Fender Mixer M12, M12 Mixer Owner's manual

Fender Mixer M12, M12 Mixer Owner's manual
 MADE IN U.S.A.
OPERATION INSTRUCTION MANUAL
MANUAL NO. 015538
M12
12 CHANNEL MIXER
BY
®
MADE IN U.S.A.
PHYSICAL DIMENSIONS (APPROXIMATE, FOR SHIPPING PURPOSES)
Width —— 31 inches (79 cm)
Depth —— 27 inches (68.6 cm)
Height —— 7 inches (18 cm)
Weight -— 65 pounds (29.5 kg)
P.O. BOX 4137 - 1300 EAST VALENCIA DRIVE « FULLERTON, CALIFORNIA 92634
NOTE: See accompanying limited warranty folder.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
+ + € = RAYA
DESCRIPTION OF CONTROLS
BY MODULES ...........................
MICROPHONE INPUT MODULE . ............
Gain Control ........... ena
High Frequency Equalization Control
Low Frequency Equalization Control ..........
Effects Send Control ........................
Monitor Send Controls
Program Fader Control ......................
Cue Switch
Sub Master 1 Select Switch. .................
Sub Master 2 Select Switch ..................
Channel On/Off Switch ......................
SUBMASTERMODULE ....................
Sub Master Program Fader Control ...........
On/Off Switch... a
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Monitor Send Controls ......................
High Frequency Equalization Control
Low Frequency Equalization Control ..........
Effects Send Control ........................
Cue Switch ...... aaa
Limiter indicator .........
Limiter Level Control ........................
Limiter On/Off Switch .......................
MASTER MODULE ........ ee
Master Fader Control
Effects On/Off Switch
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Auxiliary Input Level Control
Equalizer Controls ............. 2.2.2...
Limiter Indicator ............................
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TALKBACK/EARPHONE MODULE ..........
Earphone Amplifier ........................
Earphone Select Switch .....................
Earphone Level Control .....................
Earphone Jacks ............................
Talkback Amplifier .........................
Talkback Level Control ......................
Talkback Select Switch ......................
Talkback Button
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PAGE
Talkback Microphone Connector ............. 7
REAR PANEL CONNECTORS ............... 8
Low Impedance (LO-Z)
Microphone Inputs. ....................... 8
High Impedance (HI-Z) Inputs ............... 8
High Level Input/Output Jacks ............... 8
Main Qutputs .............................. 8
Unbalanced Qutputs ........................ 8
Record Outputs к.кв, 9
Direct Inputs .......... ..... e. 9
Auxiliary Inputs ......... ee 9
Sub Master Line Output/Input Jacks .......... 9
sub Master Direct inputs .................... 9
Cue Qutdack ....... i. 9
Cue/Effects Direct Input Jack ................ 9
Effects Send Jack .......................... 10
Effects Return Jack ......................... 10
Power Cord Connector ...................... 10
Accessory AC Outlets. ...................... 10
Сисий ВгеаКег............................. 10
Panel Lamp Socket ......................... 10
On/Off Switch .......... a a aa a aa aa a 10
Expander Connector ........................ 10
USEOF THE MI2MIXER ................... 11
Input Modules ............. 2.2... e... 11.
High Level Input/Output Jacks ............... 11
Channel Accessory Patching ................ 12
Multi-Track Recorder Connection ............. 12
Sub Master Modules ........................ 13
Маз!ег Моашщез ............................ 14
Directinputs ............................... 15
SPECIAL FUNCTION PATCHING ............ 16
Multi-Track Recording ....................... 16
Two Effects Devices ........................ 17
CONSTRUCTION NOTES... 18
Internal Programming ....................... 18
TrimControls .......... 0 ee 19
M12 ELECTRICAL SPECIFICATIONS ........ 20
INPUT CHANNEL EQUALIZATION |
FREQUENCY RESPONSE ................ 21
OUTPUT EQUALIZATION FREQUENCY
RESPONSE ............................. 21
CONSOLE INPUTS ......................... 22
CONSOLE OUTPUTS ...................... 22
23
BLOCK DIAGRAMS ........................
LIST OF FIGURES
FIGURE DESCRIPTION PAGE
1 Basic Sound Reinforcement System Block Diagram ...................... 1
2 Microphone Input Module . .... eee 2
3 Sub Master Module ........ 200090600, 4 ee 4 4e a a ee 6 4
4 Master Module ...... A 4 44 AAA 4 4 4e 4 4 ene 6
5 Talkback/Earphone Module ...... Re, ae 7
6 Rear Panel Connectors ....... a 4 ee 4e ea ea a a aa 0 8
7 High Level Input/Qutput Jacks Block Diagram ........... 2.000.000... 11
8 1 Channel Accessory Patching Block Diagram ...............0 00.009.000. 12
9a Multi-Track Recorder Connection Chart .......... iii... 12
9b Multi-Track Recorder Connection Block Diagram ......................... 13
10 Typical Sound Reinforcement Channel Assignment ....................... 14
11 Direct Inputs Example 1 Block Diagram ........... iii... 15
12 Direct Inputs Example 2 Block Diagram .......... iii... 16
13 Multi-Track Recording Chart... 00000 ea 0 16
14 Multi-Track Recording Block Diagram .......... iii... 17
15 Special Auxiliary Effects Patching ......... AA 18
16a Master Module Function Assignment ........... 2.2.9.0, ea 18
160 Assignment Switches . . A 19
17. Trim Controls (Internal) ........... A PE 19
18 Frequency Response, Input Channel Equalization Graph .................. 21
19 Frequency Response, Output Equalization Graph ........................ 21
20 Console Inputs Chart . ..... eaaio enredo a. 22
21 Console Outputs Chart ............. 2.0000, aredeCeCecece ac 22
22 Microphone Input Module (1 of 12) Block Diagram ....................... 23
23 Sub Master Module (1 of 2) Block Diagram ...............0000000000000.. 24
24 Master Module — Program Block Diagram ..............20000000 ee 25
25 Master Module — Monitor 1 Block Diagram ........... oi. 26
26 Master Module — Monitor 2 Block Diagram ............. aL. 27
27 Master Module — Monitor 3 Block Diagram ............... LL. 28
28 Talkback/Earphone Module Block Diagram .............................. 29
29 M12 Console Block Diagram ....... A 30-31
INTRODUCTION
The M12 Mixer System is a 12 input/4 output mixing console. The
architecture of the mixer has been specifically optimized for professional
sound reinforcement applications.
