Energy Tech Laboratories Fan Modular Direct Fired Heaters Installation, Operating And Maintenance Instructions

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Energy Tech Laboratories Fan Modular Direct Fired Heaters Installation, Operating And Maintenance Instructions | Manualzz
Standard and Modular Direct Fired Heaters
Installation, Operation, and Maintenance Manual
Modular Direct Fired Heater
Standard Direct Fired Heater
FOR YOUR SAFETY
If you smell gas:
1. Open windows.
2. Don’t touch electrical switches.
3. Extinguish any open flames.
4. Immediately call your gas supplier.
Direct Fired Module
FOR YOUR SAFETY
The use and storage of gasoline or other flammable vapors and liquids in open containers in the
vicinity of this appliance is hazardous.
RECEIVING AND INSPECTION
Upon receiving unit, check for any interior and exterior damage, and if found, report it
immediately to the carrier. Also check that all accessory items are accounted for and are
damage free. Turn the blower wheel by hand to verify free rotation and check the damper (if
supplied) for free operation.
WARNING!!
Improper installation, adjustment, alteration, service or maintenance can cause property
damage, injury or death. Read the installation, operating and maintenance instructions
thoroughly before installing or servicing this equipment. ALWAYS disconnect power and gas
prior to working on heater.
Save these instructions. This document is the property of the owner of this equipment and is
required for future maintenance. Leave this document with the owner when installation or
service is complete.
April 2006 Rev. 9
TABLE OF CONTENTS
WARRANTY.................................................................................................................................................. 3
INSTALLATION............................................................................................................................................. 4
Mechanical................................................................................................................................................ 4
Site Preparation.................................................................................................................................... 4
Assembly .............................................................................................................................................. 4
Curb and Ductwork............................................................................................................................... 4
Roof Mount Installation......................................................................................................................... 5
Installation with Exhaust Fan................................................................................................................ 5
Direct Fired Module Installation............................................................................................................ 6
Indoor (INLINE) Installation .................................................................................................................. 6
Heat Module Add-On Installation ......................................................................................................... 6
Gas ........................................................................................................................................................... 7
Electrical ................................................................................................................................................... 8
Motorized Intake Damper ..................................................................................................................... 8
Remote Control Panel .......................................................................................................................... 9
Fan to Building Wiring Connection ....................................................................................................... 9
OPERATION ............................................................................................................................................... 10
Start Up................................................................................................................................................... 10
Special Tools Required ...................................................................................................................... 10
Start Up Procedure............................................................................................................................. 10
Pilot Adjustment.................................................................................................................................. 10
Main Burner Adjustment..................................................................................................................... 11
Heater Start Up Summary .................................................................................................................. 12
Final Start Up Procedure.................................................................................................................... 13
Pulley Adjustment............................................................................................................................... 13
Pulley Alignment................................................................................................................................. 13
Proper Belt Tension............................................................................................................................ 13
Pulley Combination Chart................................................................................................................... 14
Sequence of Operation........................................................................................................................... 15
Flame Safety Control.......................................................................................................................... 15
Air Flow Switch ................................................................................................................................... 15
Modulating Gas System ..................................................................................................................... 16
High Temperature Limit...................................................................................................................... 16
Operation Summary ........................................................................................................................... 16
Optional Remote Panel Circuit ........................................................................................................... 17
Components............................................................................................................................................ 18
Remote Panel Option ......................................................................................................................... 19
Troubleshooting ...................................................................................................................................... 20
Airflow Troubleshooting Chart ............................................................................................................ 20
Burner Troubleshooting Chart ............................................................................................................ 21
Remote Panel Troubleshooting Chart ................................................................................................ 22
Troubleshooting Flowcharts ............................................................................................................... 23
MAINTENANCE .......................................................................................................................................... 26
General Maintenance ............................................................................................................................. 26
2 weeks after startup .............................................................................................................................. 27
Every 3 months ....................................................................................................................................... 27
Filter Quantity Chart ........................................................................................................................... 27
Yearly...................................................................................................................................................... 27
Start-Up and Maintenance Documentation ............................................................................................ 28
Job Information................................................................................................................................... 28
Heater Information.............................................................................................................................. 28
Maintenance Record .......................................................................................................................... 28
Factory Service Department............................................................................................................... 28
WARRANTY
This equipment is warranted to be free from defects in materials and workmanship, under normal use and
service, for a period of 12 months from date of shipment. This warranty shall not apply if:
1. The equipment is not installed by a qualified installer per the MANUFACTURER’S installation
instructions shipped with the product,
2. The equipment is not installed in accordance with federal, state and local codes and regulations,
3. The equipment is misused or neglected,
4. The equipment is not operated within its published capacity,
5. The invoice is not paid within the terms of the sales agreement.
The MANUFACTURER shall not be liable for incidental and consequential losses and damages
potentially attributable to malfunctioning equipment. Should any part of the equipment prove to be
defective in material or workmanship within the 12-month warranty period, upon examination by the
MANUFACTURER, such part will be repaired or replaced by MANUFACTURER at no charge. The
BUYER shall pay all labor costs incurred in connection with such repair or replacement. Equipment shall
not be returned without MANUFACTURER’S prior authorization and all returned equipment shall be
shipped by the BUYER, freight prepaid to a destination determined by the MANUFACTURER.
3
INSTALLATION
It is imperative that this unit is installed and operated with the designed airflow, gas, and electrical supply
in accordance with this manual. If there are any questions about any items, please call the service
department at 1-866-784-6900 for warranty and technical support issues.
Mechanical
WARNING: DO NOT RAISE VENTILATOR BY THE INTAKE HOOD, BLOWER OR
MOTOR SHAFT, OR BEARINGS – USE LIFTING LUGS PROVIDED OR A SLING
Site Preparation
1. Provide clearance around installation site to safely rig and
CLEARANCES
lift equipment into its final position. Supports must
The top, back, and front
adequately support equipment. Refer to manufacturer’s
surfaces of this heater may not
estimated weights.
be installed less than 6” from
2. Consider general service and installation space when
combustible materials.
The
locating unit.
heater base may be installed
3. Locate unit close to the space it will serve to reduce long,
on
combustible
surfaces.
twisted duct runs.
Allow 24” minimum service
4. Do not allow air intake to face prevailing winds. Support
clearance on both sides of this
unit above ground or at roof level high enough to prevent
heater.
precipitation from being drawn into its inlet. The inlet must
also be located at least 10 feet away from any exhaust
vents. The heater inlet shall be located in accordance with the applicable building code
provisions for ventilation air. All air to the heater must be ducted from the outdoors. Recirculation
of room air is not permitted. If in doubt regarding the application, consult the manufacturer.
Assembly
Intakes and curbs are shipped unassembled.
assemble the intake to the heater:
Upon unit arrival, follow the following procedure to
1. Apply silicone or weather-proof gasket on
the back side of the flanges of the intake
hood or v-bank intake.
2. Screw the flanges of the intake hood or vbank to the unit with the supplied sheet
metal screws. If the unit is a modular unit
with a v-bank or evaporative cooler section,
the v-bank or evaporative cooler will bolt to
the heater with the bolts provided.
Curb and Ductwork
This fan was specified for a specific CFM and static pressure. The ductwork attached to this unit will
significantly affect the airflow performance. Flexible ductwork and square elbows should not be used.
