Texas Instruments | TI DLP® Pico™ System Design: Optical Module Specifications (Rev. A) | Application notes | Texas Instruments TI DLP® Pico™ System Design: Optical Module Specifications (Rev. A) Application notes

Texas Instruments TI DLP® Pico™ System Design: Optical Module Specifications (Rev. A) Application notes
Application Report
DLPA078A – February 2017 – Revised August 2017
TI DLP® Pico™ System Design: Optical Module
Specifications
Jesse Richuso
ABSTRACT
The objective of this application note is to help product developers better understand optical module
specifications and related system design considerations. This information can help expedite product
development and conversations with optical module manufacturers (OMMs).
This document is focused on projection optical modules that incorporate Texas Instruments DLP Pico
chips and are designed to project an image onto a surface for a variety of applications, including
smartphones, tablets, pico projectors, smart home displays, digital signage, and more. Developers seeking
information on DLP Pico optical modules for different optical architectures, such as head-mounted
displays (HMD) or aftermarket head-up displays (HUDs), may find more applicable resources on the
technical documents page.
Prior to reading this application note, it is recommended to read the Getting Started with DLP Pico
Technology whitepaper.
Please note that the terms “optical engine” and “light engine” are also used in the projection industry. For
consistency, this document will only use the term “optical module.”
DLPA078A – February 2017 – Revised August 2017
Submit Documentation Feedback
TI DLP® Pico™ System Design: Optical Module Specifications
Copyright © 2017, Texas Instruments Incorporated
1
www.ti.com
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Contents
Introduction to Optical Modules ............................................................................................ 3
Use Case Considerations................................................................................................... 5
Core Optical Module Specifications ....................................................................................... 5
Additional Optical Module Specifications ................................................................................. 9
Features Implemented in Software ...................................................................................... 12
Hardware Integration Considerations .................................................................................... 13
Business Considerations .................................................................................................. 13
Example Optical Module Specification Table ........................................................................... 14
Get Started with Development ............................................................................................ 15
List of Figures
1
Example DLP2010 Projection Optical Module - Dimensions: 44 × 48 × 14 mm3 ................................... 3
2
Optical Components in an Example Pico Projection Optical Module Dimensions: 68 × 57 × 15 mm3 ........... 4
3
Supply Chain from TI DLP Chip to Product .............................................................................. 5
4
Examples of a 75-mm DLP4501 Optical Module (Left) and a 25-mm DLP2010 Optical Module (Right) ........ 6
5
A 0.2" Diagonal DMD (e.g. DLP2010) Compared to a 0.45" Diagonal DMD (e.g. DLP4501) ..................... 6
6
Throw Ratio................................................................................................................... 7
7
0% Offset and 100% Offset ................................................................................................ 8
8
A Simulation of a High Contrast Projected Image (Above) and a Low Contrast Projected Image (Below) ...... 9
9
Color Gamut ................................................................................................................ 10
10
Keystone Correction ....................................................................................................... 12
List of Tables
1
2
3
..................................................................................... 4
Use Case Considerations .................................................................................................. 5
Example Optical Module Specification Table ........................................................................... 14
DLP Pico Technology DMD Portfolio
Trademarks
Pico, IntelliBright are trademarks of Texas Instruments.
DLP is a registered trademark of Texas Instruments.
2
TI DLP® Pico™ System Design: Optical Module Specifications
DLPA078A – February 2017 – Revised August 2017
Submit Documentation Feedback
Copyright © 2017, Texas Instruments Incorporated
Introduction to Optical Modules
www.ti.com
1
Introduction to Optical Modules
An optical module (see Figure 1 and Figure 2) is the core sub-system of a DLP Pico display system. It
consists of five main hardware components:
Illumination
optics (inside)
Flex cable with
flash memory
LED illumination
(inside)
Heatsink
for LEDs
DLP Pico chip
(behind heatsink)
Projection
lens
Figure 1. Example DLP2010 Projection Optical Module - Dimensions: 44 × 48 × 14 mm3
1.1
DLP Pico Chip or Digital Micromirror Device (DMD)
A micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) device with up to millions of micromirrors that rapidly switch
to create projected pixels of different color and intensity when modulated in sync with color sequential
illumination.
1.2
Illumination
DLP technology is compatible with all visible light illumination sources, such as HID lamps, RGB LEDs,
direct laser, laser/LED hybrid, and laser-phosphor illumination. Currently, most DLP Pico projection optical
modules use RGB LED illumination due to its small size and high brightness efficiency. DLP Pico
projection systems also use laser phosphor illumination to achieve higher brightness levels and smaller
optical designs.