The unit is constructed using 19 modules and a main chassis. The
modules are composed of 12 input channels, two submaster channels,
four master (output) channels, and a talkback/earphone amplifier mod-
ule. The main chassis contains four illuminated VU meters (one for each
output channel), a power supply, and all of the input and output connec-
tors. In total, the unit contains 136 rotary controls, 18 slide controls, 73
pushbutton switches, 17 three-conductor XLR type connectors, and 58
phone jacks. Special connectors are also provided for the optional panel
lamp and for connection to an additional twelve channel input expander.
The unit has been constructed using heavy gauge aluminum in order to
be light in weight and yet rugged enough to sustain the punishment of
portable sound reinforcement use. The complete unit is supplied in a
substantial tolex-covered wood cabinet which includes a built-in acces-
sory storage compartment.
The electrical design of the M12 makes extensive use of very low noise,
high speed operational amplifiers. All line level outputs are capable of
driving 6000 loads. The input transformers have been specially de-
signed, using humbucking construction, to handle high input voltages
with a minimum of distortion. The unit has also been provided with
extensive input and output patching capabilities, making the M12 one of
the most versatile units available.
SYSTEM SET-UP AND OPERATION
As a first step in describing the operation of the M12
Mixer System, a basic sound reinforcement connec-
tion (Fig. 1) will be described. Following the basic
set-up, a detailed description of all controls and
connectors will be presented.
This connection provides four independent mixes of
the 12 microphone inputs. One mix, controlled by
the channel slide controls, is fed to the main power
amplifiers and house speaker systems. The three
monitor mixes, independently obtained using the
three Monitor send level controls on each input
channel, are fed to three separate power amplifiers
and their associated stage monitor speaker sys-
tems. It is not necessary to use all three monitor
mixes if they are not required. Most applications will
require only one or two monitor mixes.
FIGURE 1 — Basic Sound Reinforcement System
DESCRIPTION OF CONTROLS
The following is a module-by-module description of all the operating controls,
inputs, and outputs.
MICROPHONE INPUT MODULE (Fig. 2) (Block Diagram, Fig. 22)
1. Gain Control (Fig. 2 - ltem 4)
This provides continuous adjustment of the preamplifier voltage gain. The
control is marked with overall system gain, in dB, from a 1500) low impedance
source to the balanced 600€} outputs, with both the channel and master faders
at 0 dB attenuation (maximum signal). This control should be adjusted by
turning clockwise until the channel overload light (Fig. 2 - Item 10) is illumi-
nated, then counterclockwise until the overload light only occasionally lights
on very loud program material. Adjustment of the Channel Gain Control will
change the level of this channel's signal into all outputs using the signal.
2. High Frequency Equalization (H. F. Eq.) Control (Fig. 2 - Item 5)
This provides frequency response cut and boost of the shelving type for high
frequencies. The maximum cut and boost is approximately 20 dB at 15 kHz.
The turnover frequency is approximately 1 kHz. See Figure 18 for a graph of
the tone control response.
3. Low Frequency Equalization (L. F. Eq.) Control (Fig. 2 - Item 6)
This provides frequency response cut and boost of the shelving type for the
low frequencies. The maximum cut and boost is approximately 20 dB at 100
Hz. The turnover frequency is approximately 1 kHz. See figure 18 for a graph
of the tone control response.
4. Effects Send Control (Fig. 2 - Item 7)
This provides a post-fader send signal to the effects summing amplifier and
then to the Effects Send jack on the rear panel. If no external effects device is
plugged in, the internal reverb unit is connected to the effects system. The
Effects Send control does not modify the level of the normal mix signals. The
effects return signal is added to the designated output mix. If the entire chan-
nel signal is to be processed in an external device (i.e. - a phaser) the High
Level Input/Output jacks should be used. This will be explained in more detail
in the discussion of these jacks.
FIGURE 2 — Microphone Input Module 2
10.
Monitor Send Controls (Fig. 2 - Нет 8)
These three controls provide pre-fader (also pre-on/off switch) signals to the
Monitor summing busses. The Monitor level controls are used to produce the
Monitor signal mixes.
While each monitor mix is pre-fader, it is derived following the channel equali-
zation and gain controls.
. Program Fader Control (Fig. 2 - Item 12)
This slide control provides level control for the program mix. It is calibrated in
dB attenuation.
Cue Switch (Fig. 2 - Item 1)
This push-push switch, when in the down (on) position, connects the channel
output to the Cue summing bus. This switching occurs ahead ot any channel
level controls, but following the equalization and gain controis. The summed
cue signal is available at the Cue Output jack on the rear panel and may be
monitored by the internal earphone amplifier.
Sub Master 1 Select Switch (Fig. 2 - Item 2)
This push-push switch, when in the down (on) position, routes the channel
program output to Sub Master 1 summing bus and disconnects the channel
from the program summing bus. Use of the Sub Master switch does not
change the monitor or effects signal routing.
Sub Master 2 Select Switch (Fig. 2 - Item 3)
This push-push switch, when in the down (on) position, routes the channel
program output to Sub Master 2 summing bus and disconnects the channel
from the program summing bus. Use of the Sub Master switch does not
change the monitor or effects signal routing. If both Sub Master 1 and Sub
Master 2 switches are on, the channel program output is routed to both Sub
Master summing buses.
Channel On/Off Switch (Fig. 2 - Item 11)
This push-push switch turns off both the program and effects channel outputs.
When the channel is “ON” the green LED (Fig. 2 - Нет 9) is lit. The switch does
not effect the three monitor outputs.
3
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SUB MASTER MODULE (Fig. 3) (Block Diagram, Fig. 23)
1. Sub Master Program Fader Control (Fig. 3 - Item 12)
This slide contro! provides level control for the composite sub master signal
supplied to the program summing bus. The sub master module acts as a
master control for the program output signal sum of the assigned input chan-
nels. Use of the Sub Master is discussed in more detail in M12 Mixer Use
section.
2. On/Off Switch (Fig. 3 - Нет 11)
This push-push switch turns on and off the program and effects. output from
the module. When the module is on, the green indicator light (Fig. 3 - Нет 9) 1$
also on. This switch does not effect the three monitor outputs.
. Overload Indicator (Fig. 3 - Item 10)
This red LED will turn on when the sub master summing amplifier is approxi-
mately 10 dB below clipping. If the light is on frequently, the level settings of
the program faders of all the input modules assigned to this Sub Master must
be reduced.