Also, transitions and turns in ductwork near the fan outlet will cause system effect and will drastically
increase the static pressure and reduce airflow. The chart below shows the minimum fan outlet duct
sizes and straight lengths recommended for optimal fan performance. Follow SMACNA guides and
recommendations for the remaining duct run. Fans designed for rooftop installation should be
installed on a prefabricated or factory built roof curb. Follow curb manufacturer’s instructions for proper
curb installation. The unit should be installed on a curb and/or rail elevated not less than 20” above any
surface. Be sure duct connection and fan outlet are properly aligned and sealed. Secure fan to curb
4
through vertical portion of the ventilator base
assembly flange using a minimum of eight (8) lug
screws, anchor bolts, or other suitable fasteners (not
furnished). Shims may be required depending upon
curb installation and roofing material. Check all
fasteners for tightness. The diagrams below show
different mechanical installation configurations.
Recommended Supply Ductwork Sizes
Blower Size
10
12
15
18
20
25
Duct Size
14 x 14
16 x 16
20 x 20
24 x 24
26 x 26
32 x 32
Straight Duct Length
48 in.
54 in.
72 in.
86 in.
108 in.
168 in.
Adequate building relief shall be provided so as to
not over pressurize the building when the heating
system is operating at its rated capacity. This can be accomplished by taking into account, through
standard engineering methods, the structure’s designed infiltration rate; by providing properly sized relief
openings; or by interlocking a powered exhaust system; or by a combination of these methods.
Heaters installed with intake ductwork must be purged to replace at least four air changes of the volume
of the intake duct.
If the failure or malfunction of this heater creates a hazard to other fuel burning equipment in the building
(e.g. when the heater is providing make up air to a boiler room), the unit is to be interlocked to open inlet
air dampers or other such devices.
Units being installed in airplane hangars should be installed in accordance with the Standard for Aircraft
Hangars, ANSI/NFPA 409. Units being installed in public garages should be installed in accordance
with the Standard for Parking Structures, ANSI/NFPA 88A, or the Standard for Repair Garages,
ANSI/NFPA 88B, and with CAN/CGA B149 Installation Codes.
Roof Mount Installation
Installation with Exhaust Fan
5
Direct Fired Module Installation
Indoor (INLINE) Installation
Heat Module Add-On Installation
Modular heat units shipped to add heat onto existing blower only applications require field mechanical
and wiring installation.
1. Remove existing filter intake and lifting lugs from blower section intake side.
2. Attach heat module to blower intake using the provided sheet metal screws and bolts. Tighten
screws and bolts securely to compress the
gasket between the heat module and the
blower module.
3. Support and level the end of the heat module
(end opposite the blower) with the provided
equipment legs/rails.
4. Attach the filter hood to the intake side of the
heater module.
5. Drill a hole in the discharge of the blower large
enough to insert the Maxitrol mixing tube and
discharge sensor (if provided). Install the Maxitrol mixing tube in the proper airflow direction. The
airflow direction is labeled on the Maxitrol mixing tube.
6. Wire the sensor as indicated on the supplied wiring schematic. Run all wiring within metal
conduit. Supply 120V AC to terminals 1 and N in the direct fired module.
7. Follow the start up instructions located in this manual.
6
Gas
Installation of gas piping must conform with local building codes, or in the absence of local codes, with the
National Fuel Gas Code, ANSI Z223.1 (NFPA 54) – latest edition. In Canada, installation must be in
accordance with CAN/CGA-B149.1 for natural gas units and CAN/CGA-B149.2 for propane units.
WARNING: INLET GAS PRESSURE MUST NOT EXCEED PRESSURE INDICATED
ON NAMEPLATE.
SEE UNIT NAMEPLATE FOR PROPER GAS SUPPLY
PRESSURE AND GAS TYPE.
1. Always disconnect power before working on or near a heater. Lock and tag the disconnect
switch or breaker to prevent accidental power up.
2. Piping to the unit should conform with local and national requirements for type and volume of gas
handled, and pressure drop allowed in the line. Refer to the Gas Engineer’s Handbook for gas
line capacities.
3. The incoming pipe near the heater should be sized to
Gas Connection Sizes
match the connection on the outside of the unit. Unit inlet
sizes are shown in the table to the right. Avoid multiple
Unit Size Gas Pipe Size (NPT)
taps in the gas supply so the unit has a steady supply of
Size 1
¾”
gas at all times.
Size 2
1”
4. Install a ground joint union with brass seat and a manual
Size 3
1”
shut-off valve external to the unit casing, as shown below,
Size 4
1-1/4”
adjacent to the unit for emergency shut-off and easy
Size 5
1-1/2”
servicing of controls.
5. Provide a sediment trap, as shown below, before each
unit and where low spots in the pipe line cannot be avoided.
6. Blow out the gas line to remove debris before making connections. Purge line to remove air
before attempting to start unit. Purging of air from gas lines should be performed as described in
ANSI Z223.1-latest edition “National Fuel Gas Code”, or in Canada in CAN/CGA-B149.
7. All field gas piping must be pressure/leak tested prior to unit operation. Use a non-corrosive
bubble forming solution or equivalent
for leak testing. The heater and its
Gas Pressure Table
individual shut-off valve must be
disconnected from the gas supply
Gas Pressure Type
Gas Pressure
piping system during any pressure
Size 1-3 Inlet Pressure
7 in. w.c. – 14 in. w.c.
testing of that system at test
Size 4-5 Inlet Pressure
7 in. w.c. – 5 psi.
pressures in excess of ½ psi. The
Max. Manifold Pressure - Natural Gas
5 in. w.c. maximum
heater must be isolated from the gas
Max. Manifold Pressure - Propane
2.5 in. w.c. maximum
supply piping system by closing its
individual manual shutoff valve
during any pressure testing of the gas supply piping system at test pressures equal to or less
than ½ psi.
8. This unit requires a constant 7 in. w.c. minimum
natural gas supply, when the unit is operating at
Gas Connection Diagram
maximum gas flow. If the gas supply exceeds 14 in.
w.c. (5 psi. for sizes 4-5 housings) it will damage the
internal valve components, and if it is below 7 in.
w.c., the heater may not perform to specifications.
NOTICE
Refer to the heater rating
plate for determining the
minimum
gas
supply
pressure for obtaining the
maximum gas capacity for
which this heater is specified.
7
Electrical
Before connecting power to the heater, read and understand this
entire section of this document. As-built wiring diagrams are
furnished with each fan by the factory, and are attached to the
door of the unit.
WARNING!!
Disconnect
power
before
installing or servicing fan. High
voltage electrical input is
needed for this equipment. This
work should be performed by a
qualified electrician.
Electrical wiring and connections should be done in accordance
with local ordnances and the National Electric Code,
ANSI/NFPA70. Be sure the voltage and phase of the power
supply and the wire amperage capacity is in accordance with the
motor nameplate. For additional safety information refer to AMCA publication 410-96, Recommended
Safety Practices for Users and Installers of Industrial and Commercial Fans.
1. Always disconnect power before working on or near a
Copper Wire Ampacity
heater. Lock and tag the disconnect switch or breaker to
Wire Size AWG
Maximum Amps
prevent accidental power up.
14
20
2. An electrical drop containing the motor power wiring is
12
25
shipped with every fan. The electrical drop should be
10
30
brought through one of the conduit openings located in
8
40
the base of the unit, run through the curb, and connected
6
55
to a junction box inside the building.
4
70
3. A dedicated branch circuit should supply the motor circuit
with short circuit protection according to the National
Electric Code. This dedicated branch should be run to the junction box mentioned above and
connected as shown in a following
illustration labeled “Fan to Building
Wiring Connection”.
4. Make certain that the power source
is
compatible
with
the
requirements of your equipment.
The heater nameplate identifies
the proper phase and voltage of
the motor.
5. Units shipped with an optional
remote panel have two electrical
circuit drops. It is important to run
the motor wires in a separate conduit from the remote control wiring. The DC wires from the unit
temperature controller, located in the control drop, should either be shielded cable or be run in a
separate conduit.
