ACTi PSTR-0400 Hardware Manual

ACTi PSTR-0400 Hardware Manual
6G SAS NAS System
Hardware Manual
Revision 1.0
NAS System
Table of Contents
Preface ................................................................................................................................ 3
Before You Begin ............................................................................................................. 4
Chapter 1
Introduction ................................................................................................. 5
1.1
Key Features ............................................................................................................................................................. 5
1.2
Technical Specifications ....................................................................................................................................... 6
1.3
RAID Concepts ........................................................................................................................................................ 7
1.4
Array Definition ..................................................................................................................................................... 10
1.4.1
Drive Group ................................................................................................................................................... 10
1.4.2
Virtual Drive ................................................................................................................................................... 10
Chapter 2
Getting Started .........................................................................................11
2.1
Packaging, Shipment and Delivery ............................................................................................................... 11
2.2
Unpacking the NAS System.............................................................................................................................11
2.3
Identifying Parts of the NAS System ........................................................................................................... 12
2.3.1
Front View ......................................................................................................................................................12
2.3.1.1
2.3.2
2.4
LCD Front Panel .................................................................................................................................. 13
Rear View ........................................................................................................................................................ 15
Drive Carrier Module ..........................................................................................................................................16
2.4.1
Disk Drive Status Indicators ....................................................................................................................16
2.4.2
Lock Indicator ...............................................................................................................................................16
2.5
Installing Hard Drives .........................................................................................................................................17
2.6
Preparing the System .........................................................................................................................................18
2.7
Powering On ..........................................................................................................................................................18
Chapter 3
3.1
RAID Configuration and Management ................................................19
WebBIOS Configuration Utility .......................................................................................................................19
3.1.1
Starting the WebBIOS Configuration Utility .................................................................................... 19
3.1.2
WebBIOS CU Main Screen Options.....................................................................................................20
3.2
Configuring RAID Drive Groups and Virtual Drives ............................................................................... 22
3.2.1
Using Auto Configuration ........................................................................................................................24
3.2.2
Using Manual Configuration: Creating RAID 5 Virtual Drives .................................................. 25
3.3
Creating Global Hot Spare ............................................................................................................................... 33
3.4
Restarting the Controller ..................................................................................................................................35
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Preface
About this manual
his manual provides information regarding the hardware features, installation
and configuration of the SAS NAS System. Information contained in the
manual has been reviewed for accuracy, but not for product warranty because
of the various environment/OS/settings. Information and specifications will be
changed without further notice. Some pictures and screenshots might be
different with the actual machine.
This manual uses section numbering for every topic being discussed for easy and
convenient way of finding information in accordance with the user’s needs. The following
icons are being used for some details and information to be considered in going through
with this manual:
NOTES:
These are notes that contain useful information and tips
that the user must give attention to in going through
with the subsystem operation.
IMPORTANT!
These are the important information that the user must
remember.
WARNING!
These are the warnings that the user must follow to avoid
unnecessary errors and bodily injury during hardware and
software operation of the subsystem.
CAUTION:
These are the cautions that user must be aware of to
prevent damage to the equipment and its components.
Copyright
No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or
transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying,
recording or otherwise, without the prior written consent.
Trademarks
All products and trade names used in this document are trademarks or registered
trademarks of their respective owners.
Changes
The material in this document is for information only and is subject to change without
notice.
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Before You Begin
efore going through with this manual, you should read and focus on the
following safety guidelines. Information about the NAS system’s packaging
and delivery are also included. To provide reasonable protection against any
harm on the part of the user and to obtain maximum performance, user is
advised to be aware of the following safety guidelines particularly in
handling hardware components:
Upon receiving of the product:
 Place the product in its proper location.
 To avoid unnecessary dropping out, make sure that somebody is around for
immediate assistance.
 It should be handled with care to avoid dropping that may cause damage to the
product. Always use the correct lifting procedures.
Upon installing of the product:
 Ambient temperature is very important for the installation site. It must not
exceed 30°C. Due to seasonal climate changes; regulate the installation site