. Monitor Send Controls (Fig. 3 - Item 8)
These three controls provide pre-fader signals to the Monitor summing buses.
The controls are used to produce the monitor mix signals. It is important to
recognize that when channels are assigned to a Sub Master module, the
monitor mix may be derived either independently from the monitor send con-
trols on the assigned input modules or as a composite sum using the sub
master monitor controls. If the monitor mix is derived from the sub master, the
monitor mix is now a function of the program faders on the assigned input
modules, but it is not a function of the sub master program fader.
. High Frequency Equalization (H. F. Eq.) Control (Fig. 3 - Item 5)
This control performs the same function as the H. F. Ed. Control in each
Microphone Input Module.
FIGURE 3 — Sub Master Module 4
6.
Low Frequency Equalization (L. F. Eq.) Control (Fig. 3 - Item 6)
This control performs the same function as the L. F. Eq. Control in each
Microphone Input Module.
7. Effects Send Control (Fig. 3 - Item 7)
10.
11.
This provides a post-fader send signal to the effects summing amplifier and
then to the Effects Send jack on the rear panel. If no external effects device is
plugged in, the internal reverb unit is connected to the effects system. The
Effects Send control does not modify the level of the normal mix signals. The
effects return signal is added to the designated output mix. If the entire Sub
Master signal is to be processed in an external device (i.e. - a phaser) the High
Level Input/Output jacks should be used. This will be explained in more detail
in the discussion of these jacks.
. Cue Switch (Fig. 3 - Item 1)
This push-push switch, when in the down (on) position, connects the Sub
Master output to the Cue summing bus. This switching occurs ahead of any
Sub Master level controls, but following the equalization controls. The summed
cue signal is available at the Cue Output jack on the rear panel and may be
monitored by the internal earphone amplifier.
Limiter Indicator (Fig. 3 - Item 2)
This red LED lights when the limiter starts to limit.
Limiter Level Control (Fig. 3 - Нет 4)
This sets the level at which the limiter starts to operate (threshold level).
Clockwise rotation reduces the threshold level. The limiter operates only on the
program and effects outputs.
Limiter On/Off Switch (Fig. 3 - Item 3)
This push-push switch turns the limiter off, or allows the limiter to operate,
subject to the Limiter Level (threshold) control.
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FIGURE 4 — Master Module
MASTER MODULE (Fig. 4) (Block Diagram, Figs. 23, 24, 25, 26)
. Master Fader Control (Fig. 4 - Item 8)
This slide control determines the overall output level of the program or monitor
signals. It adjusts the voltage gain of the summing amplifiers, thereby preventing
overloading of the summing amplifiers before the maximum console output
voltage has been reached.
Effects On/Off Switch (Fig. 4 - Item 7)
This push-push switch is “ON” in the down position. It turns the effects return
signal on or off.
. Effects Return Level Control (Fig. 4 - Item 6)
This determines the amount of effects return signal added to the final mix. When
an external effects device is used, the output of the device should be connected
to the Effects Return jack on the rear panel. When no external device is used, the
internal reverb is connected to the effects controls.
Auxiliary Input Level Control (Fig. 4 - item 5)
This determines the amount of auxiliary input signal that is added to the final mix.
A detailed description of Auxiliary Input functions will be found in the section on
Rear Panel Connections.
Equalizer Controls (Fig. 4 - Item 4)
The five equalizer controls provide frequency response cut or boost as indicated
in Figure 20. The three center frequency bands (400 Hz, 1 kHz, 2.5kHz) are of the
peaking type with the maximum boost or cut centered at the indicated frequency.
The two end controls are of the shelving type and operate below 100 Hz for the
low frequency control and above 5 kHz for the high frequency control.
Limiter Indicator (Fig. 4 - Item 1)
This red LED indicates that the limiter has been activated by a signal above the
threshold set by the Limiter Level control.
Limiter Level Control (Fig. 4 - Нет 3)
This sets the threshold at which the limiter starts to operate. It is calibrated to
correspond to the VU meter when driven from a sine wave signal. Since program
material differs significantly from sine waves, the limiter setting should be ad-
justed on actual program material using the Limiter Indicator. There is a more
detailed discussion of the M12 Limiter on page 14.
6
8. Limiter On (Enable) Switch (Fig. 4 - Item 2)
This push-push switch turns the limiter off (out position) or enables the limiter to
operate as a function of the Limiter Level (threshold) control.
TALKBACK/EARPHONE MODULE (Fig. 5) (Block Diagram, Fig. 27)
EARPHONE AMPLIFIER
1. Earphone Select Switch (Fig. 5 - item 2)
This is a six button interlocked switch. The switch selects the signal source for the
internal 2 watt audio amplifier. Any of the four main outputs, the effects send, or
the cue signals may be selected.
2. Earphone Level Control (Fig. 5 - Нет 3)
This is a loudness-compensated volume control for the earphone amplifier.
3. Earphone Jacks (Fig. 5 - Item 7)
These jacks accept standard stereo Hi Fi earphones. Only a stereo plug should
be used since the two channels are connected internally to provide a
monophonic signal. If a monophonic plug is used, the output of the internal
amplifier is shorted. The amplifier can be damaged if the short circuit is main-
tained for an extended period of time.
TALKBACK AMPLIFIER
1. Talkback Level Control (Fig. 5 - ltem 4)
This controls the voltage gain of the talkback microphone preamplifier.
в (5) 2. Talkback Select Switch (Fig. 5 - Item 5)
This is a five section push-push switch. Each switch operates independently.
When a button is down, the talkback microphone signal is connected to the
indicated summing bus. Talkback is controlled by the appropriate Master Fader
control, the Talkback Select switches, and the Talkback Button.
3. Talkback Button (Fig. 5 - Нет 6)
This momentary switch turns on the talkback microphone subject to the level
control and the select switches.
4. Talkback Microphone Connector (Fig. 5 - Нет 1)
В ni This standard microphone input connector is used to connect a low impedance
a microphone to the talkback amplifier.
FIGURE 5 — Talkback Earphone Module 7
REAR PANEL CONNECTORS (Fig. 6)
1. Low Impedance (LO-Z) Microphone Inputs
(Fig. 6 - Item 6)
These 12 microphone inputs are standard three
pin audio connectors for use with low imped-
ance (50 to 250()) microphones. The inputs are
floated and transformer coupled. Pins 2 and 3
are the signal lines, Pin1 is chassis ground.
