Getting Started
Sound
Getting Started
Plug and Play
®
TM
Gen-plug&play.Cdr\ GS \ ENGLISH
Audio Card
Plug and Play
Getting Started
Information in this document is subject to change without notice and does not represent a
commitment on the part of Creative Technology Ltd. No part of this manual may be reproduced
or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying
and recording, for any purpose without the written permission of Creative Technology Ltd.
The software described in this document is furnished under a license agreement and may be used
or copied only in accordance with the terms of the license agreement. It is against the law to copy
the software on any other medium except as specifically allowed in the license agreement.
The licensee may make one copy of the software for backup purposes.
Copyright © 1997 by Creative Technology Ltd. All rights reserved.
Version 2.0
October 1997
Sound Blaster is a registered trademark of Creative Technology Ltd.
Sound Blaster 16 and Wave Blaster are trademarks of Creative Technology Ltd.
Microsoft, MS-DOS, Windows, and the Windows logo are registered trademarks of
Microsoft Corporation.
All other products are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.
Regulatory Information
The following sections contain regulatory notices for Europe.
FCC Part 15: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B
digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide
reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential installation. This equipment
generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in
accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications.
However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this
equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be
determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try one or more of the
following measures:
❑ Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
❑ Increase the distance between the equipment and receiver.
❑ Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver
is connected.
❑ Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician.
Caution
To comply with the limits for the Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules,
this device must be installed in computer equipment certified to comply with the Class B limits.
All cables used to connect the computer and peripherals must be shielded and grounded.
Operation with non-certified computers or non-shielded cables may result in interference to radio
or television reception.
Modifications
Any changes or modifications not expressly approved by the grantee of this device could void the
user’s authority to operate the device.
Safety Information
CAUTION: This device is intended to be installed by the user in a CSA/TUV/UL certified/listed
IBM AT or compatible personal computers in the manufacturer’s defined operator access area.
Check the equipment operating/installation manual and/or with the equipment manufacturer to
verify/confirm if your equipment is suitable for user-installed application cards.
Compliance
This product conforms to the following Council Directive:
❑ Directive 89/336/EEC, 92/31/EEC (EMC)
Contents
Before You Begin.............................................................................................. v
Using This Guide.................................................................................. v
Getting More Information.................................................................... v
Document Conventions........................................................................ v
1
Installing Audio Card and Related Hardware
To install the card and related peripherals ........................................1-1
To test the DRAM upgrade ...............................................................1-3
2
Installing Software in Windows 95
Setting Up the Audio Drivers........................................................................2-1
Installing the Applications.............................................................................2-4
Testing the Installation...................................................................................2-4
Uninstalling the Applications........................................................................2-6
3
Installing Software in DOS/
Windows 3.1x
Installing the Software...................................................................................3-1
Testing the Installation...................................................................................3-2
Optimizing Memory Usage...........................................................................3-2
Using Memory Managers .................................................................3-3
A
Understanding the Installation
Understanding the Software-Configurable Settings....................................A-1
Input/Output (I/O) Addresses ..........................................................A-2
Interrupt Request (IRQ) Lines .........................................................A-3
Direct Memory Access (DMA) Channels.......................................A-3
Understanding the Environment Variables ..................................................A-3
SOUND Environment Variable .......................................................A-4
BLASTER Environment Variable ...................................................A-4
MIDI Environment Variable ............................................................A-5
Understanding the Installation Program in Windows 3.1x.........................A-6
The AUTOEXEC.BAT File Settings...............................................A-6
The CONFIG.SYS File Settings......................................................A-7
iii
B
Changing Audio Card Settings
Enabling/Disabling Creative 3D Stereo Enhancement Effect .................... B-1
Enabling/Disabling Full-Duplex Operation................................................. B-2
Enabling/Disabling MPU-401 MIDI Emulation......................................... B-3
Enabling/Disabling Joystick or IDE Interface............................................. B-5
C
Troubleshooting
Problems Installing Audio Card Software from CD-ROM ........................ C-1
Problems with Sound.................................................................................... C-2
Problems in DOS .......................................................................................... C-3
Problems in Windows 3.1x........................................................................... C-4
Resolving Hardware Conflicts ..................................................................... C-5
D
Hardware Information
Redirecting PC Sounds to External Speakers..............................................D-2
AUX1 Connector Pin Assignments .............................................................D-3
AUX2 Connector Pin Assignments .............................................................D-3
CD Audio Connector Pin Assignments.......................................................D-4
DRAM Upgrade Connector Pin Assignments ............................................D-5
Gold Finch Connector Pin Assignments......................................................D-7
IDE Connector Pin Assignments .................................................................D-7
Microphone Connector Pin Assignments....................................................D-8
Modem Connector Pin Assignments ...........................................................D-9
PC Speaker Connector Pin Assignments.....................................................D-9
SPDIF Connector Pin Assignments...........................................................D-10
Speaker/Line Connector Pin Assignments ................................................D-10
Telephone Answering Device Connector Pin Assignments .....................D-11
Wave Blaster Connector Pin Assignments ................................................D-11
E
Technical Support
Inside Europe................................................................................................. E-3
Through CompuServe................................................................................... E-3
By Fax............................................................................................................ E-3
iv
Before You Begin
The README file on the first installation diskette or CD-ROM
contains information and changes not available at the time of printing.
Read the file before you continue. If your package contains floppy
diskettes, you may want to make backup copies. In addition, read the
following sections:
❑ Using This Guide
❑ Getting More Information
❑ Document Conventions
Using This Guide
Chapter 1 shows you how to install the audio card into your computer.
Chapters 2 and 3 describes how to install the audio software in
Windows 95 and Windows 3.1x, respectively. For information on
installation, changing settings, and troubleshooting, see the
appendices.
Getting More Information
Refer to the Knowing Your Audio Card leaflet to familiarize yourself with
the key features of your audio card. Refer to the online User’s Guide for
MIDI specifications and connector pin assignments, as well as
instructions on how to use the various applications in your audio package.
Document Conventions
This guide uses the following conventions to help you locate and
identify the information that you need.
Table i:
Icons.
This Icon
Represents
Tip or useful information.
Warning.
v
Table ii:
Text conventions.
Text In
Represents
bold
Text that must be entered exactly as it appears.
italic
Title of a book.
Otherwise, when presented at the DOS command
line, it is a placeholder that represents
information you must provide.
This information usually appears in the
parameter listing after the command is presented.
UPPERCASE
Directory name, file name, or acronym.
<>
Symbols, letters, and key names on the keyboard.
If you are not familiar with the elements found in a typical dialog box,
refer to the following figure:
Tabs
Check box
(selected)
Option
buttons
Up/Down
buttons
Check box
(cleared)
Text box
List box
Drop-down
list box
Figure i: Elements of a dialog box.
vi
1
Installing Audio Card and Related
Hardware
If you want to install this Plug and Play (PnP) audio card in a
non-PnP environment such as DOS/Windows 3.1x or
Windows 95 MS-DOS Mode, you must first install a PnP
configuration manager. For details, refer to the documentation
that comes with your PnP configuration manager.
To install the card and related peripherals
1. Switch off your system and all peripheral devices, and unplug
the power cord from the wall outlet.
2. Touch a metal plate on your system to ground yourself and
discharge any static electricity.
3. Remove the cover from your system.
Installing Audio Card and Related Hardware 1-1
4. If you have a memory upgrade module (DRAM daughterboard)
and your card has DRAM upgrade connectors, you may want
to mount the module onto your audio card now, as shown in
Figure 1-1.
DRAM Upgrade
connectors
Housing
Audio Card
Memory
upgrade module
Figure 1-1: Mounting the memory upgrade module.
5. Find a free 16-bit expansion slot in your system. Remove the
metal plate from the slot you have chosen and put the screw
aside. The screw will be used in a later step.
6. Align your card’s 16-bit slot
connector with the expansion
slot and gently press down the
card into the free slot as shown.
7. Secure the card to the
expansion slot with the screw
that you removed from the
metal plate.
Metal plates
Audio card
16-bit slot
8-bit slot
Figure 1-2
8. Connect powered speakers or an external amplifier to the Line
Out jack(s) if your audio card does not have an internal
amplifier, or if you do not want to use the amplifier.
You can also connect non-powered speakers to your audio
card’s Speaker Out jack. Refer to the Knowing Your Audio
Card leaflet to learn how to connect the various devices.
1-2 Installing Audio Card and Related Hardware
For better quality sound, use powered speakers even if your
card has an internal amplifier.
The joystick connector on your audio card is identical to
that on a standard PC game control adapter or game I/O
connector. You can connect any analog joystick with a
15-pin D-shell connector or any device that is compatible
with the standard PC joystick. To use two joysticks, you
need a Y-cable splitter.
9. Replace the cover onto your system.
10. Plug the power cord back into the wall outlet, and switch on
the system.
To test the DRAM upgrade
If you have mounted a memory upgrade module in step 4, you can test
it as follows:
1. Make sure that you have installed the audio software.
(The installation of the software is covered in the next two
chapters.)
2. Start the AWE Control Panel. That is, click the Start button,
point to Programs, point to the menu of your Sound Blaster
card, and then click AWE Control Panel.
3. Load SoundFont banks. That is, click the User tab, click the
Browse button to browse for the installed folder of the SoundFont
bank, select the file name, and then click the Apply button.
From the memory status bar, you can see the changes in the
amount of onboard memory available.
4. Play your SoundFont banks to make sure that your memory
upgrade module is working properly.
Refer to the online User’s Guide for detailed information on how to
use the AWE Control Panel.
Installing Audio Card and Related Hardware 1-3
2
Installing Software in Windows 95
This chapter shows you how to install the audio software in Windows
95 after installing your card. It consists of the following sections:
❑ Setting Up the Audio Drivers
❑ Installing the Applications
❑ Testing the Installation
❑ Uninstalling the Applications
Setting Up the Audio Drivers
You need device drivers to control the components on your audio card.
After you have installed the card and switched on your system,
Windows 95 automatically detects the components, and either installs
the drivers or prompts you for the drivers. You may encounter the
following messages, which may not be in the sequence shown.
❑ If a message similar to Figure 2-1 appears, just take note of it
and wait for the next message to appear.
Figure 2-1: Message box indicating the detection of a device.
Installing Software in Windows 95 2-1
❑ If a dialog box similar to Figure 2-2 appears:
If the device detected is Standard IDE/ESDI Hard Disk
Controller:
•
Click the second option, and then click the OK button.
Otherwise:
•
Click the first option, and then click the OK button. If you
are prompted for the Windows 95 installation diskette or
CD-ROM, insert it into a drive and click the OK button.
Figure 2-2: Driver installation dialog box in which the Windows default driver
option is available.
❑ If a dialog box similar to Figure 2-3 appears, click the second
option, and then click the OK button.
Figure 2-3: Driver installation dialog box in which the Windows default driver
option is NOT available.
2-2 Installing Software in Windows 95
❑ If a dialog box similar to Figure 2-4 appears, click the Next
button, and follow the instructions on the screen to complete
the installation of the driver.
Figure 2-4: Update Device Driver Wizard dialog box at start of installation.
❑ If the Install From Disk dialog box appears, and
If your package comes with a Drivers Disk:
•
Insert it into your floppy disk drive, select the appropriate
drive, and click the OK button.
Otherwise:
1. Insert the installation CD-ROM into your CD-ROM drive
and select the drive.
2. Click the Browse button and look for a .INF file in the root
directory.
If you cannot find it, select the folder
\WIN95\Language\DRIVERS, where Language is the
language of the software that you want to install.
3. Click the OK button.
The required files are copied to your hard disk.
Installing Software in Windows 95 2-3
Installing the Applications
Your audio card’s applications can be installed from floppy diskettes,
a CD-ROM, or both, depending on which is supplied in your package.
To install from CD-ROM
1. Make sure that your CD-ROM drive is installed and working
properly. For details, refer to the documentation that comes
with it.
2. Insert the installation CD-ROM into your CD-ROM drive.
The CD-ROM supports Windows 95 AutoPlay mode and starts
running automatically. If it does not, see Appendix C,
“Troubleshooting”.
3. Follow the instructions on the screen to complete the
installation.
To install from diskettes
1. Insert the first installation diskette into your floppy disk drive.
2. Click the Start button, and then click Run.
3. In the Run dialog box, type A:\SETUP or B:\SETUP.
4. Click the OK button and follow the instructions on the screen
to complete the installation.
Testing the Installation
After the applications are installed, you can use Windows 95 Media
Player to test if your audio card is working properly. If you do not have
Media Player, follow the instructions below to install it.
To install Media Player
1. Click the Start button, point to Settings, and then click
Control Panel.
2. In the Control Panel window, double-click the Add/Remove
Programs icon.
2-4 Installing Software in Windows 95
3. Click the Windows Setup tab.
The Windows Setup tabbed page similar to Figure 2-5 appears.
Figure 2-5: Windows Setup tabbed page.
4. Make sure that the Multimedia check box is selected, and then
click the Details button.
5. In the Multimedia dialog box, make sure that the Media Player
check box is selected.
If you do not have Volume Control, Sound Recorder or
Audio Compression installed, make sure that the
relevant check boxes are also selected.
6. Follow the instructions on the screen to complete the
installation.
Installing Software in Windows 95 2-5
To test the audio card
1. Click the Start button, point to Programs, point to Accessories,
point to Multimedia, and then click Media Player.
Media Player appears as shown in Figure 2-6.
