Texas Instruments | TMS320C6413 Hardware Designer's Resource (Rev. D) | Application notes | Texas Instruments TMS320C6413 Hardware Designer's Resource (Rev. D) Application notes

Texas Instruments TMS320C6413 Hardware Designer's Resource (Rev. D) Application notes
Design Guide
SPRAA18D − October 2005
TMS320C6413 Hardware Designer’s Resource Guide
Kevin Jones
DSP Hardware Applications Team
ABSTRACT
The TMS320C6413 DSP Hardware Designer’s Resource Guide is a collection of the most
commonly used technical documentation, and models for DSP hardware system designers.
Topics covered include Getting Started, Models and Symbols, Bootloading, and Checklists
to aid in your initial design and debug efforts. Each section includes pointers to valuable
information including technical documentation, models, symbols, and reference designs for
use in each phase of design.
Contents
1
Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.1 Registering on my.TI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.2 Training and Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.3 Technical Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.3.1 Where to Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.3.2 Using TI Literature Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.3.3 Peripheral Reference Guides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.3.4 Application Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2
2
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3
3
2
Board Design and Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1 High−Speed DSP Systems Design Reference Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2 Schematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3 Signal Integrity and Timing Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4 Board Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.5 Power Supply and Sequencing Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.6 Power/Thermal Management Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.7 Boot Mode Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.8 Joint Test Action Group (JTAG) Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.9 Board Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4
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7
3
System Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
3.1 Boundary Scan Description Language (BSDL) Model(s) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
4
Design and Debug Checklists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
4.1 Design Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
4.2 Debug Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
5
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
List of Tables
Table 1. Boot Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
1
SPRAA18D
1
Getting Started
1.1
Registering on my.TI
my.TI is a customizable area within the Texas Instruments web site. By registering on my.TI, you
can receive the following benefits:
•
Quick Reference to information you select as part of your profile.
•
Email alerts that inform you of updates to products, technical documentation, and errata.
•
The my.TI newsletter providing information on the latest innovations and product releases.
To register on my.TI for updates related to these devices:
1. Go to the device product folders.
2. Select the link called “ADD To myTI” in the upper right hand corner, and follow the
on-screen instructions.
3. Select Customize my.TI to specify what you would like to receive notification about.
The following is a link to the product folder.
TMS320C6413 Product Folder
1.2
Training and Support
Texas Instruments offers a variety of training options tailored for your specific needs and
requirements. Options include on-line training, webcasts, seminars, single and multi-day
workshops, and conferences. For more information about training, visit Texas Instruments
Training Home. For assistance with technical questions regarding TI Semiconductor products
and services, you can access the Semiconductor Technical Support KnowledgeBase .
1.3
Technical Documentation
1.3.1
Where to Start
The key area for obtaining documentation for these devices are the product folders. When
getting started, it is of great importance to have the latest data sheet and silicon errata. Listed
below are links to this key information:
1.3.2
•
TMS320C6413 Product Folder
•
TMS320C6413, TMS320C6410 Fixed-Point Digital Signal Processors Data Manual
(SPRS247)
•
TMS320C6413, TMS320C6410 Fixed-Point Digital Signal Processors Silicon Errata
(SPRZ219)
Using TI Literature Numbers
All TI documentation is assigned a literature number. This number can be used to search for the
document on the Web. Technical documentation revisions are indicated by the alpha character
at the end of the literature number on the title page, and in the file name.
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Use the literature number (without the trailing alpha character) to search the TI website for the
document. For example, if a data manual has a literature number of SPRS205B, the ”B”
indicates the revision of the document. If the document has no trailing alpha character, it is the
original version of the document. When searching for this document on the TI web site, you can
simply enter ”SPRS205” as the search keyword.
1.3.3
Peripheral Reference Guides
Each peripheral has a reference guide that provides beneficial information for completing a
design. Each peripheral and its respective reference guide is listed here. There are two
categories. The first category contains peripherals which connect directly to external devices.
