Texas Instruments | Extend HDMI Cable Reach Using DS16EV5110A, DS22EV5110, & DS34RT5110 Equalizers (Rev. B) | Application notes | Texas Instruments Extend HDMI Cable Reach Using DS16EV5110A, DS22EV5110, & DS34RT5110 Equalizers (Rev. B) Application notes

Texas Instruments Extend HDMI Cable Reach Using DS16EV5110A, DS22EV5110, & DS34RT5110 Equalizers (Rev. B) Application notes
Application Report
SNLA095B – April 2007 – Revised April 2013
AN-1613 Extending HDMI Cable Reach Using TI's
DS16EV5110A, DS22EV5110 and DS34RT5110 Equalizers
.....................................................................................................................................................
ABSTRACT
The DS16EV5110A, DS22EV5110, and DS34RT5110 provide signal conditioning features to greatly
extend the reach of the cable in HDMI or DVI applications. Understanding the interconnect parameters
that has been selected will provide the necessary information to set the correct signal conditioning settings
and then yield the maximum reach with the lowest jitter. The DS34RT5110 is unique in that it can be used
in multiple hop applications.
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2
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5
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7
Contents
Theory and Purpose ........................................................................................................ 3
Cable Attenuation Theory .................................................................................................. 3
Cable Equalization and Reclocking ....................................................................................... 4
HDMI Equalizer Features .................................................................................................. 7
Optimizing the Performance of the Equalizer ........................................................................... 8
Cable and Connector Selection ........................................................................................... 9
Board Design ............................................................................................................... 11
List of Figures
1
Eye Diagram After 25m 28 AWG DVI Cable (1.65 Gbps) ............................................................. 3
2
Output Eye Diagram of DS16EV5110A w/ 25m 28 AWG DVI Cable (1.65 Gbps) ................................. 3
3
Eye Diagram After 5m 28 AWG DVI Cable (1.65Gbps) ............................................................... 3
4
Eye Diagram After 10m 28 AWG DVI Cable (1.65Gbps) .............................................................. 3
5
Transmission Loss of 3-, 10- and 20-Meter DVI Cables (28 AWG). Vertical lines drawn at 720p/1080i,
1080p60, and Deep Color 1080p60. ..................................................................................... 4
6
Simplified Test Setup as a Single Repeater ............................................................................. 5
7
Eye Diagram at TPA (2.25 Gbps)......................................................................................... 5
8
Eye Diagram at TPB (2.25 Gbps, Cable A = 25m 28 AWG HDMI) .................................................. 5
9
Eye Diagram at TPC w/ EQ Only (2.25 Gbps, Cable A = 25m 28 AWG HDMI)
10
Eye Diagram at TPD (2.25 Gbps, Cable A = 25m 28 AWG HDMI) .................................................. 5
11
Eye Diagram at TPD w/ DE on (2.25 Gbps, Cable A = 25m 28 AWG HDMI) ...................................... 6
12
Eye Diagram at TPE w/ DE on (2.25 Gbps, Cable A = 25m, and Cable B = 7.5m 28 AWG HDMI)............. 6
13
Multi-hop System (1.5 Gbps — 1080p, Total Cable Reach = 100m CAT6)
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15
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19
...................................
........................................
Complex HDMI Matrix Switch System ...................................................................................
2 DS16EV5110A in a DVI Dual Link Application .......................................................................
2 DS34RT511 in a DVI Dual Link Application ...........................................................................
Transmission Loss of 20-Meter DVI Cable, 15-, 20- and 25-Meter CAT5 Cables ................................
DS16EV5110A Evaluation Board Layout (with DVI Connectors) – top side.......................................
DS16EV5110A Evaluation Board Layout (with DVI Connectors) – Bottom Side .................................