Figure 2-6: Media Player interface.
2. On the Device menu, click Sound.
3. In the Open dialog box, select a sound from the list, and then
click the Open button.
4. On Media Player, click .
You should hear the selected sound being played. If you
encounter any problems, see Appendix C, “Troubleshooting”.
Uninstalling the Applications
The Windows 95 Uninstall feature allows you to remove applications
cleanly and then reinstall them to correct problems, change
configurations, or make version upgrades.
Quit the audio card’s applications before uninstalling.
Applications that are still running during uninstallation will not
be uninstalled.
Some applications may share files with other Windows
applications. If so, the uninstallation program will prompt you
when it tries to delete these files. Do not delete the files unless
you are sure that you do not need to use them.
2-6 Installing Software in Windows 95
To uninstall the applications
1. Click the Start button, point to Settings, and then click
Control Panel.
2. Double-click the Add/Remove Programs icon.
3. In the Add/Remove Programs Properties dialog box, select the
Sound Blaster entry for your card (see the Knowing Your
Audio Card leaflet for your exact card model) and click the
Add/Remove button.
4. Follow the instructions on the screen to uninstall.
Installing Software in Windows 95 2-7
3
Installing Software in DOS/
Windows 3.1x
This chapter shows you how to install the audio software in
DOS/Windows 3.1x after installing your card. It consists of the
following sections:
❑ Installing the Software
❑ Testing the Installation
❑ Optimizing Memory Usage
Installing the Software
To install the software
1. If your package comes with installation diskettes, insert the
first installation diskette into a floppy disk drive. Otherwise,
insert the installation CD-ROM into your CD-ROM drive.
2. Select Run from the File menu.
3. Type D:\WIN31\DISK1\SETUP and press <Enter>
4. Follow the instructions on the screen to complete the
installation.
After you have completed the installation and rebooted your system,
proceed to the next section to test whether your installation works.
Installing Software in DOS/ Windows 3.1x 3-1
Testing the Installation
To test the installation
1. At the DOS prompt, change to the directory containing your
audio card’s software. For example, if your directory path is
C:\SB16, type C:\SB16 and press <Enter>.
The directory name may also be VIBRA16.
2. Type DIAGNOSE and press <Enter>.
(This test program checks the resources used by your audio
card and displays a menu to let you test the card’s sound and
music output.)
3. Follow the instructions on the screen to complete the test.
If the test program stops or displays an error message, it may be due to
a conflict between the audio card and another peripheral device. To
resolve the conflict, you have to change the settings of your audio card.
For more information, see Appendix A, “Understanding the
Installation” or Appendix C, “Troubleshooting”.
Optimizing Memory Usage
If you choose to install the low-level DOS device drivers under custom
installation (see “The CONFIG.SYS File Settings” on page A-7), your
system will load them into memory during system startup.
However, if you do not need these drivers (for example, you are
running only Windows applications or playing DOS games), you can
bypass loading these drivers. Otherwise, it is recommended that you
load them into high memory (for example, using memory managers).
3-2 Installing Software in DOS/ Windows 3.1x
Using Memory Managers
To bypass loading of low-level device drivers
1. During system startup, press and hold down the <Alt> key
when the message “Starting MS-DOS...” appears.
2. Release the key only when you see the DOS prompt.
Alternatively, you can use MS-DOS 6.x’s multiple boot
sessions feature. Create a session with settings that load the
drivers into memory. If you do not want to load these drivers,
select another session without them at system bootup.
(Refer to your MS-DOS 6.x documentation for instructions on
how to create multiple boot sessions.)
To use a memory manager
❑ If you are using MS-DOS 6.x, run MEMMAKER.
(For details, refer to your MS-DOS 6.x documentation.)
❑ If you have a memory manager such as QEMM or 386MAX,
refer to their respective documentation for instructions.
Installing Software in DOS/ Windows 3.1x 3-3
A
Understanding the Installation
This appendix is organized as follows:
❑ Understanding the Software-Configurable Settings
❑ Understanding the Environment Variables
❑ Understanding the Installation Program in Windows 3.1x
Understanding the Software-Configurable
Settings
Your audio card supports the Plug and Play (PnP) 1.0a standard. This
allows a PnP system to assign necessary resources such as I/O
addresses, interrupt lines and DMA channels to your card when you
install it.
If you are using Windows 95, this PnP operating system will
automatically set up your card’s resources. If you are using a non-PnP
system such as Windows 3.1x, you must run a PnP configuration
manager to configure the card. For details, refer to the documentation
on your PnP configuration manager.
This section explains the following software-configurable resources of
your audio card:
❑ Input/Output (I/O) Addresses
❑ Interrupt Request (IRQ) Lines
❑ Direct Memory Access (DMA) Channels
Understanding the Installation A-1
If your card encounters a conflict with a peripheral device, you
may need to change its resource settings. If you are using
Windows 95, run the Device Manager. If you are using
Windows 3.1x, run the configuration utility that comes with
your PnP configuration manager. For details, see “Resolving
Hardware Conflicts” on page C-5. When any resource setting
is changed, ensure that the environment variables (see
“Understanding the Environment Variables” on page A-3)
reflect the changes as well. You can view your system
environment by typing SET at the DOS prompt.
Input/Output (I/O) Addresses
I/O addresses are communication areas used by your computer’s
central processor to distinguish among various peripheral devices
connected to your system when sending or receiving data.
Table A-1: Possible default I/O addresses used by the various devices on the audio card.
I/O Address Range
Device
100H
§
1E8H to 1EFH
§
168H to 16FH
§
200H to 207H
Game/Joystick interface
220H to 22FH
Audio interface
330H to 331H
MPU-401 UART MIDI interface
3D Stereo Enhancement device
IDE interface (Tertiary)
IDE interface (Quarternary)
388H to 38BH
Stereo music synthesizer
620H to 623H,
A20H to A23H,
E20H to E23H
§
Advanced WavEffects synthesizer
(Advanced Wavetable synthesizer)
Refer to “General Specifications” of the Knowing Your Audio
Card leaflet to find out which devices marked § are available on
your card.
A-2 Understanding the Installation
Interrupt Request (IRQ) Lines
An IRQ line is a signal line that a device uses to notify your computer’s
central processor that it wants to send or receive data for processing.
Table A-2: Possible default IRQ line assignments for audio card devices.
IRQ Line
Device
5
Audio interface
11
IDE interface
Direct Memory Access (DMA) Channels
A DMA channel is a data channel that a device uses to transfer data
directly to and from the system memory. Your card’s audio interface
transfers data through the Low and High DMA channels.
Table A-3: Possible default DMA channel assignments for audio card devices.
DMA Channel
Usage
1
Audio Low DMA channel
5
Audio High DMA channel
Understanding the Environment Variables
Environment variables are used to pass hardware configuration
information to software in your system. This section explains the
environment variables of your audio card:
❑ SOUND Environment Variable
❑ BLASTER Environment Variable
(only DOS applications use this)
❑ MIDI Environment Variable
(applicable only in DOS for the PLAY utility)
Understanding the Installation A-3
SOUND Environment Variable
The SOUND environment variable specifies your audio software
directory. The syntax for this variable is as follows:
SOUND=path
where path is the drive and directory of the audio software
(for example, C:\SB16 or C:\VIBRA16). No space is allowed before
and after the equal sign.
BLASTER Environment Variable
The BLASTER environment variable specifies the base I/O address,
IRQ line, and DMA channels of the audio interface. Its syntax is:
BLASTER=A220 I5 D1 H5 P330 E620 T6
The values shown above may be different for your system. No
space is allowed before and after the equal sign. However,
there must be at least a space between parameters.
The parameters in the command and their possible default values are
as follows:
This Parameter Specifies
Axxx
Audio interface’s base I/O address.
xxx defaults to 220.
Ix
IRQ line used by the audio interface.
x defaults to 5.
Dx
Low DMA channel used by the audio interface.
x defaults to 1.
Hx
High DMA channel used by the audio interface.
x defaults to 5.
Pxxx
MPU-401 UART interface’s base I/O address.
xxx defaults to 330.
Exxx
Advanced WavEffects synthesizer chip’s base I/O
address. xxx defaults to 620.
Tx
Card type. x must be 6.
The parameters in bold apply only to Sound Blaster SB32 and
the AWE line of audio cards.
A-4 Understanding the Installation
MIDI Environment Variable
The MIDI environment variable specifies the MIDI file format used
and where MIDI data is sent to. MIDI data can be sent to the internal
stereo music synthesizer or MIDI port.
Generally, there are three MIDI file formats: General MIDI, Extended
MIDI and Basic MIDI. The syntax for this variable is as follows:
MIDI=SYNTH:x
MAP:x
MODE:x
The parameters in the command are described below:
This Parameter Specifies
SYNTH:x
Synthesizer type.
x can be 1 or 2.
1 (default setting) specifies the stereo music
synthesizer.
2 specifies the MIDI port.
MAP:x
File format.
x can be G, E, or B.
G specifies the General MIDI file format.
E (default setting) specifies the Extended MIDI file
format.
B specifies the Basic MIDI file format.
MODE:x
Synthesizer mode.
x can be 0, 1, or 2.
0 (default setting) specifies General MIDI mode.
1 specifies General Standard mode.
2 specifies MT-32 mode.
The parameters in bold apply only to Sound Blaster SB32 and
the AWE line of audio cards.
Understanding the Installation A-5
Understanding the Installation Program in
Windows 3.1x
When you install the audio software, the installation program creates
a directory and copies the software into it. It then allows you to set up
your Windows applications by adding a command to the WIN.INI file
to run WINSETUP.EXE. This command automatically creates the
audio card program group and the application icons when you next run
Windows.
You can also choose to set up your Windows applications at a
later time by running SETUP in the audio software directory on
your hard disk. SETUP also allows you to selectively set up
components that were not installed previously.
The installation program also modifies your AUTOEXEC.BAT and
CONFIG.SYS files.
The AUTOEXEC.BAT File Settings
The installation program adds the following statements to the
AUTOEXEC.BAT file:
SET BLASTER=A220 I5 D1 H5 P330 E620 T6
SET SOUND=C:\SB16
SET MIDI=SYNTH:1 MAP:E MODE:0
C:\SB16\DIAGNOSE /S /W=C:\WINDOWS
C:\SB16\MIXERSET /P /Q
C:\SB16\AWEUTIL /S
The directory name SB16 may be VIBRA16 in your
installation.
The parameters in bold apply only to Sound Blaster SB32 and
the AWE line of audio cards.
The first 3 statements set up the environment variables for your audio
card. The last 3 statements run the DIAGNOSE, MIXERSET, and
AWEUTIL utilities. The BLASTER statement is added by the
DIAGNOSE utility, and the values shown above may differ from those
in your system.
A-6 Understanding the Installation
❑ Running DIAGNOSE with the /S parameter updates the
BLASTER environment with the resource settings from the
PnP configuration manager.
❑ Running DIAGNOSE with the /W=C:\WINDOWS parameter
updates the SYSTEM.INI file in the Windows directory with
the resource settings from the PnP configuration manager.
For a description of the AWEUTIL utility, refer to the
AWEUTIL.TXT file found in the audio software directory.
The CONFIG.SYS File Settings
If you install the low-level DOS device drivers under custom
installation, the installation program adds the following statements to
the CONFIG.SYS file:
DEVICE= C:\SB16\DRV\CTSB16.SYS /UNIT=0
/BLASTER=A:220 I:5 D:1 H:5
DEVICE= C:\SB16\DRV\CTMMSYS.SYS
The directory name SB16 may be VIBRA16 and the driver
name CTSB16.SYS may be VIBRA16.SYS in your
installation.
CTSB16.SYS (or VIBRA16.SYS) and CTMMSYS.SYS are
low-level device drivers that provide wave playback and recording for
DOS applications, including third-party DOS applications developed
using drivers (such as CTWDSK.DRV, CTWMEM.DRV,
CTVDSK.DRV, and CT-VOICE.DRV) that require these low-level
drivers. The drivers are found in the DRV subdirectory of your audio
software directory.
See “Optimizing Memory Usage” on page 3-2 to learn how to
optimize your memory.
To free system memory when you are using Windows applications or
playing DOS games, use a text editor to delete or comment out the
preceding two statements from the CONFIG.SYS file.
If you later need the low-level device drivers for your software
application, load them into memory by typing DIAGNOSE /A at the
DOS prompt and pressing <Enter>. This command adds the required
statements to the CONFIG.SYS file.
Understanding the Installation A-7
B
Changing Audio Card Settings
This chapter is organized as follows:
❑ Enabling/Disabling Creative 3D Stereo Enhancement Effect
❑ Enabling/Disabling Full-Duplex Operation
❑ Enabling/Disabling MPU-401 MIDI Emulation
❑ Enabling/Disabling Joystick or IDE Interface
These features may not be present on your card. See the
Knowing Your Audio Card leaflet for the list of your card’s
features.
Enabling/Disabling Creative 3D Stereo
Enhancement Effect
The Creative 3D Stereo Enhancement (3DSE) effect allows you to
eliminate speaker crosstalk which occurs when two speakers are
placed close together. With this effect enabled, mono and stereo
sounds produced by your speakers will have increased depth and
breadth.
If your pair of speakers or another device already has a built-in
3D sound technology, do not activate this feature in both devices.
The 3D Stereo Enhancement effect, when activated with another
3D sound technology, may distort the audio output.
