Texas Instruments | ResolutionPlus 20-Bit Data Acquisition System Analog-to-Digital Converter | Datasheet | Texas Instruments ResolutionPlus 20-Bit Data Acquisition System Analog-to-Digital Converter Datasheet

Texas Instruments ResolutionPlus 20-Bit Data Acquisition System Analog-to-Digital Converter Datasheet
®
ADS
ADS1250
125
0
For most current data sheet and other product
information, visit www.burr-brown.com
20-Bit Data Acquisition System
ANALOG-TO-DIGITAL CONVERTER
FEATURES
DESCRIPTION
● 20 BITS NO MISSING CODES
● 18 BITS EFFECTIVE RESOLUTION UP TO
25kHz DATA RATE
● LOW NOISE: 2.8ppm at PGA = 1
● DIFFERENTIAL INPUTS
● INL: 0.002% (MAX)
● PROGRAMMABLE FULL SCALE
● I/O CONTROLLED PGA: 1, 2, 4, 8
● EXTERNAL REFERENCE
The ADS1250 is a precision, wide dynamic range,
delta-sigma, analog-to-digital converter with 20-bit
resolution operating from a single +5V supply. The
delta-sigma architecture is used for wide dynamic
range and to guarantee 20 bits of no missing code
performance. An effective resolution of 18 bits (2.8ppm
of rms noise) is achieved for conversion rates up to
25kHz. The dynamic range of the converter is further
increased by providing a low-noise Programmable
Gain Amplifier (PGA) with gain stages of 1, 2, 4, or
8 for low level input signals.
The ADS1250 is designed for high-resolution measurement applications in cardiac diagnostics, smart
transmitters, industrial process control, weigh scales,
chromatography and portable instrumentation. The
converter includes a flexible synchronous serial interface and offers a three-wire control mode for low-cost
isolation.
The ADS1250 is a single-channel converter and is
offered in an SOL-16 package.
APPLICATIONS
●
●
●
●
●
●
CARDIAC DIAGNOSTICS
DIRECT THERMOCOUPLE INTERFACE
BLOOD ANALYSIS
INFRARED PYROMETER
LIQUID/GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY
PRECISION PROCESS CONTROL
G0
G1
VREF
CLK
+
+VIN
PGA
–VIN
–
SCLK
4th-Order
∆Σ
Modulator
Digital
Filter
Serial
Output
DRDY
DOUT
+VS
AGND
Control
DSYNC
CS
+VD
DGND
ADS1250
International Airport Industrial Park • Mailing Address: PO Box 11400, Tucson, AZ 85734 • Street Address: 6730 S. Tucson Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85706 • Tel: (520) 746-1111
Twx: 910-952-1111 • Internet: http://www.burr-brown.com/ • Cable: BBRCORP • Telex: 066-6491 • FAX: (520) 889-1510 • Immediate Product Info: (800) 548-6132
©
SBAS114
1999 Burr-Brown Corporation
PDS-1520B
Printed in U.S.A. December, 1999
SPECIFICATIONS
All specifications at TMIN to TMAX, VD = VS = +5V, CLK = 9.6MHz, PGA = 1, and VREF = 4.096, unless otherwise specified.
ADS1250U
PARAMETER
ANALOG INPUT
Input Voltage Range(1)
Programmable Gain Amplifier
Input Impedance (differential)
Input Capacitance
Input Leakage
DYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS
Data Rate
Bandwidth
Serial Clock (SCLK)
System Clock Input (CLK)
ACCURACY
Integral Linearity Error(2)
THD
Noise
Resolution
No Missing Codes
Common-Mode Rejection(3)
Gain Error
Offset Error
Gain Sensitivity to VREF
Power Supply Rejection Ratio
CONDITIONS
MIN
G = Gain
AGND
1
G = Gain
G = Gain
At +25°C
At TMIN to TMAX
104/G
6•G
5
MAX
UNITS
±VREF/G
8
V
50
1
25
3dB
5.4
9.6
9.6
90
±0.0012
97
2.8
20
20
105
60
±100
1:1
78
1kHz Input; 0.1dB below FS
at DC
VREF = 4.096V ±0.1V
PERFORMANCE OVER TEMPERATURE
Offset Drift
Gain Drift
±0.0020
3.8
1
±200
3.996V
DIGITAL INPUT/OUTPUT
Logic Family
Logic Level: VIH
VIL
VOH
VOL
Data Format
+4.0
–0.3
+4.5
4.096
125
kΩ
pF
pA
nA
kHz
kHz
MHz
MHz
% of FSR
dB
ppm of FSR, rms
Bits
Bits
dB
% of FSR
ppm of FSR
dB
0.25
5.0
VOLTAGE REFERENCE
VREF
Load Current
POWER SUPPLY REQUIREMENTS
Operation
Quiescent Current, Analog
Quiescent Current, Digital
Operating Power
TYP
ppm/°C
ppm/°C
4.196
V
µA
+VD + 0.3
+0.8
V
V
V
V
CMOS
IOH = –500µA
IOL = 500µA
0.4
Binary Two’s Complement
+4.75
V = +5VDC
V = +5VDC
TEMPERATURE RANGE
Operating
Storage
–40
–60
+5
14
1
75
+5.25
100
VDC
mA
mA
mW
+85
+100
°C
°C
NOTES: (1) In order to achieve the converter’s full-scale range, the input must be fully differential. If the input is single-ended (+VIN or –VIN is fixed), then the
full-scale range is one-half that of the differential range. (2) Applies to full-differential signals. (3) The common-mode rejection test is performed with a 100mV
differential input.
®
ADS1250
2
ELECTROSTATIC
DISCHARGE SENSITIVITY
ABSOLUTE MAXIMUM RATINGS
Analog Input: Current ................................................ ±100mA, Momentary
±10mA, Continuous
Voltage ....................................... AGND –0.3V to VS + 0.3V
VS to VD .................................................................................... –0.3V to 6V
VS to AGND ............................................................................ –0.3V to 6V
VD to DGND ............................................................................ –0.3V to 6V
AGND to DGND ................................................................................ ±0.3V
VREF Voltage to AGND ................................................. –0.3V to VS + 0.3V
Digital Input Voltage to DGND ..................................... –0.3V to VD + 0.3V
Digital Output Voltage to DGND .................................. –0.3V to VD + 0.3V
Lead Temperature (soldering, 10s) .............................................. +300°C
Power Dissipation (any package) .................................................. 500mW
This integrated circuit can be damaged by ESD. Burr-Brown
recommends that all integrated circuits be handled with appropriate precautions. Failure to observe proper handling and
installation procedures can cause damage.
Electrostatic discharge can cause damage ranging from
performance degradation to complete device failure. BurrBrown Corporation recommends that all integrated circuits be
handled and stored using appropriate ESD protection
methods.
PACKAGE/ORDERING INFORMATION
PRODUCT
PACKAGE
PACKAGE
DRAWING
NUMBER
ADS1250U
"
SOL-16
"
211
"
SPECIFIED
TEMPERATURE
RANGE
PACKAGE
MARKING
ORDERING
NUMBER(1)
TRANSPORT
MEDIA
–40°C to +85°C
"
ADS1250U
"
ADS1250U
ADS1250U/1K
Rails
Tape and Reel
NOTE: (1) Models with a slash (/) are available only in Tape and Reel in the quantities indicated (e.g., /1K indicates 1000 devices per reel). Ordering 1000 pieces
of “ADS1250U/1K” will get a single 1000-piece Tape and Reel.
