Miller | MH000000 | Owner Manual | Miller JETLINE 9700W WIRE FEEDER CONTROL User manual

Miller JETLINE 9700W WIRE FEEDER CONTROL  User manual
OM-9700T-02-2015
8-5-2016 V
OPERATION MANUAL
For
9700W Microprocessor
Wire Feed Control
AUGUST 2016
IMPORTANT
Read this manual carefully before installing,
Commissioning, or operating this product.
Miller Welding Automation, 281 E. Lies Rd., Carol Stream, Il 60188
Telephone: (949) 951-1515 • Fax: (949) 951-9237
Web site: www.jetline.com • E-mail: sales@jetline
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LIMITED WARRANTY
Components or parts manufactured directly by Miller Electric Mfg. Co. are subject to Miller’s True Blue® Warranty set
forth at www.millerwelds.com/support/warranty. Seller does not make any warranties for components or parts not
manufactured directly by Jetline Engineering, Miller Welding Automation, and Panasonic Welding Systems Company;
such components or parts are subject to the warranty terms of the respective manufacturer. Components and parts
manufactured by Jetline Engineering, Miller Welding Automation, and Panasonic Welding Systems Company are
subject to the following warranty terms. Terms and Conditions of Sale Seller warrants to Purchaser that the
components or parts manufactured by Seller or Panasonic Welding Systems Company shall be free from defects in
material and workmanship, and shall conform to the Seller’s specifications for the following periods:
a. 12 months from the date of shipment of the Products for components and equipment manufactured by
Panasonic Welding Systems Company including robot manipulator, controller and connecting cables; external
axis components (external axis base unit, servo amplifiers, motors, connecting cables and pre-engineered
positioners); peripheral devices (high voltage touch sensors, thru arc seam trackers); welding power sources
(internally built into the robot controller cabinet); wire feeders (separated design or integrated design, i.e.
Active Wire Torch/Feeder); or
b. 12 months from date of shipment of the Products for equipment manufactured by Jetline Engineering or
Miller Welding Automation.
In the event of a breach of the warranties set forth above, Seller will, at Seller’s option and as Seller’s sole liability and
Purchaser’s sole remedy, repair, replace or credit Purchaser’s account for, any Product that fails to conform to the
above warranty, provided that (i) during the applicable warranty period Seller is promptly notified in writing upon
discovery of such failure with a detailed explanation of any alleged deficiencies; (ii) Seller is given a reasonable
opportunity to investigate all claims; and (iii) Seller’s examination of such Product confirms the alleged deficiencies and
that the deficiencies were not caused by accident, misuse, neglect, improper installment, unauthorized alteration or
repair or improper testing. No Products may be returned to Seller until inspection and approval by Seller. All warranty
work performed shall be FOB Seller’s facility (Incoterms 2010) and freight for returned Products shall be paid for by
Purchaser. The above warranty against defects does not apply to: (1) consumable components or ordinary wear items
including but not limited to torches; or (2) defects due to (i) failure to install and perform maintenance set forth in
Product documentation, (ii) the use of components, parts, peripherals, attachments, accessories, or perishable tooling
not approved by Seller, (iii) accident, misuse, neglect, abuse, mishandling, misapplication, modification, alteration, acts
of God, or (iv) improper installation, service or maintenance. Purchaser and/or the operator of the Products are in full
control of the weld process. Seller makes no warranty regarding the quality or the success of the welds on the Products
due to factors under Purchaser’s and/or operator’s control including but not limited to welding procedures, material
types, material coatings, joint/part fit, part geometry, metallurgy, welding gases, proper machine/process
maintenance, and operator skill. EXCEPT AS SET FORTH ABOVE, SELLER MAKES NO WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION
OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED (INCLUDING NO WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR ANY
PARTICULAR PURPOSE).
- See more at: https://www.millerwelds.com/automation-terms-of-sale#sthash.l5oRebWB.dpuf
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NOTICE
The installation, operation and maintenance guidelines set out in this manual will enable you to
maintain the equipment in peak condition and achieve maximum efficiency with your welding operation.
Please read these instructions carefully to become aware of every advantage.
CAUTION
Only experienced personnel familiar with the
operation and safe practice of welding
equipment should install and/or use this
equipment.
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CONTENTS
SECTION I ........................................................................................................................................................ 1
SAFETY PRECAUTIONS – READ BEFORE USING (som 2013-09) .................................................................... 1
1.1
Symbol Usage ...................................................................................................................................... 1
1.2 Arc Welding Hazards ................................................................................................................................. 1
1.3 Additional Symbols for Installation, Operation, And Maintenance .......................................................... 4
1.4 California Proposition 65 Warnings .......................................................................................................... 6
1.5 Principal Safety Standards ........................................................................................................................ 6
1.6 EMF Information ....................................................................................................................................... 6
Section II .......................................................................................................................................................... 7
Introduction
A.
B.
.................................................................................................................................................... 7
Description .............................................................................................................................................. 8
Specifications .......................................................................................................................................... 9
Section III ....................................................................................................................................................... 12
Operation Mode 9700W ............................................................................................................................... 12
1.
RUN SCREENS ........................................................................................................................................ 13
2.
PROGRAM SCREENS .............................................................................................................................. 13
3.
AUX1-3 SCREENS ................................................................................................................................... 16
4.
PULSED SCREENS ................................................................................................................................... 16
Section IV....................................................................................................................................................... 19
Weld Screen .................................................................................................................................................. 19
Section V........................................................................................................................................................ 20
ESTOP Screen ................................................................................................................................................ 20
Section VI....................................................................................................................................................... 20
Mechanical Installation ................................................................................................................................. 20
Section VII...................................................................................................................................................... 22
Electrical Installation ..................................................................................................................................... 22
A.
Input Power ........................................................................................................................................... 22
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B.
Output Connections .............................................................................................................................. 22
C.
Interconnections ................................................................................................................................... 26
Travel Addition.............................................................................................................................................. 27
Travel & ALC Addition ................................................................................................................................... 28
Section VIII..................................................................................................................................................... 30
Maintenance ................................................................................................................................................. 30
A.
Calibration ............................................................................................................................................. 30
Initial Calibration .................................................................................................................................. 30
Touch-up Calibration ............................................................................................................................ 30
B.
Regular Maintenance ............................................................................................................................ 30
Section IX ....................................................................................................................................................... 32
Parts Lists ...................................................................................................................................................... 32
Section X ........................................................................................................................................................ 37
PCB Descriptions ........................................................................................................................................... 37
Section XI ....................................................................................................................................................... 41
Electrical Diagrams ........................................................................................................................................ 41
Appendix A 9700W Calibration Sub Menu Mode
......................................................................................... 44
Appendix B 9700W Configuration Sub Menu Mode
..................................................................................... 50
Appendix C 9700W Auto Calibration............................................................................................................. 54
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SECTION I
SAFETY PRECAUTIONS – READ BEFORE USING
(som 2013-09)
Protect yourself and others from injury – read, follow and save these important safety precautions and operating instructions.
1.1
Symbol Usage
DANGER! − Indicates a hazardous situation which, if not avoided, will result in death or serious injury. The possible hazards are shown in the
adjoining symbols or explained in the text.
Indicates a hazardous situation which, if not avoided, could result in death or serious injury. The possible hazards are shown in the adjoining symbols or
explained in the text.
NOTICE − Indicates statements not related to personal injury.
 Indicates special instructions.
This group of symbols means: Warning! Watch Out! ELECTRIC SHOCK, MOVING PARTS, and HOT PARTS hazards.
Consult symbols and related instructions below for necessary actions to avoid the hazards.
1.2 Arc Welding Hazards
The symbols shown below are used throughout this manual to call attention to and identify possible hazards. When you see the symbol,
watch out, and follow the related instructions to avoid the hazard. The safety information given below is only a summary of the more
complete safety information found in the Safety Standards listed in Section 1-5. Read and follow all Safety Standards.
Only qualified persons should install, operate, maintain, and repair this unit.
During operation, keep everybody, especially children, away.
ELECTRIC SHOCK can kill.
Touching live electrical parts can cause fatal shocks or severe burns. The electrode and work circuit is electrically live whenever the output is
on. The input power circuit and machine internal circuits are also live when power is on. In semiautomatic or automatic wire welding, the wire,
wire reel, drive roll housing, and all metal parts touching the welding wire are electrically live. Incorrectly installed or improperly grounded
equipment is a hazard.

Do not touch live electrical parts.

Wear dry, hole-free insulating gloves and body protection.

Insulate yourself from work and ground using dry insulating mats or covers big enough to prevent any physical contact with the work
or ground.

Do not use AC output in damp areas, if movement is confined, or if there is a danger of falling.

Use AC output ONLY if required for the welding process.

If AC output is required, use remote output control if present on unit.

Additional safety precautions are required when any of the following electrically hazardous conditions are present: in damp locations
or while wearing wet clothing; on metal structures such as floors, gratings, or scaffolds; when in cramped positions such as sitting,
kneeling, or lying; or when there is a high risk of unavoidable or accidental contact with the work piece or ground. For these
conditions, use the following equipment in order presented: 1) a semiautomatic DC constant voltage (wire) welder, 2) a DC manual
(stick) welder, or 3) an AC welder with reduced open-circuit voltage. In most situations, use of a DC, constant voltage wire welder is
recommended. And, do not work alone!

Disconnect input power or stop engine before installing or servicing this equipment. Lockout/tagout input power according to OSHA
29 CFR 1910.147 (see Safety Standards).

Properly install, ground, and operate this equipment according to its Owner’s Manual and national, state, and local codes.

Always verify the supply ground − check and be sure that input power cord ground wire is properly connected to ground terminal in
disconnect box or that cord plug is connected to a properly grounded receptacle outlet.

When making input connections, attach proper grounding conductor first − double-check connections.

Keep cords dry, free of oil and grease, and protected from hot metal and sparks.

Frequently inspect input power cord and ground conductor for damage or bare wiring – replace immediately if damaged – bare
wiring can kill.
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Turn off all equipment when not in use.
Do not use worn, damaged, undersized, or repaired cables.
Do not drape cables over your body.
If earth grounding of the workpiece is required, ground it directly with a separate cable.
Do not touch electrode if you are in contact with the work, ground, or another electrode from a different machine.
Do not touch electrode holders connected to two welding machines at the same time since double open-circuit voltage will be
present.
Use only well-maintained equipment. Repair or replace damaged parts at once. Maintain unit according to manual.
Wear a safety harness if working above floor level.
Keep all panels and covers securely in place.
Clamp work cable with good metal-to-metal contact to workpiece or worktable as near the weld as practical.
Insulate work clamp when not connected to workpiece to prevent contact with any metal object.
Do not connect more than one electrode or work cable to any single weld output terminal. Disconnect cable for process not in use.
Use GFCI protection when operating auxiliary equipment in damp or wet locations.
SIGNIFICANT DC VOLTAGE exists in inverter welding power sources AFTER removal of input power.

Turn Off inverter, disconnect input power, and discharge input capacitors according to instructions in Maintenance Section before
touching any parts.
HOT PARTS can burn.
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Do not touch hot parts bare handed.
Allow cooling period before working on equipment.
To handle hot parts, use proper tools and/or wear heavy, insulated welding gloves and clothing to prevent burns.
FUMES AND GASES can be hazardous.
Welding produces fumes and gases. Breathing these fumes and gases can be hazardous to your health.

Keep your head out of the fumes. Do not breathe the fumes.

If inside, ventilate the area and/or use local forced ventilation at the arc to remove welding fumes and gases. The recommended way
to determine adequate ventilation is to sample for the composition and quantity of fumes and gases to which personnel are
exposed.

If ventilation is poor, wear an approved air-supplied respirator.

Read and understand the Safety Data Sheets (SDSs) and the manufacturer’s instructions for adhesives, coatings, cleaners,
consumables, coolants, degreasers, fluxes, and metals.

Work in a confined space only if it is well ventilated, or while wearing an air-supplied respirator. Always have a trained watch-person
nearby. Welding fumes and gases can displace air and lower the oxygen level causing injury or death. Be sure the breathing air is
safe.

Do not weld in locations near degreasing, cleaning, or spraying operations. The heat and rays of the arc can react with vapors to
form highly toxic and irritating gases.

Do not weld on coated metals, such as galvanized, lead, or cadmium plated steel, unless the coating is removed from the weld area,
the area is well ventilated, and while wearing an air-supplied respirator. The coatings and any metals containing these elements can
give off toxic fumes if welded.
ARC RAYS can burn eyes and skin.
Arc rays from the welding process produce intense visible and invisible (ultraviolet and infrared) rays that can burn eyes and skin. Sparks fly off
from the weld.

Wear an approved welding helmet fitted with a proper shade of filter lenses to protect your face and eyes from arc rays and sparks
when welding or watching (see ANSI Z49.1 and Z87.1 listed in Safety Standards).

Wear approved safety glasses with side shields under your helmet.

Use protective screens or barriers to protect others from flash,glare and sparks; warn others not to watch the arc.

Wear body protection made from durable, flame−resistant material (leather, heavy cotton, wool). Body protection includes oil-free
clothing such as leather gloves, heavy shirt, cuffless trousers, high shoes, and a cap.
2
WELDING can cause fire or explosion.
Welding on closed containers, such as tanks, drums, or pipes, can cause them to blow up. Sparks can fly off from the welding arc. The flying
sparks, hot workpiece, and hot equipment can cause fires and burns. Accidental contact of electrode to metal objects can cause sparks,
explosion, overheating, or fire. Check and be sure the area is safe before doing any welding.

Remove all flammables within 35 ft (10.7 m) of the welding arc. If this is not possible, tightly cover them with approved covers.

Do not weld where flying sparks can strike flammable material.

Protect yourself and others from flying sparks and hot metal.

Be alert that welding sparks and hot materials from welding can easily go through small cracks and openings to adjacent areas.

Watch for fire, and keep a fire extinguisher nearby.

Be aware that welding on a ceiling, floor, bulkhead, or partition can cause fire on the hidden side.

Do not weld on containers that have held combustibles, or on closed containers such as tanks, drums, or pipes unless they are
properly prepared according to AWS F4.1 and AWS A6.0 (see Safety Standards).

Do not weld where the atmosphere may contain flammable dust, gas, or liquid vapors (such as gasoline).

Connect work cable to the work as close to the welding area as practical to prevent welding current from traveling long, possibly
unknown paths and causing electric shock, sparks, and fire hazards.

Do not use welder to thaw frozen pipes.

Remove stick electrode from holder or cut off welding wire at contact tip when not in use.

Wear body protection made from durable, flame−resistant material (leather, heavy cotton, wool). Body protection includes oil-free
clothing such as leather gloves, heavy shirt, cuffless trousers, high shoes, and a cap.

Remove any combustibles, such as a butane lighter or matches, from your person before doing any welding.

After completion of work, inspect area to ensure it is free of sparks, glowing embers, and flames.

Use only correct fuses or circuit breakers. Do not oversize or bypass them.

Follow requirements in OSHA 1910.252 (a) (2) (iv) and NFPA 51B for hot work and have a fire watcher and extinguisher nearby.
FLYING METAL or DIRT can injure eyes.
Read and understand the Safety Data Sheets (SDSs) and the manufacturer’s instructions for adhesives, coatings, cleaners, consumables,
coolants, degreasers, fluxes, and metals.

Welding, chipping, wire brushing, and grinding cause sparks and flying metal. As welds cool, they can throw off slag.

Wear approved safety glasses with side shields even under your welding helmet.
BUILDUP OF GAS can injure or kill.
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Shut off compressed gas supply when not in use.
Always ventilate confined spaces or use approved air-supplied respirator.
ELECTRIC AND MAGNETIC FIELDS (EMF) can affect Implanted Medical Devices.
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Wearers of Pacemakers and other Implanted Medical Devices should keep away.
Implanted Medical Device wearers should consult their doctor and the device manufacturer before going near arc welding, spot
welding, gouging, plasma arc cutting, or induction heating operations.
NOISE can damage hearing.
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Noise from some processes or equipment can damage hearing.
Wear approved ear protection if noise level is high.
3
CYLINDERS can explode if damaged.
Compressed gas cylinders contain gas under high pressure. If damaged, a cylinder can explode. Since gas cylinders are normally part of the
welding process, be sure to treat them carefully.
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Protect compressed gas cylinders from excessive heat, mechanical shocks, physical damage, slag, open flames, sparks, and arcs.
Install cylinders in an upright position by securing to a stationary support or cylinder rack to prevent falling or tipping.
Keep cylinders away from any welding or other electrical circuits.
Never drape a welding torch over a gas cylinder.
Never allow a welding electrode to touch any cylinder.
Never weld on a pressurized cylinder − explosion will result.
Use only correct compressed gas cylinders, regulators, hoses, and fittings designed for the specific application; maintain them and
associated parts in good condition.
Turn face away from valve outlet when opening cylinder valve. Do not stand in front of or behind the regulator when opening the
valve.
Keep protective cap in place over valve except when cylinder is in use or connected for use.
Use the right equipment, correct procedures, and sufficient number of persons to lift and move cylinders.
Read and follow instructions on compressed gas cylinders, associated equipment, and Compressed Gas Association (CGA) publication
P-1 listed in Safety Standards.
1.3 Additional Symbols for Installation, Operation, And Maintenance
FIRE OR EXPLOSION hazard.
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Do not install or place unit on, over, or near combustible surfaces.
Do not install unit near flammables.
Do not overload building wiring − be sure power supply system is properly sized, rated, and protected to handle this unit.
FALLING EQUIPMENT can injure.
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Use lifting eye to lift unit only, NOT running gear, gas cylinders, or any other accessories.
Use equipment of adequate capacity to lift and support unit.
If using lift forks to move unit, be sure forks are long enough to extend beyond opposite side of unit.
Keep equipment (cables and cords) away from moving vehicles when working from an aerial location.
Follow the guidelines in the Applications Manual for the Revised NIOSH Lifting Equation (Publication No. 94−110) when manually
lifting heavy parts or equipment.
OVERUSE can cause OVERHEATING
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Allow cooling period; follow rated duty cycle.
Reduce current or reduce duty cycle before starting to weld again.
Do not block or filter airflow to unit.
FLYING SPARKS can injure.
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Wear a face shield to protect eyes and face.
Shape tungsten electrode only on grinder with proper guards in a safe location wearing proper face, hand, and body protection.
Sparks can cause fires — keep flammables away.
STATIC (ESD) can damage PC boards.
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Put on grounded wrist strap BEFORE handling boards or parts.
Use proper static-proof bags and boxes to store, move, or ship PC boards.
4
MOVING PARTS can injure.
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Keep away from moving parts.
Keep away from pinch points such as drive rolls.
WELDING WIRE can injure.
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Do not press gun trigger until instructed to do so.
Do not point gun toward any part of the body, other people, or any metal when threading welding wire.
BATTERY EXPLOSION can injure.
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Do not use welder to charge batteries or jump start vehicles unless it has a battery charging feature designed for this purpose.
MOVING PARTS can injure.
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Keep away from moving parts such as fans.
Keep all doors, panels, covers, and guards closed and securely in place.
Have only qualified persons remove doors, panels, covers, or guards for maintenance and troubleshooting as necessary.
Reinstall doors, panels, covers, or guards when maintenance is finished and before reconnecting input power.
READ INSTRUCTIONS.
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Read and follow all labels and the Owner’s Manual carefully before installing, operating, or servicing unit. Read the safety
information at the beginning of the manual and in each section.
Use only genuine replacement parts from the manufacturer.
Perform maintenance and service according to the Owner’s Manuals, industry standards, and national, state, and local codes.
H.F. RADIATION can cause interference.
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High-frequency (H.F.) can interfere with radio navigation, safety services, computers, and communications equipment.
Have only qualified persons familiar with electronic equipment perform this installation.
The user is responsible for having a qualified electrician promptly correct any interference problem resulting from the installation.
If notified by the FCC about interference, stop using the equipment at once.
Have the installation regularly checked and maintained.
Keep high-frequency source doors and panels tightly shut, keep spark gaps at correct setting, and use grounding and shielding to
minimize the possibility of interference.
ARC WELDING can cause interference.
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Electromagnetic energy can interfere with sensitive electronic equipment such as computers and computer-driven equipment such
as robots.
Be sure all equipment in the welding area is electromagnetically compatible.
To reduce possible interference, keep weld cables as short as possible, close together, and down low, such as on the floor.
Locate welding operation 100 meters from any sensitive electronic equipment.
Be sure this welding machine is installed and grounded according to this manual.
If interference still occurs, the user must take extra measures such as moving the welding machine, using shielded cables, using line
filters, or shielding the work area.
5
1.4 California Proposition 65 Warnings
Welding or cutting equipment produces fumes or gases which contain chemicals known to the State of California to cause birth defects
and, in some cases, cancer. (California Health & Safety Code Section 25249.5 et seq.)
This product contains chemicals, including lead, known to the state of California to cause cancer, birth defects, or other reproductive
harm. Wash hands after use.
1.5 Principal Safety Standards
Safety in Welding, Cutting, and Allied Processes, ANSI Standard Z49.1, is available as a free download from the American Welding Society at
http://www.aws.org or purchased from Global Engineering Documents (phone: 1-877-413-5184, website: www.global.ihs.com).
Safe Practices for the Preparation of Containers and Piping for Welding and Cutting, American Welding Society Standard AWS F4.1, from Global
Engineering Documents (phone: 1-877-413-5184, website: www.global.ihs.com).
Safe Practices for Welding and Cutting Containers that have Held Combustibles, American Welding Society Standard AWS A6.0, from Global
EngineeringDocuments (phone: 1-877-413-5184, website: www.global.ihs.com).
National Electrical Code, NFPA Standard 70, from National Fire Protection Association, Quincy, MA 02269 (phone: 1-800-344-3555, website:
www.nfpa.org and www. sparky.org).
Safe Handling of Compressed Gases in Cylinders, CGA Pamphlet P-1, from Compressed Gas Association, 14501 George Carter Way, Suite 103,
Chantilly, VA 20151 (phone: 703-788-2700, website:www.cganet.com).
Safety in Welding, Cutting, and Allied Processes, CSA Standard W117.2, from Canadian Standards Association, Standards Sales, 5060 Spectrum Way,
Suite 100, Ontario, Canada L4W 5NS (phone: 800-463-6727, website: www.csa-international.org).
Safe Practice For Occupational And Educational Eye And Face Protection, ANSI Standard Z87.1, from American National Standards Institute, 25 West
43rd Street, New York, NY 10036 (phone: 212-642-4900, web-site: www.ansi.org).
Standard for Fire Prevention During Welding, Cutting, and Other Hot Work, NFPA Standard 51B, from National Fire Protection Association, Quincy,
MA 02269 (phone: 1-800-344-3555, website: www.nfpa.org.
OSHA, Occupational Safety and Health Standards for General Industry, Title 29, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 1910, Subpart Q, and Part
1926, Subpart J, from U.S. Government Printing Office, Superintendent of Documents, P.O. Box 371954, Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954 (phone: 1-866512-1800) (there are 10 OSHA Regional Offices— phone for Region 5, Chicago, is 312-353-2220, website: www.osha.gov).
Applications Manual for the Revised NIOSH Lifting Equation, The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), 1600 Clifton Rd,
Atlanta, GA 30333 (phone: 1-800-232-4636, website: www.cdc.gov/NIOSH).
1.6 EMF Information
Electric current flowing through any conductor causes localized electric and magnetic fields (EMF). The current from arc welding (and allied processes
including spot welding, gouging, plasma arc cutting, and induction heating operations) creates an EMF field around the welding circuit. EMF fields
may interfere with some medical implants, e.g. pacemakers. Protective measures for persons wearing medical implants have to be taken. For
example, restrict access for passers−by or conduct individual risk assessment for welders. All welders should use the following procedures in order to
minimize exposure to EMF fields from the welding circuit:
1. Keep cables close together by twisting or taping them, or using a cable cover.
2. Do not place your body between welding cables. Arrange cables to one side and away from the operator.
3. Do not coil or drape cables around your body.
4. Keep head and trunk as far away from the equipment in the welding circuit as possible.
5. Connect work clamp to workpiece as close to the weld as possible.
6. Do not work next to, sit or lean on the welding power source.
7. Do not weld whilst carrying the welding power source or wire feeder.
About Implanted Medical Devices:
Implanted Medical Device wearers should consult their doctor and the device manufacturer before performing or going near arc welding, spot
welding, gouging, plasma arc cutting, or induction heating operations. If cleared by your doctor, then following the above procedures is recommended.
6
SECTION II
INTRODUCTION
This technical manual provides details of the set up and calibration procedures for the control as well as
providing information about the interfacing of the system with other 9700 series controls and ancillary
controls. It also provides troubleshooting and maintenance information.
The 9700W microprocessor controller has been developed to provide high quality, precision wire feed
control. The quality design and workmanship of this control will provide many years of dependable service.
The 9700W control includes a motor controller and can therefore be connected directly to the wire feed
motor. It is used for motors up to ½ HP of the type used on Miller Welding Automation standard wire feed.
It provides wire feed accuracy levels suitable for most conventional applications.
Modes of operation are:
Operator Mode:
This is the mode used by the welding operator to run the unit. It permits the wire feed speed, start and stop
delays to be adjusted.
Configuration Mode:
This mode is used to set up of the unit for specific applications. It permits the setting of the wire feed
speeds, and interface with other control boxes and features are used in a dedicated system.
Calibration Mode:
In this mode, the closed loop can be turned on and off, the unit can be set for inch or metric units and the
calibration can be checked and set.
7
A. Description
The 9700W control is a microprocessor-based control designed for the control of welding wire feed.
It is primarily used with GTAW and PAW for both cold wire and hot wire delivery. The delivery
mechanism requires other parts. In the case of hot wire an additional power source is needed. The
9700W is one of a series of controls designed for ease-of-use and for accurate control of various
drive motors for different weld applications.
The control is packaged in a conveniently-sized enclosure with Amphenol connectors. The
enclosure has four mounting holes to permit it to be fastened to the face of a travel carriage or to a
control podium. The front panel is a membrane overlay with a graphic backlit LCD display and
switches to control the setup and operation of the unit.
The 9700W control has been designed to be easy to use. Its operation is made easier by the use
of the display which guides you through the setup process, and during the welding sequence, tells
you what is happening.
Figure 1: Front view of 9700W control and mounting dimensions.
8
B. SPECIFICATIONS
Processor:
Microprocessor
Display:
Graphic Backlit LCD
Panel:
Polycarbonate overlay
Input:
120 VAC, 1 ph, 50/60 Hz, 10 amps
240 VAC, 1 ph, 50/60 Hz, 5 amps
Power cord:
Standard 120 VAC 6 ft. (1.8 m) long
Dimensions:
Weight:
14 lbs. (6 kg)
Height:
8” (200 mm)
Width:
10” (250 mm)
Depth:
6” (150 mm)
Connections:
Welding Power Supply
Outputs:
1 Analog, 8 Digital
Inputs:
2 Analog, 8 Digital
Second 9700 Control S2 to S2 connection
Output:
Pulse Lockout
Input:
Remote Run, Pulse Lockout
9
Motor (90VDC Permanent Magnet)
Output:
Motor voltage
Input:
Tach-generator voltage
10
Figure 2: 9700W Front Panel Showing Operator Interface and functions of dials, switches
4 Line
display
Screen
Knob, Dial adjust for screen- CW
more and CCW less
3 Remote Receptacles
S3 top, S2 middle, S1 at
bottom
4 touch arrows/buttons for
screen navigation
On/off Circuit
Breaker
120 VAC input
Weld – start and stop
Mounting holes-4 places
Ground Stud
11
SECTION III
OPERATION MODE 9700W
This mode is used by the operator to feed weld wire.
To set the conditions for operation, the operator can scroll through the various screens and make
the appropriate changes using the up/down and left/right arrows on the face of the control.
When changing a numeric value each click of the dial will increase or decrease the value by one. If
the up button is pressed then each click of the dial increases or decreases the value by 10. Pressing
the up button again allows the dial to change values by 100 per click. Using the down button will
move the values back to 10 and pressing down again will move the values back to 1. The number
location to be changed will be inversed until the dial is moved. The number 10 will appear on the
top line while the up and down buttons will change the number location.
Operator Mode consists of two main sections- Run, and
Program. Both sections are linked together to form one list.
Some entries in the program section also have sub menus.
The four sub menus are –Aux1, Aux2, Aux3 and Pulsed. Use
the right arrow to enter them and then you navigate as you
would before. Use the left arrow to return to the Operator
mode main section.
Please note that not all the screens in this manual appear on your 9700W. Your system or control
might not have the function. During programming if you disable a function it will not appear in run
screens.
WELCOME SCREEN
This screen appears automatically when the unit is switched on and remains on the screen for
approximately 3 seconds.
The next screen will appear automatically.
12
1. RUN SCREENS
The operator must be in either of these two screens in order to begin a weld. If the right or left buttons are
pressed in the run screens, it will cause the wire to feed. A single press will give jog speed. A double press
will give rapid speed. If the up button is pressed with moving, that speed will be maintained without the
buttons pressed until the stop button is pressed. When in the program portion of the menu, a left arrow
will save all the program parameters to the main menu.
WIRE SPEED
RUN
The wire screen sets the travel speed of the torch during the weld.
RUN
NORMAL
WIRE IPM
20.0
ADJUST
UNLOCKED
Wire feed speed is shown in IPM (inches per minute) or CPM
(centimeters per minute).
The number of decimal places is set in Configuration / Set DP.
The unit will limit the programmed speed to be between the high
and low speeds set up in the Calibration.
UNLOCKED OR LOCKED
RUN
WIRE IPM
20.00
ADJUST
UNLOCKED
WIRE START DLY
The unlocked setting allows the user to change the speed during
the weld by adjusting the knob. Locked does not allow the user to
change the speed during the weld.
0.0
2. PROGRAM SCREENS
Pressing the left arrow in any of the program screens will save the entire program to the permanent
memory of the 9700W.
WIRE START DLY
PROGRAM
ADJUST
WIRE START DLY
WIRE STOP DLY
UNLOCKED
0.0
0.0
If the wire is started by the external contact this is the delay after
getting the signal from when the wire starts to move. If started by
the Start button on the panel this value is dismissed and the wire
starts immediately. Minimum value is 0.0, Maximum value is
10.0.
13
WIRE STOP DLY
PROGRAM
WIRE START DLY
WIRE STOP DLY
RAMP TIME
0.0
0.0
0.0
RAMP TIME
PROGRAM
WIRE STOP DLY
RAMP TIME
AUX1
0.0
0.0
llu
AUX1
AUX2
0.0
llu
llu
AUX2
AUX3
llu
llu
llu
AUX3
PULSED
If the right button is pressed you will go into the AUX2 sub menu.
This screen will only appear if Configuration / AUX2 name has
been assigned a name and then that name will appear in the
menu. See AUX1-3 section for details of this sub menu.
AUX3 PROGRAM SUB MENU SCREEN
PROGRAM
AUX2
If the right button is pressed you will go into the AUX1 sub menu.
This screen will only appear if Configuration Mode / AUX1 name
has been assigned a name and then that name will appear in the
menu. See AUX1-3 section for details of this sub menu.
AUX2 PROGRAM SUB MENU SCREEN
PROGRAM
AUX1
After the wire starts feeding, this is the time the wire will ramp up
from 0.0 to its programmed speed. This is most likely used in hot
wire applications when high wire speeds are used to ramp wire
with the heat put into the part. The line will only appear if
Configuration Mode / Ramp Enable is Yes. Minimum value is
0.0, Maximum value is 10.0.
AUX1 PROGRAM SUB MENU SCREEN
PROGRAM
RAMP TIME
If the wire is started by the external contact this is how long after
the contact has been removed before the wire will start begin
retract. Otherwise retracts starts when stop is pressed. Minimum
value is 0.0, Maximum value is 10.0.
llu
llu
llu
If the right button is pressed you will go into the AUX3 sub menu.
This screen will only appear if Configuration / AUX3 name has
been assigned a name and then that name will appear in the
menu. See AUX1-3 section for details of this sub menu.
14
PULSED
PROGRAM
AUX3
PULSED
RETRACT TIME
llu
llu
0.00
RETRACT TIME
PROGRAM
PULSED
RETRACT TIME
CALIBRATION
llu
0.00
CALIBRATION
CONFIGURATION
CALIBRATION
0.00
llu
llu
CONFIGURATION
RUN
If the right button is pressed you will go into the Calibration Mode
sub menu. If a password was selected, it must first be entered
before you can get into the sub menu. The password is a five
digit Alpha/Numeric and is set by turning the knob/dial to change
each place. The right arrow moves to the next character to the
right and the left arrow moves back to the left. On the fifth and
last character when entering the password, press the right key; if
correct you will enter the sub menu, if not you will be returned to
the program menu. See appendix A for details of this sub menu.
CONFIGURATION
PROGRAM
CALIBRATION
This is the amount of time that the wire will retract at rapid speed
when the wire stops.
llu
PROGRAM
RETRACT TIME
If the right button is pressed you will go into the Pulsed sub menu.
This screen will only appear if Configuration Mode / Pulse Enable
is Yes. See Pulsed section for details of this sub menu.
llu
llu
NORMAL
If the right button is pressed you will go into the Configuration
Mode sub menu. If a password was selected it must first be
entered before you can get into the sub menu. The password is a
five digit Alpha/Numeric and is set by turning the knob to change
each place. The right arrow moves to the next character to the
right and left arrow moves back to the left. On the fifth and last
character when entering the password, press the right key; if
correct you will enter the sub menu, if not you will be returned to
the main menu. See appendix B for details of this sub menu.
15
RUN
PROGRAM
CONFIGURATION
RUN
WIRE IPM
llu
NORMAL
20.00
Run is either Normal or Dry. If Dry, the wire will not feed when the
external signal is send. Also the Run will change to Dry Run in
the run screens. If Normal, the system will run normally on the
external start.
3. AUX1-3 SCREENS
To get out of the AUX1-3 sub menu all you have to do is press the left arrow. Also if you do have an auxiliary
output the name shown will be what is programmed in Configuration Mode / AUX1-3
START DELAY
AUX1
AUX1
START DLY
STOP DLY
DISABLE
0.0
0.0
STOP DELAY
AUX1
START DLY
STOP DLY
AUX1
0.0
0.0
AUX1
START DLY
Stop Dly is the amount of time that the auxiliary output is shorted
after the 9700W gets a stop command. Minimum value is 0.0,
Maximum value is 10.0.
DISABLE
AUX1-3 ENABLE/DISABLE
AUX1
STOP DLY
This is the amount of time from when the 9700W gets a start
command until the output becomes active. Minimum value is 0.0,
Maximum value is 10.0.
0.0
DISABLE
AUX 1-3 is enable or disable. If enable then the auxiliary output
signal will be activated during the weld. If disable the auxiliary
output will stay open.
0.0
4. PULSED SCREENS
To get out of the pulsed sub menu all you have to do is press the left arrow.
16
PULSED WIRE
PULSED
LOW TIME
PULSED WIRE
LOW %
0.50
ON
50.0
LOW PERCENTAGE
PULSED
PULSED WIRE
LOW %
WIRE PULSING
ON
50.0
WIRE PULSING
HIGH TIME
WIRING PULSING
50.0
TIMED
0.75
HIGH TIME
LOW TIME
TIMED
0.75
0.50
LOW TIME
PULSED WIRE
If Wire Pulsing is in timed, this is the amount of time in seconds
that the wire will stay in the high wire feed. Minimum value is
0.05, Maximum value is 10.0.
WIRING PULSING
PULSED
HIGH TIME
Wire Pulsing is either timed or synch. For timed, the high and low
time period is determined by High and Low Time. For synch the
high speed is when the weld current is in the high state and low
speed is during the low welding current.
HIGH TIME
PULSED
WIRE PULSING
Low % is the percentage of the wire feed speed when
commanded to move at the slower speed . Minimum value is 0.0,
Maximum value is 100.0.
TIMED
PULSED
LOW %
Pulsed Wire is on or off. If on, the wire will pulse, if off, it will feed
at the command speed.
0.75
0.50
If Wire Pulsing is in timed, this is the amount of time in seconds
that the wire will stay in the low wire feed. Minimum value is 0.05,
Maximum value is 10.0.
ON
17
18
SECTION IV
WELD SCREEN
RUN
LINE 1
12
12.1
WELD
WIRE IPM
AUX1
AUX2
AUX3
EXT
LINE 2
LINE 3
LINE 4
LINE 1
The RUN on the left is highlighted to show that the 9700W is in the run state
LINE 2
The label of the line informs you of the current state of the weld schedule. The states that can be shown are
as follows: START DLY, WELD and STOP DLY. If the number is counting down it is how long that segment of
the weld schedule is left (START DLY and STOP DLY). It will count up in WELD since the 9700W does not
know how long the weld segment will be.
LINE 3
This line shows the actual or the programmed wire feed speed as set in the Calibration menu. If the line is
highlighted that means that the speed can be changed by using the dial. If the wire feed speed is changed,
the new speed will be used for the next weld, but will not be saved to permanent memory unless it is saved
after the weld is finished. To save go back to program menu and press the left arrow button.
LINE 4
This line shows that status of various outputs and inputs. AUX1, AUX2, and AUX3 are highlighted when the
9700W sends out an active signal. If the EXT is highlighted, it means the 9700W has received an external
start command. In this case the STOP button acts like a wire lock command. Pressing the STOP button will
cause the wire to stop feeding and the START button would start the wire again.
19
SECTION V
ESTOP SCREEN
RUN
DRY RUN
WIRE IPM
ADJUST
ESTOP
OFF
12.1
ESTOP
If the 9700W is in ESTOP at any time it will display in the
upper right corner of the screen. In addition the back light for
the display will flash so it can be easily seen.
UNLOCKED
SECTION VI
MECHANICAL INSTALLATION
The 9700W control is mounted in a steel enclosure with a hinged front panel to facilitate servicing. The
front panel consists of a polycarbonate overlay with tactile switches and integrated touch pads.
Three Amphenol connectors are located on the right side of the enclosure. When planning the location
of the 9700W control, sufficient access for the connections should be provided at the right hand side of
the unit, we recommend allowing a space not less than 5” (125 mm).
The front panel is hinged for servicing purposes. The hinge is located at the left hand side of the
enclosure so it is important that you do not locate the 9700W too close to an obstruction on the left
side which would block the full opening of the door.
Plates are provided on the rear of the enclosure with four mounting holes, two at the top and two at
the bottom. The location and size of these holes is shown on the figure below. Use ¼” (6 mm)
diameter screws to secure the control to the mounting face.
We recommend that the control be mounted so that front panel is vertical or sloped back at an angle of
no more than 30° from the vertical. The vertical or slightly sloping front panel position will prove to be
best for the operator.
Because the control includes a digital display, the best location will be where the display is close to eye
height from the floor. The vertical front panel orientation ensures that the LCD display is clearly visible
- avoid a location where very bright light falls on the display, this causes a reflection from the
20
transparent overlay and make it difficult to clearly read the display.
Figure 3: Sheet Metal Enclosure showing dimensions for mounting.
21
SECTION VII
ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION
A. Input Power
The 9700W control is designed to operate on either 115VAC or 230VAC 50/60HZ and is fitted with a 10 amp
circuit breaker suitable for either voltage. The unit is typically configured for your choice of voltage prior to
shipment. The unit ships with a standard 6 foot length cable for 115/120 VAC only input. If it is necessary to
change the input voltage, this can be done as follows:
Make sure no power is apply to unit during this procedure.
Open the front door of the unit and locate the motor control module (Picture of jumpers on motor drive).
At the top, left hand side of the module there are two jumpers, these are marked J1A and J1B. These
should be set as shown in the diagram below.
Figure 4: Input Voltage change over.
Since the 9700W is fitted with an IEC 60320-1 C14 power receptacle you will need to get a power cord with
an IEC 60320-1 C13 connector rated for 250VAC to use with 220/230VAC.
B. Output Connections
All output connections to and from the 9700W control use Amphenol connectors. There are three
Amphenol connectors, the lower one is marked S1, the center one is S2 and the upper one is S3.
Interconnection of the 9700W control with associated equipment is shown on the following pages.
22
Figure 5: Amphenol Connectors-Pin locations and designations
Figure 6: Location of keyway on connector @ 6 o’clock.
S1 CONNECTOR
The S1 connector is used to connect the 9700W control to auxiliary controls. If you need to provide your
own cable, it should be fitted with the following:
Amphenol plug 97-3106A-20-27S
Cord Grip
97-3057-1012-1
23
Pin Connection Details
Connections should be made as shown below.
JOG LEFT (Pins A & B)
Function: When this circuit is completed, the 9700W will jog the wire the same direction as the left arrow if
in a Run screen.
Electrical: You can connect a dry relay contact or an open collector signal, Pin A is high, Pin B is low. Either
one must handle 12VDC at 4mA.
JOG RIGHT (Pins C & D)
Function: When this circuit is completed, the 9700W will jog the wire the same direction as the right arrow
if in a Run screen.
Electrical: You can connect a dry relay contact or an open collector signal, Pin C is high, Pin D is low. Either
one must handle 12VDC at 4mA.
PULSE LOCKOUT INPUT (Pins E & F)
Function: When the control is connected to a power supply with pulse current facilities, it is sometimes
necessary to the wire feed with the current pulsing. When the control is connected to the current
background signal through these connections the wire can pulse with the arc.
Electrical: You can connect a dry relay contact or an open collector signal, Pin E is high, Pin F is low. Either
one must handle 12VDC at 4mA.
AUX2 OUTPUT (Pins G & H)
Function: When the “Arc On” signal has been received by the control, this contact closes, relaying the signal
to anther device to initiate its function. This contact opens during the stop sequence.
Electrical: We supply a dry relay contact capable of handling 110VAC at 0.6A.
EMERGENCY STOP OUTPUT CONTACT (Pins I & J)
Function: When the emergency stop button is pressed, this contact will open up. This will prohibit the
power supply from initiating or maintaining a welding arc.
Electrical: We supply a dry relay contact capable of handling 110VAC at 0.6A.
PULSE LOCKOUT OUTPUT (Pins K & L)
Function: Permits the 9700W to pass a pulse signal to another device. This signal would be used if it is
desired to pulse a third party control. It is not used with Miller Welding Automation 9600 series controlled
equipment. The signal from these pins directly follows the Pulse Lockout Input signal.
Electrical: This is an open collector output, Pin K is high, Pin L is low.
AUX3 OUTPUT (Pins M & N)
24
Function: When the “Arc On” signal has been received by the control, this contact closes, relaying the signal
to anther device to initiate its function. This contact opens during the stop sequence.
Electrical: We supply a dry relay contact capable of handling 110VAC at 0.6A.
S2 CONNECTOR
The S2 connector is used to connect the 9700W wire feed control to a 9700T travel control. In certain
circumstances, it can be interfaced with a PLC or other control interface. Miller Welding Automation can
provide standard connecting cables to be connected to the S2 connector on the 9700W control. If you need
to provide your own cable, it should be fitted with the following:
Amphenol plug 97-3106A-20-27P
Cord Grip
97-3057-1012-1
Pin Connection Details
Connections should be made as shown below.
REMOTE START INPUT (Pins A & B)
Function: When this circuit is completed, the 9700W control will start the programmed sequence. The
process will continue until this contact is removed.
Electrical: You can connect a dry relay contact or an open collector signal, Pin A is high, Pin B is low. Either
one must handle 12VDC at 4mA.
EMERGENCY STOP INPUT (Pins C & D)
Function: When this circuit is opened, the 9700W control will initiate an emergency stop sequence.
Electrical: You can connect a dry relay contact or an open collector signal, Pin C is high, Pin D is low. Either
one must handle 12VDC at 4mA. Logic must be normally closed.
PULSE LOCKOUT INPUT (Pins E & F)
Function: When the control is connected to a power supply with pulse current facilities, it is sometimes
necessary to the wire feed with the current pulsing. When the control is connected to the current
background signal through these connections the wire can pulse with the arc.
Electrical: You can connect a dry relay contact or an open collector signal, Pin E is high, Pin F is low. Either
one must handle 12VDC at 4mA.
AUX1 OUTPUT (Pins G & H)
Function: When the “Arc On” signal has been received by the control, this contact closes, relaying the signal
to anther device to initiate its function. This contact opens during the stop sequence.
Electrical: We supply a dry relay contact capable of handling 110VAC at 0.6A.
REMOTE EMERGENCY STOP OUTPUT (Pins I & J)
Function: When the emergency stop button is pressed, this contact will open. This will prohibit the
operation of the secondary 9629 control.
Electrical: We supply a dry relay contact capable of handling 110VAC at 0.6A.
25
PULSE LOCKOUT OUTPUT (Pins K & L)
Function: Permits the 9700W to pass a pulse signal to another device. The signal from these pins directly
follows the Pulse Lockout Input signal.
Electrical: This is an open collector output, Pin K is high, Pin L is low.
REMOTE SPEED INPUT (Pins M & N)
Function: The 9700W can be configured to permit the travel speed to be set by a remote analog input
signal. The signal is supplied to these pins from the remote device.
Electrical: Requires 0 to 10VDC input signal. Pin M is high, Pin N is low. Input impedance is 60K.
S3 CONNECTOR
The S3 connector is used to connect the 9700W control to the motor which it is controlling. Miller Welding
Automation can provide standard connecting cables to be connected to the S3 connector on the 9700W
control. If you need to provide your own cable, it should be fitted with the following:
Amphenol plug 97-3106A-22-19P
Cord Grip
97-3057-1012-1
Pin Connection Details
Connections should be made as shown below.
Note: Pins E, F, G, H, J, K, L, M, N and P are reserved.
MOTOR OUTPUT CONNECTION (Pins A & B)
Function: To supply voltage to the carriage drive motor. If Pin A is positive voltage with respect to Pin
B, the motor will rotate in a clockwise direction. If it is negative, motor rotation will be
counterclockwise.
Electrical: We supply 90VDC to the motor.
TACHOMETER INPUT (Pins C & D)
Function: To receive a voltage signal from the tachometer mounted on the motor which drives the
carriage. The signal is used to provide digital speed indication on the display and also to provide closed
loop facilities.
Electrical: We accept a 0 to 100VDC signal. The signal is conditioned in the 9700W control.
C. Interconnections
The 9700W control can be connected to other devices to provide more complete control of the welding
process. Standard length cables, complete with the appropriate Amphenol connectors are available from
Miller Welding Automation. Special length cables can be made to order.
26
Note: The Miller TIG welding power supplies are available with a special 28-pin connectors, this permits
easy communication between the 9700T and the power supply. Power supplies from other manufacturers
can be used. Various remote interfaces for different power sources are available-consult the Miller Welding
Automation factory for best fit regarding your application and power source model.
In this case the carriage drive motor is connected to, and controlled by the 9700T control which also is
connected to a Miller power supply.
Travel Addition
In addition to being interconnected with the welding power supply, the 9700T control can also be
interconnected with a Miller Welding Automation wire feeder. All Miller Welding Automation wire feeders
use a 9700W series control giving them complete compatibility with the 9700T.
When the 9700T carriage control is connected to the 9700W wire feeder control, the 9700T acts as the
primary control and the 9700W acts as the secondary unit. This means that the complete weld sequence
can be initiated by pressing the start button on the 9700T control. The weld and travel sequence will be
automatically started and, at the same time, a signal will be sent to the 9700W wire feeder control to
initiate the wire feed start sequence.
When the stop signal is given, either by pressing the stop button on the 9700T control or by this control
receiving a limit switch or encoder end of travel signal, the stop sequence set in the 9700W wire feeder
control will also be automatically initiated.
27
Figure 7: Typical Miller Welding Automation System Interconnection Schematic for a GTAW and Wire
Feeder.
NOTE: Fixture shown is rotation but connection same for linear.
Travel & ALC Addition
It is possible to interface the 9700T control with an arc length control and a wire feeder as well as the
welding power supply. This creates a completely integrated welding system where the operation of the
start button on the 9700T control initiates the start of the weld sequence. The preset start time delays
which have been set on the 9700T carriage control, 9700W wire feed control and 9790 arc length control
operate automatically to provide coordinated start of the various parameters. At the end of the weld,
operation of the 9700T stop push-button initiates a controlled end of weld sequence with downslope and
wire and travel stop delays.
28
Figure 8: Typical Miller Welding Automation System Interconnection Schematic for a GTAW with Wire
Feeder and Arc Length Control.
NOTE: Fixture shown is rotation but connection same for linear.
29
SECTION VIII
MAINTENANCE
A. Calibration
Your 9700W longitudinal travel control has been precisely calibrated before shipment - no further
calibration is necessary on receipt of the equipment. There are two types of calibration routines,
they are:
Initial Calibration
This routine is carried out only if major changes have been made to the system. Typical reasons for
carrying out this type of calibration would be:
•
A change of the drive mechanism gearing to produce a different output speed.
•
The integration of the 9700W control with a third party carriage.
In the event that you wish to carry out initial calibration, for the above or for other reasons, you
should contact Miller Welding Automation for technical support.
There is also a possibility that you could suffer a total loss of the preset calibration, this is very
unlikely, but could be caused by:
- Failure and subsequent replacement of the main CPU board.
- Unauthorized tampering with the system.
To avoid unwanted downtime and cost in the event of this type of failure, it is recommended that,
on receipt of the control, you call up the calibration mode and make and store a written copy of all
the calibration values.
Touch-up Calibration
Please follow what is written in the Auto Calibration section.
B. Regular Maintenance
Your 9700W control requires a minimum of maintenance. The following checks should be carried
out on a regular basis:
30
Weekly:
• Clean the front polycarbonate overlay panel with a soft cloth - pay particular attention to the
window area. Do not use any abrasive cleaning materials.
•
Check the functionality of the controls, adjust knob and push button switches.
•
Check interconnecting cables for cuts or burns.
•
Check security of Amphenol connections.
Monthly:
In addition to the weekly maintenance routine, check the following:
•
Check that the sequence of operation is satisfactory.
Annually:
In addition to the weekly and monthly maintenance routines, check the following:
• Check the touch pad areas to ensure that there is no undue wear or splitting of the
polycarbonate surface.
•
Carry out the calibration routine to ensure optimum, accurate operation of the control.
• Check the interior of the control for possible loose connections and/or components caused by
vibration or knocks.
•
Check the interior of the control for signs of overheating of wires and/or components.
31
SECTION IX
PARTS LISTS
The following pages provide a detailed parts list of the 9700W control.
Item numbers shown in the parts list refer to those items referenced by the balloon in the drawing. Each
parts list shows the main assembly as item 1, all the quantities shown are the quantities used to make the
main assembly.
Two columns are included in the list to show the spare parts recommended to be stocked by the user. The
two levels can be defined as follows:
Level 1
These are the spares recommended for US domestic users whose use of the product does not exceed 2000
hours per year.
Level 2
These are the spares recommended for International users of the product or for US domestic users who will
use the product in excess of 2000 hours per year.
32
9700W Enclosure
Recommended
Item
Part
No.
No.
Description
1
9700-1
Complete, assembled control Enclosure ........................ 1
2
9700W-105
Cabinet Sheet metal only ................................................ 1
4
9700-CAB-S1
Cable Assembly Remote S1............................................. 1
5
9700-CAB-S2
Cable Assembly Remote S2............................................. 1
6
9700-CAB-S3
Cable Assembly Remote S3............................................. 1
7
C-1318-006-BL
Power Cord 6 foot Right Angle 76803 ............................ 1
8
AS-25-5
Power Supply RS-25-5 ..................................................... 1
9
81F4550
RFI Filter 240D10............................................................. 1
10
9700-110
Sub-Panel ........................................................................ 1
11
240D10
Solid State Relay SSR1 ..................................................... 1
1
12
9700-11
Isolation Board 9600-11R ............................................... 1
1
13
KBMG-212D
Motor Drive Module ....................................................... 1
1
14
9700-CAB-MWH
Wire Harness - Main (Not illustrated)............................. 1
15
9700-CAB-SWH
Wire Harness - Signal (Not illustrated) ........................... 1
16
9700-CAB-AWH
Wire Harness - Analog (Not illustrated) .......................... 1
Qty
33
Level
Level
I
II
11
13
12
6
5
10
7
Door
9
8
34
9700W Enclosure Door
Recommended
Item
Part
No.
No.
Description
1
9700-1
Complete Enclosure ........................................................ 1
2
TA35-CFTRF100CO
Circuit Breaker CB1 ......................................................... 1
3
9700W-100
Overlay Front Panel ........................................................ 1
4
9700-10
Processor Board CPU Board ............................................ 1
5
AYW400
Switch Operator .............................................................. 1
6
TWC01
Contact - Normally Closed .............................................. 1
1
7
9700-LCD
Display ............................................................................. 1
1
8
AML21EBA2AA
Push-button Switch - Momentary .................................. 2
9
AML51-E10R
Red Cap - Extended ......................................................... 1
10
AML51-F10G
Green Cap - Small............................................................ 1
11
AML71-SCB
Center Barrier ................................................................. 1
12
AML71-SEB
End Barrier ...................................................................... 2
13
RE16-V24AC1
Encoder only ................................................................... 1
14
DD-75-2-6MM
Adjust Knob only for Encoder ......................................... 1
Qty
35
Level
Level
I
II
1
1
1
1
1
4
2
36
SECTION X
PCB DESCRIPTIONS
9700-10 Microcontroller Board (CPU BOARD) Located on inside of control door.
CONNECTORS
J1 - Power Supply Connector
The main 5VDC is supplied on this connector. If there is no 5VDC, the unit will not operate.
J2 - Analog Input/ Output Connector
This sends and receives the analog signals that are on the 9600-11 board.
J3 - Keypad Connector
This allows the membrane style front panel to be connected to the microcontroller.
J4 - Display Connector
This connects to the display which provides programming and operational information.
J5 - Discrete Input/ Output Connector
Connects to the 9600-11 board and transfers and receives digital information.
J6 - Start/Stop & Encoder Connector
Connects to the start and stop push-buttons to initiate an end of weld sequence and the encoder to receive
pulses to increment and decrement the screen display.
J12 - Relay Connector
Used for Pulse Lockout at the end of the weld and to start the ALC touch retract.
J13 – Spare Input Connector
This is unused in current 9700W models.
J14 – Spare Output Connector
This is unused in current 9700W models.
J15 – Spare Analog Output Connector
This is unused in current 9700W models.
J16 - Encoder Connector
This is unused in current 9700W models.
37
COMPONENTS
SW1 - Reset Switch
This restarts the program sequence in the same way as a power down at the main power switch.
SW2 - Dip Switch
This dip switch is used to setup the configuration of the 9700T module. Do not change unless instructed by
Miller Welding Automation.
Wire – Bit 4 Off, Bit 5 On
Reserved – Bits 1 & 3 Off
Rabbit Processor – Bit 4 On (20-101-1093), Bit 4 Off (20-101-1154)
R36 – Variable Resistor
This variable resistor is used to control the contrast of the display.
TEST POINTS
TP1 – 9700-10 5 Volt
Used to check the 5 Volts going to the 9700-10 board.
TP2 – 9700-10 Ground
When measuring the signals of this board, connect your isolated instrument ground lead here.
TP3 – Analog Input 1
Connect the red lead of your meter here to measure the analog signal from the tachometer. This value has
been scaled on the 9600-11R board.
TP4 - Analog Output 1
Connect the red lead of your meter here to measure the analog signal going to the motor controller.
TP5 – Analog Input 2
Connect the red lead of your meter here to measure the analog signal from the remote input. This value
has been scaled on the 9600-11R board.
TP6 - Analog Output 2
Connect the red lead of your meter here to measure the analog signal going to the spare output.
9600-11R Isolation Board- Located inside enclosure near output amphenol connectors.
CONNECTORS
J1 - Power Supply Connector
38
The main 5VDC is supplied on this connector. If there is no 5VDC, the relays and isolation circuits will not
operate.
J2 - Analog Input/ Output Connector
This sends and receives analog signals to and from the 9600-10 board.
J3 - Digital Input/ Output Connector
This allows the 9700-10 microcontroller board to control the relays and read the optical isolators.
J4 - Motion Connector
This connects through the Amphenol connector to the limit switches and tachometer to feed their signals to
the 9600-11 board.
J5 - Power Supply Connector
Connects through the Amphenol connector to the welding power supply and sends and receives information
to and from it.
J6 - Auxiliary Unit Connector
Connects through the Amphenol S2 connector to a second 9700 control or a PLC.
J7 - Motor Control Connector
This sends a -10VDC to +10VDC signal to the motor control module to control the speed of the motor.
J8 - Emergency Stop Condition Connector
This connection is for an emergency stop condition. It energizes a solid state relay that controls power to
the motor control.
J9 - Emergency Stop Connector
This is where the emergency stop switch is tied. If the circuit is broken, the system will disable movement.
COMPONENTS
SW1 - Remote Emergency Stop Selector Switch
In the “up” position (towards CR7), the remote emergency stop function is overridden.
In the “down” position (towards J9), the remote emergency stop function is active.
JP1-3 - Tachometer Voltage Range
Ranges are as follows:
JP1
0 to 10VDC Input Range
JP2
0 to 33VDC Input Range
39
JP3
0 to 100VDC Input Range
TEST POINTS
TP1 - +5V Ground
This is used when checking signal levels at the J3 header.
TP2 - +12V Isolated Ground
This is used when checking signal levels on the headers J5 and J6.
TP5 & TP6 - Tachometer Voltage
This is the signal which is being received from the tachometer connected to the drive motor. The voltage
readings should match those at the tachometer.
TP7 & TP8 - Motor Control Voltage
This is the voltage level being sent to the motor control module. It should be a -10VDC to +10VDC signal.
TP9 - Analog Common
This is the analog common from the 9700-10 board. You should use this when measuring signals at TP10
and TP11.
TP10 - Tachometer Signal
This is the signal which is being received from the tachometer connected to the drive motor. The signal has
been scaled by the jumpers JP1-3. This signal is then sent to the 9700 -10 board and read into the
processor.
TP11 - Motor Control Signal
This signal is from the microcontroller, it will be isolated and sent to the motor control module.
TP12 - Remote Speed Signal
This checks that the remote speed signal, 0 to 5VDC will be proportional to the speed signal.
40
SECTION XI
ELECTRICAL DIAGRAMS
The following pages include electrical diagrams for the 9700T Microprocessor Controller.
9700 W Control Schematic
9700 W Interconnection Diagram showing as a reference a complete system. Your actual system might
differ from that shown and should be referred to by Job # for exact details.
41
42
43
APPENDIX A 9700W CALIBRATION SUB MENU MODE
You enter the Calibration mode from the program mode. To get out of the calibration sub menu all you
have to do is press the left arrow. When you leave the calibration sub menu all settings will be saved to the
main calibration permanent memory. Default Password is CALIB
CLOSED LOOP MODE
CALIB
AUTO CAL
CLOSED LOOP
LOOP SENSING
llu
ON
1.0
LOOP SENSING
CALIB
CLOSED LOOP
LOOP SENSING
SENSING DLY
ON
1.0
2.0
SENSING DLY
DISPLAY
1.0
2.0
ACTUAL
DISPLAY
HI LMT
Sensing Dly is the amount of time after the drive is turned on
before the closed looping is enabled. This allows the motor to get
to a stable reading before making any changes. Minimum value is
0.0 and Maximum value is 10.0.
DISPLAY – ACTUAL OR SET SPEED
CALIB
LOOP SENSING
Loop sensing is the percentage of the error that will added or
subtracted to correct the speed. Adjustments are made every 20
msec. Minimum value is 0.1 and Maximum value is 99.9.
SENSING DELAY
CALIB
LOOP SENSING
Closed loop can be either on or off. When on the unit will read the
feedback from the travel motor and adjust the voltage output to
make sure you we are traveling at the correct speed. If off the
system will work open loop.
1.0
ACTUAL
Display is Actual or Set. If in Actual when welding, the display will
show the feedback speed of the motors. If in Set, the speed
shown will be the set speed for the motors.
200.000
44
HI LIMIT
CALIB
DISPLAY
HI LMT
HI OUT
ACTUAL
200.000
8.532
HI OUT
CALIB
HI LMT
HI OUT
HI IN
200.000
8.532
18.092
HI IN
LOW LMT
8.532
18.092
4.000
LOW LMT
LOW OUT
18.092
4.000
0.421
LOW OUT
LOW IN
Low Lmt is the lower limit of the wire feed speed. Minimum value
is 0.000 and Maximum value is 999.999.
LOW OUT
CALIB
LOW LMT
Hi In is the voltage of the feedback from the motor when running
at the high limit. Minimum value is 0.000 and Maximum value is
100.000.
LOW LIMIT
CALIB
HI IN
Hi Out is the voltage that is put out of the 9700-10 board to reach
the upper limit of the travel motor. Minimum value is 0.000 and
Maximum value is 10.000.
HI IN
CALIB
HI OUT
Hi Lmt is the upper limit of the wire speed. Minimum value is
0.000 and Maximum value is 3000.000.
4.000
0.421
0.385
Low Out is the voltage that is put out of the 9700-10 board to
reach the lower limit of travel motor. Minimum value is -1.000 and
Maximum value is 10.000.
45
LOW IN
CALIB
LOW OUT
LOW IN
INPUT JUMPER
0.421
0.385
J2
INPUT JUMPER
CALIB
LOW IN
INPUT JUMPER
SET SPEED
0.385
J2
LOCAL
J2
SET SPEED
LOCAL
REMOTE HI
9.682
SET SPEED
LOCAL
REMOTE HI
9.682
0.219
REMOTE LOW
UNITS
The voltage on the remote input pins that will cause the wire to go
at the high speed. Minimum value is 0.000 and Maximum value is
10.000.
REMOTE LOW
CALIB
REMOTE HI
Set Speed is either local or remote. In local, the speed is
controlled by the panel. In remote, the speed is controlled by the
voltage between the remote input pins.
REMOTE HI
CALIB
REMOTE LOW
Input Jumper is J1, J2, or J3 and lets the system know which
jumper on the 9600-11R board is installed. J1 is for input voltage
of the tachometer up to 10 volts, J2 is for up to 33 volts and J3 is
for up to 100 volts.
SET SPEED
CALIB
INPUT JUMPER
Low In is the voltage of the feedback from the motor when running
at the low limit. Minimum value is -1.000 and Maximum value is
100.000.
9.682
0.219
The voltage on the remote input pins that will cause the travel to
go at the low speed. Minimum value is 0.000 and Maximum value
is 10.000.
INCH
46
UNITS – INCH OR CM
CALIB
REMOTE LOW
UNITS
SWITCH MOTOR
0.219
INCH
NO
SWITCH MOTOR
CALIB
UNITS
Set the units for the system to either inch or CM (centimeters).
INCH
SWITCH MOTOR
NO
SWITCH JOG
NO
Switch Motor is either no or yes. If yes, it switches the direction
on the motor to match the forward direction of the system.
SWITCH JOG
CALIB
SWITCH MOTOR
NO
SWITCH JOG
NO
UNIPOLAR OUTPUT
NO
Switch Jog is either no or yes. If yes, it switches the direction of
travel jogging to help match the direction of the arrows on the
panel.
UNIPOLAR OUTPUT
CALIB
SWITCH JOG
NO
UNIPOLAR OUTPUT
NO
SWITCH INPUT
NO
Unipolar Output is either yes or no. If no, the output of the 970010 board is from +/- 10 volts. If Yes, the output is 0 to 10 volts with
a relay contact for reverse.
SWITCH INPUT
CALIB
UNIPOLAR OUTPUT
NO
SWITCH INPUT
NO
UNIPOLAR INPUT
NO
Switch input is either yes or no. If no, the input voltage is not
switched in the software. If yes, it switches the polarity of the
input lines so that it reads a forward direction when moving
forward.
47
UNIPOLAR INPUT
CALIB
SWITCH INPUT
NO
UNIPOLAR INPUT
NO
PASSWORD
llu
SUB MENU PASSWORD
CALIB
UNIPOLAR INPUT
PASSWORD
BACKUP
NO
llu
llu
BACKUP
RESTORE
llu
llu
llu
RESTORE
HOUR METER
llu
llu
HOUR METER
AUTO CAL
If the right arrow is pressed the 9700W copies all of the calibration
parameters from the backup to the main memory.
4
HOUR METER
CALIB
RESTORE
If the right arrow is pressed the 9700W copies all of the calibration
parameters to the backup memory.
RESTORE
CALIB
BACKUP
If the right button is pressed, the user is allowed to see and
change the password for the calibration sub menu. If the
password is set to all blanks, then you do not need a password to
get into the sub menu. Use the dial to change the blinking
character and the right and left button to move to different
characters. To get out press the right button when at the far right
character. Password is always 5 characters.
BACKUP
CALIB
PASSWORD
Unipolar Input is either yes or no. If no, the input from the motor
can be both positive and negative voltage depending on direction.
If yes, the input voltage is always is always positive no matter
which direction the motor is running.
llu
4
Hour Meter shows how long the motor attached to the travel has
run. This is not weld time.
llu
48
AUTO CALIBRATION SUB MENU
CALIB
HOUR METER
AUTO CAL
CLOSED LOOP
4
llu
Pressing the right arrow will enter the user into the Auto Cal sub
menu. See appendix C for details on each auto calibration sub
menu and how to run auto calibration.
ON
49
APPENDIX B 9700W CONFIGURATION SUB MENU MODE
You enter the Configuration mode from the program mode. To get out of the configuration sub menu all
you have to do is press the left arrow. When you leave the calibration sub menu all settings will be saved to
the main configuration permanent memory. Default Password is CONFI
FORWARD JOG
CONFIG
RESTORE
llu
FWD JOG
25
25
REV JOG
REVERSE JOG
CONFIG
FWD JOG
REV JOG
RAPID JOG
25
25
75
Rev Jog is the percentage of the high speed that is moved when
jogging reverse. Minimum value is 5 and Maximum value is 100.
RAPID JOG
CONFIG
RAPID JOG
25
75
RAMP ENABLE
YES
REV JOG
Fwd Jog is the percentage of the high speed that is moved when
jogging forward. Minimum value is 5 and Maximum value is 100.
Rapid Jog is the percentage of the high speed that is moved when
doing a rapid jog or wire retract. Minimum value is 5 and
Maximum value is 100.
RAMP ENABLE
CONFIG
RAPID JOG
75
RAMP ENABLE
YES
PULSE ENABLE
YES
Ramp Enable is either yes or no.
displayed in the main screen.
50
If yes, then Ramp Time is
PULSE ENABLE
CONFIG
RAMP ENABLE
YES
PULSE ENABLE
YES
TACHOMETER
YES
TACHOMETER
CONFIG
PULSE ENABLE
YES
TACHOMETER
YES
EXT START
EXT START
EXT JOG
EXT START
YES
MAINTAIN
EXT JOG
AUX1 NAME
EXT JOG
MAINTAIN
NONE
llu
AUX1 NAME
AUX2 NAME
Ext Jog is either None, Normal or Switch. If set to none the
external jog input are not used. If set to Normal they cause a wire
jog. If Switch then the left and right external jog inputs are
switched.
AUX1 NAME
CONFIG
EXT JOG
Ext Start is either Maintain or None. If yes, then the 9700W will
accept an external start signal.
NONE
CONFIG
EXT START
Tachometer is either Yes or No. If yes, then the a tachometer for
the speed of the motor is attached to the 9700W
MAINTAIN
CONFIG
TACHOMETER
Pulse Enable is either yes or no. If yes, them Pulsed is displayed
in the main screen.
NONE
llu
llu
By pressing the right arrow you will be able to enter the name for
the AUX1 output. This is the name that will be shown in the name
menu and on the run screen. The name is limited to 4
alpha/numeric characters.
51
AUX2 NAME
CONFIG
AUX1 NAME
AUX2 NAME
AUX3 NAME
llu
llu
llu
AUX3 NAME
CONFIG
AUX2 NAME
AUX3 NAME
PASSWORD
llu
llu
llu
PASSWORD
JOB NUMBER
llu
llu
llu
JOB NUMBER
VERSION
llu
llu
1.000
VERSION
SET DP
Pressing the right button will show you the Miller Welding
Automation Job Number that this control unit shipped out on.
When the job number is displayed you can press either the left or
right arrow key to get out.
FIRMWARE VERSION
CONFIG
JOB NUMBER
Pressing the right button allows that user to see and change the
password for the configuration sub menu. If the password is set
to all blanks, then you do not need a password to get into the sub
menu.
MILLER WELDING AUTOMATION JOB NUMBER
CONFIG
PASSWORD
By pressing the right arrow you will be able to enter the name for
the AUX3 output. This is the name that will be shown in the name
menu and on the run screen. The name is limited to 4
alpha/numeric characters.
PASSWORD, CONFIGURATION SUB MENU
CONFIG
AUX3 NAME
By pressing the right arrow you will be able to enter the name for
the AUX2 output. This is the name that will be shown in the name
menu and on the run screen. The name is limited to 4
alpha/numeric characters.
llu
Shows the version number of the firmware in your unit.
1.000
1
52
SET DECIMAL POINTS
CONFIG
SET DP
1.000
1
BACKUP
llu
VERSION
BACKUP
CONFIG
SET DP
1
BACKUP
llu
llu
RESTORE
If the right arrow is pressed, the 9700W copies all of the
configuration parameters to the backup memory.
RESTORE
CONFIG
RESTORE
llu
llu
FWD JOG
25
BACKUP
Set DP is for the number of decimal points that can be displayed
when setting the travel speed. Minimum value is 1 and Maximum
value is 3.
If the right arrow is pressed, the 9700W copies all of the
configuration parameters from the backup to the main memory.
53
APPENDIX C 9700W AUTO CALIBRATION
Tools required are a tape measure, masking tape, and marker pen. This allows for physical
measurement and references of the amount or length of wire feed.
You need to run the calibration at a speed near the upper limit and a speed near the lower limit.
Running two tests, one high and one low, allows the setting of the two extremes. This is important for the
proper operation and display values on the 9700W.
1) Backup the existing calibration numbers just in case of a mistake or you want to return to them. Do
this by going into the Calibration menu and making the Backup line item highlighted and then
pressing the right arrow key. This will copy the Calibration numbers from the main memory on the
9700-10 board to the backup location found on the Rabbit microcontroller board. (Note: If an error
is made and you want to restore the values before you started go to the Calibration menu and make
the Restore line item highlighted and then press the right arrow key).
2) Go into the Auto Calibration sub menu.
3) Choose a speed and time that you want to run the test for. Make sure that you have enough room
to feed wire for a reasonable length to measure. It is best if the final amount that should be feed is
a whole number just so you know how close the calibration is (i.e. 150 ipm of wire speed for 20
seconds should be 50 inches). Enter in the time and value for the wire feed speed to run.
4) Pressing the Start button causes the wire to feed. On the screen you will see the amount of time
left in the run and what speed the 9700W thinks that it is running. During the calibration run you
can stop the system by pressing either the left arrow key, the stop button or the estop button. You
will need a complete run to be able to recalculate the calibration numbers.
5) After the allotted time the screen will allow you to enter how much wire has been feed by entering
the data into the Actual line. (Note: Please make sure that you enter how much wire has feed and
NOT convert these numbers to inches per minute. The 9700W knows how long the calibration was
on for and will take care of that for you.)
6) Change the menu until the Set is highlighted. At this point press the right arrow and the 9700W will
do the calculations to change the input and output numbers. You can check by running again at the
same time and speed in item 3 or you can change to the other end of the calibration.
54
TIME
AUTO CAL
llu
SET
TIME
VALUE IPM
60.00
8.00
VALUE
AUTO CAL
TIME
VALUE IPM
MOVE
60.00
8.00
tll
MOVE
ACTUAL
MOVE
8.00
tll
llu
0.000
ACTUAL
READ
tll
llu
0.000
0.01
READ
SET
After running the test, this is the actual distance that was moved
during the test if it was programmed by time. If the test was
programmed using revolutions then it is the distance off from that
number of revolutions. If the move is short then you enter in
distance as a minus number, if over you enter the distance as a
positive number.
READ
AUTO CAL
ACTUAL
This menu line will allow the user to use the right and left buttons
to move the travel. Note: Other screen in Auto Cal the left arrow
will move the user out of the Auto Calibration sub menu.
ACTUAL
AUTO CAL
MOVE
This is the speed that the calibration will run.
llu
AUTO CAL
VALUE IPM
This is the amount of time that the Auto calibration will run.
0.000
0.01
After running a test this is the distance that the unit thought that it
moved. Note: This number cannot be changed.
llu
55
SET
AUTO CAL
READ
SET
TIME
0.01
llu
60.00
By pressing the right arrow button the unit will look at all the
numbers and make the changes to the input and output numbers.
During the calculations the display will show you CALC LOW (low
speed run) or CALC HIGH (high speed run). Error conditions will
need to be cleared with the stop button and the calibration number
will not be changed.
Last Page
56
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