ICP DAS USA | MSM-508FCS-T | User manual | ICP DAS USA MSM-508 User Manual

ICP DAS USA MSM-508 User Manual
TM
Managed Switch User Manual
Industrial Managed Ethernet Switch
Version 1.2
This document applied to models of
MSM-508,MSM-508FC/FCS/FT
April 29, 2008
Please print in double side
TDRS4050601
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Document Control
Date
July 1, 2006
Dec 2, 2010
Jan 1, 2011
i
Author
KC Chen
Jerry Chiu
Jerry Chiu
Version
1.0
1.1
1.2
TDRS4050601
Description
First draft
Add DI/O Wire Connection
Modify jumper block label
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Copyright & Trademarks
All rig hts re se rv ed. No par t o f th is p ubl ica tio n ma y be
repr odu ced , s to re d in a ret rie va l syst em, or
tran smi tte d i n an y fo rm or by an y mean s, whe the r
elec tro nic , m ec ha nica l, pho to co py ing, re cor din g or
othe rwi se, wi th ou t th e p rio r w ri tt en p erm iss ion o f the
publ ish er.
The nam es use d fo r id ent ifi cat io n only ma y b e
regi ste red tr ad em arks of th eir r es pect ive co mpa ni es .
Copy rig ht
©
IC P D A S Co ., Ltd ., Al l Righ ts Res erv ed .
TDRS4050601
ii
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Disclaimer
Limited Warranty
All pro duc ts ma nu fact ure d b y I CP D AS a re war ran te d
agai nst de fec ti ve mat eri als fo r a peri od of one y ea r
from th e d ate o f deli ver y t o t he o rigi nal pu rch as er .
Duri ng thi s p er io d, i f a cu sto me r is u nab le to re so lve
a pr odu ct pro bl em wit h I CP DAS T ec hnic al Sup por t, a
Retu rn Mat eri al A utho riz ati on (R MA ) wi ll be iss ue d. If
the pro duc t i s no t un der wa rra nt y, the cu sto mer m ay
have IC P D AS re pa ir t he uni t o n a fee bas is or re tu rn
it.
This wa rra nty i s void ed if the c us tome r u ses th e
prod uct in an u na utho riz ed or im pr oper wa y, or in a n
envi ron men t f or w hich it wa s n ot d esig ned .
Standards
The Rin g S wit ch m eets th e f oll ow in g st and ard s:
EMC imm uni ty
- IE C61 326 -1, I EE E C3 7.9 0
EMI emi ssi ons
- FC C p art 15 , IC ES 0 03, EN 550 22 ;
Clas s B
Elec tri cal sa fe ty - UL 50 8, CSA C 22 /14; EN 610 10- 1
(IEC 101 0)
Warning
ICP DAS as sum e no lia bil ity fo r da mage s c ons equ en t to
the use of th is p rodu ct. IC P D AS r eser ves th e r ig ht to
chan ge thi s m an ua l at an y t ime w it hout no tic e. Th e
info rma tio n f ur ni shed by IC P D AS i s be lie ved to b e
accu rat e a nd re li able . H owe ver , no res pon sib ili ty i s
assu med by IC P DA S fo r i ts use , no r fo r a ny
infr ing eme nts o f pate nts or ot he r righ ts of thi rd
part ies re sul ti ng fro m i ts use .
Safety
Inst all th e R ea l Time Ri ng Swi tc h in a cco rda nce w it h
loca l a nd nat io na l el ect ric al co de s.
Ligh tni ng Dan ge r: Do not wo rk on e quip men t d uri ng
peri ods of li gh tn ing act ivi ty.
Do n ot con nec t a tele pho ne lin e in to o ne of the
Ethe rne t R J45 c on nect ors .
iii
TDRS4050601
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Preface
The advent of Ethernet brings the whole world a new territory. So it does in industrial
application. More and more industrial devices and equipment now support Ethernet. To
make all these devices and equipment integrated and worked, the Ethernet switch is a
key character.
For commercial using, the Ethernet switch is very easy to choose, and also cheap. But,
in industrial field application, user must take the environment conditions and field
requirement into concern.
Harsh environ, such as extreme high or low temperature, moisture, ground
differentials and electrical noise … etc
Requirement of fault-tolerant solution.
For automation and control engineers who have been forced into this IT domain,
they really don't want to get too involved with the idiosyncrasies and maintenance
of Ethernet networks.
To satisfy these, the Managed Switch provides you a rugged, fault-tolerant, plug and
play solution.
ICP DAS industrial Switch Series
ICP DAS industrial Ethernet switch has the following series:
NS Series: Network Switch Series, a standard switch with industrial class of
quality.
RS Series: Ring Switch Series, a redundant ring switch with industrial class of
quality.
Managed Series: A redundant ring switch with industrial class of quality, and
provides lots of powerful managed functions.
How to Use this manual
This manual is intended to help user quickly understanding and easily making use of
MSM-508 (and other supported products), and the arrangement of chapters and
sections follows the steps that user need to take.
TDRS4050601
iv
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Contents
Document Control...................................................................................... i
Copyright & Trademarks............................................................................ ii
Disclaimer.................................................................................................. iii
Limited Warranty.......................................................................................................iii
Standards .................................................................................................................iii
Warning.....................................................................................................................iii
Safety........................................................................................................................iii
Preface ...................................................................................................... iv
ICP DAS industrial Switch Series .............................................................................iv
How to Use this manual............................................................................................iv
Contents .................................................................................................... v
Acronyms .................................................................................................. 1
Introduction................................................................................................ 4
Ethernet Switch......................................................................................................... 5
Industrial Ethernet..................................................................................................... 5
Industrial Fiber Optic................................................................................................. 7
Why Fiber Optics?