temperature making it not to exceed the allowed ambient temperature.
 Before plugging-in any power cords, cables and connectors, make sure that the
power switches are turned off. Disconnect first any power connection if the power
supply module is being removed from the enclosure.
 Outlets must be accessible to the equipment.
 All external connections should be made using shielded cables and as much as
possible should not be performed by bare hand. Using anti-static hand gloves is
recommended.
 In installing each component, secure all the mounting screws and locks. Make
sure that all screws are fully tightened. Follow correctly all the listed procedures
in this manual for reliable performance.
Controller Configuration
This NAS system supports single RAID controller configuration.
Packaging, Shipment and Delivery
 Before removing the subsystem from the shipping carton, you should visually
inspect the physical condition of the shipping carton.
 Unpack and verify that the contents of the shipping carton are complete and in
good condition.
 Exterior damage to the shipping carton may indicate that the contents of the
carton are damaged.
 If any damage is found, do not remove the components; contact the dealer where
you purchased the subsystem for further instructions.
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Chapter 1 Introduction
The NAS System
1.1 Key Features
- Configurable to 19" rack-mountable 2U chassis
- Intel Sandy Bridge / Ivy Bridge inside
- Supports up to Twelve (12) 2.5" and 3.5'' hot-swappable 6G SAS/SATA hard drives
- Supports RAID levels 0, 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, 60
- Support three Gigabit Ethernet port for NAS file-sharing application
- Supports Tape/DAT backup/restore (Option)
- Smart-function LCD panel
- Supports hot spare and automatic hot rebuild.
- Allows online capacity expansion within the enclosure
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1.2 Technical Specifications
Hardware Platform
Intel Quad Core Xeon 3.1GHz processor
System Memory:4GB DDR3 SDRAM up to 32GB
Three Gigabit Ethernet ports (option for 10Gigabit Ethernet)
Up to Twelve (12) 2.5" and 3.5” hot-swappable 6Gb SAS/SATA hard drives
Real time drive activity and status indicators
Environmental monitoring unit
Two(2) 460W 80plus hot-swap power supplies with PFC
Expansion PCI slot for H/W upgrade
RAID Controller
800MHz RAID-On-Chip storage processor
RAID level RAID 0, 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, 60
Supports 512MB DDRII cache memory
Support drive hot spare and automatic hot rebuild
Allow online capacity expansion within the enclosure
Locally audible event notification alarm
Environmental
Relative humidity : 10%~85% Non-condensing
Operating temp : 10oC~40oC(50oF~104oF)
Power requirements
AC 100V ~ 240V Full range
10A ~ 5A, 47~63Hz
Physical Dimension
88(H) x 482(W) x 620(D) mm
Specifications are subject to change without notice.
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1.3 RAID Concepts
RAID Fundamentals
The basic idea of RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks) is to combine multiple
inexpensive disk drives into an array of disk drives to obtain performance, capacity and
reliability that exceeds that of a single large drive. The array of drives appears to the
host computer as a single logical drive.
Five types of array architectures, RAID 1 through RAID 5, were originally defined; each
provides disk fault-tolerance with different compromises in features and performance. In
addition to these five redundant array architectures, it has become popular to refer to a
non-redundant array of disk drives as a RAID 0 arrays.
Disk Striping
Fundamental to RAID technology is striping. This is a method of combining multiple
drives into one logical storage unit. Striping partitions the storage space of each drive
into stripes, which can be as small as one sector (512 bytes) or as large as several
megabytes. These stripes are then interleaved in a rotating sequence, so that the
combined space is composed alternately of stripes from each drive. The specific type of
operating environment determines whether large or small stripes should be used.
Most operating systems today support concurrent disk I/O operations across multiple
drives. However, in order to maximize throughput for the disk subsystem, the I/O load
must be balanced across all the drives so that each drive can be kept busy as much as
possible. In a multiple drive system without striping, the disk I/O load is never perfectly
balanced. Some drives will contain data files that are frequently accessed and some
drives will rarely be accessed.
By striping the drives in the array with stripes large enough so that each record falls
entirely within one stripe, most records can be evenly distributed across all drives. This
keeps all drives in the array busy during heavy load situations. This situation allows all
drives to work concurrently on different I/O operations, and thus maximize the number
of simultaneous I/O operations that can be performed by the array.
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Definition of RAID Levels
RAID 0 is typically defined as a group of striped disk drives without parity or data
redundancy. RAID 0 arrays can be configured with large stripes for multi-user
environments or small stripes for single-user systems that access long sequential records.
RAID 0 arrays deliver the best data storage efficiency and performance of any array type.
The disadvantage is that if one drive in a RAID 0 array fails, the entire array fails.
RAID 1, also known as disk mirroring, is simply a pair of disk drives that store duplicate
data but appear to the computer as a single drive. Although striping is not used within a
single mirrored drive pair, multiple RAID 1 arrays can be striped together to create a
single large array consisting of pairs of mirrored drives. All writes must go to both drives
of a mirrored pair so that the information on the drives is kept identical. However, each
individual drive can perform simultaneous, independent read operations. Mirroring thus
doubles the read performance of a single non-mirrored drive and while the write
performance is unchanged. RAID 1 delivers the best performance of any redundant array
type. In addition, there is less performance degradation during drive failure than in RAID
5 arrays.
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Under RAID 5 parity information is distributed across all the drives. Since there is no
dedicated parity drive, all drives contain data and read operations can be overlapped on
every drive in the array. Write operations will typically access one data drive and one
parity drive. However, because different records store their parity on different drives,
write operations can usually be overlapped.
RAID 6 is similar to RAID 5 in that data protection is achieved by writing parity
information to the physical drives in the array. With RAID 6, however, two sets of parity
data are used. These two sets are different, and each set occupies a capacity equivalent
to that of one of the constituent drives. The main advantage of RAID 6 is High data
availability – any two drives can fail without loss of critical data.
Dual-level RAID achieves a balance between the increased data availability inherent in
RAID 1 and RAID 5 and the increased read performance inherent in disk striping (RAID
0). These arrays are sometimes referred to as RAID 0+1 or RAID 10 and RAID 0+5 or
RAID 50.
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In summary:

RAID 0 is the fastest and most efficient array type but offers no fault-tolerance. RAID
0 requires a minimum of one drive.

RAID 1 is the best choice for performance-critical, fault-tolerant environments. RAID
1 is the only choice for fault-tolerance if no more than two drives are used.

RAID 5 combines efficient, fault-tolerant data storage with good performance
characteristics. However, write performance and performance during drive failure is
slower than with RAID 1. Rebuild operations also require more time than with RAID 1
because parity information is also reconstructed. At least three drives are required
for RAID 5 arrays.

RAID 6 is essentially an extension of RAID level 5 which allows for additional fault
tolerance by using a second independent distributed parity scheme (two-dimensional
parity). Data is striped on a block level across a set of drives, just like in RAID 5, and
a second set of parity is calculated and written across all the drives; RAID 6 provides
for an extremely high data fault tolerance and can sustain multiple simultaneous
drive failures. It is a perfect solution for mission critical applications.
1.4 Array Definition
1.4.1 Drive Group
A Drive Group is a group of physical drives attached to the RAID controller, and where
one or more Virtual Drives (VD) can be created. All Virtual Drives in the Drive Group use
all of the physical drives in the Drive Group.
It is not possible to have multiple Disk Groups on the same physical disks. If physical
disks of different capacity are grouped together in a Drive Group, then the capacity of
the smallest disk will become the effective capacity of all the disks in the Drive Group.
1.4.2 Virtual Drive
A Virtual Drive is seen by the operating system as a single drive or logical device. A
Virtual Drive is a storage unit created by the RAID controller from one or more physical
drives. If there is an existing Drive Group and there is available Free Space, then a new
Virtual Drive can still be created.
Depending on the RAID level used, the Virtual Drive may retain redundant data in
case of a drive failure.
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Chapter 2 Getting Started
2.1 Packaging, Shipment and Delivery
 Before removing the subsystem from the shipping carton, you should visually
inspect the physical condition of the shipping carton.
 Unpack and verify that the contents of the shipping carton are complete and in
good condition.
 Exterior damage to the shipping carton may indicate that the contents of the
carton are damaged.
 If any damage is found, do not remove the components; contact the dealer where
you purchased the subsystem for further instructions.
2.2 Unpacking the NAS System
The package contains the following items:
NAS System Unit
Two (2) power cords
Three (3) Ethernet LAN cables
One (1) external serial cable
One (1) RS232 null modem
cable (phone jack to DB9)
One (1) USB-to-PS/2
converter cable
Installation Reference Guide
Spare screws, etc.
If any of these items are missing or damaged, please contact your dealer or sales
representative for assistance.
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2.3 Identifying Parts of the NAS System
The illustrations below identify the various parts of the subsystem.
2.3.1 Front View
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2.3.1.1 LCD Front Panel
Front Panel
The LCD front panel is an option to setup some system settings. To start using the
LCD panel, press the Select button to login and configure the system. See the
LCD menu diagram in the next section.
Parts
Exit button
Function
EXIT
Press this button to return to the previous
menu.
Select button
This is used to enter the option you have
selected.
Up and Down
Arrow buttons
Use the Up or Down arrow keys to go through
the information on the LCD screen. This is also
used to move between each menu when you
configure the system.
Use the function keys to navigate through the menus in the front panel. The menus
will show the system status and allows you to configure network settings, password
and mute the alarm buzzer.
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Menu Diagram
MODEL
xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
VERSION
3.x.xx
CHANGE
PASSWORD
NEW PASSWORD
00000000
SUBMIT PASSWORD
SETTING(YES/NO)
BEEPER
SETTING
SETTING
MUTE / ALARM
SUBMIT BEEPER
SETTING(YES/NO)
CPU
NORMAL
FAN
NORMAL
DISK
NORMAL
POWER
NORMAL
TEMP
NORMAL
RAID
NORMAL
DISK
INFORMATION
DISK_1 *O* TEMP 35C
:
DISK_12 *O* TEMP 35C
RAID
INFORMATION
ARRAY NAME
RAID LEVEL
NETWORK
INFORMATION
ETHO IP
xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
ETH1 IP
xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
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SIZE: xxxxGB
NORMAL/REBUILD/INIT
ETH0 NETMASK
255.255.255.0
SUBMIT IP
SETTING(YES/NO)
ETH1 NETMASK
255.255.255.0
SUBMIT IP
SETTING(YES/NO)
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2.3.2 Rear View