Changing Audio Card Settings B-1
To enable or disable 3DSE in DOS/Windows 3.1x
1. Exit to DOS if you are in Windows 3.1x.
2. At the DOS prompt, change to the directory containing your
audio software; for example, C:\SB16.
3. To enable the effect, type CT3DSE ON.
To disable the effect, type CT3DSE OFF.
To enable or disable 3DSE in Windows 95
1. Click the Start button, point to Settings, and then click
Control Panel.
2. In the Control Panel window, double-click the System icon.
3. In the System Properties dialog box, click the Device Manager tab.
4. Double-click Sound, Video And Game Controllers.
5. Select the Creative Sound Blaster entry for your audio card and
click the Properties button.
6. In the Properties dialog box, click the Settings tab.
7. To enable the Creative 3D Stereo Enhancement effect, make
sure that the Enable Creative 3D Stereo Enhancement check
box is selected.
To disable the effect, clear the check box.
8. Click the OK button.
Enabling/Disabling Full-Duplex Operation
The full-duplex feature in your audio card is useful for audio
conferencing and telephone-like applications. When it is enabled, you
can play back and record audio data at the same time. You must,
however, use the same sampling rate for both playback and recording.
For details on full-duplex constraints, refer to the online
User’s Guide.
B-2 Changing Audio Card Settings
To enable or disable full-duplex in Windows 3.1x
1. Launch your File Manager.
2. Locate the SYSTEM.INI file in your Windows directory.
3. Double-click the file.
A text editor appears, displaying the contents of the file.
4. In the [sndblst.drv] section, look for the line FullDuplex=1 or
FullDuplex=0.
To enable the feature, make sure that FullDuplex=1.
To disable it, make sure that FullDuplex=0.
5. Save the file.
6. Restart your system for the drivers to be updated.
To enable or disable full-duplex in Windows 95
1. Repeat steps 1 - 6 of “To enable or disable 3DSE in
Windows 95” on page B-2.
2. To enable full-duplex, make sure that the Allow Full-Duplex
Operation check box is selected.
To disable the operation, clear the check box.
3. Click the OK button.
Enabling/Disabling MPU-401 MIDI Emulation
The MPU-401 MIDI Emulation feature allows most real mode games,
which do not support wavetable synthesis, to play wavetable music
from the audio card. The MIDI output from the games is directed to
the wavetable synthesizer rather than the MPU-401 interface. Games
that have not been designed to use the wavetable synthesis features on
your card can now use them.
In DOS/Windows 3.1x, you must install the DOS AWEUTIL
utility for the MIDI Emulation feature to function properly. For
more information, refer to the AWEUTIL.TXT file in your
audio software directory.
Protected mode software does not support MIDI Emulation.
You can still play music from such software by using the
4-operator synthesizer chip.
Changing Audio Card Settings B-3
To enable or disable MPU401 emulation in
DOS/Windows 3.1x
1. If your audio card is already installed, switch off your computer
and all peripheral devices. Remove the the cover from your
system and then the audio card.
2. Enable or disable the MFBEN jumper according to the settings
shown in Figure B-1.
Enabled (Factory
default setting)
Disabled
Figure B-1: Available MPU-401 MIDI Emulation settings.
To enable or disable MPU401 emulation in Windows 95
1. Start AWE Control Panel.
2. In AWE Control Panel, click the Device button.
3. In the Device Selection dialog box, make sure that the Allow
MPU401 Emulation On This Device check box is selected, and
then click the Select button.
4. In AWE Control Panel, click the Quit button.
B-4 Changing Audio Card Settings
Enabling/Disabling Joystick or IDE Interface
The Gamepad Joystick and IDE interfaces on your audio card can be
enabled or disabled in DOS/Windows 3.1x and Windows 95.
To enable or disable the interface in DOS/Windows 3.1x
1. Exit to DOS if you are in Windows 3.1x.
2. Change to the directory where your CTCM and CTCU
programs are installed. The default directory is C:\CTCM.
Type CTCU and press <Enter>.
3. On the Menu of the Creative Plug and Play Configuration
Utility screen, click PnP Cards.
4. In the List Of PnP Cards box, click your Creative Plug and Play
card. In the List Of Devices box, click Gameport or IDE as
required.
5. Click the Resources button.
The Resources window displays the current resources assigned
to the interface.
6. To enable the interface, clear the check box.
To disable it, make sure the Disable check box is selected.
7. Click the OK button twice.
8. On the Menu, click Exit. Type the path of your Windows 3.1x
directory (for example, C:\Windows) and press <Enter>.
9. Restart your system for the change to take effect.
To enable or disable the interface in Windows 95
1. Click the Start button, point to Settings, and then click
Control Panel.
2. In the Control Panel window, double-click the System icon.
3. In the System Properties dialog box, click the Device Manager tab.
4. For the Joystick interface, double-click Sound, Video And
Game Controllers and select Gameport Joystick.
For the IDE interface, double-click Hard Disk Controllers and
select your IDE CD-ROM drive.
5. Click the Properties button.
Changing Audio Card Settings B-5
6. In the Properties dialog box:
If you have an Original Configuration (Current) check box:
•
To enable the interface, make sure that the check box is
selected.
To disable it, clear the check box.
If you have a Disable In This Hardware Profile check box:
•
To enable the interface, clear the check box.
To disable it, make sure that the check box is selected.
7. Click the OK button and restart Windows 95 for the change to
take effect.
After restarting Windows 95, ignore the information displayed
in the Resource Settings box on the Resources tabbed page of
the dialog box.
The only indicator that your interface has been disabled is the
cleared Original Configuration (Current) check box or the
selected Disable In This Hardware Profile check box.
When you re-enable the interface for use by another device,
Windows 95 might warn you that there is a conflicting device
or that the resource area associated with the interface is already
in use. Ignore this warning. The new device should function
perfectly despite the warning.
B-6 Changing Audio Card Settings
C
Troubleshooting
This appendix provides some tips for solving some problems you may
encounter with your audio card during installation or normal use.
Problems Installing Audio Card Software
from CD-ROM
Problem
In Windows 95, the installation program does not run
automatically after you insert the CD-ROM into the drive.
Cause
The AutoPlay feature in your Windows 95 system may
not be enabled.
Solution
To enable AutoPlay:
❑ Through the My Computer shortcut menu
1. Double-click the My Computer icon on your
Windows 95 desktop.
2. In the My Computer window, right-click the
CD-ROM drive icon.
3. On the shortcut menu, click AutoPlay and follow
the instructions on the screen.
❑ Through Auto Insert Notification
1. Click the Start button, point to Settings, and then
click Control Panel.
2. In the Control Panel window, double-click the
System icon.
3. In the System Properties dialog box, click
the Device Manager tab and select your
CD-ROM drive.
4. Click the Properties button.
Troubleshooting C-1
5. In the Properties dialog box, click the Settings
tab and ensure that the Auto Insert Notification
check box is selected.
6. Click the OK button to you exit from the
dialog box.
Problems with Sound
Problem
No output from both the 8-bit and 16-bit digitized
sounds when running the test program.
Causes
❑ The volume knob on the speakers is not set properly.
❑ The external amplifier or speakers are connected to
the wrong jack.
❑ The speaker amplifiers are in the On position.
If you are using powered speakers in a non-powered
state, turn off their amplifiers.
❑ There is hardware conflict.
Solution
Verify the following:
❑ Volume control knob of the speakers, if any, is set at
mid-range.
❑ Speakers are connected to the Speaker Out jack.
❑ External amplifier or powered speakers are
connected to the card’s Line Out jack(s) if you do
not have or decide not to use the card’s internal
power amplifier.
❑ The speaker amplifiers are in the Off position.
❑ No hardware conflict between the card and a
peripheral device. For details, see “Resolving
Hardware Conflicts” on page C-5.
C-2 Troubleshooting
Problems in DOS
Problem
SOUND or BLASTER environment values are missing
or incorrect.
Cause
When you install your audio software, the commands
are automatically added to the AUTOEXEC.BAT file so
that both environment strings are set up when your
system restarts.
However, the command to set up the SOUND or
BLASTER environment might not be included in the
AUTOEXEC.BAT file because you might have edited
the file and deleted the command, or you might have
installed another software which assigned another value
to the command.
Solution
To set up the BLASTER environment in the respective
system files, run DIAGNOSE (see “Understanding the
Installation” on page A-1).
To set up the SOUND environment, insert the statement
SET SOUND=C:\SB16 into the AUTOEXEC.BAT
file using a text editor.
Reboot your system for the changes to take effect.
The directory name SB16 may be VIBRA16 in
your installation.
Problem
Error message “Out of environment space”.
Cause
The system environment space is used up.
Solution
Add the statement SHELL=C:\COMMAND.COM
/E:512 /P to the CONFIG.SYS file.
/E defines a new size for the system environment space.
You can choose a higher value if the environment size is
already 512 bytes. (Usually, the next value is 1024 bytes.)
For details on the SHELL command, refer to your
DOS manual.
Troubleshooting C-3
Problem
System hangs or reboots during the 16-bit digitized
sound test, but it works fine during the 8-bit test.
Cause
Your system’s motherboard cannot handle 16-bit DMA
transfer properly. On some machines, the DMA
controller on the motherboard does not function
properly during High DMA transfers. High DMA
transfers on such machines might corrupt the data in
main memory and cause the system to hang or
encounter a parity error.
Solution
Use the 8-bit DMA channel to transfer 16-bit data. Run
the Plug and Play configuration utility and select a
configuration that uses Low DMA channel only. 16-bit
audio data will then be transferred through the Low
DMA channel.
When you set your High DMA channel to Low DMA,
you will lose the full-duplex operation, which requires
two separate DMA channels.
Problems in Windows 3.1x
The following are problems you might encounter when in
Windows 3.1x:
Problem
No sound is heard when running your audio card’s
Windows applications.
Cause
One or more of the sound drivers might not be included
in the SYSTEM.INI file.
Solution
Check the SYSTEM.INI file. To do so:
1. On the File menu in Program Manager, click Run.
2. In the Command Line box, type SYSEDIT and
click the OK button.
C-4 Troubleshooting
3. Make sure that the following statements are present:
[boot]
drivers=mmsystem.dll msmixmgr.dll
[386enh]
device=vsbpd.386
device=vsbawe.386
[drivers]
timer=timer.drv
midimapper=midimap.drv
Aux=sb16snd.drv
Mixer=sb16snd.drv
Wave=sb16snd.drv
MIDI=sb16fm.drv
MIDI1=sb16snd.drv
MIDI2=sbawe32.drv
[sndblst.drv]
Port=220
MIDIPort=330
Int=5
DmaChannel=1
HDmaChannel=5
The values shown in the [sndblst.drv] section may be different
in your system. The parameters in bold apply only to Sound
Blaster SB32 and the AWE line of audio cards.
If one or more of the statements are missing, run SETUP in the
audio software directory. SETUP rewrites SYSTEM.INI to set
up the drivers and the Windows applications.
Resolving Hardware Conflicts
Hardware conflicts occur when two or more peripheral devices
contend for the same resources. Conflicts between your audio card
and another peripheral device may occur if your card and the other
device are set to use the same I/O address, IRQ line, or DMA channel.
Troubleshooting C-5
To resolve hardware conflicts, change the resource settings of your
audio card or the conflicting peripheral device in your system using
Device Manager in Windows 95 or Configuration Manager in
Windows 3.1x.
If you do not know which card is causing the conflict, remove all cards
except the audio card and other essential cards (for example, disk
controller and graphics cards). Add each card back until Device
Manager or Configuration Manager indicates that a conflict has
occurred.
To resolve hardware conflicts in Windows 95
1. Click the Start button, point to Settings, and then click
Control Panel.
2. In the Control Panel window, double-click the System icon.
3. In the System Properties dialog box, click the Device Manager tab.
4. Double-click Sound, Video And Game Controllers.
5. Select your audio card and click the Properties button.
6. In the Properties dialog box, click the Resources tab.
7. Ensure that the Use Automatic Settings check box is selected.
If it is selected, in the Conflicting Device List box, double-click
the peripheral device conflicting with your audio card
(indicated by an exclamation mark (!)). Ensure that the Use
Automatic Settings check box in that Properties dialog box is
selected as well.
8. Reboot your system to allow Windows 95 to reassign resources
to your audio card and/or the conflicting device.
You can also refer to the Troubleshooting section in the
Windows 95 Help.
To resolve hardware conflicts in DOS/Windows 3.1x
1. Run your Plug and Play configuration utility.
2. Reselect the resource settings of your audio card that are in
conflict. For more details, refer to the documentation that
comes with your Plug and Play configuration utility.
C-6 Troubleshooting
D
Hardware Information
You may want to connect your audio card to other devices inside your
system, for example, to a CD-ROM drive or another audio card. Or,
you may want to redirect the “beeps” that you hear from your system
to your external speakers.
This appendix helps you to do so by providing the following information:
Not all of the following information is applicable to your audio
card. Refer to “General Specifications” of the Knowing Your
Audio Card leaflet to find out what is available on your card.