7
Industrial vs. Commercial
8
Managed Switch Key Features................................................................................. 8
Package Contents .................................................................................................... 8
Appearance ............................................................................................... 9
Dimensions ............................................................................................................. 10
Dimensions ............................................................................................................. 10
Front Panel ............................................................................................................. 11
On Case Quick Guide............................................................................................. 12
Hardware Installation................................................................................. 13
DIN-Rail Mounting Installation ................................................................................ 14
Wall-Mounting Installation....................................................................................... 15
Connecting Input Power ......................................................................................... 15
Connecting Input Power ......................................................................................... 16
Connecting Output Relay........................................................................................ 17
Connecting Digital Input & Output .......................................................................... 18
Connecting Ethernet Ports...................................................................................... 20
Connecting Fiber Ports (only for models with fiber port) ........................................ 21
Configuration ............................................................................................. 22
One Ring Topology................................................................................................. 23
Two Rings Coupling................................................................................................ 24
Two Rings Coupling with Two Phase Recovering.................................................. 25
Troubleshooting......................................................................................... 26
No power to the switch.
No link light on a switch port.
Master LED keep on Flashing
27
27
27
Service Information.................................................................................... 28
v
TDRS4050601
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
On-line support ....................................................................................................... 28
Contact Worldwide.................................................................................................. 28
Appendix A ................................................................................................ a
Glossaries ................................................................................................................. a
Appendix B ................................................................................................ c
Specifications............................................................................................................ c
Appendix C................................................................................................ d
Modbus Table ........................................................................................................... d
Appendix E ................................................................................................ f
Ingress Protection (IP) ............................................................................................... f
Appendix F ................................................................................................ g
Accessories .............................................................................................................. g
TDRS4050601
vi
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Acronyms
1
ATM
Acronym for Asynchronous Transfer Mode, a high performance
networking technology based on the switching of fixed length, 53 byte
cells. ATM switching supports the switching of voice, video, and data;
also supports isochronous communication.
BPV
Acronym for Bi-Polar Violation.
B-ISDN
Broadband ISDN. A network standard from the CCITT and ANSI
committee. It supports voice, data and video in the same network.
CCITT
Acronym for Consultative Committee, International Telephone and
Telegraph. An international standards body responsible for setting
international communications standards that allow interoperability
among telephony and data communications equipment.
CD (DCD)
Acronym for Carrier Detect (Detect Carrier Detect).
CDDI
The use of unshielded or shielded twisted pair cable to transmit the
FDDI signal.
CO
Acronym for Central Office. The local telephone company switch that
terminates subscribers' lines for switching and connecting to the
public network.
CSMA/CD
Acronym for Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection.
Access protocol for Ethernet.
CSU
Acronym for Channel Service Unit, a device furnished as an integral
part of a digital access line where a user wishes to supply the bipolar
signals. It provides the network with protection against user side
electrical anomalies such as surges, and provides the user with
network clocking.
CTS
Acronym for Clear To Send.
DCE
Acronym for Data Communication Equipment, aka. Data CircuitTerminating Equipment.
DCR
Acronym for Data Communication Ready.
DS1
Digital Signal, Level 1 is the North American data rate used for T1
carriers. It operates at 1.544Mbps and supports 24 phone lines.
DS2
Digital Signal, Level 2 is the North American data rate used for T2
carriers. It operates at 6.312 Mbps and supports four T1 lines or 96
phone calls
DS3
Digital signal, Level 3 is the North American data rate used for T3
carriers. It operates at 44.736 Mbps and supports 28 T1 lines.
DSU
Acronym for Data Service Unit, a DCE used with digital
communications circuits to provide digital data services interface.
Located on the users premises, the DSU interfaces directly with the
DTE, and provides loop equalization, remote and local test
TDRS4050601
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
capabilities, and the logic and timing necessary to provide a standard
EIA/TIA or CCITT interface. Converts signals between those used at
the DTE's serial interface and bipolar signals used on the digital
network. Also Network Terminal Unit (NTU).
DTE
Acronym for Data Terminating or Data Terminal Equipment.
DTR
Acronym for Data Terminal Ready.
E1
The European standard for high speed, point to point transmission
operating at 2.048 Mbps and defines 64 Kbps sub-channels.
EIA
Acronym for Electronic Industries Association. EIA, a standards body,
has a set of standards which includes data communications and
interface standards among others.
EMI
Acronym for Electro-Magnetic Interference.
FEP
Stands for Front End Processor. It is an IBM communication controller
that routes traffic to and from cluster controllers.
FDDI
Acronym for Fiber Distributed Data Interface, is a shared medium, ring
topology LAN that operates at 100 Mbps. It is ANSI standard X3T9.5,
using fiber optic cable as the medium.
FPGA
Acronym for Field Programmable Gate Array.
LAN
A local area network is a group of PCs connected over a common
medium within a building.
MAC
Acronym for Medium Access Control. A designated hardware address
for each device on a LAN or MAN. This address is burnt into The
network interface card (NIC) by its manufacturer.
MAN
A metropolitan area network is a group of PCs connected over a
common medium within a campus environment or the same city.