. High Impedance (HI-Z) Inputs (Fig. 6 - Item 7)
The 12 high impedance inputs are for use with
high impedance microphones (50 KQ) or line
level signals from either high impedance or low
impedance sources. Use of these standard
single conductor phone jacks disconnects any
source connected to the low impedance mi-
crophone connector for that channel.
. High Level Input/Output Jacks
(Fig. 6 - item 8)
These 12 stereo phone jacks provide an effects
looping capability for the input channels. The
jacks can also be used to obtain a pre-fader,
ORO
post-E.Q., line level output from each input
channel. These jacks add significantly to the
flexibility of the M12 but can be misused if their
function is not understood. The use of these
jacks will be discussed more fully in the Console
Use section.
Main Outputs (Fig. 6 - Нет 4)
The four main console outputs (Program,
Monitor 1, Monitor 2, Monitor 3) are three-pin
male connectors. The outputs are transformer
coupled. Pins 2 and 3 are the signal lines, Pin 1 is
chassis ground. Each output will drive a 6000
load to +20 dB. (+22 dBv).
Unbalanced Outputs (Fig. 6 - ltem 8)
These four phone Jacks provide unbalanced
outputs for the four main output signals. These
(3)
outputs are the signals supplied to the primaries
of the four output transformers. These outputs
will drive 6001) loads if the main outputs are not
loaded, or have high impedance loads. The
mixer can drive a combination load of 6000 on
main and unbalanced outputs.
FIGURE 6 — Rear Panel Connectors
8
6. Record Outputs (Fig. 6 - item 9)
These four phone jacks provide a buffered
unbalanced output for each of the four main
output channels. These outputs are also capa-
ble of driving 6000 loads.
Direct Inputs (Fig. 6 - ltem 10)
These four phone jacks provide high impedance
inputs to the Program, Monitor 1, Monitor 2, and
Monitor 3 summing amplifiers.
. Auxiliary Inputs (Fig. 6 - Нет 11)
These four phone jacks provide inputs to the
Auxiliary Level controls on the four master mod-
ules. They can be used as additional line level
inputs. The jacks are wired so that a signal con-
nected to the Program Auxiliary Input will also be
fed to each of the other three auxiliary inputs If
nothing is plugged into them. If the signal is
connected to the Monitor 1 jack, it is fed to
Monitor 2 and Monitor 3 also, provided the
Monitor 2 and 3 jacks are not used. A Monitor 2
input signal is fed to Monitor 3 if the Monitor 3
jack is not used. A Monitor 3 input signal is fed
only to Monitor 3.
(6) (12) (7) (12)
9.
10.
11.
12.
Sub Master Line Output/Input Jacks
(Fig. 6 - Item 12)
These two stereo phone jacks function the same
as the 12 High Level Input/Output jacks.
Sub Master Direct Inputs (Fig. 6 - Item 13)
These two phone jacks provide high impedance
inputs to the two Sub Master summing busses.
Cue Out Jack (Fig. 6 - Item 14)
This phone jack provides a line level output of
the summed cue signal. The output can drive a
6000 load.
Cue/Effects Direct Input Jack
(Fig. 6 - Нет 15)
This stereo phone jack provides a high imped-
ance input to the cue and the effects summing
busses.
(8)(12)
13. Effects Send Jack (Fig. 6 - Item 16)
This phone jack provides access to the output of
the effects summing amplifier. The signal is used
to drive an external effects device. Use of the
jack does not disconnect the drive signal sent to
the internal reverb unit.
14. Effects Return Jack (Fig. 6 - ltem 17)
15.
This phone jack provides a medium-impedance
input for a signal returned from an external ef-
fects device. The signal is available on the four
master modules at the Effects control. Use of this
jack disconnects the return signal from the inter-
nal reverb.
Power Cord Connector (Fig. 6 - ltem 1)
This connector accepts the AC power cord pro-
vided with the console. M12 consoles delivered
in the U.S., CANADA, and JAPAN are supplied
with a grounded (3 wire) AC cord for connection
to a 120 volt 50/60 Hz power source. The mixer
has been designed to operate within specifica-
tion for input voltages from 90 VAC to 130 VAC.
However, brilliance of the lights may vary pro-
portional to input voltage.
M12 consoles delivered outside the U.S,
CANADA, and JAPAN are supplied with a
grounded AC cord for connection to a 240 volt
50/60 Hz power source. The console will operate
from 180 V to 260 V AC.
10
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
Accessory AC Outlets (Fig. 6 - Item 2)
Two accessory 120 volt outlets are provided on
the 120 V model. The outlets are deleted on the
240 V model. The accessory outlets should not
be loaded in excess of 400 watts.
Circuit Breaker (Fig. 6 - ltem 3)
The circuit breaker provides protection for the
unit in the event of major power supply failure.
The circuit breaker is reset by pushing the red
button in. Pushing the button while the unit is
operating will interrupt the AC power and cause
the system to turn off.
Panel Lamp Socket (Fig. 6 - ltem 18)
This socket provides 6 VAC power for the
optional panel lamp. Recommended Lamp:
Fender Part No. 71-2100.
On/Off Switch
This illuminated pushbutton is located at the
right end of the VU meter panel. It controls all AC
power to the console. CAUTION: Always turn on
M12 Mixer before Power Amplifier is turned on.
Always turn off Power Amplifier before M12
Mixer is turned off.
Expander Connector (Fig. 6 - ltem 19)
This is used for connection of an optional
expander.
USE OF THE M12 MIXER
The information presented in this section is intended
to complement and expand upon the description of
the module function already presented.
Input Modules
The twelve input modules are the first elements in the
mixer signal processing system. Each input module
contains an input transformer, a variable gain
preamplifier, high frequency and low frequency
equalization controls, five output mix controls, and
several signal routing switches.
Under normal operating conditions one low imped-
ance microphone is connected to each of the twelve
input channels. With a normal input signal present at
the microphone, the gain control is adjusted as far
clockwise as is possible without lighting the over-
load indicator. The equalization controls are then
adjusted if necessary. Use of the proper
microphone and microphone placement will
minimize the amount of equalization required and, in
most cases, the mix will be better if equalization is
minimized. One way to get an initial adjustment of
both gain and equalization is to use the headphone
amplifier and cue bus. Thisis accomplished by push-
ing the cue select button on the input channel, the
cue select button on the earphone select switch, and
adjusting the earphone volume control for an ac-
ceptable monitoring level.
Once the gain and equalization are adjusted, the
output mix controls must be adjusted. The signal is
added to the program mix by pushing the channel
on/off pushbutton down (the green LED should
illuminate) and advancing the channel attenuator
(adjusting for less attenuation). In order for the mod-
ule to be connected directly to the program bus the
two Sub Master assign buttons must be in the up (off)
position.