6. Before connecting heater to the building power source, verify power line wiring is de-energized.
7. Secure the power cables to prevent contact with sharp objects.
8. Do not kink power cable and never allow the cable to come in contact with oil, grease, hot
surfaces or chemicals.
9. Before powering up the heater, check fan wheel for free rotation and make sure that the interior of
the heater is free of loose debris or shipping materials.
10. If any of the original wire supplied with the heater must be replaced, it must be replaced with type
TW wire or equivalent.
Motorized Intake Damper
On units shipped with the optional motorized intake damper, a power transformer is supplied with the unit
if the main incoming voltage is greater than 120V. The damper motor is automatically energized when
the main disconnect switch is in the ON position. No external wiring to the damper motor is required.
8
Remote Control Panel
BK
BK
OR
OR
WH
WH
GY
GY
BR
BR
RD
RD
PK
PK
YW
YW
RD
RD
BK
BK
BK
BK
OR
OR
WH
WH
GY
GY
BR
BR
RD
RD
PK
PK
YW
YW
RD
RD
BK
BK
BL
Fan to Building Wiring Connection
9
C
NO
NC
On units shipped with the optional remote control panel, an electrical drop containing the panel wiring is
provided with the heater. There is a terminal strip inside the remote panel that matches the terminals in
the heater unit. The remote panel should be wired as shown below.
PR
E
Fire System
Microswitch
BK
1
OPERATION
Prior to starting up or operating the heater, check all fasteners for tightness. In particular, check the set
screw in the wheel hub, bearings and the fan sheaves (pulleys). With power and gas to the heater OFF or
prior to connecting ventilator to power, turn the fan wheel by hand to be sure it is not striking the inlet or
any obstacles. Re-center if necessary.
Start Up
Special Tools Required
•
•
•
•
•
•
AC Voltage Meter
Tachometer
Standard Hand Tools
Amperage Meter
Manometer
Differential Pressure Gauge
Start Up Procedure
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Check all electrical connections for tightness and continuity.
Check pulley alignment and belt tension as described below.
Inspect the condition of the intake damper and damper linkage, if provided.
Inspect the air-stream for obstructions and install intake filters if missing.
Compare the supplied motor voltage with the fan’s nameplate motor voltage. If this does not
match, correct the problem.
6. Start the fan up, by turning the external disconnect to the ON position, and shut it OFF
immediately to check rotation of the wheel with the directional arrow on the blower scroll.
Reversed rotation will result in poor air performance, motor overloading and possible burnout.
For units equipped with a single-phase motor check the motor wiring diagram to change rotation.
For 3-phase motors, any two power leads can be interchanged to reverse motor direction.
7. When the fan is started up, observe the operation and check for any unusual noises.
Pilot Adjustment
1. Restart the fan and check the gas supply pressure at the inlet
gas tap upstream of all electronic valves. The inlet pressure
should be 7 in. - 14 in. w.c. ( 7 in. w.c. – 5 psi on Size 4-5
heaters). If the inlet pressure is too high, install an additional
pressure regulator external to the unit.
2. Open the field installed manual gas shut-off valve and the
manual main gas valve on the combination gas control valve.
3. Call for heat with the intake air thermostat (turn set-point to
temperature above outside air) and allow the pilot to light. If the
pilot does not light, purge the pilot line. If air purging is
required, disconnect the pilot line at the outlet of the pilot valve.
4. Check the pilot flame voltage at the Flame Safety Control
interface test jacks. A weak pilot flame can be caused by low
gas pressure, or a dirty pilot orifice. To adjust the pilot flame,
remove the cap from the pilot adjustment screw on the
combination gas valve. Increase the pilot gas flow by turning
the screw counter-clockwise. Decrease the pilot gas flow by
turning the screw clockwise. The pilot DC voltage should read
12 VDC minimum and should typically be 15 VDC.
5. Once the pilot has been established, open the main manual gas
shut-off valve downstream of the electronic valves. Check to
make sure that the main gas valve opens, and gas flows to the
burner.
10
Pilot Assembly
Main Burner Adjustment
Manifold Pressure (in. w.c.)
1. Once the pilot has been properly established, the
Mod Valve Voltage Summary
manifold gas pressure or temperature rise should be
Volts DC
Firing Mode
adjusted to jobsite conditions.
The gas pressure
0 to 5 VDC
Low Fire
regulator (integral to the combination gas control on size
5 to 15 VDC
Modulation
1-3 heaters and located in the modulating valve on size
15 to 20 VDC
High Fire
4-5 heaters) is adjusted at the factory for average gas
conditions. It is important that the gas be supplied to the burner in accordance with the input
rating on the rating plate.
2. Create a high fire call for heat. This should be done with the blower on and all gas controls on.
High fire can be achieved by removing the wire at terminal #4 (remove wires #2 and #4 for
Maxitrol 44 systems) from the Maxitrol 14 amplifier.
3. The manifold pressure should be checked
Average Manifold Pressure vs. Firing Rate/Ft. of Burner
at the pressure tap downstream of the
6.00
modulating valve. The graph to the right
indicates the proper manifold pressure for
5.00
Natural Gas
Propane Gas
the desired amount of BTUs per foot of
4.00
burner. For natural gas systems, the high
fire manifold pressure should not exceed 5
3.00
in. w.c. For propane gas, the high fire
manifold pressure should not exceed 2.5
2.00
in. w.c. Another method of checking high
fire is to measure the temperature rise of
1.00
the unit. The temperature rise should be
0.00
set to design conditions and typically is
minimum 70°F.
-1.00
4. Remove the cap from the combination gas
0
100000
200000
300000
400000
500000
600000
Firing Rate (BTU/Hr/Ft. of Burner)
valve regulator adjustment (size 1-3) or
the cap from the MR212 valve (size 4-5).
Using the regulator pressure adjusting screw, adjust the high fire manifold pressure to 5 in. w.c.
maximum for natural gas and 2.5 in. w.c. maximum for propane gas. High fire should be set to
generate the desired temperature rise. If the high fire screw is at the end of its adjustment and
more pressure is needed, then adjust the main building gas pressure regulator spring (located
external to the unit) to achieve the proper manifold pressure. Turning the regulator screw
clockwise will increase pressure and counter-clockwise will decrease pressure. Remember The high fire DC voltage should read 12 VDC minimum and should typically be 15 VDC on
the Flame Safety Controller test jacks.
5. Reconnect the wire on the Maxitrol 14 amplifier at terminal #4 (wires #2 and #4 for Maxitrol 44).
6. The low fire manifold pressure must now be set. Low fire can be achieved
by removing the wire at terminal #5 from the Maxitrol 14 amplifier (remove
Maxitrol MR212 Low
#8 for Maxitrol 44). Check the low fire flame signal to ensure that the DC
Fire Bypass Screw
voltage is 12 VDC minimum on the Flame Safety Controller test jacks.
7. Using the bypass screw (located on the side of the M511 and M611 valves,
and under the cap of the MR212 valve), adjust low the low fire manifold
pressure until there is a very thin flame along the entire length of the burner.
No dark spots should be seen in the burner. The burner may be observed
through the view-port located on the external wall of the heater. Replace
the cap to the Maxitrol valve and restore all of the original wiring on the
Maxitrol amplifier and gas components.
Maxitrol M511 and M611
8. A final gas leak check shall be performed to verify the gas-tightness of the
Low Fire Bypass Screw
heater’s components and piping under normal operating conditions. This
can be done by measuring the gas pressure at the ¼” gas plug just
downstream of the modulating valve.
11
Heater Start Up Summary
Is incoming gas pressure
7"-14"?
(7"-5 psi. for size 4-5 units)
No
Adjust
incoming gas
pressure.
Yes
Adjust pilot flame.
Setting incoming pressure:
Presure must be measured at first "T" in
supply gas line before the first gas valve.
