Texas Instruments | DRV10983EVM-TB Target Board Programming | Application notes | Texas Instruments DRV10983EVM-TB Target Board Programming Application notes

Texas Instruments DRV10983EVM-TB Target Board Programming Application notes
Application Report
SLVUAA5 – October 2014
Programming Guide for the DRV10983
ABSTRACT
This guide assists the user in programming the DRV10983 whether through the TI programming socket or
a custom solution. The following procedures aid in creating a system for programming prototype or
production devices. Figure 1 shows the general block diagram for the DRV10983. Standard I2C is used to
communicate with the device to read and write values to the registers.
EEPROM
eeWrite
I2C
DRV10983
Power Cycle
or eeRefresh
Registers
Logic Core
Motor
Figure 1. Basic Block Diagram of DRV10983
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Contents
Introduction ................................................................................................................... 2
Using I2C to Communicate With the DRV10983 ......................................................................... 4
2.1
Writing to a Register ................................................................................................ 4
2.2
Writing the Registers to EEPROM................................................................................ 5
2.3
Reading the Registers ............................................................................................. 6
Using the Hardware and Software......................................................................................... 8
3.1
Download the Software for the LaunchPad ..................................................................... 8
3.2
Hooking Up the Hardware ......................................................................................... 8
3.3
Modifying the Software for Custom Register Values ........................................................... 8
3.4
Running the Project ................................................................................................ 9
Different Methods of Programming ...................................................................................... 10
4.1
Pre-Soldering ...................................................................................................... 10
4.2
Post-Soldering .................................................................................................... 10
Summary ................................................................................................................... 11
Schematic ................................................................................................................... 12
Bill of Materials ............................................................................................................. 13
List of Figures
1
Basic Block Diagram of DRV10983 ....................................................................................... 1
2
Flow Chart of the Programming Process ................................................................................. 2
3
Communication Example With PC, MSP430, and Programming Socket
4
5
6
7
............................................
I C Command Chain for Enabling Sidata Bit .............................................................................
I2C Command Chain for Setting a Register ..............................................................................
I2C Waveform of Writing to a Register ....................................................................................
I2C Command Chain for Writing to EEPROM ............................................................................
2
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4
4
4
5
1
Introduction
1
www.ti.com
8
I C Command Chain for Refreshing the Registers ...................................................................... 6
9
I2C Command Chain for Reading a Register ............................................................................. 6
10
I2C Waveform of Reading a Register...................................................................................... 7
11
Hardware Setup of the MSP430 and Programming Socket............................................................ 8
12
Example Register Settings Entered into the Programming Tools Code .............................................. 9
13
Flowchart Specific to Programming ICs With the LaunchPad and Socket ........................................... 9
14
General Configuration Methods .......................................................................................... 11
15
Example Circuit for Bed of Nails Tester ................................................................................. 11
16
Schematic of the Programming Socket
2
.................................................................................
12
Introduction
To program this device, the user should first load the register values. When the registers have the desired
values in them, setting the eeWrite bit writes them into EEPROM. For this process, use any controller or
processor communicating with the DRV10983. This guide uses an external microcontroller (MCU), but the
user could use a MCU already soldered onto the final product or a bulk programming tool connected to
many ICs at the same time.
Figure 2 shows the general process for configuring these parts for their final application. It is important to
have the correct register values to configure the DRV10983 to drive the specific motor in the application. If
these values are not known, refer to the tuning guide (SLOU395) to find the optimized register settings.
Use the EVM and tuning guide to obtain
the best parameters
for the specific motor
Save the
parameters and
copy them into the
programming
tools code
Connect the
hardware
Load the register
values by I2C into
the DRV10983
device
Repeat
for each
IC or batch
of ICs
Write the register
values into
EEPROM
Figure 2. Flow Chart of the Programming Process
Code Composer Studio is a trademark of Texas Instruments.
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Introduction
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Figure 3 shows the devices used when creating this guide. This setup is referenced throughout the
document as an example. A PC is used to load the firmware onto a MSP430G2553 LaunchPad through
USB. After the firmware is loaded, the PC is only used as a USB power supply. Any 5-V supply works to
power the LaunchPad. The provided firmware configures the MSP430 to program a DRV10983 IC through
I2C communication. Each DRV10983 is easily connected to the necessary LaunchPad pins by the
programming socket tool.
Find the programming socket tool, MSP430G2553 LaunchPad, DRV10983 ICs, and the Code Composer
Studio™ (CCS) software project all on www.ti.com. Note that the programming socket tool does not come
with any ICs. Order samples from www.ti.com for the DRV10983.
If using a MSP430 LaunchPad, ensure it is setup properly. For details, refer to the user's guide for the
LaunchPad (SLAU318). Verify all jumpers are configured as shown in Figure 3. On J3, all jumpers are in
place. On J5, only the jumper for P1.0 is in place. Remove the jumper for P1.6.
DRV10983
or
DRV10975
USB
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
I2C
Figure 3. Communication Example With PC, MSP430, and Programming Socket
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Using I2C to Communicate With the DRV10983
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Using I2C to Communicate With the DRV10983
2
The DRV10983 uses the standard I2C protocol and is the slave device in the communicating pair. Its
address is 1010 010. When a master addresses the part, it sends 8 bits, the address and one bit
specifying a write (0) or read (1). The master sends 1010 0100 (0xA4) for write and 1010 0101 (0xA5) for
read.
2.1
Writing to a Register
Send the following basic command chains (see Figure 4 and Figure 5) from the master to the slave to
program the register settings. The first command enables the Sidata bit. If this bit is not enabled, the
register values cannot change. Set the Sidata bit to '1' one time before setting all of the register values.
Enable the
Sidata bit
to enable writing to
the registers
I2C_start
I2C_start
I2C_write(0xA4)
I2C_write(0xA4)
I2C_write(register address 0x03)
I2C_write(register address 0x??)
I2C_write(register data 0x40)
I2C_write(register data 0x??)
I2C_stop
I2C_stop
Figure 4. I2C Command Chain for Enabling Sidata Bit
START
WRITE
I2C ADDRESS + WRITE
0xA4
Repeat
for all 12
registers
Figure 5. I2C Command Chain for Setting a Register
WRITE
REGISTER ADDRESS
0x20
WRITE
REGISTER DATA
0x39
STOP
Figure 6. I2C Waveform of Writing to a Register
Figure 6 shows the waveforms for writing the value 0x39 to register 0x20.
Repeat those steps as many times as needed until all 12 registers (0x20 through 0x2B) are loaded with
the correct values. For specific information on the registers, see the data sheet (SLVSCP6). The logic core
runs the motor based on the register values so it is not necessary to write the register values to EEPROM.
However, writing the values to EEPROM saves the parameters and auto loads them after a power cycle.
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Using I2C to Communicate With the DRV10983
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2.2
Writing the Registers to EEPROM
After the registers are loaded, the next step is to write them to EEPROM so the device can maintain those
settings. Figure 7 describes the command chain for writing to EEPROM. First, enter the program key
(0xB6) in the device control register (0x02), and then immediately after, set the eeWrite bit to 1 (0x50) in
the EEPROM control register (0x03). If the eeWrite bit is not set directly after the program key is entered,
the program key will be reset.
The programming time is about 24 ms, and when finished, the device clears the eeWrite bit. After the data
is stored in EEPROM, the device can be powered down, and upon power-up, it auto loads the values into
the registers. For the device to properly write to EEPROM, the VCC must be at least 22 V and have at least
a 24-ms delay before power cycling or refreshing the device.
I2C_start
I2C_write(0xA4)
I2C_write(0x02)
I2C_write(0xB6)
I2C_stop
I2C_start
I2C_write(0xA4)
I2C_write(0x03)
I2C_write(0x50)
I2C_stop
Delay 24 ms
Figure 7. I2C Command Chain for Writing to EEPROM
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Using I2C to Communicate With the DRV10983
2.3
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Reading the Registers
Reading the registers is a way to verify the values saved in EEPROM or to obtain feedback from the
DRV10983. Because the EEPROM cannot be read directly, the settings saved in EEPROM can be loaded
into the registers by two methods. Power cycling the device auto loads the registers from EEPROM upon
startup. Alternatively, the registers can be refreshed with the EEPROM values while still powered.
The device has a bit, ‘eeRefresh’, which loads the registers with the values in EEPROM. Setting
‘eeRefresh’ has the same effect as power cycling the device. After the bit is set to 1, the registers are
loaded with the values stored in EEPROM, then the device clears the bit. Figure 8 shows the commands
for setting eeRefresh.
To read data from the registers, the user must make a few changes from the writing process. Most
importantly, the master must tell the slave to send information (see the command chain shown in
Figure 9). Note that the user does not need to set the eeRefresh bit to read the registers; it is only for
setting the registers back to the EEPROM values.
I2C_start
I2C_write(0xA4)
I2C_write(register address 0x??)
Refresh the
EEPROM
in the registers
I2C_start
I2C_stop
I2C_write(0xA4)
I2C_start
I2C_write(register address 0x03)
I2C_write(0xA5)
I2C_write(register data 0x20)
I2C_read
I2C_stop
I2C_stop
Figure 8. I2C Command Chain for Refreshing the
Registers
6
Figure 9. I2C Command Chain for Reading a
Register
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STOP
START
WRITE
I2C ADDRESS + WRITE
0xA4
WRITE
REGISTER ADDRESS
0x20
START
WRITE
I2C ADDRESS + READ
0xA5
READ
REGISTER DATA
0x39
STOP
Figure 10. I2C Waveform of Reading a Register
Figure 10 shows the SDA and SCL lines during a read command. The register 0x20 is read and shows a
value of 0x39.
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Using the Hardware and Software
3
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Using the Hardware and Software
Using the program socket tool sold by Texas Instruments is a great way to program a small quantity of
devices. This section gives the details needed to operate the program tool, but also provides details about
programming the DRV10983 when using a different method for configuring the parts. Note that the socket
board does not include any DRV10983 ICs. These ICs must be ordered separately.
3.1
Download the Software for the LaunchPad
To run the provided programming example (SLOC316), the user's PC must have CCS, IAR, or an IDE that
works with the MSP430 LaunchPad. The project developed for download was used in CCS, but also
tested in IAR.
The code used to program the DRV10983 with the MSP430G2553 LaunchPad and programming socket
board can be downloaded from the product page for the DRV10983 on www.ti.com. After the download
completes, extract the files.
If using a custom solution to program the devices, it is still useful to download the project. After the project
is open, it is easy to see the process of programming the device by reading through the .c file of the
project. Note that the code provided uses a software version of the I2C interface. This simplifies the code
and allows for easy modifications across multiple platforms. Most MCUs also include a hardware I2C
peripheral, which is another way to program and communicate with the DRV10983.
3.2
Hooking Up the Hardware
The DRV10983 devices are programmed by I2C. If using the programming socket board with the
LaunchPad, the socket board conveniently fits on the LaunchPad and connects the needed pins. The
DRV10983 IC should be inserted into the socket tool while the setup is not powered. If using a custom
solution, ensure that there is an I2C connection between the DRV10983 and the MCU used to
communicate as the master. The hardware files for the programming socket (SLAR101) can be
downloaded from www.ti.com.
On the example setup in Figure 11, the last item to connect is a USB cord from the PC to the LaunchPad.
For a custom hardware configuration, connect the MCU to the PC or testing equipment used to load the
programming process and register values into the MCU. The USB connection is only for the initial
programming of the MSP430 LaunchPad. Afterward, the USB is only used for power.
For each device (DRV10983), the VCC needs to be at least 22 V for successful programming. The
programming socket board uses a boost converter to boost the MSP430s from 3.3 to 23 V. Verify that the
solution used can provide a VCC of at least 22 V for the programming to work.
Socket Board fits on
the LaunchPad
USB cable from PC to MCU
for initial programming
Figure 11. Hardware Setup of the MSP430 and Programming Socket
3.3
Modifying the Software for Custom Register Values
Import the project downloaded into CCS through the project dropdown menu or the resource explorer
welcome page.
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Using the Hardware and Software
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The software was written with register values for a specific motor that may or may not work for the end
application. With that in mind, it is best to obtain the proper settings for the application and load those into
the programming software. This process takes three steps.
1. Find the proper settings. The best way to get these settings is to follow the user’s guide (SLOU393)
and tuning guide (SLOU395) for the DRV10983.
2. After the system is tuned, save the parameters using the save feature of the GUI. When saving the file,
it does not matter what the name is, but remember where it is saved. Locate the parameters file (that
was just saved) and open it. The file should contain 12 rows with register data for the device. Figure 12
shows the file saved from the GUI on the left.
'Register_Values.h' with the
register values entered
File saved from the GUI
Figure 12. Example Register Settings Entered into the Programming Tools Code
3. Define the register values in the programming code to match the tuned values from the GUI. The
downloaded project has the registers defined in ‘Register_Values.h’, but these need to be changed to
the tuned values from the GUI. As shown in Figure 12, the defined register values in the code (right
side) need to match the registers in the file saved from the GUI (left side). To open
‘Register_Values.h’, expand the project in the project explorer window and double click
'Register_Values.h'. Manually enter each register value from the GUI file into the program code. Make
sure to save ‘Register_Values.h’ after the new register values are entered.
3.4
Running the Project
With the register values entered into the code, the next step is to load it into the MSP430 LaunchPad.
After the downloaded project is imported into the workspace in CCS, the project should reference all of the
necessary header files from the path variables. Build, load, and run the code. For help running a project in
CCS, refer to the web resources link in the welcome menu on the resource explorer page. Find this by
clicking on the TI Resource Explorer under the View dropdown menu. If not using CCS, make sure all the
necessary files are in the workspace for the project to compile correctly.
Repeat for each IC
or batch of ICs
Power down
the
LaunchPad
Switch the IC
Power on the
Launchpad
Press button
connected to
P1.3
Wait for the
P1.0 LED
Figure 13. Flowchart Specific to Programming ICs With the LaunchPad and Socket
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Different Methods of Programming
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In the example code when the LaunchPad receives power, it waits to configure the DRV10983 until first
the VCC is up to at least 22 V, then the button is pushed. It is important to disconnect the power before
removing the IC from the socket and wait until the new IC is in place before powering on the LaunchPad.
One option is to use a switched USB power port to avoid needing to unplug and plug the USB cord
repeatedly.
4
Different Methods of Programming
The example this guide refers to uses an external MCU to program the DRV10983 parts one at a time.
Each DRV10983 is configured before it is soldered down. This setup was designed to be an easy way to
create prototypes or to program a small amount of ICs. It is not practical to use this method for
programming production parts. This section describes alternative methods for easily programming parts in
production.
The IC can be easily configured during two portions of the manufacturing process. The first opportunity is
before the DRV10983 is soldered down (pre-soldering). Alternatively, the part can be configured after it
has been fixed on the board (post-soldering). Regardless of the configuration method used, it is important
that the VCC is at least 22 V to program the EEPROM.
4.1
Pre-Soldering
Programming the parts before soldering them down on the final board follows a process similar to the one
described previously in this document. The IC is placed into a socket and programmed through an
external connection. Some developers may choose to design their own programming solution based on
the example provided or may work with a third party to develop a mass programming solution.
4.2
Post-Soldering
Figure 14 outlines two methods for programming the device after it is soldered down. The first method has
a controller or processor in the circuit, which is already connected to the DRV10983. The pins used to
configure that MCU or MPU for normal operation are the same pins that can be used for loading the
configuration settings. This method is useful if the circuit has a controller.
If the application will not allow VCC to reach 22 V to program the EEPROM, an alternate method can be
used to configure the DRV10983. Every time the device is powered on, the registers can be setup for the
application by the MCU. As long as the values in the registers are correct for the application, the device
will run the motor regardless of the EEPROM settings. However, every time the device is powered down
then powered up, the registers load from the EEPROM settings; this occurrence is the reason that in this
configuration method, the registers must be reconfigured after every startup.
If the DRV10983 is a standalone device without a MCU in the circuit, the process is only slightly different.
The user needs an external device to send the I2C commands to the part. An example of this is using the
EVM with the GUI. The USB2ANY is the external device that communicates through I2C with the
DRV10983.
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Summary
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PC or tool used to
build and load the
I2C commands
Connection to
configure the
MCU or processor
Controller or
processor
SCL
I2C master device
DRV10983
SDA
Internal MCU/MPU
Soldered on the PCB
PC or tool used to
build, load, and run
the program
USB to I2C
interface
USB
SCL
External MCU
DRV10983
SDA
Figure 14. General Configuration Methods
The DRV10983 can be programmed as part of the PCB test even when a MCU is not used. To do this,
program an in-circuit tester or bed-of-nails tester to send the I2C commands to the IC. For this to work, it is
essential that the circuit board is designed to provide 22 V and that the tester can access the SDA and
SCL lines. Figure 15 is an example of a simple circuit that shows the SDA and SCL connection brought
out and exposed so the pins on the testing equipment can make contact at those points. It is important to
design the contact points to fit the tester that is used.
Test
Point 1
IC 1
TP 2
IC 3
SDA
IC 2
TP n
IC 4
DRV10983
SCL
Figure 15. Example Circuit for Bed of Nails Tester
The testing tool should be able to provide the 22-V supply for writing to the EEPROM of the DRV10983.
After VCC is at least 22 V and the testing tool has connected with the SDA and SCL contact points, send
the I2C commands shown in Section 2 to configure the device.
5
Summary
To setup the DRV10983 for its end application, write specific values to registers 20 through 2B that
describe the motor and how to best operate it, then save those in EEPROM. This setup can be done using
multiple methods, pre-soldering and post-soldering. Use the procedure outlined in this document as an
easy way to understand how the configuration process is done and to program small quantities of devices.
This guide also described methods to configure the ICs for production.
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Schematic
6
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Schematic
Power Connections
and Test Points
Alternate Connections to Program
TP1
VCC
TP2
J3
5-146278-4
1
2
3
4
GND
L1
3.3V
SCL
SDA
3.3 V
C8
4.7 µF
5
C1
2
VCC
C2
0.1 µF
0.1 µF
1
C5
2
1
VCC
R3
10.0 kΩ
VIN
SW
CTRL
FB
COMP
GND
PAD
R1
178 kΩ
4
1
C9
4.7 µF
3
R2
10.0 kΩ
TPS61170DRV
GND
CPP
2
23
0.1 µF CPN
3
22
SW
4
21
5
20
VREG
6
19
V1P8
7
18
8
17
V3P3
9
16
SCL
10
15
SDA
11
FG
12
VLCF5020T-100M1R1-1
10 µF
C
24
C4
L2
C3
4.7 µF
A
D_SCHOT_MBR0540T
U2
6
GND
U1
VCP 1
2
2
VLCF5020T-100M1R1-1
GND
DRV10983
D1
1
GND
C10
0.01 µF
W
GND
V
25
NC-Alignment
Center Pin
GND
LaunchPad Connections
U
3.3V
R4
5.1 kΩ
14
13
3.3 V
J1
R5
5.1 kΩ
SPEED
SDA
26
1 µF
27
1 µF
C7
NC-Alignment
C6
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
J2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
GND
SDA
SCL
GND
OTS-24(28)-0.65-01
GND
Figure 16. Schematic of the Programming Socket
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Bill of Materials
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7
Bill of Materials
Designator
Quantity
PCB
1
C1, C2, C4
3
C3
Value
Part Number
Manufacturer
Description
Package
Reference
DRV10983/975
TargetBoard
Any
Printed Circuit Board
0.1uF
C1608X7R1H104K
TDK
CAP, CERM, 0.1uF, 50V, +/10%, X7R, 0603
0603
1
4.7uF
GRM32ER71H475KA88L
MuRata
CAP, CERM, 4.7uF, 50V, +/10%, X7R, 1210
1210
C5
1
10uF
CGA5L3X5R1H106K160AB TDK
CAP, CERM, 10uF, 50V, +/10%, X5R, 1206_190
1206_190
C6, C7
2
1uF
GRM188R61H105KAALD
MuRata
CAP, CERM, 1uF, 50V, +/10%, X5R, 0603
0603
C8
1
4.7uF
0603ZD475KAT2A
AVX
CAP, CERM, 4.7uF, 10V, +/10%, X5R, 0603
0603
C9
1
4.7uF
C2012X5R1H475K125AB
TDK
CAP, CERM, 4.7uF, 50V, +/10%, X5R, 0805
0805
C10
1
0.01uF
C1608X7R1H103K
TDK
CAP, CERM, 0.01uF, 50V,
+/-10%, X7R, 0603
0603
D1
1
MBR0540T
MBR0540T
OnSemi
Diode, Schottky, 0.5A, 40V
SOD-123
Connector, Receptacle,
100mil, 10x1, TH
10x1
Receptacle
J1, J2
2
CRD-081413-B-T
Major League
Electronics
J3
1
5-146278-4
TE Connectivity
Header, 100mil, 4x1, Tin, TH
Header, 4x1,
100mil, TH
L1, L2
2
10uH
VLCF5020T-100M1R1-1
TDK
Inductor, SMT, yyA,
zzmilliohm
0.157 x 0.157
inch
R1
1
178k
RC0603FR-07178KL
Yageo America
RES, 178k ohm, 1%, 0.1W,
0603
0603
R2, R3
2
10.0k
CRCW060310K0FKEA
Vishay-Dale
RES, 10.0k ohm, 1%, 0.1W,
0603
0603
R4, R5
2
5.1k
CRCW06035K10JNEA
Vishay-Dale
RES, 5.1k ohm, 5%, 0.1W,
0603
0603
TP1, TP2
2
SMT
5016
Keystone
Test Point, Compact, SMT
Testpoint_Keyst
one_Compact
U1
1
OTS-24(28)-0.65-02
Enplas
24 pin socket with no center
pin
HTTOP
U2
1
TPS61170DRV
Texas
Instruments
1.2A High Voltage Boost
Converter in 2x2mm QFN
Package, DRV0006A
DRV0006A
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