If the signal from this channel is also to be processed
by the internal reverb (or external effects device) the
effects control must be advanced. The effects send
mix can also be monitored using the earphone
amplifier.
Up to three separate monitor (or foldback) mixes can
now be constructed using the three monitor send
controls. The monitor mixes formed using the input
channel monitor controls are independent of the
program fader (pre-fader), the channel on/off switch,
and the Sub Master assign switches.
High Level Input/Output Jacks
A special feature of the input channels is the high
level input/output jacks located on the rear panel.
Each jack is a tip-ring-sleeve type stereo phone jack.
When a plug is connected to the jack, the normal
signal routing in the input module is interrupted.
Figure 7 indicates what takes place.
LO-Z IN. — PREAMP
&
EQUILIZATION
HI -Z IN. — >
| TIP
SWITCH | |
A
| RING
TIP
RING
SLEEVE
SLEEVE y
TIP я MODULE OUTPUT
— MONITOR, ING ~ MODULE INPUT
PROGRAM, SLEEVE = GROUND
& EFFECTS
SENDS
FIGURE 7 — High Level Input/Output Jacks
The tip connection is the module output following the
pre-amp and equalization. The ring connection is the
module input signal to various output mix controls.
The sleeve is ground (or the shield). The switch con-
necting the tip and ring circuits is opened when a
plug is inserted in the jack.
The following examples illustrate possible uses of
these jacks:
Channel Accessory Patching
Assume that it is desired to patch an external limiter
into the lead vocal audio. The lead vocal for this
example is assigned to Channel 6. The Channel 6
high level output is routed to the external limiter input.
The limiter output is routed to the Channel 6 high level
input. Refer to Figure 8 for a more detailed connec-
tion diagram.
Multi-track Recorder Connection
For a second example, assume that an 8 channel
multi-track recording is to be made at the same time
that the mixer is used for a sound reinforcement
send. For the purpose of this example assume the
following channel and track assignments.
With the system patched as indicated in Figure 9b,
the operation of the console for sound reinforcement
is unchanged. The eight recorder feeds are pre-
fader and are subject only to gain control and equal-
ization changes on the console. The use of the
console for simultaneous multi-track recording will
be discussed in more detail in the special patching
section.
CHANNEL
AUDIO
CONNECT TO OUT
HIGH LEVEL INJOUT гр o INPUT
TIP G>- ———
RING ACCESSORY
SLEEVE ER
E _ nr
IL — OUTPUT
SHIELDED |
CABLE a
RETURN
FIGURE 8 — Channel Accessory Patching
CHANNEL # SIGNAL IDENTIFICATION RECORD TRACK
1 Lead Vocal 1
2 Lead Guitar 2
3 Back-Up Vocal 3
4 Keyboards 4
5 Bass 5
6 Kick Drum 6
7 Drum Overhead Left 7
8 Drum Overhead Right 8
9
o NOT USED
12
FIGURE 9a — Multi-Track
12
Recorder Connection
M 12 CONSOLE
TIP [FT — чу SHIELDED CABLE
CH 1 HIGH LEVEL
INJOUT
.
° RING
. SLEEVE
CH 8 HIGH LEVEL
INJOUT
CH 9, 10, 11, 8: 12
HIGH LEVEL INJOUT
JACKS NOT USED
—
L—
SLEEVE
У
CABLE REPEATED
7 TIMES
CH 1 INPUT
8 TRACK
RECORDER
CH 8 INPUT
FIGURE 9b — Multi-Track Recorder Connection
Several precautions on the use of the High Level
Input/Output jacks must be noted. Since the jacks
are of the switching type, insertion of a plug inter-
rupts the normal module signal routing. The signal
path must be restored either in an external signal
processor (the limiter example) or by a connection in
the plug (recorder example). If a standard (mono)
phone plug is inserted into the High Level In/Out
jack, the module output signal is available at the plug
tip. Since the monophonic plug sleeve is ground, it
will connect the ring contact of the jack to ground and
thus ground the module return signal. Although the
input signal, modified by the gain and equalizer con-
trols, is available at the plug tip, the signal is no
longer available within the module for routing to any
of the mixing busses (except for the cue bus).
Sub Master Modules
Use of the Sub Master Modules is optional as far as
the basic mixer signal flow is concerned. These two
modules can be used to form two sub groups of
13
signals out of the twelve available input signals. The
functioning of the Sub Master is best explained by
the use of an example. Consider the sound rein-
forcement set-up in Figure 10.
Generation of the program mix (house PA feed)
would be accomplished in the following manner: The
drum microphones are mixed using the channel 1
through 5 program faders. These signals are com-
bined in the Sub Master 1 module and the composite
mix is then added to the program mix using the Sub
Master 1 program fader. The overall drum mix is
controlled by Sub Master 1. The channel 6 through 9
signals are routed directly to the program master by
their respective channel program faders. Channels
10 through 12 are assigned to Sub Master 2. The
individual background vocals are balanced using
the individual channel program faders. The resultant
background vocal mix is then added to the program
bus using the Sub Master 2 program fader.
Vocal 4
CHANNEL # SIGNAL DESCRIPTION SIGNAL ROUTING
1 Kick Drum Sub Master 1
2 Left Drum Overhead Sub Master 1
3 Left Tom Tom Sub Master 1
4 Right Drum Overhead Sub Master 1
5 Right Tom Tom Sub Master 1
6 Lead Vocal Normal
7 Lead Guitar Normal
8 Bass Normal
9 Rhodes Normal
10 Vocal 2 Sub Master 2
11 Vocal 3 Sub Master 2
12 Sub Master 2
FIGURE 10 — Typical Sound Reinforcement Channel Assignment
The monitor mixes for the Sub Master groups can
now be generated in either of two ways. The monitor
mixes can be generated by using the monitor send
controls located on each of the input modules, leav-
ing the monitor send controls on the Sub Master at
zero. Alternatively, the monitor signal can be derived
using the composite signal on the Sub Master mod-
ule. If the Sub Master monitor sends are used, the
monitor send controls on the input modules which
form the sub group should be left at zero (full coun-
terclockwise position). The effects mix will operate in
the same way as the monitor mixes.