1.3
llumination Optics
Illumination optical components, such as lenses, beam mixing optics (e.g. fly’s eye or light tunnel), fold
mirrors, prisms, and dichroic mirrors collect light from the illumination source and guide it onto the DMD at
the appropriate angle.
1.4
Projection Optics
Projection optical components collect light reflected by the DMD and project and focus the light onto a
surface at some distance from the final optical component.
1.5
Flash Memory Board
The flash memory board is a small board typically attached to either the module itself or the flex cable
connecting the DMD and DLP controller. DLP image processing settings specific to the optical module are
stored in the flash memory and are used by the DLP controller during configuration of the system.
DLPA078A – February 2017 – Revised August 2017
Submit Documentation Feedback
TI DLP® Pico™ System Design: Optical Module Specifications
Copyright © 2017, Texas Instruments Incorporated
3
Introduction to Optical Modules
www.ti.com
Projection lens
DLP Pico chip
RTIR prism
Wedge prism
Dichroic mirrors
Fold mirror
Relay lenses
&oÇ[• Ç o v• ŒŒ Ç
RGB LEDs and
collimating lenses
68mm
Figure 2. Optical Components in an Example Pico Projection Optical Module
Dimensions: 68 × 57 × 15 mm3
TI manufactures and sells the DLP chipset, which includes a DMD, a controller IC, and a power
management IC (PMIC). Of these three components, only the DMD is included in an optical module (the
controller and PMIC are integrated on a nearby printed circuit board or PCB).
TI offers a portfolio of DMDs that enable different classes of optical modules (see Table 1). Optical
modules are designed and manufactured by third party companies (see Figure 3). Customers can source
a pre-existing, tooled optical module from an optical module manufacturer (OMM) to speed design time
and get to market faster. Alternatively, custom optical modules can be designed by an OMM with
additional time and resources. The optical module ecosystem is robust, with OMMs worldwide that can
supply a variety of optical modules in high volumes.
Table 1. DLP Pico Technology DMD Portfolio
DLP Pico Chipset
Class
Resolution
Typical Brightness
(lumens) (1)
Micromirror
Array Diagonal
DMD Part
Number
Tools (Evaluation
Modules)
640 × 360 (nHD)
Up to 40
0.2"
DLP2000
DLPDLCR2000EVM
Up to 50
0.24"
Contact TI
Contact TI
Ultra-mobile, Ultra- 640 × 480 (VGA)
low Power
854 × 480 (WVGA)
Mobile HD
Mobile Full HD
(1)
4
Up to 150
0.2"
DLP2010
DLPDLCR2010EVM
854 × 480 (WVGA)
Up to 175
0.3"
Contact TI
Contact TI
1280 × 720 (720p)
Up to 300
0.3"
DLP3010
DLPDLCR3010EVM
1280 × 800 (WXGA) Up to 1000
0.45"
DLP4501
DLPC6401DISPLAYEVM
1920 × 1080
(1080p)
0.47"
DLP4710
DLPDLCR4710EVM-G2
Up to 1500
Brightness is measured out of the projection lens. The brightness of a DLP Pico projection system depends upon a number of
variables, including the type of illumination source, the DMD size, and throughput efficiency of the overall optical design. Please
read the Brightness Requirements and Tradeoffs application note to learn more.
TI DLP® Pico™ System Design: Optical Module Specifications
DLPA078A – February 2017 – Revised August 2017
Submit Documentation Feedback
Copyright © 2017, Texas Instruments Incorporated
Use Case Considerations
www.ti.com
TI DLP Products
Optical Module
Manufacturers
Product
Developers
‡ Designs and
manufacturers DLP chips
‡ Design and manufacturer
DLP projection optical
modules
‡ Design and manufacture
products that incorporate
DLP projection optical
modules
Figure 3. Supply Chain from TI DLP Chip to Product
2
Use Case Considerations
How the pico projection system will be used in the end product is fundamental in determining the required
optical module specifications.
Table 2. Use Case Considerations
Use Case Considerations
Optical Module Specifications Impacted
Size of the product and space available for projection system
Size, power consumption, thermal management solution
Ambient lighting environment
Brightness, image size, DLP IntelliBright™algorithms
Battery-powered operation or plugged in to a power outlet
Brightness
Distance from the projection surface and image size target
Throw ratio
Type of video content (e.g. movies, signage, PowerPoint
presentations, etc.)
