Meade LX85 Series Owner Manual

Meade LX85 Series Owner Manual
Instruction Manual
LX85 Series with AudioStar
German Equatorial Mounted Telescopes
WARNING!
Never use an unfiltered telescope to look at the Sun!
Looking at or near the Sun will cause instant and
irreversible damage to your eye. Eye damage
is often painless, so there is no warning to the
observer that damage has occurred until it is
too late. Do not point the telescope at or near
the Sun. Do not look through the telescope
or Viewfinder as it is moving. Children should
always have adult supervision while observing.
2
Appendix A:
CONTENTS
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
LX85 Mount Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4
ACF Optical Tube Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8
Mak-Cass Optical Tube Overview . . . . . . . . .
9
Reflector Optical Tube Overview . . . . . . . . .
10
Refractor Optical Tube Overview . . . . . . . .
11
Parts List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12
Assembly
Assembling the Tripod . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Attaching the LX85 Mount to the Tripod . . . . . . . .
Setting the Latitude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Attaching the Accessory Tray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Attaching the Counterweight & Shaft . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the AudioStar and Cables . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the Telescope Optical Tube . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Balancing the LX85 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Telescope Home Position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Aligning the Finder Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Polar Alignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operating the LX85
Advanced Polar Alignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
Celestial Coordinates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Alternative Polar Alignments with AudioStar . . . . . 45
Appendix C:
General Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Appendix D:
Training the Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Appendix E:
Advanced Coma-Free Optical System . . . . . . . . .
Maksutov-Cassegrain Optical System . . . . . . . . .
Refractor Optical System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reflector Optical System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14
14
14
15
15
15
15
16
16
17
17
18
Powering the LX85 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving Through AudioStar's Menus . . . . . . . . . . .
Initializing AudioStar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Easy Alignment with AudioStar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Go To Your First Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Guided Tour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19
19
19
20
21
21
The AudioStar Handbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22
22
24
25
25
Tour the Cosmos with Just the Push of a Button .
Observing Using AudioStar's Arrow Keys . . . . . . .
Observe the Moon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Terrestrial Observing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix B:
Appendix F
Collimating the Optics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Collimating the Maksutov-Cassegrain . . . . . . . . .
Collimating the ACF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Collimating the Newtonian Reflector . . . . . . . . . . .
28
29
30
30
31
Periodic Error Correction (PEC) Training . . . . . . . .
PEC Train Menu Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PEC Update Menu Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PEC Erase Menu Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PEC On and Off Menu Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
33
33
34
34
34
52
52
52
54
Appendix G
Table of Latitudes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Recycling Information
Waste Electrical & Electronic Equipment . . . . . . . . 58
Meade Limited Warranty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Contact Information
59
Social Media and Address . . . . . . . . . . . . Back Cover
AudioStar Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
AudioStar Navigation Exercise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
Entering Data into AudioStar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Entering Data into AudioStar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Guided Tour Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Object Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
The AudioStar Menu Tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Event Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Glossary Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Utilities Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setup Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
50
50
51
51
3
LX85 Mount Overview
4
LX85 Mount Overview
5
position from lifting during transport.
Overview
Azimuth Adjustment Knobs: Used during polar
alignment of the telescope. Makes fine adjustments
to the azimuth (left/right) to locate true north (or
south in the Southern Hemisphere).
Tripod Assembly: Supports the weight of your
entire telescope assembly. Adjustable height tripod
collapses for transport and storage.
LX85 Equatorial Mount: This is the equatorial
platform on top of the tripod which holds your
telescope and all of its accessories. This is the
mechanical component responsible for pointing
and tracking. It contains two motors, one for Right
Ascension which moves east/west, and one for
Declination, which moves north/south.
Control Panel: Contains the HBX port for the
AudioStar Hand Box Cable, Declination Port,
AutoGuide Port, and Auxiliary Port.
R.A. Index Mark: To indicate the RA home position
for the telescope.
Declination Index Mark: To indicate the Declination
home position of the telescope.
Optical Tube Assembly (OTA): The optical portion of
the telescope which gathers light and focuses distant
objects through the eyepiece for observation, or to a
camera for astrophotography.
R.A. Lock Lever: Locks the Right Ascension axis.
Must remain locked when using AudioStar to keep
alignment.
Eyepiece: The optical component that you look
through to observe objects in the night sky.
Eyepieces are interchangeable. Several varieties are
available with a range of magnification and field of
view.
Declination Lock Lever: Locks the Declination axis.
Must remained locked when using AudioStar to keep
alignment. When in the locked position, the mounts
movements are controlled electronically through the
AudioStar Handbox.
Diagonal Mirror (for ACF, Mak-Cass, and
Refractors only): Flips the eyepiece position
upright for better comfort and accessibility when
viewing objects high overhead. The Diagonal Mirror
also provides a right-side-up image through the
telescope.
Declination Cable: Plugs into the Control panel and
Declination Motor Housing.
Dovetail Saddle: Mounting space that accepts the
Dovetail Mounting Plate.
Dovetail Mounting Plate: The mounting component
that attaches the Optical Tube Assembly to the LX85
Equatorial Mount.
Finder Scope: Provides a lower power, wider field
of view to help locate bright stars and objects before
centering them in the eyepiece of the Optical Tube
Assembly. The Finder Scope is especially useful
during the AudioStar Alignment procedure, and to
quickly locate bright objects such as the Moon and
planets.
Dovetail Attachment Knobs: Allows attachment
of Dovetail Mounting Plate to Dovetail Saddle.
Both screws must be firmly tightened to secure the
Optical Tube Assembly.
Counterweight Shaft: Threads into the LX85 EQ
Mount and holds the Counterweight(s).
AudioStar Hand Box: The computer control for
the LX85. The AudioStar controls the motors and
electronics of the mount, responsible for the GOTO,
pointing and tracking.
Counterweight: Counterbalances the weight of the
Optical Tube Assembly and accessories. Keeps the
Right Ascension motor drive smooth and accurate
when properly balanced.
Altitude Adjustment Knob: Adjusts the altitude
angle of the LX85 EQ mount. This angle is set to
the latitude of your observing location and must be
correctly positioned to polar align the telescope.
Counterweight Lock Knob: Tighten firmly to hold
the counterweight in place.
Safety Nut: Stops the Counterweight from falling
to the ground (or your feet) in the event the
Counterweight Lock Knob is not tightened.
Altitude Adjustment Lock Knob: Locks the altitude
position in place. This is not a load-bearing screw
and is only used to prevent the mount’s altitude
6
Polar Axis Port with Cover: An opening around the
R.A. axis which is aimed at the Celestial Pole (north
or south) when properly polar aligned. Remove the
cap when using the optional Polar Scope, otherwise,
keep the cap in place.
12V DC Power Input Port: Accepts 12V DC with
at least 5A of current. Accepts tip-positive power
plugs with a 5.5mm outside diameter and 2.5mm
inside diameter.
On/Off Switch: Turns the mount on and off when
connected to a power source.
Center Rod: Threads the LX85 EQ Mount to the
Tripod Assembly. Also secures the Accessory Tray.
Accessory Tray: Conveniently holds both 2” and
1.25” eyepieces while also improving the rigidity of
the tripod when firmly tightened in place.
Accessory Tray Nut: Secures the Accessory Tray in
place. Tighten firmly to keep the tripod extra rigid.
7
ACF Optical Tube Overview
8
Maksutov-Cassegrain Optical Tube
Overview
9
Reflector Optical Tube Overview
10
Refractor Optical Tube Overview
11
LX85 Parts List
#217004 with 8" Reflector Parts List
Optical Tube Assembly with Tube Rings and Dust
Caps
LX85 EQ Head
Counterweight Shaft
8x50 Finder Scope
Altitude Knobs (Adjustment & Lock)
1.25” Plössl Eyepiece, 9mm
Azimuth Adjustment Knobs
1.25” Plössl Eyepiece, 26mm
9 lbs Counterweight
AudioStar Handbox
#217002 with 6" Maksutov-Cassegrain
Cable for AudioStar Handbox
Cable for Declination Motor
Parts List
Tripod with Center Rod and Accessory Tray Nut
Optical Tube Assembly with Visual Back and Dust
Caps
Accessory Tray
8x50 Finder Scope
Compass
1.25” Plössl Eyepiece, 9mm
Instruction Manual
1.25” Plössl Eyepiece, 26mm
1.25" Diagonal Mirror
#217005 with 6" ACF Parts List
#217001 with 5" Refractor Parts List
Optical Tube Assembly and Dust Caps
Optical Tube Assembly with Tube Rings and Dust
Caps
8x50 Finder Scope
1.25” Plössl Eyepiece, 9mm
8x50 Finder Scope
1.25” Plössl Eyepiece, 26mm
1.25” Plössl Eyepiece, 9mm
1.25" Diagonal Mirror
1.25” Plössl Eyepiece, 26mm
Visual Back
2" Diagonal Mirror
#217006 with 8" ACF Parts List
#217003 with 6" Reflector Parts List
Optical Tube Assembly and Dust Caps
Optical Tube Assembly with Tube Rings and Dust
Caps
8x50 Finder Scope
1.25” Plössl Eyepiece, 9mm
8x50 Finder Scope
1.25” Plössl Eyepiece, 26mm
1.25” Plössl Eyepiece, 9mm
1.25" Diagonal Mirror
1.25” Plössl Eyepiece, 26mm
Visual Back
12
#217010 with 70mm Astrograph Refractor
Parts List
Optical Tube Assembly with Tube Rings and Dust
Caps
48mm to 42mm Adapter
Vixen-style Dovetail
Hard Carry Case
#217008 with 80mm APO Refractor
Parts List
Optical Tube Assembly with Tube Rings and Dust
Caps
2" to 1.25" Adapter
Vixen-style Dovetail
Hard Carry Case
#217009 with 115mm APO Refractor
Parts List
Optical Tube Assembly with Tube Rings and Dust
Caps
2" to 1.25" Adapter
Vixen-style Dovetail
Hard Carry Case
13
Assembly
Post. While holding the mount onto the top of the
tripod with one hand, secure the mount to the tripod by
threading in the tripod Center Rod Mount Locking Nut.
Begin unpacking the box contents and start
assembling the mount during the day to become
familiar with the parts and operation of the LX85.
3. Attach the two Azimuth Adjustment Knobs to the
mount. They should just be finger tight.
4. Attach the Altitude Adjustment Knobs to the back
(south) side of the mount.
Setting the Latitude
We suggest roughly setting the latitude on the mount
before more weight is added. This makes the larger
adjustments easier.
1. Loosen the front (north side) Altitude Lock Knob a
Assembling the Tripod
1. Setup the telescope in a large open area where you
can see lots of sky and where the North Star (Polaris)
is visible. Don’t setup right next to a building or a wall
where your view of the night sky will be obstructed.
Make sure the ground is stable and is approximately
level. Always setup the telescope in a safe area away
from roads and traffic. It is best to set up the scope
away from bright nighttime lighting. Bright lights will
spoil your night vision and impede your ability to see the
sky.
few turns to allow room for adjustment.
2. Move the back (south side) Altitude Adjustment
Knob until the degree scale on the mount matches
2. Stand the tripod vertically with the tripod feet down
and with the tripod still fully collapsed. Grasp two of
the tripod legs and, with the full weight of the tripod on
the third leg, gently pull the legs apart to a fully open
position.
the latitude for your observing site. For example, in Los
Angeles, CA, adjust the mount until the scale is at 34º.
5. Attach the Altitude Lock Knob to the front (north) side
of the mount and lightly tighten. This locks the mount’s
latitude position in place and prevents the mount from
moving during future transport.
3. Adjust the height of the tripod by loosening the
Height Adjustment Lock Knobs at the bottom of each
leg, one at a time. Raise the leg to the desired level
then tighten the lock knob. The tripod should be
reasonably level but it does not need to be precisely
level when using an EQ mount.
You can find the latitude of your observing site from
your smartphone, quick internet search, or geographical
map. You will fine tune this adjustment later while under
the night sky.
If the back (south side) Altitude Adjustment Knob stops
moving, you will need to loosen the front (north side)
Altitude Lock Knob more to allow room for adjustment.
Note the front knob just keeps the mount from lifting
during transport, so you can keep this completely loose
until your polar alignment is complete.
Attaching the LX85 Mount to the Tripod
1. Locate the Azimuth Alignment Post on the top side of
the tripod.
2. Place the LX85 mount on the top of the tripod so that
the side which contains the motor covers (the north side
of the mount) is positioned over the Azimuth Alignment
14
Attaching the Accessory Tray
Installing the AudioStar and Cables
Reminder: The LX85 head should be firmly attached to
the tripod before attaching the accessory tray.
1. Plug the Declination Cable into the port on the
Control Panel labeled “DEC”, then plug the other end
of the cable to the port located on the Declination
Motor Housing Cover.
1. Remove the Accessory Tray Nut from the Center
Rod and slide the accessory tray up until it comes
in contact with the tripod legs. The Accessory Tray
arms should align with each leg before tightening the
Accessory Tray Nut.
2. Plug the AudioStar cable into the port on the
Control Panel labeled “HBX”, then plug the other end
into the bottom of the AudioStar Handbox.
2. Attach the Nut and firmly tighten until the Accessory
Tray is in full contact with all three tripod legs.
3. Attach the AudioStar Hanger Clip to the back side
of the handbox by squeezing the sides of the clip so
they fit into the two mounting holes,, then hang it from
the Accessory Tray or other convenient location.
3. Push against the Accessory Tray and check that it
does not move against the tripod. It should be firmly
in place. This not only assures that the Accessory
Tray is properly installed, it also makes the tripod more
rigid to better support the weight of the telescope.
Attaching the Counterweight Shaft and
Counterweight(s)
Installing the Telescope Optical Tube
1. The Counterweight Shaft and Counterweight Shaft
Locking Nut are packed separately in the box and
need to be assembled before the Counterweight is
installed. To assemble, thread the Locking Nut onto
the top of the Counterweight Shaft until it stops.
Any optical tube with a Vixen-style dovetail bar can
be attached to the LX85. Before attaching an Optical
Tube, make sure the total weight of the optical tube
with accessories is below the stated payload capacity
of the LX85 Mount. Visit the Meade website (www.
Meade.com) for the LX85 payload capacity. Make sure
the mount and tripod are already setup in the location
you wish to observe before attaching the optical tube.
2. Now thread the Counterweight Lock Nut up the
shaft until it stops. The Lock Nut helps to stabilize the
Counterweight shaft during use.
3. Unlock the Right Ascension (R.A.) Lock Lever and
position the Counterweight Shaft so that it’s pointing
downward towards the ground. Remove the Safety
Nut and slide the *Counterweight to the middle
position of the Counterweight Shaft. You will later
adjust the position of the Counterweight to balance
the mount after the tube assembly and accessories
have been added.
1. Position the Right Ascension (R.A.) so that the
counterweights face downward towards the ground,
and Declination (Dec) so that the Dovetail Saddle
runs north/south along the mount. This is the home
position of the mount and the most secure position to
attach the optical tube.
2. Firmly tighten both the R.A. and Dec Lock Levers.
4. Lock the R.A. Lock Lever so that it does not move
when installing the Optical Tube.
Reminder: The Counterweight(s) should already be
installed before attaching the optical tube!
*Install the second counterweight if your LX85
telescope came with two counterweights. If so, the
second counterweight will be packaged separately.
3. Loosen the Dovetail Attachment Screws to make
15
room for the dovetail bar on the optical tube, but do
not remove the screws.
Balancing the LX85
Whether you are using an LX85 series optical tube,
or an optical tube of your own, balancing the LX85
equatorial mount allows for safe operation and to
achieve the best stability, tracking, and pointing
accuracy.
4. Place your optical tube’s dovetail bar flat against
the Dovetail Saddle of the LX85. Use caution and
make sure the bar is flat against the saddle. Position
the optical tube so that it’s about midway on the LX85
mount.
1. Verify all accessories are installed and dust covers
removed before balancing the telescope.
5. With one hand holding onto the optical tube, use
your other hand to tighten the Dovetail Attachment
Screws. Check that everything is secure to before
letting go of the optical tube.
Balancing the R.A. Axis
2. Carefully unlock the R.A. Lock Lever while
holding onto the telescope. Move R.A. so that the
counterweight shaft is horizontal.
Hint: For larger and heavier telescopes, we
recommend enlisting the help of a second person
to assist installing the optical tube onto the mount.
Working with an equatorial mount can take some time
to get used to, so having someone spot you while
installing the optical tube can help greatly.
3. Gradually let go of the telescope and see which
way it starts to swing. If it swings towards the optical
tube, slide the counterweights down the counterweight
shaft; if towards the counterweight side, slide them
upward. Do this until the R.A. axis does not move
when the R.A. Lock Lever is unlocked. A well balanced
R.A. will reduce motor strain and improve the
telescope performance.
Installing the Accessories
Balancing the Dec Axis
Refer to the Optical Overview section on pages 8-11
for your particular LX85 optical tube.
4. With the R.A. counterweights shaft still pointing
horizontally, tighten the R.A. Lock Lever.
1. If not already installed, thread the Visual Back (ACF
and Maksutov only) to the back of the telescope.
5. Carefully unlock the Dec Lock Lever while holding
onto the optical tube.
2. Insert the Diagonal Mirror (ACF, Maksutov,
and Refractor only) and secure it with the locking
thumbscrew. If an imaging camera will be used, it will
be beneficial to not use the diagonal mirror at all.
6. Gradually let go of the optical tube and see which
way it starts to swing. If it swings forward (towards the
opening of the optical tube), then the Dec axis is frontheavy; if backward it is back-heavy.
3. Insert the eyepiece info the focuser (for reflectors)
or the Diagonal Mirror and secure it in place with the
locking thumbscrew. Always start with the lower
power 26mm eyepiece.
7. Move the optical tube back to the home position (in
R.A., counterweight shaft pointing downward towards
the ground; in Dec, optical tube facing north to safely
balance in Dec. This way, the optical tube will be
held down by gravity once you unlock the Dovetail
Attachment Screws.
4. Insert the 8x50 Finder Scope into the Finder Scope
Bracket and secure it to the telescope with the locking
thumbscrews.
8. Carefully unlock the Dovetail Locking Screws while
holding onto the optical tube, then slide the scope
forward or backward slightly as needed to reach
balance. You may have to go back to steps 4-6 to
determine when the telescope is balanced in Dec.
5. Install any other accessories that will be used
including dew shields, filter wheels, guider cameras
etc before moving forward to the balancing procedure.
Note: In some cases you can adjust the optical tube
position within the tube cradle rings to achieve a
balanced system. To do this loosen the cradle ring lock
knobs slightly and slide the OTA forward or backward
in the cradle rings until balanced. Then lock the cradle
16
in the Southern Hemisphere). The Optical Tube
Assembly points toward the forward-facing tripod leg
with the “N” label.
ring lock knobs firmly in place.
After using the LX85 for the first couple of times
you will soon be able to run through the balancing
procedure quickly and easily.
To help indicate the correct Home Position, the
LX85 has an index mark on the R.A. and Dec axis.
Unlock the R.A. and Dec Lock Levers and position
the telescope to align with the index marks, then
lock both levers. The mount must remain locked so
that you can successfully perform an alignment and
accurately locate objects with the AudioStar.
<!>Caution: If the telescope is severely out of
balance, it may tend to quickly fall to one side.
Always hold on to the telescope whenever you
unlock one of the levers to prevent accidental
damage.
The Telescope Home Position
Aligning The Finder Scope
The Home Position is the starting position of your
telescope before starting an alignment. This is also
considered the default position for the mount when
setting up.
All LX85 telescopes are equipped with an 8x50
optical Finder Scope. This is essentially a small,
low powered telescope with centered crosshairs
designed to help you locate an object before
centering it in the field of view of your telescope.
Without the Finder Scope, it would be difficult to
initially locate anything because the field of view
through your main telescope is much smaller. The
Finder Scope is primarily used to help you locate
your alignment stars when using the AudioStar
handbox. But it proves useful when trying to locate
and center new objects.
The R.A. axis should be positioned so that the
Counterweight Shaft is pointing downward toward
the ground.
The Dec axis should be positioned so that the
Optical Tube Assembly is pointing north (or south
There are 5 adjustment screws and 1 spring-loaded
tensioning screw which helps keep the finder seated
in its bracket. To align the finder:
LX85 Home Position
17
1. Using the 26mm eyepiece, locate an object at
least 1000 yards away during the day, or a bright star
at night.
To roughly polar align your LX85:
1. Place the telescope in the home position
(counterweight shaft facing downward towards the
ground, optical tube facing the north side of the
mount, R.A. and Dec aligned to the index marks).
2. Center the object in your eyepiece.
3. Now, look through the Finder Scope. The object
will be away from the center point of the crosshairs.
Adjust the 5 adjustment screws until the object is
centered in the crosshairs.
2. Without unlocking the R.A. and Dec Lock Levers,
roughly position the LX85 so that it’s facing true
north (or south in the Southern Hemisphere). You
can use the included magnetic compass to get
you close but remember the compass will point
toward Magnetic North and not True North. It may
be necessary to reposition the tripod so the North
tripod leg points roughly near True North. You can
adjust the Azimuth Adjustment Knobs to fine tune
the pointing if necessary. If it’s already dark enough
to see Polaris, use that as your target for true north.
4. Check the view both through the main telescope
and the Finder Scope.
Once aligned, you typically do not have to realign
unless the Finder Scope is moved.
Note: Aligning the Finder Scope during the day can
be easier before beginning your observing session.
However, for best accuracy, you should eventually
align on a bright star in the sky or a very distant
object during the day, such as a mountaintop. This
is because objects closer than “infinity” focus exhibit
parallax.
3. Loosen the front (north side) Altitude Lock Knob a
few turns to allow the Altitude Adjustment knob to be
adjusted.
4. Move the back (south side) Altitude Adjustment
knob until the Latitude Scale on the mount matches
the latitude for your location. For example, in Los
Angeles, CA, adjust the mount until the scale is at
34º.
Reminder: Never look at the Sun with your
telescope or finder scope! Use extreme caution
whenever operating the telescope during the day.
Polar Alignment
5. With the viewfinder already aligned with the
optical tube (see the section on Aligning the
viewfinder if needed), locate Polaris in the finder
scope. If Polaris is not in the finder scope, use the
Azimuth and Altitude adjustment knobs to reposition
the mount. If you run out of adjustment travel, you
will need to reposition the tripods position.
The LX85 is a German Equatorial Mount designed
to precisely track any object in the sky. To work
properly, the mount must be polar aligned so that the
Right Ascension axis follows the apparent motion
of the night sky. If the mount is not accurately polar
aligned, objects will eventually drift out of the field of
view of the telescope.
6. Move the azimuth (left/right) by loosening one of
the Azimuth adjustment knobs while tightening the
other.
Please note that the polar alignment is a mechanical
alignment, which is independent of the computerized
go-to alignment of the AudioStar. Before even
turning the mount on, you should at least have the
LX85 roughly polar aligned.
7. Move the altitude by turning the Altitude
Adjustment knob as needed until Polaris is centered
in the finder scope.
This will achieve a rough polar alignment. The same
procedure can be done using the optional Meade
#617006 Polar Axis Finder for more accurate polar
alignment. Additionally, other methods can be used,
such as drift align, optional third party accessories,
and/or software tools to help precisely polar align the
LX85 Mount.
An optional Polar Axis Finder Scope #617006 is
available from Meade. For northern hemisphere
observers, it allows you to sight Polaris (the North
Star) to quickly locate the North Celestial Pole (NCP)
and achieve a fast polar alignment.
18
Cables” on page 15.
Operating the LX85
2. Turn the telescope power switch to the ON
position. The AudioStar beeps and the display screen
is activated. Then AudioStar takes a few moments to
start up the system.
Powering the LX85
The LX85 requires 12V DC with at least 5 amperes of
current with tip positive polarity. Most portable 12V
field batteries can provide this. The optional Meade
AC Power Adapter (#07584) can be used if you have
access to an AC outlet. The power input port uses a
5.5mm outside diameter and 2.5mm inside diameter
socket.
3. “Press 0 to Align or Mode for Menu” displays.
Press 0 to align your telescope using the “Easy Align”
method, see “Easy (Two-Star) Align” on page 20.
To skip the alignment process, select an alternative
alignment, or access the AudioStar menus, press the
Mode key instead.
4. The telescope then tests the motor function of the
telescope by moving a small amount in the horizontal
and vertical directions. This motor test only occurs on
the first power up and will not occur again unless the
handbox is RESET.
Turn the mount on by flipping the rocker switch to
the up position. A red L.E.D. on the rocker switch
will light to indicate it’s in the ON position.
Moving Through AudioStar’s Menus
5. Set Your Location or Zip Code: The Location
screen displays. This screen asks you if you wish to
choose either the zip code of your observing location
or the location (i.e., entering the city and state or
country of your observing location). Press “1” to
select the zip code option or “2” to enter the city and
state.
The AudioStar database is organized in levels for
quick and easy navigation.
•....................................................................................
Press ENTER to go deeper into AudioStar’s menu
levels.
•....................................................................................
Press MODE to move back toward the top menu
level. This is similar to a back button.
Note: The location settings (country/state/
province and city, or zip code) are only asked for
the first time you turn on the mount. If you wish
to change this setting later on, use the Site menu.
See SITE, page 32 for more information.
•....................................................................................
Press GOTO to move to objects in the database. Use
this after you perform a night sky alignment and have
selected an object from the Audiostar database.
•....................................................................................
Press the central Arrow keys to electronically move
the telescope in a specific direction or in combination
with the number keys to input characters and digits.
A. If you chose the zip code option, the left most
“0” is highlighted. Use the Number keys to enter
the digits. As you enter a digit, the next digit to
the right will be highlighted. Enter the next digit.
Repeat this process until all 5 digits of your zip
code are entered. Press ENTER.
•....................................................................................
Press the bottom Scroll keys to move up and down
through the AudioStar menus.
B. If you chose the location option, the next
screen asks for the country or state/province
(listed alphabetically) of the observing site.
Initializing AudioStar
This section describes how to use AudioStar for the
first time, or after performing a reset (see “RESET”
on page 33).
i. Use the Scroll keys to scroll through the list of
countries, states, and provinces. Press ENTER when
the correct location displays.
1. Verify that AudioStar is properly connected to
the LX85 mount. See “Installing the AudioStar and
ii. The next screen asks for the city (listed
alphabetically) closest to the observing site. Use the
19
From this point forward, you should not move the
mount manually or unlock R.A. or Dec, otherwise the
AudioStar alignment will be lost.
Scroll keys to scroll through the list of cities. Press
ENTER when the correct city appears on screen.
6. The next screen requests the status of Daylight
Savings Time. If Daylight Savings Time is active,
press the “1” key. If Daylight Savings Time is not
active, press the “2” key.
3. Power on the LX85 by pushing the rocker switch
to the up position. A red LED will light on the rocker
switch to indicate the mount is in the ON position.
4. "Press 0 to Align" or "Mode for Menu" appears
on the AudioStar display. Press 0 to begin the Easy
Alignment. If AudioStar has already completed
initialization, the Easy Alignment can be started by
going to the Setup/Align menu and selecting Easy.
7. AudioStar then asks for the Telescope Model.
Using the scroll keys on the AudioStar locate the
model of your telescope and press enter.
Note: If you are using a optical tube not shown in
the LX85 telescope model database, select "LX85
Mount" and enter in the optical tubes focal length
when prompted.
The AudioStar will display scrolling text describing
how to put the telescope into the home position. To
skip this press Enter. The LX85 will slew to the first
of two bright alignment stars. These stars are the
brightest stars in that area of the sky and should
be standout from surrounding stars nearby. Your
telescope may not be pointing directly at the star, but
it should be in the area, usually close enough to sight
within the finder scope.
8. "Enter Date" appears. Use the AudioStar keypad
to enter the date.
9. "Enter Time" appears. Use the AudioStar keypad
to enter the time.
10. Initializing Smart Drive will then appear. The
mount will now move slowly in RA for 30 seconds
while it searches for the RA worm index sensor.
When the sensor is located "Select Item: Object
appears. If the worm index sensor is not located on
the first attempt, power cycle the mount to locate the
sensor.
5. While looking through the finder, use the central
arrow keys to center the alignment star in the finder.
When centering the alignment star select the proper
motor slew speed by pressing the 0-9 keys on the
AudioStar. See Slew Speeds on page 23 to learn
about the different slew speeds. When centering
targets it is best to use a slower more precise slew
speed.
System initialization is now complete and AudioStar
enters into the Easy Alignment routine. See “Easy
(Two-Star) Alignment” for performing an alignment
on the night sky. If you do not wish to begin an
alignment on the night sky, press the MODE key to
exit to the main AudioStar menu.
6. Now, look through the eyepiece and use the Arrow
Keys to center the star in the eyepiece’s field of view,
then press ENTER.
Note: If during the 2 star alignment process
the telescope points to an area of sky that is
obstructed, you can select a different star by
pressing one of the bottom Scroll Keys.
Easy Alignment with AudioStar
The LX85 must be aligned so that the AudioStar
can accurately point to objects in the night sky.
Alternatively, you can choose to simply use the
mount’s tracking ability to track a star or solar system
object (read more in AudioStar Features on pg 22).
7. Repeat the procedure for the second alignment
star.
When the procedure is performed correctly,
“Alignment Successful” displays. If AudioStar does
not display this message, or displays "Alignment
Failed" perform this procedure again and confirm
you are centering the correct alignment stars.
1. Unlock the R.A. and Dec Lock Levers and
manually move the telescope to the home position
(see the Telescope Home Position on pg 17). The
counterweight shaft should be pointing downward
towards the ground and the optical tube should be
pointing north (or south in the Southern Hemisphere).
Hint: The GO TO key also allows you to perform
2. Lock the R.A. and Dec Lock Levers.
20
a “spiral search”. A spiral search is useful when
the telescope slews to an object, but that object
is not visible in the eyepiece after the telescope
finishes its search. (This sometimes occurs
during an alignment procedure.) Press GO TO
when the slew is finished and the telescope
starts slewing in a spiral pattern at a very slow
speed around the search area. Look through
the eyepiece and when the object does become
visible, press MODE to stop the spiral search.
Then use the Arrow keys to center the object.
Saturn precisely in the eyepiece. AudioStar then
automatically moves the telescope so that it
“tracks” Saturn (or whatever other object you may
have chosen); i.e., Saturn remains centered in the
eyepiece.
After you Go To Saturn, practice the Go To feature
with other objects in the Object menu lists. For
example, during Winter, choose M42, the Orion
nebula, from the Messier list. Or in the summer,
choose the Dumbbell nebula from the Deep Sky,
Named Objects list.
Once aligned, your LX85 is ready to locate from
thousands of objects contained in the AudioStar’s
database.
Using the Guided Tour
This example demonstrates using “Tonight’s Best”
Guided Tour.
Go To Your First Object
Different celestial objects are visible at different
times of the year. And depending on your observing
location, possible obstructions (like trees, buildings,
etc.) some objects will be more suitable for your
particular observing session. Solar system objects
including the Moon, Jupiter and Saturn (when visible)
are excellent first targets to observe. And, unlike
fainter deep sky objects, these Solar System objects
are not really affected by light pollution from city
locations.
1. After observing Saturn, press mode three times so
that “Select Item: Object” displays again.
2. Press the Scroll Down key twice. “Select Item:
Guided Tour” displays.
3. Press ENTER. “Guided Tour: Tonight’s Best”
displays. Press ENTER.
If you wish to try out other Guided Tours, press the
Scroll Down key to scroll through other tour choices.
When the tour you wish to select displays, press
ENTER.
Reminder: Once aligned, only use the GO TO or
Arrow keys to move the telescope. Do not move
the telescope manually, or alignment will be lost.
4. “Tonight’s Best: Searching...” displays. After
calculating, “Tonight’s Best: Jupiter” displays.
Note: Different objects may be displayed on a tour
list on any given night. Press ENTER to display
information about the object. Press GO TO to move
the telescope to the object.
1. After the telescope is aligned, “Select Item:
Object” displays. Press ENTER.
2. “Object: Solar System” displays. Press ENTER.
3. “Solar System: Mercury” displays. Keep pressing
the Scroll Down key until a bright planet which is
currently visible displays; for example, Saturn.
5. Press MODE to return to the Tour list. Press the
Scroll keys to scroll through the list. Press ENTER
when you find the next object you wish to observe.
4. Press ENTER. “Calculating” displays. Then
“Saturn” and a set of coordinates displays. Note
that Saturn’s (and other planets’) coordinates change
throughout the year.
6. Press and hold down MODE for two seconds to
leave the Guided Tour menu.
5. Press GO TO. “Saturn: Slewing...” displays
and the telescope slews until it finds Saturn.
You may need to use the Arrow keys to center
21
AUDIOSTAR HANDBOX
The AudioStar Handbox
12
1
13
2
14
3
The AudioStar - Back Detail
4
5
1. 2-Line LCD
Display
6
2. ENTER Key
11
3. MODE Key
4. “GO TO” Key
7
10
5. Arrow Keys
6. Number Keys
9
8
7. Scroll Keys
Tour the Cosmos with Just the
Push of a Button
Control of the LX85 is through the operation of the
standard-equipment AudioStar. Nearly all functions of
the telescope are accomplished with just a few pushes
of AudioStar’s buttons. Some of the major features of
AudioStar are:
22
•
Automatically move the telescope to any of
over 30,000 objects stored in the database or
manually enter the astronomical coordinates of
any celestial object.
•
Take a guided tour of the best celestial objects
to view on any given night of the year.
•
Meade's Astronomer Inside audio content.
Listen through its built-in speaker as it tells you
fun and informative descriptions of over 500
night sky objects as you actually view them in
the eyepiece.
22
8. Serial Port
9. Coil Cord
10. Coil Cord Port
11. "?" Key
12. Utility Light
13. Hook
14. Audio Speaker
•
Download the latest software revisions
directly from the Meade website (www.
meade.com) and share software with other
AudioStar enthusiasts.
•
Control your LX85 with your PC using an
serial interface.
•
Access a glossary of astronomical terms.
•
Calculate which eyepiece to use for optimum
viewing of a celestial object.
coordinates
The AudioStar Computer Controller provides control
of the telescope functions. AudioStar has softtouch keys designed to have a positive feel. The
LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) is back-lit with a red
LED (Light Emitting Diode) for easy viewing in the
dark. The back-lit display, key arrangement, and
sequential database make AudioStar extremely user
friendly.
1
Top line: Lists the primary category or menu
item.
•
Bottom line: Contains a menu option or
information about an object or subject,
depending on which function is being
performed.
•
Local Time and Local Sidereal Time (LST)
•
Timer and Alarm Status
•
Battery status
Press MODE again to return to the previous menu.
ENTER Key: Accesses, in a sequential manner,
the next menu or data level in the AudioStar
database. See MOVING THROUGH AudioStar’s
MENUS, page 19.
NOTE: If ENTER is pressed for two seconds
or more and then released, AudioStar emits
a beep and “ENTER to Sync” is displayed.
“ENTER to Sync” is relevant only after the
telescope has been aligned and is pointing at
an object. If the “ENTER to Sync” feature is
accessed by mistake, press MODE to return
to the previous screen. See High Precision, for
more details about this feature.
3
Date
Site coordinates
2-Line LCD Display: Provides an interface
between AudioStar and the telescope.
•
2
•
4
GO TO Key: Slews (moves) the telescope to
the coordinates of the currently selected object.
While the telescope is slewing, the operation
may be aborted at any time by pressing any
key except GO TO. Pressing GO TO again
resumes the slew to the object.

Arrow Keys: Slew the telescope in a specific
direction (up, down, left, and right), at any
one of nine different speeds. Speed selection
is explained in “SLEW SPEEDS”, below. The
following functions are also available with the
Arrow keys:
MODE Key: Returns to the previous menu or
data level in the AudioStar database until the
top level, “Select Item” is reached. The MODE
key is similar to the back key on a smart phone.
•
•
Note: Pressing MODE while in the “Select
Item” level moves AudioStar to the topmost
screen: “Select Item: Object”.
0 - 9 and changes the slew speeds (see Slew
Speeds, see below). The “0” key also turns on and
off the red utility light on the top of the handbox.
If MODE is pressed and held for two seconds or
more, information about the telescope’s status
displays. When the status displays, press one
of the Scroll keys to display the following
information:
Slew Speeds
LX85 has nine slew speeds that are directly
proportional to the sidereal rate (the rate at
which stars appear to drift across the sky)
and have been calculated to accomplish
specific functions. Pressing a Number key
changes the slew speed, which is shown for
about two seconds on AudioStar’s display.
•
Right Ascension and Declination (astronomical)
coordinates
•
Altitude (vertical) and Azimuth (horizontal)
23
Moves the telescope – Use the Up and
Down Arrow keys to move the telescope
vertically up and down. The Left Arrow key
rotates the telescope horizontally
counterclockwise, while the Right Arrow key
rotates it clockwise.
Data entry – When the scope is prompting
for user entered data, use the Up and Down
Arrow keys to scroll through the letters of the
alphabet and numerical digits. The Down
Arrow key starts with the letter “A” and the
Up Arrow key starts with the digit “9.” The
Left and Right Arrow keys are used to
move the blinking cursor left and right across
the LCD display.
To change the speed, press
appropriate key shown below.
Nine available speeds are:
Number Key “1” = 1x (Guide)
Number Key “2” = 2x
Number Key “3” = 8x
Number Key “4” = 16x
Number Key “5” = 64x
Number Key “6” = 0.50°/sec
Number Key “7” = 1.0°/sec
Number Key “8” = 1.5°/sec
Number Key “9” = 4.0°/sec (Max)
the
9
Coil Cord: Plug one end of the AudioStar coil
cord into the HBX port of the computer control
panel of the telescope and the other end into
the coil cord port.
10
Coil Cord Port: Plug one end of the AudioStar
coil cord into this port located at the bottom of
the AudioStar handbox.
11
? Key: Accesses the “Help” file. “Help” provides
on-screen information on how to accomplish
whatever task is currently active.
Hold down the ? key and then follow the prompts
on the display to access details of AudioStar
functions in the Help feature. The Help system
is essentially an on-screen instruction manual.
Speeds “1”,“2”, or “3”: Best used for fine
centering of an object in the field of view of
a higher power eyepiece, such as a 12mm or
a 9mm eyepiece.
If you have a question about an AudioStar
operation, e.g., INITIALIZATION, ALIGNMENT,
etc., hold down the ? key and follow the
directions that scroll on the second line of the
LCD screen. When a word appears in [brackets],
press ENTER to access the AudioStar Glossary.
A definition or more detailed information
is displayed. Press MODE to return to the
scrolling AudioStar Help display.
Speeds “4”, “5”, or “6”: Enables centering
an object in the field of a low-to-moderate
power eyepiece, such as the standard Super
Plössl 26mm.
Speeds “7” or “8”: Best used for rough
centering of an object in the finder scope.
Speed “9”: Moves the telescope quickly from
one point in the sky to another.

When satisfied with the Help provided, press
MODE to return to the original screen and
continue with the chosen procedure.
Scroll Keys: Accesses options within a
selected menu. The menu is displayed on the
first line of the screen. Options within the menu
are displayed, one at a time, on the second
line. Press the Scroll keys to move through the
options. Press and hold a Scroll key to move
quickly through the options.
The Scroll keys also scroll through the letters of
the alphabet and numerical digits.
Note: The Scroll Down key and the Down
Arrow key move forward through the alphabet
& digits (A to Z, 0 to 9). The Scroll Up key and
the Up Arrow key move backward (Z to A, 9 to
0). Common symbols are also available in the
list.

12
Utility Light: Use this built-in red light to
illuminate star charts and accessories without
disturbing your eye’s adaptation to darkness.
13
Hook: Attach the metal hook to the back side
of AudioStar. Allows the AudioStar to be hung
on various places on the LX85 for quick access.
14
Audio Speaker: Built-in speaker
Astronomer Inside audio content.
plays
Observing Using AudioStar’s Arrow
Keys
You may observe land and astronomical objects
Serial Port: Plug a serial accessory (#505)
cable into AudioStar for updating functions
such as “Download” or “Clone”.
24
looking along the Earth’s surface through heat waves.
These heat waves often cause degradation of image
quality. Lower power eyepieces, like the Super Plössl
26mm eyepiece, magnify these heat waves less than
higher power eyepieces. Therefore, lower power
eyepieces provide a steadier, higher quality image.
using AudioStar’s Arrow keys to move the telescope.
1. Verify the telescope is fully assembled and
that AudioStar is properly connected to your
telescope.
2. Flip the telescope power switch to the ON
position. The AudioStar screen is activated
and a copyright message displays briefly,
followed by a short beep. Then AudioStar
takes a few moments to start up the system.
“Press 0 to align or Mode for Menu” displays
(if you select “0”, Alignment will begin).
If the image is fuzzy or ill-defined, reduce to a lower
power eyepiece, where the heat waves do not have
such an effect on image quality. Observing in early
morning hours, before the ground has built up internal
heat, produces better viewing conditions than during
late afternoon hours.
3. The Arrow keys are now activated. Press the
Arrow keys to slew (move) the telescope up,
down, right, or left.
If you wish to observe a distant land object, such
as a mountain top or a bird, you want to use your
telescope in its Terrestrial Observing mode. To start
up the telescope in Terrestrial mode:
4. Press a Number key to change the telescope’s
slew speed. See Slew Speeds, on pg 23 for
more information.
5. Use the viewfinder to locate an object and
practice using the AudioStar’s Arrow keys to
center the object in the telescope’s field of
view.
1. Turn on the telescope.
2. Move your telescope using the direction arrows
on the handbox while looking through the
viewfinder to put your target in the eyepiece.
6. Use the telescope's focus knob to bring the
object to focus.
3. Focus on the target with the focus knob .
Observe the Moon
Point your telescope at the Moon (note that the Moon
is not visible every night) and practice using the Arrow
keys and the slew speeds to view different features.
The Moon contains many interesting features,
including craters, mountain ranges, and fault lines.
The best time to view the Moon is during its crescent
or half phase. Sunlight strikes the Moon at an angle
during these periods and adds a depth to the view.
No shadows are seen during a full Moon, causing
the overly bright surface to appear flat and rather
uninteresting. Consider the use of a neutral density
Moon filter when observing the Moon. Not only does it
cut down the Moon’s bright glare, but it also enhances
contrast, providing a more dramatic image.
Terrestrial Observing
The LX85 is an excellent high-resolution, terrestrial
(land) telescope. Viewing terrestrial objects requires
25
AudioStar Operation
Important Note: No matter how many levels
into AudioStar are traveled, each press of the
MODE key moves up a level, until the top level,
“Select Item”, is reached. Once in the Select
Item level, press MODE to return to the topmost
level, “Select Item: Object”.
AudioStar Navigation Exercise
The Universe
of AudioStar
To demonstrate how the AudioStar menu structure
works, the following exercise calculates Sunset time
so an evening observing session can be planned.
To Calculate Sunset time:
1. Press the MODE key several times, until “Select
Item: Object” is displayed.
It is important to understand that menu selections are
set in a loop This means that pressing the Scroll Down
key cycles down through all the available options
within a given category, then returns to the first option.
The Scroll Up key cycles up through the options in the
opposite order. Note that this capability is a quick way
to get to an option that is near the bottom of the list.
The following example demonstrates this capability.
2. Press the Scroll Down key once to display the
“Event” option in the “Select Item” menu.
3. Press the ENTER key to choose the “Event”
option and move down a level. “Event: Sunrise”
is displayed.
4. Press the Scroll Down key once to display the
“Sunset” option in the Event menu.
5. Press the ENTER key to choose the “Sunset”
option and move down another level.
Example:
To navigate to the “Select Item: Setup” menu option
when the “Select Item: Object” menu is displayed:
6. AudioStar calculates the Sunset time based on
the current date, time, and location. AudioStar
then displays the results of the calculation.
1. Press the Scroll Down key four times or the
Scroll Up key once.
7. Press MODE once to start moving back up
through the AudioStar levels. The first level up
The screen displays two lines of information. The top
line shows the current menu level. The second line
displays an option which may be selected within that
menu level. Some options are choices that select the
next menu level down. The Scroll keys move up and
down within the list of available options, showing one
option at a time.
When the desired option is displayed on the second
line, press the ENTER key to choose that option and
move down one menu level.
AudioStar Levels
Menus set in loop
Press the MODE key to leave a level; e.g., the wrong
menu option is chosen.
26
is the Event menu.
objects that are visible for the user’s particular location,
time and date.
8. Press MODE again to move up another level.
This is the top level, “Select Item”.
9. Press MODE again to return to the starting
point of “Select Item: Object”.
The most popular tour is “Tonight’s Best” that guides
the user to the best objects that are currently up in the
night sky. This tour is the easiest way to get started
exploring the cosmos with your new LX85 telescope.
Entering Data into AudioStar
Each tour will select the objects, present information
about the object and, if you press “GoTo”, put that
object in the eyepiece of the telescope for you to view.
• To enter numbers and text:
A) Use the Number keys, or
B) Use the Arrow keys to scroll through numbers
0 - 9 and the alphabet. The Down Arrow key
begins with the letter “A”; the Up Arrow key
begins with digit “9”.
The telescope comes pre-loaded with:
•
• To move the cursor across the display: Use the
Right or Left Arrow key to move the cursor from
one number to the next in the display
“Tonight’s Best”, a selection of the most
interesting objects visible on any night.
•
• Press ENTER when the desired information
has been entered.
“A Star’s Life”, tours how stars are formed,
created, changes through their lives and finally
die using examples that are visible tonight.
•
“How Far is Far”, tour showing the phenomenal
distances you can see with your LX85.
Navigating AudioStar
AudioStar’s menus are organized for quick and
easy navigation:
AutoStar Suite Software also allows you to create
your own guided tours of the skies, including your own
objects and titles (for complete instructions on how to
use the authoring tools please refer to the reference
manual included on the AutoStar Suite DVD).
• Press ENTER to go deeper into AudioStar’s
menu levels.
• Press MODE to move back toward the top
menu level.
• Press the Scroll keys to move up and down
through the options or lists.
Object Menu
• Press the Arrow keys to move the cursor across
the display.
Almost all observing with the LX85 is performed using
the Object menu category. (NOTE: Exceptions include
Guided Tour and Landmarks).
• Press the Help (?) key to access on-line help.
Many LX85 menu categories contain databases. The
database is a list of objects, such as stars, planets,
comets, nebulae and so forth. When one of these
objects is selected from a database by pressing
“ENTER” and then “GO TO”, LX85 moves your
telescope (when properly aligned) and points it at the
selected object.
When multiple choices are available within a menu
option, the option that is currently selected is usually
displayed first and highlighted by a right pointing
arrow (>).
Guided Tour Menu
When Guided Tours is selected, LX85 shows you a
list of theme tours that will help you explore the night
sky. These tours are pre-programmed presentations of
27
The AudioStar Menu Tree
28
The Object Menu options include:
•
Solar System is a database of the eight planets
(Earth is not included) in ascending orbits from the
Sun, followed by the Moon, asteroids, and comets.
•
Constellation is a database of all 88 Northern and
Southern Hemisphere constellations. When this
menu option is chosen and a constellation name
appears on the first line of the screen, press GO
TO once to change the second line to the name of
the brightest star in the constellation.
Add – To
­­ add a Landmark, choose the “Add”
option. Enter a name for the Landmark. Locate
and center the Landmark in the eyepiece, then
press “ENTER”.
•
Press GO TO a second time to slew the telescope to
that star. Use the Scroll keys to cycle through the list
of stars in the constellation, from brightest to dimmest.
•
•
•
Deep Sky is a database of objects outside our
Solar System such as nebulae, star clusters,
galaxies, and quasars grouped in various catalogs
like Messier, Caldwell and NGC.
1.
When a desired object is visible in the eyepiece,
keep pressing MODE until the “Select Item: Object”
menu is displayed. Press ENTER to select this menu.
Star is a database of stars listed in different
categories such as named, double, variable, or
nearby.
2.
Scroll through the Object menu options until the
“Object: Identify” screen appears.
3.
Press ENTER. AudioStar searches the database
for the identity of the object being observed.
4.
If the telescope is not directly on an AudioStar
database object, the nearest database object is located
and displayed on the screen. Press GO TO and the
telescope slews to that object.
User Objects allows the user to define and store in
memory deep-sky objects of specific interest that
are not currently in the LX85 database. Satellite
is a database of Earth-orbiting objects such as
the International Space Station (ISS), the Hubble
Space Telescope (HST), Global Positioning
System (GPS) satellites, and geosynchronous
orbit satellites. In order to find and track satellites,
you must download recent orbital data into the
telescope.
•
Landmarks stores the location of terrestrial points
of interest that you create in the permanent LX85
database.
IMPORTANT NOTE: To use the Landmark function,
the telescope must be located and aligned exactly as
when the landmark was added to the database.
•
Identify is an exciting feature for an observer who
wants to scan the night sky and start exploring.
After the telescope has been properly aligned, use
the AudioStar Arrow keys to move about in the sky.
Then follow this procedure:
Important Note: Only use the Arrow keys to move the
telescope during the Identify procedure. Do not move
the telescope manually or the alignment will be lost.
IMPORTANT NOTE: When an object is selected,
pressing “ENTER” for two seconds will synchronize
the telescope’s coordinates with the object. This is
most useful when syncing on bright stars to achieve
better pointing in the vicinity of the star.
•
to select a Landmark, then press “GO TO” and the
telescope slews to the object.
Browse allows you to search the database
for objects with certain parameters, much like
a search engine. “Edit Parameters” lets you
set various parameters for the search, such
as: Object Type, Minimum Elevation, Largest,
etc. Once you have set the parameters of the
search, select “Start Search” and press ENTER.
AudioStar will display the results of the search.
Event Menu
The Event menu provides access to dates and times
of astronomical events. The Event database includes:
Select – ­­To select a Landmark already in the
database (see ADD below), choose the “Select”
option and scroll through the list. Press “ENTER”
29
Sunrise and Sunset calculates the time that the Sun
rises or sets on the current date.
Moon Phases displays the date and time of the next
New, 1st Quarter, Full and 3rd Quarter Moon.
the Glossary menu or through hypertext words
embedded in AudioStar. A hypertext word is any word
in [brackets], usually found when using the AudioStar
Help function or when reading a scrolling message
such as a description of a planet or star. Press ENTER
whenever a hypertext word is on screen and AudioStar
goes to the glossary entry for that word.
Meteor Showers provides information on upcoming
meteor showers, such as the Perseids, the Leonids,
etc. Also lists the dates of the showers and when they
reach maximum.
To access directly from the Glossary menu, use the
Scroll keys to scroll through the alphabet. Press
ENTER on the desired letter. Scroll to the desired entry
and then press ENTER to read the description.
NOTE: Meteors are fast moving objects that cover
large areas of the sky and are usually best observed
with the naked eye.
Utilities Menu
Moon rise and Moon set calculates the time that the
Moon rises or sets on the current date.
The Utilities menu provides access to several extra
features within AudioStar, including a countdown timer
and an alarm. The Utilities functions include:
Solar Eclipse lists upcoming Solar Eclipses, including
the date and type (total, annular, or partial) of eclipse,
and the location and time of the first and last contacts
of the Moon’s shadow. Use the Scroll Up and Down
keys to display the available data. Remember, never
use a telescope to look at the Sun!
Timer selects a countdown timer. This feature is useful
for functions such as astrophotography and tracking
satellites. To use the Timer, press ENTER, then choose
“Set” or “Start/Stop.”
Lunar Eclipse lists upcoming Lunar Eclipses,
including the date and type (total, partial, penumbral)
of eclipse. Use the Scroll Up and Down keys to display
the available data.
• Set: Enter the time to be counted down, in
hours, minutes, and seconds, then press
ENTER.
• Start/Stop: Activates the timer set previously.