❑ Redirecting PC Sounds to External Speakers
❑ AUX1 Connector Pin Assignments
❑ AUX2 Connector Pin Assignments
❑ CD Audio Connector Pin Assignments
❑ DRAM Upgrade Connector Pin Assignments
❑ Gold Finch Connector Pin Assignments
❑ IDE Connector Pin Assignments
❑ Microphone Connector Pin Assignments
❑ Modem Connector Pin Assignments
❑ PC Speaker Connector Pin Assignments
❑ SPDIF Connector Pin Assignments
❑ Speaker/Line Connector Pin Assignments
❑ Telephone Answering Device Connector Pin Assignments
❑ Wave Blaster Connector Pin Assignments
Hardware Information D-1
Redirecting PC Sounds to External Speakers
It is possible to redirect the sounds that normally come from your
computer’s speaker to the speakers connected to the audio card.
However, once you do this, you will not be able to hear POST beeps,
that is, computer beeps made during power-on self test.
Read this appendix only if you are an advanced user who
knows how to use the pin assignments. If you want to redirect
sound from your computer to external speakers, you should
also be familiar with your computer motherboard and should
where to find the internal speaker. You should seek the help of
an experienced technician to perform this task.
To redirect PC sounds to external speakers:
1. Locate and remove the PC Speaker connection from your
motherboard.
2. Connect a wire from the +5V DC pin of the motherboard
speaker connector to pin 1 of the PC Speaker connector on the
audio card.
3. Connect another wire from the PC Speaker Out pin of the
motherboard speaker connector to pin 2 of the PC Speaker
connector on the card.
D-2 Hardware Information
AUX1 Connector Pin Assignments
The AUX1 connector has the following pin assignments as shown in
Table D-1.
Table D-1: AUX1 connector pin assignments.
Pin
Signal
I/O
1
AUX1 Left Channel
In
2
Analog Ground
—
3
Analog Ground
—
4
AUX1 Right Channel
In
AUX2 Connector Pin Assignments
The AUX2 connector has the following pin assignments as shown in
Table D-2.
Table D-2: AUX2 connector pin assignments.
Pin
Signal
I/O
1
AUX2 Left Channel
In
2
Analog Ground
—
3
Analog Ground
—
4
AUX2 Right Channel
In
Hardware Information D-3
CD Audio Connector Pin Assignments
Your audio card has two types of CD Audio connectors.
The CD Audio connector
shown in Table D-3.
has the following pin assignments as
Table D-3: CD Audio connector pin assignments.
Pin
Signal
I/O
1
Analog Ground
—
2
CD Left Channel
In
3
Analog Ground
—
4
CD Right Channel
In
The CD Audio connector
shown in Table D-4.
has the following pin assignments as
Table D-4: CD Audio connector pin assignments.
Pin
Signal
I/O
1
CD Left Channel
In
2
Analog Ground
—
3
Analog Ground
—
4
CD Right Channel
In
D-4 Hardware Information
DRAM Upgrade Connector Pin Assignments
There are two DRAM Upgrade connectors on your card. Each has a
different set of pin assignments as shown in Table D-5 and Table D-6.
Table D-5: 24-pin DRAM Upgrade connector pin assignments.
Pin
Description
Pin
Description
1
VCC
2
VCC
3
SDO
4
SD1
5
SD2
6
SD3
7
SD4
8
SD5
9
SD6
10
SD7
11
Digital Ground
12
Digital Ground
13
WRB
14
SMRAS
15
Digital Ground
16
Digital Ground
17
SMA19
18
SMA0
19
SMA1
20
SMA2
21
SMA3
22
SMA20
23
NC
24
VCC
Hardware Information D-5
Table D-6: 26-pin DRAM Upgrade connector pin assignments.
Pin
Description
Pin
Description
1
RAMDIS
2
VCC
3
SD15
4
SD14
5
SD13
6
SD12
7
SD11
8
SD10
9
SD9
10
SD8
11
Digital Ground
12
Digital Ground
13
SMCAS
14
MODE
15
Digital Ground
16
Digital Ground
17
Digital Ground
18
Digital Ground
19
SMA16
20
SMA7
21
SMA6
22
SMA5
23
SMA4
24
SMA18
25
VCC
26
VCC
D-6 Hardware Information
Gold Finch Connector Pin Assignments
The Gold Finch connector has the following pin descriptions as shown
in Table D-7.
Table D-7: Gold Finch connector pin assignments.
Pin
Description
Pin
Description
1
EMUR
2
AGND
3
EMUL
4
AGND
5
KEYED
6
AGND
7
NC
8
NC
IDE Connector Pin Assignments
The IDE connector has the following pin assignments shown in
Table D-8.
Table D-8: IDE connector pin assignments.
Pin
Description
Pin
Description
1
ResetB
2
Digital Ground
3
DD7
4
DD8
5
DD6
6
DD9
7
DD5
8
DD10
9
DD4
10
DD11
11
DD3
12
DD12
13
DD2
14
DD13
15
DD1
16
DD14
17
DD0
18
DD15
19
Digital Ground
20
NC
Hardware Information D-7
Table D-8: IDE connector pin assignments.
Pin
Description
Pin
Description
21
NC
22
Digital Ground
23
DIOWB
24
Digital Ground
25
DIORB
26
Digital Ground
27
IOCHRDYB
28
BALE
29
NC
30
Digital Ground
31
IRQ
32
IOCS16B
33
DA1
34
NC
35
DA0
36
DA2
37
CS0
38
CS1
39
NC
40
Digital Ground
Microphone Connector Pin Assignments
The Microphone connector has the following pin assignments as
shown in Table D-9.
Table D-9:
Microphone connector pin assignment
Pin
Signal
I/O
1
Mic-In
In
2
Analog Ground
—
3
Mic Power
In
D-8 Hardware Information
Modem Connector Pin Assignments
The Modem connector has the following pin assignments shown in
Table D-10.
Table D-10: Modem connector pin assignments.
Pin
Description
I/O
1
Analog Ground
—
2
Pin is cut to provide keyed connection.
3
Mono line level input from modem to Line In jack.
In
4
Analog Ground
—
5
Left channel line level audio output to modem.
Out
6
Analog Ground
—
7
Right channel line level audio output to modem.
Out
8
Mono line level input from modem to PC Speaker.
In
9
Analog Ground
—
10
Microphone input from modem.
In
N/A
PC Speaker Connector Pin Assignments
The PC Speaker connector has the following pin assignments as
shown in Table D-11.
Table D-11: PC Speaker connector pin assignments.
Pin
Signal
I/O
1
+5V
In
2
PC Speaker Out
In
Hardware Information D-9
SPDIF Connector Pin Assignments
The SPDIF connector has the following pin assignments as shown in
Table D-12.
Table D-12: SPDIF connector pin assignments.
Pin
Signal
0
Digital Out
1
Digital Ground
Speaker/Line Connector Pin Assignments
The Speaker/Line connector has the following pin assignments as
shown in Table D-13.
Table D-13: Speaker/Line connector pin assignments.
Pin
Description
I/O
1
Left channel line level audio out
Out
2
Right channel line level audio out
Out
3
Pin is cut to provide keyed connection
—
4
Analog Ground
—
5
Left channel speaker audio out
Out
6
Right channel speaker audio out
Out
D-10 Hardware Information
Telephone Answering Device Connector Pin
Assignments
The Telephone Answering Device connector has the following pin
assignments as shown in Table D-14.
Table D-14: Telephone Answering Device connector pin assignments.
Pin
Description
I/O
1
Mono Line-In from modem.
In
2
Analog Ground
—
3
Analog Ground
—
4
Microphone output to modem.
Out
Wave Blaster Connector Pin Assignments
The Wave Blaster connector has the following pin descriptions as
shown in Table D-15.
Table D-15: Wave Blaster connector pin assignments.
Pin
Description
Pin
Description
1
Digital Ground
2
NC
3
Digital Ground
4
MIDI Output
5
Digital Ground
6
VCC
7
Digital Ground
8
MIDI Input
9
Digital Ground
10
VCC
11
Digital Ground
12
NC
13
NC
14
VCC
15
Analog Ground
16
NC
Hardware Information D-11
Table D-15: Wave Blaster connector pin assignments.
Pin
Description
Pin
Description
17
Analog Ground
18
+12 V
19
Analog Ground
20
Line In: Right
21
Analog Ground
22
-12 V
23
Analog Ground
24
Line In: Left
25
Analog Ground
26
ResetB
D-12 Hardware Information
E
Technical Support
For the latest technical support information, please refer to the
‘Creative Technical Services’ leaflet, supplied with your product.
We are committed to giving you the best product as well as the best
technical support. Please enter the following information in the table
below and have it ready when you contact Technical Support.
❑ The model and serial numbers of your card and other devices.
❑ Error message on the screen and how it came about.
❑ Information on the adapter card that conflicts with your card.
❑ Hardware configuration information such as the base I/O
address, IRQ line, or DMA channel used.
❑ Type and version of your operating system, e.g., DOS 6.0,
Windows 3.1x or Windows 95.
Please ensure to retain your purchase receipt plus all packaging
and contents until such time that all components of the product
are functioning to your satisfaction. They will all be required in
the unlikely event that your product needs to be returned to
Creative.
Before contacting ‘Creative Technical Services’, please ensure
that you have read Appendix C, ‘Troubleshooting’.
Technical Support E-1
For quick and easy reference, it is advisable that you write down the
following numbers of your card and other hardware devices, if
installed in your system in Table E-1 and Table E-2.
Table E-1:
Model and Serial Numbers of your hardware.
Hardware
Audio Card*
Video Card
Fax/Modem
CD-ROM Drive
MIDI Device
Telephony Card
Others:
Model Number
Serial Number
*See label on underside of card
Table E-2:
Hardware Configuration Information.
Hardware
Audio Card
Video Card
Fax/Modem
CD-ROM Drive
MIDI Device
Graphics Card
Others:
Base I/O Address
IRQ
This section shows where you can contact us.
❑ Inside Europe
❑ Through CompuServe
❑ By Fax
E-2 Technical Support
DMA
Inside Europe
See ‘Creative Technical Services’ leaflet for details.
Through CompuServe
To serve you better, we have created a Creative Labs Forum on
CompuServe. Through this forum:
❑ You will have direct access to our company representatives
who will be there to answer your questions.
❑ You will be part of an interactive community of Creative’s
product users. Here you can share experiences and ideas and
also seek solutions to problems.
❑ We will also keep you up-to-date on the latest product
information, software updates, and fixes to common problems.
❑ We will also welcome your recommendations and suggestions
for new products and for improving our products in future
releases.
See ‘Creative Technical Services’ leaflet for details.
By Fax
For fast and efficient Technical Support solutions, please use our
telephone service in the first instance. If you decide to write or fax us
then please send your correspondence ONLY to our Ireland address.
Please allow up to two weeks processing and postal time for a
response. See ‘Creative Technical Services’ leaflet for details.
AutoFax is a facility that allows you to obtain product and technical
information through facsimile services. In Europe, use the following
number: +353 1 8203667.
Technical Support E-3
Quick Start
™
Interneted Audio
This leaflet contains abbreviated information to get you started right away.
This information is organized as follows:
1. Installation instructions for Windows 95.
❑ Setting up Microsoft Internet Explorer
❑ Setting up Dialing and Service Provider Information
❑ Setting up a Dial Up Script
2. Installation instructions for Windows 3x.
❑ Setting up Microsoft Internet Explorer
3. A Creative Video Webphone 3.0 Guide to help you get on line.
Installing Software for Windows 95
To install the accompanying applications for Windows 95:
1. Ensure that your CD-ROM drive is installed and working
properly. If not, refer to the document that comes with your
drive to solve the problem.
2. Load the installation CD-ROM into your CD-ROM drive.
The installation CD-ROM supports Windows 95 AutoPlay
mode and starts running automatically.
3. Choose the desired applications to install.
4. Follow the instructions on the screen to finish installing your
applications.
To install Real Audio as a component of Microsoft Internet
Explorer 3.0, Microsoft Internet Explorer 3.0 must be fully
installed. To do this, follow the instructions above with Real
Audio not checked, and reboot your computer. Then follow the
instructions above and install Real Audio only.
1
Setting Up Microsoft Internet Explorer
If you have installed Microsoft Internet Explorer, you need to
configure Windows 95 and set up Microsoft Internet Explorer for your
Internet Service Provider.
1. Before you proceed to set up Microsoft Internet Explorer, get
the following ready:
2. Windows 95 CD-ROM to install the required drivers when
prompted.
3. Information from your Internet Service Provider:
❑ The name of your Internet Service Provider.
❑ Your user or account name.
❑ Your password.
❑ The phone number to dial up your Internet Service
Provider.
❑ Your DNS server address.
❑ Your IP address and subnet mask. This is usually not
required as the Service Provider may automatically assign
one to you each time you log on.
❑ A dial-up script. This is required by some Internet Service
Providers.
❑ Your proxy server and port number. This is required by
some Internet Service Providers.
❑ If you intend to use Microsoft Exchange to handle your
e-mail, you would need the following additional
information:
a. Your e-mail address.
b. Your Internet mail server.
If you do not have the above information, call your
Internet Service Provider to obtain them.
To set up Microsoft Internet Explorer, you need to do the following:
❑ Set up the dialing and Service Provider information.
❑ Set up a dial-up script (if a dial-up script is required by your
Service Provider).
2
Setting Up the Dialing and Service Provider Information
To set up the dialing and Service Provider information:
1. Click Start on the taskbar.
2. Select Programs, followed by Accessories, and then Internet
Tools to run “Get On The Internet”.
3. Under “Setup Options” choose “Manual” and click Next.
4. Click Next on the “Welcome to Internet Setup” dialog box to
access the “How to Connect” dialog box.