NA
Acronym for Numerical Aperture.
OC1
Optical Carrier Signal Level 1 refers to SONET data transmission at
51.840Mbps.
OC3
Acronym for Optical Carrier 3, a transmission rate standard for fiber
optic telephony or data communications circuits. OC3 operates at 155
Mbps speed and is part of the SONET hierarchy.
OC12
Optical Carrier Signal Level 12 refers to SONET data transmission at
622.080Mbps.
OSI
(Open Data Interconnection Reference Model) - This is the
International Standards Organization (ISO) model of how data
communications systems can be interconnected. Communication is
partitioned into seven function layers. Each layer builds on the
services provided by those under it.
PBX
Acronym for Private Branch Exchange, is a small private version of a
phone company's larger central switching office.
TDRS4050601
2
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
3
PCM
Acronym for Pulse-Coded Modulation, a means of converting analog
to digital form.
RING
Path or channel; usually electrical, where devices along the path
receive transmissions sequentially from one device to the next along
the ring.
RS-232
An interface used between DTE and DCE employing serial binary
data interchange, defined by EIA, aka. EIA-232. Similar to standard
V.24 of CCITT.
RS-422
Standard defined by EIA, aka. EIA-422. Deals with the electrical
characteristics of balanced voltage digital interface circuits. Similar to
standard V.11 of CCITT.
RS-423
Standard defined by EIA, aka. EIA 423. Deals with electrical
characteristics of unbalanced voltage digital interface circuits. Similar
to standard V.10 of CCITT.
RS-449
Standard defined by EIA, aka. EIA-449. Deals with general-purpose
37- and 9-position interface for data terminal equipment and data
circuit-terminating equipment employing serial binary data
interchange.
RS-485
Standard defined by EIA, aka. EIA-485. Standard for electrical
characteristics of generators and receivers for use in balanced
multipoint systems.
RTS
Acronym for Request To Send.
SCADA
Acronym for Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition.
SNMP
Acronym for Simple Network Management Protocol. A standard
management protocol used to provide a common means of managing
network devices.
SONET
Acronym for Synchronous Optical NETwork, is a hierarchical standard
for a high speed (45 Mbps to 2.4 Gbps) transport network.
T1
Transmission rate standard for telephony or data communications
circuits. T1 operates at 1.544 Mbps speed. Usually this circuit is
subdivided into many 64 Kb channels.
TCP/IP
Acronym for Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol.
WAN
Acronym for Wide Area Network, a computer network interconnected
over distances beyond a city or metropolitan area.
802.3
Commonly referred to as Ethernet. It is a local area network protocol
that operates at 10Mbps.
802.5
Commonly referred to as Token Ring. Operates at either 4 or 16Mbps.
TDRS4050601
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Introduction
Ethernet Switch
Industrial Ethernet
Industrial Fiber Optic
Key Features
Package Contents
Welcome to ICP DAS Managed Industrial Ethernet Switch one of
the world’s best Industrial Ethernet Switch designed for connecting
Ethernet-enabled devices in industrial field applications. This manual
is for the ICP DAS Managed Switch.
Overview
The Managed Industrial Ethernet Switch is designed upon concepts
of reliability, quick recovery, easy configuration, self-healing and
SCADA for status monitoring. Besides, all models in Managed Switch
1
mechanism is also designed to meet IP30 above for working under
harsh environment.
Unlike other existing ring switch or managed Ethernet switch on the
market, the ICPDAS Managed Switch is much more easy to use and
absolutely free of software setting.
1
Ingress Protection, see “Appendix B” for detail information.
TDRS4050601
4
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Ethernet Switch
Ethernet is an ideal medium to transport large volumes of data, at speed, across great
distances. Previously, multiple networks carrying specific protocols were installed side by
side to carry out unique tasks. This inevitably led to project costs increasing as additional
fiber optic or copper cables were installed to deal with the increasing volume of data.
Using Ethernet a single fiber optic cable can carry multiple protocols. Furthermore,
manufacturers are exporting their legacy protocols onto Ethernet, designing new IP
based communication protocols and providing embedded Web-Pages within devices that
offer real-time information using simple tools like Internet Explorer and Netscape
Navigator.
Unfortunately, although network hardware has dramatically increased in speed and
technology over the past decade the poor perception of Ethernet has remained; namely
as being difficult to fault-find and critically being a non-deterministic network. A key
development that overcame some of these issues was the advent of the Ethernet Switch.
Early Ethernet networks were based on a hub or repeater. These units have no
intelligence and therefore are unable to identify any information contained within the
Header frame of an Ethernet packet. This means that it is not capable of determining
which port to send the frame to. Therefore, every frame is sent to every port. A network of
repeaters and hubs is called a ‘Shared Ethernet’ or ‘Collision Domain’. Various devices
will all compete with each other before sending data using ‘Carrier Sense Multiple Access
/ Collision Detect’ (CSMA/CD) protocol. This means that only one system is allowed to
proceed with a transmission of a frame within a Collision Domain at any one time. This is
a major disadvantage when using Hubs and Repeaters within a network.
A switch, like a hub, has to forward and receive packets from one network or device to
another. The switch could forward all packets, but if this was the case it would have
similar behaviour to a hub. It would be more intelligent if the switch only forwarded
packets which needed to travel from one network or device to another. To do this, the
switch must learn which devices or networks are connected to each port. In simplistic
terms; it needs to learn the destination and source ports of each and every packet
received on each individual Switch port. Once learnt, any identically addressed packet
will be automatically be forwarded. With today’s enhanced processing power the
introduction of a Switch has significantly increase network bandwidth.