The second category lists the internal peripherals.
Peripherals that connect directly to external devices:
•
TMS320C6000 DSP Inter-Integrated Circuit (I2C) Module Reference Guide (SPRU175)
•
TMS320C6410/C6413 DSP Inter-Integrated Circuit (I2C) Module (SPRZ221)
•
TMS320C6000 DSP Multichannel Audio Serial Port (McASP) Reference Guide (SPRU041)
•
TMS320C6000 DSP External Memory Interface (EMIF) Reference Guide (SPRU266)
•
TMS320C6000 DSP General-Purpose Input/Output (GPIO) Reference Guide (SPRU584)
•
TMS320C6000 DSP Host-Port Interface (HPI) Reference Guide (SPRU578)
•
TMS320C6000 DSP Multichannel Buffered Serial Port (McBSP) Reference Guide
(SPRU580)
Internal peripherals:
•
TMS320C6000 DSP Two-Level Internal Memory Reference Guide (SPRU610)
•
TMS320C6000 DSP Interrupt Selector Reference Guide (SPRU646)
•
TMS320C6000 DSP 32-bit Timer Reference Guide (SPRU582)
•
TMS320C6000 DSP Enhanced Direct Memory Access (EDMA) Controller Reference Guide
(SPRU234)
1.3.4
Application Reports
Application reports are documents written to describe functionality and usability for a specific
application or design. Listed below are application reports that provide useful information about
peripherals.
External Memory Interface (EMIF):
•
TMS320C6000 EMIF-to-External SDRAM Interface (SPRA433)
•
TMS320C6000 EMIF to External Flash Memory (SPRA568)
•
TMS320C6000 EMIF to External Asynchronous SRAM Interface (SPRA542)
•
TMS320C6000 EMIF to TMS320C6000 Host Port Interface (SPRA536)
TMS320C6413 Hardware Designer’s Resource Guide
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Multichannel Buffered Serial Port (McBSP):
•
TMS320C6000 McBSP Interface to an ST-BUS Device (SPRA511)
•
Using the TMS320C6000 McBSP as a High Speed Communication Port (SPRA455)
•
TMS320C6000 McBSP to Voice Band Audio Processor (VBAP) Interface (SPRA489)
•
TMS320C6000 McBSP: AC’97 Codec Interface (TLV320AIC27) (SPRA528)
•
TMS320C6000 McBSP Interface to SPI ROM (SPRA487)
•
TMS320C6000 McBSP: IOM-2 Interface (SPRA569)
•
TMS320C6000 McBSP: UART (SPRA633)
•
TMS320C6000 McBSP as a TDM Highway (SPRA491)
•
TMS320C6000 Multichannel Communications System Interface (SPRA637)
•
TMS320C6000 McBSP: I 2S Interface (SPRA595)
Host Port Interface (HPI):
•
TMS320C6000 Host Port to MC68360 Interface (SPRA545)
•
TMS320C6000 Host Port to the i80960 Microprocessors Interface (SPRA541)
•
TMS320C6000 Host Port to MPC860 Interface (SPRA546)
•
TMS320C6000 Host Port to the i80960 Microprocessors Interface (SPRA541)
2
Board Design and Layout
2.1
High−Speed DSP Systems Design Reference Guide
Today’s digital signal processors (DSPs) are typically run at a 1GHz internal clock rate while
transmit and receive signals to and from external devices operate at rates higher than 200MHz.
These fast switching signals generate a considerable amount of noise and radiation, which
degrades system performance and creates electromagnetic interference (EMI) problems that
make it difficult to pass tests required to obtain certification from the Federal Communication
Commission (FCC). Good high−speed system design requires robust power sources with low
switching noise under dynamic loading conditions, minimum crosstalk between high−speed
signal traces, high− and low−frequency decoupling techniques, and good signal integrity with
minimum transmission line effects. This document provides recommendations for meeting the
many challenges of high−speed DSP system design.
For more information, refer to High−Speed DSP Systems Design Reference Guide (SPRU889).
2.2
Schematics
This section includes ORCAD symbols to assist you in schematic generation. The method
chosen to provide the ORCAD symbols is a multi-section or “heterogeneous” package. The
logical parts in the package have different graphics, numbers of pins, or properties. This allows
the schematic designer to easily connect the various parts on separate schematic pages and yet
retain the same reference designator for the part across all schematic pages.
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Following are links to download the ORCAD symbols for these devices:
TMS320C6413 ORCAD Symbol (SPRC173)
2.3
Signal Integrity and Timing Considerations
Today’s high-speed interfaces require strict timings and accurate system design. To achieve the
necessary timings for a given system, input/output buffer information specification (IBIS) models
must be used. These models accurately represent the device drivers under various process
conditions. Board characteristics, such as impedance, loading, length, number of nodes, etc.,
affect how the device driver behaves. The following key information to support these devices.
2.4
•
TMS320C6413 IBIS Model
•
Using IBIS Models for Timing Analysis (SPRA839)
Board Layout
The significance of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of electronic circuits and systems has
recently been increasing. This increase has led to more stringent requirements for the
electromagnetic properties of equipment. Two property aspects are of interest: the ability of a
circuit to generate the lowest (or zero) interference, and the immunity of a circuit to the effects of
the electromagnetic energy it is subjected to. The effects on electronic circuits and systems is
well documented, but little attention has been paid to circuit behavior and the interference it
generates. The following link discusses the important criteria that determine the EMC of a circuit.
Printed-Circuit Board Layout for Improved Electromagnetic Compatibility (SDYA011).
2.5
Power Supply and Sequencing Considerations
Texas Instruments offers several Power Management Products for these devices. In the Power
Management selection guide below, refer to the TMS320C6000 section for more information on
available solutions. For a complete list of product offerings, visit the power.ti.com website. The
following applications reports are helpful in choosing the right power solution:
2.6
•
Power Management Selection Guide (SLVT145)
•
Providing a DSP Power Solution from a 5-V or 3.3-V Only System (SLVA069)
•
Power Supply Sequencing Solutions for Dual Supply Voltage DSPs (SLVA073)
•
Dual Output Power Supply Sequencing for High Performance Processors (SLVA117)
Power/Thermal Management Considerations
Circuit designers must always consider the effects of thermal stack up – the cascaded effect of
the transfer of heat from a device die to the surrounding package. The flow of heat from the
device die to ambient must be sufficient to maintain an acceptably low junction temperature, and
maximize device reliability. The thermal resistance characteristics for this device are
documented in the data sheet. The following application reports discuss thermal analysis, heat
sink selection, and power consumption.
TMS320C6x Thermal Design Considerations (SPRA432)
TMS320C6413 Hardware Designer’s Resource Guide
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2.7
Boot Mode Configurations
The boot process is determined by the boot configuration stemming from the pull-up/pull-down
resistors on the EMIFA address bus, AEA[22:21]. Table 1 shows the possible configurations.
Table 1. Boot Mode
BOOTMODE
Boot Process
00
Boot (Default)
01
HPI Boot (based on HPI-EN pin)
10
Reserved
11
EMIFA 8-bit ROM boot
The three possible boot processes are:
•
No boot process − The CPU begins direct execution from the memory located at address 0.
•
ROM boot process − The program located in external ROM is copied to address 0 by the
EDMA Controller. This transfer occurs while the CPU is held in reset, so that once it is
released, it can start executing code from location 0. For C64x devices, the EDMA copies
the first 1K Bytes from the beginning of CE1 (on EMIFA) to address 0.
•
Host boot process − The CPU is held in reset while the rest of the device is released.
During this time, an external host can appropriately change any internal memory and/or
registers needed. When it is finished, it needs to set the DSPINT to complete. This action
will release the CPU from reset and cause it to start executing from location 0.
The following are links to key information about bootloading:
2.8
•
TMS320C6413, TMS320C6410 Fixed-Point Digital Signal Processors Data Manual
(SPRS247).
•
TMS320C6000 Tools: Vector Table and Boot ROM Creation (SPRA544)
•
TMS320C6000 HPI Boot Operation (SPRA512)
Joint Test Action Group (JTAG) Interface
DSP devices have a JTAG interface that allows for emulation hardware and software to
communicate with the DSP. The JTAG port also supports boundary scan testability. Listed below
are links to this key information.
6
•
TMS320C6000 Board Design: Considerations for Debug (SPRA523)
•
TMS320C6000 Board Design for JTAG (SPRA584)
•
TMS320C6000 DSP Designing for JTAG Emulation Reference Guide (SPRU641)
•
60-pin Emulation Header Technical Reference (SPRU655)
•
Emulation Fundamentals for TI’s DSP Solutions (SPRA439)
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2.9
Board Manufacturing
When designing with a high−density BGA package, it is important to be aware of different
techniques that aid in the quality of the manufacture. The following is a link to this key
information.
Flip Chip Ball Grid Array Package Reference Guide (SPRU811)
3
System Test
3.1
Boundary Scan Description Language (BSDL) Model(s)
BSDL models can be used to facilitate board level testing. Currently we have two different
versions of the BSDL, one model for revision 1.1 silicon and another model for revision 2.0
silicon. You can find BSDL models for this device here:
TMS320C6413 GTS BSDL Model
TMS320C6413 Hardware Designer’s Resource Guide
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4
Design and Debug Checklists
4.1
Design Checklist
The Design Checklist was put together by Texas Instruments application and field support staff
as a guide to considerations made during the design phase of development. Use this check list
to keep track of considerations you make during the design phase of development.
j
Check data sheet and errata for the most up to date information.
j
Reset circuitry?
For debugging it is important to be able to reset the DSP when/if it gets into an unstable state. To perform
this, one of the easiest things to do is to have a reset button on the board itself. Having a reset supervisor
on board enables you to do things like monitor the supply rails for sags in power. The TPS3110 class of
devices are the most commonly used reset supervisors from TI.
For more information, see the following data sheet.Reset
Circuitry for the TMS320C6000 DSP
(SPRA431)
j
Are boot mode pins configured correctly?
The three boot modes for the C6000 devices are: no boot, a boot over the HPI, or a boot from a ROM device
located at Chip Enable Space 1. Check the definition for these modes in the Bootloading Guide section of this
document and choose the correct configuration you need. It is very useful to include the ability to choose an
alternate boot configuration. Use unpopulated resistor pads to allow the choice of different boot modes.
j
Has the DSP input clock source been correctly selected?
The input clock source for these devices can be generated by an external clock source or by the on-chip oscillator. The CLKINSEL pin is used to select between the two clock sources. The OSC_DIS pin enables and disables the on-chip oscillator; it should always be pulled to the same logic level as CLKINSEL.
Make sure both pins are pulled to the correct level based on your system’s needs. Note that the CLKINSEL
and OSC_DIS pins have internal pull−up resistors to disable the on-chip oscillator and select an external clocksource input by default.
j
Is the CLKMODEx pin configured correctly?
In addition to checking the CLKMODE[3:0] pins to see if they are set up to generate the correct frequency,
the CLKOUT4/6 pins should be checked with an oscilloscope. To do this, you must clock EMIFA. If the
CLKOUT4/6 signal is correct, this verifies lock of the PLL, in addition to the correct frequency of operation
for your DSP. If the CLKOUT4/6 signal is not correct, check that the PLL and the CLKMODE pins are
configured correctly. Does the PLL have the correct circuitry around it, following the data sheet
recommendations?
j
Is there a provision for changing the clock during debug time?
It can be very helpful to set up a jumper on your board to change the clock frequency. This can allow you
to detect whether or not problems are related to the high clock rate.
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j
Have all other device configuration pins been properly configured?
The TOUT1/LENDIAN, TOUT0/HPI_EN, and HD5 pins are used to set certain configurations in the device.
These pins are latched at reset. The TOUT1/LENDIAN pin selects which endian mode for the device. The
TOUT0/HPI_EN and HD5 affect HPI, McASP1, and GP0[15:8] pins as follows:
HPI_EN
HD5
HPI
McASP1
GP0[15:8]
Low
Low
16-bit HPI
enabled
Available
Not available
Low
High
32-bit HPI
enabled
Not available
Not available
High
X
Not available
Available
Available
The TOUT0/HPI_EN pin is pulled low by default through an internal resistor, while the HD5 and
TOUT1/LENDIAN pins are pulled through internal resistors. These pins should be configured through
external resistors based on your system needs.
j
Is the emulation configured properly?
In a general sense, can you connect to the board via JTAG? Check to make sure EMU[1:0] is connected
according to your needs:
EMU[1:0]
Operation
00
Boundary Scan/Normal Mode
01
Reserved
10
Reserved
11
Emulation/Normal Mode
NOTE: Check the data sheet for more information about these pins. To use with Code Composer Studio,
Emulation/Normal mode should be selected. /TRST has an internal pull-down, though it may be useful to
include an external pull-down.
In the future, TI will be switching to more advanced emulation using a 60-pin header instead of the
traditional 14-pin. See the 60-Pin Emulation Header Technical Reference Guide (SPRU655). For now,
leave the extra emulation pins EMU[11:2] unconnected because they have internal pull-ups. For full details
on designing with JTAG, see IEE Std 1149.1 (JTAG) Testability Primer (SSYA002). These resources will
allow you to check your JTAG circuitry for correctness. The following link provides key information.
IEE Std 1149.1 (JTAG) Testability Primer (SSYA002)
j
If it is a multiprocessor, is the TDI/TDO connection tied properly?
In multiprocessor environments, the TDI (JTAG test-port data in) and TDO (JTAG test-port data out) pins
need to be tied correctly. The TDI pin on the JTAG header should tie to the TDI pin on the first DSP, and
the TDO pin on the first DSP should tie to the TDI pin on the second DSP. This sequence should continue
for subsequent DSPs, until the TDO pin of the last DSP connects to the JTAG header’s TDO pin. For more
information on designing for JTAG emulation, see Chapter 16 of the peripherals guide (SPRU190).
j
Is there provision for power sequence?
To operate properly, the DSP needs to be powered up in the correct sequence. Check the sequencing for
power, according to data sheet specifications.
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j
Voltage levels changes?
The board should be able to accommodate some voltage level changes. It can be useful to accommodate
some changes by changing a resistor.
j
Are there any GPIOs pinned out to via or LED for probing?
The board should be able to accommodate some voltage level changes. It can be useful to accommodate
some changes by changing a resistor. GPIOs can be very useful for debugging. If a GPIO pin is available
for use, it is worthwhile to pin it out to a via or an LED to observe the operation.
j
Are the HDS/HAS signals correctly configured to access the DSP?
If using the HPI, then you have a choice of configurations. Examples of timing diagrams for when HAS is
used or unused (tied high) are in TMS320C6000 DSP Host−Post Interface (HPI) Reference Guide
(SPRU578). Also, there is a choice on how to assert /HSTROBE using both, one, or none of the HDS1/2 in
combination with HCS. The gate logic for these pins should be checked in the reference guide as well.
j
Are the McBSP signals pinned to via for scope trace?
For debugging information it can be very useful to have the McBSP signals pinned out to a via. This allows
you to check the signals (clock, frame sync, data, etc.) on a scope for correct operation.
j
Are decoupling caps placed on the board near the DSP?
Voltages from traces on a printed circuit board can couple to each other in places where it is not desired,
(like power supply planes). To decouple the traces, we add capacitors to absorb some of the voltage and
help reduce this effect. For more information on how to correctly place decoupling caps, see the Design
FAQ.
j
Do the DSP vias go all the way through the board?
It is extremely helpful to have the DSP pins available through all layers. This will increase the layout
difficulty and allow visibility into all possible pins on the DSP, which can be a useful for debug.
j
How much general visibility is there on the board?
If space allows it, the more signals and pins that are accessible, the easier it is to debug. One common
consideration is adding hooks for a logic analyzer on the EMIF bus. This can help with any timing issues
that might come up during development.
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4.2
Debug Checklist
The Debug Checklist was put together by Texas Instruments application and field support staff
as a guide to considerations made during the debug phase of development. Use this check list
to keep track of considerations you make during the debug phase of development.
(a) Level 1 − Check general operation of DSP, and JTAG connection for development and
debugging
The goal of Level 1 is to determine whether the DSP is functional. This is done by first
checking the debug environment, JTAG chain, and by loading and running programs in the
DSP memory. If the device is able to pass all of the functions laid out in level 1, then at
minimum the device is functional. If there are issues, they likely are with the components
outside the DSP.
j
Check general DSP environment.
Here, you should check things such as power sequencing and reset circuitry. Is the board being released
from reset correctly? This will make sure the DSP is given the chance to start running properly.
j
Start DSP in NO boot mode.
Starting the DSP in NO boot mode will allow the device to boot up without having to wait for a host or
relying on external memory to be set up correctly. This then allows you to test the voltage levels for
both I/O and core against the recommendations in the data sheet.
j
Is the CLKOUT frequency correct?
Now that the device is up and running with correct voltages tested from a NO boot power on, check
CLKOUT4/6 to make sure the PLL and CLKMODE[3:0] pins are configured properly. This will tell us the
exact frequency at which the DSP core is running.
It should be noted that in order for CLKOUT4 and CLKOUT6 to be used, EMIFA must be clocked.
j
Does Code Composer Studio run with a simulator (only)?
Set up Code Composer Studio to run with a 64x simulator. After starting Code Composer Studio, run a
small program in the simulator. If Code Composer Studio is able to run with a simulator, then the
installation is functional, and further issues may be emulation-driver related. For example, if Code
Composer Studio is able to run a program in the simulator, but is unable to start up with a card or
EVM/TEB, then there is a high probability that the emulator driver may be incorrect or incorrectly
configured. If that is the case, look at the emulator/JTAG portions of this checklist.
j
Is the scan chain length set correctly?
If the scan chain length is not detected properly on your board, Code Composer Studio will not correctly
recognize power to the DSP. If it is a multiprocessor board, a scan chain test should return the correct
number of devices.
Check the JTAG scan chain.
If you are unable to get Code Composer Studio to run with an emulator, the utility xdsprobe.exe is
available to troubleshoot. The xdsprobe.exe utility is available with TI emulators. If there are multiple
devices in the chain, the utility should correctly identify all of them. The results of the scan path test
should be verified with the setup in the Code Composer Studio Setup Tool. The following is a link for this
key information. Using xdsprobe With XDS510 and XDS560 (SPRA758)
TMS320C6413 Hardware Designer’s Resource Guide
11
SPRAA18D
j
Does Code Composer Studio run with emulator?
Assuming now that Code Composer Studio is working correctly with the simulator, determine if full
emulation via JTAG can be achieved. Having emulation functional gives us a more robust development
environment with a larger set of peripherals to use and more debugging tools. First, make sure the
appropriate drivers for the emulator are loaded into the Code Composer Studio Setup Tool. Then check
if the memory map for the specific device is configured upon Code Composer Studio initialization
(usually through a startup GEL file in the Code Composer Studio Setup Tool).
j
Can you load/run hello world?
Under the tutorials directory of the Code Composer Studio installation, there are two “Hello World”
examples. The first one does not use DSP/BIOS and does a simple write to the standard output
window using standard C I/O. The second one uses DSP/BIOS and utilizes the LOG object to write to
the message log. Verify that both of these example programs are functioning correctly. If they are not,
is it a memory verification error? If so, check the memory map.
After this, the DSP is working. Now, check the peripherals and all external components.
j
Are the EMIF Clocks set up properly?
To interface correctly with external memory like SDRAM, check the specifications for your memory’s
speed, then set the clock to the EMIF. Three options exist for the EMIF clock: CPU/4, CPU/6, or
external ECLKIN. Check clocks with a scope for proper frequency.
j
Are the CE spaces configured correctly?
Using the EMIF control registers for each CE space, make sure that each space is configured for the
appropriate form of external memory. Important note: If booting from ROM, the ROM device needs to
be on CE1, since the on-chip bootloader automatically looks there to start a ROM boot.
j
Do EMIF timings match the data sheets?
The data sheets for both the DSP and the external memory device should have timing diagrams. Check
the timings from the point of view of both the DSP and external memory, and make sure the signals
match their respective data sheets. An IBIS model can also be used to examine timings.
j
Are holds used?
If using asynchronous RAM, make sure /HOLD and /HOLDA are used properly. If NOT using
asynchronous RAM, make sure the NOHOLD bit in GBLCTL register is set to 0.
j
Is the AARDY pin used?
If using asynchronous RAM, make sure AARDY (EMIFA) is being used appropriately. If NOT using
asynchronous RAM, the pins are pulled up internally.
j
Are the HDS/HAS signals correctly configured to access the DSP?
If using the HPI, then you have a choice of configurations. Examples of timing diagrams for when HAS
is used or unused (tied high) are in TMS320C6000 DSP Peripherals Overview Reference Guide
(SPRU190). Also, there is a choice on how to assert /HSTROBE using both, one, or none of the
HDS1/2 in combination with HCS. The gate logic for these pins should be checked in the reference
guide as well.
12
TMS320C6413 Hardware Designer’s Resource Guide
SPRAA18D
(b) Level 2 − External Memory − Read/Write from/to external memory
Follow the steps below:
1. Load a small program into internal memory that writes to external memory and then verifies all
external memory.
2. Have the host program write known values into memory using HPI. Each value should be
unique. Have the DSP read back values via JTAG.
3. Have the DSP program write known values into memory. Each value should be unique. The
DSP sends an interrupt to the host. The host uses HPI access to read those values back while
the DSP is in reset or in a NOP loop.
4. Have the host program write known values into memory. Each value should be unique. Have
host generate an interrupt to the DSP. The DSP then checks values.
NOTE: If no HPI is being used in the system, then simply use the DSP and JTAG to read and write
memory values.
This not only verifies operation of any external memory that might be used in the system, it also verifies
operation of the HPI.
(c) Level 3 − Boot and Run code
Now that we have verified operation of both the DSP and possibly the HPI, you can add the
boot mode you desire. Check the Bootloading Guide, section 2.7, for details on different boot
configurations. Whichever boot process is being used, write a simple test program to make
sure you can get the DSP from power-on, to reset, to running the code you desire it to run.
The program should do some/all of the following:
1. Toggle an LED(s).
2. Use EDMA to do some data transfer.
3. Generate an interrupt from EDMA transfer.
4. Send a sine wave out through McBSP.
5. Toggle some GPIO pins.
6. Run POST (power-on self test).
7. Run checks on any peripherals your system will use.
5
Summary
Using the information provided in this document, along with documentation that is pointed out for
each step of the design process, a DSP designer will be able to make more knowledgeable
decisions concerning their design.
TMS320C6413 Hardware Designer’s Resource Guide
13
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