Texas Instruments | Improving Electro-Magnetic Noise Immunity in Serial Communications Systems (Rev. A) | Application notes | Texas Instruments Improving Electro-Magnetic Noise Immunity in Serial Communications Systems (Rev. A) Application notes

Texas Instruments Improving Electro-Magnetic Noise Immunity in Serial Communications Systems (Rev. A) Application notes
Application Report
SNLA108A – July 2008 – Revised April 2013
AN-1881 Improving Electro-Magnetic Noise Immunity in
Serial Communications Systems
.....................................................................................................................................................
ABSTRACT
This application note provides key recommendations for implementing serial communication systems that
exceed IEC immunity test standards. To provide an example of highly reliable serial communications
system implementation and testing, a Texas Instruments DP83640 Ethernet Physical Layer device was
tested for International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) immunity test compliance. Results from these
tests are included for reference.
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Contents
Introduction ..................................................................................................................
Key Recommendations .....................................................................................................
Background: Electromagnetic Noise .....................................................................................
3.1
Discharge and Impulse Noise Sources and Remedies .......................................................
3.2
Static Electromagnetic Field Noise Sources and Remedies .................................................
IEC Test Descriptions ......................................................................................................
4.1
IEC61000-4-2 .......................................................................................................
4.2
IEC61000-4-3 .......................................................................................................
4.3
IEC61000-4-4 .......................................................................................................
4.4
IEC61000-4-5 .......................................................................................................
4.5
IEC61000-4-6 .......................................................................................................
4.6
IEC61000-4-8 .......................................................................................................
Test Demonstration .........................................................................................................
5.1
Test System ........................................................................................................
5.2
Test Results ........................................................................................................
Summary .....................................................................................................................
References ...................................................................................................................
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9
List of Figures
1
Chassis Ground and GDT Implementation .............................................................................. 4
2
Test System Configuration................................................................................................. 7
List of Tables
1
Discharge Device Comparison ............................................................................................ 3
2
Immunity Test Description Summary ..................................................................................... 5
3
Results Summary ........................................................................................................... 8
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1
Introduction
1
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Introduction
Electronic communications devices that operate in environments with a high level of electromagnetic noise
require special consideration and testing to ensure the continuous delivery of uncorrupted data.
Communication devices are susceptible to data interruption and corruption in industrial, automotive,
telecommunication, medical and test lab environments, to name just a few. Demonstrating compliance
with international immunity testing standards helps to ensure robust communications in noisy
electromagnetic environments.
The scope of this document is restricted to communication signals; immunity issues related to AC and DC
power supply signals are not included in this document.
This document is applicable to the following products:
DP83640
DP83630
DP83620
2
DP83849C
DP83849I
DP83849ID
DP83849IF
DP83848C
DP83848I
DP83848YB
DP83848VYB
DP83848M
DP83848T
DP83848H
DP83848J
DP83848K
DP83848Q-Q1
Key Recommendations
Texas Instrument's networking and serial communications components are designed to provide robust
communications in noisy electromagnetic environments. Some of the features that support robust
operation include:
1. Protection against Electro-Static Discharge (ESD) that meets and exceeds industry standards.
2. Robust receive signal common mode noise rejection to reduce susceptibility to external noise on
differential communication signals.
3. Robust power supply noise rejection to reduce susceptibility to external noise originating on power and
ground signals.
In addition to these designed in advantages, key recommendations for designing robust communications
subsystems include:
• Use high quality shielded twisted pair cables to interconnect communications components. For network
implementations, use CAT5E or better cable.
• Provide a chassis ground system that is decoupled from the internal PCB ground.
• Use shielded connectors that are connected to the decoupled chassis ground plane.
• Use isolation transformers that include common mode choking devices on both receive and transmit
signals.
• Where possible, the use of external transient suppression components like ESD diode, Transient
Voltage Suppressor (TVS), or Gas Discharge Tube (GDT) devices on communication signals can
increase immunity to high voltage discharge events.
• Use discrete shielded oscillator devices for generating clock signals rather than crystals connected to
integrated oscillator pins.
• If possible, use higher voltage digital IO signals (3.3 V rather than 2.5 V or 1.8 V) to increase immunity
to noise.