Industrial Ethernet
Industrial rated Switches are intended to be installed in both harsh climatic environments
and noisy electrical installations. Such Switches are an excellent example of true
industrial design principles –
very high operating temperatures (down to -30°C an d up to 75°C)
dual input power supplies
wide DC operating voltages
In Roadside and tunnel applications distances between cabinets with a suitable power
supply can be challenging. Naturally, fiber optic cable is the preferred solution. Using
single mode fiber, runs of up to 85km are possible. Even using standard CAT5e copper
cable the Industrial Switch supports the long cable specification and distances of up to
185m are viable. However, the domain of Ethernet has always been controlled by the IT
department who normally configured office networks with an iron fist and dictated to the
organisation how the network would be designed. Complex network recovery protocols
5
TDRS4050601
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
like spanning tree, and SNMP to help with fault finding and system analysis were often
employed to enhance network resilience. If a network failure occurred the IT department
would casually look at repairing the equipment; there was no real rush as it was an office
network.
However, with industrial Ethernet you need very fast repair time and with an IT
department not readily available on the roadside, maintenance personnel need to be
made aware of the fault, find the error and repair it - quickly. To aid this, unique network
recovery features are employed to significantly enhance network recovery times. When
an IT department requires a level of redundancy a common method is to employ the
spanning tree protocol. However, spanning tree can be complex to program and
critically can take over 30 seconds to detect and recover from the fault – far to long for
critical applications!
ICP DAS Managed Switch incorporates propriety protocols that enable multiple Switches
to be placed into a redundant ring. A single Switch, configured as the network focal point
will monitor, detect and recover from a fiber or copper link failure within approximately
50mS – for the majority of applications a seamless process. The configuration process
of the network focal point is simple as it must be remembered that as the switches are to
be installed on the roadside the first to be called to rectify a fault will more than likely be
Maintenance personnel.
Module
Feature
Communication Protocol
Managed Interface
Service
Redundancy
Amount of Rings
Single Coupling
Redundant Coupling
Router/IP sharing
ICPDAS Managed Switch
General Managed Switch
Modbus/TCP
Modbus/RTU
SNMP
IGMP
Serial Console,
Utility
Web
telnet
Serial Console
Utility
Web
telnet
OoS, HTTP, VLAN, SMTP.
QoS, CoS, VPN, FTP, HTTP,
HTTPS, SSH, VLAN
Cyber-Ring
(Variable recovery time from 100
ms to 1.5s)
Spanning Tree.
Trunking, Spanning Tree, Rapid
Spanning Tree
2
1
Yes
No
Yes
No
No
Yes
IEEE standards
802.3
802.3x
802.3u
802.1D
802.1p
802.1q
802.3
802.3x
802.3u
802.1D/w
802.1p
802.1q
Alarm
Relay Output
Modbus
SNMP
Convenience
Easy to use/configure
N/A
TDRS4050601
6
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
It is likely that these people will not be fully trained on Ethernet and the protocols that are
in operation, nor will they fully understand the principles of SNMP etc. However, with a
fault contact, fault LED’s and graphical interface implemented they have a multi-level
approach to fault finding:
The fault contact is hard-wired to an alarm on a control panel or as an input to a DCS. If a
link failure occurs (between two switches or an Ethernet Device) or a network failure
occurs the fault contact on the Switches will be energized. The Maintenance Engineer
can easily locate the fault.
With the increased use of Ethernet in the field to pass critical data the greater the
reliability in network infrastructure. Where multiple rings are configured in a system it is
also critical that the links between the rings are also duplicated to provide enhanced
redundancy. This can be achieved using Multi-ring Redundancy
Industrial Fiber Optic
Why Fiber Optics?
The utilization of fiber optic data transmission for industrial automation and process
control has become increasingly popular over the past decade.
A basic fiber optic system, using an optical transceiver circuit and fiber optic media, offers
a wide array of benefits that are not available with traditional copper conductors.
Advantages of Fiber Optic Data Transmission Technology
High data rate and wide bandwidth
Immunity to EMI/RFI and lightning damage
No ground loops
Low attenuation (data loss)
Longer distance – up to 1.8 miles (3 km) with Muliti Mode fiber and over 15 miles
(25 km) with Single Mode fiber
Small cable diameter fits almost anywhere - requires less duct space
Light weight
No sparks if cut – ideal for Hazardous Area applications
No electric shock hazard
Secure communications
Flexible networking topologies
Corrosion resistant
Longer life expectancy than copper or coaxial cable
Economical total system cost
Disadvantages of Electronic Cabling (Twisted Pair (TP), Coax, Twinax)
In selecting the signal/data transmission technology for your Industrial Automation and
Process Control networking, the following limitations of electronic cabling should be
considered:
7
Cabling hassles: weight, routing, size, attenuation and cross-talk
Distance between terminals and hosts is severely limited
Large diameter cable fills plenums and conduits
Needs to be routed away from power cabling
Poor security
Limited topologies
TDRS4050601
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Cost can be high relative to Fiber
Industrial vs. Commercial
Most process plants and factories have unique requirements for communications
networks that differ from those of commercial grade networks. Industrial network
components must withstand much harsher environmental conditions that can include
extreme temperatures, lightning strikes, electromagnetic interference and, in many
instances, installation in hazardous area locations.
