Texas Instruments | TMS320C55x Chip Support Library API Reference (Rev. J) | User Guides | Texas Instruments TMS320C55x Chip Support Library API Reference (Rev. J) User guides

Texas Instruments TMS320C55x Chip Support Library API Reference (Rev. J) User guides
TMS320C55x
Chip Support Library
API Reference Guide
SPRU433J
September 2004
Printed on Recycled Paper
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Preface
Read This First
About This Manual
The TMS320C55x™ DSP Chip Support Library (CSL) provides C-program
functions to configure and control on-chip peripherals, which makes it easier
for algorithms to run in a real system. The CSL provides peripheral ease of use,
shortened development time, portability, and hardware abstraction, along with
some level of standardization and compatibility among devices. A version of
the CSL is available for all TMS320C55x DSP devices.
This document provides reference information for the CSL library and is
organized as follows:
How to Use This Manual
The contents of the TMS320C5000™ DSP Chip Support Library (CSL) are as
follows:
Chapter 1 provides an overview of the CSL, includes tables showing CSL
API module support for various C5000 devices, and lists the API modules.
Chapter 2 provides basic examples of how to use CSL functions, and
shows how to define Build options in the Code Composer Studio™ environment.
Chapters 3-21 provide basic examples, functions, and macros, for the in-
dividual CSL modules.
Read This First
iii
Notational Conventions
Notational Conventions
This document uses the following conventions:
Program listings, program examples, and interactive displays are shown
in a special typeface.
In syntax descriptions, the function or macro appears in a bold typeface
and the parameters appear in plainface within parentheses. Portions of a
syntax that are in bold should be entered as shown; portions of a syntax
that are within parentheses describe the type of information that should be
entered.
Macro names are written in uppercase text; function names are written in
lowercase.
TMS320C55x™ DSP devices are referred to throughout this reference
guide as C5501, C5502, etc.
iv
Related Documentation From Texas Instruments
Related Documentation From Texas Instruments
The following books describe the TMS320C55x™ DSP and related support
tools. To obtain a copy of any of these TI documents, call the Texas Instruments Literature Response Center at (800) 477-8924. When ordering, please
identify the book by its title and literature number. Many of these documents
are located on the internet at http://www.ti.com.
TMS320C55x DSP Algebraic Instruction Set Reference Guide (literature
number SPRU375) describes the algebraic instructions individually. Also
includes a summary of the instruction set,a list of the instruction opcodes,
and a cross-reference to the mnemonic instruction set.
TMS320C55x Assembly Language Tools User’s Guide (literature number
SPRU280) describes the assembly language tools (assembler, linker,
and other tools used to develop assembly language code), assembler
directives, macros, common object file format, and symbolic debugging
directives for TMS320C55x devices.
TMS320C55x Optimizing C Compiler User’s Guide (literature number
SPRU281) describes the C55x C Compiler. This C compiler accepts
ANSI standard C source code and produces assembly language source
code for TMS320C55x devices.
TMS320C55x DSP CPU Reference Guide (literature number SPRU371)
describes the architecture, registers, and operation of the CPU for these
digital signal processors (DSPs). This book also describes how to make
individual portions of the DSP inactive to save power.
TMS320C55x DSP Mnemonic Instruction Set Reference Guide (literature
number SPRU374) describes the mnemonic instructions individually.
Also includes a summary of the instruction set, a list of the instruction
opcodes, and a cross-reference to the algebraic instruction set.
TMS320C55x Programmer’s Guide (literature number SPRU376) describes
ways to optimize C and assembly code for the TMS320C55x DSPs and
explains how to write code that uses special features and instructions of
the DSP.
TMS320C55x Technical Overview (SPRU393). This overview is an
introduction to the TMS320C55x digital signal processor (DSP). The
TMS320C55x is the latest generation of fixed-point DSPs in the
TMS320C5000 DSP platform. Like the previous generations, this processor is optimized for high performance and low-power operation. This
book describes the CPU architecture, low-power enhancements, and
embedded emulation features of the TMS320C55x.
Read This First
v
Trademarks
Trademarks
The Texas Instruments logo and Texas Instruments are registered trademarks
of Texas Instruments. Trademarks of Texas Instruments include: TI, Code
Composer Studio, DSP/BIOS, and the TMS320C5000 family and devices.
All other brand or product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of
their respective companies or organizations.
vi
Contents
Contents
1
CSL Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
1.1
Introduction to CSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
1.1.1 How the CSL Benefits You . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
1.1.2 CSL Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
1.2
Naming Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
1.3
CSL Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7
1.4
CSL Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-8
1.4.1 Peripheral Initialization via Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-9
1.4.2 Peripheral Initialization via Functional Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-10
1.5
CSL Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-11
1.6
CSL Symbolic Constant Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-13
1.7
Resource Management and the Use of CSL Handles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-14
1.7.1 Using CSL Handles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-14
2
How to Use CSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2
Using the CSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.1 Using the DMA_config() function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3
Compiling and Linking with the CSL Using Code Composer Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.1 Specifying Your Target Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1
2-2
2-2
2-2
2-7
2-7
3
ADC Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2
Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3
Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4
Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5
Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-1
3-2
3-4
3-5
3-8
3-9
4
CHIP Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.1.1 CHIP Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2
Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.3
Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-1
4-2
4-2
4-3
4-4
5
DAT Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
5.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
5.2
Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3
vii
Contents
6
DMA Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
6.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2
6.1.1 DMA Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4
6.2
Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5
6.3
Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-6
6.4
Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11
7
EMIF Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
7.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2
7.1.1 EMIF Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4
7.2
Configuration Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6
7.3
Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-8
7.4
Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-11
8
GPIO Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1
8.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
8.2
Configuration Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4
8.3
Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5
8.4
Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-17
9
HPI Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2
Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.3
Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.4
Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-1
9-2
9-4
9-5
9-6
10 I2C Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-1
10.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-2
10.1.1 I2C Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-4
10.2 Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-5
10.3 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-7
10.4 Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-17
10.5 Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-18
11 ICACHE Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2 Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.3 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.4 Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11-1
11-2
11-3
11-5
11-8
12 IRQ Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.1.1 The Event ID Concept . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2 Using Interrupts with CSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.3 Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12-1
12-2
12-3
12-7
12-8
viii
Contents
12.4
Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-9
13 McBSP Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-1
13.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-2
13.1.1 MCBSP Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-3
13.2 Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-6
13.3
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-7
13.4 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-8
13.5 Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-23
13.6 Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-26
14 MMC Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-1
14.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-2
14.2 Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-5
14.3 Data Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-6
14.4 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-13
15 PLL Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15.2 Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15.3 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15.4 Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15-1
15-2
15-4
15-5
15-7
16 PWR Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16.1.1 PWR Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16.2 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16.3 Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16-1
16-2
16-2
16-3
16-4
17 RTC Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-1
17.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-2
17.2 Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-6
17.3 API Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-9
17.4 Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-16
18 Timer Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18.2 Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18.3 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18.4 Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18-1
18-2
18-3
18-4
18-9
19 UART Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19.2 Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19.3 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19.3.1 CSL Primary Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19-1
19-2
19-5
19-8
19-8
Contents
ix
Contents
19.4
Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-14
19.4.1 General Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-14
19.4.2 UART Control Signal Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-15
20 WDTIM Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-1
20.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-2
20.2 Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-3
20.3 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-4
20.4 Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-14
21 GPT Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21.2 Configuration Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21.3 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
x
21-1
21-2
21-3
21-4
Figures
Figures
1−1
2−1
2−2
2−3
CSL Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Defining the Target Device in the Build Options Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8
Defining Large Memory Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10
Defining Library Paths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11
Contents
xi
Tables
Tables
1−1
1−2
1−3
1−4
1−5
1−6
1−7
1−8
2−1
3−1
3−2
3−3
3−4
4−1
4−2
4−3
5−1
6−1
6−2
6−3
6−4
7−1
7−2
7−3
7−4
8−1
8−2
8−3
9−1
9−2
9−3
9−4
10−1
10−2
10−3
10−4
xii
CSL Modules and Include Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
CSL Device Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
CSL Naming Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
CSL Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7
Generic CSL Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-9
Generic CSL Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-11
Generic CSL Macros (Handle-based) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-12
Generic CSL Symbolic Constants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-13
CSL Directory Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
ADC Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
ADC Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
ADC Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
ADC Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
CHIP Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
CHIP Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
CHIP Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
DAT Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
DMA Configuration Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3
DMA Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3
DMA Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3
DMA Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4
EMIF Configuration Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3
EMIF Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3
Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4
EMIF CSL Macros Using EMIF Port Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-11
GPIO Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
GPIO Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
GPIO CSL Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-17
HPI Module Configuration Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-2
HPI Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-2
HPI Registers and Bit Field Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-2
HPI Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-3
I2C Configuration Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-2
I2C Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-2
I2C Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-4
I2C Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-17
Tables
11−1
11−2
11−3
12−1
12−2
12−3
13−1
13−2
13−3
13−4
13−5
14−1
14−2
14−3
14−4
15−1
15−2
15−3
15−4
16−1
16−2
16−3
17−1
17−2
17−3
17−4
17−5
18−1
18−2
18−3
18−4
18−5
19−1
19−2
20−1
20−2
21−1
21−2
ICACHE Configuration Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-2
ICACHE Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-2
ICACHE CSL Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-8
IRQ Configuration Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-2
IRQ Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-3
IRQ_EVT_NNNN Events List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-4
McBSP Configuration Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-2
McBSP Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-2
MCBSP Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-3
McBSP Macros Using McBSP Port Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-23
McBSP CSL Macros Using Handle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-24
MMC Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-2
MMC Data Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-2
MMC Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-2
OCR Register Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-24
PLL Configuration Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-2
PLL Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-2
PLL Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-3
PLL CSL Macros Using PLL Port Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-7
PWR Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-2
PWR Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-2
PWR CSL Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-4
RTC Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-3
RTC Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-3
RTC ANSI C-Style Time Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-4
RTC Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-4
Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-5
TIMER Configuration Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-2
TIMER Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-2
Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-2
TIMER CSL Macros Using Timer Port Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-9
TIMER CSL Macros Using Handle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-10
UART APIs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-2
UART CSL Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-14
WDTIM Structure and APIs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-2
WDTIM CSL Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-14
GPT Configuration Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21-2
GPT Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21-2
Contents
xiii
Examples
Examples
1−1
1−2
2−1
12−1
13−1
xiv
Using PER_config . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-10
Using PER_setup() . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-10
Using a Linker Command File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12
Manual Interrupt Setting Outside DSP/BIOS HWIs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-7
McBSP Port Initialization Using MCBSP_config() . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-26
Chapter 1
CSL Overview
This chapter introduces the Chip Support Library, briefly describes its
architecture, and provides a generic overview of the collection of functions,
macros, and constants that help you program DSP peripherals.
Topic
Page
1.1
Introduction to CSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
1.2
Naming Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
1.3
CSL Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7
1.4
CSL Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-8
1.5
CSL Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-11
1.6
CSL Symbolic Constant Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-13
1.7
Resource Management and the Use of CSL Handles . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-14
1-1
Introduction to CSL
1.1 Introduction to CSL
The chip support library(CSL) is a collection of functions, macros, and symbols
used to configure and control on-chip peripherals. It is a fully scalable
component of DSP/BIOS and does not require the use of other DSP/BIOS
components to operate.
1.1.1
How the CSL Benefits You
The benefits of the CSL include peripheral ease of use, shortened development time, portability, hardware abstraction, and a level of standardization and
compatibility among devices. Specifically, the CSL offers:
Standard Protocol to Program Peripherals
The CSL provides you with a standard protocol to program on-chip peripherals. This protocol includes data types and macros to define a peripherals
configuration, and functions to implement the various operations of each
peripheral.
Basic Resource Management
Basic resource management is provided through the use of open and
close functions for many of the peripherals. This is especially helpful for
peripherals that support multiple channels.
Symbol Peripheral Descriptions
As a side benefit to the creation of the CSL, a complete symbolic description of all peripheral registers and register fields has been created. It is
suggested you should use the higher level protocols described in the first
two benefits, as these are less device-specific, thus making it easier to migrate code to newer versions of DSPs.
1.1.2
CSL Architecture
The CSL consists of modules that are built and archived into a library file. Each
peripheral is covered by a single module while additional modules provide
general programming support.
Figure 1−1 illustrates the individual CSL modules. This architecture allows for
future expansion because new modules can be added as new peripherals
emerge.
Figure 1−1. CSL Modules
CSL
1-2
DAT
CHIP
DMA
...
McBSP TIMER
...
Introduction to CSL
Although each CSL module provides a unique set of functions, some
interdependency exists between the modules. For example, the DMA module
depends on the IRQ module because of DMA interrupts; as a result, when you
link code that uses the DMA module, a portion of the IRQ module is linked
automatically.
Each module has a compile-time support symbol that denotes whether or not
the module is supported for a given device. For example, the symbol
_DMA_SUPPORT has a value of 1 if the current device supports it and a value
of 0 otherwise. The available symbols are located in Table 1−1. You can use
these support symbols in your application code to make decisions.
CSL Overview
1-3
Introduction to CSL
Table 1−1. CSL Modules and Include Files
†
Peripheral
Module (PER)
Description
Include File
Module Support
Symbol
ADC
Analog-to-digital converter
csl_adc.h
_ADC_SUPPORT
CHIP
General device module
csl_chip.h
_CHIP_SUPPORT
DAT
A data copy/fill module based on
the DMA C55x
csl_dat.h
_DAT_SUPPORT
DMA
DMA peripheral
csl_dma.h
_DMA_SUPPORT
EMIF
External memory bus interface
csl_emif.h
_EMIF_SUPPORT
GPIO
Non-multiplexed general purpose
I/O
csl_gpio.h
_GPIO_SUPPORT
I2C
I2C peripheral
csl_i2c.h
_I2C_SUPPORT
ICACHE
Instruction cache
csl_icache.h
_ICACHE_SUPPORT
IRQ
Interrupt controller
csl_irq.h
_IRQ_SUPPORT
McBSP
Multichannel buffered serial port
csl_mcbsp.h
_MCBSP_SUPPORT
MMC
Multimedia controller
csl_mmc.h
_MMC_SUPPORT
PLL
PLL
csl_pll.h
_PLL_SUPPORT
PWR
Power savings control
csl_pwr.h
_PWR_SUPPORT
RTC
Real-time clock
csl_rtc.h
_RTC_SUPPORT
TIMER
Timer peripheral
csl_timer.h
_TIMER_SUPPORT
WDTIM
Watchdog timer
csl_wdtim.h
_WDT_SUPPORT
USB†
USB peripheral
csl_usb.h
_USB_SUPPORT
UART
Universal asynchronous receiver/
transmitter
csl_uart.h
_UART_SUPPORT
HPI
Host port interface
csl_hpi.h
_HPI_SUPPORT
GPT
64-bit General purpose timer
csl_gpt.h
_GPT_SUPPORT
Information and instructions for the configuration of the USB module are found in the TMS320C55x CSL USB Programmer’s
Reference Guide (SPRU511).
1-4
Introduction to CSL
Table 1−2 lists the C5000 devices that the CSL supports and the large and
small-model libraries included in the CSL. The device support symbol must be
used with the compiler (−d option), for the correct peripheral configuration to
be used in your code.
Table 1−2. CSL Device Support
Device
Small-Model Library
Large-Model Library
Device Support Symbol
C5501
csl5501.lib
csl5501x.lib
CHIP_5501
C5502
csl5502.lib
csl5502x.lib
CHIP_5502
C5509
csl5509.lib
csl5509x.lib
CHIP_5509
C5509A
csl5509a.lib
CSL5509ax.lig
CHIP_5509A
C5510PG1.0
csl5510PG1_0.lib
csl5510PG1_0x.lib
CHIP_5510PG1_0
C5510PG1.2
csl5510PG1_2.lib
csl5510PG1_2x.lib
CHIP_5510PG1_2
C5510PG2.0
csl5510PG2_0.lib
csl5510PG2_0x.lib
CHIP_5510PG2_0
C5510PG2.1
csl5510PG2_1.lib
csl5510PG2_1x.lib
CHIP_5510PG2_1
C5510PG2.2
csl5510PG2_2.lib
csl5510PG2_2x.lib
CHIP_5510PG2_2
CSL Overview
1-5
Naming Conventions
1.2 Naming Conventions
The following conventions are used when naming CSL functions, macros, and
data types.
Table 1−3. CSL Naming Conventions
†
Object Type
Naming Convention
Function
PER_funcName()†
Variable
PER_varName()†
Macro
PER_MACRO_NAME†
Typedef
PER_Typename†
Function Argument
funcArg
Structure Member
memberName
PER is the placeholder for the module name.
All functions, macros, and data types start with PER_ (where PER is the
peripheral module name listed in Table 1−1) in uppercase letters.
Function names use all lowercase letters. Uppercase letters are used only
if the function name consists of two separate words. For example,
PER_getConfig().
Macro
names use
DMA_DMPREC_RMK.
all
uppercase
letters;
for
example,
Data types start with an uppercase letter followed by lowercase letters,
e.g., DMA_Handle.
1-6
CSL Data Types
1.3 CSL Data Types
The CSL provides its own set of data types that all begin with an uppercase
letter. Table 1−4 lists the CSL data types as defined in the stdinc.h file.
Table 1−4. CSL Data Types
Data Type
Description
CSLBool
unsigned short
PER_Handle
void *
Int16
short
Int32
long
Uchar
unsigned char
Uint16
unsigned short
Uint32
unsigned long
DMA_AdrPtr
void (*DMA_AdrPtr)()
pointer to a void function
CSL Overview
1-7
CSL Functions
1.4 CSL Functions
Table 1−5 provides a generic description of the most common CSL functions
where PER indicates a peripheral module as listed in Table 1−1.
Note:
Not all of the peripheral functions are available for all the modules. See the
specific module chapter for specific module information. Also, each peripheral module may offer additional peripheral specific functions.
The following conventions are used and are shown in Table 1−5:
Italics indicate variable names.
Brackets [...] indicate optional parameters.
[handle] is required only for the handle-based peripherals: DAT, DMA,
McBSP, and TIMER. See section 1.7.1.
[priority] is required only for the DAT peripheral module.
CSL functions provide a way to program peripherals by:
Direct register initialization using the PER_config() function (see sec-
tion 1.4.1).
Using functional parameters using the PER_setup() function and vari-
ous module specific functions (see section 1.4.2). This method provides
a higher level of abstraction compared with the direct register initialization
method, but typically at the expense of a larger code size and higher cycle
count.
Note:
These functions are not available for all CSL peripheral modules.
1-8
CSL Functions
Table 1−5. Generic CSL Functions
Function
Description
handle = PER_open(
channelNumber,
[priority,]
flags
Opens a peripheral channel and then performs the operation indicated by flags;
must be called before using a channel. The return value is a unique device handle
to use in subsequent API calls.
The priority parameter applies only to the DAT module.
)
PER_config(
[handle,]
*configStructure
)
Writes the values of the configuration structure to the peripheral registers.
Initialize the configuration structure with:
Integer constants
Integer variables
CSL symbolic constants, PER_REG_DEFAULT (See Section 1.6 on page
1-13, CSL Symbolic Constant Values)
Merged field values created with the PER_REG_RMK macro
PER_setup(
[handle,]
*setupStructure
)
Initializes the peripheral based on the functional parameters included in the
initialization structure. Functional parameters are peripheral specific. This
function may not be supported in all peripherals. Please consult the chapter that
includes the module for specific details.
PER_start(
[handle,])
[txrx,]
[delay]
)
Starts the peripheral after using PER_config(). [txrx] and [delay] apply only to
McBSP.
PER_reset(
[handle]
)
Resets the peripheral to its power-on default values.
PER_close(
handle
)
Closes a peripheral channel previously opened with PER_open(). The registers
for the channel are set to their power-on defaults, and any pending interrupt is
cleared.
1.4.1
Peripheral Initialization via Registers
The CSL provides a generic function, Per_config(), for initializing the registers
of a peripheral (PER is the peripheral as listed in Table 1−1).
PER_config() allows you to initialize a configuration structure with the
appropriate register values and pass the address of that structure to the
function, which then writes the values to the writable register.
Example 1−1 shows an example of this method. The CSL also provides
the PER_REG_RMK (make) macros, which form merged values from a
list of field arguments. Macros are covered in section 1.5, CSL Macros.
CSL Overview
1-9
CSL Functions
Example 1−1. Using PER_config
PER_Config MyConfig = {
reg0,
reg1,
…
};
main() {
…
PER_config(&MyConfig);
…
;
1.4.2
Peripheral Initialization via Functional Parameters
The CSL also provides functions to initialize peripherals via functional
parameters. This method provides a higher level of abstraction compared with
the direct register initialization method, which produces larger code size and
higher cycle count.
Even though each CSL module may offer different parameter-based functions,
PER_setup() is the most commonly used. PER_setup() initializes the
parameters in the peripheral that are typically initialized only once in your
application. PER_setup() can then be followed by other module functions
implementing other common run-time peripheral operations as shown in
Example 1−2. Other parameter-based functions include module-specific
functions such as the PLL_setFreq() or the ADC_setFreq() functions.
Example 1−2. Using PER_setup()
PER_setup mySetup = {param_1, .... param_n};
main() {
...
PER_setup (&mySetup);
...
}
Note:
In previous versions of CSL, PER_setup() is referred to as PER_init().
1-10
CSL Macros
1.5 CSL Macros
Table 1−6 provides a generic description of the most common CSL macros.
The following naming conventions are used:
PER indicates a peripheral module as listed in Table 1−1 (with the excep-
tion of the DAT module).
REG indicates a register name (without the channel number).
REG# indicates, if applicable, a register with the channel number. (For
example: DMAGCR, TCR0, ...)
FIELD indicates a field in a register.
regval indicates an integer constant, an integer variable, a symbolic
constant (PER_REG_DEFAULT), or a merged field value created with the
PER_REG_RMK() macro.
fieldval indicates an integer constant, integer variable, macro, or symbolic
constant (PER_REG_FIELD_SYMVAL) as explained in section 1.6; all
field values are right justified.
CSL also offers equivalent macros to those listed in Table 1−6, but instead of
using REG# to identify which channel the register belongs to, it uses the Handle value. The Handle value is returned by the PER_open() function. These
macros are shown Table 1−7. Please note that REG is the register name without the channel/port number.
Table 1−6. Generic CSL Macros
Macro
Description
PER_REG_RMK(,
fieldval_15,
.
.
.
fieldval_0
)
Creates a value to store in the peripheral register; _RMK macros make it easier
to construct register values based on field values.
PER_RGET(REG#
)
Returns the value in the peripheral register.
PER_RSET(REG#,
regval
)
Writes the value to the peripheral register.
The following rules apply to the _RMK macros:
Defined only for registers with more than one field.
Include only fields that are writable.
Specify field arguments as most-significant bit first.
Whether or not they are used, all writable field values must be included.
If you pass a field value exceeding the number of bits allowed for that
particular field, the _RMK macro truncates that field value.
CSL Overview
1-11
CSL Macros
Table 1−6. Generic CSL Macros (Continued)
Macro
Description
PER_FMK (REG,
FIELD,
fieldval)
Creates a shifted version of fieldval that you could OR with the result of other
_FMK macros to initialize register REG. This allows you to initialize few fields in
REG as an alternative to the _RMK macro that requires that ALL the fields in the
register be initialized.
PER_FGET(REG#,
FIELD
)
Returns the value of the specified FIELD in the peripheral register.
PER_FSET(REG#,
FIELD,
fieldval
)
Writes fieldval to the specified FIELD in the peripheral register.
PER_ADDR(REG#
)
If applicable, gets the memory address (or sub-address) of the peripheral register
REG#.
Table 1−7. Generic CSL Macros (Handle-based)
Macro
Description
PER_RGETH(handle,
REG
)
Returns the value of the peripheral register REG associated with Handle.
PER_RSETH(handle,
REG,
regval
)
Writes the value to the peripheral register REG associated with Handle.
PER_ADDRH(handle,
REG
)
If applicable, gets the memory address (or sub-address) of the peripheral register
REG associated with Handle.
PER_FGETH(handle,
REG,
FIELD
)
Returns the value of the specified FIELD in the peripheral register REG
associated with Handle.
PER_FSETH(handle,
REG,
FIELD,
fieldval
)
Sets the value of the specified FIELD in the peripheral register REG to fieldval.
1-12
CSL Symbolic Constant Values
1.6 CSL Symbolic Constant Values
To facilitate initialization of values in your application code, the CSL provides
symbolic constants for peripheral registers and writable field values as
described in Table 1−8. The following naming conventions are used:
PER indicates a peripheral module as listed in Table 1−1 (with the excep-
tion of the DAT module, which does not have its own registers).
REG indicates a peripheral register.
FIELD indicates a field in the register.
SYMVAL indicates the symbolic value of a register field.
Table 1−8. Generic CSL Symbolic Constants
(a) Constant Values for Registers
Constant
Description
PER_REG_DEFAULT
Default value for a register; corresponds to the register value after a
reset or to 0 if a reset has no effect.
(b) Constant Values for Fields
Constant
Description
PER_REG_FIELD_SYMVAL
Symbolic constant to specify values for individual fields in the specified
peripheral register.
PER_REG_FIELD_DEFAULT
Default value for a field; corresponds to the field value after a reset or to
0 if a reset has no effect.
CSL Overview
1-13
Resource Management and the Use of CSL Handles
1.7 Resource Management and the Use of CSL Handles
The CSL provides limited support for resource management in applications
that involve multiple threads, reusing the same multichannel peripheral
device.
Resource management in the CSL is achieved through calls to the PER_open
and PER_close functions. The PER_open function normally takes a
channel/port number as the primary argument and returns a pointer to a
Handle structure that contains information about which channel (DMA) or port
(McBSP) was opened.
When given a specific channel/port number, the open function checks a global
flag to determine its availability. If the port/channel is available, then it returns
a pointer to a predefined Handle structure for this device. If the device has
already been opened by another process, then an invalid Handle is returned
with a value equal to the CSL symbolic constant, INV.
Calling PER_close frees a port/channel for use by other processes.
PER_close clears the in_use flag and resets the port/channel.
Note:
All CSL modules that support multiple ports or channels, such as McBSP,
TIMER, DAT, and DMA, require a device Handle as primary argument to
most functions. For these functions, the definition of a PER_Handle object
is required.
1.7.1
Using CSL Handles
CSL Handle objects are used to uniquely identify an opened peripheral
channel/port or device. Handle objects must be declared in the C source, and
initialized by a call to a PER_open function before calling any other API
functions that require a handle object as argument. For example:
DMA_Handle myDma;
/* Defines a DMA_Handle object, myDma */
Once defined, the CSL Handle object is initialized by a call to PER_open:
.
.
myDma = DMA_open(DMA_CHA0,DMA_OPEN_RESET);
/* Open DMA channel 0 */
The call to DMA_open initializes the handle, myDma. This handle can then be
used in calls to other API functions:
DMA_start(myDma);
.
.
.
DMA_close(myDma);
1-14
/* Begin transfer */
/* Free DMA channel */
Chapter 21
How to Use CSL
This chapter provides instructions on how to use the CSL to configure and
program peripherals as well as how to compile and link the CSL using Code
Composer Studio.
Topic
Page
2.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
2.2
Using the CSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
2.3
Compiling and Linking with the CSL Using
Code Composer Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
2-1
Overview
2.1 Overview
Peripherals are configured using the CSL by declaring/initializing objects and
invoking the CSL functions inside your C source code.
2.2 Using the CSL
This section provides an example of using CSL APIs. There are two ways to
program peripherals using the CSL:
Register-based configuration (PER_config()): Configures peripherals
by setting the full values of memory-map registers. Compared to functional parameter-based configurations, register-based configurations require
less cycles and code size, but are not abstracted.
Functional parameter-based configuration (PER_setup()): Config-
ures peripherals via a set of parameters. Compared to register-based configurations, functional parameter-based configurations require more
cycles and code size, but are more abstracted.
The following example illustrates the use of the CSL to initialize DMA channel
0 and to copy a table from address 0x3000 to address 0x2000 using the
register based configuration (DMA_config())
Source address:
Destination address:
Transfer size:
2.2.1
2000h in data space
3000h in data space
Sixteen 16-bit single words
Using the DMA_config() function
The example and steps below use the DMA_config() function to initialize the
registers. This example is written for the C5509 device.
Step 1: Include the csl.h and the header file of the module/peripheral you will
use <csl_dma.h>. The different header files are shown in Table 1.1.
#include <csl.h>
#include <csl_dma.h>
// Example-specific initialization
#define N 16
// block size to transfer
#pragma DATA_SECTION(src,”table1”)
/* scr data table address */
2-2
Using the CSL
Uint16 src[N] =
0xBEEFu,
0xBEEFu,
0xBEEFu,
0xBEEFu,
};
{
0xBEEFu,
0xBEEFu,
0xBEEFu,
0xBEEFu,
0xBEEFu,
0xBEEFu,
0xBEEFu,
0xBEEFu,
0xBEEFu,
0xBEEFu,
0xBEEFu,
0xBEEFu
#pragma DATA_SECTION(dst, ”table2”)
/* dst data table address */
Uint16 dst[N];
Step 2: Define and initialize the DMA channel configuration structure.
DMA_Config myconfig = {
/* DMA configuration structure*/
DMA_DMACSDP_RMK(
DMA_DMACSDP_DSTBEN_NOBURST , /* Destination burst :−
DMA_DMACSDP_DSTBEN_NOBURST
DMA_DMACSDP_DSTBEN_BURST4
*/
DMA_DMACSDP_DSTPACK_OFF,
/* Destination packing :−
DMA_DMACSDP_DSTPACK_ON
DMA_DMACSDP_DSTPACK_OFF
*/
DMA_DMACSDP_DST_SARAM ,
/* Destination selection :−
DMA_DMACSDP_DST_SARAM
DMA_DMACSDP_DST_DARAM
DMA_DMACSDP_DST_EMIF
DMA_DMACSDP_DST_PERIPH
*/
DMA_DMACSDP_SRCBEN_NOBURST , /* Source burst :−
DMA_DMACSDP_SRCBEN_NOBURST
DMA_DMACSDP_SRCBEN_BURST4 */
DMA_DMACSDP_SRCPACK_OFF,
DMA_DMACSDP_SRC_SARAM ,
DMA_DMACSDP_DATATYPE_16BIT
/* Source packing :−
DMA_DMACSDP_SRCPACK_ON
DMA_DMACSDP_SRCPACK_OFF
*/
/* Source selection :−
DMA_DMACSDP_SRC_SARAM
DMA_DMACSDP_SRC_DARAM
DMA_DMACSDP_SRC_EMIF
DMA_DMACSDP_SRC_PERIPH
*/
/* Data type :−
DMA_DMACSDP_DATATYPE_8BIT
DMA_DMACSDP_DATATYPE_16BIT
DMA_DMACSDP_DATATYPE_32BIT */
) /* DMACSDP */
How to Use CSL
2-3
Using the CSL
DMA_DMACCR_RMK(
DMA_DMACCR_DSTAMODE_POSTINC, /* Destination address mode :−
DMA_DMACCR_DSTAMODE_CONST
DMA_DMACCR_DSTAMODE_POSTINC
DMA_DMACCR_DSTAMODE_SGLINDX
DMA_DMACCR_DSTAMODE_DBLINDX */
DMA_DMACCR_SRCAMODE_POSTINC, /* Source address mode :−
DMA_DMACCR_SRCAMODE_CONST
DMA_DMACCR_SRCAMODE_POSTINC
DMA_DMACCR_SRCAMODE_SGLINDX
DMA_DMACCR_SRCAMODE_DBLINDX */
DMA_DMACCR_ENDPROG_OFF, /* End of programmation bit :−
DMA_DMACCR_ENDPROG_ON
DMA_DMACCR_ENDPROG_OFF
*/
DMA_DMACCR_REPEAT_OFF,/* Repeat condition :−
DMA_DMACCR_REPEAT_ON
DMA_DMACCR_REPEAT_ALWAYS
DMA_DMACCR_REPEAT_ENDPROG1
DMA_DMACCR_REPEAT_OFF
*/
DMA_DMACCR_AUTOINIT_OFF,/* Auto initialization bit :−
DMA_DMACCR_AUTOINIT_ON
DMA_DMACCR_AUTOINIT_OFF
*/
DMA_DMACCR_EN_STOP,/* Channel enable :−
DMA_DMACCR_EN_START
DMA_DMACCR_EN_STOP
DMA_DMACCR_PRIO_LOW, /* Channel priority :−
DMA_DMACCR_PRIO_HI
DMA_DMACCR_PRIO_LOW
*/
*/
DMA_DMACCR_FS_ELEMENT, /* Frame\Element Sync :−
DMA_DMACCR_FS_ENABLE
DMA_DMACCR_FS_DISABLE
DMA_DMACCR_FS_ELEMENT
DMA_DMACCR_FS_FRAME
*/
DMA_DMACCR_SYNC_NONE
2-4
/* Synchronization control :−
DMA_DMACCR_SYNC_NONE
DMA_DMACCR_SYNC_REVT0
DMA_DMACCR_SYNC_XEVT0
DMA_DMACCR_SYNC_REVTA0
DMA_DMACCR_SYNC_XEVTA0
DMA_DMACCR_SYNC_REVT1
DMA_DMACCR_SYNC_XEVT1
DMA_DMACCR_SYNC_REVTA1
DMA_DMACCR_SYNC_XEVTA1
DMA_DMACCR_SYNC_REVT2
Using the CSL
DMA_DMACCR_SYNC_XEVT2
DMA_DMACCR_SYNC_REVTA2
DMA_DMACCR_SYNC_XEVTA2
DMA_DMACCR_SYNC_TIM1INT
DMA_DMACCR_SYNC_TIM2INT
DMA_DMACCR_SYNC_EXTINT0
DMA_DMACCR_SYNC_EXTINT1
DMA_DMACCR_SYNC_EXTINT2
DMA_DMACCR_SYNC_EXTINT3
DMA_DMACCR_SYNC_EXTINT4
DMA_DMACCR_SYNC_EXTINT5
*/
) /* DMACCR */
DMA_DMACICR_RMK(
DMA_DMACICR_BLOCKIE_ON , /* Whole block interrupt enable :−
DMA_DMACICR_BLOCKIE_ON
DMA_DMACICR_BLOCKIE_OFF
*/
DMA_DMACICR_LASTIE_ON, /* Last frame Interrupt enable :−
DMA_DMACICR_LASTIE_ON
DMA_DMACICR_LASTIE_OFF
*/
DMA_DMACICR_FRAMEIE_ON, /* Whole frame interrupt enable :−
DMA_DMACICR_FRAMEIE_ON
DMA_DMACICR_FRAMEIE_OFF
*/
DMA_DMACICR_FIRSTHALFIE_ON, /* HAlf frame interrupt enable :−
DMA_DMACICR_FIRSTHALFIE_ON
DMA_DMACICR_FIRSTHALFIE_OFF
*/
DMA_DMACICR_DROPIE_ON, /* Sync. event drop interrupt enable :−
DMA_DMACICR_DROPIE_ON
DMA_DMACICR_DROPIE_OFF
*/
DMA_DMACICR_TIMEOUTIE_ON /* Time out inetrrupt enable
DMA_DMACICR_TIMEOUTIE_ON
DMA_DMACICR_TIMEOUTIE_OFF
:−
*/
), /* DMACICR */
(DMA_AdrPtr) &src, /* DMACSSAL */
0, /* DMACSSAU */
(DMA_AdrPtr)&dst, /* DMACDSAL */
0, /* DMACDSAU */
N, /* DMACEN */
1, /* DMACFN */
0, /* DMACFI */
0 /* DMACEI */
};
How to Use CSL
2-5
Using the CSL
Step 3: Define a DMA_Handle pointer. DMA_open will initialize this handle
when a DMA channel is opened.
DMA_Handle myhDma;
void main(void) {
// .....
Step 4: Initialize the CSL Library. A one-time only initialization of the CSL
library must be done before calling any CSL module API:
CSL_init();
/* Init CSL */
Step 5: For multi-resource peripherals such as McBSP and DMA, call
PER_open to reserve resources (McBSP_open(), DMA_open()...):
myhDma = DMA_open(DMA_CHA0, 0);/* Open DMA Channel 0 */
By default, the TMS320C55xx compiler assigns all data symbols word
addresses. The DMA however, expects all addresses to be byte
addresses. Therefore, you must shift the address by 2 in order to change
the word address to a byte address for the DMA transfer.
Step 6: Configure the DMA channel by calling DMA_config() function:
myconfig.dmacssal =
(DMA_AdrPtr)(((Uint16)(myconfig.dmacssal)<<1)&0xFFFF);
myconfig.dmacdsal =
(DMA_AdrPtr)(((Uint16)(myconfig.dmacdsal)<<1)&0xFFFF);
myconfig.dmacssau = (((Uint32) &src) >> 15) & 0xFFFF;
myconfig.dmacdsau = (((Uint32) &dst) >> 15) & 0xFFFF;
DMA_config(myhDma, &myConfig);
/* Configure Channel */
Step 7: Call DMA_start() to begin DMA transfers:
DMA_start(myhDma);
/*
Begin Transfer
*/
Step 8: Wait for FRAME status bit in DMA status register to signal transfer
is complete
while (!DMA_FGETH(myhDma, DMACSR, FRAME)) {
;
}
Step 9: Close DMA channel
DMA_close(myhDma);
}
2-6
/* Close channel (Optional) */
Compiling and Linking with the CSL Using Code Composer Studio
2.3 Compiling and Linking with the CSL Using Code Composer Studio
To compile and link with the CSL, you must configure the Code Composer
Studio IDE project environment. To complete this process, follow these steps:
Step 1: Specify the target device. (Refer to section 2.3.1)
Step 2: Determine whether or not you are using a small or large memory
model and specify the CSL and RTS libraries you require. (Refer to
section 2.3.1.1)
Step 3: Create the linker command file (with a special .csldata section) and
add the file to the project. (Refer to section 2.3.1.2)
Step 4: Determine if you must enable inlining. (Refer to section 2.3.1.3)
The remaining sections in this chapter will provide more details and
explanations for the steps above.
Note:
Code Composer Studio will automatically define the search paths for include
files and libraries as defined in Table 2−1. You are not required to set the −i
option.
Table 2−1. CSL Directory Structure
2.3.1
This CSL component...
Is located in this directory...
Libraries
<Install_Dir>\c5500\csl\lib
Source Library
<Install_Dir>\c5500\csl\lib
Include files
<Install_Dir>\c5500\csl\include
Examples
<Install_Dir>\examples\<target>\csl
Documentation
<Install_Dir>\docs
Specifying Your Target Device
Use the following steps to specify the target device you are configuring:
Step 1: In Code Composer Studio, select Project → Options.
Step 2: In the Build Options dialog box, select the Compiler tab (see
Figure 2−1).
Step 3: In the Category list box, highlight Preprocessor.
How to Use CSL
2-7
Compiling and Linking with the CSL Using Code Composer Studio
Step 4: In the Define Symbols field, enter one of the device support symbols
in Table 1−2, on page 1-5.
For example, if you are using the 5510PG1.2 device, enter
CHIP_5510PG1_2.
Step 5: Click OK.
Figure 2−1. Defining the Target Device in the Build Options Dialog
2.3.1.1
Large/Small Memory Model Selection
Use of CSL requires that all data resides in the base 64k (Page 0) of memory
because of the way in which the small data memory model is implemented.
Page independence for the small data memory model is achieved in the compiler by setting all XAR registers to initially point to the area in memory where
the .bss section is located. This is done when the C environment boot routine
_c_int00 is executed. The compiler then uses ARx addressing for all data accesses, leaving the upper part of XARx untouched.
2-8
Compiling and Linking with the CSL Using Code Composer Studio
Because, CSL is written in C, it relies on the compiler to perform the data/peripheral memory access to read/write peripheral and CPU registers. So in the
small data memory model, all peripheral/CPU registers are accessed via ARx
addressing. Because the peripheral control registers and CPU status registers
reside in the base 64K of I/O and data space respectively, this forces all data
to be on page 0 of memory when compiling in small model and using the CSL.
Note that this is a problem only when using the small data memory model. This
limitation does not exist when compiling with a large data memory model.
If you use any large memory model libraries, define the -ml option for the compiler and link with the large memory model runtime library (rts55x.lib) using the
following steps:
Step 1: In Code Composer Studio, select Project → Options.
Step 2: In the Build Options dialog box, select the Compiler Tab
(Figure 2−2).
Step 3: In the Category list box, highlight advanced.
Step 4: Select Use Large memory model (-ml).
Step 5: Click OK.
How to Use CSL
2-9
Compiling and Linking with the CSL Using Code Composer Studio
Figure 2−2. Defining Large Memory Model
Then, you must specify which CSL and RTS libraries will be linked in your
project.
In Code Composer Studio, select Project → Options.
In the Build Options dialog box, Select the Linker Tab (see Figure 2−3).
In the Category list, highlight Basic.
The Library search Path field (-l), should show:
<Install_Dir>\c5500\csl\lib (automatically configured by Code Composer
Studio)
In the Include Libraries (-l) field, enter the correct library from Table 1−2,
on page 1-5.
2-10
Compiling and Linking with the CSL Using Code Composer Studio
For example, if you are using the 5510 device, enter csl5510.lib for near
mode or csl5510x.lib for far mode. In addition, you must include the corresponding rts55.lib or rts55x.lib compiler runtime support libraries.
Click OK.
Figure 2−3. Defining Library Paths
How to Use CSL
2-11
Compiling and Linking with the CSL Using Code Composer Studio
2.3.1.2
Creating a Linker Command File
The CSL has two requirements for the linker command file:
You must allocate the .csldata section.
The CSL creates a .csl data section to maintain global data that is used to
implement functions with configurable data. You must allocate this section
within the base 64K address space of the data space.
You must reserve address 0x7b in scratch pad memory
The CSL uses address 0x7b in the data space as a pointer to the .csldata
section, which is initialized during the execution of CSL_init(). For this
reason, you must call CSL_init() before calling any other CSL functions.
Overwriting memory location 0x7b can cause the CSL functions to fail.
Example 2−1 illustrates these requirements which must be included in the
linker command file.
Example 2−1. Using a Linker Command File
MEMORY
{
PROG0:
PROG1:
DATA:
}
SECTIONS
{
.text
.cinit
.switch
.data
.bss
.const
.sysmem
.stack
.csldata
}
origin = 8000h, length = 0D000h
origin = 18000h, length = 08000h
origin =
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
PROG0
PROG0
PROG0
DATA
DATA
DATA
DATA
DATA
DATA
table1 : load =
table2 : load =
2.3.1.3
1000h, length = 04000h
6000h
4000h
Using Function Inlining
Because some CSL functions are short (they may set only a single bit field),
incurring the overhead of a C function call is not always necessary. If you
enable inline, the CSL declares these functions as static inline. Using this
technique helps you improve code performance.
2-12
Chapter 3
ADC Module
This chapter describes the ADC module, lists the API structure, functions, and
macros within the module, and provides an ADC API reference section. The
ADC module is not handle-based.
Topic
Page
3.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
3.2
Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
3.3
Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
3.4
Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
3.5
Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
3-1
Overview
3.1 Overview
The configuration of the ADC can be performed by using one of the following
methods:
Register-based configuration
A register-based configuration is performed by calling ADC_config() or
any of the SET register/field macros.
Parameter-based configuration
A parameter-based configuration can be performed by calling
ADC_setFreq(). Using ADC_setFreq() to initialize the ADC registers for
the desired sampling frequency is the recommended approach. The
sampled value can also be read using the ADC_read() function.
Compared to the register-based approach, this method provides a higher
level of abstraction. The downside is larger code size and higher cycle
counts.
Table 3−1 lists the configuration structure used to set up the ADC.
Table 3−2 lists the functions available for use with the ADC module.
Table 3−3 lists ADC registers and fields.
Table 3−1. ADC Configuration Structures
Syntax
Description
ADC_Config
ADC configuration structure used to set up the ADC (register
based)
See page…
3-4
Table 3−2. ADC Functions
Syntax
Description
ADC_config()
Sets up the ADC using the configuration structure
3-5
ADC_getConfig()
Obtains the current configuration of all the ADC registers
3-5
ADC_read()
Performs conversion and reads sampled values from the data
register
3-6
ADC_setFreq()
Sets up the ADC using parameters passed
3-6
3-2
See page…
Overview
Table 3−3. ADC Registers
Register
Field
ADCCTL
CHSELECT, ADCSTART
ADCDATA
ADCDATA(R), CHSELECT, ADCBUSY(R)
ADCCLKDIV
CONVRATEDIV, SAMPTIMEDIV
ADCCLKCTL
CPUCLKDIV, IDLEEN
Note:
R = Read Only; W = Write; By default, most fields are Read/Write
ADC Module
3-3
ADC_Config
3.2 Configuration Structures
The following is the configuration structure used to set up the ADC (register
based).
ADC_Config
ADC configuration structure used to set up the ADC interface
Structure
ADC_Config
Members
Uint16 adcctl
Control Register
Uint16 adcclkdiv
Clock Divider Register
Uint16 adcclkctl
Clock Control Register
Description
ADC configuration structure used to set up the ADC. You create and initialize
this structure and then pass its address to the ADC_config() function. You can
either use literal values or use ADC_RMK macros to create the structure
member values.
Example
ADC_Config
0xFFFF,
0xFFFF,
0xFFFF
}
3-4
Config = {
/* ADCCTL
*/
/* ADCCLKDIV */
/* ADCCLKCTL */
ADC_getConfig
3.3 Functions
The following are functions available for use with the ADC module.
ADC_config
Writes the values to ADC registers using the configuration structure
Function
void ADC_config(ADC_Config *Config);
Arguments
Config
Return Value
None
Description
Writes a value to set up the ADC using the configuration structure. The values
of the configuration structure are written to the port registers.
Example
ADC_Config Config = {
0xFFFF,
/* ADCCTL */
0xFFFF,
/* ADCCLKDIV */
0xFFFF
/* ADCCLKCTL */
Pointer to an initialized configuration structure
(see ADC_Config)
};
ADC_getConfig
Writes values to ADC registers using the configuration structure
Function
void ADC_getConfig(ADC_Config *Config);
Arguments
Config
Return Value
None
Description
Reads the current value of all ADC registers being used and places them into
the corresponding configuration structure member.
Example
ADC_Config testConfig;
ADC_getConfig(&testConfig);
Pointer to a configuration structure
(see ADC_Config)
ADC Module
3-5
ADC_read
ADC_read
Performs an ADC conversion and reads the digital data
Function
void ADC_read(int channelnumber,
Uint16 date,
int length);
Arguments
int channelnumber Analog Input Selector Value from 0−3
Uint16 *data
Data array to store digital data converted from
analog signal
int length
number of samples to convert
Return Value
None
Description
Performs conversions by setting the ADC start bit (ADCCTL) and polling ADC
busy (ADCDATA) until done. The sampled values are then read into the array.
Example
int i=7,j=15,k=1;
int channel=0,samplenumber=3;
Uint16 samplestorage[3]={0,0,0};
ADC_setFreq(i,j,k);
ADC_read(channel,samplestorage,samplenumber);
/* performs 3 conversions from analog input 0 */
/* and reads the digital data into the
*/
/* samplestorage array.
*/
ADC_setFreq
Initializes the ADC for a desired sampling frequency
Function
void ADC_setFreq(int cpuclkdiv,
int convratediv,
int sampletimediv);
Arguments
cpuclkdiv
CPU clock divider value (inside ADCCLKCTL register)
Value from 0−255
convratediv
Conversion clock rate divider value (inside ADCCLKDIV)
Value from 0−16
sampletimediv Sample and hold time divider value (inside ADCCLKDIV)
Value from 0−255
Return Value
3-6
None
ADC_setFreq
Description
Initializes the ADC peripheral by setting the system clock divider, conversion
clock rate divider, and sample and hold time divider values into the appropriate
registers.
Refer to the TMS320C55x Peripherals Reference Guide (SPRU317A) for
explanations on how to produce a desired ADC sampling frequency using
these three parameters.
Example
int i=7,j=15,k=1;
ADC_setFreq(i,j,k);
/* This example sets the ADC sampling frequency
*/
/* to 21.5 KHZ, given a 144 MHZ clockout frequency */
ADC Module
3-7
Macros
3.4 Macros
This section contains descriptions of the macros available in the ADC module.
See the general macros description in section 1.5 on page 1-11. To use these
macros, you must include “csl_adc.h.”
The ADC module defines macros that have been designed for the following
purposes:
The RMK macros create individual control-register masks for the following
purposes:
To initialize a ADC_Config structure that can be passed to
functions such as ADC_Config().
To use as arguments for the appropriate RSET macro.
Other macros are available primarily to facilitate reading and writing
individual bits and fields in the ADC control registers.
Table 3−4. ADC Macros
(a) Macros to read/write ADC register values
Macro
Syntax
ADC_RGET()
Uint16 ADC_RGET(REG)
ADC_RSET()
Void ADC_RSET(REG, Uint16 regval)
(b) Macros to read/write ADC register field values (Applicable to register with more than one field)
Macro
Syntax
ADC_FGET()
Uint16 ADC_FGET(REG, FIELD)
ADC_FSET()
Void ADC_FSET(REG,FIELD,Uint16 fieldval)
Notes:
1) REG indicates the registers, ADCCTL, ADCCLKDIV, ADCCLKCTL
2) FIELD indicates the register field name
For REG_FSET and REG_FMK, FIELD must be a writable field.
For REG_FGET, the field must be a readable field.
3) regval indicates the value to write in the register (REG).
4) fieldval indicates the value to write in the field (FIELD).
3-8
Examples
Table 3−4. ADC Macros (Continued)
(c) Macros to create values to ADC registers and fields (Applicable to registers with more than one field)
Macro
Syntax
ADC_REG_RMK()
Uint16 ADC_REG_RMK(fieldval_n,…fieldval_0)
Note: *Start with field values with most significant field positions:
field_n: MSB field
field_0: LSB field
*only writable fields allowed
ADC_FMK()
Uint16 ADC_FMK(REG, FIELD, fieldval)
(d) Macros to read a register address
Macro
Syntax
ADC_ADDR()
Uint16 ADC_ADDR(REG)
Notes:
1) REG indicates the registers, ADCCTL, ADCCLKDIV, ADCCLKCTL
2) FIELD indicates the register field name
For REG_FSET and REG_FMK, FIELD must be a writable field.
For REG_FGET, the field must be a readable field.
3) regval indicates the value to write in the register (REG).
4) fieldval indicates the value to write in the field (FIELD).
3.5 Examples
ADC programming examples using CSL are provided in the:
\examples\<target>\CSL directory of Code Composer Studio
and in Programming the C5509 ADC Peripheral Application Report
(SPRA785).
ADC Module
3-9
3-10
Chapter 4
CHIP Module
This chapter describes the CHIP module, lists the API functions and macros
within the module, and provides a CHIP API reference section. The CSL CHIP
module is not handle-based; it offers general CPU functions and macros for
C55x register accesses.
Topic
Page
4.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
4.2
Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
4.3
Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
4-1
Overview
4.1 Overview
The following sections contain all the information required to run the CHIP
module. Table 4−1 lists the functions available, section 4.3 contains the
macros, and Table 4−2 lists CHIP registers.
Table 4−1. CHIP Functions
Function
Description
CHIP_getDieId_High32
Returns the high 32 bits of the DieID register.
4-3
CHIP_getDieId_Low32
Returns the low 32 bits of the DieID register.
4-3
CHIP_getRevId
Returns the value of the RevID register.
4-3
4.1.1
See page ...
CHIP Registers
Table 4−2. CHIP Registers
Register
Field
ST0_55
ACOV0, ACOV1, ACOV2, ACOV3, TC1, TC2, CARRY, DP
ST1_55
BRAF, CPL, XF, HM, INTM, M40, SATD, SXMD, C16, FRCT, C54CM, ASM
ST2_55
ARMS, DBGM, EALLOW, RDM, CDPLC, AR7LC, AR6LC, AR5LC, AR4LC,
AR3LC, AR2LC, AR1LC, AR0LC
ST3_55
CAFRZ, CAEN, CACLR, HINT, CBERR, MPNMC, SATA, AVIS, CLKOFF,
SMUL, SST
IER0
DMAC5, DMAC4, XINT2, RINT2, INT3, DSPINT, DMAC1, XINT1, RINT1,
RINT0, TINT0, INT2, INT0
IER1
INT5, TINT1, DMAC3, DMAC2, INT4, DMAC0, XINT0, INT1
IFR0
DMAC5, DMAC4, XINT2, RINT2, INT3, DSPINT, DMAC1, XINT1, RINT1,
RINT0, TINT0, INT2, INT0
IFR1
INT5, TINT1, DMAC3, DMAC2, INT4, DMAC0, XINT0, INT1
IVPD
IVPD
IVPH
IVPH
PDP
PDP
SYSR
HPE, BH, HBH, BOOTM3(R), CLKDIV
XBSR
CLKOUT, OSCDIS, EMIFX2, SP2, SP1, PP
Note:
4-2
R = Read Only; W = Write; By default, most fields are Read/Write
CHIP_getRevId
4.2 Functions
The following are functions available for use with theCHIP module.
CHIP_getDieId_High32
Get the high 32 bits of the Die ID register
Function
Uint32 CHIP_getDieId_High32();
Arguments
None
Return Value
high 32 bits of Die ID
Description
Returns high 32 bits of the Die ID register
Example
Uint32 DieId_32_High;
…
DieId_32_High = CHIP_getDieId_High32();
CHIP_getDieId_Low32
Get the low 32 bits of the Die ID register
Function
Uint32 CHIP_getDieId_Low32();
Arguments
None
Return Value
low 32 bits of Die ID
Description
Returns low 32 bits of the Die ID register
Example
Uint32 DieId_32_Low;
…
DieId_32_Low = CHIP_getDieId_Low32();
CHIP_getRevId
Gets the Rev ID Register
Function
Uint16 CHIP_getRevId();
Arguments
None
Return Value
Rev ID
Description
This function returns the Rev Id register.
Example
Uint16 RevId;
...
RevId = CHIP_getRevId();
CHIP Module
4-3
Macros
4.3 Macros
CSL offers a collection of macros to gain individual access to the CHIP peripheral registers and fields. Table 4−3 contains a list of macros available for the
CHIP module. To use them, include “csl_chip.h.”
Table 4−3. CHIP Macros
(a) Macros to read/write CHIP register values
Macro
Syntax
CHIP_RGET()
Uint16 CHIP_RGET(REG)
CHIP_RSET()
void CHIP_RSET(REG, Uint16 regval)
(b) Macros to read/write CHIP register field values (Applicable only to registers with more than one field)
Macro
Syntax
CHIP_FGET()
Uint16 CHIP_FGET(REG, FIELD)
CHIP_FSET()
void CHIP_FSET(REG,FIELD, Uint16 fieldval)
(c) Macros to read/write CHIP register field values (Applicable only to registers with more than one field)
Macro
Syntax
CHIP_REG_RMK()
Uint16 CHIP_REG_RMK(fieldval_n,...fieldval_0)
Note: *Start with field values with most significant field
positions:
field_n: MSB field
field_0: LSB field
* only writeable fields allowed
CHIP_FMK()
Uint16 CHIP_FMK(REG, FIELD, fieldval)
(d) Macros to read a register address
Macro
Syntax
CHIP_ADDR()
Uint16 CHIP_ADDR(REG)
Notes:
1) REG indicates the register XBSR
2) FIELD indicates the register field name
For REG_FSET and REG_FMK, FIELD must be a writable field.
For REG_FGET, the field must be a readable field.
3) regval indicates the value to write in the register (REG).
4) fieldval indicates the value to write in the field (FIELD).
4-4
Chapter 5
DAT Module
This chapter describes the DAT (data) module, lists the API functions within
the module, and provides a DAT API reference section. The handle-based
DAT module allows you to use DMA hardware to move data.
Topic
Page
5.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
5.2
Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3
5-1
Overview
5.1 Overview
The handle-based DAT(data) module allows you to use DMA hardware to
move data. This module works the same for all devices that support the DMA
regardless of the type of the DMA controller. Therefore, any application code
using the DAT module is compatible across all devices as long as the DMA
supports the specific address reach and memory space.
The DAT copy operations occur on dedicated DMA hardware independent of
the CPU. Because of this asynchronous nature, you can submit an operation
to be performed in the background while the CPU performs other tasks in the
foreground. Then you can use the DAT_wait() function to block completion of
the operation before moving to the next task.
Since the DAT module uses the DMA peripheral, it cannot use a DMA channel
that is already allocated by the application. To ensure this does not happen,
you must call the DAT_open() function to allocate a DMA channel for exclusive
use. When the module is no longer needed, you can free the DMA resource
by calling DAT_close().
It should be noted that for 5509/5510/5509A targets, the source as well as
destination data is in SARAM (since DMA internally is configured for this port)
and for 5502, the data is in DARAM (since DMA internally is configured for
DARAM PORT0).
Table 5−1 lists the functions for use with the DAT modules. The functions are
listed in alphabetical order. Your application must call DAT_open() and
DAT_close(); the other functions are used at your discretion.
Table 5−1. DAT Functions
Function
Purpose
DAT_close()
Closes the DAT
5-3
DAT_copy()
Copies data of specific length from the source memory to the
destination memory.
5-3
DAT_copy2D()
Copies 2D data of specific line length from the source memory
to the destination memory.
5-4
DAT_fill()
Fills the destination memory with a data value
5-5
DAT_open()
Opens the DAT with a channel number and a channel priority
5-6
DAT_wait()
DAT wait function
5-7
5-2
See page ...
DAT_copy
5.2 Functions
The following are functions available for use with the DAT module.
DAT_close
Closes a DAT device
Function
void DAT_close(
DAT_Handle hDat
);
Arguments
hDat
Return Value
None
Description
Closes a previously opened DAT device. Any pending requests are first
allowed to complete.
Example
DAT_close(hDat);
DAT_copy
Performs bytewise copy from source to destination memory
Function
Uint16 DAT_copy(DAT_Handle hDat,
(DMA_AdrPtr)Src,
(DMA_AdrPtr)Dst,
Uint16 ElemCnt
);
Arguments
hDat
Device Handler (see DAT_open)
Src
Pointer to source memory assumes byte addresses
Dst
Pointer to destination memory assumes byte addresses
ByteCnt
Number of bytes to transfer to *Dst
Return Value
DMA status
Returns status of data transfer at the moment of exiting the
routine:
0: transfer complete
1: on-going transfer
Description
Copies the memory values from the Src to the Dst memory locations.
Example
DAT_copy(hDat,
/*
(DMA_AdrPtr)0xF000, /*
(DMA_AdrPtr)0xFF00, /*
0x0010
/*
);
Device Handler
src
dst
ByteCnt
*/
*/
*/
*/
DAT Module
5-3
DAT_copy2D
DAT_copy2D
Copies 2−dimensional data from source memory to destination memory
Function
Uint16 DAT_copy2D(DAT_Handle hDat,
Uint16 Type,
(DMA_AdrPtr)Src,
(DMA_AdrPtr)Dst,
Uint16 LineLen,
Uint16 LineCnt,
Uint16 LinePitch
);
Arguments
hDat
Device Handler (see DAT_open)
Type
Type of 2D DMA transfer, must be one of the following:
DAT_1D2D : 1D to 2D transfer
DAT_2D1D : 2D to 1D transfer
DAT_2D2D : 2D to 2D transfer
Src
Pointer to source memory assumes byte addresses
Dst
Pointer to destination memory assumes byte addresses
LineLen
Number of 16-bit words in one line
LineCnt
Number of lines to copy
LinePitch
Number of bytes between start of one line to start of next line
(always an even number since underlying DMA transfer
assumes 16-bit elements)
Return Value
DMA status
Description
Copies the memory values from the Src to the Dst memory locations.
5-4
Returns status of data transfer at the moment of exiting the
routine:
0: transfer complete
1: on-going transfer
DAT_fill
Example
DAT_fill
DAT_copy2D(hDat,
/*
DAT_2D2D,
/*
(DMA_AdrPtr)0xFF00, /*
(DMA_AdrPtr)0xF000, /*
0x0010,
/*
0x0004,
/*
0x0110,
/*
);
Device Handler
Type
src
dst
linelen
Line Cnt
LinePitch
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
Fills DAT destination memory with value
Function
Uint16 DAT_fill(DAT_Handle hDat,
(DMA_AdrPtr)Dst,
Uint16 ElemCnt,
Uint16 *Value
);
Arguments
hDat
Device Handler (DAT_open)
(DMA_AdrPtr)Dst
Pointer to destination memory location
ElemCnt
Number of 16-bit words to fill
*Value
Pointer to value that will fill the memory
Return Value
DMA status
Returns status of data transfer at the moment of exiting the
routine:
0: transfer complete
1: on-going transfer
Description
Fills the destination memory with a value for a specified byte count using DMA
hardware. You must open the DAT channel with DAT_open() before calling this
function. You can use the DAT_wait() function to poll for the completed transfer
of data.
Example
Uint16 value;
DAT_fill(hDat,
/*
(DMA_AdrPtr)0x00FF, /*
0x0010,
/*
&value
/*
);
Device Handler
dst
ElemCnt
Value
*/
*/
*/
*/
DAT Module
5-5
DAT_open
DAT_open
Opens DAT for DAT calls
Function
DAT_Handle DAT_open(
int ChaNum,
int Priority,
Uint32 flags
);
Arguments
ChaNum
Specifies which DMA channel to allocate; must be one of the
following:
DAT_CHA_ANY (allocates Channel 2 or 3)
DAT_CHA0
DAT_CHA1
DAT_CHA2
DAT_CHA3
DAT_CHA4
DAT_CHA5
Priority
Specifies the priority of the DMA channel, must be one of the
following:
DAT_PRI_LOW sets the DMA channel for low priority level
DAT_PRI_HIGH sets the DMA channel for high priority level
Flags
Miscellaneous open flags (currently None available).
Return Value
DAT_Handle hdat
Description
Before a DAT channel can be used, it must first be opened by this function with
an assigned priority. Once opened, it cannot be opened again until closed (see
DAT_close).
Example
DAT_open(DAT_CHA0,DAT_PRI_LOW,0);
5-6
Device Handler (see DAT_open). If the requested DMA
channel is currently being used, an INV(-1) value is
returned.
DAT_wait
DAT_wait
DAT wait function
Function
void DAT_wait
DAT_Handle hDat
);
Arguments
hDat
Return Value
none
Description
This function polls the IFRx flag to see if the DMA channel has completed a
transfer. If the transfer is already completed, the function returns immediately.
If the transfer is not complete, the function waits for completion of the transfer
as identified by the handle; interrupts are not disabled during the wait.
Example
DAT_wait(myhDat);
Device handler (see DAT_open).
DAT Module
5-7
DAT_wait
5-8
Chapter 6
DMA Module
This chapter describes the DMA module, lists the API structure, functions, and
macros within the module, and provides a DMA API reference section.
Topic
Page
6.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2
6.2
Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5
6.3
Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-6
6.4
Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11
6-1
Overview
6.1 Overview
Table 6−2 summarizes the primary API functions and macros.
Your application must call DMA_open() and DMA_close().
Your application can also call DMA_reset(hDma).
You can perform configuration by calling DMA_config() or any of the SET
register macros.
Because DMA_config() initializes 11 control registers, macros are
provided to enable efficient access to individual registers when you need
to set only one or two.
The recommended approach is to use DMA_config() to initialize the DMA
registers.
The CSL DMA module defines macros (see section 6.4) designed for these
primary purposes:
The RMK macros create individual control-register masks for the following
purposes:
To initialize an DMA_Config structure that you then pass to functions
such as DMA_config().
To use as arguments for the appropriate SET macro.
Other macros are available primarily to facilitate reading and writing
individual bits and fields in the DMA control registers.
6-2
Overview
Table 6−1. DMA Configuration Structure
Configuration Structure
Description
See page ...
DMA_Config
DMA configuration structure used to setup the DMA interface
6-5
Table 6−2. DMA Functions
Function
Description
See page ...
DMA_close()
Closes the DMA and its corresponding handler
6-6
DMA_config()
Sets up DMA using configuration structure (DMA_Config)
6-6
DMA_getConfig()
Reads the DMA configuration
6-7
DMA_getEventId()
Returns the IRQ Event ID for the DMA completion interrupt
6-7
DMA_open()
Opens the DMA and assigns a handler to it
6-8
DMA_pause()
Interrupts the transfer in the corresponding DMA channel
6-9
DMA_reset()
Resets the DMA registers with default values
6-9
DMA_start()
Enables transfers in the corresponding DMA channel
6-9
DMA_stop()
Disables the transfer in the corresponding DMA channel
6-10
Table 6−3. DMA Macros
Macro
Description
See page ...
DMA_ADDR()
Gets the address of a DMA register
6-11
DMA_ADDRH()
Gets the address of a DMA local register for channel used in
hDma
6-11
DMA_FGET()
Gets the DMA register field value
6-12
DMA_FGETH()
Gets the DMA register field value
6-13
DMA_FMK()
Creates register value based on individual field values
6-14
DMA_FSET()
Sets the DMA register value to regval
6-15
DMA_FSETH()
Sets value of register field
6-16
DMA_REG_RMK()
Creates register value based on individual field values
6-17
DMA_RGET()
Gets value of a DMA register
6-18
DMA_RGETH()
Gets value of DMA register used in handle
6-19
DMA_RSET()
Sets the DMA register REG value to regval
6-19
DMA_RSETH()
Sets the DMA register LOCALREG for the channel associated
with handle to the value regval
6-20
DMA Module
6-3
Overview
6.1.1
DMA Registers
Table 6−4. DMA Registers
Register
Field
DMAGCR
FREE, EHPIEXCL, EHPIPRIO
DMACSDP
DSTBEN, DSTPACK, DST, SRCBEN, SRCPACK, SRC, DATATYPE
DMACCR
DSTAMODE, SRCAMODE, ENDPROG, FIFOFLUSH, REPEAT, AUTOINIT,
EN, PRIO, FS, SYNC
DMACICR
BLOCKIE, LASTIE, FRAMEIE, FIRSTHALFIE, DROPIE, TIMEOUTIE
DMACSR
(R)SYNC, (R)BLOCK, (R)LAST, (R)FRAME, (R)HALF, (R)DROP, (R)TIMEOUT
DMACSSAL
SSAL
DMACSSAU
SSAU
DMACDSAL
DSAL
DMACDSAU
DSAU
DMACEN
ELEMENTNUM
DMACFI
FRAMENDX
DMACEI
ELEMENTNDX
DMACSFI
FRAMENDX
DMACSEI
ELEMENTNDX
DMACDFI
FRAMENDX
DMACDEI
ELEMENTNDX
DMACSAC
DMACSAC
DMACDAC
DMACDAC
DMAGTCR
PTE, ETE, ITE1, ITE0
DMAGTCR
DTCE, STCE
DMAGSCR
COMPMODE
Note:
6-4
R = Read Only; W = Write; By default, most fields are Read/Write
DMA_Config
6.2 Configuration Structures
The following configuration structure is used to set up the DMA.
DMA_Config
DMA configuration structure used to set up DMA interface
Structure
DMA_Config
Members
Uint16 dmacsdp
Uint16 dmaccr
Uint16 dmacicr
(DMA_AdrPtr) dmacssal
Uint16 dmacssau
(DMA_AdrPtr) dmacdsal
Uint16 dmacdsau
Uint16 dmacen
Uint16 dmacfn
DMA Channel Control Register
DMA Channel Interrupt Register
DMA Channel Status Register
DMA Channel Source Start Address
(Lower Bits)
DMA Channel Source Start Address
(Upper Bits)
DMA Channel Source Destination Address
(Lower Bits)
DMA Channel Source Destination Address
(Upper Bits)
DMA Channel Element Number Register
DMA Channel Frame Number Register
For CHIP_5509, CHIP_5510PG1_x (x=0, 2)
Int16 dmacfi
DMA Channel Frame Index Register
Int16 dmacei
DMA Channel Element Index Register
For CHIP_5510PG2_x (x=0, 1, 2), 5509A, 5502, 5501
Int16 dmacsfi
DMA Channel Source Frame Index Register
Int16 dmacsei
DMA Channel Source Element Index Register
Int16 dmacdfi
DMA Channel Destination Frame Index
Register
Int16 dmacdei
DMA Channel Destination Element Index
Description
DMA configuration structure used to set up a DMA channel. You create and
initialize this structure and then pass its address to the DMA_config() function.
You can use literal values or the DMA_RMK macros to create the structure
member values.
Example
Refer to section 2.2.1, step 2 and step 6.
DMA Module
6-5
DMA_close
6.3 Functions
The following are functions available for use with the DMA module.
DMA_close
Closes DMA
Function
void DMA_close(
DMA_Handle hDma
);
Arguments
hDma
Return Value
None
Description
Closes a previously opened DMA device. The DMA event is disabled and
cleared. The DMA registers are set to their default values.
Example
Refer to section 2.2.1, step 6.
DMA_config
Device Handle, see DMA_open();
Writes value to up DMA using configuration structure
Function
void DMA_config(DMA_Handle hDma,
DMA_Config *Config
);
Arguments
hDma
DMA Device handle
Config
Pointer to an initialized configuration structure
Return Value
None
Description
Writes a value to the DMA using the configuration structure. The values of the
structure are written to the port registers. See also DMA_Config.
Example
Refer to section 2.2.1, step 2 and step 6.
6-6
DMA_getEventId
DMA_getConfig
Reads the DMA configuration
Function
void DMA_getConfig(
DMA_Handle hDma
DMA_Config *Config
);
Arguments
hDma
DMA device handle
Config
Pointer to an un-initialized configuration structure
Return Value
None
Description
Reads the DMA configuration into the Config structure (see DMA_Config).
Example
DMA_Config myConfig;
DMA_getConfig (hDma, &myConfig);
DMA_getEventId
Returns IRQ Event ID for DMA completion interrupt
Function
Uint16 DMA_getEventId(
DMA_Handle hDma
);
Arguments
hDma
Handle to DMA channel; see DMA_open().
Return Value
Event ID
IRQ Event ID for DMA Channel
Description
Returns the IRQ Event ID for the DMA completion interrupt. Use this ID to
manage the event using the IRQ module.
Example
EventId = DMA_getEventId(hDma);
IRQ_enable(EventId);
DMA Module
6-7
DMA_open
DMA_open
Opens DMA for DMA calls
Function
DMA_Handle DMA_open(
int ChaNum,
Uint32 flags
);
Arguments
ChaNum
DMA Channel Number: DMA_CHA0, DMA_CHA1
DMA_CHA2, DMA_CHA3, DMA_CHA4, DMA_CHA5,
DMA_CHA_ANY
flags
Event Flag Number: Logical open or DMA_OPEN_RESET
Return Value
DMA_Handle
Device handler
Description
Before a DMA device can be used, it must first be opened by this function.
Once opened, it cannot be opened again until closed (see DMA_close). The
return value is a unique device handle that is used in subsequent DMA API
calls. If the function fails, INV is returned. If the DMA_OPEN_RESET is
specified, then the power on defaults are set and any interrupts are disabled
and cleared.
Example
DMA_Handle hDma;
...
hDma = DMA_open(DMA_CHA0,0);
6-8
DMA_reset
DMA_pause
Interrupts the transfer in the corresponding DMA channel
Function
void DMA_pause(hDMA);
Arguments
hDma
Return Value
None
Description
If a DMA transfer is already active in the channel, DMA_pause will cause the
DMA controller to stop the transfer and reset the channel.
Example
DMA_pause(hDma);
DMA_reset
Handle to DMA channel; see DMA_open().
Resets DMA
Function
void DMA_reset(
DMA_Handle hDma
);
Arguments
hDma
Return Value
None
Description
Resets the DMA device. Disables and clears the interrupt event and sets the
DMA registers to default values. If INV is specified, all DMA devices are reset.
Example
DMA_reset(hDma);
DMA_start
Device handle, see DMA_open();
Enables transfers in the corresponding DMA channel
Function
void DMA_start(
DMA_Handle hDma
);
Arguments
hDma
Return Value
None
Description
Enables the DMA channel indicated by hDma so it can be serviced by the DMA
controller at the next available time slot.
Example
DMA_start(hDma);
Handle to DMA channel; see DMA_open().
DMA Module
6-9
DMA_reset
DMA_stop
Disables the transfer in the corresponding DMA channel
Function
void DMA_stop(
DMA_Handle hDma
);
Arguments
hDma
Return Value
None
Description
The transfer in the DMA channel, indicated by hDma, is disabled. The channel
can’t be serviced by the DMA controller.
Example
DMA_stop(hDma);
6-10
Handle to DMA channel; see DMA_open().
DMA_ADDRH
6.4 Macros
The CSL offers a collection of macros that allow individual access to the
peripheral registers and fields. To use the DMA macros include “csl_dma.h”
in your project.
Because the DMA has several channels, the macros identify the channel used
by either the channel number or the handle used.
DMA_ADDR
Gets address of given register
Macro
Uint16 DMA_ADDR (REG)
Arguments
REG
Return Value
Address of register LOCALREG and GLOBALREG
Description
Gets the address of a DMA register.
Example 1
LOCALREG# or GLOBALREG as listed in DMA_RGET() macro
For local registers:
myvar = DMA_ADDR (DMACSDP1);
Example 2
For global registers:
myvar = DMA_ADDR (DMAGCR);
DMA_ADDRH
Gets address of given register
Macro
Uint16 DMA_ADDRH (DMA_Handle hDma, LOCALREG,)
Arguments
hDma
Handle to DMA channel that identifies the specific DMA
channel used.
LOCALREG
Same register as in DMA_RSET(), but without channel
number (#). Example: DMACSDP (instead of DMACSDP#)
Return Value
Address of register LOCALREG
Description
Gets the address of a DMA local register for channel used in hDma
Example
DMA_Handle myHandle;
Uint16 myVar
...
myVar = DMA_ADDRH (myHandle, DMACSDP);
DMA Module
6-11
DMA_FGET
DMA_FGET
Gets value of register field
Macro
Uint16 DMA_FGET (REG, FIELD)
Arguments
REG
Only writable registers containing more than one field are
supported by this macro. Also notice that for local registers, the
channel number is used as part of the register name.
For example:
DMAGCR
DMACSDP1
FIELD Symbolic name for field of register REG Possible values: Field names
as listed in the TMS320C55x DSP Peripherals Reference Guide
(SPRU317C). Only writable fields are allowed.
Return Value
Value of register field
Description
Gets the DMA register field value
Example 1
For local registers:
Uint16 myregval;
...
myregval = DMA_FGET (DMACCR0, AUTOINIT);
Example 2
For global registers:
Uint16 myvar;
...
myregval = DMA_FGET (DMAGCR, EHPIEXCL);
6-12
DMA_FGETH
DMA_FGETH
Gets value of register field
Macro
Uint16 DMA_FGETH (DMA_Handle hDma, LOCALREG, FIELD)
Arguments
hDma
Handle to DMA channel that identifies the specific DMA
channel used.
LOCALREG
Same register as in DMA_RGET(), but without channel
number (#). Example: DMACSDP (instead of DMACSDP#)
Only registers containing more than one field are
supported by this macro.
FIELD
Symbolic name for field of register REG. Possible values:
Field names as listed in the TMS320C55x DSP Peripherals
Reference Guide (SPRU317C).
Only writable fields are allowed.
Return Value
Value of register field given by FIELD.
Description
Gets the DMA register field value
Example
DMA_Handle myHandle;
...
myHandle = DMA_open (DMA_CHA0, DMA_OPEN_RESET);
...
myVar = DMA_FGETH (myHandle, DMACCR, AUTOINIT);
DMA Module
6-13
DMA_FMK
DMA_FMK
Creates register value based on individual field values
Macro
Uint16 DMA_FMK (REG, FIELD, fieldval)
Arguments
REG
Only writable registers containing more than one field are
supported by this macro. Also notice that for local registers, the
channel number is not used as part of the register name.
For example:
DMAGCR
DMACSDP
FIELD
Symbolic name for field of register REG Possible values: Field
names as listed in the TMS320C55x DSP Peripherals Reference
Guide (SPRU317C). Only writable fields are allowed.
fieldval
Field values to be assigned to the writable register fields.
Rules to follow:
Only writable fields are allowed
Value should be a right-justified constant. If fieldval_n
value exceeds the number of bits allowed for that field,
fieldval_n is truncated accordingly.
Return Value
Shifted version of fieldval. fieldval is shifted to the bit numbering appropriate
for FIELD.
Description
Returns the shifted version of fieldval. Fieldval is shifted to the bit numbering
appropriate for FIELD within register REG. This macro allows the user to
initialize few fields in REG as an alternative to the DMA_REG_RMK() macro
that requires ALL the fields in the register to be initialized. The returned value
could be ORed with the result of other _FMK macros, as show below.
Example
Uint16 myregval;
myregval = DMA_FMK (DMAGCR, FREE, 1) | DMA_FMK (DMAGCR,
EHPIEXCL, 1);
6-14
DMA_FSET
DMA_FSET
Sets value of register field
Macro
Void DMA_FSET (REG, FIELD, fieldval)
Arguments
REG
Only writable registers containing more than one field are
supported by this macro. Also notice that for local registers, the
channel number is used as part of the register name.
For example:
DMAGCR
DMACSDP1
FIELD
Symbolic name for field of register REG. Possible values: Field
names as listed in the TMS320C55x DSP Peripherals Reference
Guide (SPRU317C). Only writable fields are allowed.
fieldval
Field values to be assigned to the writable register fields.
Rules to follow:
Only writable fields are allowed
If fieldval value exceeds the number of bits allowed for field,
fieldval is truncated accordingly.
Return Value
None
Description
Sets the DMA register field value to fieldval.
Example 1
For local registers:
DMA_FSET (DMACCR0, AUTOINIT, 1);
Example 2
For global registers:
DMA_FSET (DMAGCR, EHPIEXCL, 1);
DMA Module
6-15
DMA_FSETH
DMA_FSETH
Sets value of register field
Macro
void DMA_FSETH (DMA_Handle hDma, LOCALREG, FIELD, fieldval)
Arguments
hDma
Handle to DMA channel that identifies the specific DMA
channel used.
LOCALREG
Same register as in DMA_RGET(), but without channel
number (#). Example: DMACSDP (instead of DMACSDP#)
Only register containing more than one field are
supported by this macro.
FIELD
Symbolic name for field of register REG Possible values:
Field names as listed in the TMS320C55x DSP Peripherals
Reference Guide (SPRU317C).
Only writable fields are allowed.
fieldval
Field values to be assigned to the writable register fields.
Rules to follow:
Only writable fields are allowed
Value should be a right-justified constant. If fieldval
value exceeds the number of bits allowed for that field,
fieldval is truncated accordingly.
Return Value
None
Description
Sets the DMA register field FIELD of the LOCALREG register to fieldval for the
channel associated with handle to the value fieldval.
Example
DMA_Handle myHandle;
...
myHandle = DMA_open (DMA_CHA0, DMA_OPEN_RESET);
...
DMA_FSETH (myHandle, DMACCR, AUTOINIT, 1);
6-16
DMA_REG_RMK
DMA_REG_RMK
Creates register value based on individual field values
Macro
Uint16 DMA_REG_RMK (fieldval_n,...,fieldval_0)
Arguments
REG
Only writable registers containing more than one field are
supported by this macro. Also notice that the channel
number is not used as part of the register name.
For example:
DMAGCR
DMACSDP
fieldval
Field values to be assigned to the writable register fields.
Rules to follow:
Only writable fields are allowed
Start from Most-significant field first
Value should be a right-justified constant. If fieldval_n
value exceeds the number of bits allowed for that field,
fieldval_n is truncated accordingly.
Return Value
Value of register that corresponds to the concatenation of values passed for
the fields.
Description
Returns the DMA register value given specific field values. You can use
constants or the CSL symbolic constants covered in Section 1.6.
Example
Uint16 myregval;
/* free, ehpiexcl, ehpi prio fields */
myregval = DMA_DMAGCR_RMK (0,0,1);
DMA_REG_RMK are typically used to initialize a DMA configuration structure
used for the DMA_config() function (see section 6.2).
DMA Module
6-17
DMA_RGET
DMA_RGET
Gets value of a DMA register
Macro
Uint16 DMA_RGET (REG)
Arguments
REG
LOCALREG# or GLOBALREG, where:
LOCALREG# Local register name with channel number (#),
where # = 0, 1, 2 ,3, 4, 5,
DMACSDP#
DMACCR#
DMACICR#
DMACSR#
DMACSSAL#
DMACSSAU#
DMACDSAL#
DMACDSAU#
DMACEN#
DMACFN#
DMACFI#
DMACEI#
For CHIP_5509 and CHIP_550PG2_0:
DMACSFI#
DMACSEI#
DMACDFI#
DMACDEI#
GLOBALREG Global register name
DMGCR
DMGSCR
Return Value
value of register
Description
Returns the DMA register value
Example 1
For local registers:
Uint16 myvar;
myVar = DMA_RGET(DMACSDP1); /*read DMACSDP for channel 1*/
Example 2
For global registers:
Uint16 myVar;
...
myVar = DMA_RGET(DMAGCR);
6-18
DMA_RSET
DMA_RGETH
Gets value of DMA register used in handle
Macro
Uint16 DMA_RGETH (DMA_Handle hDma, LOCALREG)
Arguments
hDma
Handle to DMA channel that identifies the specific DMA
channel used.
LOCALREG
Same register as in DMA_RGET(), but without channel
number (#). Example: DMACSDP (instead of DMACSDP#)
Return Value
Value of register
Description
Returns the DMA value for register LOCALREG for the channel associated
with handle.
Example
DMA_Handle myHandle;
Uint16 myVar;
...
myHandle = DMA_open (DMA_CHA0, DMA_OPEN_RESET);
...
myVar = DMA_RGETH (myHandle, DMACSDP);
DMA_RSET
Sets value of DMA register
Macro
Void DMA_RSET (REG, Uint16 regval)
Arguments
REG
LOCALREG# or GLOBALREG, as listed in DMA_RGET() macro
regval register value that wants to write to register REG
Return Value
value of register
Description
Sets the DMA register REG value to regval
Example 1
For local registers:
/*DMACSDP for channel 1 = 0x8000 */
DMA_RSET(DMACSDP1, 0x8000);
Example 2
For global registers:
DMA_RSET(DMAGCR, 3);
/* DMAGCR = 3 */
DMA Module
6-19
DMA_RSETH
DMA_RSETH
Sets value of DMA register
Macro
void DMA_RSETH (DMA_Handle hDma, LOCALREG, Uint16 regval)
Arguments
hDma
Handle to DMA channel that identifies the specific DMA
channel used.
LOCALREG
Same register as in DMA_RGET(), but without channel
number (#). Example: DMACSDP (instead of DMACSDP#)
regval
value to write to register LOCALREG for the channel
associated with handle.
Return Value
None
Description
Sets the DMA register LOCALREG for the channel associated with handle to
the value regval.
Example
DMA_Handle myHandle;
...
myHandle = DMA_open (DMA_CHA0, DMA_OPEN_RESET);
...
DMA_RSETH (myHandle, DMACSDP, 0x123);
6-20
Chapter 7
EMIF Module
This chapter describes the EMIF module, lists the API structure, functions, and
macros within the module, and provides an EMIF API reference section.
Topic
Page
7.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2
7.2
Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6
7.3
Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-8
7.4
Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-11
7-1
Overview
7.1 Overview
The EMIF configuration can be performed by calling either EMIF_config() or
any of the SET register macros. Because EMIF_config() initializes 17 control
registers, macros are provided to enable efficient access to individual registers
when you need to set only one or two. The recommended approach is to use
EMIF_config() to initialize the EMIF registers.
The RMK macros create individual control-register masks for the following
purposes:
To initialize an EMIF_Config structure that is passed to EMIF_config().
To use as arguments for the appropriate SET macros.
Other macros are available primarily to facilitate reading and writing
individual bits and fields in the control registers.
Section 7.4 includes a description of all EMIF macros.
Table 7−1 lists the configuration structure used to set up the EMIF.
Table 7−2 lists the functions available for use with the EMIF module.
Table 7−3 lists DMA registers and fields.
7-2
Overview
Table 7−1. EMIF Configuration Structure
Syntax
Description
See page ...
EMIF_Config
EMIF configuration structure used to setup the EMIF interface
7-6
Table 7−2. EMIF Functions
Syntax
Description
See page ...
EMIF_config()
Sets up EMIF using configuration structure (EMIF_Config)
7-8
EMIF_getConfig()
Reads the EMIF configuration structure
7-9
EMIF_enterselfRefresh
(for 5509A only)
Places SDRAM in refresh mode
7-9
EMIF_exitselfRefresh
(for 5509A only)
SDRAM exit refresh mode
7-10
EMIF_reset
(for 5510xx, 5509, 5509A
only)
Resets memory connected in EMIF CE Space
7-10
EMIF Module
7-3
Overview
7.1.1
EMIF Registers
Table 7−3. Registers
(a) EMIF Registers
Register
Field
EGCR
MEMFREQ, WPE, MEMCEN, (R)ARDY, (R)HOLD, (R)HOLDA, NOHOLD
EMIRST
(W)EMIRST
EMIBE
(R)TIME, (R)CE3, (R)CE2, (R)CE1, (R)CE0, (R)DMA, (R)FBUS, (R)EBUS,
(R)DBUS, (R)CBUS, (R)PBUS
CE01
MTYPE, RDSETUP, RDSTROBE, RDHOLD
CE11
MTYPE, RDSETUP, RDSTROBE, RDHOLD
CE21
MTYPE, RDSETUP, RDSTROBE, RDHOLD
CE31
MTYPE, RDSETUP, RDSTROBE, RDHOLD
CE02
RDEXHLD, WREXHLD, WRSETUP, WRSTROBE, WRHOLD
CE12
RDEXHLD, WREXHLD, WRSETUP, WRSTROBE, WRHOLD
CE22
RDEXHLD, WREXHLD, WRSETUP, WRSTROBE, WRHOLD
CE32
RDEXHLD, WREXHLD, WRSETUP, WRSTROBE, WRHOLD
CE03
TIMOUT
CE13
TIMOUT
CE23
TIMOUT
CE33
TIMOUT
SDC1
TRC, SDSIZE, SDWID, RFEN, TRCD, TRP
SDPER
PERIOD
SDCNT
(R)COUNTER
INIT
INIT
SDC2
TMRD, TRAS, TACTV2ACTV
7-4
Overview
Table 7−3. Registers (Continued)
(b) 5502 and 5501 Registers
Register
Field
GBLCTL1
EK1EN,EK1HZ,NOHOLD,HOLDA,HOLD,ARDY
GBLCTL2
EK2EN,EK2HZ,EK2RATE
CE1CTL1
READ_HOLD,WRITE_HOLD,MTYPE,READ_STROBE,TA
CE1CTL2
READ_SETUP,WRITE_HOLD,WRITE_STROBE,WRITE_SETUP
CE0CTL1
READ_HOLD,WRITE_HOLD,MTYPE,READ_STROBE,TA
CE0CTL2
READ_SETUP,WRITE_HOLD,WRITE_STROBE,WRITE_SETUP
CE2CTL1
READ_HOLD,WRITE_HOLD,MTYPE,READ_STROBE,TA
CE2CTL2
READ_SETUP,WRITE_HOLD,WRITE_STROBE,WRITE_SETUP
CE3CTL1
READ_HOLD,WRITE_HOLD,MTYPE,READ_STROBE,TA
CE3CTL2
READ_SETUP,WRITE_HOLD,WRITE_STROBE,WRITE_SETUP
SDCTL1
SLFRFR,TRC
SDCTL2
TRP,TRCD,INIT,RFEN,SDWTH
SDRFR1
PERIOD,COUNTER
SDRFR2
COUNTER,EXTRA_REFRESHES
SDEXT1
TCL,TRAS,TRRD,TWR,THZP,RD2RD,RD2DEAC,RD2WR,R2WDQM
SDEXT2
R2WDQM,WR2WR,WR2DEAC,WR2RD
CE1SEC1
SYNCRL,SYNCWL,CEEXT,RENEN,SNCCLK
CE0SEC1
SYNCRL,SYNCWL,CEEXT,RENEN,SNCCLK
CE2SEC1
SYNCRL,SYNCWL,CEEXT,RENEN,SNCCLK
CE3SEC1
SYNCRL,SYNCWL,CEEXT,RENEN,SNCCLK
CESCR
CES
Note:
R = Read Only; W = Write; By default, most fields are Read/Write
EMIF Module
7-5
EMIF_Config
7.2 Configuration Structure
The following is the configuration structure used to set up the EMIF.
EMIF_Config
EMIF configuration structure used to set up EMIF interface
Structure
EMIF_Config
Members
Uint16 egcr
Uint16 emirst
Uint16 ce01
Uint16 ce02
Uint16 ce03
Uint16 ce11
Uint16 ce12
Uint16 ce13
Uint16 ce21
Uint16 ce22
Uint16 ce23
Uint16 ce31
Uint16 ce32
Uint16 ce33
Uint16 sdc1
Uint16 sdper
Uint16 init
Uint16 sdc2
Members
5502 and 5501 only
Uint16 gblctl1
EMIF Global Control Register 1
Uint16 gblctl2
EMIF Global Control Register 2
Uint16 ce1ctl1
CE1 Space Control Register 1
Uint16 ce1ctl2
CE1 Space Control Register 2
Uint16 ce0ctl1
CE0 Space Control Register 1
Uint16 ce0ctl2
CE0 Space Control Register 2
Uint16 ce2ctl1
CE2 Space Control Register 1
Uint16 ce2ctl2
CE2 Space Control Register 2
Uint16 ce3ctl1
CE3 Space Control Register 1
Uint16 ce3ctl2
CE3 Space Control Register 2
Uint16 sdctl1
SDRAM Control Register 1
Uint16 sdctl2
SDRAM Control Register 2
7-6
Global Control Register
Global Reset Register
EMIF CE0 Space Control Register 1
EMIF CE0 Space Control Register 2
EMIF CE0 Space Control Register 3
EMIF CE1 Space Control Register 1
EMIF CE1 Space Control Register 2
EMIF CE1 Space Control Register 3
EMIF CE2 Space Control Register 1
EMIIF CE2 Space Control Register 2
EMIF CE2 Space Control Register 3
EMIF CE3 Space Control Register 1
EMIF CE3 Space Control Register 2
EMIF CE3 Space Control Register 3
EMIF SDRAM Control Register 1
EMIF SDRAM Period Register
EMIF SDRAM Initialization Register
EMIF SDRAM Control Register 2
EMIF_Config
Uint16 sdrfr1
Uint16 sdrfr2
Uint16 sdext1
Uint16 sdext2
Uint16 ce1sec1
Uint16 ce0sec1
Uint16 ce2sec1
Uint16 ce3sec1
Uint16 cescr
SDRAM Refresh Control Register 1
SDRAM Refresh Control Register 2
SDRAM Extension Register 1
SDRAM Extension Register 2
CE1 Secondary Control Register 1
CE0 Secondary Control Register 1
CE2 Secondary Control Register 2
CE3 Secondary Control Register 1
CE Size Control Register
Description
The EMIF configuration structure is used to set up the EMIF Interface. You
create and initialize this structure and then pass its address to the
EMIF_config() function. You can use literal values or the EMIF_RMK macros
to create the structure member values.
Example
EMIF_Config Config1 = {
0x06CF, /* egcr
*/
0xFFFF, /* emirst */
0x7FFF, /* ce01
*/
0xFFFF, /* ce02
*/
0x00FF, /* ce03
*/
0x7FFF, /* ce11
*/
0xFFFF, /* ce12
*/
0x00FF, /* ce13
*/
0x7FFF, /* ce21
*/
0xFFFF, /* ce22
*/
0x00FF, /* ce23
*/
0x7FFF, /* ce31
*/
0xFFFF, /* ce32
*/
0x00FF, /* ce33
*/
0x07FF, /* sdc1
*/
0x0FFF, /* sdper */
0x07FF, /* init
*/
0x03FF /* sdc2
*/
}
EMIF Module
7-7
EMIF_config
7.3 Functions
The following are functions available for use with the ADC module.
EMIF_config
Writes value to up EMIF using configuration structure
Function
void EMIF_config(
EMIF_Config *Config
);
Arguments
Config
Return Value
None
Description
Writes a value to up the EMIF using the configuration structure. The values of
the structure are written to the port registers.
Example
EMIF_Config MyConfig
0x06CF, /* egcr
0xFFFF, /* emirst
0x7FFF, /* ce01
0xFFFF, /* ce02
0x00FF, /* ce03
0x7FFF, /* ce11
0xFFFF, /* ce12
0x00FF, /* ce13
0x7FFF, /* ce21
0xFFFF, /* ce22
0x00FF, /* ce23
0x7FFF, /* ce31
0xFFFF, /* ce32
0x00FF, /* ce33
0x07FF, /* sdc1
0x0FFF, /* sdper
0x07FF, /* init
0x03FF /* sdc2
Pointer to an initialized configuration structure
= {
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/ }
EMIF_config(&MyConfig);
7-8
EMIF_config
EMIF_getConfig
Reads the EMIF configuration structure
Function
void EMIF_getConfig(
EMIF_Config *Config
);
Arguments
Config
Return Value
None
Description
Reads the EMIF configuration in a configuration structure.
Example
EMIF_Config myConfig;
EMIF_getConfig(&myConfig);
EMIF_enterselfRefresh
Pointer to an initialized configuration structure
Performs self refresh for SDRAM connected to EMIF (5509A only)
Function
void EMIF_enterSelfRefresh(
Uint16 ckePin,
Uint16 tRasDelay
);
Arguments
ckePin — selects which pin to use for CKE
ckePin — 0 selects XF pin
ckePin — 1 selects GPIO.4
tRasDelay — number of CPU cycles to hold memory in refresh
Return Value
None
Description
Performs SDRAM self refresh, given GPIO pin to use toggle for refresh enable,
and the minimum number of CPU cycles to hold the memory in refresh.
Example
EMIF_enterSelfRefresh(1,1000);
EMIF Module
7-9
EMIF_config
EMIF_exitselfRefresh
Exits self refresh for SDRAM connected to EMIF (5509A only)
Function
void EMIF_exitSelfRefresh(
Uint16 tXsrDelay
);
Arguments
tXsrDelay — number of CPU cycles to wait for refresh to complete before
de-asserting refresh enable
Return Value
None
Description
Exits SDRAM self refresh after waiting tXsrDelay CPU cycles to allow current
refresh to complete.
Example
EMIF_exitSelfRefresh(1000);
EMIF_reset
Resets memory connected in EMIF CE space (5510xx,5509,5509A)
Function
void EMIF_reset
(void
);
Arguments
None
Return Value
None
Description
Resets mememory in EMIF CE spaces. Has no effect on EMIF configuration
registers. These register retain their current value.
Example
EMIF_reset();
7-10
Macros
7.4 Macros
The CSL offers a collection of macros to gain individual access to the EMIF
peripheral registers and fields.
Table 7−4 contains a list of macros available for the EMIF module. To use
them, include “csl_emif.h.”
Table 7−4. EMIF CSL Macros Using EMIF Port Number
(a) Macros to read/write EMIF register values
Macro
Syntax
EMIF_RGET()
Uint16 EMIF_RGET(REG)
EMIF_RSET()
Void EMIF_RSET(REG, Uint16 regval)
(b) Macros to read/write EMIF register field values (Applicable only to registers with more than one field)
Macro
Syntax
EMIF_FGET()
Uint16 EMIF_FGET(REG, FIELD)
EMIF_FSET()
Void EMIF_FSET(REG, FIELD, Uint16 fieldval)
(c) Macros to create value to EMIF registers and fields (Applies only to registers with more than one field)
Macro
Syntax
EMIF_REG_RMK()
Uint16 EMIF_REG_RMK(fieldval_n,…fieldval_0) (see note 5)
Note: *Start with field values with most significant field positions:
field_n: MSB field
field_0: LSB field
*only writable fields allowed
EMIF_FMK()
Uint16 EMIF_FMK(REG, FIELD, fieldval) (see note 5)
(d) Macros to read a register address
Macro
Syntax
EMIF_ADDR()
Uint16 EMIF_ADDR(REG)
Notes:
1) REG indicates the register: EGCR, EMIRST, EMIBE, CE01, CE02, CE03,
CE11, CE12, CE13, CE21, CE22, CE23, CE31,
CE32, CE33, SDC1, SDPER, SDCNT, INIT, SDC2
2) FIELD indicates the register field name as specified in the 55x Peripheral User’s Guide.
For REG_FSET and REG_FMK, FIELD must be a writable field.
For REG_FGET, the field must be a readable field.
3) regval indicates the value to write in the register (REG).
4) fieldval indicates the value to write in the field (FIELD).
5) For the special case of the CEx0, CEx1, CEx2, and CEx3, EMIF_REG_RMK(), and EMIF_FMK() both use
REG = CEx0, CEx1, CEx2, and CEx3, where x is the letter X
EMIF Module
7-11
7-12
Chapter 8
GPIO Module
This chapter describes the GPIO module, lists the API functions and macros
within the module, and provides a GPIO API reference section.
Topic
Page
8.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
8.2
Configuration Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4
8.3
Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5
8.4
Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-17
8-1
Overview
8.1 Overview
The GPIO module is designed to allow central control of the non-multiplexed
and address GPIO pins available in the C55x devices. The following three
tables list the functions, registers and macros used with this module.
Table 8−1. GPIO Functions
Syntax
Description
See page ...
GPIO_pinDirection
Sets the GPIO pins as either an input or output pin
8-8
GPIO_pinDisable
Disables a pin as a GPIO pin
8-13
GPIO_pinEnable
Enables a pin as a GPIO pin
8-13
GPIO_pinRead
Reads the GPIO pin value
8-14
GPIO_pinWrite
Writes a value to a GPIO pin
8-15
The following functions are supported by C5502 and C5501.
GPIO_close
Frees one or more GPIO pins for use
8-5
GPIO_config
Configures GPIO pins
8-7
GPIO_open
Allocates one or more GPIO pins to the current process
8-5
GPIO_pinReadAll
Reads the value of one or more pins
8-14
GPIO_pinWriteAll
Writes the value to one or more pins
8-15
GPIO_pinReset
Resets the value of one or more pins
8-16
8-2
Overview
Table 8−2. GPIO Registers
Register
Field
IODIR
IO7DIR, IO6DIR, IO5DIR, IO4DIR, IO3DIR, IO2DIR, IO1DIR, IO0DIR
IODATA
IO7D, IO6D, IO5D, IO4D, IO3D, IO2D, IO1D, IO0D
The following registers are supported by C5509 and C5509A.
AGPIOEN
IO13, IO12, IO11, IO10, IO9, IO8
AGPIODIR
IO13DIR, IO12DIR, IO11DIR, IO10DIR, IO9DIR, IO8DIR
AGPIODATA
IO13D, IO12D, IO11D, IO10D, IO9D, IO8D
The following registers are supported by C5502 and C5501.
PGPIOEN0
IO15EN, IO14EN, IO13EN, IO12EN, IO11EN, IO10EN, IO9EN, IO8EN,
IO7EN, IO6EN, IO5EN, IO4EN, IO3EN, IO2EN, IO1EN, IO0EN
PGPIODIR0
IO15DIR, IO14DIR, IO13DIR, IO12DIR, IO11DIR, IO10DIR, IO9DIR, IO8DIR,
IO7DIR, IO6DIR, IO5DIR, IO4DIR, IO3DIR, IO2DIR, IO1DIR
PGPIODAT0
IO15DAT, IO14DAT, IO13DAT, IO12DAT, IO11DAT, IO10DAT, IO9DAT, IO8DAT,
IO7DAT, IO6DAT, IO5DAT, IO4DAT, IO3DAT, IO2DAT, IO1DAT, IO0DAT
PGPIOEN1
IO31EN, IO30EN, IO29EN, IO28EN, IO27EN, IO26EN, IO25EN, IO24EN,
IO23EN, IO22EN, IO21EN, IO20EN, IO19EN, IO18EN, IO17EN, IO16EN
PGPIODIR1
IO31DIR, IO30DIR, IO29DIR, IO28DIR, IO27DIR, IO26DIR, IO25DIR,
IO24DIR, IO23DIR, IO22DIR, IO21DIR, IO20DIR, IO19DIR, IO18DIR,
IO17DIR, IO16DIR
PGPIODAT1
IO31DAT, IO30DAT, IO29DAT, IO28DAT, IO27DAT, IO26DAT, IO25DAT,
IO24DAT, IO23DAT, IO22DAT, IO20DAT, IO19DAT, IO18DAT, IO17DAT,
IO16DAT
PGPIOEN2
IO45EN, IO44EN, IO43EN, IO42EN, IO41EN, IO40EN, IO39EN, IO38EN,
IO37EN, IO36EN, IO35EN, IO34EN, IO33EN, IO32EN
PGPIODIR2
IO45DIR, IO44DIR, IO43DIR, IO42DIR, IO41DIR, IO40DIR, IO39DIR,
IO38DIR, IO37DIR, IO36DIR, IO35DIR, IO34DIR, IO33DIR, IO32DIR
PGPIODAT2
IO45DAT, IO44DAT, IO43DAT, IO42DAT, IO41DAT, IO40DAT, IO39DAT,
IO38DAT, IO37DAT, IO36DAT, IO35DAT, IO34DAT, IO33DAT, IO32DAT
Note:
R = Read Only; W = Write; By default, most fields are Read/Write
GPIO Module
8-3
GPIO_Config
8.2 Configuration Structure
The following is the configuration structure used to set up the GPIO.
GPIO_Config
Configuration structure for non-parallel GPIO pins
Structure
GPIO_Config
Members
Uint16 ioen
Uint16 iodir
Description
The GPIO configuration structure is used to set up the non-parallel GPIO pins.
You create and initialize this structure and then pass its address to the
GPIO_config() function. You can use literal values or the GPIO_RMK macros
to create the structure member values.
GPIO_ConfigAll
Pin Enable Register IOEN
Pin Direction Register IODIR
Configuration structure for both parallel and non-parallel GPIO pins
Structure
GPIO_ConfigAll
Description
The GPIO configuration structure is used to set up both non-parallel and
parallel GPIO pins. You create and initialize this structure and then pass its
address to the GPIO_ConfigAll() function. You can use literal values or the
GPIO_RMK macros to create the structure member values.
Members
Uint16 ioen
Uint16 iodir
Uint16 pgpioen
Uint16 pgpiodir
Uint16 pgpioen1
Uint16 pgpiodir1
Uint16 pgpioen2
Uint16 pgpiodir2
8-4
Non-parallel GPIO pin enable register
IOEN
Non-parallel GPIO pin direction register
IODIR
Parallel GPIO pin enable register 0
PGPIOEN0
Parallel GPIO pin direction register 0 PGPIODIR0
Parallel GPIO pin enable register 1
PGPIOEN1
Parallel GPIO pin direction register 1 PGPIODIR1
Parallel GPIO pin enable register 2
PGPIOEN2
Parallel GPIO pin direction register 2 PGPIODIR2
GPIO_open
8.3 Functions
The following are functions available for the GPIO module. They are supported
by C5502 and C5501.
GPIO_close
Frees GPIO pins previously reserved by call to GPIO_open()
Function
void GPIO_close(GPIO_Handle hGpio);
Arguments
hGpio
Return Value
None
Description
Frees GPIO pins previously reserved in call to GPIO_open().
Example
GPIO_close(hGpio);
GPIO_open
GPIO pin Handle (see GPIO_open()).
Reserves GPIO pin for exclusive use
Function
GPIO_Handle GPIO_open(Uint32 allocMask, Uint32 flags);
Arguments
allocMask GPIO pins to reserve. For list of pins, please see
GPIO_pinDirection().
flags
Open flags , currently non defined.
Return Value
GPIO_Handle Device handle
GPIO Module
8-5
GPIO_open
Description
Before a GPIO pin can be used, it must be reserved for use by the application.
Once reserved, it cannot be requested again until, closed by GPIO_close().
The return value is a unique device handle that is used in subsequent GPIO
API calls. If the function fails, INV (-1) is returned.
For C5502 and C5501, there are four groups of GPIO pins. (See
GPIO_pinDirection() for list of pins in each group).
GPIO_open() must be called to open one or more pins of only one group at a
time. Calling the allocMask of pins in different groups will produce unknown
results.
Example: The first parameter to GPIO_open() could be
(GPIO_GPIO_PIN4 | GPIO_GPIO_PIN2
as they are in the same group, but
(GPIO_GPIO_PIN4 | GPIO_PGPIO_PIN2)
will produce unknown results.
If GPIO_open() is called for one or more pins in a particular group, it cannot
be called again to open other pins of the same group unless corresponding
GPIO_close() is called. However, GPIO_open() can be called again to open
one or more pins of another group.
Example: If GPIO_open() is called for the first time with GPIO_GPIO_PIN4 as
the first parameter, it can not be called again with GPIO_GPIO_PIN2
parameter, as they belong to the same pin group. However, it can be called
again with GPIO_PGPIO_PIN2 as the first parameter.
Example
8-6
GPIO_Handle hGPIO;
hGPio = GPIO_open(GPIO_PGPIO_PIN1,0);
GPIO_configAll
GPIO_config
Writes value to non-parallel registers using GPIO_config
Function
void GPIO_config(GPIO_Handle hGpio,
GPIO_Config *cfg);
Arguments
hGpio
cfg
Return Value
None
Description
Writes values to the non-parallel GPIO control registers using the
configuration structure.
Note: GPIO_Config structure is common for GPIO and PGPIO pins. The
GPIO_config() function just discards the enable field in case of GPIO [0:7]
pins.
Example
GPIO_Handle hGpio;
GPIO_Config myConfig = {GPIO_PIN1_OUTPUT |
GPIO_PIN3_OUTPUT
}
configuration for 5502 and 5501
GPIO Device handle
Pointer to an initialized configuration structure
hGpio = GPIO_open(GPIO_GPIO_PIN1 | GPIO_GPIO_PIN3,0);
GPIO_config(hGpio &myConfig);
GPIO_configAll
Writes value to both non-parallel and parallel GPIO control registers
Function
void GPIO_config(GPIO_ConfigAll &gCfg);
Arguments
gCfg
Return Value
None
Description
Writes values to both parallelowe and non−parallel GPIO control registers
using the configuration structure. See also GPIO_ConfigAll.
Example
GPIO_ConfigAll gCfg = {
GPIO_PIN1_OUTPUT | GPIO_PIN3_OUTPUT, /* IODIR */
0, /* PGPIOEN0 */
0, /* PGPIODIR0 */
0, /* PGPIOEN1 */
0, /* PGPIODIR1 */
0, /* PGPIOEN2 */
0 /* PGPIODIR2 */
};
/* GPIO configuration for 5502 and 5501 */
GPIO_configAll(&gCfg);
Configuration structure for both power and non−power,
non-muxedGPIO pins.
GPIO Module
8-7
GPIO_pinDirection
GPIO_pinDirection Sets the GPIO pin as either an input oroutpit pin
Function
For C5502 and 5501:
void GPIO_pinDirection(GPIO_Handle hGpio,
Uint32 pinMask,
Uint16 direction);
For C5509/C5509A/C5510:
void GPIO_pinDirection(Uint32 pinMask,
Uint16 direction);
Arguments
hGPIO
pinMask
GPIO Handle returned from previous call to
GPIO_open()
(This argument is only for C5502 and C5501 CSL)
GPIO pins affected by direction
For 5502 and 5501, pinMask may be any of the following:
GPIO Pin Group 0 (Non-Parallel GPIO Pins):
GPIO_GPIO_PIN0
GPIO_GPIO_PIN1
GPIO_GPIO_PIN2
GPIO_GPIO_PIN3
GPIO_GPIO_PIN4
GPIO_GPIO_PIN5
GPIO_GPIO_PIN6
GPIO_GPIO_PIN7
GPIO Pin Group 1 (Parallel GPIO Pins 0-15):
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN0
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN1
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN2
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN3
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN4
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN5
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN6
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN7
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN8
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN9
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN10
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN11
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN12
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN13
8-8
GPIO_pinDirection
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN14
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN15
GPIO Pin Group 2 (Parallel GPIO Pins 16-31):
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN16
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN17
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN18
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN19
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN20
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN21
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN22
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN23
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN24
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN25
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN26
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN27
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN28
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN29
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN30
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN31
GPIO Pin Group 3 (Parellel GPIO Pins 32-45):
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN32
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN33
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN34
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN35
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN36
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN37
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN38
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN39
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN40
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN41
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN42
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN43
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN44
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN45
The pinMask may be formed by using a single pin Id listed above or you may
combine pin IDs from pins within the same group (i.e., GPIO_PGPIO_PIN23
| GPIO_PGPIO_PIN30)
direction
Mask used to set pin direction for pins selected in pinMask
GPIO Module
8-9
GPIO_pinDirection
GPIO Pin Group 0 (Non-Parallel GPIO Pins):
GPIO_GPIO_PIN0_OUTPUT
GPIO_GPIO_PIN1_OUTPUT
GPIO_GPIO_PIN2_OUTPUT
GPIO_GPIO_PIN3_OUTPUT
GPIO_GPIO_PIN4_OUTPUT
GPIO_GPIO_PIN5_OUTPUT
GPIO_GPIO_PIN6_OUTPUT
GPIO_GPIO_PIN7_OUTPUT
GPIO_GPIO_PIN0_INPUT
GPIO_GPIO_PIN1_INPUT
GPIO_GPIO_PIN2_INPUT
GPIO_GPIO_PIN3_INPUT
GPIO_GPIO_PIN4_INPUT
GPIO_GPIO_PIN5_INPUT
GPIO_GPIO_PIN6_INPUT
GPIO_GPIO_PIN7_INPUT
GPIO Pin Group 1 (Parallel GPIO Pins 0-15):
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN0_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN1_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN2_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN3_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN4_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN5_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN6_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN7_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN8_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN9_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN10_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN11_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN12_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN13_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN14_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN15_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN0_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN1_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN2_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN3_INPUT
8-10
GPIO_pinDirection
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN4_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN5_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN6_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN7_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN8_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN9_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN10_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN11_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN12_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN13_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN14_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN15_INPUT
GPIO Pin Group 2 (Parallel GPIO Pins 16-31):
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN16_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN17_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN18_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN19_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN20_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN21_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN22_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN23_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN24_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN25_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN26_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN27_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN28_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN29_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN30_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN31_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN16_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN17_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN18_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN19_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN20_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN21_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN22_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN23_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN24_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN25_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN26_INPUT
GPIO Module
8-11
GPIO_pinDirection
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN27_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN28_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN29_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN30_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN31_INPUT
GPIO Pin Group 3 (Parellel GPIO Pins 32-45):
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN32_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN33_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN34_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN35_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN36_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN37_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN38_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN39_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN40_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN41_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN42_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN43_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN44_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN45_OUTPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN32_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN33_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN34_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN35_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN36_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN37_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN38_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN39_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN40_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN41_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN42_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN43_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN44_INPUT
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN45_INPUT
Direction may be set using any of the symbolic constant defined above.
Direction for multiple pins within the same group may be set by OR’ing together
several constants:
GPIO_PGPIO_PIN45_INPUT | GPIO_PGPIO_PIN40_OUTPUT
Return Value
8-12
None
GPIO_pinEnable
Description
Sets the direction for oneor more General purpose I/O pins (input or output)
Example
/* sets the pin pgpio1 as an input */
GPIO_handle hGpio = GPIO_open(GPIO_PGPIO_PIN1|GPIO_PGPIO_PIN15);
GPIO_pinDirection(hGPio, GPIO_PGPIO_PIN1, GPIO_PGPIO_PIN1_INPUT);
GPIO_pinDisable
Disables a pin as a GPIO pin
Function
For C5502 and 5501:
void GPIO_pinDisable(GPIO_Handle hGpio, Uint32 pinId)
For C5509/C5509A/C5510:
void GPIO_pinDisable((Uint32 pinId)
Arguments
hGpio
pinID
GPIO handle returned from previous call to GPIO_open
(This argument is only for C5502 and C5501 CSL)
IDs of the pins to disable.
Please see GPIO_pinDirection() for list of possible pin IDs.
Return Value
None
Description
Disables one or more pins as GPIO pins.
Example
/* disables pin pgpio1 as a GPIO pin */
GPIO_handle hGpio = GPIO_open(GPIO_PGPIO_PIN1|GPIO_PGPIO_PIN15);
GPIO_pinDisable (hGpio,GPIO_PGPIO_PIN1);
/* disables parallel pin IO1 as GPIO */
GPIO_pinEnable
Enables a pin as a GPIO pin
Function
For C5502 and C5501:
void GPIO_pinEnable(GPIO_Handle hGpio, Uint32 pinId)
For C5509/C5509A/C5510:
void GPIO_pinEnable(Uint32 pinId)
Arguments
hGpio
pinID
GPIO Handle returned from call to GPIO_open().
(This argument is only for C5502 and C5501 CSL)
ID of the pin to enable.
For valid pin IDs, please see GPIO_pinDirection().
Return Value
None
Description
Enables a pin as a general purpose I/O pin.
Example
GPIO_pinEnable (hGpio, GPIO_GPIO_PIN1);
/* enables pin IO1 as GPIO */
GPIO Module
8-13
GPIO_pinRead
GPIO_pinRead
Reads a GPIO pin value
Function
For C5502 and C5501:
int GPIO_pinRead(GPIO_Handle hGpio, Uint32 pinId)
For C5509/C5509A/C5510
int GPIO_pinRead(Uint32 pinId)
Arguments
hGPio
pinId
GPIO Handle returned from previous call to GPIO_open().
(This argument is only for C5502 and C5501 CSL)
IDs of the GPIO pins to read.
Return Value
Value
Value read in GPIO pin (1 or 0)
Description
Reads the value in a general purpose input pin.
Example
int val;
val = GPIO_pinRead (hGPio,GPIO_GPIO_PIN1);
/* reads IO1 pin value */
GPIO_pinReadAll
Reads a value of one or more GPIO pins
Function
For C5502 and C5501:
int GPIO_pinReadAll(GPIO_Handle hGpio, Uint32 pinMask)
For C5509/C5509A/C5510
int GPIO_pinReadAll(Uint32 pinMask)
Arguments
hGPio
pinMask
GPIO Handle returned from previous call to GPIO_open().
(This argument is only for C5502 and C5501 CSL)
IDs of the GPIO pins to read. Please see GPIO_pinDirection() for
list of pin IDs.
Return Value
Value
Description
Reads in the value of the GPIO pins specified by pinMask. The function returns
the value in place of the pins. It does not right-justify the value to return a raw
result.
Example
int val;
/* reads IOO and IO7 pin values */
val=GPIO_pinRead (hGPio,GPIO_GPIO_PIN0| GPIO_GPIO_PIN7);
8-14
Value read in GPIO pin/s
GPIO_pinWriteAll
GPIO_pinWrite
Writes a value to a GPIO pin
Function
For C5502 and C5501:
void GPIO_pinWrite(GPIO_Handle hGpio,
Uint32 pinMask,
Uint16 val)
For C5509/C5509A/C5510:
void GPIO_pinWrite(Uint32 pinMask Uint16 val)
Arguments
hGpio
pinMask
val
GPIO Handle returned from previous call to GPIO_open().
(This argument is only for C5502 and C5501 CSL)
ID of one or more GPIO pins to write. Please see
GPIO_pinDirection for a list of valid pin IDs.
Value (0 or 1) to write to selected GPIO pins.
Return Value
None
Description
Writes a value to a general purpose output pin.
Example
/* writes 1 to IO pin0 and IO pin 5 */
GPIO_pinWrite (hGpio, GPIO_GPIO_PIN0 | GPIO_GPIO_PIN5, 1);
GPIO_pinWriteAll
Writes a value to one or more GPIO pins
Function
For C5502 and C5501:
void GPIO_pinWriteAll(GPIO_Handle hGpio,
Uint32 pinMask,
Uint16 val)
For C5509/C5509A/C5510:
void GPIO_pinWriteAll(Uint32 pinMask,
Uint16 val)
Arguments
hGpio
pinMask
val
GPIO Handle returned from previous call to GPIO_open().
(This argument is only for C5502 and C5501 CSL)
ID of one or more GPIO pins to write. Please see
GPIO_pinDirection for a list of valid pin IDs.
Value mask to write to selected GPIO pins.
Return Value
None
Description
Writes a value to one or more general purpose output pins. Ths function
assumes an in-place value mask for writing to the GPIO pins. It will not
left-justify values.
Example
/* writes 1 to IO pin0 and IO pin 5 */
GPIO_pinWrite (hGpio,GPIO_GPIO_PIN0| GPIO_GPIO_PIN5,0x0021);
GPIO Module
8-15
GPIO_pinReset
GPIO_pinReset
Resets GPIO pins to default values
Function
void GPIO_pinReset(GPIO_Handle hGpio, Uint32 pinMask)
Arguments
hGpio
pinMask
Return Value
None
Description
Restores selected GPIO pins to default value of 0.
Example
/* writes 1 to IO pin1 and IO pin 3 */
GPIO_pinReset (hGpio, GPIO_GPIO_PIN1 | GPIO_GPIO_PIN3);
8-16
GPIO Handle returned from previous call to GPIO_open().
ID of one or more GPIO pins to write. Please see
GPIO_pinDirection for list of valid pin IDs.
Macros
8.4 Macros
The CSL offers a collection of macros to gain individual access to the GPIO
peripheral registers and fields.
Table 8−3 contains a list of macros available for the GPIO module. To use
them, include “csl_gpio.h.”
Table 8−3. GPIO CSL Macros
(a) Macros to read/write GPIO register values
Macro
Syntax
GPIO_RGET()
Uint16 GPIO_RGET(REG)
GPIO_RSET()
Void GPIO_RSET(REG, Uint16 regval)
(b) Macros to read/write GPIO register field values (Applicable only to registers with more than one field)
Macro
Syntax
GPIO_FGET()
Uint16 GPIO_FGET(REG, FIELD)
GPIO_FSET()
Void GPIO_FSET(REG, FIELD, Uint16 fieldval)
(c) Macros to create value to GPIO registers and fields (Applies only to registers with more than one field)
Macro
Syntax
GPIO_REG_RMK()
Uint16 GPIO_REG_RMK(fieldval_n,…fieldval_0)
Note: *Start with field values with most significant field positions:
field_n: MSB field
field_0: LSB field
*only writable fields allowed
GPIO_FMK()
Uint16 GPIO_FMK(REG, FIELD, fieldval)
(d) Macros to read a register address
Macro
Syntax
GPIO_ADDR()
Uint16 GPIO_ADDR(REG)
Notes:
1) REG include the registers IODIR, IODATA, GPIODIR, GPIODATA, GPIOEN,
AGPIODIR, AGPIODATA, and AGPIOEN.
2) FIELD indicates the register field name
For REG_FSET and REG_FMK, FIELD must be a writable field.
For REG_FGET, the field must be a readable field.
3) regval indicates the value to write in the register (REG).
4) fieldval indicates the value to write in the field (FIELD).
GPIO Module
8-17
8-18
Chapter 9
HPI Module
This chapter describes the HPI module, lists the API structure, macros,
functions, and provides an HPI API reference. The HPI module applies to the
C5502 and C5501 devices.
Topic
Page
9.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-2
9.2
Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-4
9.3
Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5
9.4
Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-6
9-1
Overview
9.1 Overview
This module enables configuration of the 5502 and 5501 HPI. The HPI module
is not handle based. Configuration of the HPI is easily accomplished by calling
HPI_config() or any of the SET register macros. Using HPI_config() is the preferred method for configuration.
Table 9−1 Lists the configuration structure for HPI modules
Table 9−2 Lists the function APIs
Table 9−3 Lists the register and bit field names
Lists the API macros
Table 9−1. HPI Module Configuration Structure
Syntax
Description
HPI_Config
HPI module configuration structure
See page ...
9-4
Table 9−2. HPI Functions
Syntax
Description
See page ...
HPI_config()
Sets up HPI using configuration structure (HPI_Config)
9-5
HPI_getConfig()
Returns current HPI control register values in a configuration
structure (HPI_Config)
9-5
Table 9−3. HPI Registers and Bit Field Names
Register
Field
HGPIOEN
EN0, EN1, EN2, EN4, EN6, EN7, EN8, EN9, EN11, EN12
HGPIODIR
HDn(n=0−15)
HGPIODAT
HDn(n=0−15)
HPIC
HPIASEL, DUALHPIA, BOBSTAT, HPIRST, FETCH, HRDY, HINT, DSPINT,
BOB
HPIAW
HPIAW
HPIAR
HPIAR
HPWREMU
FREE, SOFT
9-2
Overview
Table 9−4. HPI Macros
Syntax
Description
See page ...
HPI_ADDR
Get the address of a given register
9-6
HPI_FGET
Gets value of a register field
9-6
HPI_FMK
Creates register value based on individual field value
9-7
HPI_FSET
Sets value of register field
9-7
HPI_REG_RMK
Creates register value based on individual field values
9-8
HPI_RGET
Gets the value of an HPI register
9-9
HPI_RSET
Set the value of an HPI register
9-9
HPI Module
9-3
Configuration Structures
9.2 Configuration Structures
The following is the HPI configuration structure used to set up the HPI interface.
HPI_Config
HPI configuration structure used to set up HPI interface
Structure
HPI_Config
Members
Uint16
Uint16
Uint16
Uint16
9-4
hpwremu
hgpioen
hgpiodir
hpic
HPI power/emulation management register
HPI GPIO pin enable register
HPI GPIO pin direction register
HPI Control register
HPI_getConfig
9.3 Functions
The following are functions available for the HPI module.
HPI_config
Writes to HPI registers using values in configuration structure
Function
void HPI_config(
HPI_Config *myConfig
);
Arguments
myConfig
Return Value
None
Description
Writes the values given in the initialized configuration structure to the
corresponding HPI control register. See HPI_Config.
Pointer to an initialized configuration structure
Example
HPI_Config myConfig = {0x3,
/* HPWREMU , Select FREE = SOFT = 1
*/
0x0,
/* HGPIOEN , Disable all GPIO pins
0x0,
/* HGPIODIR, Default GPIO pins to output */
0x80
/* HPIC
, Reset HPI
*/
*/
};
HPI_config(&myConfig);
HPI_getConfig
Reads current HPI configuration
Function
void HPI_getConfig(
HPI_Config *myConfig
);
Arguments
myConfig
Return Value
None
Description
Reads the curent values of the HPI control registers, returning those values
in the given configuration structure. See HPI_config
Pointer to an initialized configuration structure
Example
HPI_Config myConfig;
HPI_getConfig(&myConfig);
HPI Module
9-5
HPI_ADDR
9.4 Macros
The following is a listing of HPI macros.
HPI_ADDR
Gets address of given register
Macro
HPI_ADDR(REG)
Function
void DMA_reset(
DMA_Handle hDma
);
Arguments
REG register as listed in HPI_RGET()
Return Value
Address of Register
Description
Gets the address of an HPI register
Example
ioport Uint16 *hpi_ctl;
hpi_ctl = HPI_ADDR(HPIC);
HPI_FGET
Gets the value of register field
Macro
HPI_FGET(REG,FIELD)
Arguments
REG register as listed in HPI_RGET()
FIELD symbolic name for field of register REG.
Possible values: All field names are listed in the TMS320VC5501/5502 DSP
Host Port Interface (HPI) Reference Guide (SPRU620A)
Return Value
Value of register field
Description
Gets current value of register field
Example
Uint16 bob = HPI_FGET(HPIC,BOB);
9-6
HPI_FSET
HPI_FMK
Creates register value based on individual field value
Macro
HPI_FMK(REG,FIELD,fieldval)
Arguments
REG register as listed in HPI_RGET()
FIELD symbolic name for field of register REG.
Possible values: All field names are listed in the TMS320VC5501/5502 DSP
Host Port Interface (HPI) Reference Guide (SPRU620A)
Return Value
Shifted version of fieldval. Value is shifted to appropriate bit position for FIELD.
Description
Returns the shifted version of fieldval. Fieldval is shifted to the bit numbering
appropriate for FIELD within register REG. This macro allows the user to
initialize few fields in REG as an alternative to the HPI_REG_RMK() macro
that requires ALL the fields in the register to be initialized. The returned value
could be ORed with the result of other _FMK macros, as show below.
Example
unt16 gpioenMask = HPI_FMK(HGPIOEN,EN2,1) |
HPI_FMK(HGPIOEN,EN8,1);
HPI_FSET
Sets the value of register field
Macro
Void HPI_FSET (REG, FIELD, fieldval)
Arguments
REG Only writable registers containing more than one field are supported by
this macro.
FIELD symbolic name for field of register REG.
Possible values: All writeable field names are listed in the
TMS320VC5501/5502 DSP Host Port Interface (HPI) Reference Guide
(SPRU620A)
Return Value
None
Description
Sets the HPI register field value to fieldval.
Example
HPI_FSET(HGPIOEN,EN0,1);
HPI Module
9-7
HPI_REG_RMK
HPI_REG_RMK
Creates register value based on individual field values
Macro
Uint16 HPI_REG_RMK (fieldval_n,...,fieldval_0)
Arguments
REG Only writable registers containing more than one field are supported
by this macro.
fieldval Field values to be assigned to the writable register fields.
Rules to follow:
Only writable fields are allowed
Start from most−significant field first
Value should be a right-justified constant
If fieldval_n value exceeds the number of bits allowed for that field, field-
val_n is truncated accordingly.
Return Value
Value of register that corresponds to the concatenation of values passed for
the fields.
Description
Returns the HPI register value given specific field values. You can use
constants or the CSL symbolic constants covered in Section 1.6.
Example
Uint16 myregval;
/* enable HA[0:7], HD[8:15], HD[0:7] for GPIO */
myregval = HPI_HGPIOEN_RMK (0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0);
HPI_REG_RMK are typically used to initialize a HPI configuration structure
used for the HPI_config() function (see section 9.2).
9-8
HPI_RSET
HPI_RGET
Gets value of an HPI register
Macro
Uint16 HPI_RGET (REG)
Arguments
REG where:
REG is one of the following
HGPIOEN
HGPIODIR
HPIAR
HPIAW
HPWREMU
HPIC
Return Value
Value of register
Description
Returns the HPI register value
Example
Uint16 myvar;
myVar = HPI_RGET(HPIC); /*read HPI control register */
HPI_RSET
Sets value of an HPI register
Macro
Void HPI_RSET (REG, Uint16 regval)
Arguments
REG register, as listed in HPI_RGET() macro
regval register value that wants to write to register REG
Return Value
None
Description
Sets the HPI register REG value to regval
Example
HPI_RSET(HPWREMU, 0x3); /* Set FREE and SOFT bits */
CSL offers a collection of macros to gain individual access to the GPIO
peripheral registers and fields.
Table 8−3 contains a list of macros available for the GPIO module. To use
them, include “csl_gpio.h.”
HPI Module
9-9
HPI_RSET
9-10
Chapter 10
I2C Module
This chapter describes the I2C module, lists the API structure, functions, and
macros within the module, and provides an I2C API reference section.
Topic
Page
10.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-2
10.2 Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-5
10.3 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-7
10.4 Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-17
10.5 Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-18
10-1
Overview
10.1 Overview
The configuration of the I2C can be performed by using one of the following
methods:
Register-based configuration
A register-based configuration can be performed by calling either
I2C_config() or any of the SET register field macros.
Parameter-based configuration (Recommended)
A parameter-based configuration can be performed by calling
I2C_setup(). Using I2C_setup() to initialize the I2C registers is the
recommended approach.
Compared to the register-based approach, this method provides a higher
level of abstraction. The downside is larger code size and higher cycle
counts.
Table 10−3 lists DMA registers and fields.
Table 10−1. I2C Configuration Structure
Configuration Structure
Description
See page…
I2C_Config
I2C configuration structure used to set up the I2C (register−
based)
10-5
I2C_Setup
Sets up the I2C using the initialization structure
10-6
Table 10−2. I2C Functions
Functions
Description
I2C_config()
Sets up the I2C using the configuration structure
10-7
I2C_eventDisable()
Disables the I2C interrupt specified.
10-8
I2C_eventEnable()
Enables the I2C interrupt specified.
10-8
I2C_getConfig()
Obtains the current configuration of all the I2C registers
10-8
I2C_getEventId()
Returns the I2C IRQ event ID
10-9
I2C_setup()
Sets up the I2C using the initialization structure
10-9
I2C_IsrAddr
I2C structure containing pointers to functions that will be executed when a specific I2C interrupt is enabled and received.
10-10
10-2
See page…
Overview
Table 10−2. I2C Functions (Continued)
Functions
Description
See page…
I2C_read()
Performs master/slave receiver functions
10-10
I2C_readByte()
Performs a read from the data receive register (I2CDRR).
10-11
I2C_reset()
Sets the IRS bit in the I2CMDR register to 1 (performs a reset).
10-12
I2C_rfull()
Reads the RSFULL bit in the I2CSTR register.
10-12
I2C_rrdy()
Reads the I2CRRDY bit in the I2CSTR register.
10-12
I2C_sendStop()
Sets the STP bit in the I2CMDR register (generates a stop).
10-13
I2C_setCallback()
Associates each callback function to one of the I2C interrupt
events and installs the I2C dispatcher table.
10-13
I2C_start()
Sets the STT bit in the I2CMDR register (generates a start).
10-14
I2C_write()
Performs master/slave transmitter functions
10-14
I2C_writeByte()
Performs a write to the data transmit register (I2CDXR).
10-15
I2C_xempty()
Reads the XSMT bit in theI2CSTR register.
10-16
I2C_xrdy()
Reads the I2CXRDY bit in the I2CSTR register.
10-16
I2C Module
10-3
Overview
10.1.1 I2C Registers
Table 10−3. I2C Registers
Register
Field
I2COAR
OAR
I2CIER
AL , NACK , ARDY , RRDY , XRDY
I2CSTR
(R)AL, (R)NACK, (R)ARDY, RRDY, (R)XRDY, (R)AD0, (R)AAS, (R)XSMT,
(R)RSFULL ,(R)BB
I2CCLKL
ICCL
I2CCLKH
ICCH
I2CCNT
ICDC
I2CDRR
(R)DATA
I2CSAR
SAR
I2CDXR
(R)DATA
I2CMDR
BC, FDF, STB, IRS, DLB, RM, XA, TRX, MST, STP, IDLEEN , STT, FREE
I2CISRC
(R)INTCODE, TESTMD
I2CGPIO
I2CPSC
Note:
10-4
IPSC
R = Read Only; W = Write; By default, most fields are Read/Write
I2C_Config
10.2 Configuration Structures
The following are the configuration structures used to set up the I2C module.
I2C_Config
I2C Configuration Structure used to set up the I2C interface
Structure
I2C_Config
Members
Uint16 i2coar
Uint16 i2cier
Uint16 i2cstr
Uint16 i2cclkl
Uint16 i2cclkh
Uint16 i2ccnt
Uint16 i2csar
Uint16 i2cmdr
Uint16 i2cisrc
Uint16 i2cpsc
Description
I2C configuration structure used to set up the I2C interface. You create and
initialize this structure and then pass its address to the I2C_config() function.
You can use either literal values, or I2C_RMK macros to create the structure
member values.
Example
I2C_Config
0xFFFF,
0x0000,
0xFFFF,
10,
8,
1,
0xFFFA,
0x0664,
0xFFFF,
0x0000
}
Own address register
Interrupt mask/status register
Interrupt status register
Clock Divider Low register
Clock Divider High register
Data Count register
Slave Address register
Mode register
Interrupt source vector register
Prescaler register
Config = {
/* I2COAR
/* I2CIER
/* I2CSTR
/* I2CCLKL
/* I2CCLKH
/* I2CCNT
/* I2CSAR
/* I2CMDR
/* I2CISRC
/* I2CPSC
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
I2C Module
10-5
I2C_Setup
I2C_Setup
I2C Initialization Structure used to set up the I2C interface
Structure
I2C_Setup
Members
Uint16 addrmode
Uint16 ownaddr
Uint16 sysinclock
Uint16 rate
Uint16 bitbyte
Uint16 dlb
Uint16 free
Address Mode:
0 = 7 bit
1 = 10 bit
Own Address (I2COAR)
System Clock Value (MHz)
Desired Transfer rate (10−400 kbps)
Number of bits per byte to be received or
transmitted:
Value Bits/byte transmitted/received
0
8
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
Data Loopback mode
0 = off, 1 = on
emulator FREE mode
0 = off, 1 = on
Description
I2C initialization structure used to set up the I2C interface. You create and
initialize this structure and then pass its address to the I2C_setup() function.
Example
I2C_Setup Setup = {
0,
/* 7 or 10 bit address mode
*/
0x0000,
/* own address − don’t care if master
*/
144,
/* clkout value (Mhz)
*/
400,
/* a number between 10 and 400
*/
0,
/* number of bits/byte to be received or */
/* transmitted (8 bits)
*/
0,
/* DLB mode
*/
1
/* FREE mode of operation
*/
}
10-6
I2C_config
10.3 Functions
The following are functions available for use with the I2C module.
I2C_config
Sets up the I2C using the configuration structure
Function
void I2C_config (I2C_Config *Config);
Arguments
Config
Return Value
none
Description
Writes a value to set up the I2C using the configuration structure. The values
of the configuration structure are written to the port registers.
Pointer to an initialized configuration structure
If desired, you can configure all I2C registers with:
I2C_config(); [maintaining I2CMDR(STT)=0]
and later, use the I2C_start() function to start the I2C peripheral
Example
I2C_Config
0xFFFF,
0x0000,
0xFFFF,
10,
8,
1,
0xFFFA,
0x0664,
0xFFFF,
0x0000
};
Config = {
/* I2COAR
/* I2CIER
/* I2CSTR
/* I2CCLKL
/* I2CCLKH
/* I2CCNT
/* I2CSAR
/* I2CMDR
/* I2CSRC
/* I2CPSC
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
I2C_config(&Config);
I2C Module
10-7
I2C_eventDisable
I2C_eventDisable
Disables the interrupt specified by the ierMask
Function
void I2C_eventDisable(Uint16 isrMask);
Arguments
isrMask can be one or the logical OR any of the following:
I2C_EVT_AL
// Arbitration Lost Interrupt Enable
I2C_EVT_NACK
// No Acknowledgement Interrupt Enable
I2C_EVT_ARDY
// Register Access Ready Interrupt
I2C_EVT_RRDY
// Data Receive Ready Interrupt
I2C_EVT_XRDY
// Data Transmit Ready Interrupt
Description
This function disables the interrupt specified by the ierMask.
Example
I2C_eventDisable(I2C_EVT_RRDY);
...
I2C_eventDisable (I2C_EVT_RRDY|I2C_EVT_XRDY);
I2C_eventEnable
Enables the I2C interrupt specified by the isrMask
Function
void I2C_eventEnable(Uint16 isrMask);
Arguments
isrMask can be one or a logical OR of the following:
I2C_EVT_AL
// Arbitration Lost Interrupt Enable
I2C_EVT_NACK
// No Acknowledgement Interrupt Enable
I2C_EVT_ARDY
// Register Access Ready Interrupt
I2C_EVT_RRDY
// Data Receive Ready Interrupt
I2C_EVT_XRDY
// Data Transmit Ready Interrupt
Description
This function enables the I2C interrupts specified by the isrMask.
Example
I2C_eventEnable(I2C_EVT_AL);
...
I2C_eventEnable (I2C_EVT_RRDY|I2C_EVT_XRDY);
I2C_getConfig
Writes values to I2C registers using the configuration strucucture
Function
void I2C_getConfig (I2C_Config *Config);
Arguments
Config
Return Value
None
Description
Reads the current value of all I2C registers being used and places them into
the corresponding configuration structure member.
10-8
Pointer to a configuration structure
I2C_setup
Example
I2C_getEventId
I2C_Config *testConfig;
I2C_getConfig(testConfig);
Returns the I2C software interrupt value
Function
int I2C_getEventId(
);
Arguments
None
Description
Returns the I2C software interrupt value.
Example
int evID;
evID = I2C_getEventId();
I2C_setup
Initializes I2C registers using initialization structure
Function
void I2C_setup (I2C_Setup *Setup);
Arguments
Setup
Return Value
None
Description
Sets the address mode (7 or 10 bit), the own address, the prescaler value
(based on system clock), the transfer rate, the number of bits/byte to be
received or transmitted, the data loopback mode, and the free mode. Refer to
the I2C_Setup structure for structure members.
Example
I2C_Setup Setup = {
0,
/* 7 bit address mode
*/
0x0000,
/* own address
*/
144,
/* clkout value (Mhz)
*/
400,
/* a number between 10 and 400
*/
0,
/* 8 bits/byte to be received or transmitted */
0,
/* DLB mode off
*/
1
/* FREE mode on
*/
};
Pointer to an initialized initialization structure
I2C_setup(&Setup);
I2C Module
10-9
I2C_IsrAddr
I2C_IsrAddr
I2C structure used to assign functions for each interrupt structure
Structure
I2C_IsrAddr
Members
void (*alAddr)(void);
void (*nackAddr)(void);
void (*ardyAddr)(void);
void (*rrdyAddr)(void);
void (*xrdyAddr)(void);
Description
I2C structure used to assign functions for each of the five I2C interrupts. The
structure member values should be pointers to the functions that are executed
when a particular interrupt occurs.
Example
I2C_IsrAddr addr = {
myALIsr,
myNACKIsr,
myARDYIsr,
myRRDYIsr,
myXRDYIsr
};
I2C_read
pointer to function for AL interrupt
pointer to function for NACK interrupt
pointer to function for ARDY interrupt
pointer to function for RRDY interrupt
pointer to function for XRDY interrupt
Performs master/slave receiver functions
Function
int I2C_read (Uint16 *data, int length, int master, Uint16 slaveaddress,
int transfermode, int timeout, int checkbus);
Arguments
Uint16 *data
int length
int master
10-10
Pointer to data array
length of data to be received
master mode:
0 = slave, 1 = master
Uint16 slaveaddress
Slave address to receive from
int transfermode
Transfer mode of operation (SADP, SAD, etc.)
Value Transfer Mode
1
S−A−D..(n)..D−P
2
S−A−D..(n)..D (repeat n times)
3
S−A−D−D−D..... (continuous)
int timeout
Timeout for bus busy, no acknowledge,
transmit ready
int checkbus
flag used to check if bus is busy. Typically, it must be
set to 1, except under special I2C program conditions.)
I2C_readByte
Return Value
int
Value returned
0
1
2
4
Description
No errors
Bus busy; not able to generate start condition
Timeout for transmit ready (first byte)
Timeout for transmit ready (within main loop)
Description
Performs master/slave receiver functions. Inputs are the data array to be
transferred, length of data, master mode, slaveaddress, timeout for errors, and
a check for bus busy flag.
Example
Uint16 datareceive[6]={0,0,0,0,0,0};
int x;
I2C_Init Init = {
0,
/* 7 bit address mode
*/
0x0000,
/* own address
*/
144,
/* clkout value (Mhz)
*/
400,
/* a number between 10 and 400
*/
0,
/* 8 bits/byte to be received or transmitted */
0,
/* DLB mode off
*/
1
/* FREE mode on
*/
};
I2C_init(&Init);
z=I2C_read(datareceive,6,1,0x50,3,30000,0);
/* receives 6 bytes of data
/* in master receiver
/* S−A−D..(n)..D−P mode
/* to from the 0x50 address
/* with a timeout of 30000
/* and check for bus busy on
I2C_readByte
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
Performs a 16-bit data read
Function
Uint16 I2C_readByte(
);
Arguments
None
Return Value
Data read for an I2C receive port.
I2C Module
10-11
I2C_readByte
Description
Performs a direct 16-bit read from the data receive register I2CDRR.
Example
Uint16 Data;
...
Data = I2C_readByte();
This function does not check to see if valid data has been received. For this
purpose, use I2C_rrdy().
I2C_reset
Resets a given serial port
Function
void I2C_reset(
);
Arguments
None
Return Value
None
Description
Sets the IRS bit in the I2CMDR register to 1 (performs a reset).
Example
I2C_reset();
I2C_rfull
Reads the RSFULL bit of I2CSTR Register
Function
Uint16 I2C_rfull(
);
Arguments
None
Return Value
RFULL
Description
Reads the RSFULL bit of the I2CSTR register.
Example
if (I2C_rfull()) {
…
}
I2C_rrdy
Returns RSFULL status bit of I2CSTR register to 0 (receive buffer
empty), or 1(receive buffer full).
Reads the ICRRDY status bit of I2CSTR
Function
Uint16 I2C_rrdy(
);
Arguments
None
10-12
I2C_readByte
Return Value
RRDY
Description
Reads the RRDY status bit of the I2CSTR register. A 1 indicates the receiver
is ready with data to be read.
Example
if (I2C_rrdy()) {
…
}
I2C_sendStop
Returns RRDY status bit of SPCR1, 0 or 1
Sets the STP bit in the I2CMDR register (generates stop condition)
Function
void I2C_sendStop();
Arguments
None
Return Value
None
Description
Sets the STP bit in the I2CMDR register (generates a stop condition).
Example
I2C_sendStop();
I2C_setCallback
Associates functions to interrupts and installs dispatcher routines
Function
void I2C_setCallback(I2C_IsrAddr *isrAddr);
Arguments
isrAddr is a structure containing pointers to the five functions that will be
executed when the corresponding interrupt is enabled and received. These
five functions should not be declared using the “interrupt” keyword.
Description
I2C_setCallback associates each function to one of the I2C interrupts and
installs the I2C dispatcher routine address in the I2C interrupt vector. It then
determines what I2C interrupt as been received (by reading the I2CIMR
register) and calls the corresponding function from the structure.
Example
I2C_IsrAddr addr = {
myalIsr,
mynackIsr,
myardyIsr
myrrdyIsr,
myxrdyIsr
};
I2C_setCallback(&addr);
I2C Module
10-13
I2C_readByte
I2C_start
Starts the transmit and/or receive operation for an I2C port
Function
void I2C_start(
);
Arguments
None
Return Value
None
Description
Sets the STT bit in the I2CMDR register (generates a start condition). The
values of the configuration structure are written to the port registers.
If desired, you can configure all I2C registers with:
I2C_config() [maintaining I2CMDR(STT)=0]
and later, use the I2C_start() function to start the I2C peripheral
Example
I2C_write
I2C_start();
Performs master/slave transmitter functions
Function
int I2C_write (Uint16 *data, int length, int master, Uint16 slaveaddress,
int transfermode, int timeout);
Arguments
Uint16 *data
int length
int master
Return Value
int
Pointer to data array
length of data to be transmitted
master mode:
0 = slave, 1 = master
Uint16 slaveaddress
Slave address to transmit to
int transfermode
Transfer mode of operation (SADP, SAD, etc.)
Value
Transfer Mode
1
S−A−D..(n)..D−P
2
S−A−D..(n)..D (repeat n times)
3
S−A−D−D−D..... (continuous)
int timeout
Timeout for bus busy, no acknowledge, or
transmit ready
Value returned
0
1
2
3
4
5
10-14
Description
No errors
Bus busy; not able to generate start condition
Timeout for transmit ready (first byte)
NACK (No−acknowledge) received
Timeout for transmit ready (within main loop)
NACK (No−acknowledge) received (last byte)
I2C_readByte
Description
Performs master/slave transmitter functions. Inputs are the data array to be
transferred, length of data, master mode, slaveaddress, and timeout for errors.
int timeout
Example
Timeout for bus busy, no acknowledge, or transmit ready
Uint16 databyte[7]={0,0,10,11,12,13,14};
int x;
I2C_Init Init = {
0,
/* 7 bit address mode
*/
0x0000,
/* own address
*/
144,
/* clkout value (Mhz)
*/
400,
/* a number between 10 and 400
*/
0,
/* 8 bits/byte to be received or transmitted */
0,
/* DLB mode off
*/
1
/* FREE mode on
*/
};
I2C_init(&Init);
x=I2C_write (databyte,7,1,0x50,1,30000);
/* sends 7 bytes of data
/* in master transmitter
/* S−A−D..(n)..D−P mode
/* to the 0x50 slave
/* address with a timeout
/* of 30000.
I2C_writeByte
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
Writes a 16-bit data value for I2CDXR
Function
void I2C_writeByte(
Uint16 Val
);
Arguments
Val
Return Value
None
Description
Directly writes a 16-bit value to the serial port data transmit register; I2CDXR;
before writing the value, this function does not check if the transmitter is
ready. For this purpose, use I2C_xrdy().
Example
I2C_writeByte(0x34);
16-bit data value to be written to I2C transmit register.
I2C Module
10-15
I2C_readByte
I2C_xempty
Reads an XMST bit from an I2CST register
Function
Uint16 I2C_xempty(
);
Arguments
None
Return Value
XSMT
Description
Reads the XSMT bit from the I2CSTR register. A 0 indicates the transmit
shift (XSR) is empty.
Example
if (I2C_xempty()) {
…
}
I2C_xrdy
Returns the XSMT bit of I2CSTR register:
0 (transmit buffer empty),
or
1 (transmit buffer full).
Reads the ICXRDY status bit of the I2CSTR register
Function
Bool I2C_xrdy(
);
Arguments
None
Return Value
XRDY Returns the XRDY status bit of the I2CSTR register.
Description
Reads the XRDY status bit of the I2CSTR register. A “1” indicates that the
transmitter is ready to transmit a new word. A ”0” indicates that the transmitter
is not ready to transmit a new word.
Example
if (I2C_xrdy()) {
...
I2C_writeByte (0x34);
...
}
10-16
Macros
10.4 Macros
This section contains descriptions of the macros available in the I2C module.
The I2C API defines macros that have been designed for the following
purposes:
The RMK macros create individual control-register masks for the following
purposes:
To initialize a I2C_Config structure that you then pass to functions
such as I2C_Config().
To use as arguments for the appropriate RSET macros.
Other macros are available primarily to facilitate reading and writing indi-
vidual bits and fields in the I2C control registers.
Table 10−4. I2C Macros
(a) Macros to read/write I2C register values
Macro
Syntax
I2C_RGET()
Uint16 I2C_RGET(REG)
I2C_RSET()
Void I2C_RSET(REG, Uint16 regval)
(b) Macros to read/write I2C register field values (Applicable to registers with more than one field)
Macro
Syntax
I2C_FGET()
Uint16 I2C_FGET(REG, FIELD)
I2C_FSET()
Void I2C_FSET(REG,FIELD,Uint16 fieldval)
(c) Macros to create values to I2C registers and fields (Applicable to registers with more than one field)
Macro
Syntax
I2C_REG_RMK()
Uint16 I2C_REG_RMK(fieldval_n,…fieldval_0)
Note: *Start with field values with most significant field positions:
field_n: MSB field
field_0: LSB field
*only writable fields allowed
I2C_FMK()
Uint16 I2C_FMK(REG, FIELD, fieldval)
(d) Macros to read a register address
Macro
Syntax
I2C_ADDR()
Uint16 I2C_ADDR(REG)
I2C Module
10-17
Examples
Notes:
1) REG indicates the registers: I2COAR, I2CIMR, I2CSTR, I2CCLKL, I2CCLKH,
I2CDRR, I2CCNT, I2CSAR, I2CDXR, I2CMDR, I2CSRC, I2CPSC.
2) FIELD indicates the register field name.
For REG_FSET and REG_FMK, FIELD must be a writable field.
For REG_FGET, the field must be a readable field.
3) regval indicates the value to write in the register (REG).
4) fieldval indicates the value to write in the field (FIELD).
10.5 Examples
I2C programming examples using CSL are provided in:
The Programming the C5509 I2C Peripheral Application Report
(SPRA785)
In the CCS examples directory: examples\<target>\csl\
10-18
Chapter 11
ICACHE Module
This chapter describes the ICACHE module, lists the API structure, functions,
and macros within the module, and provides a ICACHE API reference section.
Topic
Page
11.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-2
11.2 Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-3
11.3 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-5
11.4 Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-8
11-1
Overview
11.1 Overview
Table 11−2 lists the configuration structures and functions used with the
ICACHE module.
Section 11.4 lists the macros available for the ICACHE module.
Currently, there are no handles available for the Instruction Cache.
Table 11−1. ICACHE Configuration Structure
Structure
Purpose
See page ...
ICACHE_Config
ICACHE configuration structure used to setup the Instruction
Cache
11-3
ICACHE_Setup
ICACHE Configuration structure used to enable the Instruction Cache.
11-4
ICACHE_TagSet
ICACHE structure used to set the tag registers.
11-4
Table 11−2. ICACHE Functions
Structure
Purpose
ICACHE_config
Sets up the ICACHE register using the configuration structure
11-5
ICACHE_disable
Resets the Cache Enable bit in status register 3
11-5
ICACHE_enable
Sets the Cache Enable bit in status register 3
11-6
ICACHE_flush
Sets the Cache Flush bit in status register 3
11-6
ICACHE_freeze
Sets the Cache Freeze bit in status register 3
11-6
ICACHE_setup
Configures the ICACHE and enables it
11-7
ICACHE_tagset
Sets the values of the Ramset Tags
11-7
ICACHE_unfreeze
Resets the Cache Freeze bit in status register 3
11-7
11-2
See page ...
ICACHE_Config
11.2 Configuration Structures
The following are configuration structures used to set up the ICACHE module.
ICACHE_Config
ICACHE configuration structure used to setup the ICACHE
Structure
ICACHE_Config
Members
Members
Uint16 icgc
Uint16 icwc
Uint16 icrc1
Uint16 icrtag1
Uint16 icrc2
Uint16 icrtag2
Global Control Register
N-way Control Register (not supported on C5502/5501)
Ramset 1 Control Register (not supported on C5502/5501)
Ramset 1 Tag Register (not supported on C5502/5501)
Ramset 2 Control Register (not supported on C5502/5501)
Ramset 2 Tag Register (not supported on C5502/5501)
Description
The ICACHE configuration structure is used to set up the cache. You create
and initialize this structure, then pass its address to the ICACHE_config()
function. You can use literal values or the ICACHE_RMK macros to create the
structure member values.
Example
ICACHE_Config MyConfig = {
0x0060, /* Global Control
0x1000, /* N-way Control
0x0000, /* Ramset 1 Control
0x1000, /* Ramset 1 Tag
0x0000, /* Ramset 1 Control
0x1000 /* Ramset 1 Tag
};
…
ICACHE_config(&MyConfig);
Example
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
For C5502 and C5501
ICACHE_Config MyConfig = {
0x0000, /* Global Control
};
*/
ICACHE Module
11-3
ICACHE_Setup
ICACHE_Setup
Structure used to configure and enable the ICACHE
Structure
ICACHE_Setup
Members
Members
Uint32
Uint32
rmode
Description
ICACHE setup structure is used to configure and enable the ICACHE. The
structure is created and initialized. Its address is passed to the
ICACHE_setup() function.
Example
ICACHE_Setup Mysetup = {
ICACHE_ICGC_RMODE_1RAMSET,
0x50000,
0x0000};
...
ICACHE_setup(&Mysetup);
ICACHE_Tagset
Uint16
rmode
r1addr
r2addr
Ramset Mode. Can take the following predefined values:
ICACHE_ICGC_RMODE_0RAMSET
ICACHE_ICGC_RMODE_1RAMSET
ICACHE_ICGC_RMODE_2RAMSET
Structure used to configure the ramset tag registers
Structure
ICACHE_Tagset
Members
Members Uint32
Uint32
r2addr
Description
ICACHE tag set structure is used to configure the ramset tag registers of the
ICACHE.
Example
ICACHE_Tagset Mytagset = {
0x50000,
0x0000};
...
ICACHE_tagset(&Mytagset);
11-4
r1addr
ICACHE_disable
11.3 Functions
The following are functions available for use with the ICACHE module.
ICACHE_config
Sets up ICACHE registers using configuration structure
Function
void ICACHE_config(
ICACHE_Config *Config
);
Arguments
Config
Return Value
None
Description
Sets up the ICACHE register using the configuration structure. The values of
the structure are written to the registers ICGC, ICWC, ICRC1, ICRTAG1,
ICRC2 and ICRTAG2 (see also ICACHE_Config).
Example
ICACHE_Config MyConfig = {
};
…
ICACHE_config(&MyConfig);
ICACHE_disable
Pointer to an initialized configuration structure
Resets the ICACHE enable bit in the Status Register 3
Function
void ICACHE_disable();
Arguments
None
Return Value
None
Description
Function resets the ICACHE enable bit in the Status Register 3 and disables
the ICACHE. After disabling the ICACHE the values in the ICACHE are
preserved.
Example
ICACHE_disable();
ICACHE Module
11-5
ICACHE_enable
ICACHE_enable
Sets the ICACHE enable bit in the Status Register 3
Function
void ICACHE_enable();
Arguments
None
Return Value
None
Description
Function sets the ICACHE enable bit in the Status Register 3 and then polls
the enable flag in the Cache Status Register. This function is useful when the
ICACHE was disabled using the ICACHE_disable() function. In order to
initialize the ICACHE the use of the ICACHE_setParams is prefered since this
function will also enable the ICACHE.
Example
ICACHE_enable();
ICACHE_flush
Sets the ICACHE flush bit in the Status Register 3
Function
void ICACHE_flush();
Arguments
None
Return Value
None
Description
Function sets the ICACHE flush bit in the Status Register 3 The content of the
ICACHE is invalidated.
Example
ICACHE_flush();
ICACHE_freeze
Sets the ICACHE freeze bit in the Status Register 3
Function
void ICACHE_freeze();
Arguments
None
Return Value
None
Description
Function sets the ICACHE freeze bit in the Status Register 3 and freezes the
content of the ICACHE.
Example
ICACHE_freeze();
11-6
ICACHE_unfreeze
ICACHE_setup
Configures the ICACHE and enables it
Function
void ICACHE_setup(ICACHE_Setup *setup);
Arguments
setup
Return Value
None
Description
Sets the Ramset Mode and enables the ICACHE
Example
ICACHE_Setup mySetup = {
};
...
ICACHE_setup (&mySetup);
ICACHE_tagset
Pointer to an initialized setup structure
Sets the address in the Ramset Tag registers
Function
void ICACHE_tagset(ICACHE_Tagset *params);
Arguments
params
Return Value
None
Description
Function sets the addresses in the Ramset Tag registers. This function is
useful when the user wants to change the Ramset addresses after the
ICACHE had been flushed .
Example
ICACHE_Tagset mySetup = {
};
...
ICACHE_tagset(&mySetup);
Pointer to an initialized tagset structure
ICACHE_unfreeze Resets the ICACHE freeze bit in the Status Register 3
Function
void ICACHE_unfreeze();
Arguments
None
Return Value
None
Description
Function resets the ICACHE freeze bit in the Status Register 3 the content of
the ICACHE is unfrozen.
Example
ICACHE_unfreeze();
ICACHE Module
11-7
Macros
11.4 Macros
The CSL offers a collection of macros to access CPU control registers and
fields.
Table 11−3 lists the ICACHE macros available. To use them include
“csl_icache.h.”
Table 11−3. ICACHE CSL Macros
(a) Macros to read/write ICACHE register values
Macro
Syntax
ICACHE_RGET()
Uint16 ICACHE_RGET(REG)
ICACHE_RSET()
void ICACHE_RSET(REG, Uint16 regval)
(b) Macros to read/write ICACHE register field values (Applicable only to registers with more than one field)
Macro
Syntax
ICACHE_FGET()
Uint16 ICACHE_FGET(REG, FIELD)
ICACHE_FSET()
void ICACHE_FSET(REG, FIELD, Uint16 fieldval)
(c) Macros to create value to write to ICACHE registers and fields (Applicable only to registers with more
than one field)
Macro
Syntax
ICACHE_REG_RMK()
Uint16 ICACHE_REG_RMK(fieldval_n,...fieldval_0)
Note: *Start with field values with most significant field
positions:
field_n: MSB field
field_0: LSB field
* only writable fields allowed
ICACHE_FMK()
Uint16 ICACHE_FMK(REG, FIELD, fieldval)
(d) Macros to read a register address
Macro
Syntax
ICACHE_ADDR()
Uint16 ICACHE_ADDR(REG)
Notes:
1) REG indicates the registers:ICGC, ICWC, ICST, ICRC1&2 or ICRTAG1&2.
2) FIELD indicates the register field name.
− For REG_FSET and REG__FMK, FIELD must be a writable field.
−
For REG_FGET, the field must be a readable field.
3) regval indicates the value to write in the register (REG)
4) fieldval indicates the value to write in the field (FIELD)
11-8
Chapter 12
IRQ Module
This chapter describes the IRQ module, lists the API structure and functions
within the module, and provides an IRQ API reference section. The IRQ
module provides an easy to use interface for enabling/disabling and managing
interrupts.
Topic
Page
12.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-2
12.2 Using Interrupts with CSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-7
12.3 Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-8
12.4 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-9
12-1
Overview
12.1 Overview
The IRQ module provides an interface for managing peripheral interrupts to
the CPU. This module provides the following functionality:
Masking an interrupt in the IMRx register.
Polling for the interrupt status from the IFRx register.
Setting the interrupt vector table address and placing the necessary code
in the interrupt vector table to branch to a user-defined interrupt service
routine (ISR).
Enabling/Disabling Global Interrupts in the ST1 (INTM) bit.
Reading and writing to parameters in the DSP/BIOS dispatch table.
(When the DPS BIOS dispatcher option is enabled in DSP BIOS.)
The DSP BIOS dispatcher is responsible for dynamically handling
interrupts and maintains a table of ISRs to be executed for specific
interrupts. The IRQ module has a set of APIs that update the dispatch
table. Table 12−2 lists the IRQ APIs.
The IRQ functions can be used with or without DSP/BIOS; however, if
DSP/BIOS is present, do not disable interrupts for long periods of time
because this could disrupt the DSP/BIOS environment.
IRQ_plug() is the only API function that cannot be used when DSP/BIOS
dispatcher is present or DSP/BIOS HWI module is used to configure the
interrupt vectors. This function, IRQ_plug(), dynamically places code at the
interrupt vector location to branch to a user-defined ISR for a specified event.
If you call IRQ_plug() when DSP/BIOS dispatcher is present or HWI module
has been used to configure interrupt vectors, this could disrupt the DSP/BIOS
operating environment.
The API functions that enable DSP/BIOS dispatcher communication are noted
in the table. These functions should be used only when DSP/BIOS is present
and the DSP/BIOS dispatcher is enabled.
Table 12−3 lists all IRQ logical interrupt events for this module.
Table 12−1. IRQ Configuration Structure
Syntax
Description
IRQ_Config
IRQ structure that contains all local registers required to set up
a specific IRQ channel.
12-2
See page ...
12-8
Overview
Table 12−2. IRQ Functions
Syntax
Description
See page ...
IRQ_clear()
Clears the interrupt flag in the IFR0/1 registers for the specified
event.
12-9
IRQ_config()†
Updates the DSP/BIOS dispatch table with a new configuration
for the specified event.
12-9
IRQ_disable()
Disables the specified event in the IMR0/1 registers.
12-10
IRQ_enable()
Enables the specified event in the IMR0/1 register flags.
12-10
IRQ_getArg()†
Returns value of the argument to the interrupt service routine
that the DSP/BIOS dispatcher passes when the interrupt
occurs.
12-10
IRQ_getConfig()†
Returns current DSP/BIOS dispatch table entries for the
specified event.
12-11
IRQ_globalDisable()
Globally disables all maskable interrupts. (INTM = 1)
12-11
IRQ_globalEnable()
Globally enables all maskable interrupts. (INTM = 0)
12-12
IRQ_globalRestore()
Restores the status of global interrupt enable/disable (INTM).
12-12
IRQ_map()†
Maps a logical event to its physical interrupt.
12-13
IRQ_plug()
Writes the necessary code in the interrupt vector location to
branch to the interrupt service routine for the specified event.
12-13
Caution: Do not use this function if the DSP/BIOS HWI module
or the DSP/BIOS dispatcher are in use.
IRQ_restore()
Restores the status of the specified event in the IMR0/1
register.
12-14
IRQ_setArg()†
Sets the value of the argument for DSP/BIOS dispatch to pass
to the interrupt service routine for the specified event.
12-14
IRQ_setVecs()
Sets the base address of the interrupt vector table.
12-15
IRQ_test()
Polls the interrupt flag in IFR register the specified event.
12-15
12.1.1 The Event ID Concept
The IRQ module assigns an event ID to each of the possible physical
interrupts. Because there are more events possible than events that can be
masked in the IMR register, many of the events share a common physical
interrupt. Therefore, it is necessary in some cases to map the logical events
to the corresponding physical interrupt.
IRQ Module
12-3
Overview
The IRQ module defines a set of constants, IRQ_EVT_NNNN, that uniquely
identify each of the possible logical interrupts (see Table 12−3). All of the IRQ
APIs operate on logical events.
Table 12−3. IRQ_EVT_NNNN Events List
12-4
Constant
Purpose
IRQ_EVT_RS
Reset
IRQ_EVT_SINTR
Software Interrupt
IRQ_EVT_NMI
Non-Maskable Interrupt (NMI)
IRQ_EVT_SINT16
Software Interrupt #16
IRQ_EVT_SINT17
Software Interrupt #17
IRQ_EVT_SINT18
Software Interrupt #18
IRQ_EVT_SINT19
Software Interrupt #19
IRQ_EVT_SINT20
Software Interrupt #20
IRQ_EVT_SINT21
Software Interrupt #21
IRQ_EVT_SINT22
Software Interrupt #22
IRQ_EVT_SINT23
Software Interrupt #23
IRQ_EVT_SINT24
Software Interrupt #24
IRQ_EVT_SINT25
Software Interrupt #25
IRQ_EVT_SINT26
Software Interrupt #26
IRQ_EVT_SINT27
Software Interrupt #27
IRQ_EVT_SINT28
Software Interrupt #28
IRQ_EVT_SINT29
Software Interrupt #29
IRQ_EVT_SINT30
Software Interrupt #30
IRQ_EVT_SINT0
Software Interrupt #0
IRQ_EVT_SINT1
Software Interrupt #1
IRQ_EVT_SINT2
Software Interrupt #2
IRQ_EVT_SINT3
Software Interrupt #3
IRQ_EVT_SINT4
Software Interrupt #4
IRQ_EVT_SINT5
Software Interrupt #5
Overview
Table 12−3. IRQ_EVT_NNNN Events List (Continued)
Constant
Purpose1
IRQ_EVT_SINT6
Software Interrupt #6
IRQ_EVT_SINT7
Software Interrupt #7
IRQ_EVT_SINT8
Software Interrupt #8
IRQ_EVT_SINT9
Software Interrupt #9
IRQ_EVT_SINT10
Software Interrupt #10
IRQ_EVT_SINT11
Software Interrupt #11
IRQ_EVT_SINT12
Software Interrupt #12
IRQ_EVT_SINT13
Software Interrupt #13
IRQ_EVT_INT0
External User Interrupt #0
IRQ_EVT_INT1
External User Interrupt #1
IRQ_EVT_INT2
External User Interrupt #2
IRQ_EVT_INT3
External User Interrupt #3
IRQ_EVT_TINT0
Timer 0 Interrupt
IRQ_EVT_HINT
Host Interrupt (HPI)
IRQ_EVT_DMA0
DMA Channel 0 Interrupt
IRQ_EVT_DMA1
DMA Channel 1 Interrupt
IRQ_EVT_DMA2
DMA Channel 2 Interrupt
IRQ_EVT_DMA3
DMA Channel 3 Interrupt
IRQ_EVT_DMA4
DMA Channel 4 Interrupt
IRQ_EVT_DMA5
DMA Channel 5 Interrupt
IRQ_EVT_RINT0
MCBSP Port #0 Receive Interrupt
IRQ_EVT_XINT0
MCBSP Port #0 Transmit Interrupt
IRQ_EVT_RINT2
MCBSP Port #2 Receive Interrupt
IRQ_EVT_XINT2
MCBSP Port #2 Transmit Interrupt
IRQ_EVT_TINT1
Timer #1 Interrupt
IRQ_EVT_HPINT
Host Interrupt (HPI)
IRQ Module
12-5
Overview
Table 12−3. IRQ_EVT_NNNN Events List (Continued)
12-6
Constant
Purpose1
IRQ_EVT_RINT1
MCBSP Port #1 Receive Interrupt
IRQ_EVT_XINT1
MCBSP Port #1 Transmit Interrupt
IRQ_EVT_IPINT
FIFO Full Interrupt
IRQ_EVT_SINT14
Software Interrupt #14
IRQ_EVT_RTC
RTC Interrupt
IRQ_EVT_I2C
I2C Interrupt
IRQ_EVT_WDTINT
Watchdog Timer Interrupt
Using Interrupts with CSL
12.2 Using Interrupts with CSL
Interrupts can be managed using any of the following methods:
You can use DSP/BIOS HWIs: Refer to DSP/BIOS Users Guide.
You can use the DSP/BIOS Dispatcher
You can use CSL IRQ routines: Example 12−1 illustrates how to initialize
and manage interrupts outside the DSP/BIOS environment.
Example 12−1. Manual Interrupt Setting Outside DSP/BIOS HWIs
extern Uint32 myVec;
; ...
interrupt void myIsr();
; ...
main (){
; ...
; Option 1: use Event IDs directly
; ...
IRQ_setVecs((Uint32)(&myvec) << 1));
IRQ_plug(IRQ_EVT_TINT0,&myIsr);
IRQ_enable(IRQ_EVT_TINT0);
IRQ_globalEnable();
; ...
; Option 2: Use the PER_getEventId() function (TIMER as an example)
for a better abstraction
; ...
IRQ_setVecs((Uint32)(&myvec) << 1));
eventId = TIMER_getEventId (hTimer);
IRQ_plug (eventId,&myIsr);
IRQ_enable (eventId);
IRQ_globalEnable();
; ...
}
interrupt void myIsr(void)
{
//...
}
IRQ Module
12-7
IRQ_Config
12.3 Configuration Structures
The following is the configuration structure used to set up the IRQ module.
IRQ_Config
IRQ configuration structure
Structure
IRQ_Config
Members
IRQ_IsrPtr funcAddr
Address of interrupt service routine
Uint32 ierMask
Interrupt to disable the existing ISR
Uint32 cachectrl
Currently, this member has no function
and has been reserved for future expansion.
Uint32 funcArg
Argument to pass to ISR when invoked
Description
This is the IRQ configuration structure used to update a DSP/BIOS table entry.
You create and initialize this structure then pass its address to the
IRQ_config() function.
Example
IRQ_Config MyConfig = {
0x0000, /* funcAddr */
0x0300, /* ierMask
*/
0x0000, /* cachectrl */
0x0000, /* funcArg
*/
};
12-8
IRQ_config
12.4 Functions
The following are functions available for use with the IRQ module.
IRQ_clear
Clears event flag from IFR register
Function
void IRQ_clear(
Uint16 EventId
);
Arguments
EventId
Return Value
None
Description
Clears the event flag from the IFR register
Example
IRQ_clear(IRQ_EVT_TINT0);
IRQ_config
Event ID, see IRQ_EVT_NNNN (Table 12−3) for a complete list
of events. Or, use the PER_getEventId() function to get the
Event ID.
Updates an entry in the DSP/BIOS Dispatch Table
Function
void IRQ_config(
Uint16 EventId,
IRQ_Config *Config
);
Arguments
EventID
Event ID, see IRQ_EVT_NNNN for a complete list of events.
Config
Pointer to an initialized configuration structure
Return Value
None
Description
Updates the entry in the DSPBIOS dispatch table for the specified event.
Example
IRQ_config myConfig = {
0X0000,
0X0300,
0X0000,
0X0000
};
IRQ_config (IRQ_EVT_TINT0, &myConfig);
IRQ Module
12-9
IRQ_disable
IRQ_disable
Disables specified event
Function
int IRQ_disable(
Uint16 EventId
);
Arguments
EventId
Return Value
int
Description
Disables the specified event, by modifying the IMR register.
Example
Uint32 oldint;
oldint = IRQ_disable(IRQ_EVT_TINT0);
IRQ_enable
Event ID, see IRQ_EVT_NNNN (Table 12−3) for a complete list
of events. Or, use the PER_getEventId() function to get the
EventID.
Old value of the event
Enables specified event
Function
void IRQ_enable(
Uint16 EventId
);
Arguments
EventId
Return Value
None
Description
Enables the specified event.
Example
Uint32 oldint;
oldint = IRQ_enable(IRQ_EVT_TINT0);
IRQ_getArg
Event ID, see IRQ_EVT_NNNN (Table 12−3) for a complete list
of events. Or, use the PER_getEventId() function to get the
Event ID.
Gets value for specified event
Function
Uint32 IRQ_getArg(
Uint16 EventId
);
Arguments
EventId
12-10
Event ID, see IRQ_EVT_NNNN (Table 12−3) for a complete list
of events. Or, use the PER_getEventId() function to get the
EventID.
IRQ_globalDisable
Return Value
Value of argument
Description
Returns value for specified event.
Example
Uint32 evVal;
evVal = IRQ_getArg(IRQ_EVT_TINT0);
IRQ_getConfig
Gets DSP/BIOS dispatch table entry
Function
void IRQ_getConfig(
Uint16 EventId,
IRQ_Config *Config
);
Arguments
EventId
Event ID, see IRQ_EVT_NNNN (Table 12−3) for a complete list
of events. Or, use the PER_getEventId() function to get the
EventID.
Config
Pointer to configuration structure
Return Value
None
Description
Returns current values in DSP/BIOS dispatch table entry for the specified
event.
Example
IRQ_Config myConfig;
IRQ_getConfig(IRQ_EVT_SINT3, &myConfig);
IRQ_globalDisable Globally disables interrupts
Function
int IRQ_globalDisable(
);
Arguments
None
Return Value
intm
Description
This function globally disables interrupts by setting the INTM of the ST1
register. The old value of INTM is returned. This is useful for temporarily
disabling global interrupts, then enabling them again.
Example
int intm;
intm = IRQ_globalDisable();
...
IRQ_globalRestore (intm);
Returns the old INTM value
IRQ Module
12-11
IRQ_globalEnable
IRQ_globalEnable Globally enables interrupts
Function
int IRQ_globalEnable(
);
Arguments
None
Return Value
intm
Description
This function globally Enables interrupts by setting the INTM of the ST1
register. The old value of INTM is returned. This is useful for temporarily
enabling global interrupts, then disabling them again.
Example
int intm;
intm = IRQ_globalEnable();
...
IRQ_globalRestore (intm);
Returns the old INTM value
IRQ_globalRestore Restores the global interrupt mask state
Function
void IRQ_globalRestore(
int intm
);
Arguments
intm
Return Value
None
Description
This function restores the INTM state to the value passed in by writing to the
INTM bit of the ST1 register. This is useful for temporarily disabling/enabling
global interrupts, then restoring them back to its previous state.
Example
int intm;
intm = IRQ_globalDisable();
...
IRQ_globalRestore (intm);
12-12
Value to restore the INTM value to (0 = enable, 1 = disable)
IRQ_plug
IRQ_map
Maps event to physical interrupt number
Function
void IRQ_map(
Uint16 EventId
);
Arguments
EventId
Return Value
None
Description
This function maps a logical event to a physical interrupt number for use by
DSPBIOS dispatch.
Example
IRQ_map(IRQ_EVT_TINT0);
IRQ_plug
Event ID, see IRQ_EVT_NNNN for a complete list of events.
Initializes an interrupt vector table vector
Function
void IRQ_plug(
Uint16 EventId,
IRQ_IsrPtr funcAddr
);
Arguments
EventId
Event ID, see IRQ_EVT_NNNN (Table 12−3) for a complete list
of events. Or, use the PER_getEventId() function to get the
EventID.
funcAddr
Address of the interrupt service routine to be called when the
interrupt happens. This function must be C-callable and if
implemented in C, it must be declared using the interrupt
keyword.
Return Value
0 or 1
Description
Initializes an interrupt vector table vector with the necessary code to branch
to the specified ISR.
Caution: Do not use this function when DSP/BIOS is present and the
dispatcher is enabled.
Example
interrupt void myIsr ();
.
.
.
IRQ_plug (IRQ_EVT_TINT0, &myIsr)
IRQ Module
12-13
IRQ_setArg
IRQ_restore
Restores the state of a specified event
Function
void IRQ_restore(
Uint16 EventId,
Uint16 Old_flag
);
Arguments
EventId
Event ID, see IRQ_EVT_NNNN (Table 12−3) for a complete list
of events. Or, use the PER_getEventId() function to get the
EventID.
Old_flag
Value used to restore an event (0 = enable, 1 = disable)
Return Value
None
Description
This function restores the event’s state to the value that was originally passed
to it.
Example
int oldint;
oldint = IRQ_disable(IRQ_EVT_TINT0);
.
.
.
IRQ_restore(IRQ_EVT_TINT0, oldint);
IRQ_setArg
Sets value of argument for DSPBIOS dispatch entry
Function
void IRQ_setArg(
Uint16 EventId,
Uint32 val
);
Arguments
EventId
Return Value
None
Description
Sets the argument that DSP/BIOS dispatcher will pass to the interrupt service
routine for the specified event.
Example
IRQ_setArg(IRQ_EVT_TINT0, val);
12-14
Event ID, see IRQ_EVT_NNNN (Table 12−3) for a complete list
of events. Or, use the PER_getEventId() function to get the
EventID.
IRQ_test
IRQ_setVecs
Sets the base address of the interrupt vectors
Function
void IRQ_setVecs(
Uint32 IVPD
);
Arguments
IVPD
Return Value
Old IVPD register value
Description
Use this function to set the base address of the interrupt vector table in the
IVPD and IVPH registers (both registers are set to the same value).
IVPD pointer to the DSP interrupt vector table
Caution: Changing the interrupt vector table base can have adverse effects
on your system because you will be effectively eliminating all previous interrupt
settings. There is a strong chance that the DSP/BIOS kernel and RTDX will fail
if this function is not used with care.
Example
IRQ_test
IRQ_setVecs (0x8000);
Tests event to see if its flag is set in IFR register
Function
Bool IRQ_test(
Uint16 EventId
);
Arguments
EventId
Return Value
Event flag, 0 or 1
Description
Tests an event to see if its flag is set in the IFR register.
Example
while (!IRQ_test(IRQ_EVT_TINT0);
Event ID, see IRQ_EVT_NNNN (Table 12−3) for a complete list
of events. Or, use the PER_getEventId() function to get the
EventID.
IRQ Module
12-15
IRQ_test
12-16
Chapter 13
McBSP Module
This chapter describes the McBSP module, lists the API structure, functions,
and macros within the module, and provides a McBSP API reference section.
Topic
Page
13.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-2
13.2 Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-6
13.4 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-8
13.5 Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-23
13.6 Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-26
13-1
Overview
13.1 Overview
The McBSP is a handle-based module that requires you to call
MCBSP_open() to obtain a handle before calling any other functions.
Table 13−2 lists the structure and functions for use with the McBSP modules.
Table 13−1 lists the configuration structure used to set up the McBSP.
Table 13−2 lists the functions available for use with the McBSP module
Table 13−3 lists McBSP registers and fields.
Table 13−1. McBSP Configuration Structure
Syntax
Description
MCBSP_Config
McBSP configuration structure used to setup a McBSP port.
See page ...
13-6
Table 13−2. McBSP Functions
Syntax
Description
MCBSP_channelDisable()
Disables one or several McBSP channels
13-8
MCBSP_channelEnable()
Enables one or several McBSP channels of the selected
register
13-9
MCBSP_channelStatus()
Returns the channel status
13-11
MCBSP_close()
Closes the McBSP and its corresponding handle
13-12
MCBSP_config()
Sets up McBSP using configuration structure (MCBSP_Config)
13-12
MCBSP_getConfig()
Get MCBSP channel configuration
13-14
MCBSP_getRcvEventId()
Retrieves the receive event ID for the given port
13-15
MCBSP_getXmtEventId()
Retrieves the transmit event ID for the given port
13-15
MCBSP_getPort()
Get MCBSP Port number used in given handle
13-14
MCBSP_open()
Opens the McBSP and assigns a handle to it
13-16
MCBSP_read16()
Performs a direct 16-bit read from the data receive register
DRR1
13-17
MCBSP_read32()
Performs two direct 16-bit reads: data receive register 2 DRR2
(MSB) and data receive register 1 DRR1 (LSB)
13-17
MCBSP_reset()
Resets the McBSP registers with default values
13-18
13-2
See page ...
Overview
Syntax
Description
See page ...
MCBSP_rfull()
Reads the RFULL bit SPCR1 register
13-18
MCBSP_rrdy()
Reads the RRDY status bit of the SPCR1 register
13-19
MCBSP_start()
Starts a McBSP receive/transmit based on start flags
13-19
MCBSP_write16()
Writes a 16-bit value to the serial port data transmit register,
DXR1
13-21
MCBSP_write32()
Writes two 16-bit values to the two serial port data transmit
registers, DXR2 (16-bit MSB) and DXR1 (16-bit LSB)
13-21
MCBSP_xempty()
Reads the XEMPTY bit from the SPCR2 register
13-22
MCBSP_xrdy()
Reads the XRDY status bit of the SPCR2 register
13-22
13.1.1 MCBSP Registers
Table 13−3. MCBSP Registers
Register
Field
SPCR1
DLB, RJUST, CLKSTP, DXENA, ABIS, RINTM, RSYNCERR, (R)RFULL,
(R)RRDY, RRST
SPCR2
FREE, SOFT, FRST, GRST, XINTM, XSYNCERR, (R)XEMPTY, (R)XRDY,
XRST
PCR
SCLKME, (R)CLKSSTAT, DXSTAT, (R)DRSTAT, FSXP, FSRP, CLKXP, CLKRP,
IDLEEN, XIOEN, RIOEN, FSXM, FSRM, CLKXM, CLKRM
RCR1
RFRLEN1, RWDLEN1
RCR2
RPHASE, RFRLEN2, RWDLEN2, RCOMPAND, RFIG, RDATDLY
XCR1
XFRLEN1, XWDLEN1
XCR2
XPHASE, XFRLEN2, XWDLEN2, XCOMPAND, XFIG, XDATDLY
SRGR1
FWID, CLKGDV
SRGR2
GSYNC, CLKSP, CLKSM, FSGM, FPER
MCR1
RMCME, RPBBLK, RPABLK, (R)RCBLK, RMCM
MCR2
XMCME, XPBBLK, XPABLK, (R)XCBLK, XMCM
XCERA
XCEY15, XCEY14, XCEY13, XCEY12, XCEY11, XCEY10, XCEY9, XCEY8,
XCEY7, XCEY6, XCEY5, XCEY4, XCEY3, XCEY2, XCEY1, XCEY0
McBSP Module
13-3
Overview
Table 13−3. MCBSP Registers(Continued)
Register
Field
XCERB
XCEY15, XCEY14, XCEY13, XCEY12, XCEY11, XCEY10, XCEY9, XCEY8,
XCEY7, XCEY6, XCEY5, XCEY4, XCEY3, XCEY2, XCEY1, XCEY0
XCERC
XCEY15, XCEY14, XCEY13, XCEY12, XCEY11, XCEY10, XCEY9, XCEY8,
XCEY7, XCEY6, XCEY5, XCEY4, XCEY3, XCEY2, XCEY1, XCEY0
XCERD
XCEY15, XCEY14, XCEY13, XCEY12, XCEY11, XCEY10, XCEY9, XCEY8,
XCEY7, XCEY6, XCEY5, XCEY4, XCEY3, XCEY2, XCEY1, XCEY0
XCERE
XCEY15, XCEY14, XCEY13, XCEY12, XCEY11, XCEY10, XCEY9, XCEY8,
XCEY7, XCEY6, XCEY5, XCEY4, XCEY3, XCEY2, XCEY1, XCEY0
XCERF
XCEY15, XCEY14, XCEY13, XCEY12, XCEY11, XCEY10, XCEY9, XCEY8,
XCEY7, XCEY6, XCEY5, XCEY4, XCEY3, XCEY2, XCEY1, XCEY0
XCERG
XCEY15, XCEY14, XCEY13, XCEY12, XCEY11, XCEY10, XCEY9, XCEY8,
XCEY7, XCEY6, XCEY5, XCEY4, XCEY3, XCEY2, XCEY1, XCEY0
XCERH
XCEY15, XCEY14, XCEY13, XCEY12, XCEY11, XCEY10, XCEY9, XCEY8,
XCEY7, XCEY6, XCEY5, XCEY4, XCEY3, XCEY2, XCEY1, XCEY0
RCERA
RCEY15, RCEY14, RCEY13, RCEY12, RCEY11, RCEY10, RCEY9, RCEY8,
RCEY7, RCEY6, RCEY5, RCEY4, RCEY3, RCEY2, RCEY1, RCEY0
RCERB
RCEY15, RCEY14, RCEY13, RCEY12, RCEY11, RCEY10, RCEY9, RCEY8,
RCEY7, RCEY6, RCEY5, RCEY4, RCEY3, RCEY2, RCEY1, RCEY0
RCERC
RCEY15, RCEY14, RCEY13, RCEY12, RCEY11, RCEY10, RCEY9, RCEY8,
RCEY7, RCEY6, RCEY5, RCEY4, RCEY3, RCEY2, RCEY1, RCEY0
RCERD
RCEY15, RCEY14, RCEY13, RCEY12, RCEY11, RCEY10, RCEY9, RCEY8,
RCEY7, RCEY6, RCEY5, RCEY4, RCEY3, RCEY2, RCEY1, RCEY0
RCERE
RCEY15, RCEY14, RCEY13, RCEY12, RCEY11, RCEY10, RCEY9, RCEY8,
RCEY7, RCEY6, RCEY5, RCEY4, RCEY3, RCEY2, RCEY1, RCEY0
RCERF
RCEY15, RCEY14, RCEY13, RCEY12, RCEY11, RCEY10, RCEY9, RCEY8,
RCEY7, RCEY6, RCEY5, RCEY4, RCEY3, RCEY2, RCEY1, RCEY0
RCERG
RCEY15, RCEY14, RCEY13, RCEY12, RCEY11, RCEY10, RCEY9, RCEY8,
RCEY7, RCEY6, RCEY5, RCEY4, RCEY3, RCEY2, RCEY1, RCEY0
RCERH
RCEY15, RCEY14, RCEY13, RCEY12, RCEY11, RCEY10, RCEY9, RCEY8,
RCEY7, RCEY6, RCEY5, RCEY4, RCEY3, RCEY2, RCEY1, RCEY0
DRR1
RCEY15, RCEY14, RCEY13, RCEY12, RCEY11, RCEY10, RCEY9, RCEY8,
RCEY7, RCEY6, RCEY5, RCEY4, RCEY3, RCEY2, RCEY1, RCEY0
13-4
Overview
Table 13−3. MCBSP Registers(Continued)
Register
Field
DRR2
RCEY15, RCEY14, RCEY13, RCEY12, RCEY11, RCEY10, RCEY9, RCEY8,
RCEY7, RCEY6, RCEY5, RCEY4, RCEY3, RCEY2, RCEY1, RCEY0
DXR1
RCEY15, RCEY14, RCEY13, RCEY12, RCEY11, RCEY10, RCEY9, RCEY8,
RCEY7, RCEY6, RCEY5, RCEY4, RCEY3, RCEY2, RCEY1, RCEY0
DXR2
RCEY15, RCEY14, RCEY13, RCEY12, RCEY11, RCEY10, RCEY9, RCEY8,
RCEY7, RCEY6, RCEY5, RCEY4, RCEY3, RCEY2, RCEY1, RCEY0
Note:
R = Read Only; W = Write; By default, most fields are Read/Write
McBSP Module
13-5
MCBSP_Config
13.2 Configuration Structures
The following is the configuration structure used to set up the McBSP.
MCBSP_Config
McBSP configuration structure used to set up a McBSP port
Structure
MCBSP_Config
Members
Uint16 spcr1
Uint16 spcr2
Uint16 rcr1
Uint16 rcr2
Uint16 xcr1
Uint16 xcr2
Uint16 srgr1
Uint16 srgr2
Uint16 mcr1
Uint16 mcr2
Uint16 pcr
Uint16 rcera
Uint16 rcerb
Uint16 rcerc
Uint16 rcerd
Uint16 rcere
Uint16 rcerf
Uint16 rcerg
Uint16 rcerh
Uint16 xcera
Uint16 xcerb
Uint16 xcerc
Uint16 xcerd
Uint16 xcere
Uint16 xcerf
Uint16 xcerg
Uint16 xcerh
Description
The McBSP configuration structure is used to set up a McBSP port. You create
and initialize this structure and then pass its address to the MCBSP_config()
function. You can use literal values or the MCBSP_RMK macros to create the
structure member values.
13-6
Serial port control register 1 value
Serial port control register 2 value
Receive control register 1 value
Receive control register 2 value
Transmit control register 1 value
Transmit control register 2 value
Sample rate generator register 1 value
Sample rate generator register 2 value
Multi-channel control register 1 value
Multi-channel control register 2 value
Pin control register value
Receive channel enable register partition A value
Receive channel enable register partition B value
Receive channel enable register partition C value
Receive channel enable register partition D value
Receive channel enable register partition E value
Receive channel enable register partition F value
Receive channel enable register partition G value
Receive channel enable register partition H value
Transmit channel enable register partition A value
Transmit channel enable register partition B value
Transmit channel enable register partition C value
Transmit channel enable register partition D value
Transmit channel enable register partition E value
Transmit channel enable register partition F value
Transmit channel enable register partition G value
Transmit channel enable register partition H value
MCBSP_Config
13.3
Example
MCBSP_Config config1 = {
0xFFFF, /* spcr1 */
0x03FF, /* spcr2 */
0x7FE0, /* rcr1
*/
0xFFFF, /* rcr2
*/
0x7FE0, /* xcr1
*/
0xFFFF, /* xcr2
*/
0xFFFF, /* srgr1 */
0xFFFF, /* srgr2 */
0x03FF, /* mcr1
*/
0x03FF, /* mcr2
*/
0xFFFF, /* pcr
*/
0xFFFF, /* rcera */
0xFFFF, /* rcerb */
0xFFFF, /* rcerc */
0xFFFF, /* rcerd */
0xFFFF, /* rcere */
0xFFFF, /* rcerf */
0xFFFF, /* rcerg */
0xFFFF, /* rcerh */
0xFFFF, /* xcera */
0xFFFF, /* xcerb */
0xFFFF, /* xcerc */
0xFFFF, /* xcerd */
0xFFFF, /* xcere */
0xFFFF, /* xcerf */
0xFFFF, /* xcerg */
0xFFFF /* xcerh */
}
...
hMcbsp = MCBSP_open(MCBSP_PORT0, MCBSP_OPEN_RESET)
...
MCBSP_config(hMcbsp, &config1);
McBSP Module
13-7
MCBSP_channelDisable
13.4 Functions
The following are functions available for use with the McBSP module.
MCBSP_channelDisable Disables one or several McBSP channels
Function
void MCBSP_channelDisable(
MCBSP_Handle hMcbsp,
Uint16 RegName,
Uint16 Channels
);
Arguments
hMcbsp
Handle to McBSP port obtained by MCBSP_open()
RegName Receive and Transmit Channel Enable Registers:
RCERA
RCERB
XCERA
XCERB
RCERC
RCERD
RCERE
RCERF
RCERG
RCERH
XCERC
XCERD
XCERE
XCERF
XCERG
XCERH
Channels Available values for the specific RegName are:
MCBSP_CHAN0
MCBSP_CHAN1
MCBSP_CHAN2
MCBSP_CHAN3
MCBSP_CHAN4
MCBSP_CHAN5
MCBSP_CHAN6
MCBSP_CHAN7
MCBSP_CHAN8
MCBSP_CHAN9
MCBSP_CHAN10
MCBSP_CHAN11
MCBSP_CHAN12
13-8
MCBSP_channelEnable
MCBSP_CHAN13
MCBSP_CHAN14
MCBSP_CHAN15
Return Value
None
Description
Disables one or several McBSP channels of the selected register. To disable
several channels at the same time, the sign “|” OR has to be added in between.
To see if there is pending data in the receive or transmit buffers before
disabling a channel, use MCBSP_rrdy() or MCBSP_xrdy().
Example
/* Disables Channel 0 of the partition A */
MCBSP_channelDisable(hMcbsp,RCERA, MCBSP_CHAN0);
/* Disables Channels 1, 2 and 8 of the partition B with “|”*/
MCBSP_channelDisable(hMcbsp,RCERB, (MCBSP_CHAN1 | MCBSP_CHAN2
| MCBSP_CHAN8));
MCBSP_channelEnable
Enables one or several McBSP channels of selected register
Function
void MCBSP_channelEnable(
MCBSP_Handle hMcbsp,
Uint16 RegName,
Uint16 Channels
);
Arguments
hMcbsp
Handle to McBSP port obtained by MCBSP_open()
RegName Receive and Transmit Channel Enable Registers:
RCERA
RCERB
XCERA
XCERB
RCERC
RCERD
RCERE
RCERF
RCERG
RCERH
XCERC
XCERD
XCERE
McBSP Module
13-9
MCBSP_channelEnable
XCERF
XCERG
XCERH
Channels
Available values for the specificReg Addr are:
MCBSP_CHAN0
MCBSP_CHAN1
MCBSP_CHAN2
MCBSP_CHAN3
MCBSP_CHAN4
MCBSP_CHAN5
MCBSP_CHAN6
MCBSP_CHAN7
MCBSP_CHAN8
MCBSP_CHAN9
MCBSP_CHAN10
MCBSP_CHAN11
MCBSP_CHAN12
MCBSP_CHAN13
MCBSP_CHAN14
MCBSP_CHAN15
Return Value
None
Description
Enables one or several McBSP channels of the selected register.
To enable several channels at the same time, the sign “|” OR has to be added
in between.
Example
13-10
/* Enables Channel 0 of the partition A */
MCBSP_channelEnable(hMcbsp,RCERA, MCBSP_CHAN0);
/* Enables Channel 1, 4 and 6 of the partition B with “|” */
MCBSP_channelEnable(hMcbsp,RCERB,(MCBSP_CHAN1| MCBSP_CHAN4 |
MCBSP_CHAN6));
MCBSP_channelStatus
MCBSP_channelStatus
Returns channel status
Function
Uint16 MCBSP_channelStatus(
MCBSP_Handle hMcbsp,
Uint16 RegName,
Uint16 Channel
);
Arguments
hMcbsp
Handle to McBSP port obtained by MCBSP_open()
RegName Receive and Transmit Channel Enable Registers:
RCERA
RCERB
XCERA
XCERB
RCERC
RCERD
RCERE
RCERF
RCERG
RCERH
XCERC
XCERD
XCERE
XCERF
XCERG
XCERH
Channel
Selectable Channels for the specific RegName are:
MCBSP_CHAN0
MCBSP_CHAN1
MCBSP_CHAN2
MCBSP_CHAN3
MCBSP_CHAN4
MCBSP_CHAN5
MCBSP_CHAN6
MCBSP_CHAN7
MCBSP_CHAN8
MCBSP_CHAN9
MCBSP_CHAN10
MCBSP_CHAN11
MCBSP_CHAN12
MCBSP_CHAN13
MCBSP_CHAN14
MCBSP_CHAN15
McBSP Module
13-11
MCBSP_close
Return Value
Channel status
Description
Returns the channel status by reading the associated bit into the the selected
register (RegName). Only one channel can be observed.
Example
Uint16 C1, C4;
/* Returns Channel Status of the channel 1 of the partition B
*/
C1=MCBSP_channelStatus(hMcbsp,RCERB,MCBSP_CHAN1);
/* Returns Channel Status of the channel 4 of the partition A
*/
C4=MCBSP_channelStatus(hMcbsp,RCERA,MCBSP_CHAN4);
MCBSP_close
0 - Disabled
1 - Enabled
Closes a McBSP Port
Function
void MCBSP_close(
MCBSP_Handle hMcbsp
);
Arguments
hMcbsp
Return Value
None
Description
Closes a previously opened McBSP port. The McBSP registers are set to their
default values and any associated interrupts are disabled and cleard.
Example
MCBSP_close(hMcbsp);
MCBSP_config
Device Handle (see MCBSP_open()).
Sets up a McBSP port using a configuration structure
Function
void MCBSP_config(MCBSP_Handle hMcbsp,
MCBSP_Config *Config
);
Arguments
hMcbsp
Handle to MCBSP port obtained by MCBSP_open()
Config
Pointer to an initialized configuration structure
Return Value
None
Description
Sets up the McBSP port identified by hMcbsp handle using the configuration
structure. The values of the structure are written directly to the Mcbsp port
registers.
13-12
MCBSP_config
Note:
If you want to configure all McBSP registers without starting the McBSP port,
use MCBSP_config() without setting the SPCR2 (XRST, RRST, GRST, and
FRST) fields. Then, after you write the first data valid to the DXR registers,
call MCBSP_start() when ready to start the McBSP port. This guarantees
that the correct value is transmitted/received.
Example
MCBSP_Config MyConfig = {
0xFFFF, /* spcr1 */
0x03FF, /* spcr2 */
0x7FE0, /* rcr1
*/
0xFFFF, /* rcr2
*/
0x7FE0, /* xcr1
*/
0xFFFF, /* xcr2
*/
0xFFFF, /* srgr1 */
0xFFFF, /* srgr2 */
0x03FF, /* mcr1
*/
0x03FF, /* mcr2
*/
0xFFFF, /* pcr
*/
0xFFFF, /* rcera */
0xFFFF, /* rcerb */
0xFFFF, /* rcerc */
0xFFFF, /* rcerd */
0xFFFF, /* rcere */
0xFFFF, /* rcerf */
0xFFFF, /* rcerg */
0xFFFF, /* rcerh */
0xFFFF, /* xcera */
0xFFFF, /* xcerb */
0xFFFF, /* xcerc */
0xFFFF, /* xcerd */
0xFFFF, /* xcere */
0xFFFF, /* xcerf */
0xFFFF, /* xcerg */
0xFFFF /* xcerh */
};
...
MCBSP_config(myhMcbsp, &MyConfig);
McBSP Module
13-13
MCBSP_getPort
MCBSP_getConfig
Reads the MCBSP configuration in the configuration structure
Function
void MCBSP_getConfig(
MCBSP_Handle hMcbsp,
MCBSP_Config *Config
);
Arguments
hMcbsp
McBSP Device Handle obtained by MCBSP_open()
Config
Pointer to a McBSP configuration structure
Return Value
None
Description
Reads the McBSP configuration into the configuration structure. See also
McBSP_Config.
Example
MCBSP_Config myConfig;
...
hMcbsp = MCBSP_open(MCBSP_PORT0, 0);
MCBSP_getConfig(hMcbsp, &myConfig);
MCBSP_getPort
Get McBSP port number used in given handle
Function
Uint16 MCBSP_getPort (MCBSP_Handle hMcbsp)
Arguments
hMcbsp
Return Value
Port number
Description
Get Port number used by specific handle
Example
Uint16 PortNum;
...
PortNum = MCBSP_getPort (hMcbsp));
13-14
Handle to McBSP port given by MCBSP_open()
MCBSP_getXmt EventID
MCBSP_getRcvEventId
Retrieves the receive event ID for a given McBSP port
Function
Uint16 MCBSP_getRcvEventId(
MCBSP_Handle hMcbsp
);
Arguments
hMcbsp
Return Value
Receiver event ID
Description
Retrieves the IRQ receive event ID for a given port. Use this ID to manage the
event using the IRQ module.
Example
Uint16 RecvEventId;
...
RecvEventId = MCBSP_getRcvEventId(hMcbsp);
IRQ_enable(RecvEventId);
Handle to McBSP port obtained by MCBSP_open()
MCBSP_getXmt EventID Retrieves the transmit event ID for a given MCBSP port
Function
Uint16 MCBSP_getXmtEventId(
MCBSP_Handle hMcbsp
);
Arguments
hMcbsp
Return Value
Transmitter event ID
Description
Retrieves the IRQ transmit event ID for the given port. Use this ID to manage
the event using the IRQ module.
Example
Uint16 XmtEventId;
...
XmtEventId = MCBSP_getXmtEventId(hMcbsp);
IRQ_enable(XmtEventId);
Handle to McBSP port obtained by MCBSP_open()
McBSP Module
13-15
MCBSP_open
MCBSP_open
Opens a McBSP port
Function
MCBSP_Handle MCBSP_open(
int devnum,
Uint32 flags
);
Arguments
devNum
McBSP device (port) number:
MCBSP_PORT0
MCBSP_PORT1
MCBSP_PORT2
MCBSP_PORT_ANY
flags
Open flags, may be logical OR of any of the following:
MCBSP_OPEN_RESET
Return Value
MCBSP_Handle
Device handle
Description
Before a McBSP device can be used, it must first be opened by this function.
Once opened, it cannot be opened again until closed (see MCBSP_close).
The return value is a unique device handle that is used in subsequent McBSP
API calls. If the function fails, INV (−1) is returned.
If the MCBSP_OPEN_RESET is specified, then the power on defaults are set
and any interupts are disabled and cleared.
Example
13-16
MCBSP_Handle hMcbsp;
...
hMcbsp = MCBSP_open(MCBSP_PORT0,MCBSP_OPEN_RESET);
MCBSP_open
MCBSP_read16
Reads a 16-bit value
Function
Uint16 MCBSP_read16(
MCBSP_Handle hMcbsp
);
Arguments
hMcbsp
Return Value
16-bit value
Description
Directly reads a 16-bit value from the McBSP data receive register DRR1.
McBSP Device Handle obtained by MCBSP_open()
Depending on the receive word data length you have selected in the
RCR1/RCR2 registers, the actual data could be 8, 12, or 16 bits long.
This function does not verify that new valid data has been received. Use
MCBSP_rrdy() (prior to calling MCBSP_read16()) for this purpose.
Example
MCBSP_read32
Uint16 val16;
val16 = MCBSP_read16(hMcbsp);
Reads a 32-bit value
Function
Uint32 MCBSP_read32(
MCBSP_Handle hMcbsp
);
Arguments
hMcbsp
Return Value
32-bit value (MSW-LSW ordering)
Description
A 32-bit read. First, the 16-bit MSW (Most significant word) is read from
register DRR2. Then, the 16-bit LSW (least significant word) is read from
register DRR1.
McBSP Device Handle (see MCBSP_open())
Depending on the receive word data length you have selected in the
RCR1/RCR2 register, the actual data could be 20, 24, or 32 bits.
This function does not check to verify that new valid data has been received.
Use MCBSP_rrdy() (prior to calling MCBSP_read32()) for this purpose.
Example
Uint32 val32;
val32 = MCBSP_read32(hMcbsp);
McBSP Module
13-17
MCBSP_reset
MCBSP_reset
Resets a McBSP port
Function
void MCBSP_reset(
MCBSP_Handle hMcbsp
);
Arguments
hMcbsp
Return Value
None
Description
Resets the McBSP device. Disables and clears the interrupt event and sets the
McBSP registers to default values. If INV is specified, all McBSP devices are
reset.
Device handle, see MCBSP_open();
Actions Taken:
All serial port registers are set to their power-on defaults.
All associated interrupts are disabled and cleared.
Example
MCBSP_rfull
MCBSP_reset(hMcbsp);
MCBSP_reset(INV);
Reads RFULL bit of serial port control register 1
Function
CSLBool MCBSP_rfull(
MCBSP_Handle hMcbsp
);
Arguments
hMcbsp
Handle to McBSP port obtained by MCBSP_open()
Return Value
RFULL
Returns RFULL status bit of SPCR1 register
0 − receive buffer empty
1 − receive buffer full
Description
Reads the RFULL bit of the serial port control register 1. (Both RBR and RSR
are full. A receive overrun error could have occured.)
Example
if (MCBSP_rfull(hMcbsp)) {
…
}
13-18
MCBSP_start
MCBSP_rrdy
Reads RRDY status bit of SPCR1 register
Function
CSLBool MCBSP_rrdy(
MCBSP_Handle hMcbsp
);
Arguments
hMcbsp
Handle to McBSP port obtained by MCBSP_open()
Return Value
RRDY
Returns RRDY status bit of SPCR1
0 − no new data to be received
1 − new data has been received
Description
Reads the RRDY status bit of the SPCR1 register. A 1 indicates the receiver
is ready with data to be read.
Example
if (MCBSP_rrdy(hMcbsp)) {
val = MCBSP_read16 (hMcbsp);
}
MCBSP_start
Starts a transmit and/or receive operation for a MCBSP port
Function
void MCBSP_start(
MCBSP_Handle hMcbsp,
Uint16 startMask,
Uint16 SampleRateGenDelay
);
Arguments
hMcbsp
Handle to McBSP port obtained by MCBSP_open()
startMask
Start mask. It could be any of the following values (or
their logical OR):
MCBSP_XMIT_START: start transmit
(XRST field)
MCBSP_RCV_START: start receive
(RRST field)
MCBSP_SRGR_START: start sample rate
generator (GRST field)
MCBSP_SRGR_FRAMESYNC: start
framesync generation (FRST field)
SampleRateGenDelay Sample rate generates delay. MCBSP logic requires
two sample_rate generator clock_periods after
enabling the sample rate generator for its logic to
stabilize. Use this parameter to provide the
appropriate delay before starting the MCBSP.
A conservative value should be equal to:
McBSP Module
13-19
MCBSP_start
SampleRateGenDelay +
2
Sample_Rate_Generator_Clock_period
4
C55x_Instruction_Cycle
A default value of:
MCBSP_SRGR_DEFAULT_DELAY (0xFFFF value) can be used (maximum
value).
Return Value
None
Description
Starts a transmit and/or receive operation for a MCBSP port.
Note:
If you want to configure all McBSP registers without starting the McBSP port,
use MCBSP_config() without setting the SPCR2 (XRST, RRST, GRST, and
FRST) fields. Then, after you write the first data valid to the DXR registers,
call MCBSP_start() when ready to start the McBSP port. This guarantees
that the correct value is transmitted/received.
Example 1
MCBSP_start(hMcbsp, MCBSP_XMIT_START, 0x3000);
...
MCBSP_start(hMcbsp, MCBSP_XMIT_START|MCBSP_SRGR_START|
MCBSP_SRGR_FRAMESYNC, 0x1000);
Example 2
MCBSP_start(hMcbsp,
MCBSP_SRGR_START|MCBSP_RCV_START,
0x200
);
13-20
MCBSP_start
MCBSP_write16
Writes a 16-bit value
Function
void MCBSP_write16(
MCBSP_Handle hMcbsp,
Uint16 Val
);
Arguments
hMcbsp
McBSP Device Handle obtained by MCBSP_open()
Val
16-bit value to be written
Return Value
None
Description
Directly writes a 16-bit value to the serial port data transmit register: DXR1.
Depending on the receive word data length you have selected in the
XCR1/XCR2 registers, the actual data could be 8, 12, or 16 bits long.
This function does not verify that the transmitter is ready to transmit a new
word. Use MCBSP_xrdy() (prior to calling MCBSP_write16()) for this purpose.
Example
MCBSP_write32
Uint16 val16;
MCBSP_write16(hMcbsp, val16);
Writes a 32-bit value
Function
void MCBSP_write32(
MCBSP_Handle hMcbsp,
Uint32 Val
);
Arguments
hMcbsp
McBSP Device Handle obtained by MCBSP_open()
Val
32-bit value to be written
Return Value
None
Description
Writes a 32-bit value. Depending on the transmit word data length you have
selected in the XCR1|XCR2 registers, the actual data could be 20, 24, or 32
bits long.
This function does not check to verify that the transmitter is ready to transmit
a new word. Use MCBSP_xrdy() (prior to calling MCBSP_write32()) for this
purpose.
Example
Uint32 val32;
MCBSP_write32(hMcbsp, val32);
McBSP Module
13-21
MCBSP_xempty
MCBSP_xempty
Reads XEMPTY bit from SPCR2 register
Function
CSLBool MCBSP_xempty(
MCBSP_Handle hMcbsp
);
Arguments
hMcbsp
Handle to McBSP port obtained by MCBSP_open()
Return Value
XEMPTY
Returns XEMPTY bit of SPCR2 register
0 − transmit buffer empty)
1 − transmit buffer full
Description
Reads the XEMPTY bit from the SPCR2 register. A 0 indicates the transmit
shift (XSR) is empty.
Example
if (MCBSP_xempty(hMcbsp)) {
…
}
MCBSP_xrdy
Reads XRDY status bit of SPCR2 register
Function
CSLBool MCBSP_xrdy(
MCBSP_Handle hMcbsp
);
Arguments
hMcbsp
Handle to McBSP port obtained by MCBSP_open()
Return Value
XRDY
Returns XRDY status bit of SPCR2
0 − not ready to transmit new data
1 − ready to transmit new data
Description
Reads the XRDY status bit of the SPCR2 register. A 1 indicates that the
transmitter is ready to transmit a new word. A 0 indicates that the transmitter
is not ready to transmit a new word.
Example
if (MCBSP_xrdy(hMcbsp)) {
...
MCBSP_write16 (hMcbsp, 0x1234);
...
}
13-22
Macros
13.5 Macros
The CSL offers a collection of macros to gain individual access to the McBSP
peripheral registers and fields.
Table 13−4 lists macros available for the McBSP module using McBSP port
number. Table 13−5 lists macros available for the McBSP module using
handle.
Table 13−4. McBSP Macros Using McBSP Port Number
(a) Macros to read/write McBSP register values
Macro
Syntax
MCBSP_RGET()
Uint16 MCBSP_RGET(REG#)
MCBSP_RSET()
Void MCBSP_RSET(REG#, Uint16 regval)
(b) Macros to read/write McBSP register field values (Applicable only to registers with more than one field)
Macro
Syntax
MCBSP_FGET()
Uint16 MCBSP_FGET(REG#, FIELD)
MCBSP_FSET()
Void MCBSP_FSET(REG#, FIELD, Uint16 fieldval)
(c) Macros to create a value for the McBSP registers and fields (Applies only to registers with more than one
field)
Macro
Syntax
MCBSP_REG_RMK()
Uint16 MCBSP_REG_RMK(fieldval_n,…fieldval_0)
Note: *Start with field values with most significant field positions:
field_n: MSB field
field_0: LSB field
*only writable fields allowed
MCBSP_FMK()
Uint16 MCBSP_FMK(REG, FIELD, fieldval)
McBSP Module
13-23
Macros
Table 13−4. McBSP Macros Using McBSP Port Number (Continued)
(d) Macros to read a register address
Macro
Syntax
MCBSP_ADDR()
Uint16 MCBSP_ADDR(REG#)
Notes:
1) REG# indicates, if applicable, a register name with the channel number (example: DMACCR0)
2) REG indicates the registers: SPCR1, SPCR2, RCR1, RCR2, XCR1, XCR2, SRGR1, SRGR2, MCR1, MCR2,
RCERA, RCERB, RCERC, RCERD, RCERE, RCERF, RCERG, RCERH, XCERA, XCERB, XCERC, XCERD,
XCERE, XCERF, XCERG, XCERH, PCR
3) FIELD indicates the register field name as specified in the 55x DSP Peripherals Reference Guide.
For REG_FSET and REG_FMK, FIELD must be a writable field.
For REG_FGET, the field must be a readable field.
4) regval indicates the value to write in the register (REG).
5) fieldval indicates the value to write in the field (FIELD).
Table 13−5. McBSP CSL Macros Using Handle
(a) Macros to read/write McBSP register values
Macro
Syntax
MCBSP_RGETH()
Uint16 MCBSP_RGETH(MCBSP_Handle hMCBSP, REG)
MCBSP_RSETH()
Void MCBSP_RSETH(
MCBSP_Handle hMCBSP,
REG,
Uint16 regval
)
(b) Macros to read/write McBSP register field values (Applicable only to registers with more than one field)
Macro
Syntax
MCBSP_FGETH()
Uint16 MCBSP_FGETH(MCBSP_Handle hMCBSP, REG, FIELD)
MCBSP_FSETH()
Void MCBSP_FSETH(
MCBSP_Handle hMCBSP,
REG,
FIELD,
Uint16 fieldval)
13-24
Macros
Table 13−5. McBSP CSL Macros Using Handle (Continued)
(c) Macros to read a register address
Macro
Syntax
MCBSP_ADDRH()
Uint16 MCBSP_ADDRH(MCBSP_Handle hMCBSP, REG)
Notes:
1) REG indicates the registers: SPCR1, SPCR2, RCR1, RCR2, XCR1, XCR2, SRGR1, SRGR2, MCR1, MCR2,
RCERA, RCERB, RCERC, RCERD, RCERE, RCERF, RCERG, RCERH, XCERA, XCERB, XCERC, XCERD,
XCERE, XCERF, XCERG, XCERH, PCR
2) FIELD indicates the register field name as specified in the 55x DSP Peripherals Reference Guide.
For REG_FSETH, FIELD must be a writable field.
For REG_FGET, the field must be a readable field.
3) regval indicates the value to write in the register (REG).
4) fieldval indicates the value to write in the field (FIELD).
McBSP Module
13-25
Examples
13.6 Examples
Examples for the McBSP module are found in the CCS examples\<target>\csl
directory.
Example 13−1 illustrates the McBSP port initialization using MCBSP_config().
The example also explains how to set the McBSP into digital loopback mode
and perform 32-bit reads/writes from/to the serial port.
Example 13−1. McBSP Port Initialization Using MCBSP_config()
#include <csl.h>
#include <csl_mcbsp.h>
#define N
10
/* Step 0: This is your MCBSP register configuration */
static MCBSP_Config ConfigLoopBack32= {
....
};
void main(void) {
MCBSP_Handle mhMcbsp;
Uint32 xmt[N], rcv[N];
....
/* Step 1: Initialize CSL */
CSL_init();
/* Step 2: Open and configure the MCBSP port */
mhMcbsp = MCBSP_open(MCBSP_PORT0, MCBSP_OPEN_RESET);
MCBSP_config(mhMcbsp, &ConfigLoopBack32);
/* Step 3: Write the first data value and start */
/* the sample rate genteration in the MCBSP
*/
MCBSP_write32(mhMcbsp, xmt[0]);
MCBSP_start(mhMcbsp,MCBSP_XMIT_START|MCBSP_RCV_START|
MCBSP_SRGR_START|MCBSP_SRGR_FRAMESYNC,
0x300u);
......
while (!MCBSP_rrdy(mhMcbsp));
rcv[0] = MCBSP_read32(mhMcbsp);
13-26
Examples
Example 13−1. McBSP Port Initialization Using MCBSP_config() (Continued)
/* Begin the data transfer loop of the remaining (N-1) values. */
for (i=1; i<N-1;i++)
{
/* Wait for XRDY signal before writing data to DXR */
while (!MCBSP_xrdy(mhMcbsp));
/* Write 32 bit data value to DXR */
MCBSP_write32(mhMcbsp,xmt[i]);
/* Wait for RRDY signal to read data from DRR */
while (!MCBSP_rrdy(mhMcbsp));
/* Read 32 bit value from DRR */
rcv[i] = MCBSP_read32(mhMcbsp);
}
MCBSP_close(mhMcbsp);
} /* main */
McBSP Module
13-27
13-28
Chapter 14
MMC Module
This chapter contains descriptions of the configuration structures, data strucutres, and functions available in the multimedia controller (MMC) module.
This module supports both MMC and SD cards. The initialization and data
transfer to MMC and SD cards differ in a few aspects, and there are SD_<function> APIs provided for accessing the SD card. The MMC APIs and data structures that are valid only for MMC cards are marked accordingly. All other APIs
can be used for both MMC and SD cards.
Note: The SPI mode is no longer supported on the 5509 MMC Controller.
Topic
Page
14.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-2
14.2 Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-5
14.3 Data Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-6
14.4 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-13
14-1
Overview
14.1 Overview
Table 14−1. MMC Configuration Structures
Config Structure
Description
See Page
MMC_Config
MMC configuration structure
14-5
Table 14−2. MMC Data Structures
Data Structure
Description
See Page
MMC_CallBackObj
Structure used to assign functions for each interrupt
14-6
MMC_CardCsdObj†
Contains card-specific data
14-7
SD_CardCsdObj††
Contains card-specific data
14-8
MMC_CardIdObj
Contains card identification (CID)
14-9
MMC_CardObj
Contains information about memory cards including CID and
CSD structures for MMC/SD cards
14-10
MMC_CardXCsdObj
Extended card-specific data (XCSD)
14-10
MMC_Cmdobj
Structure to store commands
14-11
MMC_MmcRegObj
Structure to store values of all MMC regs
14-11
MMC_SetupNative
Native mode Initialization Structure
14-12
MMC_RspRegObj
Structure to store values of MMC response registers
14-12
† Only for MMC card
†† Only for SD card
Table 14−3. MMC Functions
Function
Description
See Page
MMC_clearResponse
Clears the MMC response registers
14-13
MMC_close
Frees MMC controller reserved by call to MMC_open
14-13
MMC_config
Writes the values of the configuration structure into the control
registers for the specified MMC controller
14-14
MMC_dispatch0
ISR dispatch function to service MMC0 (port0) isrs
14-14
MMC_dispatch1
ISR dispatch function to service MMC1 (port1) isrs
14-14
14-2
Overview
Table 14−3. MMC Functions (Continued)
Function
Description
See Page
MMC_drrdy
Returns the contents of the DRRDY status bit in the MMCST0
register
14-15
MMC_dxrdy
Returns the contents of the DXRDY status bit in the MMCST0
register
14-15
MMC_getCardCsd†
Reads the card-specific data from response registers
14-16
MMC_getCardId†
Reads card ID from the MMC response registers
14-16
MMC_getConfig
Returns the current contents of the MMC control registers. This
excludes the MMC response registers.
14-17
MMC_getNumberOfCards
Returns the number of cards found when MMC_open is called
with MMC_OPEN_SENDALLCID option
14-17
MMC_getStatus
Returns the status of the specified field in the MMCST0 register
14-18
MMC_intEnable
Enables interrupts by writing to the MMCIE register
14-28
MMC_SetupNative
Initializes the controller when in Native mode
14-12
MMC_open
Reserves the MMC device specified by, device
14-18
MMC_read
Sends commands to read blocks of data. This is a blocking
function in that it does not return until all data has been
transferred.
14-19
MMC_responseDone
Checks the status of a register for a response complete
condition
14-19
MMC_saveStatus
Saves current contents of MMCST0 register in MMC Handle
14-20
MMC_selectCard
Selects card with specified relative address for communication
14-20
MMC_sendAllCID†
Sends broadcast command to all cards to identify themselves
14-21
MMC_sendCmd
Sends a command to selected memory card/s. Optionally waits
for a response
14-22
MMC_sendCSD
Sends a request to card to submit its card-specific data or CSD
structure
14-22
MMC_sendGoIdle
Sends a broadcast GO_IDLE command
14-23
MMC_setCardPtr
Sets the card pointer in the MMC global status table
14-23
MMC_setCardType
Writes the card type (MMC or SD) to the MMC_CardObj
structure
14-29
MMC Module
14-3
Overview
Table 14−3. MMC Functions (Continued)
Function
Description
See Page
MMC_sendOpCond
Sets the operating voltage window while in Native mode
14-24
MMC_setCallBack
Associated functions to interrupts and installs dispatcher
routines
14-25
MMC_setRca
Set the relative card address of an attached memory card
14-25
MMC_stop
Halts a current data transfer
14-26
MMC_waitForFlag
Waits for a particular field in the MMCST0 register to be set
14-26
MMC_write
Writes a block of data. This is a blocking function in that it does
not return until all data has been transferred
14-27
SD_sendAllCID
Sends broadcast command to SD cards to identify themselves
14-29
SD_getCardId
Reads SD specific card ID from MMC response registers
14-30
SD_getCardCsd
Reads SD card-specific data from response registers
14-30
SD_sendRca
Asks the SD card to respond with its relative card address
14-31
SD_setWidth
Sets the data bus width to either 1 bit or 4 bits
14-31
† Only for MMC card
14-4
MMC_Config
14.2 Configuration Structures
The section contains the configuration structures available for the MMC
module.
MMC_Config
Structure
MMC Configuration Structure
void MMC_Config
Members
Uint16 mmcctl
/*
Control register
*/
Uint16 mmcfclk
/*
Functional Clock register
*/
Uint16 mmcclk
/*
Clock Control register
*/
Uint16 mmcie
/*
Interrupt Enable register
*/
Uint16 mmctor
/*
Timeout Response register
*/
Uint16 mmctod
/*
Timeout Data Read register
*/
Uint16 mmcblen
/*
Block Length register
*/
Uint16 mmcnblk
/*
Number of Block register
*/
Description
MMC configuration strucutre used to set up the MMC interface. You create and
initialize this structure and then pass its address to the MMC_config() function.
Example
MMC_Config Config = {
0x000F,
0x0F00,
0x0001,
0x0FA0,
0x0500,
0x0500,
0x0200,
0x0001
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
MMCCTL
MMCFCLK
MMCCLK
MMCIE
MMCTOR
MMCTOD
MMCBLEN
MMCNBLK
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
};
MMC Module
14-5
MMC_CallBackObj
14.3 Data Structures
This section contains the data structures available for use with the MMC
module.
MMC_CallBackObj
Structure
Configures pointers to functions
MMC_CallBackObj
Members
MMC_CallBackPtr isr [12]
Holds the functions to be involoved for
MMC interrupt
Description
Configures pointers to functions.
Example
MMC_CallBackObj cback = {
(MMC_CallBackPtr)0x0000, /* Callback for Data Transfer Done
*/
(MMC_CallBackPtr)0x0000, /* Callback for Busy Done
*/
(MMC_CallBackPtr)0x0000, /* Callback for response Done
*/
(MMC_CallBackPtr)0x0000, /* Callback for Read−data time−out
*/
(MMC_CallBackPtr)0x0000, /* Callback for Response time−out
*/
(MMC_CallBackPtr)0x0000, /* Callback for write−data CRC error */
} ;
14-6
(MMC_CallBackPtr)0x0000, /* Callback for read−data CRC error
*/
(MMC_CallBackPtr)0x0000, /* Callback for response CRC error
*/
(MMC_CallBackPtr)0x0000, /* This is never used
*/
write_interrupt,
/* Callback for data xmt ready
*/
read_interrupt,
/* Callback for data rcv ready
*/
(MMC_CallBackPtr)0x0000
/* Callback for DAT3 edge
*/
MMC_CardCsdobj
MMC_CardCsdobj
Contains Card Specific Data (CSD)
Structure
MMC_CardCsdObj
Members
Uint16 csdStructure
2-bit structure type field
Uint16 mmcProt
2-bit MMC protocol
Uint16 taac
8-bit TAAC
Uint16 nsac
8-bit NSAC
Uint16 tranSpeed
8-bit max data transmission speed
Uint16 ccc
12-bit card command classes
Uint16 readBlLen
4-bit maximum Read Block Length
Uint16 readBlPartial
1-bit indicates if partial read blocks allowed
Uint16 writeBlkMisalign
1-bit flag indicates write block misalignment
Uint16 readBlkMisalign
1-bit flag indicates read block misalignment
Uint16 dsrImp
1-bit flag indicates whether card has DSR reg
Uint16 cSize
12-bit device size
Uint16 vddRCurrMin
3-bit Max. Read Current @ Vdd Min
Uint16 vddRCurrMax
3-bit Max. Read Current @ Vdd Max
Uint16 vddWCurrMin
3-bit Max. Write Current @ Vdd Min
Uint16 vddWCurrMax
3-bit Max. Write Current @ Vdd Max
Uint16 cSizeMult
3-bit device size multiplier
Uint16 eraseGrpSize
5-bit erase sector size
Uint16 eraseGrpMult
5-bit erase group multiplier
Uint16 wpGrpSize
5-bit write protect group size
Uint16 wpGrpEnable
1-bit write protect enable flag
Uint16 defaultEcc
2-bit Manufacturer default ECC
Uint16 r2wFactor
3-bit stream write factor
Uint16 writeBlLen
4-bit maximum write block length
Uint16 writeBlPartial
1-bit indicates if partial write blocks allowed
Uint16 fileFmtGrp
1-bit file format group
Uint16 copy
1-bit copy flag
Uint16 permWriteProtect
1-bit to disable/enable permanent write protection
Uint16 tmpWriteProtect
1-bit to disable/enable temporary write protection
MMC Module
14-7
SD_CardCsdObj
Uint16 fileFmt
2-bit file format
Uint16 ecc
2-bit ECC code
Uint16 crc
7-bit r/w/e redundancy check
Description
Contains card specific data (CSD) for MMC cards
Example
None
SD_CardCsdObj
Structure
Contains card-specific data (CSD)
SD_CardCsdObj
Members
14-8
Uint16
csdStructure
2−bit structure type field
Uint16
taac
8-bit TAAC
Uint16
nsac
8-bit NSAC
Uint16
tranSpeed
8-bit max data transmission speed
Uint16
ccc
12-bit card command classes
Uint16
readBlLen
4-bit maximum Read Block Length
Uint16
readBlPartial
1-bit indicates if partial read blocks allowed
Uint16
writeBlkMisalign
1-bit flag indicates write block misalignment
Uint16
readBlkMisalign
1-bit flag indicates read block misalignment
Uint16
dsrImp
1-bit flag indicates whether card has DSR reg
Uint16
cSize
12-bit device size
Uint16
vddRCurrMin
3-bit Max. Read Current @ Vdd Min
Uint16
vddRCurrMax
3-bit Max. Read Current @ Vdd Max
Uint16
vddWCurrMin
3-bit Max. Write Current @ Vdd Min
Uint16
vddWCurrMax
3-bit Max. Write Current @ Vdd Max
Uint16
cSizeMult
3-bit device size multiplier
Uint16
eraseBlkEn
1-bit erase single block enable
Uint16
sectorSize
7-bit erase group size
Uint16
wpGrpSize
7-bit write protect group size
Uint16
wpGrpEnable
1-bit write protect enable flag
Uint16
r2wFactor
3-bit stream write factor
Uint16
writeBlLen
4-bit maximum write block length
MMC_CardIdObj
Uint16
writeBlPartial
1-bit indicates if partial write blocks allowed
Uint16
fileFmtGrp
1-bit file format group
Uint16
copy
1-bit copy flag
Uint16
permWriteProtect
1-bit to disable/enable permanent write protection
Uint16
tmpWriteProtect
1-bit to disable/enable temporary write protection
Uint16
fileFmt
2-bit file format
Uint16
crc
7-bit r/w/e redundancy check
Description
Contains card-specific data (CSD) for SD cards
Example
None
MMC_CardIdObj
Structure
Contains Card Identification (CID)
MMC_CardIdObj
Members
Uint32 mfgId
24-bit Manufacturer’s ID
Char productName[8] 8-character Product Name
Uint16 hwRev
4-bit Hardware Revision Number
Uint16 fwRev
4-bit Firmware Revision Number
Uint32 serialNumber
24-bit Serial Number
Uint16 monthCode
4-bit Manufacturing Date (Month)
Uint16 yearCode
bit Manufacturing Date (Year)
Uint16 checksum
7-bit crc
Description
Contains card identification
Example
None
MMC Module
14-9
MMC_CardObj
MMC_CardObj
Structure
Contains information about Memory Cards, including CID and CSD
MMC_CardObj
Members
Uint32 rca
User assigned relative card address (RCA)
Uint16 status
Last read status value
Uint16 CardIndex
MMC module assigned index for card
Uint16 cardType
MMC or SD
Uint32 maxXfrRate
Maximum transfer rate
Uint32 readAccessTime
TAAC exp * mantissa
Uint32 cardCapacity
Total memory available on card
Uint32 lastAddrRead
Last address read from memory card
Uint32 lastAddrWritten
Last address written to on memory card
MMC_CardIdObj cid
Manufacturers Card ID
MMC_CardCsdObj *MMC_csd
Card-specific data
SD_CardCsdObj *SD_csd;
card either sd or mmc; we will use the appropriate csd.
MMC_CardXCsdObj *xcsd
Extended CSD
Description
Contains information about memory cards, including CID and CSD.
Example
None
MMC_CardXCsdobj
Structure
Extended Card Specific Data (XCSD)
MMC_CardXCsdObj
Members
Uint16 securitySysId
Security System ID
Uint16 securitySysVers
Security System Version
Uint16 maxLicenses
Maximum number of storable licenses
Uint32 xStatus
Extended status bits
Description
Extended card specific data.
Example
None
14-10
MMC_MmcRegObj
MMC_Cmdobj
Structure
Stores an MMC Command
MMC_Cmdobj
Members
Uint16 argh
High part of command argument
Uint16 argl
Low part of command argument
Uint16 cmd
MMC command
Description
Stores an MMC command
Example
None
MMC_MmcRegObj Structure to store values of all MMC regs
Structure
MMC_MmcRegObj
Members
Uint16 mmcfclk
MMCFCLK register
Uint16 mmcctl
MMCCTL register
Uint16 mmcclk
MMCCLK register
Uint16 mmcst0
MMCST0 register
Uint16 mmcst1
MMCST1 register
Uint16 mmcie
MMCIE register
Uint16 mmctor
MMCTOR register
Uint16 mmctod
MMCTOD register
Uint16 mmcblen
MMCBLEN register
Uint16 mmcnblk
MMCNBLK register
Uint16 mmcdrr
MMCDRR register
Uint16 mmcdxr
MMCDXR register
Uint16 mmccmd
MMCCMD register
Uint16 mmcargl
MMCARGL register
Uint16 mmcargh
MMCARGH register
MMC_RspRegObj mmcrsp MMCRSP registers
Uint16 mmcdrsp
MMCDRSP register
Uint16 mmccidx
MMCCIDX register
Description
Structure to store values of all MMC regs
Example
None
MMC Module
14-11
MMC_SetupNative
MMC_SetupNative
Structure
Native mode Initialization Structure
MMC_SetupNative
Members
Uint16 dmaEnable
Enable/disable DMA for data read/write
Uint16 dat3EdgeDetection
Set level of edge detection for DAT3 pin
Uint16 goIdle
Determines if MMC goes IDLE during IDLE
instr
Uint16 enableClkPin
Memory clk reflected on CLK Pin
Uint32 fdiv
CPU CLK to MMC function clk divide down
Uint32 cdiv
MMC func clk to memory clk divide down
Uint16 rspTimeout
Number of memory clks to wait before response timeout
Uint16 dataTimeout
Number of memory clks to wait before data
timeout
uint16 blockLen
Block length must be same as CSD
Description
Initialization structure for Native mode
Example
None
MMC_RspRegObj
Structure to store values of all MMC response regs
Structure
MMC_RspRegObj
Members
Uint16 rsp0
Uint16 rsp1
Uint16 rsp2
Uint16 rsp3
Uint16 rsp4
Uint16 rsp5
Uint16 rsp6
Uint16 rsp7
Description
Structure to store values of all MMC response regs
Example
None
14-12
MMC_close
14.4 Functions
MMC_clrResponse Clears the contents of the MMC response registers
Function
Void MMC_clearResponse(
MMC_Handle mmc
);
Arguments
mmc
Description
Clears the contents of the MMC response registers.
Example
MMC_Handle myMmc;
Uint16 rca = 2;
Uint16 waitForRsp = TRUE;
MyMmc = MMC_open(MMC_DEV1);
.
.
.
MMC_clrResponse(myMmc);
MMC_sendCmd(MyMmc, MMC_SEND_CID, waitForRsp, rca);
MMC_close
MMC Handle returned by call to MMC_open
Closes/frees the MMC device
Function
void MMC_close(
MMC_Handle mmc
);
Arguments
mmc
Description
Closes/frees the MMC device reserved by previous call to MMC_open.
Example
MMC_Handle myMmc;
MyMmc = MMC_open(MMC_DEV0);
.
.
.
MMC_close(myMmc);
MMC Handle returned by call to MMC_open
MMC Module
14-13
MMC_config
MMC_config
Writes the values of configuration structures for MMC controllers
Function
void MMC_config(
MMC_Handle mmc,
MMC_Config *mmcCfg
);
Arguments
mmc
mmcCfg
Description
Configures the MMC controller by writing the specified values to the MMC
control registers. Calls to this function are unnecessary if you have called the
MMC_open function using any of the MMC_OPEN_INIT_XXX flags and have
set the needed configuration parameters in the MMC_InitObj structure.
Example
MMC_config(myMMC, &myMMCCfg);
MMC_dispatch0
MMC handle returned call to MMC_open.
Pointer to user defined MMC configuration structure which
contains the values to set the MMC control registers.
ISR dispatch function to service the MMC0 isrs
Function
void MMC_dispatch0(
);
Arguments
None
Description
Interrupt service routine dispatch function to service interrupts that occur on
MMC port 0.
Example
MMC_dispatch0();
MMC_dispatch1
ISR dispatch function to service the MMC1 isrs
Function
void MMC_dispatch1(
);
Arguments
None
Description
Interrupt service routine dispatch function to service interrupts that occur on
MMC port 1.
Example
MMC_dispatch1();
14-14
MMC_dxrdy
MMC_drrdy
Returns the DRRDY status bit
Function
int MMC_drrdy(
MMC_Handle myMmc
);
Arguments
mmc
Description
Returns the value of the DRRDY field in the MMCST0 register.
Example
MMC_Handle myMmc;
int i;
.
.
.
i = MMC_drrdy(myMmc);
MMC_dxrdy
MMC Handle returned by call to MMC_open
Returns the DXRDY status bit
Function
int MMC_dxrdy(
MMC_Handle mmc
);
Arguments
mmc
Description
Returns the value of the DXRDY field in the MMCST0 register.
Example
MMC_Handle myMmc;
int i;
.
.
.
i = MMC_dxrdy(myMmc);
MMC Handle returned by call to MMC_open
MMC Module
14-15
MMC_getCardCSD
MMC_getCardCSD
Reads card specific data from response registers
Function
void MMC_getCardCSD(
MMC_Handle mmc,
MMC_CardCSD Obj *csd);
Arguments
mmc
csd
Description
Parses CSD data from response registers. MMC_getCardCSD verifies that
the SEND_CSD command has been issued and the response is complete.
Example
MMC_Handle myMmc;
MMC_CardCsd Obj *csd;
.
.
.
MMC_sendCSD(myMmc);
MMC_getCardCSD(myMmc, csd);
MMC_getCardId
MMC Handle returned by call to MMC_open
Pointer to Card Specific Data object
Reads card ID from the MMC response registers
Function
Void MMC_getCardId(
MMC_Handle mmc,
MMC_CardIdObj *cardId
)
Arguments
mmc
cardId
Description
Parses memory card ID from contents of the MMC controller response
registers and returns the card identity in the given card ID object.
Example
MMC_Handle myMmc;
MMC_CardIdObj myCardId;
myMmc = MMC_open(MMC_DEV1);
.
.
MMC_getCardId(myMmc,&myCardId);
14-16
MMC Handle returned by call to MMC_open
Pointer to user defined memory card ID object.
MMC_getNumberOfCards
MMC_getConfig
Returns the current contents of the MMC conrtrol registers
Function
Void MMC_getConfig(
MMC_Handle mmc,
MMC_Config *mmcCfg
);
Arguments
mmc
mmcCfg
Description
Returns the values of the MMC control registers in the specified MMC
configuration structure.
Example
MMC_getConfig(myMMC, &myMMcCfg);
MMC_getNumberOfCards
MMC_Handle returned from a call to MMC_open.
Pointer to a user defined MMC configuration structure where
current values of the MMC control registers will be returned.
Returns the number of cards found when MMC_Open is called
Function
Uint16 MMC_getNumberOfCards(
MMC_Handle mmc,
Uint16 *active,
Uint16 *inactive
);
Arguments
mmc
active
inactive
Description
Returns the number of cards found when MMC_open is called with the
MMC_OPEN_SENDALLCID option.
Example
MMC_Handle myMmc;
MMC_InitObj myMmcInit;
Uint16 n;
Uint16 active[i] = {0};
Uint16 inactive[i] = {0};
MMC Handle returned by call to MMC_open.
Pointer to where to return number of active cards.
Pointer to where to return number of inactive cards.
MyMmc = MMC_open(MMC_DEV1);
n = MMC_getNumberOfCards(myMmc, active, inactive);
MMC Module
14-17
MMC_getStatus
MMC_getStatus
Returns the status of a specified field in the status register
Function
int MMC_getStatus(
MMC_Handle mm,
Uint32 lmask
);
Arguments
mmc MMC Handle returned by call to MMC_open
lmask Mask of the status flags to check
Description
Returns the contents of status registers
Example
MMC_Handle myMmc;
Uint16 ready;
read = MMC_getStatus(myMmc, MMC_ST0_DXRDY);
MMC_open
Reserves the MMC device as specified by a device
Function
MMC_Handle MMC_open(
Uint16 device,
);
Arguments
device Device (port) number. It can be one of the following:
MMC_DEV0
MMC_DEV1
Description
MMC_open performs the following tasks:
1) Reserves the specified MMC controller and corresponding MMC port.
2) Enables controller access by setting appropriate bits in the External Bus
Selection register.
Example
MMC_Handle myMmC;
myMmc = MMC_open(MMC_DEV0);
14-18
MMC_responseDone
MMC_read
Reads a block of data from a pre-selected memory card
Function
void MMC_read(
MMC_Handle mmc,
Uint32 cardAddr,
Void *buffer,
Uint16 buflen
);
Arguments
mmc
cardAddr
buffer
buflen
Description
Reads a block of data from the pre-selected memory card (see
MMC_selectCard) and stores the information in the specified buffer.
Example
MMC_Handle myMmc;
Uint16 mybuf[512];
MMC Handle returned by call to MMC_open.
Address on card where read begins.
Pointer to buffer where received data should be stored.
number of bytes to store in buffer.
MyMmc = MMC_open(MMC_DEV1);
.
.
.
MMC_read(myMmc, 0, mybuf, 512);
MMC_responseDone
Checks status register for Response Done condition
Function
int MMC_responseDone(
MMC)Handle mmc
);
Arguments
mmc
Description
Checks the status of register MMCST0 for response done (RSPDONE)
condition. If a timeout occurs before the response done flag is set, the function
returns an error condition of 0xFFFF = MMC_RESPONSE_TIMEOUT.
Example
MMC_Handle myMmc;
.
.
./* wait for response done */
while ((sfd = MMC_responseDone (myMmc))==0){
}
if(sfd == MMC_RESPONSE_TIMEOUT)
return 0;
MMC Handle returned by call to MMC_open
MMC Module
14-19
MMC_saveStatus
MMC_saveStatus
Saves the current status of MMC
Function
int MMC_saveStatus(
MMC_Handle mmc
);
Arguments
mmc
Description
Saves the current contents of the MMCST0 register in the MMC Handle.
Example
MMC_Handle myMmc;
.
.
.
MMC_saveStatus(myMmc);
MMC_selectCard
MMC Handle returned by call to MMC_open
Selects card with specified relative address for communication
Function
Int MMC_selectCard(
MMC_Handle mmc;
MMC_CardObj *card
)
Arguments
mmc
card
Description
Selects card with specified relative address for communication.
Example
MMC_InitObj myMmcInit;
MMC_Handle myMmc;
MMC_CardObj card;
Uint16 rca = 2;
MMC Handle returned from MMC_open
Pointer to card object
myMmc = MMC_open(MMC_DEV1,);
MMC_selectCard(myMmc, &card);
14-20
MMC_sendAllCID
MMC_sendAllCID
Sends a broadcast command to all cards to identify themselves
Function
void MMC_sendAllCID(
MMC_Handle mmc,
MMC_CardId Obj *cid
);
Arguments
mmc
cid
Description
This function sends the MMC_SEND_ALL_CID command to initiate
identification of all memory cards attached to the controller. If a response is
sent from a card, it returns the information about that card in the specified
cardId object.
Example
MMC_Handle myMmc;
MMC_CardIdObj myCardId;
myMmc = MMC_open(MMC_DEV1, MMC_OPEN_ONLY);
.
.
MMC_SendAllCID(myMmc, &myCardID);
MMC Handle returned by call to MMC_open
Pointer to card ID object
MMC Module
14-21
MMC_sendCmd
MMC_sendCmd
Sends commands to selected memory cards.
Function
void MMC_sendCmd(
MMC_Handle mmc,
Uint16 cmd,
Uint16 argh,
Uint16 argh,
Uint16 waitForRsp,
);
Arguments
mmc
cmd
argh
argl
waitForRsp
Description
Function sends the specified command to the memory card associated with
the given relative card address. Optionally, the function will wait for a response
from the card before returning.
Example
MMC_Handle myMmc;
myMmc = MMC_open(MMC_DEV0);
.
.
.
MMC_SendCmd(myMmc, MMC_GO_IDLE_STATE, 0, 0, 1);
MMC_sendCSD
MMC Handle returned from call to MMC_open
Command to send to memory card.
Upper 16 bits of argument
Lower 16 bits of argument
Boolean. TRUE, if function should wait for response from
card,FALSE otherwise.
variable length set of arguments for specified command
Sends a request to card to submit its CSD structure
Function
int MMC_sendCSD(
MMC_Handle mmc
);
Arguments
mmc
Description
Sends a request to card in the identification process to submit its Card Specific
Data Structures.
Example
MMC_Handle myMmc;
.
.
.
MMC_sendCSD(myMmc);
14-22
MMC_Handle returned from a call to MMC_open
MMC_setCardPtr
MMC_sendGoIdle
Sends a broadcast GO_IDLE command
Function
void MMC_sendGoIdle(
MMC_Handle mmc
);
Arguments
mmc
Description
Sends a broadcast GO_IDLE command
Example
MMC_Handle myMmc;
.
.
.
MMC_sendGoIdle(myMmc);
MMC_setCardPtr
MMC_Handle returned from a call to MMC_open
Sets the card pointer in the MMC global status table
Function
void MMC_setCardPtr(
MMC_Handle mmc,
MMC_cardObj *card
);
Arguments
mmc
card
Description
Sets the card pointer in the MMC global status table. This function must be
used if the application performs a system/card initialization outside of the
MMC_initCard function.
Example
MMC_Handle myMmc;
MMC_cardObj *card;
MMC_Handle returned from a call to MMC_open
Pointer to card objects
MMC_setCardPtr(myMmc, &card);
MMC Module
14-23
MMC_sendOpCond
MMC_sendOpCond
Sends the SEND_OP_COND command to a card
Function
int MMC_sendOpCond(
MMC_Handle mmc,
Uint32 hvddMask
);
Arguments
mmc
MMC Handle returned by call to MMC_open
hvddMask Mask used to set operating voltage conditions in native mode
Description
Sets the operating condition in native mode.
Table 14−4. OCR Register Definitions
Example
14-24
OCR Bit
VDD Voltage Window
0-7
Reserved
8
2.0-2.1
9
2.1-2.2
10
2.2-2.3
11
2.3-2.4
12
2.4-2.5
13
2.5-2.6
14
2.6-2.7
15
2.7-2.8
16
2.8-2.9
17
2.9-3.0
18
3.0-3.1
19
3.1-3.2
20
3.2-3.3
21
3.3-3.4
22
3.4-3.5
23
3.5-3.6
24-30
reserved
31
Card power-up status bit (busy)
MMC_Handle myMmc;
.
MMC_setRca
.
.
/* enables 3.2-3.3V of operating voltage by setting bit 20 */
MMC_sendOpCond(myMmc, 0x00100000)
MMC_setCallBack
Associates functions to interrupts and installs dispatcher routines
Function
void MMC_setCallBack(
MMC_Handle mmc,
MMC_callBackObj *callbackfuncs
);
Arguments
mmc
callbackfuncs
Description
MMC_setCallBack associates each function to one of the MMC interrupts.
Example
MMC_Handle myMmc;
MMC_callBackObj *callback;
.
.
.
MMC_setCallBack(myMmc, &callback);
MMC_setRca
MMC_Handle returned from a call to MMC_open
Pointer to MMC_callBackObj containing a predefined set of
functions to call to service flagged MMC interrupts.
Sets the relative card address of an attatched memory card
Function
void MMC_setRca(
MMC_Handle mmc,
MMC_CardObj *card,
Uint16 rca
);
Arguments
mmc
card
Rca
Description
Sends command to set a card’s relative card address.
Example
MMC_Handle myMmc;
MMC Handle returned by call to MMC_open
Pointer to card object
Relative card address
MMC Module
14-25
MMC_stop
MMC_CardObj *card;
myMmc = MMC_open(MMC_DEV0);
.
.
.
MMC_sendAllCid(myMmc, &cardid);
.
.
.
MMC_setRca(myMmc, card, 2);
MMC_stop
Halts a current data transfer
Function
int MMC_stop(
MMC_Handle mmc
);
Arguments
mmc
Description
Halts a current data transfer by issuing the MMC_STOP_TRANSMISSION
command.
Example
MMC_Handle myMmc;
.
.
.
MMC_stop(myMmc);
MMC_waitForFlag
MMC_Handle returned from a call to MMC_open
Waits for specified flags to be set in the status register
Function
int MMC_waitForFlag(
MMC_Handle mmc,
Uint16 mask
);
Arguments
mmc
mask
Description
Waits for specified flags to be set in the status register
Example
MMC_Handle myMmc;
.
.
.
MMC_waitForFlag(myMmc, 0x0100);
14-26
MMC Handle returned by call to MMC_open
Mask of the status flags wait for (ST0)
MMC_write
MMC_write
Writes a block of data to a pre-selected memory card
Function
void MMC_write(
MMC_Handle mmc,
Uint32 cardAddr,
Void *buffer,
Uint16 buflen
);
Arguments
mmc
cardAddr
buffer
buflen
Description
Writes a block of data to the pre-selected memory card.
Example
MMC_Handle myMmc;
Uint16 mybuf[512];
MMC Handle returned by call to MMC_open
Address on card where read begins.
Pointer to buffer where received data should be stored.
number of bytes to store in buffer.
myMmc = MMC_open(MMC_DEV1);
.
.
.
MMC_write(myMmc, 0, mybuf, 512);
MMC Module
14-27
MMC_intEnable
MMC_intEnable
Enables interrupts by writing to the MMCIE register
Function
void MMC_intEnable(
MMC_Handle mmc,
Uint16 enableMask
);
Arguments
mmc
enableMask
Description
Enables interrupts by writing to the MMCIE register. The functions that service
MMC events need to be associated to the interrupts using the
MMC_setCallBack before calling this function.
Example
MMC_Handle myMmc;
Uint16 enableMask;
MMC_callBackObj callback;
...
myMmc = MMC_open(MMC_DEV1);
.
.
.
MMC_setCallBack(myMmc, &callback);
MMC_intEnable(myMMc, 0x200);
14-28
MMC Handle returned by call to MMC_open
16-bit value to be written to the MMCIE. A bit value of 1
enables an interrupt while a bit value of 0 resets it
SD_sendAllCID
MMC_setCardType
Writes the card type (MMC ro SD) to the MMC_CardObj structure
Function
void MMC_setCardType(
MMC_CardObj *card,
Uint16 type
);
Arguments
*card
type
Description
Sets the card type in the card obj for later reference
Example
MMC_CardObj *card;
Uint16 type;
.
.
type = MMC_sendOpCond(myMmc,0x00100000);
/* Returns either MMC_CARD or SD_CARD */
.
.
.
MMC_setCardType(card, type);
SD_sendAllCID
Pointer to card obj for the controller
Card type (MMC_CARD/SD_CARD) returned by the
MMC_sendOpCond function
Sends broadcast command to SD cards to identify themselves
Function
int SD_sendAllCID(
MMC_Handle sd,
MMC_CardIdObj *cid
);
Arguments
sd MMC Handle returned by call to MMC_open
cid Pointer to card ID object
Description
Sends the MMC_SEND_ALL_CID command to initiate identification of all
SDmemory cards attached to the controller. If a response is sent from a card,
it returns the information about that card in the specified cardId object.
Example
MMC_Handle mySD;
MMC_CardIdObj myCardId;
mySD = MMC_open(MMC_DEV1);
.
.
SD_SendAllCID(mySD, &myCardID);
MMC Module
14-29
SD_getCardId
SD_getCardId
Reads SD-specific card ID from MMC response registers
Function
void SD_getCardID(
MMC_Handle sd,
MMC_CardIdObj *cid
);
Arguments
sd SD handle returned by call to MMC_open
cid Pointer to user defined memory card ID object
Description
Parses memory card ID from contents of the MMC controller response
registers and returns the card identity in the given card ID object.
Example
MMC_Handle mySD;
MMC_CardIdObj myCardId;
mySD = MMC_open(MMC_DEV1);
.
.
MMC_getCardId(mySD,&myCardId);
SD_getCardCsd
Reads SD card-specific data from response registers
Function
void SD_getCardCsd(
MMC_Handle sd,
SD_CardCsdObj *csd
);
Arguments
sd SD handle returned by call to MMC_open
csd Pointer to card-specific data object
Description
Parses CSD data from response registers. MMC_getCardCSD verifies that
the SEND_CSD command has been issued and the response is complete.
Example
MMC_Handle mySD;
MMC_CardCsd Obj *csd;
.
.
.
MMC_sendCSD(mySD);
SD_getCardCSD(mySD, csd);
14-30
SD_setWidth
SD_sendRca
Asks the SD card to respond with its relative card address
Function
int SD_sendRca(
MMC_Handle sd,
MMC_CardObj *card
);
Arguments
sd
card
Description
The host requests the SD card to set it’s Relative Card Address and send it to
the host once done. This RCA will be used for all future communication with
the card.
Example
MMC_Handle mySD;
MMC_CardObj *card;
.
.
.
SD_sendRca(mySD, card);
SD_setWidth
SD handle returned by call to MMC_open
Pointer to card object
Sets the data bus width to either 1 bit or 4 bits
Function
int SD_setWidth(
MMC_Handle sd,
Uint16 width
);
Arguments
sd
width
Description
The SD card supports a 4-bit width data transfer. The bus width can be set after
the card is selected using the MMC_selCard API.
Example
MMC_Handle mySD;
Uint16 retVal;
MMC_CardObj *card;
.
.
mySD = MMC_open(MMC_DEV1);
.
.
retVal = MMC_selectCard(mySD,card);
retVal = SD_setWidth(mySD, 0x4);
SD Handle returned by call to MMC_open
Value to set bus width for data transfer from/to the card. Width of 0x1
sets the bus width to 1 bit and a width of 0x4 sets it to 4 −bits.
MMC Module
14-31
SD_setWidth
14-32
Chapter 15
PLL Module
This chapter describes the PLL module, lists the API structure, functions, and
macros within the module, and provides a PLL API reference section.
Topic
Page
15.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-2
15.2 Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-4
15.3 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-5
15.4 Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-7
15-1
Overview
15.1 Overview
The CSL PLL module offers functions and macros to control the Phase Locked
Loop of the C55xx.
The PLL module is not handle-based.
Table 15−1 lists the configuration structure used to set up the PLL module.
Table 15−2 lists the functions available for use with the PLL module.
Table 15−3 lists PLL registers and fields.
Section 15.4 includes a description of available PLL macros.
Table 15−1. PLL Configuration Structure
Syntax
Description
PLL_Config
PLL configuration structure used to set up the PLL interface
See page ...
15-4
Table 15−2. PLL Functions
Syntax
Description
PLL_config()
Sets up PLL using configuration structure (PLL_Config)
15-5
PLL_setFreq()
Initializes the PLL to produce the desired CPU (core)/Fast
peripherals/Slow peripherals/EMIF output frequency
15-6
15-2
See page ...
Overview
Table 15−3. PLL Registers
Register
Field
CLKMD
PLLENABLE, PLLDIV, PLLMULT, VCOONOFF
For C5502 and C5501
PLLCSR
PLLEN, PLLPWRDN, OSCPWRDN, PLLRST, LOCK, STABLE
PLLM
PLLM
PLLDIV0
PLLDIV0, D0EN
PLLDIV1
PLLDIV1, D1EN
PLLDIV2
PLLDIV2, D2EN
PLLDIV3
PLLDIV3, D3EN
OSCDIV1
OSCDIV1, OD1EN
WAKEUP
WKEN0, WKEN1, WKEN2, WKEN3
CLKMD
CLKMD0
CLKOUTSR
CLKOUTDIS, CLKOSEL
Note:
R = Read Only; W = Write; By default, most fields are Read/Write
PLL Module
15-3
PLL_Config
15.2 Configuration Structures
The following is the configuration structure used to set up the PLL.
PLL_Config
PLL configuration structure used to set up PLL interface
Structure
PLL_Config
Members
For devices having a digital PLL:
Uint16 iai
Initialize After Idle
Uint16 iob
Initialize On Break
Uint16 pllmult PLL Multiply value
Uint16 div
PLL Divide value
For devices having an analog PLL (5510PG1_2 only):
Uint16 vcoonoff APLL Voltage-controlled oscillator control
Uint16 pllmult APLL Multiply value
Uint16 div
APLL Divide value
For 5502 and 5501 device:
Uint16 pllcsr
// PLL Control Register
Uint16 pllm
// Clock 0 Multiplier Register
Uint16 plldiv0 // Clock 0 Divide Down Register
Uint16 plldiv1 // Sysclk 1 Divide Down Register
Uint16 plldiv2 // Sysclk 1 Divide Down Register
Uint16 plldiv3 // Sysclk3 Divide Down Register
Uint16 oscdiv1 // Oscillator divide down register
Uint16 wken
// Oscillator Wakeup Control Register
Uint16 clkmd // Clock Mode Control Register
Uint16 clkoutsr // CLKOUT Select Register
Description
The PLL configuration structure is used to set up the PLL Interface. You create
and initialize this structure and then pass its address to the PLL_config()
function. You can use literal values or the PLL_RMK macros to create the
structure member values.
Example
PLL_Config
1,
1,
31,
3
}
15-4
Config1 = {
/* iai
*/
/* iob
*/
/* pllmult */
/* div
*/
PLL_config
15.3 Functions
The following are functions available for use with the PLL module.
PLL_config
Writes value to up PLL using configuration structure
Function
void PLL_config(
PLL_Config *Config
);
Arguments
Config
Return Value
None
Description
Writes a value to up the PLL using the configuration structure. The values of
the structure are written to the port registers (see also PLL_Config).
Example
1. /* Using PLL_config function and PLL_Config structure for
Pointer to an initialized configuration structure
Digital
PLL*/
PLL_Config MyConfig = {
1, /* iai */
1, /* iab */
31, /* pllmult */
3 /* div */
};
2. /* Using PLL_config function and PLL_Config structure for
5502/5501 PLL*/
PLL_Config MyConfig = {
0x0,
/* PLLCSR
*/
0xA,
/* PLLM
*/
0x8001, /* PLLDIV0 */
0x8003, /* PLLDIV1 */
0x8003, /* PLLDIV2 */
0x8003, /* PLLDIV3 */
0x0,
/* OSCDIV1 */
0x0,
/* WAKEUP
*/
0x0,
/* CLKMD
*/
0x2
/* CLKOUTSR */
};
PLL_config(&MyConfig);
PLL Module
15-5
PLL_config
PLL_setFreq
Function
Initializes the PLL to produce the desired CPU output frequency
void PLL_setFreq (Uint16 mul, Uint16 div);
(For C5502 and C5501 device):
void PLL_setFreq (Uint16 mode, Uint16 mul, Uint16 div0, Uint16 div1,
Uint16 div2,Uint16 div3, Uint16 oscdiv);
Arguments
Uint16 mode
Uint16 mul
Uint16 div0
Uint16 div1
Uint16 div2
Uint16 div3
Uint16 oscdiv
// PLL mode
//PLL_PLLCSR_PLLEN_BYPASS_MODE
//PLL_PLLCSR_PLLEN_PLL_MODE
// Multiply factor, Valid values are (multiply by) 2 to 15.
// Sysclk 0 Divide Down, Valid values are 0, (divide by 1)
//to 31 (divide by 32)
// Sysclk1 Divider, Valid values are 0, 1, and 3 corresponding
//to divide by 1, 2, and 4 respectively
// Sysclk2 Divider, Valid values are 0, 1, and 3
//corresponding to divide by 1, 2, and 4 respectively
// Sysclk3 Divider, Valid values are 0, 1 and 3
//corresponding to divide by 1, 2 and 4 respectively
// CLKOUT3(DSP core clock) divider,Valid values are 0
//(divide by 1) to 31 (divide by 32)
Return Value
None
Description
Initializes the PLL to produce the desired CPU output frequency (clkout)
Example
1. /* Using PLL_setFreq for devices other than 5502/5501 */
PLL_setFreq (1, 2); // set clkout = 1/2 clkin
2. /* Using PLL_setFreq for 5502 device
*/
/*
mode = 1 means PLL enabled (non−bypass mode)
mul
= 5 means multiply by 5
div0 = 0 means Divider0 divides by 1
div1 = 3 means Divider1 divides by 4
div2 = 3 means Divider2 divides by 4
div3 = 3 means Divider3 divides by 4
oscdiv = 1 means Oscillator Divider1 divides by 2
*/
PLL_setFreq(1, 5, 0, 3, 3, 3, 1);
15-6
Macros
15.4 Macros
The CSL offers a collection of macros to gain individual access to the PLL
peripheral registers and fields.
Table 15−4 contains a list of macros available for the PLL module. To use
them, include “csl_pll.h.”
Table 15−4. PLL CSL Macros Using PLL Port Number
(a) Macros to read/write PLL register values
Macro
Syntax
PLL_RGET()
Uint16 PLL_RGET(REG)
PLL_RSET()
Void PLL_RSET(REG, Uint16 regval)
(b) Macros to read/write PLL register field values (Applicable only to registers with more than one field)
Macro
Syntax
PLL_FGET()
Uint16 PLL_FGET(REG, FIELD)
PLL_FSET()
Void PLL_FSET(REG, FIELD, Uint16 fieldval)
(c) Macros to create value to PLL registers and fields (Applies only to registers with more than one field)
Macro
Syntax
PLL_REG_RMK()
Uint16 PLL_REG_RMK(fieldval_n,…fieldval_0)
Note: *Start with field values with most significant field positions:
field_n: MSB field
field_0: LSB field
*only writable fields allowed
PLL_FMK()
Uint16 PLL_FMK(REG, FIELD, fieldval)
(d) Macros to read a register address
Macro
Syntax
PLL_ADDR()
Uint16 PLL_ADDR(REG)
Notes:
1) REG indicates the register, CLKMD.
2) FIELD indicates the register field name.
For REG_FSET and REG_FMK, FIELD must be a writable field.
For REG_FGET, the field must be a readable field.
3) regval indicates the value to write in the register (REG).
4) fieldval indicates the value to write in the field (FIELD).
PLL Module
15-7
15-8
Chapter 16
PWR Module
This chapter describes the PWR module, lists the API functions and macros
within the module, and provides a PWR API reference section. The CSL PWR
module offers functions to select which section in the device will power-down
during an IDLE execution.
Topic
Page
16.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-2
16.2 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-3
16.3 Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-4
16-1
Overview
16.1 Overview
The CSL PWR module offers functions to control the power consumption of
different sections in the C55x device. The PWR module is not handle-based.
Table 16−1 lists the functions for use with the PWR modules that order specific
parts of the C55x to power down.
Table 16−2 lists DMA registers and fields.
Table 16−1. PWR Functions
Functions
Purpose
See page ...
PWR_powerDown
Forces the DSP to enter a power-down (IDLE) state
(only for C5509 and C5510)
16-3
16.1.1 PWR Registers
Table 16−2. PWR Registers
Register
Field
Only for C5509 and C5510
ICR
EMIFI, CLKGENI, PERI, CACHEI, DMAI, CPUI
ISTR
EMIFIS, CLKGENIS, PERIS, CACHEIS, DMAIS, CPUIS
Only for C5502 and C5501
ICR
IPORTI,MPORTI,XPORTI,EMIFI,CLKI,PERI,ICACHEI,MPI,CPUI
ISTR
IPORTIS,MPORTIS,XPORTIS,EMIFIS,CLKIS,PERIS,ICACHEIS,MPIS,CPUIS
PICR
MISC,EMIF,BIOST,WDT,PIO,URT,I2C,ID,IO,SP2,SP1,SP0,TIM1,TIM0
PISTR
MISC,EMIF,BIOST,WDT,PIO,URT,I2C,ID,IO,SP2,SP1,SP0,TIM1,TIM0
MICR
HPI,DMA
Note:
16-2
R = Read Only; W = Write; By default, most fields are Read/Write
PWR_powerDown
16.2 Functions
The following are functions available for use with the PWR module.
PWR_powerDown Forces DSP to enter power-down state (On C5509 and C5510 only)
Function
void PWR_powerDown (Uint16 wakeUpMode)
Arguments
wakeupMode
PWR_WAKEUP_MI wakes up with an unmasked interrupt and
jump to execute the ISRs executed.
PWR_WAKEUP_NMI wakes up with an unmasked interrupt and
executes the next following instruction (interrupt is not taken).
Return Value
None
Description
This function will Power-down the device in different power-down and wake-up
modes by setting the C55x ICR register and invoking the IDLE instruction.
Example
/* This function will power-down the McBSP2 */
/*and wake-up with an unmasked interrupt
*/
PWR_FSET(ICR, PERI, 1);
MCBSP_FSET(PCR2, IDLEEN, 1);
PWR_powerDown(PWR_WAKEUP_MI);
PWR Module
16-3
Macros
16.3 Macros
The CSL offers a collection of macros to gain individual access to the PWR
peripheral registers and fields..
Table 16−3 contains a list of macros available for the PWR module. To use
them, include “csl_pwr.h.”
Table 16−3. PWR CSL Macros
(a) Macros to read/write PWR register values
Macro
Syntax
PWR_RGET()
Uint16 PWR_RGET(REG)
PWR_RSET()
Void PWR_RSET(REG, Uint16 regval)
(b) Macros to read/write PWR register field values (Applicable only to registers with more than one field)
Macro
Syntax
PWR_FGET()
Uint16 PWR_FGET(REG, FIELD)
PWR_FSET()
Void PWR_FSET(REG, FIELD, Uint16 fieldval)
(c) Macros to create value to PWR registers and fields (Applies only to registers with more than one field)
Macro
Syntax
PWR_REG_RMK()
Uint16 PWR_REG_RMK(fieldval_n,…fieldval_0)
Note: *Start with field values with most significant field positions:
field_n: MSB field
field_0: LSB field
*only writable fields allowed
PWR_FMK()
Uint16 PWR_FMK(REG, FIELD, fieldval)
(d) Macros to read a register address
Macro
Syntax
PWR_ADDR()
Uint16 PWR_ADDR(REG)
Notes:
1) REG indicates the register, ICR, ISTR
2) FIELD indicates the register field name as specified in the 55x DSP Peripherals Reference Guide.
For REG_FSET and REG_FMK, FIELD must be a writable field.
For REG_FGET, the field must be a readable field.
3) regval indicates the value to write in the register (REG).
4) fieldval indicates the value to write in the field (FIELD).
16-4
Chapter 17
RTC Module
This chapter describes the RTC module, lists the API structure, functions, and
macros within the module, and provides an RTC API reference section.
Topic
Page
17.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-2
17.2 Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-6
17.3 API Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-9
17.4 Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-16
17-1
Overview
17.1 Overview
The real-time clock (RTC) provides the following features:
100-year calendar up to year 2099
Counts seconds, minutes, hours, day of the week, date, month, and year
with leap year compensation
Binary-coded-decimal (BCD) representation of time, calendar, and alarm
12-hour (with AM and PM in 12-hour mode) or 24-hour clock modes. CSL
supports only 24-hour mode.
Second, minute, hour, or day alarm interrupts
Update Cycle interrupt and periodic interrupts
The RTC has a separate clock domain and power supply. The clock is derived
from the external 32 KHz crystal.
The configuration of the RTC can be performed by using one of the following
methods:
Register-based configuration
A register-based configuration can be performed by calling either
RTC_config(), or any of the SET register/field macros.
Parameter-based configuration
A parameter based configuration can be performed by calling the
functions listed in Table 17−1, such as RTC_setTime(), RTC_setAlarm().
Compared to the register-based approach, this method provides a higher
level of abstraction. The downside is larger code size and higher cycle
counts.
ANSI C-Style Time Configuration
Time functions are provided for the RTC module, which performs the same
functions as the ANSI C-style standard time functions. The time is
obtained, however, from the RTC. Table 17−3 contains the a list and
descriptions of the RTC ANSI C-style functions. For a complete
description of the functions, the arguments and structures they use please
refer to the TMS320C55x Optimizing Compiler User’s Guide (SPRU281).
Table 17−1 lists the configuration structures used to set up the RTC.
Table 17−2 and Table 17−3 lists the functions available for use with the RTC.
17-2
Table 17−4 lists macros for the RTC.
Table 17−5 lists RTC registers and fields.
Table 17−1. RTC Configuration Structures
Configuration Structure
Description
See page ...
RTC_Alarm
Structure used to set RTC Time
17-6
RTC_Config
RTC register Configuration Structure
17-7
RTC_Date
Structure used to set RTC Calendar
17-7
RTC_IsrAddr
Structure to set the RTC callback function
17-8
RTC_Time
Structure used to set RTC Alarm Time
17-8
Table 17−2. RTC Functions
Function
Description
See page ...
RTC_bcdToDec
Changes BCD value to a hexadecimal value
17-9
RTC_config
Writes value to initialize RTC using the RTC register
Configuration Structure
17-9
RTC_decToBcd
Changes decimal value to BCD value
17-9
RTC_eventDisable
Disables interrupt event specified by the argument
17-10
RTC_eventEnable
Enables RTC interrupt event specified by an argument
17-10
RTC_getConfig
Reads the RTC registers into the RTC register Configuration
Structure
17-10
RTC_getDate
Reads current date from RTC Registers
17-11
RTC_getEventId
Obtains IRQ module event ID for RTC
17-11
RTC_getTime
Reads current time from RTC Registers, in a 24-hour format
17-11
RTC_reset
Sets the RTC register to the default (power-on) values
17-12
RTC_setAlarm
Sets alarm to a specific time
17-12
RTC_setCallback
Associates each function to one of the RTC interrupts
17-13
RTC_setDate
Sets RTC Calendar
17-13
RTC_setPeriodicInterval
Sets periodic interrupt rate
17-14
RTC_setTime
Sets time registers
17-14
RTC Module
17-3
Table 17−2. RTC Functions(Continued)
Function
Description
See page ...
RTC_start
Instructs the RTC to begin running
17-15
RTC_stop
Stops the RTC
17-15
Table 17−3. RTC ANSI C-Style Time Functions
Function
Description
RTC_asctime
Converts a time to an ASCII string
RTC_ctime
Converts calendar time to local time
RTC_difftime
Returns the difference between two calendar times
RTC_gmtime
Converts calendar time to GMT
RTC_localtime
Converts calendar time to local time
RTC_mktime
Converts local time to calendar time
RTC_strftime
Formats a time into a character string
RTC_time
Returns the current RTC time and date
Note:
For documentation on these functions, please refer to the ANSI C equivalent routines in
the TMS320C55x Optimizing C Compiler User’s Guide (SPRU281).
Table 17−4. RTC Macros
Macro
Description
RTC_Addr
Reads register address
17-16
RTC_FGET
Reads RTC register field values
17-16
RTC_FSET
Writes RTC register field values
17-16
RTC_REG_FMK
Creates value of RTC register fields
17-16
RTC_REG_RMK
Creates value of RTC registers
17-17
RTC_RGET
Reads RTC register values
17-17
RTC_RSET
Writes RTC register values
17-17
17-4
See page ...
Table 17−5. Registers
Register
Field
RTCSEC
SEC
RTCSECA
SAR
RTCMIN
MIN
RTCMINA
MAR
RTCHOUR
HR, AMPM
RTCHOURA
HAR, AMPM
RTCDAYW
DAY, DAEN, DAR
RTCDAYM
DATE
RTCMONTH
MONTH
RTCYEAR
YEAR
RTCPINTR
RS, (R)UIP
RTCINTEN
TM, UIE, AIE, PIE, SET
RTCINTFL
UF, AF, PF, (R)IRQF
Note:
R = Read Only; W = Write; By default, most fields are Read/Write
RTC Module
17-5
RTC_Alarm
17.2 Configuration Structures
The following is the configuration structure used to set up the RTC.
RTC_Alarm
Structure used to set RTC time
Structure
RTC_Alarm
Members
Uint16 alhour
Alarm hour (Range: 0x00−0x23 for BCD, for 24-hour
format. (12-hour format is not supported.)
Uint16 alminute
Alarm Minute (Range: 0x00−0x59 for BCD)
Uint16 alsecond
Alarm Second (Range:0x00−0x59 for BCD)
Uint16 aldayw
Alarm day of the week. This member is ignored if the
Periodic Weekly Alarm bit (DAEN) is set to 0. In this
case, the alarm will occur in the current day.
You can use the “DONTCARE” value for each of the structure’s member if you
want to set a periodic alarm for that specific interval. For example, using the
DONTCARE value in the alminute field will generate an alarm interrupt every
minute.
Note:
Description
17-6
Due to hardware limitations, after the first period, the every second periodic alarm does
not produce an interrupt. To generate an alarm every second, use instead the update interrupt.
Structure used to set the RTC time. After it is created and initialized, the
structure is passed to the RTC_setAlarm() function. The values of the structure
must be entered in BCD format. You can use the RTC_decToBcd() and
RTC_bcdToDec() functions to switch between decimal and BCD values.
RTC_Date
RTC_Config
RTC configuration structure
Structure
RTC_Config
Members
Uint16 rtcsec
Uint16 rtcseca
Uint16 rtcmin
Uint16 rtcmina
Uint16 rtchour
Uint16 rtchoura
Uint16 rtcdayw
Uint16 rtcdaym
Uint16 rtcmonth
Uint16 rtcyear
Uint16 rtcpintr
Uint16 rtcinten
Description
RTC configuration structure. This structure is created and initialized, and then
passed to the RTC_Config() function.
Seconds Register
Seconds Alarm Register
Minutes Register
Minutes Alarm Register
Hour Register
Hour Alarm Register
Day of the Week and Day Alarm Register
Day of the Month (Date) Register
Month Register
Year Register
Periodic Interrupt selection Register
Interrupt Enable Register
The values put in the structure can be literal values or values created by
RTC_REG_RMK macro. For the hour registers, the supported mode is
24-hour. The values of all time, alarm, and calendar fields must be entered in
BCD format. You can use the RTC_decToBcd() and RTC_bcdToDec() functions to switch between decimal and BCD values.
RTC_Date
Structure used to set RTC calendar
Structure
RTC_Date
Members
Uint16 year
Current year (Range: 0x00–0x99 for BCD)
Uint16 month
Current month (Range: 0x01-0x12 for BCD)
Uint16 daym
Day of the month, or date (Range: 0x01-0x31 for BCD)
Uint16 dayw
Day of the week (Range 1–7, where Sunday is 1)
Description
Structure used to set the RTC calendar. After it is created and initialized, the
structure is passed to the RTC_setDate() function. The values of the structure
must be entered in BCD format. You can use the RTC_decToBcd() and
RTC_bcdToDec() functions to switch between decimal and BCD values.
RTC Module
17-7
RTC_Time
RTC_IsrAddr
Structure used to set the RTC callback function
Structure
RTC_IsrAddr
Members
void (*periodicAddr)(void)
Pointer to the function called when a periodic
interrupt occurs.
void (*alarmAddr)(void)
Pointer to the function called when an alarm
interrupt occurs.
void (*updateAddr)(void)
Pointer to the function called when an update
interrupt occurs.
Description
RTC_Time
This structure is used to set the RTC callback function. After it is created and
initialized, the structure is passed to RTC_setCallback() function. The values
of the structure are pointers to the functions that are executed when the
corresponding interrupt is enabled. The functions should not be declared with
the interrupt keyword.
Structure used to set RTC time
Structure
RTC_Time
Members
Uint16 hour
Current time (Range: 0x00−0x23 for BCD, for 24-hour
format. 12-hour format is not supported.)
Uint16 minute
Current Minute (Range: 0x00−0x59 for BCD)
Uint16 second
Second (Range: 0x00−0x59 for BCD)
Description
17-8
Structure used to set the RTC time. After it is created and initialized, the
structure is passed to the RTC_setTime() function. The values of the structure
must be entered in BCD format. You can use the RTC_decToBcd() and
RTC_bcdToDec() functions to switch between decimal and BCD values.
RTC_decToBcd
17.3 API Reference
RTC_bcdToDec
Changes BCD value to hexadecimal value
Function
int RTC_bcdToDec(int hex_value);
Arguments
hex_value A hexadecimal value
Description
Changes a BCD value to a hexadecimal value.
Example
for (i = 10;i<=30;i++)
{
printf(”DEC of %x is %d\n”,i,RTC_bcdToDec(i));
}
RTC_config
Writes value to initialize RTC using configuration structure
Function
void RTC_config(RTC_Config *myConfig);
Arguments
myConfig
Description
Writes a value to initialize the RTC using the configuration structure.
Example
RTC_Config myConfig = {
0x0, /* Seconds
*/
0x10, /* Seconds Alarm
*/
0x18, /* Minutes
*/
0x10, /* Minutes Alarm
*/
0x10, /* Hour
*/
0x13, /* Hours Alarm
*/
0x06, /* Day of the week and day alarm
*/
0x11, /* Day of the month
*/
0x05, /* Month
*/
0x01, /* Year
*/
0x10, /* Peridodic Interrupt Selection register */
0x02, /* Interrupt Enable register
*/
};
RTC_config(&myConfig);
RTC_decToBcd
Pointer to an initialized configuration structure
(containing values for all registers that are visible to the user)
Changes decimal value to BCD value
Function
int RTC_decToBcd(int dec_value);
Arguments
dec_value A decimal value
RTC Module
17-9
RTC_eventDisable
Description
Changes a decimal value to a BCD value, which is what RTC needs.
Example
for (i = 10;i<=30;i++)
{
printf(”BCD of %d is %x\n”,i,RTC_decToBcd(i));
}
RTC_eventDisable Disables interrupt event specified by ierMask
Function
void RTC_eventDisable(Uint16 isrMask);
Arguments
isrMask
Description
It disables the interrupt specified by the ierMask.
Example
RTC_eventDisable(RTC_EVT_UPDATE);
Can be one of the following:
RTC_EVT_PERIODIC // Periodic Interrupt
RTC_EVT_ALARM
// Alarm Interrupt
RTC_EVT_UPDATE
// Update Ended Interrupt
RTC_eventEnable Enables RTC interrupt event specified by isrMask
Function
void RTC_eventEnable(Uint16 isrMask);
Arguments
isrMask
Description
It enables the RTC interrupt specified by the isrMask.
Example
RTC_eventEnable(RTC_EVT_PERIODIC);
RTC_getConfig
Can be one of the following:
RTC_EVT_PERIODIC // Periodic Interrupt
RTC_EVT_ALARM
// Alarm Interrupt
RTC_EVT_UPDATE
// Update Ended Interrupt
Reads RTC configuration structure
Function
void RTC_getConfig(RTC_Config *myConfig);
Arguments
myConfig
Description
Reads the RTC register values into the RTC configuration register structure.
Example
RTC_Config myConfig;
Pointer to an initialized configuration structure
(including all registers that are visible to the user)
RTC_getConfig(&myConfig);
17-10
RTC_getTime
RTC_getDate
Reads current date from RTC registers
Function
void RTC_getDate(RTC_Date *myDate);
Arguments
myDate
Description
Reads the current date from the RTC registers. Only the 24-hour format is
supported. The values of the structure are read in BCD format.
Example
RTC_Date getDate;
Pointer to an initialized configuration structure that contains
values for year, month, day of the month (date), and
day of the week.
RTC_getDate(&getDate);
RTC_getEventId
Obtains IRQ module event ID for RTC
Function
int RTC_getEventID()
Arguments
None
Description
Obtains IRQ module event ID for RTC
Example
int id;
id = RTC_getEventId();
RTC_getTime
Reads current time from RTC registers, in 24-hour format
Function
void RTC_getTime(RTC_Time *myTime);
Arguments
myTime
Description
Reads the current time from the RTC registers, in 24-hour format. Only the
24-hour format is supported. The values of the structure are obtained in BCD
format.
Example
RTC_Time getTime;
Pointer to an initialized configuration structure that contains
values for second, minute and hour
RTC_getTime(&getTime);
RTC Module
17-11
RTC_reset
RTC_reset
Reset RTC registers to their default values
Function
void RTC_reset();
Arguments
None
Description
Resets RTC registers to their default values. This function is provided due to
the RTC having a separate power supply and will remain powered even if the
DSP is turned off.
Example
void RTC_reset();
RTC_setAlarm
Sets alarm at specific time
Function
void RTC_setAlarm(RTC_Alarm *myAlarm);
Arguments
myAlarm
Description
Set alarm at a specific time: sec, min, hour, day of week. Only the 24-hour
format is supported. The values of the structure must be entered in BCD
format.
Example 1
RTC_Alarm myAlarm = {
0x12,
/* alHour , in 24-hour format */
0x03,
/* alMinutes */
0x03,
/* alSeconds */
0x05,
/* alDayw */
};
Pointer to an initialized configuration structure that contains
the hour, minute, second, and day of the week for the alarm
to occur.
RTC_setAlarm(&myAlarm);
/*This sets the alarm at 12:03:03am, */
/* every week, on Thursday
*/
Example 2
RTC_Alarm myPeriodicAlarm = {
0x1,
/* alHour , in 24-hour format */
DONTCARE,
/* alMinutes */
0x0,
/* alSeconds */
0x2,
/* alDayw */
};
RTC_setAlarm(&myAlarm);
/* This sets the alarm every minute, at */
/* 01:**:00, on Monday of every week
*/
17-12
RTC_setDate
RTC_setCallback
Associates a function to an RTC interrupt
Function
void RTC_setCallback(RTC_IsrAddr *isrAddr);
Arguments
isrAddr
Description
RTC_setCallback associates a function to each of the RTC interrupt events
(periodic interrupt, alarm interrupt, or update ended interrupt):
Example
void myPeriodicIsr();
void myAlarmIsr();
void myUpdateIsr();
RTC_IsrAddr addr = {
myPeriodicIsr,
void myAlarmIsr,
void myUpdateIsr
};
A structure containing pointers to the 3 functions that will be
executed when the corresponding interrupt is enabled. The
functions should not be declared with the interrupt function
keyword.
RTC_setCallback(&addr);
RTC_setDate
Sets RTC calendar date
Function
void RTC_setDate(RTC_Date *myDate);
Arguments
myDate
Description
Sets the RTC calendar. Only the 24-hour format is supported. The values of
the structure must be entered in BCD format.
Example
RTC_Date myDate = {
0x01,
/* Year 2001 */
0x05,
/* Month May*/
0x10,
/* Day of month */
0x05
/* Day of week Thursday */
};
Pointer to an initialized configuration structure that contains
values for year, month, day of the month (date), and
day of the week
RTC_setDate(&myDate);
RTC Module
17-13
RTC_setPeriodicInterval
RTC_setPeriodicInterval Sets periodic interrupt rate
Function
void RTC_setPeriodicInterval(Uint16 interval);
Arguments
interval
Description
Sets the periodic interrupt rate.
Example
RTC_setPeriodicInterval(RTC_RATE_122us);
RTC_setTime
Symbolic value for periodic interrupt rate. An interval can be one
of the following values:
RTC_RATE_NONE
RTC_RATE_122us
RTC_RATE_244us
RTC_RATE_488us
RTC_RATE_976us
RTC_RATE_1_95ms
RTC_RATE_3_9ms
RTC_RATE_7_8125ms
RTC_RATE_15_625ms
RTC_RATE_31_25ms
RTC_RATE_62_5ms
RTC_RATE_125ms
RTC_RATE_250ms
RTC_RATE_500ms
RTC_RATE_1min
Sets time registers, in 24-hour format
Function
void RTC_setTime(RTC_Time *myTime);
Arguments
myTime
Description
Sets the time registers. Only the 24-hour format is supported. The values of
the structure must be entered in BCD format.
Example
RTC_Time myTime = {
0x13,
/* Hour in 24-hour format */
0x58,
/* Minutes */
0x30
/* Seconds */
};
Pointer to an initialized configuration structure that contains
values for second, minute and hour
RTC_setTime(&myTime);
This example sets the RTC time to 13:58:30 (24-hour format) and is equivalent
to 1:58:30 PM (12-hour format).
17-14
RTC_stop
RTC_start
Instructs the RTC to begin running
Function
void RTC_start();
Arguments
None
Description
Instructs the RTC to begin running and keep the time by setting the SET bit in
the RTCINTEN register to 0.
Example
RTC_start();
RTC_stop
Stops the RTC
Function
void RTC_stop();
Arguments
None
Description
Instructs the RTC to stop running by setting the SET bit in the RTCINTEN
register to 0.
Example
RTC_stop();
RTC Module
17-15
RTC_ADDR
17.4 Macros
The following are macros available for use with the RTC module.
RTC_ADDR
Reads register address
Macro
Uint16 RTC_ADDR(REG)
Description
Reads a register address
Example
Uint16 x;
x = RTC_ADDR(RTCSEC);
RTC_FGET
Reads RTC register field values
Macro
Uint16 RTC_FGET(REG, FIELD)
Description
Reads RTC register field values. This is applicable only to registers with more
than one field.
Example
Uint16 x;
x = RTC_FGET(RTCDAYW, DAEN);
RTC_FSET
Writes RTC register field values
Macro
Void RTC_FSET(REG, FIELD, Uint16 fieldval)
Description
Writes RTC register field values. This is applicable only to registers with more
than one field.
Example
Uint16 x = 1;
RTC_FSET(RTCDAYW, DAEN, x);
RTC_REG_FMK
Creates value of RTC register fields
Macro
Uint16 RTC_REG_FMK(FIELD, Uint 16 fieldval)
Description
Creates value of RTC register fields (only for registers with more than one
field).
Example
Uint16 x, v = 0x09;
x = RTC_FMK(RTCDAYW, DAY, v);
17-16
RTC_RSET
RTC_REG_RMK
Creates value of RTC registers
Macro
Uint16 RTC_REG_RMK(Uint16 fieldval_n, 0, Uint16fieldval_0)
Arguments
REG
Register (RTCxxxx)
FIELD
Register field name. For REG_FSET, REG_FGET and
REG_FMK, FIELD must be a writeable field
regval
Value to write in the register REG
fieldval
Value to write in the field FIELD
Description
Creates value of RTC registers (only for registers with more than one field).
Example
Uint16 x, field1, field2, field3;
x = RTC_RTDAYW_RMK(field1, field2, field3);
RTC_RGET
Reads RTC register values
Macro
Uint16 RTC_RGET(REG)
Description
Reads RTC register values
Example
Uint16 x;
x = RTC_RGET(RTCSEC);
RTC_RSET
Writes RTC register values
Macro
Void RTC_RSET(REG, Uint16 regval)
Description
Writes RTC register values
Example
Uint16 x = 0x15;
RTC_RSET(RTCSEC, x);
RTC Module
17-17
RTC_RSET
17-18
Chapter 18
Timer Module
This chapter describes the TIMER module, lists the API structure, functions
and macros within the module, and provides a TIMER API reference section.
Topic
Page
18.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-2
18.2 Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-3
18.3 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-4
18.4 Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-9
18-1
Overview
18.1 Overview
Table 18−1 lists the configuration structure used to set the TIMER module.
Table 18−2 lists the functions available for the TIMER module.
Table 18−3 lists registers for the TIMER module.
Section 18.4 inlcudes descriptions for available TIMER macros.
Table 18−1. TIMER Configuration Structure
Syntax
Description
TIMER_Config
TIMER configuration structure used to setup the
TIMER_config() function
See page ...
18-3
Table 18−2. TIMER Functions
Syntax
Description
See page ...
TIMER_close()
Closes the TIMER and its corresponding handler
18-4
TIMER_config()
Sets up TIMER using configuration structure (TIMER_Config)
18-4
TIMER_getConfig()
Reads the TIMER configuration
18-5
TIMER_getEventId()
Obtains IRQ event ID for TIMER device
18-5
TIMER_open()
Opens the TIMER and assigns a handler to it
18-6
TIMER_reset()
Resets the TIMER registers with default values
18-7
TIMER_start()
Starts the TIMER device running
18-7
TIMER_stop()
Stops the TIMER device running
18-7
TIMER_tintoutCfg()
Sets up the TIMER Polarity pin along with settings for the
FUNC, PWID, CP fields in the TCR register
18-8
Table 18−3. Registers
Register
Field
TCR
IDLEEN, (R)INTEXT, (R)ERRTIM, FUNC, TLB, SOFT, FREE, PWID, ARB,
TSS, CP, POLAR, DATOUT
PRD
PRD
TIM
TIM
PRSC
PSC, TDDR
Note:
18-2
R = Read Only; W = Write; By default, most fields are Read/Write
TIMER_Config
18.2 Configuration Structures
The following is the configuration structure used to set up the TIMER.
TIMER_Config
TIMER configuration structure
Structure
TIMER_Config
Members
Uint16 tcr
Timer Control Register
Uint16 prd Period Register
Uint16 prsc Timer Pre-scaler Register
Description
The TIMER configuration structure is used to setup a timer device. You create
and initialize this structure then pass its address to the TIMER_config()
function. You can use literal values or the TIMER_RMK macros to create the
structure member values.
Example
TIMER_Config Config1 = {
0x0010, /* tcr */
0xFFFF, /* prd */
0xF0F0, /* prsc */
};
Timer Module
18-3
TIMER_close
18.3 Functions
The following are functions available for use with the TIMER module.
TIMER_close
Closes a previously opened TIMER device
Function
void TIMER_close
TIMER_Handle hTimer
);
Arguments
hTimer
Return Value
TIMER_Handle Device handler
Description
Closes a previously opened timer device. The timer event is disabled and
cleared. The timer registers are set to their default values.
Example
TIMER_close(hTimer);
TIMER_config
Device Handle (see TIMER_open).
Writes value to TIMER using configuration structure
Function
void TIMER_config(
TIMER_Handle hTimer,
TIMER_Config *Config
);
Arguments
Config
Pointer to an initialized configuration structure
hTimer
Device Handle, see TIMER_open
Return Value
none
Description
The values of the configuration structure are written to the timer registers (see
also TIMER_Config).
Example
TIMER_Config MyConfig = {
0x0010, /* tcr */
0xFFFF, /* prd */
0xF0F0 /* prsc */
};
TIMER_config(hTimer,&MyConfig);
18-4
TIMER_getEventId
TIMER_getConfig
Reads the TIMER configuration
Function
void TIMER_getConfig(
TIMER_Handle hTimer,
TIMER_Config *Config
);
Arguments
Config
Pointer to an initialized TIMER configuration structure
hTimer
Timer Device Handle
Return Value
None
Description
Reads the TIMER configuration into the configuration structure. See also
TIMER_Config.
Example
TIMER_Config MyConfig;
TIMER_getConfig(hTimer,&MyConfig);
TIMER_getEventId Obtains IRQ event ID for TIMER device
Function
Uint16 TIMER_getEventId(
TIMER_Handle hTimer
);
Arguments
hTimer
Device handle (see TIMER_open).
Return Value
Event ID
IRQ Event ID for the timer device
Description
Obtains the IRQ event ID for the timer device (see Chapter 10, IRQ Module).
Example
Uint16 TimerEventId;
TimerEventId = TIMER_getEventId(hTimer);
IRQ_enable(TimerEventId);
Timer Module
18-5
TIMER_open
TIMER_open
Opens TIMER for TIMER calls
Function
TIMER_Handle TIMER_open(
int devnum,
Uint16 flags
);
Arguments
devnum
Timer Device Number: TIMER_DEV0, TIMER_DEV1,
TIMER_DEV_ANY
flags
Event Flag Number: Logical open or TIMER_OPEN_RESET
Return Value
TIMER_Handle Device handler
Description
Before a TIMER device can be used, it must first be opened by this function.
Once opened, it cannot be opened again until closed, see TIMER_close. The
return value is a unique device handle that is used in subsequent TIMER calls.
If the function fails, an INV (−1) value is returned. If the TIMER_OPEN_RESET
is specified, then the power on defaults are set and any interrupts are disabled
and cleared.
Example
TIMER_Handle hTimer;
...
hTimer = TIMER_open(TIMER_DEV0,0);
18-6
TIMER_stop
TIMER_reset
Resets TIMER
Function
void TIMER_reset(
TIMER_Handle hTimer
);
Arguments
hTimer
Return Value
none
Description
Resets the timer device. Disables and clears the interrupt event and sets the
timer registers to default values. If INV (−1) is specified, all timer devices are
reset.
Example
TIMER_reset(hTimer);
TIMER_start
Device handle (see TIMER_open).
Starts TIMER device running
Function
void TIMER_start(
TIMER_Handle hTimer
);
Arguments
hTimer
Return Value
none
Description
Starts the timer device running. TSS field =0.
Example
TIMER_start(hTimer);
TIMER_stop
Device handle (see TIMER_open).
Stops TIMER device running
Function
void TIMER_stop(
TIMER_Handle hTimer
);
Arguments
hTimer
Return Value
none
Description
Stops the timer device running. TSS field =1.
Example
TIMER_stop(hTimer);
Device handle (see TIMER_open).
Timer Module
18-7
TIMER_tintoutCfg
TIMER_tintoutCfg
Configures TINT/TOUT pin
Function
void TIMER_tintoutCfg(
TIMER_Handle hTimer,
Uint16 idleen,
Uint16 func,
Uint16 pwid,
Uint16 cp,
Uint16 polar
);
Arguments
hTimer
Device handle (see TIMER_open).
idleen
Timer idle mode
func
Function of the TIN/TOUT pin and the source of the timer
module.
pwid
TIN/TOUT pulse width
cp
Clock or pulse mode
polar
Polarity of the TIN/TOUT pin
Return Value
none
Description
Configures the TIN/TOUT pin of the device using the TCR register
Example
Timer_tintoutCfg(hTimer,
1, /*idleen*/
1, /*funct*/
0, /*pwid*/
0, /*cp*/
0 /*polar*/ );
18-8
Macros
18.4 Macros
The CSL offers a collection of macros to gain individual access to the TIMER
peripheral registers and fields.
Table 18−4 lists of macros available for the TIMER module using TIMER port
number and Table 18−5 lists the macros for the TIMER module using handle.
To use them, include “csl_timer.h.”
Table 18−3 lists DMA registers and fields.
Table 18−4. TIMER CSL Macros Using Timer Port Number
(a) Macros to read/write TIMER register values
Macro
Syntax
TIMER_RGET()
Uint16 TIMER_RGET(REG#)
TIMER_RSET()
Void TIMER_RSET(REG#, Uint16 regval)
(b) Macros to read/write TIMER register field values (Applicable only to registers with more than one field)
Macro
Syntax
TIMER_FGET()
Uint16 TIMER_FGET(REG#, FIELD)
TIMER_FSET()
Void TIMER_FSET(REG#, FIELD, Uint16 fieldval)
(c) Macros to create value to TIMER registers and fields (Applies only to registers with more than one field)
Macro
Syntax
TIMER_REG_RMK()
Uint16 TIMER_REG_RMK(fieldval_n,…fieldval_0)
Note: *Start with field values with most significant field positions:
field_n: MSB field
field_0: LSB field
*only writable fields allowed
TIMER_FMK()
Uint16 TIMER_FMK(REG, FIELD, fieldval)
(d) Macros to read a register address
Macro
Syntax
TIMER_ADDR()
Uint16 TIMER_ADDR(REG#)
Notes:
1) REG indicates the registers: TCR, PRD, TIM, PRSC
2) REG# indicates, if applicable, a register name with the channel number (example: TCR0)
3) FIELD indicates the register field name as specified in the C55x DSP Peripherals Reference Guide.
For REG_FSET and REG_FMK, FIELD must be a writable field.
For REG_FGET, the field must be a readable field.
4) regval indicates the value to write in the register (REG).
5) fieldval indicates the value to write in the field (FIELD).
Timer Module
18-9
Macros
Table 18−5. TIMER CSL Macros Using Handle
(a) Macros to read/write TIMER register values
Macro
Syntax
TIMER_RGETH()
Uint16 TIMER_RGETH(TIMER_Handle hTimer, REG)
TIMER_RSETH()
Void TIMER_RSETH(
TIMER_Handle hTimer,
REG,
Uint16 regval
)
(b) Macros to read/write TIMER register field values (Applicable only to registers with more than one field)
Macro
Syntax
TIMER_FGETH()
Uint16 TIMER_FGETH(TIMER_Handle hTimer, REG, FIELD)
TIMER_FSETH()
Void TIMER_FSETH(
TIMER_Handle hTimer,
REG,
FIELD,
Uint16 fieldval)
(c) Macros to read a register address
Macro
Syntax
TIMER_ADDRH()
Uint16 TIMER_ADDRH(TIMER_Handle hTimer, REG)
Notes:
1) REG indicates the registers: TCR, PRD, TIM, and PRSC
2) FIELD indicates the register field name as specified inthe C55x DSP Peripherals Reference Guide.
For REG_FSETH, FIELD must be a writable field.
For REG_FGETH, the field must be a readable field.
3) regval indicates the value to write in the register (REG).
4) fieldval indicates the value to write in the field (FIELD).
18-10
Chapter 19
UART Module
This chapter describes the UART module, lists the API structure, functions,
and macros within the module, and provides a UART API reference section.
Topic
Page
19.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-2
19.2 Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-5
19.3 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-8
19.4 Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-14
19-1
Overview
19.1 Overview
The Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART) controller is the
key component of the serial communications subsystem of a computer. Asynchronous transmission allows data to be transmitted without a clock signal to
the receiver. Instead, the sender and receiver must agree on timing parameters in advance. Special bits are added to each word that is used to synchronize the sending and receiving units.
The configuration of UART can be performed by using one of the following
methods:
1) Register-based configuration
A register-based configuration can be performed by calling either
UART_config() or any of the SET register field macros.
2) Parameter-based configuration (Recommended)
A parameter-based configuration can be performed by calling
UART_setup(). Compared to the register-based approach, this method
provides a higher level of abstraction.
Table 19−1 lists the configuration structures and functions used with the UART
module.
Table 19−1. UART APIs
Structure
Type Purpose
See page ...
UART_Config
S
UART configuration structure used to setup the UART
19-5
UART_config
F
Sets up the UART using the configuration structure
19-8
UART_eventDisable
F
Disable UART interrupts
19-8
UART_eventEnable
F
Enable UART interrupts
19-9
UART_fgetc
F
Read a character from UART by polling
19-10
UART_fgets
F
This routine reads a string from the uart
19-11
UART_fputc
F
Write a character from UART by polling
19-11
UART_fputs
F
This routine writes a string from the uart
19-11
UART_getConfig
F
Reads the UART configuration
19-11
UART_read
F
Read a buffer of data from UART by polling
19-12
UART_setCallback
F
Plugs UART interrupt routines into UART dispatcher
table
19-12
Note:
19-2
F = Function; S = Structure
Overview
Table 19−1. UART APIs (Continued)
Structure
Type Purpose
See page ...
UART_Setup
S
UART configuration structure used to setup the UART
19-5
UART_setup
F
Sets up the UART using the register values passed into
the code
19-13
UART_write
F
Write a buffer of data to UART by polling
19-13
Note:
F = Function; S = Structure
UART Module
19-3
UART_Setup
19.2 Configuration Structures
UART_Config
Configuration Structure for UART
Members
Description
UART_Setup
Uint16
dll
Divisor Latch Register (low 8 bits)
Uint16
dlm
Divisor Latch Register (high 8 bits)
Uint16
lcr
Line Control Register
Uint16
fcr
FIFO Control Register
Uint16
mcr
Modem Control Register
UART configuration structure. This structure is created and initialized, and
then passed to the UART_Config() function.
Structure used to initialize the UART
Members
Uint16 clkInput
UART input clock frequency. Valid symbolic values are:
UART_CLK_INPUT_20 // Input clock = 20MHz
UART_CLK_INPUT_40 // Input clock = 40MHz
UART_CLK_INPUT_60 // Input clock = 60MHz
UART_CLK_INPUT_80 // Input clock = 80MHz
UART_CLK_INPUT_100 // Input clock = 100MHz
UART_CLK_INPUT_120 // Input clock = 120MHz
UART_CLK_INPUT_140 // Input clock = 140MHz
Uint16 baud
Baud Rate (Range: 150 − 115200). Valid
symbolic values are:
UART_BAUD_150
UART_BAUD_300
UART_BAUD_600
UART_BAUD_1200
UART_BAUD_1800
UART_BAUD_2000
UART_BAUD_2400
UART_BAUD_3600
UART Module
19-5
UART_Setup
UART_BAUD_4800
UART_BAUD_7200
UART_BAUD_9600
UART_BAUD_14400
UART_BAUD_19200
UART_BAUD_38400
UART_BAUD_57600
UART_BAUD_115200
Uint16 wordLength
bits per word (Range: 5,6,7,8).
Valid symbolic values are:
UART_WORD5 5 bits per word
UART_WORD6 6 bits per word
UART_WORD7 7 bits per word
UART_WORD8 8 bits per word
Uint16 stopBits
stop bits in a word (1, 1.5, and 2)
Valid symbolic values are:
UART_STOP1
1 stop bit
UART_STOP1_PLUS_HALF
1 and 1/2 stop bits
UART_STOP2
Uint16 parity
2 stop bits
parity setups
Valid symbolic values are:
UART_DISABLE_PARITY
UART_ODD_PARITY
odd parity
UART_EVEN_PARITY
even parity
UART_MARK_PARITY
mark parity
(the parity bit is always ‘1’)
UART_SPACE_PARITY space parity
(the parity bit is always ‘0’)
19-6
UART_Setup
Uint16 fifoControl
FIFO Control
Valid symbolic values are:
UART_FIFO_DISABLE
//Non FIFO mode
UART_FIFO_DMA0_TRIG01 //DMA mode 0 and Trigger level 1
UART_FIFO_DMA0_TRIG04 //DMA mode 0 and Trigger level 4
UART_FIFO_DMA0_TRIG08 //DMA mode 0 and Trigger level 8
UART_FIFO_DMA0_TRIG14 //DMA mode 0 and Trigger level 14
UART_FIFO_DMA1_TRIG01 //DMA mode 1 and Trigger level 1
UART_FIFO_DMA1_TRIG04 //DMA mode 1 and Trigger level 4
UART_FIFO_DMA1_TRIG08 //DMA mode 1 and Trigger level 8
UART_FIFO_DMA1_TRIG14 //DMA mode 1 and Trigger level 14
Uint16 loopbackEnable
loopback Enable Valid Symbolic values are:
UART_NO_LOOPBACK
UART_LOOPBACK
Description
Structure used to init the UART. After created and initialized, it is passed to the
UART_setup() function.
UART Module
19-7
UART_config
19.3 Functions
19.3.1 CSL Primary Functions
UART_config
Initializes the UART using the configuration structure
Function
void UART_config (UART_Config *Config);
Arguments
Configure pointer to an initialized configuration structure (containing values for
all registers that are visible to the user)
Description
Writes a value to initialize the UART using the configuration structure.
Example
UART_Config Config = {
0x00, /* DLL */
0x06, /* DLM – baud rate 150 */
0x18, /* LCR – even parity, 1 stop bit, 5
bits word length */
0x00, /* Disable FIFO */
0x00
/* No Loop Back */
};
UART_config(&Config);
UART_eventDisable
Disables UART interrupts
Function
void UART_eventDisable(Uint16 ierMask);
Arguments
ierMask can be one or a combination of the following:
UART_RINT
0x01
// Enable rx data available
interrupt
UART_TINT
0x02
// Enable tx hold register
empty interrupt
UART_LSINT
0x04
// Enable rx line status
interrupt
UART_MSINT
0x08
// Enable modem status
interrupt
UART_ALLINT 0x0f
19-8
// Enable all interrupts
UART_eventEnable
Description
It disables the interrupt specified by the ierMask.
Example
UART_eventDisable(UART_TINT);
UART_eventEnable
Enables a UART interrupt
Function
void UART_eventEnable (Uint16 isrMask);
Arguments
isrMask can be one or a combination of the following:
UART_RINT
0x01
// Enable rx data available interrupt
UART_TINT
0x02
// Enable tx hold register
empty interrupt
UART_LSINT
0x04
// Enable rx line status interrupt
UART_MSINT
0x08
// Enable modem status interrupt
UART_ALLINT 0x0f
// Enable all interrupts
Description
It enables the UART interrupt specified by the isrMask.
Example
UART_eventEnable(UART_RINT|UART_TINT);
UART Module
19-9
UART_fgetc
UART_fgetc
Reads UART characters
Function
CSLBool UART_fgetc(int *c, Uint32 timeout);
Arguments
c
timeout
Description
Read a character from UART by polling.
Example
Int retChar;
CSLBool returnFlag
Character read from UART
Time out for data ready.
If it is setup as 0, means there will be no time out count.
The function will block forever until DR bit is set.
returnFlag = UART_fgetc(&retChar,0);
UART_fgets
Reads UART strings
Function
CSLBool UART_fgets(char* pBuf, int bufSize, Uint32 timeout);
Arguments
pBuf
bufSize
timeout
Description
This routine reads a string from the uart. The string will be read upto a newline
or until the buffer is filled. The string is always NULL terminated and does not
have any newline character removed.
Example
char readBuf[10];
CSLBool returnFlag
Pointer to a buffer
Length of the buffer
Time out for data ready.
If it is setup as 0, means there will be no time out count.
The function will block forever until DR bit is set.
returnFlag = UART_fgets(&readBuf[0], 10, 0);
19-10
UART_getConfig
UART_fputc
Writes characters to the UART
Function
CSLBool UART_fputc(const int c, Uint32 timeout);
Arguments
c
timeout
Description
This routine writes a character out through UART.
Example
Example
const int putchar = ‘A’;
CSLBool returnFlag;
The character, as an int, to be sent to the uart.
Time out for data ready.
If it is setup as 0, means there will be no time out count.
The function will block forever if THRE bit is not set.
ReturnFlag = UART_fputc(putchar, 0);
UART_fputs
Writes strings to the UART
Function
CSLBool UART_fputs(const char* pBuf, Uint32 timeout);
Arguments
pBuf
timeout
Description
This routine writes a string to the uart. The NULL terminator is not written and
a newline is not added to the output.
Example
UART_fputs(”\n\rthis is a test!\n\r”);
UART_getConfig
Pointer to a buffer
Time out for data ready.
If it is setup as 0, means there will be no time out count.
The function will block forever if THRE bit is not set.
Reads the UART Configuration Structure
Function
void UART_getConfig (UART_Config *Config);
Arguments
Config Pointer to an initialized configuration structure (including all registers
that are visible to the user)
Description
Reads the UART configuration structure.
Example
UART_Config Config;
UART_getConfig(&Config);
UART Module
19-11
UART_read
UART_read
Reads received data
Function
CSLBool UART_read(char *pBuf, Uint16 length, Uint32 timeout);
Arguments
pbuf
length
timeout
Description
Receive and put the received data to the buffer pointed by pbuf.
Example
Uint16 length = 10;
char pbuf[length];
CSLBool returnFlag;
Pointer to a buffer
Length of data to be received
Time out for data ready.
If it is setup as 0, means there will be no time out count.
The function will block forever until DR bit is set.
ReturnFlag = UART_read(&pbuf[0],length, 0);
UART_setCallback
Associates a function to the UART dispatch table
Function
void UART_setCallback(UART_IsrAddr *isrAddr);
Arguments
isrAddr is a structure containing pointers to the 5 functions that will be executed
when the corresponding events is enabled.
Description
It associates each function specified in the isrAddr structure to the UART dispatch table.
Example
UART_IsrAddr MyIsrAddr= {
NULL,
// Receiver line status
UartRxIsr,
// received data available
UartTxIsr,
// transmiter holding register empty
NULL
// character time-out indication
};
UART_setCallback(&MyIsrAddr);
19-12
UART_write
UART_setup
Sets the UART based on the UART_Setup configuration structure
Function
void UART_setup (UART_Setup *Params);
Arguments
Params Pointer to an initialized configuration structure that contains values for
UART setup.
Description
Sets UART based on UART_Setup structure.
Example
UART_Setup Params = {
UART_CLK_INPUT_60,
/* input clock freq
*/
UART_BAUD_115200,
/* baud rate
*/
UART_WORD8,
/* word length
*/
UART_STOP1,
/* stop bits
*/
UART_DISABLE_PARITY,
/* parity
*/
UART_FIFO_DISABLE,
/* FIFO control
*/
UART_NO_LOOPBACK,
/* Loop Back enable/disable */
};
UART_setup(&Params);
UART_write
Transmits buffers of data by polling
Function
CSLBool UART_write(char *pBuf, Uint16 length, Uint32 timeout);
Arguments
pbuf
Length
timeout
Description
Transmit a buffer of data by polling.
Example
Uint16 length = 4;
char pbuf[4] = {0x74, 0x65, 0x73, 0x74};
CSLBool returnFlag;
Pointer to a data buffer
Length of the data buffer
Time out for data ready.
If it is setup as 0, means there will be no time out count.
The function will block forever if THRE bit is not set.
ReturnFlag = UART_write(&pbuf[0],length,0);
UART Module
19-13
UART_write
19.4 Macros
The following macros are used with the UART chip support library.
19.4.1 General Macros
Table 19−2. UART CSL Macros
Macro
Syntax
(a) Macros to read/write UART register values
UART_RGET()
Uint16 UART_RGET(REG)
UART_RSET()
void UART_RSET(REG, Uint16 regval)
(b) Macros to read/write UART register field values
(Applicable only to registers with more than one field)
UART_FGET()
Uint16 UART_FGET(REG, FIELD)
UART_FSET()
void UART_FSET(REG, FIELD, Uint16 fieldval)
(c) Macros to create value to write to UART registers and fields (Applicable only to registers with
more than one field)
UART_REG_RMK()
Uint16 UART_REG_RMK(fieldval_n,...fieldval_0)
Note: *Start with field values with most significant field
positions:
field_n: MSB field
field_0: LSB field
* only writable fields allowed
UART_FMK()
Notes:
Uint16 UART_FMK(REG, FIELD, fieldval)
1) REG indicates the registers: URIER, URIIR, URBRB, URTHR, URFCR, URLCR, URMCR, URLSR, URMSR,
URDLL or URDLM.
2) FIELD indicates the register field name.
3) − or REG_FSET and REG__FMK, FIELD must be a writable field.
4) − For REG_FGET, the field must be a readable field.
5) regval indicates the value to write in the register (REG)
6) fieldval indicates the value to write in the field (FIELD)
19-14
UART_write
Table 19−2. UART CSL Macros (Continued)
Macro
Syntax
(d) Macros to read a register address
UART_ADDR()
Notes:
Uint16 UART_ADDR(REG)
1) REG indicates the registers: URIER, URIIR, URBRB, URTHR, URFCR, URLCR, URMCR, URLSR, URMSR,
URDLL or URDLM.
2) FIELD indicates the register field name.
3) − or REG_FSET and REG__FMK, FIELD must be a writable field.
4) − For REG_FGET, the field must be a readable field.
5) regval indicates the value to write in the register (REG)
6) fieldval indicates the value to write in the field (FIELD)
19.4.2 UART Control Signal Macros
All the UART control signals are mapped through HPIGPIO pins. They are
configurable through GPIOCR and GPIOSR registers. Since C54x DSP are
commonly used as DCE (Data Communication Equipment), these signals are
configured as following:
HD0 − DTR – Input
HD1 − RTS – Input
HD2 − CTS – Output
HD3 − DSR – Output
HD4 − DCD – Output
HD5 − RI – Output
UART Module
19-15
UART_ctsOff
UART_ctsOff
Sets a CTS signal to OFF
Macro
UART_ctsOff
Arguments
None
Description
Set CTS signal off.
Example
UART_ctsOff;
UART_ctsOn
Sets a CTS signal to ON
Macro
UART_ctsOn
Arguments
None
Description
Set CTS signal on.
Example
UART_ctsOn;
UART_isRts
Verifies that RTS is ON
Macro
UART_isRts
Arguments
None
Description
Check if RTS is on. Return RTS value.
Example
CSLBool rtsSignal;
rtsSignal = UART_isRts;
UART_dtcOff
Sets a DTC signal to OFF
Macro
UART_dtcOff
Arguments
None
Description
Set DTC signal off.
Example
UART_dtcOff;
UART_dtcOn
Sets a DTC signal to ON
Macro
UART_dtcOn
Arguments
None
Description
Set DTC signal on.
Example
UART_dtcOn;
19-16
UART_isDtr
UART_riOff
Sets an RI signal to OFF
Macro
UART_riOff
Arguments
None
Description
Set RI signal off.
Example
UART_riOff;
UART_riOn
Sets an RI signal to ON
Macro
UART_riOn
Arguments
None
Description
Set RI signal on.
Example
UART_riOn;
UART_dsrOff
Sets a DSR signal to OFF
Macro
UART_dsrOff
Arguments
None
Description
Set DSR signal off.
Example
UART_dsrOff;
UART_dsrOn
Sets a DSR signal to ON
Macro
UART_dsrOn
Arguments
None
Description
Set DSR signal on.
Example
UART_dsrOn;
UART_isDtr
Verifies that DTR is ON
Macro
UART_isDtr
Arguments
Nobe
Description
Check if DTR is on. Return DTR value.
Example
CSLBool dtrSignal;
dtrSignal = UART_isDtr;
UART Module
19-17
Chapter 20
WDTIM Module
This chapter describes the WDTIM module, lists the API structure, functions,
and macros within the module, and provides a WDTIM API reference section.
Topic
Page
20.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-2
20.2 Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-3
20.3 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-4
20.4 Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-14
20-1
Overview
20.1 Overview
Table 20−1 lists the configuration structures and functions used with the
WDTIM module.
Table 20−1. WDTIM Structure and APIs
Structure
Desctiption
See page...
WDTIM_Config
Structure used to configure a WDTIM Device
Syntax
Desctiption
WDTIM_config
Configures WDTIM using configuration structure
20-4
WDTIM_service
Executes the watchdog service sequence
20-9
20-3
See page...
The following functions are supported by C5509/C5509A only
WDTIM_getConfig
Reads the WDTIM configuration structure
20-5
WDTIM_start
Starts the WDTIM device running
20-10
The following functions are supported by C5502 and C5501
WDTIM_close
Closes previously opened WDTIMER device
20-4
WDTIM_getCnt
Gives the timer count values
20-5
WDTIM_getPID
Gets peripheral ID details
20-6
WDTIM_init64
Intializes the timer in 64 bit mode
20-6
WDTIM_open
Opens the WDTIM device for use
20-9
WDTIM_start
Pulls both timers out of reset before activating the watchdog
timer
20-10
WDTIM_stop
Stops all the timers if running
20-12
WDTIM_wdStart
Activates the watchdog timer
20-13
20-2
WDTIM_Config
20.2 Configuration Structures
The following is the configuration structure used to set up the Watchdog Timer
module.
WDTIM_Config
Structure used to configure a WDTIM device
Structure
WDTIM_Config
Members
For C5509/5509A only
Uint16 wdprd
Period register
Uint16 wdtcr
Control register
Uint16 wdtcr2
Secondary register
Members
For C5502 and C5501
Uint16 wdtemu
Emulation management register
Uint16 wdtgpint
GPIO interrupt control register
Uint16 wdtgpen
GPIO enable register
Uint16 wdtgpdir
GPIO direction register
Uint16 wdtgpdat
GPIO data register
Uint16 wdtprd1
Timer period register 1
Uint16 wdtprd2
Timer period register 2
Uint16 wdtprd3
Timer period register 3
Uint16 wdtprd4
Timer period register 4
Uint16 wdtctl1
Timer control register 1
Uint16 wdtctl2
Timer control register 2
Uint16 wdtgctl1
Global timer control register
Uint16 wdtwctl1
Watchdog timer control register 1
Uint16 wdtwctl2
Watchdog timer control register 2
Example
This example shows how to configure a watchdog timer for C5509/5509A
devices.
WDTIM_Config MyConfig = {
0x1000, /* Period */
0x0000, /* Control */
};
0x1000 /* Secondary control */
WDTIM_config(&MyConfig);
WDTIM Module
20-3
WDTIM_close
20.3 Functions
The following functions are available for use with the Watchdog Timer module.
WDTIM_close
Closes a previously opened WDTIMER device
Function
void WDTIM_close(WDTIM_Handle hWdtim)
Arguments
hWdtim Device handle; see WDTIM_open
Return Value
None
Description
WDTIM_close closes a previously opened WDTIMER device
Example
WDTIM_Handle hWdtim;
...
WDTIM_close(hWdtim);
WDTIM_config
Function
Configures WDTIM using configuration structure
For 5509/5509A only
void WDTIM_config(
WDTIM_Config *myConfig
);
Function
For 5502 and 5501 only
void WDTIM_config(
WDTIM_Handle
hWdtim,
WDTIM_Config
*myConfig
);
Arguments
For 5509/5509A only
myConfig Pointer to the initialized configuration structure
Arguments
For 5502 and 5501 only
hWdtim
Device Handle; see WDTIM_open
myConfig Pointer to the initialized configuration structure
Return Value
None
Description
Configures the WDTIMER device using the configuration structure which
contains members corresponding to each of the WDTIM registers. These
values are directly written to the corresponding WDTIM device−registers.
20-4
WDTIM_getConfig
Example
This is the example skeleton code for 5502 and 5501 only
WDTIM_Handle hWdtim;
WDTIM_Config MyConfig;
...
WDTIM_config(hWdtim, &MyConfig);
WDTIM_getCnt
Gives the timer count values
Function
void WDTIM_getCnt(
WDTIM_Handleh,
Uint32
*hi32,
Uint32
*lo32
)
Arguments
h
hi32
lo32
Return Value
None
Description
Gives the timer count values. hi32 will give CNT1 and CNT2 values aligned
in 32 bit. lo32 will give CNT3 and CNT4 values aligned in 32 bit.
Example
WDTIM_Handle hWdtim;
Uint32 *hi32,*lo32;
...
Device Handle; see WDTIM_open
Pointer to obtain CNT3 and CNT4 values
Pointer to obtain CNT1 and CNT2 values
WDTIM_getCnt(hWdtim,hi32,lo32);
WDTIM_getConfig Gets the WDTIM configuration structure for a specified device
Function
void WDTIMER_getConfig(
WDTIMER_Config *Config
);
Arguments
Config
Return Value
None
Description
Gets the WDTIM configuration structure for a specified device.
Example
WDTIM_Config MyConfig;
WDTIM_getConfig(&MyConfig);
Pointer to a WDTIM configuration structure
WDTIM Module
20-5
WDTIM_getPID
WDTIM_getPID
Gets peripheral ID details
Function
void WDTIM_getPID(
WDTIM_HandlehWdtim,
Uint16
*_type,
Uint16
*_class,
Uint16
*revision
)
Arguments
hWdtim
_type
_class
revision
Return Value
None
Description
Obtains the peripheral ID details like class ,type and revision
Example
WDTIM_Handle hWdtim;
Uint16 *type;
Uint16 *class;
Uint16 *rev;
Device Handle; see WDTIM_open
Pointer to obtain Device type
Pointer to obtain device class
Pointer to obtain device revision
...
WDTIM_getPID(hWdtim,type,class,rev);
WDTIM_init64
Initializes the timer in 64-bit mode
Function
void WDTIM_init64(
WDTIM_HandlehWdtim,
Uint16
gptgctl,
Uint16
dt12ctl,
Uint32
prdHigh,
Uint32
prdLow
)
Arguments
hWdtim
gptgctl
dt12ctl
prdHigh
prdLow
Return Value
None
Description
This API is used to set up and intialize the timer in 64 bit mode. It allows to
initialize the period and also provide arguments to setup the timer control
registers.
20-6
Device Handle; see WDTIM_open
Global timer control(not used)
timer1 control value
MSB of timer period value
LSB of timer period value
WDTIM_initChained32
Example
WDTIM_Handle hWdtim;
......
WDTIM_init64(
hWdtim,
//
0x0000,
//
0x5F04,
//
0x0000,
//
0x0000
//
WDTIM_initChained32
Device
Global
timer1
MSB of
LSB of
Handle; see WDTIM_open
timer control(not used)
control value
timer period value
timer period value
Initializes the timer in dual 34-bit chained mode
Function
void WDTIM_initChained32(
WDTIM_Handle hWdtim,
Uint16
gctl,
Uint16
ctl1,
Uint32
prdHigh,
Uint32
prdLow
)
Arguments
hWdtim
gctl
ctl1
prdHigh
prdLow
Return Value
None
Description
This API is used to set up and intialize two 32-bit timers in chained mode. It
allows to initialize the period and also provide arguments to set up the timer
control registers.
Example
WDTIM_Handle hWdtim;
......
WDTIM_initChained32(
Handle hWdtim,
0x0000 // Global timer control(not used)
0x5F04 // Timer1 control value
0x0000,// MSB of timer period value
0x0000 // LSB of timer period value
);
Device Handle; see WDTIM_open
Global timer control(not used)
Timer1 control value
Higher bytes of timer period value
Lower bytes of timer period value
WDTIM Module
20-7
WDTIM_initDual32
Initializes the timer in dual 32-bit unchained mode
WDTIM_initDual32
Function
void WDTIM_initDual32(
WDTIM_Handle
hWdtim,
Uint16
dt1ctl,
Uint16
dt2ctl,
Uint32
dt1prd,
Uint32
dt2prd,
Uint16
dt2prsc
)
Arguments
hWdtim
dt1ctl
dt2ctl
dt1prd
dt2prd
dt2prsc
Return Value
None
Description
This API is used to set up and intialize the timer in dual 32-bit unchained mode.
It allows to initialize the period for both the timers and also the prescalar
counter which specify the count of the timer.It also provide arguments to setup
the timer control registers.
Example
WDTIM_Handle hWdtim;
......
WDTIM_initDual32(
hWdtim,
0x3FE, // timer1 control value
0x3FE, // timer2 control value
0x005, // Timer1 period
0x008, // Timer2 period
0x0FF // Prescalar count
);
20-8
Device Handle; see WDTIM_open
timer1 control value
timer2 control value
Timer1 period
Timer2 period
Prescalar count
WDTIM_service
WDTIM_open
Opens the WDTIM device for use
Function
WDTIM_Handle WDTIM_open(
void
)
Arguments
None
Return Value
WDTIM_Handle
Description
Before the WDTIM device can be used, it must be ’opened’ using this function.
Once opened it cannot be opened again until it is ’closed’ (see WDTIM_close).
The return value is a unique device handle that is used in subsequent WDTIM
API calls.
Example
WDTIM_Handle hWdtim;
...
hWdtim = WDTIM_open();
WDTIM_service
Function
Executes the watchdog service sequence
For 5509/5509A
void WDTIM_service(
void
);
Arguments
void
Return Value
None
Description
Executes the watchdog timer service sequence
Example
WDTIM_service();
Function
For C5502 and 5501
void WDTIM_service(
WDTIM_Handle hWdt
);
Arguments
hWdt Device Handle; see WDTIM_open
Return Value
None
WDTIM Module
20-9
WDTIM_start
Description
Executes the watchdog service sequence
Example
WDTIM_Handle hWdtim;
...
WDTIM_service(hWdtim);
WDTIM_start
Function
Starts the watchdog timer operation (5509/5509A)/ Pulls both timers
out of reset (5502/5501)
For 5509/5509A only
void WDTIM_start(
void
);
Arguments
void
Return Value
None
Description
Starts the watchdog timer device running.
Example
WDTIM_start();
Function
For 5502 and 5501 only
void WDTIM_start(
WDTIM_Handle hWdt
);
Arguments
hWdt Device Handle; see WDTIM_open
Return Value
None
Description
Starts both the timers running, i.e., timer12 and timer34 are pulled out of reset.
Example
WDTIM_Handle hWdtim;
...
WDTIM_start (hWdtim);
20-10
WDTIM_start34
WDTIM_start12
Starts the 32-bit timer1 device
Function
void WDTIM_start12(
WDTIM_Handle
hWdtim
)
Arguments
hWdtim
Device Handle; see WDTIM_open
Return Value
None
Description
Starts the 32-bit timer1 device
Example
WDTIM_Handle hWdtim;
....
WDTIM_start12(hWdtim);
WDTIM_start34
Starts the 32-bit timer2 device
Function
void WDTIM_start34(
WDTIM_Handle
hWdtim
)
Arguments
hWdtim Device Handle; see WDTIM_open
Return Value
None
Description
Starts the 32-bit timer2 device
Example
WDTIM_Handle hWdtim;
....
WDTIM_start12(hWdtim);
WDTIM Module
20-11
WDTIM_stop
WDTIM_stop
Function
Stops all the timers if running
void WDTIM_stop(
WDTIM_Handle
)
hWdtim
Arguments
hWdtim
Return Value
None
Example
Stops the timer if running.
Example
WDTIM_Handle hWdtim;
....
WDTIM_stop(hWdtim);
WDTIM_stop12
Device Handle; see WDTIM_open.
Stops the 32-bit timer1 device if running
Function
void WDTIM_stop12(
WDTIM_Handle
hWdtim
)
Arguments
hWdtim
Return Value
None
Description
Stops the 32-bit timer1 device if running.
Example
WDTIM_Handle hWdtim;
....
WDTIM_stop12(hWdtim);
WDTIM_stop34
Device Handle; see WDTIM_open
Stops the 32-bit timer2 device if running
Function
void WDTIM_stop34(
WDTIM_Handle
hWdtim
)
Arguments
hWdtim
Return Value
None
Description
Stops the 32-bit timer2 device if running.
Example
WDTIM_Handle hWdtim;
....
WDTIM_stop34(hWdtim);
20-12
Device Handle; see WDTIM_open
WDTIM_wdStart
WDTIM_wdStart
Activates the watchdog timer
Function
void WDTIM_wdStart(
WDTIM_Handle
hWdt
)
Arguments
Arguments hWdt
Device Handle; see WDTIM_open
Return Value
None
Description
Activates the watchdog timer.
Example
WDTIM_Handle hWdtim;
....
WDTIM_wdStart(hWdtim);
WDTIM Module
20-13
Macros
20.4 Macros
The CSL offers a collection of macros to access CPU control registers and
fields. For additional details, see section 1.5.
Table 20−2 lists the WDTIM macros available. To use them, include
“csl_wdtimer.h.”
Table 3−3 lists DMA registers and fields.
Table 20−2. WDTIM CSL Macros
(a) Macros to read/write WDTIM register values
Macro
Syntax
WDTIM_RGET()
Uint16 WDTIM_RGET(REG)
WDTIM_RSET()
void WDTIM_RSET(REG, Uint16 regval)
(b) Macros to read/write WDTIM register field values (Applicable only to registers with more than one field)
Macro
Syntax
WDTIM_FGET()
Uint16 WDTIM_FGET(REG, FIELD)
WDTIM_FSET()
void WDTIM_FSET(REG, FIELD, Uint16 fieldval)
(c) Macros to create value to write to WDTIM registers and fields (Applicable only to registers with more than
one field)
Macro
Syntax
WDTIM_REG_RMK()
Uint16 WDTIM_REG_RMK(fieldval_n,...fieldval_0)
Note: *Start with field values with most significant field
positions:
field_n: MSB field
field_0: LSB field
* only writable fields allowed
WDTIM_FMK()
Uint16 WDTIM_FMK(REG, FIELD, fieldval)
(d) Macros to read a register address
Macro
Syntax
WDTIM_ADDR()
Notes:
Uint16 WDTIM_ADDR(REG)
1) REG indicates the registers: WDTCR, WDPRD, WDTCR2, or WDTIM.
2) FIELD indicates the register field name.
For REG_FSET and REG__FMK, FIELD must be a writable field.
For REG_FGET, the field must be a readable field.
3) regval indicates the value to write in the register (REG)
4) fieldval indicates the value to write in the field (FIELD)
20-14
Chapter 21
GPT Module
This chapter describes the GPT module, lists the API structure, functions and
macros within the module, and provides a GPT API reference section.
Topic
Page
21.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21-2
21.2 Configuration Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21-3
21.3 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21-4
21-1
Overview
21.1 Overview
This section describes the interface to the two general purpose timers (GPT0,
GPT1) available in TMS320VC5501/5502 DSPs. It also lists the API functions
and macros within the module, discusses how to use a GPT device, and
provides a GPT API reference section.
Table 21−1 lists the configuration structure used to set the GPT module.
Table 21−2 lists the functions available for the GPT module.
Table 21−1. GPT Configuration Structure
Syntax
Description
GPT_Config
Structure used to configure a GPT device
See page ...
21-3
GPT_OPEN_RESET
GPT reset flag, used while opening the GPT device
21-3
Table 21−2. GPT Functions
Structure
Purpose
GPT_close
Closes previously opened GPT device
21-4
GPT_config
Configure GPT using configuration structure
21-4
GPT_getCnt
Gives the timer count values
21-5
GPT_getConfig
Reads the current GPT configuration values
21-5
GPT_getEventId
Returns event ID of the opened GPT device
21-6
GPT_getPID
Gets peripheral ID details
21-6
GPT_init64
Intialize the timer in 64 bit mode
21-7
GPT_initChained32
Intialize the timer in dual 32 bit chained mode
21-8
GPT_initDual32
Intialize the timer in dual 32 bit unchained mode
21-9
GPT_open
Opens a GPT device for use
21-10
GPT_reset
Resets a GPT
21-10
GPT_start
Starts all the timers
21-11
GPT_start12
Starts the 32 bit timer1 device
21-11
GPT_start34
Starts the 32 bit timer2 device
21-11
GPT_stop
Stops the timer if running
21-12
GPT_stop12
Stops the 32 bit timer1 device if running
21-12
GPT_stop34
Stops the 32 bit timer2 device if running
21-13
21-2
See page ...
GPT_OPEN_RESET GPT
21.2 Configuration Structure
The following is the configuration structure used to set up the GPT module.
GPT_Config
Structure used to configure a GPT device
Structure
GPT_Config
Members
Uint16 gptemu //Emulation management register
Uint16 gptgpint //GPIO interrupt control register
Uint16 gptgpen //GPIO enable register
Uint16 gptgpdir //GPIO direction register
Uint16 gptgpdat //GPIO data register
Uint16 gptprd1 //Timer period register 1
Uint16 gptprd2 //Timer period register 2
Uint16 gptprd3 //Timer period register 3
Uint16 gptprd4 //Timer period register 4
Uint16 gptctl1 //Timer control register 1
Uint16 gptctl2 //Timer control register 2
Uint16 gptgctl1 //Global timer control register
Description
This is the GPT configuration structure used to configure a GPT device. The
user should create and initalize this structure before passing its address to the
GPT_config function.
GPT_OPEN_RESET GPT Reset flag, used while opening the GPT device
Constant
GPT_OPEN_RESET
Description
This flag is used while opening a GPT device.
Example
See GPT_open
GPT Module
21-3
GPT_close
21.3 Functions
The following are functions available for use with the GPT module.
GPT_close
Function
Closes previously opened GPT device
void GPT_close(
GPT_Handle
)
hGpt
Arguments
hGpt
Device handle; see GPT_open
Return Value
none
Description
Closes the previously opened GPT device(see GPT_open). The following
tasks are performed:
The GPT event is disabled and cleared
The GPT registers are set to their default values
Example
GPT_config
Function
GPT_Handle hGpt;
.....
GPT_close(hGpt);
Configure GPT using configuration structure
void GPT_config(
GPT_Handle
GPT_Config
)
hGpt,
*myConfig
Arguments
hGpt
Device Handle; see GPT_open
myConfig
Pointer to the initialized configuration structure
Return Value
none
Description
Configures the GPT device using the configuration structure which contains
members corresponding to each of the GPT registers. These values are
directly written to the corresponding GPT device-registers.
21-4
GPT_getConfig
Example
GPT_getCnt
Function
GPT_Handle hGpt;
GPT_Config MyConfig
...
GPT_config(hGpt, &MyConfig);
Gives the timer count values
void GPT_getCnt(
GPT_Handle
hGpt,
Uint32
*tim34,
Uint32
*tim12
)
Arguments
hGpt
Device Handle; see GPT_open
tim34
Pointer to obtain CNT3 and CNT4 values
tim12
Pointer to obtain CNT1 and CNT2 values
Return Value
none
Description
Gives the timer count values. tim12 will give CNT1 and CNT2 values aligned
in 32-bit format. tim34 will give CNT3 and CNT4 values aligned in 32-bit format.
Example
GPT_Handle hGpt;
Uint32 *tim12,*tim34;
...
GPT_getCnt(hGpt,tim34,tim12);
GPT_getConfig
Function
Reads the current GPT configuration values
void GPT_getConfig(
GPT_Handle
hGpt,
GPT_Config
*myConfig
)
Arguments
hGpt
Device Handle; see GPT_open
myConfig
Pointer to the configuration structure
GPT Module
21-5
GPT_getEventId
Return Value
none
Description
Gives the current GPT configuration values.
Example
GPT_Handle hGpt;
GPT_Config gptCfg;
.....
GPT_getConfig(hGpt, &gptCfg);
GPT_getEventId
Returns event ID of the opened GPT device
Function
Uint16 GPT_getEventId(
GPT_Handle hgpt
)
Arguments
hGpt
Return Value
Uint16 Event Id value
Description
Before using IRQ APIs to setup/enable/disable ISR for device, this function
must be used. The return value of this function can later be used as an input
to IRQ APIs.
Example
GPT_Handle hGpt;
Uint16 gptEvt_Id;
...
gptEvt_Id = GPT_getEventId(hGpt);
IRQ_clear(gptEvt_Id);
IRQ_plus (gptEvt_Id, & gptIsr);
IRQ_enable (gptEvt_Id);
GPT_getPID
Function
Handle of GPT device opened
Gets peripheral ID details
void GPT_getPID(
GPT_Handle
hGpt,
Uint16
*_type,
Uint16
*_class,
Uint16
*revision
)
Arguments
21-6
hGpt
Device Handle; see GPT_open
_type
Pointer to obtain device type
GPT_init64
_class
Pointer to obtain device class
revision
Pointer to obtain device revision
Return Value
none
Description
Obtains the peripheral ID details like class, type, and revision.
Example
GPT_Handle hGpt;
Uint16 *type;
Uint16 *class;
Uint16 *rev;
...
GPT_getPID(hGpt,type,class,rev);
GPT_init64
Function
Intialize the timer in 64-bit mode
void GPT_init64(
GPT_Handle
hGpt,
Uint16
gptgctl,
Uint16
dt12ctl,
Uint32
prdHigh,
Uint32
prdLow
)
Arguments
hGpt
Device Handle; see GPT_open
gptgctl
Global timer control (not used)
dt12ctl
timer1 control value
prdHigh
MSB of timer period value
prdLow
LSB of timer period value
Return Value
none
Description
This API is used to set up and intialize the timer in 64-bit mode. It allows to
initialize the period and also provide arguments to setup the timer control
registers.
GPT Module
21-7
GPT_initChained32
Example
GPT_initChained32
Function
GPT_Handle hGpt;
......
GPT_init64(
hGpt, // Device Handle; see GPT_open
0x0000, // Global timer control(not used)
0x5F04, // timer1 control value
0x0000, // MSB of timer period value
0x0000
// LSB of timer period value
);
Intialize the timer in dual 32-bit chained mode
void GPT_initChained32(
GPT_Handle
hGpt,
Uint16
gctl,
Uint16
ctl1,
Uint32
prdHigh,
Uint32
prdLow
)
Arguments
hGpt
Device Handle; see GPT_open
gctl
Global timer control (not used)
ctl1
Timer1 control value
prdHigh
MSB of timer period value
prdLow
LSB bytes of timer period value
Return Value
none
Description
This API is used to set up and intialize two 32-bit timers in chained mode. It
allows to initialize the period and also provide arguments to setup the timer
control registers.
Example
GPT_Handle hGpt;
......
GPT_initChained32(
hGpt,
0x0000, // Global
0x5F04, // Timer1
0x0000, // MSB of
0x0000 // LSB of
);
21-8
timer control(not used)
control value
timer period value
timer period value
GPT_initDual32
GPT_initDual32
Function
Intialize the timer in dual 32-bit unchained mode
void GPT_initDual32(
GPT_Handle
hGpt,
Uint16
dt1ctl,
Uint16
dt2ctl,
Uint32
dt1prd,
Uint32
dt2prd,
Uint16
dt2prsc
)
Arguments
hGpt
Device Handle; see GPT_open
dt1ctl
Timer1 control value
dt2ctl
Timer2 control value
dt1prd
Timer1 period
dt2prd
Timer2 period
dt2prsc
Prescalar count
Return Value
none
Description
This API is used to set up and intialize the timer in dual 32-bit unchained mode.
It allows to initialize the period for both the timers and also the prescalar
counter which specify the count of the timer.It also provide arguments to setup
the timer control registers.
Example
GPT_Handle hGpt;
......
GPT_initDual32(
hGpt,
0x3FE, //
0x3FE, //
0x005, //
0x008, //
0x0FF //
);
ctl1
ctl2
prd1
prd2
psc34
GPT Module
21-9
GPT_open
GPT_open
Function
Opens a GPT device for use
GPT_Handle GPT_open(
Uint16
devNum,
Uint16
flags
)
Arguments
devNum
Specifies the GPT device to be opened flags
Open flags
GPT_OPEN_RESET: resets the GPT device
Return Value
GPT_HandleDevice Handle INV: open failed
Description
Before the GPT device can be used, it must be ‘opened’ using this function.
Once opened it cannot be opened again until it is ‘closed’ (see GPT_close).
The return value is a unique device handle that is used in subsequent GPT API
calls. If the open fails, ‘INV’ is returned.
If the GPT_OPEN_RESET flag is specified, the GPT module registers are set
to their power-on defaults and any associated interrupts are disabled and
cleared.
Example
GPT_reset
Function
Handle hGpt;
...
hGpt = GPT_open(GPT_DEV0, GPT_OPEN_RESET);
Resets a GPT
void GPT_reset(
GPT_Handle
)
hGpt
Arguments
hGpt
Device Handle; see GPT_open
Return Value
none
Description
Resets the timer device. Disables and clears any interrupt events and sets the
GPT registers to default values. If the handle is INV (−1) , all timer devices are
reset.
21-10
GPT_start34
Example
GPT_start
Function
GPT_Handle hGpt;
......
GPT_reset(hGpt);
Starts all the timers
void GPT_start(
GPT_Handle
)
hGpt
Arguments
hGpt
Device Handle; see GPT_open
Return Value
none
Description
Starts all the timers.
Example
GPT_Handle hGpt;
....
GPT_start(hGpt);
GPT_start12
Function
Starts the 32-bit timer1 device
void GPT_start12(
GPT_Handle
)
hGpt
Arguments
hGpt
Device Handle; see GPT_open
Return Value
none
Description
Starts the 32-bit timer1 device.
Example
GPT_Handle hGpt;
....
GPT_start12(hGpt);
GPT_start34
Function
Starts the 32-bit timer2 device
void GPT_start34(
GPT_Handle
)
hGpt
Arguments
hGpt
Device Handle; see GPT_open
GPT Module
21-11
GPT_stop
Return Value
none
Description
Starts the 32-bit timer2 device.
Example
GPT_Handle hGpt;
....
GPT_start34(hGpt);
GPT_stop
Function
Stops the timer, if running
void GPT_stop(
GPT_Handle
)
hGpt
Arguments
hGpt
Device Handle. see GPT_open
Return Value
none
Description
Stops the timer, if running.
Example
GPT_Handle hGpt;
....
GPT_stop(hGpt);
GPT_stop12
Function
Stops the 32-bit timer1 device, if running
void GPT_stop12(
GPT_Handle
)
hGpt
Arguments
hGpt
Device Handle; see GPT_open
Return Value
none
Description
Stops the 32-bit timer1 device, if running.
Example
GPT_Handle hGpt;
....
GPT_stop12(hGpt);
21-12
GPT_stop34
GPT_stop34
Function
Stops the 32-bit timer2 device, if running
void GPT_stop34(
GPT_Handle
)
hGpt
Arguments
hGpt
Device Handle; see GPT_open
Return Value
none
Description
Stops the 32-bit timer2 device, if running.
Example
GPT_Handle hGpt;
....
GPT_stop34(hGpt);
GPT Module
21-13
GPT_stop34
21-14
Index
Index
A
ADC, registers 3-3
ADC functions
ADC_config 3-5
ADC_getConfig 3-5
ADC_read 3-6
ADC_setFreq 3-6
parameter-based functions 3-2
register-based functions 3-2
ADC module
configuration structure 3-4
examples 3-9
functions 3-5
include file 1-4
macros 3-8
module support symbol 1-4
ADC_Config 3-4
API modules, illustration of 1-2
architecture, of the CSL 1-2
functions 4-2
overview 4-2
CHIP module
functions 4-3
macros 4-4
chip module
include file 1-4
module support symbol 1-4
chip support library 1-2
constant values for fields 1-13
constant values for registers 1-13
CSL
architecture 1-2
benefits of 1-2
data types 1-7
functions 1-8
generic macros, handle-based 1-12
generic symbolic constants 1-13
introduction to 1-2
macros 1-11
generic1-11
B
build options
defining a target device 2-8
defining large memory model 2-10
defining library paths 2-11
C
CHIP functions
CHIP_getDieId_High32 4-3
CHIP_getDieId_Low32 4-3
CHIP_getRevId 4-3
CHIP module
modules and include files 1-4
naming conventions 1-6
CSL , generic functions 1-9
CSL
compiling and linking 2-7
destination address 2-2
directory structure 2-7
See also compiling and linking with CSL
how to use, overview 2-2
source address 2-2
transfer size 2-2
CSL bool. See data types
CSL device support 1-5
CSL_init 2-12
.csldata, allocation of 2-12
Index-1
Index
D
DAT 5-2
module support symbol 1-4
DAT functions
DAT_close 5-3
DAT_copy 5-3
DAT_copy2D 5-4
DAT_fill 5-5
DAT_open 5-6
DAT_wait 5-7
DAT module
functions 5-2 , 5-3
include file 1-4
overview 5-2
data types 1-7
device support 1-5
device support symbols 1-5
devices. See CSL device support
direct register initialization 1-8
directory structure 2-7
documentation 2-7
examples 2-7
include files 2-7
libraries 2-7
source library 2-7
DMA configuration structures, DMA_Config 6-5
DMA functions
DMA_close 6-6
DMA_config 6-6
DMA_getConfig 6-7
DMA_getEventId 6-7
DMA_open 6-8
DMA_pause 6-9
DMA_reset 6-9
DMA_start 6-9
DMA_stop 6-10
DMA macros
DMA_ADDR 6-11
DMA_ADDRH 6-11
DMA_FGET 6-12
DMA_FGETH 6-13
DMA_FMK 6-14
DMA_FSET 6-15
DMA_FSETH 6-16
DMA_REG_RMK 6-17
DMA_RGET 6-18
DMA_RGETH 6-19
Index-2
DMA_RSET 6-19
DMA_RSETH 6-20
DMA module
configuration structure 6-5
functions 6-6
include file 1-4
macros 6-11
using channel number6-11
module support symbol 1-4
overview 6-2
DMA_AdrPtr. See data types
DMA_close 6-2
DMA_config 6-2
DMA_config(), using 2-2
DMA_open 6-2
DMA_reset 6-2
documentation. See directory structure
E
EMIF configuration structure, EMIF_Config 7-6
EMIF functions
EMIF_config 7-8
EMIF_enterselfRefresh 7-9
EMIF_exitselfRefresh 7-10
EMIF_getConfig 7-9
EMIF_reset 7-10
EMIF macros, using port number 7-11
EMIF module
configuration structures 7-6
functions 7-8
include file 1-4
macros 7-11
module support symbol 1-4
overview 7-2
EMIF_config 7-2
event ID 12-3
See also IRQ module
examples
See also directory structure
McBSP 13-26
F
FIELD 1-13
explanation of 1-11
fieldval, explanation of 1-11
funcArg. See naming conventions
Index
function, naming conventions 1-6
function argument, naming conventions 1-6
function inlining, using 2-12
functional parameters, for use with peripheral initialization 1-10
functions 1-8
generic 1-9
G
generic CSL functions 1-9
GPIO configuration structure
GPIO_Config 8-4
GPIO_ConfigAll 8-4
GPIO functions
GPIO_close 8-5
GPIO_config 8-7
GPIO_configAll 8-7
GPIO_open 8-5
GPIO_pinDirection 8-8
GPIO_pinDisable 8-13
GPIO_pinEnable 8-13
GPIO_pinRead 8-14
GPIO_pinReadAll 8-14
GPIO_pinReset 8-16
GPIO_pinWrite 8-15
GPIO_pinWriteAll 8-15
GPIO module, configuration structures 8-4
GPIO module
functions 8-5
include file 1-4
macros 8-17
module support symbol 1-4
Overview 8-2
GPT configuration structure
GPT_Config 21-3
GPT_OPEN_RESET_GPT 21-3
GPT module
API reference
configuration structure21-3
functions21-4
configuration structure 21-2
functions 21-2
include file 1-4
module support symbol 1-4
overview 21-2
GPT_functions
GPT_close 21-4
GPT_config 21-4
GPT_getCnt 21-5
GPT_getConfig 21-5
GPT_getPID 21-6
GPT_init64 21-7
GPT_initChained32 21-8
GPT_initDual32 21-9
GPT_open 21-10
GPT_reset 21-10
GPT_start 21-11
GPT_start12 21-11
GPT_start34 21-11
GPT_stop 21-12
GPT_stop12 21-12
GPT_stop34 21-13
H
handles
resource management 1-14
use of 1-14
HPI module, functions 9-5
HPI Configuration Structures, HPI_Config 9-4
HPI functions
HPI_config 9-5
HPI_getConfig 9-5
HPI macros
HPI_ADDR 9-6
HPI_FGET 9-6
HPI_FMK 9-7
HPI_FSET 9-7
HPI_REG_RMK 9-8
HPI_RGET 9-9
HPI_RSET 9-9
HPI module
HPI configuration structures 9-4
include file 1-4
macros 9-6
module support symbol 1-4
Overview 9-2
I
I2C Configuration Structures
I2C_Config 10-5
I2C_Setup 10-6
I2C Functions, I2C_sendStop 10-13
I2C functions
I2C_config 10-7
Index-3
Index
I2C_eventDisable 10-8
I2C_eventEnable 10-8
I2C_getConfig 10-8
I2C_getEventId 10-9
I2C_IsrAddr 10-10
I2C_read 10-10
I2C_readByte 10-11
I2C_reset 10-12
I2C_rfull 10-12
I2C_rrdy 10-12
I2C_setCallback 10-13
I2C_setup 10-9
I2C_start 10-14
I2C_write 10-14
I2C_writeByte 10-15
I2C_xempty 10-16
I2C_xrdy 10-16
I2C module
Configuration Structures 10-5
examples 10-18
Functions 10-7
include file 1-4
macros 10-17
module support symbol 1-4
overview 10-2
ICACHE configuration structures
ICACHE_Config 11-3
ICACHE_Setup 11-4
ICACHE_Tagset 11-4
ICACHE functions
ICACHE_config 11-5
ICACHE_disable 11-5
ICACHE_enable 11-6
ICACHE_flush 11-6
ICACHE_freeze 11-6
ICACHE_setup 11-7
ICACHE_tagset 11-7
ICACHE_unfreeze 11-7
ICACHE macros
ICACHE_ADDR 11-8
ICACHE_FGET 11-8
ICACHE_FMK 11-8
ICACHE_FSET 11-8
ICACHE_REG_RMK 11-8
ICACHE_RGET 11-8
ICACHE_RSET 11-8
ICACHE Module
include file 1-4
module support Symbol 1-4
Index-4
ICACHE module
Configuration Structures 11-3
functions 11-5
macros 11-8
overview 11-2
include Files. See directory structure
include files, for CSL modules 1-4
Int16. See data types
Int32. See data types
IRQ configuration structure, IRQ_Config 12-2 ,
12-8
IRQ functions
IRQ_clear 12-9
IRQ_config 12-9
IRQ_disable 12-10
IRQ_enable 12-10
IRQ_getArg 12-10
IRQ_getConfig 12-11
IRQ_globalDisable 12-11
IRQ_globalEnable 12-12
IRQ_globalRestore 12-12
IRQ_map 12-13
IRQ_plug 12-13
IRQ_restore 12-14
IRQ_setArg 12-14
IRQ_setVecs 12-15
IRQ_test 12-15
IRQ module
Configuration Structures 12-8
functions 12-9
include file 1-4
module support symbol 1-4
overview 12-2
using interrupts 12-7
IRQ_EVT_NNNN 12-4
events list 12-4
IRQ_EVT_WDTINT 12-6
L
large-model library. See CSL device support
large/small memory model selection, instructions 2-8
libraries
See also directory structure
linking to a project 2-10
linker command file
creating. See compiling and linking with CSL
using 2-12
Index
M
macro, naming conventions 1-6
macros
generic 1-11
handle-based1-12
generic description of
FIELD1-11
fieldval1-11
PER1-11
REG1-11
REG#1-11
regval1-11
McBSP 13-23
McBSP
example 13-26
registers 13-3
McBSP , configuration structure 13-6
McBSP configuration structure, MCBSP_Config 13-6
MCBSP Functions, MCBSP_channelStatus 13-11
McBSP functions
MCBSP_channelDisable 13-8
MCBSP_channelEnable 13-9
MCBSP_close 13-12
MCBSP_config 13-12
MCBSP_getConfig 13-14
MCBSP_getPort 13-14
MCBSP_getRcvEventID 13-15
MCBSP_getXmtEventID 13-15
MCBSP_open 13-16
MCBSP_read16 13-17
MCBSP_read32 13-17
MCBSP_reset 13-18
MCBSP_rfull 13-18
MCBSP_rrdy 13-19
MCBSP_start 13-19
MCBSP_write16 13-21
MCBSP_write32 13-21
MCBSP_xempty 13-22
MCBSP_xrdy 13-22
MCBSP Macros, MCBSP_FSET 13-23
McBSP macros
MCBSP_ADDR 13-24
MCBSP_FGET 13-23
MCBSP_FMK 13-23
MCBSP_REG_RMK 13-23
MCBSP_RGET 13-23
MCBSP_RSET 13-23
using handle 13-24
using port number 13-23
McBSP module
API reference 13-8
configuration structure 13-2
functions 13-2
include file 1-4
module support symbol 1-4
overview 13-2
memberName. See naming conventions
MMC
Configuration Structures, MMC_Config 14-5
Data Structures
MMC_CardIdobj14-9
MMC_CardObj14-10
MMC_CardXCsdObj14-10
MMC_CmdObj14-11
MMC_MmcR
egObj14-11
MMC_NativeInitObj14-12
MMC_RspR
egObj14-12
Functions
MMC_close14-13
MMC_clrR
esponse14-13
MMC_config14-14
MMC_dispatch014-14
MMC_dispatch114-14
MMC_drrdy14-15
MMC_dxrdy14-15
MMC_getCardCSD14-16
MMC_getCardId14-16
MMC_getConfig14-17
MMC_getNumberOfCards14-17
MMC_getStatus14-18
MMC_open14-18
MMC_readBlock14-19
MMC_responseDone14-19
MMC_saveStatus14-20
MMC_selectCard14-20
MMC_sendAllCID14-21
MMC_sendCmd14-22
MMC_sendCSD14-22
MMC_sendGoIdle14-23
MMC_sendOpCond14-24
MMC_setCallBack14-25
MMC_setCardPtr14-23
MMC_setRca14-25
MMC_stop14-26
Index-5
Index
MMC_watiF
orFlag14-26
MMC_writeBlock14-27
O
MMC Data Structures
MMC_CallBackObj 14-6
MMC_CardCsdobj 14-7
SD_CardCsdObj 14-8
object types. See Naming Conventions
MMC Module
Configuration Structures 14-5
Data Structures 14-6
Functions 14-13
include file 1-4
module support Symbol 1-4
Overview 14-2
parameter-based configuration, ADC module 3-2
PER 1-13
explanation of 1-11
PER_ADDR 1-12
PER_close 1-9
PER_config 1-9
initialization of registers 1-9
PER_FGET 1-12
PER_FMK 1-12
PER_FSET 1-12
PER_funcName(). See naming conventions
PER_Handle. See data types
PER_MACRO_NAME. See naming conventions
PER_open 1-9
PER_REG_DEFAULT 1-13
PER_REG_FIELD_DEFAULT 1-13
PER_REG_FIELD_SYMVAL 1-13
PER_REG_RMK 1-11
for use with peripheral initialization 1-9
PER_reset 1-9
PER_RGET 1-11
PER_RSET 1-11
PER_setup 1-9
PER_setup(), example of use 1-10
PER_start 1-9
PER_Typename. See naming conventions
PER_varName(). See naming conventions
peripheral initialization via functional parameters 1-10
using PER_setup 1-10
peripheral initialization via registers 1-9
using PER_config 1-10
peripheral modules
descriptions of 1-4
include files 1-4
PLL configuration structure, PLL_Config 15-4
PLL functions
PLL_config 15-5
PLL_setFreq 15-6
PLL macros, using port number 15-7
MMC_CardIdobj 14-9
MMC_CardObj 14-10
MMC_CardXCsdObj 14-10
MMC_close 14-13
MMC_clrResponse 14-13
MMC_CmdObj 14-11
MMC_Config 14-5
MMC_config, see also MMC_open 14-14
MMC_getCardId 14-16
MMC_getConfig 14-17
MMC_getNumberOfCards 14-17
MMC_MmcRegObj 14-11
MMC_NativeInitObj 14-12
MMC_open 14-18
MMC_readBlock 14-19
MMC_RspRegObj 14-12
MMC_selectCard 14-20
MMC_sendAllCID 14-21
MMC_sendCmd 14-22
MMC_setRca 14-25
MMC_writeBlock 14-27
module support symbols, for CSL modules 1-4
N
naming conventions 1-6
Index-6
P
Index
PLL module
API reference 15-5
configuration structure 15-2
functions 15-2
include file 1-4
macros 15-7
module support symbol 1-4
overview 15-2
PWR functions, PWR_powerDown 16-2
PWR macros 16-4
PWR_ADDR 16-4
PWR_FGET 16-4
PWR_FMK 16-4
PWR_FSET 16-4
PWR_REG_RMK 16-4
PWR_RGET 16-4
PWR_RSET 16-4
PWR module
API reference 16-3
PWR_powerDown16-3
functions 16-2
include file 1-4
macros 16-4
module support symbol 1-4
overview 16-2
R
real-time clock, features of 17-2
REG 1-13
explanation of 1-11
REG#, explanation of 1-11
register-based configuration, ADC module 3-2
Registers, MCBSP 13-3
registers, peripheral initialization 1-9
regval, explanation of 1-11
resource management, using CSL handles 1-14
RTC, ANSI C-style time functions 17-4
RTC configuration structures
RTC_Alarm 17-6
RTC_Config 17-7
RTC_Date 17-7
RTC_IsrAddr 17-8
RTC_Time 17-8
RTC functions
RTC_bcdToDec 17-9
RTC_config 17-9
RTC_decToBcd 17-9
RTC_getConfig 17-10
RTC_getDate 17-11
RTC_getTime 17-11
RTC_isrDisable 17-10
RTC_isrDisphook 17-13
RTC_isrEnable 17-10
RTC_setAlarm 17-12
RTC_setDate 17-13
RTC_setPeriodicInterval 17-14
RTC_setTime 17-14
RTC macros
RTC_ADDR 17-16
RTC_FGET 17-16
RTC_FSET 17-16
RTC_REG_FMK 17-16
RTC_REG_RMK 17-17
RTC_RGET 17-17
RTC_RSET 17-17
RTC module
API reference 17-9
configuration structure 17-3 , 17-6
functions 17-3
include file 1-4
macros 17-3 , 17-4
module support symbol 1-4
overview 17-2
RTC_bcdToDec, description of 17-3
RTC_decToBcd, description of 17-3
S
scratch pad memory 2-12
small-model library. See CSL device support
source library. See directory structure
static inline. See function inlining
structure member, naming conventions 1-6
symbolic constant values 1-13
symbolic constants, generic 1-13
SYMVAL 1-13
T
target device, specifying. See compiling and linking
with CSL
TIMER configuration structure, TIMER_Config 18-3
TIMER functions
TIMER_close 18-4
Index-7
Index
TIMER_Config 18-4
TIMER_getConfig 18-5
TIMER_getEventID 18-5
TIMER_open 18-6
TIMER_reset 18-7
TIMER_start 18-7
TIMER_stop 18-7
TIMER_tintoutCfg 18-8
TIMER macros
TIMER_ADDR 18-9
TIMER_FGET 18-9
TIMER_FMK 18-9
TIMER_FSET 18-9
TIMER_REG_RMK 18-9
TIMER_RGET 18-9
TIMER_RSET 18-9
using handle 18-10
using port number 18-9
TIMER module
API reference 18-4
configuration structure 18-2
functions 18-2
include file 1-4
macros 18-9
module support symbol 1-4
overview 18-2
typedef, naming conventions 1-6
U
UART, Control Signal Macros 19-15
UART configuration structures
UART_Config 19-5
UART_Setup 19-5
UART functions
UART_config 19-8
UART_eventDisable 19-8
UART_eventEnable 19-9
UART_fgetc 19-10
UART_fgets 19-10
UART_fputc 19-11
UART_fputs 19-11
UART_getConfig 19-11
UART_read 19-12
UART_setCallback 19-12
UART_setup 19-13
UART_write 19-13
UART macros
UART_ctsOff 19-16
Index-8
UART_ctsOn 19-16
UART_dsrOff 19-17
UART_dsrOn 19-17
UART_dtcOff 19-16
UART_dtcOn 19-17
UART_isDtr 19-17
UART_isRts 19-16
UART_riOff 19-17
UART_riOn 19-17
WDTIM_ADDR 19-15
WDTIM_FGET 19-14
WDTIM_FMK 19-14
WDTIM_FSET 19-14
WDTIM_REG_RMK 19-14
WDTIM_RGET 19-14
WDTIM_RSET 19-14
UART module
configuration structure 19-2
configuration structures 19-5
functions 19-2 , 19-8
include file 1-4
macros 19-14
module support symbol 1-4
overview 19-2
Uchar. See data types
Uint16. See data types
Uint32. See data types
USB module
configuration information 1-4
include file 1-4
module support symbol 1-4
using functional parameters 1-8
V
variable, naming conventions 1-6
W
WDTIM configuration structures, WDTIM_Config 20-3
WDTIM functions
WDTIM_close 20-4
WDTIM_config 20-4
WDTIM_getCnt 20-5
WDTIM_getPID 20-6
WDTIM_init64 20-6
WDTIM_initChained32 20-7
WDTIM_initDual32 20-8
Index
WDTIM_open 20-9
WDTIM_service 20-9
WDTIM_start 20-10
WDTIM_start12 20-11
WDTIM_start34 20-11
WDTIM_stop 20-12
WDTIM_stop12 20-12
WDTIM_stop34 20-12
WDTIM_wdStart 20-13
WDTIM macros
WDTIM_ADDR 20-14
WDTIM_FGET 20-14
WDTIM_FMK 20-14
WDTIM_FSET 20-14
WDTIM_REG_RMK 20-14
WDTIM_RGET 20-14
WDTIM_RSET 20-14
WDTIM module
API reference 20-4
APIs 20-2
include file 1-4
macros 20-14
module support symbol 1-4
overview 20-2
Index-9
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