5
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13
List of Tables
1
Cable Reach at Different Data Rates and Video Formats ............................................................. 6
All trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
SNLA095B – April 2007 – Revised April 2013
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AN-1613 Extending HDMI Cable Reach Using TI's DS16EV5110A,
DS22EV5110 and DS34RT5110 Equalizers
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1
www.ti.com
2
2
Feature List .................................................................................................................. 8
3
Common Resolutions With TMDS Data Rates and Frequencies for Equalization ................................. 9
4
EQ Gain Control Table ..................................................................................................... 9
AN-1613 Extending HDMI Cable Reach Using TI's DS16EV5110A,
DS22EV5110 and DS34RT5110 Equalizers
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SNLA095B – April 2007 – Revised April 2013
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Theory and Purpose
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1
Theory and Purpose
DVI and HDMI are originally intended to deliver video and data over shorter distances, where the effects
of cable losses would have little to negligible effect. However, there are many applications requiring longer
cable lengths, such as sending computer graphics to remote displays and routing video throughout home
theaters and entertainment venues. Display resolutions, refresh rates and color depths continue to
increase and so do the required data rates, at 1.65 Gbps for DVI 1.0 and upto 3.4 Gbps for HDMI 1.3a.
Unfortunately, the cables that facilitate this high bandwidth data transfer also cause signal degradation in
the form of attenuation, jitter, skew, and crosstalk, which limit the reach between source and display and
creates screen flicker, noise sparkles, and audio distortion.
Figure 1. Eye Diagram After 25m 28 AWG DVI Cable
(1.65 Gbps)
2
Figure 2. Output Eye Diagram of DS16EV5110A
w/ 25m 28 AWG DVI Cable (1.65 Gbps)
Cable Attenuation Theory
Cable equalizers are used to offset the signal degradation caused by frequency dispersion and skin effect
losses in the cables by equalization. These losses are highly dependent on the quality of the cable
construction and worsen with the use of thinner wires, mismatched wire lengths or twist ratios, poor
dielectric insulation or spacing, and poor shielding. In addition to other negative effects such as crosstalk,
skew, and jitter, these cables create attenuation that reduces the amplitude of the signal, decreases the
slope of the edges, and separates or disperses the high frequency signal into its individual components.
The result is a closing of the “eye” of the differential signal, decreasing video quality, and increasing bit
error rate resolutions, refresh rates and color depths continue to increase and so do the required data
rates, at 1.65 Gbps for DVI 1.0 and upto 3.4 Gbps for HDMI 1.3a. Unfortunately, the cables that facilitate
this high bandwidth data transfer also cause signal degradation in the form of attenuation, jitter, skew, and
crosstalk, which limit the reach between source and display and creates screen flicker, noise sparkles,
and audio distortion.
Total jitter (Tj) is comprised of both deterministic jitter (Dj) and random jitter (Rj). The gain curves of the
DS16EV5110A, DS22EV5110 and DS34RT5110 are designed to match the inverse of the cable’s
transmission losses over frequency (Figure 5 and Figure 17), counteracting deterministic jitter (Dj). Since
random jitter is also very important, these equalizers are designed with the right gain, bandwidth, and
noise generation combination to provide best-in-class random jitter (3ps rms) for optimum total
performance.
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Cable Equalization and Reclocking
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Figure 3. Eye Diagram After 5m 28 AWG DVI Cable
(1.65Gbps)
Figure 4. Eye Diagram After 10m 28 AWG DVI Cable
(1.65Gbps)
Figure 5. Transmission Loss of 3-, 10- and 20-Meter DVI Cables (28 AWG). Vertical lines drawn at 720p/1080i,
1080p60, and Deep Color 1080p60.
3
Cable Equalization and Reclocking
TIs DS16EV5110A, DS22EV5110 and DS34RT5110 HDMI equalizers are designed to counter many of
the negative effects caused by using longer length cables for video transmission (Figure 1 and Figure 8).