The information provided herein is believed to be reliable; however, BURR-BROWN assumes no responsibility for inaccuracies or omissions. BURR-BROWN assumes
no responsibility for the use of this information, and all use of such information shall be entirely at the user’s own risk. Prices and specifications are subject to change
without notice. No patent rights or licenses to any of the circuits described herein are implied or granted to any third party. BURR-BROWN does not authorize or warrant
any BURR-BROWN product for use in life support devices and/or systems.
®
3
ADS1250
PIN CONFIGURATION
Top View
SOL-16
+VIN
1
16 DGND
–VIN
2
15 G1 (MSB)
AGND
3
14 G0 (LSB)
+VS
4
13 CS
ADS1250
VREF
5
12 DRDY
DSYNC
6
11 CLK
+VD
7
10 SCLK
DGND
8
9
DOUT
PIN DESCRIPTIONS
PIN
NAME
1
+VIN
Analog Input: Positive Input of the Differential Analog Input.
2
–VIN
Analog Input: Negative Input of the Differential Analog Input.
3
AGND
4
+VS
5
VREF
6
DSYNC
PIN DESCRIPTION
Analog Input: Analog Ground.
Analog Input: Analog Power Supply Voltage, +5V.
Analog Input: Reference Voltage Input.
Digital Input: Data Synchronization. A falling edge on this input will reset the modulator count and place the modulator in a hold
state. The modulator is released from the hold state on the rising edge of DSYNC. This can be used to synchronize multiple
ADS1250s.
7
+VD
8
DGND
Digital Input: Digital Ground.
9
DOUT
Digital Output: Serial Data Output. The serial data is clocked out of the serial data output shift register through this pin. The pin
is driven when CS is LOW, and high impedance when CS is HIGH.
10
SCLK
Digital Input: Serial Clock. The serial clock is in the form of a CMOS-compatible clock. The serial clock can operate up to the
device’s system clock frequency. The serial clock can be either a free-running clock or noncontinuous clock, with either type of
clock; the serial data output is gated by CS.
Digital Input: Digital Power Supply Voltage, +5V.
11
CLK
12
DRDY
Digital Output: Data Ready. A falling edge on this output indicates that a new output word is available from the ADS1250 data output
register.
Digital Input: Device System Clock. The system clock is in the form of a CMOS-compatible clock.
13
CS
Digital Input: Chip Select. Active LOW logic input used to enable serial data output from the ADS1250. CS controls the state of
the DOUT pin. If CS is HIGH, DOUT is high impedance; if CS is LOW, DOUT drives the bus. CS can be used in three ways:
(1) If the ADS1250 shares the bus with other devices, CS is used as serial data output enable for communications.
(2) If the ADS1250 shares the bus with other devices and SCLK is a free-running clock, CS is used to gate serial data
out of the device.
(3) If the ADS1250 is the only device on the bus, CS can be tied LOW to always enable serial data output for a
two-wire interface.
Refer to the Serial Communications section of this data sheet for more detail.
14
G0
Digital Input: Gain Selection Control (LSB).
15
G1
Digital Input: Gain Selection Control (MSB).
16
DGND
Digital Input: Digital Ground.
®
ADS1250
4
TYPICAL PERFORMANCE CURVES
At TA = +25°C, VD = VS = +5V, CLK = 9.6MHz, PGA = 1, and VREF = 4.096, unless otherwise specified.
EFFECTIVE RESOLUTION
vs DATA OUTPUT RATE
RMS NOISE vs DATA OUTPUT RATE
20.0
4.0
Effective Resolution Bits (rms)
3.5
RMS Noise (ppm of FS)
PGA = 8
PGA = 4
3.0
2.5
PGA = 2
PGA = 1
2.0
1.5
1.0
0.5
PGA = 1
19.0
PGA = 2
18.0
PGA = 4
PGA = 8
17.0
16.0
0.0
1
10
100
1000
10000
1
10000
10
100
1000
10000
10000
Data Output Rate (Hz)
Data Output Rate (Hz)
RMS NOISE vs TEMPERATURE
RMS NOISE vs INPUT VOLTAGE (PGA = 1)
4.0
4.0
PGA = 8
3.5
PGA = 4
RMS Noise (ppm of FS)
RMS Noise (ppm of FS)
3.5
3.0
2.5
PGA = 2
2.0
PGA = 1
1.5
1.0
0.5
3.0
2.5
2.0
1.5
1.0
0.5
0.0
–60
–40
–20
0
20
40
60
80
0.0
–4.0
100
–3.0
–2.0
–1.0
0.0
1.0
2.0
Temperature (°C)
Differential Analog Input Voltage (V)
INTEGRAL NON-LINEARITY vs TEMPERATURE
INTEGRAL NON-LINEARITY
vs DATA OUTPUT RATE (PGA = 1)
3.0
4.0
14.0
20
13.5
PGA = 1
13.0
INL (ppm of FS)
INL (ppm of FS)
15
PGA = 2
10
PGA = 8
5
12.5
12.0
11.5
11.0
10.5
PGA = 4
10.0
0
–60
–40
–20
0
20
40
60
80
100
1
Temperature (°C)
10
100
1000
10000
10000
Data Output Rate (Hz)
®
5
ADS1250
TYPICAL PERFORMANCE CURVES (Cont.)
At TA = +25°C, VD = VS = +5V, CLK = 9.6MHz, PGA = 1, and VREF = 4.096, unless otherwise specified.
OFFSET DRIFT vs TEMPERATURE
GAIN DRIFT vs TEMPERATURE
30
400
PGA = 1
PGA = 4
PGA = 2
10
PGA = 8
0
PGA = 1
PGA = 8
PGA = 1
–10
200
Gain Drift (ppm of FS)
Offset Drift (ppm of FS)
20
PGA = 4
PGA = 2
PGA = 4
PGA = 8
0
PGA = 8
PGA = 4
–200
–20
PGA = 2
–30
–60
–40
–20
0
20
40
60
80
100
PGA = 2
PGA = 1
–400
–60
–40
–20
0
20
40
60
Temperature (°C)
Temperature (°C)
POWER SUPPLY REJECTION RATIO
vs FREQUENCY
COMMON-MODE REJECTION RATIO
vs FREQUENCY
80
100
120
100
PGA = 8
PGA = 4
80
CMRR (dB)
PSRR (dB)
PGA = 1
115
90
PGA = 2
PGA = 1
70
PGA = 2
110
PGA = 4
105
PGA = 8
100
60
1
10
100
1k
1
10k
10
100
1000
Frequency (Hz)
Frequency (Hz)
ANALOG CURRENT vs TEMPERATURE
(PGA = 1)
DIGITAL CURRENT vs TEMPERATURE
(PGA = 1)
20.0
1.4
18.0
1.2
Digital Current (mA)
Analog Current (mA)
16.0
14.0
12.0
10.0
8.0
6.0
1.0
0.8
0.6
0.4
4.0
0.2
2.0
0.0
0.0
–60
–40
–20
0
20
40
60
80
–60
100
®
ADS1250
–40
–20
0
20
40
Temperature (°C)
Temperature (°C)
6
60
80
100
TYPICAL PERFORMANCE CURVES (Cont.)
At TA = +25°C, VD = VS = +5V, CLK = 9.6MHz, PGA = 1, and VREF = 4.096, unless otherwise specified.
