Texas Instruments | TMS320DM357 Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART) | User Guides | Texas Instruments TMS320DM357 Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART) User guides

Texas Instruments TMS320DM357 Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART) User guides
TMS320DM357 DMSoC
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter
(UART)
User's Guide
Literature Number: SPRUG26
November 2008
2
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Contents
Preface ........................................................................................................................................ 6
1
Introduction......................................................................................................................... 9
1.1
Purpose of the Peripheral ................................................................................................ 9
1.2
Features .................................................................................................................... 9
1.3
Functional Block Diagram .............................................................................................. 10
........................................................................ 10
Peripheral Architecture ....................................................................................................... 12
2.1
Clock Generation and Control ......................................................................................... 12
2.2
Signal Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 14
2.3
Pin Multiplexing .......................................................................................................... 14
2.4
Protocol Description ..................................................................................................... 14
2.5
Operation ................................................................................................................. 15
2.6
Reset Considerations ................................................................................................... 19
2.7
Initialization ............................................................................................................... 19
2.8
Interrupt Support ......................................................................................................... 19
2.9
DMA Event Support ..................................................................................................... 21
2.10 Power Management ..................................................................................................... 21
2.11 Emulation Considerations .............................................................................................. 21
2.12 Exception Processing ................................................................................................... 21
Registers ........................................................................................................................... 22
3.1
Receiver Buffer Register (RBR) ....................................................................................... 23
3.2
Transmitter Holding Register (THR) .................................................................................. 24
3.3
Interrupt Enable Register (IER) ........................................................................................ 25
3.4
Interrupt Identification Register (IIR) .................................................................................. 26
3.5
FIFO Control Register (FCR) .......................................................................................... 28
3.6
Line Control Register (LCR) ............................................................................................ 30
3.7
Modem Control Register (MCR) ....................................................................................... 32
3.8
Line Status Register (LSR) ............................................................................................. 33
3.9
Divisor Latches (DLL and DLH) ....................................................................................... 35
3.10 Peripheral Identification Registers (PID1 and PID2) ................................................................ 37
3.11 Power and Emulation Management Register (PWREMU_MGMT) ............................................... 38
1.4
2
3
Industry Standard(s) Compliance Statement
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Table of Contents
3
www.ti.com
List of Figures
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
4
UART Block Diagram ......................................................................................................
UART Clock Generation Diagram ........................................................................................
Relationships Between Data Bit, BCLK, and UART Input Clock .....................................................
UART Protocol Formats ...................................................................................................
UART Interface Using Autoflow Diagram ...............................................................................
Autoflow Functional Timing Waveforms for RTS .......................................................................
Autoflow Functional Timing Waveforms for CTS .......................................................................
UART Interrupt Request Enable Paths ..................................................................................
Receiver Buffer Register (RBR) ..........................................................................................
Transmitter Holding Register (THR) .....................................................................................
Interrupt Enable Register (IER)...........................................................................................
Interrupt Identification Register (IIR) .....................................................................................
FIFO Control Register (FCR) .............................................................................................
Line Control Register (LCR) ..............................................................................................
Modem Control Register (MCR) ..........................................................................................
Line Status Register (LSR)................................................................................................
Divisor LSB Latch (DLL) ...................................................................................................
Divisor MSB Latch (DLH) .................................................................................................
Peripheral Identification Register 1 (PID1) ..............................................................................
Peripheral Identification Register 2 (PID2) ..............................................................................
Power and Emulation Management Register (PWREMU_MGMT) ..................................................
List of Figures
11
12
13
15
18
18
18
20
23
24
25
26
28
30
32
33
36
36
37
37
38
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
www.ti.com
List of Tables
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
UART Supported Features/Characteristics by Instance ..............................................................
Baud Rate Examples for 27 MHz UART Input Clock ..................................................................
UART Signal Descriptions ................................................................................................
Character Time for Word Lengths .......................................................................................
UART Interrupt Requests Descriptions ..................................................................................
UART Registers ............................................................................................................
Receiver Buffer Register (RBR) Field Descriptions ....................................................................
Transmitter Holding Register (THR) Field Descriptions ...............................................................
Interrupt Enable Register (IER) Field Descriptions ....................................................................
Interrupt Identification Register (IIR) Field Descriptions...............................................................
Interrupt Identification and Interrupt Clearing Information ............................................................
FIFO Control Register (FCR) Field Descriptions .......................................................................
Line Control Register (LCR) Field Descriptions ........................................................................
Relationship Between ST, EPS, and PEN Bits in LCR................................................................
Number of STOP Bits Generated ........................................................................................
Modem Control Register (MCR) Field Descriptions ...................................................................
Line Status Register (LSR) Field Descriptions .........................................................................
Divisor LSB Latch (DLL) Field Descriptions ............................................................................
Divisor MSB Latch (DLH) Field Descriptions ...........................................................................
Peripheral Identification Register 1 (PID1) Field Descriptions .......................................................
Peripheral Identification Register 2 (PID2) Field Descriptions .......................................................
Power and Emulation Management Register (PWREMU_MGMT) Field Descriptions ............................
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
List of Tables
10
13
14
17
20
22
23
24
25
26
27
29
30
31
31
32
33
36
36
37
37
38
5
Preface
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Read This First
About This Manual
This document describes the universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter (UART) peripheral in the
TMS320DM357 Digital Media System-on-Chip (DMSoc).
Notational Conventions
This document uses the following conventions.
• Hexadecimal numbers are shown with the suffix h. For example, the following number is 40
hexadecimal (decimal 64): 40h.
• Registers in this document are shown in figures and described in tables.
– Each register figure shows a rectangle divided into fields that represent the fields of the register.
Each field is labeled with its bit name, its beginning and ending bit numbers above, and its
read/write properties below. A legend explains the notation used for the properties.
– Reserved bits in a register figure designate a bit that is used for future device expansion.
Related Documentation From Texas Instruments
The following documents describe the TMS320DM357 Digital Media System-on-Chip (DMSoC). Copies of
these documents are available on the Internet at www.ti.com. Tip: Enter the literature number in the
search box provided at www.ti.com.
SPRUG06 — TMS320DM357 DMSoC Video Processing Back End (VPBE) User's Guide. Describes
the video processing back end (VPBE) in the TMS320DM357 Digital Media System-on-Chip
(DMSoC) video processing subsystem. Included in the VPBE is the video encoder, on-screen
display, and digital LCD controller.
SPRUG25 — TMS320DM357 DMSoC ARM Subsystem Reference Guide. Describes the ARM
subsystem in the TMS320DM357 Digital Media System-on-Chip (DMSoC). The ARM subsystem is
designed to give the ARM926EJ-S (ARM9) master control of the device. In general, the ARM is
responsible for configuration and control of the device; including the video processing subsystem,
and a majority of the peripherals and external memories.
SPRUG26 — TMS320DM357 DMSoC Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART) User's
Guide. This document describes the universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter (UART) peripheral
in the TMS320DM357 Digital Media System-on-Chip (DMSoC). The UART peripheral performs
serial-to-parallel conversion on data received from a peripheral device, and parallel-to-serial
conversion on data received from the CPU.
SPRUG27 — TMS320DM357 DMSoC Inter-Integrated Circuit (I2C) Peripheral User's Guide.
Describes the inter-integrated circuit (I2C) peripheral in the TMS320DM357 Digital Media
System-on-Chip (DMSoC). The I2C peripheral provides an interface between the DMSoC and other
devices compliant with the I2C-bus specification and connected by way of an I2C-bus. External
components attached to this 2-wire serial bus can transmit and receive up to 8-bit wide data to and
from the DMSoC through the I2C peripheral. This document assumes the reader is familiar with the
I2C-bus specification.
6
Preface
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
www.ti.com
Notational Conventions
SPRUG28 — TMS320DM357 DMSoC 64-Bit Timer User's Guide. Describes the operation of the
software-programmable 64-bit timer in the TMS320DM357 Digital Media System-on-Chip (DMSoC).
Timer 0 and Timer 1 are used as general-purpose (GP) timers and can be programmed in 64-bit
mode, dual 32-bit unchained mode, or dual 32-bit chained mode; Timer 2 is used only as a
watchdog timer. The GP timer modes can be used to generate periodic interrupts or enhanced
direct memory access (EDMA) synchronization events. The watchdog timer mode is used to
provide a recovery mechanism for the device in the event of a fault condition, such as a non-exiting
code loop.
SPRUG29 — TMS320DM357 DMSoC Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) User's Guide. Describes the
serial peripheral interface (SPI) in the TMS320DM357 Digital Media System-on-Chip (DMSoC). The
SPI is a high-speed synchronous serial input/output port that allows a serial bit stream of
programmed length (1 to 16 bits) to be shifted into and out of the device at a programmed
bit-transfer rate. The SPI is normally used for communication between the DMSoC and external
peripherals. Typical applications include an interface to external I/O or peripheral expansion via
devices such as shift registers, display drivers, SPI EPROMs and analog-to-digital converters.
SPRUG30 — TMS320DM357 DMSoC Host Port Interface (HPI) Reference Guide. This document
describes the host port interface in the TMS320DM357 Digital Media System-on-Chip (DMSoC).
The HPI provides a parallel port interface through which an external host processor can directly
access the TMS320DM357 DMSoC processor's resources (configuration and program/data
memories).
SPRUG31 — TMS320DM357 DMSoC General-Purpose Input/Output (GPIO) User's Guide. Describes
the general-purpose input/output (GPIO) peripheral in the TMS320DM357 Digital Media
System-on-Chip (DMSoC). The GPIO peripheral provides dedicated general-purpose pins that can
be configured as either inputs or outputs. When configured as an input, you can detect the state of
the input by reading the state of an internal register. When configured as an output, you can write
to an internal register to control the state driven on the output pin.
SPRUG32 — TMS320DM357 DMSoC Multimedia Card (MMC)/Secure Digital (SD) Card Controller
User's Guide. Describes the multimedia card (MMC)/secure digital (SD) card controller in the
TMS320DM357 Digital Media System-on-Chip (DMSoC). The MMC/SD card is used in a number of
applications to provide removable data storage. The MMC/SD controller provides an interface to
external MMC and SD cards. The communication between the MMC/SD controller and MMC/SD
card(s) is performed by the MMC/SD protocol.
SPRUG33 — TMS320DM357 DMSoC Asynchronous External Memory Interface (EMIF) User's
Guide. Describes the asynchronous external memory interface (EMIF) in the TMS320DM357
Digital Media System-on-Chip (DMSoC). The EMIF supports a glueless interface to a variety of
external devices.
SPRUG34 — TMS320DM357 DMSoC Enhanced Direct Memory Access (EDMA) Controller User's
Guide. Describes the operation of the enhanced direct memory access (EDMA3) controller in the
TMS320DM357 Digital Media System-on-Chip (DMSoC). The EDMA3 controller’s primary purpose
is to service user-programmed data transfers between two memory-mapped slave endpoints on the
DMSoC.
SPRUG35 — TMS320DM357 DMSoC Audio Serial Port (ASP) User's Guide. Describes the operation
of the audio serial port (ASP) audio interface in the TMS320DM357 Digital Media System-on-Chip
(DMSoC). The primary audio modes that are supported by the ASP are the AC97 and IIS modes. In
addition to the primary audio modes, the ASP supports general serial port receive and transmit
operation, but is not intended to be used as a high-speed interface.
SPRUG36 — TMS320DM357 DMSoC Ethernet Media Access Controller (EMAC)/Management Data
Input/Output (MDIO) Module User's Guide. Discusses the ethernet media access controller
(EMAC) and physical layer (PHY) device management data input/output (MDIO) module in the
TMS320DM357 Digital Media System-on-Chip (DMSoC). The EMAC controls the flow of packet
data from the DMSoC to the PHY. The MDIO module controls PHY configuration and status
monitoring.
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Read This First
7
Notational Conventions
www.ti.com
SPRUG37 — TMS320DM357 DMSoC Pulse-Width Modulator (PWM) Peripheral User's Guide.
Describes the pulse-width modulator (PWM) peripheral in the TMS320DM357 Digital Media
System-on-Chip (DMSoC).
SPRUG38 — TMS320DM357 DMSoC DDR2 Memory Controller User's Guide. Describes the DDR2
memory controller in the TMS320DM357 Digital Media System-on-Chip (DMSoC). The DDR2
memory controller is used to interface with JESD79D-2A standard compliant DDR2 SDRAM
devices.
SPRUG39 — TMS320DM357 DMSoC Video Processing Front End (VPFE) User's Guide. Describes
the video processing front end (VPFE) in the TMS320DM357 Digital Media System-on-Chip
(DMSoC) video processing subsystem. Included in the VPFE is the preview engine, CCD controller,
resizer, histogram, and hardware 3A (H3A) statistic generator.
SPRUGH2 — TMS320DM357 DMSoC Peripherals Overview Reference Guide. This document provides
an overview of the peripherals in the TMS320DM357 Digital Media System-on-Chip (DMSoC).
SPRUGH3 — TMS320DM357 DMSoC Universal Serial Bus Controller User's Guide. This document
describes the universal serial bus (USB) controller in the TMS320DM357 Digital Media
System-on-Chip (DMSoC). The USB controller supports data throughput rates up to 480 Mbps. It
provides a mechanism for data transfer between USB devices and also supports host negotiation.
Trademarks
8
Read This First
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
User's Guide
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
1
Introduction
This document describes the universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter (UART) peripheral in the
TMS320DM357 Digital Media System-on-Chip (DMSoC).
1.1
Purpose of the Peripheral
The UART peripheral is based on the industry standard TL16C550 asynchronous communications
element, which in turn is a functional upgrade of the TL16C450. Functionally similar to the TL16C450 on
power up (single character or TL16C450 mode), the UART can be placed in an alternate FIFO
(TL16C550) mode. This relieves the CPU of excessive software overhead by buffering received and
transmitted characters. The receiver and transmitter FIFOs store up to 16 bytes including three additional
bits of error status per byte for the receiver FIFO.
The UART performs serial-to-parallel conversions on data received from a peripheral device and
parallel-to-serial conversion on data received from the CPU. The CPU can read the UART status at any
time. The UART includes control capability and a processor interrupt system that can be tailored to
minimize software management of the communications link.
The UART includes a programmable baud generator capable of dividing the UART input clock by divisors
from 1 to 65 535 and producing a 16 ‫נ‬reference clock for the internal transmitter and receiver logic. For
detailed timing and electrical specifications for the UART, see the device specific data manual.
1.2
Features
The UART peripheral has the following features:
• Programmable baud rates (frequency pre-scale values from 1 to 65535)
• Fully programmable serial interface characteristics:
– 5, 6, 7, or 8-bit characters
– Even, odd, or no PARITY bit generation and detection
– 1, 1.5, or 2 STOP bit generation
• 16-byte depth transmitter and receiver FIFOs:
– The UART can be operated with or without the FIFOs
– 1, 4, 8, or 14 byte selectable receiver FIFO trigger level for autoflow control and DMA
• DMA signaling capability for both received and transmitted data
• CPU interrupt capability for both received and transmitted data
• False START bit detection
• Line break generation and detection
• Internal diagnostic capabilities:
– Loopback controls for communications link fault isolation
– Break, parity, overrun, and framing error simulation
• Programmable autoflow control using RTS and CTS signals for UART2
• Modem control functions (CTS, RTS) for UART2. No Modem control functions are available for UART0
and UART1.
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
9
Introduction
www.ti.com
The DMxxx DMSoC provides three instances of the UART peripheral. Not all of the peripheral capabilities
are supported on all instances. Table 1 shows the capabilities supported on each instance.
Table 1. UART Supported Features/Characteristics by Instance
1.3
Feature
UART0
UART1
UART2
5, 6, 7 or 8-bit characters
Supported
Supported
Supported
Even, odd, or no PARITY bit
Supported
Supported
Supported
1, 1.5, or 2 STOP bit generation
Supported
Supported
Supported
Line break generation and detection
Supported
Supported
Supported
Internal loop back
Supported
Supported
Supported
DMA sync events for both received and transmitted data
Supported
Supported
Supported
1, 4, 8, or 14 byte selectable receiver FIFO trigger level
Supported
Supported
Supported
Polling/Interrupt
Supported
Supported
Supported
Max speed 128 kbps
Supported
Supported
Supported
Modem control features (CTS, RTS) only for UART2 instance
Not supported
Not supported
Supported
Autoflow control using CTS/RTS
Not supported
Not supported
Supported
DTR and DSR
Not supported
Not supported
Not supported
Ring indication
Not supported
Not supported
Not supported
Carrier detection
Not supported
Not supported
Not supported
Single-character transfer mode (mode 0) in DMA mode
Not supported
Not supported
Not supported
Functional Block Diagram
A functional block diagram of the UART is shown in Figure 1.
1.4
Industry Standard(s) Compliance Statement
The UART peripheral is based on the industry standard TL16C550 asynchronous communications
element, which is a functional upgrade of the TL16C450. Any deviations in supported functions are
indicated in Table 1.
The information in this document assumes the reader is familiar with these standards.
10
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Introduction
www.ti.com
Figure 1. UART Block Diagram
S
e
l
e
c
t
Peripheral
Bus
Data
Bus
Buffer
8
8
Receiver
FIFO
8
Receiver
Shift
Register
8
Receiver
Buffer
Register
RX
pin
16
Receiver
Timing and
Control
Line
Control
Register
Divisor
Latch (LS)
16
Divisor
Latch (MS)
Baud
Generator
Transmitter
Timing and
Control
Line
Status
Register
8
Transmitter
FIFO
Transmitter
Holding
Register
8
Modem
Control
Register
Interrupt
Identification
Register
FIFO
Control
Register
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
8
S
e
l
e
c
t
8
Transmitter
Shift
Register
TX
pin
Control
Logic
8
Interrupt
Enable
Register
8
Interrupt/
Event
Control
Logic
Interrupt to CPU
Event to DMA controller
8
Power and
Emulation
Control
Register
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
11
Peripheral Architecture
www.ti.com
2
Peripheral Architecture
2.1
Clock Generation and Control
The UART bit clock is derived from a fixed on-chip 27-MHz clock. It supports up to 128 000 bps maximum
data rate.
Figure 2 is a conceptual clock generation diagram for the UART. The processor clock generator receives
a signal from an external clock source and produces a UART input clock with a programmed frequency.
The UART contains a programmable baud generator that takes an input clock and divides it by a divisor in
the range between 1 and (216 - 1) to produce a baud clock (BCLK). The frequency of BCLK is sixteen
times (16 ‫ ש‬the baud rate; each received or transmitted bit lasts 16 BCLK cycles. When the UART is
receiving, the bit is sampled in the 8th BCLK cycle. The formula to calculate the divisor is:
Divisor +
UART input clock frequency
Desired baud rate 16
Two 8-bit register fields (DLH and DLL), called divisor latches, hold this 16-bit divisor. DLH holds the most
significant bits of the divisor, and DLL holds the least significant bits of the divisor. For information about
these register fields, see Section 3. These divisor latches must be loaded during initialization of the UART
in order to ensure desired operation of the baud generator. Writing to the divisor latches results in two wait
states being inserted during the write access while the baud generator is loaded with the new value.
Figure 3 summarizes the relationship between the transferred data bit, BCLK, and the UART input clock.
Example baud rates and divisor values relative to a 27-MHz UART input clock are shown in Table 2.
Figure 2. UART Clock Generation Diagram
Processor
UART
DLH:DLL
Input clock
Clock
generator
UART input clock
Baud
generator
Other logic
12
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
Receiver
timing and
control
BCLK
Transmitter
timing and
control
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Peripheral Architecture
www.ti.com
Figure 3. Relationships Between Data Bit, BCLK, and UART Input Clock
n UART input clock cycles, where n = divisor in DLH:DLL
UART input clock
n
BCLK
Each bit lasts 16 BCLK cycles.
When receiving, the UART samples the bit in the 8th cycle.
BCLK
TX,
RX
D1
D2
D0
TX,
RX
START
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
PARITY STOP1 STOP2
Table 2. Baud Rate Examples for 27 MHz UART Input Clock
Baud Rate
Divisor Value
Actual Baud Rate
Error (%)
2400
703
2400.427
0.018
4800
352
4794.034
-0.124
9600
176
9588.068
-0.124
19200
88
19176.14
-0.124
38400
44
38352.27
-0.124
56000
30
56250
0.446
128000
13
129807.7
1.412
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
13
Peripheral Architecture
2.2
www.ti.com
Signal Descriptions
The DM357 processor has three UARTs, but only UART2 supports flow control and the associated signals
(UART_CTS2 and UART_RTS2). The UART signal descriptions are included in Table 3.
Table 3. UART Signal Descriptions
Signal Name
Signal Type
Function
UART_TX0
Output
Serial data transmit
Input
Serial data receive
UART_CTS2
Input
Clear-to-Send handshaking signal
UART_RTS2
Output
Request-to-Send handshaking signal
UART_TX1
UART_TX2
UART_RX0
UART_RX1
UART_RX2
2.3
Pin Multiplexing
On the DM357 processor, the UART pins are multiplexed with other pins functions. The UART0 pins are
multiplexed with general-purpose I/O pins. The UART1 pins are multiplexed with ATA controller functional
pins. The UART2 pins are multiplexed with VPFE functional pins.
For these signals to be used for UART functions, the pin multiplexing must be configured appropriately.
For details on the pin multiplexing and configuration, see the device specific data manual.
2.4
2.4.1
Protocol Description
Transmission
The UART transmitter section includes a transmitter hold register (THR) and a transmitter shift register
(TSR). When the UART is in the FIFO mode, THR is a 16-byte FIFO. Transmitter section control is a
function of the UART line control register (LCR). Based on the settings chosen in LCR, the UART
transmitter sends the following to the receiving device:
• 1 START bit
• 5, 6, 7, or 8 data bits
• 1 PARITY bit (optional)
• 1, 1.5, or 2 STOP bits
2.4.2
Reception
The UART receiver section includes a receiver shift register (RSR) and a receiver buffer register (RBR).
When the UART is in the FIFO mode, RBR is a 16-byte FIFO. Receiver section control is a function of the
UART line control register (LCR). Based on the settings chosen in LCR, the UART receiver accepts the
following from the transmitting device:
• 1 START bit
• 5, 6, 7, or 8 data bits
• 1 PARITY bit (optional)
• 1 STOP bit (any other STOP bits transferred with the above data are not detected)
14
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Peripheral Architecture
www.ti.com
2.4.3
Data Format
The UART transmits in the following format:
1 START bit + data bits (5, 6, 7, 8) + 1 PARITY bit (optional) + STOP bit (1, 1.5, 2)
It transmits 1 START bit; 5, 6, 7, or 8 data bits, depending on the data width selection; 1 PARITY bit, if
parity is selected; and 1, 1.5, or 2 STOP bits, depending on the STOP bit selection.
The UART receives in the following format:
1 START bit + data bits (5, 6, 7, 8) + 1 PARITY bit (optional) + STOP bit (1)
It receives 1 START bit; 5, 6, 7, or 8 data bits, depending on the data width selection; 1 PARITY bit, if
parity is selected; and 1 STOP bit.
The protocol formats are shown in Figure 4
Figure 4. UART Protocol Formats
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
PARITY
STOP1
Transmit/Receive for 5-bit data, parity Enable, 1 STOP bit
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
PARITY
STOP1
Transmit/Receive for 6-bit data, parity Enable, 1 STOP bit
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
PARITY
STOP1
D7
PARITY
Transmit/Receive for 7-bit data, parity Enable, 1 STOP bit
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
STOP1
Transmit/Receive for 8-bit data, parity Enable, 1 STOP bit
2.5
2.5.1
Operation
Transmission
The UART transmitter section includes a transmitter hold register (THR) and a transmitter shift register
(TSR). When the UART is in the FIFO mode, THR is a 16-byte FIFO. Transmitter section control is a
function of the UART line control register (LCR). Based on the settings chosen in LCR, the UART
transmitter sends the following to the receiving device:
• 1 START bit
• 5, 6, 7, or 8 data bits
• 1 PARITY bit (optional)
• 1, 1.5, or 2 STOP bits
THR receives data from the internal data bus, and when TSR is ready, the UART moves the data from
THR to TSR. The UART serializes the data in TSR and transmits the data on the TX pin. In the non-FIFO
mode, if THR is empty and the THR empty interrupt is enabled in the interrupt enable register (IER), an
interrupt is generated. This interrupt is cleared when a character is loaded into THR. In the FIFO mode,
the interrupt is generated when the transmitter FIFO is empty, and it is cleared when at least one byte is
loaded into the FIFO.
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
15
Peripheral Architecture
2.5.2
www.ti.com
Reception
The UART receiver section includes a receiver shift register (RSR) and a receiver buffer register (RBR).
When the UART is in the FIFO mode, RBR is a 16-byte FIFO. Timing is supplied by the 16‫נ‬receiver clock.
Receiver section control is a function of the UART line control register (LCR). Based on the settings
chosen in LCR, the UART receiver accepts the following from the transmitting device:
• 1 START bit
• 5, 6, 7, or 8 data bits
• 1 PARITY bit (optional)
• 1 STOP bit (any other STOP bits transferred with the above data are not detected)
RSR receives the data bits from the RX pin. Then RSR concatenates the data bits and moves the
resulting value into RBR (or the receiver FIFO). The UART also stores three bits of error status
information next to each received character, to record a parity error, framing error, or break.
In the non-FIFO mode, when a character is placed in RBR and the receiver data-ready interrupt is enabled
in the interrupt enable register (IER), an interrupt is generated. This interrupt is cleared when the character
is read from RBR. In the FIFO mode, the interrupt is generated when the FIFO is filled to the trigger level
selected in the FIFO control register (FCR), and it is cleared when the FIFO contents drop below the
trigger level.
2.5.3
FIFO Modes
The following two modes can be used for servicing the receiver and transmitter FIFOs:
• FIFO interrupt mode. The FIFO is enabled and the associated interrupts are enabled. Interrupts are
sent to the CPU to indicate when specific events occur.
• FIFO poll mode. The FIFO is enabled but the associated interrupts are disabled. The CPU polls status
bits to detect specific events.
Because the receiver FIFO and the transmitter FIFO are controlled separately, either one or both can be
placed into the interrupt mode or the poll mode.
2.5.3.1
FIFO Interrupt Mode
When the receiver FIFO is enabled in the FIFO control register (FCR) and the receiver interrupts are
enabled in the interrupt enable register (IER), the interrupt mode is selected for the receiver FIFO. The
following are important points about the receiver interrupts:
• The receiver data-ready interrupt is issued to the CPU when the FIFO has reached the trigger level
that is programmed in FCR. It is cleared when the CPU or the DMA controller reads enough characters
from the FIFO such that the FIFO drops below its programmed trigger level.
• The receiver line status interrupt is generated in response to an overrun error, a parity error, a framing
error, or a break. This interrupt has higher priority than the receiver data-ready interrupt. For details,
see Section 2.8.
• The data-ready (DR) bit in the line status register (LSR) indicates the presence or absence of
characters in the receiver FIFO. The DR bit is set when a character is transferred from the receiver
shift register (RSR) to the empty receiver FIFO. The DR bit remains set until the FIFO is empty again.
• A receiver time-out interrupt occurs if all of the following conditions exist:
– At least one character is in the FIFO,
– The most recent character was received more than four continuous character times ago. A
character time is the time allotted for 1 START bit, n data bits, 1 PARITY bit, and 1 STOP bit,
where n depends on the word length selected with the WLS bits in the line control register (LCR).
See Table 4.
– The most recent read of the FIFO has occurred more than four continuous character times before.
• Character times are calculated by using the baud rate.
• When a receiver time-out interrupt has occurred, it is cleared and the time-out timer is cleared when
the CPU or the EDMA controller reads one character from the receiver FIFO. The interrupt is also
cleared if a new character is received in the FIFO or if the URRST bit is cleared in the power and
emulation management register (PWREMU_MGMT).
16
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Peripheral Architecture
www.ti.com
•
If a receiver time-out interrupt has not occurred, the time-out timer is cleared after a new character is
received or after the CPU or EDMA reads the receiver FIFO.
When the transmitter FIFO is enabled in FCR and the transmitter holding register empty interrupt is
enabled in IER, the interrupt mode is selected for the transmitter FIFO. The transmitter holding register
empty interrupt occurs when the transmitter FIFO is empty. It is cleared when the transmitter hold register
(THR) is loaded (1 to 16 characters may be written to the transmitter FIFO while servicing this interrupt).
Table 4. Character Time for Word Lengths
Word Length (n)
2.5.3.2
Character Time
Four Character Times
5
Time for 8 bits
Time for 32 bits
6
Time for 9 bits
Time for 36 bits
7
Time for 10 bits
Time for 40 bits
8
Time for 11 bits
Time for 44 bits
FIFO Poll Mode
When the receiver FIFO is enabled in the FIFO control register (FCR) and the receiver interrupts are
disabled in the interrupt enable register (IER), the poll mode is selected for the receiver FIFO. Similarly,
when the transmitter FIFO is enabled and the transmitter interrupts are disabled, the transmitted FIFO is in
the poll mode. In the poll mode, the CPU detects events by checking bits in the line status register (LSR):
• The RXFIFOE bit indicates whether there are any errors in the receiver FIFO.
• The TEMT bit indicates that both the transmitter holding register (THR) and the transmitter shift
register (TSR) are empty.
• The THRE bit indicates when THR is empty.
• The BI (break), FE (framing error), PE (parity error), and OE (overrun error) bits specify which error or
errors have occurred.
• The DR (data-ready) bit is set as long as there is at least one byte in the receiver FIFO.
Also, in the FIFO poll mode:
• The interrupt identification register (IIR) is not affected by any events because the interrupts are
disabled.
• The UART does not indicate when the receiver FIFO trigger level is reached or when a receiver
time-out occurs.
2.5.4
Autoflow Control (UART2 only)
UART2 can employ autoflow control by connecting the CTS and RTS signals. The CTS input must be
active before the transmitter FIFO can transmit data. The RTS becomes active when the receiver needs
more data and notifies the sending device. When RTS is connected to CTS, data transmission does not
occur unless the receiver FIFO has space for the data. Therefore, when two UARTs are connected as
shown in Figure 5 with autoflow enabled, overrun errors are eliminated.
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
17
Peripheral Architecture
www.ti.com
Figure 5. UART Interface Using Autoflow Diagram
UART 2
UART
Serial to
Parallel
Receiver
FIFO
Flow
Control
rx
tx
Parallel to
Serial
rts cts
Flow
Control
tx
Serial to
Parallel
Transmitter
FIFO
D[7:0]
Transmitter
FIFO
Parallel to
Serial
Flow
Control
DMSoC
2.5.4.1
rx
cts rts
D[7:0]
Receiver
FIFO
Flow
Control
Off-chip
RTS Behavior
RTS data flow control originates in the receiver block (see Figure 1). When the receiver FIFO level
reaches a trigger level of 1, 4, 8, or 14 (see Figure 6), RTS is deasserted. The sending UART may send
an additional byte after the trigger level is reached (assuming the sending UART has another byte to
send), because it may not recognize the deassertion of RTS until after it has begun sending the additional
byte. For trigger level 1, 4, and 8, RTS is automatically reasserted once the receiver FIFO is emptied. For
trigger level 14, RTS is automatically reasserted once the receiver FIFO drops below the trigger level.
Figure 6. Autoflow Functional Timing Waveforms for RTS
Start
RX
Bits N
Stop
Start Bits N+1 Stop
Start
RTS
2.5.4.2
(1)
N = Receiver FIFO trigger level.
(2)
The two blocks in dashed lines cover the case where an additional byte is sent.
CTS Behavior
The transmitter checks CTS before sending the next data byte. If CTS is active, the transmitter sends the
next byte. To stop the transmitter from sending the following byte, CTS must be released before the
middle of the last STOP bit that is currently being sent (see Figure 7). When flow control is enabled, CTS
level changes do not trigger interrupts because the device automatically controls its own transmitter.
Without autoflow control, the transmitter sends any data present in the transmitter FIFO and a receiver
overrun error may result.
Figure 7. Autoflow Functional Timing Waveforms for CTS
Start
TX
Bits0−7 Stop
Start Bits 0−7 Stop
Start
Bits 0−7 Stop
CTS
18
(1)
When CTS is active (low), the transmitter keeps sending serial data out.
(2)
When CTS goes high before the middle of the last STOP bit of the current byte, the transmitter finishes
sending the current byte but it does not send the next byte.
(3)
When CTS goes from high to low, the transmitter begins sending data again.
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
www.ti.com
2.5.5
Peripheral Architecture
Loopback Control
The UART can be placed in the diagnostic mode using the LOOP bit in the modem control register (MCR),
which internally connects the UART output back to the UART input. In this mode, the transmit and receive
data paths, the transmitter and receiver interrupts, and the modem control interrupts can be verified
without connecting to another UART.
2.6
2.6.1
Reset Considerations
Software Reset Considerations
Three bits in the power and emulation management register (PWREMU_MGMT) control resetting the
parts of the UART:
• The UTRST bit controls resetting the transmitter only. If UTRST = 1, the transmitter is active;
if UTRST = 0, the transmitter is in reset.
• The URRST bit controls resetting the receiver only. If URRST = 1, the receiver is active;
if URRST = 0, the receiver is in reset.
In each case, putting the receiver and/or transmitter in reset will reset the state machine of the affected
portion but does not affect the UART registers.
2.6.2
Hardware Reset Considerations
When the processor RESET pin is asserted, the entire processor is reset and is held in the reset state
until the RESET pin is released. As part of a device reset, the UART state machine is reset and the UART
registers are forced to their default states. The default states of the registers are shown in Section 3.
Following a hardware reset, the UART reset bits (UTRST and URRST) in the power and emulation
management register (PWREMU_MGMT) must be set to 1 to bring the UART out of reset.
2.7
Initialization
The following steps are required to initialize the UART:
• Set the desired baud rate by writing the appropriate clock divisor values to the divisor latch registers
(DLL and DLH).
• If the FIFOs will be used, select the desired trigger level and enable the FIFOs by writing the
appropriate values to the FIFO control register (FCR). The FIFOEN bit in FCR must be set first, before
the other bits in FCR are configured.
• Choose the desired protocol settings by writing the appropriate values to the line control register
(LCR).
• If autoflow control is desired, write appropriate values to the modem control register (MCR).
• Choose the desired response to emulation suspend events by configuring the FREE bit and enable the
UART by setting the UTRST and URRST bits in the power and emulation management register
(PWREMU_MGMT).
2.8
2.8.1
Interrupt Support
Interrupt Events and Requests
The UART generates the interrupt requests described in Table 5. All requests are multiplexed through an
arbiter to a single UART interrupt request to the CPU, as shown in Figure 8. Each of the interrupt requests
has an enable bit in the interrupt enable register (IER) and is recorded in the interrupt identification
register (IIR).
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
19
Peripheral Architecture
www.ti.com
If an interrupt occurs and the corresponding enable bit is set to 1, the interrupt request is recorded in IIR
and is forwarded to the CPU. If an interrupt occurs and the corresponding enable bit is cleared to 0, the
interrupt request is blocked. The interrupt request is neither recorded in IIR nor forwarded to the CPU.
Table 5. UART Interrupt Requests Descriptions
UART Interrupt
Request
Interrupt Source
Comment
THREINT
THR-empty condition: The transmitter holding register
(THR) or the transmitter FIFO is empty. All of the data
has been copied from THR to the transmitter shift
register (TSR).
If THREINT is enabled in IER, by setting the ETBEI
bit, it is recorded in IIR.
As an alternative to using THREINT, the CPU can poll
the THRE bit in the line status register (LSR).
RDAINT
Receive data available in non-FIFO mode or trigger
level reached in the FIFO mode.
If RDAINT is enabled in IER, by setting the ERBI bit,
it is recorded in IIR.
As an alternative to using RDAINT, the CPU can poll
the DR bit in the line status register (LSR). In the
FIFO mode, this is not a functionally equivalent
alternative because the DR bit does not respond to
the FIFO trigger level. The DR bit only indicates the
presence or absence of unread characters.
RTOINT
Receiver time-out condition (in the FIFO mode only):
No characters have been removed from or input to
the receiver FIFO during the last four character times
(see Table 4), and there is at least one character in
the receiver FIFO during this time.
The receiver time-out interrupt prevents the UART
from waiting indefinitely, in the case when the receiver
FIFO level is below the trigger level and thus does not
generate a receiver data-ready interrupt.
If RTOINT is enabled in IER, by setting the ERBI bit,
it is recorded in IIR.
There is no status bit to reflect the occurrence of a
time-out condition.
RLSINT
Receiver line status condition: An overrun error, parity If RLSINT is enabled in IER, by setting the ELSI bit, it
error, framing error, or break has occurred.
is recorded in IIR.
As an alternative to using RLSINT, the CPU can poll
the following bits in the line status register (LSR):
overrun error indicator (OE), parity error indicator
(PE), framing error indicator (FE), and break indicator
(BI).
Figure 8. UART Interrupt Request Enable Paths
Conditions
Transmitter holding
register empty
Enable bits
UART interrupt requests
THREINT
IER(ETBEI)
Receiver data ready
RDRINT
IER(ERBI)
RTOINT
Arbiter
UART interrupt
request to CPU
Receiver time-out
Overrun error
RLSINT
Parity error
Framing error
IER(ELSI)
Break
2.8.2
Interrupt Multiplexing
The UARTs have dedicated interrupt signals to the ARM CPU and the interrupts are not multiplexed with
any other interrupt source.
20
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Peripheral Architecture
www.ti.com
2.9
DMA Event Support
In the FIFO mode, the UART generates the following two DMA events:
• Receive event (URXEVT): The trigger level for the receiver FIFO (1, 4, 8, or 14 characters) is set with
the RXFIFTL bit in the FIFO control register (FCR). Every time the trigger level is reached or a receiver
time-out occurs, the UART sends a receive event to the EDMA controller. In response, the EDMA
controller reads the data from the receiver FIFO by way of the receiver buffer register (RBR).
• Transmit event (UTXEVT): When the transmitter FIFO is empty (when the last byte in the transmitter
FIFO has been copied to the transmitter shift register), the UART sends an UTXEVT signal to the
EDMA controller. In response, the EDMA controller refills the transmitter FIFO by way of the transmitter
holding register (THR). The UTXEVT signal is also sent to the DMA controller when the UART is taken
out of reset using the UTRST bit in the power and emulation management register
(PWREMU_MGMT).
Activity in DMA channels can be synchronized to these events. In the non-FIFO mode, the UART
generates no DMA events. Any DMA channel synchronized to either of these events must be enabled at
the time the UART event is generated. Otherwise, the DMA channel will miss the event and, unless the
UART generates a new event, no data transfer will occur.
2.10 Power Management
The UART peripheral can be placed in reduced-power modes to conserve power during periods of low
activity. The power management of the UART peripheral is controlled by the processor Power and Sleep
Controller (PSC). The PSC acts as a master controller for power management for all of the peripherals on
the device. For detailed information on power management procedures using the PSC, see the
TMS320DM357 DMSoC ARM Subsystem Reference Guide (SPRUG25).
2.11 Emulation Considerations
The FREE bit in the power and emulation management register (PWREMU_MGMT) determines how the
UART responds to an emulation suspend event such as an emulator halt or breakpoint. If FREE = 0 and a
transmission is in progress, the UART stops after completing the one-word transmission; if FREE = 0 and
a transmission is not in progress, the UART stops immediately. If FREE = 1, the UART does not stop and
continues operating normally.
The UART registers can be read from or written to during emulation suspend events, even if the UART
activity has stopped.
2.12 Exception Processing
2.12.1
Divisor Latch Not Programmed
Since the processor reset signal has no effect on the divisor latch, the divisor latch will have an unknown
value after power up. If the divisor latch is not programmed after power up, the baud clock (BCLK) will not
operate and will instead be set to a constant logic 1 state.
The divisor latch values should always be reinitialized following a processor reset.
2.12.2
Changing Operating Mode During Busy Serial Communication
Since the serial link characteristics are based on how the control registers are programmed, the UART will
expect the control registers to be static while it is busy engaging in a serial communication. Therefore,
changing the control registers while the module is still busy communicating with another serial device will
most likely cause an error condition and should be avoided.
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
21
Registers
3
www.ti.com
Registers
The system programmer has access to and control over any of the UART registers that are listed in
Table 6. These registers, which control UART operations, receive data, and transmit data, are available at
32-bit addresses in the device memory map. See the device-specific data manual for the memory address
of these registers.
• RBR, THR, and DLL share one address. When the DLAB bit in LCR is 0, reading from the address
gives the content of RBR, and writing to the address modifies THR. When DLAB = 1, all accesses at
the address read or modify DLL. DLL can also be accessed with address offset 20h.
• IER and DLH share one address. When DLAB = 0, all accesses read or modify IER. When DLAB = 1,
all accesses read or modify DLH. DLH can also be accessed with address offset 24h.
• IIR and FCR share one address. Regardless of the value of the DLAB bit, reading from the address
gives the content of IIR, and writing modifies FCR.
Table 6. UART Registers
Offset
22
Acronym
Register Description
Section
0h
RBR
Receiver Buffer Register (read only)
Section 3.1
0h
THR
Transmitter Holding Register (write only)
Section 3.2
4h
IER
Interrupt Enable Register
Section 3.3
8h
IIR
Interrupt Identification Register (read only)
Section 3.4
8h
FCR
FIFO Control Register (write only)
Section 3.5
Ch
LCR
Line Control Register
Section 3.6
10h
MCR
Modem Control Register
Section 3.7
14h
LSR
Line Status Register
Section 3.8
20h
DLL
Divisor LSB Latch
Section 3.9
24h
DLH
Divisor MSB Latch
Section 3.9
28h
PID1
Peripheral Identification Register 1
Section 3.10
2Ch
PID2
Peripheral Identification Register 2
Section 3.10
30h
PWREMU_MGMT
Power and Emulation Management Register
Section 3.11
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Registers
www.ti.com
3.1
Receiver Buffer Register (RBR)
The receiver buffer register (RBR) is shown in Figure 9 and described in Table 7.
The UART receiver section consists of a receiver shift register (RSR) and a receiver buffer register (RBR).
When the UART is in the FIFO mode, RBR is a 16-byte FIFO. Timing is supplied by the 16x receiver
clock. Receiver section control is a function of the line control register (LCR).
RSR receives serial data from the RX pin. Then RSR concatenates the data and moves it into RBR (or the
receiver FIFO). In the non-FIFO mode, when a character is placed in RBR and the receiver data-ready
interrupt is enabled (DR = 1 in IER), an interrupt is generated. This interrupt is cleared when the character
is read from RBR. In the FIFO mode, the interrupt is generated when the FIFO is filled to the trigger level
selected in the FIFO control register (FCR), and it is cleared when the FIFO contents drop below the
trigger level.
Access considerations:
RBR, THR, and DLL share one address. To read RBR, write 0 to the DLAB bit in LCR, and read from the
shared address. When DLAB = 0, writing to the shared address modifies THR. When DLAB = 1, all
accesses at the shared address read or modify DLL.
DLL also has a dedicated address. If you use the dedicated address, you can keep DLAB = 0, so that
RBR and THR are always selected at the shared address.
Figure 9. Receiver Buffer Register (RBR)
31
16
Reserved
R-0
15
8
7
0
Reserved
DATA
R-0
R-0
LEGEND: R = Read only; -n = value after reset
Table 7. Receiver Buffer Register (RBR) Field Descriptions
Bit
Field
31-8
Reserved
7-0
DATA
Value
0
0-FFh
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Description
Reserved
Received data
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
23
Registers
3.2
www.ti.com
Transmitter Holding Register (THR)
The transmitter holding register (THR) is shown in Figure 10 and described in Table 8.
The UART transmitter section consists of a transmitter hold register (THR) and a transmitter shift register
(TSR). When the UART is in the FIFO mode, THR is a 16-byte FIFO. Transmitter section control is a
function of the line control register (LCR).
THR receives data from the internal data bus and when TSR is idle, the UART moves the data from THR
to TSR. The UART serializes the data in TSR and transmits the data on the TX pin. In the non-FIFO
mode, if THR is empty and the THR empty (THRE) interrupt is enabled (ETBEI = 1 in IER), an interrupt is
generated. This interrupt is cleared when a character is loaded into THR. In the FIFO mode, the interrupt
is generated when the transmitter FIFO is empty, and it is cleared when at least one byte is loaded into
the FIFO.
Access considerations:
RBR, THR, and DLL share one address. To load THR, write 0 to the DLAB bit of LCR, and write to the
shared address. When DLAB = 0, reading from the shared address gives the content of RBR. When
DLAB = 1, all accesses at the address read or modify DLL.
DLL also has a dedicated address. If you use the dedicated address, you can keep DLAB = 0, so that
RBR and THR are always selected at the shared address.
Figure 10. Transmitter Holding Register (THR)
31
16
Reserved
R-0
15
8
7
0
Reserved
DATA
R-0
W-0
LEGEND: R = Read only; W = Write only; -n = value after reset
Table 8. Transmitter Holding Register (THR) Field Descriptions
Bit
24
Field
31-8
Reserved
7-0
DATA
Value
0
0-FFh
Description
Reserved
Data to transmit
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Registers
www.ti.com
3.3
Interrupt Enable Register (IER)
The interrupt enable register (IER) is used to individually enable or disable each type of interrupt request
that can be generated by the UART. Each interrupt request that is enabled in IER is forwarded to the
CPU. IER is shown in Figure 11 and described in Table 9.
Access considerations:
IER and DLH share one address. To read or modify IER, write 0 to the DLAB bit in LCR. When DLAB = 1,
all accesses at the shared address read or modify DLH.
DLH also has a dedicated address. If you use the dedicated address, you can keep DLAB = 0, so that IER
is always selected at the shared address.
Figure 11. Interrupt Enable Register (IER)
31
16
Reserved
R-0
15
4
3
2
1
0
Reserved
Rsvd
ELSI
ETBEI
ERBI
R-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
LEGEND: R/W = Read/Write; R = Read only; -n = value after reset
Table 9. Interrupt Enable Register (IER) Field Descriptions
Bit
Field
Value
Description
31-4
Reserved
0
Reserved
3
Reserved
0
Reserved. This bit must always be written with a 0.
2
ELSI
1
0
Receiver line status interrupt enable.
0
Receiver line status interrupt is disabled.
1
Receiver line status interrupt is enabled.
ETBEI
Transmitter holding register empty interrupt enable.
0
Transmitter holding register empty interrupt is disabled.
1
Transmitter holding register empty interrupt is enabled.
ERBI
Receiver data available interrupt and character timeout indication interrupt enable.
0
Receiver data available interrupt and character timeout indication interrupt is disabled.
1
Receiver data available interrupt and character timeout indication interrupt is enabled.
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
25
Registers
3.4
www.ti.com
Interrupt Identification Register (IIR)
The interrupt identification register (IIR) is a read-only register at the same address as the FIFO control
register (FCR), which is a write-only register. When an interrupt is generated and enabled in the interrupt
enable register (IER), IIR indicates that an interrupt is pending in the IPEND bit and encodes the type of
interrupt in the INTID bits. IIR is shown in Figure 12 and described in Figure 12.
The UART has an on-chip interrupt generation and prioritization capability that permits flexible
communication with the CPU. The UART provides three priority levels of interrupts:
• Priority 1 - Receiver line status (highest priority)
• Priority 2 - Receiver data ready or receiver timeout
• Priority 3 - Transmitter holding register empty
The FIFOEN bit in IIR can be checked to determine whether the UART is in the FIFO mode or the
non-FIFO mode.
Access consideration:
IIR and FCR share one address. Regardless of the value of the DLAB bit in LCR, reading from the
address gives the content of IIR, and writing to the address modifies FCR.
Figure 12. Interrupt Identification Register (IIR)
31
16
Reserved
R-0
15
8
7
6
5
4
3
1
0
Reserved
FIFOEN
Reserved
INTID
IPEND
R-0
R-0
R-0
R-0
R-1
LEGEND: R = Read only; -n = value after reset
Table 10. Interrupt Identification Register (IIR) Field Descriptions
Bit
Field
31-8
Reserved
7-6
FIFOEN
Value
0
Reserved
3-1
INTID
FIFOs enabled.
0
Non-FIFO mode
26
Reserved
3h
FIFOs are enabled. FIFOEN bit in the FIFO control register (FCR) is set to 1.
0
Reserved
0-7h
Interrupt type. See Table 11.
0
Reserved
1h
Transmitter holding register empty (priority 3)
2h
Receiver data available (priority 2)
3h
Receiver line status (priority 1, highest)
4h-5h
0
Reserved
0-3h
1h-2h
5-4
Description
Reserved
6h
Character timeout indication (priority 2)
7h
Reserved
IPEND
Interrupt pending. When any UART interrupt is generated and is enabled in IER, IPEND is forced to 0.
IPEND remains 0 until all pending interrupts are cleared or until a hardware reset occurs. If no interrupts
are enabled, IPEND is never forced to 0.
0
Interrupts pending.
1
No interrupts pending.
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Registers
www.ti.com
Table 11. Interrupt Identification and Interrupt Clearing Information
IIR Bits
Priority
Level
3
2
1
0
Interrupt Type
Interrupt Source
Event That Clears Interrupt
None
0
0
0
1
None
None
None
1
0
1
1
0
Receiver line status
Overrun error, parity error, framing
error, or break is detected.
For an overrun error, reading the line
status register (LSR) clears the
interrupt. For a parity error, framing
error, or break, the interrupt is
cleared only after all the erroneous
data have been read.
2
0
1
0
0
Receiver data-ready
Non-FIFO mode: Receiver data is
ready.
Non-FIFO mode: The receiver buffer
register (RBR) is read.
FIFO mode: Trigger level reached. If FIFO mode: The FIFO drops below
four character times (see Table 4)
the trigger level. (1)
pass with no access of the FIFO, the
interrupt is asserted again.
(1)
2
1
1
0
0
Receiver time-out
FIFO mode only: No characters have One of the following events:
been removed from or input to the
• A character is read from the
receiver FIFO during the last four
receiver FIFO. (1)
character times (see Table 4), and
• A new character arrives in the
there is at least one character in the
receiver FIFO.
receiver FIFO during this time.
• The URRST bit in the power
and emulation management
register (PWREMU_MGMT) is
loaded with 0.
3
0
0
1
0
Transmitter holding
register empty
Non-FIFO mode: Transmitter holding A character is written to the
register (THR) is empty.
transmitter holding register (THR).
FIFO mode: Transmitter FIFO is
empty.
In the FIFO mode, the receiver data-ready interrupt or receiver time-out interrupt is cleared by the CPU or by the DMA
controller, whichever reads from the receiver FIFO first.
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
27
Registers
3.5
www.ti.com
FIFO Control Register (FCR)
The FIFO control register (FCR) is a write-only register at the same address as the interrupt identification
register (IIR), which is a read-only register. Use FCR to enable and clear the FIFOs and to select the
receiver FIFO trigger level FCR is shown in Figure 13 and described in Table 12. The FIFOEN bit must be
set to 1 before other FCR bits are written to or the FCR bits are not programmed.
Access consideration:
IIR and FCR share one address. Regardless of the value of the DLAB bit, reading from the address gives
the content of IIR, and writing to the address modifies FCR.
CAUTION
For proper communication between the UART and the EDMA controller, the
DMAMODE1 bit must be set to 1. Always write a 1 to the DMAMODE1 bit, and
after a hardware reset, change the DMAMODE1 bit from 0 to 1.
Figure 13. FIFO Control Register (FCR)
31
16
Reserved
R-0
15
8
Reserved
R-0
7
6
5
4
RXFIFTL
Reserved
W-0
R-0
3
(A)
DMAMODE1
W-0
2
1
0
TXCLR
RXCLR
FIFOEN
W1C-0
W1C-0
W-0
LEGEND: R = Read only; W = Write only; W1C = Write 1 to clear (writing 0 has no effect); -n = value after reset
(A)
Always write 1 to the DMAMODE1 bit. After a hardware reset, change the DMAMODE1 bit from 0 to 1. DMAMODE = 1 is required for
proper communication between the UART and the DMA controller.
28
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Registers
www.ti.com
Table 12. FIFO Control Register (FCR) Field Descriptions
Bit
Field
Value
31-8
Reserved
0
7-6
RXFIFTL
0-3h
5-4
3
2
1
0
Reserved
Description
Reserved
Receiver FIFO trigger level. RXFIFTL sets the trigger level for the receiver FIFO. When the trigger level
is reached, a receiver data-ready interrupt is generated (if the interrupt request is enabled). Once the
FIFO drops below the trigger level, the interrupt is cleared.
0
1 byte
1h
4 bytes
2h
8 bytes
3h
14 bytes
0
Reserved
DMAMODE1
DMA MODE1 enable if FIFOs are enabled. Always write 1 to DMAMODE1. After a hardware reset,
change DMAMODE1 from 0 to 1. DMAMOD1 = 1 is a requirement for proper communication between
the UART and the EDMA controller.
0
DMA MODE1 is disabled.
1
DMA MODE1 is enabled.
TXCLR
Transmitter FIFO clear. Write a 1 to TXCLR to clear the bit.
0
No effect.
1
Clears transmitter FIFO and resets the transmitter FIFO counter. The shift register is not cleared.
RXCLR
Receiver FIFO clear. Write a 1 to RXCLR to clear the bit.
0
No effect.
1
Clears receiver FIFO and resets the receiver FIFO counter. The shift register is not cleared.
FIFOEN
Transmitter and receiver FIFOs mode enable. FIFOEN must be set before other FCR bits are written to
or the FCR bits are not programmed. Clearing this bit clears the FIFO counters.
0
Non-FIFO mode. The transmitter and receiver FIFOs are disabled, and the FIFO pointers are cleared.
1
FIFO mode. The transmitter and receiver FIFOs are enabled.
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
29
Registers
3.6
www.ti.com
Line Control Register (LCR)
The line control register (LCR) is shown in Figure 14 and described in Table 13.
The system programmer controls the format of the asynchronous data communication exchange by using
LCR. In addition, the programmer can retrieve, inspect, and modify the content of LCR; this eliminates the
need for separate storage of the line characteristics in system memory.
Figure 14. Line Control Register (LCR)
31
16
Reserved
R-0
15
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Reserved
DLAB
BC
SP
EPS
PEN
STB
WLS
R-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
LEGEND: R/W = Read/Write; R = Read only; -n = value after reset
Table 13. Line Control Register (LCR) Field Descriptions
Bit
31-8
7
6
5
Field
Reserved
Value
0
DLAB
Description
Reserved
Divisor latch access bit. The divisor latch registers (DLL and DLH) can be accessed at dedicated
addresses or at addresses shared by RBR, THR, and IER. Using the shared addresses requires
toggling DLAB to change which registers are selected. If you use the dedicated addresses, you can
keep DLAB = 0.
0
Allows access to the receiver buffer register (RBR), the transmitter holding register (THR), and the
interrupt enable register (IER) selected. At the address shared by RBR, THR, and DLL, the CPU can
read from RBR and write to THR. At the address shared by IER and DLH, the CPU can read from and
write to IER.
1
Allows access to the divisor latches of the baud generator during a read or write operation (DLL and
DLH). At the address shared by RBR, THR, and DLL, the CPU can read from and write to DLL. At the
address shared by IER and DLH, the CPU can read from and write to DLH.
BC
Break control.
0
Break condition is disabled.
1
Break condition is transmitted to the receiving UART. A break condition is a condition where the
UART_TX signal is forced to the spacing (cleared) state.
SP
Stick parity. The SP bit works in conjunction with the EPS and PEN bits. The relationship between the
SP, EPS, and PEN bits is summarized in Table 14.
0
Stick parity is disabled.
1
Stick parity is enabled.
• When odd parity is selected (EPS = 0), the PARITY bit is transmitted and checked as set.
• When even parity is selected (EPS = 1), the PARITY bit is transmitted and checked as cleared.
4
3
30
EPS
Even parity select. Selects the parity when parity is enabled (PEN = 1). The EPS bit works in
conjunction with the SP and PEN bits. The relationship between the SP, EPS, and PEN bits is
summarized in Table 14.
0
Odd parity is selected (an odd number of logic 1s is transmitted or checked in the data and PARITY
bits).
1
Even parity is selected (an even number of logic 1s is transmitted or checked in the data and PARITY
bits).
PEN
Parity enable. The PEN bit works in conjunction with the SP and EPS bits. The relationship between the
SP, EPS, and PEN bits is summarized in Table 14.
0
No PARITY bit is transmitted or checked.
1
Parity bit is generated in transmitted data and is checked in received data between the last data word
bit and the first STOP bit.
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Registers
www.ti.com
Table 13. Line Control Register (LCR) Field Descriptions (continued)
Bit
Field
2
STB
Value
Description
Number of STOP bits generated. STB specifies 1, 1.5, or 2 STOP bits in each transmitted character.
When STB = 1, the WLS bit determines the number of STOP bits. The receiver clocks only the first
STOP bit, regardless of the number of STOP bits selected. The number of STOP bits generated is
summarized in Table 15.
0
1 STOP bit is generated.
1
WLS bit determines the number of STOP bits:
• When WLS = 0, 1.5 STOP bits are generated.
• When WLS = 1h, 2h, or 3h, 2 STOP bits are generated.
1-0
WLS
0-3h
Word length select. Number of bits in each transmitted or received serial character. When STB = 1, the
WLS bit determines the number of STOP bits.
0
5 bits
1h
6 bits
2h
7 bits
3h
8 bits
Table 14. Relationship Between ST, EPS, and PEN Bits in LCR
ST Bit
EPS Bit
PEN Bit
Parity Option
x
x
0
Parity disabled: No PARITY bit is transmitted or checked
0
0
1
Odd parity selected: Odd number of logic 1s
0
1
1
Even parity selected: Even number of logic 1s
1
0
1
Stick parity selected with PARITY bit transmitted and checked as set
1
1
1
Stick parity selected with PARITY bit transmitted and checked as cleared
Table 15. Number of STOP Bits Generated
STB Bit
WLS Bits
Word Length Selected
with WLS Bits
Number of STOP Bits
Generated
Baud Clock (BCLK)
Cycles
0
x
Any word length
1
16
1
0h
5 bits
1.5
24
1
1h
6 bits
2
32
1
2h
7 bits
2
32
1
3h
8 bits
2
32
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
31
Registers
3.7
www.ti.com
Modem Control Register (MCR)
The modem control register (MCR) is shown in Figure 15 and described in Table 16. The modem control
register provides the ability to enable/disable the autoflow functions, and enable/disable the loopback
function for diagnostic purposes.
Figure 15. Modem Control Register (MCR)
31
16
Reserved
R-0
15
5
4
1
0
Reserved
6
AFE
LOOP
3
Reserved
2
RTS
Rsvd
R-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R-0
R/W-0
R-0
LEGEND: R/W = Read/Write; R = Read only; -n = value after reset
Table 16. Modem Control Register (MCR) Field Descriptions
Bit
31-6
5
Field
Reserved
Value
0
AFE
Description
Reserved
Autoflow control enable. Autoflow control allows the RTS and CTS signals to provide handshaking
between UARTs during data transfer. When AFE = 1, the RTS bit determines the autoflow control
enabled.
0
Autoflow control is disabled.
1
Autoflow control is enabled:
• When RTS = 0, CTS is only enabled.
• When RTS = 1, RTS and CTS are enabled.
4
LOOP
Loop back mode enable. LOOP is used for the diagnostic testing using the loop back feature.
0
Loop back mode is disabled.
1
Loop back mode is enabled. When LOOP is set, the following occur:
• The UART_TX signal is set high.
• The UART_RX pin is disconnected
• The output of the transmitter shift register (TSR) is lopped back in to the receiver shift register (RSR)
input.
3-2
1
0
32
Reserved
0
RTS
Reserved
Reserved
RTS control. When AFE = 1, the RTS bit determines the autoflow control enabled.
0
RTS is disabled, CTS is only enabled.
1
RTS and CTS are enabled.
0
Reserved
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Registers
www.ti.com
3.8
Line Status Register (LSR)
The line status register (LSR) is shown in Figure 16 and described in Table 17. LSR provides information
to the CPU concerning the status of data transfers. LSR is intended for read operations only; do not write
to this register. Bits 1 through 4 record the error conditions that produce a receiver line status interrupt.
Figure 16. Line Status Register (LSR)
31
16
Reserved
R-0
15
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Reserved
8
RXFIFOE
TEMT
THRE
BI
FE
PE
OE
DR
R-0
R-0
R-1
R-1
R-0
R-0
R-0
R-0
R-0
LEGEND: R = Read only; -n = value after reset
Table 17. Line Status Register (LSR) Field Descriptions
Bit
Field
31-8
Reserved
7
RXFIFOE
Value
0
Description
Reserved
Receiver FIFO error.
In non-FIFO mode:
0
There has been no error, or RXFIFOE was cleared because the CPU read the erroneous character
from the receiver buffer register (RBR).
1
There is a parity error, framing error, or break indicator in the receiver buffer register (RBR).
In FIFO mode:
6
0
There has been no error, or RXFIFOE was cleared because the CPU read the erroneous character
from the receiver FIFO and there are no more errors in the receiver FIFO.
1
At least one parity error, framing error, or break indicator in the receiver FIFO.
TEMT
Transmitter empty (TEMT) indicator.
In non-FIFO mode:
0
Either the transmitter holding register (THR) or the transmitter shift register (TSR) contains a data
character.
1
Both the transmitter holding register (THR) and the transmitter shift register (TSR) are empty.
In FIFO mode:
5
0
Either the transmitter FIFO or the transmitter shift register (TSR) contains a data character.
1
Both the transmitter FIFO and the transmitter shift register (TSR) are empty.
THRE
Transmitter holding register empty (THRE) indicator. If the THRE bit is set and the corresponding
interrupt enable bit is set (ETBEI = 1 in IER), an interrupt request is generated.
In non-FIFO mode:
0
Transmitter holding register (THR) is not empty. THR has been loaded by the CPU.
1
Transmitter holding register (THR) is empty (ready to accept a new character). The content of THR has
been transferred to the transmitter shift register (TSR).
In FIFO mode:
0
Transmitter FIFO is not empty. At least one character has been written to the transmitter FIFO. You can
write to the transmitter FIFO if it is not full.
1
Transmitter FIFO is empty. The last character in the FIFO has been transferred to the transmitter shift
register (TSR).
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
33
Registers
www.ti.com
Table 17. Line Status Register (LSR) Field Descriptions (continued)
Bit
4
Field
Value
BI
Description
Break indicator. The BI bit is set whenever the receive data input (RX) was held low for longer than a
full-word transmission time. A full-word transmission time is defined as the total time to transmit the
START, data, PARITY, and STOP bits. If the BI bit is set and the corresponding interrupt enable bit is
set (ELSI = 1 in IER), an interrupt request is generated.
In non-FIFO mode:
0
No break has been detected, or the BI bit was cleared because the CPU read the erroneous character
from the receiver buffer register (RBR).
1
A break has been detected with the character in the receiver buffer register (RBR).
In FIFO mode:
3
0
No break has been detected, or the BI bit was cleared because the CPU read the erroneous character
from the receiver FIFO and the next character to be read from the FIFO has no break indicator.
1
A break has been detected with the character at the top of the receiver FIFO.
FE
Framing error (FE) indicator. A framing error occurs when the received character does not have a valid
STOP bit. In response to a framing error, the UART sets the FE bit and waits until the signal on the RX
pin goes high. Once the RX signal goes high, the receiver is ready to detect a new START bit and
receive new data. If the FE bit is set and the corresponding interrupt enable bit is set (ELSI = 1 in IER),
an interrupt request is generated.
In non-FIFO mode:
0
No framing error has been detected, or the FE bit was cleared because the CPU read the erroneous
data from the receiver buffer register (RBR).
1
A framing error has been detected with the character in the receiver buffer register (RBR).
In FIFO mode:
2
0
No framing error has been detected, or the FE bit was cleared because the CPU read the erroneous
data from the receiver FIFO and the next character to be read from the FIFO has no framing error.
1
A framing error has been detected with the character at the top of the receiver FIFO.
PE
Parity error (PE) indicator. A parity error occurs when the parity of the received character does not
match the parity selected with the EPS bit in the line control register (LCR). If the PE bit is set and the
corresponding interrupt enable bit is set (ELSI = 1 in IER), an interrupt request is generated.
In non-FIFO mode:
0
No parity error has been detected, or the PE bit was cleared because the CPU read the erroneous data
from the receiver buffer register (RBR).
1
A parity error has been detected with the character in the receiver buffer register (RBR).
In FIFO mode:
1
0
No parity error has been detected, or the PE bit was cleared because the CPU read the erroneous data
from the receiver FIFO and the next character to be read from the FIFO has no parity error.
1
A parity error has been detected with the character at the top of the receiver FIFO.
OE
Overrun error (OE) indicator. An overrun error in the non-FIFO mode is different from an overrun error
in the FIFO mode. If the OE bit is set and the corresponding interrupt enable bit is set (ELSI = 1 in IER),
an interrupt request is generated.
In non-FIFO mode:
0
No overrun error has been detected, or the OE bit was cleared because the CPU read the content of
the line status register (LSR).
1
Overrun error has been detected. Before the character in the receiver buffer register (RBR) could be
read, it was overwritten by the next character arriving in RBR.
In FIFO mode:
34
0
No overrun error has been detected, or the OE bit was cleared because the CPU read the content of
the line status register (LSR).
1
Overrun error has been detected. If data continues to fill the FIFO beyond the trigger level, an overrun
error occurs only after the FIFO is full and the next character has been completely received in the shift
register. An overrun error is indicated to the CPU as soon as it happens. The new character overwrites
the character in the shift register, but it is not transferred to the FIFO.
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Registers
www.ti.com
Table 17. Line Status Register (LSR) Field Descriptions (continued)
Bit
Field
0
Value
DR
Description
Data-ready (DR) indicator for the receiver. If the DR bit is set and the corresponding interrupt enable bit
is set (ERBI = 1 in IER), an interrupt request is generated.
In non-FIFO mode:
0
Data is not ready, or the DR bit was cleared because the character was read from the receiver buffer
register (RBR).
1
Data is ready. A complete incoming character has been received and transferred into the receiver buffer
register (RBR).
In FIFO mode:
3.9
0
Data is not ready, or the DR bit was cleared because all of the characters in the receiver FIFO have
been read.
1
Data is ready. There is at least one unread character in the receiver FIFO. If the FIFO is empty, the DR
bit is set as soon as a complete incoming character has been received and transferred into the FIFO.
The DR bit remains set until the FIFO is empty again.
Divisor Latches (DLL and DLH)
Two 8-bit register fields (DLL and DLH), called divisor latches, store the 16-bit divisor for generation of the
baud clock in the baud generator. The latches are in DLH and DLL. DLH holds the most-significant bits of
the divisor, and DLL holds the least-significant bits of the divisor. These divisor latches must be loaded
during initialization of the UART in order to ensure desired operation of the baud generator. Writing to the
divisor latches results in two wait states being inserted during the write access while the baud generator is
loaded with the new value.
Access considerations:
•
•
RBR, THR, and DLL share one address. When DLAB = 1 in LCR, all accesses at the shared address
are accesses to DLL. When DLAB = 0, reading from the shared address gives the content of RBR, and
writing to the shared address modifies THR.
IER and DLH share one address. When DLAB = 1 in LCR, accesses to the shared address read or
modify to DLH. When DLAB = 0, all accesses at the shared address read or modify IER.
DLL and DLH also have dedicated addresses. If you use the dedicated addresses, you can keep the
DLAB bit cleared, so that RBR, THR, and IER are always selected at the shared addresses.
The divisor LSB latch (DLL) is shown in Figure 17 and described in Table 18. The divisor MSB latch (DLH)
is shown in Figure 18 and described in Table 19.
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
35
Registers
www.ti.com
Figure 17. Divisor LSB Latch (DLL)
31
16
Reserved
R-0
15
8
7
0
Reserved
DLL
R-0
R/W-0
LEGEND: R/W = Read/Write; R = Read only; -n = value after reset
Table 18. Divisor LSB Latch (DLL) Field Descriptions
Bit
Field
31-8
Reserved
7-0
DLL
Value
0
Description
Reserved
0-Fh
The 8 least-significant bits (LSBs) of the 16-bit divisor for generation of the baud clock in the baud rate
generator.
Figure 18. Divisor MSB Latch (DLH)
31
16
Reserved
R-0
15
8
7
0
Reserved
DLH
R-0
R/W-0
LEGEND: R/W = Read/Write; R = Read only; -n = value after reset
Table 19. Divisor MSB Latch (DLH) Field Descriptions
Bit
36
Field
31-8
Reserved
7-0
DLH
Value
0
0-Fh
Description
Reserved
The 8 most-significant bits (MSBs) of the 16-bit divisor for generation of the baud clock in the baud rate
generator.
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
Registers
www.ti.com
3.10 Peripheral Identification Registers (PID1 and PID2)
The peripheral identification registers (PID) contain identification data (class, revision, and type) for the
peripheral. PID1 is shown in Figure 19 and described in Table 20. PID2 is shown in Figure 20 and
described in Table 21.
Figure 19. Peripheral Identification Register 1 (PID1)
31
16
Reserved
R-0
15
8
7
0
CLS
REV
R-1h
R-1h
LEGEND: R = Read only; -n = value after reset
Table 20. Peripheral Identification Register 1 (PID1) Field Descriptions
Bit
Field
31-16
Reserved
15-8
CLS
7-0
REV
Value
0
Description
Reserved
Identifies class of peripheral.
1
Serial port
Identifies revision of peripheral.
1
Current revision of peripheral.
Figure 20. Peripheral Identification Register 2 (PID2)
31
16
Reserved
R-0
15
8
7
0
Reserved
TYP
R-0
R-04h
LEGEND: R = Read only; -n = value after reset
Table 21. Peripheral Identification Register 2 (PID2) Field Descriptions
Bit
Field
31-8
Reserved
7-0
TYP
Value
0
Description
Reserved
Identifies type of peripheral.
4h
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
UART
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
37
Registers
www.ti.com
3.11 Power and Emulation Management Register (PWREMU_MGMT)
The power and emulation management register (PWREMU_MGMT) is shown in Figure 21 and described
in Table 22.
Figure 21. Power and Emulation Management Register (PWREMU_MGMT)
31
16
Reserved
R-0
15
14
13
12
1
0
Rsvd
UTRST
URRST
Reserved
FREE
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R-0
R/W-0
LEGEND: R/W = Read/Write; R = Read only; -n = value after reset
Table 22. Power and Emulation Management Register (PWREMU_MGMT) Field Descriptions
Bit
Field
Value
Description
31-16
Reserved
0
Reserved
15
Reserved
0
Reserved. This bit must always be written with a 0.
14
UTRST
13
12-1
0
38
UART transmitter reset. Resets and enables the transmitter.
0
Transmitter is disabled and in reset state.
1
Transmitter is enabled.
URRST
Reserved
UART receiver reset. Resets and enables the receiver.
0
Receiver is disabled and in reset state.
1
Receiver is enabled.
0
Reserved
FREE
Free-running enable mode bit. This bit determines the emulation mode functionality of the UART. In
suspended mode, the UART can handle register read/write requests, but does not generate any
transmission/reception, interrupts or events.
0
If a transmission is not in progress, the UART stops immediately. If a transmission is in progress, the
UART stops after completion of the one word transmission.
1
Free-running mode is enabled; UART continues to run normally.
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
SPRUG26 – November 2008
Submit Documentation Feedback
IMPORTANT NOTICE
Texas Instruments Incorporated and its subsidiaries (TI) reserve the right to make corrections, modifications, enhancements, improvements,
and other changes to its products and services at any time and to discontinue any product or service without notice. Customers should
obtain the latest relevant information before placing orders and should verify that such information is current and complete. All products are
sold subject to TI’s terms and conditions of sale supplied at the time of order acknowledgment.
TI warrants performance of its hardware products to the specifications applicable at the time of sale in accordance with TI’s standard
warranty. Testing and other quality control techniques are used to the extent TI deems necessary to support this warranty. Except where
mandated by government requirements, testing of all parameters of each product is not necessarily performed.
TI assumes no liability for applications assistance or customer product design. Customers are responsible for their products and
applications using TI components. To minimize the risks associated with customer products and applications, customers should provide
adequate design and operating safeguards.
TI does not warrant or represent that any license, either express or implied, is granted under any TI patent right, copyright, mask work right,
or other TI intellectual property right relating to any combination, machine, or process in which TI products or services are used. Information
published by TI regarding third-party products or services does not constitute a license from TI to use such products or services or a
warranty or endorsement thereof. Use of such information may require a license from a third party under the patents or other intellectual
property of the third party, or a license from TI under the patents or other intellectual property of TI.
Reproduction of TI information in TI data books or data sheets is permissible only if reproduction is without alteration and is accompanied
by all associated warranties, conditions, limitations, and notices. Reproduction of this information with alteration is an unfair and deceptive
business practice. TI is not responsible or liable for such altered documentation. Information of third parties may be subject to additional
restrictions.
Resale of TI products or services with statements different from or beyond the parameters stated by TI for that product or service voids all
express and any implied warranties for the associated TI product or service and is an unfair and deceptive business practice. TI is not
responsible or liable for any such statements.
TI products are not authorized for use in safety-critical applications (such as life support) where a failure of the TI product would reasonably
be expected to cause severe personal injury or death, unless officers of the parties have executed an agreement specifically governing
such use. Buyers represent that they have all necessary expertise in the safety and regulatory ramifications of their applications, and
acknowledge and agree that they are solely responsible for all legal, regulatory and safety-related requirements concerning their products
and any use of TI products in such safety-critical applications, notwithstanding any applications-related information or support that may be
provided by TI. Further, Buyers must fully indemnify TI and its representatives against any damages arising out of the use of TI products in
such safety-critical applications.
TI products are neither designed nor intended for use in military/aerospace applications or environments unless the TI products are
specifically designated by TI as military-grade or "enhanced plastic." Only products designated by TI as military-grade meet military
specifications. Buyers acknowledge and agree that any such use of TI products which TI has not designated as military-grade is solely at
the Buyer's risk, and that they are solely responsible for compliance with all legal and regulatory requirements in connection with such use.
TI products are neither designed nor intended for use in automotive applications or environments unless the specific TI products are
designated by TI as compliant with ISO/TS 16949 requirements. Buyers acknowledge and agree that, if they use any non-designated
products in automotive applications, TI will not be responsible for any failure to meet such requirements.
Following are URLs where you can obtain information on other Texas Instruments products and application solutions:
Products
Amplifiers
Data Converters
DSP
Clocks and Timers
Interface
Logic
Power Mgmt
Microcontrollers
RFID
RF/IF and ZigBee® Solutions
amplifier.ti.com
dataconverter.ti.com
dsp.ti.com
www.ti.com/clocks
interface.ti.com
logic.ti.com
power.ti.com
microcontroller.ti.com
www.ti-rfid.com
www.ti.com/lprf
Applications
Audio
Automotive
Broadband
Digital Control
Medical
Military
Optical Networking
Security
Telephony
Video & Imaging
Wireless
www.ti.com/audio
www.ti.com/automotive
www.ti.com/broadband
www.ti.com/digitalcontrol
www.ti.com/medical
www.ti.com/military
www.ti.com/opticalnetwork
www.ti.com/security
www.ti.com/telephony
www.ti.com/video
www.ti.com/wireless
Mailing Address: Texas Instruments, Post Office Box 655303, Dallas, Texas 75265
Copyright © 2008, Texas Instruments Incorporated
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Related manuals

Download PDF

advertising