Adjusting the pilot:
The pilot DC signal should be 12 VDC
minimum.
Lock unit into
high fire.
Does high fire produce No
at least a 70°F temp
rise and produce the
Adjust high fire
correct manifold
pressure?
Yes
Lock unit into low fire.
Does thin flame fill
entire burner length?
No
Adjust low
fire.
Yes
Burner start up
complete.
12
Adjusting high fire:
High fire manifold pressure should be 5"
maximum for natural gas and 2.5"
maximum for propane. High fire should
produce at least a 70°F temperature rise.
Remove wire #4 from the Maxitrol 14
amplifier (#2 and #4 for Maxitrol 44).
This will drive the valve into its full open
position. Adjust high fire with the
regulator inside the unit. Turn clockwise
to increase temperature rise. Ensure that
DC flame signal is minimum 12 VDC.
Replace the wires on the Maxitrol
Amplifier.
Adjusting low fire:
Remove wire #5 from the Maxitrol 14
amplifier (#8 for Maxitrol 44). This will
drive the valve into its lowest position.
Adjust the low fire by turning the low fire
bypass screw on the side of teh
modulating valve for M511 and M611
models. For MR212 valves, the low and
high fire are both under the valve cover.
Refer to the included Maxitrol literature
for more detailed information. Ensure
that DC flame signal is minimum 12 VDC
and that the enite length of burner is filled
with a thin flame.
Final Start Up Procedure
1. With the air and burner systems in full operation and all ducts attached, measure the system
airflow. Motor sheave (pulley) is variable pitch, and allows for an increase or decrease of the fan
RPM to adjust the airflow, as shown in the illustration below. For your convenience, a RPM chart
is included in the following pages.
2. Once the proper airflow is achieved, measure and record the fan speed with a reliable
tachometer. Caution - Excessive speed will result in motor overloading or bearing failure.
Do not set fan RPMs higher than specified in the maximum RPM chart. See the
troubleshooting guide for more information.
3. Measure and record the voltage and amperage to the motor and compare with the motor
nameplate to determine if the motor is operating under safe load condition.
4. Once the rpm of the ventilator has been properly set, disconnect power and recheck belt tension
and pulley alignment as described below.
Maximum RPM and HP Chart
Blower Size
10”
12”
15”
18”
20”
25”
Maximum RPM
1800
1500
1400
1200
1000
900
Pulley Adjustment Illustration
Maximum HP
2
3
5
5
10
20
Pulley Adjustment
The adjustable motor pulley is factory set for the RPM specified.
Speed can be increased by closing or decreased by opening the
adjustable motor sheave. Two groove variable pitch pulleys must
be adjusted an equal number of turns open or closed. Any
increase in speed represents a substantial increase in
horsepower required by the unit. Motor amperage should always
be checked to avoid serious damage to the motor when the
speed is varied. Always torque setscrews according to the
setscrew torque chart.
Pulley Alignment
Setscrew Torque
Thread Size
No. 10
1/4”
5/16”
3/8”
7/17”
1/2”
Torque (IN/Lb)
33
80
156
275
384
600
Proper Belt Tension
13
Pulley Combination Chart
Motor RPM
1725
1/3 to 1-1/2 HP
MOTOR PULLEY
AX BELTS
1VL34
Dd1
Dd2
Pd1
1.9
2.9
2
Pd2
3
TURNS ON MOTOR PULLEY
Open
BLOWER PULLEY
AK114
PITCH DIAMETER
5
4 1/2
4
3 1/2
3
2 1/2
2
1 1/2
1
1/2
0
11
11.2
308
323
339
354
370
385
400
416
431
447
462
Dd1
Dd2
Pd1
Pd2
2.4
3.4
2.6
3.6
4 1/2
4
3 1/2
1 1/2
1
1/2
1/3 to 2 HP
MOTOR PULLEY
AX BELTS
1VL40
TURNS ON MOTOR PULLEY
Open
BLOWER PULLEY
10 - 20 IN. BLOWER**
AK114
DATUM DIAMETER
PITCH DIAMETER
5
3
2 1/2
2
Closed
0
11
11.2
400
416
431
447
462
477
493
508
524
539
554
AK94
9
9.2
488
506
525
544
563
581
600
619
638
656
675
AK79
7.5
AK66
6.2
6.4
701
728
755
782
809
836
863
889
916
943
970
AK54
5
5.2
863
896
929
962
995
1028
1062
1095
1128
1161
1194
AK46
4.2
4.4
1019
1059
1098
1137
1176
1215
1255
1294
1333
1372
1411
AK39
3.5
3.7
1212
1259
1305
1352
1399
1445
1492
1539
1585
1632
1678
AK32
3
3.2
1402
1455
1509
1563
1617
1671
1725
1779
1833
1887
1941
Dd1
Dd2
Pd1
Pd2
2.9
3.9
3
4
7.7
3 to 5 HP
MOTOR PULLEY
BX BELTS
2VP42
582
605
627
650
672
BLOWER PULLEY
694
717
739
762
784
806
TURNS ON MOTOR PULLEY
Open
Closed
DATUM DIAMETER
PITCH DIAMETER
6
5 1/2
5
4 1/2
4
3 1/2
3
2 1/2
2
1 1/2
1
1/2
0
2BK160H
15.4
15.7
330
339
348
357
366
375
385
394
403
412
421
430
439
2BK140H
13.4
13.7
378
388
399
409
420
430
441
451
462
472
483
493
504
2BK120H
11.4
11.7
442
455
467
479
491
504
516
528
541
553
565
577
2BK110H
10.4
10.7
484
497
511
524
537
551
564
578
591
605
618
631
645
2BK100H
9.4
9.7
534
548
563
578
593
608
622
637
652
667
682
697
711
2BK90H
8.4
8.7
595
611
628
644
661
677
694
710
727
744
760
777
793
2BK80H
7.4
7.7
672
691
709
728
747
765
784
803
821
840
859
877
896
2BK70H
6.4
6.7
772
794
815
837
858
880
901
923
944
965
987
1008
1030
2BK60H
5.4
5.7
908
933
958
984
1009
1034
1059
1084
1110
1135
1160
1185
1211
2BK55H
4.9
5.2
995
1023
1050
1078
1106
1133
1161
1189
1216
1244
1272
1299
1327
2BK50H
4.4
4.7
1101
1132
1162
1193
1223
1254
1285
1315
1346
1376
1407
1438
1468
MOTOR PULLEY
Dd1
Dd2
Pd1
Pd2
4.3
5.5
4.7
5.9
7-1/2 to 10 HP
BX BELTS
2VP60
TURNS ON MOTOR PULLEY
Open
BLOWER PULLEY
590
Closed
DATUM DIAMETER
PITCH DIAMETER
6
5 1/2
5
4 1/2
4
3 1/2
3
2 1/2
2
1 1/2
1
1/2
0
2BK160H
15.4
15.7
516
527
538
549
560
571
582
593
604
615
626
637
648
2BK140H
13.4
13.7
592
604
617
630
642
655
667
680
693
705
718
730
743
2BK120H
11.4
11.7
2BK110H
10.4
10.7
758
774
790
806
822
838
854
871
887
903
919
935
951
2BK100H
9.4
9.7
836
854
871
889
907
925
943
960
978
996
1014
1031
1049
2BK90H
8.4
8.7
932
952
972
991
1011
1031
1051
1071
1091
1110
1130
1150
1170
2BK80H
7.4
1143
1165
1187
1210
1232
1255
1277
1299
1322
693
708
722
737
7.7
1053
1075
1098
1120
3 to 5 HP
MOTOR PULLEY
Dd1
Dd2
Pd1
Pd2
BX BELTS
2VP42
2.9
3.9
3
4
752
BLOWER PULLEY
767
781
796
811
826
840
855
TURNS ON MOTOR PULLEY
Open
25 IN. BLOWER
Closed
DATUM DIAMETER
870
Closed
DATUM DIAMETER
PITCH DIAMETER
6
5 1/2
5
4 1/2
4
3 1/2
3
2 1/2
2
1 1/2
1
1/2
2B5V278
27.8
28.1
184
189
194
200
205
210
215
220
225
230
235
240
246
2B5V250
25
25.3
205
210
216
222
227
233
239
244
250
256
261
267
273
0
2B5V234
23.4
23.7
218
224
230
237
243
249
255
261
267
273
279
285
291
2B5V200
20
20.3
255
262
269
276
283
290
297
304
312
319
326
333
340
2B5V184
18.4
18.7
277
284
292
300
307