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Background: Electromagnetic Noise
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3
Background: Electromagnetic Noise
Three noise sources that can disrupt the operation of electronic communication systems include: direct
contact high voltage or current discharges, impulse energy induced by strong instantaneous
electromagnetic fields, and strong steady state electric or magnetic fields. All three sources induce
common mode noise into systems, which can disrupt the operation of communication devices.
3.1
Discharge and Impulse Noise Sources and Remedies
Discharge events can occur due to Electro-Static Discharge (ESD), lightning or power source induced
surges. Strong instantaneous impulse fields can be caused by close proximity to equipment that requires
high current during start up (like motors) or by Electro-Magnetic Pulse (EMP) events.
With regard to discharge or impulse noise, communication receivers can experience discrete data
corruption or lose synchronization with transmitting devices, which usually results in higher-level protocols
requesting that data be re-sent. Under worst-case conditions, communication devices can experience
catastrophic failure and cease to function.
In order to improve discharge and impulse immunity in communication systems, using a separate chassis
ground in conjunction with a shielded connector and cable is recommended. Also, using an isolation
transformer with integrated common mode choking devices on both transmit and receive signals can be
beneficial.
Additionally, directly coupling high voltage discharge devices between communication signals and chassis
ground can be beneficial. Traditional discharge devices include Trans-Voltage Suppression (TVS) devices,
discrete ESD diodes, and Gas Discharge Tube (GDT) devices.
TVS devices have the advantage of operating at high current ratings (~100 A). Unfortunately, TVS devices
usually have a load capacitance in the 100 pF - 1000 pF range under normal signal conditions, which can
affect the quality, range, and interoperability of communication signals.
External ESD diode devices are available in discrete and multi-device array configurations. These devices
present a lower capacitive load (~1 pF) but also have lower current ratings (< 30 A). These devices are
suitable for communication signal applications that require extra ESD protection, but are not necessarily
suitable for more demanding environments with surge and fast transient protection requirements.
Both TVS and ESD diode devices share the advantage of having low breakdown voltages. This allows the
designer to choose a breakdown voltage close to the signal voltage used in the communication system.
For example, Ethernet utilizes 5 V differential signals for 10MB/second operation, making the selection of
devices with a 7.5 V breakdown voltage applicable.
Alternatively, GDT devices typically present a very low capacitive load (~1 pF) and can service large
amounts of current (> 5 kA) making them useful for the more demanding surge standards. GDT devices
have the limitation of higher breakdown voltages, starting at 75 V.
In DP83640 demonstration testing, it was found that the use of external suppression devices added value
when testing was performed with unshielded cables. With the addition of GDT devices, it was found that
ESD testing results improved by +/- 4 kV, and surge testing results improved by +/- 2 kV.
For convenience, Table 1 summarizes the characteristics of ESD diodes, TVS devices, and GDT devices.
Figure 1 provides an example circuit diagram utilizing chassis ground and GDT devices.
Table 1. Discharge Device Comparison
Device
Breakdown Voltage
Current Capacity
Capacitive Load
ESD Diodes
No Minimum
< 30 A
~1 pF
TVS Devices
~10 V Min
< 100 A
~1000 pF
GDT Devices
~75 V Min
> 5 kA
~1 pF
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IEC Test Descriptions
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Plane Coupling
Component
Isolation
Transformer
and
Common
Mode Choke
Communication
Component
Connector
Termination
Components
Plane Coupling
Component
System Power/Ground
Planes
GDT's
Chassis Ground
Plane
Figure 1. Chassis Ground and GDT Implementation
3.2
Static Electromagnetic Field Noise Sources and Remedies
Strong electromagnetic fields can be caused by close physical proximity to high power transmission
equipment and signals or by close proximity to high current power cables. With regard to field-induced
noise, common mode signals can interfere with the clocking of internal state machines in devices, which
can result in data corruption. Under worst-case conditions, device lockup can occur requiring an
intervening reset or power cycle of the device.
As is the case with impulse and discharge noise, strong field noise immunity can be increased using a
separate chassis ground in conjunction with shielded connectors and cables. Using isolation transformers
with common mode choking devices can also be beneficial.
The presence of a strong AC field with a frequency that is near a harmonic of the operating frequency of
the communication device can interfere with the internal operation of the device. For example, if a
communication device operates using a 25 MHz oscillator, strong fields with frequencies of 25 MHz, 75
MHz, 125 MHz, and so on, have the potential to interfere with the operation of the device. The
interference can be due to the stimulating field coupling into device I/O signals, including external clock
sources. To help avoid issues due to strong electric fields, it is recommended that external shielded, or
canned, oscillators be used to generate clocks, rather than relying on integrated oscillators utilizing
external crystals. It is also recommended that higher voltage signaling be used for I/O signals, that is, 3 V
rather than 2.5 V or 1.8 V, as higher voltage signals increase noise immunity.
4
IEC Test Descriptions
The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) provides standards to ensure robust operation of
electronic devices under discharge and strong field conditions. These standards are organized
hierarchically, such that high-level generic standards (IEC61000–6) specify the use of more detailed
individual test standards (IEC61000–4). The high-level generic standards also specify stimulus level and
result requirements for groups of individual test standards.
In addition to IEC standards, various other standards exist for specific applications. For example, the
International Telecommunications Union (ITU) has its own set of immunity standards. Similarly, standards
exist for military, security, and other application spaces. For the purpose of this application note, the IEC
standards are referenced because they provide a relatively concise focus that is similar to susceptibility
tests defined in other application based standards.
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IEC Test Descriptions
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The IEC61000-6-1 specification defines test performance requirements for operating in commercial and
light industrial environments, while the IEC61000-6-2 specification defines test performance requirements
for operating in industrial environments. For the purpose of this document, IEC61000-6-2 industrial
performance standards will be discussed.
All IEC tests provide a common method for evaluating and reporting test results, categorized in four ways:
A. The network device continues to operate without data corruption.
B. The network device continues to operate, but some data corruption is experienced during testing.
C. The network device ceases to operate, but can be restarted with operator intervention.
D. The network device ceases to operate and cannot be restarted.
In addition, all IEC tests describe different levels of test stimuli, usually in terms of applied signal voltage
or field strength.
Table 2 provides a brief summary of the test requirements described in the IEC EN61000-6-2 general
industrial immunity standard. For more details, please refer directly to the individual IEC documents.
There are two methods described in these tests for coupling stimuli into equipment: through non-intrusive
coupling, and through a fixture that directly couples stimuli to network signals. Non-intrusive coupling
includes external cable clamping devices and antennae; direct coupling includes Coupling / Decoupling
Network (CDN) devices. The method used depends on the cable type tested as part of the system;
unshielded communications cables may require direct CDN coupling while shielded cables may not.
All of the individual tests enumerated in Table 2 are briefly described below.
Table 2. Immunity Test Description Summary
4.1
Test
Description
Stimulus Level
Passing Criteria
IEC61000-4-2
Electrostatic Discharge
+/- 4 kV direct contact
B
IEC61000-4-3
Electric Field Test
10 V/m @ 80 MHz to 6 GHz
A
IEC61000-4-4
Fast Transient Noise
+/- 1 kV
B
IEC61000-4-5
Surge Induced Noise
+/- 1 kV
B
IEC61000-4-6
Conducted RF noise
10 V rms @ 150 kHz to 80
MHz
A
IEC61000-4-8
Magnetic Field Test
30 A/m @ 30, 50, or 60 Hz
A
IEC61000-4-2
This standard specifies a system’s ability to withstand ESD events.
Conditions are described under which direct or air discharge testing should be performed. For the purpose
of this application note, metallic chassis grounded network connectors were utilized, so the direct coupling
method was required. Applications utilizing all plastic chassis and connectors require air discharge testing.
Specifications are provided for rise time, current, and impedance control of the voltage applied in the
testing. For the purpose of this application note, the procedures that apply to an ungrounded, battery
operated device are utilized, including bleed resistors used to couple the chassis to ground to prevent
charge from accumulating between tests.
Texas Instrument's serial communications devices are designed and tested to withstand ESD energy on a
component level as specified in individual device datasheets. IEC testing is defined for system level
testing, which complements Texas Instrument's component testing.
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Test Demonstration
4.2
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IEC61000-4-3
This standard specifies a system’s ability to operate in environments where strong electric field energy is
present. The frequency spectrum applicable for this test ranges from 80 MHz to 6 GHz. Tests above 1
GHz are limited to specific frequencies at which mobile telephone and radio equipment may be operated.
The IEC Specification describes a non-intrusive configuration for the test environment, including an
antenna-based source for stimulus energy.
Electric field energy is experienced as common mode energy by serial communication devices. TI's
physical layer network devices are designed and tested to withstand common mode energy as specified in
the Ethernet IEEE 802.3 specifications
4.3
IEC61000-4-4
This standard specifies a system’s ability to withstand fast transient bursts of energy. Energy bursts of this
type occur due to local environmental factors, such as large current relay switching in close proximity to
the device being tested.
Test characteristics such as burst frequency and repetition, as well as voltage from the burst generator
under 50 ohm and 1000 ohm load conditions are described in the standard.
Because this application note focuses on communication interface rather than power supply oriented
susceptibility, the sections of the test that focus on I/O standards are applicable. When unshielded
interface cables are utilized, testing is performed using a capacitively coupled clamping device. When
shielded interface cables are used, testing is performed using a capacitively coupled direct connection to
the cable shield.
4.4
IEC61000-4-5
This standard specifies a system’s ability to withstand power surges due to nearby lightning strike induced
transients.
The signal generator used for this test has a source impedance specified at 40 ohms and 2 ohms, and is
designed to meet open and short circuit conditions up to 6 kV and 3000 Amperes.
With regard to communications equipment, testing varies depending on whether unshielded or shielded
cables are used. When using unshielded cables, a transformer coupled CDN fixture is required for directly
injecting surge current into the communication signals. When using shielded cables, the surge is induced
across the cable shield.
4.5
IEC61000-4-6
This standard specifies a system’s ability to operate in environments where EMI energy is present. The
frequency spectrum applicable for this test is from 150 kHz to 80 MHz.
This is a conducted test, which means that direct stimulation of cables through a Couple / Decoupling
Network device (CDN) is required for testing unshielded cables. For shielded cables, a capacitive
clamping device is used to stimulate the cable.
4.6
IEC61000-4-8
This standard specifies a system’s ability to operate in environments where magnetic field energy is
present. The test specifies that 30 Amp / meter magnetic energy be applied at frequencies of 30, 50, or 60
Hz, depending on the intended operating environment of the device. The field is applied using a magnetic
loop antenna.
5
Test Demonstration
For demonstration purposes, the tests described above were performed using a Texas Instruments
DP83640 Precision PHYTER based test system. Tests were performed by AHD LLC, a National Voluntary
Lab Accreditation Program (NVLAP) certified test lab. All tests were performed to the industrial levels and
passing criteria indicated in the IEC61000-6-2 industrial standard.
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Test Demonstration
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5.1
Test System
The test system consisted of an aluminum enclosure that housed a DP83640 physical layer component
based PCB, and a Programmable Logic Device (PLD) based packet generator PCB. Tests were
performed using both shielded and unshielded CAT5 cables. 100 MB per second data was generated in
standard MII mode by the PLD, and looped back through the PHY device and the cable back to the PLD,
fully exercising the PHY component MDI and MII transmit and receive signals (see Figure 2).
The PLD was designed to identify the reception of corrupted packet data. When a corrupted packet was
received, the PLD stopped transmitting for 10 seconds, and the activity LED signal from of the physical
layer device indicated that corrupted packets had been received. Thus, a test passing level A compliance
would operate without interruption, a test passing level B would temporarily halt packet data and resume,
and a test passing level C would require a system reset to resume operation.
Batteries
PLD
Based
Packet
Generator
DP83640
Family
Device
RJ45
Cable with Loop
Back Plug
Aluminum Enclosure
Figure 2. Test System Configuration
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Summary
5.2
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Test Results
The results from testing the DP83640 demonstration system are included below. The system met and
exceeded all IEC61000-6-2 passing criteria when tested with shielded cable.
The system had mixed results when tested with unshielded cable. Consequently, the tests that failed while
using unshielded cable were later investigated in conjunction with board modifications. It was found that
the addition of GDT devices improved unshielded cable discharge test performance by as much as +/- 4
kV overall, and surge test performance by as much as +/- 2 kV.
With regard to strong electromagnetic field oriented testing using unshielded cable, worst case
performance was recorded at 175 MHz. This result was later replicated using direct 175 MHz noise
injection onto the receive signal. It was determined that the strong common mode signal disrupted the
very small (< 1 V) input signal levels used for operating the crystal based integrated device oscillator. By
replacing the external crystal with a shielded external 3.3 V oscillator device, the data corruption issues at
175 MHz were resolved.
Table 3. Results Summary
6
Test
Test Description
EN61000-6-2 Pass
Criteria
Shielded Results
Unshielded Results
IEC61000-4-2
System level ESD test
Test +/- 4 kV to Level B,
recoverable data errors
Exceeded pass criteria,
Passed Level A to +/- 8
kV, no data corruption
Met pass criteria, Level
B to +/- 4 kV levels.
IEC61000-4-3
Radiated Immunity test,
swept from 80 MHz to 1
GHz
Test at 10 V/m signal
levels to Level A, no
data corruption
Met pass criteria, Level
A, no data corruption
across frequency range
Failed at 10 V/m signal
levels, worst case
recorded at 175 MHz
IEC61000-4-4
Fast Transient Burst
Test
Test +/- 1 kV to Level B,
recoverable data errors
Exceeded pass criteria,
Passed Level A to +/-1
kV, Level B to +/-2 kV
Did not meet pass
criteria, Passed Level A
to +/- 500 V
IEC61000-4-5
Transient Surge Test
Test +/- 1 kV to Level B,
recoverable data errors
Exceeded pass criteria,
Passed Level A to +/- 2
kV
Exceeded pass criteria,
Passed Level B +/- 2 kV,
Passed Level A +/- 1 kV
IEC61000-4-6
Conducted susceptibility Test 10 V signal levels
test using 10 V signals
to Level A, no data
from 150 kHz to 80 MHz corruption
Met pass criteria,
Passed Level A at 10 V
signal levels, no data
corruption
Did not meet pass
criteria, but did pass
Level A at 3 V signal
levels
IEC61000-4-8
Radiated susceptibility
tested with 50 Hz
magnetic field
Met pass criteria, Level
A, no data corruption
Met pass criteria, Level
A, no data corruption
Test 30 A/m field to
Level A, no data
corruption
Summary
This application note provided key recommendations for implementing serial communication systems that
exceed IEC immunity test standards. IEC standards were described that test for immunity to
electromagnetic noise, produced through discharge and surge events, and through strong electromagnetic
fields.
To provide an example of highly reliable serial communications system implementation and testing, results
from tests utilizing a Texas Instruments DP83640 Ethernet Physical Layer device were provided. This
testing showed that while using shielded cable helps communication systems to meet and exceed
immunity standards, other options are available for improving the immunity of systems using unshielded
cable. These options include the use of Gas Discharge Tube devices on communication signals to
improve discharge immunity and the use of shielded oscillator devices as clock sources for communication
devices.
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References
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7
References
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
http://www.ti.com/product/DP83640
IEC EN61000-6-2, (2005) Generic standards – Immunity for industrial environments, second edition.
International Electrotechnical Commission, Geneva Switzerland.
IEC EN61000-4-2, (2000) Testing and measurement techniques – Electrostatic discharge immunity
test, edition 1.2. International Electrotechnical Commission, Geneva Switzerland.
IEC EN61000-4-3, (2006) Testing and measurement techniques – Radiated, radio-frequency,
electromagnetic field immunity test, third edition. International Electrotechnical Commission, Geneva
Switzerland.
IEC EN61000-4-4, (2004) Testing and measurement techniques – Electrical fast transient/burst
immunity test, second edition. International Electrotechnical Commission, Geneva Switzerland.
IEC EN61000-4-5, (2005) Testing and measurement techniques – Surge immunity test, second edition.
International Electrotechnical Commission, Geneva Switzerland.
IEC EN61000-4-6, (2006) Testing and measurement techniques – Immunity to conducted
disturbances, induced by radio-frequency fields, edition 2.2. International Electrotechnical Commission,
Geneva Switzerland.
IEC EN61000-4-8, (2001) Testing and measurement techniques – Power frequency magnetic field
immunity test, edition 1.1. International Electrotechnical Commission, Geneva Switzerland.
AHD LLC, a National Voluntary Lab Accreditation Program (NVLAP)
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