5. Select “Connect using my phone line” and click Next.
6. You will be prompted to select whether you would like to use
Microsoft Exchange to handle your Internet mail. Select your
choice and click Next.
7. Click Next to install files and driver to access the Internet. If
prompted, insert the Windows 95 CD-ROM to install the
required drivers.
8. Enter the Name of Service Provider and click Next.
9. Enter the phone number to dial up your Internet Service
Provider and click Next.
10. Enter your user name and password and click Next.
11. In the IP Address dialog box, select “My Internet Service
Provider automatically assign me one” and click Next.
12. Enter the addresses for DNS Server and Alternate DNS Server.
The address is made of four numbers separated by periods, e.g.,
“149.174.211.5”.
If you have chosen to let Microsoft Exchange to handle your Internet
mail (see step 7):
a. Enter your e-mail address and Internet mail server and click Next.
b. Click Next in the Exchange Profile dialog box.
13. Click Finish to complete the setup.
14. If your Service Provider requires a proxy server, follow the
steps below to configure it:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Click Start on the taskbar.
Select Settings, followed by Control Panel.
Double-click the Internet icon.
Select the Connection tab.
Ensure that the User Proxy Server box is checked.
3
f.
Click the Settings button in the Proxy Server box and in the Server
box type the Proxy server address followed by the port number.
E.g., If your Service Provider’s proxy server is proxy.myisp.com
and the port number is 8080, then the entry should be
“proxy.myisp.com:8080”.
g. Click OK.
To Set Up a Dial-Up Script
Ignore this section if your Service Provider does not require
a dial-up script. If using Dial-Up Scripting, do not check the
“Bring Up Terminal Window” option.
To set up a dial-up script:
1. If you have not installed the Dial-Up Scripting Tool, follow the
steps below to install the tool:
a.
b.
c.
d.
Insert the Windows 95 CD-ROM into your CD-ROM drive.
Using the Control Panel, select Add/Remove Programs.
Select Windows Setup from the Title Bar.
Select Have Disk, Browse and locate the RNAPLUS.INF file in
\ADMIN\APPTOOLS\DSCRIPT\.
e. Click OK and follow the instructions on screen to complete the
installation.
2. You will need a dial-up script (filename.SCP) in the directory
\Program Files\Accessories\ of your system. This is usually
provided by your Internet Service Provider.
If you do not have a dial-up script, check with your Internet
Service Provider whether you need one and where can you
download one to your system.
3. Once the Dial-Up Scripting Tool is installed:
a. Click Start on the taskbar.
b. Select Programs, followed by Accessories to run the Dial-Up
Scripting Tool.
c. In the Connections section, select the name of your Internet
Service Provider.
d. Click Browse and double-click on the script file name you created
in step 2.
e. Click Apply and click Close.
4
4. Finally, make sure that TCP/IP is the only option selected as the
allowed network protocol:
a. Right-click The Internet icon on your desktop
b. Select Properties
c. Select Properties a second time from the Dialing box under the
Connection tab.
d. Select Server Type
e. Ensure that TCP/IP is the only option selected as the allowed
network protocol.
Running Microsoft Internet Explorer
Once you have set up Microsoft Internet Explorer, you are ready to
connect to your Internet Service Provider. To do so, double-click The
Internet icon on your desktop.
Installing Software for Windows 3.x
To install the accompanying software for Windows 3.x:
1. Ensure that your CD-ROM drive is installed and working
properly. If not, refer to the document that comes with your
drive to solve the problem.
2. Start Windows.
3. Load the installation CD-ROM into your CD-ROM drive.
4. Select Run from the File menu.
5. Type the drive letter of your CD-ROM drive (eg D:\), followed
by the Internet directory, the desired interneted audio
application directory, the operating system and the application
installation command (see table below).
Application
Command
Microsoft Internet Explorer
D:\INTERNET\MSIE\WIN31\ENGLISH\SETUP
Real Audio
D:\INTERNET\RA\WIN31\ENGLISH\RA16_30
Video WebPhone
D:\INTERNET\VIDEOWP\WIN31\ENGLISH\WPSETUP
6. Follow the instructions on the screen to finish installing your
application.
7. Repeat steps 4 to 6 until you have installed all the desired
applications.
5
Setting up Microsoft Internet Explorer
When you have installed Microsoft Internet Explorer, you need to
configure your modem to be recognized under Windows 3.x and set up
Microsoft Internet Explorer for your Internet Service Provider.
Before you set up Microsoft Internet Explorer, have the following ready:
1. Windows 3.x disks or CD-ROM and your modem
configuration software.
2. Information from your Internet Service Provider:
❑ The name of your Internet Service Provider.
❑ Your user or account name.
❑ Your password.
❑ The phone number to dial your Internet Service Provider.
❑ Your DNS server address.
❑ Your I.P. address and subnet mask. This may not be
required by your Internet Service Provider as they may
automatically assign one each time you log on.
❑ Your proxy server and port number. This is required by
some Internet Service Providers.
To set up Microsoft Internet Explorer, you need to do the following:
❑ Set up your modem under Windows 3.x and set up the
Dialing and Internet Server Provider information.
To set up your modem under Windows 3.x and to set up
the Dialing and Internet Server Provider information:
1. Run your modem configuration software and ensure the
settings chosen do not conflict with any other devices. This
should be done before installing Microsoft Internet Explorer, as
the first part of the setup involves detecting your modem.
2. Click Next on the Install New Modem dialog box. Windows
will query all COM ports for the presence of a modem. This
may take a few minutes to complete.
3. Windows should detect your modem on the correct port. If it
cannot uniquely identify the modem, select the manufacturer
and model from the list provided.
6
4. You should then get a message saying your modem has been set
up successfully. You will then be asked to restart your
computer.
When your computer restarts, run Windows again to carry out
the next part of the setup.
5. Go to the Microsoft Internet Explorer Program Group and
double-click the “Get on The Internet” icon
6. Click Next on the “Get Connected” dialog box.
7. Under “Setup Options” choose “Manual” and click Next.
8. Enter the name of your Service Provider and click Next.
9. Enter the phone number to dial up your Internet Service
Provider and click Next.
10. Enter the user name and password and click Next.
11. In the IP Address dialog box, select “My Internet Service
Provider automatically assign me one” and click Next.
12. Enter the addresses for DNS Server and Alternate DNS Server.
The address is made of four numbers separated by periods, e.g.,
“149.174.211.5”.
13. You will be prompted to select whether you would like to use
Microsoft Exchange to handle your Internet mail. Select your
choice, fill in the necessary details and click Next.
14. You will be prompted to select whether you want to set up an
Internet News account. Select your choice, fill in the necessary
details and click Next.
15. Click Finish to complete the setup.
16. Select the group you wish the icon for this connection to appear in
at the Choose Program Manager Group dialog box and click OK.
17. By double clicking on this icon the Connect To dialog box
appears. Click on the Properties button in this dialog box.
18. Under the General tab, the telephone number etc., that you have
previously entered should appear. Make sure the “Bring up
Terminal Window” option, in the Connection Preferences box
of the dialog, is checked.
19. Click the modem tab of the Connection Properties dialog. The
name of your modem should appear at the top of the box. Here
you can change the maximum speed of your modem depending
on how fast your modem is.
7
20. Click on the Advanced button at the bottom of the dialog.
This displays your modem address and interrupt request settings.
The interrupt setting can only be set to interrupt 3 or 4. You
should ensure your modem is using one of these interrupts.If
you have an internal modem that uses COM3 or COM4, such
as a Creative Labs Phone Blaster or a Creative Labs Modem
Blaster, it may select interrupt 10 or 11 as its default setting.
If you would prefer not to change this setting, then you can
force the Modem Properties dialog to recognize this interrupt
by editing the Windows INI file ‘SHIVAPPP.INI’. This file is
in the Microsoft Internet Explorer installation directory,
which is IEXPLORE by default, and you should change the
[COM3] or the [COM4] section, depending on which COM
port your modem uses so that the interrupt line reads
‘IRQ=10’ or ‘IRQ=11’, again depending on the interrupt
your modem uses.
Connecting to Your Internet Service Provider
1. Click Connect on the “Connect to” dialog box to dial your
provider.
2. When you are logging on to your Internet Service Provider’s
computer, another Window may appear asking for your User
Name and Password and possibly some additional information.
Enter this information and then click the Continue button.
If you do not have the above information, call your
Internet Service Provider to obtain them.
8
Creative Video Webphone 3.0 Guide
Entering your activation key
When you start your Creative Video Webphone for the first time, you
will be asked to enter an “Activation Key”. The activation key is a
16-character code provided with your CD-ROM. Enter the
16-character activation key in the dialog box and select “OK”. Once
your activation key is verified, the enhanced features of the Creative
Video Webphone will be enabled, including unlimited talk time on
one line.
Entering information in the Configure window
When you start your Creative Video Webphone for the first time, it
will open the Configure window for you to specify your User
Information and Network Parameters. This information is very
important. If you enter erroneous data, chances are your Creative
Video Webphone will not operate properly. Once you enter your User
Information and Network Parameters, press the CONFIGURE text,
located on top of the Configure window, to save the information.
Entering your User Information
Please enter all your User Information. If it is inaccurate, you will be
misrepresented in NetSpeak’s Information Assistance and other
Creative Video Webphone users will not be able to find you to call
you. In addition, your ‘Caller ID’ information will be incorrect when
you place outbound calls.
Information
You can select how much of your user information will be published
in NetSpeak’s Information Assistance (all, some or none) to be made
visible to other Creative Video Webphone users.
9
Entering your Network Parameters
The Network Parameters required in this release are your:
❑ E-mail address that serves as your Creative Video
Webphone number
❑ WebPhone password protects others from using your
Creative Video Webphone
❑ Password Confirmation used to confirm your Creative
Video Webphone Password
❑ E-Mail Login used for connecting to your POP Server
❑ E-Mail Password used for connecting to your POP Server
❑ POP Server address used for retrieving your off-line voice
mail messages
❑ SMTP Server address used for sending voice mail to
off-line parties
WebPhone Password
The WebPhone password prevents other users from using their
WebPhone to assume your identity. Once you have configured your
WebPhone with your e-mail address, no one else can configure a
WebPhone with your e-mail address.
Then only the e-mail address is protected, i.e. other users can
still configure their phones with whatever first and last names
they desire.
You will not need to enter your password each time you use the
Creative Video Webphone , but you will need to enter your password
if you reinstall the Creative Video Webphone for any reason, so take
care not to lose your password. You may change your Creative Video
Webphone password at any time by entering a new password in the
WebPhone Password and password confirmations fields. A message
will be displayed when your password change has been accepted.
If you forget your password, please call “[email protected]” on
your WebPhone or send e-mail to “[email protected]”
describing your problem. Support agents will reset your password
once your identity is confirmed. If you enter an invalid password, your
WebPhone will ONLY be able to call “[email protected]” or
“[email protected]”.
10
Network Parameter descriptions
To assist you in understanding the other Network Parameters, lets look
at Roger Wilco’s Network Parameters:
❑ E-Mail address: [email protected]
❑ E-Mail Login: wilco
❑ E-Mail Password*******
❑ Password Confirmation *******
❑ POP Server address:mailhost.provider.net
❑ SMTP Server address:mailhost.provider.net
Roger has a dialup SLIP/PPP account to his Internet Service Provider
(ISP) which has a domain name of “provider.net”. Roger’s E-Mail
Login is “rwilco”, which he defined when he established his Internet
account with his ISP. The E-Mail login is used along with his
provider’s domain name to construct his E-Mail address:
“[email protected]”.
His ISP’s POP Server (retains e-mail sent to you by other users) and
SMTP Server (used to send e-mail from you to other users) are both
named “mailhost” which is used along with his provider’s domain
name to construct the POP and SMTP Server addresses:
“mailhost.provider.net”.
If you do not know or are not sure of the values for some of these
parameters, check your E-Mail program’s (e.g., Eudora) setup screen,
check your Web browser’s (e.g., Netscape) setup screen or consult
your Internet Service Provider. If you can only find your SMTP Server
address, you can probably safely assume your POP Server address is
identical.
Changing your E-Mail Address
In the event you change your e-mail address (e.g., you change your
Internet service provider), you will need to change your E-Mail
address in the Network Parameters section of the Creative Video
Webphone Configure window. A message will be displayed when
your e-mail address change has been confirmed.
11
Audio Programs and your Creative Video Webphone
Playing audio (WAV, MIDI, CD player...) through your sound card
with another program while Creative Video Webphone is running is
not a good idea and may prevent Creative Video Webphone from
operating properly. When Creative Video Webphone requires control
of the sound card (to play a sound effect or to allow conversation with
a party) and the sound card is in use, it will attempt to terminate the
sound being played. If Creative Video Webphone cannot gain control
of the sound card, it will display a dialog box informing you “Sound
Card Already In Use”. If this occurs during an active conversation, the
call will be placed on hold. Correct the problem (stop using the sound
card with the other application) and take the call off hold to resume
your conversation.
Sound Cards and your Creative Video Webphone
Make sure your Voice Activation Level (located in the Creative Video
Webphone flip door), is set to recognize silence. Otherwise, the
parties you call using half duplex sound cards will never get an
opportunity to talk (they will always see LISTEN in their display and
you will always see TALK in your display). If this happens, stop
talking into the microphone and move the Voice Activation Level
(VOX) slider to the right until the VOX meter displays Silence and you
see the red bar. Now verify the VOX enunciator displays Speaking and
the red bar disappears (covered by the green bar) only when you talk
into the microphone.