TYPICAL FFT ANALYSIS
OF THE 1kHz fS INPUT SIGNAL (PGA = 4)
POWER DISSIPATION vs CLK FREQUENCY
(PGA = 1)
0
100
–40
80
Dynamic Range (dB)
Power Dissipation (mW)
–20
60
40
–60
–80
–100
–120
–140
–160
20
–180
–200
0
0.0
2.0
4.0
6.0
8.0
0
10.0
2500
5000
7500
10000
12500
Frequency (Hz)
CLK Frequency (MHz)
®
7
ADS1250
THEORY OF OPERATION
Additionally, a lower gain setting (G) decreases the sampling capacitor size, which results in a higher analog input
impedance. This can be seen in the following equation:
The ADS1250 is a precision, high dynamic range, 20-bit,
delta-sigma, A/D converter capable of achieving very highresolution digital results at high data rates. The analog input
signal is continuously sampled at a rate determined by the
frequency of the system clock (CLK). The sampled analog
input is modulated by the delta-sigma A/D modulator, followed by a digital filter value. A programmable gain function is also incorporated in the delta-sigma modulator with
larger input sampling capacitors for higher gains. A sinc5
digital low-pass filter processes the output of the delta-sigma
modulator and writes the result into the data output register.
The DRDY pin is pulled LOW indicating that new data is
available to be read by the external microcontroller/microprocessor. As shown in the block diagram, the main functional blocks of the ADS1250 are the programmable gain
amplifier, a fourth-order delta-sigma modulator, a digital
filter, control logic, and a serial interface. Each of these
functional blocks is described below.
A IN Impedance (Ω) =
With regard to the analog input signal, the overall analog
performance of the device is affected by three items. First,
the input impedance can affect accuracy. If the source
impedance of the input signal is significant, or if there is
passive filtering prior to the ADS1250, a significant portion
of the signal can be lost across this external impedance. The
magnitude of the effect is dependent on the desired system
performance.
Second, the current into or out of the analog inputs must be
limited. Under no conditions should the current into or out
of the analog inputs exceed 10mA.
Third, to prevent aliasing of the input signal, the bandwidth
of the analog input signal must be band limited. The bandwidth is a function of the system clock frequency. With a
system clock frequency of 9.6MHz, the data output rate is
25kHz, with a –3dB frequency of 5.4kHz. The –3dB frequency scales with the system clock frequency.
ANALOG INPUT
The ADS1250 contains a fully differential analog input with
programmable gain. The fully differential switched capacitor architecture provides low system noise, common-mode
rejection of 105dB, and excellent power supply rejection.
The selectable gains on the input are 1, 2, 4, or 8, which
gives a bipolar input voltage range from –4.096 to +4.096V,
to –512mV to +512mV, when the reference input voltage
equals +4.096V. The bipolar ranges are with respect to –VIN
and not with respect to GND.
To guarantee the best linearity of the ADS1250, a fully
differential signal is recommended.
PROGRAMMABLE GAIN AMPLIFIER
The PGA gain setting is programmed via the PGA pins on the
ADS1250. Changes in the gain setting (G) of the PGA results
in an increase in the input capacitor size. Therefore, higher
gain settings result in a lower analog input impedance.
Figure 1 shows the basic input structure of the ADS1250.
The analog input impedance is directly related to the sampling frequency of the input capacitor (fMOD), and the gain
setting (G) of the device. The sampling frequency of the
input capacitor is derived from the system clock (CLK).
Therefore, a lower CLK rate decreases the sampling frequency, which results in a higher analog input impedance.
The PGA of the ADS1250 can be set to a gain of 1, 2, 4, or
8, substantially increasing the dynamic range of the converter
and simplifying the interface to the more common transducers
(see Table I).
GAIN SETTING
RSW
(1kΩ typical • G)
Internal
Circuitry
AIN
Modulator Frequency
= fMOD
CINT
(6pF typical • G)
ANALOG INPUT
G1
G0
GAIN VALUE
DIFFERENTIAL
FSR (V)
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
1
2
4
8
8.192
4.096
2.048
1.024
SINGLE-ENDED
FSR (V)
4.096
2.048
1.024
0.512
NOTE: Based on a 4.096V reference. The ADS1250 allows commonmode voltage as long as the absolute input voltage on +VIN or –VIN does
not go below AGND or above +VS.
VCM
TABLE I. Full-Scale Range versus PGA Setting.
FIGURE 1. Analog Input Structure.
®
ADS1250
9.6 MHz • 104E3
CLK • G
8
DELTA-SIGMA MODULATOR
The modulator clock is generated by dividing the system
clock by 6. With a nominal system clock frequency of
9.6MHz, the modulator clock frequency is 1.6MHz
(9.6MHz / 6). The output from the modulator is oversampled
64 times by the digital filter. Therefore, with 1.6MHz
modulator clock (derived from a 9.6MHz system clock), the
data output rate is 25kHz (1.6MHz / 64). The data output
rate scales directly with the system clock frequency, as
shown in Table II.
CLK (MHz)
DATA OUTPUT RATE (Hz)
9.600000
7.372800(1)
6.144000(1)
6.000000(1)
4.915200(1)
3.686400(1)
3.072000(1)
2.457600(1)
1.843200(1)
0.921600
0.460800
0.384000
0.192000
0.038400
0.023040
0.019200
0.011520
0.009600
0.007680
0.006400
0.005760
0.004800
0.003840
25,000
19,200
16,000
15,625
12,800
9,600
8,000
6,400
4,800
2,400
1,200
1,000
500
100
60
50
30
25
20
16.67
15
12.50
10
Reference voltages higher than 4.096V will increase the
full-scale range, while the absolute internal circuit noise of
the converter remains the same. This will decrease the noise
in terms of ppm of full scale. However, using a higher
reference voltage will also degrade linearity. Therefore, the
use of a higher reference voltage is not recommended.
Reference voltages lower than 4.096V will decrease the fullscale range, while the absolute internal circuit noise at the
converter remains the same. This will increase the noise in
terms of ppm of full scale. However, using a lower reference
voltage will not degrade linearity. Therefore, the use of a
lower reference voltage will reduce the effective resolution.
DIGITAL FILTER
The digital filter is a sinc5 and is described by the following
transfer function:
 π • f • 64 
sin 

 fMOD 
H( f ) =
 π•f 
64 • sin 

 fMOD 
5
or
 1 – z –64
H( z ) = 
 64 • 1 – z –1

(
)




5
The digital filter of the ADS1250 computes the digital result
based on the most recent outputs from the delta-sigma
modulator. At the most basic level, the digital filter can be
thought of as simply averaging the modulator results in a
weighted form and presenting this average as the digital
result. The digital result is calculated from the digital filter
every 64 modulator clock cycles, or 6 • 64 = 384 system
clock cycles (refer to the Delta-Sigma Modulator section).
However, if there is a significant change in the analog input,
five full conversions are needed for the digital filter to settle.
If the analog input change occurs asynchronously to the
DRDY pulse, six conversions are needed for the conversion
to fully settle. Furthermore, the group delay is only 2.5
conversions due to the digital filter's linear phase response.
NOTE: (1) Standard Clock Oscillator.
TABLE II. CLK Rate versus Data Output Rate.
REFERENCE INPUT
Unlike the analog input, the reference input impedance has no
dependency on the PGA gain setting.
Reference input takes an average current of 125µA with a
9.6MHz system clock. This current will be proportional to
the system clock. A buffered reference is needed for
ADS1250. The recommended reference circuit is shown in
Figure 2.
+5V
+5V
0.10µF
7
4.99kΩ
2
To VREF
Pin 5 of
the ADS1250
6
10kΩ
3
1
OPA350
+
+
LM404-4.1
10µF
0.10µF
10µF
0.1µF
4
FIGURE 2. Recommended External Voltage Reference Circuit for Best Low Noise Operation with the ADS1250.
®
9
ADS1250
There is an additional benefit in using a lower data output
rate. It will provide better rejection of signals in the frequency band of interest. For example, with a 50Hz data
output rate, a significant signal at 75Hz may alias back into
the passband at 25Hz. This is due to the fact that rejection at
75Hz may only be 66dB in the stopband (frequencies higher
than the first notch frequency), as shown in Figure 4.
However, setting the data output rate to 10Hz will provide
135dB rejection at 75Hz (see Figure 6). A similar benefit is
gained at frequencies near the data output rate (see Figures
7, 8, 9, and 10). If a slower data output rate does not meet
the system requirements, the analog front end can be designed to provide the needed attenuation to prevent aliasing.
Additionally the data output rate may be increased and
additional digital filtering may be done in the processor or
controller.
The digital output rate, or data rate, scales directly with the
system CLK frequency. This allows the data output rate to
be changed over a very wide range (five orders of magnitude) by changing the system CLK frequency. However, it
is important to note that the –3dB point of the filter is 0.216
times the data output rate. Therefore, the data output rate
should allow for sufficient margin to prevent attenuation of
the signal of interest.
Since the conversion result is essentially an average, the data
output rate determines the location of the resulting notches
in the digital filter (see Figure 3). Note that the first notch is
located at the data output rate frequency, and subsequent
notches are located at integer multiples of the data output
rate to allow for rejection of not only the fundamental
frequency, but also harmonic frequencies. In this manner,
the data output rate can be used to set specific notch
frequencies in the digital filter response.
CONTROL LOGIC
The control logic is used for communications and control of
the ADS1250.
For example, if rejection of the power line frequency is
desired, the data output rate can simply be set to the power
line frequency. For 50Hz rejection, the system CLK frequency should be 19.200kHz; this will set the data output
rate to 50Hz (see Table II and Figure 4). For 60Hz rejection,
the system CLK frequency should be 23.040kHz; this will
set the data output rate to 60Hz (see Table II and Figure 5).
If both 50Hz and 60Hz rejection is required, then the system
CLK should be 3.840kHz; this will set the data output rate
to 10Hz and reject both 50Hz and 60Hz (See Table II and
Figure 6).
Power-Up Sequence
Prior to power-up, all digital and analog input pins must be
LOW. At the time of power-up, these signal inputs can be
biased to a voltage other than 0V, however, they should
never exceed +VS or +VD.
Once the ADS1250 powers up, the DRDY line will pulse
LOW on the first conversion. This data will not be valid. The
sixth pulse of DRDY will be valid data from the analog input
signal.
DIGITAL FILTER RESPONSE
0
–20
–20
–40
–40
–60
–60
–80
Gain (dB)
Gain (dB)
NORMALIZED DIGITAL FILTER RESPONSE
0
–100
–120
–80
–100
–120
–140
–140
–160
–160
–180
–180
–200
–200
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
10
FIGURE 3. Normalized Digital Filter Response.
100
150
200
FIGURE 4. Digital Filter Response (50Hz).
®
ADS1250
50
Frequency (Hz)
Frequency (Hz)
10
250
300
DIGITAL FILTER RESPONSE
0
–20
–20
–40
–40
–60
–60
–80
Gain (dB)
Gain (dB)
DIGITAL FILTER RESPONSE
0
–100
–120
–80
–100
–120
–140
–140
–160
–160
–180
–180
–200
–200
0
50
100
150
200
250
0
300
10
20
30
Frequency (Hz)
FIGURE 5. Digital Filter Response (60Hz).
60
70
80
90
100
DIGITAL FILTER RESPONSE
0
0
–20
–20
–40
–40
–60
–60
Gain (dB)
Gain (dB)
50
FIGURE 6. Digital Filter Response (10Hz Multiples).
DIGITAL FILTER RESPONSE
–80
–100
–120
–80
–100
–120
–140
–140
–160
–160
–180
–180
–200
–200
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
45
55
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
Frequency (Hz)
Frequency (Hz)
FIGURE 7. Expanded Digital Filter Response (50Hz with a
50Hz Notch).
FIGURE 8. Expanded Digital Filter Response (50Hz with a
10Hz Notch).
DIGITAL FILTER RESPONSE
DIGITAL FILTER RESPONSE
0
0
–20
–20
–40
–40
–60
–60
–80
Gain (dB)
Gain (dB)
40
Frequency (Hz)
–100
–120
–80
–100
–120
–140
–140
–160
–160
–180
–180
–200
–200
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
55
65
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
Frequency (Hz)
Frequency (Hz)
FIGURE 9. Expanded Digital Filter Response (60Hz with a
60Hz Notch).
FIGURE 10. Expanded Digital Filter Response (60Hz with
a 10Hz Notch).
®
11
ADS1250
DSYNC
The DSYNC signal can be used is two ways. First, DSYNC
can be used to synchronize multiple converters. This is done
by applying a negative-going pulse on DSYNC. The negative pulse resets the current modulator count to zero and
places it in a hold state. The modulator is released from the
hold state and synchronization occurs on the rising edge of
DSYNC. DSYNC does not reset the internal data to zero.
Synchronization assumes that each ADS1250 is driven from
the same system clock. If the DSYNC pulse is completely
asynchronous to the master clock, some ADS1250s may
start-up one CLK clock cycle before the others.
Therefore, the output data will be synchronized, but only to
within one CLK clock cycle. To ensure exact synchronization to the same CLK clock edge, the timing relationship
between the DSYNC and CLK signals must be observed, as
shown in Figure 11 and Table III. Figure 12 shows a simple
circuit which can be used to clock multiple ADS1250s from
one ADS1250, as well as to ensure that an asynchronous
DSYNC signal will exactly synchronize all the converters.
The second use of DSYNC is to reset the modulator count
to zero in order to obtain valid data as quickly as possible.
For example, if the analog input signal is changed significantly on the ADS1250, the current conversion cycle will be
a mix of the old data and the new data. Five conversions are
needed for the digital filter to settle. Therefore, the sixth
conversion will be valid data. However, if the analog input
signal is changed and then DSYNC is used to reset the
modulator count, the modulator data at the end of the current
conversion cycle will be entirely from the new signal. After
four additional conversion cycles, the output data will be
completely valid. Note that the conversion cycle in which
DSYNC is used will be slightly longer than normal. Its
length will depend on when DSYNC was set.
CLK
t14
t13
DSYNC
FIGURE 11. DSYNC to CLK Timing for Synchronizing
Multiple ADS1250s.
1/2 74AHC74
Asynchronous
DSYNC
Strobe
D
Q
CLK
Q
1/6 74AHC04
DVDD
OSC
DSYNC
DOUT
DSYNC
DOUT
DSYNC
DOUT
CLK
SCLK
CLK
SCLK
CLK
SCLK
DGND
DVDD
DGND
DVDD
DGND
DVDD
ADS1250
ADS1250
ADS1250
DGND
FIGURE 12. Exactly Synchronizing Multiple ADS1250s to an Asynchronous DSYNC Signal.
SYMBOL
DESCRIPTION
MIN
DOR Write Time (Using CS)
DRDY LOW Time
DOR Write Time (CS HIGH)
DRDY HIGH Time
Rising Edge of CLK to Falling Edge of DRDY
Falling Edge of DRDY to Falling Edge of CS
Falling Edge of CS to Rising Edge of DRDY
Falling Edge of CS to Rising Edge of SCLK or
Falling Edge of DRDY to Rising Edge of SCLK if CS is Tied LOW
Falling Edge of CS to DOUT Valid or
Falling Edge of DRDY to DOUT Valid if CS is Tied LOW (Setup Time)
Falling Edge of SCLK to DOUT Valid (Hold Time)
Falling Edge of SCLK to Next DOUT Valid (Setup Time)
Rising Edge of CS to DOUT High Impedance
DSYNC Pulse Width
Falling Edge of CLK to Falling Edge of DSYNC
t1
t2
t3
t4
t5
t6
t7
t8
t9
t10
t11
t12
t13
t14
TABLE III. Digital Timing.
®
ADS1250
12
TYP
MAX
6
6
6
6
• CLK
• CLK
• CLK
• CLK
30
30
6 • CLK
30
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
30
5
30
30
100
UNITS
CLK
–5
2
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
CS
The CS signal controls the state of DOUT. If CS is HIGH,
DOUT is in a high-impedance state. When CS is LOW,
DOUT drives the bus.
MSB to LSB in the time defined by t3. The DRDY line
would stay HIGH for the time defined by t4, as shown in
Figure 15.
t3
DRDY
The DRDY signal is used to indicate that new data has been
loaded into the data output register and is ready to be read.
The operation of DRDY depends on how the CS signal is
used. The specifics of the three communications methods
are described in the Serial Interface section.
In the first case, which is typical for three-wire serial
communications (CS tied LOW), DRDY would normally be
HIGH. The result of the A/D conversion would be written to
the DOR from MSB to LSB in the time defined by t1. The
DRDY line would then pulse LOW for time defined by t2,
as shown in Figure 13.
t1
DRDY
MSB
written
to DOR
DOR
write
complete
FIGURE 15. DRDY Pulse (CS HIGH).
Reading DRDY during the time shown by t1 and t3 (Figures
13, 14, and 15) will result in invalid data being read. This is
due to the fact that writes to the DOR are not blocked.
Subsequently, a read from DOR during this time will result
in a combination of old and new data.
SERIAL INTERFACE
The ADS1250 includes a simple serial interface which can
be connected to microcontrollers and digital signal processors in a variety of ways. Communications with the ADS1250
can commence on the first detection of the DRDY pulse
after power up, although data will not be valid until the sixth
conversion.
It is important to note that the data from the ADS1250 is a 20bit result transmitted MSB-first in Binary Two’s Complement
format, as shown in Table IV.
t2
DRDY
MSB
written
to DOR
t4
DOR
write
complete
DOUT
FIGURE 13. DRDY Pulse (CS tied LOW).
In the second case, which is typical for four-wire serial
communications (CS used), DRDY would normally be HIGH.
The result of the A/D conversion would be written to the DOR
from MSB to LSB in the time defined by t1. The DRDY would
go LOW after the DOR write is completed. After taking CS
LOW, the DRDY line would remain LOW for the time
defined by t2, as shown in Figure 14.
t1
DIGITAL OUTPUT (HEX)
+Full Scale
7FFFFH
Zero
00000H
–Full Scale
80000H
TABLE IV. ADS1250 Data Format (Binary Two's Complement).
The entire 20-bit result can be read out of the device by simply
providing 20 SCLKs during serial communication with the
part. However, the most common method of communicating
with the device is with a standard SSI interface, such as SPI.
This protocol is based on 8-bit or 16-bit data transfers. It is
possible to use a standard 8-bit or 16-bit data transfer with the
ADS1250. For instance, if only 16 bits of data are read, the
internal bit pointer will automatically reset to the MSB of the
DOR on the next DRDY pulse. This will ensure that the next
read from the DOR will begin with the MSB of newly
converted data. If more than 20 bits of data are read, the data
will be 0 padded. Therefore, if 24 bits of data are read from the
ADS1250, the lowest four bits of the 24-bit data transfer are
read as 0s (0 padded).
The only limitation on SCLK is that it cannot be higher than
9.6MHz. Therefore, it is possible to run CLK at a lower
frequency than SCLK. For instance, it is possible to run
CLK at 23.040kHz for a 60Hz notch, and run SCLK at
9.6MHz to achieve high-speed serial communications. Additionally, the data must be clocked out before the next
DRDY to ensure valid data, as described in the DRDY
section.
t2
DRDY
MSB
written
to DOR
DIFFERENTIAL VOLTAGE INPUT
DOR
write
complete
CS
DOUT
FIGURE 14. DRDY Pulse (using CS).
In the third case, CS is left HIGH, which may be used if data
is only periodically read from the ADS1250. In this case,
DRDY would normally be LOW. DRDY would go HIGH
immediately prior to the MSB being written to the DOR.
The result of the A/D conversion would be written from
®
13
ADS1250
There are three basic methods of receiving data from the
ADS1250. The first two methods involve a four-wire interface and the third method is a three-wire interface.
Method 1: Four-Wire Interface
The most common method of receiving data is using a
simple four-wire interface (CS, SCLK, DOUT, and DRDY).
The DRDY line will pulse LOW after the DOR is updated.
The processor would then take CS LOW to select the device
for communication. Once CS is taken LOW, the DOUT
would be driven to the level dictated by the MSB of the data
output register. The processor would provide 20 (or 24)
SCLKs to read the contents of the DOR. The data bits in the
DOR are shifted out on the DOUT pin after the falling edge
of SCLK. If more than 20 bits of data are read, the data is 0
padded. Taking CS HIGH will take DOUT to a highimpedance state. The timing for the data transfer is shown in
Figure 16 (see Table III). A simple four-wire interface using
this method is shown in Figure 17. The P1.0 output from the
8xC51 is a free-running clock.
t5
CLK
t6
DRDY
t7
CS
t8
t10
SCLK
1
2
19
20
22
23
24
t12
t9
t11
OUT
LSB
OUT
MSB
DOUT
21
FIGURE 16. Method 1: Four-Wire Interface Using Noncontinuous SCLK.
DVDD
8xC51
AGND
VREF
Circuit
AVDD
DGND
–VIN
G1
P1.1
P0.0
AGND
G0
P1.2
P0.1
P1.3
P0.2
DRDY
P1.4
P0.3
CLK
P1.5
P0.4
+VD
SCLK
P1.6
P0.5
DGND
DOUT
P1.7
P0.6
RST
P0.7
+VS
ADS1250
VREF
DVDD
VCC
+VIN
DSYNC
P1.0 / T2
DGND
CS
DGND
P3.0
EA
P3.1
ALE
P3.2 / INT0
PSEN
P3.3
P2.7
P3.4
P2.6
P3.5
P2.5
P3.6
P2.4
P3.7
P2.3
XTAL2
P2.2
C1
XTAL
C2
DGND
FIGURE 17. Four-Wire Interface to an 8xC51.
®
ADS1250
14
XTAL1
P2.1
VSS
P2.0
DVDD
Method 2: Four-Wire Interface
The second method of receiving data also uses a simple
four-wire interface (CS, SCLK, DOUT, and DRDY). The
main difference from method 1 is that SCLK is a freerunning clock. The DRDY line will pulse LOW for the time
defined by t2 after the DOR is updated. The processor would
then take CS LOW to select the device for communication.
The recommended method of using CS is to take CS LOW
on the falling edge of SCLK. The only timing constraint of
CS is that the setup time (t9) for the data must be met before
the rising edge of SCLK. Once CS is taken LOW, the DOUT
would be driven to the level dictated by the MSB of the data
output register. CS would be held low for 20 (or 24) SCLKs
to read the contents of the DOR. The data bits in the DOR
are shifted out on the DOUT pin after the falling edge of
SCLK. If CS is held low for more than 20 SCLKs, the data
would be 0 padded. Taking CS HIGH will take DOUT to a
high-impedance state. The timing for the data transfer is
shown in Figure 18 (see Table III). A simple four-wire
interface is shown in Figure 19. The P1.0 output from the
8xC51 is a free-running clock.
t5
CLK
t6
DRDY
t7
CS
t8
t10
SCLK
1
t9
2
19
20
22
23
24
t11
t12
OUT
MSB
DOUT
21
OUT
LSB
FIGURE 18. Method 2: Four-Wire Interface Using a Free-Running SCLK.
DVDD
8xC51
AGND
VREF
Circuit
AVDD
+VIN
DGND
–VIN
G1
VCC
P1.1
P0.0
P1.2
P0.1
P1.3
P0.2
DRDY
P1.4
P0.3
CLK
P1.5
P0.4
+VD
SCLK
P1.6
P0.5
DGND
DOUT
P1.7
P0.6
RST
P0.7
AGND
G0
+VS
CS
ADS1250
VREF
DVDD
P1.0 / T2
DSYNC
DGND
DGND
P3.0
EA
P3.1
ALE
P3.2 / INT0
DVDD
PSEN
P3.3
P2.7
P3.4
P2.6
P3.5
P2.5
P3.6
P2.4
P3.7
P2.3
XTAL2
P2.2
XTAL1
P2.1
VSS
P2.0
C1
XTAL
C2
DGND
FIGURE 19. Four-Wire Interface to an 8xC51 (Free-Running SCLK).
15
®
ADS1250
Method 3: Three-Wire Interface
The third method of receiving data uses a simple three-wire
interface (SCLK, DOUT, and DRDY). The main difference
from method 1 is that CS is tied LOW, therefore, the DOUT
pin is always driving the bus. The DRDY line will pulse
LOW after the DOR is updated. Since CS is tied LOW (the
DOUT pin is enabled for output), the level dictated by the
MSB of the data output register would be driven on the bus.
The processor would provide 20 (or 24) SCLKs to read the
contents of the DOR. The data bits in the DOR are shifted
out on the DOUT pin after the falling edge of SCLK. If more
than 20 bits of data are read, the data is 0 padded. Since CS
is tied LOW, the bus will be driven to the state of the last bit
that was shifted out of the DOR. The timing for the data
transfer is shown in Figure 20 (see Table III). A simple
three-wire interface using this method is shown in Figure 21.
The P1.0 output from the 8xC51 is a free-running clock.
Figure 22 shows a five-wire interface using DSYNC. The
communication with the ADS1250 is the same as described
in Method 1. Figure 23 shows a full interface using DSYNC,
G1, and G0. The communication with ADS1250 is the same
as described in Method 1.
t5
CLK
t2
DRDY
t8
SCLK
1
DOUT
OUT
MSB
t10
2
19
20
21
22
23
24
t11
t9
OUT
LSB
FIGURE 20. Method 3: Two-Wire Interface (CS tied LOW).
DVDD
8xC51
AGND
VREF
Circuit
AVDD
DGND
–VIN
G1
P1.1
P0.0
AGND
G0
P1.2
P0.1
P1.3
P0.2
P1.4
P0.3
CLK
P1.5
P0.4
+VD
SCLK
P1.6
P0.5
DGND
DOUT
P1.7
P0.6
RST
P0.7
+VS
ADS1250
VREF
DVDD
VCC
+VIN
DSYNC
P1.0 / T2
CS
DGND
DRDY
DGND
P3.0
EA
P3.1
ALE
P3.2 / INT0
PSEN
P3.3
P2.7
P3.4
P2.6
P3.5
P2.5
P3.6
P2.4
P3.7
P2.3
XTAL2
P2.2
C1
XTAL
C2
DGND
FIGURE 21. Three-Wire Interface to an 8xC51 (CS tied LOW).
®
ADS1250
16
XTAL1
P2.1
VSS
P2.0
DVDD
DVDD
8xC51
AGND
AVDD
VREF
Circuit
+VIN
DGND
–VIN
G1
P0.0
P1.2
P0.1
P1.3
P0.2
DRDY
P1.4
P0.3
G0
+VS
CS
ADS1250
DGND
CLK
P1.5
P0.4
+VD
SCLK
P1.6
P0.5
DGND
DOUT
P1.7
P0.6
RST
P0.7
P3.0
EA
DSYNC
DVDD
P1.1
AGND
VREF
VCC
P1.0 / T2
DGND
DVDD
ALE
P3.1
P3.2 / INT0
PSEN
P3.3
P2.7
P3.4
P2.6
P3.5
P2.5
P3.6
P2.4
P3.7
P2.3
XTAL2
P2.2
C1
XTAL
C2
XTAL1
P2.1
VSS
P2.0
DGND
FIGURE 22. Five-Wire Interface to an 8xC51.
DVDD
8xC51
AGND
AVDD
+VIN
DGND
–VIN
G1
P0.0
G0
P1.2
P0.1
P1.3
P0.2
DRDY
P1.4
P0.3
CLK
P1.5
P0.4
+VD
SCLK
P1.6
P0.5
DGND
DOUT
P1.7
P0.6
RST
P0.7
ADS1250
VREF
DSYNC
DVDD
VCC
P1.1
CS
AGND
+VS
VREF
Circuit
P1.0 / T2
DGND
DGND
P3.0
EA
P3.1
ALE
P3.2 / INT0
DVDD
PSEN
P3.3
P2.7
P3.4
P2.6
P3.5
P2.5
P3.6
P2.4
P3.7
P2.3
XTAL2
P2.2
C1
XTAL
C2
XTAL1
P2.1
VSS
P2.0
DGND
FIGURE 23. Full Interface to an 8xC51.
®
17
ADS1250
SOFTWARE GAIN
The excellent performance, flexibility, and low cost of the
ADS1250 allows the converter to be considered for designs
which would not normally need a 20-bit ADC. For example,
many designs utilize a 12-bit converter and a high gain INA
or PGA for digitizing low amplitude signals. For some of these
applications, the ADS1250 by itself may be a solution. The
digital result of the converter can simply be shifted up by “n”
bits in the main controller, resulting in a gain of “n” times G,
where G is the gain setting. While this type of manipulation of
the output data is obvious, it is easy to miss how much the gain
can be increased in this manner on a 20-bit converter. For
example, shifting the result by 4 bits when the ADS1250 is set
to a gain of 8 results in an effective gain of 128.
Isolation
The serial interface of the ADS1250 provides for simple
isolation methods. An example of an isolated four-wire
interface is shown in Figure 19. The ISO150 is used to
transmit the digital clocks over the isolation barrier. In
addition, the digital output of the ADS1250 can, in some
cases, drive opto-isolators directly. Note that DOUT is tristated for the majority of the conversion period and the optoisolator connection must take this into account.
VDD2
DRDY
–VIN
G1
AGND
G0
R/T2B
D2B
R/T1B
D1B
VSB
GB
VDD1
VDD2
DGND
DGND
SCLK
CLK
R/T2B
D2B
D1B
DOUT
R/T1B
DGND
DGND
VSB
SCLK
ISO150
+VD
GA
DSYNC
CS
DRDY
AGND
DGND
R/T2A
ADS1250
VREF
VDD1
CLK
VDD2
D2A
+VS
VREF
Circuit
VDD1
R/T1A
AVDD
DGND
D1A
AGND
+VIN
VSA
ISO150
R/T2A
R/T1A
GA
D2A
D1A
DGND
GB
VSA
DGND
VDD1
DOUT
DGND
FIGURE 24. Isolated Four-Wire Interface.
®
ADS1250
18
AGND
VDD2
LAYOUT
should be connected to the analog ground plane as well as all
other analog grounds. DGND should be connected to the
digital ground plane and all digital signals referenced to this
plane. The ADS1250 pinout is such that the converter is
cleanly separated into an analog and digital portion. This
should allow simple layout of the analog and digital sections
of the design. For a single converter system, AGND and
DGND of the ADS1250 should be connected together,
underneath the converter. Do not join the ground planes, but
connect the two with a moderate signal trace. For multiple
converters, connect the two ground planes at one location as
central to all of the converters as possible. In some cases,
experimentation may be required to find the best point to
connect the two planes together. The printed circuit board
can be designed to provide different analog/digital ground
connections via short jumpers. The initial prototype can be
used to establish which connection works best.
POWER SUPPLIES
The analog supply should be well regulated and low noise.
For designs requiring very high resolution from the ADS1250,
power supply rejection will be a concern. Avoid running
digital lines under the device as they may couple noise onto
the die. The requirements for the digital supply are not as
strict, however, high frequency noise on VD can capacitively
couple into the analog portion of the ADS1250. This noise
can originate from switching power supplies, very fast
microprocessors, or digital signal processors. For either
supply, high frequency noise will alias back into the passband of the digital filter, affecting the conversion result. If
one supply must be used to power the ADS1250, the VS
supply should be used to power VD. This connection can be
made via a 10Ω resistor which, along with the decoupling
capacitors, will provide some filtering between VD and VS.
In some systems, a direct connection can be made. Experimentation may be the best way to determine the appropriate
connection between VS and VD.
DECOUPLING
Good decoupling practices should be used for the ADS1250
and for all components in the design. All decoupling capacitors, but specifically the 0.1µF ceramic capacitors, should be
placed as close as possible to the pin being decoupled. A
1µF to 10µF capacitor, in parallel with a 0.1µF ceramic
capacitor, should be used to decouple VS to AGND. At a
minimum, a 0.1µF ceramic capacitor should be used to
decouple VD to DGND, as well as for the digital supply on
each digital component.
GROUNDING
The analog and digital sections of the design should be
carefully and cleanly partitioned. Each section should have
its own ground plane with no overlap between them. AGND
TYPICAL CONNECTION
+VIN
1
–VIN
2
3
4
10µF
0.1µF
VREF
DSYNC
+VD
+
G1
–
14
G0
Digital
Filter
13
CS
12
DRDY
11
CLK
10
SCLK
9
DOUT
∆Σ
Modulator
5
6
Serial
Output
7
10µF
DGND
15
PGA
AGND
+VS
16
0.1µF
DGND
8
ADS1250
FIGURE 25. Connection Diagram.
®
19
ADS1250
SYSTEM CONSIDERATIONS
analog inputs of the ADS1250 are at 2.048V, the differential
voltage is 0V. If one input is at 0V and the other is at 4.096V,
the differential voltage magnitude is 4.096V. This is the case
regardless of which input is at 0V and which is at 4.096V.
The analog input differential voltage is given by the following equation:
+VIN – –VIN
The recommendations for power supplies and grounding
will change depending on the requirements and specific
design of the overall system. Achieving 20 bits noise performance is a great deal more difficult than achieving 12 bits of
noise performance. In general, a system can be broken up
into four different stages:
•
•
•
•
Analog Processing
Analog Portion of the ADS1250
Digital Portion of the ADS1250
Digital Processing
A positive digital output is produced whenever the analog
input differential voltage is positive, while a negative digital
output is produced whenever the differential is negative. For
example, with a 4.096V reference and a gain setting of 2, a
positive full-scale output is produced when the analog input
differential is 2.048V. A negative full-scale output is produced when the differential voltage is –2.048V. In each case,
the actual input voltages must remain within the AGND to
VS range (see Table I).
Actual Analog Input Voltage—The voltage at any one
analog input relative to AGND.
Full-Scale Range (FSR)—As with most A/D converters,
the full-scale range of the ADS1250 is defined as the “input”
which produces the positive full-scale digital output minus
the “input” which produces the negative full-scale digital
output. For example, with a 4.096V reference and a gain
setting of 2, the differential full-scale range is
2.048V – (–2.048V) = 4.096V.
For the simplest system consisting of minimal analog signal
processing (basic filtering and gain), a microcontroller, and
one clock source, high resolution can be achieved by powering all components by a common power supply. In addition, all components can share a common ground plane.
Thus, there would be no distinctions between “analog” or
“digital” power and ground. The layout should still include
a power plane, a ground plane, and careful decoupling. In
a more extreme case, the design could include: multiple
ADS1250s; extensive analog signal processing; one or more
microcontrollers, digital signal processors, or microprocessors; many different clock sources; and interconnections to
various other systems. High resolution will be very difficult
to achieve for this design. The approach would be to break
the system into as many different parts as possible. For
example, each ADS1250 may have its own “analog” processing front end, its own analog power and ground (possibly shared with the analog front end), and its own “digital”
power and ground. The converter’s “digital” power and
ground would be separate from the power and ground for the
system’s processors, RAM, ROM, and “glue” logic.
Least Significant Bit (LSB) Weight—This is the theoretical amount of voltage that the differential voltage at the
analog input would have to change in order to observe a
change in the output data of one least significant bit. It is
computed as follows:
LSBWeight =
DEFINITION OF TERMS
An attempt has been made to be consistent with the terminology used in this data sheet. In that regard, the definition
of each term is given as follows:
Analog Input Differential Voltage—For an analog signal
that is fully differential, the voltage range can be compared
to that of an instrumentation amplifier. For example, if both
where N is the number of bits in the digital output.
Conversion Cycle—The term conversion cycle, as used
here, refers to the time period between DRDY pulses.
®
ADS1250
Full−Scale Range
2N
20
PACKAGE OPTION ADDENDUM
www.ti.com
16-Feb-2009
PACKAGING INFORMATION
Orderable Device
Status (1)
Package
Type
Package
Drawing
Pins Package Eco Plan (2)
Qty
ADS1250U
ACTIVE
SOIC
DW
16
ADS1250U/1K
ACTIVE
SOIC
DW
ADS1250U/1KG4
ACTIVE
SOIC
ADS1250UG4
ACTIVE
SOIC
40
Lead/Ball Finish
MSL Peak Temp (3)
Green (RoHS &
no Sb/Br)
CU NIPDAU
Level-2-260C-1 YEAR
16
1000 Green (RoHS &
no Sb/Br)
CU NIPDAU
Level-2-260C-1 YEAR
DW
16
1000 Green (RoHS &
no Sb/Br)
CU NIPDAU
Level-2-260C-1 YEAR
DW
16
CU NIPDAU
Level-2-260C-1 YEAR
40
Green (RoHS &
no Sb/Br)
(1)
The marketing status values are defined as follows:
ACTIVE: Product device recommended for new designs.
LIFEBUY: TI has announced that the device will be discontinued, and a lifetime-buy period is in effect.
NRND: Not recommended for new designs. Device is in production to support existing customers, but TI does not recommend using this part in
a new design.
PREVIEW: Device has been announced but is not in production. Samples may or may not be available.
OBSOLETE: TI has discontinued the production of the device.
(2)
Eco Plan - The planned eco-friendly classification: Pb-Free (RoHS), Pb-Free (RoHS Exempt), or Green (RoHS & no Sb/Br) - please check
http://www.ti.com/productcontent for the latest availability information and additional product content details.
TBD: The Pb-Free/Green conversion plan has not been defined.
Pb-Free (RoHS): TI's terms "Lead-Free" or "Pb-Free" mean semiconductor products that are compatible with the current RoHS requirements
for all 6 substances, including the requirement that lead not exceed 0.1% by weight in homogeneous materials. Where designed to be soldered
at high temperatures, TI Pb-Free products are suitable for use in specified lead-free processes.
Pb-Free (RoHS Exempt): This component has a RoHS exemption for either 1) lead-based flip-chip solder bumps used between the die and
package, or 2) lead-based die adhesive used between the die and leadframe. The component is otherwise considered Pb-Free (RoHS
compatible) as defined above.
Green (RoHS & no Sb/Br): TI defines "Green" to mean Pb-Free (RoHS compatible), and free of Bromine (Br) and Antimony (Sb) based flame
retardants (Br or Sb do not exceed 0.1% by weight in homogeneous material)
(3)
MSL, Peak Temp. -- The Moisture Sensitivity Level rating according to the JEDEC industry standard classifications, and peak solder
temperature.
Important Information and Disclaimer:The information provided on this page represents TI's knowledge and belief as of the date that it is
provided. TI bases its knowledge and belief on information provided by third parties, and makes no representation or warranty as to the
accuracy of such information. Efforts are underway to better integrate information from third parties. TI has taken and continues to take
reasonable steps to provide representative and accurate information but may not have conducted destructive testing or chemical analysis on
incoming materials and chemicals. TI and TI suppliers consider certain information to be proprietary, and thus CAS numbers and other limited
information may not be available for release.
In no event shall TI's liability arising out of such information exceed the total purchase price of the TI part(s) at issue in this document sold by TI
to Customer on an annual basis.
Addendum-Page 1
PACKAGE MATERIALS INFORMATION
www.ti.com
11-Mar-2008
TAPE AND REEL INFORMATION
*All dimensions are nominal
Device
ADS1250U/1K
Package Package Pins
Type Drawing
SOIC
DW
16
SPQ
Reel
Reel
Diameter Width
(mm) W1 (mm)
1000
330.0
16.4
Pack Materials-Page 1
A0 (mm)
B0 (mm)
K0 (mm)
P1
(mm)
W
Pin1
(mm) Quadrant
10.85
10.8
2.7
12.0
16.0
Q1
PACKAGE MATERIALS INFORMATION
www.ti.com
11-Mar-2008
*All dimensions are nominal
Device
Package Type
Package Drawing
Pins
SPQ
Length (mm)
Width (mm)
Height (mm)
ADS1250U/1K
SOIC
DW
16
1000
346.0
346.0
33.0
Pack Materials-Page 2
IMPORTANT NOTICE
Texas Instruments Incorporated and its subsidiaries (TI) reserve the right to make corrections, modifications, enhancements, improvements,
and other changes to its products and services at any time and to discontinue any product or service without notice. Customers should
obtain the latest relevant information before placing orders and should verify that such information is current and complete. All products are
sold subject to TI’s terms and conditions of sale supplied at the time of order acknowledgment.
TI warrants performance of its hardware products to the specifications applicable at the time of sale in accordance with TI’s standard
warranty. Testing and other quality control techniques are used to the extent TI deems necessary to support this warranty. Except where
mandated by government requirements, testing of all parameters of each product is not necessarily performed.
TI assumes no liability for applications assistance or customer product design. Customers are responsible for their products and
applications using TI components. To minimize the risks associated with customer products and applications, customers should provide
adequate design and operating safeguards.
TI does not warrant or represent that any license, either express or implied, is granted under any TI patent right, copyright, mask work right,
or other TI intellectual property right relating to any combination, machine, or process in which TI products or services are used. Information
published by TI regarding third-party products or services does not constitute a license from TI to use such products or services or a
warranty or endorsement thereof. Use of such information may require a license from a third party under the patents or other intellectual
property of the third party, or a license from TI under the patents or other intellectual property of TI.
Reproduction of TI information in TI data books or data sheets is permissible only if reproduction is without alteration and is accompanied
by all associated warranties, conditions, limitations, and notices. Reproduction of this information with alteration is an unfair and deceptive
business practice. TI is not responsible or liable for such altered documentation. Information of third parties may be subject to additional
restrictions.
Resale of TI products or services with statements different from or beyond the parameters stated by TI for that product or service voids all
express and any implied warranties for the associated TI product or service and is an unfair and deceptive business practice. TI is not
responsible or liable for any such statements.
TI products are not authorized for use in safety-critical applications (such as life support) where a failure of the TI product would reasonably
be expected to cause severe personal injury or death, unless officers of the parties have executed an agreement specifically governing
such use. Buyers represent that they have all necessary expertise in the safety and regulatory ramifications of their applications, and
acknowledge and agree that they are solely responsible for all legal, regulatory and safety-related requirements concerning their products
and any use of TI products in such safety-critical applications, notwithstanding any applications-related information or support that may be
provided by TI. Further, Buyers must fully indemnify TI and its representatives against any damages arising out of the use of TI products in
such safety-critical applications.
TI products are neither designed nor intended for use in military/aerospace applications or environments unless the TI products are
specifically designated by TI as military-grade or "enhanced plastic." Only products designated by TI as military-grade meet military
specifications. Buyers acknowledge and agree that any such use of TI products which TI has not designated as military-grade is solely at
the Buyer's risk, and that they are solely responsible for compliance with all legal and regulatory requirements in connection with such use.
TI products are neither designed nor intended for use in automotive applications or environments unless the specific TI products are
designated by TI as compliant with ISO/TS 16949 requirements. Buyers acknowledge and agree that, if they use any non-designated
products in automotive applications, TI will not be responsible for any failure to meet such requirements.
Following are URLs where you can obtain information on other Texas Instruments products and application solutions:
Products
Amplifiers
Data Converters
DLP® Products
DSP
Clocks and Timers
Interface
Logic
Power Mgmt
Microcontrollers
RFID
RF/IF and ZigBee® Solutions
amplifier.ti.com
dataconverter.ti.com
www.dlp.com
dsp.ti.com
www.ti.com/clocks
interface.ti.com
logic.ti.com
power.ti.com
microcontroller.ti.com
www.ti-rfid.com
www.ti.com/lprf
Applications
Audio
Automotive
Broadband
Digital Control
Medical
Military
Optical Networking
Security
Telephony
Video & Imaging
Wireless
www.ti.com/audio
www.ti.com/automotive
www.ti.com/broadband
www.ti.com/digitalcontrol
www.ti.com/medical
www.ti.com/military
www.ti.com/opticalnetwork
www.ti.com/security
www.ti.com/telephony
www.ti.com/video
www.ti.com/wireless
Mailing Address: Texas Instruments, Post Office Box 655303, Dallas, Texas 75265
Copyright © 2009, Texas Instruments Incorporated
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising