Miller | KE607495 | Owner Manual | Miller INTELLITIG 40 User manual

Miller INTELLITIG 40 User manual
OM-894
127 412C
September 1997
OWNER’S
MANUAL
Intellitig 40
Read and follow these instructions and all
safety blocks carefully.
Give this manual to the operator.
Have only trained and qualified persons
install, operate, or service this unit.
For help, call your distributor
Call your distributor if you do not understand
the directions.
or: MILLER Electric Mfg. Co., P.O. Box 1079,
Appleton, WI 54912
414-734-9821
cover 7/93 – SB-129 229-A
 1997 MILLER Electric Mfg. Co.
PRINTED IN USA
From Miller to You
Thank you and congratulations on choosing Miller. Now
you can get the job done and get it done right. We know
you don’t have time to do it any other way.
That’s why when Niels Miller first started building arc
welders in 1929, he made sure his products offered
long-lasting value and superior quality. Like you, his
customers couldn’t afford anything less. Miller products
had to be more than the best they could be. They had to
be the best you could buy.
Today, the people that build and sell Miller products continue the
tradition. They’re just as committed to providing equipment and service
that meets the high standards of quality and value established in 1929.
This Owner’s Manual is designed to help you get the most out of your
Miller products. Please take time to read the Safety precautions. They will
help you protect yourself against potential hazards on the worksite. We’ve
made installation and operation quick and easy.
With Miller you can count on years of reliable
service with proper maintenance. And if for
some reason the unit needs repair, there’s a
Troubleshooting section that will help you
Miller is the first welding figure out what the problem is. The parts list
equipment manufacturer in will then help you to decide which exact part
the U.S.A. to be registered to
the ISO 9001 Quality System you may need to fix the problem. Warranty and
Standard.
service information for your particular model
are also provided.
Miller Electric manufactures a full line
of welders and welding related equipment.
For information on other quality Miller
products, contact your local Miller distributor
to receive the latest full line catalog or
individual catalog sheets. To locate your nearest
distributor or service agency call 1-800-4-A-Miller,
or visit us at www.MillerWelds.com on the web.
Working as hard as you do
– every power source from
Miller is backed by the most
hassle-free warranty in the
business.
Miller offers a Technical
Manual which provides
more detailed service and
parts information for your
unit. To obtain a Technical
Manual, contact your local
distributor. Your distributor
can also supply you with
Welding Process Manuals
such as SMAW, GTAW,
GMAW, and GMAW-P.
CERTIFICATE
MODEL NO.
NAME OF EQUIPMENT:
SERIAL NO.
DATE:
This equipment has been type-tested under standardized field test conditions as recommended
by the Joint Industry Committee on High-Frequency Stabilized Arc Welding Machines found to radiate
less than 10 microvolts per meter at a distance of one mile, the maximum allowable limit established
by the Federal Communications Commission for equipment of this type.
Installations using this equipment on the basis of these tests, may reasonably be expected to
meet the radiation limitations established by the Federal Communications Commission, only when
installed, operated and maintained as specified in the instruction book provided.
USER’S CERTIFICATION
The welding equipment identified above has been installed in accordance with the specific
instructions applicable to this model as outlined in the instruction book furnished. It is being used only
for the purpose for which it was intended and is being maintained and operated in accordance with the
manufacturer’s instructions
Date Installed
Signed
OM-894C – 9/97
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section No.
Page No.
SECTION 1 – SAFETY RULES FOR OPERATION OF ARC WELDING POWER SOURCE
1-1.
1-2.
1-3.
1-4.
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Arc Welding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Standards Booklet Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1
1
4
5
SECTION 2 – SAFETY PRECAUTIONS AND SIGNAL WORDS
2-1.
2-2.
General Information And Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Safety Alert Symbol And Signal Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6
6
SECTION 3 – SPECIFICATIONS
3-1.
Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7
SECTION 4 – INSTALLATION OR RELOCATION
4-1.
4-2.
4-3.
4-4.
4-5.
4-6.
4-7.
Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting DIP Switch SW1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shielding Gas Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote Operator Control Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Welding Power Source Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Weld Input/Output Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Optional Internal Wiring Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7
7
9
9
10
10
11
SECTION 5 – OPERATOR CONTROLS
5-1.
5-2.
5-3.
5-4.
5-5.
5-6.
5-7.
5-8.
5-9.
5-10.
5-11.
5-12.
Power Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program/Run/Reset Key Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mode Selector Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parameter Select Push Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Up Push Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Down Push Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Purge Push Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gas Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gas Flow Rate Digital Meter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Digital Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Weld Amperes Meter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote Operator Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13
13
13
13
14
14
14
14
14
14
15
15
SECTION 6 – PROGRAMMING
6-1.
6-2.
6-3.
6-4.
6-5.
6-6.
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modes Of Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering A Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing A Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dry Run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15
15
16
16
16
17
6-7.
6-8.
6-9.
6-10.
Stop Watch Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Linking Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Combining Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running A Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17
17
17
18
SECTION 7 – SEQUENCE OF OPERATION
7-1.
7-2.
Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shutting Down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19
19
SECTION 8 – MAINTENANCE & TROUBLESHOOTING
8-1.
8-2.
8-3.
8-4.
8-5.
Routine Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overload Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tungsten Electrode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Circuit Board Handling Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostic Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20
20
20
22
22
SECTION 9 – ELECTRICAL DIAGRAMS
Diagram 9-1. Circuit Diagram For Control Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagram 9-2. Circuit Diagram For Remote Operator Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagram 9-3. Wiring Diagram For Control Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
36
37
38
SECTION 10 – CERTIFICATION FOR HIGH FREQUENCY ARC WELDING EQUIPMENT
10-1.
10-2.
10-3.
10-4.
10-5.
10-6.
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
High-Frequency Radiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General Installation Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Guidelines For Installation Of High-Frequency Assisted Arc Welding
Power Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10-7. Installation Guidelines Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
40
40
41
41
41
43
43
SECTION 11 – PARTS LIST
Figure 11-1. Main Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 11-2. Pendant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 11-3. Panel, Rear w/Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
44
47
48
SECTION 1 – SAFETY RULES FOR OPERATION OF ARC WELDING POWER SOURCE
1-1.
INTRODUCTION
We learn by experience. Learning safety through personal experience, like a child touching a hot stove is
harmful, wasteful, and unwise. Let the experience of
others teach you.
Safe practices developed from experience in the use of
welding and cutting are described in this manual. Research, development, and field experience have
evolved reliable equipment and safe installation, operation, and servicing practices. Accidents occur when
equipment is improperly used or maintained. The reason for the safe practices may not always be given.
Some are based on common sense, others may require
technical volumes to explain. It is wiser to follow the
rules.
Read and understand these safe practices before attempting to install, operate, or service the equipment.
Comply with these procedures as applicable to the particular equipment used and their instruction manuals,
for personal safety and for the safety of others.
Failure to observe these safe practices may cause serious injury or death. When safety becomes a habit, the
equipment can be used with confidence.
These safe practices are divided into two Sections:
1-General Precautions, common to arc welding and cutting; and 2-Arc Welding (and Cutting) (only).
Reference standards: Published Standards on safety
are also available for additional and more complete procedures than those given in this manual. They are listed
in the Standards Index in this manual. ANSI Z49.1 is the
most complete.
The National Electrical Code, Occupational Safety and
Health Administration, local industrial codes, and local
inspection requirements also provide a basis for equipment installation, use, and service.
1-2.
GENERAL PRECAUTIONS
Different arc welding processes, electrode alloys,
and fluxes can produce different fumes, gases, and
radiation levels. In addition to the information in
this manual, be sure to consult flux and electrode
manufacturers Material Safety Data Sheets
(MSDSs) for specific technical data and precautionary measures concerning their material.
A. Burn Prevention
Wear protective clothing-gauntlet gloves designed for
use in welding, hat, and high safety-toe shoes. Button
shirt collar and pocket flaps, and wear cuffless trousers
to avoid entry of sparks and slag.
Wear helmet with safety goggles and glasses with side
shields underneath, appropriate filter lenses or plates
(protected by clear cover glass). This is a MUST for
welding or cutting, (and chipping) to protect the eyes
from radiant energy and flying metal. Replace cover
glass when broken, pitted, or spattered. See 1-3A.2.
Avoid oily or greasy clothing. A spark may ignite them.
Hot metal such as electrode stubs and workpieces
should never be handled without gloves.
Medical first aid and eye treatment. First aid facilities
and a qualified first aid person should be available for
each shift unless medical facilities are close by for immediate treatment of flash burns of the eyes and skin
burns.
Ear plugs should be worn when working on overhead or
in a confined space. A hard hat should be worn when
others work overhead.
Flammable hair preparations should not be used by persons intending to weld or cut.
B. Toxic Fume Prevention
Severe discomfort, illness or death can result from
fumes, vapors, heat, or oxygen enrichment or depletion
that welding (or cutting) may produce. Prevent them
with adequate ventilation as described in ANSI Standard Z49.1 listed in Standards Index. NEVER ventilate
with oxygen.
Lead -, cadmium -, zinc -, mercury -, and beryllium-bearing and similar materials, when welded (or cut) may produce harmful concentrations of toxic fumes. Adequate
local exhaust ventilation must be used, or each person
in the area as well as the operator must wear an air-supplied respirator. For beryllium, both must be used.
Metals coated with or containing materials that emit
toxic fumes should not be heated unless coating is removed from the work surface, the area is well ventilated
and, if necessary, while wearing an air-supplied respirator.
Work in a confined space only while it is being ventilated
and, if necessary, while wearing an air-supplied respirator.
Gas leaks in a confined space should be avoided.
Leaked gas in large quantities can change oxygen concentration dangerously. Do not bring gas cylinders into a
confined space.
Leaving confined space, shut OFF gas supply at source
to prevent possible accumulation of gases in the space if
downstream valves have been accidentally opened or
left open. Check to be sure that the space is safe before
re-entering it.
Vapors from chlorinated solvents can be decomposed
by the heat of the arc (or flame) to form PHOSGENE, a
highly toxic gas, and other lung and eye irritating products. The ultraviolet (radiant) energy of the arc can also
decompose trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene
vapors to form phosgene. DO NOT WELD or cut where
solvent vapors can be drawn into the welding or cutting
OM-894 Page 1
atmosphere or where the radiant energy can penetrate
to atmospheres containing even minute amounts of
trichloroethylene or perchloroethylene.
C. Fire and Explosion Prevention
Causes of fire and explosion are: combustibles reached
by the arc, flame, flying sparks, hot slag or heated material; misuse of compressed gases and cylinders; and
short circuits.
BE AWARE THAT flying sparks or falling slag can pass
through cracks, along pipes, through windows or doors,
and through wall or floor openings, out of sight of the
goggled operator. Sparks and slag can fly 35 feet.
To prevent fires and explosion:
Keep equipment clean and operable, free of oil, grease,
and (in electrical parts) of metallic particles that can
cause short circuits.
If combustibles are in area, do NOT weld or cut. Move
the work if practicable, to an area free of combustibles.
Avoid paint spray rooms, dip tanks, storage areas, ventilators. If the work cannot be moved, move combustibles at least 35 feet away out of reach of sparks and
heat; or protect against ignition with suitable and snugfitting, fire-resistant covers or shields.
Walls touching combustibles on opposite sides should
not be welded on (or cut). Walls, ceilings, and floor near
work should be protected by heat-resistant covers or
shields.
Fire watcher must be standing by with suitable fire extinguishing equipment during and for some time after welding or cutting if:
a. appreciable combustibles (including building
construction) are within 35 feet
b. appreciable combustibles are further than 35
feet but can be ignited by sparks
c. openings (concealed or visible) in floors or walls
within 35 feet may expose combustibles to
sparks
d. combustibles adjacent to walls, ceilings, roofs,
or metal partitions can be ignited by radiant or
conducted heat.
Hot work permit should be obtained before operation to
ensure supervisor’s approval that adequate precautions have been taken.
After work is done, check that area is free of sparks,
glowing embers, and flames.
An empty container that held combustibles, or that can
produce flammable or toxic vapors when heated, must
never be welded on or cut, unless container has first
been cleaned as described in AWS Standard A6.0,
listed 7 in Standards Index.
This includes: a thorough steam or caustic cleaning (or
a solvent or water washing, depending on the combustible’s solubility) followed by purging and inerting with nitrogen or carbon dioxide, and using protective equipOM-894C Page 2
ment as recommended in A6.0. Waterfilling just below
working level may substitute for inerting.
A container with unknown contents should be cleaned
(see preceding paragraph). Do NOT depend on sense
of smell or sight to determine if it is safe to weld or cut.
Hollow castings or containers must be vented before
welding or cutting. They can explode.
Explosive atmospheres. Never weld or cut where the air
may contain flammable dust, gas, or liquid vapors (such
as gasoline).
D. Compressed Gas Equipment
Standard precautions. Comply with precautions in this
manual, and those detailed in CGA Standard P-1, SAFE
HANDLING OF COMPRESSED GASES IN CYLINDERS, listed 11 in Standards Index.
1. Pressure Regulators
Regulator relief valve is designed to protect only the
regulator from overpressure; it is not intended to protect
any downstream equipment. Provide such protection
with one or more relief devices.
Never connect a regulator to a cylinder containing gas
other than that for which the regulator was designed.
Remove faulty regulator from service immediately for
repair (first close cylinder valve). The following symptoms indicate a faulty regulator:
Leaks-if gas leaks externally.
Excessive Creep-if delivery pressure continues to rise
with downstream valve closed.
Faulty Gauge-if gauge pointer does not move off stop
pin when pressurized, nor returns to stop pin after pressure release.
Repair. Do NOT attempt to repair. Send faulty regulators for repair to manufacturer’s designated repair center, where special techniques and tools are used by
trained personnel.
2. Cylinders
Cylinders must be handled carefully to prevent leaks
and damage to their walls, valves, or safety devices:
Avoid electrical circuit contact with cylinders including
third rails, electrical wires, or welding circuits. They can
produce short circuit arcs that may lead to a serious accident. (See 1-3C.)
ICC or DOT marking must be on each cylinder. It is an
assurance of safety when the cylinder is properly handled.
Identifying gas content. Use only cylinders with name of
gas marked on them; do not rely on color to identify gas
content. Notify supplier if unmarked. NEVER DEFACE
or alter name, number, or other markings on a cylinder. It
is illegal and hazardous.
Empties: Keep valves closed, replace caps securely;
mark MT; keep them separate from FULLS and return
promptly.
Prohibited use. Never use a cylinder or its contents for
other than its intended use, NEVER as a support or
roller.
Locate or secure cylinders so they cannot be knocked
over.
outlet away from people and sources of ignition. Wipe
with a clean lintless cloth.
Passageways and work areas. Keep cylinders clear of
areas where they may be struck.
Match regulator to cylinder. Before connecting, check
that the regulator label and cylinder marking area, and
that the regulator inlet and cylinder outlet match.
NEVER CONNECT a regulator designed for a particular
gas or gases to a cylinder containing any other gas.
Transporting cylinders. With a crane, use a secure support such as a platform or cradle. Do NOT lift cylinders
off the ground by their valves or caps, or by chains,
slings, or magnets.
Do NOT expose cylinders to excessive heat, sparks,
slag, and flame, etc. that may cause rupture. Do not allow contents to exceed 130°F. Cool with water spray
where such exposure exists.
Protect cylinders particularly valves from bumps, falls,
falling objects, and weather. Replace caps securely
when moving cylinders.
Stuck valve. Do NOT use a hammer or wrench to open a
cylinder valve that can not be opened by hand. Notify
your supplier.
Mixing gases. Never try to mix any gases in a cylinder.
Never refill any cylinder.
Cylinder fittings should never be modified or exchanged.
3.
Hose
Tighten connections. When assembling threaded connections, clean and smooth seats where necessary.
Tighten. If connection leaks, disassemble, clean, and
retighten using properly fitting wrench.
Adapters. Use a CGA adapter (available from your supplier) between cylinder and regulator, if one is required.
use two wrenches to tighten adapter marked RIGHT
and LEFT HAND threads.
Regulator outlet (or hose) connections may be identified
by right hand threads for oxygen and left hand threads
(with grooved hex on nut or shank) for fuel gas.
5.
Pressurizing Steps:
Drain regulator of residual gas through suitable vent before opening cylinder (or manifold valve) by turning adjusting screw in (clockwise). Draining prevents excessive compression heat at high pressure seat by allowing
seat to open on pressurization. Leave adjusting screw
engaged slightly on single-stage regulators.
Stand to side of regulator while opening cylinder valve.
Prohibited use. Never use hose other than that designed for the specified gas. A general hose identification rule is: red for fuel gas, green for oxygen, and black
for inert gases.
Use ferrules or clamps designed for the hose (not ordinary wire or other substitute) as a binding to connect
hoses to fittings.
No copper tubing splices. Use only standard brass fittings to splice hose.
Avoid long runs to prevent kinks and abuse. Suspend
hose off ground to keep it from being run over, stepped
on, or otherwise damaged.
Coil excess hose to prevent kinks and tangles.
Protect hose from damage by sharp edges, and by
sparks, slag, and open flame.
Examine hose regularly for leaks, wear, and loose connections. Immerse pressured hose in water; bubbles indicate leaks.
Repair leaky or worn hose by cutting area out and splicing (1-2D3). Do NOT tape.
4.
Proper Connections
Clean cylinder valve outlet of impurities that may clog
orifices and damage seats before connecting regulator.
Except for hydrogen, crack valve momentarily, pointing
Open cylinder valve slowly so that regulator pressure increases slowly. When gauge is pressurized (gauge
reaches regulator maximum) leave cylinder valve in following position: For oxygen, and inert gases, open fully
to seal stem against possible leak. For fuel gas, open to
less than one turn to permit quick emergency shutoff.
Use pressure charts (available from your supplier) for
safe and efficient, recommended pressure settings on
regulators.
Check for leaks on first pressurization and regularly
there-after. Brush with soap solution (capfull of Ivory
Liquid* or equivalent per gallon of water). Bubbles indicate leak. Clean off soapy water after test; dried soap is
combustible.
E. User Responsibilities
Remove leaky or defective equipment from service immediately for repair. See User Responsibility statement
in equipment manual.
F.
Leaving Equipment Unattended
Close gas supply at source and drain gas.
G. Rope Staging-Support
Rope staging-support should not be used for welding or
cutting operation; rope may burn.
*Trademark of Proctor & Gamble.
OM-894 Page 3
1-3.
ARC WELDING
Comply with precautions in 1-1, 1-2, and this section.
Arc Welding, properly done, is a safe process, but a
careless operator invites trouble. The equipment carries
high currents at significant voltages. The arc is very
bright and hot. Sparks fly, fumes rise, ultraviolet and infrared energy radiates, weldments are hot, and compressed gases may be used. The wise operator avoids
unnecessary risks and protects himself and others from
accidents. Precautions are described here and in standards referenced in index.
A. Burn Protection
Comply with precautions in 1-2.
The welding arc is intense and visibly bright. Its radiation
can damage eyes, penetrate lightweight clothing, reflect
from light-colored surfaces, and burn the skin and eyes.
Skin burns resemble acute sunburn, those from gasshielded arcs are more severe and painful. DON’T GET
BURNED; COMPLY WITH PRECAUTIONS.
1.
Protective Clothing
Wear long-sleeve clothing (particularly for gas-shielded
arc) in addition to gloves, hat, and shoes (1-2A). As necessary, use additional protective clothing such as
leather jacket or sleeves, flame-proof apron, and fire-resistant leggings. Avoid outer garments of untreated cotton.
Bare skin protection. Wear dark, substantial clothing.
Button collar to protect chest and neck and button pockets to prevent entry of sparks.
2.
Eye and Head Protection
Protect eyes from exposure to arc. NEVER look at an
electric arc without protection.
Welding helmet or shield containing a filter plate shade
no. 12 or denser must be used when welding. Place over
face before striking arc.
Protect filter plate with a clear cover plate.
Cracked or broken helmet or shield should NOT be
worn; radiation can pass through to cause burns.
Cracked, broken, or loose filter plates must be replaced
IMMEDIATELY. Replace clear cover plate when broken,
pitted, or spattered.
Flash goggles with side shields MUST be worn under
the helmet to give some protection to the eyes should
the helmet not be lowered over the face before an arc is
struck. Looking at an arc momentarily with unprotected
eyes (particularly a high intensity gas-shielded arc) can
cause a retinal burn that may leave a permanent dark
area in the field of vision.
3.
Protection of Nearby Personnel
Enclosed welding area. For production welding, a separate room or enclosed bay is best. In open areas, surround the operation with low-reflective, non-combustible screens or panels. Allow for free air circulation, particularly at floor level.
OM-894C Page 4
Viewing the weld. Provide face shields for all persons
who will be looking directly at the weld.
Others working in area. See that all persons are wearing
flash goggles.
Before starting to weld, make sure that screen flaps or
bay doors are closed.
B. Toxic Fume Prevention
Comply with precautions in 1-2B.
Generator engine exhaust must be vented to the outside air. Carbon monoxide can kill.
C. Fire and Explosion Prevention
Comply with precautions in 1-2C.
Equipment’s rated capacity. Do not overload arc welding equipment. It may overheat cables and cause a fire.
Loose cable connections may overheat or flash and
cause a fire.
Never strike an arc on a cylinder or other pressure vessel. It creates a brittle area that can cause a violent rupture or lead to such a rupture under rough handling.
D. Compressed Gas Equipment
Comply with precautions in 1-2D.
E. Shock Prevention
Exposed hot conductors or other bare metal in the welding circuit, or in ungrounded, electrically-HOT equipment can fatally shock a person whose body becomes a
conductor. DO NOT STAND, SIT, LIE, LEAN ON, OR
TOUCH a wet surface when welding, without suitable
protection.
To protect against shock:
Wear dry insulating gloves and body protection. Keep
body and clothing dry. Never work in damp area without
adequate insulation against electrical shock. Stay on a
dry duckboard, or rubber mat when dampness or sweat
can not be avoided. Sweat, sea water, or moisture between body and an electrically HOT part or grounded
metal reduces the electrical resistance, and could enable dangerous and possibly lethal currents to flow
through the body.
A voltage will exist between the electrode and any conducting object in the work circuit. Examples of conducting objects include, but are not limited to, buildings, electrical tools, work benches, welding power source cases,
workpieces, etc. Never touch the electrode and any
metal object unless the welding power source is
off.
1.
Grounding the Equipment
Arc welding equipment must be grounded according to
the National Electrical Code, and the work must be
grounded according to ANSI Z49.1 “Safety In Welding
And Cutting.”
When installing, connect the frames of each unit such as
welding power source, control, work table, and water circulator to the building ground. Conductors must be ade-
quate to carry ground currents safely. Equipment made
electrically HOT by stray current may shock, possibly
fatally. Do NOT GROUND to electrical conduit, or to a
pipe carrying ANY gas or flammable liquid such as oil or
fuel.
ject in contact with the electrode circuit unless
the welding power source is off.
b. Equipment without output on/off control (no
contactor)
Welding power sources used with shielded
metal arc welding (SMAW) and similar processes may not be equipped with welding power
output on-off control devices. With such equipment the electrode is electrically HOT when the
power switch is turned ON. Never touch the
electrode unless the welding power source is
off.
Three-phase connection. Check phase requirements of
equipment before installing. If only 3-phase power is
available, connect single-phase equipment to only two
wires of the 3-phase line. Do NOT connect the equipment ground lead to the third (live) wire, or the equipment will become electrically HOT-a dangerous condition that can shock, possibly fatally.
Before welding, check ground for continuity. Be sure
conductors are touching bare metal of equipment
frames at connections.
If a line cord with a ground lead is provided with the
equipment for connection to a switchbox, connect the
ground lead to the grounded switchbox. If a three-prong
plug is added for connection to a grounded mating receptacle, the ground lead must be connected to the
ground prong only. If the line cord comes with a threeprong plug, connect to a grounded mating receptacle.
Never remove the ground prong from a plug, or use a
plug with a broken off ground prong.
2.
Electrode Holders
Fully insulated electrode holders should be used. Do
NOT use holders with protruding screws.
3.
Connectors
Fully insulated lock-type connectors should be used to
join welding cable lengths.
4.
Cables
Frequently inspect cables for wear, cracks and damage.
IMMEDIATELY REPLACE those with excessively worn
or damaged insulation to avoid possibly-lethal shock
from bared cable. Cables with damaged areas may be
taped to give resistance equivalent to original cable.
Keep cable dry, free of oil and grease, and protected
from hot metal and sparks.
5.
Before installation, inspection, or service, of equipment,
shut OFF all power and remove line fuses (or lock or
red-tag switches) to prevent accidental turning ON of
power. Disconnect all cables from welding power
source, and pull all 115 volts line-cord plugs.
Do not open power circuit or change polarity while welding. If, in an emergency, it must be disconnected, guard
against shock burns, or flash from switch arcing.
Leaving equipment unattended. Always shut OFF and
disconnect all power to equipment.
Power disconnect switch must be available near the
welding power source.
F.
Protection For Wearers of Electronic Life Support Devices (Pacemakers)
Magnetic fields from high currents can affect pacemaker operation. Persons wearing electronic life support
equipment (pacemaker) should consult with their doctor
before going near arc welding, gouging, or spot welding
operations.
1-4.
STANDARDS BOOKLET INDEX
For more information, refer to the following standards or
their latest revisions and comply as applicable:
1.
ANSI Standard Z49.1, SAFETY IN WELDING
AND CUTTING obtainable from the American
Welding Society, 550 N.W. LeJeune Rd, Miami,
FL 33126.
2.
NIOSH, SAFETY AND HEALTH IN ARC WELDING AND GAS WELDING AND CUTTING obtainable from the Superintendent of Documents,
U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington,
D.C. 20402.
3.
OSHA, SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS,
29CFR 1910, obtainable from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing
Office, Washington, D.C. 20402.
4.
ANSI Standard Z87.1, SAFE PRACTICES FOR
OCCUPATION AND EDUCATIONAL EYE AND
FACE PROTECTION obtainable from the American National Standards Institute, 1430 Broadway, New York, NY 10018.
Electrode
a. Equipment with output on/off control (contactor)
Welding power sources for use with the gas
metal arc welding (GMAW), gas tungsten arc
welding (GTAW) and similar processes normally are equipped with devices that permit onoff control of the welding power output. When
so equipped the electrode wire becomes electrically HOT when the power source switch is
ON and the welding gun switch is closed. Never
touch the electrode wire or any conducting ob-
Safety Devices
Safety devices such as interlocks and circuit breakers
should not be disconnected or shunted out.
Terminals And Other Exposed Parts
Terminals and other exposed parts of electrical units
should have insulating covers secured before operation.
6.
7.
OM-894 Page 5
5.
ANSI Standard Z41.1, STANDARD FOR MEN’S
SAFETY-TOE FOOTWEAR obtainable from the
American National Standards Institute, 1430
Broadway, New York, NY 10018.
6.
ANSI Standard Z49.2, FIRE PREVENTION IN
THE USE OF CUTTING AND WELDING PROCESSES obtainable from the American National
Standards Institute, 1430 Broadway, New York,
NY 10018.
7.
8.
AWS Standard A6.0, WELDING AND CUTTING
CONTAINERS WHICH HAVE HELD COMBUSTIBLES obtainable from the American Welding
Society, 550 N.W. LeJeune Rd, Miami, FL 33126.
NFPA Standard 51, OXYGEN-FUEL GAS SYSTEMS FOR WELDING, CUTTING, AND ALLIED
PROCESSES obtainable from the National Fire
Protection Association, Batterymarch Park,
Quincy, MA 02269.
9.
NFPA Standard 70, NATIONAL ELECTRICAL
CODE obtainable from the National Fire Protection Association, Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA
02269.
10.
NFPA Standard 51B, CUTTING AND WELDING
PROCESSES obtainable from the National Fire
Protection Association, Batterymarch Park,
Quincy, MA 02269.
11.
CGA Pamphlet P-1, SAFE HANDLING OF
COMPRESSED GASES IN CYLINDERS obtainable from the Compressed Gas Association,
1235 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 501, Arlington, VA 22202.
12.
CSA Standard W117.2, CODE FOR SAFETY IN
WELDING AND CUTTING obtainable from the
Canadian Standards Association, Standards
Sales, 178 Rexdale Boulevard, Rexdale, Ontario, Canada M9W 1R3.
13.
NWSA booklet, WELDING SAFETY BIBLIOGRAPHY obtainable from the National Welding
Supply Association, 1900 Arch Street, Philadelphia, PA 19103.
14.
American Welding Society Standard AWSF4.1,
RECOMMENDED SAFE PRACTICES FOR
THE PREPARATION FOR WELDING AND
CUTTING OF CONTAINERS AND PIPING
THAT HAVE HELD HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES, obtainable from the American Welding Society, 550 N.W. LeJeune Rd, Miami, FL
33126.
15.
ANSI Standard Z88.2, PRACTICE FOR RESPIRATORY PROTECTION, obtainable from the
American National Standards Institute, 1430
Broadway, New York, NY 10018.
SECTION 2 – SAFETY PRECAUTIONS AND SIGNAL WORDS
2-1.
GENERAL INFORMATION AND SAFETY
A. General
Information presented in this manual and on various labels, tags, and plates on the unit pertains to equipment
design, installation, operation, maintenance, and
troubleshooting which should be read, understood, and
followed for the safe and effective use of this equipment.
The nameplate of this unit uses international symbols
for labeling the front panel controls. The symbols also
appear at the appropriate section in the text.
B. Safety
The installation, operation, maintenance, and troubleshooting of arc welding equipment requires practices
and procedures which ensure personal safety and the
safety of others. Therefore, this equipment is to be installed, operated, and maintained only by qualified persons in accordance with this manual and all applicable
codes such as, but not limited to, those listed at the end
of Section 1 – Safety Rules For Operation Of Arc Welding Power Source.
OM-894C Page 6
2-2.
SAFETY ALERT SYMBOL AND SIGNAL
WORDS
The following safety alert symbol and signal words are
used throughout this manual to call attention to and
identify different levels of hazard and special instructions.
This safety alert symbol is used with the signal
words WARNING and CAUTION to call attention to the safety statements.
WARNING statements identify procedures or
practices which must be followed to avoid serious personal injury or loss of life.
CAUTION statements identify procedures or
practices which must be followed to avoid minor
personal injury or damage to this equipment.
IMPORTANT statements identify special instructions
necessary for the most efficient operation of this equipment.
SECTION 3 – SPECIFICATIONS
9-3/4 in.
(248 mm)
16 in.
(406 mm)
13-1/8 in.
(333 mm)
SB-129 229-A
Figure 3-1. Dimensional Drawing
Table 3-1. Specifications
3-1.
user to create programs that control functions of the
weld process. Programs can be run individually or linked
to run in a sequence defined by the user.
Weight
Input Power
Requirements
Net
Ship
115 Volts AC
At 1 Ampere
44 lbs.
(20 kg)
49 lbs.
(22.2 kg)
DESCRIPTION
This unit is a microprocessor-controlled Gas Tungsten
Arc Welding (GTAW) control unit designed for use with
inverter welding power sources. This unit allows the
When properly connected to the welding power source,
this unit provides high frequency, preflow time, initial
current, initial slope time, final slope time, final current,
postflow time, and amperage selection of weld/peak
current for either a pulsing or nonpulsing weld current.
Pulsing controls include on/off selection, pulse time,
peak current, background current, and pulse frequency.
This unit provides a delay time for wire feed on/off control and gas flow control.
SECTION 4 – INSTALLATION OR RELOCATION
4-1.
LOCATION
IMPORTANT: Read entire Section 10 regarding highfrequency equipment location and installation requirements before installing this equipment.
Locate the control unit close to the work station. This will
allow torch and work weld cables to be kept as short as
possible, thereby minimizing high frequency radiation.
4-2.
SETTING DIP SWITCH SW1 (Figures 4-1 And
5-1)
Eight-position DIP switch SW1 allows the operator to
define certain functions of the control unit. To set the positions of SW1, proceed as follows:
WARNING: ELECTRIC SHOCK can kill.
• Do not touch live electrical parts.
• Shut down control unit and welding power
source, and disconnect input power employing lockout/tagging procedures before beginning this procedure.
Lockout/tagging procedures consist of padlocking line disconnect switch in open position,
removing fuses from fuse box, or shutting off
and red-tagging circuit breaker or other disconnecting device.
CAUTION: ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE
(ESD) can damage circuit boards.
• Put on properly grounded wrist strap BEFORE handling circuit boards.
• Perform work only at a static-safe work area.
OM-894 Page 7
16.
Loosen the front panel retaining screw (see Figure 5-1) and swing the hinged front panel down.
17.
Locate DIP switch SW1 on vertically mounted
Control Board PC1 (see Figure 4-1).
18.
Set the applicable positions of SW1 as desired.
SW1 settings are explained in Subsections A
through D in this section.
19.
After setting position(s) of SW1, swing the hinged
front panel up into normal operating position, and
securely tighten the retaining screw.
IMPORTANT: The eight positions on DIP switch SW1
resemble miniature rocker switches. Each position has
two possible states: ON or OFF. To set a position OFF,
fully depress the end of the position nearest the side of
the DIP switch labeled OFF. To set a position ON, fully
depress the end of the position farthest from the side of
the switch labeled OFF.
IMPORTANT: The DIP switch is only read by the control
unit when power is applied after a power down, or when
a RESET is initiated through the PROGRAM/RUN/RESET key switch.
A. Defining
Amperage
(Positions 1 And 2)
Adjustment
Limits
WARNING: Read and follow safety information at beginning of Section 4-2 before proceeding.
While welding is taking place, weld amperage can be
adjusted up or down through the use of the Remote Operator Control. Amperage adjustment limits are defined
by positions 1 and 2 (see Table 4-1).
Table 4-1. Amperage Adjustment Limits Definition
Position
1
Position Defined Amperage
Adjustment Limit
2
ON
ON
ON
OFF
± 5 Amperes
± 10 Amperes
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
± 20 Amperes
± 40 Amperes
B. Defining Pulser Time Values (Position 3)
WARNING: Read and follow safety information at beginning of Section 4-2 before proceeding.
Two methods are provided for defining the amount of
time spent in peak current and the amount of time spent
in background current during pulsing. The first method
allows each value to be defined as a time value, and the
second method allows direct frequency entry with the
time spent in peak current to be defined as a percentage
of the total period. The remainder of the period is then
spent in background current.
To use the first method of defining peak current/background current time, set position 3 ON. To use the second method of defining frequency/peak time percentage, set position 3 OFF.
C. Selecting RUN Or Diagnostics (Position 4)
WARNING: Read and follow safety information at beginning of Section 4-2 before proceeding.
When RUN is chosen on the PROGRAM/RUN/RESET
key switch, the control unit will either enter the program
execution mode or carry out a diagnostics routine, depending on position 4. To enter the program execution
mode when RUN is chosen on the key switch, set position 4 ON. To carry out the diagnostics routine when
RUN is chosen, set position 4 OFF.
D. Defining The Welding Power Source Used With
The Control Unit (Positions 5 Through 8)
WARNING: Read and follow safety information at beginning of Section 4-2 before proceeding.
Positions 5-8 allow the user to define the welding power
source that is being used with the control unit (see Table
4-2). When a non-Miller welding power source is indicated, a series of displays requests the information required by the control unit.
Filter Board PC10
Line Filter FL5
DIP Switch SW1
Center Panel
Control Board PC1
Power
Distribution
Board PC3
Ref. SB-132 634
Figure 4-1. Inside Front View
OM-894 Page 8
*Table 4-2. Welding Power Source Definition
Position 5
Position 6
Position 7
Position 8
Defined Welding
Power Source
ON
ON
ON
ON
Maxstar 90
ON
ON
ON
OFF
Maxstar 150 or 151
ON
ON
OFF
ON
XMT 200
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
Maxtron 300/XMT 300
ON
OFF
ON
ON
Arc Pak 350
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
Non-Listed Power
Source**
*Unlisted combinations for DIP switch positions 5-8 are interpreted by the control unit as defining the Maxstar 151.
**A welding power source that is not listed in the table. It must meet the following
requirements to be usable with this control unit:
1. It must be capable of doing Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW).
2. It must be capable of responding to a 0-10V control signal.
4-3.
SHIELDING GAS CONNECTIONS (Figure
4-2)
IMPORTANT: Allowable pressure range for shielding
gas input is 30-50 psi.
The gas fittings on the control unit have 5/8-18 righthand threads. Obtain shielding gas hose of proper size,
type and length to connect from shielding gas supply to
control unit. Proceed as follows:
1.
Install gas fitting onto one end of shielding gas
hose from shielding gas supply.
2.
Connect hose from shielding gas supply to gas IN
fitting on rear of control unit.
3.
Connect shielding gas hose from torch to gas
OUT fitting on rear of control unit.
4-4.
REMOTE OPERATOR CONTROL CONNECTIONS (Figure 4-2)
TO OPERATOR CONTROL receptacle RC2 is used to
connect the supplied Remote Operator Control to the
control unit.To make connections, align keyway, insert
plug, and rotate threaded collar fully clockwise.
The sockets in TO OPERATOR CONTROL receptacle
RC2 function as follows:
Socket A:
Provides normally closed contact with
socket C. Contact is opened when Remote
Operator Control STOP push button is
pressed.
Socket B:
Provides normally open contact with socket
C. Contact is closed when Remote Operator Control DECREASE push button is
pressed.
Power Switch
To Operator
Control Receptacle
To Power Source
Receptacle
Strain Relief Clamp
Gas In Fitting
Gas Out Fitting
Positive/Work
Terminal
Electrode Terminal
Negative Terminal
SB-129 230-A
Figure 4-2. Rear View
OM-894 Page 9
Socket C:
Circuit common with respect to control unit
chassis.
Socket D:
Provides normally open contact with socket
C. Contact is closed when Remote Operator Control START/INCREASE push button is pressed.
A
D
B
C
115VAC across pins I and G (a 115VAC receptacle must be available).
c.
Each type of welding power source receptacle combination requires a different interconnection cord. To make
interconnections, proceed as follows:
1.
An interconnection cord is provided that connects to a Remote 14 receptacle that provides all
necessary signals. If the welding power source in
use does not have such a receptacle, obtain correct interconnecting cord.
2.
Connect 14-socket plug on interconnecting cord
to the 14-pin TO POWER SOURCE receptacle
on rear of control unit as follows: align keyway, insert plug, and rotate threaded collar fully clockwise.
3.
If remaining end of cord has a 14-pin plug, connect plug to the REMOTE 14 receptacle on welding power source as follows: align keyway, insert
plug, and rotate threaded collar fully clockwise.
4.
If remaining end of cord has a 14-pin or 5-pin plug
and a 3-prong plug, insert 3-prong plug into
115VAC receptacle. Connect remaining plug to
applicable receptacle as follows: align keyway,
insert plug, and rotate threaded collar fully clockwise.
4-6.
WELD INPUT/OUTPUT CONNECTIONS (Figure 4-2)
WARNING: ELECTRIC SHOCK can kill.
• Do not touch live electrical parts.
Ref. S-0446-A
Figure 4-3. Front View Of TO OPERATOR
CONTROL Receptacle With Socket Locations
4-5.
WELDING POWER SOURCE
TIONS (Figures 4-2 And 4-3)
CONNEC-
The pins of TO POWER SOURCE receptacle RC1
function as follows:
Pin A: Provides connection to program-controlled
relay contact internal to control unit; contact
makes connection with relay contact connected
to pin B to energize welding power source.
Pin B: Provides connection to program-controlled
relay contact internal to control unit; contact
makes connection with relay contact connected
to pin A to energize welding power source.
Pin D: Control circuit common with respect to pin E.
Pin E: Provides 0-10 volt command signal with respect to pin D.
Pin G: 115 volts ac circuit common; also connected to
welding power source chassis.
Pin I:
A suitable 5-socket Remote Contactor Control
receptacle that provides all the necessary signals except the 115VAC across pins I and G (a
115VAC receptacle must be available).
Up to 1.5 amperes of 115 volts ac, 60 Hz, with
respect to socket G (circuit common).
•
Pin K: Machine chassis (circuit common).
IMPORTANT: The remaining pins in the receptacle are
not used.
Shut down control unit and welding power
source, and disconnect input power employing lockout/tagging procedures before inspecting or installing.
B
Lockout/tagging procedures consist of padlocking line disconnect switch in open position,
removing fuses from fuse box, or shutting off
and red-tagging circuit breaker or other disconnecting device.
N L C
M D
G
F E
Three terminals are provided on the rear panel of the
control unit for weld input/output connections. Make
connections to the terminals as follows:
I
J
K
A
H
1.
Connect weld cable from positive (+) terminal on
welding power source to POSITIVE/WORK terminal on control unit.
These signals can be obtained by making connections
to a welding power source that provides one of the following combinations:
2.
Connect weld cable from negative (-) terminal on
welding power source to NEGATIVE terminal on
control unit.
a. A suitable REMOTE 14 receptacle that provides all the necessary signals.
3.
Connect weld cable from POSITIVE/WORK terminal on control unit to work.
b. A suitable REMOTE 14 receptacle that provides all the necessary signals except the
4.
Connect weld cable from ELECTRODE terminal
on control unit to welding torch.
Ref. S-0004-A
Figure 4-4. Front View Of TO POWER SOURCE
Receptacle With Pin Locations
OM-894 Page 10
4-7.
OPTIONAL INTERNAL WIRING CONNECTIONS
To make wiring connections to RC7, proceed as follows:
1.
Strip 1/2 in. (13 mm) insulation from ends of leads
to be connected to terminals on RC7.
Shut down control unit and welding power
source, and disconnect input power employing lockout/tagging procedures before beginning this procedure.
2.
Loosen strain relief clamp (see Figure 4-2) on
rear panel of control unit sufficiently to allow desired number of leads to be inserted.
Lockout/tagging procedures consist of padlocking line disconnect switch in open position, removing fuses from fuse box, or shutting off and
red-tagging circuit breaker or other disconnecting device.
3.
Remove top cover.
4.
Locate pressure terminal strip RC7 on Interface
Board PC2 (see Figure 4-7).
5.
Route stripped ends of leads through strain relief
clamp on back of control unit.
6.
Press down on slotted end of white tab for desired
connection point (1-24), insert stripped end of
applicable lead, and release white tab.
7.
Repeat Step 6 for each desired connection point.
WARNING: ELECTRIC SHOCK can kill.
• Do not touch live electrical parts.
•
CAUTION: ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE
(ESD) can damage circuit boards.
• Put on properly grounded wrist strap BEFORE handling circuit boards.
• Perform work only at a static-safe work area.
EXCESSIVE PRESSURE can break circuit
board and terminal strip.
• Use only minimal pressure and gentle movement when disconnecting or connecting
leads.
A. Wiring Connections To Pressure Terminal Strip
RC7 (Figures 4-2, 4-5, 4-6, And 4-7)
WARNING: Read and follow safety information at beginning of Section 4-7 before proceeding.
The states of various internal relay contacts that close
and open during program execution can be used to control external devices (fixturing control is a common use).
When wired correctly, the internal relay contacts function as switches. The relay contacts are accessible
through pressure terminal strip RC7 on Interface Board
PC2 (see Figure 4-5 for typical layout of relay contacts).
The contacts are rated at 3 amperes, 120VAC each. Refer to Table 4-3 for an explanation of the various contact
connections available.
A weld profile diagram is shown in Figure 4-6. Relays
CR1 thru CR6 automatically change state at the transition time points (TN). Each relay resets at the end of
postflow (T7). However, relay CR7 can be programmed
to change state (from normally-open to normally-closed
or vice-versa) any time from the end of initial current
(T2), up to 25 seconds after the end of T2 or at the end of
weld current (T4), whichever comes first. Relay CR7 can
then be programmed to change state again any time
from the end of weld current (T4), up to 25 seconds after
the end of T4 or until the end of postflow (T7), whichever
comes first. The operator simply programs the delay
time required before relay CR7 should change state.
Relay CR7 is intended for use with external wire feeders; however, it can be used for other purposes at the
discretion of the operator.
IMPORTANT: If making wiring connections to pressure
terminal strip RC3 (used to signal the end of a weld sequence in the SEMI-AUTOMATIC mode), proceed directly to Section 4-7B. Otherwise, continue with the following steps.
8.
Reinstall top cover.
9.
To avoid high frequency interference, route leads
away from weld cables.
10.
Tighten strain relief clamp.
11.
Connect leads to external devices.
Normally Open Contacts Connection
*CR
Normally Closed Contacts Connection
Wiper Connection
*The related control relay energizes when its controlling
event takes place (see Table 4-3). For instance, the Start
Postflow contacts change states when postflow begins.
S-0650
Figure 4-5. Typical Layout For Internal Relays
Connected To Terminal Strip RC7
OM-894 Page 11
Initial
Current
Preflow
T1
Weld/Peak
Current
Initial
Slope
T2
T3
Final
Slope
Background
Current (when
pulsing
T4
Final
Current
Postflow
T5
T6
T7
CR1
CR1 Reset
CR2
CR2 Reset
CR3
CR3 Reset
CR4
Relay Contacts
CR4 Reset
CR5
CR5 Reset
CR6
CR7
CR6 Reset
CR7
PTD 0 to
25 sec.
or end T4
CR7 Reset
PTD 0 to 25 sec. or end T7
(whichever comes first, wire feed delay)
(whichever comes first)
TN = Time
PTD = Programmed Time Delay
S-0844
Figure 4-6. Weld Profile Diagram
B. Wiring Connections To Pressure Terminal Strip
RC3 (Figures 4-2 And 4-7)
WARNING: Read and follow safety information at beginning of Section 4-7 before proceeding.
The two terminals in pressure terminal strip RC3 are
used in the SEMI-AUTOMATIC Mode to signal the end
of a weld sequence. This is done by closing contacts
that are wired to pressure terminal strip RC3 on Interface Board PC2. To make the needed wiring connections, proceed as follows:
1.
Strip 1/2 in. (13 mm) insulation from ends of
leads to be connected to terminals on RC3.
2.
Loosen strain relief clamp on rear panel of control
unit (see Figure 4-2) sufficiently to allow leads to
be inserted.
3.
Remove top cover (if applicable).
4.
Locate pressure terminal strip RC3 on Interface
Board PC2 (see Figure 4-7).
5.
Route stripped ends of leads through strain relief
clamp on back of control unit.
6.
Press down on slotted end of white tab for one of
the two connection points, insert stripped end of
applicable lead, and release white tab.
7.
Repeat Step 6 for other connection point.
OM-894 Page 12
8.
Reinstall top cover.
9.
To avoid high frequency interference, route leads
away from weld cables.
10.
Tighten strain relief clamp.
11.
Connect leads from RC3 to relay. If applicable,
connect leads from RC7 to external devices.
Fuse F1
Pressure Terminal
Strip RC3
Relay Mounting
Panel
Pressure Terminal
Strip RC7
Interface
Board PC2
Figure 4-7. Inside Top View
Ref. SB-132 634
Table 4-3. Pressure Terminal Strip RC7 Connection Functions
Relay
Connection On
Pressure
Terminal Strip RC7
Function
3
Common ♦
Signal Synchronized With
Pulses* ♦
+24VDC
CR7
4
5
6
Wire Feed Contact N.O.
Wire Feed Contact Wiper
Wire Feed Contact N.C.
CR6
7
8
9
Start Postflow N.O.
Start Postflow Wiper
Start Postflow N.C.
CR5
10
11
12
Start Final Amperage N.O.
Start Final Amperage Wiper
Start Final Amperage N.C.
CR4
13
14
15
Start Final Slope N.O.
Start Final Slope Wiper
Start Final Slope N.C.
CR3
16
17
18
Start Weld Amperage N.O.
Start Weld Ameprage Wiper
Start Weld Amperage N.C.
CR2
19
20
21
Start Initial Slope N.O.
Start Initial Slope Wiper
Start Initial Slope N.C.
CR1
22
23
24
Start Initial Amperage N.O.
Start Initial Amperage Wiper
Start Initial Amperage N.C.
1
2
* Open collector – transistor ON during peak current.
♦ Maximum allowable voltage between collector and common is +40 VDC, 100MA
N.O. = normally open
N.C. = normally closed
SECTION 5 – OPERATOR CONTROLS
5-1.
POWER SWITCH (Figure 4-2)
5-3.
MODE SELECTOR SWITCH (Figure 5-1)
Depressing the ON portion of the POWER switch energizes the control unit and makes it ready to operate. Depressing the OFF portion of the POWER switch shuts
down the unit. When the POWER switch is in the ON position, a display is seen in the digital display area.
This switch selects the mode of operation: AUTOMATIC-1, SEMI-AUTOMATIC, MANUAL, or AUTOMATIC-2, (see Section 6-3). During programming, this
switch allows programs to be entered into each mode.
When the unit is placed in RUN, it will operate in the
mode selected on the mode switch.
5-2.
5-4.
PROGRAM/RUN/RESET KEY SWITCH (Figure 5-1)
This key switch places the control unit in one of three
states. Selecting PROGRAM allows the operator to enter or modify a program. Selecting RUN locks out any
program changes. Program execution can be carried
out from PROGRAM or RUN. Selecting RESET and
then returning to RUN or PROGRAM has the same effect as turning the unit OFF and then ON again.
PARAMETER SELECT PUSH BUTTON (Figure 5-1)
The PARAMETER SELECT push button performs a
number of functions. When a display contains more
than one parameter, pressing the PARAMETER SELECT push button selects each parameter in sequence.
Pressing the push button while the last parameter in a
display is selected will de-select that parameter without
selecting another one.
OM-894 Page 13
Remote Operator
Control
Front Panel
Retaining Screw
Stop
Push Button
Weld Amperage
Display
Start/Increase
Push Button
Gas Flow
Meter
4-Pin Plug
Digital Display
Decrease
Push Button
Up
Push Button
Program/Run/Reset
Key Switch
Down
Push Button
Purge
Push Button
Mode Selector
Switch
Parameter Select
Push Button
SB-129 229-A
ST-149 839
Figure 5-1. Control Unit Front Panel View And Remote Operator Control
Pressing the PARAMETER SELECT push button while
the PULSE ON/OFF display is shown will toggle between one option and the other.
Pressing the PARAMETER SELECT push button in the
RUN condition (see Section 6-2) will increment the
PROGRAM #. Pressing PARAMETER SELECT repeatedly will bring up programs one through ten, after
which the PROGRAM “LINK” MODE display is shown
and then the ”COMBINE” MODE display. Pressing the
PARAMETER SELECT push button again brings up
program one again.
5-5.
UP PUSH BUTTON (Figure 5-1)
The UP push button carries out two functions. Pressing
the UP push button while a parameter is selected will increase the parameter value (press and hold the push
button to increase the value rapidly). Pressing the UP
push button without a parameter being selected will
show the previous display in the display sequence.
IMPORTANT: To zero a parameter value, select the parameter and press the UP and DOWN push buttons at
the same time.
5-6.
5-7.
PURGE PUSH BUTTON (Figure 5-1)
PURGE
The PURGE push button is a momentary-contact
switch. Pressing the PURGE push button energizes the
gas solenoid and purges the gas line of the welding
torch. The PURGE push button allows the gas flow to be
adjusted without energizing the weld circuitry. PURGE
is active only in the Run condition (see Section 6-2).
5-8.
GAS CONTROL (Figure 5-1)
The gas control adjusts the flow of shielding gas. Turning the control in a clockwise direction decreases the
flow of shielding gas. Turning the control in a counterclockwise direction increases the flow.
5-9.
GAS FLOW RATE DIGITAL METER (Figure
5-1)
GAS FLOW RATE
(CFH)
DOWN PUSH BUTTON (Figure 5-1)
The DOWN push button carries out two functions.
Pressing the DOWN push button while a parameter is
selected will decrease the parameter value (press and
hold the push button to decrease the value rapidly).
Pressing the DOWN push button without a parameter
being selected will show the next display in the display
sequence.
IMPORTANT: To zero a parameter value, select the parameter and press the UP and DOWN push buttons at
the same time.
OM-894 Page 14
The GAS FLOW RATE digital meter indicates the flow
rate of the shielding gas. The meter is calibrated in cubic
feet per hour and has a range of 0-50 cubic feet per hour
with Argon shielding gas. If gas flow rate exceeds 50 cubic feet per second, the display reads OL.
5-10. DIGITAL DISPLAY (Figure 5-1)
The two line by twenty character digital display allows
the user to enter values and to read values once they are
entered. When a program is performed (either in RUN or
DRY RUN), weld sequence displays are shown as they
are executed and programmed time values decrement
to zero as the related process times out.
perage slope. After that takes place, the STOP push
button is not functional in SEMI-AUTOMATIC.
5-11.
B. START/INCREASE Push Button
WELD AMPERES METER (Figure 5-1)
A
WELD AMPERES
The WELD AMPERES meter indicates actual weld amperage when the weld circuitry is energized. The weld
amperage is indicated to the nearest ampere.
5-12. REMOTE OPERATOR CONTROL
A. STOP Push Button
Pressing the red STOP push button halts program execution and goes directly to postflow in all modes except
SEMI-AUTOMATIC. In SEMI-AUTOMATIC, the STOP
push button functions normally until the weld amperage
is begun. After that, pressing the STOP push button signals the end of weld time and begins the weld to final am-
The START/INCREASE push button has a number of
functions. Pressing the START/INCREASE push button
when the DRY RUN display is shown will initiate a dry
run of the program. Pressing the START/INCREASE
push button in the RUN condition initiates execution of
the indicated program.
Pressing START/INCREASE push button during the
weld/peak portion of the welding process increases the
weld amperage. This change from the programmed
value does not change the program.
C. DECREASE Push Button
Pressing the DECREASE push button during the weld/
peak portion of the welding process decreases the weld
amperage. This change from the programmed value
does not change the program.
SECTION 6 – PROGRAMMING
6-1.
GENERAL
This control unit allows the user to control the weld process and related functions. The weld process is broken
down into seven parts: preflow, initial amperage, initial
to weld amperage slope, weld amperage, weld to final
amperage slope, final amperage, and postflow. Related
functions include pulsing of weld output and specifying
delay times for wire feed on and off. The user-created
program controls the parts of the weld sequence according to values that the user defines.
IMPORTANT: Programs reside in battery-backed
memory, and are not lost when a RESET is carried out
or power removed from the control unit.
A. Definition Of Terms
Parameter – a user-defined value that is required for
program execution.
Select – Selecting a parameter readies it to receive a
value. Parameters are selected by pressing the PARAMETER SELECT push button. A selected parameter
flashes on/off.
Pulsing – Pulsing refers to the alternate raising and lowering of the weld output at a periodic rate. The raised
portions of the weld output are controlled in width, frequency, and height, forming pulses of weld output.
These pulses and the lower amperage between them
(called the background amperage) alternately heat and
chill the molten weld puddle. The combined effect gives
the operator better control of penetration, bead width,
crowning, undercutting, and puddle sag in out-of-position welding, especially vertical-up.
When pulsing is used with this control unit, pulsing begins at upslope, continues through the weld portion of
the cycle, and ends when downslope is finished.
Wire feed ON delay time – defines how long after the
start of initial slope the wire feeder ON contactor should
close.
Wire feed OFF delay time – defines how long after the
start of final slope the wire feeder ON contactor should
open.
B. Parameter Values
1.
Preflow time, initial time, initial slope, final slope,
final time, and postflow time are programmed in
increments of 0.1 second with a range of 0.0 –
10.0 seconds.
2.
Possible amperage values range from zero to the
maximum output of the welding power source in
0.1 ampere increments.
3.
The amount of time spent in peak current and
background current during pulsing can be defined in one of two ways. When defined as a time
value, pulse times for peak and background are
selectable from .001 seconds to 9.999 seconds
in .001 second increments. When defined in
terms of frequency and percent peak time, peak
current is defined as a percentage (0-100%) of
the total period. The remainder of the period is
spent in background current.
4.
Weld time is programmable from 0.0 to 999.9
seconds in 0.1 second intervals.
6-2.
DISPLAYS
A. Initial Displays
When power is applied to the control unit after a power
down or when RESET is selected on the PROGRAM/
RUN/RESET key switch, a display indicates what welding power source has been defined as being used with
OM-894 Page 15
the control unit (See Section 4-2D). The next display indicates the amperage adjustment limits that have been
defined (see Section 4-2A).
6.
a. Define a numerical value by pressing either UP
or DOWN push buttons.
B. RUN Condition
After the initial displays are shown, three displays are repeated in sequence, one explaining the use of the PARAMETER SELECT push button, one explaining the
use of the UP/DOWN push buttons, and one indicating
the program number and how to start the program.
These displays indicate that the unit is in the RUN condition and provide a reference point for program execution.
The RUN condition is also entered after a program is
created and the operator continues beyond the DRY
RUN display. Pressing the PARAMETER SELECT push
button while the RUN condition is active will bring up the
PROGRAM # display. The number in the PROGRAM #
parameter indicates which program will be executed
when the START/INCREASE push button is pressed on
the Remote Operator Control. Pressing the PARAMETER SELECT push button while ”PROGRAM #” is displayed will increment the program number.
6-3.
b. Choose PULSE ON/OFF by pressing PARAMETER SELECT push button.
IMPORTANT: The two digit number preceded by a “#”
symbol is the program number. When entering parameter values, only change the program number when it is
desired to enter parameter values into a different program.
7.
Repeat Steps 5 and 6 until all parameters in the
display are defined as desired.
8.
Press PARAMETER SELECT to deselect last
parameter.
9.
Press DOWN push button to show next display.
10.
Continue bringing up displays and defining parameters until all necessary parameter values
have been entered (the ”PROGRAM #, USE
REMOTE TO START” display is shown). The
RUN condition will then be active (see Section
6-2).
MODES OF OPERATION
This control unit has four modes of operation: AUTOMATIC-1, SEMI-AUTOMATIC, MANUAL, and AUTOMATIC-2. The mode that is selected when a program is
created determines which mode that program will run in.
Up to ten programs can be entered into each of the four
modes of operation. In addition, programs can be linked
or combined (see Section 6-8 and Section 6-9).
A program that is created in the AUTOMATIC-1 or
AUTOMATIC-2 modes controls each of the parts of the
weld process and the related functions in timed sequence.
A program created in the SEMI-AUTOMATIC mode
acts the same as a program created in AUTOMATIC-1
or AUTOMATIC-2 except that weld time is terminated by
the operator pressing the STOP push button on the Remote Operator Control or a contact closure on pressure
terminal strip RC3 (see Section 4-7B).
6-5.
1.
2.
3.
EDITING A PROGRAM
To edit an existing program, carry out the following:
1.
Place PROGRAM/RUN/RESET key switch in
PROGRAM position.
2.
Select desired mode on Mode Selector switch
(see Sections 5-3 and 6-3).
3.
Select desired program number with PARAMETER SELECT push button (see Section 5-4).
4.
Press the UP or DOWN push buttons until the
display to be edited is shown.
5.
Use PARAMETER SELECT push button to select parameter to be edited.
6.
Define parameter by using one of the following
methods:
When a program is created in the MANUAL mode, each
step in the weld sequence is initiated by the operator
through the use of the Remote Operator Control.
6-4.
Define parameter by using one of the following
methods:
a. Define a numerical value by pressing either UP
or DOWN push buttons.
b. Choose PULSE ON/OFF by pressing PARAMETER SELECT push button.
ENTERING A PROGRAM
Place PROGRAM/RUN/RESET key switch in
PROGRAM position.
7.
Select desired mode on Mode Selector switch
(see Sections 5-3 and 6-3).
Press PARAMETER
changed parameter.
8.
Select desired program number with PARAMETER SELECT push button (see Section 5-4).
Repeat Steps 4 through 7 as needed until editing
is complete.
9.
To enter the RUN condition, place PROGRAM/
RUN/RESET key switch in RESET position or
use the UP or DOWN push button to display
”PROGRAM #, USE REMOTE TO START” (see
Section 6-2).
4.
Press DOWN push button to show next display.
5.
Use PARAMETER SELECT push button to select parameter to be defined.
OM-894 Page 16
SELECT to deselect
6-6.
DRY RUN
IMPORTANT: The DRY RUN feature is not available in
the MANUAL mode. When used in the SEMI-AUTOMATIC mode, the weld time will continue to increment
until the START/INCREASE push button on the Remote
Operator Control is pressed, just as it would if the weld
process was actually being performed.
The DRY RUN feature allows a program to be executed
without actually establishing an arc. All timing and contact closures are performed without gas, high frequency, or power source contactor being activated. To
use the DRY RUN feature, call up the DRY RUN display
and press the START/INCREASE push button on the
Remote Operator Control.
6-7.
STOP WATCH FEATURE
3.
Press the UP or DOWN push buttons to show the
LINK POSITION display.
4.
Use the PARAMETER SELECT push button to
select the parameter to be defined.
5.
Assign a numerical value to the selected parameter by pressing either the UP or DOWN push buttons.
6.
Repeat Steps 4 and 5 until all programs being
linked have been assigned to the desired LINK
position.
IMPORTANT: If ten programs are linked together, it is
not necessary for the user to assign a reset. A reset is
permanently assigned to the eleventh LINK position.
7.
The Stop Watch feature is a part of DRY RUN. Stop
Watch allows the operator to signal the desired end of
weld time by pressing the START/INCREASE push button on the Remote Operator Control. The time displayed
when the push button is pressed then becomes the weld
time value and is a part of the program until changed.
This feature allows the operator to observe fixturing during a dry run and define the end of weld time relative to
actual positions.
To use the Stop Watch feature, enter a zero for weld
time when creating a program in AUTOMATIC-1 or AUTOMATIC-2 modes and carry out a dry run of the program. When the desired end of weld time is reached,
press the START/INCREASE push button on the Remote Operator Control.
6-8.
LINKING PROGRAMS
Programs that have been created can be linked together
so that the next program in sequence will begin each
time START/INCREASE is pressed on the Remote Operator Control. Up to ten programs can be linked. All
linked programs must be in the same mode of operation.
The first program desired in the chain of programs is assigned to position one, the second desired program is
assigned to position two, etc. A reset is assigned to the
LINK position following the last program to signal the
end of the linked programs.
For example, to run program 6, then program 3, and finally program 9, program 6 would be assigned to link position one, program 3 would be assigned to position 2
and program 9 would be assigned to position 3. A reset
would be assigned to position 4 to indicate the end of the
linked programs.
When the LINK mode is entered, three displays are repeated in sequence. This indicates that the LINK RUN
condition is active. These displays must be present in
order to start execution of the linked programs.
To link programs, proceed as follows:
When the final program to be linked has been assigned to its LINK position, assign a reset to the
next LINK position as follows:
a. Select the LINK POSITION number and increment it to the position following the last position
a program number was assigned to.
b. Select the PROGRAM NUMBER parameter
and use the UP push button to increment it beyond 10.
c.
Press PARAMETER SELECT to deselect the
PROGRAM NUMBER parameter.
IMPORTANT: The LINK position shown when LINK
mode is exited will be the first position executed when
the LINK programs are run. Be sure the desired LINK
position is showing before exiting LINK mode.
8.
Press the UP or DOWN push buttons to return to
the repeating LINK displays.
9.
Press PARAMETER SELECT to exit the LINK
mode.
6-9.
COMBINING PROGRAMS
The COMBINE feature uses parameters from several
programs to create a single multi-slope weld program.
This is useful in applications using multiple non-stop
passes, such as pipe-welding with the use of a seamtracker. The first program defines preflow, initial amperage, initial to weld amperage slope, and weld amperage.
Following specified programs provide weld to weld
slopes and weld times. The weld to weld slopes are calculated by the control unit. The last program provides
the final slope, final amperage and postflow values.
IMPORTANT: The COMBINE feature is not available in
the MANUAL mode.
When the COMBINE mode is entered, three displays
are repeated in sequence. This indicates that the COMBINE RUN condition is active.
To combine programs, proceed as follows:
1.
Call up the PROGRAM # display (see Section
6-2).
1.
Call up the PROGRAM # display (see Section
6-2).
2.
Press the PARAMETER SELECT push button
until the PROGRAM “LINK” MODE display is
shown.
2.
Press the PARAMETER SELECT push button
until the PROGRAM COMBINE MODE display is
shown.
OM-894 Page 17
3.
Press the UP or DOWN push buttons to show the
COMBINE POSITION display.
4.
Press START/INCREASE on the Remote Operator Control.
4.
Use the PARAMETER SELECT push button to
select the parameter to be defined.
5.
5.
Assign a numerical value to the selected parameter by pressing either the UP or DOWN push buttons.
When the desired weld time is completed, press
the STOP push button on the Remote Operator
Control or close a contact wired to pressure terminal strip RC3 (see Section 4-7B). The weld sequence will ramp to final amperage and execute
the rest of the program.
6.
Repeat Steps 4 and 5 until all programs being
combined have been assigned to the desired
COMBINE position.
C. MANUAL Mode
1.
Select the MANUAL mode on the Mode Selector
Switch (see Section 5-3).
2.
Enter the RUN condition (see Section 6-2).
3.
When the final program to be combined has been
assigned to its COMBINE position, assign a reset
to the next position as follows:
Use the PARAMETER SELECT push button to
increment the PROGRAM # value to the desired
program number (if the existing number is incorrect).
4.
a. Select the COMBINE POSITION number and
increment it to the position following the last position a program number was assigned to.
Press START/INCREASE on the Remote Operator Control. This turns on the shielding gas and
begins the preflow interval.
5.
The START/INCREASE push button must be
pressed again during the preflow interval to turn
on the power source output and start the arc. If
the START/INCREASE push button is not
pressed the second time before the preflow time
elapses, the gas is turned off at the end of preflow
time and the cycle resets. When the START/INCREASE push button is pressed the second time
during preflow, the power source contactor and
high frequency is energized. Once the arc is
struck, the high frequency is automatically turned
off.
IMPORTANT: If ten programs are combined, it is not
necessary to assign a reset. A reset is permanently assigned to the eleventh COMBINE position.
7.
b. Select the PROGRAM NUMBER parameter
and use the UP push button to increment it beyond 10.
c.
Press PARAMETER SELECT to deselect the
PROGRAM NUMBER parameter.
8.
Press the UP or DOWN push buttons to return to
the COMBINE RUN condition (three repeating
displays).
9.
Press PARAMETER SELECT to exit the COMBINE mode.
If the START/INCREASE push button is held
continuously the second time it is pressed, the
current immediately begins to ramp up from the
initial level once the arc is struck. If the START/
INCREASE push button is pressed momentarily,
once the arc is struck the current will remain at
the ”initial” level until the START/INCREASE
push button is pressed again and held. The unit
will ramp up or down only while the respective
push button is pressed and held.
6-10. RUNNING A PROGRAM
A. AUTOMATIC-1 Or AUTOMATIC-2 Modes
1.
Select the desired mode on the Mode Selector
Switch (see Section 5-3).
2.
Enter the RUN condition (see Section 6-2).
3.
Use the PARAMETER SELECT push button to
increment the PROGRAM # value to the desired
program number (if the existing number is incorrect).
4.
Press START/INCREASE on the Remote Operator Control. The defined program will be carried
out.
B. SEMI-AUTOMATIC Mode
1.
Select the SEMI-AUTOMATIC mode on the
Mode Selector Switch (see Section 5-3).
2.
Enter the RUN condition (see Section 6-2).
3.
Use the PARAMETER SELECT push button to
increment the PROGRAM # value to the desired
program number (if the existing number is incorrect).
OM-894 Page 18
6.
Terminate the weld sequence by pressing and
holding the DECREASE push button. The weld
current will ramp down to the final value at which
time the power source contactor will drop out and
the postflow time interval will begin. The weld sequence may be ended prematurely before the
current has begun to ramp up from initial. If the
DECREASE push button is pressed before the
arc is struck, the gas and high frequency is turned
off and the cycle reset. If the DECREASE push
button is pressed while in the initial mode, the
power source contactor is immediately turned off
and postflow time started. If the arc is broken by
physically pulling the torch away from the workpiece, the power source contactor is turned off
and postflow time started.
D. Linked Programs
E. Combined Programs
1.
Enter the RUN condition (see Section 6-2).
2.
Use the PARAMETER SELECT push button to
increment the PROGRAM # value past 10 to
LINK MODE.
3.
Use the UP or DOWN push buttons to bring up
the LINK position to be executed first (if necessary).
4.
Press START/INCREASE on the Remote Operator Control to begin execution of each linked
program.
1.
Enter the RUN condition (see Section 6-2).
2.
Use the PARAMETER SELECT push button to
increment the PROGRAM # value past 10 to
COMBINE MODE.
3.
Press START/INCREASE on the Remote Operator Control to begin execution of the combined
programs.
SECTION 7 – SEQUENCE OF OPERATION
WARNING: ELECTRIC SHOCK can kill;
MOVING PARTS can cause serious injury;
IMPROPER AIRFLOW AND EXPOSURE TO
ENVIRONMENT can damage internal parts.
• Do not touch live electrical parts.
7-1.
Keep all covers and panels in place while
operating.
Warranty is void if the welding power source is
operated with any portion of the outer enclosure
removed.
1.
Be sure the welding power source and related
equipment are installed as instructed in their respective Owner’s Manuals.
2.
Install the control unit according to Section 4.
ARC RAYS, SPARKS, AND HOT SURFACES
can burn eyes and skin; NOISE can damage
hearing.
• Wear correct eye, ear, and body protection.
3.
Be sure desired weld program(s) has been entered into control unit.
4.
Select and obtain proper tungsten electrode (see
Table 8-2).
5.
Prepare tungsten electrode according to Section
8-3, and insert into torch.
6.
Wear dry insulating gloves and clothing.
7.
Connect work clamp to clean, bare metal at workpiece.
8.
Turn on shielding gas supply at the source.
9.
Wear welding helmet with proper filter lens according to ANSI Z49.1.
10.
Energize the welding power source and control
unit.
11.
Begin welding, following the procedure for the desired mode (see Section 6-10).
•
FUMES AND GASES can seriously harm
your health.
• Keep your head out of the fumes.
•
•
Ventilate to keep from breathing fumes and
gases.
If ventilation is inadequate, use approved
breathing device.
HOT METAL, SPATTER, AND SLAG can
cause fire and burns.
• Watch for fire.
•
•
•
Keep a fire extinguisher nearby, and know
how to use it.
Do not use near flammable material.
Allow work and equipment to cool before
handling.
MAGNETIC FIELDS FROM HIGH CURRENTS can affect pacemaker operation.
• Wearers should consult their doctor before
going near arc welding, gouging, or spot
welding operations.
See Section 1 - Safety Rules For Operation Of
Arc Welding Power Source for basic welding
safety information.
GAS TUNGSTEN ARC WELDING (GTAW)
WARNING: Read and follow safety information at beginning of entire Section 7 before
proceeding.
7-2.
SHUTTING DOWN
1.
Stop welding.
2.
Shut down welding power source and control
unit.
3.
Turn off shielding gas supply at the source.
WARNING: HIGH CONCENTRATION OF
SHIELDING GAS can harm health or kill.
• Shut off gas supply when not in use.
OM-894 Page 19
SECTION 8 – MAINTENANCE & TROUBLESHOOTING
8-1.
ROUTINE MAINTENANCE
IMPORTANT: Every six months inspect the labels on
this unit for legibility. All precautionary labels must be
maintained in a clearly readable state and replaced
when necessary. See Parts List for part number of precautionary labels.
Every six months blow out or vacuum dust and dirt from
the inside of the control unit. Remove the outer enclosure, and use a clean, dry airstream or vacuum suction
for the cleaning operation. If dusty or dirty conditions are
present, clean the unit monthly.
8-2.
WARNING: ELECTRIC SHOCK can kill.
• Do not touch live electrical parts.
•
WARNING: ELECTRIC SHOCK can kill.
• Do not touch live electrical parts.
Shut down control unit and welding power
source, and disconnect input power employing lockout/tagging procedures before inspecting, maintaining, or servicing.
•
Lockout/tagging procedures consist of padlocking line disconnect switch in open position,
removing fuses from fuse box, or shutting off
and red-tagging circuit breaker or other disconnecting device.
HOT SURFACES can cause severe burns.
• Allow cooling period before servicing.
HOT SURFACES can cause severe burns.
• Allow cooling period before servicing.
INCORRECT FUSE can damage unit.
• Use only replacement fuse of same size,
type, and rating (see Parts List).
Table 8-1. Maintenance Schedule
MAINTENANCE
Every Month
Units in heavy service environments:
Check labels, weld cables, clean
internal parts.
Every 3 Months
Check weld cables (see Section
8-1A).
Every 6 Months
Check all labels (see IMPORTANT block, Section 8-1). Clean
internal parts (see Section 8-1B).
*Frequency of service is based on units operated
40 hours per week. Increase frequency of maintenance if usage exceeds 40 hours per week.
A. Weld Cables
WARNING: Read and follow safety information at beginning of Section 8-1 before proceeding.
Every three months inspect cables for breaks in insulation. Repair or replace cables if insulation breaks are
present. Clean and tighten connections at each inspection.
B. Internal Cleaning
WARNING: Read and follow safety information at beginning of Section 8-1 before proceeding.
OM-894 Page 20
Shut down control unit and welding power
source, and disconnect input power employing lockout/tagging procedures before inspecting, maintaining, or servicing.
Lockout/tagging procedures consist of padlocking line disconnect switch in open position,
removing fuses from fuse box, or shutting off
and red-tagging circuit breaker or other disconnecting device.
MOVING PARTS can cause serious injury.
• Keep away from moving parts.
FREQUENCY
OVERLOAD PROTECTION (Figure 4-6)
Fuse F1 protects the internal circuitry of the unit from
overload. Fuse F1 is located on the component-mounting panel under the top cover (see Figure 4-6). Should
fuse F1 open, the unit will no longer be operational.
To replace F1, proceed as follows:
1.
Remove top cover.
2.
Check F1, and replace if necessary.
3.
Reinstall top cover.
8-3.
TUNGSTEN ELECTRODE (Table 8-2, Figures
8-1 And 8-2)
Use Table 8-2 to select the correct size and type tungsten electrode. Prepare the tungsten electrode using
the following guidelines. A properly prepared tungsten
electrode is essential in obtaining a satisfactory weld.
A. For AC Or DC Electrode Positive (Figure 8-1)
Ball the end of tungsten electrodes used for ac or dc
electrode positive welding before beginning the welding
operation. Weld amperage causes the tungsten electrode to form the balled end. The diameter of the end
should not exceed the diameter of the tungsten electrode by more than 1-1/2 times. For example, the end of
a 1/8 in. (3.2 mm) diameter tungsten electrode should
not exceed 3/16 in. (4.8 mm) diameter.
Table 8-2. Tungsten Size
Amperage Range - Polarity - Gas Type
Electrode Diameter
Pure Tungsten
(Green Band)
DC-Argon Electrode
Negative/Straight Polarity
DC-Argon Electrode
Positive/Reverse Polarity
AC-Argon Using
High Frequency
AC-Argon Balanced
Wave Using High Freq.
.010”
.020”
.040”
1/16”
3/32”
1/8”
5/32”
3/16”
1/4”
Up to 15
5-20
15-80
70-150
125-225
225-360
360-450
450-720
720-950
*
*
*
10-20
15-30
25-40
40-55
55-80
80-125
Up to 15
5-20
10-60
50-100
100-160
150-210
200-275
250-350
325-450
Up to 10
10-20
20-30
30-80
60-130
100-180
160-240
190-300
250-400
Up to 25
15-40
25-85
50-160
135-235
250-400
400-500
500-750
750-1000
*
*
*
10-20
15-30
25-40
40-55
55-80
80-125
Up to 20
15-35
20-80
50-150
130-250
225-360
300-450
400-500
600-800
Up to 15
5-20
20-60
60-120
100-180
160-250
200-320
290-390
340-525
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
Up to 20
15-35
20-80
50-150
130-250
225-360
300-450
400-550
600-800
Up to 15
5-20
20-60
60-120
100-180
160-250
200-320
290-390
340-525
2% Thorium Alloyed
Tungsten
(Red Band)
.010”
.020”
.040”
1/16”
3/32”
1/8”
5/32”
3/16”
1/4”
Zirconium Alloyed
Tungsten
(Brown Band)
.010”
.020”
.040”
1/16”
3/32”
1/8”
5/32”
3/16”
1/4”
*NOT RECOMMENDED
The figures listed are intended as a guide and are a composite of recommendations from American Welding
Society (AWS) and electrode manufacturers.
S-0009/8-88
1-1/2 Times
Electrode
Diameter
AC And DC
Electrode Positive
2-1/2 Times
Electrode
Diameter
DC Electrode
Negative
S-0161
Figure 8-1. Properly Prepared Tungsten Electrodes
OM-894 Page 21
B. For DC Electrode Negative Welding (Figures 8-1
And 8-2)
8-4.
BOARD
HANDLING
PRECAU-
WARNING: ELECTRIC SHOCK can kill.
• Do not touch live electrical parts.
TUNGSTEN PREPARATION: IDEAL
•
Stable Arc
Straight Ground
Shut down control unit and welding power
source, and disconnect input power employing lockout/tagging procedures before inspecting, maintaining, or servicing.
Lockout/tagging procedures consist of padlocking line disconnect switch in open position, removing fuses from fuse box, or shutting off and
red-tagging circuit breaker or other disconnecting device.
Flat
(The Dia. Of This Flat
Governs Amperage Capacity)
CAUTION: ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE
(ESD) can damage circuit boards.
• Put on properly grounded wrist strap
BEFORE handling circuit boards.
• Transport circuit boards in proper staticshielding carriers or packages.
• Perform work only at a static-safe work area.
TUNGSTEN PREPARATION: WRONG
Arc Wander
INCORRECT INSTALLATION or misaligned
plugs can damage circuit board.
• Be sure that plugs are properly installed and
aligned.
Point
Radial Ground
EXCESSIVE PRESSURE can break circuit
board.
• Use only minimal pressure and gentle movement when disconnecting or connecting
board plugs and removing or installing board.
S-0162
Figure 8-2. Tungsten Preparation
CAUTION: HOT FLYING METAL PARTICLES
can injure personnel, start fires, and damage equipment; TUNGSTEN CONTAMINATION can lower weld quality.
• Shape tungsten electrode only on grinder
with proper guards in a safe location wearing
proper face, hand, and body protection.
• Do not use same wheel for any other job or
the tungsten will become contaminated.
• Shape tungsten electrodes on a fine grit, hard
abrasive wheel used only for tungsten shaping. Grind tungsten electrodes so that grinding marks run lengthwise with the electrode.
These procedures reduce the possibility of
the tungsten electrode transferring foreign
matter into the weld and help reduce arc wander.
Grind the end of the tungsten electrode to a taper for a
distance of 2 to 2-1/2 electrode diameters in length. For
example, the ground surface for a 1/8 in. (3.2 mm) diameter tungsten electrode should be 1/4 to 5/16 in. (6.4
to 8.0 mm) long.
For additional information, see your distributor for a
handbook on the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW)
process.
OM-894 Page 22
CIRCUIT
TIONS
8-5.
DIAGNOSTIC PROGRAM
A. General
WARNING: ELECTRIC SHOCK can kill.
RUNNING THE DIAGNOSTIC PROGRAM
requires an energized unit.
• Do not touch live electrical parts.
•
•
Have only qualified persons familiar with and
following standard safety practices run the
diagnostic program.
Have all test procedures and parts replacements done only by Factory Authorized
persons.
CAUTION: ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE
(ESD) can damage circuit boards.
• Put on properly grounded wrist strap
BEFORE handling circuit boards.
• Perform work only at a static-safe work area.
What Is Tested
The diagnostic program tests the following:
1.
Internal RAM memory
2.
The RUN and PROGRAM positions of the key
switch
3.
The mode selector switch
4.
The front panel programming push buttons
5.
The purge push button
6.
The user relays
7.
The pulse signal available on terminal strip RC7
8.
The output contactor relay
9.
The gas solenoid relay
D E V E L O P E D
M I L L E R
E L E C T R I C
T H E
The arc starter relay
11.
The push buttons on the Remote Operator
Control
12.
The digital to analog converter (DAC)
13.
The open circuit voltage (OCV) detection circuitry
Y OU R
M F G .
F O L L OW I N G
P R OGR A M
10.
B Y
W I L L
U N I T
T H A T
T O
V E R I F Y
I T
F U N C T I ON I N G
C H E C K
I S
P R O P E R L Y
The individual tests are carried out in sequence each
time the diagnostic program is carried out.
Running The Diagnostic Program
To run the diagnostic program, proceed as follows:
1.
Set position 4 of DIP switch SW1 to the diagnostic setting according to Section 4-2.
2.
Close hinged front panel and securely tighten
front panel retaining screw.
3.
Energize the control unit.
4.
Place the PROGRAM/RUN/RESET key switch in
the RESET position, and then in the RUN position.
5.
The next display scrolls into view.
B. RAM Test
This test checks the random access memory (RAM) of
the microprocessor control to make sure each memory
location is functioning properly.
1.
R A M
In most cases, the diagnostic tests continue when a
problem area is found. Run all the tests or stop after suspected items are checked as desired.
Stopping The Diagnostic Program
Each time the diagnostic program starts, the following
series of informational displays is shown:
I N T E L L I T I G – 4 0
D I A GN O S T I C
E R R OR ! ! !
N O T
WO R K I N G
P L E A S E
W I T H
T H E
T E S T
Informational Displays
* *
If the RAM does not test okay, the display shows:
B E F OR E
The diagnostic tests can be stopped at any time. To stop
the diagnostic program, follow the directions in Section
4-2C for choosing program execution on DIP switch
SW1.
* *
P R OGR A M
WO R K I N G
If the RAM tests okay, the program proceeds to
Section 8-5C.
2.
When one of the tested items does not test okay, either
contact the nearest Factory Authorized Service Agent,
or replace the defective part as directed in the procedure.
I S
P R O P E R L Y
Carry out the steps indicated on the digital display
until the desired item has been checked.
What To Do When A Problem Is Found
If the RAM tests okay, the display shows:
R A M
I S
P R O P E R L Y
R E P L A C E
R A M
C ON T I N U I N G
D I A GN O S T I C
P R OGR A M
If the RAM does not test okay, contact the nearest Factory Authorized Service Agent.
C. PROGRAM/RUN/RESET Key Switch Tests
This procedure tests the operation of the RUN and
PROGRAM positions of the PROGRAM/RUN/RESET
key switch.
OM-894 Page 23
P L E A S E
R U N
1.
P U T
K E Y
I N
P O S I T I ON
I S
The control unit waits ten seconds for the key
switch to be placed in the RUN position. If this is
done within the time allowed and the position is
functioning correctly, the display shows:
R U N
I S
E R R OR ! !
T U R N
WO R K I N G
K N O B
T O
T O
A U T O – 2
C ON T I N U E
If the PROGRAM position is not functioning correctly, replace the key switch. If continuing with
diagnostics, proceed to Step 2 of Section 8-5D.
P O S I T I ON
WO R K I N G
N O T
P R OGR A M
P R O P E R L Y
D. Mode Selector Switch Test
2.
If the RUN position tests okay, proceed to Step 3.
1.
If the key switch is not placed in the RUN position
within the time allowed, or if the position is not
functioning correctly, the display shows:
P L E A S E
E R R OR ! !
R U N
P O S I T I ON
I S
N O T
WO R K I N G
T U R N
K E Y
T O
T O
The display shows:
T U R N
A U T OMA T I C – 2
2.
A U T O – 2
C ON T I N U E
P O S I T I ON
P R OGR A M
K E Y
I N
P O S I T I ON
I S
I S
The control unit waits ten seconds for the key
switch to be placed in the PROGRAM position. If
this is done within the time allowed and the position is functioning correctly, the display shows:
P R OGR A M
WO R K I N G
P O S I T I ON
WO R K I N G
If the AUTOMATIC-2 position is not functioning
correctly, replace the Mode Selector switch. If
continuing with diagnostics, proceed to Step 4.
4.
The display shows:
P R O P E R L Y
If the key switch is not placed in the PROGRAM
position within the time allowed, or if the position
is not functioning correctly, the display shows:
T U R N
MA N U A L
If the PROGRAM position tests okay, proceed to
Section 8-5D.
OM-894 Page 24
A U T OMA T I C – 2
N O T
P L E A S E
5.
P R O P E R L Y
If the Mode Selector switch is not placed in the
AUTOMATIC-2 position within the time allowed,
or if the position is not functioning correctly, the
display shows:
E R R OR ! !
4.
I S
If the AUTOMATIC-2 position tests okay, proceed to Step 4.
3.
The display shows:
P U T
P O S I T I ON
P R OGR A M
If the RUN position is not functioning correctly, replace the key switch. If continuing with diagnostics, proceed to Step 4.
P L E A S E
T O
The control unit waits five seconds for the Mode
Selector switch to be placed in the AUTOMATIC-2 position. If this is done within the time allowed and the position is functioning correctly,
the display shows:
WO R K I N G
3.
K N O B
5.
K N O B
T O
P O S I T I ON
The control unit waits five seconds for the Mode
Selector switch to be placed in the MANUAL position. If this is done within the time allowed and the
position is functioning correctly, the display
shows:
10.
The display shows:
P L E A S E
MA N U A L
P O S I T I ON
WO R K I N G
I S
If the Mode Selector switch is not placed in the
MANUAL position within the time allowed, or if
the position is not functioning correctly, the display shows:
E R R OR !
N O T
P O S I T I ON
WO R K I N G
I S
P R O P E R L Y
If the AUTOMATIC-1 position tests okay, proceed to Section 8-5E.
WO R K I N G
12.
If the Mode Selector switch is not placed in the
AUTOMATIC-1 position within the time allowed,
or if the position is not functioning correctly, the
display shows:
E R R OR ! !
A U T OMA T I C – 1
The display shows:
I S
P L E A S E
T U R N
K N O B
T O
8.
The control unit waits five seconds for the Mode
Selector switch to be placed in the SEMI-AUTOMATIC position. If this is done within the time allowed and the position is functioning correctly,
the display shows:
N O T
E. Programming Push Button Tests
1.
The display shows:
P L E A S E
B U T T ON
S E M I – A U T O
I S
WO R K I N G
P R O P E R L Y
2.
N O T
T O
U P
C ON T I N U E
S E M I – A U T O
WO R K I N G
If the SEMI-AUTOMATIC position is not functioning correctly, replace the Mode Selector switch. If
continuing with diagnostics, proceed to Step 10.
The control unit waits nine seconds for the UP
push button to be pressed. If this is done within
the time allowed and the push button is functioning properly, the display shows:
U P
If the Mode Selector switch is not placed in the
SEMI-AUTOMATIC position within the time allowed, or if the position is not functioning correctly, the display shows:
I S
P U S H
P O S I T I ON
If the SEMI-AUTOMATIC position tests okay,
proceed to Step 10.
E R R OR ! !
WO R K I N G
If the AUTOMATIC-1 position is not functioning
correctly, replace the Mode Selector switch. If
continuing with diagnostics, proceed to Section
8-5E.
S E M I – A U T OMA T I C
9.
P O S I T I ON
The control unit waits five seconds for the Mode
Selector switch to be placed in the AUTOMATIC-1 position. If this is done within the time allowed and the position is functioning correctly,
the display shows:
A U T O – 1
MA N U A L
If the MANUAL position is not functioning correctly, replace the Mode Selector switch. If continuing
with diagnostics, proceed to Step 7.
7.
T O
P R O P E R L Y
If the MANUAL position tests okay, proceed to
Step 7.
I S
K N O B
A U T OMA T I C – 1
11.
6.
T U R N
B U T T ON
WO R K I N G
I S
P R O P E R L Y
If the UP push button tests okay, proceed to Step
4.
3.
If the UP push button is not pressed within the
time allowed, or if the push button is not functioning correctly, the display shows:
E R R OR ! !
I S
N O T
U P
B U T T ON
WO R K I N G
OM-894 Page 25
If the UP push button is not functioning correctly,
replace Switch Board PC6. If continuing with
diagnostics, proceed to Step 4.
4.
button is not functioning correctly, the display
shows:
E R R OR ! !
The display shows:
S E L E C T
P L E A S E
B U T T ON
5.
P U S H
T O
WO R K I N G
F.
Purge Push Button Test
1.
I S
P R O P E R L Y
2.
If the DOWN push button tests okay, proceed to
Step 7.
6.
If the DOWN push button is not pressed within
the time allowed, or if the push button is not functioning correctly, the display shows:
The display shows:
P L E A S E
P U S H
B U T T ON
T O
I S
N O T
D OWN
P U R G E
B U T T ON
I S
8.
I S
T O
B U T T ON
WO R K I N G
If the PURGE push button is not functioning correctly, replace Switch Board PC6. If continuing
with diagnostics, proceed to Section 8-5G.
C ON T I N U E
The control unit waits nine seconds for the PARAMETER SELECT push button to be pressed.
If this is done within the time allowed and the push
button is functioning correctly, the display shows:
P A R A ME T E R
S E L E C T
WO R K I N G
P R O P E R L Y
If the PARAMETER SELECT push button tests
okay, proceed to Section 8-5F.
If the PARAMETER SELECT push button is not
pressed within the time allowed, or if the push
OM-894 Page 26
N O T
P U R G E
P A R A ME T E R
G. User Relay Tests
This procedure tests the operation of relay contacts accessible through pressure terminal strip RC7 (see Section 4-7A).
IMPORTANT: This test requires the use of a suitable
DMM (digital multimeter) to check for correct resistance.
1.
9.
P R O P E R L Y
If the PURGE push button is not pressed within
the time allowed, or if the push button is not functioning correctly, the display shows:
E R R OR ! !
The display shows:
S E L E C T
I S
If the PURGE push button tests okay, proceed to
Section 8-5G.
WO R K I N G
3.
P U S H
C ON T I N U E
B U T T ON
If the DOWN push button is not functioning correctly, replace Switch Board PC6. If continuing
with diagnostics, proceed to Step 7.
7.
P U R G E
The control unit waits nine seconds for the
PURGE push button to be pressed. If this is done
within the time allowed and the push button is
functioning correctly, the display shows:
WO R K I N G
E R R OR ! !
WO R K I N G
If the PARAMETER SELECT push button is not
functioning correctly, replace Switch Board PC6.
If continuing with diagnostics, proceed to Section
8-5F.
C ON T I N U E
B U T T ON
N O T
D OWN
The control unit waits nine seconds for the
DOWN push button to be pressed. If this is done
within the time allowed and the push button is
functioning correctly, the display shows:
D OWN
P A R A ME T E R
The following displays are shown:
P L E A S E
C H E C K
C ON N E C T OR
R C 7
P I N S
F OR
P R E S S
D OWN
2.
4
T O
5
C ON T I N U I T Y
U P
I F
I F
WO R K I N G
N O T
WO R K I N G
P R E S S
D OWN
I S
WO R K I N G
WO R K I N G
If the resistance tests okay, press the UP push
button. The display shows:
P O S T
F L OW
WO R K I N G
R E L A Y
I S
P R O P E R L Y
Proceed to Step 10.
R E L A Y
P R O P E R L Y
N O T
8.
9.
F E E D E R
WO R K I N G
Use a DMM to check the resistance across terminals 7 and 8 of RC7. A low resistance (less than 1
ohm) should be found.
If the resistance tests okay, press the UP push
button. The display shows:
W I R E
I F
I F
7.
Remove the top from the control unit. Use a DMM
to check the resistance across terminals 4 and 5
of RC7. A low resistance (less than 1 ohm) should
be found.
3.
U P
If the resistance does not test okay, press the
DOWN push button. The display shows:
E R R OR ! !
R E L A Y
P O S T
I S
F L OW
N O T
WO R K I N G
Proceed to Step 5.
4.
If the resistance does not test okay, press the
DOWN push button. The display shows:
E R R OR ! !
R E L A Y
W I R E
I S
N O T
If the postflow relay is not working correctly, contact the nearest Factory Authorized Service
Agent. If continuing with diagnostics, proceed to
Step 10.
F E E D E R
WO R K I N G
10.
The display shows:
P R E S S
If the wire feeder relay is not working correctly,
contact the nearest Factory Authorized Service
Agent. If continuing with diagnostics, proceed to
Step 5.
5.
6.
11.
The display shows:
P R E S S
T O
T O
U P
C H E C K
C H E C K
P I N S
R C 7
P R E S S
D OWN
T O
T O
1 1
C ON T I N U I T Y
U P
I F
I F
WO R K I N G
N O T
WO R K I N G
8
12.
F OR
1 0
R C 7
C H E C K
C ON N E C T OR
7
R E L A Y
C H E C K
C ON N E C T OR
R E L A Y
F OR
P I N S
N E X T
P L E A S E
When the UP push button is pressed, the following displays are shown:
P L E A S E
B U T T ON
When the UP push button is pressed, the following displays are shown:
B U T T ON
N E X T
U P
C ON T I N U I T Y
Use a DMM to check the resistance across terminals 10 and 11 of RC7. A low resistance (less
than 1 ohm) should be found.
OM-894 Page 27
13.
If the resistance tests okay, press the UP push
button. The display shows:
F I N A L
T I ME
WO R K I N G
R E L A Y
I S
P R O P E R L Y
19.
If the resistance does not test okay, press the
DOWN push button. The display shows:
E R R OR ! !
R E L A Y
If the resistance does not test okay, press the
DOWN push button. The display shows:
20.
E R R OR ! !
R E L A Y
F I N A L
I S
N O T
N O T
WO R K I N G
The display shows:
T I ME
P R E S S
WO R K I N G
T O
If the final time relay is not working correctly, contact the nearest Factory Authorized Service
Agent. If continuing with diagnostics, proceed to
Step 15.
15.
S L O P E
If the final slope relay is not working correctly,
contact the nearest Factory Authorized Service
Agent. If continuing with diagnostics, proceed to
Step 20.
Proceed to Step 15.
14.
I S
F I N A L
21.
U P
C H E C K
B U T T ON
N E X T
When the UP push button is pressed, the following displays are shown:
P L E A S E
The display shows:
C H E C K
C ON N E C T OR
P R E S S
T O
U P
C H E C K
N E X T
R E L A Y
F OR
When the UP push button is pressed, the following displays are shown:
P L E A S E
C H E C K
C ON N E C T OR
P I N S
F OR
P R E S S
D OWN
1 3
R C 7
T O
I F
P R E S S
D OWN
N O T
WO R K I N G
T I ME
R E L A Y
I S
P R O P E R L Y
Proceed to Step 25.
24.
If the resistance does not test okay, press the
DOWN push button. The display shows:
E R R OR ! !
R E L A Y
Proceed to Step 20.
WO R K I N G
If the resistance tests okay, press the UP push
button. The display shows:
WO R K I N G
WO R K I N G
I F
23.
WO R K I N G
S L O P E
1 7
Use a DMM to check the resistance across terminals 16 and 17 of RC7. A low resistance (less
than 1 ohm) should be found.
N O T
If the resistance tests okay, press the UP push
button. The display shows:
OM-894 Page 28
I F
WE L D
18.
I S
U P
WO R K I N G
Use a DMM to check the resistance across terminals 13 and 14 of RC7. A low resistance (less
than 1 ohm) should be found.
T O
C ON T I N U I T Y
I F
17.
F I N A L
1 6
22.
1 4
C ON T I N U I T Y
U P
R C 7
B U T T ON
P I N S
16.
R E L A Y
I S
WE L D
N O T
T I ME
WO R K I N G
R E L A Y
P R O P E R L Y
If the weld time relay is not working correctly, contact the nearest Factory Authorized Service
Agent. If continuing with diagnostics, proceed to
Step 25.
25.
The display shows:
P R E S S
T O
26.
U P
C H E C K
31.
When the UP push button is pressed, the following displays are shown:
B U T T ON
N E X T
P L E A S E
R E L A Y
C ON N E C T OR
When the UP push button is pressed, the following displays are shown:
P L E A S E
P I N S
F OR
C H E C K
C ON N E C T OR
D OWN
F OR
P R E S S
D OWN
1 9
T O
I F
I F
WO R K I N G
N O T
WO R K I N G
27.
Use a DMM to check the resistance across terminals 19 and 20 of RC7. A low resistance (less
than 1 ohm) should be found.
28.
If the resistance tests okay, press the UP push
button. The display shows:
I S
S L O P E
WO R K I N G
U P
I F
I F
WO R K I N G
N O T
WO R K I N G
32.
Use a DMM to check the resistance across terminals 22 and 23 of RC7. A low resistance (less
than 1 ohm) should be found.
33.
If the resistance tests okay, press the UP push
button. The display shows:
R E L A Y
P R O P E R L Y
I S
34.
R E L A Y
I S
N O T
T O
C H E C K
WO R K I N G
If the initial time relay is not working correctly,
contact the nearest Factory Authorized Service
Agent. If continuing with diagnostics, proceed to
Step 35.
The display shows:
P L E A S E
WO R K I N G
36.
T O
P U S H
U P
C ON T I N U E
Press the UP push button to continue diagnostics
and proceed to Section 8-5H, or stop diagnostics
here if desired.
H. Pulse Signal Test
The display shows:
U P
N O T
T I ME
S L O P E
If the initial slope relay is not working correctly,
contact the nearest Factory Authorized Service
Agent. If continuing with diagnostics, proceed to
Step 30.
P R E S S
P R O P E R L Y
I N I T I A L
I S
B U T T ON
30.
R E L A Y
If the resistance does not test okay, press the
DOWN push button. The display shows:
R E L A Y
35.
I N I T I A L
WO R K I N G
E R R OR ! !
If the resistance does not test okay, press the
DOWN push button. The display shows:
E R R OR !
T I ME
Proceed to Section 8-5H.
Proceed to Step 30.
29.
2 3
C ON T I N U I T Y
I N I T I A L
I N I T I A L
T O
2 0
C ON T I N U I T Y
U P
2 2
R C 7
R C 7
P R E S S
P I N S
C H E C K
B U T T ON
N E X T
R E L A Y
This procedure tests the pulse signal at pressure terminal strip RC7 (see Section 4-7A).
IMPORTANT: This test requires the use of a suitable
DMM (digital multimeter) to check for correct resistance.
OM-894 Page 29
1.
The display shows:
C H E C K
F OR
H I GH
P R E S S
D OWN
2.
R C 7
P I N
2
T O
E R R OR ! !
1
I S
I F
WO R K I N G
N O T
WO R K I N G
P U L S E
N O T
P R E S S
T O
9.
The display shows:
The display shows:
WO R K I N G
S I GN A L
N O T
T O
U P
C H E C K
10.
B U T T ON
N E X T
R E L A Y
I.
4.
If the pulse signal is not working correctly, contact
the nearest Factory Authorized Service Agent.
Press the UP push button to continue diagnostics
and proceed to Section 8-5I, or stop diagnostics
here if desired.
5.
The display shows:
C H E C K
F OR
R C 7
2 0 0
D OWN
6.
U P
I F
P U S H
U P
OHMS
2
OR
T O
IMPORTANT: This test requires the use of a suitable
DMM (digital multimeter) to check for correct resistance. If the diagnostic program is stopped after this
test, be sure to reconnect plug PLG5 into receptacle
RC5 on Interface Board PC2.
The display shows:
P L E A S E
1
WO R K I N G
N O T
WO R K I N G
D I S C ON N E C T
P L U G
L E S S
I F
C ON T I N U E
Contactor Relay Test
1.
P I N
T O
Press the UP push button to continue diagnostics
and proceed to Section 8-5I, or stop diagnostics
here if desired.
P R E S S
P R E S S
P R O P E R L Y
WO R K I N G
B U T T ON
P R E S S
I S
S I GN A L
P L E A S E
I S
R E L A Y
If the pulse signal is not working correctly, contact
the nearest Factory Authorized Service Agent.
Press the UP push button to continue diagnostics
and proceed to Section 8-5I, or stop diagnostics
here if desired.
P U L S E
P U L S E
B U T T ON
N E X T
If the resistance does not check okay, press the
DOWN push button.
E R R OR ! !
WO R K I N G
U P
C H E C K
S I GN A L
8.
Use a DMM to check the resistance across terminals 1 and 2 of RC7. A very high resistance
should be found.
If the resistance tests okay, press the UP push
button and proceed to Step 5.
3.
The display shows:
R E S I S T A N C E
U P
I F
7.
WH E N
U P
R C 5
B U T T ON
D I S C ON N E C T E D
2.
Use a DMM to check the resistance across terminals 1 and 2 of RC7. The indicated resistance
should be found.
Press UP push button after plug PLG5 is disconnected from receptacle RC5 on Interface Board
PC2.
3.
The display shows:
If the resistance tests okay, press the UP push
button and proceed to Step 9.
C H E C K
If the resistance does not test okay, press the
DOWN push button.
OM-894 Page 30
F OR
R C 5
P I N
D
T O
C ON T I N U I T Y
H
P R E S S
D OWN
4.
U P
I F
I F
WO R K I N G
N O T
WO R K I N G
Use a DMM to check the resistance across terminals D and H of RC5. A low resistance (less than
1 ohm) should be found.
5.
1.
The display shows:
C H E C K
R C 5
P I N
C
F OR
2 4 V
+ / –
4 V
P R E S S
If the resistance tests okay, press the UP push
button and proceed to Step 7.
D OWN
If the resistance does not check okay, press the
DOWN push button.
2.
R E L A Y
I S
6.
C H E C K
N E X T
WO R K I N G
C H E C K
N E X T
R E L A Y
4.
If the gas solenoid relay is not working correctly,
contact the nearest Factory Authorized Service
Agent. Press the UP push button to continue
diagnostics and proceed to Section 8-5K, or stop
diagnostics here if desired.
5.
The display shows:
The display shows:
C ON T A C T OR
B U T T ON
R E L A Y
If the contactor relay is not working correctly, contact the nearest Factory Authorized Service
Agent. Press the UP push button to continue
diagnostics and proceed to Section 8-5J, or stop
diagnostics here if desired.
7.
U P
B U T T ON
T O
T O
WO R K I N G
The display shows:
P R E S S
U P
N O T
If the voltage does not test okay, press the
DOWN push button.
WO R K I N G
3.
P R E S S
WO R K I N G
If the voltage tests okay, press the UP push button and proceed to Step 5.
C O N T AC T O R
N O T
I F
I F
G
Use a DMM to check the dc voltage across terminals C and G of receptacle RC5 on Interface
Board PC2. The indicated voltage should be
found.
The display shows:
E R R OR ! !
U P
T O
G A S
R E L A Y
I S
P R O P E R L Y
I S
6.
S O L E N O I D
WO R K I N G
R E L A Y
P R O P E R L Y
Proceed to Section 8-5K.
K. Arc Starter Relay Test
P R E S S
T O
8.
C H E C K
U P
B U T T ON
N E X T
R E L A Y
Press the UP push button to continue diagnostics
and proceed to Section 8-5J, or stop diagnostics
here if desired.
J. Gas Solenoid Relay Test
IMPORTANT: This test requires the use of a suitable
DMM (digital multimeter) to check for correct voltage.
This test requires that plug PLG5 be disconnected from
receptacle RC5 on Interface Board PC2. If the diagnostic program is stopped after this test, be sure to reconnect PLG5 to RC5 on PC2.
IMPORTANT: This test requires the use of a suitable
DMM (digital multimeter) to check for correct resistance. This test requires that plug PLG5 be disconnected from receptacle RC5 on Interface Board PC2. If
the diagnostic program is stopped after this test, be sure
to reconnect PLG5 to RC5 on PC2.
1.
The display shows:
C H E C K
P I N S
F OR
P R E S S
D OWN
E
T O
F
C ON T I N U I T Y
U P
I F
I F
WO R K I N G
N O T
WO R K I N G
OM-894 Page 31
2.
Use a DMM to check the resistance across terminals E and F of receptacle RC5 on Interface
Board PC2. A low resistance (less than 1 ohm)
should be found.
If the resistance tests okay, press the UP push
button and proceed to Step 5.
If the resistance does not check okay, press the
DOWN push button.
3.
10.
Proceed to Section 8-5L.
L. Remote Operator Control Tests
This procedure tests the push buttons on the Remote
Operator Control. Be sure the Remote Operator Control
is correctly connected to the control unit before following
this test.
1.
The display shows:
The display shows:
E R R OR ! !
R E L A Y
P U S H
A R C
I S
ON
S T A R T E R
N O T
U P / S T A R T
R E MO T E
WO R K I N G
WA T C H
4.
If the arc starter relay is not working correctly,
contact the nearest Factory Authorized Service
Agent. The next display scrolls into view. Continue to Section 8-5L or stop the diagnostic program
as desired.
5.
The display shows:
C H E C K
P R E S S
D OWN
6.
A
T O
I F
I F
WO R K I N G
N O T
WO R K I N G
2.
P U R G E
T O
P U S H E D
A D V A N C E
Press the START/INCREASE push button on the
Remote Operator Control. If the push button is
functioning correctly, the display shows:
U S E
I S
P U R G E
P U S H E D
T O
A D V A N C E
If the START/INCREASE push button tests okay,
press the PURGE push button and proceed to
Step 3.
If the resistance tests okay, press the UP push
button and proceed to Step 9.
If the START/INCREASE push button does not
test okay, replace the push button. Press the
PURGE push button to continue diagnostics and
proceed to Step 3, or stop diagnostics here if desired.
E R R OR ! !
R E L A Y
I S
3.
A R C
S T A R T E R
N O T
The display shows:
P U S H
WO R K I N G
ON
If the arc starter relay is not working correctly,
contact the nearest Factory Authorized Service
Agent. Proceed to Section 8-5L or stop the diagnostic program as desired.
9.
N O T
Use a DMM to check the resistance across terminals A and B of RC5. A low resistance (less than 1
ohm) should be found.
The display shows:
8.
I S
B U T T ON
If the resistance does not check okay, press the
DOWN push button.
7.
R E S P ON S E
B
C ON T I N U I T Y
U P
B U T T ON
U S E
P I N S
F OR
F OR
D I S P L A Y
D OWN
R E MO T E
WA T C H
F OR
B U T T ON
D I S P L A Y
R E S P ON S E
The display shows:
A R C
I S
S T A R T E R
WO R K I N G
OM-894 Page 32
R E L A Y
P R O P E R L Y
B U T T ON
U S E
I S
P U R G E
N O T
T O
P U S H E D
A D V A N C E
4.
Press the DECREASE push button on the Remote Operator Control. If the push button is functioning correctly, the display shows:
B U T T ON
U S E
I S
P U R G E
1.
S H OR T
T O
A D V A N C E
If the DECREASE push button does not test
okay, replace the push button. Press the PURGE
push button to continue diagnostics and proceed
to Step 5, or stop diagnostics here if desired.
2.
P U S H
S T O P
ON
B U T T ON
F OR
R E S P ON S E
B U T T ON
U S E
6.
I S
P U R G E
N O T
T O
D OWN
B U T T ON
U S E
P U R G E
I S
T O
5.
IMPORTANT: This test requires the use of a suitable
DMM (digital multimeter) to check for correct voltage.
U P
I F
1 0
V O L T
V O L T S
I F
WO R K I N G
N O T
WO R K I N G
Use a DMM to check the dc voltage across the
lower (load) terminals on line filter FL5. The indicated voltage should be found.
The display shows:
D A C
WO R K I N G
I S
N O T
P R O P E R L Y
6.
If the DAC is not working correctly, contact the
nearest Factory Authorized Service Agent. The
next display scrolls into view. Continue to Section
8-5N or stop the diagnostic program as desired.
7.
The display shows:
If the STOP push button tests okay, press the
PURGE push button and proceed to Section
8-5M.
See Section 4-7B for information on terminal strip RC3.
Line filter FL5 is located in the upper left area of the center panel (see Figure 4-1).
F OR
E R R OR ! !
A D V A N C E
M. Digital To Analog Converter (DAC) Test
W I T H
If the voltage does not test okay, press the
DOWN push button.
P U S H E D
If the STOP push button does not test okay, replace the push button. Press the PURGE push
button to continue diagnostics and proceed to
Section 8-5M, or stop diagnostics here if desired.
A D V A N C E
If the voltage tests okay, press the UP push button and proceed to Step 7.
A D V A N C E
Press the STOP push button on the Remote Operator Control. If the push button is functioning
correctly, the display shows:
S H OR T E D
T O
F L 5
P R E S S
P U S H E D
B
Press the PURGE push button. The display
shows:
C H E C K
4.
R C 3
I S
P U R G E
ME T E R
D I S P L A Y
T O
S T O P
Connect a lead from terminal A to terminal B of
terminal strip RC3. When this is done, the display
shows:
U S E
R E MO T E
WA T C H
A
T E RM I N A L
3.
The display shows:
S E M I – A U T O
R C 3
P U S H E D
If the DECREASE push button tests okay, press
the PURGE push button and proceed to Step 5.
5.
The display shows:
C H E C K
F L 5
ME T E R
P R E S S
D OWN
W I T H
F OR
U P
I F
5
V O L T
V O L T S
I F
WO R K I N G
N O T
WO R K I N G
OM-894 Page 33
8.
To check the OCV detection circuitry, press the
UP push button and proceed to Step 2.
Use a DMM to check the dc voltage across the
lower (load) terminals on line filter FL5. The indicated voltage should be found.
If not checking the OCV detection circuitry, press
the DOWN push button. The first diagnostic display scrolls into view (see Section 8-5A).
If the voltage tests okay, press the UP push button and proceed to Step 11.
If the voltage does not test okay, press the
DOWN push button.
9.
2.
The display shows:
E R R OR ! !
10.
P U T
D A C
WO R K I N G
I S
N O T
P O S .
I S
WO R K I N G
P R O P E R L Y
12.
If the required voltage is connected and the OCV
detection circuitry is not functioning correctly, the
display shows:
OC V
I S
U S E
P U R G E
The display shows:
5.
WA N T
T O
F OR
OC V
P R E S S
U P
F OR
P R E S S
D OWN
C H E C K
D E T E C T E D
T O
A D V A N C E
If the required voltage is connected and the OCV
detection circuitry is functioning correctly, the display shows:
OC V
U S E
OM-894 Page 34
N O T
If the OCV detection circuitry is not working correctly, contact the nearest Factory Authorized
Service Agent. Press the PURGE push button to
repeat diagnostics and return to Section 8-5A, or
stop diagnostics here if desired.
This test checks the OCV detection circuitry in the control unit.
Y OU
S T U D S
4.
N. Open Circuit Voltage (OCV) Test
D O
N E G .
ON
Connect the indicated voltage across the POSITIVE/WORK terminal on the rear of the control
unit and the NEGATIVE terminal. The next display scrolls into view.
The next display scrolls into view (see Section
8-5N).
1.
A N D
V O L T S
3.
The display shows:
D A C
6 0 –1 0 0
P R O P E R L Y
If the DAC is not working correctly, contact the
nearest Factory Authorized Service Agent. The
next display scrolls into view. Continue to Section
8-5N or stop the diagnostic program as desired.
11.
The display shows:
I S
P U R G E
D E T E C T E D
T O
A D V A N C E
Y E S
F OR
N O
Press the PURGE push button. The first diagnostic display scrolls into view (see Section 8-5A).
Notes
OM-894 Page 35
Diagram 9-1. Circuit Diagram For Control Unit
Circuit Diagram No. SC-138 372-A
SECTION 9 – ELECTRICAL DIAGRAMS
OM-894 Page 36
Circuit Diagram No. SA-132 263
Diagram 9-2. Circuit Diagram For Remote Operator Control
OM-894 Page 37
Diagram 9-3. Wiring Diagram For Control Unit
OM-894 Page 38
SD-156 130
OM-894 Page 39
SECTION 10 – CERTIFICATION FOR HIGH FREQUENCY ARC WELDING EQUIPMENT
10-1. GENERAL
The following information is necessary to make a proper
installation of the high-frequency arc welding equipment
described in this instruction manual. In order to comply
with Part 18 of the Rules and Regulations of the Federal
Communications Commission (FCC), the certificate in
the front of this manual must be filled in completely and
signed after the unit has been correctly installed. The
certificate must be kept WITH THE EQUIPMENT AT
ALL TIMES to comply with the regulation. The manufacturer of the equipment covered herein has conducted
approved field tests and certifies that the radiation can
be expected to be within the legal limits if the correct installation procedures, as outlined, are followed. The importance of a correct installation cannot be overemphasized since case histories of interference due to highfrequency stabilized arc welding equipment have shown
that in most cases, an inadequate installation was at
fault. In the event that interference with authorized FCC
services occurs, the user is required to take suitable
steps to clear the situation. The Factory Service Department personnel will assist the user by supplying technical information.
Instead of complying with the installation requirements
and the certification of each individual installation, the
user may elect to certify the entire plant by having a
qualified engineer make a plant radiation survey. In such
cases, these instructions could serve as a guide in minimizing interference that might be caused by the highfrequency arc welding equipment.
Many processes and applications of processes require
open-circuit voltages sufficient to jump from the electrode to the work without making direct contact. The
maximum open-circuit voltage (OCV) of a welding
power source is not sufficient for this. In the Submerged
Arc Welding (SAW) process, granules of flux often get
between the electrode and the workpiece making starting of the arc difficult at normal open-circuit voltages. A
higher voltage is also required to start and maintain a
stable arc in processes like the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process. In these cases it will take several
thousand volts to cause an electrical spark to jump this
gap between the electrode and the work, creating an initial path of ionization that the arc current can follow
without the hazards that would be present at power frequency.
In order to provide these higher voltages, it is common
practice to superimpose a high open-circuit voltage on
the output of a welding power source by using high-frequency techniques. The high-frequency voltage can be
a source of interference and will be discussed in this
section.
OM-894 Page 40
10-2. DEFINITIONS
A. High-Frequency Assisted Arc Welding Power
Sources
In the arc welding process, high frequency may be used
for initiating an arc or stabilizing the arc once it is struck,
or for both functions.
The energy from the high-frequency source must flow to
the welding electrode via a good quality, low impedance,
and well insulated connecting cable.
B. Welding Circuit
The welding circuit consists of all attachments connected to the welding terminals.
C. Welding Terminals
Welding terminals are the terminals which provide welding power and high-frequency energy to the arc.
D. Electrode Terminal
The electrode terminal is the terminal to which the electrode cable or welding torch is connected.
E. Welding Torch
A device used in the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW)
process to control the position of the electrode, to transfer current to the arc, and to direct the flow of shielding
gas.
F.
Work Terminal
The work terminal is the terminal to which the welding
workpiece is connected.
G. Welding Zone
The welding zone is the space within 50 ft. (15 m) in all
directions from the midpoint between the power source
and the welding arc (see Figure 10-6).
H. Bonding
Bonding refers to connecting metallic objects together
to cause the objects to be at the same potential regardless of any current flow between them (see Figure 10-3
and Figure 10-4).
I.
Grounding (Earthing)
Depending on the practices within jurisdictions, one of
these terms is commonly used to indicate the connection, or bonding, of parts of the apparatus to the
earth.The terms may be used interchangeably.
J. Receiver
A receiver is any device normally used for receiving
electromagnetic energy and converting it to useful communications purposes.
K. Conduction
Conduction is the transmission of high-frequency energy via an electrical conductor or conducting medium.
L. High Frequency
10-4. LOCATION
High frequency is radio frequency energy, either continuous or pulsed, used to start or stabilize a welding arc.
Locate the high-frequency power source as close to the
welding process as possible. Also consider the nearness of a suitable ground connection when selecting a
site for the installation of the power source. Ideally, the
high-frequency power source should be located in an
area where there is a limited amount of miscellaneous
wiring (lighting, power, telephone, communications, and
other unshielded conductors) located within the welding
zone. Ungrounded, metallic conductors in the welding
zone can act as antennas which will pick up, conduct, or
reradiate the high-frequency energy transmitted by the
welding circuit. All miscellaneous wiring in the welding
zone should be enclosed in grounded, rigid metallic conduit, copper braid, or some other material having an
equivalent shielding efficiency, and grounded at 50 ft.
(15 m) intervals (see Figure 10-1).
M. High-Frequency Assisted Arc Welding
High-frequency assisted arc welding refers to any of the
arc welding processes requiring high frequency.
N. Interference
Interference is the unwanted and problematic reception
of high-frequency energy.
O. Radiation
Radiation is the transmission of high-frequency energy
through space.
Shielded Wire
10-3. HIGH-FREQUENCY RADIATION
Installations using high frequency, either as an integral
part of the power source or as an accessory unit, will
produce some high-frequency radiation. Such radiation,
if the signal strength is sufficient at the receiving device,
can cause an inconvenience or disruption of communications or can cause malfunction in sensitive electronic
controls and systems. The four major causes of highfrequency radiation are as follows:
Electrode
Holder
Ground At 50ft.
(15 m) Intervals
50 ft.
(15 m)
A. Direct Radiation From The Power Source Or
High-Frequency Accessory Unit
Direct radiation is that radiation emanating directly from
the power source or accessory unit. Radiation from the
power line and welding power source accessories is not
considered to be direct radiation from the power source
or accessory unit.
B. Direct Radiation From The Welding Circuit
Any attachment to the output terminals of the high-frequency source is capable of acting as an antenna and
radiating high-frequency energy. Attachments include
weld cables, torches, worktables, etc. Since direct radiation from the welding circuit is the major source of radiation, it is important to keep attachments to a minimum.
C. Conduction And Radiation From The Power
Line
Most power lines are capable of conducting high-frequency energy which may cause interference directly or
by reradiation from these power lines. Normally such radiation is small when compared to that caused by radiation from the weld cables.
D. Reradiation
Radiation from the welding circuit can be picked up by
ungrounded metal objects or unshielded wiring in the
immediate vicinity, conducted some distance, and
reradiated. This can be a troublesome source of interference.
Work Clamp
Ground
High-Frequency
Welding
Power Source
Keep all unshielded and ungrounded
wires out of the welding zone.
S-0017
Figure 10-1. Requirements To Minimize Reradiation Pickup In The Vicinity Of The Welding Zone
10-5. GENERAL INSTALLATION PROCEDURES
A. Weld Cables
Keep the weld cables as short as possible and do not
exceed 25 ft. (8 m) in length. Position the cables as
close together and as close to the floor or ground plane
as possible.
If the welding operation must be carried out at a point
farther than 25 ft. (8 m) from the welding power source,
use a portable high-frequency source and locate the
portable unit within 25 ft. (8 m) of the welding electrode.
B. High-Frequency Assisted Arc Welding Power
Sources
When the high-frequency assisted arc welding power
source is in operation, all service doors and covers must
be closed, securely fastened, and adequately bonded to
ensure good contact around the entire perimeter of the
opening. Except for changes and adjustments allowed
by the manufacturer, the high-frequency assisted arc
welding power source should not be modified.
OM-894 Page 41
Place leads on floor or on boards
and keep 3/4 in. (19 mm)
to 1 in. (25 mm) apart.
High-Frequency
Welding Power Source
Electrode Holder
Electrical
Input
Supply
Work Clamp
Ground
S-0018
Figure 10-2. General Rules For Welding Leads
E. Shielding Of Miscellaneous Wiring In The Welding Zone
C. Grounding (Earthing) The Weld Cables
Be sure that the enclosure of the high-frequency power
source is firmly grounded to the WORK terminal. If the
high-frequency power source is not labeled as being internally high-frequency grounded, then this ground
must be made by grounding the enclosure to the WORK
terminal with No. 12 AWG gauge or smaller wire. Connect the ground wire to a driven ground rod or to a water
pipe which enters the earth within 10 ft. (3 m) of the highfrequency power source.
D. Metal Buildings
Installation of a high-frequency power source within a
suitably bonded and grounded (earthed) metal building
can be an effective means of reducing high-frequency
radiation. Wherever possible, install high-frequency
power sources in such places.
Grounded Copper
Screens
However, when the high-frequency power source is installed within a metal building, precautions must be
taken to be sure that the building is properly bonded and
grounded (earthed). This can be accomplished by placing several good electrical ground rods around the periphery of the building. During the construction of a new
building of any type having metal in the structure, be
sure that all the reinforcing and structural steel is
bonded together (as by welding each piece of metal to
all other adjacent pieces). For metal buildings, adjacent
metal panels should be bolted or welded together at frequent intervals.All windows and doorways should be
covered with grounded copper screen or galvanized
hardware cloth of not more than 1/4 in. (6.4 mm) mesh.
Ungrounded, metallic conductors in the welding zone
can act as antennas which will pick up, conduct, and/or
reradiate the high-frequency energy transmitted by the
welding circuit located within or near the welding zone.
This means that all ungrounded water pipes must be
grounded, and that all lighting, power, telephone, communications, and other conductors within the welding
zone must be enclosed in grounded, rigid metallic conduit, copper braid, or some other material having an
equivalent shielding capability (spirally wound, flexible,
metallic conduit is not suitable). Shielding of the miscellaneous wiring in the welding zone must be grounded at
50 ft. (15 m) intervals. Excellent low resistance electrical
connections must be maintained between conduit sections (see Figure 10-4).
Copper Strap
Metal Building
Panels
S-0020
Driven Ground Rod
Grounding
Wire
Figure 10-4. Bonding Method For
Poor Conductors
Metal
Panels
F.
Metal
Panels
Bonding Of Metal Panels
Figure 10-3. Grounding And Bonding
Panels Of Metal Building
OM-894 Page 42
S-0019
Power Service
The high-frequency power source should be connected
to the line input power supply as instructed in this manual. If the unit is equipped with a power cord, the supply
conductors serving the high-frequency power source
should be completely enclosed in solid metallic conduit,
or in equivalent shielding, up to the point of connection
with the power cord. The solid, metallic conduit, or
equivalent shielding, should extend the entire distance
from the power entrance location in the building to the
high-frequency power source. Shielding should be electrically continuous throughout its length and should be
connected so that good electrical contact is provided between the shield and the high-frequency power source.
High-Frequency
Welding Power Source
50 ft. (15 m)
Line Input
Power Supply
a. Have all unshielded power, lighting, and communication wires within the welding zone
placed in grounded shields or relocated outside
the welding zone.
b. Ground all large metallic objects, long guy
wires, or support wires within the welding zone.
Solid Metallic Conduit
c.
Line Fuse
And Switch
Box
Ground
Be sure that there are no external power or telephone wires, which may be off the immediate
premises, within the welding zone.
S-0021
Figure 10-5. Installation Of High-Frequency
Stabilized Arc Welding Power Source
High-Frequency
Welding Power
Source
10-6. GUIDELINES FOR INSTALLATION OF HIGHFREQUENCY ASSISTED ARC WELDING
POWER SOURCES
1. Locate the equipment so that the ground wire of the
high-frequency power source can be kept as short
as possible.
2. Shield the line input power leads up to the point of
connection with the enclosure of the high-frequency
power source as specified by the manufacture’s requirements (see Section 10-5F).
3. Be sure that there is good electrical contact made at
the enclosure of the high-frequency welding power
source, through the conduit, and back to the service
box. Be sure that the conduit system is continuous
to a point at least 50 ft. (15 m) from the equipment,
and that the conduit system is one complete run
within the high-frequency zone. If rigid, metallic conduit is not used, be sure that the shielding used has
equivalent shielding efficiency. Copper sleeving,
lead covered cable, or the equivalent, is satisfactory. Spirally wound, flexible, metallic conduit is not
suitable.
4. Keep WORK and ELECTRODE cables as short
and straight as possible.
Center Point
Electrode
Holder
S-0022
Figure 10-6. Welding Zone
10. Use driven ground rods which enter the ground
10 ft. (3 m) or less from the ground connection, or
cold water pipes, as the ground for the high-frequency welding power source.
11. Be sure that all ground connections are clean and
tight.
12. If the high-frequency welding power source is operated within a metal building, be sure that the building
is properly grounded.
10-7. INSTALLATION GUIDELINES CHECKLIST
All items may not be necessary or practical for each installation. Complete the necessary items to eliminate interference with authorized FCC services.
5. Keep weld cables to a maximum length of 25 ft. (8
m).
1. Is equipment properly located?
(See Sections 10-4, 10-5D, 10-5E, 10-6.1, and
10-6.9.)
6. Keep weld cables as close together and as close to
the ground plane as possible.
2. Are ac input power connections properly made?
(See Sections 10-5B, 10-6.2, and 10-6.3.)
7. Adjust spark gap setting to the minimum setting
given in this manual.
3. Are weld cables and equipment properly installed?
(See Sections 10-5A, 10-6.4, 10-5.5, and 10-6.6.)
8. Secure all service and access doors before operating.
4. Are ground connections properly made?
(See Sections 10-5C, 10-6.1, 10-6.6, 10-6.11, and
10-6.12.)
9. Visualize the welding zone as a sphere with a 50 ft.
(15 m) radius centered on a point between the
power source and the electrode holder (see
Figure 10-6), and proceed as follows:
5. Is equipment properly set up and adjusted?
(See Sections 10-6.7 and 10-6.8.)
OM-894 Page 43
OM-894 Page 44
53
54
55
56
57
45
58
52
59
64
65
62
66
51
36
8
1
50
60
15
2
7
7
62
7
44
36 61
63
10
3
49
4
48
43
36
46
45
44
36
20
19
39
11
17
2
38
5 6 7
20
8
Figure 11-1. Main Assembly
47
42
41
40
10
15
18
13
1
21
16
9
22
23
15
28
27
26
25
37
25
Fig 11-3
23 24
24
14
13
12
11
10
29
36
35
34
33
32
31
30
SD-128 568-A
Fig 11-2
SECTION 11 – PARTS LIST
Item
No.
Dia.
Mkgs.
Part
No.
Description
Quantity
Figure 11-1. Main Assembly
. . 1 . . . . . . FL3-6 . . . . 084 171 . . FILTER, line pwr 115/250V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 094 484 . . STAND-OFF, No. 6-32 x 1.000 lg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 033 . . PANEL, center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 4 . . . . . . . . T1 . . . . . . 128 687 . . TRANSFORMER, control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 5 . . . . . . . . F1 . . . . . . *012 663 . . FUSE, mintr gl slo-blo 3A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 012 571 . . HOLDER, fuse mintr .250 x 1.250 clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 7 . . . PLG1,10-12,
. . . . . . . . . . . 28,29 . . . . 119 490 . . HOUSING, term hdr 8skt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 8 . . . . . PLG4,16 . . . 115 094 . . HOUSING PLUG & SOCKETS, (consisting of) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 746 . . . . TERMINAL, female 1skt 24-18 wire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 9 . . . . . . PLG6 . . . . 115 091 . . HOUSING PLUG & SOCKETS, (consisting of) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 746 . . . . TERMINAL, female 1skt 24-18 wire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 10 . . . . PLG2,13,
21,30,31 . . . 114 366 . . HOUSING, term hdr 13skt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 11 . . . . PLG5,18 . . . 115 092 . . HOUSING PLUG & SOCKETS, (consisting of) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 746 . . . . TERMINAL, female 1skt 24-18 wire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 12 . . . . . . PC2 . . . . . 184 108 . . CIRCUIT CARD, interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 098 691 . . STAND-OFF, No. 6-32 x .500 lg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig 11-3 . . PANEL, rear w/components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 375 . . STAND-OFF SUPPORT, PC card No. 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 420 . . PANEL, mtg relay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 083 147 . . GROMMET, scr No. 8/10 panel hole .312sq .500 high . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 18 . . . . . . PC1 . . . . . 168 645 . . CIRCUIT CARD, logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 19 . . . . . . PC4 . . . . . 134 655 . . CIRCUIT CARD, flowmeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 938 . . VALVE, shut-off scr bonnet 1/4FNPT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 21 . . . . . . GS1 . . . . . 121 939 . . VALVE, 24VDC 2 way 1/8NPT 1/8 orf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 341 . . FITTING, junction block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 073 432 . . FITTING, brs barbed M 3/16tbg x 1/8NPT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 24 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 089 120 . . CLAMP, hose .375-450clp dia slfttng . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 834 . . HOSE, SAE .187 ID x .410 OD (order by ft) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 26 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 973 . . FITTING, brs barbed M 1/8tbg x 1/8NPT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 27 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 343 . . CLAMP, hose .312-.375clp dia slfttng . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 271 . . HOSE, vinyl braided .125 ID x .312 OD (order by ft) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 29 . . . . . . . T2 . . . . . . 126 840 . . ARC STARTER, pulse HF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 064 . . PENDANT, (Fig 11-2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 31 . . . . . . R1 . . . . . 030 087 . . RESISTOR, WW fxd 25W 200 ohm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 32 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 605 741 . . CLIP, mtg resistor .312 ID core . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 33 . . . . . . PC8 . . . . . 126 866 . . CIRCUIT CARD, arc starter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 34 . . . . . PLG26 . . . . 128 336 . . HOUSING, term plug nyl 3cont . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 748 . . TERMINAL, contact box-shaped leaf 22-18 wire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 35 . . . . . PLG27 . . . . 146 099 . . HOUSING PLUG & SOCKETS, (consisting of) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 748 . . . . TERMINAL, contact box-shaped leaf 22-18 wire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 36 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 073 756 . . STAND-OFF, No. 6-32 x .625 lg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 37 . . . . . . PC9 . . . . . 125 966 . . POWER SUPPLY, switching 85-132VAC/110-170VDC . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 38 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 019 663 . . MOUNT, nprn 15/16 OD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 39 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 912 . . CASE SECTION, bottom/sides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 40 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 480 . . STRIP, hold down meter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 41 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 601 836 . . NUT, brs hex .250-20 jam hvy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 42 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 453 . . METER, digital 0 to 2VDC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 43 . . . . . . PC7 . . . . . 124 026 . . DISPLAY, led . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 44 . . . . PLG9,20 . . . 089 222 . . HOUSING, term hdr 11skt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 45 . . . PLG19,24 . . 089 241 . . CONNECTOR, plug 4posn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 46 . . . . . . PC6 . . . . . 140 532 . . CIRCUIT CARD, switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 47 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 272 . . PANEL, front . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 48 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 469 . . PANEL, front lower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 49 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NAMEPLATE, (order by model and serial number) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 50 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 089 186 . . ACTUATOR, switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4
4
1
1
1
1
6
2
4
1
10
5
2
8
1
6
1
11
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
4
2ft
2
2
2ft
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
1
4
21
1
4
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
4
OM-894 Page 45
Item
No.
Dia.
Mkgs.
Part
No.
Description
Quantity
Figure 11-1. Main Assembly (Continued)
. . 51 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 52 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 53 . . . . . . . S2 . . . . .
. . 54 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 55 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 56 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 57 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 58 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 59 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 60 . . . . . . PC5 . . . . .
. . 61 . . . . . PLG22 . . . .
. . 62 . . . . PLG8,14 . . .
......................
. . 63 . . . . . PC10 . . . .
. . 64 . . . . . PLG15 . . . .
......................
. . 65 . . . . . PLG17 . . . .
......................
. . 66 . . . . . . PC3 . . . . .
115 360
115 359
125 945
126 908
136 796
010 853
010 855
605 670
120 475
140 534
128 350
115 093
113 746
129 946
131 054
113 746
131 056
113 746
127 003
. . KNOB, arrow .125 shaft dia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . CAP, peaked . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . SWITCH, key 3posn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . BEZEL/FILTER, blue filter/non-glare 4 in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . BEZEL/FILTER, blk bezel/red filter 1.375 viewing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . FASTENER, scr sltd hd No. 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . RETAINER, scr No. 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . NUT, speed 12-24scr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . COVER, top . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . CIRCUIT CARD, digital meter flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . HOUSING, term hdr 12skt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . HOUSING PLUG & SOCKETS, (consisting of) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . TERMINAL, female 1skt 24-18 wire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . CIRCUIT CARD, filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . HOUSING RECEPTACLE & SOCKETS, (consisting of) . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . TERMINAL, female 1skt 24-18 wire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . HOUSING RECEPTACLE & SOCKETS, (consisting of) . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . TERMINAL, female 1skt 24-18 wire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . CIRCUIT CARD, pwr distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
*Recommended Spare Parts.
BE SURE TO PROVIDE MODEL AND SERIAL NUMBER WHEN ORDERING REPLACEMENT PARTS.
OM-894 Page 46
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
6
1
1
2
1
14
1
Item
No.
Dia.
Mkgs.
Part
No.
Description
132 064
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
1 .............
2 .............
3 . . . . . S1 . . . .
4 . . . . S2,3 . . . .
5 .............
6 .............
7 .............
8 .............
9 . . . PLG50 . .
10 . . . . . . . . . . . .
132 285
134 429
079 724
021 105
148 348
134 900
604 571
039 828
053 075
079 725
Quantity
Figure 11-2. Pendant (Fig 11-1 Item 30)
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
NAMEPLATE, pendant control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
CASE SECTION, front/end . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
SWITCH, PB MC SPDT 6A 125VAC red button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
SWITCH, PB Licon 76-2351 SPDT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
CASE SECTION, back/sides/end . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
STRAIN RELIEF, cable flexible .270-.480 cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
CABLE, port No. 18 4/c (order by ft) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15ft
CLAMP, cable AN-3057-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
PLUG, 4 pin MS-3106A-14S-2P . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
GUARD, switch al knurled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
3
4
5
2
1
10
4
6
9
8
7
SB-146 840
Figure 11-2. Pendant
BE SURE TO PROVIDE MODEL WHEN ORDERING REPLACEMENT PARTS.
OM-894 Page 47
5
6
7
4
1
2
8
3
9
10
21
14
15
16
17
11
18
20
13
19
12
19
SB-132 869-A
Figure 11-3. Panel, Rear w/Components
OM-894 Page 48
Item
No.
Dia.
Mkgs.
Part
No.
Description
Quantity
Figure 11-3. Panel, Rear w/Components (Fig 11-1 Item 14)
. . 1 . . . PLG25 . .
..................
. . 2 . . . . HD1 . . . .
.. 3 .............
. . 4 . . . FL1,2 . . .
. . 5 . . . . RC1 . . . .
..................
..................
. . 6 . . . . . S1 . . . .
. . 7 . . . . RC2 . . . .
. . 8 . . . . C4-7 . . .
.. 9 .............
. . 10 . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 11 . TORCH . .
. . 12 . . . NEG . . .
. . 13 . . . POS . . .
. . 14 . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 15 . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 16 . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 17 . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 17 . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 17 . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 18 . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 19 . . . C2,3 . . .
. . 20 . . . . C1 . . . .
. . 21 . . . . . . . . . . . .
130 204
114 066
156 313
129 381
084 171
094 480
094 482
116 964
111 997
073 687
144 241
136 759
115 104
099 255
039 046
039 047
601 879
039 044
601 880
039 040
039 045
039 049
601 976
142 134
144 242
120 854
. . HOUSING PLUG & SOCKETS, (consisting of) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . TERMINAL, female 1skt 20-14 wire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . TRANSDUCER, current 300A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . BRACKET, mtg current transducer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . FILTER, line pwr 115/250V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . RECEPTACLE, 14 pin MS-3102A-20-27P . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . PLUG, 14skt 97-3106A-20-27S Amphenol
. . CLAMP, cable 97-3057-1012 Amphenol
. . SWITCH, rocker SPST 10A 250VAC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . RECEPTACLE, 4skt 97-3102A-14S-2S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . CAPACITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . PANEL, rear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . CONNECTOR, clamp cable .500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . TERMINAL, pwr output neutral (consisting of) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . TERMINAL, pwr output black (consisting of) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . TERMINAL, pwr output red (consisting of) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . NUT, stl hex full fnsh .500-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . BUS BAR, term bd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . NUT, stl hex jam .500-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . TERMINAL BOARD, neutral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . TERMINAL BOARD, black . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . TERMINAL BOARD, red . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . SCREW, cap stl hexhd .500-13 x 1.500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . CAPACITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . CAPACITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . FITTING, gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
2
2
BE SURE TO PROVIDE MODEL AND SERIAL NUMBER WHEN ORDERING REPLACEMENT PARTS.
OM-894 Page 49
Notes
OM-894 Page 50
Notes
Notes
Effective January 1, 2000
(Equipment with a serial number preface of “LA” or newer)
This limited warranty supersedes all previous Miller warranties and is exclusive with no other
guarantees or warranties expressed or implied.
Warranty Questions?
Call
1-800-4-A-MILLER
for your local
Miller distributor.
Your distributor also gives
you ...
Service
You always get the fast,
reliable response you
need. Most replacement
parts can be in your
hands in 24 hours.
Support
Need fast answers to the
tough welding questions?
Contact your distributor.
The expertise of the
distributor and Miller is
there to help you, every
step of the way.
*
LIMITED WARRANTY – Subject to the terms and conditions
below, Miller Electric Mfg. Co., Appleton, Wisconsin, warrants
to its original retail purchaser that new Miller equipment sold
after the effective date of this limited warranty is free of defects
in material and workmanship at the time it is shipped by Miller.
THIS WARRANTY IS EXPRESSLY IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER
WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING THE
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS.
Within the warranty periods listed below, Miller will repair or
replace any warranted parts or components that fail due to
such defects in material or workmanship. Miller must be
notified in writing within thirty (30) days of such defect or
failure, at which time Miller will provide instructions on the
warranty claim procedures to be followed.
Miller shall honor warranty claims on warranted equipment
listed below in the event of such a failure within the warranty
time periods. All warranty time periods start on the date that
the equipment was delivered to the original retail purchaser, or
one year after the equipment is sent to a North American
distributor or eighteen months after the equipment is sent to an
International distributor.
1.
5 Years Parts – 3 Years Labor
*
*
2.
3 Years — Parts and Labor
*
*
*
*
*
*
3.
Original main power rectifiers
Inverters (input and output rectifiers only)
Transformer/Rectifier Power Sources
Plasma Arc Cutting Power Sources
Semi-Automatic and Automatic Wire Feeders
Inverter Power Supplies
Intellitig
Engine Driven Welding Generators
(NOTE: Engines are warranted separately by
the engine manufacturer.)
1 Year — Parts and Labor
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
DS-2 Wire Feeder
Motor Driven Guns (w/exception of Spoolmate
185 & Spoolmate 250)
Process Controllers
Positioners and Controllers
Automatic Motion Devices
RFCS Foot Controls
Induction Heating Power Sources
Water Coolant Systems
HF Units
Grids
Maxstar 140
Spot Welders
Load Banks
Miller Cyclomatic Equipment
Running Gear/Trailers
Plasma Cutting Torches (except APT & SAF
Models)
Field Options
(NOTE: Field options are covered under True
Blue for the remaining warranty period of the
product they are installed in, or for a minimum of
one year — whichever is greater.)
4.
6 Months — Batteries
5.
90 Days — Parts
*
*
MIG Guns/TIG Torches
Induction Heating Coils and Blankets
*
*
*
*
*
APT, ZIPCUT & PLAZCUT Model Plasma Cutting
Torches
Remote Controls
Accessory Kits
Replacement Parts (No labor)
Spoolmate 185 & Spoolmate 250
Canvas Covers
Miller’s True Blue Limited Warranty shall not apply to:
1.
Consumable components; such as contact tips,
cutting nozzles, contactors, brushes, slip rings,
relays or parts that fail due to normal wear.
2.
Items furnished by Miller, but manufactured by others,
such as engines or trade accessories. These items are
covered by the manufacturer’s warranty, if any.
3.
Equipment that has been modified by any party other
than Miller, or equipment that has been improperly
installed, improperly operated or misused based upon
industry standards, or equipment which has not had
reasonable and necessary maintenance, or equipment
which has been used for operation outside of the
specifications for the equipment.
MILLER PRODUCTS ARE INTENDED FOR PURCHASE
AND USE BY COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL USERS AND
PERSONS TRAINED AND EXPERIENCED IN THE USE
AND MAINTENANCE OF WELDING EQUIPMENT.
In the event of a warranty claim covered by this warranty, the
exclusive remedies shall be, at Miller’s option: (1) repair; or (2)
replacement; or, where authorized in writing by Miller in
appropriate cases, (3) the reasonable cost of repair or
replacement at an authorized Miller service station; or (4)
payment of or credit for the purchase price (less reasonable
depreciation based upon actual use) upon return of the goods
at customer’s risk and expense. Miller’s option of repair or
replacement will be F.O.B., Factory at Appleton, Wisconsin, or
F.O.B. at a Miller authorized service facility as determined by
Miller. Therefore no compensation or reimbursement for
transportation costs of any kind will be allowed.
TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY LAW, THE REMEDIES
PROVIDED HEREIN ARE THE SOLE AND EXCLUSIVE
REMEDIES. IN NO EVENT SHALL MILLER BE LIABLE FOR
DIRECT, INDIRECT, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL OR
CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING LOSS OF
PROFIT), WHETHER BASED ON CONTRACT, TORT OR
ANY OTHER LEGAL THEORY.
ANY EXPRESS WARRANTY NOT PROVIDED HEREIN
AND ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY, GUARANTY OR
REPRESENTATION AS TO PERFORMANCE, AND ANY
REMEDY FOR BREACH OF CONTRACT TORT OR ANY
OTHER LEGAL THEORY WHICH, BUT FOR THIS
PROVISION,
MIGHT
ARISE
BY
IMPLICATION,
OPERATION OF LAW, CUSTOM OF TRADE OR COURSE
OF DEALING, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF
MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR PARTICULAR
PURPOSE, WITH RESPECT TO ANY AND ALL
EQUIPMENT FURNISHED BY MILLER IS EXCLUDED AND
DISCLAIMED BY MILLER.
Some states in the U.S.A. do not allow limitations of how long
an implied warranty lasts, or the exclusion of incidental,
indirect, special or consequential damages, so the above
limitation or exclusion may not apply to you. This warranty
provides specific legal rights, and other rights may be
available, but may vary from state to state.
In Canada, legislation in some provinces provides for certain
additional warranties or remedies other than as stated herein,
and to the extent that they may not be waived, the limitations
and exclusions set out above may not apply. This Limited
Warranty provides specific legal rights, and other rights may
be available, but may vary from province to province.
miller_warr 7/00
Owner’s Record
Please complete and retain with your personal records.
Model Name
Serial/Style Number
Purchase Date
(Date which equipment was delivered to original customer.)
Distributor
Address
City
State
Zip
For Service
Call 1-800-4-A-Miller or see our website at www.MillerWelds.com
to locate a DISTRIBUTOR or SERVICE AGENCY near you.
Always provide Model Name and Serial/Style Number.
Contact your Distributor for:
Welding Supplies and Consumables
Options and Accessories
Personal Safety Equipment
Service and Repair
Miller Electric Mfg. Co.
An Illinois Tool Works Company
1635 West Spencer Street
Appleton, WI 54914 USA
Replacement Parts
Training (Schools, Videos, Books)
International Headquarters–USA
USA Phone: 920-735-4505 Auto-Attended
USA & Canada FAX: 920-735-4134
International FAX: 920-735-4125
Technical Manuals (Servicing Information
and Parts)
Circuit Diagrams
European Headquarters –
United Kingdom
Phone: 44 (0) 1204-593493
FAX: 44 (0) 1204-598066
Welding Process Handbooks
www.MillerWelds.com
Contact the Delivering Carrier for:
File a claim for loss or damage during
shipment.
For assistance in filing or settling claims,
contact your distributor and/or equipment
manufacturer’s Transportation Department.
PRINTED IN USA
 2000 Miller Electric Mfg. Co.
6/00
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