In effect, the equalizer of the devices re-opens the eye of the differential signal (Figure 2 and Figure 9) by
applying a high-pass filter and gain curve inversely proportional to the cable’s attenuation curve, which is
primarily comprised of skin effect and dielectric losses. The DS16EV5110A, DS22EV5110 and
DS34RT5110 can equalize greater than 40 meters of 24 AWG DVI or HDMI cable at the full 1.65 Gbps
and over 25 meters using the low cost 28 AWG version of these cables. On the high end of the resolution
range, the DS16EV5110A, DS22EV5110 and DS34RT5110 can support greater than 30 meters of deep
color depth HDMI (12 bits per color, 36 bits per pixel) at 2.25 Gbps using 24 AWG cable. Greater than 20
meters of standard CAT5-based cabling can also be used, which is becoming more popular for video
distribution due to its low cost, large existing installation base, and ease of new cable routing through
conduits.
4
AN-1613 Extending HDMI Cable Reach Using TI's DS16EV5110A,
DS22EV5110 and DS34RT5110 Equalizers
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Cable Equalization and Reclocking
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In addition to the equalization feature, the DS22EV5110 and DS34RT5110 also offer reclocking and
output de-emphasis features. The reclocker consists of a PLL for the TMDS clock channel, and three
clock and data recovery (CDR) circuits for the TMDS data channels. The PLL regenerates a low jitter
sampling clock for the TMDS clock channel and also for the CDR units in the TMDS data channels. Each
CDR aligns the sampling clock edges by digitally interpolating the clock from PLL of the TMDS clock
channel. Thus, the output total jitter is extremely low over the supported data rates (Figure 10). With the
de-emphasis driver (Figure 11), additional lengths of cables or FR4 traces can be driven by the output
(Figure 12).
The DS34RT5110 reclocking equalizer supports the total throughput of 10.2 Gbps (3 x 3.4 Gbps),
enabling 48-bit deep color depth or higher resolution / higher refresh rate; and is optimized for DVI / HDMI
repeater and multi-hop applications. A total of 30 meters of 28 AWG HDMI cable can be reached at 10.2
Gbps; or 100 meters of CAT6 cable can be achieved at 1.5 Gbps (1080p 8-bit color) with multi-hop
application (Figure 13). The multi-hop application is widely used for home theater and professional studio
systems. The DS34RT5110 is also idea to equalize the long cable reach requirement, and clean the
system jitter due to the complexity of PCB routing for the complex security system with large matrix HDMI
switches as shown in Figure 14.
The DS22EV5110 Super Equalizer is a 6.75 Gbps (3 x 2.25 Gbps) extended reach equalizer with the
reclocker and output de-emphasis. A total of 37 meters of 28 AWG HDMI cable can be supported at 6.75
Gbps (1080p 12-bit deep color).
DS22EV5110
DS34RT5110
Pattern
Generator
EQ
HDMI Cable A
Coax
TPA
TPB
RT
TPC
HDMI Cable B
TPD
Coax
Jitter
Test
Instrument
TPE
Figure 6. Simplified Test Setup as a Single Repeater
Figure 7. Eye Diagram at TPA
(2.25 Gbps)
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Figure 8. Eye Diagram at TPB
(2.25 Gbps, Cable A = 25m 28 AWG HDMI)
AN-1613 Extending HDMI Cable Reach Using TI's DS16EV5110A,
DS22EV5110 and DS34RT5110 Equalizers
Copyright © 2007–2013, Texas Instruments Incorporated
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Cable Equalization and Reclocking
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Figure 9. Eye Diagram at TPC w/ EQ Only
(2.25 Gbps, Cable A = 25m 28 AWG HDMI)
Figure 10. Eye Diagram at TPD
(2.25 Gbps, Cable A = 25m 28 AWG HDMI)
Figure 11. Eye Diagram at TPD w/ DE on