NOTE: For maximum performance, we recommend that you select the
second PCIe bus(x8 connector) for installing other HBA (10G LAN,
SAS, FC). Refer to the motherboard documentation to obtain a block
diagram of all available PCI buses. This diagram will help you
determine which connectors belong to which buses. Contact your
dealer or sales representative for additional assistance.
1. SAS Expansion Port – For connecting to SAS Expansion Chassis.
2. Power On/Off Switch – Use this switch to power on the system.
3. LAN Ports – The system comes with three 1Gigabit Ethernet ports LAN0, LAN1
and LAN2.
4. RS232 Port (Phone-Jack) – This is used for upgrading the firmware of JBOD
Controller SAS Expander board.
5. VGA Port – Use this to connect a VGA monitor.
6. USB 2.0 ports – Four USB ports are located at the rear of the system.
7. COM1 and COM2 Serial Ports – The system has one two serial ports COM1 and
COM2.
8. Mute – Use the mute button to stop the power supply buzzer alarm.
9. AC Power Input Socket – Use this to plug in the power cable connected from
power source.
10. Power Supply A, B – Two power supplies PSU-A and PSU-B are located at the
rear of the NAS system.
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2.4 Drive Carrier Module
The Drive Carrier Module houses a 3.5 inch hard disk drive. It is designed for
maximum airflow and incorporates a carrier locking mechanism to prevent
unauthorized access to the HDD.
2.4.1 Disk Drive Status Indicators
Every Drive Carrier has 2 status indicator lights. One indicator light is used for
Power On/Error. When this light is GREEN the power is on and everything is
functioning normally. When the Power On/Error light is RED, then an error has
occur that requires the user’s attention.
The other status indicator light is the hard disk drive access light. When the hard
disk drive is being accessed, this light will flash BLUE.
In addition, both indicator lights are viewable within a 170° arc.
Disk Activity
Indicator
Disk Status
Indicator
2.4.2 Lock Indicator
Every Drive Carrier is lockable and is fitted with a lock indicator to indicate whether
or not the carrier is locked into the chassis or not. Each carrier is also fitted with an
ergonomic handle for easy carrier removal.
When the Lock Groove is horizontal, this indicates that the Drive Carrier is locked.
When the Lock Groove is vertical, then the Drive Carrier is unlocked. Lock and
unlock the Drive Carriers by using a flat-head screw driver.
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Drive Carrier is
Unlocked
Drive Carrier
is locked
2.5 Installing Hard Drives
This section describes the physical locations of the hard drives supported by the
NAS system and give instructions on installing a hard drive. The system supports
hot-swapping allowing you to install or replace a hard drive while the NAS system
is running.
a. To remove a drive tray, make sure it is in unlocked position. Then press the
carrier open button. The Drive Carrier handle will flip open.
Carrier
Open
Button
c. Pull out an empty disk tray. Pull the handle outwards to remove the carrier from
the enclosure.
d. Place the hard drive in the disk tray. Make sure the holes of the disk tray align
with the holes of the hard drive.
e. Install the mounting screws on the bottom part to secure the drive in the disk
tray.
f.
Slide the tray into a slot.
g. Close the handle until you hear the latch click into place.
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2.6 Preparing the System
1. Attach network cable to Ethernet port LAN0. Connect the other end to your
network switch. You may also connect the other Ethernet LAN port if needed.
2. Connect monitor to the VGA port.
3. Connect PS/2 keyboard and mouse to the USB-to-PS/2 converter cable, and then
connect the USB connector to the USB port on the NAS.
2.7 Powering On
1. Plug in the two power cords into the AC Power Input Socket of PSU located at the
rear of the NAS system.
NOTE: The NAS system is equipped with redundant, full range
power supplies with PFC (power factor correction). The system
will automatically select voltage.
2. Open the protective cover of the Toggle Switch. And press the toggle switch to
redundant power supply mode.
3. Press the Power On/Off Switch to power on the NAS.
4. The Power LED on the front Panel will turn green.
5. Follow the steps in the next chapter to configure a RAID.
6. Follow the steps in the succeeding chapters to configure the NAS system.
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Chapter 3 RAID Configuration and Management
Before using the NAS system, a RAID configuration must be created. At least one virtual
drive is required to be used in the NAS. You may create more than one Virtual Drive if
needed.
3.1 WebBIOS Configuration Utility
The WebBIOS Configuration Utility (CU) enables you to create and manage RAID
configurations on LSI SAS controllers. The WebBIOS CU resides in the SAS controller