You will obtain superior audio performance if you enable your sound
card’s automatic gain control (AGC) via the mixer application bundled
with your sound card.
Modems and your Creative Video Webphone
If you have a modem connection (dialup) to your Internet service
provider, make sure your modem has error correction and data
compression enabled (this is the default for almost every modem we
know of). If your 14.4 kb modem does not support data compression,
you and the parties you talk to will not obtain the audio performance
that is possible using data compression. To verify your modem has
error correction and data compression is enabled, consult your
modem’s documentation.
12
Bandwidth and your Answering Machine
If you have a 14.4Kb modem and have your answering machine
enabled, when you are talking to a party on a Line and one or more
parties call and engage your answering machine, your answering
machine will play an OGM to each of the parties in the background.
This will degrade the audio performance of your conversation. It is
recommended that you disable your answering machine while talking
on your Creative Video Webphone .
Troubleshooting
1. Received audio is delayed and choppy.
This may happen if you have a bad connection to the Internet
and/or you are talking during a heavy traffic period on the Internet
(slow packet transmission because of diminished available
bandwidth). This is not a problem with Creative Video Webphone
but a natural phenomena associated with the Internet. If this is the
case, try reconnecting to the Internet or call at another time.
2. You cannot hear the remote party
If Creative Video Webphone always displays TALK and never
displays IN USE or LISTEN, then you must raise your Voice
Activation Level (the VOX slider in the flip door) so Creative
Video Webphone can detect silence and allow the remote party to
talk (this is will not be the case if both you and the remote party
have full duplex sound cards). If this is not the case and Creative
Video Webphone displays LISTEN when you would expect to
hear something from the remote party, check your Speaker volume
on the flip door and in your sound card’s mixer application. If you
still cannot hear the remote party and Creative Video Webphone
does not periodically display LISTEN, the remote party’s Voice
Activation Level or MIC volume is not set correctly. Use the TXT
button to launch the Text Board and tell them to adjust their MIC
and/or Voice Activation Level.
3. The remote party cannot hear you
If Creative Video Webphone always displays LISTEN, the remote
party’s MIC volume is too high and/or their Voice Activation
Level is set incorrectly so their Creative Video Webphone cannot
detect silence and is constantly transmitting (not giving you an
opportunity to talk). If this is not the case and Creative Video
Webphone displays IN USE but never TALK when you speak into
the microphone, increase your MIC volume and check your Voice
Activation Level to verify Creative Video Webphone can detect
your voice. If Creative Video Webphone does display TALK
when you speak into the microphone and LISTEN when the
remote party speaks and the remote party still cannot hear you, the
remote party’s speaker volume is probably not set correctly. Use
the TXT button to launch the Text Board and tell raise their
speaker volume.
For additional information, see the NetSpeak home page, at
http://www.netspeak.com.
No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the prior
written consent of Creative Technology Ltd.
Copyright © 1997 by Creative Technology Ltd. All rights reserved.
Version 2.0
October 1997
Creative Video Webphone is a trademark of the NetSpeak Corporation.
Microsoft, MS-DOS, Windows, and the Windows logo are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
Real Audio is a trademark of Progressive Networks.
Sound Blaster is a registered trademark of Creative Technology Ltd.
All other products are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.
DOS/Windows 3.1x
Plug and Play
Installation Tips
Welcome to the world of Plug and Play (PnP).
If you are going to install your Creative PnP card in a PnP system like
Windows 95, you only need to “plug” the card into your personal
computer and the card will “play” shortly after the system reboots.
However, if you want to install this card in a non-PnP environment
such as DOS/Windows 3.1x, you need to use Creative PnP
Configuration Manager (CTCM) and Creative PnP Configuration
Utility (CTCU).
So, we have prepared this leaflet to show you how to install and use
CTCM and CTCU in your system. We have also provided some
information here, from page 11 to page 16, to help you understand
basic PnP concepts as well as Creative’s PnP solution for non-PnP
environments. And to find out how to solve some common PnP
installation problems, just flip to the last section which starts from
page 16.
The information here is organized into the following sections:
❑ Installing CTCM & CTCU
❑ Using CTCM
❑ Using CTCU
❑ The CTCU Interface
❑ PnP Concepts
❑ PnP in DOS/Windows 3.1x
❑ Creative’s Approach to PnP
❑ Common Questions and Answers
Installing CTCM & CTCU
To install Creative PnP Configuration Manager (CTCM) and Creative
PnP Configuration Utility (CTCU) in DOS/Windows 3.1x:
1. Load the installation CD-ROM into your CD-ROM drive.
2. From the Windows File Manager, select File, Run
and type D:\WIN31\DISK1\SETUP
3. Follow the instructions on the screen to complete the
installation.
CTCM is installed as part of the software installation, and the
following line added to the CONFIG.SYS file:
DEVICE=<C:\SB16>\CTCM.EXE
where <C:\SB16> is the directory where you have installed CTCM.
This CTCM statement will be placed before all the statements that
load other low-level device drivers (such as CTSB16.SYS and
SBIDE.SYS) so that your Creative PnP cards will be configured
before these device drivers try to use them.
If you add this line to CONFIG.SYS manually, please make
sure that this line is placed after the statement (if any) that loads
the other PnP configuration manager in your system.
The installation program will also add the following lines to the
AUTOEXEC.BAT file:
SET CTCM=<C:\SB16>
<C:\SB16>\CTCU /S /W=<C:\WINDOWS>
where <C:\SB16> and <C:\WINDOWS> are the directories where
your CTCM/CTCU and Windows 3.1x files are installed respectively.
2
After the installation, CTCM and CTCU will be invoked each time
you boot your system. CTCM will scan for and configure any
unconfigured Creative PnP cards. CTCU will run in silent mode and
update the parameters needed by your Creative and Windows drivers.
It will also update the BLASTER environment variable if it detects a
Creative audio card in the system.
For more details on how the CTCM and CTCU commands work,
please read the sections “Using CTCM” on page 3 and “Using CTCU”
on page 4.
Using CTCM
After booting your system, you may want to configure a Creative PnP
card again. You can do so by running Creative PnP Configuration
Manager (CTCM) from the DOS prompt:
1. Exit to DOS if you are in Windows 3.1x.
2. Change to the directory of your CTCM files. The default
directory is C:\SB16.
3. Type CTCM and press <ENTER>.
CTCM will configure your Creative PnP card(s) and update the
BLASTER environment variable if it detects a Creative audio
card in your system.
CTCM configures Creative PnP cards only. But it can work
with or without another PnP configuration manager installed in
the same system. Just make sure that the statement which
invokes CTCM in your CONFIG.SYS file is placed AFTER
the statement that calls the other configuration manager.
3
Using CTCU
Creative PnP Configuration Utility (CTCU) allows you to view, free
or re-allocate resources reserved for a card. So you should run
Creative PnP Configuration Utility (CTCU) when one of the
following situations happens:
❑ Your PnP cards’ settings do not work properly.
For example, some systems do not support high DMA (Direct
Memory Access) and one of your PnP devices is set to use high
DMA. Then you need to run CTCU to select another set of
configuration which does not use high DMA.
❑ You need to add resource settings for new and existing legacy
(non-PnP) cards.
❑ You have changed the resource settings of your legacy cards.
❑ You have removed a legacy card from your system.
CTCU does not access the resource settings database used by
Intel Configuration Manager (ICM). So, do not use CTCU to
change or disable your card settings if you already have ICM
installed. Use ISA Configuration Utility (ICU) instead. For
more details, please refer to the section “PnP in DOS/Windows
3.1x” in page 13.
To run CTCU in DOS/Windows 3.1x:
1. Exit to DOS if you are in Windows 3.1x.
2. Change to the directory where your CTCM and CTCU
programs are installed. The default directory is C:\SB16.
3. Type CTCU and press <ENTER>.
The CTCU interface will appear.
4
The CTCU command has two optional switches: /S and
/W=C:\<WINDOWS>. You can type it in the following way:
CTCU /S /W=<C:\WINDOWS>
where <C:\WINDOWS> is the directory where your Windows 3.1x
files are installed and the switches are as follows on the next page.
Parameter
Description
/S
Notifies CTCU to run in silent mode. This
means that CTCU will not display any messages
or screens. It will simply update the parameters
required by the Creative drivers. If you do not
use the /S switch, CTCU will run in full-screen
mode (see Figure 1).
/W
Informs CTCU to update the PnP hardware
information of your Windows drivers in the
SYSTEM.INI file. If you do not use this switch,
CTCU will prompt you to enter the name of the
directory where your Windows files can be
found.
The CTCU Interface
When you run CTCU in full-screen mode, you can pull down the menu
to select one of the following sections:
❑ PnP Cards section
❑ Legacy Cards section
❑ System Devices section
❑ PCI Devices section
You can use your mouse or keyboard to move around and select an
item or action in CTCU.
5
Mouse Action
❑ To pull down the CTCU menu or select an item in the menu or
box using your mouse, click on the item.
Keyboard Action
❑ To pull down the CTCU menu using your keyboard, press
<ALT> followed by a key.
For example, to pull down the Menu, press <ALT, M>.
❑ To select an item in a menu or box, use the arrow keys to move
your screen cursor to that item.
❑ To move your screen cursor from box to box within the same
window, press <TAB>. To see more details about the item,
double-click the item or press <ENTER> after you have moved
your screen cursor to that item.
The instructions in the following sections are written with the
assumption that you will use your mouse in CTCU.
PnP Cards Section
You can use this section to view the resource settings of the
PnP cards in your system and change the settings of Creative
PnP cards only.
When you select the PnP Cards section from the CTCU menu, the Plug
and Play window will appear, listing the PnP cards in the system.
Choosing a card here will, in turn, display a list of logical devices on
that particular card.
To view the resources for a PnP device, double-click the device you
want. Alternatively, select the device from the list and then click the
Resources button. The Resources window will appear.
Resources Window
The Resources window displays the current resource settings of a
particular logical device. The settings shown may include input/output
(I/O) ranges, interrupts, Direct Memory Access (DMA) channels and
32-bit memory ranges, depending on the PnP card you have and the
configuration chosen.
6
To change the resource configuration, click the down arrow next to the
Configuration box and then select a suitable configuration which has
all the settings that your card needs.
To disable a logical device, click the Disable checkbox. A mark will
appear in the box, informing CTCM not to configure this device the
next time it runs.
Reconfigure Button
To view or change a resource setting, double-click the setting you
want, or alternatively, select the setting and then click the Reconfigure
button in the Resources window. Depending on the setting that you
have chosen, one of the following windows will appear:
❑ I/O Range window
❑ Interrupt window
❑ Direct Memory Access window
❑ Memory Range window
The I/O Range window displays the current I/O resource setting and a
list of possible settings. To change this setting, select one from the list.
Make sure it will not conflict with the other cards’ settings. Then
double-click the new setting or click the OK button.
The Interrupt window displays the current interrupt resource setting
and a list of possible settings. To change this setting, select one from
the list. Make sure that it will not conflict with the other cards’
settings. Then double-click the new setting or click the OK button.
The Direct Memory Access window displays the current DMA
resource setting and a list of possible settings. To change this setting,
select one from the list. Make sure it will not conflict with the other
cards’ settings. Then double-click the new setting or click the OK
button.
The Memory Range window displays the current 32-bit memory
resource setting and a list of possible settings. To change this setting,
select one from the list. Make sure it will not conflict with the other
cards’ settings. Then double-click the new setting or click OK.
7
Each of these windows has a Conflicting Devices message box
which will inform you of any hardware conflicts that may
result from the settings you have just selected for your card.
To see the list of settings available in each window, click the
down arrow on the right-hand side of the Choices box.
Test Button
Once you have reconfigured the resource settings of your card, select
the setting and click the Test button in the resources window. CTCU
will test the settings allocated to your device and inform you of the
outcome.
If the testing is not successful, you should reconfigure and test the
settings again.
CTCU supports the testing of Creative’s audio and wavetable
devices only.
Legacy Cards Section
You can use this section to enter, view or change the resource
settings of all the legacy (non-PnP) cards in your system.
When you select the Legacy Cards section from the CTCU menu, the
Legacy window will appear, displaying the resources taken up by the
legacy cards in your system. You can view, alter or add a legacy
(non-PnP) card’s resource settings by clicking one of these buttons
below:
❑ View All button
❑ View button
❑ Add button
❑ Remove button
❑ Change button
View All Button
Clicking this button in the Legacy window opens the View All
window, which lists all the resources you have reserved in your
system.
8
These resources are grouped by type and displayed in four boxes —
input/output Range (I/O), interrupt (IRQ), Direct Memory Access
channel (DMA), and 32-bit memory range (Mem).
View Button
Clicking this button in the Legacy window opens the View window
which lists the resources reserved for a selected legacy card in your
system.
Add Button
Clicking this button in the Legacy window opens the Add window
where you can enter the following details for a new or existing legacy
card in your system (if it is not listed in the Legacy Window):
❑ Card Name
❑ Input/Output Range (I/O)
❑ Interrupt (IRQ)
❑ Direct Memory Access channel (DMA)
❑ 32-bit Memory Range (Mem)
You must enter the card’s name in the Card Name field.
The other fields can be left blank if the card does not use that
resource(s).
Remove Button
Clicking this button in the Legacy window removes a selected card’s
settings from your system. Once the settings are removed, you can
proceed to remove the card from your system.