A unique feature of the Sub Master module is the
built-in limiter. The limiters used inthe M12 mixer are
of the fast attack, slow release type. They operate
using a full wave active rectifier and a peak holding
detection circuit. The threshold of the detector is
adjustable on the front panel and ared LED indicates
when the signal has exceeded the threshold and the
limiter starts to operate. When the on/off switch is in
the up (off) position, the limiter is inhibited from
operating.
The limiter is used to prevent short term high level
peaks from reaching the output. With proper adjust-
ment, the limiter will prevent over-driving of the
power amplifier which in turn will prevent damage to
expensive compression drivers.
The Sub Master module is provided with a full set of
patching jacks. It has a high level input/output jack
14
which performs the same function as the corre-
sponding jacks on the input modules. A direct input
jack is also provided. This high impedance input jack
can be used to feed a signal directly into the Sub
Master summing amplifier. If no input modules have
been assigned to the Sub Master, the module can be
used as an additional input channel for a line level
signal connected to the direct input jack.
Master Modules
The M12 Mixer system contains four master mod-
ules. Each of the modules is assigned to one of the
four main output functions (Program, Monitor 1,
Monitor 2, Monitor 3). The output assignment is ac-
complished using PCB mounted DIP switches, pre-
set in the factory at the time the modules are installed
in the chassis.
The Master Module contains the bus summing
amplifier, effects and auxiliary input controls, a five
band frequency response equalizer, and an adjust-
able limiter. Response curves for the equalizer are
given in Figure 18. On this module the master fader is
connected so that it controls the gain of the summing
amplifier. Since there is voltage gain following the
summing amplifier, this arrangement prevents over-
load of the summing amplifier before output clipping.
The other module functions have been explained in
the Control Identification section.
Direct Inputs
The M12 Console is equipped with a high imped-
ance direct input to each of the eight summing
amplifiers. These inputs have been provided so that
additional mixers can be connected without using
one of the M12 input channels. The gain of the direct
inputs is controlled only by the master faders for the
four main output channels and is a fixed gain for the
two Sub Masters, Effects, and Cue. The signal level
applied to these inputs should be typically O dB, on
the four main channels and approximately — 10 dBm
on the other inputs.
Since there is so much equipment of different man-
ufacture and age available, only two very basic
examples of the use of the direct inputs will be given.
For the first example, assume that a second mixer is
to be added to the M12 to expand the number of
available inputs. The second mixer has six input
channels, a main output channel and an effects out-
put channel. The connection to the M12 is shown In
Figure 11. The accessory mixer will operate directly
into the program and effects busses in the M12 con-
sole. Since the accessory mixer does not have
monitor send controls, the signals from the acces-
sory mixer cannot be added to the M12 monitor
system with the connection shown.
For the second example, a more complex second
mixer will be used. This mixer has eight inputs, left
and right main outputs, a monitor output, and an
effects output. The mixer connection is shown in
Figure 12. This connection results in the accessory
left output assigned to the M12 program output, the
right output assigned to Monitor 1, the monitor output
assigned to Monitor 2, and the effects assigned to
the M12 effects system.
The direct inputs can also be used for feeding any
additional line level signals into the mix. However,
there should be a level control on the signal being
added so that it can be balanced with the internal
M12 signals.
The summing amplifier current summing junctions
(summing busses) are available at the multipin ex-
pander connector. This connection should only be
used with the Fender input expander unit. Other
commercially available mixers may also be modified
to use this interface.
HIGH
LEVEL
OUTPUT
PROGRAM
DIRECT
INPUT
ACCESSORY
SIX
CHANNEL
MIXER
NN —0
EFFECTS M 12
DIRECT CONSOLE
INPUT
EFFECTS
HIGH
LEVEL
OUTPUT
SLEEVE
NOTE: NO CONNECTION)
TO RING OF PLUG
FIGURE 11 — Direct inputs Example 1
DIRECT
INPUTS
LEFT д
err | CJ) HF rosa
RIGHT AS ABOVE
OUTPUT и не ее ее ее ее ее ет ет еее ет === ет ПН ТН О ET MON - 1
8 CHANNEL
ACCESSORY M 12
MIXER CONSOLE
MONITOR | En —
OUTPUT MON.2
TIP
EFFECTS ER
creer |G) ) | HE——— EFFECTS
SLEEVE
NOTE: NO CONNECTION
TO RING OF PLUG
FIGURE 12 — Direct Inputs Example 2
SPECIAL FUNCTION PATCHING
The M12 Console contains 58 phone jacks and 17
three-conductor XLR type audio connectors. With
the exception of the Talkback Microphone connec-
tor, all of the three-conductor XLR connectors are
transformer coupled. The phone jacks are all unbal-
anced signals. The following examples demonstrate
the patching capability built into the M12 Console.
Multi-Track Recording
While the M12 is specifically designed for sound
reinforcement applications, the patching capability
is well suited to the simultaneous connection of an 8
track recorder. One basic connection has already
been presented in the discussion on the use of the
high level input/output jacks.
For a more complex example, assume that an 8
channel multi-track recording is to be made while the
mixer is used for a live PA feed. The following mixer
set-up is being used (Figure 13).
In this example, the house sound reinforcement feed
is derived from the Console Program output. Only
CHANNEL # INPUT SIGNAL
Я Kick Drum
2 Drum Overhead Left
3 Tom Tom Left
4 Drum Overhead Right
5 Tom Tom Right
6 Lead Vocal
7 Lead Guitar
8 Bass
9 Keyboards
10 Vocal 2
11 Vocal 3
12 Vocal 4
RECORDER
SUB GROUP CHANNEL
— 1
Monitor 2 2
Monitor 2 2
Monitor 3 3
Monitor 3 3
— 4
—— 5
—— 6
— 7
Sub Master 1 8
Sub Master 1 8
Sub Master 8
FIGURE 13 — Multi-Track Recording Channel Assignment
one stage monitor mix is used and this is derived
from the Monitor 1 console output. For the House and
Monitor 1 feeds, all 12 channels and Sub Master 1
are mixed using the program and Monitor 1 faders.
Channels 10, 11, and 12 are assigned to Sub Master
1 (Sub Master 2 is not used in this example). Sub
Master 1 1s used for the back up vocals. The 12 inputs
are then grouped into 8 recorder feeds as indicated
in the track assignment table. The Monitor 2 and
Monitor 3 outputs are used to combine the left and
right drum signals so that when the 8 track recording
is mixed down, the drum kit can be given a stereo
perspective. Three other channels have been com-
bined using Sub Master 1. The patching required is
indicated in Figure 14.