315
323
331
338
346
354
361
369
2B5V160
16
16.3
317
326
335
344
353
362
370
379
388
397
406
414
423
2B5V154
15.4
15.7
330
339
348
357
366
375
385
394
403
412
421
430
439
2B5V136
12.6
12.9
401
412
423
435
446
457
468
479
490
501
513
524
2B5V124
12.4
12.7
407
419
430
441
453
464
475
487
498
509
521
532
543
2B5V110
11
11.3
458
471
483
496
509
522
534
547
560
572
585
598
611
MOTOR PULLEY
Dd1
Dd2
Pd1
Pd2
2VP60
4.3
5.5
4.7
5.9
7-1/2 to 10 HP
BX BELTS
TURNS ON MOTOR PULLEY
Open
BLOWER PULLEY
535
Closed
DATUM DIAMETER
PITCH DIAMETER
6
5 1/2
5
4 1/2
4
3 1/2
3
2 1/2
2
1 1/2
1
1/2
2B5V278
27.8
28.1
289
295
301
307
313
319
325
331
338
344
350
356
362
2B5V250
25
25.3
320
327
334
341
348
355
361
368
375
382
389
395
402
0
2B5V234
23.4
23.7
342
349
357
364
371
378
386
393
400
408
415
422
429
2B5V200
20
20.3
399
408
416
425
433
442
450
459
467
476
484
493
501
2B5V184
18.4
18.7
434
443
452
461
470
480
489
498
507
517
526
535
544
2B5V160
16
16.3
497
508
519
529
540
550
561
571
582
593
603
614
624
2B5V154
15.4
15.7
516
527
538
549
560
571
582
593
604
615
626
637
648
2B5V136
12.6
12.9
628
642
655
669
682
695
709
722
735
749
762
776
2B5V124
12.4
12.7
638
652
666
679
693
706
720
733
747
761
774
788
801
2B5V110
11
11.3
717
733
748
763
779
794
809
824
840
855
870
885
901
Dd1
Dd2
Pd1
Pd2
5.8
7
6.2
7.4
15 to 20 HP
MOTOR PULLEY
BX BELTS
2VP75
TURNS ON MOTOR PULLEY
Open
BLOWER PULLEY
789
Closed
DATUM DIAMETER
PITCH DIAMETER
6
5 1/2
5
4 1/2
4
3 1/2
3
2 1/2
2
1 1/2
1
1/2
2B5V278
27.8
28.1
381
387
393
399
405
411
417
424
430
436
442
448
454
2B5V250
25
25.3
423
430
436
443
450
457
464
470
477
484
491
498
505
0
2B5V234
23.4
23.7
451
459
466
473
480
488
495
502
509
517
524
531
539
2B5V200
20
20.3
527
535
544
552
561
569
578
586
595
603
612
620
629
2B5V184
18.4
18.7
572
581
590
600
609
618
627
636
646
655
664
673
683
2B5V160
16
16.3
656
667
677
688
698
709
720
730
741
751
762
773
783
2B5V154
15.4
15.7
681
692
703
714
725
736
747
758
769
780
791
802
813
2B5V136
12.6
12.9
829
842
856
869
883
896
909
923
936
949
963
976
990
** 2HP Motors on 20 IN Blowers use 2VP42 Pulleys
14
Sequence of Operation
The direct-fired heater is most easily understood when broken down into smaller individual systems.
There are two main systems, a make-up air fan and a heater. The make-up air fan consists of a blower
and motor. The heater may be further broken down into two control systems, the Flame Safety Control
(FSC) and the Modulating Gas System (MGS). The burner mixes air with the gas (Natural or LP) which
heats the air.
Flame Safety Control
The first system to understand is the Flame Safety Control. The FSC
is there only to monitor the flame, NOT to control temperature. The
FSC uses a flame rectification sensor mounted on the pilot assembly
to detect the presence of flame in the burner. Flame strength and
presence can be measured at the FSC by reading the rectified flame
signal. This is done by removing the FSC cover and using a DC
voltage meter in the test jacks. Flame is present when the DC voltage
reads between 6 and 18 VDC. Ideal flame intensity produces a signal
of 12 VDC or greater. The FSC is also wired into an airflow switch,
which tells it whether there is proper airflow through the unit (not just
any airflow, but proper airflow). Proper airflow occurs when there is a
.15 in. w.c. to .65 in. w.c. differential pressure drop across the
burner. When the airflow through the heater produces a pressure
drop in this range, the FSC indicates so by illuminating the AIRFLOW
LED. The FSC controls the opening of the redundant solenoid gas
valves and the operation of the spark igniter to initiate a pilot flame
upon start-up.
Flame Safety Controller
DC Flame Signal
DC Voltage
0 to 5 VDC
6 to 11 VDC
12 to 18 VDC
Flame Status
No Flame
Weak Flame
Strong Flame
The OPR CTRL LED indicates that there is power to the FSC. Next,
the AIRFLOW LED will come on if there is proper airflow through the
unit. Third, the unit will pause to purge any gasses or combustible vapors before attempting flame
ignition. Then, there is a Pilot Trial For Ignition (PTFI) and the PTFI LED comes on. During PTFI, the FSC
opens the pilot gas valve and allows gas to flow to the pilot assembly. At the same moment, the spark
igniter is started, causing the spark to ignite the pilot gas. When the flamerod sensor detects the flame, it
turns on the FLAME LED, turns off the PTFI LED, and powers the modulating gas system. This is the
normal operating mode. The FSC continues to monitor the flame and airflow. Once this occurs, the unit is
in a main flame cycle and thus powers the main gas valve and the modulating gas system. This is the
normal operating mode. The FSC continues to monitor the flame and airflow. The last LED on the FSC is
the ALARM LED. This will turn on when the FSC determines an unsafe condition has occurred, and will
not allow the unit to recycle for heat until it has been properly reset. Anytime the FSC has gone into
“Alarm” mode, the problem must be diagnosed and corrected to avoid future lockouts after resetting. To
begin troubleshooting, or to reset the FSC, shut down power to the heater and restart the heater. This
will clear the alarm from the flame safety.
Air Flow Switch
There are both high and low airflow switches contained within one housing
measuring the pressure drop across the burner. This is to insure that there is
proper airflow (.15 in. w.c. to .65 in. w.c.) across the burner and proper
combustion at all times. Both switches are wired in series and have single pole
double throw (one common contact, one normally open contact, and one normally
closed contact) switches that are ‘switched’ by air pressure. There are two airflow
tubes in the heater, located near the burner and profile plate assembly (profile
plates surround the burner and control air into the burner section). In the case of
clogged filters, blocked intake, excessive duct static pressure, or a broken belt, the
correct burner differential pressure may not be achieved, not allowing the low
15
Air Flow Switch
airflow switch to close. The high airflow switch protects against profile plate failures that cause excessive
airflow through the burner. In the event that the pressure drop across the burner is not in the range of the
airflow switch, gas flow to the burner is stopped by the Flame Safety Control.