To re-install the same card, you have to enter the card’s original
settings again. Alternatively, you can retain a card’s resource
settings by simply marking the settings for retrieval in the
Change window (refer to the next section).
9
Change Button
Clicking this button in the Legacy window opens the Change window
which displays the current resources that have been reserved for a
selected legacy card. You can also change any of the resources as well
as the card’s name here.
To store a card’s system settings for future use, select the Card
Removed check box in the Change window and click OK. To
re-use the same resources after re-installing the card, simply
clear the check box to retrieve its original settings.
Be very careful when you add or change resource information
for a legacy card. Verify all the hardware settings of the legacy
cards in your system. Filling in incorrect data may reserve
resources which will not be used by any device. In addition,
CTCM would not be informed of resource(s) actually reserved
by the legacy card. This may in turn lead to resource conflicts.
System Devices Section
You can use this section to view but not change the resource
settings of the system devices in your computer.
When you select the System Devices section from the CTCU menu,
the System Device Resources window appears, listing all the
resources used by your system devices.
These resources are grouped by type and displayed in four boxes —
input/output range (I/O), interrupt (IRQ), Direct Memory Access
channel (DMA) and 32-bit memory range (Mem).
PCI Devices Section
You can use this section to view but not change the resource
settings of the PCI devices in your computer.
When you select the PCI Devices section from the CTCU menu, the
PCI Devices window appears. You can view one or all of existing PCI
cards' resource settings by clicking one of these buttons:
10
❑ View All button
❑ View button
Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) local bus is a newly
developed bus system that utilizes a 33MHz 32-bit data path.
This bus architecture transfers data at a much faster rate than
standard ISA bus.
View All Button
Clicking this button in the PCI Devices window opens the View All
window, which lists all the resources used by the PCI cards in your
system.
View Button
Clicking this button in the PCI Devices window opens the View
window which lists the resources reserved for a selected PCI card in
your system.
PnP Concepts
When you add a hardware card to your personal computer (PC), you
must reserve some system resources — such as input/output address
spaces, interrupts, Direct Memory Access channels or memory spaces
— for the card. You must also make sure that there is no hardware
conflict, that is, the resources reserved by one card are not used by
another card in the same system.
Before Plug and Play (PnP) was introduced, you can reserve system
resources only by manually changing the settings of some dip switches
or jumpers on a legacy (non-PnP) card. This can be quite difficult
since you have to understand how the hardware settings correspond to
the system resources that your card requires. It can also be very tedious
since you may need to change the dip switch or jumper settings several
times before your card can be configured without any hardware
conflict.
11
With the emergence of Plug and Play (PnP), a revolutionary design
philosophy and a new PC architecture specification finalized recently,
the PC, hardware cards, drivers and the operating system can now
work together without such “user intervention”.
You no longer need to change any hardware settings on your card
before it can work properly in a PC. Instead, a PnP BIOS or software
would find out the types of resources each card needs and allocate the
resources accordingly.
Generally, a PnP card requires one of the following to work:
❑ PnP System BIOS
❑ PnP Operating System
❑ PnP Configuration Drivers and Utilities
The PnP BIOS specification went through several revisions.
The version 1.0a specification was finalized in May 1994, with
further clarifications documented in October 1994. As a result,
older PnP systems shipped are not fully compliant with this
specification. So, there are some compatibility problems. For
more details, please read the section “PnP in DOS/Windows
3.1x” on page 14.
PnP System BIOS
The PnP system BIOS is the lowest level of your PnP system. Its main
functions are to provide information on the resource settings of your
system devices and to configure PnP cards.
Some PnP system BIOS configure PnP cards automatically. Other
BIOS give you an option in their setup utilities to disable their PnP
configuration capability. Please refer to your system manual for more
details.
PnP Operating System
A PnP operating system provides a fully PnP user environment. It can
support PnP cards on its own, with or without a PnP system BIOS. Its
main functions are to determine which resources have been reserved
by the legacy and PnP cards in your system, and then dynamically
allocate free resources to newly added PnP cards.
12
Windows 95 is an example of a PnP operating system. When you
install or upgrade to Windows 95 for the first time, it will
automatically determine the resource settings of the existing cards in
your system and allocate other resources to new PnP cards.
When you add a legacy card later, however, you will need to run the
“Add New Hardware” wizard in Control Panel so that Windows 95
can detect this card. To avoid any conflicts that may be introduced by
the hardware settings of this new legacy card, Windows 95 may also
re-assign different resources to existing PnP cards.
PnP Configuration Drivers and Utilities
If you do not have a PnP operating system, you need to install a PnP
configuration driver and utility to perform the allocation and
configuration functions of a PnP operating system.
A PnP configuration driver determines the resource settings of all your
system devices and legacy cards, configures PnP cards, and provides
relevant configuration information to other drivers or applications that
access your PnP cards.
A PnP configuration utility allows you to view, enter or change the
resource settings of the PnP and legacy cards in your system. The new
or changed settings are then used by the PnP configuration driver to
configure new PnP cards.
Intel Configuration Manager (ICM) and ISA Configuration Utility
(ICU) are examples of a PnP configuration driver and a PnP
configuration utility. For more details, please read the next section
“PnP in DOS/Windows 3.1x” .
PnP in DOS/Windows 3.1x
DOS/Windows 3.1x is not a PnP operating system. So, to configure
PnP cards, you need to install a PnP configuration driver and a PnP
configuration utility.
Currently, a generic set of PnP configuration drivers and utilities that
you can find in the market for the DOS/Windows 3.1x environment is
ICM. Consisting of Intel Configuration Manager (ICM) and ISA
13
Configuration Utility (ICU), this driver and utility set was developed
by Intel Corporation as an interim solution to facilitate PnP
configuration when a PnP operating system is not available. It may
come pre-installed in your PC or bundled with your PnP cards.
However, due to the compatibility problem mentioned earlier (please
refer to the note in the section “PnP Concepts” on page 12), you may
encounter one of the following error message or problems when you
use ICM version 1.43 to configure your PnP card:
❑ “Error: Failed NVS write, Error=82h”
❑ Failure to detect PnP BIOS machine
❑ Failure to assign new configuration to PnP card
And ICM may not be able to configure your PnP card properly.
Creative’s Approach to PnP
To solve problems similar to those mentioned in the previous section,
we have developed a DOS-based PnP configuration driver and utility
for the DOS/Windows 3.1x environment. They are called Creative
PnP Configuration Manager (CTCM) and Creative PnP Configuration
Utility (CTCU).
CTCM can be loaded as a device driver through a statement in the
CONFIG.SYS file. It can also be run from the DOS prompt. It
configures Creative PnP cards only and provides configuration
information to other drivers or DOS applications.
CTCU is used when your DOS/Windows 3.1x system does not have
ICM and ICU. It allows you to perform the following functions on the
devices in your system:
❑ Enter, view, change or remove the settings of legacy cards
❑ View, change, or disable the settings of Creative PnP cards
❑ View the settings of system devices and non-Creative PnP
cards
14
Why Use CTCM and CTCU?
There are several reasons why we offer CTCM and CTCU:
1. CTCM provides a consistent method for configuring all
Creative PnP cards. It works with or without PnP BIOS or
ICM. If your PnP BIOS or ICM has already configured your
PnP card(s), CTCM will simply retain those settings.
2. If the PnP BIOS or ICM did not configure your Creative PnP
cards properly, due to incompatibility problems similar to
those mentioned in the section “PnP in DOS/Windows 3.1x” in
page 13, CTCM may be able to allocate resources to these
cards.
3. You need not reboot your system after using CTCU to change
Creative PnP card settings, if you do not have any DOS device
drivers (e.g., SBIDE.SYS or CTSB16.SYS) loaded. You only
need to run CTCM to reconfigure the card. This is possible
because CTCM can be activated from the DOS prompt, unlike
ICM.
Limitations of CTCM and CTCU
If you use a non-PnP operating system like DOS/Windows 3.1x and
do not have a PnP BIOS or ICM, your PnP card works like a
software-configurable card.
In such an environment, CTCM needs to know which resources have
been reserved by all the legacy and PnP cards, and system devices in
your system before it can allocate conflict-free resources to your new
Creative PnP card.
CTCM can get the resource settings of PnP cards and system devices
from the PnP cards and BIOS. But you need to use CTCU to enter the
resource settings of all the legacy cards in your PC, and then run
CTCM to configure your Creative PnP card.
You may still encounter hardware conflicts if the resource settings
specified through CTCU are incomplete or wrong. If this happens, use
CTCU to select a different group of resources for the Creative PnP
card that caused the conflict. You may need to try a few combinations
until you find one that works. This can be tedious, but it is easier than
the legacy way of changing dip switches or jumpers.
15
Common Questions and Answers
This section gives the answers to some common questions that you
may have while installing a Creative PnP card in the DOS/Windows
3.1x environment.
General Questions
Question
I have a PnP BIOS as well as a PnP operating system or
a PnP configuration driver and utility. Which one
should I use to configure my PnP card?
Answer
If you have a PnP operating system or a PnP
configuration driver and utility, it is better to let your
PnP operating system or configuration driver configure
your PnP card. Try to set your BIOS so that it will not
configure PnP cards since it may not have access to the
hardware setting information of your legacy (non-PnP)
cards and thus may give your PnP card some settings
that would conflict with those of existing legacy cards.
ICM (or other Configuration Manager) Questions
16
Question
Must I remove ICM (or another configuration
manager) in order to use CTCM?
Answer
No, you do not have to remove ICM (or another
configuration manager) to use CTCM. If both CTCM
and ICM are installed in your system, just make sure the
CTCM statement in your CONFIG.SYS file is placed
after the ICM statement.
Question
What should I do if I cannot configure my Creative PnP
card using ICM?
Answer
If you cannot configure your PnP card using ICM, try
removing ICM. Then use CTCU and CTCM to change
and reconfigure your card settings. For more details on
using CTCU or CTCM, please refer to the sections
“Using CTCM” in page 3 and “Using CTCU” in page 4.
CTCU Question
Question
Can I run CTCU to change or disable my card settings
if I have ICM in my system?
Answer
No, do not use CTCU to change or disable your card
settings since CTCU does not access or update the
resource settings database used by ICM.
You should use ICU instead to change or disable your
card settings if ICM is already loaded into your system.
CTCM Questions
Question
How do I use CTCM to configure both legacy and PnP
cards in DOS/Windows 3.1x?
Answer
First, run CTCU to add the information on the hardware
resource used by your legacy cards. Next, run CTCM to
configure your PnP card.
Alternatively, if you do not know your legacy cards’
settings, use CTCU to change the settings of your PnP
card. Then run CTCM and test whether your card works
properly. This is a trial-and-error method since CTCM
will not be “informed” about the resources that have
been reserved by your legacy cards. You may need to
try different combinations of settings before you can
configure your PnP cards successfully, without any
hardware conflicts with existing cards.
For more details on using CTCU or CTCM, please refer
to the sections “Using CTCM” in page 3 and “Using
CTCU” in page 4.
17
Question
My system hangs or reboots whenever I load CTCM.
What should I do?
Answer
The memory area of your PnP BIOS machine is
probably mapped by EMM386 using the HIGHSCAN
option and thus, can get corrupted easily. When it does,
CTCM will not work properly.
To solve this problem, remove the HIGHSCAN option
in the EMM386 statement in the CONFIG.SYS file.
For example, change the statement
DEVICE=<C:\dir>\EMM386.EXE HIGHSCAN
<other parameters>
to
DEVICE=<C:\dir>\EMM386.EXE
<other parameters>
where <C:\dir> is the directory in which your EMM386
program is installed and <other parameters> are the
other parameters in the EMM386 statement.
No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the
prior written consent of Creative Technology Ltd.
Copyright © 1997 by Creative Technology Ltd. All rights reserved.
Version 2.0
October 1997
Microsoft, MS-DOS, Windows, and the Windows logo are registered trademarks of
Microsoft Corporation.
All other products are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.
18
Notes for WaveSynth/WG Users
For the past few years, hardware wavetable synthesis has been the high-end
alternative to FM synthesis for audio reproduction in personal computers.
With ever-increasing CPU power and Intel’s new multimedia-extended
instructions, software wavetable synthesis is now feasible and can be
powerful. This is why we have introduced our software wavetable
synthesizer, Creative WaveSynth/WG. Since the technology is relatively
new, it currently has some limitations.
Due to these limitations, it is necessary to have two modes of operations for
Creative’s sound system — full-duplex and half-duplex modes. Each mode
caters to different needs but has some constraints (which are explained in this
leaflet). Thus, you should select the mode that suits your needs.
The following constraints apply in both full-duplex and half-duplex modes:
❑ You cannot record a WaveSynth/WG MIDI playback because
currently, the Sound Blaster hardware and driver do not support this.
❑ While WaveSynth/WG is playing a MIDI file, you cannot enable
Creative Mixer’s LED display. And vice versa.
Some of the constraints explained in this leaflet may not apply to your
audio card. For details, refer to the Readme file in you audio package.
Full-Duplex Mode
When you select this mode, you can play and record audio data concurrently.
But there are some constraints in this mode:
❑ If you want to play back and record concurrently, you can only do so
using uncompressed wave files, that is, Pulse Code Modulation
(PCM) data.
❑ While WaveSynth/WG is playing a MIDI file, you cannot do a wave
(including DirectSound) playback at the same time.
❑ You cannot add reverb to a wave (including DirectSound) playback.