The connection requires 6 special patch cords and
two standard shielded patch cords. The important
thing to remember about the above set-ups is that all
the recording signals are pre-fader except for the
three inputs which were routed to Sub Master 1. The
recording signal is, however, pre-sub master fader.
Many other combinations are also possible. The
second sub master can be used as another record
send, the effects signal may be used, or the cue bus
output may be used. As many inputs as desired can
be assigned to the cue bus simultaneously.
Two Effects Devices
Another convenient feature of the M12 will allow for
the simultaneous use of the internal reverb and an
external effects device. The effects mix thatis sent to
the two devices is the same and is formed using the
Effects Controls on the input modules. The return
signal from the two devices is separately adjustable
on the master modules. With the patching shown in
Figure 15 the Effects Return Control on each Master
Module will control the amount of return signal from
the internal reverb that is added to the mix. The
Auxiliary Input Level Control on each Master Module
will control the amount of return signal from the exter-
nal device that is added to the mix. It should be noted
that when a return signal is plugged into the Program
Auxiliary Input only, it is also connected internally to
the other Master Module Auxiliary Inputs.
M 12 CONSOLE | I | on N
TIP. M7 —1
CH 1 HIGH LEV. INJOUT CIO) TY — | 1 в
a TRACK
т т, RECORDER
chal b—— — — — | ___ 1a
т T
CHS| nn — — {| s
т. T
сне | | - —m — — | — р
L x
сн7 | + —— —————————{_—____0{;
T y т
SUB MST 1 | — — — — — food Ne
TiP re
MON 2 REC OUT A A 2
SLEEVE SLEEVE
MON 3 REC OUT —— aa ILL 13
FIGURE 14 — Multi-Track Recording Patching
17
M 12 CONSOLE
EFFECTS
ACCESSORY
EFFECTS DEVICE
SEND JACK
PROGRAM
AUX INPUT
LI
HU — ID LINE LEVEL OUTPUT
FIGURE 15 — Special Auxiliary Effects Patching
CONSTRUCTION NOTES
A review of the modular type construction of the M12
will be useful. The Console contains 19 front panel
modules composed of four different types. Any
module may be removed by first disconnecting the
module's connecting cables from the inside of the
unit and then removing the two phillips head screws
which secure the module. The twelve input modules
are identical and can be positioned in any one of the
twelve input channels. The two Sub Master modules
are electrically identical, but have been physically
assigned to be Sub Master 1 or Sub Master 2. The
assignment has been performed during assembly
by the connection of a jumper wire on the module PC
Board and the installation of either a white or grey
on/off pushbutton. In an emergency, the modules
can be reassigned by moving the jumper wire, which
uses removable push-on terminal contacts.
Internal Programming.
The four Master Modules are also electrically identi-
cal. They are assigned at the time of assembly by the
use of PC mounted slide switches (Figs. 16a, 16D).
Since each Master Module contains two summing
amplifiers, a separate switch is provided for each
one. The programming is accomplished as indicated
in Fig. 16a. It should be noted that the auxiliary sum-
ming amplifiers on Monitor 2 and Monitor 3 Master
Modules are not used. Under no circumstances
should there be more than one summing amplifier
assigned to the same bus.
ON ON
| Е Р с Е
M3 $1 8
M2 $2 |
M1 E Е
si $2
MAIN AUX
SUMMING SUMMING
ASSIGN. ASSIGN.
(PROGRAM MODULE SHOWN)
M3
M2
M1
si
s2
PROGRAM MONITOR 1 MONITOR 2 MONITOR 3
ON. OFF OFF - OFF -
OFF OFF OFF “ON. ©
OFF OFF ON. OFF.
OFF ON _ OFF OFF
OFF OFF OFF OFF
- OFF OFF OFF OFF
OFF OFF
FIGURE 16a — Master Module Function Assignment (Internal)
18
switches
switches
FIGURE 16b — Assignment Switches (Internal)
Trim Controls The controls allow calibration of the VU meters. If the
The M12 Console contains four internal trim controls, Console is to be operated at a VU reference point
(Fig. 17). These are located on the four Output/Meter other than +4 dB, these controls may be adjusted
Driver PC Boards, one for each main output channel. accordingly.
controls
FIGURE 17 — Trim Controls (Internal)
19
M12 ELECTRICAL SPECIFICATIONS
LOW IMPEDANCE BALANCED INPUT TO PROGRAM BALANCED OUTPUT
Frequency Response’:
Total Harmonic Distortion:
plus Noise’
Hum and Noise”:
Voltage Gain:
Equalization:
Maximum Input Voltage:
Output Voltage:
+0, —4 dB, 20 Hz to 20 kHz
+0, —1.5 dB, 35 Hz to 20 kHz
Less than 0.1%, 40 Hz to 20 kHz
Less than 0.2%, 20 Hz to 20 kHz
— 128 dB, maximum equivalent input noise
(1500 source, 6000 load, maximum gain)
— 80 dB,, master fader at minimum
— 70 dB, master fader at —10, all input faders
at minimum
— 70 dB,, master fader at — 10, one channel at
— 10 with gain set to mid position
83 +2 dB maximum, LO impedance balanced
input to balanced output 6000 load
60 +2 dB maximum, LO-Z input to channel
line level output
65 +2 dB maximum, LO-Z input to effects
output
61 =2 dB maximum, high impedance input to
main outputs a
16 +2 dB maximum, auxiliary input to main
outputs
16 +2 dB maximum, effects return to main
outputs
23 +2 dB maximum, program direct input to
balanced output
+15 dB typical @ 100 Hz, shelving
+15 dB typical @ 10 kHz, shelving
460 MVams, LO-Z input (+ 4.5 dBn)
4.6 Vans, HI-Z input (+15.5 dBm)
О МЫ = +4 dB, = 1.23 Vams (600 Q load),
balanced output
+19 dB,, maximum, balanced outputs, 600)
load
+20 dB,, maximum, unbalanced outputs,
6000 load
1. LO impedance balanced input to program balanced output loaded with 6000. Gain at mid position. Master
at — 10, input voltage = 1.5MVaews Output voltage = .775MVams (О dBm). Equalization flat.
2. Band limited at 30 KHz. Equalization flat. 1500 source, 6000 load, unless otherwise indicated.
20
M12 MIXER INPUT CHANNEL EQUALIZATION TYPICAL RESPONSE
+25
+20}
MAXIMUM
1 =~ —
+10 po J CS столы
—]
| +5 Su —
—
9 0 FLAT ~~ —
2 a
5 rr J TN
a. ~~ ~~
z °Г AC >
<< ss
ou _—— LOW FREQUENCY E.O. A —
>» MINIMUM HIGH FREQUENCY E.Q.