Mounting and space requirements can also be an issue since industrial networking
components are often installed in the same control panel or cabinet with other
measurement and control equipment. At ICP DAS, our goal is to meet the demanding
requirements of industrial communication networks. Our industry standard, Managed
Switch of industrially hardened fiber optic communication products addresses these
issues and provides you with optimal solutions for your factory automation and process
control needs.
Managed Switch Key Features
Connectors locate in front panel, reducing wiring complexity and easy maintenance.
Dual input power supply for non-stop connectivity
Patent pending Cyber-Ring Protocol
Versatile DIN-rail, surface, and wall-mountable design
Rugged aluminium case with IP30 rated protection
Provides redundant dual DC power inputs with reverse polarity protection and alarm
Non-blocking, store-and-forward switching architecture
Watch dog
Support SCADA via Modbus/TCP or Serial Console for status monitoring
Support 2 rings
Support multiple single coupling and redundant coupling
Provides easy-to-use GUI configuration utility
Supports email warning via Simple Mail Transfer Protocol ( by GUI configuration
utility)
Support VLAN, QoS, Port Trunking, TELNET…etc. variety protocols.
Package Contents
One Industrial Ethernet Switch
Quick Installation Guide
User Manual
RJ-45 Covers
4PCA-090510 cable line
TDRS4050601
8
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Appearance
Overview
Dimensions
Front Panel
On Case Quick Guide
The Managed Switch provides useful interfaces to configure the
switch functions. For hardware installation, we provide easy DIN rail
mounting, wall mounting modes, and come with aluminum case.
All of connectors are well arranged on the front panel, so it is easier
to stack with other devices and to maintain in a small installation
space.
9
TDRS4050601
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Dimensions
TDRS4050601
10
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Front Panel
Terminal block
Left :
1. DO PWR
2. DO GND
3. DO #2
4. DO #1
5. DO #0
6. Relay (R.NO)
7. Relay (R.COM)
8. Power 2 +Vs
9. Power 2 GND
10. Frame Ground
Rignt :
11. 12. DI COM
13. DI #2
14. DI #1
15. DI #0
16. Data+
17. Data18. Power 1 +Vs
19. Power 1 GND
20. Frame Ground
Serial line via Ethernet port
Jumper block
Repair Mode
Normal Mode
Upgrade Firmware Mode
Master switch LED indicator
Power 1 LED indicator
Power 2 LED indicator
RJ-45 Ethernet ports
Interconnection port for 2
phase recovering coupling
11
TDRS4050601
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
On Case Quick Guide
LED status and Default Setting have been printed on left side of front panel. After
acquainted with Managed Switch features, field engineers could deploy switches quickly
by referencing those information.
TDRS4050601
12
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Hardware Installation
DIN-Rail Mounting
Installation
Wall-Mounting Installation
Connecting Input Power
Connecting Output Relay
Connecting Ethernet Ports
Connecting Fiber Ports
13
For hardware installation, we provide both easy DIN rail mounting
and wall mounting modes.
Overview
Managed Switch support redundant power, output relay and
enhanced isolation to make device much robust. With ICP DAS
®
patent DIN-Clip design, the installation is just as easy as plugging
power cord into outlet.
TDRS4050601
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
DIN-Rail Mounting Installation
®
Up Clip
Down Clip
With ICPDAS patent DIN-Clip design, DIN-Rail mounting installation becomes very easy.
Following 3 steps completes installation.
➊
Pull the down rail clip out.
Push &
Clip
➋
Obliquing the switch and insert the upper clip onto the upper lip of the DINrail track. Then push down the switch to fit into DIN rail as shown below.
➌
Push up down rail clip to lock the switch on the DIN rail.
TDRS4050601
14
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Wall-Mounting Installation
®
With ICP DAS patent DIN-Clip design, Wall-Mounting installation becomes very easy.
Following 1 step completes installation.
➊
Use the slotted holes at each corner of the wall-mounting clip to attach the unit
to the wall or other flat surface. Then fasten it on the wall with screw.
15
TDRS4050601
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Connecting Input Power
IMPORTANT: It is good practice to turn off input and load power, and unplug the power
terminal block before making wire connections. Otherwise, your screwdriver blade can
inadvertently short your terminal connections to the grounded enclosure.
➊
Identify PWR1, GND, PWR2, GND contacts on terminal block. Then identify
power wire and ground wire.
➋
Insert the wire of your DC supply or Battery supply into the PWN1 and/or
PWN2 contacts of the terminal block connector, and fastening the terminal
screws to prevent the wires from coming loose.
NOTE: For best reliability, please install both of PWN1 and PWN2 for power redundant.
TDRS4050601
16
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Connecting Output Relay
The diagram of output relay:
➊
➋
Identify R.NO and R.COM contacts on terminal block.
Insert the relayed device such as a light bulb or a buzzer pair of wire, and
fastening the terminal screws to prevent the wires from coming loose.
17
TDRS4050601
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Connecting Digital Input & Output
The diagram of digital input and output:
Wire Connection
TDRS4050601
18
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
➊
➋
19
Identify digital input and output contacts on terminal block.
Fastening the terminal screws to prevent the wires from coming loose.
TDRS4050601
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Connecting Ethernet Ports
Managed Switch includes all RJ-45 ports with automatic MDI/MDI-X crossover, and
automatic 10/100Mbps data rate sensing for 10Base-T or 100Base-TX connections.
Automatic MDI/MDI-X crossover allows you to connect to other switches, hubs, or
workstations, without regard to using straight-through or crossover cabling. The following
figures depict the schematic diagram of straight-through and crossover cabling. Note that
crossover cables simply cross-connect the transmit lines at each end to the receive lines
at the opposite end.
Straight-through Cabling Schematic
Crossover Cabling Schematic
Note that Ethernet cables use pins 1, 2, 3, and 6 of an 8-pin RJ45 connector. The signals
of these pins are converted by the automatic MDI-X function, as shown in the table below:
Connect one side of an Ethernet cable into any switch port and connect the other side to
your attached device. The green LNK LED will light up when the cable is correctly
connected. Always make sure that the cables between the switches and attached devices
(e.g. switch, hub, or workstation) are less than 100 meters (328 feet).
Two switches are now up-linked together. If we change the up-link port manually at this
time, the MAC address table will change as well. After the MAC address table changes,
then the data can be transmitted between these two switches. This period of time is
called the MAC address table aging time. The switch’s default aging time is 5 minutes,
which means that if you manually change the up-link port, you will need to wait up to 5
minutes before the data can be sent. If the aging time is too short, the MAC address table
will constantly refresh, resulting in excess consumption of switch computing resources.
For this reason, a longer aging time is recommended.
TDRS4050601
20
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Connecting Fiber Ports (only for models with fiber port)
The automatic MDI/MDI-X crossover function does not apply to fiber connections, as
these must be crossed over manually. To connect the fiber port on one switch to the fiber
port of another switch, simply cross-connect the transmit channel at each end to the
receive channel at the opposite end as illustrated in the figure below.
These models have two 100Base-FX ports with SC type connectors (in multi-mode and
single mode versions).
A fiber segment using single-mode cable must use 9/125 or 10/125 micrometer singlemode fiber cables. For single-mode, the connection distance can be up to 30 km.
A fiber segment using multi-mode must use 50 or 62.5/125 micrometer multi-mode fiber
cables. For multi-mode, the connection distance can be up to 2 km.
21
TDRS4050601
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Configuration
One Ring Topology
Two Rings Coupling
Two Rings Coupling with
Two Phase Recovering
This chapter provide basic techniques to form a redundant ring on
your demand.
Overview
To successfully form a robust industrial Ethernet network, the
designing of network pattern is the most important stage. A welldesigned network pattern could dramatically reduce the risk network
failure in critical situation.
TDRS4050601
22
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
One Ring Topology
A ring topology ensures the network having one more chance to keep connection alive
when any connection between 2 switches (nodes) has been broken inside the ring.
When we have formed a ring network, the focal point (master) will choose any one and
only one path as Redundant Path. It is actually inactive when the ring network works
properly. At the moment of any connection failure, the focal point will activate the
Redundant Path and fire alarm to output relay.
Managed Switch come with 2 ring pair by default. A ring pair can form a ring with other
network devices as below:
23
TDRS4050601
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Two Rings Coupling
As a ring network is a small group of switches by geography, functionalities, or
subsystem, 2 or more rings could be coupled together to form a whole picture of industrial
network for an integrated system.
Single coupling point uses a switch to bridge 2 rings. Each ring still keeps original ring
topology features.
TDRS4050601
24
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Two Rings Coupling with Two Phase Recovering
Redundant coupling gives one more chance to keep connection alive when any
connection between 2 rings has been broken. It is much safe than Single Coupling, but it
takes 3 more switches to form Redundant Coupling.
Be sure to use port 5 (interconnection port) to form two phase recovering coupling and
only ring pair 2 can be used in this topology.
25
TDRS4050601
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Troubleshooting
Overview
No Power to the Switch
No Link Light on a Switch
Port
Master LED Keep on
Flashing
This chapter includes some information for general troubleshooting
as follows:
No Power to the Switch
No Link Light on a Switch Port
Master LED Keep on Flashing
TDRS4050601
26
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
No power to the switch.
•
Check for faulty power cord.
•
Check for loose or broken power connections.
•
Check connections to ensure the power and ground are attached to the correct terminals.
•
Check for power loss or power surges at the AC power outlet.
•
Check Voltage of power coming into PWR1 or PWR2 to ensure it is within +10 - +30V DC.
•
Ensure there are no shorts between power and ground.
No link light on a switch port.
•
Check for faulty or loose Cables(both ends). Visually inspect for loose or faulty connections at all
connectors and cables. If that does not correct the problem, try replacing the cable.
•
Check the other device to see if it is powered up and operating correctly.
•
Try moving the Ethernet cable that has the possible faulty connection to another port in the
switch and check for link light.
Master LED keep on Flashing
27
•
Check if the topology is accurate.
•
Check if network is functioning properly.
•
Check if power supply is connected properly.
•
Check if there is devices failure exit (including ring switch or other devices connected to the
switch)
•
Check if MAC address is duplicated or illegal.
•
Check if the length of recovery time (rtime) is adequate; if the recovery time is too short, set a
longer time interval.
•
Check if the firmware is the newest version , please go to
http://www.icpdas.com/download/download-list.htm for downloading newest firmware version.
•
Check if the firmware upgrading process is completed. If not, redo the upgrading sequence to
complete firmware upgrading process.
TDRS4050601
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Service Information
We sincerely hope that you never experience a problem with any ICP DAS product. If you
do need service, call ICP DAS at 886-3-5973366 and ask for Applications Engineering.
Our well-trained specialist will help you to quickly determine the source of the problem.
Many problems are easily resolved with a single phone call.
On-line support
H T T P :/ / W W W . I C P D A S . C O M . T W / S E V I C E S / S U P P O R T . H T M
E- M A I L : S U P P O R T @ I C P D A S . C O M
Contact Worldwide
Taiwan
USA
Europe
Shanghai
Beijing
Hsinchu Headquarter
Banchiao Office
Hsintien Office
Taichung Office
Kaoshiung Office
USA Office
Europe Office
Shanghai Office
Beijing Office
TELEPHONE
FAX
886-3-5973366
886-3-5973733
886-2-29500655
886-2-29500807
886-2-89192220
886-2-89192221
886-4-23582815
886-4-23589114
886-7-2157688
886-7-2162602
1-310-517-9888 x101
1-310-517-0998
0049-711-9 97 37 75
0049-711- 9 97 37 84
8621-6247-1722
8621-6247-1725
8610-6298-0933
8610-6296-2890
TDRS4050601
28
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Appendix A
Glossaries
a
ANSI X3T9
Commonly referred to as FDDI. A local area network protocol that operates at
100Mbps.
Asynchronous
Having a variable time interval between successive data or information in the form
of characters, operations, events. Transmission in which the data or information is
individually synchronized or timed usually by start and stop bits (S/S).
Attenuation
A general term describing the loss of power between two points, measured in
decibels per kilometer (dB/km) at a specified wavelength (nm).
Backbone Network
A main or high speed transmission facility or medium usually designed to connect
lower speed channels or clusters of terminals. May describe common carrier main
transmission path.
Bandwidth
A range of frequencies available for signaling; the differences between the highest
and lowest frequencies of a band are expressed in (Hz).
Bridge
A device used to connect two separate LANs or used to divide a large LAN into
smaller LANs. Each LAN acts as its own LAN, but uses a bridge device to
communicate from one LAN to another.
Bus
Path or channel, usually electrical, with one or more conductors, where all devices
are able to receive all transmissions at the same time.
Counter-Rotating
Ring
Aka. Self-Healing Ring; has two physical transmission lines or rings with
transmitting and receiving signals in each ring travelling in opposite directions. If the
line or a device along the ring fails, the ring re-anneals by bypassing the device and
or line and forms with the other ring to form a new single ring.
Crosstalk
The unwanted transfer of energy from the disturbing circuit to another called the
disturbed circuit. Usually from an adjacent analog channel.
Dispersion
The spreading of light pulses that takes place in multimode fiber optic transmission.
Dispersion limits the potential transmission distance because the spread out light
pulses reach the destination at different times making the signal unreadable.
Ethernet
Product name for one of the first popular LAN technologies, later standardized as
IEEE 802.3.
Fiber Optic Cable
Thin filaments of glass or other transparent material sheathed in an insulator
through which a light beam may be transmitted for long distances by means of
multiple internal reflections. A waveguide used to transmit digital information.
Flow Control
A method for a receiver to control the information flow from a transmitter. It
eliminates data overflow at the receiver.
Full Duplex
A communication method where both ends can transmit and receive
simultaneously.
Half Duplex
A communication method where one end transmits while the other end receives,
then reverses the process.
TDRS4050601
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Hub
A device for local area networks (LANs) that is used to interconnect multiple
devices over an internal bus.
Jitter
Aka. phase jitter, caused by power line harmonics and perceived in the form of
minor phase changes.
Multi-Drop Line
Aka. Multipoint Line, a data link supporting multiple DTE connections, usually with
one DTE controlling the link by polling the other DTEs for input and addressing
output to the other DTEs. Utilizing frequency division or statistical MUX, a multipoint
line can support multiple independent point-to-point channels.
Multimode fiber
An optical fiber that supports more than one propagating mode of light propagation.
Multiplexer
Aka. or Multiplexor or Mux,. A device using several communications channels at the
same time, transmits and receives messages and controls communications lines,
may be a microprocessor.
Node
A network-connected device, such as a server or PC.
Order Wire
Voice channel used to communicate between two locations.
Packet
A grouping of data, usually consisting of data and an address header prior to being
sent over a network.
Point-of Presence
(POP)
The physical access location within a specific location of the long distance or
common carrier.
Polling
The method used for terminal to controller communications. The controller
systematically asks for each terminal if it needs to transmit to the controller.
Protocol
A set of rules for data communication. All devices communicating together must
adhere to the same rules.
Router
Similar to a bridge but provides more complex and flexible networking support. It
usually also supports WANs.
Single mode fiber
An optical fiber that supports only one mode of light propagation above the cutoff
wavelength.
Star
Network in which all terminals are connected through a single point or node, such
as a star coupler.
Synchronous
Transmission
Having a constant time interval between successive bits of data or information.
Time Division
Multiplexing
A type of multiplexer that allocates a defined amount of backbone bandwidth for
each connected device.
Time Slot
Unit of backbone bandwidth allocated for each port.
Token Ring
A LAN topology where a control packet or token is passed from station to station in
sequential order. The stations wishing to access must wait for the token before
transmitting data, in the token ring the next logical station is also the next physical
station.
Virtual Path
A software-controlled point-to-point connection between two devices or segments.
TDRS4050601
b
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Appendix B
Specifications
Ethernet switch type
Intelligent store & forward
RJ45 ports (shielded)
10/100BaseT(x)
RJ45 speed (auto-negotiating)
10 Mbps or 100 Mbps
RJ45 auto-mdi/mdi-x
All 8 ports
Ethernet protocols supported
All standard IEEE 802.3
Memory bandwidth
3.2 Gbps
Completely compliant
IEEE 802.3, IEEE 802.3u, IEEE802.3x
Full or half duplex operation
Auto-sensing
MAC addresses supported
2K
Ethernet isolation
1500 VRMS 1 minute
Required supply voltage
+12 ~ +48 VDC
Power input isolation
1KV
Power consumption
5W
(Redundant input terminals)
c
(typical - all ports active at 100 Mbps)
Operating temperature
-30 ~ +75°C
Storage temperature
-40 ~ +85°C
Vibration
EN 50155 and EN11373.
EMC immunity
EN61326-1 (EN61000-4-2, 3, 4, 5, 6)
TDRS4050601
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Appendix C
Modbus Table
Switch Status
Address
10000
10001
10002
10003
Status
Ring Pair 1 Enable
Ring Pair 2 Enable
0 : Ring Protocol
1 : Spanning Tree Protocol
Secondary switch
Address
10004
10005
10006
Status
Link on port 1
Link on port 2
Link on port 3
Link on port 4
Link on port 5
Link on port 6
Link on port 7
Link on port 8
Address
10016
10017
10018
10019
10020
10021
10022
10023
Link on port 9
Link on port 10
Link on port 11
Link on port 12
Link on port 13
Link on port 14
Link on port 15
Link on port 16
Address
10032
10033
10034
10035
10036
10037
10038
10039
Port 9 is forwarding
Port 10 is forwarding
Port 11 is forwarding
Port 12 is forwarding
Port 13 is forwarding
Port 14 is forwarding
Port 15 is forwarding
Port 16 is forwarding
Address
10048
10049
10050
10051
10052
10053
10054
10055
Port 9 lose pair port
Port 10 lose pair port
Port 11 lose pair port
Port 12 lose pair port
Port 13 lose pair port
Port 14 lose pair port
Port 15 lose pair port
Port 16 lose pair port
10007
Power 1 Fail
Power 2 Fail
Relay output
Master
Link Status
Address
10008
10009
10010
10011
10012
10013
10014
10015
Forwarding Status
Address
10024
10025
10026
10027
10028
10029
10030
10031
Status
Port 1 is forwarding
Port 2 is forwarding
Port 3 is forwarding
Port 4 is forwarding
Port 5 is forwarding
Port 6 is forwarding
Port 7 is forwarding
Port 8 is forwarding
Communication Status
Address
10040
10041
10042
10043
10044
10045
10046
10047
Status
Port 1 lose pair port
Port 2 lose pair port
Port 3 lose pair port
Port 4 lose pair port
Port 5 lose pair port
Port 6 lose pair port
Port 7 lose pair port
Port 8 lose pair port
TDRS4050601
d
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Digital Input & Output
Address
10057
10058
10059
10060
10061
10062
10063
10064
e
Status
Digital Input channel 1
Digital Input channel 2
Digital Input channel 3
Digital Input channel 4
Digital Input channel 5
Digital Input channel 6
Digital Input channel 7
Digital Input channel 8
Address
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
00007
00008
TDRS4050601
Digital Output channel 1
Digital Output channel 2
Digital Output channel 3
Digital Output channel 4
Digital Output channel 5
Digital Output channel 6
Digital Output channel 7
Digital Output channel 8
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Appendix E
Ingress Protection (IP)
An IP number is used to specify the environmental protection of enclosures around electronic
equipment. These ratings are determined by specific tests.
The IP number is composed of two numbers, the first referring to the protection against solid objects
and the second against liquids. The higher the number is, the better the protection.
Note: All ICP DAS MS Series devices are manufactured and tested to IEC IP30 standards.
First Number
0
No protection (Sometimes X)
1
Protected against solid objects up to 50mm³
2
Protected against solid objects up to 12mm³
3
Protected against solid objects up to 2.5mm³
4
Protected against solid objects up to 1mm³
5
Protected against dust, limited ingress (no harmful deposit)
6
Totally protected against dust
Second Number
0
No protection (Sometimes X)
1
Protection against vertically falling drops of water (e.g. condensation)
2
Protection against direct sprays of water up to 15 degrees from vertical
3
Protection against direct sprays of water up to 60 degrees from vertical
4
Protection against water sprayed from all directions - limited ingress permitted
5
Protected against low pressure jets of water from all directions - limited ingress permitted
6
Protected against low pressure jets of water, limited ingress permitted (e.g. ship deck)
7
Protected against the effect of immersion between 15cm and 1m
8
Protected against long periods of immersion under pressure
TDRS4050601
f
Industrial Ethernet Layer 2 Managed Switch User Manual
Appendix F
Accessories
Power Supply (KA-52F/DIN-KA52F)
Features & Specifications
•
Input Range : 100~250AC
•
Input Frequency : 50Hz to 60 Hz
•
Output : 24Vdc/1Amp max.
•
Output Power : 25Watts
•
Operating Temperature:0 to 70℃
•
Storage Temperature : -40 to 85℃
•
Demension :
65 x 105 x 36mm (KA-52F)
68 x 107 x 50mm (DIN-KA52F)
Part No. Information
g
KA-52F
24V/1A output power supply
DIN-KA52F
24V/1A output power supply with DIN-Rail Mount
TDRS4050601
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising