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Texas Instruments tioScript Editor Users User guides
tioScript Editor
Language and Environment Documentation
User's Guide
Literature Number: SBOU070
August 2008
2
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Contents
1
2
Overview ............................................................................................................................. 7
Working with tioScript.exe .................................................................................................... 7
2.1
3
4
5
6
7
8
Installation .................................................................................................................. 7
..............................................................................................
2.3
Environment Variables ..................................................................................................
Buttons and Keys ...............................................................................................................
3.1
Load Button ..............................................................................................................
3.2
Save Script Button .......................................................................................................
3.3
Save Script + Results Button ..........................................................................................
3.4
Clear Button ..............................................................................................................
3.5
Step Button ...............................................................................................................
3.6
Run Button................................................................................................................
3.7
Stop Button ...............................................................................................................
3.8
Print Button ...............................................................................................................
Context Menu.....................................................................................................................
4.1
Delete Line ...............................................................................................................
4.2
Insert Line Before Selection ............................................................................................
4.3
Insert Line After Selection ..............................................................................................
4.4
Set Actual Line ...........................................................................................................
4.5
Toggle Breakpoint .......................................................................................................
4.6
Debug Window ...........................................................................................................
Mnemonic Commands ........................................................................................................
5.1
I2C Mnemonic Commands..............................................................................................
5.2
SPI Mnemonic Commands .............................................................................................
5.3
One-Wire Mnemonic Commands ......................................................................................
5.4
General-Purpose Mnemonic Commands .............................................................................
High-Level Commands ........................................................................................................
6.1
WRITE_DAC Commands...............................................................................................
6.2
read_ads Commands ...................................................................................................
6.3
ReadDoubleFromEEPROM Command ...............................................................................
6.4
WriteDoubleToEEPROM Command ..................................................................................
6.5
ads_mux Commands....................................................................................................
6.6
SetCurrVoltMode Command ...........................................................................................
6.7
ReadILoop Command ...................................................................................................
Script Editor Commands .....................................................................................................
7.1
Pause Command ........................................................................................................
7.2
Stop Command ..........................................................................................................
Mathematical Calculations ...................................................................................................
8.1
Operands .................................................................................................................
8.2
Supported Operators ....................................................................................................
8.3
Resulting Numerical Data Types ......................................................................................
2.2
The tioScript.exe Window
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Table of Contents
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Script File Format ............................................................................................................... 35
Important Notices ............................................................................................................... 36
4
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List of Figures
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
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19
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23
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26
27
28
29
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31
32
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35
36
37
38
39
40
41
tioScript Installation Welcome Screen .................................................................................... 8
tioScript Installation: Destination Folder .................................................................................. 9
tioScript Installation: Confirmation ....................................................................................... 10
tioScript Installation: Successful Completion ........................................................................... 11
tioScript Installation: Setup Error (Existing Version Must Be Removed) ............................................ 12
tioScript Editor Window .................................................................................................... 13
Example Script with Variables ............................................................................................ 14
Implicit Variables in Command (Example 1) ............................................................................ 15
Implicit Variables in Command (Example 2: Deleted Line) ........................................................... 15
Load Button ................................................................................................................. 16
Save Script Button ......................................................................................................... 16
Save Script + Results Button ............................................................................................. 16
Clear Button ................................................................................................................. 16
Step Button .................................................................................................................. 17
Run Button .................................................................................................................. 17
Stop Button .................................................................................................................. 17
Print Button .................................................................................................................. 17
Context Pop-Up Menu ..................................................................................................... 18
Selected Table Cells ...................................................................................................... 18
Delete Line Command ..................................................................................................... 18
Insert Line Before Selection Command ................................................................................. 18
Insert Line After Selection Command ................................................................................... 18
Set Actual Line.............................................................................................................. 19
Selected Actual Line ....................................................................................................... 19
Toggle Breakpoint Command............................................................................................. 19
Toggle Breakpoint Example............................................................................................... 19
Debug Window ............................................................................................................. 20
Generation of an I2C Mnemonic Command with an I2C Digital Pattern ............................................. 21
I2C Mnemonic Command in Script Editor (Example 1) ................................................................ 22
Generation of an I2C Mnemonic Command with an I2C Digital Pattern (with Read Command) ................. 23
I2C Mnemonic Command in Script Editor (Example 2) ................................................................ 24
Generation of an SPI Mnemonic Command with an SPI Digital Pattern............................................ 25
SPI Mnemonic Command in Script Editor .............................................................................. 26
Clock Phase and Polarity: Mode 00 ..................................................................................... 26
Clock Phase and Polarity: Mode 01 ..................................................................................... 27
Clock Phase and Polarity: Mode 10 ..................................................................................... 27
Clock Phase and Polarity: Mode 11 ..................................................................................... 28
Generation of a One-Wire Mnemonic Command ...................................................................... 28
One-Wire Command in Script Editor..................................................................................... 29
General-Purpose Command in Script Editor............................................................................ 30
Example Script with Variables ............................................................................................ 35
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List of Figures
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List of Tables
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
6
Variable Types in Figure 7 ................................................................................................
List of I2C Mnemonic Commands ........................................................................................
General Commands Associated with I2C Commands .................................................................
SPI Mnemonic Commands................................................................................................
Different SPI Clock Phase and Polarity Modes ........................................................................
One-Wire Mnemonic Commands ........................................................................................
General One-Wire Commands ...........................................................................................
General-Purpose Mnemonic Commands ...............................................................................
Summary of Supported Operators .......................................................................................
List of Tables
14
21
24
24
25
28
29
30
34
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User's Guide
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tioScript Editor
1
Overview
This documentation describes the tio32 script language and its application. This script language is used
with the USB DAQ Platform and the USB DIG Platform to directly communicate with the devices. The
Script Editor and the runtime environment come with the application:
tioScript.exe
This software program is a Microsoft® .NET® application; in other words, it is necessary to have .NET 2.0
installed on the PC.
Scripts are stored in comma-separated value (CSV)-text files with a .ts0 file extension.
It is recommended to associate .ts0 files with the tioScript.exe application so that double-clicking on a
script file automatically launches the tioScript.exe program.
2
Working with tioScript.exe
2.1
Installation
There is an installation package available for the script software that contains the following files and
directories:
29.04.2008 07:47 <DIR> dotnetfx
29.04.2008 08:07 438.272 setup.exe
29.04.2008 08:07 1.487.872 tioScriptSetup.msi
Because the script software requires .NET 2.0, the installation also contains an optional .NET installation
in the dotnetfx directory. This file is called automatically during the install process if it is detected that the
PC does not already have .NET installed.
To start the installation, run the setup.exe file. It guides you through the installation process as described
in Figure 1 through Figure 4.
Microsoft, .NET are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
I2C is a trademark of NXP Semiconductors.
All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
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As shown in Figure 1, the process begins with a Welcome window.
Figure 1. tioScript Installation Welcome Screen
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Press the Next button; the user is then required to set the application program folder, as shown in
Figure 2.
Figure 2. tioScript Installation: Destination Folder
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The next screen asks the user to confirm the installation directory and begins the process, as Figure 3
illustrates.
Figure 3. tioScript Installation: Confirmation
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Once the installation process completes, the program displays an Installation Complete message (shown
in Figure 4).
Figure 4. tioScript Installation: Successful Completion
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If the user attempts to install a newer version of the Script Editor application on a PC with an existing
version of the software installed, the old version must first be removed. Otherwise, the installation process
indicates an error, as Figure 5 shows.
Figure 5. tioScript Installation: Setup Error (Existing Version Must Be Removed)
If this situation occurs, the software can be removed using the system Control Panel (Start→Control
Panel→Add or Remove Programs).
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2.2
The tioScript.exe Window
Double-click the tioScript.exe icon (now located on the PC desktop) to start the tioScript Editor program.
The software loads the tio32.dll file to communicate with the USB DAQ or USB DIG board. When the
application window is loaded, the settings from the previous session of this program are restored from an
.ini file. Figure 6 displays the window.
Figure 6. tioScript Editor Window
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2.3
2.3.1
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Environment Variables
Variable Types and Definitions
The Script Editor allows users to work with different variables. There are two types of variables:
• user-defined variables: these variables are declared explicitly by the user. For example: $value
• implicit variables: these variables hold the result values of any readings; items of this type are
generated automatically by the software. For example: $3.1
Figure 7 illustrates the environment variables as seen in the Script Editor.
Figure 7. Example Script with Variables
Table 1 defines the variables displayed in Figure 7.
Table 1. Variable Types in Figure 7
In Line Number
Variable Name
Explanation
11.1
$11.1
Implicit variable; generated automatically, after execution holds
the double value 5.75 read from EEPROM address 1000
13
$INP
User-generated variable; type becomes INTEGER after
execution, the value 2 is assigned to this variable
14
$INN
User-generated variable; type becomes INTEGER after
execution, the value 3 is assigned to this variable
16
$ADCMODE
User-generated variable; type becomes INTEGER after
execution, the value 1 is assigned to this variable
17.1
$17.1
Implicit variable; generated automatically, after execution holds
the double value –0.0119 read from ADC1
17.2
$17.2
Implicit variable; generated automatically, after execution holds
the integer value 0xFFA9, the binary code read from ADC1
User-defined variables:
User-defined variables are generated when they are first mentioned as the target of an assignment
command, as shown in Example 1. The name of an user-defined variable consists of a leading $-sign
followed by a string of characters. The first mandatory character of this string must contain a letter or an
underscore (_); the remaining optional characters must contain letters, digits, or underscores. All letters
are automatically converted to upper-case letters.
Example 1. User-Defined Variables
$VAL = 3.0
$VAL16 = $10.1 + 0x100 * $10.2
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Implicit variables:
Implicit variables are automatically generated. They hold the values of reading results. The name of an
implicit variable is also a string, with a leading $-sign followed by the contents of the #-column shown in
the ScriptEditor window, as shown in Example 2. It is not necessary to assign values to implicit variables;
they are assigned values after execution of the line to which they belong.
Example 2. Implicit Variables
$17.1
$17.2
When lines are deleted or inserted in the active script, implicit variables are re-numbered by the script
software. This action also occurs in commands, where only implicit variables are used, as shown in
Figure 8.
Figure 8. Implicit Variables in Command (Example 1)
After the program deletes line 18, what was formerly line 19 then becomes line 18; the respective results
go from $19.1 and $19.2 to $18.1 and $18.2. Additionally, in the previous line, $19.1 becomes $18.1, as
Figure 9 illustrates.
Figure 9. Implicit Variables in Command (Example 2: Deleted Line)
2.3.2
Limit Check of Variable Results
It is possible to check the value of a variable against the limit values presented in the table columns
LowerLimit or bool and UpperLimit. These entries are optional. If there is an entry in either of these
columns, it is tested against the defined variable value. Depending on the variable data type, there are two
different tests that can be performed.
Boolean variable
The optional entry in LowerLimit or bool may be TRUE or FALSE. It is compared to the variable. If it
equals the value, the test passes; otherwise, it fails. An entry in UpperLimit is ignored in boolean mode. If
there is no entry in LowerLimit or bool, the test passes.
Arithmetic variable
With arithmetic variables, the following test will be performed.
PASS == LowerLimit or bool ≤ (variable value) ≤ UpperLimit
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Both limit values are optional. If present, they are used in the test. The limit entries may be:
HEX-Values with prefix 0x
decimal values
or float values
For example: 0x1234
For example: 1000 ; –300
For example: 0.0123 ; 3.33E5 ; 2334.567 ; –0.25
The test result affects the P/F column entry of the table. The entry will be PASS or FAIL, depending on the
test result.
3
Buttons and Keys
3.1
Load Button
The Load icon opens a file load dialog to load a script file. Figure 10 shows the Load button.
Figure 10. Load Button
3.2
Save Script Button
The Save Script button, illustrated in Figure 11, opens a file save dialog to save the script into a file. The
script is saved without the contents of the Result and P/F columns.
Figure 11. Save Script Button
3.3
Save Script + Results Button
This icon (shown in Figure 12) opens a file save dialog to save the script with all its columns into a file.
Figure 12. Save Script + Results Button
3.4
Clear Button
This button clears the table so that the script is empty. Figure 13 shows the Clear button.
Figure 13. Clear Button
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3.5
Step Button
Pressing the Step icon (illustrated in Figure 14) executes one line of the script (that is, a single step of the
actual row). Function key F10 performs the same function.
Figure 14. Step Button
3.6
Run Button
Press the Run button, shown in Figure 15, executes commands from actual row until the next BREAK
position, or STOP or END command.
Figure 15. Run Button
When running a script, the Stop button is enabled, so that the user has the option to interrupt the
execution. Function key F5 performs the same function.
3.7
Stop Button
The Stop icon interrupts the execution. This button (shown in Figure 16) is only enabled if a script is
executed. The Esc key performs the same function.
Figure 16. Stop Button
3.8
Print Button
Press the Print button to print all rows and columns of the script, including results and pass/fail
information. Figure 17 shows the Print button.
Figure 17. Print Button
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Context Menu
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Context Menu
When the mouse cursor is in the script grid area, one can activate the a context pop-up menu (as shown
in Figure 18) by clicking the right mouse button.
Contextual pop-up menu
(right-click to access)
Figure 18. Context Pop-Up Menu
With the left mouse button, a user can select specific table cells for editing or to mark it as the row that is
actually referred to. The marked cells are then bordered in black, as Figure 19 shows. Here, row 3 is
marked.
Figure 19. Selected Table Cells
4.1
Delete Line
This command deletes the line that is presently selected. Figure 20 shows the Delete Line command.
Figure 20. Delete Line Command
4.2
Insert Line Before Selection
To insert an empty line before the actual selection, choose this right-click menu option (shown in
Figure 21).
Figure 21. Insert Line Before Selection Command
4.3
Insert Line After Selection
This command inserts an empty line after the actual selection, as Figure 22 shows.
Figure 22. Insert Line After Selection Command
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4.4
Set Actual Line
This command (illustrated in Figure 23) sets the line that is selected as the next line to be executed. The
actual line means that this line is to be executed when either the Step or Run button is pressed.
Figure 23. Set Actual Line
The actual line becomes highlighted with a light blue background, as Figure 24 shows; in this case, line 11
with the PAUSE command is the actual line to be executed.
Figure 24. Selected Actual Line
4.5
Toggle Breakpoint
The Toggle Breakpoint command, as shown in Figure 25, toggles the breakpoint in the line that is actually
selected. A breakpoint is indicated with BRK in the first left column.
Figure 25. Toggle Breakpoint Command
In the example shown in Figure 26, a breakpoint is set at line 11 with the PAUSE command.
Figure 26. Toggle Breakpoint Example
It is possible to set as many breakpoints as the script has command lines. Breakpoints cannot be set in
result lines.
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Debug Window
Pressing the F11 function key allows users to print a list of all known variables with the respective actual
values into the debug window and then display that window. Figure 27 illustrates the Debug window.
Figure 27. Debug Window
The contents of the debug window are deleted by pressing the Clear button (see Section 3.4). The Print
button (explained in Section 3.8) prints a list of all known variables with the respective actual values.
5
Mnemonic Commands
The Script Editor uses three categories of commands:
• Mnemonic Commands
• High-Level Commands
• Script Editor Commands
A mnemonic command is a series of test strings that can be used to generate digital signals with either
the USB DAQ Platform or the USB DIG Platform. For example, the mnemonic command I2C CH1 S 80
ACKS 16 ACKS P generates an I2C™ signal. Mnemonic commands can also be used to configure the
USB DAQ and USB DIG Platforms. For example, CMD VDUT_ON turns on the VDUT power supply.
Mnemonic commands are different from high-level commands in that they are a single transaction with the
USB DAQ Platform. High-level commands are composed of multiple mnemonic commands. An example
of a mnemonic command is a single I2C write. An example of a high-level command is a DAC write. The
DAC write consists of multiple I2C writes.
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5.1
2
I C Mnemonic Commands
Table 2 summarizes the I2C mnemonic commands. Figure 28 and Figure 30 illustrate how an I2C
transaction can be translated into a mnemonic command using the strings from Table 2.
Table 2. List of I2C Mnemonic Commands
Command
Explanation
I2C
This sequence is always the first mnemonic in an I2C command.
CH1
CH2
This sequence is always the second mnemonic in an I2C command. This mnemonic
identifies which I2C channel is used. The EVM contains two I2C channels to allow for
the connection of two different I2C devices.
S
Start condition. This command means: ask all I2C devices on bus to listen.
P
Stop condition. Thsis command means: let the I2C bus know the transaction is
completed.
R
Read an 8-bit word
ACKS
Checks to see if the slave acknowledged (that is, SDA is read during the acknowledge
pulse to see if the slave acknowledged).
ACLM
Drives the acknowledge bit low (that is, SDA is driven low by the EVM).
Example: 0x3A 0x21 0xBA
Write an 8-bit word (0x00 to 0xFF for hex, and 00 to 255 for decimal)
1
9
1
9
SCL
¼
1
SDA
0
0
1
A2
A1
A0
R/W
Start By
Master
0
0
0
0
0
0
P1
ACK By
TMP100 or TMP101
¼
ACK By
TMP100 or TMP101
2
Frame 1 I C Slave Address Byte
Frame 2 Pointer Register Byte
0x90
S
P0
0x02
ACKS
1
ACKS
1
9
9
SCL
(Continued)
SDA
(Continued)
D7
D6
D5
D4
D3
D2
D1
D7
D0
D6
D5
D4
D3
D1
D0
ACK By
Stop By
TMP100 or TMP101 Master
ACK By
TMP100 or TMP101
Frame 4 Data Byte 2
Frame 3 Data Byte 1
0x1C
D2
ACKS
0x00
ACKS
P
I2C CH1 S 0x90 ACKS 0x02 ACKS 0x1C ACKS 0x00 ACKS P
Figure 28. Generation of an I2C Mnemonic Command with an I2C Digital Pattern
Figure 28 shows how the I2C mnemonic command is generated using an I2C digital pattern. Note that the
mnemonic I2C is always first in I2C commands. The mnemonic CH1 indicates which channel is used. The
USB DAQ Platform has two I2C channels available. The remainder of the command (that is, S 0x90 ACKS
0x02 ACKS 0x1C ACKS 0x00 ACKS P) depends on the specific I2C signal the user wants to generate.
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2
Figure 29 shows how an I C command appears when entered into the Script Editor. Note that lines 4.1 to
4.3 are automatically generated. These lines display the results. They can also be used as implicit
variables $4.1, $4.2, and $4.3. Limits can be used to test the results. A '0' for the Acknowledge result
indicates that the device acknowledges. The limits are both set to 0 so that an the test passes when the
device acknowledges.
2
I C command shown on line 4.
Limits for acknowledge results are on lines 4.1, 4.2 and 4.3.
The limits in this example are set so that a zero result will
pass (that is, 0 < passing result < 0).
Fields for all results are automatically generated when the
command is typed in. In this case there are only three
results. Thus, lines 4.1, 4.2, and 4.3 correspond to the
acknowledge results. These lines can also be thought of
as implicit variables $4.1, $4.2, and $4.3.
Acknowledge results.
Figure 29. I2C Mnemonic Command in Script Editor (Example 1)
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2
Figure 30 illustrates another example of how the I C mnemonic command is generated using an I2C digital
pattern. In this case, the command contains an I2C read (that is, R).
1
9
1
9
SCL
¼
SDA
1
0
0
1
A2
A1
A0
R/W
Start By
Master
0
0
0
0
0
0
P1
ACK By
TMP100 or TMP101
P0
¼
ACK By
TMP100 or TMP101
2
Frame 1 I C Slave Address Byte
Frame 2 Pointer Register Byte
1
9
1
9
SCL
(Continued)
¼
SDA
(Continued)
1
0
0
1
A2
A1
A0
R/W
Start By
Master
D7
D6
D5
D4
D3
ACK By
TMP100 or TMP101
2
Frame 3 I C Slave Address Byte
ACKS
1
D1
D0
From
TMP100 or TMP101
¼
ACK By
Master
Frame 4 Data Byte 1 Read Register
0x91
S
D2
R
ACKM
9
SCL
(Continued)
SDA
(Continued)
D7
D6
D5
D4
D3
D2
D1
D0
From
TMP100 or TMP101
ACK By
Master
Stop By
Master
Frame 5 Data Byte 2 Read Register
R
ACKM
P
I2C CH1 S 0x91 ACKS R ACKM R ACKM P
Figure 30. Generation of an I2C Mnemonic Command with an I2C Digital Pattern (with Read Command)
Figure 31 shows another example of how an I2C command appears when entered into the Script Editor.
Note that lines 4.1 to 4.3 are automatically generated. These lines display the results. They can also be
used as implicit variables $4.1, $4.2, and $4.3. Note that lines 4.2 and 4.3 are the results associated with
the two 8-bit reads. The limits for lines 4.2 and 4.3 are set to pass all values from 0 to 0xFF.
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2
I C command shown on line 4.
Limit for acknowledge results is on lines 4.1
The limits for the read results are on lines 4.2 and 4.3.
Acknowledge and read results.
Fields for all results are automatically generated when the
command is typed in. In this case there are only three
results. Thus, lines 4.1, 4.2, and 4.3 correspond to the
acknowledge results. These lines can also be thought of
as implicit variables $4.1, $4.2, and $4.3.
Figure 31. I2C Mnemonic Command in Script Editor (Example 2)
Table 3 lists the general commands that are associated with I2C commands. The most important of these
commands is the EN_I2C ON command. This command enables I2C Channel 1 for communication.
Table 3. General Commands Associated with I2C Commands
Command
CMD
EN_I2C ON (or OFF)
5.2
Explanation
This sequence is always the first mnemonic in a general command.
This command is used to enable (connect) I2C channel 1.
CH1_SCL_LOW
Drive SCL low: useful in debugging fault conditions (such as a timeout)
CH1_SCL_HIGH
Drive SCL high: useful in debugging fault conditions (such as a timeout)
CH1_SDA_LOW
Drive SDA low: useful in debugging fault conditions (such as a timeout)
CH1_SDA_HIGH
Drive SDA high: useful in debugging fault conditions (such as a timeout)
SPI Mnemonic Commands
Table 4 summarizes the SPI commands. Figure 32 shows how an SPI transaction can be translated into a
mnemonic command using the strings from Table 4.
Table 4. SPI Mnemonic Commands
Command
SPI
This sequence is always the first mnemonic in an SPI command.
CH1
CH2
This sequence is always the second mnemonic in an SPI command. This mnemonic
identifies which SPI channel is used. The EVM contains two SPI channels to allow for
the connection of two different SPI devices.
BREH
BREL
AFEH
AFEL
This sequence is always the third mnemonic in an SPI command. This mnemonic
identifies different modes of data capture for SPI. For example, BREL means that the
data is captured before the rising edge of the clock and the clock is active low. Further
details, including timing diagrams, are shown later.
L
Drive chip select low
H
Drive chip select high
R
Read an 8-bit word
Example: 0x3A 0x21 0xBA
24
tioScript Editor
Explanation
Write an 8-bit word (any hex two-character byte)
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Table 5 describes the four different SPI clock phase and polarity modes of operation. The USB DAQ
Platform can operate in all four SPI modes.
Table 5. Different SPI Clock Phase and Polarity Modes
Clock Polarity Description
(CPOL)
Mode
Clock Transition for Data Polarity Description (CPHA)
BREH
Clock idles low
CPOL = 0
Data are read by the USB DAQ EVM on rising edge of clock.
Data are changed by the USB DAQ EVM on falling edge of
clock. Data are sampled on first clock edge.
CPHA = 0
BREL
Clock idles low
CPOL = 0
Data are read on fallinge dge of clock. Data change on rising
edge of clock. Data are sampled on second clock edge.
CPHA = 1
AFEH
Clock idles high
CPOL = 1
Data are read on falling edge of clock. Data change on rising
edge of clock. Data are sampled on first clock edge.
CPHA = 0
AFEL
Clock idles HIGH
CPOL = 1
Data are read on rising edge of clock. Data change on falling
edge of clock. Data are sampled on second clock edge.
CPHA = 1
Figure 32 illustrates how the SPI mnemonic command is generated using an SPI digital pattern. Note that
the mnemonic SPI is always first in SPI commands. The mnemonic CH1 indicates which channel is used.
The USB DAQ Platform has two available SPI channels. The mnemonic BREH sets the SPI mode (for
example, the SPI clock polarity and phase). The remainder of the command (that is, L R R 0x80 0x08 R R
H) depends on the specific SPI signal the user wants to generate.
CS
...
SCK
SO/I
D15
D14
D13
D12
L
D11
D10
D9
D8
D7
D6
D5
D4
R
D3
1
Z
Z
R
CS
...
SCK
SO/I
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
P1
0x80
P0
0
0
0
1
Z
Z
0x08
CS
SCK
SO/I
D15
D14
D13
D12
R
D11
D10
D9
D8
D7
D6
D5
D4
D3
R
H
SPI CH1 BREH L R R 0x80 0x80 R R H
Figure 32. Generation of an SPI Mnemonic Command with an SPI Digital Pattern
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Mnemonic Commands
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Figure 33 shows how an SPI command appears when entered into the Script Editor. Note that lines 3.1
through 3.4 are automatically generated. These lines display the results. They can also be used as implicit
variables $3.1 through $3.4. The limits are used to test each result. In this example, line 3.4 fails the limit
test while all other lines pass.
Limit for acknowledge results is on lines 3.1.
The limits for the read result are on lines 3.2 and 3.3
SPI command shown on line 3.
Fields for all results are automatically generated when the
command is typed in. In this case there are only three
results. Thus, lines 3.1 through 3.3 correspond to the
acknowledge results. These lines can also be thought of
as implicit variables $3.1, $3.2, $3.3, and $3.4.
Results for 8-bit reads.
Figure 33. SPI Mnemonic Command in Script Editor
Figure 34 to Figure 37 show timing diagrams for the different SPI clock phase and polarity modes. The
USB DAQ Platform can operate in all four SPI modes.
BREH: SPI Mode 00
SPI Mode 0,0 (CPOL = 0, CPHA = 0)
CS
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
SCLK
DIN
DOUT
Data change on the falling
edge of the clock
Data are captured on the rising
edge of the clock
Clock idles low
Data are sampled by the first clock
edge. For data writes, the USB DAQ
sets data before the rising edge.
Figure 34. Clock Phase and Polarity: Mode 00
26
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AFEH: SPI Mode 01
SPI Mode 0,1 (CPOL = 0, CPHA = 1)
CS
1
2
4
3
5
7
6
8
9
10
12
11
13
14
15
16
SCLK
DIN
DOUT
Data are captured on the falling
edge of the clock
Data change on the rising
edge of the clock
Clock idles low
Data change on the rising
edge of the first bit
Figure 35. Clock Phase and Polarity: Mode 01
BREH: SPI Mode 10
SPI Mode 1,0 (CPOL = 1, CPHA = 0)
CS
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
SCLK
DIN
DOUT
Data change on the rising
edge of the clock
Data are captured on the falling
edge of the clock
Clock idles high
Data are sampled by the first clock
edge, so data are set valid before
the first clock edge.
Figure 36. Clock Phase and Polarity: Mode 10
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AFEH: SPI Mode 11
SPI Mode 1,1 (CPOL = 1, CPHA = 1)
CS
1
2
4
3
5
7
6
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
SCLK
DIN
DOUT
Data change on the falling
edge of the clock
Clock idles high
Data are captured on the rising
edge of the clock
Data change on the falling
edge of clock (first bit)
Figure 37. Clock Phase and Polarity: Mode 11
5.3
One-Wire Mnemonic Commands
Table 6 summarizes the One-Wire commands. Figure 38 and Figure 39 demonstrate how a One-Wire
transaction can be translated into a mnemonic command using the strings from Table 6.
Table 6. One-Wire Mnemonic Commands
Command
Explanation
One
This sequence is always the first mnemonic in an ONE command.
R
Read an 8-bit word
Example: 3A 21 BA
Write an 8-bit word (any hex two-character byte)
Write PGA309 Register Timing
PRG S
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
P
0
S
Initialization Byte (55h)
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
P
Register Write Command (04h)
0x55
0x04
S D0 D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 P
S D8 D9 D10 D11D12 D13 D14 D15 P
Register Data (8 LSBs)
Register Data (8 MSBs)
0x3A
(Example Data)
0xF2
(Example Data)
ONE 0x55 0x04 0x3A 0xF2
Read PGA309 Register Timing
PRG S
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
Initialization Byte (55h)
0x55
0
Driven by PGA309
P
S
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
Register Read Command (10h)
0x10
P
S D0 D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 P
One-Byte Period Delay
Allows for Bus Direction Change
No Mnemonic
Register Data (8 LSBs)
R
S D8 D9 D10 D11D12 D13 D14 D15
P
Register Data (8 MSBs)
R
ONE 0x55 0x10 R R
Figure 38. Generation of a One-Wire Mnemonic Command
28
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One commands shown on lines 2 and 3.
The limits for read results are on 3.1 and 3.2.
Results for 8-bit reads
Fields for all results are automatically generated when the command is typed
in. In this case, there are only three results. Thus, lines 3.1 through 3.2
correspond to the acknowledge results. These lines can also be thought of
as implicit variables $3.1 and $3.2.
Figure 39. One-Wire Command in Script Editor
Table 7 shows some general commands that are related to the One-Wire interface.
Table 7. General One-Wire Commands
Command
CMD
EN_ONE ON (or OFF)
WAKE_UP_ONE
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Explanation
This sequence is always the first mnemonic in a general command.
This command is used to enable the One-Wire interface.
This command cycles the power, waits a few milliseconds, and then issues a one-wire
command. This command was developed for a special mode on specific products (for
example, the PGA308 and PGA309). This mode allows for the One-Wire line and
output voltage line to be connected together.
tioScript Editor
29
Mnemonic Commands
5.4
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General-Purpose Mnemonic Commands
This section discusses general-purpose mnemonic commands. All general-purpose commands start with
the mnemonic CMD. Some general-purpose commands are used in conjunction with the different
interfaces. For example, there is a general-purpose command that enables and disables the I2C interface.
Other general-purpose commands perform unique functions such as turning the device power on or off.
Table 8 summarizes the general-purpose mnemonic commands.
Table 8. General-Purpose Mnemonic Commands
Command
Meaning
EN_ADS ON (or OFF)
Connects or disconnects the ADS to the DSUB connector. EN_ADS ON connects the
ADS, and EN_ADS OFF disconnects the ADS. This mode of operation allows the ADS
to be disconnected from the circuit under test when the DAC goes through its self
calibration.
EN_ONE ON (or OFF)
Connects or disconnects the One-Wire interface from the DSUB connector (U21).
EN_ONE ON connects the interface and EN_ONE OFF disconnects it.
EN_I2C ON (or OFF)
Connects or disconnects I2C CH1 from the DSUB connector (U23 and U27). Note that
I2C CH2 is not affected by this command (this channel is always connected).
ILOOP ON (or OFF)
Connects the current loop receiver instrumentation amplifier (U32) to the ADS (U30)
using a switch (U31).
RS232 ON (or OFF)
Turns the charge pump on the RS-232 translator on or off. The RS-232 port is used for
firmware debug purposes. When it is not in use, the charge pump should be turned off
because the charge pump generates noise.
WAKE_UP_ONE
This command cycles the power, waits a few milliseconds, and issues a One-Wire
command. This command was developed for a special mode on specific products (for
example, the PGA308 and PGA309). This mode allows for the One-Wire line and
output voltage line to be connected together.
MEAS
Measures the digital signal on the 8 input bit port.
CTRL
Sets the digital output on the 8-bit output port.
Figure 40 shows the syntax of different general-purpose commands entered into the script editor.
Several general commands entered
into the Script Editor
Figure 40. General-Purpose Command in Script Editor
30
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High-Level Commands
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6
High-Level Commands
The script editor uses three categories of commands: Mnemonic commands, High-Level Commands, and
Script Editor Commands. This section covers High Level Commands commands.
High-level commands are typically composed of several mnemonic commands. For example, a
Write_DAC command is composed of several I2C writes. However, it should be noted that this distinction
is most important to software developers. Script Editor users can consider the High-Level Commands and
Mnemonic Commands to represent two different categories. The commands are not case-sensitive;
internally, all commands convert to upper case. This case conversion also happens when a command is
entered with the Script Editor.
6.1
WRITE_DAC Commands
These commands set the DAC output voltage of one of the four DAC channels. In the slow modes, the
output value is measured with the ADC and the deviation is corrected. In fast modes, these commands
only output the value.
Syntax:
WRITE_DAC_A
WRITE_DAC_B
WRITE_DAC_C
WRITE_DAC_D
dval
dval
dval
dval
mode
mode
mode
mode
[ref]
[ref]
[ref]
[ref]
Parameter
dval
Description
DAC output voltage value to be set. Valid range:
The operation mode. Supported modes:
mode
ref
6.2
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Slow mode with 5V reference, calibrated and corrected
Slow mode with 3V reference, calibrated and corrected
Slow mode with user reference, not calibrated but corrected
Slow mode with code output, not calibrated
Fast mode with 5V reference, not calibrated
Fast mode with 3V reference, not calibrated
Optional user reference voltage used in mode 3 only
read_ads Commands
The read_ads commands read an ADC value and deliver a result depending on the operating mode.
Syntax:
READ_ADS1 mode [ref]
READ_ADS2 mode [ref]
Parameter
Description
The operation mode. Supported modes:
mode
ref
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1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Slow mode with 5V reference, calibrated and corrected
Slow mode with 3V reference, calibrated and corrected
Slow mode with user reference, not calibrated but corrected
Slow mode with code output, not calibrated
Fast mode with 5V reference, not calibrated
Fast mode with 3V reference, not calibrated
Optional user reference voltage used in mode 3 only
tioScript Editor
31
High-Level Commands
6.3
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ReadDoubleFromEEPROM Command
Reads a double value from the EEPROM. The value is read from three consecutive 8-bit memory cells.
The double result is stored in the implicit result value.
Syntax:
READDOUBLEFROMEEPROM adr
Parameter
adr
6.4
Description
The address to be read from
WriteDoubleToEEPROM Command
This instruction writes a double value into the EEPROM. The value is written as three consecutive 8-bit
values into the memory cells.
Syntax:
WRITEDOUBLETOEEPROM val adr
Parameter
6.5
Description
Val
The double value to be written
adr
The address to be read from
ads_mux Commands
These commands set the MUX1/MUX2 input lines.
Syntax:
ADS_MUX1 inp inn
ADS_MUX2 inp inn
Parameter
6.6
Description
inp
The in_p option (1-4)
inn
The in_n option (1-4)
SetCurrVoltMode Command
This command sets either current or voltage mode.
Syntax:
SETCURRVOLTMODE val
Parameter
val
32
tioScript Editor
Description
1.
2.
Current mode
Voltage mode
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6.7
ReadILoop Command
This function reads the 4mA to 20mA current loop. It does this by reading the ADS1100 (U24) and applies
the appropriate calibration constants. Before this function is used, the SetCurrVoltMode must be set to
current mode.
Syntax:
READILOOP
Parameter
Description
none
7
Script Editor Commands
Script Editor commands do not affect the USB DAQ Platform. Script Editor commands control the
execution of the script. Stop, for example, stops the execution of a script in progress.
7.1
Pause Command
Pauses the execution for x milliseconds.
Syntax:
PAUSE X
Parameter
X
7.2
Description
Duration of the pause in milliseconds
Stop Command
Stops the execution. The buttons on the toolstrip are enabled again. It is possible to continue execution
with the Step or Run button starting from the actual (blue marked) line.
Syntax:
STOP
Parameter
Description
none
8
Mathematical Calculations
The Script Editor contains a means for interpreting mathematical equations. Equations are formulated
according to general mathematical principles. Arithmetical, relational, and logical operators are supported
and handled correctly according to the respective range. Operators use the same symbols as in the C
language.
Braces can be used to affect the order of the calculation and can be nested to any level. Syntax errors as
missing arguments, missing operators, and braces match imbalance are recognized.
Here are several example mathematical calcuations:
$FORCE = $F_SLOPE * $V_PGA + $F_OFFSET
$VAL1 = ($VAL2 | $VAL3) & !$VAL4
$VALID = ($4.1 > $L_LEVEL) && ($4.1 < $H_LEVEL)
$REG2 = (($MSB << 8) | $LSB) & 0XFFFF
$BIT4 = $10.2 & 0X10
8.1
Operands
Operands can be variables, handled by their names or numerical and boolean literals.
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Mathematical Calculations
8.1.1
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Variables
For the format of variable names see Figure 7. User-defined and implicit variables may be used.
Supported data types are bool, int and double.
Variables at the right side of the equation must already have a valid data entry. If not the calculation will
fail, giving an invalid result, reported as an error. Calculations with a failure give an invalid variable result
type, also reported as an error.
8.1.2
Numerical and Boolean Literals
Boolean literals are FALSE and TRUE.
Int Literals are accepted as hex value by prefix 0x, e.g. 0X1234, or decimal, e.g. 10, 3456, 300 , there
must not be a period or a comma.
Double literals are recognized by a number containing a period. Examples are:
.725 ; 1.0 ; 2.5 ; 0.00033 ; 5400.375
The exponential format is also supported. Exampls are:
.333E2 ; 1.25E+3 ; 3.25E-6
Note that these literals are always positive numbers because a preceding minus would be handled
separately as a unary minus before recognizing the literal.
8.2
Supported Operators
Table 9 lists all suported operators sorted by their range with their supported data types, the resulting data
type and the association (left | right).
Table 9. Summary of Supported Operators
Sign
Supported Operands
Data Types
Result Data Type
Range
Association
L
(
left brace
—
—
15
)
right brace
—
—
15
L
!
not
bool
bool
14
R
~
1's complement
int
int
14
R
-
unary minus
int, double
int, double
14
R
*
multiplication
int, double
int, double
13
L
/
division
int, double
int, double
13
L
%
modulo
int
int
13
L
+
addition
int, double
int, double
12
L
-
subtraction
int, double
int, double
12
L
<<
left shift
int
int
11
L
>>
right shift
int
int
11
L
<
less than
int, double
bool
10
L
<=
less or equal
int, double
bool
10
L
>=
greater or equal
int, double
bool
10
L
>
greater than
int, double
bool
10
L
bool
9
L
==
equals
bool, int, double
!=
not equal
bool, int, double
bool
9
L
&
and
bool, int
bool, int
8
L
^
xor
bool, int
bool, int
7
|
or
&&
||
34
Name
tioScript Editor
bool, int
bool, int
6
L
conditional and
bool
bool
5
L
conditional or
bool
bool
4
L
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8.3
Resulting Numerical Data Types
If an operator supports different numerical data types (such as arguments) and the result is numerical,
then the data type of the result follows the argument with the highest resolution. For example:
9
int op int
results in
int
int op double
results in
double
double op int
results in
double
double op double
results in
double
Script File Format
The script is stored in .CSV format files with the colon (;) as a separator. The contents of the breakpoint
column are not stored, so a line starts with the line number column (#).
Figure 41. Example Script with Variables
The output in Figure 41 corresponds to:
1;# Test the CTRL and MEAS Command;;;
2;;CMD CTRL 0XF0;;
3;;CMD MEAS;;
3.1;; result value =;0;
4;comment;CMD MEAS;;
4.1;; result value =;1;
The script files are stored with a .tsc file extension for a tio32 script file.
One can edit these files with any text editor such as Notepad. It is not necessary to write the result line;
they are inserted automatically when the script is loaded.
As noted earlier in this document, it is possible to associate .tsc files with the tioScript.exe application so
that double-clicking on a script file launches the tioScript.exe program automatically.
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tioScript Editor
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