25 т ра | | LL 1 1 LU | ааа! |
20
100 1000
FREQUENCY IN CYCLES PER SECOND
FIGURE 18 — M12 MIXER INPUT CHANNEL EQUALIZATION TYPICAL FREQUENCY RESPONSE
M12 MIXER OUTPUT EQUALIZER FREQUENCY RESPONSE (TYPICAL)
+25
+20
+15
+10
+
© с
AMPLITUDE dB
on
-10
-15
"20
i AXIMUM
=
`` —— — —
_ Ds TN TONS 2 ~~
Ss X AA
y TR es Gomme IO
7 === — ~— st — — — —
| <> TT Se _ _
— 7 > XK >
7 и” № ‚” NA >
| soon Coop mue anne 5KHZ ~~
MINIMUM
l Cora odd I i e ii | I 1 1 4 nu ul
-25
20
100 20600
FREQUENCY IN CYCLES PER SECOND
FIGURE 19 — M12 MIXER OUTPUT EQUALIZATION TYPICAL FREQUENCY RESPONSE
21
Actual
Nominal Input Sensitivity Nominal Maximum
Signal Source Impedance At Max. Input Input Console
(Quantity) Impedance @ 1 kHz Gain Level Before Clip Connector
LO-Z Microphone 1500 KO — 79 dB. — 34 dBm — 4.5 dB, XLR 3 pin
(12) (0.11MV) (15MV) (460 MV)
HI-Z Microphone 15K0O 100K0 —57 dB — 14 dB +15.5 dB,, Phone
(12) (150 MV) (4.6V)
Auxiliary 6000 max 25K min — 12 dBn 0 dBm +25 dBr! Phone
(4)
Effects Return 6008) max 10K min — 12 dB. O dB +25 dB. Phone
(1)
Summing Direct Inputs 6000 max 47KQ0 — 19 dB — 10 dB +20 dB. Phone
Prog., Mon. 1, 100KQ — 19 dBn — 10 dB. +20 dB. Phone
Mon. 2, Mon. 3
Channel & Sub Master 6000 max 2.5K) — 18 dBm -10 dB. +20 dB. Stereo
High Leve! Phone (ring
Input (14) connection)
1. These inputs are fed directly to a potentiometer so that there is no active element to overdrive. The noted numbers are reasonabie
maximum values in order to have an acceptabie control range.
FIGURE 20 — Console Inputs
Actual
Rated Source Nominal Maximum
Signal Load impedance Output Output Console
(Quantity) Impedance @ 1 kHz Level Level Connector Notes
Balanced Main Outputs 6000 1500 +4 dB. +19. dB. XLR - 3 pin Transformer
Prog., Mon. 1, minimum Coupled,
Mon. 2, Mon. 3 floating
Unbalanced Main Outputs 6000' <0.50 +4 dB, +20 dBn Phone
Prog., Mon. 1, minimum
Mon. 2, Mon. 3
Recording Outputs 6000 <0.50 +4 dB, +20 dB, Phone Unbalanced
Prog., Mon. 1, minimum
Mon. 2, Mon. 3
Effects send 6000 <0.50 —15 dBm +20 dB, Phone Unbalanced
Cue 6000 <0.50 — 10 dB, +20 dB. Phone Unbalanced
Channel & Sub Master 6000 <0.50 — 10 dBm +20 dB, Stereo Tip
High Level Output minimum Phone Connection
Earphone 80 <10 1Vams 4 Vans Stereo 2 watts
minimum Phone Maximum
Output
1. The total load on the Balanced & Unbalanced outputs for a given channel.
FIGURE 21 — Console Outputs
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FIGURE 29 — M12 Console Block Diagram
30
TO MON 3 REC. OUT
TO CUE OUT
Pa So q PA o |
DIRECT | OVERLOAD |
J | GAIN OVERLOAO |_ | INPUT | INDICATOR [*— |
- INDICATOR |] | | SUMMING |
|
= | | BASS
= A |
BASS | | | TREBLE |
& | L
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- Г О + | MONITOR 1 |
| “BUsses’ MON 1 | |
A > | | MONITOR 2 = |
Е MON 2 | |
= MONITOR 1 | — PROGRAM
| | | MONITOR 3 FADER |
CHANNEL | MON 1 |
ON/OFF MONITOR 2 | MON 3 |
| mon 2 |
PROGRAM MONITOR 3 | PROG | + LIMITER |
FADER MON 3 | EFFECTS |
EFFECTS
| ` | SUB MASTER MODULE (ONE OF TWO) |
EFFECTS
| , (RIBBON CABLE) ‚>
BUFFER | | [FALRBAGK — — TT 1
è o » | сов 1 | MICROPHONE |
° | | |
| | |
SUB |
MASTER 2 | | TALKBACK |
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PREAMP MODULE | |
(ONE OF 12) — —— o Ly | PROGRAM | |
ee — |
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PHONES > WATTS |
28 PIN ; | To PROGRAM
EXPANDER | RECORDER OUT
CONNECTOR @— | TO MON 1 REC. OUT
| ТО МОМ 2 REC. OUT
|
|
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TO EFFECTS SEND
ANT ANT ONT: A AA EEE SEE SEEN SO OS чан. = A SEE LAN AS TT TT TT A. TA ANS NA TA TA AT SEE S—— ————
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| II | DIRECT INPUT
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| MASTER MODULE A |_| P'RECTIN
| (AS ABOVE EXCEPT NO. 2 AUX IN \/
MMING AMP NOT USED
| So EFFECTS IN | , Eo
| | ТО ЕАВРНОМЕ
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— IIT TTC A [= = =~ — SaLanceooureur — 1
UNBALANCED OUTPUT |
| NO. 1 | CRC MOVE RECORD OUTPUT |
MON 3/— SUMMING MAIN OUT (IS POP AT оц DIRECT INPUT _ —
AMP BALANCED OUTPUT
| MONITOR 3 DIRECT IN | | MON UNBALANCED OUTPUT |
MASTER MODULE : — ITOR 2 RECORD OUTPUT
| (AS ABOVE) AUXIN | Lo ООН DIRECT INPUT |
| | | BALANCED OUTPUT |
| EFFECTS IN — MONITOR 3 UNBALANCED OUTPUT |
> | U
LO e ЛО | oe DIRECTINPUT __ _J
31
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