❑ Since WaveSynth/WG outputs sounds at 22 kHz, if you are recording
a wave file at any other sampling rate, WaveSynth/WG cannot play a
MIDI file because the sampling rates for both playback and recording
must be the same.
1
For some audio cards, WaveSynth/WG can output sounds at
44 kHz if you select this option in the WaveSynth/WG control
panel.
In addition, for Sound Blaster cards that use one 8-bit and one 16-bit DMA
channels for either playback or recording, the following constraints also apply:
❑ while you are recording a 16-bit wave file, WaveSynth/WG cannot
play a MIDI file;
❑ while WaveSynth/WG is playing a MIDI file, you can record only an
8-bit wave file;
since WaveSynth/WG must play back through the 16-bit DMA channel.
If audio playback or recording is too slow (for example, resulting in
clicking sounds heard during playback), try to reduce the sampling
rate to improve performance.
Half-Duplex Mode
When you select this mode, you can do a wave (including DirectSound)
playback while WaveSynth/WG is playing a MIDI file. But there are some
constraints in this mode:
❑ You cannot play an audio file and record another one at the same time.
❑ Creative FastSpeech playback is not supported.
❑ Wave playback is restricted to the sampling rate conversions that
Microsoft’s Audio Compression Manager (ACM) supports. ACM
will do the necessary sampling rate conversion during playback.
Thus, if you do not have ACM, you cannot play 8 kHz wave files.
❑ You cannot play wave files when Creative Mixer’s LED is active
because LED is doing recording.
(To disable LED, refer to Creative Mixer’s online help.)
❑ The Volume Unit display of Microsoft Mixer is not available.
No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the
prior written consent of Creative Technology Ltd.
Copyright © 1997 Creative Technology Ltd. All rights reserved.
Sound Blaster is a trademark of Creative Technology Ltd.
Microsoft, MS-DOS, Windows 3.x, and Windows 95 are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
All other products are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.
Knowing Your Audio Card
Welcome to the next wave of multimedia
computing! Fully Sound Blaster compatible,
your audio card supports these features:
❑ Compliance with the Plug and Play (PnP)
ISA specification version 1.0a
❑ Compression algorithms such as A-law,
Mu-law, CTADPCM, and IMA-ADPCM
❑ Full duplex operation
❑ Creative 3D Stereo Enhancement
Technology
Read this leaflet to know the components and
settings of your audio card. Read the Getting
Started manual to find out how to install and
use your new audio card.
On the Audio Card
Your audio card has these jacks and connectors which allow you to attach other devices:
AUX connector
CD Audio connector
Telephone Answering Device connector
Connects an internal audio
source, such as a TV
Tuner or an MPEG card.
Connects a CD-ROM drive
using a CD audio cable.
Provides a mono connection from a standard
voice modem, and transmits microphone
signals to the modem.
Microphone connector
Connects internal condenser microphone.
Line In jack
Connects an external device (such
as a cassette, DAT, or Minidisc
player) for playback or recording.
Microphone In jack
Connects an external
microphone for voice input.
Speaker Out / Line Out jack
PC Speaker connector
Connects to your motherboard’s speaker
connector. (See “PC Speaker Connector
Pin Assignments” as provided online.)
Connects non-powered speakers by
default. Also connects powered speakers
and an external amplifier when built-in
amplifier is disabled.
Joystick/MIDI connector
Connects a joystick or a MIDI device. You can
buy an optional MIDI kit that allows you to plug
in the joystick and MIDI device simultaneously.
Note: Jacks are one-hole connecting interfaces whereas connectors consist of many pairs of
pins. Refer to the online User’s Guide, “Hardware Information”, for details on connector pin
assignments.
Figure 1: Jacks and connectors on your audio card.
1
Checking System Requirements
Your card requires at least:
❑ 7.5 MB free hard disk space
❑ An Intel Pentium or AMD K5 90MHz
computer with a VGA or SVGA card
installed
❑ Windows 95
or Windows 3.1x with DOS 5.0 and a Plug
and Play (PnP) configuration manager
❑ 4 MB RAM
Changing Audio Card Settings
This section is organized as follows:
Table 1: Input/Output (I/O) addresses.
❑ Changing Hardware Resource Settings
❑ Enabling/Disabling Creative 3D Stereo
Enhancement Effect
Device
Default I/O Address
Range
❑ Enabling/Disabling Full Duplex Operation
Audio interface
220H to 22FH
❑ Enabling/Disabling Joystick Interface
Game/Joystick
interface
201H
MPU-401 UART
MIDI interface
330H to 331H
Stereo music
synthesizer
388H to 38BH
❑ Enabling/Disabling the Built-in Amplifier
Changing Hardware
Resource Settings
The following tables list the possible default
settings used by various devices on your card.
When necessary (for example, when there is a
hardware conflict), you may change one or
more of these settings. For more details, see
Appendix A, “Understanding the Installation”
in the Getting Started manual.
Table 2: Interrupt request (IRQ) line assignments.
Device
Default IRQ Line
Audio interface
5
Table 3: Direct memory access (DMA) channel
assignments.
Usage
Default DMA
Channel
First DMA
channel
1
Second DMA
channel
3
Table 4: BLASTER environment variables.
Parameter
Axxx
2
Preferred Value
A220
Table 4: BLASTER environment variables.
Parameter
Preferred Value
Ix
I5
Dx
D1
Hx
H1
Pxxx
P330
Tx
T6
Enabling/Disabling
Creative 3D Stereo
Enhancement Effect
The Creative 3D Stereo Enhancement (3DSE)
effect allows you to eliminate speaker
crosstalk which occurs when two speakers are
placed close to each other. With this effect
enabled, mono and stereo sounds produced by
your speakers will have increased depth and
breadth.
Note: If your pair of speakers or another
device already has a built-in 3D sound
technology, do not activate this feature in
both devices. The 3D Stereo Enhancement
effect, when activated with another 3D
sound technology, may distort the audio
output.
To enable or disable 3DSE in
Windows 95
1. Start Creative Mixer. Click the Start
button, point to Programs, point to the
menu of your Sound Blaster card, and
then click Creative Mixer.
2. To view the title bar, click anywhere in the
Creative Mixer window. On the system
menu, click Input/Output Settings.
3. To enable 3DSE, make sure that the 3D
Stereo Enhancement check box is
selected.
To disable the effect, clear the check box.
To enable or disable 3DSE in
DOS/Windows 3.1x
1. Exit to DOS if you are in Windows 3.1x.
2. At the DOS prompt, change to the
directory containing your audio software;
for example, C:\SB16.
3. Type MIXERSET and then press
<Enter>.
The MixerSet control panel appears.
4. To enable the effect, make sure that the
3DSE check box is selected.
To disable the effect, clear the check box.
Enabling/Disabling Full
Duplex Operation
The full duplex feature in your audio card is
useful for audio conferencing and
telephone-like applications. When enabled,
you can play back and record audio data at the
same time. You must, however, use the same
sampling rate for both playback and
recording.
Note: For details on full duplex
constraints, refer to the online User’s Guide.
To enable or disable full duplex
in Windows 95
1. Click the Start button, point to Settings,
and then click Control Panel.
2. In the Control Panel window,
double-click the System icon.
3. In the System Properties dialog box, click
the Device Manager tab.
4. Double-click Sound, Video And Game
Controllers.
5. Select the Creative Sound Blaster entry
for your audio card and click the
Properties button.
6. In the Properties dialog box, click the
Settings tab.
3
7. To enable full duplex, make sure that the
Allow Full Duplex Operation check box is
selected.
To disable the operation, clear the check
box.
6. In the Properties dialog box:
If you have an Original Configuration
(Current) check box:
•
8. Click the OK button.
To enable the interface, make sure
that the check box is selected.
To disable it, clear the check box.
To enable or disable full duplex
in Windows 3.1x
If you have a Disable In This Hardware
Profile check box:
1. Launch the File Manager.
•
2. Locate the SYSTEM.INI file in your
Windows directory.
3. Double-click the file.
A text editor appears, displaying the
contents of the file.
4. In the [sndblst.drv] section, look for the
line FullDuplex=1 or FullDuplex=0.
To enable the feature, make sure that
FullDuplex=1.
To disable it, make sure that
FullDuplex=0.
To enable the interface, clear the
check box.
To disable it, make sure that the check
box is selected.
7. Click OK to restart Windows and for the
change to take effect.
Note: After restarting Windows 95, the
only indicator that your interface has been
disabled is the cleared Original
Configuration (Current) check box or the
selected Disable In This Hardware Profile
check box.
5. Save the file.
6. Restart your system to update the drivers.
Enabling/Disabling Joystick
Interface
To enable or disable the
interface in DOS/Windows 3.1x
The Gamepad Joystick interface on your
audio card can be enabled or disabled in
DOS/Windows 3.1x and Windows 95.
1. If you are in Windows 3.1x, exit to DOS
and then change to the directory where
your CTCM and CTCU programs are
installed. The default directory is
C:\CTCM. Type CTCU and press
<Enter>.
To enable or disable the
interface in Windows 95
2. On the Menu of the Creative Plug and
Play Configuration Utility screen, click
PnP Cards.
1. Click the Start button, point to Settings,
and then click Control Panel.
3. In the List Of PnP Cards box, click the
Creative Plug and Play card. In the List
Of Devices box, click Gameport.
2. In the Control Panel window,
double-click the System icon.
3. In the System Properties dialog box, click
the Device Manager tab.
4. Double-click Sound, Video And Game
Controllers, and then select Gameport
Joystick.
5. Click the Properties button.
4
4. Click the Resources button.
The Resources window displays the
current resources assigned to the
interface.
5. To enable the interface, clear the Disable
check box for the interface.
To disable it, make sure that the Disable
check box is selected.
6. Click the OK button twice.
7. On the Menu, click Exit. Type the path of
your Windows 3.1x directory (for
example, C:\Windows) and press
<Enter>.
To enable/disable the built-in
amplifier
1. If your audio card is already installed,
switch off your system and all peripheral
devices. Remove the cover from your
system and then the audio card.
2. Enable or disable the built-in amplifier
according to the settings shown in
Figure 2.
8. Restart your system for the change to take
effect.
Enabling/Disabling the
Built-in Amplifier
Your audio card comes with a Speaker
Out/Line Out jack which connects
non-powered speakers by default. To connect
powered speakers or an external amplifier, the
built-in amplifier must first be disabled.
Warning: The built-in stereo power
amplifier can deliver a maximum output
power of four watts per channel to four-ohm
speakers and two watts per channel to
eight-ohm speakers. Do not play at
maximum volume if your speakers cannot
handle this power.
Enabled (Factory
default setting)
Disabled
Figure 2: Enabling/Disabling the built-in
amplifier.
5
General Specifications
This section lists the general specifications of
your audio card.
Plug and Play
❑ ISA Specification version 1.0a compliant
Stereo Music Synthesizer
❑ 4-operator 11-voice or 2-operator
20-voice stereo music synthesizer
❑ Compatible with previous Sound Blaster
music synthesizer chips
Stereo Digitized Voice Channel
❑ Full duplex
❑ 16-bit and 8-bit digitizing in stereo and
mono modes
❑ Programmable sampling rates, 5 kHz to
44.1 kHz in linear steps
Note: Your audio applications may
support only selected ranges of sampling
rates.
❑ First and Second DMA channels for audio
recording and playback
❑ Dynamic filtering for digital audio
recording and playback
Built-in Digital/Analog Mixer
❑ Mixes sources from digitized voice and
inputs from MIDI devices, CD Audio,
AUX, Line In, Microphone, and PC
Speaker
❑ Selectable input source or mixing of
various audio sources for recording
Volume Control
❑ Software volume control of Master
Playback Volume, Master Recording
Volume, Digitized Voice, and inputs from
MIDI devices, CD Audio, AUX, Line In,
Microphone, and PC Speaker
❑ Microphone level at 32 levels:
• above 0 dB, it is in 3 dB steps
• below 0 dB, it is in 1.5 dB steps
❑ All other sources at 32 levels in
1.5 dB steps
❑ Full software control of fade-in, fade-out,
and panning effects
Built-in Stereo Power Amplifier
❑ Four watts per channel with four ohms
stereo output
❑ Internal or External Audio Output
Amplifier
3D Stereo Enhancement Technology
❑ Increased depth and breadth in perceived
audio
❑ Enhances mono and stereo audio output
❑ Independent of speaker quality
❑ Independent of setup configuration (for
example, placement and alignment of
speakers with the listener)
MIDI Interface
❑ Built-in MIDI interface for connection to
external MIDI devices
Copyright © 1997 by Creative Technology Ltd.
All rights reserved.
Version 1.1, November 1997
Information in this document is subject to change
without notice and does not represent a commitment on
the part of Creative Technology Ltd. No part of this
manual may be reproduced or transmitted in any form
or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including
photocopying and recording, for any purpose without
the written permission of Creative Technology Ltd.
The software described in this document is furnished
under a license agreement and may be used or copied
only in accordance with the terms of the license
agreement. It is against the law to copy the software on
any other medium except as specifically allowed in the
license agreement. The licensee may make one copy of
the software for backup purposes.
Sound Blaster is a registered trademark, and Blaster is
a trademark of Creative Technology Ltd.
Intel and Pentium are registered trademarks of Intel
Corporation.
Microsoft, MS-DOS, Windows, and the Windows logo are
registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
All other products are trademarks or registered
trademarks of their respective owners.
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