BIOS and operates independently of the operating system.
NOTE: For additional information about the LSI MegaRAID 92604i RAID Configuration and Management, please visit LSI web
site:
http://www.lsi.com/DistributionSystem/AssetDocument/files/d
ocs/techdocs/storage_stand_prod/sas/mr_sas_sw_ug.pdf
3.1.1 Starting the WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Perform the following steps to enter the WebBIOS Configuration Utility when you boot
the system.
1. When the host computer is booting, hold down the <Ctrl> key and press the <H>
key when the following text appears on the screen:
LSI MegaRAID SAS-MFI BIOS
Version x.xx.xx
Copyright© LSI Corporation
Press <Ctrl><H> for WebBIOS CU
The Adapter Selection screen appears.
2. Select the SAS MegaRAID Adapter, if not selected.
3. Click Start to continue. The main WebBIOS CU screen appears.
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3.1.2 WebBIOS CU Main Screen Options
The figure below shows the screen when you start the WebBIOS CU and select an
adapter.
In the lower right panel, the logical view part of the screen displays all of the virtual
drives that are configured on this controller. In the upper right panel, the physical
view part of the screen displays the drives that are connected to the controller.
To toggle between the physical view and logical view of the storage devices
connected to the controller, click Physical View or Logical View in the menu on the
left. When the physical view screen is displayed, the lower right panel displays the
drive groups that are configured on this controller.
For drives in an enclosure, the screen displays the drive information in the following
format: (Connector): position: slot. The connector information identifies where the
chain of enclosures is connected to the RAID controller. The position number
identifies the position of the enclosure in the daisy chain.
Directly-attached drives displays in the following format: Slot.
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The toolbar at the top of the WebBIOS CU has the following buttons:
Table 3.1.2
Icon
WebBIOS CU Toolbar Icons
Description
Click this icon to return to the main screen from any other
WebBIOS CU screen.
Click this icon to return to the previous screen that you were
viewing.
Click this icon to exit the WebBIOS CU program.
Click this icon to display the Adapter Selection screen. If the
computer system has multiple controllers, you use this screen to
view the devices connected to a different controller.
Click this icon to turn off the sound on the onboard controller
alarm.
Click this icon to display information about the WebBIOS CU
version, browser version, and HTML interface engine.
The WebBIOS CU Main Screen contains the following options:
 Controller Selection: Select this to view the Adapter Selection screen, where
you can select a different SAS controller. You can then view information about
the controller and the devices connected to it, or create a new configuration
on the controller.
 Controller Properties: Select this to view the properties of the currently
selected SAS controller.
 Scan Devices: Select this to have the WebBIOS CU re-scan the physical and
virtual drives for any changes in the drive status or the physical configuration.
The WebBIOS CU displays the results of the scan in the physical and virtual
drive descriptions.
 Virtual Drives: Select this to view the Virtual Disks screen, where you can
change and view virtual drive properties, delete virtual drives, initialize drives,
and perform other tasks.
 Drives: Select this to view the Drives screen, where you can view drive
properties, create hot spares, and perform other tasks.
 Configuration Wizard: Select this to start the Configuration Wizard and
create a new storage configuration, clear a configuration, or add a
configuration.
 Physical View/Logical View: Select this to toggle between the Physical
View and Logical View screens.
 Events: Select this to view system events in the Event Information screen.
 Exit: Select this to exit the WebBIOS CU and continue with system boot
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3.2 Configuring RAID Drive Groups and Virtual Drives
NOTE: This section describes the steps to create two RAID Level
5 Virtual Drives to be used in the NAS system.
For additional information about the LSI MegaRAID 9260-4i RAID
Configuration and Management, please visit the LSI web site:
http://www.lsi.com/DistributionSystem/AssetDocument/files/d
ocs/techdocs/storage_stand_prod/sas/mr_sas_sw_ug.pdf
To create a RAID configuration:
1. Click Configuration Wizard on the WebBIOS main screen. The first
Configuration Wizard screen is displayed.
2. Select a configuration option.
WARNING: If you choose the first or second option, all existing
data in the configuration will be deleted. Make a backup of any
data that you want to keep before you choose an option.