The graphs below illustrate the approximate cfm going through the unit vs. the differential pressure
measured by the airflow switch. Simply measure the differential profile pressure drop at the airflow tubes
in the unit and match that value up to the matching unit curve below. This will show the cfms traveling
through the burner and will indicate proper airflow or airflow problems (too much or not enough). If the
pressure drop is outside of the .15” to .65” range, the blower rpm should be adjusted to fix airflow.
Size 1-3 Heater CFM vs. Burner Profile Pressure
Size 4-5 Heater CFM vs. Burner Profile Pressure
10000
25000
9000
23000
Size 1
Size 4
Size 2
8000
19000
7000
17000
CFM
CFM
6000
5000
4000
15000
13000
11000
3000
9000
2000
7000
1000
0
0.15
Size 5
21000
Size 3
5000
0.2
0.25
0.3
0.35
0.4
0.45
0.5
0.55
0.6
3000
0.15
0.65
0.2
0.25
Burner Differential Profile Pressure (in. w.c.)
0.3
0.35
0.4
0.45
0.5
0.55
0.6
0.65
Burner Differential Profile Pressure (in. w.c.)
Modulating Gas System
The second system, the Maxitrol modulating gas system, consists of a
temperature selector dial, a discharge air sensor, an amplifier, and a
modulating gas valve. The two types of Maxitrol systems used are the Maxitrol
14 series or the Maxitrol 44 series. The Maxitrol 14 utilizes a discharge air
sensor and modulates the Maxitrol gas valve to provide discharge air to match
the selected temperature on the temperature selector. The Maxitrol 44 utilizes a
room temperature sensor to control room temperature as well as a discharge air
sensor in order to control the discharge air temperature. The modulating gas
valve controls the amount of gas flow to the burner based on the temperature
rise needed. When the modulating gas valve is all the way open and achieving
the maximum BTUs and temperature rise of the unit, it is called “high fire”.
High Temperature Limit
One of the back up safety device is the high temperature limit switch.
This switch is a mechanical thermostat that measures the temperature
inside the unit downstream of the burner. If the factory-set temperature
of 170°F is exceeded, it will signal the FSC to turn off the burner. This
requires a manual reset of the high temperature limit. This insures that
the discharge does not exceed 185°F.
High Temperature Limit
Operation Summary
ƒ
•
With the blower already running and the airflow switch proven;
9 The outside air temperature falls below the setting of intake air thermostat
or
9 The optional remote panel is set to “Manual” and “Heat” mode
The FSC in energized and the following occurs;
9 FSC indicates that it has power by illuminating the OPR CTRL LED
9 FSC verifies proper Airflow
16
Maxitrol 14
Amplifier
Begins Pilot Trial For Ignition and turns on PTFI LED
The pilot gas solenoid valve is opened, the spark igniter begins sparking, and the flamerod
sensor watches for flame initiation
9 When flame is established, the FLAME LED is illuminated and main valve opens and the
FSC powers the Maxitrol system and gas flow begins modulating
9 The FSC monitors the flame while the Maxitrol system adjusts to the selected temperature
The Maxitrol system checks the discharge air temperature (and the room temperature for the Maxitrol
44) and regulates the gas going to the burner to satisfy the temperature setting. The Maxitrol system
will modulate the main burner gas from 100% down to 5% as needed.
9
9
•
Optional Remote Panel Circuit
Power
Supply From
Heater
"Power" Light
Off
No Power to
Panel
On
Panel is
Powered
Blower Switch
Nothing Happens
"Off"
Position
(3-Position Panels Only)
"Auto"
No Power is Sent
to Heater
"Manual"
Power is Sent to
Heater to Open
Damper (if
provided) and
Start Blower
"Blower On"
Light
Power is Sent to
Heater to Open
Damper (if
provided) and
Start Blower
Off
Damper is not
Open or FreezeStat has Detected
Low Temperature
Operation
"Blower On"
Light
On
Nothing Happens
Intake Air is
Warmer Than
Thermostat
Set-Point
Intake Air
Thermstat is
Powered
Off
Damper is not
Open or FreezeStat has Detected
Low Temperature
Operation
On
Blower Operates
Cooling Circuit is
Energized
Intake Air is Cooler Than
Thermostat Set-Point
"Cool"
Position
(if provided)
Blower Operates
Temperature
Control Switch
"Vent"
Position
"Heat"
Position
Heat Circuit is Energized
Heat Circuit is Energized
"Burner On" Light Illuminates with
proper flame.
"Burner On" Light Illuminates with
proper flame.
"Flame Failure" Light illuminates
if proper flame is not established
"Flame Failure" Light illuminates
if proper flame is not established
17
Heat Does not
Operate
Components
The following image and list outlines the typical direct fired heater components and their functions.
8
2
10
18
20
11
3
12
4
19
21
13
9
14
15
22
6
7
5
16
6
17
23
1
1. Gas Inlet – Main gas supply connection
2. Motor Starter – Contactor with overload protection to start and protect motor.
3. Freeze-Stat Thermostat (Optional) – De-energizes blower motor if the discharge air
temperature falls below the set point.
4. Cooling Interlock Relay (Optional) – Energizes power to cooling circuit on call for cooling.
5. Inlet Gas Pressure Tap – Inlet gas pressure should be measured here.
6. Combination Gas Valve - A combination of redundant solenoid valves, pilot valve and gas
regulator built into one unit.
7. Pilot Tubing – Pilot tube connection to combination gas valve.
8. Manual Reset High Temperature Limit – Safety device that prevents the heater from
overheating.
9. Maxitrol Modulating Amplifier - Regulates temperature by modulating gas valve
10. Power Transformer – Installed when motor voltage > 120V. Used to provide 120V service to
controls.
11. Circuit Breaker – Protects electrical components from high current spikes.
12. Terminal Strip – Central location to terminate control wiring. Should be used for troubleshooting.
13. Control Transformer – 120V primary; 24V secondary control transformer.
14. Low Pressure Airflow Probe – Measures profile pressure downstream of burner.
15. High Pressure Airflow Probe – Measures profile pressure upstream of burner.
16. Modulating Gas Valve – Modulates gas flow to burner to provide proper air temperature.
17. Manifold Gas Pressure Tap – Manifold gas pressure should be measured here.
18. Flame Safety Control – Initiates and monitors flame.
19. Airflow Switch – A safety device insuring proper air flow during burner operation.
20. Ignition Transformer – Produces high voltage spark to ignite flame.
21. Intake Air Thermostat – De-energize heating circuit when intake air exceeds set-point.
22. Damper Actuator – Motor containing end switch that opens intake damper.
23. Manual Gas Shut-Off Valve Allows gas flow to burner to be shut off to leak test gas train
18
Remote Panel Option
The Remote Panel is a device used to control the operation of the heater from a remote location. This
unit is available in both a “2 Position” or “3 Position” configuration and with or without a cooling output. It
also will accommodate both the Maxitrol discharge temperature dial and the Maxitrol space sensing
Selectrastat. It is important to understand the following Remote Panel controls and uses:
3
1
4
2
FLAME
FAILURE
CLOGGED
FILTER
1. Manual/Off/Auto Switch - Used to control blower operation and tempering mode of unit. The
AUTO position allows the unit to “decide”, through the use of the intake air thermostat, whether or
not heating is needed. The MANUAL position allows the user to control whether or not heat is
needed. The OFF position will turn the blower off when a “3 Position” remote panel is ordered.
The OFF position will disable all temperature controls when a “2 Position” remote panel is
ordered and fan power is then controlled by the pre-wire package only.