Use the Scroll keys to toggle between ON and
OFF. When ON is displayed, press ENTER to
activate the timer. When the timer runs out, four
beeps sound and the timer is deactivated
Min. (Minimum) of Algol is the minimum brightness of
the dramatic eclipsing binary star system, Algol. It is
relatively close at a distance of 100 light years. Every
2.8 days during a 10 hour period, Algol undergoes a
major change in apparent magnitude as one of the
two stars passes behind the other. The combined
magnitude of the two stars thus dips from +2.1 to a
minimum of +3.4 halfway through the eclipse as the
second star is hidden. LX85 calculates minimum
magnitude time at mid-eclipse.
Alarm: selects a time for an alarm signal as a reminder.
To use the Alarm, press ENTER, then choose “Set” or
“Start/Stop”.
• Set: Enter the time of day for the alarm to
sound, in hours, minutes, and seconds, then
press ENTER.
Autumn and Vernal Equinox calculates the time and
date of the fall or spring equinox of the current year.
• Start/Stop: Activates the alarm set previously.
Use the Scroll keys to toggle between ON and
OFF. When ON is displayed, press ENTER to
activate the alarm. When the alarm time arrives,
AudioStar beeps. Press ENTER to deactivate
the alarm.
Winter and Summer Solstice calculates the time
and date of the winter or summer solstice of the
current year.
Glossary Menu
Eyepiece Calc: calculates information about an eyepiece for the specific telescope to which AudioStar is
The Glossary menu provides an alphabetical listing of
definitions and descriptions for common astronomical
terms and AudioStar functions. Access directly through
30
Cord Wrap, when set to “On”, moves the telescope in
such a way as to prevent the cords and cables attached
to your telescope assembly from getting wound around
the assembly and tangled as the telescope slews to
objects. “Off” is the default setting.
connected.
Field of View: Scroll through a list of available eyepieces. When an eyepiece is selected, the field of
view is calculated.
• Magnification: Scroll through a list of available
eyepieces. When an eyepiece is selected, the
magnification is calculated.
Setup Menu
• Suggest: AudioStar calculates and suggests
the best eyepiece for viewing, based on the
telescope and the object being viewed.
The Setup menu’s primary function is to align the
telescope. However, there are numerous other features
available within the Setup menu, including:
•Suggest: Brightness Adj adjusts the brightness
of the display using the Scroll keys. When
complete, press ENTER.
Date changes the date used by AudioStar. This function
is useful to check events in the past or future. For
example, set the Date menu for a day three months in
the future. Then check the “Select Item: Event” menu
for the Sunset time on that date. See EVENT MENU,
page 29.
Contrast Adj adjusts the contrast of the display using
the Scroll keys. When complete, press ENTER.
Note: This feature is usually only required in very cold
weather.
Time changes the time entered into AudioStar. Setting
the correct time is critical for AudioStar to properly
calculate locations and events. Time may be set to
24-hour mode (military time) by selecting the “blank”
option which follows the “AM” and “PM” options.
Landmark Survey automatically slews the telescope
to all user-defined landmarks with a short pause at
each location. Press ENTER to start the survey. While
a slew is in progress, press any key to skip that object
and go to the next landmark on the list. To observe
a landmark for a longer period, press MODE when
paused on the object to stop the survey. Press ENTER
to restart the survey at the first object on the list. See
Landmarks, page 29.
Daylight Saving is used to enable or disable Daylight
Savings time.
Note: Daylight Savings Time may be referred to by
different names in various areas of the world. Check
local time to verify.
Sleep Scope is a power saving option that shuts down
AudioStar and the telescope without forgetting its
alignment. With “Sleep Scope” selected, press ENTER
to activate the Sleep function. AudioStar goes dark, but
the internal clock keeps running. Press any key, except
ENTER, to re-activate AudioStar and the telescope.
Telescope accesses the several options, including:
• Model: Allows you to select the telescope
model connected to AudioStar.
• Focal Length: Displays the focal length of the
selected telescope.
Park Scope is designed for a telescope that is not moved
between observing sessions. Align the telescope one
time, then use this function to park the telescope. Next
time it is powered up, enter the correct date and time –
no alignment is required. Pressing ENTER causes the
telescope to move to its pre-determined Park position.
Once parked, the screen prompts to turn off power.
• Az Ratio and Alt Ratio: The Az (Azimuth)
ratio and Alt (Altitude) ratio refers to the gears
of the telescope’s motors. Do not alter these
numbers.
• Az Percent: The Az (Azimuth) Percent allows
you to change the azimuth backlash, i.e., the
way the Arrow keys move the telescope along
the azimuth (horizontal) axis. If you enter a
value near 100, the telescope tube responds
more quickly (it responds immediately at 100%)
as you hold down an Arrow key and also slews
(moves) the tube more quickly. If you enter
Important Note: When the “Park Scope” option is
chosen and the display prompts you to turn off the
telescope’s power, AudioStar is unable to be returned
to operation without turning the power off and then
back on.
31
• Min AOS (Acquisition of Signal) allows you
enter a value in degrees. This value represents
the altitude at which your telescope begins to
slew when acquiring a satellite track. This is
useful when you are observing satellites, but a
tall tree or building is obstructing the telescope.
For example, you might begin to track the
satellite at 15° altitude, instead of 5°.
a value near 0, it takes longer for the tube to
respond as you hold down an Arrow key and
also slews the tube more slowly. Experiment
with this option. Try changing the percent value
until you get a “feel” for the Arrow keys that is
comfortable for you.
• Alt Percent: The Alt (Altitude) Percent operates
identical to the Az Percent option (see above),
but allows you to change the altitude backlash,
i.e., the way the Arrow keys move the telescope
when moving along the altitude (vertical) axis.
• Calibrate Motor if the telescope motors appear
to have a problem, use this option to retest the
motors before performing a Reset. This option
is also used if an AudioStar unit is moved
between telescopes, to match AudioStar to the
new telescope. To calibrate the motors, select
this option and press ENTER.
• Train Drive: Trains the Altitude and Azimuth
motors to locate objects with more precision.
If you are experiencing any problems with
pointing accuracy, follow the procedure
described in APPENDIX C: TRAINING THE
DRIVE, page 49. to insure accurate pointing
and tracking.
• High Precision if turned on, when looking for
a faint celestial object (i.e., a nebula or galaxy),
AudioStar first slews to a nearby bright star
and displays “Center (Star name) Press Enter”.
Center the star in the eyepiece, then press
ENTER. At that point the telescope has a high
precision alignment to that part of the sky and
it then slews to the object that was originally
requested.
• Tracking Rate: Changes the speed at which
the telescope tracks targets in the sky.
A. Sidereal: The default setting for AudioStar;
sidereal rate is the standard rate at which stars
move from East to West across the sky due to
the rotation of the Earth.
Targets switches between Astronomical targets and
Terrestrial targets. If “Astronomical” is selected, the
telescope tracking motor is activated and any object
you observe will remain centered in the eyepiece.
If “Terrestrial” is selected, the tracking motor is
turned off.
B. Lunar: Choose this option to properly track the
Moon over long observing sessions.
C. Custom: Allows entry of user-defined tracking
rates.
• Reverse L/R reverses the functions of the Left
and Right Arrow keys (i.e., the Right key moves
the telescope to the left).
Site provides access to several options including:
• Select: Displays the currently selected
observing site. Use the Scroll keys to cycle
through all available sites (see Add below).
Press ENTER when the site you wish to select
displays. Use this option when you move to a
different geographic location.
• Reverse UP/DOWN reverses the functions of
the Up and Down Arrow keys (i.e., the Up key
moves the telescope down).
• Quiet Slew sets the maximum slew rate to 1.5°
for quieter operation.
• Add: Allows you to add new observing sites to
the database (up to six sites may be stored).
Scroll through the list of Countries/States.
Press ENTER when the site you wish to add
displays. Then choose the desired city in the
same manner.
• Max Elevation allows you to enter a value in
degrees that sets a limit as to how far the optical
tube can swing upward during a programmed
slew. (Note that it does not prevent you from
performing a manual slew past this limit.) This
is useful when you have a camera or other
peripheral attached to the telescope—you can
prevent it from striking the telescope base.
32
• Delete: Deletes
the database.
a
stored
site
from
Statistics provides basic statistical data about
AudioStar, including:
• Edit: Edits a selected site, including: the name,
latitude, longitude, and time zone. Time Zone
refers to the Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) time
zone shift. Users West of Greenwich, England
use “-” hours, East of Greenwich use “+” hours.
For the United States, look up the time zone
shift in the table at left.
• Characters Free: Shows how much room is
available in user-defined object memory.
• Version: Shows the current version of the
AudioStar software.
• Reset completely resets AudioStar. Most
values entered into the menus revert to factory
defaults.
AudioStar compensates for daylight savings
time, if selected.
Periodic Error Correction (PEC)
Training
Owner Info accesses the owner information menu,
including:
If you wish to perform high-precision astrophotography,
you may wish to "train" your telescope in order to
keep objects that you are imaging dead center in
the telescope's field of view during the photographic
exposure. Periodic error correction (PEC) helps to
remove the slight tracking errors that are inherent
in the R.A. drive system. To perform this procedure,
you need to use a high-power reticle eyepiece, or an
autoguider camera properly configured and connected
to the Autoguider port.
• Name: Users may enter both their first and last
names using the Up and Down Arrow keys to
cycle through the alphabet. Use the Right and
Left Arrow keys to move through the text. Press
ENTER when the entry is complete.
• Address: Use the Up and Down Arrow keys
to enter your street address, city, state, and
zip code. Press ENTER when the entry is
complete.
Download transfers information from another
AudioStar during cloning (see below). During the
operation, the warning “Downloading Do Not Turn Off”
appears.
PEC Train Menu Option
To perform the procedure on the RA axis, pick a
bright star in the South near the celestial equator and
greater than 30 degrees about the horizon. Using your
imaging camera begin auto guiding on the target star
and wait about one minute for your guiding corrections
to stabilize.
Note: The Download function requires the optional
#505 Astrofinder Software and Cable Connector Kit.
See the instruction sheet included with the kit for more
information on how to download.
Clone uploads information from one AudioStar
handbox to another. Three options are available:
Important Note: The Train option overwrites any
previous PEC data recorded.
• Catalogs: Sends only user-defined object
information, such as new satellite orbits or
comet data to another AudioStar handbox.
1. Select “PEC Train” from the Smart Drive menu (in
the “Setup: Telescope” menu) and press ENTER.
• Software: Sends only the basic AudioStar
software. This is useful if one user has
downloaded a new version of AudioStar
software from the Meade website (www.
meade.com) and wants to pass this software
along to friends.
2. AudioStar will then begin recording the periodic error
in the RA worm. A full cycle takes about 10 minutes.
When complete AudioStar will return to the PEC menu.
It is advised that you perform one training and then
immediately follow-up with two updates for maximum
Periodic Error Correction. This level of training is
necessary for critical applications such as long
exposure photography. Periodic Error Correction
• All: Everything – user-defined information
and AudioStar software – is sent to
another AudioStar.
33
is retained within the AudioStar memory until you
overwrite it by performing additional training cycles.
PEC Update Menu Option
PEC Update does not overwrite the data, but updates
the training using information gathered from both the
last and the current training sessions. If you wish to
further refine your training, select this menu again and
repeat the procedure. If you do not wish to update the
PEC, press the MODE key to exit from this option.
PEC Erase Menu Option
Select this option to erase all PEC training data.
PEC On and Off Menu Options
Select “On” when you want the telescope to use the
training information. Select “Off” when you do not want
for the telescope to use the training information.
34
APPENDIX A:
SPECIFICATIONS
Mount
LX85 German Equatorial Mount & Tripod #217000
Mount Type
German Equatorial
Drives
2.91 inch Precision Worm Drive
Power
12 Volts DC, 5 Amperes
Tripod
New Adjustable-Height Steel Leg Tripod
Electronics
Computer Control
AudioStar Handbox
Guide Port
ST-4 Compatible AutoGuider Port
PC Connection
RS-232 to AudioStar
Included Accessories
Compass
9 lbs Counterweight
AutoStar Suite DVD
Weight
LX85 Mount & Tripod
34.1 lbs
35
SPECIFICATIONS
Model and Product Number
LX85 with 70mm Astrograph #217010
Optical System
Optical Design
4-Element Petzval Refractor
Aperture (Diameter of Objective)
70mm
Focal Length
350mm
Focal Ratio
f/5
Optical Coatings
Fully Multi-Coated
Optical Glass
FPL 53 ED (Extremely Low Dispersion) Glass
Resolving Power (arc seconds)
1.65
Limiting Visual Setllar Magnitude
11.2
Finder Scope
Optional
Mount
Mount Type
German Equatorial
Drives
2.91 inch Precision Worm Drive
Power
12 Volts DC, 5 Amperes
Tripod
New Adjustable-Height Steel Leg Tripod
Electronics
Computer Control
AudioStar Handbox
Guide Port
ST-4 Compatible AutoGuider Port
PC Connection
RS-232 to AudioStar
Included Accessories
Eyepieces
Not included, for photographic use only
Camera Adapter
48 to 42mm Adapter
Tube Rings and Dovetail Mounting Plate
Finder Scope
Not included
Weight
LX85 Mount & Tripod
34.1 lbs
Optical Tube
4.5 lbs
Total Weight
38.6 lbs
36
SPECIFICATIONS
Model and Product Number
LX85 with 80mm APO Refractor #217008
Optical System
Optical Design
3-Element Apochromat Refractor
Aperture (Diameter of Objective)
80mm
Focal Length
400mm
Focal Ratio
f/5
Optical Coatings
Fully Multi-Coated
Optical Glass
FPL 53 ED (Extremely Low Dispersion) Glass
Resolving Power (arc seconds)
1.45
Limiting Visual Setllar Magnitude
11.5
Finder Scope
Optional
Mount
Mount Type
German Equatorial
Drives
2.91 inch Precision Worm Drive
Power
12 Volts DC, 5 Amperes
Tripod
New Adjustable-Height Steel Leg Tripod
Electronics
Computer Control
AudioStar Handbox
Guide Port
ST-4 Compatible AutoGuider Port
PC Connection
RS-232 to AudioStar
Included Accessories
Eyepieces
Not included
Eyepiece Adapter
2" to 1.25"
Tube Rings and Dovetail Mounting Plate
Finder Scope
Not included
Weight
LX85 Mount & Tripod
34.1 lbs
Optical Tube
6.9 lbs
Total Weight
41 lbs
37
SPECIFICATIONS
Model and Product Number
LX85 with 115mm APO Refractor #217009
Optical System
Optical Design
3-Element Apochromat Refractor
Aperture (Diameter of Objective)
115mm
Focal Length
805mm
Focal Ratio
f/7
Optical Coatings
Fully Multi-Coated
Optical Glass
FPL 53 ED (Extremely Low Dispersion) Glass
Resolving Power (arc seconds)
1.0
Limiting Visual Setllar Magnitude
12.3
Finder Scope
Optional
Mount
Mount Type
German Equatorial
Drives
2.91 inch Precision Worm Drive
Power
12 Volts DC, 5 Amperes
Tripod
New Adjustable-Height Steel Leg Tripod
Electronics
Computer Control
AudioStar Handbox
Guide Port
ST-4 Compatible AutoGuider Port
PC Connection
RS-232 to AudioStar
Included Accessories
Eyepieces
Not included
Eyepiece Adapter
2" to 1.25"
Tube Rings and Dovetail Mounting Plate
Finder Scope
Not included
Weight
LX85 Mount & Tripod
34.1 lbs
Optical Tube
12.9 lbs
Total Weight
47 lbs
38
SPECIFICATIONS
Model and Product Number
LX85 with 5" Refractor #217001
Optical System
Optical Design
2-Element Achromat Refractor
Aperture (Diameter of Objective)
4.72" (120mm)
Focal Length
700mm
Focal Ratio
f/5.8
Optical Coatings
Multi-coated
Resolving Power (arc seconds)
0.9
Limiting Visual Setllar Magnitude
12.39
Finder Scope
8x50 Optical
Mount
Mount Type
German Equatorial
Drives
2.91 inch Precision Worm Drive
Power
12 Volts DC, 5 Amperes
Tripod
New Adjustable-Height Steel Leg Tripod
Electronics
Computer Control
AudioStar Handbox
Guide Port
ST-4 Compatible AutoGuider Port
PC Connection
RS-232 to AudioStar
Included Accessories
Eyepieces
26mm and 9mm Plössl
Tube Rings
Interior Felt-lined
Finder Scope
8x50 Optical
Diagonal Mirror
2" with 1.25" Adapter
Weight
LX85 Mount & Tripod
34.1 lbs
Optical Tube
12 lbs
Total Weight
46.1 lbs
39
SPECIFICATIONS
Model and Product Number
LX85 with 6" Reflector #217003
Optical System
Optical Design
Newtonian Reflector with Parabolic Mirror
Aperture (Diameter of Objective)
5.9" (150mm)
Focal Length
750mm
Focal Ratio
f/5
Optical Coatings
Aluminum with Si02 Overcoat
Resolving Power (arc seconds)
0.76
Limiting Visual Setllar Magnitude
12.9
Finder Scope
8x50 Optical
Mount
Mount Type
German Equatorial
Drives
2.91 inch Precision Worm Drive
Power
12 Volts DC, 5 Amperes
Tripod
New Adjustable-Height Steel Leg Tripod
Electronics
Computer Control
AudioStar Handbox
Guide Port
ST-4 Compatible AutoGuider Port
PC Connection
RS-232 to AudioStar
Included Accessories
Eyepieces
26mm and 9mm Plössl
Tube Rings
Interior Felt-lined
Finder Scope
8x50 Optical
Weight
LX85 Mount & Tripod
34.1 lbs
Optical Tube
11.4 lbs
Total Weight
45.5 lbs
40
SPECIFICATIONS
Model and Product Number
LX85 with 8" Reflector #217004
Optical System
Optical Design
Newtonian Reflector with Parabolic Mirror
Aperture (Diameter of Objective)
7.9" (200mm)
Focal Length
750mm
Focal Ratio
f/5
Optical Coatings
Aluminum with SiO2 Overcoat
Resolving Power (arc seconds)
0.76
Limiting Visual Setllar Magnitude
12.9
Finder Scope
8x50 Optical
Mount
Mount Type
German Equatorial
Drives
2.91 inch Precision Worm Drive
Power
12 Volts DC, 5 Amperes
Tripod
New Adjustable-Height Steel Leg Tripod
Electronics
Computer Control
AudioStar Handbox
Guide Port
ST-4 Compatible AutoGuider Port
PC Connection
RS-232 to AudioStar
Included Accessories
Eyepieces
26mm and 9mm Plössl
Tube Rings
Interior Felt-lined
2" to 1.25" Adapter
Included in Focuser
Finder Scope
8x50 Optical
Weight
LX85 Mount & Tripod
34.1 lbs
Optical Tube
18.4 lbs
Total Weight
52.5 lbs
41
SPECIFICATIONS
Model and Product Number
LX85 with 6" Maksutov-Cassegrain #217002
Optical System
Optical Design
Maksutov-Cassegrain
Aperture (Diameter of Objective)
5.9" (150mm)
Focal Length
1800mm
Focal Ratio
f/12
Optical Coatings
Ultra-High Transmission Coatings (UHTC™)
Resolving Power (arc seconds)
0.77
Limiting Visual Setllar Magnitude
12.9
Finder Scope
8x50 Optical
Mount
Mount Type
German Equatorial
Drives
2.91 inch Precision Worm Drive
Power
12 Volts DC, 5 Amperes
Tripod
New Adjustable-Height Steel Leg Tripod
Electronics
Computer Control
AudioStar Handbox
Guide Port
ST-4 Compatible AutoGuider Port
PC Connection
RS-232 to AudioStar
Included Accessories
Eyepieces
26mm and 9mm Plössl
Diagonal Mirror
1.25"
Visual Back
1.25"
Finder Scope
8x50 Optical
Weight
LX85 Mount & Tripod
34.1 lbs
Optical Tube and Accessories
16.7 lbs
Total Weight
50.8 lbs
42
SPECIFICATIONS
Model and Product Number
LX85 with 6" ACF #217005
Optical System
Optical Design
Advanced Coma-Free
Aperture (Diameter of Objective)
6" (152mm)
Focal Length
1520mm
Focal Ratio
f/10
Optical Coatings
Ultra-High Transmission Coatings (UHTC™)
Resolving Power (arc seconds)
0.76
Limiting Visual Setllar Magnitude
12.9
Finder Scope
8x50 Optical
Mount
Mount Type
German Equatorial
Drives
2.91 inch Precision Worm Drive
Power
12 Volts DC, 5 Amperes
Tripod
New Adjustable-Height Steel Leg Tripod
Electronics
Computer Control
AudioStar Handbox
Guide Port
ST-4 Compatible AutoGuider Port
PC Connection
RS-232 to AudioStar
Included Accessories
Eyepieces
26mm and 9mm Plössl
Diagonal Mirror
1.25"
Visual Back
1.25"
Finder Scope
8x50 Optical
Weight
LX85 Mount & Tripod
34.1 lbs
Optical Tube and Accessories
11.4 lbs
Total Weight
45.5 lbs
43
SPECIFICATIONS
Model and Product Number
LX85 with 8" ACF #217006
Optical System
Optical Design
Advanced Coma-Free
Aperture (Diameter of Objective)
8" (203mm)
Focal Length
2032mm
Focal Ratio
f/10
Optical Coatings
Ultra-High Transmission Coatings (UHTC™)
Resolving Power (arc seconds)
0.57
Limiting Visual Setllar Magnitude
13.5
Finder Scope
8x50 Optical
Mount
Mount Type
German Equatorial
Drives
2.91 inch Precision Worm Drive
Power
12 Volts DC, 5 Amperes
Tripod
New Adjustable-Height Steel Leg Tripod
Electronics
Computer Control
AudioStar Handbox
Guide Port
ST-4 Compatible AutoGuider Port
PC Connection
RS-232 to AudioStar
Included Accessories
Eyepieces
26mm and 9mm Plössl
Diagonal Mirror
1.25"
Visual Back
1.25"
Finder Scope
8x50 Optical
Weight
LX85 Mount & Tripod
34.1 lbs
Optical Tube and Accessories
13.2 lbs
Total Weight
47.3 lbs
44
objects may also be located using Right Ascension
and Declination. For example: You could locate Los
Angeles, California, by its latitude (+34°) and longitude
(118°). Similarly, you could locate the Ring Nebula
(M57) by its Right Ascension (18hr) and its Declination
(+33°).
APPENDIX B:
Advanced Polar Alignment
You can achieve a satisfactory polar alignment
from the method outlined on page 18. However, for
astrophotography, a more precise polar alignment may
be required, depending on how long your exposure
times are. Solar system photography of the Moon
and planets do not require perfect polar alignment.
But deep sky photography typically involves longer
exposures and therefore requires a more accurately
polar aligned mount. The better the polar alignment is,
the less the mount will drift in the north/south direction
(in Declination) which will allow for longer exposure
astrophotos..
• Right Ascension (R.A.): This celestial version of
longitude is measured in units of hours (hr), minutes
(min) and seconds (sec) on a 24-hour “clock” (similar
to how Earth’s time zones are determined by longitude
lines). The “zero” line was arbitrarily chosen to pass
through the constellation Pegasus, a sort of cosmic
Greenwich meridian. R.A. coordinates range from 0hr
0min 0sec to 23hr 59min 59sec. There are 24 primary
lines of R.A., located at 15-degree intervals along the
celestial equator. Objects located further and further
East of the zero R.A. grid line (0hr 0min 0sec) carry
higher R.A. coordinates.
Celestial Coordinates
• Declination (Dec.): This celestial version of latitude
is measured in degrees, arc-minutes and arc-seconds
(e.g., 15° 27’ 33”). Dec. locations North of the celestial
equator are indicated with a plus (+) sign (e.g., the
Dec. of the North celestial pole is +90°). Dec. locations
South of the celestial equator are indicated with a
minus (–) sign (e.g., the Dec. of the South celestial
pole is –90°). Any point on the celestial equator (such
as the constellations of Orion, Virgo and Aquarius) is
said to have a Declination of zero, shown as 0° 0’ 0.”
A celestial coordinate system was created that maps
an imaginary sphere surrounding the Earth upon which
all stars appear to be placed. This mapping system is
similar to the system of latitude and longitude on Earth
surface maps.
In mapping the surface of the Earth, lines of longitude
are drawn between the North and South Poles and
lines of latitude are drawn in an East-West direction,
parallel to the Earth’s equator. Similarly, imaginary
lines have been drawn to form a latitude and longitude
grid for the celestial sphere. These lines are known as
Right Ascension and Declination.
Alternative
AudioStar
Polar
Alignments
with
The AudioStar handbox comes equipped with several
different methods to polar align your telescope. These
are described briefly below. Easy Polar Alignment
The celestial map also contains two poles and an
equator just like a map of the Earth. The poles of this
coordinate system are defined as those two points
where the Earth’s North and South poles (i.e., the
Earth’s axis), if extended to infinity, would cross the
celestial sphere. Thus, the North Celestial Pole is that
point in the sky where an extension of the North Pole
intersects the celestial sphere. The North Star, Polaris,
is located very near the North Celestial Pole). The
celestial equator is a projection of the Earth’s equator
onto the celestial sphere.
Two alignment stars are chosen by AudioStar based
on the date, time and location. The telescope will slew
to each AudioStar selected alignment star and you
center each star in the eyepiece.
One-Star Polar Alignment
Polar One-Star Alignment requires some knowledge
of the night sky. Starting in the telescope's home
position, AudioStar will slew to the North Star (Polaris)
and have you center it in the telescope eyepiece using
only the mechanical latitude and azimuth knobs. Once
centered, press enter and AudioStar will select an
So just as an object’s position on the Earth’s surface
can be located by its latitude and longitude, celestial
45
down keys).
alignment star based on your observing sites date,
time and location. Center that star in the eyepiece and
press enter to complete the alignment.
• Declination Setting Circle: The Dec. setting circle
has been factory set to read the correct Declination of
celestial objects.
Two-Star Polar Alignment
Polar Two-Star Alignment requires some knowledge of
the night sky. AudioStar provides a database of bright
stars and two stars from this database are chosen by
the observer for alignment.
• Right Ascension Setting Circle: Since celestial
objects move in R.A., the R.A. setting circle must be
reset as each object is located during an observing
session. The R.A. pointer is located on the drive base.
Locating the Celestial Pole
To get basic bearings at an observing location, take
note of where the Sun rises (East) and sets (West)
each day. After the site is dark, face North by pointing
your left shoulder toward where the Sun sets. To
precisely point at the pole, find the North Star (Polaris)
by using the Big Dipper as a guide.
To use the setting circles to find astronomical objects,
the LX85 must first be polar aligned. It is advisable
that a low-power eyepiece (e.g., a 26mm eyepiece) be
employed. Then use the following procedure:
Note: For almost all astronomical observing
requirements, approximate settings of the telescope’s
latitude and Polar axis are acceptable. Do not allow
undue attention to precise Polar Alignment of the
telescope to interfere with your basic enjoyment of the
instrument.
Little Dipper
Big Dipper
1. Identify the celestial coordinates (R.A. and Dec.) of a
bright, easy-to-find object, such as a bright star. (Avoid
using Polaris or any object near Polaris.) Coordinates
of bright stars are listed in astronomy magazines,
text books or star charts. Center this object in the
telescope’s field of view.
2. Manually turn the R.A. circle to read the R.A. of the
object at the R.A. pointer (the molded triangle beneath
this setting circle).
Polaris
Cassiopeia
3. The R.A. circle is now calibrated to read the correct
R.A. of any object at which the telescope is pointed.
The Dec. circle is already calibrated through polar
alignment.
Setting Circles
If you choose not to use AudioStar's automatic go-to
pointing from the computerized handbox, the LX85
models are equipped with R.A. and Dec. setting circles
to aid in locating faint celestial objects manually when
the telescope has been polar aligned. Setting circles
emulate the celestial coordinates found on star charts
or in sky catalogs. Any charted object is easily located
by coordinates in R.A. (in hours, minutes and seconds,
from 0h 0m 0s to 23h 59m 59s) and Dec. (in degrees
from 0° to ±90°).
4. To find another object, again identify the R.A. and
Dec. coordinates. Then, without touching the setting
circles, move the telescope (manually, by unlocking
the vertical and horizontal locks or by slewing the
telescope using the Arrow keys) so that the R.A. and
Dec. pointers read the coordinates of the second
object.
5. If the above procedure has been followed carefully,
the second object will now be in the telescope’s field
of view.
When polar aligned, use the Arrow keys to move the
telescope in R.A. (left and right keys) and Dec. (up and
46
Note: Since the second object (i.e., the object to be
located) is in constant motion, once the R.A. circle
is calibrated (step 2, above) the telescope should be
moved rapidly to read the coordinates of the second
object. Otherwise the second object will no longer be
in the position indicated by the R.A. circle.
Using setting circles requires a developed technique.
When using the circles for the first time, try hopping
from one bright star (the calibration star) to another
bright star of known coordinates. Practice moving the
telescope from one easy-to-find object to another. In
this way the precision required for accurate object
location becomes familiar.
40
30
20
10
0
10
Declination
Setting Circle
20
30
40
12
12
11
13
10
14
Right Ascension
Setting Circle
47
APPENDIX C:
telescope to sit for some time in the warm indoor
air, so that the wet optical surfaces can dry
unattended.
General Maintenance
f. Do not leave your LX85 inside a sealed car
on a warm summer day; excessive ambient
temperatures can damage the telescope’s internal
lubrication and electronic circuitry.
LX85-Series telescopes are precision optical
instruments designed to yield a lifetime of rewarding
applications. Given the care and respect due any
precision instrument, your LX85 will rarely, if ever,
require factory servicing. Maintenance guidelines
include:
a. Avoid cleaning the telescope’s optics: A little
dust on the front surface of the telescope’s
correcting lens causes virtually no degradation
of image quality and should not be considered
reason to clean the lens.
b.When absolutely necessary, dust on the front
lens should be removed with gentle strokes of a
camel hair brush or blown off with an ear syringe
(available at any pharmacy). DO NOT use a
commercial photographic lens cleaner.
c. Organic materials (e.g., fingerprints) on the
front lens may be removed with a solution of 3
parts distilled water to 1 part isopropyl alcohol.
You may also add 1 drop of biodegradable
dishwashing soap per pint of solution. Use
soft, white facial tissues and make short, gentle
strokes. Change tissues often.
Caution: Do not use scented or lotioned tissues
or damage could result to the optics.
d. Do not, for any reason, remove the correcting
plate from its machined housing for cleaning
or other purposes. You will almost certainly not
be able to replace the corrector in its proper
rotational orientation and serious degradation
of optical performance will result. Meade
Instruments assumes no liability for damage
incurred to the telescope in this way.
e. If the LX85 is used outdoors on a humid night,
water condensation on the telescope surfaces will
probably result. While such condensation does
not normally cause any damage to the telescope,
it is recommended that the entire telescope be
wiped down with a dry cloth before the telescope
is packed away. Do not, how- ever, wipe any of
the optical surfaces. Rather, simply allow the
48
APPENDIX D:
Verify that AUTOSTAR
INITIALIZATION is
complete.
1
Training The Drive
2
Press MODE until
Select Item is displayed.
Select Item
Object
Perform this procedure if you are experiencing any
pointing accuracy problems. The diagram to the right
depicts the complete Drive Training procedure.
3
Press the scroll
up key once.
Select Item
Setup
NOTE: Use a far away terrestrial object, such as a
telephone pole or lamp post, to train the drive.
4
Access the Setup
Setup
Align
Setup
Telescope
6
Access the
Telescope menu.
Telescope
Telescope Model
7
1
Multiple presses.
Telescope
Train Drive
ENTER
8
Choose the Train
Drive option.
Train Drive
Az. Train
ENTER
Drive Setup
For this op. . .
ENTER
Reminder to
use terrestrial
target.
Center reference
object.
ENTER
10
11
Center target
using Arrow
keys.
Scope slews left.
Bring target back
to center using
the Right Arrow key.
Scope slews right.
Bring target back
to center using
the Left Arrow key.
14
Menu returns to
Az. training.
Train Drive
Alt. Train
ENTER
15
Altitude
(vertical)
training.
Drive Setup
For this op. . .
ENTER
16
Reminder to
use terrestrial
target.
Center reference
object
ENTER
Press ^ until it
is centered
ENTER
19
Scope slews up.
Bring target back
to center using
the Down Arrow key.
Train Drive
Az. Train
MODE
18
Scope slews down.
Bring target back
to center using
the Up Arrow key.
Press ˅ until it
is centered
ENTER
17
Center target
using Arrow
keys.
20
Multiple presses.
Select Item
Object
49
13
Train Drive
Az. Train
9
Azimuth
(horizontal)
training.
12
Press < until it
is centered
5
Multiple presses.
ENTER
ENTER
ENTER
ENTER menu.
Complete this exercise once every 3 to 6 months.
Press > until it
is centered
21
APPENDIX E:
Optical Designs
The Meade Advanced Coma-Free Optical System
(2)
(1)
(1)
(2)
Ray (2)
Ray (1)
(2)
(1)
Secondary
Mirror
Focal
Plane
Secondary
Baffle
Primary Baffle Tube
Field Stops
Correcting
Plate
Primary Mirror
Unlike Schmidt-Cassegrain systems, Meade’s Advanced Coma-Free (ACF) optical system provides razor-sharp
pin-point star images all the way to the very edge of the field of view. This aplanatic (coma-free) optical system
brings the highest level of performance to the amateur astronomer.
In the ACF design of the Meade LX85 telescope, light enters from the right, passes through a thin lens with
2-sided aspheric correction (“correcting plate”), proceeds to a spherical primary mirror, and then to a hyperbolic
secondary mirror. The hyperbolic secondary mirror multiplies the effective focal length of the primary mirror and
results in a focus at the focal plane, with light passing through a central perforation in the primary mirror.
All ACFs include oversize primary mirrors, yielding a fully illuminated field-of-view significantly wider than is
possible with a standard-size primary mirror. Note that light ray (2) in the figure would be lost entirely, except
for the oversize primary. It is this phenomenon which results in Meade ACF having off-axis field illuminations
about 10% greater, aperture-for-aperture, than other systems utilizing standard-size primary mirrors. Field stops
machined into the inside-diameter surface of the primary mirror baffle tube significantly increase lunar, planetary,
and deep-space image contrast. These field stops effectively block off-axis stray light rays.
The Maksutov-Cassegrain Optical System
(2)
Incident Light
(1)
(1)
(2)
Ray (2)
Secondary mirror
Ray (1)
(2)
Primary Baffle
(1)
Focal
Plane
Focal point
Secondary
Mirror
Secondary
Baffle
Primary Baffle Tube
Field Stops
Aperture
Correcting
Plate
Primary mirror
Primary Mirror
Meniscus Corrector Lens
In the optical design of the Maksutov-Cassegrain, light enters from the right through a multi-coated meniscus lens,
proceeds to an f/2.2 primary mirror, and then to a convex secondary mirror that multiplies effective focal length by
a factor of 6.3. The secondary mirror light baffle, in combination with the anti-reflection threads inside the primary
mirror baffle, produces extremely high contrast astronomical images at the focal plane.
50
The Refractor Optical System
Refracting Telescopes use a large objective lens as their primary light-collecting element. Meade refractors include
an achromatic (2-element) objective lenses in order to reduce, or virtually eliminate, the false color (chromatic
aberration) that results in the telescopic image when light passes through a lens.
The Reflector Optical System
Reflector telescopes, also referred to as Newtonian Reflectors, crediting Isaac Newton for the invention of this
telescope type, uses a concave primary mirror to gather light to a point of focus. All LX85 Reflectors use a
parabolic-figured mirror, which corrects for spherical aberration inherent in other more standard reflector types
that use a spherical mirror. The secondary mirror is a flat optical surface that directs the focal point to the side
of the optical tube where the focuser and eyepiece are located. The design is simple, efficient, and often the
most economic choice for larger aperture instruments.
51
APPENDIX F:
Collimating the Optics
(for ACFs, Maksutov-Cassegrains
and Reflectors)
The optics of your LX85 telescope have been
collimated (aligned) at the factory. Ordinarily the
telescope collimation should remain intact unless
it is handled roughly in transport. Occasionally the
alignment should be inspected and adjusted, when
necessary, to retain the maximum optical performance
of the telescope.
Collimating the
Optical System
Figure 2.
Maksutov-Cassegrain
center the star as needed with the AudioStar handbox.
Note: The star must be precisely centered in the
eyepiece to accurately assess the collimation of the
telescope.
The only optical component that can be adjusted in
your 6” Maksutov-Cassegrain is the tilt of the Primary
Mirror. The front corrector and secondary mirror are
permanently aligned. This makes collimation overall
fairly straightforward. Follow these steps to inspect
and adjust the alignment of your optical tube.
3. Bring the star out of focus by about 1/2 turn on the
focus knob. The defocused star pattern should look
concentric, with the secondary mirror shadow centered
to star pattern. Everything should look circular as it
does in Figure 1. If the pattern is not concentric, or if
it looks elliptical (2, Fig 1), you will need to make and
adjustment to the primary mirror.
Collimate Using the Star Test
1. At night, point the telescope to a fairly bright star
that is at least 60º above the horizon. This will ensure
the star is above most of the turbulent layers of sky
seen closer to the horizon. Allow the telescope to
adjust to the temperature of your observation site
before proceeding; temperature differences between
the optics and the outside air can cause distortion in
the images.
4. The primary mirror cell is adjusted using three
adjustment screws and three locking screws. To
collimate the primary mirror, first loosen each of the
locking screws by turning them counterclockwise
one full turn. Next make a small adjustment to the
necessary adjustment screws and re-center the star
in the eyepiece. Each adjustment screw can tilt the
primary mirror and has limited range of adjustment.
Using a 2.5mm and 4mm Allen wrench, make small
adjustments until the defocused star image looks like
“1” in Figure 1. When complete lightly tighten all three
locking knobs to secure the mirror in place. Do not
overtighten.
2. Center the star with the 26mm eyepiece, then switch
to the 9mm eyepiece. We recommend powering on the
LX85 and turning the tracking on so that you can keep
the star centered during this process and easily re-
Collimating the ACF Optical System
The optical collimation (alignment) of any astronomical
telescope used for serious purposes is important,
but in the case of the Advanced Coma-Free (ACF)
Figure 1. Correct (1) and incorrect (2) collimation as
viewed during a star test.
52
system, such collimation is absolutely essential for
good performance. Take special care to read and
understand this section well so that your ACF will give
you the best optical performance.
1. At night, point the telescope to a fairly bright star
that is at least 60º above the horizon. This will ensure
the star is above most of the turbulent layers of sky
seen closer to the horizon. Allow the telescope to
adjust to the temperature of your observation site
before proceeding; temperature differences between
the optics and the outside air can cause distortion in
the images.
Figure 3c. Defocused star pattern in a
properly collimated ACF system.
mirror housing. The outer screws should not be
touched and hold the holder in place. Only make
small adjustments to the inner three collimation
screws.
2. With the star centered, defocus the image gradually
so that the defocused star looks like a ring of light
surrounding a dark central spot; the dark central spot
is the shadow of the secondary mirror. Turn the focus
knob until the ring of light fills about 10% of the eyepiece
field-diameter. If the dark central spot is offset in (i.e.,
not concentric with) the ring of light, your telescope’s
optical system is misaligned and requires collimation.
Do not turn the screws past their normal travel
and do not loosen them more than two full turns
in a counterclockwise direction or the secondary
mirror may come loose from its support. You will
find that the adjustments are very sensitive, usually
requiring only one-half turn or less to produce the
desired result.
Follow these steps for collimation of the optical system:
a. The only adjustments possible for the secondary
mirror are located in the center of the secondary
b. While looking at the defocused star image, notice
which direction the darker shadow is offset in the
ring of light or notice which part of the ring is the
thinnest. Place your index finger in front of the
telescope so that it touches one of the collimation
set screws. You will see the shadow of your finger
in the ring of light. Move your finger around the
edge of the black plastic secondary mirror sup- port
until you see the shadow of the finger crossing the
thinnest part of the ring of light. At this point, look
at the front of the telescope where your finger is
aiming. It will either be pointing directly at a set
screw, or it will be between two set screws aiming
at the set screw on the far side of the black plastic
secondary mirror support. This is the set screw that
you will adjust.
Figure 3a.
c. Using the AudioStar’s Arrow keys at the slowest
slew speed, move the defocused image to the edge
of the eyepiece field of view (2, Fig. 3a), in the same
direction as the darker shadow is offset in the ring
of light.
d. Turn the set screw that you found with the
pointing exercise while looking in the eyepiece. You
will notice that the star image will move across the
Figure 3b.
53
field. If while turning the defocused star image flies
out of the eyepiece field, then you are turning the
screw the wrong way. Turn the opposite direction
and bring the image back to the center of the field.
(1, Fig. 5); primary mirror-tilt screws (5, Fig. 4). The
telescope’s image is brought to a focus at (6, Fig. 4).
1. Confirm alignment - To confirm optical alignment
look down the focuser draw- tube (1, Fig. 7) with the
eyepiece removed. The edge of the focuser drawtube
frames reflections of the primary mirror (2, Fig. 7),
the secondary mirror (3, Fig. 7), the three (“spider”)
vanes (4, Fig. 7) holding the secondary mirror, and
the observer’s eye (5, Fig. 7). With the optics properly
aligned, all of these reflections appear concentric
(centered), as shown in Fig. 37. Any deviation from
concentricity of any of these telescope parts with the
eye requires adjustments to the secondary mirrorholder (Fig. 5) and/or the primary mirror cell (Fig. 6, as
described below.
e. If the screw you are turning becomes very loose,
tighten the other two screws by even amounts. If
the screw you are turning gets too tight, unthread
the other two by even amounts.
f. When you bring the image to center (Fig. 3a),
carefully examine the evenness of the ring of light
(concentricity, Figure 3c). If you find that the dark
center is still off in the same direction, continue
to make the adjustment in the original turning
direction. If it is now off in the opposite direction,
you have turned too far and you need to turn in the
opposite direction. Always double check the image
in the center of the field of the eyepiece.
Secondary mirror-vane adjustments: If the secondary
mirror (1, Fig. 8) is left or right of center within the
drawtube (2, Fig. 8), slightly loosen the 3-vane
adjustment/lock knobs (1, Fig. 5) located on the outside
surface of the main tube and slide the entire secondary
mirror-holder system up or down in the slotted holes of
the main tube until the secondary mirror is centered
in the drawtube. If the secondary mirror (1, Fig. 8) is
above- or below-center within the drawtube, thread
inward one of the adjustment/lock knobs (1, Fig. 5)
while unthreading another of these knobs. Only make
adjustments to two knobs at a time until the secondary
mirror appears as in Fig. 9.
g. You may find after your initial adjustment that the
dark center is off in a new direction (e.g., instead
of being off side-to-side it is now off in an up-anddown direction). In this case repeat steps b through
f to find the new adjustment screw.
h. Now try a higher power eyepiece (e.g., 9mm
or less) and repeat the above tests. Any lack of
collimation at this point will require only very slight
adjustments of the three set screws. You now have
good collimation of the optics.
i. As a final check of alignment, examine the star
image in focus with the higher power eyepiece
as suggested (j), under good viewing conditions.
The star point should appear as a small central
dot (commonly referred to as an “Airy disc”) with
a diffraction ring surrounding it. To give a final
precision collimation, make extremely slight
adjustments of the three set screws, if necessary,
to center the Airy disc in the diffraction ring. You
now have the best alignment of the optics possible
with this telescope.
2. Secondary mirror-holder adjustments: If the
secondary mirror (1, Fig. 9) is centered in the focuser
drawtube (2, Fig. 9), but the primary mirror is only
partially visible in the reflection (3, Fig. 9), the three
“+” (Phillips head) secondary mirror-tilt screws (2, Fig.
5) should be slightly unthreaded to the point where the
secondary mirror-holder (3, Fig. 5) can rotate about
its axis parallel to the main tube. Grasp the secondary
mirror-holder (avoid touching the mirror surface!)
with your hand and rotate it until, looking through the
drawtube, you can see the primary mirror centered
as well as possible in the reflection of the secondary
mirror. With the rotation of the secondary mirror-holder
at this best-possible position, thread in the three
Phillips head screws (2, Fig. 5) to lock the rotational
position. Then, if necessary, make adjustments to
these three Phillips head screws to refine the tilt-angle
of the secondary mirror, until the entire primary mirror
can be seen centered within the secondary mirror’s
Collimating Newtonian Reflector Optical
System
(figures seen on page 56)
The optical systems of Newtonian Reflector telescopes
include the following parts: primary mirror (1, Fig. 4);
secondary mirror (2, Fig. 4); secondary mirror-holder
(3, Fig 4); secondary mirror-vanes (4, Fig. 4) and
54
reflection. With the secondary mirror thus aligned the
image through the drawtube appears as in Fig. 10.
3. Primary mirror adjustments: If the secondary mirror
(1, Fig. 10) and the reflection of the primary mirror (2,
Fig. 10) appear centered within the drawtube (3, Fig.
10), but the reflection of your eye and the reflection
of the secondary mirror (4, Fig. 10) appear off-center,
then the primary mirror tilt requires adjusting, using
the Phillips head screws of the primary mirror cell (3,
Fig. 6). These primary mirror-tilt screws are located
behind the primary mirror, at the lower end of the main
tube. See Fig. 6. Before adjusting the primary mirrortilt screws, first unscrew by several turns (use either
a hex wrench or pliers) the three hex-head primary
mirror lock screws (2, Fig. 6) which are also located
on the rear surface of the primary mirror cell and which
alternate around the cell’s circumference with the three
Phillips head screws. Then by trial and error turn the
primary mirror Phillips head tilt screws (3, Fig. 6) until
you develop a feel for which way to turn each screw to
center the reflection of your eye in the drawtube. (An
assistant is helpful in this operation.) With your eye
centered as shown in Fig. 7, turn the three hex head
primary mirror lock screws (2, Fig. 6) to re-lock the tiltangle of the primary mirror.
The telescope’s optical system is now aligned. This
collimation should be checked from time to time, with
small adjustments (per steps 1, 2, and/or 3, above)
effected as required to keep the optics well-aligned.
55
56
APPENDIX G:
Northern hemisphere observers (N): If the site is over
70 miles (110 km) North of the listed city, add one
degree for every 70 miles. If the site is over 70 miles
South of the listed city, subtract one degree per 70
miles.
Table of Latitudes
Latitude Chart for Major Cities of the World
To aid in the polar alignment procedure (see page
45), latitudes of major cities around the world are
listed below. To determine the latitude of an observing
site not listed on the chart, locate the city closest to
your site. Then follow the procedure below:
NORTH AMERICA
City
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Boston
Calgary
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Honolulu
Jackson
Kansas City
Kenosha
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Mexico City
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Ottawa
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Portland
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Washington
EUROPE
City
Amsterdam
Athens
Bern
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Glasgow
Helsinki
Lisbon
London
Madrid
State/Prov./Country
New Mexico
Alaska
Georgia
Massachusetts
Alberta
Illinois
Ohio
Texas
Colorado
Michigan
Hawaii
Mississippi
Missouri
Wisconsin
Nevada
Arkansas
California
Mexico
Florida
Minnesota
Tennessee
Louisiana
New York
Oklahoma
Ontario
Pennsylvania
Arizona
Oregon
Utah
Texas
California
California
Washington
District of Columbia
Latitude
35° N
61° N
34° N
42° N
51° N
42° N
41° N
33° N
40° N
42° N
21° N
32° N
39° N
45° N
36° N
35° N
34° N
19° N
26° N
45° N
36° N
30° N
41° N
35° N
45° N
40° N
33° N
46° N
41° N
29° N
33° N
38° N
47° N
39° N
Country
Netherlands
Greece
Switzerland
Denmark
Ireland
Germany
Scotland
Finland
Portugal
England
Spain
Latitude
52° N
38° N
47° N
56° N
53° N
50° N
56° N
60° N
39° N
51° N
40° N
Southern Hemisphere observers (S): If the site is over
70 miles (110 km) North of the listed city, subtract one
degree for every 70 miles. If the site is over 70 miles
South of the listed city, add one degree per 70 miles.
EUROPE (continued)
City
Oslo
Paris
Rome
Stockholm
Vienna
Warsaw
SOUTH AMERICA
City
Bogotá
São Paulo
Buenos Aires
Montevideo
Santiago
Caracas
ASIA
City
Beijing
Hong Kong
Seoul
Taipei
Tokyo
Sapporo
Bombay
Calcutta
Hanoi
Jedda
AFRICA
City
Cairo
Cape Town
Rabat
Tunis
Windhoek
Country
Norway
France
Italy
Sweden
Austria
Poland
Latitude
60° N
49° N
42° N
59° N
48° N
52° N
Country
Colombia
Brazil
Argentina
Uruguay
Chile
Venezuela
Latitude
4° N
23° S
35° S
35° S
34° S
10° N
Country
China
China
South Korea
Taiwan
Japan
Japan
India
India
Vietnam
Saudi Arabia
Latitude
40° N
23° N
37° N
25° N
36° N
43° N
19° N
22° N
21° N
21° N
Country
Egypt
South Africa
Morocco
Tunisia
Namibia
Latitude
30° N
34° S
34° N
37° N
23° S
AUSTRALIA AND OCEANIA
City
Adelaide
Brisbane
Canberra
Alice Springs
Hobart
Perth
Sydney
Melbourne
Auckland
57
State/Country
South Australia
Queensland
New South Wales
Northern Territory
Tasmania
Western Australia
New South Wales
Victoria
New Zealand
Latitude
35° S
27° S
35° S
24° S
43° S
32° S
34° S
38° S
37° S
RECYCLING INFORMATION
(EU Countries only)
Correct Disposal of this Product
(Waste Electrical & Electronic Equipment)
This marking shown on the product or its literature indicates that it
must not be disposed of in unsorted municipal waste at the end of its
working life
To prevent possible harm to the environment or human health from
uncontrolled waste disposal, please separate this from other types of wastes and recycle it as
required by law. Household users should contact either the retailer where they purchased this
product, or their local government office, for details of where and how they can take this item
for environmentally safe recycling. Business users should contact their supplier and check the
terms and conditions of the purchase contract. This product should not be mixed with other
commercial wastes for disposal.
58
Meade Limited Warranty
Every Meade telescope, spotting scope, and telescope accessory is warranted by Meade
Instruments Corp (“Meade”) to be free of defects in materials and workmanship for a period of
ONE YEAR from the date of original purchase in the U.S.A. and Canada. Meade will repair or
replace a product, or part thereof, found by Meade to be defective, provided the defective part is
returned to Meade, freight-prepaid, with proof of purchase. This warranty applies to the original
purchaser only and is non-transferable. Meade products purchased outside North America
are not included in this warranty, but are covered under separate warranties issued by Meade
international distributors.
RGA Number Required: Prior to the return of any product or part, a Return Goods Authorization
(RGA) number must be obtained from Meade by writing, or by calling (800) 626-3233. Each
returned part or product must include a written statement detailing the nature of the claimed
defect, as well as the owner’s name, address, and phone number.
This warranty is not valid in cases where the product has been abused or mishandled, where
unauthorized repairs have been attempted or performed, or where depreciation of the product
is due to normal wear-and-tear. Meade specifically disclaims special, indirect, or consequential
damages or lost profit which may result from a breach of this warranty. Any implied warranties
which cannot be disclaimed are hereby limited to a term of one year from the date of original
retail purchase.
This warranty gives you specific rights. You may have other rights which vary from state to state.
Meade reserves the right to change product specifications or to discontinue products without
notice.
This warranty supersedes all previous Meade product warranties.
59
We appreciate your business. Keep in touch!
Let’s get social:
@meadeinstruments
@meadeinstruments
@meadeinstrument
Share your photos with us:
#MeadeMoments
Social@meade.com
For special offers and other products, visit our website
www.meade.com
1-800-626-3233
Meade Instruments
27 Hubble
Irvine, CA 92618
27 Hubble, Irvine, California 92618
(800) 626-3233 www.meade.com
July 2018 REV 0
14-2720-00
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