Resolution, brightness, contrast ratio, color management
Projection surface shape (flat or curved)
Depth of focus
Orientation (distance, angle, position) between the optical
module and the projection surface
Throw ratio, keystone correction, offset
Operating environment temperature
Thermal management solution
Maximum allowable bill of materials cost
Brightness, resolution, throw ratio
This is just a sample of the type of questions that should be answered by the product developer in order to
better define the required specifications of a DLP Pico projection optical module.
2.1
Optical Module Specifications
It is helpful to divide optical module specifications into two categories. Core specifications are the ones
most commonly used to define the performance and characteristics of an optical module. Additional
specifications are less commonly used but may be critical for certain applications. It is recommended to
carefully consider all possible specifications when defining optical module requirements.
3
Core Optical Module Specifications
The following projection optical module specifications are generally important and applicable to most
applications.
3.1
Brightness
The brightness of an optical module is specified as the amount of light, in lumens, that is emitted from the
projection lens when the illumination source is run at peak output and an entirely white image is displayed
(i.e. all DLP micromirrors are in the “on” position). All else equal, higher brightness optical modules can
project images that are easier to see, particularly in brighter ambient lighting conditions, because they can
create a greater difference in brightness between the projected content and the background projection
surface.
DLPA078A – February 2017 – Revised August 2017
Submit Documentation Feedback
TI DLP® Pico™ System Design: Optical Module Specifications
Copyright © 2017, Texas Instruments Incorporated
5
Core Optical Module Specifications
www.ti.com
Higher brightness generally comes with system tradeoffs such as larger size and higher power
consumption. These tradeoffs are mitigated by the high optical efficiency of DLP technology, which
enables high brightness from small, low power optical modules. To learn more about the brightness
specification and its impact on system tradeoffs, please read the Brightness Requirements and Tradeoffs
application note.
Brightness of an optical module can vary as its white point (i.e. the relative mix of red, green, and blue
light that creates white light) is adjusted. For the most accurate measure of performance, brightness
should be specified with a target white point. For example, D65 (6500 K) is an industry standard.
3.2
Size
DLP Pico projection optical modules can vary in size (see Figure 4) and can be as small as a few cubic
centimeters. The size of a DLP optical module mainly depends on three factors: DMD size (see Figure 5),
optical design, and illumination size. In general, optical module size increases with brightness capability.
Size may be specified with or without a heat sink. The size of the heat sink is mainly driven by the power
consumption and efficiency of the illumination in the optical module.
The performance requirements and optical design layout affect both the size and shape of an optical
module. Light can be folded (i.e. bounced back and forth off mirrors) to minimize a specific dimension
such as depth or height. In addition, throw ratio and image offset specifications affect the size of the
projection lens. A shorter throw ratio design generally results in a larger size, and a higher offset design
generally results in a larger size.
Figure 4. Examples of a 75-mm DLP4501 Optical Module (Left)
and a 25-mm DLP2010 Optical Module (Right)
Figure 5. A 0.2" Diagonal DMD (e.g. DLP2010) Compared to a 0.45" Diagonal DMD (e.g. DLP4501)
6
TI DLP® Pico™ System Design: Optical Module Specifications
DLPA078A – February 2017 – Revised August 2017
Submit Documentation Feedback
Copyright © 2017, Texas Instruments Incorporated
Core Optical Module Specifications
www.ti.com
3.3
Resolution
The resolution of an optical module is determined by the DMD used in the module. Currently, resolutions
of DLP Pico projection optical modules range from 640 × 360 to 1920 × 1080 with higher resolutions
planned for the future.
Higher resolution optical modules typically come with the tradeoffs of size and cost. However,
advancements in DLP technology have enabled higher resolutions from smaller, lower cost optical
modules.
3.4
Illumination Power Consumption
The power consumption of a DLP Pico projection system is primarily driven by the illumination source in
the optical module and is typically measured in watts.
In the case of an RGB LED-illuminated optical module, the power consumption specification includes all
three LEDs (red, green, and blue). The LEDs can be driven to a maximum current and temperature
specified by the LED manufacturer. Total LED power consumption depends on the LED drive current as
well as the designated duty cycle for each color.
3.5
Throw Ratio
Throw ratio (see Figure 6) describes how large of a projected image an optical module creates at a given
distance from the projection surface. It is defined as the ratio of D (the distance from the final optical
element to the projection surface) to W (width of projected image). For pico projection applications, throw
ratios typically range from around 0.3 (“ultra-short”) to 2.0 (“long”). For example:
• An optical module with a throw ratio of 1.4 will create a 17” wide projected image from 24” away
• An ultra-short throw optical module with a throw ratio of 0.3 will create an 80” wide projected image
from the same 24” distance
Shorter throw ratios typically result in larger projection lenses and mirrors, and therefore larger overall
optical modules.
w
d
Figure 6. Throw Ratio
DLPA078A – February 2017 – Revised August 2017
Submit Documentation Feedback
TI DLP® Pico™ System Design: Optical Module Specifications
Copyright © 2017, Texas Instruments Incorporated
7
Core Optical Module Specifications
3.6
www.ti.com
Offset
Offset describes the path of the projected light once it exits the projection lens. 0% offset describes an
optical module that sends light equally up and down after it exits the projection lens. 100% offset
describes an optical module that sends the top of the image up and keeps the bottom of the image
coincident with the projection lens axis. 100% or higher (i.e. tilted up) offset is most common in order to
avoid sending the bottom part of a projected image into the surface on which the product is resting.
However, 0% offset may be preferred for some applications and 0% offset optical designs allow for thinner
optical modules.
Optical
Module
0% offset
Optical
Module
100% offset
Figure 7. 0% Offset and 100% Offset
3.7
Contrast Ratio
There are two general methods of measuring the contrast ratio of a projection system: Full On / Full Off
(FOFO) and methods using a checkerboard pattern, such as the IEC 61947 contrast standard, also known
as ANSI contrast. FOFO contrast is more commonly used by optical module manufacturers.
FOFO contrast measures the ratio of the brightness of an entirely white projected image versus an entirely
black projected image. The checkerboard pattern methods measure contrast using a 4 × 4 array of black
and white rectangles. In both cases, the measurement is normalized as “x to 1.”
The FOFO contrast measurement is primarily impacted by the inherent contrast ratio of the DMD, whereas
the checkerboard measurement is influenced by both the inherent contrast of the DMD and the contrast
performance of the projection optics. As such, FOFO contrast is higher than checkerboard contrast.
Checkerboard contrast is more indicative of the true contrast performance of an optical module when
displaying actual video content.
Higher contrast optical modules can create more vibrant, colorful projected images while projected images
from lower contrast optical modules can look washed out (see Figure 8).
8
TI DLP® Pico™ System Design: Optical Module Specifications
DLPA078A – February 2017 – Revised August 2017
Submit Documentation Feedback
Copyright © 2017, Texas Instruments Incorporated
Additional Optical Module Specifications
www.ti.com
Figure 8. A Simulation of a High Contrast Projected Image (Above)
and a Low Contrast Projected Image (Below)
4
Additional Optical Module Specifications
The following specifications are not as frequently used to specify an optical module, but may be critically
important for some applications.
4.1
Brightness Uniformity
Brightness uniformity describes the variation in the brightness levels of different points across a projected
image. To measure brightness uniformity, an all-white image is projected, and then the illuminance (lux) is
measured at nine points across the image (an equally spaced 3 × 3 array). Brightness uniformity is then
calculated as:
Brightness uniformity = [(lux of dimmest point) ⁄ (average lux)] / [(lux of brightest point) ⁄ (average lux)]
(1)
Brightness uniformity of 100% would describe a perfectly uniform projected white image with equal
brightness levels at each point. Brightness uniformity of DLP Pico projection optical modules typically
ranges between 70 to 90 percent. Variation in brightness uniformity is caused by variations in optical
component performance, truncation of optical elements due to size constraints, and optical misalignment.
The importance of brightness uniformity depends on the application and image content being projected.
For example, even relatively low brightness uniformity can be difficult to detect with typical movie or TV
show content, while a solid color can make the differences in brightness more obvious.
4.2
Focus Uniformity
An ideal projection optical module has perfect focus uniformity – that is, the entire image is in focus at the
same time.
DLPA078A – February 2017 – Revised August 2017
Submit Documentation Feedback
TI DLP® Pico™ System Design: Optical Module Specifications
Copyright © 2017, Texas Instruments Incorporated
9
Additional Optical Module Specifications
www.ti.com
If an optical module has a focus non-uniformity problem, then the image is visibly out of focus in at least
one location, often the edges or corners. Focus non-uniformity can be caused by variations in optical
component performance or optical misalignment.
4.3
Color Management
The color gamut of a display system defines the extent of colors that can be produced by the display. This
extent is defined by the three additive primary colors: red, green, and blue. In the case of an LEDilluminated optical module, these colors are controlled by the color of the individual LEDs and any filters in
the system. The color gamut is traditionally plotted in the 1931 CIE chromaticity space.
ITU-R Recommendation BT.709 (commonly known as Rec. 709) is a common HDTV color gamut
recommendation created by ITU (International Telecommunications Union). It is possible for an LEDilluminated DLP projection system to achieve a wider color gamut than Rec. 709 (see Figure 9).
DLP Pico projection optical modules can produce variable white points and color temperatures, which can
be adjusted by the optical module manufacturer and programmed into different modes (e.g. cool, normal,
warm) in the final product. Note that the brightness specification of an optical module can vary depending
on the white point. If color accuracy is a key requirement of the final product, it is recommended to specify
a target white point, for example Illuminant D65 (1).
0.9
DLP LED Projector
0.8
Rec. 709 (xy)
Green
0.7
0.6
0.5
y
0.4
Red
0.3
0.2
0.1
Blue
0
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
x
Figure 9. Color Gamut
4.4
Illumination Type
DLP technology can be used with any illumination type. Lamps, LEDs, and laser illumination are all
potential options when designing optical modules with DLP chips. Currently, most DLP Pico projection
optical modules use RGB LED illumination due to their small size and high brightness efficiency. DLP Pico
projection systems also use laser illumination to achieve higher brightness levels and smaller optical
designs.
(1)
10
“ISO 11664-2:2007(E)/CIE S 014-2/E:2006,” International Commission on Illumination, http://cie.co.at/index.php?i_ca_id=484
TI DLP® Pico™ System Design: Optical Module Specifications
DLPA078A – February 2017 – Revised August 2017
Submit Documentation Feedback
Copyright © 2017, Texas Instruments Incorporated
Additional Optical Module Specifications
www.ti.com
4.5
Thermal Management
The heatsink solution provided by optical module manufacturers (e.g. a heat spreader or planar copper-fin
heatsink) is physically sized to achieve a target brightness specification, given the constraints of the
maximum heat load on the DMD (see datasheets), the maximum available illumination drive current, and
the minimum efficiency of the illumination source. Based upon the heatsink solution provided by the OMM,
a mechanical systems engineer can determine the appropriate amount of passive or active cooling (e.g. a
fan) required to keep the DMD and illumination source within their respective recommended operating
temperature ranges.
Keep in mind that if a particular application does not require the maximum brightness for which an optical
module was designed, then the system electronics can be programmed to run the optical module at a
lower power and brightness level. For such applications, there is also an opportunity to reduce the product
size by reducing the air flow and/or working with the optical module manufacture to reduce the heatsink
size.
4.6
Optical Zoom
Optical Zoom allows the optical module to change its throw ratio by mechanically moving a component of
the projection lens. While this feature is not commonly found in DLP Pico projection optical modules, it can
be included if necessary.
4.7
Depth of Focus
The distance at which a projection lens is focused is referred to as the “plane of focus.” While the focus is
best at the plane of focus, the focus is often acceptable for some distance in front of and behind the plane
of focus. This distance range over which the focus is acceptable is referred to as the “focus depth”.
A long depth of focus is generally desirable, especially for portable applications such as pico projections
built in to smartphones or tablets. The longer the depth of focus, the more the product can be moved
relative to the surface and still be considered in focus.
4.8
Focus Method
DLP Pico projection optical modules need to be focused at a target projection surface distance. This is
accomplished by adjusting the position of the projection lens. The position can be adjusted manually,
digitally using a stepper motor, or automatically using an external autofocus solution (e.g. camera or depth
sensing system) in combination with a stepper motor. Currently, manually focused optical modules are
most common.
4.9
Automatic White Point Correction
Over time, LED brightness can decline and change the relative mix of red, green, and blue light in the
projected image. This can result in a change in the white point. To counteract this process, some optical
modules include a sensor that tracks the relative brightness of each LED. This data can be used in the
DLP controller to maintain a consistent white point and color temperature over time. For more information
on automatic white point correction, please refer to the Real-Time Color Management for DLPC343x
application note and associated reference design.
DLPA078A – February 2017 – Revised August 2017
Submit Documentation Feedback
TI DLP® Pico™ System Design: Optical Module Specifications
Copyright © 2017, Texas Instruments Incorporated
11
Features Implemented in Software
5
www.ti.com
Features Implemented in Software
The following software features impact the performance and functionality of an optical module.
5.1
Keystone Correction
Optical modules are generally designed to be positioned orthogonal to the projection surface. When a
projector is tilted relative to the projection surface, or vice versa, the image will become trapezoidal in
shape due to a change in the distance between the projection lens and the edges of the projected image.
To correct for this effect, some projection systems include a feature called keystone correction, which
manipulates the image in software to fit it into a rectangular subset of the projected pixels (see Figure 10).
Keystone correction can be manually adjusted or automatic with an accelerometer which measures the tilt
angle of the system. Vertical keystone correction is most common, but some projection systems also offer
horizontal keystone correction. Note that keystone correction is a software feature, not a hardware feature.
The DLPC343x controller has vertical keystone correction functionality when used with the DLP2010 and
DLP3010 DMDs. For the DLP4710 chipset, keystone correction must be implemented external to the DLP
controller.
Note that a shorter throw ratio optical module will result in a more distorted image when the product is
tilted relative to the projection surface.
Figure 10. Keystone Correction
5.2
DLP Image Processing Settings
The DLP controller determines how the incoming image is displayed, through a combination of image
processing techniques and control of the illumination. Image processing techniques include gamma
correction, white point, color temperature, and color saturation adjustments.
Some DLP image processing settings can be defined by the optical module manufacturer, based upon
design attributes of the particular optical module. To learn more about these settings, please read the
DLPC343x datasheet and the DLPC343x software programmer’s guide.
5.3
DLP IntelliBright™ Algorithms
DLP IntelliBright is a suite of TI image processing algorithms designed to improve the performance of
LED-illuminated pico projection systems. The suite comprises two distinct algorithms: Content Adaptive
Illumination Control (CAIC) and Local Area Brightness Boost (LABB). DLP IntelliBright is a feature of
DLPC343x-based chipsets.
The CAIC algorithm intelligently manages LED drive strength, on a frame by frame basis, resulting in
optical image brightness and contrast. For example, if a frame has more blue than red or green, CAIC will
increase the current to the blue LED. CAIC can be adjusted to maximize brightness, minimize power
consumption (while maintaining the pre-CAIC brightness level), or somewhere in between with some
brightness increase and some power savings.
The LABB algorithm intelligently boosts image brightness, on a frame by frame basis, resulting in brighter,
more dynamic images. The LABB algorithm evaluates each image frame, in real time, first identifying dark
areas of the image which can benefit from a boost in brightness, and then applying a brightness gain
based on the configured “boost strength” setting. A relatively higher gain is applied to the darker regions of
the image while little or no gain is applied to brighter regions of the image. LABB is particularly useful for
pico projectors in high ambient lighting environments and can be automatically adjusted using an ambient
light sensor.
12
TI DLP® Pico™ System Design: Optical Module Specifications
DLPA078A – February 2017 – Revised August 2017
Submit Documentation Feedback
Copyright © 2017, Texas Instruments Incorporated
Hardware Integration Considerations
www.ti.com
For more details on DLP IntelliBright, please read the TI DLP IntelliBright Algorithms for the DLPC343x
Controller application note.
6
Hardware Integration Considerations
6.1
Flash Memory
A flash memory PCB is typically integrated with the optical module (mounted on the exterior or on a flex
cable connecting the DLP controller and DMD) and stores the firmware and configuration data (generated
by DLP Composer software), and illumination calibration data (e.g. white point alignment for different
image settings in a pico projector) provided by the optical module manufacture. The flash memory
interfaces with the DLP controller when the optical module is integrated into a projection system.
6.2
DLP Controller to DMD Interface
The interface between the DLPC343x controller and the DMD consists of four single ended control signals
and a sub-LVDS bus consisting of 4 or 8 (depending on the DMD) data pairs and a clock pair. The
differential signals make up the HS (high speed) bus that sends mirror on/off data to the DMD. Three of
the four control lines (LS_CLK, LS_WDATA and LS_RDATA) make up a serial control bus. While the
fourth line (ARSTZ) is a power up reset.
6.3
Flash Memory to DLP Controller Interface
The DLPC34xx does not contain non-volatile memory and uses an external SPI (Serial Peripheral Bus)
flash memory to hold the software image. The DLPC34xx supports 1.8 – 3.3 V devices.
7
Business Considerations
7.1
Cost
The cost of an optical module is dependent upon unit volume and is generally correlated to its
performance, including brightness capability, resolution, and optical component quality.
Brightness and resolution are determined primarily by the DLP chip, illumination type and size, and optical
throughput. In addition, a shorter throw ratio typically requires larger and more complex projection optics,
which leads to higher cost.
7.2
Custom Optical Modules
To minimize cost and lead time, customers can leverage an existing optical module that is currently in
production.
If modification of an existing optical module or design of an entirely new optical module is required, it is
important to align with an OMM regarding lead times and non-recurring engineering (NRE) costs (or
amortization costs associated with NRE).
Modification of an existing optical module design, such as the development of a new projection lens to
enable a shorter throw ratio, is generally less costly and is quicker than developing an entirely new optical
module.
7.3
Minimum Order Quantity (MOQ)
Depending upon the business opportunity, optical module manufacturers will sell optical modules in small
quantities to support product development and prototyping.
For production quantities, optical module manufactures typically require minimum order quantities. The
MOQ will vary from manufacturer to manufacturer.
7.4
Lead Times
Optical module manufacturers typically require lead times of 8-12 weeks or more for existing, in-production
optical modules due to lead times of optical module components and manufacturing time.
DLPA078A – February 2017 – Revised August 2017
Submit Documentation Feedback
TI DLP® Pico™ System Design: Optical Module Specifications
Copyright © 2017, Texas Instruments Incorporated
13
Example Optical Module Specification Table
8
www.ti.com
Example Optical Module Specification Table
Developers can use this table to help accelerate communication with DLP Pico projection optical module
manufacturers. By listing target and boundary specifications, the OMM will be able to more quickly identify
the right solution. The target spec should be the ideal specification, within reason, and the boundary spec
should be the minimum or maximum acceptable specification.
Included in the table is a column with example target specifications for a smartphone or tablet built-in pico
projection application.
Table 3. Example Optical Module Specification Table
Specification
Priority Rank
Target
Boundary
(min/max)
Example
Description
Provide a high level description of the application and “must-have” optical module
specifications/features.
Brightness (lumens)
> 30 lumens
Resolution (x by y pixels)
854 × 480
Size (x-y-z dimensions in mm) –
note if one dimension is higher
priority
25 mm × 25 mm × 6 mm
(minimize thickness)
Power consumption (watts)
< 1.5 W
Throw ratio
1.0 - 1.5
Offset (typically 0% or 100-120%)
100%
Optional Specifications
14
Brightness uniformity
> 70%
Contrast ratio (full on, full off)
> 500:1
Contrast ratio (checkerboard)
> 200:1
Optical zoom (note as required or
not required)
Not required
Long depth of focus (note as
required or not required)
Not required
Focus method (e.g. manual,
motorized, autofocus)
Motorized
TI DLP® Pico™ System Design: Optical Module Specifications
DLPA078A – February 2017 – Revised August 2017
Submit Documentation Feedback
Copyright © 2017, Texas Instruments Incorporated
Get Started with Development
www.ti.com
9
Get Started with Development
Take the following steps to start product development with DLP Pico technology:
1. Learn more about DLP Pico technology:
• Browse getting started resources
• Learn about the variety of applications which DLP Pico technology enables
• Read the Getting Started with TI DLP Pico Technology white paper
• Browse products and datasheets
• Experiment with the DLP throw ratio and brightness calculator
• Read other technical documents
2. Evaluate DLP Pico technology with an easy to use evaluation module (EVM).
3. Download TI Designs reference designs to speed product development, including schematics, layout
files, bill of materials, and test reports:
• DLP2010: Ultra Mobile, Ultra Low Power Display Reference Design using DLP® Technology
• DLP3010: Portable, Low Power HD Projection Display using DLP® Technology
• DLP4710: Portable, Low Power Full HD Projection Display using DLP® Technology
4. Browse TI’s E2E community to search for solutions, ash for help, share knowledge and solve problems
with fellow engineers and TI experts.
5. Find optical modules and design support:
• Buy small quantities of DLP Pico projection optical modules from a distributor
• Contact optical module manufacturers for high volume, production-ready optical modules
• Contact members of the DLP Design Network for custom solutions
DLPA078A – February 2017 – Revised August 2017
Submit Documentation Feedback
TI DLP® Pico™ System Design: Optical Module Specifications
Copyright © 2017, Texas Instruments Incorporated
15
Revision History
www.ti.com
Revision History
NOTE: Page numbers for previous revisions may differ from page numbers in the current version.
Changes from Original (February 2017) to A Revision .................................................................................................. Page
•
16
New DMD Part Number (DLP2000) and EVM (DLPDLCR2000EVM) links added to Table 1 for ultra-mobile, ultra-low
power chipset class with 640 × 360 (nHD) resolution ................................................................................ 4
Revision History
DLPA078A – February 2017 – Revised August 2017
Submit Documentation Feedback
Copyright © 2017, Texas Instruments Incorporated
IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR TI DESIGN INFORMATION AND RESOURCES
Texas Instruments Incorporated (‘TI”) technical, application or other design advice, services or information, including, but not limited to,
reference designs and materials relating to evaluation modules, (collectively, “TI Resources”) are intended to assist designers who are
developing applications that incorporate TI products; by downloading, accessing or using any particular TI Resource in any way, you
(individually or, if you are acting on behalf of a company, your company) agree to use it solely for this purpose and subject to the terms of
this Notice.
TI’s provision of TI Resources does not expand or otherwise alter TI’s applicable published warranties or warranty disclaimers for TI
products, and no additional obligations or liabilities arise from TI providing such TI Resources. TI reserves the right to make corrections,
enhancements, improvements and other changes to its TI Resources.
You understand and agree that you remain responsible for using your independent analysis, evaluation and judgment in designing your
applications and that you have full and exclusive responsibility to assure the safety of your applications and compliance of your applications
(and of all TI products used in or for your applications) with all applicable regulations, laws and other applicable requirements. You
represent that, with respect to your applications, you have all the necessary expertise to create and implement safeguards that (1)
anticipate dangerous consequences of failures, (2) monitor failures and their consequences, and (3) lessen the likelihood of failures that
might cause harm and take appropriate actions. You agree that prior to using or distributing any applications that include TI products, you
will thoroughly test such applications and the functionality of such TI products as used in such applications. TI has not conducted any
testing other than that specifically described in the published documentation for a particular TI Resource.
You are authorized to use, copy and modify any individual TI Resource only in connection with the development of applications that include
the TI product(s) identified in such TI Resource. NO OTHER LICENSE, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, BY ESTOPPEL OR OTHERWISE TO
ANY OTHER TI INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHT, AND NO LICENSE TO ANY TECHNOLOGY OR INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY
RIGHT OF TI OR ANY THIRD PARTY IS GRANTED HEREIN, including but not limited to any patent right, copyright, mask work right, or
other intellectual property right relating to any combination, machine, or process in which TI products or services are used. Information
regarding or referencing third-party products or services does not constitute a license to use such products or services, or a warranty or
endorsement thereof. Use of TI Resources may require a license from a third party under the patents or other intellectual property of the
third party, or a license from TI under the patents or other intellectual property of TI.
TI RESOURCES ARE PROVIDED “AS IS” AND WITH ALL FAULTS. TI DISCLAIMS ALL OTHER WARRANTIES OR
REPRESENTATIONS, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, REGARDING TI RESOURCES OR USE THEREOF, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO
ACCURACY OR COMPLETENESS, TITLE, ANY EPIDEMIC FAILURE WARRANTY AND ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, AND NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY THIRD PARTY INTELLECTUAL
PROPERTY RIGHTS.
TI SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR AND SHALL NOT DEFEND OR INDEMNIFY YOU AGAINST ANY CLAIM, INCLUDING BUT NOT
LIMITED TO ANY INFRINGEMENT CLAIM THAT RELATES TO OR IS BASED ON ANY COMBINATION OF PRODUCTS EVEN IF
DESCRIBED IN TI RESOURCES OR OTHERWISE. IN NO EVENT SHALL TI BE LIABLE FOR ANY ACTUAL, DIRECT, SPECIAL,
COLLATERAL, INDIRECT, PUNITIVE, INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL OR EXEMPLARY DAMAGES IN CONNECTION WITH OR
ARISING OUT OF TI RESOURCES OR USE THEREOF, AND REGARDLESS OF WHETHER TI HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE
POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.
You agree to fully indemnify TI and its representatives against any damages, costs, losses, and/or liabilities arising out of your noncompliance with the terms and provisions of this Notice.
This Notice applies to TI Resources. Additional terms apply to the use and purchase of certain types of materials, TI products and services.
These include; without limitation, TI’s standard terms for semiconductor products http://www.ti.com/sc/docs/stdterms.htm), evaluation
modules, and samples (http://www.ti.com/sc/docs/sampterms.htm).
Mailing Address: Texas Instruments, Post Office Box 655303, Dallas, Texas 75265
Copyright © 2018, Texas Instruments Incorporated
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Related manuals

Download PDF

advertising