(2.25 Gbps, Cable A = 25m 28 AWG HDMI)
Figure 12. Eye Diagram at TPE w/ DE on
(2.25 Gbps, Cable A = 25m, and Cable B = 7.5m 28
AWG HDMI)
Table 1. Cable Reach at Different Data Rates and Video Formats
DS16EV5110A
DS22EV5110 / DS34RT5110
HDMI
Cable A
(28 AWG)
HDMI
Cable B
(28 AWG)
Total
Cable
Length
(28 AWG)
HDMI
Cable A
(28 AWG)
HDMI
Cable B
(28 AWG)
Total
Cable
Length
(28 AWG)
Video
Format
Data Rate
(Per Channel)
1080i / 720p
750 Mbps
> 50m
—
> 50m
> 60m
> 15m
> 75m
1080p 8-bit Color
1.65 Gbps
> 25m
—
> 25m
> 40m
> 10m
> 50m
1080p 12-bit Color
2.25 Gbps
> 20m
—
> 20m
> 30m
> 7m
> 37m
> 1080p 16-bit Color
3.4 Gbps (DS34RT5110
Only)
—
—
—
> 25m
> 5m
> 30m
6
AN-1613 Extending HDMI Cable Reach Using TI's DS16EV5110A,
DS22EV5110 and DS34RT5110 Equalizers
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HDMI Equalizer Features
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30m CAT6 Cable
HDMI Source
HOP 1
SER/A/V Decoder
DS34RT5110
30m CAT6 Cable
Total of 100m CAT6 Cables Reached
(1.5 Gbps 1080p)
HOP 2
DS34RT5110
30m CAT6 Cable
10m CAT6 Cable
HDMI Sink
Final HOP
DES/Display
Processor
DS34RT5110
Figure 13. Multi-hop System (1.5 Gbps — 1080p, Total Cable Reach = 100m CAT6)
Source
Sink
DS34RT5110
DS34RT5110
Source
Sink
DS34RT5110
DS34RT5110
DVI / HDMI Matrix Switch
DS34RT5110
DS34RT5110
Source
Sink
Figure 14. Complex HDMI Matrix Switch System
4
HDMI Equalizer Features
Some of the other features of the TI's HDMI Equalizers include programmability configuration through
SMBus interface (DS16EV5110A only), settable equalization or de-emphasis control for optimized cable
reach, robust ESD protection, and the ability to parallel two equalizers (Figure 15 and Figure 16) for DVI
dual link applications. For detailed information, see Table 2.
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Optimizing the Performance of the Equalizer
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Table 2. Feature List
Description
DS16EV5110A
DS22EV5110
DS34RT5110
HDMI Equalizer
HDMI Super Equalizer
HDMI Reclocking Equalizer
Applications
Sink
Source, Sink, Repeater
Source, Sink, Multi-hop
Repeater
DVI Applications
Single / Dual Link
Single Link
Single / Dual Link
Max Data Rate Per Channel
(Video Format)
2.25 Gbps
(1080p 12-bit Color)
2.25 Gbps
(1080p 12-bit Color)
3.4 Gbps
(1080p 16-bit Color)
Standard Support
HDMI v1.3a / DVI 1.0
HDMI v1.3a / DVI 1.0
HDMI v1.3a / DVI 1.0
Max Cable Reach
Long
Very Long
Extremely Long w/ Multi-hop
Configuration
Pin, SMBus
Pin
Pin
Equalization
8-level Settable
8-level Settable
8-level Settable
De-Emphasis
—
4-level Settable
4-level Settable
Retiming
—
PLL / CDR
PLL / CDR
VOD
1000 mVpp
1000 mVpp – 2000 mVpp
1000 mVpp – 2000 mVpp
Output Status
Signal Detect
Signal Detect / Lock
Signal Detect / Lock
ESD Protection
> 6 kV HBM
> 8 kV HBM
> 8 kV HBM
MODE = 1
D0
D0
D0
D0
D1
D1
D1
D1
DS16EV5110A
D2
DS34RT5110
D2
D2
CLK
CS
SD
D2
CLK
EN
CLK
MODE = 0 (Default)
EN
D3
SD
CS
D3
CLK
DS16EV5110A
D3
D5
D5
CLK
D3
DS34RT5110
D4
D4
D5
D5
CLK
Figure 15. 2 DS16EV5110A in a DVI Dual Link
Application
5
CLK
D4
D4
Figure 16. 2 DS34RT511 in a DVI Dual Link Application
Optimizing the Performance of the Equalizer
The gain setting can be configured using the SMBus interface (DS16EV5110A only) or the three external
pins provided. Two of these pins can be permanently strapped if you wish to use a simple high or low
setting that captures the majority of the equalizer’s gain curve, binary b‘100’ for < 20 meters and b’110’ for
> 20 meters (Table 4). Our evaluation boards use a dial version of a 3-bit dip switch with eight settings for
easy manual adjustment and visual tuning of equalizer gain.
Since cable attenuation increases with frequency, the equalizers' gain should be set at your highest
supported resolution (Figure 5 and Figure 17). Table 3 lists some common resolutions and the associated
frequency of interest for equalization. Notice that this frequency is half the speed of the data rate, which is
created by a worst case 1010 data pattern. Table 4 shows the equalizers' gain for three key frequencies
and illustrates how the gain curves of these equalizers are sloped to automatically provide less gain for
the lower resolutions using the same cable. Since the equalizers will handle the lower resolutions
automatically, you will not need to change gain settings once you’ve established the correct gain setting
for your cable. Therefore, this procedure needs to be done only once for any given cable installation.
8
AN-1613 Extending HDMI Cable Reach Using TI's DS16EV5110A,
DS22EV5110 and DS34RT5110 Equalizers
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Cable and Connector Selection
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For example, if your attenuation is 30dB based on 40 meters of 24 AWG DVI cable and a bit rate of
1.65Gbps, then the boost setting should be set close to the maximum of 30dB (b’111’). However, if you
change the cable to a 20 meter length and the attenuation drops to 21dB, you should change your boost
setting to reflect this with an equalization setting closer to 21dB (b’011’). Although your new 20 meter
cable length will still be supported by the same 30dB setting that was used for the 40 meter length cable,
the lower 21dB setting is preferred as it will limit some of the gain at the higher frequencies, which will
improve jitter and help reduce noise and crosstalk.
Deterministic jitter is minimized when the skin effect and dielectric losses of the cable are neither underequalized nor over-equalized by the equalizers. The most accurate method for determining the proper
setting is to use a communication analyzer which separates the deterministic jitter and random jitter to
specified Bit Error Rate (BER), and find a setting which minimizes the deterministic jitter. Another method
is to use the histogram function on a high bandwidth oscilloscope, and find a setting which minimizes the
total jitter. Since many labs are not outfitted with this test equipment, a simple visual test using some
demanding resolutions like those from HD-DVD Players, computers and PS3 game consoles can often be
adequate.
Table 3. Common Resolutions With TMDS Data Rates and Frequencies for Equalization
Standard
Resolution
TMDS data rate
Frequency to Equalize
640 x 480
252 Mbps
126 MHz
SVGA
800 x 600
400 Mbps
200 MHz
XGA
1024 x 768
650 Mbps
325 MHz
720p 60fps HDTV
1280 x 720
742.5 Mbps
371.25 MHz
1080i 30fps HDTV
1920 x 1080
742.5 Mbps
371.25 MHz
SXGA
1280 x 1024
1080 Mbps
540 MHz
1080p 60fps HDTV
1920 x 1080
1485 Mbps
742.5 MHz
UXGA
1600 x 1200
1620 Mbps
810 MHz
—
1650 Mbps
825 MHz
12-bit Deep Color 1080p 60fps HDTV
1920 x 1080
2250 Mbps
1125 MHz
16-bit Deep Color 1080p 60fps HDTV
1920 x 1080
3000 Mbps
1500 MHz
—
3400 Mbps
1700 MHz
VGA
DVI1.0/HDMI 1.2a Max
HDMI 1.3a Max
Table 4. EQ Gain Control Table
6
Equalizing at
825 MHz / 1.65Gbps
(DS16EV5110A)
Equalizing at
1.125 GHz / 2.25Gbps
(DS22EV5110 and
DS34RT5110)
BST[2:0] / EQ [2:0]
b’xxx’
Equalizing at
375 MHz / 750 Mbps
(DS16EV5110A)
Equalizing at
1.7 GHz / 3.4 Gbps
(DS34RT5110)
0 0 0 (Default)
5 dB
9 dB
0 dB
0 dB
001
7 dB
14 dB
12 dB
10 dB
010
10 dB
18 dB
18 dB
16 dB
011
12 dB
21 dB
21 dB
19 dB
100
14 dB
24 dB
24 dB
23 dB
101
16 dB
26 dB
26 dB
25 dB
110
18 dB
28 dB
28 dB
26 dB
111
19 dB
30 dB
30 dB
27 dB
Cable and Connector Selection
Signal degradation is the result of skin effect losses, noise injection from inadequate shielding, impedance
mismatches, unequal wire distances, dielectric spacing, and composition. The DS16EV5110A,
DS22EV5110 and DS34RT5110 are designed to improve the performance of systems that use longer
distances of low cost cables. However, if you want to maximize overall signal quality and cable reach, we
recommend using superior quality cables and connectors with thicker gauge wires (22 AWG is best, 28
AWG is most common), minimize excessive cabling by using the most direct path possible, and reduce
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Cable and Connector Selection
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return loss due to impedance mismatches and reflections by reducing connectors, adapters, solder joints
and couplers. Cables should be routed to avoid noisy grounds, heavy EMI environments, and bends or
loops in the cables. The DS16EV5110A, DS22EV5110 and DS34RT5110 are designed to equalize
deterministic jitter and attenuation and will not compensate for perturbations from noise injection and
random spikes. This is especially important if using lower cost cabling such as unshielded CAT5
(Figure 17).
There really is no standard for extended reach DVI / HDMI cable, or CAT5/5e/6/6a/7 cable for DVI / HDMI
application. Performance can vary dramatically since each manufacturer may be targeting different
customers, ranging from lowest cost to highest performance. Each manufacturer designs their cables and
connectors using cost versus performance tradeoffs such as wire thickness and composition, dielectric
composition and spacing, skew/length accuracy between wires and pairs, shielding of pairs and cables,
etc.
Unfortunately, some trade-offs can’t be avoided. For example, in order to achieve tight skew tolerances,
each wire and pair must be closely matched in length. DVI and Category 1 HDMI cables allow only 151
psec (0.25 Tbit) of intra-pair skew and 2.42 nsec (0.4 Tpixel) of inter-pair skew. Category 2 HDMI cables
have even more stringent requirements with 111 psec of allowable intra-pair skew and only 1.78 nsec of
allowable inter-pair skew. This necessitates matched twist ratios for each TMDS twisted pair, but matching
twist ratios also increases capacitance between pairs and can increase crosstalk dramatically. DVI and
HDMI cables combat this effect by using shielding around every twisted pair, and even more shielding
around the entire cable to help reject noise from being injected into the cable. The tight tolerances,
additional shielding, and intricate connectors result in a more expensive cable.
The most prevalent negatives of DVI and HDMI cabling are related to their bulk and cost. In an effort to
reduce cost and simplify cable routing, CAT5 and its variants are gaining in popularity. Like DVI and HDMI
cabling, there is no standard performance for basic CAT5 cabling and performance can vary greatly.
Unlike DVI and HDMI cabling, CAT5 contains no shielding to reduce crosstalk and noise (Figure 17) and
is much more lenient when it comes to impedance variations and skew due to mismatched lengths and
manufacturing tolerances. In Figure 17, the vertical lines are drawn at 720p/1080i, 1080p60, and Deep
Color 1080p60; the intersection of the line and curve at the highest resolution used will identify the
optimum equalizer gain setting. The lack of shielding on CAT5 cabling results in additional noise and
crosstalk. Please note that the bottom trace is for the 28 AWG DVI Cable.
Figure 17. Transmission Loss of 20-Meter DVI Cable, 15-, 20- and 25-Meter CAT5 Cables
10
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Board Design
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In general, the higher the category, the better the cable. As the category increases from CAT5 (100 MHz),
CAT5e (100 MHz with far end inter-pair crosstalk specs), CAT6 (250 MHz), CAT6a (500 MHz with cable
crosstalk specs), and CAT7 (600 MHz), the quality of the cables improve to reduce attenuation, crosstalk,
return loss, and noise rejection. Thicker gauge wiring, tighter manufacturing specifications, and improved
shielding improve cable performance - but these changes also increase the price of the cables. System
performance and cost requirements will determine the appropriate cable type and performance for each
application.
CAT7 is closest to DVI and HDMI cables since it is generally designed with shielding around each pair
and around the entire cable to meet the very demanding requirements, but installation can be
cumbersome and expensive. The shielded connectors used with CAT7 can be backwards compatible to
the RJ45 and have additional pins for grounding the cable’s shields.
CAT6a is the next best performer and is easier to field terminate than CAT7, with higher bandwidth
requirements than CAT5e and CAT6 and limitations on alien (cable) crosstalk which almost guarantees
the use of shielding. This is a good choice for running your high speed TMDS lines over standard CAT
cabling. Keep in mind that the connectors you use must also be rated for the highest category of cable
you use.
Some manufacturers, such as Belden, have CAT cabling designed for low skew with closely matched wire
lengths and cables with bonded twisted pairs which ensure that the spacing in each twisted pair remains
constant throughout the cable, even when bent during installation and routing. This can be very helpful in
combating crosstalk, return loss and noise.
Regardless of whether it’s CATx, DVI, or HDMI cabling, if the twisted pairs are identical in composition
and tolerances for thickness, spacing, twists, and dielectric, then the attenuation curves and deterministic
jitter will be similar and the DS16EV5110A, DS22EV5110 and DS34RT5110 will help correct either cable.
However, lack of shielding and wide tolerances inherent in CAT5 cabling will show up as increased
crosstalk, noise, return loss and random jitter that cannot be equalized out.
Lower speed CAT5 or CAT5e cabling can be used for the second cable containing the control signals
such as DDC, hot plug detect, +5V, CEC, and ground.
7
Board Design
The DS16EV5110A, DS22EV5110 and DS34RT5110 are packaged to provide easy alignment and pass
through for both DVI and HDMI connectors. Since impedance changes cause reflections, make sure to
keep the high speed TMDS lines as close to the connectors as possible, allowing any reflections to settle
out quickly. Care must also be taken to ensure that all the traces between the TMDS pins and the
connectors are kept equal to reduce skew (Figure 18 and Figure 19).
The DS16EV5110A, DS22EV5110 and DS34RT5110 are packaged in the LLP-48 package, which has a
large thermal pad on the underside and has excellent power dissipation properties. Operation is
guaranteed with system ambient temperatures up to 70 °C. Several small vias can be used to connect this
thermal pad to additional copper on the bottom side of the board for additional heat dissipation (Figure 18
and Figure 19). For additional information on the LLP package, see AN-1187.
Since noise rejection is very important in this application, using an LDO regulator with ceramic output
capacitors is recommended for superior noise and load transient performance.
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Board Design
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Figure 18. DS16EV5110A Evaluation Board Layout
(with DVI Connectors) – top side
12
AN-1613 Extending HDMI Cable Reach Using TI's DS16EV5110A,
DS22EV5110 and DS34RT5110 Equalizers
Copyright © 2007–2013, Texas Instruments Incorporated
SNLA095B – April 2007 – Revised April 2013
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Board Design
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Figure 19. DS16EV5110A Evaluation Board Layout
(with DVI Connectors) – Bottom Side
SNLA095B – April 2007 – Revised April 2013
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AN-1613 Extending HDMI Cable Reach Using TI's DS16EV5110A,
DS22EV5110 and DS34RT5110 Equalizers
Copyright © 2007–2013, Texas Instruments Incorporated
13
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