Maintenance,
Reference, and Read access to all tables.
•
Default_Call_Type
•
Dialed_Number_Plan
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have the following access
controls:
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
this table has the following access
controls:
•
The Peripheral object provides
Maintenance, Reference, and Read
access. It controls the following
objects:
– Agent
– Agent Team
– Service
– Skill Group
– Trunk Group
•
The Peripheral Global object is the
controlling object.
•
The Peripheral Gateway object
provides Maintenance access.
•
The Network/Peripheral object is the
controlling object.
The Peripheral Gateway object is a
member of the Global class. The Global
class provides Maintenance, Reference,
and Read access to all tables.
Person
Person
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
this table has the following access
controls:
•
The Person object provides
Reference and Read access.
•
The Peripheral Global object is the
controlling object.
The Person object is a member of the
Global and Peripheral classes. The
Global class provides Maintenance,
Reference, and Read access to all tables.
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Database
Object Type
Query Rule
Specific Tables
•
Query_Rule
•
Query_Rule_Clause
Effect of Partitioning
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have the following access
controls:
•
The Query Rule object provides
Reference and Read access.
•
The System object is the controlling
object.
The Query Rule object is a member of the
Global and System classes. The Global
class provides Maintenance, Reference,
and Read access to all tables.
Response
Template
NONE
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
this table has the following access
controls:
•
The Response Template object
provides Reference and Read access.
•
The Peripheral object is the
controlling object.
The Response Template object is a
member of the Global and Peripheral
classes. The Global class provides
Maintenance, Reference, and Read access
to all tables.
Route
•
Route
•
Route_Five_Minute
•
Route_Half_Hour
•
Route_Real_Time
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have the following access
controls:
•
The Route object provides Reference
and Read access.
•
The Peripheral Global object is the
controlling object.
The Route object is a member of Global
and Peripheral classes. The Global class
provides Maintenance, Reference, and
Read access to all tables.
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Database
Object Type
Schedule
Specific Tables
•
Import_Log
•
Import_Schedule
•
Recurring_Schedule_Map
•
Schedule
•
Schedule_Import
•
Schedule_Import_Real_Time
•
Schedule_Map
Schedule Source Schedule_Source
Effect of Partitioning
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have the following access
controls:
•
The Schedule object provides
Reference and Read access.
•
The Business Entity object is the
controlling object.
The Schedule object is a member of the
Global and System classes. The Global
class provides Maintenance, Reference,
and Read access to all tables.
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
this table has the following access
controls:
•
The Schedule Source object provides
Reference and Read access.
•
The Business Entity object is the
controlling object.
The Schedule Source object is a member
of the Global and System classes. The
Global class provides Maintenance,
Reference, and Read access to all tables.
Schedule Target
•
Schedule_Target
•
Schedule_Target_Real_Time
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have the following access
controls:
•
The Scheduled Target object
provides Maintenance, Reference,
and Read access.
•
The Network Interface object is the
controlling object.
The Scheduled Target object is a member
of the Global and Network Interface
classes. The Global class provides
Maintenance, Reference, and Read access
to all tables.
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Database
Object Type
Scheduled
Report
Specific Tables
•
Schedule_Report
•
Schedule_Report_Input
Effect of Partitioning
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have the following access
controls:
•
The Schedule Report object provides
Maintenance, Reference, and Read
access.
•
The Business Entity object is the
controlling object.
The Schedule Report object is a member
of the Global classes. The Global class
provides Maintenance, Reference, and
Read access to all tables.
Script
Service
•
Admin_Script_Schedule_Map
•
Script
•
Script_Cross_Reference
•
Script_Data
•
Script_Five_Minute
•
Script_Print_Control
•
Script_Queue_Real_Time
•
Script_Real_Time
•
Master_Script
•
Media_Class
•
Media_Routing_Domain
•
Galaxy_Gate
•
Galaxy_Gate_Delayed_Call
•
Galaxy_Overflow
•
Service
•
Service_Five_Minute
•
Service_Half_Hour
•
Service_Member
•
Service_Real_Time
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have the following access
controls:
•
The Script object provides Reference
and Read access.
•
The Business Entity object is the
controlling object.
The Script object is a member of the
Global and System classes. The Global
class provides Maintenance, Reference,
and Read access to all tables.
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have the following access
controls:
•
The Service object provides
Reference and Read access.
•
The Peripheral object is the
controlling object.
The Service object is a member of the
Global and Peripheral classes. The
Global class provides Maintenance,
Reference, and Read access to all tables.
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Database
Object Type
Service Array
Specific Tables
•
Service_Array
•
Service_Array_Member
Effect of Partitioning
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have the following access
controls:
•
The Service Array object provides
Reference and Read access.
•
The Global Peripheral object is the
controlling object.
The Service Array object is a member of
the Global and Peripheral classes. The
Global class provides Maintenance,
Reference, and Read access to all tables.
Skill Group
•
Agent_Skill_Group_Half_Hour
•
Agent_Skill_Group_Logout
•
Agent_Skill_Group_Real_Time
•
Skill_Group
•
Skill_Group_Five_Minute
•
Skill_Group_Half_Hour
•
Skill_Group_Member
•
Skill_Group_Real_Time
•
Skill_Group_Target
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have the following access
controls:
The Skill Group object provides
Reference and Read access.
•
The Peripheral object is the
controlling object.
The Skill Group object is a member of the
Global and Peripheral classes. The
Global class provides Maintenance,
Reference, and Read access to all tables.
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Partitioning and Database Access
Database
Object Type
System
Specific Tables
•
Agent_Distribution
•
Application_Gateway_Global
•
Application_Path
•
Application_Path_Member
•
Application_Path_Real_Time
•
Blended_Agent_Options
•
Class_Access_Xref
•
Class_List
•
Class_Security
•
ClassID_To_ObjectType
•
Customer_Definition
•
Customer_Options
•
Feature_Control_Set
•
ICR_Globals
•
ICR_Instance
•
ICR_Node
•
Machine_Info
•
Object_Access_Xref
•
Object_List
•
Object_Security
•
Reason_Code
•
Region
•
Region_Member
•
Region_Prefix
•
Region_View
•
Region_View_Member
•
User_Group
•
User_Group_Member
•
User_Supervisor_Map
•
VRU_Currency
Effect of Partitioning
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
this table has the following access
controls:
•
The System object is a special object
that provides a direct mapping
between this table and the other
objects it controls:
– Agent Desk Settings
– Application Gateway
– Business Entity
– Campaign
– Database Lookup
– Expanded Call Variable
– Import Rule
– Query Rule
– User Formula
– User Variable
The System object – which provides
security to read the ICM security and
configuration tables – is a member of the
Global and System classes. The Global
class provides Maintenance, Reference,
and Read access to all tables.
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Database
Object Type
Translation
Route
Specific Tables
Effect of Partitioning
Translation_Route
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
this table has the following access
controls:
•
The Translation Route object
provides Reference and Read access.
•
The Peripheral Global object is the
controlling object.
The Translation Route object is a member
of the Global and Peripheral classes. The
Global class provides Maintenance,
Reference, and Read access to all tables.
Trunk Group
•
Galaxy_Single_Trunk_Table
•
Galaxy_Trunk_Call_Count
•
Galaxy_Trunk_IGroup
•
Trunk
•
Trunk_Group
•
Trunk_Group_Five_Minute
•
Trunk_Group_Half_Hour
•
Trunk_Group_Real_Time
•
VRU_Port_Map
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
these tables have the following access
controls:
The Trunk Group object provides
Reference and Read access.
•
The Peripheral object is the
controlling object.
The Trunk Group object is a member of
the Global and Peripheral classes. The
Global class provides Maintenance,
Reference, and Read access to all tables.
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Problems with Partitioning
Database
Object Type
Specific Tables
Effect of Partitioning
User Formula
User_Formula_Equation
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
this table has the following access
controls:
•
The User Formula object provides
Maintenance, Reference, and Read
access.
•
The System object is the controlling
object.
The User Formula object is a member of
the Global and System classes. The
Global class provides Maintenance,
Reference, and Read access to all tables.
User Variable
•
Persistent_Variable
•
User_Variable
If the ICM partitioning feature is enabled,
this table has the following access
controls:
•
The User Variable object provides
Reference and Read access.
•
The System object is the controlling
object.
The User Variable object is a member of
the Global and System classes. The
Global class provides Maintenance,
Reference, and Read access to all tables.
Problems with Partitioning
Problems with partitioning occur because of the implicit generation of the large User_Security_Control
table. Because this table is so large, transaction sizes can become extremely large and cause the logger
to detect a timeout and restart.
In order to ensure the consistency of the ICM configuration, every aspect of a configuration change must
happen or the entire change must be rejected. The ICM application forces that behavior by wrapping
the entire configuration change into a single database transaction.
The ICM logger has been designed so that if any transaction takes longer than a predefined period of
time, it considers the transaction a failure, and resets the system (causing the logger process to restart
and, depending on configuration settings, potentially rebooting the server). This design was put in place
to ensure that if a transaction deadlocked the ICM logger would reboot, and then continue to service
requests. When a configuration update gets too large (including the updates to the
User_Security_Control table) this limit can be reached, causing the logger process to restart. When this
problem is caused by both loggers trying to perform a configuration update it leads to a double logger
failure.
Because there is no way to directly correlate transaction size to time, and database behaviors such as
triggers can change both the size and time it takes for a transaction to complete, it is not possible to
determine when a transaction will fail due to its size before it is executed. It is therefore necessary to
understand what the stored procedures are doing in order to keep transaction size to a minimum.
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Best Practices
To further complicate the problem, the same transaction can have greatly varying execution times
depending on conditions in the database (both existing data and concurrent activity) at the time of
execution. As the User_Security_Control table gets larger, transaction times tend to go up significantly.
As the number of rows in the User_Security_Control table approaches 800,000, the chance of any
configuration change causing a transaction timeout to occur increases significantly. For Cisco support,
it is required to keep this table below 800,000 rows.
Best Practices
Because there is no way to be assured that any given transaction will succeed, it is important to follow
the best practices and guidelines provided in this document that will allow transactions the highest
chance of success. Following these guidelines does not guarantee that a transaction on a system that is
approaching or is over the recommended 800,000 row count in the User_Security_Control table will
succeed, but not following them will often cause configuration transactions on a partitioned system to
fail.
These required practices must be followed to maintain Cisco support.
Only enable partitioning if it is really needed
In order to avoid the problems listed in this document, do not use partitioning unless it is absolutely
necessary for your business. If you have systems with partitioning enabled and want to disable it, contact
Cisco Advanced Services or your partner for assistance.
ICM software provides two alternatives to using partitioning.
•
Feature Control is an alternative to partitioning that provides some level of security on a user by user
basis. Feature Control allows users to be associated with Feature Control Sets. Feature Control Sets
restrict which configuration tools a user is allowed to use or see, as well as what script nodes they
are allowed to use in the Script Editor.
For example, Feature Control could be used to specify that a User can edit Services but not Skill Groups.
This would be accomplished by using the Feature Control Set List tool to define a Feature Set that
allowed running the Service Explorer but not the Skill Group Explorer. A User would then be assigned
to that Feature Set. The User would not be able to run the Skill Group Explorer.
•
Another alternative to partitioning is a WebView feature that allows administrators to restrict which
call types users can see by associating users and call types with a specific customer object. Both the
Call Type list tool and the User list tool have a field for Customer in them. If this is set to a given
user, that user is only able to see Call Types in WebView that have the field also set to associated
them with the same Customer.
Hardware can help the problem
Because the nature of the problem is timing based, faster hardware can alleviate the problem. While
better hardware is not the complete answer ensuring that the Logger system does not have any hardware
bottlenecks. Examples of hardware problems that may cause transactions to fail more frequently are:
•
Insufficient memory; having too little memory available to the SQL Server database can cause
transactions to take longer than normal.
•
Poorly performing disks; slow disks will also increase transaction time
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Best Practices
Do changes in small batches
Make changes to configuration in small increments. Follow these rules to help ensure that the change is
completed successfully in the allotted transaction time:
Note
•
Follow the partial update rules. Involving as few objects as possible in a configuration change helps
ensure that the change is performed successfully in the allotted transaction time.
•
Grant access to objects to a group one at a time, not all at once.
•
Add users to groups one at a time.
Do not add or remove several users from a group at once; restrict changes to a single change at a time.
Ensure the logger system is idle during changes
Avoid making changes while other activity is happening on the system because this can increase the time
required to execute a transaction.
Specific examples are:
•
Avoid making updates at ½ hour boundaries. The ICM transfers 30 minute summary data every half
hour. Avoid making changes at this time as the database is busy loading that data into the historical
tables.
•
Avoid updates when other background tasks are executing, such as:
– Database purge
– Backups
– System updates
•
Avoid updates during peak call volume hours. When the ICM is actively handling calls data is being
written to the database. During high call volume periods the writing of Call Detail Records can
significantly increase the time required for transactions to execute.
Minimize the number of objects in the system
Minimizing the number of objects on a partitioned system can significantly increase the performance
during configuration changes. Ensuring that the number of objects in the system stays low helps keep
the User_Security_Control table size below 1 million rows.
Permanently delete old or unused objects. If a system has 1000 extra objects and 50 users, the
User_Security_Control table would have 50,000 extra rows. Specifically look at unused Agents, Labels
and old versions of Scripts for objects that can be permanently deleted.
ICM enables you to configure the number of old versions of a script to save. The default is to keep all
old versions. Set the script retention to a specific number (based on business requirements) to help keep
the total number of objects in the system under control.
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Partitioning Tips
Minimize the number of users in the system
Removing old or unused users in the system significantly decreases the size of the
User_Security_Control table. This is especially true of administrative users.
Supervisors increase the row count in the User_Security_Control table as well, but not to as great an
extent because they do not have access to as many objects as most administrators. Supervisors are
granted access to a limited set of objects on the peripheral that the particular supervisor is configured
on. These objects are:
•
Agent
•
Agent Team
•
Service
•
Skill Group
•
Trunk Group
Sharing login information and user definitions between administrators or WebView users helps reduce
the number of users configured in the ICM. For example, reducing the number of users from 15 to 10
could reduce the size of the User_Security_Control table by 33%.
Partitioning Tips
The partitioning feature of ICM Enterprise is an optional feature designed to be used to flexibly limit the
access of ICM users to configuration objects. The feature is implemented using functionality available
in the SQL Server database to limit access directly at the database level.
Note
In order to implement this functionality the User_Security_Control table contains a
comprehensive list of the access rights for all users in the system. Due to the way this table is
constructed its size grows quickly. The size of the User_Security_Control table is bounded by
the formula: Number of ICM Users * Number of ICM Objects
The size of the User_Security_Control table limits the performance of the database. In severe cases, a
transaction (usually initiated because of a configuration change) takes longer than the ICM Logger can
accomodate. When this happens, the ICM Logger restarts itself and may reboot the system. This can
lead to service outages.
Ensuring that a partitioned ICM system does not run into these problems requires a two-pronged
approach:
•
Ensuring that the size of the User_Security_Control table stays as small as possible. Problems begin
to appear as the size of this table approaches 800,000 rows.
•
Following a set of required practices (as outlined in section 4) to ensure that database transactions
happen as efficiently as possible on the system.
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INDEX
Agent_Skill_Group_Logout
Symbols
8-44
Agent_Skill_Group_Logout Table security
.ems files
6-7
Agent_Skill_Group_Real_Time
8-19
8-44
Agent_Skill_Group_Real_Time Table security
Agent_State_Trace
Numerics
Agent_Team
30-minute data
5-minute data
8-31
8-31
Agent_Team_Member
3-3
8-31
Agent_Team_Service Table security
3-3
Agent_Team_Supervisor
Agent Desk Settings
A
8-31
Agent object security
8-4
Access privileges, classes and objects
Add Device
Agents Logged On
8-4
Agent Team
4-6
Admin_Script_Schedule_Map
Admin_Script_Schedule_Map Table security
8-18
8-11
8-31
8-32
Application_Gateway_Global
2-13
Agent_Desk_Settings
Agent_Distribution
Application_Gateway_Half_Hour
8-31
Agent_Distribution Table security
8-20
8-31
8-32
Application_Gateway Table security
8-11
Application_Instance Table security
8-20
Application_Path
8-31
8-45
Application_Path_Member Table security
8-44
Agent_Skill_Group_Half_Hour Table security
8-19
8-11
8-45
Application_Path_Member
8-31
Agent_Skill_Group_Half_Hour
8-20
Application_Gateway_Half_Hour Table security
8-45
8-11
8-45
Application_Gateway_Globals Table security
8-31
Agent_Real_Time
8-32
Application_ Gateway_ Connection Table security
real-time data
Agent_Log_Out
7-3
Application_Gateway
6-1
Agent_Half_Hour
7-3
Application_Event
1-1
Admin Workstations
Agent
8-11
Announcement object security
1-1
Administrative tasks
events
8-31
Announcement
5-2
overview
5-5
message formats
5-1
optional
8-11
Alarm
feed
Administration
built-in
8-11
Agent Team object security
8-43
8-16
8-31
Agent Desk Settings security
Access Privilege Levels
8-19
Application_Path_Real_Time
8-20
8-45
ICM Administration Guide for Cisco ICM/IPCC Enterprise & Hosted Editions Release 7.0(0)
IN-1
Index
Application_Path_Real_Time Table security
Application_Path Table security
Application Gateway
Call_Type Table security
Call Detai
8-20
8-11
Application log
3-3
Call object security
8-12
CallRouter
recovery
6-6
Application Table security
restart
8-20
Architecture
Calls/sec
fault-tolerant
B
Back-up strategies
8-20
Bulk configuration security
8-34
8-12
Call Type Table security
8-15
8-34
Campaign_Query_Rule_Half_Hour
Campaign_Skill_Group
8-33
8-27
8-26
Campaign object security
8-13
Campaign Table security
8-13
Central Controller
8-3
objects in a business entity
viewing current entities
and event forwarding
8-3
device connections
8-26
fault tolerance
Central database
C
data
6-2
2-7
2-4
3-3
3-3
disk space
8-9
4-1
monitoring the size of
8-34
sizing and usage
8-34
Call_Type_Half_Hour Table security
Call_Type_Map
8-34
Campaign_Target_Sequence Table security
changing names and descriptions
Call_Type_Half_Hour
8-12
Call_Type_Map Table security
storage capabilities
Cisco Support Tools
8-12
CiscoWorks 2000
8-34
Call_Type_Real_Time Table security
8-12
Class_Access_Xref
4-15
4-1
4-2
Checking integrity of data
8-34
Call_Type_Real_Time
5-2
7-5
7-4
8-45
Class_Access_Xref Table security
ICM Administration Guide for Cisco ICM/IPCC Enterprise & Hosted Editions Release 7.0(0)
IN-2
8-13
8-34
Campaign_Target_Sequence
8-12
8-13
8-34
Campaign_Query_Rule Table security
Business entity security
Call_Type
8-34
Campaign_Query_Rule_Real_Time Table security
8-12
8-3
Business Entity object security
Call
8-34
Campaign_Query_Rule_Real_Time
8-29
Business_Entity Table security
assigning access
5-5
Campaign_Query_Rule_Half_Hour Table security
4-5
Business Entity
5-5
Campaign_Query_Rule
8-45
Blended_Agent_Options Table security
Business Entities
2-8
Call Type object security
Campaign
5-14
Blended_Agent_Options
Blended Agent
2-8
Calls In Progress
2-1
Call Type
defining
8-12
8-33
Call detail data
8-32
Application Gateway object security
Windows
8-20
8-20
8-13
8-13
Index
Class_List
8-45
D
Class_List Table security
Class_Security
8-20
Data
8-45
Class_Security Table security
Classes and Objects
integrity checks
8-20
retention time
8-2
ClassID_To_ObjectType
ClassID_To_ObjectType Table security
Class security
central
8-8
5-14, 5-15
3-3
comparing
8-34
Cnfg_Manager_Snapshot_Stat
Cnfg_Manager_User
4-15
backing up
8-27
5-16
configuration checks
8-34
creating
8-34
8-34
duplexed
Cnfg_Manager_User_Settings
8-34
full indicator
Command logs
HDS
8-34
active and idle paths
path duplication
local
2-3
5-2
4-15
3-5
network support
5-2
overview
3-3, 3-5
Configuration Manager
Create Database
3-5
tools
4-5
creating a new data device
3-6
4-5
DBCC CHECKDB
7-2
Customer_Definition
dbdiff.exe
8-45
Customer_Definition Table security
Customer_Options
5-2
5-15
DDSN
8-20
Distributed Diagnostics and Services Network
8-45
Customer_Options Table security
Transfer Process (DTP)
8-20
Default_Call_Type
Customers
Device_Target
7-2
Customer Support Center
8-40
Customer Support Forwarding Service
7-2
Device Target
8-16
8-35
Device_Target Table security
7-2
7-1
7-2
Default_Call_Type Table security
3-2
Customer support
3-2
3-1
database size
4-6
2-10
service bureau
temporary
8-34
5-4
3-1
recovery of
4-16
Configuration Management Service (CMS)
databases
4-16
3-5
names
down-loading data
CSFS
4-14
monitoring size
2-3
Configuration
data
4-14
integrity check
Communication
checks
3-4
initializing local
6-3
5-2
3-5
Cnfg_Manager_User_Desktop
Cnfg_Manager_View
8-13
2-1
adding space
8-8, 8-9
Cnfg_Manager_Globals
8-34
Database Lookup object security
Databases
assigning access
overview
8-20
8-9
access levels
4-2
Database Lookup
8-45
5-2, 5-3
8-13
8-35
ICM Administration Guide for Cisco ICM/IPCC Enterprise & Hosted Editions Release 7.0(0)
IN-3
Index
Device Target object security
Dial_Number_Plan Table security
Dialed_Number
EMS events
8-13
Enterprise_Agent_Group Table security
Dialed_Number_Label
Enterprise_Route
8-35
Dialed_Number_Label Table security
8-13
Dialed_Number_Plan
8-13, 8-15
Enterprise_Route Table security
Enterprise_Service_Member
Dialer_Half_Hour Table security
Dialer_Port_Map_Real_Time
8-35
Dialer_Port_Map Table security
Dialer security
8-13
Enterprise Agent Group object security
8-13
Enterprise Route
8-36
Domain Adherence integrity checks
5-4
7-2
events
reporting
7-2
Event logging
4-4
databases
Events
3-4
data storage
2-1, 2-4
Duplicated communication paths
examining
2-3, 2-7
3-3, 6-3
6-4
forwarding process
logging
on Logger
6-1
log files
viewing
6-4
ICM Administration Guide for Cisco ICM/IPCC Enterprise & Hosted Editions Release 7.0(0)
IN-4
6-3, 6-5
5-4
severity levels
6-6
6-2
6-2
logs (Windows)
E
4-4
6-5
Event Management System (EMS)
2-1
8-14
6-2
estimating size of a database
6-12
Duplexed
EMS
8-36
Error
Estimate Database
6-4, 6-11
components
8-14
Enterprise Skill Group object security
Distributed Diagnostics and Services Network
(DDSN) 7-1
full syntax
8-14
8-36
Enterprise Skill Group
2-10
Dumplog utility
5-4
Enterprise Service object security
8-13
5-16
Disk failures
8-14
Enterprise Service
8-13
diffconfig.bat
8-36
Enterprise_Skill_Group Table security
Enterprise Route object security
8-35
Dialer Table security
8-14
8-36
Enterprise integrity check
8-13
Dialer_Port_Real_Time Table security
8-14
Enterprise_Skill_Group_Member Table security
8-13
8-35
Dialer_Real_Time
8-14
8-36
Enterprise_Skill_Group_Member
8-35
Dialer_Port_Map
8-14
8-36
Enterprise_Skill_Group
Dialer_Half_Hour
8-36
Enterprise_Service Table Security
8-13
8-35
systems
Enterprise_Route_Member
Enterprise_Service_Member Table security
8-35
Dialed Number object security
DTP
8-36
Enterprise_Service
8-40
Dialed_Number Table security
Dialed Number
8-13
8-13
8-13
Enterprise_Route_Member Table security
8-35
Dialed_Number_Map Table security
Dialer
Enterprise_Agent_Group_Member Table security
8-16
8-35
Dialed_Number_Map
6-1
6-2
6-1, 6-2
8-14
Index
viewing on other systems
Galaxy_DNIS Table security
6-6
Event Viewer
Galaxy_Gate
Windows
8-43
Galaxy_Gate_Delayed_Call Table security
4-7
Expanded_Call_Variable
Galaxy_Gate Table security
8-37
Expanded_Call _Variable Table Security
Expanded Call Variable object security
Expanded Call Variables
Export directory
8-43
Galaxy_Gate_Delayed_Call
6-5
Expand Database
8-16
8-14
Galaxy_Overflow
8-19
8-43
Galaxy_Overflow Table security
8-14
Galaxy_PBX
8-37
8-19
8-40
Galaxy_PBX Table security
7-2
8-16
Galaxy_Single_Trunk Table security
Galaxy_Transaction_Code
F
8-22
8-40
Galaxy_Transaction_Code Table security
Failure detection
2-2
Galaxy_Trunk_Call_Count
Failure scenarios
2-4
Galaxy_Trunk_Call_Count Table security
Fault tolerance
Galaxy_Trunk_IGroup
2-1
approaches to
Central Controller
goals of
NICs
Getting Started
2-4
Global
2-1
8-22
8-46
8-22
8-7
8-9
2-11
Feature_Control_Set
8-45
Feature_Control_Set Table security
H
8-21
Files
HDS
transferring
3-6
HDS database
7-2
2-13, 4-14
disk space
4-1
sizing and usage
G
Galaxy
8-16
8-46
Galaxy_Trunk_Igroup Table security
2-2
8-19
Historical data
Galaxy_Agent_Call_Count Peripheral
Peripheral_Default_Route Peripheral_Half_Hour
Peripheral_Monitor Peripheral_Real_Time
Service_Level_Threshold 8-40
Galaxy_Agent_Call_Count Table security
Galaxy_Agent_IGroup
Galaxy_Agent_Performance
Galaxy_DNIS
4-2
Historical Data Server
architecture
database
Hot standby
8-16
2-13, 3-6
3-6
2-13, 4-14
2-10
2-2
How Partitioning Works
8-40
8-40
8-40
2-13
Historical recovery
Galaxy_Agent_Performance Table security
Galaxy_Alarm Table security
retention
8-16
8-40
Galaxy_Agent_Igroup Table security
Galaxy_Alarm
3-3
location of
8-46
4-1
8-5
8-16
I
8-16
ICM
ICM Administration Guide for Cisco ICM/IPCC Enterprise & Hosted Editions Release 7.0(0)
IN-5
Index
log files
6-6
ICMDBA
accessing functions
main window
starting
8-14
Label Table security
8-14, 8-15
Local database
4-4
3-5
Locks
4-3
Master
4-3
ICM Partitioning Security
ICMP NIC
Label object security
3-7
Log files
8-5
command logs
2-11
ICM security tools
displaying
8-23
6-3
6-11
ICR_Globals
8-45
examples
ICR_Instance
8-45
naming conventions
ICR_Instance Table security
ICR_Locks
ICR_Node
ICR_View
Import_Log
trace
Logger
8-45
8-37
Import_Rule_Real_Time
8-14
8-37
M
Machine_Info
Import_Rule_Real_Time Table security
8-42
8-14
8-45
Management Information Base (MIB)
Mapping Objects
Import_Schedule Table security
8-17
8-37
Master_Script
Informational events
8-14
6-3
Initialize Local Database
8-43
3-2, 4-16
Integrity
5-9
MDS Synchronizer
Media_Class
8-23
8-43
Media_Class Table security
5-2, 5-3
8-43
Message Delivery Service meters
Modems
7-1
8-37
ICM Administration Guide for Cisco ICM/IPCC Enterprise & Hosted Editions Release 7.0(0)
IN-6
8-21
Media_Routing_Domain Table security
Mirrored disks
Label
5-17
Media_Routing_Domain
5-2
8-18
3-7
MDS meters
4-16
Installing ICM Partitioning
Master lock
7-3
8-2
Master_Script Table security
Import Rule object security
Integrity checks
8-38
8-14
Import_Rule_History Table security
L
5-4
Logical_Interface_Controller Table security
8-37
Import_Rule_History
of data
5-19
Logical_Interface_Controller
Import_Rule_Clause Table security
main window
2-9
viewing logs
8-17
8-37
Import_Rule_Clause
Import Rule
7-1
time synchronization
8-42
Import_Schedule
6-1, 6-3, 6-6, 6-7
2-3
restart
8-31
6-7
5-4
modem
8-20
Import_Log Table security
Import_Rule
per-process
8-20
8-34
ICR_Node Table security
6-11
5-15
5-9
8-21
8-15
Index
Nulls integrity check
N
NAM (Network Applications Manager)
time synchronization
Names integrity check
Network / Peripheral
Object
8-38
defining security for multiple
Network/Peripheral object security
8-15
security
8-38
8-14
8-14
Object_List
8-39
8-39
Object_Security
Network_Trunk_Group_Half_Hour Table security
Network_Trunk_Group_Real_time
8-39
Network_Trunk_Group Table security
8-15
8-39
8-39
Network_Vru Table security
8-15
8-15
Agent
Agent Desk Settings
Call
2-11
2-12
8-14
8-11
8-12
Call Type
8-12
Campaign
8-13
Dialer
8-39
8-15
8-39
8-15
Enterprise Route
Network VRU Table security
restarting
6-4
2-3
2-3
8-14
8-14
Expanded Call Variable
8-15
8-15
Import Rule
Label
8-14
8-14
8-14
Network/Peripheral
Node Manager
8-13
8-14
Enterprise Skill Group
8-39
Network Vru Script object security
2-11
8-13
Enterprise Service
Network VRU object security
Network VRU Script
8-13
Enterprise Agent Group
Network Trunk Group object security
Network VRU
8-13
8-13
Dialed Number
5-4
8-11
8-12
Device Target
Networks
Network Trunk Group
8-11
8-11
Database Lookup
database configuration
8-21
8-11
Business Entity
8-9, 8-38
Network Interface object security
Notepad
8-15
Application Gateway
Network Interface Controller (NIC)
NIC
Object_Security Table security
Announcement
Network_Vru_Script Table security
load sharing
8-45
Agent Team
Network_VRU_Bank
8-21
Object security
Network_Trunk_Group_Real_Time Table security
fault-tolerance
8-15
8-21
8-45
Object_List Table security
Network_Trunk_Group_Half_Hour
8-28
8-45
Object_Access_Xref Table security
Network_Trunk_Group
Network Interface
8-10
Object_Access_Xref
8-38
Network_Target Table security
Network_VRU
8-29
security, defining or changing access rights
Network_Event_Detail Table security
Network_Target
O
5-18
5-4
Network_Event_Detail
5-3
Network Interface
8-15
8-14
Network Trunk Group
Network VRU
8-15
8-15
ICM Administration Guide for Cisco ICM/IPCC Enterprise & Hosted Editions Release 7.0(0)
IN-7
Index
Network Vru Script
overview
Peripheral_Real_Time
8-8
Peripheral
Peripheral global
Peripheral_Target
8-16
Route
fault tolerance
8-17
modem
Scheduled Target
8-40
2-12
7-1
Peripheral global object security
8-18
Schedule Report
8-18
Peripheral object security
8-16
Schedule Source
8-18
Peripheral Table security
8-16
Script
Per-process log files
8-18
Service
viewing
8-19
Service Array
Skill Group
System
8-17
6-6
8-47
Persistent_Variable Table security
8-19
Person
8-20
Translation Route
8-21
8-22
8-16
6-11
Persistent_Variable
8-19
Trunk Group
8-15
Peripheral Gateway object security
8-17
8-16
8-39
Peripheral Gateway
8-17
Schedule
8-40
Peripheral_Target Table security
8-17
8-17
Query Rule
8-16
Peripheral_Real_Time Table security
8-16
Peripheral Gateway
Person
Peripheral_Monitor Table security
8-15
8-22
8-40
Person object security
8-17
Person Table security
8-17
User Formula
8-22
Physical_Controller_Half_Hour Table security
User Variable
8-22
Physical_Interface_Controller_Five_ Minute
8-38
Physical_Interface_Controller Table security
8-15
Outbound Option
4-5
pplication_Gateway_Connection
8-32
Private WAN
P
and synchronization
Partitioning
Process pairs
8-1
Partitioning for security
Partitioning Tips
purgeold
8-1
installing
database full
8-23
Partitions, defining
nightly
8-3
5-4
4-2
Q
8-10, 8-40
Peripheral_Default_Route
QoS PerfMon counters
8-40
Peripheral_Default_Route Table security
Peripheral_Half_Hour
Peripheral_Monitor
8-40
8-16
Query_Rule
8-16
5-6
8-41
Query_Rule_Clause
8-40
Peripheral_Half_Hour Table security
8-41
Query_Rule_Clause Table security
Query_Rule Table security
ICM Administration Guide for Cisco ICM/IPCC Enterprise & Hosted Editions Release 7.0(0)
IN-8
4-14
5-4
Performance Monitor
Peripheral
6-6
Purging data
Partitions
PerfMon
2-2
6-6
purgeold.log
8-23
2-6
8-17
8-17
8-15
Index
Query Rule
Route_Call_Detail Table security
8-41
Query Rule object security
8-12
Route_Call_Variable Table security
8-17
Route_Five_Minute
8-41
Route_Five_Minute Tabel security
R
Route_Half_Hour
RAID
RAS
Route_Real_Time
7-1
architecture
Rebooting
8-17
time synchronization
5-19
Routes and Numbers integrity check
2-3
Logger
Route Table security
2-8
Routing_Client
2-9
8-38
Routing_Client Table security
2-9
Recreate Database
Routing scripts
4-8
Recurring_Schedule_Map
8-45
Region_Prefix
Region_View
4-16
S
Schedule
8-21
8-43
8-42
Schedule_Import
8-45
8-42
Schedule_Import_Real_Time
8-21
8-42
Schedule_Import_Real_Time Table security
8-45
Region_View_Member
Schedule_Import Table security
8-45
Region_View_Member Table security
Region_View Table security
Region Table security
8-21
8-21
Schedule_Map
8-17
8-43
Schedule_Report_Input Table security
Remote Access Service (RAS)
7-1
Schedule_Report Table security
8-18
8-18
Remote diagnostics
7-1
Schedule_Source Table security
Response Template
8-41
Schedule_Target
Resynchronization
Retention time
Route
8-33, 8-41
4-2
8-17
8-43
Schedule_Report_Input
5-14
2-8
8-17
8-42
Schedule_Map Table security
Schedule_Report
8-21
4-5
backing up
5-15
Schedul
8-45
Region_Prefix Table security
8-15
8-17
Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks (RAID)
Region_Member Table security
8-15
3-3, 3-5
down-loading
8-42
Recurring_ Schedule_ Map Table security
Region_Member
8-38
Routing_Client_Five_Minute Table security
2-10
SQL Server
5-3
8-17
Routing_Client_Five_Minute
Recovery
historical
8-17
Router
8-45
CallRouter
Registry
8-41
Route object security
2-13
3-3, 3-5
Reason_Code
Region
8-17
Route_Real_Time Table security
Real-time
data
8-17
8-41
Route_Half_Hour Table security
5-15
8-12
8-18
8-42
Schedule_Target_Real_Time
8-42
Scheduled_Target_Real_Time Table security
Scheduled_Target Table security
8-18
8-18
ICM Administration Guide for Cisco ICM/IPCC Enterprise & Hosted Editions Release 7.0(0)
IN-9
Index
Scheduled Target object security
Schedule object security
Admin_Script_Schedule_Map
8-18
Agent
8-17
Agent_Logout
8-43
Script_Cross_Reference Table security
Agent_Real
8-11
8-11
Agent_Skill_Group_Logout
8-18
Script_Print_Control
8-18
Script_Queue_Real_Time
8-18
Agent_Team_Member
Announcement
8-18
Application
8-34
Script_Table_Column Table security
Script_Table Table security
8-13
8-13
8-19
8-11
8-11
8-16
Agent_Team_Supervisor
Script_Real_Time Table security
Script object security
8-19
8-11
Agent_Team_Service
8-43
8-43
Script_Table_Column
Agent_State_Trace
Agent_Team
8-43
Script_Print_Control Table security
Script_Real_Time
8-19
Agent_Skill_Group_Real_Time
8-43
Script_Five_Minute Table security
8-11
8-11
8-20
Application_Event
8-11
Application_Gateway
8-11
Application_ Gateway_ Connection
8-18
Scripts
Application_Gateway_Globals
down-loading
routing
Application_Instance
3-3, 3-5
Application_Path
assigning access
dialog box, opening
Scripts integrity check
Script Table security
Sec_Group
Blended_Agent_Options
5-3
Business_Entity
8-18
Call_Type
8-31
Security groups
assigning users to group
Call Type
8-15
Campaign
8-13
Campaign_Query_Rule
8-5
defining a group
8-24
8-23
8-20
8-12
8-12
Call_Type_Real_Time
8-24
8-20
8-12
Call_Type_Map
1-2
adding a new group
8-20
8-12
Call_Type_Half_Hour
8-31
defining
8-20
Application_Path_Real_Time
8-30
8-12
8-13
Campaign_Query_Rule_Half_Hour
ICM Administration Guide for Cisco ICM/IPCC Enterprise & Hosted Editions Release 7.0(0)
8-11
8-20
Application_Path_Member
8-30
8-11
8-20
Application_Gateway_Half_Hour
4-16
Script security
IN-10
8-20
Agent_Skill_Group_Half_Hour
Script_Five_Minute
Security
8-18
8-43
Script_Data Table security
Sec_User
8-11
Agent_Distribution
Script_Cross_Reference
8-18
8-11
Agent_Desk_Settings
8-42
8-34, 8-43
Script_Data
6-6
Security object by table
Schedule Table security
Script
Windows
8-18
8-42
Schedule Source object security
Schedule Target
8-24
Security log
8-17
Schedule Report object security
Schedule Source
deleting groups
8-18
8-13
Index
Campaign_Query_Rule_Real_Time
Campaign_Skill_Group
8-13
Campaign_Target_Sequence
Class_Access_Xref
Class_List
8-20
ClassID_To_ObjectType
8-20
Default_Call_Type
8-16
Device_Target
8-22
8-20
ICR_Node
8-20
ICR_View
8-11
8-17
Import_Rule Table security
Import_Rule_Clause
Import_Schedule
8-13, 8-15
Dialed_Number_Label
Label
8-13
Dialed_Number_Map
Dialer_Port_Real_Time
Network_Event_Detail
8-13
Enterprise_Agent_Group
Network_Target
8-13
Enterprise_Agent_Group_Member
8-13
8-14
Enterprise_Route_Member
8-14
Enterprise_Service_Member
Enterprise_Skill_Group
Enterprise_Skill_Group_Member
Expanded_Call _Variable
8-14
Galaxy_Agent_Igroup
8-15
Network_Trunk_Group_Real_Time
8-15
8-16
8-15
8-15
Object_Access_Xref
Object_List
Peripheral
8-21
8-21
8-21
8-16
Peripheral_Default_Route
8-16
Galaxy_Agent_Performance
8-15
Object_Security
8-21
Galaxy_Agent_Call_Count
8-14
8-16
Peripheral_Half_Hour
Galaxy_Alarm
8-16
Peripheral_Monitor
Galaxy_DNIS
8-16
Peripheral_Real_Time
Galaxy_Gate
Peripheral_Target
8-19
Galaxy_Gate_Delayed_Call
Galaxy_Overflow
Galaxy_PBX
Persistent_Variable
8-16
8-16
8-16
8-16
8-15
8-22
8-17
Physical_Controller_Half_Hour
8-16
Galaxy_Single_Trunk
8-19
Person
8-19
8-15
Network_Trunk_Group_Half_Hour
Network VRU
8-14
8-14
8-14
Network_Vru_Script
8-14
8-21
Network_Trunk_Group
Network_Vru
8-14
Feature_Control_Set
8-21
Media_Routing_Domain
8-13
8-15
8-18
Media_Class
8-13
Enterprise_Service
8-17
8-14, 8-15
Master_Script
Enterprise_Route
8-14
Logical_Interface_Controller
8-13
8-13
Dialer_Port_Map
8-14
Import_Rule_Real_Time
8-16
8-22
8-14
8-14
Import_Rule_History
Dial_Number_Plan
Dialer_Half_Hour
8-22
Import_Rule
8-13
Dialed_Number
Galaxy_Trunk_Call_Count
Import_Log
8-20
8-20
Customer_Options
8-16
ICR_Instance
8-20
Customer_Definition
Galaxy_Transaction_Code
Galaxy_Trunk_Igroup
8-13
8-20
Class_Security
Dialer
8-13
Physical_Interface_Controller
8-15
8-15
ICM Administration Guide for Cisco ICM/IPCC Enterprise & Hosted Editions Release 7.0(0)
IN-11
Index
Query_Rule
Service_Member
8-17
Query_Rule_Clause
Service_Real_Time
8-17
Recurring_ Schedule_ Map
Region
8-17
Skill_Group
8-19
8-19
Skill_Group_Five_Minute
8-21
Region_Member
Region_Prefix
Region_View
Skill_Group_Half_Hour
8-21
Skill_Group_Member
8-21
Skill_Target
8-21
8-19
8-19
8-19
Skill_Group_Real_Time
8-21
Region_View_Member
Route
8-19
8-19
8-19
Termination_Call_Detail
8-17
Route_Call_Detail
Termination_Call_Variable
8-12
Route_Call_Variable
Translation_Route
8-12
Route_Five_Minute
8-12
Trunk
8-17
8-12
8-21
8-22
Route_Half_Hour
8-17
Trunk_Group
Route_Real_Time
8-17
Trunk_Group_Five_Minute
Routing_Client
8-15
Routing_Client_Five_Minute
Schedule
Schedule_Import_Real_Time
Schedule_Map
8-18
Schedule_Report_Input
Schedule_Source
8-18
8-18
Scheduled_Target
Trunk_Group_Real_Time
8-22
User_Group
8-18
8-18
User_Group_Member
8-21
User_Supervisor_Map
8-21
User_Variable
8-22
Vru_Currency
8-21
Vru_Locale
8-21
8-21
Script_Five_Minute
Script_Table
Service
8-18
7-3
8-44
Service_Array_Member
8-13
Script_Table_Column
8-13
8-44
Service_Array_Member Table security
Service_Array Table security
8-19
Service_Array
8-23
8-43
Service_Array
8-18
8-22
8-10
Serial alarm feed
8-18
Script_Print_Control
Script_Real_Time
Security objects
Security tools
8-18
8-22
8-21
Vru_Port_Map
8-18
Script_Cross_Reference
Service_Five_Minute
8-19
Service_Array_Member
Service_Five_Minute
Service_Half_Hour
8-19
8-43
8-16
Service_Level_Threshold
ICM Administration Guide for Cisco ICM/IPCC Enterprise & Hosted Editions Release 7.0(0)
8-19
8-43
Service_Half_Hour Table security
8-19
8-19
8-19
Service_Five_Minute Table security
Service_Half_Hour
8-19
Service_Level_Threshold
IN-12
8-22
Vru_Defaults
8-18
Scheduled_Target_Real_Time
Service
8-17
8-17
Schedule_Report
Script_Data
8-22
User_Formula_Equation
8-17
8-22
Trunk_Group_Half_Hour
User_Formula
8-17
Schedule_Import
Script
8-15
8-22
8-40
8-19
Index
Service_Level_Threshold Table security
Service_Member
Service_Real_Time
time
8-43
8-19
Service bureau
8-19
Service Table security
8-19
Syslog
7-4
System
8-10, 8-45
6-6
System object security
System restarts
8-20
2-3
2-4
Simplexed
T
2-14
2-1
table groups
8-44
Tables
Skill_Group_Five_Minute
8-44
Skill_Group_Half_Hour
8-19
8-44
Skill_Group_Real_Time
Targets integrity check
5-3
3-2, 3-6
Temporary database
3-6
Termination_Call_Detail Table security
8-19
8-44
Termination_Call_Variable
8-44
8-19
Terminiation_Call_Detail
Time Synchronization
Skill_Group Table security
8-19
Trace events
Skill_Target Table security
8-19
Trace log files
8-44
example
8-19
5-17
6-3
5-4
6-11
Transaction log
5-15
3-3
Transferring files
SQL Monitor
5-15
Translation_Route Table security
Translation Route
automatic recovery
2-9
for multiple customers
log files
6-3
State transfer
overview of
4-2
Trunk
8-46
8-21
4-16
8-46
Trunk_Group
2-8
8-21
Troubleshooting
database
start or stop a database sever
7-2
Translation Route object security
3-2
8-12
8-33
Snapshot data
SQL Server
8-12
8-33
Termination_Call_Variable Table security
Skill_Group_Real_Time Table security
Skill Group object security
5-15
TEMPDB database
Skill_Group_Member Table security
Skill_Group_Target
8-19
8-44
Skill_Group_Half_Hour Table security
Skill_Group_Member
4-3
comparing
Skill_Group_Five_Minute Table security
Skill Group
2-6
Windows
Sides
of the system
2-2
System log
2-3
Service object security
Skill_Group
5-17
Synchronizer
component failure
2-8
Synchronized execution
8-19
8-44
Service Array object security
systems
7-5
overview of
8-19
Service_Real_Time Table security
operation
Support Tools
Synchronization
8-43
Service_Member Table security
Service Array
8-16
8-46
Trunk_Group_Five_Minute
8-46
ICM Administration Guide for Cisco ICM/IPCC Enterprise & Hosted Editions Release 7.0(0)
IN-13
Index
Trunk_Group_Five_Minute Table security
Trunk_Group_Half_Hour
Trunk_Group_Real_Time
8-22
Trunk_Group_Real_Time Table security
8-22
8-45
8-21
Vru_Defaults Table security
VRU_Port_Map
Trunk Group object security
4-3
Vru_Locale Table security
8-22
8-46
Trunk Table security
VRU_Currency
4-9
Vru_Currency Table security
8-46
Trunk_Group Table security
viewing database properties
viewing table properties
8-46
Trunk_Group_Half_Hour Table security
Trunk Group
8-22
8-21
8-21
8-46
Vru_Port_Map Table security
8-22
8-22
VRU PIM
8-22
time synchronization
5-18
U
User_Formula_Equation Table security
User_Formula Table security
User_Group
8-22
Warning events
8-22
partitioning issue
8-45
User_Group_Member Table security
User_Group Table security
8-21
User_Security_Control
8-31
User_Supervisor_Map
8-45
8-1
Windows
event logs
WordPad
6-4
8-21
8-47
User_Variable Table security
User Formula
8-22
8-47
User Formula object security
8-22
8-5
User Privileges
8-5
Users
adding
8-25
deleting
8-26
viewing current users
User Variable
8-24
8-47
User Variable object security
8-22
V
View_Column
8-31
ICM Administration Guide for Cisco ICM/IPCC Enterprise & Hosted Editions Release 7.0(0)
IN-14
6-3
Event Viewer
User_Supervisor_Map Table security
User Groups
Why
8-25
Why Use ICM Partitioning?
8-21
User_Secuirty_Control table partial recalculation
conditions 8-6
User_Variable
6-2
Web View
8-45
User_Group_Member
W
6-4, 6-5
8-1
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