22
Clear Configuration: Clears the existing configuration.
New Configuration: Clears the existing configuration and lets you
create a new configuration.
Add Configuration: Retains the existing storage configuration and
adds new drives to it (this does not cause any data loss).
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3. To create a new configuration, select New Configuration. Click Next.
A dialog box will warn that you will lose data if you select Clear
Configuration or New Configuration.
NOTE: You only select New Configuration the first time you create
the drive group and virtual drives. When you add more drives and
create new drive groups or virtual drives, you need to select Add
Configuration.
4. On the next screen, select Manual Configuration.
Types of Configuration Methods:



Manual Configuration: Allows you to control all attributes of the new
storage configuration.
Automatic Configuration with Redundancy: Automatically creates
an optimal RAID 1, RAID 5, or RAID 6 configuration, providing data
redundancy.
Automatic Configuration without Redundancy: Automatically
creates a non-redundant RAID 0 configuration.
5. Click Next to continue.
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3.2.1 Using Auto Configuration
If you select one of the Auto Configuration options, either with or without redundancy,
the following are the steps to configure RAID:
1. When WebBIOS displays the proposed new configuration, review the information
on the screen, and click Accept to accept it. (Or click Back to go back and
change the configuration.)
RAID 0: If you select Automatic Configuration without Redundancy,
WebBIOS creates a RAID 0 configuration.
 RAID 1: If you select Automatic Configuration with Redundancy, and
only two drives are available, WebBIOS creates a RAID 1 configuration.
 RAID 5: If you select Automatic Configuration with Redundancy, and
three or more drives are available, WebBIOS creates a RAID 5
configuration.
 RAID 6: If you select Automatic Configuration with Redundancy, and
the RAID 6 option is enabled, and three or more drives are available,
WebBIOS creates a RAID 6 configuration.
2. Click Yes when you are prompted to save the configuration.

3. Click Yes when you are prompted to initialize the new virtual drive(s). WebBIOS
CU begins a background initialization of the virtual drives.
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3.2.2 Using Manual Configuration: Creating RAID 5 Virtual Drives
When you select Custom Configuration and click Next, the Drive Group Definition
screen appears. You use this screen to select drives to create drive groups.
1. Hold <Ctrl> while you select at least three ready drives in the Physical Drives
panel on the left.
2. Click Add to Array to move the drives to a proposed drive group configuration in
the Drive Groups panel on the right.
If you need to undo the changes, click the Reclaim button.
3. When you have finished selecting drives for the drive group, click Accept DG.
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4. Click Next.
5. The Span Definition screen appears. Drive Group 0 is shown in the Array With
Free Space list. Click Add to SPAN.
6. Drive Group 0 is listed in the Span panel. Click Next.
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7. The Virtual Drive Definition screen appears. You use this screen to select the
RAID level, stripe size, read policy and other attributes for the new virtual drives.
Virtual Drive Parameters and Descriptions
Parameter
Description
RAID Level
The drop-down menu lists the possible RAID levels for the virtual
drive.
Stripe Size
The stripe size specifies the length of the data segments that the
RAID controller writes across multiple drives, not including parity
drives. For example, consider a stripe that contains 64 KB of
drive space and has 16 KB of data residing on each drive in the
stripe. In this case, the stripe size is 64 KB and the strip size is
16 KB. You can set the stripe size to 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256,
512, and 1024 Kbytes. A larger stripe size produces higher read
performance. If your computer regularly performs random read
requests, choose a smaller stripe size. The default is 64 Kbytes.
Access
Policy
Select the type of data access that is allowed for this virtual
drive:
Read Policy

RW: Allow read/write access. This is the default.

Read Only: Allow read-only access.

Blocked: Do not allow access.
Specify the read policy for this virtual drive:

Normal: This disables the read ahead capability. This is the
default.

Ahead: This enables read ahead capability, which allows the
controller to read sequentially ahead of requested data and
to store the additional data in cache memory, anticipating
that the data will be needed soon. This speeds up reads for
sequential data, but there is little improvement when
accessing random data.

Adaptive: When Adaptive read ahead is selected, the
controller begins using read ahead if the two most recent
drive accesses occurred in sequential sectors. If the read
requests are random, the controller reverts to Normal (no
read ahead).
Write Policy Specify the write policy for this virtual drive:

Always Write Back: In Writeback mode the controller sends
a data transfer completion signal to the host when the
controller cache has received all of the data in a transaction.
This setting is recommended in Standard mode.

Write Through: In Writethrough mode the controller sends a
data transfer completion signal to the host when the drive
subsystem has received all of the data in a transaction. This
is the default.
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NAS System

Write Back with BBU: Select this mode if you want the
controller to use Writeback mode but the controller has no
BBU or the BBU is bad. If you do not choose this option, the
controller firmware automatically switches to Writethrough
mode if it detects a bad or missing BBU.
Caution: LSI allows Writeback mode to be used with or
without a battery. LSI recommends that you use either a
battery to protect the controller cache, or an
uninterruptible power supply (UPS) to protect the entire
system. If you do not use a battery or a UPS, and there is
a power failure, you risk losing the data in the controller
cache.
IO Policy
The IO Policy applies to reads on a specific virtual drive.
It does not affect the read ahead cache.
 Direct: In Direct I/O mode, reads are not buffered in cache
memory. Data is transferred to the cache and the host
concurrently. If the same data block is read again, it comes
from cache memory. This is the default.
 Cached: In Cached I/O mode, all reads are buffered in cache
memory.
Drive Cache Specify the drive cache policy:
 Enable: Enable the drive cache.
 Disable: Disable the drive cache. This is the default.
 Unchanged: Leave the current drive cache policy
unchanged.
Disable BGI Specify the background initialization status:
 No: Leave background initialization enabled. This means
that a new configuration can be initialized in the background
while you use WebBIOS to do other configuration tasks. This
is the default.
 Yes: Select Yes if you do not want to allow background
initializations for configurations on this controller.
Select Size
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User’s Manual
Specify the size of the virtual drive in megabytes. Normally, this
would be the full size for RAID 5 shown in the Configuration
panel on the right. You may specify a smaller size if you want to
create other virtual drives on the same drive group.
NAS System
To create Virtual Drive 0, select RAID 5 as RAID Level, and enter the size in
Select Size. Click Accept then Next.
NOTE: The Virtual Drive can use all of the capacity of the Drive
Group. You may create several Virtual Drives depending on your
usage and requirement.
NOTE: For ProNAS 1.3.x version, the following RAID settings are
recommended:
Stripe Size
128 KB
Read Policy
Ahead
Write Policy
Always Write Back
Drive Cache
Enable
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29
NAS System
8. VD 0 is created. To create the second Virtual Drive, click Back. The Span
Definition will be displayed. Click Add to SPAN and Yes.
9. The Virtual Disk Definition screen appears. To create Virtual Drive 1, select RAID
5 as RAID Level. The remaining capacity of the Drive Group will be used by
Virtual Drive 1. Select Accept and click Next.
NOTE: For ProNAS 1.3.x version, the following RAID settings are
recommended:
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User’s Manual
Stripe Size
128 KB
Read Policy
Ahead
Write Policy
Always Write Back
Drive Cache
Enable
NAS System
10. Virtual Drive 1 is created. Click Next.
11. The Configuration Preview screen is shown. Click Accept to save the
configuration.
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31
NAS System
12. A Confirmation Page will be displayed. Select Yes to confirm.
13. Another Confirmation Page is displayed. Select Yes to initialize the Virtual Drives.
14. The two Virtual Drives will be initialized in the background. Click Home to return
to the main screen of WebBIOS CU.
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User’s Manual
NAS System
3.3 Creating Global Hot Spare
A global hot spare can be used to replace a failed physical disk in any redundant
array as long as the capacity of the global hot spare is equal to or larger than the
coerced capacity of the failed physical disk.
To create a global hot spare:
1. While in WebBIOS CU main screen, select Drives option.
2. Select an un-configured drive and tick Properties the click Go.
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NAS System
3. Choose the Make Global HSP option and click Go.
4. Click Go.
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User’s Manual
NAS System
5. The global hot spare drive is created.
3.4 Restarting the Controller
1. Verify the status of Virtual Drives.
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35
NAS System
2. Click Exit.
3. A confirmation screen will be displayed. Select Yes.
4. A message “Please Reboot your system.” Will be displayed. Reboot your system
by pressing CTRL+ALT+DEL keys.
5. The system will reboot.
6. The NAS system will be started. Please refer to Part 2 for the proNAS system
configuration.
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User’s Manual
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