2. Heat/Vent Switch – This switch is powered when the Manual/Off/Auto switch is in the MANUAL
position. It is used to control the tempering mode of the unit. The VENT position will prevent the
burner from operating and the heater will deliver untempered air. The HEAT position will force
the burner on and the unit will heat the incoming air. This switch becomes a Heat/Vent/Cool
switch when the cooling interlock is ordered. This option provides a 120V cooling output from the
remote panel.
3. Lights- Displays the current status of unit features. The light definitions are as follows:
POWER - Illuminated when there is power to Remote Panel.
BLOWER ON - Illuminated when the blower motor is powered.
BURNER ON - Illuminates after pilot flame has established and main valve is powered.
FLAME FAILURE - Illuminated when the Flame Safety Control is in Alarm mode.
CLOGGED FILTER – (Optional) Illuminated when the Intake Filters are Dirty.
4. Temperature Control – Controls the discharge temperature of a standard unit. The temperature
dial is replaced with Maxitrol Selectrastat in Space Heating applications and is used to control the
space temperature.
19
Troubleshooting
The following tables list causes and corrective actions for possible problems with direct fired heater units.
Review these lists prior to consulting manufacturer.
Airflow Troubleshooting Chart
Problem
Fan Inoperative
Potential Cause
Blown fuse or open circuit breaker
Disconnect switch in “Off” position
Motor wired incorrectly
Broken fan belt
Motor starter overloaded
Remote panel set to “Off” Position
Motor Overload
Fan rotating in the wrong direction
Fan speed is too high
Motor wired incorrectly
Insufficient Airflow
Overload in starter set too low
Motor HP too low
Duct static pressure lower than design
Fan rotating in the wrong direction
Poor outlet conditions
Intake damper not fully open
Duct static pressure higher than
design
Blower speed too low
Excessive Airflow
Excessive Vibration and Noise
Supply grills or registers closed
Dirty or clogged filters
Belt slippage
Blower speed to high
Filters not installed
Duct static pressure lower than design
Misaligned pulleys
Damaged or unbalanced wheel
Fan is operating in the unstable region
of the fan curve
Bearings need lubrication or
replacement
Fan speed is too high
Belts too loose, worn or oily
20
Corrective Action
Replace fuse or reset circuit breaker
and check amps
Turn to “On” position
Check motor wiring to wiring diagram
located on fan motor
Replace belt
Reset starter and check amps
Set Remote Panel to “Manual” or
“Auto” Position
Be sure fan is rotating in the direction
shown on rotation label
Reduce fan RPM
Check motor wiring to wiring diagram
located on fan motor
Set overload to motor FLA value
Determine if HP is sufficient for job
Reduce fan RPM
Be sure fan is rotating in the direction
shown on rotation label
There should be a straight clear duct
at the outlet
Inspect damper linkage and replace
damper motor if needed
Improve ductwork to eliminate or
reduce duct losses
Increase fan RPM. Do not overload
motor
Open and adjust
Clean and/or replace
Adjust belt tension
Reduce fan RPM
Install filters
Reduce fan RPM
Align pulleys
Replace wheel
Refer to performance curve for fan
Lubricate or replace
Reduce fan RPM
Inspect and replace if needed
Burner Troubleshooting Chart
Problem
Pilot Does Not Light/Stay Lit
Potential Cause
Main gas if off
Air in gas line
Dirt in pilot orifice
Gas pressure out of range
Pilot valve is off
Pilot orifice fitting leak
Excessive drafts
Safety device has cut power
Dirty flame sensor
Remote panel in “Vent” mode
No spark at igniter
Main Burner Does Not Light
(Pilot is Lit)
Defective valve
Loose valve wiring
Defective pilot sensor
Shut off valve closed
Defective flame safety controller
Pilot fails as main gas valves open
and main gas begins to flow
Main gas pressure too low
Not Enough Heat
Too Much Heat
Too much airflow
Burner undersized
Gas controls not wired properly
Thermostat setting too low
Thermostat malfunction
Unit locked into low fire
Defective modulating gas valve
Thermostat setting too high
Unit locked into high fire
Thermostat wired incorrectly
Proper Spark Gap
21
Corrective Action
Open main gas valve
Purge gas line
Clean orifice with compressed air
Adjust to proper gas pressure
Turn pilot valve on
Tighten pilot orifice
Re-direct draft away from unit
Check limits and airflow switch
Clean flame sensor
Change to “Heat” mode
Check wiring, sensor, and ignition
controller. Check spark gap as shown
below.
Replace combination valve
Check wiring to valve
Replace pilot sensor
Open shut off valve
Replace flame safety controller
Plug the first burner port next to the
pilot gas tube with burner cement
Increase main gas pressure – do not
exceed 14 in. w.c. inlet pressure (5 psi.
on size 4-5 heater)
Decrease airflow if possible
Check design conditions
Check wiring
Increase thermostat setting
Check/replace thermostat
Check wiring
Check/replace modulating valve
Decrease thermostat setting
Check wiring
Check thermostat wiring
Remote Panel Troubleshooting Chart
Light Indication
No Lights
Condition
Power not available to Remote Panel
Proper Heating Operation
Possible Cause
Bad voltage to unit
Main disconnect in “OFF” Position
Circuit breaker tripped
Bad main transformer
No problem
Manual/Off/Auto Switch in “Off” Position
(3 Position Remote Panels Only)
Improper damper function
Low Temperature Thermostat Timed
Out (Option)
No Problem
Manual/Off/Auto Switch in “Off” Position
(2 Position Remote Panels Only)
Heat/Vent Switch in “Vent” Position
Gas Pressure Switch Tripped (option)
High Temperature Limit Thermostat
Tripped
Manual/Off/Auto Switch in “Auto”
Position and Intake Air Thermostat not
Satisfied
Insufficient Airflow
Excessive Airflow
Bad airflow switch
Problem with air probes
Problem with airflow tubing
Broken Belt
No Problem
POWER Light Only
Proper unit Off Operation
No power to motor starter
POWER Light and
BLOWER ON Light
Proper Ventilation Operation
No Power to Flame Safety Controller
Filters Clogged
Filters Dirty or Need Replacement
Flame Safety Alarm Activated
Combination Valve in “Off” Position
(Unit Sizes 1-3)
Stuck Closed Gas Valve
No or Low Gas Pressure
Bad Spark Electrode
Bad Ignition Transformer
Flames Sensor Malfunction
Clogged Pilot Orifices
Improper Airflow
POWER Light and
BLOWER ON Light and
BURNER ON Light
CLOGGED FILTER Light On
(Optional)
FLAME FAILURE Light On
No Flame Detected during Pilot
Establishment Period
22
Troubleshooting Flowcharts
Nothing
Happens
Is Overload
tripped on
starter?
YES
Reset & measure FLA
of motor. Is it higher
than rating?
YES
Adjust
or
change
Pulley
YES
Is the air flow LED
on Flame Saftey
illuminated?
Adjust or
Replace
Adjust pulley to
achieve proper
airflow.
NO
YES
Is outside air cooler than
intake air thermostat
setting?
NO
Is Freeze-Stat
open?
Blower runs
but there is
no heat
NO
Proper
economizer
operation
YES
NO
NO
Is end switch on
Motorized
Damper closed?
YES
Is High Temp.
Limit Tripped?
Adjust or
Replace
actuator
Reset
NO
Is there a
Remote Panel
Installed?
NO
Check wiring
YES
Is Remote set to
"Heat"
YES
NO
Set Remote
Panel to
"Manual" and
"Heat" mode.
Refer to Flame
Safety Guide
Burner lights but
heater stays in
Low Fire
Is there voltage on
Terminal #17
No
Burner lights but heater
stays in High Fire
Replace
FSC
No
Is there a short circuit in
the Remote Temperature
Selector or wiring?
Check valve wiring
or open valves
Yes
With wires 3 & 4
removed from the
Maxitrol Amplifier, is
there 9.5K to 11K
Ohms between the
wires?
Replace
Discharge Air
Sensor
No
No
No
Is there a short or open
circuit in Modulating
Valve? Should be 45-55
Ohms (60-80 on MR212)
No
Yes
With wires 1 & 2
removed from the
Maxitrol Amplifier, is
there 9.5K to 11K Ohms
between the wires?
Install
Jumper
Yes
Repair short or
replace
Temperature
Selector
No
Is there an open circuit in
the Discharge Air Sensor
or wiring?
Yes
Remove Terminal #4
from the Maxitrol
Amplifier. Does the
heater go into High Fire?
No
Yes
Yes
Are all valves
powered and open?
Is there a jumper between
terminals 2 & 3 on the
Maxitrol Amplifier?
Replace
Amplifier
No
Yes
Replace
Modulating
Valve
Replace the
Temperature
Selector
23
Is Plunger in the
Modulating Valve jammed?
Inspect and clean. It
should operate freely in
the sleeve.
No
Foreign object holding
valve open. Remove
bottom plate and inspect
valve and seat. Clean or
replace valve.
Yes
Repair Circuit or
replace the
Discharge Air
Sensor
Flame Safety Service Guide
(Airflow LED may or may not be illuminated)
24
Flame Safety Service Guide (continued)
(Airflow LED may or may not be illuminated)
25
MAINTENANCE
To guarantee trouble free operation of this heater, the manufacturer suggests following these guidelines.
Most problems associated with fan failures are directly related to poor service and maintenance.
Please record any maintenance or service performed on this fan in the documentation section located at
the end of this manual.
WARNING: DO NOT ATTEMPT MAINTENANCE ON THE HEATER UNTIL THE
ELECTRICAL SUPPLY HAS BEEN COMPLETELY DISCONNECTED AND THE
MAIN GAS SUPPLY VALVE HAS BEEN TURNED OFF.
General Maintenance
1. Fan inlet and approaches to ventilator should be kept clean and free from any obstruction.
2. Motors are normally permanently lubricated. Check bearings periodically. If they have grease
fittings lubricate each season. Use caution when lubricating bearings, wipe the fittings clean, the
unit should be rotated by hand while lubricating. Caution: Use care when touching the exterior
of an operating motor. Motors normally run hot and may be hot enough to be painful or
cause injury.
3. All fasteners should be checked for tightness each time maintenance checks are preformed prior
to restarting unit.
4. Blowers require very little attention when moving clean air. Occasionally oil and dust may
accumulate causing imbalance. If the fan is installed in a corrosive or dirty atmosphere,
periodically inspect and clean the wheel, inlet and other moving parts to ensure smooth and safe
operation.
Re-Setting Of The Unit
If the flame safety control is locked out (alarm light on), reset the unit by:
1. Turn OFF Power to the unit.
2. Turn Power to the unit back ON.
Emergency shutdown of unit
To shut down the unit in the event of an emergency do the following:
1. Turn power OFF to the unit from main building disconnect.
2. Turn the external disconnect switch to the OFF position.
3. CLOSE the inlet gas valve located on the heater.
Prolonged shutdown of the unit
For prolonged shutdown the following steps should be done:
1. Turn the external disconnect switch to the OFF position.
2. CLOSE the inlet gas valve located on the heater.
To re-start the unit the following steps should be done:
1. Turn the external disconnect switch to the ON position.
2. OPEN the inlet gas valve located on the heater.
26
2 weeks after startup
1. Belt tension should be checked after the first 2 weeks of fan operation. Belts tend to stretch and
settle into pulleys after an initial start-up sequence. Do not tension belts by changing the
setting of the motor pulley, this will change the fan speed and may damage the motor. To retension belts, turn the power to the fan motor OFF. Loosen the fasteners that hold the blower
scroll plate to the blower. Rotate the motor to the left or right to adjust the belt tension. Belt
tension should be adjusted to allow 1/64” of deflection per inch of belt span. Exercise extreme
care when adjusting V-belts as not to misalign pulleys. Any misalignment will cause a sharp
reduction in belt life and produce squeaky noises. Over-tightening will cause excessive belt and
bearing wear as well as noise. Too little tension will cause slippage at startup and uneven wear.
Whenever belts are removed or installed, never force belts over pulleys without loosening
motor first to relieve belt tension. When replacing belts, use the same type as supplied by the
manufacturer. On units shipped with double groove pulleys, matched belts should always be
used.
2. All fasteners should be checked for tightness each time maintenance checks are preformed prior
to restarting unit.
Every 3 months
1. Belt tension should be checked quarterly. See instructions in the previous maintenance section.
Over-tightening will cause excessive bearing wear and noise. Too little tension will cause
slippage at startup and uneven wear.
2. Filters need to be cleaned and/or replaced quarterly, and more often in severe conditions.
Washable filters can be washed in warm soapy water. When re-installing filters, be sure to install
with the airflow in the correct direction as indicated on the filter.
Filter Quantity Chart
Intake
Size 1 Sloped
Size 2 Sloped
Size 3 Sloped
Size 4 Sloped
Size 5 Sloped
Size 1 V-Bank
Size 2 V-Bank
Size 3 V-Bank
Size 4 V-Bank
Size 5 V-Bank
16” x 20”
3
20” x 25”
3
6
10
8
3
8
8
15
12
Yearly
1.
2.
3.
4.
Inspect bearings for wear and deterioration. Replace if necessary.
Inspect belt wear and replace torn or worn belts.
Inspect bolts and set screws for tightness. Tighten as necessary.
Inspect motor for cleanliness. Clean exterior surfaces only. Remove dust and
grease from the motor housing to ensure proper motor cooling. Remove dirt
and grease from the wheel and housing to prevent imbalance and damage.
5. Check for gas leaks and repair if present.
6. Clean flame sensor by rubbing with steel wool to remove any rust build-up,
7. Clean burner with a wire brush and insure burner ports are free of debris.
Then wipe the burner with a clean rag.
27
Burner Orifice
Drill Size
Orifice
Gas Port
Air Port
Drill Size
31
43
Start-Up and Maintenance Documentation
START-UP AND MEASUREMENTS SHOULD BE PERFORMED AFTER THE SYSTEM HAS BEEN
AIR BALANCED AND WITH THE HEAT ON (Warranty will be void without completion of this form)
Job Information
Job Name
Address
City
State
Zip
Phone Number
Fax Number
Contact
Purchase Date
Service Company
Address
City
State
Zip
Phone Number
Fax Number
Contact
Start-Up Date
Heater Information
Refer to the start-up procedure in this manual to complete this section.
Name Plate and Unit Information
Field Measured Information
Model Number
Motor Voltage
Serial Number
Motor Amperage**
Motor Volts
RPM
Motor Hertz
Burner Differential Pressure
Motor Phase
Pilot Flame Signal
Motor FLA
Low Fire Flame Signal
Motor HP
High Fire Flame Signal
Blower Pulley
Gas Type
Motor Pulley
High Fire Inlet Gas Pressure
Belt Number
Low Fire Manifold Gas Pressure
Gas Type
High Fire Manifold Gas Pressure
Min. Btu/Hr
Thermostat Set-Point
Max. Btu/Hr
Temperature Control
in. w.c.
VDC
VDC
VDC
in. w.c.
in. w.c.
in. w.c.
Discharge
Space
Correct
Airflow Direction
Incorrect
**If measured amps exceed the FLA rating on the nameplate, fan RPM must be reduced to decrease the
measured amps below the nameplate FLA rating.
Maintenance Record
Date
Service Performed
Factory Service Department
Phone: 1-866-784-6900
Fax: 1-919-554-9374
28
April 2006 Rev. 9

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